Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


HIGH
LOW

84F
72F

SUNNY AND
BREEZY

Volume: 106 No.111





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

As
Ta ee
Me: a

Se















aU



SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SEE PAGE 10

FNM, PLP in fight
tO SIgN Up ROlINS



Family of dead man accuse
police of ‘sloppy’ case work

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net





FAMILY members of Captain Bernard Burrows,
who was last seen alive 18 months ago, have accused
police of "sloppy" case work and are calling for a new
investigation into the circumstances surrounding his
disappearance and death.

Some relatives suspect that Mr Burrows, 45, was the
victim of foul play. They feel investigators did not pur-
sue this avenue aggressively in the case's early stages,
leaving many stones unturned, and a possible killer on
the loose.

Unhappy with the 18-month long investigation, several
members of the Burrows family are now calling on new
police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade to look into the

Popular candidate in
demand after impressive
by-election campaign

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOR the country’s two major
political parties, Dr Andre
Rollins has become the most
wanted man in the Bahamas,
The Tribune can exclusively
reveal.

FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham and former PLP first lady
Dame Marguerite Pindling have
held high-level talks with Dr
Rollins.

Both have invited him to join
their parties.

Last night, Dr Rollins told
how he is now “soul searching”
about which direction he will
take.

Dr Rollins, who ran for the
NDP in the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion winning 49 votes, said he
has not yet made a decision
about whether he will take up
either of the offers but has in
the meantime resigned his post
as Chairman of the NDP’s
Executive Steering Committee,
which he felt was appropriate
while he considers his options.

Both formal meetings took
place in the last 10 days, Dr
Rollins said, following unoffi-
cial discussions with lower level
PLPs and FNMs in the wake of

DR ANDRE ROLLINS



the February 16 by-election.

He said he did not “solicit”
either of the parties.

Now the 34-year-old ortho-
dontist, who many agreed dis-
tinguished himself as an articu-
late and ardent candidate dur-
ing the Elizabeth by-election
campaign, said he has a lot of

SEE page eight



AUTO INSURANCE

|
|

Never start your

‘Auito Insurance.

eas the smart choice is
| Insurance Management.

| Smart people you can trust.
- 7 %

i LIBEEED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGE NTS

| Ma
suit

| Hewes | frum
Te hepa





SEE page seven









pt

Major/Tribune

THE BAHAMAS’ MEDAL-WINNING Carifta team returned from Grand Cayman Island last night. The Bahamas accumulated a total of
27 medals, inclusive of six gold, eight silver and 13 bronze.

Two charged
with murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men appeared in
court yesterday in connection
with a murder that occurred
in Montell Heights.

Christoph Knowles, 30, of
Bowe Avenue and Palm
Court, and Curtis Richard
Taylor, 20, of Palm Court and
Straw Flower Road, were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court

It is alleged that between
Saturday, January 16, and
Sunday, January 17, 2010, the
accused intentionally caused
the death of Fednet Geanjil.

Mr Geanjil, 37, of Montell
Heights, was found stabbed
to death in a vehicle in the
Montell Heights area. Police
initially received reports of a
man suffering from stab
wounds at a garage on Hill
Flower Road. Officers
responded to the scene and
found Mr Geanjil’s lifeless






By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE a union boss’s
claim that thousands of Chi-
nese workers will flock to the
Bahamas to help construct the
Baha Mar development at
Cable Beach, an official
stressed that the long-term
benefits will be reaped by
locals.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president for gov-
ernmental and external affairs,
said that although contractual-
ly Chinese labour will help con-
struct the $2.6 billion develop-

Baha Mar official: Chinese labour
will help, locals will reap benefits

¢ SEE SPORT ON PAGE 10



many qualified locals as possi-
ble during the construction
phase and beyond.

During the phased construc-
tion period, some 3,300 locals
are expected to be employed
with jobs for more than 8,000
Bahamians expected once the
redevelopment is concluded.

"The construction of the
Baha Mar project will require
an exceptionally large work-
force due to the sheer volume
of work being undertaken and
the aggressive construction
timeline in the various phases
of the Cable Beach redevelop-
ment.





oe pee yeeeneey SEE page seven ment, developers will hire as SEE page nine
auiznoss .
“th
i __ __| tn —
vais ; aoe {i}? with the purchase “Gay
J a = of = — or.
_— ; y arge sub. = ee”
a —_ ~ a8 Prices mery ary Se. my
_— hs. Maderia St Paradise Idand ae,











NASSAU

NN BAA

MA ISLANDS? DEADING NEWSPA

PER



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Loyos Hope

‘hook ship’

locks in the
Bahamas

THE “book ship”, Logos
Hope, is currently docked at
Prince George Wharf and is invit-
ing Bahamians to come on board
to sample the wide array of edu-
cational and entertaining litera-
ture and DVDs on offer.

Visitors can enjoy browsing
through the 7,500 titles available
for purchase or enjoy a cup of
coffee in the international café
on deck four.

Purchased in 2004, the Logos
Hope has been crossing the globe
with the aim of supplying vital
literature resources, encouraging
inter-cultural understanding, pro-
moting greater global awareness
and sharing a message of hope
in God wherever there is oppor-
tunity.

The Logos Hope will remain
docked in Nassau until Friday.

PICTURED ARE customers
checking out the books and
DVDs yesterday

y
u Vag

Jewels by the Sea, a chain of Fine Jewelry stores in the Cable Beach
district of N.P. is looking for:

SALES ASSOCIATES

This is a SALARIED position, not a commission based structure.
Our compensation plan rewards team performance and individual
excellence.

Key Functions

e Building Relationships with Customers

e Matching Customer Needs with Goods & Services Available

e Ensuring Post-Purchase Satisfaction

e Maintaining an Organized, Well Arranged & Customer Friendly
Showroom

Qualifications & Experience

e 19 years of age or older

e Previous experience in some Customer Service Field
¢ High School Diploma or equivalent required

e Basic Computing skills

Skills & Abilities

e Excellent Communication Skills
e Professional Demeanor

e Self-Motivated

Qualified applicants should email
resume & cover letters to:
jbsjobs2010@gmail.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


































“<2 2010

Drive one.

FORD EXPLORER XLT

A aie i Fie aoe . -
At 2 Fre t Anerivan : Foon
Shop & Compare .

48 V6 with auton Treenidon, eather inerkor, Sor T pamnigper
[Mig urEion, pewer seat @ith power hack rei, power winds,
leeks and mirrors, alley wheels, automatic headlights, media, CO
player, with cml quesiiom, the heat vale in The Bahamas om a large
SUV, withived emneptiom, all dhis plus} years! fdHil mile warranéy, 4
ears Prone vide ais ena dyeurs rust protertion, Linence and
inpertain Bea boiertheedea y,, Hall lank. of gas, Geo mats fied five services.

If you are LOOKing for the best value





















Felipé Major/Tribune staff





(L-R) REV DR J CARL RAHMING, president of the Fox Hill Pastor's Association; Ambassador Tommy Robin-
son, High Commissioner Mohinder Grover of India; Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill MP, and Wellington Miller, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Olympic Association. Brion Cox and a young lady of Sandilands Primary School bear

the Queen's Baton.

Queen’s Baton Relay starts
its Bahamas leg in Fox Hill

THE official Queen’s
Baton Relay leading up to
the Commonwealth Games
started its run through the
Bahamas with the children
of the Sandilands Primary
School on the holiday
weekend.

The high-tech Queen's
Baton is journeying through
all the countries of the
Commonwealth, the

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

You owe it to yourself to visit our SHOWTOOM
“
Drive one.

Shop & Compare

Awtometr Trancwdrsien, 4 piinatrr; 24 Litre Exgiog, ANT, rdiatral
Power etubers, loci, sino, suet driver anata, beplers airy, raat oad
Hd cutee ae bs, all qf ake pas 3 pearii 35000 mall: wearrenly, 4 are
Pini aein,2 nd Fecal ‘Protection, Dericat ike ripanentue Ms iether,
Jal wall of gas, Baar ea, Sa fier eae,

tetas Pee mare erly

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

Bahamas being the 45th
country visited in advance
of the Commonwealth
Games, slated for New Del-
hi, India, in October.

The Bahamas Olympic
Association, headed by
Wellington Miller, with Sec-
retary General Romell
Knowles, Chef de Mission
Roy Colebrook and Indian
High Commissioner Mohin-
der Grover were there to
witness the event.

Speaking at the ceremony
on Saturday, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell welcomed the
relay group, including Tom-
my Robinson the nation’s
first international medal
winner in elite athletics.

Mr Mitchell urged the
children who were taking
part in the relay to look to
Mr Robinson’s career as an
example of how discipline
can take a person around
the world.

He thanked the Associa-

Ud lB
EXTERMINATORS

eA UE
PHONE: 322-2157



tion and the High Commis-
sioner for the honour
bestowed upon Fox Hill.

The first Queen’s Baton
Relay, similar to the
Olympic Torch Relay, was
held to celebrate the
Cardiff 1958 Common-
wealth Games in Wales.

For the 2010 Common-
wealth Games the relay was
launched at Buckingham
Palace in London last Octo-
ber.

Travelling through all
other 70 Commonwealth
nations, the relay will be an
historic journey that will
cover a distance of more
than 190,000 kilometres in
340 days.

The relay will conclude
after the final baton bearer
enters the Jawaharlal
Nehru Stadium during the
opening ceremony of the
XIX Commonwealth
Games on October 23.

In recent years, the
Queen’s Baton Relay has
harnessed the very latest in
digital and other communi-
cation technology.

The high-tech tracking
technology housed in the
baton enables families and
friends to pinpoint the
baton’s location by the
internet.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094



USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES

EMAIL: dianal yrretarct oir Loon
WEESITE: hendhmotorshahamas.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Repatriation of Haitian
migrants is criticised

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HAITIAN community
leaders have criticised Gov-
ernment for repatriating
Haitian migrants last weck,
claiming they will face
deplorable conditions and
“certain death.”

Although the repatriation
of illegal Haitian migrants
was suspended when Haiti’s
capital Port-au-Prince was
devastated by the magnitude
7.0 earthquake on January
12, Haitian migrants who
have been apprehended in
the Bahamas since then
were returned to Haiti on
Monday, March 29.

Deputy Prime Minister
and Immigration Minister
Brent Symonette maintains
Haiti is now ready for repa-
triation to resume as nor-
mal, while members of the
Haitian community say
those seeking refuge from
the devastated nation should
not be returned until condi-
tions improve.

“They are sending people
to certain death,” said a
Haitian Bahamian commu-
nity leader who did not want
to be named.

“Now Haiti is coming into
the rainy season they are
talking about the mud; peo-
ple are walking in three
inches of mud and they
have to sleep in that, in
tents, and it is going to get
worse.

“To me it is really unfor-
tunate to send people to a
situation where their liveli-







BRENT SYMONETTE



hood and their lives are at
stake.

“We are just sending peo-
ple to more misery.”

An estimated 200,000
people were killed in the
earthquake, and aid agen-
cies have struggled to pro-
vide food and shelter for
around one million left
homeless.

Home}less

The Haitian government
is now appealing for 40,000
dwellings for the 200,000
homeless living in the worst
flooding and mudslide-
prone areas.

By returning migrants
now, the community leader
fears the Bahamas will gain
a poor humanitarian repu-
tation internationally.

Antoine St Louis, presi-
dent of the United Haitian
Bahamian Association,
added: “We applaud what
the Government did for the
Haitian people after the
earthquake, but we would
hope they would give them
some more time.

“Haiti is not ready to take
anyone as yet.

“They still have a million
homeless people sleeping on
the street, they still have no
food.

“There has not been any
improvement to the situa-
tion.

“If they gave them some
more time that would really
help because it is still in dire
need.”

Mr Symonette maintains
there has been no change to
the Bahamian Immigration
policy, although exceptions
were made in the aftermath
of the earthquake.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham approved the
release of 102 Haitian men,
women and children held at
the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre days after
the quake hit and they were
granted temporary status to
remain in the Bahamas for
up to six months.

Meanwhile the United
States government extend-
ed 18 months Temporary
Protected Status (TPS) to
an estimated 200,000
Haitians already in the US
when the earthquake struck.

However, both the US
and Bahamas continued to
apprehend all those illegally
landing within their borders

TTS Da GUST





CONSTRUCTION on the new Straw Market is continuing on Bay Street. Work is taking place
behind the colourful murals which block out the area to pedestrians. The original straw market
burned down in 2001.

Dr. Carlos O. Thomas & Associates

Have Relocated To #6 Collins Avenue Opposite Doctor's Hospital
Phone: 325-8028 or 325-8048
Mon - Fri 8:30 am to 6:00 pm ¢ Sat 8:30 am to 2:00 pm

LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU AT OUR NEW LOCATION!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

after January 12 to be repa-
triated when the Haitian
government was ready to
accept them.

A total of 62 Haitian
migrants found on a boat in
Exuma two weeks after the
earthquake were immedi-
ately repatriated by the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force with assistance from
the United States Coast
Guard.

Earthquake

While dozens of others
apprehended since the
earthquake were charged in
court to extend the period
of their detention until they
could be repatriated on
Monday, March 29.

The 86 illegal migrants
apprehended in Long Island
on March 27 were then
returned to Haiti on
Wednesday.

In response to criticism
from the PLP Opposition,
the Immigration Minister
released a statement on
Monday to clarify how gov-
ernment’s policy regarding
repatriation has remained
constant despite exceptions
being made in the aftermath
of the quake.

“Now that it is possible to
resume the orderly repatri-
ation of illegal Haitian immi-
grants, those who have been
incarcerated are being repa-
triated,” Mr Symonette said.

“Any new illegal immi-
grants are being apprehend-
ed and repatriated as
promptly as possible.”





eR BP Bsa
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
aKa O TL)
ei na Tey
922-2197

Wine ava Gallery

WOnGS Riazal® ViaGeira ot, \ 4 ma
Nel; ((242)326-2335 ae F

Chairsum
Tables
Benches
Umbre
Lounge
Drinks T
Coffee Table
End Tables
Cushions

BEC power plant opponents’
hearing underway today

FOUR months after permission was granted for
opponents of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Wilson City power plant to seek a judicial review of the
Government’s decision to build the plant, that hearing
gets underway today in Freeport.

At the end of the three-day review proceedings
against the Prime Minister, ministers of the Environ-
ment, Health, Public Works and Transport, The South
Abaco District Council, the Attorney General and
BEC, the judge is expected to give his judgment on
whether the Government was correct or otherwise in its
decision-making and handling of the Abaco power
plant project.

It is likely that the findings will be largely of use in
determining the way forward in future cases of this
kind, as the trial, before Justice Hartman Longley of the
Supreme Court, comes at a time when the construction
of the $105 million plant is now almost 80 per cent
complete.



Development

The judicial review was sought by Responsible Devel-
opment for Abaco, a company that has been created by
civic minded Abaconians and Grand Bahamians to be
a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) to oppose
the development of the Wilson City Power Plant in
Abaco.

When RDA applied for the review, which attempts to
stop the construction of the Wilson City Power Plant,
they also asked for all work on the plant to be stopped
until the review was able to go ahead, warning that
the facility would — as it now is — be substantially
finished by the time the review went ahead.

RDA, which is represented by Fred Smith, QC, con-
tends that the people of Abaco were not adequately
consulted on the decision to locate the plant where it
has been constructed and to burn the controversial
“Bunker C” fuel that it was initially set to use to create
power.

In what has been seen as a victory for RDA prior to
the review, BEC has confirmed that it has changed its
mind on “Bunker C”, considered more environmentally
damaging than other fuels, and will now use automotive
diesel oil at the plant.

ios Bost Moment

FURNISHED!!!
exclusively at
Maison Décor
i?

PRITCHARD DESIG













WaT
J ji
1 F

MN GROU.
Nassau’s Premier Store

Ao eis ar Out ee

Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9933
PA). Hox N-121, Nassau, '.P., Bahamas

email:info@colesofnassnucom

ie ee *
ns ++

or Elegance



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ee => °) 3.0") "=n =13 =a 1°) sr
For the record: I do not

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

‘Operation Ceasefire’ worth investigating

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed
another approach to crime, one that would
tap into a community’s social problems and
force criminals — especially those operating
in gangs — to take responsibility, not only
individually, but also as a group, for the
error of their ways.

A Scottish police woman, impressed by
the results that “Operation Ceasefire” was
having in subduing Boston’s criminals, tried
to convince the Strathclyde police depart-
ment, which included Glasgow, a city
plagued by 3,500 gang members, ranging in
age from 11 to 23, to explore the possibilities
of adapting the programme to the needs of
Glasgow.

Her colleagues were sceptical, writes
Gavin Knight, in “The Week”, a weekly
London publication. They believed that
Boston gang crime was driven by the control
of the drug markets, with guns the enforcers,
and gang members mainly African-Ameri-
cans. They believed that Glasgow’s crime
was different. Police woman, Karyn
McCluskey, disagreed. She was convinced
that the “macho street code and group
dynamics were the same.” McCluskey said
when she sat in on Boston gang trials she
found that “the majority of the fights and
murders were about respect. They weren’t
about control of the drugs market. Fights
over girlfriends. Fights over territory. You’ve
come into my area — exactly what we have
in Glasgow.”

She was determined to try out Harvard-
educated David Kennedy’s “Operation
Ceasefire”. Kennedy flew to Strathclyde to
convince McCluskey’s colleagues. The £5
million needed to fund the project was
raised. People were brought together from
justice, government, housing, careers, edu-
cation, social work, health and the commu-
nity. After 18 months of planning, the Strath-
clyde police were ready for the first call-in. It
was held in the Glasgow sheriff’s court on
October 24, 2008 and was opened by the
sheriff.

Wrote Gavin Knight:

“Through a cordon of four mounted
police at the entrance, 120 gang members
were escorted into the courtroom by police
in riot gear. A police helicopter hovered
overhead and constables cruised up and
down the Clyde. ‘The chief of police stands
up first. He gives a hard-edged message,’





Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS
ep) ee a)
aS a ee By
Nee eS
Check Out These Great Values





McCluskey recalled. ‘Pictures of the gangs
are getting flashed around on the screens.
We know who you are, who you associate
with, who you fight with. If we wanted, we
could have a police officer outside your front
door. You could see the looks on their faces.
They are shocked.”

Members of the community then spoke.
An elderly man told how frightened he was
to walk down the street to collect his pen-
sion. An Accident and Emergency consul-
tant explained the difficulty in dealing with
knife victims. A mother told of how her 13-
year-old son was set upon by a machete-
wielding gang. He tried to protect his badly
damaged face, resulting in the loss of his
fingers. “We had gang members crying
because regardless of how good or bad their
parents are — they love their mums,”
McCluskey said “That was the most power-
ful thing in the US, and it was the most pow-
erful thing here too,” she noted.

Another speaker had committed murder
at 18. He explained the dehumanising and
harrowing aspects of prison life. He told of
spending his twenties in prison, “someone
telling him when he can go to the toilet,
when he can eat.” He had a “level of
remorse that speaks to them,” said
McCluskey.

It is too early to officially evaluate the
results of the Stathclyde programme, but
according to anecdotal evidence it appears to
be working. It is reported that the Ceasefire
model has been the most successful attempt
so far to reduce crime in that area, and is
being suggested for other British cities.

“Operation Ceasefire” provides a helping
hand for anyone who wants to leave gang life
and enter the world of worthwhile achieve-
ment. Each gang member is given a phone
number to call if he wants to leave a gang.
The boys are assessed by a social worker,
and their needs are noted, whether it be a
programme to get them off drugs or get
them an education. Health care, career
advice and social services are also provided.

We suggest that our Commissioner of
Police give Mr David Kennedy a call to
explore whether “Operation Ceasefire”, or
some adaptation of it, might bear fruit in
the Bahamas.

Our crime situation has now reached a
point where almost anything is worth inves-
tigation.






Blair Estates,

Danville has



issued.

THE TRIBUNE



support forced sexual
intercourse in marriage

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the aftermath of the
death of the proposed amend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
and Domestic Violence Act,
many have ventured to spec-
ulate on the reasons the bill
did not make it into law. One
recent instalment to the
plethora of speculative views
is The Tribune’s March 29
Insight column written by Ms
Noelle Nicolls. In the process
of giving her view, which was
summed up in her title, “Govt
‘running scared’ over marital
rape bill,” Ms Nicolls joined
the long line of others who,
over the months of public
debate, misquoted my state-
ments and misrepresented my
position on the proposed
amendment.

Ms Nicolls wrote: “King-
dom Life Church pastor
Cedric Moss argued that rape
cannot be committed in mar-
riage as each spouse gives the
other authority over their
body and agrees to open-end-
ed sexual consent in the mar-
riage vows.” I’ve surmised
that Ms Nicolls is referring to
the address I made to the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
on August 6, 2009, and since I
did not argue such a position
as stated by Ms Nicolls, I have
provided her with a copy of
my full remarks for her
perusal.

Hopefully, after consider-
ing what I actually said, Ms
Nicolls will offer the appro-
priate correction in a future
edition of The Tribune.

In her quest to make her
case, it appears as though Ms
Nicolls chose to not state the
most important part of my
position on the issue of forced
sexual intercourse in mar-
riage, and it is this: Through-
out the entirety of the debate
on the proposed amendment,
T unequivocally supported the
criminalisation of forced sex-

Our moral decline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The level of crime in this
country has risen (or shall I say
“fallen”) to such a state that
after reading today’s headlines,
I fear it confirms the morals
that our society apparently
embraces allowing or encour-
aging such behaviour. The fact
that criminals can get away with
gunning down innocent victims
in broad daylight is bad enough,
but doing it while naked is quite
a statement! I refer to today’s
front page (March 22) “Naked
Gunman Kills Motorist”. That
says it all. What’s next?

A VERY
CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Nassau,

March 22, 2010.

I, Debra J. Darville of Coral Place, Little Blair,
Nassau, The Bahamas
made sworn deposition that Life of Barbados
policy No.0103426 on the life of Rodman Horsley
been lost and having made
application to us to grant a duplication of
the same. Notice is hereby given that unless
objection is raised with one month of the date
thereof, the duplicate policy asked for will be

have



LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ual intercourse in marriage;
however, I did not support
the approach by which the bill
proposed to criminalise forced
sexual intercourse in mar-
riage.

However, from Ms Nicolls’s
article, it is easy to get the
impression that I support
forced sexual intercourse in
marriage.

Nevertheless, for the record
I again unconditionally state
that I did not and still do not
support forced sexual inter-
course in marriage; it is wrong
and should be punishable by
law.

In my view, one of the rea-
sons that the proposed legis-
lation failed to garner public
consensus is the biased
reporting of activist journalists
(they know who they are);
instead of objectively report-
ing on the various views on
the proposed amendment,
they allowed personal
activism to trump profession-
al journalism.

In the end, the public
debate suffered. It is actually
sad that the public debate on
that important piece of pro-
posed legislation was not
done in a more civil and
objective manner.

During the course of the
debate, many persons (includ-
ing some journalists) felt the
need to vilify, mock, and
demean those who had an
opposing view, and the
national debate suffered.

Ms Nicolls’s Insight article
continues with this approach
and is a case in point.

I am hopeful that in this
next parliamentary session the
government will introduce a
new bill to criminalise forced
sexual intercourse in marriage
without blurring the clear and

very obvious distinctions
between forced sexual inter-
course between unmarried
persons and forced sexual
intercourse between married
persons.

Our laws already cover
forced sexual intercourse
between unmarried persons,
and we don’t need to tamper
with those laws in order to
criminalise forced sexual
intercourse within marriage.

We simply need appropri-
ate laws to separately crimi-
nalise forced sexual inter-
course in marriage.

I believe there will be over-
whelming support from mar-
ried men and women for such
an approach, so long as it
takes into account the realities
of marital relations.

While little attention has
been given to it, I think the
saddest part of the failure of
the proposed amendment to
the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act is the
death of the proposal to
increase from six months to
two years the time limit for
proceedings for summary
offences that are triable under
the Act.

In my view, since there
seemed to be no widespread
dissent on this part of the pro-
posed amendment, the gov-
ernment should have sepa-
rately passed it rather than
letting it die with the more
contentious parts of the bill. I
supported such an approach
in my remarks to the Rotary
Club of West Nassau, but it
went unreported.

Perhaps if activist journal-
ists who focused exclusively
on the marital rape aspect of
the bill had done their job of
objective reporting, the out-
come of this and the other
parts of the bill would have
be quite different.

CEDRIC MOSS
Nassau,
March 31, 2010.

Quietness is ex’

to Godliness ...

EDITOR, The Tribune.

make,

work,

Signed,

Nassau,
March, 2010.



Dear Mr Prime Minister, please len’ me your ear,

I got me one problem, dat’s bring me to tears.

It’s dese damn motorcycles, screamin’ tru da night,
Loud enough to wake da dead, it just ain’t right.
Ain’t there some kinda law against dis kinda muffla,
Why you don’t enforce it, so we don’t got to suffa?
It ain’t like dey hard to find, wit all da noise deys

So please get ’em off da streets for errybody sake.
Make ’em change da mufflas to ones dat’re quiet,
Before da rest of da peoples dem does start one riot.
Tell customs dem, “keep dem tings outa we country”
An’ firewoiks an’ cherry bombs, an’ all an’ sundry!
If I can’t sleep, I can’t t’inks, if I can’t t’inks, I can’t

So please don’t get me fired because of these

Going Deaf, but ain’t Dumb







PS
FOR SALE

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI

'04 FORD EXPLORER

'95 NISSAN BLUEBIRD
‘98 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
‘99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘08 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

. ‘97 TOYOTA AVALON
img@8 '91 VOLVO 740 GL

— '98 HONDA ACCORD

#1 AUTO DEALER Id THE Baur AAAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wail ger chereraere of Cuaality Auta Sobei (Freeport) lid es ides deck, Qeaere bey, 132-6197
af Abooo Mivior Ball, Don bacieg Bed, 167-39 1d

OPEN: Mon to Fr actiam - 5:30om * Sat B:S0ami - 1
















2006 IZUZU
ADVERTISING VAN
LOADED WITH
SPECIAL FEATURES

Call: 396-4101

SANS SOUCI SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 25

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residence, 5 beds / 4 baths
with 2 Apartment Units, 1 bed/ 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,450 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Prince Charles Drive
enter Sans Souci then turn onto Sherwood
Drive; the subject property is the 3rd
building on the right, peach trimmed
white.

APPRAISED VALUE: $497,000







INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OFTELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT
RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O. BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVETHE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.

eur





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 5



Call for inquiry into reported
child abuse cases disparity

By ALESHA CADET

THE Opposition’s
spokesperson for social ser-
vices is calling on the gov-
ernment to launch an
inquiry into the disparity in
the number of reported
child abuse cases recorded
by the different agencies.

Melanie Griffin, PLP MP
for Yamacraw and former
Minister of Social Services,
said in a statement yester-
day:

“The Ministry of Social
Services is indicating that
according to their records
there are 118 reported cases
of sexual abuse of children
in 2010. However, police
statistics show that for 2010
thus far, the total number
of all rape, attempted rape,
and unlawful sexual inter-
course matters are 80 cases
(i.e. in all categories.

“Does this mean that
there is a difference of at
least 38 cases that have not
been reported to the police
for investigation?”

Ms Griffin was respond-
ing to a report in a daily last
week which stated that so
far for 2010 reported cases
of child sexual abuse are up

42 per cent over last year.









“If the 118 cases which
represent the first quarter
of reporting are any indica-
tion of what the number of
sexual abuse cases against
children is likely to be for
2010, our children and our
country are in serious trou-
ble,” she said.

Ms Griffin said such an
increase cannot be exclu-
sively due the enactment of
the Child Protection Act
2007 in October last year.

“The increase in child
abuse statistics generally



“What is the explanation for
this disconnect, particularly in
light of the National Child
Abuse Protocol which was put
in place in part to co-ordinate
inter-agency handling of
reported cases of child abuse?”



and sexual abuse in particu-
lar was noted long before
the enactment of the Child
Protection Act 2007 in
October 2009. In fact,
according to Child Abuse
Statistics for 2007, compiled
by the Department, there
were almost 1,600 reported
cases of child abuse of
which 286 were sexual
abuse,” she said.

While the enactment of
the Child Protection Act
and the efforts to heighten
awareness of the problem
would have an impact on
the increased reporting, Ms
Griffin said it “cannot be
accepted that these are the
only reasons, particularly in

Melanie Griffin

view of such significant
increases.”

“There must be some-
thing else at play. Is the
problem really due in large
part to the fact that the
Department does not have
the capacity to deal with the
ever increasing social issues
of today?” she said.

“What is the explanation
for this disconnect, particu-
larly in light of the National
Child Abuse Protocol which
was put in place in part to
co-ordinate inter-agency
handling of reported cases
of child abuse? Is there a
break down in the govern-
ment’s reporting and the
prosecution process?”

Five weekend armed
robberies investigated

POLICE are investigating
five reported armed robberies
that occurred throughout the
capital over the holiday week-
end.

The first incident occurred
around 12.25am on Friday in
the area of Robinson Road
and Minnie Street.

Police were told that a man
was approached by three
men, one of whom was
allegedly armed with a hand-
gun, as he was getting in his
car.

The thugs demanded cash
from the victim before rob-
bing him of his cell phone and
his wallet containing an unde-
termined amount of cash.

The culprits fled the area
on foot into the Minnie Street
area.

A second armed robbery
was reported to police around
11.19pm on Friday in the area
of Mermaid Boulevard, near
Carmichael Road.

According to reports a
woman, while on Mermaid
Boulevard, was approached
by a masked man armed with
a handgun who robbed her of
her 2003 Navy Blue Honda
Accord with the license plate
number 207187.

The car thief fled the area
in an unknown direction,
police said.

Around 4.20am the next
day police were called to the
scene of an armed robbery at

TOUGH CALL

LARRY SMITH’S week-
ly column, “Tough Call”,
will not appear in today’s
Tribune.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Podoleo Street off Cordeaux
Avenue.

Responding officers were
told that while at home, two
men were approached by four
masked men, clad in dark
clothing, all armed with hand-
guns, who demanded cash.

The culprits robbed the
men of an undisclosed
amount of money and fled the
area on foot in an unknown
direction.

Also on Saturday, at
around 8.45pm, _ police
received information of an
armed robbery at Robinson
and Marathon Roads.

A phone card vendor told
police that while standing at
the junction of the two streets,
he was approached by three
men one of whom was armed
with a handgun.

It is reported the culprits
robbed the man of an unde-
termined amount of cash and
pre-paid cell phone cards
before fleeing the area in a

gold coloured car, license
plate number 164739.

Moments later police were
able to intercept the vehicle
and arrested four male occu-
pants, aged 22, 23, 27 and 30.

The last reported incident
occurred around 11.24pm on
Saturday at the laundromat
Sparkle Wash on Baillou Hill
Road south.

Police were told that a man
wearing a white jacket and
blue jeans, and armed with a
handgun, entered the estab-
lishment demanding cash.

The culprit robbed the
establishment of an undeter-
mined amount of money and
fled the area on foot in an
unknown direction.

In other crime news, police
patrolling the Frederick Street
area on Friday morning
around 6.04am spotted the
wooden front door of the
high-end jewellery store
Colombian Emeralds open.

Officers, along with a key

[ MARINE NAVIGATION |

COURSES

Summer is coming so now is the time to
prepare for the boating season by enrolling
in courses offered by The Bahamas School
of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend the
free first class of the Terrestrial Navigation
Course on Monday, April 12th, at & 7p.m. at
BASRA Headquarters on East Bay Street then
consider enrolling in the 3-month course. Visit
www.bsmn.biz for details.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CAUTION IN THE WIND INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



holder for the store, checked
the establishment and found it
undisturbed, police said.
Investigations into all of
these incidents continue.

Ms Griffin is calling on
the government to appoint a
special task force to address
the high incidences of
reported abuse of children.

She further said that the
National Child Protection
Council should be mandat-
ed and provided with the
necessary resources to
increase its programmes to
educate the public about the
high incidences of child
abuse and what steps they
ought to take to prevent it
and report it.

Additionally, Ms Griffin
said government should
enlist the assistance of the
Bahamas Christian Council
and other religious organi-
sations in going into the
communities with faith-
based initiatives designed to
reach families and arrest
this current situation.

Woman ties
after traffic
accident

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 66-year-

: old woman died following
: a traffic accident in the
: South Bahamia area.

Her death is the third

fatality for the year on
: Grand Bahama.

Police Asst Supt Loretta

: Mackey reported that the
: accident occurred around
: 5pm last Wednesday when
? a woman driving a Sunfire
: Pontiac lost control of her
: vehicle and crashed into a
i utility pole on Pinta
; Avenue.

Ms Mackey said the vic-

: tim was transported by
: ambulance to the Rand
: Memorial Hospital, where
i she later died of her injuries
: at around 5.46pm.

Officers at the Police

: Traffic Division and a team
: of detectives are continuing
: their investigation into this
: matter.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SPEEDWAY HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Mase D. GARDINER HURRICANE
AND BURGULAR PROTECTION

#34 Bay Lilly Dr. Sea Breeze Estates
P.0. Box $$-5592, Nassau, The Bahamas

Phone: (242) 324-6794 © Fax: (242) 324-7554

Non-Fust Burgutar Screen
Doors with Double Action
Deadbolt Lock

—

Aluminum Accordion Shutters

Aluminum Bahama Shutters

nt

to fit Every budget

shila] |

mete

Aluminum Colonial Hinged Shutters

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS







a

Janet Bostwick (left) and Thelma Beneby, Per-
manent Secretary in the Office of the Attorney
General, embrace at a retirement luncheon held
for Mrs Beneby.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KANAGAWA VIEW INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator}

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CYGNUS VILLAGE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DIAMOND FIELDS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY ENTERPRISE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

—_





ie

, . F i i i — - | 7
. . . Ae é \ F [a a |
FORMER MINISTER of Justice and Immigration 9 eel Ee

pent

ATTORNEY GENERAL John Delaney and Minister of Legal Affairs speaks at the retire-
ment luncheon held for Thelma Beneby, Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Attor-
ney General, at the Police Conference Centre.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORSONNENS CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
FEMAX INT’L CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEXMARK CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUMMERTIME GROUP INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Permanent Secretary
is recognised for

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

THELMA Ferguson-
Beneby, Permanent Secretary
in the Office of the Attorney
General, was recognised for
34 years of exemplary service
in the public service.

A retirement luncheon was
held in her honour at the
Police Conference Centre last
Wednesday.

Mrs Beneby served 16
years aS a permanent secre-
tary in the Ministries of Jus-
tice and Immigration, Trans-
port, and the Public Service
Commission.

In a written tribute, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said Mrs Beneby served with
“honesty” and “integrity.”

He said she is knowledge-
able about the public service
and was “helpful” to early ini-
tiatives of modernising the
service, removing discrimina-
tory practices and reducing
anomalies that had evolved
over time.

Senator Foulkes said Mrs
Beneby created a family envi-
ronment in the ministries to
which she was assigned.

“Tt wasn’t business as usu-
al,” he said. “She cared for
her staff, she showed it in her
attitude towards them. She
also rewarded good work.”

Attending the retirement
luncheon, Mrs Janet Bostwick

* 9) 34 years of service

“In Thelma you will defi-
nitely not have someone who
will tell you what you want
to hear,” she said.

She thanked Mrs Beneby
for personal assistance to her,
to the country, and for the
example that she gave as a
mother, wife, public servant
and a child of God.

“TI can also attest to Mrs
Beneby’s deep spirituality
because not only did we work
together, we prayed togeth-
er over the work that we had
to do,” she said.

“There was more than a
bond of minister and perma-
nent secretary, there was the
deeper bond of two sisters in
Christ.”

The Attorney General
described Mrs Beneby as one
who epitomises “excellence”
in the public service.

“Tt is indeed my privilege
to have commenced my ser-
vice having her as my right
hand.”

In her response, Mrs
Beneby reflected on her
career and thanked Prime
Minister Ingraham for the
opportunity to have served
aS permanent secretary in
sO many important min-
istries.

Along with her husband
Felix and family, she
acknowledged the ministers,
colleagues, employees of the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral, church leaders and pub-
lic officers who supported her

also paid tribute to Mrs Bene-
by.

over the years.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGDENAU LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIMNAH CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WESTERN SPRINGTIDE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE





5 Haitian man charged after cocaine found

A HAITIAN man, who was arrested
Saturday after police discovered five kilos
of cocaine during a bag search at the Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport, was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yester-



FROM page one

body in an old Bronco jeep with an
apparent stab wound in his

abdomen.

The pair was not required to enter

a plea to the murder charge.

Knowles told the court that he
needed medical attention. He told
Chief Magistrate Gomez that offi-
cers from the Central Detective Unit
took hot water from a coffee
machine and poured it on his pri-

vate area.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered
that Knowles be taken to see a doc-
tor. He remanded the pair to Her
Majesty’s Prison. Their case has
been adjourned to April 13 and
transferred to Court 11, Nassau

Street.

day.



Jean Pierre Deiudonne, also known as
Ronald Jean Pierre, 52, of Midshipman
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama was
arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 8, Bank Lane yesterday.

It is alleged that on April 3, while at New
Providence he was found in possession of
a quantity of cocaine with intent to supply
to another. It is also alleged that on the
same day he attempted to import a quan-
tity of cocaine into the country.

Deiudonne, who was represented by
attorney Ian Cargill, pleaded not guilty to
the charges. He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected back in
court on Friday for a bail hearing.






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Family of dead man accuse
police of ‘sloppy’ case work

FROM page one

case and commission a fresh
investigation into the matter.

However, Assistant Super-
intendent Bernard Bonamy
Jr who took over the Central
Detective Unit's Homicide
Unit in January, said the case
is being investigated as a
homicide adding that the lead
investigator has done a
"remarkable" job.

"We investigate all (suspi-
cious) deaths as if it is a homi-
cide until we can prove oth-
erwise," he said.

Mr Burrows, a boater who
co-owned a landscaping com-
pany with his wife Arnette, is
said to have left his family
home around 5am on Sep-
tember 8, 2008. He was never
seen again. He was reported
missing several days later.

His family claims Mr Bur-
rows disappeared on his 45th
birthday leaving behind his
cellular phone, bank cards,
wallet, passport, his house
keys along with his wedding
band which they said he nev-
er took off.

On November 9, 2008,
police found a skull lying on
Spring Street in the Glenis-
ton Gardens subdivision, off
Prince Charles Road in east-
ern New Providence. DNA
testing identified the skull as
that of Mr Burrows. The fam-
ily said police told them about
the DNA match on February
17, 2010, 15 months after the
skull was discovered.

Additional skeletal
remains, found in another
location that same year, have
been sent off to a lab in the
United States to determine if
they belong to Mr Burrows.

"Once the results come
back and we have confidence
on who it is then we would
prepare our file and send it
to the Coroner's Court to
make a determination as to
how this person came about
his death. Based on the analy-
sis they will determine how
he was killed. Once we get
the results we'll know what
course of action to take," said
ASP Bonamy.

These remains were found
in late 2008 in an empty lot
in the San Souci area several
miles away from where the
skull was recovered on Spring
Road, according to a report
compiled by some of Mr Bur-
rows' relatives and sent to Mr
Greenslade.

The family claims police
told them a stray dog might
have moved some of the
remains to the second loca-
tion, several miles away. The
family also claimed in their
report that police found a
boot lace tied to a tree near
some of the remains, an item
the family believes may have
been planted at the site to
give the appearance of a sui-
cide.

Fed up, they now want a
new investigation launched
into Mr Burrows’ death.

"Our brother Bernard was
not known to the police nor
involved in any illegal activi-
ties. He was a church going
man, a devoted husband and
father, a dependable loving
brother and uncle. He was
always with a smile on his
face, even when he was in

pain during his hospitilisation.
We strongly believe that
police exerted little energy in
the preliminary stages of the
disappearance.

"His disappearance and
death was untimely and we
would appreciate some type
of closure," said the family,
in a written plea to Mr
Greenslade.

The family said while some
officers, notably Assistant
Commissioner Glenn Miller
before he was transferred out
of the CDU and a Detective
Turnquest stationed at the
Homicide section, have
expressed interest in the case,
they feel the "ball was
dropped" by investigating
officers during the start of the
case.



CURTIS RICHARD TAYLOR (left) and Christoph Knowles oe if Pan ec

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COLOMBIERSTRASS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice
in the provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable
candidates for the position of:

Accountant

c ore Responsibilities:
¢ Prepare individual and consolidated financial statements for
the company and its subsidiaries in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards
Provide analytical reviews of financial statements, management
reports, and other financial information to identify and
investigate significant variances of actual vs. budget and/or
prior year on a consolidated basis and on a more detailed level
for example, line of business, cost center ete.
Make recommendations on appropriate corrective action of
financial performance against planned and projected targets
to ensure sustained profitability
Document and analyze control environments for the Finance

Department

Compile budgets and prepare forecasts

Responsible for ensuring that statutory reports are filed in all
jurisdictions where the Company operates

Assist in the coordination of internal and statutory financial

audits

Position Requirements:
Certified Public Accountant
Three or more years of experience in public accounting
(financial services background is a necessity)
Strong technical skills and knowledgeable of generally accepted
accounting principles
Analytical and forward thinking
Knowledge of general ledger implementation and mamtenance
background (a plus)
Project management skills is a plus
A team player; willingness to be the pacesetter when appropriate

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications. Interested
persons should apply no later than 20th April, 2010 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
Or fax to: 242-323-2637

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 7

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA GOLD TRADING INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAND AND C
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAZI PLAINS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAGE MOUNTAIN
VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONETTE MOUNTAIN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





THE HEADQUARTERS of the FNM and PLP pictured yesterday.

FNM, PLP in fight

FROM page one

thinking to do — primarily
about how best he can ensure
his “hunger” to serve his coun-
try and to help it develop going
forward.

“I am extremely passionate
about getting involved. Not just
being involved for the sake of
pursuing any self interest, that’s
never been what it’s about, but
I have to consider whether the
electorate is prepared to accept
a party other than the PLP or
the FNM. I believe many per-
sons would’ve seen with this
recent by-election that I have a
lot of passion and I’d really like
for that passion to be put to use
in a way that will be accepted by
Bahamians,” he said.

Dr Rollins, who operates The
Bahamas Brace Place, was one
of three “fringe” party candi-
dates to offer for election in the
Elizabeth by-election, along
with the Bahamas Democratic
Movement’s Cassius Stewart
and the Workers’ Party’s Rod-

ney Moncur. Mr Stewart and
Mr Moncur received 77 and 16
votes each. The NDP has been
in existence since October 2008
and therefore the Elizabeth by-
election was the first time it put
forward a candidate for elec-
tion.

The revelation that he is now
seriously considering joining
one of the two main political
parties may come as a surprise
to some who paid attention to
his statements during the run
up to the election.

The NDP frontman ran on a
platform that in part sought to
distinguish him and the party
as an alternative to either of the
established political parties,
whom he often referred to as
devoid of ideas to help move
the country forward.

“T’ve heard people call it par-
ty shopping,” said Dr Rollins
yesterday of his meetings with
the two political parties, “but
one has to take into account in
politics to be successful that one
has to master the art of the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAKSTIGEN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR HORIZON EQUITY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



political, to work with people
not necessarily involved in your
political party. You have to be
able to reach across aisles reach
certain compromises to get
things done. That is an act of
political maturity.”

He added that he does not
see the possibility of him joining
the FNM or PLP as a “depar-
ture from many of the state-
ments I would’ve made or the
principles I have said previous-
ly that I believe strongly in”
although he recognised that
some will view it as such.

“Those principles I’ve
espoused those beliefs and goals
I’ve talked about previously are
still and will always be a part of
my make up. They are things
that I believe strongly in and
those things will not change —I
will always be about serving the
Bahamian people and seeking
to be about country before self.”

The dentist described it as a
privilege to meet with wife of
former PLP leader and Prime
Minister Sir Lynden Pindling,

to sign up Rollins

Dame Marguerite, and Prime
Minister Ingraham, whom he
met in that order.

Speaking of his meeting with
the Prime Minister and FNM
leader he said: “T had the oppor-
tunity to ask him certain ques-
tions and he had an opportuni-
ty to ask certain questions of
me and he had many years of
political experience and as a
result I was able to hear his per-
spective on certain things. I con-
sidered it a privilege for me to
meet with him one on one. The
fact of the matter is I left that
meeting with the opportunity
to meet with him further.”

He denied that he was
offered the chance to run in a
particular constituency by either
party, as had been reported in a
downmarket tabloid newspa-
per.

“T am still a member of the
NDP. I am doing a lot of soul
searching. My ultimate objec-
tive is to see this country really
take off and maximise its poten-
tial,” he said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLERO ALPHA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALENTEJO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

LITTLE STEPS UP TO THE LEAP

; By MIKE LIGHTBOURN





: AS YOU’VE already read here, con-
: ditions are ripe to become a homeown-
: er and it’s time to determine if you’re
: ready to make the leap. While the price
: of the home is the largest factor, don’t
: forget about loan fees and closing costs,
? which add to your total financed amount.
: Since banks are strict in their lending,
: Step One is pay off or reduce any debt
; you may already have, if you are able, to
: improve your risk rating. This may
: increase your chances of getting better
: terms and interest rates.

: Similarly, a larger down payment will
: positively affect your mortgage terms
: and reduce the amount you have to finance. If parents allow it,
: one option is to live at home longer and save money for a
: down payment. Another is to rent with a friend in order to pay
: less rent and save.

: Upon preapproval from a lender (which is something you
: should always do), you'll know how much of a loan you qual-
: ify for, and how much is required for the down payment. It’s best
: to secure preapproval before you begin looking at homes, so
: Vendors will see your offer is a solid one worthy of considera-
: tion since you have already qualified yourself.

: Ask your Bahamas Real Estate Association agent about
: closing costs. They will quote you the standard legal cost and
: your stamp duty obligations. Don’t forget if you are a first
: time homeowner you can apply for stamp duty exemption on
: a purchase up to $500,000. Ask your bank up front to list all fees
: associated with the loan (attorney’s fees, stamp duty on your
: mortgage, etc) and life insurance requirements.

: If you are borrowing money from a bank, you will need to get
: an appraisal from a bank-approved BREA appraiser.

: Contact your BREA agent today to get the ball rolling and
: find out from your bank how much home you can afford. This
: will save a whole lot of time.

: Tip of the Week — Save yourself the heartache and prequal-
: ify for a loan before you start to search for a home. I can’t count
: the number of times a fantastic buy has come on the market and
: the prospect has rushed to the bank to pursue a loan. Howev-
: er, by the time approval was granted, the home was under
: contract. Don’t miss the boat.

: Mike Lightbourn is president of Colwell Banker Light-
: bourn Realty in the Bahamas.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 21
in Block C situate in Garden Hills Subdivision Section II
in the Southern district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of a triplex with one unit consisting of (3) bedrooms, (2)
bathrooms and two units consisting of (2) bedrooms, (1)
bathroom.

Property Size: 8,807 sq. ft
Building Size: 4,151 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3276”. All offers must be received
peg close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ULSANWAR S.A

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SYNDICATE D.J.C. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CADDO MILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNGA MAWAR

INVESTMENTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

"Our agreement with China State
Construction Company includes the use
of their labour, however Baha Mar has
reaffirmed its commitment to hire as
many qualified Bahamians as possible
to work on the project during its three
year plus construction phase," Mr Sands
told The Tribune yesterday.

"The important point, however, is
once completed the project is expected
to create more than 8,000 new jobs for
Bahamian workers and contribute sig-

Baha Mar official

nificantly to the island's overall econo-
my," he said.

His comments came in response to
criticism by John Pinder, head of the
National Congress of Trade Unions of
The Bahamas (NCTUB).

"I don't think it's fair for them to
have to bring in 7,000 workers. I am
sure we can find the skills necessary
right here," Mr Pinder is quoted as say-
ing, referring to a speculative number of

how many Chinese workers are expect-
ed to help construct the project.

The number of work permits being
sought by Baha Mar's Chinese partners
has been viewed as a potentially difficult
political issue for the Bahamas govern-
ment, Tribune Business reported earli-
er this year, having heard varying esti-
mates ranging from 4,000 to 6,500 and
above.

However, a cap of 2,500 work per-
mit holders would be present in this
nation and working on the project at

While side-stepping the question of
how many Chinese workers will ulti-
mately take part in the construction
phase, Mr Sands said Bahamian labour
will be factored into the construction.

He added: "The fact of the matter is
that during the construction phase we
will have a full range of disciplines that
will be available to the Bahamian work-
force and certainly all those that are
qualified to perform those jobs would
be given the opportunity to apply and
hopefully be allowed to participate with-
in this venture.”

Last week Baha Mar pledged to
award all contracts for the $200 million
first phase construction of its Cable
Beach redevelopment to Bahamian
contractors, providing more than 250
jobs during the first 12 months of work,
with some 3,300 locals set to gain work
over the three-and-a-half year building
phase.

The developer hopes to break ground
once it and its equity partner, China
State Construction, received all the rel-
evant approvals from the Bahamian

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 3463
situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,136 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3547”. All offers must be received
by i close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
154 in Twynam Heights Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a single family residence consisting of a (4)
bedrooms and (3 1/2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 8,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 2,450 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2511”. All offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
97 situate in Big Pond Subdivision in the Western
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (1) bathrooms.

Property Size: 3,200 sq. ft
Building Size: 868 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1999”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land situate
northwardly of Blue Berry Hill Road in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of a (4) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,925 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,577 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1232”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

any one time.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 227
situate in Eastwood Estates Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single family residence consisting of (8) bedrooms
and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 7,500 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,132 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3036”. All offers must be received
Bane close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 2423
situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 6,307 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,368 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2012”. All offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land situate
approximately 2,320 feet South of Harold Road and
1.2 miles West of Blue Hill Road in the Western district
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a vacant property.

Property Size: 7,119 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE
CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1937”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 51
situate in Twynam Heights Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single family residence consisting of (8) bedrooms
and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 11,494 sq. ft
Building Size: 4,430 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed

envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank

Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

and marked “Tender 0782”. All offers must be received

by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
010.

and Chinese governments.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
446 West Winds Subdivision in the Western district of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is
a vacant property.

Property Size: 6,769 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 2556”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being a portion
of a larger tract of land situate on Gladstone Road in
the Western district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of a triplex apartment with each unit consisting of (2)
bedrooms and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 7,450 sq. ft
Building Size: 2,002 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2008”. All offers must be received
ag close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
400 situate in Yellow Elder Gardens Subdivision in
the Western district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a single family residence
consisting of (3) bedrooms and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 3,200 sq. ft
Building Size: 702 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE
CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1626”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
3254/55 situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of single family residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and
(2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,143 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed

envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank

Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

and marked “Tender 4170”. All offers must be received

ao close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
0.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM








THE TRIBUNE PAGE 10

or
|
ke



ts



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7,









2010



iy Le
2010 Carifta track and field team

Carifta track team
returns home













Felipé Major/Tribune sta

ae

BELOW is the final medal count for the 39th Carifta (Track and
Field) Games held over the weekend at the Truman Bodden
Sports Complex in the Cayman Islands:



1 Jamaica (JAM) 37 22 13 72
2 Trinidad & Tobago (TRI) | 12 16 12 40
3 Bahamas (BAH) 6 10 13 29
4 Barbados (BAR) 3 7 8 18
By RENALDO DORSETT George Town, Grand Cayman BAAAs President, Mike __ learning experience and use it as 5 Grenada (GRN) 2 0 2 4
Tribune Sports Reporter = with a complete medal haulof Sands, lauded the overall team _ motivation to train even harder 6 Martinique (MTQ) { 4 { 6
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net 29, which included six gold, 10 _ effort and their performance as _ for future events and for the 7 St. Kitts & Nevis (SKN) { { 0 9
_ silver and 13 bronze, which acohesive unit. next Carifta Games so you will 8 US Virgin Islands (ISV { { 0 9
AFTER A weekendofcom-. Secured a third place finish “This was a true team effort ensure you achieve your desired q )
petition at the region’s most overall. and from the moment competi- _ result, whether that be a posi- 9 St. Lucia (LCA) 1 0 3 4
prestigious junior meet, team Jamaica was once again the __ tion began to the finalevent this _ tion on the medal podium or a 10 Dominica (DMA) 1 0 1 2
Bahamas was greeted upon top country overall with a total team was together and per- new personal best.” 11 Cayman Islands (CAY) { 0 0 |
their return to the capital with of 72 medals (37 gold, 22 silver, formed as one. Those who were Sands praised the efforts of 12 Guyana (GUY) { 0 0 {
accolades and honours resulting and 13 bronze), while Trinidad —_ able to medal and set personal _ those behind the scenes that led 13 Bermuda (BER) 0 3 8 14
from one of the most statisti. @2¢ Tobago finished second __ bests the entire country is proud _ to the performance, including f
with 40 medals (12 gold, 16 sil- of you, your accomplishments coaches, management team 14 Netherlands Antilles (AHO) | 0 1 2 3
cally successful performances Be voy P oe ? :
in recent history. ver and 12 bronze). and the way you represented us administration, parents and the 15 Turks & Caicos (TKS) 0 1 0 1
“he: Fsmen ber Trace and The Bahamas improved on all in competetion,” he said,“To Ministry of Sports. 16 Antigua & Barbuda (ANT) | 0 0 1 |
Field team returned from the _/@St year’s fifth place finish and _ those of you who feel as if your “As usual the coaching staff 17 Guadeloupe (GPE) 0 0 { {
30th Carifta Championships in total of 25 medals which includ- performances fellshort of what — did a tremendous job guiding 18 Anguilla (AIA) 0 0 0 0
ed just two first place finishes. you expected, take this as a such a large team in each of the
events and they deservse spe- 19 Aruba (ARU) 0 0 0 0
cial commendation as well. 20 British Virgin Is. (IVB) 0 0 0 0
Regardless of their different 21 Fr. Guyana/ 0 0 0 0
methods as coaches we should Cayenne (GYE)
e e all realise that there is some- 22 Haiti (HAI) 0 0 0 0
A elebration of life thing different we all bring to 23 Montserrat (MNT) 0 0 0 0
the table and we must remem- as
e ber that the performance and 24 St. Vincent & 0 0 0 0
LS lanned or The Grenadines (VIN)
Dp SEE page 11 25 Suriname (SUR) 0 0 0 0



aphne Farrington

Friday afternoon 5 p.m.
April 9th
at
Port New Providence
Beach & Club House







Knowles loses doubles
partner to hip injury

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JUST when Mark Knowles
was hoping to turn things
around this season, his new
partnership suffered another
blow with Amercan Mardy
Fish going down with a hip
injury.

The injury came one day
after the duo won ther open-
ing match on Monday night at
the US Men’s Clay Court
Championships with a gru-
elling 6-7 (3), 7-5, 11-9 triumph
over the American team of
Eric Butorac and Rajeev Ram.

As Fish, 28, was preparing
to play his first round singles
match, he informed tourna-
ment officials that due to the
lingering effects of a siatic
nerce injury sustained in a fall
last week at the Sony Erics-
son Open in Miami, Florida,
he had to withdraw.

“Tm obviously extremely
disappointed not being able to
play here,” Fish, the Houston
singles champion in 2006 said
on the tournament’s website.

“T’ve had a lot of success at
this tournament. I have great
memomries here. It’s a real
bummer. From my point of
view, the way I was hitting the
ball, the was feeling in Miami
before I fell in the fourth
round there, it’s a bummer not
being able to play here.”

Unseeded Fish, who was
scheduled to play Isreal’s
Conor Niland in the first
round, was replaced by Indian
Somdev Devvarmann.

However, after winning
their first round doubles
match, Knowles and Fish had
to wait to see who their second
round opponents would be.
But Knowles say it doesn’t
matter because they had to
withdraw from further com-

petition.

“We won a good match on
Monday, but seeing that we
hadn’t played that many
matches, it was good for us to
get this one under our belts,’
Knowles said when contacted
yesterday.

“We played well. I hit the
ball well, but unfortunately
Mardy was still hurting rom
the injury and we got through
that match, but Mardy had to
withdraw from singles and we
withdrew from doubles.”

Knowles, 38, called it a
nightmare that he hope he can
finally wake up from.

“Who really has the jinx on
us are doing a pretty good
job,” Knowles said. “This is
crazy. We entered four tour-
naments and we’ve withdrawn
from three of them in four
months. It’s real discouraging.
But all you can dois try to get
healthy and try to win.”

Coming off his injury that
sidelined the newly formed
duo from January, Knowles
said he now have to go back to
the drawing board.

“The good news is that I’m
healthy and I’m playing well,”
Knowles said.

Knowles feels he will defi-
nitely know for sure how
healthy he is when he play in
Monte Carlo, teaming up with
Bruno Soares from Brasil, who
is currently ranked at 23 in
doubles.

“T don’t think Mardy and I
will play again until the French
Open. It is what it is. It’s not
the type of start to the year
that I anticipated, but for oth-
er reasons, it has happened,”
Knowles said.

“T just have to stay focus and
try to get both of us healthy
again. But at this point, it’s
obviously been very frustrat-
ing.”

Even though this is just the

fourth month in the year,
Knowles said it’s very late in
the season to look for a new
partner so with each tourna-
ment, he will have to see who
is available until Fish return
to action.

“Everybody’s already paired
up. I probably will end up
playing with a different partner
every week,’ he said. “I’m
going to just try to play my
best tennis and hope that it
blend with whoever I’m play-
ing with that week.”

Knowles and Soares will
play in the Monte-Carlo Rolex
Masters starting on Monday.
Following that, he will have to
find a new partner to play at
the Barcelona Open in Spain,
starting on April 18.

He will close out the month
at the Internazionali BNL d’1-
talia in Rome on April 25.

The French Open at Roland
Garros, when Fish is expected
to return, is scheduled to start
on May 23 in Paris, France.

As a side bar to the injuries
to Knowles and Fish, Knowles’
former partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi and his new partner,
came close to winning their
first tournament for the year
when they fell victim to the
team of Leander Paes and
Lukas Dlouhy.

And from another Bahami-
an perspective in Houston yes-
terday, former Davis Cup
player Ryan Sweeting pulled
off a big win in the men’s sin-
gles.

Having advanced from the
qualifying round, Sweeting
eliminated number five seed
Kazakhstani Evgeny Korolev
with a 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 win.

Sweeting, 22, is ranked at
150 in the world. It was his first
win on the ATP World Tour
since July 2009 when he got
to the second round of the LA
Tennis Open.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



TRIBUNE SPORTS

AT the end of the third
day of the XXV Carifta
Swimming Championships in
Kingston, Jamaica, the
Bahamas’ 36-member team
moved up from fourth to
third in the medal count.

The Bahamas had accu-
mulated a total of 26 medals,
including six gold, nine silver
and 11 bronze. They were sit-
ting behind Barbados, who
had 14 gold, 16 silver and five
bronze for 35 medals.

Trinidad & Tobago con-
tinued to press out front with
72 medals. They had 35 gold,
24 silver and 13 bronze.

The Bahamas was also
occupying third place in the
point standings with 442.
Trinidad & Tobago led with
757 and Guadeloupe was in
second with 442.

The final day of the meet
was held last night, but the
results were not available at
press time.

e In events staged on Mon-
day’s day three, the follow-
ing results were posted by the
Bahamian athletes:

GIRLS 11-12
100 freestyle final — 1 Mar-



TRACK
DEATH/

FUNERAL SERVICE

e THE Tribune Sports
Department join the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations and
the College of the Bahamas
in extending condolences to
the family of Bradley Coop-
er, whose mother Shirley
Cooper, recently passed
away.

Mrs Cooper will be funer-
alised on Saturday at 10 a.m.
at Salem Union Baptist
Church. The BAAA is
encouraging as many of its
members to come out and
support the Cooper family.

Bradley Cooper was a for-
mer outstanding athlete who
still holds the national
records in both the shot put
and discus. He is now the
Assistant Athletic Director
at the College of the
Bahamas and is a BAAA’s
affiliated coach.

mie ee
THIRD ANNUAL
FRITZ GRANT

INVITATIONAL

e THE third annual Fritz
Grant Track and Field Invi-
tational is scheduled for Sat-
urday, May 8 at the Thomas
A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium.

The age categories include
the under 7, 9, 11, 13,15, 17
and Open divisions for both
male and female. The entry
fee is $5.00 per athlete.
Relay teams will be charged
$8.00 per team, but teams
under 13 will only pay $5 per
relay.

The entry deadline is
Tuesday, April 27. There
will be no entries on the day
of the meet. Applications
are to be turned in to
Bernard Newbold, Fritz
Grant or the BAAA’s
office.

Medals will be presented
to the first three finishers in
each event. The meet is
sanctioned by the Bahamas
Association of Athletic
Associations and will give
athletes the opportunity to
meet the qualification stan-
dards for CAC Junior
Championships, IAAF
World Junior Champi-
onships, CAC Games and
Commonwealth Games.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



tin, Tyla, Trinidad, 1:01.74R;
2 Sherry, Inayah, Barbados,
1:02.13; 3 Backovic, Char-
lotte, Guadeloupe, 1:04.25; 8
Sturrup, Simone, Bahamas,
1:07.95.

200 butterfly - 1 Arends,
Sue-Gin, Aruba, 2:37.66; 2
David, Syriah, Trinidad,
2:42.91; 3 Arends, Ginayla,
Aruba, 2:45.60; 6 Bevans,
Jourdan, Bahamas, 2:59.89;
8 Sturrup, Simone, Bahamas,
3:13.00.

¢ BOYS 11-12

200 IM final - 1 Baptiste,
Jabari, Trinidad, 2:24.55; 2
Selby, Christian, Barbados,
2:31.09; 3 Moses, Zach,
Bahamas, 2:33.68; 4 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 2:33.90.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Campbell, Kevaughn,
Jamaica, 34.54; 2 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 34.90; 3
Charlemagne, Che Sheldon,
Guadeloupe, 35.99.

100 freestyle final - 1 Bap-
tiste, Jabari, Trinidad, 58.49; 2
Selby, Christian, Barbados,
59.29; 3 Wernet, Tyreke, Aru-
ba, 1:00.07; 5 Moses, Zach,
Bahamas, 1:03.67; 8 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 1:04.44.

200 butterfly - 1 Selby,
Christian, Barbados, 2:27.31;
2 Marsau, Mathias, Guade-
loupe, 2:41.52; 3 Carey, Dion-
isio, Bahamas, 2:43.28; 5
Moses, Zach, Bahamas,
2:44.93.

¢ GIRLS 13-14

200 IM final - 1 Holder,
Zabrina, Barbados, 2:29.49;
2 van den Berg, Daniella,
Aruba, 2:33.77; 3 Small,
Deandre, Barbados, 2:35.36;
5 Morley, Laura, Bahamas,
2:37.10.

50 breastroke - 1 Leter, Evi-
ta, Suriname, 35.00R; 2
Small, Deandre, Barbados,
35.37; 3 Stephenson, Jessica,
Guyana, 35.50; 5 Greene,
Gabrielle, Bahamas, 36.30; 8
Rolle, Riquel, Bahamas,
37.53.

100 freestyle final - 1 Hold-
er, Zabrina, Barbados,
1:00.43; 2 Azincourt, Laurie,
Guadeloupe, 1:00.65; 3 Pon-
son, Gaby, Aruba, 1:01.38; 5
Smith, Taryn, Bahamas,
1:03.75.

200 butterfly - 1 Gibbs,
Amara, Barbados, 2:22.37; 2
Holder, Zabrina, Barbados,
2:23.59; 3 van den Berg,

Daniella, Aruba, 2:36.44; 4
Smith, Taryn, Bahamas,
2:38.58.

800 freestyle relay final - 1
Barbados, 9:12.92; 2 Guade-
loupe, 9:13.46; 3 Aruba,
9:15.70; 4 Bahamas, 9:39.92 -
Morley, Laura; Lowe, Abi-
gail; Williams, Jacinda;
Smith, Taryn.

° BOYS 13-14

200 IM final - 1 Groters,
Jordy, Aruba, 2:17.5; 2 Bois-
son-Yates, Keegan, Trinidad,
2:20.01; 3 Bouchaut, Joris,
Guadeloupe, 2:20.09; 7
Tynes, Dustin, Bahamas,
2:28.30.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Tynes, Dustin, Bahamas,
32.06; 2 Groters, Jordy, Aru-
ba, 32.25; 3 Denswil, Wayne,
Suriname, 33.16.

100 freestyle final - 1
Romany, Joshua, Trinidad,
53.64R; 2 Carter, Dylan,
Trinidad, 54.77; 3 Laventure,
Kevin, Martinique, 55.58; 7
Farquharson, Peter,
Bahamas, 59.05.

200 butterfly final - 1
Bouchaut, Joris, Guade-
loupe, 2:17.92; 2 Romany,
Joshua, Trinidad, 2:18.75; 3

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 11

SPORTS

Bahamas takes third place at Carifta Swimming Championships

Ledan, Axel, Guadeloupe,
2:19.96; 8 Moss, T'Auren,
Bahamas, 2:45.35.

800 freestyle relay final - 1
Trinidad and Tobago,
8:27.73; 2 Martinique, 8:28.67;
3 Guadeloupe, 8:29.81; 6
Bahamas, 9:04.52 - Cleare,
Zarian; Tynes, Dustin; Far-
quharson, Peter; Hernandez
Valdes, Anibal.

¢ GIRLS 15-17

200 IM final - 1 Lightbourn,
McKayla, Bahamas, 2:23.05;
2 Rahael, Samantha,
Trinidad, 2:23.61; 3
Marinette, Caroline, Guade-
loupe, 2:28.14.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Dufeal, Etie, Martinique,
35.80; 2 Chin, Rejan,
Trinidad, 36.07; 3 Thompson,
Cherelle, Trinidad, 36.28; 5
Moss, Shaunte, Bahamas,
36.43.

100 freestyle final - 1 Pigot,
Chinyére, Suriname, 59.00; 2
John Williams, Kimberlee,
Trinidad, 59.68; 3 Marinette,
Caroline, Guadeloupe,
1:00.09; 6 Butler, Ashley,
Bahamas, 1:01.35; 8 Deveaux,
Bria, Bahamas, 1:02.25.

200 butterfly final - 1

Dufeal, Etie, Martinique,
35.80; 2 Chin, Rejan,
Trinidad, 36.07; 3 Thompson,
Cherelle, Trinidad, 36.28; 5
Moss, Shaunte, Bahamas,
36.43.

800 freestyle relay - 1 Suri-
name, 9:04.86; 2 Trinidad and
Tobago, 9:04.98; 3 Jamaica,
9:12.32; 5 Bahamas, 9:19.49 -
Deveaux, Bria; Butler, Ash-
ley; Albury, Maya; Light-
bourn, McKayla.

¢ BOYS 15-17

50 breastroke final - 1 Pigot,
Diguan, Suriname, 31.34; 2
Rigues, Ryan, Trinidad,
31.53; 3 Gibson, Evante,
Bahamas, 31.64.

200 butterfly final - 1 Bel-
lance, Matthias, Martinique,
2:05.83R; 2 Pelagie, Valy,
Guadeloupe, 2:10.30; 3
Homer, Christian, Trinidad,
2:12.73; 5 Lowe, Matthew,
Bahamas, 2:18.72; 8 Gibson,
Evante, Bahamas, 2:22.90.

800 freestyle relay - 1 Mar-
tinique, 8:02.08; 2 Guade-
loupe, 8:06.83; 3 Trinidad and
Tobago, 8:17.78; 5 Bahamas,
8:32.35 - McIntosh, Delano;
Roberts, Mancer; Moss,
Armando; Lowe, Matthew.



Kendal Rolle All-Star Baskethall Classic set for Saturday

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil has announced that its
2010 Kendal Rolle All-Star
Basketball Classic will take
place on Saturday at the DW
Davis Gymnasium.

The All-Star Classic will
feature the majority of the
top players from the 15-And-
Under, 19-And-Under and
Men's Division. As there is
no ladies division this year,
the All-Star Classic will pro-
vide a game for the female
players to participate in.

Additionally, there is a spe-
cial matchup with the coach-
es playing against the execu-
tives and the officials com-
bined.

The All-Star Classic will
kick off at 10 a.m. on Satur-
day with the 15-And-Under
game. That will be followed
by the ladies’ All-Star and
then the Coaches/Executives
game. The three-point and
slam dunk contest will then
take place.

The All-Star Classic will
then conclude with the 19-
And-Under and the Men's
All-Star games.

e Here's a look at the play-
ers selected to participate in
the three divisions:

15-AND-UNDER

PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Coach — Brent Stubbs
(Macedonia), assisted by Ster-
ling Pratt (Latter-Day).

Macedonia — Adolphsis
Leadon, Steven Mitchel, Del-
roy Garrison, Lamar Saun-
ders, Van Hutchinson and
Omari Neely.

Latter-Day - Jeffery
Williams, Teneas Mackey,
Jamal Ingraham and Dario
McKenzie.

St. John’s — Nathan Nicholls
and Wesley Strapp.

15-AND-UNDER

VICE PRESIDENT

Coach — Geno Campbell
(Temple Fellowship), assist-
ed by Christopher Russell Jr
(Christian Tabernacle).

Temple Fellowshp — Jan
Thompson, Kenrico Lock-
hart, Randy Mille, Renauld
Ingraham, Antario Collie and
Rashad Bain.

Christian Tabernacle —
Westin Saunders, Dereck
Adams, Omar Belle and
Valentino Sargent.

St. John’s — Oral Forbes
and Percival Nicholls.

19-AND-UNDER
PRESIDENT’S TEAM
Coach - Kevin McPhee

(Cousin McPhee), assisted by





J . al \
MEMBERS of the Carifta team look on as they are adressed by





members of the BAAAs administration.

Carifta track team
returns home

FROM page 10

development of the athlete
remains the top priority. Thanks
to the Ministry we were able to
field the largest team possible,”
he said. “As you know it is not a
cheap trip from the travel to the
operating costs we felt we were
able to send the best available
team because of the Ministry’s
contributions. Parents, these
athletes need your support and
we cannot thank you enough
for the effort you have put forth
as we attempt to turn Carifta
into a true family event and pos-
itively effect the general devel-
opment of the sport.”

The team saw six new Carifta
champions crowned in the
Grand Cayman, while two new
meet records were established.

Nine athletes qualified for the
TAAF World Junior Champi-
onships, the most the Bahamas
has ever fielded for the event,
while 25 qualified for the JR
CAC games.

Team Head Coach, Fritz
Grant, said the impressive per-
formance over the weekend
should serve as building blocks
for the individual athletes as

they continue with the sport and
for the development of nation-
al junior program

“The experience you gained
on the biggest stage in the
region should prove invaluable
as your careers progress. It
should only inspire you to work
harder and reach levels of
achievement that you may have
thought you were unable to
reach. Your journey here began
some time ago in your individ-
ual training sessions and your
coaches did an excellent job of
preparing you.” he said. “We
were able to improve our stand-
ing from fifth place to third, but
it does not stop there. We will
continue to work toward our
ultimate goal and continue to
close the gap between us and
our competitors.”

The 40th Carifta Track and
Field Championships will be
hosted by St. Kitts and Nevis,
and Sands offered encourage-
ment to those still eligible for
competition.

“You have already made the
team and your position for next
year is secure” he said. “It is up
to you to retain your spot to
those looking to come in and
sit where you are right now.”

Chevy Simmons (Mt. Tabor).

Cousin McPhee — Jason
Cambridge, Trevor Smith,
Vaughn Toote and Buska
Panza.

Mt. Tabor — Patrio Leadon
and Deniro Moss.

Golden Gates — Zanvaughn
Beckford and Anthony
Anderson.

Christian Tabernacle —
Leslie Wilson and Devaughn
Gibson.

Faith United — Ramone
and Raymond McFall.

19-AND-UNDER VICE
PRESIDENT TEAM
Coach — Geno Campbell
(Temple Fellowship), assist-
ed by Sterling Pratt (Latter-
Day).
Temple Fellowship — Mar-
vin Albury, Kemico Sands.

@lSINVissye

Tickets available from Bahamasé

Bahamasair 242-377-5505 | Family Island
www.bahamasair.com

Latter-Day — Kenneth Pratt
and Teran Greenslade.

Macedonia — Patrick Brice
and Karon Pratt.

St. John’s — Trujelio
Darville and Leon Bowe.

Salvation Army — Adelphin
Alexander and Alex Bastian.

MEN’S PRESIDENT
TEAM

Coach — Lavol Rolle
(Christian Tabernacle), assist-
ed by Geno Nairn (Temple
Fellowship).

Christian Tabernacle —
Shawn Ferguson and Donnie
Johnson.

Temple Fellowship — Ian
Pinder and Edwin Burrows.

Church of the Nazarene —
Evins Milford and Perry
Lubin.

Golden Gates — Christian

Gibson and Kenny Strachan.

New Bethlehem — Kyheil
Roberts and

Faith United — Joseph
McDonald and Ricardo Fer-
guson.

Men’s Vice President

Coach — Ricardo Stubbs
(Macedonia), assisted by
Garvin Taylor — (Calvary
Bible).

Macedonia — Leon Bain
and Johnnie Smith.

Calvary Bible — Roy Brice
and Chevy Simmons.

Evangelistic Center —
Randy Ferguson and Sher-
man Bowe.

Bahamas Harvest - Travis
Forbes and Imara Thompson.

BIBA —- Detino Thurston
and Keay McKenzie.

Latter-Day — Lionel Chris-
tian and Chrisoff Stuart.



amasair
Poe

?

cal travel agency or at

| Toll Free 1-242-300-8359

Kl







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM









TANTEI ht
EEA
TT



GRAPE NEWS: Bahamian
wine enthusiasts can toast a
new environment in which
to enjoy their favourite drink.

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WINE Savants finally
have a place of refuge
after a recent $75,000
outlay uncorked a wholly
untapped market in the
form of the Bahamas’
first authentic Wine
Lounge.

Partner in the Wine
Lounge, Ruben Fox,
opened the wine lounge
knowing there were wine
enthusiasts like himself
both local and foreign
who needed a place to
taste, learn and pair the
popular alcoholic drink
made from fermented
grape juice.

Previously, Mr Fox was
a Wine importer and
found a perfect fit in cre-
ating a relaxing environ-
ment where individuals
could go to taste prod-
ucts from a wide variety
of California vineyards
(Wine Lounge specialises
in only California wines).

He became a wine
enthusiast as a boy while
on holidays with his par-
ents in some of the
world’s vineyards and as
an adult became a con-
noisseur.

“Wine has been some-
thing I have always been
around,” Said Mr Fox.

“My parents and I
traveled extensively
when I was young and
they enjoyed going to
vineyards. We traveled to
several regions and visit-
ed vineyards and as an
adult that continued.”

The Wine Lounge,
open just shy of four
months ago, has received
rave reviews and has
already had the represen-
tative from The Bogle
Vineyard come in to talk
to patrons about her
product.

Principal of Bogle
Vineyards, Jodie Bogle,
said she was happy to
have her product sold
and sampled in the cozy,
warm Wine Lounge and
hoped to come back to
visit and talk about her
product again.

Mr Fox said he expects
to have Vineyard repre-
sentatives come in regu-
larly to speak to his
patrons. A representative
of Dry Creek Vineyards
is expected near the
month’s end.

Meanwhile, he said
Wine Lounge is working
on the organisation of
wine seminars and the
formation of a wine club
which would offer cus-
tomers the chance to
sample and learn about
many of the 25 wineries
represented at his estab-
lishment.

According to him,
Wine Lounge pours 35
wine types by the glass
and more than 100 by the
bottle.

Wine Lounge is set
where the former Shogun
Revolver restaurant once
stood, near the Green
Parrot on East Bay
Street.

With warm, muted
tones and shelves of Cali-
fornia Merlots, Cabernets,

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE







WEDNESDAY,APRIL 7,

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Ml GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY

Hutchison could own
majority stake in GBPA

Tribune learns sale has been agreed in principle

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE HONG KONG -
based Hutchison Whampoa
could own a majority stake
in the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) when
the sale, which Tribune
Business has learned is
already agreed on in princi-
pal, is complete, while a US
firm could carry a “very”
minority share once the deal
is complete.

One source close to the
deal, told this paper Hutchi-
son would not settle for any-
thing less than a majority
stake in Grand Bahama's
most important private con-
glomerate.

It is hoped the sale of the
GBPA could herald a new
day for Grand Bahama,
bringing long-term invest-
ments through an estab-
lished, high net-worth multi-
lateral corporation.



Hutchison
would seem a
perfect fit for
the island as
the owners of

| the Our
Paul Moss Lucaya Resort

and with a
large stake in the Freeport
Container Port, however
nothing has yet been con-
firmed as to their acquisi-
tion.

Tribune Business was told,
however, that principals
from one of the two fami-
ly's holding majority stake
in the GBPA was recently
in Hong Kong, possibly in
protruded talks with the
Chinese Investment group.

Those two families were
recently in a deadlock over
the GBPA estate, each dis-
puting the others share own-
ership in a court battle that
amicably ended March 31.

The two families have
agreed to work together on
a joint sale of their equal



Easter fishing sales
match last year’s





Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

NEW PROVIDENCE
fishermen reported Easter
sales equivalent to last year’s,
marking the weekend as prof-
itable a time as any year
despite the economic climate,
the Bahamas Commercial
Fishers Alliance's (BCFA)
chief said yesterday.

As Grand Bahama report-
ed weak Easter Weekend
sales, Adrian La-Roda told
Tribune Business that Potters
Cay dock was teeming with
fishing boats (wholesalers),
retailers and fish cleaners who
stayed busy for the weekend
renowned for high scale-fish
sales.

According to Mr La-Roda,
sales were comparable to
2009, when a global econom-
ic recession was bearing down
on the Bahamas and market
prices on marine commodi-
ties such as lobster were left
slashed by close to 50 per
cent.

Chief Counselor for Span-
ish Wells, Abner Pinder, said
fish sales had been high all
week, slowing down as it tra-
ditionally has near the culmi-
nation of the holiday week-
end.

“As a rule, nine per cent of
Bahamians are going to have
fish for Good Friday, so that
is what boosted the sales last
week, which was good,” said
Mr Pinder.

“Out there this morning
there were three boats, but
not like it was last week.

“The fishermen I talked to
said sales were about the
same (as last year) and did-
mt drop down any during last
week, so that’s a good sign
and that tells me that some
people still have money and
are going to buy.”

However, in Grand
Bahama fishermen met with
less than robust sales, a tes-
tament to the economic cli-
mate of the Island where two
tornados ripped through areas
of Freeport, killing three men
at the Freeport Container
Port.

Mr La-Roda said Abaco
and Andros typically engage
in subsistence fishing.

POTTERS
CAY dock,
which was
busy over
| the weekend.

His sentiments echoed
much of Mr Pinder’s senti-
ments, adding that the Easter
weekend caused spin-off busi-
nesses on the dock, leaving
cash-in-hand for many fish
cleaners who would not every
day find the scale of business
like that of Good Friday.

Your Pre-Approved



2010

interests in the Port compa-
nies to a buyer who would
be good for the future of
Grand Bahama.

It is unclear if the second
investor in the GBPA will
be an US firm that
expressed interest earlier
this year.

But the late St Georges
Estate said it was not
involved in any “ongoing
negotiations” to sell its stake
in the GBPA to Mid-
Atlantic Projects.

While a second investor
in the GBPA, if any, is still
up in the air, most Bahami-
ans seem to agree that it is
time to move Grand
Bahama forward, now that
the St George Estate versus
Sir Jack Hayward Estate
debacle has found armistice.

Well-known political
hopeful, Paul Moss, said in a
statement yesterday that the
end of the family feud could

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



Call for action

against poaching in

Bahamian waters





Suggestion that RBDF arrest crew of poaching
vessels and sink ships to create artificial reefs

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards @tribunemedia.net



PIRACY might be the final resolve to discourage
poachers who plunder millions of dollars worth of
valuable marine life from Bahamian waters every
year and is 90 per cent of the fishing industry's
complications, the Chief Counselor for Spanish
Wells told Tribune Business yesterday.

Abner Pinder said Bahamian fishermen are tired
of losing their livelihood to fishing vessels that do
not belong in these waters and said some fishermen
are taking measures into their own hands.

According to Mr Pinder, eight to ten foreign
fishing vessels were spotted by Bahamian fishermen
following the closure of this country’s lobster sea-
son picking up possible spawning females.

This menace, he said is detrimental to the
Bahamas’ fishing industry and has to be given
precedence by the Bahamian government.

“We have enough Defence Force boats we have
a Defence Force plane and there is absolutely no
reason for this,” said Mr Pinder.

Mr Pinder said some fishermen were recently
threatened by what they suspected to be a fishing
vessel out of the Dominican Republic. According
to reports, when the Bahamian men approached
the vessel they noticed the men aboard filling bot-
tles with Gasoline, possibly to make Molotov cock-
tails which cause a fiery explosion when smashed.

The poaching situation has gotten so caustic, Mr
Pinder suggests the Royal Bahamas Defense Force
arrest the crew of the poaching vessels and sink
their ships to create artificial reefs as future fish
habitats.

“What needs to happen is they need to catch a
couple and put their boats to the bottom,” he said.

“Old wrecks harbour fish and breed fish. If you
put half a dozen down, the rest would stop and
think before they come on the Bahama Bank.”

However, it seems the problem remains with
government policy and action toward poaching
vessels.

The Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance's
(BCFA) chief, Adrian La-Roda, told Tribune Busi-
ness that when caught, poachers are not stripped of
their cargo, but made to pay a $10,000 fine - 0.5 per
cent of the total value of their catch.

He said the Bahamas loses almost $22 million
worth of valuable fisheries product, threatening

SEE page 3B



LOAN INTEREST
RATE AS LOW AS

Loan is Ready!

Borrow up to 45% of eligible securities

in your portfolio

Annual Loan interest rate as low as 8.25%
(BSD prime + 2.75%)*

Loan commitment fee reduced on first year.

No fixed repayment terms

Easy and convenient application process

- just give us a call.

* Special terms and conditions apply

OFFER VALID
through
May 315¢, 2010

Royal Fidelity Brokerage Account Margin Loans

ROYAL FIDELITY

WY Kelat= Varian A 0) 4

Call: 356.7764 or 397.4553
Email: info@royalfidelity.com









PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Spirit Airlines to charge up to $45 for carry-o

JOSHUA FREED,
AP Airlines Writer
MINNEAPOLIS



Baggage fees have sneaked out of the bel-
ly of the plane and into the overhead bin.

Spirit Airlines will charge as much as $45
each way for a carry-on bag starting Aug. 1.
Personal items like purses and laptop com-
puters that fit under the seat will still be
free.

Spirit is the first airline to charge passen-
gers for carry-ons. It's sure to seize the atten-
tion of passengers as well as airline execu-
tives who are probably glad that Spirit tried
it first. "I didn't think anyone would go this
far," said Jay Sorensen, an airline consultant
who specializes in airline fees.

Industry observers said Spirit's move does-
n't mean it will spread to the big airlines.
None of the major carriers changed their
fees on Tuesday.

Spirit's new charge for a carry-on is $45 if
paid at the gate, and $30 if paid in advance.
Spirit said on Tuesday that it reduced its
lowest fares by $40 on average, so most cus-
tomers won't really pay more to fly. Cus-
tomers who pay for space in the overhead
bin will also get to board the plane earlier.

Spirit CEO Ben Baldanza said having
fewer carry-on bags will help empty the
plane faster. He said the idea is to get cus-
tomers to pay for individual things they
want, while keeping the base fare low.

"The beauty of it is they will do what they
think is best for them and will now have the
choice," he said.

Spirit is based in Miramar, Fla., and is
privately held. Most of its flights carry leisure
travelers from big airports in the U.S.
through Fort Lauderdale and on to Latin
America.

Like Ryanair in Europe, Spirit has rela-
tively low base fares but charges lots of add-
on fees, including $16 per round-trip ticket
to book at its Web site. The only way to
avoid the fee is to buy a ticket at the airport
ticket counter.

It has fewer than two dozen planes. Its
150 daily flights are about one-twentieth as
many as American Airlines and its regional

partners offer. Even though Spirit is a minor
player, big airlines will watch it to see
whether customers are willing to pay for
carry-ons, Sorensen said. "It's a potential
source of revenue for an industry that still
needs it."

The problem with charging for checked
luggage but keeping carry-ons free is that
passengers lug as much onto the plane as
they can, he said. Spirit's move does help
solve that problem, Sorensen said.

Spirit said it will add measuring devices at
the gates to determine which carry-ons are
free and which ones will incur the charge.
Things like diaper bags, umbrellas, strollers,
and reading material won't count as a pas-
senger's free personal item.

The big airlines stepped gingerly when
they started charging to check baggage in
2008, making a move, then watching to see
who matched it. Now, all of them charge to
check a bag on domestic flights except
Southwest (two free bags) and JetBlue (one
free bag).

Spirit CEO Baldanza said he's confident
the airline will stick with the new carry-on
fee. "Our decision to do it isn't dependent"
on other carriers following along, he said.

He said he doesn't see the bag fee as a rev-
enue boost as much as an operational help.
Dealing with large carry-ons has delayed
departures and slowed down unloading after
a flight. On domestic flights, checking a bag
will be $5 cheaper than carrying it on, which
could encourage passengers to check more
bags. Baldanza said that's fine with him,
since it costs the airline about as much to
load one bag as it does to load 100 into the
belly of the plane.

While it's too soon to know whether pas-
sengers will accept the carry-on fee, it actu-
ally makes sense to encourage them to check
bags as Spirit has done, said Genevieve
Shaw Brown, senior editor at Travelocity.

Ever since checked bag fees began, "the
boarding process has become more chaotic,
there's more tension among travelers fight-
ing for space in the overhead bin," she said.
"It also becomes less efficient to board and
deplane, which is not good for airlines that
make money on being efficient."



Raising a glass to Bahamas’ first Wine Lounge

FROM page 1B

even Ports (among others)
lining the walls, the lounge’s
cushy decor relaxes, while the
friendly, wine-saavy staff



Whirlpool Duet
Wesher
WIE? ACY

$1,850











enlighten. And with al fresco
dining in the courtyard,
patrons are privy to a differ-
ent dining option.

The Wine Lounge also
offers thin crust pizzas and
full course dinners, with which

% 2
é © TumbleFresh’

CLOTHES KEEP MOVING SO
YOU DON'T HAVE TO.

You're tired of waiting, checking on the washer and rewashing loads. That's why
this industry-first option helps keep clothes fresh and reduces wrinkles with
periodic tumbling at cycle’s end. Make laundry-sitting a thing of the past.

Save 7575 when you pay cash

The power fo get mode doae,

Fede ol Witepeci |! 4A

the wines can be paired. And
if one does not have a taste
for wine, beer is on tap.

Mr Fox and several part-
ners have plans to expand the
wine lounge to include a sep-
arate restaurant entity.








option



Whirlpool Duet”
Gas Dryer
WGDS?7 S50

$1,700





ea eraer rrr a a



faery Uritertg ee i Ae aL tO le ae ort ee ately



eee ee Me Ment rg cag ee Cre





fis

i.





“——
= 3



(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, file)
IN THIS MAY 21, 2008 file photo, a person is seen rolling luggage at Philadelphia International Airport,
Philadelphia. Spirit Airlines said Tuesday April 6, 2010, it will charge as much as $45 each way for a car-
ry-on bag, adding a fee that bigger airlines have yet to try.











VACANCY NOTICE

Database Administrator
(Senior Assistant Manager)

~~ nr
Applications are invited from suitably cpualitieed persons for the above position in the Information

Technology Department of The National Insurance Hoard.

PURPOSE OF JOB
‘To be responsible for the planning, development, performance, integnty and security of The National

Insurance Board’s Database,

OVERALL RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:
Planning, development and troubleshooting of the database
Installing and testing new versions of the database management system (RDBMS).
Ensure that the physical design meets system storage requirements.
Ensure that data ig clearly defined and remains consistent across the database.
Monitoring performance and managing parumeters to peovide fast query responses to ‘/raay end wens
Establishing the needs of users and controlling access permissions and privileges.
Waiting database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data
dictionary {metactata}.
Developing, managing and testing backup and recovery plans,
Ensure that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly.
Work closely with [T Project Managers, Darabase Programmers and Web Developers,
Communicate regularly with technical and operational staff to ensure database integrity and security.

Commission and install new applications

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
Applicants should have a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited College or University in Computer
Science, Information Science, ot Management Information Scienee with nwo (2) to five (5) years experince
in the relevant areas. ‘The Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA) Certification would be
aplus. Preference will be given to Candidares with both a Bachelors Degree and the MCDBA Certification.

A working knowledge of MS SQL Datahase Systems ts desired. working knowledge of DB/2 and

Oracle 1g is preferted.

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed applicanon form, along with the necessary
proof of qualifications on or before Priday, April 9, 2010, ta:

Senior Manager
Human Resources Administration
The National Insurance Board
Headquarters Building
E.O. Box N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 3B



LOCAL AND OVERSEAS BUSINESS



FROM page 1B



the survival of one of this nation's largest
exporters. According to Mr La-Roda, the BCFA
has identified by name up to 11 vessels that
poach in Bahamian waters. He said those ships
can often carry up to 60,000 pounds of fish or
lobsters out of these waters on one trip.

Mr La-Roda lamented that poachers remain a



clear and present danger that the Government

needs to do more to address.

Mr Pinder said the Bahamas' fishing industry
would “never” have another problem if the
poachers are eradicated.

The Poachers not only pose a threat to the
Marine life of the Bahamas, but to the lives of
Bahamian fishermen who are often threatened at
gun point.

Call for action against poaching in Bahamian waters

Defence Force patrol boats have been known
to get into gun battles with some poaching ships,
while many other undertake illegal fishing using
illegal fishing methods, such as bleaching, unmo-
lested by authorities.

“IT know I could do it (stop the poachers),”
said Mr Pinder. “Give me one of the Defense
Force boats and a crew and if they don’t want to
give me a crew, I can get my own crew.”







Federal Communications Commission
loses key ruling on Internet ‘neutrality’

Hutchison
could own

majority stake
in GBPA

FROM page 1B



spell the beginning of a turn-
around for the Nation's sec-
ond capital which has been
in an economic stupor it
seems not capable of shak-
ing off.

“T am not naive however,
to believe that this is the end
of the economic woes of that
island; or that the PA issues
are over,” said Mr Moss.

“The fact is the PA (Port
Authority) and Grand

JOELLE TESSLER, cations of Tuesday's ruling are —_is Comcast's challenge of a 2008 © FCC now has several options. It be used to transfer large files | Bahama needs intervention
AP Technology Writer much broader. That's because it FCC order banning it from could ask Congress to give it such as online video, which | so that the port fees are
WASHINGTON undercuts the FCC's ability to blocking subscribers from using explicit authority to regulate — could threaten Comcast's cable greatly reduced to spur busi-

A federal court threw the
future of Internet regulations
and U.S. broadband expansion
plans into doubt Tuesday with a
far-reaching decision that went
against the Federal Communi-
cations Commission.

The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia
ruled that the FCC lacks
authority to require broadband
providers to give equal treat-
ment to all Internet traffic flow-
ing over their networks. That
was a big victory for Comcast
Corp., the nation's largest cable
company, which had challenged
the FCC's authority to impose
such "network neutrality"
obligations on broadband
providers.

The unanimous ruling by the
three-judge panel marks a seri-
ous setback for the FCC, which
is trying to adopt official net
neutrality regulations. FCC
Chairman Julius Genachowski,
a Democrat, argues such rules
are needed to prevent phone
and cable companies from using
their control over Internet
access to favor some kinds of
online content and services
over others.

The case centers on Com-
cast's actions in 2007 when it
interfered with an online file-
sharing service called BitTor-
rent, which allows users to swap
big files such as movies over
the Internet. But public interest
groups stressed that the ramifi-

prevent broadband providers
from becoming gatekeepers for
many kinds of online services,
potentially including Internet
phone programs and software
that runs in a Web browser.

"Today's appeals court deci-
sion means there are no pro-
tections in the law for con-
sumers' broadband services,"
Gigi Sohn, co-founder of Public
Knowledge, said in a statement.
"Companies selling Internet
access are free to play favorites
with content on their networks,
to throttle certain applications
or simply to block others."

The decision also has serious
implications for the massive
national broadband plan
released by the FCC last
month. The FCC needs clear
authority to regulate broadband
in order to push ahead with
some its key recommendations,
including a proposal to expand
broadband by tapping the fed-
eral fund that subsidizes tele-
phone service in poor and rural
communities.

In a statement, the FCC said
it remains "firmly committed
to promoting an open Internet
and to policies that will bring
the enormous benefits of
broadband to all Americans"
and "will rest these policies ...
on a solid legal foundation."

Comcast welcomed the deci-
sion, saying "our primary goal
was always to clear our name
and reputation."

At the heart of the court case

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCINE JEAN OF P.O.
BOX AB-20962, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31ST day of MARCH, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALINE JUSTILIEN of GOLDEN
ISLES is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31stday of MARCH, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DENISE DUROLIN of MACKEY
STREET is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within

BitTorrent. The commission, at
the time headed by Republican
Kevin Martin, based its order
on a set of net neutrality prin-
ciples adopted in 2005.

But Comcast argued that the
FCC order was illegal because
the agency was seeking to
enforce mere policy principles,
which don't have the force of
regulations or law. That's one
reason that Genachowski is
now trying to formalize those
rules.

The cable company had also
argued the FCC lacks authority
to mandate net neutrality
because it had deregulated
broadband under the Bush
administration, a decision
upheld by the Supreme Court
in 2005.

Information

The FCC now defines broad-
band as a lightly regulated
information service. That
means it is not subject to the
obligations traditional telecom-
munications services have to
share their networks with com-
petitors and treat all traffic
equally. But the FCC maintains
that existing law gives it author-
ity to set rules for information
services, including net neutral-
ity rules.

Tuesday's court decision
rejected that reasoning, con-
cluding that Congress has not
given the FCC "untrammeled
freedom" to regulate without
explicit legal authority.

With so much at stake, the

broadband. Or it could appeal
Tuesday's decision.

But both of those steps could
take too long because the
agency "has too many impor-
tant things they have to do right
away," said Ben Scott, policy
director for the public interest
group Free Press. Free Press
was among the groups that
alerted the FCC to Comcast's
behavior after The Associated
Press ran tests and reported
that the cable company was
interfering with attempts by
some subscribers to share files
online.

The more likely scenario,
Scott believes, is that the
agency will simply reclassify
broadband as a more heavily
regulated telecommunications
service. That, ironically, could
be the worst-case outcome from
the perspective of the phone
and cable companies.

"Comcast swung an ax at the
FCC to protest the BitTorrent
order," Scott said. "And they
sliced right through the FCC's
arm and plunged the ax into
their own back."

The battle over the FCC's
legal jurisdiction comes amid a
larger policy dispute over the
merits of net neutrality. Backed
by Internet companies such as
Google Inc. and the online call-
ing service Skype, the FCC says
rules are needed to prevent
phone and cable companies
from prioritizing some traffic
or degrading or services that
compete with their core busi-
nesses. Indeed, BitTorrent can

Ce TUT TE Cag aE

Swim Training
ages 1 to
ageless adult.

| Private Lessons

|| & Small Groups

with experienced
professional
instructors.

| GUARANTEED a

RESULTS

he Swimming

a

Roy ieRLI (oe See

= ee

Sate

all 362-149

Private heated |Fran Young

pool at our
swim centre





Bisex


















ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Wok

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TV business.

But broadband providers
such as Comcast, AT&T Inc.
and Verizon Communications
Inc. argue that after spending
billions of dollars on their net-
works, they should be able to
manage their systems to offer
premium services and prevent
high-bandwidth applications
such as BitTorrent from hog-
ging capacity.

For its part, the FCC offered
no details on its next step, but
stressed that it remains com-
mitted to the principle of net
neutrality.

"Today's court decision
invalidated the prior commis-
sion's approach to preserving
an open Internet," the agency's
statement said. "But the court
in no way disagreed with the
importance of preserving a free
and open Internet; nor did it
close the door to other methods
for achieving this important
end."

ness and government should
seek to put a proper port at
West End. This would give
new life to other part of the
island.

“T also ask the Govern-
ment to give an account for
the seven per cent of the
shares in the PA. This is
curious that no one is talking
about this and it is critical
for accountability and ensur-
ing that the Bahamian peo-
ple are treated fairly with
respect to payment of divi-
dends and profits.”

A statement released over
the weekend said Prime
Minister Ingraham was very
pleased about the agree-
ment, adding that he, and
all of Grand Bahama, looks
forward to better times
ahead for the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
for Freeport.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERTHONY AIME of JOHN
ROAD is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31stday of MARCH, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
CASTELO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation



“Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), CASTELO
INTERNATIONAL LTD., has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Register General on

19th day of March, 2010.

Nautilus Corporate Service Limited
of Nautilus House
La Cour des Casernes,
St. Heiler, Jersey
Liquidator

TUESDAY, 6 APRIL 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,597.14 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD 31.76 | YTD % 2.03

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%






WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320










FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES








Pre

crc fea MN TA T.









































; 52wk-Low Securit _y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div S P/E

twenty-eight days from the 31st day of MARCH, 2010 to the : 1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.02 1.02 0.00 0.283 ;
eee : : : den . 10.75 9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.992 0.200 10.7 1.88%
6.94 5.30 Bank of Bahamas 5.74 5.74 0.00 0.598 0.260 9.6 4.53%)
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box a 20; Bauer be! oe S74 p00 oe, ee 453%
le 3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168 0.090 18.8 2.86%)
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. 2.15 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 «43.1 1.69%
12.55 9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.24 12.24 0.00 1.406 0.290 8.7 2.37%!
2.83 2.69 Colina Holdings ae mare 0.00 0.249 0.040 10.9 147%)
7.00 5.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.64 6.64 0.00 0.419 0.230 15.8 3.46%)
3.65 2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.79 2.86 0.07 0.111 0.052 25.8 1.82%)
2.55 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00 0.627 0.110 4.1 4.33%
Legal Notice 6.99 5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00 -0.003 0.240 N/M 3.95%]
10.99 8.75 Finco 9.27 9.27 0.00 0.168 0.520 55.2 5.61%
10.43 9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.43 10.43 0.00 0.654 0.350 15.9 3.36%)
NOTICE 5.53 3.75 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00 0.00 0.326 0.150 15.3 3.00%!
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.30 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 7. 0.00%)
5.59 5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.7 8.94%
10.50 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.43%
DESERT ROSE Pp REMIER 10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000 64.1 0.00%

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b ases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T% 19 October 2017



INVESTMENTS LTD.

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
eae 1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
(In Voluntary Liquidation) 1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities











52wk-Low
7.92

BidS
10.06

Ask &
11.06

Last Price P/E Yield

14.00

EPS $
-2.246

DivS
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Daily Val.























































i ‘ . 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
Pursuant to Section 1 37 (4) of the International 0.55 0.40 RND Holdings ee - 0.40 = : 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
: : : olina Over-The-Counter Securities
141.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby 0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
‘ : : BISX Listed Mutual Funds
given that the above named Company is in S2wk-Low Fund Rare NAV _-YTD% Last 12 Months 9 NAV 3MTH___NAV 6MTH
. é 7 7.3664 _GFAL Bond Fund 7.4525 0.96 6.30 7.419947 1.403783
dissolution, which commenced on the 11th day of J [ist 7.8288 Cea te era Fu ee a eee aa
a joney Market Fun Zl ‘ 7 a - -Mar-
inn i 3.2025 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.2025 2.75 -3.54 31-Jan-00
December, 2009. The Liquidator id BdS Corporate 13.4296 12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.4296 5.58 5.90 31-Oct-09
¢ ss 103.9873 93.1999 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103.9873 3.41 3.41 103.095570 101.669300 31-Dec-09
Services Limited, George House, George Street, 101.7254 96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 101.7254 5.52 5.52 99.417680 96.739830 31-Dec-09
1.0986 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0986 0.81 5.23 10-Feb-10
1.0801 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0797 1.10 4.18 10-Feb-10
P.O. Box N-81 59, Nassau, Bahamas. 1.1008 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1008 0.93 5.32 10-Feb-10
9.5795 9.1005 — Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 9.5795 5.33 5.33 31-Dec-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
11.2361 10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 11.2361 12.36 12.36 31-Dec-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
7.7174 4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.6928 -0.31 47.51 31-Dec-09










MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Galina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)










THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 5B





The Tribune





A taste of the good lite

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



XPERIENCE a quintes-

sential representation of

a Napa Valley wine
tasting lounge at the Wine
Lounge on East Bay Street
next to Green Parrot Bar &

Grill.

“It’s been a busy seven months
since the opening of the Wine
Lounge,” says Matteal Campbell,
general manager. The restaurant is
the first of its kind in the Bahamas,
with boutique wines that are found
mostly in the family vineyards of
Napa Valley, California.

From time to time, Reuben Fox,
one of the partners of the establish-
ment goes to Napa Valley-one of the
world’s wine meccas-to select wine
brands that he knows his customers
will enjoy.

Mr Fox’s concept was to have a
full-service wine tasting establish-
ment in the Bahamas, where you can
sit and enjoy wine either by a tasting,
glass or bottle. And as you start to
sip, you will find your wine taking
on a whole new flavour, says Ms
Campbell.

At the Wine Lounge, an extensive
offering of wine is available. From
sparkling wine to a bottle of Pinot
Noir, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc,
The Late Harvest, and Petit Syrah,
Bogle Vineyards, Bliss, Queen of
Hearts, every bottle ranges from $20
to $65. She promises that among
their 30-plus wines, you will fine a
wine that suits your taste buds that
isn’t too sweet or too dry.

“What’s so amazing is that if a cus-
tomer purchases a wine, they would
share with another table,” said Ms
Campbell. “It’s like a family atmos-
phere where everyone would share
and say ‘have you tasted this, have a
drink out of my bottle.’

“If you’re new to wines, we would

offer you a Chardonnay or Fume
Blanc. Both have ‘in between’
flavours that are not too sweet, and
not dry, but fruity wines. You can
taste the fruits inside.”

For the customer that may walk
up the bar, unfamiliar with wine, the
bartender would offer a ‘flight’, a
palette where you can take three,
three ounce glasses of wines.

They offer something called a
‘bubble flight’ which is a palette of
three sparkling wines--three red,
three white or you can have it mixed.

They will offer you a taste of what-
ever’s your preference, a sweet or
dry wine. They have people who
would come back and purchase cas-
es of the wine they like.

Some of their wines have never
been tasted, said Ms Campbell. The
Wine Lounge offers the first wide
variety of California wine in the
Bahamas.

Inside the bar room you will find
an intimate and cozy feel; the walls
are lined with neatly displayed bot-
tles with a new high high-tech wine
dispenser to serve you a fresh glass
of wine well matched with small
bites from the tapas menu.

Chef Dorvil Pierrelus creates thin
crust gourmet pizzas, the main fea-
ture of their food menu. Toppings
includes their signature Napa Style
pizza topped with prosciutto, goat
cheese and figs poached in syrah.

The Yukon Gold pizza is another
highly requested choice; topped with
potatoes, mushrooms and white truf-
fle creme, with the option of chicken.

“Persons would come in for a box
of the Yukon pizza, and make anoth-
er order to-go when they leave,” said
Ms Campbell.

The Margarita pizza is a classic-
topped with mozzarella, cherry
tomatoes, and fresh basil.

The Classic pizza is a pepperoni
pizza, with cheese and tomatoes.

The Frutti di Mare pizza has more
of a seafood blend with scallops,
conch and shrimp.

To wash down your pizza, pur-

‘5 "
| j _ a
AL bed.

ase

wee TT mT

—
LLL wa

ub nL LI

| oa iT :
betel RTI TTT

iL

THE wine tasting room at The Wine Lounge.

chase a drink inside the bar room,
and sit inside the courtyard which
has a firepit that is lit up each night.
Torch lights are lit on the table while
soft jazz music plays in the back-
ground.

For dessert, they offer guava rum
cake, chocolate panna cotta-with
caramel and roasted pecans, home-
made vanilla, chocolate, and pineap-
ple coconut ice creams, and home-
made sorbets in three flavours--man-
go, raspberry, and coconut cream.

We’ve wanted to be something
that you can go in and relax, after a
hard day of work you can come in
and relax. It’s like the diner in

‘Cheers’ the TV show where every-
body knows your name, says Chef
Pierrelus.

“Persons stop by and have glasses
of wine in the wine tasting room
until traffic dies down for them to go
home,” said Ms Campbell. The
ambiance in the Wine Lounge is
relaxing, surrounded by bottles of
California wines produced in Napa
Valley.

The restaurant is available for pri-
vate functions upon request.

Opened from Tuesday to Thurs-
day, 11 am ‘til 11 pm, the Wine
Lounge wants the customers to
enjoy the experience of “being in

obthe ee ee eT

a





Napa, but not leaving the Bahamas,”
said Ms Campbell.

They have recurring clients who
come in at all hours during the day,
especially the after work crowd and
persons have found the Wine
Lounge to be a family friendly
atmosphere. The Wine Lounge is
not a noisy bar with a lot of things
going on, and a rowdy bunch of tip-
sy drinkers.

“Parents bring their children, and
have pizza outside with a bottle of
wine and make it a family night,”
said Ms Campbell. “They sit out-
side in the courtyard and enjoy their
kids.”





MORE than 400 people attended Paradise Plates last year and raised over $60, 000 to help fight hunger

in The Bahamas.







LOCAL Chefs from 19 dif-
ferent restaurants, catering
businesses, wine and spirit
merchants are busy preparing
to showcase exciting new cre-
ations or their well-loved sig-
nature fare, specialty wines
and beverages to guests of Par-
adise Plates, Hands For
Hunger’s second annual
fundraiser event being held on
Saturday, May 15, 2010 from 7
— 11 pm at the Atlantis Crown
Ballroom.

Sponsored by The New
Providence Development
Company Limited and Tom-
my Hilfiger, the creatively pre-
sented event showcases a lav-
ish array of gourmet food pre-
pared by chefs from Nassau’s
premier restaurants, fine wine
and spirits and live entertain-
ment with all proceeds bene-
fiting Hands For Hunger the
non-profit, humanitarian
organisation committed to the
elimination of hunger and the
reduction of food waste in The
Bahamas.

To date, chefs from a wide
variety of restaurants includ-
ing: Old Fort Bay Club; Dune;
Nobu; Mesa Grill; British
Colonial Hilton; Patisserie Tea
Room; VanBreugels; Food
Art By Cacique; Goodfellow
Farms; Compass Point;
Luciano's of Chicago; Le Petit
Gourmet; La Hipica Spanish
Tapas and Grill; Essence
Catering & Premium Food
Services have agreed to par-
ticipate and showcase their
extraordinary food.

Fine wine will also be show-
cased at Paradise Plates. Men-
doza Wine Imports will be
returning this year and offer-
ing samples of wine from
Argentina that will comple-
ment the food being served.



HANDS For Hunger is gearing up for its second annual fundraiser, Paradise Plates, scheduled to take
place on May 15th, 2010 at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Mesa Grill Chefs will be returning this year to

showcase their fine food.



Nautilus Water will be the fea-
tured water for the evening
and Bahamian Brewery and

Beverage Company will be
featuring Sands draft beer.
SHG Management/Tropics
Beverage Company will also
be returning this year offering
a premium martini from their
frozen fruit blends.

Also new this year, will be
Havana Humidor providing
cigars for the evening and gen-
erously donating 100 per cent
of cigar sales to Hands For
Hunger.

“We are honoured to have
so many of last year’s Chefs,
restaurants and vendors
returning to make the evening
a great success,” said Andrea
Strommer, who along with
Rosamund Roberts is Co-
Director of Fundraising for the
organisation and in charge of
leading the event planning.

“There is no question that
the food, wine and beverages
being served for the evening
will be extraordinary given the
caliber of the participants. Par-
adise Plates will be bigger this
year and we are pleased to be
presenting several new Chefs
and restaurants as well as the
addition of cigars. We are very
grateful to them and our other
sponsors for their generous
support. Paradise Plates is
receiving tremendous response
from the public and we look
forward to another memorable
evening.”

Other sponsors include:
Atlantis, Creative Relations,
Credit Suisse, Pearle Vision,
Royal Bank of Canada, Royal
Star Assurance, The D’Albe-
nas Agency, Charles E Carey
and Sons, Coldwell
Banker/Lightbourn Realty,
Odyssey Aviation and
Bahamas Local.

All proceeds from Paradise
Plates will go to Hands For
Hunger and its food rescue
program. Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high

Local chefs and
merchants prepare
for Paradise Plates

quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and delivers
it to community centers, shel-
ters, churches and soup
kitchens throughout New
Providence.

Since operations began in
March of 2009, H4H has
already distributed over
185,000 lbs of food to those in
need (approximately equal to
185,000 meals served) and pre-
vented more than 388.5 tons
of C02 carbon emissions from
entering the atmosphere.

“Hunger is a solvable prob-
lem. It is a fact that there is
more than enough food on this
island to amply feed every sin-
gle woman, man and child.
Hands For Hunger functions
to connect this excess supply
with the unmet, ever growing
need through the more equi-
table and efficient distribution
of resources, ” said Alanna
Rodgers, Founder and Pro-
gram Coordinator of Hands
For Hunger. “The proceeds
raised from Paradise Plates
will go directly to addressing a
most basic human need in our
community.”

The amazing array of food
and drink is complemented by
a silent auction, raffle, live
entertainment and beautiful
décor. Tickets are $140 per
person and will be available
by April 16. Contact:
info@handsforhunger.org for
more information. Tickets will
be sold at the following loca-
tions: New Providence Com-
munity Church on Blake Road
contact: ashleyl@hands-
forhunger.org; Central from
Rosamund Roberts contact:
rosroberts@hands-

forhunger.org East from
Andrea Strommer andreas-

trommer@handsforhunger.org
. A limited number of tickets
are available online at

www.handsforhunger.org .

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune







TEA TIME IN WONDERLAND

e The Event is Fashionista
2010 Ltd.'s Spring Trunk
Show/ Shopping Party show-
casing its Limited Spring
Collection! Fashionista
hosts a monthly event cater-
ing to the women of Corpo-
rate Bahamas and the like...

In Celebration of Alice's
Wonderland, Fashionista
hosts its Spring Tea Party
where must have accessories
are commonplace- they
offer a bit of wit and whimsy
guaranteed to even intrigue
the Cheshire Cat.

The event takes place on
April 11 from 2pm- until at
Harry's Haven Queen St.
(just behind the U.S.
Embassy) Complimentary
bites and drinks. No cover
charge.

Contact Info: charez.fash-
ionista@gmail.com

THE COLOUR OF HARMONY

e The College of the
Bahamas’ School of Com-
munication and Creative
arts presents the 21st The
Colour of Harmony concert
on Thursday, April 8, 2010,
at 6.30 pm at The Perform-
ing Arts Centre at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas.

T: 302-4370 or 302-4485 for
more information.

Reeeeececeeeeeecereee ere eeeeee ees seesee ene ses nesses eee eee eee

JE'ROME HARRIS MILLER'S
“BRILLIANCE” EXHIBITION

¢ Je'Rome Harris Miller
invites you to view an exhi-
bition of his new paintings
entitled “Brilliance.” This
fourth collection is whimsi-
cal, where the dancers sway,
the musicians gyrate and all
of nature bursts forth in a
brightly coloured celebra-
tion of life. The exhibit is
opened from 6pm-9pm on
Thursday, April 8, at Christ
Church Cathedral Hall. T:
324-6425.

AKA'S EASTER EGG
HUNT AND FUN DAY

e The sorority Alpha Kap-
pa Alpha, along with Antiq-
uities, Monuments and
Museums and Cultural
Experience Productions,
brings to you an Easter fun
day filled with activities,
including face painting, elec-
tronic rides, a bouncing cas-
tle and a game trailer. Sat-
urday, April 10 at 1lam-5pm
on Collins Estates Grounds.
Easter egg hunt begins 3pm.
Entrance fee: $1.

8TH ANNUAL JAMES
BETHEL MEMORIAL
GOLF TOURNAMENT

¢ The Rotary Club of Nas-
sau invites the general pub-
lic and all interested golfers
to participate in the 8th
annual James Bethel Memo-
rial Golf Tournament,
beginning 8am at the Cable
Beach golf course on Sun-
day, April 11. Cost: $100 per
player, includes lunch and
gift bag. Contact Cornel
Collins, T: 393-2164 or F:
394-4971.

WESTERN HEMISPHERE
SAILING CHAMPIONSHIP
2010

e Nassau Yacht Club hosts
the 2010 Western Hemi-
sphere Sailing Champi-
onship, beginning with an
opening reception, Mon
April 12. Racing starts Wed,
April 14 and commences
until Sat, April 17. See
www.nassauyachtclub.org

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



Opera company
hits right note

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he newly formed

Nassau City Opera

Company(NCOC)
is set to have its inavu-
gural performance next
Friday evening with a
performance called The

Story of the Spirituals.

The group which to date
has more than 35 members
was the brain child of noted
Bahamian musical director Dr
Cleveland Williams who
recently sat down with Tri-
bune Entertainment to discuss
his vision to increase the pub-
lic’s awareness of classical
music.

“ The mission of the NCOC
is to enhance the quality of
life for Bahamians through
fully staged operatic perfor-
mances of the highest quality

using national talent and later
international talents.

“Through its performances,
NCOC hopes to create cultur-
al and educational programs
to encourage an appreciation
as well as an enriching experi-
ence of opera for future gen-
erations of Bahamian artists
and audiences alike.”

The group has been hard
at work preparing The Story
of the Spirituals which fea-
tures both narrative and musi-
cal performances and tells the
story in nine carols. The per-
formance will serve as the
company’s soft launch.

The show will explain the
origin of Negro spirituals and
what they meant to the peo-
ple who sang them and their
importance as a whole to
Black people throughout the
Western Hemisphere he said.

“This performance will
showcase the best orators in
the Bahamas,” Dr Williams
explained, “ including Neville

Smith, Veronica Duncanson,
Stacey Campbell Marshall,
Noel Stirrup and Idris Reid.”

Dr Williams said that while
the country has a strong musi-
cal culture base through
Junkanoo, he would like to
combine other musical gen-
res to further enhance
Bahamian culture.

“ We want to bring another
element to culture through
singing and stage produc-
tions,” he said.

To facilitate this, Dr
Williams said the NCOC is
seeking to partner with the
Ministry of Education so that
students can be exposed to
opera music.

“We need to begin to edu-
cate the younger generation
so that they understand that
opera is not “ so high brow”
and that we can expand our
horizons and have an appre-
ciation of the work,” he said,

In this way, he explained
Bahamians would be able to





produce their own operatic
works. The company is plan-
ning its first opera in 2011 a
production of Porgy and Bess.

“The Story of the Spiritu-
als,” is scheduled to run at
Christ Church Cathedral





under the direction of Dr
Cleveland A Williams and
pianist Audrey Dean Wright.
Part of the proceeds of the
event's $20 donation is ear-
marked for The Bahamas
Cancer Society.















Haynes Library
hosts book author

IN collaboration with K Ali-
son Albury, author of the book,
Life on the Rock, the Haynes
Library located in Governors
Harbour recently hosted a
book event at the intimate ter-
rain of the Beach House Tapas
Bar.

During the book event Ms
Albury read a few passages
from her book Life on the
Rock,

Based on a series of journal
entries, the book tells the
untold stories and the many
intriguing experiences she and
her husband Peter experienced
while spending five years on
Highbourne Cay in the Exu-
ma islands serving as property
managers.

The book event was part of a
monthly lecture and discussions
series usually held by the
library and allowed readers the
opportunity to get up-close and
personal with the author.

The event though intimate,
was well attended by members
of the Governor’s Harbour
community, who had a num-
ber of probing questions, and
took keen interest in what Ms
Albury had to say.

The Haynes Library is one
of the Bahamas’ historic build-
ing and was originally dedicat-
ed for service in 1897, 113 years
ago and has over the years
housed a variety of govern-
mental offices as well as a small
public library.

Over the years, however, the
building has deteriorated and
was scheduled for demolition.
In 1994, the community formed
a group known as “Friends of
the Library” and organisied
gifts and donations from the



EW Aisle) UAY

community and around the
world to faciliate the restora-
tion process.

Today the library is the cen-
ter of activities in Governor’s
Harbour. Its children programs
include after school homework
assistance, Internet access and
computer classes, as well as art
and craft classes.

The shelves of this historic
building house over 11,000 vol-
umes and a large selection of
educational software.

The community outreach
program provides scholarships
to local student sponsors sum-
mer camps and participants in
high school work experience.

The Haynes library is her-
alded as cornerstone of the
community and is a privately
managed, non profit organiza-
tion. Annual fund raising
events, private and corporate
donations and an annual gov-
ernment grant help to Keep its
doors open.



BIFF founder holds acting classes

BAHAMAS International
Film Festival Founder Leslie
Vanderpool is extending her
acting classes through May
with Stage and On Camera
class. The classes begin today
and will continue until May 5
on Mondays from 6.30-8.30
and Wednesdays 6.30pm-
8.30pm for persons 13 and
older. The classes will be held
at the New Providence Com-
munity Center on Blake
Road. The cost for 5 weeks of
classes is $400 and there is an
individual class charge of $40.

RSVP A MUST: 356-5939
as there is limited class size.

Topics include:
SHERLOCK HOLMESING THE TEXT
"To Be A Great Actor, You Have

To Be A Good Detective!"
- William Hurt

All information an actor
needs for the Audition is
"Hidden" within the materi-
al. Your tendency is to rush to
judgment or "What are my
lines?" Rather than: Who am
I? Who are they? What just
happened? How do I feel?
What am I doing? What do I
want this person to understand
about me? Ms Vanderpool
will teach you how to find the
"Clues" that the writers are
laying out for you.

On Camera Intensive

The Intensive is just that-
Intense. This is a practical
Nuts & Bolts approach to

Crafting your work for the
Camera.

You also have the oppor-
tunity to see Playback and get
Feedback on your work,
which allows you to be more
competent and confident in
your Auditions and working
On Camera. Our focus begins
with Script Interpretation &
Character Analysis. Ms Van-
derpool will teach you how to
introduce yourself to the
script through the process of
"Sherlock Holmesing" of the
text. This includes Crafting
of the First Moment, Rela-
tionships to Persons, Places,
Things & Events, and Using
Clichés & Social Dictates.

e¢ Ms Vanderpool has pro-

grammed over 400 films at
BIFF and has become a well
recognised name on the film
festival circuit, appearing on
panels at various film festi-
vals around the world, such
as Cannes, and has spoken to
over a hundred interested
filmmakers on strategies to
employ to get your film
shown at film festivals. As far
as The Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival Is concerned,
Leslie concentrates on three
ingredients that play an
important role In the festi-
val's success: platforming film-
makers around the world,
providing alternative finances
opportunities and providing
cultural entity to support the
tourism product while stimu-

lating the minds of the com-
munity within The Bahamas.

In addition to programming
films from around the world,
Ms Vanderpool created a pro-
gramme within the festival
called the BIFF Filmmaker
Residency Programme,
designed to serve Bahamian
and Caribbean Filmmakers
only. This programme led to
the discovery of emerging
directors, such as Maria Gov-
an, director of RAIN, and
Kareem Mortimer, director
of CHILDREN OF GOD,
both of whom subsequently
have become very well known
within the Bahamian com-
munity and have been invited
to leading film festivals
around the world.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Plates



Local chefs
prepare for
Paratlise

see page five



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010



Sim
bill

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

E’ROME Harris Miller debuts his

fourth collection of paintings this

Thursday evening, in an exhibit
simply titled ‘Brilliance’ at Christ
Church Cathedral on top of the Hill,
George Street.

Oly

OM



Miller calls this year’s body of work
a “PG” exhibit unlike his previous
works, that had biblical and fun
themes behind it. It’s a milder theme
of “wholesomeness” unlike the adult
tones that his exhibits have taken on
in the past.

In ‘Brilliance,’ the pieces are heav-
enly, in terms of “the way they gaze
back at you,” he told Tribune Arts.
He further explained: “Even as you
gaze upon it, it’s something else oth-
er than what you see.”

Each painting in his 30-piece col-
lection has musicians, which spark a
jubilant feeling in the viewer’s con-
sciousness, set off by Miller’s use of
bright, bold colours.

‘Brilliance’ overall as an exhibit
encapsulates a whimsical theme--
where dancers sway, musicians gyrate,
and all of nature bursts forth in all
it’s glory through a brightly coloured
celebration of life.

In this year’s exhibit, Miller has
translated carefully thought out inter-
pretations of what he sees in life,
bringing a feeling of joy, happiness
and playfulness to the viewer’s spirit.

“The young boy playing in the
fields and beaches of North Andros
still exists in his soul,” he says, and he
expresses this jubilation in this body
of work.

This show, as the previous ones are
held in the honor of Winston V Saun-
ders, and part proceeds will be donat-
ed to Winston V Saunders scholar-
ship fund. Fifty-thousand dollars has
been raised to support of the schol-
arship fund thus far.

Miller’s pieces range in vision from
religious themes, to more identifiable
experiences of human life. He told
Tribune Arts that the vision behind

Miss Grand Bahama
contestants unveiled

See page seven



“Brilliance” was going places in the
world, and capturing the spirit of the
universe-including humanity and
nature.

In his painting, “The Gift,’ Miller
captures and neatly wraps into gift
form, the very essence of the Easter
season with its rich purples, and bright
colors, symbolising a new beginning.

“The Birth’ represents the recently
observed birth and resurrection of
Jesus Christ, but could’ve been easily
titled, “Big Things Come in Small
Packages,” says Mr Miller.

It’s painted with solid colours, pur-
ple, blue and green, orange, and red,
with a bow on it that is shaped as a
crucifixion. The white bow serves as
an imaginary watermark of Christ,
bolstered by a purple gift box that
represents the Roman times.

‘Brilliant’ is a piece that relies on
strokes and color selection to leave
the viewer with a slew of translations.
The colours, generally strong black,
and soft sky blue are magnificent in
their presentation.

‘Purity’ is a piece that flows from
the artist’s mind onto canvas. It’s a
story floating on the background of
“black as night canvas.” The actual
gift box image in “The Gift’ is multi-
coloured, and the ribbon is shaped
in a cross, outlined by a white water-
mark of Christ.

The purity of purple thinly outlin-
ing and shading, one of the bishop’s
most important head pieces leaves
the viewer in awe and looking for the
underlying messages that must surely
be present. “A sense of happiness
and redemption seems to be present
in this piece,” says Miller.

‘Bugle Boys’ returns to the familiar
subjects of music and youth. In Har-






UQIUXS ,SOUDIIG, SIYy JOY soeid PSWey $ JEyIAy SOL Woy, ef



mony, school boys go at it with gusto.
The intensity of the earthy colors in
the background of this painting pro-
vide a magnificent staging place for
the musical instruments that he allows
to standout as the primary subject of
the piece.

In ‘Saints go Marching In,’ saxo-
phone players are the primary sub-
ject, but the viewer must examine
the beauty of the hues and strokes in
the secondary subject matter, or the
background to appreciate the effort
of the artist in bringing the piece to
life.

The only distinct or defined colour
is the musical instruments, but the
play on blue that outlines the boys
bring an effervescent presence to this
art piece.

Miller has visual and entertainment
artist participate in “food art” will
be done by Horatio Smith, and an
Entertainment section is being done
by Sonovia Pierre, Yodephy model-
ing agency, and Nikita Wells

In this year’s exhibit, 30 pieces will
be displayed. “It was a six month
task finishing all of the pieces,” he
said. “I had to use my discretion on
what I would like to show.”

Guests will notice that the piece
on the invitation cover, “Brilliance,”
was the auctioned painting to the
College of the Bahamas.

In this piece, and the others, Miller
says you can actually hear the paint-
ings playing and singing.

On the night of the exhibit viewing,
guests will be enchanted by the oper-
atic sounds of Candice Boswick,
including Gordon Knowles, Lakita
Thompson- Wells, and Sonovia Pierre
who is bringing along a band that
will jazz up things at the event.



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E10P0DDNP_0YDUNX INGEST_TIME 2011-07-26T23:01:08Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01542
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES






HIGH
LOW

84F
72F

SUNNY AND
BREEZY

Volume: 106 No.111





BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

As
Ta ee
Me: a

Se















aU



SEE ‘THE ARTS’ SEE PAGE 10

FNM, PLP in fight
tO SIgN Up ROlINS



Family of dead man accuse
police of ‘sloppy’ case work

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net





FAMILY members of Captain Bernard Burrows,
who was last seen alive 18 months ago, have accused
police of "sloppy" case work and are calling for a new
investigation into the circumstances surrounding his
disappearance and death.

Some relatives suspect that Mr Burrows, 45, was the
victim of foul play. They feel investigators did not pur-
sue this avenue aggressively in the case's early stages,
leaving many stones unturned, and a possible killer on
the loose.

Unhappy with the 18-month long investigation, several
members of the Burrows family are now calling on new
police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade to look into the

Popular candidate in
demand after impressive
by-election campaign

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOR the country’s two major
political parties, Dr Andre
Rollins has become the most
wanted man in the Bahamas,
The Tribune can exclusively
reveal.

FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham and former PLP first lady
Dame Marguerite Pindling have
held high-level talks with Dr
Rollins.

Both have invited him to join
their parties.

Last night, Dr Rollins told
how he is now “soul searching”
about which direction he will
take.

Dr Rollins, who ran for the
NDP in the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion winning 49 votes, said he
has not yet made a decision
about whether he will take up
either of the offers but has in
the meantime resigned his post
as Chairman of the NDP’s
Executive Steering Committee,
which he felt was appropriate
while he considers his options.

Both formal meetings took
place in the last 10 days, Dr
Rollins said, following unoffi-
cial discussions with lower level
PLPs and FNMs in the wake of

DR ANDRE ROLLINS



the February 16 by-election.

He said he did not “solicit”
either of the parties.

Now the 34-year-old ortho-
dontist, who many agreed dis-
tinguished himself as an articu-
late and ardent candidate dur-
ing the Elizabeth by-election
campaign, said he has a lot of

SEE page eight



AUTO INSURANCE

|
|

Never start your

‘Auito Insurance.

eas the smart choice is
| Insurance Management.

| Smart people you can trust.
- 7 %

i LIBEEED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGE NTS

| Ma
suit

| Hewes | frum
Te hepa





SEE page seven









pt

Major/Tribune

THE BAHAMAS’ MEDAL-WINNING Carifta team returned from Grand Cayman Island last night. The Bahamas accumulated a total of
27 medals, inclusive of six gold, eight silver and 13 bronze.

Two charged
with murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO men appeared in
court yesterday in connection
with a murder that occurred
in Montell Heights.

Christoph Knowles, 30, of
Bowe Avenue and Palm
Court, and Curtis Richard
Taylor, 20, of Palm Court and
Straw Flower Road, were
arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Roger Gomez in Court

It is alleged that between
Saturday, January 16, and
Sunday, January 17, 2010, the
accused intentionally caused
the death of Fednet Geanjil.

Mr Geanjil, 37, of Montell
Heights, was found stabbed
to death in a vehicle in the
Montell Heights area. Police
initially received reports of a
man suffering from stab
wounds at a garage on Hill
Flower Road. Officers
responded to the scene and
found Mr Geanjil’s lifeless






By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE a union boss’s
claim that thousands of Chi-
nese workers will flock to the
Bahamas to help construct the
Baha Mar development at
Cable Beach, an official
stressed that the long-term
benefits will be reaped by
locals.

Robert Sands, Baha Mar's
senior vice-president for gov-
ernmental and external affairs,
said that although contractual-
ly Chinese labour will help con-
struct the $2.6 billion develop-

Baha Mar official: Chinese labour
will help, locals will reap benefits

¢ SEE SPORT ON PAGE 10



many qualified locals as possi-
ble during the construction
phase and beyond.

During the phased construc-
tion period, some 3,300 locals
are expected to be employed
with jobs for more than 8,000
Bahamians expected once the
redevelopment is concluded.

"The construction of the
Baha Mar project will require
an exceptionally large work-
force due to the sheer volume
of work being undertaken and
the aggressive construction
timeline in the various phases
of the Cable Beach redevelop-
ment.





oe pee yeeeneey SEE page seven ment, developers will hire as SEE page nine
auiznoss .
“th
i __ __| tn —
vais ; aoe {i}? with the purchase “Gay
J a = of = — or.
_— ; y arge sub. = ee”
a —_ ~ a8 Prices mery ary Se. my
_— hs. Maderia St Paradise Idand ae,











NASSAU

NN BAA

MA ISLANDS? DEADING NEWSPA

PER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

Loyos Hope

‘hook ship’

locks in the
Bahamas

THE “book ship”, Logos
Hope, is currently docked at
Prince George Wharf and is invit-
ing Bahamians to come on board
to sample the wide array of edu-
cational and entertaining litera-
ture and DVDs on offer.

Visitors can enjoy browsing
through the 7,500 titles available
for purchase or enjoy a cup of
coffee in the international café
on deck four.

Purchased in 2004, the Logos
Hope has been crossing the globe
with the aim of supplying vital
literature resources, encouraging
inter-cultural understanding, pro-
moting greater global awareness
and sharing a message of hope
in God wherever there is oppor-
tunity.

The Logos Hope will remain
docked in Nassau until Friday.

PICTURED ARE customers
checking out the books and
DVDs yesterday

y
u Vag

Jewels by the Sea, a chain of Fine Jewelry stores in the Cable Beach
district of N.P. is looking for:

SALES ASSOCIATES

This is a SALARIED position, not a commission based structure.
Our compensation plan rewards team performance and individual
excellence.

Key Functions

e Building Relationships with Customers

e Matching Customer Needs with Goods & Services Available

e Ensuring Post-Purchase Satisfaction

e Maintaining an Organized, Well Arranged & Customer Friendly
Showroom

Qualifications & Experience

e 19 years of age or older

e Previous experience in some Customer Service Field
¢ High School Diploma or equivalent required

e Basic Computing skills

Skills & Abilities

e Excellent Communication Skills
e Professional Demeanor

e Self-Motivated

Qualified applicants should email
resume & cover letters to:
jbsjobs2010@gmail.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.


































“<2 2010

Drive one.

FORD EXPLORER XLT

A aie i Fie aoe . -
At 2 Fre t Anerivan : Foon
Shop & Compare .

48 V6 with auton Treenidon, eather inerkor, Sor T pamnigper
[Mig urEion, pewer seat @ith power hack rei, power winds,
leeks and mirrors, alley wheels, automatic headlights, media, CO
player, with cml quesiiom, the heat vale in The Bahamas om a large
SUV, withived emneptiom, all dhis plus} years! fdHil mile warranéy, 4
ears Prone vide ais ena dyeurs rust protertion, Linence and
inpertain Bea boiertheedea y,, Hall lank. of gas, Geo mats fied five services.

If you are LOOKing for the best value





















Felipé Major/Tribune staff





(L-R) REV DR J CARL RAHMING, president of the Fox Hill Pastor's Association; Ambassador Tommy Robin-
son, High Commissioner Mohinder Grover of India; Fred Mitchell, Fox Hill MP, and Wellington Miller, pres-
ident of the Bahamas Olympic Association. Brion Cox and a young lady of Sandilands Primary School bear

the Queen's Baton.

Queen’s Baton Relay starts
its Bahamas leg in Fox Hill

THE official Queen’s
Baton Relay leading up to
the Commonwealth Games
started its run through the
Bahamas with the children
of the Sandilands Primary
School on the holiday
weekend.

The high-tech Queen's
Baton is journeying through
all the countries of the
Commonwealth, the

Some Optional
Equipment Shown

You owe it to yourself to visit our SHOWTOOM
“
Drive one.

Shop & Compare

Awtometr Trancwdrsien, 4 piinatrr; 24 Litre Exgiog, ANT, rdiatral
Power etubers, loci, sino, suet driver anata, beplers airy, raat oad
Hd cutee ae bs, all qf ake pas 3 pearii 35000 mall: wearrenly, 4 are
Pini aein,2 nd Fecal ‘Protection, Dericat ike ripanentue Ms iether,
Jal wall of gas, Baar ea, Sa fier eae,

tetas Pee mare erly

FRIENDLY MOTORS CO. LTD

Bahamas being the 45th
country visited in advance
of the Commonwealth
Games, slated for New Del-
hi, India, in October.

The Bahamas Olympic
Association, headed by
Wellington Miller, with Sec-
retary General Romell
Knowles, Chef de Mission
Roy Colebrook and Indian
High Commissioner Mohin-
der Grover were there to
witness the event.

Speaking at the ceremony
on Saturday, Fox Hill MP
Fred Mitchell welcomed the
relay group, including Tom-
my Robinson the nation’s
first international medal
winner in elite athletics.

Mr Mitchell urged the
children who were taking
part in the relay to look to
Mr Robinson’s career as an
example of how discipline
can take a person around
the world.

He thanked the Associa-

Ud lB
EXTERMINATORS

eA UE
PHONE: 322-2157



tion and the High Commis-
sioner for the honour
bestowed upon Fox Hill.

The first Queen’s Baton
Relay, similar to the
Olympic Torch Relay, was
held to celebrate the
Cardiff 1958 Common-
wealth Games in Wales.

For the 2010 Common-
wealth Games the relay was
launched at Buckingham
Palace in London last Octo-
ber.

Travelling through all
other 70 Commonwealth
nations, the relay will be an
historic journey that will
cover a distance of more
than 190,000 kilometres in
340 days.

The relay will conclude
after the final baton bearer
enters the Jawaharlal
Nehru Stadium during the
opening ceremony of the
XIX Commonwealth
Games on October 23.

In recent years, the
Queen’s Baton Relay has
harnessed the very latest in
digital and other communi-
cation technology.

The high-tech tracking
technology housed in the
baton enables families and
friends to pinpoint the
baton’s location by the
internet.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

THOMPSON BOULEVARD « TEL.: 356-7100 « FAX: 328-6094



USA TODAY MAIN/SPORTS 12 PAGES

EMAIL: dianal yrretarct oir Loon
WEESITE: hendhmotorshahamas.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

Repatriation of Haitian
migrants is criticised

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HAITIAN community
leaders have criticised Gov-
ernment for repatriating
Haitian migrants last weck,
claiming they will face
deplorable conditions and
“certain death.”

Although the repatriation
of illegal Haitian migrants
was suspended when Haiti’s
capital Port-au-Prince was
devastated by the magnitude
7.0 earthquake on January
12, Haitian migrants who
have been apprehended in
the Bahamas since then
were returned to Haiti on
Monday, March 29.

Deputy Prime Minister
and Immigration Minister
Brent Symonette maintains
Haiti is now ready for repa-
triation to resume as nor-
mal, while members of the
Haitian community say
those seeking refuge from
the devastated nation should
not be returned until condi-
tions improve.

“They are sending people
to certain death,” said a
Haitian Bahamian commu-
nity leader who did not want
to be named.

“Now Haiti is coming into
the rainy season they are
talking about the mud; peo-
ple are walking in three
inches of mud and they
have to sleep in that, in
tents, and it is going to get
worse.

“To me it is really unfor-
tunate to send people to a
situation where their liveli-







BRENT SYMONETTE



hood and their lives are at
stake.

“We are just sending peo-
ple to more misery.”

An estimated 200,000
people were killed in the
earthquake, and aid agen-
cies have struggled to pro-
vide food and shelter for
around one million left
homeless.

Home}less

The Haitian government
is now appealing for 40,000
dwellings for the 200,000
homeless living in the worst
flooding and mudslide-
prone areas.

By returning migrants
now, the community leader
fears the Bahamas will gain
a poor humanitarian repu-
tation internationally.

Antoine St Louis, presi-
dent of the United Haitian
Bahamian Association,
added: “We applaud what
the Government did for the
Haitian people after the
earthquake, but we would
hope they would give them
some more time.

“Haiti is not ready to take
anyone as yet.

“They still have a million
homeless people sleeping on
the street, they still have no
food.

“There has not been any
improvement to the situa-
tion.

“If they gave them some
more time that would really
help because it is still in dire
need.”

Mr Symonette maintains
there has been no change to
the Bahamian Immigration
policy, although exceptions
were made in the aftermath
of the earthquake.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham approved the
release of 102 Haitian men,
women and children held at
the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre days after
the quake hit and they were
granted temporary status to
remain in the Bahamas for
up to six months.

Meanwhile the United
States government extend-
ed 18 months Temporary
Protected Status (TPS) to
an estimated 200,000
Haitians already in the US
when the earthquake struck.

However, both the US
and Bahamas continued to
apprehend all those illegally
landing within their borders

TTS Da GUST





CONSTRUCTION on the new Straw Market is continuing on Bay Street. Work is taking place
behind the colourful murals which block out the area to pedestrians. The original straw market
burned down in 2001.

Dr. Carlos O. Thomas & Associates

Have Relocated To #6 Collins Avenue Opposite Doctor's Hospital
Phone: 325-8028 or 325-8048
Mon - Fri 8:30 am to 6:00 pm ¢ Sat 8:30 am to 2:00 pm

LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU AT OUR NEW LOCATION!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

after January 12 to be repa-
triated when the Haitian
government was ready to
accept them.

A total of 62 Haitian
migrants found on a boat in
Exuma two weeks after the
earthquake were immedi-
ately repatriated by the
Royal Bahamas Defence
Force with assistance from
the United States Coast
Guard.

Earthquake

While dozens of others
apprehended since the
earthquake were charged in
court to extend the period
of their detention until they
could be repatriated on
Monday, March 29.

The 86 illegal migrants
apprehended in Long Island
on March 27 were then
returned to Haiti on
Wednesday.

In response to criticism
from the PLP Opposition,
the Immigration Minister
released a statement on
Monday to clarify how gov-
ernment’s policy regarding
repatriation has remained
constant despite exceptions
being made in the aftermath
of the quake.

“Now that it is possible to
resume the orderly repatri-
ation of illegal Haitian immi-
grants, those who have been
incarcerated are being repa-
triated,” Mr Symonette said.

“Any new illegal immi-
grants are being apprehend-
ed and repatriated as
promptly as possible.”





eR BP Bsa
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
aKa O TL)
ei na Tey
922-2197

Wine ava Gallery

WOnGS Riazal® ViaGeira ot, \ 4 ma
Nel; ((242)326-2335 ae F

Chairsum
Tables
Benches
Umbre
Lounge
Drinks T
Coffee Table
End Tables
Cushions

BEC power plant opponents’
hearing underway today

FOUR months after permission was granted for
opponents of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s
Wilson City power plant to seek a judicial review of the
Government’s decision to build the plant, that hearing
gets underway today in Freeport.

At the end of the three-day review proceedings
against the Prime Minister, ministers of the Environ-
ment, Health, Public Works and Transport, The South
Abaco District Council, the Attorney General and
BEC, the judge is expected to give his judgment on
whether the Government was correct or otherwise in its
decision-making and handling of the Abaco power
plant project.

It is likely that the findings will be largely of use in
determining the way forward in future cases of this
kind, as the trial, before Justice Hartman Longley of the
Supreme Court, comes at a time when the construction
of the $105 million plant is now almost 80 per cent
complete.



Development

The judicial review was sought by Responsible Devel-
opment for Abaco, a company that has been created by
civic minded Abaconians and Grand Bahamians to be
a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) to oppose
the development of the Wilson City Power Plant in
Abaco.

When RDA applied for the review, which attempts to
stop the construction of the Wilson City Power Plant,
they also asked for all work on the plant to be stopped
until the review was able to go ahead, warning that
the facility would — as it now is — be substantially
finished by the time the review went ahead.

RDA, which is represented by Fred Smith, QC, con-
tends that the people of Abaco were not adequately
consulted on the decision to locate the plant where it
has been constructed and to burn the controversial
“Bunker C” fuel that it was initially set to use to create
power.

In what has been seen as a victory for RDA prior to
the review, BEC has confirmed that it has changed its
mind on “Bunker C”, considered more environmentally
damaging than other fuels, and will now use automotive
diesel oil at the plant.

ios Bost Moment

FURNISHED!!!
exclusively at
Maison Décor
i?

PRITCHARD DESIG













WaT
J ji
1 F

MN GROU.
Nassau’s Premier Store

Ao eis ar Out ee

Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9933
PA). Hox N-121, Nassau, '.P., Bahamas

email:info@colesofnassnucom

ie ee *
ns ++

or Elegance
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ee => °) 3.0") "=n =13 =a 1°) sr
For the record: I do not

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

‘Operation Ceasefire’ worth investigating

IN THIS column yesterday we discussed
another approach to crime, one that would
tap into a community’s social problems and
force criminals — especially those operating
in gangs — to take responsibility, not only
individually, but also as a group, for the
error of their ways.

A Scottish police woman, impressed by
the results that “Operation Ceasefire” was
having in subduing Boston’s criminals, tried
to convince the Strathclyde police depart-
ment, which included Glasgow, a city
plagued by 3,500 gang members, ranging in
age from 11 to 23, to explore the possibilities
of adapting the programme to the needs of
Glasgow.

Her colleagues were sceptical, writes
Gavin Knight, in “The Week”, a weekly
London publication. They believed that
Boston gang crime was driven by the control
of the drug markets, with guns the enforcers,
and gang members mainly African-Ameri-
cans. They believed that Glasgow’s crime
was different. Police woman, Karyn
McCluskey, disagreed. She was convinced
that the “macho street code and group
dynamics were the same.” McCluskey said
when she sat in on Boston gang trials she
found that “the majority of the fights and
murders were about respect. They weren’t
about control of the drugs market. Fights
over girlfriends. Fights over territory. You’ve
come into my area — exactly what we have
in Glasgow.”

She was determined to try out Harvard-
educated David Kennedy’s “Operation
Ceasefire”. Kennedy flew to Strathclyde to
convince McCluskey’s colleagues. The £5
million needed to fund the project was
raised. People were brought together from
justice, government, housing, careers, edu-
cation, social work, health and the commu-
nity. After 18 months of planning, the Strath-
clyde police were ready for the first call-in. It
was held in the Glasgow sheriff’s court on
October 24, 2008 and was opened by the
sheriff.

Wrote Gavin Knight:

“Through a cordon of four mounted
police at the entrance, 120 gang members
were escorted into the courtroom by police
in riot gear. A police helicopter hovered
overhead and constables cruised up and
down the Clyde. ‘The chief of police stands
up first. He gives a hard-edged message,’





Quality Auto Sales
PRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS
ep) ee a)
aS a ee By
Nee eS
Check Out These Great Values





McCluskey recalled. ‘Pictures of the gangs
are getting flashed around on the screens.
We know who you are, who you associate
with, who you fight with. If we wanted, we
could have a police officer outside your front
door. You could see the looks on their faces.
They are shocked.”

Members of the community then spoke.
An elderly man told how frightened he was
to walk down the street to collect his pen-
sion. An Accident and Emergency consul-
tant explained the difficulty in dealing with
knife victims. A mother told of how her 13-
year-old son was set upon by a machete-
wielding gang. He tried to protect his badly
damaged face, resulting in the loss of his
fingers. “We had gang members crying
because regardless of how good or bad their
parents are — they love their mums,”
McCluskey said “That was the most power-
ful thing in the US, and it was the most pow-
erful thing here too,” she noted.

Another speaker had committed murder
at 18. He explained the dehumanising and
harrowing aspects of prison life. He told of
spending his twenties in prison, “someone
telling him when he can go to the toilet,
when he can eat.” He had a “level of
remorse that speaks to them,” said
McCluskey.

It is too early to officially evaluate the
results of the Stathclyde programme, but
according to anecdotal evidence it appears to
be working. It is reported that the Ceasefire
model has been the most successful attempt
so far to reduce crime in that area, and is
being suggested for other British cities.

“Operation Ceasefire” provides a helping
hand for anyone who wants to leave gang life
and enter the world of worthwhile achieve-
ment. Each gang member is given a phone
number to call if he wants to leave a gang.
The boys are assessed by a social worker,
and their needs are noted, whether it be a
programme to get them off drugs or get
them an education. Health care, career
advice and social services are also provided.

We suggest that our Commissioner of
Police give Mr David Kennedy a call to
explore whether “Operation Ceasefire”, or
some adaptation of it, might bear fruit in
the Bahamas.

Our crime situation has now reached a
point where almost anything is worth inves-
tigation.






Blair Estates,

Danville has



issued.

THE TRIBUNE



support forced sexual
intercourse in marriage

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In the aftermath of the
death of the proposed amend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
and Domestic Violence Act,
many have ventured to spec-
ulate on the reasons the bill
did not make it into law. One
recent instalment to the
plethora of speculative views
is The Tribune’s March 29
Insight column written by Ms
Noelle Nicolls. In the process
of giving her view, which was
summed up in her title, “Govt
‘running scared’ over marital
rape bill,” Ms Nicolls joined
the long line of others who,
over the months of public
debate, misquoted my state-
ments and misrepresented my
position on the proposed
amendment.

Ms Nicolls wrote: “King-
dom Life Church pastor
Cedric Moss argued that rape
cannot be committed in mar-
riage as each spouse gives the
other authority over their
body and agrees to open-end-
ed sexual consent in the mar-
riage vows.” I’ve surmised
that Ms Nicolls is referring to
the address I made to the
Rotary Club of West Nassau
on August 6, 2009, and since I
did not argue such a position
as stated by Ms Nicolls, I have
provided her with a copy of
my full remarks for her
perusal.

Hopefully, after consider-
ing what I actually said, Ms
Nicolls will offer the appro-
priate correction in a future
edition of The Tribune.

In her quest to make her
case, it appears as though Ms
Nicolls chose to not state the
most important part of my
position on the issue of forced
sexual intercourse in mar-
riage, and it is this: Through-
out the entirety of the debate
on the proposed amendment,
T unequivocally supported the
criminalisation of forced sex-

Our moral decline

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The level of crime in this
country has risen (or shall I say
“fallen”) to such a state that
after reading today’s headlines,
I fear it confirms the morals
that our society apparently
embraces allowing or encour-
aging such behaviour. The fact
that criminals can get away with
gunning down innocent victims
in broad daylight is bad enough,
but doing it while naked is quite
a statement! I refer to today’s
front page (March 22) “Naked
Gunman Kills Motorist”. That
says it all. What’s next?

A VERY
CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Nassau,

March 22, 2010.

I, Debra J. Darville of Coral Place, Little Blair,
Nassau, The Bahamas
made sworn deposition that Life of Barbados
policy No.0103426 on the life of Rodman Horsley
been lost and having made
application to us to grant a duplication of
the same. Notice is hereby given that unless
objection is raised with one month of the date
thereof, the duplicate policy asked for will be

have



LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ual intercourse in marriage;
however, I did not support
the approach by which the bill
proposed to criminalise forced
sexual intercourse in mar-
riage.

However, from Ms Nicolls’s
article, it is easy to get the
impression that I support
forced sexual intercourse in
marriage.

Nevertheless, for the record
I again unconditionally state
that I did not and still do not
support forced sexual inter-
course in marriage; it is wrong
and should be punishable by
law.

In my view, one of the rea-
sons that the proposed legis-
lation failed to garner public
consensus is the biased
reporting of activist journalists
(they know who they are);
instead of objectively report-
ing on the various views on
the proposed amendment,
they allowed personal
activism to trump profession-
al journalism.

In the end, the public
debate suffered. It is actually
sad that the public debate on
that important piece of pro-
posed legislation was not
done in a more civil and
objective manner.

During the course of the
debate, many persons (includ-
ing some journalists) felt the
need to vilify, mock, and
demean those who had an
opposing view, and the
national debate suffered.

Ms Nicolls’s Insight article
continues with this approach
and is a case in point.

I am hopeful that in this
next parliamentary session the
government will introduce a
new bill to criminalise forced
sexual intercourse in marriage
without blurring the clear and

very obvious distinctions
between forced sexual inter-
course between unmarried
persons and forced sexual
intercourse between married
persons.

Our laws already cover
forced sexual intercourse
between unmarried persons,
and we don’t need to tamper
with those laws in order to
criminalise forced sexual
intercourse within marriage.

We simply need appropri-
ate laws to separately crimi-
nalise forced sexual inter-
course in marriage.

I believe there will be over-
whelming support from mar-
ried men and women for such
an approach, so long as it
takes into account the realities
of marital relations.

While little attention has
been given to it, I think the
saddest part of the failure of
the proposed amendment to
the Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act is the
death of the proposal to
increase from six months to
two years the time limit for
proceedings for summary
offences that are triable under
the Act.

In my view, since there
seemed to be no widespread
dissent on this part of the pro-
posed amendment, the gov-
ernment should have sepa-
rately passed it rather than
letting it die with the more
contentious parts of the bill. I
supported such an approach
in my remarks to the Rotary
Club of West Nassau, but it
went unreported.

Perhaps if activist journal-
ists who focused exclusively
on the marital rape aspect of
the bill had done their job of
objective reporting, the out-
come of this and the other
parts of the bill would have
be quite different.

CEDRIC MOSS
Nassau,
March 31, 2010.

Quietness is ex’

to Godliness ...

EDITOR, The Tribune.

make,

work,

Signed,

Nassau,
March, 2010.



Dear Mr Prime Minister, please len’ me your ear,

I got me one problem, dat’s bring me to tears.

It’s dese damn motorcycles, screamin’ tru da night,
Loud enough to wake da dead, it just ain’t right.
Ain’t there some kinda law against dis kinda muffla,
Why you don’t enforce it, so we don’t got to suffa?
It ain’t like dey hard to find, wit all da noise deys

So please get ’em off da streets for errybody sake.
Make ’em change da mufflas to ones dat’re quiet,
Before da rest of da peoples dem does start one riot.
Tell customs dem, “keep dem tings outa we country”
An’ firewoiks an’ cherry bombs, an’ all an’ sundry!
If I can’t sleep, I can’t t’inks, if I can’t t’inks, I can’t

So please don’t get me fired because of these

Going Deaf, but ain’t Dumb







PS
FOR SALE

‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘01 HYUNDAI

'04 FORD EXPLORER

'95 NISSAN BLUEBIRD
‘98 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE

‘01 MAZDA MPV WAGON
‘99 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘08 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

. ‘97 TOYOTA AVALON
img@8 '91 VOLVO 740 GL

— '98 HONDA ACCORD

#1 AUTO DEALER Id THE Baur AAAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Wail ger chereraere of Cuaality Auta Sobei (Freeport) lid es ides deck, Qeaere bey, 132-6197
af Abooo Mivior Ball, Don bacieg Bed, 167-39 1d

OPEN: Mon to Fr actiam - 5:30om * Sat B:S0ami - 1
















2006 IZUZU
ADVERTISING VAN
LOADED WITH
SPECIAL FEATURES

Call: 396-4101

SANS SOUCI SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 25

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Multi-family Residence, 5 beds / 4 baths
with 2 Apartment Units, 1 bed/ 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 9,450 sq. ft.
LOCATION: From Prince Charles Drive
enter Sans Souci then turn onto Sherwood
Drive; the subject property is the 3rd
building on the right, peach trimmed
white.

APPRAISED VALUE: $497,000







INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OFTELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT
RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O. BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVETHE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.

eur


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 5



Call for inquiry into reported
child abuse cases disparity

By ALESHA CADET

THE Opposition’s
spokesperson for social ser-
vices is calling on the gov-
ernment to launch an
inquiry into the disparity in
the number of reported
child abuse cases recorded
by the different agencies.

Melanie Griffin, PLP MP
for Yamacraw and former
Minister of Social Services,
said in a statement yester-
day:

“The Ministry of Social
Services is indicating that
according to their records
there are 118 reported cases
of sexual abuse of children
in 2010. However, police
statistics show that for 2010
thus far, the total number
of all rape, attempted rape,
and unlawful sexual inter-
course matters are 80 cases
(i.e. in all categories.

“Does this mean that
there is a difference of at
least 38 cases that have not
been reported to the police
for investigation?”

Ms Griffin was respond-
ing to a report in a daily last
week which stated that so
far for 2010 reported cases
of child sexual abuse are up

42 per cent over last year.









“If the 118 cases which
represent the first quarter
of reporting are any indica-
tion of what the number of
sexual abuse cases against
children is likely to be for
2010, our children and our
country are in serious trou-
ble,” she said.

Ms Griffin said such an
increase cannot be exclu-
sively due the enactment of
the Child Protection Act
2007 in October last year.

“The increase in child
abuse statistics generally



“What is the explanation for
this disconnect, particularly in
light of the National Child
Abuse Protocol which was put
in place in part to co-ordinate
inter-agency handling of
reported cases of child abuse?”



and sexual abuse in particu-
lar was noted long before
the enactment of the Child
Protection Act 2007 in
October 2009. In fact,
according to Child Abuse
Statistics for 2007, compiled
by the Department, there
were almost 1,600 reported
cases of child abuse of
which 286 were sexual
abuse,” she said.

While the enactment of
the Child Protection Act
and the efforts to heighten
awareness of the problem
would have an impact on
the increased reporting, Ms
Griffin said it “cannot be
accepted that these are the
only reasons, particularly in

Melanie Griffin

view of such significant
increases.”

“There must be some-
thing else at play. Is the
problem really due in large
part to the fact that the
Department does not have
the capacity to deal with the
ever increasing social issues
of today?” she said.

“What is the explanation
for this disconnect, particu-
larly in light of the National
Child Abuse Protocol which
was put in place in part to
co-ordinate inter-agency
handling of reported cases
of child abuse? Is there a
break down in the govern-
ment’s reporting and the
prosecution process?”

Five weekend armed
robberies investigated

POLICE are investigating
five reported armed robberies
that occurred throughout the
capital over the holiday week-
end.

The first incident occurred
around 12.25am on Friday in
the area of Robinson Road
and Minnie Street.

Police were told that a man
was approached by three
men, one of whom was
allegedly armed with a hand-
gun, as he was getting in his
car.

The thugs demanded cash
from the victim before rob-
bing him of his cell phone and
his wallet containing an unde-
termined amount of cash.

The culprits fled the area
on foot into the Minnie Street
area.

A second armed robbery
was reported to police around
11.19pm on Friday in the area
of Mermaid Boulevard, near
Carmichael Road.

According to reports a
woman, while on Mermaid
Boulevard, was approached
by a masked man armed with
a handgun who robbed her of
her 2003 Navy Blue Honda
Accord with the license plate
number 207187.

The car thief fled the area
in an unknown direction,
police said.

Around 4.20am the next
day police were called to the
scene of an armed robbery at

TOUGH CALL

LARRY SMITH’S week-
ly column, “Tough Call”,
will not appear in today’s
Tribune.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





Podoleo Street off Cordeaux
Avenue.

Responding officers were
told that while at home, two
men were approached by four
masked men, clad in dark
clothing, all armed with hand-
guns, who demanded cash.

The culprits robbed the
men of an undisclosed
amount of money and fled the
area on foot in an unknown
direction.

Also on Saturday, at
around 8.45pm, _ police
received information of an
armed robbery at Robinson
and Marathon Roads.

A phone card vendor told
police that while standing at
the junction of the two streets,
he was approached by three
men one of whom was armed
with a handgun.

It is reported the culprits
robbed the man of an unde-
termined amount of cash and
pre-paid cell phone cards
before fleeing the area in a

gold coloured car, license
plate number 164739.

Moments later police were
able to intercept the vehicle
and arrested four male occu-
pants, aged 22, 23, 27 and 30.

The last reported incident
occurred around 11.24pm on
Saturday at the laundromat
Sparkle Wash on Baillou Hill
Road south.

Police were told that a man
wearing a white jacket and
blue jeans, and armed with a
handgun, entered the estab-
lishment demanding cash.

The culprit robbed the
establishment of an undeter-
mined amount of money and
fled the area on foot in an
unknown direction.

In other crime news, police
patrolling the Frederick Street
area on Friday morning
around 6.04am spotted the
wooden front door of the
high-end jewellery store
Colombian Emeralds open.

Officers, along with a key

[ MARINE NAVIGATION |

COURSES

Summer is coming so now is the time to
prepare for the boating season by enrolling
in courses offered by The Bahamas School
of Marine Navigation. Plan to attend the
free first class of the Terrestrial Navigation
Course on Monday, April 12th, at & 7p.m. at
BASRA Headquarters on East Bay Street then
consider enrolling in the 3-month course. Visit
www.bsmn.biz for details.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CAUTION IN THE WIND INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



holder for the store, checked
the establishment and found it
undisturbed, police said.
Investigations into all of
these incidents continue.

Ms Griffin is calling on
the government to appoint a
special task force to address
the high incidences of
reported abuse of children.

She further said that the
National Child Protection
Council should be mandat-
ed and provided with the
necessary resources to
increase its programmes to
educate the public about the
high incidences of child
abuse and what steps they
ought to take to prevent it
and report it.

Additionally, Ms Griffin
said government should
enlist the assistance of the
Bahamas Christian Council
and other religious organi-
sations in going into the
communities with faith-
based initiatives designed to
reach families and arrest
this current situation.

Woman ties
after traffic
accident

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 66-year-

: old woman died following
: a traffic accident in the
: South Bahamia area.

Her death is the third

fatality for the year on
: Grand Bahama.

Police Asst Supt Loretta

: Mackey reported that the
: accident occurred around
: 5pm last Wednesday when
? a woman driving a Sunfire
: Pontiac lost control of her
: vehicle and crashed into a
i utility pole on Pinta
; Avenue.

Ms Mackey said the vic-

: tim was transported by
: ambulance to the Rand
: Memorial Hospital, where
i she later died of her injuries
: at around 5.46pm.

Officers at the Police

: Traffic Division and a team
: of detectives are continuing
: their investigation into this
: matter.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SPEEDWAY HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Mase D. GARDINER HURRICANE
AND BURGULAR PROTECTION

#34 Bay Lilly Dr. Sea Breeze Estates
P.0. Box $$-5592, Nassau, The Bahamas

Phone: (242) 324-6794 © Fax: (242) 324-7554

Non-Fust Burgutar Screen
Doors with Double Action
Deadbolt Lock

—

Aluminum Accordion Shutters

Aluminum Bahama Shutters

nt

to fit Every budget

shila] |

mete

Aluminum Colonial Hinged Shutters

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS







a

Janet Bostwick (left) and Thelma Beneby, Per-
manent Secretary in the Office of the Attorney
General, embrace at a retirement luncheon held
for Mrs Beneby.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KANAGAWA VIEW INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator}

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CYGNUS VILLAGE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DIAMOND FIELDS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY ENTERPRISE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

—_





ie

, . F i i i — - | 7
. . . Ae é \ F [a a |
FORMER MINISTER of Justice and Immigration 9 eel Ee

pent

ATTORNEY GENERAL John Delaney and Minister of Legal Affairs speaks at the retire-
ment luncheon held for Thelma Beneby, Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Attor-
ney General, at the Police Conference Centre.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORSONNENS CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
FEMAX INT’L CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEXMARK CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUMMERTIME GROUP INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Permanent Secretary
is recognised for

By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

THELMA Ferguson-
Beneby, Permanent Secretary
in the Office of the Attorney
General, was recognised for
34 years of exemplary service
in the public service.

A retirement luncheon was
held in her honour at the
Police Conference Centre last
Wednesday.

Mrs Beneby served 16
years aS a permanent secre-
tary in the Ministries of Jus-
tice and Immigration, Trans-
port, and the Public Service
Commission.

In a written tribute, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
said Mrs Beneby served with
“honesty” and “integrity.”

He said she is knowledge-
able about the public service
and was “helpful” to early ini-
tiatives of modernising the
service, removing discrimina-
tory practices and reducing
anomalies that had evolved
over time.

Senator Foulkes said Mrs
Beneby created a family envi-
ronment in the ministries to
which she was assigned.

“Tt wasn’t business as usu-
al,” he said. “She cared for
her staff, she showed it in her
attitude towards them. She
also rewarded good work.”

Attending the retirement
luncheon, Mrs Janet Bostwick

* 9) 34 years of service

“In Thelma you will defi-
nitely not have someone who
will tell you what you want
to hear,” she said.

She thanked Mrs Beneby
for personal assistance to her,
to the country, and for the
example that she gave as a
mother, wife, public servant
and a child of God.

“TI can also attest to Mrs
Beneby’s deep spirituality
because not only did we work
together, we prayed togeth-
er over the work that we had
to do,” she said.

“There was more than a
bond of minister and perma-
nent secretary, there was the
deeper bond of two sisters in
Christ.”

The Attorney General
described Mrs Beneby as one
who epitomises “excellence”
in the public service.

“Tt is indeed my privilege
to have commenced my ser-
vice having her as my right
hand.”

In her response, Mrs
Beneby reflected on her
career and thanked Prime
Minister Ingraham for the
opportunity to have served
aS permanent secretary in
sO many important min-
istries.

Along with her husband
Felix and family, she
acknowledged the ministers,
colleagues, employees of the
Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral, church leaders and pub-
lic officers who supported her

also paid tribute to Mrs Bene-
by.

over the years.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MAGDENAU LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
TIMNAH CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WESTERN SPRINGTIDE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE





5 Haitian man charged after cocaine found

A HAITIAN man, who was arrested
Saturday after police discovered five kilos
of cocaine during a bag search at the Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport, was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yester-



FROM page one

body in an old Bronco jeep with an
apparent stab wound in his

abdomen.

The pair was not required to enter

a plea to the murder charge.

Knowles told the court that he
needed medical attention. He told
Chief Magistrate Gomez that offi-
cers from the Central Detective Unit
took hot water from a coffee
machine and poured it on his pri-

vate area.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered
that Knowles be taken to see a doc-
tor. He remanded the pair to Her
Majesty’s Prison. Their case has
been adjourned to April 13 and
transferred to Court 11, Nassau

Street.

day.



Jean Pierre Deiudonne, also known as
Ronald Jean Pierre, 52, of Midshipman
Road, Freeport, Grand Bahama was
arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 8, Bank Lane yesterday.

It is alleged that on April 3, while at New
Providence he was found in possession of
a quantity of cocaine with intent to supply
to another. It is also alleged that on the
same day he attempted to import a quan-
tity of cocaine into the country.

Deiudonne, who was represented by
attorney Ian Cargill, pleaded not guilty to
the charges. He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected back in
court on Friday for a bail hearing.






Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

Family of dead man accuse
police of ‘sloppy’ case work

FROM page one

case and commission a fresh
investigation into the matter.

However, Assistant Super-
intendent Bernard Bonamy
Jr who took over the Central
Detective Unit's Homicide
Unit in January, said the case
is being investigated as a
homicide adding that the lead
investigator has done a
"remarkable" job.

"We investigate all (suspi-
cious) deaths as if it is a homi-
cide until we can prove oth-
erwise," he said.

Mr Burrows, a boater who
co-owned a landscaping com-
pany with his wife Arnette, is
said to have left his family
home around 5am on Sep-
tember 8, 2008. He was never
seen again. He was reported
missing several days later.

His family claims Mr Bur-
rows disappeared on his 45th
birthday leaving behind his
cellular phone, bank cards,
wallet, passport, his house
keys along with his wedding
band which they said he nev-
er took off.

On November 9, 2008,
police found a skull lying on
Spring Street in the Glenis-
ton Gardens subdivision, off
Prince Charles Road in east-
ern New Providence. DNA
testing identified the skull as
that of Mr Burrows. The fam-
ily said police told them about
the DNA match on February
17, 2010, 15 months after the
skull was discovered.

Additional skeletal
remains, found in another
location that same year, have
been sent off to a lab in the
United States to determine if
they belong to Mr Burrows.

"Once the results come
back and we have confidence
on who it is then we would
prepare our file and send it
to the Coroner's Court to
make a determination as to
how this person came about
his death. Based on the analy-
sis they will determine how
he was killed. Once we get
the results we'll know what
course of action to take," said
ASP Bonamy.

These remains were found
in late 2008 in an empty lot
in the San Souci area several
miles away from where the
skull was recovered on Spring
Road, according to a report
compiled by some of Mr Bur-
rows' relatives and sent to Mr
Greenslade.

The family claims police
told them a stray dog might
have moved some of the
remains to the second loca-
tion, several miles away. The
family also claimed in their
report that police found a
boot lace tied to a tree near
some of the remains, an item
the family believes may have
been planted at the site to
give the appearance of a sui-
cide.

Fed up, they now want a
new investigation launched
into Mr Burrows’ death.

"Our brother Bernard was
not known to the police nor
involved in any illegal activi-
ties. He was a church going
man, a devoted husband and
father, a dependable loving
brother and uncle. He was
always with a smile on his
face, even when he was in

pain during his hospitilisation.
We strongly believe that
police exerted little energy in
the preliminary stages of the
disappearance.

"His disappearance and
death was untimely and we
would appreciate some type
of closure," said the family,
in a written plea to Mr
Greenslade.

The family said while some
officers, notably Assistant
Commissioner Glenn Miller
before he was transferred out
of the CDU and a Detective
Turnquest stationed at the
Homicide section, have
expressed interest in the case,
they feel the "ball was
dropped" by investigating
officers during the start of the
case.



CURTIS RICHARD TAYLOR (left) and Christoph Knowles oe if Pan ec

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COLOMBIERSTRASS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice
in the provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable
candidates for the position of:

Accountant

c ore Responsibilities:
¢ Prepare individual and consolidated financial statements for
the company and its subsidiaries in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards
Provide analytical reviews of financial statements, management
reports, and other financial information to identify and
investigate significant variances of actual vs. budget and/or
prior year on a consolidated basis and on a more detailed level
for example, line of business, cost center ete.
Make recommendations on appropriate corrective action of
financial performance against planned and projected targets
to ensure sustained profitability
Document and analyze control environments for the Finance

Department

Compile budgets and prepare forecasts

Responsible for ensuring that statutory reports are filed in all
jurisdictions where the Company operates

Assist in the coordination of internal and statutory financial

audits

Position Requirements:
Certified Public Accountant
Three or more years of experience in public accounting
(financial services background is a necessity)
Strong technical skills and knowledgeable of generally accepted
accounting principles
Analytical and forward thinking
Knowledge of general ledger implementation and mamtenance
background (a plus)
Project management skills is a plus
A team player; willingness to be the pacesetter when appropriate

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package,
commensurate with work experience and qualifications. Interested
persons should apply no later than 20th April, 2010 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
Or fax to: 242-323-2637

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 7

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA GOLD TRADING INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator

is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAND AND C
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAZI PLAINS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAGE MOUNTAIN
VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BONETTE MOUNTAIN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





THE HEADQUARTERS of the FNM and PLP pictured yesterday.

FNM, PLP in fight

FROM page one

thinking to do — primarily
about how best he can ensure
his “hunger” to serve his coun-
try and to help it develop going
forward.

“I am extremely passionate
about getting involved. Not just
being involved for the sake of
pursuing any self interest, that’s
never been what it’s about, but
I have to consider whether the
electorate is prepared to accept
a party other than the PLP or
the FNM. I believe many per-
sons would’ve seen with this
recent by-election that I have a
lot of passion and I’d really like
for that passion to be put to use
in a way that will be accepted by
Bahamians,” he said.

Dr Rollins, who operates The
Bahamas Brace Place, was one
of three “fringe” party candi-
dates to offer for election in the
Elizabeth by-election, along
with the Bahamas Democratic
Movement’s Cassius Stewart
and the Workers’ Party’s Rod-

ney Moncur. Mr Stewart and
Mr Moncur received 77 and 16
votes each. The NDP has been
in existence since October 2008
and therefore the Elizabeth by-
election was the first time it put
forward a candidate for elec-
tion.

The revelation that he is now
seriously considering joining
one of the two main political
parties may come as a surprise
to some who paid attention to
his statements during the run
up to the election.

The NDP frontman ran on a
platform that in part sought to
distinguish him and the party
as an alternative to either of the
established political parties,
whom he often referred to as
devoid of ideas to help move
the country forward.

“T’ve heard people call it par-
ty shopping,” said Dr Rollins
yesterday of his meetings with
the two political parties, “but
one has to take into account in
politics to be successful that one
has to master the art of the

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JAKSTIGEN CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
STAR HORIZON EQUITY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.



political, to work with people
not necessarily involved in your
political party. You have to be
able to reach across aisles reach
certain compromises to get
things done. That is an act of
political maturity.”

He added that he does not
see the possibility of him joining
the FNM or PLP as a “depar-
ture from many of the state-
ments I would’ve made or the
principles I have said previous-
ly that I believe strongly in”
although he recognised that
some will view it as such.

“Those principles I’ve
espoused those beliefs and goals
I’ve talked about previously are
still and will always be a part of
my make up. They are things
that I believe strongly in and
those things will not change —I
will always be about serving the
Bahamian people and seeking
to be about country before self.”

The dentist described it as a
privilege to meet with wife of
former PLP leader and Prime
Minister Sir Lynden Pindling,

to sign up Rollins

Dame Marguerite, and Prime
Minister Ingraham, whom he
met in that order.

Speaking of his meeting with
the Prime Minister and FNM
leader he said: “T had the oppor-
tunity to ask him certain ques-
tions and he had an opportuni-
ty to ask certain questions of
me and he had many years of
political experience and as a
result I was able to hear his per-
spective on certain things. I con-
sidered it a privilege for me to
meet with him one on one. The
fact of the matter is I left that
meeting with the opportunity
to meet with him further.”

He denied that he was
offered the chance to run in a
particular constituency by either
party, as had been reported in a
downmarket tabloid newspa-
per.

“T am still a member of the
NDP. I am doing a lot of soul
searching. My ultimate objec-
tive is to see this country really
take off and maximise its poten-
tial,” he said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BOLLERO ALPHA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is herteby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ALENTEJO INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

LITTLE STEPS UP TO THE LEAP

; By MIKE LIGHTBOURN





: AS YOU’VE already read here, con-
: ditions are ripe to become a homeown-
: er and it’s time to determine if you’re
: ready to make the leap. While the price
: of the home is the largest factor, don’t
: forget about loan fees and closing costs,
? which add to your total financed amount.
: Since banks are strict in their lending,
: Step One is pay off or reduce any debt
; you may already have, if you are able, to
: improve your risk rating. This may
: increase your chances of getting better
: terms and interest rates.

: Similarly, a larger down payment will
: positively affect your mortgage terms
: and reduce the amount you have to finance. If parents allow it,
: one option is to live at home longer and save money for a
: down payment. Another is to rent with a friend in order to pay
: less rent and save.

: Upon preapproval from a lender (which is something you
: should always do), you'll know how much of a loan you qual-
: ify for, and how much is required for the down payment. It’s best
: to secure preapproval before you begin looking at homes, so
: Vendors will see your offer is a solid one worthy of considera-
: tion since you have already qualified yourself.

: Ask your Bahamas Real Estate Association agent about
: closing costs. They will quote you the standard legal cost and
: your stamp duty obligations. Don’t forget if you are a first
: time homeowner you can apply for stamp duty exemption on
: a purchase up to $500,000. Ask your bank up front to list all fees
: associated with the loan (attorney’s fees, stamp duty on your
: mortgage, etc) and life insurance requirements.

: If you are borrowing money from a bank, you will need to get
: an appraisal from a bank-approved BREA appraiser.

: Contact your BREA agent today to get the ball rolling and
: find out from your bank how much home you can afford. This
: will save a whole lot of time.

: Tip of the Week — Save yourself the heartache and prequal-
: ify for a loan before you start to search for a home. I can’t count
: the number of times a fantastic buy has come on the market and
: the prospect has rushed to the bank to pursue a loan. Howev-
: er, by the time approval was granted, the home was under
: contract. Don’t miss the boat.

: Mike Lightbourn is president of Colwell Banker Light-
: bourn Realty in the Bahamas.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 21
in Block C situate in Garden Hills Subdivision Section II
in the Southern district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.

Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of a triplex with one unit consisting of (3) bedrooms, (2)
bathrooms and two units consisting of (2) bedrooms, (1)
bathroom.

Property Size: 8,807 sq. ft
Building Size: 4,151 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3276”. All offers must be received
peg close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,



Legal Notice

NOTICE
ULSANWAR S.A

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SYNDICATE D.J.C. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CADDO MILLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BUNGA MAWAR

INVESTMENTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 31st day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

"Our agreement with China State
Construction Company includes the use
of their labour, however Baha Mar has
reaffirmed its commitment to hire as
many qualified Bahamians as possible
to work on the project during its three
year plus construction phase," Mr Sands
told The Tribune yesterday.

"The important point, however, is
once completed the project is expected
to create more than 8,000 new jobs for
Bahamian workers and contribute sig-

Baha Mar official

nificantly to the island's overall econo-
my," he said.

His comments came in response to
criticism by John Pinder, head of the
National Congress of Trade Unions of
The Bahamas (NCTUB).

"I don't think it's fair for them to
have to bring in 7,000 workers. I am
sure we can find the skills necessary
right here," Mr Pinder is quoted as say-
ing, referring to a speculative number of

how many Chinese workers are expect-
ed to help construct the project.

The number of work permits being
sought by Baha Mar's Chinese partners
has been viewed as a potentially difficult
political issue for the Bahamas govern-
ment, Tribune Business reported earli-
er this year, having heard varying esti-
mates ranging from 4,000 to 6,500 and
above.

However, a cap of 2,500 work per-
mit holders would be present in this
nation and working on the project at

While side-stepping the question of
how many Chinese workers will ulti-
mately take part in the construction
phase, Mr Sands said Bahamian labour
will be factored into the construction.

He added: "The fact of the matter is
that during the construction phase we
will have a full range of disciplines that
will be available to the Bahamian work-
force and certainly all those that are
qualified to perform those jobs would
be given the opportunity to apply and
hopefully be allowed to participate with-
in this venture.”

Last week Baha Mar pledged to
award all contracts for the $200 million
first phase construction of its Cable
Beach redevelopment to Bahamian
contractors, providing more than 250
jobs during the first 12 months of work,
with some 3,300 locals set to gain work
over the three-and-a-half year building
phase.

The developer hopes to break ground
once it and its equity partner, China
State Construction, received all the rel-
evant approvals from the Bahamian

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 3463
situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,136 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3547”. All offers must be received
by i close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
154 in Twynam Heights Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a single family residence consisting of a (4)
bedrooms and (3 1/2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 8,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 2,450 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2511”. All offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
97 situate in Big Pond Subdivision in the Western
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (1) bathrooms.

Property Size: 3,200 sq. ft
Building Size: 868 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1999”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land situate
northwardly of Blue Berry Hill Road in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of a (4) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,925 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,577 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1232”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

any one time.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 227
situate in Eastwood Estates Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single family residence consisting of (8) bedrooms
and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 7,500 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,132 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 3036”. All offers must be received
Bane close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 2423
situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates Subdivision in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a single family residence consisting
of (8) bedrooms and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 6,307 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,368 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2012”. All offers must be received
by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land situate
approximately 2,320 feet South of Harold Road and
1.2 miles West of Blue Hill Road in the Western district
of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a vacant property.

Property Size: 7,119 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE
CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1937”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No. 51
situate in Twynam Heights Subdivision in the Eastern
district of the Island of New Providence one of the islands
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon
is a single family residence consisting of (8) bedrooms
and (2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 11,494 sq. ft
Building Size: 4,430 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed

envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank

Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

and marked “Tender 0782”. All offers must be received

by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
010.

and Chinese governments.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
446 West Winds Subdivision in the Western district of
the Island of New Providence one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is
a vacant property.

Property Size: 6,769 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION
OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 2556”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being a portion
of a larger tract of land situate on Gladstone Road in
the Western district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of a triplex apartment with each unit consisting of (2)
bedrooms and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 7,450 sq. ft
Building Size: 2,002 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, PO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas
and marked “Tender 2008”. All offers must be received
ag close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,

RBC
FINCO

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
400 situate in Yellow Elder Gardens Subdivision in
the Western district of the Island of New Providence
one of the islands of the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a single family residence
consisting of (3) bedrooms and (1) bathroom.

Property Size: 3,200 sq. ft
Building Size: 702 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale
contained in a Mortgage to FINANCE
CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed
envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank
Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked “Tender 1626”. All offers must
be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday
16th April, 2010.

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the
following:

“All THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot No.
3254/55 situate in Sir Lynden Pindling Estates in the
Southern district of the Island of New Providence one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Situated thereon is a multi family residence consisting
of single family residence consisting of (3) bedrooms and
(2) bathrooms.

Property Size: 6,000 sq. ft
Building Size: 1,143 sq. ft

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF
BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in sealed

envelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank

Collections Centre, RO. Box N-7549, Nassau, Bahamas

and marked “Tender 4170”. All offers must be received

ao close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday 16th April,
0.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 10

or
|
ke



ts



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7,









2010



iy Le
2010 Carifta track and field team

Carifta track team
returns home













Felipé Major/Tribune sta

ae

BELOW is the final medal count for the 39th Carifta (Track and
Field) Games held over the weekend at the Truman Bodden
Sports Complex in the Cayman Islands:



1 Jamaica (JAM) 37 22 13 72
2 Trinidad & Tobago (TRI) | 12 16 12 40
3 Bahamas (BAH) 6 10 13 29
4 Barbados (BAR) 3 7 8 18
By RENALDO DORSETT George Town, Grand Cayman BAAAs President, Mike __ learning experience and use it as 5 Grenada (GRN) 2 0 2 4
Tribune Sports Reporter = with a complete medal haulof Sands, lauded the overall team _ motivation to train even harder 6 Martinique (MTQ) { 4 { 6
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net 29, which included six gold, 10 _ effort and their performance as _ for future events and for the 7 St. Kitts & Nevis (SKN) { { 0 9
_ silver and 13 bronze, which acohesive unit. next Carifta Games so you will 8 US Virgin Islands (ISV { { 0 9
AFTER A weekendofcom-. Secured a third place finish “This was a true team effort ensure you achieve your desired q )
petition at the region’s most overall. and from the moment competi- _ result, whether that be a posi- 9 St. Lucia (LCA) 1 0 3 4
prestigious junior meet, team Jamaica was once again the __ tion began to the finalevent this _ tion on the medal podium or a 10 Dominica (DMA) 1 0 1 2
Bahamas was greeted upon top country overall with a total team was together and per- new personal best.” 11 Cayman Islands (CAY) { 0 0 |
their return to the capital with of 72 medals (37 gold, 22 silver, formed as one. Those who were Sands praised the efforts of 12 Guyana (GUY) { 0 0 {
accolades and honours resulting and 13 bronze), while Trinidad —_ able to medal and set personal _ those behind the scenes that led 13 Bermuda (BER) 0 3 8 14
from one of the most statisti. @2¢ Tobago finished second __ bests the entire country is proud _ to the performance, including f
with 40 medals (12 gold, 16 sil- of you, your accomplishments coaches, management team 14 Netherlands Antilles (AHO) | 0 1 2 3
cally successful performances Be voy P oe ? :
in recent history. ver and 12 bronze). and the way you represented us administration, parents and the 15 Turks & Caicos (TKS) 0 1 0 1
“he: Fsmen ber Trace and The Bahamas improved on all in competetion,” he said,“To Ministry of Sports. 16 Antigua & Barbuda (ANT) | 0 0 1 |
Field team returned from the _/@St year’s fifth place finish and _ those of you who feel as if your “As usual the coaching staff 17 Guadeloupe (GPE) 0 0 { {
30th Carifta Championships in total of 25 medals which includ- performances fellshort of what — did a tremendous job guiding 18 Anguilla (AIA) 0 0 0 0
ed just two first place finishes. you expected, take this as a such a large team in each of the
events and they deservse spe- 19 Aruba (ARU) 0 0 0 0
cial commendation as well. 20 British Virgin Is. (IVB) 0 0 0 0
Regardless of their different 21 Fr. Guyana/ 0 0 0 0
methods as coaches we should Cayenne (GYE)
e e all realise that there is some- 22 Haiti (HAI) 0 0 0 0
A elebration of life thing different we all bring to 23 Montserrat (MNT) 0 0 0 0
the table and we must remem- as
e ber that the performance and 24 St. Vincent & 0 0 0 0
LS lanned or The Grenadines (VIN)
Dp SEE page 11 25 Suriname (SUR) 0 0 0 0



aphne Farrington

Friday afternoon 5 p.m.
April 9th
at
Port New Providence
Beach & Club House







Knowles loses doubles
partner to hip injury

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JUST when Mark Knowles
was hoping to turn things
around this season, his new
partnership suffered another
blow with Amercan Mardy
Fish going down with a hip
injury.

The injury came one day
after the duo won ther open-
ing match on Monday night at
the US Men’s Clay Court
Championships with a gru-
elling 6-7 (3), 7-5, 11-9 triumph
over the American team of
Eric Butorac and Rajeev Ram.

As Fish, 28, was preparing
to play his first round singles
match, he informed tourna-
ment officials that due to the
lingering effects of a siatic
nerce injury sustained in a fall
last week at the Sony Erics-
son Open in Miami, Florida,
he had to withdraw.

“Tm obviously extremely
disappointed not being able to
play here,” Fish, the Houston
singles champion in 2006 said
on the tournament’s website.

“T’ve had a lot of success at
this tournament. I have great
memomries here. It’s a real
bummer. From my point of
view, the way I was hitting the
ball, the was feeling in Miami
before I fell in the fourth
round there, it’s a bummer not
being able to play here.”

Unseeded Fish, who was
scheduled to play Isreal’s
Conor Niland in the first
round, was replaced by Indian
Somdev Devvarmann.

However, after winning
their first round doubles
match, Knowles and Fish had
to wait to see who their second
round opponents would be.
But Knowles say it doesn’t
matter because they had to
withdraw from further com-

petition.

“We won a good match on
Monday, but seeing that we
hadn’t played that many
matches, it was good for us to
get this one under our belts,’
Knowles said when contacted
yesterday.

“We played well. I hit the
ball well, but unfortunately
Mardy was still hurting rom
the injury and we got through
that match, but Mardy had to
withdraw from singles and we
withdrew from doubles.”

Knowles, 38, called it a
nightmare that he hope he can
finally wake up from.

“Who really has the jinx on
us are doing a pretty good
job,” Knowles said. “This is
crazy. We entered four tour-
naments and we’ve withdrawn
from three of them in four
months. It’s real discouraging.
But all you can dois try to get
healthy and try to win.”

Coming off his injury that
sidelined the newly formed
duo from January, Knowles
said he now have to go back to
the drawing board.

“The good news is that I’m
healthy and I’m playing well,”
Knowles said.

Knowles feels he will defi-
nitely know for sure how
healthy he is when he play in
Monte Carlo, teaming up with
Bruno Soares from Brasil, who
is currently ranked at 23 in
doubles.

“T don’t think Mardy and I
will play again until the French
Open. It is what it is. It’s not
the type of start to the year
that I anticipated, but for oth-
er reasons, it has happened,”
Knowles said.

“T just have to stay focus and
try to get both of us healthy
again. But at this point, it’s
obviously been very frustrat-
ing.”

Even though this is just the

fourth month in the year,
Knowles said it’s very late in
the season to look for a new
partner so with each tourna-
ment, he will have to see who
is available until Fish return
to action.

“Everybody’s already paired
up. I probably will end up
playing with a different partner
every week,’ he said. “I’m
going to just try to play my
best tennis and hope that it
blend with whoever I’m play-
ing with that week.”

Knowles and Soares will
play in the Monte-Carlo Rolex
Masters starting on Monday.
Following that, he will have to
find a new partner to play at
the Barcelona Open in Spain,
starting on April 18.

He will close out the month
at the Internazionali BNL d’1-
talia in Rome on April 25.

The French Open at Roland
Garros, when Fish is expected
to return, is scheduled to start
on May 23 in Paris, France.

As a side bar to the injuries
to Knowles and Fish, Knowles’
former partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi and his new partner,
came close to winning their
first tournament for the year
when they fell victim to the
team of Leander Paes and
Lukas Dlouhy.

And from another Bahami-
an perspective in Houston yes-
terday, former Davis Cup
player Ryan Sweeting pulled
off a big win in the men’s sin-
gles.

Having advanced from the
qualifying round, Sweeting
eliminated number five seed
Kazakhstani Evgeny Korolev
with a 6-3, 4-6, 6-2 win.

Sweeting, 22, is ranked at
150 in the world. It was his first
win on the ATP World Tour
since July 2009 when he got
to the second round of the LA
Tennis Open.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
TRIBUNE SPORTS

AT the end of the third
day of the XXV Carifta
Swimming Championships in
Kingston, Jamaica, the
Bahamas’ 36-member team
moved up from fourth to
third in the medal count.

The Bahamas had accu-
mulated a total of 26 medals,
including six gold, nine silver
and 11 bronze. They were sit-
ting behind Barbados, who
had 14 gold, 16 silver and five
bronze for 35 medals.

Trinidad & Tobago con-
tinued to press out front with
72 medals. They had 35 gold,
24 silver and 13 bronze.

The Bahamas was also
occupying third place in the
point standings with 442.
Trinidad & Tobago led with
757 and Guadeloupe was in
second with 442.

The final day of the meet
was held last night, but the
results were not available at
press time.

e In events staged on Mon-
day’s day three, the follow-
ing results were posted by the
Bahamian athletes:

GIRLS 11-12
100 freestyle final — 1 Mar-



TRACK
DEATH/

FUNERAL SERVICE

e THE Tribune Sports
Department join the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations and
the College of the Bahamas
in extending condolences to
the family of Bradley Coop-
er, whose mother Shirley
Cooper, recently passed
away.

Mrs Cooper will be funer-
alised on Saturday at 10 a.m.
at Salem Union Baptist
Church. The BAAA is
encouraging as many of its
members to come out and
support the Cooper family.

Bradley Cooper was a for-
mer outstanding athlete who
still holds the national
records in both the shot put
and discus. He is now the
Assistant Athletic Director
at the College of the
Bahamas and is a BAAA’s
affiliated coach.

mie ee
THIRD ANNUAL
FRITZ GRANT

INVITATIONAL

e THE third annual Fritz
Grant Track and Field Invi-
tational is scheduled for Sat-
urday, May 8 at the Thomas
A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium.

The age categories include
the under 7, 9, 11, 13,15, 17
and Open divisions for both
male and female. The entry
fee is $5.00 per athlete.
Relay teams will be charged
$8.00 per team, but teams
under 13 will only pay $5 per
relay.

The entry deadline is
Tuesday, April 27. There
will be no entries on the day
of the meet. Applications
are to be turned in to
Bernard Newbold, Fritz
Grant or the BAAA’s
office.

Medals will be presented
to the first three finishers in
each event. The meet is
sanctioned by the Bahamas
Association of Athletic
Associations and will give
athletes the opportunity to
meet the qualification stan-
dards for CAC Junior
Championships, IAAF
World Junior Champi-
onships, CAC Games and
Commonwealth Games.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



tin, Tyla, Trinidad, 1:01.74R;
2 Sherry, Inayah, Barbados,
1:02.13; 3 Backovic, Char-
lotte, Guadeloupe, 1:04.25; 8
Sturrup, Simone, Bahamas,
1:07.95.

200 butterfly - 1 Arends,
Sue-Gin, Aruba, 2:37.66; 2
David, Syriah, Trinidad,
2:42.91; 3 Arends, Ginayla,
Aruba, 2:45.60; 6 Bevans,
Jourdan, Bahamas, 2:59.89;
8 Sturrup, Simone, Bahamas,
3:13.00.

¢ BOYS 11-12

200 IM final - 1 Baptiste,
Jabari, Trinidad, 2:24.55; 2
Selby, Christian, Barbados,
2:31.09; 3 Moses, Zach,
Bahamas, 2:33.68; 4 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 2:33.90.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Campbell, Kevaughn,
Jamaica, 34.54; 2 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 34.90; 3
Charlemagne, Che Sheldon,
Guadeloupe, 35.99.

100 freestyle final - 1 Bap-
tiste, Jabari, Trinidad, 58.49; 2
Selby, Christian, Barbados,
59.29; 3 Wernet, Tyreke, Aru-
ba, 1:00.07; 5 Moses, Zach,
Bahamas, 1:03.67; 8 Carey,
Dionisio, Bahamas, 1:04.44.

200 butterfly - 1 Selby,
Christian, Barbados, 2:27.31;
2 Marsau, Mathias, Guade-
loupe, 2:41.52; 3 Carey, Dion-
isio, Bahamas, 2:43.28; 5
Moses, Zach, Bahamas,
2:44.93.

¢ GIRLS 13-14

200 IM final - 1 Holder,
Zabrina, Barbados, 2:29.49;
2 van den Berg, Daniella,
Aruba, 2:33.77; 3 Small,
Deandre, Barbados, 2:35.36;
5 Morley, Laura, Bahamas,
2:37.10.

50 breastroke - 1 Leter, Evi-
ta, Suriname, 35.00R; 2
Small, Deandre, Barbados,
35.37; 3 Stephenson, Jessica,
Guyana, 35.50; 5 Greene,
Gabrielle, Bahamas, 36.30; 8
Rolle, Riquel, Bahamas,
37.53.

100 freestyle final - 1 Hold-
er, Zabrina, Barbados,
1:00.43; 2 Azincourt, Laurie,
Guadeloupe, 1:00.65; 3 Pon-
son, Gaby, Aruba, 1:01.38; 5
Smith, Taryn, Bahamas,
1:03.75.

200 butterfly - 1 Gibbs,
Amara, Barbados, 2:22.37; 2
Holder, Zabrina, Barbados,
2:23.59; 3 van den Berg,

Daniella, Aruba, 2:36.44; 4
Smith, Taryn, Bahamas,
2:38.58.

800 freestyle relay final - 1
Barbados, 9:12.92; 2 Guade-
loupe, 9:13.46; 3 Aruba,
9:15.70; 4 Bahamas, 9:39.92 -
Morley, Laura; Lowe, Abi-
gail; Williams, Jacinda;
Smith, Taryn.

° BOYS 13-14

200 IM final - 1 Groters,
Jordy, Aruba, 2:17.5; 2 Bois-
son-Yates, Keegan, Trinidad,
2:20.01; 3 Bouchaut, Joris,
Guadeloupe, 2:20.09; 7
Tynes, Dustin, Bahamas,
2:28.30.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Tynes, Dustin, Bahamas,
32.06; 2 Groters, Jordy, Aru-
ba, 32.25; 3 Denswil, Wayne,
Suriname, 33.16.

100 freestyle final - 1
Romany, Joshua, Trinidad,
53.64R; 2 Carter, Dylan,
Trinidad, 54.77; 3 Laventure,
Kevin, Martinique, 55.58; 7
Farquharson, Peter,
Bahamas, 59.05.

200 butterfly final - 1
Bouchaut, Joris, Guade-
loupe, 2:17.92; 2 Romany,
Joshua, Trinidad, 2:18.75; 3

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 11

SPORTS

Bahamas takes third place at Carifta Swimming Championships

Ledan, Axel, Guadeloupe,
2:19.96; 8 Moss, T'Auren,
Bahamas, 2:45.35.

800 freestyle relay final - 1
Trinidad and Tobago,
8:27.73; 2 Martinique, 8:28.67;
3 Guadeloupe, 8:29.81; 6
Bahamas, 9:04.52 - Cleare,
Zarian; Tynes, Dustin; Far-
quharson, Peter; Hernandez
Valdes, Anibal.

¢ GIRLS 15-17

200 IM final - 1 Lightbourn,
McKayla, Bahamas, 2:23.05;
2 Rahael, Samantha,
Trinidad, 2:23.61; 3
Marinette, Caroline, Guade-
loupe, 2:28.14.

50 breaststroke final - 1
Dufeal, Etie, Martinique,
35.80; 2 Chin, Rejan,
Trinidad, 36.07; 3 Thompson,
Cherelle, Trinidad, 36.28; 5
Moss, Shaunte, Bahamas,
36.43.

100 freestyle final - 1 Pigot,
Chinyére, Suriname, 59.00; 2
John Williams, Kimberlee,
Trinidad, 59.68; 3 Marinette,
Caroline, Guadeloupe,
1:00.09; 6 Butler, Ashley,
Bahamas, 1:01.35; 8 Deveaux,
Bria, Bahamas, 1:02.25.

200 butterfly final - 1

Dufeal, Etie, Martinique,
35.80; 2 Chin, Rejan,
Trinidad, 36.07; 3 Thompson,
Cherelle, Trinidad, 36.28; 5
Moss, Shaunte, Bahamas,
36.43.

800 freestyle relay - 1 Suri-
name, 9:04.86; 2 Trinidad and
Tobago, 9:04.98; 3 Jamaica,
9:12.32; 5 Bahamas, 9:19.49 -
Deveaux, Bria; Butler, Ash-
ley; Albury, Maya; Light-
bourn, McKayla.

¢ BOYS 15-17

50 breastroke final - 1 Pigot,
Diguan, Suriname, 31.34; 2
Rigues, Ryan, Trinidad,
31.53; 3 Gibson, Evante,
Bahamas, 31.64.

200 butterfly final - 1 Bel-
lance, Matthias, Martinique,
2:05.83R; 2 Pelagie, Valy,
Guadeloupe, 2:10.30; 3
Homer, Christian, Trinidad,
2:12.73; 5 Lowe, Matthew,
Bahamas, 2:18.72; 8 Gibson,
Evante, Bahamas, 2:22.90.

800 freestyle relay - 1 Mar-
tinique, 8:02.08; 2 Guade-
loupe, 8:06.83; 3 Trinidad and
Tobago, 8:17.78; 5 Bahamas,
8:32.35 - McIntosh, Delano;
Roberts, Mancer; Moss,
Armando; Lowe, Matthew.



Kendal Rolle All-Star Baskethall Classic set for Saturday

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil has announced that its
2010 Kendal Rolle All-Star
Basketball Classic will take
place on Saturday at the DW
Davis Gymnasium.

The All-Star Classic will
feature the majority of the
top players from the 15-And-
Under, 19-And-Under and
Men's Division. As there is
no ladies division this year,
the All-Star Classic will pro-
vide a game for the female
players to participate in.

Additionally, there is a spe-
cial matchup with the coach-
es playing against the execu-
tives and the officials com-
bined.

The All-Star Classic will
kick off at 10 a.m. on Satur-
day with the 15-And-Under
game. That will be followed
by the ladies’ All-Star and
then the Coaches/Executives
game. The three-point and
slam dunk contest will then
take place.

The All-Star Classic will
then conclude with the 19-
And-Under and the Men's
All-Star games.

e Here's a look at the play-
ers selected to participate in
the three divisions:

15-AND-UNDER

PRESIDENT’S TEAM

Coach — Brent Stubbs
(Macedonia), assisted by Ster-
ling Pratt (Latter-Day).

Macedonia — Adolphsis
Leadon, Steven Mitchel, Del-
roy Garrison, Lamar Saun-
ders, Van Hutchinson and
Omari Neely.

Latter-Day - Jeffery
Williams, Teneas Mackey,
Jamal Ingraham and Dario
McKenzie.

St. John’s — Nathan Nicholls
and Wesley Strapp.

15-AND-UNDER

VICE PRESIDENT

Coach — Geno Campbell
(Temple Fellowship), assist-
ed by Christopher Russell Jr
(Christian Tabernacle).

Temple Fellowshp — Jan
Thompson, Kenrico Lock-
hart, Randy Mille, Renauld
Ingraham, Antario Collie and
Rashad Bain.

Christian Tabernacle —
Westin Saunders, Dereck
Adams, Omar Belle and
Valentino Sargent.

St. John’s — Oral Forbes
and Percival Nicholls.

19-AND-UNDER
PRESIDENT’S TEAM
Coach - Kevin McPhee

(Cousin McPhee), assisted by





J . al \
MEMBERS of the Carifta team look on as they are adressed by





members of the BAAAs administration.

Carifta track team
returns home

FROM page 10

development of the athlete
remains the top priority. Thanks
to the Ministry we were able to
field the largest team possible,”
he said. “As you know it is not a
cheap trip from the travel to the
operating costs we felt we were
able to send the best available
team because of the Ministry’s
contributions. Parents, these
athletes need your support and
we cannot thank you enough
for the effort you have put forth
as we attempt to turn Carifta
into a true family event and pos-
itively effect the general devel-
opment of the sport.”

The team saw six new Carifta
champions crowned in the
Grand Cayman, while two new
meet records were established.

Nine athletes qualified for the
TAAF World Junior Champi-
onships, the most the Bahamas
has ever fielded for the event,
while 25 qualified for the JR
CAC games.

Team Head Coach, Fritz
Grant, said the impressive per-
formance over the weekend
should serve as building blocks
for the individual athletes as

they continue with the sport and
for the development of nation-
al junior program

“The experience you gained
on the biggest stage in the
region should prove invaluable
as your careers progress. It
should only inspire you to work
harder and reach levels of
achievement that you may have
thought you were unable to
reach. Your journey here began
some time ago in your individ-
ual training sessions and your
coaches did an excellent job of
preparing you.” he said. “We
were able to improve our stand-
ing from fifth place to third, but
it does not stop there. We will
continue to work toward our
ultimate goal and continue to
close the gap between us and
our competitors.”

The 40th Carifta Track and
Field Championships will be
hosted by St. Kitts and Nevis,
and Sands offered encourage-
ment to those still eligible for
competition.

“You have already made the
team and your position for next
year is secure” he said. “It is up
to you to retain your spot to
those looking to come in and
sit where you are right now.”

Chevy Simmons (Mt. Tabor).

Cousin McPhee — Jason
Cambridge, Trevor Smith,
Vaughn Toote and Buska
Panza.

Mt. Tabor — Patrio Leadon
and Deniro Moss.

Golden Gates — Zanvaughn
Beckford and Anthony
Anderson.

Christian Tabernacle —
Leslie Wilson and Devaughn
Gibson.

Faith United — Ramone
and Raymond McFall.

19-AND-UNDER VICE
PRESIDENT TEAM
Coach — Geno Campbell
(Temple Fellowship), assist-
ed by Sterling Pratt (Latter-
Day).
Temple Fellowship — Mar-
vin Albury, Kemico Sands.

@lSINVissye

Tickets available from Bahamasé

Bahamasair 242-377-5505 | Family Island
www.bahamasair.com

Latter-Day — Kenneth Pratt
and Teran Greenslade.

Macedonia — Patrick Brice
and Karon Pratt.

St. John’s — Trujelio
Darville and Leon Bowe.

Salvation Army — Adelphin
Alexander and Alex Bastian.

MEN’S PRESIDENT
TEAM

Coach — Lavol Rolle
(Christian Tabernacle), assist-
ed by Geno Nairn (Temple
Fellowship).

Christian Tabernacle —
Shawn Ferguson and Donnie
Johnson.

Temple Fellowship — Ian
Pinder and Edwin Burrows.

Church of the Nazarene —
Evins Milford and Perry
Lubin.

Golden Gates — Christian

Gibson and Kenny Strachan.

New Bethlehem — Kyheil
Roberts and

Faith United — Joseph
McDonald and Ricardo Fer-
guson.

Men’s Vice President

Coach — Ricardo Stubbs
(Macedonia), assisted by
Garvin Taylor — (Calvary
Bible).

Macedonia — Leon Bain
and Johnnie Smith.

Calvary Bible — Roy Brice
and Chevy Simmons.

Evangelistic Center —
Randy Ferguson and Sher-
man Bowe.

Bahamas Harvest - Travis
Forbes and Imara Thompson.

BIBA —- Detino Thurston
and Keay McKenzie.

Latter-Day — Lionel Chris-
tian and Chrisoff Stuart.



amasair
Poe

?

cal travel agency or at

| Toll Free 1-242-300-8359

Kl







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM






TANTEI ht
EEA
TT



GRAPE NEWS: Bahamian
wine enthusiasts can toast a
new environment in which
to enjoy their favourite drink.

By CHESTER
ROBARDS

Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

WINE Savants finally
have a place of refuge
after a recent $75,000
outlay uncorked a wholly
untapped market in the
form of the Bahamas’
first authentic Wine
Lounge.

Partner in the Wine
Lounge, Ruben Fox,
opened the wine lounge
knowing there were wine
enthusiasts like himself
both local and foreign
who needed a place to
taste, learn and pair the
popular alcoholic drink
made from fermented
grape juice.

Previously, Mr Fox was
a Wine importer and
found a perfect fit in cre-
ating a relaxing environ-
ment where individuals
could go to taste prod-
ucts from a wide variety
of California vineyards
(Wine Lounge specialises
in only California wines).

He became a wine
enthusiast as a boy while
on holidays with his par-
ents in some of the
world’s vineyards and as
an adult became a con-
noisseur.

“Wine has been some-
thing I have always been
around,” Said Mr Fox.

“My parents and I
traveled extensively
when I was young and
they enjoyed going to
vineyards. We traveled to
several regions and visit-
ed vineyards and as an
adult that continued.”

The Wine Lounge,
open just shy of four
months ago, has received
rave reviews and has
already had the represen-
tative from The Bogle
Vineyard come in to talk
to patrons about her
product.

Principal of Bogle
Vineyards, Jodie Bogle,
said she was happy to
have her product sold
and sampled in the cozy,
warm Wine Lounge and
hoped to come back to
visit and talk about her
product again.

Mr Fox said he expects
to have Vineyard repre-
sentatives come in regu-
larly to speak to his
patrons. A representative
of Dry Creek Vineyards
is expected near the
month’s end.

Meanwhile, he said
Wine Lounge is working
on the organisation of
wine seminars and the
formation of a wine club
which would offer cus-
tomers the chance to
sample and learn about
many of the 25 wineries
represented at his estab-
lishment.

According to him,
Wine Lounge pours 35
wine types by the glass
and more than 100 by the
bottle.

Wine Lounge is set
where the former Shogun
Revolver restaurant once
stood, near the Green
Parrot on East Bay
Street.

With warm, muted
tones and shelves of Cali-
fornia Merlots, Cabernets,

SEE page 2B

THE TRIBUNE







WEDNESDAY,APRIL 7,

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia.net

Ml GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY

Hutchison could own
majority stake in GBPA

Tribune learns sale has been agreed in principle

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE HONG KONG -
based Hutchison Whampoa
could own a majority stake
in the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) when
the sale, which Tribune
Business has learned is
already agreed on in princi-
pal, is complete, while a US
firm could carry a “very”
minority share once the deal
is complete.

One source close to the
deal, told this paper Hutchi-
son would not settle for any-
thing less than a majority
stake in Grand Bahama's
most important private con-
glomerate.

It is hoped the sale of the
GBPA could herald a new
day for Grand Bahama,
bringing long-term invest-
ments through an estab-
lished, high net-worth multi-
lateral corporation.



Hutchison
would seem a
perfect fit for
the island as
the owners of

| the Our
Paul Moss Lucaya Resort

and with a
large stake in the Freeport
Container Port, however
nothing has yet been con-
firmed as to their acquisi-
tion.

Tribune Business was told,
however, that principals
from one of the two fami-
ly's holding majority stake
in the GBPA was recently
in Hong Kong, possibly in
protruded talks with the
Chinese Investment group.

Those two families were
recently in a deadlock over
the GBPA estate, each dis-
puting the others share own-
ership in a court battle that
amicably ended March 31.

The two families have
agreed to work together on
a joint sale of their equal



Easter fishing sales
match last year’s





Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

NEW PROVIDENCE
fishermen reported Easter
sales equivalent to last year’s,
marking the weekend as prof-
itable a time as any year
despite the economic climate,
the Bahamas Commercial
Fishers Alliance's (BCFA)
chief said yesterday.

As Grand Bahama report-
ed weak Easter Weekend
sales, Adrian La-Roda told
Tribune Business that Potters
Cay dock was teeming with
fishing boats (wholesalers),
retailers and fish cleaners who
stayed busy for the weekend
renowned for high scale-fish
sales.

According to Mr La-Roda,
sales were comparable to
2009, when a global econom-
ic recession was bearing down
on the Bahamas and market
prices on marine commodi-
ties such as lobster were left
slashed by close to 50 per
cent.

Chief Counselor for Span-
ish Wells, Abner Pinder, said
fish sales had been high all
week, slowing down as it tra-
ditionally has near the culmi-
nation of the holiday week-
end.

“As a rule, nine per cent of
Bahamians are going to have
fish for Good Friday, so that
is what boosted the sales last
week, which was good,” said
Mr Pinder.

“Out there this morning
there were three boats, but
not like it was last week.

“The fishermen I talked to
said sales were about the
same (as last year) and did-
mt drop down any during last
week, so that’s a good sign
and that tells me that some
people still have money and
are going to buy.”

However, in Grand
Bahama fishermen met with
less than robust sales, a tes-
tament to the economic cli-
mate of the Island where two
tornados ripped through areas
of Freeport, killing three men
at the Freeport Container
Port.

Mr La-Roda said Abaco
and Andros typically engage
in subsistence fishing.

POTTERS
CAY dock,
which was
busy over
| the weekend.

His sentiments echoed
much of Mr Pinder’s senti-
ments, adding that the Easter
weekend caused spin-off busi-
nesses on the dock, leaving
cash-in-hand for many fish
cleaners who would not every
day find the scale of business
like that of Good Friday.

Your Pre-Approved



2010

interests in the Port compa-
nies to a buyer who would
be good for the future of
Grand Bahama.

It is unclear if the second
investor in the GBPA will
be an US firm that
expressed interest earlier
this year.

But the late St Georges
Estate said it was not
involved in any “ongoing
negotiations” to sell its stake
in the GBPA to Mid-
Atlantic Projects.

While a second investor
in the GBPA, if any, is still
up in the air, most Bahami-
ans seem to agree that it is
time to move Grand
Bahama forward, now that
the St George Estate versus
Sir Jack Hayward Estate
debacle has found armistice.

Well-known political
hopeful, Paul Moss, said in a
statement yesterday that the
end of the family feud could

SEE page 3B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work
RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company
NASSAU
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com



Call for action

against poaching in

Bahamian waters





Suggestion that RBDF arrest crew of poaching
vessels and sink ships to create artificial reefs

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards @tribunemedia.net



PIRACY might be the final resolve to discourage
poachers who plunder millions of dollars worth of
valuable marine life from Bahamian waters every
year and is 90 per cent of the fishing industry's
complications, the Chief Counselor for Spanish
Wells told Tribune Business yesterday.

Abner Pinder said Bahamian fishermen are tired
of losing their livelihood to fishing vessels that do
not belong in these waters and said some fishermen
are taking measures into their own hands.

According to Mr Pinder, eight to ten foreign
fishing vessels were spotted by Bahamian fishermen
following the closure of this country’s lobster sea-
son picking up possible spawning females.

This menace, he said is detrimental to the
Bahamas’ fishing industry and has to be given
precedence by the Bahamian government.

“We have enough Defence Force boats we have
a Defence Force plane and there is absolutely no
reason for this,” said Mr Pinder.

Mr Pinder said some fishermen were recently
threatened by what they suspected to be a fishing
vessel out of the Dominican Republic. According
to reports, when the Bahamian men approached
the vessel they noticed the men aboard filling bot-
tles with Gasoline, possibly to make Molotov cock-
tails which cause a fiery explosion when smashed.

The poaching situation has gotten so caustic, Mr
Pinder suggests the Royal Bahamas Defense Force
arrest the crew of the poaching vessels and sink
their ships to create artificial reefs as future fish
habitats.

“What needs to happen is they need to catch a
couple and put their boats to the bottom,” he said.

“Old wrecks harbour fish and breed fish. If you
put half a dozen down, the rest would stop and
think before they come on the Bahama Bank.”

However, it seems the problem remains with
government policy and action toward poaching
vessels.

The Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance's
(BCFA) chief, Adrian La-Roda, told Tribune Busi-
ness that when caught, poachers are not stripped of
their cargo, but made to pay a $10,000 fine - 0.5 per
cent of the total value of their catch.

He said the Bahamas loses almost $22 million
worth of valuable fisheries product, threatening

SEE page 3B



LOAN INTEREST
RATE AS LOW AS

Loan is Ready!

Borrow up to 45% of eligible securities

in your portfolio

Annual Loan interest rate as low as 8.25%
(BSD prime + 2.75%)*

Loan commitment fee reduced on first year.

No fixed repayment terms

Easy and convenient application process

- just give us a call.

* Special terms and conditions apply

OFFER VALID
through
May 315¢, 2010

Royal Fidelity Brokerage Account Margin Loans

ROYAL FIDELITY

WY Kelat= Varian A 0) 4

Call: 356.7764 or 397.4553
Email: info@royalfidelity.com






PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



Spirit Airlines to charge up to $45 for carry-o

JOSHUA FREED,
AP Airlines Writer
MINNEAPOLIS



Baggage fees have sneaked out of the bel-
ly of the plane and into the overhead bin.

Spirit Airlines will charge as much as $45
each way for a carry-on bag starting Aug. 1.
Personal items like purses and laptop com-
puters that fit under the seat will still be
free.

Spirit is the first airline to charge passen-
gers for carry-ons. It's sure to seize the atten-
tion of passengers as well as airline execu-
tives who are probably glad that Spirit tried
it first. "I didn't think anyone would go this
far," said Jay Sorensen, an airline consultant
who specializes in airline fees.

Industry observers said Spirit's move does-
n't mean it will spread to the big airlines.
None of the major carriers changed their
fees on Tuesday.

Spirit's new charge for a carry-on is $45 if
paid at the gate, and $30 if paid in advance.
Spirit said on Tuesday that it reduced its
lowest fares by $40 on average, so most cus-
tomers won't really pay more to fly. Cus-
tomers who pay for space in the overhead
bin will also get to board the plane earlier.

Spirit CEO Ben Baldanza said having
fewer carry-on bags will help empty the
plane faster. He said the idea is to get cus-
tomers to pay for individual things they
want, while keeping the base fare low.

"The beauty of it is they will do what they
think is best for them and will now have the
choice," he said.

Spirit is based in Miramar, Fla., and is
privately held. Most of its flights carry leisure
travelers from big airports in the U.S.
through Fort Lauderdale and on to Latin
America.

Like Ryanair in Europe, Spirit has rela-
tively low base fares but charges lots of add-
on fees, including $16 per round-trip ticket
to book at its Web site. The only way to
avoid the fee is to buy a ticket at the airport
ticket counter.

It has fewer than two dozen planes. Its
150 daily flights are about one-twentieth as
many as American Airlines and its regional

partners offer. Even though Spirit is a minor
player, big airlines will watch it to see
whether customers are willing to pay for
carry-ons, Sorensen said. "It's a potential
source of revenue for an industry that still
needs it."

The problem with charging for checked
luggage but keeping carry-ons free is that
passengers lug as much onto the plane as
they can, he said. Spirit's move does help
solve that problem, Sorensen said.

Spirit said it will add measuring devices at
the gates to determine which carry-ons are
free and which ones will incur the charge.
Things like diaper bags, umbrellas, strollers,
and reading material won't count as a pas-
senger's free personal item.

The big airlines stepped gingerly when
they started charging to check baggage in
2008, making a move, then watching to see
who matched it. Now, all of them charge to
check a bag on domestic flights except
Southwest (two free bags) and JetBlue (one
free bag).

Spirit CEO Baldanza said he's confident
the airline will stick with the new carry-on
fee. "Our decision to do it isn't dependent"
on other carriers following along, he said.

He said he doesn't see the bag fee as a rev-
enue boost as much as an operational help.
Dealing with large carry-ons has delayed
departures and slowed down unloading after
a flight. On domestic flights, checking a bag
will be $5 cheaper than carrying it on, which
could encourage passengers to check more
bags. Baldanza said that's fine with him,
since it costs the airline about as much to
load one bag as it does to load 100 into the
belly of the plane.

While it's too soon to know whether pas-
sengers will accept the carry-on fee, it actu-
ally makes sense to encourage them to check
bags as Spirit has done, said Genevieve
Shaw Brown, senior editor at Travelocity.

Ever since checked bag fees began, "the
boarding process has become more chaotic,
there's more tension among travelers fight-
ing for space in the overhead bin," she said.
"It also becomes less efficient to board and
deplane, which is not good for airlines that
make money on being efficient."



Raising a glass to Bahamas’ first Wine Lounge

FROM page 1B

even Ports (among others)
lining the walls, the lounge’s
cushy decor relaxes, while the
friendly, wine-saavy staff



Whirlpool Duet
Wesher
WIE? ACY

$1,850











enlighten. And with al fresco
dining in the courtyard,
patrons are privy to a differ-
ent dining option.

The Wine Lounge also
offers thin crust pizzas and
full course dinners, with which

% 2
é © TumbleFresh’

CLOTHES KEEP MOVING SO
YOU DON'T HAVE TO.

You're tired of waiting, checking on the washer and rewashing loads. That's why
this industry-first option helps keep clothes fresh and reduces wrinkles with
periodic tumbling at cycle’s end. Make laundry-sitting a thing of the past.

Save 7575 when you pay cash

The power fo get mode doae,

Fede ol Witepeci |! 4A

the wines can be paired. And
if one does not have a taste
for wine, beer is on tap.

Mr Fox and several part-
ners have plans to expand the
wine lounge to include a sep-
arate restaurant entity.








option



Whirlpool Duet”
Gas Dryer
WGDS?7 S50

$1,700





ea eraer rrr a a



faery Uritertg ee i Ae aL tO le ae ort ee ately



eee ee Me Ment rg cag ee Cre





fis

i.





“——
= 3



(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, file)
IN THIS MAY 21, 2008 file photo, a person is seen rolling luggage at Philadelphia International Airport,
Philadelphia. Spirit Airlines said Tuesday April 6, 2010, it will charge as much as $45 each way for a car-
ry-on bag, adding a fee that bigger airlines have yet to try.











VACANCY NOTICE

Database Administrator
(Senior Assistant Manager)

~~ nr
Applications are invited from suitably cpualitieed persons for the above position in the Information

Technology Department of The National Insurance Hoard.

PURPOSE OF JOB
‘To be responsible for the planning, development, performance, integnty and security of The National

Insurance Board’s Database,

OVERALL RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:
Planning, development and troubleshooting of the database
Installing and testing new versions of the database management system (RDBMS).
Ensure that the physical design meets system storage requirements.
Ensure that data ig clearly defined and remains consistent across the database.
Monitoring performance and managing parumeters to peovide fast query responses to ‘/raay end wens
Establishing the needs of users and controlling access permissions and privileges.
Waiting database documentation, including data standards, procedures and definitions for the data
dictionary {metactata}.
Developing, managing and testing backup and recovery plans,
Ensure that storage, archiving, backup and recovery procedures are functioning correctly.
Work closely with [T Project Managers, Darabase Programmers and Web Developers,
Communicate regularly with technical and operational staff to ensure database integrity and security.

Commission and install new applications

QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
Applicants should have a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited College or University in Computer
Science, Information Science, ot Management Information Scienee with nwo (2) to five (5) years experince
in the relevant areas. ‘The Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA) Certification would be
aplus. Preference will be given to Candidares with both a Bachelors Degree and the MCDBA Certification.

A working knowledge of MS SQL Datahase Systems ts desired. working knowledge of DB/2 and

Oracle 1g is preferted.

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed applicanon form, along with the necessary
proof of qualifications on or before Priday, April 9, 2010, ta:

Senior Manager
Human Resources Administration
The National Insurance Board
Headquarters Building
E.O. Box N-7508
Nassau, Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 3B



LOCAL AND OVERSEAS BUSINESS



FROM page 1B



the survival of one of this nation's largest
exporters. According to Mr La-Roda, the BCFA
has identified by name up to 11 vessels that
poach in Bahamian waters. He said those ships
can often carry up to 60,000 pounds of fish or
lobsters out of these waters on one trip.

Mr La-Roda lamented that poachers remain a



clear and present danger that the Government

needs to do more to address.

Mr Pinder said the Bahamas' fishing industry
would “never” have another problem if the
poachers are eradicated.

The Poachers not only pose a threat to the
Marine life of the Bahamas, but to the lives of
Bahamian fishermen who are often threatened at
gun point.

Call for action against poaching in Bahamian waters

Defence Force patrol boats have been known
to get into gun battles with some poaching ships,
while many other undertake illegal fishing using
illegal fishing methods, such as bleaching, unmo-
lested by authorities.

“IT know I could do it (stop the poachers),”
said Mr Pinder. “Give me one of the Defense
Force boats and a crew and if they don’t want to
give me a crew, I can get my own crew.”







Federal Communications Commission
loses key ruling on Internet ‘neutrality’

Hutchison
could own

majority stake
in GBPA

FROM page 1B



spell the beginning of a turn-
around for the Nation's sec-
ond capital which has been
in an economic stupor it
seems not capable of shak-
ing off.

“T am not naive however,
to believe that this is the end
of the economic woes of that
island; or that the PA issues
are over,” said Mr Moss.

“The fact is the PA (Port
Authority) and Grand

JOELLE TESSLER, cations of Tuesday's ruling are —_is Comcast's challenge of a 2008 © FCC now has several options. It be used to transfer large files | Bahama needs intervention
AP Technology Writer much broader. That's because it FCC order banning it from could ask Congress to give it such as online video, which | so that the port fees are
WASHINGTON undercuts the FCC's ability to blocking subscribers from using explicit authority to regulate — could threaten Comcast's cable greatly reduced to spur busi-

A federal court threw the
future of Internet regulations
and U.S. broadband expansion
plans into doubt Tuesday with a
far-reaching decision that went
against the Federal Communi-
cations Commission.

The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia
ruled that the FCC lacks
authority to require broadband
providers to give equal treat-
ment to all Internet traffic flow-
ing over their networks. That
was a big victory for Comcast
Corp., the nation's largest cable
company, which had challenged
the FCC's authority to impose
such "network neutrality"
obligations on broadband
providers.

The unanimous ruling by the
three-judge panel marks a seri-
ous setback for the FCC, which
is trying to adopt official net
neutrality regulations. FCC
Chairman Julius Genachowski,
a Democrat, argues such rules
are needed to prevent phone
and cable companies from using
their control over Internet
access to favor some kinds of
online content and services
over others.

The case centers on Com-
cast's actions in 2007 when it
interfered with an online file-
sharing service called BitTor-
rent, which allows users to swap
big files such as movies over
the Internet. But public interest
groups stressed that the ramifi-

prevent broadband providers
from becoming gatekeepers for
many kinds of online services,
potentially including Internet
phone programs and software
that runs in a Web browser.

"Today's appeals court deci-
sion means there are no pro-
tections in the law for con-
sumers' broadband services,"
Gigi Sohn, co-founder of Public
Knowledge, said in a statement.
"Companies selling Internet
access are free to play favorites
with content on their networks,
to throttle certain applications
or simply to block others."

The decision also has serious
implications for the massive
national broadband plan
released by the FCC last
month. The FCC needs clear
authority to regulate broadband
in order to push ahead with
some its key recommendations,
including a proposal to expand
broadband by tapping the fed-
eral fund that subsidizes tele-
phone service in poor and rural
communities.

In a statement, the FCC said
it remains "firmly committed
to promoting an open Internet
and to policies that will bring
the enormous benefits of
broadband to all Americans"
and "will rest these policies ...
on a solid legal foundation."

Comcast welcomed the deci-
sion, saying "our primary goal
was always to clear our name
and reputation."

At the heart of the court case

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCINE JEAN OF P.O.
BOX AB-20962, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31ST day of MARCH, 2010 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALINE JUSTILIEN of GOLDEN
ISLES is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31stday of MARCH, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DENISE DUROLIN of MACKEY
STREET is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within

BitTorrent. The commission, at
the time headed by Republican
Kevin Martin, based its order
on a set of net neutrality prin-
ciples adopted in 2005.

But Comcast argued that the
FCC order was illegal because
the agency was seeking to
enforce mere policy principles,
which don't have the force of
regulations or law. That's one
reason that Genachowski is
now trying to formalize those
rules.

The cable company had also
argued the FCC lacks authority
to mandate net neutrality
because it had deregulated
broadband under the Bush
administration, a decision
upheld by the Supreme Court
in 2005.

Information

The FCC now defines broad-
band as a lightly regulated
information service. That
means it is not subject to the
obligations traditional telecom-
munications services have to
share their networks with com-
petitors and treat all traffic
equally. But the FCC maintains
that existing law gives it author-
ity to set rules for information
services, including net neutral-
ity rules.

Tuesday's court decision
rejected that reasoning, con-
cluding that Congress has not
given the FCC "untrammeled
freedom" to regulate without
explicit legal authority.

With so much at stake, the

broadband. Or it could appeal
Tuesday's decision.

But both of those steps could
take too long because the
agency "has too many impor-
tant things they have to do right
away," said Ben Scott, policy
director for the public interest
group Free Press. Free Press
was among the groups that
alerted the FCC to Comcast's
behavior after The Associated
Press ran tests and reported
that the cable company was
interfering with attempts by
some subscribers to share files
online.

The more likely scenario,
Scott believes, is that the
agency will simply reclassify
broadband as a more heavily
regulated telecommunications
service. That, ironically, could
be the worst-case outcome from
the perspective of the phone
and cable companies.

"Comcast swung an ax at the
FCC to protest the BitTorrent
order," Scott said. "And they
sliced right through the FCC's
arm and plunged the ax into
their own back."

The battle over the FCC's
legal jurisdiction comes amid a
larger policy dispute over the
merits of net neutrality. Backed
by Internet companies such as
Google Inc. and the online call-
ing service Skype, the FCC says
rules are needed to prevent
phone and cable companies
from prioritizing some traffic
or degrading or services that
compete with their core busi-
nesses. Indeed, BitTorrent can

Ce TUT TE Cag aE

Swim Training
ages 1 to
ageless adult.

| Private Lessons

|| & Small Groups

with experienced
professional
instructors.

| GUARANTEED a

RESULTS

he Swimming

a

Roy ieRLI (oe See

= ee

Sate

all 362-149

Private heated |Fran Young

pool at our
swim centre





Bisex


















ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Wok

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:

TV business.

But broadband providers
such as Comcast, AT&T Inc.
and Verizon Communications
Inc. argue that after spending
billions of dollars on their net-
works, they should be able to
manage their systems to offer
premium services and prevent
high-bandwidth applications
such as BitTorrent from hog-
ging capacity.

For its part, the FCC offered
no details on its next step, but
stressed that it remains com-
mitted to the principle of net
neutrality.

"Today's court decision
invalidated the prior commis-
sion's approach to preserving
an open Internet," the agency's
statement said. "But the court
in no way disagreed with the
importance of preserving a free
and open Internet; nor did it
close the door to other methods
for achieving this important
end."

ness and government should
seek to put a proper port at
West End. This would give
new life to other part of the
island.

“T also ask the Govern-
ment to give an account for
the seven per cent of the
shares in the PA. This is
curious that no one is talking
about this and it is critical
for accountability and ensur-
ing that the Bahamian peo-
ple are treated fairly with
respect to payment of divi-
dends and profits.”

A statement released over
the weekend said Prime
Minister Ingraham was very
pleased about the agree-
ment, adding that he, and
all of Grand Bahama, looks
forward to better times
ahead for the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and
for Freeport.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERTHONY AIME of JOHN
ROAD is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31stday of MARCH, 2010 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
CASTELO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation



“Notice is hereby given that in accordance
with Section 138 of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), CASTELO
INTERNATIONAL LTD., has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate
of Dissolution issued by the Register General on

19th day of March, 2010.

Nautilus Corporate Service Limited
of Nautilus House
La Cour des Casernes,
St. Heiler, Jersey
Liquidator

TUESDAY, 6 APRIL 2010

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,597.14 | CHG 0.08 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD 31.76 | YTD % 2.03

FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%






WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320










FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES








Pre

crc fea MN TA T.









































; 52wk-Low Securit _y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div S P/E

twenty-eight days from the 31st day of MARCH, 2010 to the : 1.00 AML Foods Limited 1.02 1.02 0.00 0.283 ;
eee : : : den . 10.75 9.67 Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 0.992 0.200 10.7 1.88%
6.94 5.30 Bank of Bahamas 5.74 5.74 0.00 0.598 0.260 9.6 4.53%)
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box a 20; Bauer be! oe S74 p00 oe, ee 453%
le 3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.168 0.090 18.8 2.86%)
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. 2.15 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 «43.1 1.69%
12.55 9.62 Cable Bahamas 12.24 12.24 0.00 1.406 0.290 8.7 2.37%!
2.83 2.69 Colina Holdings ae mare 0.00 0.249 0.040 10.9 147%)
7.00 5.00 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.64 6.64 0.00 0.419 0.230 15.8 3.46%)
3.65 2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.79 2.86 0.07 0.111 0.052 25.8 1.82%)
2.55 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.54 2.54 0.00 0.627 0.110 4.1 4.33%
Legal Notice 6.99 5.94 Famguard 6.07 6.07 0.00 -0.003 0.240 N/M 3.95%]
10.99 8.75 Finco 9.27 9.27 0.00 0.168 0.520 55.2 5.61%
10.43 9.50 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.43 10.43 0.00 0.654 0.350 15.9 3.36%)
NOTICE 5.53 3.75 Focol (S) 5.00 5.00 0.00 0.326 0.150 15.3 3.00%!
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.30 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 7. 0.00%)
5.59 5.00 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.7 8.94%
10.50 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.43%
DESERT ROSE Pp REMIER 10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 0.000 64.1 0.00%

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b ases)
52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T% 19 October 2017



INVESTMENTS LTD.

1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
eae 1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7% 30 May 2013
(In Voluntary Liquidation) 1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities











52wk-Low
7.92

BidS
10.06

Ask &
11.06

Last Price P/E Yield

14.00

EPS $
-2.246

DivS
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Daily Val.























































i ‘ . 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 0.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
Pursuant to Section 1 37 (4) of the International 0.55 0.40 RND Holdings ee - 0.40 = : 0.55 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%
: : : olina Over-The-Counter Securities
141.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%
Business Companies Act, 2000, notice is hereby 0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
‘ : : BISX Listed Mutual Funds
given that the above named Company is in S2wk-Low Fund Rare NAV _-YTD% Last 12 Months 9 NAV 3MTH___NAV 6MTH
. é 7 7.3664 _GFAL Bond Fund 7.4525 0.96 6.30 7.419947 1.403783
dissolution, which commenced on the 11th day of J [ist 7.8288 Cea te era Fu ee a eee aa
a joney Market Fun Zl ‘ 7 a - -Mar-
inn i 3.2025 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.2025 2.75 -3.54 31-Jan-00
December, 2009. The Liquidator id BdS Corporate 13.4296 12.6816 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.4296 5.58 5.90 31-Oct-09
¢ ss 103.9873 93.1999 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103.9873 3.41 3.41 103.095570 101.669300 31-Dec-09
Services Limited, George House, George Street, 101.7254 96.4070 CFAL Global Equity Fund 101.7254 5.52 5.52 99.417680 96.739830 31-Dec-09
1.0986 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0986 0.81 5.23 10-Feb-10
1.0801 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0797 1.10 4.18 10-Feb-10
P.O. Box N-81 59, Nassau, Bahamas. 1.1008 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.1008 0.93 5.32 10-Feb-10
9.5795 9.1005 — Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 9.5795 5.33 5.33 31-Dec-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
11.2361 10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bah Intl Investment Fund 11.2361 12.36 12.36 31-Dec-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 2
7.7174 4.8105 Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund 7.6928 -0.31 47.51 31-Dec-09










MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Galina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

BdS Corporate Services Ltd.
(Liquidator)







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, PAGE 5B





The Tribune





A taste of the good lite

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net



XPERIENCE a quintes-

sential representation of

a Napa Valley wine
tasting lounge at the Wine
Lounge on East Bay Street
next to Green Parrot Bar &

Grill.

“It’s been a busy seven months
since the opening of the Wine
Lounge,” says Matteal Campbell,
general manager. The restaurant is
the first of its kind in the Bahamas,
with boutique wines that are found
mostly in the family vineyards of
Napa Valley, California.

From time to time, Reuben Fox,
one of the partners of the establish-
ment goes to Napa Valley-one of the
world’s wine meccas-to select wine
brands that he knows his customers
will enjoy.

Mr Fox’s concept was to have a
full-service wine tasting establish-
ment in the Bahamas, where you can
sit and enjoy wine either by a tasting,
glass or bottle. And as you start to
sip, you will find your wine taking
on a whole new flavour, says Ms
Campbell.

At the Wine Lounge, an extensive
offering of wine is available. From
sparkling wine to a bottle of Pinot
Noir, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc,
The Late Harvest, and Petit Syrah,
Bogle Vineyards, Bliss, Queen of
Hearts, every bottle ranges from $20
to $65. She promises that among
their 30-plus wines, you will fine a
wine that suits your taste buds that
isn’t too sweet or too dry.

“What’s so amazing is that if a cus-
tomer purchases a wine, they would
share with another table,” said Ms
Campbell. “It’s like a family atmos-
phere where everyone would share
and say ‘have you tasted this, have a
drink out of my bottle.’

“If you’re new to wines, we would

offer you a Chardonnay or Fume
Blanc. Both have ‘in between’
flavours that are not too sweet, and
not dry, but fruity wines. You can
taste the fruits inside.”

For the customer that may walk
up the bar, unfamiliar with wine, the
bartender would offer a ‘flight’, a
palette where you can take three,
three ounce glasses of wines.

They offer something called a
‘bubble flight’ which is a palette of
three sparkling wines--three red,
three white or you can have it mixed.

They will offer you a taste of what-
ever’s your preference, a sweet or
dry wine. They have people who
would come back and purchase cas-
es of the wine they like.

Some of their wines have never
been tasted, said Ms Campbell. The
Wine Lounge offers the first wide
variety of California wine in the
Bahamas.

Inside the bar room you will find
an intimate and cozy feel; the walls
are lined with neatly displayed bot-
tles with a new high high-tech wine
dispenser to serve you a fresh glass
of wine well matched with small
bites from the tapas menu.

Chef Dorvil Pierrelus creates thin
crust gourmet pizzas, the main fea-
ture of their food menu. Toppings
includes their signature Napa Style
pizza topped with prosciutto, goat
cheese and figs poached in syrah.

The Yukon Gold pizza is another
highly requested choice; topped with
potatoes, mushrooms and white truf-
fle creme, with the option of chicken.

“Persons would come in for a box
of the Yukon pizza, and make anoth-
er order to-go when they leave,” said
Ms Campbell.

The Margarita pizza is a classic-
topped with mozzarella, cherry
tomatoes, and fresh basil.

The Classic pizza is a pepperoni
pizza, with cheese and tomatoes.

The Frutti di Mare pizza has more
of a seafood blend with scallops,
conch and shrimp.

To wash down your pizza, pur-

‘5 "
| j _ a
AL bed.

ase

wee TT mT

—
LLL wa

ub nL LI

| oa iT :
betel RTI TTT

iL

THE wine tasting room at The Wine Lounge.

chase a drink inside the bar room,
and sit inside the courtyard which
has a firepit that is lit up each night.
Torch lights are lit on the table while
soft jazz music plays in the back-
ground.

For dessert, they offer guava rum
cake, chocolate panna cotta-with
caramel and roasted pecans, home-
made vanilla, chocolate, and pineap-
ple coconut ice creams, and home-
made sorbets in three flavours--man-
go, raspberry, and coconut cream.

We’ve wanted to be something
that you can go in and relax, after a
hard day of work you can come in
and relax. It’s like the diner in

‘Cheers’ the TV show where every-
body knows your name, says Chef
Pierrelus.

“Persons stop by and have glasses
of wine in the wine tasting room
until traffic dies down for them to go
home,” said Ms Campbell. The
ambiance in the Wine Lounge is
relaxing, surrounded by bottles of
California wines produced in Napa
Valley.

The restaurant is available for pri-
vate functions upon request.

Opened from Tuesday to Thurs-
day, 11 am ‘til 11 pm, the Wine
Lounge wants the customers to
enjoy the experience of “being in

obthe ee ee eT

a





Napa, but not leaving the Bahamas,”
said Ms Campbell.

They have recurring clients who
come in at all hours during the day,
especially the after work crowd and
persons have found the Wine
Lounge to be a family friendly
atmosphere. The Wine Lounge is
not a noisy bar with a lot of things
going on, and a rowdy bunch of tip-
sy drinkers.

“Parents bring their children, and
have pizza outside with a bottle of
wine and make it a family night,”
said Ms Campbell. “They sit out-
side in the courtyard and enjoy their
kids.”





MORE than 400 people attended Paradise Plates last year and raised over $60, 000 to help fight hunger

in The Bahamas.







LOCAL Chefs from 19 dif-
ferent restaurants, catering
businesses, wine and spirit
merchants are busy preparing
to showcase exciting new cre-
ations or their well-loved sig-
nature fare, specialty wines
and beverages to guests of Par-
adise Plates, Hands For
Hunger’s second annual
fundraiser event being held on
Saturday, May 15, 2010 from 7
— 11 pm at the Atlantis Crown
Ballroom.

Sponsored by The New
Providence Development
Company Limited and Tom-
my Hilfiger, the creatively pre-
sented event showcases a lav-
ish array of gourmet food pre-
pared by chefs from Nassau’s
premier restaurants, fine wine
and spirits and live entertain-
ment with all proceeds bene-
fiting Hands For Hunger the
non-profit, humanitarian
organisation committed to the
elimination of hunger and the
reduction of food waste in The
Bahamas.

To date, chefs from a wide
variety of restaurants includ-
ing: Old Fort Bay Club; Dune;
Nobu; Mesa Grill; British
Colonial Hilton; Patisserie Tea
Room; VanBreugels; Food
Art By Cacique; Goodfellow
Farms; Compass Point;
Luciano's of Chicago; Le Petit
Gourmet; La Hipica Spanish
Tapas and Grill; Essence
Catering & Premium Food
Services have agreed to par-
ticipate and showcase their
extraordinary food.

Fine wine will also be show-
cased at Paradise Plates. Men-
doza Wine Imports will be
returning this year and offer-
ing samples of wine from
Argentina that will comple-
ment the food being served.



HANDS For Hunger is gearing up for its second annual fundraiser, Paradise Plates, scheduled to take
place on May 15th, 2010 at the Atlantis Crown Ballroom. Mesa Grill Chefs will be returning this year to

showcase their fine food.



Nautilus Water will be the fea-
tured water for the evening
and Bahamian Brewery and

Beverage Company will be
featuring Sands draft beer.
SHG Management/Tropics
Beverage Company will also
be returning this year offering
a premium martini from their
frozen fruit blends.

Also new this year, will be
Havana Humidor providing
cigars for the evening and gen-
erously donating 100 per cent
of cigar sales to Hands For
Hunger.

“We are honoured to have
so many of last year’s Chefs,
restaurants and vendors
returning to make the evening
a great success,” said Andrea
Strommer, who along with
Rosamund Roberts is Co-
Director of Fundraising for the
organisation and in charge of
leading the event planning.

“There is no question that
the food, wine and beverages
being served for the evening
will be extraordinary given the
caliber of the participants. Par-
adise Plates will be bigger this
year and we are pleased to be
presenting several new Chefs
and restaurants as well as the
addition of cigars. We are very
grateful to them and our other
sponsors for their generous
support. Paradise Plates is
receiving tremendous response
from the public and we look
forward to another memorable
evening.”

Other sponsors include:
Atlantis, Creative Relations,
Credit Suisse, Pearle Vision,
Royal Bank of Canada, Royal
Star Assurance, The D’Albe-
nas Agency, Charles E Carey
and Sons, Coldwell
Banker/Lightbourn Realty,
Odyssey Aviation and
Bahamas Local.

All proceeds from Paradise
Plates will go to Hands For
Hunger and its food rescue
program. Each day, Hands For
Hunger picks-up fresh, high

Local chefs and
merchants prepare
for Paradise Plates

quality food that would oth-
erwise go to waste and delivers
it to community centers, shel-
ters, churches and soup
kitchens throughout New
Providence.

Since operations began in
March of 2009, H4H has
already distributed over
185,000 lbs of food to those in
need (approximately equal to
185,000 meals served) and pre-
vented more than 388.5 tons
of C02 carbon emissions from
entering the atmosphere.

“Hunger is a solvable prob-
lem. It is a fact that there is
more than enough food on this
island to amply feed every sin-
gle woman, man and child.
Hands For Hunger functions
to connect this excess supply
with the unmet, ever growing
need through the more equi-
table and efficient distribution
of resources, ” said Alanna
Rodgers, Founder and Pro-
gram Coordinator of Hands
For Hunger. “The proceeds
raised from Paradise Plates
will go directly to addressing a
most basic human need in our
community.”

The amazing array of food
and drink is complemented by
a silent auction, raffle, live
entertainment and beautiful
décor. Tickets are $140 per
person and will be available
by April 16. Contact:
info@handsforhunger.org for
more information. Tickets will
be sold at the following loca-
tions: New Providence Com-
munity Church on Blake Road
contact: ashleyl@hands-
forhunger.org; Central from
Rosamund Roberts contact:
rosroberts@hands-

forhunger.org East from
Andrea Strommer andreas-

trommer@handsforhunger.org
. A limited number of tickets
are available online at

www.handsforhunger.org .

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune







TEA TIME IN WONDERLAND

e The Event is Fashionista
2010 Ltd.'s Spring Trunk
Show/ Shopping Party show-
casing its Limited Spring
Collection! Fashionista
hosts a monthly event cater-
ing to the women of Corpo-
rate Bahamas and the like...

In Celebration of Alice's
Wonderland, Fashionista
hosts its Spring Tea Party
where must have accessories
are commonplace- they
offer a bit of wit and whimsy
guaranteed to even intrigue
the Cheshire Cat.

The event takes place on
April 11 from 2pm- until at
Harry's Haven Queen St.
(just behind the U.S.
Embassy) Complimentary
bites and drinks. No cover
charge.

Contact Info: charez.fash-
ionista@gmail.com

THE COLOUR OF HARMONY

e The College of the
Bahamas’ School of Com-
munication and Creative
arts presents the 21st The
Colour of Harmony concert
on Thursday, April 8, 2010,
at 6.30 pm at The Perform-
ing Arts Centre at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas.

T: 302-4370 or 302-4485 for
more information.

Reeeeececeeeeeecereee ere eeeeee ees seesee ene ses nesses eee eee eee

JE'ROME HARRIS MILLER'S
“BRILLIANCE” EXHIBITION

¢ Je'Rome Harris Miller
invites you to view an exhi-
bition of his new paintings
entitled “Brilliance.” This
fourth collection is whimsi-
cal, where the dancers sway,
the musicians gyrate and all
of nature bursts forth in a
brightly coloured celebra-
tion of life. The exhibit is
opened from 6pm-9pm on
Thursday, April 8, at Christ
Church Cathedral Hall. T:
324-6425.

AKA'S EASTER EGG
HUNT AND FUN DAY

e The sorority Alpha Kap-
pa Alpha, along with Antiq-
uities, Monuments and
Museums and Cultural
Experience Productions,
brings to you an Easter fun
day filled with activities,
including face painting, elec-
tronic rides, a bouncing cas-
tle and a game trailer. Sat-
urday, April 10 at 1lam-5pm
on Collins Estates Grounds.
Easter egg hunt begins 3pm.
Entrance fee: $1.

8TH ANNUAL JAMES
BETHEL MEMORIAL
GOLF TOURNAMENT

¢ The Rotary Club of Nas-
sau invites the general pub-
lic and all interested golfers
to participate in the 8th
annual James Bethel Memo-
rial Golf Tournament,
beginning 8am at the Cable
Beach golf course on Sun-
day, April 11. Cost: $100 per
player, includes lunch and
gift bag. Contact Cornel
Collins, T: 393-2164 or F:
394-4971.

WESTERN HEMISPHERE
SAILING CHAMPIONSHIP
2010

e Nassau Yacht Club hosts
the 2010 Western Hemi-
sphere Sailing Champi-
onship, beginning with an
opening reception, Mon
April 12. Racing starts Wed,
April 14 and commences
until Sat, April 17. See
www.nassauyachtclub.org

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



Opera company
hits right note

By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

he newly formed

Nassau City Opera

Company(NCOC)
is set to have its inavu-
gural performance next
Friday evening with a
performance called The

Story of the Spirituals.

The group which to date
has more than 35 members
was the brain child of noted
Bahamian musical director Dr
Cleveland Williams who
recently sat down with Tri-
bune Entertainment to discuss
his vision to increase the pub-
lic’s awareness of classical
music.

“ The mission of the NCOC
is to enhance the quality of
life for Bahamians through
fully staged operatic perfor-
mances of the highest quality

using national talent and later
international talents.

“Through its performances,
NCOC hopes to create cultur-
al and educational programs
to encourage an appreciation
as well as an enriching experi-
ence of opera for future gen-
erations of Bahamian artists
and audiences alike.”

The group has been hard
at work preparing The Story
of the Spirituals which fea-
tures both narrative and musi-
cal performances and tells the
story in nine carols. The per-
formance will serve as the
company’s soft launch.

The show will explain the
origin of Negro spirituals and
what they meant to the peo-
ple who sang them and their
importance as a whole to
Black people throughout the
Western Hemisphere he said.

“This performance will
showcase the best orators in
the Bahamas,” Dr Williams
explained, “ including Neville

Smith, Veronica Duncanson,
Stacey Campbell Marshall,
Noel Stirrup and Idris Reid.”

Dr Williams said that while
the country has a strong musi-
cal culture base through
Junkanoo, he would like to
combine other musical gen-
res to further enhance
Bahamian culture.

“ We want to bring another
element to culture through
singing and stage produc-
tions,” he said.

To facilitate this, Dr
Williams said the NCOC is
seeking to partner with the
Ministry of Education so that
students can be exposed to
opera music.

“We need to begin to edu-
cate the younger generation
so that they understand that
opera is not “ so high brow”
and that we can expand our
horizons and have an appre-
ciation of the work,” he said,

In this way, he explained
Bahamians would be able to





produce their own operatic
works. The company is plan-
ning its first opera in 2011 a
production of Porgy and Bess.

“The Story of the Spiritu-
als,” is scheduled to run at
Christ Church Cathedral





under the direction of Dr
Cleveland A Williams and
pianist Audrey Dean Wright.
Part of the proceeds of the
event's $20 donation is ear-
marked for The Bahamas
Cancer Society.















Haynes Library
hosts book author

IN collaboration with K Ali-
son Albury, author of the book,
Life on the Rock, the Haynes
Library located in Governors
Harbour recently hosted a
book event at the intimate ter-
rain of the Beach House Tapas
Bar.

During the book event Ms
Albury read a few passages
from her book Life on the
Rock,

Based on a series of journal
entries, the book tells the
untold stories and the many
intriguing experiences she and
her husband Peter experienced
while spending five years on
Highbourne Cay in the Exu-
ma islands serving as property
managers.

The book event was part of a
monthly lecture and discussions
series usually held by the
library and allowed readers the
opportunity to get up-close and
personal with the author.

The event though intimate,
was well attended by members
of the Governor’s Harbour
community, who had a num-
ber of probing questions, and
took keen interest in what Ms
Albury had to say.

The Haynes Library is one
of the Bahamas’ historic build-
ing and was originally dedicat-
ed for service in 1897, 113 years
ago and has over the years
housed a variety of govern-
mental offices as well as a small
public library.

Over the years, however, the
building has deteriorated and
was scheduled for demolition.
In 1994, the community formed
a group known as “Friends of
the Library” and organisied
gifts and donations from the



EW Aisle) UAY

community and around the
world to faciliate the restora-
tion process.

Today the library is the cen-
ter of activities in Governor’s
Harbour. Its children programs
include after school homework
assistance, Internet access and
computer classes, as well as art
and craft classes.

The shelves of this historic
building house over 11,000 vol-
umes and a large selection of
educational software.

The community outreach
program provides scholarships
to local student sponsors sum-
mer camps and participants in
high school work experience.

The Haynes library is her-
alded as cornerstone of the
community and is a privately
managed, non profit organiza-
tion. Annual fund raising
events, private and corporate
donations and an annual gov-
ernment grant help to Keep its
doors open.



BIFF founder holds acting classes

BAHAMAS International
Film Festival Founder Leslie
Vanderpool is extending her
acting classes through May
with Stage and On Camera
class. The classes begin today
and will continue until May 5
on Mondays from 6.30-8.30
and Wednesdays 6.30pm-
8.30pm for persons 13 and
older. The classes will be held
at the New Providence Com-
munity Center on Blake
Road. The cost for 5 weeks of
classes is $400 and there is an
individual class charge of $40.

RSVP A MUST: 356-5939
as there is limited class size.

Topics include:
SHERLOCK HOLMESING THE TEXT
"To Be A Great Actor, You Have

To Be A Good Detective!"
- William Hurt

All information an actor
needs for the Audition is
"Hidden" within the materi-
al. Your tendency is to rush to
judgment or "What are my
lines?" Rather than: Who am
I? Who are they? What just
happened? How do I feel?
What am I doing? What do I
want this person to understand
about me? Ms Vanderpool
will teach you how to find the
"Clues" that the writers are
laying out for you.

On Camera Intensive

The Intensive is just that-
Intense. This is a practical
Nuts & Bolts approach to

Crafting your work for the
Camera.

You also have the oppor-
tunity to see Playback and get
Feedback on your work,
which allows you to be more
competent and confident in
your Auditions and working
On Camera. Our focus begins
with Script Interpretation &
Character Analysis. Ms Van-
derpool will teach you how to
introduce yourself to the
script through the process of
"Sherlock Holmesing" of the
text. This includes Crafting
of the First Moment, Rela-
tionships to Persons, Places,
Things & Events, and Using
Clichés & Social Dictates.

e¢ Ms Vanderpool has pro-

grammed over 400 films at
BIFF and has become a well
recognised name on the film
festival circuit, appearing on
panels at various film festi-
vals around the world, such
as Cannes, and has spoken to
over a hundred interested
filmmakers on strategies to
employ to get your film
shown at film festivals. As far
as The Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival Is concerned,
Leslie concentrates on three
ingredients that play an
important role In the festi-
val's success: platforming film-
makers around the world,
providing alternative finances
opportunities and providing
cultural entity to support the
tourism product while stimu-

lating the minds of the com-
munity within The Bahamas.

In addition to programming
films from around the world,
Ms Vanderpool created a pro-
gramme within the festival
called the BIFF Filmmaker
Residency Programme,
designed to serve Bahamian
and Caribbean Filmmakers
only. This programme led to
the discovery of emerging
directors, such as Maria Gov-
an, director of RAIN, and
Kareem Mortimer, director
of CHILDREN OF GOD,
both of whom subsequently
have become very well known
within the Bahamian com-
munity and have been invited
to leading film festivals
around the world.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
Plates



Local chefs
prepare for
Paratlise

see page five



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010



Sim
bill

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

E’ROME Harris Miller debuts his

fourth collection of paintings this

Thursday evening, in an exhibit
simply titled ‘Brilliance’ at Christ
Church Cathedral on top of the Hill,
George Street.

Oly

OM



Miller calls this year’s body of work
a “PG” exhibit unlike his previous
works, that had biblical and fun
themes behind it. It’s a milder theme
of “wholesomeness” unlike the adult
tones that his exhibits have taken on
in the past.

In ‘Brilliance,’ the pieces are heav-
enly, in terms of “the way they gaze
back at you,” he told Tribune Arts.
He further explained: “Even as you
gaze upon it, it’s something else oth-
er than what you see.”

Each painting in his 30-piece col-
lection has musicians, which spark a
jubilant feeling in the viewer’s con-
sciousness, set off by Miller’s use of
bright, bold colours.

‘Brilliance’ overall as an exhibit
encapsulates a whimsical theme--
where dancers sway, musicians gyrate,
and all of nature bursts forth in all
it’s glory through a brightly coloured
celebration of life.

In this year’s exhibit, Miller has
translated carefully thought out inter-
pretations of what he sees in life,
bringing a feeling of joy, happiness
and playfulness to the viewer’s spirit.

“The young boy playing in the
fields and beaches of North Andros
still exists in his soul,” he says, and he
expresses this jubilation in this body
of work.

This show, as the previous ones are
held in the honor of Winston V Saun-
ders, and part proceeds will be donat-
ed to Winston V Saunders scholar-
ship fund. Fifty-thousand dollars has
been raised to support of the schol-
arship fund thus far.

Miller’s pieces range in vision from
religious themes, to more identifiable
experiences of human life. He told
Tribune Arts that the vision behind

Miss Grand Bahama
contestants unveiled

See page seven



“Brilliance” was going places in the
world, and capturing the spirit of the
universe-including humanity and
nature.

In his painting, “The Gift,’ Miller
captures and neatly wraps into gift
form, the very essence of the Easter
season with its rich purples, and bright
colors, symbolising a new beginning.

“The Birth’ represents the recently
observed birth and resurrection of
Jesus Christ, but could’ve been easily
titled, “Big Things Come in Small
Packages,” says Mr Miller.

It’s painted with solid colours, pur-
ple, blue and green, orange, and red,
with a bow on it that is shaped as a
crucifixion. The white bow serves as
an imaginary watermark of Christ,
bolstered by a purple gift box that
represents the Roman times.

‘Brilliant’ is a piece that relies on
strokes and color selection to leave
the viewer with a slew of translations.
The colours, generally strong black,
and soft sky blue are magnificent in
their presentation.

‘Purity’ is a piece that flows from
the artist’s mind onto canvas. It’s a
story floating on the background of
“black as night canvas.” The actual
gift box image in “The Gift’ is multi-
coloured, and the ribbon is shaped
in a cross, outlined by a white water-
mark of Christ.

The purity of purple thinly outlin-
ing and shading, one of the bishop’s
most important head pieces leaves
the viewer in awe and looking for the
underlying messages that must surely
be present. “A sense of happiness
and redemption seems to be present
in this piece,” says Miller.

‘Bugle Boys’ returns to the familiar
subjects of music and youth. In Har-






UQIUXS ,SOUDIIG, SIYy JOY soeid PSWey $ JEyIAy SOL Woy, ef



mony, school boys go at it with gusto.
The intensity of the earthy colors in
the background of this painting pro-
vide a magnificent staging place for
the musical instruments that he allows
to standout as the primary subject of
the piece.

In ‘Saints go Marching In,’ saxo-
phone players are the primary sub-
ject, but the viewer must examine
the beauty of the hues and strokes in
the secondary subject matter, or the
background to appreciate the effort
of the artist in bringing the piece to
life.

The only distinct or defined colour
is the musical instruments, but the
play on blue that outlines the boys
bring an effervescent presence to this
art piece.

Miller has visual and entertainment
artist participate in “food art” will
be done by Horatio Smith, and an
Entertainment section is being done
by Sonovia Pierre, Yodephy model-
ing agency, and Nikita Wells

In this year’s exhibit, 30 pieces will
be displayed. “It was a six month
task finishing all of the pieces,” he
said. “I had to use my discretion on
what I would like to show.”

Guests will notice that the piece
on the invitation cover, “Brilliance,”
was the auctioned painting to the
College of the Bahamas.

In this piece, and the others, Miller
says you can actually hear the paint-
ings playing and singing.

On the night of the exhibit viewing,
guests will be enchanted by the oper-
atic sounds of Candice Boswick,
including Gordon Knowles, Lakita
Thompson- Wells, and Sonovia Pierre
who is bringing along a band that
will jazz up things at the event.