Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TRY OUR
DOUBLE
FISH FILET

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 106 No.113

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Pion blowin’ it

82F
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FULL DAY OF
~ SUNSHINE



The mapune fi



ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1





Another woman
eae Come
on Shirley Street

SEE PAGE THREE



Former tof mF
fleciared fugitive

US judge makes ruling
on attorney accused in
money-laundering scheme

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEY Sidney Cam-
bridge, who is accused of
involvement in a $900,000
money-laundering scheme
with a US politician, has been
declared a “fugitive from jus-
tice” by a Florida judge.

Contrary to reports in a
local tabloid that Cambridge
may be “off the hook”, docu-
ments seen by The Tribune
reveal that the attorney’s case
has been “transferred to the
suspended/fugitive file until
such time as he is apprehend-
ed.”

The order, signed by Unit-
ed States District Judge
Daniel Hurley, was made in
light of the fact that a review
of Cambridge’s file led to him
being determined “a fugitive
from justice.”

The judge further ordered
the Clerk of the Court to des-
ignate the file “closed” for the
time being.

Cambridge’s US attorney,
Lilly Ann Sanchez, said she
and her client, who has assert-
ed his innocence, are hoping

US prosecutors have
“reassessed” their case against
the Bahamian lawyer.

However, she admitted that
rather than evidence of the
case being dropped entirely,
the order is an administrative
and “routine” one issued in
cases where a defendant has
not come to the US to face
charges against him.

The order requires the
Court to move the file off the
“active docket” caseload.

Cambridge was formally
indicted in a Florida court in
November 2009 on one count
of conspiracy to commit mon-
ey laundering and five counts
of money laundering. An
arrest warrant was issued for
him at that time.

The laundering scheme was
allegedly masterminded by
Florida’s Broward County
Commissioner Josephus
Eggelletion, who was last
month jailed for two and a
half years, fined $10,000 and
ordered to be placed on
three-year supervised proba-
tion when released for his part
in the plot.

SEE page nine



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sels

pth de
SANDWICH



USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

ALR a
TCs ee
OG eS bf

BAHAMAS BIGGEST jive;



Cool ee

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Remembering
BCG MGC)

4 and Lavette
SEE PAGE TWO

Drivers struggle
with new one-way
road system

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





PEOPLE working and living along
the Market Street/Blue Hill Road
one-way system are calling for more
street signs and police presence to
help the public come to grips with
the new traffic system as daily dozens
of drivers continue to endanger oth-
ers by going the wrong way.

For now, many bystanders say the
new one way system on Blue Hill
Road and Market Street, imple-

SEE page 12







USL eta might 18 CaROSY(H)

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



fi) FIREFIGHTER eee LToM OE Vase Nils vacant? S semesin

A MINISTRY of Works employee was rushed to hospi-
tal yesterday afternoon after being injured when part of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation’s John F Kennedy Drive
plant exploded.

The worker has been identified as Floyd Russell, a man
in his mid-forties.

According to reports, most employees had left for the day
yesterday when several remaining men noticed smoke ema-





nating from the Auto Repair store.

When they went to check out the source of the smoke, the
building exploded, injuring Mr Russell.

Three fire trucks attended the scene at around 4.20pm,
finding the building “fully engulfed” in flames, according to
a police officer.

The damage to the building was extensive. An investi-
gation is underway into the cause of the explosion.



Weather reporting deficiencies letter
sent to PIM a week before tornado

By TANEKA THOMPSON workers at the Freeport Con-

Man charged with
abusing young boys

A MAN was arraigned dockets, Hanna, of

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LETTER highlighting
deficiencies in weather
reporting on Grand Bahama
was sent to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham a week
before a tornado killed three

red Ron ae

Wulff Road Opposite Mackey Street
Olea Ly me |S
De Eger Vee ee Dy We De ve

tainer Port.

Progressive Liberal Party
Chairman Bradley Roberts
believes that if the concerns
in the letter had been readily
addressed — namely reopen-
ing the Freeport Weather

SEE page 12

before a local magistrate
yesterday charged with
abusing four young boys.

Kevin Hanna, 36, is
accused of having sex with
the youngsters who are
aged between two and six.

According to court

et ee

eile eral
emma eae eed a

WE HAVE EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO BUILD IT RIGHT!
eee eee eee ee eel ee ee ee eee



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

Peardale Road, sometime
between December, 2009
and April 5, 2010, had
unlawful intercourse with
a six-year-old boy.

A second count alleges

SEE page nine





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

OCA NEWS eee
BEC defends proposed rate increase

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE the proposed electricity
rate increase, BEC executives say cus-
tomers’ bills will remain lower than in
1993.

Faced with a crippling financial situ-
ation, the state-owned power company
is planning to increase its core tariff
rate.

Last month, Minister of State for the
Environment Phenton Neymour out-
lined the corporation’s financial posi-
tion, indicating it owed $190 million.

“BEC is losing money left, right and
centre and it certainly needs relief. It is
the corporation’s intention to look to
government to see if they would be
inclined to adjust the tariff structure so

BEC could be restored to some kind of
wholesome financial footing,” said
Michael Moss, BEC chairman.

“What our marching orders are is
we need to firstly take our case to the
public; let them know what we believe
is necessary to put BEC back into a
wholesome financial position.

“The information will be indepen-
dently monitored and presented to gov-
ernment,” said Mr Moss.

The government will then make a
determination, as there is currently no
independent regulatory body for the
energy sector.

Mr Moss said the last time there was
a tariff increase was 1993. The increase
was in line with commitments made by
the then FNM government in a loan
agreement with the International
Development Bank.

Under the subsequent PLP govern-
ment, there were tariff reductions in
2003, which left the rate below 1993
levels.

The PLP, now the opposition, is
blaming the government for the dire
financial straights in which BEC finds
itself.

Criticising the intention to increase
the rates, PLP chairman, Bradley
Roberts, called the government “heart-
less and uncaring”.

“The Progressive Liberal Party notes
with very deep concern the intention of
the FNM government to place addi-
tional burden on the backs of the poor
and middle class in New Providence
and the Family Islands at a time when
they are struggling to keep their lights
on,” said Mr Roberts.

“The consumers of the Bahamas










Electricity Corporation have been sad-
dled with heavy surcharges which
reflected the movement of the price of
oil each step of the way,” he said.

The fluctuating fuel surcharge paid
by consumers covers the direct cost of
fuel, which fluctuates on the open mar-
ket. Only the core tariff paid by con-
sumers contributes direct revenue to
BEC.

“Tt has been almost three years since
junior minister Phenton Neymour and
the FNM with much fanfare promised
the Bahamian people alternative ener-
gy which they claim would bring down
the cost of electricity. It has turned out
to be another FNM empty promise,”
said Mr Roberts.

Mr Moss said the rate increases are
only one part of the corporations over-
all strategy.

“Consultants’ studies on BEC have
said a number of measures are needed
for BEC to have a wholesome financial
footing. Included in that grouping
would be cost containment measures.
BEC certainly needs to improve oper-
ational inefficiencies, but those in and of
themselves will not put BEC in a
wholesome financial footing,” said Mr
Moss.

Asked about whether the public
could hold him accountable for the
actions initiated under his leadership
to restructure the corporation, Mr Moss
said, “No question about it.”

“There needs to be improved
accountability in the entire public sector
and BEC is no exception. The thing
here is BEC needs to make its opera-
tion a bit more transparent going for-
ward,” he added.



REMEMBERING KEISHA, BRENTON AND LAVETTE

CAROL THURSTON, mother
of the late Keisha Thurston,
lights a candle in the foyer of
the College of the Bahamas
Performing Arts Centre after
yesterday's memorial service.














THE GRANDMOTHER and sis-
ter of the late Brenton Smith light
a candle at the College of the
Bahamas Performing Arts Centre
after a memorial service celebrat-
ing the lives of the late Keisha

Felipé Major/Tribune staff


















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Miss Universe to attend Miss



Bahamas pageant launch

ON AUGUST 23, 2009 she
was crowned Miss Universe in
the Bahamas. Now Stefania
Fernandez is preparing to
return to the place where her
dream came true as 17 Bahami-
an beauties officially begin
their journey to fulfill the same
dream.

Under the theme ‘Timeless
Beauty’, the launch of the 2010
Miss Bahamas Beauty Pageant
season is set for Friday, April 9
at 8pm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel with a glamorous
charity gala to raise money for
the Red Cross’ Haiti disaster
relief effort.

Miss Universe, who is pas-
sionate about helping the peo-
ple of Haiti, will be the special
guest.

The Miss Bahamas Charity
Gala will be the first opportu-
nity for the public to meet this
year’s contestants face to face.
While there, they will be able
to bid on auction gifts provided
by the contestants themselves,
as well as the Miss Bahamas
Organisation.

All proceeds from the auc-
tion will be donated to the Red
Cross. “It’s going to be a very
elegant affair”, said Miss
Bahamas Organisation (MBO)
president Michelle Malcolm.
“In keeping with the theme of
the night, you will feel like
you’ve walked into an old Hol-
lywood movie premiere, red
carpet and all. And of course,
you can’t have a premiere with-
out celebrities, so Miss Uni-
verse, our reigning queen Joan-
na Brown, and our contestants
will be the glamorous starlets
of the night.”

Under the leadership of Miss
Malcolm, the Miss Bahamas
Pageant has placed heavy











PICTURED (L-R) ARE: Miss Bahamas Joanna Brown, Miss
Bahamas Organisation President Michelle Malcolm; Miss Universe;
Miss Universe Organisation director of talent Esther Swan.
Derek Smith

emphasis on charitable endeav-
ors.

In addition to the queen’s
annual “Beauty with a Pur-
pose” project, each year con-
testants are required to raise
money for charity as a group
as well as complete individual
projects designed to benefit
their communities.

During the course of the
evening, the contestants will
present more than $3,000
which they raised to benefit the
homeless in the Bahamas.

“This is going to be a swanky
affair with fancy food, fabulous
music by the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Pop Band, and
a chance to mix and mingle
with beautiful people,” says
Miss Malcolm. “But more
importantly, it’s an opportuni-
ty to lend a helping hand to

those desperately in need. We
are encouraging Bahamians to
come out and dig deep,
because as the old saying goes,
‘There but for the grace of God
go I.’ You just never know
when it will be our time of need
and when we will be calling on
others to be in the giving spirit,
so we should give while we
can.”

In a video posted on the
Miss Universe Organisation’s
You Tube channel, Miss Uni-
verse talks about how she was
saddened by the events in
Haiti, and approached the
organisation about doing some-
thing to help.

She pledged to donate a por-
tion of her salary as Miss Uni-
verse to the Haiti disaster relief
effort and encouraged others
to do the same.

Controversial Nygard documentary set to air

A DOCUMENTARY on
the business operations of
Canadian fashion designer
Peter Nygard, the subject of
an ongoing lawsuit, is set to

Ud lB
Ss

ee
PHONE: 322-2157



air tonight.

The Canadian Broadcast-
ing Corporation (CBC),
which broadcasts on channel
eight on Cable Bahamas, is
advertising the 9pm pro-
gramme on its website.

In January this year, Cana-
dian news reports stated that
Mr Nygard had filed a law-
suit arguing that the courts
should block an episode of
the investigative journalism
series The Fifth Estate

because its content is based
on confidential information
released by two former
employees.

According to the Winnipeg
Free Press, Mr Nygard claims
the story would “injure his
reputation, cause loss of prof-
it and damage goodwill”.

It is claimed that the infor-
mation supplied to the pro-
gramme included employee
lists, personnel records, and
video tapes.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 3



Grand Bahama
Peay for active
hurricane season

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING a major | :
blow from deadly tornadoes ;
and in anticipation of an :
active hurricane season this :
year, the emergency support :
functions on Grand Bahama :
are in full preparation mode. ;

The forecast for the upcom- :
ing season indicates the :
Bahamas can anticipate at :
least 15 named storms - eight :
of which are expect to:
become hurricanes and four :

major hurricanes.

This year, there is a 69 per :
cent chance of landfall for a :
storm system on the eastern :
seaboard of the United States. :
That is significantly higher :
than the average 52 per cent :
chance, which increases the :
probability of impact for the :
US and the Bahamas, said :
Michael Stubbs, chief clima- :
tological officer at the Mete- :

orological Department.

Speaking of the tornadoes :
which killed three in Grand ;
Bahama last week, Mr Stubbs :
said: “We are unable to say :
what wind speed was realised :
on that fatal day, but the char- :
acteristic of tornadoes is that :
they can have winds as high as :
300mph. The only saving :
grace is that tornadoes are :
small weather features and :
their life span is very short. :
They can be spawned during :

the passage of tropical storms,

hurricanes or severe cold :

fronts.”

The Grand Bahama Disas- ;
ter Consultative Committee :
got its feet wet responding to :
that crisis, which left a num- :

ber of people injured.

The committee is com- }
prised of public and private :
stakeholders, including the :
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue :

Association (BASRA),

Bahamas Red Cross, the :
Grand Bahama Port Author- :
ity, Tropical Shipping and the :
Department of Social Ser- :

vices.

“Our training is ongoing. :
Just two weeks ago we had a
certified emergency response :
training for one dozen peo- :
ple from the community, pri- :
vate and public sector. We :
have damage assessment :
needs analysis people doing :
certified training,” said Don :
Cornish, Grand Bahama :
administrator and island rep- :
resentative for the National :
Emergency Management :

Agency.

eR BO Bae
OR MLL
AWE!

Lee
Baa]

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ANOTHER young woman
has come forward to warn the
public after being viciously
attacked with a rock while dri-
ving on Shirley Street earlier
this week.

Days after a woman told of
how she had to get seven stitch-
es after being struck in the head
with an unknown object when
she stopped her car on Shirley
Street to avoid hitting a group
of teenagers who refused to
move out of the way, another
woman said she was attacked
in the same area later the same
day.

The latest incident occurred
as the woman, who did not wish
to be identified, was leaving
Harbour Bay by way of the

LOCAL NEWS

Another woman attacked.
driving on Shirley Street

Shirley Street exit after having
a coffee with a friend at Star-
bucks at around 9pm on Easter
Sunday, April 4. The previous
attack occurred on the road
itself between the Harbour Bay
exit and Kemp Road, at around
3am.

The victim said: “I had
stopped to look left for oncom-
ing traffic before I pulled out.
When the last car passed I
turned my head to the right as I
was going to pull out and this
guy was standing right there.
He looked as if he had just run
up in front of my car. He
jumped on top of the car and
smashed this large rock right
into the windshield, right
towards my face.”

“Tt was incredibly shocking, I
freaked out and pressed the
gas. It was then that I saw a sec-
ond person right by the driver’s

window as I turned,” she said.

Although her windscreen
was badly damaged the woman
was not injured.She did not
stick around long enough to dis-
cover what the man’s intentions
were.

“He was extremely aggres-
sive, he didn’t show any uncer-
tainty, he was fast and bold,”
she said.

The woman was unable to
recall her attacker’s features
due to the sudden nature of the
attack and the fact it was dark.
“IT know he was a bigger guy,
and he was wearing a white t-
shirt which was reflecting in the
headlights,” she said.

The other man who she
noticed next to the driver’s
door of the car appeared
younger, she added, although
again the woman was unable
to note any distinguishing fea-



Minister of State
receives death threat

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



A DEATH threat received by Minister of
State for the Environment Phenton Neymour
has required him to remain on constant alert
as police continue with their intensive inves-
tigations.

The husband and father of four has had to
take extra care to be aware of his movements
and those of his family since receiving a letter
at his office in Dockendale House, Bay Street,
threatening to kill him and his family if he
does not resign.

However, Mr Neymour said he will not be
intimidated into stepping down from his min-
isterial responsibilities for government utili-
ties by anonymous assailants.

“One is always concerned in matters like
this, but it’s important that I continue to car-
ry out my responsibilities and not impact the
life of myself and change dramatically my
lifestyle or that of my family,” Mr Neymour
told The Tribune yesterday.

“T have to be aware of my surroundings
and be careful as I go about my routine, and
naturally as a minister that is something that
I should always be aware of, so I am contin-
uing to be careful of where I go.”

The junior minister was threatened with
death once before, when intruders broke into
his home and stole two personal items before
the last general election.

He is also the third Cabinet Minister to
receive death threats this year.

Former Minister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney received an anonymous
letter threatening to kill him if he did not
resign from office in February, and although
he resigned three weeks later, Mr McCart-
ney maintains his resignation was not con-
nected to the threat.

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MINISTER OF STATE for the
Environment Phenton Neymour

Less than two weeks earlier, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard
received a letter at his office signed by ‘The
Brothers’ stating that he and his wife would
be attacked, and he would be shot in the
head.

However, Assistant Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna said public officials need not
live in fear.

“Threats against public officials are taken
very seriously and we will vigorously investi-
gate these matters and try to bring to justice
or to the public attention persons who may be
involved in these kind of activities,” Mr Han-
na said.

“We don’t feel as if there is any reason for
panic on the part of any public official in this
country, as we are convinced our public offi-
cials are not under threat, and we are also
mindful that there are people who may decide
for their own selfish reasons to copy others.”

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tures due to the speed with
which everything happened.
Like the first attack victim,

the woman reported the inci-
dent to police, who are investi-
gating.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

N=). "=a =U, K-01";
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon) LL.D, D1LiG,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

NEMA audit soon ready for Parliament

OH ye of short memory!

An article published in The Tribune on
April 1 that quoted PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts as claiming that NEMA thrived
under the PLP administration, caught our
full attention.

In the article Mr Roberts criticised
NEMA for failing to warn Grand Bahama
that it was in the path of a deadly tornado.
He outlined action that he claims should
have been taken to minimise the impact that
the tornado had on Freeport. The tornado,
which struck on March 29, killed three main-
tenance workers trapped in a 400 ft gantry
that crashed into the water at the Freeport
Container Port. Several other Port employ-
ees were injured. Other than inclement
weather conditions that day, the Port had no
prior warning of the approaching storm.

In criticising the lack of notice by NEMA,
Mr Roberts made the preposterous claim
that NEMA had thrived under the PLP
administration.

We believe that a report due to be pre-
sented to Parliament shortly — the long
awaited Deloitte and Touche audit for that
period — will shatter that claim.

According to Mr Roberts, the PLP
administration accelerated the development
of a national emergency plan and invested in
a number of intensive training programmes
on damage assessment and emergency
response.

He claimed that under the FNM, the
organisation suffered because the PLP pro-
grammes were not continued and for three
years there was no national training.

We recall the NEMA years under the
PLP as being one of confusion, dominated by
questions being asked of how public dona-
tions — in the region of $5 million — had
been spent on assisting those who had lost
their homes in the two hurricanes that had
devastated Grand Bahama in 2004.

On January 7, 2005, The Tribune pub-
lished a statement by Mr James Smith that
the millions of dollars, donated by the pub-
lic to the National Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) to repair damage done by
the 2004 hurricanes, were being audited.
The audited reports, he said would be pub-
lished “next week.” That was five years ago.

At the time Mr Smith was Minister of
State in the Ministry of Finance and co-
chairman of NEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund.
He told the press that Deloitte and Touch
was compiling the report even though the
fund was still being used.

In the meantime we kept hearing allega-






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tions that persons who had no property or
homes were receiving assistance from the
disaster fund. We heard of waste, of double
ordering, friends getting help over persons
who qualified for assistance receiving noth-
ing.

One of the greatest flaws was an attempt
to decentralise the assistance operations in
Grand Bahama. There was a separate relief
operation in the north and another in the
south with no apparent control or record
keeping of how NEMA’s money was being
spent. There were even dark, but unproved
rumours, of misappropriation of funds.

When the FNM became the government
unused material was found deteriorating in
sheds; persons in Grand Bahama who qual-
ified for assistance from NEMA received
nothing; the NEMA fund still owed almost
half a million dollars to various Freeport
suppliers for materials delivered, but never
paid for.

And then there was the outcry by Sir Jack
Hayward for an accounting of the $1 million
that he and his late partner Edward St
George had donated to the fund exclusively
for the use of Freeport, and especially to
restore Grand Bahamas’ educational facili-
ties. After giving an angry Sir Jack the usu-
al civil service brush off, it was finally admit-
ted that his and his partner’s million dollars
was deposited to the general disaster relief
fund and applied nationally, contrary to the
donors wishes. Obviously, those adminis-
tering the fund were oblivious to the fact
that 200 years of case law had established
that it was illegal to apply money given for a
specific purpose to a different purpose. In a
1970 House of Lords case it was stated that
if money given for a specific purpose could
not be used for that purpose, it had to be
returned to the donor.

We have also learned that during the
compilation of this audit report the police
have been back and forth requesting cer-
tain documents. It is understood that the
NEMA audit has been completed up to 2007
and will soon be ready for presentation to
parliament. Meanwhile, the auditors will
continue their work to bring the report up to
date.

The nation will then learn whether all
the rumours about the misuse of NEMA’s
funds have been accurate, or whether it is
true, as Mr Roberts claims, that NEMA
thrived under the PLP administration.

Whatever it reports, the audit should
make interesting reading.





THE TRIBUNE



Concerns over
proposed Chinese
farming in Abaco or

elsewhere in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Under mentioned are
some points of concern trig-
gered by the possibility of
Chinese farming on Abaco.
There has not been any pub-
lic thorough information dis-
closure so far and we are
hoping that this letter will
prompt BAIC or the Min-
istry of Agriculture to hold a
public meeting so farmers
and the residents of our
island can know what to
expect as far as the Chinese
involvement on our island.
We would appreciate if you
could publish this letter in
your next issue.

Abaco Neem welcomes
growth on our island, envi-
ronmentally friendly and
controlled growth (of course
we still need a master plan);
we are concerned with com-
panies coming here to do
large scale agriculture (espe-
cially with livestock) that
could further contaminate
our water table.

Let’s not forget that one
of our most valuable
resources is our fresh water,
another one being the man-
groves that protect our
shores and that could be eas-
ily destroyed by agriculture
products run-off.

According to internet
data, 65 per cent of the
world’s water is now pollut-
ed by chemicals.

We are one of the few
places on earth sitting on
that valuable commodity:
fresh potable water. It
should not be contaminated
by large scale industry or
unsupervised use of toxic
chemicals for the short term
benefit of the creation of a
few jobs or government
trade offs. It is our most
sacred duty to protect our
fresh water reserves and to
leave it unpolluted for future
generations.

If China wants to come
here and grow organically
and practise environmental-
ly friendly farming, where
the food is going to be sold
here first hand, not through
third hand importation by
wholesalers, we welcome
them. It is being said that
they intend to do large scale
livestock farming: that
would most certainly create
contamination through the
seeping of nitrates and
growth hormones and
antibiotics into the water
lens that eventually end up
in our drinking water. This
inevitably will result in the
long term to high health care

#P Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219




Bayes

letters@triobunemedia.net



costs, increased disease and
create a further strain on our
public treasury and result in
increased cost of living.

As a concerned entity we
would like to be informed
of where these farmers were
farming prior to coming
here; we would like to see
photographs of their farms
and the environmental
impact they had on the sur-
rounding communities. Chi-
na supposedly has a high
rate of birth defects caused
by industrial and mostly
agricultural pollutants.

That information prompts
us to request an impact
study on the communities
where the Chinese were
involved in farming.

What do those surround-
ing areas look like today?

The population of The
Bahamas is approaching
400,000 people. With assis-
tance from the Government,
it should be possible for
local farmers, taking a les-
son from past farming,
adopting new agro-technol-
ogy such as vertical farming
and hydroponics to render
our country self-sufficient.
Abaco Neem has proven,
without formal assistance,
that organic farming can be
successful in this country.
Give our Bahamian farmers
a real chance and support
from the public and assis-
tance from the Government
with land tenure and grants
where deserved and we
farmers can repeat history
and do what our forefathers
did a short forty years ago.
We can help our country get

on track with food security
for the nation. If any country
wants to step in and lend
assistance with the develop-
ment of new environmen-
tally friendly technologies
we would welcome them.

Stop and consider anoth-
er area of concern might be
the reaction provoked in our
Northern neighbors, Amer-
ica and Canada, by the
Bahamas depending on the
Chinese for food security, is
this really what indepen-
dence is all about? Our
North American neighbours
have helped feed us through
the years by contributing to
steady tourism and agricul-
ture and here on Abaco
have provided financial
security through the regular
yearly cash influx of our sec-
ond home owners who have
helped build our communi-
ty. Are we cutting off the
hands that help feed us?

We would welcome a
public forum during which
BAIC and the Ministry of
Agriculture could outline
the immediate and residual
benefits the Bahamian peo-
ple would obtain through
this alliance with China.

This letter is meant to
voice our concerns and to
ask questions.

We have not formed an
opinion because we do not
have all the facts, like the
rest of our community we
would like to be apprised of
the facts by those who are
drawing the contracts before
they are signed on the dot-
ted line and before any land
preparation takes place.

NICK MIAOULIS
Abaco Neem,
Marsh Harbour,
Abaco,

Apri, 2010.

Thank you to wonderful doctors

FS SU aC



EDITOR, The Tribune.

REUBEN W SEARS
Nassau,
March, 2010.



Please allow me to sincerely thank the wonderful
doctors and nurses at the A&E Ward of the Princess
Margaret Hospital who attended to me so nicely during
my recent sudden illness. I also would like to thank my
children Nurse Lyndianna, son Churchill, sister Alice
Lowe, niece, Nurse Leonnie, brother Campbell and
my cousin, Nurse Lola Collins who stayed with me
throughout my ordeal. I also want to thank the staff of
the Federal Management System, especially Mr Pedro
Goodman, GFC, Mr Andrew Huyler, GM and Super-
visors Messrs Carroll, Kemp and Mrs A Brown for
their kindness and well wishes.

May God bless all of you.





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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 5

Police official ‘has no knowledge’
of petition on alleged corruption

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased fo announce a

Stevens, Long Island, on March
27, but failed to report the find.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna said he has
no knowledge of corruption on
the island, nor of a petition hav-
ing been received by the com-
missioner.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Walter Evans was sta-
tioned in Long Island two
months ago to oversee the local
force, and Mr Hanna said he is
doing a stellar job.

ASP Evans, former press liaison offi-
cer for the Royal Bahamas Police Force
(RBPF), declined to comment on the
allegations or his strategies for main-
taining law and order on the island.

ASP Hanna said: “Mr Greenslade and
his executive management team pro-

posed ASP Evans take command in Long
Island, a very thriving community, and he
has been doing an outstanding job.

“He has the overwhelming support of
his officers and the community at large.”

However Long Island’s contingent of
officers, like any other faction of the
RBPF, is vulnerable to corruption, ASP
Hanna said.

“We know there may be situations
where not all officers are perfect, and
wherever discipline is necessary, officers
will be disciplined,” ASP Hanna said.

“But I know of no situation or cir-
cumstances that warrant anything con-
tained in the reports.”

The Commissioner of Police and Assis-
tant Commissioner for the Family Islands
Willard Cunningham Sr did not respond
to a request for comment on the allega-
tions before The Tribune went to press.



A SENIOR police official said
he has no knowledge of reports
that Long Island residents are
petitioning for the removal of
allegedly corrupt officers.

Around 200 permanent and
part-time residents of Long â„¢
Island are reported to have
signed a petition calling on
Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade
to root out corrupt members of the local
force.

Allegations listed on a Bahamian web-
site claim rogue police officers are con-
tributing to crime on the island and that
a senior officer seized cocaine when 86
Haitian migrants apprehended in

MTU



dividend payment of

4 cents per share to all

Coral Harbour residents ‘can expect better water quality’ |} orcinay shareholders of record

By ALESHA CADET

RESIDENTS of the Coral
Harbour area who have been
enduring rusty water for years
can expect better quality and
pressure in the near future,
government has promised.

Phenton Neymour, Minis-
ter of State for the Environ-
ment, told The Tribune yes-
terday that “we are faced with
an increased need to replace
the galvanised pipes” cur-
rently in place throughout
most of New Providence.

“There are a lot of areas in
which we want to replace the
water mains, Coral Harbour is

one of those areas,” he said.

Residents told The Tribune
that they have been com-
plaining about the quality of
water in Coral Harbour for
many years now.

Speaking about the rusty
water, one resident said:

“Would you want to bathe,
brush your teeth, wash your
clothes in (and) drink water
that turns the filters a filthy
colour in only a couple of
weeks?”

“What kind of build-up in
the pipes of everyone’s home
is this causing? What is this
doing to every valve and
faucet in the average home?”







LISTENING intently at the workshop.



Pinewood’s young
men turn out for
career workshop

WHEN Pinewood MP
Byran Woodside decided to
put together a career plan-
ning workshop to help
unemployed residents in his
constituency, he never
expected that the vast major-
ity of those who responded
would be young men.

It was a development wel-
comed by seminar presen-
ters Yvette Bethel and
Glenn Ferguson, who noted
that the sight of so many
men at a seminar designed
for self-help is a good indi-
cation that our “budding
male leaders” are taking
their futures seriously.

Ms Bethel — who is the
CEO of Organisational Soul;
a company that provides eti-
quette training, leadership
coaching and human
resources consulting services
— commented that she had
never seen a male-dominat-
ed audience at a seminar like
this before.

Her presentation gave
participants tips on how to
land the job they want or
start a new business. She
explained the importance of
an effective resume; how to
behave on a job interview;
deciding on future goals and
effectively implementing
them.

Glenn Ferguson, a well-
known financial coach,
shared tips on how to save
money, and just what to do
with the money that is saved.

Mr Ferguson also shed
light on the financial services
industry and explained how
family life can be improved

by financial stability.

Mr Woodside applauded
the male attendees — who
disproved the stereotype
that only Bahamian women
are determined to succeed.

The MP said his aim is to
continue to fuel the zeal he
sees in the young people in
Pinewood by empowering
them in any way he can.

The resident added: “We
were promised that all these
old cast iron pipes in Coral
Harbour would be replaced
two or more years ago.

“When is it going to hap-
pen and what is it going to
take to get this done in our
lifetime?”

In a press statement, Mr
Neymour said Coral Harbour
east and west, the Blair sub-
division and Joe Farrington
Road west all have persistent
red/rust water challenges.

“We recognise the chal-

lenges and we do have them
on schedule for main replace-
ment,” he said

According to Mr Neymour,
schedules, however, are sub-
ject to change depending on
the rate of progress.

“We cannot give an exact
date but we expect (to get to
Coral Harbour) in the near
future,” he said.

“In addition to the replace-
ment exercises of the water
mains, we have to replace the
service lines throughout New
Providence.”

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consider enrolling in the 3-month course. Visit
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as of April 30, 2010

payable May 11, 2010

"Fueling Growth For People”

Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET * P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782







RBG ee ee

Police Corporal #424 Hurtle Rolle,
aka "Beach Boy, Daddy Rock", 71

a resident of Prophecy
Way & formerly of Old
Bight, Cat Island, who
passed away on 26th
March, 2010), will be held
at Mt Ararat Baptist
Church, Washington
Street, on Saturday at
1100 am. Ofictating will
be Rev. DOr. Gloria D.
Ferguson, assisted by
Father Davies, Interment
follows in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.






















Left to cherish his memory are his sons, Bradley, Dennis,
Jarvis & Leroy Rolle; daughters, Marilyn Taylor, Kenrise
Rolle, Joanne, Dianne, Bernadette Rolle; adopted daughter,
Sandra Rolle: brothers, Leviticus, Hensel and Genest Rolle
and Raymond Taylor, sisters, Joyce McLean of New York,
Elnora Rolle, Susiemae Dorsette & Reaulah Hart; uncles,
Harold Hart of New York, Charles Hart & Benjamin Rolle;
aunts, Bessie Cartwright & Colene Davis; brothers-in-








Hiram Larramore; sisters-in-law, Leah Rolle, Woman
Revst, Inspt. Ellamay Rolle, Madgelyn Rolle, Esther
Larramore, Rachel Thompson & Jerelean Newton,
daughters-in-law, Elizabeth, Roshelle & Donna Rolle,
son-in-law, David Taylor Sr.; grandsons, Deron, Nathaniel,
Renardo, David Jr., Rashad, Bradley Jr,, Devante, Antonio,
Derick, Randolph & Romain, grand daughters, Sherese,
Davyanette, Davyanique, Sparkles, Sherele, Sophia,
Shenique, Shandesha, Tanya, Shekeva, Shekera, Dementra,
Deneka, Deneshia, Nagia, Raynette, Denasha, Lakeshia,
Angelicia & Alexis; 4 great grand sons; 2 great grand
daughters; nephews, Father Dwight Rolle, Lloyd, Glenn,
Dhan, Darrell, Zendal, Perry, Coolridge, Leviticus Jr., John
Braynen, Barron Missick, Sterlin Knowles, Ryan Dorsette,
10 grand nephews, 10 grand nieces; nieces, Jennifer
Braynen, Ingrid Gibson, Claudia Knowles, Denise Rolle,
Woman Revst. Corporal 486 Philippa Rolle, Woman Revst,
482 Helena Rolle, Rochell Rolle, Marsha Dean, Bridgette
Rolle, Nadia Lunn, Erica, Sharnette Rolle, Nicola Rolle,
Marion Newchurch, Karen Rolle Missick, Wendy Russell,
Jackie Rolle of New York, Dianetie Dorsette, Patricia Tobin
of Virginia, Candice McLean of New York, Shenna,
Eyvonne, Sineka Basden, Donnalee, Samantha Tinker,
Cleopatra, Patrice Sweeting, Lyndzeh Rolle, cousins, Eden
& Tanna Dawkins, Iclee Burrows & Rhoda King, friends
& relatives, Miss Veronica Brown, Bishop Stanley Seymour
& family, Bishop Neville Hart & family, Bishop Lawrence
Rolle, Dr, EJ, Daniels, 0.C. Pratt, Higgs & McKenzie
family, Rolle, Harts, Dorsette, Taylor, Davis, Brown,
Simmons, Daniels, Simms, Russells, Romers, Stuarts,
Gaitors, Clears, Burrows & Bowles families, the Retired
Police Officers Association & President Mr. Grafton Ifill,
Mr. Ellison Greenslade Commissioner of Police & the
entire Royal Bahamas Police Force & other family members
too HUMEroUs to mention.







































Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.







PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
UAE TC

aS LUC Ta



THE Hong Kong and
Shanghai Banking Corpo-
ration (HSBC) is providing
support for a unique nation-
al park in the Bahamas.

With a $10,000 grant,
HSBC will assist in the cre-
ation and installation of
interpretive signage at the
Primeval Forest.

The Primeval Forest
located in southwestern
New Providence is a 7.4
acre old growth forest filled
with dramatic sink holes
and caverns.

Remarkably undisturbed,
the area is representative
of the early evergreen trop-
ical hardwood forests that
covered much of the
Bahamas in the 16th centu-

ry.
Caverns

Some of the limestone
caverns found in the park
are 50 feet long and 30 feet
deep and tell the dramatic
story of sea level rise and
fall in the Bahamas.

The park supports a
diverse collection of plant
life and is an important
resource for education
about the geological history
of the islands.

The Bahamas National
Trust (BNT) has begun the
development of a trail sys-
tem in the park which is
being supported by funding
from the $300,000 govern-
ment stimulus package
granted to the Trust to aid
in the development of

national parks on New

Providence.

The trails are part of an :
overall conceptual plan for :
the park which includes }
boardwalks, interpretive :
signage, a canopy walkway, :
parking area and restrooms. :

The signage installed with :
money from the HSBC :
grant will identify plant :
species within the forest :
and tell the geological his- :
tory of property which is a :
window into the geological :

history of the Bahamas.

“We are very grateful :
and excited by the support :
the :
Primeval Forest. This park :
has great educational :
potential for students study- :
ing the geography of our :
islands and is an excellent :
site for visitors to gain }
insight on how the Bahama :
islands were formed and to :
experience our unique trop- :
ical hardwood forest” said }
Eric Carey, executive direc- :

from HSBC for

tor of the BNT.

The Primeval Forest is :
one of four national parks :
on New Providence, the :
others being Bonefish Pond :
National Park, a coastal :
mangrove wetland, Harrold :
and Wilson Ponds National :
Park, an important bird :
area, and the Village Road :
Retreat, once the third :
largest collection of tropi- :
cal palms in this hemi- :

sphere.

The HSBC is one of the
oldest banking groups in :

the modern world.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LAKE NIROBI INC.

Endangered birds colour
banded by researchers

WITH assistance from
the Bahamas National
Trust (BNT), researchers
working under contract for
Environment Canada cap-
tured and colour banded 57
Piping Plovers during Janu-
ary and February of this
year.

The Piping Plover is a
small rare shorebird with
yellow legs and feathering
that is the colour of dry
beach sand.

Listed as threatened or
endangered in the United
States and Canada where
they breed, there are only
about 8,000 Piping Plovers
in the world.

This species is threatened
by habitat destruction,
predators, and human dis-
turbance.

Habitat

In addition, in the
Bahamas, the loss of habitat
from invasive plants is a
concern.

Researchers visited New
Providence, Grand
Bahama, and Andros,
where they carried out sur-
veys.

The birds were captured
using nets, and a unique
colour band combination
was placed on the legs that
allow the individual birds
to be identified.

In addition, small samples





(=



were taken for DNA analy-
sis to show if the bird is part

of the Atlantic, Great

Lakes, or Great Plains
breeding populations.

All of the birds were
released unharmed.

"This research is intended
to show the connections
between the wintering loca-
tions in the Bahamas,

where the birds spend most

of the year, and the breed-
ing locations in Canada and
the United States," said Dr
Cheri Gratto-Trevor, the
principal investigator.

"By knowing where these
wintering birds stop over
during migration and then
nest during the summer, we
can better understand the
challenges these rare birds
face."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR WARS
GALAXIES INC.




Ts PIPING PLOVER is a ar rare ace)

Ann Maddock ji
a) <|



&
E

"The local expertise of
the Bahamas National
Trust was critical to suc-
cessfully completing this
research,” said researcher
Sidney Maddock, who did
the field work with Peter
Doherty.

Grateful

"We are grateful to the
assistance provided by BNT
throughout this project."

At one site on North
Andros, researchers found
89 Piping Plovers, and
another location had 45.

For such a very rare
shorebird, these numbers
are unusually high and
show the importance of the
Bahamas.

"With Piping Plovers
spending up to about eight
months during the non-
breeding season in the
Bahamas, our beaches and
flats are critical to the
recovery of this rare
species," said Lynn Gape,
deputy executive director
of BNT.

"This beautiful shorebird
is an important part of our
national heritage.”

While the research pro-
ject was being conducted,
staff of BNT and the
National Audubon Society
spoke with local landown-
ers to support their efforts
to remove invasive plants
and discuss how the bird
species can be better pro-
tected.

"It was gratifying to see
Piping Plovers doing well
in the Bahamas at sites that
had low-density lodging,"
said Matthew Jeffery of
Audubon's international
alliances programme.

"Certain landowners, in
their desire to control the
spread of invasive plants on
the Bahamian beaches, not
only were helping create
wider beaches, but also
were helping maintain high
tide resting habitats for this
rare shorebird. We thank
the landowners for their
efforts. Audubon is looking
forward to collaborating
with BNT for future con-
servation efforts."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRANVISION
INVESTMENTS CORP.

—

#

—

—-f— ,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LAKE NIROBI INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
of GRANVISION INVESTMENTS
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of STAR WARS GALAXIES INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

dissolution

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the has been issued and the Company has therefore been

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SWEET CACHET INC.

—+,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SWEET CACHET INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOLLY SPRINGS
LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of HOLY SPRINGS LIMITED

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MUSICAL ODYSSEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RUMPELSTILSKIN

HOLDINGS LTD.

— *,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RUMPELSTILSKIN LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GIBLOUXNASS LTD.

j—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GIBLOUXNASS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EASTERN

COTTONWOOD LTD.

— -,——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EASTERN COTTONWOOD LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

S |
f .
FRIDAY, APRIL 9,

| Major headlines|

C\GN oF



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST a_ two-year
absence from the local scene,
Caribbean lightweight cham-
pion Meacher ‘Pain’ Major
will be back in the square ring
on Sunday night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

This time, however, Major
will headline an unusual card
dubbed: "Reign of Pain,"
which will be complimented
by a series of martial arts
bouts, including Bahamian
singing sensation and radio
personality Bodine 'Bo' John-
son in the co-main event.

Johnson, incidentally, will
be celebrating her birthday
today.

The show is being promot-
ed by Caribbean Fight Order,
headed by president Kent
Bazard. Denez Jones is the
chief executive officer.

Major, 28, will take on
American Robert ‘Don't
Lose’ DeLux from Provi-
dence, Rhode Island, in the
lone boxing match. They will
compete in a six-rounder in

PAGE 10

the super featherweight or
130-pound division.

In the Female MMA exhi-
bition match, Johnson will
take on a surprise female mar-
tial artist.

There will also be three
mixed martial arts bouts, fea-
turing Ronald 'Smokey' Mar-
tin against Scott Chegel Jr.;
Jimbo vs James 'Dragon'
Walkine and Dewitt 'DC'
Pratt against Justin ‘Slayer’
Sawyer.

Major, under contract with
Excel Worldwide Promotions
out of Buffalo, New York and
headed by Nick Garone, said
he's excited to have been
afforded the opportunity to
fight at home again and at the
new weight division he's cam-
paigning in.

"The last championship title
that I fought for was in the
super featherweight division,"
said Major, who is coming off
a fourth round TKO loss to
Dorin Spivey on November 6
for the NABA lightweight
title.

"Everything I prepare for a
fight, instead of making 135, I
always go below that. I fight at
132 or 133. But I said last year



ts



2010

that whether I won or lost the
fight, I was going to go back to
the 130 weight. Even though I
didn't win the fight, things
happened for a reason. So I
will just stay there and cam-
paign at that division."

Before he secured his inter-
national contract, Major went
on a four-match winning
streak from June 30, 2007 to
February 20, 2009, the last
time he fought at home with
First Class Promotions.

Major said he's been
encouraged by the support
that he got from his local han-
dlers, the fans and even Fred
Sturrup, secretary of the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
to make the right decision as
far as the future of his career
is concerned.

Training under the watchful
eyes of long-time coach
Nathaniel Knowles at the
Nassau Stadium, Major said
he's eager to get back into the
ring and show the Bahamian
public just how committed he
is.

"I'm just taking one step at
atime," he said. "When I was
contacted by the promoters
to headline this card, I gladly

Dain

accepted. I think it's a great
opportunity for me to be able
to come back home and fight
again.

"IT had no idea when I
would be able to fight again.
So when this opportunity
came up, I made contact with
my promoter and he gave me
the go ahead. I want to thank
my promoter because he was
the one who really dealt with
the opponent, making sure
that I got the right fight for
the new division."

If everything goes as
planned, Major said he should
be fighting at least two more
times this year.

But right now, he said it’s
all about being a part of a his-
toric night of martial arts.

"We've never had anything
like this,” he said. "So I'm just
happy to be a part of it and
being the headliner. I just
want to thank Caribbean
Fight Order for allowing me
to showcase my talent on
their show."

Major is being sponsored
by Nautellus Water and
Quick Welding for the fight.
He also thanked coach
Knowles’ wife for ensuring





a rn ae ogee










Meacher Major

that he maintains his weight
by eating the proper meals on
time.

DeLux, 31, is 12-25 with
nine knockouts. He also drew
three of his fights. The fight is
supposed to be a tune up for
DeLux, who will be taking on
Joey Silva on May 22 at the
Sovereign Center in Reading,
Pennsylvania.

"It doesn't matter who I
get," Major said. "I want to
become the next world cham-
pion. We haven't had one



since Elisha Obeb. I know my
former trainer Ray Minus Jr.
came close when he fought.
But I know I have the poten-
tial to do it and I'm going to
make sure that I do."

Tickets for Sunday's show
are available at Mr Donuts
(downtown), Scotiabank
(downtown), The Juke Box
Mall at Marathon, Corner
Motel, Khalfani Oils Town
Centre Mall, the Blue Hill
Meat Mart and Hurry Hurry
Meat Mart (Poincianna).



SIRQUWA, =a

Knowles presents â„¢
Paul Cayard with
the Santa Maria
perpetual trophy
following his win
the last time the
Star Western
Hemisphere
Championships
was sailed in Nas-
sau in 2005. This
trophy is only
competed for
when the Western
Hemisphere
Championship is
sailed in Nassau.
In honour of Sir
Durward's history
with the Star class,
the Santa Maria
trophy was
renamed the Sir
Durward Knowles
trophy during the
presentation cere-
mony.

The Nassau Yacht Club/Photo

imagination at work

CASH SALES ONLY!








Sales & Full Service Department

Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9



TERT ETE
crush top seeded
Te ee

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN HIS NBA Development
League playoff debut, Benet
Davis and his upstart squad
tipped off the postseason with
perhaps the most shocking win
of the year.

Davis and the fourth seeded
Utah Flash upended the top
seeded and pennant winning
Iowa Energy, 107-76 to take a
1-0 lead in the best of three
opening round playoff series.

The versatile forward, who
has been a fixture in the start-
ing lineup since February, con-
tinued his consistent play in
game one of the series with 10
points, eight rebounds and
four assists.

In a balanced scoring effort,
Davis was one of six Utah
players to reach double fig-
ures.

Brian Hamilton and former
Boston Celtic Orien Greene
each finished with a team high
18 points, while Hamilton
secured a double double with
a game high 12 rebounds.

Kevin Kruger added 16
points, another former Celtic,
Gabe Pruitt, came off the
bench to finish with 15 and
Andre Ingram chipped in with
10.

Curtis Stinson led the Ener-
gy in a losing effort with a
game high 24, 12 rebounds and
seven assists.

Former Texas star Conner
Atchley notched a double
double with 10 points and 12
rebounds while former NBA
and D-League veteran Jeff
Trepagnier added 14.

Iowa took a 17-15 lead after
the opening quarter, but it was
all Utah for the remainder of
the game.

The Flash made just one of
their first 10 shots to start the
game and shot 24 per cent in
the first quarter. They went
on a late 9-2 run and closed to
two points at the end of the
period.

Stinson led the way for Iowa
scoring eight first quarter
points and grabbing eight
rebounds.

Davis scored four first quar-



Bennet Davis



ter points for the Flash to help
the team recover from the
slow start.

The winner of the series will
advance to take on the win-
ner of the Sioux Falls Skyforce
and Tulsa 66ers series in the
Western Conference Finals.

The Flash outscored the
energy 33-20 in the second
quarter to take a 48-37 lead at
the half.

The lead continued to bal-
loon in the second half as the
Flash advantage reached as
much as 37.

They won the third quarter
31-20 and the fourth, 28-19 to
close out the 31 point blowout.

In the D-League playoff for-
mat, the top three seeds in the
Conference choose to select
their opponents and the Ener-
gy’s choice to select the Flash
have had less than desirable
results thus far.

After ending the season
with the league’s best record at
37-13, the Energy lost several
players to NBA call ups
including Earl Barron to the
New York Knicks and Cartier
Martin to the Washington
Wizards.

The series now moves to
Des Moines, where with their
backs against the wall and fac-
ing elimination the Energy will
have to win both games to
avoid falling out of the playoffs
in the first round for the sec-
ond consecutive year.

The two teams will meet for
game two of three-game series
in Iowa on Friday night. Game
three, if necessary will take
place Sunday in Iowa as well.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 11



SPORTS



(SY CARIFTA GAMES 2010

BAAA, BSF have much work to
do in quest for regional glory

NOTHER Carifta

Games has been

completed and
both the track and field
and swimming teams
have returned home,
albeit with different
results from two sepa-

rate venues.

The 70-plus track and field
team matched last year's
third place finish with 28
medals in St. Lucia by col-
lecting one more medal. The
team secured six gold, 10 sil-
ver and 13 bronze over the
Easter holiday weekend.

Not bad, considering the
fact that two of the gold
medals came with record
breaking performances from
Shaunea Miller of St.
Augustine's College in the
under-17 girls 400 metres and
Stephen Newbold of St.
John's College in the under-
17 boys 400 hurdles.

Jamaica, as usual, domi-

nated the meet by posting 72
medals, inclusive of 37 gold,
22 silver and 13 bronze.
Trinidad & Tobago got sec-
ond with 12 gold, 16 silver
and 12 bronze for 40 medals.

The 30-plus swimming
team, on the other hand,
returned from Kingston,
Jamaica where they slipped
from second last year to
fourth in the medal hunt

Last year, the Bahamas
accumulated 49 medals and
they were second in the point
standings with

Over the Easter holiday
weekend, the Bahamas ended
up with 37 medals for fourth
place, but was third overall
in the point standings with
603.

Drop Off

This year, Trinidad &
Tobago took top honours
with 1011 points and 94
medals. Guadeloupe was sec-
ond with 707 points, but they
were third with 47 medals.
Barbados had 48 medals for

second, but was sixth in
points with just 488.

The Bahamas also boast-
ed of having one of the six
divisional high point winners
in Dionisio Carey. The 12-
year-old Queen's College
grade eight student was tied
with Trinidad & Tobago's
Jabari Baptiste with 79 points
in the boys 11-12 division.

Those were the second
highest points achieved indi-
vidually at the four-day meet.
Trinidad & Tobago's Tyla
Martin had the highest with
88 in the girls 11-12 division.

This time around, I have
to give a little more kudos
to the track and field team,
who have been more consis-
tent in their feat than the
swimming team, which
dropped a little below their
standard.

Criticism
The Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations,
headed by Mike Sands, has
always been criticised for tak-

ing more athletes that
attained the qualifying stan-
dards.

To their defence, the addi-
tional athletes have been
added for relay purposes and
therefore they have been
inserted into their speciality
events.

That seemed to have paid
off dividends for the team at
the games.

However, I think it would
still be better if the BAAA
push for more athletes to
attain the standards, which
gives them more gratification
in making the team outright
and gives the Bahamas a
much better chance to regain
its lofty position at the top of
the standings.

With the new national sta-
dium coming on stream for
next year, hopefully the ath-
letes will be inspired even
more to compete and get
ready to travel to St. Kitts for
the 2011 Carifta Games.

And as you’re heard, the
BAAA has put in a bid to

host the 2012 games. That
would be another morale
booster for the athletes as
they will get a chance to com-
pete at home in front of their
home crowd in a brand new
stadium.

As for the swim team, they
must be commended, consid-
ering the fact that the swim-
mers were somewhat hap-
mered by the fact that the
pool at the Betty Kelly
National Swim Complex was
disengaged over the last few
weeks leading up to their
departure.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture had to do
through some renovations to
repair the damaged heater
system. Up to now, it’s not
certain if all of the work,
including the maintaince of
the facility, have been com-
pleted.

But having had a slight
drop off its overall perfor-
mances this year, I’m sure
that president Algernon
Cargill and his executives will





STUBBS

OPINION

be working even harder to get
the team prepared to regain
their position in the top two
next year.

Another Carifta Games
have certainly come and gone,
but both the BAAA and the
BSF have a lot of work to do
in the upcoming months as
the quest continues for
regional glory.



New national stadium to open up new opportunities

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net





AS THE country eagerly antici-





pates the completion of the new
national stadium, the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associations has
begun initial efforts to position itself to
host most prestigious international
events.

Upon the return of the contingent
from the 39th Carifta Games in
Grand Cayman, BAAAs President
Mike Sands indicated the association’s
wishes to have the game return to the
Bahamas for the first in a decade.

“With the completion of the new
stadium we think it will give us an
opportunity to increase our profile in
the region from a hosting standpoint,”
he said, “With the talent we produce
on the track it’s only fitting that the
Bahamas is able to play host to our
competitors in the region and around
the world.”

The 2011 edition of the Carifta
Track and Field Championships will
be hosted by St. Kitts and Nevis, who
last hosted the games in 2008.

The Bahamas last hosted the games
in 2002 where Jamaica’s Usain Bolt
first rose to international prominence.

Thus far the selection committee
has received offers of interest from
the Bahamas and Bermuda.

The BAAAs have officially
expressed interest to the [AAF to
host the 2011 edition of the World
Youth Championships.

Thus far, three countries have
expressed interest to host the games,
the Bahamas, Greenville North Car-

PICTURED in front of a retired Star Class boat from the fleet of Olympic gold medalist Sir Durward
Knowles are Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, Regatta co-Chairman; Christian Coquoz, Managing Director Lom-
bard Odier Darier Hentsch; Laurent Colli, Head of Private Banking at Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch;
and Brent Burrows, Nassau Yacht Club Commodore.

Nassau Yacht Club set to host
international sailing championship

THE BAHAMAS and the Nassau Yacht
Club are once again preparing to host some of
the world's top sailors, this time in the Inter-
national Star Class Western Hemisphere

Championship 2010.

Thirty-five 2-man teams have entered the
challenging four-day race set for April 14th
through 17th. Twelve countries, including Aus-
tralia and Ukraine will be represented. The
Bahamas will be represented by brothers Mark

and William ‘Billy’ Holowesko.

Races will be sailed in the waters off eastern
New Providence and will give the sailors a
chance to size up the competition ahead of

the 2012 London Olympic Games.

"Events like these give The Bahamas invalu-
able exposure and also bring enormous eco-

olina and Slovenia.

Sands, said that while the Bahamas
has not made an official bid to host
the games, it has expressed interest to
the IAAF and the wheels have been
set in motion.

"We have hosted marquee events



nomic value,"

Odier Darier Hentsch.

munity,"

Championships in 2005.

points out Regatta co-Chair-
man Paul Hutton-Ashkenny

The prestigious event is being supported by
the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and the Nas-
sau branch of private banking firm Lombard

"We've sponsored international sailing com-
petitions here before and this kind of event is
a high quality event which will have a posi-
tive impact on The Bahamas, so it is a good fit
with our company's efforts to be a good cor-
porate citizen and contribute to the local com-
says Laurent Colli, Head of Private
Banking at Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch.

The Bahamas and the Nassau Yacht Club
last hosted the Star Class Western Hemisphere

Concept for new national stadium

in the past and with the completion of
the new national stadium slated for
2011, we have taken steps toward
possibly hosting the World Youth
Championships. We have not yet put
forth a bid but we have expressed
interest and we feel that if all goes

SEVE
SEAS’

Builds Nealth.. Natwrally

according to plan, the Bahamas can
host a major event of this calibre,"
he said, "After the interest has been
expressed to we will sit down in a
series of meetings and hope to con-
vince the government to give full sup-
port. Once that is completed we will



make an official bid at the IAAF
head offices in Monaco."

Kingston in Jamaica was the last
city in the NACAC Area to host an
IAAF World Championships. They
hosted the World Junior Champi-
onships in 2002.

Net AYE iat UT

Seven Seas Cod Liver Oil:
A rich source of Omega-3
fish oils for all around pood health!

Available in The Bahamas at pharmacies and dug stores. everywhere!

Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. 993-4854



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THE TRIBUNE
“ ru





I
Great Business

EM)
SST



Hi All-day event to
motivate and inspire
business people

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES and
business people are in
need of motivation and
inspiration with the
state of the economy the
way it is, claims the
organiser of the first
annual Dare to be Great
Business and Motiva-
tional Symposium.

Spence Finlayson said
the symposium is
designed to educate,
inspire and motivate
upcoming entrepre-
neurs, working profes-
sionals and even those
at the college and pri-
mary school levels.

Proceeds from the
symposium are expected
to go to The Bahamas
Primary School Student
of the year programme,
which has in 14 years
amassed and distributed
almost $500,000 in
scholarship money.

The Dare to be Great
symposium will feature
some Managing partner
at Baker Tilly Gomez,
Craig Gomez, Senior
Vice President of BTC,
Antonio Stubbs,
Founder of the
Bahamas Primary
School Student of the
year programme, Ricar-
do Deveaux, Chief
Executive Officer of
Creative Wealth Man-
agement, Keshelle Kerr,
Lecturer at the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute,
Mustafa Khalfani,
Entrepreneur and talk
show host, Lincoln
Bain, and Creator and
host of the “Dare to be
Great” Television show.

Speakers

The all day sympo-
sium to be held at the
British Colonial Hilton
on Thursday, April 22,
will offer attendees
inspired views of the
economic climate and
the way forward for
entrepreneurs, while
several speakers will
regale the audience with
stories of finding success
in adverse situations.

“Right now motiva-
tion is low and a lot of
people are depressed
and feel disenfran-
chised,” said Mr Fin-
layson.

“We aim to encourage
people to step out in
faith and try to achieve
their dreams.

“Too many people are
walking around discour-
aged and dejected.”

According to him ,
attendees of the sympo-
sium will receive lunch,
a participant’s manual
and a certificate of
attendance.

He added that the
symposium will also
provide an opportunity
for organizers to honor
several Human resource
professionals.

“We are daring peo-
ple to be great, because
we all have greatness
within us,” said Mr Fin-
layson.









FRIDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

APRIL 9,

iness

2010





FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





‘The IDB and government should look with shame on this experience.”

— Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux

Dump revamp ‘will not affect
BEC’s waste to energy plan’

Government hoping to have firm approved by July to manage facility

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net





THE Reorganisation of the mis-
managed city dump will not set back
the Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s Waste to Energy explorations
the minister of the environment told
Tribune Business yesterday, saying
“the IDB and government should
look with shame on this experience”.

Earl Deveaux said hiring a pri-
vate American firm to manage the
city dump will not affect BEC’s bid
to some day soon convert the
dump’s waste to usable energy as it
attempts to slowly move from



reliance on fossil fuels to renewable

energy.

According to Mr Deveaux, gov-
ernment hopes to have a firm vetted
and approved by July first to take
over management of the dump,

which has effectively been misman-
aged over a period of years, even as
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) undertook a project to
bring some semblance of organisa-

Mm AUTOMATED CLEARING HOUSE

Employers will soon be able to electronically
deposit payroll into employee bank accounts

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN employers
will soon have the ability to
electronically deposit their
payroll directly into employ-
ee’s bank accounts regard-
less of which financial insti-
tution they use, the General
Manager of the Automated
Clearing House (ACH) said
yesterday.

Brian Smith said the ACH
could go live with a direct
credit trial as soon as next
week.

Four large employers are
assisting in the testing the
direct deposit system that
will allow employees to pay
their employees without
physical cheques, no matter
what bank they bank with.

Mr Smith said on test runs
banks have been able to
receive transactions and post
them as long as the correct
bank account numbers are
provided to the employer’s
bank.

According to him, the
process requires employers
provide their financial firms
with the account numbers
of their employees, after
which the ACH receives the
routing information for each
employee in order for funds
to be transferred to the
receiver’s banks.

Process

It is not clear as yet
whether the clearing banks
will require employers to
hold a chequing or savings
account in order to receive
payments electronically.

Mr Smith said the process
would have to be cleared
between the banks and
employers.

According to him, the
most important part of the
process is to have the
account number, or routing
information correct in order
for the transaction to go
through without a hitch.

However, direct debit,
which Mr Smith said he
hopes the ACH could get
off the ground in another
few weeks is far more com-

tion to the Bahamas’ waste man-
agement systems.

However, it was found that the
IDB project was itself wholly mis-
managed, throwing away millions



ACH could go live with direct credit trial next week

plicated and requires the
institution to bolster it’s
legal position.

It was hoped that the
ACH would help to usher
in Ecommerce in this coun-
try, as it would create online
connectivity between finan-
cial institutions, making

online transfers of money
easier. Mr Smith said each
financial institution is at a
different state of readiness
for Internet banking to
occur, but “we would like
that to come on stream as
quickly as possible”.

He said the ACH could

make collection of National
Insurance payouts much
easier and help the govern-
ment to significantly reduce
the number of cheques it
prints per month.

“If you are a large com-
pany, it gives you lots of
flexibility,” said Mr Smith.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED ~

call us today at 396-1355

—__A Excellent __~





EARL DEVEAUX

of dollars supposedly spent on con-
tractors who didn’t work and
improvements that never happened.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Secure future

[1 leave your children financially secure
[= provide a safety net for your loved ones
Cc ensure a bright future for your family

q/ all of the above

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

US ECONOMY

Initial jobless
claims increase
unexpectedly

CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER,

AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

The number of newly laid-
off workers seeking unem-
ployment benefits rose last
week, a sign that jobs
remain scarce even as the
economy recovers.

The increase also may
result from the difficulty the
Labor Department has in
seasonally adjusting the
claims around the Easter
holiday, which falls on dif-
ferent weeks each year.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

"This is ... a volatile time
when the numbers move
around quite a bit," a
department analyst said.

The Labor Department
said Thursday that first-time
claims increased by 18,000
in the week ended April 3,
to a seasonally adjusted
460,000. That's worse than
economists’ estimates of a
drop to 435,000, according
to a survey by Thomson
Reuters.

California also closed its
state offices for a holiday on
March 31, which likely held
down the claims figures. On

?

WW

2 ee ee







Eric Risherg/AP Photo

IN THIS MARCH 30, 2010 PHOTO, job seekers are reflected into a mirror while waiting in line to attend a career fair presented by Nation-
al CareerFairs in San Jose, Calif. The number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits rose last week, a sign that jobs remain
scarce even as the economy recovers.

an unadjusted basis, claims
rose by 6,500 to nearly
415,000.



work
- der
ote
iiffice Asciutcaalt Heebbrel

IN THIS MARCH, 9, 2010 photo, Damashata Washington holds potential job openings as she



looks for work at Work 2 Future, a federally funded job training center, in San Jose, Calif. The num-
ber of newly laid-off workers requesting unemployment benefits fell last week, the latest sign the
employment picture is slowly brightening.

SUN OIL LIMITED

Employment Opportunities

The company seeks to identify suitable candidates

for the position of:

Operations Supervisor
(San Salvador Bulk Fuel Terminal)

The Operations Supervisor is responsible for the overall daily
management of the bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and distribution of bulk petroleum

products in accordance with strict

industry and company

standards. Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a
proven track record in a related capacity.

The successful candidates for this key position will required to:

* Become familiar with Petroleum Operational Standards and
procedures to ensure all subordinates are equally familiar with
all technical and marketing aspect of petroleum products.

* Manage and responsible for the entire distribution network
within re-mote island
* Provide leadership and motivate work force of up to 3

persons

* Identify any business opportunities within desire market
«Assume responsibility for the Petroleum Brand on the island
* Take leads and support scheduling maintenance within

facility

* Excellent communications skills and attentions to details
within field operations and office
* Proficiently use computers and Microsoft office products (MS

Excel, Word, etc)

Background & Experience required: The successful candidate
must have supervisory experience or working within an operations
department (preferably the Oil Industry).

Additionally, the candidate must be mature individual, a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work under
pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and high degree of

accuracy.

lf you are that person, please send your resume to the following

e-mail address.

jobs @sunoilbahamas.com



Initial claims have
dropped four out of the past
six weeks and many econo-
mists say they are likely to
soon resume their decline.

"Not everything goes ina
straight line," Jennifer Lee,
senior economist at BMO
Capital Markets, wrote in a
research note. "Definitely
not the claims data."

Jumped

Separately, retail sales
jumped last month as
warmer weather and the
Easter holiday brought out
shoppers in droves.

Discounter Target Corp.,
department store Macy's
Inc., clothier Gap Inc. and
Victoria's Secret parent
Limited Brands Inc. posted
double-digit increases that
beat Wall Street analysts’
expectations.

Overall, sales in stores
open at least a year rose 9
percent in March, based on
an index of 31 retailers com-
piled by the International

"This is ...a
volatile time
when the num-
bers move
around quite a
bit.”

——EEEE See
Department analyst

Council of Shopping Cen-
ters.

The stock market dropped
in morning trading. The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age fell 28 points while
broader indexes also dipped.

Economists closely watch
unemployment insurance fil-
ings, which are seen as a
gauge of layoffs and a mea-
sure of companies’ willing-
ness to hire new workers.

The four week average,
which smoothes volatility,
rose to 450,250. Two weeks
ago, the average fell to its
lowest level since Septem-

ber 2008, when Lehman
Brothers collapsed and the
financial crisis intensified.

Jobless claims peaked
during the recession at
651,000 in late March 2009.

The figures underscore
that the job market remains
weak even as the economy
recovers. Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
said Wednesday that high
unemployment is one of the
toughest challenges the
economy faces.

While layoffs have slowed,
hiring is "very weak," he
said.

"We are far from being
out of the woods,"
Bernanke said in a speech
in Dallas. "Many Americans
are still grappling with
unemployment or foreclo-
sure or both."

On a more positive note
in the Labor Department's
report, the tally of people
continuing to claim benefits

SEE page three









(AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

A JOB SEEKER searches for work on a job Web site at a job placement center Wednesday, March 10, 2010,
in Menlo Park, Calif. The number of newly laid-off workers requesting unemployment benefits slipped last
week, the latest sign the employment picture is slowly brightening.

Jewels by the Sea, a chain of Fine Jewelry stores in the Cable Beach
district of N.P. is looking for:

SALES ASSOCIATES

This isa SALARIED position, not a commission based structure.
Our compensation plan rewards team performance and individual

excellence.

Key Functions

e Building Relationships with Customers
e Matching Customer Needs with Goods & Services Available
e Ensuring Post-Purchase Satisfaction
e Maintaining an Organized, Well Arranged & Customer Friendly

Showroom

Qualifications & Experience
e 19 years of age or older

e Previous experience in some Customer Service Field
e High School Diploma or equivalent required

e Basic Computing skills

Skills & Abilities

e Excellent Communication Skills
e Professional Demeanor

e Self-Motivated

Qualified applicants should email

resume & cover letters to:
jbsjobs2010@gmail.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 3B





ravtee
jobless

claims

NOK hie
FROM page 2B

fell by 131,000 to 4.55 mil-
lion, the lowest level since
December 2008.

That figure lags initial
claims by a week. But it
doesn't include millions of
people who have used up
the regular 26 weeks of ben-
efits typically provided by
states, and are receiving
extended benefits for up to
73 additional weeks, paid for
by the federal government.

Slightly more than 5.8 mil-
lion people were receiving
extended benefits in the
week ended March 20, the
latest data available, a drop
of about 230,000 from the
previous week. The extend-
ed benefit data isn't season-
ally adjusted and is volatile
from week to week.



Hiring

Other recent reports have
indicated that employers are
slowly ramping up hiring.
The Labor Department said
Friday that the nation added
a net total of 162,000 jobs in
March, the most in three
years. The unemployment
rate held at 9.7 percent for
the third straight month.

Layoffs fell to their lowest
level in three years in Feb-
ruary, according to a sepa-
rate government report
Tuesday. But hiring
remained about 40 percent
below pre-recession levels.

Some companies are still
cutting jobs. An oilfield ser-
vices company, Denver-
based EnerCrest, said this
month it has closed five
locations in four states, los-
ing 225 employees. Business
software company Comput-
er Associates Inc. said Tues-
day that it is cutting 1,000
jobs as part of a plan to
reduce costs.

Some recipients of the
extended federal aid could
see their benefits disrupted
this week, as Congress failed
to approve a continuation
of the federal programs
before leaving for a two-
week vacation at the end of
March. That could cut off
benefits for more than
200,000 people this week,
according to the National
Employment Law Project,
an advocacy group, but Con-
gressional Democratic lead-
ers have said they will make
up for the lost checks when
they extend the program lat-
er this month.



TU ORAL UHE Ta MUI OPO RIUTTA Macha elmer

The Bahamas needs markets,
not a ‘plan’, for recovery

BY STEVEN HORWITZ
FOR THE NASSAU INSTITUTE



N his column of March 18,

Dr John Rodgers offers a

four point plan for helping

the Bahamas emerge from
the current recession. His plan is a
mix of a few good ideas, some not so
good ideas, and an overarching but
misguided faith in the ability of gov-
ernment to guide the process of
recovery and growth.

In particular, Rodgers refers at
the start to “the failure of the free
market system” as a cause of the
current recession.

Nothing could be further from the
truth, as several of his own argu-
ments illustrate later in his article.

In fact, the path toward economic
recovery involves releasing the
forces of free market capitalism
from the government shackles that
have prevented the Bahamas from
having the sustained economic
growth that Rodgers hopes to
achieve.

Below, I offer some criticisms of
his plan as well as some alternatives
that Bahamians might consider as
they debate these important issues.

The most important and correct
point that Rodgers raises is propos-
ing an end to the exchange controls
on the Bahamian economy.

As he notes, the Bahamas is one
of the few places in the world that
still has such controls and they have
a dramatic negative effect on trade,
especially internationally.

Exchange controls do indeed
increase the cost of raising funds
from outside the country, forcing
entrepreneurs to pay more, and have
to look hard to find, local sources of
funding.

The Bahamian economy also sits
atop a very small base of US dol-
lars that will continue to make more
drastic controls necessary if the gov-
ernment cannot reduce its debt and
the central bank cannot get better
control of the internal money sup-
ply.

There is no doubt that ending
exchange controls would make for
some short run economic pain as
devaluation would surely accompa-
ny it, but like the addict who must go
through withdrawal before returning
to true health, that pain would be
worth it.

Dollarising the Bahamian econo-
my would be a substantial improve-
ment over the status quo, but over
the long run, finding market-driven
alternatives to the central bank
would be even better at capping gov-
ernment debt and maintaining an



The path forward for the Bahamas is to
reduce the cost of goods and services by
opening up international trade and free-
ing the entrepreneurial spirit of its people
by lowering taxes and reducing regulations,
particularly on the very uncompetitive

banking sector.



appropriate money supply.

Rodgers rightly recommends
more competition in the retail bank-
ing sector.

The Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act of 2000 places a vari-
ety of barriers to entry in the way of
new banks opening up, especially
ones with foreign ownership or
desiring to have foreign subsidiaries.

Allowing offshore banks to com-
pete in the retail market would be a
good first step, but true competition
also requires that government poli-
cies that restrict entrepreneurship, or
make it unnecessarily expensive,
must be eliminated.

Competitive

D oing so will cultivate a tru-
ly competitive and con-
sumer-friendly banking sector.

Introducing antitrust laws, as
Rodgers suggests, will not do much
when the source of the “oligopoly”
in the banking system is government
policy.

Such laws are more likely to be
abused by existing banks who will
complain about the competitive tac-
tics used by new entrants.

Antitrust laws tend to be just
another way for private firms to use
government policy to harm their
competitors and make consumers
worse off in the process.

Competition requires only free-
dom under the law, not antitrust
enforcement.

Rodgers’ tax plan is the most
problematic part of his proposals.

He is correct in arguing that mov-
ing from import duties to a sales tax
would reduce what economists call
the “deadweight loss” of taxation.

A sales tax would likely cheapen
goods in comparison to import
duties. However, if the long run goal
is to balance the government’s bud-
get, expenditure cuts are indeed
needed.

Lowering the costs of goods and
services by ending import duties

would reduce the prices of things
government spends on, reducing its
total expenditures, but to believe
these will stick requires the naive
view that politicians would not
quickly find ways to spend on new
programs the money thereby saved.
What is needed is fewer programs,
not just cheaper goods.

The total size of government,
regardless of its debt, is the prob-
lem to be solved.

Cuts in expenditures should be
combined with reductions in the
overall size of the revenues that gov-
ernment takes from the economy.

Rodgers proposes a “revenue neu-
tral” switch to a sales tax. Even
though such a switch might generate
those revenues by expanding the
economy, even more growth can be
obtained by reducing the total tax
take of the government, which
would free up resources for private
entrepreneurs to use to meet con-
sumer demands.

Rodgers’ claim that $500 million
in savings that would come from a
better tax policy encouraging more
business in the Bahamas is also mis-
guided.

He refers to the “velocity of mon-
ey” to argue that each dollar will
“circulate four or five times” before
it becomes an expenditure on
imports.

This reasoning is fallacious along
several lines.

Aside from the fact that what he is
talking about here is not “the veloc-
ity of money” (that refers to a dif-
ferent concept), this argument, like
others in his piece, ignores the ben-
efits of international trade.

Notice that the assumption is that
it is “bad” when Bahamians spend
on imported goods as that causes
money to “leak out” of the Bahami-
an economy.

Rodgers makes this argument ear-
lier as well when he bemoans the
“unfortunate” fact that the Bahamas
is a net importer.

Funds spent on imports need not
“disappear” from the Bahamian
economy.

Ending import duties would make
imports cheaper, enabling residents
to have money left over to spend
on products made locally and other
imports.

And where importing goods is
cheaper than making them domes-
tically, consumers benefit as well.

If consumers were able to freely
convert to and from US dollars with-
out exchange controls, the funds
spent on imports would flow back to
the Bahamas as investments in
Bahamian assets.

Just as the US current account
trade deficit implies that the dollars
spent come back to it when foreign-
ers use them to buy US assets, so
would Bahamians benefit from duty-
free imports combined with the
elimination of exchange controls.

It would lead to a flow of capital
resources into the country, which
would help make up for the low
domestic savings rate noted by
Rodgers.

Isolate

S: countries like the
Bahamas can ill-afford to iso-
late themselves from the world econ-
omy.

The notably freer trade caused
by ending import duties and
exchange controls would make
goods cheaper for its citizens and
more easily enable non-citizens to
invest back in the Bahamas by buy-
ing stocks, bonds, buildings, and oth-
er assets.

The Bahamian dollars spent on
imports have to come back as invest-
ment in Bahamian capital.

Rather than demonstrating the
failures of free markets, the recent
problems in the Bahamian econo-
my, a number of which Rodgers cor-
rectly notes, are in fact created by
restrictions on those very market
freedoms.

The path forward for the Bahamas
is to reduce the cost of goods and
services by opening up internation-
al trade and freeing the entrepre-
neurial spirit of its people by lower-
ing taxes and reducing regulations,
particularly on the very uncompeti-
tive banking sector.

This would free up the flow of
capital to fund new business and
reduce the costs of borrowing to the
thousands of small entrepreneurs
who are the lifeblood of economic
growth.

Rodgers’ plan does not go nearly
far enough in these directions.

Court Order

Action #665/2009
Judgement Creditor:
Caves Village Development Ltd.
Judgement Debtor: Geneva Wilson-Bowe

Government Registered

STOCK NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the following
Bahamas Government Registered Stock
Ta batt ht NM) old

Sales Jobs

AVAILABLE

Jewelry Stores on Bay Street and
Paradise Island

Certificate No. Maturity | Interest Rate

$2,221,100

15%
We are looking for some energetic and outgoing

individuals to join the sales team immediately.

2008 Mercedes E350
Fully loaded

$50,000 46875%

Experience with jewelry is a plus but we are
willing to train non-experienced people who
have the right attitude and personality

$883,200 .34375%

*SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY*

We propose to apply to the Registrar, Government of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas for the issue of
duplicate certificates.

Salary plus generous commission plan.
Fax resume to 393-5102

or immediate consideration. ;
f If found, please write to P. O. Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas.





Contact:327-6070
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

For Any Additional Information
a. 9. 4)
| | a,/









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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 7B



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

= S70 =
AOL looking to sell or

Smithsonian announces new
jewellery line with QVC







(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
IN THIS SEPT. 23, 2009 file photo, the Hope Diamond is displayed at
the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washing-
ton. The Smithsonian Institution has agreed to license its world
renowned gem and mineral collection.

BRETT ZONGKER,
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON



The Smithsonian Institution said Thurs-
day that it has licensed its renowned gem
and jewelry collection to create a line of
bracelets, brooches and other baubles with
the TV shopping network QVC.

The jewelry line expected to launch this
fall will be based on the National Gem and
Mineral Collection at the National Museum
of Natural History, which includes the
famous Hope Diamond and Marie
Antoinette earrings among 375,000 speci-
mens. Curators will help oversee creation of
the jewelry line.

"With all of our licensed products, every-
thing is reviewed and approved by cura-
tors in advance," said Smithsonian spokes-



| ¥
P= pa ©. s

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

IN A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 23, 2009 file photo, Russ Feather, left,
Museum Specialist Gemologist, and Kelly Carnes from Public Affairs
Office, unveil the Hope Diamond at the Smithsonian’s National

Museum of Natural History in Washington.

woman Linda St. Thomas. Curators also
will record interviews for QVC to help
introduce the collections and offer a
glimpse behind the scenes at the museum in
Washington, she said.

The jewelry line follows licensing deals
for Smithsonian-branded furniture, lighting,
books and hobby kits based on museum
collections. Showtime Networks also
launched the Smithsonian Channel on tele-
vision in 2006 as part of a licensing agree-
ment to generate revenue for the museum
complex.

The Smithsonian is a nonprofit that
receives about 70 percent of its operating
budget from the federal government. It's
also seeking new revenue to help pay fora
$2.5 billion maintenance backlog. The QVC
line will be primarily costume jewelry and
semiprecious stones, St. Thomas said. Some

of the earrings, rings, bracelets, pins and
brooches will be based on designs of pieces
in the museum, while others will simply be
inspired by its collection, including the 45.5-
carat, walnut-size Hope Diamond, long
rumored to carry a curse. The line won't
include real diamonds, though.

"We will create jewelry that is not only
fashionable, but also serves to educate the
public about the Smithsonian and the jew-
elry, gems and minerals found in its col-
lections," said Carol LeBlanc, director of
consumer products for the Smithsonian
Enterprises business unit. The Smithsonian
sought bids for the licensing deal and
received three offers before selecting QVC.
Terms of the multiyear agreement weren't
disclosed. Revenue generated by the deal
for the Smithsonian will come from royal-
ties based on sales, St. Thomas said.





shut down social site Bebo

RACHEL METZ,
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO





The struggling Internet company AOL Inc. plans to sell or
shut down Bebo nearly two years after buying it for more
than $800 million in an expansion of its social-networking
ambitions.

In an e-mail to employees Tuesday, Jon Brod, who runs
AOL's startup acquisition and investment unit, AOL Ven-
tures, said Bebo would need a "significant investment" to
remain competitive.

Although Bebo has been in the shadow of rivals such as
Facebook, it has been strong in foreign markets, including
Britain. AOL wanted to tap that strength abroad to drive
traffic to AOL's other free, ad-supported Web sites, especial-
ly internationally, while leveraging AOL's instant-messaging
communities, AIM and ICQ, to try to grow Bebo in the Unit-
ed States.

But Bebo's audience has instead been slipping in the U.S.
According to comScore Inc., Bebo had 5.1 million U.S. users
in February, down from 5.8 million a year earlier and a sliver
of the 210 million that Facebook has.

Buyers

Brod said AOL will look for potential buyers and plans to
finish a strategic evaluation by the end of May.

AOL bought San Francisco-based Bebo for $850 million in
May 2008 in its largest deal since it bought MapQuest for $1
billion in 2000 (not counting AOL's $106 billion purchase of
Time Warner in 2001). At the time, AOL was still joined with
Time Warner Inc., but it separated from the media conglom-
erate late last year.

Since spinning off from Time Warner, AOL has sold one
property: affiliate marketing business Buy.at, which it sold in
March to Digital Window Ltd. for an undisclosed price. Digi-
tal Window runs a network of affiliate marketing sites, which
steer customers to e-commerce sites in exchange for a cut of
sales.

AOL, a pioneer in the dial-up Internet business during the
‘90s, has been trying to streamline and concentrate on
rebuilding itself as a content and advertising business. It runs
dozens of Web sites, including popular tech blog Engadget
and personal finance site WalletPop.

Clayton Moran, an analyst at The Benchmark Co., said the
price AOL paid for Bebo was questioned from the start.

"It made a lot of industry watchers scratch their heads,"
Moran said. "At this point they probably would admit they
overpaid for it and now they're just cleaning it up."

He said that if AOL does sell Bebo, it would likely fetch a
fraction of its original purchase price.

Shares of New York-based AOL rose 26 cents to $26.40 in
afternoon trading Tuesday.











my INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
1 (BAHAMAS) LIMITED.
INSURANCE BROKERS & INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

EW a gt) oe a

UV Inpex Tooay
















































































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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

US Airways and UAL talk
about combining, shares up

JOSHUA FREED,
AP Airlines Writer
MINNEAPOLIS



News that United Airlines and US Air-
ways are in talks about combining was
met with approval by shareholders and
analysts Thursday.

Passengers may feel differently, how-
ever, if a combination ends up leading to
higher airfares.

Shares of both companies rose in
morning trading. US Airways gained 83
cents, or 12.2 percent, to $7.65, and Unit-
ed Airlines parent UAL Corp. rose $1.38,
or 7.3 percent, to $20.33.

News that two airlines are talking
broke Wednesday afternoon. Both car-
riers have tried for combinations in the
past. United Chairman and CEO Glenn
Tilton and US Airways Chairman and
CEO Doug Parker were both involved
when their companies talked about a tie-
up in 2008. They walked away then citing
high fuel prices, but didn't rule out a
future deal. That same year, Continental
Airlines Inc. rejected United's attempt at
a combination.

Neither airline has confirmed the talks.

It's far from certain that a deal will
actually take place. Antitrust regulators
would have to clear it, and pilots from
different unions would have to be inte-
grated.

Still, "the merits of a potential (United-
US Airways) marriage are considerable,
in our view," J.P. Morgan analyst Jamie

ee ie

Baker wrote. UBS analyst Kevin Crissey
wrote that he thinks a major combination
such as United-US Airways would
reduce capacity as much as 3 percent,
mostly in the U.S. With fewer seats and
competition, fares should rise, he wrote.

Travelers wouldn't like that, but mon-
ey-losing airlines would.

Baker noted that wage scales at the
two carriers are more closely aligned and
are among the industry's lowest, he
wrote.

They're both in the Star Alliance,
which means their computer systems
already communicate with each other
because they sell tickets on each other's
flights.

How antitrust regulators would react is
uncertain. Regulators approved Delta's
purchase of Northwest in 2008. But since
then, the Justice Department has put up
roadblocks to a slot swap between Delta
and US Air at LaGuardia and Reagan
National airports.

If US Airways and Delta "can't pull off
a simple slot transaction, how likely is a
combination that rivals Delta in size and
scope," Baker wrote, "particularly when
neither carrier is failing?"

Based on 2009 traffic, a combined
United-US Airways would be nearly as
big as Delta Air Lines Inc., which became
the world's largest airline after buying
Northwest. It is unclear which name
would survive, where the combined com-
pany would be based, or who would run
it.







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Integrating the two airlines’ unionized
work forces would be one of the most
difficult tasks if United Airlines and US
Airways got together.

US Airways, which is based in Tempe,
Arizona, still runs separate pilot and
flight attendant groups after it was
bought in 2005 by America West. And its
pilots formed their own union after leav-
ing the Air Line Pilots Association, the
union that represents United aviators.

Executives at Delta and Northwest put
their deal on hold in early 2008 so their
pilots could work out an agreement on
combining their ranks.

Pilots at US Airways have not been
involved in any talks with United, said
James Ray, a spokesman for the US Air-
line Pilots Association.

"We'll support anything that would be
good for our pilot group," he said.

Like Northwest before it, one of Unit-
ed's main attractions is its Pacific routes,
which it bought from Pan-Am in 1985.

Both airlines have been shrinking to
cope with the recession. United cut
capacity 7.4 percent last year, while US
Airways shrank 4.6 percent. US Airways
is cutting most flying that doesn't pass
through either Washington or its hubs
in Charlotte, N.C., Philadelphia, or
Phoenix.

US Airways lost $205 million in 2009,
and revenue fell almost 14 percent to
$10.46 billion. UAL lost $651 million,
while revenue fell 19.1 percent to $16.34
billion.











IN THIS COMBO made from file photos, a US Airways Airbus 319-112
takes off from Tampa International Airport in Tampa, Fla., top, and a
United Airlines jet takes off from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
in Seattle. Shares of US Airways and the parent of United Airlines rose
in after-hours trading Wednesday, April 7, 2010, after The New York
Times reported that the carriers are in merger talks.



‘We'll support anything that would
be good for our pilot group.’



James Ray, a spokesman for the
US Airline Pilots Association










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SEE PAGE THREE



Former tof mF
fleciared fugitive

US judge makes ruling
on attorney accused in
money-laundering scheme

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEY Sidney Cam-
bridge, who is accused of
involvement in a $900,000
money-laundering scheme
with a US politician, has been
declared a “fugitive from jus-
tice” by a Florida judge.

Contrary to reports in a
local tabloid that Cambridge
may be “off the hook”, docu-
ments seen by The Tribune
reveal that the attorney’s case
has been “transferred to the
suspended/fugitive file until
such time as he is apprehend-
ed.”

The order, signed by Unit-
ed States District Judge
Daniel Hurley, was made in
light of the fact that a review
of Cambridge’s file led to him
being determined “a fugitive
from justice.”

The judge further ordered
the Clerk of the Court to des-
ignate the file “closed” for the
time being.

Cambridge’s US attorney,
Lilly Ann Sanchez, said she
and her client, who has assert-
ed his innocence, are hoping

US prosecutors have
“reassessed” their case against
the Bahamian lawyer.

However, she admitted that
rather than evidence of the
case being dropped entirely,
the order is an administrative
and “routine” one issued in
cases where a defendant has
not come to the US to face
charges against him.

The order requires the
Court to move the file off the
“active docket” caseload.

Cambridge was formally
indicted in a Florida court in
November 2009 on one count
of conspiracy to commit mon-
ey laundering and five counts
of money laundering. An
arrest warrant was issued for
him at that time.

The laundering scheme was
allegedly masterminded by
Florida’s Broward County
Commissioner Josephus
Eggelletion, who was last
month jailed for two and a
half years, fined $10,000 and
ordered to be placed on
three-year supervised proba-
tion when released for his part
in the plot.

SEE page nine



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USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

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Remembering
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SEE PAGE TWO

Drivers struggle
with new one-way
road system

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





PEOPLE working and living along
the Market Street/Blue Hill Road
one-way system are calling for more
street signs and police presence to
help the public come to grips with
the new traffic system as daily dozens
of drivers continue to endanger oth-
ers by going the wrong way.

For now, many bystanders say the
new one way system on Blue Hill
Road and Market Street, imple-

SEE page 12







USL eta might 18 CaROSY(H)

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



fi) FIREFIGHTER eee LToM OE Vase Nils vacant? S semesin

A MINISTRY of Works employee was rushed to hospi-
tal yesterday afternoon after being injured when part of the
Water and Sewerage Corporation’s John F Kennedy Drive
plant exploded.

The worker has been identified as Floyd Russell, a man
in his mid-forties.

According to reports, most employees had left for the day
yesterday when several remaining men noticed smoke ema-





nating from the Auto Repair store.

When they went to check out the source of the smoke, the
building exploded, injuring Mr Russell.

Three fire trucks attended the scene at around 4.20pm,
finding the building “fully engulfed” in flames, according to
a police officer.

The damage to the building was extensive. An investi-
gation is underway into the cause of the explosion.



Weather reporting deficiencies letter
sent to PIM a week before tornado

By TANEKA THOMPSON workers at the Freeport Con-

Man charged with
abusing young boys

A MAN was arraigned dockets, Hanna, of

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LETTER highlighting
deficiencies in weather
reporting on Grand Bahama
was sent to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham a week
before a tornado killed three

red Ron ae

Wulff Road Opposite Mackey Street
Olea Ly me |S
De Eger Vee ee Dy We De ve

tainer Port.

Progressive Liberal Party
Chairman Bradley Roberts
believes that if the concerns
in the letter had been readily
addressed — namely reopen-
ing the Freeport Weather

SEE page 12

before a local magistrate
yesterday charged with
abusing four young boys.

Kevin Hanna, 36, is
accused of having sex with
the youngsters who are
aged between two and six.

According to court

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and April 5, 2010, had
unlawful intercourse with
a six-year-old boy.

A second count alleges

SEE page nine


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

OCA NEWS eee
BEC defends proposed rate increase

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net



DESPITE the proposed electricity
rate increase, BEC executives say cus-
tomers’ bills will remain lower than in
1993.

Faced with a crippling financial situ-
ation, the state-owned power company
is planning to increase its core tariff
rate.

Last month, Minister of State for the
Environment Phenton Neymour out-
lined the corporation’s financial posi-
tion, indicating it owed $190 million.

“BEC is losing money left, right and
centre and it certainly needs relief. It is
the corporation’s intention to look to
government to see if they would be
inclined to adjust the tariff structure so

BEC could be restored to some kind of
wholesome financial footing,” said
Michael Moss, BEC chairman.

“What our marching orders are is
we need to firstly take our case to the
public; let them know what we believe
is necessary to put BEC back into a
wholesome financial position.

“The information will be indepen-
dently monitored and presented to gov-
ernment,” said Mr Moss.

The government will then make a
determination, as there is currently no
independent regulatory body for the
energy sector.

Mr Moss said the last time there was
a tariff increase was 1993. The increase
was in line with commitments made by
the then FNM government in a loan
agreement with the International
Development Bank.

Under the subsequent PLP govern-
ment, there were tariff reductions in
2003, which left the rate below 1993
levels.

The PLP, now the opposition, is
blaming the government for the dire
financial straights in which BEC finds
itself.

Criticising the intention to increase
the rates, PLP chairman, Bradley
Roberts, called the government “heart-
less and uncaring”.

“The Progressive Liberal Party notes
with very deep concern the intention of
the FNM government to place addi-
tional burden on the backs of the poor
and middle class in New Providence
and the Family Islands at a time when
they are struggling to keep their lights
on,” said Mr Roberts.

“The consumers of the Bahamas










Electricity Corporation have been sad-
dled with heavy surcharges which
reflected the movement of the price of
oil each step of the way,” he said.

The fluctuating fuel surcharge paid
by consumers covers the direct cost of
fuel, which fluctuates on the open mar-
ket. Only the core tariff paid by con-
sumers contributes direct revenue to
BEC.

“Tt has been almost three years since
junior minister Phenton Neymour and
the FNM with much fanfare promised
the Bahamian people alternative ener-
gy which they claim would bring down
the cost of electricity. It has turned out
to be another FNM empty promise,”
said Mr Roberts.

Mr Moss said the rate increases are
only one part of the corporations over-
all strategy.

“Consultants’ studies on BEC have
said a number of measures are needed
for BEC to have a wholesome financial
footing. Included in that grouping
would be cost containment measures.
BEC certainly needs to improve oper-
ational inefficiencies, but those in and of
themselves will not put BEC in a
wholesome financial footing,” said Mr
Moss.

Asked about whether the public
could hold him accountable for the
actions initiated under his leadership
to restructure the corporation, Mr Moss
said, “No question about it.”

“There needs to be improved
accountability in the entire public sector
and BEC is no exception. The thing
here is BEC needs to make its opera-
tion a bit more transparent going for-
ward,” he added.



REMEMBERING KEISHA, BRENTON AND LAVETTE

CAROL THURSTON, mother
of the late Keisha Thurston,
lights a candle in the foyer of
the College of the Bahamas
Performing Arts Centre after
yesterday's memorial service.














THE GRANDMOTHER and sis-
ter of the late Brenton Smith light
a candle at the College of the
Bahamas Performing Arts Centre
after a memorial service celebrat-
ing the lives of the late Keisha

Felipé Major/Tribune staff


















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Miss Universe to attend Miss



Bahamas pageant launch

ON AUGUST 23, 2009 she
was crowned Miss Universe in
the Bahamas. Now Stefania
Fernandez is preparing to
return to the place where her
dream came true as 17 Bahami-
an beauties officially begin
their journey to fulfill the same
dream.

Under the theme ‘Timeless
Beauty’, the launch of the 2010
Miss Bahamas Beauty Pageant
season is set for Friday, April 9
at 8pm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel with a glamorous
charity gala to raise money for
the Red Cross’ Haiti disaster
relief effort.

Miss Universe, who is pas-
sionate about helping the peo-
ple of Haiti, will be the special
guest.

The Miss Bahamas Charity
Gala will be the first opportu-
nity for the public to meet this
year’s contestants face to face.
While there, they will be able
to bid on auction gifts provided
by the contestants themselves,
as well as the Miss Bahamas
Organisation.

All proceeds from the auc-
tion will be donated to the Red
Cross. “It’s going to be a very
elegant affair”, said Miss
Bahamas Organisation (MBO)
president Michelle Malcolm.
“In keeping with the theme of
the night, you will feel like
you’ve walked into an old Hol-
lywood movie premiere, red
carpet and all. And of course,
you can’t have a premiere with-
out celebrities, so Miss Uni-
verse, our reigning queen Joan-
na Brown, and our contestants
will be the glamorous starlets
of the night.”

Under the leadership of Miss
Malcolm, the Miss Bahamas
Pageant has placed heavy











PICTURED (L-R) ARE: Miss Bahamas Joanna Brown, Miss
Bahamas Organisation President Michelle Malcolm; Miss Universe;
Miss Universe Organisation director of talent Esther Swan.
Derek Smith

emphasis on charitable endeav-
ors.

In addition to the queen’s
annual “Beauty with a Pur-
pose” project, each year con-
testants are required to raise
money for charity as a group
as well as complete individual
projects designed to benefit
their communities.

During the course of the
evening, the contestants will
present more than $3,000
which they raised to benefit the
homeless in the Bahamas.

“This is going to be a swanky
affair with fancy food, fabulous
music by the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Pop Band, and
a chance to mix and mingle
with beautiful people,” says
Miss Malcolm. “But more
importantly, it’s an opportuni-
ty to lend a helping hand to

those desperately in need. We
are encouraging Bahamians to
come out and dig deep,
because as the old saying goes,
‘There but for the grace of God
go I.’ You just never know
when it will be our time of need
and when we will be calling on
others to be in the giving spirit,
so we should give while we
can.”

In a video posted on the
Miss Universe Organisation’s
You Tube channel, Miss Uni-
verse talks about how she was
saddened by the events in
Haiti, and approached the
organisation about doing some-
thing to help.

She pledged to donate a por-
tion of her salary as Miss Uni-
verse to the Haiti disaster relief
effort and encouraged others
to do the same.

Controversial Nygard documentary set to air

A DOCUMENTARY on
the business operations of
Canadian fashion designer
Peter Nygard, the subject of
an ongoing lawsuit, is set to

Ud lB
Ss

ee
PHONE: 322-2157



air tonight.

The Canadian Broadcast-
ing Corporation (CBC),
which broadcasts on channel
eight on Cable Bahamas, is
advertising the 9pm pro-
gramme on its website.

In January this year, Cana-
dian news reports stated that
Mr Nygard had filed a law-
suit arguing that the courts
should block an episode of
the investigative journalism
series The Fifth Estate

because its content is based
on confidential information
released by two former
employees.

According to the Winnipeg
Free Press, Mr Nygard claims
the story would “injure his
reputation, cause loss of prof-
it and damage goodwill”.

It is claimed that the infor-
mation supplied to the pro-
gramme included employee
lists, personnel records, and
video tapes.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 3



Grand Bahama
Peay for active
hurricane season

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter

nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

FOLLOWING a major | :
blow from deadly tornadoes ;
and in anticipation of an :
active hurricane season this :
year, the emergency support :
functions on Grand Bahama :
are in full preparation mode. ;

The forecast for the upcom- :
ing season indicates the :
Bahamas can anticipate at :
least 15 named storms - eight :
of which are expect to:
become hurricanes and four :

major hurricanes.

This year, there is a 69 per :
cent chance of landfall for a :
storm system on the eastern :
seaboard of the United States. :
That is significantly higher :
than the average 52 per cent :
chance, which increases the :
probability of impact for the :
US and the Bahamas, said :
Michael Stubbs, chief clima- :
tological officer at the Mete- :

orological Department.

Speaking of the tornadoes :
which killed three in Grand ;
Bahama last week, Mr Stubbs :
said: “We are unable to say :
what wind speed was realised :
on that fatal day, but the char- :
acteristic of tornadoes is that :
they can have winds as high as :
300mph. The only saving :
grace is that tornadoes are :
small weather features and :
their life span is very short. :
They can be spawned during :

the passage of tropical storms,

hurricanes or severe cold :

fronts.”

The Grand Bahama Disas- ;
ter Consultative Committee :
got its feet wet responding to :
that crisis, which left a num- :

ber of people injured.

The committee is com- }
prised of public and private :
stakeholders, including the :
Bahamas Air and Sea Rescue :

Association (BASRA),

Bahamas Red Cross, the :
Grand Bahama Port Author- :
ity, Tropical Shipping and the :
Department of Social Ser- :

vices.

“Our training is ongoing. :
Just two weeks ago we had a
certified emergency response :
training for one dozen peo- :
ple from the community, pri- :
vate and public sector. We :
have damage assessment :
needs analysis people doing :
certified training,” said Don :
Cornish, Grand Bahama :
administrator and island rep- :
resentative for the National :
Emergency Management :

Agency.

eR BO Bae
OR MLL
AWE!

Lee
Baa]

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ANOTHER young woman
has come forward to warn the
public after being viciously
attacked with a rock while dri-
ving on Shirley Street earlier
this week.

Days after a woman told of
how she had to get seven stitch-
es after being struck in the head
with an unknown object when
she stopped her car on Shirley
Street to avoid hitting a group
of teenagers who refused to
move out of the way, another
woman said she was attacked
in the same area later the same
day.

The latest incident occurred
as the woman, who did not wish
to be identified, was leaving
Harbour Bay by way of the

LOCAL NEWS

Another woman attacked.
driving on Shirley Street

Shirley Street exit after having
a coffee with a friend at Star-
bucks at around 9pm on Easter
Sunday, April 4. The previous
attack occurred on the road
itself between the Harbour Bay
exit and Kemp Road, at around
3am.

The victim said: “I had
stopped to look left for oncom-
ing traffic before I pulled out.
When the last car passed I
turned my head to the right as I
was going to pull out and this
guy was standing right there.
He looked as if he had just run
up in front of my car. He
jumped on top of the car and
smashed this large rock right
into the windshield, right
towards my face.”

“Tt was incredibly shocking, I
freaked out and pressed the
gas. It was then that I saw a sec-
ond person right by the driver’s

window as I turned,” she said.

Although her windscreen
was badly damaged the woman
was not injured.She did not
stick around long enough to dis-
cover what the man’s intentions
were.

“He was extremely aggres-
sive, he didn’t show any uncer-
tainty, he was fast and bold,”
she said.

The woman was unable to
recall her attacker’s features
due to the sudden nature of the
attack and the fact it was dark.
“IT know he was a bigger guy,
and he was wearing a white t-
shirt which was reflecting in the
headlights,” she said.

The other man who she
noticed next to the driver’s
door of the car appeared
younger, she added, although
again the woman was unable
to note any distinguishing fea-



Minister of State
receives death threat

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net



A DEATH threat received by Minister of
State for the Environment Phenton Neymour
has required him to remain on constant alert
as police continue with their intensive inves-
tigations.

The husband and father of four has had to
take extra care to be aware of his movements
and those of his family since receiving a letter
at his office in Dockendale House, Bay Street,
threatening to kill him and his family if he
does not resign.

However, Mr Neymour said he will not be
intimidated into stepping down from his min-
isterial responsibilities for government utili-
ties by anonymous assailants.

“One is always concerned in matters like
this, but it’s important that I continue to car-
ry out my responsibilities and not impact the
life of myself and change dramatically my
lifestyle or that of my family,” Mr Neymour
told The Tribune yesterday.

“T have to be aware of my surroundings
and be careful as I go about my routine, and
naturally as a minister that is something that
I should always be aware of, so I am contin-
uing to be careful of where I go.”

The junior minister was threatened with
death once before, when intruders broke into
his home and stole two personal items before
the last general election.

He is also the third Cabinet Minister to
receive death threats this year.

Former Minister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney received an anonymous
letter threatening to kill him if he did not
resign from office in February, and although
he resigned three weeks later, Mr McCart-
ney maintains his resignation was not con-
nected to the threat.

J Choice and freedom of access to benefits (for elective
care) remains a market leading feature of Premier Health

Fi COLONIAL GROUP

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MINISTER OF STATE for the
Environment Phenton Neymour

Less than two weeks earlier, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard
received a letter at his office signed by ‘The
Brothers’ stating that he and his wife would
be attacked, and he would be shot in the
head.

However, Assistant Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna said public officials need not
live in fear.

“Threats against public officials are taken
very seriously and we will vigorously investi-
gate these matters and try to bring to justice
or to the public attention persons who may be
involved in these kind of activities,” Mr Han-
na said.

“We don’t feel as if there is any reason for
panic on the part of any public official in this
country, as we are convinced our public offi-
cials are not under threat, and we are also
mindful that there are people who may decide
for their own selfish reasons to copy others.”

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tures due to the speed with
which everything happened.
Like the first attack victim,

the woman reported the inci-
dent to police, who are investi-
gating.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

N=). "=a =U, K-01";
The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon) LL.D, D1LiG,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

NEMA audit soon ready for Parliament

OH ye of short memory!

An article published in The Tribune on
April 1 that quoted PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts as claiming that NEMA thrived
under the PLP administration, caught our
full attention.

In the article Mr Roberts criticised
NEMA for failing to warn Grand Bahama
that it was in the path of a deadly tornado.
He outlined action that he claims should
have been taken to minimise the impact that
the tornado had on Freeport. The tornado,
which struck on March 29, killed three main-
tenance workers trapped in a 400 ft gantry
that crashed into the water at the Freeport
Container Port. Several other Port employ-
ees were injured. Other than inclement
weather conditions that day, the Port had no
prior warning of the approaching storm.

In criticising the lack of notice by NEMA,
Mr Roberts made the preposterous claim
that NEMA had thrived under the PLP
administration.

We believe that a report due to be pre-
sented to Parliament shortly — the long
awaited Deloitte and Touche audit for that
period — will shatter that claim.

According to Mr Roberts, the PLP
administration accelerated the development
of a national emergency plan and invested in
a number of intensive training programmes
on damage assessment and emergency
response.

He claimed that under the FNM, the
organisation suffered because the PLP pro-
grammes were not continued and for three
years there was no national training.

We recall the NEMA years under the
PLP as being one of confusion, dominated by
questions being asked of how public dona-
tions — in the region of $5 million — had
been spent on assisting those who had lost
their homes in the two hurricanes that had
devastated Grand Bahama in 2004.

On January 7, 2005, The Tribune pub-
lished a statement by Mr James Smith that
the millions of dollars, donated by the pub-
lic to the National Emergency Management
Agency (NEMA) to repair damage done by
the 2004 hurricanes, were being audited.
The audited reports, he said would be pub-
lished “next week.” That was five years ago.

At the time Mr Smith was Minister of
State in the Ministry of Finance and co-
chairman of NEMA’s Disaster Relief Fund.
He told the press that Deloitte and Touch
was compiling the report even though the
fund was still being used.

In the meantime we kept hearing allega-






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tions that persons who had no property or
homes were receiving assistance from the
disaster fund. We heard of waste, of double
ordering, friends getting help over persons
who qualified for assistance receiving noth-
ing.

One of the greatest flaws was an attempt
to decentralise the assistance operations in
Grand Bahama. There was a separate relief
operation in the north and another in the
south with no apparent control or record
keeping of how NEMA’s money was being
spent. There were even dark, but unproved
rumours, of misappropriation of funds.

When the FNM became the government
unused material was found deteriorating in
sheds; persons in Grand Bahama who qual-
ified for assistance from NEMA received
nothing; the NEMA fund still owed almost
half a million dollars to various Freeport
suppliers for materials delivered, but never
paid for.

And then there was the outcry by Sir Jack
Hayward for an accounting of the $1 million
that he and his late partner Edward St
George had donated to the fund exclusively
for the use of Freeport, and especially to
restore Grand Bahamas’ educational facili-
ties. After giving an angry Sir Jack the usu-
al civil service brush off, it was finally admit-
ted that his and his partner’s million dollars
was deposited to the general disaster relief
fund and applied nationally, contrary to the
donors wishes. Obviously, those adminis-
tering the fund were oblivious to the fact
that 200 years of case law had established
that it was illegal to apply money given for a
specific purpose to a different purpose. In a
1970 House of Lords case it was stated that
if money given for a specific purpose could
not be used for that purpose, it had to be
returned to the donor.

We have also learned that during the
compilation of this audit report the police
have been back and forth requesting cer-
tain documents. It is understood that the
NEMA audit has been completed up to 2007
and will soon be ready for presentation to
parliament. Meanwhile, the auditors will
continue their work to bring the report up to
date.

The nation will then learn whether all
the rumours about the misuse of NEMA’s
funds have been accurate, or whether it is
true, as Mr Roberts claims, that NEMA
thrived under the PLP administration.

Whatever it reports, the audit should
make interesting reading.





THE TRIBUNE



Concerns over
proposed Chinese
farming in Abaco or

elsewhere in Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Under mentioned are
some points of concern trig-
gered by the possibility of
Chinese farming on Abaco.
There has not been any pub-
lic thorough information dis-
closure so far and we are
hoping that this letter will
prompt BAIC or the Min-
istry of Agriculture to hold a
public meeting so farmers
and the residents of our
island can know what to
expect as far as the Chinese
involvement on our island.
We would appreciate if you
could publish this letter in
your next issue.

Abaco Neem welcomes
growth on our island, envi-
ronmentally friendly and
controlled growth (of course
we still need a master plan);
we are concerned with com-
panies coming here to do
large scale agriculture (espe-
cially with livestock) that
could further contaminate
our water table.

Let’s not forget that one
of our most valuable
resources is our fresh water,
another one being the man-
groves that protect our
shores and that could be eas-
ily destroyed by agriculture
products run-off.

According to internet
data, 65 per cent of the
world’s water is now pollut-
ed by chemicals.

We are one of the few
places on earth sitting on
that valuable commodity:
fresh potable water. It
should not be contaminated
by large scale industry or
unsupervised use of toxic
chemicals for the short term
benefit of the creation of a
few jobs or government
trade offs. It is our most
sacred duty to protect our
fresh water reserves and to
leave it unpolluted for future
generations.

If China wants to come
here and grow organically
and practise environmental-
ly friendly farming, where
the food is going to be sold
here first hand, not through
third hand importation by
wholesalers, we welcome
them. It is being said that
they intend to do large scale
livestock farming: that
would most certainly create
contamination through the
seeping of nitrates and
growth hormones and
antibiotics into the water
lens that eventually end up
in our drinking water. This
inevitably will result in the
long term to high health care

#P Don Stainton (Protection) Ltd.

SERVING THE BAHAMAS SINCE 1978
HILLSIDE PLAZA, THOMPSON BOULEVARD
FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219




Bayes

letters@triobunemedia.net



costs, increased disease and
create a further strain on our
public treasury and result in
increased cost of living.

As a concerned entity we
would like to be informed
of where these farmers were
farming prior to coming
here; we would like to see
photographs of their farms
and the environmental
impact they had on the sur-
rounding communities. Chi-
na supposedly has a high
rate of birth defects caused
by industrial and mostly
agricultural pollutants.

That information prompts
us to request an impact
study on the communities
where the Chinese were
involved in farming.

What do those surround-
ing areas look like today?

The population of The
Bahamas is approaching
400,000 people. With assis-
tance from the Government,
it should be possible for
local farmers, taking a les-
son from past farming,
adopting new agro-technol-
ogy such as vertical farming
and hydroponics to render
our country self-sufficient.
Abaco Neem has proven,
without formal assistance,
that organic farming can be
successful in this country.
Give our Bahamian farmers
a real chance and support
from the public and assis-
tance from the Government
with land tenure and grants
where deserved and we
farmers can repeat history
and do what our forefathers
did a short forty years ago.
We can help our country get

on track with food security
for the nation. If any country
wants to step in and lend
assistance with the develop-
ment of new environmen-
tally friendly technologies
we would welcome them.

Stop and consider anoth-
er area of concern might be
the reaction provoked in our
Northern neighbors, Amer-
ica and Canada, by the
Bahamas depending on the
Chinese for food security, is
this really what indepen-
dence is all about? Our
North American neighbours
have helped feed us through
the years by contributing to
steady tourism and agricul-
ture and here on Abaco
have provided financial
security through the regular
yearly cash influx of our sec-
ond home owners who have
helped build our communi-
ty. Are we cutting off the
hands that help feed us?

We would welcome a
public forum during which
BAIC and the Ministry of
Agriculture could outline
the immediate and residual
benefits the Bahamian peo-
ple would obtain through
this alliance with China.

This letter is meant to
voice our concerns and to
ask questions.

We have not formed an
opinion because we do not
have all the facts, like the
rest of our community we
would like to be apprised of
the facts by those who are
drawing the contracts before
they are signed on the dot-
ted line and before any land
preparation takes place.

NICK MIAOULIS
Abaco Neem,
Marsh Harbour,
Abaco,

Apri, 2010.

Thank you to wonderful doctors

FS SU aC



EDITOR, The Tribune.

REUBEN W SEARS
Nassau,
March, 2010.



Please allow me to sincerely thank the wonderful
doctors and nurses at the A&E Ward of the Princess
Margaret Hospital who attended to me so nicely during
my recent sudden illness. I also would like to thank my
children Nurse Lyndianna, son Churchill, sister Alice
Lowe, niece, Nurse Leonnie, brother Campbell and
my cousin, Nurse Lola Collins who stayed with me
throughout my ordeal. I also want to thank the staff of
the Federal Management System, especially Mr Pedro
Goodman, GFC, Mr Andrew Huyler, GM and Super-
visors Messrs Carroll, Kemp and Mrs A Brown for
their kindness and well wishes.

May God bless all of you.





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THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 5

Police official ‘has no knowledge’
of petition on alleged corruption

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased fo announce a

Stevens, Long Island, on March
27, but failed to report the find.

Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna said he has
no knowledge of corruption on
the island, nor of a petition hav-
ing been received by the com-
missioner.

Assistant Superintendent of
Police Walter Evans was sta-
tioned in Long Island two
months ago to oversee the local
force, and Mr Hanna said he is
doing a stellar job.

ASP Evans, former press liaison offi-
cer for the Royal Bahamas Police Force
(RBPF), declined to comment on the
allegations or his strategies for main-
taining law and order on the island.

ASP Hanna said: “Mr Greenslade and
his executive management team pro-

posed ASP Evans take command in Long
Island, a very thriving community, and he
has been doing an outstanding job.

“He has the overwhelming support of
his officers and the community at large.”

However Long Island’s contingent of
officers, like any other faction of the
RBPF, is vulnerable to corruption, ASP
Hanna said.

“We know there may be situations
where not all officers are perfect, and
wherever discipline is necessary, officers
will be disciplined,” ASP Hanna said.

“But I know of no situation or cir-
cumstances that warrant anything con-
tained in the reports.”

The Commissioner of Police and Assis-
tant Commissioner for the Family Islands
Willard Cunningham Sr did not respond
to a request for comment on the allega-
tions before The Tribune went to press.



A SENIOR police official said
he has no knowledge of reports
that Long Island residents are
petitioning for the removal of
allegedly corrupt officers.

Around 200 permanent and
part-time residents of Long â„¢
Island are reported to have
signed a petition calling on
Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade
to root out corrupt members of the local
force.

Allegations listed on a Bahamian web-
site claim rogue police officers are con-
tributing to crime on the island and that
a senior officer seized cocaine when 86
Haitian migrants apprehended in

MTU



dividend payment of

4 cents per share to all

Coral Harbour residents ‘can expect better water quality’ |} orcinay shareholders of record

By ALESHA CADET

RESIDENTS of the Coral
Harbour area who have been
enduring rusty water for years
can expect better quality and
pressure in the near future,
government has promised.

Phenton Neymour, Minis-
ter of State for the Environ-
ment, told The Tribune yes-
terday that “we are faced with
an increased need to replace
the galvanised pipes” cur-
rently in place throughout
most of New Providence.

“There are a lot of areas in
which we want to replace the
water mains, Coral Harbour is

one of those areas,” he said.

Residents told The Tribune
that they have been com-
plaining about the quality of
water in Coral Harbour for
many years now.

Speaking about the rusty
water, one resident said:

“Would you want to bathe,
brush your teeth, wash your
clothes in (and) drink water
that turns the filters a filthy
colour in only a couple of
weeks?”

“What kind of build-up in
the pipes of everyone’s home
is this causing? What is this
doing to every valve and
faucet in the average home?”







LISTENING intently at the workshop.



Pinewood’s young
men turn out for
career workshop

WHEN Pinewood MP
Byran Woodside decided to
put together a career plan-
ning workshop to help
unemployed residents in his
constituency, he never
expected that the vast major-
ity of those who responded
would be young men.

It was a development wel-
comed by seminar presen-
ters Yvette Bethel and
Glenn Ferguson, who noted
that the sight of so many
men at a seminar designed
for self-help is a good indi-
cation that our “budding
male leaders” are taking
their futures seriously.

Ms Bethel — who is the
CEO of Organisational Soul;
a company that provides eti-
quette training, leadership
coaching and human
resources consulting services
— commented that she had
never seen a male-dominat-
ed audience at a seminar like
this before.

Her presentation gave
participants tips on how to
land the job they want or
start a new business. She
explained the importance of
an effective resume; how to
behave on a job interview;
deciding on future goals and
effectively implementing
them.

Glenn Ferguson, a well-
known financial coach,
shared tips on how to save
money, and just what to do
with the money that is saved.

Mr Ferguson also shed
light on the financial services
industry and explained how
family life can be improved

by financial stability.

Mr Woodside applauded
the male attendees — who
disproved the stereotype
that only Bahamian women
are determined to succeed.

The MP said his aim is to
continue to fuel the zeal he
sees in the young people in
Pinewood by empowering
them in any way he can.

The resident added: “We
were promised that all these
old cast iron pipes in Coral
Harbour would be replaced
two or more years ago.

“When is it going to hap-
pen and what is it going to
take to get this done in our
lifetime?”

In a press statement, Mr
Neymour said Coral Harbour
east and west, the Blair sub-
division and Joe Farrington
Road west all have persistent
red/rust water challenges.

“We recognise the chal-

lenges and we do have them
on schedule for main replace-
ment,” he said

According to Mr Neymour,
schedules, however, are sub-
ject to change depending on
the rate of progress.

“We cannot give an exact
date but we expect (to get to
Coral Harbour) in the near
future,” he said.

“In addition to the replace-
ment exercises of the water
mains, we have to replace the
service lines throughout New
Providence.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





as of April 30, 2010

payable May 11, 2010

"Fueling Growth For People”

Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET * P.O. BOX GT-2097 © TEL: 323-5782







RBG ee ee

Police Corporal #424 Hurtle Rolle,
aka "Beach Boy, Daddy Rock", 71

a resident of Prophecy
Way & formerly of Old
Bight, Cat Island, who
passed away on 26th
March, 2010), will be held
at Mt Ararat Baptist
Church, Washington
Street, on Saturday at
1100 am. Ofictating will
be Rev. DOr. Gloria D.
Ferguson, assisted by
Father Davies, Interment
follows in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.






















Left to cherish his memory are his sons, Bradley, Dennis,
Jarvis & Leroy Rolle; daughters, Marilyn Taylor, Kenrise
Rolle, Joanne, Dianne, Bernadette Rolle; adopted daughter,
Sandra Rolle: brothers, Leviticus, Hensel and Genest Rolle
and Raymond Taylor, sisters, Joyce McLean of New York,
Elnora Rolle, Susiemae Dorsette & Reaulah Hart; uncles,
Harold Hart of New York, Charles Hart & Benjamin Rolle;
aunts, Bessie Cartwright & Colene Davis; brothers-in-








Hiram Larramore; sisters-in-law, Leah Rolle, Woman
Revst, Inspt. Ellamay Rolle, Madgelyn Rolle, Esther
Larramore, Rachel Thompson & Jerelean Newton,
daughters-in-law, Elizabeth, Roshelle & Donna Rolle,
son-in-law, David Taylor Sr.; grandsons, Deron, Nathaniel,
Renardo, David Jr., Rashad, Bradley Jr,, Devante, Antonio,
Derick, Randolph & Romain, grand daughters, Sherese,
Davyanette, Davyanique, Sparkles, Sherele, Sophia,
Shenique, Shandesha, Tanya, Shekeva, Shekera, Dementra,
Deneka, Deneshia, Nagia, Raynette, Denasha, Lakeshia,
Angelicia & Alexis; 4 great grand sons; 2 great grand
daughters; nephews, Father Dwight Rolle, Lloyd, Glenn,
Dhan, Darrell, Zendal, Perry, Coolridge, Leviticus Jr., John
Braynen, Barron Missick, Sterlin Knowles, Ryan Dorsette,
10 grand nephews, 10 grand nieces; nieces, Jennifer
Braynen, Ingrid Gibson, Claudia Knowles, Denise Rolle,
Woman Revst. Corporal 486 Philippa Rolle, Woman Revst,
482 Helena Rolle, Rochell Rolle, Marsha Dean, Bridgette
Rolle, Nadia Lunn, Erica, Sharnette Rolle, Nicola Rolle,
Marion Newchurch, Karen Rolle Missick, Wendy Russell,
Jackie Rolle of New York, Dianetie Dorsette, Patricia Tobin
of Virginia, Candice McLean of New York, Shenna,
Eyvonne, Sineka Basden, Donnalee, Samantha Tinker,
Cleopatra, Patrice Sweeting, Lyndzeh Rolle, cousins, Eden
& Tanna Dawkins, Iclee Burrows & Rhoda King, friends
& relatives, Miss Veronica Brown, Bishop Stanley Seymour
& family, Bishop Neville Hart & family, Bishop Lawrence
Rolle, Dr, EJ, Daniels, 0.C. Pratt, Higgs & McKenzie
family, Rolle, Harts, Dorsette, Taylor, Davis, Brown,
Simmons, Daniels, Simms, Russells, Romers, Stuarts,
Gaitors, Clears, Burrows & Bowles families, the Retired
Police Officers Association & President Mr. Grafton Ifill,
Mr. Ellison Greenslade Commissioner of Police & the
entire Royal Bahamas Police Force & other family members
too HUMEroUs to mention.







































Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10-6:00p.m. on Friday & on
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.




PAGE 6, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
UAE TC

aS LUC Ta



THE Hong Kong and
Shanghai Banking Corpo-
ration (HSBC) is providing
support for a unique nation-
al park in the Bahamas.

With a $10,000 grant,
HSBC will assist in the cre-
ation and installation of
interpretive signage at the
Primeval Forest.

The Primeval Forest
located in southwestern
New Providence is a 7.4
acre old growth forest filled
with dramatic sink holes
and caverns.

Remarkably undisturbed,
the area is representative
of the early evergreen trop-
ical hardwood forests that
covered much of the
Bahamas in the 16th centu-

ry.
Caverns

Some of the limestone
caverns found in the park
are 50 feet long and 30 feet
deep and tell the dramatic
story of sea level rise and
fall in the Bahamas.

The park supports a
diverse collection of plant
life and is an important
resource for education
about the geological history
of the islands.

The Bahamas National
Trust (BNT) has begun the
development of a trail sys-
tem in the park which is
being supported by funding
from the $300,000 govern-
ment stimulus package
granted to the Trust to aid
in the development of

national parks on New

Providence.

The trails are part of an :
overall conceptual plan for :
the park which includes }
boardwalks, interpretive :
signage, a canopy walkway, :
parking area and restrooms. :

The signage installed with :
money from the HSBC :
grant will identify plant :
species within the forest :
and tell the geological his- :
tory of property which is a :
window into the geological :

history of the Bahamas.

“We are very grateful :
and excited by the support :
the :
Primeval Forest. This park :
has great educational :
potential for students study- :
ing the geography of our :
islands and is an excellent :
site for visitors to gain }
insight on how the Bahama :
islands were formed and to :
experience our unique trop- :
ical hardwood forest” said }
Eric Carey, executive direc- :

from HSBC for

tor of the BNT.

The Primeval Forest is :
one of four national parks :
on New Providence, the :
others being Bonefish Pond :
National Park, a coastal :
mangrove wetland, Harrold :
and Wilson Ponds National :
Park, an important bird :
area, and the Village Road :
Retreat, once the third :
largest collection of tropi- :
cal palms in this hemi- :

sphere.

The HSBC is one of the
oldest banking groups in :

the modern world.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LAKE NIROBI INC.

Endangered birds colour
banded by researchers

WITH assistance from
the Bahamas National
Trust (BNT), researchers
working under contract for
Environment Canada cap-
tured and colour banded 57
Piping Plovers during Janu-
ary and February of this
year.

The Piping Plover is a
small rare shorebird with
yellow legs and feathering
that is the colour of dry
beach sand.

Listed as threatened or
endangered in the United
States and Canada where
they breed, there are only
about 8,000 Piping Plovers
in the world.

This species is threatened
by habitat destruction,
predators, and human dis-
turbance.

Habitat

In addition, in the
Bahamas, the loss of habitat
from invasive plants is a
concern.

Researchers visited New
Providence, Grand
Bahama, and Andros,
where they carried out sur-
veys.

The birds were captured
using nets, and a unique
colour band combination
was placed on the legs that
allow the individual birds
to be identified.

In addition, small samples





(=



were taken for DNA analy-
sis to show if the bird is part

of the Atlantic, Great

Lakes, or Great Plains
breeding populations.

All of the birds were
released unharmed.

"This research is intended
to show the connections
between the wintering loca-
tions in the Bahamas,

where the birds spend most

of the year, and the breed-
ing locations in Canada and
the United States," said Dr
Cheri Gratto-Trevor, the
principal investigator.

"By knowing where these
wintering birds stop over
during migration and then
nest during the summer, we
can better understand the
challenges these rare birds
face."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR WARS
GALAXIES INC.




Ts PIPING PLOVER is a ar rare ace)

Ann Maddock ji
a) <|



&
E

"The local expertise of
the Bahamas National
Trust was critical to suc-
cessfully completing this
research,” said researcher
Sidney Maddock, who did
the field work with Peter
Doherty.

Grateful

"We are grateful to the
assistance provided by BNT
throughout this project."

At one site on North
Andros, researchers found
89 Piping Plovers, and
another location had 45.

For such a very rare
shorebird, these numbers
are unusually high and
show the importance of the
Bahamas.

"With Piping Plovers
spending up to about eight
months during the non-
breeding season in the
Bahamas, our beaches and
flats are critical to the
recovery of this rare
species," said Lynn Gape,
deputy executive director
of BNT.

"This beautiful shorebird
is an important part of our
national heritage.”

While the research pro-
ject was being conducted,
staff of BNT and the
National Audubon Society
spoke with local landown-
ers to support their efforts
to remove invasive plants
and discuss how the bird
species can be better pro-
tected.

"It was gratifying to see
Piping Plovers doing well
in the Bahamas at sites that
had low-density lodging,"
said Matthew Jeffery of
Audubon's international
alliances programme.

"Certain landowners, in
their desire to control the
spread of invasive plants on
the Bahamian beaches, not
only were helping create
wider beaches, but also
were helping maintain high
tide resting habitats for this
rare shorebird. We thank
the landowners for their
efforts. Audubon is looking
forward to collaborating
with BNT for future con-
servation efforts."

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRANVISION
INVESTMENTS CORP.

—

#

—

—-f— ,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LAKE NIROBI INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
of GRANVISION INVESTMENTS
CORP. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of STAR WARS GALAXIES INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

dissolution

Company has therefore been struck off the Register. sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the has been issued and the Company has therefore been

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SWEET CACHET INC.

—+,

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SWEET CACHET INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HOLLY SPRINGS
LIMITED

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of HOLY SPRINGS LIMITED

has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MUSICAL ODYSSEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RUMPELSTILSKIN

HOLDINGS LTD.

— *,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RUMPELSTILSKIN LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GIBLOUXNASS LTD.

j—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GIBLOUXNASS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EASTERN

COTTONWOOD LTD.

— -,——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EASTERN COTTONWOOD LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

S |
f .
FRIDAY, APRIL 9,

| Major headlines|

C\GN oF



By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALMOST a_ two-year
absence from the local scene,
Caribbean lightweight cham-
pion Meacher ‘Pain’ Major
will be back in the square ring
on Sunday night at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

This time, however, Major
will headline an unusual card
dubbed: "Reign of Pain,"
which will be complimented
by a series of martial arts
bouts, including Bahamian
singing sensation and radio
personality Bodine 'Bo' John-
son in the co-main event.

Johnson, incidentally, will
be celebrating her birthday
today.

The show is being promot-
ed by Caribbean Fight Order,
headed by president Kent
Bazard. Denez Jones is the
chief executive officer.

Major, 28, will take on
American Robert ‘Don't
Lose’ DeLux from Provi-
dence, Rhode Island, in the
lone boxing match. They will
compete in a six-rounder in

PAGE 10

the super featherweight or
130-pound division.

In the Female MMA exhi-
bition match, Johnson will
take on a surprise female mar-
tial artist.

There will also be three
mixed martial arts bouts, fea-
turing Ronald 'Smokey' Mar-
tin against Scott Chegel Jr.;
Jimbo vs James 'Dragon'
Walkine and Dewitt 'DC'
Pratt against Justin ‘Slayer’
Sawyer.

Major, under contract with
Excel Worldwide Promotions
out of Buffalo, New York and
headed by Nick Garone, said
he's excited to have been
afforded the opportunity to
fight at home again and at the
new weight division he's cam-
paigning in.

"The last championship title
that I fought for was in the
super featherweight division,"
said Major, who is coming off
a fourth round TKO loss to
Dorin Spivey on November 6
for the NABA lightweight
title.

"Everything I prepare for a
fight, instead of making 135, I
always go below that. I fight at
132 or 133. But I said last year



ts



2010

that whether I won or lost the
fight, I was going to go back to
the 130 weight. Even though I
didn't win the fight, things
happened for a reason. So I
will just stay there and cam-
paign at that division."

Before he secured his inter-
national contract, Major went
on a four-match winning
streak from June 30, 2007 to
February 20, 2009, the last
time he fought at home with
First Class Promotions.

Major said he's been
encouraged by the support
that he got from his local han-
dlers, the fans and even Fred
Sturrup, secretary of the
Bahamas Boxing Commission
to make the right decision as
far as the future of his career
is concerned.

Training under the watchful
eyes of long-time coach
Nathaniel Knowles at the
Nassau Stadium, Major said
he's eager to get back into the
ring and show the Bahamian
public just how committed he
is.

"I'm just taking one step at
atime," he said. "When I was
contacted by the promoters
to headline this card, I gladly

Dain

accepted. I think it's a great
opportunity for me to be able
to come back home and fight
again.

"IT had no idea when I
would be able to fight again.
So when this opportunity
came up, I made contact with
my promoter and he gave me
the go ahead. I want to thank
my promoter because he was
the one who really dealt with
the opponent, making sure
that I got the right fight for
the new division."

If everything goes as
planned, Major said he should
be fighting at least two more
times this year.

But right now, he said it’s
all about being a part of a his-
toric night of martial arts.

"We've never had anything
like this,” he said. "So I'm just
happy to be a part of it and
being the headliner. I just
want to thank Caribbean
Fight Order for allowing me
to showcase my talent on
their show."

Major is being sponsored
by Nautellus Water and
Quick Welding for the fight.
He also thanked coach
Knowles’ wife for ensuring





a rn ae ogee










Meacher Major

that he maintains his weight
by eating the proper meals on
time.

DeLux, 31, is 12-25 with
nine knockouts. He also drew
three of his fights. The fight is
supposed to be a tune up for
DeLux, who will be taking on
Joey Silva on May 22 at the
Sovereign Center in Reading,
Pennsylvania.

"It doesn't matter who I
get," Major said. "I want to
become the next world cham-
pion. We haven't had one



since Elisha Obeb. I know my
former trainer Ray Minus Jr.
came close when he fought.
But I know I have the poten-
tial to do it and I'm going to
make sure that I do."

Tickets for Sunday's show
are available at Mr Donuts
(downtown), Scotiabank
(downtown), The Juke Box
Mall at Marathon, Corner
Motel, Khalfani Oils Town
Centre Mall, the Blue Hill
Meat Mart and Hurry Hurry
Meat Mart (Poincianna).



SIRQUWA, =a

Knowles presents â„¢
Paul Cayard with
the Santa Maria
perpetual trophy
following his win
the last time the
Star Western
Hemisphere
Championships
was sailed in Nas-
sau in 2005. This
trophy is only
competed for
when the Western
Hemisphere
Championship is
sailed in Nassau.
In honour of Sir
Durward's history
with the Star class,
the Santa Maria
trophy was
renamed the Sir
Durward Knowles
trophy during the
presentation cere-
mony.

The Nassau Yacht Club/Photo

imagination at work

CASH SALES ONLY!








Sales & Full Service Department

Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9



TERT ETE
crush top seeded
Te ee

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

IN HIS NBA Development
League playoff debut, Benet
Davis and his upstart squad
tipped off the postseason with
perhaps the most shocking win
of the year.

Davis and the fourth seeded
Utah Flash upended the top
seeded and pennant winning
Iowa Energy, 107-76 to take a
1-0 lead in the best of three
opening round playoff series.

The versatile forward, who
has been a fixture in the start-
ing lineup since February, con-
tinued his consistent play in
game one of the series with 10
points, eight rebounds and
four assists.

In a balanced scoring effort,
Davis was one of six Utah
players to reach double fig-
ures.

Brian Hamilton and former
Boston Celtic Orien Greene
each finished with a team high
18 points, while Hamilton
secured a double double with
a game high 12 rebounds.

Kevin Kruger added 16
points, another former Celtic,
Gabe Pruitt, came off the
bench to finish with 15 and
Andre Ingram chipped in with
10.

Curtis Stinson led the Ener-
gy in a losing effort with a
game high 24, 12 rebounds and
seven assists.

Former Texas star Conner
Atchley notched a double
double with 10 points and 12
rebounds while former NBA
and D-League veteran Jeff
Trepagnier added 14.

Iowa took a 17-15 lead after
the opening quarter, but it was
all Utah for the remainder of
the game.

The Flash made just one of
their first 10 shots to start the
game and shot 24 per cent in
the first quarter. They went
on a late 9-2 run and closed to
two points at the end of the
period.

Stinson led the way for Iowa
scoring eight first quarter
points and grabbing eight
rebounds.

Davis scored four first quar-



Bennet Davis



ter points for the Flash to help
the team recover from the
slow start.

The winner of the series will
advance to take on the win-
ner of the Sioux Falls Skyforce
and Tulsa 66ers series in the
Western Conference Finals.

The Flash outscored the
energy 33-20 in the second
quarter to take a 48-37 lead at
the half.

The lead continued to bal-
loon in the second half as the
Flash advantage reached as
much as 37.

They won the third quarter
31-20 and the fourth, 28-19 to
close out the 31 point blowout.

In the D-League playoff for-
mat, the top three seeds in the
Conference choose to select
their opponents and the Ener-
gy’s choice to select the Flash
have had less than desirable
results thus far.

After ending the season
with the league’s best record at
37-13, the Energy lost several
players to NBA call ups
including Earl Barron to the
New York Knicks and Cartier
Martin to the Washington
Wizards.

The series now moves to
Des Moines, where with their
backs against the wall and fac-
ing elimination the Energy will
have to win both games to
avoid falling out of the playoffs
in the first round for the sec-
ond consecutive year.

The two teams will meet for
game two of three-game series
in Iowa on Friday night. Game
three, if necessary will take
place Sunday in Iowa as well.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 11



SPORTS



(SY CARIFTA GAMES 2010

BAAA, BSF have much work to
do in quest for regional glory

NOTHER Carifta

Games has been

completed and
both the track and field
and swimming teams
have returned home,
albeit with different
results from two sepa-

rate venues.

The 70-plus track and field
team matched last year's
third place finish with 28
medals in St. Lucia by col-
lecting one more medal. The
team secured six gold, 10 sil-
ver and 13 bronze over the
Easter holiday weekend.

Not bad, considering the
fact that two of the gold
medals came with record
breaking performances from
Shaunea Miller of St.
Augustine's College in the
under-17 girls 400 metres and
Stephen Newbold of St.
John's College in the under-
17 boys 400 hurdles.

Jamaica, as usual, domi-

nated the meet by posting 72
medals, inclusive of 37 gold,
22 silver and 13 bronze.
Trinidad & Tobago got sec-
ond with 12 gold, 16 silver
and 12 bronze for 40 medals.

The 30-plus swimming
team, on the other hand,
returned from Kingston,
Jamaica where they slipped
from second last year to
fourth in the medal hunt

Last year, the Bahamas
accumulated 49 medals and
they were second in the point
standings with

Over the Easter holiday
weekend, the Bahamas ended
up with 37 medals for fourth
place, but was third overall
in the point standings with
603.

Drop Off

This year, Trinidad &
Tobago took top honours
with 1011 points and 94
medals. Guadeloupe was sec-
ond with 707 points, but they
were third with 47 medals.
Barbados had 48 medals for

second, but was sixth in
points with just 488.

The Bahamas also boast-
ed of having one of the six
divisional high point winners
in Dionisio Carey. The 12-
year-old Queen's College
grade eight student was tied
with Trinidad & Tobago's
Jabari Baptiste with 79 points
in the boys 11-12 division.

Those were the second
highest points achieved indi-
vidually at the four-day meet.
Trinidad & Tobago's Tyla
Martin had the highest with
88 in the girls 11-12 division.

This time around, I have
to give a little more kudos
to the track and field team,
who have been more consis-
tent in their feat than the
swimming team, which
dropped a little below their
standard.

Criticism
The Bahamas Association
of Athletic Associations,
headed by Mike Sands, has
always been criticised for tak-

ing more athletes that
attained the qualifying stan-
dards.

To their defence, the addi-
tional athletes have been
added for relay purposes and
therefore they have been
inserted into their speciality
events.

That seemed to have paid
off dividends for the team at
the games.

However, I think it would
still be better if the BAAA
push for more athletes to
attain the standards, which
gives them more gratification
in making the team outright
and gives the Bahamas a
much better chance to regain
its lofty position at the top of
the standings.

With the new national sta-
dium coming on stream for
next year, hopefully the ath-
letes will be inspired even
more to compete and get
ready to travel to St. Kitts for
the 2011 Carifta Games.

And as you’re heard, the
BAAA has put in a bid to

host the 2012 games. That
would be another morale
booster for the athletes as
they will get a chance to com-
pete at home in front of their
home crowd in a brand new
stadium.

As for the swim team, they
must be commended, consid-
ering the fact that the swim-
mers were somewhat hap-
mered by the fact that the
pool at the Betty Kelly
National Swim Complex was
disengaged over the last few
weeks leading up to their
departure.

The Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture had to do
through some renovations to
repair the damaged heater
system. Up to now, it’s not
certain if all of the work,
including the maintaince of
the facility, have been com-
pleted.

But having had a slight
drop off its overall perfor-
mances this year, I’m sure
that president Algernon
Cargill and his executives will





STUBBS

OPINION

be working even harder to get
the team prepared to regain
their position in the top two
next year.

Another Carifta Games
have certainly come and gone,
but both the BAAA and the
BSF have a lot of work to do
in the upcoming months as
the quest continues for
regional glory.



New national stadium to open up new opportunities

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net





AS THE country eagerly antici-





pates the completion of the new
national stadium, the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Athletic Associations has
begun initial efforts to position itself to
host most prestigious international
events.

Upon the return of the contingent
from the 39th Carifta Games in
Grand Cayman, BAAAs President
Mike Sands indicated the association’s
wishes to have the game return to the
Bahamas for the first in a decade.

“With the completion of the new
stadium we think it will give us an
opportunity to increase our profile in
the region from a hosting standpoint,”
he said, “With the talent we produce
on the track it’s only fitting that the
Bahamas is able to play host to our
competitors in the region and around
the world.”

The 2011 edition of the Carifta
Track and Field Championships will
be hosted by St. Kitts and Nevis, who
last hosted the games in 2008.

The Bahamas last hosted the games
in 2002 where Jamaica’s Usain Bolt
first rose to international prominence.

Thus far the selection committee
has received offers of interest from
the Bahamas and Bermuda.

The BAAAs have officially
expressed interest to the [AAF to
host the 2011 edition of the World
Youth Championships.

Thus far, three countries have
expressed interest to host the games,
the Bahamas, Greenville North Car-

PICTURED in front of a retired Star Class boat from the fleet of Olympic gold medalist Sir Durward
Knowles are Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, Regatta co-Chairman; Christian Coquoz, Managing Director Lom-
bard Odier Darier Hentsch; Laurent Colli, Head of Private Banking at Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch;
and Brent Burrows, Nassau Yacht Club Commodore.

Nassau Yacht Club set to host
international sailing championship

THE BAHAMAS and the Nassau Yacht
Club are once again preparing to host some of
the world's top sailors, this time in the Inter-
national Star Class Western Hemisphere

Championship 2010.

Thirty-five 2-man teams have entered the
challenging four-day race set for April 14th
through 17th. Twelve countries, including Aus-
tralia and Ukraine will be represented. The
Bahamas will be represented by brothers Mark

and William ‘Billy’ Holowesko.

Races will be sailed in the waters off eastern
New Providence and will give the sailors a
chance to size up the competition ahead of

the 2012 London Olympic Games.

"Events like these give The Bahamas invalu-
able exposure and also bring enormous eco-

olina and Slovenia.

Sands, said that while the Bahamas
has not made an official bid to host
the games, it has expressed interest to
the IAAF and the wheels have been
set in motion.

"We have hosted marquee events



nomic value,"

Odier Darier Hentsch.

munity,"

Championships in 2005.

points out Regatta co-Chair-
man Paul Hutton-Ashkenny

The prestigious event is being supported by
the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism and the Nas-
sau branch of private banking firm Lombard

"We've sponsored international sailing com-
petitions here before and this kind of event is
a high quality event which will have a posi-
tive impact on The Bahamas, so it is a good fit
with our company's efforts to be a good cor-
porate citizen and contribute to the local com-
says Laurent Colli, Head of Private
Banking at Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch.

The Bahamas and the Nassau Yacht Club
last hosted the Star Class Western Hemisphere

Concept for new national stadium

in the past and with the completion of
the new national stadium slated for
2011, we have taken steps toward
possibly hosting the World Youth
Championships. We have not yet put
forth a bid but we have expressed
interest and we feel that if all goes

SEVE
SEAS’

Builds Nealth.. Natwrally

according to plan, the Bahamas can
host a major event of this calibre,"
he said, "After the interest has been
expressed to we will sit down in a
series of meetings and hope to con-
vince the government to give full sup-
port. Once that is completed we will



make an official bid at the IAAF
head offices in Monaco."

Kingston in Jamaica was the last
city in the NACAC Area to host an
IAAF World Championships. They
hosted the World Junior Champi-
onships in 2002.

Net AYE iat UT

Seven Seas Cod Liver Oil:
A rich source of Omega-3
fish oils for all around pood health!

Available in The Bahamas at pharmacies and dug stores. everywhere!

Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. 993-4854



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THE TRIBUNE
“ ru





I
Great Business

EM)
SST



Hi All-day event to
motivate and inspire
business people

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BUSINESSES and
business people are in
need of motivation and
inspiration with the
state of the economy the
way it is, claims the
organiser of the first
annual Dare to be Great
Business and Motiva-
tional Symposium.

Spence Finlayson said
the symposium is
designed to educate,
inspire and motivate
upcoming entrepre-
neurs, working profes-
sionals and even those
at the college and pri-
mary school levels.

Proceeds from the
symposium are expected
to go to The Bahamas
Primary School Student
of the year programme,
which has in 14 years
amassed and distributed
almost $500,000 in
scholarship money.

The Dare to be Great
symposium will feature
some Managing partner
at Baker Tilly Gomez,
Craig Gomez, Senior
Vice President of BTC,
Antonio Stubbs,
Founder of the
Bahamas Primary
School Student of the
year programme, Ricar-
do Deveaux, Chief
Executive Officer of
Creative Wealth Man-
agement, Keshelle Kerr,
Lecturer at the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute,
Mustafa Khalfani,
Entrepreneur and talk
show host, Lincoln
Bain, and Creator and
host of the “Dare to be
Great” Television show.

Speakers

The all day sympo-
sium to be held at the
British Colonial Hilton
on Thursday, April 22,
will offer attendees
inspired views of the
economic climate and
the way forward for
entrepreneurs, while
several speakers will
regale the audience with
stories of finding success
in adverse situations.

“Right now motiva-
tion is low and a lot of
people are depressed
and feel disenfran-
chised,” said Mr Fin-
layson.

“We aim to encourage
people to step out in
faith and try to achieve
their dreams.

“Too many people are
walking around discour-
aged and dejected.”

According to him ,
attendees of the sympo-
sium will receive lunch,
a participant’s manual
and a certificate of
attendance.

He added that the
symposium will also
provide an opportunity
for organizers to honor
several Human resource
professionals.

“We are daring peo-
ple to be great, because
we all have greatness
within us,” said Mr Fin-
layson.









FRIDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

APRIL 9,

iness

2010





FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED





‘The IDB and government should look with shame on this experience.”

— Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux

Dump revamp ‘will not affect
BEC’s waste to energy plan’

Government hoping to have firm approved by July to manage facility

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net





THE Reorganisation of the mis-
managed city dump will not set back
the Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s Waste to Energy explorations
the minister of the environment told
Tribune Business yesterday, saying
“the IDB and government should
look with shame on this experience”.

Earl Deveaux said hiring a pri-
vate American firm to manage the
city dump will not affect BEC’s bid
to some day soon convert the
dump’s waste to usable energy as it
attempts to slowly move from



reliance on fossil fuels to renewable

energy.

According to Mr Deveaux, gov-
ernment hopes to have a firm vetted
and approved by July first to take
over management of the dump,

which has effectively been misman-
aged over a period of years, even as
the Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) undertook a project to
bring some semblance of organisa-

Mm AUTOMATED CLEARING HOUSE

Employers will soon be able to electronically
deposit payroll into employee bank accounts

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIAN employers
will soon have the ability to
electronically deposit their
payroll directly into employ-
ee’s bank accounts regard-
less of which financial insti-
tution they use, the General
Manager of the Automated
Clearing House (ACH) said
yesterday.

Brian Smith said the ACH
could go live with a direct
credit trial as soon as next
week.

Four large employers are
assisting in the testing the
direct deposit system that
will allow employees to pay
their employees without
physical cheques, no matter
what bank they bank with.

Mr Smith said on test runs
banks have been able to
receive transactions and post
them as long as the correct
bank account numbers are
provided to the employer’s
bank.

According to him, the
process requires employers
provide their financial firms
with the account numbers
of their employees, after
which the ACH receives the
routing information for each
employee in order for funds
to be transferred to the
receiver’s banks.

Process

It is not clear as yet
whether the clearing banks
will require employers to
hold a chequing or savings
account in order to receive
payments electronically.

Mr Smith said the process
would have to be cleared
between the banks and
employers.

According to him, the
most important part of the
process is to have the
account number, or routing
information correct in order
for the transaction to go
through without a hitch.

However, direct debit,
which Mr Smith said he
hopes the ACH could get
off the ground in another
few weeks is far more com-

tion to the Bahamas’ waste man-
agement systems.

However, it was found that the
IDB project was itself wholly mis-
managed, throwing away millions



ACH could go live with direct credit trial next week

plicated and requires the
institution to bolster it’s
legal position.

It was hoped that the
ACH would help to usher
in Ecommerce in this coun-
try, as it would create online
connectivity between finan-
cial institutions, making

online transfers of money
easier. Mr Smith said each
financial institution is at a
different state of readiness
for Internet banking to
occur, but “we would like
that to come on stream as
quickly as possible”.

He said the ACH could

make collection of National
Insurance payouts much
easier and help the govern-
ment to significantly reduce
the number of cheques it
prints per month.

“If you are a large com-
pany, it gives you lots of
flexibility,” said Mr Smith.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED ~

call us today at 396-1355

—__A Excellent __~





EARL DEVEAUX

of dollars supposedly spent on con-
tractors who didn’t work and
improvements that never happened.

SEE page 4B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



Secure future

[1 leave your children financially secure
[= provide a safety net for your loved ones
Cc ensure a bright future for your family

q/ all of the above

A SUBSIDIARY OF

<5

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU | FREEPORT | ABACO | ELEUTHERA | EXUMA | CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbahamé

FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

US ECONOMY

Initial jobless
claims increase
unexpectedly

CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER,

AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON

The number of newly laid-
off workers seeking unem-
ployment benefits rose last
week, a sign that jobs
remain scarce even as the
economy recovers.

The increase also may
result from the difficulty the
Labor Department has in
seasonally adjusting the
claims around the Easter
holiday, which falls on dif-
ferent weeks each year.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

"This is ... a volatile time
when the numbers move
around quite a bit," a
department analyst said.

The Labor Department
said Thursday that first-time
claims increased by 18,000
in the week ended April 3,
to a seasonally adjusted
460,000. That's worse than
economists’ estimates of a
drop to 435,000, according
to a survey by Thomson
Reuters.

California also closed its
state offices for a holiday on
March 31, which likely held
down the claims figures. On

?

WW

2 ee ee







Eric Risherg/AP Photo

IN THIS MARCH 30, 2010 PHOTO, job seekers are reflected into a mirror while waiting in line to attend a career fair presented by Nation-
al CareerFairs in San Jose, Calif. The number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits rose last week, a sign that jobs remain
scarce even as the economy recovers.

an unadjusted basis, claims
rose by 6,500 to nearly
415,000.



work
- der
ote
iiffice Asciutcaalt Heebbrel

IN THIS MARCH, 9, 2010 photo, Damashata Washington holds potential job openings as she



looks for work at Work 2 Future, a federally funded job training center, in San Jose, Calif. The num-
ber of newly laid-off workers requesting unemployment benefits fell last week, the latest sign the
employment picture is slowly brightening.

SUN OIL LIMITED

Employment Opportunities

The company seeks to identify suitable candidates

for the position of:

Operations Supervisor
(San Salvador Bulk Fuel Terminal)

The Operations Supervisor is responsible for the overall daily
management of the bulk fuel facility. These responsibilities
include the safe receipt, storage and distribution of bulk petroleum

products in accordance with strict

industry and company

standards. Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate a
proven track record in a related capacity.

The successful candidates for this key position will required to:

* Become familiar with Petroleum Operational Standards and
procedures to ensure all subordinates are equally familiar with
all technical and marketing aspect of petroleum products.

* Manage and responsible for the entire distribution network
within re-mote island
* Provide leadership and motivate work force of up to 3

persons

* Identify any business opportunities within desire market
«Assume responsibility for the Petroleum Brand on the island
* Take leads and support scheduling maintenance within

facility

* Excellent communications skills and attentions to details
within field operations and office
* Proficiently use computers and Microsoft office products (MS

Excel, Word, etc)

Background & Experience required: The successful candidate
must have supervisory experience or working within an operations
department (preferably the Oil Industry).

Additionally, the candidate must be mature individual, a team
player who is self-motivated, organized, able to work under
pressure, meet deadlines with consistent and high degree of

accuracy.

lf you are that person, please send your resume to the following

e-mail address.

jobs @sunoilbahamas.com



Initial claims have
dropped four out of the past
six weeks and many econo-
mists say they are likely to
soon resume their decline.

"Not everything goes ina
straight line," Jennifer Lee,
senior economist at BMO
Capital Markets, wrote in a
research note. "Definitely
not the claims data."

Jumped

Separately, retail sales
jumped last month as
warmer weather and the
Easter holiday brought out
shoppers in droves.

Discounter Target Corp.,
department store Macy's
Inc., clothier Gap Inc. and
Victoria's Secret parent
Limited Brands Inc. posted
double-digit increases that
beat Wall Street analysts’
expectations.

Overall, sales in stores
open at least a year rose 9
percent in March, based on
an index of 31 retailers com-
piled by the International

"This is ...a
volatile time
when the num-
bers move
around quite a
bit.”

——EEEE See
Department analyst

Council of Shopping Cen-
ters.

The stock market dropped
in morning trading. The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age fell 28 points while
broader indexes also dipped.

Economists closely watch
unemployment insurance fil-
ings, which are seen as a
gauge of layoffs and a mea-
sure of companies’ willing-
ness to hire new workers.

The four week average,
which smoothes volatility,
rose to 450,250. Two weeks
ago, the average fell to its
lowest level since Septem-

ber 2008, when Lehman
Brothers collapsed and the
financial crisis intensified.

Jobless claims peaked
during the recession at
651,000 in late March 2009.

The figures underscore
that the job market remains
weak even as the economy
recovers. Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
said Wednesday that high
unemployment is one of the
toughest challenges the
economy faces.

While layoffs have slowed,
hiring is "very weak," he
said.

"We are far from being
out of the woods,"
Bernanke said in a speech
in Dallas. "Many Americans
are still grappling with
unemployment or foreclo-
sure or both."

On a more positive note
in the Labor Department's
report, the tally of people
continuing to claim benefits

SEE page three









(AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

A JOB SEEKER searches for work on a job Web site at a job placement center Wednesday, March 10, 2010,
in Menlo Park, Calif. The number of newly laid-off workers requesting unemployment benefits slipped last
week, the latest sign the employment picture is slowly brightening.

Jewels by the Sea, a chain of Fine Jewelry stores in the Cable Beach
district of N.P. is looking for:

SALES ASSOCIATES

This isa SALARIED position, not a commission based structure.
Our compensation plan rewards team performance and individual

excellence.

Key Functions

e Building Relationships with Customers
e Matching Customer Needs with Goods & Services Available
e Ensuring Post-Purchase Satisfaction
e Maintaining an Organized, Well Arranged & Customer Friendly

Showroom

Qualifications & Experience
e 19 years of age or older

e Previous experience in some Customer Service Field
e High School Diploma or equivalent required

e Basic Computing skills

Skills & Abilities

e Excellent Communication Skills
e Professional Demeanor

e Self-Motivated

Qualified applicants should email

resume & cover letters to:
jbsjobs2010@gmail.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 3B





ravtee
jobless

claims

NOK hie
FROM page 2B

fell by 131,000 to 4.55 mil-
lion, the lowest level since
December 2008.

That figure lags initial
claims by a week. But it
doesn't include millions of
people who have used up
the regular 26 weeks of ben-
efits typically provided by
states, and are receiving
extended benefits for up to
73 additional weeks, paid for
by the federal government.

Slightly more than 5.8 mil-
lion people were receiving
extended benefits in the
week ended March 20, the
latest data available, a drop
of about 230,000 from the
previous week. The extend-
ed benefit data isn't season-
ally adjusted and is volatile
from week to week.



Hiring

Other recent reports have
indicated that employers are
slowly ramping up hiring.
The Labor Department said
Friday that the nation added
a net total of 162,000 jobs in
March, the most in three
years. The unemployment
rate held at 9.7 percent for
the third straight month.

Layoffs fell to their lowest
level in three years in Feb-
ruary, according to a sepa-
rate government report
Tuesday. But hiring
remained about 40 percent
below pre-recession levels.

Some companies are still
cutting jobs. An oilfield ser-
vices company, Denver-
based EnerCrest, said this
month it has closed five
locations in four states, los-
ing 225 employees. Business
software company Comput-
er Associates Inc. said Tues-
day that it is cutting 1,000
jobs as part of a plan to
reduce costs.

Some recipients of the
extended federal aid could
see their benefits disrupted
this week, as Congress failed
to approve a continuation
of the federal programs
before leaving for a two-
week vacation at the end of
March. That could cut off
benefits for more than
200,000 people this week,
according to the National
Employment Law Project,
an advocacy group, but Con-
gressional Democratic lead-
ers have said they will make
up for the lost checks when
they extend the program lat-
er this month.



TU ORAL UHE Ta MUI OPO RIUTTA Macha elmer

The Bahamas needs markets,
not a ‘plan’, for recovery

BY STEVEN HORWITZ
FOR THE NASSAU INSTITUTE



N his column of March 18,

Dr John Rodgers offers a

four point plan for helping

the Bahamas emerge from
the current recession. His plan is a
mix of a few good ideas, some not so
good ideas, and an overarching but
misguided faith in the ability of gov-
ernment to guide the process of
recovery and growth.

In particular, Rodgers refers at
the start to “the failure of the free
market system” as a cause of the
current recession.

Nothing could be further from the
truth, as several of his own argu-
ments illustrate later in his article.

In fact, the path toward economic
recovery involves releasing the
forces of free market capitalism
from the government shackles that
have prevented the Bahamas from
having the sustained economic
growth that Rodgers hopes to
achieve.

Below, I offer some criticisms of
his plan as well as some alternatives
that Bahamians might consider as
they debate these important issues.

The most important and correct
point that Rodgers raises is propos-
ing an end to the exchange controls
on the Bahamian economy.

As he notes, the Bahamas is one
of the few places in the world that
still has such controls and they have
a dramatic negative effect on trade,
especially internationally.

Exchange controls do indeed
increase the cost of raising funds
from outside the country, forcing
entrepreneurs to pay more, and have
to look hard to find, local sources of
funding.

The Bahamian economy also sits
atop a very small base of US dol-
lars that will continue to make more
drastic controls necessary if the gov-
ernment cannot reduce its debt and
the central bank cannot get better
control of the internal money sup-
ply.

There is no doubt that ending
exchange controls would make for
some short run economic pain as
devaluation would surely accompa-
ny it, but like the addict who must go
through withdrawal before returning
to true health, that pain would be
worth it.

Dollarising the Bahamian econo-
my would be a substantial improve-
ment over the status quo, but over
the long run, finding market-driven
alternatives to the central bank
would be even better at capping gov-
ernment debt and maintaining an



The path forward for the Bahamas is to
reduce the cost of goods and services by
opening up international trade and free-
ing the entrepreneurial spirit of its people
by lowering taxes and reducing regulations,
particularly on the very uncompetitive

banking sector.



appropriate money supply.

Rodgers rightly recommends
more competition in the retail bank-
ing sector.

The Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act of 2000 places a vari-
ety of barriers to entry in the way of
new banks opening up, especially
ones with foreign ownership or
desiring to have foreign subsidiaries.

Allowing offshore banks to com-
pete in the retail market would be a
good first step, but true competition
also requires that government poli-
cies that restrict entrepreneurship, or
make it unnecessarily expensive,
must be eliminated.

Competitive

D oing so will cultivate a tru-
ly competitive and con-
sumer-friendly banking sector.

Introducing antitrust laws, as
Rodgers suggests, will not do much
when the source of the “oligopoly”
in the banking system is government
policy.

Such laws are more likely to be
abused by existing banks who will
complain about the competitive tac-
tics used by new entrants.

Antitrust laws tend to be just
another way for private firms to use
government policy to harm their
competitors and make consumers
worse off in the process.

Competition requires only free-
dom under the law, not antitrust
enforcement.

Rodgers’ tax plan is the most
problematic part of his proposals.

He is correct in arguing that mov-
ing from import duties to a sales tax
would reduce what economists call
the “deadweight loss” of taxation.

A sales tax would likely cheapen
goods in comparison to import
duties. However, if the long run goal
is to balance the government’s bud-
get, expenditure cuts are indeed
needed.

Lowering the costs of goods and
services by ending import duties

would reduce the prices of things
government spends on, reducing its
total expenditures, but to believe
these will stick requires the naive
view that politicians would not
quickly find ways to spend on new
programs the money thereby saved.
What is needed is fewer programs,
not just cheaper goods.

The total size of government,
regardless of its debt, is the prob-
lem to be solved.

Cuts in expenditures should be
combined with reductions in the
overall size of the revenues that gov-
ernment takes from the economy.

Rodgers proposes a “revenue neu-
tral” switch to a sales tax. Even
though such a switch might generate
those revenues by expanding the
economy, even more growth can be
obtained by reducing the total tax
take of the government, which
would free up resources for private
entrepreneurs to use to meet con-
sumer demands.

Rodgers’ claim that $500 million
in savings that would come from a
better tax policy encouraging more
business in the Bahamas is also mis-
guided.

He refers to the “velocity of mon-
ey” to argue that each dollar will
“circulate four or five times” before
it becomes an expenditure on
imports.

This reasoning is fallacious along
several lines.

Aside from the fact that what he is
talking about here is not “the veloc-
ity of money” (that refers to a dif-
ferent concept), this argument, like
others in his piece, ignores the ben-
efits of international trade.

Notice that the assumption is that
it is “bad” when Bahamians spend
on imported goods as that causes
money to “leak out” of the Bahami-
an economy.

Rodgers makes this argument ear-
lier as well when he bemoans the
“unfortunate” fact that the Bahamas
is a net importer.

Funds spent on imports need not
“disappear” from the Bahamian
economy.

Ending import duties would make
imports cheaper, enabling residents
to have money left over to spend
on products made locally and other
imports.

And where importing goods is
cheaper than making them domes-
tically, consumers benefit as well.

If consumers were able to freely
convert to and from US dollars with-
out exchange controls, the funds
spent on imports would flow back to
the Bahamas as investments in
Bahamian assets.

Just as the US current account
trade deficit implies that the dollars
spent come back to it when foreign-
ers use them to buy US assets, so
would Bahamians benefit from duty-
free imports combined with the
elimination of exchange controls.

It would lead to a flow of capital
resources into the country, which
would help make up for the low
domestic savings rate noted by
Rodgers.

Isolate

S: countries like the
Bahamas can ill-afford to iso-
late themselves from the world econ-
omy.

The notably freer trade caused
by ending import duties and
exchange controls would make
goods cheaper for its citizens and
more easily enable non-citizens to
invest back in the Bahamas by buy-
ing stocks, bonds, buildings, and oth-
er assets.

The Bahamian dollars spent on
imports have to come back as invest-
ment in Bahamian capital.

Rather than demonstrating the
failures of free markets, the recent
problems in the Bahamian econo-
my, a number of which Rodgers cor-
rectly notes, are in fact created by
restrictions on those very market
freedoms.

The path forward for the Bahamas
is to reduce the cost of goods and
services by opening up internation-
al trade and freeing the entrepre-
neurial spirit of its people by lower-
ing taxes and reducing regulations,
particularly on the very uncompeti-
tive banking sector.

This would free up the flow of
capital to fund new business and
reduce the costs of borrowing to the
thousands of small entrepreneurs
who are the lifeblood of economic
growth.

Rodgers’ plan does not go nearly
far enough in these directions.

Court Order

Action #665/2009
Judgement Creditor:
Caves Village Development Ltd.
Judgement Debtor: Geneva Wilson-Bowe

Government Registered

STOCK NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the following
Bahamas Government Registered Stock
Ta batt ht NM) old

Sales Jobs

AVAILABLE

Jewelry Stores on Bay Street and
Paradise Island

Certificate No. Maturity | Interest Rate

$2,221,100

15%
We are looking for some energetic and outgoing

individuals to join the sales team immediately.

2008 Mercedes E350
Fully loaded

$50,000 46875%

Experience with jewelry is a plus but we are
willing to train non-experienced people who
have the right attitude and personality

$883,200 .34375%

*SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY*

We propose to apply to the Registrar, Government of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas for the issue of
duplicate certificates.

Salary plus generous commission plan.
Fax resume to 393-5102

or immediate consideration. ;
f If found, please write to P. O. Box N-4853, Nassau, Bahamas.





Contact:327-6070
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

For Any Additional Information
a. 9. 4)
| | a,/









Â¥

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010, PAGE 7B



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

= S70 =
AOL looking to sell or

Smithsonian announces new
jewellery line with QVC







(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
IN THIS SEPT. 23, 2009 file photo, the Hope Diamond is displayed at
the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washing-
ton. The Smithsonian Institution has agreed to license its world
renowned gem and mineral collection.

BRETT ZONGKER,
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON



The Smithsonian Institution said Thurs-
day that it has licensed its renowned gem
and jewelry collection to create a line of
bracelets, brooches and other baubles with
the TV shopping network QVC.

The jewelry line expected to launch this
fall will be based on the National Gem and
Mineral Collection at the National Museum
of Natural History, which includes the
famous Hope Diamond and Marie
Antoinette earrings among 375,000 speci-
mens. Curators will help oversee creation of
the jewelry line.

"With all of our licensed products, every-
thing is reviewed and approved by cura-
tors in advance," said Smithsonian spokes-



| ¥
P= pa ©. s

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

IN A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 23, 2009 file photo, Russ Feather, left,
Museum Specialist Gemologist, and Kelly Carnes from Public Affairs
Office, unveil the Hope Diamond at the Smithsonian’s National

Museum of Natural History in Washington.

woman Linda St. Thomas. Curators also
will record interviews for QVC to help
introduce the collections and offer a
glimpse behind the scenes at the museum in
Washington, she said.

The jewelry line follows licensing deals
for Smithsonian-branded furniture, lighting,
books and hobby kits based on museum
collections. Showtime Networks also
launched the Smithsonian Channel on tele-
vision in 2006 as part of a licensing agree-
ment to generate revenue for the museum
complex.

The Smithsonian is a nonprofit that
receives about 70 percent of its operating
budget from the federal government. It's
also seeking new revenue to help pay fora
$2.5 billion maintenance backlog. The QVC
line will be primarily costume jewelry and
semiprecious stones, St. Thomas said. Some

of the earrings, rings, bracelets, pins and
brooches will be based on designs of pieces
in the museum, while others will simply be
inspired by its collection, including the 45.5-
carat, walnut-size Hope Diamond, long
rumored to carry a curse. The line won't
include real diamonds, though.

"We will create jewelry that is not only
fashionable, but also serves to educate the
public about the Smithsonian and the jew-
elry, gems and minerals found in its col-
lections," said Carol LeBlanc, director of
consumer products for the Smithsonian
Enterprises business unit. The Smithsonian
sought bids for the licensing deal and
received three offers before selecting QVC.
Terms of the multiyear agreement weren't
disclosed. Revenue generated by the deal
for the Smithsonian will come from royal-
ties based on sales, St. Thomas said.





shut down social site Bebo

RACHEL METZ,
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO





The struggling Internet company AOL Inc. plans to sell or
shut down Bebo nearly two years after buying it for more
than $800 million in an expansion of its social-networking
ambitions.

In an e-mail to employees Tuesday, Jon Brod, who runs
AOL's startup acquisition and investment unit, AOL Ven-
tures, said Bebo would need a "significant investment" to
remain competitive.

Although Bebo has been in the shadow of rivals such as
Facebook, it has been strong in foreign markets, including
Britain. AOL wanted to tap that strength abroad to drive
traffic to AOL's other free, ad-supported Web sites, especial-
ly internationally, while leveraging AOL's instant-messaging
communities, AIM and ICQ, to try to grow Bebo in the Unit-
ed States.

But Bebo's audience has instead been slipping in the U.S.
According to comScore Inc., Bebo had 5.1 million U.S. users
in February, down from 5.8 million a year earlier and a sliver
of the 210 million that Facebook has.

Buyers

Brod said AOL will look for potential buyers and plans to
finish a strategic evaluation by the end of May.

AOL bought San Francisco-based Bebo for $850 million in
May 2008 in its largest deal since it bought MapQuest for $1
billion in 2000 (not counting AOL's $106 billion purchase of
Time Warner in 2001). At the time, AOL was still joined with
Time Warner Inc., but it separated from the media conglom-
erate late last year.

Since spinning off from Time Warner, AOL has sold one
property: affiliate marketing business Buy.at, which it sold in
March to Digital Window Ltd. for an undisclosed price. Digi-
tal Window runs a network of affiliate marketing sites, which
steer customers to e-commerce sites in exchange for a cut of
sales.

AOL, a pioneer in the dial-up Internet business during the
‘90s, has been trying to streamline and concentrate on
rebuilding itself as a content and advertising business. It runs
dozens of Web sites, including popular tech blog Engadget
and personal finance site WalletPop.

Clayton Moran, an analyst at The Benchmark Co., said the
price AOL paid for Bebo was questioned from the start.

"It made a lot of industry watchers scratch their heads,"
Moran said. "At this point they probably would admit they
overpaid for it and now they're just cleaning it up."

He said that if AOL does sell Bebo, it would likely fetch a
fraction of its original purchase price.

Shares of New York-based AOL rose 26 cents to $26.40 in
afternoon trading Tuesday.











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PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



OVERSEAS BUSINESS

US Airways and UAL talk
about combining, shares up

JOSHUA FREED,
AP Airlines Writer
MINNEAPOLIS



News that United Airlines and US Air-
ways are in talks about combining was
met with approval by shareholders and
analysts Thursday.

Passengers may feel differently, how-
ever, if a combination ends up leading to
higher airfares.

Shares of both companies rose in
morning trading. US Airways gained 83
cents, or 12.2 percent, to $7.65, and Unit-
ed Airlines parent UAL Corp. rose $1.38,
or 7.3 percent, to $20.33.

News that two airlines are talking
broke Wednesday afternoon. Both car-
riers have tried for combinations in the
past. United Chairman and CEO Glenn
Tilton and US Airways Chairman and
CEO Doug Parker were both involved
when their companies talked about a tie-
up in 2008. They walked away then citing
high fuel prices, but didn't rule out a
future deal. That same year, Continental
Airlines Inc. rejected United's attempt at
a combination.

Neither airline has confirmed the talks.

It's far from certain that a deal will
actually take place. Antitrust regulators
would have to clear it, and pilots from
different unions would have to be inte-
grated.

Still, "the merits of a potential (United-
US Airways) marriage are considerable,
in our view," J.P. Morgan analyst Jamie

ee ie

Baker wrote. UBS analyst Kevin Crissey
wrote that he thinks a major combination
such as United-US Airways would
reduce capacity as much as 3 percent,
mostly in the U.S. With fewer seats and
competition, fares should rise, he wrote.

Travelers wouldn't like that, but mon-
ey-losing airlines would.

Baker noted that wage scales at the
two carriers are more closely aligned and
are among the industry's lowest, he
wrote.

They're both in the Star Alliance,
which means their computer systems
already communicate with each other
because they sell tickets on each other's
flights.

How antitrust regulators would react is
uncertain. Regulators approved Delta's
purchase of Northwest in 2008. But since
then, the Justice Department has put up
roadblocks to a slot swap between Delta
and US Air at LaGuardia and Reagan
National airports.

If US Airways and Delta "can't pull off
a simple slot transaction, how likely is a
combination that rivals Delta in size and
scope," Baker wrote, "particularly when
neither carrier is failing?"

Based on 2009 traffic, a combined
United-US Airways would be nearly as
big as Delta Air Lines Inc., which became
the world's largest airline after buying
Northwest. It is unclear which name
would survive, where the combined com-
pany would be based, or who would run
it.







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Integrating the two airlines’ unionized
work forces would be one of the most
difficult tasks if United Airlines and US
Airways got together.

US Airways, which is based in Tempe,
Arizona, still runs separate pilot and
flight attendant groups after it was
bought in 2005 by America West. And its
pilots formed their own union after leav-
ing the Air Line Pilots Association, the
union that represents United aviators.

Executives at Delta and Northwest put
their deal on hold in early 2008 so their
pilots could work out an agreement on
combining their ranks.

Pilots at US Airways have not been
involved in any talks with United, said
James Ray, a spokesman for the US Air-
line Pilots Association.

"We'll support anything that would be
good for our pilot group," he said.

Like Northwest before it, one of Unit-
ed's main attractions is its Pacific routes,
which it bought from Pan-Am in 1985.

Both airlines have been shrinking to
cope with the recession. United cut
capacity 7.4 percent last year, while US
Airways shrank 4.6 percent. US Airways
is cutting most flying that doesn't pass
through either Washington or its hubs
in Charlotte, N.C., Philadelphia, or
Phoenix.

US Airways lost $205 million in 2009,
and revenue fell almost 14 percent to
$10.46 billion. UAL lost $651 million,
while revenue fell 19.1 percent to $16.34
billion.











IN THIS COMBO made from file photos, a US Airways Airbus 319-112
takes off from Tampa International Airport in Tampa, Fla., top, and a
United Airlines jet takes off from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport
in Seattle. Shares of US Airways and the parent of United Airlines rose
in after-hours trading Wednesday, April 7, 2010, after The New York
Times reported that the carriers are in merger talks.



‘We'll support anything that would
be good for our pilot group.’



James Ray, a spokesman for the
US Airline Pilots Association










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