Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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HIGH
LOW

SUNNY

INTERVALS

Volume: JO6 No.73

SU!



Legal challenge is

‘virtually inevitable’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Elizabeth by-election
recount went on through the
night last night, with no official
winner announced up to mid-
night at Thelma Gibson Primary
School.

At presstime last night, party
operatives did not anticipate a
final result until sometime today.

The first election count on
Tuesday ended with FNM can-
didate Duane Sands ahead by
one vote, in front of PLP candi-
date Ryan Pinder. The PLP
declared the result too close to
call, while FNM leader, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
refused to declare a win.

The Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) is anticipating legal chal-
lenges if they lose in the recount
by a margin that is still not deci-
sive. PLP attorneys maintain, if



the vote is tied or if the outcome
could be affected by protest
votes, then a court challenge is
virtually inevitable.

Some political commentators
have questioned the point of tak-
ing the election to the courts.
The FNM is maintaining their
position that the courts should
not decide elections.

Court room tactics would only
“interfere with the clear inten-
tion of the people of Elizabeth to
support the FNM,” according to
Carl Bethel, FNM campaign

SEE page 12

Parliamentary Commissioner
maintains low voter turnout

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE low turnout of voters disputed by both the PLP and FNM
has been maintained by Parliamentary Commissioner Errol Bethel
who said Elizabeth residents simply did not choose to cast their by-

election ballots.

Mr Bethel estimates that more than 4,600 of the 4,934 registered
constituents are Elizabeth residents eligible to vote as less than 400

could not be found.

And with just 3,142 ballots cast yesterday, that would estimate
a turnout of 64 per cent or slightly more.
However, PLP candidate Ryan Pinder argued the turnout may

have been higher.

“T don’t truly believe there are 5,000 registered voters in the con-
stituency because it doesn’t take into account who has moved

out,” Mr Pinder said.

SEE page 11

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The Tribu

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010



PITTSBURGH
PA |

A oT 6

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave,
Tel:326-1875

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

THEY WON, HAVE YOU?

¢ BYELECTION LATEST ON WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A PLP fanatic hit

Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette on the
shoulder as tempers flared
at the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion re-count yesterday.
The calm and peaceful
atmosphere became con-
frontational as goading
statements were asserted
by PLP supporters and
returned by FNMs gath-
ered in a schoolyard out-
side the re-count room at
Thelma Gibson Primary.
Police filed the increas-
ingly agitated crowd out
of the schoolyard and set
up barricades to separate
the crowd of about 100
PLP and FNM supporters
at around 10.30am.
Arguments had escalat-
ed to a bitter shouting
match between the two
sides as the Deputy Prime
Minister walked through
the dividing aisle and PLP
activist Laura Williams
was at the front of the
PLP crowd shouting
defamatory statements.
Mr Symonette put a
hand on her shoulder and
asked her to calm down,
but as he turned away she
slammed the Deputy
Prime Minister across the
shoulder and upper arm,
eye-witnesses said.
“Those who didn’t see

it, heard it. She slammed

him,” attested one eye-

witness.
While

another

SEE page 12

READERS heaped praise on
The Tribune’s news team and
tribune242.com for providing
real time, up-to-the-minute cov-
erage of the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion.

Bahamians from across the
country and around the world
logged on to follow the excite-
ment as it happened.

On Tuesday alone, tri-
bune242.com received more

OTHER TY SiES ALSO AVAILABLE.

+,
£

Tribune by-election coverage

necount agony






ABOVE: Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette speaks to the media yesterday.
BELOW: PLP activist Laura Williams outside Thelma Gibson Primary School.

es H

than a quarter million hits and
double the unique visitors of a
normal weekday.

Up to press time last night,
more than 200 readers had com-
mented on our election cover-
age, in what developed into a
stimulating and hotly-contested
online debate. One Bahamian
living overseas wrote: “Being
outside the country and being
able to get up to the moment





NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER









praised by readers

result information was by far the
greatest sense of national pride
T have ever experienced.

“T felt as though I was pre-
sent in the Elizabeth con-
stituency yesterday. It was like
an action-packed movie that
kept me on the edge of my seat,
refreshing my page waiting with
great anticipation for the next

SEE page 19
AVAILABLE AT:

RADIOSHACK

Harbour Bor location

lic Mell ae?



e “-

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

TENSIONS RUN
HIGH DURING
BY-ELECTION
RECOUNT

FNMS AND PLPS gathered
in the Elizabeth constituency
yesterday as a recount of Tues-
day’s votes took place.

Police filed the increasingly
agitated crowd out of the
schoolyard at Thelma Gibson
Primary School and set up bar-
ricades to separate the crowd
of about 100 PLP and FNM
supporters.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff [fF

PLP CAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN Dr Bernard Nottage (above in white jacket) and Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard (below
right) among those outside of Thelma Gibson Primary School yesterday.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News Pale2 315697 ou0)
Local News eal pall wil lel
Local News
Editorial/Letters
Feal@rlaralia
20 24925) 25,27o o0 onhoe

BUSINESS SECTION

Business P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10
Business P11,12,14,15,16
OBITUARIES/RELIGION 28 PAGES

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

Haiti judge frees 8 of 10
American missionaries

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

EIGHT American mission-
aries were freed from a Hait-
ian jail Wednesday, nearly
three weeks after being charged
with kidnapping for trying to
take a group of children out of
the quake-stricken country,
according to Associated Press.

The eight — looking
bedraggled and sweaty —
walked out of the Haitian jail
escorted by U.S. diplomats just
after dusk.

They waited until they were
safely inside a white van before
flashing smiles, waving and giv-
ing a thumbs up to reporters.

Hours earlier, judge Bernard
Saint-Vil told The Associated

a Press that eight of the 10 mis-
sionaries were free to leave
without bail or other conditions

ot after parents testified they vol-
Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd eae fenced Wet Ghildien

4 over to the missionaries.
"The parents of the kids

made statements proving that

they can be released,” he said,

adding that still wants to ques-

' tion the group's leader and her
nanny.

The group planned to fly out

VALUE MEAL of Haiti late Wednesday,

defense attorney Aviol Fleu-

rant said. A spokesman for Ida-

ho Sen. Jim Risch said they
would be flown to Miami.

Gilantro SQuce RoE TROPICAL

with a twist of (me OS
PEST CONTROL

Ha para by |
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Bradley attacks ‘FNM smearing’ of
Pinder for never voting in Bahamas

‘This is a non-issue’



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley
Roberts maintains that the
fact that the PLP’s candidate
for Elizabeth Ryan Pinder
never voted in the Bahamas is
a “non-issue” with which the
FNM attempted to sway vot-
ers prior to Tuesday’s by-elec-
tion.

During the FNM’s mass ral-
ly on Monday night, Mount
Moriah MP Tommy Turn-
quest revealed that Mr Pin-
der has never voted in the
Bahamas in his life, but had
deemed it important enough
to vote in two US elections.

This fact left Mr Pinder
open to attacks from his polit-

PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts



PLP. Yesterday, Mr Roberts
said that he was extremely
disappointed in the FNM’s
tactics by smearing Mr Pin-
der’s name on the night
before the election.

Opportunity

By doing so, he said, the
PLP were not afforded an
opportunity to respond to the
remarks due to the newly
implemented rules laid out by
URCA which restricts any
political dialogue or cam-
paigning on the day of the
election.

“T don’t see it as a big deal.
There are other Members of
Parliament who have served
for long years who have nev-
er voted, and these persons
mostly represented the Fami-
ly Islands.

“Tam further advised that
Sir Lynden Pindling, (Gover-
nor General) AD Hanna, and
others voted in England when
they were in school. It was
customary back then,” he
said.

As such, the PLP’s chair-

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ical opponents who mocked
him during the rally and even
sang the American national
anthem when he arrived at
the Thelma Gibson Primary
School polling station on

Tuesday. Winning by a single
vote on election night, the
FNM’s Dr Duane Sands was
declared the victor late last
night when the final ballots

were counted. He beat out
the PLP’s candidate in the
closest election seen in the
history of the Bahamas —
1501 FNM, to 1500 for the

man said that this “furor” sur-
rounding Mr Pinder’s former
US citizenship and his voting
record in the Bahamas is a
“dead issue” that “nobody
will pay any attention to.”



IN order for a US citizen or a person
holding dual citizenship to give up their
American citizenship they must make a
formal renunciation of nationality before a
diplomatic or consular officer of the Unit-
ed States while in a foreign state, according
to the US Immigration and Nationality
Act.

The Tribune understands that once this
is done, US officials wait 24 hours before
sending the request to the United States.
The application is then sent to Washington,
DC for scrutiny — which can take months
— to ensure that the person in question is
not trying to evade taxes or justice in the
United States.

However, once this probe is done the
official date of renunciation will be retroac-
tive to the date of the application, The
Tribune understands.

Questions regarding the process of a
dual citizen renouncing American citizen-
ship emerged with the entrance of Pro-
gressive Liberal Party by-election candi-
date Ryan Pinder to the political sphere
last month. The tax attorney was born to a
Bahamian father, former PLP MP for Mal-

The process of dual citizens renouncing US citizenship

colm Creek Mar-
vin Pinder, and an
American moth-
er.

In January, Mr
Pinder, who is
employed by
Florida-based law
firm Becker and

| Poliakoff as a
Nassau-based
consultant,
defended his right
to hold dual citi-
zenship in the
face of criticism
that it was inap-
propriate and

unconstitutional for someone seeking pub-
lic office in the Bahamas.

At the time he called his dual-citizenship
a "non-issue."

But last week, PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts said Mr Pinder renounced his US
citizenship prior to nominating as a by-
election candidate on January 29. Mr Pin-
der told the media that his decision was a

PLP CANDIDATE
RYAN PINDER

personal one, adding that he was not pres-
sured by his party to give up his American
citizenship.

He has not publicly disclosed the exact
date he gave his citizenship up.

Failed by-election candidates Workers'
Party leader Rodney Moncur and Nation-
al Development Party candidate Andre
Rollins earlier criticised the fact that Mr
Pinder held dual citizenship, suggesting it
drew into question his eligibility to hold
public office in the Bahamas and the like-
lihood that he would act in the best inter-
ests of Bahamian constituents if elected.

Recently, Prime Minister and FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham took a jab at Mr
Pinder suggesting his party's candidate,
Dr Duane Sands, would be more loyal to
Elizabeth constituents given his single,
rather than dual, citizenship.

According to the US Department of
State's website, dual nationals "owe alle-
giance to both the United States and the
foreign country. They are required to obey
the laws of both countries. Either country
has the right to enforce its laws, particu-
larly if the person later travels there."





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(-\n)
Na LY,

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

an
WY

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Registration confusion traced to 2007

BOTH POLITICAL parties are bemoan-
ing the low voter turnout in Tuesday’s Eliz-
abeth by-election. As we write at 10.30pm
Wednesday, the new MP for the con-
stituency has not been decided and the
recount at Thelma Gibson Primary School
continues.

If the recount is not completed before
midnight, The Tribune will go to press with-
out the final result. However, those inter-
ested in following the recount can switch to
where the running report
will continue until a winner has been
announced.

Preparations for the Elizabeth by-election
started in confusion when it was discovered
that hundreds of names on the voters regis-
ter could not be found — either they had
died, moved out of the constituency or were
bogus from the beginning.

Mr Errol Bethel, Parliamentary Com-
missioner, estimated that 4,600 of the 4,934
registered persons for Elizabeth were eligi-
ble to vote in the constituency. He said that
less than 400 on the electoral role could not
be found. According to his count he con-
firmed that with only 3,142 ballots cast in
Tuesday’s by-election, voter turnout was
indeed low — an estimated 64 per cent or
slightly more. It was something for both par-
ties to ponder as there is nothing that
Bahamians like more than to gather at the
polls on election day.

However, there are those who believe
that there are not as many legitimate voters
in Elizabeth as are still reflected on the reg-
ister.

For example, PLP candidate Ryan Pin-
der, who when the polls closed Tuesday had
been defeated by the FNM’s Dr Duane
Sands by one vote, believes there are no
more than 4,300 eligible voters in Elizabeth.
He does not think that the number of voters
who have moved out of the constituency
have been taken into consideration and elim-
inated from the register.

“Tf there are 4,300, and slightly over 3,000
votes, then there was an 84 per cent turnout.

“It’s tough to tell with the register how it
is, and what is the true total of the regis-
tered voters in the constituency,” he said.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette
agreed: “You will probably find we had a
high turnout of the actual people in Eliza-
beth.”

If Mr Ryan finds it tough to read “the reg-
ister how it is,” he should go back to the
indecisive days before the May 2, 2007 elec-
tion for his answer. May 2 was the date on
which his party, then the government, was

defeated at the polls. The 2007 election will
go down in Bahamian history as an election
of colossal mismanagement, especially in
the confusion created in the Parliamentary
Registrar’s department because of the short
time allowed between the close of the regis-
ter and election day.

PLP party leader Perry Christie, then
prime minister, could not bring himself to
close the register.

He blamed it on the late registration of
Bahamians, resulting in it being difficult for
the Boundaries Commission to define the
constituency boundaries. This meant that
the Boundaries Commission report was not
presented to the House of Assembly until
March 19 for a May 2 election. In the report
five constituencies were eliminated and four
were created. The report still had to face a
House debate. It was speculated that Mr
Christie was trying to keep the House in
session as long as possible, because as soon
as it closed the register would also close.

He wanted to give tardy Bahamians more
time to register, not thinking of the chaos his
decision would cause the Parliamentary
department. However, he had until May 22
to call an election, failing which, under the
Constitution, the House would dissolve itself.

The Parliamentary Registrar’s staff had
less than eight weeks to write out by hand
new voters cards with their counterfoils for
the dramatic change in the newly created
constituencies in addition to the boundary
changes in the remaining constituencies. It
was estimated that by the time the two cards
and counterfoils for each voter had been
written, the staff would have had to have
made 360,000 changes by hand before the
cards could be put in the computer and dis-
tributed to voters.

The Parliamentary Registrar then had two
weeks to certify the register, have the ballots
printed, and the voters register published
and still be on time for an election that had
to be called within four weeks.

The Parliamentary Registrar’s office
accomplished a miracle to have the register
completed on time, but it would be another
miracle if there were no mistakes, Eliza-
beth probably being one of them.

The FNM now has two years to go
through the register, constituency by con-
stituency, to make certain that every district
is correct, so that when an election is called
the Registrar’s Department will have ample
time to update the register, and avoid the
confusion still haunting us from the 2007
debacle.



Gay cruise ship
poll exposed
embarrassing

ignorance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Today as I was having my
morning coffee and reading
the newspaper, I came across
a story that if it weren’t so
sad, it might be quite laugh-
able!

I am referring to the poll
that was conducted regarding
the gay cruise ship coming to
Nassau.

Have we not been down
this road?

While there were a few
comments that were a bit
more open minded, most of
the readers surveyed seemed
to have the same, ignorant
view of the gay population.
Of course, most of these peo-
ple hide behind their religion,
stating that being gay is
unnatural.

I nearly choked when I
read that one reader was con-
cerned about “our little ones,”
as if the people off this boat

Illegal immigrants
should he sent
hack home

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I’m a Bahamian and I
would like to put my five
cents on the Haitian issue.
If we give the Haitian who
is coming in now status,
they would be a burden on
our economy.

They wouldn’t go back
home to help rebuild their
country instead they would
drain the little resources
we have for our people.
We can help but from a
distance.

I have nothing against
Haitians, but the Lord said
that he would help those
who helped themselves.

By them fleeing their
country they aren’t help-
ing.

It is in our best interest
to send all illegal immi-
grants back home to their
country.

We have to secure the
few jobs we have now for
Bahamian brothers and sis-
ters.

L JOHNSON
Nassau,
February, 2010.

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



would come into their home
and whisk away their chil-
dren! What utter nonsense!

Another thing, many gays
do not “openly flaunt” their
lifestyle or their “boldness.”
What do these people think,
that all gays walk around with
aneon sign that says “look at
me, I’m gay!” Gee, they look
just like regular people, what
a shock!

I fully agree with one of the
people surveyed who stated
that the Bahamas better open
their eyes to the big, wide
world out there. We live on
a small island, but does that
mean we have to be small
minded as well? These peo-
ple who spout religion as a

cloak to hide behind, are sim-
ply covering up their fear of
something they know nothing
about. Fear can turn into
anger and ignorance. I sug-
gest that these people, who
seem to be so concerned
about a gay cruise tipping the
balance of what is right and
wrong in Nassau, take a look
at what is more important in
the scheme of things. Maybe
they should be more con-
cerned with the crime running
amok here. Come on Nassau,
are we still focusing our ener-
gies on this subject? This sort
of ignorance and hate is quite
an embarrassment in the eyes
of the rest of the world. Is that
how we want to portray our-
selves?

SUSAN KATZ
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
February, 2010.

ETI yeu Keele ee.) oe Ihe
is no longer acceptable,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY (February 15th) there was an article in the Business
section by Neil Hartnell about the Mayaguana project. The
article was an attempt to inform the public about the project and
how the Government was trying to avoid the “very bad idea” of
conveying huge chunks of land to the developers. While we, I
would think, would approve of this approach as far as it goes,
but when Neil Hartnell tried to elicit further information from
the Minister, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, he declined to confirm
any details of the Government’s discussion with the Principals
behind the project and when a scenario was suggested indicat-

ed it was “vaguely correct”.

As we are all aware the level of trust in the actions of any
Government today is very low and therefore for a Minister to
avoid answering questions raises the question whether there are
issues that are embarrassing to the Government and cannot be
divulged. I think it is about time that Members of Parliament
realize that they are representatives of the Bahamian public and
the public has a right to know what is going on. So please stop
trying to brush over information that might not be palatable to
the public or in the best political interests of the Government or

Opposition.

If you want to gain the public’s trust, “vaguely correct” is not
an acceptable answer anymore. What is “truly correct” and
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace might like to let us know.

PATRICK THOMSON
Nassau,
February 15, 2010



Dr. Ken Knowles seems to misunderstands
concept of health care insurance vouchers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Dr. Ken Knowles put his pen to paper in a longer than nor-
mal letter to the The Tribune recently.

It seems he misunderstands the concept of vouchers for the
purchase of health care insurance and medication.

The idea of vouchers is for those people that cannot get
health insurance themselves, as a result of a pre-existing condi-
tion, or they are simply too poor to afford it, should be provided
with a voucher from the government to buy health insurance for
themselves.

Dr. Ken also seems to believe that in order to help the less
fortunate, the government needs to run the health care industry.

Too bad. Maybe he has forgotten all those wonderfully acer-
bic letters he has written to the press bemoaning "services" pro-
vided by the government that he finds less than satisfactory, but
now, for some reason, he thinks they can solve health care.

"It is amazing that people who think we cannot afford to pay
for doctors, hospitals, and medication somehow think that we can
afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, medication and a government
bureaucracy to administer it." (Dr. Thomas Sowell).

Pirst Baptist Church

“God's Love Still Stands When
All Elee Has Fallen.”

The Tomlinson
Scholarship

***$15,000 per year***

SUNDAY SEAVICES
Tam, 9:00am, 17:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,00,
Mariage Oticer, Coursalior Iriecessor
Phare: 39-6459 « 395-5708
Fax: S26-4550/304-0919

Heading to Canada for University?
RICK LOWE

www.weblogbahamas.com

McGill University
: February, 2010.

McMaster University
Queen's University
University of Guelph
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
University of Western Ontario



Quality Auto Sales Ltd

PARTS DEPARTMENT
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
FEB 24 thru FEB 27

(Wednesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday)

To our valued customers

There is

ONLY ONE LOCATION OF
Meintague

and that’s at #6 Village Road.

If you are planning to attend one of these schools
then apply NOW for one of our scholarships!

Undereraduates only

Applications must be in by
March 31st, 20170 We will re-open for business as usual on Monday, March 1.
We apologise to our valued customers and regret any
inconvenience this may cause. All other sections of the

AUTO MALL will be open for business as usual.

QUALITY: ANN

EAST SHIRLEY STREET ¢ 397-1700 AUTOMALL

4 7 Application forns may be obtained by wing to the Tomlinson
We have no association with Scholarship, P.O. Box CB 10975, Nassau, Bahamas

any other car lot in the Bahamas.

ONLY Montague Motors Ltd. cars are inspected
by us in Japan and we do not sell any of our cars
wholesale to any car lot in the Bahamas.

The Tomlinson Scholarship is fanded by High Tor Limited
and family members in memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson







an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en
Na LY,

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



TSCA MCMC)
ae SU TATA)

Rom Eg

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



An “incapacitated” woman
who could not properly com-
prehend the electoral process
voted in the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion on Tuesday, a lawyer
claimed yesterday.

Kathleen Johnson-Hassan,
who was at the polls represent-
ing the FNM, said that she
argued that a woman, alleged to
be “not of sound mind”, should
not be able to vote.

However, lawyers represent-
ing other political parties at the
polls argued in favour of allow-
ing the woman to vote.

“She went in and she went
through the procedure but it
was very evident that her abili-
ty to participate in the process
was seriously under question,”
said Ms Johnson-Hassan, also
vice-president of the Bahamas
Bar Association.

The attorney made her com-
ments yesterday as she waited
outside the Thelma Gibson Pri-
mary School building where the
mandatory recount of the Eliz-
abeth by-election votes got
underway at 8am.

Unofficial results after the
first vote count on Tuesday
night when the polls closed
gave the FNM candidate, Dr
Duane Sands, just a one-vote
lead on the PLP’s Ryan Pinder.

That night, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham said he was
not going to declare victory
until the results of yesterday’s
recount were in.

Observers noted that the out-
come could end up being
dependent on the eligibility of
the votes of a number of per-
sons who were “challenged” at
the polls, or voted on “protest”
ballots after their identity as
legitimate Elizabeth voters was
questioned.

This would only happen if
the result went to an election
court — something that FNM
leader Mr Ingraham said his
side would not pursue, but
which the PLP has not denied
as being an option.

Given that the ballot paper
marked by the woman whose
mental capacity was questioned
by Mrs Johnson-Hassan would
not have been seen before it
was deposited in the ballot box,
the way the woman voted, or
if she made a definitive mark
against a candidate that would
be sufficient for the vote to be
counted when scrutinised, is not
known. In order for a ballot to
be counted, and not considered
“spoiled”, a clear mark - usual-
ly an “X”- has to be seen next

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“She went in and
she went through
the procedure but it
was very evident
that her ability to
participate in the
process was serious-
ly under question.”



to a candidate’s name. Mrs
Johnson-Hassan claimed that
an attorney from another party
tried to argue that the woman
could not hold a pen and that
someone should go into the
polling booth with the voter to
assist her in casting her vote,
however, it later turned out that
the woman “could hold a pen.”

Mrs Johnson-Hassan alleged
that the incident was represen-
tative of a problematic trend of
lawyers representing parties at
the polls in elections.

They are brought into the
field on the basis that they will
use their legal know-how to
help minimise voting irregular-
ities, but sometimes they may
misinterpret the law in the hope
that they will help secure a win
for their preferred party, she
said. This disregard for the law
is filtering down to the grass-
roots level of the parties, Mrs
Johnson-Hassan suggested.

“There is always a different
interpretation applied that isn’t
there, that is incorrect, and it
is that type of difficulty that we
have coming from attorneys
who all read the same legisla-
tion who all ought to under-
stand the same legislation.

“That causes the mix up and
the problems, and what it does
is radiate down to their sup-
porters who have themselves
no understanding of the finer
points.

“Therefore they cause this
escalation of hostility which is
totally unnecessary. It makes
one party feel like they are
being slighted,” said Ms John-
son-Hassan.

Christie: Serious need for
election campaign reform



By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THERE is a serious need for
election campaign reform from
the two major political parties to
assure third-party and indepen-
dent candidates an even play-
ing field, Progressive Liberal
Party leader Perry Christie said.

His comments came as he
accused FNM operatives of run-
ning an unethical by-election
campaign, filled with alleged
promises of jobs and other
incentives to voters in exchange
for their support.

Having been in Parliament
for nearly three decades, Mr
Christie remarked that the
weeks leading up to the Eliza-
beth by-election were "the
worst I've ever seen it" in terms
of allegations that members of
the FNM were allegedly using
their government clout to sway
voters. He said that on the eve
of the by-election, a PLP sup-
porter told him that her daugh-
ter had been offered a job by a
member of the FNM, presum-
ably to influence her vote.

"Up to (Monday) govern-
ment was giving people jobs
with a clear intention of influ-
encing the vote. That's not
proper, ethical or fair," he said
in a recent interview with The
Tribune. He continued: "Both
parties should look at what's
happening in the country today
with a view to reorganising our
approach to elections because

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or

it is awfully difficult for inde-
pendent and small parties to
have even a remotely small
chance (to win) given what is
happening on the part of the
two major political parties.”

Consequently, fringe parties
and independent candidates are
caught between "two political
giants" with one giant, the
FNM, using "weapons of pow-
er" in their favour, said Mr
Christie.

"I've had an opportunity to
recognise that we have to really

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have a strong will to make elec-
tions fairer and more transpar-
ent because right now two,
much below the radar things,
are happening. It's not fair," he
added. Throughout the by-elec-
tion campaign, there were alle-
gations from all sides that
prospective voters were offered
everything from jobs, money,
alcohol — even cellular phone
cards — by the major political
parties in an effort to influence
votes.

Several weeks ago, by-elec-

Call for third-party, independent candidates to receive even playing field

tion candidate Bahamas Demo-
cratic Movement leader Cassius
Stuart told police that a senior
member of the PLP was offer-
ing bribes of $200 in exchange
for votes. Police said they were
looking into Mr Stuart's claims,
but said there was no concrete
evidence, or a formal complaint
behind his allegations.

The PLP also refuted the
claims. A special team headed
by Superintendent Leon Bethel,
officer-in-charge of the Central
Detective Unit, was formed to
investigate allegations of cor-
ruption and voter fraud in the
by-election. When asked if his
team was investigating any com-
plaints of bribery on part of the
FNM, Supt Bethel said, "I don't
have any (such) reports about
the FNM offering any jobs (in
exchange for votes). If such a
thing is reported, another unit
would look at that, in fact we
would have to take legal advice
with respect to that."

His unit was on-site at the
Thelma Gibson Primary School
polling station, ready to act on
any possible emergence of vot-
er fraud at yesterday's by-elec-
tion recount. Up to press time,
he had no reports of voter
fraud, he said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PM Hubert Ingraham attends 9 <®
Elizabeth Betty Kenning funeral \\~ ”

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday attended the
funeral service for Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Kelly Kenning
OBE, at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk.

President of the Senate, Senator Lynn Holowesko; Sir
Geoffrey and Lady Johnstone; Leader of the Opposition in
the Senate, Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and Max
Gibson also attended the service.

Mr Ingraham recently paid tribute to Mrs Kenning, a
philanthropist and former long-time secretary of the
Bahamas Humane Society, who died last week aged 85.

Generosity

Mr Ingraham described Mrs Kenning as a "great Bahami-
an lady" who was well known for her generosity to good
causes.

She was a businesswoman noted for accomplishments in
the commercial world and was the owner of the Betty K ship-
ping business.

"She was an outstanding athlete, generous patron of
sports, humanitarian and animal lover,” Mr Ingraham said.

Mrs Kenning, who is survived by her husband John, died
at Doctor's Hospital while being treated for pneumonia.



NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED
Saturday February 20th

for our company’s

FUN BY

in order to give our staff
a well-deserved break.

We will reopen on Monday February 22nd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused
Mackey Street 393-8165









with music by

FRANKIE

a)

; ce th

Mg

t Ms -



(BIS photo: Peter Ramsay)

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at the funeral of Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Kelly Kenning at St
Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. Inset: Mrs Kenning.

MT. CARMEL PREPARATORY ACADEMY

TEACHERS WANTED

The Administration is now accepting resumes
for professional high school teachers for
the 2010 - 2011 school year. Please submit
resume to the school office via fax, email, or
delivery.

All applicants must have status in the
country.

Needed immediately due to maternity
lease - Junior High English Teacher.

Phone: 325-6570/1
Fax: 325-7151
Email: mtccarmel @coralwave.com
#27 Palmdale



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Scholarship
forum tonight to
help students
fulfill dreams

THE Bahamas National
Youth Council (BNYC), in
conjunction with other stake-
holders, will host a special
scholarship forum tonight to
help students utilise available
resources to fulfill educational
dreams.

“The BNYC understands
that our most valuable
resource is our people and the
development of the Bahamian
people is critical for the suc-
cess of our nation. As more
and more Bahamians matricu-
late to higher education, few
choose to settle to live
deferred dreams and accept
employment lacking personal
satisfaction,” the organisation
said.

With the understanding
that education is paramount
to success, BNYC together
with representatives of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
the Cuban Embassy, the
Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture
(ICA), the Organisation of
American States (OAS), the
Bahamas Cooperative League
and the Lyford Cay Founda-
tion, will host a scholarship
forum.

The International Affairs
Committee of BNYC will host
the ‘Meet the Deadline Schol-
arship Forum’ today at the
Bahamas Cooperative League
Ltd (yellow building behind
McDonalds Oakes Field) at
7pm.

“Many countries have
secured scholarships solely for
Bahamian students’ advance-
ment.

“As such, we admonish our
fellow youth to utilise the
opportunities available. At
the forum questions and con-
cerns relating to scholarships
and tertiary education both
domestically and internation-
ally will be facilitate.

“Despite the global eco-
nomic instability and unfortu-
nate suspension of govern-
mental loans, our youth can
accomplish their educational
goals without compromise,”
the BNYC said.







(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

LOCAL NEWS

(EW

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 7





MAGISTRATES COURT

Haitian man charged with Teenager admits setting fire to school

manslaughter after woman
killed by falling pine tree

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN man charged
with manslaughter in the
death of a woman who was
fatally struck by a pine tree
on Sunday, appeared in the
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged Simon
Pierre, 44, in the death of Jus-
lene Alteme Nicolas.

Pierre, a Lazeretta Road
resident, is accused of negli-
gently causing Ms Nicolas’
death on Sunday, February
14.

Ms Nicolas is alleged to
have been with a man who
was cutting pine trees shortly
before 9 o’clock Sunday
morning in the Dignity Gar-
dens area when one of the
trees fell and struck her on
the head. She reportedly died
at the scene. Pierre, who was
not represented by an attor-
ney during his arraignment
yesterday afternoon, told
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez that he only under-
stood “a little” English.

He was then aided by a
male relative who was sworn
in to interpret the proceed-

ings for him. Pierre was not
called upon to answer a plea
to the charge.

The prosecution objected
to Pierre being granted bail,
citing that his work permit
had expired since November
of last year and there had
been no request to renew it.
The prosecution contended
that Pierre had no legal status
in the country. Pierre was
remanded into custody at Her
Majesty’s Prison and the case
was adjourned to February
22. The case has been trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

A teenager pleaded guilty in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday to setting fire to a Catholic
Primary School last year.

The 16-year-old boy, who has been held on
remand since his arraignment last August,
pleaded guilty to the charge of arson yester-

day. He and a 24-year-old man, who is cur-
rently standing trial in the matter, were
accused of setting fire to the St Francis and St

Beeler

Joseph Catholic Primary School on August 12
last year. The fire reportedly resulted in dam-
age of $200,000.

The teenager, who appeared before Mag-
istrate Derrence Rolle-Davis in Court 5,
Bank Lane, claimed that he had been under
the influence of drugs and alcohol when he
committed the offence. The juvenile was sen-
tenced to time served.




pple YOUF

EL He tid ie bad

BAHAMAS NATIONAL PRIDE ASSOCIATION presented its first Best Kept Yard Award for 2010. Con-
gratulations go to Mr. & Mrs. Ronald and Helen Stubbs of Windsor Estates. Pictured (from the left) are
Mrs. Judy Williams Board member at Bahamas National Pride Association, Mr. & Mrs. Ronald and
Helen Stubbs Best Kept Yard winners, Ms. Joanne Johnson Executive Coordinator and Mr. Anthony Capron



also a Board member at BNPA.

In Loving Memory of our Dear Friend



Noelle Kelly Roberts

March 15th 1970 - Every 18th 2009

"Nell

A year of sunsets has passed and your
generous, loving spirit has filled our
hearts with grace and peace.

We love you Nelli
You are forever in our h

a,

Your Girls - A.K.A. The sisterhood of
the traveling white pants!



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attain your aoe ea aes a rea Sa Inner peace, rere
and calmness. It's also a fun re es hela Lee
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$ “$-

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



@x BAHAMAS OBSERVES KEY DATE ON CHRISTIAN CALENDAR

BAY VIEW ACADEMY
students (above and
right) at St. Mary’s the
Virgin Anglican Church.

In the Western Christian cal-
endar, Ash Wednesday is the
first day of Lent and occurs
forty-six days (forty days not
counting Sundays) before Easter.
It is a moveable fast, falling on a
different date each year because
it is dependent on the date of
Easter. It can occur as early as 4
February or as late as 10 March.

Information source: Wikipedia

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&

PARISHIONER Bob Isaacs.

POSITION: ANALYST PROGRAMMER II

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons forthe
above position of Analyst Programmer I in the Information
Technology Department of The National Insurance Board.

Job Summary:

l heyelops COT aeler solar syste as
mer LSer TeQUneMents and prove user
supper.

Duties and
u les an aja,
Responsibilities:
* Analyze, design, develop, implement
and maintain computer sobware
SY SIE.
Provick: status reports On PrOEMeSs ol
projects to the Analyst Programmes,
Advise ues of availability of systerns
for testing
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Database
Ensure proper sequencing of
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Communicate required software
changes and enhancements to the
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Ferlorn Structured walkthroughs of
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college of university, in Computer
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tield[s
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BX PeMETICE IM lava and the use of RAD
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revqpuairer.

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working inan ASSOC series

and networking enviraniments is chesinerd,

cxpenence

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the JZ FE standarel

Ability to write programmes in RPG, ILE
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A working knowledpe of DB? and MSs

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Application

Interested persons may apply by submitting
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the necessary proc! of qualifications toc

Senior Manager,

Human Resources
Administration

The National Insurance Board
Headquarters Building

P.O. Box N-7508

Nassau, Bahamas



Deaclline: February 22,2010



&

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 9

&

THE TRIBUNE

MARKING ASH WEDNESDAY

6

LOCAL NEWS



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

_

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian attitudes towards the Haitian migration

By LARRY SMITH

IN THE weeks since the
catastrophic earthquake that
killed an estimated 230,000
men women and children in
Haiti, there has been an end-
less stream of consciousness
from Bahamians on both
sides of the migration issue.

First we had what I con-
sidered to be some
extraordinary reac-
tions to the prime
minister's remarks
immediately after the
January 12 event. In
a series of Facebook
exchanges, several
intellectual critics
condemned Ingra-
ham for being insen-
sitive and justifying
anti-Haitian senti-
ments by discourag-
ing Bahamians from
helping in the wake of the
disaster. These were the
remarks in question (as
reported by The Guardian):
"The government has estab-
lished a common account at
all the country's commercial
banks, into which donations
to the relief effort in Haiti
can be made. We will cause
that money to be sent either
to the Haitian government
and/or to international orga-
nizations that are able to pro-
vide assistance to Haiti at this
time and the government will
make a significant financial
contribution. It is not appro-
priate for us to be collecting
goods to send to Haiti
because there is no means by
which we can get there.”

Then there was an equally
hostile reaction to the per-
fectly sensible policy
announced at the same time
that the government would
release Haitians from the
Detention Centre and sus-
pend apprehension and repa-
triation efforts, while seeking
to prevent new illegal immi-
gration. This generated howls
of vitriolic protest and con-
fused comments from
Bahamians upset about the
supposed creolisation of the

ey

eg al



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham



JLARRY SMITH

country. In response, the PM
had this to say: "The Haitian
homeland has been devastat-
ed by the worst cata-
strophe in 200 years,
with governmental
agencies rendered
impotent. Burdening
a collapsed country
with destitute depor-
tees would be a true
crime. I can’t imag-
ine hypocrites going
to church on Sunday
morning and then
saying on the radio
and in the newspa-
pers and in their
hearts, that we ought to
detain and keep these peo-
ple and send them back to
Haiti."

Up next was a call by Col-
lege of the Bahamas lecturer
Nicolette Bethel for a more
informed policy on Haitian
migrants: "What about an
organized agricultural pro-
ject,” she asked, "where those
who enter illegally must
reside and work under super-
vision — Government hous-
ing (not illegal and unsafe
shanty towns) and some pay-
ment should be part of the
deal—in exchange for labour.
Couldn't there be a win-win
situation?"

Although variations on
this theme have been pro-
posed over the years, it nev-
ertheless produced the stan-
dard outraged Bahamian
responses: "We have thou-
sands of illegal immigrants in
The Bahamas already who
are looking for a fresh start in
life,” argued Dennis Dames
in a letter to the editor, "and
it's a huge burden on our
social services. How many
mnillions of new illegals do
you think that we could
accommodate?"

Frankly, the level of igno-

rance, fear and hate-monger-
ing surrounding the Haitian
migration to the Bahamas is
astounding — especially
when one considers the fact
that Africans living in Haiti
achieved the first successful
slave revolt in history against
one of the world's most
advanced nations. I would
have thought that this should
mean something to most
Bahamians, but it doesn't. So
much for all the talk about
the African diaspora.

This antagonistic Bahami-
an attitude towards Haitians
is largely due to our religious,
political and educational
leaders (at least those who
know better) — who have
consistently recoiled from dis-
cussing the social issues or
promoting integration in
order to avoid stirring the
political pot.

If we are to develop an
informed policy we need
information — which is extra-
ordinarily difficult to come
by in the Bahamas. In fact,
there has been scant research
on this subject over the past
30 years — only two major
studies, a couple of substan-
tial analyses, and a handful
of limited government sur-
veys. But during the Christie
administration an attempt
was made to address this defi-
ciency.

In 2004 the International
Office of Migration was
asked to undertake an assess-
ment of the Haitian commu-
nity in the Bahamas, in con-
junction with researchers at
the College of the Bahamas.
The resulting 98-page report
collated all the available data,
and creole-speaking inter-
viewers surveyed 500
Haitians on four islands, with
the support of the Haitian
Embassy. But the findings

Ca

eee ds met be 4

were never officially pub-
lished (although the report is
available online), and the
information in the report is
never discussed.

What this research shows
is that the Haitian problem
is not quite as insurmount-
able as many of us believe.
For example, published esti-
mates of the size of the Hait-
ian population range from
80,000 up to 400,000 (more
than the entire Bahamian
population of about 340,000).
Such wild estimates have
been made at various times
by politicians, journalists and
pundits — among others — all
with a view to proving that
we are being overwhelmed
by foreigners.

Counting illegal residents
is a notoriously unreliable
exercise, but the IOM report
used a number of methods
to arrive at an estimate of 30
to 60,000, of which many are
just passing through to a third
country (like the US) or
returning home to Haiti. And
many more are here legally in
one form or another. And it
is often overlooked that there
are an estimated 70,000
undocumented Bahamians
living in the United States, in
addition to some 12,000 living
there legally.

The claim that Haitians
are hogging up free public
services also bears a closer
look. Official data indicate
that about 8.8 per cent of all
school children are Haitian.
Haitians constituted just over
11 per cent of hospital admis-
sions in 2001 (although they
made almost 20 per cent of
all outpatient visits to public
clinics) and less than 12 per
cent of live births were to
Haitian nationals in 2003.

On the other side of the
coin, over 12,000 registered
Haitians contributed more
than $3.5 million to National
Insurance in 2004, but they
received only 1.8 per cent of
total benefits — far less than
might be expected from the
estimated size of the popula-
tion. And like the rest of us,

“Frankly, the level
of ignorance, fear
and hate-mongering
surrounding the
Haitian migration
to the Bahamas is
astounding —
especially when one
considers the fact
that Africans living
in Haiti achieved
the first successful
slave revolt in
history against one
of the world's most
advanced nations.”



Haitians (whether legal or
not) pay taxes on whatever
they buy in our stores.

Over 30 years ago,
Bahamian social scientist
Dawn Marshall undertook
the first study of the Haitian
migration to the Bahamas.
She noted at the time that:
"It cannot be in the best
interest of either the Bahami-
an government or the
Bahamian nation to allow a
large proportion of its popu-
lation to live and develop in
isolation.

And in its 2005 report, the
IOM said much the same
thing: "Unless the Haitian
community becomes more
fully integrated into Bahami-
an society, an important
minority of the Bahamian-
born population will grow up
as foreigners within the only
society they know."

Dawn Marshall says the
official policy of both parties
boils down to "apprehend
and deport with no consider-
ation of the needs of the
economy.

“Small island developing
states like the Bahamas usu-
ally have to import labour if
they want to grow. We need

‘
Bvehumane

The Bahamas Humane Society

THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY

would like to thank

a policy on how we are going
to manage that importation."

And that is essentially the
crux of the matter. Plainly
we need the labour.

That's why the Haitians
are here — because there is a
market for them, and they
can earn more than they can
at home. In fact, there would
be no Bahamian agriculture
at all if it were not for
Haitians. We are willing to
employ them illegally and
pay them low wages because
they are outside the protec-
tion of the law. It follows,
therefore, that in order to
control the migration we
have to control both supply
and demand, which means
regulating employers as well
as deporting illegals. But we
don't do that.

Meanwhile, the govern-
ment's unstated policy on this
issue seems to boil down to
co-existence rather than inte-
gration. And we have to ask
whether the government
(PLP or FNM) has made a
conscious, informed decision
on this.

Well, good luck in getting
that answer from anyone ina
position to know.

Should we invite hundreds
of thousands of Haitians in
to set up peasant plantations
and denude our scattered
islands? Or should we round
up every man, woman and
child of Haitian descent and
put them in concentration
camps until we can deport
them?

These are apparently the
choices we face if we take our
leaders at face value. There
may be better solutions, but
we will never arrive at them
without a rational public
debate based on accurate
information. in the meantime,
we will continue to repeat
rubbish and hurl racial epi-
thets.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



SUPPORTERS OUT IN FORCE FOR BY-ELECTION



PLP AND FNM supporters have been out in force in the Elizabeth constituency over the last two days.
Mingling with those in red and yellow were Dr Andre Rollins of the National Democratic Party (below),
FNM candidate Dr Duane Sands (top right); West End MP Obie Wilchcombe and Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest (right).

FROM page one

“Tf there are 4,300, and slight-
ly over 3,000 votes, then there
was an 84 per cent turnout.

“Tt’s tough to tell with the
register how it is, and what is
the true total of the registered
voters in the constituency.”

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette agreed: “You will
probably find we had a high
turnout of the actual people in
Elizabeth.”

As he said there are a large
number of temporary residents
in the constituency who may
have left since the register was
drawn “at the last hour” by for-
mer Prime Minister Perry
Christie prior to the 2007 gen-
eral election.

He emphasised how the reg-
ister would be cleaned up by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham before the next election.

However, the Parliamentary
Commissioner said the voters



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Turnout

who had moved out or could
not be found would not account
for the 1,458 to 1,792 missing
ballots.

“Many people just didn’t
show up to vote,” he said.

“A lot of people who were
eligible to vote did not show
up, it was a low turnout and
that’s all it was.”

Low voter turnout is consis-
tently more common in by-elec-
tions than in general elections
where there is an average 90
per cent turnout.

However PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts said a low
turnout in Elizabeth could be
put down to general apathy,
malaise, or dirty politics.

An Elizabeth voter who
chose not to vote on Tuesday
said she did not feel empow-
ered to vote as the two major
parties offered no real choice,

— — ie

a

=.

TIM CLARKE/TRIBUNE STAFF



and there was no chance of a
third party coming to power.

“T just feel like it was a waste
of time,” she said.

“Tm sick of the FNM and the
PLP. They are like the same
party with different T-shirts. I
hear the exact same story from
them both, and I realised the
time has come for a third party,
and we are not going to put ina
third party at this point.”

The Joe Farrington Road
resident who has been kept
awake by PLP and FNM par-
ties at the constituency offices
every night for the last three
weeks said she would have vot-
ed for Cassius Stuart of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment if he had commanded
more support.

She said: “This is the first
time I have not voted and I
know the by-election is impor-
tant, because if you don’t have
a vote you don’t have a voice,
but I just feel like we don’t have
a voice anyway.”

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

manager.
Some commentators argue a
court process would be futile,
because it would cost hundreds
of thousands; it would not
change the composition of the
government significantly, and
the seat would be back up for
election in less than two years.
“In a democracy the question
of the next election or the cost of
a court proceeding is not the
issue; it is a matter of fairness
and justice in the decisions made
in the process. If cost and the
date of the next election deter-



Recount agony

mined our actions that would
seriously injure our commitment
to democracy.

“Tf that is the case, we might
as well have not had the elec-
tion and let the government
appoint someone,” said PLP
campaign manager, Dr Bernard
Nottage.

Dr Nottage said this was his
personal view, and not the posi-
tion of the party. He said at the
end of the day, it was the candi-
date’s responsibility and right to
file a court challenge if so
desired.



The issue of
protest votes is
increasing in
importance
because PLP
operatives claim
there are only five
protest votes and
all of them were
cast for their can-
didate, Ryan Pin-
der.

The Free National Movement
(FNM) are rejecting this claim.
Carl Bethel, FNM campaign
manager, said this was inaccu-

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Duane Sands and Ryan Pinder

rate, as protest
votes have not
been counted as
yet.

A prominent
FNM attorney
said protest votes
are not counted
unless there is a
| tie. She said there
were no protest
votes in the divi-
sion she was sta-
tioned at, but she
could not speak to the overall
protest count.

Protest votes are cast on yel-
low ballots. They result from sev-
eral scenarios, such as when vot-
ers turn up to vote with valid
voter registration cards and their
names, for whatever reason, are
not on the list, or when the pre-
siding officer is not satisfied of
the identity of the person,
according to a PLP attorney.
These votes have to be validated
by the election court in order to
be counted.

Early results from the recount
changed the dynamics only
slightly. By the time the first
three polling divisions were cer-
tified in the recount, Mr Sands
picked up two more votes and
lost one vote, while Mr Pinder
lost two votes. This gave Mr
Sands a net gain of three.

“Up by three is better than
up by one vote. We'll take it any
way we get it. It gives us a little
bit more of a cushion, and cre-
ates more of a challenge for our
lead to be eroded,” said Mr
Sands on the scene of the
recount. This lead was reduced
to two after the fourth polling
division was counted.

PLP stalwart Valentine
Grimes explained the two votes
thrown out during the recount
of polling division number three

FROM page one

were rejected because the voters
used their inky thumbs to make
their mark, instead of the pens
provided.

Examples of defective ballots
from previous elections, are inci-
dents where individuals write
their names, signatures or other
identifying marks on the ballot.
During the election campaign,
the PLP distributed parapher-
nalia with instructions for vot-
ing. PLP agents believe the prob-
lem would have been worse,
with more lost votes, if they did
not make this push.

“Ballots are being scrutinised
much more carefully to find
defects in the vote itself. (Tues-
day) night, there was a ballot
with an ‘X’ that went below the
line. It was accepted last night
but it might very well be rejected
today,” said a prominent PLP
attorney. In a previous election
she said she encountered a voter
wrote “Jesus is Lord” next to
the name of the chosen candi-
date.

The major political parties had
a strong contingent of lawyers
in the recount room, along with
several cabinet ministers, in the
case of the FNM. According to a
PLP attorney, this is typical for
recounts. She said, at polling sta-
tions during general elections,
the major parties do not usually
have sufficient resources to
deploy lawyers everywhere.
However, they bring lawyers and
more experience electioneers in
for the recount to bring a greater
level of scrutiny to each ballot.

The PLP objected to Mount
Moriah MP Tommy Turnquest
being a part of the FNM's scruti-
ny team. Mr Grimes said the
PLP feels this is a conflict of
interest as Mr Turnquest is the
Minister of National Security
and in charge of elections.

To the amazement of many
Tribune242.com commentators,
who followed minute-by-minute
coverage of the election and the
recount online, it was hard to
understand why it took authori-
ties so long to count the 3142
votes cast on Tuesday. With a
combined vote total of 778, it
took over seven hours to just
count polling divisions one, two
and three, which were the first
three to be tackled.

PLP MP Dr Bernard Nottage
said it is not unusual for a
recount to take this long. He not-
ed that during the first count, all
the polling divisions were count-
ed simultaneously, whereas dur-
ing the recount they were count-
ed consecutively, by the return-
ing officer himself.

The recount was contentious
in the early hours, according to
FNM campaign manager, Carl
Bethel, who said ground rules
had to be established to govern
the interpretation of various
challenges. It is unclear whether
this helped to speed up the
process, although Mr Bethel said
it should have. Hundreds of par-
ty faithfuls gathered on the out-
side to observe the recount. The
primary school grounds were a
who’s who of prominent attor-
neys, government ministers, and
members of parliament, who
camped out waiting for the
results to filter in.

It was not a national holiday
or sick day at work, but many
of the government officials were
party agents at the polling station
on Tuesday. They were asked
to be present when their polling
divisions were called to be count-
ed, according to a PLP agent.

Further scrutiny is brought to
bear by seasoned attorneys dur-
ing the recount, who were not
present during the first count.

exclaimed: “She just turned around and bashed
him.”

The shocked crowd watched as Mr Symon-
ette walked calmly away and asked police not to
get involved.

Although the DPM declined to comment on
the incident, he told the press: “We started off
this morning very peacefully, there was a distur-
bance from a non-FNM party member, and as a
result police asked us to come outside the fence.
Tempers were rising.”

He added: “The election officers and police
have done an excellent job, they deserve to be
commended.”

FNM election worker Freddie Lightbourn said:
“She should have been arrested or removed for
disorderly behaviour.

“T think it’s pretty sad that we had behaviour

Deputy PM hit

like that when it shouldn’t be allowed to happen.”

Another FNM supporter who saw the attack
said: “It’s a total disrespect of the government,
because at no point do you challenge either the
Prime Minister or the Deputy Prime Minister or
any Member of Parliament in that form or fash-
ion, you don’t want to send the message out
there that you don’t respect the government of
the country or that you would hit a government
official just because you can do it.

“They don’t represent just a segment of society,
they represent the entire society.

“They are not just representing themselves,
so when you lay hands on a person like that it’s
never warranted, there is no justification for it.”

Ms Williams declined the opportunity to speak
to The Tribune yesterday.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





MARSH Harbour, Abaco, will host a special
customer service conference, the brainchild of
motivational speaker Spence Finlayson.

The “World Class Customer Service Confer-
ence” will take place on Thursday, February 25,
from 9am to 3.30pm at St John’s Anglican
Church Hall on Don Mackay Boulevard.

Mr Finlayson, a Bahamian-born motivational
speaker and corporate trainer of 22 years, has
held his World Class Customer Service Confer-
ences in 15 Caribbean countries.

Abaco plays host to customer service conference

It is designed for managers and front-line staff
members who deal with customers and the pub-
lic, whether it is face to face or through other
communication channels.

Professionals

Mr Finlayson said that his conference is “for
professionals who are determined to strengthen
their ability to succeed in the customer service

field and are searching for new ideas, techniques
and strategies to help them achieve their goals.”

“With tourism being our number one industry,
it only makes business sense to train persons
directly or indirectly involved in this sector,” he
said.

Spence Finlayson is also the creator and host
of the popular international motivational tele-
vision show “Dare To Be Great” which is aired
in 20 Caribbean countries and the United King-

#

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers
On

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Topic

“EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
PREPAREDNESS RESPONSE
including
EARTHQUAKE and TSUNAMI
CONDITIONS”

Guest Speaker

Captain Stephen Russell
DIRECTOR
NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (NEMA)

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m. - 12:15p.m.
Registration and Networking
12:15p.m. - 1:15p.m. Luncheon

Financial Members: $20.00

Student Members: $15.00
Public: $25.00

If possible, please confirm your attendance by e-mail

crreiss@reisseng.com -or- pdec@coralwave.com

P.O. Box SS-6533, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-394-5544
www. bahamasengincers.org



dom and airs locally on Cable 12.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS: CENSUS 2010

‘We want to count everyone’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - As the
Bahamas prepares to conduct
the Census 2010, Department
of Statistics Director Kelsie
Dorsett said it is important that
everyone is counted, including
all foreign nationals residing in
the country.

“We are not looking into the
legal status of anyone — that
is not our mandate. We are sim-
ply counting,” said Ms Dorsett.

“We do not discriminate and
whether they are Chinese,
Haitians, Jamaicans or Bahami-
ans, whether they are legal or

m@ Census Day to start on May 3

illegal, if they are residents they
should be counted as well.”
Foreign nationals accounted
for 10 per cent of the Bahamas’
population, according to the
last census report in 2000.
Although initial reports had
estimated that some $5 million
was earmarked for Census
2010, Ms Dorsett said the cost
has been cut to $3 million.
While in Grand Bahama, Ms
Dorsett spoke to members of
the Rotary Club of Lucaya on
Tuesday.
She said Census Day begins
on May 3 and continues to the

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end June. She noted that
approximately 1,500 to 1,600
enumerators who will be
recruited throughout the
Bahamas will start collecting
information on May 4 for the
census. “Because of the econ-
omy, when recruiting enumer-
ators we are trying to give pref-
erence to unemployed persons,
if they qualify.

“We do have a screening test
and we are looking for people
of integrity and good character
references because they will be
going into people’s home,” she
said. According to Mrs Dorsett,
several new questions have
been added to the question-
naire and persons are urged to
give accurate and truthful infor-
mation.

“We are asking you...to give
the best and accurate informa-
tion you can. It is critical that
we have honest and truthful
information. If at the time of
the visit you do not know the
information tell the enumerator
to come back and you will find
out, but we want you to do your
best to provide us with honest
information,” she said.

Mrs Dorsett said persons
should call the Department of
Statistics if no one has visited
their home.

She also noted that residents
living in private gated commu-
nities should form a committee
and decide what days they can












SPENCE FINLAYSO






meet with enumerators.

“This is a national exercise.
Please make yourself available
to us. Everyone counts, no one
should be excluded,” she said.

Mrs Dorsett said the data
collected for the Census pro-
vides socio-demographic infor-
mation that is important for
proper planning and decision
making for both the public and
private sectors.

She said they are looking to
obtain more details about the
actual number of families with-
in a household. “Before we
were able to tell you the make
up of a household, but not the
make up of families in that
household,” she explained.

“We are also getting infor-
mation about the use of infor-
mation technology and use of
the Internet because it is also an
indicator in terms of the coun-
try’s progress. We need to
know how many have access,
how are they using it, and
where they are using it.

“We will also be asking peo-
ple about whether they have
medical insurance.”

Mrs Dorsett said that the
Bahamas is part of the
Caribbean-wide programme
and worldwide programme that
conducts census every 10 years.

In the last couple of decades,
the Bahamas has been con-
ducting the census in years end-
ing with zero. The last census
was in 2000. The slogan for the
Census 2010 is ‘Every Island,
Every Household, Everyone
Counts.’



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 19



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

update.

“T commend the reporters of
tribune242 — excellent job! This
represents 21st century journal-
ism, this is forward movement,
excellence deserving of recog-
nition.”

From the moment the polls
opened on Tuesday morning,
reporters manned every polling
division and party headquarters
to send continuous updates to
The Tribune’s Newsroom. This
information was quickly organ-
ised and disseminated to online
readers in the form of a con-
stantly updated, blow-by-blow
timeline.

The Tribune’s photographers
provided the website team with
a steady stream of photos, so
readers could witness the most
important developments first-
hand.

Tuesday’s hits nearly dou-
bled the website’s previous
record of 140,000 set on October
22, 2009 — the day after PLP MP
Picewell Forbes made his pre-
mature and ill-fated comments
about the outcome of the John
Travolta extortion case.

In a single day, the by-elec-

ay. Mediu

(Mr jad

y a
Fore

Tribune coverage

tion newsfeed became the web-
site’s most viewed and second
most commented story ever,
beating out stories that had been
attracting steady comments for
months.

More than 200 readers rec-
ommended our by-election
newsfeed and hundreds men-
tioned it in their Facebook status
updates.

Through Twitter and Face-
book, Tribune online editor Jes-
sica Robertson sent out teasers
to drive traffic to the site. Ana-
lytics show that nearly 1,200 users
clicked on these links alone.

She said: “What I’m happy
about is that we not only pro-
vided information, but achieved
what we originally set out to do
with the website — create a plat-
form for intelligent discussion
on events that matter; not just
disseminating information, but
giving our audience a voice.”

WHAT SOME OF OUR
READERS SAID

Montagu voter: The best part
of this election has been The
Tribune up-dates and the

accompanying comments, which
have been more enlightening
than all the campaign rhetoric!
You go, Tribune!

Frustrated in Elizabeth: “I
just read the minute-by-minute
coverage of the election online.
Hats off to The Tribune for bril-
liantly recording the reality
check for the two major political
parties.”

Two Thumbs Up: “The Tri-
bune is doing an excellent job
with this minute-by-minute cov-



well informed and it’s just like
I’m right in the middle of all the
action. Keep up the good
work!”

James Smith: “This is excel-
lent, congratulations to The Tri-
bune!”

Thomas B: “You guys are
keeping everyone abreast of
what is going on today with the
very exciting by-election. To me
there is nothing better than to
see democracy first hand.”

eae haere HS

Sade: “Wow - live blogging
the election. Cool.”

T Gibson: “Real time elec-
tion coverage ... this is great. I
feel like I am there.”

Ms Lucky: “I would really
like to say that The Tribune is
doing a great job in keeping us
Bahamians up to date with the
tallies.”

TSD: “I commend The Tri-
bune on a great job covering
this story. I feel as if I am right
there where all the action is. I
appreciate this.”

Samiadde: “I think you guys
are doing a great job keeping
us up to date. I'm at work and
I'm glad I'm able to get an idea
as to what's going on.”

Cozzmo The Critic: “I must
commend The Tribune on a job
well done. Keep It Up!”

Ear on the Ground: “Jessica
and the guys at The Tribune —
another great job! Thanks for
keeping us bang up to date.

Lala: Great job Tribune! Tam

at work and still able to keep
up with what's going on
regarding this by-election.
Keep up the good work!”

Ron: “My first time on tri-
bune242 ... Great to be able
to get up to date information
at any time.”

Grateful Bahamian:
“Thanks tribune242! Your
updates made this election
come alive for those of us that
are not home right now in Nas-
sau. Thank you!”

R Moxey: “The up to date
coverage was excellent by The
Tribune and you guys deserve
a round of applause.”

Antoinette: “I am proud of
you Tribune. Good work!”

Spaceyg: “Really appreciate
the live coverage. It was
great.”

Breezy: “I enjoyed the fren-
zy last night as the results from
the polls came in, and I must
big up tribune242 for their cov-
erage of this by-election — JOB
WELL DONE!”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PG 20 ¢ Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION

giv |

¢ultur Up

A Children’s ete Training Event

We invite you to nominate children with extraordinary
arts leadership skills and record of service
who attend your church, ages 8 to 11 to be considered for the

Casktonro- ‘i Asks
a tla

2010

« Dancers
¢ Instrumentalist

Nomination period is Feb. 15th to Feb. 26th 2070
Performance interview is March 8th to March 13th, 2010

AWARDS CEREMONY March 27th, 2010
The Diplomat r Carmichael Road

For more information contact us at: 461-6442/5 or 461-6418
ST ea Ue URC MEL meee

"COME CELEBRATE WITH US"

The Tribune





The Tribune

Remember

you are t

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

warms of Anglicans and Catholics

attended Ash Wednesday masses

throughout the country to mark the
start of the Lenten season - a time of
fasting, prayer and almsgiving. Lent will
run until the mass of the Lord’s Supper
exclusively on Holy Thursday, the day
before Good Friday. It a season of
penance, reflection, and fasting which
prepares Christians for Christ's resurrec-

tion on Easter Sunday.

Yesterday, Tribune Religion visited the noon mass at
St Francis Xavier Cathedral, where Catholics from
many backgrounds gathered to receive ashes. Some
came early before service, finding their seats in the
pews of St Francis Xavier Cathedral. In each bench,
persons are meditating on scriptures before service.

Barbara Sweeting has been a member of St Francis
Xavier Cathedral all of her life. She broke down the
service proceedings, which for a non-Catholic was a big
help in deciphering what was going on.

Ritual after ritual, everything is solemn. Not a pin
drop can be heard inside the church.

Two scripture lessons were read by members of the
church, urging parishioners to be “reconciled to God”
on behalf of Christ. The leader beckoned each person
in the congregation to “Be merciful O God, for we have
sinned.”

“This service is a reminder of our mortality and
accountability to God,” says Archbishop Pinder.
“Remember man that you are dust, and to dust you will
return,” he says to a fully packed church bursting at the
seams.

“Even though we sin, what temptation represents is
that we can still reform our lives. It represents being
able to know that there is always a way to turn back
from the bad in your life. It gives you fasting, peace and
redemption,” said one Catholic.

Historically, Lent began as a journey of Jesus’ 40 days
in the wilderness, to celebrate Easter with hearts of
thankfulness and praise.

One curious tourist couple of New York just hap-
pened to come across the service while traveling down
West Hill Street. They explained that they had stum-
bled upon the mass by accident, but really enjoyed it.

“T thought it was just lovely, how we just happened to
come across this wonderful service on Ash Wednesday”
says Lori Squillacioti. “Everything happens for a rea-
son, and the same thing happened to us in Italy.”

SEE page 27

RELIGION Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 21



TWO students from Bayview Academy look at a prayer book after recieving ashes at St Mary The Virgin Anglican
Church yesterday.



PG 22 ¢ Thursday, February 18, 2010

eH:

RELIGION

UU :

The Tribune



Name:
Grade: 5

I would like to live in a "Christian
World". A world where black,
Hispanic and white people can live
together in harmony. With God as
Our Father, brothers all are we. Like
1 John 4: 7 says "Let us love one
another, for love comes from God.
Proverbs 15: 1 says "A gentle answer
turns away wrath, but a harsh word



Name:
Grade: 5

ONE day while I was watching televi-
sion, I started to wonder what kind of
world I would like to live in. This world
is horrible. I think I would like to live in
a world without crime.

There would be no killing, shooting or

KENISHA KING

stirs up anger.” I just don't see why we
have all these wars, crime and gangs.
The earthquake in Haiti is hurtful,
we need to help them instead of just
sitting there watching them face
major destruction. The Golden Rule
says, “Do unto others as you would
have them to do unto you.”
When you help them (Haitians),

KIYSHANTI HIGGS

gangs. I would like my world to be
peaceful, with less gangs and murders.
Now in this world, there are children
being abused by their parents or
strangers.

It is very complicated living in this

the Lord will guide you always; He
will satisfy your needs in a sun-
scorched land and will strengthen
your frame. (Isaiah 58: 1)

Now we all know about education.
It helps you to strive for excellence.
But many children do not go to school
to learn. Some children just come to
school for the fun of it.

In my world, children would know
that school is really fun once you get
into it.

Crime is the main or worst thing
happening in the world now. People

y

world today. I wish there was another
world to live in. If I could choose what I
wanted my world to be like, it would be
less killings, shootings,

child abuse and robberies. All adults
would work less and grow crops for
food. I would still like children to go to
school where teachers cannot spank, but
only punish children by taking away
their break. I would call my world
Peaceful World. I would have peace in
the churches and end all suffering and

are getting raped, shot, killed, stabbed
and forced to join gangs. I mean,
what's so good about crime? It is a
sick abomination. "You intended to
harm me, but God intended it for
good to accomplish what is now being
done, the saving of many lives."
(Genesis 50; 20)

I hope one day my new world
would come true. I am learning that if
you want things done you have to put
in a little hard work of your own.

"Blessed are the dead who die in
the Lord."

dying. The world today is horrible and
some people still don't have civil rights.
Some people are shot by white people
because they are black. Haiti just faced a
natural disaster. Some of them
(Haitians) don't have homes. Some of
them are still trapped under the rocks.
The Haitians are hungry and they have
no food. Many Bahamians are helping
them, but they still need more help. This
is why I wish for another world to live in.
Bless this whole world.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Name: REAGAN CARTWRIGHT

Grade: 5

TODAY in our world, too many
things are going on. Some are good
and some are bad. Some of the good
things are civil rights, education and
homes to live in. Some of the bad
things are the sixty-six homes robbed
this week, the earthquake in Haiti,
shoot-outs and kidnapping.

The last one is the use of foul lan-
guage. I think all of these things
should go away. If I could, I would live





Rak
fl j



in a world of candy, where teeth never
go bad and there is no danger or fear.
Rivers will be made of the richest and
creamiest chocolate. The grasslands
are cotton candy of the finest mixture.
Trees are candy canes and lollipops.
The dirt, don't get me started, but the
dirt would be the most delicious pop-
ping rocks that would crackle in your
mouth along with everlasting gob-
stoppers.

sRE

Parents wouldn't have to work, it
will always rain money. In my world,
children are born with prepared or
smart minds so that they can do well
in all subjects. We would also live in
the best gingerbread houses.

One day, I went outside and asked
my mother "Is there anything to eat?"
"No", she replied, "just go and get
some cotton candy or candy cane".
"Maybe I will get a piece of ginger-
bread and a glass' of chocolate milk
from the river, I said." I went in
search of a giant picnic basket that my
mother plaited. Then I went to the
town board and it read population



Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 23



~~ 4% E —_

100. We have one hundred cups and
plates at home I thought. So I went
back home and got one hundred
plates and cups. Soon after I took a
trip to the Chocolate River and
stayed there for one hour. I sat there
scooping and counting glasses of
chocolate milk. Then, I picked one
hundred pieces of cotton candy and
gingerbread. Finally, I went to the
alarm tower and pressed the alarm
button.

Suddenly, the whole town gathered
around and we had a picnic at sunset.

The main point of this essay is to
share and not to be selfish.





FROM left to right: Pastor Adderly, Kenisha King, Reagan Cartwright, Kiyshanti Higgs, Principal of Sadie Curtis Primary School Audrey R Farrington.





PG 24 ® Thursday, February 18, 2010

RELIGION The Tribune

St Agnes Parish Anglican Church Men (AGM)
and Women (ACW) Celebrate Anniversaries

A SOLEMN High Mass of
Thanksgiving was held on Friday,
February 12 at 7pm under the theme:
“Ordering Our Steps In God's
Words” Proverbs 3:6, to celebrate
the 38th and 46th anniversaries
respectively of St Agnes Parish Men
(ACM) and Women (ACW) and the
recognition of past president,
Veronica Cooper. The celebrant and
preacher for this service was the Rt
Rev'd. Laish Z. Boyd, Sr., Bishop of
The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos
Islands.

Bishop Boyd told the congregation
that in order for their steps to be
ordered in God's Word, they must
intentionally seek the Lord while He
may be found, realise that they cannot
play games with God because He is
all-knowing, and they must ask God
to give them a pure heart and for
them to never be separated from God.

“Order your life according to His
principles, you're expected to do
great things and keep the organisa-
tions operating at a high level and be
professional “Bishop Boyd said.

Bishop Boyd informed the men
and women that God's Word directs
them to think the best of other peo-
ple, “love endures all things and
believes the best and hopes the
best”, he said.

Archdeacon IJ. Ranfurly Brown,
Rector of St. Agnes Parish congrat-
ulated both organisations and
stressed to them that there is much
work to be done as he installed the
Officers for 2010.

The ACM Officers are:
Christopher Wright, President, Ken
O'Brien, Vice-President, Bernard
Bostwick, Secretary, Neil O'Brien,
Assistant Secretary, Everette
Burrows, Treasurer, Barrett
McDonald, Assistant Treasurer and
Kenneth Braynen, Chaplain.

The ACW Officers are: Cleomi
Turner, President, Yolanda
Fernander, Vice-President, Shelly
Cooke-Seymour, Secretary, Monique
Mitchell, Assistant Secretary,
Verlene Harris, Treasurer, Patrice
Ferguson, Assistant ‘Treasurer,
Kathleen Maynard, Chaplain and
Lyn Bullard, Assistant Chaplain.

Anglican Church Men and Women
throughout the Diocese joined in the
celebration along with other wor-
shippers including Dame Marguerite
Pindling who is always in attendance
at these anniversary services.





tn

aa i

> Poe “1h 7

,
'
j
'



David Knowles/Photos



The Tribune

RELIGION Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 25

The Measure of a Mant

‘Mighty Men Ministry’ hosts Men and Boys conference

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

T risk and challenged

boys are invited to

attend St Paul’s
Baptist Church, where they
will explore the pressures
and mixed messages that
bombard boys, with violent
and distorted images of mas-
culinity. Images that tell
them to stifle emotion, and
that suggest they aspire to
one particular image of how
they should act and how
they should treat others.

These and other avenues of “male-
ness” will be discovered at St Paul
Baptist Church’s first ever Men and
Boys conference, for “at risk” boys.
The conference is sponsored by their
‘Mighty Men Ministry’ under the
theme “The Measure of a Man,”
drawn from the biblical passage I
Kings 2: 1-5.

George Bodie, president of the
men’s department at the church said
the conference “seeks to zero in on
three aspects: 1) boys who are consid-
ered “at risk,” and those who are
challenged, 2) persons who work with
young people, and 3) persons who
lead men’s civic or religious min-
istries.

The conference’s official opening
will take place on Thursday, February
25 at 6.30 pm. National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest, Minister

EBENEZER WALK-A-THON

—_
7



i a = ~
ye ere
5
4 > a
m ° ira
| al - * ~~
a — io
Re 2 te be:

EBENEZER Methodist Church held its annual Walk-A-Thon on Saturday January 31

4

i

= ee a

of Youth Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard, and Education Minister
Desmond Bannister will bring greet-
ings along with Fred Mitchell, the PLP
spokesman on foreign affairs.

“All of our speakers will seek to
address issues dealing with boys, in
three lectures happening at once and
persons can choose which ones they
are most interested in,” said Mr
Bodie.

There will be a general session each
night at 8.30. Persons are invited to
come and benefit from the sessions.

The Men and Boy’s Conference
focuses on supporting boys in their
transition to manhood, and seeks to
recognise and celebrate the many
ways of being male, and facilitate the
healthy involvement and presence of
adult males in boys’ lives.

Nightly topics include : Who’s Your

Po
“=

Daddy, Working With Difficult Boys,
Boys to Men- Crime Doesn't Pay,
Men’s Health and Sexuality, Leading
Men From The Pages of Your Life,
What Every Men’s President Needs to
Know, How to Impact Your Men’s
Ministry, and Reframing your Men’s
Ministry-Going to the Next Level.

Attorney Keith Bell, Dr Kendal
Major, Charles Rolle, Wrensworth
Butler, Dr Hasting Johnson, Rev Dr J
Carl Rahming, Dr Phil Roberts, and
Rev Jackson Miller are some of the
facilitators.

“Tt is our hope that at the end of the
conference persons will be able to
improve their men’s ministry,” said Mr
Bodie. “Those who work with youths
will be better informed, and boys will
be more productive in making positive
contributions to nation building and
staying on the right track.”




, with a walk from the church to Blair Estates and back.

42 people participated in the walk and returned to the Church for a souse- out and fellowship. This was the first fundraising event for the
year and was a great success. Winners for the event included: Rashad Johnson, Deniro Lightbourne, Lapetra Rolle, Kyosen McPhee,
Samantha Bethell, Timothy Pinder, Wayne Key and Linda Sands. Looking forward the music department is making final plans for the Spring
Concert scheduled for April 18. The public is invited and can look forward to a wonderful presentation.



PG 26 ® Thursday, February 18, 2010

RELI

ION

The Tribune



Ce
Lessons of Lent

AS we enter this solemn season of
Lent, we are reminded that now is
the time to learn some new lessons
and re-discover some old ones. Let us
consider together how to benefit
from this time before Easter:

1. DEATH: We are made from dust
and we will return to this humble
beginning either in the dust of the
grave or the ashes of cremation. We
need to curb our pride.

2. SIN: We all have to fight a strong
pull to slip away from the will of God.
We must fight harder.

3. PRAYER: The process by which
a relationship is maintained with our
Lord God Almighty. It should be a
daily desire to draw closer and closer
to our Creator, Saviour, and the Holy

Spirit.




REV. ANGELA
C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS




4. FASTING: The discipline of
exercising self-control in order to
strengthen our ability to resist daily
temptations.

5. STUDY: The time taken to grow
in wisdom and knowledge is a worth-
while investment in oneself.

6. WORSHIP: Extra services pro-
vide additional opportunities to

experience the presence of God. We
need to take advantage of them.

7. PREPARATION: These forty
days may be best spent with an eye
on the day’s demands and the prom-
ise of the Easter hope.

8. CONFESSION: The admission
of guilt, request for forgiveness and
the acceptance of absolution is a nec-
essary process to free us, heal us and
set US On a new course in the right
direction.

9. WILDERNESS: Finding time to
be alone is vital to do the inner exam-
ination that is required to move
toward maturity in faith.

10: SILENCE: Establishing peri-
ods of silence allows the whispers of
God to be heard, and to listen to the
ruminations of our mind.

It is our individual choice to deter-
mine how successful our Lent will be.
Success is not measured at any other
level than the personal. It is a private
exercise that may involve public
appearances.

Each one of us will be free to pur-
sue our normal routines or to make
the desired change in rhythm and
routine to enable — significant
improvement in spiritual things.

God is looking for us to want to
grow in grace. We have the will and
God has made the way. What are we
going to do? The decision is mine and
yours. Choose wisely.

There are lessons to be learnt in
Lent. Listen, learn, and love your
way to Easter.



Sail Salvador
Christian Council
llonates to Haiti
Earthquake Relief

THE San Salvador Christian
Council presented a cheque in the
amount of two thousand dollars to
the Bahamas Red Cross Society on
Monday, February 8, in aid of Haiti
relief mission. The cheque was pre-
sented by Reverend Father Jude
Edomwonyi, President of the San
Salvador Christian Council to
Willamae Jeaure-Evans, Finance
Officer of the Red Cross at the head-
quarters of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society, John F Kennedy Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Also on January 18 a special
prayer session was held for the land
of Haiti and her people at the
Church of God of Prophecy,
Cockburn Town, San Salvador. The
prayer gathering which was organ-
ised by the San Salvador Christian
Council attracted many people
including the island Administrator,
Terrece Bootle-Bethel, Chief
Counsellor Terrance Major, govern-
ment functionaries, ministers of the
gospel, corporate citizens and people
of Haitian descent.



THE Reverend Father Jude Edomwonyi, President of the San Salvador Christian Council presenting the cheque to Willamae Jeaure-Evans,
Finance Officer of the Bahamas Red Cross Society.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 27

The Blessing, What is it ?

PROVERBS.10: 22. The blessing of the
LORD, it maketh rich, and he addeth no
sorrow with it.

HOW many times have you heard a
member of a congregation or a reli-
gious leader get up and testify about
the blessing of God upon their lives, as
they’ve recently became the recipient
of a new car, a new home or a sum of
money; using the above passage of
scripture to validate their claim?

Then six months to a year later, a
number of sorrows evolves within what
they’ve once called God’s blessings,
i.e. 1) Financially unable to properly
service and maintain the car, 2) The
bank repossesses the car, 3) The bank
forecloses on the new home, and 4)
Start avoiding / ducking people and
complaining of folks coming to borrow
money or ask for financial assistance.
How quickly have these persons for-
gotten the “and he added no sorrow
with it” part of their testimony?

The misappropriating of God’s word
has a great deal to do with the level of
ignorance that exists among the reli-
gious community. This is the breeding
ground for undisciplined, itching ears,
gullible Christians that have and will
continue to become victims to various
forms of unbalanced, and in some cases
false teachings about prosperity and
the blessing that are coming forth today
in Jesus’ name.

Understandably so, Yeshuwa
Messiah (a.k.a. Jesus the Christ) never
called His followers Christians, but
rather He always called them disciples /



PASTOR

discipline ones.

As it is a proven fact that religious
Christians are good at reading and
quoting a few scripture verses; whereas
the Apostle Paul in writing to his disci-
ple and spiritual son namely Timothy
didn’t just say to him “read”

2 Timothy.2:15. Study to show thy-
self approved unto God, a workman
that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly
dividing the word of truth.

This word study in the Greek is:
spoudazo, spoo-dad'-zo; which has sev-
eral meanings as follows 1) to make
effort, 2) to be prompt or earnest, 3) to
give diligence, or be diligent, 4) to
endeavour, and 5) to labour.

Watch this! And don’t get me wrong;
I’m not saying that all religious leaders
are of a twisted mind-set when it comes
to rightly teaching about the blessing;
it’s just that many of them are teaching
out of ignorance based upon that which
they’ve heard another religious leader /
hireling teach and preach.

Listen! It’s by accident that the scrip-
ture says “Rightly dividing the word of
truth” for this also means that the word
of truth / word of God can be wrongly
divided. And I make absolutely no
apology in saying that if there is ever a

time that God’s word is being wrongly
divided for selfish monetary gain, that
time is now.

The thousands of fragmented, pow-
erless churches today are all competing
against each other for their portion of
the undisciplined religious Christians
(prey) community; that gives little to
no attention in truly studying God’s
word. Rather they rely solely upon the
teachings of some religious leaders.
Thereby, today we’ve got thousands of
Christians, who as a result of the
incomplete teachings are of the mind-
set that (a car, a house, a job, etc;) is the
blessing; and nothing, could be further
from the truth. For the blessing is not a
thing such as a car, a house or a job, etc;
but rather the blessing is God’s empow-
erment upon one's life.

This erroneous teaching has two
main negative affects that has absolute-
ly nothing to do with the kingdom of
God:

1) It helps in fueling the myth
that because God is blessing apostle,
bishop, pastor or doctor; with fine cars
and houses and if I want to be blessed
also, ’ve got to continue sowing finan-
cially into my religious leader’s life,
even if I have to go without”

2) It puts a yoke and a burden upon
the necks of the poor in spirit, thereby
causing many to feel unworthy as
they’re not driving or living as their
leaders. Which in most cases leads to
the sin of idolatry, whereby these per-
sons begin to render a form of worship
to their religious leaders. It also serves
as a blockage to those on the outside,

who would want to join / be apart of a
local congregation; but are wise enough
to see through this erroneous teaching.

Let’s quickly trace the origin of the
blessing, to actually see what it is and
the purpose of the blessing.

Genesis 12:1: Now the LORD had
said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy
country, and from thy kindred, and
from thy father’s house, unto a land
that I will show thee 2. And I will make
of thee a great nation, and I will bless
thee, and make thy name great; and
thou shalt be a blessing:

Please note: 1) That the blessing is
not a house; for Father Yahweh told
Abram to leave his father‘s (Terah)
house, 2) The blessing is God’s empow-
erment “And I will make of thee” and
3) The purpose, “And thou shalt be a
blessing.

This word blessing in the Hebrew is:
Berakah, ber-aw-kaw'; which means a
benediction, an act of approval.

The cars, houses and other material
possessions that man craves in some
cases are the byproducts of the bless-
ing. There is so much more to share in
order to bring some form of clarity and
balance back into the church. Stay tune
next week for part 2.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mails:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
kmfci@live.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’!



Remember you are dust
FROM page 21

“We just happened to be coming down
this block looking for something else and
didn’t find it.”

“It’s really lovely that everybody’s
dressed up, but we look a little shabby,”
said Lori noting the differences in dress
at the service compared to a Lent service
they would attend in New York.

Lori is giving up wine for Lent, which
she tries to have every weekend. And
it’s not going to be easy. “But I plan to
spend a lot of time praying instead,” she
told Tribune Religion.

Her husband Mike, plans to stop
snacking as much. So it’s not only a spir-
itual sacrifice, but one that would do
wonders for his physical health as well.

According to Catholics, the Lenten
season is the fitting time to ‘climb the
holy mountain of Easter.’ It represents
the 40 days that Jesus Christ spent in the

wilderness being ‘tempted and tried’ by
Satan.

It’s a celebration of the resurrection of
Christ who redeemed Christians by
dying on the cross. But moreso His res-
urrection represents new life. Lent is a
time of retrospection to prepare yourself
for what that means to you as a
Christian.

The forty days were intended to imi-
tate the forty days and nights which we
are told Jesus spent in prayer and fasting
in the desert preparing for his public
ministry (Lk 4:1-2).

It’s a time where he had to take on all
the challenges of a human being even
though he was just like us without sin.
He walked that journey in terms of turn-
ing away from all the temptations that
the devil put before him.

Tribune Religion asked a few parish-
ioners what they would be giving up this
Lenten season. Drinking beverages like
wine and Coca-Cola soda were men-
tioned and some decided to take on acts
of kindness, instead of fasting or adding

something extra to their regimen.

This period, which we know in English
as ‘Lent,’ deriving from the middle
English term meaning ‘day-lengthening’
or springtime, is known in German as
‘Fastenzeit’, a time of fasting; in French

ee ONS)

as ‘caréme’; Italian as ‘quaresima’j;and
Spanishas ‘cuaresma’, these all deriving
from the Latin ‘quadragesima,’ meaning
‘fortieth’.



M



ACM PREPARES FOR
ANNUAL CONFERENCE

¢ The 38th annual Anglican Church Men(ACM)

conference will be held in North Andros from March
17-21. All Anglican men are asked to register at their
parish or contact any ACM council member for
more information. Ken Obrien is the conference
chairman he can be reach at
kob1150@coralwave.com for more information.





PG 28 © Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION The Tribune

rer EE



WeonES DAY &

Scenes from the noon Ash Wednesday service at St Mary The Virgin Anglican Church.





Full Text
{T\

Pim blowin’ it

67F
J4F

HIGH
LOW

SUNNY

INTERVALS

Volume: JO6 No.73

SU!



Legal challenge is

‘virtually inevitable’

By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

THE Elizabeth by-election
recount went on through the
night last night, with no official
winner announced up to mid-
night at Thelma Gibson Primary
School.

At presstime last night, party
operatives did not anticipate a
final result until sometime today.

The first election count on
Tuesday ended with FNM can-
didate Duane Sands ahead by
one vote, in front of PLP candi-
date Ryan Pinder. The PLP
declared the result too close to
call, while FNM leader, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
refused to declare a win.

The Progressive Liberal Party
(PLP) is anticipating legal chal-
lenges if they lose in the recount
by a margin that is still not deci-
sive. PLP attorneys maintain, if



the vote is tied or if the outcome
could be affected by protest
votes, then a court challenge is
virtually inevitable.

Some political commentators
have questioned the point of tak-
ing the election to the courts.
The FNM is maintaining their
position that the courts should
not decide elections.

Court room tactics would only
“interfere with the clear inten-
tion of the people of Elizabeth to
support the FNM,” according to
Carl Bethel, FNM campaign

SEE page 12

Parliamentary Commissioner
maintains low voter turnout

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE low turnout of voters disputed by both the PLP and FNM
has been maintained by Parliamentary Commissioner Errol Bethel
who said Elizabeth residents simply did not choose to cast their by-

election ballots.

Mr Bethel estimates that more than 4,600 of the 4,934 registered
constituents are Elizabeth residents eligible to vote as less than 400

could not be found.

And with just 3,142 ballots cast yesterday, that would estimate
a turnout of 64 per cent or slightly more.
However, PLP candidate Ryan Pinder argued the turnout may

have been higher.

“T don’t truly believe there are 5,000 registered voters in the con-
stituency because it doesn’t take into account who has moved

out,” Mr Pinder said.

SEE page 11

SHACKER COMBO

er mE tigi
Regular Fries and 160z Pepsi

—_—

vat en ere Ts]

- ey

eee aa

aa ee es cat



The Tribu

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010



PITTSBURGH
PA |

A oT 6

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave,
Tel:326-1875

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

THEY WON, HAVE YOU?

¢ BYELECTION LATEST ON WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

A PLP fanatic hit

Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette on the
shoulder as tempers flared
at the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion re-count yesterday.
The calm and peaceful
atmosphere became con-
frontational as goading
statements were asserted
by PLP supporters and
returned by FNMs gath-
ered in a schoolyard out-
side the re-count room at
Thelma Gibson Primary.
Police filed the increas-
ingly agitated crowd out
of the schoolyard and set
up barricades to separate
the crowd of about 100
PLP and FNM supporters
at around 10.30am.
Arguments had escalat-
ed to a bitter shouting
match between the two
sides as the Deputy Prime
Minister walked through
the dividing aisle and PLP
activist Laura Williams
was at the front of the
PLP crowd shouting
defamatory statements.
Mr Symonette put a
hand on her shoulder and
asked her to calm down,
but as he turned away she
slammed the Deputy
Prime Minister across the
shoulder and upper arm,
eye-witnesses said.
“Those who didn’t see

it, heard it. She slammed

him,” attested one eye-

witness.
While

another

SEE page 12

READERS heaped praise on
The Tribune’s news team and
tribune242.com for providing
real time, up-to-the-minute cov-
erage of the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion.

Bahamians from across the
country and around the world
logged on to follow the excite-
ment as it happened.

On Tuesday alone, tri-
bune242.com received more

OTHER TY SiES ALSO AVAILABLE.

+,
£

Tribune by-election coverage

necount agony






ABOVE: Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette speaks to the media yesterday.
BELOW: PLP activist Laura Williams outside Thelma Gibson Primary School.

es H

than a quarter million hits and
double the unique visitors of a
normal weekday.

Up to press time last night,
more than 200 readers had com-
mented on our election cover-
age, in what developed into a
stimulating and hotly-contested
online debate. One Bahamian
living overseas wrote: “Being
outside the country and being
able to get up to the moment





NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER









praised by readers

result information was by far the
greatest sense of national pride
T have ever experienced.

“T felt as though I was pre-
sent in the Elizabeth con-
stituency yesterday. It was like
an action-packed movie that
kept me on the edge of my seat,
refreshing my page waiting with
great anticipation for the next

SEE page 19
AVAILABLE AT:

RADIOSHACK

Harbour Bor location

lic Mell ae?
e “-

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

TENSIONS RUN
HIGH DURING
BY-ELECTION
RECOUNT

FNMS AND PLPS gathered
in the Elizabeth constituency
yesterday as a recount of Tues-
day’s votes took place.

Police filed the increasingly
agitated crowd out of the
schoolyard at Thelma Gibson
Primary School and set up bar-
ricades to separate the crowd
of about 100 PLP and FNM
supporters.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff [fF

PLP CAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN Dr Bernard Nottage (above in white jacket) and Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard (below
right) among those outside of Thelma Gibson Primary School yesterday.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News Pale2 315697 ou0)
Local News eal pall wil lel
Local News
Editorial/Letters
Feal@rlaralia
20 24925) 25,27o o0 onhoe

BUSINESS SECTION

Business P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10
Business P11,12,14,15,16
OBITUARIES/RELIGION 28 PAGES

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

Haiti judge frees 8 of 10
American missionaries

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti

EIGHT American mission-
aries were freed from a Hait-
ian jail Wednesday, nearly
three weeks after being charged
with kidnapping for trying to
take a group of children out of
the quake-stricken country,
according to Associated Press.

The eight — looking
bedraggled and sweaty —
walked out of the Haitian jail
escorted by U.S. diplomats just
after dusk.

They waited until they were
safely inside a white van before
flashing smiles, waving and giv-
ing a thumbs up to reporters.

Hours earlier, judge Bernard
Saint-Vil told The Associated

a Press that eight of the 10 mis-
sionaries were free to leave
without bail or other conditions

ot after parents testified they vol-
Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd eae fenced Wet Ghildien

4 over to the missionaries.
"The parents of the kids

made statements proving that

they can be released,” he said,

adding that still wants to ques-

' tion the group's leader and her
nanny.

The group planned to fly out

VALUE MEAL of Haiti late Wednesday,

defense attorney Aviol Fleu-

rant said. A spokesman for Ida-

ho Sen. Jim Risch said they
would be flown to Miami.

Gilantro SQuce RoE TROPICAL

with a twist of (me OS
PEST CONTROL

Ha para by |
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Bradley attacks ‘FNM smearing’ of
Pinder for never voting in Bahamas

‘This is a non-issue’



By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley
Roberts maintains that the
fact that the PLP’s candidate
for Elizabeth Ryan Pinder
never voted in the Bahamas is
a “non-issue” with which the
FNM attempted to sway vot-
ers prior to Tuesday’s by-elec-
tion.

During the FNM’s mass ral-
ly on Monday night, Mount
Moriah MP Tommy Turn-
quest revealed that Mr Pin-
der has never voted in the
Bahamas in his life, but had
deemed it important enough
to vote in two US elections.

This fact left Mr Pinder
open to attacks from his polit-

PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts



PLP. Yesterday, Mr Roberts
said that he was extremely
disappointed in the FNM’s
tactics by smearing Mr Pin-
der’s name on the night
before the election.

Opportunity

By doing so, he said, the
PLP were not afforded an
opportunity to respond to the
remarks due to the newly
implemented rules laid out by
URCA which restricts any
political dialogue or cam-
paigning on the day of the
election.

“T don’t see it as a big deal.
There are other Members of
Parliament who have served
for long years who have nev-
er voted, and these persons
mostly represented the Fami-
ly Islands.

“Tam further advised that
Sir Lynden Pindling, (Gover-
nor General) AD Hanna, and
others voted in England when
they were in school. It was
customary back then,” he
said.

As such, the PLP’s chair-

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ical opponents who mocked
him during the rally and even
sang the American national
anthem when he arrived at
the Thelma Gibson Primary
School polling station on

Tuesday. Winning by a single
vote on election night, the
FNM’s Dr Duane Sands was
declared the victor late last
night when the final ballots

were counted. He beat out
the PLP’s candidate in the
closest election seen in the
history of the Bahamas —
1501 FNM, to 1500 for the

man said that this “furor” sur-
rounding Mr Pinder’s former
US citizenship and his voting
record in the Bahamas is a
“dead issue” that “nobody
will pay any attention to.”



IN order for a US citizen or a person
holding dual citizenship to give up their
American citizenship they must make a
formal renunciation of nationality before a
diplomatic or consular officer of the Unit-
ed States while in a foreign state, according
to the US Immigration and Nationality
Act.

The Tribune understands that once this
is done, US officials wait 24 hours before
sending the request to the United States.
The application is then sent to Washington,
DC for scrutiny — which can take months
— to ensure that the person in question is
not trying to evade taxes or justice in the
United States.

However, once this probe is done the
official date of renunciation will be retroac-
tive to the date of the application, The
Tribune understands.

Questions regarding the process of a
dual citizen renouncing American citizen-
ship emerged with the entrance of Pro-
gressive Liberal Party by-election candi-
date Ryan Pinder to the political sphere
last month. The tax attorney was born to a
Bahamian father, former PLP MP for Mal-

The process of dual citizens renouncing US citizenship

colm Creek Mar-
vin Pinder, and an
American moth-
er.

In January, Mr
Pinder, who is
employed by
Florida-based law
firm Becker and

| Poliakoff as a
Nassau-based
consultant,
defended his right
to hold dual citi-
zenship in the
face of criticism
that it was inap-
propriate and

unconstitutional for someone seeking pub-
lic office in the Bahamas.

At the time he called his dual-citizenship
a "non-issue."

But last week, PLP chairman Bradley
Roberts said Mr Pinder renounced his US
citizenship prior to nominating as a by-
election candidate on January 29. Mr Pin-
der told the media that his decision was a

PLP CANDIDATE
RYAN PINDER

personal one, adding that he was not pres-
sured by his party to give up his American
citizenship.

He has not publicly disclosed the exact
date he gave his citizenship up.

Failed by-election candidates Workers'
Party leader Rodney Moncur and Nation-
al Development Party candidate Andre
Rollins earlier criticised the fact that Mr
Pinder held dual citizenship, suggesting it
drew into question his eligibility to hold
public office in the Bahamas and the like-
lihood that he would act in the best inter-
ests of Bahamian constituents if elected.

Recently, Prime Minister and FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham took a jab at Mr
Pinder suggesting his party's candidate,
Dr Duane Sands, would be more loyal to
Elizabeth constituents given his single,
rather than dual, citizenship.

According to the US Department of
State's website, dual nationals "owe alle-
giance to both the United States and the
foreign country. They are required to obey
the laws of both countries. Either country
has the right to enforce its laws, particu-
larly if the person later travels there."





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On Tuesday, attorney
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represents Orville Clarke, 37,
filed an application before
Chief Magistrate Roger
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(-\n)
Na LY,

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

an
WY

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Registration confusion traced to 2007

BOTH POLITICAL parties are bemoan-
ing the low voter turnout in Tuesday’s Eliz-
abeth by-election. As we write at 10.30pm
Wednesday, the new MP for the con-
stituency has not been decided and the
recount at Thelma Gibson Primary School
continues.

If the recount is not completed before
midnight, The Tribune will go to press with-
out the final result. However, those inter-
ested in following the recount can switch to
where the running report
will continue until a winner has been
announced.

Preparations for the Elizabeth by-election
started in confusion when it was discovered
that hundreds of names on the voters regis-
ter could not be found — either they had
died, moved out of the constituency or were
bogus from the beginning.

Mr Errol Bethel, Parliamentary Com-
missioner, estimated that 4,600 of the 4,934
registered persons for Elizabeth were eligi-
ble to vote in the constituency. He said that
less than 400 on the electoral role could not
be found. According to his count he con-
firmed that with only 3,142 ballots cast in
Tuesday’s by-election, voter turnout was
indeed low — an estimated 64 per cent or
slightly more. It was something for both par-
ties to ponder as there is nothing that
Bahamians like more than to gather at the
polls on election day.

However, there are those who believe
that there are not as many legitimate voters
in Elizabeth as are still reflected on the reg-
ister.

For example, PLP candidate Ryan Pin-
der, who when the polls closed Tuesday had
been defeated by the FNM’s Dr Duane
Sands by one vote, believes there are no
more than 4,300 eligible voters in Elizabeth.
He does not think that the number of voters
who have moved out of the constituency
have been taken into consideration and elim-
inated from the register.

“Tf there are 4,300, and slightly over 3,000
votes, then there was an 84 per cent turnout.

“It’s tough to tell with the register how it
is, and what is the true total of the regis-
tered voters in the constituency,” he said.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette
agreed: “You will probably find we had a
high turnout of the actual people in Eliza-
beth.”

If Mr Ryan finds it tough to read “the reg-
ister how it is,” he should go back to the
indecisive days before the May 2, 2007 elec-
tion for his answer. May 2 was the date on
which his party, then the government, was

defeated at the polls. The 2007 election will
go down in Bahamian history as an election
of colossal mismanagement, especially in
the confusion created in the Parliamentary
Registrar’s department because of the short
time allowed between the close of the regis-
ter and election day.

PLP party leader Perry Christie, then
prime minister, could not bring himself to
close the register.

He blamed it on the late registration of
Bahamians, resulting in it being difficult for
the Boundaries Commission to define the
constituency boundaries. This meant that
the Boundaries Commission report was not
presented to the House of Assembly until
March 19 for a May 2 election. In the report
five constituencies were eliminated and four
were created. The report still had to face a
House debate. It was speculated that Mr
Christie was trying to keep the House in
session as long as possible, because as soon
as it closed the register would also close.

He wanted to give tardy Bahamians more
time to register, not thinking of the chaos his
decision would cause the Parliamentary
department. However, he had until May 22
to call an election, failing which, under the
Constitution, the House would dissolve itself.

The Parliamentary Registrar’s staff had
less than eight weeks to write out by hand
new voters cards with their counterfoils for
the dramatic change in the newly created
constituencies in addition to the boundary
changes in the remaining constituencies. It
was estimated that by the time the two cards
and counterfoils for each voter had been
written, the staff would have had to have
made 360,000 changes by hand before the
cards could be put in the computer and dis-
tributed to voters.

The Parliamentary Registrar then had two
weeks to certify the register, have the ballots
printed, and the voters register published
and still be on time for an election that had
to be called within four weeks.

The Parliamentary Registrar’s office
accomplished a miracle to have the register
completed on time, but it would be another
miracle if there were no mistakes, Eliza-
beth probably being one of them.

The FNM now has two years to go
through the register, constituency by con-
stituency, to make certain that every district
is correct, so that when an election is called
the Registrar’s Department will have ample
time to update the register, and avoid the
confusion still haunting us from the 2007
debacle.



Gay cruise ship
poll exposed
embarrassing

ignorance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Today as I was having my
morning coffee and reading
the newspaper, I came across
a story that if it weren’t so
sad, it might be quite laugh-
able!

I am referring to the poll
that was conducted regarding
the gay cruise ship coming to
Nassau.

Have we not been down
this road?

While there were a few
comments that were a bit
more open minded, most of
the readers surveyed seemed
to have the same, ignorant
view of the gay population.
Of course, most of these peo-
ple hide behind their religion,
stating that being gay is
unnatural.

I nearly choked when I
read that one reader was con-
cerned about “our little ones,”
as if the people off this boat

Illegal immigrants
should he sent
hack home

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I’m a Bahamian and I
would like to put my five
cents on the Haitian issue.
If we give the Haitian who
is coming in now status,
they would be a burden on
our economy.

They wouldn’t go back
home to help rebuild their
country instead they would
drain the little resources
we have for our people.
We can help but from a
distance.

I have nothing against
Haitians, but the Lord said
that he would help those
who helped themselves.

By them fleeing their
country they aren’t help-
ing.

It is in our best interest
to send all illegal immi-
grants back home to their
country.

We have to secure the
few jobs we have now for
Bahamian brothers and sis-
ters.

L JOHNSON
Nassau,
February, 2010.

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



would come into their home
and whisk away their chil-
dren! What utter nonsense!

Another thing, many gays
do not “openly flaunt” their
lifestyle or their “boldness.”
What do these people think,
that all gays walk around with
aneon sign that says “look at
me, I’m gay!” Gee, they look
just like regular people, what
a shock!

I fully agree with one of the
people surveyed who stated
that the Bahamas better open
their eyes to the big, wide
world out there. We live on
a small island, but does that
mean we have to be small
minded as well? These peo-
ple who spout religion as a

cloak to hide behind, are sim-
ply covering up their fear of
something they know nothing
about. Fear can turn into
anger and ignorance. I sug-
gest that these people, who
seem to be so concerned
about a gay cruise tipping the
balance of what is right and
wrong in Nassau, take a look
at what is more important in
the scheme of things. Maybe
they should be more con-
cerned with the crime running
amok here. Come on Nassau,
are we still focusing our ener-
gies on this subject? This sort
of ignorance and hate is quite
an embarrassment in the eyes
of the rest of the world. Is that
how we want to portray our-
selves?

SUSAN KATZ
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,
February, 2010.

ETI yeu Keele ee.) oe Ihe
is no longer acceptable,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace

EDITOR, The Tribune.

TODAY (February 15th) there was an article in the Business
section by Neil Hartnell about the Mayaguana project. The
article was an attempt to inform the public about the project and
how the Government was trying to avoid the “very bad idea” of
conveying huge chunks of land to the developers. While we, I
would think, would approve of this approach as far as it goes,
but when Neil Hartnell tried to elicit further information from
the Minister, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, he declined to confirm
any details of the Government’s discussion with the Principals
behind the project and when a scenario was suggested indicat-

ed it was “vaguely correct”.

As we are all aware the level of trust in the actions of any
Government today is very low and therefore for a Minister to
avoid answering questions raises the question whether there are
issues that are embarrassing to the Government and cannot be
divulged. I think it is about time that Members of Parliament
realize that they are representatives of the Bahamian public and
the public has a right to know what is going on. So please stop
trying to brush over information that might not be palatable to
the public or in the best political interests of the Government or

Opposition.

If you want to gain the public’s trust, “vaguely correct” is not
an acceptable answer anymore. What is “truly correct” and
Minister Vanderpool-Wallace might like to let us know.

PATRICK THOMSON
Nassau,
February 15, 2010



Dr. Ken Knowles seems to misunderstands
concept of health care insurance vouchers

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Dr. Ken Knowles put his pen to paper in a longer than nor-
mal letter to the The Tribune recently.

It seems he misunderstands the concept of vouchers for the
purchase of health care insurance and medication.

The idea of vouchers is for those people that cannot get
health insurance themselves, as a result of a pre-existing condi-
tion, or they are simply too poor to afford it, should be provided
with a voucher from the government to buy health insurance for
themselves.

Dr. Ken also seems to believe that in order to help the less
fortunate, the government needs to run the health care industry.

Too bad. Maybe he has forgotten all those wonderfully acer-
bic letters he has written to the press bemoaning "services" pro-
vided by the government that he finds less than satisfactory, but
now, for some reason, he thinks they can solve health care.

"It is amazing that people who think we cannot afford to pay
for doctors, hospitals, and medication somehow think that we can
afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, medication and a government
bureaucracy to administer it." (Dr. Thomas Sowell).

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Fax: S26-4550/304-0919

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and family members in memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson




an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en
Na LY,

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



TSCA MCMC)
ae SU TATA)

Rom Eg

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



An “incapacitated” woman
who could not properly com-
prehend the electoral process
voted in the Elizabeth by-elec-
tion on Tuesday, a lawyer
claimed yesterday.

Kathleen Johnson-Hassan,
who was at the polls represent-
ing the FNM, said that she
argued that a woman, alleged to
be “not of sound mind”, should
not be able to vote.

However, lawyers represent-
ing other political parties at the
polls argued in favour of allow-
ing the woman to vote.

“She went in and she went
through the procedure but it
was very evident that her abili-
ty to participate in the process
was seriously under question,”
said Ms Johnson-Hassan, also
vice-president of the Bahamas
Bar Association.

The attorney made her com-
ments yesterday as she waited
outside the Thelma Gibson Pri-
mary School building where the
mandatory recount of the Eliz-
abeth by-election votes got
underway at 8am.

Unofficial results after the
first vote count on Tuesday
night when the polls closed
gave the FNM candidate, Dr
Duane Sands, just a one-vote
lead on the PLP’s Ryan Pinder.

That night, FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham said he was
not going to declare victory
until the results of yesterday’s
recount were in.

Observers noted that the out-
come could end up being
dependent on the eligibility of
the votes of a number of per-
sons who were “challenged” at
the polls, or voted on “protest”
ballots after their identity as
legitimate Elizabeth voters was
questioned.

This would only happen if
the result went to an election
court — something that FNM
leader Mr Ingraham said his
side would not pursue, but
which the PLP has not denied
as being an option.

Given that the ballot paper
marked by the woman whose
mental capacity was questioned
by Mrs Johnson-Hassan would
not have been seen before it
was deposited in the ballot box,
the way the woman voted, or
if she made a definitive mark
against a candidate that would
be sufficient for the vote to be
counted when scrutinised, is not
known. In order for a ballot to
be counted, and not considered
“spoiled”, a clear mark - usual-
ly an “X”- has to be seen next

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“She went in and
she went through
the procedure but it
was very evident
that her ability to
participate in the
process was serious-
ly under question.”



to a candidate’s name. Mrs
Johnson-Hassan claimed that
an attorney from another party
tried to argue that the woman
could not hold a pen and that
someone should go into the
polling booth with the voter to
assist her in casting her vote,
however, it later turned out that
the woman “could hold a pen.”

Mrs Johnson-Hassan alleged
that the incident was represen-
tative of a problematic trend of
lawyers representing parties at
the polls in elections.

They are brought into the
field on the basis that they will
use their legal know-how to
help minimise voting irregular-
ities, but sometimes they may
misinterpret the law in the hope
that they will help secure a win
for their preferred party, she
said. This disregard for the law
is filtering down to the grass-
roots level of the parties, Mrs
Johnson-Hassan suggested.

“There is always a different
interpretation applied that isn’t
there, that is incorrect, and it
is that type of difficulty that we
have coming from attorneys
who all read the same legisla-
tion who all ought to under-
stand the same legislation.

“That causes the mix up and
the problems, and what it does
is radiate down to their sup-
porters who have themselves
no understanding of the finer
points.

“Therefore they cause this
escalation of hostility which is
totally unnecessary. It makes
one party feel like they are
being slighted,” said Ms John-
son-Hassan.

Christie: Serious need for
election campaign reform



By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THERE is a serious need for
election campaign reform from
the two major political parties to
assure third-party and indepen-
dent candidates an even play-
ing field, Progressive Liberal
Party leader Perry Christie said.

His comments came as he
accused FNM operatives of run-
ning an unethical by-election
campaign, filled with alleged
promises of jobs and other
incentives to voters in exchange
for their support.

Having been in Parliament
for nearly three decades, Mr
Christie remarked that the
weeks leading up to the Eliza-
beth by-election were "the
worst I've ever seen it" in terms
of allegations that members of
the FNM were allegedly using
their government clout to sway
voters. He said that on the eve
of the by-election, a PLP sup-
porter told him that her daugh-
ter had been offered a job by a
member of the FNM, presum-
ably to influence her vote.

"Up to (Monday) govern-
ment was giving people jobs
with a clear intention of influ-
encing the vote. That's not
proper, ethical or fair," he said
in a recent interview with The
Tribune. He continued: "Both
parties should look at what's
happening in the country today
with a view to reorganising our
approach to elections because

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or

it is awfully difficult for inde-
pendent and small parties to
have even a remotely small
chance (to win) given what is
happening on the part of the
two major political parties.”

Consequently, fringe parties
and independent candidates are
caught between "two political
giants" with one giant, the
FNM, using "weapons of pow-
er" in their favour, said Mr
Christie.

"I've had an opportunity to
recognise that we have to really

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have a strong will to make elec-
tions fairer and more transpar-
ent because right now two,
much below the radar things,
are happening. It's not fair," he
added. Throughout the by-elec-
tion campaign, there were alle-
gations from all sides that
prospective voters were offered
everything from jobs, money,
alcohol — even cellular phone
cards — by the major political
parties in an effort to influence
votes.

Several weeks ago, by-elec-

Call for third-party, independent candidates to receive even playing field

tion candidate Bahamas Demo-
cratic Movement leader Cassius
Stuart told police that a senior
member of the PLP was offer-
ing bribes of $200 in exchange
for votes. Police said they were
looking into Mr Stuart's claims,
but said there was no concrete
evidence, or a formal complaint
behind his allegations.

The PLP also refuted the
claims. A special team headed
by Superintendent Leon Bethel,
officer-in-charge of the Central
Detective Unit, was formed to
investigate allegations of cor-
ruption and voter fraud in the
by-election. When asked if his
team was investigating any com-
plaints of bribery on part of the
FNM, Supt Bethel said, "I don't
have any (such) reports about
the FNM offering any jobs (in
exchange for votes). If such a
thing is reported, another unit
would look at that, in fact we
would have to take legal advice
with respect to that."

His unit was on-site at the
Thelma Gibson Primary School
polling station, ready to act on
any possible emergence of vot-
er fraud at yesterday's by-elec-
tion recount. Up to press time,
he had no reports of voter
fraud, he said.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



PM Hubert Ingraham attends 9 <®
Elizabeth Betty Kenning funeral \\~ ”

PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday attended the
funeral service for Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Kelly Kenning
OBE, at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk.

President of the Senate, Senator Lynn Holowesko; Sir
Geoffrey and Lady Johnstone; Leader of the Opposition in
the Senate, Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and Max
Gibson also attended the service.

Mr Ingraham recently paid tribute to Mrs Kenning, a
philanthropist and former long-time secretary of the
Bahamas Humane Society, who died last week aged 85.

Generosity

Mr Ingraham described Mrs Kenning as a "great Bahami-
an lady" who was well known for her generosity to good
causes.

She was a businesswoman noted for accomplishments in
the commercial world and was the owner of the Betty K ship-
ping business.

"She was an outstanding athlete, generous patron of
sports, humanitarian and animal lover,” Mr Ingraham said.

Mrs Kenning, who is survived by her husband John, died
at Doctor's Hospital while being treated for pneumonia.



NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED
Saturday February 20th

for our company’s

FUN BY

in order to give our staff
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We will reopen on Monday February 22nd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused
Mackey Street 393-8165









with music by

FRANKIE

a)

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Mg

t Ms -



(BIS photo: Peter Ramsay)

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at the funeral of Mary Elizabeth (Betty) Kelly Kenning at St
Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. Inset: Mrs Kenning.

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Scholarship
forum tonight to
help students
fulfill dreams

THE Bahamas National
Youth Council (BNYC), in
conjunction with other stake-
holders, will host a special
scholarship forum tonight to
help students utilise available
resources to fulfill educational
dreams.

“The BNYC understands
that our most valuable
resource is our people and the
development of the Bahamian
people is critical for the suc-
cess of our nation. As more
and more Bahamians matricu-
late to higher education, few
choose to settle to live
deferred dreams and accept
employment lacking personal
satisfaction,” the organisation
said.

With the understanding
that education is paramount
to success, BNYC together
with representatives of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
the Cuban Embassy, the
Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation on Agriculture
(ICA), the Organisation of
American States (OAS), the
Bahamas Cooperative League
and the Lyford Cay Founda-
tion, will host a scholarship
forum.

The International Affairs
Committee of BNYC will host
the ‘Meet the Deadline Schol-
arship Forum’ today at the
Bahamas Cooperative League
Ltd (yellow building behind
McDonalds Oakes Field) at
7pm.

“Many countries have
secured scholarships solely for
Bahamian students’ advance-
ment.

“As such, we admonish our
fellow youth to utilise the
opportunities available. At
the forum questions and con-
cerns relating to scholarships
and tertiary education both
domestically and internation-
ally will be facilitate.

“Despite the global eco-
nomic instability and unfortu-
nate suspension of govern-
mental loans, our youth can
accomplish their educational
goals without compromise,”
the BNYC said.




(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

LOCAL NEWS

(EW

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 7





MAGISTRATES COURT

Haitian man charged with Teenager admits setting fire to school

manslaughter after woman
killed by falling pine tree

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

A HAITIAN man charged
with manslaughter in the
death of a woman who was
fatally struck by a pine tree
on Sunday, appeared in the
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Police have charged Simon
Pierre, 44, in the death of Jus-
lene Alteme Nicolas.

Pierre, a Lazeretta Road
resident, is accused of negli-
gently causing Ms Nicolas’
death on Sunday, February
14.

Ms Nicolas is alleged to
have been with a man who
was cutting pine trees shortly
before 9 o’clock Sunday
morning in the Dignity Gar-
dens area when one of the
trees fell and struck her on
the head. She reportedly died
at the scene. Pierre, who was
not represented by an attor-
ney during his arraignment
yesterday afternoon, told
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez that he only under-
stood “a little” English.

He was then aided by a
male relative who was sworn
in to interpret the proceed-

ings for him. Pierre was not
called upon to answer a plea
to the charge.

The prosecution objected
to Pierre being granted bail,
citing that his work permit
had expired since November
of last year and there had
been no request to renew it.
The prosecution contended
that Pierre had no legal status
in the country. Pierre was
remanded into custody at Her
Majesty’s Prison and the case
was adjourned to February
22. The case has been trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

A teenager pleaded guilty in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday to setting fire to a Catholic
Primary School last year.

The 16-year-old boy, who has been held on
remand since his arraignment last August,
pleaded guilty to the charge of arson yester-

day. He and a 24-year-old man, who is cur-
rently standing trial in the matter, were
accused of setting fire to the St Francis and St

Beeler

Joseph Catholic Primary School on August 12
last year. The fire reportedly resulted in dam-
age of $200,000.

The teenager, who appeared before Mag-
istrate Derrence Rolle-Davis in Court 5,
Bank Lane, claimed that he had been under
the influence of drugs and alcohol when he
committed the offence. The juvenile was sen-
tenced to time served.




pple YOUF

EL He tid ie bad

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

_

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamian attitudes towards the Haitian migration

By LARRY SMITH

IN THE weeks since the
catastrophic earthquake that
killed an estimated 230,000
men women and children in
Haiti, there has been an end-
less stream of consciousness
from Bahamians on both
sides of the migration issue.

First we had what I con-
sidered to be some
extraordinary reac-
tions to the prime
minister's remarks
immediately after the
January 12 event. In
a series of Facebook
exchanges, several
intellectual critics
condemned Ingra-
ham for being insen-
sitive and justifying
anti-Haitian senti-
ments by discourag-
ing Bahamians from
helping in the wake of the
disaster. These were the
remarks in question (as
reported by The Guardian):
"The government has estab-
lished a common account at
all the country's commercial
banks, into which donations
to the relief effort in Haiti
can be made. We will cause
that money to be sent either
to the Haitian government
and/or to international orga-
nizations that are able to pro-
vide assistance to Haiti at this
time and the government will
make a significant financial
contribution. It is not appro-
priate for us to be collecting
goods to send to Haiti
because there is no means by
which we can get there.”

Then there was an equally
hostile reaction to the per-
fectly sensible policy
announced at the same time
that the government would
release Haitians from the
Detention Centre and sus-
pend apprehension and repa-
triation efforts, while seeking
to prevent new illegal immi-
gration. This generated howls
of vitriolic protest and con-
fused comments from
Bahamians upset about the
supposed creolisation of the

ey

eg al



PRIME MINISTER
Hubert Ingraham



JLARRY SMITH

country. In response, the PM
had this to say: "The Haitian
homeland has been devastat-
ed by the worst cata-
strophe in 200 years,
with governmental
agencies rendered
impotent. Burdening
a collapsed country
with destitute depor-
tees would be a true
crime. I can’t imag-
ine hypocrites going
to church on Sunday
morning and then
saying on the radio
and in the newspa-
pers and in their
hearts, that we ought to
detain and keep these peo-
ple and send them back to
Haiti."

Up next was a call by Col-
lege of the Bahamas lecturer
Nicolette Bethel for a more
informed policy on Haitian
migrants: "What about an
organized agricultural pro-
ject,” she asked, "where those
who enter illegally must
reside and work under super-
vision — Government hous-
ing (not illegal and unsafe
shanty towns) and some pay-
ment should be part of the
deal—in exchange for labour.
Couldn't there be a win-win
situation?"

Although variations on
this theme have been pro-
posed over the years, it nev-
ertheless produced the stan-
dard outraged Bahamian
responses: "We have thou-
sands of illegal immigrants in
The Bahamas already who
are looking for a fresh start in
life,” argued Dennis Dames
in a letter to the editor, "and
it's a huge burden on our
social services. How many
mnillions of new illegals do
you think that we could
accommodate?"

Frankly, the level of igno-

rance, fear and hate-monger-
ing surrounding the Haitian
migration to the Bahamas is
astounding — especially
when one considers the fact
that Africans living in Haiti
achieved the first successful
slave revolt in history against
one of the world's most
advanced nations. I would
have thought that this should
mean something to most
Bahamians, but it doesn't. So
much for all the talk about
the African diaspora.

This antagonistic Bahami-
an attitude towards Haitians
is largely due to our religious,
political and educational
leaders (at least those who
know better) — who have
consistently recoiled from dis-
cussing the social issues or
promoting integration in
order to avoid stirring the
political pot.

If we are to develop an
informed policy we need
information — which is extra-
ordinarily difficult to come
by in the Bahamas. In fact,
there has been scant research
on this subject over the past
30 years — only two major
studies, a couple of substan-
tial analyses, and a handful
of limited government sur-
veys. But during the Christie
administration an attempt
was made to address this defi-
ciency.

In 2004 the International
Office of Migration was
asked to undertake an assess-
ment of the Haitian commu-
nity in the Bahamas, in con-
junction with researchers at
the College of the Bahamas.
The resulting 98-page report
collated all the available data,
and creole-speaking inter-
viewers surveyed 500
Haitians on four islands, with
the support of the Haitian
Embassy. But the findings

Ca

eee ds met be 4

were never officially pub-
lished (although the report is
available online), and the
information in the report is
never discussed.

What this research shows
is that the Haitian problem
is not quite as insurmount-
able as many of us believe.
For example, published esti-
mates of the size of the Hait-
ian population range from
80,000 up to 400,000 (more
than the entire Bahamian
population of about 340,000).
Such wild estimates have
been made at various times
by politicians, journalists and
pundits — among others — all
with a view to proving that
we are being overwhelmed
by foreigners.

Counting illegal residents
is a notoriously unreliable
exercise, but the IOM report
used a number of methods
to arrive at an estimate of 30
to 60,000, of which many are
just passing through to a third
country (like the US) or
returning home to Haiti. And
many more are here legally in
one form or another. And it
is often overlooked that there
are an estimated 70,000
undocumented Bahamians
living in the United States, in
addition to some 12,000 living
there legally.

The claim that Haitians
are hogging up free public
services also bears a closer
look. Official data indicate
that about 8.8 per cent of all
school children are Haitian.
Haitians constituted just over
11 per cent of hospital admis-
sions in 2001 (although they
made almost 20 per cent of
all outpatient visits to public
clinics) and less than 12 per
cent of live births were to
Haitian nationals in 2003.

On the other side of the
coin, over 12,000 registered
Haitians contributed more
than $3.5 million to National
Insurance in 2004, but they
received only 1.8 per cent of
total benefits — far less than
might be expected from the
estimated size of the popula-
tion. And like the rest of us,

“Frankly, the level
of ignorance, fear
and hate-mongering
surrounding the
Haitian migration
to the Bahamas is
astounding —
especially when one
considers the fact
that Africans living
in Haiti achieved
the first successful
slave revolt in
history against one
of the world's most
advanced nations.”



Haitians (whether legal or
not) pay taxes on whatever
they buy in our stores.

Over 30 years ago,
Bahamian social scientist
Dawn Marshall undertook
the first study of the Haitian
migration to the Bahamas.
She noted at the time that:
"It cannot be in the best
interest of either the Bahami-
an government or the
Bahamian nation to allow a
large proportion of its popu-
lation to live and develop in
isolation.

And in its 2005 report, the
IOM said much the same
thing: "Unless the Haitian
community becomes more
fully integrated into Bahami-
an society, an important
minority of the Bahamian-
born population will grow up
as foreigners within the only
society they know."

Dawn Marshall says the
official policy of both parties
boils down to "apprehend
and deport with no consider-
ation of the needs of the
economy.

“Small island developing
states like the Bahamas usu-
ally have to import labour if
they want to grow. We need

‘
Bvehumane

The Bahamas Humane Society

THE BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY

would like to thank

a policy on how we are going
to manage that importation."

And that is essentially the
crux of the matter. Plainly
we need the labour.

That's why the Haitians
are here — because there is a
market for them, and they
can earn more than they can
at home. In fact, there would
be no Bahamian agriculture
at all if it were not for
Haitians. We are willing to
employ them illegally and
pay them low wages because
they are outside the protec-
tion of the law. It follows,
therefore, that in order to
control the migration we
have to control both supply
and demand, which means
regulating employers as well
as deporting illegals. But we
don't do that.

Meanwhile, the govern-
ment's unstated policy on this
issue seems to boil down to
co-existence rather than inte-
gration. And we have to ask
whether the government
(PLP or FNM) has made a
conscious, informed decision
on this.

Well, good luck in getting
that answer from anyone ina
position to know.

Should we invite hundreds
of thousands of Haitians in
to set up peasant plantations
and denude our scattered
islands? Or should we round
up every man, woman and
child of Haitian descent and
put them in concentration
camps until we can deport
them?

These are apparently the
choices we face if we take our
leaders at face value. There
may be better solutions, but
we will never arrive at them
without a rational public
debate based on accurate
information. in the meantime,
we will continue to repeat
rubbish and hurl racial epi-
thets.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

LOMBARD ODIER

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



SUPPORTERS OUT IN FORCE FOR BY-ELECTION



PLP AND FNM supporters have been out in force in the Elizabeth constituency over the last two days.
Mingling with those in red and yellow were Dr Andre Rollins of the National Democratic Party (below),
FNM candidate Dr Duane Sands (top right); West End MP Obie Wilchcombe and Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest (right).

FROM page one

“Tf there are 4,300, and slight-
ly over 3,000 votes, then there
was an 84 per cent turnout.

“Tt’s tough to tell with the
register how it is, and what is
the true total of the registered
voters in the constituency.”

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette agreed: “You will
probably find we had a high
turnout of the actual people in
Elizabeth.”

As he said there are a large
number of temporary residents
in the constituency who may
have left since the register was
drawn “at the last hour” by for-
mer Prime Minister Perry
Christie prior to the 2007 gen-
eral election.

He emphasised how the reg-
ister would be cleaned up by
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham before the next election.

However, the Parliamentary
Commissioner said the voters



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Turnout

who had moved out or could
not be found would not account
for the 1,458 to 1,792 missing
ballots.

“Many people just didn’t
show up to vote,” he said.

“A lot of people who were
eligible to vote did not show
up, it was a low turnout and
that’s all it was.”

Low voter turnout is consis-
tently more common in by-elec-
tions than in general elections
where there is an average 90
per cent turnout.

However PLP chairman
Bradley Roberts said a low
turnout in Elizabeth could be
put down to general apathy,
malaise, or dirty politics.

An Elizabeth voter who
chose not to vote on Tuesday
said she did not feel empow-
ered to vote as the two major
parties offered no real choice,

— — ie

a

=.

TIM CLARKE/TRIBUNE STAFF



and there was no chance of a
third party coming to power.

“T just feel like it was a waste
of time,” she said.

“Tm sick of the FNM and the
PLP. They are like the same
party with different T-shirts. I
hear the exact same story from
them both, and I realised the
time has come for a third party,
and we are not going to put ina
third party at this point.”

The Joe Farrington Road
resident who has been kept
awake by PLP and FNM par-
ties at the constituency offices
every night for the last three
weeks said she would have vot-
ed for Cassius Stuart of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment if he had commanded
more support.

She said: “This is the first
time I have not voted and I
know the by-election is impor-
tant, because if you don’t have
a vote you don’t have a voice,
but I just feel like we don’t have
a voice anyway.”

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

manager.
Some commentators argue a
court process would be futile,
because it would cost hundreds
of thousands; it would not
change the composition of the
government significantly, and
the seat would be back up for
election in less than two years.
“In a democracy the question
of the next election or the cost of
a court proceeding is not the
issue; it is a matter of fairness
and justice in the decisions made
in the process. If cost and the
date of the next election deter-



Recount agony

mined our actions that would
seriously injure our commitment
to democracy.

“Tf that is the case, we might
as well have not had the elec-
tion and let the government
appoint someone,” said PLP
campaign manager, Dr Bernard
Nottage.

Dr Nottage said this was his
personal view, and not the posi-
tion of the party. He said at the
end of the day, it was the candi-
date’s responsibility and right to
file a court challenge if so
desired.



The issue of
protest votes is
increasing in
importance
because PLP
operatives claim
there are only five
protest votes and
all of them were
cast for their can-
didate, Ryan Pin-
der.

The Free National Movement
(FNM) are rejecting this claim.
Carl Bethel, FNM campaign
manager, said this was inaccu-

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Duane Sands and Ryan Pinder

rate, as protest
votes have not
been counted as
yet.

A prominent
FNM attorney
said protest votes
are not counted
unless there is a
| tie. She said there
were no protest
votes in the divi-
sion she was sta-
tioned at, but she
could not speak to the overall
protest count.

Protest votes are cast on yel-
low ballots. They result from sev-
eral scenarios, such as when vot-
ers turn up to vote with valid
voter registration cards and their
names, for whatever reason, are
not on the list, or when the pre-
siding officer is not satisfied of
the identity of the person,
according to a PLP attorney.
These votes have to be validated
by the election court in order to
be counted.

Early results from the recount
changed the dynamics only
slightly. By the time the first
three polling divisions were cer-
tified in the recount, Mr Sands
picked up two more votes and
lost one vote, while Mr Pinder
lost two votes. This gave Mr
Sands a net gain of three.

“Up by three is better than
up by one vote. We'll take it any
way we get it. It gives us a little
bit more of a cushion, and cre-
ates more of a challenge for our
lead to be eroded,” said Mr
Sands on the scene of the
recount. This lead was reduced
to two after the fourth polling
division was counted.

PLP stalwart Valentine
Grimes explained the two votes
thrown out during the recount
of polling division number three

FROM page one

were rejected because the voters
used their inky thumbs to make
their mark, instead of the pens
provided.

Examples of defective ballots
from previous elections, are inci-
dents where individuals write
their names, signatures or other
identifying marks on the ballot.
During the election campaign,
the PLP distributed parapher-
nalia with instructions for vot-
ing. PLP agents believe the prob-
lem would have been worse,
with more lost votes, if they did
not make this push.

“Ballots are being scrutinised
much more carefully to find
defects in the vote itself. (Tues-
day) night, there was a ballot
with an ‘X’ that went below the
line. It was accepted last night
but it might very well be rejected
today,” said a prominent PLP
attorney. In a previous election
she said she encountered a voter
wrote “Jesus is Lord” next to
the name of the chosen candi-
date.

The major political parties had
a strong contingent of lawyers
in the recount room, along with
several cabinet ministers, in the
case of the FNM. According to a
PLP attorney, this is typical for
recounts. She said, at polling sta-
tions during general elections,
the major parties do not usually
have sufficient resources to
deploy lawyers everywhere.
However, they bring lawyers and
more experience electioneers in
for the recount to bring a greater
level of scrutiny to each ballot.

The PLP objected to Mount
Moriah MP Tommy Turnquest
being a part of the FNM's scruti-
ny team. Mr Grimes said the
PLP feels this is a conflict of
interest as Mr Turnquest is the
Minister of National Security
and in charge of elections.

To the amazement of many
Tribune242.com commentators,
who followed minute-by-minute
coverage of the election and the
recount online, it was hard to
understand why it took authori-
ties so long to count the 3142
votes cast on Tuesday. With a
combined vote total of 778, it
took over seven hours to just
count polling divisions one, two
and three, which were the first
three to be tackled.

PLP MP Dr Bernard Nottage
said it is not unusual for a
recount to take this long. He not-
ed that during the first count, all
the polling divisions were count-
ed simultaneously, whereas dur-
ing the recount they were count-
ed consecutively, by the return-
ing officer himself.

The recount was contentious
in the early hours, according to
FNM campaign manager, Carl
Bethel, who said ground rules
had to be established to govern
the interpretation of various
challenges. It is unclear whether
this helped to speed up the
process, although Mr Bethel said
it should have. Hundreds of par-
ty faithfuls gathered on the out-
side to observe the recount. The
primary school grounds were a
who’s who of prominent attor-
neys, government ministers, and
members of parliament, who
camped out waiting for the
results to filter in.

It was not a national holiday
or sick day at work, but many
of the government officials were
party agents at the polling station
on Tuesday. They were asked
to be present when their polling
divisions were called to be count-
ed, according to a PLP agent.

Further scrutiny is brought to
bear by seasoned attorneys dur-
ing the recount, who were not
present during the first count.

exclaimed: “She just turned around and bashed
him.”

The shocked crowd watched as Mr Symon-
ette walked calmly away and asked police not to
get involved.

Although the DPM declined to comment on
the incident, he told the press: “We started off
this morning very peacefully, there was a distur-
bance from a non-FNM party member, and as a
result police asked us to come outside the fence.
Tempers were rising.”

He added: “The election officers and police
have done an excellent job, they deserve to be
commended.”

FNM election worker Freddie Lightbourn said:
“She should have been arrested or removed for
disorderly behaviour.

“T think it’s pretty sad that we had behaviour

Deputy PM hit

like that when it shouldn’t be allowed to happen.”

Another FNM supporter who saw the attack
said: “It’s a total disrespect of the government,
because at no point do you challenge either the
Prime Minister or the Deputy Prime Minister or
any Member of Parliament in that form or fash-
ion, you don’t want to send the message out
there that you don’t respect the government of
the country or that you would hit a government
official just because you can do it.

“They don’t represent just a segment of society,
they represent the entire society.

“They are not just representing themselves,
so when you lay hands on a person like that it’s
never warranted, there is no justification for it.”

Ms Williams declined the opportunity to speak
to The Tribune yesterday.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





MARSH Harbour, Abaco, will host a special
customer service conference, the brainchild of
motivational speaker Spence Finlayson.

The “World Class Customer Service Confer-
ence” will take place on Thursday, February 25,
from 9am to 3.30pm at St John’s Anglican
Church Hall on Don Mackay Boulevard.

Mr Finlayson, a Bahamian-born motivational
speaker and corporate trainer of 22 years, has
held his World Class Customer Service Confer-
ences in 15 Caribbean countries.

Abaco plays host to customer service conference

It is designed for managers and front-line staff
members who deal with customers and the pub-
lic, whether it is face to face or through other
communication channels.

Professionals

Mr Finlayson said that his conference is “for
professionals who are determined to strengthen
their ability to succeed in the customer service

field and are searching for new ideas, techniques
and strategies to help them achieve their goals.”

“With tourism being our number one industry,
it only makes business sense to train persons
directly or indirectly involved in this sector,” he
said.

Spence Finlayson is also the creator and host
of the popular international motivational tele-
vision show “Dare To Be Great” which is aired
in 20 Caribbean countries and the United King-

#

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION
Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers
On

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Topic

“EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
PREPAREDNESS RESPONSE
including
EARTHQUAKE and TSUNAMI
CONDITIONS”

Guest Speaker

Captain Stephen Russell
DIRECTOR
NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (NEMA)

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m. - 12:15p.m.
Registration and Networking
12:15p.m. - 1:15p.m. Luncheon

Financial Members: $20.00

Student Members: $15.00
Public: $25.00

If possible, please confirm your attendance by e-mail

crreiss@reisseng.com -or- pdec@coralwave.com

P.O. Box SS-6533, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel. 242-394-5544
www. bahamasengincers.org



dom and airs locally on Cable 12.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS: CENSUS 2010

‘We want to count everyone’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - As the
Bahamas prepares to conduct
the Census 2010, Department
of Statistics Director Kelsie
Dorsett said it is important that
everyone is counted, including
all foreign nationals residing in
the country.

“We are not looking into the
legal status of anyone — that
is not our mandate. We are sim-
ply counting,” said Ms Dorsett.

“We do not discriminate and
whether they are Chinese,
Haitians, Jamaicans or Bahami-
ans, whether they are legal or

m@ Census Day to start on May 3

illegal, if they are residents they
should be counted as well.”
Foreign nationals accounted
for 10 per cent of the Bahamas’
population, according to the
last census report in 2000.
Although initial reports had
estimated that some $5 million
was earmarked for Census
2010, Ms Dorsett said the cost
has been cut to $3 million.
While in Grand Bahama, Ms
Dorsett spoke to members of
the Rotary Club of Lucaya on
Tuesday.
She said Census Day begins
on May 3 and continues to the

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end June. She noted that
approximately 1,500 to 1,600
enumerators who will be
recruited throughout the
Bahamas will start collecting
information on May 4 for the
census. “Because of the econ-
omy, when recruiting enumer-
ators we are trying to give pref-
erence to unemployed persons,
if they qualify.

“We do have a screening test
and we are looking for people
of integrity and good character
references because they will be
going into people’s home,” she
said. According to Mrs Dorsett,
several new questions have
been added to the question-
naire and persons are urged to
give accurate and truthful infor-
mation.

“We are asking you...to give
the best and accurate informa-
tion you can. It is critical that
we have honest and truthful
information. If at the time of
the visit you do not know the
information tell the enumerator
to come back and you will find
out, but we want you to do your
best to provide us with honest
information,” she said.

Mrs Dorsett said persons
should call the Department of
Statistics if no one has visited
their home.

She also noted that residents
living in private gated commu-
nities should form a committee
and decide what days they can












SPENCE FINLAYSO






meet with enumerators.

“This is a national exercise.
Please make yourself available
to us. Everyone counts, no one
should be excluded,” she said.

Mrs Dorsett said the data
collected for the Census pro-
vides socio-demographic infor-
mation that is important for
proper planning and decision
making for both the public and
private sectors.

She said they are looking to
obtain more details about the
actual number of families with-
in a household. “Before we
were able to tell you the make
up of a household, but not the
make up of families in that
household,” she explained.

“We are also getting infor-
mation about the use of infor-
mation technology and use of
the Internet because it is also an
indicator in terms of the coun-
try’s progress. We need to
know how many have access,
how are they using it, and
where they are using it.

“We will also be asking peo-
ple about whether they have
medical insurance.”

Mrs Dorsett said that the
Bahamas is part of the
Caribbean-wide programme
and worldwide programme that
conducts census every 10 years.

In the last couple of decades,
the Bahamas has been con-
ducting the census in years end-
ing with zero. The last census
was in 2000. The slogan for the
Census 2010 is ‘Every Island,
Every Household, Everyone
Counts.’



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 19



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

update.

“T commend the reporters of
tribune242 — excellent job! This
represents 21st century journal-
ism, this is forward movement,
excellence deserving of recog-
nition.”

From the moment the polls
opened on Tuesday morning,
reporters manned every polling
division and party headquarters
to send continuous updates to
The Tribune’s Newsroom. This
information was quickly organ-
ised and disseminated to online
readers in the form of a con-
stantly updated, blow-by-blow
timeline.

The Tribune’s photographers
provided the website team with
a steady stream of photos, so
readers could witness the most
important developments first-
hand.

Tuesday’s hits nearly dou-
bled the website’s previous
record of 140,000 set on October
22, 2009 — the day after PLP MP
Picewell Forbes made his pre-
mature and ill-fated comments
about the outcome of the John
Travolta extortion case.

In a single day, the by-elec-

ay. Mediu

(Mr jad

y a
Fore

Tribune coverage

tion newsfeed became the web-
site’s most viewed and second
most commented story ever,
beating out stories that had been
attracting steady comments for
months.

More than 200 readers rec-
ommended our by-election
newsfeed and hundreds men-
tioned it in their Facebook status
updates.

Through Twitter and Face-
book, Tribune online editor Jes-
sica Robertson sent out teasers
to drive traffic to the site. Ana-
lytics show that nearly 1,200 users
clicked on these links alone.

She said: “What I’m happy
about is that we not only pro-
vided information, but achieved
what we originally set out to do
with the website — create a plat-
form for intelligent discussion
on events that matter; not just
disseminating information, but
giving our audience a voice.”

WHAT SOME OF OUR
READERS SAID

Montagu voter: The best part
of this election has been The
Tribune up-dates and the

accompanying comments, which
have been more enlightening
than all the campaign rhetoric!
You go, Tribune!

Frustrated in Elizabeth: “I
just read the minute-by-minute
coverage of the election online.
Hats off to The Tribune for bril-
liantly recording the reality
check for the two major political
parties.”

Two Thumbs Up: “The Tri-
bune is doing an excellent job
with this minute-by-minute cov-



well informed and it’s just like
I’m right in the middle of all the
action. Keep up the good
work!”

James Smith: “This is excel-
lent, congratulations to The Tri-
bune!”

Thomas B: “You guys are
keeping everyone abreast of
what is going on today with the
very exciting by-election. To me
there is nothing better than to
see democracy first hand.”

eae haere HS

Sade: “Wow - live blogging
the election. Cool.”

T Gibson: “Real time elec-
tion coverage ... this is great. I
feel like I am there.”

Ms Lucky: “I would really
like to say that The Tribune is
doing a great job in keeping us
Bahamians up to date with the
tallies.”

TSD: “I commend The Tri-
bune on a great job covering
this story. I feel as if I am right
there where all the action is. I
appreciate this.”

Samiadde: “I think you guys
are doing a great job keeping
us up to date. I'm at work and
I'm glad I'm able to get an idea
as to what's going on.”

Cozzmo The Critic: “I must
commend The Tribune on a job
well done. Keep It Up!”

Ear on the Ground: “Jessica
and the guys at The Tribune —
another great job! Thanks for
keeping us bang up to date.

Lala: Great job Tribune! Tam

at work and still able to keep
up with what's going on
regarding this by-election.
Keep up the good work!”

Ron: “My first time on tri-
bune242 ... Great to be able
to get up to date information
at any time.”

Grateful Bahamian:
“Thanks tribune242! Your
updates made this election
come alive for those of us that
are not home right now in Nas-
sau. Thank you!”

R Moxey: “The up to date
coverage was excellent by The
Tribune and you guys deserve
a round of applause.”

Antoinette: “I am proud of
you Tribune. Good work!”

Spaceyg: “Really appreciate
the live coverage. It was
great.”

Breezy: “I enjoyed the fren-
zy last night as the results from
the polls came in, and I must
big up tribune242 for their cov-
erage of this by-election — JOB
WELL DONE!”

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By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

warms of Anglicans and Catholics

attended Ash Wednesday masses

throughout the country to mark the
start of the Lenten season - a time of
fasting, prayer and almsgiving. Lent will
run until the mass of the Lord’s Supper
exclusively on Holy Thursday, the day
before Good Friday. It a season of
penance, reflection, and fasting which
prepares Christians for Christ's resurrec-

tion on Easter Sunday.

Yesterday, Tribune Religion visited the noon mass at
St Francis Xavier Cathedral, where Catholics from
many backgrounds gathered to receive ashes. Some
came early before service, finding their seats in the
pews of St Francis Xavier Cathedral. In each bench,
persons are meditating on scriptures before service.

Barbara Sweeting has been a member of St Francis
Xavier Cathedral all of her life. She broke down the
service proceedings, which for a non-Catholic was a big
help in deciphering what was going on.

Ritual after ritual, everything is solemn. Not a pin
drop can be heard inside the church.

Two scripture lessons were read by members of the
church, urging parishioners to be “reconciled to God”
on behalf of Christ. The leader beckoned each person
in the congregation to “Be merciful O God, for we have
sinned.”

“This service is a reminder of our mortality and
accountability to God,” says Archbishop Pinder.
“Remember man that you are dust, and to dust you will
return,” he says to a fully packed church bursting at the
seams.

“Even though we sin, what temptation represents is
that we can still reform our lives. It represents being
able to know that there is always a way to turn back
from the bad in your life. It gives you fasting, peace and
redemption,” said one Catholic.

Historically, Lent began as a journey of Jesus’ 40 days
in the wilderness, to celebrate Easter with hearts of
thankfulness and praise.

One curious tourist couple of New York just hap-
pened to come across the service while traveling down
West Hill Street. They explained that they had stum-
bled upon the mass by accident, but really enjoyed it.

“T thought it was just lovely, how we just happened to
come across this wonderful service on Ash Wednesday”
says Lori Squillacioti. “Everything happens for a rea-
son, and the same thing happened to us in Italy.”

SEE page 27

RELIGION Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 21



TWO students from Bayview Academy look at a prayer book after recieving ashes at St Mary The Virgin Anglican
Church yesterday.
PG 22 ¢ Thursday, February 18, 2010

eH:

RELIGION

UU :

The Tribune



Name:
Grade: 5

I would like to live in a "Christian
World". A world where black,
Hispanic and white people can live
together in harmony. With God as
Our Father, brothers all are we. Like
1 John 4: 7 says "Let us love one
another, for love comes from God.
Proverbs 15: 1 says "A gentle answer
turns away wrath, but a harsh word



Name:
Grade: 5

ONE day while I was watching televi-
sion, I started to wonder what kind of
world I would like to live in. This world
is horrible. I think I would like to live in
a world without crime.

There would be no killing, shooting or

KENISHA KING

stirs up anger.” I just don't see why we
have all these wars, crime and gangs.
The earthquake in Haiti is hurtful,
we need to help them instead of just
sitting there watching them face
major destruction. The Golden Rule
says, “Do unto others as you would
have them to do unto you.”
When you help them (Haitians),

KIYSHANTI HIGGS

gangs. I would like my world to be
peaceful, with less gangs and murders.
Now in this world, there are children
being abused by their parents or
strangers.

It is very complicated living in this

the Lord will guide you always; He
will satisfy your needs in a sun-
scorched land and will strengthen
your frame. (Isaiah 58: 1)

Now we all know about education.
It helps you to strive for excellence.
But many children do not go to school
to learn. Some children just come to
school for the fun of it.

In my world, children would know
that school is really fun once you get
into it.

Crime is the main or worst thing
happening in the world now. People

y

world today. I wish there was another
world to live in. If I could choose what I
wanted my world to be like, it would be
less killings, shootings,

child abuse and robberies. All adults
would work less and grow crops for
food. I would still like children to go to
school where teachers cannot spank, but
only punish children by taking away
their break. I would call my world
Peaceful World. I would have peace in
the churches and end all suffering and

are getting raped, shot, killed, stabbed
and forced to join gangs. I mean,
what's so good about crime? It is a
sick abomination. "You intended to
harm me, but God intended it for
good to accomplish what is now being
done, the saving of many lives."
(Genesis 50; 20)

I hope one day my new world
would come true. I am learning that if
you want things done you have to put
in a little hard work of your own.

"Blessed are the dead who die in
the Lord."

dying. The world today is horrible and
some people still don't have civil rights.
Some people are shot by white people
because they are black. Haiti just faced a
natural disaster. Some of them
(Haitians) don't have homes. Some of
them are still trapped under the rocks.
The Haitians are hungry and they have
no food. Many Bahamians are helping
them, but they still need more help. This
is why I wish for another world to live in.
Bless this whole world.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Name: REAGAN CARTWRIGHT

Grade: 5

TODAY in our world, too many
things are going on. Some are good
and some are bad. Some of the good
things are civil rights, education and
homes to live in. Some of the bad
things are the sixty-six homes robbed
this week, the earthquake in Haiti,
shoot-outs and kidnapping.

The last one is the use of foul lan-
guage. I think all of these things
should go away. If I could, I would live





Rak
fl j



in a world of candy, where teeth never
go bad and there is no danger or fear.
Rivers will be made of the richest and
creamiest chocolate. The grasslands
are cotton candy of the finest mixture.
Trees are candy canes and lollipops.
The dirt, don't get me started, but the
dirt would be the most delicious pop-
ping rocks that would crackle in your
mouth along with everlasting gob-
stoppers.

sRE

Parents wouldn't have to work, it
will always rain money. In my world,
children are born with prepared or
smart minds so that they can do well
in all subjects. We would also live in
the best gingerbread houses.

One day, I went outside and asked
my mother "Is there anything to eat?"
"No", she replied, "just go and get
some cotton candy or candy cane".
"Maybe I will get a piece of ginger-
bread and a glass' of chocolate milk
from the river, I said." I went in
search of a giant picnic basket that my
mother plaited. Then I went to the
town board and it read population



Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 23



~~ 4% E —_

100. We have one hundred cups and
plates at home I thought. So I went
back home and got one hundred
plates and cups. Soon after I took a
trip to the Chocolate River and
stayed there for one hour. I sat there
scooping and counting glasses of
chocolate milk. Then, I picked one
hundred pieces of cotton candy and
gingerbread. Finally, I went to the
alarm tower and pressed the alarm
button.

Suddenly, the whole town gathered
around and we had a picnic at sunset.

The main point of this essay is to
share and not to be selfish.





FROM left to right: Pastor Adderly, Kenisha King, Reagan Cartwright, Kiyshanti Higgs, Principal of Sadie Curtis Primary School Audrey R Farrington.


PG 24 ® Thursday, February 18, 2010

RELIGION The Tribune

St Agnes Parish Anglican Church Men (AGM)
and Women (ACW) Celebrate Anniversaries

A SOLEMN High Mass of
Thanksgiving was held on Friday,
February 12 at 7pm under the theme:
“Ordering Our Steps In God's
Words” Proverbs 3:6, to celebrate
the 38th and 46th anniversaries
respectively of St Agnes Parish Men
(ACM) and Women (ACW) and the
recognition of past president,
Veronica Cooper. The celebrant and
preacher for this service was the Rt
Rev'd. Laish Z. Boyd, Sr., Bishop of
The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos
Islands.

Bishop Boyd told the congregation
that in order for their steps to be
ordered in God's Word, they must
intentionally seek the Lord while He
may be found, realise that they cannot
play games with God because He is
all-knowing, and they must ask God
to give them a pure heart and for
them to never be separated from God.

“Order your life according to His
principles, you're expected to do
great things and keep the organisa-
tions operating at a high level and be
professional “Bishop Boyd said.

Bishop Boyd informed the men
and women that God's Word directs
them to think the best of other peo-
ple, “love endures all things and
believes the best and hopes the
best”, he said.

Archdeacon IJ. Ranfurly Brown,
Rector of St. Agnes Parish congrat-
ulated both organisations and
stressed to them that there is much
work to be done as he installed the
Officers for 2010.

The ACM Officers are:
Christopher Wright, President, Ken
O'Brien, Vice-President, Bernard
Bostwick, Secretary, Neil O'Brien,
Assistant Secretary, Everette
Burrows, Treasurer, Barrett
McDonald, Assistant Treasurer and
Kenneth Braynen, Chaplain.

The ACW Officers are: Cleomi
Turner, President, Yolanda
Fernander, Vice-President, Shelly
Cooke-Seymour, Secretary, Monique
Mitchell, Assistant Secretary,
Verlene Harris, Treasurer, Patrice
Ferguson, Assistant ‘Treasurer,
Kathleen Maynard, Chaplain and
Lyn Bullard, Assistant Chaplain.

Anglican Church Men and Women
throughout the Diocese joined in the
celebration along with other wor-
shippers including Dame Marguerite
Pindling who is always in attendance
at these anniversary services.





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David Knowles/Photos
The Tribune

RELIGION Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 25

The Measure of a Mant

‘Mighty Men Ministry’ hosts Men and Boys conference

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter
rshearer@tribunemedia.net

T risk and challenged

boys are invited to

attend St Paul’s
Baptist Church, where they
will explore the pressures
and mixed messages that
bombard boys, with violent
and distorted images of mas-
culinity. Images that tell
them to stifle emotion, and
that suggest they aspire to
one particular image of how
they should act and how
they should treat others.

These and other avenues of “male-
ness” will be discovered at St Paul
Baptist Church’s first ever Men and
Boys conference, for “at risk” boys.
The conference is sponsored by their
‘Mighty Men Ministry’ under the
theme “The Measure of a Man,”
drawn from the biblical passage I
Kings 2: 1-5.

George Bodie, president of the
men’s department at the church said
the conference “seeks to zero in on
three aspects: 1) boys who are consid-
ered “at risk,” and those who are
challenged, 2) persons who work with
young people, and 3) persons who
lead men’s civic or religious min-
istries.

The conference’s official opening
will take place on Thursday, February
25 at 6.30 pm. National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest, Minister

EBENEZER WALK-A-THON

—_
7



i a = ~
ye ere
5
4 > a
m ° ira
| al - * ~~
a — io
Re 2 te be:

EBENEZER Methodist Church held its annual Walk-A-Thon on Saturday January 31

4

i

= ee a

of Youth Sports and Culture Charles
Maynard, and Education Minister
Desmond Bannister will bring greet-
ings along with Fred Mitchell, the PLP
spokesman on foreign affairs.

“All of our speakers will seek to
address issues dealing with boys, in
three lectures happening at once and
persons can choose which ones they
are most interested in,” said Mr
Bodie.

There will be a general session each
night at 8.30. Persons are invited to
come and benefit from the sessions.

The Men and Boy’s Conference
focuses on supporting boys in their
transition to manhood, and seeks to
recognise and celebrate the many
ways of being male, and facilitate the
healthy involvement and presence of
adult males in boys’ lives.

Nightly topics include : Who’s Your

Po
“=

Daddy, Working With Difficult Boys,
Boys to Men- Crime Doesn't Pay,
Men’s Health and Sexuality, Leading
Men From The Pages of Your Life,
What Every Men’s President Needs to
Know, How to Impact Your Men’s
Ministry, and Reframing your Men’s
Ministry-Going to the Next Level.

Attorney Keith Bell, Dr Kendal
Major, Charles Rolle, Wrensworth
Butler, Dr Hasting Johnson, Rev Dr J
Carl Rahming, Dr Phil Roberts, and
Rev Jackson Miller are some of the
facilitators.

“Tt is our hope that at the end of the
conference persons will be able to
improve their men’s ministry,” said Mr
Bodie. “Those who work with youths
will be better informed, and boys will
be more productive in making positive
contributions to nation building and
staying on the right track.”




, with a walk from the church to Blair Estates and back.

42 people participated in the walk and returned to the Church for a souse- out and fellowship. This was the first fundraising event for the
year and was a great success. Winners for the event included: Rashad Johnson, Deniro Lightbourne, Lapetra Rolle, Kyosen McPhee,
Samantha Bethell, Timothy Pinder, Wayne Key and Linda Sands. Looking forward the music department is making final plans for the Spring
Concert scheduled for April 18. The public is invited and can look forward to a wonderful presentation.
PG 26 ® Thursday, February 18, 2010

RELI

ION

The Tribune



Ce
Lessons of Lent

AS we enter this solemn season of
Lent, we are reminded that now is
the time to learn some new lessons
and re-discover some old ones. Let us
consider together how to benefit
from this time before Easter:

1. DEATH: We are made from dust
and we will return to this humble
beginning either in the dust of the
grave or the ashes of cremation. We
need to curb our pride.

2. SIN: We all have to fight a strong
pull to slip away from the will of God.
We must fight harder.

3. PRAYER: The process by which
a relationship is maintained with our
Lord God Almighty. It should be a
daily desire to draw closer and closer
to our Creator, Saviour, and the Holy

Spirit.




REV. ANGELA
C BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS




4. FASTING: The discipline of
exercising self-control in order to
strengthen our ability to resist daily
temptations.

5. STUDY: The time taken to grow
in wisdom and knowledge is a worth-
while investment in oneself.

6. WORSHIP: Extra services pro-
vide additional opportunities to

experience the presence of God. We
need to take advantage of them.

7. PREPARATION: These forty
days may be best spent with an eye
on the day’s demands and the prom-
ise of the Easter hope.

8. CONFESSION: The admission
of guilt, request for forgiveness and
the acceptance of absolution is a nec-
essary process to free us, heal us and
set US On a new course in the right
direction.

9. WILDERNESS: Finding time to
be alone is vital to do the inner exam-
ination that is required to move
toward maturity in faith.

10: SILENCE: Establishing peri-
ods of silence allows the whispers of
God to be heard, and to listen to the
ruminations of our mind.

It is our individual choice to deter-
mine how successful our Lent will be.
Success is not measured at any other
level than the personal. It is a private
exercise that may involve public
appearances.

Each one of us will be free to pur-
sue our normal routines or to make
the desired change in rhythm and
routine to enable — significant
improvement in spiritual things.

God is looking for us to want to
grow in grace. We have the will and
God has made the way. What are we
going to do? The decision is mine and
yours. Choose wisely.

There are lessons to be learnt in
Lent. Listen, learn, and love your
way to Easter.



Sail Salvador
Christian Council
llonates to Haiti
Earthquake Relief

THE San Salvador Christian
Council presented a cheque in the
amount of two thousand dollars to
the Bahamas Red Cross Society on
Monday, February 8, in aid of Haiti
relief mission. The cheque was pre-
sented by Reverend Father Jude
Edomwonyi, President of the San
Salvador Christian Council to
Willamae Jeaure-Evans, Finance
Officer of the Red Cross at the head-
quarters of the Bahamas Red Cross
Society, John F Kennedy Drive,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Also on January 18 a special
prayer session was held for the land
of Haiti and her people at the
Church of God of Prophecy,
Cockburn Town, San Salvador. The
prayer gathering which was organ-
ised by the San Salvador Christian
Council attracted many people
including the island Administrator,
Terrece Bootle-Bethel, Chief
Counsellor Terrance Major, govern-
ment functionaries, ministers of the
gospel, corporate citizens and people
of Haitian descent.



THE Reverend Father Jude Edomwonyi, President of the San Salvador Christian Council presenting the cheque to Willamae Jeaure-Evans,
Finance Officer of the Bahamas Red Cross Society.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, February 18, 2010 ® PG 27

The Blessing, What is it ?

PROVERBS.10: 22. The blessing of the
LORD, it maketh rich, and he addeth no
sorrow with it.

HOW many times have you heard a
member of a congregation or a reli-
gious leader get up and testify about
the blessing of God upon their lives, as
they’ve recently became the recipient
of a new car, a new home or a sum of
money; using the above passage of
scripture to validate their claim?

Then six months to a year later, a
number of sorrows evolves within what
they’ve once called God’s blessings,
i.e. 1) Financially unable to properly
service and maintain the car, 2) The
bank repossesses the car, 3) The bank
forecloses on the new home, and 4)
Start avoiding / ducking people and
complaining of folks coming to borrow
money or ask for financial assistance.
How quickly have these persons for-
gotten the “and he added no sorrow
with it” part of their testimony?

The misappropriating of God’s word
has a great deal to do with the level of
ignorance that exists among the reli-
gious community. This is the breeding
ground for undisciplined, itching ears,
gullible Christians that have and will
continue to become victims to various
forms of unbalanced, and in some cases
false teachings about prosperity and
the blessing that are coming forth today
in Jesus’ name.

Understandably so, Yeshuwa
Messiah (a.k.a. Jesus the Christ) never
called His followers Christians, but
rather He always called them disciples /



PASTOR

discipline ones.

As it is a proven fact that religious
Christians are good at reading and
quoting a few scripture verses; whereas
the Apostle Paul in writing to his disci-
ple and spiritual son namely Timothy
didn’t just say to him “read”

2 Timothy.2:15. Study to show thy-
self approved unto God, a workman
that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly
dividing the word of truth.

This word study in the Greek is:
spoudazo, spoo-dad'-zo; which has sev-
eral meanings as follows 1) to make
effort, 2) to be prompt or earnest, 3) to
give diligence, or be diligent, 4) to
endeavour, and 5) to labour.

Watch this! And don’t get me wrong;
I’m not saying that all religious leaders
are of a twisted mind-set when it comes
to rightly teaching about the blessing;
it’s just that many of them are teaching
out of ignorance based upon that which
they’ve heard another religious leader /
hireling teach and preach.

Listen! It’s by accident that the scrip-
ture says “Rightly dividing the word of
truth” for this also means that the word
of truth / word of God can be wrongly
divided. And I make absolutely no
apology in saying that if there is ever a

time that God’s word is being wrongly
divided for selfish monetary gain, that
time is now.

The thousands of fragmented, pow-
erless churches today are all competing
against each other for their portion of
the undisciplined religious Christians
(prey) community; that gives little to
no attention in truly studying God’s
word. Rather they rely solely upon the
teachings of some religious leaders.
Thereby, today we’ve got thousands of
Christians, who as a result of the
incomplete teachings are of the mind-
set that (a car, a house, a job, etc;) is the
blessing; and nothing, could be further
from the truth. For the blessing is not a
thing such as a car, a house or a job, etc;
but rather the blessing is God’s empow-
erment upon one's life.

This erroneous teaching has two
main negative affects that has absolute-
ly nothing to do with the kingdom of
God:

1) It helps in fueling the myth
that because God is blessing apostle,
bishop, pastor or doctor; with fine cars
and houses and if I want to be blessed
also, ’ve got to continue sowing finan-
cially into my religious leader’s life,
even if I have to go without”

2) It puts a yoke and a burden upon
the necks of the poor in spirit, thereby
causing many to feel unworthy as
they’re not driving or living as their
leaders. Which in most cases leads to
the sin of idolatry, whereby these per-
sons begin to render a form of worship
to their religious leaders. It also serves
as a blockage to those on the outside,

who would want to join / be apart of a
local congregation; but are wise enough
to see through this erroneous teaching.

Let’s quickly trace the origin of the
blessing, to actually see what it is and
the purpose of the blessing.

Genesis 12:1: Now the LORD had
said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy
country, and from thy kindred, and
from thy father’s house, unto a land
that I will show thee 2. And I will make
of thee a great nation, and I will bless
thee, and make thy name great; and
thou shalt be a blessing:

Please note: 1) That the blessing is
not a house; for Father Yahweh told
Abram to leave his father‘s (Terah)
house, 2) The blessing is God’s empow-
erment “And I will make of thee” and
3) The purpose, “And thou shalt be a
blessing.

This word blessing in the Hebrew is:
Berakah, ber-aw-kaw'; which means a
benediction, an act of approval.

The cars, houses and other material
possessions that man craves in some
cases are the byproducts of the bless-
ing. There is so much more to share in
order to bring some form of clarity and
balance back into the church. Stay tune
next week for part 2.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mails:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
kmfci@live.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’!



Remember you are dust
FROM page 21

“We just happened to be coming down
this block looking for something else and
didn’t find it.”

“It’s really lovely that everybody’s
dressed up, but we look a little shabby,”
said Lori noting the differences in dress
at the service compared to a Lent service
they would attend in New York.

Lori is giving up wine for Lent, which
she tries to have every weekend. And
it’s not going to be easy. “But I plan to
spend a lot of time praying instead,” she
told Tribune Religion.

Her husband Mike, plans to stop
snacking as much. So it’s not only a spir-
itual sacrifice, but one that would do
wonders for his physical health as well.

According to Catholics, the Lenten
season is the fitting time to ‘climb the
holy mountain of Easter.’ It represents
the 40 days that Jesus Christ spent in the

wilderness being ‘tempted and tried’ by
Satan.

It’s a celebration of the resurrection of
Christ who redeemed Christians by
dying on the cross. But moreso His res-
urrection represents new life. Lent is a
time of retrospection to prepare yourself
for what that means to you as a
Christian.

The forty days were intended to imi-
tate the forty days and nights which we
are told Jesus spent in prayer and fasting
in the desert preparing for his public
ministry (Lk 4:1-2).

It’s a time where he had to take on all
the challenges of a human being even
though he was just like us without sin.
He walked that journey in terms of turn-
ing away from all the temptations that
the devil put before him.

Tribune Religion asked a few parish-
ioners what they would be giving up this
Lenten season. Drinking beverages like
wine and Coca-Cola soda were men-
tioned and some decided to take on acts
of kindness, instead of fasting or adding

something extra to their regimen.

This period, which we know in English
as ‘Lent,’ deriving from the middle
English term meaning ‘day-lengthening’
or springtime, is known in German as
‘Fastenzeit’, a time of fasting; in French

ee ONS)

as ‘caréme’; Italian as ‘quaresima’j;and
Spanishas ‘cuaresma’, these all deriving
from the Latin ‘quadragesima,’ meaning
‘fortieth’.



M



ACM PREPARES FOR
ANNUAL CONFERENCE

¢ The 38th annual Anglican Church Men(ACM)

conference will be held in North Andros from March
17-21. All Anglican men are asked to register at their
parish or contact any ACM council member for
more information. Ken Obrien is the conference
chairman he can be reach at
kob1150@coralwave.com for more information.


PG 28 © Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION The Tribune

rer EE



WeonES DAY &

Scenes from the noon Ash Wednesday service at St Mary The Virgin Anglican Church.








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Recount agony C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 106 No.73THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY INTERVALS HIGH 67F LOW 54F By NOELLE NICOLLS Tribune Staff Reporter nnicolls@tribunemedia.net THEElizabeth by-election r ecount went on through the night last night, with no official w inner announced up to mid night at Thelma Gibson Primary School. At presstime last night, party operatives did not anticipate a f inal result until sometime today. The first election count on T uesday ended with FNM candidate Duane Sands ahead by o ne vote, in front of PLP candi date Ryan Pinder. The PLP declared the result too close to call, while FNM leader, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, r efused to declare a win. The Progressive Liberal Party ( PLP) is anticipating legal challenges if they lose in the recount b y a margin that is still not decisive. PLP attorneys maintain, if t he vote is tied or if the outcome could be affected by protest v otes, then a court challenge is virtually inevitable. S ome political commentators have questioned the point of tak ing the election to the courts. The FNM is maintaining their position that the courts should n ot decide elections. Court room tactics would only interfere with the clear inten tion of the people of Elizabeth to s upport the FNM,” according to Carl Bethel, FNM campaign Legal c hallenge is ‘vir tuall y ine vita b le’ The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FISH FILET www.tribune242.com BY-ELECTION LATESTONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM S E E P A G E S 2 4 & 2 5 By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE low turnout of voters disputed by both the PLP and FNM has been maintained by Parliamentary Commissioner Errol Bethelw ho said Elizabeth residents simply did not choose to cast their byelection ballots. Mr Bethel estimates that more than 4,600 of the 4,934 registered constituents are Elizabeth residents eligible to vote as less than 400 could not be found. And with just 3,142 ballots cast yesterday, that would estimate a turnout of 64 per cent or slightly more. However, PLP candidate Ryan Pinder argued the turnout may have been higher. “I don’t truly believe there are 5,000 registered voters in the constituency because it doesn’t take into account who has moved out,” Mr Pinder said. Parliamentary Commissioner maintains low voter turnout SEE page 11 READERS heaped praise on The Tribune’s news team and tribune242.com for providing real time, up-to-the-minute coverage of the Elizabeth by-election. Bahamians from across the country and around the world logged on to follow the excitement as it happened. On Tuesday alone, tribune242.com received more than a quarter million hits and double the unique visitors of a normal weekday. Up to press time last night, more than 200 readers had commented on our election cover age, in what developed into a stimulating and hotly-contested online debate. One Bahamian living overseas wrote: “Being outside the country and being able to get up to the moment result information was by far the greatest sense of national pride I have ever experienced. “I felt as though I was present in the Elizabeth constituency yesterday. It was like an action-packed movie that kept me on the edge of my seat, refreshing my page waiting with great anticipation for the next T ribune by-election coverage praised by readers SEE page 19 ABOVE: Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette speaks to the media yesterday. BELOW: PLP activist Laura Williams outside Thelma Gibson Primary School. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net A PLP fanatic hit D eputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette on the shoulder as tempers flared at the Elizabeth by-election re-count yesterday. T he calm and peaceful atmosphere became conf rontational as goading statements were asserted b y PLP supporters and returned by FNMs gathered in a schoolyard outside the re-count room at Thelma Gibson Primary. Police filed the increasingly agitated crowd out of the schoolyard and set up barricades to separate the crowd of about 100 PLP and FNM supporters at around 10.30am. Arguments had escalat ed to a bitter shouting match between the two sides as the Deputy Prime Minister walked through the dividing aisle and PLP activist Laura Williams was at the front of the PLP crowd shouting defamatory statements. Mr Symonette put a hand on her shoulder and asked her to calm down, but as he turned away she slammed the Deputy Prime Minister across the shoulder and upper arm, eye-witnesses said. “Those who didn’t see it, heard it. She slammed him,” attested one eyewitness. While another DEPUTY PM HIT AS TEMPERS FLARE INELIZABETH SEE page 12 SEE page 12 X ELIZABETH BY-ELECTION

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION L ocal News....................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10 L ocal News....................P11,12,13,14,15,19 L ocal News................................P21,22,23,27 E ditorial/Letters.......................................P4 Spor ts..........................................P16,17,18 Advts....................P20,24,25,28,29,30,31,32 Comics...................................................P26 BUSINESS SECTION Business.........................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10 Business................................P11,12,14,15,16 Advts....................................................P8,13 OBITUARIES/RELIGION 28 PAGES CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES TENSIONSRUN HIGHDURING BY-ELECTION RECOUNT T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f FNMS AND PLPS gathered in the Elizabeth constituency yesterday as a recount of Tues-d ay’s votes took place. P olice filed the increasingly agitated crowd out of the schoolyard at Thelma Gibson Primary School and set up barricades to separate the crowdo f about 100 PLP and FNM supporters. Haiti judge fr ees 8 of 10 American missionaries PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti EIGHTAmerican missionaries were freed from a Haitian jail Wednesday, nearly three weeks after being charged with kidnapping for trying to take a group of children out of the quake-stricken country, according to Associated Press. The eight looking bedraggled and sweaty walked out of the Haitian jail escorted by U.S. diplomats just after dusk. They waited until they were safely inside a white van before flashing smiles, waving and giv ing a thumbs up to reporters. Hours earlier, judge Bernard Saint-Vil told The Associated Press that eight of the 10 missionaries were free to leave without bail or other conditions after parents testified they voluntarily handed their children over to the missionaries. "The parents of the kids made statements proving that they can be released," he said, adding that still wants to ques tion the group's leader and her nanny. The group planned to fly out of Haiti late Wednesday, defense attorney Aviol Fleu rant said. A spokesman for Idaho Sen. Jim Risch said they would be flown to Miami. PLPCAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN Dr Bernard Nottage (above in white jacket) and Minister of State for Culture Charles Maynard (below right) among those outside of Thelma Gibson Primary School yesterday.

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM AN Eleuthera teacher who is accused of indecently assaulting several female students is expected back in court on Monday. On Tuesday, attorney Romona Farquharson who represents Orville Clarke, 37, filed an application before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez to have her client reappear in court to ensure that due process was followed during his initial arraignment. Attorney Romona Farquharson who represents Orville Clarke, 37, a teacher at the Governor's Harbour High School, told Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez Tuesday that she had been made aware that Clarke had been arraigned before a Family Island admin istrator. Clarke who is accused of assaulting several female students between November of last year and February of this year was arraigned on five counts of indecent assault over the weekend. Ms Far quharson said she was also made aware that he had been remanded to Sandilands for a month. Ms Farquharson asked the magistrate to request a report from the court to ascertain exactly what had transpired and why he had been sent to Sandi lands so as to ensure that due process was upheld. Clarke was expected to appear in court yesterday however he was not brought from Sandilands. He is now expected to appear in court on Monday. Teacher accused of indecent assault set to return to court B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts maintains that the fact that the PLP’s candidate for Elizabeth Ryan Pinder never voted in the Bahamas is a “non-issue” with which the F NM attempted to sway vote rs prior to Tuesday’s by-election. During the FNM’s mass ral ly on Monday night, Mount Moriah MP Tommy Turnquest revealed that Mr Pin der has never voted in the Bahamas in his life, but had deemed it important enough to vote in two US elections. This fact left Mr Pinder open to attacks from his political opponents who mocked h im during the rally and even s ang the American national anthem when he arrived at the Thelma Gibson Primary School polling station on Tuesday. Winning by a single vote on election night, the FNM’s Dr Duane Sands was declared the victor late last night when the final ballots were counted. He beat out the PLP’s candidate in the closest election seen in the history of the Bahamas 1501 FNM, to 1500 for the PLP. Yesterday, Mr Roberts said that he was extremely disappointed in the FNM’s tactics by smearing Mr Pinder’s name on the night before the election. Opportunity By doing so, he said, the PLP were not afforded an opportunity to respond to the remarks due to the newly implemented rules laid out by URCA which restricts any political dialogue or campaigning on the day of the election. “I don’t see it as a big deal. There are other Members of Parliament who have served for long years who have never voted, and these persons mostly represented the Family Islands. “I am further advised that Sir Lynden Pindling, (Governor General) AD Hanna, and others voted in England when they were in school. It was customary back then,” he said. As such, the PLP’s chairman said that this “furor” surrounding Mr Pinder’s former US citizenship and his voting record in the Bahamas is a “dead issue” that “nobody will pay any attention to.” ‘This is a non-issue’ PLPCHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts I N order for a US citizen or a person holding dual citizenship to give up their A merican citizenship they must make a formal renunciation of nationality before a diplomatic or consular officer of the Unite d States while in a foreign state, according to the US Immigration and Nationality Act. The Tribune understands that once this is done, US officials wait 24 hours before sending the request to the United States. T he application is then sent to Washington, DC for scrutiny which can take months to ensure that the person in question is not trying to evade taxes or justice in the United States. H owever, once this probe is done the official date of renunciation will be retroactive to the date of the application, The T ribune understands. Questions regarding the process of a dual citizen renouncing American citizen s hip emerged with the entrance of Pro gressive Liberal Party by-election candidate Ryan Pinder to the political sphere l ast month. The tax attorney was born to a Bahamian father, former PLP MP for Mal c olm Creek Marvin Pinder, and an American mother. In January, Mr P inder, who is employed by F lorida-based law firm Becker and P oliakoff as a Nassau-based consultant, defended his right to hold dual citiz enship in the face of criticism t hat it was inap propriate and u nconstitutional for someone seeking pub lic office in the Bahamas. At the time he called his dual-citizenship a "non-issue." But last week, PLP chairman Bradley R oberts said Mr Pinder renounced his US citizenship prior to nominating as a bye lection candidate on January 29. Mr Pinder told the media that his decision was a p ersonal one, adding that he was not pressured by his party to give up his American c itizenship. He has not publicly disclosed the exact date he gave his citizenship up. F ailed by-election candidates Workers' Party leader Rodney Moncur and National Development Party candidate Andre Rollins earlier criticised the fact that Mr Pinder held dual citizenship, suggesting it drew into question his eligibility to hold p ublic office in the Bahamas and the likelihood that he would act in the best inter ests of Bahamian constituents if elected. Recently, Prime Minister and FNM leader Hubert Ingraham took a jab at Mr P inder suggesting his party's candidate, Dr Duane Sands, would be more loyal to Elizabeth constituents given his single, r ather than dual, citizenship. According to the US Department of State's website, dual nationals "owe alle g iance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country h as the right to enforce its laws, particu larly if the person later travels there." The process of dual citizens renouncing UScitizenship Bradley attacks ‘FNM smearing’ of Pinder for never voting in Bahamas X ELIZABETH BY-ELECTION Court brief I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s PLP CANDIDATE RYAN PINDER

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Today as I was having my morning coffee and reading the newspaper, I came across a story that if it weren’t so sad, it might be quite laughable! I am referring to the poll that was conducted regarding the gay cruise ship coming to Nassau. Have we not been down this road? W hile there were a few comments that were a bit more open minded, most of the readers surveyed seemed to have the same, ignorant view of the gay population. Of course, most of these people hide behind their religion, stating that being gay is unnatural. I nearly choked when I read that one reader was concerned about “our little ones,” as if the people off this boat would come into their home and whisk away their children! What utter nonsense! Another thing, many gays do not “openly flaunt” their lifestyle or their “boldness.” What do these people think, that all gays walk around with a neon sign that says “look at me, I’m gay!” Gee, they look just like regular people, what a shock! I fully agree with one of the people surveyed who stated that the Bahamas better open their eyes to the big, wide world out there. We live ona small island, but does that mean we have to be small minded as well? These people who spout religion as a cloak to hide behind, are simply covering up their fear of something they know nothing about. Fear can turn into anger and ignorance. I suggest that these people, who seem to be so concerned about a gay cruise tipping the balance of what is right and wrong in Nassau, take a look at what is more important in the scheme of things. Maybe they should be more concerned with the crime running amok here. Come on Nassau, are we still focusing our energies on this subject? This sort of ignorance and hate is quite an embarrassment in the eyes of the rest of the world. Is that how we want to portray our selves? SUSAN KATZ LIGHTBOURN Nassau, February, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm BOTH POLITICAL parties are bemoani ng the low voter turnout in Tuesday’s Elizabeth by-election. As we write at 10.30pm Wednesday, the new MP for the cons tituency has not been decided and the recount at Thelma Gibson Primary School continues. I f the recount is not completed before midnight, The Tribune will go to press with out the final result. However, those intere sted in following the recount can switch to where the running report w ill continue until a winner has been a nnounced. Preparations for the Elizabeth by-election started in confusion when it was discovered t hat hundreds of names on the voters register could not be found either they had died, moved out of the constituency or were b ogus from the beginning. Mr Errol Bethel, Parliamentary Commissioner, estimated that 4,600 of the 4,934 r egistered persons for Elizabeth were eligi ble to vote in the constituency. He said that less than 400 on the electoral role could not be found. According to his count he con firmed that with only 3,142 ballots cast in Tuesday’s by-election, voter turnout was indeed low an estimated 64 per cent or slightly more. It was something for both par ties to ponder as there is nothing that B ahamians like more than to gather at the polls on election day. However, there are those who believe t hat there are not as many legitimate voters in Elizabeth as are still reflected on the regi ster. F or example, PLP candidate Ryan Pinder, who when the polls closed Tuesday had been defeated by the FNM’s Dr Duane S ands by one vote, believes there are no more than 4,300 eligible voters in Elizabeth. He does not think that the number of voters w ho have moved out of the constituency have been taken into consideration and elim inated from the register. If there are 4,300, and slightly over 3,000 votes, then there was an 84 per cent turnout. “It’s tough to tell with the register how it i s, and what is the true total of the registered voters in the constituency,” he said. Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette agreed: “You will probably find we had a high turnout of the actual people in Elizabeth.” If Mr Ryan finds it tough to read “the register how it is,” he should go back to the indecisive days before the May 2, 2007 election for his answer. May 2 was the date on which his party, then the government, was defeated at the polls. The 2007 election will g o down in Bahamian history as an election of colossal mismanagement, especially in t he confusion created in the Parliamentary R egistrar’s department because of the short time allowed between the close of the register and election day. PLP party leader Perry Christie, then prime minister, could not bring himself to c lose the register. He blamed it on the late registration of Bahamians, resulting in it being difficult fort he Boundaries Commission to define the c onstituency boundaries. This meant that the Boundaries Commission report was notp resented to the House of Assembly until March 19 for a May 2 election. In the report five constituencies were eliminated and four w ere created. The report still had to face a House debate. It was speculated that Mr Christie was trying to keep the House in session as long as possible, because as soon as it closed the register would also close. He wanted to give tardy Bahamians more t ime to register, not thinking of the chaos his decision would cause the Parliamentary department. However, he had until May 22 to call an election, failing which, under the Constitution, the House would dissolve itself. The Parliamentary Registrar’s staff had less than eight weeks to write out by hand new voters cards with their counterfoils for t he dramatic change in the newly created constituencies in addition to the boundary changes in the remaining constituencies. It w as estimated that by the time the two cards and counterfoils for each voter had been written, the staff would have had to havem ade 360,000 changes by hand before the cards could be put in the computer and dist ributed to voters. T he Parliamentary Registrar then had two weeks to certify the register, have the ballots p rinted, and the voters register published a nd still be on time for an election that had to be called within four weeks. T he Parliamentary Registrar’s office accomplished a miracle to have the register completed on time, but it would be another m iracle if there were no mistakes, Eliza beth probably being one of them. The FNM now has two years to go through the register, constituency by constituency, to make certain that every district is correct, so that when an election is called the Registrar’s Department will have ample time to update the register, and avoid the confusion still haunting us from the 2007 debacle. Gay cruise ship poll exposed embarrassing ignorance LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Registration confusion traced to 2007 EDITOR, The Tribune. TODAY (February 15th section by Neil Hartnell about the Mayaguana project. The a rticle was an attempt to inform the public about the project and how the Government was trying to avoid the “very bad idea” ofc onveying huge chunks of land to the developers. While we, I would think, would approve of this approach as far as it goes, b ut when Neil Hartnell tried to elicit further information from the Minister, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, he declined to confirm any details of the Government’s discussion with the Principals behind the project and when a scenario was suggested indicat ed it was “vaguely correct”. A s we are all aware the level of trust in the actions of any Government today is very low and therefore for a Minister toa void answering questions raises the question whether there are issues that are embarrassing to the Government and cannot be d ivulged. I think it is about time that Members of Parliament realize that they are representatives of the Bahamian public and the public has a right to know what is going on. So please stop trying to brush over information that might not be palatable to the public or in the best political interests of the Government or Opposition. If you want to gain the public’s trust, “vaguely correct” is not an acceptable answer anymore. What is “truly correct” and Minister Vanderpool-Wallace might like to let us know. PATRICK THOMSON Nassau, February 15, 2010 V V a a g g u u e e l l y y c c o o r r r r e e c c t t r r e e s s p p o o n n s s e e i i s s n n o o l l o o n n g g e e r r a a c c c c e e p p t t a a b b l l e e , , M M r r V V a a n n d d e e r r p p o o o o l l W W a a l l l l a a c c e e EDITOR, The Tribune. I ’m a Bahamian and I would like to put my five c ents on the Haitian issue. If we give the Haitian who is coming in now status,t hey would be a burden on our economy. They wouldn’t go back home to help rebuild their country instead they wouldd rain the little resources we have for our people. We can help but from a distance. I have nothing against H aitians, but the Lord said that he would help those who helped themselves. By them fleeing their country they aren’t help ing. I t is in our best interest to send all illegal immig rants back home to their country. We have to secure the few jobs we have now for Bahamian brothers and sis ters. L JOHNSON Nassau, February, 2010. Illegal immigrants should be sent back home EDITOR, The Tribune. Dr. Ken Knowles put his pen to paper in a longer than normal letter to the The Tribune recently. It seems he misunderstands the concept of vouchers for the purchase of health care insurance and medication. The idea of vouchers is for those people that cannot get health insurance themselves, as a result of a pre-existing condition, or they are simply too poor to afford it, should be provided with a voucher from the government to buy health insurance for themselves. Dr. Ken also seems to believe that in order to help the less fortunate, the government needs to run the health care industry. Too bad. Maybe he has forgotten all those wonderfully acerbic letters he has written to the press bemoaning "services" pro vided by the government that he finds less than satisfactory, but now, for some reason, he thinks they can solve health care. "It is amazing that people who think we cannot afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, and medication somehow think that we can afford to pay for doctors, hospitals, medication and a government bureaucracy to administer it." (Dr. Thomas Sowell RICK LOWE www.weblogbahamas.com February, 2010. Dr. Ken Knowles seems to misunderstands concept of health care insurance vouchers

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Call for third-party, independent candidates to receive even playing field By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THERE is a serious need for e lection campaign reform from t he two major political parties to assure third-party and independent candidates an even play i ng field, Progressive Liberal Party leader Perry Christie said. His comments came as he accused FNM operatives of running an unethical by-electionc ampaign, filled with alleged promises of jobs and otheri ncentives to voters in exchange for their support. H aving been in Parliament for nearly three decades, Mr Christie remarked that the weeks leading up to the Elizabeth by-election were "thew orst I've ever seen it" in terms of allegations that members oft he FNM were allegedly using their government clout to sway v oters. He said that on the eve of the by-election, a PLP supp orter told him that her daughter had been offered a job by a member of the FNM, presumably to influence her vote. "Up to (Monday m ent was giving people jobs with a clear intention of influe ncing the vote. That's not proper, ethical or fair," he saidi n a recent interview with T he Tribune. He continued: "Both p arties should look at what's happening in the country today with a view to reorganising our approach to elections because i t is awfully difficult for independent and small parties to h ave even a remotely small chance (to winh appening on the part of the t wo major political parties.” C onsequently, fringe parties a nd independent candidates are caught between "two political g iants" with one giant, the FNM, using "weapons of powe r" in their favour, said Mr Christie. " I've had an opportunity to recognise that we have to really h ave a strong will to make elections fairer and more transpar e nt because right now two, much below the radar things,a re happening. It's not fair," he a dded. Throughout the by-elect ion campaign, there were alleg ations from all sides that prospective voters were offered e verything from jobs, money, alcohol even cellular phone c ards by the major political parties in an effort to influencev otes. Several weeks ago, by-election candidate Bahamas Democratic Movement leader Cassius Stuart told police that a senior member of the PLP was offering bribes of $200 in exchange for votes. Police said they were looking into Mr Stuart's claims, b ut said there was no concrete evidence, or a formal complaint behind his allegations. The PLP also refuted the claims. A special team headed by Superintendent Leon Bethel, officer-in-charge of the Central Detective Unit, was formed to investigate allegations of corr uption and voter fraud in the by-election. When asked if his team was investigating any comp laints of bribery on part of the F NM, Supt Bethel said, "I don't have any (sucht he FNM offering any jobs (in exchange for votes). If such a t hing is reported, another unit would look at that, in fact we w ould have to take legal advice with respect to that." H is unit was on-site at the T helma Gibson Primary School polling station, ready to act ona ny possible emergence of voter fraud at yesterday's by-elect ion recount. Up to press time, he had no reports of voter f raud, he said. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net An “incapacitated” woman who could not properly comprehend the electoral processv oted in the Elizabeth by-election on Tuesday, a lawyer claimed yesterday. Kathleen Johnson-Hassan, who was at the polls representi ng the FNM, said that she argued that a woman, alleged to be “not of sound mind”, should not be able to vote. H owever, lawyers representing other political parties at the polls argued in favour of allowing the woman to vote. “She went in and she went t hrough the procedure but it was very evident that her ability to participate in the process w as seriously under question,” said Ms Johnson-Hassan, also v ice-president of the Bahamas B ar Association. The attorney made her comments yesterday as she waited outside the Thelma Gibson Prim ary School building where the mandatory recount of the Elizabeth by-election votes got underway at 8am. U nofficial results after the f irst vote count on Tuesday night when the polls closed gave the FNM candidate, Dr Duane Sands, just a one-vote l ead on the PLP’s Ryan Pinder. That night, FNM leader H ubert Ingraham said he was not going to declare victory u ntil the results of yesterday’s recount were in. Observers noted that the outcome could end up being dependent on the eligibility of t he votes of a number of persons who were “challenged” at t he polls, or voted on “protest” ballots after their identity as l egitimate Elizabeth voters was questioned. This would only happen if the result went to an election court something that FNM l eader Mr Ingraham said his side would not pursue, but w hich the PLP has not denied as being an option. G iven that the ballot paper marked by the woman whose mental capacity was questioned by Mrs Johnson-Hassan wouldnot have been seen before it w as deposited in the ballot box, the way the woman voted, or i f she made a definitive mark against a candidate that would b e sufficient for the vote to be counted when scrutinised, is not known. In order for a ballot to be counted, and not considered “spoiled”, a clear mark usuall y an “X”has to be seen next to a candidate’s name. Mrs J ohnson-Hassan claimed that a n attorney from another party tried to argue that the woman could not hold a pen and that someone should go into the p olling booth with the voter to assist her in casting her vote, however, it later turned out that the woman “could hold a pen.” M rs Johnson-Hassan alleged that the incident was representative of a problematic trend of lawyers representing parties att he polls in elections. They are brought into the f ield on the basis that they will use their legal know-how to h elp minimise voting irregularities, but sometimes they may misinterpret the law in the hope that they will help secure a win for their preferred party, shes aid. This disregard for the law is filtering down to the grass-r oots level of the parties, Mrs Johnson-Hassan suggested. There is always a different interpretation applied that isn’t t here, that is incorrect, and it is that type of difficulty that we have coming from attorneys who all read the same legislation who all ought to under s tand the same legislation. “That causes the mix up and t he problems, and what it does is radiate down to their supp orters who have themselves no understanding of the finer points. “Therefore they cause this escalation of hostility which is t otally unnecessary. It makes one party feel like they are b eing slighted,” said Ms John son-Hassan. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Christie: Serious need for election campaign reform ‘Incapacitated woman voted – despite being confused by-election process’ PLPLEADER PERRY CHRISTIE BY-ELECTIONRECOUNTDRAMA By TRIBUNESTAFF X ELIZABETH BY-ELECTION “She went in and she went through the procedure but it was very evident that her ability to participate in the process was seriously under question.”

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7($&+(56:$17(' rffnb f%'*&+%"*!# " *&& PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham yesterday attended the funeral service for Mary Elizabeth (Betty OBE, at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. President of the Senate, Senator Lynn Holowesko; Sir Geoffrey and Lady Johnstone; Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson and Max Gibson also attended the service. Mr Ingraham recently paid tribute to Mrs Kenning, a philanthropist and former long-time secretary of the Bahamas Humane Society, who died last week aged 85. Generosity Mr Ingraham described Mrs Kenning as a "great Bahamian lady" who was well known for her generosity to good causes. S he was a businesswoman noted for accomplishments in the commercial world and was the owner of the Betty K shipping business. "She was an outstanding athlete, generous patron of sports, humanitarian and animal lover,” Mr Ingraham said. Mrs Kenning, who is survived by her husband John, died at Doctor's Hospital while being treated for pneumonia. PM Hubert Ingraham attends Elizabeth Betty Kenning funeral THE Bahamas National Youth Council (BNYC conjunction with other stakeh olders, will host a special scholarship forum tonight to help students utilise available resources to fulfill educational d reams. “The BNYC understands that our most valuable resource is our people and the development of the Bahamian people is critical for the success of our nation. As more and more Bahamians matricu-l ate to higher education, few c hoose to settle to live deferred dreams and accept employment lacking personal satisfaction,” the organisation s aid. With the understanding that education is paramount to success, BNYC together with representatives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Cuban Embassy, the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA American States (OAS B ahamas Cooperative League and the Lyford Cay Foundation, will host a scholarshipf orum. The International Affairs Committee of BNYC will host the ‘Meet the Deadline Schola rship Forum’ today at the Bahamas Cooperative LeagueL td (yellow building behind McDonalds Oakes Field) at 7 pm. “Many countries have s ecured scholarships solely for B ahamian students’ advancement. “As such, we admonish our fellow youth to utilise the opportunities available. At the forum questions and conc erns relating to scholarships and tertiary education both d omestically and internation ally will be facilitate. Despite the global economic instability and unfortun ate suspension of govern mental loans, our youth can a ccomplish their educational goals without compromise,”t he BNYC said. Scholarship forum tonight to help students fulfill dreams ( BIS photo: Peter Ramsay) PRIMEMINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured at the funeral of Mary Elizabeth (Betty Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk. Inset: Mrs Kenning.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A HAITIAN man charged with manslaughter in the death of a woman who was fatally struck by a pine treeon Sunday, appeared in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Simon Pierre, 44, in the death of Juslene Alteme Nicolas. Pierre, a Lazeretta Road resident, is accused of negligently causing Ms Nicolas’ death on Sunday, February1 4. Ms Nicolas is alleged to have been with a man who was cutting pine trees shortly before 9 o’clock Sunday morning in the Dignity Gardens area when one of the trees fell and struck her on the head. She reportedly died at the scene. Pierre, who was not represented by an attorney during his arraignment yesterday afternoon, told Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez that he only understood “a little” English. He was then aided by a male relative who was sworn in to interpret the proceedings for him. Pierre was not called upon to answer a plea to the charge. The prosecution objected to Pierre being granted bail, citing that his work permit had expired since November of last year and there had been no request to renew it. The prosecution contended that Pierre had no legal status in the country. Pierre was remanded into custody at Her Majesty’s Prison and the case was adjourned to February 22. The case has been transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street. Haitian man charged with manslaughter after woman killed by falling pine tree A teenager pleaded guilty in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday to setting fire to a Catholic Primary School last year. The 16-year-old boy, who has been held on remand since his arraignment last August, pleaded guilty to the charge of arson yesterday. He and a 24-year-old man, who is currently standing trial in the matter, were accused of setting fire to the St Francis and St Joseph Catholic Primary School on August 12 last year. The fire reportedly resulted in damage of $200,000. The teenager, who appeared before Magistrate Derrence Rolle-Davis in Court 5, Bank Lane, claimed that he had been under the influence of drugs and alcohol when he committed the offence. The juvenile was sentenced to time served. Teenager admits setting fire to school MAGISTRATE’SCOURT B AHAMAS NATIONAL PRIDE ASSOCIATION p resented its first Best Kept Yard Award for 2010. Congratulations go to Mr. & Mrs. Ronald and Helen Stubbs of Windsor Estates. Pictured (from the left Mrs. Judy Williams Board member at Bahamas National Pride Association, Mr. & Mrs. Ronald and Helen Stubbs Best Kept Yard winners, Ms. Joanne Johnson Executive Coordinator and Mr. Anthony Capron also a Board member at BNPA. 2010 BESTKEPTYARDAWARD

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAY VIEW ACADEMY students (above and right) at St. Mary’s the Virgin Anglican Church. PARISHIONER Bob Isaacs. BAHAMASOBSERVESKEYDATEON CHRISTIAN CALENDAR In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent and occurs forty-six days (forty days not counting Sundays) before Easter. It is a moveable fast, falling on a different date each year because it is dependent on the date of Easter. It can occur as early as 4 February or as late as 10 March. Information source: Wikipedia Wednesday Ash P HOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By LARRY SMITH IN THE weeks since the c atastrophic earthquake that k illed an estimated 230,000 men women and children in Haiti, there has been an endless stream of consciousnessf rom Bahamians on both s ides of the migration issue. First we had what I considered to be some extraordinary reactions to the primem inister's remarks immediately after the January 12 event. Ina series of Facebook exchanges, severali ntellectual critics c ondemned Ingraham for being insensitive and justifyinga nti-Haitian sentiments by discouragi ng Bahamians from helping in the wake of the disaster. These were ther emarks in question (as reported by The Guardian): " The government has established a common account at all the country's commercial banks, into which donations t o the relief effort in Haiti can be made. We will cause that money to be sent eithert o the Haitian government and/or to international organ izations that are able to provide assistance to Haiti at this time and the government willm ake a significant financial contribution. It is not approp riate for us to be collecting goods to send to Haiti because there is no means byw hich we can get there.” Then there was an equally h ostile reaction to the per fectly sensible policy announced at the same time that the government would release Haitians from theD etention Centre and suspend apprehension and repa triation efforts, while seeking to prevent new illegal immigration. This generated howlso f vitriolic protest and con fused comments from Bahamians upset about thes upposed creolisation of the country. In response, the PM had this to say: "The Haitian homeland has been devastated by the worst cata-s trophe in 200 years, with governmental agencies rendered impotent. Burdeninga collapsed country w ith destitute deportees would be a true crime. I can’t imagine hypocrites goingt o church on Sunday morning and then s aying on the radio and in the newspapers and in their h earts, that we ought to detain and keep these peop le and send them back to Haiti." Up next was a call by Coll ege of the Bahamas lecturer Nicolette Bethel for a more informed policy on Haitianm igrants: "What about an organized agricultural proj ect," she asked, "where those who enter illegally must reside and work under super-v ision Government housing (not illegal and unsafe s hanty towns) and some payment should be part of the dealin exchange for labour.C ouldn't there be a win-win situation?" A lthough variations on this theme have been proposed over the years, it nev ertheless produced the stan dard outraged Bahamian responses: "We have thou s ands of illegal immigrants i n The Bahamas already who are looking for a fresh start inl ife," argued Dennis Dames in a letter to the editor, "and i t's a huge burden on our social services. How many millions of new illegals do y ou think that we could accommodate?" Frankly, the level of ignorance, fear and hate-mongering surrounding the Haitian migration to the Bahamas is astounding especiallyw hen one considers the fact that Africans living in Haiti achieved the first successful slave revolt in history against one of the world's mosta dvanced nations. I would have thought that this should mean something to most Bahamians, but it doesn't. Som uch for all the talk about the African diaspora. T his antagonistic Bahamian attitude towards Haitians is largely due to our religious,p olitical and educational leaders (at least those who k now better) who have consistently recoiled from discussing the social issues orp romoting integration in order to avoid stirring the political pot. I f we are to develop an informed policy we need i nformation which is extraordinarily difficult to come by in the Bahamas. In fact,t here has been scant research on this subject over the past 3 0 years only two major studies, a couple of substantial analyses, and a handfulo f limited government surveys. But during the Christie a dministration an attempt was made to address this deficiency. In 2004 the International Office of Migration was asked to undertake an assess m ent of the Haitian commu nity in the Bahamas, in conjunction with researchers att he College of the Bahamas. The resulting 98-page report c ollated all the available data, and creole-speaking interviewers surveyed 500H aitians on four islands, with the support of the Haitian Embassy. But the findings were never officially published (although the report is available online), and thei nformation in the report is n ever discussed. What this research shows is that the Haitian problem is not quite as insurmount-a ble as many of us believe. F or example, published estimates of the size of the Haitian population range from 80,000 up to 400,000 (more than the entire Bahamianp opulation of about 340,000). Such wild estimates have been made at various times by politicians, journalists and pundits – among others allw ith a view to proving that w e are being overwhelmed by foreigners. Counting illegal residents i s a notoriously unreliable exercise, but the IOM report u sed a number of methods to arrive at an estimate of 30 to 60,000, of which many arej ust passing through to a third country (like the US r eturning home to Haiti. And many more are here legally in one form or another. And it is often overlooked that there a re an estimated 70,000 undocumented Bahamians living in the United States, ina ddition to some 12,000 living there legally. T he claim that Haitians are hogging up free public services also bears a closerl ook. Official data indicate that about 8.8 per cent of all s chool children are Haitian. Haitians constituted just over 11 per cent of hospital admis-s ions in 2001 (although they made almost 20 per cent of a ll outpatient visits to public clinics) and less than 12 per cent of live births were to Haitian nationals in 2003. On the other side of the c oin, over 12,000 registered Haitians contributed more than $3.5 million to National Insurance in 2004, but they received only 1.8 per cent oft otal benefits far less than might be expected from the estimated size of the popula t ion. And like the rest of us, Haitians (whether legal or not) pay taxes on whatevert hey buy in our stores. Over 30 years ago, B ahamian social scientist Dawn Marshall undertook the first study of the Haitianm igration to the Bahamas. She noted at the time that: "It cannot be in the best interest of either the Bahamian government or theB ahamian nation to allow a large proportion of its population to live and develop ini solation. And in its 2005 report, the I OM said much the same thing: "Unless the Haitian community becomes moref ully integrated into Bahamian society, an important m inority of the Bahamianborn population will grow up as foreigners within the only s ociety they know." Dawn Marshall says the official policy of both parties boils down to "apprehend and deport with no consider a tion of the needs of the economy. “Small island developing states like the Bahamas usu ally have to import labour if t hey want to grow. We need a policy on how we are going to manage that importation." And that is essentially the c rux of the matter. Plainly w e need the labour. That's why the Haitians are here because there is a market for them, and theyc an earn more than they can a t home. In fact, there would be no Bahamian agriculture at all if it were not for Haitians. We are willing to employ them illegally andp ay them low wages because they are outside the protection of the law. It follows, therefore, that in order to control the migration weh ave to control both supply a nd demand, which means regulating employers as well as deporting illegals. But wed on't do that. Meanwhile, the governm ent's unstated policy on this issue seems to boil down to co-existence rather than inte-g ration. And we have to ask whether the government ( PLP or FNM) has made a conscious, informed decision on this. Well, good luck in getting t hat answer from anyone in a position to know. Should we invite hundreds o f thousands of Haitians in to set up peasant plantations a nd denude our scattered islands? Or should we round up every man, woman andc hild of Haitian descent and put them in concentration c amps until we can deport them? These are apparently the c hoices we face if we take our leaders at face value. There m ay be better solutions, but we will never arrive at them without a rational public debate based on accurate information. in the meantime,w e will continue to repeat rubbish and hurl racial epi thets. What do you think? S end comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit w ww.bahamapundit.com Bahamian attitudes towards the Haitian migration “Frankly, the level of ignorance, fear and hate-mongering s urrounding the Haitian migration to the Bahamas is astounding especially when one c onsiders the fact that Africans living in Haiti achieved the first successful slave revolt in history against one of the world's most advanced nations.” PRIMEMINISTER Hubert Ingraham

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SUPPORTERSOUTINFORCEFORBY-ELECTION TIMCLARKE/TRIBUNESTAFF PLPANDFNM supporters have been out in force in the Elizabeth constituency over the last two days. Mingling with those in red and yellow were Dr Andre Rollins of the National Democratic Party (below FNMcandidate Dr Duane Sands (top right Security Tommy Turnquest (right “If there are 4,300, and slightly over 3,000 votes, then there was an 84 per cent turnout. It’s tough to tell with the register how it is, and what is t he true total of the registered voters in the constituency.” D eputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette agreed: “You will probably find we had a high turnout of the actual people in Elizabeth.” A s he said there are a large number of temporary residents i n the constituency who may have left since the register was d rawn “at the last hour” by former Prime Minister Perry Christie prior to the 2007 general election. He emphasised how the reg i ster would be cleaned up by Prime Minister Hubert Ingra h am before the next election. However, the Parliamentary C ommissioner said the voters who had moved out or could n ot be found would not account for the 1,458 to 1,792 missing b allots. “Many people just didn’t show up to vote,” he said. “A lot of people who were eligible to vote did not show u p, it was a low turnout and that’s all it was.” L ow voter turnout is consis tently more common in by-elect ions than in general elections where there is an average 90 p er cent turnout. However PLP chairman Bradley Roberts said a low turnout in Elizabeth could be put down to general apathy, m alaise, or dirty politics. An Elizabeth voter who c hose not to vote on Tuesday said she did not feel empowered to vote as the two major parties offered no real choice, and there was no chance of a third party coming to power. “I just feel like it was a waste of time,” she said. “I’m sick of the FNM and the PLP. They are like the same p arty with different T-shirts. I hear the exact same story from them both, and I realised the time has come for a third party, and we are not going to put in a third party at this point.” The Joe Farrington Road resident who has been kept awake by PLP and FNM part ies at the constituency offices every night for the last three weeks said she would have vot ed for Cassius Stuart of the Bahamas Democratic Movement if he had commanded more support. She said: “This is the first time I have not voted and I k now the by-election is important, because if you don’t have a vote you don’t have a voice, but I just feel like we don’t have a voice anyway.” FROM page one Turnout

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manager. Some commentators argue a court process would be futile, because it would cost hundreds o f thousands; it would not change the composition of the government significantly, and the seat would be back up for election in less than two years. “In a democracy the question of the next election or the cost of a court proceeding is not the issue; it is a matter of fairness a nd justice in the decisions made in the process. If cost and the date of the next election determined our actions that would seriously injure our commitment to democracy. “If that is the case, we might a s well have not had the election and let the government appoint someone,” said PLP campaign manager, Dr Bernard N ottage. Dr Nottage said this was his personal view, and not the position of the party. He said at the end of the day, it was the candidate’s responsibility and right to file a court challenge if so desired. The issue of protest votes is increasing in importanceb ecause PLP operatives claim there are only five protest votes and a ll of them were cast for their candidate, Ryan Pinder. The Free National Movement (FNM Carl Bethel, FNM campaign manager, said this was inaccur ate, as protest votes have not been counted as yet. A prominent F NM attorney said protest votes are not counted unless there is a t ie. She said there were no protest votes in the division she was stationed at, but she c ould not speak to the overall protest count. Protest votes are cast on yellow ballots. They result from seve ral scenarios, such as when voters turn up to vote with valid voter registration cards and their names, for whatever reason, are not on the list, or when the pre-s iding officer is not satisfied of the identity of the person, according to a PLP attorney. These votes have to be validated b y the election court in order to be counted. Early results from the recount changed the dynamics only slightly. By the time the firstt hree polling divisions were certified in the recount, Mr Sands picked up two more votes and lost one vote, while Mr Pinder l ost two votes. This gave Mr Sands a net gain of three. “Up by three is better than up by one vote. We’ll take it any w ay we get it. It gives us a little bit more of a cushion, and crea tes more of a challenge for our lead to be eroded,” said Mr S ands on the scene of the recount. This lead was reducedt o two after the fourth polling division was counted. P LP stalwart Valentine Grimes explained the two votes thrown out during the recount o f polling division number three w ere rejected because the voters used their inky thumbs to make their mark, instead of the pens provided. Examples of defective ballots f rom previous elections, are incidents where individuals write their names, signatures or other identifying marks on the ballot. D uring the election campaign, the PLP distributed paraphernalia with instructions for voting. PLP agents believe the problem would have been worse,w ith more lost votes, if they did not make this push. “Ballots are being scrutinised much more carefully to find d efects in the vote itself. (Tuesday) night, there was a ballot with an ‘X’ that went below the line. It was accepted last night but it might very well be rejectedt oday,” said a prominent PLP attorney. In a previous election she said she encountered a voter wrote “Jesus is Lord” next to t he name of the chosen candidate. The major political parties had a strong contingent of lawyers in the recount room, along withs everal cabinet ministers, in the case of the FNM. According to a PLP attorney, this is typical for recounts. She said, at polling stat ions during general elections, the major parties do not usually have sufficient resources to deploy lawyers everywhere. H owever, they bring lawyers and more experience electioneers in f or the recount to bring a greater level of scrutiny to each ballot. T he PLP objected to Mount Moriah MP Tommy Turnquestb eing a part of the FNM's scruti ny team. Mr Grimes said the P LP feels this is a conflict of interest as Mr Turnquest is the Minister of National Security a nd in charge of elections. T o the amazement of many Tribune242.com commentators, who followed minute-by-minute coverage of the election and the recount online, it was hard tou nderstand why it took authorities so long to count the 3142 votes cast on Tuesday. With a combined vote total of 778, it t ook over seven hours to just count polling divisions one, two and three, which were the first three to be tackled. PLP MP Dr Bernard Nottage s aid it is not unusual for a recount to take this long. He noted that during the first count, all the polling divisions were counte d simultaneously, whereas during the recount they were counted consecutively, by the returning officer himself. The recount was contentious i n the early hours, according to FNM campaign manager, Carl Bethel, who said ground rules had to be established to govern t he interpretation of various challenges. It is unclear whether this helped to speed up the process, although Mr Bethel said it should have. Hundreds of par-t y faithfuls gathered on the outside to observe the recount. The primary school grounds were a who’s who of prominent attorn eys, government ministers, and members of parliament, who camped out waiting for the results to filter in. I t was not a national holiday or sick day at work, but many o f the government officials were party agents at the polling station o n Tuesday. They were asked to be present when their pollingd ivisions were called to be count ed, according to a PLP agent. F urther scrutiny is brought to bear by seasoned attorneys during the recount, who were not p resent during the first count. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Please be advised that with effect February 2010Ms. Tameka Kingwas no longer authorized to conduct business on behalf of Family Guardian Insurance CompanyPUBLIC NOTICE Tel: (242www.famguardbahamas.com exclaimed: “She just turned around and bashed him.” T he shocked crowd watched as Mr Symonette walked calmly away and asked police not to g et involved. Although the DPM declined to comment on the incident, he told the press: “We started off this morning very peacefully, there was a disturbance from a non-FNM party member, and as a r esult police asked us to come outside the fence. Tempers were rising.” H e added: “The election officers and police have done an excellent job, they deserve to be c ommended.” FNM election worker Freddie Lightbourn said: “She should have been arrested or removed for disorderly behaviour. “I think it’s pretty sad that we had behaviour like that when it shouldn’t be allowed to happen.” A nother FNM supporter who saw the attack said: “It’s a total disrespect of the government, because at no point do you challenge either the Prime Minister or the Deputy Prime Minister or any Member of Parliament in that form or fash i on, you don’t want to send the message out there that you don’t respect the government of t he country or that you would hit a government official just because you can do it. They don’t represent just a segment of society, they represent the entire society. They are not just representing themselves, so when you lay hands on a person like that it’s never warranted, there is no justification for it.” Ms Williams declined the opportunity to speak to The Tribune yesterday. FROM page one Deputy PM hit D uane Sands and Ryan Pinder F ROM page one Recount agony

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM QFSOJHIU QMVTUBYBOE HSBUVJUJFT"TLBCPVUPVS TQFDJBM#BIBNJBO SPPNSBUFTGSPN5SFBUUIFGBNJMZUPVOEBZ#SVODI BUIFSBUPO/BTTBV#FBDIFTPSU &WFSZVOEBZr/PPOUPQN #JNJOJ.BSLFU'SFFBEVMUTDIJMESFODIJMESFO %PXO)PNFFE#FBOTBOEJDF #BIBNJBOUZMF$IFFTZ .BDBSPOJBOE$IFFTF 4QBOJTIFMMT'SJFE'JTI'JMMFU XJUIQJDZBSUBSBVDF $PODI$IPXEFS 1FBSMTPGUIF#BIBNJBO 4FB(SJMMFE.BIJ.BIJ #BIBNJBO'SJFE$IJDLFO $PODI'SJFEJDF 1JOFBQQMFQTJEF%PXO$BLF (VBWB%VGG #SVODIJODMVEFTPOFHMBTTPGXJOFPSDJEFS 'PSIPUFMSFTFSWBUPODPNOBTTBVXPPE)PUFMTFTPSUTPSMEXJEFr*OD"MMJHIUTFTFS4IFSBUPOBOEJUTMPHPBSFUIFUSBEFNBSLTPG4UBSXPPE)PUFMT 3FTPSUT8PSMEXJEFr*ODrPSJUTBGGJMJBUFT 7 KHXEOLF,V&RUGLDOO\,QYLWHGR$WWHQG 7+(+/
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2010, PAGE 19 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM update. I commend the reporters of tribune242 – excellent job! This represents 21st century journalism, this is forward movement, e xcellence deserving of recognition.” From the moment the polls opened on Tuesday morning, reporters manned every pollingd ivision and party headquarters to send continuous updates to The Tribune’s Newsroom. This information was quickly organi sed and disseminated to online readers in the form of a constantly updated, blow-by-blow timeline. The Tribune’s photographers p rovided the website team with a steady stream of photos, so readers could witness the most important developments firsth and. Tuesday’s hits nearly doubled the website’s previous record of 140,000 set on October 22, 2009 – the day after PLP MPP icewell Forbes made his premature and ill-fated comments about the outcome of the John Travolta extortion case. I n a single day, the by-election newsfeed became the website’s most viewed and second m ost commented story ever, b eating out stories that had been attracting steady comments for months. More than 200 readers reco mmended our by-election newsfeed and hundreds mentioned it in their Facebook status updates. Through Twitter and Faceb ook, T ribune o nline editor Jessica Robertson sent out teasers to drive traffic to the site. Analytics show that nearly 1,200 users c licked on these links alone. S he said: “What I’m happy about is that we not only provided information, but achieved what we originally set out to do w ith the website – create a platform for intelligent discussion on events that matter; not just disseminating information, butg iving our audience a voice.” WHAT SOME OF OUR READERS SAID M ontagu voter: The best part of this election has been The Tribune up-dates and the accompanying comments, which h ave been more enlightening than all the campaign rhetoric! You go, Tribune ! F rustrated in Elizabeth: “I j ust read the minute-by-minute coverage of the election online. Hats off to The Tribune for brilliantly recording the reality c heck for the two major political parties.” Two Thumbs Up: “ The Trib une i s doing an excellent job w ith this minute-by-minute coverage of the by-election. I feel w ell informed and it’s just like I’m right in the middle of all the action. Keep up the good work!” J ames Smith: “This is excellent, congratulations to The Tribune T homas B: “You guys are keeping everyone abreast of what is going on today with the very exciting by-election. To me t here is nothing better than to s ee democracy first hand.” Sade: “Wow live blogging the election. Cool.” T Gibson: “Real time election coverage . . . this is great. I feel like I am there.” Ms Lucky: “I would really l ike to say that T he Tribune i s doing a great job in keeping us Bahamians up to date with the tallies.” TSD: “I commend The Tribune on a great job covering this story. I feel as if I am right there where all the action is. Ia ppreciate this.” Samiadde: “I think you guys are doing a great job keeping u s up to date. I'm at work and I'm glad I'm able to get an idea as to what's going on.” Cozzmo The Critic: “I must c ommend T he Tribune o n a job well done. Keep It Up!” Ear on the Ground: “Jessica a nd the guys at T he Tribune another great job! Thanks for keeping us bang up to date. Lala: Great job Tribune ! I am at work and still able to keep up with what's going on regarding this by-election. K eep up the good work!” Ron: “My first time on tribune242 . . . Great to be able to get up to date informationa t any time.” Grateful Bahamian: “Thanks tribune242! Your u pdates made this election come alive for those of us that are not home right now in Nassau. Thank you!” R Moxey: “The up to date coverage was excellent by The Tribune and you guys deserve a round of applause.” Antoinette: “I am proud of you Tribune . Good work!” Spaceyg: “Really appreciate t he live coverage. It was great.” Breezy: “I enjoyed the frenz y last night as the results from the polls came in, and I must big up tribune242 for their coverage of this by-election – JOB WELL DONE!” F ROM page one Tribune coverage

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The Tribune’s RELIGION SECTION PG 35 The Tribune PG 20 Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION

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The Tribune T hursday, February 18, 2010 PG 21 RELIGION By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter rshearer@tribunemedia.net S warms of Anglicans and Catholics attended Ash Wednesday masses t hroughout the country to mark the start of the Lenten season a time of fasting, prayer and almsgiving. Lent will run until the mass of the Lord’s Supper exclusively on Holy Thursday, the day before Good Friday. It a season of penance, reflection, and fasting which pr epares Christians for Christ's resurrection on Easter Sunday. Y ester day, T ribune Religion visited the noon mass at St Francis Xavier Cathedral, where Catholics from many backgr ounds gather ed to r eceive ashes. Some came early before service, finding their seats in the pews of St Francis Xavier Cathedral. In each bench, persons are meditating on scriptures before service. Barbara Sweeting has been a member of St Francis Xavier Cathedral all of her life. She broke down the service proceedings, which for a non-Catholic was a big help in deciphering what was going on. Ritual after ritual, everything is solemn. Not a pin dr op can be hear d inside the chur ch. Two scripture lessons were read by members of the church, urging parishioners to be “reconciled to God” on behalf of Christ. The leader beckoned each person in the congr egation to “Be mer ciful O God, for we have sinned.” “This service is a reminder of our mortality and accountability to God,” says Archbishop Pinder. “Remember man that you are dust, and to dust you will r etur n,” he says to a fully packed church bursting at the seams. “Even though we sin, what temptation represents is that we can still reform our lives. It represents being able to know that ther e is always a way to tur n back fr om the bad in your life. It gives you fasting, peace and redemption,” said one Catholic. Historically, Lent began as a journey of Jesus’ 40 days in the wilder ness, to celebrate Easter with hear ts of thankfulness and praise. One curious tourist couple of New York just happened to come across the service while traveling down W est Hill Str eet. They explained that they had stum bled upon the mass by accident, but r eally enjoyed it. “I thought it was just lovely, how we just happened to come across this wonderful service on Ash Wednesday” says Lori Squillacioti. “Everything happens for a reason, and the same thing happened to us in Italy Remember you are dust SEE page 27 TWO students from Bayview Academy look at a prayer book after recieving ashes at St Mary The Virgin Anglican Chur ch yesterday . F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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The Tribune PG 22 Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION “WHAT KIND OF WORLD WOULD YOU LIKE TO LIVE IN I would like to live in a "Christian World". A world where black, Hispanic and white people can live together in harmony. With God as Our Father, brothers all are we. Like 1 John 4: 7 says "Let us love one another, for love comes from God. Proverbs 15: 1 says "A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.” I just don't see why we have all these wars, crime and gangs. The earthquake in Haiti is hurtful, we need to help them instead of just sitting there watching them face major destruction. The Golden Rule says, “Do unto others as you would have them to do unto you.” When you help them (Haitians the Lord will guide you always; He will satisfy your needs in a sunscorched land and will strengthen your frame. (Isaiah 58: 1 Now we all know about education. I t helps you to strive for excellence. B ut many children do not go to school to learn. Some children just come to school for the fun of it. In my world, children would know that school is really fun once you get into it. Crime is the main or worst thing happening in the world now. People are getting raped, shot, killed, stabbed and forced to join gangs. I mean, what's so good about crime? It is a sick abomination. "You intended to harm me, but God intended it forg ood to accomplish what is now being d one, the saving of many lives." (Genesis 50; 20 I hope one day my new world would come true. I am learning that if you want things done you have to put in a little hard work of your own. "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord." Name: KENISHA KING Grade: 5 ONE day while I was watching televi sion, I started to wonder what kind of world I would like to live in. This world is hor rible. I think I would like to live in a world without crime. There would be no killing, shooting or gangs. I would like my world to be peaceful, with less gangs and murders. Now in this world, there are children being abused by their par ents or strangers. It is very complicated living in this world today . I wish there was another world to live in. If I could choose what I wanted my world to be like, it would be less killings, shootings, child abuse and r obberies. All adults would work less and grow crops for food. I would still like childr en to go to school where teachers cannot spank, but only punish childr en by taking away their br eak. I would call my world Peaceful W orld. I would have peace in the chur ches and end alI suffering and dying. The world today is hor rible and some people still don't have civil rights. Some people ar e shot by white people because they are black. Haiti just faced a natural disaster . Some of them (Haitians them ar e still trapped under the r ocks. The Haitians are hungry and they have no food. Many Bahamians ar e helping them, but they still need mor e help. This is why I wish for another world to live in. Bless this whole world. Name: KIY SHANTI HIGGS Grade: 5 FROM left to right: Kenisha King, Reagan Cartwright, Kiyshanti Higgs

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The Tribune Thursday, February 18, 2010 PG 23 RELIGION “Fifth grade students of the Sadie Curtis Primary School took part in a creative writing exercise where they were asked to discuss the type of world they wished to live in. The Tribune is pleased to publish the three of the top essays. FROM left to right: Pastor Adderly , Kenisha King, Reagan Cartwright, Kiyshanti Higgs, Principal of Sadie Curtis Primar y School Audrey R Farrington. TODAY in our world, too many things are going on. Some are good and some are bad. Some of the good things are civil rights, education and homes to live in. Some of the bad things are the sixty-six homes robbed this week, the earthquake in Haiti, shoot-outs and kidnapping. The last one is the use of foul language. I think all of these things should go away. If I could, I would live in a world of candy, where teeth never go bad and there is no danger or fear. Rivers will be made of the richest and creamiest chocolate. The grasslands are cotton candy of the finest mixture. Trees are candy canes and lollipops. The dirt, don't get me started, but the dirt would be the most delicious popping rocks that would crackle in your mouth along with everlasting gobstoppers. Parents wouldn't have to work, it will always rain money. In my world,c hildren are born with prepared or smart minds so that they can do well in all subjects. We would also live in the best gingerbread houses. One day, I went outside and asked my mother "Is there anything to eat?" "No", she replied, "just go and get some cotton candy or candy cane". "Maybe I will get a piece of gingerbread and a glass' of chocolate milk from the river, I said." I went in search of a giant picnic basket that my mother plaited. Then I went to the town board and it read population 100. We have one hundred cups and plates at home I thought. So I wentb ack home and got one hundred plates and cups. Soon after I took a trip to the Chocolate River and stayed there for one hour. I sat there scooping and counting glasses of chocolate milk. Then, I picked one hundred pieces of cotton candy and gingerbread. Finally, I went to the alarm tower and pressed the alarm button. Suddenly, the whole town gathered around and we had a picnic at sunset. The main point of this essay is to share and not to be selfish. Name: REAGAN CARTWRIGHT Grade: 5

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The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION A SOLEMNHigh Mass of Thanksgiving was held on Friday, February 12 at 7pm under the theme: “Ordering Our Steps In God's Words” Proverbs 3:6, to celebrate the 38th and 46th anniversaries respectively of St Agnes Parish Men (ACMomen (ACW recognition of past president, Veronica Cooper. The celebrant and preacher for this service was the Rt Rev'd. Laish Z. Boyd, Sr ., Bishop of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands. Bishop Boyd told the congregation that in order for their steps to be ordered in God's Word, they must intentionally seek the Lord while He may be found, realise that they cannot play games with God because He is all-knowing, and they must ask God to give them a pur e heart and for them to never be separated fr om God. “Order your life according to His principles, you'r e expected to do gr eat things and keep the organisations operating at a high level and be pr ofessional “Bishop Boyd said. Bishop Boyd informed the men and women that God's W or d directs them to think the best of other people, “love endures all things and believes the best and hopes the best”, he said. Ar chdeacon I. Ranfurly Br own, Rector of St. Agnes Parish congratulated both organisations and str essed to them that there is much work to be done as he installed the Of ficers for 2010. The ACM Officers are: Christopher W right, President, Ken O'Brien, Vice-President, Bernard Bostwick, Secr etar y, Neil O'Brien, Assistant Secretary, Everette Burrows, Treasurer, Barrett McDonald, Assistant Treasurer and Kenneth Braynen, Chaplain. The ACW Officers are: Cleomi Turner, President, Yolanda Fer nander, Vice-President, Shelly Cooke-Seymour, Secretary, Monique Mitchell, Assistant Secr etary, Verlene Harris, Treasurer, Patrice Fer guson, Assistant T reasurer, Kathleen Maynard, Chaplain and L yn Bullar d, Assistant Chaplain. Anglican Church Men and Women thr oughout the Diocese joined in the celebration along with other worshippers including Dame Marguerite Pindling who is always in attendance at these anniversar y ser vices. St Agnes Parish Anglican Church Men (ACM and Women (ACW D a v i d K n o w l e s / P h o t o s

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The Tribune T hursday, February 18, 2010 PG 25 RELIGION B y REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter rshearer@tribunemedia.net A T risk and challenged bo ys are invited to attend St Paul’s Baptist Church, where they will explore the pressures and mixed messages that bombard boys, with violent and distorted images of masculinity. Images that tell them to stifle emotion, andt hat suggest they aspire to one particular image of how they should act and howt he y should tr eat o thers. These and other avenues of “malen ess” will be discovered at St Paul Baptist Church’s first ever Men and Boys conference, for “at risk” boys. The conference is sponsored by their ‘Mighty Men Ministry’ under the theme “The Measure of a Man,” drawn from the biblical passage I Kings 2: 1-5. George Bodie, president of the men’s department at the church said the conference “seeks to zero in on three aspects: 1) boys who are considered “at risk,” and those who are challenged, 2) persons who work with young people, and 3) persons who lead men’s civic or religious ministries. The conference’s official opening will take place on Thursday, February 25 at 6.30 pm. National Security Minister T ommy T ur nquest, Minister of Youth Sports and Culture Charles M aynard, and Education Minister Desmond Bannister will bring greetings along with Fred Mitchell, the PLP spokesman on foreign affairs. “All of our speakers will seek to address issues dealing with boys, in three lectures happening at once and persons can choose which ones they are most interested in,” said Mr Bodie. There will be a general session each night at 8.30. Persons are invited to come and benefit from the sessions. The Men and Boy’s Conference focuses on supporting boys in their transition to manhood, and seeks to recognise and celebrate the many ways of being male, and facilitate the healthy involvement and presence of adult males in boys’ lives. Nightly topics include : Who’ s Y our Daddy, Working With Difficult Boys, B oys to MenCrime Doesn’t Pay, Men’s Health and Sexuality, Leading Men From The Pages of Your Life, What Every Men’s President Needs to Know, How to Impact Your Men’s Ministry, and Reframing your Men’s Ministry-Going to the Next Level. Attorney Keith Bell, Dr Kendal Major, Charles Rolle, Wrensworth Butler, Dr Hasting Johnson, Rev Dr J Carl Rahming, Dr Phil Roberts, and Rev Jackson Miller are some of the facilitators. “It is our hope that at the end of the conference persons will be able to improve their men’s ministry,” said Mr Bodie. “Those who work with youths will be better informed, and boys will be more productive in making positive contributions to nation building and staying on the right track.” The Measure of a Man ‘Mighty Men Ministry’ hosts Men and Boys conference EBENEZER WALK-A-THON EBENEZER Methodist Chur ch held its annual W alk-A-Thon on Saturday Januar y 31, with a walk from the chur ch to Blair Estates and back. 42 people participated in the walk and returned to the Chur ch for a souseout and fellowship. This was the first fundraising event for the year and was a great success. Winners for the event included: Rashad Johnson, Deniro Lightbourne, Lapetra Rolle, Kyosen McPhee, Samantha Bethell, Timothy Pinder, Wayne Key and Linda Sands. Looking forward the music department is making final plans for the Spring Concert scheduled for April 18. The public is invited and can look forward to a wonderful presentation.

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A Swe enter this solemn season of L ent, we are reminded that now is the time to learn some new lessons and re-discover some old ones. Let us consider together how to benefit from this time before Easter: 1. DEATH: We are made from dust and we will return to this humble beginning either in the dust of the grave or the ashes of cremation. We need to curb our pride. 2. SIN: We all have to fight a strong pull to slip away from the will of God. We must fight harder. 3. PRAYER: The process by which a relationship is maintained with our Lord God Almighty. It should be a daily desire to draw closer and closer to our Creator, Saviour, and the Holy S pirit. 4. FASTING: The discipline of exercising self-control in order to strengthen our ability to resist daily temptations. 5. STUDY: The time taken to grow in wisdom and knowledge is a worthwhile investment in oneself. 6. WORSHIP: Extra services provide additional opportunities to e xperience the presence of God. We n eed to take advantage of them. 7. PREPARATION: These forty days may be best spent with an eye on the day’s demands and the promise of the Easter hope. 8. CONFESSION: The admission of guilt, request for forgiveness and the acceptance of absolution is a necessary process to free us, heal us and set us on a new course in the right direction. 9. WILDERNESS: Finding time to be alone is vital to do the inner examination that is required to move toward maturity in faith. 10: SILENCE: Establishing periods of silence allows the whispers of God to be heard, and to listen to the ruminations of our mind. I t is our individual choice to determine how successful our Lent will be. Success is not measured at any other level than the personal. It is a private exercise that may involve public appearances. Each one of us will be free to pursue our normal routines or to make the desired change in rhythm and routine to enable significant improvement in spiritual things. God is looking for us to want to grow in grace. We have the will and God has made the way. What are we going to do? The decision is mine and yours. Choose wisely. There are lessons to be learnt in Lent. Listen, learn, and love your way to Easter. The Tribune PG 26 T hursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION Lessons of Lent REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS MEDITATION THESan Salvador Christian Council pr esented a cheque in the amount of two thousand dollars to the Bahamas Red Cross Society on Monday, February 8, in aid of Haitir elief mission. The cheque was pr esented by Rever end Father Jude Edomwonyi, President of the San Salvador Christian Council to Willamae Jeaure-Evans, Finance Officer of the Red Cross at the headquarters of the Bahamas Red Cross Society , John F Kennedy Drive, Nassau, Bahamas. Also on Januar y 18 a special prayer session was held for the land of Haiti and her people at the Church of God of Prophecy, Cockburn Town, San Salvador. The prayer gathering which was organised by the San Salvador Christian Council attracted many people including the island Administrator , T er r ece Bootle-Bethel, Chief Counsellor T er rance Major , gover n ment functionaries, ministers of the gospel, corporate citizens and people of Haitian descent. San Salvador Christian Council donates to Haiti Earthquake Relief THE Reverend Father Jude Edomwonyi, President of the San Salvador Christian Council presenting the cheque to Willamae Jeaure-Evans, Finance Officer of the Bahamas Red Cross Society.

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e just happened to be coming down this block looking for something else and didn’t find it.” s really lovely that everybody’s dressed up, but we look a little shabby said Lori noting the dif fer ences in dr ess at the ser vice compared to a Lent service they would attend in New York. Lori is giving up wine for Lent, which she tries to have ever y weekend. And it’ s not going to be easy. “But I plan to spend a lot of time praying instead,” she told Tribune Religion . Her husband Mike, plans to stop snacking as much. So it’ s not only a spir itual sacrifice, but one that would do wonders for his physical health as well. According to Catholics, the Lenten season is the fitting time to ‘climb the holy mountain of Easter .’ It represents the 40 days that Jesus Christ spent in the wilder ness being ‘tempted and tried’ by Satan. It’s a celebration of the resurrection of Christ who redeemed Christians by dying on the cross. But moreso His resur rection represents new life. Lent is a time of retrospection to prepare yourself for what that means to you as a Christian. The for ty days were intended to imitate the forty days and nights which we are told Jesus spent in prayer and fasting in the desert preparing for his public ministr y (Lk 4:1-2 It’s a time where he had to take on all the challenges of a human being even though he was just like us without sin. He walked that jour ney in ter ms of tur ning away fr om all the temptations that the devil put before him. T ribune Religion asked a few parish ioners what they would be giving up this Lenten season. Drinking beverages like wine and Coca-Cola soda were mentioned and some decided to take on acts of kindness, instead of fasting or adding something extra to their r egimen. This period, which we know in English as ‘Lent,’ deriving from the middle English term meaning ‘day-lengthening’ or springtime, is known in German as ‘Fastenzeit’, a time of fasting; in Fr ench as ‘carme’; Italian as ‘quar esima’;and Spanishas ‘cuaresma’, these all deriving from the Latin ‘quadragesima,’ meaning ‘fortieth’. PROVERBS.10: 22. The blessing of the LORD, it maketh rich, and he addeth no s orrow with it. HOW many times have you heard a m ember of a congregation or a religious leader get up and testify about the blessing of God upon their lives, as they’ve recently became the recipient of a new car, a new home or a sum of money; using the above passage of scripture to validate their claim? Then six months to a year later, a number of sorrows evolves within what they’ve once called God’s blessings, i.e.1) Financially unable to properly service and maintain the car, 2) The bank repossesses the car, 3) The bank forecloses on the new home, and 4) Start avoiding / ducking people and complaining of folks coming to borrow money or ask for financial assistance. How quickly have these persons forgotten the “and he added no sorrow with it” part of their testimony? The misappropriating of God’s word has a gr eat deal to do with the level of ignorance that exists among the religious community . This is the br eeding ground for undisciplined, itching ears, gullible Christians that have and will continue to become victims to various forms of unbalanced, and in some cases false teachings about prosperity and the blessing that ar e coming forth today in Jesus’ name. Understandably so, Yeshuwa Messiah(a.k.a. Jesus the Christ called His followers Christians, but rather He always called them disciples / d iscipline ones. As it is a pr oven fact that religious Christians are good at reading and quoting a few scripture verses; whereas the Apostle Paul in writing to his disciple and spiritual son namely Timothy didn’t just say to him “read” 2 Timothy.2:15.Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. This word study in the Greek is: spoudazo, spoo-dad'-zo;which has several meanings as follows 1) to make effort, 2) to be prompt or earnest,3) to give diligence, or be diligent, 4) to endeavour, and 5) to labour. Watch this!And don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying that all religious leaders are of a twisted mind-set when it comes to rightly teaching about the blessing; it’ s just that many of them ar e teaching out of ignorance based upon that which they’ve hear d another r eligious leader / hir eling teach and preach. Listen! It’s by accident that the scripture says “Rightly dividing the word of tr uth” for this also means that the wor d of truth / word of God can be wrongly divided.And I make absolutely no apology in saying that if there is ever a t ime that God’s word is being wrongly divided for selfish monetary gain, that time is now. The thousands of fragmented, powerless churches today are all competing against each other for their portion of t he undisciplined religious Christians (prey no attention in truly studying God’s word. Rather they rely solely upon the t eachings of some religious leaders. Thereby, today we’ve got thousands of Christians, who as a result of the incomplete teachings are of the mindset that (a car, a house, a job, etc;) is the blessing; and nothing, could be further from the truth.For the blessing is not a thing such as a car, a house or a job, etc; but rather the blessing is God’s empowerment upon one‘s life. This erroneous teaching has two main negative affects that has absolutely nothing to do with the kingdom of God: 1) It helps in fueling the myth that because God is blessing apostle, bishop, pastor or doctor; with fine cars and houses and if I want to be blessed also, I’ve got to continue sowing financially into my religious leader’s life, even if I have to go without” 2) It puts a yoke and a bur den upon the necks of the poor in spirit, thereby causing many to feel unwor thy as they’re not driving or living as their leaders. Which in most cases leads to the sin of idolatry, whereby these persons begin to r ender a for m of worship to their r eligious leaders.It also serves as a blockage to those on the outside, w ho would want to join / be apart of a local congregation; but are wise enough to see through this erroneous teaching. Let’s quickly trace the origin of the blessing, to actually see what it is and the purpose of the blessing. G enesis 12:1:Now the LORD had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father's house, unto a land t hat I will show thee 2.And I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great; and thou shalt be a blessing: Please note: 1) That the blessing is not a house; for Father Yahweh told Abram to leave his father‘s (Terah) house, 2) The blessing is God’s empowerment “And I will make of thee” and 3) The purpose, “And thou shalt be a blessing. This word blessing in the Hebrew is: Berakah, ber-aw-kaw'; which means a benediction, an act of appr oval. The cars, houses and other material possessions that man craves in some cases are the byproducts of the blessing. Ther e is so much mor e to shar e in order to bring some form of clarity and balance back into the church.Stay tune next week for part 2. For questions or comments contact us via E-mails:pastormallen@yahoo.com or kmfci@live.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int’l The Tribune T hursday, February 18, 2010 PG 27 RELIGION The Blessing, What is it ? PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN CHURCH NOTES ACM PREPARES FOR ANNUAL CONFERENCE The 38th annual Anglican Church Men(ACM conference will be held in North Andros from March 17-21. All Anglican men are asked to register at their parish or contact any ACM council member for more information. Ken Obrien is the conference chairman he can be reach at kob1150@coralwave.com for more information. FROM page 21 Remember you are dust More pictures on pg 28

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The Tribune PG 28 T hursday, February 18, 2010 RELIGION as H EDN W ESDAY Scenes from the noon Ash Wednesday service at St Mary The Virgin Anglican Church. Felip Major /Tribune staff