Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 106 No.80



Police shoot
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Man is killed
after threatening

officers with knife

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE shot dead a
would-be burglar who
threatened officers with a
knife and screwdriver before
trying to flee.

The gunfire rang out in a
quiet suburban neighbour-
hood when police responded
to reports of attempted
break-ins.

The police had been
called to stop two men seen
walking from house to
house trying to open car
doors and the doors to peo-
ple’s homes in Tower
Heights Drive, off Sans
Souci Road, in east Nassau,
at around 5.20am as resi-
dents slept.

Officers from Elizabeth
Estates Police Station sent

SEE page 12

Shooting leaves man in hospital

A 22-YEAR-OLD Golden Gates man is in hospital in seri-
ous condition following a shooting in Mermaid Boulevard off
Carmichael Road yesterday morning.

Police responded to reports of gunfire at 9.20am and said the
young man had been shot in the abdomen and taken to hospi-

tal in a private vehicle.

He remains in hospital in serious condition while police

investigations continue.

The Criminal Detective Unit is following significant leads into
the shooting and is appealing to the public for any information

that may assist investigations.

Contact police urgently on 911, 919, or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).



The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010





By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

am
IY

Love
TOKENS FOR

wes

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Tourist in Harbour
Island cutlass attack

A CUTLASS attack on an American tourist has shocked
the tiny community of Harbour Island and led to demands

police in their probe.

SEE page 15

MAN sl DEAD


















PAC

bd a



| | POLICE REMOVE the
body of the man in the
South Beach area

yesterday.



By ALESHA CADET

THE body of a man
riddled with multiple
gunshot wounds was
discovered in the back
seat of a car in the area
of South Beach yester-
day.

The victim has been
identified as David
Bowleg, believed to be
between 25 and 30
years old.

The Tribune under-
stands that Bowleg is
known to the police for
several crime matters.

Officers responded
to the scene at around
lpm, where they found
the dead man in a
champagne-coloured
vehicle on Holiday Dri-
ve in South Beach.
Detectives have

SEE page 12

TALK SHOW host Ortland Bodie Jr was
apologetic on his radio programme yesterday,
stating that he was wrong for offering to sell a
firearm on national radio and that his remarks
were “irresponsible” and should never have
been said.

Having been released from police custody
some hours after being arrested on Wednes-
day, Mr Bodie also lauded the police at the
Central Detective Unit (CDU) for their pro-
fessionalism, maintaining at the same time
that he had no animosity for what had tran-
spired.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff ——— * A













NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

for an increase in police protection.

The incident happened at about 2am yesterday when
two dark-skinned men, both armed with cutlasses, burst
into a hotel room occupied by two American men at Tingum
Village and demanded cash.

One of the victims was slashed on his right arm but his
friend managed to escape unharmed, police said. Three
detectives were dispatched from the capital to assist with the
investigation and up to press time, three men were assisting

A reliable source identified the victim as Eddie Bryant of
Stanford, Connecticut. He was reportedly airlifted to New
Providence yesterday and then to hospital in Florida for



Bahamas close
to strengthening
diplomatic

ties with Brazil

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is close to
signing a technical co-opera-
tion agreement with Brazil
that would strengthen diplo-
matic ties, according to Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs offi-
cials.

In the first instance, the
agreement will facilitate the
transfer of agriculture exper-
tise, in research, food tech-
nology and biofuel technolo-
gy. These are the areas of
interest identified by the Min-
istry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, which is
the main Bahamian agency
pushing the negotiations.

“Brazil has comparative
advantage in the agricultural
sector and has a lot to offer
the Bahamas by way of tech-
nology and food production,”
said Ava Lane, senior assis-
tant secretary in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs (MOFA),
and head of the technical
assistance unit.

Nothing has been signed as
yet, but there is a draft agree-

SEE page 16

Talk show host apologetic
over on-air firearm remarks

“T should never have said it,” Mr Bodie told
his listeners yesterday. “You know you cannot
shout fire in a theatre, and if you do, it has to
be investigated.

“T said everybody knows where to find an
illegal gun. But I don’t really know where any
are and I don’t want to know. But the police
had to do their job.”

On Wednesday, Mr Bodie was taken into
police custody shortly after his programme
ended and his home searched. To illustrate

SEE page 12





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Partnership
raises $80,000
for Haiti relief

A JOINT partnership
between Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Limited and
the Western Union Foun-
dation has raised over
$80,000 for disaster relief
in Haiti.

Efforts to raise the
funds began immediately
after a devastating 7.0
earthquake levelled the
Haitian capital Port-au-
Prince and surrounding
regions on January 12,
leaving hundreds of thou-
sands dead and many more
injured.

Staff at Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Ltd in the
Bahamas, Grand Cayman
and the Cayman Islands
were encouraged to donate
to the relief fund and every
dollar they donated was
matched by the bank.

As Fidelity acts as an
agent for Western Union
in the Bahamas, Cayman
and Turks and Caicos,
Western Union then
matched Fidelity’s dona-
tions through the Western
Union Foundation and its
Agent Giving circle pro-
gramme.

The community was
also invited to show their
support for Haiti by mak-
ing donations at the West-
ern Union, MoneyCentre,
Fidelity and Fidelity loca-
tions.

Money raised will be
sent to Mercy Corps, as it
is a sanctioned, registered
charity currently working
to assist victims of the
earthquake and their fami-
lies in Haiti.

Fidelity president Gre-
gory Bethel said: “We are
very proud by the level of
giving from our staff. You
know you have hired the
right people when they are
not only deeply touched by
the situation in Haiti, but
they are willing to partici-
pate and part with their
own money just to make a
difference.”

wi Ws tg

PASTOR Mee Rem Bor rn Belay



Assisting the Haitian
earthquake relief effort

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MORE than a month after a 7.0
magnitude earthquake destroyed
Haiti's capital city Port-au-Prince,
and despite the generous out-
pouring of donations from
Bahamians and the international
community, countless displaced
survivors are still desperate for
food and medical aid.

This, according to local real
estate agent Gavin Christie and
German businessman Peter Reb-
mann who recently returned from
a week-long trip to the devastated
city where they assisted in the
relief effort.

Mr Christie told The Tribune
about what prompted him and his
friends to make such a compas-
sionate gesture.

"A friend of mine (Peter Reb-
mann) had a friend from Haiti
who lost about two thirds of her
family during the earthquake.

“He decided to ship a few
crates of food, clothes and med-
ical aid" to his friend's surviving
family members, said Mr Christie.

After this initial show of good-
will, both men realised they had
the means and connections to
raise a significant amount of mon-
ey to contribute to Haiti.

But they wanted to ensure that
their donations went straight into
the hands of those in need.

Supplies

On February 12, the pair, along
with Miami-based doctor Ali
Shyagan, chartered a private
plane filled with boxes with food,
medical supplies and toys.

They teamed up with a Haitian
charity and spent the week doling
out medical care to survivors and
handing out food and toys to mal-
nourished orphans.

They came face-to-face with a
city, which was already struggling
with widespread poverty before
the January 12 quake, that looked
as if it had been ravaged by war.

Huge piles of rubble still lined
the streets of Port-au-Prince, evi-
dence of the many buildings -
including the presidential palace -
that collapsed during the quake.
Hundreds of thousands of dis-
placed survivors sought shelter in
tent communities on the outskirts
of the city, lacking food, electric-
ity and running water.

"We expected to see suffering,
but I didn't expect it (to be) so
bad," Mr Rebmann told The Tri-
bune.

"You don't expect to see a town
(that looks) completely bombed
out, but not one and half hours
away from Nassau.”

‘a

PETER REBMANN (kneeling), Dr Ali Shyagan (centre) and Gavin Christie (right) care TM ROa Elis Prautenen

One of the most heart-wrench-
ing moments for the pair came
when they visited Sister Veroni-
ca's Orphanage in Port-au-Prince.
The orphanage is home to about
80 undernourished children, run
by 83-year-old Sister Veronica
who could not find the $100 US
she needed every week to sustain
the place.

"When we first went in there

the kids were like zombies but
after we gave them some toys,
candy and food you could see a
change in like 24 hours,” Mr
Christie said.

"She was running the place
herself, there was no food for the
kids, the kids were unhealthy and
I was shocked," Mr Rebmann
added.

"I said how is this possible



when hundreds of millions of dol-
lars (in aid) dropped in Port-au-
Prince?”

The group left behind toys,
food and money for the children
and recruited volunteers in Haiti
to check in on the home periodi-
cally.

They plan to return to Haiti in
several weeks to carry out further
relief efforts.

Minister to address security
issues at CARICOM meeting

CRITICAL security issues
for the Bahamas and the
region will be addressed by
National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest at the
CARICOM Council for
National Security and Law
Enforcement (CONSLE)
meeting in Antigua and Bar-
buda today.

Mr Turnquest and the gov-
ernment department’s per-
manent secretary Missouri
Sherman-Peter left today for
the regional meeting with
expectations of an update on

CARICOM’s military
response to Haiti’s cata-
strophic earthquake of Janu-
ary 12.

They will also have the
opportunity to put forward
recommendations about how
the Caribbean can now assist
the devastated country, and
these will be sent to Heads of
Government for considera-
tion.

Also on the agenda is a
review of preparations for the
Caribbean and United States
High Level Dialogue on

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Local News
Editorial/Letters

P1,2,3,4,5,9,13,14
PO ee-o1 Oli

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

Crime and Security to take
place in Washington, DC, lat-
er this year between partici-
pating CARICOM members,
the Dominican Republic and
the US.

A Caribbean-United States
Declaration on Security
Cooperation and a
Caribbean-US Plan of Action
on Security Cooperation is
expected to be agreed in
Washington, and it is antici-
pated the plan of action will
be funded by the US under
the Caribbean Basin Security
Initiative.

On the second day of the
two-day conference in
Antigua and Barbuda, CON-
SLE will also address the
Strategic Work Plan and Bud-
get of the CARICOM Imple-
mentation Agency for Crime
and Security (IMPACS), as
well as the CARICOM legal
agenda, including the status
of signature and ratification
of the various CARICOM
treaties.

Mr Turnquest said:
“CONSLE has a short and
concise agenda, which per-
mits it to consider and make
decisions on critical nation-
al and regional security
issues, such as the situation
in Haiti.

“The outcome of the CON-

SLE meeting should help to
advance the region’s security
agenda.”

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



0 In br. 7ef INQUEST: Michael Knowles

Man gets one-year
term for weapons
and ammo charges

A 29-year-old Watling’s
Street man was sentenced to a
year in jail yesterday after
pleading guilty to weapons
and ammunitions charges.

Tarino Moss pleaded guilty
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell to the charges of pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

Moss had initially pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was standing trial.

According to court dockets,
on January 12, Moss was
found in possession of a black
Smith and Wesson .40 pistol
and 11 .40 bullets.

Moss was sentenced to a
year in jail on each count.

The sentences are to run
concurrently.

The magistrate ordered that
the gun and ammunition be
confiscated.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette
was the prosecutor.

Fishing crew
left adrift after
hoat destroyed

THE crew of a fishing ves-
sel was left adrift in the water
after their boat was complete-
ly destroyed when it ran
aground near the entrance to
Nassau Harbour yesterday
morning.

Windy weather and rough
seas slammed the boat onto
rocks east of New Providence
after one of the engines failed
on the 48ft fishing boat Ocean
Mist as it was returning to
Nassau at the end of a fishing
trip.

The wood and fibreglass
vessel was completely
destroyed as it was bashed
against the rocks.

Help

Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) officers
responding to calls for help
just after 7am found the
boat’s five crew members
clinging to rocks near the
wreckage.

RBDF Lieutenant Carlton
Bethel said: “Because they
lost control of their engines
and the weather that we have
out there is so terrible the
boat just crashed into the
rocks and was completely
destroyed.

“We had people who were
holding onto rocks and some
of them were still in the water.
They were in the water for
less than an hour, but it’s
rough, and even in this cli-
mate hypothermia could set
in.

“It’s not even safe for a
small craft to be out there in
this weather.”

Officers on board HMBS
P-38 took all five crew on
board and landed them at the
Harbour Patrol Unit just
before 8.30am to be examined
by Emergency Medical Ser-
vices.

All but one, who suffered
minor injuries, appeared to be
in good health apart from cuts
and bruising.

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Thread 4 for $1

‘My son wanted to §

be a police officer’ ,

Mother of teenager found hanging in police cell testifies

THE mother of a teenager
who was found hanging in a
police station holding cell last
May told the Coroner’s Court
yesterday that her son had aspi-
rations of being a police offi-
cer.

“Michael was a striving
young man. He had to do things
to help himself. I don’t know
what went wrong,” Donna Wil-
son, the mother of 15-year-old
Michael Knowles said yester-
day. On May 31, 2009, Michael
was found hanging in a hold-
ing cell at the East Street South
Police Station.

An emotional Ms Wilson tes-
tified yesterday that around
5.45pm on Tuesday, May 26,
Detective Kelrico Burrows
brought Michael to her New-
bold Street apartment.

She said that Constable Bur-
rows told her that he had found
Michael and another boy wan-

dering in the South Beach area.

Ms Wilson said that she told
the officer that she had not seen
her son for a day and Constable
Burrows in turn scolded
Michael. She also told the court
that she was alarmed when she
saw Constable Burrows spank
Michael with the handle of a
hammer and asked him what
he was doing.

Ms Wilson testified that she
went to the East Street South
Police Station on Thursday,
May 28, after Michael had been
picked up by police a second
time.

She told the court that she
caught the jitney to the police
station, arriving there at 4pm
and waited some three hours
to see Constable Burrows.

She said that around 7pm
that night Constable Burrows
came out and she told him that
she had been waiting for him a

very long time, but he told her
that no one had informed him
that she was there.

Ms Wilson said that at that
time Constable Burrows told
her he was heading out to
investigate a shooting in
Pinewood Gardens. She told
the court that she called the
police station on Saturday and
was informed that her son had
not been granted bail. She also
testified that when she inquired
on Sunday whether she could
bring her son food and a
change of clothes, she was
informed by the station orderly
that Michael would be going to
court that week.

The inquest is being prose-
cuted by attorney Terry
Archer. Attorney Keod Smith
represents the mother of the
deceased. Coroner William
Campbell is presiding over the
inquest.

Agribusiness expo promotes food security



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

IN a bid to spread the mes-
sage of food security, the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine j
Resources has launched a series rainy Cartwriont
of 11 agribusiness expos across 11 islands.

With three down, one in progress in Nassau
and seven more to go, the ministry has thrown its
full support behind the initiative. “The theme
chosen for these expos, ‘Progressing Toward
Food Security’, is most befitting as food security
throughout the Bahamas is indeed a concern,”
said Larry Cartwright, Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources.

“Our recent experience in the Bahamas and
throughout the world confirms that the certain
production and supply of food which might have
been taken for granted are no longer as certain as
they once were,” he said.

The ministry plans to approach food security
by encouraging increased local production in the
areas of vegetable, root crops, fruits, poultry,
marine resources or livestock, and by addressing
the issues that impact the industry adversely.

In the making is a five-year development plan

that aims to position agriculture and marine
resources as key pillars of the Bahamian econo-
my. A rapid assessment exercise is currently
underway towards this end. The ministry is also
seeking a technical cooperation agreement with
the Brazilian government to facilitate the trans-
fer of technology and advanced agricultural
research conducted by the Brazilians.

Mr. Cartwright said the challenge to farmers is
to provide commercial produce to the local mar-
ket that meets acceptable standards of quality,
quantity and consistency. This would enable
greater linkages between tourism and the agri-
culture industry, with the supply of native sea-
sonal fruits, vegetables and root crops to guests
staying in local hotels and resorts. Food security
in the Bahamas is not guaranteed because of the
various threats in the market, according to Mr
Cartwright. He said rising fuel prices, rising glob-
al food prices and the global financial meltdown
all affected the industry in recent times. He said
a fundamental reality of climate change is fre-
quent droughts and unpredictable storms.

An expo is currently underway at the Glad-
stone Road Agricultural Centre in New Provi-
dence. The next expo in the series takes place in
Cat Island on March 18. North and Central
Andros will follow closely behind.

Teenager in US custodly over alleged ‘alien smuggling’ =|)

A BAHAMIAN man is fac-
ing federal charges in the Unit-
ed States following an attempt-
ed migrant smuggling venture
that left a Jamaican man dead.

Davon Rolle, 19, was
charged with alien smuggling
when a criminal complaint was
filed on Wednesday. He is cur-
rently in US custody with two
other Bahamians.

Tyrel Levarity, 23, of the
Bahamas, and three other men
were charged with illegally try-
ing to re-enter the US after
deportation, and a 24-year-old
Bahamian man was charged
with violating US Immigration
law.

Authorities say a 28ft Intre-
pid speedboat spotted by a
police helicopter near the Black
Point Marina in Miami was
chased off the South Florida
coast on Tuesday night and
people on the boat jumped
overboard.

The body of an unidentified
Jamaican man was later dis-
covered around 30ft from the

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Madeira
Location

Harbives, 'f aj ancl nsf rn

ONLY Flower Bushes

shore. Prosecutors say a duffel
bag containing 60 Ibs of mari-
juana was also found on the
boat.

US Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement (ICE)
agents took seven men into cus-
tody. Rolle is being held with-
out bail. Levarity is also in cus-
tody with Jamaicans David
Coore, 27, and Delroy Coombs,
45, as well as Mathura Bridge-
lal, 50, of Trinidad, all facing
illegal re-entry charges. The 24-
year-old Bahamian charged
with violating US Immigration
law is being held in Immigra-
tion Customs Enforcement
(ICE), while a seventh man was
released by authorities, accord-
ing to The Miami Herald.

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an
Na LY,

PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(-|"\
Na DY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Prisoners should earn their own keep

IN DEBATING the Planning and Subdi-
visions Bill in the Senate yesterday Mrs
Alyson Maynard Gibson stated the obvi-
ous: There is no point in planning wonder-
ful communities if people will not be safe in
their own homes.

She pointed out five areas, which in her
opinion, had to be dealt with before the pro-
posed Bill would have any meaning.

Of course, crime headed the list. She read
the headlines of the two daily newspapers for
February 23 and 24 — home invasion, mur-
der, robberies and stabbings. Turn to today’s
front page and there’s little else to read but
crime — murder in South Beach, cutlass
attack on a tourist in Harbour Island, shoot-
ing in Carmichael, and thief who tried to
attack the police in San Souci, killed.

She also recommended the obvious: Any-
one who shoots or threatens a policeman, or
attacks or threatens a judge should be tried
immediately. The man who broke into a
policeman’s home recently should also be
tried immediately.

Secondly, accused murderers should not
be let out on bail. Instead they should get an
immediate trial.

It was obvious to the community and dis-
couraging to the police that a person with a
serious criminal record let lose on a com-
munity would create mayhem. Which one of
you would hire a person with a criminal
record — especially one accused of murder
or other acts of violence? The answer is
none of you. Yet, these are human beings
with all the natural urges of hunger, thirst,
the need to support a family and to have a
job to be able to do so. Everyone knows
that a hungry, desperate man will steal —
and, depending on his desperation, will also
kill. The community knows this. But appar-
ently the courts did not.

Today almost every crime we report has
been committed by someone out on bail.
At times the victim, with a long criminal
record, is awaiting trial when he is overtak-
en by another bailed criminal. This one ends
the first man’s life of crime with a bullet —
always with an unlicensed gun, illegally
obtained.

It is not unusual to be told by a resident.
“Oh, I know him, he mother live next door.
He’s a real tief, a menace to us around here,
he always in and out of prison.”

And so as long as these criminals are
always in and out of prison, they will always
be a menace to a community, and extra work
for the police, who are discouraged by hav-
ing to keep hunting them down and return-
ing them to prison — a prison they should






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have never left. So no one should be sur-
prised at what is happening in this commu-
nity today. But how to stop it?

Some cynic commented recently: “Oh,
but they are killing each other!” Yes, they
are killing each other and saving the courts
time, but in the meantime, innocent citizens
are being caught in the cross-fire.

Many years ago an English superinten-
dent headed HM Prison, and an English
superintendent, we believe his name was
Capt. Holland, headed what was then known
as the Boys Industrial School. These two
men made the inmates — the men and the
boys — earn their own keep. The prisoners
grew their own food. We believe that this is
still done on a smaller scale at the prison
today.

With the need to reduce our food
imports, and with all the Crown land that
government has, it would seem reasonable
that a large acreage should be set aside to be
worked by the inmates, especially those on
remand. This farm should be able to sup-
ply the island with its fruits and vegetables,
which could be sold with part proceeds going
to the prisoners to support their families
and the remainder to pay government rent
for their stay at HM prison.

It would be a security risk to turn all the
prisoners — even under armed guard — on
the farm at the same time. They should,
therefore, be taken out in relays.

The late Sir Etienne Dupuch worked with
one of the prison superintendents to get the
prisoners to make toys for his Santa Claus
Committee to distribute to poor children in
the community at Christmas time.

These toys were quite professional —
wheels turned, little horns on trucks honked,
there were wooden animals on wheels at
the end of a string for small children to pull
around behind them. They were all beauti-
fully painted.

The prisoners enjoyed the work. It made
them feel that they were not only a part of
the community, but also making a contri-
bution.

And the Santa Claus committee volun-
teers took great pride in wrapping the pris-
oners’ toys and decking them out with rib-
bons and bows. To the committee women
these were very special gifts that deserved
special treatment.

These social misfits, who got off life’s
train at the wrong stop, need not be a finan-
cial drain on the community if some thought
and planning could go into helping them
earn their keep during their period of reha-
bilitation.







We are being

financially
neglected or
punished.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is with great remorse
and disdain that I write this
correspondence. Certainly,
I say this because after dis-
creet conversation and close
dialogue with most of my
affected colleagues in the
department, I am of the con-
sensus that we are being
financially neglected or pun-
ished. Is it perhaps, for the
unethical misdeeds of some
in the past in which we all
should presently be held
accountable? Or is it only
for the persuasion of the
hierarchical order who
appear to care not whether
we “sink or swim” in these
economically challenging
times.

Over the last two years or
so, the Government via the
Customs Department, have
been engaged in a tedious
restructuring programme
where it endeavoured to
bring upon a change in the
department in essentially
two ways:

1) The Government has
terminated and also “trans-
ferred/seconded” some of its
less desirable officers (for
lack of a better word) to var-
ious government depart-
ments and early retired most
of the longer serving officers
(40 years or more). This was
done in efforts to promote
younger officers (some with
tertiary level education) who
in my estimation can possi-
bly help to bring about a
new vision and enterprising
ideas, which can perhaps
revamp the functioning of
the Department through
their youthfulness and
acquired technical and voca-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



tional skills.

2) Over the last three years
the government hired
approximately 300 customs
officers and guards (com-
bined) to help to bring into
fruition the new-imple-
mented shift system into the
department. This new shift
system is design firstly, to
alleviate the government
and the airline/shipping
agencies of the so-called
“absorbidant” overtime
charges that they are
required to pay us for our
extra-working attendance.
Secondly, the hiring of these
new personnel was in my
opinion, tactfully done by
the Government to obtain
its political objective while
appeasing its political
detractors during these
recessionary times.

Contrary to the points
mentioned above, I have
absolutely no problem with
the Government firing,
transferring or hiring offi-
cers if it feels that this is
what is necessary to bring
about positive and effective
change in the department. I
also, understand and accept
that in the Government's
quest to promote trade and
tourism for the benefit of all
Bahamians, it may be eco-
nomically impractical for the
government and the rele-
vant agencies to continue
the payment of overtime
fees in the rate done so in
the past to suffice this cause.
However, I am very discor-

dant with the compensation
payment that was given to
us in lieu of overtime pay-
ment. Not only was the
amount that was given to us
grossly inadequate (average
of $300 per month) in com-
parison to (average of $1200
per month) made in over-
time in the past. Also, in
particular, I oppose the hier-
archical method in which the
payment was dispersed,
which was clearly disingen-
uous to the junior staff. This
is so, because the bulk of the
compensation payment
which was “said to be giv-
en” in lieu of overtime was
in fact paid out to the exec-
utives and junior executives
in the average of $700-$900
per month and they never
worked overtime because
the overtime duties were
performed by the junior
staff and junior management
respectively.
Furthermore, to com-
pound an already vexing sit-
uation, we commenced
working the newly imple-
mented shift system from
January 18, 2010. However,
we have overtime payment
outstanding to us as far back
as September 1, 2009. This
outstanding overtime was
promised to be paid to us at
year ending December 31,
2009, we are currently in the
month of February. How
reasonable is this to honest
officers trying to survive on
“already” budgeted salaries.
How reasonable is this?

A REASONABLE
CUSTOMS
OFFICER

Nassau,

February, 2010.

Looking at Real Estate closings

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Efficiency, professionalism,
proficiency and integrity must
always be the norm in Real
Estate closings.

In each and every real estate
closing, “all of the i’s must be
dotted and all of the t’s must
be crossed!”

This writer has personally
experienced the disgust and
heartbreak wrought by bungled
closings.








DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

Truly, one botched closing is
one too many; so I am thankful
to you for publishing this let-
ter that may be helpful to those
who are interested in buying or
selling real estate, so that they
will do everything to ensure
that their sale or purchase of
real estate is not muddled at
the closing.

Barring unforeseen and/or
extraordinary circumstances
that may arise, each and every
closing should close on time,
with penalties to be paid by
whichever party is responsible
for delays.

Everything, including minu-
tia, must be settled between all



of the parties. At the closing,
all parties and their legal reps,
including the Real Estate bro-
ker and his/her lawyer, should
be in a particular place desig-
nated for the occasion. From
what I have seen, it would be
prudent for the real estate bro-
ker to take his/her lawyer to
represent him/her at the clos-
ing, as it seems that his/her
presence is considered to be
unnecessary or, at best, merely
incidental to the very impor-
tant matter of closing.

GLEN MORE
Nassau,
February 9, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



IN A move to further
expand their influence and
voice within the Progres-
sive Liberal Party (PLP),
the youth wing of the polit-
ical organisation, the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals
(PYL), will be establishing
a local branch in every
constituency throughout
the country.

According to De’Angelo
Whyms, the vice-chairman
of the PYL, these 41
Young Liberal branches
are a part of their organi-
sation’s mission to empow-
er the nation’s youth.

“Throughout the length
and breath of our nation
the young people within
the various constituencies
have been crying out for
an avenue to voice their
concerns on matters of
national importance, we
intend to satisfy their
hunger to be heard. We
intend to travel through-
out each and every con-
stituency within the Com-
monwealth of the

Apis, |

DE’ANGELO WHYMS, the vice-chairman of the PYL.

ea olul emmy arate
set to branch out

Bahamas seeking out the
young minds dwelling
within and establishing 41
Young Liberals branches.

“The mentality of the
youth of our nation is
evolving daily and with
evolution there comes
change.

“The Progressive Young
Liberals intends to nurture
this evolution, thus max-
imising its potential and
inevitably procuring a
secure future for our gen-
eration and generations to
come,” Mr Whyms said.

“With the wisdom of
those who came before us
and those who are cur-
rently at the helm of our
party, we will create a
youth centric environment
where innovation is con-
stant, pro-creation preva-
lent and having an idea
would be the only require-
ment. We invite all youth
to get involved and chal-
lenge yourself to become
Progressive Young Liber-
als.”



Seagrapes

Parties in discussions
over possible merger

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas may soon
see the birth of a new polit-
ical party as the leadership
of both the Bahamas Demo-
cratic Movement (BDM)
and the National Develop-
ment Party (NDP) have
begun discussions about a
possible merger of the two
organisations.

Having held three meet-
ings since the Elizabeth by-
election, in which both par-
ties’ candidates were defeat-
ed, the NDP and the BDM
have been embroiled in talks
with other known political
persons as to their collective
way forward.

However, according to
sources within the two par-
ties there has already been
difficulties with this process.

Reportedly one of the
main issues raised in the first
meeting was whether or not
the two parties would do
away with their names and
join under a new umbrella,
or if one organisation should
simply join up under the
leadership of the other.

A second issue raised was
the leadership styles and
structure of the parties.

The NDP seems to prefer
to allow the constituents to
be the ones who are respon-
sible for picking their repre-
sentative in an election. This
model, it was said, was prov-
ing to be a stumbling block
for many with the BDM who
feel that the candidates
should be chosen in another
fashion.

Questioned on the issue
of a possible merger yester-
day, BDM leader Cassius

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Stuart said that the two
political parties were in the
very initial stages of their
“talks” and his organisation
was not against meeting and
speaking with the NDP.

However, as to which
organisation could possibly
end up absorbing the other,
Mr Stuart was adamant that
the BDM is the more well-
known of the two, having
spent more than a decade on
the political stage.

“I spoke with our team
last night and they were not
against meeting and talking.
Because we do have some
philosophical differences at
this time. For us it is getting
the best. Anytime you nego-
tiate it has to be a win-win
situation. Our brand (BDM)
is constantly out there. And





Cassius Stuart of the BDM and Dr Andre Rollins of the NDP.



to get a new brand in the
minds of the Bahamian peo-
ple may take another 10
years.

“So it only makes practical
sense if there were to be any
joining to keep the BDM
brand,” he said.

As for what his party is
doing in the meantime, Mr
Stuart said that they have
been holding meetings to
review why the organisation
under-performed in the Eliz-
abeth by-election.

“We were not happy with
the results coming out of the
last election but when you
look at what we were up
against, the government with
all its machinery, and the
Opposition, they were
spending millions and mil-
lions of dollars. So there

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were a whole lot of things
we were concerned about.

“And we were also con-
cerned about all the Minis-
ters and Members of Parlia-
ment sitting in polling divi-
sion booths. What happened
to the government on that
day? Because the level of
intimidation was unbeliev-
able. So whatever they
promised the people before
voting day they were there
to make sure they voted like
they said they would. So
from our perspective it
appears that the government
was pulling out all stops in
that regard to win this elec-
tion,” he said.

In the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion, the BDM secured 76
votes in total to the NDP’s
49. The FNM’s Dr Duane
Sands won the majority of
white ballots cast during the
election, winning 1,501. The
PLP’s Ryan Pinder secured
1,499 votes.

Mr Pinder is currently
contesting five protest bal-
lots that he claims were cast
in favour of him. Until this
issue can be rectified in the
Election Court there can be
no declaration of an
absolute winner for the seat
as these five votes if count-
ed, can shift the majority to
the PLP. Therefore the Eliz-
abeth seat remains empty in
the House of Assembly at
this time.

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a





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Lease agreements diversify
NIB investment portfolio

MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO - The financing of
lease agreements between the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and the government for
the country’s infrastructural
development has led to a fur-
ther diversification of the
Board’s investment portfolio,
according to NIB director
Algernon Cargill.

Mr Cargill said the agree-
ments continue to serve the
Board “well”, as they ensure
that NIB funds are being “opti-
mally deployed.”

Addressing central and local

government officials and resi-
dents of Abaco attending the
contract signing for the con-
struction of the government
administration building in
Marsh Harbour last Friday, Mr
Cargill said the lease financing
of government buildings has
“generally earned” a yield of
approximately 7.25 per cent per
annum.

The new government com-
plex in Abaco will be con-
structed on nine acres of land
by WOSLEE Contractors at a
cost of $19.6million. Construc-
tion is set to begin immediately

with an expected completion
date of December, 2011.

Officials say the construction
of the building will address
much of the space challenges
faced by government offices
and agencies which provide
vital services to residents of
Abaco.

The complex will house the
Magistrates Courts, Ministry of
Works, Business Licensing
Authority, Department of
Immigration and Department
of Environmental Health.

Mr Cargill said that while the
granting of loans comprises a

Police in GB conduct
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“very small part” of the Board-
’s Investment portfolio, it is an
important aspect as the alter-
native would be that “NIB
funds would not be optimally
deployed and in some cases
earning no interest at all.”

“Given NIB’s long-term
investment horizon, having the
present 7.5 per cent of the
National Insurance Fund in real
estate is a healthy diversifica-
tion of our investment portfolio
by any standard,” Mr Cargill
said.

Mr Cargill said the Board can
“further credit” its focus on

investments such as the con-
struction of the government
administrative building in
Marsh Harbour as a primary
reason why the National Insur-
ance Fund did not experience
any “significant erosion in val-
ue” during the recent global
financial crisis.

“Our investments in govern-
ment and quasi-government
debt issues, as well as specific
building projects used by the
government and its agencies,
have performed satisfactorily
and have historically and are
currently, yielding above-mar-

ket returns,” he added.

Mr Cargill said NIB’s
reserves currently stand at
$1.6billion which represents an
accumulation of income from
contributions and investments,
less benefits and expenses, over
the almost 36 years of the life of
the programme.

“Surplus contributions (those
not paid out in benefits and
assistance) go into NIB
reserves,” he said. “Monies
from this Reserve Fund are rou-
tinely invested so as to meet
both the present and future
costs of benefits and assistance.”

ea Len O) Sa Dele Peitel children using a crosswalk during the road check exercise.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Police offi-
cers at the Eight Mile Rock
Division conducted road check
exercises on Wednesday in the
school zones and the pedestri-
an crossings in the Eight Mile
Rock area.

Supt Christopher Pickstock,
the officer in charge of the
Eight Mile Rock Division, ASP
Loretta Mackey, second in
command, and Corporals
Christina King and Godfrey
Knowles were at two busy traf-
fic locations ensuring that
motorists and pedestrians
obeyed the traffic rules.

ASP Mackey said Queens
Highway is a busy road that
runs through the Eight Mile
Rock settlement, where many
persons live, work and go to
school.

Un To
(Tate

She said it is important that
motorists obey the speed limit,
especially in the school zones
where the speed limit is 1S5mph
from 7.30am — 9.30am, and in
the afternoon from 2.30pm -
4pm. She also noted that
pedestrians should use the
pedestrian/traffic crossing when
crossing the street.

Persons using the crossing
must make one step onto the
crossing then look left, then
right, then left again to ascer-
tain that the vehicles approach-
ing come to a complete stop
before continuing to walk, not
run, to the other side of the
street.

“We need the motoring pub-
lic to be more conscious of oth-
er road users, in particular the
children walking to school or
being dropped off on the road-
side by parents,” said Ms
Mackey.

“We wanted to take this
opportunity to ensure that

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motorists are obeying the speed
limit and to also teach young
pedestrians how to properly
use the traffic crossing,” she
said. Supt Pickstock said that
road checks will be conducted
on a weekly basis in the dis-
trict, especially at the three
schools — Eight Mile Rock
High, Bartlett Hill Primary,
and Martin Town Primary.

Corporals King and Knowles
distributed flyers with road
safety tips about the proper use
of pedestrian crossings, riding
the school bus and riding bicy-
cles on the street.

Corporal Knowles said they
were able to spot speeders with
aradar gun. “We cited several
motorists for speeding today,”
he said.

ASP Mackey said that police
visibility in the Eight Mile
Rock Community will ensure
that the community is much
safer for residents to work and
live.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Creating a model of sustainable development

Bahamian and US government officials share insights
on how to make the Bahamas an example for the world

i

EXPLORING how to make
Eleuthera a model of sustain-
able development not only for
the Bahamas, but throughout
the world, was the main topic at
the 2010 sustainability confer-
ence hosted by the Cape
Eleuthera Institute (CEI) last
weekend.

Government officials, includ-
ing Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette, Speaker of
the House of Assembly Alvin
Smith and Minister of Educa-
tion Desmond Bannister,
attended the conference at
which former governor of New
Jersey and former administra-
tor of the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency

Christine Todd-Whitman was

the keynote speaker.
Each government official took
time to share thoughts on how
Eleuthera can become a model
for sustainable development.

During her keynote address,
Governor Todd-Whitman
recognised the challenges the
Bahamas faces as it works
toward a sustainable future.

“The rewards of early com-
mitment to sustainability are
not perhaps as tangible today as
we would like them to be, and
they’re hard to prove,” she said.

“But you can’t wait until that
evidence is out there to start to
take action. By then it’s too late
when you're talking about sus-
tainability. You have to move
forward sooner.”

Governor Todd-Whitman
was also quick to point out that

a
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette.

since New Jersey and Eleuthera
have many similarities, she felt
comfortable sharing her expe-
riences.

Both places have a 110-mile
Atlantic coastline, both heavily
depend on tourism, and both
places are centres of innova-
tion. Mr Symonette challenged
conference participants to be
proactive in solving problems
of sustainability in the
Bahamas.

“The government is chal-
lenged in producing a lot of the
answers you want,” he said.

“So sometimes it is helpful
for you to come to the govern-
ment with the solution to the
problem, not ask the govern-
ment to develop the solution.”

During the afternoon panel
discussion, participants exam-
ined CEI’s Charter for Sus-
tainable Development of the
Bahamas and made suggestions
on how these principles could
best be put into action.

Panellists included Shaun
Ingraham, Eleuthera commu-
nity member; Joy Jibrilu, direc-
tor of Investments for the
Bahamas Investment Authori-
ty; Mike Hartman, an eco-
developer in the Bahamas and
Costa Rica; Eric Carey, execu-
tive director of Bahamas
National Trust, and Michael
Northrop, Sustainable Devel-
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CEI will continue to solicit
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lee dele

‘The rewards of
early
commitment to
sustainability are
not perhaps as
tangible today as
we would like
them to be, and
they’re hard to

= , prove.’
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Christine Todd-Whitman

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Fri. February 26th - Sat. February 27th 10:00am - 4pm

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Tel: 393-5964





KINGSWAY ACADEMY
SCHOLARSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT

Kingsway Academy, a leading Bahamian (K-12) school with a
reputation for excellence in academics, athletics and the arts;
a commitment to Christian values; and a strong tradition of
public service, is inviting applicants for 2 (two) prestigious
3-year scholarships for students entering Grade 10 in
September 2010.

(A) The Grace Tatham Kemp Scholarship

Named in honour of Kingsway’s founder,
Mrs. Grace Tatham Kemp. This scholarship is for a well-rounded
student with proven, strong academic performance.

(B) The Ned Wallace Sports Scholarship

Named in honour of one of Kingsway’s earliest building
contractors and a former member of the Board, Mr. Ned Wallace.
This scholarship is for a well-rounded student with proven,
strong academic and sports performance.

Interested students should submit the following application
package:
¢ Completed Kingsway High School Application Form
(available at the Kingsway High School Office or may be
e-mailed upon request).
Recommendation letter from your school’s Principal.
Recommendation letter from your school’s Coach if applying
for the sports scholarship.
Personal statement sharing your school, church and
community involvement, as well as your plans for the future.
Transcript of your last 3 (three) academic years
(Grades 7, 8 and 9 to date). Transcripts will only be
considered valid if they are submitted in your school’s
sealed envelop with your school’s stamp or seal.

Note: Short-listed candidates will be invited to sit the
scholarship examination and appear at an interview.

Deadline: Complete application package should be
submitted by 4:00 p.m. at the High School Office no later
than Monday, March 1, 2010

“Enter to be Trained in the King’s Way.
Exit to be the Difference.”



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Grand Bahama pre-clearance

GB International
Airport promotes
new pre-clearance
for private aircraft

AVIATORS from all over
Florida learned more about the
new pre-clearance for private
aircraft feature at Grand
Bahama International Airport
during the recent Banyan Trade
Show in Florida.

More than 250 participants
attended, including private
pilots, FBO owners, Flying Ser-
vices, Pilot Publishers and offi-
cials from Grand Bahama Air-
port Company and the
Bahamas Tourist Office.

Gary Gilbert, Hutchison
Port Holdings chief executive
said: “Freeport, Grand Bahama
is an idyllic location for the new
pre-clearance facility for gen-
eral aviation and our atten-

BANYAN TRADE SHOW

dance at the Banyan Trade
Show provided us an opportu-
nity to alert all pilots and own-
ers of private aircraft of the
advantages for them to pre-
clear in Grand Bahama before
flying on to their ultimate US
destinations.”

Indicators suggest that own-
ers and lessees of private air-
craft in the US have a prefer-



ence for closer destinations and
airports.

The Bahamas is one of only
five destinations in the world
with US pre-clearance facilities
for commercial passengers.

The US and the Bahamas
Pre-clearance Agreement Act
is being amended to include the
pre-clearance of private aircraft.

Adjudicators named for E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival

By ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information
Services

THE Department of Culture in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture recently identified
the adjudicators for the 2010 E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival, which opens March 1.

Choral and instrumental music adjudicator is
Audrey Dean-Wright. She is a composer, singer,
choral conductor, lecturer and poet.

Mrs Dean-Wright was born in Nassau and her
educational background is extensive.

It includes being educated at the Bahamas
Academy of Seventh-Day Adventists and the
Jamaica School of Music in Kingston, Jamaica.

She was the recipient of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment Scholarship to the Manhattan School
of Music in New York where she earned a BA
Music degree — Voice and Masters of Music
degree in Music Education and Clarinet.

She also received the College of the Bahamas
In-Service Award to the Manhattan School of
Music.

Mrs Dean-Wright had early piano studies with
Muriel Mallory, in-depth study of music and
piano skills with her mentor Mr Bethel and also
studied piano with Meta Davis-Cumberbatch.

Dance adjudicator is Lawrence Carroll. He
began his dance training with the New Breed
Dancers in Nassau. Later, he travelled to Toron-
to, Canada, to advance his studies at Ryerson
University, where he studied theatre arts and
was graduated with honours.

At the Canadian College of Dance, he also
studied classical ballet with the Royal Academy

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of Dance and modern dance and national dance
with the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing.

After graduating from Ryerson University, he
began teaching at the National Dance School
and later went to A F Adderley, C C Sweeting
and D W Davis schools, among others.

Drama adjudicator is James Catalyn. He stud-
ied drama at De’ Paul University in Chicago,
Illinois.

Mr Catalyn has brought Bahamian culture to
the forefront by his prolific writing. His works
have been performed on stage, radio and
throughout the islands of the Bahamas.

He and his troupe represented the Bahamas
internationally in New Zealand, Trinidad, Bermu-
da and at the United Nations in New York City.

His insistence that Bahamians speak “Bahami-
anese” has made many more aware of the beau-
ty and uniqueness of the Bahamian dialect.

Arts and crafts adjudicator is Heino Schmid.
He has a Bahamian mother and a German father.
He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photog-
raphy at the Savannah College of Art Design
and his Masters in Fine Arts from the Utrecht
Graduate School of Visual Art and Design in
Utrecht, the Netherlands.

He has participated in numerous group shows
in the Bahamas, the United States, the United
Kingdom and Europe. Among them were
‘Work!’ in 2007 at the Popopstudios Gallery,
Nassau; ‘Funky Nassau: Recovering An Identity’
in 2006 at the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, and at the Nassauischer Kunstverein in
Wiesbaden, Germany; and ‘Dare 1’ in 2006, at the
Universities Museum in Utrecht, the Nether-
lands.

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THE TRIBUNE



6

LOCAL NEWS

(EW

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 9



Haiti jucige:
No release of US
Baptists this week

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

A HAITIAN judge says
American missionaries Lau-
ra Silsby and Charisa Coulter :
will remain in jail over the }
weekend as he awaits more }
testimony, according to Asso- }
ciated Press. :

Judge Bernard Saint-Vil :
says he has asked two real }
estate agents and a pastor }
from the Dominican Republic }
to testify in Port-au-Prince }
about property the mission- }
aries rented to set up ani
orphanage. ;

That is expected Monday. }
If they do not show, Saint-Vil }
says he still expects to rule }
next week. He also said }
Thursday he wants to ques- }
tion a pastor and another man }
from a border town. :

Silsby and Coulter were }
among 10 Americans detained }
in Haiti while trying to take }
33 kids to the Dominican }
Republic after the Jan. 12 }
earthquake. :

The others have been }

‘Cans for Kids’ project

THE Deep Creek Middle
School (DCMS) and the
Island School in Eleuthera
continue to take the lead
when it comes to teaching
Bahamian children the
importance of recycling.

And last week the DCMS
received its first cheque as
part of the ‘Cans for Kids’
project, an organisation
which raises money for
Bahamian schools and chil-
dren’s programmes through
aluminum can recycling.

Family Islands set up
depots to collect cans from
schools and the community.
The cans were then bagged
to be sent to Nassau.

In Nassau, the cans are
crushed, rebagged and sent
to the US for recycling.

The goal of the programme

is to foster the idea of recy-
cling in Bahamian youth so
that the practice becomes
habitual and can take root in
the Bahamas.

From October through
December of 2009, DCMS
and the Island School col-
lected more than 150 Ibs of
aluminum cans.

On February 17, Sam Ken-
worthy, waste management
coordinator at Cape
Eleuthera Institute, present-
ed a $45 cheque to Hershal
Knowles, president of the
DCMS eco club and Dr
Joanna Paul, principal of
DCMS.

Mr Knowles and the eco
club have been working to
educate

their fellow students and
neighbours about the impor-

tance or recycling.

The can collecting project
is part of DCMS’s larger
effort to become the first
green flag eco-certified
school in the Caribbean
through Foundation for
Environmental Education.

"Aluminum cans are the
easiest waste stream to recy-
cle,” said Mr Kenworthy.

“Although Eleuthera has
no existing recycling infra-
structure, ‘Cans for Kids’ has
made getting rid of our cans
extremely easy; anyone can
get involved. Being responsi-
ble for one's waste is a lesson
that is not only important for
young people to learn, but
society as a whole. By estab-
lishing a simple, foolproof
method to responsibly get rid
of cans, we help ourselves,

helps Bahamian schools

We J) Cy aT

a s
04) il (CONS:

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT

RECYCLING ALUMINUM CANS:

- Every minute of every day 113,204 cans are recycled.

- Making new aluminum cans from used cans costs 95
per cent less energy than creating a new can from virgin
material.

- Twenty recycled cans can be made with the energy
required to make one can from virgin material

- Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to
burn one 100 watt bulb for nearly four hours.

- It takes between 200 and 500 years for an aluminum
can to decompose.

released and returned home. thé

environment, and raise
money for local schools at
the same time,” he said.



ot ANDRE},
~ SCHOOL

QW
(wor school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates
for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.
Full information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

Shoes . Handbags . Accessorles

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Friday & Saturday
Shoes Starting at $10
20% Off Accessories

T: 242-322-2362 -Mt. Royal Avenue, opposite Gatezay Chapel] - Nassau Bahamas

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of
the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in
the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and preferably
trained in, the PYP.

Primary School Spanish: Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide
team.

Primary School Music: Candidates must be fully qualified and have
successful teaching experience at all Years from Pre Reception to Year 6.
They must also have successful experience in organizing primary school
music and drama performances.

Primary School Library Media Specialist: The primary school library
media specialist develops, implements and interprets an effective library
media and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6.
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful experience as
a school librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT
teacher.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

Letter of application

A personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
A full curriculum vitae,

Either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 12 March 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered

You
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PRICES NOT
DVN i ML







PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

6

THE TRIBUNE


























































FROZEN RAW DOUGH
JAMAICAN PATTIES

Tel: 393-6222/454-3518
Soldier Road North, immediately
South of Lowes Pharmacy &
Eye World.

. Buy frozen raw dough patties
by the dozen - cheaper

_ Store in freezer - not in cooler

. Bake as needed in your own
traditional oven (not microwave)
at 350° for 45 minutes

4. At end of bake cycle patties should
be firm/hard (if soft - not done)
do not burn

Enjoy your flaky, juicy, tasty,
Jamaican patties

. Readily available: beef, chicken,
veggie codfish, conch, crab,
grouper, shrimp, ackee codfish,
calaloo codfish, lobster (market);
mix allowed.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PIVOTE POINTE ASSETS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OTHELLO GAMET
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INBOUNDS PLAY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

LOCAL NEWS

a 205.5
Bahamas Kennel Club All-Breed Dog Show set for March

DOG lovers are invited to
come out and support the
Bahamas Kennel Club’s annual
All-Breed Dog Show next
month.

The show, which will take
place on the weekend of March
20-21 at the Nassau Botanical
Gardens, will feature dogs in the
working, sporting, non-sporting,
terrier, toy and herding groups.

Dogs from the United States,
Canada and the Bahamas will
be competing for “Best in Breed’
and ‘Best in Show’.

The show is sponsored by
Purina Dog Food.

¢ SPORTING CLASS

Dogs in the sporting class are
naturally active and alert. Sport-
ing dogs make likable, well-
rounded companions.

Members of the group include
Pointers, Retrievers, Setters and
Spaniels. Remarkable for their
instincts in water and woods,
many of these breeds actively
continue to participate in hunting
and other field activities.

Potential owners of sporting
dogs need to realise that most
require regular, invigorating
exercise.

¢ HOUNDS

Most hounds share the com-
mon ancestral trait of being used
for hunting.

Some use acute scenting pow-
ers to follow a trail. Others
demonstrate a phenomenal gift
of stamina as they relentlessly
run down quarry. Beyond this,
however, generalisations about
hounds are hard to come by,
since the group encompasses
quite a diverse lot.

There are Pharaoh Hounds,
Norwegian Elkhounds, Afghans
and Beagles, among others.

Some hounds share the distinct
ability to produce a unique
sound known as baying. You'd
best sample this sound before
you decide to get a hound of
your own to be sure it's your cup
of tea.

¢ WORKING CLASS

Dogs of the working group
were bred to perform such jobs
as guarding property, pulling
sleds and performing water res-
cues.

They have been invaluable
assets to man throughout the
ages. The Doberman Pinscher,
Siberian Husky and Great Dane
are included in this group, to
name just a few.

Quick to learn, these intelli-
gent, capable animals make sol-
id companions. Their consider-
able dimensions and strength
alone, however, make many
working dogs unsuitable as pets
for average families. And again,
by virtue of their size alone, these
dogs must be properly trained

¢ TERRIERS

Terriers are feisty, energetic
dogs whose sizes range from fair-
ly small, as in the Norfolk, Cairn
or West Highland White Terrier,
to the grand Airedale Terrier.
Terriers typically have little tol-
erance for other animals, includ-
ing other dogs. Their ancestors
were bred to hunt and kill ver-
min. Many continue to project
the attitude that they're always
eager for a spirited argument.
Most terriers have wiry coats that
require special grooming known
as stripping in order to maintain
a characteristic appearance.

In general, they make engag-
ing pets, but require owners with
the determination to match their
dogs’ lively characters.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRADIENT GOLD
INVESTMENTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALANCHINE INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CROSSOVER MOVE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

¢ TOY BREEDS

The diminutive size and win-
some expressions of toy dogs
illustrate the main function of
this group — to embody sheer
delight.

Don't let their tiny stature
fool you, though — many toys
are tough as nails. If you haven't
yet experienced the barking of
an angry Chihuahua, for exam-
ple, well, just wait.

Toy dogs will always be popu-
lar with city dwellers and peo-
ple without much living space.
They make ideal apartment dogs
and terrific lap warmers on nippy
nights.

¢ NON-SPORTING CLASS

Non-sporting dogs are a
diverse group. Here are sturdy
animals with as different per-
sonalities and appearances as the
Chow Chow, Dalmatian, French
Bulldog, and Keeshond. Talk
about differences in size, coat,
and visage!

Some, like the Schipperke
and Tibetan Spaniel are uncom-
mon sights in the average neigh-
bourhood.

Others, however, like the Poo-



dle and Lhasa Apso, have quite a
large following. The breeds in
the non-sporting group are a var-
ied collection in terms of size,
coat, personality and overall
appearance.

¢ THE HERDING GROUP

Created in 1983, the herding
group is the newest AKC classi-
fication; its members were for-
merly members of the working
group.

All breeds share the fabulous
ability to control the movement
of other animals.

A remarkable example is the
low-set Corgi, perhaps one foot
tall at the shoulders, that can dri-
ve a herd of cows many times its
size to pasture by leaping and
nipping at their heels.

The vast majority of herding
dogs, as household pets, never
cross paths with a farm animal.

Nevertheless, pure instinct
prompts many of these dogs to
gently herd their owners, espe-
cially the children of the family.
In general, these intelligent dogs
make excellent companions and
respond beautifully to training
exercises.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEARBLUE SEAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOP INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JACQUES ACME LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

_

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man fount
shot deat

FROM page one

received information about }
two suspicious vehicles in }

the Holiday Drive area.

According to Superin- }
tendent Rodney McKenzie, ;
the suspects left in a dark :
coloured Kia Sportage with }
bondo markings on the dri- }

ver’s door.

Bowleg was found wear-
ing blue jeans and a long }
sleeved navy blue shirt. The ;

legs were taped down.

“We are classifying itasa }

homicide,” Mr Mckenzie :

said.

Talk show host
apologetic over
on-air firearm

remarks
FROM page one

the proliferation of
weapons in today’s society,
the radioshow host had
reportedly offered on his
programme to be able to
sell one of his callers a
semi-automatic weapon if
they came up with as little
as $500.

Taking full responsibili-
ty for his remarks, Mr
Bodie assured his listeners
that he was handled pro-
fessionally by the police
and commended these offi-
cers openly for doing a
“magnificent” job.

Mr Bodie could not be
contacted for comment
yesterday.

Police shoot burglar dead

FROM page one

out to confront the villains found
one of the men was armed with a
screwdriver and a knife. He report-
edly threatened officers with his
weapons before bolting behind a
home that backs onto the adjacent
Sherwood Drive

Police opened fire, fatally
wounding the man in the mid-sec-
tion of his body. His accomplice
got away.

The dead man’s identity has not
been released, but The Tribune
understands he was repeat offend-
er Hubert Hall, 50, of Armbrister
Street, in Fox Hill, also known as
“Zip”.

Sources say Hall had recently
been released from HM Prison in
Fox Hill where he had been held
on a theft conviction, and that he
had been in and out of prison for
many years.

It is also claimed Hall was a
father of two, and had left his chil-
dren at home alone while he went
out to steal early yesterday morn-
ing.

A long-time resident of Sans
Souci Road praised the swift and
uncompromising response by
police yesterday morning.

He said: “I think things are out of
hand and police should do what-
ever they can to improve the situa-
tion. If it means shooting these
guys then definitely I would sup-
port it.”

The annual homicide count stood
at 14 last night, accounting for
nearly two killings a week in 2010,
and this follows a record-breaking
homicide count of 87 last year.

A home invasion and homicide
at a home in Oleander Drive,

Pai be



POLICE OFFICERS at the scene in Tower Heights Drive, off Sans Souci Road.

South Beach estates, on Monday
morning rocked the community
earlier this week, and an armed
robbery at a home in Gladstone
Road leading to the kidnapping of
two women further heightened fear
of crime for New Providence resi-
dents.

“There are horrible things hap-
pening and we need to protect our
families,” the Sans Souci man said.
“Tam glad to see the police are
becoming more aggressive.

“Tf that is really what it’s going to
take to stop people from going into
people’s homes, then I am glad.

Legal Notice

“JT have seen crime rise over the
years and it just keeps accelerat-
ing.

“T believe in getting serious
about this and I will reiterate to
say I am glad to see this action
being taken.”

Police are still looking for the
second man they attempted to
apprehend in Tower Heights Road
yesterday morning.

Anyone with any information on
his whereabouts should call police
as a matter of urgency on 911, 919
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

LICE

Neary



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DROMSTARNESS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEXT GENERATION INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOMARIK PITITANE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NOTICE
LUGANO VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILFORD CLOSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAYLILLIES CORPORTION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
LES PACCOTS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARA VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASELLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

S





By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER day one of the 17th
Annual GSSSA Senior High
School Track and Field Cham-
pionships, a familiar name sits
atop the leaderboard after a
productive day on the track.

The defending champion
C.R Walker Knights, in search
of their 11th title in school his-
tory, heads the field of eight
schools with 272.5 points, near-
ly 90 points ahead of their clos-
est competitors.

The R.M Bailey Pacers, the
last school to unseat the
Knights when they won back
to back titles in 2003 and 2004,
are in second position with 187
points.

The C.V Bethel Stingrays
remain in contention in third
place with 182.50 points, the C.I
Gibson Rattlers are currently
fourth with 150 points while the
C.C Sweeting Cobras round out
the top five with 130.5 points.

The remainder of the field
includes the Anatol Rodgers
Timberwolves (127), the Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins (111)
and the Government High
School Magic (91.5).

The Knights usual cast of
characters continued to domi-
nate their respective events to
lead the charge on day one.

Marva Etienne retained her
title in the Intermediate girls’
100m in a time of 12.44s.

Khadijah Andrews of Doris
Johnson was second in 13.17s,
and the Rattlers’ Lakeisha
Rolle was third in 13.23s.



PAGE 13

or



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26,



ts

2010



INSIDE ¢ Haiti Judo Benefit Tourney

Knights lead
ESAT]
SYR TTI
TR

With Katrina Seymour head-
ed to the BAISS, Etienne
became a sprint double cham-
pion, when she added the 400m
title to her resume.

She finished the quartermile
in 1:02.58s, while teammate
Ashley Stubbs was second in
1:06.21.

The Knights’ Shafara Lewis
continued the Intermediate
Girls’ dominance with a first
place finishes in the Interme-
diate girls 1500m in a time of
5:50.11s well ahead of team-
mate Nevelicia Martin who fin-
ished in 6:02.60s.

O'Jay Ferguson moved up to
the Senior Boys division but
retained his stranglehold on the
400m with a winning time of
50.38s.

Leeward Swann of R.M Bai-
ley was second in 52.84s and
the Knights’ Leon Cartwright
was third in 53.03s.

Other top finishers on the
day included Raygene Minus
of the C.V Bethel Stingrays
who won the Intermediate Girls
High Jump and 100m Hurdles.

Of the trio of competitors in
the High Jump Minus cleared
1.42 first to win the event and
won the hurdles in 17.32s.

2009 Carifta medallist in the
Under 17 Boys High Jump,
Ryan Ingraham of the C.I Gib-
son Rattlers, finished first in the
Senior Boys High Jump with a
leap of 1.94m, however fell
short of the Carifta qualifying
mark of 2.05m.

The meet continues tomor-
row highlighted by a myriad of
field events, the 200m, 800m
and the 4x400m relay.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MARVA ETIENNE of the C.R Walker powers her way toward the finish of the Intermediate Girls 100m. Etienne won the event in 12.44s, claim-
ing back to back titles in the division.

‘Big O’s’ battle with cancer

ANY alert track and field
fan would remember person-
al trainer Wendall ‘Big O’
Ferguson.

For years, he assisted the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO) at
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations
(BAAA) track and field
meets at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Today, Ferguson has fall-
en ill and he needs the assis-
tance of those whom he
helped to assist with his med-
ical expenses.

While he has been diag-
nosed with cancer, a group of
his friends have gotten
together to stage a Walk-A-
Thon in the “fight Against
Cancer.”

The event is scheduled for
Saturday, March 27th start-
ing at 6 a.m. from Goodman’s
Bay and will end at the
Cave’s.

The registration fee is $15.00
and can be picked up from the
BodyZone Fitness in the Sea-
grapes Shopping Centre, the
Mystical Gym on Madeira
Street, Better Bodies on
Shirley Street and Jemi Health
Wellness in the Caves Village.

This will also be a good
time for both the BAAA and
BACO to join forces and
encourage its members who
would have benefited from
Ferguson’s contribution to
come out and participate.

As a former athlete, I can
clearly remember running on
the track when Ferguson
would encourage you to “lift
up knees, stretch out your
legs.”

And once you would have
completed your race, before

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

“STUBBS



OPINION

you crumble on the track
from fatigue and exhaustion,
he would be right there to
advice you to “get up and
walk it out.”

Ferguson, with his robust
body, was an intimidating fac-
tor and so it was really hard
to avoid not following the
instructions as he issued
them.

His loud and brassy voice
would echo as you walked
away.

It only seemed as if it was
yesterday that Ferguson, who
has also assisted countless
Bahamians in their physical

fitness at the various gyms,
was walking around and
encouraging us to life a
healthy lifestyle.

Now he’s on the other side
of the spectrum as he seek
our assistance with his med-
ical expenses.

Let’s rally around and lend
our support to a great
Bahamian sporting advocate.

HUGH CAPMBELL
CHAMPS HONOURED

MEMBERS of Parliament
took time out from their nor-
mal duties when the House
of Assembly resumed on
Wednesday to congratulate
coach Norris Bain and his
Tabernacle Baptist Academy
Falcons for repeating as
champions of the prestigious
Hugh Campbell Basketball
Classic.

Coming in as the top
ranked team, as noted in the
poll produced by Ozzie Sim-
mons, the Falcons lived up to
the advanced billing as the
Grand Bahama basketball
champions held off the sec-
ond ranked Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation champions CC Sweet-
ing Cobras by one point in
overtime.

While they repeated as
champions, the Falcons
became the first school to
have won the title six times.
And Bain was right there in
the historic performance as
the winningest coach in the
history of the senior boys bas-
ketball tournament for
schools throughout the
Bahamas.

Bain and the Falcons first
emerged from the week-long
round robin tournament as
the victor in 1995. They

repeated in 1996 before they
lost out to the CR Walker
Knights, coached by then win-
ningest coach Jimmy Clarke.

But the Falcons bounced
back to reclaim the crown in
1998. They lost again to arch-
rivals Catholic High Cru-
saders in 1999 before they
clinched it again to start the
decade in 2000.

After watching the CI Gib-
son Rattlers, coached by
Kevin Johnson, reign

supreme for two consecutive
years in 2005 and 2006, Bain
and his Falcons took the title
back to Grand Bahama on
Tuesday with another two-
peat feat.

This year’s performance
was especially sweet for the
Falcons as they played in
honor of their fallen team-
mate Shaquille Hinds, who
recently collapsed and died
during a training session in
Grand Bahama.

Tabernacle Baptist Acad-
emy should be commended
for a job well done. They held
off a stubborn CC Sweeting
and coach Mario Bowleg,
who rebounded from a 17-
point deficit in the second

half of regulation and then
12 in the extra five minutes.

Had it not been for the last
of three free throws missed
by Gabbi Laurent in the final
1.5 seconds, the fans who had
earlier started to trickle out of
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, could have possibly end
up watching a double over-
time thriller.

Instead, the Falcons cele-
brated as the two-peat cham-
pions.

Congratulations Bain and
most valuable player (MVP)
Garth Brown, who carried
the team down the stretch
when two of the Falcons’ key
players fouled out of the
game in regulation.

March 6th, 2010
You can Bike/Run
or Walk/Push

Start/End at Goodman's Bay
Registration 6:30am
Sign up as an Individual Entry
OR as a 2-Person Team for the
14 mile Bike / 6.6 Mile Run

Medals tof OR Just participate in the

Winners!

6.6 Mile Walk/Push!
Enter a team from your

Business, Club or School

Entry Deadline

March 2nd, 2010

To enter call

394-3192 or 457-1414
Download the entry form .pdf

WM rotarynassau.com



| All proceeds to

Rotary Club of Nassau Charities





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Water pines failure at Bett
Kelly Kenning Swim Complex

THE MINISTRY of
Youth, Sports and Culture
confirmed today that a struc-
tural failure occurred in the
heating unit water pipes at
the Betty Kelly Kenning
National Swim Complex, in
the early morning hours of
Sunday, February 21, 2010,
at approximately 2am.This
caused damage to the opera-
tional machinery in the base-
ment of the facility.

A preliminary analysis
revealed that the piping con-





Burrows, Sands
compete in
Laser Midwinter
Kast regatta

z

vee

Flooding from pipes caused

water pump engines to explode

nected to one of the heating
units gave way to water pres-
sure, causing flooding. The
water level rose rapidly,
making contact with the
pipes and engines that drive
the computerised systems.
This contact apparently
caused an explosion that
resulted in smoke to

emanate from the facility.
The on-duty security offi-
cers quickly alerted the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force fire
branch and the police offi-
cers arrived speedily and
investigated the matter, leav-
ing the property only after
they were assured that every-
thing was under control.

Olympics.

ABOVE: Chris Sands (r) jockeys for position at the
start of the laser radials. Next to Sands is eventual
winner, Paige Railey, a US contender for the 2012

Analysis of the entire situ-
ation is on going and the rel-
evant Government agencies
are working on the matter.

The Ministry is cognizant
of the importance of the Bet-
ty Kelly Kenning National
Swim Complex to the aquat-
ics community and the youth
of The Bahamas.

This Ministry also wishes
to assure the public that
every effort is being made to
rectify the situation in the
shortest possible time.

LEFT: Chris Sands (I) and B.J. Burrows (r) of Nas-
sau are shown with Laser Radial Champion, Paige
Railey (‘06 Women's Rolex Sailor of the year)

after competing in the 4-day Laser Midwinter East



BAHAMIAN sailors BJ Burrows
and Chris Sands competed in last
week's 4 day Laser Midwinter East
regatta in Clearwater, Florida. More
than 198 sailors from 30 different coun-
tries sailed in 3 different laser cate-
gories: full rig, laser radial and 4.7's.

With various weather conditions and
chilly water temperatures of 58
degrees, Burrows and Sands were able
to gain valuable experience from sail-
ing with more experienced world class
sailors. Olympic gold medallist Paul

NOTICE

Championships in Clearwater, Florida.

Goodison from Great Britain sailed
in the full rigs, and 2006 US Sailing
Champion and '06 World Rolex sailor,
Paige Railey, competed against Sands
and Burrows in the laser radials.

Railey, of Clearwater, went on to
win the competition by outsailing 93
other competitors. Sands had a num-
ber of very strong races and came
in 33rd in the gold fleet. Burrows,
who has only been in the laser radi-
als for a few months, came in 43rd in
the silver fleet.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

World Harmony Torch
Run presents torch
to Governor General

UNDER the Distinguished Patronage of Governor General
Arthur D Hanna, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
presented the World Harmony Torch Run (WHTR) Com-
mittee and Paintings by Founder of the run, Sri Chinmoy
at Government House, Wednesday, February 17, 2010.
Pictured is the WHTR Executive Director, Salil Wilson
(left) presenting the Harmony torch to the Governor Gen-
eral.

tell alee ual a :
LU RCN ee CHM OCHO ay GSO
entering the Ballroom with the Harmony torch.

Raymond A Bethel/BIS photo

CORRIDOR 10
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSIONS
BLUE HILL ROAD

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A would like to inform the motoring public

thal a secton of Ble Hill Road wall be temporarily closed for approximately two days (2) days during: the nights
commencing Thursday February 25th to Friday February 26th between the hours of 8pm to Jam, and on
Saturday February 27, 2010 between the hours of ipo to 9pm.

During construction we kindly advise all motorist travelling along south of Blue Hill Road to obey flagman and
follow all Signs nosied “DIVERSION”

Phasxe 3 = Thurday & Friday Nights

*“Nlotorist travelling south on Blue Hill Road are advised to make a left on Soldier Road then a right
onto Clamshell Road to continue south as an alternative route.

*Motorist travelling north on Bloc Hill Road are advised te make a right onto Malcolm Rood then

wlett onto Clamshell Road to continue north as an alternative route,

Phase 4» Sotnrday Aferncoan

"A temporary one lane traffic system will be in place; please follow the traffic management in place.
Pay special attention te the "Flagman" in place.
Proper signage wall be erected delineating the work zone, Detours will be clearly marked to allow the safe
passage for pedestrians & vehicles. Access to the sub-divisons of these Closed Roads will be granted.
Towr patience thronghon this project & greatly appreciated. We apologize for the inconvenience

& delays comsed.

doce Contellose Construcciones Ciles 5.4
Office Aaure: AMfon-!n 6200 ant be ai pen

Office 2e7 372-84 Lf I22-2610
Emil: bahamanacghtarghos

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

orn. com. or

Phase 4

(SOL0IR ROAD
a

a.



("s
ANP

ar

J J

B O4

The Project Exccunon Linit

Ministry of Works & Tronpart

Motiing: (242) 302-9707

=
5

CYNTHIA RAHMING, at ei

Haiti judo benefit tourney
Set for Saturday

THE BAHAMAS Judo Federation will be hosting a tour-
nament for the benefit of rebuilding the Haitian Judo train-
ing Center which was destroyed during the earthquake. This
tournament will be held on Saturday February 27 between
Spm to 8pm at Xavier's Lower Hall, Xavier’s School West
Bay Street. Teams from the College of the Bahamas, Abaco
and various New Providence schools are expected to attend
the tournament.

There are several tournaments scheduled during the year
to prepare Bahamian athletes for success in the internation-
al arena. For example, athlete Cynthia Rahming continued to
distinguish herself on the weekend at the Cherry Blossom
Tournament in Florida. She took a second place in the 63 Kg
and 3rd in the 52 kg.

Donations will be taken at the door and spectator fees are
$10. Anyone requesting further information can call the
Bahamas Judo Federation at 364-6773.







an (en)
Na DY, Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



Tourist in
Harbour Island
cutlass attack

FROM page one

treatment of his wounds.

Reports from the island indicate that the victim may have come
into contact with his attackers earlier in the night.

Two men are reportedly in custody in connection with the inci-
dent.

According to a source on the island, the victim has been visiting
Harbour Island for more than a decade but now has no plans to
return to the idyllic community.

"He is a regular visitor. He has been coming here for 15 years,
but he said he will not come back again," said the source.

Yesterday a few residents told The Tribune that while winter res-
idents have been recently targeted by burglars, yesterday's violent
incident is not commonplace. They are concerned that the news —
which had spread like wildfire throughout the tiny community —
will have repercussions on the island's main industry, tourism.

"Tourism is our bread and butter, that's 90 per cent of our
income, it's everyone's business. It's sad to see what is happening
here on this small island that is so rich in history,” said one local
businessman, who asked to remain anonymous. "It will affect our
economy, and with no work, no jobs, we will go lifeless."

A Harbour Island second home owner, who rents to tourists, is
worried that the incident will damage the area's reputation once the
news spreads on the internet.

"Obviously this kind of publicity does no good for Harbour
Island," said the homeowner.

A businessman claimed the homes of several winter residents
have been broken into lately, however this has not been con-
firmed by police.

He and another resident said Harbour Island needs more police
presence to tackle a growing crime problem.

"We want to see the police officers step up and do their job. Har-
bour Island puts a lot of money in the government's revenue and
we are getting no results,” said the businessman.

"Recently the crime, burglary rate has increased," said a woman
resident. "The police here are overworked, we have a sergeant here
who is understaffed."

MP for the area Alvin Smith last night acknowledged the police
manpower and crime problems. He has contacted Commissioner
of Police Ellison Greenslade about the concerns and he has pledged
to look into the matter.

Mexico deputy police
chief slain at son's school

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



He was second-in-command
of the city police force.

MEXICAN authorities said
Thursday that gunmen killed a
deputy police chief outside an
elementary school as his wife,
son and other students and par-
ents looked on, according to
Associated Press.

Eduardo Ezparza, the
spokesman for prosecutors in
northern Chihuahua state, said
the shooting occurred Wednes-
day in the state capital, also
named Chihuahua.

City police coordinator
Antonio Olague, 39, was drop-
ping his 8-year-old son off at
school when assailants in a car
opened fire.

Olague was hit by eight bul-
lets.

Police had no suspects. Police
spokesman Jesus Reyes said
Olague was on the force for
almost 20 years and received
some training in the United
States.

Chihuahua is the worst-hit
region in Mexico's brutal drug
gang violence.

Elsewhere, police in the bor-
der city of Tijuana arrested four
men Thursday on suspicion
links to a plot to kill the police
chief there, Julian Leyzaola.

Authorities said the four men
were detained with five assault
rifles.

They said tests confirmed
one rifle was the same weapon
used in a shootout in which
gunmen disguised their vehi-
cles as Mexican army units in a
bid to kill Leyzaola, who has
become known for his tough
stance in cracking down on
police corruption and gangs in
Tijuana.

The four are believed to have
worked for Teodoro "El Teo"
Garcia Simental, the Tijuana
drug gang leader captured Jan.
12 in Baja California.

RIDEFOR

Eleuthera, Bahamas

2010

Saturday
March 20

Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
care, treatment, early detection, and
Bahamas-based cancer research.
Here's what participants say:
“Congratulations on organizing such
a truly amazing day. Thank you
so much for the countless hours
you put into organizing an incredible
day for a great cause!! We had
a ball and can’t stop talking about
how well it was done! ... it was
truly an inspiring time, what a
great experience!”

JOIN US!

MORE INFO AND REGISTER
RIDEFORHOPEBAHAMAS.COM

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Is your residential or

cellular bill paid in full?

If your residential or cellular bill is paid in full,
then this one’s for you!
Listen up for our radio remotes, and you can
win a $20, $50 or $100 vouchers
towards any BIC service.

We ve Gat Your Back!

All you have fo do Is show up at our live radio remote
with your current original receipt showing that your bil
has been paid in full and you can be a winner.

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CALL BIC (225-5282)

www.bicbahamas.com
www.facebook.com/myble vour conwecro





&

THE TRIBUNE

&

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15

6



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas Ambassador discusses impact of US Civil Rights Movement

By KHYLE QUINCY PARKER
Press/cultural attaché
Bahamas Embassy

WASHINGTON, DC -
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States C A Smith led
a panel discussion on “The
Global Impact of the US
Civil Rights Movement” at
the University of the District
of Columbia (UDC) on
Wednesday as part of
UDC’s celebration of Black
History Month.

During his opening state-
ment, Ambassador Smith
said the Bahamas’ journey
to internal self-rule was not
undertaken in isolation, but
linked to a larger process of
political modernisation and
change.

“In fact,” he said, “that
change was largely informed
by the responses of Bahami-
ans to the decolonisation
movement in Asia, Africa,
and the Americas and the
related struggle by Black
Americans for civil rights.”

“Most significantly, the
decision by Martin Luther
King Jr to shun violence
found an echo in the
Bahamas. Dr King pro-
pounded a non-violent rev-
olution; in the Bahamas, the
answer was what we call
“the Quiet Revolution.”

Joined on the panel by
Ambassador of St Kitts and
Nevis Izben Williams and
Paul Nehru Tennessee of the
UDC Office of Internation-
al Programmes and
Exchanges, Ambassador
Smith pointed out that the
location of the Bahamas so
near to the US made it
almost natural that “the sea
change taking place just next
door would be studied close-
ly, and would have some
influence.”

Ambassador Smith
stressed, though, that just as
the US Civil Rights move-

Bahamas and the Caribbean,
that movement was itself
heavily influenced by the
Bahamas and the Caribbean.

“As we examine that
unique confluence of time,
place and personalities that
led to Bahamian self-rule
and independence — which
is what we mean when we
say the ‘Quiet Revolution’
—we see clearly the effect of
the US civil rights move-
ment on the Bahamas. And
in fact, the two movements
are indelibly linked,” he
said.

“As Bahamian anthropol-
ogist, writer and College of
the Bahamas professor Dr
Nicolette Bethel points out,
in many cases the Bahamas
has influenced the US move-
ment; African-American
intellectuals like James Wel-
don Johnson and WEB
DuBois have roots in the
Bahamas; a Bahamian min-
ister, Dr J Robert Love,
inspired Marcus Garvey, and
a Bahamian, Joshua Cock-
burn, captained one of Gar-
vey’s Black Star Cruise Line
ships,” Ambassador Smith
said.

During his remarks,
Ambassador Williams of St
Kitts and Nevis expanded on
this point, and said the influ-
ence of the Caribbean on the
US Civil Rights movement
was greater than the influ-
ence of the US movement
on the Caribbean.

In fact, he asserted that
many of the “movers and
shakers” in the US move-
ment had strong ties to the
Caribbean, where he said
there was “an inbred
propensity for resistance,
expressed in various ways”.

Faculty and students of
the University of the District
of Columbia attended the
panel discussion, an institu-
tion where at least 15 per
cent of the students are



\ Ns \ gtd: tt if

BAHAMAS Ambassador to the United States Cornelius A Smith talks with an audience member following his talk on how the US civil rights
movement impacted the Bahamas. The Ambassador from St Kitts and Nevis, Izben Williams, joined Ambassador Smith on the panel.

ment influenced the imternational.

College of the Bahamas
Union of Students hosts
youth leaders conference

THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students
(COBUS) is hosting the 26th annual Conference of
Youth Leaders this week.

Under the theme, “Maximising Your Abilities to
Pursue Purpose: Max it Up,” the event is a conference
for young people across the length and breadth of the
Bahamas to discuss youth issues, share ideas, and rein-
force the principles of leadership development.

The conference, which includes seminars, work shops
and presentations by guest speakers, started yesterday
and will continue until Saturday.

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Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
care, treatment, early detection, and
Bahamas-based cancer research.
Here's what participants say:
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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas close to strengthening
liplomatic ties with Brazil

FROM page one

ment being considered, which
has already been vetted by
the Attorney General’s office.
A cabinet paper still has to
be submitted seeking permis-
sion to sign the agreement.

With the strong backing
of the Ministry of Agricul-
ture, and the process mov-
ing forward with fresh talks,
Ms Lane said within the next
couple of months an agree-
ment is likely, once it
receives Cabinet approval.

A Brazilian delegation
joined Ms Lane on a tour of
the Agribusiness Expo yes-
terday, organised by the
Ministry of Agriculture. The
Expo was a part of the Min-
istry’s broad move to pro-
mote food security in the
country.

Brazilian Ambassador
Tomas Guggenheim said the
technical cooperation agree-
ment was necessary to estab-
lish the legal framework for
cooperation to enable the
Brazilian government to
legally authorise funds.

“Brazil is one of the
largest food exporters glob-
ally. Now that we have this
capacity, we are offering our
support,” said Mr Guggen-
heim, who noted the agree-
ment in question would be
the first of a kind for the two
countries.

The lack of an agreement
is not stopping the progress.
Travelling with the Ambas-
sador was Jose Amauri
Buso, of the state-run
agency, the Brazilian Agri-
cultural Research Corpora-
tion (BARC). He talked
with farmers and vendors at
the Expo, gaining what he
said was vital information
towards better understand-
ing how Brazil could offer
assistance. He will partici-
pate in two-days of meetings
as a member of the Brazil
mission.

Through the state agency,
Brazil has developed
advance research capacity in



av ot

LARRY CARTWRIGHT

a number of areas, and the
ability to diffuse the knowl-
edge among stakeholders in
the agricultural industry.
This is the expertise Brazil
plans to bring to bear in sup-
port of the Bahamian agri-
cultural sector.

More than 30 per cent of
Brazil’s area is agricultural
land. Less than two per cent
of the Bahamas’ land area is
agricultural land. Brazil pro-
duces crops such as coffee,
soybeans, wheat, rice, corn,
sugarcane, cocoa, citrus.

Also invited to participate
in discussions were the Min-
istries of Health, Tourism
and Environment. Of the
invited agencies, only the
Ministry of Agriculture has
identified its specific areas
of interest.

The Bahamas receives
about six offers per year
from countries seeking tech-
nical cooperation agree-
ments, according to Ms
Lane. She said it is not any
and every request the gov-
ernment looks favourably
on, because some countries
make requests considered
unreasonable.

“A lot of countries want
technical agreements but
you have to go through them
with a fine toothcomb to see
what you are gaining, what

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you are giving up and what
you are signing on to,” said
Ms Lane.

She gave an example of an
agreement proposed by
Nigeria to supply nurses and
doctors for work in Bahami-
an hospitals that was reject-
ed. In this example, a request
was made for the Bahamas
to find furnished apartments
for the workers and pay their
rent, in addition to provid-
ing duty free exemption for
up to six-months after entry
to purchases household
appliances.

China and Cuba currently
have standing agreements
with the Bahamas. In addi-
tion to the agreement with
Cuba that facilitated needy
Bahamians receiving
cataract surgery under the
Miracle Eye programme, the
Bahamas has another agree-
ment with Cuba related to
health and education pend-
ing.

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Man is killed
after threatening

officers with knife

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POLICE shot dead a
would-be burglar who
threatened officers with a
knife and screwdriver before
trying to flee.

The gunfire rang out in a
quiet suburban neighbour-
hood when police responded
to reports of attempted
break-ins.

The police had been
called to stop two men seen
walking from house to
house trying to open car
doors and the doors to peo-
ple’s homes in Tower
Heights Drive, off Sans
Souci Road, in east Nassau,
at around 5.20am as resi-
dents slept.

Officers from Elizabeth
Estates Police Station sent

SEE page 12

Shooting leaves man in hospital

A 22-YEAR-OLD Golden Gates man is in hospital in seri-
ous condition following a shooting in Mermaid Boulevard off
Carmichael Road yesterday morning.

Police responded to reports of gunfire at 9.20am and said the
young man had been shot in the abdomen and taken to hospi-

tal in a private vehicle.

He remains in hospital in serious condition while police

investigations continue.

The Criminal Detective Unit is following significant leads into
the shooting and is appealing to the public for any information

that may assist investigations.

Contact police urgently on 911, 919, or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477).



The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010





By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

am
IY

Love
TOKENS FOR

wes

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Tourist in Harbour
Island cutlass attack

A CUTLASS attack on an American tourist has shocked
the tiny community of Harbour Island and led to demands

police in their probe.

SEE page 15

MAN sl DEAD


















PAC

bd a



| | POLICE REMOVE the
body of the man in the
South Beach area

yesterday.



By ALESHA CADET

THE body of a man
riddled with multiple
gunshot wounds was
discovered in the back
seat of a car in the area
of South Beach yester-
day.

The victim has been
identified as David
Bowleg, believed to be
between 25 and 30
years old.

The Tribune under-
stands that Bowleg is
known to the police for
several crime matters.

Officers responded
to the scene at around
lpm, where they found
the dead man in a
champagne-coloured
vehicle on Holiday Dri-
ve in South Beach.
Detectives have

SEE page 12

TALK SHOW host Ortland Bodie Jr was
apologetic on his radio programme yesterday,
stating that he was wrong for offering to sell a
firearm on national radio and that his remarks
were “irresponsible” and should never have
been said.

Having been released from police custody
some hours after being arrested on Wednes-
day, Mr Bodie also lauded the police at the
Central Detective Unit (CDU) for their pro-
fessionalism, maintaining at the same time
that he had no animosity for what had tran-
spired.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff ——— * A













NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

for an increase in police protection.

The incident happened at about 2am yesterday when
two dark-skinned men, both armed with cutlasses, burst
into a hotel room occupied by two American men at Tingum
Village and demanded cash.

One of the victims was slashed on his right arm but his
friend managed to escape unharmed, police said. Three
detectives were dispatched from the capital to assist with the
investigation and up to press time, three men were assisting

A reliable source identified the victim as Eddie Bryant of
Stanford, Connecticut. He was reportedly airlifted to New
Providence yesterday and then to hospital in Florida for



Bahamas close
to strengthening
diplomatic

ties with Brazil

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas is close to
signing a technical co-opera-
tion agreement with Brazil
that would strengthen diplo-
matic ties, according to Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs offi-
cials.

In the first instance, the
agreement will facilitate the
transfer of agriculture exper-
tise, in research, food tech-
nology and biofuel technolo-
gy. These are the areas of
interest identified by the Min-
istry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources, which is
the main Bahamian agency
pushing the negotiations.

“Brazil has comparative
advantage in the agricultural
sector and has a lot to offer
the Bahamas by way of tech-
nology and food production,”
said Ava Lane, senior assis-
tant secretary in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs (MOFA),
and head of the technical
assistance unit.

Nothing has been signed as
yet, but there is a draft agree-

SEE page 16

Talk show host apologetic
over on-air firearm remarks

“T should never have said it,” Mr Bodie told
his listeners yesterday. “You know you cannot
shout fire in a theatre, and if you do, it has to
be investigated.

“T said everybody knows where to find an
illegal gun. But I don’t really know where any
are and I don’t want to know. But the police
had to do their job.”

On Wednesday, Mr Bodie was taken into
police custody shortly after his programme
ended and his home searched. To illustrate

SEE page 12


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Partnership
raises $80,000
for Haiti relief

A JOINT partnership
between Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Limited and
the Western Union Foun-
dation has raised over
$80,000 for disaster relief
in Haiti.

Efforts to raise the
funds began immediately
after a devastating 7.0
earthquake levelled the
Haitian capital Port-au-
Prince and surrounding
regions on January 12,
leaving hundreds of thou-
sands dead and many more
injured.

Staff at Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Ltd in the
Bahamas, Grand Cayman
and the Cayman Islands
were encouraged to donate
to the relief fund and every
dollar they donated was
matched by the bank.

As Fidelity acts as an
agent for Western Union
in the Bahamas, Cayman
and Turks and Caicos,
Western Union then
matched Fidelity’s dona-
tions through the Western
Union Foundation and its
Agent Giving circle pro-
gramme.

The community was
also invited to show their
support for Haiti by mak-
ing donations at the West-
ern Union, MoneyCentre,
Fidelity and Fidelity loca-
tions.

Money raised will be
sent to Mercy Corps, as it
is a sanctioned, registered
charity currently working
to assist victims of the
earthquake and their fami-
lies in Haiti.

Fidelity president Gre-
gory Bethel said: “We are
very proud by the level of
giving from our staff. You
know you have hired the
right people when they are
not only deeply touched by
the situation in Haiti, but
they are willing to partici-
pate and part with their
own money just to make a
difference.”

wi Ws tg

PASTOR Mee Rem Bor rn Belay



Assisting the Haitian
earthquake relief effort

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MORE than a month after a 7.0
magnitude earthquake destroyed
Haiti's capital city Port-au-Prince,
and despite the generous out-
pouring of donations from
Bahamians and the international
community, countless displaced
survivors are still desperate for
food and medical aid.

This, according to local real
estate agent Gavin Christie and
German businessman Peter Reb-
mann who recently returned from
a week-long trip to the devastated
city where they assisted in the
relief effort.

Mr Christie told The Tribune
about what prompted him and his
friends to make such a compas-
sionate gesture.

"A friend of mine (Peter Reb-
mann) had a friend from Haiti
who lost about two thirds of her
family during the earthquake.

“He decided to ship a few
crates of food, clothes and med-
ical aid" to his friend's surviving
family members, said Mr Christie.

After this initial show of good-
will, both men realised they had
the means and connections to
raise a significant amount of mon-
ey to contribute to Haiti.

But they wanted to ensure that
their donations went straight into
the hands of those in need.

Supplies

On February 12, the pair, along
with Miami-based doctor Ali
Shyagan, chartered a private
plane filled with boxes with food,
medical supplies and toys.

They teamed up with a Haitian
charity and spent the week doling
out medical care to survivors and
handing out food and toys to mal-
nourished orphans.

They came face-to-face with a
city, which was already struggling
with widespread poverty before
the January 12 quake, that looked
as if it had been ravaged by war.

Huge piles of rubble still lined
the streets of Port-au-Prince, evi-
dence of the many buildings -
including the presidential palace -
that collapsed during the quake.
Hundreds of thousands of dis-
placed survivors sought shelter in
tent communities on the outskirts
of the city, lacking food, electric-
ity and running water.

"We expected to see suffering,
but I didn't expect it (to be) so
bad," Mr Rebmann told The Tri-
bune.

"You don't expect to see a town
(that looks) completely bombed
out, but not one and half hours
away from Nassau.”

‘a

PETER REBMANN (kneeling), Dr Ali Shyagan (centre) and Gavin Christie (right) care TM ROa Elis Prautenen

One of the most heart-wrench-
ing moments for the pair came
when they visited Sister Veroni-
ca's Orphanage in Port-au-Prince.
The orphanage is home to about
80 undernourished children, run
by 83-year-old Sister Veronica
who could not find the $100 US
she needed every week to sustain
the place.

"When we first went in there

the kids were like zombies but
after we gave them some toys,
candy and food you could see a
change in like 24 hours,” Mr
Christie said.

"She was running the place
herself, there was no food for the
kids, the kids were unhealthy and
I was shocked," Mr Rebmann
added.

"I said how is this possible



when hundreds of millions of dol-
lars (in aid) dropped in Port-au-
Prince?”

The group left behind toys,
food and money for the children
and recruited volunteers in Haiti
to check in on the home periodi-
cally.

They plan to return to Haiti in
several weeks to carry out further
relief efforts.

Minister to address security
issues at CARICOM meeting

CRITICAL security issues
for the Bahamas and the
region will be addressed by
National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest at the
CARICOM Council for
National Security and Law
Enforcement (CONSLE)
meeting in Antigua and Bar-
buda today.

Mr Turnquest and the gov-
ernment department’s per-
manent secretary Missouri
Sherman-Peter left today for
the regional meeting with
expectations of an update on

CARICOM’s military
response to Haiti’s cata-
strophic earthquake of Janu-
ary 12.

They will also have the
opportunity to put forward
recommendations about how
the Caribbean can now assist
the devastated country, and
these will be sent to Heads of
Government for considera-
tion.

Also on the agenda is a
review of preparations for the
Caribbean and United States
High Level Dialogue on

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Local News
Editorial/Letters

P1,2,3,4,5,9,13,14
PO ee-o1 Oli

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

Crime and Security to take
place in Washington, DC, lat-
er this year between partici-
pating CARICOM members,
the Dominican Republic and
the US.

A Caribbean-United States
Declaration on Security
Cooperation and a
Caribbean-US Plan of Action
on Security Cooperation is
expected to be agreed in
Washington, and it is antici-
pated the plan of action will
be funded by the US under
the Caribbean Basin Security
Initiative.

On the second day of the
two-day conference in
Antigua and Barbuda, CON-
SLE will also address the
Strategic Work Plan and Bud-
get of the CARICOM Imple-
mentation Agency for Crime
and Security (IMPACS), as
well as the CARICOM legal
agenda, including the status
of signature and ratification
of the various CARICOM
treaties.

Mr Turnquest said:
“CONSLE has a short and
concise agenda, which per-
mits it to consider and make
decisions on critical nation-
al and regional security
issues, such as the situation
in Haiti.

“The outcome of the CON-

SLE meeting should help to
advance the region’s security
agenda.”

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



0 In br. 7ef INQUEST: Michael Knowles

Man gets one-year
term for weapons
and ammo charges

A 29-year-old Watling’s
Street man was sentenced to a
year in jail yesterday after
pleading guilty to weapons
and ammunitions charges.

Tarino Moss pleaded guilty
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethell to the charges of pos-
session of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

Moss had initially pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
was standing trial.

According to court dockets,
on January 12, Moss was
found in possession of a black
Smith and Wesson .40 pistol
and 11 .40 bullets.

Moss was sentenced to a
year in jail on each count.

The sentences are to run
concurrently.

The magistrate ordered that
the gun and ammunition be
confiscated.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette
was the prosecutor.

Fishing crew
left adrift after
hoat destroyed

THE crew of a fishing ves-
sel was left adrift in the water
after their boat was complete-
ly destroyed when it ran
aground near the entrance to
Nassau Harbour yesterday
morning.

Windy weather and rough
seas slammed the boat onto
rocks east of New Providence
after one of the engines failed
on the 48ft fishing boat Ocean
Mist as it was returning to
Nassau at the end of a fishing
trip.

The wood and fibreglass
vessel was completely
destroyed as it was bashed
against the rocks.

Help

Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF) officers
responding to calls for help
just after 7am found the
boat’s five crew members
clinging to rocks near the
wreckage.

RBDF Lieutenant Carlton
Bethel said: “Because they
lost control of their engines
and the weather that we have
out there is so terrible the
boat just crashed into the
rocks and was completely
destroyed.

“We had people who were
holding onto rocks and some
of them were still in the water.
They were in the water for
less than an hour, but it’s
rough, and even in this cli-
mate hypothermia could set
in.

“It’s not even safe for a
small craft to be out there in
this weather.”

Officers on board HMBS
P-38 took all five crew on
board and landed them at the
Harbour Patrol Unit just
before 8.30am to be examined
by Emergency Medical Ser-
vices.

All but one, who suffered
minor injuries, appeared to be
in good health apart from cuts
and bruising.

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‘My son wanted to §

be a police officer’ ,

Mother of teenager found hanging in police cell testifies

THE mother of a teenager
who was found hanging in a
police station holding cell last
May told the Coroner’s Court
yesterday that her son had aspi-
rations of being a police offi-
cer.

“Michael was a striving
young man. He had to do things
to help himself. I don’t know
what went wrong,” Donna Wil-
son, the mother of 15-year-old
Michael Knowles said yester-
day. On May 31, 2009, Michael
was found hanging in a hold-
ing cell at the East Street South
Police Station.

An emotional Ms Wilson tes-
tified yesterday that around
5.45pm on Tuesday, May 26,
Detective Kelrico Burrows
brought Michael to her New-
bold Street apartment.

She said that Constable Bur-
rows told her that he had found
Michael and another boy wan-

dering in the South Beach area.

Ms Wilson said that she told
the officer that she had not seen
her son for a day and Constable
Burrows in turn scolded
Michael. She also told the court
that she was alarmed when she
saw Constable Burrows spank
Michael with the handle of a
hammer and asked him what
he was doing.

Ms Wilson testified that she
went to the East Street South
Police Station on Thursday,
May 28, after Michael had been
picked up by police a second
time.

She told the court that she
caught the jitney to the police
station, arriving there at 4pm
and waited some three hours
to see Constable Burrows.

She said that around 7pm
that night Constable Burrows
came out and she told him that
she had been waiting for him a

very long time, but he told her
that no one had informed him
that she was there.

Ms Wilson said that at that
time Constable Burrows told
her he was heading out to
investigate a shooting in
Pinewood Gardens. She told
the court that she called the
police station on Saturday and
was informed that her son had
not been granted bail. She also
testified that when she inquired
on Sunday whether she could
bring her son food and a
change of clothes, she was
informed by the station orderly
that Michael would be going to
court that week.

The inquest is being prose-
cuted by attorney Terry
Archer. Attorney Keod Smith
represents the mother of the
deceased. Coroner William
Campbell is presiding over the
inquest.

Agribusiness expo promotes food security



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

IN a bid to spread the mes-
sage of food security, the Min-
istry of Agriculture and Marine j
Resources has launched a series rainy Cartwriont
of 11 agribusiness expos across 11 islands.

With three down, one in progress in Nassau
and seven more to go, the ministry has thrown its
full support behind the initiative. “The theme
chosen for these expos, ‘Progressing Toward
Food Security’, is most befitting as food security
throughout the Bahamas is indeed a concern,”
said Larry Cartwright, Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources.

“Our recent experience in the Bahamas and
throughout the world confirms that the certain
production and supply of food which might have
been taken for granted are no longer as certain as
they once were,” he said.

The ministry plans to approach food security
by encouraging increased local production in the
areas of vegetable, root crops, fruits, poultry,
marine resources or livestock, and by addressing
the issues that impact the industry adversely.

In the making is a five-year development plan

that aims to position agriculture and marine
resources as key pillars of the Bahamian econo-
my. A rapid assessment exercise is currently
underway towards this end. The ministry is also
seeking a technical cooperation agreement with
the Brazilian government to facilitate the trans-
fer of technology and advanced agricultural
research conducted by the Brazilians.

Mr. Cartwright said the challenge to farmers is
to provide commercial produce to the local mar-
ket that meets acceptable standards of quality,
quantity and consistency. This would enable
greater linkages between tourism and the agri-
culture industry, with the supply of native sea-
sonal fruits, vegetables and root crops to guests
staying in local hotels and resorts. Food security
in the Bahamas is not guaranteed because of the
various threats in the market, according to Mr
Cartwright. He said rising fuel prices, rising glob-
al food prices and the global financial meltdown
all affected the industry in recent times. He said
a fundamental reality of climate change is fre-
quent droughts and unpredictable storms.

An expo is currently underway at the Glad-
stone Road Agricultural Centre in New Provi-
dence. The next expo in the series takes place in
Cat Island on March 18. North and Central
Andros will follow closely behind.

Teenager in US custodly over alleged ‘alien smuggling’ =|)

A BAHAMIAN man is fac-
ing federal charges in the Unit-
ed States following an attempt-
ed migrant smuggling venture
that left a Jamaican man dead.

Davon Rolle, 19, was
charged with alien smuggling
when a criminal complaint was
filed on Wednesday. He is cur-
rently in US custody with two
other Bahamians.

Tyrel Levarity, 23, of the
Bahamas, and three other men
were charged with illegally try-
ing to re-enter the US after
deportation, and a 24-year-old
Bahamian man was charged
with violating US Immigration
law.

Authorities say a 28ft Intre-
pid speedboat spotted by a
police helicopter near the Black
Point Marina in Miami was
chased off the South Florida
coast on Tuesday night and
people on the boat jumped
overboard.

The body of an unidentified
Jamaican man was later dis-
covered around 30ft from the

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shore. Prosecutors say a duffel
bag containing 60 Ibs of mari-
juana was also found on the
boat.

US Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement (ICE)
agents took seven men into cus-
tody. Rolle is being held with-
out bail. Levarity is also in cus-
tody with Jamaicans David
Coore, 27, and Delroy Coombs,
45, as well as Mathura Bridge-
lal, 50, of Trinidad, all facing
illegal re-entry charges. The 24-
year-old Bahamian charged
with violating US Immigration
law is being held in Immigra-
tion Customs Enforcement
(ICE), while a seventh man was
released by authorities, accord-
ing to The Miami Herald.

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an
Na LY,

PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(-|"\
Na DY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Prisoners should earn their own keep

IN DEBATING the Planning and Subdi-
visions Bill in the Senate yesterday Mrs
Alyson Maynard Gibson stated the obvi-
ous: There is no point in planning wonder-
ful communities if people will not be safe in
their own homes.

She pointed out five areas, which in her
opinion, had to be dealt with before the pro-
posed Bill would have any meaning.

Of course, crime headed the list. She read
the headlines of the two daily newspapers for
February 23 and 24 — home invasion, mur-
der, robberies and stabbings. Turn to today’s
front page and there’s little else to read but
crime — murder in South Beach, cutlass
attack on a tourist in Harbour Island, shoot-
ing in Carmichael, and thief who tried to
attack the police in San Souci, killed.

She also recommended the obvious: Any-
one who shoots or threatens a policeman, or
attacks or threatens a judge should be tried
immediately. The man who broke into a
policeman’s home recently should also be
tried immediately.

Secondly, accused murderers should not
be let out on bail. Instead they should get an
immediate trial.

It was obvious to the community and dis-
couraging to the police that a person with a
serious criminal record let lose on a com-
munity would create mayhem. Which one of
you would hire a person with a criminal
record — especially one accused of murder
or other acts of violence? The answer is
none of you. Yet, these are human beings
with all the natural urges of hunger, thirst,
the need to support a family and to have a
job to be able to do so. Everyone knows
that a hungry, desperate man will steal —
and, depending on his desperation, will also
kill. The community knows this. But appar-
ently the courts did not.

Today almost every crime we report has
been committed by someone out on bail.
At times the victim, with a long criminal
record, is awaiting trial when he is overtak-
en by another bailed criminal. This one ends
the first man’s life of crime with a bullet —
always with an unlicensed gun, illegally
obtained.

It is not unusual to be told by a resident.
“Oh, I know him, he mother live next door.
He’s a real tief, a menace to us around here,
he always in and out of prison.”

And so as long as these criminals are
always in and out of prison, they will always
be a menace to a community, and extra work
for the police, who are discouraged by hav-
ing to keep hunting them down and return-
ing them to prison — a prison they should






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have never left. So no one should be sur-
prised at what is happening in this commu-
nity today. But how to stop it?

Some cynic commented recently: “Oh,
but they are killing each other!” Yes, they
are killing each other and saving the courts
time, but in the meantime, innocent citizens
are being caught in the cross-fire.

Many years ago an English superinten-
dent headed HM Prison, and an English
superintendent, we believe his name was
Capt. Holland, headed what was then known
as the Boys Industrial School. These two
men made the inmates — the men and the
boys — earn their own keep. The prisoners
grew their own food. We believe that this is
still done on a smaller scale at the prison
today.

With the need to reduce our food
imports, and with all the Crown land that
government has, it would seem reasonable
that a large acreage should be set aside to be
worked by the inmates, especially those on
remand. This farm should be able to sup-
ply the island with its fruits and vegetables,
which could be sold with part proceeds going
to the prisoners to support their families
and the remainder to pay government rent
for their stay at HM prison.

It would be a security risk to turn all the
prisoners — even under armed guard — on
the farm at the same time. They should,
therefore, be taken out in relays.

The late Sir Etienne Dupuch worked with
one of the prison superintendents to get the
prisoners to make toys for his Santa Claus
Committee to distribute to poor children in
the community at Christmas time.

These toys were quite professional —
wheels turned, little horns on trucks honked,
there were wooden animals on wheels at
the end of a string for small children to pull
around behind them. They were all beauti-
fully painted.

The prisoners enjoyed the work. It made
them feel that they were not only a part of
the community, but also making a contri-
bution.

And the Santa Claus committee volun-
teers took great pride in wrapping the pris-
oners’ toys and decking them out with rib-
bons and bows. To the committee women
these were very special gifts that deserved
special treatment.

These social misfits, who got off life’s
train at the wrong stop, need not be a finan-
cial drain on the community if some thought
and planning could go into helping them
earn their keep during their period of reha-
bilitation.







We are being

financially
neglected or
punished.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It is with great remorse
and disdain that I write this
correspondence. Certainly,
I say this because after dis-
creet conversation and close
dialogue with most of my
affected colleagues in the
department, I am of the con-
sensus that we are being
financially neglected or pun-
ished. Is it perhaps, for the
unethical misdeeds of some
in the past in which we all
should presently be held
accountable? Or is it only
for the persuasion of the
hierarchical order who
appear to care not whether
we “sink or swim” in these
economically challenging
times.

Over the last two years or
so, the Government via the
Customs Department, have
been engaged in a tedious
restructuring programme
where it endeavoured to
bring upon a change in the
department in essentially
two ways:

1) The Government has
terminated and also “trans-
ferred/seconded” some of its
less desirable officers (for
lack of a better word) to var-
ious government depart-
ments and early retired most
of the longer serving officers
(40 years or more). This was
done in efforts to promote
younger officers (some with
tertiary level education) who
in my estimation can possi-
bly help to bring about a
new vision and enterprising
ideas, which can perhaps
revamp the functioning of
the Department through
their youthfulness and
acquired technical and voca-

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



tional skills.

2) Over the last three years
the government hired
approximately 300 customs
officers and guards (com-
bined) to help to bring into
fruition the new-imple-
mented shift system into the
department. This new shift
system is design firstly, to
alleviate the government
and the airline/shipping
agencies of the so-called
“absorbidant” overtime
charges that they are
required to pay us for our
extra-working attendance.
Secondly, the hiring of these
new personnel was in my
opinion, tactfully done by
the Government to obtain
its political objective while
appeasing its political
detractors during these
recessionary times.

Contrary to the points
mentioned above, I have
absolutely no problem with
the Government firing,
transferring or hiring offi-
cers if it feels that this is
what is necessary to bring
about positive and effective
change in the department. I
also, understand and accept
that in the Government's
quest to promote trade and
tourism for the benefit of all
Bahamians, it may be eco-
nomically impractical for the
government and the rele-
vant agencies to continue
the payment of overtime
fees in the rate done so in
the past to suffice this cause.
However, I am very discor-

dant with the compensation
payment that was given to
us in lieu of overtime pay-
ment. Not only was the
amount that was given to us
grossly inadequate (average
of $300 per month) in com-
parison to (average of $1200
per month) made in over-
time in the past. Also, in
particular, I oppose the hier-
archical method in which the
payment was dispersed,
which was clearly disingen-
uous to the junior staff. This
is so, because the bulk of the
compensation payment
which was “said to be giv-
en” in lieu of overtime was
in fact paid out to the exec-
utives and junior executives
in the average of $700-$900
per month and they never
worked overtime because
the overtime duties were
performed by the junior
staff and junior management
respectively.
Furthermore, to com-
pound an already vexing sit-
uation, we commenced
working the newly imple-
mented shift system from
January 18, 2010. However,
we have overtime payment
outstanding to us as far back
as September 1, 2009. This
outstanding overtime was
promised to be paid to us at
year ending December 31,
2009, we are currently in the
month of February. How
reasonable is this to honest
officers trying to survive on
“already” budgeted salaries.
How reasonable is this?

A REASONABLE
CUSTOMS
OFFICER

Nassau,

February, 2010.

Looking at Real Estate closings

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Efficiency, professionalism,
proficiency and integrity must
always be the norm in Real
Estate closings.

In each and every real estate
closing, “all of the i’s must be
dotted and all of the t’s must
be crossed!”

This writer has personally
experienced the disgust and
heartbreak wrought by bungled
closings.








DON STAINTON |
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

Truly, one botched closing is
one too many; so I am thankful
to you for publishing this let-
ter that may be helpful to those
who are interested in buying or
selling real estate, so that they
will do everything to ensure
that their sale or purchase of
real estate is not muddled at
the closing.

Barring unforeseen and/or
extraordinary circumstances
that may arise, each and every
closing should close on time,
with penalties to be paid by
whichever party is responsible
for delays.

Everything, including minu-
tia, must be settled between all



of the parties. At the closing,
all parties and their legal reps,
including the Real Estate bro-
ker and his/her lawyer, should
be in a particular place desig-
nated for the occasion. From
what I have seen, it would be
prudent for the real estate bro-
ker to take his/her lawyer to
represent him/her at the clos-
ing, as it seems that his/her
presence is considered to be
unnecessary or, at best, merely
incidental to the very impor-
tant matter of closing.

GLEN MORE
Nassau,
February 9, 2010.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



IN A move to further
expand their influence and
voice within the Progres-
sive Liberal Party (PLP),
the youth wing of the polit-
ical organisation, the Pro-
gressive Young Liberals
(PYL), will be establishing
a local branch in every
constituency throughout
the country.

According to De’Angelo
Whyms, the vice-chairman
of the PYL, these 41
Young Liberal branches
are a part of their organi-
sation’s mission to empow-
er the nation’s youth.

“Throughout the length
and breath of our nation
the young people within
the various constituencies
have been crying out for
an avenue to voice their
concerns on matters of
national importance, we
intend to satisfy their
hunger to be heard. We
intend to travel through-
out each and every con-
stituency within the Com-
monwealth of the

Apis, |

DE’ANGELO WHYMS, the vice-chairman of the PYL.

ea olul emmy arate
set to branch out

Bahamas seeking out the
young minds dwelling
within and establishing 41
Young Liberals branches.

“The mentality of the
youth of our nation is
evolving daily and with
evolution there comes
change.

“The Progressive Young
Liberals intends to nurture
this evolution, thus max-
imising its potential and
inevitably procuring a
secure future for our gen-
eration and generations to
come,” Mr Whyms said.

“With the wisdom of
those who came before us
and those who are cur-
rently at the helm of our
party, we will create a
youth centric environment
where innovation is con-
stant, pro-creation preva-
lent and having an idea
would be the only require-
ment. We invite all youth
to get involved and chal-
lenge yourself to become
Progressive Young Liber-
als.”



Seagrapes

Parties in discussions
over possible merger

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas may soon
see the birth of a new polit-
ical party as the leadership
of both the Bahamas Demo-
cratic Movement (BDM)
and the National Develop-
ment Party (NDP) have
begun discussions about a
possible merger of the two
organisations.

Having held three meet-
ings since the Elizabeth by-
election, in which both par-
ties’ candidates were defeat-
ed, the NDP and the BDM
have been embroiled in talks
with other known political
persons as to their collective
way forward.

However, according to
sources within the two par-
ties there has already been
difficulties with this process.

Reportedly one of the
main issues raised in the first
meeting was whether or not
the two parties would do
away with their names and
join under a new umbrella,
or if one organisation should
simply join up under the
leadership of the other.

A second issue raised was
the leadership styles and
structure of the parties.

The NDP seems to prefer
to allow the constituents to
be the ones who are respon-
sible for picking their repre-
sentative in an election. This
model, it was said, was prov-
ing to be a stumbling block
for many with the BDM who
feel that the candidates
should be chosen in another
fashion.

Questioned on the issue
of a possible merger yester-
day, BDM leader Cassius

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Stuart said that the two
political parties were in the
very initial stages of their
“talks” and his organisation
was not against meeting and
speaking with the NDP.

However, as to which
organisation could possibly
end up absorbing the other,
Mr Stuart was adamant that
the BDM is the more well-
known of the two, having
spent more than a decade on
the political stage.

“I spoke with our team
last night and they were not
against meeting and talking.
Because we do have some
philosophical differences at
this time. For us it is getting
the best. Anytime you nego-
tiate it has to be a win-win
situation. Our brand (BDM)
is constantly out there. And





Cassius Stuart of the BDM and Dr Andre Rollins of the NDP.



to get a new brand in the
minds of the Bahamian peo-
ple may take another 10
years.

“So it only makes practical
sense if there were to be any
joining to keep the BDM
brand,” he said.

As for what his party is
doing in the meantime, Mr
Stuart said that they have
been holding meetings to
review why the organisation
under-performed in the Eliz-
abeth by-election.

“We were not happy with
the results coming out of the
last election but when you
look at what we were up
against, the government with
all its machinery, and the
Opposition, they were
spending millions and mil-
lions of dollars. So there

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were a whole lot of things
we were concerned about.

“And we were also con-
cerned about all the Minis-
ters and Members of Parlia-
ment sitting in polling divi-
sion booths. What happened
to the government on that
day? Because the level of
intimidation was unbeliev-
able. So whatever they
promised the people before
voting day they were there
to make sure they voted like
they said they would. So
from our perspective it
appears that the government
was pulling out all stops in
that regard to win this elec-
tion,” he said.

In the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion, the BDM secured 76
votes in total to the NDP’s
49. The FNM’s Dr Duane
Sands won the majority of
white ballots cast during the
election, winning 1,501. The
PLP’s Ryan Pinder secured
1,499 votes.

Mr Pinder is currently
contesting five protest bal-
lots that he claims were cast
in favour of him. Until this
issue can be rectified in the
Election Court there can be
no declaration of an
absolute winner for the seat
as these five votes if count-
ed, can shift the majority to
the PLP. Therefore the Eliz-
abeth seat remains empty in
the House of Assembly at
this time.

RD Be Bsa
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aA O OD)

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a


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Lease agreements diversify
NIB investment portfolio

MARSH HARBOUR,
ABACO - The financing of
lease agreements between the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and the government for
the country’s infrastructural
development has led to a fur-
ther diversification of the
Board’s investment portfolio,
according to NIB director
Algernon Cargill.

Mr Cargill said the agree-
ments continue to serve the
Board “well”, as they ensure
that NIB funds are being “opti-
mally deployed.”

Addressing central and local

government officials and resi-
dents of Abaco attending the
contract signing for the con-
struction of the government
administration building in
Marsh Harbour last Friday, Mr
Cargill said the lease financing
of government buildings has
“generally earned” a yield of
approximately 7.25 per cent per
annum.

The new government com-
plex in Abaco will be con-
structed on nine acres of land
by WOSLEE Contractors at a
cost of $19.6million. Construc-
tion is set to begin immediately

with an expected completion
date of December, 2011.

Officials say the construction
of the building will address
much of the space challenges
faced by government offices
and agencies which provide
vital services to residents of
Abaco.

The complex will house the
Magistrates Courts, Ministry of
Works, Business Licensing
Authority, Department of
Immigration and Department
of Environmental Health.

Mr Cargill said that while the
granting of loans comprises a

Police in GB conduct
road check exercises

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“very small part” of the Board-
’s Investment portfolio, it is an
important aspect as the alter-
native would be that “NIB
funds would not be optimally
deployed and in some cases
earning no interest at all.”

“Given NIB’s long-term
investment horizon, having the
present 7.5 per cent of the
National Insurance Fund in real
estate is a healthy diversifica-
tion of our investment portfolio
by any standard,” Mr Cargill
said.

Mr Cargill said the Board can
“further credit” its focus on

investments such as the con-
struction of the government
administrative building in
Marsh Harbour as a primary
reason why the National Insur-
ance Fund did not experience
any “significant erosion in val-
ue” during the recent global
financial crisis.

“Our investments in govern-
ment and quasi-government
debt issues, as well as specific
building projects used by the
government and its agencies,
have performed satisfactorily
and have historically and are
currently, yielding above-mar-

ket returns,” he added.

Mr Cargill said NIB’s
reserves currently stand at
$1.6billion which represents an
accumulation of income from
contributions and investments,
less benefits and expenses, over
the almost 36 years of the life of
the programme.

“Surplus contributions (those
not paid out in benefits and
assistance) go into NIB
reserves,” he said. “Monies
from this Reserve Fund are rou-
tinely invested so as to meet
both the present and future
costs of benefits and assistance.”

ea Len O) Sa Dele Peitel children using a crosswalk during the road check exercise.

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Police offi-
cers at the Eight Mile Rock
Division conducted road check
exercises on Wednesday in the
school zones and the pedestri-
an crossings in the Eight Mile
Rock area.

Supt Christopher Pickstock,
the officer in charge of the
Eight Mile Rock Division, ASP
Loretta Mackey, second in
command, and Corporals
Christina King and Godfrey
Knowles were at two busy traf-
fic locations ensuring that
motorists and pedestrians
obeyed the traffic rules.

ASP Mackey said Queens
Highway is a busy road that
runs through the Eight Mile
Rock settlement, where many
persons live, work and go to
school.

Un To
(Tate

She said it is important that
motorists obey the speed limit,
especially in the school zones
where the speed limit is 1S5mph
from 7.30am — 9.30am, and in
the afternoon from 2.30pm -
4pm. She also noted that
pedestrians should use the
pedestrian/traffic crossing when
crossing the street.

Persons using the crossing
must make one step onto the
crossing then look left, then
right, then left again to ascer-
tain that the vehicles approach-
ing come to a complete stop
before continuing to walk, not
run, to the other side of the
street.

“We need the motoring pub-
lic to be more conscious of oth-
er road users, in particular the
children walking to school or
being dropped off on the road-
side by parents,” said Ms
Mackey.

“We wanted to take this
opportunity to ensure that

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motorists are obeying the speed
limit and to also teach young
pedestrians how to properly
use the traffic crossing,” she
said. Supt Pickstock said that
road checks will be conducted
on a weekly basis in the dis-
trict, especially at the three
schools — Eight Mile Rock
High, Bartlett Hill Primary,
and Martin Town Primary.

Corporals King and Knowles
distributed flyers with road
safety tips about the proper use
of pedestrian crossings, riding
the school bus and riding bicy-
cles on the street.

Corporal Knowles said they
were able to spot speeders with
aradar gun. “We cited several
motorists for speeding today,”
he said.

ASP Mackey said that police
visibility in the Eight Mile
Rock Community will ensure
that the community is much
safer for residents to work and
live.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Creating a model of sustainable development

Bahamian and US government officials share insights
on how to make the Bahamas an example for the world

i

EXPLORING how to make
Eleuthera a model of sustain-
able development not only for
the Bahamas, but throughout
the world, was the main topic at
the 2010 sustainability confer-
ence hosted by the Cape
Eleuthera Institute (CEI) last
weekend.

Government officials, includ-
ing Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette, Speaker of
the House of Assembly Alvin
Smith and Minister of Educa-
tion Desmond Bannister,
attended the conference at
which former governor of New
Jersey and former administra-
tor of the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency

Christine Todd-Whitman was

the keynote speaker.
Each government official took
time to share thoughts on how
Eleuthera can become a model
for sustainable development.

During her keynote address,
Governor Todd-Whitman
recognised the challenges the
Bahamas faces as it works
toward a sustainable future.

“The rewards of early com-
mitment to sustainability are
not perhaps as tangible today as
we would like them to be, and
they’re hard to prove,” she said.

“But you can’t wait until that
evidence is out there to start to
take action. By then it’s too late
when you're talking about sus-
tainability. You have to move
forward sooner.”

Governor Todd-Whitman
was also quick to point out that

a
DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette.

since New Jersey and Eleuthera
have many similarities, she felt
comfortable sharing her expe-
riences.

Both places have a 110-mile
Atlantic coastline, both heavily
depend on tourism, and both
places are centres of innova-
tion. Mr Symonette challenged
conference participants to be
proactive in solving problems
of sustainability in the
Bahamas.

“The government is chal-
lenged in producing a lot of the
answers you want,” he said.

“So sometimes it is helpful
for you to come to the govern-
ment with the solution to the
problem, not ask the govern-
ment to develop the solution.”

During the afternoon panel
discussion, participants exam-
ined CEI’s Charter for Sus-
tainable Development of the
Bahamas and made suggestions
on how these principles could
best be put into action.

Panellists included Shaun
Ingraham, Eleuthera commu-
nity member; Joy Jibrilu, direc-
tor of Investments for the
Bahamas Investment Authori-
ty; Mike Hartman, an eco-
developer in the Bahamas and
Costa Rica; Eric Carey, execu-
tive director of Bahamas
National Trust, and Michael
Northrop, Sustainable Devel-
opment Programme director of
the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

CEI will continue to solicit
input on the charter at
www.greenbahamas.word-
press.com.

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‘The rewards of
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KINGSWAY ACADEMY
SCHOLARSHIP ANNOUNCEMENT

Kingsway Academy, a leading Bahamian (K-12) school with a
reputation for excellence in academics, athletics and the arts;
a commitment to Christian values; and a strong tradition of
public service, is inviting applicants for 2 (two) prestigious
3-year scholarships for students entering Grade 10 in
September 2010.

(A) The Grace Tatham Kemp Scholarship

Named in honour of Kingsway’s founder,
Mrs. Grace Tatham Kemp. This scholarship is for a well-rounded
student with proven, strong academic performance.

(B) The Ned Wallace Sports Scholarship

Named in honour of one of Kingsway’s earliest building
contractors and a former member of the Board, Mr. Ned Wallace.
This scholarship is for a well-rounded student with proven,
strong academic and sports performance.

Interested students should submit the following application
package:
¢ Completed Kingsway High School Application Form
(available at the Kingsway High School Office or may be
e-mailed upon request).
Recommendation letter from your school’s Principal.
Recommendation letter from your school’s Coach if applying
for the sports scholarship.
Personal statement sharing your school, church and
community involvement, as well as your plans for the future.
Transcript of your last 3 (three) academic years
(Grades 7, 8 and 9 to date). Transcripts will only be
considered valid if they are submitted in your school’s
sealed envelop with your school’s stamp or seal.

Note: Short-listed candidates will be invited to sit the
scholarship examination and appear at an interview.

Deadline: Complete application package should be
submitted by 4:00 p.m. at the High School Office no later
than Monday, March 1, 2010

“Enter to be Trained in the King’s Way.
Exit to be the Difference.”



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Grand Bahama pre-clearance

GB International
Airport promotes
new pre-clearance
for private aircraft

AVIATORS from all over
Florida learned more about the
new pre-clearance for private
aircraft feature at Grand
Bahama International Airport
during the recent Banyan Trade
Show in Florida.

More than 250 participants
attended, including private
pilots, FBO owners, Flying Ser-
vices, Pilot Publishers and offi-
cials from Grand Bahama Air-
port Company and the
Bahamas Tourist Office.

Gary Gilbert, Hutchison
Port Holdings chief executive
said: “Freeport, Grand Bahama
is an idyllic location for the new
pre-clearance facility for gen-
eral aviation and our atten-

BANYAN TRADE SHOW

dance at the Banyan Trade
Show provided us an opportu-
nity to alert all pilots and own-
ers of private aircraft of the
advantages for them to pre-
clear in Grand Bahama before
flying on to their ultimate US
destinations.”

Indicators suggest that own-
ers and lessees of private air-
craft in the US have a prefer-



ence for closer destinations and
airports.

The Bahamas is one of only
five destinations in the world
with US pre-clearance facilities
for commercial passengers.

The US and the Bahamas
Pre-clearance Agreement Act
is being amended to include the
pre-clearance of private aircraft.

Adjudicators named for E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival

By ERIC ROSE
Bahamas Information
Services

THE Department of Culture in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture recently identified
the adjudicators for the 2010 E Clement Bethel
National Arts Festival, which opens March 1.

Choral and instrumental music adjudicator is
Audrey Dean-Wright. She is a composer, singer,
choral conductor, lecturer and poet.

Mrs Dean-Wright was born in Nassau and her
educational background is extensive.

It includes being educated at the Bahamas
Academy of Seventh-Day Adventists and the
Jamaica School of Music in Kingston, Jamaica.

She was the recipient of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment Scholarship to the Manhattan School
of Music in New York where she earned a BA
Music degree — Voice and Masters of Music
degree in Music Education and Clarinet.

She also received the College of the Bahamas
In-Service Award to the Manhattan School of
Music.

Mrs Dean-Wright had early piano studies with
Muriel Mallory, in-depth study of music and
piano skills with her mentor Mr Bethel and also
studied piano with Meta Davis-Cumberbatch.

Dance adjudicator is Lawrence Carroll. He
began his dance training with the New Breed
Dancers in Nassau. Later, he travelled to Toron-
to, Canada, to advance his studies at Ryerson
University, where he studied theatre arts and
was graduated with honours.

At the Canadian College of Dance, he also
studied classical ballet with the Royal Academy

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of Dance and modern dance and national dance
with the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing.

After graduating from Ryerson University, he
began teaching at the National Dance School
and later went to A F Adderley, C C Sweeting
and D W Davis schools, among others.

Drama adjudicator is James Catalyn. He stud-
ied drama at De’ Paul University in Chicago,
Illinois.

Mr Catalyn has brought Bahamian culture to
the forefront by his prolific writing. His works
have been performed on stage, radio and
throughout the islands of the Bahamas.

He and his troupe represented the Bahamas
internationally in New Zealand, Trinidad, Bermu-
da and at the United Nations in New York City.

His insistence that Bahamians speak “Bahami-
anese” has made many more aware of the beau-
ty and uniqueness of the Bahamian dialect.

Arts and crafts adjudicator is Heino Schmid.
He has a Bahamian mother and a German father.
He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photog-
raphy at the Savannah College of Art Design
and his Masters in Fine Arts from the Utrecht
Graduate School of Visual Art and Design in
Utrecht, the Netherlands.

He has participated in numerous group shows
in the Bahamas, the United States, the United
Kingdom and Europe. Among them were
‘Work!’ in 2007 at the Popopstudios Gallery,
Nassau; ‘Funky Nassau: Recovering An Identity’
in 2006 at the National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, and at the Nassauischer Kunstverein in
Wiesbaden, Germany; and ‘Dare 1’ in 2006, at the
Universities Museum in Utrecht, the Nether-
lands.

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THE TRIBUNE



6

LOCAL NEWS

(EW

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 9



Haiti jucige:
No release of US
Baptists this week

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

A HAITIAN judge says
American missionaries Lau-
ra Silsby and Charisa Coulter :
will remain in jail over the }
weekend as he awaits more }
testimony, according to Asso- }
ciated Press. :

Judge Bernard Saint-Vil :
says he has asked two real }
estate agents and a pastor }
from the Dominican Republic }
to testify in Port-au-Prince }
about property the mission- }
aries rented to set up ani
orphanage. ;

That is expected Monday. }
If they do not show, Saint-Vil }
says he still expects to rule }
next week. He also said }
Thursday he wants to ques- }
tion a pastor and another man }
from a border town. :

Silsby and Coulter were }
among 10 Americans detained }
in Haiti while trying to take }
33 kids to the Dominican }
Republic after the Jan. 12 }
earthquake. :

The others have been }

‘Cans for Kids’ project

THE Deep Creek Middle
School (DCMS) and the
Island School in Eleuthera
continue to take the lead
when it comes to teaching
Bahamian children the
importance of recycling.

And last week the DCMS
received its first cheque as
part of the ‘Cans for Kids’
project, an organisation
which raises money for
Bahamian schools and chil-
dren’s programmes through
aluminum can recycling.

Family Islands set up
depots to collect cans from
schools and the community.
The cans were then bagged
to be sent to Nassau.

In Nassau, the cans are
crushed, rebagged and sent
to the US for recycling.

The goal of the programme

is to foster the idea of recy-
cling in Bahamian youth so
that the practice becomes
habitual and can take root in
the Bahamas.

From October through
December of 2009, DCMS
and the Island School col-
lected more than 150 Ibs of
aluminum cans.

On February 17, Sam Ken-
worthy, waste management
coordinator at Cape
Eleuthera Institute, present-
ed a $45 cheque to Hershal
Knowles, president of the
DCMS eco club and Dr
Joanna Paul, principal of
DCMS.

Mr Knowles and the eco
club have been working to
educate

their fellow students and
neighbours about the impor-

tance or recycling.

The can collecting project
is part of DCMS’s larger
effort to become the first
green flag eco-certified
school in the Caribbean
through Foundation for
Environmental Education.

"Aluminum cans are the
easiest waste stream to recy-
cle,” said Mr Kenworthy.

“Although Eleuthera has
no existing recycling infra-
structure, ‘Cans for Kids’ has
made getting rid of our cans
extremely easy; anyone can
get involved. Being responsi-
ble for one's waste is a lesson
that is not only important for
young people to learn, but
society as a whole. By estab-
lishing a simple, foolproof
method to responsibly get rid
of cans, we help ourselves,

helps Bahamian schools

We J) Cy aT

a s
04) il (CONS:

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT

RECYCLING ALUMINUM CANS:

- Every minute of every day 113,204 cans are recycled.

- Making new aluminum cans from used cans costs 95
per cent less energy than creating a new can from virgin
material.

- Twenty recycled cans can be made with the energy
required to make one can from virgin material

- Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to
burn one 100 watt bulb for nearly four hours.

- It takes between 200 and 500 years for an aluminum
can to decompose.

released and returned home. thé

environment, and raise
money for local schools at
the same time,” he said.



ot ANDRE},
~ SCHOOL

QW
(wor school

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas,
an authorized International Baccalaureate (IB) World School, invites
applications from qualified and experienced Bahamian candidates
for the following teaching vacancies, with effect from August 2010.
Full information regarding the school may be found at its website:
www.st-andrews.com.

Shoes . Handbags . Accessorles

Candidates should be qualified teachers who possess the necessary
academic qualifications for the position(s) for which they apply, including
a teaching qualification and a bachelor’s degree, and normally need
to have a minimum of two years successful school-based experience.
Desirable qualifications, in addition to those specified for individual
posts, are that teachers have successful experience in an independent
and/or international school and an advanced degree. Applications from
candidates able to coach team sports or advise school clubs and activities
are particularly welcomed. Secondary (i.e. middle and upper) school
teachers will be expected to undertake the responsibility of a homeroom.

Friday & Saturday
Shoes Starting at $10
20% Off Accessories

T: 242-322-2362 -Mt. Royal Avenue, opposite Gatezay Chapel] - Nassau Bahamas

Please note that applications received from non-Bahamian candidates
will not be considered at this time, although permanent residents with the
right to work are invited to submit their papers for future consideration.
Applications from candidates living outside The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas will not be acknowledged or considered at this stage of the
recruiting process. If the school is unable to recruit any position locally, it
will advertise internationally.

PRIMARY SCHOOL

The school is authorized to teach the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of
the International Baccalaureate Organization. Candidates for all posts in
the primary school should be committed to the principles of, and preferably
trained in, the PYP.

Primary School Spanish: Candidates should be familiar with ACTFL
standards and be able to work as a contributing member of a school-wide
team.

Primary School Music: Candidates must be fully qualified and have
successful teaching experience at all Years from Pre Reception to Year 6.
They must also have successful experience in organizing primary school
music and drama performances.

Primary School Library Media Specialist: The primary school library
media specialist develops, implements and interprets an effective library
media and IT programme for students in Pre Reception to Year 6.
Candidates must be fully qualified and have successful experience as
a school librarian, multi media specialist, educational technologist or IT
teacher.

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Interested candidates should apply by letter, email or fax as soon as
possible. All applications MUST include the following:

Letter of application

A personal statement detailing the candidate’s educational philosophy
A full curriculum vitae,

Either the names, addresses, telephone numbers, fax and email
numbers of three people who may be approached for confidential
professional references or the name and address of the recruiting
agency from which the candidate’s confidential dossiers may be
obtained.

Please direct all correspondence to:

Allison Collie, Head of the Primary School:
Email: Allison.Collie@st-andrews.com
Fax: (1 242) 677 7846

The closing date for applications is 12 March 2010. Applications
from unqualified candidates, applications arriving without
the full information requested, applications from outside The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas or applications received after this
date will not be considered

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

6

THE TRIBUNE


























































FROZEN RAW DOUGH
JAMAICAN PATTIES

Tel: 393-6222/454-3518
Soldier Road North, immediately
South of Lowes Pharmacy &
Eye World.

. Buy frozen raw dough patties
by the dozen - cheaper

_ Store in freezer - not in cooler

. Bake as needed in your own
traditional oven (not microwave)
at 350° for 45 minutes

4. At end of bake cycle patties should
be firm/hard (if soft - not done)
do not burn

Enjoy your flaky, juicy, tasty,
Jamaican patties

. Readily available: beef, chicken,
veggie codfish, conch, crab,
grouper, shrimp, ackee codfish,
calaloo codfish, lobster (market);
mix allowed.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PIVOTE POINTE ASSETS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OTHELLO GAMET
INVESTMENTS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INBOUNDS PLAY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

LOCAL NEWS

a 205.5
Bahamas Kennel Club All-Breed Dog Show set for March

DOG lovers are invited to
come out and support the
Bahamas Kennel Club’s annual
All-Breed Dog Show next
month.

The show, which will take
place on the weekend of March
20-21 at the Nassau Botanical
Gardens, will feature dogs in the
working, sporting, non-sporting,
terrier, toy and herding groups.

Dogs from the United States,
Canada and the Bahamas will
be competing for “Best in Breed’
and ‘Best in Show’.

The show is sponsored by
Purina Dog Food.

¢ SPORTING CLASS

Dogs in the sporting class are
naturally active and alert. Sport-
ing dogs make likable, well-
rounded companions.

Members of the group include
Pointers, Retrievers, Setters and
Spaniels. Remarkable for their
instincts in water and woods,
many of these breeds actively
continue to participate in hunting
and other field activities.

Potential owners of sporting
dogs need to realise that most
require regular, invigorating
exercise.

¢ HOUNDS

Most hounds share the com-
mon ancestral trait of being used
for hunting.

Some use acute scenting pow-
ers to follow a trail. Others
demonstrate a phenomenal gift
of stamina as they relentlessly
run down quarry. Beyond this,
however, generalisations about
hounds are hard to come by,
since the group encompasses
quite a diverse lot.

There are Pharaoh Hounds,
Norwegian Elkhounds, Afghans
and Beagles, among others.

Some hounds share the distinct
ability to produce a unique
sound known as baying. You'd
best sample this sound before
you decide to get a hound of
your own to be sure it's your cup
of tea.

¢ WORKING CLASS

Dogs of the working group
were bred to perform such jobs
as guarding property, pulling
sleds and performing water res-
cues.

They have been invaluable
assets to man throughout the
ages. The Doberman Pinscher,
Siberian Husky and Great Dane
are included in this group, to
name just a few.

Quick to learn, these intelli-
gent, capable animals make sol-
id companions. Their consider-
able dimensions and strength
alone, however, make many
working dogs unsuitable as pets
for average families. And again,
by virtue of their size alone, these
dogs must be properly trained

¢ TERRIERS

Terriers are feisty, energetic
dogs whose sizes range from fair-
ly small, as in the Norfolk, Cairn
or West Highland White Terrier,
to the grand Airedale Terrier.
Terriers typically have little tol-
erance for other animals, includ-
ing other dogs. Their ancestors
were bred to hunt and kill ver-
min. Many continue to project
the attitude that they're always
eager for a spirited argument.
Most terriers have wiry coats that
require special grooming known
as stripping in order to maintain
a characteristic appearance.

In general, they make engag-
ing pets, but require owners with
the determination to match their
dogs’ lively characters.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GRADIENT GOLD
INVESTMENTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BALANCHINE INVESTMENTS
LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CROSSOVER MOVE LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

¢ TOY BREEDS

The diminutive size and win-
some expressions of toy dogs
illustrate the main function of
this group — to embody sheer
delight.

Don't let their tiny stature
fool you, though — many toys
are tough as nails. If you haven't
yet experienced the barking of
an angry Chihuahua, for exam-
ple, well, just wait.

Toy dogs will always be popu-
lar with city dwellers and peo-
ple without much living space.
They make ideal apartment dogs
and terrific lap warmers on nippy
nights.

¢ NON-SPORTING CLASS

Non-sporting dogs are a
diverse group. Here are sturdy
animals with as different per-
sonalities and appearances as the
Chow Chow, Dalmatian, French
Bulldog, and Keeshond. Talk
about differences in size, coat,
and visage!

Some, like the Schipperke
and Tibetan Spaniel are uncom-
mon sights in the average neigh-
bourhood.

Others, however, like the Poo-



dle and Lhasa Apso, have quite a
large following. The breeds in
the non-sporting group are a var-
ied collection in terms of size,
coat, personality and overall
appearance.

¢ THE HERDING GROUP

Created in 1983, the herding
group is the newest AKC classi-
fication; its members were for-
merly members of the working
group.

All breeds share the fabulous
ability to control the movement
of other animals.

A remarkable example is the
low-set Corgi, perhaps one foot
tall at the shoulders, that can dri-
ve a herd of cows many times its
size to pasture by leaping and
nipping at their heels.

The vast majority of herding
dogs, as household pets, never
cross paths with a farm animal.

Nevertheless, pure instinct
prompts many of these dogs to
gently herd their owners, espe-
cially the children of the family.
In general, these intelligent dogs
make excellent companions and
respond beautifully to training
exercises.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEARBLUE SEAS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOP INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JACQUES ACME LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

_

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man fount
shot deat

FROM page one

received information about }
two suspicious vehicles in }

the Holiday Drive area.

According to Superin- }
tendent Rodney McKenzie, ;
the suspects left in a dark :
coloured Kia Sportage with }
bondo markings on the dri- }

ver’s door.

Bowleg was found wear-
ing blue jeans and a long }
sleeved navy blue shirt. The ;

legs were taped down.

“We are classifying itasa }

homicide,” Mr Mckenzie :

said.

Talk show host
apologetic over
on-air firearm

remarks
FROM page one

the proliferation of
weapons in today’s society,
the radioshow host had
reportedly offered on his
programme to be able to
sell one of his callers a
semi-automatic weapon if
they came up with as little
as $500.

Taking full responsibili-
ty for his remarks, Mr
Bodie assured his listeners
that he was handled pro-
fessionally by the police
and commended these offi-
cers openly for doing a
“magnificent” job.

Mr Bodie could not be
contacted for comment
yesterday.

Police shoot burglar dead

FROM page one

out to confront the villains found
one of the men was armed with a
screwdriver and a knife. He report-
edly threatened officers with his
weapons before bolting behind a
home that backs onto the adjacent
Sherwood Drive

Police opened fire, fatally
wounding the man in the mid-sec-
tion of his body. His accomplice
got away.

The dead man’s identity has not
been released, but The Tribune
understands he was repeat offend-
er Hubert Hall, 50, of Armbrister
Street, in Fox Hill, also known as
“Zip”.

Sources say Hall had recently
been released from HM Prison in
Fox Hill where he had been held
on a theft conviction, and that he
had been in and out of prison for
many years.

It is also claimed Hall was a
father of two, and had left his chil-
dren at home alone while he went
out to steal early yesterday morn-
ing.

A long-time resident of Sans
Souci Road praised the swift and
uncompromising response by
police yesterday morning.

He said: “I think things are out of
hand and police should do what-
ever they can to improve the situa-
tion. If it means shooting these
guys then definitely I would sup-
port it.”

The annual homicide count stood
at 14 last night, accounting for
nearly two killings a week in 2010,
and this follows a record-breaking
homicide count of 87 last year.

A home invasion and homicide
at a home in Oleander Drive,

Pai be



POLICE OFFICERS at the scene in Tower Heights Drive, off Sans Souci Road.

South Beach estates, on Monday
morning rocked the community
earlier this week, and an armed
robbery at a home in Gladstone
Road leading to the kidnapping of
two women further heightened fear
of crime for New Providence resi-
dents.

“There are horrible things hap-
pening and we need to protect our
families,” the Sans Souci man said.
“Tam glad to see the police are
becoming more aggressive.

“Tf that is really what it’s going to
take to stop people from going into
people’s homes, then I am glad.

Legal Notice

“JT have seen crime rise over the
years and it just keeps accelerat-
ing.

“T believe in getting serious
about this and I will reiterate to
say I am glad to see this action
being taken.”

Police are still looking for the
second man they attempted to
apprehend in Tower Heights Road
yesterday morning.

Anyone with any information on
his whereabouts should call police
as a matter of urgency on 911, 919
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

LICE

Neary



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good
cause, campaigning for
improvements in the area or have
won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DROMSTARNESS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEXT GENERATION INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOMARIK PITITANE CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NOTICE
LUGANO VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
GILFORD CLOSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DAYLILLIES CORPORTION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE
LES PACCOTS CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ARA VALLEY INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ASELLIS HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of February 2010. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

S





By RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

AFTER day one of the 17th
Annual GSSSA Senior High
School Track and Field Cham-
pionships, a familiar name sits
atop the leaderboard after a
productive day on the track.

The defending champion
C.R Walker Knights, in search
of their 11th title in school his-
tory, heads the field of eight
schools with 272.5 points, near-
ly 90 points ahead of their clos-
est competitors.

The R.M Bailey Pacers, the
last school to unseat the
Knights when they won back
to back titles in 2003 and 2004,
are in second position with 187
points.

The C.V Bethel Stingrays
remain in contention in third
place with 182.50 points, the C.I
Gibson Rattlers are currently
fourth with 150 points while the
C.C Sweeting Cobras round out
the top five with 130.5 points.

The remainder of the field
includes the Anatol Rodgers
Timberwolves (127), the Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins (111)
and the Government High
School Magic (91.5).

The Knights usual cast of
characters continued to domi-
nate their respective events to
lead the charge on day one.

Marva Etienne retained her
title in the Intermediate girls’
100m in a time of 12.44s.

Khadijah Andrews of Doris
Johnson was second in 13.17s,
and the Rattlers’ Lakeisha
Rolle was third in 13.23s.



PAGE 13

or



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26,



ts

2010



INSIDE ¢ Haiti Judo Benefit Tourney

Knights lead
ESAT]
SYR TTI
TR

With Katrina Seymour head-
ed to the BAISS, Etienne
became a sprint double cham-
pion, when she added the 400m
title to her resume.

She finished the quartermile
in 1:02.58s, while teammate
Ashley Stubbs was second in
1:06.21.

The Knights’ Shafara Lewis
continued the Intermediate
Girls’ dominance with a first
place finishes in the Interme-
diate girls 1500m in a time of
5:50.11s well ahead of team-
mate Nevelicia Martin who fin-
ished in 6:02.60s.

O'Jay Ferguson moved up to
the Senior Boys division but
retained his stranglehold on the
400m with a winning time of
50.38s.

Leeward Swann of R.M Bai-
ley was second in 52.84s and
the Knights’ Leon Cartwright
was third in 53.03s.

Other top finishers on the
day included Raygene Minus
of the C.V Bethel Stingrays
who won the Intermediate Girls
High Jump and 100m Hurdles.

Of the trio of competitors in
the High Jump Minus cleared
1.42 first to win the event and
won the hurdles in 17.32s.

2009 Carifta medallist in the
Under 17 Boys High Jump,
Ryan Ingraham of the C.I Gib-
son Rattlers, finished first in the
Senior Boys High Jump with a
leap of 1.94m, however fell
short of the Carifta qualifying
mark of 2.05m.

The meet continues tomor-
row highlighted by a myriad of
field events, the 200m, 800m
and the 4x400m relay.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

MARVA ETIENNE of the C.R Walker powers her way toward the finish of the Intermediate Girls 100m. Etienne won the event in 12.44s, claim-
ing back to back titles in the division.

‘Big O’s’ battle with cancer

ANY alert track and field
fan would remember person-
al trainer Wendall ‘Big O’
Ferguson.

For years, he assisted the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO) at
the Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations
(BAAA) track and field
meets at the Thomas A.
Robinson Track and Field
Stadium.

Today, Ferguson has fall-
en ill and he needs the assis-
tance of those whom he
helped to assist with his med-
ical expenses.

While he has been diag-
nosed with cancer, a group of
his friends have gotten
together to stage a Walk-A-
Thon in the “fight Against
Cancer.”

The event is scheduled for
Saturday, March 27th start-
ing at 6 a.m. from Goodman’s
Bay and will end at the
Cave’s.

The registration fee is $15.00
and can be picked up from the
BodyZone Fitness in the Sea-
grapes Shopping Centre, the
Mystical Gym on Madeira
Street, Better Bodies on
Shirley Street and Jemi Health
Wellness in the Caves Village.

This will also be a good
time for both the BAAA and
BACO to join forces and
encourage its members who
would have benefited from
Ferguson’s contribution to
come out and participate.

As a former athlete, I can
clearly remember running on
the track when Ferguson
would encourage you to “lift
up knees, stretch out your
legs.”

And once you would have
completed your race, before

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“STUBBS



OPINION

you crumble on the track
from fatigue and exhaustion,
he would be right there to
advice you to “get up and
walk it out.”

Ferguson, with his robust
body, was an intimidating fac-
tor and so it was really hard
to avoid not following the
instructions as he issued
them.

His loud and brassy voice
would echo as you walked
away.

It only seemed as if it was
yesterday that Ferguson, who
has also assisted countless
Bahamians in their physical

fitness at the various gyms,
was walking around and
encouraging us to life a
healthy lifestyle.

Now he’s on the other side
of the spectrum as he seek
our assistance with his med-
ical expenses.

Let’s rally around and lend
our support to a great
Bahamian sporting advocate.

HUGH CAPMBELL
CHAMPS HONOURED

MEMBERS of Parliament
took time out from their nor-
mal duties when the House
of Assembly resumed on
Wednesday to congratulate
coach Norris Bain and his
Tabernacle Baptist Academy
Falcons for repeating as
champions of the prestigious
Hugh Campbell Basketball
Classic.

Coming in as the top
ranked team, as noted in the
poll produced by Ozzie Sim-
mons, the Falcons lived up to
the advanced billing as the
Grand Bahama basketball
champions held off the sec-
ond ranked Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports Asso-
ciation champions CC Sweet-
ing Cobras by one point in
overtime.

While they repeated as
champions, the Falcons
became the first school to
have won the title six times.
And Bain was right there in
the historic performance as
the winningest coach in the
history of the senior boys bas-
ketball tournament for
schools throughout the
Bahamas.

Bain and the Falcons first
emerged from the week-long
round robin tournament as
the victor in 1995. They

repeated in 1996 before they
lost out to the CR Walker
Knights, coached by then win-
ningest coach Jimmy Clarke.

But the Falcons bounced
back to reclaim the crown in
1998. They lost again to arch-
rivals Catholic High Cru-
saders in 1999 before they
clinched it again to start the
decade in 2000.

After watching the CI Gib-
son Rattlers, coached by
Kevin Johnson, reign

supreme for two consecutive
years in 2005 and 2006, Bain
and his Falcons took the title
back to Grand Bahama on
Tuesday with another two-
peat feat.

This year’s performance
was especially sweet for the
Falcons as they played in
honor of their fallen team-
mate Shaquille Hinds, who
recently collapsed and died
during a training session in
Grand Bahama.

Tabernacle Baptist Acad-
emy should be commended
for a job well done. They held
off a stubborn CC Sweeting
and coach Mario Bowleg,
who rebounded from a 17-
point deficit in the second

half of regulation and then
12 in the extra five minutes.

Had it not been for the last
of three free throws missed
by Gabbi Laurent in the final
1.5 seconds, the fans who had
earlier started to trickle out of
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, could have possibly end
up watching a double over-
time thriller.

Instead, the Falcons cele-
brated as the two-peat cham-
pions.

Congratulations Bain and
most valuable player (MVP)
Garth Brown, who carried
the team down the stretch
when two of the Falcons’ key
players fouled out of the
game in regulation.

March 6th, 2010
You can Bike/Run
or Walk/Push

Start/End at Goodman's Bay
Registration 6:30am
Sign up as an Individual Entry
OR as a 2-Person Team for the
14 mile Bike / 6.6 Mile Run

Medals tof OR Just participate in the

Winners!

6.6 Mile Walk/Push!
Enter a team from your

Business, Club or School

Entry Deadline

March 2nd, 2010

To enter call

394-3192 or 457-1414
Download the entry form .pdf

WM rotarynassau.com



| All proceeds to

Rotary Club of Nassau Charities


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Water pines failure at Bett
Kelly Kenning Swim Complex

THE MINISTRY of
Youth, Sports and Culture
confirmed today that a struc-
tural failure occurred in the
heating unit water pipes at
the Betty Kelly Kenning
National Swim Complex, in
the early morning hours of
Sunday, February 21, 2010,
at approximately 2am.This
caused damage to the opera-
tional machinery in the base-
ment of the facility.

A preliminary analysis
revealed that the piping con-





Burrows, Sands
compete in
Laser Midwinter
Kast regatta

z

vee

Flooding from pipes caused

water pump engines to explode

nected to one of the heating
units gave way to water pres-
sure, causing flooding. The
water level rose rapidly,
making contact with the
pipes and engines that drive
the computerised systems.
This contact apparently
caused an explosion that
resulted in smoke to

emanate from the facility.
The on-duty security offi-
cers quickly alerted the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force fire
branch and the police offi-
cers arrived speedily and
investigated the matter, leav-
ing the property only after
they were assured that every-
thing was under control.

Olympics.

ABOVE: Chris Sands (r) jockeys for position at the
start of the laser radials. Next to Sands is eventual
winner, Paige Railey, a US contender for the 2012

Analysis of the entire situ-
ation is on going and the rel-
evant Government agencies
are working on the matter.

The Ministry is cognizant
of the importance of the Bet-
ty Kelly Kenning National
Swim Complex to the aquat-
ics community and the youth
of The Bahamas.

This Ministry also wishes
to assure the public that
every effort is being made to
rectify the situation in the
shortest possible time.

LEFT: Chris Sands (I) and B.J. Burrows (r) of Nas-
sau are shown with Laser Radial Champion, Paige
Railey (‘06 Women's Rolex Sailor of the year)

after competing in the 4-day Laser Midwinter East



BAHAMIAN sailors BJ Burrows
and Chris Sands competed in last
week's 4 day Laser Midwinter East
regatta in Clearwater, Florida. More
than 198 sailors from 30 different coun-
tries sailed in 3 different laser cate-
gories: full rig, laser radial and 4.7's.

With various weather conditions and
chilly water temperatures of 58
degrees, Burrows and Sands were able
to gain valuable experience from sail-
ing with more experienced world class
sailors. Olympic gold medallist Paul

NOTICE

Championships in Clearwater, Florida.

Goodison from Great Britain sailed
in the full rigs, and 2006 US Sailing
Champion and '06 World Rolex sailor,
Paige Railey, competed against Sands
and Burrows in the laser radials.

Railey, of Clearwater, went on to
win the competition by outsailing 93
other competitors. Sands had a num-
ber of very strong races and came
in 33rd in the gold fleet. Burrows,
who has only been in the laser radi-
als for a few months, came in 43rd in
the silver fleet.

MINISTRY OF WORKS & TRANSPORT

World Harmony Torch
Run presents torch
to Governor General

UNDER the Distinguished Patronage of Governor General
Arthur D Hanna, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture
presented the World Harmony Torch Run (WHTR) Com-
mittee and Paintings by Founder of the run, Sri Chinmoy
at Government House, Wednesday, February 17, 2010.
Pictured is the WHTR Executive Director, Salil Wilson
(left) presenting the Harmony torch to the Governor Gen-
eral.

tell alee ual a :
LU RCN ee CHM OCHO ay GSO
entering the Ballroom with the Harmony torch.

Raymond A Bethel/BIS photo

CORRIDOR 10
TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE & DIVERSIONS
BLUE HILL ROAD

JOSE CARTELLONE CONSTRUCCIONES CIVILES S.A would like to inform the motoring public

thal a secton of Ble Hill Road wall be temporarily closed for approximately two days (2) days during: the nights
commencing Thursday February 25th to Friday February 26th between the hours of 8pm to Jam, and on
Saturday February 27, 2010 between the hours of ipo to 9pm.

During construction we kindly advise all motorist travelling along south of Blue Hill Road to obey flagman and
follow all Signs nosied “DIVERSION”

Phasxe 3 = Thurday & Friday Nights

*“Nlotorist travelling south on Blue Hill Road are advised to make a left on Soldier Road then a right
onto Clamshell Road to continue south as an alternative route.

*Motorist travelling north on Bloc Hill Road are advised te make a right onto Malcolm Rood then

wlett onto Clamshell Road to continue north as an alternative route,

Phase 4» Sotnrday Aferncoan

"A temporary one lane traffic system will be in place; please follow the traffic management in place.
Pay special attention te the "Flagman" in place.
Proper signage wall be erected delineating the work zone, Detours will be clearly marked to allow the safe
passage for pedestrians & vehicles. Access to the sub-divisons of these Closed Roads will be granted.
Towr patience thronghon this project & greatly appreciated. We apologize for the inconvenience

& delays comsed.

doce Contellose Construcciones Ciles 5.4
Office Aaure: AMfon-!n 6200 ant be ai pen

Office 2e7 372-84 Lf I22-2610
Emil: bahamanacghtarghos

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

orn. com. or

Phase 4

(SOL0IR ROAD
a

a.



("s
ANP

ar

J J

B O4

The Project Exccunon Linit

Ministry of Works & Tronpart

Motiing: (242) 302-9707

=
5

CYNTHIA RAHMING, at ei

Haiti judo benefit tourney
Set for Saturday

THE BAHAMAS Judo Federation will be hosting a tour-
nament for the benefit of rebuilding the Haitian Judo train-
ing Center which was destroyed during the earthquake. This
tournament will be held on Saturday February 27 between
Spm to 8pm at Xavier's Lower Hall, Xavier’s School West
Bay Street. Teams from the College of the Bahamas, Abaco
and various New Providence schools are expected to attend
the tournament.

There are several tournaments scheduled during the year
to prepare Bahamian athletes for success in the internation-
al arena. For example, athlete Cynthia Rahming continued to
distinguish herself on the weekend at the Cherry Blossom
Tournament in Florida. She took a second place in the 63 Kg
and 3rd in the 52 kg.

Donations will be taken at the door and spectator fees are
$10. Anyone requesting further information can call the
Bahamas Judo Federation at 364-6773.




an (en)
Na DY, Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



Tourist in
Harbour Island
cutlass attack

FROM page one

treatment of his wounds.

Reports from the island indicate that the victim may have come
into contact with his attackers earlier in the night.

Two men are reportedly in custody in connection with the inci-
dent.

According to a source on the island, the victim has been visiting
Harbour Island for more than a decade but now has no plans to
return to the idyllic community.

"He is a regular visitor. He has been coming here for 15 years,
but he said he will not come back again," said the source.

Yesterday a few residents told The Tribune that while winter res-
idents have been recently targeted by burglars, yesterday's violent
incident is not commonplace. They are concerned that the news —
which had spread like wildfire throughout the tiny community —
will have repercussions on the island's main industry, tourism.

"Tourism is our bread and butter, that's 90 per cent of our
income, it's everyone's business. It's sad to see what is happening
here on this small island that is so rich in history,” said one local
businessman, who asked to remain anonymous. "It will affect our
economy, and with no work, no jobs, we will go lifeless."

A Harbour Island second home owner, who rents to tourists, is
worried that the incident will damage the area's reputation once the
news spreads on the internet.

"Obviously this kind of publicity does no good for Harbour
Island," said the homeowner.

A businessman claimed the homes of several winter residents
have been broken into lately, however this has not been con-
firmed by police.

He and another resident said Harbour Island needs more police
presence to tackle a growing crime problem.

"We want to see the police officers step up and do their job. Har-
bour Island puts a lot of money in the government's revenue and
we are getting no results,” said the businessman.

"Recently the crime, burglary rate has increased," said a woman
resident. "The police here are overworked, we have a sergeant here
who is understaffed."

MP for the area Alvin Smith last night acknowledged the police
manpower and crime problems. He has contacted Commissioner
of Police Ellison Greenslade about the concerns and he has pledged
to look into the matter.

Mexico deputy police
chief slain at son's school

CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



He was second-in-command
of the city police force.

MEXICAN authorities said
Thursday that gunmen killed a
deputy police chief outside an
elementary school as his wife,
son and other students and par-
ents looked on, according to
Associated Press.

Eduardo Ezparza, the
spokesman for prosecutors in
northern Chihuahua state, said
the shooting occurred Wednes-
day in the state capital, also
named Chihuahua.

City police coordinator
Antonio Olague, 39, was drop-
ping his 8-year-old son off at
school when assailants in a car
opened fire.

Olague was hit by eight bul-
lets.

Police had no suspects. Police
spokesman Jesus Reyes said
Olague was on the force for
almost 20 years and received
some training in the United
States.

Chihuahua is the worst-hit
region in Mexico's brutal drug
gang violence.

Elsewhere, police in the bor-
der city of Tijuana arrested four
men Thursday on suspicion
links to a plot to kill the police
chief there, Julian Leyzaola.

Authorities said the four men
were detained with five assault
rifles.

They said tests confirmed
one rifle was the same weapon
used in a shootout in which
gunmen disguised their vehi-
cles as Mexican army units in a
bid to kill Leyzaola, who has
become known for his tough
stance in cracking down on
police corruption and gangs in
Tijuana.

The four are believed to have
worked for Teodoro "El Teo"
Garcia Simental, the Tijuana
drug gang leader captured Jan.
12 in Baja California.

RIDEFOR

Eleuthera, Bahamas

2010

Saturday
March 20

Ride for Hope is a truly memorable
annual charitable bike-a-thon which
raises money for cancer patient
care, treatment, early detection, and
Bahamas-based cancer research.
Here's what participants say:
“Congratulations on organizing such
a truly amazing day. Thank you
so much for the countless hours
you put into organizing an incredible
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a ball and can’t stop talking about
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truly an inspiring time, what a
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&

THE TRIBUNE

&

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15

6



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas Ambassador discusses impact of US Civil Rights Movement

By KHYLE QUINCY PARKER
Press/cultural attaché
Bahamas Embassy

WASHINGTON, DC -
Bahamas Ambassador to the
United States C A Smith led
a panel discussion on “The
Global Impact of the US
Civil Rights Movement” at
the University of the District
of Columbia (UDC) on
Wednesday as part of
UDC’s celebration of Black
History Month.

During his opening state-
ment, Ambassador Smith
said the Bahamas’ journey
to internal self-rule was not
undertaken in isolation, but
linked to a larger process of
political modernisation and
change.

“In fact,” he said, “that
change was largely informed
by the responses of Bahami-
ans to the decolonisation
movement in Asia, Africa,
and the Americas and the
related struggle by Black
Americans for civil rights.”

“Most significantly, the
decision by Martin Luther
King Jr to shun violence
found an echo in the
Bahamas. Dr King pro-
pounded a non-violent rev-
olution; in the Bahamas, the
answer was what we call
“the Quiet Revolution.”

Joined on the panel by
Ambassador of St Kitts and
Nevis Izben Williams and
Paul Nehru Tennessee of the
UDC Office of Internation-
al Programmes and
Exchanges, Ambassador
Smith pointed out that the
location of the Bahamas so
near to the US made it
almost natural that “the sea
change taking place just next
door would be studied close-
ly, and would have some
influence.”

Ambassador Smith
stressed, though, that just as
the US Civil Rights move-

Bahamas and the Caribbean,
that movement was itself
heavily influenced by the
Bahamas and the Caribbean.

“As we examine that
unique confluence of time,
place and personalities that
led to Bahamian self-rule
and independence — which
is what we mean when we
say the ‘Quiet Revolution’
—we see clearly the effect of
the US civil rights move-
ment on the Bahamas. And
in fact, the two movements
are indelibly linked,” he
said.

“As Bahamian anthropol-
ogist, writer and College of
the Bahamas professor Dr
Nicolette Bethel points out,
in many cases the Bahamas
has influenced the US move-
ment; African-American
intellectuals like James Wel-
don Johnson and WEB
DuBois have roots in the
Bahamas; a Bahamian min-
ister, Dr J Robert Love,
inspired Marcus Garvey, and
a Bahamian, Joshua Cock-
burn, captained one of Gar-
vey’s Black Star Cruise Line
ships,” Ambassador Smith
said.

During his remarks,
Ambassador Williams of St
Kitts and Nevis expanded on
this point, and said the influ-
ence of the Caribbean on the
US Civil Rights movement
was greater than the influ-
ence of the US movement
on the Caribbean.

In fact, he asserted that
many of the “movers and
shakers” in the US move-
ment had strong ties to the
Caribbean, where he said
there was “an inbred
propensity for resistance,
expressed in various ways”.

Faculty and students of
the University of the District
of Columbia attended the
panel discussion, an institu-
tion where at least 15 per
cent of the students are



\ Ns \ gtd: tt if

BAHAMAS Ambassador to the United States Cornelius A Smith talks with an audience member following his talk on how the US civil rights
movement impacted the Bahamas. The Ambassador from St Kitts and Nevis, Izben Williams, joined Ambassador Smith on the panel.

ment influenced the imternational.

College of the Bahamas
Union of Students hosts
youth leaders conference

THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students
(COBUS) is hosting the 26th annual Conference of
Youth Leaders this week.

Under the theme, “Maximising Your Abilities to
Pursue Purpose: Max it Up,” the event is a conference
for young people across the length and breadth of the
Bahamas to discuss youth issues, share ideas, and rein-
force the principles of leadership development.

The conference, which includes seminars, work shops
and presentations by guest speakers, started yesterday
and will continue until Saturday.

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Eleuthera, Bahamas

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truly an inspiring time, what a
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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamas close to strengthening
liplomatic ties with Brazil

FROM page one

ment being considered, which
has already been vetted by
the Attorney General’s office.
A cabinet paper still has to
be submitted seeking permis-
sion to sign the agreement.

With the strong backing
of the Ministry of Agricul-
ture, and the process mov-
ing forward with fresh talks,
Ms Lane said within the next
couple of months an agree-
ment is likely, once it
receives Cabinet approval.

A Brazilian delegation
joined Ms Lane on a tour of
the Agribusiness Expo yes-
terday, organised by the
Ministry of Agriculture. The
Expo was a part of the Min-
istry’s broad move to pro-
mote food security in the
country.

Brazilian Ambassador
Tomas Guggenheim said the
technical cooperation agree-
ment was necessary to estab-
lish the legal framework for
cooperation to enable the
Brazilian government to
legally authorise funds.

“Brazil is one of the
largest food exporters glob-
ally. Now that we have this
capacity, we are offering our
support,” said Mr Guggen-
heim, who noted the agree-
ment in question would be
the first of a kind for the two
countries.

The lack of an agreement
is not stopping the progress.
Travelling with the Ambas-
sador was Jose Amauri
Buso, of the state-run
agency, the Brazilian Agri-
cultural Research Corpora-
tion (BARC). He talked
with farmers and vendors at
the Expo, gaining what he
said was vital information
towards better understand-
ing how Brazil could offer
assistance. He will partici-
pate in two-days of meetings
as a member of the Brazil
mission.

Through the state agency,
Brazil has developed
advance research capacity in



av ot

LARRY CARTWRIGHT

a number of areas, and the
ability to diffuse the knowl-
edge among stakeholders in
the agricultural industry.
This is the expertise Brazil
plans to bring to bear in sup-
port of the Bahamian agri-
cultural sector.

More than 30 per cent of
Brazil’s area is agricultural
land. Less than two per cent
of the Bahamas’ land area is
agricultural land. Brazil pro-
duces crops such as coffee,
soybeans, wheat, rice, corn,
sugarcane, cocoa, citrus.

Also invited to participate
in discussions were the Min-
istries of Health, Tourism
and Environment. Of the
invited agencies, only the
Ministry of Agriculture has
identified its specific areas
of interest.

The Bahamas receives
about six offers per year
from countries seeking tech-
nical cooperation agree-
ments, according to Ms
Lane. She said it is not any
and every request the gov-
ernment looks favourably
on, because some countries
make requests considered
unreasonable.

“A lot of countries want
technical agreements but
you have to go through them
with a fine toothcomb to see
what you are gaining, what

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



you are giving up and what
you are signing on to,” said
Ms Lane.

She gave an example of an
agreement proposed by
Nigeria to supply nurses and
doctors for work in Bahami-
an hospitals that was reject-
ed. In this example, a request
was made for the Bahamas
to find furnished apartments
for the workers and pay their
rent, in addition to provid-
ing duty free exemption for
up to six-months after entry
to purchases household
appliances.

China and Cuba currently
have standing agreements
with the Bahamas. In addi-
tion to the agreement with
Cuba that facilitated needy
Bahamians receiving
cataract surgery under the
Miracle Eye programme, the
Bahamas has another agree-
ment with Cuba related to
health and education pend-
ing.

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Police shoot bur glar dead C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 106 No.80FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER COOLWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 70F LOW 55F N E W S SEESTORYONPAGEFIVE Parties in discussions over possible merger By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net POLICE shot dead a w ould-be burglar who t hreatened officers with a knife and screwdriver before trying to flee. The gunfire rang out in a quiet suburban neighbourhood when police responded to reports of attempted break-ins. The police had been c alled to stop two men seen walking from house to house trying to open car doors and the doors to people’s homes in Tower Heights Drive, off Sans Souci Road, in east Nassau, at around 5.20am as resi dents slept. Officers from Elizabeth Estates Police Station sent Man is killed after thr eatening of ficers with knife The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com THEBAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A CUTLASS attack on an American tourist has shocked the tiny community of Harbour Island and led to demands for an increase in police protection. T he incident happened at about 2am yesterday when two dark-skinned men, both armed with cutlasses, burst into a hotel room occupied by two American men at Tingum Village and demanded cash. One of the victims was slashed on his right arm but his friend managed to escape unharmed, police said. Three detectives were dispatched from the capital to assist with the investigation and up to press time, three men were assisting police in their probe. A reliable source identified the victim as Eddie Bryant of Stanford, Connecticut. He was reportedly airlifted to New Providence yesterday and then to hospital in Florida for Tourist in Harbour Island cutlass attack SEE page 15 A 22-YEAR-OLD Golden Gates man is in hospital in seri ous condition following a shooting in Mermaid Boulevard off Carmichael Road yesterday morning. Police responded to reports of gunfire at 9.20am and said the young man had been shot in the abdomen and taken to hospital in a private vehicle. He remains in hospital in serious condition while police investigations continue. The Criminal Detective Unit is following significant leads into the shooting and is appealing to the public for any information that may assist investigations. Contact police urgently on 911, 919, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Shooting leaves man in hospital SEE page 12 By ALESHA CADET THE body of a man riddled with multiple gunshot wounds was discovered in the back seat of a car in the area of South Beach yesterday. The victim has been identified as David Bowleg, believed to be between 25 and 30 years old. The Tribune understands that Bowleg is known to the police for several crime matters. Officers responded to the scene at around 1pm, where they found the dead man in a champagne-coloured vehicle on Holiday Drive in South Beach. Detectives have MAN F OUND SHOT DEAD SEE page 12 POLICE REMOVE the body of the man in the South Beach area yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f B y NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas is close to signing a technical co-operation agreement with Brazil t hat would strengthen diplomatic ties, according to Min istry of Foreign Affairs offic ials. In the first instance, the agreement will facilitate thet ransfer of agriculture exper tise, in research, food technology and biofuel technology. These are the areas of interest identified by the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources, which is the main Bahamian agency pushing the negotiations. “Brazil has comparative advantage in the agricultural sector and has a lot to offer the Bahamas by way of technology and food production,” said Ava Lane, senior assistant secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA and head of the technical assistance unit. Nothing has been signed as yet, but there is a draft agreeBahamas close to strengthening diplomatic ties with Brazil SEE page 16 TALK SHOW host Ortland Bodie Jr was apologetic on his radio programme yesterday, stating that he was wrong for offering to sell a firearm on national radio and that his remarks were “irresponsible” and should never have been said. Having been released from police custody some hours after being arrested on Wednesday, Mr Bodie also lauded the police at the Central Detective Unit (CDU fessionalism, maintaining at the same time that he had no animosity for what had tran spired. “I should never have said it,” Mr Bodie told his listeners yesterday. “You know you cannot shout fire in a theatre, and if you do, it has to be investigated. “I said everybody knows where to find an illegal gun. But I don’t really know where any are and I don’t want to know. But the police had to do their job.” On Wednesday, Mr Bodie was taken into police custody shortly after his programme ended and his home searched. To illustrate Talk show host apologetic o ver on-air firearm remarks SEE page 12

PAGE 2

CRITICAL security issues for the Bahamas and the region will be addressed by National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest at the CARICOM Council for National Security and Law Enforcement (CONSLE meeting in Antigua and Barbuda today. Mr Turnquest and the government department’s permanent secretary Missouri Sherman-Peter left today for the regional meeting with expectations of an update on CARICOM’s military response to Haiti’s catastrophic earthquake of January 12. They will also have the opportunity to put forward recommendations about how the Caribbean can now assist the devastated country, and these will be sent to Heads of Government for consideration. Also on the agenda is a review of preparations for the Caribbean and United States High Level Dialogue on Crime and Security to take place in Washington, DC, later this year between participating CARICOM members, the Dominican Republic and the US. A Caribbean-United States Declaration on Security Cooperation and a Caribbean-US Plan of Action on Security Cooperation is expected to be agreed in Washington, and it is anticipated the plan of action will be funded by the US under the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative. On the second day of the two-day conference in Antigua and Barbuda, CONSLE will also address the Strategic Work Plan and Budget of the CARICOM Implementation Agency for Crime and Security (IMPACS well as the CARICOM legal agenda, including the status of signature and ratification of the various CARICOM treaties. Mr Turnquest said: “CONSLE has a short and concise agenda, which per mits it to consider and make decisions on critical national and regional security issues, such as the situation in Haiti. “The outcome of the CONSLE meeting should help to advance the region’s security agenda.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9 Local News..........................P10,11,12,15,16 Editorial/Letters.........................................P4 Spor ts................................................P13,14 BUSINESS SECTION Business..........................P1,2,3,4,5,9,13,14 Advts.......................................P6,7,8,9,10,11 Comics.....................................................P12 CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES A JOINT partnership b etween Fidelity Bank ( Bahamas) Limited and the Western Union Foundation has raised over $80,000 for disaster relief in Haiti. E fforts to raise the funds began immediately after a devastating 7.0 earthquake levelled the Haitian capital Port-auPrince and surrounding regions on January 12,l eaving hundreds of thousands dead and many more injured. Staff at Fidelity Bank (Bahamas Bahamas, Grand Cayman and the Cayman Islands w ere encouraged to donate to the relief fund and every dollar they donated was matched by the bank. A s Fidelity acts as an a gent for Western Union in the Bahamas, Cayman and Turks and Caicos, W estern Union then m atched Fidelity’s donations through the Western Union Foundation and itsA gent Giving circle programme. T he community was a lso invited to show their s upport for Haiti by maki ng donations at the Western Union, MoneyCentre, Fidelity and Fidelity locations. Money raised will be s ent to Mercy Corps, as it is a sanctioned, registered c harity currently working to assist victims of the earthquake and their families in Haiti. Fidelity president Greg ory Bethel said: “We are very proud by the level of giving from our staff. Youk now you have hired the right people when they arenot only deeply touched by t he situation in Haiti, but they are willing to participate and part with their own money just to make a d ifference.” Partnership raises $80,000 for Haiti relief Assisting the Haitian earthquake relief effort Minister to address security issues at CARICOM meeting B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net MORE than a month after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake destroyed Haiti's capital city Port-au-Prince, and despite the generous outpouring of donations from Bahamians and the internationalc ommunity, countless displaced survivors are still desperate for food and medical aid. This, according to local real estate agent Gavin Christie and German businessman Peter Rebmann who recently returned from a week-long trip to the devastated c ity where they assisted in the r elief effort. Mr Christie told The Tribune a bout what prompted him and his friends to make such a compassionate gesture. " A friend of mine (Peter Rebmann) had a friend from Haiti who lost about two thirds of her family during the earthquake. He decided to ship a few crates of food, clothes and medical aid" to his friend's surviving f amily members, said Mr Christie. A fter this initial show of goodw ill, both men realised they had the means and connections tor aise a significant amount of mone y to contribute to Haiti. But they wanted to ensure that their donations went straight into the hands of those in need. Supplies On February 12, the pair, along with Miami-based doctor Ali Shyagan, chartered a privatep lane filled with boxes with food, medical supplies and toys. They teamed up with a Haitian c harity and spent the week doling out medical care to survivors and handing out food and toys to mal nourished orphans. T hey came face-to-face with a c ity, which was already struggling with widespread poverty before the January 12 quake, that looked as if it had been ravaged by war. Huge piles of rubble still lined the streets of Port-au-Prince, evidence of the many buildings -i ncluding the presidential palace that collapsed during the quake. Hundreds of thousands of displaced survivors sought shelter in tent communities on the outskirts of the city, lacking food, electricity and running water. "We expected to see suffering, but I didn't expect it (to be bad," Mr Rebmann told The Tri bune . "You don't expect to see a town (that looks out, but not one and half hours away from Nassau.” One of the most heart-wrenching moments for the pair came when they visited Sister Veroni ca's Orphanage in Port-au-Prince. The orphanage is home to about 80 undernourished children, run by 83-year-old Sister Veronica who could not find the $100 US she needed every week to sustain the place. "When we first went in there the kids were like zombies but after we gave them some toys, candy and food you could see a change in like 24 hours," Mr Christie said. "She was running the place herself, there was no food for the kids, the kids were unhealthy and I was shocked," Mr Rebmann added. "I said how is this possible when hundreds of millions of dollars (in aid Prince?” The group left behind toys, food and money for the children and recruited volunteers in Haiti to check in on the home periodically. They plan to return to Haiti in several weeks to carry out further relief efforts. HAITIAN ORPHANS enjoy a much needed meal at Sister Veronica's Orphanage in Port-au-Prince. PETER REBMANN (kneelingcentreright

PAGE 3

A BAHAMIAN man is facing federal charges in the Unit ed States following an attempt ed migrant smuggling venture that left a Jamaican man dead. Davon Rolle, 19, was charged with alien smuggling when a criminal complaint was filed on Wednesday. He is cur rently in US custody with two other Bahamians. Tyrel Levarity, 23, of the Bahamas, and three other men were charged with illegally trying to re-enter the US after deportation, and a 24-year-old Bahamian man was charged with violating US Immigration law. Authorities say a 28ft Intre pid speedboat spotted by a police helicopter near the Black Point Marina in Miami was chased off the South Florida coast on Tuesday night and people on the boat jumped overboard. The body of an unidentified Jamaican man was later dis covered around 30ft from the shore. Prosecutors say a duffel bag containing 60 lbs of mari juana was also found on the boat. US Immigration and Cus toms Enforcement (ICE agents took seven men into custody. Rolle is being held with out bail. Levarity is also in cus tody with Jamaicans David Coore, 27, and Delroy Coombs, 45, as well as Mathura Bridgelal, 50, of Trinidad, all facing illegal re-entry charges. The 24year-old Bahamian charged with violating US Immigration law is being held in Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE released by authorities, accord ing to The Miami Herald. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A 29-year-old Watling’s S treet man was sentenced to a year in jail yesterday after pleading guilty to weaponsand ammunitions charges. Tarino Moss pleaded guilty before Magistrate Carolita Bethell to the charges of possession of an unlicensed firearm and possession of a mmunition. Moss had initially pleaded not guilty to the charges and was standing trial. According to court dockets, on January 12, Moss was found in possession of a black Smith and Wesson .40 pistol and 11 .40 bullets. M oss was sentenced to a year in jail on each count. The sentences are to run concurrently. The magistrate ordered that the gun and ammunition be confiscated. Inspector Ercell Dorsette was the prosecutor. Man gets one-year term for weapons and ammo charges THE mother of a teenager who was found hanging in a police station holding cell last May told the Coroner’s Court yesterday that her son had aspirations of being a police officer. “Michael was a striving young man. He had to do things to help himself. I don’t know what went wrong,” Donna Wilson, the mother of 15-year-old Michael Knowles said yesterday. On May 31, 2009, Michael was found hanging in a holding cell at the East Street SouthP olice Station. An emotional Ms Wilson testified yesterday that around 5.45pm on Tuesday, May 26, Detective Kelrico Burrows brought Michael to her Newbold Street apartment. She said that Constable Burrows told her that he had found Michael and another boy wandering in the South Beach area. Ms Wilson said that she told the officer that she had not seen her son for a day and Constable Burrows in turn scolded Michael. She also told the court that she was alarmed when she saw Constable Burrows spank Michael with the handle of a hammer and asked him what he was doing. Ms Wilson testified that she went to the East Street South Police Station on Thursday, May 28, after Michael had been picked up by police a secondt ime. She told the court that she caught the jitney to the police station, arriving there at 4pm and waited some three hours to see Constable Burrows. She said that around 7pm that night Constable Burrows came out and she told him that she had been waiting for him a very long time, but he told her that no one had informed him that she was there. Ms Wilson said that at that time Constable Burrows told her he was heading out to investigate a shooting in Pinewood Gardens. She told the court that she called the police station on Saturday and was informed that her son had not been granted bail. She also testified that when she inquired on Sunday whether she could bring her son food and a change of clothes, she wasi nformed by the station orderly that Michael would be going to court that week. The inquest is being prosecuted by attorney Terry Archer. Attorney Keod Smith represents the mother of the deceased. Coroner William Campbell is presiding over the inquest. ‘My son wanted to be a police officer’ T eenager in US custody over alleged ‘alien smuggling’ THE crew of a fishing vessel was left adrift in the water after their boat was completely destroyed when it ran aground near the entrance to Nassau Harbour yesterday morning. Windy weather and rough s eas slammed the boat onto rocks east of New Providence after one of the engines failedon the 48ft fishing boat Ocean Mist as it was returning to Nassau at the end of a fishing trip. The wood and fibreglass vessel was completely destroyed as it was bashed against the rocks. Help Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF responding to calls for help just after 7am found the boat’s five crew members clinging to rocks near the wreckage. RBDF Lieutenant Carlton Bethel said: “Because they lost control of their enginesand the weather that we have out there is so terrible the boat just crashed into the rocks and was completely destroyed. “We had people who were holding onto rocks and some of them were still in the water. They were in the water for less than an hour, but it’s rough, and even in this climate hypothermia could set in. “It’s not even safe for a small craft to be out there in this weather.” Officers on board HMBS P-38 took all five crew on board and landed them at the Harbour Patrol Unit just before 8.30am to be examined by Emergency Medical Services. All but one, who suffered minor injuries, appeared to bein good health apart from cuts and bruising. Fishing crew left adrift after boat destroyed By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net IN a bid to spread the message of food security, the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources has launched a series of 11 agribusiness expos across 11 islands. With three down, one in progress in Nassau and seven more to go, the ministry has thrown its full support behind the initiative. “The theme chosen for these expos, ‘Progressing Toward Food Security’, is most befitting as food security throughout the Bahamas is indeed a concern,” said Larry Cartwright, Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources. “Our recent experience in the Bahamas and throughout the world confirms that the certain production and supply of food which might have been taken for granted are no longer as certain as they once were,” he said. The ministry plans to approach food security by encouraging increased local production in the areas of vegetable, root crops, fruits, poultry, marine resources or livestock, and by addressing the issues that impact the industry adversely. In the making is a five-year development plan that aims to position agriculture and marine resources as key pillars of the Bahamian economy. A rapid assessment exercise is currently underway towards this end. The ministry is also seeking a technical cooperation agreement with the Brazilian government to facilitate the transfer of technology and advanced agricultural research conducted by the Brazilians. Mr. Cartwright said the challenge to farmers is to provide commercial produce to the local market that meets acceptable standards of quality, quantity and consistency. This would enable greater linkages between tourism and the agriculture industry, with the supply of native seasonal fruits, vegetables and root crops to guests staying in local hotels and resorts. Food security in the Bahamas is not guaranteed because of the various threats in the market, according to Mr Cartwright. He said rising fuel prices, rising glob al food prices and the global financial meltdown all affected the industry in recent times. He saida fundamental reality of climate change is frequent droughts and unpredictable storms. An expo is currently underway at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre in New Provi dence. The next expo in the series takes place in Cat Island on March 18. North and Central Andros will follow closely behind. Agribusiness expo promotes food security In brief Mother of teenager found hanging in police cell testifies INQUEST: Michael Knowles Larry Cartwright

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. Efficiency, professionalism, p roficiency and integrity must always be the norm in Real Estate closings. In each and every real estate closing, “all of the i’s must be dotted and all of the t’s must be crossed!” This writer has personally experienced the disgust and heartbreak wrought by bungled closings. Truly, one botched closing is one too many; so I am thankful to you for publishing this lett er that may be helpful to those who are interested in buying or selling real estate, so that they will do everything to ensure that their sale or purchase of real estate is not muddled at the closing. Barring unforeseen and/or extraordinary circumstances that may arise, each and every closing should close on time, with penalties to be paid by whichever party is responsible for delays. Everything, including minu tia, must be settled between all of the parties. At the closing, all parties and their legal reps, including the Real Estate brok er and his/her lawyer, should be in a particular place designated for the occasion. From what I have seen, it would be prudent for the real estate broker to take his/her lawyer to represent him/her at the closing, as it seems that his/her presence is considered to be unnecessary or, at best, merely incidental to the very important matter of closing. GLEN MORE Nassau, February 9, 2010. EDITOR, The Tribune. I t is with great remorse a nd disdain that I write this correspondence. Certainly, I say this because after discreet conversation and close dialogue with most of my a ffected colleagues in the d epartment, I am of the consensus that we are being f inancially neglected or punished. Is it perhaps, for the unethical misdeeds of some i n the past in which we all s hould presently be held accountable? Or is it only f or the persuasion of the hierarchical order who appear to care not whether we “sink or swim” in these economically challenging times. Over the last two years or so, the Government via the Customs Department, have been engaged in a tedious restructuring programme where it endeavoured to bring upon a change in the department in essentially two ways: l) The Government has terminated and also “transferred/seconded” some of its less desirable officers (for lack of a better word) to various government depart ments and early retired most of the longer serving officers (40 years or more done in efforts to promote younger officers (some with tertiary level education) who in my estimation can possi bly help to bring about a new vision and enterprising ideas, which can perhapsr evamp the functioning of the Department through their youthfulness and acquired technical and voca tional skills. 2 ) 0ver the last three years the government hired a pproximately 300 customs officers and guards (combined) to help to bring intof ruition the new-implemented shift system into the d epartment. This new shift system is design firstly, to alleviate the government a nd the airline/shipping agencies of the so-called absorbidant” overtime charges that they are required to pay us for our extra-working attendance. Secondly, the hiring of thesen ew personnel was in my opinion, tactfully done by t he Government to obtain i ts political objective while appeasing its political d etractors during these recessionary times. C ontrary to the points mentioned above, I havea bsolutely no problem with t he Government firing, transferring or hiring offi-c ers if it feels that this is w hat is necessary to bring about positive and effective change in the department. I also, understand and acceptt hat in the Government's quest to promote trade and tourism for the benefit of allB ahamians, it may be eco nomically impractical for the government and the relevant agencies to continuet he payment of overtime f ees in the rate done so in the past to suffice this cause. However, I am very discor dant with the compensation payment that was given to u s in lieu of overtime paym ent. Not only was the amount that was given to us g rossly inadequate (average of $300 per month) in comparison to (average of $1200 p er month) made in overt ime in the past. Also, in particular, I oppose the hiera rchical method in which the payment was dispersed, which was clearly disingenu ous to the junior staff. This i s so, because the bulk of the compensation payment w hich was “said to be given” in lieu of overtime was in fact paid out to the executives and junior executives in the average of $700-$900 per month and they never worked overtime because the overtime duties were performed by the junior staff and junior management respectively. Furthermore, to compound an already vexing situation, we commenced working the newly imple mented shift system from January 18, 2010. However, we have overtime payment outstanding to us as far back as September 1, 2009. This outstanding overtime was promised to be paid to us at year ending December 31, 2009, we are currently in the month of February. How reasonable is this to honest officers trying to survive on “already” budgeted salaries. How reasonable is this? A REASONABLE C USTOMS OFFICER Nassau, February, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I N DEBATING the Planning and Subdivisions Bill in the Senate yesterday Mrs A lyson Maynard Gibson stated the obvious: There is no point in planning wonderful communities if people will not be safe in their own homes. She pointed out five areas, which in her opinion, had to be dealt with before the proposed Bill would have any meaning. O f course, crime headed the list. She read the headlines of the two daily newspapers for F ebruary 23 and 24 home invasion, murder, robberies and stabbings. Turn to today’s front page and there’s little else to read but crime murder in South Beach, cutlass attack on a tourist in Harbour Island, shooting in Carmichael, and thief who tried to attack the police in San Souci, killed. S he also recommended the obvious: Anyone who shoots or threatens a policeman, or a ttacks or threatens a judge should be tried immediately. The man who broke into a policeman’s home recently should also be tried immediately. Secondly, accused murderers should not be let out on bail. Instead they should get an immediate trial. It was obvious to the community and discouraging to the police that a person with a serious criminal record let lose on a com munity would create mayhem. Which one of you would hire a person with a criminal record especially one accused of murderor other acts of violence? The answer is none of you. Yet, these are human beings with all the natural urges of hunger, thirst, the need to support a family and to have a job to be able to do so. Everyone knows that a hungry, desperate man will steal and, depending on his desperation, will also kill. The community knows this. But apparently the courts did not. Today almost every crime we report has been committed by someone out on bail. At times the victim, with a long criminal r ecord, is awaiting trial when he is overtaken by another bailed criminal. This one ends the first man’s life of crime with a bullet always with an unlicensed gun, illegally obtained. It is not unusual to be told by a resident. “Oh, I know him, he mother live next door. He’s a real tief, a menace to us around here, he always in and out of prison.” And so as long as these criminals are always in and out of prison, they will always b e a menace to a community, and extra work for the police, who are discouraged by having to keep hunting them down and return ing them to prison a prison they should h ave never left. So no one should be surprised at what is happening in this commun ity today. But how to stop it? Some cynic commented recently: “Oh, but they are killing each other!” Yes, they are killing each other and saving the courts time, but in the meantime, innocent citizens are being caught in the cross-fire. Many years ago an English superintend ent headed HM Prison, and an English superintendent, we believe his name was C apt. Holland, headed what was then known as the Boys Industrial School. These two men made the inmates the men and the boys earn their own keep. The prisoners grew their own food. We believe that this is still done on a smaller scale at the prison today. W ith the need to reduce our food imports, and with all the Crown land that g overnment has, it would seem reasonable that a large acreage should be set aside to be worked by the inmates, especially those on remand. This farm should be able to sup ply the island with its fruits and vegetables, which could be sold with part proceeds going to the prisoners to support their families and the remainder to pay government rent for their stay at HM prison. It would be a security risk to turn all the prisoners even under armed guard on the farm at the same time. They should, therefore, be taken out in relays. The late Sir Etienne Dupuch worked with one of the prison superintendents to get the prisoners to make toys for his Santa Claus Committee to distribute to poor children in the community at Christmas time. These toys were quite professional wheels turned, little horns on trucks honked, there were wooden animals on wheels at the end of a string for small children to pull around behind them. They were all beauti fully painted. The prisoners enjoyed the work. It made t hem feel that they were not only a part of the community, but also making a contribution. And the Santa Claus committee volun teers took great pride in wrapping the pris oners’ toys and decking them out with rib bons and bows. To the committee women these were very special gifts that deserved special treatment. These social misfits, who got off life’s train at the wrong stop, need not be a finan c ial drain on the community if some thought and planning could go into helping them earn their keep during their period of reha bilitation. We are being financially neglected or punished LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Prisoners should earn their own keep btntf "!*b""$'$"$ &"! nbbbbrfn L L o o o o k k i i n n g g a a t t R R e e a a l l E E s s t t a a t t e e c c l l o o s s i i n n g g s s

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B y PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas may soon see the birth of a new political party as the leadership o f both the Bahamas Democ ratic Movement (BDM and the National Development Party (NDP begun discussions about a possible merger of the two organisations. H aving held three meetings since the Elizabeth bye lection, in which both parties’ candidates were defeated, the NDP and the BDMh ave been embroiled in talks with other known political persons as to their collective way forward. H owever, according to sources within the two parties there has already beend ifficulties with this process. R eportedly one of the main issues raised in the first meeting was whether or not the two parties would do a way with their names and join under a new umbrella, o r if one organisation should simply join up under the leadership of the other. A second issue raised was the leadership styles and s tructure of the parties. T he NDP seems to prefer t o allow the constituents to be the ones who are respon sible for picking their repres entative in an election. This model, it was said, was proving to be a stumbling block for many with the BDM whof eel that the candidates should be chosen in another fashion. Q uestioned on the issue of a possible merger yester day, BDM leader Cassius Stuart said that the two p olitical parties were in the very initial stages of their talks” and his organisation w as not against meeting and speaking with the NDP. H owever, as to which o rganisation could possibly e nd up absorbing the other, M r Stuart was adamant that the BDM is the more wellk nown of the two, having spent more than a decade on the political stage. I spoke with our team last night and they were not against meeting and talking. B ecause we do have some philosophical differences at this time. For us it is getting the best. Anytime you nego t iate it has to be a win-win situation. Our brand (BDM is constantly out there. And to get a new brand in the m inds of the Bahamian people may take another 10 y ears. So it only makes practical sense if there were to be any j oining to keep the BDM b rand,” he said. A s for what his party is d oing in the meantime, Mr Stuart said that they have b een holding meetings to review why the organisation under-performed in the Eliz-a beth by-election. “We were not happy with the results coming out of the l ast election but when you look at what we were up against, the government with all its machinery, and the O pposition, they were spending millions and millions of dollars. So there were a whole lot of things we were concerned about. And we were also conc erned about all the Ministers and Members of Parliament sitting in polling division booths. What happened to the government on that day? Because the level ofi ntimidation was unbelieva ble. So whatever they promised the people before voting day they were there to make sure they voted like they said they would. So from our perspective it appears that the government was pulling out all stops int hat regard to win this election,” he said. In the Elizabeth by-elect ion, the BDM secured 76 votes in total to the NDP’s4 9. The FNM’s Dr Duane Sands won the majority of w hite ballots cast during the election, winning 1,501. The PLP’s Ryan Pinder secured 1,499 votes. Mr Pinder is currently c ontesting five protest ball ots that he claims were cast i n favour of him. Until this issue can be rectified in the Election Court there can ben o declaration of an absolute winner for the seata s these five votes if counte d, can shift the majority to t he PLP. Therefore the Elizabeth seat remains empty in the House of Assembly at t his time. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Parties in discussions over possible merger I N Amove to further expand their influence and voice within the Progressive Liberal Party (PLP t he youth wing of the political organisation, the Progressive Young Liberals ( PYL), will be establishing a local branch in every c onstituency throughout the country. A ccording to De’Angelo W hyms, the vice-chairman of the PYL, these 41 Young Liberal branches are a part of their organisation’s mission to empower the nation’s youth. “Throughout the length a nd breath of our nation t he young people within the various constituencies h ave been crying out for a n avenue to voice their c oncerns on matters of national importance, we intend to satisfy their hunger to be heard. Wei ntend to travel through out each and every constituency within the Com-m onwealth of the B ahamas seeking out the young minds dwelling within and establishing 41 Young Liberals branches. The mentality of the youth of our nation is evolving daily and with e volution there comes c hange. The Progressive Young Liberals intends to nurturet his evolution, thus maxi mising its potential and inevitably procuring a secure future for our gen eration and generations to come,” Mr Whyms said. “With the wisdom of those who came before us a nd those who are curr ently at the helm of our party, we will create a y outh centric environment w here innovation is cons tant, pro-creation preva lent and having an idea would be the only requirement. We invite all youtht o get involved and chal lenge yourself to become Progressive Young Liber-a ls.” PLP youth wing set to branch out DE’ANGELO WHYMS , the vice-chairman of the PYL. Cassius Stuart of the BDM and Dr Andre Rollins of the NDP.

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MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO The financing of lease agreements between the National Insurance Board (NIB the country’s infrastructural development has led to a further diversification of the Board’s investment portfolio, according to NIB director Algernon Cargill. Mr Cargill said the agreements continue to serve the Board “well”, as they ensure that NIB funds are being “optimally deployed.” Addressing central and local government officials and residents of Abaco attending the contract signing for the construction of the government administration building in Marsh Harbour last Friday, Mr Cargill said the lease financing of government buildings has “generally earned” a yield of approximately 7.25 per cent per annum. The new government complex in Abaco will be constructed on nine acres of land by WOSLEE Contractors at a cost of $19.6million. Construction is set to begin immediately with an expected completion date of December, 2011. Officials say the construction of the building will address much of the space challenges faced by government offices and agencies which provide vital services to residents of Abaco. The complex will house the Magistrates Courts, Ministry of Works, Business Licensing Authority, Department of Immigration and Department of Environmental Health. Mr Cargill said that while the granting of loans comprises a “very small part” of the Board- ’s investment portfolio, it is an important aspect as the alternative would be that “NIB funds would not be optimally deployed and in some cases earning no interest at all.” “Given NIB’s long-term investment horizon, having the present 7.5 per cent of the National Insurance Fund in real estate is a healthy diversification of our investment portfolio by any standard,” Mr Cargill said. Mr Cargill said the Board can “further credit” its focus on investments such as the construction of the government administrative building in Marsh Harbour as a primary reason why the National Insurance Fund did not experience any “significant erosion in value” during the recent global financial crisis. “Our investments in government and quasi-government debt issues, as well as specific building projects used by the government and its agencies, have performed satisfactorily and have historically and are currently, yielding above-market returns,” he added. Mr Cargill said NIB’s reserves currently stand at $1.6billion which represents an accumulation of income from contributions and investments, less benefits and expenses, over the almost 36 years of the life of the programme. “Surplus contributions (those not paid out in benefits and assistance) go into NIB reserves,” he said. “Monies from this Reserve Fund are routinely invested so as to meet both the present and future costs of benefits and assistance.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Police officers at the Eight Mile Rock Division conducted road check exercises on Wednesday in the school zones and the pedestrian crossings in the Eight Mile Rock area. S upt Christopher Pickstock, t he officer in charge of the Eight Mile Rock Division, ASP Loretta Mackey, second in command, and Corporals Christina King and Godfrey Knowles were at two busy traffic locations ensuring that motorists and pedestrians obeyed the traffic rules. ASP Mackey said Queens Highway is a busy road that runs through the Eight Mile Rock settlement, where many persons live, work and go to school. S he said it is important that motorists obey the speed limit, especially in the school zones where the speed limit is 15mph from 7.30am – 9.30am, and in the afternoon from 2.30pm 4pm. She also noted that pedestrians should use the pedestrian/traffic crossing when crossing the street. Persons using the crossing must make one step onto the crossing then look left, then right, then left again to ascertain that the vehicles approach ing come to a complete stop before continuing to walk, not run, to the other side of the street. “We need the motoring public to be more conscious of other road users, in particular thec hildren walking to school or b eing dropped off on the roadside by parents,” said Ms Mackey. “We wanted to take this opportunity to ensure that m otorists are obeying the speed limit and to also teach young pedestrians how to properly use the traffic crossing,” she said. Supt Pickstock said that road checks will be conducted on a weekly basis in the dis trict, especially at the three schools – Eight Mile Rock High, Bartlett Hill Primary, and Martin Town Primary. Corporals King and Knowles distributed flyers with road safety tips about the proper use of pedestrian crossings, riding the school bus and riding bicycles on the street. Corporal Knowles said they were able to spot speeders witha radar gun. “We cited several motorists for speeding today,” he said. A SP Mackey said that police v isibility in the Eight Mile Rock Community will ensure that the community is much safer for residents to work and live. Police in GB conduct road check exercises Lease agreements diversify NIB investment portfolio PICTURED are school children using a crosswalk during the road check exercise.

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 75%OFFUp to Fri. February 26th Sat. February 27th 10:00am 4pm Cash&Carry!Office Supplies & Furniture, School Supplies, Stationary and MUCH MORE!Parking Lot Robinson Rd.Tel: 393-5964SALETent Head on down to John Bull Business Centre for great savings at the annual... EXPLORING how to make Eleuthera a model of sustainable development not only for the Bahamas, but throughout the world, was the main topic at the 2010 sustainability conference hosted by theCape Eleuthera Institute (CEI weekend. Government officials, including Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, Speaker of the House of Assembly Alvin Smith and Minister of Education Desmond Bannister, attended the conference at which former governor of New Jersey and former administrator of the Environmental Pro tection Agency Christine Todd-Whitman was the keynote speaker. Each government official took time to share thoughts on how Eleuthera can become a model for sustainable development. During her keynote address, Governor Todd-Whitman recognised the challenges the Bahamas faces as it works toward a sustainable future. “The rewards of early com mitment to sustainability are not perhaps as tangible today as we would like them to be, and they’re hard to prove,” she said. “But you can’t wait until that evidence is out there to start to take action. By then it’s too late when you’re talking about sus tainability. You have to move forward sooner.” Governor Todd-Whitman was also quick to point out that since New Jersey and Eleuthera have many similarities, she felt comfortable sharing her experiences. Both places have a 110-mile Atlantic coastline, both heavily depend on tourism, and both places are centres of innovation. Mr Symonette challenged conference participants to be proactive in solving problems of sustainability in the Bahamas. “The government is challenged in producing a lot of the answers you want,” he said. “So sometimes it is helpful for you to come to the government with the solution to the problem, not ask the govern ment to develop the solution.” During the afternoon panel discussion, participants exam ined CEI’s Charter for Sus tainable Development of the Bahamas and made suggestions on how these principles could best be put into action. Panellists included Shaun Ingraham, Eleuthera commu nity member; Joy Jibrilu, direc tor of Investments for the Bahamas Investment Authori ty; Mike Hartman, an ecodeveloper in the Bahamas and Costa Rica; Eric Carey, execu tive director of Bahamas National Trust, and Michael Northrop, Sustainable Development Programme director of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. CEI will continue to solicit input on the charter at www.greenbahamas.word press.com. Creating a model of sustainable development KEYNOTESPEAKER: Christine Todd-Whitman Bahamian and US government officials share insights o n how to make the Bahamas an example for the world THESPEAKERGROUP D EPUTY PRIME MINISTER a nd Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette. ‘The rewards of early commitment to sustainability aren ot perhaps as tangible today as we would like them to be, and they’re hard to p rove.’

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM .,1*6:$<$&$'(0<6&+2/$56+,3$11281&(0(17.LQJVZD\$FDGHP\OHDGLQJ%DKDPLDQVFKRROZLWK U HSXWDWLRQIRUH[FHOOHQFHLQDFDGHPLFVDWKOHWLFVDQGWKHDUWV D FRPPLWPHQWWR&KULVWLDQYDOXHVDQGVWURQJWUDGLWLRQRI SXEOLFVHUYLFHLVLQYLWLQJDSSOLFDQWVIRUWZRf SUHVWLJLRXV VFKRODUVKLSVIRUVWXGHQWVHQWHULQJ*UDGHLQ 6 $fKH*UDFHDWKDP.HPSFKRODUVKLS 1DPHGLQKRQRXURI.LQJVZD\VIRXQGHU 0UV*UDFHDWKDP.HPSKLVVFKRODUVKLSLVIRUDZHOOURXQGHG VWXGHQWZLWKSURYHQVWURQJDFDGHPLFSHUIRUPDQFH%fKHHG:DOODFHSRUWVFKRODUVKLS 1DPHGLQKRQRXURIRQHRI.LQJVZD\VHDUOLHVWEXLOGLQJ FRQWUDFWRUVDQGDIRUPHUPHPEHURIWKH%RDUGUHG:DOODFH 7KLVVFKRODUVKLSLVIRUDZHOOURXQGHGVWXGHQWZLWKSURYHQ VWURQJDFDGHPLFDQGVSRUWVSHUIRUPDQFH ,QWHUHVWHGVWXGHQWVVKRXOGVXEPLWWKHIROORZLQJDSSOLFDWLRQ SDFNDJH &RPSOHWHG.LQJVZD\+LJKFKRRO$SSOLFDWLRQ)RUP DYDLODEOHDWWKH.LQJVZD\+LJKFKRROIFHRUPD\EH HPDLOHGXSRQUHTXHVWf 5HFRPPHQGDWLRQOHWWHUIURP\RXUVFKRROVULQFLSDO 5HFRPPHQGDWLRQOHWWHUIURP\RXUVFKRROV&RDFKLIDSSO\LQJ IRUWKHVSRUWVVFKRODUVKLS 3HUVRQDOVWDWHPHQWVKDULQJ\RXUVFKRROFKXUFKDQG FRPPXQLW\LQYROYHPHQWDVZHOODV\RXUSODQVIRUWKHIXWXUH 7UDQVFULSWRI\RXUODVWWKUHHfDFDGHPLF\HDUV *UDGHVDQGWRGDWHf 7UDQVFULSWVZLOORQO\EH FRQVLGHUHGYDOLGLIWKH\DUHVXEPLWWHGLQ\RXUVFKRROV VHDOHGHQYHORSZLWK\RXUVFKRROVVWDPSRUVHDO 1RWH 6KRUWOLVWHGFDQGLGDWHVZLOOEHLQYLWHGWRVLWWKH VFKRODUVKLSH[DPLQDWLRQDQGDSSHDUDWDQLQWHUYLHZ ' HDGOLQH&RPSOHWHDSSOLFDWLRQSDFNDJHVKRXOGEH VXEPLWWHGDWWKH+LJK6FKRRO2IFHQRODWHU WKDQRQGD\DUFK V W By ERIC ROSE Bahamas Information Services THE Department of Culture in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture recently identified the adjudicators for the 2010 E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival, which opens March 1. Choral and instrumental music adjudicator is A udrey Dean-Wright. She is a composer, singer, choral conductor, lecturer and poet. Mrs Dean-Wright was born in Nassau and her educational background is extensive. It includes being educated at the Bahamas Academy of Seventh-Day Adventists and the Jamaica School of Music in Kingston, Jamaica. She was the recipient of the Bahamas Government Scholarship to the Manhattan Schoolo f Music in New York where she earned a BA Music degree Voice and Masters of Music degree in Music Education and Clarinet. She also received the College of the Bahamas In-Service Award to the Manhattan School of Music. Mrs Dean-Wright had early piano studies with Muriel Mallory, in-depth study of music and piano skills with her mentor Mr Bethel and also studied piano with Meta Davis-Cumberbatch. Dance adjudicator is Lawrence Carroll. He began his dance training with the New Breed Dancers in Nassau. Later, he travelled to Toron to, Canada, to advance his studies at Ryerson University, where he studied theatre arts and was graduated with honours. At the Canadian College of Dance, he also studied classical ballet with the Royal Academy of Dance and modern dance and national dance with the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing. After graduating from Ryerson University, he began teaching at the National Dance School and later went to A F Adderley, C C Sweeting and D W Davis schools, among others. Drama adjudicator is James Catalyn. He studied drama at De’ Paul University in Chicago, Illinois. Mr Catalyn has brought Bahamian culture to the forefront by his prolific writing. His works have been performed on stage, radio and throughout the islands of the Bahamas. He and his troupe represented the Bahamas internationally in New Zealand, Trinidad, Bermuda and at the United Nations in New York City. His insistence that Bahamians speak “Bahamianese” has made many more aware of the beauty and uniqueness of the Bahamian dialect. Arts and crafts adjudicator is Heino Schmid. He has a Bahamian mother and a German father. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography at the Savannah College of Art Design and his Masters in Fine Arts from the Utrecht Graduate School of Visual Art and Design in Utrecht, the Netherlands. He has participated in numerous group shows in the Bahamas, the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe. Among them were ‘Work!’ in 2007 at the Popopstudios Gallery, Nassau; ‘Funky Nassau: Recovering An Identity’ in 2006 at the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, and at the Nassauischer Kunstverein in Wiesbaden, Germany; and ‘Dare 1’ in 2006, at the Universities Museum in Utrecht, the Nether lands. Adjudicators named for E Clement Bethel National Arts Festival AVIATORS from all over Florida learned more about the new pre-clearance for private aircraft feature at Grand B ahama International Airport during the recent Banyan Trade Show in Florida. More than 250 participants attended, including private pilots, FBO owners, Flying Services, Pilot Publishers and officials from Grand Bahama Airport Company and the Bahamas Tourist Office. Gary Gilbert, Hutchison Port Holdings chief executive said: “Freeport, Grand Bahama is an idyllic location for the new pre-clearance facility for gen-e ral aviation and our attendance at the Banyan Trade Show provided us an opportunity to alert all pilots and owners of private aircraft of the advantages for them to preclear in Grand Bahama before flying on to their ultimate US destinations.” Indicators suggest that owners and lessees of private aircraft in the US have a preference for closer destinations and airports. The Bahamas is one of only five destinations in the world with US pre-clearance facilities for commercial passengers. The US and the Bahamas Pre-clearance Agreement Act is being amended to include the pre-clearance of private aircraft. Grand Bahama pre-clearance GB International Airport promotes n ew pre-clearance for private aircraft B ANYANTRADESHOW

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THE Deep Creek Middle School (DCMS I sland School in Eleuthera c ontinue to take the lead when it comes to teaching Bahamian children the importance of recycling. And last week the DCMS received its first cheque as p art of the ‘Cans for Kids’ p roject, an organisation which raises money for Bahamian schools and chil-d ren’s programmes through a luminum can recycling. F amily Islands set up d epots to collect cans from schools and the community. The cans were then bagged to be sent to Nassau. In Nassau, the cans are crushed, rebagged and sent to the US for recycling. T he goal of the programme is to foster the idea of recycling in Bahamian youth so t hat the practice becomes h abitual and can take root in the Bahamas. From October through December of 2009, DCMS and the Island School collected more than 150 lbs of a luminum cans. O n February 17, Sam Kenworthy, waste management coordinator at CapeE leuthera Institute, presente d a $45 cheque to Hershal K nowles, president of the D CMS eco club and Dr Joanna Paul, principal of DCMS. Mr Knowles and the eco club have been working to educate their fellow students and n eighbours about the importance or recycling. The can collecting project i s part of DCMS’s larger e ffort to become the first green flag eco-certified school in the Caribbean through Foundation for Environmental Education. "Aluminum cans are the e asiest waste stream to recyc le,” said Mr Kenworthy. “Although Eleuthera has no existing recycling infra-s tructure, ‘Cans for Kids’ has m ade getting rid of our cans e xtremely easy; anyone can g et involved. Being responsible for one's waste is a lesson that is not only important for young people to learn, but society as a whole. By establishing a simple, foolproof method to responsibly get rid o f cans, we help ourselves, t he environment, and raise money for local schools at the same time,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 6W$QGUHZ6FKRRO7KH,QWHUQDWLRQDO6FKRRORI7KH%DKDPDV DQDXWKRUL]HG,QWHUQDWLRQDO%DFFDODXUHDWH:RUOG6FKRROLQYLWHV DSSOLFDWLRQVIURPTXDOLHGDQGH[SHULHQFHG %DKDPLDQFDQGLGDWHV IRUWKHIROORZLQJWHDFKLQJYDFDQFLHVZLWKHIIHFWIURP $XJXVW )XOOLQIRUPDWLRQUHJDUGLQJWKHVFKRROPD\EHIRXQGDWLWVZHEVLWHZ ZZVWDQGUHZVFRP &DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGEHTXDOLHGWHDFKHUVZKRSRVVHVVWKHQHFHVVDU\ D FDGHPLFTXDOLFDWLRQVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQVfIRUZKLFKWKH\DSSO\LQFOXGLQJ D WHDFKLQJTXDOLFDWLRQDQGEDFKHORUGHJUHHDQGQRUPDOO\QHHG WRKDYHPLQLPXPRIWZR\HDUVVXFFHVVIXOVFKRROEDVHGH[SHULHQFH 'HVLUDEOHTXDOLFDWLRQVLQDGGLWLRQWRWKRVHVSHFLHGIRULQGLYLGXDO SRVWVDUHWKDWWHDFKHUVKDYHVXFFHVVIXOH[SHULHQFHLQDQLQGHSHQGHQW DQGRULQWHUQDWLRQDOVFKRRODQGDQDGYDQFHGGHJUHH$SSOLFDWLRQVIURP FDQGLGDWHVDEOHWRFRDFKWHDPVSRUWVRUDGYLVHVFKRROFOXEVDQGDFWLYLWLHV DUHSDUWLFXODUO\ZHOFRPHG6HFRQGDU\ LH PLGGOHDQGXSSHUf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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH1 27,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf 7 6ROGLHURDGRUWKLPPHGLDWHO\ 6RXWKRI/RZHVKDUPDF\t ( \H:RUOG %X\IUR]HQUDZGRXJKSDWWLHV E\WKHGR]HQFKHDSHU 6WRUHLQIUHH]HUQRWLQFRROHU %DNHDVQHHGHGLQ\RXURZQ WUDGLWLRQDORYHQQRWPLFURZDYHf $WHQGRIEDNHF\FOHSDWWLHVVKRXOG UPKDUGLIVRIWQRWGRQHf GRQRWEXUQ MXLF\WDVW\ -DPDLFDQSDWWLHV HDGLO\DYDLODEOHEHHIFKLFNHQ YHJJLHFRGVKFRQFKFUDE JURXSHUVKULPSDFNHHFRGVK FDODORRFRGVKOREVWHUPDUNHWf PL[DOORZHG DOG lovers are invited to come out and support the Bahamas Kennel Club’s annual All-Breed Dog Show next month. The show, which will take place on the weekend of March 20-21 at the Nassau Botanical G ardens, will feature dogs in the working, sporting, non-sporting, terrier, toy and herding groups. Dogs from the United States, Canada and the Bahamas will be competing for ‘Best in Breed’ and ‘Best in Show’. The show is sponsored by P urina Dog Food. SPORTING CLASS Dogs in the sporting class are naturally active and alert. Sporting dogs make likable, wellrounded companions. Members of the group include Pointers, Retrievers, Setters and Spaniels. Remarkable for their instincts in water and woods, many of these breeds actively continue to participate in hunting and other field activities. Potential owners of sporting dogs need to realise that most require regular, invigorating exercise. HOUNDS Most hounds share the common ancestral trait of being used for hunting. Some use acute scenting powers to follow a trail. Others demonstrate a phenomenal gift of stamina as they relentlessly run down quarry. Beyond this, however, generalisations about hounds are hard to come by, since the group encompasses quite a diverse lot. There are Pharaoh Hounds, Norwegian Elkhounds, Afghans a nd Beagles, among others. Some hounds share the distinct ability to produce a unique sound known as baying. You'd best sample this sound before you decide to get a hound of your own to be sure it's your cup of tea. WORKING CLASS Dogs of the working group were bred to perform such jobs as guarding property, pulling sleds and performing water rescues. They have been invaluable assets to man throughout thea ges. The Doberman Pinscher, Siberian Husky and Great Dane are included in this group, to name just a few. Quick to learn, these intelligent, capable animals make solid companions. Their considerable dimensions and strength alone, however, make many working dogs unsuitable as pets for average families. And again, by virtue of their size alone, these dogs must be properly trained TERRIERS Terriers are feisty, energetic dogs whose sizes range from fair ly small, as in the Norfolk, Cairn or West Highland White Terrier, to the grand Airedale Terrier. Terriers typically have little tolerance for other animals, including other dogs. Their ancestors were bred to hunt and kill vermin. Many continue to project the attitude that they're always eager for a spirited argument. Most terriers have wiry coats that require special grooming known as stripping in order to maintain a characteristic appearance. In general, they make engag ing pets, but require owners with the determination to match their d ogs' lively characters. TOY BREEDS The diminutive size and winsome expressions of toy dogs illustrate the main function of this group to embody sheer delight. Don't let their tiny stature fool you, though many toys are tough as nails. If you haven't yet experienced the barking of an angry Chihuahua, for example, well, just wait. Toy dogs will always be popular with city dwellers and people without much living space. They make ideal apartment dogs and terrific lap warmers on nippy nights. NON-SPORTING CLASS Non-sporting dogs are a diverse group. Here are sturdy animals with as different personalities and appearances as the Chow Chow, Dalmatian, French Bulldog, and Keeshond. Talk a bout differences in size, coat, and visage! Some, like the Schipperke and Tibetan Spaniel are uncomm on sights in the average neighbourhood. Others, however, like the Poodle and Lhasa Apso, have quite a large following. The breeds in the non-sporting group are a varied collection in terms of size, coat, personality and overall appearance. THE HERDING GROUP Created in 1983, the herding group is the newest AKC classification; its members were formerly members of the working group. All breeds share the fabulous ability to control the movement of other animals. A remarkable example is the low-set Corgi, perhaps one foot t all at the shoulders, that can drive a herd of cows many times its size to pasture by leaping and nipping at their heels. The vast majority of herding dogs, as household pets, never cross paths with a farm animal. Nevertheless, pure instinct p rompts many of these dogs to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family. In general, these intelligent dogs m ake excellent companions and respond beautifully to training exercises. Bahamas Kennel Club All-Breed Dog Show set for March

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1 RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG & RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ W GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU L V $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX % DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf /HJDORWLFH127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI)HEUXDU\7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV $5*26$&253/LTXLGDWRUf o ut to confront the villains found one of the men was armed with a screwdriver and a knife. He reportedly threatened officers with his weapons before bolting behind a home that backs onto the adjacent Sherwood Drive Police opened fire, fatally wounding the man in the mid-section of his body. His accomplice got away. The dead man’s identity has not been released, but The Tribune u nderstands he was repeat offender Hubert Hall, 50, of Armbrister Street, in Fox Hill, also known as Zip”. Sources say Hall had recently been released from HM Prison in F ox Hill where he had been held o n a theft conviction, and that he h ad been in and out of prison for m any years. I t is also claimed Hall was a father of two, and had left his child ren at home alone while he went out to steal early yesterday morning. A long-time resident of Sans Souci Road praised the swift and u ncompromising response by police yesterday morning. H e said: “I think things are out of h and and police should do whatever they can to improve the situat ion. If it means shooting these guys then definitely I would supp ort it.” The annual homicide count stood at 14 last night, accounting for n early two killings a week in 2010, and this follows a record-breaking h omicide count of 87 last year. A home invasion and homicide at a home in Oleander Drive, South Beach estates, on Monday morning rocked the communitye arlier this week, and an armed robbery at a home in Gladstone R oad leading to the kidnapping of two women further heightened fear of crime for New Providence resid ents. “There are horrible things happ ening and we need to protect our families,” the Sans Souci man said. “I am glad to see the police are b ecoming more aggressive. “If that is really what it’s going to t ake to stop people from going into people’s homes, then I am glad. “I have seen crime rise over the years and it just keeps accelerat-i ng. “I believe in getting serious a bout this and I will reiterate to say I am glad to see this action being taken.” P olice are still looking for the second man they attempted to a pprehend in Tower Heights Road yesterday morning. Anyone with any information on h is whereabouts should call police as a matter of urgency on 911, 919 o r call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 received information about two suspicious vehicles in the Holiday Drive area. A ccording to Superint endent Rodney McKenzie, the suspects left in a dark coloured Kia Sportage with bondo markings on the driver’s door. B owleg was found wearing blue jeans and a long s leeved navy blue shirt. The legs were taped down. “We are classifying it as a homicide,” Mr Mckenzie said. t he proliferation of w eapons in today’s society, the radioshow host had r eportedly offered on his programme to be able to sell one of his callers a s emi-automatic weapon if t hey came up with as little as $500. Taking full responsibilit y for his remarks, Mr Bodie assured his listeners that he was handled prof essionally by the police a nd commended these officers openly for doing a “magnificent” job. M r Bodie could not be contacted for comment yesterday. Talk show host apologetic over on-air firearm remarks Man found shot dead FROM page one FROM page one Police shoot burglar dead F ROM page one POLICE OFFICERS at the scene in Tower Heights Drive, off Sans Souci Road. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM treatment of his wounds. Reports from the island indicate that the victim may have come into contact with his attackers earlier in the night. Two men are reportedly in custody in connection with the incident. According to a source on the island, the victim has been visiting Harbour Island for more than a decade but now has no plans to return to the idyllic community. "He is a regular visitor. He has been coming here for 15 years, but he said he will not come back again," said the source. Yesterday a few residents told The Tribune that while winter residents have been recently targeted by burglars, yesterday's violent incident is not commonplace. They are concerned that the news which had spread like wildfire throughout the tiny community will have repercussions on the island's main industry, tourism. "Tourism is our bread and butter, that's 90 per cent of our income, it's everyone's business. It's sad to see what is happening here on this small island that is so rich in history," said one local businessman, who asked to remain anonymous. "It will affect our economy, and with no work, no jobs, we will go lifeless." A Harbour Island second home owner, who rents to tourists, is worried that the incident will damage the area's reputation once the news spreads on the internet. "Obviously this kind of publicity does no good for Harbour Island," said the homeowner. A businessman claimed the homes of several winter residents have been broken into lately, however this has not been confirmed by police. He and another resident said Harbour Island needs more police presence to tackle a growing crime problem. "We want to see the police officers step up and do their job. Harbour Island puts a lot of money in the government's revenue and we are getting no results," said the businessman. "Recently the crime, burglary rate has increased," said a woman resident. "The police here are overworked, we have a sergeant here who is understaffed." MP for the area Alvin Smith last night acknowledged the police manpower and crime problems. He has contacted Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade about the concerns and he has pledgedto look into the matter. Tourist in Harbour Island cutlass attack FROM page one CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico MEXICANauthorities said Thursday that gunmen killed a deputy police chief outside an elementary school as his wife, son and other students and par ents looked on, according to A ssociated Press. Eduardo Ezparza, the spokesman for prosecutors in northern Chihuahua state, said the shooting occurred Wednesday in the state capital, also named Chihuahua. City police coordinator Antonio Olague, 39, was drop p ing his 8-year-old son off at school when assailants in a car opened fire. Olague was hit by eight bul lets. Police had no suspects. Police spokesman Jesus Reyes said Olague was on the force for almost 20 years and received s ome training in the United States. He was second-in-command of the city police force. Chihuahua is the worst-hit region in Mexico's brutal drug gang violence. Elsewhere, police in the bor der city of Tijuana arrested four men Thursday on suspicionl inks to a plot to kill the police chief there, Julian Leyzaola. Authorities said the four men were detained with five assault rifles. They said tests confirmed one rifle was the same weapon used in a shootout in which gunmen disguised their vehi c les as Mexican army units in a bid to kill Leyzaola, who has become known for his tough stance in cracking down on police corruption and gangs in Tijuana. The four are believed to have worked for Teodoro "El Teo" Garcia Simental, the Tijuana d rug gang leader captured Jan. 12 in Baja California. Mexico deputy police chief slain at son's school THE YARD at Bahamas Mack Truck Sales Limited in Oakes Field was still flooded yesterday after the torrential rainfall of the night before. It appears the new road elevation caused water to run off into the company’s yard. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f TORRENTIALRAINCAUSESFLOODING

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ANY alert track and field fan would remember person al trainer Wendall ‘Big O’ Ferguson. For years, he assisted the Bahamas Association of Cer tified Officials (BACO the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations (BAAA meets at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Today, Ferguson has fallen ill and he needs the assis tance of those whom he helped to assist with his med ical expenses. While he has been diagnosed with cancer, a group of his friends have gotten together to stage a Walk-AThon in the “fight Against Cancer.” The event is scheduled for Saturday, March 27th start ing at 6 a.m. from Goodman’s Bay and will end at the Cave’s. The registration fee is $15.00 and can be picked up from the BodyZone Fitness in the Sea grapes Shopping Centre, the Mystical Gym on Madeira Street, Better Bodies on Shirley Street and Jemi Health Wellness in the Caves Village. This will also be a good time for both the BAAA and BACO to join forces and encourage its members who would have benefited from Ferguson’s contribution to come out and participate. As a former athlete, I can clearly remember running on the track when Ferguson would encourage you to “lift up knees, stretch out your legs.” And once you would have completed your race, before you crumble on the track from fatigue and exhaustion, he would be right there to advice you to “get up and walk it out.” Ferguson, with his robust body, was an intimidating factor and so it was really hard to avoid not following the instructions as he issued them. His loud and brassy voice would echo as you walked away. It only seemed as if it was yesterday that Ferguson, who has also assisted countless Bahamians in their physical fitness at the various gyms, was walking around and encouraging us to life a healthy lifestyle. Now he’s on the other side of the spectrum as he seek our assistance with his med ical expenses. Let’s rally around and lend our support to a great Bahamian sporting advocate. HUGH CAPMBELL CHAMPS HONOURED MEMBERS of Parliament took time out from their normal duties when the House of Assembly resumed on Wednesday to congratulate coach Norris Bain and his Tabernacle Baptist Academy Falcons for repeating as champions of the prestigious Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic. Coming in as the top ranked team, as noted in the poll produced by Ozzie Sim mons, the Falcons lived up to the advanced billing as the Grand Bahama basketball champions held off the sec ond ranked Government Sec ondary Schools Sports Association champions CC Sweet ing Cobras by one point in overtime. While they repeated as champions, the Falcons became the first school to have won the title six times. And Bain was right there in the historic performance as the winningest coach in the history of the senior boys basketball tournament for schools throughout the Bahamas. Bain and the Falcons first emerged from the week-long round robin tournament as the victor in 1995. They repeated in 1996 before they lost out to the CR Walker Knights, coached by then winningest coach Jimmy Clarke. But the Falcons bounced back to reclaim the crown in 1998. They lost again to archrivals Catholic High Crusaders in 1999 before they clinched it again to start the decade in 2000. After watching the CI Gibson Rattlers, coached by Kevin Johnson, reign supreme for two consecutive years in 2005 and 2006, Baina nd his Falcons took the title back to Grand Bahama on Tuesday with another twopeat feat. This year’s performance was especially sweet for the Falcons as they played in honor of their fallen teammate Shaquille Hinds, who recently collapsed and died during a training session in Grand Bahama. Tabernacle Baptist Acad emy should be commended for a job well done. They held off a stubborn CC Sweeting and coach Mario Bowleg, who rebounded from a 17point deficit in the second half of regulation and then 12 in the extra five minutes. H ad it not been for the last of three free throws missed by Gabbi Laurent in the final 1.5 seconds, the fans who had earlier started to trickle out of the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi um, could have possibly end up watching a double overtime thriller. Instead, the Falcons celebrated as the two-peat champions. Congratulations Bain and most valuable player (MVP Garth Brown, who carried the team down the stretch when two of the Falcons’ key players fouled out of the game in regulation. C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THETRIBUNE PAGE 13 INSIDE Haiti Judo Benefit Tourney TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘Big O’s’ battle with cancer OPINION STUBBS By RENALDO DORSETT Tribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER day one of the 17th A nnual GSSSA Senior High School Track and Field Championships, a familiar name sits atop the leaderboard after a productive day on the track. The defending champion C.R Walker Knights, in searchof their 11th title in school history, heads the field of eight schools with 272.5 points, nearly 90 points ahead of their clos e st competitors. The R.M Bailey Pacers, the last school to unseat the Knights when they won back to back titles in 2003 and 2004, are in second position with 187 points. The C.V Bethel Stingrays remain in contention in third place with 182.50 points, the C.I Gibson Rattlers are currently fourth with 150 points while theC .C Sweeting Cobras round out the top five with 130.5 points. The remainder of the field includes the Anatol Rodgers Timberwolves (127 Johnson Mystic Marlins (111 and the Government High School Magic (91.5 The Knights usual cast of characters continued to domi nate their respective events to l ead the charge on day one. Marva Etienne retained her title in the Intermediate girls' 100m in a time of 12.44s. Khadijah Andrews of Doris Johnson was second in 13.17s, and the Rattlers' Lakeisha Rolle was third in 13.23s. With Katrina Seymour headed to the BAISS, Etienne became a sprint double champion, when she added the 400m title to her resume. S he finished the quartermile in 1:02.58s, while teammate Ashley Stubbs was second in 1:06.21s. T he Knights' Shafara Lewis continued the Intermediate Girls' dominance with a first place finishes in the Intermediate girls 1500m in a time of 5:50.11s well ahead of teammate Nevelicia Martin who fini shed in 6:02.60s. O 'Jay Ferguson moved up to the Senior Boys division but retained his stranglehold on the 400m with a winning time of 50.38s. Leeward Swann of R.M Bai ley was second in 52.84s and the Knights' Leon Cartwright was third in 53.03s. Other top finishers on the day included Raygene Minus of the C.V Bethel Stingrays who won the Intermediate Girls High Jump and 100m Hurdles. Of the trio of competitors in the High Jump Minus cleared 1.42 first to win the event and won the hurdles in 17.32s. 2 009 Carifta medallist in the Under 17 Boys High Jump, Ryan Ingraham of the C.I Gib son Rattlers, finished first in the Senior Boys High Jump with a leap of 1.94m, however fell short of the Carifta qualifying mark of 2.05m. The meet continues tomor row highlighted by a myriad of field events, the 200m, 800m and the 4x400m relay. Knights lead GSSSA Senior High School track meet MARVA ETIENNE of the C.R Walker powers her way toward the finish of the Intermediate Girls 100m. Etienne won the event in 12.44s, claim ing back to back titles in the division. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE BAHAMAS Judo Federation will be hosting a tournament for the benefit of rebuilding the Haitian Judo train ing Center which was destroyed during the earthquake. This tournament will be held on Saturday February 27 between 5pm to 8pm at Xavier's Lower Hall, Xavier’s School West Bay Street. Teams from the College of the Bahamas, Abaco and various New Providence schools are expected to attend the tournament. There are several tournaments scheduled during the year to prepare Bahamian athletes for success in the internation al arena. For example, athlete Cynthia Rahming continued to distinguish herself on the weekend at the Cherry Blossom Tournament in Florida. She took a second place in the 63 Kg and 3rd in the 52 kg. Donations will be taken at the door and spectator fees are $10. Anyone requesting further information can call the Bahamas Judo Federation at 364-6773. Haiti judo benefit tourney set for Saturday CYNTHIA RAHMING, at left B AHAMIAN sailors BJ Burrows a nd Chris Sands competed in last week's 4 day Laser Midwinter East regatta in Clearwater, Florida. Moret han 198 sailors from 30 different coun t ries sailed in 3 different laser cate gories: full rig, laser radial and 4.7's. With various weather conditions and c hilly water temperatures of 58 degrees, Burrows and Sands were able to gain valuable experience from sail i ng with more experienced world class sailors. Olympic gold medallist Paul G oodison from Great Britain sailed i n the full rigs, and 2006 US Sailing Champion and '06 World Rolex sailor, Paige Railey, competed against Sandsa nd Burrows in the laser radials. R ailey, of Clearwater, went on to win the competition by outsailing 93 other competitors. Sands had a numb er of very strong races and came in 33rd in the gold fleet. Burrows, who has only been in the laser radi a ls for a few months, came in 43rd in the silver fleet. U NDER the Distinguished Patronage of Governor General A rthur D Hanna, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture presented the World Harmony Torch Run (WHTR mittee and Paintings by Founder of the run, Sri Chinmoya t Government House, Wednesday, February 17, 2010. Pictured is the WHTR Executive Director, Salil Wilson (left e ral. PICTURED is the WHTR Executive Director, Salil Wilson entering the Ballroom with the Harmony torch. R aymond A Bethel / BIS photo World Harmony Torch Run presents torch to Governor General Burrows, Sands compete in Laser Midwinter East regatta THE MINISTRYof Youth, Sports and Culture confirmed today that a struc-t ural failure occurred in the heating unit water pipes at the Betty Kelly Kenning National Swim Complex, int he early morning hours of S unday, February 21, 2010, a t approximately 2am.This caused damage to the operational machinery in the basement of the facility. A preliminary analysis r evealed that the piping conn ected to one of the heating u nits gave way to water pressure, causing flooding. The water level rose rapidly, making contact with thep ipes and engines that drive the computerised systems. This contact apparently c aused an explosion that r esulted in smoke to e manate from the facility. T he on-duty security officers quickly alerted the Royal Bahamas Police Force fire branch and the police offi-c ers arrived speedily and investigated the matter, leaving the property only after t hey were assured that everyt hing was under control. Analysis of the entire situation is on going and the relevant Government agenciesa re working on the matter. The Ministry is cognizant of the importance of the Betty Kelly Kenning NationalS wim Complex to the aquati cs community and the youth o f The Bahamas. This Ministry also wishes to assure the public that every effort is being made to rectify the situation in thes hortest possible time. Water pipes failure at Betty Kelly Kenning Swim Complex Flooding from pipes caused water pump engines to explode LEFT: Chris Sands (lr sau are shown with Laser Radial Champion, Paige R ailey ('06 Women's Rolex Sailor of the year after competing in the 4-day Laser Midwinter East Championships in Clearwater, Florida. ABOVE: Chris Sands (r start of the laser radials. Next to Sands is eventualw inner, Paige Railey, a US contender for the 2012 Olympics.

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B y KHYLE QUINCY PARKER Press/cultural attach Bahamas Embassy WASHINGTON, DC Bahamas Ambassador to the United States C A Smith leda panel discussion on “The Global Impact of the US Civil Rights Movement” at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC Wednesday as part of UDC’s celebration of Black History Month. D uring his opening statement, Ambassador Smith said the Bahamas’ journey to internal self-rule was not undertaken in isolation, but linked to a larger process of political modernisation andc hange. “In fact,” he said, “that change was largely informed by the responses of Bahamians to the decolonisation movement in Asia, Africa, a nd the Americas and the related struggle by Black A mericans for civil rights.” Most significantly, the decision by Martin Luther K ing Jr to shun violence f ound an echo in the Bahamas. Dr King prop ounded a non-violent revolution; in the Bahamas, the answer was what we call “the Quiet Revolution.” J oined on the panel by A mbassador of St Kitts and Nevis Izben Williams and P aul Nehru Tennessee of the UDC Office of International Programmes and Exchanges, Ambassador Smith pointed out that the l ocation of the Bahamas so near to the US made it a lmost natural that “the sea c hange taking place just next door would be studied close-ly, and would have some influence.” Ambassador Smith stressed, though, that just ast he US Civil Rights movem ent influenced the Bahamas and the Caribbean, that movement was itselfh eavily influenced by the B ahamas and the Caribbean. “As we examine that unique confluence of time, place and personalities that led to Bahamian self-rule and independence – whichi s what we mean when we s ay the ‘Quiet Revolution’ we see clearly the effect of the US civil rights movement on the Bahamas. And in fact, the two movements a re indelibly linked,” he s aid. As Bahamian anthropologist, writer and College of the Bahamas professor Dr Nicolette Bethel points out, in many cases the Bahamash as influenced the US movem ent; African-American intellectuals like James Weldon Johnson and W E B DuBois have roots in the Bahamas; a Bahamian min-i ster, Dr J Robert Love, inspired Marcus Garvey, anda Bahamian, Joshua Cockb urn, captained one of Garv ey’s Black Star Cruise Line ships,” Ambassador Smith said. During his remarks, Ambassador Williams of St Kitts and Nevis expanded ont his point, and said the influence of the Caribbean on the US Civil Rights movement was greater than the influence of the US movement on the Caribbean. I n fact, he asserted that m any of the “movers and shakers” in the US movement had strong ties to theC aribbean, where he said there was “an inbred propensity for resistance, e xpressed in various ways”. F aculty and students of the University of the District of Columbia attended the p anel discussion, an institu tion where at least 15 per cent of the students arei nternational. C M Y K C M Y K L OCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE College of the Bahamas Union of Students (COBUSY outh Leaders this week. Under the theme, “Maximising Your Abilities to Pursue Purpose: Max it Up,” the event is a conference for young people across the length and breadth of the Bahamas to discuss youth issues, share ideas, and reinforce the principles of leadership development. The conference, which includes seminars, work shops a nd presentations by guest speakers, started yesterday a nd will continue until Saturday. College of the Bahamas Union of Students hosts youth leaders conference Bahamas Ambassador discusses impact of US Civil Rights Movement BAHAMAS Ambassador to the United States Cornelius A Smith talks with an audience member following his talk on how the US civil rights m ovement impacted the Bahamas. The Ambassador from St Kitts and Nevis, Izben Williams, joined Ambassador Smith on the panel.

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ment being considered, which has already been vetted bythe Attorney General’s office. A cabinet paper still has to b e submitted seeking permission to sign the agreement. With the strong backing of the Ministry of Agriculture, and the process moving forward with fresh talks, Ms Lane said within the next couple of months an agreem ent is likely, once it receives Cabinet approval. A Brazilian delegation joined Ms Lane on a tour of the Agribusiness Expo yesterday, organised by the M inistry of Agriculture. The Expo was a part of the Ministry’s broad move to prom ote food security in the c ountry. B razilian Ambassador T omas Guggenheim said the t echnical cooperation agreem ent was necessary to establish the legal framework for cooperation to enable the Brazilian government to legally authorise funds. “Brazil is one of the largest food exporters globa lly. Now that we have this capacity, we are offering our support,” said Mr Guggenh eim, who noted the agreem ent in question would be t he first of a kind for the two countries. The lack of an agreement i s not stopping the progress. Travelling with the Ambassador was Jose Amauri Buso, of the state-run agency, the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (BARC w ith farmers and vendors at t he Expo, gaining what he said was vital information towards better understand-i ng how Brazil could offer a ssistance. He will partici pate in two-days of meetings as a member of the Brazil mission. T hrough the state agency, Brazil has developed advance research capacity in a number of areas, and the ability to diffuse the knowledge among stakeholders int he agricultural industry. This is the expertise Brazil plans to bring to bear in sup port of the Bahamian agri-c ultural sector. More than 30 per cent of Brazil’s area is agricultural l and. Less than two per cent o f the Bahamas’ land area is a gricultural land. Brazil produces crops such as coffee,s oybeans, wheat, rice, corn, s ugarcane, cocoa, citrus. Also invited to participate in discussions were the Ministries of Health, Tourism and Environment. Of the invited agencies, only the Ministry of Agriculture has i dentified its specific areas o f interest. The Bahamas receives a bout six offers per year f rom countries seeking techn ical cooperation agreements, according to Ms Lane. She said it is not any and every request the gov e rnment looks favourably on, because some countries make requests consideredu nreasonable. “A lot of countries want technical agreements but you have to go through themw ith a fine toothcomb to see w hat you are gaining, what y ou are giving up and what you are signing on to,” saidM s Lane. S he gave an example of an agreement proposed by Nigeria to supply nurses and doctors for work in Bahamian hospitals that was rejected. In this example, a request was made for the Bahamas t o find furnished apartments f or the workers and pay their rent, in addition to providi ng duty free exemption for u p to six-months after entry t o purchases household appliances. China and Cuba currently h ave standing agreements with the Bahamas. In addition to the agreement with Cuba that facilitated needy Bahamians receiving cataract surgery under the Miracle Eye programme, the Bahamas has another agree m ent with Cuba related to health and education pending. SEE P AGE THREE C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SIR GERALD CASH Primary Chorale perform at the New Providence Agribusiness Expo. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S M INISTER OF AGRICULTURE a nd Marine Resources Lawrence Cartwright inspects livestock in a makeshift coral at the New Providence Agribusiness Expo. Bahamas close to strengthening diplomatic ties with Brazil F ROM page one L ARRYCARTWRIGHT