Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

’m lovin’ it

73F
63F

SUNNY AND

HIGH
LOW

nites

‘BREEZY











BAHAMAS EDITION ~~

www.tribune242.com



PLT Te Cee



Volume: 106 No.89

a VA

corrunt officers

Row over public
contracts leads

to investigation

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe@
tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of
accusations from the
PLP that he presided
over “abuse and
‘cronyism” at the
Department of Envi-

ronmental Health to aul’ Manan

the tune of $18 million,

the Minister of the Environ-
ment yesterday revealed that
‘he has found evidence that
“some public officers” did

engage in corrupt practices

within his Ministry.
Environment Minister Earl
‘Deveaux said that a “full and
exhaustive investigation” into
who and what funds may have
~ been abused is now underway
and if evidence is found to
support the allegations, civil





servants will find
themselves in coutt.

His
.came after he and
PLP MP for St
Thomas More Frank
Smith became
embroiled in a parlia-
mentary dispute last
week after Mr Smith
accused the Free
National Movement
government of
awarding public con-
tracts to party “cronies” with-
out tender.

In the morning session of
the mid-year budget debate,

Mr Smith accused the Min-.

istry of the Environment of
spending more than $18 mil-
lion on clean-up programmes
“with no clearly-stated guide-

‘lines, no consistent practice

of newspaper ads inviting ten-

SEE page 11



comments

/Tribune staff

ipé Major,

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TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

eS
tS

Ae
| BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Minister tells of

WORK takes place on
Baillou Hill Road yesterday.

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net





A ONE-WAY system
will be implemented in
Baillou Hill Road and
Market Street at the end
of the month to perma-
nently change Nassau’s
traffic flow from north to
south,

Minister of Works
Neko Grant said the
unprecedented changes
to Nassau’s traffic flow
will be implemented as
part of the $120 million
New Providence road
improvement project.

As of Marchi 30, Bail-
lou Hill’ Road will be
one-way northbound and
the parallel Market
Street will be one-way
southbound between

SEE page 11







ite


























Landfill ‘will be
full in five years’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IF THE present “inadequate” garbage man-
agement practices persist, New Providence’s
only sanitary landfill will be unable to accom-
modate anymore waste within five years, the
Minister of the Environment said.

Minister Earl Deveaux made this revelation
yesterday as he announced several measures
being taken by the Government to extend the

‘life of the dump — thereby “buying the gov-

ernment time” to find another site outside of
New Providence — through implementation ‘of
more sustainable waste handling practices.
Among these steps, Dr Deveaux said the
Government soon intends to sign off on a con-
tract for the first time to have a private, proba-

SEE page 11

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Police fly in to Harbour
Island to address crime

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of Harbour Island showed °
determination and solidarity in a town meeting
held Monday by the Royal Bahamas Police Force
and Ministry of Tourism to address the escalat-
ing crime and delinquent behaviour now threat-
ening the island.

More than 100 frustrated islanders had the
full attention of the officials who had flown to
Harbour Island yesterday to hear their com-
plaints. The police presence was intended to ini-
tiate a conversation with residents towards map-
ping out a strategic plan forward to deal with
their fears. :

Despite the raised voices of passionate home-
owners and citizens, the atmosphere of the meet-
ing was one of hope and progress with persons
commending the work of current officers and

SEE page 11













Supermarket owner robbed
at gunpoint in his home

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
MES nC Sen OU eT ee net





SUPER Value owner Rupert Roberts has spo-
ken out about how he and his wife were robbed
at. gunpoint in their home to warn others of the
risk of home invasions in East Nassau.

The 72-year-old business owner said the armed
robber made a silent entry to his home as he
and his wife were getting ready for bed just
before 7.30pm on Wednesday and appeared in
the bedroom “like a ghost.”

The gunman had climbed to an upstairs bal-
cony and quietly kicked in the French double
doors with soft-soled shoes while Mr Roberts
and his wife were changing down the hall.

“He came in like a ghost,” Mr Roberts said.

“He just appeared, materialised there and
said, ‘Where's the cash?"”

SEE page 11




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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

South Abaco developments on the move

|

|; =

nee

Noelle Nicolls/Tribune staff

SCHOONER BAY BEACH, Great Abaco, is the site of several planned developments, including Serenity
Point and Schooner Bay. The beach, over 100-feet wide at points, stretches for five-miles and is
a turtle nesting ground.

IT’S ATIME OF JOY AND SUBLLATION!
I?’S A GRAND TIME
OF PRAISE
































































March 14-21, 2010 - East Street Tabernacle
mum: “RISEN, UPRIGHT,
RESTORED AND READY!”

Psalm 20:8
SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS: Sunday, March 21st, 2010
MINISTER CATHERINE H. PAYNE

The Contention closes with the Annual Pa-
litennational Diver ee wlanien's Min- rade and Water Baptiamal Service at the
ae eee eng ree are, ©Weetern Esplanade, and with the live ZS

tstries from © SA. Radio and the live Television Channel 55

BISHOP JOHN N. HUMES = evening broadcast wervice, During
National Overseer af the Church of God,
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands &. Rahming will

ice, the National 0 BEET, Bash op Dr. Elgarnet
final message on
BISHOP CLARENCE N, WILLIAMS (7 “ouventon:
Rational Qweraeer of the Turks
BISHOP BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter of the Caribbean and
Atlantic Ocewn Islands.
MINISTERING IN MUSIC WILL BE: The
Convention Praise Tearn, National Con-
vention Choir, Tabernacle Conoert Choir,
the Church of God National Choir, Ba
hamas Public Othcers Choir and various
soloists, choirs and singing proups.
The Bahama Erass Band, Bahama
Youth and Junior Brass Bands will pro-
vide special music.
Monday, March 15th, 2010—
Bishop Or, Elgarnet 6B. Rahming, CMG,
DD, JP, National Overseer and ay
tor Will deliver his Amal Matiogial Ad-
on + March 15th live
ZNS 1540

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LOG pit TO: mre
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FOR LIVE EWERING 4

Bring foe billy an db

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e bless ed!



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

GREAT Abaco’s south side
is primed for a major economic
boost with groundbreaking on
two beach-side sister develop-
ments on the five-mile long
Schooner Bay Beach, Abaco.

At Saturday’s launch of
Serenity Point, a planned 40-
acre gated residential commu-
nity, potential investors, real
estate agents and Abaconians
gathered for a visual simulation
of the high-end development.

“When you have a beach like
this that runs for miles, any real
estate agent who brings an
investor, the first thing an
investor will do is look toward
the street.

“Where is the electricity? It is
there. Where is the fiber optic
cable? It is there. Better than
that: 26-miles south of Marsh
Harbour my cell phone is work-
ing,” said Alexis Nihon I, pres-
ident of Anco Lands Ltd, the
development company.

Serenity Point is comprised
of 24 beach front lots, hilltop
sites and elevated estates rang-
ing from 20,000 to 72,000
square feet. The starting bid is
$550,000 for select lots, with
prices extending into six digits,
according to Gustaf Hernqvist,
Senior Sales and Marketing
Director. Ninety per cent of the
infrastructure is already in place
at the project site.

Based on the environmental
impact assessment conducted
on the development, of prima-
ry concern is the integrity of
the unbroken stretch of beach,
extending five-miles. This beach
is a prime turtle nesting ground,
according to Eric Carey,
Bahamas National Trust presi-
dent. “I would have loved if
they had not taken out all of
the trees. I spoke to Gustaf and
he indicated they had a lot of
hurricane damage and they
thought it would have been dif-
ficult to plan their development
and their lots around the vege-
tation they felt was degraded,”
said Mr Carey.

“They have committed to
keeping lights off the beach.
They have also committed to
using as much native vegeta-
tion as possible; taking out the
few casuarinas that are there.
They say they will commit to
keeping the dune intact because
this beach profile is entirely
dependent on this dune being
intact,” he said, also noting the



Noelle Nicolls/Tribune staff

THE SITE of the planned 40-acre gated community, Serenity
Point, on Schooner Bay Beach, Great Abaco.



INTERNATIONAL real estate
developer Alex Nihon II describes
his latest venture, Serenity Point,
Great Abaco.

Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission is responsible for ensur-
ing these commitments are met.

Village

The same commitments were
secured from the neighbouring
Schooner Bay development,
according to Mr Carey.
Schooner Bay is a planned self-
sustaining village set on 220-
acres of land. Unlike Serenity
Point, which is a gated commu-
nity, Schooner Bay is open, and
most concerned about its objec-
tive to “meld indigenous design
concepts with modern environ-
mental sensibility.”

More than half of the land is
being preserved as green space,
including a large section of
native Coppice forest.

Schooner Bay will feature a
farmer’s market, grocery story,
medical clinic, grade school and
other public facilities, which will
also service the Serenity Point
community. Based on environ-
mental models of Schooner
Bay, one environmental impact
will be the shifting contour of
the beach, according to James
Rees, Sales Manager.

This will result from plans,

already in play, for a harbour to
be cut out of the land. The cut
is located at the most southern
tip of Schooner Beach.

“From what (the main envi-
ronmental consultant, coastal
engineer Keith Bishop) showed
us from modeling, there may
be some shifting in the general
area of the opening, but gen-
erally the beach profile should
not be changed. So it is still a
wait and see game. There are
going to be some changes right
after that some people will
react to,” said Mr Carey.

“They appear committed. I
mean they are selling the fact
that they have this incredible
more than 100-foot wide beach.
They are going to sell some lots
and they want to continue sell-
ing lots, so if the beach is
degraded then obviously they
won’t be able to do that.

“We get some degree of con-
fidence that they don’t want to
destroy the very thing they are
selling,” he said.

Both projects have one major
element in common. They are
fully self-financed by private
investors, as they say: “No
banks involved.” As a result,
Mr Nihon II said, “They won’t
go under, they won’t shut
down.”

The Nihon family originated
in Liége, Belgium and migrated
to Montreal, Canada. They
have owned large tracks of land
in Abaco since the 1960s.
Asked about the timing of the
development, Mr Nihon II said:
“Well it is simple. I returned to
the Bahamas two years ago.

“T am here, I am an island
boy living under a coconut tree.
We have a wonderful team, so
we are going to gradually grow.
It is going to take time, so
watch what will happen in the
next two or three years.”

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TODAY the leadership team
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Church will meet at Odyssey
Aviation at 11.30am to official-
ly end the first phase of the
church’s response to the earth-
quake devastation in Haiti.

Within 36 hours of the earth-
quake on January 12, the
BCMC had two airplanes on
the ground in Haiti, delivering
emergency supplies and food
through its disaster relief
agency, Methodist Habitat.

“Tn all, we have accom-
plished much,” said a
spokesman.

¢ 400 flights made;

¢ 3,200 flight hours accom-
plished;

¢ 120 volunteer pilots
involved;

e¢ 250,000 plus pounds of
supplies carried;

¢ 100 plus passengers car-
ried into Haiti (medical teams);
and

¢ 176 plus passengers car-
ried out of Haiti (missionaries
stranded throughout Haiti
when the airports closed down
and commercial airlines
stopped flying).

¢ Six countries were repre-
sented — Bahamas, Canada,
Dominican Republic, Haiti,
Turks and Caicos, and the
USA.





e 32 US states were repre-
sented;

¢ Seven airports in Haiti
served: Cap Haitien, Jacmel,
Jeremie, La Gonave, Les
Cayes, Port-au-Prince, and
Pignon.

¢ Lives in Haiti impacted:
Countless.

The Bahamas Methodist
Conference will make a formal
presentation to Odyssey Avia-
tion tomorrow to acknowledge
the company’s partnership, hos-
pitality and generosity in allow-
ing Methodist Habitat to use
its facilities as the base of its
Haiti Aviation Operation.

The BCMC will continue its
partnership with Rotary
Bahamas and other civic organ-
isations to charter a cargo ship
to Haiti and to also use its
resources to send work teams
and construction material to
help in the rebuilding phase of
the Haitian communities.

“We thank God for the
divine favour, guidance and
protection given to the
Methodist Habitat ministry
throughout this massive under-
taking,” said the spokesman.
“May God continue to bless
our work — may God continue
to bless the people of Haiti.”

e 18th homicide victim identified
THE man who was shot and killed in Fox Hill last Thursday
night has been identified as 27-year-old Jean—Robert St Jean of

Reeves Street.

The victim, nicknamed “Black”, became the country’s 18th
homicide when he was shot in the area known as “The Bend”.

According to residents, he had borrowed a bicycle to go to
make a purchase in Wright Lane when he was killed.

e Rupert Dean Lane resident shot and injured

A resident of Rupert Dean Lane was shot and injured while
in his home at around 4.17am yesterday.

The 34-year-old man was shot in the right arm and was taken
to hospital by emergency medical personnel where he was treat-
ed and later discharged. Police are investigating.

e Man robbed at knife point

A MAN was robbed at knife point on Sunday while on
Hampton Street off Mount Royal Avenue.

The armed robbery victim was approached by two unknown
men at around 7.20pm. The culprits robbed the man of his jew-

ellery and fled the area on foot.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE




By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who had been
wanted by police was
arraigned on a murder charge
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Kevano Musgrove, 24, of
Halsmere Road, Highbury
Park, appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez yes-
terday charged with the Feb-
ruary 25 murder of David
Bowleg. :

US firm’s contract award could affect jobs

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 100 Department
of Environmental Health
employees could see their jobs
affected by the government’s
decision to contract a private
American comnpany to manage
the city dump.

Meanwhile, as many as 30 peo-
ple who currently make their liv-
ing by “scavenging” for poten-
tially valuable items at the landfill
off Tonique Williams-Darling
highway may soon find them-
selves employed by the same
company to do the informal
“sorting” that they currently do
on a daily basis.

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux yesterday revealed

that the government is negotiat-
ing with a private company which

.will soon take over responsibility

for solid waste management at
the dump from the Department.

Under this contract, there will
be a “separation of the staff,
equipment and fleet of the
Department of Environmental
Health to the private company,”
said Dr Deveaux.

It is expected that a number
of people currently employed by
the Department of Environmen-
tal Health to “collect and dispose
of” landfill will be reviewed for
employment by the private com-
pany, but not all.

Exactly how soon this will take
place is not known for certain at
present. The terms of. the con-
tract are currently under-negoti-
ation, however, Dr Deveaux sug-

Accountant defends himself
from Opposition allegations

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ACCOUNTANT Reece Chipman last night
defended his integrity in the wake of stinging |
allegations from the Opposition who have |
accused him of a conflict of interest and obtain-
ing a government contract through "cronyism".

Mr Chipman hit back at the Progressive Lib-
eral Party for spreading "deceit" and "mis-
leading comments" about his business prac-
tices. while hinting that he may sue over any
further character defamation.

Mr Chipman, along with chairman of the Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation Kenyatta Gibson, has been at the centre of a-firestorm
of controversy over a $152,000 contract awarded to his firm Catsan
and Chipman Ltd - to audit the BMC last year.

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts has repeatedly questioned why
Catsan and Chipman was awarded the contract, since other "rep-
utable" firms responded to the BMC's tender process with lower
bids. On Sunday, Mr. Roberts also accused both Mr Gibson and Mr
Chipman of "colluding to milk the tax-payer}’ because they had
partnered in a wheelchair rental company several years ago. .

During his first public comments on the matter, Mr Chipman
claimed he is no longer a business partner of Kenyatta Gibson,
explaining that their business relationship was severed several
years ago. He added that the defunct state of his business rela-
tionship should be clear tothe PLP, telling the media that the
attorney who handled their business dealings is wife of St Thomas
More MP Frank Smith.

"T do not see it as a conflict of interest. At one point in time there
was a business established by Mr Gibson that I assisted him with,
as a result we became partners. The business ceased around 2005.
Since that time Mr Gibson and I were pretty much estranged.
Then I submitted a bid to the BMC. When I submitted the bid to
the (BMC) it was then that I realised that he was the chairperson,"
he said, adding that he did not think his previous relationship
with Mr Gibson played in his favour during the tendering process.

When asked why he thought his firm, the highest bidder, was
awarded the contract he said it was because he offered a compre-
hensive bid. au

He also denied other claims put forth by Mr Roberts, who
recently said that Mr Chipman was awarded several cleaning con-
tracts by the Department of Environmental Health.

‘"I do not have any contracts with the Department of Environ-
mental Health. There are persons that have contracts with the
department - they are not me - but I am aware of who those per-
sons might be," said Mr Chipman, the unsuccessful FNM candidate
for the Sea Breeze constituency in the 2007 election.

"The idea is to help to provide employment for persons, espe-
cially persons in the area of St Thomas More. One individual that
I would be familiar with was given a contract to do such and has
employed three to four individuals to assist them but it is not my
contract with the department.”

iCal VPN



Former educator
and World War II
| veteran Ruth

|| Clarke-Goodridge
BEM died at her
residence on
Tuesday, March
2nd, 2010.









gested that the company could
take over within the fiscal year

‘of 2010, which starts in June of

this year.

Dr Deveaux said: “We have a
profile of those people - some
are near retiring, some are just
starting, they have some skills.
All of those people will be the
first interviewed by the company
and there will be a selection
process.

“Once that is done, the
Department still has its inspec-
torate that goes around inspect-
ing restaurants, hotels, public
facilities.

“Some will be diverted there,
some will be retired, some will
be made redundant but a process
will unfold that will end up with
(the company) selecting team
members to collect, sort, handle
and dispose of the waste.

The government’s move to
contract a private company to
take over responsibility for the

dump follows the recent fires at

the site which choked parts of
New Providence with toxic
smoke and is a part of its plan to
ensure better management prac-
tices at the landfill going forward.

The overall aim is to cut down
in the amount of garbage that
ultimately ends up being stock-
piled at the dump - increasing the
quantity of rubbish that is recy-
cled, sold or burnt in a planned
waste-to-energy facility - as a
means of expanding the life span
of the dump and minimising the
chance of further major fires (see
story on page one).









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Speaking of the “scavengers”,
Dr Deveaux said: “Just in a casu-

al.visit to the dump on Saturday I

counted 37 people sitting around
sorting garbage.

“When I inquired who they
were, and I.was advised 10 of
them had permits. So there’s a
group that are fairly constant and
a group that come and go.

“The company (Cambridge

Project Development Inc, the’

front runner to obtain the solid
waste management contract) has
interviewed them and they have
indicated they would definitely
be interested in the opportunity.

“It’s a win-win situation for
(the scavengers). They’d have
permission to be there, they’d be
given an arrangement where the
garbage they are sorting would
be properly sorted on a conveyor
belt, they would be paid an
agreed sum for their work and
they would also have permission
to use some of the matérial they
extract for their use - to do what
they are doing now,” said Dr
Deveaux.

“Meanwhile, the Minister of
Environment added that gov-
ernment is also considering the
possibility that a direct charge for
garbage collection may be levied
to help supplement the funding
for better management of

‘garbage at the dump, and that

the sorting of waste could even
begin at the individual household
level, meaning that people will
have to begin to take more
responsibility for what they throw
away.

+ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF TAB:

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 3

EE
Ci aaa eee eee
| NOMS e ccm BIinKioem Cia
Pca RU Monier eu) wir TiC CU



Mr Bowleg, 34, was found
shot to death in the back seat
of a champagne-coloured car
in the area of Holiday Drive,
South Beach. last Thursday.

Musgrove was not required
to enter a plea to the murder
charge.

Jerad Holmes, 27, of Lon-
don Avenue, was. also
arraigned in court yesterday,
charged with abetment to Mr
Bowleg’s murder. ~

Holmes was not required
to enter a’ plea to the charge.

Musgrove’s mother Mary
Chin Neely, 53, was also
arraigned yesterday, accused
of being an accessory after
the fact. Court dockets state
that Neely, knowing that her
son had been a party to the
offence of murder, assisted
him for the purpose of avoid-
ing the due process of the
law.

Attorney Mary Bain, who
appeared on behalf of
Holmes yesterday, submitted
that her client had no previ-
ous convictions, was self










sf) )
Remember...

In a Selection
from one of our

Beautiful Designer

Evening Gowns

THE HELLENIC BALL

A Night at the Acropolis

Saturday, March 13th, 2010 j

The Imperial Ballroom,
Atlantis , Paradise Island



employed and had fully co- °
operated with police in their

_investigations.

She furthér submitted that
there is no reference to the
offence of abetment to mur-
der in the Bail Act and that
the court has the discretion
to grant bail. Bain also
claimed that her client had
not been picked out in an
identification parade.

Attorney Krysta Smith,
who appeared on behalf of
Neely, told the court that her
client — a mother of five — was
recently divorced and would
be pushed into extreme finan-
cial hardship if she was,
denied bail. Smith said she
was traumatised by what had
transpired over the past
week.

Musgrove and Holmes

-were remanded in custody.

Neely, however, was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000
with one surety.

The case was adjourned to
March 12 and transferred to
Court 10, Nassau Street.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

O.B.E., K.M.,'K.C.S.G.,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
_ Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



For Obama, Iraq elections are good news

WASHINGTON — Consumed by

domestic battles over health care and the .

ravaged economy, President Barack Oba-
ma had nearly fallen silent on foreign policy
— until Sunday, when several things began
breaking his way. First among them: the
Iraq election.

Insurgent:attacks on polling stations killed
at least 36 péople even with extraordinary
security measures in place, including clo-
sure of the country's borders and the Bagh-
dad international airport. But American offi-
cials and Iraqis had feared far worse.

The president has seen a paucity of good ~

news from overseas, and when he appeared
in the White House Rose Garden to con-
gratulate Iraqis on the big turnout in the
face of violence, Obama seemed relieved.

The day had passed without an explo-
sion of bloodshed that has marked a war in
which tens of thousands of Iraqis died and

. more than 4,300 Americans have lost their
lives. “Today's voting makes it clear that
the future of Iraq belongs to the people of
Iraq," the president said.

Success in the elections moves the Unit-
ed States a step closer to its pledge of pulling
combat troops out of Iraq by August 31 and-
to withdrawing the remaining 50,000-strong
security force by the endofthe year.

The successful vote was a notch in Oba-
ma's political belt as well, given that he cam-
paigned for the White House vowing to end

the conflict and refocus on the war in

Afghanistan. °

Also Sunday and after months of frus.
tration, Palestinians said they were ready
for indirect negotiations with Israel. Oba-
ma had put a resumption of peace talks at
the top of his foreign policy agenda but was
repeatedly foiled by Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu's refusal to pledge an
end to settlement-building in the West Bank
and east Jerusalem. The Palestinians want
that land for a future state.

The United States will act as mediator for
the indirect talks, with Vice President Joe
Biden attending meetings in the region this
week. Former Sen. George Mitchell, Oba-
ma's special Mideast envoy, also is returning
to facilitate the process.

There was good news as well in
Afghanistan, where provincial officials said
as many as 100 members of the powerful
Hezb-e-Islami militia, loyal to regional war-
lord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, were joining
forces with U.S.-backed Afghan security
forces in the battle against Taliban fighters.

And in Pakistan, the authorities, in a
seeming break from their policy of allow-
ing refuge to key Afghan Taliban and al-

Qaida members, have captured several lead-
ers of those organizations over the past sev-
eral weeks.

But many of the most daunting foreign
policy challenges that faced Obama a year
ago still fester.

That will leave the foreign policy estab- °

lishment working feverishly. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton likely will
continue her relentless travel. Envoys like
Mitchell will need to continue shuttling as
Obama strives to save his domestic agenda.

The most daunting foreign policy issue:
Iran. Tehran is believed to have hastened
attempts to build a nuclear bomb to put atop
a missile. While Iran asserts it is only trying
to build reactors for electricity generation, a

new report from the U.N. nuclear watch-

dog agency to the contrary has deepened
concerns in the United States and Europe.

The U.S. and its allies are preparing for a
new push in the United Nations for a fourth
round of sanctions on Iran. The Russians
appear ready to join the effort. But China,
which holds a veto, still can block sanctions
in the Security Council. So far, it appears
the best Obama can hope for is a Chinese
abstention.

China is increasingly emboldened on the
world stage, given its growing global eco-
nomic muscle. It also is deeply at odds with
the United States over recent arms sales to
Taiwan — which the Chinese claim is part of
their territory. Beijing was further angered
by Obama's meeting with the Dalai Lama,
the Tibetan spiritual leader China accuses of
separatist ambitions for the Himalayan
region controlled by Beijing.

Russia is believed’ to be balking in nego-
tiations on an arms control treaty to replace
the START pact that expired in December.
It appears that reported plans for a U.S.
missile shield have snarled the talks.

There had been significant progress on a
replacement treaty, particularly after Obama
announced he would forgo building the mis-
sile shield in the Czech Republic and Poland.
But word that it might be shifted to Romania
and Bulgaria appears to have caught the
Russians off guard.

Global and American political realities
have stunted Obama's ambitious interna-
tional agenda of a year ago. His focus on
foreign policy — he made nine foreign jour-
neys in 2009 — has been sharply curtailed so
far, so-much so that he will first venture
abroad this year when he travels to Asia lat-
er this month.

(This article was written by Steven R.
Hurst of the Associated Press).



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THE TRIBUNE



McCartney’s
resignation an
occasion to learn
about the system

EDITOR, The Tribune

The resignation of Minister
of State Branville McCartney
may be the occasion for some
of us to learn something about
the political “system” which
Mr. McCartney says is going in
the wrong direction.

Perhaps Mr. McCartney,
instead of learning about the
parliamentary democracy and
cabinet government in which
he was expected to function,
was in fact listening to the igno-
rant comments of the chronic
callers to the radio talk shows

and their equally ill-informed |

hosts.

These people listen to the
talking heads on American
news/entertainment shows, pick
up some buzz words and phras-
es which they think invest them
with real knowledge. Then they
proceed to pontificate as to how
we can benefit from doing it
the American way.

It's a peculiar state of mind
which is, unfortunately, shared
by some other people who
ought to know better but who
believe that everything is better
in America and that what is
Bahamian is necessarily inferi-
or.

It's bad enough when our
young men imitate the low end
of American culture by wearing
their trousers down around
their backsides and forget their
Bahamian manners. It’s worse
when intelligent people fall into
this trap.

For instance, when the Clico
crisis came about, one promi-

nent, educated and respected.

religious leader said something

to the effect that “if-this was in -
‘the United States somebody

would have gone to jail.”

Dues

letters@tribunemedia.net




Incredibly, this was in the

_ midst of the banking crisis in

the US which brought the

world to its economic knees:

because of greed and regulato-

ry failure. Nobody went to jail. .

In fact, those most responsible
are still pulling down their mul-
ti-million dollar bonuses.

I believe that our financial
services sector is better regu-
lated than that of the US. I
believe that we do elections
better than the Americans. I
also believe, as Eugene Dupuch
used to say, that our Constitu-
tion is in some respects better
than that of the US.

Just take a look at what is
happening in the US right now.
A popularly elected President

with a majority in both the Sen- .

ate and the House of Repre-
sentatives can't get passed the
health insurance reform that
was a major commitment of his
campaign and that the majority
of Americans and the Congress
want.

Individual Senators can
wreak havoc. with presidential
appointments and hold up oth-
er measures important to mil-
lions of Americans. And you,
Madam Editor, just the other
day commented on that provi-
sion in the US Constitution
which gives its citizens the right
to bear arms, the only such in a
modern democracy.

The truth is that we are for-
tunate to have inherited a won-
derful parliamentary democra-
cy which is the envy of many,
the fundamentals of which were

arrived at not by the whim of a
few but by the experience of
many over the centuries.

It's time those responsible
for shaping public opinion learn

‘about the system and how it

works and teach our young
people to take pride in this
important element of our
national heritage — our proud
parliamentary democracy..

For one:thing, discipline is _
important in our parliamentary
democracy if any political party
is to successfully carry out the
platform upon which it was
elected. Having individual Min-
isters going off in different
directions simply results in
chaos and confusion.

That is why we have Cabinet
government, party discipline
and collective responsibility.
And in’ our two-party arrarige-
ment only one party and one
prime minister can govern at a
time. As Benjamin Disraeli said
about parliament, “party is
inherent in it, is bone of its
bone, and breath of its breath.”

Bahamians-~understand this
better than some would give
them credit for. They have
assimilated this political culture
for generations through their
lodges, burial societies and oth-
er organizations. They know
that only one set of officers and
one leader can govern at a time
and that there must be disci-
pline amongst them.

Never mind the egocentrics,
grandstanders and demagogues.
As our own Carlton Francis put
it many years ago: “Never mind
the shooting star! Keep your

_eyes on the fixed star!”

TEACHER a
Nassau,
March 7, 2010

What is the Bahamas Pelagic Aquaculture
Tuna Programme’s stance on long line fishing?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for your March
3rd article on the subject of
Paul and David Mellor’s pro-
posed plans to harvest yellow
fin tuna using purse seine
nets. It is the first I have seen
providing feedback from the
Mellors and I hope to see con-
tinued coverage on this issue
as it develops.

I am writing now to direct
the following important ques-
tion to Messrs Mellor, to
which I hope they will
respond promptly and with-
out prevarication:

What -is the Bahamas
Pelagic Aquaculture Tuna
Programme’s stance on long
line fishing and how does it
correlate with your stance on
purse seine netting? There

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engincers

have been assertions that
purse seine netting is at. least
equally detrimental as long
line fishing, which was out-
lawed in The Bahamas in
1993. So, I would like to
understand what has con-
vinced you that this type of
fishing is appropriate in

Bahamian waters, when our
government has already
decided that long line fishing
is not, aside from the fact that
it is not illegal at present.

FRANCHESKA SMITH
Nassau,
March, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

7 ». ’ : , ih , . a = fi

BY Timothy Zuniga-Brown,
US Chargé d’Affaires

Y esterday was Interna-
tional Women’s Day.

This year, it also marked the
15th anniversary of the United Nations Fourth World Con-
ference on Women, held in Beijing.

Fifteen years ago, 189 countries signed on to a Platform for
Action that affirmed the need to work for women’s equality in
access to education, healthcare, jobs, credit, and more.

It stressed the need to have women participate fully in the
economic and political life of their countries, and to protect
women’s right to live free from violence.

It was at this conference that then-First Lady Hillary Rodham
Clinton declared: Human rights are women’s rights, and wom-
en’s rights are human rights.

In the spirit of that conference, the United States has been
working to integrate “women’s issues” into mainstream foreign
policy.

We recognise that it is a human rights issue when mass sex-
ual violence is used as a tool of war in the ongoing conflict in the
Democratic Republic of the Congo.

It is a human rights issue when women are excluded from the
peace negotiations that affect their lives.

And it is a human rights issue when women and girls are held
like chattel by human traffickers and when girls are forced
into child marriages. Women’s rights are human rights, and
women’s issues are human issues. They cut across traditional
spheres of concern, and they are central, not peripheral.

They are international development issues: Study upon study
has shown that aid given to women is reinvested in their com-
munities, and skills-development programmes turn women
into drivers of economic growth.

And they are peace and security issues: When women are tar-
geted in conflicts around the world, societies fray and destabilise;
the places that most exclude women from public life and seek
to constrain their lives are the same in which extremist ideolo-
gy finds a receptive home.

The status of women is a bellwether for the political and
economic health of nations.

Women’s issues are a critical component of the most urgent
transnational problems we face today, and they should be on the
agenda of everyone, men and women, from the grassroots to the
policymaking levels, in political life and beyond.

Violence against women is endemic around the world. End-
ing it requires everyone’s participation, including an active and
vocal role for men and for religious leaders of both sexes.

The United States is supporting programmes around the
globe in order that their voices will be heard.

We laud the Bahamas for proposing legislation to crimi-
nalise marital rape, a significant step towards securing equal
human rights for all. Despite the pledge made in 1995 by so
many countries to end the discrimination that robs the world of
the talent it desperately needs, women are still the majority of
the world’s poor, unhealthy, underfed, and uneducated.

To the silent majority around the globe that supports wom-
en’s equality, we say: The time to translate support into action
is now. We look forward to the time when International Wom-
en’s Day will be an historical and retrospective celebration of
women’s path to the achievement of equality - when every
day belongs equally to women and to men, and every day is a
good day for human rights.



OP-ED

US CHARGE D'AFFAIRES

Women's rights are human rights Call for e

qual pay standards

Senator also argues for anti-sexual discrimination laws

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Allyson
Mayard-Gibson has called for
the creation of equal pay stan-
dards and the passage of anti-
sexual discrimination laws to
ensure that qualified women
enjoy the same rights as their
male counterparts.

Speaking yesterday before
the International Women's Day
Symposium, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son noted several social factors
impeding the progress of
women in the Bahamas.

She said that despite what
many people believe, statistics
show that when a woman and a
man with the same or similar
qualifications apply for the
same job, the man is still more
likely to be chosen.

"This bias ought to be made
illegal in the Bahamas, as it has
been in other jurisdictions, by
passage of a Sex Discrimina-
tion Act," said the senator.

She added that this bias does
not take into account the reali-
ties of Bahamian society, in
which more than 60 per cent of
households are headed by
women.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
called for the creation of an
Equal Pay Act, explaining, "sta-
tistics show that even though
women have made significant
progress at the workplace, men
tend to be paid more than
women for performing the
same job."

This too ought to be made
illegal by the passage of an
Equal Pay Act, said the senator,

EB Bs soe
AL LaLa
KAMA

Pee del
LAA) |

God's House of Refuge &
Love Ministries



out of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida









who has been advocating for
both pieces of legislation since
1981.

"As more women than men
head households, why should a
man, who it is assumed is sup-
porting his family be paid more
than a woman, especially when
that assumption is incorrect?
Without the two acts women
are disadvantaged,” she said.

Exams

Aside from discrimination in
the workplace, the rising num-
ber of babies born to teenage
girls, the growing number of
single mothers and increasingly
poor showings on national
exams are all issues impeding
women's progress, said Mrs
Maynard-Gibson.

"More than 70 per cent of
children born in the Bahamas
are born to single mothers. Of
that percentage, more than 50
per cent are born to teen moth-
ers. We must recognise that
what we are doing is not work-
ing.

“As more women than
men head households,
why should a man, who
it is assumed is support-
ing his family be paid
more than a woman, espe-
cially when that assump-
tion is incorrect? Without
the two acts women are
disadvantaged.”

ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON

“More babies are having
babies, not less. It is imperative
that the church, schools, NGOs
and other institutions get
involved in education about
planning family life.

"It is no secret that accom-
plishment, by whatever yard-

stick is used, is directly tied to
education. Persons with a high
school diploma earn more than
those without a high school
diploma.

Similarly, the more degrees
that one possesses, the more
one's earning capacity. A col-
lege degree provides women
with a measure of insurance
against poverty because col-
lege-educated women earn
higher wages, have a lower rate
of out-of-marriage childbear-
ing, and have a lower risk of
divorce than do women who do
not earn college degrees.

"Other studies have shown
that education not only increas-
es a woman's skills and pro-
ductivity, as it does men's, but
also appears to reduce the gap
in female and male earnings
attributable to factors such as
discrimination, preferences, and

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Willing to work hands-on 7/24/365 to resolve network or system
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University degree. CCNP/CCSP/CCIE,MCP/MCSE, CCSE
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Excellent troubleshooting and analytical skills

History of successful vendor management

Preferred to have already acted in a capacity as carrier liaison
Demonstrable experience with Cisco routers, switches (LAN and
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Knowledge of the fundamentals of 2nd generation NLOS MMDS
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Solid understanding of telecommunications circuits from DSO
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Flexibility to manage multiple cell sites and Operations Centers
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Familiarity with MINDCTI billing system and associated AAA
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Heests: Pastor Alvin and

Event: Three Nights of Revival Services

Theme: Glory in the City

Church: God's House of Refuge and Love Ministries

Location: Upstairs in the Bahamas Taxi Cab Union

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Revivalist: Alex Barker out of Ft. tauderdale, Florida

A God ordained Apostle and prophet to

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Hosts: Pastor Alvin and Deaconess Charmaine Davis

Dates: Wednesday, March 10th, Thursday,
March 11th and Friday, March 12th, 2010:

Time: 7pm Sharp.
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Salary is commensurate with qualifications.

Apply to:
P.O. Box N-3920
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Four face firearm
possession charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Four persons
were arraigned on illegal
firearm possession charges in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Freeport residents Connie
Louanna Johnson, 40; Geraldo
Garbocher Knowles, 22; Bree
Johnson, 19; and Emanuel
Hamilton, 38, appeared before
Magistrate Andrew Forbes.

It is alleged that on March 5,
the accused were found in pos-
session of a 12-gauge shotgun.

They all pleaded not guilty
to the charge and were each
granted $2,000 bail with one
surety. The matter was
adjourned to July 26 for trial.

BYRAN WOODSIDE






























Legal Notice

NOTICE
SWEDISH ROSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHEMSTONE VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENT D’OUEST
INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KMS VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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Department of Lands and Surveys

targets customer service issues

THE Land Use and Policy
Administration Project is now
operational and being inte-
grated into the daily manage-
ment of Crown Lands at the
Department of Lands and
Surveys, Minister of State for
Lands and Local Government
Byran Woodside said.

Mr Woodside told parlia-
mentarians during the mid-
term Budget debate that the
department is using the
LUPAP technology with the
hiring of additional surveyors,
the purchasing of much-need-
ed equipment and improving
staff accommodations to
advance the Department’s
commitment to creating a cus-
tomer friendly environment.

“Tt is anticipated that the
Department will become
more responsive thereby dis-
pelling the public’s negative
view of its operation,” he said.

Problems

The LUPAP project began
in June 2005 to address a
number of problems related
to Land Administration in the
country, such as:

e The majority of land
information used by the Gov-
ernment is outdated or incom-
plete;

¢ Information is scattered
among various Government
agencies;

¢ Much of the information
is in paper form, which limits
its accessibility and use;

¢ Uncoordinated effort
causes inconsistency and inac-
curacy, duplication of efforts

and higher costs; and

e Lack of data standards,
rules for inter-agency data
sharing and clear responsibil-
ities for data sharing and clear
responsibilities for data
upkeep and maintenance.

“The deployment of a
competent information tech-
nology officer and the contin-
uous in-house training of sur-
veyors and estates managers
have ensured the transfer of
the LUPAP technology,” Mr
Woodside said.

He also noted that the
Department of Lands and
Surveys was allocated
$2,829,982 for the 2009/2010
budget year and as of Decem-
ber 2009, $1,111,495 was
spent. The savings of
$303,496 will be used to aug-
ment the continued recruit-
ment of “much-needed” sur-
veyors and Geographic Infor-
mation Systems personnel, he
said. The Department also
spent $231,416.00 for Aerial
Imagery Mapping.

Mr Woodside said the
imaging is vital to the Depart-
ment’s mandate to “manage
the Crown Lands held in trust
on behalf of the Bahamian
people.”

During the past six months,
$63,000 has been spent to
complete renovations to the
mapping building, he said.

“The much needed repairs
and reconfiguration of this
building has enhanced the
integration of the work of sur-
veyors, estates managers and
the utilisation of the various
components of LUPAP,” Mr
Woodside said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOOSE CREEK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MADEIRA VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VAL D’ANNIVIERS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ga DSU) UIs
Vm meee aa

Contact made with attorney Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder

CONTRARY to
rampant speculation cir-
culating throughout
New Providence yester-
day, The Tribune can
confirm that attorney
Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder is
alive and well.

Initially, reports sug-
gested relatives of Mr
Pinder were having dif-
ficulty reaching him,
and feared the worst.

When contact with
Mr Pinder was finally
made, the one time
Elizabeth by-election
hopeful was said to
have chuckled and
remarked that reports
of his untimely demise
had been “greatly exag-
gerated”.

Photo: Rodney Moncur
WHILE DISCUSSING his short-lived
“Love Revolution” political campaign
at the Oakes Field McDonalds one
morning in February, Godfrey ‘Pro’
Pinder broke into song and dance.

COURT BRIEF
Andros father and son accused
of having sex with girl aged 15

A FATHER and son from Andros accused of having sex with
a 15-year-old girl were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged Stephen Forbes, 44, and his son Carame
Forbes, 22, both of Congo Town, South Andros, with having
unlawful sexual intercourse with a person under 16 years of age.

It is alleged that Stephen Forbes had sex with the girl between
September 2009 and Monday, February 22, while at South
Andros.

It is also alleged that Carame Forbes had sex with the girl,
alleged to have been his girlfriend, between May 2009 and
January 2010.

Neither man was required to enter a plea to the charges
during their arraignment in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday.

They were each granted bail in the sum of $7,500.

The case was adjourned to April 29 for the commencement
of a preliminary inquiry.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLEK VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELECTRIC SLIDE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRANVILLARSSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 7



Internal Monitoring |
Unit helps to ensure

. accountability in
Family Island Districts

THANKS to new rules
and regulations formed by
the Department of Local
Government’s Internal
Monitoring Unit about 88
per cent of Family Island
Districts are submitting
their monthly financial
reports on time.

Over the next six
months, IMU will strive for
all districts to submit their
reports on time, said Min-
ister of State for Lands and
Local Government Byran
Woodside during his con-
tribution to the 2009/2010
mid-year budget debate.

“We are well on the way -

to creating a Local Gov-
ernment financial system
that conforms to guidelines

outlined in the Financial

Administration and Audit
Act,” he said.

The main focus of the
IMU, which became. opera-

tional in January 2009, is .

to credibly track and mon-
itor accounting systems in
the Family Island districts
while inviting the 32 local
Government districts to
participate in the process.

As a result of the work
the IMU is undertaking,
Mr Woodside explained

that districts are already - --

.. exhibiting a greater aware-
ness of the various weak-
‘nesses in their operations
and implementing the rec-
ommended corrective mea-
sures.

He added that another

significant success of the :
Unit is the greater synergy :
and partnership being fos- :
tered between the Treasury :
Department, the Office of :
the Auditor General and :

Family Island districts.

“This is especially :
important in those districts :
where financial weaknesses. :
are uncovered,” Mr'Wood-

side said.

. , “The reports provided
‘by the IMU assist in the :
formulation of appropriate :
training programmes as :
intervention measures for :
those districts that need :

help.”

three
together for a review.

This process is the :
beginning of a standardiza- :
tion of the Local Govern- :
ment accounts and training :
of this nature will contin- :
ue throughout the Local :
Government administra- :
tion on a constant basis, he: :

said.

Woodside said.

For example, he :
explained, the Treasury :
Department conducted a :
four-day accounting work- :
shop in Eleuthera bringing :
16 accounts personnel and :
Administrators :

Officers from the IMU :
have.also assisted in the :
smooth transfer of districts :
between financial offi-
cers/Administrators and :
the practical training of :
administrators moving into }
their first district, Mr }

- School group work with children in Uganda

LYFORD Cay Interna-
tional School (LCIS) stu-
dents, staff and parents who
participated‘in a unique
learning opportunity in

Uganda have returned after

12 days of working with at-
risk children.
The group from the

Bahamas visited the Tent- -.

makers Academy in Kam-
pala, Uganda, which is
attended by 150 children
from the impoverished
Banda community.

Many students are
HIV/AIDS orphans with
little food or clothing, let
alone enough money for
school supplies. :

Thanks to the fundrais-
ing efforts of the entire
LCIS community the group
were able to deliver much
needed school supplies,
clothing and funds for food
for a year for the entire
school.

LCIS grade nine student
Samantha Wilson ‘com-
mented on the trip: “Our
main goals were to help
teach the children, improve
the facilities and to deliver
all the supplies. I am so
grateful for this chance to
visit Uganda. Being able to
interact with the students
at Tentmakers Academy
was amazing. What I learnt
the most from this trip was
how fortunate I am.

“It really hit me most on

our first day at the Acade-

my.
“That day we brought all
the tennis and soccer balls
to play with the students,
and they were all so happy
that they had those balls to

GRADE NINE student Jade -
Mitchell teaching the children
of Tentmakers some new -
songs.

play with and us the LCIS
students to play with them.

They were all smiling and /
genuinely happy. I am glad

we were able to impact the
lives of the students, the
way they have impacted our
lives.”

The connection with the

Ugandan community and
LCIS has been four years
in the making. |

The project not only
enables the students to
learn valuable personal
lessons from this unique
experience. working with
others less fortunate, but it
provides the students with
work toward the Interna-
tional Baccalaureate CAS
(Creativity, Action and Ser-
vice).

NOTICE

OF

COSWORTH LIMITED ©

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Sth day of March, 2010.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley ¢ & Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LAVINIO LIDO LIMITED
N-OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a), LAVINIO LIDO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b). The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March,.2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General. oe

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
‘Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOT I CE
ACQUA SMERLDA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY. GIVEN as follows:

(a): ACQUA SMERLDA LIMITED is in voluntary
‘dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4).of
the International Business Companies aul 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company Somimcnbed on :
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and fpentered by the Registrar
General.

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th aay of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MIKADOSOLE LIMITED

NOTICE EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MIKADOSOLE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
CASSIAN LIMITED

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CASSIAN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte, Streets, Pueeeaens
Bahamas. ©

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
NEW LIZARD LIMITED

N OTICEJIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: ¥

(a) NEW LIZARD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General,

(c) The Liquidator , of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI,

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



NOTICE
GREENBAJA LIMITED

NOTI c E Is HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GREENBAJA LIMITED is in vOlMntaey dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

. (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas:

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
. Liquidator |



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
VINYAMAR LIMITED |

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) VINYAMAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the

International Business Companies, Act-2000.,].

(b) _ The dissolution of the,said company commenced:on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the eens
General.

« (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI.

. Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE ~

NOTICE
DIJON INVESTMENT LTD.

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: 7

(a) DIJON INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
2rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
. 1bmitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

, (b) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd. =
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
DAYSLAND LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DAYSLAND LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of-the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered bys the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,”
BVI.
Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



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Volume: 106 No.89 TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



THE

TRIBUNE



PAGE 9

TUESDAY, MARCH 9,

a-Cola official

2010

Me gege ie ee











1

Minister presents
cheque to help
fund the Exuma

regatta...
See page 10





queers Baton Relay on
Bahamas leg Good Friday

By BRENT STUBBS
- Senior Sports. Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

’ s a prelude to the
XIX Common-
wealth Games in

October, the Bahamas is

preparing to host the Queen’s:

Baton Relay as it makes its
way through the 70 partici-
pating countries.

The relay began with
Queen Elizabeth ITinserting a
“message to the athletes”
when it left Buckingham

Palace in Lofdon on October - ’

29, 2009. The historic journey
is expected to cover 170,000
kilometres in 240 days.

Once it gets back to India,

it will be carried through the

capital of each of India’s 28 ©

states and seven union terri-
tories, plus many other cities
- along the way.

The baton is currently in St
Vincent and The Grenadines,
St Lucia as it makes it way
through the Caribbean. It first
arrived in Trinidad & Tobago
on Monday, February 22.

After making -its way
through the Cayman Islands,
the baton will arrive here on
Good Friday, April 2, and will
remain here until Sunday,
April 4, before it heads to the
Turks & Caicos Islands.

Mohinder Glover, the high
commissioner of India, is cur-
rently in town to ensure that

Softball titl

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Maynard yesterday...

the Bahamas is properly pre-
pared to receive the baton on
itsrelayleg. -

Yesterday, Glover paid a
courtesy call on Minister of

- Youth, Sports and Culture

Charles Maynard at the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and
Culture. ;

Glover said normally the
baton is passed around just a
few months prior to the
games, but India wanted to
do something a little special,
thus the dates were changed.

“We wanted to have it go
100 days outside of India and
100 days inside India,” Glover
said. “It’s an honour to be
hosting the Commonwealth
Games and the Queen’s
Baton.”

Rommel Knowles, the sec-
retary,general of the Bahamas
Olympic Association, said the
Bahamas has planned a very
special series of activities for
when the torch arrives.

After a reception is staged

at the Lynden Pindling Inter-

e goes

to Sadie Curtis



SADIE CURTIS Primary School girl’s softball team members celebrate yesterday at the Baillou Hills Sport-

ing Complex after they won the girls softball title in the Primary Schools Sports Association’s week-long
tournament that was delayed on Friday. Sadie Curtis knocked off Sandilafds Primary 14-1 to win their

first ever title in any sporting event. See Wednesday's Sports section for more coverage, including the
boys baseball championship...

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Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

/CORLOLOCTOTOXOOLAAEALEL ELLE OZER TATE EEDOLEATET TOOL LLEELLPOCLODETOLODULLELL LUO





— ‘
~- MOHINDER GROVER, high commissioner of India, chats with Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles

’ national Airport on Friday,

April 2, the baton will be car-
ried through the streets of
New Providence on Saturday,
April 3. It will leave the his-

|

TRAIL: Montague Beach Park
Cas! Bay Street
Shirleg Street

Chareh Street

New Bridge

Paradise Island Golf.
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damage against the Kingdor National Pa



toric Fox Hill Parade and
travel on Bernard Road to

Wulff Road and East Street «
and will end up at Arawak,

Cay where a cultural festival
. is set to take place.

Later that evening,
Knowles said the baton will.
be presented to Governor
General Arthur Hanna at
Government House where he
will read the message from
the Queen. The baton will

then depart for the Turks the.

following day.
“We are looking forward
‘to having athletes from the

various sports carry the.

baton,” said Wellington
Miller, president of the BOA.
“We will probably start with
cycling and then swimming
and include the other sports.”
Miller said the baton is
. intended to bind the Bahamas
with the other Common-
wealth nations as they show
their pride in being a mem-
ber.
According to Grover, who
resides in Kingston, Jamaica,
a number of international dig-





Registration Feg- $12.00
Preebigs: T- shirt, Water, Snacks and
“an opportunity to win prizes,

including an Hirling Tiekel.





() Extra lsarge
() 2X barge







god ( ) Fait ( ) Poor



Date:

Pre- reaistration will be accepted commencing Monday. 1st March 2010. A minimum of four people comprise of a team and ALL

RUAN HOUSE
P.O. BoxN 1463
‘Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone no: (242)326-529| -

RUAN HOUSE
P.O. BoxN1463
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone no: (242)326-5291



nitaries from the Common-
wealth Games and India are
expected to accompany the
baton.

Maynard, however, indi-
cated that while he won’t be
here because of his prior com-’
mitment to travel to the Cay-
man Islands for the Carifta
Games over the Easter holi-
day weekend, he assured
Grover that there will be suf-
ficient local dignitaries who
will be on hand to greet the
visitors and accept the baton.

The Commonwealth
Games are scheduled for
October 3-14 and the
Bahamas is expected to field
teams to compete in aquatics,
athletics, boxing, cycling an
tennis.

Roy Colebrooke has-been
named as the chef de mission
for the Bahamian team.

_ Other sports to be contest-
ed at the'games are archery,
badminton, gymnastics, hock-
ey, lawn bowls, netball, rugby
7s, shooting, squash, table ten- _
nis, weightlifting and
wrestling.





ee

-s Cael, YG Lulasiioll ‘
(ULLADULLA LLL LEK LULL







PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS -





Minister presents cheque to

help fund the Exuma regatta

Â¥
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the 57th National
Family Island Regatta on the
horizon, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
has made its financial contri-
bution to the organising com-
mittee.

Minister of Youth, Sports.

‘and Culture Charles May-
nard presented committee
chairman Danny Strachan
with a cheque for the regatta,
scheduled for April 19-24 in
Elizabeth Harbour, George-
town, Exuma. :

Maynard also took the
time out to congratulate Stra-
chan for the role he has
played over the years as the
chairman of the signature
event in sloop sailing in the
country.

“It doesn’t matter whether
you come from the perspec-
tive of sports, culture or any-





MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard presents a cheque to Danny Strachan, chairman

of the National Family Island Regatta. Shown (I-r) are Strachan, Maynard, permanent secretary Archie Nairn

and assistant commodore Clyde Rolle.

WIN Spa Certificates,
Gym Memberships,

Trips and

__. Mach More!

|

mw

-

NERALS

BALLY

TOTAL FITNESS”

Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff





thing else, I think we are all
Bahamians when you are
talking about the National
Family Island Regatta,” May-
nard pointed out.

“T think that over the
years, knowing the difficul-
ties that you face, you have
done a tremendous job, along
with your committee, in

‘keeping the event alive. I

think that you deserve the

‘accolades from a grateful.

nation.”

Despite the economic chal-
lenges being faced, Maynard
said they are making the con-

- tribution to the committee

early enough for them to get
the necessary things done to
ensure that the regatta is
another resounding success.

Accepting the cheque,
Strachan thanked the gov-
ernment for their contribu-

tions, saying that while they

are aware of the economic
vows, they are appreciative
of the gesture.

“This money will go to sup-
port the economy of Exuma
for that week from this event
being held here,” Strachan
said.

The regatta, according to’

Strachan, will cost an esti-
mated $275,000 and the.gov-
ernment’s contribution will
go towards defraying the
expense of getting the boats
to and from Exuma on the
barge, supply the prize mon-
ey and pay the per diam for
the sailors.

This year’s regatta is being
held in honour of Hughey
Lloyd, a native of Exuma and
boat builder, who has been
sailing in the regatta for more
than 30 years.

©

As usual, 60 boats are
expected to once again par-
ticipate in the regatta, includ-
ing a new A class and two B
class boats coming in from
Long Island.

Clyde Rolle, the assistant
commodore of the regatta,
said the competition should
be just as keen as it has been
over the years.

“My information has it that
we will have at least two new
A class and about 5 or 6 C
class,” Rolle said. “The com-
petition in the C class has »
grown just as popular as the
A class and this year will be

* no exception.”



MICHELLE LEWIS, marketing manager at Coca-Cola, presents a

Doubling up as the chair-
man of the junior regatta,
Rolle said they have adjusted
the schedule so that the
junior championships nor-
mally held on the Tuesday
leading up to the major com-
petition will be pushed back-
to Saturday.

“We're going’to get more
juniors to compete from
around the Family Islands,”
Rolle said. “We usually have
a challenge with the Ministry
having their exams around
the same time that we host
the junior championships.

“So we’re changing it from
a Tuesday to a Saturday, so
I’m expecting us to have a
lot more boats. participate
this year. We usually have
about 18 boats compete, but
I’m looking for at least 24
this year.”

As the sport continues to
lose more of its legendary
sailors, Rolle said they are -
hoping to concentrate on get- ©
ting more of the younger
sailors involved.



cheque to Danny: Strachan to help fund the 57th National Family
Island Regatta. Shown (I-r) are Clyde Rolle, assistant commodore,
Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Lewis, Strachan and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture

Charles Maynard.

Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Coca-Cola
official sponsor

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COCA-Cola, distributed by
Caribbean Bottling Compa-
ny, is the official sponsor of
the 57th National Family

Island Regatta slated for next '

month in Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

Yesterday at the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture,
Michelle Lewis, the market-
ing manager for Coca-Cola,
presented a $5,000 cheque to
Danny Strachan, chairman of
the organising committee.

“As a part of Caribbean
Bottling Coca-Cola sustain-
ability effort, our corporate
distribution remain priority
in making a positive differ-
ence in what we do through-
out our community with our
prosperity,” Lewis said.

“We provide a variety of
soft drink beverages and
packages that meets con-
sumer evolving needs, enjoy-
ment, nutrition and hydra-
tion.”

Caribbean. Bottling Com-
pany, according to Lewis, is
delighted to be able to give
back to the community in this

-venture. Strachan thanked

Coca-Cola for coming on
board as the official soft drink
of the regatta.

“As you would know,

Coca-Cola has been a peren-
nial sponsor of the National
Family Island Regatta and

“we're happy that they’re here

again this year,” Strachan
said.

“Nevertheless, Coca-Cola
has been supporting us and
they are continuing to sup-
port us. I regard them as a
role model sponsor and we
look forward to other corpo-
rate entities following them
and assist community and
sporting events throughout
the country.”

Charles Maynard, minister
of youth, sports and culture,
also joined Strachan in thank-
ing Coca-Cola for taking the
initiative to once again spon-
sor the regatta.

“T encourage other compa-
nies to follow their lead and
come on board and help with
the promotion,” he said.
“Like I said, it’s not only cul-
tural or sporting, it’s some-
thing that demonstrates the
essence of what we are as
Bahamians.”

The more companies that
can make a contribution like
Coca-Cola will help to make
the country a much better
place, Maynard said.

The National Family Island
Regatta, now in its 57th year,
is set to run April 19-24 in

‘Elizabeth Harbour, George-

town, Exuma.

»

RIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 11



| Minister tells of

FROM page one

the initiative shown by the police towards
restoring public confidence.

The tranquil 3.5 by 1.5 mile island came
under international scrutiny when an
American tourist was severely wounded
during an altercation on the island, and
subsequently resulted in the United States
issuing a Bahamas travel warning. Now,
residents say, the island’ is finally getting
the attention it has been denied for so long.

There are only seven officers currently
assigned to the island and often they are
required to operate 24-hour shifts. At night,
residents complain one officer on duty is
simply not enough.

St Johns Parish rector Oswald Pinder
said: “We desperately need more police
officers on this islarid — and not just offi-
cers but experienced officers. There are
three we have now that look like they are
fresh out of high school — they don’t have
the significant presence or experience to
effectively control the island like that of a

more senior officer. The lack of officers -

definitely contributes to the current atmos-
phere here — the people are wary to
defend justice because they don’t have any
back-up to protect them.”

Harbour Island

Mr Pinder was one of many residents
who pressed the police to give definite
numbers of how many officers would be
allocated to Harbour Island, separate from
those stationed on North Eleuthera.

Other suggestions offered by the crowd
towards crime prevention included: Regu-
lated porters at the dock, mandatory iden-
tification required for those entering and
leaving the island and beach wardens.

However, residents acknowledged that
the level of crime currently experienced
was not solely indicative of the number of
police on the island} but greater social ills,
such as inconsistent infrastructure and an
inundated social services programme.

_ Will Simmons, a 23-year-old community
volunteer, charged that there is a blatant
disconnect between the island’s youth and

the adult community. Mr Simmons leads a

drama club at the Harbour Island All-Age
School. He believes that the current crime
experienced is a direct result of the lack
of human resources in the area of Social

~ Services on the island.

He continued: “I’m certain that some of
the things that are going on could easily
have been prevented had persons been tak-







DARREL JOHNSON (centre) speaks with John
Nixon (right), Director of Safety Security at
the Ministry of Tourism; Detective Sergeant
Hart (third from left) and Harbour Island resi-
dents after yesterday's meeting.

en off the street and placed in rehab. The

island has only one social worker and the
workload is immense.”

Officials, under the guidance of Darrel
Johnson, Harbour Island’s local govern-
ment Chief Councillor, plan to conduct
numerous meetings with interested groups
within the community to further discus-
sions towards developing new strategies
tailored uniquely for Harbour Island. A
deadline is set for March 18 to provide a

general update to the community on

progress and findings where new strategies
will be discussed.

FROM page one

The intruder indicated
towards Mr Roberts’ safe and
asked him to open it and take
out his gun, but Mr Roberts
diverted his attention to avoid
bringing another firearm into
the room.

He and his wife Margaret,
68, followed the armed robber’s
instructions to lead him down-
stairs to the bathroom where Mr
Roberts kept his wallet and car
keys.

Their assailant took these
and shut the couple in the bath-
room while he attempted his
escape.

However, he returned
moments later to ask for Mr
‘Roberts to help him negotiate
the door locks, before sending
him back to the bathroom while
he got away in Mr Roberts’ van.

Supermarket

Although ‘the supermarket

owner said he was somewhat,

unfazed by the intrusion as he
has been robbed at gunpoint
dozens of times, his wife has
been exhausted by the trauma
and unable to sleep soundly
since.

_ He warned east Nassau resi-
dents to be particularly vigilant
and advises anyone in such a sit-
uation to remain calm.

Mr Roberts said: “I just
thought we have got to get this
guy out of here, so give him
what he wants, help him along,
and get him out of here.

“That is what I have done
the many times I have been
looking down the barrel of a
gun; go alohg with them and
don’t scream. -

“T knew the quicker-I got to
know him the more comfortable
everybody was going to be.”

The home invasion was fol-
lowed by. the similar armed rob-
bery of a 26-year-old woman in

her Prince Charles Drive home .

at 9pm on Saturday.

She told The Tribune how
she and her friend were getting
ready to go out when the intrud-

’ er unscrewed two lightbulbs out-

side to enter the property under
the cover of darkness.

He appeared in the bedroom
and forced them at gunpoint to
give him cash, their cellular tele-
phones and two laptop comput-
ers.

Like Mr Roberts, the young

~ women were told to wait in the

bathroom while the gunman
made his escape. Z

“He wanted to steal the cars
but I told him they weren’t
working,” the 26-year-old'said.

“J remained calm, but as I
was looking at that gun I stud-
ied that gun. That was the only
thing I could see.”

Police arrived within five
minutes of the gunman’s escape

but did not chase him or take
: his allegation.

fingerprints, the woman said.

However, Mr Roberts was
impressed by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force’s
(RBPF) handling of his case. |

RBPF press officer Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings said: “Police
are doing a lot of good stuff in
that area but at the same time
we need citizens to keep a
watchful eye and be aware of
surroundings, taking all pre-
cautions.”

Information that may assist
police investigations should be

reported to Crime Stoppers

anonymously by calling 328-
TIPS (8477) or call police
urgently on 919 or 911.

FROM page one

bly American, company conduct solid waste
management at the Tonique Williams Dar-
ling site.

“We don’t have an option in New Prov-
idence of relocating this landfill. This is
really the only available site on New Prov-
idence ... but with good management we
can extend its life and with the introduction
of a ‘Waste to Energy’ facility, we will

_ extend it as much as fifty years.

“That will buy us additional time to buy
additional options as the population
expands and increases,” the Minister said at

a press conference at the Ministry of the -

Environment yesterday. -
Currently, garbage dumped at the site
is not officially sorted. °

The growth in the stockpile of waste.

material stored there has contributed an
increase in the likelihood of noxious fires —
such as the largest in the dump’s history,
which broke out in early February and is
still in the process of being extinguished.
Meanwhile, as this waste material con-
tinues to pile up, not only does the amount

of decomposing trash entering the envi-

ronment swell, but the number of years

that the dump remains a viable site for dis-

posing of the country’s waste shrinks.
In-view of this, Dr Deveaux explained

that the Government also proposes to.

spend a projected $20 million over the next
five years — the equivalent to what it cur-
tently spends annually on managing the
dump — to build a new landfill cell and
install a garbage recycling and shredding

FROM page one

Wultt Roadiand Robinson

facility, — ,
A waste to energy facility, which would

burn certain types of garbage to produce.

electricity to power the country, is further
planned for implementation within the next
five years, impacting both oil importation
and energy: production costs and provid-

ing a means of reducing stored waste levels. .

Such a facility would take between 36 and
38 months to-construct.
“My understanding is that between burn-

‘ing garbage for energy, recycling for sale

and use and separating the garbage we
should be able to convert 90 per cent of
the garbage coming into the landfill to
another use and we should really only be
burying about 10 per cent,” said Dr
Deveaux. :

While the Government had been con-
sidering taking certain steps to improve
conditions at the landfill, Dr Deveaux
admitted that the recent dump fires have
spurred the resolve to take the necessary
action to ensure that as much as possible is
done to ensure such outbreaks do not occur
in the future.

“What this has done for us is expose the
really inadequate management of the land-
fill. The combination of material in the
landfill is such that it adds to the com-
bustibility of the fire. C and D (the con-
struction and demolitions portion. of the
landfill) should only contain construction
material, concrete building materials, etc. It
had a lot of household waste in it and for
example the fire that is currently taking

“New one-way system

place is essentially bits of burning wood
mixed in with household garbage and so
that kind of situation makes it difficult to
manage. So obviously the first step after
this is to have a comprehensive programme
‘of solid waste management,” said Dr
Deveaux.

The current front runner to obtain the
waste management contract is Cambridge
Project Development Inc, a US company
with-a history of providing landfill solu-
tions in the Caribbean.

The company would oversee the
enhanced sorting practices — including the
division of garbage into recyclable and non-
recyclable, which will see some waste —
such as clothes or paper — being shredded,
others — like wooden pallets and organic
material — mulched and some - like steel
from demolished buildings — sold.

The precise terms of the agreement
between the Government and the compa-
ny are being negotiated. Once signed, the
more advanced waste management plan
can be implemented within. “90 to 180
days”, suggested Dr Deveaux. .

“It is our hope that by fiscal year 2010
(which begins in June), we will have the
shredding and waste management pro-
gramme outlined in place,” said Dr
Deveaux.

He added that the Government further
plans to enhance security at the dump, to
better control who accesses the site and
thereby diminish the likelihood of fires
being started intentionally, as it is believed
the most recent ones were — primarily by
“scavengers” seeking ways to stay warm
in cold weather. :

be affected, as well as employees
of at least 20 government agen-
cies and a number of private
businesses, and local residents.



Road as works are carried out
to improve both dual carriage-
ways.

Rozdworks already under
way in Baillou Hill Road started
at the junction with Robinson

\

Road on February 22 and are
progressing northwards in 1,500
ft segments. : \
When roadworks between
Robinson Road and Wulff
Road have been completed, the
one-way system will be extend-

Roadworks ‘to he completed in three weeks’

SHIRLEY Street road works at the eastern end of the one-
way dual carriageway are expected to be completed within three

weeks. '

The open trenches on Shirley Street, running from Mackey
Street east to Montagu, which have been a nuisance to motorists,
will be sealed and paved by the end of the month at the latest,
according to Ministry of Works assistant engineer Robert Gar-

raway.

_ Road works on the western portion of the road from Mackey
Street to Frederick Street were completed in December, prompt-
ing the FNM government to praise Minister of Works Neko Grant
and his staff for what they called an extraordinary road building

achievement.

Shopbreaking leads to two arrests

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police arrest-
ed two young men for shop-
breaking after responding to an
alarm on Saturday evening at a
business establishment in
Freeport. ae

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
reported that shortly after
11pm officers at the Mobile
Patrol Division responded to
an alarm that was activated at

Freeport Jet Wash on West ©

Mall Drive. On arrival at the
scene, officers arrested two
young men, ages 19 and 20, of
Eight Mile Rock. f"

Police are continuing their

investigations.
¢ Grand Bahama Police are
' investigating a suspected case



of arson that resulted in exten-

sive damage to several heavy:

duty equipment at the Discov-
ery Bay Subdivision. ASP
Mackey said the president of
Treasure Coast Development
reported to police on Friday
that several pieces of equip-
ment left overnight on a prop-
erty on the canal in the area of
the Grand Bahama Yacht Club
were damaged by fire.

On arrival at the property,
officers observed that several
pieces of heavy-duty equipment
and a trailer containing four
generators, a welding machine
and a hydraulic jackal, and a

’ Dodge Dakota truck were

destroyed by fire.

The estimated damages
totalled some $25,000.

Police are investigating the
matter.

ed north to Duke Street down-
town, where Government
House is located.

The two-corridor project is

expected to reach completion in '

January next year, while the
island-wide 17 corridor project
should be completed by Janu-

‘ary 2012.

As he announced the latest
changes for Nassau’s streets yes-
terday, Mr Grant said: “We feel
that this will improve our traffic
flow considerably.

“This one-way couplet system
is a component of my Ministry’s

programme to improve the safe-:

ty and traffic flows on our road
network.
“These works will improve

the road pavement, the drain-

ing, street-lighting, and provide
for proper sidewalks, improved
signage and road markings.”

Mr Grant explained how con-
tractors Jose Cartellone Con:
structionne Civiles will carry out
all works during the day as it is
considerably cheaper than night
work.

And he argued this will not

+ increase inconvenience for

motorists: as construction areas
will be closed off around the
clock while work is in progress.

A Traffic Management Com-
mittee will manage diversions
around the active sites with signs
and banners in both roads to
indicate the new. direction of
travel.

Bus companies have been
consulted, and the Ministry is
working with public transport
organisations to ensure the 170
buses using ‘Baillqu Hill Road
and 12 using Market Street are
able to adjust to the new diver-
sions.

Hundreds of students at
schools in the area are likely to

Mr Grant vowed to.ensure

pedestrian access to work sites is.

as open as possible, and to keep
all those affected informed at
every stage of the project.

He ‘thanked the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, Road
Traffic Department, Transport
Planning and Policy Unit and
the Utility companies for coop-
erating with the works as he
asked drivers to do the same.

“T encourage motorists to dri-
ve safely and sensibly when nay-
igating through the road works
and to pay attention to and obey
the temporary traffic diversions
and other traffic management
measures,” Mr Grant,said.

“Care must be’ taken when
approaching the construction
zones, especially in the vicinity
of schools and pedestrian cross-
ings.

“Let us do our part by exer-

cising good judgment, practice .

safe driving and obey the law.”

Project coordinator for the
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project Khader Alikhan
explained how there should be
no unexpected delays as full
investigations were carried out
prior to commencement.

“For improvement there is
always inconvenience,” Mr
Alikhan said. “But when we
have two lanes of traffic going

. north it will improve the capac-

ity and relieve congestion defi-
nitely.” .
Ministry of Works:assistant
engineer Roberty Garraway
added: “It had a dramatic
improvement when ‘we imple-
mented a one-way system in
Shirley Street as it reduced the
journey time from 45 minutes
to eight minutes, so we expect to
have the same gains here.”

FROM page one

i ders or bids.”

Mr Smith later withdrew

i this assertion. after Mr
: Deveaux pointed out that
: the figures the PLP MP quot-
i ed in his speech amounted
-} to less than $2 million, a frac-
: tion of the $18 million he was
:. alleging was spent.

Mr Deveaux also pointed

? out that documents Mr
i Smith tabled only showed a
: combined $10,600 payment
? to two maintenance compa-
i nies.
? Several members from the '
? government’s side called on
? Mr Smith to provide proof
? to back up his claims or with-
? draw his statements while
? opposition members rallied
: behind their colleague.

Mr Deveaux added on

: that day he did not dispute .
? that abuse may have taken
i placé, but was asking that the

PLP MP fully corroborate

Yesterday the Minister

i said that he takes “very seri-
? ously this issue of abuse and
the implication that a public
: official, in this case a politi-
i cian, was involved in it.”

It was “kind of

: heartwretching to be accused
: directly or indirectly of tief-
: ing from people making $210
? aweek,” he said. “That’s dif-
? ficult to swallow.”

While noting that Mr

: Smith’s assertion that the
? contracts awarded were not
: subject to a public bidding -
: process, he suggested this
? was acceptable as the pro-
: gramme had the “dual goal”
? of “providing employment
: and cleaning up New Provi-
: dence” as part of the gov-
? ernment’s “stimulus pro-

gramme.”
Meanwhile, he noted that

? further documents that Mr
? Smith wished to table in
i alleged support of his accu-
? sations of abuse of funds
? were not allowed yet. by the
: Speaker of the House
: “because (Smith) had the



‘corrupt officers’

names and the figures: but
there was no way of corrob-

orating the figures with the

names.”

However, Mr Deveaux
admitted that he has subse-
quently determined that
there was some abuse of the

programme by public offi-

cers and further inquiries are
going on.

“Some public officers, I
have found, did engage in
abuse and so we have had
the Treasury in the depart-
ment taking pictures of every
person who was authorised
to get a cheque so we can
match an individual with a
payment and we have the
auditor general going foren-
sically through all of the pay-
ments to ensure where abuse
took place or didn’t.

“I have also provided the
ministry of finance with a
complete report which I
requested for them to match
the names and the payments
that I have against what the

Treasury has so we can have

a full and éxhaustive investi-
gation and where we can find
any instance that we can

" prove we will take them (to

court),” he stated,

3 Wings $295

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LOCAL NEWS

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 9B





Y
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B O72



ea







Colon Hy Tl
By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

inv

LET’S say your garbage bag starts to become
filled with waste; would you continue to load trash
upon trash into the bag without emptying it? Most
likely, not. Just as garbage begins to develop an
odour, grow bacteria, mold, develop viruses, and
probably infect the entire home with its stench, so

does the colon.

Like our garbage, we must
empty our colon before we
decide to fill it up again.
And nutritious foods ensure
regular bowel movements.
But the fact of the matter is
that most persons aren’t fill-
ing up on the right foods,
and having a consistent bow-
el movement.

The typical diet lacks the
sufficient amount of fiber
needed to excrete fat, long,
and bulky excretions.

If this is not the case, your
colon may be experiencing
a blockage, which means
your body isn’t getting a reg-
ular pass, and is lacking in
fiber.

The colonic procedure is
suggested to detoxify the
body, avoid cancer, stop con-
Stipation, acne, chronic
fatigue syndrome, allergies
and to lose weight.

But what may be a “regu-
lar” pass for one person is
not “regular” for another,
says Julia Lee, RD MS, a

i =

dietitian at Doctors Hospi-
tal. “You don’t have to have
a bowel movement every-
day; that wouldn’t be cor-
rect,” she told Tribune
Health.

Emptying your colon,
which is the receptacle for
waste is vital. As the body
takes in nutrients, air, water,
oxygen, and food to keep it
functioning properly, the
colon correspondingly elim-
inates what it doesn’t need
and excretes it from the
body.

Ms Lee and Nathelyn
LaCroy, colon hydrothera-
pist, explained that one
colonics session is the equiv-
alent of having 10 to 15 bow-
el movements.

Mrs LaCroy is one of few
colonic hydrotherapists on
the island, and explained the
procedure she administers
to Tribune Health:

“When the colonic begins,
the physician will introduce
the colon hydrotherapy

= a » “a

THE TIGER claw flowers are stunning | :

but last for all too brief a period.

i

Colonics)

U HAVE IT OR NOT?

equipment into the client’s
rectum,” said Mrs LaCroy.
“The physician will control
the temperature, and low
pressured water flows
through a little tube into the
colon.”

“All the while, there is no
sucking out the feces. Once
the water comes in contact
with the feces, the feces
blocks the water,” she said.
“When the water makes its
way through the feces, it
flows right through the
closed tube.”

“In the end, the physician
will gently massage the
patients stomach to rid him
of the last few remaining
feces. And depending on
the patient’s weight, there
could be a great deal of
excess abdominal skin.”

If the colon is not relieved
as much as possible, then
balance in your body is lack-
ing. And you must get the
digestive system working the
way it should, because the
digestive system is the feed-
er for the blood, she
explained.

“When you’re eating
breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
and dumping food on top of
food, this is piling up on the
colon,” said the colonics spe-
cialist. If the colon which is-
five feet long, and two and
half inches wide in diameter
is stalled, you will know,
because the scent of your

stool will tell the tale.

“The colon can hold up to
40 pounds of fecal matter, a
decent amount of space to
hold your waste. And just as
a cesspit can be backed up,
the colon needs relieving at
least two to three times a
day,” said Mrs LaCroy.

At the end of a colon
hydrotherapy procedure,
you will feel like you haven’t
used the toilet for a month,
and this will be a sign of
dehydration. During this
time you may experience a
rise in the electrolytes in
your body such as potassi-
um and sodium. This can be
quite dangerous, and dam-
aging to the kidneys and
heart.

This may be why some
doctors won’t recommend
colon hydrotherapy for
detoxification.

Mrs Lee, holds to this view
that colon cleansing can be
damaging. “The more tra-
ditional physicians wouldn’t
recommend it to their
patients,” she said. Colonics
can be damaging to the colon
as the colon is very capable
of cleaning itself, she said.

Persons should evaluate
the risks before they have
the procedure done and see
a GI (gastro-intestinal) spe-
cialist for more information
on the procedure.

¢ March is colorectal can-
cer awareness month.

it
REGULAR

¢ lf you are eating the
right foods, you will have
bowel movements with ease
and avoid constipation. But
if you feel “ stalled” this
may be a sign that the body
is in much need of a
“colonic” a procedure, that
drains fecal compounds in
the colon.

¢ A high fiber diet is rec-
ommended for regular
passes, working in whole
grains like oatmeal, brown
rice, whole grain cereals,
fruits and vegetables, sweet
potatoes, and plantains in
your meal plans.

¢ Eating fruits instead of
drinking fruit juice also
helps people to stay regular.
Limit the eating of “conve-
nience foods,” or quick fix
pasteurised meals that
come in a box. Drinking
OTN NMC) CIC MrUIT R=), (c1kG
ing at least three to five
times a day is also useful.

¢ When somebody has a
diet that is highly refined,
they generally have a low
fiber diet of convenience
ieyolOLse

- Julia Lee, RD MS,

dietitian at Doctors Hospital



= =
is

-





Brief encounters in March

During March, two trees make
their presence known by flowering
quite spectacularly before sliding
back into relative anonymity. The
first is pink cassia, a tree that is so
undistinguished for most of the year
that if one is on your regular car
route you may wonder where on
earth it had suddenly appeared from.

The pink cassia (Cassia javanica)
is a member of the pea family and as
such bears the familiar compound
leaves we associate with leguminous
plants. These leaves are lost during
the autumn and winter months so
that when the tree flowers, it is all
flowers. The leaves grow back while
flowering takes place, similar to the
leafing/flowering cycle of the royal
poinciana, which is related.

March is a weak month for flow-
ering trees and the presence of a
pink cassia in full bloom makes it
even more outstanding. The light
pink flowers tend to smother the

branches in an effusive display of
plant exuberance. Alas, not for long.
Usually four to five weeks later the
flowers are fading and the leaves
take over.

Pink cassia is easily propagated
from seed and is a fast grower. Most
cassias tend to shrubby but pink cassia
is a true tree growing to 30 feet or
more. I had a fine specimen in my
previous yard that was toppled by
Hurricane Floyd. Most of it was in the
bush so I left it right where it was. By
the next flowering season it had pro-
duced vertical branches that were as
long as the tree had previously been
tall, all of them smothered in blos-
soms. Pink cassia can also be grown
from cuttings.

Although there is a paucity of flow-
ering trees at this time of year, this is
the time when another brilliant but
short-lived display is put on by the
coral tree (Erythrina indica) which is
another member of the pea family.

Although named the coral tree, the
flowers are red. The distinguishing
feature of the coral tree is its com-
pound leaves that consist of three
leaflets shaped more or less like the
spades in playing cards, three to four
inches in diameter. The flowers are
produced from clusters at the end of
branches and are produced in rows
from a whorled calyx, with one petal
substantially longer than the rest. By
the time the final flowers have
appeared the first ones tend to be set-
ting pods. The seeds are produced in
these bean-like pods and are poiso-
nous to some degree.

The Erythrina grows to 30 feet tall
and produces its flowers after the
deciduous leaves have been dropped.
This causes the tree to look rather
spare because flowers are only pro-
duced at the ends of branches rather
than all along the branches as in pink
cassia and royal poinciana.

Spare and brief -the flowering peri-

the flowers are only a memory.

tive.

The juvenile tiger claw keeps its : : .
i the profession of chiropractic
; in the United States. The law-
pact than the coral tree and makes a j Swit filed against the AMA

striking specimen tree for the mid- | Was extended to benefit not

: only chiropractors, but also

leaves year round but tends not to
flower at this stage. It is more com-

dle of a large lawn.

Both the coral tree and the tiger }
claw tree bear small thorns that might :

not be noticed until they inflict a } Of treatment they wanted.

wound.

sre nesta Sawai ereae is and chiropractic work togeth-

? er, greater results can hap-
? pen. That will only benefit
? the patient, which I hope is
? what all doctors want.

for their time of beauty is short.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com



‘Chiropractic’s
‘Pocky road

TODAY there are a grow-

i ing numbers of doctors of chi-
? ropractic through out the
? world,

i Bahamas.

including the

In the past 19 years, 5

? Bahamians have returned to
i practice and more have
i entered chiropractic colleges.
i The growing number of chi-
? ropractors makes the profes-
? sion much more visible and
i therefore more accessible to
? all Bahamians.
? Bahamians still do not know
i what chiropractic is or any-
? thing about its history.

But many

Chiropractic champions a

i natural method of healing.
i Its theory holds that spinal
? mechanic, including the ver-
i tebra, corresponding nerves
i and surrounding soft tissue,
i play a primary role in the
? health of the body. Structur-
: al abnormalities in the spine,
i which causes pain, dysfunc-
? tion and loss of mobility to
? thousands, can be treated suc-
i cessfully.

This treatment is a proce-

i dure known as a vertebral
i adjustment. An adjustment is
? a technique in which the chi-
? ropractor skillfully applies
i pressure to an area of the
i spine that is out of alignment
? causing nerve inflammation.
i The result is reduced pain
i and
i restored function in the
? injured area.

@£ GREEN SCENIE By Gardener Jack :

inflammation and

Chiropractic since its birth
has become well known for

i its successful treatment of
? back and neck pain. But in
i spite of its success, its future
i has had a rocky road to
? recognition and respect. The
? road began in 1895 when
i D.D. Palmer of Davenport,
i Iowa, gave the first chiro-
i practic adjustment to a janitor
i who had became partially
i deaf suddenly after injuring
? his upper back.

After the adjustment the

i man's hearing returned and
i because of the success of
: Palmer's spinal adjustment,
i the recorded history of chi-
i ropractic began. Over the
? succeeding months, other
| : patients came to Palmer with
i diverse problems, including
i sciatica, migraine headaches
: and stomach complaints.
i Palmer found each of these
: conditions responded well to
? the adjustments.

The medical communities,

? hearing of Palmer's success,
i were not happy about it and
i wrote letters to the local
| : papers criticizing his meth-
i ods. Even as years went by
? and chiropractic grew, the
: American Medical Associa-
i tion became more outraged
: at chiropractic success. Final-
? ly, in 1963 to 1975, the AMA
i implemented a well financed
i campaign to eliminate chiro-
i practic as a health care alter-
i native.
od is even shorter than pink cassia. ; blackballing doctors who
The leaves return and give good } associated professionally with

shade during the summer months and }
? agents around the country to

There is another Erythrina found medical schools to teach doc-

in The Bahamas that flowers more }
rarely than E. indica but has far more }
spectacular leaves. This is the tiger }

claw or Erythrina variegata that has }

large leaflets that may be 8-10 inches } had enough and in 1976 filed

across. Not only are they large, they } Suit against the AMA.

are variegated, the veins being high- ; lawsuit lasted 14 years but in

lighted in half-inch wide yellow mark- } the end,
ings. This makes the tree very attrac- } : ae
? anti-trust laws by conspiring

Its tactics included

chiropractors to sending it

tors in training that chiro-
practors were unscientific
cultist and quacks.

Finally, four chiropractors

The

the AMA was
declared guilty of violating

with it members to destroy

all consumers. It gave them
the freedom to pick the type

No healing art has all the
answers, but when medicine

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ON
(Cy WOMEN & SEX

Menopause

HAVE you ever questioned
whether your internal central heat-
ing switch has suddenly been turned
on? You may have even wondered
if you were coming down with a
fever, or some other ailment. One
thing you knew for certain was that
you desperately wanted to shed
some clothing. The trickle of per-
spiration running down your cleav-
age was not only distracting but
potentially embarrassing. It may
even have got to the point that your
head felt like a pressure cooker and
you had visions of steam coming out
of your ears. Could it be possible
that the air-condition had stopped
working?

If this all sounds familiar then you
are officially a member of the
"Menopause Club.’ Members
include women just before, during
and after menses has discontinued.
The process can last anywhere from



5-15 years and the average age is 52
years. Some women have a gradual
onset of symptoms and declare
afterwards “Was that it?” Others
are hit with a lightning bolt and are
stopped in their tracks. If we take
the time to check hormone levels,
for those unfortunates, we note a
sharp plummet, rather than a grad-
ual decline. No wonder they feel as
if they have stepped off a cliff
instead of taking the slow, winding
path.

Hot flushes and flashes are often

the first sign that our old friend,
estrogen, has decided to withdraw
itself. If it were the only disruption
to our lives, then perhaps we could
tolerate 'the change’. Unfortunate-
ly, for a lot of women tagged along
with the day time heat are night
sweats and palpitations. A racing
heart rate accompanied by night-
mares is not only scary, but worri-
some.

Is it really so surprising that we
are cranky and irritable during the
day? We feel fragile, out of sorts,
and many of us feel as if we have
entered the ‘twilight zone’ as our
memory and concentration evade
us.

The list of insidious symptoms
grows longer as it affects our emo-
tional state of mind. Anxiety,
depression, and unhappiness, are
often accompanied with general
weakness, and tearfulness. If we are
unable to see what is happening,
then it is even more important for
our loved ones to pay attention.
Feelings of isolation, hopelessness
and lack of support fuel suicidal
thoughts and professional help is

definitely indicated.

When we are told our life
expectancy is extended and that one
third or even half our life could be
spent in post menopause, it makes
us sit up and think. Are we paying
enough attention to our general
health and lifestyle? If not, then it is
the perfect time to start because lose
of estrogen can affect our heart, cho-
lesterol, bone density, and weight.

Some medical professionals, view
menopause as another endocrine
disorder and treat it accordingly.
The list of signs and symptoms are
as important as other endocrine -
deficiency disorders, such as dia-
betes, and yet it still does not seem
to get sufficient attention. Is it
because of the emotional symptoms
that could be considered subjective?
We only have to look at how med-
ical insurance companies reimburse
emotional versus physical com-
plaints to know that they are con-
sidered less important.

There seem to be three approach-
es to dealing with this new period, in
our life. We can let Mother Nature
set her course, and just deal with

what ever comes along or we could
treat each problem as they reveal
themselves with the appropriate
medication. Or, we could choose to
replace the missing hormones, main-
tain our health, and in particular
our sexual health. Whichever path
we choose will require personal
research and an understanding of
our individual views on life.

For all the men reading this arti-
cle, you may have already thought
about life with a post menopausal
woman. Have you discussed it with
her and are you both going to follow
the same path? The Internet has
opened the door to information;
however we still need to push for
an increase in research. We need to
be our own advocate because our
future is in our hands.

¢ Listen to 'Love on the Rock’ with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9

For appointments: call 364
7230,email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

NLESS one explores every backyard, every

swamp, every forested land and every plant

habitat its impossible to see the myriad of
fruit trees present in the rich Bahamian soil.

Interestingly enough, if one did
explore the country’s many islands
they would find plants and fruit trees
that they have probably never seen
or heard of similar to the ones dis-
cussed in Tribune columnist, Jack
Hardy’s new book “Fruits of the
Bahamas.”

The book which was recently
released by Gardener Jack holds a
wealth of information about the
most popular and rare fruit trees in
the Bahamas.

This is the perfect book for per-
sons interested in growing fruit trees.
And whether you wish to purchase
fruit trees from local plant nurseries
or grow fruit from seeds, this book is
the perfect guide.

“There are some people who go
into the plant nurseries to purchase
plants for their gardens. And they
might pick up a plant that they don’t
really know that much about. The
name tag might be on the plant but
they don’t have one clue of how to
grow the plant. This is where my
book comes in providing helpful
information about the plant,” Gar-
dener Jack told Tribune Health.

He said that it is important to
research the type of fruit tree one is
interested in growing in their yards
since fruit trees have diverse “grow-
ing cultures”.

“There are some plants that may
thrive best in swampy areas and
others that thrive best in other con-
ditions,” he said.

In “Fruits of the Bahamas” read-
ers are exposed to a diversity of
fruit trees, their physical charac-
teristics and suggestions for grow-
ing. One example is the loquat,
which originated in China and is
not well known.

“There are hundreds of varieties
of loquat and they vary widely, so it
1s wise to buy a recognised variety
in order to get a good size and good
taste,” he explains in his book.

Fruits of the

Bahamas













“The fruit is usually
ovoid, contains 3-5 seeds,
and can be white, yellow,
or orange and a good tree
produces one of the tasti-
est treats of the tropics.
Unfortunately, fruits are
often more acid than
sweet, and the bearing sea-
son, in late spring is short.
The fruits are also subject
to attack from several
insects, notably the
Caribbean fruit fly,” the
book stated.

Other than the loquat fruit
tree, there are other trees the
book mentioned that might
just raise a brow.

Gardener Jack said the rea-
son why these particular fruit
trees may be unfamiliar to
some is because they are not
in abundance when compared
to fruit trees like jujube,
tamarind mango, or guinep.

“During the years of the post
wars some of the fruit trees
were brought to the Bahamas
by foreigners. For instance the
star fruit is not in abundance
and was brought here by for-
eigners as well,” he explained.

In the near future Gardener
Jack intends to release a new
book entitled “A Year With Gar-
dener Jack.”.

“Everything that I have ever
talk about concerning gardening
and vegetables will be included in
this book,” he said.

Jack Hardy is a retired teacher
and has been gardening since 1968.
Everything he has ever learnt
about gardening is by experience
and collecting information from
other experts and different books.

“Fruits of the Bahamas” is avail-
able at the Fox Hill Plant Nurs-
ery. It is also available in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.



@Boanouiex:

Feet are your support for life!

IF YOU are in your mid-
dle years or beyond, you
would have had decades of
walking, jogging and standing
which can leave their mark
on your feet. It all boils down
to that one word “aging”.
Aging brings many changes
to your feet! Some changes
are normal such as losing the
fat padding in your feet thus
making the skin thinner or
changes in the shape of your
feet... but having pain is not
one of them.

Thinner Skin:

The plantar (bottom of
foot) fat pads protect the
bones, nerves and blood ves-
sels of the foot by absorbing
and dissipating energy from
impact and shearing forces
when you walk and run.
Moreover, those smooth, hard
man-made surfaces (paved



and concrete surfaces) signif-
icantly increase the impact
and shearing forces on the fat
pads, causing them to degen-
erate even faster.

Effects:

The long term effects of fat
pads deterioration leaves you
with the bony prominences
crying for cover. These bony
prominences no longer have
their protective pads and so
it is your responsibility to seek
the correct cover to protect
the bones, nerves and blood
vessels of the foot. You may
ask what happens if I don't

have the protective pads?
Well, you will be vulnerable
to foot injuries and pain which
can eventually lead to immo-
bility.

Shape:

The shape of the foot may
change with fallen or col-
lapsed arches. This happens
as ligaments become more
slack. As a result the foot flat-
tens and is made wider and
longer demanding larger and
more supportive footwear.
While this can occur with age,
it is also possible with weight
gain.

Effects:

Fallen or collapsed arches
cause a lot of problems in
addition to tremendous pain
along the plantar (bottom of
foot) area of the foot which is
commonly referred to as plan-

tar fasciitis. This affects your
entire body alignment, knees,
back and neck.

Always be mindful that you
feet are the foundation of
your entire body and should
be functional for life.

Skin:

As blood circulation to
your feet decreases with age
you will experience drier skin.

Cracks and blisters can also
develop and may not heal as
quickly due to poor circula-
tion in the feet.

Effects:

— Being fully aware to the
body's circulatory system
and how it is designed to
work.

— Poor circulation in your
feet can lead to a multitude
of problems and in some
instances may prove to be

fatal.

Suggestions:

Isuggest that you seek pre-
ventative care with the prop-
er footwear, correct foot
devices and the appropriate
footwear accessories. You
may move beyond the tradi-
tional style footwear and go
revolutionary with a rocker-
soled shoe to enhance your
exercise program and add a
little pep to your step. For
example, the 'Easy Tone’ and
the 'Chung Shi' line of
footwear have been scientifi-
cally designed as dynamic
workout tools. Their unique
‘rocker sole’ design to
increase circulation, improve
posture and strengthen joints.
This type of footwear will def-
initely rock your world by its
design to reduce the stress on
the joints.

The use of a well made
sock (e.g. Thorlos or Balega)
that is padded in the forefoot
and the heel area is also very
important to the health and



function of the foot. There
are many other foot health
products that you would find
by visiting a specialty
footwear facility, but most
essential it is important to
recognise that your feet are
changing with age and require
some tender loving care to
support you for life.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a
Board Certified & licensed
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of
Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses
on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau. Please direct
any questions or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
327-

FEET, www.footsolutions.com/
Nassau

"The views expressed are those
of the author and do not nec-
essarily represent those of
Foot Solutions Incorporated or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 11B





(AS
A Japanese epiphany

Japanese Toilets

This is basically a hole in
the floor where you have to
stoop to do what you have to
do. For months I have hated
them and have tried to avoid
them as much as possible
because if you’re not use to it,
it can be quite tricky. It was-
n't until I went to Kyoto and
used a public toilette that I
had an epiphany.

The bathroom stalls
weren't able to close proper-
ly so | happened to walk by a
stall where a lady had finish-
ing using the bathroom and
I saw inside her stall. It was
like a bolt of lightening and I
realised that I've been using
the toilette backwards for the
last 8 months!

It made so much more
sense. I guess if you’re used
to going one way for the past
20 years of your life you
would never think to turn
around. So now I am no
longer afraid when I go to
public bathroom. They really
should have an instruction
manual at the front of the
bathroom in English for for-
eigners.

Sankambi

A dreaded word for for-
eign staff. My school is the
most expensive in my pre-
fecture / area (about $500-
$700) a month. So once every
few months we have sankam-
bi where the parents come to
watch your lesson. It's a real
pain and I don't really like it
because they make us prac-
tice the same lesson for
weeks so the kids know what

THE WEATHER REPORT 222

S| Te | =

5-Day Forecast

i Br IY, .
eee
—



they are supposed to do. It
is more a performance than
an actual lesson but I guess if
you pay that amount of mon-
ey amonth you want to make
sure that it is perfect. How-
ever some things you can't
prepare for.

One of my colleagues was
ten seconds into her lesson
when two kids had a fist
fight- a Mike Tyson / Evan-
der Hollyfield type situation.
The teachers had to pull
them apart. We have no idea
how it started or why, but
you can't really predict what
kids will do on the day.

During my lesson, I had
K3 and maybe 1 minute into
it one of the kids decides to
take off his shoes and socks
strips off his pants and lays
on the ground and didn't
want to get up or put back
on his clothes. His sensei
(teacher) and I had to dress
him quickly. I'm like ‘Koichi
why today of all days?’ His
answer was it was hot. I was
like, ‘ok but next time can
you do that when your par-
ents aren't here watching

>

me.

Activities Activities

Again with this being the
most expensive school in this
prefecture there is always
something going on and

Path sunny ag
beeary

High: 75°

something that you have to
organise in addition to your
daily duties. After a long
vacation, stuff just keeps
coming up. The school is very
big on advertising and keep-
ing parents / customers hap-

After vacation it was
sankambi, then sports day,
then trial lesson (when ran-
dom people bring their kids
to the school and you give
them kind of a tour and you
show them what you can
teach their kids), a trip to the
zoo, the K5 out of town
school trip, then a Halloween
parade in the center of town,
open lesson which is kind of
like trial lesson and the list
goes on and on. You barely
have time to catch your
breath from one thing and
they are already talking about
what you are going to do for
the next thing. I never in my
life thought that I would be
working overtime at a school.

I just got off the bus from
the K5 school trip and only
went in the office to check
my messages when they were
like we have a meeting in 5
minutes about Seiko's festi-
val that is happening in two
weeks. I'm like geez can I
have five minutes after hav-
ing spent two days with 54
five year olds? That's how
they are though. They were
already talking about the
Christmas concert and we
were still drafting up our pro-
gram for the Halloween
event. You definitely have
to be on your toes here. Here
are some brief highlights

Pack cious
breary

High: 81"
ome Tz

Low 6"
ae T

e Snare

Poa nenay are

from some of these activities.

SPORTS DAY - We practiced
every day for like 2 weeks.
Running, bowing, dancing,
marching, it was crazy! I
mean who practices for
sports day? However the K5
marching band was really
something else though. It's
hard to believe that these
kids are only 5 years old.
Every beat, every march was
totally on time.

They asked me to run for
parents against staff relay
race. I was like me? Run???
You have to be crazy. Just
because I am black and from
the Caribbean does not
mean that I can run. They
settled for me being a com-
mentator after I strongly
protested.

KS SCHOOL TRIP - You know
those big school groups that
you see in Disneyland and
the teachers that look like
they going crazy? Well that
was me for two days. Japan-
ese children already all look
alike so when you mix them
up with another couple hun-
dred kids it is possible for
you to loose your mind.
Thank God for uniforms
and color coordinated hats if
not I might have brought the
wrong kids back.

The kids were given 10
dollars in the souvenir shop
and were told that they
could buy whatever they
wanted. Now when you give
kids money and tell them
they can buy what ever they
want some have the tenden-

all

Partly Suny with a
nh poo bls
High: 6"
Low: 75"

Tcae

ee

Bibs at for ace eg 1 pum peter

—

Nioeiy cloud
ois pos
High: a3"
Low: Ta?

| ua ee |e pues, wd Tuoi Doane |

cy to go a little crazy. Taiyo
Kun (see newsletter 5)
brought me like 50 dollars
worth of stuff and only had
$10. I was like dude you
have to put half these things
back. It took about twenty
minutes for him to decide
what he wanted to put back.
Another little boy only
bought a dollar worth of
candy. I told him that you
can buy more stuff. He was
like he wanted to save it for
later. I'm like whoa this is a
potential banker right here.

HALLOWEEN - So cute to see
about 120 kids dressed up
for Halloween. You had
everything from traditional
witches and pumpkins to
beautiful little princesses
and even a little footballer. I
went dressed as a panda,
even made my own costume.
A black and white apron
with a tail and little pandas
all over the apron. Who
knew that I could be cre-
ative!! If I could learn how
to cook there might be some
hope for me yet.

On a side note there was a
foreigner Halloween party
that night in Tokushima. I
wore my gold leotard
junkanoo outfit. I already
get stares when I walk down
the street wearing jeans and
a t-shirt, so imagine wearing
that and a feathered skirt
and walking the streets of
Japan!!

Bus duty and Hayato Kun
Every other morning we
have bus duty where we go to



the kids houses and pick
them up on the bus. On my
bus route we have really cool
kids so we talk and they learn
English and I learn Japanese.
However, there is one fool
of a bus driver that always
tells us to be quiet when we
don't make that much noise
(there are only 3 kids on the
bus and myself). But I told
him no I am here to interact
with the kids and he isa
kindergarten bus driver so
for him to expect complete
quiet is rather silly. So we
don't like each other. He
tries to get even by having
the music up really loud in
the bus before we go to pick
up the kids.

I’m like this man don't
know that doesn't bother me.
In the Bahamas we don't
catch a bus unless it lickin’, so
IT am thinking the louder the
better. So now we just say
"hello" and "goodbye" to
each other.

Hayato Kun is one of the
kids on the bus very smart
handsome little boy who
always wants to talk. I've
known him since last year
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race to a5 year old Japanese
boy. So I just said mother
and father face black. So my
face is black too. That answer
seemed to satisfy him.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9,

2010






A woman’s

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

IBUNE Woman has been on a
quest to uncover the true definition
of the word “ sexy” and as would

be expected, the meaning changes
between men and women.

Last week Tribune Woman, asked a few men
what is it they found engaging about a woman-
their responses included superficial and ‘beyond
the surface answers”.

This week we wanted to know what it is about
a man that makes a woman’s eye twinkle, and
stomach flutter.

And after speaking to these women a mutual
opinion shared by them is that -sexy is what sexy
thinks!

“Confidence is everything,” said Ava Turnquest
who said this tells much more about how a man
feels about himself.

“A guy that is sure of himself grabs my attention.
Not when he is over confident or cocky by the
way. Its just that when a man is sure of himself it
means that nothing that anyone says to him mat-
ters.”

She added that a man who is goal oriented and
has an idea of where his life is headed is a “good
catch.”

“What I also find very sexy is a man who does
not only know what he wants in a woman, but
knows what he wants in life,” she told Tribune
Woman.

From yester years women have been taught to
seek a mate that is goal oriented, will take the
lead, fulfilling his divine role as the sole provider
and bread winner of the home. And although
times have changed, this criteria hasn’t.

Aman that is desirous for success is probably in
every woman’s blueprint of the perfect man. This
particular quality open the eyes and raises the
eyebrow for Stacey Rolle* as well.

“A man that knows what he wants is great, but
aman that has the drive and is aggressive enough
to follow through is even better,” she said.

While she finds it very sexy when a guy is
aggressive at chasing his dreams, when he’s with
her he must tame that aggression and turn it into
gentleness.

He must unlock the key to her heart, surprise
her with hugs from behind and other affectionate
gestures non-sexual in nature.

“Looks aren’t most important to me. What I
like is a guy that is nice, sweet, caring and treat me
like a princess, this is my definition of sexy,” Stacey
explained.

On the other hand, Alesha Cadet said that a
man that is in control is the most enticing thing. To
her this is his rightful place.

“When I say I find a guy sexy that is in control,
I don’t mean a guy that is abusive or too aggres-
sive. I mean it in the sense that he doesn’t beckon
to my every call. A guy who allows me to run
over him is not going to get me interested,” she

Discover the goodness

definition of

told Tribune Woman.

Apart from the physical attributes one may
possess another woman Dahlia Graham* said that
a man that can resist a woman no matter how
beautiful she is will have her knees weak.

“For instance, if there is a guy who is in a com-
mitted relationship and there is a very beautiful
sexy woman who constantly throws herself at him’
and he resists her just to honour his commitment
with his partner gets ten stars from me. In some
odd way I find that very sexy, even a little mag-
netic, since most people know men are physical
and the fact that he can defy his nature makes
him powerful in my eyes” she said.

To Lola Cartwright* courtly love is an enchant-
ment in itself. “I want to know that chivalry is not
dead with me,” Lola said.

Unlike men, looks are the least bit important to
these women. However, that does not mean a guy
with an unkempt appearance, makes the cut. These
women said a man must be well groomed, and
have a ravishing finish to be the definition of sexy.

Jennie Hill* told Tribune Woman that a tall,
firmly built guy clad in a suit with a cigar pro-
truding from his mouth is ‘hot’.

“This heightens his sex appeal. I don’t know if
it’s because it brings out his masculinity but this is
very hot to me,” Jennie said.

The lingering fragrance of the Armani Code or
Calvin Klein cologne is enough to get the blood
running Jennie said.

“Wow aman that looks great and smells great
is enchanting,” she said.

A combination of great looks, confidence, ambi-
tion, and romance is what these women say make
a man sexy.

*Names have been changed.

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Full Text

PAGE 2

TODAY the leadership team and staff of the Bahamas Con ference of the Methodist Church will meet at Odyssey Aviation at 11.30am to official ly end the first phase of the churchs response to the earthquake devastation in Haiti. Within 36 hours of the earthquake on January 12, the BCMC had two airplanes on the ground in Haiti, delivering emergency supplies and food through its disaster relief agency, Methodist Habitat. In all, we have accom plished much, said a spokesman. 400 flights made; 3,200 flight hours accomplished; 120 volunteer pilots involved; 250,000 plus pounds of supplies carried; 100 plus passengers carried into Haiti (medical teams and 176 plus passengers car ried out of Haiti (missionaries stranded throughout Haiti when the airports closed down and commercial airlines stopped flying). Six countries were represented Bahamas, Canada, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Turks and Caicos, and the USA. 32 US states were represented; Seven airports in Haiti served: Cap Haitien, Jacmel, Jeremie, La Gonave, Les Cayes, Port-au-Prince, and Pignon. Lives in Haiti impacted: Countless. The Bahamas Methodist Conference will make a formal presentation to Odyssey Aviation tomorrow to acknowledge the companys partnership, hospitality and generosity in allow ing Methodist Habitat to use its facilities as the base of its Haiti Aviation Operation. The BCMC will continue its partnership with Rotary Bahamas and other civic organisations to charter a cargo ship to Haiti and to also use its resources to send work teams and construction material to help in the rebuilding phase of the Haitian communities. We thank God for the divine favour, guidance and protection given to the Methodist Habitat ministry throughout this massive undertaking, said the spokesman. May God continue to bless our work may God continue to bless the people of Haiti. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net GREAT Abacos south side is primed for a major economic boost with groundbreaking on two beach-side sister developments on the five-mile long Schooner Bay Beach, Abaco. At Saturdays launch of Serenity Point, a planned 40acre gated residential commun ity, potential investors, real estate agents and Abaconians gathered for a visual simulation of the high-end development. When you have a beach like this that runs for miles, any real estate agent who brings an investor, the first thing an investor will do is look toward the street. Where is the electricity? It is there. Where is the fiber optic cable? It is there. Better than that: 26-miles south of Marsh Harbour my cell phone is working, said Alexis Nihon II, president of Anco Lands Ltd, the development company. Serenity Point is comprised of 24 beach front lots, hilltop sites and elevated estates ranging from 20,000 to 72,000 square feet. The starting bid is $550,000 for select lots, with prices extending into six digits, according to Gustaf Hernqvist, Senior Sales and Marketing Director. Ninety per cent of the infrastructure is already in place at the project site. Based on the environmental i mpact assessment conducted on the development, of primary concern is the integrity of the unbroken stretch of beach, extending five-miles. This beach is a prime turtle nesting ground, according to Eric Carey, Bahamas National Trust president. I would have loved if they had not taken out all of the trees. I spoke to Gustaf and he indicated they had a lot of hurricane damage and they thought it would have been dif ficult to plan their development and their lots around the vege tation they felt was degraded, said Mr Carey. They have committed to keeping lights off the beach. They have also committed to using as much native vegetation as possible; taking out the few casuarinas that are there. They say they will commit to keeping the dune intact because this beach profile is entirely dependent on this dune being intact, he said, also noting the Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST mission is responsible for ensuring these commitments are met. Village The same commitments were secured from the neighbouring Schooner Bay development, according to Mr Carey. Schooner Bay is a planned selfsustaining village set on 220acres of land. Unlike Serenity Point, which is a gated community, Schooner Bay is open, and most concerned about its objective to meld indigenous design concepts with modern environmental sensibility. More than half of the land is being preserved as green space, including a large section of native Coppice forest. Schooner Bay will feature a farmers market, grocery story, medical clinic, grade school and other public facilities, which will also service the Serenity Point community. Based on environ mental models of Schooner Bay, one environmental impact will be the shifting contour of the beach, according to James Rees, Sales Manager. This will result from plans, already in play, for a harbour to be cut out of the land. The cut is located at the most southern tip of Schooner Beach. From what (the main environmental consultant, coastal engineer Keith Bishop) showed us from modeling, there may be some shifting in the general area of the opening, but generally the beach profile should not be changed. So it is still a wait and see game. There are going to be some changes righta fter that some people will react to, said Mr Carey. They appear committed. I mean they are selling the fact that they have this incrediblem ore than 100-foot wide beach. They are going to sell some lots and they want to continue sell ing lots, so if the beach is degraded then obviously they wont be able to do that. We get some degree of confidence that they dont want to destroy the very thing they are selling, he said. Both projects have one major element in common. They are fully self-financed by private investors, as they say: No banks involved. As a result, Mr Nihon II said, They wont go under, they wont shut down. The Nihon family originated in Lige, Belgium and migrated to Montreal, Canada. They have owned large tracks of land in Abaco since the 1960s. Asked about the timing of the development, Mr Nihon II said: Well it is simple. I returned to the Bahamas two years ago. I am here, I am an island boy living under a coconut tree. We have a wonderful team, so we are going to gradually grow. It is going to take time, so watch what will happen in the next two or three years. South Abaco developments on the move Bahamas Methodist Conference completes the first phase of Haiti recovery efforts SCHOONER BAY BEACH Great Abaco, is the site of several planned developments, including Serenity Point and Schooner Bay. The beach, over 100-feet wide at points, stretches for five-miles and isa turtle nesting ground. N oelle Nicolls / Tribune staff THE SITE of the planned 40-acre gated community, Serenity Point, on Schooner Bay Beach, Great Abaco. N o e l l e N i c o l l s / T r i b u n e s t a f f 18th homicide victim identified THE man who was shot and killed in Fox Hill last Thursday night has been identified as 27-year-old JeanRobert St Jean of Reeves Street. The victim, nicknamed Black, became the countrys 18th homicide when he was shot in the area known as The Bend. According to residents, he had borrowed a bicycle to go to make a purchase in Wright Lane when he was killed. Ruper t Dean Lane r esident shot and injur ed A resident of Rupert Dean Lane was shot and injured while in his home at around 4.17am yesterday. The 34-year-old man was shot in the right arm and was taken to hospital by emergency medical personnel where he was treated and later discharged. Police are investigating. Man robbed at knife point A MAN was robbed at knife point on Sunday while on Hampton Street off Mount Royal Avenue. The armed robbery victim was approached by two unknown men at around 7.20pm. The culprits robbed the man of his jew ellery and fled the area on foot. INTERNATIONAL real estate d eveloper Alex Nihon II describes h is latest venture, Serenity Point, G reat Abaco. crime BRIEFS

PAGE 5

By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net SENATOR Allyson Mayard-Gibson has called for the creation of equal pay standards and the passage of antisexual discrimination laws to ensure that qualified women enjoy the same rights as their male counterparts. Speaking yesterday before the International Women's Day Symposium, Mrs Maynard-Gibson noted several social factors impeding the progress of women in the Bahamas. She said that despite what many people believe, statistics show that when a woman and a man with the same or similar qualifications apply for the same job, the man is still more likely to be chosen. "This bias ought to be made illegal in the Bahamas, as it has been in other jurisdictions, by passage of a Sex Discrimina tion Act," said the senator. She added that this bias does not take into account the realities of Bahamian society, in which more than 60 per cent of households are headed by women. Mrs Maynard-Gibson also called for the creation of an Equal Pay Act, explaining, "statistics show that even though women have made significant progress at the workplace, men tend to be paid more than women for performing the same job." This too ought to be made illegal by the passage of an Equal Pay Act, said the senator, who has been advocating for both pieces of legislation since 1981. "As more women than men head households, why should a man, who it is assumed is supporting his family be paid more than a woman, especially when that assumption is incorrect? Without the two acts women are disadvantaged, she said. Exams Aside from discrimination in the workplace, the rising number of babies born to teenage girls, the growing number of single mothers and increasingly poor showings on national exams are all issues impeding women's progress, said Mrs Maynard-Gibson. "More than 70 per cent of children born in the Bahamas are born to single mothers. Of that percentage, more than 50 per cent are born to teen mothers. We must recognise that what we are doing is not working. More babies are having babies, not less. It is imperative that the church, schools, NGOs and other institutions get involved in education about planning family life. "It is no secret that accomplishment, by whatever yardstick is used, is directly tied to education. Persons with a high s chool diploma earn more than those without a high school diploma. Similarly, the more degrees that one possesses, the more one's earning capacity. A college degree provides women with a measure of insurance against poverty because coll ege-educated women earn higher wages, have a lower rate of out-of-marriage childbearing, and have a lower risk of divorce than do women who do not earn college degrees. "Other studies have shown that education not only increases a woman's skills and prod uctivity, as it does men's, but also appears to reduce the gap in female and male earnings attributable to factors such as discrimination, preferences, and As more women than men head households, why should a man, who it is assumed is supporti ng his family be paid more than a woman, especially when that assumption is incorrect? Without the two acts women are disadvantaged. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Call for equal pay standards BY Timothy Ziga-Brown, US Charg dAffaires Y esterday was Internat ional Womens Day. This year, it also marked the 15th anniversary of the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing. Fifteen years ago, 189 countries signed on to a Platform for Action that affirmed the need to work for womens equality in access to education, healthcare, jobs, credit, and more. It stressed the need to have women participate fully in the economic and political life of their countries, and to protect w omens right to live free from violence. It was at this conference that then-First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton declared: Human rights are womens rights, and womens rights are human rights. In the spirit of that conference, the United States has been working to integrate womens issues into mainstream foreign policy. We recognise that it is a human rights issue when mass sexual violence is used as a tool of war in the ongoing conflict in the D emocratic Republic of the Congo. It is a human rights issue when women are excluded from the peace negotiations that affect their lives. And it is a human rights issue when women and girls are held like chattel by human traffickers and when girls are forced into child marriages. Womens rights are human rights, and womens issues are human issues. They cut across traditional spheres of concern, and they are central, not peripheral. T hey are international development issues: Study upon study has shown that aid given to women is reinvested in their comm unities, and skills-development programmes turn women into drivers of economic growth. And they are peace and security issues: When women are targeted in conflicts around the world, societies fray and destabilise; the places that most exclude women from public life and seek to constrain their lives are the same in which extremist ideology finds a receptive home. T he status of women is a bellwether for the political and economic health of nations. Womens issues are a critical component of the most urgent transnational problems we face today, and they should be on the agenda of everyone, men and women, from the grassroots to the policymaking levels, in political life and beyond. Violence against women is endemic around the world. Ending it requires everyones participation, including an active and vocal role for men and for religious leaders of both sexes. T he United States is supporting programmes around the globe in order that their voices will be heard. We laud the Bahamas for proposing legislation to criminalise marital rape, a significant step towards securing equal human rights for all. Despite the pledge made in 1995 by so many countries to end the discrimination that robs the world of the talent it desperately needs, women are still the majority of the worlds poor, unhealthy, underfed, and uneducated. To the silent majority around the globe that supports womens equality, we say: The time to translate support into action is now. We look forward to the time when International Wom ens Day will be an historical and retrospective celebration of womens path to the achievement of equality when every day belongs equally to women and to men, and every day is a good day for human rights. Womens rights are human rights OP-ED US CHARGEDAFFAIRES INTERNATIONAL WOMENS DAY ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON Senator also argues for anti-sexual discrimination laws

PAGE 6

THE Land Use and Policy Administration Project is now operational and being integrated into the daily management of Crown Lands at the D epartment of Lands and S urveys, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government B yran Woodside said. Mr Woodside told parliamentarians during the midterm Budget debate that the department is using the LUPAP technology with the h iring of additional surveyors, t he purchasing of much-neede d equipment and improving staff accommodations to advance the Departments c ommitment to creating a customer friendly environment. It is anticipated that the Department will become m ore responsive thereby disp elling the publics negative v iew of its operation, he said. Problems T he LUPAP project began in June 2005 to address an umber of problems related t o Land Administration in the c ountry, such as: The majority of land i nformation used by the Government is outdated or incomp lete; Information is scattered a mong various Government agencies; Much of the information is in paper form, which limits its accessibility and use; Uncoordinated effort causes inconsistency and inaccuracy, duplication of efforts and higher costs; and Lack of data standards, rules for inter-agency data s haring and clear responsibilities for data sharing and clear responsibilities for data upkeep and maintenance. The deployment of a competent information tech-n ology officer and the continuous in-house training of surv eyors and estates managers have ensured the transfer of the LUPAP technology, Mr Woodside said. He also noted that the Department of Lands andS urveys was allocated $ 2,829,982 for the 2009/2010 budget year and as of Decem-b er 2009, $1,111,495 was spent. The savings of $ 303,496 will be used to augment the continued recruitment of much-needed surveyors and Geographic Information Systems personnel, he said. The Department also s pent $231,416.00 for Aerial I magery Mapping. Mr Woodside said the i maging is vital to the Departm ents mandate to manage t he Crown Lands held in trust o n behalf of the Bahamian people. During the past six months, $ 63,000 has been spent to c omplete renovations to the mapping building, he said. The much needed repairs a nd reconfiguration of this building has enhanced the integration of the work of surveyors, estates managers and the utilisation of the various components of LUPAP, Mr Woodside said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH 1 27,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5 *26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI0DUFK7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $ 5*26$&253 /LTXLGDWRUf Department of Lands and Surveys targets customer service issues BYRAN WOODSIDE CONTRARY to rampant speculation circulating throughout New Providence yesterday, The Tribune can confirm that attorney Godfrey Pro Pinder is alive and well. Initially, reports suggested relatives of Mr Pinder were having difficulty reaching him, and feared the worst. When contact with Mr Pinder was finally made, the one time Elizabeth by-election hopeful was said to have chuckled and remarked that reports of his untimely demise had been greatly exaggerated. REPORTS OF MY DEMISE ARE GREATLY EXAGGERATED! P hoto: Rodney Moncur WHILE DISCUSSING his short-lived Love Revolution political campaign at the Oakes Field McDonalds one morning in February, Godfrey Pro P inder broke into song and dance. Contact made with attorney Godfrey Pro Pinder M ID-TERMBUDGETDEBATE A FATHER and son from Andros accused of having sex with a 15-year-old girl were arraigned in a Magistrates Court yest erday. Police have charged Stephen Forbes, 44, and his son Carame F orbes, 22, both of Congo Town, South Andros, with having u nlawful sexual intercourse with a person under 16 years of age. I t is alleged that Stephen Forbes had sex with the girl between S eptember 2009 and Monday, February 22, while at South Andros. It is also alleged that Carame Forbes had sex with the girl, alleged to have been his girlfriend, between May 2009 and January 2010. N either man was required to enter a plea to the charges during their arraignment in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday. They were each granted bail in the sum of $7,500. The case was adjourned to April 29 for the commencement of a preliminary inquiry. Andros father and son accused of having sex with girl aged 15 COURTBRIEF By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Four persons were arraigned on illegal firearm possession charges in Freeport Magistrates Court yesterday. F reeport residents Connie Louanna Johnson, 40; Geraldo Garbocher Knowles, 22; Bree Johnson, 19; and Emanuel Hamilton, 38, appeared before Magistrate Andrew Forbes. It is alleged that on March 5, the accused were found in possession of a 12-gauge shotgun. T hey all pleaded not guilty to the charge and were each granted $2,000 bail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to July 26 for trial. Four face firearm possession charges

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R XXXXXXXXXXXXX C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.89TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY AND WARM HIGH 82F LOW 70F B U S I N E S S L ISTED COMPANY CHIEF: MOST BISX FIRMS S P O R T S When is a firm Series is back after eight Truly Public? Rugbys RETURN N E W S Series is back after eight Rugbys RETURN asdfasdfasdfsadfsadfsadf The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WERE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com witha FastTrack Loan. EDUCATIONAL LOAN

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM customized group & individual health plans uninterrupted coverage coverage after age 75 24/7 customer serviceall of the above be happywith your health planSALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-1300 A DIVISION OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating D id you or a loved one get married recently? O r is that marriage about to take place? If so, send us a snap of your happy day and well publish it free of charge. Let everyone see how good you looked on that special day. SEND YOUR PHOTOS TO TRIBUNE@TRIBUNEMEDIA.NET INCLUDE DETAILS OF THE HAPPY COUPLES NAMES AND WHERE THEY WERE MARRIED. THE ROYAL BAHAMAS DEFENCE FORCE band leads the parade on Sunday during a march to church for the annual service. Royal Bahamas leads parade to chur ch Defence Force band PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff

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GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack Like our garbage, we must empty our colon before we decide to fill it up again. And nutritious foods ensure regular bowel movements. B ut the fact of the matter is t hat most persons arent filling up on the right foods, a nd having a consistent bowe l movement. T he typical diet lacks the sufficient amount of fiberneeded to excrete fat, long, and bulky excretions. If this is not the case, your colon may be experiencinga blockage, which means y our body isnt getting a regular pass, and is lacking in fiber. T he colonic procedure is s uggested to detoxify the body, avoid cancer, stop constipation, acne, chronic fatigue syndrome, allergiesa nd to lose weight. But what may be a regular pass for one person isn ot regular for another, says Julia Lee, RD MS, a dietitian at Doctors Hospi tal. You dont have to havea bowel movement everyday; that wouldnt be cor rect, she told Tribune H ealth. E mptying your colon, which is the receptacle for w aste is vital. As the body t akes in nutrients, air, water, o xygen, and food to keep it functioning properly, the colon correspondingly elim inates what it doesnt need and excretes it from the body. Ms Lee and Nathelyn L aCroy, colon hydrotherapist, explained that one colonics session is the equiv-a lent of having 10 to 15 bow e l movements. Mrs LaCroy is one of few colonic hydrotherapists on the island, and explained thep rocedure she administers to Tribune Health : When the colonic begins, t he physician will introduce the colon hydrotherapy equipment into the clients r ectum, said Mrs LaCroy. The physician will control t he temperature, and low pressured water flowst hrough a little tube into the c olon. All the while, there is no sucking out the feces. Once the water comes in contact with the feces, the feces blocks the water, she said. When the water makes its w ay through the feces, it f lows right through the c losed tube. In the end, the physician w ill gently massage the p atients stomach to rid him of the last few remaining feces. And depending on the patients weight, there could be a great deal of excess abdominal skin. If the colon is not relieved a s much as possible, then balance in your body is lacking. And you must get the d igestive system working the w ay it should, because the d igestive system is the feeder for the blood, she explained. When youre eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and dumping food on top of food, this is piling up on thec olon, said the colonics specialist. If the colon which isfive feet long, and two and half inches wide in diameteri s stalled, you will know, because the scent of your stool will tell the tale. The colon can hold up to 4 0 pounds of fecal matter, a d ecent amount of space to hold your waste. And just asa cesspit can be backed up, t he colon needs relieving at least two to three times a day, said Mrs LaCroy. At the end of a colon hydrotherapy procedure, you will feel like you havent used the toilet for a month, a nd this will be a sign of d ehydration. During this t ime you may experience a r ise in the electrolytes in y our body such as potassiu m and sodium. This can be quite dangerous, and damaging to the kidneys and heart. This may be why some doctors wont recommend colon hydrotherapy for d etoxification. Mrs Lee, holds to this view that colon cleansing can be d amaging. The more trad itional physicians wouldnt r ecommend it to their patients, she said. Colonics can be damaging to the colona s the colon is very capable of cleaning itself, she said. Persons should evaluate the risks before they havet he procedure done and see a GI (gastro-intestinal cialist for more information on the procedure. March is colorectal cancer awareness month. During March, two trees make their presence known by flowering quite spectacularly before sliding back into relative anonymity. The first is pink cassia, a tree that is so undistinguished for most of the year that if one is on your regular car route you may wonder where on earth it had suddenly appeared from. The pink cassia (Cassia javanica is a member of the pea family and as such bears the familiar compound leaves we associate with leguminous plants. These leaves are lost during the autumn and winter months so that when the tree flowers, it is all flowers. The leaves grow back while flowering takes place, similar to the leafing/flowering cycle of the royal poinciana, which is related. March is a weak month for flowering trees and the presence of a pink cassia in full bloom makes it even more outstanding. The light pink flowers tend to smother the branches in an effusive display of plant exuberance. Alas, not for long. Usually four to five weeks later the flowers are fading and the leaves take over. Pink cassia is easily propagated from seed and is a fast grower. Most cassias tend to shrubby but pink cassia is a true tree growing to 30 feet or more. I had a fine specimen in my previous yard that was toppled by Hurricane Floyd. Most of it was in the bush so I left it right where it was. By the next flowering season it had produced vertical branches that were as long as the tree had previously been tall, all of them smothered in blos soms. Pink cassia can also be grown from cuttings. Although there is a paucity of flowering trees at this time of year, this is the time when another brilliant but short-lived display is put on by the coral tree (Erythrina indica another member of the pea family. Although named the coral tree, the flowers are red. The distinguishing feature of the coral tree is its compound leaves that consist of three leaflets shaped more or less like the spades in playing cards, three to four inches in diameter. The flowers are produced from clusters at the end of branches and are produced in rows from a whorled calyx, with one petal substantially longer than the rest. By the time the final flowers have appeared the first ones tend to be setting pods. The seeds are produced in these bean-like pods and are poiso nous to some degree. The Erythrina grows to 30 feet tall and produces its flowers after the deciduous leaves have been dropped. This causes the tree to look rather spare because flowers are only produced at the ends of branches rather than all along the branches as in pink cassia and royal poinciana. Spare and brief -the flowering peri od is even shorter than pink cassia. The leaves return and give good shade during the summer months and the flowers are only a memory. There is another Erythrina found in The Bahamas that flowers more rarely than E. indica but has far more spectacular leaves. This is the tiger claw or Erythrina variegata that has large leaflets that may be 8-10 inches across. Not only are they large, they are variegated, the veins being highlighted in half-inch wide yellow markings. This makes the tree very attrac tive. The juvenile tiger claw keeps its leaves year round but tends not to flower at this stage. It is more com pact than the coral tree and makes a striking specimen tree for the middle of a large lawn. Both the coral tree and the tiger claw tree bear small thorns that might not be noticed until they inflict a wound. Enjoy these trees while you may for their time of beauty is short. j.hardy@coralwave.com C M Y K C M Y K W OMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e Chiropractics rocky road By SUSAN DONALD DC health TODAYthere are a growi ng numbers of doctors of chir opractic through out the w orld, including the B ahamas. In the past 19 years, 5 B ahamians have returned to practice and more have entered chiropractic colleges.T he growing number of chiropractors makes the profession much more visible and therefore more accessible to all Bahamians. But many Bahamians still do not know what chiropractic is or any t hing about its history. Chiropractic champions a natural method of healing. Its theory holds that spinal mechanic, including the vert ebra, corresponding nerves a nd surrounding soft tissue, p lay a primary role in the health of the body. Structur al abnormalities in the spine, w hich causes pain, dysfunction and loss of mobility tot housands, can be treated successfully. T his treatment is a procedure known as a vertebral adjustment. An adjustment is a technique in which the chi ropractor skillfully applies pressure to an area of thes pine that is out of alignment c ausing nerve inflammation. The result is reduced pain and inflammation andr estored function in the injured area. Chiropractic since its birth h as become well known for its successful treatment of back and neck pain. But in spite of its success, its future h as had a rocky road to recognition and respect. The road began in 1895 when D.D. Palmer of Davenport, Iowa, gave the first chiropractic adjustment to a janitor who had became partially deaf suddenly after injuring his upper back. A fter the adjustment the man's hearing returned and because of the success of Palmer's spinal adjustment, the recorded history of chi ropractic began. Over the succeeding months, other patients came to Palmer with diverse problems, including sciatica, migraine headaches and stomach complaints. Palmer found each of these conditions responded well to the adjustments. The medical communities, hearing of Palmer's success, were not happy about it and wrote letters to the local papers criticizing his methods. Even as years went by and chiropractic grew, the American Medical Association became more outraged at chiropractic success. Finally, in 1963 to 1975, the AMA implemented a well financed campaign to eliminate chiropractic as a health care alter native. Its tactics included blackballing doctors who associated professionally with chiropractors to sending it agents around the country to medical schools to teach doc tors in training that chiropractors were unscientific cultist and quacks. Finally, four chiropractors had enough and in 1976 filed suit against the AMA. The lawsuit lasted 14 years but in the end, the AMA was declared guilty of violating anti-trust laws by conspiring with it members to destroy the profession of chiropractic in the United States. The law suit filed against the AMA was extended to benefit not only chiropractors, but also all consumers. It gave them the freedom to pick the type of treatment they wanted. No healing art has all the answers, but when medicine and chiropractic work togeth er, greater results can hap pen. That will only benefit the patient, which I hope is what all doctors want. Brief encounters in March B y REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter r shearer@tribunemedia.net L ETS say your garbage bag starts to become filled with waste; would you continue to load trash upon trash into the bag without emptying it? Most likely, not. Just as garbage begins to develop an odour, grow bacteria, mold, develop viruses, and probably infect the entire home with its stench, so d oes the colon. SHOULD YOU HAVE IT OR NOT? Colon Hydrotherapy (Colonics If you are eating the right foods, you will haveb owel movements with ease and avoid constipation. But i f you feel stalled this m ay be a sign that the body is in much need of a colonic a procedure, that d rains fecal compounds in the colon. A high fiber diet is reco mmended for regular p asses, working in whole grains like oatmeal, brown rice, whole grain cereals,f ruits and vegetables, sweet potatoes, and plantains in your meal plans. Eating fruits instead of drinking fruit juice also helps people to stay regular. Limit the eating of convenience foods, or quick fix p asteurised meals that c ome in a box. Drinking p lenty of water, and exercising at least three to five times a day is also useful. When somebody has a diet that is highly refined, they generally have a low f iber diet of convenience foods. Julia Lee, RD MS, dietitian at Doctors Hospital REGULAR STEPS TO BECOMING THE TIGER claw flowers are stunning b ut last for all too brief a period.

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H AVEyou ever questioned w hether your internal central heati ng switch has suddenly been turned on? You may have even wondered if you were coming down with a fever, or some other ailment. One thing you knew for certain was thaty ou desperately wanted to shed s ome clothing. The trickle of perspiration running down your cleavage was not only distracting but potentially embarrassing. It may even have got to the point that your head felt like a pressure cooker and you had visions of steam coming outo f your ears. Could it be possible that the air-condition had stopped working? If this all sounds familiar then you are officially a member of the 'Menopause Club.' Members include women just before, during and after menses has discontinued.T he process can last anywhere from 5-15 years and the average age is 52 years. Some women have a gradual onset of symptoms and declare afterwards Was that it? Othersa re hit with a lightning bolt and are s topped in their tracks. If we take the time to check hormone levels, for those unfortunates, we note a sharp plummet, rather than a gradual decline. No wonder they feel as i f they have stepped off a cliff i nstead of taking the slow, winding path. H ot flushes and flashes are often the first sign that our old friend, estrogen, has decided to withdraw itself. If it were the only disruption t o our lives, then perhaps we could t olerate 'the change'. Unfortunately, for a lot of women tagged along with the day time heat are night sweats and palpitations. A racing heart rate accompanied by night-m ares is not only scary, but worris ome. I s it really so surprising that we are cranky and irritable during the day? We feel fragile, out of sorts, and many of us feel as if we have entered the 'twilight zone' as ourm emory and concentration evade u s. T he list of insidious symptoms grows longer as it affects our emotional state of mind. Anxiety, depression, and unhappiness, are often accompanied with generalw eakness, and tearfulness. If we are u nable to see what is happening, then it is even more important for our loved ones to pay attention. Feelings of isolation, hopelessness a nd lack of support fuel suicidal t houghts and professional help is definitely indicated. When we are told our life expectancy is extended and that one t hird or even half our life could be s pent in post menopause, it makes us sit up and think. Are we paying enough attention to our general health and lifestyle? If not, then it is the perfect time to start because loseo f estrogen can affect our heart, chol esterol, bone density, and weight. S ome medical professionals, view menopause as another endocrine disorder and treat it accordingly. The list of signs and symptoms are as important as other endocrine -d eficiency disorders, such as diab etes, and yet it still does not seem t o get sufficient attention. Is it because of the emotional symptoms that could be considered subjective? We only have to look at how medical insurance companies reimbursee motional versus physical comp laints to know that they are considered less important. There seem to be three approaches to dealing with this new period, in o ur life. We can let Mother Nature s et her course, and just deal with what ever comes along or we could treat each problem as they reveal themselves with the appropriate m edication. Or, we could choose to r eplace the missing hormones, maintain our health, and in particular our sexual health. Whichever path we choose will require personal research and an understanding ofo ur individual views on life. F or all the men reading this artic le, you may have already thought about life with a post menopausal woman. Have you discussed it with her and are you both going to follow the same path? The Internet haso pened the door to information; h owever we still need to push for a n increase in research. We need to be our own advocate because our future is in our hands. Listen to Love on the Rock' w ith M aggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on Island FM 102.9 For appointments: call 364 7230,email relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com IF YOU are in your mid dle years or beyond, you would have had decades of walking, jogging and standing which can leave their mark on your feet. It all boils down to that one word aging Aging brings many changes to your feet! Some changes are normal such as losing the fat padding in your feet thus making the skin thinner or changes in the shape of your feet but having pain is not one of them. Thinner Skin: The plantar (bottom of foot) fat pads protect the bones, nerves and blood ves sels of the foot by absorbing and dissipating energy from impact and shearing forces when you walk and run. Moreover, those smooth, hard man-made surfaces (paved and concrete surfaces) significantly increase the impact and shearing forces on the fat pads, causing them to degen erate even faster. Effects: The long term effects of fat pads deterioration leaves you with the bony prominences crying for cover. These bony prominences no longer have their protective pads and so it is your responsibility to seek the correct cover to protect the bones, nerves and blood vessels of the foot. You may ask what happens if I don't have the protective pads? Well, you will be vulnerable to foot injuries and pain which can eventually lead to immo bility. Shape: The shape of the foot may change with fallen or col lapsed arches. This happens as ligaments become more slack. As a result the foot flat tens and is made wider and longer demanding larger and more supportive footwear. While this can occur with age, it is also possible with weight gain. Effects: Fallen or collapsed arches cause a lot of problems in addition to tremendous pain along the plantar (bottom of foot) area of the foot which is commonly referred to as plan tar fasciitis This affects your entire body alignment, knees, back and neck. Always be mindful that you feet are the foundation of your entire body and should be functional for life. Skin: As blood circulation to your feet decreases with age you will experience drier skin. Cracks and blisters can also develop and may not heal as quickly due to poor circula tion in the feet. Effects: Being fully aware to the body's circulatory system and how it is designed to work. Poor circulation in your feet can lead to a multitude of problems and in some instances may prove to be fatal. Suggestions: I suggest that you seek preventative care with the proper footwear, correct foot devices and the appropriate footwear accessories. You may move beyond the tradi tional style footwear and go revolutionary with a rockersoled shoe to enhance your exercise program and add a little pep to your step. For example, the 'Easy Tone' and the 'Chung Shi' line of footwear have been scientifi cally designed as dynamic workout tools. Their unique 'rocker sole' design to increase circulation, improve posture and strengthen joints. This type of footwear will def initely rock your world by its design to reduce the stress on the joints. The use of a well made sock (e.g. Thorlos or Balega that is padded in the forefoot and the heel area is also very important to the health and function of the foot. There are many other foot health products that you would find by visiting a specialty footwear facility, but most essential it is important to recognise that your feet are changing with age and require some tender loving care to support you for life. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified & licensed Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327FEET,www.footsolutions.com/ Nassau "The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. W OMEN & SEX FOOT SOLUTIONS C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Feet are your support for life! By BERNADETTE GIBSON Menopause B y MAGGIE B AIN B y JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer U NLESS one e xplores every backyard, every swamp, every forested land and every plant h abit at its impossible to see the myriad of fruit trees present in the rich Bahamian soil. I nterestingly enough, if one did explore the countrys many islands they would find plants and fruit trees that they have probably never seen o r heard of similar to the ones discussed in Tribune columnist, Jack Hardys new book Fruits of theB ahamas. The book which was recently released by Gardener Jack holds aw ealth of information about the most popular and rare fruit trees in the Bahamas. This is the perfect book for pers ons interested in growing fruit trees. And whether you wish to purchase fruit trees from local plant nurseries o r grow fruit from seeds, this book is the perfect guide. There are some people who go i nto the plant nurseries to purchase p lants for their gardens. And they might pick up a plant that they dont really know that much about. The n ame tag might be on the plant but they dont have one clue of how to grow the plant. This is where myb ook comes in providing helpful information about the plant, Gardener Jack told Tribune Health. H e said that it is important to research the type of fruit tree one is interested in growing in their yards since fruit trees have diverse growing cultures. There are some plants that may thrive best in swampy areas and others that thrive best in other con ditions, he said. In Fruits of the Bahamas readers are exposed to a diversity of fruit trees, their physical charac teristics and suggestions for grow ing. One example is the loquat, which originated in China and is not well known. There are hundreds of varieties of loquat and they vary widely, so it is wise to buy a recognised variety in order to get a good size and good taste, he explains in his book. The fruit is usually ovoid, contains 3-5 seeds, and can be white, yellow, or orange and a good tree p roduces one of the tastiest treats of the tropics. Unfortunately, fruits areo ften more acid than sweet, and the bearing sea son, in late spring is short. T he fruits are also subject to attack from several insects, notably the Caribbean fruit fly, theb ook stated. Other than the loquat fruit tree, there are other trees the b ook mentioned that might just raise a brow. Gardener Jack said the reas on why these particular fruit t rees may be unfamiliar to some is because they are not in abundance when compared t o fruit trees like jujube, tamarind mango, or guinep. During the years of the post w ars some of the fruit trees were brought to the Bahamas by foreigners. For instance thes tar fruit is not in abundance and was brought here by foreigners as well, he explained. In the near future Gardener Jack intends to release a new book entitled A Year With Gardener Jack.. Everything that I have ever talk about concerning gardening and vegetables will be included in this book, he said. Jack Hardy is a retired teacher and has been gardening since 1968. Everything he has ever learnt about gardening is by experience and collecting information from other experts and different books. Fruits of the Bahamas is available at the Fox Hill Plant Nursery. It is also available in Marsh Harbour, Abaco. Fruits of the Bahamas

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N EWS FROM JAPAN C M Y K C M Y K W OMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM J apanese Toilets This is basically a hole in the floor where you have to stoop to do what you have todo. For months I have hated them and have tried to avoid t hem as much as possible b ecause if youre not use to it, it can be quite tricky. It wasn't until I went to Kyoto and used a public toilette that I had an epiphany. The bathroom stalls w eren't able to close properl y so I happened to walk by a stall where a lady had finishing using the bathroom and I saw inside her stall. It was like a bolt of lightening and I realised that I've been usingt he toilette backwards for the l ast 8 months! I t made so much more s ense. I guess if youre used t o going one way for the past 2 0 years of your life you w ould never think to turn around. So now I am no l onger afraid when I go to p ublic bathroom. They really should have an instruction m anual at the front of the bathroom in English for foreigners. Sankambi A dreaded word for foreign staff. My school is the m ost expensive in my pref ecture / area (about $500$700) a month. So once every few months we have sankambi where the parents come to w atch your lesson. It's a real p ain and I don't really like it because they make us pract ice the same lesson for weeks so the kids know what t hey are supposed to do. It i s more a performance than a n actual lesson but I guess if you pay that amount of money a month you want to make sure that it is perfect. However some things you can'tp repare for. O ne of my colleagues was ten seconds into her lesson when two kids had a fist fighta Mike Tyson / Evand er Hollyfield type situation. T he teachers had to pull them apart. We have no idea how it started or why, buty ou can't really predict what kids will do on the day. D uring my lesson, I had K 3 and maybe 1 minute into it one of the kids decides to take off his shoes and socks strips off his pants and lays on the ground and didn't want to get up or put back on his clothes. His sensei( teacher) and I had to dress him quickly. I'm like Koichi why today of all days? His answer was it was hot. I was like, ok but next time can you do that when your pare nts aren't here watching m e. Activities Activities A gain with this being the most expensive school in this prefecture there is always s omething going on and s omething that you have to organise in addition to your daily duties. After a long vacation, stuff just keeps coming up. The school is very big on advertising and keepi ng parents / customers happ y. After vacation it was sankambi, then sports day, then trial lesson (when random people bring their kids to the school and you givet hem kind of a tour and you s how them what you can teach their kids), a trip to the zoo, the K5 out of town school trip, then a Halloween parade in the center of town, open lesson which is kind ofl ike trial lesson and the list g oes on and on. You barely h ave time to catch your b reath from one thing and t hey are already talking about w hat you are going to do for t he next thing. I never in my life thought that I would be w orking overtime at a school. I just got off the bus from the K5 school trip and only w ent in the office to check my messages when they were like we have a meeting in 5 minutes about Seiko's festival that is happening in two w eeks. I'm like geez can I have five minutes after hav i ng spent two days with 54 f ive year olds? That's how they are though. They were already talking about the Christmas concert and we w ere still drafting up our prog ram for the Halloween event. You definitely have t o be on your toes here. Here are some brief highlights f rom some of these activities. SPORTS DAY We practiced e very day for like 2 weeks. Running, bowing, dancing, marching, it was crazy! I mean who practices for sports day? However the K5m arching band was really s omething else though. It's hard to believe that these kids are only 5 years old. Every beat, every march was totally on time. They asked me to run for p arents against staff relay r ace. I was like me? Run??? You have to be crazy. Just because I am black and from the Caribbean does not mean that I can run. They s ettled for me being a commentator after I strongly protested. K5 SCHOOL TRIP You know t hose big school groups that you see in Disneyland and t he teachers that look like they going crazy? Well that was me for two days. Japan-e se children already all look a like so when you mix them up with another couple hundred kids it is possible for you to loose your mind. T hank God for uniforms and color coordinated hats if n ot I might have brought the wrong kids back. The kids were given 10 dollars in the souvenir shop and were told that they c ould buy whatever they w anted. Now when you give k ids money and tell them they can buy what ever they want some have the tendenc y to go a little crazy. Taiyo Kun (see newsletter 5 brought me like 50 dollars worth of stuff and only had $10. I was like dude you have to put half these things b ack. It took about twenty m inutes for him to decide what he wanted to put back. Another little boy only bought a dollar worth of candy. I told him that you can buy more stuff. He wasl ike he wanted to save it for l ater. I'm like whoa this is a potential banker right here. HALLOWEEN So cute to see about 120 kids dressed up for Halloween. You had everything from traditional w itches and pumpkins to beautiful little princesses and even a little footballer. Iw ent dressed as a panda, even made my own costume. A black and white apron w ith a tail and little pandas a ll over the apron. Who knew that I could be cre ative!! If I could learn how t o cook there might be some hope for me yet. On a side note there was af oreigner Halloween party t hat night in Tokushima. I wore my gold leotard junkanoo outfit. I already g et stares when I walk down the street wearing jeans and a t-shirt, so imagine wearing t hat and a feathered skirt and walking the streets of Japan!! Bus duty and Hayato Kun Every other morning we have bus duty where we go to t he kids houses and pick them up on the bus. On my bus route we have really cool kids so we talk and they learn English and I learn Japanese. However, there is one fool o f a bus driver that always t ells us to be quiet when we don't make that much noise (there are only 3 kids on the bus and myself). But I told him no I am here to interact with the kids and he is ak indergarten bus driver so f or him to expect complete quiet is rather silly. So we don't like each other. He tries to get even by having the music up really loud in the bus before we go to picku p the kids. I m like this man don't k now that doesn't bother me. I n the Bahamas we don't c atch a bus unless it lickin', so I am thinking the louder the b etter. So now we just say "hello" and "goodbye" to e ach other. H ayato Kun is one of the kids on the bus very smart h andsome little boy who always wants to talk. I've known him since last year and we get along great. The other day he came on the bus a nd said "Coffi Sensei face black why?" I guess he fig u red since summer was over w hy do I still have my tan. I almost fell out of my chair from laughing so hard. So I'm like how do I explain r ace to a 5 year old Japanese b oy. So I just said mother and father face black. So my f ace is black too. That answer seemed to satisfy him. AJapanese epiphany By COFFI M C PHEE

PAGE 16

C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer T RIBUNE W o man has been on a q uest t o unco ver the true definition of the word sexy and as would be e xpect ed, the meaning changes between men and women. Last week Tribune Woman asked a few men w hat is it they found engaging about a womantheir responses included superficial and beyond the surface answers. This week we wanted to know what it is about a man that makes a womans eye twinkle, and stomach flutter. And after speaking to these women a mutual opinion shared by them is that -sexy is what sexy thinks! Confidence is everything, said Ava Turnquest w ho said this tells much more about how a man feels about himself. A guy that is sure of himself grabs my attention. N ot when he is over confident or cocky by the way. Its just that when a man is sure of himself it means that nothing that anyone says to him matters. She added that a man who is goal oriented and has an idea of where his life is headed is a good catch. What I also find very sexy is a man who does not only know what he wants in a woman, but knows what he wants in life, she told Tribune Woman. From yester years women have been taught to seek a mate that is goal oriented, will take the lead, fulfilling his divine role as the sole provider and bread winner of the home. And although times have changed, this criteria hasnt. A man that is desirous for success is probably in every womans blueprint of the perfect man. This particular quality open the eyes and raises the eyebrow for Stacey Rolle* as well. A man that knows what he wants is great, but a man that has the drive and is aggressive enough to follow through is even better, she said. While she finds it very sexy when a guy is aggressive at chasing his dreams, when hes with her he must tame that aggression and turn it into gentleness. He must unlock the key to her heart, surprise her with hugs from behind and other affectionate gestures non-sexual in nature. Looks arent most important to me. What I like is a guy that is nice, sweet, caring and treat me like a princess, this is my definition of sexy, Stacey explained. On the other hand, Alesha Cadet said that a man that is in control is the most enticing thing. To her this is his rightful place. When I say I find a guy sexy that is in control, I dont mean a guy that is abusive or too aggressive. I mean it in the sense that he doesnt beckon to my every call. A guy who allows me to run over him is not going to get me interested, she told Tribune Woman. Apart from the physical attributes one may p ossess another woman Dahlia Graham* said that a man that can resist a woman no matter how beautiful she is will have her knees weak. For instance, if there is a guy who is in a comm itted relationship and there is a very beautiful sexy woman who constantly throws herself at him and he resists her just to honour his commitmentw ith his partner gets ten stars from me. In some odd way I find that very sexy, even a little magnetic, since most people know men are physical a nd the fact that he can defy his nature makes him powerful in my eyes she said. To Lola Cartwright* courtly love is an enchantment in itself. I want to know that chivalry is not d ead with me, Lola said. Unlike men, looks are the least bit important to these women. However, that does not mean a guy w ith an unkempt appearance, makes the cut. These women said a man must be well groomed, and have a ravishing finish to be the definition of sexy. J ennie Hill* told Tribune Woman that a tall, firmly built guy clad in a suit with a cigar protruding from his mouth is hot. This heightens his sex appeal. I dont know if its because it brings out his masculinity but this is very hot to me, Jennie said. The lingering fragrance of the Armani Code or C alvin Klein cologne is enough to get the blood running Jennie said. Wow a man that looks great and smells great is enchanting, she said. A combination of great looks, confidence, ambition, and romance is what these women say makea man sexy. *Names have been changed. Sexy Sexy A womans definition of


m Lhe Tribune

’m lovin’ it

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BAHAMAS EDITION ~~

www.tribune242.com



PLT Te Cee



Volume: 106 No.89

a VA

corrunt officers

Row over public
contracts leads

to investigation

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

alowe@
tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of
accusations from the
PLP that he presided
over “abuse and
‘cronyism” at the
Department of Envi-

ronmental Health to aul’ Manan

the tune of $18 million,

the Minister of the Environ-
ment yesterday revealed that
‘he has found evidence that
“some public officers” did

engage in corrupt practices

within his Ministry.
Environment Minister Earl
‘Deveaux said that a “full and
exhaustive investigation” into
who and what funds may have
~ been abused is now underway
and if evidence is found to
support the allegations, civil





servants will find
themselves in coutt.

His
.came after he and
PLP MP for St
Thomas More Frank
Smith became
embroiled in a parlia-
mentary dispute last
week after Mr Smith
accused the Free
National Movement
government of
awarding public con-
tracts to party “cronies” with-
out tender.

In the morning session of
the mid-year budget debate,

Mr Smith accused the Min-.

istry of the Environment of
spending more than $18 mil-
lion on clean-up programmes
“with no clearly-stated guide-

‘lines, no consistent practice

of newspaper ads inviting ten-

SEE page 11



comments

/Tribune staff

ipé Major,

Fel



>it] D)

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

eS
tS

Ae
| BAHAMAS BIGGEST

Minister tells of

WORK takes place on
Baillou Hill Road yesterday.

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net





A ONE-WAY system
will be implemented in
Baillou Hill Road and
Market Street at the end
of the month to perma-
nently change Nassau’s
traffic flow from north to
south,

Minister of Works
Neko Grant said the
unprecedented changes
to Nassau’s traffic flow
will be implemented as
part of the $120 million
New Providence road
improvement project.

As of Marchi 30, Bail-
lou Hill’ Road will be
one-way northbound and
the parallel Market
Street will be one-way
southbound between

SEE page 11







ite


























Landfill ‘will be
full in five years’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IF THE present “inadequate” garbage man-
agement practices persist, New Providence’s
only sanitary landfill will be unable to accom-
modate anymore waste within five years, the
Minister of the Environment said.

Minister Earl Deveaux made this revelation
yesterday as he announced several measures
being taken by the Government to extend the

‘life of the dump — thereby “buying the gov-

ernment time” to find another site outside of
New Providence — through implementation ‘of
more sustainable waste handling practices.
Among these steps, Dr Deveaux said the
Government soon intends to sign off on a con-
tract for the first time to have a private, proba-

SEE page 11

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Police fly in to Harbour
Island to address crime

By AVA TURNQUEST
aturnquest@tribunemedia.net

RESIDENTS of Harbour Island showed °
determination and solidarity in a town meeting
held Monday by the Royal Bahamas Police Force
and Ministry of Tourism to address the escalat-
ing crime and delinquent behaviour now threat-
ening the island.

More than 100 frustrated islanders had the
full attention of the officials who had flown to
Harbour Island yesterday to hear their com-
plaints. The police presence was intended to ini-
tiate a conversation with residents towards map-
ping out a strategic plan forward to deal with
their fears. :

Despite the raised voices of passionate home-
owners and citizens, the atmosphere of the meet-
ing was one of hope and progress with persons
commending the work of current officers and

SEE page 11













Supermarket owner robbed
at gunpoint in his home

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
MES nC Sen OU eT ee net





SUPER Value owner Rupert Roberts has spo-
ken out about how he and his wife were robbed
at. gunpoint in their home to warn others of the
risk of home invasions in East Nassau.

The 72-year-old business owner said the armed
robber made a silent entry to his home as he
and his wife were getting ready for bed just
before 7.30pm on Wednesday and appeared in
the bedroom “like a ghost.”

The gunman had climbed to an upstairs bal-
cony and quietly kicked in the French double
doors with soft-soled shoes while Mr Roberts
and his wife were changing down the hall.

“He came in like a ghost,” Mr Roberts said.

“He just appeared, materialised there and
said, ‘Where's the cash?"”

SEE page 11




Loan.

Xt tn

EDUCATIONAL LOAN


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

South Abaco developments on the move

|

|; =

nee

Noelle Nicolls/Tribune staff

SCHOONER BAY BEACH, Great Abaco, is the site of several planned developments, including Serenity
Point and Schooner Bay. The beach, over 100-feet wide at points, stretches for five-miles and is
a turtle nesting ground.

IT’S ATIME OF JOY AND SUBLLATION!
I?’S A GRAND TIME
OF PRAISE
































































March 14-21, 2010 - East Street Tabernacle
mum: “RISEN, UPRIGHT,
RESTORED AND READY!”

Psalm 20:8
SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS: Sunday, March 21st, 2010
MINISTER CATHERINE H. PAYNE

The Contention closes with the Annual Pa-
litennational Diver ee wlanien's Min- rade and Water Baptiamal Service at the
ae eee eng ree are, ©Weetern Esplanade, and with the live ZS

tstries from © SA. Radio and the live Television Channel 55

BISHOP JOHN N. HUMES = evening broadcast wervice, During
National Overseer af the Church of God,
Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands &. Rahming will

ice, the National 0 BEET, Bash op Dr. Elgarnet
final message on
BISHOP CLARENCE N, WILLIAMS (7 “ouventon:
Rational Qweraeer of the Turks
BISHOP BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter of the Caribbean and
Atlantic Ocewn Islands.
MINISTERING IN MUSIC WILL BE: The
Convention Praise Tearn, National Con-
vention Choir, Tabernacle Conoert Choir,
the Church of God National Choir, Ba
hamas Public Othcers Choir and various
soloists, choirs and singing proups.
The Bahama Erass Band, Bahama
Youth and Junior Brass Bands will pro-
vide special music.
Monday, March 15th, 2010—
Bishop Or, Elgarnet 6B. Rahming, CMG,
DD, JP, National Overseer and ay
tor Will deliver his Amal Matiogial Ad-
on + March 15th live
ZNS 1540

= a and
LOG pit TO: mre
Wa. co sauoen evipare ca org
FOR LIVE EWERING 4

Bring foe billy an db

me ia eel eee

eveland, Tenneasesc

this serv-

& Caicos Inland

e bless ed!



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

GREAT Abaco’s south side
is primed for a major economic
boost with groundbreaking on
two beach-side sister develop-
ments on the five-mile long
Schooner Bay Beach, Abaco.

At Saturday’s launch of
Serenity Point, a planned 40-
acre gated residential commu-
nity, potential investors, real
estate agents and Abaconians
gathered for a visual simulation
of the high-end development.

“When you have a beach like
this that runs for miles, any real
estate agent who brings an
investor, the first thing an
investor will do is look toward
the street.

“Where is the electricity? It is
there. Where is the fiber optic
cable? It is there. Better than
that: 26-miles south of Marsh
Harbour my cell phone is work-
ing,” said Alexis Nihon I, pres-
ident of Anco Lands Ltd, the
development company.

Serenity Point is comprised
of 24 beach front lots, hilltop
sites and elevated estates rang-
ing from 20,000 to 72,000
square feet. The starting bid is
$550,000 for select lots, with
prices extending into six digits,
according to Gustaf Hernqvist,
Senior Sales and Marketing
Director. Ninety per cent of the
infrastructure is already in place
at the project site.

Based on the environmental
impact assessment conducted
on the development, of prima-
ry concern is the integrity of
the unbroken stretch of beach,
extending five-miles. This beach
is a prime turtle nesting ground,
according to Eric Carey,
Bahamas National Trust presi-
dent. “I would have loved if
they had not taken out all of
the trees. I spoke to Gustaf and
he indicated they had a lot of
hurricane damage and they
thought it would have been dif-
ficult to plan their development
and their lots around the vege-
tation they felt was degraded,”
said Mr Carey.

“They have committed to
keeping lights off the beach.
They have also committed to
using as much native vegeta-
tion as possible; taking out the
few casuarinas that are there.
They say they will commit to
keeping the dune intact because
this beach profile is entirely
dependent on this dune being
intact,” he said, also noting the



Noelle Nicolls/Tribune staff

THE SITE of the planned 40-acre gated community, Serenity
Point, on Schooner Bay Beach, Great Abaco.



INTERNATIONAL real estate
developer Alex Nihon II describes
his latest venture, Serenity Point,
Great Abaco.

Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission is responsible for ensur-
ing these commitments are met.

Village

The same commitments were
secured from the neighbouring
Schooner Bay development,
according to Mr Carey.
Schooner Bay is a planned self-
sustaining village set on 220-
acres of land. Unlike Serenity
Point, which is a gated commu-
nity, Schooner Bay is open, and
most concerned about its objec-
tive to “meld indigenous design
concepts with modern environ-
mental sensibility.”

More than half of the land is
being preserved as green space,
including a large section of
native Coppice forest.

Schooner Bay will feature a
farmer’s market, grocery story,
medical clinic, grade school and
other public facilities, which will
also service the Serenity Point
community. Based on environ-
mental models of Schooner
Bay, one environmental impact
will be the shifting contour of
the beach, according to James
Rees, Sales Manager.

This will result from plans,

already in play, for a harbour to
be cut out of the land. The cut
is located at the most southern
tip of Schooner Beach.

“From what (the main envi-
ronmental consultant, coastal
engineer Keith Bishop) showed
us from modeling, there may
be some shifting in the general
area of the opening, but gen-
erally the beach profile should
not be changed. So it is still a
wait and see game. There are
going to be some changes right
after that some people will
react to,” said Mr Carey.

“They appear committed. I
mean they are selling the fact
that they have this incredible
more than 100-foot wide beach.
They are going to sell some lots
and they want to continue sell-
ing lots, so if the beach is
degraded then obviously they
won’t be able to do that.

“We get some degree of con-
fidence that they don’t want to
destroy the very thing they are
selling,” he said.

Both projects have one major
element in common. They are
fully self-financed by private
investors, as they say: “No
banks involved.” As a result,
Mr Nihon II said, “They won’t
go under, they won’t shut
down.”

The Nihon family originated
in Liége, Belgium and migrated
to Montreal, Canada. They
have owned large tracks of land
in Abaco since the 1960s.
Asked about the timing of the
development, Mr Nihon II said:
“Well it is simple. I returned to
the Bahamas two years ago.

“T am here, I am an island
boy living under a coconut tree.
We have a wonderful team, so
we are going to gradually grow.
It is going to take time, so
watch what will happen in the
next two or three years.”

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TODAY the leadership team
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Church will meet at Odyssey
Aviation at 11.30am to official-
ly end the first phase of the
church’s response to the earth-
quake devastation in Haiti.

Within 36 hours of the earth-
quake on January 12, the
BCMC had two airplanes on
the ground in Haiti, delivering
emergency supplies and food
through its disaster relief
agency, Methodist Habitat.

“Tn all, we have accom-
plished much,” said a
spokesman.

¢ 400 flights made;

¢ 3,200 flight hours accom-
plished;

¢ 120 volunteer pilots
involved;

e¢ 250,000 plus pounds of
supplies carried;

¢ 100 plus passengers car-
ried into Haiti (medical teams);
and

¢ 176 plus passengers car-
ried out of Haiti (missionaries
stranded throughout Haiti
when the airports closed down
and commercial airlines
stopped flying).

¢ Six countries were repre-
sented — Bahamas, Canada,
Dominican Republic, Haiti,
Turks and Caicos, and the
USA.





e 32 US states were repre-
sented;

¢ Seven airports in Haiti
served: Cap Haitien, Jacmel,
Jeremie, La Gonave, Les
Cayes, Port-au-Prince, and
Pignon.

¢ Lives in Haiti impacted:
Countless.

The Bahamas Methodist
Conference will make a formal
presentation to Odyssey Avia-
tion tomorrow to acknowledge
the company’s partnership, hos-
pitality and generosity in allow-
ing Methodist Habitat to use
its facilities as the base of its
Haiti Aviation Operation.

The BCMC will continue its
partnership with Rotary
Bahamas and other civic organ-
isations to charter a cargo ship
to Haiti and to also use its
resources to send work teams
and construction material to
help in the rebuilding phase of
the Haitian communities.

“We thank God for the
divine favour, guidance and
protection given to the
Methodist Habitat ministry
throughout this massive under-
taking,” said the spokesman.
“May God continue to bless
our work — may God continue
to bless the people of Haiti.”

e 18th homicide victim identified
THE man who was shot and killed in Fox Hill last Thursday
night has been identified as 27-year-old Jean—Robert St Jean of

Reeves Street.

The victim, nicknamed “Black”, became the country’s 18th
homicide when he was shot in the area known as “The Bend”.

According to residents, he had borrowed a bicycle to go to
make a purchase in Wright Lane when he was killed.

e Rupert Dean Lane resident shot and injured

A resident of Rupert Dean Lane was shot and injured while
in his home at around 4.17am yesterday.

The 34-year-old man was shot in the right arm and was taken
to hospital by emergency medical personnel where he was treat-
ed and later discharged. Police are investigating.

e Man robbed at knife point

A MAN was robbed at knife point on Sunday while on
Hampton Street off Mount Royal Avenue.

The armed robbery victim was approached by two unknown
men at around 7.20pm. The culprits robbed the man of his jew-

ellery and fled the area on foot.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE




By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A MAN who had been
wanted by police was
arraigned on a murder charge
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Kevano Musgrove, 24, of
Halsmere Road, Highbury
Park, appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez yes-
terday charged with the Feb-
ruary 25 murder of David
Bowleg. :

US firm’s contract award could affect jobs

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 100 Department
of Environmental Health
employees could see their jobs
affected by the government’s
decision to contract a private
American comnpany to manage
the city dump.

Meanwhile, as many as 30 peo-
ple who currently make their liv-
ing by “scavenging” for poten-
tially valuable items at the landfill
off Tonique Williams-Darling
highway may soon find them-
selves employed by the same
company to do the informal
“sorting” that they currently do
on a daily basis.

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux yesterday revealed

that the government is negotiat-
ing with a private company which

.will soon take over responsibility

for solid waste management at
the dump from the Department.

Under this contract, there will
be a “separation of the staff,
equipment and fleet of the
Department of Environmental
Health to the private company,”
said Dr Deveaux.

It is expected that a number
of people currently employed by
the Department of Environmen-
tal Health to “collect and dispose
of” landfill will be reviewed for
employment by the private com-
pany, but not all.

Exactly how soon this will take
place is not known for certain at
present. The terms of. the con-
tract are currently under-negoti-
ation, however, Dr Deveaux sug-

Accountant defends himself
from Opposition allegations

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ACCOUNTANT Reece Chipman last night
defended his integrity in the wake of stinging |
allegations from the Opposition who have |
accused him of a conflict of interest and obtain-
ing a government contract through "cronyism".

Mr Chipman hit back at the Progressive Lib-
eral Party for spreading "deceit" and "mis-
leading comments" about his business prac-
tices. while hinting that he may sue over any
further character defamation.

Mr Chipman, along with chairman of the Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation Kenyatta Gibson, has been at the centre of a-firestorm
of controversy over a $152,000 contract awarded to his firm Catsan
and Chipman Ltd - to audit the BMC last year.

PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts has repeatedly questioned why
Catsan and Chipman was awarded the contract, since other "rep-
utable" firms responded to the BMC's tender process with lower
bids. On Sunday, Mr. Roberts also accused both Mr Gibson and Mr
Chipman of "colluding to milk the tax-payer}’ because they had
partnered in a wheelchair rental company several years ago. .

During his first public comments on the matter, Mr Chipman
claimed he is no longer a business partner of Kenyatta Gibson,
explaining that their business relationship was severed several
years ago. He added that the defunct state of his business rela-
tionship should be clear tothe PLP, telling the media that the
attorney who handled their business dealings is wife of St Thomas
More MP Frank Smith.

"T do not see it as a conflict of interest. At one point in time there
was a business established by Mr Gibson that I assisted him with,
as a result we became partners. The business ceased around 2005.
Since that time Mr Gibson and I were pretty much estranged.
Then I submitted a bid to the BMC. When I submitted the bid to
the (BMC) it was then that I realised that he was the chairperson,"
he said, adding that he did not think his previous relationship
with Mr Gibson played in his favour during the tendering process.

When asked why he thought his firm, the highest bidder, was
awarded the contract he said it was because he offered a compre-
hensive bid. au

He also denied other claims put forth by Mr Roberts, who
recently said that Mr Chipman was awarded several cleaning con-
tracts by the Department of Environmental Health.

‘"I do not have any contracts with the Department of Environ-
mental Health. There are persons that have contracts with the
department - they are not me - but I am aware of who those per-
sons might be," said Mr Chipman, the unsuccessful FNM candidate
for the Sea Breeze constituency in the 2007 election.

"The idea is to help to provide employment for persons, espe-
cially persons in the area of St Thomas More. One individual that
I would be familiar with was given a contract to do such and has
employed three to four individuals to assist them but it is not my
contract with the department.”

iCal VPN



Former educator
and World War II
| veteran Ruth

|| Clarke-Goodridge
BEM died at her
residence on
Tuesday, March
2nd, 2010.









gested that the company could
take over within the fiscal year

‘of 2010, which starts in June of

this year.

Dr Deveaux said: “We have a
profile of those people - some
are near retiring, some are just
starting, they have some skills.
All of those people will be the
first interviewed by the company
and there will be a selection
process.

“Once that is done, the
Department still has its inspec-
torate that goes around inspect-
ing restaurants, hotels, public
facilities.

“Some will be diverted there,
some will be retired, some will
be made redundant but a process
will unfold that will end up with
(the company) selecting team
members to collect, sort, handle
and dispose of the waste.

The government’s move to
contract a private company to
take over responsibility for the

dump follows the recent fires at

the site which choked parts of
New Providence with toxic
smoke and is a part of its plan to
ensure better management prac-
tices at the landfill going forward.

The overall aim is to cut down
in the amount of garbage that
ultimately ends up being stock-
piled at the dump - increasing the
quantity of rubbish that is recy-
cled, sold or burnt in a planned
waste-to-energy facility - as a
means of expanding the life span
of the dump and minimising the
chance of further major fires (see
story on page one).









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Speaking of the “scavengers”,
Dr Deveaux said: “Just in a casu-

al.visit to the dump on Saturday I

counted 37 people sitting around
sorting garbage.

“When I inquired who they
were, and I.was advised 10 of
them had permits. So there’s a
group that are fairly constant and
a group that come and go.

“The company (Cambridge

Project Development Inc, the’

front runner to obtain the solid
waste management contract) has
interviewed them and they have
indicated they would definitely
be interested in the opportunity.

“It’s a win-win situation for
(the scavengers). They’d have
permission to be there, they’d be
given an arrangement where the
garbage they are sorting would
be properly sorted on a conveyor
belt, they would be paid an
agreed sum for their work and
they would also have permission
to use some of the matérial they
extract for their use - to do what
they are doing now,” said Dr
Deveaux.

“Meanwhile, the Minister of
Environment added that gov-
ernment is also considering the
possibility that a direct charge for
garbage collection may be levied
to help supplement the funding
for better management of

‘garbage at the dump, and that

the sorting of waste could even
begin at the individual household
level, meaning that people will
have to begin to take more
responsibility for what they throw
away.

+ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF TAB:

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 3

EE
Ci aaa eee eee
| NOMS e ccm BIinKioem Cia
Pca RU Monier eu) wir TiC CU



Mr Bowleg, 34, was found
shot to death in the back seat
of a champagne-coloured car
in the area of Holiday Drive,
South Beach. last Thursday.

Musgrove was not required
to enter a plea to the murder
charge.

Jerad Holmes, 27, of Lon-
don Avenue, was. also
arraigned in court yesterday,
charged with abetment to Mr
Bowleg’s murder. ~

Holmes was not required
to enter a’ plea to the charge.

Musgrove’s mother Mary
Chin Neely, 53, was also
arraigned yesterday, accused
of being an accessory after
the fact. Court dockets state
that Neely, knowing that her
son had been a party to the
offence of murder, assisted
him for the purpose of avoid-
ing the due process of the
law.

Attorney Mary Bain, who
appeared on behalf of
Holmes yesterday, submitted
that her client had no previ-
ous convictions, was self










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employed and had fully co- °
operated with police in their

_investigations.

She furthér submitted that
there is no reference to the
offence of abetment to mur-
der in the Bail Act and that
the court has the discretion
to grant bail. Bain also
claimed that her client had
not been picked out in an
identification parade.

Attorney Krysta Smith,
who appeared on behalf of
Neely, told the court that her
client — a mother of five — was
recently divorced and would
be pushed into extreme finan-
cial hardship if she was,
denied bail. Smith said she
was traumatised by what had
transpired over the past
week.

Musgrove and Holmes

-were remanded in custody.

Neely, however, was granted
bail in the sum of $10,000
with one surety.

The case was adjourned to
March 12 and transferred to
Court 10, Nassau Street.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

O.B.E., K.M.,'K.C.S.G.,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
_ Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



For Obama, Iraq elections are good news

WASHINGTON — Consumed by

domestic battles over health care and the .

ravaged economy, President Barack Oba-
ma had nearly fallen silent on foreign policy
— until Sunday, when several things began
breaking his way. First among them: the
Iraq election.

Insurgent:attacks on polling stations killed
at least 36 péople even with extraordinary
security measures in place, including clo-
sure of the country's borders and the Bagh-
dad international airport. But American offi-
cials and Iraqis had feared far worse.

The president has seen a paucity of good ~

news from overseas, and when he appeared
in the White House Rose Garden to con-
gratulate Iraqis on the big turnout in the
face of violence, Obama seemed relieved.

The day had passed without an explo-
sion of bloodshed that has marked a war in
which tens of thousands of Iraqis died and

. more than 4,300 Americans have lost their
lives. “Today's voting makes it clear that
the future of Iraq belongs to the people of
Iraq," the president said.

Success in the elections moves the Unit-
ed States a step closer to its pledge of pulling
combat troops out of Iraq by August 31 and-
to withdrawing the remaining 50,000-strong
security force by the endofthe year.

The successful vote was a notch in Oba-
ma's political belt as well, given that he cam-
paigned for the White House vowing to end

the conflict and refocus on the war in

Afghanistan. °

Also Sunday and after months of frus.
tration, Palestinians said they were ready
for indirect negotiations with Israel. Oba-
ma had put a resumption of peace talks at
the top of his foreign policy agenda but was
repeatedly foiled by Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu's refusal to pledge an
end to settlement-building in the West Bank
and east Jerusalem. The Palestinians want
that land for a future state.

The United States will act as mediator for
the indirect talks, with Vice President Joe
Biden attending meetings in the region this
week. Former Sen. George Mitchell, Oba-
ma's special Mideast envoy, also is returning
to facilitate the process.

There was good news as well in
Afghanistan, where provincial officials said
as many as 100 members of the powerful
Hezb-e-Islami militia, loyal to regional war-
lord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, were joining
forces with U.S.-backed Afghan security
forces in the battle against Taliban fighters.

And in Pakistan, the authorities, in a
seeming break from their policy of allow-
ing refuge to key Afghan Taliban and al-

Qaida members, have captured several lead-
ers of those organizations over the past sev-
eral weeks.

But many of the most daunting foreign
policy challenges that faced Obama a year
ago still fester.

That will leave the foreign policy estab- °

lishment working feverishly. Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton likely will
continue her relentless travel. Envoys like
Mitchell will need to continue shuttling as
Obama strives to save his domestic agenda.

The most daunting foreign policy issue:
Iran. Tehran is believed to have hastened
attempts to build a nuclear bomb to put atop
a missile. While Iran asserts it is only trying
to build reactors for electricity generation, a

new report from the U.N. nuclear watch-

dog agency to the contrary has deepened
concerns in the United States and Europe.

The U.S. and its allies are preparing for a
new push in the United Nations for a fourth
round of sanctions on Iran. The Russians
appear ready to join the effort. But China,
which holds a veto, still can block sanctions
in the Security Council. So far, it appears
the best Obama can hope for is a Chinese
abstention.

China is increasingly emboldened on the
world stage, given its growing global eco-
nomic muscle. It also is deeply at odds with
the United States over recent arms sales to
Taiwan — which the Chinese claim is part of
their territory. Beijing was further angered
by Obama's meeting with the Dalai Lama,
the Tibetan spiritual leader China accuses of
separatist ambitions for the Himalayan
region controlled by Beijing.

Russia is believed’ to be balking in nego-
tiations on an arms control treaty to replace
the START pact that expired in December.
It appears that reported plans for a U.S.
missile shield have snarled the talks.

There had been significant progress on a
replacement treaty, particularly after Obama
announced he would forgo building the mis-
sile shield in the Czech Republic and Poland.
But word that it might be shifted to Romania
and Bulgaria appears to have caught the
Russians off guard.

Global and American political realities
have stunted Obama's ambitious interna-
tional agenda of a year ago. His focus on
foreign policy — he made nine foreign jour-
neys in 2009 — has been sharply curtailed so
far, so-much so that he will first venture
abroad this year when he travels to Asia lat-
er this month.

(This article was written by Steven R.
Hurst of the Associated Press).



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McCartney’s
resignation an
occasion to learn
about the system

EDITOR, The Tribune

The resignation of Minister
of State Branville McCartney
may be the occasion for some
of us to learn something about
the political “system” which
Mr. McCartney says is going in
the wrong direction.

Perhaps Mr. McCartney,
instead of learning about the
parliamentary democracy and
cabinet government in which
he was expected to function,
was in fact listening to the igno-
rant comments of the chronic
callers to the radio talk shows

and their equally ill-informed |

hosts.

These people listen to the
talking heads on American
news/entertainment shows, pick
up some buzz words and phras-
es which they think invest them
with real knowledge. Then they
proceed to pontificate as to how
we can benefit from doing it
the American way.

It's a peculiar state of mind
which is, unfortunately, shared
by some other people who
ought to know better but who
believe that everything is better
in America and that what is
Bahamian is necessarily inferi-
or.

It's bad enough when our
young men imitate the low end
of American culture by wearing
their trousers down around
their backsides and forget their
Bahamian manners. It’s worse
when intelligent people fall into
this trap.

For instance, when the Clico
crisis came about, one promi-

nent, educated and respected.

religious leader said something

to the effect that “if-this was in -
‘the United States somebody

would have gone to jail.”

Dues

letters@tribunemedia.net




Incredibly, this was in the

_ midst of the banking crisis in

the US which brought the

world to its economic knees:

because of greed and regulato-

ry failure. Nobody went to jail. .

In fact, those most responsible
are still pulling down their mul-
ti-million dollar bonuses.

I believe that our financial
services sector is better regu-
lated than that of the US. I
believe that we do elections
better than the Americans. I
also believe, as Eugene Dupuch
used to say, that our Constitu-
tion is in some respects better
than that of the US.

Just take a look at what is
happening in the US right now.
A popularly elected President

with a majority in both the Sen- .

ate and the House of Repre-
sentatives can't get passed the
health insurance reform that
was a major commitment of his
campaign and that the majority
of Americans and the Congress
want.

Individual Senators can
wreak havoc. with presidential
appointments and hold up oth-
er measures important to mil-
lions of Americans. And you,
Madam Editor, just the other
day commented on that provi-
sion in the US Constitution
which gives its citizens the right
to bear arms, the only such in a
modern democracy.

The truth is that we are for-
tunate to have inherited a won-
derful parliamentary democra-
cy which is the envy of many,
the fundamentals of which were

arrived at not by the whim of a
few but by the experience of
many over the centuries.

It's time those responsible
for shaping public opinion learn

‘about the system and how it

works and teach our young
people to take pride in this
important element of our
national heritage — our proud
parliamentary democracy..

For one:thing, discipline is _
important in our parliamentary
democracy if any political party
is to successfully carry out the
platform upon which it was
elected. Having individual Min-
isters going off in different
directions simply results in
chaos and confusion.

That is why we have Cabinet
government, party discipline
and collective responsibility.
And in’ our two-party arrarige-
ment only one party and one
prime minister can govern at a
time. As Benjamin Disraeli said
about parliament, “party is
inherent in it, is bone of its
bone, and breath of its breath.”

Bahamians-~understand this
better than some would give
them credit for. They have
assimilated this political culture
for generations through their
lodges, burial societies and oth-
er organizations. They know
that only one set of officers and
one leader can govern at a time
and that there must be disci-
pline amongst them.

Never mind the egocentrics,
grandstanders and demagogues.
As our own Carlton Francis put
it many years ago: “Never mind
the shooting star! Keep your

_eyes on the fixed star!”

TEACHER a
Nassau,
March 7, 2010

What is the Bahamas Pelagic Aquaculture
Tuna Programme’s stance on long line fishing?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thank you for your March
3rd article on the subject of
Paul and David Mellor’s pro-
posed plans to harvest yellow
fin tuna using purse seine
nets. It is the first I have seen
providing feedback from the
Mellors and I hope to see con-
tinued coverage on this issue
as it develops.

I am writing now to direct
the following important ques-
tion to Messrs Mellor, to
which I hope they will
respond promptly and with-
out prevarication:

What -is the Bahamas
Pelagic Aquaculture Tuna
Programme’s stance on long
line fishing and how does it
correlate with your stance on
purse seine netting? There

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engincers

have been assertions that
purse seine netting is at. least
equally detrimental as long
line fishing, which was out-
lawed in The Bahamas in
1993. So, I would like to
understand what has con-
vinced you that this type of
fishing is appropriate in

Bahamian waters, when our
government has already
decided that long line fishing
is not, aside from the fact that
it is not illegal at present.

FRANCHESKA SMITH
Nassau,
March, 2010.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

7 ». ’ : , ih , . a = fi

BY Timothy Zuniga-Brown,
US Chargé d’Affaires

Y esterday was Interna-
tional Women’s Day.

This year, it also marked the
15th anniversary of the United Nations Fourth World Con-
ference on Women, held in Beijing.

Fifteen years ago, 189 countries signed on to a Platform for
Action that affirmed the need to work for women’s equality in
access to education, healthcare, jobs, credit, and more.

It stressed the need to have women participate fully in the
economic and political life of their countries, and to protect
women’s right to live free from violence.

It was at this conference that then-First Lady Hillary Rodham
Clinton declared: Human rights are women’s rights, and wom-
en’s rights are human rights.

In the spirit of that conference, the United States has been
working to integrate “women’s issues” into mainstream foreign
policy.

We recognise that it is a human rights issue when mass sex-
ual violence is used as a tool of war in the ongoing conflict in the
Democratic Republic of the Congo.

It is a human rights issue when women are excluded from the
peace negotiations that affect their lives.

And it is a human rights issue when women and girls are held
like chattel by human traffickers and when girls are forced
into child marriages. Women’s rights are human rights, and
women’s issues are human issues. They cut across traditional
spheres of concern, and they are central, not peripheral.

They are international development issues: Study upon study
has shown that aid given to women is reinvested in their com-
munities, and skills-development programmes turn women
into drivers of economic growth.

And they are peace and security issues: When women are tar-
geted in conflicts around the world, societies fray and destabilise;
the places that most exclude women from public life and seek
to constrain their lives are the same in which extremist ideolo-
gy finds a receptive home.

The status of women is a bellwether for the political and
economic health of nations.

Women’s issues are a critical component of the most urgent
transnational problems we face today, and they should be on the
agenda of everyone, men and women, from the grassroots to the
policymaking levels, in political life and beyond.

Violence against women is endemic around the world. End-
ing it requires everyone’s participation, including an active and
vocal role for men and for religious leaders of both sexes.

The United States is supporting programmes around the
globe in order that their voices will be heard.

We laud the Bahamas for proposing legislation to crimi-
nalise marital rape, a significant step towards securing equal
human rights for all. Despite the pledge made in 1995 by so
many countries to end the discrimination that robs the world of
the talent it desperately needs, women are still the majority of
the world’s poor, unhealthy, underfed, and uneducated.

To the silent majority around the globe that supports wom-
en’s equality, we say: The time to translate support into action
is now. We look forward to the time when International Wom-
en’s Day will be an historical and retrospective celebration of
women’s path to the achievement of equality - when every
day belongs equally to women and to men, and every day is a
good day for human rights.



OP-ED

US CHARGE D'AFFAIRES

Women's rights are human rights Call for e

qual pay standards

Senator also argues for anti-sexual discrimination laws

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SENATOR Allyson
Mayard-Gibson has called for
the creation of equal pay stan-
dards and the passage of anti-
sexual discrimination laws to
ensure that qualified women
enjoy the same rights as their
male counterparts.

Speaking yesterday before
the International Women's Day
Symposium, Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son noted several social factors
impeding the progress of
women in the Bahamas.

She said that despite what
many people believe, statistics
show that when a woman and a
man with the same or similar
qualifications apply for the
same job, the man is still more
likely to be chosen.

"This bias ought to be made
illegal in the Bahamas, as it has
been in other jurisdictions, by
passage of a Sex Discrimina-
tion Act," said the senator.

She added that this bias does
not take into account the reali-
ties of Bahamian society, in
which more than 60 per cent of
households are headed by
women.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson also
called for the creation of an
Equal Pay Act, explaining, "sta-
tistics show that even though
women have made significant
progress at the workplace, men
tend to be paid more than
women for performing the
same job."

This too ought to be made
illegal by the passage of an
Equal Pay Act, said the senator,

EB Bs soe
AL LaLa
KAMA

Pee del
LAA) |

God's House of Refuge &
Love Ministries



out of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida









who has been advocating for
both pieces of legislation since
1981.

"As more women than men
head households, why should a
man, who it is assumed is sup-
porting his family be paid more
than a woman, especially when
that assumption is incorrect?
Without the two acts women
are disadvantaged,” she said.

Exams

Aside from discrimination in
the workplace, the rising num-
ber of babies born to teenage
girls, the growing number of
single mothers and increasingly
poor showings on national
exams are all issues impeding
women's progress, said Mrs
Maynard-Gibson.

"More than 70 per cent of
children born in the Bahamas
are born to single mothers. Of
that percentage, more than 50
per cent are born to teen moth-
ers. We must recognise that
what we are doing is not work-
ing.

“As more women than
men head households,
why should a man, who
it is assumed is support-
ing his family be paid
more than a woman, espe-
cially when that assump-
tion is incorrect? Without
the two acts women are
disadvantaged.”

ALLYSON MAYNARD-GIBSON

“More babies are having
babies, not less. It is imperative
that the church, schools, NGOs
and other institutions get
involved in education about
planning family life.

"It is no secret that accom-
plishment, by whatever yard-

stick is used, is directly tied to
education. Persons with a high
school diploma earn more than
those without a high school
diploma.

Similarly, the more degrees
that one possesses, the more
one's earning capacity. A col-
lege degree provides women
with a measure of insurance
against poverty because col-
lege-educated women earn
higher wages, have a lower rate
of out-of-marriage childbear-
ing, and have a lower risk of
divorce than do women who do
not earn college degrees.

"Other studies have shown
that education not only increas-
es a woman's skills and pro-
ductivity, as it does men's, but
also appears to reduce the gap
in female and male earnings
attributable to factors such as
discrimination, preferences, and

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University degree. CCNP/CCSP/CCIE,MCP/MCSE, CCSE
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Excellent troubleshooting and analytical skills

History of successful vendor management

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Demonstrable experience with Cisco routers, switches (LAN and
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Heests: Pastor Alvin and

Event: Three Nights of Revival Services

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Church: God's House of Refuge and Love Ministries

Location: Upstairs in the Bahamas Taxi Cab Union

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Revivalist: Alex Barker out of Ft. tauderdale, Florida

A God ordained Apostle and prophet to

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Hosts: Pastor Alvin and Deaconess Charmaine Davis

Dates: Wednesday, March 10th, Thursday,
March 11th and Friday, March 12th, 2010:

Time: 7pm Sharp.
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Salary is commensurate with qualifications.

Apply to:
P.O. Box N-3920
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Four face firearm
possession charges

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Four persons
were arraigned on illegal
firearm possession charges in
Freeport Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Freeport residents Connie
Louanna Johnson, 40; Geraldo
Garbocher Knowles, 22; Bree
Johnson, 19; and Emanuel
Hamilton, 38, appeared before
Magistrate Andrew Forbes.

It is alleged that on March 5,
the accused were found in pos-
session of a 12-gauge shotgun.

They all pleaded not guilty
to the charge and were each
granted $2,000 bail with one
surety. The matter was
adjourned to July 26 for trial.

BYRAN WOODSIDE






























Legal Notice

NOTICE
SWEDISH ROSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHEMSTONE VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VENT D’OUEST
INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KMS VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



GE nani
Department of Lands and Surveys

targets customer service issues

THE Land Use and Policy
Administration Project is now
operational and being inte-
grated into the daily manage-
ment of Crown Lands at the
Department of Lands and
Surveys, Minister of State for
Lands and Local Government
Byran Woodside said.

Mr Woodside told parlia-
mentarians during the mid-
term Budget debate that the
department is using the
LUPAP technology with the
hiring of additional surveyors,
the purchasing of much-need-
ed equipment and improving
staff accommodations to
advance the Department’s
commitment to creating a cus-
tomer friendly environment.

“Tt is anticipated that the
Department will become
more responsive thereby dis-
pelling the public’s negative
view of its operation,” he said.

Problems

The LUPAP project began
in June 2005 to address a
number of problems related
to Land Administration in the
country, such as:

e The majority of land
information used by the Gov-
ernment is outdated or incom-
plete;

¢ Information is scattered
among various Government
agencies;

¢ Much of the information
is in paper form, which limits
its accessibility and use;

¢ Uncoordinated effort
causes inconsistency and inac-
curacy, duplication of efforts

and higher costs; and

e Lack of data standards,
rules for inter-agency data
sharing and clear responsibil-
ities for data sharing and clear
responsibilities for data
upkeep and maintenance.

“The deployment of a
competent information tech-
nology officer and the contin-
uous in-house training of sur-
veyors and estates managers
have ensured the transfer of
the LUPAP technology,” Mr
Woodside said.

He also noted that the
Department of Lands and
Surveys was allocated
$2,829,982 for the 2009/2010
budget year and as of Decem-
ber 2009, $1,111,495 was
spent. The savings of
$303,496 will be used to aug-
ment the continued recruit-
ment of “much-needed” sur-
veyors and Geographic Infor-
mation Systems personnel, he
said. The Department also
spent $231,416.00 for Aerial
Imagery Mapping.

Mr Woodside said the
imaging is vital to the Depart-
ment’s mandate to “manage
the Crown Lands held in trust
on behalf of the Bahamian
people.”

During the past six months,
$63,000 has been spent to
complete renovations to the
mapping building, he said.

“The much needed repairs
and reconfiguration of this
building has enhanced the
integration of the work of sur-
veyors, estates managers and
the utilisation of the various
components of LUPAP,” Mr
Woodside said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MOOSE CREEK INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MADEIRA VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

VAL D’ANNIVIERS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ga DSU) UIs
Vm meee aa

Contact made with attorney Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder

CONTRARY to
rampant speculation cir-
culating throughout
New Providence yester-
day, The Tribune can
confirm that attorney
Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder is
alive and well.

Initially, reports sug-
gested relatives of Mr
Pinder were having dif-
ficulty reaching him,
and feared the worst.

When contact with
Mr Pinder was finally
made, the one time
Elizabeth by-election
hopeful was said to
have chuckled and
remarked that reports
of his untimely demise
had been “greatly exag-
gerated”.

Photo: Rodney Moncur
WHILE DISCUSSING his short-lived
“Love Revolution” political campaign
at the Oakes Field McDonalds one
morning in February, Godfrey ‘Pro’
Pinder broke into song and dance.

COURT BRIEF
Andros father and son accused
of having sex with girl aged 15

A FATHER and son from Andros accused of having sex with
a 15-year-old girl were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Police have charged Stephen Forbes, 44, and his son Carame
Forbes, 22, both of Congo Town, South Andros, with having
unlawful sexual intercourse with a person under 16 years of age.

It is alleged that Stephen Forbes had sex with the girl between
September 2009 and Monday, February 22, while at South
Andros.

It is also alleged that Carame Forbes had sex with the girl,
alleged to have been his girlfriend, between May 2009 and
January 2010.

Neither man was required to enter a plea to the charges
during their arraignment in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday.

They were each granted bail in the sum of $7,500.

The case was adjourned to April 29 for the commencement
of a preliminary inquiry.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
DOLEK VALLEY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELECTRIC SLIDE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRANVILLARSSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of March 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 7



Internal Monitoring |
Unit helps to ensure

. accountability in
Family Island Districts

THANKS to new rules
and regulations formed by
the Department of Local
Government’s Internal
Monitoring Unit about 88
per cent of Family Island
Districts are submitting
their monthly financial
reports on time.

Over the next six
months, IMU will strive for
all districts to submit their
reports on time, said Min-
ister of State for Lands and
Local Government Byran
Woodside during his con-
tribution to the 2009/2010
mid-year budget debate.

“We are well on the way -

to creating a Local Gov-
ernment financial system
that conforms to guidelines

outlined in the Financial

Administration and Audit
Act,” he said.

The main focus of the
IMU, which became. opera-

tional in January 2009, is .

to credibly track and mon-
itor accounting systems in
the Family Island districts
while inviting the 32 local
Government districts to
participate in the process.

As a result of the work
the IMU is undertaking,
Mr Woodside explained

that districts are already - --

.. exhibiting a greater aware-
ness of the various weak-
‘nesses in their operations
and implementing the rec-
ommended corrective mea-
sures.

He added that another

significant success of the :
Unit is the greater synergy :
and partnership being fos- :
tered between the Treasury :
Department, the Office of :
the Auditor General and :

Family Island districts.

“This is especially :
important in those districts :
where financial weaknesses. :
are uncovered,” Mr'Wood-

side said.

. , “The reports provided
‘by the IMU assist in the :
formulation of appropriate :
training programmes as :
intervention measures for :
those districts that need :

help.”

three
together for a review.

This process is the :
beginning of a standardiza- :
tion of the Local Govern- :
ment accounts and training :
of this nature will contin- :
ue throughout the Local :
Government administra- :
tion on a constant basis, he: :

said.

Woodside said.

For example, he :
explained, the Treasury :
Department conducted a :
four-day accounting work- :
shop in Eleuthera bringing :
16 accounts personnel and :
Administrators :

Officers from the IMU :
have.also assisted in the :
smooth transfer of districts :
between financial offi-
cers/Administrators and :
the practical training of :
administrators moving into }
their first district, Mr }

- School group work with children in Uganda

LYFORD Cay Interna-
tional School (LCIS) stu-
dents, staff and parents who
participated‘in a unique
learning opportunity in

Uganda have returned after

12 days of working with at-
risk children.
The group from the

Bahamas visited the Tent- -.

makers Academy in Kam-
pala, Uganda, which is
attended by 150 children
from the impoverished
Banda community.

Many students are
HIV/AIDS orphans with
little food or clothing, let
alone enough money for
school supplies. :

Thanks to the fundrais-
ing efforts of the entire
LCIS community the group
were able to deliver much
needed school supplies,
clothing and funds for food
for a year for the entire
school.

LCIS grade nine student
Samantha Wilson ‘com-
mented on the trip: “Our
main goals were to help
teach the children, improve
the facilities and to deliver
all the supplies. I am so
grateful for this chance to
visit Uganda. Being able to
interact with the students
at Tentmakers Academy
was amazing. What I learnt
the most from this trip was
how fortunate I am.

“It really hit me most on

our first day at the Acade-

my.
“That day we brought all
the tennis and soccer balls
to play with the students,
and they were all so happy
that they had those balls to

GRADE NINE student Jade -
Mitchell teaching the children
of Tentmakers some new -
songs.

play with and us the LCIS
students to play with them.

They were all smiling and /
genuinely happy. I am glad

we were able to impact the
lives of the students, the
way they have impacted our
lives.”

The connection with the

Ugandan community and
LCIS has been four years
in the making. |

The project not only
enables the students to
learn valuable personal
lessons from this unique
experience. working with
others less fortunate, but it
provides the students with
work toward the Interna-
tional Baccalaureate CAS
(Creativity, Action and Ser-
vice).

NOTICE

OF

COSWORTH LIMITED ©

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the Sth day of March, 2010.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre,
Shirley ¢ & Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-3023, Nassau, The
Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LAVINIO LIDO LIMITED
N-OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a), LAVINIO LIDO LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b). The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March,.2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General. oe

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
‘Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOT I CE
ACQUA SMERLDA LIMITED

NOTICEIS HEREBY. GIVEN as follows:

(a): ACQUA SMERLDA LIMITED is in voluntary
‘dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4).of
the International Business Companies aul 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company Somimcnbed on :
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and fpentered by the Registrar
General.

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th aay of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

MIKADOSOLE LIMITED

NOTICE EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) MIKADOSOLE LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
CASSIAN LIMITED

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CASSIAN LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte, Streets, Pueeeaens
Bahamas. ©

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
NEW LIZARD LIMITED

N OTICEJIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: ¥

(a) NEW LIZARD LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General,

(c) The Liquidator , of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI,

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



NOTICE
GREENBAJA LIMITED

NOTI c E Is HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) GREENBAJA LIMITED is in vOlMntaey dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

. (b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar
General.

The Liquidator of the said company is CST
Administration (Bahamas) Limited, The Bahamas
Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas:

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

CST Administration (Bahamas) Limited
. Liquidator |



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
VINYAMAR LIMITED |

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) VINYAMAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the

International Business Companies, Act-2000.,].

(b) _ The dissolution of the,said company commenced:on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the eens
General.

« (c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,
BVI.

. Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE ~

NOTICE
DIJON INVESTMENT LTD.

N OTICEIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows: 7

(a) DIJON INVESTMENT LTD. is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
2rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution were
. 1bmitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

, (b) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated
Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd. =
Liquidator

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
DAYSLAND LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) DAYSLAND LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of-the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 3rd March, 2010 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered bys the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro
Associated Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola,”
BVI.
Dated this 9th day of March, A. D. 2010

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



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=~ Lhe Iribune ©

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HIGH 82F
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_ SUNNY AND i=) (6A TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

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Volume: 106 No.89 TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
THE

TRIBUNE



PAGE 9

TUESDAY, MARCH 9,

a-Cola official

2010

Me gege ie ee











1

Minister presents
cheque to help
fund the Exuma

regatta...
See page 10





queers Baton Relay on
Bahamas leg Good Friday

By BRENT STUBBS
- Senior Sports. Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

’ s a prelude to the
XIX Common-
wealth Games in

October, the Bahamas is

preparing to host the Queen’s:

Baton Relay as it makes its
way through the 70 partici-
pating countries.

The relay began with
Queen Elizabeth ITinserting a
“message to the athletes”
when it left Buckingham

Palace in Lofdon on October - ’

29, 2009. The historic journey
is expected to cover 170,000
kilometres in 240 days.

Once it gets back to India,

it will be carried through the

capital of each of India’s 28 ©

states and seven union terri-
tories, plus many other cities
- along the way.

The baton is currently in St
Vincent and The Grenadines,
St Lucia as it makes it way
through the Caribbean. It first
arrived in Trinidad & Tobago
on Monday, February 22.

After making -its way
through the Cayman Islands,
the baton will arrive here on
Good Friday, April 2, and will
remain here until Sunday,
April 4, before it heads to the
Turks & Caicos Islands.

Mohinder Glover, the high
commissioner of India, is cur-
rently in town to ensure that

Softball titl

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n
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Maynard yesterday...

the Bahamas is properly pre-
pared to receive the baton on
itsrelayleg. -

Yesterday, Glover paid a
courtesy call on Minister of

- Youth, Sports and Culture

Charles Maynard at the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and
Culture. ;

Glover said normally the
baton is passed around just a
few months prior to the
games, but India wanted to
do something a little special,
thus the dates were changed.

“We wanted to have it go
100 days outside of India and
100 days inside India,” Glover
said. “It’s an honour to be
hosting the Commonwealth
Games and the Queen’s
Baton.”

Rommel Knowles, the sec-
retary,general of the Bahamas
Olympic Association, said the
Bahamas has planned a very
special series of activities for
when the torch arrives.

After a reception is staged

at the Lynden Pindling Inter-

e goes

to Sadie Curtis



SADIE CURTIS Primary School girl’s softball team members celebrate yesterday at the Baillou Hills Sport-

ing Complex after they won the girls softball title in the Primary Schools Sports Association’s week-long
tournament that was delayed on Friday. Sadie Curtis knocked off Sandilafds Primary 14-1 to win their

first ever title in any sporting event. See Wednesday's Sports section for more coverage, including the
boys baseball championship...

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Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

/CORLOLOCTOTOXOOLAAEALEL ELLE OZER TATE EEDOLEATET TOOL LLEELLPOCLODETOLODULLELL LUO





— ‘
~- MOHINDER GROVER, high commissioner of India, chats with Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles

’ national Airport on Friday,

April 2, the baton will be car-
ried through the streets of
New Providence on Saturday,
April 3. It will leave the his-

|

TRAIL: Montague Beach Park
Cas! Bay Street
Shirleg Street

Chareh Street

New Bridge

Paradise Island Golf.
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damage against the Kingdor National Pa



toric Fox Hill Parade and
travel on Bernard Road to

Wulff Road and East Street «
and will end up at Arawak,

Cay where a cultural festival
. is set to take place.

Later that evening,
Knowles said the baton will.
be presented to Governor
General Arthur Hanna at
Government House where he
will read the message from
the Queen. The baton will

then depart for the Turks the.

following day.
“We are looking forward
‘to having athletes from the

various sports carry the.

baton,” said Wellington
Miller, president of the BOA.
“We will probably start with
cycling and then swimming
and include the other sports.”
Miller said the baton is
. intended to bind the Bahamas
with the other Common-
wealth nations as they show
their pride in being a mem-
ber.
According to Grover, who
resides in Kingston, Jamaica,
a number of international dig-





Registration Feg- $12.00
Preebigs: T- shirt, Water, Snacks and
“an opportunity to win prizes,

including an Hirling Tiekel.





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Date:

Pre- reaistration will be accepted commencing Monday. 1st March 2010. A minimum of four people comprise of a team and ALL

RUAN HOUSE
P.O. BoxN 1463
‘Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone no: (242)326-529| -

RUAN HOUSE
P.O. BoxN1463
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone no: (242)326-5291



nitaries from the Common-
wealth Games and India are
expected to accompany the
baton.

Maynard, however, indi-
cated that while he won’t be
here because of his prior com-’
mitment to travel to the Cay-
man Islands for the Carifta
Games over the Easter holi-
day weekend, he assured
Grover that there will be suf-
ficient local dignitaries who
will be on hand to greet the
visitors and accept the baton.

The Commonwealth
Games are scheduled for
October 3-14 and the
Bahamas is expected to field
teams to compete in aquatics,
athletics, boxing, cycling an
tennis.

Roy Colebrooke has-been
named as the chef de mission
for the Bahamian team.

_ Other sports to be contest-
ed at the'games are archery,
badminton, gymnastics, hock-
ey, lawn bowls, netball, rugby
7s, shooting, squash, table ten- _
nis, weightlifting and
wrestling.





ee

-s Cael, YG Lulasiioll ‘
(ULLADULLA LLL LEK LULL




PAGE 10, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS -





Minister presents cheque to

help fund the Exuma regatta

Â¥
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the 57th National
Family Island Regatta on the
horizon, the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture
has made its financial contri-
bution to the organising com-
mittee.

Minister of Youth, Sports.

‘and Culture Charles May-
nard presented committee
chairman Danny Strachan
with a cheque for the regatta,
scheduled for April 19-24 in
Elizabeth Harbour, George-
town, Exuma. :

Maynard also took the
time out to congratulate Stra-
chan for the role he has
played over the years as the
chairman of the signature
event in sloop sailing in the
country.

“It doesn’t matter whether
you come from the perspec-
tive of sports, culture or any-





MINISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard presents a cheque to Danny Strachan, chairman

of the National Family Island Regatta. Shown (I-r) are Strachan, Maynard, permanent secretary Archie Nairn

and assistant commodore Clyde Rolle.

WIN Spa Certificates,
Gym Memberships,

Trips and

__. Mach More!

|

mw

-

NERALS

BALLY

TOTAL FITNESS”

Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff





thing else, I think we are all
Bahamians when you are
talking about the National
Family Island Regatta,” May-
nard pointed out.

“T think that over the
years, knowing the difficul-
ties that you face, you have
done a tremendous job, along
with your committee, in

‘keeping the event alive. I

think that you deserve the

‘accolades from a grateful.

nation.”

Despite the economic chal-
lenges being faced, Maynard
said they are making the con-

- tribution to the committee

early enough for them to get
the necessary things done to
ensure that the regatta is
another resounding success.

Accepting the cheque,
Strachan thanked the gov-
ernment for their contribu-

tions, saying that while they

are aware of the economic
vows, they are appreciative
of the gesture.

“This money will go to sup-
port the economy of Exuma
for that week from this event
being held here,” Strachan
said.

The regatta, according to’

Strachan, will cost an esti-
mated $275,000 and the.gov-
ernment’s contribution will
go towards defraying the
expense of getting the boats
to and from Exuma on the
barge, supply the prize mon-
ey and pay the per diam for
the sailors.

This year’s regatta is being
held in honour of Hughey
Lloyd, a native of Exuma and
boat builder, who has been
sailing in the regatta for more
than 30 years.

©

As usual, 60 boats are
expected to once again par-
ticipate in the regatta, includ-
ing a new A class and two B
class boats coming in from
Long Island.

Clyde Rolle, the assistant
commodore of the regatta,
said the competition should
be just as keen as it has been
over the years.

“My information has it that
we will have at least two new
A class and about 5 or 6 C
class,” Rolle said. “The com-
petition in the C class has »
grown just as popular as the
A class and this year will be

* no exception.”



MICHELLE LEWIS, marketing manager at Coca-Cola, presents a

Doubling up as the chair-
man of the junior regatta,
Rolle said they have adjusted
the schedule so that the
junior championships nor-
mally held on the Tuesday
leading up to the major com-
petition will be pushed back-
to Saturday.

“We're going’to get more
juniors to compete from
around the Family Islands,”
Rolle said. “We usually have
a challenge with the Ministry
having their exams around
the same time that we host
the junior championships.

“So we’re changing it from
a Tuesday to a Saturday, so
I’m expecting us to have a
lot more boats. participate
this year. We usually have
about 18 boats compete, but
I’m looking for at least 24
this year.”

As the sport continues to
lose more of its legendary
sailors, Rolle said they are -
hoping to concentrate on get- ©
ting more of the younger
sailors involved.



cheque to Danny: Strachan to help fund the 57th National Family
Island Regatta. Shown (I-r) are Clyde Rolle, assistant commodore,
Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, Lewis, Strachan and Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture

Charles Maynard.

Photo by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Coca-Cola
official sponsor

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

COCA-Cola, distributed by
Caribbean Bottling Compa-
ny, is the official sponsor of
the 57th National Family

Island Regatta slated for next '

month in Georgetown, Exu-
ma.

Yesterday at the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Culture,
Michelle Lewis, the market-
ing manager for Coca-Cola,
presented a $5,000 cheque to
Danny Strachan, chairman of
the organising committee.

“As a part of Caribbean
Bottling Coca-Cola sustain-
ability effort, our corporate
distribution remain priority
in making a positive differ-
ence in what we do through-
out our community with our
prosperity,” Lewis said.

“We provide a variety of
soft drink beverages and
packages that meets con-
sumer evolving needs, enjoy-
ment, nutrition and hydra-
tion.”

Caribbean. Bottling Com-
pany, according to Lewis, is
delighted to be able to give
back to the community in this

-venture. Strachan thanked

Coca-Cola for coming on
board as the official soft drink
of the regatta.

“As you would know,

Coca-Cola has been a peren-
nial sponsor of the National
Family Island Regatta and

“we're happy that they’re here

again this year,” Strachan
said.

“Nevertheless, Coca-Cola
has been supporting us and
they are continuing to sup-
port us. I regard them as a
role model sponsor and we
look forward to other corpo-
rate entities following them
and assist community and
sporting events throughout
the country.”

Charles Maynard, minister
of youth, sports and culture,
also joined Strachan in thank-
ing Coca-Cola for taking the
initiative to once again spon-
sor the regatta.

“T encourage other compa-
nies to follow their lead and
come on board and help with
the promotion,” he said.
“Like I said, it’s not only cul-
tural or sporting, it’s some-
thing that demonstrates the
essence of what we are as
Bahamians.”

The more companies that
can make a contribution like
Coca-Cola will help to make
the country a much better
place, Maynard said.

The National Family Island
Regatta, now in its 57th year,
is set to run April 19-24 in

‘Elizabeth Harbour, George-

town, Exuma.

»

RIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 11



| Minister tells of

FROM page one

the initiative shown by the police towards
restoring public confidence.

The tranquil 3.5 by 1.5 mile island came
under international scrutiny when an
American tourist was severely wounded
during an altercation on the island, and
subsequently resulted in the United States
issuing a Bahamas travel warning. Now,
residents say, the island’ is finally getting
the attention it has been denied for so long.

There are only seven officers currently
assigned to the island and often they are
required to operate 24-hour shifts. At night,
residents complain one officer on duty is
simply not enough.

St Johns Parish rector Oswald Pinder
said: “We desperately need more police
officers on this islarid — and not just offi-
cers but experienced officers. There are
three we have now that look like they are
fresh out of high school — they don’t have
the significant presence or experience to
effectively control the island like that of a

more senior officer. The lack of officers -

definitely contributes to the current atmos-
phere here — the people are wary to
defend justice because they don’t have any
back-up to protect them.”

Harbour Island

Mr Pinder was one of many residents
who pressed the police to give definite
numbers of how many officers would be
allocated to Harbour Island, separate from
those stationed on North Eleuthera.

Other suggestions offered by the crowd
towards crime prevention included: Regu-
lated porters at the dock, mandatory iden-
tification required for those entering and
leaving the island and beach wardens.

However, residents acknowledged that
the level of crime currently experienced
was not solely indicative of the number of
police on the island} but greater social ills,
such as inconsistent infrastructure and an
inundated social services programme.

_ Will Simmons, a 23-year-old community
volunteer, charged that there is a blatant
disconnect between the island’s youth and

the adult community. Mr Simmons leads a

drama club at the Harbour Island All-Age
School. He believes that the current crime
experienced is a direct result of the lack
of human resources in the area of Social

~ Services on the island.

He continued: “I’m certain that some of
the things that are going on could easily
have been prevented had persons been tak-







DARREL JOHNSON (centre) speaks with John
Nixon (right), Director of Safety Security at
the Ministry of Tourism; Detective Sergeant
Hart (third from left) and Harbour Island resi-
dents after yesterday's meeting.

en off the street and placed in rehab. The

island has only one social worker and the
workload is immense.”

Officials, under the guidance of Darrel
Johnson, Harbour Island’s local govern-
ment Chief Councillor, plan to conduct
numerous meetings with interested groups
within the community to further discus-
sions towards developing new strategies
tailored uniquely for Harbour Island. A
deadline is set for March 18 to provide a

general update to the community on

progress and findings where new strategies
will be discussed.

FROM page one

The intruder indicated
towards Mr Roberts’ safe and
asked him to open it and take
out his gun, but Mr Roberts
diverted his attention to avoid
bringing another firearm into
the room.

He and his wife Margaret,
68, followed the armed robber’s
instructions to lead him down-
stairs to the bathroom where Mr
Roberts kept his wallet and car
keys.

Their assailant took these
and shut the couple in the bath-
room while he attempted his
escape.

However, he returned
moments later to ask for Mr
‘Roberts to help him negotiate
the door locks, before sending
him back to the bathroom while
he got away in Mr Roberts’ van.

Supermarket

Although ‘the supermarket

owner said he was somewhat,

unfazed by the intrusion as he
has been robbed at gunpoint
dozens of times, his wife has
been exhausted by the trauma
and unable to sleep soundly
since.

_ He warned east Nassau resi-
dents to be particularly vigilant
and advises anyone in such a sit-
uation to remain calm.

Mr Roberts said: “I just
thought we have got to get this
guy out of here, so give him
what he wants, help him along,
and get him out of here.

“That is what I have done
the many times I have been
looking down the barrel of a
gun; go alohg with them and
don’t scream. -

“T knew the quicker-I got to
know him the more comfortable
everybody was going to be.”

The home invasion was fol-
lowed by. the similar armed rob-
bery of a 26-year-old woman in

her Prince Charles Drive home .

at 9pm on Saturday.

She told The Tribune how
she and her friend were getting
ready to go out when the intrud-

’ er unscrewed two lightbulbs out-

side to enter the property under
the cover of darkness.

He appeared in the bedroom
and forced them at gunpoint to
give him cash, their cellular tele-
phones and two laptop comput-
ers.

Like Mr Roberts, the young

~ women were told to wait in the

bathroom while the gunman
made his escape. Z

“He wanted to steal the cars
but I told him they weren’t
working,” the 26-year-old'said.

“J remained calm, but as I
was looking at that gun I stud-
ied that gun. That was the only
thing I could see.”

Police arrived within five
minutes of the gunman’s escape

but did not chase him or take
: his allegation.

fingerprints, the woman said.

However, Mr Roberts was
impressed by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force’s
(RBPF) handling of his case. |

RBPF press officer Sgt
Chrislyn Skippings said: “Police
are doing a lot of good stuff in
that area but at the same time
we need citizens to keep a
watchful eye and be aware of
surroundings, taking all pre-
cautions.”

Information that may assist
police investigations should be

reported to Crime Stoppers

anonymously by calling 328-
TIPS (8477) or call police
urgently on 919 or 911.

FROM page one

bly American, company conduct solid waste
management at the Tonique Williams Dar-
ling site.

“We don’t have an option in New Prov-
idence of relocating this landfill. This is
really the only available site on New Prov-
idence ... but with good management we
can extend its life and with the introduction
of a ‘Waste to Energy’ facility, we will

_ extend it as much as fifty years.

“That will buy us additional time to buy
additional options as the population
expands and increases,” the Minister said at

a press conference at the Ministry of the -

Environment yesterday. -
Currently, garbage dumped at the site
is not officially sorted. °

The growth in the stockpile of waste.

material stored there has contributed an
increase in the likelihood of noxious fires —
such as the largest in the dump’s history,
which broke out in early February and is
still in the process of being extinguished.
Meanwhile, as this waste material con-
tinues to pile up, not only does the amount

of decomposing trash entering the envi-

ronment swell, but the number of years

that the dump remains a viable site for dis-

posing of the country’s waste shrinks.
In-view of this, Dr Deveaux explained

that the Government also proposes to.

spend a projected $20 million over the next
five years — the equivalent to what it cur-
tently spends annually on managing the
dump — to build a new landfill cell and
install a garbage recycling and shredding

FROM page one

Wultt Roadiand Robinson

facility, — ,
A waste to energy facility, which would

burn certain types of garbage to produce.

electricity to power the country, is further
planned for implementation within the next
five years, impacting both oil importation
and energy: production costs and provid-

ing a means of reducing stored waste levels. .

Such a facility would take between 36 and
38 months to-construct.
“My understanding is that between burn-

‘ing garbage for energy, recycling for sale

and use and separating the garbage we
should be able to convert 90 per cent of
the garbage coming into the landfill to
another use and we should really only be
burying about 10 per cent,” said Dr
Deveaux. :

While the Government had been con-
sidering taking certain steps to improve
conditions at the landfill, Dr Deveaux
admitted that the recent dump fires have
spurred the resolve to take the necessary
action to ensure that as much as possible is
done to ensure such outbreaks do not occur
in the future.

“What this has done for us is expose the
really inadequate management of the land-
fill. The combination of material in the
landfill is such that it adds to the com-
bustibility of the fire. C and D (the con-
struction and demolitions portion. of the
landfill) should only contain construction
material, concrete building materials, etc. It
had a lot of household waste in it and for
example the fire that is currently taking

“New one-way system

place is essentially bits of burning wood
mixed in with household garbage and so
that kind of situation makes it difficult to
manage. So obviously the first step after
this is to have a comprehensive programme
‘of solid waste management,” said Dr
Deveaux.

The current front runner to obtain the
waste management contract is Cambridge
Project Development Inc, a US company
with-a history of providing landfill solu-
tions in the Caribbean.

The company would oversee the
enhanced sorting practices — including the
division of garbage into recyclable and non-
recyclable, which will see some waste —
such as clothes or paper — being shredded,
others — like wooden pallets and organic
material — mulched and some - like steel
from demolished buildings — sold.

The precise terms of the agreement
between the Government and the compa-
ny are being negotiated. Once signed, the
more advanced waste management plan
can be implemented within. “90 to 180
days”, suggested Dr Deveaux. .

“It is our hope that by fiscal year 2010
(which begins in June), we will have the
shredding and waste management pro-
gramme outlined in place,” said Dr
Deveaux.

He added that the Government further
plans to enhance security at the dump, to
better control who accesses the site and
thereby diminish the likelihood of fires
being started intentionally, as it is believed
the most recent ones were — primarily by
“scavengers” seeking ways to stay warm
in cold weather. :

be affected, as well as employees
of at least 20 government agen-
cies and a number of private
businesses, and local residents.



Road as works are carried out
to improve both dual carriage-
ways.

Rozdworks already under
way in Baillou Hill Road started
at the junction with Robinson

\

Road on February 22 and are
progressing northwards in 1,500
ft segments. : \
When roadworks between
Robinson Road and Wulff
Road have been completed, the
one-way system will be extend-

Roadworks ‘to he completed in three weeks’

SHIRLEY Street road works at the eastern end of the one-
way dual carriageway are expected to be completed within three

weeks. '

The open trenches on Shirley Street, running from Mackey
Street east to Montagu, which have been a nuisance to motorists,
will be sealed and paved by the end of the month at the latest,
according to Ministry of Works assistant engineer Robert Gar-

raway.

_ Road works on the western portion of the road from Mackey
Street to Frederick Street were completed in December, prompt-
ing the FNM government to praise Minister of Works Neko Grant
and his staff for what they called an extraordinary road building

achievement.

Shopbreaking leads to two arrests

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police arrest-
ed two young men for shop-
breaking after responding to an
alarm on Saturday evening at a
business establishment in
Freeport. ae

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
reported that shortly after
11pm officers at the Mobile
Patrol Division responded to
an alarm that was activated at

Freeport Jet Wash on West ©

Mall Drive. On arrival at the
scene, officers arrested two
young men, ages 19 and 20, of
Eight Mile Rock. f"

Police are continuing their

investigations.
¢ Grand Bahama Police are
' investigating a suspected case



of arson that resulted in exten-

sive damage to several heavy:

duty equipment at the Discov-
ery Bay Subdivision. ASP
Mackey said the president of
Treasure Coast Development
reported to police on Friday
that several pieces of equip-
ment left overnight on a prop-
erty on the canal in the area of
the Grand Bahama Yacht Club
were damaged by fire.

On arrival at the property,
officers observed that several
pieces of heavy-duty equipment
and a trailer containing four
generators, a welding machine
and a hydraulic jackal, and a

’ Dodge Dakota truck were

destroyed by fire.

The estimated damages
totalled some $25,000.

Police are investigating the
matter.

ed north to Duke Street down-
town, where Government
House is located.

The two-corridor project is

expected to reach completion in '

January next year, while the
island-wide 17 corridor project
should be completed by Janu-

‘ary 2012.

As he announced the latest
changes for Nassau’s streets yes-
terday, Mr Grant said: “We feel
that this will improve our traffic
flow considerably.

“This one-way couplet system
is a component of my Ministry’s

programme to improve the safe-:

ty and traffic flows on our road
network.
“These works will improve

the road pavement, the drain-

ing, street-lighting, and provide
for proper sidewalks, improved
signage and road markings.”

Mr Grant explained how con-
tractors Jose Cartellone Con:
structionne Civiles will carry out
all works during the day as it is
considerably cheaper than night
work.

And he argued this will not

+ increase inconvenience for

motorists: as construction areas
will be closed off around the
clock while work is in progress.

A Traffic Management Com-
mittee will manage diversions
around the active sites with signs
and banners in both roads to
indicate the new. direction of
travel.

Bus companies have been
consulted, and the Ministry is
working with public transport
organisations to ensure the 170
buses using ‘Baillqu Hill Road
and 12 using Market Street are
able to adjust to the new diver-
sions.

Hundreds of students at
schools in the area are likely to

Mr Grant vowed to.ensure

pedestrian access to work sites is.

as open as possible, and to keep
all those affected informed at
every stage of the project.

He ‘thanked the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, Road
Traffic Department, Transport
Planning and Policy Unit and
the Utility companies for coop-
erating with the works as he
asked drivers to do the same.

“T encourage motorists to dri-
ve safely and sensibly when nay-
igating through the road works
and to pay attention to and obey
the temporary traffic diversions
and other traffic management
measures,” Mr Grant,said.

“Care must be’ taken when
approaching the construction
zones, especially in the vicinity
of schools and pedestrian cross-
ings.

“Let us do our part by exer-

cising good judgment, practice .

safe driving and obey the law.”

Project coordinator for the
New Providence Road Improve-
ment Project Khader Alikhan
explained how there should be
no unexpected delays as full
investigations were carried out
prior to commencement.

“For improvement there is
always inconvenience,” Mr
Alikhan said. “But when we
have two lanes of traffic going

. north it will improve the capac-

ity and relieve congestion defi-
nitely.” .
Ministry of Works:assistant
engineer Roberty Garraway
added: “It had a dramatic
improvement when ‘we imple-
mented a one-way system in
Shirley Street as it reduced the
journey time from 45 minutes
to eight minutes, so we expect to
have the same gains here.”

FROM page one

i ders or bids.”

Mr Smith later withdrew

i this assertion. after Mr
: Deveaux pointed out that
: the figures the PLP MP quot-
i ed in his speech amounted
-} to less than $2 million, a frac-
: tion of the $18 million he was
:. alleging was spent.

Mr Deveaux also pointed

? out that documents Mr
i Smith tabled only showed a
: combined $10,600 payment
? to two maintenance compa-
i nies.
? Several members from the '
? government’s side called on
? Mr Smith to provide proof
? to back up his claims or with-
? draw his statements while
? opposition members rallied
: behind their colleague.

Mr Deveaux added on

: that day he did not dispute .
? that abuse may have taken
i placé, but was asking that the

PLP MP fully corroborate

Yesterday the Minister

i said that he takes “very seri-
? ously this issue of abuse and
the implication that a public
: official, in this case a politi-
i cian, was involved in it.”

It was “kind of

: heartwretching to be accused
: directly or indirectly of tief-
: ing from people making $210
? aweek,” he said. “That’s dif-
? ficult to swallow.”

While noting that Mr

: Smith’s assertion that the
? contracts awarded were not
: subject to a public bidding -
: process, he suggested this
? was acceptable as the pro-
: gramme had the “dual goal”
? of “providing employment
: and cleaning up New Provi-
: dence” as part of the gov-
? ernment’s “stimulus pro-

gramme.”
Meanwhile, he noted that

? further documents that Mr
? Smith wished to table in
i alleged support of his accu-
? sations of abuse of funds
? were not allowed yet. by the
: Speaker of the House
: “because (Smith) had the



‘corrupt officers’

names and the figures: but
there was no way of corrob-

orating the figures with the

names.”

However, Mr Deveaux
admitted that he has subse-
quently determined that
there was some abuse of the

programme by public offi-

cers and further inquiries are
going on.

“Some public officers, I
have found, did engage in
abuse and so we have had
the Treasury in the depart-
ment taking pictures of every
person who was authorised
to get a cheque so we can
match an individual with a
payment and we have the
auditor general going foren-
sically through all of the pay-
ments to ensure where abuse
took place or didn’t.

“I have also provided the
ministry of finance with a
complete report which I
requested for them to match
the names and the payments
that I have against what the

Treasury has so we can have

a full and éxhaustive investi-
gation and where we can find
any instance that we can

" prove we will take them (to

court),” he stated,

3 Wings $295

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Add a 2207 Drink & Regular Fries for $210

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LOCAL NEWS

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 9B





Y
=
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=i

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B O72



ea







Colon Hy Tl
By REUBEN SHEARER

Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tripunemedia.net

inv

LET’S say your garbage bag starts to become
filled with waste; would you continue to load trash
upon trash into the bag without emptying it? Most
likely, not. Just as garbage begins to develop an
odour, grow bacteria, mold, develop viruses, and
probably infect the entire home with its stench, so

does the colon.

Like our garbage, we must
empty our colon before we
decide to fill it up again.
And nutritious foods ensure
regular bowel movements.
But the fact of the matter is
that most persons aren’t fill-
ing up on the right foods,
and having a consistent bow-
el movement.

The typical diet lacks the
sufficient amount of fiber
needed to excrete fat, long,
and bulky excretions.

If this is not the case, your
colon may be experiencing
a blockage, which means
your body isn’t getting a reg-
ular pass, and is lacking in
fiber.

The colonic procedure is
suggested to detoxify the
body, avoid cancer, stop con-
Stipation, acne, chronic
fatigue syndrome, allergies
and to lose weight.

But what may be a “regu-
lar” pass for one person is
not “regular” for another,
says Julia Lee, RD MS, a

i =

dietitian at Doctors Hospi-
tal. “You don’t have to have
a bowel movement every-
day; that wouldn’t be cor-
rect,” she told Tribune
Health.

Emptying your colon,
which is the receptacle for
waste is vital. As the body
takes in nutrients, air, water,
oxygen, and food to keep it
functioning properly, the
colon correspondingly elim-
inates what it doesn’t need
and excretes it from the
body.

Ms Lee and Nathelyn
LaCroy, colon hydrothera-
pist, explained that one
colonics session is the equiv-
alent of having 10 to 15 bow-
el movements.

Mrs LaCroy is one of few
colonic hydrotherapists on
the island, and explained the
procedure she administers
to Tribune Health:

“When the colonic begins,
the physician will introduce
the colon hydrotherapy

= a » “a

THE TIGER claw flowers are stunning | :

but last for all too brief a period.

i

Colonics)

U HAVE IT OR NOT?

equipment into the client’s
rectum,” said Mrs LaCroy.
“The physician will control
the temperature, and low
pressured water flows
through a little tube into the
colon.”

“All the while, there is no
sucking out the feces. Once
the water comes in contact
with the feces, the feces
blocks the water,” she said.
“When the water makes its
way through the feces, it
flows right through the
closed tube.”

“In the end, the physician
will gently massage the
patients stomach to rid him
of the last few remaining
feces. And depending on
the patient’s weight, there
could be a great deal of
excess abdominal skin.”

If the colon is not relieved
as much as possible, then
balance in your body is lack-
ing. And you must get the
digestive system working the
way it should, because the
digestive system is the feed-
er for the blood, she
explained.

“When you’re eating
breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
and dumping food on top of
food, this is piling up on the
colon,” said the colonics spe-
cialist. If the colon which is-
five feet long, and two and
half inches wide in diameter
is stalled, you will know,
because the scent of your

stool will tell the tale.

“The colon can hold up to
40 pounds of fecal matter, a
decent amount of space to
hold your waste. And just as
a cesspit can be backed up,
the colon needs relieving at
least two to three times a
day,” said Mrs LaCroy.

At the end of a colon
hydrotherapy procedure,
you will feel like you haven’t
used the toilet for a month,
and this will be a sign of
dehydration. During this
time you may experience a
rise in the electrolytes in
your body such as potassi-
um and sodium. This can be
quite dangerous, and dam-
aging to the kidneys and
heart.

This may be why some
doctors won’t recommend
colon hydrotherapy for
detoxification.

Mrs Lee, holds to this view
that colon cleansing can be
damaging. “The more tra-
ditional physicians wouldn’t
recommend it to their
patients,” she said. Colonics
can be damaging to the colon
as the colon is very capable
of cleaning itself, she said.

Persons should evaluate
the risks before they have
the procedure done and see
a GI (gastro-intestinal) spe-
cialist for more information
on the procedure.

¢ March is colorectal can-
cer awareness month.

it
REGULAR

¢ lf you are eating the
right foods, you will have
bowel movements with ease
and avoid constipation. But
if you feel “ stalled” this
may be a sign that the body
is in much need of a
“colonic” a procedure, that
drains fecal compounds in
the colon.

¢ A high fiber diet is rec-
ommended for regular
passes, working in whole
grains like oatmeal, brown
rice, whole grain cereals,
fruits and vegetables, sweet
potatoes, and plantains in
your meal plans.

¢ Eating fruits instead of
drinking fruit juice also
helps people to stay regular.
Limit the eating of “conve-
nience foods,” or quick fix
pasteurised meals that
come in a box. Drinking
OTN NMC) CIC MrUIT R=), (c1kG
ing at least three to five
times a day is also useful.

¢ When somebody has a
diet that is highly refined,
they generally have a low
fiber diet of convenience
ieyolOLse

- Julia Lee, RD MS,

dietitian at Doctors Hospital



= =
is

-





Brief encounters in March

During March, two trees make
their presence known by flowering
quite spectacularly before sliding
back into relative anonymity. The
first is pink cassia, a tree that is so
undistinguished for most of the year
that if one is on your regular car
route you may wonder where on
earth it had suddenly appeared from.

The pink cassia (Cassia javanica)
is a member of the pea family and as
such bears the familiar compound
leaves we associate with leguminous
plants. These leaves are lost during
the autumn and winter months so
that when the tree flowers, it is all
flowers. The leaves grow back while
flowering takes place, similar to the
leafing/flowering cycle of the royal
poinciana, which is related.

March is a weak month for flow-
ering trees and the presence of a
pink cassia in full bloom makes it
even more outstanding. The light
pink flowers tend to smother the

branches in an effusive display of
plant exuberance. Alas, not for long.
Usually four to five weeks later the
flowers are fading and the leaves
take over.

Pink cassia is easily propagated
from seed and is a fast grower. Most
cassias tend to shrubby but pink cassia
is a true tree growing to 30 feet or
more. I had a fine specimen in my
previous yard that was toppled by
Hurricane Floyd. Most of it was in the
bush so I left it right where it was. By
the next flowering season it had pro-
duced vertical branches that were as
long as the tree had previously been
tall, all of them smothered in blos-
soms. Pink cassia can also be grown
from cuttings.

Although there is a paucity of flow-
ering trees at this time of year, this is
the time when another brilliant but
short-lived display is put on by the
coral tree (Erythrina indica) which is
another member of the pea family.

Although named the coral tree, the
flowers are red. The distinguishing
feature of the coral tree is its com-
pound leaves that consist of three
leaflets shaped more or less like the
spades in playing cards, three to four
inches in diameter. The flowers are
produced from clusters at the end of
branches and are produced in rows
from a whorled calyx, with one petal
substantially longer than the rest. By
the time the final flowers have
appeared the first ones tend to be set-
ting pods. The seeds are produced in
these bean-like pods and are poiso-
nous to some degree.

The Erythrina grows to 30 feet tall
and produces its flowers after the
deciduous leaves have been dropped.
This causes the tree to look rather
spare because flowers are only pro-
duced at the ends of branches rather
than all along the branches as in pink
cassia and royal poinciana.

Spare and brief -the flowering peri-

the flowers are only a memory.

tive.

The juvenile tiger claw keeps its : : .
i the profession of chiropractic
; in the United States. The law-
pact than the coral tree and makes a j Swit filed against the AMA

striking specimen tree for the mid- | Was extended to benefit not

: only chiropractors, but also

leaves year round but tends not to
flower at this stage. It is more com-

dle of a large lawn.

Both the coral tree and the tiger }
claw tree bear small thorns that might :

not be noticed until they inflict a } Of treatment they wanted.

wound.

sre nesta Sawai ereae is and chiropractic work togeth-

? er, greater results can hap-
? pen. That will only benefit
? the patient, which I hope is
? what all doctors want.

for their time of beauty is short.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com



‘Chiropractic’s
‘Pocky road

TODAY there are a grow-

i ing numbers of doctors of chi-
? ropractic through out the
? world,

i Bahamas.

including the

In the past 19 years, 5

? Bahamians have returned to
i practice and more have
i entered chiropractic colleges.
i The growing number of chi-
? ropractors makes the profes-
? sion much more visible and
i therefore more accessible to
? all Bahamians.
? Bahamians still do not know
i what chiropractic is or any-
? thing about its history.

But many

Chiropractic champions a

i natural method of healing.
i Its theory holds that spinal
? mechanic, including the ver-
i tebra, corresponding nerves
i and surrounding soft tissue,
i play a primary role in the
? health of the body. Structur-
: al abnormalities in the spine,
i which causes pain, dysfunc-
? tion and loss of mobility to
? thousands, can be treated suc-
i cessfully.

This treatment is a proce-

i dure known as a vertebral
i adjustment. An adjustment is
? a technique in which the chi-
? ropractor skillfully applies
i pressure to an area of the
i spine that is out of alignment
? causing nerve inflammation.
i The result is reduced pain
i and
i restored function in the
? injured area.

@£ GREEN SCENIE By Gardener Jack :

inflammation and

Chiropractic since its birth
has become well known for

i its successful treatment of
? back and neck pain. But in
i spite of its success, its future
i has had a rocky road to
? recognition and respect. The
? road began in 1895 when
i D.D. Palmer of Davenport,
i Iowa, gave the first chiro-
i practic adjustment to a janitor
i who had became partially
i deaf suddenly after injuring
? his upper back.

After the adjustment the

i man's hearing returned and
i because of the success of
: Palmer's spinal adjustment,
i the recorded history of chi-
i ropractic began. Over the
? succeeding months, other
| : patients came to Palmer with
i diverse problems, including
i sciatica, migraine headaches
: and stomach complaints.
i Palmer found each of these
: conditions responded well to
? the adjustments.

The medical communities,

? hearing of Palmer's success,
i were not happy about it and
i wrote letters to the local
| : papers criticizing his meth-
i ods. Even as years went by
? and chiropractic grew, the
: American Medical Associa-
i tion became more outraged
: at chiropractic success. Final-
? ly, in 1963 to 1975, the AMA
i implemented a well financed
i campaign to eliminate chiro-
i practic as a health care alter-
i native.
od is even shorter than pink cassia. ; blackballing doctors who
The leaves return and give good } associated professionally with

shade during the summer months and }
? agents around the country to

There is another Erythrina found medical schools to teach doc-

in The Bahamas that flowers more }
rarely than E. indica but has far more }
spectacular leaves. This is the tiger }

claw or Erythrina variegata that has }

large leaflets that may be 8-10 inches } had enough and in 1976 filed

across. Not only are they large, they } Suit against the AMA.

are variegated, the veins being high- ; lawsuit lasted 14 years but in

lighted in half-inch wide yellow mark- } the end,
ings. This makes the tree very attrac- } : ae
? anti-trust laws by conspiring

Its tactics included

chiropractors to sending it

tors in training that chiro-
practors were unscientific
cultist and quacks.

Finally, four chiropractors

The

the AMA was
declared guilty of violating

with it members to destroy

all consumers. It gave them
the freedom to pick the type

No healing art has all the
answers, but when medicine

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



ON
(Cy WOMEN & SEX

Menopause

HAVE you ever questioned
whether your internal central heat-
ing switch has suddenly been turned
on? You may have even wondered
if you were coming down with a
fever, or some other ailment. One
thing you knew for certain was that
you desperately wanted to shed
some clothing. The trickle of per-
spiration running down your cleav-
age was not only distracting but
potentially embarrassing. It may
even have got to the point that your
head felt like a pressure cooker and
you had visions of steam coming out
of your ears. Could it be possible
that the air-condition had stopped
working?

If this all sounds familiar then you
are officially a member of the
"Menopause Club.’ Members
include women just before, during
and after menses has discontinued.
The process can last anywhere from



5-15 years and the average age is 52
years. Some women have a gradual
onset of symptoms and declare
afterwards “Was that it?” Others
are hit with a lightning bolt and are
stopped in their tracks. If we take
the time to check hormone levels,
for those unfortunates, we note a
sharp plummet, rather than a grad-
ual decline. No wonder they feel as
if they have stepped off a cliff
instead of taking the slow, winding
path.

Hot flushes and flashes are often

the first sign that our old friend,
estrogen, has decided to withdraw
itself. If it were the only disruption
to our lives, then perhaps we could
tolerate 'the change’. Unfortunate-
ly, for a lot of women tagged along
with the day time heat are night
sweats and palpitations. A racing
heart rate accompanied by night-
mares is not only scary, but worri-
some.

Is it really so surprising that we
are cranky and irritable during the
day? We feel fragile, out of sorts,
and many of us feel as if we have
entered the ‘twilight zone’ as our
memory and concentration evade
us.

The list of insidious symptoms
grows longer as it affects our emo-
tional state of mind. Anxiety,
depression, and unhappiness, are
often accompanied with general
weakness, and tearfulness. If we are
unable to see what is happening,
then it is even more important for
our loved ones to pay attention.
Feelings of isolation, hopelessness
and lack of support fuel suicidal
thoughts and professional help is

definitely indicated.

When we are told our life
expectancy is extended and that one
third or even half our life could be
spent in post menopause, it makes
us sit up and think. Are we paying
enough attention to our general
health and lifestyle? If not, then it is
the perfect time to start because lose
of estrogen can affect our heart, cho-
lesterol, bone density, and weight.

Some medical professionals, view
menopause as another endocrine
disorder and treat it accordingly.
The list of signs and symptoms are
as important as other endocrine -
deficiency disorders, such as dia-
betes, and yet it still does not seem
to get sufficient attention. Is it
because of the emotional symptoms
that could be considered subjective?
We only have to look at how med-
ical insurance companies reimburse
emotional versus physical com-
plaints to know that they are con-
sidered less important.

There seem to be three approach-
es to dealing with this new period, in
our life. We can let Mother Nature
set her course, and just deal with

what ever comes along or we could
treat each problem as they reveal
themselves with the appropriate
medication. Or, we could choose to
replace the missing hormones, main-
tain our health, and in particular
our sexual health. Whichever path
we choose will require personal
research and an understanding of
our individual views on life.

For all the men reading this arti-
cle, you may have already thought
about life with a post menopausal
woman. Have you discussed it with
her and are you both going to follow
the same path? The Internet has
opened the door to information;
however we still need to push for
an increase in research. We need to
be our own advocate because our
future is in our hands.

¢ Listen to 'Love on the Rock’ with
Maggie Bain every Thursday 5-6pm on
Island FM 102.9

For appointments: call 364
7230,email
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

NLESS one explores every backyard, every

swamp, every forested land and every plant

habitat its impossible to see the myriad of
fruit trees present in the rich Bahamian soil.

Interestingly enough, if one did
explore the country’s many islands
they would find plants and fruit trees
that they have probably never seen
or heard of similar to the ones dis-
cussed in Tribune columnist, Jack
Hardy’s new book “Fruits of the
Bahamas.”

The book which was recently
released by Gardener Jack holds a
wealth of information about the
most popular and rare fruit trees in
the Bahamas.

This is the perfect book for per-
sons interested in growing fruit trees.
And whether you wish to purchase
fruit trees from local plant nurseries
or grow fruit from seeds, this book is
the perfect guide.

“There are some people who go
into the plant nurseries to purchase
plants for their gardens. And they
might pick up a plant that they don’t
really know that much about. The
name tag might be on the plant but
they don’t have one clue of how to
grow the plant. This is where my
book comes in providing helpful
information about the plant,” Gar-
dener Jack told Tribune Health.

He said that it is important to
research the type of fruit tree one is
interested in growing in their yards
since fruit trees have diverse “grow-
ing cultures”.

“There are some plants that may
thrive best in swampy areas and
others that thrive best in other con-
ditions,” he said.

In “Fruits of the Bahamas” read-
ers are exposed to a diversity of
fruit trees, their physical charac-
teristics and suggestions for grow-
ing. One example is the loquat,
which originated in China and is
not well known.

“There are hundreds of varieties
of loquat and they vary widely, so it
1s wise to buy a recognised variety
in order to get a good size and good
taste,” he explains in his book.

Fruits of the

Bahamas













“The fruit is usually
ovoid, contains 3-5 seeds,
and can be white, yellow,
or orange and a good tree
produces one of the tasti-
est treats of the tropics.
Unfortunately, fruits are
often more acid than
sweet, and the bearing sea-
son, in late spring is short.
The fruits are also subject
to attack from several
insects, notably the
Caribbean fruit fly,” the
book stated.

Other than the loquat fruit
tree, there are other trees the
book mentioned that might
just raise a brow.

Gardener Jack said the rea-
son why these particular fruit
trees may be unfamiliar to
some is because they are not
in abundance when compared
to fruit trees like jujube,
tamarind mango, or guinep.

“During the years of the post
wars some of the fruit trees
were brought to the Bahamas
by foreigners. For instance the
star fruit is not in abundance
and was brought here by for-
eigners as well,” he explained.

In the near future Gardener
Jack intends to release a new
book entitled “A Year With Gar-
dener Jack.”.

“Everything that I have ever
talk about concerning gardening
and vegetables will be included in
this book,” he said.

Jack Hardy is a retired teacher
and has been gardening since 1968.
Everything he has ever learnt
about gardening is by experience
and collecting information from
other experts and different books.

“Fruits of the Bahamas” is avail-
able at the Fox Hill Plant Nurs-
ery. It is also available in Marsh
Harbour, Abaco.



@Boanouiex:

Feet are your support for life!

IF YOU are in your mid-
dle years or beyond, you
would have had decades of
walking, jogging and standing
which can leave their mark
on your feet. It all boils down
to that one word “aging”.
Aging brings many changes
to your feet! Some changes
are normal such as losing the
fat padding in your feet thus
making the skin thinner or
changes in the shape of your
feet... but having pain is not
one of them.

Thinner Skin:

The plantar (bottom of
foot) fat pads protect the
bones, nerves and blood ves-
sels of the foot by absorbing
and dissipating energy from
impact and shearing forces
when you walk and run.
Moreover, those smooth, hard
man-made surfaces (paved



and concrete surfaces) signif-
icantly increase the impact
and shearing forces on the fat
pads, causing them to degen-
erate even faster.

Effects:

The long term effects of fat
pads deterioration leaves you
with the bony prominences
crying for cover. These bony
prominences no longer have
their protective pads and so
it is your responsibility to seek
the correct cover to protect
the bones, nerves and blood
vessels of the foot. You may
ask what happens if I don't

have the protective pads?
Well, you will be vulnerable
to foot injuries and pain which
can eventually lead to immo-
bility.

Shape:

The shape of the foot may
change with fallen or col-
lapsed arches. This happens
as ligaments become more
slack. As a result the foot flat-
tens and is made wider and
longer demanding larger and
more supportive footwear.
While this can occur with age,
it is also possible with weight
gain.

Effects:

Fallen or collapsed arches
cause a lot of problems in
addition to tremendous pain
along the plantar (bottom of
foot) area of the foot which is
commonly referred to as plan-

tar fasciitis. This affects your
entire body alignment, knees,
back and neck.

Always be mindful that you
feet are the foundation of
your entire body and should
be functional for life.

Skin:

As blood circulation to
your feet decreases with age
you will experience drier skin.

Cracks and blisters can also
develop and may not heal as
quickly due to poor circula-
tion in the feet.

Effects:

— Being fully aware to the
body's circulatory system
and how it is designed to
work.

— Poor circulation in your
feet can lead to a multitude
of problems and in some
instances may prove to be

fatal.

Suggestions:

Isuggest that you seek pre-
ventative care with the prop-
er footwear, correct foot
devices and the appropriate
footwear accessories. You
may move beyond the tradi-
tional style footwear and go
revolutionary with a rocker-
soled shoe to enhance your
exercise program and add a
little pep to your step. For
example, the 'Easy Tone’ and
the 'Chung Shi' line of
footwear have been scientifi-
cally designed as dynamic
workout tools. Their unique
‘rocker sole’ design to
increase circulation, improve
posture and strengthen joints.
This type of footwear will def-
initely rock your world by its
design to reduce the stress on
the joints.

The use of a well made
sock (e.g. Thorlos or Balega)
that is padded in the forefoot
and the heel area is also very
important to the health and



function of the foot. There
are many other foot health
products that you would find
by visiting a specialty
footwear facility, but most
essential it is important to
recognise that your feet are
changing with age and require
some tender loving care to
support you for life.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a
Board Certified & licensed
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of
Foot Solutions, a health and
wellness franchise that focuses
on foot care and proper shoe
fit, located in the Sandyport
Plaza, Nassau. Please direct
any questions or comments to
nassau@footsolutions.com or
327-

FEET, www.footsolutions.com/
Nassau

"The views expressed are those
of the author and do not nec-
essarily represent those of
Foot Solutions Incorporated or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies”.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2010, PAGE 11B





(AS
A Japanese epiphany

Japanese Toilets

This is basically a hole in
the floor where you have to
stoop to do what you have to
do. For months I have hated
them and have tried to avoid
them as much as possible
because if you’re not use to it,
it can be quite tricky. It was-
n't until I went to Kyoto and
used a public toilette that I
had an epiphany.

The bathroom stalls
weren't able to close proper-
ly so | happened to walk by a
stall where a lady had finish-
ing using the bathroom and
I saw inside her stall. It was
like a bolt of lightening and I
realised that I've been using
the toilette backwards for the
last 8 months!

It made so much more
sense. I guess if you’re used
to going one way for the past
20 years of your life you
would never think to turn
around. So now I am no
longer afraid when I go to
public bathroom. They really
should have an instruction
manual at the front of the
bathroom in English for for-
eigners.

Sankambi

A dreaded word for for-
eign staff. My school is the
most expensive in my pre-
fecture / area (about $500-
$700) a month. So once every
few months we have sankam-
bi where the parents come to
watch your lesson. It's a real
pain and I don't really like it
because they make us prac-
tice the same lesson for
weeks so the kids know what

THE WEATHER REPORT 222

S| Te | =

5-Day Forecast

i Br IY, .
eee
—



they are supposed to do. It
is more a performance than
an actual lesson but I guess if
you pay that amount of mon-
ey amonth you want to make
sure that it is perfect. How-
ever some things you can't
prepare for.

One of my colleagues was
ten seconds into her lesson
when two kids had a fist
fight- a Mike Tyson / Evan-
der Hollyfield type situation.
The teachers had to pull
them apart. We have no idea
how it started or why, but
you can't really predict what
kids will do on the day.

During my lesson, I had
K3 and maybe 1 minute into
it one of the kids decides to
take off his shoes and socks
strips off his pants and lays
on the ground and didn't
want to get up or put back
on his clothes. His sensei
(teacher) and I had to dress
him quickly. I'm like ‘Koichi
why today of all days?’ His
answer was it was hot. I was
like, ‘ok but next time can
you do that when your par-
ents aren't here watching

>

me.

Activities Activities

Again with this being the
most expensive school in this
prefecture there is always
something going on and

Path sunny ag
beeary

High: 75°

something that you have to
organise in addition to your
daily duties. After a long
vacation, stuff just keeps
coming up. The school is very
big on advertising and keep-
ing parents / customers hap-

After vacation it was
sankambi, then sports day,
then trial lesson (when ran-
dom people bring their kids
to the school and you give
them kind of a tour and you
show them what you can
teach their kids), a trip to the
zoo, the K5 out of town
school trip, then a Halloween
parade in the center of town,
open lesson which is kind of
like trial lesson and the list
goes on and on. You barely
have time to catch your
breath from one thing and
they are already talking about
what you are going to do for
the next thing. I never in my
life thought that I would be
working overtime at a school.

I just got off the bus from
the K5 school trip and only
went in the office to check
my messages when they were
like we have a meeting in 5
minutes about Seiko's festi-
val that is happening in two
weeks. I'm like geez can I
have five minutes after hav-
ing spent two days with 54
five year olds? That's how
they are though. They were
already talking about the
Christmas concert and we
were still drafting up our pro-
gram for the Halloween
event. You definitely have
to be on your toes here. Here
are some brief highlights

Pack cious
breary

High: 81"
ome Tz

Low 6"
ae T

e Snare

Poa nenay are

from some of these activities.

SPORTS DAY - We practiced
every day for like 2 weeks.
Running, bowing, dancing,
marching, it was crazy! I
mean who practices for
sports day? However the K5
marching band was really
something else though. It's
hard to believe that these
kids are only 5 years old.
Every beat, every march was
totally on time.

They asked me to run for
parents against staff relay
race. I was like me? Run???
You have to be crazy. Just
because I am black and from
the Caribbean does not
mean that I can run. They
settled for me being a com-
mentator after I strongly
protested.

KS SCHOOL TRIP - You know
those big school groups that
you see in Disneyland and
the teachers that look like
they going crazy? Well that
was me for two days. Japan-
ese children already all look
alike so when you mix them
up with another couple hun-
dred kids it is possible for
you to loose your mind.
Thank God for uniforms
and color coordinated hats if
not I might have brought the
wrong kids back.

The kids were given 10
dollars in the souvenir shop
and were told that they
could buy whatever they
wanted. Now when you give
kids money and tell them
they can buy what ever they
want some have the tenden-

all

Partly Suny with a
nh poo bls
High: 6"
Low: 75"

Tcae

ee

Bibs at for ace eg 1 pum peter

—

Nioeiy cloud
ois pos
High: a3"
Low: Ta?

| ua ee |e pues, wd Tuoi Doane |

cy to go a little crazy. Taiyo
Kun (see newsletter 5)
brought me like 50 dollars
worth of stuff and only had
$10. I was like dude you
have to put half these things
back. It took about twenty
minutes for him to decide
what he wanted to put back.
Another little boy only
bought a dollar worth of
candy. I told him that you
can buy more stuff. He was
like he wanted to save it for
later. I'm like whoa this is a
potential banker right here.

HALLOWEEN - So cute to see
about 120 kids dressed up
for Halloween. You had
everything from traditional
witches and pumpkins to
beautiful little princesses
and even a little footballer. I
went dressed as a panda,
even made my own costume.
A black and white apron
with a tail and little pandas
all over the apron. Who
knew that I could be cre-
ative!! If I could learn how
to cook there might be some
hope for me yet.

On a side note there was a
foreigner Halloween party
that night in Tokushima. I
wore my gold leotard
junkanoo outfit. I already
get stares when I walk down
the street wearing jeans and
a t-shirt, so imagine wearing
that and a feathered skirt
and walking the streets of
Japan!!

Bus duty and Hayato Kun
Every other morning we
have bus duty where we go to



the kids houses and pick
them up on the bus. On my
bus route we have really cool
kids so we talk and they learn
English and I learn Japanese.
However, there is one fool
of a bus driver that always
tells us to be quiet when we
don't make that much noise
(there are only 3 kids on the
bus and myself). But I told
him no I am here to interact
with the kids and he isa
kindergarten bus driver so
for him to expect complete
quiet is rather silly. So we
don't like each other. He
tries to get even by having
the music up really loud in
the bus before we go to pick
up the kids.

I’m like this man don't
know that doesn't bother me.
In the Bahamas we don't
catch a bus unless it lickin’, so
IT am thinking the louder the
better. So now we just say
"hello" and "goodbye" to
each other.

Hayato Kun is one of the
kids on the bus very smart
handsome little boy who
always wants to talk. I've
known him since last year
and we get along great. The
other day he came on the bus
and said "Coffi Sensei face
black why?" I guess he fig-
ured since summer was over
why do I still have my tan.

I almost fell out of my
chair from laughing so hard.
So I'm like how do I explain
race to a5 year old Japanese
boy. So I just said mother
and father face black. So my
face is black too. That answer
seemed to satisfy him.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, MARCH 9,

2010






A woman’s

By JEFFARAH GIBSON
Tribune Features Writer

IBUNE Woman has been on a
quest to uncover the true definition
of the word “ sexy” and as would

be expected, the meaning changes
between men and women.

Last week Tribune Woman, asked a few men
what is it they found engaging about a woman-
their responses included superficial and ‘beyond
the surface answers”.

This week we wanted to know what it is about
a man that makes a woman’s eye twinkle, and
stomach flutter.

And after speaking to these women a mutual
opinion shared by them is that -sexy is what sexy
thinks!

“Confidence is everything,” said Ava Turnquest
who said this tells much more about how a man
feels about himself.

“A guy that is sure of himself grabs my attention.
Not when he is over confident or cocky by the
way. Its just that when a man is sure of himself it
means that nothing that anyone says to him mat-
ters.”

She added that a man who is goal oriented and
has an idea of where his life is headed is a “good
catch.”

“What I also find very sexy is a man who does
not only know what he wants in a woman, but
knows what he wants in life,” she told Tribune
Woman.

From yester years women have been taught to
seek a mate that is goal oriented, will take the
lead, fulfilling his divine role as the sole provider
and bread winner of the home. And although
times have changed, this criteria hasn’t.

Aman that is desirous for success is probably in
every woman’s blueprint of the perfect man. This
particular quality open the eyes and raises the
eyebrow for Stacey Rolle* as well.

“A man that knows what he wants is great, but
aman that has the drive and is aggressive enough
to follow through is even better,” she said.

While she finds it very sexy when a guy is
aggressive at chasing his dreams, when he’s with
her he must tame that aggression and turn it into
gentleness.

He must unlock the key to her heart, surprise
her with hugs from behind and other affectionate
gestures non-sexual in nature.

“Looks aren’t most important to me. What I
like is a guy that is nice, sweet, caring and treat me
like a princess, this is my definition of sexy,” Stacey
explained.

On the other hand, Alesha Cadet said that a
man that is in control is the most enticing thing. To
her this is his rightful place.

“When I say I find a guy sexy that is in control,
I don’t mean a guy that is abusive or too aggres-
sive. I mean it in the sense that he doesn’t beckon
to my every call. A guy who allows me to run
over him is not going to get me interested,” she

Discover the goodness

definition of

told Tribune Woman.

Apart from the physical attributes one may
possess another woman Dahlia Graham* said that
a man that can resist a woman no matter how
beautiful she is will have her knees weak.

“For instance, if there is a guy who is in a com-
mitted relationship and there is a very beautiful
sexy woman who constantly throws herself at him’
and he resists her just to honour his commitment
with his partner gets ten stars from me. In some
odd way I find that very sexy, even a little mag-
netic, since most people know men are physical
and the fact that he can defy his nature makes
him powerful in my eyes” she said.

To Lola Cartwright* courtly love is an enchant-
ment in itself. “I want to know that chivalry is not
dead with me,” Lola said.

Unlike men, looks are the least bit important to
these women. However, that does not mean a guy
with an unkempt appearance, makes the cut. These
women said a man must be well groomed, and
have a ravishing finish to be the definition of sexy.

Jennie Hill* told Tribune Woman that a tall,
firmly built guy clad in a suit with a cigar pro-
truding from his mouth is ‘hot’.

“This heightens his sex appeal. I don’t know if
it’s because it brings out his masculinity but this is
very hot to me,” Jennie said.

The lingering fragrance of the Armani Code or
Calvin Klein cologne is enough to get the blood
running Jennie said.

“Wow aman that looks great and smells great
is enchanting,” she said.

A combination of great looks, confidence, ambi-
tion, and romance is what these women say make
a man sexy.

*Names have been changed.

of Ovaltine.





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