Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Full Text
m Lhe Tribune

=-USA TODAY

12F
BAHAMAS EDITION

Mc Oonald's downtenn

et ee

24 hours

Rage CEB Ly

LOW 62F

PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.81



Police

Commissioner
says incidents
are ‘isolated’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE country’s top police
chief yesterday sought to reas-
sure the public that the recent
spate of terrifying home inva-
sions are not part of a wider
trend.

Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade described the
attacks — which have includ-
ed a murder and a double kid-
napping — as “isolated” inci-
dents.

He said police are taking the
matters “very, very seriously.”

“There are some categories
of crime that, when they hap-
pen, create tremendous fear in
our communities, and so if you
have one home invasion it caus-
es tremendous fear. (Howev-
er) I don’t want to take that out
of context you don’t have peo-
ple in every community on
every street corner going into
homes. That’s not happening,
I have no information in that
regard,” said Mr Greenslade
yesterday.

On Monday, Henry McPhee

was murdered by an intruder
who broke into his home at
Oleander Drive, Coral Har-
bour.

Mr McPhee was shot in the
head while his girlfriend and
daughter were tied up and
robbed of valuables.

On Tuesday, a policeman’s
wife and daughter were kid-
napped from their Gladstone
Road home by two gunmen
who had demanded cash.

After being told there was
no money in the house, the ter-
rified couple were bundled into
the family’s Ford SUV.

After a short drive, the wife
was released while the daughter
escaped by leaping from the car
as it was moving.

Commissioner Greenslade
said he could not say whether
the incidents are connected.

However two men have been
arrested in connection with the
Oleander Drive attack, while
police are following “active
leads” into the second matter,

SEE page seven

Sands and Pinder lawyers
set for court appearance

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LAWYERS for by-election
contenders Dr Duane Sands
and Ryan Pinder will appear
before the Supreme Court next
Thursday for a date for a hear-
ing to be set.

It is expected the court will
settle on a date for the case to
begin. "There is a fixture date

m@ Government
investment for
public farmers’
market — PAGE 3

@ Law
students
urged to view
Â¥ potentials of
_| arbitration
— PAGE 6



set for March 4," confirmed
Milton Evans, of Evans and Co,
who is part of Dr Sands’ legal
team.

"That is the date appointed
when the court indicates that it
wants to see the interested par-
ties. The court will normally
give an indication as to the
direction of how they want to
proceed in terms of time and
scheduling. We should be able
to get a better indication as to
when the court will be able to
hear the case."

Thomas Evans, QC, also of
Evans and Co will serve as Dr
Sand's lead counsel.

This week, the PLP filed an
election court application to
have Mr Pinder declared the
winner of the hotly-contested
Elizabeth by-election arguing
that a clear majority of the vot-
ers voted for him. The crux of
their argument centres around
five protest ballots they claim
were cast in favour of Ryan Pin-
der.

Due to the slim margin of

SEE page seven

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

Aye
Ta
ME

SPENT Sy

lies vow
on hiome invasions

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents Sergeant Audley Dean with a “Pinnacle” award.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SS Sg

‘No more Police
(uestions for
talk show host’

POLICE Commis-
sioner Ellison
Greenslade went on
record yesterday to state
that controversial radio
talk show host Ortland
Bodie Jr will not face
any more questions from
his officers.

Mr Bodie was picked
up by the police on
Wednesday evening and
questioned in relation to
his possible possession
of an illegal firearm after
he claimed on national

SEE page 7





Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

Tourist recovering after cutlass attack

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist
is recovering in a Florida
hospital after he was slashed
with a cutlass by intruders
to his Harbour Island hotel
room early Thursday morn-
ing.

Sources say Eddie Bryant,
44, of Stamford, Connecti-
cut, nearly lost a finger when
he held up his arms to pro-
tect his face from the attack
after two men broke into his
Tingum Village room at
around 2am.

Mr Bryant was airlifted to
hospital in Nassau and then
flown to a Fort Lauderdale
hospital where he is receiv-
ing treatment for serious
injuries to his right arm and

SEE 7
Pee CHARGED: MARIO MOSS



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER

M@ Two men appear in Magistrate’s court

PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



@r NEW ERA OF RECOGNITION IN POLICE FORCE



COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
PC Clifford Wood with a “Pinnacle” award.





PC LEASER GAITOR receives her “Pinnacle” award from
Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.




COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade and Corpo-
ral Peter Walkes, who received a “Pinnacle” award.

om a B cl 4
COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade (left) pre-
sents Sergeant Leroy Brown with a “Pinnacle” award.

PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR

a mam he

RETIRED policemen pose with Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade

i i 3 !



Felipe Major/Tribune staff

(centre) and senior officers yesterday at

police headquarters. The retired officers were all honoured for their service and given the new “Pinnacle” award.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

USHERING in what top
officers described as a new era
of recognition for police offi-
cers and the sacrifice they make
for the Force and their com-
munities, Commissioner of
Police Ellison Greenslade yes-
terday presented awards to 19
recently retired police officers.

He also offered apologies to
those contracted officers of the
sergeant rank and below, who
from “time immemorial” have
left the police force without
adequate recognition for their
service. Mr Greenslade told the
media he believes that by doing
the “right and decent” thing by
formally recognising the con-
tributions and sacrifices made
by officers of all ranks, the
Force will be able to “make a
tremendous difference in terms
of our responses to the whole
issue of crime.”

“Trust me, there is a con-
nect,” said Mr Greenslade, who
suggested the retirement cere-
mony was part of an evolving
culture of “care, respect and
trust” within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

All the officers were of
sergeant rank and below, and
would previously have only
informally received a certificate
of discharge upon retirement
in a quick “two second” meet-
ing with the commissioner in

YOUNG BAHAMIANS

Imagine a career which will take you to the world’s most fascinating ports and far flung

destinations. A Maritime career could take you there.

Do you have, or are likely to have, § BGCSE passes, including Math, Physica'Combined

Science and English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?

Have you obtained, or do you expect fo achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 15007

Are you physically fit?

Are you between the ages of 16 and 20 years’?

It you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority offers another attractive scholarship to young
academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting and challenging
career in the Maritime industry which Is gaining increasing nathonal importance.

The scholarship is inchusive of tuition fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs. Commencing in September 2010 the successful candidate will
follow a4 year degree programme ai the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus
of the California State University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officer will
be expected to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing

the solid foundation on which te bulld his/her Maritime career.

Fe.





Further information and application forms
can be obtained from Mre Erma Rahming

Mackey, Deputy Director,

Bahamas,

emackey@bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 356
Sifz fax: 356 5663. Completed
applications must be submitted along with
copies of academic certificatesranscripts
and proof of Bahamian citizenship, mot
later than 31" March, 2010. Interviews will
take place in Nassau during the last week

in April.



Bahamas
Maritime Authority, Manx Corporate Centre,
Weal Bay Street, PO Box N-4679, Nassau,

@ AWARDEES

The officers who received the
“Pinnacle” award are: Sgt 1018
Brady Simms, Sgt 787 Christo-
pher Knowles, Sgt 823 Ernest
Rahming, PC 992 Rudolph Bur-
rows, Cpl 89 Gwendolyn Smith,
Sgt 1025 Eden Zonicle, Cpl 913
Ulysses Curry Jr, Cpl 1286
James Smith, PC 1031 Leaser
Gaitor, PC 975 Anton Lockhart,
PC 6 Clifford Wood, PC 982 Col-
in Butler, Sgt 552 Gregory
Munroe, Sgt 1089 Leon Wilch-
combe, Sgt 977 Audley Dean,
Cpl 317 Freddie Thompson, Sgt
1247 Carl Pinder, Sgt 926 Leroy
Brown and Cpl 931 Peter
Walkes.

his office. Yesterday, each was
photographed, personally con-
gratulated for their service and
given the newly-created “Pin-
nacle” award by Mr Greenslade
to take home.

“These men and women
have given stellar service, they
have sacrificed and some have
even been injured. (Commis-
sioner Greenslade) felt it should
be mandatory for an organisa-
tion to recognise that,” said
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna, modera-
tor at the retirement ceremony
held at police headquarters.

Mr Greenslade described the
officers, who together have

email:



served almost 600 years in the
various divisions and agencies
of the RBPF, as “men and
women who have committed
themselves to the police force
as youngsters right out of
school. All they know is law
enforcement and serving the
people of the Bahamas.”

He thanked them for their
“selfless contribution” in mak-
ing the Bahamas safer.

Commissioner Greenslade
said that he intends for such
ceremonies to become a staple
of the police calendar as they
will be instituted for all retir-
ing officers. At the retirement
ceremony yesterday, Mr
Greenslade spoke casually to
the officers, who he called his
“family”, about his desire to see
more unity among all ranks of
the force and suggested that
with this achieved, their effec-
tiveness in tackling crime would
only be enhanced.

“Imagine how powerful we
can be, all 4,500 of us, truly con-
nected. Eyes and ears open.
Demonstrating care, respect
and trust among one another.
And if we get that right, imag-
ine conveying that to the wider
community in the Bahamas and
getting people to reciprocate
and love you back. There’s
nothing that the public wouldn’t
tell you. Imagine what they’ll
tell us. If we work on care,
respect and trust, it’s going to

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents PC
Rudolph Burrows with his “Pinnacle” award.



pay tremendous benefits,” he

said.

A 20-year-old Nassau man
has been charged with having
unlawful sex with a 12-year-



old girl and was arraigned in a
Magistrates Court yesterday.

Johinan Gaudin, of Cow-
pen Road, has been remand-
ed in custody until Wednes-
day.

He was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomex in Court One, Bank
Lane, at around 4pm yester-
day and charged with having
unlawful sexual intercourse
with the child on February 17.

Service Times for

George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



SERGEANT Ernett Rahming (right) is given his “Pinnacle”
award by Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.





COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
and PC Anton Lockhart with his “Pinnacle” award.

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade with
Sergeant Gregory Munroe who was presented with a
“Pinnacle” award.

Man accused of unlawful sex with 12-year-old girl

Mr Gomez adjourned the
matter until Wednesday and
prosecutors requested for
Gaudin to be remanded in
custody as police are unsure
of his immigration status.

A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is enough evidence
against him for the matter to
be tried in the Supreme
Court.

Christ Church Cathedral

Anglican/Episcopal Church

Sunday, February 28", 2010

Second Sunday In Lent

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Parish’s Annual General Meeting will take place
on Sunday, February 28", 2010.

ALL Services will be held at their usual times with the
exception of Evensong.

9:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

Holy Communion with Sermon

Sung Holy Eucharist with Sermon

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Holy Communion with Sermon

PLEASE NOTE: There will be no Evening Service.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





(en)
Na LY,

PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(EN
Na DY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon) LL.D. D:Litt,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Disparate cultures on display on Hill

WASHINGTON — Corporate leaders
in Japan are affable cheerleaders who solic-
it everyone's views and avoid confrontation
at almost any cost. It's called "nemawashi."
USS. lawmakers are cutthroat partisans who
clamour for the spotlight, especially in an
election year. It's called politics.

These cultures collided Wednesday in the
appearance of a polite man from a distant
land before a congressional committee
stocked with angry men and women with
axes to grind.

Toyota President Akio Toyoda's moment
was one brought to us by globalization, the
integration of economies and societies
through a worldwide network of trade and
communications. Toyoda's appearance illus-
trated two stark realities: Nations are more
knitted together than ever, and still oh-so far
apart.

A generation ago, it was good politics in
Congress to bash Japan and buy American.
Now USS. lawmakers grab campaign money
from Toyota executives and scramble to
save Toyota jobs in their districts.

Auto workers used to take sledgeham-
mers to foreign cars. Now thousands of them
work for foreign companies, and U.S. car
dealers wear "I am Toyota in America" but-
tons to Capitol Hill.

And consider the hearing itself, where
American directness confronted Japanese
subtlety as Toyoda apologized for life-threat-
ening safety lapses and for a corporate cul-
ture that may have made things worse.

The grandson of the company's founder
noted that the vehicles bear his name. "For

e," Toyoda said in a thin, reedy voice,
"when the cars are damaged, it is as though
Tam as well.”

It was a uniquely Japanese way to lead
in crisis. How often do troubled U.S. leaders
call themselves damaged goods?

Unlike in the United States, where self-
promoting corporate leaders cast themselves
as buck-stops-here demigods, the heads of
Japanese companies are chosen for their
skills at team decision-making. Most climbed
the corporate ladder without rocking the
boat, and humility is prized.

Their job is to ensure stability and har-
mony.

Harmony? Not a word usually associated
with the US. corporate culture. Or Con-
gress.

"This is appalling, sir," said Rep. John
Mica, R-Fla., waving copies of a July 2009
presentation at Toyota's Washington office.
The confidential document bragged of saving
$100 million or more by negotiating an
"equipment recall" of floor mats involving
55,000 Toyota vehicles in September 2007.

"I'm embarrassed for you, sir," Mica said.

Toyoda, who earned a business degree in
Massachusetts, is no stranger to the United
States. But he's probably unaccustomed to

"

A leading je
i Iperanon,

the impatience — and at times the imperti-
nence — of US. lawmakers.

Their questions came “with all due
respect,” a caveat that paves the way for
countless slights on Capitol Hill.

Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., pressed
Toyoda about whether the company could
correct the acceleration problem. Toyoda
gave a long, indirect answer — establishing
a pattern for the hearing.

"I'm trying to find out," an exasperated
Towns said, "is that a yes or ano?"

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who received
a $1,000 campaign contribution in December
from the president of a Toyota dealership in
California, jumped to Toyoda's defence. He
explained that a complicated problem
required complicated answers.

Toyoda gave his opening statement in
heavily accented English. He fielded ques-
tions through a translator, but clearly had
command of the situation — and used the
extra time to consider his answers.

Early on, the company president reached
across the table to pull a microphone closer
to his translator, and when asked a ques-
tion, he nodded to her and said, " Will trans-
late.”

And so it went, this lively blend of busi-
ness and political cultures played out before
the cameras — globalization in a box, the
21st century condensed into a single Capitol
Hill committee room.

But it wasn't pretty. Not with so many
lives at risk or already wasted by mechanical
defects. Not with so many lawmakers and
Obama administration officials hoping the
accountability stops with Toyoda and Toy-
ota, sparing them.

The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration received more than 2,500
consumer complaints about Toyota before
aggressively dogging the company in late
2009. Congress, which has oversight author-
ity on NHTSA, is only now asking tough
questions.

"NHTSA failed the taxpayers,” Towns,
the committee chairman, said before swear-
ing in Toyoda. "Toyota failed their cus-
tomers."

Still, after two days of hearings, there is
too much we don't know.

Why did some cars accelerate out of con-
trol? Why did others not stop? What else
might go wrong?

Is my car safe?

At the end of the day, Congress and Toy-
ota delivered more theatre than answers.
Cultures collide. Globalization enters the
so-what phase. Political and business leaders
struggle to lead. All true.

But whether in Japan or on Capitol Hill,
in a car accident you're just as dead.

(This article was written by Ron Fournier
of the Associated Press).



oe ellery retailer is seeking: a PeTson for this senior po sition in its Nassau

IvLAND MANAGER

‘The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and profits are

optimized by ewsromer service ard Proper Maintenance of inventory controls

according to established company procedures.

‘The ideal candidate should possess:

' Intesrity, knergene motvational skills and Assernveness

‘ A minimum of 5
gales is preferred

years multi store management experience in retail jewellery

The ability to manage and supervise store managers
The ability to provide motivation and demonsteate leadership to improve

customer satistaction and sales performance

Good Educanonal Background

Management)

{Associate

depree or above in Business

Accredited jewellery professional qualification (GLA or equivalent) is preferred

Proven skills with Inventory

training

management,

merchandising, marketing atid

Good kin wheder of COM PRUTCES and administration

‘The position offers an excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested person should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242-328-5902



An open letter to
Matthew McCoy
from BEC

management

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Reference is made to your
letter addressed to Fred Got-
tlieb, the former Chairman of
BEC and which was published
in The Abaconian.

It is most unfortunate that
you attempt to discredit Mr
Gottlieb by taking his state-
ments out of context. You
should be aware that the sul-
phur emissions (in Abaco) are
directly related to the sulphur
content of oil. Hence, by using
oil with a lower sulphur con-
tent (percentage), the sulphur
emissions (parts per million)
would be reduced.

Therefore, as stated by Mr
Gottlieb, the use of a lower sul-
phur oil will result in lower sul-
phur emissions. This is a fact.
Further, the emissions will meet
international standards.

With regards to monitoring
of the emissions in Abaco, as
previously stated, ambient air
monitoring devices have been
installed not only on the site,
but also in surrounding areas.
The data captured from the
same will be collected by an
independent environmental
specialist firm and made acces-
sible to various stakeholders.

Additionally, an Environ-
mental Officer will be stationed
at the site to further re-enforce
the Corporation’s commitment
to the safety and sustainability
of the environment.

We trust that this informa-
tion provides clarity to the read-
ers and corrects your attempts
to discredit Mr Gottlieb by tak-
ing his statements out of con-
text.

Management
Bahamas Electricity
Corporation

Matthew McCoy responds to
BEC
Dear Sirs,

Not only did I not take Mr
Gottlieb’s statements out of
context, but BEC missed a real
opportunity for community
education and relations with
their misleading letter pub-
lished in response to mine.
Please allow me to explain.

At the 2009 September pub-
lic meeting Mr Gottlieb was
talking about international safe-
ty standards, and he stated:
“The HFO fuel that will be
used will result in less than 2
per cent sulfur emissions, which
is well below the World Health
Organisation’s (WHO), accept-
ed standards.” Later in the
same meeting Phenton Ney-
mour stated that 2 per cent sul-
fur content in the fuel meets
the World Bank standards.
Then, during the tour of the
























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letters@triounemedia.net



plant in December, Mr Got-
theb was shown on Cable 12
saying that the plant would
meet international emissions
standards by having 2 per cent
sulfur content in the fuel.

The context of all these state-
ments, and others to the press,
is meeting emission standards.
And BEC representatives have
been saying that a fuel source
with 2 per cent sulfur will meet
those standards. The WHO, the
World Bank, and the US Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
have published their emission
standards online, and all are
easy to contact to confirm their
standards. None present any
standards for sulfur content in
the fuel source, only standards
for the emissions themselves.
Also the emissions are not mea-
sured in percentages but in
micro grams per cubic meter.
Simple context, simple state-
ments, simply wrong.

In their letter to me, BEC
further states that “the sulfur
emissions content is directly
related to the sulfur content of
the oil. Hence, by using a lower
sulfur content (percentage) the
sulfur emissions (parts per mil-
lion) would be reduced.” It is
true that it will result in lower
sulfur dioxide emissions, but
this is not the whole story.

First, you cannot directly
convert fuel content into emis-
sions, there are too many com-
bustion and mechanical factors
specific to each engine. There is
no straight formula to go from 2
per cent sulfur content to meet-
ing the WHO standards. How-
ever, in the United States, HFO
plants without proper emission
controls cannot meet the fed-
erally enforced emission stan-
dards. Because BEC will have
no emission controls (like
scrubbers), and because the
WHO and World Bank stan-
dards are tougher than those
of the United States, it would
be a major miracle if this new
plant, using HFO fuel, can meet
those standards. It simply, phys-
ically, cannot.

BEC will argue that it has
emission controls in the form
of stack height manipulation,
however, this does not change
the amount of emissions, only
where the emissions go. This is
not a legal emission reduction
technique in the US or the EU.
It is sort of like saying it’s okay
to throw your trash out of the
window as long as you throw it
far enough in a certain direc-
tion.






At EeStlam - 12supm

Second, the sulfur content of
diesel used for industrial uses is
.0S per cent. So we can see that
Abaco’s new fuel source will
have 40 times the sulfur con-
tent of our regular diesel fuel
source.

Third, and finally, sulfur
dioxide is not the only emis-
sion, and may be the least wor-
risome. In the WHO Air Qual-
ity Guidelines (freely available
online) it is explained that cur-
rent scientific research indicates
that sulfur dioxide is probably
not as harmful or dangerous as
other emissions, particularly
nitrogen oxide and particulate
matter. Particulate matter is a
very real, very serious, health
hazard. HFO is loaded with
particulate matter, and as over
the years as the refining process
of crude oil has become more
sophisticated, more and more
of this dangerous stuff has been
concentrated in HFO, the left
over sludge.

And because diesel is a dis-
tilled fuel source, it has ZERO
particulate matter.

The missed opportunity here
is that BEC could have apolo-
gised for their mistake about
emission standards while simul-
taneously inviting all concerned
residents to engage in mean-
ingful discussions about the
future of the plant and offered
to share all their data collec-
tion results and techniques with
the whole public.

BEC has repeatedly said that
they want to be more open
about this plant, yet they con-
tinue to try and discredit all
those who raise serious ques-
tions about the plant with out-
dated, and made up data. They
continue to raise walls of secre-
cy between the real reasons for
the plant and the general pub-
lic. They continue to do busi-
ness as usual.

But in the modern world,
business as usual no longer
works. It used to be that BEC
and the government could do
something of questionable and
then cover it up with vague
speeches about the betterment
of the community and lots of
outdated and false data. They
could then count on the pub-
lic’s lack of access to raw data
and information, most of it
deliberately controlled by the
government’s secrecy policies.
This can no longer work.

We live in a world where
everything is recorded and
searchable, context and all.
Anything BEC or any politi-
cian publicly states can be
looked up later in free online
newspaper archives as well as
audio and video archives. All
of which provide the original
context. Now, our leaders can
really be held accountable, and
they should be. They need to
be.

We also live in a world where
anyone with access to the inter-
net can by-pass the govern-
ment’s attempts to limit knowl-
edge and education to go
straight to the real information.
It doesn’t take long, and it can
be confirmed easily with other
sources outside of the country.
Anyone can contact any expert
or corporation or, say, the
World Health Organisation.
The real information is avail-
able, and it often contradicts
and discredits what the politi-
cians and BEC are trying to sell
the public.

It is too bad BEC didn’t use
this opportunity to try and open
themselves up to real collabo-
ration with the community
instead of trying to beat it into
submission with false state-
ments and aggressive market-
ing.

Collaboration with an edu-
cated population is the only
way to create a sustainable
economy on Abaco, or any oth-
er island in the Bahamas. We
need local input and local initi-
ation.

And we need to be able to
let local people hold central
government accountable for the
bad decisions and mistakes they
make.

That is the future. BEC’s cur-
rent strategy is the past, and it is
economically, socially, and envi-
ronmentally crippling.

BEC may not want to
acknowledge the real standards,
but anyone who cares about
Abaco should go straight to the
source and look it up them-
selves.

MATTHEW
McCOY
Abaco,
February, 2010.



an
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





(cy SIR SIDNEY POITIER IN THE BAHAMAS

IN DAYS

— a



JANUARY 27, 1972

CAUGHT IN THE ACT? - Not quite, Sidney Poitier
was merely presenting the authentic Western gun
used by him in “Buck and the Preacher” to Lady
Thurlow; he was not robbing her. Mr Poitier gener-
ously donated the gun along with antique silver
cases, one a calling card case, the other a matchbox
case; a pair of powerful binoculars and two inter-
esting sculptors books hand-done in pewter which
original designs done by H Dessaunt in aid of a
auction held at Government House.




THIS week In Days Gone By looks back at some of the time American-Bahamian actor Sir Sid-
ney Poitier spent in the Bahamas. This past week, the College of the Bahamas held a lecture series
and film festival celebrating his life’s work. The event was also marked by a minor controversy.

The most vocal critic of the festival, filmmaker and founder of the Bahamas Film Festival Celi
Moss, publicly lambasted the college for using its resources to honour Sir Sidney, questioning what
the Academy Award-winning actor and diplomat has done to further arts in the Bahamas.




AUGUST 20, 1987

THE MOUNTAIN TO MUHAMMED - As in the old adage, when it
became clear that a tight shooting schedule would prevent Bahamian
actor Sidney Poitier from accepting an invitation to lunch with execu-
tives of the Bahamas Film Promotion Bureau, the luncheon was
brought to the film star...aboard a 40-foot ‘luxury yacht’, according to
a Bahamas News Bureau release. Poitier, “working in his native time
in his successful movie career’, was involved in shooting a sequence
from an upcoming Disney feature, “Mountain King”. Pictured from left
are Cordell Thompson, deputy director of the Bahamas Film Promotion
Bureau; Darlene Davis, executive coordinator of the bureau; Mr Poiti-
er, Julia Burnside, a cousin of the star who works at the Ministry of
Tourism, and E John Deleveaux, director of the Film Promotion Bureau.

AUGUST 13, 1987

ACTORS SCUFFLE -
Under the direction of
Roger Spottiswoode (left),
a actor Sidney Poitier scuf-
fles with Clancey Brown
in rehearsal for a scene
from the new Disney
adventure movie, “Moun-
tain King”. A crucial
sequence from the movie
was shot in the Bahamas.

JUNE 14, 1974

THIS scene looks like a meet-
ing of the Sidney Poitier fan club
with all the admiring looks on the
faces of the four children. Actual-
ly, they were the four lucky ones
chosen to meet the super star

If you have any sugges-
tions for future ‘In Days
Gone By’ please e-mail them
to Rupert Missick, Jr, at
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



JUNE 13, 1974

‘AND HOW ARE YOU DOING
TODAY?’, Sidney Poitier seems to
be asking these four lucky chil-
dren who greeted him at the airport
today. Bringing with him a copy
of his latest film “Uptown Saturday
Night” which premieres Friday
night at the Shirley Street Theatre.
Sir Sidney paused for a chat with
the children, students of the Sta-
pledon School for Retarded Chil-
dren, the beneficiary of the world
premiere showing of his film. Pos-
ing with the children is their
teacher Ms Gwen Robertson.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
A Sa
SAO aH

De Day
ea ALy |



ANDRE Yp..,
~ SCHOOL

Y
@ world school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates

for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.

Full information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

when he arrived at the Nassau
Airport yesterday. Bringing with
him a copy of his latest film
“Uptown Saturday Night” which
premieres tonight at the Shirley
Street Theatre, the actor paused
to chat with the children, stu-
dents of the Stapledon School for
Retarded Children, the beneficia-
ry of the world premiere showing
of the film.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are particularly welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.



Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

RED CROSS SOCIETY

“SERVING THE BAKAMAS FOR 70 YEAR

FAIR 2010

LOWER GARDENS

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of
the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in
the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and preferably
trained in, the PYP.

Primary School Spanish: Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide
team.

Primary School Music: Candidates must be fully qualified and have
successful teaching experience at all Years from Pre Reception to Year 6.
They must also have successful experience in organizing primary school
music and drama performances.

Primary School Library Media Specialist: The primary school library
media specialist develops, implements and interprets an effective library
media and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6.
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful experience as
a school librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT
teacher.

en | a

SATURDAY
MARCH 6, 2010

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

Letter of application

A personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
A full curriculum vitae,

Either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 12 March 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Future financing and preventive

component of Drug Plan highlighted (Uy cs

PHASE I of the $8 million
National Prescription Drug
Plan is being financed entirely
by the medical benefits branch
of the National Insurance
Board (NIB), however, future
phases will be funded by a com-
bination of payroll deductions,
government grants and coordi-
nation of benefits with insur-
ers, NIB director Algernon
Cargill recently told health pro-
fessionals at a meeting held in
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera.

“In the second phase we’ve
estimated a one per cent con-
tribution from the insurable
wage to fund the programme
so that works out to a maxi-
mum of $4 a week or $2 for the
employer and $2 for the
employee per week based on
the insurable wage ceiling of
$400,” Mr Cargill said.

He also said NIB will work
with private insurance compa-
nies to coordinate benefits so

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDLEY JEAN BAPTISTE of
MARGARETTE AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20"
day of FEBRUARY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Sales Jobs

AVAILABLE

Jewelry Stores on Bay Street and
Paradise Island



We are looking for some energetic and outgoing
individuals to join the sales team immediately.

Experience with jewelry is a plus but we are
willing to train non-experienced people who
have the right attitude and personality

Salary plus generous commission plan.
Fax resume to 393-5102
for immediate consideration.

No Jesus,

ite _ if as z
‘Know Jesus,

Come, joinus as we know Jesus Personally
by listening and studying the Word ‘of|God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
pte ad

SUNDAY SERVICES

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY af 7:30 p.m

RADIO



MINISTRY



NURSES and doctors from Eleuthera’s clinics attended the presentation on the National Prescription Drug
Plan.

that in future phases members
with private health insurance
will reap the maximum value
from the Drug Plan and their
private plans.

Pre-registration for Phase I
of the National Prescription
Drug Plan is currently in
progress throughout the
Bahamas for approximately

35,000 NIB pensioners, invalids
and children with one or more
of eleven chronic conditions.

Additional

According to Mr Cargill, the
next phase of the Drug Plan
will include an additional
100,000 persons.

During the meeting in
Eleuthera, Dr Stanley Lalta,
project manager for the Drug
Plan, also outlined details of
the Plan’s future preventive or
“healthy people” component
which will focus on funding
health promotion and wellness
projects in the community.

“We want to make an invest-
ment in health promotion well-
ness, and prevention. What we
said is that we will set aside
some of the funds from the Plan
in order to engage organisa-

tions in preparing very good
projects that can be funded. I
have to tell you that it’s not free
money. It has to be a very well
designed project. A project that
has a clear start date and end
date, clearly stipulated objec-
tives, clearly stipulated targets
and the management team has
to be very clearly indicated so
that we can have confidence
that the money put into the
project is going to create the
value that we’re looking for,”
Dr Lalta said.

He emphasised that such
projects will be monitored and
evaluated to determine their
effectiveness and ability to be
replicated in other communi-
ties. He also predicted that an
accumulation of small, success-
ful projects by non-govern-
mental organisations would
have a major impact on health
and wellness in the Bahamas.

PRIVATE physician Dr Cliff Bacchus (centre) of Eleuthera says the
National Prescription Drug Plan is a “good step forward”.
















ALGERNON Cargill,
director of the National
Insurance Board (cen-
tre) recently addressed
Eleuthera health profes-
sionals on the National
Prescription Drug Plan.
Seated are Dr Stanley
Lalta, project manager
(left), and Alexander
Williams, island admin-
istrator of Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Suneiay Schookt 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching Vlam& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2NS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise ?:30om

2

Pastor:H. Mile

No Peace
Know Peace

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phome: 392-0663 = Box Mae? ;

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2010
11:30am Speaker

Pastor Marcel Lightbourne
Topic: “Our Responsi

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Be.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Visit Qur Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

eee Cum ue eis Ti|
eC eee
Sn oe Coca nese ca

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs
















































Law students urged

UBT PLT

: —
PICTURED (left to right) JUSTICE Hugh Small, Tonya Bastian-
Galanis, principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School and Attorney
General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney at the

Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar on
Wednesday as a part of Legal Education Week.

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

ATTORNEY General and
Minister of Legal Affairs Sena-
tor John Delaney encouraged
lawyers and lawyers-to-be to
view arbitration as a new area
within which they might equip
themselves. j

“You may be called upon to ze
draft arbitral provisions, to serve i)
as counsel in arbitration proceed- 1
ings, expert witnesses on Bahami- ATTORNEY General and Min-
an law, as a member of an arbi- igter of Legal Affairs Senator
tration panel,” said the Attorney John Delaney addresses the
General. arbitration seminar spon-

Senator Delaney addressed sored by the Eugene Dupuch
the Eugene Dupuch Law School | aw School Students’ Asso-

Students’ Association arbitration gation on Wednesday. He
seminar on Wednesday as part —_ addressed the topic “The
of Legal Education Week. He Arbitration Act 2009”.
addressed the topic “The Arbi-

tration Act 2009”.

The Attorney General said in 2010 the legal profession and
the commercial community will meet a new arbitration regime
following the enactment of the Arbitration Act, 2009 and the
Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral Awards) Act 2009 at the end of
last year. “Together they comprise a new Bahamian arbitral
regime which is expected to be brought in force in the coming
months by Appointed Day Notice. The Foreign Arbitral
Awards law gives effect in the Bahamas to the New York Con-
vention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbi-
tral Awards, to which the Bahamas became party effective
2007,” he said.

“On commencement, the new Bahamian regime will whol-
ly replace the law of 1889 which governs arbitration in the
Bahamas. In so doing, it will establish state-of-the-art legal
infrastructure for arbitration in the Bahamas.”

Senator Delaney explained that arbitration provides a pri-
vate means of determining disputes arising under contractual
relationships and is an alternative to the court process.

He pointed out some of the major advantages of arbitra-
tion including privacy, speed, cost effectiveness, technical
expertise and convenience in matters of procedure, venue
and time. ““Where there is good arbitral regime and availabil-
ity of suitable arbitrators, the relative disadvantages in com-
mercial matters are few,” he said.

“The new Bahamian regime is robust comprehensive and
modern. It substantially corresponds with the statutory pro-
visions of England, which is a major international seat for
commercial arbitration. We have every confidence that it will
serve our jurisdiction well both in the context of domestic
and international arbitration.”

He encouraged lawyers and law students to equip them-
selves, embrace the opportunities and do their part to make
the country a “preferred seat for commercial arbitration.”

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

CHIEF Justice Sir Michael Barnett addresses the sixth annual
Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar held
at the British Colonial Hilton on Wednesday.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO,.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev.Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Thompson
7:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Board of General Education

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace Pet 1 Perec Church
A Society of The Free Methediat Church of
North America

Church School during Worship Service
Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box §8-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
‘lelefax number: 324-2587



an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

he said.

“We responded very swiftly
to those and we’ve had some
successful interventions.”

On Thursday, a man identi-
fied by Tribune sources as 50-
year-old Hubert Hall was shot
dead by police in Tower Estates

Police chief's vow

Drive after he threatened offi-
cers who were investigating
claims that two men were seen
going from house to house try-
ing to open the doors of cars
and homes. Police are still look-

ing for the second man.

Mr Greenslade said part of
the police’s recent approach to
tackling such crimes is ensur-
ing they have “lots of people
on the front lines.”

“We are up and about. All
of our commanders have been
tasked to put officers on the
front line. We’ve asked them
to get those officers out of the

‘No more Police questions for talk show host’

FROM page one

radio that he knew the whereabouts of illegal
weapons.

Accepting responsibility for this “reprehensi-
ble” remark, Mr Bodie himself informed The
Tribune that he was initially flabbergasted by
the request of the police to search his home, but
naturally consented to their requests.

“The statement was made in response to a
caller’s concerns about the prevalence of crime
and firearms being used to perpetuate them.
Loose sensational lips do sink ships. Words are
capable of being interpreted and misinterpreted
based on the environment they are uttered.

“T have not been charged, but was released

‘pending further investigations’. There is
absolutely no doubt in my mind that I will, at the
end of those investigations, that I will be exon-
erated. I wish to thank the scores of persons who
came down to CDU to offer me comfort.”

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in rela-
tion to the matter, Commissioner Greenslade
commended his officers for acting swiftly and
professionally.

He said that as Mr Bodie had made some com-
ments that caused the police to have reasonable
suspicion, they were duty bound to act.

“Subsequent to the investigation that was
launched we were satisfied there was nothing
else to be done. No charges are being offered
against Mr Bodie. It’s a done deal,” he said.

station, into police cars and on
cycles out into the communi-
ties,” said the top officer, who
credited this strategy with hav-
ing resulted in the “successful
intervention” in Tower Estates
Drive. When quizzed as to what
advice he may have for the pub-
lic on further protecting them-
selves from becoming victims
of crime, Mr Greenslade turned

Ul a

the tables, suggesting that the
country’s crime problem could
be “solved overnight” if more
people “took responsibility.”
“Take responsibility for
yourself, take responsibility for
your household, take responsi-
bility for your communities.
Again I come back to the busi-
ness of how you are safe when
the people who live with you

Tourist recovering after cutlass attack

FROM page one

hand.

The brutal attack has rocked
the community of around 2,000
residents who fear crime is spi-
raling out of control in the idyl-
lic tourist destination which is
home to hundreds of winter vis-
itors and a popular haven for
the rich and famous.

However, nine burglaries on
the island over the last week
has instilled fear of crime for
winter visitors and permanent
residents who are concerned
crime could negatively impact
the lucrative tourist economy.

North Eleuthera MP and
Speaker of the House of
Assembly Alvin Smith said the
crime rate in Harbour Island is
the highest in his constituency,
which stretches across the
mainland and cays north of
Governor’s Harbour airport.

He has called on Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF)
Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade to step up security
on the island, which was
manned by seven police offi-
cers under a police sergeant

Sands and Pinder lawyers set for court appearance

FROM page one

votes between Dr Sands of the
FNM and Mr Pinder of the
PLP — who received 1,501 and
1,499 regular votes respectively
— these protest votes are cru-
cial and prevent an official win-
ner from being certified, it is
argued.

Under the law, these protest
votes can only be certified and
added to the ballot box by an
election court, which can also
determine a lawful winner in
the race.

Prime Minister and leader of
the FNM Hubert Ingraham has
indicated that his party will
question Ryan Pinder's eligi-
bility to run in the Elizabeth
constituency by-election during
election court.

Mr Pinder, born to a
Bahamian father and an Amer-
ican mother, held American
and Bahamian citizenship for

until Chief Inspector Roston
Moss was posted there perma-
nently the day before the
attack.

Local police further struggle
with limited resources claims
Mr Smith. He said their most
reliable vehicle is a golf cart not
nearly fast enough to catch
criminals.

“T think the police are going
to put more resources and focus
into Harbour Island because
these break-ins have been hap-
pening for quite a while and I
don’t think police were taking
them as seriously as they ought
to,” the MP said.

“We shouldn't have to wait
until such a degree of violence
occurs before we address crime.

“But I am convinced now
that police will put more
resources out there and take
these matters more seriously.

“IT am pleased with the
recommitment of the police and
the assurances the Commis-
sioner has given me in review-
ing manpower and equipment
in North Eleuthera, particular-
ly in Harbour Island, where we
have had the highest number
of criminal activity and regular

years. According to a letter
received by The Tribune, Mr
Pinder renounced his Ameri-
can citizenship on January 20,
2010, nine days before the nom-
ination date, confirming his eli-
gibility to run in the recently
held by-election.

"The government of the
United States no longer con-
siders Mr Pinder to be a US cit-
izen," the letter read.

"His US passport is no
longer valid and has been for-
warded to the issuing agency
within the US government."

Yesterday, Mr Evans would
not confirm if this argument
would still be part of the FNM's
strategy.

"T can't speak to that. When
we get there we will indicate
what all issues we have agreed
to deal with," he said.

In addition to Messrs Pin-
der and Sands, fringe party can-
didates Cassius Stuart, Rodney
Moncur and Dr Andre Rollins

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in
the Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as
a Parts Regional Manager, at our Nassau Office.

The Candidate should have the following

requirements:

¢ Have 7-10 years experience with the
Caterpillar or similar Product Line, have
worked in a Caterpillar dealership or a

similar Organization:

Have training in Ordering and Receiving

Parts Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic

Count Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University

would be an asset:

Must be able to manage and motivate
staff in the Parts Department:

Must have experience in process
statistical control in planning,
programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse

production process;

Able to manage major components _
interchange process; Hoses assembling

process.

This candidate is required to be a_ professional
who thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts
Inventory and all other operational procedures within

the Parts Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to: M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office Administrator,

or email:me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

break-ins. It’s making things
bad for the whole island.”

Rising crime cannot be
attributed to the island’s econ-
omy as Mr Smith said many
residents have more than one
job, and there is work for any-
one who wants it.

And he hopes the rising
crime rate will be curbed as the
new chief inspector builds ties
with the community, increases
patrols and maximises local
resources.

“T expect some good to come
out of this terrible incident in
terms of recommitment from
the police and the community,”
Mr Smith said.

Two men appeared in a Nas-
sau court yesterday in connec-
tion with Thursday’s incident.

Karon Parks, 28, of Cole-
brooke Street, and Mario Moss,
35, of Clarence Street, both
Harbour Island, were charged
on three counts of burglary,
armed robbery and causing
grievous harm.

They were remanded in cus-
tody until a preliminary inquiry,
which will be heard by a local
magistrate in Harbour Island
on April 8 and 9.

are also listed as respondents
in the court case.

Their participation, or lack
of, would contribute to the
duration of the court battle,
said Mr Evans.

"The case could be very
short or it could be prolonged.
There are three others involved
in the matter, Mr Moncur, Mr
Stuart and Mr Rollins they
have all been named as respon-
dents and they do have a right
to put in a position. If they have
one or if they don't have one
would also indicate how long
the case will take.”













conduct themselves in a respon-
sible manner.

“The people who commit
crimes in the Bahamas are not
phantoms. These are our peo-
ple, they live in our homes and
in our communities and we
know who they are. So we can
solve this overnight. We have
the ability to do it, do we have
the will to do it?”

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ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 2010

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,584.93 | CHG -3.66 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD 19.55| YTD % 1.25
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit_y
7.03 AML Foods Limited
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund
5.50 Bank of Bahamas
0.58 Benchmark
3.15 Bahamas Waste
2.14 Fidelity Bank
9.62 Cable Bahamas
2.72 Colina Holdings
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital
5.94 Famguard
8.75 Finco
9.75 FirstCaribbean Bank
3.75 Focol (S$)
1.00 Focol Class B Preference
0.27 Freeport Concrete
5.00 ICD Utilities
9.95 J. S. Johnson
10.00 Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Securi

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

GFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

1.3535
2.8266
1.4398
2.9343
12.6816
93.1999
96.4070
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve:

Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve

Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
I

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in ol

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamin: gs

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
712 712 0.00
10.74 10.74 0.00
5.90 5.90 0.00

Daily Vol.

0.58 0.58 0.00
3.15 3.15 0.00
2.37 2.37 0.00
13.43 13.43 0.00
2.72 2.72 0.00
6.76 6.76 0.00
2.44 2.48 0.04
2.55 2.55 0.00
6.49 6.49 0.00
9.27 9.27 0.00
10.00 9.94 -0.06
4.77 4.77 0.00
1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 0.27 0.00
5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 10.00 0.00

7,000

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15 100.00 0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid & Ask & Last Price
10.06 11.06 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00

Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

100.00 0.00

Weekly Val...

0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4460 0.51 6.15
2.9061 0.66 -1.23
1.5154 0.53 5.25
3.2025 2.75 -3.54
13.4296 5.58 5.90
103.9873 3.41 3.41
101.7254 5.52 5.52
1.0943 0.41 5.21
1.0801 1.13 4.56

Div $

1.0972 0.60 5.40
9.5795 5.33 5.33
11.2361 12.36 12.36
7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

47.51

EPS $
0.283
0.992
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.322

100.00 0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

Div $ P/E

0.654
0.326
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

Interest

79 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div & P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin: gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525





THE TRIBUNE



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

'

rT esa ela Ga

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE CR Walker Knights tight-
ened their stranglehold of the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools Sports
Association Track and Field Cham-
pionship by winning their seventh
straight title.

Dedicated to veteran national
coach Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming, the
Knights on Friday closed out anoth-
er dominating performance with a
212 point margin over a heated
showdown for second place between
the CV Bethel Stingrays and the RM
Bailey Pacers.

At the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium as they
tried to chase down head coach
Floyd Armbrister and assistant
coach Tyrice Curry to dose them
both with water, the Knights cele-
brated with a huge 636.50 point deci-
sion.

The Stingrays held off the Pacers
in a stunning head-to-head clash to
take second place with 414.50, just a
half point ahead of the third place
Pacers.

For Armbrister, who used his 800
metre fame as a high school/colle-
giate athlete to avoid the water rush
by his team-mates, said their ability
to go out and recruit a whole new
crop of athletes was the key to their
success.

“We had a lot of new ten graders
who came into us, especially from
HO Nash and we also had some par-
ents who really wanted their chil-
dren to be a structured programme
in high school,” Armbrister said.

“We put the unit together and we
trained only in the mornings when
we came out here at the track and at
the fort (Charlotte) at 4:30 to 6
o’clock. We put in the time in the
morning. We never once came on
this track and trained in the after-
noon.”

Thanks to their principal, Arm-

S
a Pome
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

PAGE 1

1
i |



oF 4

HEAD coach Floyd Armbrister talks about his CR Walker Knights’ success as the GSS-





SA Senior High Track and Field Championships.

brister said they were able to acquire
a new Coaster bus that made it
accessible to transport their 30-plus
athletes to and from the training site.

“But I have to say that these kids
have a lot of discipline. We had to
keep molding them and keep push-
ing them to the level. We never
slacked up on them,” Armbrister
said. “Some of them who ran today
came from the getto, Quarry Road,
Mason Addition, Farm Road, the
Groove and even Fox Hill.

“T think it was the discipline and
the unity on the this team that made
the difference.”

There were also some superb indi-
vidual performances that helped out
as well.

Leading the way was Marva Eti-
enne, who swept the intermediate
girls sprints by adding the 200 metres

(25.26 seconds) to the 100 and 400
she claimed on day one on Thursday.
Shafara Lewis also got some of the
spotlight by cleaning up the middle
distance races when she took the 800
(2:35.53) to go along with the 1,500
the day before. She also won the
long jump (14-feet, 10 1/2-inches).
In the intermediate boys division,
Ashley Riley was another triple win-
ner with his record breaking triumph
in the 800 (2:04.30) to go along with
his feats in both the 400 and 1,500.
The outstanding performances in
the senior boys and girls divisions
were spread around the other
schools with Tonia-Kaye Johnson of
RM Bailey emerging as the female
sprint queen as she clinched the 200
(26.33) to go with her 100 win and
Trevor Mackey of Doris Johnson
duplicating the senior boys feat with

his 200 time of 22.43 after he pulled
off the 100 win.

“They stepped up their game. All
of the athletes stepped up their game
110 percent today and we came back
and tried to win three out of the four
relays,” Armbrister noted.

“We got three out of the four, but
we didn’t get the three that we real-
ly wanted. The senior girls came as a
major surprise to us and the 4 x 4
senior boys, we wanted that. But
RM Bailey beat us. RM Bailey feel
as if they win the meet if they win
the 4x 4. They came to the meet for
that and they got it.”

The senior boys 4 x 4 relay, spon-
sored by Muck-A-Mucks and the
Sports Center, brought the curtains
down on the meet as the Pacers pre-
vailed in 4:17.62, leaving the Knights
trailing in 4:17.96.

But as Armbrister stated, the
Knights turned in a stellar perfor-
mance in capturing the senior girls’ 4
x 4, which was sponsored by A-Plus
Enterprises, in 4:20.05. The Gov-
ernment High Magicmen finished a
distant second in 4:32.52.

They added the other relay titles
in the intermediate girls (4:14.97) in
another fabulous run and their inter-
mediate boys came through in a
come-from-behind fashion in 3:40.90,
holding off the Pacers (3:46.42).

In what turned out to be a keenly
contested battle behind the Knights,
the Stingrays had coach John Mills
smiling from ear-to-ear because of
their 1/2-point decision over the Pac-
ers.

“Most of our kids did pretty well,
but our downfall was the kids who
didn’t show,” said Mills, who had
anticipated that they would have giv-
en the Knights a run for their money
this year. “One of our better dis-
tance runners, Ronald Woodside,
was representing the country in box-
ing.
“Luckily for us, we edged out RM
Bailey by a half a point. Who say
one point don’t make a difference in




FINAL RESULTS

HERBP’S a look at the final
team results from the two days
of competition in the senior divi-
sion of the Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s track and field champi-
onships concluded on Friday at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium:

Schools Pts
CR Walker Knights 636.50
CV Bethel Stingrays 414.50
RM Bailey Pacers 414
CC Sweeting Cobras 298.50
Cl Gibson Rattlers 278
Anatol Rodgers High 250

Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 242
Government High Magicmen 190.50

Intermediates (Under-27) combined
46

CR Walker Knights

CV Bethel Stingrays 212
RM Bailey Pacers 188
ASnatol Rodgers High 157
CC Sweeting Cobras 145
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 114
Cl Gibson Rattlers 111

Government High Magicmen 19

Seniors (Under-20) combined

CR Walker Knights 290.50
RM Bailey Pacers 226

CV Bethel Stingrays 202.50
Government High Magicmen 171.50

Cl Gibson Rattlers 167
CC Sweeting Cobras 153.50
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 128
Anatol Rodgers High 93

a victory? Hopefully we will do a
little better in the (BAAA’s/Scotia-
bank) Nationals.”

The Nationals is scheduled for the
weekend of March 11-13 and Arm-
brister say his Knights intend to do
the same thing as they did at the
GSSSA. So watch out defending
champions St. Augustine’s College
Big Red Machine and the Queen’s
College Comets.



Rahming resigns as BAAA Technical Director

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IN a stunning and surpris-
ing move, Frank ‘Pancho’
Rahming resigned from the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Association as the Tech-
nical Director.

Rahming, who very rarely
speaks publicly, wrote a letter
dated Thursday, February 25
to BAAA’s secretary Timo-
thy Munnings, which read as
follows:

“At a recent executive
meeting, I was told that I was
the problem. Whatever the
speaker’s interpretation or
context, I do not wish to be
the problem for any person or
organisation’s progress.

“Because this was not dis-
puted by any other present,
like other utterances at execu-
tive meetings by inner circle

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

members, I take it to be the
consensus.

“I, therefore, offer my res-
ignation as Technical Direc-
tor of the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Association.”

Rahming, who is now in
pre-retirement as the Assis-
tant Director of Sports at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, was re-elected to
serve as the Technical Director
after he defeated Rupert Gar-
diner at the BAAA’s annual
general meeting and election
of officers in November.

He was the only member
from incumbent president
Curt Hollingsworth’s slate that
was voted in when Sands was
returned to office after a two-
year hiatus due to a vote of no
confidence in 2007.

When contacted yesterday
for further comments, Rah-
ming declined, indicating that
he just simply wished not to
be the subject of any headline

news. He referred The Tri-
bune to the BAAA for com-
ments.

There was some indication
that some of the discussion
that prompted Rahming’s res-
ignation came as a result of
the conflict in the schedule of
the BAAA’s/ScotiaBank
National High School Track
and Field Championships that
will collide with the Grand
Bahama Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Track and Field
Championships.

Both events are scheduled
for March 11-13, which means
that the Grand Bahama
schools would not be coming
to the Nationals. In the past,
the Nationals were normally
held at the end of the Carifta
Games.

But for the second consecu-
tive year, they have been
moved up and staged before
Carifta, which will be held
over the Easter holiday week-

end in the Cayman Islands.

Efforts to contact BAAA’s
president Mike Sands or
Munnings was unsuccessful,
but first vice president Sher-
win Stuart said he was really
shocked and surprised when
he heard the news yesterday
morning.

“There was no prior warn-
ing or acknowledgment that I
am aware of,” Stuart said.
“Like I said, I just found out
this morning. So there’s really
nothing I can comment on,
except that it’s unfortunate
that he has resigned.”

Pressed further by The Tri-
bune for comments, Stuart
said the BAAA has always
held Rahming in high esteem
in reference to his technical
knowledge of the sport and
they were looking forward to
him continuing to make his
contribution in the way for-
ward.

“He’s decided that he wants

to move on, so we in the
BAAA are very appreciative
of his services over the many
decades that he has been a
part of the association and the
contribution he has made to
the programme and we wish
him nothing but the very best
in his future endeavours and
hope that he will continue to
work closely with the sport.”

Based on the constitution,
Stuart said Sands, as president,
has the power to appoint
someone to fill the vacancy in
the interim and that is the
course of action that they
intend to pursue.

“There will be an appoint-
ment at this point, but I can
not say if there will be an elec-
tion any time soon,” Stuart
said. “We will just try to fill
the void in the meantime and
then in the way forward, we
will make a decision or
whether or not we will have
an election for that position.”

Clie cUNiniiire]



The BAAA was scheduled
to hold their monthly meet-
ing last night. Rahming’s res-
ignation and his new appoint-
ment was expected to be dis-
cussed as well as the selection
of the national coaches and
the national team for the
IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships in Doha next
month.





(|W

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

_

SPORTS

(ln

TRIBUNE SPORTS



GSSSA_

SoM

Nada



G.S.S.S.A. 17th Annual Track &
Field Meet — 2/25/2010 to 2/26/2010

THE Government of Secondary
Schools Sports Association complet-
ed its Senior High Schools Champi-
onship on Friday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track & Field Stadium.

Below is a look at the individual
results posted over the past two days
of competition:

¢ GIRLS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17) FINALS

(w: 0.1) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 12.44. 2, 987 Andrews,
Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 13.17. 3,
782 Rolle, Lakeisha, C.I. Gibson 16,
13.23.

¢ GIRLS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: -0.6) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 25.62. 2, 909 Higgs,
Gregria, C.V. Bethel 26, 26.40. 3, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
27.54,

¢ GIRLS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R. Walker 25,
1:02.91. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 1:06.80. 3, 925 Stanislaus,
Greann, C.V. Bethel 26, 1:10.02.

¢ GIRLS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
2:35.53. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 2:39.42. 3, 662 Lotus, Kelly,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:51.25.

¢ GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
5:50.11. 2, 851 Martin, Nevelicia, C.R.
Walker 25, 6:02.60. 3, 1166 Sturrup,
Mataya, R.M. Bailey 2, 6:30.88.

¢ GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 0.9) 1, 918 Minus, Raygene, C.V.
Bethel 26, 17.32. 2, 783 Rolle, Tiffany,
C.l. Gibson 16, 17.42. 3, 861 Whylly,
Lashawn, C.R. Walker 25, 18.05.

¢ GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 858 Stubbs, Keithra, C.R. Walker 25,
50.48. 2, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R.
Walker 25, 52.35. 3, 714 Ferguson,
Tanisha, C.C. Sweeting 7, 56.28.

¢ GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Minus,
Raygene 16, Stubbs, Rouiqua 15, Gib-
son, Julia 16, Higgs, Gregria 16),
53.09. 2, C. |. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Brice, Jalisa 16, Rolle, Lakeisha 16,
Louis Jean, Louise Anna 16, Rolle,
Tiffany 16), 54.88. 3, Anatol Rodgers
High School (Knowles, Rashae 16,
Lightbourne, Khadyjah 16, Bowe,
Lashawn 16, Frazer, Natori 16), 55.52.

¢ GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:14.97. 2,
C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays 4:39.05. 3,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:52.59.

¢ GIRLS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
4.53m, w:NWI (14-10.50). 2, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
441m, w:NWI (14-05.75). 3, 843 Eti-
enne, Marvar, C.R. Walker 25, 4.35m,
w:NWI (14-03.25).

¢ GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 10.14m, (33-03.25). 2, 725 Smith,
Karnesia, C.C. Sweeting 7, 8.86m, (29-
01). 3, 676 Williams, Sherceil, Anatol
Rodgers, 8.50m, (27-10.75).

¢ GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 25.00m, (82-00). 2, 1150 Johnson,
Kingslee, R.M. Bailey 2, 20.17m, (66-
02). 3, 994 Curry, Donisha, Doris John-
son 27, 19.57m, (64-02).

¢ GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 26.30m, (86-03). 2, 722 Poitier,
Angenette, C.C. Sweeting 7, 24.83m,
(81-05). 3, 854 Rose, Akia, C.R. Walker
25, 23.15m, (75-11).

¢ BOYS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 0.7) 1, 945 Farrington, Anthony,
CV. Bethel 26, 11.26%. 2, 868 Dames,
Xavier, C.R. Walker 25, 11.37. 3, 867
Culmer, Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 11.71.

¢ BOYS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 2.0) 1, 677 Anderson, Enrico, Ana-
tol Rodgers, 23.87. 2, 867 Culmer,
Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 23.99. 3, 886
Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25, 24.15.

¢ BOYS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
52.66. 2, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 55.45. 3, 1194 Perry,
Shorn, R.M. Bailey 2, 56.69.

BOYS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
2:04.30*. 2, 691 Gray, Rashad, Anatol
Rodgers, 2:13.57. 3, 734 Davis,
Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 2:14.05.

¢ BOYS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
4:53.56. 2, 1172 Black, Jachris, R.M.
Bailey 2, 5:03.27. 3, 814 Louis,
Wilbens, C.l. Gibson 16, 5:13.28.

BOYS 3000 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 1192 Newbold, Adam, R.M. Bailey 2,
11:14.97. 2, 1029 Armbrister, Kadashi-
an, Doris Johnson 27, 11:33.20. 3, 814
Louis, Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16,
11:38.31.

¢ BOYS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 1.5) 1, 1187 Marshall, Andre, R.M.
Bailey 2, 16.96. 2, 962 Johnson,
Jameal, C.V. Bethel 26, 18.21. 3, 884
Riley, Alex, C.R. Walker 25, 18.46.

¢ BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.38. 2, 685 Evans, Tre, Anatol
Rodgers, 1:05.62. 3, 737 Fernander,
Leon, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1:05.67.

¢ BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, Anatol Rodgers High School (Ander-
son, Enrico 16, Mossa, Owen 16,
Evans, Tre 16, Evans, Trevel 16), 45.49.
2, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Burrows,
Raymonte 16, Ferguson, Richard 16,
Darville, Tanaghe 16, Farrington,
Anthony 16), 45.98. 3, R. M. Bailey (2)
Pacers (Perry, Shorn 16, Bain, Shac-
quille 16, Gibson, Keishon 15, Gale,
Raymond 16), 48.06.

e BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 3:40.90. 2,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 3:46.42. 3, C. V.
Bethel (26) Stingrays 3:51.62.

e BOYS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 703 Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol
Rodgers, 5.94m, w:NWI (19-06). 2,
889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
5.75m, w:NWI (18-10.50). 3, 697
Mossa, Owen, Anatol Rodgers, 5.52m,
w:NWI (18-01 .50).

¢ BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 886 Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25,
12.46m, w:NWI (40-10.50). 2, 889
Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
12.23m, w:NWI (40-01.50). 3, 703
Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol Rodgers,
12.11m, w:NWI (39-08.75).

¢ BOYS SHOT PUT (12LBS)

INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 945 Farrington, Anthony, C.V. Bethel
26, 11.37m, (37-03.75). 2, 871
Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
10.45m, (34-03.50). 3, 949 Ferguson,
Richard, C.V. Bethel 26, 10.00m, (32-
09.75).

¢ BOYS DISCUS THROW (1.5K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 887 Saintillis, Harl, C.R. Walker 25,
25.52m, (83-09). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 25.41m, (83-
04). 3, 737 Fernander, Leon, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 24.23m, (79-06).

e BOYS JAVELIN THROW (700GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 871 Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
44.23m, (145-01). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 43.73m, (143-
06). 3, 1033 Burrows, Nicholas, Doris
Johnson 27, 39.90m, (130-11).

¢ GIRLS 100 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: 0.2) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 12.65. 2, 788 Stubbs,
Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 13.07. 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 13.17.

¢ GIRLS 200 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)

(w: 1.7) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 26.33. 2, 655 Demeritt,
Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 27.15. 3, 788
Stubbs, Jarona, C.|. Gibson 16, 27.46.

e GIRLS 400 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)

1, 1090 Miller, Shauntae, Government
High, 1:01.09. 2, 853 Rahming, Edric-
ka, C.R. Walker 25, 1:03.63. 3, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.59.

¢ GIRLS 800 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 2:23.24. 2, 653 Cherilus, Angela,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:35.86. 3, 855 Rus-
sell, Florazell, C.R. Walker 25, 2:40.25.

¢ GIRLS 1500 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 5:43.82. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 6:10.76. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
6:16.84.

¢ GIRLS 3000 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)

1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 14:07.67. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 15:24.23. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
15:36.58.

¢ GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

(w: -0.4) 1, 724 Sears, Hollina, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 16.98. 2, 1151 Johnson,
Tonia-Kaye, R.M. Bailey 2, 18.28. 3,
765 Brown, Vanessa, C.I. Gibson 16,
18.47.

e GIRLS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 1:06.40. 2, 1090 Miller, Shauntae,
Government High, 1:09.20. 3, 724
Sears, Hollina, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:11.32.

e GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1,0. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Adderley,
Teshona 17, Gaitor, Lyndera 18, Stuart,
Shatyna 17, Lewis, Vashonique 18),
52.42. 2, C. |. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Stubbs, Jarona 17, Colebrooke, Vashti
17, Brown, Vanessa 19, Adderley, Nasia
17), 52.78. 3, C. R. Walker (25) Knights
(Strachan, Opal 17, Rahming, Edricka
17, Capron, Lechea 17, Dean, Roshan-
da 17), 53.35.

e GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:20.05. 2,
Government High School (3) Mag
4:32.52. 3, Anatol Rodgers High School
4:35.85.

¢ GIRLS LONG JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Government High,
4.69m, w:NWI (15-04.75). 2, 914
Lewis, Vashonique, C.V. Bethel 26,
4.63m, w:NWI (15-02.25). 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 4.55m,
w:NWI (14-11.25).

¢ GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1159 Rodgers, Shonice, R.M. Bailey
2, 10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 1, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 3, 860
Thompson, Brittaney, C.R. Walker 25,
9.96m, w:NWI (32-08.25).

e GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'3")
SENIOR (U20)

1, 862 Young, Lyndia, C.R. Walker 25,
1.45m, (4-09). 2, 1090 Miller,
Shauntae, Government High, 1.40m,
(4-07). 3, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Govern-
ment High, J1.40m, (4-07).

¢ GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)

SENIOR (U20)

1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 12.22m#, (40-01.25). 2, 716 Gor-
don, Giovann, C.C. Sweeting 7, 9.10m,
(29-10.25). 3, 836 Bastian, Samantha,
C.R. Walker 25, 8.79m, (28-10.25).

¢ GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 35.65m#, (116-11). 2, 1145
Estorcien, Vernice, R.M. Bailey 2,
23.31m, (76-06). 3, 859 Taylor, Jewel,
C.R. Walker 25, 22.69m, (74-05).

¢ GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 920 Prosper, Tawanna, C.\V. Bethel
26, 29.03m, (95-03). 2, 934 Williams,
Racquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 28.75m, (94-
04). 3, 716 Gordon, Giovann, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 26.13m, (85-09).

¢ BOYS 100 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: -0.3) 1, 1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 10.90. 2, 1115 Innocent,
Nathan, Government High, 11.61. 3,
680 Brooks, Brandon, Anatol Rodgers,
11.61.

e BOYS 200 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: 2.4) 1, 1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 22.43. 2, 872 Ferguson,
O'Jay, C.R. Walker 25, 22.51. 3, 1038
Cooper, Randolph, Doris Johnson 27,
22.80.

¢ BOYS 400 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

1, 872 Ferguson, O'Jay, C.R. Walker
25, 50.38. 2, 1201 Swann, Leeward,
R.M. Bailey 2, 52.84. 3, 866 Cartwright,
Leon, C.R. Walker 25, 53.03.

¢ BOYS 800 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 866 Cartwright, Leon, C.R. Walker
25, 2:05.15. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 2:05.53. 3, 795 Bain,
Carlide, C.|. Gibson 16, 2:07.47.

¢ BOYS 1500 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)

1, 813 Louis, Harold, C.I. Gibson 16,
4:49.54. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 4:53.76. 3, 1199 Storr,
Lyndrick, R.M. Bailey 2, 5:03.68.

¢ BOYS 5000 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.l. Gibson 16,
19:08.50. 2, 869 Davis, Matthew, C.R.
Walker 25, 19:20.71. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 19:27.24.

¢ BOYS 3000 METER
STEEPLECHASE SENIOR (U20)

1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.l. Gibson 16,
11:34.11. 2, 888 Stuart, Trevonn, C.R.
Walker 25, 12:04.36. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 12:14.29.

¢ BOYS 110 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 1.2) 1, 936 Adderley, Tre, C.V.

Subway 2010 Junior Tennis Classic

THE first Bahamas Lawn and Ten-
nis Association sanctioned junior ten-
nis tournament of the year took place
this past weekend (February 19-22,
2010) at the Gully Bowe Tennis Cen-
ter at the Lucayan Bath & Racquet
Club. The Grand Bahama Tennis
Association hosted 35 junior tennis
players from Nassau, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama for several days of
healthy tennis competition with sev-
eral hundred spectators in attendance
during the four-day event.

Tournament director Gully Bowe
said that this year’s event was very
competitive and a great success. “I
enjoyed the tournament and I know
that the young tennis players did as
well,” he added. “This year’s players
displayed a high level of competive-
ness and good sportsmanship as they
vied for the first place trophies in the
various age categories.”

He thanked all the participants,
parents and coaches for their contri-
butions to the tournament. He
expressed special thanks to the tour-
nament sponsor, Shuffel Hepburn and
Subway. “Despite the economic chal-

lenges being faced by many, Mr Shuf-
fle Hepburn, owner of SUBWAY
restaurants, continues his commit-
ment to youth development in spon-
soring this year’s tournament once
again,” said Bowe.

President of the Grand Bahama
Tennis Association, Mrs Charmine
Wallace, dubbed this year’s tourna-
ment a huge success and extended
sincere appreciation to Mr Shuffle
Hepburn of Subway restaurants, the
players and their parents for con-
tributing to such a successful tourna-
ment.

The tournament results are as fol-
lows: Girls under 12 Singles: Iesha
Shepherd d. Lily Evert 5-7, 6-0, 6-3;
Girls Under 14: Gabriella Bowe d.
Lily Evert 6-1, 6-0; Girls Under 16:
Gabriella Bowe d. Dominique Morti-
er 6-0, 6-1; Boys Under 10: Cole
Majra d. Kofi Bowe 6-0,6-0; Boys
Under 12: Oneil Mortimer d. Ashton
Major 6-4, 6-0; Boys Under 14: Philip
Major d. Rasheed Carey 6-4, 6-0;
Boys Under 16: Kevin Major d.
Ondre Cargil Bye; Boys Under 18:
Johnathan Taylor d. Kevin Major

Bye; Girls Under 14 Doubles:
Shaytonya Missick & Gabriella Bowe
def Lily Evert & Iesha Shepherd Bye;
Boys Under 14 Doubles: Shannon



Francis & Ashton Major d. Oneil
Mortimer & Malik Jones 8-3; Boys
Under 18 Doubles: Hubert Russell
& Philip Major d. Johnathan Miller &

Bethel 26, 15.39. 2, 947 Ferguson,
Donshannon, C.V. Bethel 26, 16.09. 3,
733 Dames, Jaleel, C.C. Sweeting 7,
16.75.

¢ BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

1, 874 Higgs, Delvano, C.R. Walker 25,
59.64. 2, 754 Thompson, Ishmael, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 1:01.38. 3, 1183 Hentield,
Melvin, R.M. Bailey 2, 1:01.63.

¢ BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, Doris Johnson (27) Marlins
(Walkine, Marco 17, Clarke, Fredrick
19, Cooper, Randolph 18, Mackey,
Trevor 18), 44.13. 2, C. V. Bethel (26)
Stingrays (Lockhart, David 17, Adder-
ley, Tre 17, Forbes, Jarad 18,
Cartwright, Elvis 16), 44.99. 3, R. M.
Bailey (2) Pacers (Bullard, Delmarro 17,
Swann, Leeward 17, Knowles, Terrell
17, Munroe, Sean 17), 45.33.

¢ BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:17.61. 2, C.
R. Walker (25) Knights 4:17.96. 3,
Doris Johnson (27) Marlins 4:21.48.

¢ BOYS LONG JUMP SENIOR (U20)
1, 792 Adderley, Patrizio, C.I. Gibson
16, 6.03m, w:NWI (19-09.50). 2, 1119
Martin, Wayne, Government High,
5.90m, w:NWI (19-04.25). 3, 1173
Bullard, Delmarro, R.M. Bailey 2,
5,.88m, w:NWI (19-03.50).

¢ BOYS TRIPLE JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1120 McDonald, Jerome, Govern-
ment High, 13.83m, w:NWI (45-04.50).
2, 863 Babbs, Tehneil, C.R. Walker 25,
12.92m, w:NWI (42-04.75). 3, 940
Burns, Michael, C.V. Bethel 26,
12.50m, w:NWI (41-00.25).

¢ BOYS HIGH JUMP (5'5")

SENIOR (U20)

1, 810 Ingraham, Ryan, C.I. Gibson 16,
1.94m, (6-04.25). 2, 808 Hall,
Jerwaine, C.|. Gibson 16, 1.91m, (6-
03.25). 3, 959 Hinsey, Jaran, C.V.
Bethel 26, 1.85m, (6-00.75). 3, 1120
McDonald, Jerome, Government High,
1.85m, (6-00.75).

¢ BOYS SHOT PUT (14LBS)

SENIOR (U20)

1, 881 Nottage, Deangelo, C.R. Walker
25, 12.06m, (39-07). 2, 1098 Arnett,
Jonathan, Government High, 11.70m,
(38-04.75). 3, 1116 Johnson, Welling-
ton, Government High, 11.64m, (38-
02.25).

¢ BOYS DISCUS THROW 1.75K
SENIOR (U20)

1, 1201 Swann, Leeward, R.M. Bailey
2, 40.34m#, (132-04). 2, 881 Nottage,
Deangelo, C.R. Walker 25, 37.22m,
(122-01). 3, 1197 Rolle, Cardell, R.M.
Bailey 2, 36.83m, (120-10).

¢ BOYS JAVELIN THROW (800GMS)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 880 MACKEY, Samuel, C.R. Walker
25, 50.54m, (165-10). 2, 936 Adderley,
Tre, C.V. Bethel 26, 45.98m, (150-10).
3, 1119 Martin, Wayne, Government
High, 45.17m, (148-02).

¢ BOYS POLE VAULT SENIOR (U20)
1, 970 Roker, Terrane, C.V. Bethel 26,
3.07m*, (10-00.75). 2, 953 Goodman,
Ritchie, C.V. Bethel 26, 2.98m, (9-
09.25).

e GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'0")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1,918 Minus, Raygene, C.V. Bethel 26,
1.42m, (4-07.75). 2, 850 Lewis,
Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, J1.42m, (4-
07.75). 3, 709 Cox, Jaynell, C.C. Sweet-
ing 7, J1.42m, (4-07.75).

¢ BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker
25, 1.78m, (5-10). 2, 1033 Burrows,
Nicholas, Doris Johnson 27, J1.78m,
(5-10). 3, 1032 Bowles, Dion, Doris
Johnson 27, 1.62m, (5-03.75).

results

GABRIELLA
Bowe cracks a
forehand at the
2010 Subway
Junior Tennis
Classic at the
Gully Bowe Ten-
nis Center at the
Lucayan Bath &
Racquet Club.

Mark Da Cunha/
Bahamas2000.com

Dirnaj Saunders 8-1.

Bahamas tennis fans can see a full
gallery of photos from the event
atwww.bahamastennis.com.



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$ -$- ce

THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 13
LOCAL NEWS

RED CROSS: HELPING HAITI FOR

EXECUTIVE Members of the Bahamas ; .* | ; ae
Professional Photographers and Videog- r ol= , .

raphers Association (BPPVA) present a E — THE | \

cheque, food, water and shoes to the | :

Bahamas Red Cross Society. i : ,

The money and goods were raised after
two weeks of partnering with the Mall at

Marathon and Robin Hood Mega Store. : , Eleuthera, Bahamas

The theme for this drive was “Preserving

the Family to Rebuild Haiti”. ae — —o
Pictured presenting the cheque (from I-r) ' - ; ey Of ae aah
is Vincent Vaughan, assistant secretary i i 71 Sa gk aoe ee ee
of the BPPVA; Raphael Munnings, pub- , ; ‘= a }

lic relations; Portia King, vice-president

of the BPPVA; Caroline Turnquest, direc- | se aa Saturday

tor general of the Bahamas Red Cross

Society; Kemuel Stubbs, president of the , j |
BPPVA; Willamae Jenoure Evans, finan- , Mv a rc h 20
cial officer of the Bahamas Red Cross ie .

Society; Fabian Whymms, treasurer of : . :

BPPVA, Peter Campbell: assistant | 1 roe y Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
aaa oe annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
7 care, treatment, early detection, and
Att S ———— Bahamas-based cancer research.
. Here's what participants say:
assists 1 “Congratulations on organizing such
TETITIES {Ip o- . a truly amazing day. Thank you
s so much for the countless hours
Ty Weis oe you put into organizing an incredible
i : = 5 day for a great cause!! We had
WWI HIRS UIT E a ball and can’t stop talking about
ae awed, how well it was done! ... it was

ALANA RODGERS (lett) and Ash: truly an inspiring time, what a

ley Lepine (right) of Hands for Eine great experience!”
Hunger are pictured receiving a

donation from Nancy B Kelly, ,
president of Kelly's House and . J O I MN u q I
Home during the recent Kelly’s H .
Annual Awards. Kelly’s also

donates fuel on a monthly basis | J ) MORE IN FO AND REGISTER
for the delivery vehicles of Hands RIDEFORHOPEBAHAMAS.COM





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Full Text



PAGE 1

‘No more Police questions for talk show host’ N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 106 No.81SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 72F LOW 62F N E W S SEE PAGE FIVE N E W S SEE PAGE 14 Rare whale sightings Commissioner sa ys incidents ar e ‘isolated’ The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E days GONE BY SIRSIDNEYPOITIERS INTHEBAHAMAS CHARGED: MARIO MOSS CHARGED: KARON PARKS Photo: Felipe Major/ Tribune staff COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents Sergeant Audley Dean with a “Pinnacle” award. SEE PAGE TWO for full story and more photos. By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE country’s top police c hief yesterday sought to reas sure the public that the recent spate of terrifying home inva sions are not part of a wider trend. C ommissioner Ellison Greenslade described the a ttacks which have included a murder and a double kidn apping as “isolated” inci dents. H e said police are taking the matters “very, very seriously.” “There are some categories of crime that, when they hap pen, create tremendous fear in our communities, and so if you have one home invasion it causes tremendous fear. (Howev er) I don’t want to take that out of context you don’t have peo ple in every community on every street corner going into homes. That’s not happening, I have no information in that regard,” said Mr Greenslade yesterday. On Monday, Henry McPhee was murdered by an intruder w ho broke into his home at Oleander Drive, Coral Har b our. Mr McPhee was shot in the h ead while his girlfriend and daughter were tied up and robbed of valuables. On Tuesday, a policeman’s wife and daughter were kid n apped from their Gladstone Road home by two gunmen w ho had demanded cash. After being told there was no money in the house, the terrified couple were bundled into the family’s Ford SUV. A fter a short drive, the wife was released while the daughter escaped by leaping from the car as it was moving. Commissioner Greenslade said he could not say whether the incidents are connected. However two men have been arrested in connection with the Oleander Drive attack, while police are following “active leads” into the second matter, Police chief’s vow on home invasions By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net AN AMERICAN tourist is recovering in a Florida hospital after he was slashed with a cutlass by intruders to his Harbour Island hotel room early Thursday morning. Sources say Eddie Bryant, 44, of Stamford, Connecticut, nearly lost a finger when he held up his arms to protect his face from the attack after two men broke into his Tingum Village room at around 2am. Mr Bryant was airlifted to hospital in Nassau and then flown to a Fort Lauderdale hospital where he is receiving treatment for serious injuries to his right arm and Tourist recovering after cutlass attack P OLICE Commiss ioner Ellison Greenslade went on record yesterday to state that controversial radio t alk show host Ortland Bodie Jr will not facea ny more questions from his officers. M r Bodie was picked up by the police on Wednesday evening and questioned in relation to his possible possession o f an illegal firearm after he claimed on national S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 POLICECOMMISSIONERPRESENTSAWARDSTORETIREDOFFICERS P H O T O S : F e l i p e M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f n Two men appear in Magistrate’s court By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net LAWYERS for by-election contenders Dr Duane Sands and Ryan Pinder will appear before the Supreme Court next Thursday for a date for a hear ing to be set. It is expected the court will settle on a date for the case to begin. "There is a fixture date set for March 4," confirmed Milton Evans, of Evans and Co, who is part of Dr Sands' legal team. "That is the date appointed when the court indicates that it wants to see the interested par ties. The court will normally give an indication as to the direction of how they want to proceed in terms of time and scheduling. We should be able to get a better indication as to when the court will be able to hear the case." Thomas Evans, QC, also of Evans and Co will serve as Dr Sand's lead counsel. This week, the PLP filed an election court application to have Mr Pinder declared the winner of the hotly-contested Elizabeth by-election arguing that a clear majority of the voters voted for him. The crux of their argument centres around five protest ballots they claim were cast in favour of Ryan Pin der. Due to the slim margin of Sands and Pinder lawyers set for court appearance S S E E E E p p a a g g e e s s e e v v e e n n S S E E E E p p a a g g e e s s e e v v e e n n INSIDE n Government investment for public farmers’ market – P AGE 3 n Law students urged to view potentials of arbitration – PAGE 6

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A 20-year-old Nassau man h as been charged with having unlawful sex with a 12-yearold girl and was arraigned in a Magistrates Court yesterday. Johinan Gaudin, of Cowpen Road, has been remanded in custody until Wednes d ay. He was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomex in Court One, Bank Lane, at around 4pm yesterday and charged with having unlawful sexual intercourse with the child on February 17. Mr Gomez adjourned the matter until Wednesday and prosecutors requested for Gaudin to be remanded in custody as police are unsure of his immigration status. A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there is enough evidence against him for the matter to be tried in the Supreme Court. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Man accused of unlawful sex with 12-year-old girl B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net USHERING in what top o fficers described as a new era of recognition for police officers and the sacrifice they make for the Force and their communities, Commissioner ofP olice Ellison Greenslade yest erday presented awards to 19 recently retired police officers. He also offered apologies to those contracted officers of the s ergeant rank and below, who from “time immemorial” have left the police force without adequate recognition for theirs ervice. Mr Greenslade told the m edia he believes that by doing the “right and decent” thing by formally recognising the contributions and sacrifices made b y officers of all ranks, the Force will be able to “make a t remendous difference in terms of our responses to the whole i ssue of crime.” “Trust me, there is a connect,” said Mr Greenslade, who suggested the retirement cere mony was part of an evolvingc ulture of “care, respect and trust” within the Royal B ahamas Police Force. All the officers were of s ergeant rank and below, and would previously have only informally received a certificate of discharge upon retirement in a quick “two second” meet i ng with the commissioner in h is office. Yesterday, each was photographed, personally congratulated for their service and given the newly-created “Pin nacle” award by Mr Greensladet o take home. “These men and women h ave given stellar service, they have sacrificed and some have e ven been injured. (Commissioner Greenslade) felt it should be mandatory for an organisation to recognise that,” said Assistant Commissioner of P olice Hulan Hanna, moderator at the retirement ceremony h eld at police headquarters. Mr Greenslade described the o fficers, who together have served almost 600 years in the various divisions and agencies of the RBPF, as “men andw omen who have committed themselves to the police force as youngsters right out of school. All they know is law e nforcement and serving the people of the Bahamas.” H e thanked them for their selfless contribution” in maki ng the Bahamas safer. Commissioner Greenslade s aid that he intends for such ceremonies to become a staple o f the police calendar as they will be instituted for all retir-i ng officers. At the retirement c eremony yesterday, Mr G reenslade spoke casually to t he officers, who he called his “family”, about his desire to see m ore unity among all ranks of the force and suggested that w ith this achieved, their effectiveness in tackling crime wouldo nly be enhanced. “Imagine how powerful we c an be, all 4,500 of us, truly con nected. Eyes and ears open. Demonstrating care, respect and trust among one another. And if we get that right, imag i ne conveying that to the wider community in the Bahamas and g etting people to reciprocate and love you back. There’s n othing that the public wouldn’t tell you. Imagine what they’ll tell us. If we work on care, respect and trust, it’s going to pay tremendous benefits,” he s aid. A Force for good NEWERAOFRECOGNITIONIN POLICEFORCE COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents PC Clifford Wood with a “Pinnacle” award. PC LEASER GAITOR receives her “Pinnacle” award from Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade and Corporal Peter Walkes, who received a “Pinnacle” award. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade (left sents Sergeant Leroy Brown with a “Pinnacle” award. RETIRED policemen pose with Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade (centre police headquarters. The retired officers were all honoured for their service and given the new “Pinnacle” award. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents PC Rudolph Burrows with his “Pinnacle” award. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents and PC Anton Lockhart with his “Pinnacle” award. COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade with Sergeant Gregory Munroe who was presented with a “Pinnacle” award. SERGEANT Ernett Rahming (right award by Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade. C ommissioner presents awards to 19 retired police officers A WARDEES The officers who received the “Pinnacle” award are: Sgt 1018 Brady Simms, Sgt 787 Christopher Knowles, Sgt 823 Ernest Rahming, PC 992 Rudolph Burrows, Cpl 89 Gwendolyn Smith, Sgt 1025 Eden Zonicle, Cpl 913 Ulysses Curry Jr, Cpl 1286 James Smith, PC 1031 Leaser Gaitor, PC 975 Anton Lockhart, PC 6 Clifford Wood, PC 982 Col in Butler, Sgt 552 Gregory Munroe, Sgt 1089 Leon Wilchcombe, Sgt 977 Audley Dean, Cpl 317 Freddie Thompson, Sgt 1247 Carl Pinder, Sgt 926 Leroy Brown and Cpl 931 Peter Walkes. F e l i p e M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f PHOTOS: Felipe Major /Tribune staff

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E E D D I I T T O O R R , , T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e . . Reference is made to your letter addressed to Fred Gott lieb, the former Chairman of BEC and which was published in The Abaconian. It is most unfortunate that you attempt to discredit Mr Gottlieb by taking his statements out of context. You should be aware that the sulphur emissions (in Abaco d irectly related to the sulphur content of oil. Hence, by using oil with a lower sulphur cont ent (percentage emissions (parts per million would be reduced. Therefore, as stated by Mr Gottlieb, the use of a lower sul-p hur oil will result in lower sulphur emissions. This is a fact.F urther, the emissions will meet international standards. W ith regards to monitoring of the emissions in Abaco, as previously stated, ambient air monitoring devices have been installed not only on the site,b ut also in surrounding areas. The data captured from thes ame will be collected by an independent environmental s pecialist firm and made acces sible to various stakeholders. Additionally, an Environ mental Officer will be stationed at the site to further re-enforce t he Corporation’s commitment to the safety and sustainabilityo f the environment. We trust that this informat ion provides clarity to the read ers and corrects your attempts to discredit Mr Gottlieb by tak ing his statements out of con text. M M a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t B B a a h h a a m m a a s s E E l l e e c c t t r r i i c c i i t t y y C C o o r r p p o o r r a a t t i i o o n n M M a a t t t t h h e e w w M M c c C C o o y y r r e e s s p p o o n n d d s s t t o o B B E E C C Dear Sirs, Not only did I not take Mr G ottlieb’s statements out of context, but BEC missed a realo pportunity for community education and relations with t heir misleading letter pub lished in response to mine. Please allow me to explain. At the 2009 September public meeting Mr Gottlieb was talking about international safe ty standards, and he stated: The HFO fuel that will be used will result in less than 2 p er cent sulfur emissions, which is well below the World Health O rganisation’s (WHO ed standards.” Later in the s ame meeting Phenton Neymour stated that 2 per cent sulfur content in the fuel meets the World Bank standards. Then, during the tour of the plant in December, Mr Gottlieb was shown on Cable 12 saying that the plant would m eet international emissions standards by having 2 per cent sulfur content in the fuel. The context of all these statem ents, and others to the press, i s meeting emission standards. And BEC representatives have been saying that a fuel source w ith 2 per cent sulfur will meet those standards. The WHO, the World Bank, and the US Environmental Protection Agencyh ave published their emission s tandards online, and all are easy to contact to confirm their standards. None present any standards for sulfur content in t he fuel source, only standards for the emissions themselves. Also the emissions are not measured in percentages but inm icro grams per cubic meter. S imple context, simple statements, simply wrong. In their letter to me, BEC further states that “the sulfur e missions content is directly related to the sulfur content oft he oil. Hence, by using a lower sulfur content (percentage s ulfur emissions (parts per mil lion) would be reduced.” It is true that it will result in lower sulfur dioxide emissions, but this is not the whole story. F irst, you cannot directly convert fuel content into emis s ions, there are too many combustion and mechanical factors s pecific to each engine. There is no straight formula to go from 2 per cent sulfur content to meeting the WHO standards. However, in the United States, HFO p lants without proper emission controls cannot meet the fed e rally enforced emission stan dards. Because BEC will have n o emission controls (like scrubbers), and because the WHO and World Bank standards are tougher than those of the United States, it would b e a major miracle if this new plant, using HFO fuel, can meet t hose standards. It simply, phys ically, cannot. BEC will argue that it has emission controls in the form of stack height manipulation, however, this does not change the amount of emissions, only where the emissions go. This is not a legal emission reductiont echnique in the US or the EU. It is sort of like saying it’s okay t o throw your trash out of the window as long as you throw it far enough in a certain direc tion. Second, the sulfur content of diesel used for industrial uses is .05 per cent. So we can see that Abaco’s new fuel source will h ave 40 times the sulfur content of our regular diesel fuel source. Third, and finally, sulfur dioxide is not the only emission, and may be the least worrisome. In the WHO Air Quality Guidelines (freely available online) it is explained that curr ent scientific research indicates that sulfur dioxide is probably not as harmful or dangerous as o ther emissions, particularly nitrogen oxide and particulate matter. Particulate matter is a very real, very serious, health hazard. HFO is loaded withp articulate matter, and as over the years as the refining processo f crude oil has become more sophisticated, more and more o f this dangerous stuff has been concentrated in HFO, the left over sludge. And because diesel is a distilled fuel source, it has ZEROp articulate matter. The missed opportunity here i s that BEC could have apologised for their mistake about e mission standards while simul taneously inviting all concerned residents to engage in mean ingful discussions about the future of the plant and offered t o share all their data collection results and techniques witht he whole public. BEC has repeatedly said that t hey want to be more open about this plant, yet they continue to try and discredit all those who raise serious ques tions about the plant with outd ated, and made up data. They continue to raise walls of secre-c y between the real reasons for the plant and the general publ ic. They continue to do busi ness as usual. But in the modern world, business as usual no longer works. It used to be that BEC a nd the government could do something of questionable andt hen cover it up with vague speeches about the betterment o f the community and lots of outdated and false data. They could then count on the public’s lack of access to raw data and information, most of it deliberately controlled by the government’s secrecy policies.T his can no longer work. We live in a world where e verything is recorded and searchable, context and all. A nything BEC or any politician publicly states can be l ooked up later in free online newspaper archives as well as audio and video archives. All of which provide the original context. Now, our leaders can really be held accountable, and they should be. They need to be. We also live in a world where anyone with access to the internet can by-pass the government’s attempts to limit knowl edge and education to go straight to the real information. It doesn’t take long, and it can be confirmed easily with other sources outside of the country. Anyone can contact any expert or corporation or, say, the World Health Organisation. The real information is avail able, and it often contradicts and discredits what the politicians and BEC are trying to sell the public. It is too bad BEC didn’t use this opportunity to try and open themselves up to real collaboration with the community instead of trying to beat it into submission with false statements and aggressive marketing. Collaboration with an edu cated population is the only way to create a sustainable economy on Abaco, or any oth er island in the Bahamas. We need local input and local initi ation. And we need to be able to let local people hold central government accountable for the bad decisions and mistakes they make. That is the future. BEC’s cur rent strategy is the past, and it is economically, socially, and envi ronmentally crippling. BEC may not want to acknowledge the real standards, but anyone who cares about Abaco should go straight to the source and look it up themselves. M M A A T T T T H H E E W W M M c c C C O O Y Y Abaco, February, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Corporate leaders in Japan are affable cheerleaders who solicit everyone's views and avoid confrontation at almost any cost. It's called "nemawashi." U .S. lawmakers are cutthroat partisans who clamour for the spotlight, especially in an e lection year. It's called politics. These cultures collided Wednesday in the a ppearance of a polite man from a distant l and before a congressional committee s tocked with angry men and women with a xes to grind. Toyota President Akio Toyoda's moment w as one brought to us by globalization, the integration of economies and societies t hrough a worldwide network of trade and communications. Toyoda's appearance illus-t rated two stark realities: Nations are more knitted together than ever, and still oh-so far a part. A generation ago, it was good politics in Congress to bash Japan and buy American.N ow U.S. lawmakers grab campaign money from Toyota executives and scramble to s ave Toyota jobs in their districts. Auto workers used to take sledgehamm ers to foreign cars. Now thousands of them work for foreign companies, and U.S. car d ealers wear "I am Toyota in America" but tons to Capitol Hill. And consider the hearing itself, where American directness confronted Japanese subtlety as Toyoda apologized for life-threat e ning safety lapses and for a corporate culture that may have made things worse. T he grandson of the company's founder noted that the vehicles bear his name. "For m e," Toyoda said in a thin, reedy voice, "when the cars are damaged, it is as though I am as well." It was a uniquely Japanese way to lead in crisis. How often do troubled U.S. leaders c all themselves damaged goods? Unlike in the United States, where selfp romoting corporate leaders cast themselves as buck-stops-here demigods, the heads of J apanese companies are chosen for their skills at team decision-making. Most climbed the corporate ladder without rocking the boat, and humility is prized. Their job is to ensure stability and har m ony. Harmony? Not a word usually associated w ith the U.S. corporate culture. Or Con gress. " This is appalling, sir," said Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., waving copies of a July 2009 presentation at Toyota's Washington office. The confidential document bragged of saving $100 million or more by negotiating an" equipment recall" of floor mats involving 55,000 Toyota vehicles in September 2007. " I'm embarrassed for you, sir," Mica said. Toyoda, who earned a business degree in Massachusetts, is no stranger to the United States. But he's probably unaccustomed to the impatience and at times the impertinence of U.S. lawmakers. Their questions came "with all due respect," a caveat that paves the way for c ountless slights on Capitol Hill. Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., pressed T oyoda about whether the company could correct the acceleration problem. Toyodag ave a long, indirect answer establishing a pattern for the hearing. " I'm trying to find out," an exasperated T owns said, "is that a yes or a no?" Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who received a $1,000 campaign contribution in December from the president of a Toyota dealership in C alifornia, jumped to Toyoda's defence. He explained that a complicated problemr equired complicated answers. Toyoda gave his opening statement in h eavily accented English. He fielded questions through a translator, but clearly had command of the situation and used thee xtra time to consider his answers. Early on, the company president reached a cross the table to pull a microphone closer to his translator, and when asked a quest ion, he nodded to her and said, "Will trans late." A nd so it went, this lively blend of busi ness and political cultures played out before the cameras globalization in a box, the 21st century condensed into a single Capitol Hill committee room. B ut it wasn't pretty. Not with so many lives at risk or already wasted by mechanical d efects. Not with so many lawmakers and Obama administration officials hoping the a ccountability stops with Toyoda and Toy ota, sparing them. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration received more than 2,500 consumer complaints about Toyota before a ggressively dogging the company in late 2009. Congress, which has oversight author i ty on NHTSA, is only now asking tough questions. " NHTSA failed the taxpayers," Towns, the committee chairman, said before swearing in Toyoda. "Toyota failed their customers." Still, after two days of hearings, there is t oo much we don't know. Why did some cars accelerate out of con t rol? Why did others not stop? What else might go wrong? I s my car safe? At the end of the day, Congress and Toyota delivered more theatre than answers. Cultures collide. Globalization enters the so-what phase. Political and business leaderss truggle to lead. All true. But whether in Japan or on Capitol Hill, i n a car accident you're just as dead. (This article was written by Ron Fournier of the Associated Press). An open letter to Matthew McCoy from BEC management LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Disparate cultures on display on Hill

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 6W$QGUHZ6FKRRO7KH,QWHUQDWLRQDO6FKRRORI7KH%DKDPDV DQDXWKRUL]HG,QWHUQDWLRQDO%DFFDODXUHDWH:RUOG6FKRROLQYLWHV DSSOLFDWLRQVIURPTXDOLHGDQGH[SHULHQFHG %DKDPLDQFDQGLGDWHV IRUWKHIROORZLQJWHDFKLQJYDFDQFLHVZLWKHIIHFWIURP $XJXVW )XOOLQIRUPDWLRQUHJDUGLQJWKHVFKRROPD\EHIRXQGDWLWVZHEVLWHZZZVWDQGUHZVFRP &DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGEHTXDOLHGWHDFKHUVZKRSRVVHVVWKHQHFHVVDU\ DFDGHPLFTXDOLFDWLRQVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQVfIRUZKLFKWKH\DSSO\LQFOXGLQJD WHDFKLQJTXDOLFDWLRQDQGEDFKHORUGHJUHHDQGQRUPDOO\QHHG WRKDYHPLQLPXPRIWZR\HDUVVXFFHVVIXOVFKRROEDVHGH[SHULHQFH 'HVLUDEOHTXDOLFDWLRQVLQDGGLWLRQWRWKRVHVSHFLHGIRULQGLYLGXDO SRVWVDUHWKDWWHDFKHUVKDYHVXFFHVVIXOH[SHULHQFHLQDQLQGHSHQGHQW DQGRULQWHUQDWLRQDOVFKRRODQGDQDGYDQFHGGHJUHH$SSOLFDWLRQVIURP FDQGLGDWHVDEOHWRFRDFKWHDPVSRUWVRUDGYLVHVFKRROFOXEVDQGDFWLYLWLHV DUHSDUWLFXODUO\ZHOFRPHG6HFRQGDU\ LH PLGGOHDQGXSSHUf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PHASE I of the $8 million National Prescription Drug Plan is being financed entirelyby the medical benefits branch of the National InsuranceBoard (NIB phases will be funded by a combination of payroll deductions, government grants and coordination of benefits with insurers, NIB director Algernon Cargill recently told health professionals at a meeting held in Palmetto Point, Eleuthera. “In the second phase we’ve estimated a one per cent contribution from the insurable wage to fund the programme so that works out to a maximum of $4 a week or $2 for the employer and $2 for the employee per week based on the insurable wage ceiling of $400,” Mr Cargill said. He also said NIB will work with private insurance companies to coordinate benefits so that in future phases members with private health insurance will reap the maximum value from the Drug Plan and their private plans. Pre-registration for Phase I of the National Prescription Drug Plan is currently in progress throughout the Bahamas for approximately 35,000 NIB pensioners, invalids and children with one or more of eleven chronic conditions. Additional According to Mr Cargill, the next phase of the Drug Plan will include an additional 100,000 persons. During the meeting in Eleuthera, Dr Stanley Lalta, project manager for the Drug Plan, also outlined details of the Plan’s future preventive or “healthy people” component which will focus on funding health promotion and wellness projects in the community. “We want to make an invest ment in health promotion wellness, and prevention. What we said is that we will set aside some of the funds from the Plan in order to engage organisations in preparing very good projects that can be funded. I have to tell you that it’s not free money. It has to be a very well designed project. A project that has a clear start date and end date, clearly stipulated objectives, clearly stipulated targets and the management team has to be very clearly indicated so that we can have confidence that the money put into the project is going to create the value that we’re looking for,” Dr Lalta said. He emphasised that such projects will be monitored and evaluated to determine their effectiveness and ability to be replicated in other communities. He also predicted that an accumulation of small, successful projects by non-governmental organisations would have a major impact on health and wellness in the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS P AGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPELCHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2010 Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m. Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)11:30am SpeakerPastor Marcel LightbourneTopic: “Our Responsibilities To The World” Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist Church(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) P.O.Box CB-13046 The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427(www.gtwesley.org)SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH, 2010Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”7:00 a.m. Rev.Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams11:00 a.m.Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Thompson 7:00 p.m. Sis.Tezel Anderson/Board of General Education $ 1'/(<-($1%$37,67(RI 0$5*$5(77($9(18(&$50,&+$(/52$' 1$66$8%$+$0$6 ATTORNEY General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney encouraged lawyers and lawyers-to-be to view arbitration as a new area w ithin which they might equip themselves. “You may be called upon to draft arbitral provisions, to serve as counsel in arbitration proceedings, expert witnesses on Bahamian law, as a member of an arbitration panel,” said the Attorney General. Senator Delaney addressed the Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association arbitration seminar on Wednesday as part of Legal Education Week. He addressed the topic “The Arbitration Act 2009”. The Attorney General said in 2010 the legal profession and the commercial community will meet a new arbitration regime following the enactment of the Arbitration Act, 2009 and the Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral Awards last year. “Together they comprise a new Bahamian arbitral regime which is expected to be brought in force in the coming months by Appointed Day Notice. The Foreign Arbitral Awards law gives effect in the Bahamas to the New York Con vention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, to which the Bahamas became party effective 2007,” he said. “On commencement, the new Bahamian regime will wholly replace the law of 1889 which governs arbitration in the Bahamas. In so doing, it will establish state-of-the-art legal infrastructure for arbitration in the Bahamas.” Senator Delaney explained that arbitration provides a pri vate means of determining disputes arising under contractual relationships and is an alternative to the court process. He pointed out some of the major advantages of arbitration including privacy, speed, cost effectiveness, technical expertise and convenience in matters of procedure, venue and time. “Where there is good arbitral regime and availabil ity of suitable arbitrators, the relative disadvantages in com mercial matters are few,” he said. “The new Bahamian regime is robust comprehensive and modern. It substantially corresponds with the statutory pro visions of England, which is a major international seat for commercial arbitration. We have every confidence that it will serve our jurisdiction well both in the context of domestic and international arbitration.” He encouraged lawyers and law students to equip themselves, embrace the opportunities and do their part to make the country a “preferred seat for commercial arbitration.” Law students urged to view the potentials of arbitration Future financing and preventive component of Drug Plan highlighted PICTURED (left to right Galanis, principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School and Attorney General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney at the Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar on Wednesday as a part of Legal Education Week. L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S P h o t o L e t i s h a H e n d e r s o n / B I S P h o t o ATTORNEY General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney addresses the arbitration seminar spon sored by the Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association on Wednesday. He addressed the topic “The Arbitration Act 2009”. CHIEF Justice Sir Michael Barnett addresses the sixth annual Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar held at the British Colonial Hilton on Wednesday. ALGERNON Cargill, director of the National Insurance Board (cen tre) recently addressed Eleuthera health profes sionals on the National Prescription Drug Plan. Seated are Dr StanleyL alta, project manager (left Williams, island admin istrator of Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera. PHOTOS: Dominique Thompson NURSES and doctors from Eleuthera’s clinics attended the presentation on the National Prescription Drug Plan. PRIVATE physician Dr Cliff Bacchus (centre National Prescription Drug Plan is a “good step forward”.

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votes between Dr Sands of the F NM and Mr Pinder of the PLP who received 1,501 and 1 ,499 regular votes respectively these protest votes are cru cial and prevent an official winner from being certified, it is argued. U nder the law, these protest votes can only be certified and a dded to the ballot box by an election court, which can also d etermine a lawful winner in the race. Prime Minister and leader of the FNM Hubert Ingraham has indicated that his party will question Ryan Pinder's eligibility to run in the Elizabethc onstituency by-election during election court. Mr Pinder, born to a Bahamian father and an American mother, held Americana nd Bahamian citizenship for years. According to a letter received by The Tribune , Mr Pinder renounced his American citizenship on January 20, 2 010, nine days before the nomination date, confirming his eli g ibility to run in the recently held by-election. " The government of the United States no longer con siders Mr Pinder to be a US citizen," the letter read. "His US passport is no l onger valid and has been forwarded to the issuing agency w ithin the US government." Yesterday, Mr Evans would n ot confirm if this argument would still be part of the FNM's strategy. "I can't speak to that. When we get there we will indicate what all issues we have agreed to deal with," he said. In addition to Messrs Pinder and Sands, fringe party candidates Cassius Stuart, Rodney Moncur and Dr Andre Rollins are also listed as respondents in the court case. Their participation, or lack of, would contribute to the d uration of the court battle, said Mr Evans. " The case could be very short or it could be prolonged. T here are three others involved in the matter, Mr Moncur, Mr Stuart and Mr Rollins they have all been named as respondents and they do have a right t o put in a position. If they have one or if they don't have one w ould also indicate how long the case will take.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.491.03AML Foods Limited1.121.120.000.2830.0004.00.00% 10.759.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7410.740.000.9920.20010.81.86% 7.005.50Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.001,5000.5980.2609.94.41% 0.580.58Benchmark0.580.580.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3 .493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1680.09018.82.86% 2.152.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 13.439.62Cable Bahamas13.4313.430.001.4060.2509.61.86% 2.882.72Colina Holdings2.722.720.000.2490.04010.91.47% 7.005.00Commonwealth Bank (S1)6.766.760.000.4190.30016.14.44% 3.652.21Consolidated Water BDRs2.442.480.040.1110.05222.32.10% 2.551.32Doctor's Hospital2.552.550.000.6270.0804.13.14% 7.805.94Famguard6.496.490.00-0.0030.240N/M3.70% 11.808.75Finco9.279.270.000.3220.52028.85.61% 10.409.75FirstCaribbean Bank10.009.94-0.068,0000.6540.35015.23.52% 5.533.75Focol (S)4.774.770.000.3260.15014.63.14% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.300.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 5 .595.00ICD Utilities5.595.590.007,0000.4070.50013.78.94% 10.509.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.001 000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk Hi 52wk Low Symbol Bid$ Ask$ LastPrice WeeklyVol. EPS$ Div$ P/E Yield FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%WEDNESDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 2010BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,584.93 | CHG -3.66 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD 19.55 | YTD % 1.25B ISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Interest 52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol . EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets10.0611.0614.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3535CFAL Bond Fund1.44600.516.15 2.88692.8266CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.90610.66-1.23 1.51541.4398CFAL Money Market Fund1.51540.535.25 3.20252.9343Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.20252.75-3.54 13.429612.6816Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.42965.585.90 103.987393.1999CFAL Global Bond Fund103.98733.413.41 101.725496.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund101.72545.525.52 1.09431.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.09430.415.21 1.08011.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.08011.134.56 1.09721.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.09720.605.40 9.57959.1005Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.57955.335.33 11.236110.0000Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 211.236112.3612.36 7.71714.8105Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund7.6928-0.3147.51 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Dec-09 31-Dec-09TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jan-10 31-Dec-09 31-Jan-10 12-Feb-10 31-Jan-00MARKET TERMS Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds10-Jan-10 31-Dec-09 10-Jan-10 NAV Date 31-Dec-09 10-Jan-10 31-Oct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he said. “We responded very swiftly t o those and we’ve had some successful interventions.” On Thursday, a man identified by Tribune sources as 50y ear-old Hubert Hall was shot dead by police in Tower Estates Drive after he threatened offic ers who were investigating c laims that two men were seen going from house to house trying to open the doors of cars and homes. Police are still looki ng for the second man. M r Greenslade said part of the police’s recent approach to tackling such crimes is ensuring they have “lots of people o n the front lines.” “We are up and about. All of our commanders have been tasked to put officers on the f ront line. We’ve asked them t o get those officers out of the s tation, into police cars and on c ycles out into the communities,” said the top officer, who credited this strategy with having resulted in the “successful i ntervention” in Tower Estates Drive. When quizzed as to what advice he may have for the public on further protecting thems elves from becoming victims o f crime, Mr Greenslade turned t he tables, suggesting that the c ountry’s crime problem could be “solved overnight” if more people “took responsibility.” “Take responsibility for y ourself, take responsibility for your household, take responsibility for your communities. Again I come back to the busin ess of how you are safe when t he people who live with you c onduct themselves in a respons ible manner. “The people who commit crimes in the Bahamas are not phantoms. These are our peop le, they live in our homes and in our communities and we know who they are. So we can solve this overnight. We have t he ability to do it, do we have t he will to do it?” Police chief’s vow F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e o o n n e e radio that he knew the whereabouts of illegal w eapons. Accepting responsibility for this “reprehensible” remark, Mr Bodie himself informed The Tribune that he was initially flabbergasted by t he request of the police to search his home, but n aturally consented to their requests. “The statement was made in response to a caller’s concerns about the prevalence of crime and firearms being used to perpetuate them. L oose sensational lips do sink ships. Words are capable of being interpreted and misinterpreted based on the environment they are uttered. “I have not been charged, but was released ‘pending further investigations’. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that I will, at thee nd of those investigations, that I will be exonerated. I wish to thank the scores of persons who came down to CDU to offer me comfort.” Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in relat ion to the matter, Commissioner Greenslade commended his officers for acting swiftly and professionally. He said that as Mr Bodie had made some comments that caused the police to have reasonables uspicion, they were duty bound to act. “Subsequent to the investigation that was launched we were satisfied there was nothing else to be done. No charges are being offered a gainst Mr Bodie. It’s a done deal,” he said. ‘No more Police questions for talk show host’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e o o n n e e hand. T he brutal attack has rocked the community of around 2,000 r esidents who fear crime is spir aling out of control in the idyll ic tourist destination which is home to hundreds of winter visi tors and a popular haven for the rich and famous. H owever, nine burglaries on the island over the last weekh as instilled fear of crime for winter visitors and permanent r esidents who are concerned crime could negatively impact the lucrative tourist economy. North Eleuthera MP and Speaker of the House ofA ssembly Alvin Smith said the crime rate in Harbour Island ist he highest in his constituency, which stretches across the mainland and cays north of Governor’s Harbour airport. He has called on Royal B ahamas Police Force (RBPF Commissioner EllisonG reenslade to step up security on the island, which was m anned by seven police offi cers under a police sergeant until Chief Inspector Roston Moss was posted there perman ently the day before the attack. Local police further struggle w ith limited resources claims Mr Smith. He said their most r eliable vehicle is a golf cart not nearly fast enough to catch criminals. “I think the police are going t o put more resources and focus i nto Harbour Island because these break-ins have been happening for quite a while and I don’t think police were taking t hem as seriously as they ought to,” the MP said. “We shouldn't have to wait until such a degree of violenceo ccurs before we address crime. But I am convinced now that police will put more r esources out there and take these matters more seriously. I am pleased with the recommitment of the police and the assurances the Commissioner has given me in review ing manpower and equipmenti n North Eleuthera, particularly in Harbour Island, where we h ave had the highest number of criminal activity and regular break-ins. It’s making things bad for the whole island.” R ising crime cannot be attributed to the island’s economy as Mr Smith said many r esidents have more than one job, and there is work for anyo ne who wants it. And he hopes the rising crime rate will be curbed as the new chief inspector builds tiesw ith the community, increases p atrols and maximises local resources. “I expect some good to come out of this terrible incident in t erms of recommitment from the police and the community,” Mr Smith said. Two men appeared in a Nass au court yesterday in connect ion with Thursday’s incident. Karon Parks, 28, of Coleb rooke Street, and Mario Moss, 35, of Clarence Street, both H arbour Island, were charged on three counts of burglary, armed robbery and causing grievous harm. They were remanded in cust ody until a preliminary inquiry, which will be heard by a local m agistrate in Harbour Island on April 8 and 9. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e o o n n e e F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e o o n n e e Tourist recovering after cutlass attack Sands and Pinder lawyers set for court appearance

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE CR Walker Knights tight e ned their stranglehold of the Gov ernment Secondary Schools Sports Association Track and Field Cham pionship by winning their seventh straight title. Dedicated to veteran national c oach Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming, the K nights on Friday closed out anoth er dominating performance with a 212 point margin over a heateds howdown for second place between t he CV Bethel Stingrays and the RM Bailey Pacers. At the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium as they tried to chase down head coachF loyd Armbrister and assistant coach Tyrice Curry to dose themb oth with water, the Knights celebrated with a huge 636.50 point deci sion. The Stingrays held off the Pacers in a stunning head-to-head clash to take second place with 414.50, just a half point ahead of the third place Pacers. For Armbrister, who used his 800 metre fame as a high school/colle giate athlete to avoid the water rush by his team-mates, said their ability to go out and recruit a whole new crop of athletes was the key to their success. “We had a lot of new ten graders who came into us, especially from HO Nash and we also had some par ents who really wanted their children to be a structured programme in high school,” Armbrister said. “We put the unit together and we trained only in the mornings when we came out here at the track and at the fort (Charlotte o’clock. We put in the time in the morning. We never once came on this track and trained in the after noon.” Thanks to their principal, Armbrister said they were able to acquire a new Coaster bus that made it accessible to transport their 30-plus athletes to and from the training site. “But I have to say that these kids have a lot of discipline. We had to keep molding them and keep pushing them to the level. We never slacked up on them,” Armbrister said. “Some of them who ran today came from the getto, Quarry Road, Mason Addition, Farm Road, the Groove and even Fox Hill. “I think it was the discipline and the unity on the this team that made the difference.” There were also some superb indi vidual performances that helped out as well. Leading the way was Marva Etienne, who swept the intermediate girls sprints by adding the 200 metres (25.26 seconds she claimed on day one on Thursday. Shafara Lewis also got some of the spotlight by cleaning up the middle distance races when she took the 800 (2:35.53 the day before. She also won the long jump (14-feet, 10 1/2-inches In the intermediate boys division, Ashley Riley was another triple winner with his record breaking triumph in the 800 (2:04.30 his feats in both the 400 and 1,500. The outstanding performances in the senior boys and girls divisions were spread around the other schools with Tonia-Kaye Johnson of RM Bailey emerging as the female sprint queen as she clinched the 200 (26.33 Trevor Mackey of Doris Johnson duplicating the senior boys feat with h is 200 time of 22.43 after he pulled o ff the 100 win. “They stepped up their game. All o f the athletes stepped up their game 110 percent today and we came back and tried to win three out of the four relays,” Armbrister noted. We got three out of the four, but we didn’t get the three that we really wanted. The senior girls came as a major surprise to us and the 4 x 4 senior boys, we wanted that. But RM Bailey beat us. RM Bailey feel as if they win the meet if they win t he 4 x 4. They came to the meet for that and they got it.” The senior boys 4 x 4 relay, spons ored by Muck-A-Mucks and the S ports Center, brought the curtains down on the meet as the Pacers pre vailed in 4:17.62, leaving the Knightst railing in 4:17.96. But as Armbrister stated, the Knights turned in a stellar perfor-m ance in capturing the senior girls’ 4 x 4, which was sponsored by A-Plus Enterprises, in 4:20.05. The Gov e rnment High Magicmen finished a distant second in 4:32.52. They added the other relay titles in the intermediate girls (4:14.97a nother fabulous run and their inter mediate boys came through in a come-from-behind fashion in 3:40.90, holding off the Pacers (3:46.42 In what turned out to be a keenly contested battle behind the Knights, the Stingrays had coach John Mills smiling from ear-to-ear because of their 1/2-point decision over the Pac ers. “Most of our kids did pretty well, but our downfall was the kids who didn’t show,” said Mills, who had anticipated that they would have given the Knights a run for their money this year. “One of our better distance runners, Ronald Woodside, was representing the country in boxing. “Luckily for us, we edged out RM Bailey by a half a point. Who say one point don’t make a difference in a victory? Hopefully we will do a little better in the (BAAA’s/Scotiabank) Nationals.” The Nationals is scheduled for the weekend of March 11-13 and Armbrister say his Knights intend to do the same thing as they did at the GSSSA. So watch out defending champions St. Augustine’s College Big Red Machine and the Queen’s College Comets. C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 INSIDE Subway Junior Tennis Classic TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM HERE’S a look at the final t eam results from the two days of competition in the senior divi sion of the Government Seco ndary Schools Sports Associa tion’s track and field championships concluded on Friday at the Thomas A. Robinson Tracka nd Field Stadium: SchoolsPts CR Walker Knights 636.50 CV Bethel Stingrays414.50 RM Bailey Pacers 414 CC Sweeting Cobras 298.50 C I Gibson Rattlers 278 Anatol Rodgers High250 Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 242 Government High Magicmen190.50 Intermediates (Under-27 CR Walker Knights 346 CV Bethel Stingrays212 RM Bailey Pacers188 ASnatol Rodgers High 157 CC Sweeting Cobras145 Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins114 CI Gibson Rattlers 111 Government High Magicmen19 Seniors (Under-20 CR Walker Knights290.50 RM Bailey Pacers226 CV Bethel Stingrays202.50 Government High Magicmen171.50 CI Gibson Rattlers 167 CC Sweeting Cobras153.50 Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 128 Anatol Rodgers High93 GSSSA FINAL RESULTS T HE C R Walker Knights gather together for a team photo after winning their seventh straight GSSSA Senior High Track and Field Championships yersterday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Knights shine again By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net IN a stunning and surpris ing move, Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming resigned from the Bahamas Association of Athletic Association as the Technical Director. Rahming, who very rarely speaks publicly, wrote a letter dated Thursday, February 25to BAAA’s secretary Timo thy Munnings, which read as follows: “At a recent executive meeting, I was told that I was the problem. Whatever the speaker’s interpretation or context, I do not wish to be the problem for any person or organisation’s progress. “Because this was not disputed by any other present, like other utterances at executive meetings by inner circle members, I take it to be the consensus. “I, therefore, offer my res ignation as Technical Director of the Bahamas Association of Athletic Association.” Rahming, who is now in pre-retirement as the Assistant Director of Sports at the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, was re-elected to serve as the Technical Director after he defeated Rupert Gardiner at the BAAA’s annual general meeting and election of officers in November. He was the only member from incumbent president Curt Hollingsworth’s slate that was voted in when Sands was returned to office after a twoyear hiatus due to a vote of no confidence in 2007. When contacted yesterday for further comments, Rahming declined, indicating that he just simply wished not to be the subject of any headline news. He referred The Tri bune to the BAAA for comments. There was some indication that some of the discussion that prompted Rahming’s res ignation came as a result of the conflict in the schedule of the BAAA’s/ScotiaBank National High School Track and Field Championships that will collide with the Grand Bahama Schools Sports Association’s Track and Field Championships. Both events are scheduled for March 11-13, which means that the Grand Bahama schools would not be coming to the Nationals. In the past, the Nationals were normally held at the end of the Carifta Games. But for the second consecutive year, they have been moved up and staged before Carifta, which will be held over the Easter holiday week end in the Cayman Islands. Efforts to contact BAAA’s president Mike Sands or Munnings was unsuccessful, but first vice president Sherwin Stuart said he was really shocked and surprised when he heard the news yesterday morning. “There was no prior warn ing or acknowledgment that I am aware of,” Stuart said. “Like I said, I just found out this morning. So there’s really nothing I can comment on, except that it’s unfortunate that he has resigned.” Pressed further by The Tri bune for comments, Stuart said the BAAA has always held Rahming in high esteem in reference to his technical knowledge of the sport and they were looking forward to him continuing to make his contribution in the way forward. “He’s decided that he wants to move on, so we in the BAAA are very appreciative of his services over the many decades that he has been a part of the association and the contribution he has made to the programme and we wish him nothing but the very best in his future endeavours and hope that he will continue to work closely with the sport.” Based on the constitution, Stuart said Sands, as president, has the power to appoint someone to fill the vacancy in the interim and that is the course of action that they intend to pursue. “There will be an appoint ment at this point, but I can not say if there will be an elec tion any time soon,” Stuart said. “We will just try to fill the void in the meantime and then in the way forward, we will make a decision or whether or not we will have an election for that position.” The BAAA was scheduled to hold their monthly meet ing last night. Rahming’s res ignation and his new appointment was expected to be discussed as well as the selection of the national coaches and the national team for the IAAF World Indoor Championships in Doha next month. Rahming resigns as BAAA Technical Director Frank Rahming H EAD c oach Floyd Armbrister talks about his CR Walker Knights’ success as the GSS SA Senior High Track and Field Championships. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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THE first Bahamas Lawn and Ten nis Association sanctioned junior ten nis tournament of the year took place this past weekend (February 19-22, 2010) at the Gully Bowe Tennis Center at the Lucayan Bath & Racquet Club. The Grand Bahama Tennis Association hosted 35 junior tennis players from Nassau, Eleuthera and Grand Bahama for several days of healthy tennis competition with sev eral hundred spectators in attendance during the four-day event. Tournament director Gully Bowe said that this year’s event was very competitive and a great success. “I enjoyed the tournament and I know that the young tennis players did as well,” he added. “This year’s players displayed a high level of competive ness and good sportsmanship as they vied for the first place trophies in the various age categories.” He thanked all the participants, parents and coaches for their contri butions to the tournament. He expressed special thanks to the tour nament sponsor, Shuffel Hepburn and Subway. “Despite the economic chal lenges being faced by many, Mr Shuf fle Hepburn, owner of SUBWAY restaurants, continues his commit ment to youth development in spon soring this year’s tournament once again,” said Bowe. President of the Grand Bahama Tennis Association, Mrs Charmine Wallace, dubbed this year’s tourna ment a huge success and extended sincere appreciation to Mr Shuffle Hepburn of Subway restaurants, the players and their parents for contributing to such a successful tourna ment. The tournament results are as follows: Girls under12 Singles: Iesha Shepherd d. Lily Evert 5-7, 6-0, 6-3; Girls Under 14: Gabriella Bowe d. Lily Evert 6-1, 6-0; Girls Under 16: Gabriella Bowe d. Dominique Mortier 6-0, 6-1; Boys Under 10: Cole Majra d. Kofi Bowe 6-0,6-0; Boys Under 12: Oneil Mortimer d. Ashton Major 6-4, 6-0; Boys Under 14: Philip Major d. Rasheed Carey 6-4, 6-0; Boys Under 16: Kevin Major d. Ondre Cargil Bye;Boys Under 18: Johnathan Taylor d. Kevin Major Bye; Girls Under 14 Doubles: Shaytonya Missick & Gabriella Bowe def Lily Evert & Iesha Shepherd Bye; Boys Under 14 Doubles: Shannon Francis & Ashton Major d. Oneil Mortimer & Malik Jones 8-3; Boys Under 18 Doubles: Hubert Russell & Philip Major d. Johnathan Miller & Dirnaj Saunders 8-1. Bahamas tennis fans can see a full gallery of photos from the event atwww.bahamastennis.com. Subway 2010 Junior Tennis Classic results C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM G.S.S.S.A. 17th Annual Track & Field Meet – 2/25/2010 to 2/26/2010 THE Government of Secondary Schools Sports Association complet-e d its Senior High Schools Champio nship on Friday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track & Field Stadium. B elow is a look at the individual r esults posted over the past two days of competition: GIRLS 100 METER DASH I NTERMEDIATE (U17 ( w: 0.1) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R. Walker 25, 12.44. 2, 987 Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 13.17. 3, 782 Rolle, Lakeisha, C.I. Gibson 16, 13.23. GIRLS 200 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 (w: -0.6 Walker 25, 25.62. 2, 909 Higgs, G regria, C.V. Bethel 26, 26.40. 3, 987 A ndrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 2 7.54. GIRLS 400 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R. Walker 25, 1:02.91. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.W alker 25, 1:06.80. 3, 925 Stanislaus, G reann, C.V. Bethel 26, 1:10.02. GIRLS 800 METER RUN I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, 2 :35.53. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25, 2:39.42. 3, 662 Lotus, Kelly, Anatol Rodgers, 2:51.25. GIRLS 1500 METER RUN INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, 5 :50.11. 2, 851 Martin, Nevelicia, C.R. Walker 25, 6:02.60. 3, 1166 Sturrup, Mataya, R.M. Bailey 2, 6:30.88. GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES INTERMEDIATE (U17 (w: 0.9 B ethel 26, 17.32. 2, 783 Rolle, Tiffany, C .I. Gibson 16, 17.42. 3, 861 Whylly, Lashawn, C.R. Walker 25, 18.05. GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 858 Stubbs, Keithra, C.R. Walker 25, 50.48. 2, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. W alker 25, 52.35. 3, 714 Ferguson, Tanisha, C.C. Sweeting 7, 56.28. G IRLS 4X100 METER RELAY INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Minus, Raygene 16, Stubbs, Rouiqua 15, Gib s on, Julia 16, Higgs, Gregria 16), 53.09. 2, C. I. Gibson (16 (Brice, Jalisa 16, Rolle, Lakeisha 16, L ouis Jean, Louise Anna 16, Rolle, T iffany 16), 54.88. 3, Anatol Rodgers High School (Knowles, Rashae 16, L ightbourne, Khadyjah 16, Bowe, Lashawn 16, Frazer, Natori 16), 55.52. GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY INTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , C. R. Walker (25 C. V. Bethel (26 R. M. Bailey (2 GIRLS LONG JUMP INTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, 4.53m, w:NWI (14-10.50 Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 4.41m, w:NWI (14-05.75 enne, Marvar, C.R. Walker 25, 4.35m, w:NWI (14-03.25 GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson 16, 10.14m, (33-03.25 Karnesia, C.C. Sweeting 7, 8.86m, (2901). 3, 676 Williams, Sherceil, Anatol Rodgers, 8.50m, (27-10.75 GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson 16, 25.00m, (82-00 Kingslee, R.M. Bailey 2, 20.17m, (6602). 3, 994 Curry, Donisha, Doris John son 27, 19.57m, (64-02 GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson 16, 26.30m, (86-03 Angenette, C.C. Sweeting 7, 24.83m, (81-052 5, 23.15m, (75-11 BOYS 100 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 (w: 0.7 C .V. Bethel 26, 11.26*. 2, 868 Dames, Xavier, C.R. Walker 25, 11.37. 3, 867 Culmer, Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 11.71. BOYS 200 METER DASH I NTERMEDIATE (U17 (w: 2.0 tol Rodgers, 23.87. 2, 867 Culmer, Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 23.99. 3, 886 Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25, 24.15. BOYS 400 METER DASH INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25, 5 2.66. 2, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 55.45. 3, 1194 Perry, S horn, R.M. Bailey 2, 56.69. BOYS 800 METER RUN INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25, 2:04.30*. 2, 691 Gray, Rashad, Anatol Rodgers, 2:13.57. 3, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 2:14.05. BOYS 1500 METER RUN I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25, 4 :53.56. 2, 1172 Black, Jachris, R.M. Bailey 2, 5:03.27. 3, 814 Louis, Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16, 5:13.28. BOYS 3000 METER RUN I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 1192 Newbold, Adam, R.M. Bailey 2, 11:14.97. 2, 1029 Armbrister, Kadashia n, Doris Johnson 27, 11:33.20. 3, 814 L ouis, Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16, 11:38.31. BOYS 100 METER HURDLES INTERMEDIATE (U17 ( w: 1.5) 1, 1187 Marshall, Andre, R.M. Bailey 2, 16.96. 2, 962 Johnson, Jameal, C.V. Bethel 26, 18.21. 3, 884R iley, Alex, C.R. Walker 25, 18.46. BOYS 400 METER HURDLES I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1 :04.38. 2, 685 Evans, Tre, Anatol Rodgers, 1:05.62. 3, 737 Fernander, Leon, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1:05.67. BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, Anatol Rodgers High School (Ander s on, Enrico 16, Mossa, Owen 16, Evans, Tre 16, Evans, Trevel 16), 45.49. 2, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Burrows, Raymonte 16, Ferguson, Richard 16, D arville, Tanaghe 16, Farrington, Anthony 16), 45.98. 3, R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers (Perry, Shorn 16, Bain, Shac-q uille 16, Gibson, Keishon 15, Gale, Raymond 16), 48.06. BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1, C. R. Walker (25 R. M. Bailey (2B ethel (26 BOYS LONG JUMP INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 703 Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol Rodgers, 5.94m, w:NWI (19-06 889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25, 5.75m, w:NWI (18-10.50 Mossa, Owen, Anatol Rodgers, 5.52m, w:NWI (18-01.50 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 886 Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25, 12.46m, w:NWI (40-10.50 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25, 12.23m, w:NWI (40-01.50 Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol Rodgers, 12.11m, w:NWI (39-08.75 BOYS SHOT PUT (12LBS I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 945 Farrington, Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 11.37m, (37-03.75 Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25, 10.45m, (34-03.50 Richard, C.V. Bethel 26, 10.00m, (3209.75). BOYS DISCUS THROW (1.5K INTERMEDIATE (U17 1 , 887 Saintillis, Harl, C.R. Walker 25, 25.52m, (83-09 Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 25.41m, (8304). 3, 737 Fernander, Leon, C.C. Sweeting 7, 24.23m, (79-06 BOYS JAVELIN THROW (700GMS I NTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 871 Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25, 44.23m, (145-01A nthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 43.73m, (1430 6). 3, 1033 Burrows, Nicholas, Doris Johnson 27, 39.90m, (130-11 GIRLS 100 METER DASH SENIOR (U20 ( w: 0.2) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye, R.M. Bailey 2, 12.65. 2, 788 Stubbs, Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 13.07. 3, 655 Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 13.17. GIRLS 200 METER DASH S ENIOR (U20 ( w: 1.7) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye, R .M. Bailey 2, 26.33. 2, 655 Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 27.15. 3, 788 S tubbs, Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 27.46. GIRLS 400 METER DASH S ENIOR (U20 1, 1090 Miller, Shauntae, Government H igh, 1:01.09. 2, 853 Rahming, Edric ka, C.R. Walker 25, 1:03.63. 3, 723 Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,1 :04.59. GIRLS 800 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1 , 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel 26, 2:23.24. 2, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol Rodgers, 2:35.86. 3, 855 Russell, Florazell, C.R. Walker 25, 2:40.25. GIRLS 1500 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol R odgers, 5:43.82. 2, 847 Humed, Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 6:10.76. 3, 1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2, 6 :16.84. GIRLS 3000 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1 , 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol Rodgers, 14:07.67. 2, 847 Humed, Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 15:24.23. 3,1 156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2, 1 5:36.58. GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES S ENIOR (U20 ( w: -0.4) 1, 724 Sears, Hollina, C.C. Sweeting 7, 16.98. 2, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye, R.M. Bailey 2, 18.28. 3, 765 Brown, Vanessa, C.I. Gibson 16, 18.47. GIRLS 400 METER HURDLES S ENIOR (U20 1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel 26, 1:06.40. 2, 1090 Miller, Shauntae,G overnment High, 1:09.20. 3, 724 Sears, Hollina, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1:11.32. GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY SENIOR (U20 1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Adderley, Teshona 17, Gaitor, Lyndera 18, Stuart, Shatyna 17, Lewis, Vashonique 18), 52.42. 2, C. I. Gibson (16 (Stubbs, Jarona 17, Colebrooke, Vashti 17, Brown, Vanessa 19, Adderley, Nasia 17), 52.78. 3, C. R. Walker (25) Knights (Strachan, Opal 17, Rahming, Edricka 17, Capron, Lechea 17, Dean, Roshanda 17), 53.35. GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY SENIOR (U20 1, C. R. Walker (25 Government High School (3 4:32.52. 3, Anatol Rodgers High School 4:35.85. GIRLS LONG JUMP S ENIOR (U20 1 , 1087 Kelly, Cache, Government High, 4.69m, w:NWI (15-04.75 Lewis, Vashonique, C.V. Bethel 26, 4.63m, w:NWI (15-02.25 Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 4.55m,w :NWI (14-11.25 GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP SENIOR (U20 1, 1159 Rodgers, Shonice, R.M. Bailey 2 , 10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50 Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7, 10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50 Thompson, Brittaney, C.R. Walker 25, 9.96m, w:NWI (32-08.25 GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'3" SENIOR (U20 1, 862 Young, Lyndia, C.R. Walker 25, 1.45m, (4-09S hauntae, Government High, 1.40m, (4-07 m ent High, J1.40m, (4-07 G IRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS SENIOR (U20 1 , 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 12.22m#, (40-01.25 don, Giovann, C.C. Sweeting 7, 9.10m, ( 29-10.25). 3, 836 Bastian, Samantha, C.R. Walker 25, 8.79m, (28-10.25 GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K SENIOR (U20 1 , 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 35.65m#, (116-11 E storcien, Vernice, R.M. Bailey 2, 2 3.31m, (76-06 C.R. Walker 25, 22.69m, (74-05 GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS SENIOR (U20 1, 920 Prosper, Tawanna, C.V. Bethel 26, 29.03m, (95-03R acquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 28.75m, (940 4). 3, 716 Gordon, Giovann, C.C. Sweeting 7, 26.13m, (85-09 BOYS 100 METER DASH S ENIOR (U20 (w: -0.3 J ohnson 27, 10.90. 2, 1115 Innocent, Nathan, Government High, 11.61. 3, 680 Brooks, Brandon, Anatol Rodgers, 11.61. BOYS 200 METER DASH S ENIOR (U20 (w: 2.4 J ohnson 27, 22.43. 2, 872 Ferguson, O'Jay, C.R. Walker 25, 22.51. 3, 1038 Cooper, Randolph, Doris Johnson 27, 22.80. BOYS 400 METER DASH S ENIOR (U20 1 , 872 Ferguson, O'Jay, C.R. Walker 25, 50.38. 2, 1201 Swann, Leeward, R.M. Bailey 2, 52.84. 3, 866 Cartwright, Leon, C.R. Walker 25, 53.03. BOYS 800 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1, 866 Cartwright, Leon, C.R. Walker 2 5, 2:05.15. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon, R.M. Bailey 2, 2:05.53. 3, 795 Bain, Carlide, C.I. Gibson 16, 2:07.47. BOYS 1500 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1, 813 Louis, Harold, C.I. Gibson 16, 4 :49.54. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon, R.M. Bailey 2, 4:53.76. 3, 1199 Storr, Lyndrick, R.M. Bailey 2, 5:03.68. BOYS 5000 METER RUN SENIOR (U20 1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.I. Gibson 16, 19:08.50. 2, 869 Davis, Matthew, C.R. Walker 25, 19:20.71. 3, 756 Wells, Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 19:27.24. BOYS 3000 METER STEEPLECHASE SENIOR (U20 1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.I. Gibson 16, 11:34.11. 2, 888 Stuart, Trevonn, C.R. Walker 25, 12:04.36. 3, 756 Wells, Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 12:14.29. BOYS 110 METER HURDLES SENIOR (U20 (w: 1.2 Bethel 26, 15.39. 2, 947 Ferguson, Donshannon, C.V. Bethel 26, 16.09. 3,7 33 Dames, Jaleel, C.C. Sweeting 7, 16.75. BOYS 400 METER HURDLES SENIOR (U20 1 , 874 Higgs, Delvano, C.R. Walker 25, 5 9.64. 2, 754 Thompson, Ishmael, C.C. S weeting 7, 1:01.38. 3, 1183 Henfield, Melvin, R.M. Bailey 2, 1:01.63. BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY SENIOR (U20 1, Doris Johnson (27 (Walkine, Marco 17, Clarke, Fredrick 19, Cooper, Randolph 18, Mackey, Trevor 18), 44.13. 2, C. V. Bethel (26) S tingrays (Lockhart, David 17, Adderl ey, Tre 17, Forbes, Jarad 18, Cartwright, Elvis 16), 44.99. 3, R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers (Bullard, Delmarro 17, Swann, Leeward 17, Knowles, Terrell 17, Munroe, Sean 17), 45.33. BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY SENIOR (U20 1, R. M. Bailey (2 R . Walker (25 Doris Johnson (27 BOYS LONG JUMP SENIOR (U20 1, 792 Adderley, Patrizio, C.I. Gibson 1 6, 6.03m, w:NWI (19-09.50 Martin, Wayne, Government High, 5.90m, w:NWI (19-04.25B ullard, Delmarro, R.M. Bailey 2, 5.88m, w:NWI (19-03.50 BOYS TRIPLE JUMP S ENIOR (U20 1 , 1120 McDonald, Jerome, Government High, 13.83m, w:NWI (45-04.50 2 , 863 Babbs, Tehneil, C.R. Walker 25, 12.92m, w:NWI (42-04.75 Burns, Michael, C.V. Bethel 26, 12.50m, w:NWI (41-00.25 BOYS HIGH JUMP (5'5" S ENIOR (U20 1, 810 Ingraham, Ryan, C.I. Gibson 16, 1 .94m, (6-04.25 J erwaine, C.I. Gibson 16, 1.91m, (603.25). 3, 959 Hinsey, Jaran, C.V. B ethel 26, 1.85m, (6-00.75 McDonald, Jerome, Government High, 1.85m, (6-00.75 BOYS SHOT PUT (14LBS SENIOR (U20 1, 881 Nottage, Deangelo, C.R. Walker 25, 12.06m, (39-07J onathan, Government High, 11.70m, (38-04.75 ton, Government High, 11.64m, (380 2.25). BOYS DISCUS THROW 1.75K SENIOR (U20 1 , 1201 Swann, Leeward, R.M. Bailey 2, 40.34m#, (132-04 Deangelo, C.R. Walker 25, 37.22m, (122-01 B ailey 2, 36.83m, (120-10 BOYS JAVELIN THROW (800GMS SENIOR (U20 1, 880 MACKEY, Samuel, C.R. Walker 25, 50.54m, (165-10 Tre, C.V. Bethel 26, 45.98m, (150-103 , 1119 Martin, Wayne, Government High, 45.17m, (148-02 BOYS POLE VAULT SENIOR (U20 1, 970 Roker, Terrane, C.V. Bethel 26, 3.07m*, (10-00.75 Ritchie, C.V. Bethel 26, 2.98m, (909.25). GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'0" INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 918 Minus, Raygene, C.V. Bethel 26, 1.42m, (4-07.75 Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, J1.42m, (407.75). 3, 709 Cox, Jaynell, C.C. Sweeting 7, J1.42m, (4-07.75 BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8" INTERMEDIATE (U17 1, 889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25, 1.78m, (5-10 Nicholas, Doris Johnson 27, J1.78m, (5-10 Johnson 27, 1.62m, (5-03.75 GSSSA SENIOR DIVISIONAL INDIVIDUAL RESULTS GABRIELLA Bowe cracks a forehand at the 2010 Subway Junior Tennis Classic at the Gully Bowe Tennis Center at the Lucayan Bath & Racquet Club. M a r k D a C u n h a / B a h a m a s 2 0 0 0 . c o m

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Kelly’ s assists Hands for Hunger organisation RED CROSS:HELPING HAITI E XECUTIVE M embers of the Bahamas P rofessional Photographers and Videogr aphers Association (BPPVA cheque, food, water and shoes to the Bahamas Red Cross Society. The money and goods were raised after two weeks of partnering with the Mall atM arathon and Robin Hood Mega Store. T he theme for this drive was “Preserving the Family to Rebuild Haiti”. Pictured presenting the cheque (from l-r is Vincent Vaughan, assistant secretary of the BPPVA; Raphael Munnings, public relations; Portia King, vice-presidento f the BPPVA; Caroline Turnquest, direct or general of the Bahamas Red Cross Society; Kemuel Stubbs, president of the BPPVA; Willamae Jenoure Evans, financial officer of the Bahamas Red Cross Society; Fabian Whymms, treasurer of BPPVA, Peter Campbell; assistant s ergeant at-arms. ALANA RODGERS (left ley Lepine (right Hunger are pictured receiving a donation from Nancy B Kelly, president of Kelly’s House andH ome during the recent Kelly’s Annual Awards. Kelly’s also donates fuel on a monthly basis for the delivery vehicles of Hands For Hunger.


m Lhe Tribune

=-USA TODAY

12F
BAHAMAS EDITION

Mc Oonald's downtenn

et ee

24 hours

Rage CEB Ly

LOW 62F

PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 106 No.81



Police

Commissioner
says incidents
are ‘isolated’

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE country’s top police
chief yesterday sought to reas-
sure the public that the recent
spate of terrifying home inva-
sions are not part of a wider
trend.

Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade described the
attacks — which have includ-
ed a murder and a double kid-
napping — as “isolated” inci-
dents.

He said police are taking the
matters “very, very seriously.”

“There are some categories
of crime that, when they hap-
pen, create tremendous fear in
our communities, and so if you
have one home invasion it caus-
es tremendous fear. (Howev-
er) I don’t want to take that out
of context you don’t have peo-
ple in every community on
every street corner going into
homes. That’s not happening,
I have no information in that
regard,” said Mr Greenslade
yesterday.

On Monday, Henry McPhee

was murdered by an intruder
who broke into his home at
Oleander Drive, Coral Har-
bour.

Mr McPhee was shot in the
head while his girlfriend and
daughter were tied up and
robbed of valuables.

On Tuesday, a policeman’s
wife and daughter were kid-
napped from their Gladstone
Road home by two gunmen
who had demanded cash.

After being told there was
no money in the house, the ter-
rified couple were bundled into
the family’s Ford SUV.

After a short drive, the wife
was released while the daughter
escaped by leaping from the car
as it was moving.

Commissioner Greenslade
said he could not say whether
the incidents are connected.

However two men have been
arrested in connection with the
Oleander Drive attack, while
police are following “active
leads” into the second matter,

SEE page seven

Sands and Pinder lawyers
set for court appearance

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

LAWYERS for by-election
contenders Dr Duane Sands
and Ryan Pinder will appear
before the Supreme Court next
Thursday for a date for a hear-
ing to be set.

It is expected the court will
settle on a date for the case to
begin. "There is a fixture date

m@ Government
investment for
public farmers’
market — PAGE 3

@ Law
students
urged to view
Â¥ potentials of
_| arbitration
— PAGE 6



set for March 4," confirmed
Milton Evans, of Evans and Co,
who is part of Dr Sands’ legal
team.

"That is the date appointed
when the court indicates that it
wants to see the interested par-
ties. The court will normally
give an indication as to the
direction of how they want to
proceed in terms of time and
scheduling. We should be able
to get a better indication as to
when the court will be able to
hear the case."

Thomas Evans, QC, also of
Evans and Co will serve as Dr
Sand's lead counsel.

This week, the PLP filed an
election court application to
have Mr Pinder declared the
winner of the hotly-contested
Elizabeth by-election arguing
that a clear majority of the vot-
ers voted for him. The crux of
their argument centres around
five protest ballots they claim
were cast in favour of Ryan Pin-
der.

Due to the slim margin of

SEE page seven

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

Aye
Ta
ME

SPENT Sy

lies vow
on hiome invasions

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents Sergeant Audley Dean with a “Pinnacle” award.



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SS Sg

‘No more Police
(uestions for
talk show host’

POLICE Commis-
sioner Ellison
Greenslade went on
record yesterday to state
that controversial radio
talk show host Ortland
Bodie Jr will not face
any more questions from
his officers.

Mr Bodie was picked
up by the police on
Wednesday evening and
questioned in relation to
his possible possession
of an illegal firearm after
he claimed on national

SEE page 7





Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

Tourist recovering after cutlass attack

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist
is recovering in a Florida
hospital after he was slashed
with a cutlass by intruders
to his Harbour Island hotel
room early Thursday morn-
ing.

Sources say Eddie Bryant,
44, of Stamford, Connecti-
cut, nearly lost a finger when
he held up his arms to pro-
tect his face from the attack
after two men broke into his
Tingum Village room at
around 2am.

Mr Bryant was airlifted to
hospital in Nassau and then
flown to a Fort Lauderdale
hospital where he is receiv-
ing treatment for serious
injuries to his right arm and

SEE 7
Pee CHARGED: MARIO MOSS



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

ISLANDS) LEADING NEWSPAPER

M@ Two men appear in Magistrate’s court

PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



@r NEW ERA OF RECOGNITION IN POLICE FORCE



COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
PC Clifford Wood with a “Pinnacle” award.





PC LEASER GAITOR receives her “Pinnacle” award from
Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.




COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade and Corpo-
ral Peter Walkes, who received a “Pinnacle” award.

om a B cl 4
COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade (left) pre-
sents Sergeant Leroy Brown with a “Pinnacle” award.

PHOTOS: Felipe Major/Tribune staff

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR

a mam he

RETIRED policemen pose with Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade

i i 3 !



Felipe Major/Tribune staff

(centre) and senior officers yesterday at

police headquarters. The retired officers were all honoured for their service and given the new “Pinnacle” award.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

USHERING in what top
officers described as a new era
of recognition for police offi-
cers and the sacrifice they make
for the Force and their com-
munities, Commissioner of
Police Ellison Greenslade yes-
terday presented awards to 19
recently retired police officers.

He also offered apologies to
those contracted officers of the
sergeant rank and below, who
from “time immemorial” have
left the police force without
adequate recognition for their
service. Mr Greenslade told the
media he believes that by doing
the “right and decent” thing by
formally recognising the con-
tributions and sacrifices made
by officers of all ranks, the
Force will be able to “make a
tremendous difference in terms
of our responses to the whole
issue of crime.”

“Trust me, there is a con-
nect,” said Mr Greenslade, who
suggested the retirement cere-
mony was part of an evolving
culture of “care, respect and
trust” within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force.

All the officers were of
sergeant rank and below, and
would previously have only
informally received a certificate
of discharge upon retirement
in a quick “two second” meet-
ing with the commissioner in

YOUNG BAHAMIANS

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It you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

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academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting and challenging
career in the Maritime industry which Is gaining increasing nathonal importance.

The scholarship is inchusive of tuition fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs. Commencing in September 2010 the successful candidate will
follow a4 year degree programme ai the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus
of the California State University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officer will
be expected to serve on board a Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing

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Fe.





Further information and application forms
can be obtained from Mre Erma Rahming

Mackey, Deputy Director,

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emackey@bahamasmaritime.com, tel: 356
Sifz fax: 356 5663. Completed
applications must be submitted along with
copies of academic certificatesranscripts
and proof of Bahamian citizenship, mot
later than 31" March, 2010. Interviews will
take place in Nassau during the last week

in April.



Bahamas
Maritime Authority, Manx Corporate Centre,
Weal Bay Street, PO Box N-4679, Nassau,

@ AWARDEES

The officers who received the
“Pinnacle” award are: Sgt 1018
Brady Simms, Sgt 787 Christo-
pher Knowles, Sgt 823 Ernest
Rahming, PC 992 Rudolph Bur-
rows, Cpl 89 Gwendolyn Smith,
Sgt 1025 Eden Zonicle, Cpl 913
Ulysses Curry Jr, Cpl 1286
James Smith, PC 1031 Leaser
Gaitor, PC 975 Anton Lockhart,
PC 6 Clifford Wood, PC 982 Col-
in Butler, Sgt 552 Gregory
Munroe, Sgt 1089 Leon Wilch-
combe, Sgt 977 Audley Dean,
Cpl 317 Freddie Thompson, Sgt
1247 Carl Pinder, Sgt 926 Leroy
Brown and Cpl 931 Peter
Walkes.

his office. Yesterday, each was
photographed, personally con-
gratulated for their service and
given the newly-created “Pin-
nacle” award by Mr Greenslade
to take home.

“These men and women
have given stellar service, they
have sacrificed and some have
even been injured. (Commis-
sioner Greenslade) felt it should
be mandatory for an organisa-
tion to recognise that,” said
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna, modera-
tor at the retirement ceremony
held at police headquarters.

Mr Greenslade described the
officers, who together have

email:



served almost 600 years in the
various divisions and agencies
of the RBPF, as “men and
women who have committed
themselves to the police force
as youngsters right out of
school. All they know is law
enforcement and serving the
people of the Bahamas.”

He thanked them for their
“selfless contribution” in mak-
ing the Bahamas safer.

Commissioner Greenslade
said that he intends for such
ceremonies to become a staple
of the police calendar as they
will be instituted for all retir-
ing officers. At the retirement
ceremony yesterday, Mr
Greenslade spoke casually to
the officers, who he called his
“family”, about his desire to see
more unity among all ranks of
the force and suggested that
with this achieved, their effec-
tiveness in tackling crime would
only be enhanced.

“Imagine how powerful we
can be, all 4,500 of us, truly con-
nected. Eyes and ears open.
Demonstrating care, respect
and trust among one another.
And if we get that right, imag-
ine conveying that to the wider
community in the Bahamas and
getting people to reciprocate
and love you back. There’s
nothing that the public wouldn’t
tell you. Imagine what they’ll
tell us. If we work on care,
respect and trust, it’s going to

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents PC
Rudolph Burrows with his “Pinnacle” award.



pay tremendous benefits,” he

said.

A 20-year-old Nassau man
has been charged with having
unlawful sex with a 12-year-



old girl and was arraigned in a
Magistrates Court yesterday.

Johinan Gaudin, of Cow-
pen Road, has been remand-
ed in custody until Wednes-
day.

He was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomex in Court One, Bank
Lane, at around 4pm yester-
day and charged with having
unlawful sexual intercourse
with the child on February 17.

Service Times for

George Street
Nassau, Bahamas



SERGEANT Ernett Rahming (right) is given his “Pinnacle”
award by Police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.





COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade presents
and PC Anton Lockhart with his “Pinnacle” award.

COMMISSIONER of Police Ellison Greenslade with
Sergeant Gregory Munroe who was presented with a
“Pinnacle” award.

Man accused of unlawful sex with 12-year-old girl

Mr Gomez adjourned the
matter until Wednesday and
prosecutors requested for
Gaudin to be remanded in
custody as police are unsure
of his immigration status.

A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is enough evidence
against him for the matter to
be tried in the Supreme
Court.

Christ Church Cathedral

Anglican/Episcopal Church

Sunday, February 28", 2010

Second Sunday In Lent

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Parish’s Annual General Meeting will take place
on Sunday, February 28", 2010.

ALL Services will be held at their usual times with the
exception of Evensong.

9:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

Holy Communion with Sermon

Sung Holy Eucharist with Sermon

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Holy Communion with Sermon

PLEASE NOTE: There will be no Evening Service.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


(en)
Na LY,

PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(EN
Na DY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon) LL.D. D:Litt,

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Disparate cultures on display on Hill

WASHINGTON — Corporate leaders
in Japan are affable cheerleaders who solic-
it everyone's views and avoid confrontation
at almost any cost. It's called "nemawashi."
USS. lawmakers are cutthroat partisans who
clamour for the spotlight, especially in an
election year. It's called politics.

These cultures collided Wednesday in the
appearance of a polite man from a distant
land before a congressional committee
stocked with angry men and women with
axes to grind.

Toyota President Akio Toyoda's moment
was one brought to us by globalization, the
integration of economies and societies
through a worldwide network of trade and
communications. Toyoda's appearance illus-
trated two stark realities: Nations are more
knitted together than ever, and still oh-so far
apart.

A generation ago, it was good politics in
Congress to bash Japan and buy American.
Now USS. lawmakers grab campaign money
from Toyota executives and scramble to
save Toyota jobs in their districts.

Auto workers used to take sledgeham-
mers to foreign cars. Now thousands of them
work for foreign companies, and U.S. car
dealers wear "I am Toyota in America" but-
tons to Capitol Hill.

And consider the hearing itself, where
American directness confronted Japanese
subtlety as Toyoda apologized for life-threat-
ening safety lapses and for a corporate cul-
ture that may have made things worse.

The grandson of the company's founder
noted that the vehicles bear his name. "For

e," Toyoda said in a thin, reedy voice,
"when the cars are damaged, it is as though
Tam as well.”

It was a uniquely Japanese way to lead
in crisis. How often do troubled U.S. leaders
call themselves damaged goods?

Unlike in the United States, where self-
promoting corporate leaders cast themselves
as buck-stops-here demigods, the heads of
Japanese companies are chosen for their
skills at team decision-making. Most climbed
the corporate ladder without rocking the
boat, and humility is prized.

Their job is to ensure stability and har-
mony.

Harmony? Not a word usually associated
with the US. corporate culture. Or Con-
gress.

"This is appalling, sir," said Rep. John
Mica, R-Fla., waving copies of a July 2009
presentation at Toyota's Washington office.
The confidential document bragged of saving
$100 million or more by negotiating an
"equipment recall" of floor mats involving
55,000 Toyota vehicles in September 2007.

"I'm embarrassed for you, sir," Mica said.

Toyoda, who earned a business degree in
Massachusetts, is no stranger to the United
States. But he's probably unaccustomed to

"

A leading je
i Iperanon,

the impatience — and at times the imperti-
nence — of US. lawmakers.

Their questions came “with all due
respect,” a caveat that paves the way for
countless slights on Capitol Hill.

Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., pressed
Toyoda about whether the company could
correct the acceleration problem. Toyoda
gave a long, indirect answer — establishing
a pattern for the hearing.

"I'm trying to find out," an exasperated
Towns said, "is that a yes or ano?"

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who received
a $1,000 campaign contribution in December
from the president of a Toyota dealership in
California, jumped to Toyoda's defence. He
explained that a complicated problem
required complicated answers.

Toyoda gave his opening statement in
heavily accented English. He fielded ques-
tions through a translator, but clearly had
command of the situation — and used the
extra time to consider his answers.

Early on, the company president reached
across the table to pull a microphone closer
to his translator, and when asked a ques-
tion, he nodded to her and said, " Will trans-
late.”

And so it went, this lively blend of busi-
ness and political cultures played out before
the cameras — globalization in a box, the
21st century condensed into a single Capitol
Hill committee room.

But it wasn't pretty. Not with so many
lives at risk or already wasted by mechanical
defects. Not with so many lawmakers and
Obama administration officials hoping the
accountability stops with Toyoda and Toy-
ota, sparing them.

The National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration received more than 2,500
consumer complaints about Toyota before
aggressively dogging the company in late
2009. Congress, which has oversight author-
ity on NHTSA, is only now asking tough
questions.

"NHTSA failed the taxpayers,” Towns,
the committee chairman, said before swear-
ing in Toyoda. "Toyota failed their cus-
tomers."

Still, after two days of hearings, there is
too much we don't know.

Why did some cars accelerate out of con-
trol? Why did others not stop? What else
might go wrong?

Is my car safe?

At the end of the day, Congress and Toy-
ota delivered more theatre than answers.
Cultures collide. Globalization enters the
so-what phase. Political and business leaders
struggle to lead. All true.

But whether in Japan or on Capitol Hill,
in a car accident you're just as dead.

(This article was written by Ron Fournier
of the Associated Press).



oe ellery retailer is seeking: a PeTson for this senior po sition in its Nassau

IvLAND MANAGER

‘The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring sales and profits are

optimized by ewsromer service ard Proper Maintenance of inventory controls

according to established company procedures.

‘The ideal candidate should possess:

' Intesrity, knergene motvational skills and Assernveness

‘ A minimum of 5
gales is preferred

years multi store management experience in retail jewellery

The ability to manage and supervise store managers
The ability to provide motivation and demonsteate leadership to improve

customer satistaction and sales performance

Good Educanonal Background

Management)

{Associate

depree or above in Business

Accredited jewellery professional qualification (GLA or equivalent) is preferred

Proven skills with Inventory

training

management,

merchandising, marketing atid

Good kin wheder of COM PRUTCES and administration

‘The position offers an excellent remuneration and benefits package.

Interested person should submit your resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box N-623
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax (242-328-5902



An open letter to
Matthew McCoy
from BEC

management

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Reference is made to your
letter addressed to Fred Got-
tlieb, the former Chairman of
BEC and which was published
in The Abaconian.

It is most unfortunate that
you attempt to discredit Mr
Gottlieb by taking his state-
ments out of context. You
should be aware that the sul-
phur emissions (in Abaco) are
directly related to the sulphur
content of oil. Hence, by using
oil with a lower sulphur con-
tent (percentage), the sulphur
emissions (parts per million)
would be reduced.

Therefore, as stated by Mr
Gottlieb, the use of a lower sul-
phur oil will result in lower sul-
phur emissions. This is a fact.
Further, the emissions will meet
international standards.

With regards to monitoring
of the emissions in Abaco, as
previously stated, ambient air
monitoring devices have been
installed not only on the site,
but also in surrounding areas.
The data captured from the
same will be collected by an
independent environmental
specialist firm and made acces-
sible to various stakeholders.

Additionally, an Environ-
mental Officer will be stationed
at the site to further re-enforce
the Corporation’s commitment
to the safety and sustainability
of the environment.

We trust that this informa-
tion provides clarity to the read-
ers and corrects your attempts
to discredit Mr Gottlieb by tak-
ing his statements out of con-
text.

Management
Bahamas Electricity
Corporation

Matthew McCoy responds to
BEC
Dear Sirs,

Not only did I not take Mr
Gottlieb’s statements out of
context, but BEC missed a real
opportunity for community
education and relations with
their misleading letter pub-
lished in response to mine.
Please allow me to explain.

At the 2009 September pub-
lic meeting Mr Gottlieb was
talking about international safe-
ty standards, and he stated:
“The HFO fuel that will be
used will result in less than 2
per cent sulfur emissions, which
is well below the World Health
Organisation’s (WHO), accept-
ed standards.” Later in the
same meeting Phenton Ney-
mour stated that 2 per cent sul-
fur content in the fuel meets
the World Bank standards.
Then, during the tour of the
























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letters@triounemedia.net



plant in December, Mr Got-
theb was shown on Cable 12
saying that the plant would
meet international emissions
standards by having 2 per cent
sulfur content in the fuel.

The context of all these state-
ments, and others to the press,
is meeting emission standards.
And BEC representatives have
been saying that a fuel source
with 2 per cent sulfur will meet
those standards. The WHO, the
World Bank, and the US Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
have published their emission
standards online, and all are
easy to contact to confirm their
standards. None present any
standards for sulfur content in
the fuel source, only standards
for the emissions themselves.
Also the emissions are not mea-
sured in percentages but in
micro grams per cubic meter.
Simple context, simple state-
ments, simply wrong.

In their letter to me, BEC
further states that “the sulfur
emissions content is directly
related to the sulfur content of
the oil. Hence, by using a lower
sulfur content (percentage) the
sulfur emissions (parts per mil-
lion) would be reduced.” It is
true that it will result in lower
sulfur dioxide emissions, but
this is not the whole story.

First, you cannot directly
convert fuel content into emis-
sions, there are too many com-
bustion and mechanical factors
specific to each engine. There is
no straight formula to go from 2
per cent sulfur content to meet-
ing the WHO standards. How-
ever, in the United States, HFO
plants without proper emission
controls cannot meet the fed-
erally enforced emission stan-
dards. Because BEC will have
no emission controls (like
scrubbers), and because the
WHO and World Bank stan-
dards are tougher than those
of the United States, it would
be a major miracle if this new
plant, using HFO fuel, can meet
those standards. It simply, phys-
ically, cannot.

BEC will argue that it has
emission controls in the form
of stack height manipulation,
however, this does not change
the amount of emissions, only
where the emissions go. This is
not a legal emission reduction
technique in the US or the EU.
It is sort of like saying it’s okay
to throw your trash out of the
window as long as you throw it
far enough in a certain direc-
tion.






At EeStlam - 12supm

Second, the sulfur content of
diesel used for industrial uses is
.0S per cent. So we can see that
Abaco’s new fuel source will
have 40 times the sulfur con-
tent of our regular diesel fuel
source.

Third, and finally, sulfur
dioxide is not the only emis-
sion, and may be the least wor-
risome. In the WHO Air Qual-
ity Guidelines (freely available
online) it is explained that cur-
rent scientific research indicates
that sulfur dioxide is probably
not as harmful or dangerous as
other emissions, particularly
nitrogen oxide and particulate
matter. Particulate matter is a
very real, very serious, health
hazard. HFO is loaded with
particulate matter, and as over
the years as the refining process
of crude oil has become more
sophisticated, more and more
of this dangerous stuff has been
concentrated in HFO, the left
over sludge.

And because diesel is a dis-
tilled fuel source, it has ZERO
particulate matter.

The missed opportunity here
is that BEC could have apolo-
gised for their mistake about
emission standards while simul-
taneously inviting all concerned
residents to engage in mean-
ingful discussions about the
future of the plant and offered
to share all their data collec-
tion results and techniques with
the whole public.

BEC has repeatedly said that
they want to be more open
about this plant, yet they con-
tinue to try and discredit all
those who raise serious ques-
tions about the plant with out-
dated, and made up data. They
continue to raise walls of secre-
cy between the real reasons for
the plant and the general pub-
lic. They continue to do busi-
ness as usual.

But in the modern world,
business as usual no longer
works. It used to be that BEC
and the government could do
something of questionable and
then cover it up with vague
speeches about the betterment
of the community and lots of
outdated and false data. They
could then count on the pub-
lic’s lack of access to raw data
and information, most of it
deliberately controlled by the
government’s secrecy policies.
This can no longer work.

We live in a world where
everything is recorded and
searchable, context and all.
Anything BEC or any politi-
cian publicly states can be
looked up later in free online
newspaper archives as well as
audio and video archives. All
of which provide the original
context. Now, our leaders can
really be held accountable, and
they should be. They need to
be.

We also live in a world where
anyone with access to the inter-
net can by-pass the govern-
ment’s attempts to limit knowl-
edge and education to go
straight to the real information.
It doesn’t take long, and it can
be confirmed easily with other
sources outside of the country.
Anyone can contact any expert
or corporation or, say, the
World Health Organisation.
The real information is avail-
able, and it often contradicts
and discredits what the politi-
cians and BEC are trying to sell
the public.

It is too bad BEC didn’t use
this opportunity to try and open
themselves up to real collabo-
ration with the community
instead of trying to beat it into
submission with false state-
ments and aggressive market-
ing.

Collaboration with an edu-
cated population is the only
way to create a sustainable
economy on Abaco, or any oth-
er island in the Bahamas. We
need local input and local initi-
ation.

And we need to be able to
let local people hold central
government accountable for the
bad decisions and mistakes they
make.

That is the future. BEC’s cur-
rent strategy is the past, and it is
economically, socially, and envi-
ronmentally crippling.

BEC may not want to
acknowledge the real standards,
but anyone who cares about
Abaco should go straight to the
source and look it up them-
selves.

MATTHEW
McCOY
Abaco,
February, 2010.
an
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS





(cy SIR SIDNEY POITIER IN THE BAHAMAS

IN DAYS

— a



JANUARY 27, 1972

CAUGHT IN THE ACT? - Not quite, Sidney Poitier
was merely presenting the authentic Western gun
used by him in “Buck and the Preacher” to Lady
Thurlow; he was not robbing her. Mr Poitier gener-
ously donated the gun along with antique silver
cases, one a calling card case, the other a matchbox
case; a pair of powerful binoculars and two inter-
esting sculptors books hand-done in pewter which
original designs done by H Dessaunt in aid of a
auction held at Government House.




THIS week In Days Gone By looks back at some of the time American-Bahamian actor Sir Sid-
ney Poitier spent in the Bahamas. This past week, the College of the Bahamas held a lecture series
and film festival celebrating his life’s work. The event was also marked by a minor controversy.

The most vocal critic of the festival, filmmaker and founder of the Bahamas Film Festival Celi
Moss, publicly lambasted the college for using its resources to honour Sir Sidney, questioning what
the Academy Award-winning actor and diplomat has done to further arts in the Bahamas.




AUGUST 20, 1987

THE MOUNTAIN TO MUHAMMED - As in the old adage, when it
became clear that a tight shooting schedule would prevent Bahamian
actor Sidney Poitier from accepting an invitation to lunch with execu-
tives of the Bahamas Film Promotion Bureau, the luncheon was
brought to the film star...aboard a 40-foot ‘luxury yacht’, according to
a Bahamas News Bureau release. Poitier, “working in his native time
in his successful movie career’, was involved in shooting a sequence
from an upcoming Disney feature, “Mountain King”. Pictured from left
are Cordell Thompson, deputy director of the Bahamas Film Promotion
Bureau; Darlene Davis, executive coordinator of the bureau; Mr Poiti-
er, Julia Burnside, a cousin of the star who works at the Ministry of
Tourism, and E John Deleveaux, director of the Film Promotion Bureau.

AUGUST 13, 1987

ACTORS SCUFFLE -
Under the direction of
Roger Spottiswoode (left),
a actor Sidney Poitier scuf-
fles with Clancey Brown
in rehearsal for a scene
from the new Disney
adventure movie, “Moun-
tain King”. A crucial
sequence from the movie
was shot in the Bahamas.

JUNE 14, 1974

THIS scene looks like a meet-
ing of the Sidney Poitier fan club
with all the admiring looks on the
faces of the four children. Actual-
ly, they were the four lucky ones
chosen to meet the super star

If you have any sugges-
tions for future ‘In Days
Gone By’ please e-mail them
to Rupert Missick, Jr, at
rmissick@tribunemedia.net



JUNE 13, 1974

‘AND HOW ARE YOU DOING
TODAY?’, Sidney Poitier seems to
be asking these four lucky chil-
dren who greeted him at the airport
today. Bringing with him a copy
of his latest film “Uptown Saturday
Night” which premieres Friday
night at the Shirley Street Theatre.
Sir Sidney paused for a chat with
the children, students of the Sta-
pledon School for Retarded Chil-
dren, the beneficiary of the world
premiere showing of his film. Pos-
ing with the children is their
teacher Ms Gwen Robertson.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
A Sa
SAO aH

De Day
ea ALy |



ANDRE Yp..,
~ SCHOOL

Y
@ world school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates

for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.

Full information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

when he arrived at the Nassau
Airport yesterday. Bringing with
him a copy of his latest film
“Uptown Saturday Night” which
premieres tonight at the Shirley
Street Theatre, the actor paused
to chat with the children, stu-
dents of the Stapledon School for
Retarded Children, the beneficia-
ry of the world premiere showing
of the film.

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are particularly welcomed. Secondary (/.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.



Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

RED CROSS SOCIETY

“SERVING THE BAKAMAS FOR 70 YEAR

FAIR 2010

LOWER GARDENS

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of
the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in
the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and preferably
trained in, the PYP.

Primary School Spanish: Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide
team.

Primary School Music: Candidates must be fully qualified and have
successful teaching experience at all Years from Pre Reception to Year 6.
They must also have successful experience in organizing primary school
music and drama performances.

Primary School Library Media Specialist: The primary school library
media specialist develops, implements and interprets an effective library
media and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6.
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful experience as
a school librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT
teacher.

en | a

SATURDAY
MARCH 6, 2010

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

Letter of application

A personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
A full curriculum vitae,

Either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 12 March 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Future financing and preventive

component of Drug Plan highlighted (Uy cs

PHASE I of the $8 million
National Prescription Drug
Plan is being financed entirely
by the medical benefits branch
of the National Insurance
Board (NIB), however, future
phases will be funded by a com-
bination of payroll deductions,
government grants and coordi-
nation of benefits with insur-
ers, NIB director Algernon
Cargill recently told health pro-
fessionals at a meeting held in
Palmetto Point, Eleuthera.

“In the second phase we’ve
estimated a one per cent con-
tribution from the insurable
wage to fund the programme
so that works out to a maxi-
mum of $4 a week or $2 for the
employer and $2 for the
employee per week based on
the insurable wage ceiling of
$400,” Mr Cargill said.

He also said NIB will work
with private insurance compa-
nies to coordinate benefits so

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDLEY JEAN BAPTISTE of
MARGARETTE AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20"
day of FEBRUARY, 2010 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Sales Jobs

AVAILABLE

Jewelry Stores on Bay Street and
Paradise Island



We are looking for some energetic and outgoing
individuals to join the sales team immediately.

Experience with jewelry is a plus but we are
willing to train non-experienced people who
have the right attitude and personality

Salary plus generous commission plan.
Fax resume to 393-5102
for immediate consideration.

No Jesus,

ite _ if as z
‘Know Jesus,

Come, joinus as we know Jesus Personally
by listening and studying the Word ‘of|God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
pte ad

SUNDAY SERVICES

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

FRIDAY af 7:30 p.m

RADIO



MINISTRY



NURSES and doctors from Eleuthera’s clinics attended the presentation on the National Prescription Drug
Plan.

that in future phases members
with private health insurance
will reap the maximum value
from the Drug Plan and their
private plans.

Pre-registration for Phase I
of the National Prescription
Drug Plan is currently in
progress throughout the
Bahamas for approximately

35,000 NIB pensioners, invalids
and children with one or more
of eleven chronic conditions.

Additional

According to Mr Cargill, the
next phase of the Drug Plan
will include an additional
100,000 persons.

During the meeting in
Eleuthera, Dr Stanley Lalta,
project manager for the Drug
Plan, also outlined details of
the Plan’s future preventive or
“healthy people” component
which will focus on funding
health promotion and wellness
projects in the community.

“We want to make an invest-
ment in health promotion well-
ness, and prevention. What we
said is that we will set aside
some of the funds from the Plan
in order to engage organisa-

tions in preparing very good
projects that can be funded. I
have to tell you that it’s not free
money. It has to be a very well
designed project. A project that
has a clear start date and end
date, clearly stipulated objec-
tives, clearly stipulated targets
and the management team has
to be very clearly indicated so
that we can have confidence
that the money put into the
project is going to create the
value that we’re looking for,”
Dr Lalta said.

He emphasised that such
projects will be monitored and
evaluated to determine their
effectiveness and ability to be
replicated in other communi-
ties. He also predicted that an
accumulation of small, success-
ful projects by non-govern-
mental organisations would
have a major impact on health
and wellness in the Bahamas.

PRIVATE physician Dr Cliff Bacchus (centre) of Eleuthera says the
National Prescription Drug Plan is a “good step forward”.
















ALGERNON Cargill,
director of the National
Insurance Board (cen-
tre) recently addressed
Eleuthera health profes-
sionals on the National
Prescription Drug Plan.
Seated are Dr Stanley
Lalta, project manager
(left), and Alexander
Williams, island admin-
istrator of Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Suneiay Schookt 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preaching Vlam& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2NS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise ?:30om

2

Pastor:H. Mile

No Peace
Know Peace

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phome: 392-0663 = Box Mae? ;

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS » Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2010
11:30am Speaker

Pastor Marcel Lightbourne
Topic: “Our Responsi

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Be.

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira
Shopping Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Visit Qur Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

eee Cum ue eis Ti|
eC eee
Sn oe Coca nese ca

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs
















































Law students urged

UBT PLT

: —
PICTURED (left to right) JUSTICE Hugh Small, Tonya Bastian-
Galanis, principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School and Attorney
General and Minister of Legal Affairs Senator John Delaney at the

Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar on
Wednesday as a part of Legal Education Week.

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

ATTORNEY General and
Minister of Legal Affairs Sena-
tor John Delaney encouraged
lawyers and lawyers-to-be to
view arbitration as a new area
within which they might equip
themselves. j

“You may be called upon to ze
draft arbitral provisions, to serve i)
as counsel in arbitration proceed- 1
ings, expert witnesses on Bahami- ATTORNEY General and Min-
an law, as a member of an arbi- igter of Legal Affairs Senator
tration panel,” said the Attorney John Delaney addresses the
General. arbitration seminar spon-

Senator Delaney addressed sored by the Eugene Dupuch
the Eugene Dupuch Law School | aw School Students’ Asso-

Students’ Association arbitration gation on Wednesday. He
seminar on Wednesday as part —_ addressed the topic “The
of Legal Education Week. He Arbitration Act 2009”.
addressed the topic “The Arbi-

tration Act 2009”.

The Attorney General said in 2010 the legal profession and
the commercial community will meet a new arbitration regime
following the enactment of the Arbitration Act, 2009 and the
Arbitration (Foreign Arbitral Awards) Act 2009 at the end of
last year. “Together they comprise a new Bahamian arbitral
regime which is expected to be brought in force in the coming
months by Appointed Day Notice. The Foreign Arbitral
Awards law gives effect in the Bahamas to the New York Con-
vention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbi-
tral Awards, to which the Bahamas became party effective
2007,” he said.

“On commencement, the new Bahamian regime will whol-
ly replace the law of 1889 which governs arbitration in the
Bahamas. In so doing, it will establish state-of-the-art legal
infrastructure for arbitration in the Bahamas.”

Senator Delaney explained that arbitration provides a pri-
vate means of determining disputes arising under contractual
relationships and is an alternative to the court process.

He pointed out some of the major advantages of arbitra-
tion including privacy, speed, cost effectiveness, technical
expertise and convenience in matters of procedure, venue
and time. ““Where there is good arbitral regime and availabil-
ity of suitable arbitrators, the relative disadvantages in com-
mercial matters are few,” he said.

“The new Bahamian regime is robust comprehensive and
modern. It substantially corresponds with the statutory pro-
visions of England, which is a major international seat for
commercial arbitration. We have every confidence that it will
serve our jurisdiction well both in the context of domestic
and international arbitration.”

He encouraged lawyers and law students to equip them-
selves, embrace the opportunities and do their part to make
the country a “preferred seat for commercial arbitration.”

Letisha Henderson/BIS Photo

CHIEF Justice Sir Michael Barnett addresses the sixth annual
Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association seminar held
at the British Colonial Hilton on Wednesday.

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO,.Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH, 2010

7:00 a.m. Rev.Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Thompson
7:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Board of General Education

Theme: “ But As For Me And My Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

Grace Pet 1 Perec Church
A Society of The Free Methediat Church of
North America

Church School during Worship Service
Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box §8-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
‘lelefax number: 324-2587
an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

he said.

“We responded very swiftly
to those and we’ve had some
successful interventions.”

On Thursday, a man identi-
fied by Tribune sources as 50-
year-old Hubert Hall was shot
dead by police in Tower Estates

Police chief's vow

Drive after he threatened offi-
cers who were investigating
claims that two men were seen
going from house to house try-
ing to open the doors of cars
and homes. Police are still look-

ing for the second man.

Mr Greenslade said part of
the police’s recent approach to
tackling such crimes is ensur-
ing they have “lots of people
on the front lines.”

“We are up and about. All
of our commanders have been
tasked to put officers on the
front line. We’ve asked them
to get those officers out of the

‘No more Police questions for talk show host’

FROM page one

radio that he knew the whereabouts of illegal
weapons.

Accepting responsibility for this “reprehensi-
ble” remark, Mr Bodie himself informed The
Tribune that he was initially flabbergasted by
the request of the police to search his home, but
naturally consented to their requests.

“The statement was made in response to a
caller’s concerns about the prevalence of crime
and firearms being used to perpetuate them.
Loose sensational lips do sink ships. Words are
capable of being interpreted and misinterpreted
based on the environment they are uttered.

“T have not been charged, but was released

‘pending further investigations’. There is
absolutely no doubt in my mind that I will, at the
end of those investigations, that I will be exon-
erated. I wish to thank the scores of persons who
came down to CDU to offer me comfort.”

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday in rela-
tion to the matter, Commissioner Greenslade
commended his officers for acting swiftly and
professionally.

He said that as Mr Bodie had made some com-
ments that caused the police to have reasonable
suspicion, they were duty bound to act.

“Subsequent to the investigation that was
launched we were satisfied there was nothing
else to be done. No charges are being offered
against Mr Bodie. It’s a done deal,” he said.

station, into police cars and on
cycles out into the communi-
ties,” said the top officer, who
credited this strategy with hav-
ing resulted in the “successful
intervention” in Tower Estates
Drive. When quizzed as to what
advice he may have for the pub-
lic on further protecting them-
selves from becoming victims
of crime, Mr Greenslade turned

Ul a

the tables, suggesting that the
country’s crime problem could
be “solved overnight” if more
people “took responsibility.”
“Take responsibility for
yourself, take responsibility for
your household, take responsi-
bility for your communities.
Again I come back to the busi-
ness of how you are safe when
the people who live with you

Tourist recovering after cutlass attack

FROM page one

hand.

The brutal attack has rocked
the community of around 2,000
residents who fear crime is spi-
raling out of control in the idyl-
lic tourist destination which is
home to hundreds of winter vis-
itors and a popular haven for
the rich and famous.

However, nine burglaries on
the island over the last week
has instilled fear of crime for
winter visitors and permanent
residents who are concerned
crime could negatively impact
the lucrative tourist economy.

North Eleuthera MP and
Speaker of the House of
Assembly Alvin Smith said the
crime rate in Harbour Island is
the highest in his constituency,
which stretches across the
mainland and cays north of
Governor’s Harbour airport.

He has called on Royal
Bahamas Police Force (RBPF)
Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade to step up security
on the island, which was
manned by seven police offi-
cers under a police sergeant

Sands and Pinder lawyers set for court appearance

FROM page one

votes between Dr Sands of the
FNM and Mr Pinder of the
PLP — who received 1,501 and
1,499 regular votes respectively
— these protest votes are cru-
cial and prevent an official win-
ner from being certified, it is
argued.

Under the law, these protest
votes can only be certified and
added to the ballot box by an
election court, which can also
determine a lawful winner in
the race.

Prime Minister and leader of
the FNM Hubert Ingraham has
indicated that his party will
question Ryan Pinder's eligi-
bility to run in the Elizabeth
constituency by-election during
election court.

Mr Pinder, born to a
Bahamian father and an Amer-
ican mother, held American
and Bahamian citizenship for

until Chief Inspector Roston
Moss was posted there perma-
nently the day before the
attack.

Local police further struggle
with limited resources claims
Mr Smith. He said their most
reliable vehicle is a golf cart not
nearly fast enough to catch
criminals.

“T think the police are going
to put more resources and focus
into Harbour Island because
these break-ins have been hap-
pening for quite a while and I
don’t think police were taking
them as seriously as they ought
to,” the MP said.

“We shouldn't have to wait
until such a degree of violence
occurs before we address crime.

“But I am convinced now
that police will put more
resources out there and take
these matters more seriously.

“IT am pleased with the
recommitment of the police and
the assurances the Commis-
sioner has given me in review-
ing manpower and equipment
in North Eleuthera, particular-
ly in Harbour Island, where we
have had the highest number
of criminal activity and regular

years. According to a letter
received by The Tribune, Mr
Pinder renounced his Ameri-
can citizenship on January 20,
2010, nine days before the nom-
ination date, confirming his eli-
gibility to run in the recently
held by-election.

"The government of the
United States no longer con-
siders Mr Pinder to be a US cit-
izen," the letter read.

"His US passport is no
longer valid and has been for-
warded to the issuing agency
within the US government."

Yesterday, Mr Evans would
not confirm if this argument
would still be part of the FNM's
strategy.

"T can't speak to that. When
we get there we will indicate
what all issues we have agreed
to deal with," he said.

In addition to Messrs Pin-
der and Sands, fringe party can-
didates Cassius Stuart, Rodney
Moncur and Dr Andre Rollins

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in
the Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as
a Parts Regional Manager, at our Nassau Office.

The Candidate should have the following

requirements:

¢ Have 7-10 years experience with the
Caterpillar or similar Product Line, have
worked in a Caterpillar dealership or a

similar Organization:

Have training in Ordering and Receiving

Parts Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic

Count Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University

would be an asset:

Must be able to manage and motivate
staff in the Parts Department:

Must have experience in process
statistical control in planning,
programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse

production process;

Able to manage major components _
interchange process; Hoses assembling

process.

This candidate is required to be a_ professional
who thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts
Inventory and all other operational procedures within

the Parts Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to: M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Office Administrator,

or email:me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this
position will be contacted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

break-ins. It’s making things
bad for the whole island.”

Rising crime cannot be
attributed to the island’s econ-
omy as Mr Smith said many
residents have more than one
job, and there is work for any-
one who wants it.

And he hopes the rising
crime rate will be curbed as the
new chief inspector builds ties
with the community, increases
patrols and maximises local
resources.

“T expect some good to come
out of this terrible incident in
terms of recommitment from
the police and the community,”
Mr Smith said.

Two men appeared in a Nas-
sau court yesterday in connec-
tion with Thursday’s incident.

Karon Parks, 28, of Cole-
brooke Street, and Mario Moss,
35, of Clarence Street, both
Harbour Island, were charged
on three counts of burglary,
armed robbery and causing
grievous harm.

They were remanded in cus-
tody until a preliminary inquiry,
which will be heard by a local
magistrate in Harbour Island
on April 8 and 9.

are also listed as respondents
in the court case.

Their participation, or lack
of, would contribute to the
duration of the court battle,
said Mr Evans.

"The case could be very
short or it could be prolonged.
There are three others involved
in the matter, Mr Moncur, Mr
Stuart and Mr Rollins they
have all been named as respon-
dents and they do have a right
to put in a position. If they have
one or if they don't have one
would also indicate how long
the case will take.”













conduct themselves in a respon-
sible manner.

“The people who commit
crimes in the Bahamas are not
phantoms. These are our peo-
ple, they live in our homes and
in our communities and we
know who they are. So we can
solve this overnight. We have
the ability to do it, do we have
the will to do it?”

MULTI - DISCOUNT FURNITURE

OUTDOOR SALE!

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SR rs ace eee

Everything Must Go!

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« Living Room
« Dinning Room

Appliances

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& many, many more

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APPLIANCES BY FRIGIDAIRE
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NHASSAU

322-2536 * 325-2040 © 323-7758 + 328-7494

PUBLIC NOTICE

Please be advised that with effect February 2010
Mr. Edwards (Reds) Wilkinson and Mr. Charles (Charlie) Lightbourne are no
longer authorized to conduct business on behalf of Bahamas Gas.



ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 2: Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 24 FEBRUARY 2010

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,584.93 | CHG -3.66 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD 19.55| YTD % 1.25
FINDEX: CLOSE 000.00 | YTD 00.00% | 2009 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit_y
7.03 AML Foods Limited
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund
5.50 Bank of Bahamas
0.58 Benchmark
3.15 Bahamas Waste
2.14 Fidelity Bank
9.62 Cable Bahamas
2.72 Colina Holdings
5.00 Commonwealth Bank ($1)
2.21 Consolidated Water BDRs
1.32 Doctor's Hospital
5.94 Famguard
8.75 Finco
9.75 FirstCaribbean Bank
3.75 Focol (S$)
1.00 Focol Class B Preference
0.27 Freeport Concrete
5.00 ICD Utilities
9.95 J. S. Johnson
10.00 Premier Real Estate

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Securi

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name

GFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund

Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

1.3535
2.8266
1.4398
2.9343
12.6816
93.1999
96.4070
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000
9.1005

FG Financial Diversified Fund
Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve:

Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Inve

Principal Protected TIGRS,

Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund - Equities Sub Fund

10.0000

4.8105

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
I

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in ol

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamin: gs

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
712 712 0.00
10.74 10.74 0.00
5.90 5.90 0.00

Daily Vol.

0.58 0.58 0.00
3.15 3.15 0.00
2.37 2.37 0.00
13.43 13.43 0.00
2.72 2.72 0.00
6.76 6.76 0.00
2.44 2.48 0.04
2.55 2.55 0.00
6.49 6.49 0.00
9.27 9.27 0.00
10.00 9.94 -0.06
4.77 4.77 0.00
1.00 1.00 0.00
0.27 0.27 0.00
5.59 5.59 0.00
9.95 9.95 0.00
10.00 10.00 0.00

7,000

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15 100.00 0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid & Ask & Last Price
10.06 11.06 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00

Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

100.00 0.00

Weekly Val...

0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4460 0.51 6.15
2.9061 0.66 -1.23
1.5154 0.53 5.25
3.2025 2.75 -3.54
13.4296 5.58 5.90
103.9873 3.41 3.41
101.7254 5.52 5.52
1.0943 0.41 5.21
1.0801 1.13 4.56

Div $

1.0972 0.60 5.40
9.5795 5.33 5.33
11.2361 12.36 12.36
7.6928 -0.31
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

47.51

EPS $
0.283
0.992
0.598

-0.877
0.168
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.627

-0.003
0.322

100.00 0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%
100.00 0.00 7%
Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246
0.000
0.001

4.540
0.002

Div $ P/E

0.654
0.326
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)

Interest

79 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div & P/E
0.000
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.000

Yield %

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meanin: gful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525


THE TRIBUNE



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

'

rT esa ela Ga

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE CR Walker Knights tight-
ened their stranglehold of the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools Sports
Association Track and Field Cham-
pionship by winning their seventh
straight title.

Dedicated to veteran national
coach Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming, the
Knights on Friday closed out anoth-
er dominating performance with a
212 point margin over a heated
showdown for second place between
the CV Bethel Stingrays and the RM
Bailey Pacers.

At the Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium as they
tried to chase down head coach
Floyd Armbrister and assistant
coach Tyrice Curry to dose them
both with water, the Knights cele-
brated with a huge 636.50 point deci-
sion.

The Stingrays held off the Pacers
in a stunning head-to-head clash to
take second place with 414.50, just a
half point ahead of the third place
Pacers.

For Armbrister, who used his 800
metre fame as a high school/colle-
giate athlete to avoid the water rush
by his team-mates, said their ability
to go out and recruit a whole new
crop of athletes was the key to their
success.

“We had a lot of new ten graders
who came into us, especially from
HO Nash and we also had some par-
ents who really wanted their chil-
dren to be a structured programme
in high school,” Armbrister said.

“We put the unit together and we
trained only in the mornings when
we came out here at the track and at
the fort (Charlotte) at 4:30 to 6
o’clock. We put in the time in the
morning. We never once came on
this track and trained in the after-
noon.”

Thanks to their principal, Arm-

S
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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY

PAGE 1

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oF 4

HEAD coach Floyd Armbrister talks about his CR Walker Knights’ success as the GSS-





SA Senior High Track and Field Championships.

brister said they were able to acquire
a new Coaster bus that made it
accessible to transport their 30-plus
athletes to and from the training site.

“But I have to say that these kids
have a lot of discipline. We had to
keep molding them and keep push-
ing them to the level. We never
slacked up on them,” Armbrister
said. “Some of them who ran today
came from the getto, Quarry Road,
Mason Addition, Farm Road, the
Groove and even Fox Hill.

“T think it was the discipline and
the unity on the this team that made
the difference.”

There were also some superb indi-
vidual performances that helped out
as well.

Leading the way was Marva Eti-
enne, who swept the intermediate
girls sprints by adding the 200 metres

(25.26 seconds) to the 100 and 400
she claimed on day one on Thursday.
Shafara Lewis also got some of the
spotlight by cleaning up the middle
distance races when she took the 800
(2:35.53) to go along with the 1,500
the day before. She also won the
long jump (14-feet, 10 1/2-inches).
In the intermediate boys division,
Ashley Riley was another triple win-
ner with his record breaking triumph
in the 800 (2:04.30) to go along with
his feats in both the 400 and 1,500.
The outstanding performances in
the senior boys and girls divisions
were spread around the other
schools with Tonia-Kaye Johnson of
RM Bailey emerging as the female
sprint queen as she clinched the 200
(26.33) to go with her 100 win and
Trevor Mackey of Doris Johnson
duplicating the senior boys feat with

his 200 time of 22.43 after he pulled
off the 100 win.

“They stepped up their game. All
of the athletes stepped up their game
110 percent today and we came back
and tried to win three out of the four
relays,” Armbrister noted.

“We got three out of the four, but
we didn’t get the three that we real-
ly wanted. The senior girls came as a
major surprise to us and the 4 x 4
senior boys, we wanted that. But
RM Bailey beat us. RM Bailey feel
as if they win the meet if they win
the 4x 4. They came to the meet for
that and they got it.”

The senior boys 4 x 4 relay, spon-
sored by Muck-A-Mucks and the
Sports Center, brought the curtains
down on the meet as the Pacers pre-
vailed in 4:17.62, leaving the Knights
trailing in 4:17.96.

But as Armbrister stated, the
Knights turned in a stellar perfor-
mance in capturing the senior girls’ 4
x 4, which was sponsored by A-Plus
Enterprises, in 4:20.05. The Gov-
ernment High Magicmen finished a
distant second in 4:32.52.

They added the other relay titles
in the intermediate girls (4:14.97) in
another fabulous run and their inter-
mediate boys came through in a
come-from-behind fashion in 3:40.90,
holding off the Pacers (3:46.42).

In what turned out to be a keenly
contested battle behind the Knights,
the Stingrays had coach John Mills
smiling from ear-to-ear because of
their 1/2-point decision over the Pac-
ers.

“Most of our kids did pretty well,
but our downfall was the kids who
didn’t show,” said Mills, who had
anticipated that they would have giv-
en the Knights a run for their money
this year. “One of our better dis-
tance runners, Ronald Woodside,
was representing the country in box-
ing.
“Luckily for us, we edged out RM
Bailey by a half a point. Who say
one point don’t make a difference in




FINAL RESULTS

HERBP’S a look at the final
team results from the two days
of competition in the senior divi-
sion of the Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s track and field champi-
onships concluded on Friday at
the Thomas A. Robinson Track
and Field Stadium:

Schools Pts
CR Walker Knights 636.50
CV Bethel Stingrays 414.50
RM Bailey Pacers 414
CC Sweeting Cobras 298.50
Cl Gibson Rattlers 278
Anatol Rodgers High 250

Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 242
Government High Magicmen 190.50

Intermediates (Under-27) combined
46

CR Walker Knights

CV Bethel Stingrays 212
RM Bailey Pacers 188
ASnatol Rodgers High 157
CC Sweeting Cobras 145
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 114
Cl Gibson Rattlers 111

Government High Magicmen 19

Seniors (Under-20) combined

CR Walker Knights 290.50
RM Bailey Pacers 226

CV Bethel Stingrays 202.50
Government High Magicmen 171.50

Cl Gibson Rattlers 167
CC Sweeting Cobras 153.50
Doris Johnson Mys. Marlins 128
Anatol Rodgers High 93

a victory? Hopefully we will do a
little better in the (BAAA’s/Scotia-
bank) Nationals.”

The Nationals is scheduled for the
weekend of March 11-13 and Arm-
brister say his Knights intend to do
the same thing as they did at the
GSSSA. So watch out defending
champions St. Augustine’s College
Big Red Machine and the Queen’s
College Comets.



Rahming resigns as BAAA Technical Director

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IN a stunning and surpris-
ing move, Frank ‘Pancho’
Rahming resigned from the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Association as the Tech-
nical Director.

Rahming, who very rarely
speaks publicly, wrote a letter
dated Thursday, February 25
to BAAA’s secretary Timo-
thy Munnings, which read as
follows:

“At a recent executive
meeting, I was told that I was
the problem. Whatever the
speaker’s interpretation or
context, I do not wish to be
the problem for any person or
organisation’s progress.

“Because this was not dis-
puted by any other present,
like other utterances at execu-
tive meetings by inner circle

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members, I take it to be the
consensus.

“I, therefore, offer my res-
ignation as Technical Direc-
tor of the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Association.”

Rahming, who is now in
pre-retirement as the Assis-
tant Director of Sports at the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, was re-elected to
serve as the Technical Director
after he defeated Rupert Gar-
diner at the BAAA’s annual
general meeting and election
of officers in November.

He was the only member
from incumbent president
Curt Hollingsworth’s slate that
was voted in when Sands was
returned to office after a two-
year hiatus due to a vote of no
confidence in 2007.

When contacted yesterday
for further comments, Rah-
ming declined, indicating that
he just simply wished not to
be the subject of any headline

news. He referred The Tri-
bune to the BAAA for com-
ments.

There was some indication
that some of the discussion
that prompted Rahming’s res-
ignation came as a result of
the conflict in the schedule of
the BAAA’s/ScotiaBank
National High School Track
and Field Championships that
will collide with the Grand
Bahama Schools Sports Asso-
ciation’s Track and Field
Championships.

Both events are scheduled
for March 11-13, which means
that the Grand Bahama
schools would not be coming
to the Nationals. In the past,
the Nationals were normally
held at the end of the Carifta
Games.

But for the second consecu-
tive year, they have been
moved up and staged before
Carifta, which will be held
over the Easter holiday week-

end in the Cayman Islands.

Efforts to contact BAAA’s
president Mike Sands or
Munnings was unsuccessful,
but first vice president Sher-
win Stuart said he was really
shocked and surprised when
he heard the news yesterday
morning.

“There was no prior warn-
ing or acknowledgment that I
am aware of,” Stuart said.
“Like I said, I just found out
this morning. So there’s really
nothing I can comment on,
except that it’s unfortunate
that he has resigned.”

Pressed further by The Tri-
bune for comments, Stuart
said the BAAA has always
held Rahming in high esteem
in reference to his technical
knowledge of the sport and
they were looking forward to
him continuing to make his
contribution in the way for-
ward.

“He’s decided that he wants

to move on, so we in the
BAAA are very appreciative
of his services over the many
decades that he has been a
part of the association and the
contribution he has made to
the programme and we wish
him nothing but the very best
in his future endeavours and
hope that he will continue to
work closely with the sport.”

Based on the constitution,
Stuart said Sands, as president,
has the power to appoint
someone to fill the vacancy in
the interim and that is the
course of action that they
intend to pursue.

“There will be an appoint-
ment at this point, but I can
not say if there will be an elec-
tion any time soon,” Stuart
said. “We will just try to fill
the void in the meantime and
then in the way forward, we
will make a decision or
whether or not we will have
an election for that position.”

Clie cUNiniiire]



The BAAA was scheduled
to hold their monthly meet-
ing last night. Rahming’s res-
ignation and his new appoint-
ment was expected to be dis-
cussed as well as the selection
of the national coaches and
the national team for the
IAAF World Indoor Cham-
pionships in Doha next
month.


(|W

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010

_

SPORTS

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



GSSSA_

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G.S.S.S.A. 17th Annual Track &
Field Meet — 2/25/2010 to 2/26/2010

THE Government of Secondary
Schools Sports Association complet-
ed its Senior High Schools Champi-
onship on Friday at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track & Field Stadium.

Below is a look at the individual
results posted over the past two days
of competition:

¢ GIRLS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17) FINALS

(w: 0.1) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 12.44. 2, 987 Andrews,
Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27, 13.17. 3,
782 Rolle, Lakeisha, C.I. Gibson 16,
13.23.

¢ GIRLS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: -0.6) 1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R.
Walker 25, 25.62. 2, 909 Higgs,
Gregria, C.V. Bethel 26, 26.40. 3, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
27.54,

¢ GIRLS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 843 Etienne, Marva, C.R. Walker 25,
1:02.91. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 1:06.80. 3, 925 Stanislaus,
Greann, C.V. Bethel 26, 1:10.02.

¢ GIRLS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
2:35.53. 2, 857 Stubbs, Ashley, C.R.
Walker 25, 2:39.42. 3, 662 Lotus, Kelly,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:51.25.

¢ GIRLS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
5:50.11. 2, 851 Martin, Nevelicia, C.R.
Walker 25, 6:02.60. 3, 1166 Sturrup,
Mataya, R.M. Bailey 2, 6:30.88.

¢ GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 0.9) 1, 918 Minus, Raygene, C.V.
Bethel 26, 17.32. 2, 783 Rolle, Tiffany,
C.l. Gibson 16, 17.42. 3, 861 Whylly,
Lashawn, C.R. Walker 25, 18.05.

¢ GIRLS 300 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 858 Stubbs, Keithra, C.R. Walker 25,
50.48. 2, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R.
Walker 25, 52.35. 3, 714 Ferguson,
Tanisha, C.C. Sweeting 7, 56.28.

¢ GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Minus,
Raygene 16, Stubbs, Rouiqua 15, Gib-
son, Julia 16, Higgs, Gregria 16),
53.09. 2, C. |. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Brice, Jalisa 16, Rolle, Lakeisha 16,
Louis Jean, Louise Anna 16, Rolle,
Tiffany 16), 54.88. 3, Anatol Rodgers
High School (Knowles, Rashae 16,
Lightbourne, Khadyjah 16, Bowe,
Lashawn 16, Frazer, Natori 16), 55.52.

¢ GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:14.97. 2,
C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays 4:39.05. 3,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:52.59.

¢ GIRLS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 850 Lewis, Shafara, C.R. Walker 25,
4.53m, w:NWI (14-10.50). 2, 987
Andrews, Khadijah, Doris Johnson 27,
441m, w:NWI (14-05.75). 3, 843 Eti-
enne, Marvar, C.R. Walker 25, 4.35m,
w:NWI (14-03.25).

¢ GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 10.14m, (33-03.25). 2, 725 Smith,
Karnesia, C.C. Sweeting 7, 8.86m, (29-
01). 3, 676 Williams, Sherceil, Anatol
Rodgers, 8.50m, (27-10.75).

¢ GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 25.00m, (82-00). 2, 1150 Johnson,
Kingslee, R.M. Bailey 2, 20.17m, (66-
02). 3, 994 Curry, Donisha, Doris John-
son 27, 19.57m, (64-02).

¢ GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 760 Arahna, Precious, C.I. Gibson
16, 26.30m, (86-03). 2, 722 Poitier,
Angenette, C.C. Sweeting 7, 24.83m,
(81-05). 3, 854 Rose, Akia, C.R. Walker
25, 23.15m, (75-11).

¢ BOYS 100 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 0.7) 1, 945 Farrington, Anthony,
CV. Bethel 26, 11.26%. 2, 868 Dames,
Xavier, C.R. Walker 25, 11.37. 3, 867
Culmer, Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 11.71.

¢ BOYS 200 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 2.0) 1, 677 Anderson, Enrico, Ana-
tol Rodgers, 23.87. 2, 867 Culmer,
Tomiko, C.R. Walker 25, 23.99. 3, 886
Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25, 24.15.

¢ BOYS 400 METER DASH
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
52.66. 2, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 55.45. 3, 1194 Perry,
Shorn, R.M. Bailey 2, 56.69.

BOYS 800 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
2:04.30*. 2, 691 Gray, Rashad, Anatol
Rodgers, 2:13.57. 3, 734 Davis,
Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7, 2:14.05.

¢ BOYS 1500 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 885 Riley, Ashley, C.R. Walker 25,
4:53.56. 2, 1172 Black, Jachris, R.M.
Bailey 2, 5:03.27. 3, 814 Louis,
Wilbens, C.l. Gibson 16, 5:13.28.

BOYS 3000 METER RUN
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 1192 Newbold, Adam, R.M. Bailey 2,
11:14.97. 2, 1029 Armbrister, Kadashi-
an, Doris Johnson 27, 11:33.20. 3, 814
Louis, Wilbens, C.I. Gibson 16,
11:38.31.

¢ BOYS 100 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

(w: 1.5) 1, 1187 Marshall, Andre, R.M.
Bailey 2, 16.96. 2, 962 Johnson,
Jameal, C.V. Bethel 26, 18.21. 3, 884
Riley, Alex, C.R. Walker 25, 18.46.

¢ BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 734 Davis, Patrick, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.38. 2, 685 Evans, Tre, Anatol
Rodgers, 1:05.62. 3, 737 Fernander,
Leon, C.C. Sweeting 7, 1:05.67.

¢ BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, Anatol Rodgers High School (Ander-
son, Enrico 16, Mossa, Owen 16,
Evans, Tre 16, Evans, Trevel 16), 45.49.
2, C. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Burrows,
Raymonte 16, Ferguson, Richard 16,
Darville, Tanaghe 16, Farrington,
Anthony 16), 45.98. 3, R. M. Bailey (2)
Pacers (Perry, Shorn 16, Bain, Shac-
quille 16, Gibson, Keishon 15, Gale,
Raymond 16), 48.06.

e BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 3:40.90. 2,
R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 3:46.42. 3, C. V.
Bethel (26) Stingrays 3:51.62.

e BOYS LONG JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 703 Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol
Rodgers, 5.94m, w:NWI (19-06). 2,
889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
5.75m, w:NWI (18-10.50). 3, 697
Mossa, Owen, Anatol Rodgers, 5.52m,
w:NWI (18-01 .50).

¢ BOYS TRIPLE JUMP
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 886 Russell, Silvano, C.R. Walker 25,
12.46m, w:NWI (40-10.50). 2, 889
Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker 25,
12.23m, w:NWI (40-01.50). 3, 703
Wilmotte, Donovan, Anatol Rodgers,
12.11m, w:NWI (39-08.75).

¢ BOYS SHOT PUT (12LBS)

INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 945 Farrington, Anthony, C.V. Bethel
26, 11.37m, (37-03.75). 2, 871
Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
10.45m, (34-03.50). 3, 949 Ferguson,
Richard, C.V. Bethel 26, 10.00m, (32-
09.75).

¢ BOYS DISCUS THROW (1.5K)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 887 Saintillis, Harl, C.R. Walker 25,
25.52m, (83-09). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 25.41m, (83-
04). 3, 737 Fernander, Leon, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 24.23m, (79-06).

e BOYS JAVELIN THROW (700GMS)
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 871 Dorsette, Tavari, C.R. Walker 25,
44.23m, (145-01). 2, 945 Farrington,
Anthony, C.V. Bethel 26, 43.73m, (143-
06). 3, 1033 Burrows, Nicholas, Doris
Johnson 27, 39.90m, (130-11).

¢ GIRLS 100 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: 0.2) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 12.65. 2, 788 Stubbs,
Jarona, C.I. Gibson 16, 13.07. 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 13.17.

¢ GIRLS 200 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)

(w: 1.7) 1, 1151 Johnson, Tonia-Kaye,
R.M. Bailey 2, 26.33. 2, 655 Demeritt,
Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 27.15. 3, 788
Stubbs, Jarona, C.|. Gibson 16, 27.46.

e GIRLS 400 METER DASH
SENIOR (U20)

1, 1090 Miller, Shauntae, Government
High, 1:01.09. 2, 853 Rahming, Edric-
ka, C.R. Walker 25, 1:03.63. 3, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:04.59.

¢ GIRLS 800 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 2:23.24. 2, 653 Cherilus, Angela,
Anatol Rodgers, 2:35.86. 3, 855 Rus-
sell, Florazell, C.R. Walker 25, 2:40.25.

¢ GIRLS 1500 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 5:43.82. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 6:10.76. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
6:16.84.

¢ GIRLS 3000 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)

1, 653 Cherilus, Angela, Anatol
Rodgers, 14:07.67. 2, 847 Humed,
Kendra, C.R. Walker 25, 15:24.23. 3,
1156 McIntosh, Crystal, R.M. Bailey 2,
15:36.58.

¢ GIRLS 100 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

(w: -0.4) 1, 724 Sears, Hollina, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 16.98. 2, 1151 Johnson,
Tonia-Kaye, R.M. Bailey 2, 18.28. 3,
765 Brown, Vanessa, C.I. Gibson 16,
18.47.

e GIRLS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

1, 891 Adderley, Teshona, C.V. Bethel
26, 1:06.40. 2, 1090 Miller, Shauntae,
Government High, 1:09.20. 3, 724
Sears, Hollina, C.C. Sweeting 7,
1:11.32.

e GIRLS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1,0. V. Bethel (26) Stingrays (Adderley,
Teshona 17, Gaitor, Lyndera 18, Stuart,
Shatyna 17, Lewis, Vashonique 18),
52.42. 2, C. |. Gibson (16) Rattlers
(Stubbs, Jarona 17, Colebrooke, Vashti
17, Brown, Vanessa 19, Adderley, Nasia
17), 52.78. 3, C. R. Walker (25) Knights
(Strachan, Opal 17, Rahming, Edricka
17, Capron, Lechea 17, Dean, Roshan-
da 17), 53.35.

e GIRLS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, C. R. Walker (25) Knights 4:20.05. 2,
Government High School (3) Mag
4:32.52. 3, Anatol Rodgers High School
4:35.85.

¢ GIRLS LONG JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Government High,
4.69m, w:NWI (15-04.75). 2, 914
Lewis, Vashonique, C.V. Bethel 26,
4.63m, w:NWI (15-02.25). 3, 655
Demeritt, Ariel, Anatol Rodgers, 4.55m,
w:NWI (14-11.25).

¢ GIRLS TRIPLE JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1159 Rodgers, Shonice, R.M. Bailey
2, 10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 1, 723
Rodgers, Terranique, C.C. Sweeting 7,
10.07m, w:NWI (33-00.50). 3, 860
Thompson, Brittaney, C.R. Walker 25,
9.96m, w:NWI (32-08.25).

e GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'3")
SENIOR (U20)

1, 862 Young, Lyndia, C.R. Walker 25,
1.45m, (4-09). 2, 1090 Miller,
Shauntae, Government High, 1.40m,
(4-07). 3, 1087 Kelly, Cache, Govern-
ment High, J1.40m, (4-07).

¢ GIRLS SHOT PUT (8LBS)

SENIOR (U20)

1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 12.22m#, (40-01.25). 2, 716 Gor-
don, Giovann, C.C. Sweeting 7, 9.10m,
(29-10.25). 3, 836 Bastian, Samantha,
C.R. Walker 25, 8.79m, (28-10.25).

¢ GIRLS DISCUS THROW (1K)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 934 Williams, Racquel, C.V. Bethel
26, 35.65m#, (116-11). 2, 1145
Estorcien, Vernice, R.M. Bailey 2,
23.31m, (76-06). 3, 859 Taylor, Jewel,
C.R. Walker 25, 22.69m, (74-05).

¢ GIRLS JAVELIN THROW (600GMS)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 920 Prosper, Tawanna, C.\V. Bethel
26, 29.03m, (95-03). 2, 934 Williams,
Racquel, C.V. Bethel 26, 28.75m, (94-
04). 3, 716 Gordon, Giovann, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 26.13m, (85-09).

¢ BOYS 100 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: -0.3) 1, 1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 10.90. 2, 1115 Innocent,
Nathan, Government High, 11.61. 3,
680 Brooks, Brandon, Anatol Rodgers,
11.61.

e BOYS 200 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

(w: 2.4) 1, 1053 Mackey, Trevor, Doris
Johnson 27, 22.43. 2, 872 Ferguson,
O'Jay, C.R. Walker 25, 22.51. 3, 1038
Cooper, Randolph, Doris Johnson 27,
22.80.

¢ BOYS 400 METER DASH

SENIOR (U20)

1, 872 Ferguson, O'Jay, C.R. Walker
25, 50.38. 2, 1201 Swann, Leeward,
R.M. Bailey 2, 52.84. 3, 866 Cartwright,
Leon, C.R. Walker 25, 53.03.

¢ BOYS 800 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 866 Cartwright, Leon, C.R. Walker
25, 2:05.15. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 2:05.53. 3, 795 Bain,
Carlide, C.|. Gibson 16, 2:07.47.

¢ BOYS 1500 METER RUN
SENIOR (U20)

1, 813 Louis, Harold, C.I. Gibson 16,
4:49.54. 2, 1175 Darville, Brandon,
R.M. Bailey 2, 4:53.76. 3, 1199 Storr,
Lyndrick, R.M. Bailey 2, 5:03.68.

¢ BOYS 5000 METER RUN

SENIOR (U20)

1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.l. Gibson 16,
19:08.50. 2, 869 Davis, Matthew, C.R.
Walker 25, 19:20.71. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 19:27.24.

¢ BOYS 3000 METER
STEEPLECHASE SENIOR (U20)

1, 827 Serveus, Vicknel, C.l. Gibson 16,
11:34.11. 2, 888 Stuart, Trevonn, C.R.
Walker 25, 12:04.36. 3, 756 Wells,
Denzil, C.C. Sweeting 7, 12:14.29.

¢ BOYS 110 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)
(w: 1.2) 1, 936 Adderley, Tre, C.V.

Subway 2010 Junior Tennis Classic

THE first Bahamas Lawn and Ten-
nis Association sanctioned junior ten-
nis tournament of the year took place
this past weekend (February 19-22,
2010) at the Gully Bowe Tennis Cen-
ter at the Lucayan Bath & Racquet
Club. The Grand Bahama Tennis
Association hosted 35 junior tennis
players from Nassau, Eleuthera and
Grand Bahama for several days of
healthy tennis competition with sev-
eral hundred spectators in attendance
during the four-day event.

Tournament director Gully Bowe
said that this year’s event was very
competitive and a great success. “I
enjoyed the tournament and I know
that the young tennis players did as
well,” he added. “This year’s players
displayed a high level of competive-
ness and good sportsmanship as they
vied for the first place trophies in the
various age categories.”

He thanked all the participants,
parents and coaches for their contri-
butions to the tournament. He
expressed special thanks to the tour-
nament sponsor, Shuffel Hepburn and
Subway. “Despite the economic chal-

lenges being faced by many, Mr Shuf-
fle Hepburn, owner of SUBWAY
restaurants, continues his commit-
ment to youth development in spon-
soring this year’s tournament once
again,” said Bowe.

President of the Grand Bahama
Tennis Association, Mrs Charmine
Wallace, dubbed this year’s tourna-
ment a huge success and extended
sincere appreciation to Mr Shuffle
Hepburn of Subway restaurants, the
players and their parents for con-
tributing to such a successful tourna-
ment.

The tournament results are as fol-
lows: Girls under 12 Singles: Iesha
Shepherd d. Lily Evert 5-7, 6-0, 6-3;
Girls Under 14: Gabriella Bowe d.
Lily Evert 6-1, 6-0; Girls Under 16:
Gabriella Bowe d. Dominique Morti-
er 6-0, 6-1; Boys Under 10: Cole
Majra d. Kofi Bowe 6-0,6-0; Boys
Under 12: Oneil Mortimer d. Ashton
Major 6-4, 6-0; Boys Under 14: Philip
Major d. Rasheed Carey 6-4, 6-0;
Boys Under 16: Kevin Major d.
Ondre Cargil Bye; Boys Under 18:
Johnathan Taylor d. Kevin Major

Bye; Girls Under 14 Doubles:
Shaytonya Missick & Gabriella Bowe
def Lily Evert & Iesha Shepherd Bye;
Boys Under 14 Doubles: Shannon



Francis & Ashton Major d. Oneil
Mortimer & Malik Jones 8-3; Boys
Under 18 Doubles: Hubert Russell
& Philip Major d. Johnathan Miller &

Bethel 26, 15.39. 2, 947 Ferguson,
Donshannon, C.V. Bethel 26, 16.09. 3,
733 Dames, Jaleel, C.C. Sweeting 7,
16.75.

¢ BOYS 400 METER HURDLES
SENIOR (U20)

1, 874 Higgs, Delvano, C.R. Walker 25,
59.64. 2, 754 Thompson, Ishmael, C.C.
Sweeting 7, 1:01.38. 3, 1183 Hentield,
Melvin, R.M. Bailey 2, 1:01.63.

¢ BOYS 4X100 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, Doris Johnson (27) Marlins
(Walkine, Marco 17, Clarke, Fredrick
19, Cooper, Randolph 18, Mackey,
Trevor 18), 44.13. 2, C. V. Bethel (26)
Stingrays (Lockhart, David 17, Adder-
ley, Tre 17, Forbes, Jarad 18,
Cartwright, Elvis 16), 44.99. 3, R. M.
Bailey (2) Pacers (Bullard, Delmarro 17,
Swann, Leeward 17, Knowles, Terrell
17, Munroe, Sean 17), 45.33.

¢ BOYS 4X400 METER RELAY
SENIOR (U20)

1, R. M. Bailey (2) Pacers 4:17.61. 2, C.
R. Walker (25) Knights 4:17.96. 3,
Doris Johnson (27) Marlins 4:21.48.

¢ BOYS LONG JUMP SENIOR (U20)
1, 792 Adderley, Patrizio, C.I. Gibson
16, 6.03m, w:NWI (19-09.50). 2, 1119
Martin, Wayne, Government High,
5.90m, w:NWI (19-04.25). 3, 1173
Bullard, Delmarro, R.M. Bailey 2,
5,.88m, w:NWI (19-03.50).

¢ BOYS TRIPLE JUMP

SENIOR (U20)

1, 1120 McDonald, Jerome, Govern-
ment High, 13.83m, w:NWI (45-04.50).
2, 863 Babbs, Tehneil, C.R. Walker 25,
12.92m, w:NWI (42-04.75). 3, 940
Burns, Michael, C.V. Bethel 26,
12.50m, w:NWI (41-00.25).

¢ BOYS HIGH JUMP (5'5")

SENIOR (U20)

1, 810 Ingraham, Ryan, C.I. Gibson 16,
1.94m, (6-04.25). 2, 808 Hall,
Jerwaine, C.|. Gibson 16, 1.91m, (6-
03.25). 3, 959 Hinsey, Jaran, C.V.
Bethel 26, 1.85m, (6-00.75). 3, 1120
McDonald, Jerome, Government High,
1.85m, (6-00.75).

¢ BOYS SHOT PUT (14LBS)

SENIOR (U20)

1, 881 Nottage, Deangelo, C.R. Walker
25, 12.06m, (39-07). 2, 1098 Arnett,
Jonathan, Government High, 11.70m,
(38-04.75). 3, 1116 Johnson, Welling-
ton, Government High, 11.64m, (38-
02.25).

¢ BOYS DISCUS THROW 1.75K
SENIOR (U20)

1, 1201 Swann, Leeward, R.M. Bailey
2, 40.34m#, (132-04). 2, 881 Nottage,
Deangelo, C.R. Walker 25, 37.22m,
(122-01). 3, 1197 Rolle, Cardell, R.M.
Bailey 2, 36.83m, (120-10).

¢ BOYS JAVELIN THROW (800GMS)
SENIOR (U20)

1, 880 MACKEY, Samuel, C.R. Walker
25, 50.54m, (165-10). 2, 936 Adderley,
Tre, C.V. Bethel 26, 45.98m, (150-10).
3, 1119 Martin, Wayne, Government
High, 45.17m, (148-02).

¢ BOYS POLE VAULT SENIOR (U20)
1, 970 Roker, Terrane, C.V. Bethel 26,
3.07m*, (10-00.75). 2, 953 Goodman,
Ritchie, C.V. Bethel 26, 2.98m, (9-
09.25).

e GIRLS HIGH JUMP (4'0")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1,918 Minus, Raygene, C.V. Bethel 26,
1.42m, (4-07.75). 2, 850 Lewis,
Shafara, C.R. Walker 25, J1.42m, (4-
07.75). 3, 709 Cox, Jaynell, C.C. Sweet-
ing 7, J1.42m, (4-07.75).

¢ BOYS HIGH JUMP (4'8")
INTERMEDIATE (U17)

1, 889 Sweeting, Ricardo, C.R. Walker
25, 1.78m, (5-10). 2, 1033 Burrows,
Nicholas, Doris Johnson 27, J1.78m,
(5-10). 3, 1032 Bowles, Dion, Doris
Johnson 27, 1.62m, (5-03.75).

results

GABRIELLA
Bowe cracks a
forehand at the
2010 Subway
Junior Tennis
Classic at the
Gully Bowe Ten-
nis Center at the
Lucayan Bath &
Racquet Club.

Mark Da Cunha/
Bahamas2000.com

Dirnaj Saunders 8-1.

Bahamas tennis fans can see a full
gallery of photos from the event
atwww.bahamastennis.com.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
$ -$- ce

THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2010, PAGE 13
LOCAL NEWS

RED CROSS: HELPING HAITI FOR

EXECUTIVE Members of the Bahamas ; .* | ; ae
Professional Photographers and Videog- r ol= , .

raphers Association (BPPVA) present a E — THE | \

cheque, food, water and shoes to the | :

Bahamas Red Cross Society. i : ,

The money and goods were raised after
two weeks of partnering with the Mall at

Marathon and Robin Hood Mega Store. : , Eleuthera, Bahamas

The theme for this drive was “Preserving

the Family to Rebuild Haiti”. ae — —o
Pictured presenting the cheque (from I-r) ' - ; ey Of ae aah
is Vincent Vaughan, assistant secretary i i 71 Sa gk aoe ee ee
of the BPPVA; Raphael Munnings, pub- , ; ‘= a }

lic relations; Portia King, vice-president

of the BPPVA; Caroline Turnquest, direc- | se aa Saturday

tor general of the Bahamas Red Cross

Society; Kemuel Stubbs, president of the , j |
BPPVA; Willamae Jenoure Evans, finan- , Mv a rc h 20
cial officer of the Bahamas Red Cross ie .

Society; Fabian Whymms, treasurer of : . :

BPPVA, Peter Campbell: assistant | 1 roe y Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
aaa oe annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
7 care, treatment, early detection, and
Att S ———— Bahamas-based cancer research.
. Here's what participants say:
assists 1 “Congratulations on organizing such
TETITIES {Ip o- . a truly amazing day. Thank you
s so much for the countless hours
Ty Weis oe you put into organizing an incredible
i : = 5 day for a great cause!! We had
WWI HIRS UIT E a ball and can’t stop talking about
ae awed, how well it was done! ... it was

ALANA RODGERS (lett) and Ash: truly an inspiring time, what a

ley Lepine (right) of Hands for Eine great experience!”
Hunger are pictured receiving a

donation from Nancy B Kelly, ,
president of Kelly's House and . J O I MN u q I
Home during the recent Kelly’s H .
Annual Awards. Kelly’s also

donates fuel on a monthly basis | J ) MORE IN FO AND REGISTER
for the delivery vehicles of Hands RIDEFORHOPEBAHAMAS.COM





For Hunger.

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