Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Ministry pro
Irauid allegations

Claims that businessman was
coerced into inflating invoices

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN investigation is under
way into claims that civil ser-
vants at the Ministry of Agri-
culture coerced a business-
man into inflating company
invoices in order to pocket
the extra cash, The Tribune
can reveal.

The alleged fraud came to
the attention of ministry offi-
cials in late February, dur-
ing its Agribusiness expo at
the Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural Centre.

Agriculture Minister Lar-
ry Cartwright, who con-
firmed an investigation was
under way, said ministry
officials "kind of suspected”
something was amiss when
they noticed that a bill for
tent rentals for the recent
expo varied significantly
from what the ministry paid
for tents during the same
event in previous years.

"It was brought to my
attention and I am having it
investigated,” Mr Cartwright
told The Tribune.

According to a well-placed
source, a business owner
renting tents to the ministry
for the event was asked by a
high-ranking civil servant to
adjust an invoice by several
thousand dollars, with

instructions that the public
servant would take the extra
money.

The source further claimed
that the business owner was
promised more government
work if this request was
agreed to.

When these claims were
put to Mr Cartwright, he
denied a high-ranking
employee was involved.

He said the investigation
was in its initial stages and
that the person/s believed to
be behind the alleged
scheme has not yet been
identified.

"There have been no fir-
ings, the ministry wasn't able
to identify any particular
person as yet,” he said.

When asked if he suspect-
ed the allegations may be
part of wider fraudulent acts
throughout the ministry, the
Long Island representative
said: "It is difficult to say but
this is the first time I heard
about a matter like that."

At the moment, it does not
appear that the ministry will
file criminal charges against
any employee if their suspi-
cions are substantiated.

"From our end, no, we will
not file charges. I would
expect to hear from the sales
person, they should have
gone to police," said Mr
Cartwright.



m Lhe Tribune

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

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FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010
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FNM bid to have PLP election
Court petition struck out fails

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEYS for Dr
Duane Sands yesterday
sought to have the election
court petition of Leo Ryan
Pinder struck out, claim-
ing it was “fundamentally
flawed.”

The court, however, did
not accede to the applica-
tion and also refused a
subsequent application by
Dr Sands’ legal team for a
stay of proceedings and for

MICHAEL AND CARAL THURSTON, the parents of Keisha, at the memorial service last night.

FAMILY members and close
friends gathered at D W Davis Junior
High last night in a memorial service

for Keisha Thurston.

The young athlete’s apparent sui-

Former Turks and Caicos Premier
wants Prime Minister to assist territory

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE disgraced former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos
Islands has pleaded for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to

SOLOMON’S WHOLESALE AD

A SOLOMON’S
WHOLESALE advertise-
ment that appeared in yes-
terday’s Tribune contained
inaccurate information. The
correct version is in today’s
edition, on Page 12. The Tri-
bune apologises for any
inconvenience this error
may have caused.



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verses

Cara iale oe fe
WUE Wesesew YW &

“become more engaged” in
the plight of the British over-
seas territory over which the
United Kingdom assumed
control.

Michael Misick said the
Turks and Caicos Islands
(TCD “really needs the assis-
tance of Caricom and partic-
ularly The Bahamas — no
one less than Prime Minister
of the Bahamas himself — to
educate on our behalf (and)
to intervene on our behalf
with his counterpart in Lon-
don (British Prime Minister
Gordon Brown).”

Mr Misick was the highest
profile member of the Turks

SEE page eight

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cide has shocked all who knew her.
Just 18 years old, Keisha was in her
second semester at the College of the
Bahamas on an athletic scholarship,
and proactive in the athletic commu-

ruary 28.

leave to appeal the deci-
sion in the Court of
Appeal.

The Elizabeth by-elec-
tion court case began
before Senior Justices Ani-
ta Allen and Jon Isaacs
yesterday with the court
hearing preliminary argu-
ments raised by counsel
for Free National Move-
ment candidate Dr Duane
Sands. QC Thomas Evans
who is lead counsel for Dr
Sands submitted that the

SEE page 11



nity through its women’s volleyball
team. Keisha was found hanging from
a rope at the family’s home in McK-
inney Drive, Nassau, on Sunday, Feb-



US report contains claims that children
trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas

CLAIMS that children are
being trafficked from Haiti
into the Bahamas to be used
for sex and forced labour
have been raised for a second
time in a US government
report — this time attributed to
independent social workers.

The State Department’s
2009 Human Rights Report,
released yesterday, said rep-
resentatives of non-govern-
mental organisations on the
ground in Haiti reported the
problem of child trafficking
for sexual and labour purpos-
es, “especially to the Domini-
can Republic and the
Bahamas.”

The researchers noted that
Haiti continues to be a source

country for persons trafficked
to a number of other places as
well, including Jamaica, the
United States, Europe and
Canada.

The report said: “Traf-
ficked citizens reported con-
ditions of bonded servitude,
slavery, and forced labour.
Extreme poverty and lack of
employment were among key
risk factors supporting human
trafficking.”

It added that no informa-
tion could be collected on the
principal traffickers, their net-
works, or methods, and noted
that there were no antti-traf-
ficking laws in Haiti and

SEE page eight



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Tel: 393-0512, 393-8006, 393-3513

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Arraignment of
officer postponed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE arraignment of a
police officer facing a num-
ber of fraud charges was
postponed until Monday for
court dockets to be put in
order,

Eddie Florival, 40, of
Sweet Lane off Faith
Avenue, had been ordered
to appear before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court
Eight, Bank Lane yesterday
morning to be arraigned on
charges of conspiracy to
commit fraud by false pre-
tences and abetment to
commit fraud.

Some of the charges were
concerned with others who
had already been charged:
prison inmate Shane Mack-
ey, 29; prison officer Free-
man Basden, 45, of Cox
Way; and Tamanica Bethel,
38, a store manager of
Whites Lane.

But when Florival, who is
currently free on bail,
appeared before Ms Bethel
at 10am she said she could
not arraign him on the
charges as the particulars
were inconsistent and listed
others who had already
been charged.

The magistrate asked for
Royal Bahamas Police
Force prosecutor Erecell
Dorsett to re-order the
dockets and for Florival to
return to court at 2pm.

However Florival’s

EDDIE FLORIVAL



arraignment was then further postponed until Monday as Ms
Bethel was still not satisfied with the dockets.

And as she began to read two charges stating Florival was con-
cerned with others in a conspiracy to commit fraud by false
pretences and abetment to commit fraud, she asked the prose-
cutor why the dockets were not directed solely to Florival.

Referring to the others named in the docket, she asked: “Why

aren’t they here?

“T don’t have a difficulty reading the charges to him, but
when you bring it on the same docket, and my docket has a per-
son already charged with abetment on the same facts — how can
you charge him unless you put a new docket in?”

Inspector Dorsett said his officers had not understood the
command to correct the dockets, and Ms Bethel made the pros-
ecutor give his assurance the new dockets would be corrected
and submitted on Monday morning.

“They have already taken a lot of my court time so they bet-

ter get this fixed,” she said.

Florival remains on bail.















Prison criticised in
Human Rights Report

THE CARMICHAEL Road
Detention Centre along with
Her Majesty’s Prison once again
featured negatively in the Unit-
ed States government’s Human
Rights Report which was
released yesterday.

Calling conditions at the
prison “harsh”, the US report
said that overcrowding remains
a major problem in the men’s
maximum security block.

“Originally built in 1953 to
hold 450 inmates, it held 624 of
the country’s 1,319 prisoners,”
the report prepared by the US
Department of State reads.

“The remaining prisoners
were held in medium- and min-
imum-security units that were
at intended capacity. A remand
centre held 265 detainees. Male
prisoners in the maximum-secu-
rity unit were crowded into
poorly ventilated and poorly lit
cells that generally lacked regu-
lar running water.

“Prisoners lacked beds, slept
on concrete floors, and if not
participating in work pro-
grammes, were locked in small
cells. Maximum-security inmates
were allowed outside for exer-
cise four days a week for one
hour per day. Inmates com-
plained of inadequate potable
water, lack of medical care, and

poor treatment,” the report
states.

The US State Department’s
report further said that there
continued to be allegations of
abuse by prison guards.

“Local attorneys and human
rights observers asserted that
the prison’s Internal Affairs
Unit lacked the independence
needed to investigate impartial-
ly allegations of abuse and mis-
conduct; it conducted no inves-
tigations during the year.

Access

“Conditions for female pris-
oners were less severe than for
men; however, women did not
have access to the same work-
release programmes available
to male prisoners.”

Despite the existence of a sep-
arate section to hold offenders
between the ages of 16 and 18,
the report said there is “occa-
sional mixing” of juveniles and
adult inmates “depending on the
severity of their crimes”.

As it concerns the Carmichael
Road Immigrant Detention
Centre, the US report said that
the facility held up to 500
detainees (with tent space for
an additional 500), and women
and men were held separately.

oe SHY “Mule NEW MEE

It said: “Haitians and
Jamaicans were the most com-
monly interdicted migrants. The
highest occupancy during the
year was approximately 664.
Observers complained of con-
tinuing abuse by guards,
although immigration officials
stated that no such complaints
were filed during the year.”

However, human rights
groups have expressed their con-
cern that complaint investiga-
tions were being handled inter-
nally without any independent
review or oversight.

“Children under the age of
14 were held in the women’s
dormitory. Many children arriv-
ing with both parents were not
allowed contact with the father
except during weekly visitation.
Despite the possibility of being
held for months, children did
not have access to education.

“The government made
improvements to the
Carmichael Road centre during
the year, including benches for
seating and recreation, cable
television, bunk mattresses, fans,
and 100 roll-away mattresses for
overflow. Two nurses conducted
medical screening of detainees
on a weekly basis; authorities
issued care packages upon entry
into the facility and installed a

THE SEVEN NEW police vehicles at yesterday’s presentation on Thompson Boulevard.

of New Providence.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE Royal Bahamas Police Force
commissioned seven new vehicles last
night to assist in their presence in the
Eastern, Western, and Southern districts

Speaking with the press at the Central
Detective Unit's headquarters on
Thompson Boulevard, Superintendent
Stephen Dean said they want the public
to know that the funds that the police

said.

force has received to assist in the fight
against crime are being utilised properly.

"We will be developing new strategies
in fighting crime and this is a testament to
the general public today that we are seri-
ous, and this is also a message to the
criminal element, and we want them to
know that we are hot on their trails," he

washer and dryer and addition-
al pay phones for detainee use.

“(Amnesty International) as
well as local media wrote and
released reports throughout the
year alleging systemic abuse of
detainees at the Carmichael
Road centre.

“In February the media
reported that three Cuban
detainees went on a hunger
strike to protest conditions at
the centre.

Detainees

“In an expansive interview
with a local daily newspaper in
June, an anonymous former offi-
cer at the centre alleged wide-
spread abuse of detainees that
included killings. Media reports
also claimed that detainees
exchanged sex for food due to
insufficient rations.

“Neither domestic nor inter-
national human rights groups
made any requests to visit the
detention centre or prison dur-
ing the year.

“However, organisations pro-
viding aid, counselling services,
and religious instruction had
regular access to inmates,” the
report read.

e SEE PAGE SIX

wanted to assure the public that they will
be having a strong presence at the nation-
al high school track and field competition.
As such, he said, gangs and trouble-
makers should be forewarned that the
police will be there in "full force."

The vehicles that were presented to
CDU were four Jeep Explorers, two

Dodge Chargers, and one Jeep Chero-

Superintendent Dean said he also kee.



Man wanted for questioning in connection with murder

AN all-points bulletin
has been issued for 48-
year-old Kirkwood Mario

Storr who is wanted for
questioning in connection
with murder.

Storr’s last known
address is Johnson Ter-
race.

He is described as
being of dark complexion,
medium build,
5’8” tall and weighing
150Ibs.

Storr is considered
armed and extremely dan-

gerous.

Persons with any infor-
mation about his where-
abouts are asked to con-
tact the following num-
bers:

Police emergency at
919/911; police control
room at 322-3333; Crime
Stoppers at 328-8477; the
Southeastern police sta-
tion at 392-4333/9 or the
nearest police station.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 3



Concern over party reportedly

planned at ‘Brave’ Davis’ home | i

Resident fears possible traffic congestion, violent behaviour



PHILIP ‘BRAVE’ DAVIS

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ADVERTISEMENTS for a commercial par-
ty in the residential area of West Ridge, report-
edly to be held at the home of opposition mem-
ber Philip “Brave” Davis, have angered at least
one resident.

According to a flyer advertising the party,
billed as “Platinum Status”, patrons must pay
$20 to enjoy music, food and an open bar at the
"Davis residence" in West Ridge this coming
Saturday. There is also a $100 “champagne
room”, The Tribune was told.

According to one of the event's multiple
sponsors, the party is being organised by Mr
Davis’ son.

Yesterday, an employee at the Department
of Physical Planning said internal records did
not show an application for a permit to host a
commercial party in West Ridge, as is required
under zoning guidelines.

The area in western New Providence is
zoned strictly for single-family dwellings, the
employee said, adding that such a party would
require permission from his department.

According to physical planning guidelines,
the permit application should have been sub-
mitted for review at least two weeks before
the party.

One resident is afraid the event will attract
scores of patrons due to the multiple radio
commercials promoting the party.

She is concerned about possible traffic con-
gestion and the potential for violent behaviour
from intoxicated party-goers.

"It's pretty much like having a night club in
a residential area. We all know the amount of
violence happening at night clubs and I'm wor-
ried the party will end with a shooting or stab-
bing.

Worried

"I'm worried that if it happened once it
would keep happening because they would
think that it's okay," said the concerned resi-
dent, who did not want to be named.

Meanwhile, the physical planning employee
said if residents complain to police on the night
of the party, the event will be shut down if the
organisers cannot produce the required per-
mit. He added that party organisers would need
another permit from the Licensing Authority if
alcohol is on sale at the event.

But yesterday an employee from the Licens-
ing Authority claimed there was no need for a
permit at a "private party."

Attempts to reach Mr Davis for comment
were unsuccessful up to press time last night.

BCB: No tampering of employee valuations forms occurred

THE BROADCASTING
Corporation of the Bahamas
has denied that any tampering
with employee evaluation
forms took place, as claimed
in an article appearing in yes-
terday’s Tribune.

According to a statement
issued by the government-run
news agency, in mid-2009 the
Broadcasting Corporation
(BCB) began training all
managers and staff to enhance
the productivity and efficien-
cy of all aspects of its opera-
tions with particular emphasis
on performance.

This, the BCB said, was in
accordance with industrial
agreements with both the
Bahamas Communications

and Public Officers Union
and Bahamas Communica-
tions and Managerial Union
(BCPOU and BCPMU) and
necessitated a change in the
evaluation system which
requires persons to be “more
accountable for their perfor-
mance”.

“The process is still in its
infancy stage and will
undoubtedly experience a
number of growing pains as
the changes are quite signifi-
cant compared with evalua-
tions in previous years.

“The corporation denies
any ‘tampering’ as alleged.
Out of the 240 plus staff eval-
uated, less than six per cent
of the evaluation forms

reviewed, following com-
plaints made of procedural
non-compliance, were found
to have not followed proce-
dure,” the BCB said.

The statement further stat-
ed that the BCB will follow
all procedures which call for
evaluations to be redone fol-
lowing the “appropriate
guidelines”, noting that the
BCPOU and the BCPMU are
aware of the situation and the
steps being taken.

On Thursday, The Tribune
reported that staff at ZNS
were in shock after learning
that a senior manager at the
Broadcasting Corporation
had allegedly tampered with
employee evaluation forms.

The claims of tampering —
which allegedly saw staff
members’ scores lowered, to
the potential detriment of
their promotion and salary
adjustment hopes — came to
light this week when certain
employees obtained copies of
their evaluation forms only to
find the documents had been
altered after being signed by
their immediate supervisor.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



We need more

understanding from
administration of

Queen’s College
LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972- EDS the TAD U

I am writing concerning the
letter that appeared in your
newspaper dated February 17,
2010 under the heading “Con-
cern about the new rule at
Queen’s College.”

Tam also in agreement with
the letter writer. Primary school
children are to be dropped at
the security gate and it’s up to
these children to walk up that
long drive and go to class.

Bear in mind these include
grade one children who are as
young as five years old. A lot of
these children do not want to
go to school and therefore wan-
der around the school hoping to
delay the start of school and
possibly getting into mischief:
This is all over an alleged child
abduction which QC, along
with the police, say did not hap-
pen. If it did not happen, why
are we, the innocent parents,
being made to suffer for this
child’s imagination? This child
should be dealt with and not
the rest of the student body.

We need some sort of com-
munication from the Adminis-
tration of QC, who from what I
understand do not have chil-
dren themselves, so they are
unable to understand the con-
cern that we have for our chil-

SUT TTF CA UTT
AC

EDITOR, The Tribune

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Ban smoking in public places

IN A letter published in Wednesday’s Tri-
bune retired assistant police commissioner
Paul Thompson urged government to intro-
duce legislation to ban smoking in public
places.

About four years ago it was announced
that government was drafting legislation to
protect non-smokers from the dangerous
fumes of smokers. However, nothing more
was heard of the draft. Whether it was nev-
er brought forward due to the slow-moving
Christie administration or whether there
were protests behind the scenes that stayed
the draughtsman’s hand, we shall probably
never know.

However, the matter is once more before
the public. There must be a movement out
there — whether organised or not — that is
becoming agitated by the proliferation of
smoke in certain public places. We say this
because of the number of telephone calls
that we are suddenly receiving from those
who want us to put our fingers to our key-
board and reopen the issue. This is an issue
that we have written about many times
before.

Mr Thompson has now re-opened the
debate. But this time because of the increas-
ing respiratory problems in this country, it is
time for smoking to be taken beyond the
debating stage. Action is now necessary.

The smoking lobby will protest that they
have rights too. We agree they have rights,
but the rights extend only to destroying their
own health, not the health of others. Each
man’s right ends when it infringes on the
rights of others. And second hand smoke is
that infringement from which in a public
place the non-smoker has a right to be pro-
tected.

No one is asking for legislation that will
ban the committed smoker from blacken-
ing his own lungs. All that is being asked is
that he remove himself and his dirty weed a
safe distance from those who don’t want to
share his fate.

There is now conclusive evidence that
inhaling second hand smoke causes lung
cancer in non-smokers.

This has been proven by scientists over
many years. However, in 1604 James 1 of
England (James VI of Scotland) needed no
scientist to tell him what was so obvious to
the eye and the resulting congestion in the
chest.

The king described smoking as a “‘custom
loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose,
harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs,

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and in the black, stinking fume thereof, near-
est resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of
the pit that is bottomless.”

Four centuries ago James would have
had no problem banning such an evil, which
he saw not only as “a great vanity, but a
great contempt of God’s good gifts, that the
sweetness of man’s breath, being a good gift
of God, should be wilfully corrupted by this
stinking smoke.”

James did not know then what we know
now. According to statistics there are about
3,400 cancer deaths annually among adult
non-smokers in the US due to their exposure
to second hand smoke.

The US Surgeon General has estimated
that living with a smoker increases a non-
smoker’s chance of developing cancer by 20
to 30 per cent.

It has also been suggested by some
researchers that there is evidence that second
hand smoke may increase the risk of breast
cancer, nasal sinus cavity cancer, nasopha-
ryngeal cancer in adults, and leukemia, lym-
phoma, and brain tumours in children. How-
ever, it is claimed that more research is nec-
essary to conclusively confirm what present
research so far is suggesting.

In the US second hand smoke is believed
to be the cause of about 46,000 heart disease
deaths each year. The researchers have gone
so far as to suggest that second hand smoke
might be linked to the risk of a stroke and
hardening of the arteries.

Researchers also say that second hand
smoke can cause an increased risk of sudden
infant death syndrome (SIDS), ear infec-
tions, colds, pneumonia, bronchitis and more
severe asthma. It can also slow the growth of
children’s lungs and cause breathlessness
and wheezing.

“There is no safe level of exposure to second
hand smoke,” say the experts. “Studies have
shown that even low levels of second hand
smoke exposure can be harmful. The only
way to fully protect non-smokers from sec-
ond hand smoke exposure is to completely
eliminate smoking in indoor spaces.”
Apparently separating smokers from non-s
mokers, cleaning the air, and ventilating
buildings cannot completely eliminate sec-
ond hand smoke exposure.

So what are we waiting for? Time is over-
due for the complete banning of smoking
in all public places.

The smoker can light up in the wide open
spaces on the outside where he has all the
freedom he needs to do harm to himself.

I feel obliged to comment
on the letters written in the
paper between Mr Abner
Pinder and Mr Algernon
Allen. Iam a devoted listen-
er to "Issues of the Day” and
although I may not com-
pletely agree with the com-
ment by Mr Pinder that Mr
Allen "hates" Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham — I would say
that Mr Allen is no Wendall
Jones.

Mr Jones manages each
guest and caller with integri-
ty and respect. I find him
sometimes to be painfully
non-biased.

Mr Allen on the other
hand needs to realize that
the show is a forum for
guests and callers. He is to
act as a mediator between
the two. When Mr Allen is
not laughing, he is running
on with his own life experi-
ences. To you, Mr Allen, I
say: Take a step back and
humble yourself. Learn from
your co-worker Mr Wendall
Jones. Mediate, do not bully.

And to Mr Pinder: Go
ahead and express yourself
for you are not alone.

A CONCERNED
READER
Nassau,

March 5, 2010.

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dren. We as parents entrust our
children to QC every day, and
we expect the same trust
returned to us.

QC in my opinion is falling
down on their part of the agree-
ment, unless they have admin-
istration or teachers down at
the bottom of the drive for us
parents to hand our children
off to, they have failed! Not us
parents! Also nights the chil-
dren are released and they wan-
der all over the field and park-
ing lots looking for their par-
ents which may not have even
arrived in the parking lot yet.

There is no supervision and
this situation that QC has cre-
ated could result in major prob-
lems and law suits against the
school. What happens when
someone’s child is beaten as the
previous letter writer says or
even worse really kidnapped?

I also want the opportunity
to meet with the other parents
and teachers in the morning.
The ELC was a very loving sec-
tion of the school where par-
ents chatted before and after

school together outside the
classrooms. But the primary
school is another matter. I
understand that after about
grade three there should be no
need for parents to walk the
kids up the drive, but we still
should be afforded that right.

If QC does not want outside
people on the campus, have
them issue two walking passes
for every child in the primary
school. The reason I say two is
that it took two people to make
the child so therefore a mini-
mum of two passes should be
needed. The same person does
not pick up the child every
night. We do need more under-
standing from the administra-
tion of Queen’s College. I only
can say that the people that can
afford to will move their chil-
dren to other schools like St
Andrews.

We are paying a lot of mon-
ey each term for our kids in QC
and we are being dictated to. I
have had an experience at
another private school in Nas-
sau and parents were allowed
to walk their kids to and from
class everyday.

MARSHA BETHELL
Nassau,
February, 2010.

It's time to he transparent, GBPA

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The young management of the Port are putting on a good face,
however, everyone knows that with Sir Jack still cruising there has
to be a person who was there till the New Year as you simply can-
not leave such an enterprise without a pilot.

Surely it is time that GBPA make the appropriate announcement
who is the chief who is running and acting as chairman of the
port? Yes, we are told we should become washers of windows,
but the real potential is not there but in what the management of
the GBPA and the group of companies can generate.

None of us can be reassured when we know the immediate past
chair did not have his permit renewed for whatever reason, but who

is running the show?

Time to be transparent Grand Bahama Port Authority.

W DARVILLE
Freeport,
February, 2010.

Having a nation to call your own

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My husband and J make our home in Marsh Harbour during the
winter months and are just concluding our fifth season here. It is
very fulfilling for us to be involved in our community, and have
come to appreciate the concerns of this country, from food supply

stability to immigration issues.

In regards to the latter I had occasion to help with one young
lady’s desire to establish herself as a Bahamian who, even though
born here, was essentially without any legal status.

I will withhold comment on the laborious, time consuming,
frustrating, and inefficient bureaucracies that she encountered
along the way to legally accord herself franchise in a country
which had always been her home. I came alongside her (and her
brother) and made another trip to Nassau (her sixth) this time with
her mother, to get proof of her birth from PMH.

We were successful and I would like to thank publicly Ms Ellis
from Medical Records at Princess Margaret Hospital who works in
a very crowded setting. She is to be commended for a job well done,
and has been instrumental in the process for two young people to
be embraced legally into a nation which has always been home to
them. They can now become solid contributing members of
Bahamian society. It is only a matter of how far you go back in your
heritage to find parents, grandparents, great grandparents or great
great grandparents who did the same thing for you so that you
would have a nation to call your own.

It was very satisfying to facilitate this process, and I encourage
other young people to persevere in their application to do the
same. The Bahamas will be the better for it as we live according to
the Scripture, Micah 6:8, “He has shown you, women and men,
what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act
justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

DEBORAH R BALLARD
Nassau,
February 27, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Call for website to name
accused criminals on bail

Former Attorney General makes
proposals to tackle crime

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

FORMER Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has
called on the government to
immediately create a website
where members of the public
can easily find out which
accused criminals have been
released on bail.

The proposal was one of sev-
eral put forward by the PLP
Senator and leader of Opposi-
tion business in the Senate dur-
ing Wednesday’s session.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson sug-
gested this website should be
launched right away by the
government to reduce crime
and the fear of crime.

Monitoring

The Senator’s other propos-
als included that anyone who
attacks or threatens a police-
man or judge should be tried
right away; that accused mur-
derers should be subject to
immediate trials so as to avoid
the chance of them being
released on bail; that electron-
ic monitoring of those on bail
should be implemented; that
regular checks on the status of
evidence, witnesses and those
accused in crimes should be
made to ensure that cases do
not fall by the wayside.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
crime should not be made into
a “political football”, but noted
that the FNM’s general elec-
tion campaign included the
message that “if you want to

fA Aahaniwas faniited

reduce crime, vote FNM.”

“Well, the FNM has been in
charge since 2008 and crime
has steadily increased since
then,” she said, quoting sever-
al recent crime related head-
lines.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson
accused the government of
“dismantling a multi-faceted
strategy to address the prob-
lems in the administration of
justice and crime” left in place
by the former PLP government
prior to the 2007 election.

Projects

“Unfortunately law and
order is another area where
projects left in place were not
built on. They were stopped or
cancelled and Urban Renewal
was subsequently reinstated. I
understand that Swift Justice
is partially reinstated. I do not
understand why games would
be played or risks taken with
the safety of our citizens and
the vitality of our tourist indus-
try. Urban Renewal and Swift
Justice were working for the
benefit of Bahamians. If they
were not prefect they should
have been fixed, not stopped
and reinstated two years later
while crime continues to spiral
out of control,” said the Sena-
tor.

She said that if the 2009 mur-
der rate were to take into
account all of the “unclassified
deaths” the increase in the rate
from 2008 to 2009 would be
just under 40 per cent.

“They show murders (are) at
85 to end December 2009. We

Employment Opportunity

Financial Controller

Description:

SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson

know that the police reported
more than 100 deaths, some of
which are yet to be classified.
We Bahamians know that they
were not due to natural causes
and we know that they are
crimes, which is why the police
are involved,” she said.

Law

It seems “people are more
and more feeling that they
must take the law into their
own hands because the gov-
ernment seems to be inept and
unable and at very least, help-
less. Bahamians are under siege
in their homes. Home invasions
are increasing. Bahamians are
not safe on the streets. Tourists



are not safe on Bay Street.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson com-
mended the police force for its
efforts to combat crime but
added that the full effective-
ness of their attempts will be
diminished unless matters can
be swiftly brought to trial.

“Judges are ready to hear
matters. They can only hear
what is brought before them.
They do not prepare matters
for trial,” said the former
Attorney General.

She suggested that full and
effective collaboration between
various government agencies is
lacking and that this is imping-
ing upon the number of mat-
ters which are being put for-
ward for trial.

pledged their support,”
: Said.

Police officers carry
out ‘operation disrupt’

IN the first of a planned series of
exercises, officers of the Southwest-
ern Division last week conducted
an operation to ensure the busi-

i nesses in that area were secure,
? school children were not harassing
? members of the community and
i motorists were abiding by the laws

of the road.
The police officers set out last

Friday at about 2.45pm to carry out

“operation disrupt” with the aim of

disrupting persons who seem to
: have little or no regard for law and

order.
The operation commenced at the

junction of Baillou Hill Road and

Carmichael Road, and officers paid

specific attention to “school chil-
: dren who usually annoy members

of the community after school,” the

i police said in a press release.

Additionally, road checks were
conducted, halting bus drivers

whose licences were expired or did
; not meet the required dressed

code.
The officers also conducted a

walkabout in the community, assur-
; ing residents of the police’s com-
: mitment to reducing and eventually

eradicating crime.
Residents were encouraged to be

their brother’s keeper and to report

all suspicious persons, vehicles and
activities.

“The residents were excited and
the police

Further, officers also ensured

that the business community of

Carmichael was secured. Patrols

: were increased during the evening
? thus creating a safer environment
: for businesses.

The operation was a success, and

the officers arrested two men for
? suspected dangerous drugs, four
: men for house break-ins and recov-

ered three suspected stolen vehi-
cles.
“This initiative is just the begin-

: ning of a number of activities

: geared toward ensuring the resi-

: dents and business communities of
? the Southwestern Division

(Carmichael) are safe. The officers
of the Southwestern Division are

: focused and determined to create a
? safe environment for persons to

? live, work, visit and play,” the

: police’s press statement said.

IT’S A TIME OF JOY.AND JUBULAT
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- Acting as a trusted business advisor to the IBM Bahamas

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

MINISTER CATHERINE H. PAYNE
International Director of Wonven’s Min-
estries from Cleveland, Tennessee, U.S.A
BISHOP JOHN N. HUMES

National Overseer of the Church of God
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands
BISHOP CLARENCE WN. WILLIAMS

ation Career of tbe Turks & Caria [slarke

BISHOP BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter of the Caribbean and
Athintic Ocean Islands
: The
Convention Praise Team, National Con
vention Chair, Tabernacle Concert Chor,
the Church of God National Choir, Ba-
hamas Public Officers Choir and various
soloists, choirs and singing groupes.
The Bahama Brass Band, Bahama
Youth and Junior Brass Bands will pro
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Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, CMG,
DD, JP, National Overseer and era-

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ioe, the National Grerseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarmet
B. Rahming will deliger the final message on
the Convention's

icine, the family a and a

For further lieu eist eall 322-309





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Ambassador Joshua Sears in London for two days of intensive discussions



Bahamas awarded ‘signal honour’ of helping
with Commonwealth’s human rights review



THE Bahamas has been awarded a
“signal honour” by being given the
opportunity to contribute to the Com-
monwealth’s review of human rights
records and laws, said Ambassador
Joshua Sears, Director General of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The ambassador travelled to Lon-
don this week to attend the two-day
Commonwealth Mid-Term Review
of Universal Periodic Review Process
which concludes today.

the Human Rights Council estab-
lished by the United Nations Gener-
al Assembly in March 2006 is to mon-
itor and review the human rights
records of 192 member states of the
international community.

Expert

An expert panel convened in Lon-
don to review the implementation of
the Universal Period Review Process

UN. A document of best practices in
the Commonwealth will be one of
the outcomes of this review.

To date, 142 countries of the UN
have been reviewed.

The Bahamas was the first CARI-
COM country to be reviewed, which
was done at the Third Session in
December 2008, and Ambassador
Sears has been invited to share the
Bahamas and Caribbean experience
with the Commonwealth Expert

Secretary General Kamelesh Shar-
ma delivered the keynote address and
the panel engaged in two days of
intensive discussions, which made an
important contribution to the UN
review process.

Ambassador Sears said that this
opportunity to contribute to the Com-
monwealth’s position of the review
of this new instrument and the further
development of human rights laws
and practices globally is an honour
for the Bahamas.

One of the primary instruments of

and to make recommendations to the

Group.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREST STORM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FENUGREEK
ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EAST WATER RESEARCH
GROUP LIMITED

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EAST WATER RESEARCH GROUP LIMITED is
in voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(b) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard
of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Peter Leppard
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ECLAIRE LTD.

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ECLAIRE LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Gizeh
Management Ltd. of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British
Virgin Islands.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Gizeh Management Ltd.
Liquidator

KGBC SCHOOL VISITS — Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee members partic-
ipated in a special morning assembly at Walter Parker Primary School. Some of the
students got up close and personal with the KFC mascot ‘Chicky’ as he helped

spread the anti-littering message.

THE Keep Grand Bahama Clean
Committee’s (KGBC) first commu-
nity clean-up for the year is planned
for this Saturday in Coral Gardens.

KGBC in conjunction with Domin-
ion Community Church, Access Min-
istries and the Seahorse Urban
Renewal, will spearhead an early
morning clean-up of loose litter
throughout the community, beginning
at 7.30am.

The event culminates with a much
anticipated health fair and fun day.

To increase public awareness
amongst Coral Gardens’ residents and
garner support for Saturday morn-
ing’s event, representatives of the var-
ious groups took to the streets on
Wednesday afternoon distributing fly-
ers and speaking with residents.

Nakira Wilchcombe, KGBC chair-
person, described the clean-ups as an
integral part of their mission and invit-
ed Coral Gardens’ residents, civic

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OLD GELLINGSLY
INVESTMENTS LTD.

JOSHUA SEARS

Community clean-up on Saturday



CORAL GARDENS CLEAN-UP — Representatives
from the Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee and
other organisations delivered personal invitations to
Coral Gardens’ residents in advance of Saturday’s
clean-up in their community. Pictured (I-r): Lonna

groups, other organisations and the
general public to join in the activities.

Prior to Saturday’s clean-up, KGBC
participated in a special assembly at
the nearby Walter Parker Primary
School. Committee members were on
hand to spread the message of love
of country and the environment to
the entire gathering of students, fac-
ulty and administrators.

Addressing them was KGBC mem-
ber Rehuder Rolle of Love 97.

Excited

“We are excited to stop by your
school to encourage you to ‘Keep
Grand Bahama Clean’. Even though
you are young now, you’re not too
young to begin to be proactive and
aware of the importance of keeping
Grand Bahama and your entire coun-
try, clean.”

Munroe, KGBC committee member; Rowena Albury,
facilitator with Seahorse Urban Renewal; Nola
McKenzie, resident, and Geneva Rutherford, direc-
tor of community relations at GBPA.

A highlight of the school visit was a
special appearance by Kentucky Fried
Chicken’s mascot ‘Chicky’.

KFC is an official corporate partner
of the ‘Keep Grand Bahama Clean’
initiative.

“Once again, KFC has joined forces
with KGBC in an effort to reach the
youth in our schools by using our
much-loved ‘Chicky’ to reinforce the
importance of their part in keeping
Grand Bahama Clean,” said Aniska
Saunders, assistant marketing man-
ager at KFC.

“Through anti-littering campaigns
we hope to promote pride in our
country and personal responsibility
in keeping our island litter free which
is a benefit we all enjoy.”

School visits and community clean-
ups will continue throughout the
course of the year, along with other
special KGBC-sponsored events.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

AVLONA LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
PAPEIRA LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PAPEIRA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Orbitron Limited
of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Orbitron Limited
Liquidator

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRENOBLE FALLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



One of world’s largest
cargo ships in Freeport

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT- THE arrival
of one of the world’s largest
cargo ships in Grand Bahama
this week signals the impor-
tance of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port in the face of a
growing global population and
the expansion of China’s
exports, said Environment
Minister Dr Earl Deveaux.

And although the amount
of shipping traffic at the port
is still down due to the global
recession, things are slowly
starting to look up with more
orders from China.

Dr Deveaux was in
Freeport on Wednesday for
the arrival of the Northern
Jasper - one of the largest con-
tainer vessels in the world.

The vessel, which is oper-
ated by the Mediterranean
Shipping Company (MSC),
arrived in port carrying some
8,200 containers.

Minister Deveaux and Con-
tainer Port CEO Gary Gilbert
went onboard the ship, where
they presented a plaque to
Captain Seredyn Dariusz and
chief engineer Scarlat Alexan-
dru to commemorate the
occasion.

“This ship (Northern
Jasper) is the biggest ship we
ever had in Grand Bahama -
so this is a real big plus for
Grand Bahama,” Mr Gilbert
told reporters.

This is the second mega
container ship of its kind that
has docked at the harbour
here.

The Tomoko, the sister ship
of Northern Jasper, came in
February, carrying some 8,000
containers.

Dr Deveaux said the ship’s
arrival is a very significant
one, not only for the contain-
er port, but also for Grand
Bahama and the Bahamas.

“In order for this ship to go
into New York they have to
lower the top deck to get
under the bridge, but yet
Freeport is able to accommo-
date it.

“This ship is about half the
size of the one that will come
later in the year that actual
carries 14,000 containers (and)
that can’t even go on the east-
ern seaboard of the US, yet
the freight of the world will
come to Grand Bahama to
unload containers.

“MSC is one of our biggest
(on) register, and of course
the Bahamas is seeking to
promote the maritime regis-
ter,” said Dr Deveaux.

He noted that the port’s

Domeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Sylvia Lousie Davis Brown, 79

a resident of Davis Street, Fox Hill,
who passed away on 2nd March,
2010, will be held at Macedonia
Baptist Church, Bernard Road, Fox
Hill, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. David
S. Johnson, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.













































































Sylvia's true spirit of loving, caring,

sharing and cherished memories

will continue to linger in the hearts

of her beloved family three sons,

Roderick, Rev. Dr. Anthony and

Servant Elect Bob Brown; one

adopted son, Timothy Capronfour
daughters, Advilda Lockhart, Jacqueline Comarcho, Patricia Cartwright,
and Donna Brown; two brothers, Samuel Davis Jr. of New York, and
Calvin Davis; one sister, Vernell Davis; twenty seven grandchildren,
Yvette "Sandy" Kerr, Eddie, Anishka, Tito, Kino and Candice, Carol,
Lloyd, Latoya, Amanda, Jamie, Roderick Jr.; Lakisha, Anton, Antoinette,
Monate, Amanda, Albert Jr., and Cyril Cartwright Jr; Isrick, Robert,
Zahane, Brinique, and Bobby Jr. Brown; Gia Finley, Timea and
Timothy Jr. Carpron; fifteen great grandchildren, Aysha-Cassidi, Tito
Jr., Rashan, Donica, Angelica, Ryan, Ramold, Lloyd Jr., Brandon,
Dillon, Garnet, Rotisha, Laquell, Antrielle, Denoughn Knowles and
Demeco Dean; thirteen nieces, Vandria Forbes, Cindy Cartwright,
Kim Thompson, Jill Hanna, Janet Rolle, Ethel Pinder, Peggy Davis,
Gail Cochinamogulos, Sharona, Shabraka, Lakeisha, Sherelle, and
Sherese Davis; eight nephews, Calvin Jr., Marvin Davis, Troy Davis,
Larry Pinder, John Pinder President of the Public Service Union and
N.C.T.U, Fredrick and Valentino Davis; nineteen grand-nieces, Daria,
Darrinika, Deshanna, Brittany, Tina, Yvette, Amy, Narrissa, Theodosia,
Petiere, Kesha, Claudina Cooper, Kera Cartwright, Inderia, lleanna
Thompson, Taniesha Davis, Katera Thompson, Renna Rolle, and
Trishae Davis; twenty-one granddnephews, Darrien, Steven, Dwight,
Theo, Theron, Theodore, Theophilus Cochinamogulos, Antereu, Javan,
Jamar, Larrez, Lamar, Patrick, Valentino Forbes, Jamal, Jermaine,
Cecil, Calvin Davis III, Malvin Davis Jr., Macfado Thompson, Rodolph
Rolle, sister-in-law, Cora Davis; one son-in-law, Albert Cartwright
Sr., two daughtersin-law, Esther Brown, Quillie Capron; grand-
daughter-in-law, Nadia Brown; godchild, Shirley Dames of Acklins
Island; numerous relatives and friends including, The Community of
Black Point Exuma, Browns, Smiths, Minnis’, Ferguson's, Rolle's,
Robinson's, The entire Davis family of the Fox Hill Community, Irene
Davis, Cleomy Saunders, Theologus Cochinamogulos, Steven Kerr,
Dorothy Davis Rahming, Rev. Dr. William Thompson, Minister Betty
Davis Thompson, Rev. Julia Bain, Sophie Davis Forbes, Rubey,
Margaret, Debra and Anthony Davis, Beryl Davis Wright, Linol Davis,
Martie Davis, Trevor, Burky, Dillian Davis, Joyann Davis Thompson,
Elenor Forrester Smith, Dr.Carrington Pinder, St. Marks Native Baptist
Church, Evangelist Carolyn Demeritte, Rev. Sherry Saunders, Ena
and Madolyn Timothy, Elsie Mae Johnson, Dola Anna Smith, Shirley
Johnson, Ralnol, Sammy, Karvol, Junior and Glen Mackey, Beverley
Bain, Anna Smith, Bruce Davis, Maud Bain, Derek Davis, Urskin
Davis, Cora Davis Mackey, Senitor Doctor Jacinta Higgs, Fred Ramsey
and family, Cynthia Davis, Rev. Estella Davis of Orlando Florida,
Oline Francis, Janique Francis, Miriam Brennen, Sylvia Sealy,
Honorable Minister Fred Mitchell, Martin Kemp, Paula Tynes, Bishop
Dr. Evin Hart, William Hall Senior, Buster Hall, Maxine and Marium
Rolle, Rev.Dr. Cari Rahming, Samuel Kemp, Evangelist Margaret
Strachan and family, Mt Senior Preston Moss of the St. Anselm's
Church and Miriam Roker. The Soup Kitchen of Mt. Carey Church,
and The Soup Kitchen of Macedonia Baptist Church, The staff of the
Ministry of Health, the staff of the Department of Environmental
Health Services, Elizabeth Estate Clinic, Nurse Debra Watson, and
the Fox Hill Clinic, Present Day Bible Miistries, Mount Tabor Full
Baptist Church, Pastors of Prayer, Macedonia Baptist Church, Rev.
Dr. David Johnson, Friends of Davis Street Fox Hill, Rev. Dr. Philip
Rahming, Demeritte's Funeral Home, Princess Margaret Hospital, The
Fox Hill Police Station, Inspector Smith, and Woodlawn Gardens.

Aa MINISTER Dr Earl Deveaux (right) onboard the Northern Jasper.



proximity to the eastern
seaboard of the US makes
Freeport a “vital link” in
international shipping from
South America to Asia and
Europe.

Dr Deveaux said the con-
tinued expansion of the con-
tainer port and the harbour in
Freeport is important as the
world population grows and
exports continue to increase
from China.

He reported that China
exports for February
increased by 46 per cent com-
pared to last year this time.

Minister Grant said Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
decision to approve the con-
tainer port for Freeport was
the right decision. He noted
that the port continues to pro-

vide hundreds of jobs for
Bahamians.

Mr Gilbert said Freeport
has the deepest harbour in the
Western Hemisphere, with a
depth of 54ft to accommodate
the largest vessels in the
world.

He said every week one of
MSC’s mega container vessels
will dock at the container
port.

In addition to MSC, Mr
Gilbert revealed that the con-
tainer port is looking for
another a major shipping cus-
tomer.

He said that business at the
container port is still down,
but has improved slightly over
the recession.

“We are not to the 2,000
levels but at the rest of

Hutchison’s other ports we
are starting to see more orders
coming from China ports.
They are not as long in dura-
tion but we are back about 25
per cent of what we were at
the low of last year, and that is
not all the way to when we
were 30 per cent down from
2008. So it is a very good sign
that things are coming back,”
he said.

Mr Gilbert said that expan-
sion is continuing with
Bahama Rock to excavate the
harbour for an additional
1,800 meters of quay side and
other 10 cranes.

He said their safety record
at the container port is very
good, with no fatalities,
although there were minor
accidents.

AVOID BEING NEXT
How To Avoip BEING SHOT BY THE POLICE - Part 4

STOP LIVING IN FEAR - .



GO AND tell your young men
these things.

Under no circumstances should you
ever become verbally abusive to a
police officer. Even if you are inno-
cent, you are exposing yourself to
potential violence.

A police officer deals on a daily
basis with members of the general
public who are cursing at him in the
course of doing his duty.

It is quite human to lash out at the
officer; I know I don’t feel “served and pro-
tected” when someone is writing me a ticket
for speeding.

Truth be known, most officers in this coun-
try just ignore the verbal threats against their
person. They appreciate the violent language
of our new culture, and the immaturity of

some people.

The problem comes when the officer
is in a combative state, because he may
be stopping cars to look for a criminal
whose profile you fit. Any resistance —
including verbal abuse — on your part,
could escalate the situation rapidly and
dangerously.

Always remember, we outnumber
the Bad Guys.

D’Arcy Rahming



e D’Arcy Rahming is a violent crime
researcher and Adjunct Faculty Member at the
College of the Bahamas. He holds Black Belts
in several martial arts and is an internationally
renowned seminar leader for corporations, pri-
vate groups and police and security groups.
You can follow him on his blog at www.sto-
plivinginfear.org.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
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church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
—

Former Turks and Caicos Premier
wants Prime Minister to assist territory

FROM page one

and Caicos government to
have been accused of malfea-
sance by the British-led com-
mission of inquiry that ulti-
mately resulted in the suspen-
sion of the country’s constiti-
tution and its democratic insti-
tutions last year by the United
Kingdom government.

Mr Misick stepped down as

Premier in March 2009, deny-
ing charges of corruption. The
British then took direct con-
trol of governing the country
for what they forecast would
be a period of up to two years
— a move that was criticised
by Caricom as “not the most
effective tool to bolster good
governance and effective
administration in the territo-
ry. 2?
On Monday, a “Unity
march” in Providenciales
against the imposition of
direct rule by the British, sup-
ported by both major politi-
cal parties in Turks and
Caicos, drew a turnout esti-
mated at between 750 and
2,000. Putting this in perspec-
tive, there are around 8,000
people on the country’s elec-
toral register.

Some local observers say
the turnout proves the
strength of opposition nation-
ally to the direct British rule
— which also involves the sus-
pension of trial by jury in the
British Overseas Territory —
and more recent proposals by

the British to change the
island’s constitution to allow a
certain class of foreign nation-
als to vote and seek political
office in the islands.

The day after the march —
which was heralded as an
unprecedented and symbolic
show of unity by the political
parties — the British interim
government drew the ire of
Turks Islanders by announc-
ing that it would be slashing
civil servant’s pay by 10 per
cent effective April 1.

The British put this decision
down to falling revenue in a
poor economy, however, for-
mer Premier Mr Misick told
The Tribune yesterday that he
views the action as “subtle
intimidation for misbehav-
iour” in the wake of the
protest march.

Yesterday Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
said the Bahamas’ position on
the situation there “has not
changed.”

“The Bahamas has already
stated its position. The
Bahamas is not going to inter-
vene in any of the issues
regarding the TCI until they
resolve their internal matters.”

The PLP, meanwhile, have
taken a slightly different view
of the situation. In a statement
issued Tuesday, the PLP

called the joint march “a pos-
itive development in the
development of Turks and
Caicos democracy,” adding
that it is pleased the two par-
ties have “come to a joint
position” on the question of
British rule.

“We urge the British to
restore democratic rule to the
Turks and Caicos and to resist
any move that would weaken
the ability of the native peo-
ples of the Turks and Caicos
to run their own affairs,” read
the statement.

Yesterday Fred Mitchell,
the MP for Fox Hill and for-
mer minister of foreign affairs
under the Christie adminis-
tration, said he believes the
Bahamas and Caricom have
a responsibility to keep the
plight of TCI “on the front
burner.”

“T will certainly try to be in
touch with friends at Caricom
to see whether issue can be
raised. There is a heads of
government meeting going on
now. I don’t think Caricom
should ignore the fact that
democracy has been suspend-
ed in TCL TCI is an associate
member of Caricom, so Cari-
com has a responsibility in line
with the statement issued last
year saying that they would
keep it on the front burner.”

The MP said he is of the

YOUR CONNECTION-TO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER 2010 - 2011 DIRECTORS AND
OFFICERS/ EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES
REQUEST FOR QUOTATION

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited

Nea FANsl Ma IES) L0 4



view that the Bahamas has a
“special interest” in the affairs
of the TCI, “because anything
that happens in TCI of course
affects us.”

And he added the PLP sup-
ports giving the TCI people
the opportunity to have a gen-
eral election in which they can
elect the government of their
choice.

“Tt is the same thing they
(the British) would do in their
own country if there was polit-
ical or constitutional crisis —
dissolve parliament and have
fresh elections, so that you
deal with new people. The
way to deal with people
alleged to be individually
responsible for criminal con-
duct is to bring charges before
the courts,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said he and
some of his parliamentary col-
leagues have discussed the
possibility of “mobilising the

(BIC) is pleased fo invite qualified Companies/Firms to

submit a proposal to provide insurance coverage for Di-
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The deadline for submission of tenders is March 23rd,
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were)



Turks and Caicos popula-
tion in the Bahamas to see
if we couldn’t bring some
more sensitivity on this
issue and to help with what-
ever is going on in TCI”.

According to Mr Misick,
the population of Turks and
Caicos islanders and their
descendants in the
Bahamas are larger than
those who currently reside
in the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Misick describes the
British Governor of TCI as
a “dictator” and the current
situation in the islands as
an “occupation” by the
British.

He told The Tribune that
“particularly because of the
long history” shared by the

Bahamas and TCI, he feels
the Bahamas “more than
any other country in Cari-
com has a greater respon-
sibility to educate for fair-
ness and change in Turks
and Caicos in the same way
the Bahamas under (Sir
Lynden) Pindling led the
way on educating for
change in South Africa
when there was apartheid.”

“T certainly take this
opportunity to call on the
Prime Minister to become
more engaged in the mat-
ters that are taking place,
in the the injustice that has
taken place in the Turks
and Caicos,” Mr Misick
stated.

US report contains claims that children
trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas

FROM page one

therefore no prosecutions or convictions during the year.

This comes after noted anti-slavery campaigner Aaron Cohen
warned that the Bahamas is “at risk of falling into the tentacles of
organised crime in the Caribbean”.

In an interview with The Tribune last week, he said that while the
country is already a transit stop and destination for women and chil-
dren either tricked or forced into servitude, the problem could be

about to get much worse.

He fears that in the wake of the January 12 earthquake in Haiti,
the Bahamas could replace that country as a chief transit hub for

human traffickers.

Mr Cohen pointed to the State Department’s Trafficking in
Persons (TIP) reports for 2008 and 2009, which mentioned the
Bahamas as a destination for sex workers from the Dominican
Republic and “restaveks”, or children exploited for domestic

labour, from Haiti.

The most recent TIP report, released last week, noted that in
2008, parliament passed the Trafficking in Persons Prevention
and Suppression Act which sets out penalties for offenders that
range from three years to life imprisonment.

However, the State Department criticised the tendency of local
officials to lump human trafficking together with human smuggling
— the transportation of persons engaging in voluntary illegal immi-
gration — and punish the victims with arrest and deportation rather

than offering them help.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

You can find our interview with Aaron Cohen at:
http://www.tribune242.com/editorial/Insight/03082010_slavery_Insight-pg

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHISPERS OF
THE MUSE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERANNA PARK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PEACESTONIA
RIVER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 9

S
k
FRIDAY, MARCH

12,

ts

2010











HIGH AMBITIONS School track and field

CV BETHEL’S Terrane
Roker takes part in the
high jump during the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations ‘
annual Scotiabank Nation-
al High School Track and
Field Championships. The
event is taking place at the
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

NOTICE

SANTANDER MERCHANT BANK
LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders was held on
5" day of December, 2009 at which time all
accounts showing the manner in which the
winding up of the above company had been
conducted and the property of the Company
disposed of was laid before the meeting and
approved by the Shareholders.

Pablo Rodriguez Miiller



SAC’S Danielle Gibson jumps
during the long jump.

LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE
PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders was held on
5" day of December, 2009 at which time all
accounts showing the manner in which the
winding up of the above company had been
conducted and the property of the Company
disposed of was laid before the meeting and
approved by the Shareholders.



NCA’S Lathario Minnis in the Pablo Rodriguez Miller

triple jump. LIQUIDATOR

PHOTOS:

aed : P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas
Felipé Major

/Tribune staff

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SEE PAGE 10

CARIFTA SWIMMING TEAM PICKED



[AAF WORLD INDOOR
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Baltamian athletes eye
International metals

A contingent of Bahamian
athletes vie for spots on the
international medal stand and
an opportunity to be crowned
World Champion at the biggest
gathering of nations in the his-
tory of the IAAF World Indoor
Championships.

Nine Bahamians take to the
track today on day one of the
meet in Doha, Qatar.

Christine Amertil, a two-time
World Indoors bronze medallist
in the event in 2003 and 2006,
opens competition for the
Bahamas in Heat One of the
Women's 400m.

Amertil, who has posted a
season's best time of 53.43s, will
run out of lane five.

Also in the heat will be Deb-
bie Dunn of the United States,
world leader in the event with a
time of 50.86s.

In the Men's 400m, Chris
Brown will start his trek
towards a third World Indoors
medal. Brown, who has previ-
ously captured two bronze
medals in the event, will run in
heat five out of lane six.

Brown has posted the fastest
qualifying time of his heat with
a time of 46.20s.

Michael Mathieu will also
join Brown in the field of quar-
termilers.

Mathieu will run in heat one
out of lane four and enters with
the third fastest season's best




CHRISTINE AMERTIL

of his heat with a time of 46.82s.

Chandra Sturrup, the first
Bahamian to capture a gold
medal for the Bahamas at the
event, when she took a first
place finish in 2001, makes yet
another appearance in her sig-
nature event.

Sturrup will run in lane two
of heat two coming in with a
qualifying time of 7.20s.

Sturrup will be paired against
Veronica Campbell-Brown of
Jamaica who in her first appear-
ance at the World Indoor
Championships enters the heat
with the fastest qualifying time
of 7.14s. In the Men's 60m,
Rodney Greene will make his
first appearance at the event
when he runs in heat four out
of lane three. Green's time of
6.66s is the second fastest qual-
ifying time of the heat behind

Nine take to track today in Doha



CHANDRA STURRUP

Mike Rodgers of the United
States with 6.52s.

Shamar Sands will run in
heat two of the 60m hurdles out
of lane seven, and enters with a
season's best time of 7.54s.

Former world champion
Donald Thomas and Trevor
Barry will be the lone competi-
tors in the field when they com-
pete in the men's high jump.

Thomas has posted a sea-
son's best leap of 2.25m while
Barry has reached 2.19m on the
year. With 150 countries con-
firmed to compete in Doha at
the Aspire Dome, it surpassed
the record of 147 countries set
two years agon in Valencia.

The World Indoor Champi-
onships, which were first called
the World Indoor Games in
Paris took place in Paris in
1985 and 69 nations took part.

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For Information: 393-3453/393-3141





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS

36-member team picked to compete
at Carifta swimming championships

@ THE TEAM: Boys and giris

Girls

15-17

Maya Albury
Ashley Butler
Kadesha Culmer
Bria Deveaux
McKayla Lightbourn
Shaunte Moss
Je'Nae Saunders

13-14

Gabrielle Greene
Abigail Lowe
Berchadette Moss
Laura Morely
Riquel ROlle
Taryn Smith

NOTICE

SANTANDER MERCHANT BANK
LIMITED

A traditionally successful Carifta team
fielded by the Bahamas Swimming Feder-
ation looks to extend its legacy after nam-
ing what promises to be another group of
top-notch performers.

The BSF has selected and ratified a 36
member team to compete at the 25th
annual Carifta Swimming, Synchronized
Swimming, and Water Polo Champi-
onships Championships, April 3-6 in
Kingston, Jamaica.

The Bahamas returns several veteran
swimmers from a team that finished second
in the points standing last year with 691.50
points and tallied 18 gold, 17 silver and 14
bronze.

Nearly 20 countries will field teams for
the 25th edition of the games including
defending champions Aruba.

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required
to send particulars thereof to the

Mancer Roberts

13-14

Zarian Cleare

Peter Farquaharson
TAuren Moss
Dustin Tynes
Anibal Hernandez
Valdes

Jacinda Williams

11-12

Jourdan Bevans
Leslie Campbell
Joanna Evans
Doran Reed
Simone Sturrup
Andreas Weech

undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-1682,

Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30" day of
March, A.D. 2010.

Pablo Rodriguez Miller
11-12

Dionisio Carey
Farion Cooper
Aaron Levarity
Zach Moses
Meshach ROberts

Boys

15-17

Evante Gibson
Matthew Lowe
Toby McCarroll
Delano McIntosh
Armando Moss

LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas



Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERLASTING WONDERS
INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ST. PETRUS
BUSINESS CORP.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COVENDALE SEAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAVITY FORCES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Un ROMAN CHGuleeeeleny Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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NOTICE
PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required
to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-1682,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30" day of
March, A.D. 2010.

Pablo Rodriguez Miiller
LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENTERPRISE IVORY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POTATORI CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 11





FROM page one

petition filed on behalf of Mr
Pinder — the Progressive Lib-
eral Party’s candidate — was
fundamentally flawed.

“In the prayers of the peti-
tion, the petitioner asks the
court to exercise the jurisdic-
tion conferred by section 69(1)
— of the Parliamentary Elec-
tions Act. A petitioner who is
seeing to avail himself of the
jurisdiction of the court ought
to say what he is seeking,” Mr
Evans submitted. “In this case
one would expect that he
would reveal exactly what it
is that he seeks to receive
from the court. If he does not
do that he puts the respon-
dents in a position of not
knowing what case they have
to meet, not knowing what
they have to respond to,” Mr
Evans told the court.

“First of all he must assert
that the voters were properly
registered and entitled to vote.
The petition contains no
prayer in his favour. There are
no grounds given for finding



BOCA Dt

that the voters were properly
registered and entitled to
vote,” Mr Evans said.

“A petition has particular
characteristics, one of which
the petitioner must set out the
brief facts. Notwithstanding
the discreet nature of the peti-
tion, the court must deal with

LOCAL NEWS

FNM bid to have PLP election court petition struck out fails

it in the same manner as it
deals with any other petition,”
Mr Evans said. Mr Evans
argued that the defect in the
petition cannot be cured by
an amendment. Mr Evans also
argued that the fact that he
had not highlighted the issue
earlier did not prevent the
court from striking out the
petition.

Attorney David Higgins,
who is lead counsel for
Returning Officer Jack
Thompson and Parliamentary
Commissioner Errol Bethel,
adopted the submissions of
Mr Evans.

“We adopt them to the
extent that the petition lacks
the necessary facts and
grounds as is required by a
regular petition. The petition
should contain all the facts rel-
evant to the application. The
petition ought to be able to
stand on its own,” Mr Higgins
told the court.

Mr Ryan’s attorney Philip

Nyseei,

Dr, Koes Flowers, PhO

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“Brave” Davis, however,
maintained that the applica-
tion to have the petition struck
out was misconceived. “The
application presupposes that
we don’t know why we are
here,” he said. Mr Davis noted
that the respondents had filed
affidavits and played an active
role in the proceedings thus
far. Mr Davis submitted that
the application should not be
entertained and should be dis-
missed. He said that the peti-
tion satisfied all the mandato-
ry requirements.

The judges, after delibera-
tions on the matter did not
accede to Mr Evans’ applica-
tion and awarded cost for two
attorneys to Mr Pinder’s legal
team. Mr Evans then made an
application to appeal the deci-
sion in the Court of Appeal
and also sought a stay of the
proceedings.

“Having regard to the
nature of the proceedings, the
only just remedy would be to

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grant us leave to appeal and
grant us a stay,” Mr Evans
said. Mr Higgins also joined
in the application. Mr Davis,
however, opposed the appli-
cation.

“Assuming but not con-
ceding that there is a right of
appeal, it would seem to me
that if a right resides now,
the same right would reside
at the completion of the pro-
ceedings,” Mr Davis said. To
this Mr Evans responded by
saying, “In terms of the effect
of the application, if the
appeal is launched at the end
it would avail us nothing.”

After deliberating, the
judges refused that applica-
tion as well. “We feel that
any appeal which is neces-
sary, can be brought at the
end of the process without
prejudice to any of the par-
ties,” Senior Justice Allen
said. Mr Evans then asked
the court to grant a conser-
vatory stay until Monday so

Mr. Jermaine Kalle, WIS

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that his team could approach
the Court of Appeal today.
Mr Davis, however, object-
ed stating that the court did
not have the jurisdiction to
grant such a stay but only a
superior court. Mr Evans,
however, claimed that he had
once been involved in a case
in which such a stay was
granted.

Senior Justice Allen, how-
ever, said that in the absence
of any such authorities the
court was minded not to
grant the stay. The case is
now expected to proceed at
10 o’clock this morning.

The election court petition
was filed by Ryan Pinder of
the PLP, who gained 1,499
votes to Dr Sands’ 1,501 in
the February 16 Elizabeth
constituency by-election. Mr
Pinder is claiming that five
protest votes cast in his
favour should be counted,
thus making him the elected
MP for Elizabeth.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE disgraced former Premier of the Turks and Caicos Islands has pleaded for Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham to become more engaged in the plight of the British overseas territory over which the United Kingdom assumed control. Michael Misick said the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI tance of Caricom and partic ularly The Bahamas no one less than Prime Minister of the Bahamas himself to educate on our behalf (and to intervene on our behalf with his counterpart in London (British Prime Minister Gordon Brown). Mr Misick was the highest profile member of the Turks N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K WEATHER SUNWITH T-STORM HIGH 87F LOW 72F SEEPAGEB1 S P O R T S City Markets cuts net losses by 55 per cent SEEPAGE NINE High School track and field By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A N investigation is under way into claims that civil ser vants at the Ministry of Agric ulture coerced a businessm an into inflating company invoices in order to pocket the extra cash, The Tribune c an reveal. The alleged fraud came to the attention of ministry officials in late February, duri ng its Agribusiness expo at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre. A griculture Minister Larry Cartwright, who con firmed an investigation was u nder way, said ministry o fficials "kind of suspected" something was amiss when they noticed that a bill for tent rentals for the recent expo varied significantly from what the ministry paid for tents during the same event in previous years. "It was brought to my attention and I am having it investigated," Mr Cartwright told The Tribune According to a well-placed source, a business owner renting tents to the ministry for the event was asked by a high-ranking civil servant to adjust an invoice by several thousand dollars, with i nstructions that the public servant would take the extra money. T he source further claimed that the business owner was promised more government w ork if this request was agreed to. When these claims were put to Mr Cartwright, he d enied a high-ranking employee was involved. He said the investigation w as in its initial stages and that the person/s believed to be behind the alleged scheme has not yet been i dentified. "There have been no firings, the ministry wasn't ablet o identify any particular person as yet," he said. When asked if he suspected the allegations may be part of wider fraudulent acts throughout the ministry, the Long Island representative said: "It is difficult to say but this is the first time I heard about a matter like that." At the moment, it does not appear that the ministry will file criminal charges against any employee if their suspi cions are substantiated. "From our end, no, we will not file charges. I would expect to hear from the sales person, they should have gone to police," said Mr Cartwright. The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WERE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich Ministry probes fraud allegations Claims that businessman was coerced into inflating invoices B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o rBa h a m a s S u p e r m a r k e t s p a r e n t o f t h e 1 1 s t r o n g C i t y M a r k e t s f o o d s t o r e c h a i n s l a s h e d i t s n e t l o s s e s b y 5 5 p e r c e n t d u r i n g i t s 2 0 0 9 f i s c a l y e a r t o $ 6 0 6 9 m i l l i o n i t s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s y e s t e r d a y t h a t w h i l e c u s t o m e r c o u n t w a s u p b y a c o u p l e o f p e r c e n t a g e p o i n t s i t h a d a l o n g l o n g l o n g w a y t o g o t o r e t u r n t o p r o f i t a b i l i t y T h e p u b l i c l y t r a d e d f i r m u n v e i l i n g u n a u d i t e d m a n a g e m e n t a c c o u n t s f o r t h e y e a r t o J u n e 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t a n d i n g s u m 2 0 0 9 f i n a n c i a l y e a r s l o s s u p 1 6 5 % a t $ 1 2 9 1 m a s c a s h f l o w c o n t i n u e s t o d e t e r i o r a t e 2 0 1 0 Q 2 l o s s l i k e l y t o b e h i g h e r t h a n Q 1 s $ 3 9 8 k a s f i r m f a l l s i n t o n e g a t i v e n e t w o r t h S E E p a g e 7 B B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T H E B a h a m a s I n s t i t u t e o f C h a r t e r e d A c c o u n t a n t s ( B I C A ) C o u n c i l w i l l m e e t o n M a r c h 1 8 t o d e c i d e w h e t h e r t o a d o p t n e w a u d i t i n g s t a n d a r d s f o r s m a l l a n d m e d i u m s i z e d f i r m s i t s p r e s i d e n t s a i d y e s t e r d a y e x p l a i n i n g t h a t t h e s e i n v o l v e d a m u c h s m a l l e r s t a n d a r d s c h e c k l i s t t h a n t h e 3 0 0 0 p a g e d o c u m e n t u s e d o n f u l l d i s c l o s u r e a u d i t s R e e c e C h i p m a n s a i d t h a t i n c o m p a r i s o n t h e s t a n d a r d s c h e c k l i s t d o c u m e n t t h a t w o u l d b e u s e d i f B I C A a d o p t e d t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l F i n a n c i a l R e p o r t i n g S t a n d a r d s ( I F R S ) f o r s m a l l a n d m e d i u m s i z e d e n t e r p r i s e s r a n t o j u s t 2 5 0 p a g e s H e a l s o c l a r i f i e d s t a t e m e n t s m a d e p r e v i o u s l y t h a t a d o p t i o n o f t h e I F R S s t a n d a r d s c o u l d r e d u c e a u d i t f e e s b y 1 0 2 0 p e r c e n t t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e c o s t r e d u c t i o n s w e r e l i k e l y t o c o m e f r o m B a h a m i a n a c c o u n t a n t s a n d a u d i t o r s n o t h a v i n g t o a s s i s t s m a l l a n d m e d i u m s i z e d b u s i n e s s c l i e n t s w i t h t h e i n i t i a l p r e p a r a t i o n o f t h e i r f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s d u e t o t h e s i m p l i f i e d s t a n d a r d s T h i s w o r k M r C h i p m a n e x p l a i n e d w a s d i s t i n c t a n d s e p a r a t e f r o m t h e a c t u a l a u d i t i t s e l f s i n c e i t i n v o l v e d h e l p i n g c l i e n t s p r e p a r e f o r t h e p r o c e s s s i n c e m a n y d i d n o t k n o w h o w t o p r e p a r e f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s A u d i t f e e s b y t h e m s e l v e s t h e B I C A p r e s i d e n t s a i d m a y n o t c h a n g e a d d i n g t h a t t h e I F R S s t a n d a r d s f o r s m a l l a n d m e d i u m s i z e d b u s i n e s s e s w e r e s t i l l s t a n d a r d s a n d t h e w o r k r e q u i r e d w o u l d h a v e n o i m p a c t o n t h e a d o p t i o n o f o n e s t a n d a r d o v e r t h e o t h e r H e a d d e d : I n m o s t c a s e s s m a l l a n d m e d i u m e n t e r p r i s e c l i e n t s u s e a u d i t o r s o r a u d i t o r s s p e n d t i m e a s s i s t i n g i n p r e p a r i n g t h e f i n a n c i a l s H o w e v e r a s a r e s u l t o f s i m p l e r a c c o u n t i n g a n d r e p o r t i n g s t a n d a r d s t h e r e s h o u l d b e a r e d u c t i o n i n c o s t a s c l i e n t s s h o u l d b e a b l e t o p r o d u c e a n d p r e p a r e t h e i r o w n s t a t e m e n t s i n p r e p a r a t i o n f o r a n a u d i t M r C h i p m a n s a i d a b o u t 5 0 p e r s o n s r o u g h l y 2 5 p e r c e n t o f B I C A l i c e n s e e s a t t e n d e d T u e s d a y n i g h t s m e e t i n g t o d i s c u s s w h e t h e r t h e I F R S f o r s m a l l a n d m e d i u m s i z e d b u s i n e s s e s s h o u l d b e a d o p t e d D i f f e r e n t v a r i a t i o n s a n d o p i n i o n s w e r e e x p r e s s e d h e A c c o u n t a n t s t o d e c i d e o n s m a l l f i r m s t a n d a r d s n e x t w e e kS E E p a g e 5 B $ 6 m g a i n s s e e t a x a m n e s t y c o n t i n u e C i t y M a r k e t s c u t s n e t l o s s e s b y 5 5 % A u d i t s e t t o b e c o m p l e t e d e n d A p r i l / e a r l y M a y 2 0 1 0 C u s t o m e r c o u n t r i s e s a c o u p l e o f p e r c e n t a g e p o i n t s a s g r o c e r y c h a i n c o n t i n u e s r e c o v e r y p l a n L i k e f o r l i k e s a l e s d o w n 1 0 % f o r F e b r u a r y p e r i o d c o m p a r e d t o 1 8 % d e c l i n e y e a r o v e r y e a r f o r f i r s t h a l f B U S I N E S S V olume: 106 No.92FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 B AHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E By NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter n mckenzie@tribunemedia.net A TTORNEYS for Dr Duane Sands yesterday sought to have the election court petition of Leo Ryan Pinder struck out, claimi ng it was fundamentally flawed. T he court, however, did n ot accede to the application and also refused a subsequent application by Dr Sands legal team for a s tay of proceedings and for leave to appeal the decis ion in the Court of Appeal. T he Elizabeth by-elect ion court case began before Senior Justices Anita Allen and Jon Isaacs yesterday with the court h earing preliminary argum ents raised by counsel for Free National Movem ent candidate Dr Duane Sands. QC Thomas Evans w ho is lead counsel for Dr Sands submitted that the FNM bid to have PLP election court petition struck out fails SEE page 11 ASOLOMONS WHOLESALE advertise ment that appeared in yesterdays Tribune contained inaccurate information. The correct version is in todays edition, on Page 12. The Tri bune apologises for any inconvenience this error may have caused. SOLOMONS WHOLES ALE AD FAMILY members and close friends gathered at D W Davis Junior High last night in a memorial service for Keisha Thurston. The young athletes apparent suicide has shocked all who knew her. Just 18 years old, Keisha was in her second semester at the College of the Bahamas on an athletic scholarship, and proactive in the athletic community through its womens volleyball team. Keisha was found hanging from a rope at the familys home in McKinney Drive, Nassau, on Sunday, Feb ruary 28. REMEMBERING TRA GIC KEISHA MICHAELANDCARAL THURSTON the parents of Keisha, at the memorial service last night. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Former T urks and Caicos Premier wants Prime Minister to assist territory SEE page eight CLAIMS that children are being trafficked from Haiti into the Bahamas to be used for sex and forced labour have been raised for a second time in a US government report this time attributed to independent social workers. The State Departments 2009 Human Rights Report, released yesterday, said representatives of non-govern mental organisations on the ground in Haiti reported the problem of child trafficking for sexual and labour purposes, especially to the Domini can Republic and the Bahamas. The researchers noted that Haiti continues to be a source country for persons trafficked to a number of other places as well, including Jamaica, the United States, Europe and Canada. The report said: Trafficked citizens reported con ditions of bonded servitude, slavery, and forced labour. Extreme poverty and lack of employment were among key risk factors supporting human trafficking. It added that no information could be collected on the principal traffickers, their networks, or methods, and noted that there were no anti-traf ficking laws in Haiti and US report contains claims that children trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas SEE page eight

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AN all-points bulletin has been issued for 48-y ear-old Kirkwood Mario Storr who is wanted for questioning in connectionw ith murder. Storrs last known address is Johnson Terrace. He is described as being of dark complexion, medium build, 5 tall and weighing 150lbs. Storr is considered armed and extremely dan gerous. Persons with any infor m ation about his whereabouts are asked to contact the following numbers: Police emergency at 919/911; police control room at 322-3333; Crime Stoppers at 328-8477; the Southeastern police station at 392-4333/9 or the nearest police station. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net THE arraignment of a police officer facing a number of fraud charges was postponed until Monday for court dockets to be put in order. Eddie Florival, 40, of Sweet Lane off Faith Avenue, had been orderedto appear before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court Eight, Bank Lane yesterday morning to be arraigned on charges of conspiracy to commit fraud by false pretences and abetment to commit fraud. Some of the charges were concerned with others who had already been charged: prison inmate Shane Mackey, 29; prison officer Freeman Basden, 45, of Cox Way; and Tamanica Bethel, 38, a store manager of Whites Lane. But when Florival, who is currently free on bail, appeared before Ms Bethelat 10am she said she could not arraign him on the charges as the particulars were inconsistent and listed others who had already been charged. The magistrate asked for Royal Bahamas Police Force prosecutor Erecell Dorsett to re-order the dockets and for Florival to return to court at 2pm. However Florivals arraignment was then further postponed until Monday as Ms Bethel was still not satisfied with the dockets. And as she began to read two charges stating Florival was concerned with others in a conspiracy to commit fraud by false pretences and abetment to commit fraud, she asked the prosecutor why the dockets were not directed solely to Florival. Referring to the others named in the docket, she asked: Why arent they here? I dont have a difficulty reading the charges to him, but when you bring it on the same docket, and my docket has a person already charged with abetment on the same facts how can you charge him unless you put a new docket in? Inspector Dorsett said his officers had not understood the command to correct the dockets, and Ms Bethel made the prosecutor give his assurance the new dockets would be corrected and submitted on Monday morning. They have already taken a lot of my court time so they better get this fixed, she said. Florival remains on bail. Arraignment of officer postponed THE CARMICHAEL Road Detention Centre along with Her Majestys Prison once again featured negatively in the United States governments Human Rights Report which was released yesterday. Calling conditions at the prison harsh, the US report said that overcrowding remainsa major problem in the mens maximum security block. Originally built in 1953 to hold 450 inmates, it held 624 of the countrys 1,319 prisoners, the report prepared by the US Department of State reads. The remaining prisoners w ere held in mediumand minimum-security units that were at intended capacity. A remand centre held 265 detainees. Male prisoners in the maximum-security unit were crowded into poorly ventilated and poorly lit cells that generally lacked regular running water. Prisoners lacked beds, slept on concrete floors, and if not participating in work programmes, were locked in small cells. Maximum-security inmates w ere allowed outside for exercise four days a week for one hour per day. Inmates complained of inadequate potable water, lack of medical care, and poor treatment, the report states. The US State Departments report further said that there continued to be allegations of abuse by prison guards. Local attorneys and human rights observers asserted that the prisons Internal Affairs Unit lacked the independence needed to investigate impartially allegations of abuse and misconduct; it conducted no investigations during the year. Access Conditions for female prisoners were less severe than for men; however, women did not have access to the same workrelease programmes available to male prisoners. Despite the existence of a separate section to hold offenders between the ages of 16 and 18, the report said there is occasional mixing of juveniles and adult inmates depending on the severity of their crimes. A s it concerns the Carmichael Road Immigrant Detention Centre, the US report said that the facility held up to 500 detainees (with tent space for an additional 500), and women and men were held separately. It said: Haitians and Jamaicans were the most commonly interdicted migrants. The highest occupancy during the year was approximately 664. Observers complained of continuing abuse by guards, although immigration officials stated that no such complaints were filed during the year. However, human rights groups have expressed their concern that complaint investigations were being handled internally without any independent review or oversight. Children under the age of 14 were held in the womens d ormitory. Many children arriving with both parents were not allowed contact with the father except during weekly visitation. Despite the possibility of being held for months, children did not have access to education. The government made improvements to the Carmichael Road centre during the year, including benches for seating and recreation, cable television, bunk mattresses, fans, and 100 roll-away mattresses for o verflow. Two nurses conducted medical screening of detainees on a weekly basis; authorities issued care packages upon entry into the facility and installed a washer and dryer and additional pay phones for detainee use. (Amnesty International well as local media wrote and released reports throughout the year alleging systemic abuse of detainees at the Carmichael Road centre. In February the media reported that three Cuban detainees went on a hunger strike to protest conditions at the centre. Detainees In an expansive interview with a local daily newspaper in June, an anonymous former officer at the centre alleged widespread abuse of detainees that included killings. Media reports also claimed that detainees exchanged sex for food due to insufficient rations. Neither domestic nor international human rights groups made any requests to visit the detention centre or prison during the year. However, organisations pro viding aid, counselling services, and religious instruction had regular access to inmates, the report read. SEEPAGESIX Prison criticised in Human Rights Report Man wanted for questioning in connection with mur der EDDIE FLORIVAL THE Royal Bahamas Police Force commissioned seven new vehicles last night to assist in their presence in the Eastern, Western, and Southern districts of New Providence. Speaking with the press at the Central Detective Unit's headquarters on Thompson Boulevard, Superintendent Stephen Dean said they want the public to know that the funds that the police force has received to assist in the fight against crime are being utilised properly. "We will be developing new strategies in fighting crime and this is a testament to the general public today that we are seri ous, and this is also a message to the criminal element, and we want them to know that we are hot on their trails," he said. Superintendent Dean said he also wanted to assure the public that they will be having a strong presence at the nation al high school track and field competition. As such, he said, gangs and troublemakers should be forewarned that the police will be there in "full force." The vehicles that were presented to CDU were four Jeep Explorers, two Dodge Chargers, and one Jeep Chero kee. POLICE COMMISSIONSEVENNEWVEHICLES THESEVENNEW police vehicles at yesterdays presentation on Thompson Boulevard. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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THE BROADCASTING C orporation of the Bahamas h as denied that any tampering with employee evaluation forms took place, as claimed in an article appearing in yest erdays T ribune A ccording to a statement issued by the government-run n ews agency, in mid-2009 the Broadcasting Corporation ( BCB) began training all managers and staff to enhance the productivity and efficien cy of all aspects of its operat ions with particular emphasis on performance. This, the BCB said, was in accordance with industrial a greements with both the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union a nd Bahamas Communicat ions and Managerial Union (BCPOU and BCPMU necessitated a change in the evaluation system which r equires persons to be more a ccountable for their performance. The process is still in its infancy stage and will u ndoubtedly experience a number of growing pains as the changes are quite signifi cant compared with evaluat ions in previous years. The corporation denies any tampering as alleged. Out of the 240 plus staff eval u ated, less than six per cent of the evaluation forms reviewed, following com p laints made of procedural n on-compliance, were found to have not followed procedure, the BCB said. The statement further state d that the BCB will follow a ll procedures which call for evaluations to be redone foll owing the appropriate guidelines, noting that the B CPOU and the BCPMU are aware of the situation and the steps being taken. On Thursday, The Tribune r eported that staff at ZNS were in shock after learning that a senior manager at the Broadcasting Corporation h ad allegedly tampered with employee evaluation forms. The claims of tampering w hich allegedly saw staff m embers scores lowered, to the potential detriment of their promotion and salary adjustment hopes came to l ight this week when certain e mployees obtained copies of their evaluation forms only to f ind the documents had been altered after being signed by t heir immediate supervisor. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net ADVERTISEMENTS for a commercial party in the residential area of West Ridge, reportedly to be held at the home of opposition member Philip Brave Davis, have angered at leasto ne resident. According to a flyer advertising the party, billed as Platinum Status, patrons must pay $20 to enjoy music, food and an open bar at the "Davis residence" in West Ridge this coming Saturday. There is also a $100 champagne room, The Tribune was told. According to one of the event's multiple sponsors, the party is being organised by Mr Davis' son. Yesterday, an employee at the Department of Physical Planning said internal records did not show an application for a permit to host a commercial party in West Ridge, as is required under zoning guidelines. The area in western New Providence is zoned strictly for single-family dwellings, the employee said, adding that such a party would require permission from his department. According to physical planning guidelines, the permit application should have been submitted for review at least two weeks before the party. One resident is afraid the event will attract scores of patrons due to the multiple radio commercials promoting the party. She is concerned about possible traffic congestion and the potential for violent behaviour from intoxicated party-goers. "It's pretty much like having a night club in a residential area. We all know the amount of violence happening at night clubs and I'm worried the party will end with a shooting or stabbing. Worried "I'm worried that if it happened once it would keep happening because they would think that it's okay," said the concerned resident, who did not want to be named. Meanwhile, the physical planning employee said if residents complain to police on the night of the party, the event will be shut down if the organisers cannot produce the required perm it. He added that party organisers would need another permit from the Licensing Authority if alcohol is on sale at the event. But yesterday an employee from the Licens ing Authority claimed there was no need for a permit at a "private party." Attempts to reach Mr Davis for comment were unsuccessful up to press time last night. Concern over party reportedly planned at Brave Davis home BCB: No tampering of employee valuations forms occurred Resident fears possible traffic congestion, violent behaviour P HILIPBRAVEDAVIS

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I am writing concerning the letter that appeared in your newspaper dated February 17, 2010 under the heading Concern about the new rule at Queens College. I am also in agreement with the letter writer. Primary school children are to be dropped at the security gate and its up to these children to walk up that long drive and go to class. Bear in mind these include grade one children who are as young as five years old. A lot of these children do not want to go to school and therefore wander around the school hoping to delay the start of school and possibly getting into mischief: This is all over an alleged child abduction which QC, along with the police, say did not happen. If it did not happen, why are we, the innocent parents, being made to suffer for this childs imagination? This child should be dealt with and not the rest of the student body. We need some sort of communication from the Administration of QC, who from what I understand do not have children themselves, so they are unable to understand the concern that we have for our children. We as parents entrust our children to QC every day, and we expect the same trust returned to us. QC in my opinion is falling down on their part of the agreement, unless they have administration or teachers down at the bottom of the drive for us parents to hand our children off to, they have failed! Not us parents! Also nights the chil-d ren are released and they wander all over the field and parking lots looking for their parents which may not have even arrived in the parking lot yet. There is no supervision and this situation that QC has created could result in major probl ems and law suits against the school. What happens when someones child is beaten as the previous letter writer says or even worse really kidnapped? I also want the opportunity to meet with the other parents and teachers in the morning. The ELC was a very loving sect ion of the school where parents chatted before and after school together outside the classrooms. But the primary school is another matter. I understand that after about grade three there should be no need for parents to walk the kids up the drive, but we still should be afforded that right. If QC does not want outside people on the campus, have them issue two walking passes for every child in the primary school. The reason I say two is that it took two people to make the child so therefore a minimum of two passes should be needed. The same person does not pick up the child every night. We do need more understanding from the administration of Queens College. I only can say that the people that can afford to will move their chil dren to other schools like St Andrews. We are paying a lot of money each term for our kids in QC and we are being dictated to. I have had an experience at another private school in Nassau and parents were allowed to walk their kids to and from class everyday. MARSHA BETHELL Nassau, February, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm IN A letter published in Wednesdays Tribune retired assistant police commissioner Paul Thompson urged government to introduce legislation to ban smoking in public places. About four years ago it was announced that government was drafting legislation to protect non-smokers from the dangerous fumes of smokers. However, nothing more was heard of the draft. Whether it was never brought forward due to the slow-moving Christie administration or whether there were protests behind the scenes that stayed the draughtsmans hand, we shall probably never know. However, the matter is once more before the public. There must be a movement out there whether organised or not that is becoming agitated by the proliferation of smoke in certain public places. We say this because of the number of telephone calls that we are suddenly receiving from those who want us to put our fingers to our keyboard and reopen the issue. This is an issuethat we have written about many times before. Mr Thompson has now re-opened the debate. But this time because of the increas ing respiratory problems in this country, it is time for smoking to be taken beyond the debating stage. Action is now necessary. The smoking lobby will protest that they have rights too. We agree they have rights, but the rights extend only to destroying their own health, not the health of others. Each mans right ends when it infringes on the rights of others. And second hand smoke is that infringement from which in a public place the non-smoker has a right to be pro tected. No one is asking for legislation that will ban the committed smoker from blackening his own lungs. All that is being asked is that he remove himself and his dirty weed a safe distance from those who dont want to share his fate. There is now conclusive evidence that inhaling second hand smoke causes lung cancer in non-smokers. This has been proven by scientists over many years. However, in 1604 James 1 of England (James VI of Scotland scientist to tell him what was so obvious to the eye and the resulting congestion in the chest. The king described smoking as a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black, stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless. Four centuries ago James would have had no problem banning such an evil, which he saw not only as a great vanity, but a great contempt of Gods good gifts, that the sweetness of mans breath, being a good gift of God, should be wilfully corrupted by this stinking smoke. James did not know then what we know now. According to statistics there are about 3,400 cancer deaths annually among adult non-smokers in the US due to their exposure to second hand smoke. The US Surgeon General has estimated that living with a smoker increases a nonsmokers chance of developing cancer by 20 to 30 per cent. It has also been suggested by some researchers that there is evidence that second hand smoke may increase the risk of breast cancer, nasal sinus cavity cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer in adults, and leukemia, lymphoma, and brain tumours in children. However, it is claimed that more research is nec essary to conclusively confirm what present research so far is suggesting. In the US second hand smoke is believed to be the cause of about 46,000 heart disease deaths each year. The researchers have gone so far as to suggest that second hand smoke might be linked to the risk of a stroke and hardening of the arteries. Researchers also say that second hand smoke can cause an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS tions, colds, pneumonia, bronchitis and more severe asthma. It can also slow the growth of childrens lungs and cause breathlessness and wheezing. There is no safe level of exposure to second hand smoke, say the experts. Studies have shown that even low levels of second hand smoke exposure can be harmful. The only way to fully protect non-smokers from second hand smoke exposure is to completely eliminate smoking in indoor spaces. Apparently separating smokers from non-s mokers, cleaning the air, and ventilating buildings cannot completely eliminate sec ond hand smoke exposure. So what are we waiting for? Time is overdue for the complete banning of smoking in all public places. The smoker can light up in the wide open spaces on the outside where he has all the freedom he needs to do harm to himself. We need more understanding from administration of Queens College LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Ban smoking in public places EDITOR, The Tribune I feel obliged to comment on the letters written in the paper between Mr Abner Pinder and Mr Algernon Allen. I am a devoted listen er to "Issues of the Day" and although I may not completely agree withthe comment by Mr Pinder that Mr Allen "hates" Prime Minis ter Ingraham I would say that Mr Allen is no Wendall Jones. Mr Jones manages each guest and caller with integrity and respect. I find him sometimes to be painfully non-biased. Mr Allen on the other hand needs to realize that the show is aforum for guests and callers.He is to act as a mediator between the two. When Mr Allen is not laughing, he is running on with his own life experi ences. To you, Mr Allen, I say: Take a step back and humble yourself. Learn from your co-worker Mr Wendall Jones. Mediate, do not bully. And to Mr Pinder: Go ahead and express yourself for you are not alone. A CONCERNED READER Nassau, March 5, 2010. Mediate, do not bully, Mr Allen EDITOR, The Tribune. My husband and I make our home in Marsh Harbour during the winter months and are just concluding our fifth season here. It is very fulfilling for us to be involved in our community, and have c ome to appreciate the concerns of this country, from food supply stability to immigration issues. In regards to the latter I had occasion to help with one young ladys desire to establish herself as a Bahamian who, even though born here, was essentially without any legal status. I will withhold comment on the laborious, time consuming, frustrating, and inefficient bureaucracies that she encountered along the way to legally accord herself franchise in a country which had always been her home. I came alongside her (and her b rother) and made another trip to Nassau (her sixth) this time with her mother, to get proof of her birth from PMH. We were successful and I would like to thank publicly Ms Ellis from Medical Records at Princess Margaret Hospital who works in a very crowded setting. She is to be commended for a job well done, and has been instrumental in the process for two young people to be embraced legally into a nation which has always been home to them. They can now become solid contributing members of Bahamian society. It is only a matter of how far you go back in your heritage to find parents, grandparents, great grandparents or great great grandparents who did the same thing for you so that you would have a nation to call your own. It was very satisfying to facilitate this process, and I encourage other young people to persevere in their application to do the same. The Bahamas will be the better for it as we live according to the Scripture, Micah 6:8, He has shown you, women and men, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God. DEBORAH R BALLARD Nassau, February 27, 2010. Having a nation to call your own EDITOR, The Tribune. The young management of the Port are putting on a good face, however, everyone knows that with Sir Jack still cruising there has to be a person who was there till the New Year as you simply can not leave such an enterprise without a pilot. Surely it is time that GBPA make the appropriate announcement who is the chief who is running and acting as chairman of the port?Yes, we are told we should become washers of windows, but the real potential is not there but in what the management of the GBPA and the group of companies can generate. None of us can be reassured when we know the immediate past chair did not have his permit renewed for whatever reason, but who is running the show? Time to be transparent Grand Bahama Port Authority. W DARVILLE Freeport, February, 2010. Its time to be transparent, GBPA

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net F ORMER Attorney General Allyson Maynard-Gibson hasc alled on the government to i mmediately create a website where members of the publiccan easily find out which accused criminals have been released on bail. The proposal was one of several put forward by the PLP S enator and leader of Opposit ion business in the Senate duri ng Wednesdays session. M rs Maynard-Gibson sugg ested this website should be l aunched right away by the government to reduce crime and the fear of crime. Monitor ing The Senators other proposals included that anyone who attacks or threatens a policem an or judge should be tried r ight away; that accused murderers should be subject to i mmediate trials so as to avoid t he chance of them being r eleased on bail; that electronic monitoring of those on bail should be implemented; that regular checks on the status ofe vidence, witnesses and those accused in crimes should bem ade to ensure that cases do n ot fall by the wayside. Mrs Maynard-Gibson said crime should not be made intoa political football, but noted t hat the FNMs general elec tion campaign included the message that if you want to reduce crime, vote FNM. Well, the FNM has been in charge since 2008 and crime h as steadily increased since then, she said, quoting several recent crime related headl ines. Mrs Maynard-Gibson accused the government of dismantling a multi-faceted s trategy to address the probl ems in the administration of j ustice and crime left in place by the former PLP government p rior to the 2007 election. Projects Unfortunately law and order is another area where projects left in place were not built on. They were stopped or cancelled and Urban Renewal w as subsequently reinstated. I u nderstand that Swift Justice i s partially reinstated. I do not understand why games wouldb e played or risks taken with t he safety of our citizens and the vitality of our tourist industry. Urban Renewal and Swift Justice were working for the benefit of Bahamians. If they were not prefect they should have been fixed, not stopped a nd reinstated two years later while crime continues to spiral out of control, said the Sena tor. S he said that if the 2009 murd er rate were to take into account all of the unclassified deaths the increase in the ratef rom 2008 to 2009 would be just under 40 per cent. They show murders (are 85 to end December 2009. We know that the police reported more than 100 deaths, some of w hich are yet to be classified. W e Bahamians know that they w ere not due to natural causes and we know that they arec rimes, which is why the police a re involved, she said. Law It seems people are more a nd more feeling that they must take the law into their own hands because the gov ernment seems to be inept and u nable and at very least, help l ess. Bahamians are under siege in their homes. Home invasions are increasing. Bahamians are not safe on the streets. Tourists are not safe on Bay Street. Mrs Maynard-Gibson comm ended the police force for its e fforts to combat crime but a dded that the full effectiveness of their attempts will bed iminished unless matters can b e swiftly brought to trial. Judges are ready to hear matters. They can only hear what is brought before them. They do not prepare matters for trial, said the former Attorney General. She suggested that full and e ffective collaboration between various government agencies is lacking and that this is imping i ng upon the number of matters which are being put forward for trial. Call for website to name accused criminals on bail IN the first of a planned series of exercises, officers of the Southwestern Division last week conducted an operation to ensure the businesses in that area were secure,s chool children were not harassing m embers of the community and motorists were abiding by the laws of the road. The police officers set out last Friday at about 2.45pm to carry out operation disrupt with the aim of disrupting persons who seem to h ave little or no regard for law and o rder. T he operation commenced at the junction of Baillou Hill Road and Carmichael Road, and officers paid specific attention to school child ren who usually annoy members o f the community after school, the p olice said in a press release. A dditionally, road checks were c onducted, halting bus drivers w hose licences were expired or did not meet the required dressed code. T he officers also conducted a walkabout in the community, assuring residents of the polices commitment to reducing and eventually e radicating crime. Residents were encouraged to be their brothers keeper and to report a ll suspicious persons, vehicles and a ctivities. The residents were excited and pledged their support, the polices aid. F urther, officers also ensured that the business community of Carmichael was secured. Patrols were increased during the evening thus creating a safer environment for businesses. The operation was a success, and t he officers arrested two men for s uspected dangerous drugs, four men for house break-ins and recove red three suspected stolen vehic les. This initiative is just the beginning of a number of activities geared toward ensuring the resi-d ents and business communities of t he Southwestern Division (Carmichaelo f the Southwestern Division are f ocused and determined to create a safe environment for persons to live, work, visit and play, the polices press statement said. Police officers carry out operation disrupt Former Attorney General makes proposals to tackle crime SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf THE Keep Grand Bahama Clean C ommittees (KGBC nity clean-up for the year is planned for this Saturday in Coral Gardens. KGBC in conjunction with Domin ion Community Church, Access Ministries and the Seahorse Urban R enewal, will spearhead an early morning clean-up of loose litter throughout the community, beginninga t 7.30am. The event culminates with a much anticipated health fair and fun day. To increase public awareness a mongst Coral Gardens residents and garner support for Saturday morn ings event, representatives of the var ious groups took to the streets on W ednesday afternoon distributing fly ers and speaking with residents. Nakira Wilchcombe, KGBC chairp erson, described the clean-ups as an i ntegral part of their mission and invited Coral Gardens residents, civic groups, other organisations and the general public to join in the activities. P rior to Saturdays clean-up, KGBC p articipated in a special assembly at the nearby Walter Parker PrimaryS chool. Committee members were on h and to spread the message of love o f country and the environment to the entire gathering of students, fac u lty and administrators. A ddressing them was KGBC member Rehuder Rolle of Love 97. Excited We are excited to stop by your school to encourage you to Keep G rand Bahama Clean. Even though you are young now, youre not too young to begin to be proactive and a ware of the importance of keeping G rand Bahama and your entire country, clean. A highlight of the school visit was a special appearance by Kentucky Fried C hickens mascot Chicky. KFC is an official corporate partner o f the Keep Grand Bahama Clean initiative. Once again, KFC has joined forces with KGBC in an effort to reach the y outh in our schools by using our much-loved Chicky to reinforce the importance of their part in keeping Grand Bahama Clean, said Aniska S aunders, assistant marketing man ager at KFC. Through anti-littering campaigns we hope to promote pride in our c ountry and personal responsibility in keeping our island litter free whichi s a benefit we all enjoy. School visits and community cleanups will continue throughout the course of the year, along with other special KGBC-sponsored events. Community clean-up on Saturday KGBC SCHOOL VISITS Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee members partici pated in a special morning assembly at Walter Parker Primary School. Some of the students got up close and personal with the KFC mascot Chicky as he helped spread the anti-littering message. CORAL GARDENS CLEAN-UP Representatives f rom the Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee and other organisations delivered personal invitations to C oral Gardens residents in advance of Saturdays clean-up in their community. Pictured (l-r Munroe, KGBC committee member; Rowena Albury,f acilitator with Seahorse Urban Renewal; Nola McKenzie, resident, and Geneva Rutherford, direc-t or of community relations at GBPA. THE Bahamas has been awarded a signal honour by being given the opportunity to contribute to the Commonwealths review of human rights records and laws, said Ambassador Joshua Sears, Director General ofthe Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The ambassador travelled to Lond on this week to attend the two-day Commonwealth Mid-Term Review of Universal Periodic Review Process which concludes today. One of the primary instruments of the Human Rights Council establ ished by the United Nations General Assembly in March 2006 is to monitor and review the human rights records of 192 member states of the international community. Expert A n expert panel convened in London to review the implementation of the Universal Period Review Process and to make recommendations to the UN. A document of best practices in t he Commonwealth will be one of the outcomes of this review. To date, 142 countries of the UN have been reviewed. The Bahamas was the first CARICOM country to be reviewed, which was done at the Third Session inD ecember 2008, and Ambassador Sears has been invited to share the Bahamas and Caribbean experience with the Commonwealth Expert Group. Secretary General Kamelesh Sharm a delivered the keynote address and the panel engaged in two days of intensive discussions, which made an important contribution to the UN review process. Ambassador Sears said that this opportunity to contribute to the Com-m onwealths position of the review of this new instrument and the further development of human rights laws and practices globally is an honour for the Bahamas. Bahamas awarded signal honour of helping with Commonwealths human rights review JOSHUASEARS Ambassador Joshua Sears in London for two days of intensive discussions

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORTTHE arrival of one of the worlds largest cargo ships in Grand Bahama this week signals the importance of the Freeport Container Port in the face of a growing global population and the expansion of Chinas exports, said Environment Minister Dr Earl Deveaux. A nd although the amount of shipping traffic at the port i s still down due to the global r ecession, things are slowly starting to look up with more orders from China. Dr Deveaux was in Freeport on Wednesday for the arrival of the Northern Jasper one of the largest cont ainer vessels in the world. The vessel, which is operated by the Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC arrived in port carrying some 8 ,200 containers. Minister Deveaux and Container Port CEO Gary Gilbert went onboard the ship, where they presented a plaque toC aptain Seredyn Dariusz and chief engineer Scarlat Alexandru to commemorate the occasion. This ship (Northern J asper) is the biggest ship we ever had in Grand Bahama so this is a real big plus for Grand Bahama, Mr Gilbert told reporters. T his is the second mega container ship of its kind that has docked at the harbour here. The Tomoko, the sister ship o f Northern Jasper, came in February, carrying some 8,000 containers. Dr Deveaux said the ships arrival is a very significant one, not only for the contain er port, but also for GrandBahama and the Bahamas. In order for this ship to go into New York they have tol ower the top deck to get under the bridge, but yet Freeport is able to accommodate it. This ship is about half the s ize of the one that will come l ater in the year that actual carries 14,000 containers (and that cant even go on the east ern seaboard of the US, yet the freight of the world will come to Grand Bahama to unload containers. MSC is one of our biggest (ont he Bahamas is seeking to promote the maritime register, said Dr Deveaux. H e noted that the ports proximity to the eastern seaboard of the US makes Freeport a vital link in international shipping fromS outh America to Asia and Europe. Dr Deveaux said the continued expansion of the container port and the harbour inF reeport is important as the world population grows ande xports continue to increase from China. He reported that China e xports for February increased by 46 per cent compared to last year this time. Minister Grant said Prime Minister Hubert Ingrahams decision to approve the container port for Freeport wast he right decision. He noted t hat the port continues to pro vide hundreds of jobs for Bahamians. Mr Gilbert said Freeport has the deepest harbour in theW estern Hemisphere, with a depth of 54ft to accommodate the largest vessels in the world. He said every week one of M SCs mega container vessels will dock at the containerp ort. In addition to MSC, Mr Gilbert revealed that the con t ainer port is looking for another a major shipping customer. He said that business at the container port is still down, but has improved slightly over the recession. We are not to the 2,000 l evels but at the rest of Hutchisons other ports we are starting to see more orders coming from China ports. They are not as long in dura-t ion but we are back about 25 per cent of what we were at the low of last year, and that is not all the way to when we were 30 per cent down from2 008. So it is a very good sign that things are coming back,h e said. Mr Gilbert said that expan sion is continuing withB ahama Rock to excavate the harbour for an additional 1,800 meters of quay side and other 10 cranes. He said their safety record at the container port is very good, with no fatalities,a lthough there were minor a ccidents. One of worlds largest cargo ships in Freeport ENVIRONMENT MINISTER Dr Earl Deveaux (right GO ANDtell your young men these things. Under no circumstances should you e ver become verbally abusive to a police officer. Even if you are inno cent, you are exposing yourself to p otential violence. A police officer deals on a daily basis with members of the generalp ublic who are cursing at him in the c ourse of doing his duty. It is quite human to lash out at the officer; I know I dont feel served and pro t ected when someone is writing me a ticket for speeding. Truth be known, most officers in this count ry just ignore the verbal threats against their p erson. They appreciate the violent language of our new culture, and the immaturity of some people. The problem comes when the officer is in a combative state, because he mayb e stopping cars to look for a criminal whose profile you fit. Any resistance including verbal abuse on your part, c ould escalate the situation rapidly and dangerously. Always remember, we outnumber t he Bad Guys. DArcy Rahming is a violent crime researcher and Adjunct Faculty Member at theC ollege of the Bahamas. He holds Black Belts in several martial arts and is an internationally renowned seminar leader for corporations, pri-v ate groups and police and security groups. Y ou can follow him on his blog at www.sto plivinginfear.org. S TOP L IVING IN F EAR A VOID B EING N EXT H OW TO A VOID B EING S HOT BY THE P OLICE P ART 3 D Arcy Rahming

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and Caicos government to have been accused of malfeasance by the British-led commission of inquiry that ultimately resulted in the suspension of the countrys constiti-t ution and its democratic instit utions last year by the United Kingdom government. Mr Misick stepped down as Premier in March 2009, denying charges of corruption. The British then took direct con-t rol of governing the country f or what they forecast would be a period of up to two years a move that was criticised by Caricom as not the most effective tool to bolster goodg overnance and effective a dministration in the territor y. On Monday, a Unity march in Providenciales against the imposition of direct rule by the British, sup-p orted by both major political parties in Turks and Caicos, drew a turnout estimated at between 750 and 2,000. Putting this in perspective, there are around 8,000p eople on the countrys electoral register. Some local observers say t he turnout proves the s trength of opposition nationally to the direct British rule which also involves the suspension of trial by jury in the British Overseas Territory and more recent proposals by the British to change the i slands constitution to allow a certain class of foreign nationals to vote and seek political office in the islands. The day after the march which was heralded as an unprecedented and symbolics how of unity by the political parties the British interim government drew the ire of Turks Islanders by announcing that it would be slashingc ivil servants pay by 10 per cent effective April 1. The British put this decision down to falling revenue in a poor economy, however, former Premier Mr Misick told The Tribune yesterday that he views the action as subtlei ntimidation for misbehaviour in the wake of the protest march. Yesterday Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonettes aid the Bahamas position on the situation there has not c hanged. The Bahamas has already stated its position. The Bahamas is not going to intervene in any of the issues r egarding the TCI until they resolve their internal matters. T he PLP, meanwhile, have t aken a slightly different view of the situation. In a statement issued Tuesday, the PLP called the joint march a posi tive development in the development of Turks and Caicos democracy, adding that it is pleased the two parties have come to a joint position on the question of British rule. We urge the British to restore democratic rule to the Turks and Caicos and to resist any move that would weaken the ability of the native peo-p les of the Turks and Caicos to run their own affairs, read the statement. Yesterday Fred Mitchell, the MP for Fox Hill and former minister of foreign affairs under the Christie administration, said he believes theB ahamas and Caricom have a responsibility to keep the plight of TCI on the front burner. I will certainly try to be in touch with friends at Caricomt o see whether issue can be raised. There is a heads of g overnment meeting going on now. I dont think Caricom should ignore the fact that democracy has been suspended in TCI. TCI is an associate m ember of Caricom, so Caricom has a responsibility in line w ith the statement issued last y ear saying that they would keep it on the front burner. The MP said he is of the view that the Bahamas has a special interest in the affairs of the TCI, because anything that happens in TCI of coursea ffects us. A nd he added the PLP supports giving the TCI people the opportunity to have a general election in which they can elect the government of their choice. It is the same thing they (the British own country if there was politi cal or constitutional crisis d issolve parliament and have fresh elections, so that you d eal with new people. The way to deal with people a lleged to be individually r esponsible for criminal cond uct is to bring charges before t he courts, he said. Mr Mitchell said he and s ome of his parliamentary col leagues have discussed the possibility of mobilising the Turks and Caicos population in the Bahamas to see if we couldnt bring somem ore sensitivity on this i ssue and to help with whate ver is going on in TCI. According to Mr Misick, the population of Turks and Caicos islanders and their descendants in theB ahamas are larger than t hose who currently reside in the Turks and Caicos. Mr Misick describes the British Governor of TCI as a dictator and the current situation in the islands as an occupation by theB ritish. He told The Tribune that particularly because of the long history shared by the Bahamas and TCI, he feels the Bahamas more than any other country in Cari-c om has a greater respons ibility to educate for fairn ess and change in Turks and Caicos in the same way the Bahamas under (Sir Lynden) Pindling led the way on educating forc hange in South Africa w hen there was apartheid. I certainly take this opportunity to call on the Prime Minister to become more engaged in the matters that are taking place, in the the injustice that hast aken place in the Turks and Caicos, Mr Misick stated. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf therefore no prosecutions or convictions during the year. This comes after noted anti-slavery campaigner Aaron Cohen warned that the Bahamas is at risk of falling into the tentacles of organised crime in the Caribbean. In an interview with The Tribune last week, he said that while the country is already a transit stop and destination for women and children either tricked or forced into servitude, the problem could be about to get much worse. He fears that in the wake of the January 12 earthquake in Haiti, the Bahamas could replace that country as a chief transit hub for human traffickers. Mr Cohen pointed to the State Departments Trafficking in Persons (TIP Bahamas as a destination for sex workers from the Dominican Republic and restaveks, or children exploited for domestic labour, from Haiti. The most recent TIP report, released last week, noted that in 2008, parliament passed the Trafficking in Persons Prevention and Suppression Act which sets out penalties for offenders that range from three years to life imprisonment. However, the State Department criticised the tendency of local officials to lump human trafficking together with human smuggling the transportation of persons engaging in voluntary illegal immigration and punish the victims with arrest and deportation rather than offering them help. SEEPAGETWO You can find our interview with Aaron Cohen at: http://www.tribune242.com/editorial/Insight/03082010_slavery_Insight-pg FROM page one USreport contains claims that children trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas FROM page one F ormer Turks and Caicos Premier wants Prime Minister to assist territory MICHAEL MISICK

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 PAGE10 Local sports news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BIBLECOLLEGET H E A S S E M B L I E S O F G O D I N T H E B A H A M A S EquippingfortheHarves t Empowering Believers for Effective Ministry Caribbean School of Theology Bachelors & Masters programs NOTICE PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED Noticeisherebygiventhatan Extraordinary GeneralMeetingo ftheShareholderswasheldon 5 th dayofDecember,2009atwhichtimeall accountsshowingthemannerinwhichthe windingupoftheabovecompanyhadbeen conductedandthepropertyoftheCompany disposedofwaslaidbefo rethemeetingand approvedbytheShareholders. PabloRodrguezMler LIQUIDATOR P.O.BoxN 1682,Nassau,Bahamas NOTICE SANTANDER MERCHANT BANK LIMITED NoticeisherebygiventhatanExtraordinary GeneralMeetingo ftheShareholderswasheldon 5 th dayofDecember,2009atwhichtimeall accountsshowingthemannerinwhichthe windingupoftheabovecompanyha dbeen conductedandthepropertyoftheCompany disposedofwaslaidbeforethemeetingand approvedbytheShareholders. PabloRodrguezMler LIQUIDATOR P.O.BoxN 1682,Nassau,Bahamas A contingent of Bahamian athletes vie for spots on the international medal stand and a n opportunity to be crowned World Champion at the biggest gathering of nations in the history of the IAAF World Indoor Championships. Nine Bahamians take to the track today on day one of the meet in Doha, Qatar. Christine Amertil, a two-time World Indoors bronze medallist in the event in 2003 and 2006, opens competition for the Bahamas in Heat One of the Women's 400m. Amertil, who has posted a season's best time of 53.43s, will run out of lane five. Also in the heat will be Debbie Dunn of the United States, world leader in the event with a time of 50.86s. In the Men's 400m, Chris Brown will start his trek towards a third World Indoors medal. Brown, who has previously captured two bronze medals in the event, will run in heat five out of lane six. Brown has posted the fastest qualifying time of his heat witha time of 46.20s. M ichael Mathieu will also join Brown in the field of quartermilers. Mathieu will run in heat one out of lane four and enters with the third fastest season's best of his heat with a time of 46.82s. Chandra Sturrup, the first Bahamian to capture a gold medal for the Bahamas at the event, when she took a first place finish in 2001, makes yet another appearance in her signature event. Sturrup will run in lane two of heat two coming in with a qualifying time of 7.20s. Sturrup will be paired against Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica who in her first appearance at the World Indoor Championships enters the heat with the fastest qualifying timeo f 7.14s. In the Men's 60m, Rodney Greene will make his first appearance at the event when he runs in heat four out of lane three. Green's time of 6.66s is the second fastest qualifying time of the heat behind Mike Rodgers of the United S tates with 6.52s. Shamar Sands will run in heat two of the 60m hurdles out of lane seven, and enters with a season's best time of 7.54s. Former world champion Donald Thomas and Trevor Barry will be the lone competitors in the field when they compete in the men's high jump. Thomas has posted a season's best leap of 2.25m while Barry has reached 2.19m on the year. With 150 countries con firmed to compete in Doha at the Aspire Dome, it surpassed the record of 147 countries set two years agon in Valencia. The World Indoor Champi onships, which were first called the World Indoor Games in Paris took place in Paris in 1985 and 69 nations took part. Bahamian athletes eye international medals HIGHAMBITION: School track and field IAAF WORLD INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS CHRISTINEAMERTIL Nine take to track today in Doha CHANDRA STURRUP SACS Danielle Gibson jumps during the long jump. CV BETHELS Terrane Roker takes part in theh igh jump during the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations annual Scotiabank Nation-a l High School Track and Field Championships. The event is taking place at the T homas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff NCAS Lathario Minnis in the triple jump. SEE PAGE 10 C ARIFTASWIMMINGTEAM PICKED

PAGE 10

A traditionally successful Carifta team fielded by the Bahamas Swimming Federa tion looks to extend its legacy after naming what promises to be another group of top-notch performers. T he BSF has selected and ratified a 36 member team to compete at the 25th annual Carifta Swimming, Synchronized Swimming, and Water Polo Championships Championships, April 3-6 in Kingston, Jamaica. T he Bahamas returns several veteran s wimmers from a team that finished second in the points standing last year with 691.50 p oints and tallied 18 gold, 17 silver and 14 bronze. N early 20 countries will field teams for the 25th edition of the games including defending champions Aruba. C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG R Q GD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED Creditors having debts or claims against the ab ove named Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N 1682, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30 th day of March, A.D. 2010. Pablo Rodrguez Mller LIQUIDATOR P.O. Box N 1682, Nassau, Bahamas N OTICE S ANTANDER MERCHANT BANK LIMITED C reditors having debts or claims against t he above n amed Company are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P.O. Box N 1682, N assau, Bahamas on or before 30 th d ay of March, A.D. 2010. Pablo Rodrguez Mller LIQUIDATOR P.O. Box N 1682, Nassau, Bahamas 36-member team picked to compete at Carifta swimming championships THETEAM: Boys and girls Girls 15-17 Maya Albury Ashley Butler Kadesha Culmer Bria Deveaux M cKayla Lightbourn S haunte Moss J e'Nae Saunders 13-14 Gabrielle Greene Abigail Lowe B erchadette Moss L aura Morely Riquel ROlleT aryn Smith Jacinda Williams 11-12 Jourdan Bevans Leslie Campbell Joanna Evans D oran Reed S imone Sturrup A ndreas Weech Boys 15-17 Evante Gibson M atthew Lowe T oby McCarroll Delano McIntoshA rmando Moss Mancer Roberts 13-14 Zarian Cleare Peter Farquaharson Turen Moss D ustin Tynes A nibal Hernandez V aldes 11-12 Dionisio Carey Farion Cooper A aron Levarity Z ach Moses Meshach ROberts High school track and field GIRLS 100 metre heats. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM petition filed on behalf of Mr Pinder the Progressive Lib-e ral Partys candidate was f undamentally flawed. In the prayers of the petition, the petitioner asks the court to exercise the jurisdiction conferred by section 69(1 of the Parliamentary Elections Act. A petitioner who iss eeing to avail himself of the jurisdiction of the court ought to say what he is seeking, Mr Evans submitted. In this case one would expect that he would reveal exactly what it is that he seeks to receivef rom the court. If he does not do that he puts the respondents in a position of not knowing what case they have to meet, not knowing what they have to respond to, Mr E vans told the court. First of all he must assert that the voters were properly registered and entitled to vote. The petition contains no prayer in his favour. There aren o grounds given for finding that the voters were properly r egistered and entitled to v ote, Mr Evans said. A petition has particular characteristics, one of which the petitioner must set out the brief facts. Notwithstanding the discreet nature of the petition, the court must deal with i t in the same manner as it d eals with any other petition, Mr Evans said. Mr Evans argued that the defect in the petition cannot be cured by an amendment. Mr Evans also argued that the fact that he had not highlighted the issuee arlier did not prevent the court from striking out the petition. Attorney David Higgins, who is lead counsel for Returning Officer Jack Thompson and ParliamentaryC ommissioner Errol Bethel, adopted the submissions of Mr Evans. We adopt them to the extent that the petition lackst he necessary facts and g rounds as is required by a r egular petition. The petition should contain all the facts relevant to the application. The petition ought to be able to stand on its own, Mr Higgins told the court. Mr Ryans attorney Philip Brave Davis, however, m aintained that the application to have the petition struck out was misconceived. The application presupposes that we dont know why we are here, he said. Mr Davis noted that the respondents had fileda ffidavits and played an active role in the proceedings thus far. Mr Davis submitted that the application should not be entertained and should be dismissed. He said that the petition satisfied all the mandato-r y requirements. The judges, after deliberations on the matter did not accede to Mr Evans application and awarded cost for twoa ttorneys to Mr Pinders legal t eam. Mr Evans then made an a pplication to appeal the decision in the Court of Appeal and also sought a stay of the proceedings. Having regard to the nature of the proceedings, the only just remedy would be to g rant us leave to appeal and g rant us a stay, Mr Evans said. Mr Higgins also joined in the application. Mr Davis, however, opposed the application. Assuming but not conceding that there is a right ofa ppeal, it would seem to me that if a right resides now, the same right would reside at the completion of the proceedings, Mr Davis said. To this Mr Evans responded by saying, In terms of the effecto f the application, if the appeal is launched at the end it would avail us nothing. After deliberating, the judges refused that applica-t ion as well. We feel that a ny appeal which is necess ary, can be brought at the end of the process without prejudice to any of the parties, Senior Justice Allen said. Mr Evans then asked the court to grant a conservatory stay until Monday so t hat his team could approach t he Court of Appeal today. Mr Davis, however, objected stating that the court did not have the jurisdiction to grant such a stay but only a superior court. Mr Evans, however, claimed that he hado nce been involved in a case in which such a stay was granted. Senior Justice Allen, however, said that in the absence of any such authorities the court was minded not tog rant the stay. The case is now expected to proceed at 10 oclock this morning. The election court petition was filed by Ryan Pinder oft he PLP, who gained 1,499 v otes to Dr Sands' 1,501 in t he February 16 Elizabeth constituency by-election. Mr Pinder is claiming that five protest votes cast in his favour should be counted, thus making him the elected MP for Elizabeth. FROM page one FNM bid to have PLP election court petition struck out fails RYANPINDER


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Ministry pro
Irauid allegations

Claims that businessman was
coerced into inflating invoices

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN investigation is under
way into claims that civil ser-
vants at the Ministry of Agri-
culture coerced a business-
man into inflating company
invoices in order to pocket
the extra cash, The Tribune
can reveal.

The alleged fraud came to
the attention of ministry offi-
cials in late February, dur-
ing its Agribusiness expo at
the Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural Centre.

Agriculture Minister Lar-
ry Cartwright, who con-
firmed an investigation was
under way, said ministry
officials "kind of suspected”
something was amiss when
they noticed that a bill for
tent rentals for the recent
expo varied significantly
from what the ministry paid
for tents during the same
event in previous years.

"It was brought to my
attention and I am having it
investigated,” Mr Cartwright
told The Tribune.

According to a well-placed
source, a business owner
renting tents to the ministry
for the event was asked by a
high-ranking civil servant to
adjust an invoice by several
thousand dollars, with

instructions that the public
servant would take the extra
money.

The source further claimed
that the business owner was
promised more government
work if this request was
agreed to.

When these claims were
put to Mr Cartwright, he
denied a high-ranking
employee was involved.

He said the investigation
was in its initial stages and
that the person/s believed to
be behind the alleged
scheme has not yet been
identified.

"There have been no fir-
ings, the ministry wasn't able
to identify any particular
person as yet,” he said.

When asked if he suspect-
ed the allegations may be
part of wider fraudulent acts
throughout the ministry, the
Long Island representative
said: "It is difficult to say but
this is the first time I heard
about a matter like that."

At the moment, it does not
appear that the ministry will
file criminal charges against
any employee if their suspi-
cions are substantiated.

"From our end, no, we will
not file charges. I would
expect to hear from the sales
person, they should have
gone to police," said Mr
Cartwright.



m Lhe Tribune

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

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FNM bid to have PLP election
Court petition struck out fails

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

ATTORNEYS for Dr
Duane Sands yesterday
sought to have the election
court petition of Leo Ryan
Pinder struck out, claim-
ing it was “fundamentally
flawed.”

The court, however, did
not accede to the applica-
tion and also refused a
subsequent application by
Dr Sands’ legal team for a
stay of proceedings and for

MICHAEL AND CARAL THURSTON, the parents of Keisha, at the memorial service last night.

FAMILY members and close
friends gathered at D W Davis Junior
High last night in a memorial service

for Keisha Thurston.

The young athlete’s apparent sui-

Former Turks and Caicos Premier
wants Prime Minister to assist territory

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE disgraced former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos
Islands has pleaded for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to

SOLOMON’S WHOLESALE AD

A SOLOMON’S
WHOLESALE advertise-
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inaccurate information. The
correct version is in today’s
edition, on Page 12. The Tri-
bune apologises for any
inconvenience this error
may have caused.



a
verses

Cara iale oe fe
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“become more engaged” in
the plight of the British over-
seas territory over which the
United Kingdom assumed
control.

Michael Misick said the
Turks and Caicos Islands
(TCD “really needs the assis-
tance of Caricom and partic-
ularly The Bahamas — no
one less than Prime Minister
of the Bahamas himself — to
educate on our behalf (and)
to intervene on our behalf
with his counterpart in Lon-
don (British Prime Minister
Gordon Brown).”

Mr Misick was the highest
profile member of the Turks

SEE page eight

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cide has shocked all who knew her.
Just 18 years old, Keisha was in her
second semester at the College of the
Bahamas on an athletic scholarship,
and proactive in the athletic commu-

ruary 28.

leave to appeal the deci-
sion in the Court of
Appeal.

The Elizabeth by-elec-
tion court case began
before Senior Justices Ani-
ta Allen and Jon Isaacs
yesterday with the court
hearing preliminary argu-
ments raised by counsel
for Free National Move-
ment candidate Dr Duane
Sands. QC Thomas Evans
who is lead counsel for Dr
Sands submitted that the

SEE page 11



nity through its women’s volleyball
team. Keisha was found hanging from
a rope at the family’s home in McK-
inney Drive, Nassau, on Sunday, Feb-



US report contains claims that children
trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas

CLAIMS that children are
being trafficked from Haiti
into the Bahamas to be used
for sex and forced labour
have been raised for a second
time in a US government
report — this time attributed to
independent social workers.

The State Department’s
2009 Human Rights Report,
released yesterday, said rep-
resentatives of non-govern-
mental organisations on the
ground in Haiti reported the
problem of child trafficking
for sexual and labour purpos-
es, “especially to the Domini-
can Republic and the
Bahamas.”

The researchers noted that
Haiti continues to be a source

country for persons trafficked
to a number of other places as
well, including Jamaica, the
United States, Europe and
Canada.

The report said: “Traf-
ficked citizens reported con-
ditions of bonded servitude,
slavery, and forced labour.
Extreme poverty and lack of
employment were among key
risk factors supporting human
trafficking.”

It added that no informa-
tion could be collected on the
principal traffickers, their net-
works, or methods, and noted
that there were no antti-traf-
ficking laws in Haiti and

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Arraignment of
officer postponed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE arraignment of a
police officer facing a num-
ber of fraud charges was
postponed until Monday for
court dockets to be put in
order,

Eddie Florival, 40, of
Sweet Lane off Faith
Avenue, had been ordered
to appear before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court
Eight, Bank Lane yesterday
morning to be arraigned on
charges of conspiracy to
commit fraud by false pre-
tences and abetment to
commit fraud.

Some of the charges were
concerned with others who
had already been charged:
prison inmate Shane Mack-
ey, 29; prison officer Free-
man Basden, 45, of Cox
Way; and Tamanica Bethel,
38, a store manager of
Whites Lane.

But when Florival, who is
currently free on bail,
appeared before Ms Bethel
at 10am she said she could
not arraign him on the
charges as the particulars
were inconsistent and listed
others who had already
been charged.

The magistrate asked for
Royal Bahamas Police
Force prosecutor Erecell
Dorsett to re-order the
dockets and for Florival to
return to court at 2pm.

However Florival’s

EDDIE FLORIVAL



arraignment was then further postponed until Monday as Ms
Bethel was still not satisfied with the dockets.

And as she began to read two charges stating Florival was con-
cerned with others in a conspiracy to commit fraud by false
pretences and abetment to commit fraud, she asked the prose-
cutor why the dockets were not directed solely to Florival.

Referring to the others named in the docket, she asked: “Why

aren’t they here?

“T don’t have a difficulty reading the charges to him, but
when you bring it on the same docket, and my docket has a per-
son already charged with abetment on the same facts — how can
you charge him unless you put a new docket in?”

Inspector Dorsett said his officers had not understood the
command to correct the dockets, and Ms Bethel made the pros-
ecutor give his assurance the new dockets would be corrected
and submitted on Monday morning.

“They have already taken a lot of my court time so they bet-

ter get this fixed,” she said.

Florival remains on bail.















Prison criticised in
Human Rights Report

THE CARMICHAEL Road
Detention Centre along with
Her Majesty’s Prison once again
featured negatively in the Unit-
ed States government’s Human
Rights Report which was
released yesterday.

Calling conditions at the
prison “harsh”, the US report
said that overcrowding remains
a major problem in the men’s
maximum security block.

“Originally built in 1953 to
hold 450 inmates, it held 624 of
the country’s 1,319 prisoners,”
the report prepared by the US
Department of State reads.

“The remaining prisoners
were held in medium- and min-
imum-security units that were
at intended capacity. A remand
centre held 265 detainees. Male
prisoners in the maximum-secu-
rity unit were crowded into
poorly ventilated and poorly lit
cells that generally lacked regu-
lar running water.

“Prisoners lacked beds, slept
on concrete floors, and if not
participating in work pro-
grammes, were locked in small
cells. Maximum-security inmates
were allowed outside for exer-
cise four days a week for one
hour per day. Inmates com-
plained of inadequate potable
water, lack of medical care, and

poor treatment,” the report
states.

The US State Department’s
report further said that there
continued to be allegations of
abuse by prison guards.

“Local attorneys and human
rights observers asserted that
the prison’s Internal Affairs
Unit lacked the independence
needed to investigate impartial-
ly allegations of abuse and mis-
conduct; it conducted no inves-
tigations during the year.

Access

“Conditions for female pris-
oners were less severe than for
men; however, women did not
have access to the same work-
release programmes available
to male prisoners.”

Despite the existence of a sep-
arate section to hold offenders
between the ages of 16 and 18,
the report said there is “occa-
sional mixing” of juveniles and
adult inmates “depending on the
severity of their crimes”.

As it concerns the Carmichael
Road Immigrant Detention
Centre, the US report said that
the facility held up to 500
detainees (with tent space for
an additional 500), and women
and men were held separately.

oe SHY “Mule NEW MEE

It said: “Haitians and
Jamaicans were the most com-
monly interdicted migrants. The
highest occupancy during the
year was approximately 664.
Observers complained of con-
tinuing abuse by guards,
although immigration officials
stated that no such complaints
were filed during the year.”

However, human rights
groups have expressed their con-
cern that complaint investiga-
tions were being handled inter-
nally without any independent
review or oversight.

“Children under the age of
14 were held in the women’s
dormitory. Many children arriv-
ing with both parents were not
allowed contact with the father
except during weekly visitation.
Despite the possibility of being
held for months, children did
not have access to education.

“The government made
improvements to the
Carmichael Road centre during
the year, including benches for
seating and recreation, cable
television, bunk mattresses, fans,
and 100 roll-away mattresses for
overflow. Two nurses conducted
medical screening of detainees
on a weekly basis; authorities
issued care packages upon entry
into the facility and installed a

THE SEVEN NEW police vehicles at yesterday’s presentation on Thompson Boulevard.

of New Providence.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

THE Royal Bahamas Police Force
commissioned seven new vehicles last
night to assist in their presence in the
Eastern, Western, and Southern districts

Speaking with the press at the Central
Detective Unit's headquarters on
Thompson Boulevard, Superintendent
Stephen Dean said they want the public
to know that the funds that the police

said.

force has received to assist in the fight
against crime are being utilised properly.

"We will be developing new strategies
in fighting crime and this is a testament to
the general public today that we are seri-
ous, and this is also a message to the
criminal element, and we want them to
know that we are hot on their trails," he

washer and dryer and addition-
al pay phones for detainee use.

“(Amnesty International) as
well as local media wrote and
released reports throughout the
year alleging systemic abuse of
detainees at the Carmichael
Road centre.

“In February the media
reported that three Cuban
detainees went on a hunger
strike to protest conditions at
the centre.

Detainees

“In an expansive interview
with a local daily newspaper in
June, an anonymous former offi-
cer at the centre alleged wide-
spread abuse of detainees that
included killings. Media reports
also claimed that detainees
exchanged sex for food due to
insufficient rations.

“Neither domestic nor inter-
national human rights groups
made any requests to visit the
detention centre or prison dur-
ing the year.

“However, organisations pro-
viding aid, counselling services,
and religious instruction had
regular access to inmates,” the
report read.

e SEE PAGE SIX

wanted to assure the public that they will
be having a strong presence at the nation-
al high school track and field competition.
As such, he said, gangs and trouble-
makers should be forewarned that the
police will be there in "full force."

The vehicles that were presented to
CDU were four Jeep Explorers, two

Dodge Chargers, and one Jeep Chero-

Superintendent Dean said he also kee.



Man wanted for questioning in connection with murder

AN all-points bulletin
has been issued for 48-
year-old Kirkwood Mario

Storr who is wanted for
questioning in connection
with murder.

Storr’s last known
address is Johnson Ter-
race.

He is described as
being of dark complexion,
medium build,
5’8” tall and weighing
150Ibs.

Storr is considered
armed and extremely dan-

gerous.

Persons with any infor-
mation about his where-
abouts are asked to con-
tact the following num-
bers:

Police emergency at
919/911; police control
room at 322-3333; Crime
Stoppers at 328-8477; the
Southeastern police sta-
tion at 392-4333/9 or the
nearest police station.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 3



Concern over party reportedly

planned at ‘Brave’ Davis’ home | i

Resident fears possible traffic congestion, violent behaviour



PHILIP ‘BRAVE’ DAVIS

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ADVERTISEMENTS for a commercial par-
ty in the residential area of West Ridge, report-
edly to be held at the home of opposition mem-
ber Philip “Brave” Davis, have angered at least
one resident.

According to a flyer advertising the party,
billed as “Platinum Status”, patrons must pay
$20 to enjoy music, food and an open bar at the
"Davis residence" in West Ridge this coming
Saturday. There is also a $100 “champagne
room”, The Tribune was told.

According to one of the event's multiple
sponsors, the party is being organised by Mr
Davis’ son.

Yesterday, an employee at the Department
of Physical Planning said internal records did
not show an application for a permit to host a
commercial party in West Ridge, as is required
under zoning guidelines.

The area in western New Providence is
zoned strictly for single-family dwellings, the
employee said, adding that such a party would
require permission from his department.

According to physical planning guidelines,
the permit application should have been sub-
mitted for review at least two weeks before
the party.

One resident is afraid the event will attract
scores of patrons due to the multiple radio
commercials promoting the party.

She is concerned about possible traffic con-
gestion and the potential for violent behaviour
from intoxicated party-goers.

"It's pretty much like having a night club in
a residential area. We all know the amount of
violence happening at night clubs and I'm wor-
ried the party will end with a shooting or stab-
bing.

Worried

"I'm worried that if it happened once it
would keep happening because they would
think that it's okay," said the concerned resi-
dent, who did not want to be named.

Meanwhile, the physical planning employee
said if residents complain to police on the night
of the party, the event will be shut down if the
organisers cannot produce the required per-
mit. He added that party organisers would need
another permit from the Licensing Authority if
alcohol is on sale at the event.

But yesterday an employee from the Licens-
ing Authority claimed there was no need for a
permit at a "private party."

Attempts to reach Mr Davis for comment
were unsuccessful up to press time last night.

BCB: No tampering of employee valuations forms occurred

THE BROADCASTING
Corporation of the Bahamas
has denied that any tampering
with employee evaluation
forms took place, as claimed
in an article appearing in yes-
terday’s Tribune.

According to a statement
issued by the government-run
news agency, in mid-2009 the
Broadcasting Corporation
(BCB) began training all
managers and staff to enhance
the productivity and efficien-
cy of all aspects of its opera-
tions with particular emphasis
on performance.

This, the BCB said, was in
accordance with industrial
agreements with both the
Bahamas Communications

and Public Officers Union
and Bahamas Communica-
tions and Managerial Union
(BCPOU and BCPMU) and
necessitated a change in the
evaluation system which
requires persons to be “more
accountable for their perfor-
mance”.

“The process is still in its
infancy stage and will
undoubtedly experience a
number of growing pains as
the changes are quite signifi-
cant compared with evalua-
tions in previous years.

“The corporation denies
any ‘tampering’ as alleged.
Out of the 240 plus staff eval-
uated, less than six per cent
of the evaluation forms

reviewed, following com-
plaints made of procedural
non-compliance, were found
to have not followed proce-
dure,” the BCB said.

The statement further stat-
ed that the BCB will follow
all procedures which call for
evaluations to be redone fol-
lowing the “appropriate
guidelines”, noting that the
BCPOU and the BCPMU are
aware of the situation and the
steps being taken.

On Thursday, The Tribune
reported that staff at ZNS
were in shock after learning
that a senior manager at the
Broadcasting Corporation
had allegedly tampered with
employee evaluation forms.

The claims of tampering —
which allegedly saw staff
members’ scores lowered, to
the potential detriment of
their promotion and salary
adjustment hopes — came to
light this week when certain
employees obtained copies of
their evaluation forms only to
find the documents had been
altered after being signed by
their immediate supervisor.

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THE TRIBUNE



We need more

understanding from
administration of

Queen’s College
LETTERS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972- EDS the TAD U

I am writing concerning the
letter that appeared in your
newspaper dated February 17,
2010 under the heading “Con-
cern about the new rule at
Queen’s College.”

Tam also in agreement with
the letter writer. Primary school
children are to be dropped at
the security gate and it’s up to
these children to walk up that
long drive and go to class.

Bear in mind these include
grade one children who are as
young as five years old. A lot of
these children do not want to
go to school and therefore wan-
der around the school hoping to
delay the start of school and
possibly getting into mischief:
This is all over an alleged child
abduction which QC, along
with the police, say did not hap-
pen. If it did not happen, why
are we, the innocent parents,
being made to suffer for this
child’s imagination? This child
should be dealt with and not
the rest of the student body.

We need some sort of com-
munication from the Adminis-
tration of QC, who from what I
understand do not have chil-
dren themselves, so they are
unable to understand the con-
cern that we have for our chil-

SUT TTF CA UTT
AC

EDITOR, The Tribune

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Ban smoking in public places

IN A letter published in Wednesday’s Tri-
bune retired assistant police commissioner
Paul Thompson urged government to intro-
duce legislation to ban smoking in public
places.

About four years ago it was announced
that government was drafting legislation to
protect non-smokers from the dangerous
fumes of smokers. However, nothing more
was heard of the draft. Whether it was nev-
er brought forward due to the slow-moving
Christie administration or whether there
were protests behind the scenes that stayed
the draughtsman’s hand, we shall probably
never know.

However, the matter is once more before
the public. There must be a movement out
there — whether organised or not — that is
becoming agitated by the proliferation of
smoke in certain public places. We say this
because of the number of telephone calls
that we are suddenly receiving from those
who want us to put our fingers to our key-
board and reopen the issue. This is an issue
that we have written about many times
before.

Mr Thompson has now re-opened the
debate. But this time because of the increas-
ing respiratory problems in this country, it is
time for smoking to be taken beyond the
debating stage. Action is now necessary.

The smoking lobby will protest that they
have rights too. We agree they have rights,
but the rights extend only to destroying their
own health, not the health of others. Each
man’s right ends when it infringes on the
rights of others. And second hand smoke is
that infringement from which in a public
place the non-smoker has a right to be pro-
tected.

No one is asking for legislation that will
ban the committed smoker from blacken-
ing his own lungs. All that is being asked is
that he remove himself and his dirty weed a
safe distance from those who don’t want to
share his fate.

There is now conclusive evidence that
inhaling second hand smoke causes lung
cancer in non-smokers.

This has been proven by scientists over
many years. However, in 1604 James 1 of
England (James VI of Scotland) needed no
scientist to tell him what was so obvious to
the eye and the resulting congestion in the
chest.

The king described smoking as a “‘custom
loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose,
harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs,

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and in the black, stinking fume thereof, near-
est resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of
the pit that is bottomless.”

Four centuries ago James would have
had no problem banning such an evil, which
he saw not only as “a great vanity, but a
great contempt of God’s good gifts, that the
sweetness of man’s breath, being a good gift
of God, should be wilfully corrupted by this
stinking smoke.”

James did not know then what we know
now. According to statistics there are about
3,400 cancer deaths annually among adult
non-smokers in the US due to their exposure
to second hand smoke.

The US Surgeon General has estimated
that living with a smoker increases a non-
smoker’s chance of developing cancer by 20
to 30 per cent.

It has also been suggested by some
researchers that there is evidence that second
hand smoke may increase the risk of breast
cancer, nasal sinus cavity cancer, nasopha-
ryngeal cancer in adults, and leukemia, lym-
phoma, and brain tumours in children. How-
ever, it is claimed that more research is nec-
essary to conclusively confirm what present
research so far is suggesting.

In the US second hand smoke is believed
to be the cause of about 46,000 heart disease
deaths each year. The researchers have gone
so far as to suggest that second hand smoke
might be linked to the risk of a stroke and
hardening of the arteries.

Researchers also say that second hand
smoke can cause an increased risk of sudden
infant death syndrome (SIDS), ear infec-
tions, colds, pneumonia, bronchitis and more
severe asthma. It can also slow the growth of
children’s lungs and cause breathlessness
and wheezing.

“There is no safe level of exposure to second
hand smoke,” say the experts. “Studies have
shown that even low levels of second hand
smoke exposure can be harmful. The only
way to fully protect non-smokers from sec-
ond hand smoke exposure is to completely
eliminate smoking in indoor spaces.”
Apparently separating smokers from non-s
mokers, cleaning the air, and ventilating
buildings cannot completely eliminate sec-
ond hand smoke exposure.

So what are we waiting for? Time is over-
due for the complete banning of smoking
in all public places.

The smoker can light up in the wide open
spaces on the outside where he has all the
freedom he needs to do harm to himself.

I feel obliged to comment
on the letters written in the
paper between Mr Abner
Pinder and Mr Algernon
Allen. Iam a devoted listen-
er to "Issues of the Day” and
although I may not com-
pletely agree with the com-
ment by Mr Pinder that Mr
Allen "hates" Prime Minis-
ter Ingraham — I would say
that Mr Allen is no Wendall
Jones.

Mr Jones manages each
guest and caller with integri-
ty and respect. I find him
sometimes to be painfully
non-biased.

Mr Allen on the other
hand needs to realize that
the show is a forum for
guests and callers. He is to
act as a mediator between
the two. When Mr Allen is
not laughing, he is running
on with his own life experi-
ences. To you, Mr Allen, I
say: Take a step back and
humble yourself. Learn from
your co-worker Mr Wendall
Jones. Mediate, do not bully.

And to Mr Pinder: Go
ahead and express yourself
for you are not alone.

A CONCERNED
READER
Nassau,

March 5, 2010.

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dren. We as parents entrust our
children to QC every day, and
we expect the same trust
returned to us.

QC in my opinion is falling
down on their part of the agree-
ment, unless they have admin-
istration or teachers down at
the bottom of the drive for us
parents to hand our children
off to, they have failed! Not us
parents! Also nights the chil-
dren are released and they wan-
der all over the field and park-
ing lots looking for their par-
ents which may not have even
arrived in the parking lot yet.

There is no supervision and
this situation that QC has cre-
ated could result in major prob-
lems and law suits against the
school. What happens when
someone’s child is beaten as the
previous letter writer says or
even worse really kidnapped?

I also want the opportunity
to meet with the other parents
and teachers in the morning.
The ELC was a very loving sec-
tion of the school where par-
ents chatted before and after

school together outside the
classrooms. But the primary
school is another matter. I
understand that after about
grade three there should be no
need for parents to walk the
kids up the drive, but we still
should be afforded that right.

If QC does not want outside
people on the campus, have
them issue two walking passes
for every child in the primary
school. The reason I say two is
that it took two people to make
the child so therefore a mini-
mum of two passes should be
needed. The same person does
not pick up the child every
night. We do need more under-
standing from the administra-
tion of Queen’s College. I only
can say that the people that can
afford to will move their chil-
dren to other schools like St
Andrews.

We are paying a lot of mon-
ey each term for our kids in QC
and we are being dictated to. I
have had an experience at
another private school in Nas-
sau and parents were allowed
to walk their kids to and from
class everyday.

MARSHA BETHELL
Nassau,
February, 2010.

It's time to he transparent, GBPA

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The young management of the Port are putting on a good face,
however, everyone knows that with Sir Jack still cruising there has
to be a person who was there till the New Year as you simply can-
not leave such an enterprise without a pilot.

Surely it is time that GBPA make the appropriate announcement
who is the chief who is running and acting as chairman of the
port? Yes, we are told we should become washers of windows,
but the real potential is not there but in what the management of
the GBPA and the group of companies can generate.

None of us can be reassured when we know the immediate past
chair did not have his permit renewed for whatever reason, but who

is running the show?

Time to be transparent Grand Bahama Port Authority.

W DARVILLE
Freeport,
February, 2010.

Having a nation to call your own

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My husband and J make our home in Marsh Harbour during the
winter months and are just concluding our fifth season here. It is
very fulfilling for us to be involved in our community, and have
come to appreciate the concerns of this country, from food supply

stability to immigration issues.

In regards to the latter I had occasion to help with one young
lady’s desire to establish herself as a Bahamian who, even though
born here, was essentially without any legal status.

I will withhold comment on the laborious, time consuming,
frustrating, and inefficient bureaucracies that she encountered
along the way to legally accord herself franchise in a country
which had always been her home. I came alongside her (and her
brother) and made another trip to Nassau (her sixth) this time with
her mother, to get proof of her birth from PMH.

We were successful and I would like to thank publicly Ms Ellis
from Medical Records at Princess Margaret Hospital who works in
a very crowded setting. She is to be commended for a job well done,
and has been instrumental in the process for two young people to
be embraced legally into a nation which has always been home to
them. They can now become solid contributing members of
Bahamian society. It is only a matter of how far you go back in your
heritage to find parents, grandparents, great grandparents or great
great grandparents who did the same thing for you so that you
would have a nation to call your own.

It was very satisfying to facilitate this process, and I encourage
other young people to persevere in their application to do the
same. The Bahamas will be the better for it as we live according to
the Scripture, Micah 6:8, “He has shown you, women and men,
what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act
justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

DEBORAH R BALLARD
Nassau,
February 27, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Call for website to name
accused criminals on bail

Former Attorney General makes
proposals to tackle crime

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

FORMER Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson has
called on the government to
immediately create a website
where members of the public
can easily find out which
accused criminals have been
released on bail.

The proposal was one of sev-
eral put forward by the PLP
Senator and leader of Opposi-
tion business in the Senate dur-
ing Wednesday’s session.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson sug-
gested this website should be
launched right away by the
government to reduce crime
and the fear of crime.

Monitoring

The Senator’s other propos-
als included that anyone who
attacks or threatens a police-
man or judge should be tried
right away; that accused mur-
derers should be subject to
immediate trials so as to avoid
the chance of them being
released on bail; that electron-
ic monitoring of those on bail
should be implemented; that
regular checks on the status of
evidence, witnesses and those
accused in crimes should be
made to ensure that cases do
not fall by the wayside.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
crime should not be made into
a “political football”, but noted
that the FNM’s general elec-
tion campaign included the
message that “if you want to

fA Aahaniwas faniited

reduce crime, vote FNM.”

“Well, the FNM has been in
charge since 2008 and crime
has steadily increased since
then,” she said, quoting sever-
al recent crime related head-
lines.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson
accused the government of
“dismantling a multi-faceted
strategy to address the prob-
lems in the administration of
justice and crime” left in place
by the former PLP government
prior to the 2007 election.

Projects

“Unfortunately law and
order is another area where
projects left in place were not
built on. They were stopped or
cancelled and Urban Renewal
was subsequently reinstated. I
understand that Swift Justice
is partially reinstated. I do not
understand why games would
be played or risks taken with
the safety of our citizens and
the vitality of our tourist indus-
try. Urban Renewal and Swift
Justice were working for the
benefit of Bahamians. If they
were not prefect they should
have been fixed, not stopped
and reinstated two years later
while crime continues to spiral
out of control,” said the Sena-
tor.

She said that if the 2009 mur-
der rate were to take into
account all of the “unclassified
deaths” the increase in the rate
from 2008 to 2009 would be
just under 40 per cent.

“They show murders (are) at
85 to end December 2009. We

Employment Opportunity

Financial Controller

Description:

SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson

know that the police reported
more than 100 deaths, some of
which are yet to be classified.
We Bahamians know that they
were not due to natural causes
and we know that they are
crimes, which is why the police
are involved,” she said.

Law

It seems “people are more
and more feeling that they
must take the law into their
own hands because the gov-
ernment seems to be inept and
unable and at very least, help-
less. Bahamians are under siege
in their homes. Home invasions
are increasing. Bahamians are
not safe on the streets. Tourists



are not safe on Bay Street.”

Mrs Maynard-Gibson com-
mended the police force for its
efforts to combat crime but
added that the full effective-
ness of their attempts will be
diminished unless matters can
be swiftly brought to trial.

“Judges are ready to hear
matters. They can only hear
what is brought before them.
They do not prepare matters
for trial,” said the former
Attorney General.

She suggested that full and
effective collaboration between
various government agencies is
lacking and that this is imping-
ing upon the number of mat-
ters which are being put for-
ward for trial.

pledged their support,”
: Said.

Police officers carry
out ‘operation disrupt’

IN the first of a planned series of
exercises, officers of the Southwest-
ern Division last week conducted
an operation to ensure the busi-

i nesses in that area were secure,
? school children were not harassing
? members of the community and
i motorists were abiding by the laws

of the road.
The police officers set out last

Friday at about 2.45pm to carry out

“operation disrupt” with the aim of

disrupting persons who seem to
: have little or no regard for law and

order.
The operation commenced at the

junction of Baillou Hill Road and

Carmichael Road, and officers paid

specific attention to “school chil-
: dren who usually annoy members

of the community after school,” the

i police said in a press release.

Additionally, road checks were
conducted, halting bus drivers

whose licences were expired or did
; not meet the required dressed

code.
The officers also conducted a

walkabout in the community, assur-
; ing residents of the police’s com-
: mitment to reducing and eventually

eradicating crime.
Residents were encouraged to be

their brother’s keeper and to report

all suspicious persons, vehicles and
activities.

“The residents were excited and
the police

Further, officers also ensured

that the business community of

Carmichael was secured. Patrols

: were increased during the evening
? thus creating a safer environment
: for businesses.

The operation was a success, and

the officers arrested two men for
? suspected dangerous drugs, four
: men for house break-ins and recov-

ered three suspected stolen vehi-
cles.
“This initiative is just the begin-

: ning of a number of activities

: geared toward ensuring the resi-

: dents and business communities of
? the Southwestern Division

(Carmichael) are safe. The officers
of the Southwestern Division are

: focused and determined to create a
? safe environment for persons to

? live, work, visit and play,” the

: police’s press statement said.

IT’S A TIME OF JOY.AND JUBULAT
if’S AGRAND

OF PRAISE”

AND €1

Provide leadership and coordination for the campany's financial actual reporting,

planning and budgetary

management functions. The position is accountable for the accounting opera-
tlons. of the company which Include tie
maintenance of an adequate system of accounting records, and a set of com-
prehensive contrals designed to maintain
tha integrity of the company's financial results. Hasponsibililias will include:

- Directing and coordinating the company's financial planning and budget
ary management functions.
~ Leading the daily operations of the company's business controls, cash

managamant, fulfillmant, pansion management, accounting systams and

balance sheet processes.

Maintaining an organizational structure and staffing to effectively
accomplish the company's strategic goals and objectives
- Acting as a trusted business advisor to the IBM Bahamas

Leadership Team.

- Recruitment, training, supervising and evaluating department's staff.

Qualifications:

March 14-21, 2010 - East Street Tabernacle —

meme: “RISEN, UPRIGHT,

SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS;

RESTORED AND READY!”

Psalm 20:8
March 21st 1

- University Degree in Accounting, with either a CA, CPA, OCGA or
CMA accounting designation,

3 to 5 years of expenence in a similar senior level finance or accounting
position,

* Work requires strong professional written and verbal communication skills
Ability to motivate teams and produce high quality work within tight
timeframes.

* Required to simultaneously manage several projects and must be
willing to work a flexible schedule.

- Ability to affactively work in an international, fast-paced, matrixed
organization.

An equal opportunity amployer, IBM provides competitive salaries. Thus, corm-
pensation will be commensurate with experiance and qualifications,

Please mail detailed resume ofr in electronic format to the attention of:

Financial Controller

IEM Bahamas Limited

Fourth Floor

Atlantic House

Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas

e-Mail: nseaton@bs.ibm.com

Deadline far receipt of rasumes is: Friday, March 19th 2010.

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence. Only short-listed appli-
cants will be contacted

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

MINISTER CATHERINE H. PAYNE
International Director of Wonven’s Min-
estries from Cleveland, Tennessee, U.S.A
BISHOP JOHN N. HUMES

National Overseer of the Church of God
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands
BISHOP CLARENCE WN. WILLIAMS

ation Career of tbe Turks & Caria [slarke

BISHOP BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter of the Caribbean and
Athintic Ocean Islands
: The
Convention Praise Team, National Con
vention Chair, Tabernacle Concert Chor,
the Church of God National Choir, Ba-
hamas Public Officers Choir and various
soloists, choirs and singing groupes.
The Bahama Brass Band, Bahama
Youth and Junior Brass Bands will pro
Vide special music.

Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming, CMG,
DD, JP, National Overseer and era-

tor will deliver his Annual Natlonal Ad-

or 6 1640 Bi Spa

LOG on

ee bea ham
‘Wencesr evening sass

The Convention cloase with the Annual Pa-
rade and Water Baptismal Service at the
Western Esplanade, and with the live ZNS
Radio and the live Television Channel 35
evening broadcast service. During this ser-
ioe, the National Grerseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarmet
B. Rahming will deliger the final message on
the Convention's

icine, the family a and a

For further lieu eist eall 322-309


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

Ambassador Joshua Sears in London for two days of intensive discussions



Bahamas awarded ‘signal honour’ of helping
with Commonwealth’s human rights review



THE Bahamas has been awarded a
“signal honour” by being given the
opportunity to contribute to the Com-
monwealth’s review of human rights
records and laws, said Ambassador
Joshua Sears, Director General of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The ambassador travelled to Lon-
don this week to attend the two-day
Commonwealth Mid-Term Review
of Universal Periodic Review Process
which concludes today.

the Human Rights Council estab-
lished by the United Nations Gener-
al Assembly in March 2006 is to mon-
itor and review the human rights
records of 192 member states of the
international community.

Expert

An expert panel convened in Lon-
don to review the implementation of
the Universal Period Review Process

UN. A document of best practices in
the Commonwealth will be one of
the outcomes of this review.

To date, 142 countries of the UN
have been reviewed.

The Bahamas was the first CARI-
COM country to be reviewed, which
was done at the Third Session in
December 2008, and Ambassador
Sears has been invited to share the
Bahamas and Caribbean experience
with the Commonwealth Expert

Secretary General Kamelesh Shar-
ma delivered the keynote address and
the panel engaged in two days of
intensive discussions, which made an
important contribution to the UN
review process.

Ambassador Sears said that this
opportunity to contribute to the Com-
monwealth’s position of the review
of this new instrument and the further
development of human rights laws
and practices globally is an honour
for the Bahamas.

One of the primary instruments of

and to make recommendations to the

Group.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FOREST STORM INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FENUGREEK
ENTERPRISES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

EAST WATER RESEARCH
GROUP LIMITED

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) EAST WATER RESEARCH GROUP LIMITED is
in voluntary dissolution under the provisions of Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(b) The Liquidator of the said company is Peter Leppard
of c/o 1 Raffles Link #05-02 Singapore 039393.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Peter Leppard
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
ECLAIRE LTD.

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ECLAIRE LTD. is in voluntary dissolution under the
provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Gizeh
Management Ltd. of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British
Virgin Islands.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Gizeh Management Ltd.
Liquidator

KGBC SCHOOL VISITS — Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee members partic-
ipated in a special morning assembly at Walter Parker Primary School. Some of the
students got up close and personal with the KFC mascot ‘Chicky’ as he helped

spread the anti-littering message.

THE Keep Grand Bahama Clean
Committee’s (KGBC) first commu-
nity clean-up for the year is planned
for this Saturday in Coral Gardens.

KGBC in conjunction with Domin-
ion Community Church, Access Min-
istries and the Seahorse Urban
Renewal, will spearhead an early
morning clean-up of loose litter
throughout the community, beginning
at 7.30am.

The event culminates with a much
anticipated health fair and fun day.

To increase public awareness
amongst Coral Gardens’ residents and
garner support for Saturday morn-
ing’s event, representatives of the var-
ious groups took to the streets on
Wednesday afternoon distributing fly-
ers and speaking with residents.

Nakira Wilchcombe, KGBC chair-
person, described the clean-ups as an
integral part of their mission and invit-
ed Coral Gardens’ residents, civic

Legal Notice

NOTICE

OLD GELLINGSLY
INVESTMENTS LTD.

JOSHUA SEARS

Community clean-up on Saturday



CORAL GARDENS CLEAN-UP — Representatives
from the Keep Grand Bahama Clean committee and
other organisations delivered personal invitations to
Coral Gardens’ residents in advance of Saturday’s
clean-up in their community. Pictured (I-r): Lonna

groups, other organisations and the
general public to join in the activities.

Prior to Saturday’s clean-up, KGBC
participated in a special assembly at
the nearby Walter Parker Primary
School. Committee members were on
hand to spread the message of love
of country and the environment to
the entire gathering of students, fac-
ulty and administrators.

Addressing them was KGBC mem-
ber Rehuder Rolle of Love 97.

Excited

“We are excited to stop by your
school to encourage you to ‘Keep
Grand Bahama Clean’. Even though
you are young now, you’re not too
young to begin to be proactive and
aware of the importance of keeping
Grand Bahama and your entire coun-
try, clean.”

Munroe, KGBC committee member; Rowena Albury,
facilitator with Seahorse Urban Renewal; Nola
McKenzie, resident, and Geneva Rutherford, direc-
tor of community relations at GBPA.

A highlight of the school visit was a
special appearance by Kentucky Fried
Chicken’s mascot ‘Chicky’.

KFC is an official corporate partner
of the ‘Keep Grand Bahama Clean’
initiative.

“Once again, KFC has joined forces
with KGBC in an effort to reach the
youth in our schools by using our
much-loved ‘Chicky’ to reinforce the
importance of their part in keeping
Grand Bahama Clean,” said Aniska
Saunders, assistant marketing man-
ager at KFC.

“Through anti-littering campaigns
we hope to promote pride in our
country and personal responsibility
in keeping our island litter free which
is a benefit we all enjoy.”

School visits and community clean-
ups will continue throughout the
course of the year, along with other
special KGBC-sponsored events.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

AVLONA LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
PAPEIRA LIMITED

N OTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PAPEIRA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 10th March 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Orbitron Limited
of Wickhams Cay, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

Dated this 12th day of March A. D. 2010

Orbitron Limited
Liquidator

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRENOBLE FALLS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



One of world’s largest
cargo ships in Freeport

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT- THE arrival
of one of the world’s largest
cargo ships in Grand Bahama
this week signals the impor-
tance of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port in the face of a
growing global population and
the expansion of China’s
exports, said Environment
Minister Dr Earl Deveaux.

And although the amount
of shipping traffic at the port
is still down due to the global
recession, things are slowly
starting to look up with more
orders from China.

Dr Deveaux was in
Freeport on Wednesday for
the arrival of the Northern
Jasper - one of the largest con-
tainer vessels in the world.

The vessel, which is oper-
ated by the Mediterranean
Shipping Company (MSC),
arrived in port carrying some
8,200 containers.

Minister Deveaux and Con-
tainer Port CEO Gary Gilbert
went onboard the ship, where
they presented a plaque to
Captain Seredyn Dariusz and
chief engineer Scarlat Alexan-
dru to commemorate the
occasion.

“This ship (Northern
Jasper) is the biggest ship we
ever had in Grand Bahama -
so this is a real big plus for
Grand Bahama,” Mr Gilbert
told reporters.

This is the second mega
container ship of its kind that
has docked at the harbour
here.

The Tomoko, the sister ship
of Northern Jasper, came in
February, carrying some 8,000
containers.

Dr Deveaux said the ship’s
arrival is a very significant
one, not only for the contain-
er port, but also for Grand
Bahama and the Bahamas.

“In order for this ship to go
into New York they have to
lower the top deck to get
under the bridge, but yet
Freeport is able to accommo-
date it.

“This ship is about half the
size of the one that will come
later in the year that actual
carries 14,000 containers (and)
that can’t even go on the east-
ern seaboard of the US, yet
the freight of the world will
come to Grand Bahama to
unload containers.

“MSC is one of our biggest
(on) register, and of course
the Bahamas is seeking to
promote the maritime regis-
ter,” said Dr Deveaux.

He noted that the port’s

Domeritte’s Funeral

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Sylvia Lousie Davis Brown, 79

a resident of Davis Street, Fox Hill,
who passed away on 2nd March,
2010, will be held at Macedonia
Baptist Church, Bernard Road, Fox
Hill, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. David
S. Johnson, assisted by other
Ministers. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.













































































Sylvia's true spirit of loving, caring,

sharing and cherished memories

will continue to linger in the hearts

of her beloved family three sons,

Roderick, Rev. Dr. Anthony and

Servant Elect Bob Brown; one

adopted son, Timothy Capronfour
daughters, Advilda Lockhart, Jacqueline Comarcho, Patricia Cartwright,
and Donna Brown; two brothers, Samuel Davis Jr. of New York, and
Calvin Davis; one sister, Vernell Davis; twenty seven grandchildren,
Yvette "Sandy" Kerr, Eddie, Anishka, Tito, Kino and Candice, Carol,
Lloyd, Latoya, Amanda, Jamie, Roderick Jr.; Lakisha, Anton, Antoinette,
Monate, Amanda, Albert Jr., and Cyril Cartwright Jr; Isrick, Robert,
Zahane, Brinique, and Bobby Jr. Brown; Gia Finley, Timea and
Timothy Jr. Carpron; fifteen great grandchildren, Aysha-Cassidi, Tito
Jr., Rashan, Donica, Angelica, Ryan, Ramold, Lloyd Jr., Brandon,
Dillon, Garnet, Rotisha, Laquell, Antrielle, Denoughn Knowles and
Demeco Dean; thirteen nieces, Vandria Forbes, Cindy Cartwright,
Kim Thompson, Jill Hanna, Janet Rolle, Ethel Pinder, Peggy Davis,
Gail Cochinamogulos, Sharona, Shabraka, Lakeisha, Sherelle, and
Sherese Davis; eight nephews, Calvin Jr., Marvin Davis, Troy Davis,
Larry Pinder, John Pinder President of the Public Service Union and
N.C.T.U, Fredrick and Valentino Davis; nineteen grand-nieces, Daria,
Darrinika, Deshanna, Brittany, Tina, Yvette, Amy, Narrissa, Theodosia,
Petiere, Kesha, Claudina Cooper, Kera Cartwright, Inderia, lleanna
Thompson, Taniesha Davis, Katera Thompson, Renna Rolle, and
Trishae Davis; twenty-one granddnephews, Darrien, Steven, Dwight,
Theo, Theron, Theodore, Theophilus Cochinamogulos, Antereu, Javan,
Jamar, Larrez, Lamar, Patrick, Valentino Forbes, Jamal, Jermaine,
Cecil, Calvin Davis III, Malvin Davis Jr., Macfado Thompson, Rodolph
Rolle, sister-in-law, Cora Davis; one son-in-law, Albert Cartwright
Sr., two daughtersin-law, Esther Brown, Quillie Capron; grand-
daughter-in-law, Nadia Brown; godchild, Shirley Dames of Acklins
Island; numerous relatives and friends including, The Community of
Black Point Exuma, Browns, Smiths, Minnis’, Ferguson's, Rolle's,
Robinson's, The entire Davis family of the Fox Hill Community, Irene
Davis, Cleomy Saunders, Theologus Cochinamogulos, Steven Kerr,
Dorothy Davis Rahming, Rev. Dr. William Thompson, Minister Betty
Davis Thompson, Rev. Julia Bain, Sophie Davis Forbes, Rubey,
Margaret, Debra and Anthony Davis, Beryl Davis Wright, Linol Davis,
Martie Davis, Trevor, Burky, Dillian Davis, Joyann Davis Thompson,
Elenor Forrester Smith, Dr.Carrington Pinder, St. Marks Native Baptist
Church, Evangelist Carolyn Demeritte, Rev. Sherry Saunders, Ena
and Madolyn Timothy, Elsie Mae Johnson, Dola Anna Smith, Shirley
Johnson, Ralnol, Sammy, Karvol, Junior and Glen Mackey, Beverley
Bain, Anna Smith, Bruce Davis, Maud Bain, Derek Davis, Urskin
Davis, Cora Davis Mackey, Senitor Doctor Jacinta Higgs, Fred Ramsey
and family, Cynthia Davis, Rev. Estella Davis of Orlando Florida,
Oline Francis, Janique Francis, Miriam Brennen, Sylvia Sealy,
Honorable Minister Fred Mitchell, Martin Kemp, Paula Tynes, Bishop
Dr. Evin Hart, William Hall Senior, Buster Hall, Maxine and Marium
Rolle, Rev.Dr. Cari Rahming, Samuel Kemp, Evangelist Margaret
Strachan and family, Mt Senior Preston Moss of the St. Anselm's
Church and Miriam Roker. The Soup Kitchen of Mt. Carey Church,
and The Soup Kitchen of Macedonia Baptist Church, The staff of the
Ministry of Health, the staff of the Department of Environmental
Health Services, Elizabeth Estate Clinic, Nurse Debra Watson, and
the Fox Hill Clinic, Present Day Bible Miistries, Mount Tabor Full
Baptist Church, Pastors of Prayer, Macedonia Baptist Church, Rev.
Dr. David Johnson, Friends of Davis Street Fox Hill, Rev. Dr. Philip
Rahming, Demeritte's Funeral Home, Princess Margaret Hospital, The
Fox Hill Police Station, Inspector Smith, and Woodlawn Gardens.

Aa MINISTER Dr Earl Deveaux (right) onboard the Northern Jasper.



proximity to the eastern
seaboard of the US makes
Freeport a “vital link” in
international shipping from
South America to Asia and
Europe.

Dr Deveaux said the con-
tinued expansion of the con-
tainer port and the harbour in
Freeport is important as the
world population grows and
exports continue to increase
from China.

He reported that China
exports for February
increased by 46 per cent com-
pared to last year this time.

Minister Grant said Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham’s
decision to approve the con-
tainer port for Freeport was
the right decision. He noted
that the port continues to pro-

vide hundreds of jobs for
Bahamians.

Mr Gilbert said Freeport
has the deepest harbour in the
Western Hemisphere, with a
depth of 54ft to accommodate
the largest vessels in the
world.

He said every week one of
MSC’s mega container vessels
will dock at the container
port.

In addition to MSC, Mr
Gilbert revealed that the con-
tainer port is looking for
another a major shipping cus-
tomer.

He said that business at the
container port is still down,
but has improved slightly over
the recession.

“We are not to the 2,000
levels but at the rest of

Hutchison’s other ports we
are starting to see more orders
coming from China ports.
They are not as long in dura-
tion but we are back about 25
per cent of what we were at
the low of last year, and that is
not all the way to when we
were 30 per cent down from
2008. So it is a very good sign
that things are coming back,”
he said.

Mr Gilbert said that expan-
sion is continuing with
Bahama Rock to excavate the
harbour for an additional
1,800 meters of quay side and
other 10 cranes.

He said their safety record
at the container port is very
good, with no fatalities,
although there were minor
accidents.

AVOID BEING NEXT
How To Avoip BEING SHOT BY THE POLICE - Part 4

STOP LIVING IN FEAR - .



GO AND tell your young men
these things.

Under no circumstances should you
ever become verbally abusive to a
police officer. Even if you are inno-
cent, you are exposing yourself to
potential violence.

A police officer deals on a daily
basis with members of the general
public who are cursing at him in the
course of doing his duty.

It is quite human to lash out at the
officer; I know I don’t feel “served and pro-
tected” when someone is writing me a ticket
for speeding.

Truth be known, most officers in this coun-
try just ignore the verbal threats against their
person. They appreciate the violent language
of our new culture, and the immaturity of

some people.

The problem comes when the officer
is in a combative state, because he may
be stopping cars to look for a criminal
whose profile you fit. Any resistance —
including verbal abuse — on your part,
could escalate the situation rapidly and
dangerously.

Always remember, we outnumber
the Bad Guys.

D’Arcy Rahming



e D’Arcy Rahming is a violent crime
researcher and Adjunct Faculty Member at the
College of the Bahamas. He holds Black Belts
in several martial arts and is an internationally
renowned seminar leader for corporations, pri-
vate groups and police and security groups.
You can follow him on his blog at www.sto-
plivinginfear.org.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the
church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

ee ee tom Cl mts

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS
—

Former Turks and Caicos Premier
wants Prime Minister to assist territory

FROM page one

and Caicos government to
have been accused of malfea-
sance by the British-led com-
mission of inquiry that ulti-
mately resulted in the suspen-
sion of the country’s constiti-
tution and its democratic insti-
tutions last year by the United
Kingdom government.

Mr Misick stepped down as

Premier in March 2009, deny-
ing charges of corruption. The
British then took direct con-
trol of governing the country
for what they forecast would
be a period of up to two years
— a move that was criticised
by Caricom as “not the most
effective tool to bolster good
governance and effective
administration in the territo-
ry. 2?
On Monday, a “Unity
march” in Providenciales
against the imposition of
direct rule by the British, sup-
ported by both major politi-
cal parties in Turks and
Caicos, drew a turnout esti-
mated at between 750 and
2,000. Putting this in perspec-
tive, there are around 8,000
people on the country’s elec-
toral register.

Some local observers say
the turnout proves the
strength of opposition nation-
ally to the direct British rule
— which also involves the sus-
pension of trial by jury in the
British Overseas Territory —
and more recent proposals by

the British to change the
island’s constitution to allow a
certain class of foreign nation-
als to vote and seek political
office in the islands.

The day after the march —
which was heralded as an
unprecedented and symbolic
show of unity by the political
parties — the British interim
government drew the ire of
Turks Islanders by announc-
ing that it would be slashing
civil servant’s pay by 10 per
cent effective April 1.

The British put this decision
down to falling revenue in a
poor economy, however, for-
mer Premier Mr Misick told
The Tribune yesterday that he
views the action as “subtle
intimidation for misbehav-
iour” in the wake of the
protest march.

Yesterday Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
said the Bahamas’ position on
the situation there “has not
changed.”

“The Bahamas has already
stated its position. The
Bahamas is not going to inter-
vene in any of the issues
regarding the TCI until they
resolve their internal matters.”

The PLP, meanwhile, have
taken a slightly different view
of the situation. In a statement
issued Tuesday, the PLP

called the joint march “a pos-
itive development in the
development of Turks and
Caicos democracy,” adding
that it is pleased the two par-
ties have “come to a joint
position” on the question of
British rule.

“We urge the British to
restore democratic rule to the
Turks and Caicos and to resist
any move that would weaken
the ability of the native peo-
ples of the Turks and Caicos
to run their own affairs,” read
the statement.

Yesterday Fred Mitchell,
the MP for Fox Hill and for-
mer minister of foreign affairs
under the Christie adminis-
tration, said he believes the
Bahamas and Caricom have
a responsibility to keep the
plight of TCI “on the front
burner.”

“T will certainly try to be in
touch with friends at Caricom
to see whether issue can be
raised. There is a heads of
government meeting going on
now. I don’t think Caricom
should ignore the fact that
democracy has been suspend-
ed in TCL TCI is an associate
member of Caricom, so Cari-
com has a responsibility in line
with the statement issued last
year saying that they would
keep it on the front burner.”

The MP said he is of the

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view that the Bahamas has a
“special interest” in the affairs
of the TCI, “because anything
that happens in TCI of course
affects us.”

And he added the PLP sup-
ports giving the TCI people
the opportunity to have a gen-
eral election in which they can
elect the government of their
choice.

“Tt is the same thing they
(the British) would do in their
own country if there was polit-
ical or constitutional crisis —
dissolve parliament and have
fresh elections, so that you
deal with new people. The
way to deal with people
alleged to be individually
responsible for criminal con-
duct is to bring charges before
the courts,” he said.

Mr Mitchell said he and
some of his parliamentary col-
leagues have discussed the
possibility of “mobilising the

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Turks and Caicos popula-
tion in the Bahamas to see
if we couldn’t bring some
more sensitivity on this
issue and to help with what-
ever is going on in TCI”.

According to Mr Misick,
the population of Turks and
Caicos islanders and their
descendants in the
Bahamas are larger than
those who currently reside
in the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Misick describes the
British Governor of TCI as
a “dictator” and the current
situation in the islands as
an “occupation” by the
British.

He told The Tribune that
“particularly because of the
long history” shared by the

Bahamas and TCI, he feels
the Bahamas “more than
any other country in Cari-
com has a greater respon-
sibility to educate for fair-
ness and change in Turks
and Caicos in the same way
the Bahamas under (Sir
Lynden) Pindling led the
way on educating for
change in South Africa
when there was apartheid.”

“T certainly take this
opportunity to call on the
Prime Minister to become
more engaged in the mat-
ters that are taking place,
in the the injustice that has
taken place in the Turks
and Caicos,” Mr Misick
stated.

US report contains claims that children
trafficked from Haiti for sex in Bahamas

FROM page one

therefore no prosecutions or convictions during the year.

This comes after noted anti-slavery campaigner Aaron Cohen
warned that the Bahamas is “at risk of falling into the tentacles of
organised crime in the Caribbean”.

In an interview with The Tribune last week, he said that while the
country is already a transit stop and destination for women and chil-
dren either tricked or forced into servitude, the problem could be

about to get much worse.

He fears that in the wake of the January 12 earthquake in Haiti,
the Bahamas could replace that country as a chief transit hub for

human traffickers.

Mr Cohen pointed to the State Department’s Trafficking in
Persons (TIP) reports for 2008 and 2009, which mentioned the
Bahamas as a destination for sex workers from the Dominican
Republic and “restaveks”, or children exploited for domestic

labour, from Haiti.

The most recent TIP report, released last week, noted that in
2008, parliament passed the Trafficking in Persons Prevention
and Suppression Act which sets out penalties for offenders that
range from three years to life imprisonment.

However, the State Department criticised the tendency of local
officials to lump human trafficking together with human smuggling
— the transportation of persons engaging in voluntary illegal immi-
gration — and punish the victims with arrest and deportation rather

than offering them help.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO

You can find our interview with Aaron Cohen at:
http://www.tribune242.com/editorial/Insight/03082010_slavery_Insight-pg

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHISPERS OF
THE MUSE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PERANNA PARK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PEACESTONIA
RIVER INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 9

S
k
FRIDAY, MARCH

12,

ts

2010











HIGH AMBITIONS School track and field

CV BETHEL’S Terrane
Roker takes part in the
high jump during the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations ‘
annual Scotiabank Nation-
al High School Track and
Field Championships. The
event is taking place at the
Thomas A Robinson Track
and Field Stadium.

NOTICE

SANTANDER MERCHANT BANK
LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders was held on
5" day of December, 2009 at which time all
accounts showing the manner in which the
winding up of the above company had been
conducted and the property of the Company
disposed of was laid before the meeting and
approved by the Shareholders.

Pablo Rodriguez Miiller



SAC’S Danielle Gibson jumps
during the long jump.

LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE
PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that an Extraordinary
General Meeting of the Shareholders was held on
5" day of December, 2009 at which time all
accounts showing the manner in which the
winding up of the above company had been
conducted and the property of the Company
disposed of was laid before the meeting and
approved by the Shareholders.



NCA’S Lathario Minnis in the Pablo Rodriguez Miller

triple jump. LIQUIDATOR

PHOTOS:

aed : P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas
Felipé Major

/Tribune staff

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SEE PAGE 10

CARIFTA SWIMMING TEAM PICKED



[AAF WORLD INDOOR
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Baltamian athletes eye
International metals

A contingent of Bahamian
athletes vie for spots on the
international medal stand and
an opportunity to be crowned
World Champion at the biggest
gathering of nations in the his-
tory of the IAAF World Indoor
Championships.

Nine Bahamians take to the
track today on day one of the
meet in Doha, Qatar.

Christine Amertil, a two-time
World Indoors bronze medallist
in the event in 2003 and 2006,
opens competition for the
Bahamas in Heat One of the
Women's 400m.

Amertil, who has posted a
season's best time of 53.43s, will
run out of lane five.

Also in the heat will be Deb-
bie Dunn of the United States,
world leader in the event with a
time of 50.86s.

In the Men's 400m, Chris
Brown will start his trek
towards a third World Indoors
medal. Brown, who has previ-
ously captured two bronze
medals in the event, will run in
heat five out of lane six.

Brown has posted the fastest
qualifying time of his heat with
a time of 46.20s.

Michael Mathieu will also
join Brown in the field of quar-
termilers.

Mathieu will run in heat one
out of lane four and enters with
the third fastest season's best




CHRISTINE AMERTIL

of his heat with a time of 46.82s.

Chandra Sturrup, the first
Bahamian to capture a gold
medal for the Bahamas at the
event, when she took a first
place finish in 2001, makes yet
another appearance in her sig-
nature event.

Sturrup will run in lane two
of heat two coming in with a
qualifying time of 7.20s.

Sturrup will be paired against
Veronica Campbell-Brown of
Jamaica who in her first appear-
ance at the World Indoor
Championships enters the heat
with the fastest qualifying time
of 7.14s. In the Men's 60m,
Rodney Greene will make his
first appearance at the event
when he runs in heat four out
of lane three. Green's time of
6.66s is the second fastest qual-
ifying time of the heat behind

Nine take to track today in Doha



CHANDRA STURRUP

Mike Rodgers of the United
States with 6.52s.

Shamar Sands will run in
heat two of the 60m hurdles out
of lane seven, and enters with a
season's best time of 7.54s.

Former world champion
Donald Thomas and Trevor
Barry will be the lone competi-
tors in the field when they com-
pete in the men's high jump.

Thomas has posted a sea-
son's best leap of 2.25m while
Barry has reached 2.19m on the
year. With 150 countries con-
firmed to compete in Doha at
the Aspire Dome, it surpassed
the record of 147 countries set
two years agon in Valencia.

The World Indoor Champi-
onships, which were first called
the World Indoor Games in
Paris took place in Paris in
1985 and 69 nations took part.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS

36-member team picked to compete
at Carifta swimming championships

@ THE TEAM: Boys and giris

Girls

15-17

Maya Albury
Ashley Butler
Kadesha Culmer
Bria Deveaux
McKayla Lightbourn
Shaunte Moss
Je'Nae Saunders

13-14

Gabrielle Greene
Abigail Lowe
Berchadette Moss
Laura Morely
Riquel ROlle
Taryn Smith

NOTICE

SANTANDER MERCHANT BANK
LIMITED

A traditionally successful Carifta team
fielded by the Bahamas Swimming Feder-
ation looks to extend its legacy after nam-
ing what promises to be another group of
top-notch performers.

The BSF has selected and ratified a 36
member team to compete at the 25th
annual Carifta Swimming, Synchronized
Swimming, and Water Polo Champi-
onships Championships, April 3-6 in
Kingston, Jamaica.

The Bahamas returns several veteran
swimmers from a team that finished second
in the points standing last year with 691.50
points and tallied 18 gold, 17 silver and 14
bronze.

Nearly 20 countries will field teams for
the 25th edition of the games including
defending champions Aruba.

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required
to send particulars thereof to the

Mancer Roberts

13-14

Zarian Cleare

Peter Farquaharson
TAuren Moss
Dustin Tynes
Anibal Hernandez
Valdes

Jacinda Williams

11-12

Jourdan Bevans
Leslie Campbell
Joanna Evans
Doran Reed
Simone Sturrup
Andreas Weech

undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-1682,

Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30" day of
March, A.D. 2010.

Pablo Rodriguez Miller
11-12

Dionisio Carey
Farion Cooper
Aaron Levarity
Zach Moses
Meshach ROberts

Boys

15-17

Evante Gibson
Matthew Lowe
Toby McCarroll
Delano McIntosh
Armando Moss

LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas



Legal Notice

NOTICE
EVERLASTING WONDERS
INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ST. PETRUS
BUSINESS CORP.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
COVENDALE SEAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRAVITY FORCES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Un ROMAN CHGuleeeeleny Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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High school track and field

GIRLS’ 100
metre heats.

I ME PAM OTN RS ISU

NOTICE
PAN AMERICAN BANK LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against
the above-named Company are required
to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P.O. Box N-1682,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 30" day of
March, A.D. 2010.

Pablo Rodriguez Miiller
LIQUIDATOR

P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ENTERPRISE IVORY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
POTATORI CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 10th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010, PAGE 11





FROM page one

petition filed on behalf of Mr
Pinder — the Progressive Lib-
eral Party’s candidate — was
fundamentally flawed.

“In the prayers of the peti-
tion, the petitioner asks the
court to exercise the jurisdic-
tion conferred by section 69(1)
— of the Parliamentary Elec-
tions Act. A petitioner who is
seeing to avail himself of the
jurisdiction of the court ought
to say what he is seeking,” Mr
Evans submitted. “In this case
one would expect that he
would reveal exactly what it
is that he seeks to receive
from the court. If he does not
do that he puts the respon-
dents in a position of not
knowing what case they have
to meet, not knowing what
they have to respond to,” Mr
Evans told the court.

“First of all he must assert
that the voters were properly
registered and entitled to vote.
The petition contains no
prayer in his favour. There are
no grounds given for finding



BOCA Dt

that the voters were properly
registered and entitled to
vote,” Mr Evans said.

“A petition has particular
characteristics, one of which
the petitioner must set out the
brief facts. Notwithstanding
the discreet nature of the peti-
tion, the court must deal with

LOCAL NEWS

FNM bid to have PLP election court petition struck out fails

it in the same manner as it
deals with any other petition,”
Mr Evans said. Mr Evans
argued that the defect in the
petition cannot be cured by
an amendment. Mr Evans also
argued that the fact that he
had not highlighted the issue
earlier did not prevent the
court from striking out the
petition.

Attorney David Higgins,
who is lead counsel for
Returning Officer Jack
Thompson and Parliamentary
Commissioner Errol Bethel,
adopted the submissions of
Mr Evans.

“We adopt them to the
extent that the petition lacks
the necessary facts and
grounds as is required by a
regular petition. The petition
should contain all the facts rel-
evant to the application. The
petition ought to be able to
stand on its own,” Mr Higgins
told the court.

Mr Ryan’s attorney Philip

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“Brave” Davis, however,
maintained that the applica-
tion to have the petition struck
out was misconceived. “The
application presupposes that
we don’t know why we are
here,” he said. Mr Davis noted
that the respondents had filed
affidavits and played an active
role in the proceedings thus
far. Mr Davis submitted that
the application should not be
entertained and should be dis-
missed. He said that the peti-
tion satisfied all the mandato-
ry requirements.

The judges, after delibera-
tions on the matter did not
accede to Mr Evans’ applica-
tion and awarded cost for two
attorneys to Mr Pinder’s legal
team. Mr Evans then made an
application to appeal the deci-
sion in the Court of Appeal
and also sought a stay of the
proceedings.

“Having regard to the
nature of the proceedings, the
only just remedy would be to

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grant us leave to appeal and
grant us a stay,” Mr Evans
said. Mr Higgins also joined
in the application. Mr Davis,
however, opposed the appli-
cation.

“Assuming but not con-
ceding that there is a right of
appeal, it would seem to me
that if a right resides now,
the same right would reside
at the completion of the pro-
ceedings,” Mr Davis said. To
this Mr Evans responded by
saying, “In terms of the effect
of the application, if the
appeal is launched at the end
it would avail us nothing.”

After deliberating, the
judges refused that applica-
tion as well. “We feel that
any appeal which is neces-
sary, can be brought at the
end of the process without
prejudice to any of the par-
ties,” Senior Justice Allen
said. Mr Evans then asked
the court to grant a conser-
vatory stay until Monday so

Mr. Jermaine Kalle, WIS

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that his team could approach
the Court of Appeal today.
Mr Davis, however, object-
ed stating that the court did
not have the jurisdiction to
grant such a stay but only a
superior court. Mr Evans,
however, claimed that he had
once been involved in a case
in which such a stay was
granted.

Senior Justice Allen, how-
ever, said that in the absence
of any such authorities the
court was minded not to
grant the stay. The case is
now expected to proceed at
10 o’clock this morning.

The election court petition
was filed by Ryan Pinder of
the PLP, who gained 1,499
votes to Dr Sands’ 1,501 in
the February 16 Elizabeth
constituency by-election. Mr
Pinder is claiming that five
protest votes cast in his
favour should be counted,
thus making him the elected
MP for Elizabeth.

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