Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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SEE PAGE 1B

HOW tragic Keisha
will be remembered

Family and friends pay
tribute to student after
‘apparent suicide’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AT KEISHA THUR-
STON’S house, the evidence
is all over the wall. Two walls.

Keisha was found hanged
on March 1 at the home she
shared with her family. Police,
who are investigating the inci-
dent, have described her
death as an “apparent sui-
cide”.

Two walls in the front room
of Keisha’s home are laden
with medals, certificates and
trophies, proof of Keisha’s
star-studded, student-athlete
past.

The most prized award for
her father, Michael Thurston,
is the sports certificate of
achievement conferred by the
Governor General last year
at the annual awards ceremo-
ny of the Bahamas Outstand-
ing Students Foundation.

“That was the greatest
achievement for her. That is
what inspired me. Not many
kids have that opportunity.
She always made the honour
roll, principal’s list, but get-
ting that award is when you
excel higher above the rest.





STAR-STUDDED
student-athlete
Keisha Thurston

You have to be proud. She
was the captain of all the
teams. To have a child who
plays every sport and still
keeps a grade point average
above 3.0,” said Mr Thurston.

SEE page two



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FNM attorney:
three protest votes
must automatically

he thrown out

LEAD attorney for
FNM candidate Dr Duane
Sands, Thomas Evans
QC, yesterday argued in
election court that of six
protest votes cast in the
Elizabeth by-election
three must be automati-
cally thrown out as the
individual’s names did not
appear on the Elizabeth
register on the day of the
election.

“The evidence shows

SEE page 16











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a cheque for $16,000 at Radio House.
By ALESHA CADET



DAD-TO-BE Terrell Manning used
nothing but sound judgment to bag a
radio station’s top prize ... a whopping
$16,000.

Terrell was the lucky 16th caller on
Randy C’s morning show on Tuesday,
correctly guessing the 100Jamz Secret
Sound and thereby winning the cash.

Mr Manning, a pastry chef by pro-
fession, accurately identified the

LEFT: Terrell Manning with the source of the Secret Sound —a light bulb and an empty crate.
ABOVE: 100Jamz’ Maxine Seymour and Special K (right) present Terrell Manning (centre) with

100Jamz Secret Sound as a light bulb
shaking around in an empty crate.
Bursting with excitement, he told
The Tribune: “When I got through I
thought Randy was joking with me,
when he say I won I almost gone crazy.
I told everybody I was going to win.
“T recorded the sound on to my cell
phone and every day I would cut the
clues out of The Tribune and store

SEE page 12







Teacher charged
AB IiiCaKans

Brenton Smith
inquest to visit
site of death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

assault of girls

A MAN who worked as a teacher at
the Central Eleuthera High School was
yesterday arraigned in New Providence
on five counts of indecently assaulting
young girls.



Orville Clarke, 37, had been
arraigned in Eleuthera last month and
was sent to Sandiland’s Rehabilitation
Centre for an evaluation of whether
he is fit to stand trial.

In the meantime, his attorney
Ramona Farquharson made an appli-
cation to the court stating that she
could not ascertain whether he had
been charged in Eleuthera as she had

SEE page 12

AN INQUEST into the fatal shooting
of teenager Brenton Smith, allegedly by
police officer Detective Corporal Kelsie
Munroe, will conclude today following a
visit to the site.

Key witnesses who have presented con-
tradictory evidence throughout the four-
month inquiry will together show the jury,
counsel and coroner William Campbell

SEE page 12









Campaign to block
controversial net
fishing ‘successful’

CONCERNED Bahamians, environ-
mentalists and sports-fishermen can toast
the success of their campaign to block the
introduction of a controversial type of net
fishing, as the company in question has
reportedly given up its interest in the
scheme.

Observers in Grand Bahama say the
commercial fishing vessel Pelagic I has
removed its purse seine net —a large fish-
ing net crafted to function like a draw-
string purse.

The controversial fishing method was
predicted by many environmental experts
to be detrimental to parallel industries

SEE page 12



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How tragic
Keisha will be
remembered

FROM page one

He was known as “Mr
Brown” to Keisha, who had a
habit of naming her family
members in a fun-loving spir-
it. Mr Thurston gained the
nickname Mr Brown after
Tyler Perry’s “Meet the
Browns” character, Mr
Brown.

What Keisha thought the
two had in common was a
short neck, according to her
mother Carol Thurston,
whose pet name was Cora,
Mr Brown’s wife in real life,
and in Tyler Perry’s movie.

Keisha named one of her
cousin’s poogie, and one of
her sisters an invented word
that no one could spell, used
probably for the phonetic
quality. This was typical of
her comedic side, which was
inherited from her mother
and grandfather, both
Jamaican natives.

“T planned to take her to
Jamaica this summer. She
wanted to know there. I feel
so bad to know that she
passed and didn’t get go,” said
grandpa Joslyn Birch.

There were no shortages of
nicknames for Keisha. The
family called her “Box”, as a
joke about her shape. The
most infamous name was
probably Block and Co. This
Keisha acquired because of a
daring photo shoot gone
awry.

“They climbed on this wall
(to take a photo) and the wall
fell apart. The wall fell on
Keisha and broke her finger,
but we didn’t tell anyone. We
went in the bathroom and
washed the blood off,”
recounted Keisha’s cousin,
Vandeka Rodgers, who was
an eye witness to the adven-
ture.

The Thurstons are a photo
taking family. Everyone has
their own camera, just to
avoid contention over which
person failed to upload
images to the Internet or
which person failed to empty
the memory card.

Keisha and her friends
played off the accident in
front of Mrs Thurston who
was getting ready to leave the
house to attend a photo ses-
sion for the wedding of anoth-
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KEISHA THURSTON ‘always
made the honour roll, and
principal’s list.’

“By the time I pulled out
the yard they called me to say
her hand was broken, you
have to come back to take us
to the hospital. I said, I just
stepped out of the house,”
said Mrs Thurston. The name
Block and Co. was coined
after the block falling inci-
dent, in honour of the unoffi-
cial family photo studio.

The night before her death,
Keisha’s original bowling
plans with her friends were
replaced with a night time
movie and party at Uptown
on West Bay Street.

“Most of her close friends
grew up close to the family,
many of them called us mom
and dad. Her friends were
special. She would take the
time out and spend with
them. She would counsel
them. She was loving,” said
Mrs Thurston.

Keisha was so respected by
her friends, Mrs Thurston said
only Keisha could bring them
to change group plans to
accommodate her schedule.
This happened one time when
Keisha begged her mother to
allow her to go to a social
event without the appropri-
ate one to two weeks worth of
notice.

Her mother’s advice was,
‘don’t ask me to change my
standards, ask your friends to
change their plans’, and they
did.

“She is not a pretender.
Whatever you see is what you
get. She won’t talk a lot, but
when she has something to
say it is always positive, or she
would give you that smile,”
said Mrs Thurston.

The enterprising Keisha,
known to family and friends,
found a job almost ever
Christmas and summer vaca-
tion, whether at Costright,
Solomon’s Supercentre, or
Domino’s Pizza.

She saved her money to
ensure she did not place any
undue burden on the family
to finance her habit for liking
to dress well, and to ensure
her pockets were full during
annual summer trips to Aunt
Jacynth Birch in New Jersey.
New Jersey was like Keisha’s
second home.

She lived there for a few
years as a child.

“T answered my doorbell
and there was Keisha standing
by the door saying, Happy
Birthday. She had the cam-
corder. She said close your
eyes. When I went in the
room she had happy birthday
aunty with all my love on the
wall. That was so special. That
was the last one she did for
me,” said Ms Birch, about a
surprise birthday trip made

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by Keisha last year.

“She would say, ‘Aunty you
want something to eat?’ She
would make me some tea and
toast me some bread. When I
came out the shower it would
be right there. She was very
loving.

“Tam going to miss her
every summer,” said Ms
Birch, talking about occasions
when she would return home
from work after a long shift.

Keisha called her aunt the
week before her death to plan
her summer 2010 vacation.
She told her aunt she found a
plane ticket for $218.

“T told her yes baby you
don’t have to call me. Yes
baby. When I heard the news
I said she wouldn’t do it. She
knew the Bible she knew
God. She would not do that,”
said Ms Birch.

Keisha was the most valu-
able player and captain on vir-
tually every sports team she
was a member of. This was
not surprising considering her
family’s athletic past.

Her two older sisters, Kim-
berly Thurston and Deandra
Munnings, were members of
several CR Walker champi-
onship teams in volleyball.
They were a great inspiration
to Keisha.

The athletic prowess goes
further back. Mrs Thurston
was also an athlete in her
school days. Her stride was
the 400 meter and 100 meter
sprints, high jump and long
jump.

“They usually would prac-
tice at home.

“We would take them on
the park. Deandra would
teach Keisha to catch. Kim-
berly would pitch.

“They always did things
regardless if they were in dif-
ferent schools.

“They always inspired each
other and worked together
cooperatively,” said Mrs
Thurston.

The tragic story of Keisha’s
“apparent suicide” that con-
fronted the Bahamian com-
munity on March 1 is as much
a mystery to the family as it is
for the wider public.

People are often remem-
bered for the mistakes they
make and not the good things
they do, noted Keisha’s moth-

er.

With this glimpse of Keisha,
remembered by family and
friends, perhaps the lasting
memory will be her star-stud-
ded, student-athlete past.



THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 3



ee ee



7.6 28 1 OAT Poa
WELL, ATS A LITToE



HEAVYWEIGHT CLASH BETWEEN FORMER AND CURRENT YOUTH MINISTER

Maynard and Wisdom
trade political punches

Mr Maynard has failed to demonstrate the
requisite quality of leadership ...’

T'll be famous ore day,
but for naw Dm stuck
ih middle schoo!
wrth, d, burch of mor orig.



Neville Wisdom on Charles Maynard



His failure in opposition to offer any con-
structive advice is consistent with his extraor-
dinary failures as a minister.’

CHARLES MAYNARD









. * eesee

Charles Maynard on Neville Wisdom NEVILLE WISDOM [x Sheatey Apel

A WAR of words has broken out
between the former and current minister
of youth, Charles Maynard yesterday
responding to his predecessor’s accusa-
tion that he has shown a lack of concern
and commitment to his duties.

On Tuesday, Neville Wisdom, who
occupied the minister’s office under the
PLP until the 2007 election saw the party
ousted, said: “Given the large number of
at-risk youths in our country and the
impact this condition has on the social
health of our society, Mr Maynard has
failed to demonstrate the requisite quali-
ty of leadership necessary to proactively
provide viable alternatives to this vulner-
able demographic through enhanced and
progressive and sustained youth develop-
ment programmes.”

As an example, he pointed to the state
of the Gambier Youth Path Project, which
was awarded one of only two UNESCO
grants in the Caribbean in 2003, but has
now been replaced by a web-shop.

Not one to ignore a challenge, Mr May-
nard countered yesterday that Mr Wis-

dom has the “worst record” of anyone
who has ever held the post, and that his
assertions are “disjointed, uninformed and
misleading”.

He said: “His failure in opposition to
offer any constructive advice is consistent
with his extraordinary failures as a minis-
ter. In an attempt to mask these failures
and rewrite the history on his weak lead-
ership and paltry record, Mr Wisdom has
now resorted to distortions.”

Misleading

The minister charged that Mr Wisdom’s
comments on the Gambier Youth Park
Project were “highly selective and grossly
misleading”. He said programme had a
clear end date which fell on Mr Wisdom’s
watch. “The next step after the completion
of the programme was the development of
a plan to leverage the talents, dynamism
and cultural assets of Gambier by bringing
tourists to the historic village.

“Mr Wisdom and his colleague at the

create such a plan. Still, the spirit and
objectives of that programme are essential
for national development in general and
the development of our historic heritage
communities and sites in particular,” Mr
Maynard said.

He said that in honour of the spirit of
the Gambier project, the FNM is launch-
ing the most ambitious heritage tourism
programmes in the nation’s history, which
will aim to empower young people in
Gambier, Fox Hill, Adelaide and Bain
and Grant’s Town.

Mr Maynard explained that after a
review of the National Youth Service Pro-
gramme (NYSP) — which grew out of the
YEAST programme launched by the
Roman Catholic Archdiocese in conjunc-
tion with the first FNM government — it
was decided that more at-risk youths could
be helped if the programme was recon-
figured. He said the government is review-
ing a number of initiatives that can reach
significantly more of the young people
whom Mr Wisdom “purports to be con-
cerned about”.

The Moall-at-Marathon
OM OFFICE CHESS AT [i AM DAILY

Ministry of Tourism absolutely failed to

[THE BOUNTY HUNTER = NEW | BOWHTY HUNTER MEW Faeps facas | Wik | gens | 28 |







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A SIGN MAN witha
stencil puts finishing
touches to the logo of
this Royal Bahamas
Police Force vehicle.

PHOTOS:

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Girl shooting victim leaves
hospital following treatment

Police believe one or two gunmen opened fire

THE 12-year-old girl shot while she slept in
her home at Tropical Gardens has been treat-
ed and discharged from hospital, the police
reported yesterday.

The girl, who officers said was lucky to be
alive, was hit several times in the upper right
leg and buttocks when her house was sprayed
with gunfire.

Police believe one or two gunmen opened
fire on the house in the early hours of the
morning on Wednesday.

As the girl and her family slept, a handgun
was used to fire several shots directly into the
victim's bedroom.

There has been no update on the progress of
the investigation, but on Wednesday, a senior
officer from the Central Detective Unit denied
reports that the girl was shot during a home
invasion.

"A number of shots were fired and then the
shooter, or shooters fled the scene. We could
so easily have been dealing with a murder
here, but this little girl has been so very lucky,”
the officer said.

In other crime news, police reported that
two armed robberies took place on Wednesday
night.

The first occurred around 7pm on Soldier
Road east of Abundant Life Road when a

phone card vendor was approached by three
men — one of them armed with a handgun —
who demanded cash.

They got no money or phone cards, but did
rob the victim of his jewellery.

The fled the scene heading north.

Then, just before 9.30pm, Sharkies on the
Prince George Wharf was robbed by two dark
men armed carrying handguns.

They made off with an undetermined
amount of cash and fled on foot heading west.

Early yesterday morning, police received
information about a stabbing at Plane Street in
Pinewood Gardens.

The victim, a 47-year-old male resident of
Jacaranda Street, was approached at his home
by another man, who forced himself into the
house and stabbed the victim in right arm, left
forearm and chest.

The victim was taken to hospital where he is
listed in stable condition.

The police say they are following signifi-
cant leads in this matter and are vigorously
investigating the other incidents.

They also announced that Kenyon Williams,
who was wanted for questioning in connec-
tion with an investigation, was detained yes-
terday at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport.




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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Delicate bonds keep a president afloat

WASHINGTON (AP) — President
Barack Obama has forged a complicated per-
sonal connection with the American public:
Many voters consider him a principled and
inspiring leader even as they question his
policies and job performance.

That delicate bond has given Obama a
reservoir of goodwill that is sustaining his
presidency in tough times — a political fire-
wall of sorts. As Jessica Luna, a 21-year-old
Democrat from Austin, Minn., says: "If you
like someone, you'll give them time to accom-
plish their goals."

But Obama's likability ratings have slipped
a bit, raising an ominous question: Is the
bond fraying?

History suggests such a connection could
give way at any time — over almost any issue
— and send Obama into the kind of nosedive
from which other presidents never recovered.

Obama needs to look no further than his
predecessor. George W. Bush enjoyed high
approval ratings through much of his first
term, only to see them slip during the Iraq
war and then plummet after the botched
response to Hurricane Katrina.

His presidency limped to a conclusion.

"There was a sense that this man didn't
care," says GOP pollster Steve Lombardo.
"That can be virtually debilitating."

Every president has character traits that
bind him to voters, at least initially. That gut-
level connection matters to people as much,
and arguably more, than a president's policies,
sometimes keeping him afloat through polit-
ical storms.

Obama's personal approval rating has
trended 5 to 7 percentage points higher than
his job approval rating, a likability benefit
that is not inconsistent with past presidents.

Bill Clinton's strongest attribute was empa-
thy. The sense that he'd work for you, to use
one of his phrases, "until the last dog dies,"
kept his presidency going after its rocky first
two years and during the Monica Lewinsky
scandal.

Bush was seen as a strong and decisive
leader, traits that kept many voters on his
side despite misgivings over the Iraq war. He
knew that character trumped policies when he
declared in 2004, "Even when you might not
agree with me, you know where I stand."

Obama's advisers like to draw parallels
between their boss and another Republican
president, Ronald Reagan. The Gipper's lik-
ability ratings remained high despite an eco-
nomic recession in the early 1980s and rough
patches later.

"People believed that he had strong prin-
ciples," says senior Obama adviser David
Axelrod.







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"They thought he was a likable, admirable
person."

Axelrod says Obama is viewed the same
way — and there is evidence that he's right.
At least, to a point.

Obama's job approval rating, perhaps the
best gauge of an incumbent's re-election
chances, has been hovering around 50 percent
since October. It would probably be much
lower — the health care debate and bank
bailouts have drained him politically — if
voters did not like him so much, Democratic
and Republican pollsters agree.

"Voters think Obama is sincere, wants to
do well and has a stable and real marriage,"
Republican pollster Bill McInturff said.
"Those are all important things because when
people like a president, they will give him a
chance to do his job even when they're not so
sure about his policies."

A look inside Obama's ratings show that he
has actually gained ground since taking office
on the public's view of his values and his abil-
ity to manage a crisis, according to NBC
News-Wall Street Journal polling conducted
by McInturff. But those are not the character
traits got him elected.

He has experienced double-digit declines
on personal attributes that hew closely to the
Obama political brand — his ability to inspire,
unify the country and achieve his goals. While
those ratings are still high, the trend could
spell trouble.

But like Bush and Reagan before him,
Obama's strongest suit may be voters’ belief
in the sincerity of his motives. Item: Nearly 6
in 10 Americans say Obama is more inter-
ested in serving the public than interest
groups, according to a CBS News/New York
Times poll. Only 13 percent think the same of
Congress. Still, strategists in both parties say
the health care fight for Obama could be the
rough equivalent of what the first years of
the Iraq war were for Bush — a long, but
less-than-debilitating slog that weakened his
bond with the public.

What could destroy Obama's bond, as Kat-
rina did for Bush? Anything that galvanizes
the public's growing questions about his abil-
ities to inspire and unify the country. Or any-
thing that raises questions about the purity of
his motives.

Deal-cutting on health care. A failure to
create promised jobs — or an incident that
shows a lack of empathy toward people
who've lost them. Anything could go wrong.

But, clearly, the character issue has bought
Obama time.

(This article is by Julie Pace and Ron
Fournier of the Associated Press)






THE TRIBUNE



Homosexuality:
A quick response to
Pastor Lyall Bethel

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SINCE Mr Bethel has
made far too many assertions
to respond to in this space,
Id just like to focus on one
particular area that I believe is
the crux of the matter.

Mr Bethel seems to have a
very narrow view of what is
and what is not a civil rights
issue. Suffrage is just one
aspect of the much larger
issue of civil rights, which
includes free speech, non-dis-
crimination, religious free-
dom, etc. The Oxford English
Dictionary defines civil rights
as “the rights of citizens to
political and social freedom
and equality.” Rights for gay
people seem to fit very nicely
within this definition. And ’m
sure that Ms Thompson is
well aware that the black
rights movement is different
from the gay rights movement
in many ways, but she was
correct to use it as analogy as
there are important com-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net



monalities and it is an issue
that most Bahamians can
relate to.

Once you consider the “gay
movement” as a civil rights
movement, than the rest of
Mr Bethel’s points are irrele-
vant. Whether one group of
people is more healthy or bet-
ter at raising children than
another has nothing to do
with whether they should be
granted the same rights.
Because of unfortunate cir-
cumstances, blacks in the US
are far more likely to commit
crimes and have lower pay-
ing jobs than whites, but does
this mean that they shouldn’t
vote or should go to different
schools or not be allowed to
marry? Of course not!

Statistics are easy to cherry-
pick, and to use them to sup-

Thank you Bahamians for
helping quake-hit Haiti

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Allow me please to use a
space in your paper to thank
the Bahamian people for their
efforts for Haiti in these hard
times.

First, let me thank the Rt
Hon Hubert A Ingraham for
releasing the 102 Haitians
who were housed in the
Detention Centre without
good care. This was the right
thing to do at the right time.
Thank you, Mr Ingraham, for
being a decisive leader and
continue to be strong in your
leadership. If you were to
consult the leader of the
opposition, until now they
would be in the Detention
Centre. Now the PLP put that
on their Political agenda, this
not a political issue.

I also want to thank every
single Bahamian who suffered
with us. Those who con-
tribute, any little thing you
give will do plenty. I want to
thank Mr Bain who has used
Sky Bahamas to fly help to
those earthquake victims back
home, God will bless you as
He ever did before. I want to
thank the staff of the
Bahamas Red Cross Society,
The Staff of NEMA, The
Management of Aquapure,
The Management of the
Rotary Club, all those who
take part on the Coins for
Haiti, ’'ve watched them on
Bay Street and Wulff Road
with tears in my eyes, God
will bless you guys. I want to
thank Mr Flowers for promis-

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ing $250,000. All those I don’t
have a chance to mention, I
thank you all.

Then for those who are
talking nonsense about the
release of the illegal, let me
tell you that God can forgive
you, if you ask for forgiveness
because in a situation like that
these are not the kind of
words you can say. The
Bahamas is not situated in the
airspace. Natural disasters can
happen in any country in the
world.

I’m living in the Bahamas
for the past 13 years, I’ve seen
Hurricane Floyd, Michelle,
Frances, Jeanne and Wilma. I
don’t want to see any natural
disaster in the Bahamas that
will affect me too, but the
Bahamas is not in the air-
space. It’s time for Bahami-
ans to stop thinking selfish-
ness and discrimination. One
Bahamian said why all the
rest of the Haitians didn’t die?
Can you imagine that?

Bahamians, please, it’s time
to stop these kind of wicked-
ness and to practice Justice
for Haitians, because we are
human beings like you are.
Why do you always say the
Bahamas is a Christian coun-
try? Can a Christian country
act like a satanic country?

So, be Christian, Bahami-
ans Thank you again and God
bless you Bahamas.

OCILIEN PAUL
Nassau,
January 25, 2010.

press a certain group of peo-
ple is dispicable. How would
Mr Bethel feel if his church
was not allowed to perform
marriages because it was
found out that the divorce
rate of his church was higher
than other churches? Or if he
was denied membership to
the Coalition of Evangelical
Pastors because his congre-
gation did not give as much
to charity? I'm sure he would
be very quick to downplay
such narrow-mindedness.

Mr Bethel is more than
welcome to express his views,
but he should be careful not
to judge gays as a group
because of views or actions of
a few (often more vocal) indi-
viduals. In the same manner, I
will try not to judge Bahami-
an Christians based on the
views of a more vocal Mr
Bethel.

R KNOWLES
Nassau,
March 18, 2010.

Taal
STI eI

mT Cam 1
system challenges

EDITOR, The Tribune.



Traffic problems in Nassau
are on everyone’s lips includ-
ing our Family Island friends.
So who in their right mind
allowed “tuk tuks” and three
wheeled scooters to be licensed
to drive at 10-15 mph on our
clogged thoroughfares? Not
only are they extremely dan-
gerous, having no safety equip-
ment, poor steering, no seat-
belts (even though it is the law),
they are often rented to intoxi-
cated and/or young drivers with
no experience who dangerous-
ly weave in and out of cars and
trucks wearing no helmet and
no shoes!

My question is: When they
run into my newly painted car,
who will pay for that? Because
I can bet you the driver will be
gone in a day and the vendors
who rent them will not be
responsible! I have already paid
over $200 to fix my side mirror
— hit by a motor cyclist driving
in no particular lane!

Government, please save us
from ourselves and from you!
Stop licensing dangerous vehi-
cles on our roads, including
those with ridiculous exhaust
fumes that create a visual obsta-
cle!

Honestly, if I did not know I
lived in a third world country, I
do now!

APPLETON
Nassau,
January 25, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 5



Police issue
warning to
scam artists

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia. net

ENTREPRENEURS are
not the only enterprising
people taking advantage of
the recession — scam artists
are as well.

And as the number of
commercial crimes rises, the
Central Detective Unit
believe 30-year-old Melissa
Deal can help them with one
investigation in particular.

Officers want to question
Ms Deal about a scheme in
which property sales and all-
inclusive services, such as
legal and appraisal services,
were offered under false pre-
tenses.

Assistant Superintendent
(ASP) Michael Moxey, head
of the of the CDU Business
and Technology Management





— —

7S Sel or =

POLICE want to
question Melissa Deal.







ing they were buying a home
and lot. The perpetrators
allegedly collected large
amounts of money, then
“closed up shop” before
delivering the services to 80

They have noticed a rise in
scams and fraud associated
with land and motor vehicle
sales since December 2009.
There are about 12 cases cur-
rently before the court, and
several others being investi-
gated by the CDU.

“We would like to advise
the public: if you don’t know
the person, if you have never
seen the vehicle, don’t
change hands with your
funds,” said ASP Moxey ata
press conference held yester-
day to warn the public of the
emerging trend.

Mr Moxey said individuals
have fallen prey by making
deposits of money based on
false claims about motor
vehicles and land being
advertised for sale in the
local daily newspapers. Sin-
gle mothers seem to be the
main group preyed upon,



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

i














i

FROM LEFT: SUPT Stephen Dames; Inspector Marcus Edgecombe and ASP Michael Moxey, head of
the Business and Technology Manager Section of the CDU.

In all instances, the victims
were unable to recover the
money they paid.

“We are issuing a warning.
If you have money for any-
one return it now. Once (the
matter) is in the hands of the
police, there will be no deal
worked out in the police sta-
tion. We will be sending you
to the courts immaterial of
who you are and what your
status is. Enough is enough,”
said Superintendent Stephen
Dames. Fraud offences

attract prison sentences of six
months to 14 years.

Inspector Marcus Edge-
combe of the Business and
Technology Management
Section said land is often
advertised at a low, attrac-
tive price. He advised home
buyers to make sure they
conduct thorough back-
ground checks on anyone
before doing business with
them.

Members of the public can
contact the CDU for assis-

tance in this regard. They can
also bring any relevant docu-
ments and receipts to the
CDU to make a report if
they suspect they have
become victims of fraud.

Other scams monitored by
the CDU are loan schemes
and Internet scams, like the
Nigerian 419 Scam, in which
money is solicited from indi-
viduals to help an unknown,
long lost relative, or as a
deposit to acquire winnings
in a fake lotto.

Section, formerly Commer-
cial Crimes, said the scheme
was in operation for about 18
months.

According to ASP Moxey,
clients were lured in believ-

per cent of their clients.

Ms Deal is just one of
many other individuals the
CDU wants to question
about such schemes.

according to the police.

In some cases, the individ-
uals or companies advertis-
ing did not own the property;
or the property did not exist;
or the company was a farce.







THE contestants gathered outside Bally Fitness (a sponsor) last weekend during a preliminary event.

Supermodel of the Bahamas
announces 2010 contestants

TWELVE young contestants from
Eleuthera, Grand Bahama and Abaco
arrived in New Providence last week to join
the 14 contestants from Nassau vying for the
2010 Supermodel of the Bahamas.

The title will be determined on May 2 at
the British Colonial Hilton Grand Ballroom.

“Our launch weekend came off as a great
success and I'm looking forward to the float
parade and preliminary competition which
will take place on April 24 and 25,” said
founder of Supermodel of the Bahamas, Mr
OilinSha Coakley.

In Nassau, the contestants participated in a
busy weekend of workshops, photo shoots,
interviews for the upcoming ZNS reality
show on the event, and a launch party where
the contestants walked the runway sporting
designs by Brynda Knowles of the Fashion
Group, Cedric Bernard, Rachel Garcia,
Debonaire Boutique and Tuxedo Styles, and
ICandy Swimwear.

The event is in its third season and has
expanded with a “Little Supermodel of the



Bahamas” segment. However, there was not
enough interest from young men to justify a
male competition, so it has been dropped
this year.

In the older group, Supermodel of
Bahamas is the overall title and a male and
female winner will be awarded cash and
prizes worth $3,000, a complete portfolio,
representation with OilinSha’s Models, and
will have the opportunity to compete in the
“Top Model of the Universe” competition
in Europe.

The title winners will be flown to New
York and accommodated in the OilinSha’s
Models & Talent Agency’s apartment.

Last year’s winners have been participating
in such high profile shows as New York Fash-
ion Week and Islands of the World Fashion
Week.

The competition continues on Saturday,
April 24 when all the contestants will once
again be back in Nassau for a float parade
and the preliminary competition on Sunday,
April 25 at the British Colonial Hilton.

STOP LIVING IN FEAR - AVOID BEING NEXT
HoW TO AVOID BEING SHOT BY THE POLICE - PART 4



By D’ARCY RAHMING

GO AND tell your young
men these things.

If stopped by a police offi-
cer while driving you can make
him relax. If your car windows
are tinted, roll all of them
down. If it is night, turn on
your vehicle’s inside light and
put your hands on the steering
wheel. If you are a passenger in
the car, put your hands where
the officer can see them. Leave
them there until directed by
the officer to do otherwise.

Do not reach about your





DAT

going to be in a combative
state. And in the case of an
untrained officer, the situation
could rapidly get out of hand if
he wrongly interprets your
actions.

Always remember, we out-
number the Bad Guys.

D’Arcy Rahming is a vio-
lent crime researcher and
Adjunct Faculty Member at
the College of the Bahamas.
He holds Black Belts in sever-
al martial arts and is an inter-
nationally renowned seminar

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PARADISE REALTY

email: Craig@ParadiseBahamas.com

fA Bahamas Lamited

Employment Opportunity

Financial Controller
Description:

Provide leadership and coordination far the company's financial actual reporting,
planning and budgetary

management tunchons. The position is accountable for the accounting opera-
tions of the company which include the

maintenance of an adequate system of accounting necords, and a set of oom-
prehensive controls designed to maintain

the integrity of tha company's financial results. Responsibilities will include:

- Directing and coordinating the campany's financial planning and budget
ary management tunctlons.

- Laading the daily operations of the company's business controls, cash
management, fulfillment, pension management, accounting systems and
balance sheet processes.

* Maintaining an organizational structure and staffing to effectively
accomplish the company's strategic goals and objectives
Acting a5 4 trusted business advisor to the IBM Bahamas
Leadership Tear.

- Recruitment, training, supervising and evaluating department's staff.

Qualifications:

- University Degree in Accounting, with either a CA, CPA, CGA ar
CMA accounting designation.

'3to 5 years of experience in a similar senior level finance or accounting
pasitian,

* Work requires strong professional written and verbal communication skills.

- AbIlity lo motivale teams and produce high quality work within tight
timmefrerries:.

- Required to simullaneously manage several projects and must bea
willing to work @ flexible schedule.

- Ability to effectively work in an international, fast-paced, matrined
organization,

An equal opportunity employer, IBM provides compatitive salaries. Thus, oom-
pensation will be commensurate with experiance and qualifications.

Please mail detailed rasume or in electronic format to the attantian af:

Financial Controller

IBM Bahamas Limited

Fourth Floor

Atlantic House

Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas

e-Mail: nseatan®@bs.ibm.com

person or in the glove com-
partment for your driver’s
licence or other documents,
unless told to do so. Before
making any moves, ask the offi-

cer’s permission. For example,
“My wallet is in my front pock-
et, is it okay to reach for it?”
If the officer is looking for
someone dangerous, he is

leader for corporations, pri-
vate groups and police and
security groups. You can fol-
low him on his blog at
www.stoplivinginfear.org.

Deadline tor raceipl of rasumes is: Friday, March 19ih 2010.

All applications will be held in the strictest confidenoes. Onky short-listed apoli-

canis will be contacted.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

RE/MAX Paradise Realty Agents

RECEIVE AWARDS

PICTURED (left to right) CRAIG Pinder (broker/owner); Zack Bonczek (broker); Jen-
nifer Higgs (broker); Frank Knowles (Hope Town sales associate); Martina
McSweeney (Nassau sales associate).

et ANDRE.
~ SCHOOL

@ world school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates for
the following teaching vacancies, with effect from pepe 2010. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are aa welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and uepe! school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
oe from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP)
of the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all
posts in the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and
preferably trained in, the PYP.

Primary School IT/Library Teacher: The primary school IT/library
teacher develops, implements and interprets an effective library media
and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6. Candidates
must be fully qualified and have successful experience as a school
librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT teacher.

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:
Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:

Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7846



The closing date for applications is 12" April 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered



THE TRIBUNE







On March 1, thousands of RE/MAX real estate

agents from around the world descended on
Orlando, Florida to attend the annual RE/MAX
international convention to learn, network and
enjoy the unique energy generated at the annu-
al gatherings.

The convention offered educational classes,
seminars to help improve and promote business,
a trade show, and most importantly great net-
working opportunities between RE/MAX agents.

There was also the annual awards banquet
honouring top producing agents and offices.

Principal broker of RE/MAX Paradise Realty
Craig Pinder, who was awarded the 100% Club
Award for sales performance in 2009, said he
was “very pleased to receive the award” and he
would continue to “take RE/MAX Paradise
Realty to the next level of customer satisfac-
tion.”

RE/MAX’s Zack Bonczek, broker and sales
manager, and Jennifer Higgs, broker, both
received Executive Club awards for their sales
performance and achievement in 2009.

"It is extremely important to attend these
annual conferences so that brokers and agents
can learn new skills and techniques that will ulti-
mately better serve our clients” said Mr Bon-
ezek. “RE/MAX is unmatched when it comes to



educating it’s members and giving them the tools
to be the best.”

Mrs Higgs agreed: "We learned a lot and had
fun meeting wonderful people from all over the
world. It was inspiring to see how many agents
have soared to the top through RE/MAX. We'll
definitely be in Las Vegas next year.”

Education was front and centre throughout
the week. Tip-filled sessions on social media,
marketing, technology and other relevant topics
were held each day. "It was wonderful, a lot of
very useful information," said Martina
McSweeney, Nassau sales associate of RE/MAX.

"We're excited to get back to our office to
practice what we learned.”

Frank Knowles, RE/MAX Paradise Realty’s
agent in Hope Town, Abaco, said that he “thor-
oughly enjoyed meeting and learning from such
a vast network of realtors, especially from
RE/MAX Cayman agents who we share a lot of
similarities with.”

RE/MAX was founded in 1973 by Dave and
Gail Liniger. From a single office in Denver,
Colorado, it has grown into a global network of
nearly 100,000 sales associates in more than 75
countries. RE/MAX was honoured as the leading
real estate franchise in the “2009 Franchise Times
Top 200.”

IBS and Marathon Bahamas
partner for a winning website

A “winning website” helped
the inaugural Marathon
Bahamas event to go from a
quick launch to a spectacular
finish in just under five months.

At the end of the journey
was a successful marathon held
on February 14 in Nassau that
attracted 500 participants,
including winner Delroy
Boothe, a Grand Bahamian
who raced against seasoned
local and international runners.

Behind the scenes of the
marathon - the brainchild of
Bahamian businessman
Franklyn Wilson - was Inte-
grated Business Solutions
(Bahamas), also known as IBS
International.

IBS helped Marathon
Bahamas stay in the lead with a
high quality, interactive web-
site that is on par with those of
the Boston, New York, and
Miami marathons.

Dr Donovan Moxey, PhD, is
the CEO of IBS International,
an international software devel-
opment and consulting services
company.

IBS built the Marathon
Bahamas website to appeal to
different audiences because it
not only advertised the event
but also the Bahamas and many
of its sponsors in a very promi-
nent fashion.

Sandals Emerald Bay Resort

Invites applications for the following positions:-

Room Service Manager
Bartenders

Dining Room Servers
Stewards

Line Cooks

Asst. Housekeeper
Room Attendants
Housemen

Butlers

Tour Desk Agents
Spa Therapists

Gift Shop Clerks
Security Officers
Photographers

Engineers

Asst. Chief Engineer

Air Condition Tech.
Refrigeration Tech.

Golf Equipment Tech.
Dive Instructors

Certified Lifeguards
Receiving Supervisors
Store Porters

Cost Control Clerk
Wedding Coordinators
Entertainment Coordinators
Environment Coordinator
Videographers

Fax or email resume with proof of qualifications and experience to:

sebhr@grp.sandals.com
Fax: 242-336-6980

Applications close March 27, 2010





Pa

IBS INTERNATIONAL CEO Dr Donovan Moxey, PhD, (middle) shows



the Marathon Bahamas website to marathon chairman Franklyn Wilson
(right) and Brian Moodie, president (left).

It also offered vital informa-
tion and access to functionality
that allowed participants to reg-
ister for the event and book
reservations for airline and
hotel accommodations. There
were just over 100 internation-
al participants in this successful
sports tourism venture.

“Launching a custom web-
site of this kind in just five
weeks is virtually unheard of,”
said Dr Moxey.

Brian Moodie, president of
Sunshine Insurance-Marathon
Bahamas, said: “The amount
of information that we were
able to get on the website was
phenomenal and with IBS
International’s help, the capa-
bilities of the site were top
notch.”

Some of the key elements of
the site included access to
online registration, medical and
volunteer information, inte-
grated video content, including
an embedded satellite map of
the course that was tagged with
markers and links to sponsor
websites. Mr Wilson said: “We
wanted to create a world class
event and a site to match. Each
element had to be broken down
into great detail.”

He also pointed out that the
website had to be user friendly.

The fact that a number of
companies or organisations had
‘marathon’ and ‘Bahamas’ asso-
ciated with their web presence

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created an obstacle to the web-
site developers which had to be
dealt with in a relatively short
period of time.

A search request even point-
ed to the Mall at Marathon. To
address this problem, IBS Inter-
national employed the use of
search engine optimisation
(SEO) functionality that is an
integral part of its website
development platform, as well
as the use of Google AdWords.

Veronica Duncanson, who
was responsible for the mar-
keting of Marathon Bahamas
and its website, worked closely
with Dr Moxey and they cre-
ated keywords, meta tags and
meta phrases that were the best
fit for their campaign. The
entire list of words and phrases
had to be strategically chosen in
order for Google to efficiently
index them and provide the
higher ranking.

“To get a site like ours up so
quickly and to iron out some
of the kinks took real knowl-
edge and we were happy that
we achieved the number one
search for ‘Marathon Bahamas’
in Google after a few adjust-
ments,” said Ms Duncanson.

Another winning strategy
was the utilisation of social
media tools like Facebook and
Twitter that helped Marathon
Bahamas reach a registration
level of over 500 in less than
three months.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 7



FNM to celebrate birth of
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield

Canadian winter
resident donates
hooks, backpacks

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_

FREEPORT - A Cana-
dian winter resident has
donated a number of chil-
dren’s books and back-
packs to the Eight Mile
Rock Urban Renewal
Centre in the Harbour
West Shopping Centre.

Tracey Bonvarlez, a resi- :

dent of Ontario made the
presentation on Wednes-
day to Margaret Grant,
Urban Renewal Centre
manager, and Antoinette
Coakley, area coordinator
of the Urban Renewal
West Grand Bahama.

Ms Grant was very
grateful to Ms Bonvarlez
for her donation. She said
it will help to promote lit-
eracy among the youth of
Eight Mile Rock commu-
nity.

“We extend our sincere

appreciation to Ms Bonva-

rlez for this gesture of
kindness. It was very
thoughtful of her to have
donated the books to the
children’s library we have
here at the centre,” she
said.

“We have an after-

school programme here for :

some 30 children who will
make good use of these
books.”

Ms Grant said the after
school-programme is held

from Monday to Thursday.

Students can use library,
learn how to read, how to
use the computer, and are
assisted with homework.
The centre also has a

marching band programme :

that is held on Wednes-
days from 4.30pm to
6.30pm.

“There is a need for
more musical instruments
and computers and we
would be very grateful if
persons in the wider com-
munity can also assist us,”
Ms Grant said.

aR

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The Free
National Movement will hold a
number of activities this week-
end to celebrate the birth of

At FNM headquarters on
Wednesday, Senator David
Thompson, chairman of the
Grand Bahama FNM Council,
announced that events com-
memorating the life and
achievement of Sir Cecil will
be held starting today and con-

Kenneth Whitfield and the late
Dorothy Wallace Rogers.

He was educated at the Uni-
versity of Hull, England, and
Middle Temple, London. He
was a barrister at law.

Sir Cecil died on June 28,
1990. He was married to Lady

the late Sir Cecil Wallace-Whit-
field - a Bahamian national
hero and founder of the FNM.





tinuing through Sunday.
Sir Cecil was born in Nassau
on March 20, 1930, the son of

BAHAMAS TAKES THE OU VCE Tene re

Naomi Wallace Whitfield at
the time of his death.
Senator Thompson said a



Cnr tl Security Minister Tommy Turnquest ¢ aa as eo (ov nT) en: X in Washington, DC.

By KHYLE QUINCY PARKER
Press Attaché
Embassy of The Bahamas



WASHINGTON, DC - National Security Min-
ister Tommy Turnquest assumed the chairmanship
of the 10th Regular Session of the Inter-American
Committee against Terrorism (CICTE) - an arm of
the Organisation of American States — at a cere-
mony in Washington, DC, on Wednesday evening.
It is the first time the Bahamas has chaired the
Committee.

The Bahamas was elected by acclamation to chair
the committee through March 2011, after having
served as Vice Chair to Mexico over the last year.
Colombia nominated the Bahamas, citing among
other things the country’s “widespread activity” in
support of Mexico’s chairmanship as reason to sup-
port the Bahamas in the position of chairman. Cana-
da, a major contributor to the OAS and the CICTE,
seconded the nomination.

Mr Turnquest, during brief remarks, expounded
on the theme chosen by the Bahamas for the three-
day conclave — “Public/Private Partnerships In The
Fight Against Terrorism.”

The minister said the “traditional approach to
terrorism has been that it is a critical security matter,
and is therefore the responsibility of the state.”

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“Recent attacks by terrorists, however, show that
their willful and wanton destruction is intended to
inflect maximum damage in terms of lives and prop-
erty, and they are not concerned about whether
what they destroy is public or private,’ ” he said.

“There is, consequently, a growing appreciation
that the traditional approach to countering terrorism
does not create a sufficient space for the business
community and other civil actors, whose interests
can be devastated by acts of terrorism. It also does
not take into account the information, knowledge,
experience and resources that the private sector
can bring to bear on efforts to counter terrorism, and
the potential threat from terrorist activities.”

Mr Turnquest said an increasing awareness of
the significant value in public-private sector part-
nership is encouraging governments to establish
such partnerships “as a critical countermeasure
from which states and the private sector can mutu-
ally benefit in the fight against terrorism and to
guard against potential terrorist threats.”

“Such partnerships,” he said, “heighten public
interest, raise awareness, build mutual understand-
ing, and allows for private sector input in govern-
ment’s anti-terrorism policies and programmes.
Public-private sector partnership also helps to broad-
en the resource base, both financial and human, in
the fight against terrorism.”

radio talk show featuring pan-
elists who knew Sir Cecil will
be aired today on ZNS from
3pm — 4pm.

Also, a Fish Fry will be
hosted by the Eight Mile
Rock Constituency Associa-
tion at the Lewis Yard Lodge
Hall from 5pm until.

“Lewis Yard was where we
had our battle when the FNM
was first started and where we
had to defend democracy for
the first time right across the
street from the Lodge Hall in
the school,” he recalled.

On Saturday, a Family Fun
Day will start at 12noon, and
the official opening of the Sir
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Exhi-
bition will begin at 4pm at the
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield
Community Centre on West
Atlantic Drive.

Senator Thompson said Sir
Cecil left a sacred legacy for
future generations.

“He was a giant warrior in
the cause of democracy in the




















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Bahamas. He sacrificed to
ensure that the two party sys-
tem in our Bahamas became a
reality in our constitution, and
Bahamians are grateful to him
and appreciate him and his
family for the service he gave
to all of us.”

“We hope all lovers of
freedom and all Bahamians
who cherish human rights
and liberty (will) attend this
exhibition on Sir Cecil,” he
said.

On Sunday, a church ser-
vice will be held at 10am at
Christ the King Church, where
Sir Cecil attended mass.

On April 6, the national
hero’s exhibition on the life
and times of Sir Cecil will
move to the College of the
Bahamas.

The FNM will also host the
Grand Bahama Schools Essay
Competition and Speech Con-
test based on the legacy, times
and accomplishment of Sir
Cecil.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 9



27,0 1
What now for political free-thinker Paul Moss?

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

[us week, Paul
Moss’s resignation
from the PLP adds another
interesting dimension to the
political brouhaha and the-
atrics of late, seemingly rip-
ping the heart out of any
momentum the PLP may
have recently gained while
also adorning Mr Moss in
the political veneer of a
political carpetbagger—a
political opportunist.

Following the PLP’s 51st
Convention last year, where
Mr Moss faced up to defeat
after a losing in his attempt
to ascent to the PLP’s
throne, he has shown a
steely determination and
spirited drive for a political
nomination that, at the very
least, is appreciable.

However, within the PLP
it appears the attorney
was/is seen as a rank out-
sider, a fame hankerer and a
“Johnny-come-lately”
whose zeal and pursuit of
the leadership has appar-
ently left many of the long-
standing party hacks dis-
gruntled and determined to
resist his advancement at all
costs. Indeed, the lawyer
stood up to confront the
PLP’s strongman while
everyone else—besides Dr
Bernard Nottage—cowered
and were too afraid to do
so. I applaud Mr Moss for
being a pacesetter and seem-
ingly a political free-thinker,
rather than another baby-
kisser politician who suffers
from “kiss-up disease” and
who is overly concerned
with petty politics. That said,
unless he is actively seeking
or has been offered an FNM
nomination, it is likely that
Paul Moss will be experi-
encing a cold political winter
between now and the next
general election.

In recent months, Mr
Moss declared his intent—
while a guest on a radio talk
show—to run as an inde-
pendent if he was not nomi-
nated for the St Cecilia con-
stituency. While I can appre-
ciate that Mr Moss will gar-
ner some support, unless he
is sprinkling sparkly fairy
dust on the voters residing in
this traditionally PLP con-
stituency, his electoral bid is
likely to be unsuccessful.

Legitimise

To the politically dis-
cerning eye, it does appear
that Mr Moss was hoping
that the PLP would legit-
imise his bid for the St Cecil-
ia constituency. Undoubt-
edly, Mr Moss realised
beforehand that in order to
get a highly-regarded nomi-
nation and achieve his ulti-
mate goal of winning a Par-
liamentary seat, he would
need the blessing of a major
party, particularly since the
Bahamian electorate does
not appear to be quite ready
to elect a third party candi-
date. In the Bahamas, it
appears that place of third
parties in the minds of the
electorate is just that—third!

Dr Dexter Johnson, who
recently left the Bahamas
Democratic Movement
(BDM) to join the National
Development Party (NDP),
espouses a different view:
“The significance of Paul’s
resignation is that here is
another young leader, in
opposition—saying the same
thing as a young leader
(Bran McCartney) from the
governing party, who also
recently resigned. This
means, therefore, that any-
one serious would look to a
third party.”

Although Mr Moss affili-
ated himself with the PLP,
sources within the party
assert that the St Cecilia
constituency was too valu-
able to grant a nomination
to an unpredictable, “uncon-
trollable” journeyman can-
didate. Frankly, I’m told that
another candidate (Paulette
Zonicle) — and likely nom-
inee — has long canvassed
the district and has received
the support of the incum-
bent Parliamentary repre-
sentative (Cynthia ‘Mother’
Pratt).

Paul Moss’s resignation
indicates he must have

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

ADRIAN

GIBSON

‘To the politically discerning eye, it
does appear that Mr Moss was hop-
ing that the PLP would legitimise his
bid for the St Cecilia constituency.’

recognised that his fight for
the nomination was not as
clear-cut as seemingly antic-
ipated and that his pursuit
of a political nomination in
his preferred constituency
was made even more diffi-
cult when he entered the
leadership catfight without
having significantly con-
tributed to the party’s inter-
nal operations or nurturing
an approved constituency.
PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts conveyed what is
seemingly the general con-
sensus within the PLP,
which is — that Mr Moss
brought nothing to the par-
ty’s table and therefore has
taken nothing from it!

Political sources stress the
fact that the political aspi-
rant began campaigning in
St Cecelia without Mother
Pratt’s blessing was an
affront to the National Gen-
eral Council (NGC) — the
candidate’s committee — of
the PLP.

It appears that Mr Moss
refused to toe the party line,
going against the political
culture of the PLP and
instead of exhibiting what
some call “blind loyalty” to
the party, he openly berated
leader Perry Christie and his
leadership style and
expressed certain views that
were diametrically opposed
to the PLP’s public pro-
nouncements.

Undoubtedly, Mr Moss’s
leadership gamble must
have been contemplated
with the expectation of
attaining the support of the
educated, middle class folks
within the party’s hierarchy
and the hope of garnering
sufficient support to over-
throw Paulette Zonicle in
her quest for the St Cecilia
seat.

According to Dr Johnson:
“Paul tried a power move at
the convention. At that
time, he should have bar-
gained to withdraw from the
leadership race for the nom-
ination. Christie was jittery
at that time. It seems that
he wanted to shake up the
establishment.

Paul’s resignation must
have come as someone like
him could not demonstrate
any leadership qualities in
that ‘shut up and sit down’
setting.”

At this juncture, it is
doubtful that Mr Moss has
the popular support of St
Cecilia and must have come
to the understanding that
Mother Pratt openly endors-
es Mrs Zonicle, and that
whoever she endorses — as
is the norm in Bahamian
politics —t he NGC would
support.

In addressing Moss’s res-
ignation, a legal eagle who
wishes to remain anony-
mous, stated: “A major fault
of persons like Mr Moss
who aspire to be leaders of a
country is that they don’t
seem to be interested in con-
tributing to an organisation
in a significant way, believ-
ing that their education or
international exposure and
their ramblings to the press
are sufficient to spiral them
to the top. Not so.

“What Mr Moss and oth-
ers like him don’t appear to
realise is the fact that he is
able to summon the press to
press conferences and then
see his face on television
does not mean that he has
the overwhelming support
of the community. Perhaps,
one of the press conferences
should have been reserved
for his formal resignation
from the PLP, rather than a
press release from Europe.
That way, he could’ve field-
ed questions posed by those
same reporters who provid-
ed the mirage of hope for

any leadership of the PLP,”
he concluded.

Now that he has divorced
the PLP, does Paul Moss
now flail in the political
wind?

Will Mr Moss run as an
independent? Or, will he
join the NDP?

Leader

I have long held the belief
that the NDP—with which
one of Mr Moss’s brothers is
affiliated and which contin-
ues to assert that it has no



















leader — was preparing for
Mr Moss to become the
leader, particularly if he had
not secured the PLP’s nom-
ination for St Cecilia.
However, there are some
within the NDP who empha-
sise that if Mr Moss joins the
party, he has to submit him-
self to a democratic primary
for the party’s leadership



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while there are others who
suggest that after de facto
leader Dr Rollins’ good
showing in Elizabeth, the
NDP would commit political
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leader.

On the other hand, Mr
Moss could join the FNM or
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costly undertaking likely to
end in failure. I have come
to know Paul Moss as an
earnest individual who
appears to have a genuine
interest in nation-building.
However, it appears that if
the Bahamas continues to
be a red (FNM) or gold
(PLP) state, young persons
promoting change and aspir-
ing for leadership must fight
from within the internal
structure of the major par-
ties, seeking to convince
council and executive mem-
bers of the value of their
candidacy and the impor-
tance of the injection of new
ideas in advancing the coun-

try.

Both the PLP and the
FNM need to engage ina
comprehensive house clean-
ing exercise when reviewing
candidates, including incum-
bents, seeking nominations,
while consistently recruiting
better candidates and
rebuilding the parties.

There is a need for truth-
ful voices amidst the can-
cerous pit of sleaze and dis-
honesty with which Bahami-
an politics/society is rapidly
becoming synonymous.














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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

where and how Mr Smith was
shot behind the City Market
store in Village Road at
around 8pm on July 9 last
year.

Questions were raised by the
jury yesterday as evidence sub-

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around six months at the Fox
Hill division, Detective Con-
stable Darrington Sands, took
the stand yesterday, he told the

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He said DC Munroe ran
behind the wall and seconds lat-
er the shot was fired.

DC Sands then drew his gun
and followed DC Munroe
behind the wall where he saw
him fall to the ground as two
men who appeared to fit the
description of the suspects were
running away, he said.

“He fell on his back like he
was covering a wound,” DC
Sands said. “I thought he was
shot. I went to him and he said
he was all right, and I looked
and saw the two fellas running
so I went through.”

One of the men fell as he was
running, DC Sands said, so he
pursued the second man to stop
and search him.

“He said, ‘It wasn’t us, it was
the other two men who run
ahead of us’,” DC Sands said.

“Whilst holding my firearm I
did a quick search of his waist
and body, and then put down
my firearm and walked him
back past the body lying there
and the person was gasping.

“He didn’t say anything to
him. He attempted to go and
touch the fella on the ground
but I held him back.”

DC Sands said the man he
apprehended, Leshad Thomp-
son, 18, of Dan Nottage
Estates, Bernard Road, did not
stop to talk to the fallen man,
Mr Smith, of Sea Breeze
Estates, nor did he touch or cra-
dle him, contrary to evidence
previously submitted to the
court.

Detective Constable 437
Obinna Okpuno testified on
November 10 that Mr Thomp-
son held his dying friend in his
arms and cried out, “You just
shot an innocent man!’ when
he arrived at the scene.

And Mr Thompson submit-
ted on January 14 that he had
held his friend and told him he

Brenton Smith inquest
to visit site of death

was not going to die, while he
saw two other suspects get
away.

However DC Sands main-
tained Mr Thompson did not
have contact with Mr Smith as
he escorted him to the car
where he was met by Sergeant
Santrice Bowleg and Sergeant
451 Sands.

Assistant Superintendent
Cleophus Anthony Cooper, the
Central Detective Unit’s chief
superintendent in charge of
homicide, then arrived at the
scene.

He testified yesterday, when
prompted by the jury, that Mr
Thompson did have blood on
his hands when he saw him.

Mr Thompson had identified
Mr Smith for ASP Cooper and
directed the senior superinten-
dent to the Smith family home
after the teenager’s death, ASP
Cooper said.

He said that in his 31 years
experience on the force police
officers will draw their
weapons at their own discre-
tion when responding to armed
robberies.

“Every situation is differ-
ent,” he said. “You may have a
guideline but those will not be
followed in every circumstance.
In some cases it relies on the
individual officer.”

Sergeant 2274 William
Knowles from the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force com-
munications unit also took the
stand yesterday, to complete
his February 16 testimony
relating to his transcription of
police radio transmissions sur-
rounding the incident.

The inquest will conclude
tomorrow following the site vis-
it by ASP Cooper, DC Sands,
DC Munroe, DC Okpuno, Mr
Thompson the jurors, counsel,
coroner William Campbell and
Mr Smith’s family.

Campaign to block controversial
net fishing ‘successful’

FROM page one

(242) 302-8552 OR Email:
iesella. el hceciti, such as sports-fishing and eco-tourism due to its high tenden-
cy to catch many non-target species during fishing operations.

Initial outcry began when the Pelagic I was sighted in
Freeport, allegedly outfitted to accommodate “purse seine” or
net fishing in early February. A flood of calls, e-mails, online
petitions, and Facebook group led to official response from the
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources which
announced that the government was "not minded to permit the
use of purse seine or net fishing within the waters of the
Bahamas".

In a release issued last month, the government said the deci-
sion to move to outlaw the activity was taken "having regard to
the importance of sport-fishing to the tourism industry",
and that it planned to make necessary amendments to the
Fisheries Conservation (Jurisdiction and Conversation) Act
and Regulations in an effort to strengthen legislation.

Owners of the vessel, brothers Paul and David Mellor, con-
firmed observations that it had removed the net equipment and
also announced plans to abandon the industry altogether to pur-
sue waste transport, it was reported.

It was not made clear if outright public opposition con-
tributed to their decision to abandon their efforts, however the
government made very clear its definite resistance to their
proposal.

David Mellor was quoted as saying: “Instead of spending
more money on fishing we have decided to get out of the busi-
ness altogether.”

The Bahamas National Trust called purse seine netting a
"destructive method" of fishing that involves "indiscriminate-
ly catching not only adult tuna but also immature tuna, thus
dealing the fishery the additional blow of juvenile mortality’.

Trust executive director Eric Carey added that in addition to
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the venture would be questionable considering the small local
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Pre-register: Fax: 326-6618
Cost per day: Members $125
CPE hours: 7

Topics & Speakers Include:
* o200 a.m, — 9: 15a.m.
Opening Remarks

Mr, Reece DF, Chipman

0:13 am. = 10:13 a.m. assisted him throughout this
“Mergers & Acquisitions” FROM page one entire experience, is expect-
Mr. David Slatter, Associate Director, KPMG them,” he said. Ing a baby.

Mr Manning said he had an With the money I plan to

10:15 am. — 11:00 a.m.
“Suspicious Transaction”

Ms. Sharmie Farrington-Austin, Financial Intelligence Unit

(15 MINUTES —- BREAK)

L115 mim, = 12:13 p.m,
“Healthcare Services ™

Ms. Suzanne Black, Managing Director, Black & Assocules

12:15 p.m. — 1:43 pom.

1:43 pom. — 2:50 p.m.
“Business Continuity Planning”
Speaker to be Announced

2:30 pom. — 3:15 p.m.
“Good Business Sense”
Speaker to be Announced

3:13 pom. — 4:00 p.m.

——-—- LUN CH-

“Survival of Small & Medium Practices/Small & Medium Entities in the Global

Environmentâ„¢

Mr. Lynden Mayeock, Managing Director, Accounting Outsource Services Lid.



idea the sound resembled a
light bulb after reading the
seventh clue published in The
Tribune newspaper.

He said he narrowed the
clues down as being either a
stapler, mug, tin can or a light
bulb in a crate.

“At home I tried moving
around a light bulb in a crate,
I called Jamz yesterday but I
was the 15th caller,” he said.

Mr Manning’s wife, who

pay off bills and loan pay-
ments. It came at the right
time,” he said

Maxine Seymour, market-
ing and promotions Director
at 100Jamz said: “The
100Jamz Secret Sound brings
hope to so many. It evokes
enthusiasm and fosters cre-
ativity.

“Tam equally as excited as
Terrell and wish him and his
wife every success.”

Teacher charged

FROM page one

received conflicting reports from police officers. She also ques-
tioned what authority Family Island Administrator Margaret
Symonette had to send him to Sandilands for 30 days.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Mr Clarke be brought
to the New Providence court, and yesterday he pleaded not

guilty to the charges.

The electronics teacher was granted $15,000 bail with two

sureties.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





CYCLING
RESULTS

THE NEW Providence
Cycling Association staged its
2nd road race on

Saturday March 13th at the
National Heritage Parking lot.

This race was used as one of
the trial for the National Team
selection by the Federation.

The next available race on
the list of trials will be held
in Freeport in April.

Following shortly will be
the final trial in New Provi-
dence, also in April.



RESULTS: each lap 6 miles.

JUNIORS 3 LAPS

Justin Minnis 52:35.53
Antinece Simmons 1:04:11.09
Peetron Lightbourne 1:05:31.38

5 LAPS

Jay Major 1:21:48.75
Tracy Sweeting = 1:21:49.12
Laurence Jupp ~—-1:21:55.88

Anthony Colebrook1:22:14.91
Barron Musgrove 1:22:16:38
Van Demeritte 1:23:42.18
Robert Bethel 1:29:50.15

OPEN MEN/WOMEN/NOVICE

1 lap

Larry Russell 27:00:00
2 laps

Sylvia Russel 1:06:59.00
Nadia Taylor 1:39:46.75
Antonia Burrows 1:40:00.34

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays







FRIDAY, MARCH 19,



2010





Vanderpool-Wallace in action
at the NGAA championships

Vanderpool-Wallace

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



ARIANNA Vanderpool-
Wallace has a busy three
days ahead of her as she
competes along with seven
other Auburn Tiger team-
mates at the NCAA Division
1 Women's Swimming &
Diving Championships.

Vanderpool-Wallace will
swim three individual events
and is likely to swim three
relays over the three-day
meet.

She will swim the 50 yard
and 100 yard freestyle and

Swimmer set for busy weekend
in women’s swimming and diving

the 100 butterfly. She enters
the meet as the SEC cham-
pion in the 100 free and 100
fly and is seeded 3rd and
10th respectively in these
events at these champi-
onships.

In the preliminaries she
swam the lead off leg of the
200 yard freestyle relay and
posted a time of 22.27.

In the final, Vanderpool-
Wallace, alongside Caitlin

Geary, Hannah Riordan, and
Melissa Marik, finished sixth
in the A final in 1:28.80s.
Vanderpool Wallace fin-
ished ninth overall and third
in the B final of the 50 yard
freestyle in a time of 22.32s.
Vanderpool-Wallace and
teammates Melissa Marik,
Ava Ohlgren and Micah
Lawrence swam to a first
place finish in the B final of
the 400 yard medley relay in

a time of 3:34.08s.

At the end of one, the
Tigers sat in seventh position
with 49 points. Georgia leads
the field with 112 points,
Stanford second with 108.5,
California — 98, Texas A&M
— 76 and Florida — 75 round
out the top five.

Vanderpool- Wallace com-
petes today in the 100m fly,
entering with the 10th fastest
time of 52.55s and also as a
member of the 200m medley
team.

The NCAA Division 1
Women's Swimming & Div-
ing Championships continue
through Saturday.



Teams eye metal round
in the Phil Smith Classic

AS THE Providence Bas-
ketball Club's "Phil Smith
Classic" moved into its fourth
day, several teams looked to
secure berths into today's
medal round and champi-
onship game.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE — 24
ST. ANNE'S - 3

¢ Chad-Vaughn Jones’ hot
shooting led the Comets to
the biggest win of the after-
noon as he outscored the Blue
Waves'entire depth chart in
the first half.









the gospel. Interment

Bomeritte’s Funeral Home

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Oswald Alexander Brown, 60

a resident of Carmichael Road, who passed away
on 1st March, 2010, will be held at Living Waters
Kingdom Ministries, Warren Street, Oakes Field,
on Saturday at 11am. Officiating will be Bishop
Raymond Wells, assisted by other Ministers of

Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to treasure all his golden memories is

follows in Southern



Jones finished with a game
high 10 points to lead the
Comets to the win in yester-
day's opening game.

Jyles Romer added six,
while Christian Bain finished
with four.

CARLTON FRANCIS —12
GALILEE — 9

¢ Carlton Francis rebound-
ed from a day three defeat
with a narrow one possession
win over the Miracles.

Andrew Sands led the way
with six points while Kareem
King finished with four.

Rashon Russell led Galilee
with six points in a losing
effort while Yekini Mowatt
added three.

KINGSWAY (A) - 12
ST. ANNE'S — 7

e The Saints’ one-two scor-
ing punch of Cleon Munroe
and Jayson Green led the way
to an early first half lead and
the win.

Both finished with five
points apiece to give the Blue
Waves their second loss of the

SEE page 14




Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



STEPHEN Dillet's McClellan Major heads to the basket for a layup in his team's 12-2 win over Freedom

Baptist.

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sons, Don, John, Wille, Ken; grandchildren,
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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

MORE SCENES FROM PHIL SMITH CLASSIC



CHAD-VAUGHN Jones dribbles the ball upcourt through the Blue
Waves defence. He finished with a game high 10 points.

Teams eye
medal rount
in the Phil
Smith Classic

FROM page 13

afternoon.

The Saints led 9-4 at the
half and maintained the
advantage in the second as
each team scored just three
points.

STEPHEN DILLET — 12
FREEDOM BAPTIST —- 3

¢ Stephen Dillet jumped
out to an early led on with
point guard Michael Bethel
leading the charge and sat its
startes in the second half en
route to the win.

Bethel dominated the game
on both ends of the floor and
finished with a game high sev-
en points, while his teammate
Keith Stubbs finished with six.

The tournament concludes
today with play beginning at
4pm at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.







=

JYLES Romer of Queen's College controls the opening tip against

St. Anne's.





FLOYD Mayweather, left, and current WBA welterweight world
champion Shane Mosley pose for a picture during a news con-
ference in New York, Tuesday, March 2, 2010.

Cools

PECIALS Pleysn Selected Appliances

imagination at work KeyNSTRYNE Sse) N| Ra!

a

Mayweather, Mosley embrace
Olympic-style drug test

BOXING
NEW YORK
Associated Press

FLOYD Mayweather Jr.
and welterweight champion
Shane Mosley will undergo
Olympic-style drug testing for
their May 1 fight in Las Vegas,
which they hope will set a new
standard for boxing.

Representatives of the two
fighters joined Travis Tygart of

the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency
on a conference call Thursday
to discuss the program, which is
more extensive than the test-
ing that currently falls under
the jurisdiction of state athletic
commissions.

"This is one of the biggest
events I've seen in the sport of
boxing, and if this introduces
Olympic-style testing to box-
ing, we not only have delivered
a great fight but also leveled

JONES & CO

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

322-2188/9

the field for athletes," Richard
Schaefer of Golden Boy Pro-
motions said.

Mayweather and Mosley will
be subjected to an unlimited
number of unannounced blood
and urine tests before and after
the fight, and the results will
be stored so USADA can test
them in the future. The sam-
ples are screened for all drugs
currently banned by the World
Anti-Doping Agency, includ-
ing human growth hormone
and designer steroids such as
THG

Most state athletic commis-
sions test only urine samples,
which Tygart said cannot detect
several performance-enhanc-
ing substances, including HGH.

"For the first time, you have
professional athletes in the
sport of boxing approaching us
to implement an anti-doping
program," Tygart said. "These
athletes are courageous in their
position and their desire to be
held to the most stringent anti-
doping standard."

Mayweather's insistence on
Olympic-style testing is the pri-
mary reason negotiations fell
through in January for a fight
against pound-for-pound king
Manny Pacquiao. Mayweath-
er wanted blood tests up to 14
days before the fight, while Pac-
quiao claims he feels weak after
drawing blood and would not
agree to testing within 24 days.

Pacquiao promoter Bob
Arum accused Mayweather
of trying to get into his fight-
er's head by alleging that he
used steroids. The negotia-
tions quickly deteriorated,
and Pacquiao signed to fight
Joshua Clottey while May-
weather turned his attention
to Mosley.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUE
mn

Dontrelle Willis

‘Willis sharp for
Tigers in 5-4 win
_over Astros

: BASEBALL
LAKELAND, Fla.
Assocaited Press

DONTRELLE WILLIS

: had a lot more to worry
: about in this outing than his
: pitching line.

And the line was pretty
good.
Willis pitched through

: back spasms, was hit in the
: knee with a line drive and
: injured his thumb catching
: another, but worked three
: scoreless innings in the
: Detroit Tigers’ 5-4 win over
; the Houston Astros on
: Thursday.

"I started to feel spasms,"

: Willis said after trying to
: snare a liner while facing
: the second batter. "It feels
: all right, but I was just try-
: ing to have some fun out
: there. You have to be men-
: tally tough and have confi-
: dence in yourself. My abili-
: ty is there, so just let it go."

Willis is competing with

: several pitchers, including
: Jeremy Bonderman, Nate
: Robertson, and Eddie
: Bonine for the final two
: spots in the Tigers rotation.

Willis, a former 22-game

: winner, has struggled since
: arriving in Detroit in 2008,
: but he has a 1.29 ERA in
: four appearances this
: spring, better than any of
: his competition. The Tigers
: made it a little easier on
: Willis, optioning Armando
: Galarraga to Triple A Tole-
: do before the game.

Two batters after sus-

i taining spasms, Willis
: dodged another liner back
: at the mound. It deflected
: off him to shortstop Adam
: Everett, who made the play.
: One pitch later, Hunter
: Pence hit a liner that Willis
: caught in self-defense. He
: made the play, but it injured
: his right thumb and Willis
: said he was in pain the next
: two innings.

It was an important out-

: ing for Willis, a former
: Rookie of the Year with the
: Florida Marlins, who went
: 1-4 with a 7.49 ERA last
: season.

"I've changed my pitch-

: ing a lot this year," Willis
: said. "I used to think I could
: strike everyone out. Now I
: just let them hit the ball. If I
: could, I'd take 27 lineouts
: and just get out of there."

Tigers manager Jim Ley-

? land said Willis was slated
: to go further, but once he
: saw the back spasms and
: the thumb injury that was
: affecting Willis, he pulled
: him.

"He said he was fine,"

: Leyland said. "I wanted to
: let him keep going. It puts a
: manager in an awkward
: position, so I just decided
: enough was enough."

Leyland likes what he's

seen of Willis this spring.

"He's getting the ball

: over the plate and he's get-
: ting it in play," Leyland
: said. "I don't think there
: are any surprises with Don-
: trelle."

Houston starter Felipe

: Paulino went three innings
: and allowed three runs.
: Reliever Brandon Lyon
: allowed an earned run in
: his only inning. Lyon, who
: has pitched in at least 61
: games in each of the past
: four seasons, has struggled
: with shoulder surgery last
: month to drain a cyst in his
: right shoulder.

Lyon allowed a hit and

walked one, but he said
i there was no discomfort.

O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FNM attorney:
three protest votes
must automatically

be thrown out

FROM page one

that three voters were not
registered in Elizabeth. Two
were in the adjacent
Yamacraw and one was in
Fox Hill. These voters plain-
ly are not entitled to vote in
the Elizabeth constituency
and no question of retifca-
tion of register with any of
them,” Mr Evans told the
election court.

He further argued that in
addition to these three votes
- that of Voter A, D and F -
the vote of Voter B should
not be counted as his date of
birth on his driver’s licence
which he sought to use to
vote differed to that on the
register and he never
appeared before the court to
explain why.

This left two protest votes,
that of Voters C and E,
which Mr Evans agreed
should be counted. Philip
Davis, lead attorney for PLP
candidate, Ryan Pinder, had
proposed on Wednesday that
all five protest votes cast for
his party’s candidate should
be upheld as valid.

But Mr Evans contended
that the court can only con-
sider counting the votes of
those voters for whom cleri-
cal errors or omissions
caused them to have to cast
their ballot on a coloured or
protest ballot, not those who
did not appear on the register
at all as the register should
be consider “conclusive” on
the day of the election.

He further stated that for
the court to “stray” into the
question of whether certain
voters were resident in the
constituency or not would
cause the court to “overstep”
its mandate in this particular
matter.

The attorney made these
comments as he gave his final
submissions to the court on
behalf of his client, FNM can-
didate Dr Duane Sands.
Some had expected that once
Mr Evans concluded his sub-
missions today that judges
would leave the court to
deliberate and come to a con-
clusion on the matter as ear-
ly as today. But yesterday
when Mr Evans took his seat
having made his final sub-
missions relative to the votes,
lead attorney for PLP candi-
date Ryan Pinder, Philip
Davis stood to counter some
of the points he had made
and this is expect to continue
tomorrow when the court
resumes at 10.30am.

At present it is not entire-
ly clear when a conclusion to
the case will come, and it is
possible that the matter may
drag on until next week.

In the February 16 by-elec-
tion in Elizabeth, Dr Duane
Sands won 1,501 ordinary
votes and Mr Pinder got
1,499. Mr Pinder made an
application to the court to
determine the validity of five
“protest” votes cast for him,
to see whether they could be
added to the official vote
count and therefore change
the outcome of the election,
making him the representa-
tive for the constituency.

Mr Evans spoke at some
length about Voter A, whose
vote he ultimately said
should be discounted.

That voter claimed she reg-
istered at a foodstore then
gave evidence to the court
that she found that she had
been “put in the wrong con-
stituency” (Fox Hill not Eliz-
abeth). She said she and
some friends and family
members net with Parlia-



mentary Commissioner Errol
Bethel to have the situation
rectified.

However, Mr Evans drew
that claim into question, and
told the court he was “sorely
tempted to ask you to dis-
miss” the evidence that she
met with Mr Bethel and
sought to have the discrep-
ancy changed.

The attorney said this was
because Errol Bethel was not
questioned on this alleged
meeting while he gave his
evidence and because there
were varying and significant
differences between the evi-
dence of voter A and other
supporting witnesses con-
nected to her, as well as
between her own evidence at
different times.

He noted that Mr Bethel
said that he had no record of
Voter A having attended his
office to change her voter’s
card. There was no docu-
mentary evidence and her
oath was unamended, said
Mr Evans.

“Normally if a change was
made it would be reflected
in all of the documents rele-
vant to that voter,” said Mr
Evans.

DR DUANE SANDS and Ryan Pinder leaving Election Court yesterday.

“The flood or accumula-
tion of contradictions in the
evidence is irrefutable proof
of their lack of credibility,”
he said of voter A and asso-
ciated witnesses.

“This court is invited to
find that Voter A never made
any such application or atten-
dance at the Parliamentary
Registrar’s office,that Voter
A voluntarily placed herself
in the Fox Hill constituency
by giving herself the address
North Pine Barren Road and
that her vote should not be
allowed,” proposed Mr
Evans.

He added the inconsisten-
cies raise the possibility of her
voter’s card being fraudulent.
“I’m not saying anyone is
guilty of fraud, but it is a pos-
sibility.”

“We would say that from
all the evidence available that
the voter’s card may very well
not be genuine.”

“Tf it is believed, you may
direct further investigations
along those lines.”

In relation to Voter B, who
was made to cast a protest
vote after he could not pro-
duce a voter’s card but only a
driver’s license which had a



ee

keep them dry :



So that during the day they are happy
fel fale MNES Com cee em eae

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

birth date upon it which dif-
fered from the date of birth
on the register, Mr Evans said
that because the voter has not
appeared before the court or
provided any evidence or
explanation for the differ-
ences his vote should not be
allowed.

“We have no evidence to
show that the holder of the
license is the same person on
the register,” said Mr Evans.

In relation to voter C, Mr
Evans said that there was an
inconsistency between the
date of birth on her driver’s
license and on the counter
foil and register. However, in
this case Mr Evans said his
client does not “suggest it
can’t be counted.”

In relation to Voter D, Mr
Evans said she does not live
in the Elizabeth constituen-
cy and is registered in
Yamacraw. “It follows that
her vote can’t be counted,”
he said. Voter D was
removed from the register by
the parliamentary commis-
sioner.

Voter E, Mr Evans said she
was on the Elizabeth register
and had a voter’s card and
therefore she was “no doubt



entitled” to vote. He said that
the question of whether she
was in fact an Elizabeth resi-
dent was a separate question,
but could not be determined
as part of this court matter.

With regard to Voter F, he
said her vote should not be
counted as she did not have a
voter’s card or appear on the
Elizabeth register.

Mr Davis, beginning to
respond to Mr Evan’s sub-
missions, said that if the court
accepts the assertions made
by Mr Evans it would “have
startling results.”

The attorney charged that
the inconsistencies in the tes-
timony of Voter A and other
associated witnesses in fact
make their evidence more
believable.

If all of the witnesses had
given the same story, one
would suspect they had been
“coached,” he said.

“One has to look at the
inconsistencies in regard to
the passage of time,” Mr
Davis said.

“If a husband doesn’t
remember the date of his
marriage, does that mean he
didn’t get married?” he
asked.



unscented



Peaceful nights, playful days







Full Text


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Volume: 106 No.98

GB Power
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to help BEC

SEE PAGE 1B

HOW tragic Keisha
will be remembered

Family and friends pay
tribute to student after
‘apparent suicide’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

AT KEISHA THUR-
STON’S house, the evidence
is all over the wall. Two walls.

Keisha was found hanged
on March 1 at the home she
shared with her family. Police,
who are investigating the inci-
dent, have described her
death as an “apparent sui-
cide”.

Two walls in the front room
of Keisha’s home are laden
with medals, certificates and
trophies, proof of Keisha’s
star-studded, student-athlete
past.

The most prized award for
her father, Michael Thurston,
is the sports certificate of
achievement conferred by the
Governor General last year
at the annual awards ceremo-
ny of the Bahamas Outstand-
ing Students Foundation.

“That was the greatest
achievement for her. That is
what inspired me. Not many
kids have that opportunity.
She always made the honour
roll, principal’s list, but get-
ting that award is when you
excel higher above the rest.





STAR-STUDDED
student-athlete
Keisha Thurston

You have to be proud. She
was the captain of all the
teams. To have a child who
plays every sport and still
keeps a grade point average
above 3.0,” said Mr Thurston.

SEE page two



Tati any
SANDWICH



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FNM attorney:
three protest votes
must automatically

he thrown out

LEAD attorney for
FNM candidate Dr Duane
Sands, Thomas Evans
QC, yesterday argued in
election court that of six
protest votes cast in the
Elizabeth by-election
three must be automati-
cally thrown out as the
individual’s names did not
appear on the Elizabeth
register on the day of the
election.

“The evidence shows

SEE page 16











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Felipé Major/Tribune staff










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a cheque for $16,000 at Radio House.
By ALESHA CADET



DAD-TO-BE Terrell Manning used
nothing but sound judgment to bag a
radio station’s top prize ... a whopping
$16,000.

Terrell was the lucky 16th caller on
Randy C’s morning show on Tuesday,
correctly guessing the 100Jamz Secret
Sound and thereby winning the cash.

Mr Manning, a pastry chef by pro-
fession, accurately identified the

LEFT: Terrell Manning with the source of the Secret Sound —a light bulb and an empty crate.
ABOVE: 100Jamz’ Maxine Seymour and Special K (right) present Terrell Manning (centre) with

100Jamz Secret Sound as a light bulb
shaking around in an empty crate.
Bursting with excitement, he told
The Tribune: “When I got through I
thought Randy was joking with me,
when he say I won I almost gone crazy.
I told everybody I was going to win.
“T recorded the sound on to my cell
phone and every day I would cut the
clues out of The Tribune and store

SEE page 12







Teacher charged
AB IiiCaKans

Brenton Smith
inquest to visit
site of death

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

assault of girls

A MAN who worked as a teacher at
the Central Eleuthera High School was
yesterday arraigned in New Providence
on five counts of indecently assaulting
young girls.



Orville Clarke, 37, had been
arraigned in Eleuthera last month and
was sent to Sandiland’s Rehabilitation
Centre for an evaluation of whether
he is fit to stand trial.

In the meantime, his attorney
Ramona Farquharson made an appli-
cation to the court stating that she
could not ascertain whether he had
been charged in Eleuthera as she had

SEE page 12

AN INQUEST into the fatal shooting
of teenager Brenton Smith, allegedly by
police officer Detective Corporal Kelsie
Munroe, will conclude today following a
visit to the site.

Key witnesses who have presented con-
tradictory evidence throughout the four-
month inquiry will together show the jury,
counsel and coroner William Campbell

SEE page 12









Campaign to block
controversial net
fishing ‘successful’

CONCERNED Bahamians, environ-
mentalists and sports-fishermen can toast
the success of their campaign to block the
introduction of a controversial type of net
fishing, as the company in question has
reportedly given up its interest in the
scheme.

Observers in Grand Bahama say the
commercial fishing vessel Pelagic I has
removed its purse seine net —a large fish-
ing net crafted to function like a draw-
string purse.

The controversial fishing method was
predicted by many environmental experts
to be detrimental to parallel industries

SEE page 12



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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



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How tragic
Keisha will be
remembered

FROM page one

He was known as “Mr
Brown” to Keisha, who had a
habit of naming her family
members in a fun-loving spir-
it. Mr Thurston gained the
nickname Mr Brown after
Tyler Perry’s “Meet the
Browns” character, Mr
Brown.

What Keisha thought the
two had in common was a
short neck, according to her
mother Carol Thurston,
whose pet name was Cora,
Mr Brown’s wife in real life,
and in Tyler Perry’s movie.

Keisha named one of her
cousin’s poogie, and one of
her sisters an invented word
that no one could spell, used
probably for the phonetic
quality. This was typical of
her comedic side, which was
inherited from her mother
and grandfather, both
Jamaican natives.

“T planned to take her to
Jamaica this summer. She
wanted to know there. I feel
so bad to know that she
passed and didn’t get go,” said
grandpa Joslyn Birch.

There were no shortages of
nicknames for Keisha. The
family called her “Box”, as a
joke about her shape. The
most infamous name was
probably Block and Co. This
Keisha acquired because of a
daring photo shoot gone
awry.

“They climbed on this wall
(to take a photo) and the wall
fell apart. The wall fell on
Keisha and broke her finger,
but we didn’t tell anyone. We
went in the bathroom and
washed the blood off,”
recounted Keisha’s cousin,
Vandeka Rodgers, who was
an eye witness to the adven-
ture.

The Thurstons are a photo
taking family. Everyone has
their own camera, just to
avoid contention over which
person failed to upload
images to the Internet or
which person failed to empty
the memory card.

Keisha and her friends
played off the accident in
front of Mrs Thurston who
was getting ready to leave the
house to attend a photo ses-
sion for the wedding of anoth-
er daughter.

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KEISHA THURSTON ‘always
made the honour roll, and
principal’s list.’

“By the time I pulled out
the yard they called me to say
her hand was broken, you
have to come back to take us
to the hospital. I said, I just
stepped out of the house,”
said Mrs Thurston. The name
Block and Co. was coined
after the block falling inci-
dent, in honour of the unoffi-
cial family photo studio.

The night before her death,
Keisha’s original bowling
plans with her friends were
replaced with a night time
movie and party at Uptown
on West Bay Street.

“Most of her close friends
grew up close to the family,
many of them called us mom
and dad. Her friends were
special. She would take the
time out and spend with
them. She would counsel
them. She was loving,” said
Mrs Thurston.

Keisha was so respected by
her friends, Mrs Thurston said
only Keisha could bring them
to change group plans to
accommodate her schedule.
This happened one time when
Keisha begged her mother to
allow her to go to a social
event without the appropri-
ate one to two weeks worth of
notice.

Her mother’s advice was,
‘don’t ask me to change my
standards, ask your friends to
change their plans’, and they
did.

“She is not a pretender.
Whatever you see is what you
get. She won’t talk a lot, but
when she has something to
say it is always positive, or she
would give you that smile,”
said Mrs Thurston.

The enterprising Keisha,
known to family and friends,
found a job almost ever
Christmas and summer vaca-
tion, whether at Costright,
Solomon’s Supercentre, or
Domino’s Pizza.

She saved her money to
ensure she did not place any
undue burden on the family
to finance her habit for liking
to dress well, and to ensure
her pockets were full during
annual summer trips to Aunt
Jacynth Birch in New Jersey.
New Jersey was like Keisha’s
second home.

She lived there for a few
years as a child.

“T answered my doorbell
and there was Keisha standing
by the door saying, Happy
Birthday. She had the cam-
corder. She said close your
eyes. When I went in the
room she had happy birthday
aunty with all my love on the
wall. That was so special. That
was the last one she did for
me,” said Ms Birch, about a
surprise birthday trip made

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





by Keisha last year.

“She would say, ‘Aunty you
want something to eat?’ She
would make me some tea and
toast me some bread. When I
came out the shower it would
be right there. She was very
loving.

“Tam going to miss her
every summer,” said Ms
Birch, talking about occasions
when she would return home
from work after a long shift.

Keisha called her aunt the
week before her death to plan
her summer 2010 vacation.
She told her aunt she found a
plane ticket for $218.

“T told her yes baby you
don’t have to call me. Yes
baby. When I heard the news
I said she wouldn’t do it. She
knew the Bible she knew
God. She would not do that,”
said Ms Birch.

Keisha was the most valu-
able player and captain on vir-
tually every sports team she
was a member of. This was
not surprising considering her
family’s athletic past.

Her two older sisters, Kim-
berly Thurston and Deandra
Munnings, were members of
several CR Walker champi-
onship teams in volleyball.
They were a great inspiration
to Keisha.

The athletic prowess goes
further back. Mrs Thurston
was also an athlete in her
school days. Her stride was
the 400 meter and 100 meter
sprints, high jump and long
jump.

“They usually would prac-
tice at home.

“We would take them on
the park. Deandra would
teach Keisha to catch. Kim-
berly would pitch.

“They always did things
regardless if they were in dif-
ferent schools.

“They always inspired each
other and worked together
cooperatively,” said Mrs
Thurston.

The tragic story of Keisha’s
“apparent suicide” that con-
fronted the Bahamian com-
munity on March 1 is as much
a mystery to the family as it is
for the wider public.

People are often remem-
bered for the mistakes they
make and not the good things
they do, noted Keisha’s moth-

er.

With this glimpse of Keisha,
remembered by family and
friends, perhaps the lasting
memory will be her star-stud-
ded, student-athlete past.
THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 3



ee ee



7.6 28 1 OAT Poa
WELL, ATS A LITToE



HEAVYWEIGHT CLASH BETWEEN FORMER AND CURRENT YOUTH MINISTER

Maynard and Wisdom
trade political punches

Mr Maynard has failed to demonstrate the
requisite quality of leadership ...’

T'll be famous ore day,
but for naw Dm stuck
ih middle schoo!
wrth, d, burch of mor orig.



Neville Wisdom on Charles Maynard



His failure in opposition to offer any con-
structive advice is consistent with his extraor-
dinary failures as a minister.’

CHARLES MAYNARD









. * eesee

Charles Maynard on Neville Wisdom NEVILLE WISDOM [x Sheatey Apel

A WAR of words has broken out
between the former and current minister
of youth, Charles Maynard yesterday
responding to his predecessor’s accusa-
tion that he has shown a lack of concern
and commitment to his duties.

On Tuesday, Neville Wisdom, who
occupied the minister’s office under the
PLP until the 2007 election saw the party
ousted, said: “Given the large number of
at-risk youths in our country and the
impact this condition has on the social
health of our society, Mr Maynard has
failed to demonstrate the requisite quali-
ty of leadership necessary to proactively
provide viable alternatives to this vulner-
able demographic through enhanced and
progressive and sustained youth develop-
ment programmes.”

As an example, he pointed to the state
of the Gambier Youth Path Project, which
was awarded one of only two UNESCO
grants in the Caribbean in 2003, but has
now been replaced by a web-shop.

Not one to ignore a challenge, Mr May-
nard countered yesterday that Mr Wis-

dom has the “worst record” of anyone
who has ever held the post, and that his
assertions are “disjointed, uninformed and
misleading”.

He said: “His failure in opposition to
offer any constructive advice is consistent
with his extraordinary failures as a minis-
ter. In an attempt to mask these failures
and rewrite the history on his weak lead-
ership and paltry record, Mr Wisdom has
now resorted to distortions.”

Misleading

The minister charged that Mr Wisdom’s
comments on the Gambier Youth Park
Project were “highly selective and grossly
misleading”. He said programme had a
clear end date which fell on Mr Wisdom’s
watch. “The next step after the completion
of the programme was the development of
a plan to leverage the talents, dynamism
and cultural assets of Gambier by bringing
tourists to the historic village.

“Mr Wisdom and his colleague at the

create such a plan. Still, the spirit and
objectives of that programme are essential
for national development in general and
the development of our historic heritage
communities and sites in particular,” Mr
Maynard said.

He said that in honour of the spirit of
the Gambier project, the FNM is launch-
ing the most ambitious heritage tourism
programmes in the nation’s history, which
will aim to empower young people in
Gambier, Fox Hill, Adelaide and Bain
and Grant’s Town.

Mr Maynard explained that after a
review of the National Youth Service Pro-
gramme (NYSP) — which grew out of the
YEAST programme launched by the
Roman Catholic Archdiocese in conjunc-
tion with the first FNM government — it
was decided that more at-risk youths could
be helped if the programme was recon-
figured. He said the government is review-
ing a number of initiatives that can reach
significantly more of the young people
whom Mr Wisdom “purports to be con-
cerned about”.

The Moall-at-Marathon
OM OFFICE CHESS AT [i AM DAILY

Ministry of Tourism absolutely failed to

[THE BOUNTY HUNTER = NEW | BOWHTY HUNTER MEW Faeps facas | Wik | gens | 28 |







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A SIGN MAN witha
stencil puts finishing
touches to the logo of
this Royal Bahamas
Police Force vehicle.

PHOTOS:

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Girl shooting victim leaves
hospital following treatment

Police believe one or two gunmen opened fire

THE 12-year-old girl shot while she slept in
her home at Tropical Gardens has been treat-
ed and discharged from hospital, the police
reported yesterday.

The girl, who officers said was lucky to be
alive, was hit several times in the upper right
leg and buttocks when her house was sprayed
with gunfire.

Police believe one or two gunmen opened
fire on the house in the early hours of the
morning on Wednesday.

As the girl and her family slept, a handgun
was used to fire several shots directly into the
victim's bedroom.

There has been no update on the progress of
the investigation, but on Wednesday, a senior
officer from the Central Detective Unit denied
reports that the girl was shot during a home
invasion.

"A number of shots were fired and then the
shooter, or shooters fled the scene. We could
so easily have been dealing with a murder
here, but this little girl has been so very lucky,”
the officer said.

In other crime news, police reported that
two armed robberies took place on Wednesday
night.

The first occurred around 7pm on Soldier
Road east of Abundant Life Road when a

phone card vendor was approached by three
men — one of them armed with a handgun —
who demanded cash.

They got no money or phone cards, but did
rob the victim of his jewellery.

The fled the scene heading north.

Then, just before 9.30pm, Sharkies on the
Prince George Wharf was robbed by two dark
men armed carrying handguns.

They made off with an undetermined
amount of cash and fled on foot heading west.

Early yesterday morning, police received
information about a stabbing at Plane Street in
Pinewood Gardens.

The victim, a 47-year-old male resident of
Jacaranda Street, was approached at his home
by another man, who forced himself into the
house and stabbed the victim in right arm, left
forearm and chest.

The victim was taken to hospital where he is
listed in stable condition.

The police say they are following signifi-
cant leads in this matter and are vigorously
investigating the other incidents.

They also announced that Kenyon Williams,
who was wanted for questioning in connec-
tion with an investigation, was detained yes-
terday at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport.




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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt .

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Delicate bonds keep a president afloat

WASHINGTON (AP) — President
Barack Obama has forged a complicated per-
sonal connection with the American public:
Many voters consider him a principled and
inspiring leader even as they question his
policies and job performance.

That delicate bond has given Obama a
reservoir of goodwill that is sustaining his
presidency in tough times — a political fire-
wall of sorts. As Jessica Luna, a 21-year-old
Democrat from Austin, Minn., says: "If you
like someone, you'll give them time to accom-
plish their goals."

But Obama's likability ratings have slipped
a bit, raising an ominous question: Is the
bond fraying?

History suggests such a connection could
give way at any time — over almost any issue
— and send Obama into the kind of nosedive
from which other presidents never recovered.

Obama needs to look no further than his
predecessor. George W. Bush enjoyed high
approval ratings through much of his first
term, only to see them slip during the Iraq
war and then plummet after the botched
response to Hurricane Katrina.

His presidency limped to a conclusion.

"There was a sense that this man didn't
care," says GOP pollster Steve Lombardo.
"That can be virtually debilitating."

Every president has character traits that
bind him to voters, at least initially. That gut-
level connection matters to people as much,
and arguably more, than a president's policies,
sometimes keeping him afloat through polit-
ical storms.

Obama's personal approval rating has
trended 5 to 7 percentage points higher than
his job approval rating, a likability benefit
that is not inconsistent with past presidents.

Bill Clinton's strongest attribute was empa-
thy. The sense that he'd work for you, to use
one of his phrases, "until the last dog dies,"
kept his presidency going after its rocky first
two years and during the Monica Lewinsky
scandal.

Bush was seen as a strong and decisive
leader, traits that kept many voters on his
side despite misgivings over the Iraq war. He
knew that character trumped policies when he
declared in 2004, "Even when you might not
agree with me, you know where I stand."

Obama's advisers like to draw parallels
between their boss and another Republican
president, Ronald Reagan. The Gipper's lik-
ability ratings remained high despite an eco-
nomic recession in the early 1980s and rough
patches later.

"People believed that he had strong prin-
ciples," says senior Obama adviser David
Axelrod.







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"They thought he was a likable, admirable
person."

Axelrod says Obama is viewed the same
way — and there is evidence that he's right.
At least, to a point.

Obama's job approval rating, perhaps the
best gauge of an incumbent's re-election
chances, has been hovering around 50 percent
since October. It would probably be much
lower — the health care debate and bank
bailouts have drained him politically — if
voters did not like him so much, Democratic
and Republican pollsters agree.

"Voters think Obama is sincere, wants to
do well and has a stable and real marriage,"
Republican pollster Bill McInturff said.
"Those are all important things because when
people like a president, they will give him a
chance to do his job even when they're not so
sure about his policies."

A look inside Obama's ratings show that he
has actually gained ground since taking office
on the public's view of his values and his abil-
ity to manage a crisis, according to NBC
News-Wall Street Journal polling conducted
by McInturff. But those are not the character
traits got him elected.

He has experienced double-digit declines
on personal attributes that hew closely to the
Obama political brand — his ability to inspire,
unify the country and achieve his goals. While
those ratings are still high, the trend could
spell trouble.

But like Bush and Reagan before him,
Obama's strongest suit may be voters’ belief
in the sincerity of his motives. Item: Nearly 6
in 10 Americans say Obama is more inter-
ested in serving the public than interest
groups, according to a CBS News/New York
Times poll. Only 13 percent think the same of
Congress. Still, strategists in both parties say
the health care fight for Obama could be the
rough equivalent of what the first years of
the Iraq war were for Bush — a long, but
less-than-debilitating slog that weakened his
bond with the public.

What could destroy Obama's bond, as Kat-
rina did for Bush? Anything that galvanizes
the public's growing questions about his abil-
ities to inspire and unify the country. Or any-
thing that raises questions about the purity of
his motives.

Deal-cutting on health care. A failure to
create promised jobs — or an incident that
shows a lack of empathy toward people
who've lost them. Anything could go wrong.

But, clearly, the character issue has bought
Obama time.

(This article is by Julie Pace and Ron
Fournier of the Associated Press)






THE TRIBUNE



Homosexuality:
A quick response to
Pastor Lyall Bethel

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SINCE Mr Bethel has
made far too many assertions
to respond to in this space,
Id just like to focus on one
particular area that I believe is
the crux of the matter.

Mr Bethel seems to have a
very narrow view of what is
and what is not a civil rights
issue. Suffrage is just one
aspect of the much larger
issue of civil rights, which
includes free speech, non-dis-
crimination, religious free-
dom, etc. The Oxford English
Dictionary defines civil rights
as “the rights of citizens to
political and social freedom
and equality.” Rights for gay
people seem to fit very nicely
within this definition. And ’m
sure that Ms Thompson is
well aware that the black
rights movement is different
from the gay rights movement
in many ways, but she was
correct to use it as analogy as
there are important com-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net



monalities and it is an issue
that most Bahamians can
relate to.

Once you consider the “gay
movement” as a civil rights
movement, than the rest of
Mr Bethel’s points are irrele-
vant. Whether one group of
people is more healthy or bet-
ter at raising children than
another has nothing to do
with whether they should be
granted the same rights.
Because of unfortunate cir-
cumstances, blacks in the US
are far more likely to commit
crimes and have lower pay-
ing jobs than whites, but does
this mean that they shouldn’t
vote or should go to different
schools or not be allowed to
marry? Of course not!

Statistics are easy to cherry-
pick, and to use them to sup-

Thank you Bahamians for
helping quake-hit Haiti

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Allow me please to use a
space in your paper to thank
the Bahamian people for their
efforts for Haiti in these hard
times.

First, let me thank the Rt
Hon Hubert A Ingraham for
releasing the 102 Haitians
who were housed in the
Detention Centre without
good care. This was the right
thing to do at the right time.
Thank you, Mr Ingraham, for
being a decisive leader and
continue to be strong in your
leadership. If you were to
consult the leader of the
opposition, until now they
would be in the Detention
Centre. Now the PLP put that
on their Political agenda, this
not a political issue.

I also want to thank every
single Bahamian who suffered
with us. Those who con-
tribute, any little thing you
give will do plenty. I want to
thank Mr Bain who has used
Sky Bahamas to fly help to
those earthquake victims back
home, God will bless you as
He ever did before. I want to
thank the staff of the
Bahamas Red Cross Society,
The Staff of NEMA, The
Management of Aquapure,
The Management of the
Rotary Club, all those who
take part on the Coins for
Haiti, ’'ve watched them on
Bay Street and Wulff Road
with tears in my eyes, God
will bless you guys. I want to
thank Mr Flowers for promis-

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FREE ESTIMATES 322-8160/322-8219

ing $250,000. All those I don’t
have a chance to mention, I
thank you all.

Then for those who are
talking nonsense about the
release of the illegal, let me
tell you that God can forgive
you, if you ask for forgiveness
because in a situation like that
these are not the kind of
words you can say. The
Bahamas is not situated in the
airspace. Natural disasters can
happen in any country in the
world.

I’m living in the Bahamas
for the past 13 years, I’ve seen
Hurricane Floyd, Michelle,
Frances, Jeanne and Wilma. I
don’t want to see any natural
disaster in the Bahamas that
will affect me too, but the
Bahamas is not in the air-
space. It’s time for Bahami-
ans to stop thinking selfish-
ness and discrimination. One
Bahamian said why all the
rest of the Haitians didn’t die?
Can you imagine that?

Bahamians, please, it’s time
to stop these kind of wicked-
ness and to practice Justice
for Haitians, because we are
human beings like you are.
Why do you always say the
Bahamas is a Christian coun-
try? Can a Christian country
act like a satanic country?

So, be Christian, Bahami-
ans Thank you again and God
bless you Bahamas.

OCILIEN PAUL
Nassau,
January 25, 2010.

press a certain group of peo-
ple is dispicable. How would
Mr Bethel feel if his church
was not allowed to perform
marriages because it was
found out that the divorce
rate of his church was higher
than other churches? Or if he
was denied membership to
the Coalition of Evangelical
Pastors because his congre-
gation did not give as much
to charity? I'm sure he would
be very quick to downplay
such narrow-mindedness.

Mr Bethel is more than
welcome to express his views,
but he should be careful not
to judge gays as a group
because of views or actions of
a few (often more vocal) indi-
viduals. In the same manner, I
will try not to judge Bahami-
an Christians based on the
views of a more vocal Mr
Bethel.

R KNOWLES
Nassau,
March 18, 2010.

Taal
STI eI

mT Cam 1
system challenges

EDITOR, The Tribune.



Traffic problems in Nassau
are on everyone’s lips includ-
ing our Family Island friends.
So who in their right mind
allowed “tuk tuks” and three
wheeled scooters to be licensed
to drive at 10-15 mph on our
clogged thoroughfares? Not
only are they extremely dan-
gerous, having no safety equip-
ment, poor steering, no seat-
belts (even though it is the law),
they are often rented to intoxi-
cated and/or young drivers with
no experience who dangerous-
ly weave in and out of cars and
trucks wearing no helmet and
no shoes!

My question is: When they
run into my newly painted car,
who will pay for that? Because
I can bet you the driver will be
gone in a day and the vendors
who rent them will not be
responsible! I have already paid
over $200 to fix my side mirror
— hit by a motor cyclist driving
in no particular lane!

Government, please save us
from ourselves and from you!
Stop licensing dangerous vehi-
cles on our roads, including
those with ridiculous exhaust
fumes that create a visual obsta-
cle!

Honestly, if I did not know I
lived in a third world country, I
do now!

APPLETON
Nassau,
January 25, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 5



Police issue
warning to
scam artists

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia. net

ENTREPRENEURS are
not the only enterprising
people taking advantage of
the recession — scam artists
are as well.

And as the number of
commercial crimes rises, the
Central Detective Unit
believe 30-year-old Melissa
Deal can help them with one
investigation in particular.

Officers want to question
Ms Deal about a scheme in
which property sales and all-
inclusive services, such as
legal and appraisal services,
were offered under false pre-
tenses.

Assistant Superintendent
(ASP) Michael Moxey, head
of the of the CDU Business
and Technology Management





— —

7S Sel or =

POLICE want to
question Melissa Deal.







ing they were buying a home
and lot. The perpetrators
allegedly collected large
amounts of money, then
“closed up shop” before
delivering the services to 80

They have noticed a rise in
scams and fraud associated
with land and motor vehicle
sales since December 2009.
There are about 12 cases cur-
rently before the court, and
several others being investi-
gated by the CDU.

“We would like to advise
the public: if you don’t know
the person, if you have never
seen the vehicle, don’t
change hands with your
funds,” said ASP Moxey ata
press conference held yester-
day to warn the public of the
emerging trend.

Mr Moxey said individuals
have fallen prey by making
deposits of money based on
false claims about motor
vehicles and land being
advertised for sale in the
local daily newspapers. Sin-
gle mothers seem to be the
main group preyed upon,



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

i














i

FROM LEFT: SUPT Stephen Dames; Inspector Marcus Edgecombe and ASP Michael Moxey, head of
the Business and Technology Manager Section of the CDU.

In all instances, the victims
were unable to recover the
money they paid.

“We are issuing a warning.
If you have money for any-
one return it now. Once (the
matter) is in the hands of the
police, there will be no deal
worked out in the police sta-
tion. We will be sending you
to the courts immaterial of
who you are and what your
status is. Enough is enough,”
said Superintendent Stephen
Dames. Fraud offences

attract prison sentences of six
months to 14 years.

Inspector Marcus Edge-
combe of the Business and
Technology Management
Section said land is often
advertised at a low, attrac-
tive price. He advised home
buyers to make sure they
conduct thorough back-
ground checks on anyone
before doing business with
them.

Members of the public can
contact the CDU for assis-

tance in this regard. They can
also bring any relevant docu-
ments and receipts to the
CDU to make a report if
they suspect they have
become victims of fraud.

Other scams monitored by
the CDU are loan schemes
and Internet scams, like the
Nigerian 419 Scam, in which
money is solicited from indi-
viduals to help an unknown,
long lost relative, or as a
deposit to acquire winnings
in a fake lotto.

Section, formerly Commer-
cial Crimes, said the scheme
was in operation for about 18
months.

According to ASP Moxey,
clients were lured in believ-

per cent of their clients.

Ms Deal is just one of
many other individuals the
CDU wants to question
about such schemes.

according to the police.

In some cases, the individ-
uals or companies advertis-
ing did not own the property;
or the property did not exist;
or the company was a farce.







THE contestants gathered outside Bally Fitness (a sponsor) last weekend during a preliminary event.

Supermodel of the Bahamas
announces 2010 contestants

TWELVE young contestants from
Eleuthera, Grand Bahama and Abaco
arrived in New Providence last week to join
the 14 contestants from Nassau vying for the
2010 Supermodel of the Bahamas.

The title will be determined on May 2 at
the British Colonial Hilton Grand Ballroom.

“Our launch weekend came off as a great
success and I'm looking forward to the float
parade and preliminary competition which
will take place on April 24 and 25,” said
founder of Supermodel of the Bahamas, Mr
OilinSha Coakley.

In Nassau, the contestants participated in a
busy weekend of workshops, photo shoots,
interviews for the upcoming ZNS reality
show on the event, and a launch party where
the contestants walked the runway sporting
designs by Brynda Knowles of the Fashion
Group, Cedric Bernard, Rachel Garcia,
Debonaire Boutique and Tuxedo Styles, and
ICandy Swimwear.

The event is in its third season and has
expanded with a “Little Supermodel of the



Bahamas” segment. However, there was not
enough interest from young men to justify a
male competition, so it has been dropped
this year.

In the older group, Supermodel of
Bahamas is the overall title and a male and
female winner will be awarded cash and
prizes worth $3,000, a complete portfolio,
representation with OilinSha’s Models, and
will have the opportunity to compete in the
“Top Model of the Universe” competition
in Europe.

The title winners will be flown to New
York and accommodated in the OilinSha’s
Models & Talent Agency’s apartment.

Last year’s winners have been participating
in such high profile shows as New York Fash-
ion Week and Islands of the World Fashion
Week.

The competition continues on Saturday,
April 24 when all the contestants will once
again be back in Nassau for a float parade
and the preliminary competition on Sunday,
April 25 at the British Colonial Hilton.

STOP LIVING IN FEAR - AVOID BEING NEXT
HoW TO AVOID BEING SHOT BY THE POLICE - PART 4



By D’ARCY RAHMING

GO AND tell your young
men these things.

If stopped by a police offi-
cer while driving you can make
him relax. If your car windows
are tinted, roll all of them
down. If it is night, turn on
your vehicle’s inside light and
put your hands on the steering
wheel. If you are a passenger in
the car, put your hands where
the officer can see them. Leave
them there until directed by
the officer to do otherwise.

Do not reach about your





DAT

going to be in a combative
state. And in the case of an
untrained officer, the situation
could rapidly get out of hand if
he wrongly interprets your
actions.

Always remember, we out-
number the Bad Guys.

D’Arcy Rahming is a vio-
lent crime researcher and
Adjunct Faculty Member at
the College of the Bahamas.
He holds Black Belts in sever-
al martial arts and is an inter-
nationally renowned seminar

BEST PRICES in Treasure Cove!

3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, furnished ‘Eleuthera’ home
with a bright & open floor p a large patio with

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These Homes Won't Last Lon read

$360,000 Gross each Take your Pick!

prc AR e OM NG

pda |
Craig Pinder 457-2282
PARADISE REALTY

email: Craig@ParadiseBahamas.com

fA Bahamas Lamited

Employment Opportunity

Financial Controller
Description:

Provide leadership and coordination far the company's financial actual reporting,
planning and budgetary

management tunchons. The position is accountable for the accounting opera-
tions of the company which include the

maintenance of an adequate system of accounting necords, and a set of oom-
prehensive controls designed to maintain

the integrity of tha company's financial results. Responsibilities will include:

- Directing and coordinating the campany's financial planning and budget
ary management tunctlons.

- Laading the daily operations of the company's business controls, cash
management, fulfillment, pension management, accounting systems and
balance sheet processes.

* Maintaining an organizational structure and staffing to effectively
accomplish the company's strategic goals and objectives
Acting a5 4 trusted business advisor to the IBM Bahamas
Leadership Tear.

- Recruitment, training, supervising and evaluating department's staff.

Qualifications:

- University Degree in Accounting, with either a CA, CPA, CGA ar
CMA accounting designation.

'3to 5 years of experience in a similar senior level finance or accounting
pasitian,

* Work requires strong professional written and verbal communication skills.

- AbIlity lo motivale teams and produce high quality work within tight
timmefrerries:.

- Required to simullaneously manage several projects and must bea
willing to work @ flexible schedule.

- Ability to effectively work in an international, fast-paced, matrined
organization,

An equal opportunity employer, IBM provides compatitive salaries. Thus, oom-
pensation will be commensurate with experiance and qualifications.

Please mail detailed rasume or in electronic format to the attantian af:

Financial Controller

IBM Bahamas Limited

Fourth Floor

Atlantic House

Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas

e-Mail: nseatan®@bs.ibm.com

person or in the glove com-
partment for your driver’s
licence or other documents,
unless told to do so. Before
making any moves, ask the offi-

cer’s permission. For example,
“My wallet is in my front pock-
et, is it okay to reach for it?”
If the officer is looking for
someone dangerous, he is

leader for corporations, pri-
vate groups and police and
security groups. You can fol-
low him on his blog at
www.stoplivinginfear.org.

Deadline tor raceipl of rasumes is: Friday, March 19ih 2010.

All applications will be held in the strictest confidenoes. Onky short-listed apoli-

canis will be contacted.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

LOCAL NEWS

RE/MAX Paradise Realty Agents

RECEIVE AWARDS

PICTURED (left to right) CRAIG Pinder (broker/owner); Zack Bonczek (broker); Jen-
nifer Higgs (broker); Frank Knowles (Hope Town sales associate); Martina
McSweeney (Nassau sales associate).

et ANDRE.
~ SCHOOL

@ world school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates for
the following teaching vacancies, with effect from pepe 2010. Full
information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are aa welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and uepe! school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
oe from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP)
of the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all
posts in the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and
preferably trained in, the PYP.

Primary School IT/Library Teacher: The primary school IT/library
teacher develops, implements and interprets an effective library media
and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6. Candidates
must be fully qualified and have successful experience as a school
librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT teacher.

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

letter of application

a personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
a full curriculum vitae,

either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:
Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:

Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1242) 677 7846



The closing date for applications is 12" April 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered



THE TRIBUNE







On March 1, thousands of RE/MAX real estate

agents from around the world descended on
Orlando, Florida to attend the annual RE/MAX
international convention to learn, network and
enjoy the unique energy generated at the annu-
al gatherings.

The convention offered educational classes,
seminars to help improve and promote business,
a trade show, and most importantly great net-
working opportunities between RE/MAX agents.

There was also the annual awards banquet
honouring top producing agents and offices.

Principal broker of RE/MAX Paradise Realty
Craig Pinder, who was awarded the 100% Club
Award for sales performance in 2009, said he
was “very pleased to receive the award” and he
would continue to “take RE/MAX Paradise
Realty to the next level of customer satisfac-
tion.”

RE/MAX’s Zack Bonczek, broker and sales
manager, and Jennifer Higgs, broker, both
received Executive Club awards for their sales
performance and achievement in 2009.

"It is extremely important to attend these
annual conferences so that brokers and agents
can learn new skills and techniques that will ulti-
mately better serve our clients” said Mr Bon-
ezek. “RE/MAX is unmatched when it comes to



educating it’s members and giving them the tools
to be the best.”

Mrs Higgs agreed: "We learned a lot and had
fun meeting wonderful people from all over the
world. It was inspiring to see how many agents
have soared to the top through RE/MAX. We'll
definitely be in Las Vegas next year.”

Education was front and centre throughout
the week. Tip-filled sessions on social media,
marketing, technology and other relevant topics
were held each day. "It was wonderful, a lot of
very useful information," said Martina
McSweeney, Nassau sales associate of RE/MAX.

"We're excited to get back to our office to
practice what we learned.”

Frank Knowles, RE/MAX Paradise Realty’s
agent in Hope Town, Abaco, said that he “thor-
oughly enjoyed meeting and learning from such
a vast network of realtors, especially from
RE/MAX Cayman agents who we share a lot of
similarities with.”

RE/MAX was founded in 1973 by Dave and
Gail Liniger. From a single office in Denver,
Colorado, it has grown into a global network of
nearly 100,000 sales associates in more than 75
countries. RE/MAX was honoured as the leading
real estate franchise in the “2009 Franchise Times
Top 200.”

IBS and Marathon Bahamas
partner for a winning website

A “winning website” helped
the inaugural Marathon
Bahamas event to go from a
quick launch to a spectacular
finish in just under five months.

At the end of the journey
was a successful marathon held
on February 14 in Nassau that
attracted 500 participants,
including winner Delroy
Boothe, a Grand Bahamian
who raced against seasoned
local and international runners.

Behind the scenes of the
marathon - the brainchild of
Bahamian businessman
Franklyn Wilson - was Inte-
grated Business Solutions
(Bahamas), also known as IBS
International.

IBS helped Marathon
Bahamas stay in the lead with a
high quality, interactive web-
site that is on par with those of
the Boston, New York, and
Miami marathons.

Dr Donovan Moxey, PhD, is
the CEO of IBS International,
an international software devel-
opment and consulting services
company.

IBS built the Marathon
Bahamas website to appeal to
different audiences because it
not only advertised the event
but also the Bahamas and many
of its sponsors in a very promi-
nent fashion.

Sandals Emerald Bay Resort

Invites applications for the following positions:-

Room Service Manager
Bartenders

Dining Room Servers
Stewards

Line Cooks

Asst. Housekeeper
Room Attendants
Housemen

Butlers

Tour Desk Agents
Spa Therapists

Gift Shop Clerks
Security Officers
Photographers

Engineers

Asst. Chief Engineer

Air Condition Tech.
Refrigeration Tech.

Golf Equipment Tech.
Dive Instructors

Certified Lifeguards
Receiving Supervisors
Store Porters

Cost Control Clerk
Wedding Coordinators
Entertainment Coordinators
Environment Coordinator
Videographers

Fax or email resume with proof of qualifications and experience to:

sebhr@grp.sandals.com
Fax: 242-336-6980

Applications close March 27, 2010





Pa

IBS INTERNATIONAL CEO Dr Donovan Moxey, PhD, (middle) shows



the Marathon Bahamas website to marathon chairman Franklyn Wilson
(right) and Brian Moodie, president (left).

It also offered vital informa-
tion and access to functionality
that allowed participants to reg-
ister for the event and book
reservations for airline and
hotel accommodations. There
were just over 100 internation-
al participants in this successful
sports tourism venture.

“Launching a custom web-
site of this kind in just five
weeks is virtually unheard of,”
said Dr Moxey.

Brian Moodie, president of
Sunshine Insurance-Marathon
Bahamas, said: “The amount
of information that we were
able to get on the website was
phenomenal and with IBS
International’s help, the capa-
bilities of the site were top
notch.”

Some of the key elements of
the site included access to
online registration, medical and
volunteer information, inte-
grated video content, including
an embedded satellite map of
the course that was tagged with
markers and links to sponsor
websites. Mr Wilson said: “We
wanted to create a world class
event and a site to match. Each
element had to be broken down
into great detail.”

He also pointed out that the
website had to be user friendly.

The fact that a number of
companies or organisations had
‘marathon’ and ‘Bahamas’ asso-
ciated with their web presence

mL.

| Clothing For all Ages From Birth to Teen |

created an obstacle to the web-
site developers which had to be
dealt with in a relatively short
period of time.

A search request even point-
ed to the Mall at Marathon. To
address this problem, IBS Inter-
national employed the use of
search engine optimisation
(SEO) functionality that is an
integral part of its website
development platform, as well
as the use of Google AdWords.

Veronica Duncanson, who
was responsible for the mar-
keting of Marathon Bahamas
and its website, worked closely
with Dr Moxey and they cre-
ated keywords, meta tags and
meta phrases that were the best
fit for their campaign. The
entire list of words and phrases
had to be strategically chosen in
order for Google to efficiently
index them and provide the
higher ranking.

“To get a site like ours up so
quickly and to iron out some
of the kinks took real knowl-
edge and we were happy that
we achieved the number one
search for ‘Marathon Bahamas’
in Google after a few adjust-
ments,” said Ms Duncanson.

Another winning strategy
was the utilisation of social
media tools like Facebook and
Twitter that helped Marathon
Bahamas reach a registration
level of over 500 in less than
three months.

Dresses and suits for all occasions
including, weddings christening,
funerals and everyday wear
Mon.Fri.|Qam - 7pm
Saturday Bam-5:30pm
6th Terrace next to Centerville Bakery

Tel. 242-356-7970
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 7



FNM to celebrate birth of
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield

Canadian winter
resident donates
hooks, backpacks

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net_

FREEPORT - A Cana-
dian winter resident has
donated a number of chil-
dren’s books and back-
packs to the Eight Mile
Rock Urban Renewal
Centre in the Harbour
West Shopping Centre.

Tracey Bonvarlez, a resi- :

dent of Ontario made the
presentation on Wednes-
day to Margaret Grant,
Urban Renewal Centre
manager, and Antoinette
Coakley, area coordinator
of the Urban Renewal
West Grand Bahama.

Ms Grant was very
grateful to Ms Bonvarlez
for her donation. She said
it will help to promote lit-
eracy among the youth of
Eight Mile Rock commu-
nity.

“We extend our sincere

appreciation to Ms Bonva-

rlez for this gesture of
kindness. It was very
thoughtful of her to have
donated the books to the
children’s library we have
here at the centre,” she
said.

“We have an after-

school programme here for :

some 30 children who will
make good use of these
books.”

Ms Grant said the after
school-programme is held

from Monday to Thursday.

Students can use library,
learn how to read, how to
use the computer, and are
assisted with homework.
The centre also has a

marching band programme :

that is held on Wednes-
days from 4.30pm to
6.30pm.

“There is a need for
more musical instruments
and computers and we
would be very grateful if
persons in the wider com-
munity can also assist us,”
Ms Grant said.

aR

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The Free
National Movement will hold a
number of activities this week-
end to celebrate the birth of

At FNM headquarters on
Wednesday, Senator David
Thompson, chairman of the
Grand Bahama FNM Council,
announced that events com-
memorating the life and
achievement of Sir Cecil will
be held starting today and con-

Kenneth Whitfield and the late
Dorothy Wallace Rogers.

He was educated at the Uni-
versity of Hull, England, and
Middle Temple, London. He
was a barrister at law.

Sir Cecil died on June 28,
1990. He was married to Lady

the late Sir Cecil Wallace-Whit-
field - a Bahamian national
hero and founder of the FNM.





tinuing through Sunday.
Sir Cecil was born in Nassau
on March 20, 1930, the son of

BAHAMAS TAKES THE OU VCE Tene re

Naomi Wallace Whitfield at
the time of his death.
Senator Thompson said a



Cnr tl Security Minister Tommy Turnquest ¢ aa as eo (ov nT) en: X in Washington, DC.

By KHYLE QUINCY PARKER
Press Attaché
Embassy of The Bahamas



WASHINGTON, DC - National Security Min-
ister Tommy Turnquest assumed the chairmanship
of the 10th Regular Session of the Inter-American
Committee against Terrorism (CICTE) - an arm of
the Organisation of American States — at a cere-
mony in Washington, DC, on Wednesday evening.
It is the first time the Bahamas has chaired the
Committee.

The Bahamas was elected by acclamation to chair
the committee through March 2011, after having
served as Vice Chair to Mexico over the last year.
Colombia nominated the Bahamas, citing among
other things the country’s “widespread activity” in
support of Mexico’s chairmanship as reason to sup-
port the Bahamas in the position of chairman. Cana-
da, a major contributor to the OAS and the CICTE,
seconded the nomination.

Mr Turnquest, during brief remarks, expounded
on the theme chosen by the Bahamas for the three-
day conclave — “Public/Private Partnerships In The
Fight Against Terrorism.”

The minister said the “traditional approach to
terrorism has been that it is a critical security matter,
and is therefore the responsibility of the state.”

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“Recent attacks by terrorists, however, show that
their willful and wanton destruction is intended to
inflect maximum damage in terms of lives and prop-
erty, and they are not concerned about whether
what they destroy is public or private,’ ” he said.

“There is, consequently, a growing appreciation
that the traditional approach to countering terrorism
does not create a sufficient space for the business
community and other civil actors, whose interests
can be devastated by acts of terrorism. It also does
not take into account the information, knowledge,
experience and resources that the private sector
can bring to bear on efforts to counter terrorism, and
the potential threat from terrorist activities.”

Mr Turnquest said an increasing awareness of
the significant value in public-private sector part-
nership is encouraging governments to establish
such partnerships “as a critical countermeasure
from which states and the private sector can mutu-
ally benefit in the fight against terrorism and to
guard against potential terrorist threats.”

“Such partnerships,” he said, “heighten public
interest, raise awareness, build mutual understand-
ing, and allows for private sector input in govern-
ment’s anti-terrorism policies and programmes.
Public-private sector partnership also helps to broad-
en the resource base, both financial and human, in
the fight against terrorism.”

radio talk show featuring pan-
elists who knew Sir Cecil will
be aired today on ZNS from
3pm — 4pm.

Also, a Fish Fry will be
hosted by the Eight Mile
Rock Constituency Associa-
tion at the Lewis Yard Lodge
Hall from 5pm until.

“Lewis Yard was where we
had our battle when the FNM
was first started and where we
had to defend democracy for
the first time right across the
street from the Lodge Hall in
the school,” he recalled.

On Saturday, a Family Fun
Day will start at 12noon, and
the official opening of the Sir
Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Exhi-
bition will begin at 4pm at the
Sir Cecil Wallace-Whitfield
Community Centre on West
Atlantic Drive.

Senator Thompson said Sir
Cecil left a sacred legacy for
future generations.

“He was a giant warrior in
the cause of democracy in the




















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Bahamas. He sacrificed to
ensure that the two party sys-
tem in our Bahamas became a
reality in our constitution, and
Bahamians are grateful to him
and appreciate him and his
family for the service he gave
to all of us.”

“We hope all lovers of
freedom and all Bahamians
who cherish human rights
and liberty (will) attend this
exhibition on Sir Cecil,” he
said.

On Sunday, a church ser-
vice will be held at 10am at
Christ the King Church, where
Sir Cecil attended mass.

On April 6, the national
hero’s exhibition on the life
and times of Sir Cecil will
move to the College of the
Bahamas.

The FNM will also host the
Grand Bahama Schools Essay
Competition and Speech Con-
test based on the legacy, times
and accomplishment of Sir
Cecil.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010, PAGE 9



27,0 1
What now for political free-thinker Paul Moss?

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

[us week, Paul
Moss’s resignation
from the PLP adds another
interesting dimension to the
political brouhaha and the-
atrics of late, seemingly rip-
ping the heart out of any
momentum the PLP may
have recently gained while
also adorning Mr Moss in
the political veneer of a
political carpetbagger—a
political opportunist.

Following the PLP’s 51st
Convention last year, where
Mr Moss faced up to defeat
after a losing in his attempt
to ascent to the PLP’s
throne, he has shown a
steely determination and
spirited drive for a political
nomination that, at the very
least, is appreciable.

However, within the PLP
it appears the attorney
was/is seen as a rank out-
sider, a fame hankerer and a
“Johnny-come-lately”
whose zeal and pursuit of
the leadership has appar-
ently left many of the long-
standing party hacks dis-
gruntled and determined to
resist his advancement at all
costs. Indeed, the lawyer
stood up to confront the
PLP’s strongman while
everyone else—besides Dr
Bernard Nottage—cowered
and were too afraid to do
so. I applaud Mr Moss for
being a pacesetter and seem-
ingly a political free-thinker,
rather than another baby-
kisser politician who suffers
from “kiss-up disease” and
who is overly concerned
with petty politics. That said,
unless he is actively seeking
or has been offered an FNM
nomination, it is likely that
Paul Moss will be experi-
encing a cold political winter
between now and the next
general election.

In recent months, Mr
Moss declared his intent—
while a guest on a radio talk
show—to run as an inde-
pendent if he was not nomi-
nated for the St Cecilia con-
stituency. While I can appre-
ciate that Mr Moss will gar-
ner some support, unless he
is sprinkling sparkly fairy
dust on the voters residing in
this traditionally PLP con-
stituency, his electoral bid is
likely to be unsuccessful.

Legitimise

To the politically dis-
cerning eye, it does appear
that Mr Moss was hoping
that the PLP would legit-
imise his bid for the St Cecil-
ia constituency. Undoubt-
edly, Mr Moss realised
beforehand that in order to
get a highly-regarded nomi-
nation and achieve his ulti-
mate goal of winning a Par-
liamentary seat, he would
need the blessing of a major
party, particularly since the
Bahamian electorate does
not appear to be quite ready
to elect a third party candi-
date. In the Bahamas, it
appears that place of third
parties in the minds of the
electorate is just that—third!

Dr Dexter Johnson, who
recently left the Bahamas
Democratic Movement
(BDM) to join the National
Development Party (NDP),
espouses a different view:
“The significance of Paul’s
resignation is that here is
another young leader, in
opposition—saying the same
thing as a young leader
(Bran McCartney) from the
governing party, who also
recently resigned. This
means, therefore, that any-
one serious would look to a
third party.”

Although Mr Moss affili-
ated himself with the PLP,
sources within the party
assert that the St Cecilia
constituency was too valu-
able to grant a nomination
to an unpredictable, “uncon-
trollable” journeyman can-
didate. Frankly, I’m told that
another candidate (Paulette
Zonicle) — and likely nom-
inee — has long canvassed
the district and has received
the support of the incum-
bent Parliamentary repre-
sentative (Cynthia ‘Mother’
Pratt).

Paul Moss’s resignation
indicates he must have

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

ADRIAN

GIBSON

‘To the politically discerning eye, it
does appear that Mr Moss was hop-
ing that the PLP would legitimise his
bid for the St Cecilia constituency.’

recognised that his fight for
the nomination was not as
clear-cut as seemingly antic-
ipated and that his pursuit
of a political nomination in
his preferred constituency
was made even more diffi-
cult when he entered the
leadership catfight without
having significantly con-
tributed to the party’s inter-
nal operations or nurturing
an approved constituency.
PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts conveyed what is
seemingly the general con-
sensus within the PLP,
which is — that Mr Moss
brought nothing to the par-
ty’s table and therefore has
taken nothing from it!

Political sources stress the
fact that the political aspi-
rant began campaigning in
St Cecelia without Mother
Pratt’s blessing was an
affront to the National Gen-
eral Council (NGC) — the
candidate’s committee — of
the PLP.

It appears that Mr Moss
refused to toe the party line,
going against the political
culture of the PLP and
instead of exhibiting what
some call “blind loyalty” to
the party, he openly berated
leader Perry Christie and his
leadership style and
expressed certain views that
were diametrically opposed
to the PLP’s public pro-
nouncements.

Undoubtedly, Mr Moss’s
leadership gamble must
have been contemplated
with the expectation of
attaining the support of the
educated, middle class folks
within the party’s hierarchy
and the hope of garnering
sufficient support to over-
throw Paulette Zonicle in
her quest for the St Cecilia
seat.

According to Dr Johnson:
“Paul tried a power move at
the convention. At that
time, he should have bar-
gained to withdraw from the
leadership race for the nom-
ination. Christie was jittery
at that time. It seems that
he wanted to shake up the
establishment.

Paul’s resignation must
have come as someone like
him could not demonstrate
any leadership qualities in
that ‘shut up and sit down’
setting.”

At this juncture, it is
doubtful that Mr Moss has
the popular support of St
Cecilia and must have come
to the understanding that
Mother Pratt openly endors-
es Mrs Zonicle, and that
whoever she endorses — as
is the norm in Bahamian
politics —t he NGC would
support.

In addressing Moss’s res-
ignation, a legal eagle who
wishes to remain anony-
mous, stated: “A major fault
of persons like Mr Moss
who aspire to be leaders of a
country is that they don’t
seem to be interested in con-
tributing to an organisation
in a significant way, believ-
ing that their education or
international exposure and
their ramblings to the press
are sufficient to spiral them
to the top. Not so.

“What Mr Moss and oth-
ers like him don’t appear to
realise is the fact that he is
able to summon the press to
press conferences and then
see his face on television
does not mean that he has
the overwhelming support
of the community. Perhaps,
one of the press conferences
should have been reserved
for his formal resignation
from the PLP, rather than a
press release from Europe.
That way, he could’ve field-
ed questions posed by those
same reporters who provid-
ed the mirage of hope for

any leadership of the PLP,”
he concluded.

Now that he has divorced
the PLP, does Paul Moss
now flail in the political
wind?

Will Mr Moss run as an
independent? Or, will he
join the NDP?

Leader

I have long held the belief
that the NDP—with which
one of Mr Moss’s brothers is
affiliated and which contin-
ues to assert that it has no



















leader — was preparing for
Mr Moss to become the
leader, particularly if he had
not secured the PLP’s nom-
ination for St Cecilia.
However, there are some
within the NDP who empha-
sise that if Mr Moss joins the
party, he has to submit him-
self to a democratic primary
for the party’s leadership



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while there are others who
suggest that after de facto
leader Dr Rollins’ good
showing in Elizabeth, the
NDP would commit political
suicide to install Mr Moss as
leader.

On the other hand, Mr
Moss could join the FNM or
run as an independent, the
latter of which would be a

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costly undertaking likely to
end in failure. I have come
to know Paul Moss as an
earnest individual who
appears to have a genuine
interest in nation-building.
However, it appears that if
the Bahamas continues to
be a red (FNM) or gold
(PLP) state, young persons
promoting change and aspir-
ing for leadership must fight
from within the internal
structure of the major par-
ties, seeking to convince
council and executive mem-
bers of the value of their
candidacy and the impor-
tance of the injection of new
ideas in advancing the coun-

try.

Both the PLP and the
FNM need to engage ina
comprehensive house clean-
ing exercise when reviewing
candidates, including incum-
bents, seeking nominations,
while consistently recruiting
better candidates and
rebuilding the parties.

There is a need for truth-
ful voices amidst the can-
cerous pit of sleaze and dis-
honesty with which Bahami-
an politics/society is rapidly
becoming synonymous.














TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

where and how Mr Smith was
shot behind the City Market
store in Village Road at
around 8pm on July 9 last
year.

Questions were raised by the
jury yesterday as evidence sub-

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As DC Munroe’s partner of
around six months at the Fox
Hill division, Detective Con-
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the stand yesterday, he told the

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He said DC Munroe ran
behind the wall and seconds lat-
er the shot was fired.

DC Sands then drew his gun
and followed DC Munroe
behind the wall where he saw
him fall to the ground as two
men who appeared to fit the
description of the suspects were
running away, he said.

“He fell on his back like he
was covering a wound,” DC
Sands said. “I thought he was
shot. I went to him and he said
he was all right, and I looked
and saw the two fellas running
so I went through.”

One of the men fell as he was
running, DC Sands said, so he
pursued the second man to stop
and search him.

“He said, ‘It wasn’t us, it was
the other two men who run
ahead of us’,” DC Sands said.

“Whilst holding my firearm I
did a quick search of his waist
and body, and then put down
my firearm and walked him
back past the body lying there
and the person was gasping.

“He didn’t say anything to
him. He attempted to go and
touch the fella on the ground
but I held him back.”

DC Sands said the man he
apprehended, Leshad Thomp-
son, 18, of Dan Nottage
Estates, Bernard Road, did not
stop to talk to the fallen man,
Mr Smith, of Sea Breeze
Estates, nor did he touch or cra-
dle him, contrary to evidence
previously submitted to the
court.

Detective Constable 437
Obinna Okpuno testified on
November 10 that Mr Thomp-
son held his dying friend in his
arms and cried out, “You just
shot an innocent man!’ when
he arrived at the scene.

And Mr Thompson submit-
ted on January 14 that he had
held his friend and told him he

Brenton Smith inquest
to visit site of death

was not going to die, while he
saw two other suspects get
away.

However DC Sands main-
tained Mr Thompson did not
have contact with Mr Smith as
he escorted him to the car
where he was met by Sergeant
Santrice Bowleg and Sergeant
451 Sands.

Assistant Superintendent
Cleophus Anthony Cooper, the
Central Detective Unit’s chief
superintendent in charge of
homicide, then arrived at the
scene.

He testified yesterday, when
prompted by the jury, that Mr
Thompson did have blood on
his hands when he saw him.

Mr Thompson had identified
Mr Smith for ASP Cooper and
directed the senior superinten-
dent to the Smith family home
after the teenager’s death, ASP
Cooper said.

He said that in his 31 years
experience on the force police
officers will draw their
weapons at their own discre-
tion when responding to armed
robberies.

“Every situation is differ-
ent,” he said. “You may have a
guideline but those will not be
followed in every circumstance.
In some cases it relies on the
individual officer.”

Sergeant 2274 William
Knowles from the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force com-
munications unit also took the
stand yesterday, to complete
his February 16 testimony
relating to his transcription of
police radio transmissions sur-
rounding the incident.

The inquest will conclude
tomorrow following the site vis-
it by ASP Cooper, DC Sands,
DC Munroe, DC Okpuno, Mr
Thompson the jurors, counsel,
coroner William Campbell and
Mr Smith’s family.

Campaign to block controversial
net fishing ‘successful’

FROM page one

(242) 302-8552 OR Email:
iesella. el hceciti, such as sports-fishing and eco-tourism due to its high tenden-
cy to catch many non-target species during fishing operations.

Initial outcry began when the Pelagic I was sighted in
Freeport, allegedly outfitted to accommodate “purse seine” or
net fishing in early February. A flood of calls, e-mails, online
petitions, and Facebook group led to official response from the
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources which
announced that the government was "not minded to permit the
use of purse seine or net fishing within the waters of the
Bahamas".

In a release issued last month, the government said the deci-
sion to move to outlaw the activity was taken "having regard to
the importance of sport-fishing to the tourism industry",
and that it planned to make necessary amendments to the
Fisheries Conservation (Jurisdiction and Conversation) Act
and Regulations in an effort to strengthen legislation.

Owners of the vessel, brothers Paul and David Mellor, con-
firmed observations that it had removed the net equipment and
also announced plans to abandon the industry altogether to pur-
sue waste transport, it was reported.

It was not made clear if outright public opposition con-
tributed to their decision to abandon their efforts, however the
government made very clear its definite resistance to their
proposal.

David Mellor was quoted as saying: “Instead of spending
more money on fishing we have decided to get out of the busi-
ness altogether.”

The Bahamas National Trust called purse seine netting a
"destructive method" of fishing that involves "indiscriminate-
ly catching not only adult tuna but also immature tuna, thus
dealing the fishery the additional blow of juvenile mortality’.

Trust executive director Eric Carey added that in addition to
its negative impact on the environment, the profitability of
the venture would be questionable considering the small local
market and the challenges of export.

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Teacher charged

FROM page one

received conflicting reports from police officers. She also ques-
tioned what authority Family Island Administrator Margaret
Symonette had to send him to Sandilands for 30 days.

Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that Mr Clarke be brought
to the New Providence court, and yesterday he pleaded not

guilty to the charges.

The electronics teacher was granted $15,000 bail with two

sureties.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


CYCLING
RESULTS

THE NEW Providence
Cycling Association staged its
2nd road race on

Saturday March 13th at the
National Heritage Parking lot.

This race was used as one of
the trial for the National Team
selection by the Federation.

The next available race on
the list of trials will be held
in Freeport in April.

Following shortly will be
the final trial in New Provi-
dence, also in April.



RESULTS: each lap 6 miles.

JUNIORS 3 LAPS

Justin Minnis 52:35.53
Antinece Simmons 1:04:11.09
Peetron Lightbourne 1:05:31.38

5 LAPS

Jay Major 1:21:48.75
Tracy Sweeting = 1:21:49.12
Laurence Jupp ~—-1:21:55.88

Anthony Colebrook1:22:14.91
Barron Musgrove 1:22:16:38
Van Demeritte 1:23:42.18
Robert Bethel 1:29:50.15

OPEN MEN/WOMEN/NOVICE

1 lap

Larry Russell 27:00:00
2 laps

Sylvia Russel 1:06:59.00
Nadia Taylor 1:39:46.75
Antonia Burrows 1:40:00.34

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays







FRIDAY, MARCH 19,



2010





Vanderpool-Wallace in action
at the NGAA championships

Vanderpool-Wallace

By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net



ARIANNA Vanderpool-
Wallace has a busy three
days ahead of her as she
competes along with seven
other Auburn Tiger team-
mates at the NCAA Division
1 Women's Swimming &
Diving Championships.

Vanderpool-Wallace will
swim three individual events
and is likely to swim three
relays over the three-day
meet.

She will swim the 50 yard
and 100 yard freestyle and

Swimmer set for busy weekend
in women’s swimming and diving

the 100 butterfly. She enters
the meet as the SEC cham-
pion in the 100 free and 100
fly and is seeded 3rd and
10th respectively in these
events at these champi-
onships.

In the preliminaries she
swam the lead off leg of the
200 yard freestyle relay and
posted a time of 22.27.

In the final, Vanderpool-
Wallace, alongside Caitlin

Geary, Hannah Riordan, and
Melissa Marik, finished sixth
in the A final in 1:28.80s.
Vanderpool Wallace fin-
ished ninth overall and third
in the B final of the 50 yard
freestyle in a time of 22.32s.
Vanderpool-Wallace and
teammates Melissa Marik,
Ava Ohlgren and Micah
Lawrence swam to a first
place finish in the B final of
the 400 yard medley relay in

a time of 3:34.08s.

At the end of one, the
Tigers sat in seventh position
with 49 points. Georgia leads
the field with 112 points,
Stanford second with 108.5,
California — 98, Texas A&M
— 76 and Florida — 75 round
out the top five.

Vanderpool- Wallace com-
petes today in the 100m fly,
entering with the 10th fastest
time of 52.55s and also as a
member of the 200m medley
team.

The NCAA Division 1
Women's Swimming & Div-
ing Championships continue
through Saturday.



Teams eye metal round
in the Phil Smith Classic

AS THE Providence Bas-
ketball Club's "Phil Smith
Classic" moved into its fourth
day, several teams looked to
secure berths into today's
medal round and champi-
onship game.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE — 24
ST. ANNE'S - 3

¢ Chad-Vaughn Jones’ hot
shooting led the Comets to
the biggest win of the after-
noon as he outscored the Blue
Waves'entire depth chart in
the first half.









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Kingdom Ministries, Warren Street, Oakes Field,
on Saturday at 11am. Officiating will be Bishop
Raymond Wells, assisted by other Ministers of

Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Left to treasure all his golden memories is

follows in Southern



Jones finished with a game
high 10 points to lead the
Comets to the win in yester-
day's opening game.

Jyles Romer added six,
while Christian Bain finished
with four.

CARLTON FRANCIS —12
GALILEE — 9

¢ Carlton Francis rebound-
ed from a day three defeat
with a narrow one possession
win over the Miracles.

Andrew Sands led the way
with six points while Kareem
King finished with four.

Rashon Russell led Galilee
with six points in a losing
effort while Yekini Mowatt
added three.

KINGSWAY (A) - 12
ST. ANNE'S — 7

e The Saints’ one-two scor-
ing punch of Cleon Munroe
and Jayson Green led the way
to an early first half lead and
the win.

Both finished with five
points apiece to give the Blue
Waves their second loss of the

SEE page 14




Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



STEPHEN Dillet's McClellan Major heads to the basket for a layup in his team's 12-2 win over Freedom

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

MORE SCENES FROM PHIL SMITH CLASSIC



CHAD-VAUGHN Jones dribbles the ball upcourt through the Blue
Waves defence. He finished with a game high 10 points.

Teams eye
medal rount
in the Phil
Smith Classic

FROM page 13

afternoon.

The Saints led 9-4 at the
half and maintained the
advantage in the second as
each team scored just three
points.

STEPHEN DILLET — 12
FREEDOM BAPTIST —- 3

¢ Stephen Dillet jumped
out to an early led on with
point guard Michael Bethel
leading the charge and sat its
startes in the second half en
route to the win.

Bethel dominated the game
on both ends of the floor and
finished with a game high sev-
en points, while his teammate
Keith Stubbs finished with six.

The tournament concludes
today with play beginning at
4pm at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.







=

JYLES Romer of Queen's College controls the opening tip against

St. Anne's.





FLOYD Mayweather, left, and current WBA welterweight world
champion Shane Mosley pose for a picture during a news con-
ference in New York, Tuesday, March 2, 2010.

Cools

PECIALS Pleysn Selected Appliances

imagination at work KeyNSTRYNE Sse) N| Ra!

a

Mayweather, Mosley embrace
Olympic-style drug test

BOXING
NEW YORK
Associated Press

FLOYD Mayweather Jr.
and welterweight champion
Shane Mosley will undergo
Olympic-style drug testing for
their May 1 fight in Las Vegas,
which they hope will set a new
standard for boxing.

Representatives of the two
fighters joined Travis Tygart of

the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency
on a conference call Thursday
to discuss the program, which is
more extensive than the test-
ing that currently falls under
the jurisdiction of state athletic
commissions.

"This is one of the biggest
events I've seen in the sport of
boxing, and if this introduces
Olympic-style testing to box-
ing, we not only have delivered
a great fight but also leveled

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the field for athletes," Richard
Schaefer of Golden Boy Pro-
motions said.

Mayweather and Mosley will
be subjected to an unlimited
number of unannounced blood
and urine tests before and after
the fight, and the results will
be stored so USADA can test
them in the future. The sam-
ples are screened for all drugs
currently banned by the World
Anti-Doping Agency, includ-
ing human growth hormone
and designer steroids such as
THG

Most state athletic commis-
sions test only urine samples,
which Tygart said cannot detect
several performance-enhanc-
ing substances, including HGH.

"For the first time, you have
professional athletes in the
sport of boxing approaching us
to implement an anti-doping
program," Tygart said. "These
athletes are courageous in their
position and their desire to be
held to the most stringent anti-
doping standard."

Mayweather's insistence on
Olympic-style testing is the pri-
mary reason negotiations fell
through in January for a fight
against pound-for-pound king
Manny Pacquiao. Mayweath-
er wanted blood tests up to 14
days before the fight, while Pac-
quiao claims he feels weak after
drawing blood and would not
agree to testing within 24 days.

Pacquiao promoter Bob
Arum accused Mayweather
of trying to get into his fight-
er's head by alleging that he
used steroids. The negotia-
tions quickly deteriorated,
and Pacquiao signed to fight
Joshua Clottey while May-
weather turned his attention
to Mosley.

TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUE
mn

Dontrelle Willis

‘Willis sharp for
Tigers in 5-4 win
_over Astros

: BASEBALL
LAKELAND, Fla.
Assocaited Press

DONTRELLE WILLIS

: had a lot more to worry
: about in this outing than his
: pitching line.

And the line was pretty
good.
Willis pitched through

: back spasms, was hit in the
: knee with a line drive and
: injured his thumb catching
: another, but worked three
: scoreless innings in the
: Detroit Tigers’ 5-4 win over
; the Houston Astros on
: Thursday.

"I started to feel spasms,"

: Willis said after trying to
: snare a liner while facing
: the second batter. "It feels
: all right, but I was just try-
: ing to have some fun out
: there. You have to be men-
: tally tough and have confi-
: dence in yourself. My abili-
: ty is there, so just let it go."

Willis is competing with

: several pitchers, including
: Jeremy Bonderman, Nate
: Robertson, and Eddie
: Bonine for the final two
: spots in the Tigers rotation.

Willis, a former 22-game

: winner, has struggled since
: arriving in Detroit in 2008,
: but he has a 1.29 ERA in
: four appearances this
: spring, better than any of
: his competition. The Tigers
: made it a little easier on
: Willis, optioning Armando
: Galarraga to Triple A Tole-
: do before the game.

Two batters after sus-

i taining spasms, Willis
: dodged another liner back
: at the mound. It deflected
: off him to shortstop Adam
: Everett, who made the play.
: One pitch later, Hunter
: Pence hit a liner that Willis
: caught in self-defense. He
: made the play, but it injured
: his right thumb and Willis
: said he was in pain the next
: two innings.

It was an important out-

: ing for Willis, a former
: Rookie of the Year with the
: Florida Marlins, who went
: 1-4 with a 7.49 ERA last
: season.

"I've changed my pitch-

: ing a lot this year," Willis
: said. "I used to think I could
: strike everyone out. Now I
: just let them hit the ball. If I
: could, I'd take 27 lineouts
: and just get out of there."

Tigers manager Jim Ley-

? land said Willis was slated
: to go further, but once he
: saw the back spasms and
: the thumb injury that was
: affecting Willis, he pulled
: him.

"He said he was fine,"

: Leyland said. "I wanted to
: let him keep going. It puts a
: manager in an awkward
: position, so I just decided
: enough was enough."

Leyland likes what he's

seen of Willis this spring.

"He's getting the ball

: over the plate and he's get-
: ting it in play," Leyland
: said. "I don't think there
: are any surprises with Don-
: trelle."

Houston starter Felipe

: Paulino went three innings
: and allowed three runs.
: Reliever Brandon Lyon
: allowed an earned run in
: his only inning. Lyon, who
: has pitched in at least 61
: games in each of the past
: four seasons, has struggled
: with shoulder surgery last
: month to drain a cyst in his
: right shoulder.

Lyon allowed a hit and

walked one, but he said
i there was no discomfort.

O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



FNM attorney:
three protest votes
must automatically

be thrown out

FROM page one

that three voters were not
registered in Elizabeth. Two
were in the adjacent
Yamacraw and one was in
Fox Hill. These voters plain-
ly are not entitled to vote in
the Elizabeth constituency
and no question of retifca-
tion of register with any of
them,” Mr Evans told the
election court.

He further argued that in
addition to these three votes
- that of Voter A, D and F -
the vote of Voter B should
not be counted as his date of
birth on his driver’s licence
which he sought to use to
vote differed to that on the
register and he never
appeared before the court to
explain why.

This left two protest votes,
that of Voters C and E,
which Mr Evans agreed
should be counted. Philip
Davis, lead attorney for PLP
candidate, Ryan Pinder, had
proposed on Wednesday that
all five protest votes cast for
his party’s candidate should
be upheld as valid.

But Mr Evans contended
that the court can only con-
sider counting the votes of
those voters for whom cleri-
cal errors or omissions
caused them to have to cast
their ballot on a coloured or
protest ballot, not those who
did not appear on the register
at all as the register should
be consider “conclusive” on
the day of the election.

He further stated that for
the court to “stray” into the
question of whether certain
voters were resident in the
constituency or not would
cause the court to “overstep”
its mandate in this particular
matter.

The attorney made these
comments as he gave his final
submissions to the court on
behalf of his client, FNM can-
didate Dr Duane Sands.
Some had expected that once
Mr Evans concluded his sub-
missions today that judges
would leave the court to
deliberate and come to a con-
clusion on the matter as ear-
ly as today. But yesterday
when Mr Evans took his seat
having made his final sub-
missions relative to the votes,
lead attorney for PLP candi-
date Ryan Pinder, Philip
Davis stood to counter some
of the points he had made
and this is expect to continue
tomorrow when the court
resumes at 10.30am.

At present it is not entire-
ly clear when a conclusion to
the case will come, and it is
possible that the matter may
drag on until next week.

In the February 16 by-elec-
tion in Elizabeth, Dr Duane
Sands won 1,501 ordinary
votes and Mr Pinder got
1,499. Mr Pinder made an
application to the court to
determine the validity of five
“protest” votes cast for him,
to see whether they could be
added to the official vote
count and therefore change
the outcome of the election,
making him the representa-
tive for the constituency.

Mr Evans spoke at some
length about Voter A, whose
vote he ultimately said
should be discounted.

That voter claimed she reg-
istered at a foodstore then
gave evidence to the court
that she found that she had
been “put in the wrong con-
stituency” (Fox Hill not Eliz-
abeth). She said she and
some friends and family
members net with Parlia-



mentary Commissioner Errol
Bethel to have the situation
rectified.

However, Mr Evans drew
that claim into question, and
told the court he was “sorely
tempted to ask you to dis-
miss” the evidence that she
met with Mr Bethel and
sought to have the discrep-
ancy changed.

The attorney said this was
because Errol Bethel was not
questioned on this alleged
meeting while he gave his
evidence and because there
were varying and significant
differences between the evi-
dence of voter A and other
supporting witnesses con-
nected to her, as well as
between her own evidence at
different times.

He noted that Mr Bethel
said that he had no record of
Voter A having attended his
office to change her voter’s
card. There was no docu-
mentary evidence and her
oath was unamended, said
Mr Evans.

“Normally if a change was
made it would be reflected
in all of the documents rele-
vant to that voter,” said Mr
Evans.

DR DUANE SANDS and Ryan Pinder leaving Election Court yesterday.

“The flood or accumula-
tion of contradictions in the
evidence is irrefutable proof
of their lack of credibility,”
he said of voter A and asso-
ciated witnesses.

“This court is invited to
find that Voter A never made
any such application or atten-
dance at the Parliamentary
Registrar’s office,that Voter
A voluntarily placed herself
in the Fox Hill constituency
by giving herself the address
North Pine Barren Road and
that her vote should not be
allowed,” proposed Mr
Evans.

He added the inconsisten-
cies raise the possibility of her
voter’s card being fraudulent.
“I’m not saying anyone is
guilty of fraud, but it is a pos-
sibility.”

“We would say that from
all the evidence available that
the voter’s card may very well
not be genuine.”

“Tf it is believed, you may
direct further investigations
along those lines.”

In relation to Voter B, who
was made to cast a protest
vote after he could not pro-
duce a voter’s card but only a
driver’s license which had a



ee

keep them dry :



So that during the day they are happy
fel fale MNES Com cee em eae

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

birth date upon it which dif-
fered from the date of birth
on the register, Mr Evans said
that because the voter has not
appeared before the court or
provided any evidence or
explanation for the differ-
ences his vote should not be
allowed.

“We have no evidence to
show that the holder of the
license is the same person on
the register,” said Mr Evans.

In relation to voter C, Mr
Evans said that there was an
inconsistency between the
date of birth on her driver’s
license and on the counter
foil and register. However, in
this case Mr Evans said his
client does not “suggest it
can’t be counted.”

In relation to Voter D, Mr
Evans said she does not live
in the Elizabeth constituen-
cy and is registered in
Yamacraw. “It follows that
her vote can’t be counted,”
he said. Voter D was
removed from the register by
the parliamentary commis-
sioner.

Voter E, Mr Evans said she
was on the Elizabeth register
and had a voter’s card and
therefore she was “no doubt



entitled” to vote. He said that
the question of whether she
was in fact an Elizabeth resi-
dent was a separate question,
but could not be determined
as part of this court matter.

With regard to Voter F, he
said her vote should not be
counted as she did not have a
voter’s card or appear on the
Elizabeth register.

Mr Davis, beginning to
respond to Mr Evan’s sub-
missions, said that if the court
accepts the assertions made
by Mr Evans it would “have
startling results.”

The attorney charged that
the inconsistencies in the tes-
timony of Voter A and other
associated witnesses in fact
make their evidence more
believable.

If all of the witnesses had
given the same story, one
would suspect they had been
“coached,” he said.

“One has to look at the
inconsistencies in regard to
the passage of time,” Mr
Davis said.

“If a husband doesn’t
remember the date of his
marriage, does that mean he
didn’t get married?” he
asked.



unscented



Peaceful nights, playful days