Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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The Tribune

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‘BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009






PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and {

fon nrere ;



PHOTOS by Felipé Major! Tribune staff
AN oasis. IN PARADISE: The aiant cruise is e docked | in Nassau Harbour. The 18- -storey mega eanesis: class vessel can accommodate 5,900 passengers and has been described’ as a “city on the s sea.”

_ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter ; : ;
alowe@tribunemedia.net






. THE climax of a $44 million harbour dredging project was
reached yesterday as Bahamians and visitors thronged Nas-
sau’s harbourside to welcome the much-anticipated arrival of

‘ the world’s biggest cruise ship, the Oasis of the Seas.

And the excitement went a step further for hundreds of
invited Bahamian officials and stakeholders who went
onboard the ship to get‘a taste of the luxurious and fun-filled

“city on the sea,” an experience that the 18-storey mega Gen-
esis-class vessel provides for the 5,900. passengers it can
accommodate.

Speaking during an official reception onboard yesterday,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said it was his “singular .

‘,honour” to welcome the Oasis of the Seas on its first trip to
Nassau. He noted that the ship is “‘all the more welcome and
appreciated” by The Bahamas given that it comes during

“an especially challenging time for tourism amidst a global
economic recession and international Yinancial crisis.’

“We offer our congratulations to"RCCL on the achievement
of this tremendous addition to the cruise industry. My Gov-
ernment will continue to. demonstrate our commitment to
this business as we seck to ensure that the relationship remains
mutually beneficial and that your guests will continue to
demand a Bahamas vacation,” said Mr Ingraham.

Stepping inside the ship yesterday it was possible that aside
from the Prime Minister’s reference to the hard economic
times, one could start ta forget what the concept of “recession”
ever meant.

For an average of between $1500 and $7000 for seven
nights, the happy, well-fed visitors relaxed, dined and were
entertained by brand-new facilities so vast, hi-tech and daz-
zling that it would take days to see, let alone take it all in.

SEE page six



POLICE PATROL the waters as the Oasis of the Seas arrives in port. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham hailed its arrival as a singular honour.





‘Govt set to sign $12m straw market contract






MURDER COUNT HITS 79

Argument at exclusive Cape Eleuthera Resort ends in stabbing





SEE PAGE 3




THE government is sect to
sign a $12 million contract fora
new straw market this Tuesday,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham revealed yesterday.

Speaking at a reception
onboard the Royal Caribbean
Cruise Line’s Oasis of the Seas
ship, which made its inaugural
trip to Nassau yesterday, Mr

Ingraham said the government
anticipates that the 37,000
square foot market will be
operational by spring 2011.

He added that the govern-
ment also intends to soon com-
plete an “All-Bahamian” craft
market for:the display of pre-
mium quality Bahamian made
crafts arid souvenirs.:





iGE 2, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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THE TRIBUNE



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN ARGUMENT between two
men at the exclusive Cape Eleuthera
Resort and Marina resulted in a vio-
lent stabbing and the record-tying 79th
murder of the year yesterday morn-
ing.

The contractors hired to do con-
struction and landscaping work at the
finest hotel in Eleuthera reportedly
got into an argument while working
on the hotel grounds just after 8am.

Twenty-two-year-old Noel Pratt Jr
was stabbed in the neck with a sharp
object and rushed to the Rock Sound
health clinic where, he succumbed to
his injuries. Police arrested a 32-year-
old man in connection with the mur-
der.




LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, DEC

Oth murder ties record in Bahamas

Central Detective Unit investiga-
tors will travel from Nassau to
Eleuthera to assist local police with
the investigation.

Cape Eleuthera Resort and Mari-
na has been rated the third best hotel
out of the 380 establishments across

- the country and exists on an island

witha very low crime rate.

The shocking murder has not only
rocked the local community but has
sent shock waves through the country
as it put the Bahamas is on the brink of
a record year in terms of homicides.

Workers’ Party leader Rodney
Moncur said the murder rate is unac-
ceptable. He said: “We have come to
the end of one of the most tragic years
in the history of the country. We have

witnessed over the last 12 months a
continued degradation of law and
order in this country. Our beloved
country is decomposing like a dead
body and the horrible stench reaches
to high heaven.”

March

Mr Moncur, Workers’ Party mem-
bers and the friends and relatives of
murder victims will march across New
Providence today calling for capital
punishment for killers.

Hundreds of supporters are expect-
ed to take to the streets to put pressure
on the government to address the
unacceptable crime rate and ensure

those on Death Row are hanged.

Mr Moncur said: “There is no uncer-
tainty in our minds that the govern-
ment must remove all of the impedi-
ments that prevent the execution of
murderers. Citizens will continue to
ignore the law, continue to remain
unrestrained, and the murders will con-
tinue to increase.

“Capital punishment guarantees us
that at least the murderer will never
commit the crime again. And the
Workers’ Party, along with the families
of murder victims, invites all members
of the public to join us today.

“We condemn this increase in crime,
the shootings of the police officers.
We condemn the murders. The time
has come for the government to guard

EMBER 12, 2009, PA A



the nation; the nation is unguarded!”

The Workers’ Party is also calling
for CCTV security cameras to be
installed in high crime areas, and for
judges and magistrates to be prohibit-
ed from releasing murder suspects on
bail. Mr Moncur fears that if nothing is
done, it will be the ruin not only of
local communities, but also of the
entire tourism industry, spelling the
crumbling of the Bahamian economy.

But the battle is not just political,
it is spiritual, Mr Moncur said.

“In addition-to the government hav-
ing to influence the law, there’s a spir-
itual battle. where the Devil is taking
over the country; because these crimes
are the work of the Devil,” he said.

The pro-hanging march and motor-
cade will begin at RM Bailey Park in
Robinson Road, across from the Mall
at Marathon, at 9am today.

Private-public partnership brings security to Southeastern residents



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

Police officers of the South-
eastern Division of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force are find-
ing innovative ways to bring
peace of mind to residents in
the community. Terry Hanna,
resident of Pinewood for 24
years, is benefiting from the lat-
est initiative, which is a part-
nership with Migrafill Elec-
tronic Security.

Two consecutive daytime
robberies left Mrs Hanna’s
home vandalised. The intrud-
ers rummaged through almost
every draw in the bedroom of
the single mother and that of
her 12-year-old son.

Feeling violated, Hanna
washed every item touched by
the intruders. Her son feared
sleeping alone in his bedroom
for almost two weeks. He cried

‘for several days out of fear and

over.the loss of his electronic
games. :

“T was at work and received a
message to call Superintendent
Stephen Dean. He said he had
a nice Christmas present for
me,” said Mrs Hanna. She was
surprised with an offer from
Migrafill to install an alarm sys-
tem:in her home free of charge.

Mrs Hanna is the first to ben- .



efit from the charitable







GRANTLEY IFILL, General Manager, Migrafill Electronic Security pre-
sents alarm system to Pinewood resident, Terry Hanna.

of the two agencies, but there
are plans for more beneficia-
ries of the public-private sec-
tor partnership. The company’s
general manager Grantley Ifill
says the pilot project will con-
tinue into 2010 based on the
needs of the community and
the availability of resources.
According to the senior offi-
cers at the Southeastern Police

- Division, alarm systems are one

of the most useful tools in crime

‘prevention. They consider this

initiative to be an important
strategy in the fight against
house break-ins.

So, you want everything in life.



Alarm

The alarm system now
installed in Mrs Hanna’s home
is a standard Migrafill model -—
designed to deter criminals,
improve the speed of police
response and reduce false
alarms.

The pilot project was
launched in the southeastern
area out of respect for the
founders of the company, who
have been residents of the Gar-
den Hills community for more
than 30 years.

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break-in, Mrs Hanna was care-
ful to look out for suspicious
activity whenever she came
home. She carried her valuable
belongings with her during the
day and asked. her neighbours
to keep a watchful eye out. _

“We’ve had our share of
crime, but usually after an inci-
dent time passes and things qui-.
et down. Everyone feels
relaxed again,” she said. The
recent break-ins were first in
five years.

“T feel confident now that I
have the alarm to know [the
police and Migrafill] are watch-
ing over me. This experience
has strengthened my faith in
the police force. I never thought
I would be saying this, but I
also have to thank the person
or persons who entered my
home for they have made this’
possible for me,” she said.



TERRY HANNA, Pinewood
4-resident receives new alarm
system from Migrafill Elec-

tronic Security.





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GE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



AGE 4, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. Hi. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Ki, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A.,; LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday -

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Manapement Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and ‘Aaverishay 322-1 986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
_ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
. Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

. . WEBSITE oy
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s case for war in support of peace

WASHINGTON — Barack Obama split
the difference in his Nobel speech, laying
down a doctrine that will likely define his
presidency: a steadfast defence of warfare
against evil mixed with praise of non-vio-
lence and exhortations for mankind to affirm
the "spark of the divine" in everyone.

As he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize,
the world's highest honour for peacemaking,

Obatna voiced his starkest rejection yet: of *

the pre-emptive war doctrine and unilater-
alism articulated by his predecessor.

At the same time, the young president
carefully set forth and sought to explain

what might appear to be contradictory prin- -

ciples that have guided his foreign policy
decisions during his first year in the White
House:

e That military force i is justified to confront
evil or stop organised human depravity.

' @ That alt nations ‘must follow interna-
tional rules of conduct that gover. the-use of
itilitary force,

¢ That the United States cannot act alone
when going to war.

e That lasting peace is built on united .

global pressure on -errant: nations, tough
sanctions — when needed,— to'change the

behaviour of countries such;as Iran-and:- .

North Korea; recognition of the inherent

rights and dignity of every individual, and

assurance of mankind's security’ from fear
and economic want.

In a certain sign that he, for once, had not
automatically offended the conservative
Republican opposition at home, Newt Gin-
grich, the former House’ speaker, said the
president’ s message f in Oslo ' "was actually
very good."

The deeply conseivative Gingrich said
the liberat Obama acknowledged he was
"given the prize prematurely" “but wisely
reminded the Nobel committee "they would-
n't be able to have a peace prize, without
having force. ... § thought i in some ways it's a
very historic speech."

. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, the
GOP vice presidential nominee last year,
also praised Obama's words on the necessi-
ty of war.

"Wow, that really sounded familiar," she
said in an interview with USA Today.

"T talked, too, in my book about the fail-
en nature of man and why war is necessary at
times."

Historian John Baick said ‘Obama ‘had

rejected "the need to choose between ide-.-

alism or realism."

"This speech has got to be the Obama:
doctrine," said Baick, a professor at Western
New England College in Springfield, Mass.

. Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Jimmy

' Carter's national security adviser, said Oba-

ma had taken to Oslo a careful restatement
and refinement of his "grand re-conceptu-:
alization of American foreign policy, a very
broadly stated case that we cannot in all cir-
cumstances avoid war." ;
And to that point, Obama spoke cigars
"I face the world as it is, and cannot stand

_idle in the face of threats to the American
people. For make no mistake: Evil does exist —

in the world. A non-violent movement could :

, not have halted Hitler's armies. Negotia-

tions cannot convince al-Qaida's leaders. to
lay down their arms."

: Obama then turned. philosopher, appar: Ni
ently satisfied with his defence:of the U.S. °
-war in Afghanistan, comfortable.he had

explained how a Nobel laureate had just*

: days earlier ordered 30,000 more U.S. troops

into battle.

He became a preachers ‘issuing-a sermon.
“calling the world to what he said was the

best in people.

"Let us reach for the world that ought to ©
be. — that spark of the divine that still stirs.

within each of our souls," the president said,

. finally drawing applause.

- And.as he wound down toward a conclu-

sion, Obama sought again to embrace. what

he saw as the best and worst in the world,
looking toward an uneven but popeka)
future.

"Clear- -eyed, we can dodoretana that
there will be war, and still strive for.peace.

“.We.can-do. that, for that is:the story:of. - :
human progress; that's the hope of all the

world; and at this moment of challenge, that --
must be our work here on Earth."

A fine message.to a hall full of intellec-
tuals in Oslo.

Will it translate in the grimy, shadowy
corners of a world where war and terrorism

(This. article was: written by Steven R.

_ Hurst, Associated Press Writer, who is based

Save our





‘3 EDITOR, The Tribune. .

They are faceless and name- °
less to a community numb with . -
fear. Known only to the police, -

family and friends, they are the
“throw. away children”, dubbed
-» hoodlums, thugs, hooligans and_° ;
the like; some of whom fall vic- °

tim to:society’s ills, end up
incarcerated, or die untimely
deaths. They start out. as cute,

sweet adorable pre-school and...

primary school lads, eager ‘to
learn, with cognitive. deficits
that go undetected and undiag-

- nosed. From grade to: grade

they are socially. promoted,

while,faced with reading and/or

math failure. Then. they begin

~ to act out because their acade-

mic lack becomes more glaring.
They then become truant,
because school iis frustrating,

- While home, their idle hands

find houses to invade, as their
delinquent parents put work
before’ common sense. They

test the: water housebreaking,
“and then jump in at the°deep ©
end. They are now juvenile ©
delinquents: who mature into
- seasoned criminals. .
These are the present: day.
‘criminals wreaking havoc on

our nation:

Research clearly shows that ©

treading failure leads to aggres-

sive behaviour, crime, includ-.
-. ing'the gang culture, and drugs,.

in study after study. With a
whopping 82 per cent of gradu-
ating seniors failing mathemat-
ics, according to a study. by
Ralph Massey, and more than
one third also reading failures,
we are facing an enormous cri-
sis of underachievement that is
now causing adverse. conse-

* quences. J. Barry Farrington of -

the Coalition of Education

- Reform summed it up this way...
“The overwhelming and criti-

cal national problem. that. we

. -inust address is functional illit-

eracy ona large scale.” (July
30; 2007-Tribune Business).

: These angry marginalized
illiterate under-achievers are

robbing our businesses and our ~

visitors. They are putting the

very survival of our nation in
jeopardy. ;
Former Prime Minister Per- .

_ ry Christie in: September 2002,
lamented that he measured :
“the Bahamas by the failure of.
“the education system to deal
-with children leaving school |

who are unable to read and

_write.” He.asked: “How can we

allow something like this to

’ happen when we have: only °
300,000 people?” (June 20, .

2006, The Tribune).

Three recent stabbings ‘at’
New Providence high schools.
have: reportedly taken place in

four days. God forbid a shoot-

[LETTERS

letters@tribunemecdia.net ll




or killed. Troubled youth given

to violence should be identified
in our schools and
removed immediately, so as to
prevent school stabbings and/or
shootings. Counselling and the

relevant support services
should be provided for these
pupils.

Too many of our young
people have failed to acquire
the language of their parents,
without which, they are reduced
to brute beasts grunting their
way through. They know
instinctively that they are born
to read, but because they can’t,
they fight instead. Nothing
makes sense. It’s no wonder

they’re anti-social; they have”
not learned the language of |

their elders. Caught in a prison
of their, muddled minds—
almost daily involved in acts of

_senseless violence.and gang dis-

putes — they .drink confusion

- and eat folly, barely able to

communicate, because they-are
illiterate. They possess brains
and mouths, but they neither
speak— except to grunt or
curse — read nor write. With
jumbled thoughts, frustrated
hearts and crumpled pants
below their hips, the males
roam, restless and unhappy.
They do not understand and
are not understood. With
absent parents, too busy to
care; the community must raise

these errant ones, before they .
turn on us to tob, to pillage and

to burn.
The truth is, they have
already turned on us. Our lives

~are expendable. “Motivated by
base instincts, they.are. callous.
~ and. calculating. With seared

consciences, they kill without
flinching. They are fatherless,
and the foes of all that is decent

and right. Sadly, their gang

outh and
cr ime

comrades are their fathily?. :

It is critical that we get the
aimless ‘and. idle youth off the
streets and engaged in farming,

-. trades, and life skills and acad-
. emic skills, including basic read-

ing and math. They must also
be taught godly. values. Inte-
grate programmes YEAST and
SURE to assist them. . ©

We must humble ourselves
and pray for our nation like

- never before; and mentor and

care for as many young people
as we can. Delinquent parents
must search their hearts and do
right by their children. Corrup-
tion in high and low places must
cease.

2-Chronicles 7:14: “If My
people who are called by My
name will humble themselves
and pray.and seek. My face and
turn from their wicked. ways,
then I will hear from heaven and
will forgive their sin and heal
their land."

2 Chronicles 16:9: “For the
eyes of the Lord run to and fro

. throughout the whole earth to

show Himself strong on behalf

- of those whose heart is loyal to

Him.”

No more crime councils and
crime studies needed. (Econo-
mist Marlon Johnson did an in-
depth crime study already).
Apply the recommendations
made. Embrace bipartisan-
ship! Enforce the laws! Deal
with the Bail Act! Establish
National Service.

Enough is enough! Crime, a
vexing phenomenon, caused by
multiple factors, needs a multi-
pronged approach.

Our crime rate is at astound-

_ ing levels as the youth leave

chaos in their wake. We must
act swiftly and.decisively to save
the youth of our nation, and in
so doing, save ourselves.

SHERLE KNOWLES ©
Former public school -
teacher

Nassau,
November 28, 2009.

Innigration fees ai permits

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Just why can t Immigration collect fees before i issuing
permits?






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Immigration as to why they were still owed over $1,000,000
in immigration fees...

Editor, as long as Ican récall, you paid first and then got
the permit but today it looks as if you get the permit first and

never pay!

My advice — cancel all unpaid for Immigration permits
immediately until they are paid for and further require a
charge for breaking the law, say a fine of $1,200 per permit.

Everyone is saying the Minister of State is doing such a

- fine job — well he might be on television and in phete; Ops
but not collecting for the Freastry

B. . FERGUSON
December 9, 2009.

~ NOTICE



“|. NOTICE is hereby given that BLONDEL VINCENT OF SOUTH

BEACH, P.0:BOX SB-51712, NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is
applying: to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization:should not be granted, should send a written.and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12TH day of DECEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O: Box N-7147, Ressal The

Bahamas.:

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMA: DORSAINVIL of
CORONATION ROAD, MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the. Minister responsible
for Nationality.and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why. registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a-written and signed statement of the facts within
‘twenty-eight days from the 12" day of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for. nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau; Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDWIN LOUIS of OKRA HILL, P.O.
BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister

‘| responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 12'" day. of December, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE







Bahamas International
Film Festival

.

Talking movies
Filmmakers converge

on Old Fort Bay to
discuss their work



~
XS

BAHAMIAN FILMMAKER Kareem Mortimer and actor Johnny Ferro preparing-for the world premiere of

Children of God at the Atlantis theatre last night.

FILMMAKERS from all
over the world met in Old
Fort.Bay to discuss their films
on the'eve of the sixth annual
Bahamas International Film
Festival.

The festival, featuring 86
movies from around the
world, kicked off yesterday
with a world premiere of the
first feature film by Bahamian
filmmaker Kareem Mortimer,
Children.of God. ., ~

Mr Mortimer was one of.

around 20 filmmakers, writ-

ers, directors and producers

who discussed their work at

a press conference on Thurs-

day.

The Bahamian filmmaker,
whose film Eleutheran Adven-
ture was shown at BIFF in
2006, was accompanied by

“New York actor Johnny Fer-
ro who plays Johnny in the
movie, which tells the story
of a gay white Bahamian
artist in a homophobic soci-
ety, and his friendship with a
conservative. Christian

Dance concert to benefit _

woman. Mr Mortimer said:
“Tt’s an emotional story about
two polar opposite characters,
-and how we may be different
but we are all essentially the
same.

“T believe films can change
the world, and I can be a part
of that process if I can change
the way people see each oth-

“That’s part of what attract-
ed me to this project and
inspired me to write it."

Documentary

Other films discussed at
Old Fort Bay last night

‘include Lakay, by 21-year-

old Bahamian filmmaker Bri-
an Lee, a documentary
addressing the plight of young
Haitian Bahamians; The
Nature of Existence, a docu-
mentary crossing the globe in
search of the answers to life’s
most profound questions; and
multi-narrative drama Jn /Sig-

cancer patient Tenia, 7

USS) |

WA Sa OTe Sl



THE West Wing Dance Conservatory is asking the pub-
lic to attend the dance concert Seasons of Change tonight at
the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts on Mackey

Street.

The conservatory is presenting the concert, directed by

Mervin A Smith and Adanceia Kemp, in support 7-year-old

Tenia Cash and her fight against bone cancer.
Tenia was diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma of the leg

about a month ago. -

Chemotherapy

She is undergoing chemotherapy and is waiting to have a

tumor removed.

The family are doing all they can to avoid the aspiring lit-
tle gymnast having her leg amputated.

The Cash Family said: “Your presence here tonight not
only supports the arts, but also joins hands in the fight
against cancer by providing relief and hope.”



_TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009, ,






FORMER Senator and PLP general secre-
tary Berlin Pratt died on Thursday night fol-
lowing a long battle with cancer.

PLP chairman Bradley Roberts issued a
statement of condolence from the party last
night and said Mr Pratt’s death marks the loss of
a humble servant of the Bahamas and a long
and faithful warrior for the Progressive Liber-
al Party (PLP).

Cat Island native Mr Prait served the country
and his party with the tenets of disciplined duty
and quiet strength, exemplary of Family Island
men of his generation, Mr Roberts said.

He expressed the party’s sympathy to Mr
Pratt’s wife Ruth, children, brothers and sis-
ters. a

Mr Roberts said: “Cat Island has lost anoth-
er of its finer sons.

“Those members of his family left to cherish
his memory can be proud of a great Bahamian
who dedicated so very much of his life to the

causes of a developing Bahamas, having served
in the upper chamber of parliament, and as

secretary general to the smooth functioning of

the internal business of the Progressive Liber-

al Party. “The PLP is forever indebted to Sen-

ator Pratt for the role he played in the conti-

nuity of its inner management.”

The PLP chairman also noted how Mr Pratt
devoted much of his time and energy to his
family and the church as he was secretary of St
John’s Native Particular Baptist Church.

He said: “No doubt it was this spiritual
anchor which gave such a balanced perspec-
tive to his public and family responsibilities.

“We mourn his passing. Yet in our grief we

celebrate his time on earth and celebrate the-
hope of all who die in the Lord.
, “Having run his race and finished his course
we know that our brother Berlin has gone on to
a most deserving reward.

“May he rest in peace.”



















nificant Others, in which char-
acters are linked by a homi-
cide investigation.

The films are from 26 coun-
tries around the world and
filmmakers, producers, direc-
tors, writers and editors said
last night they look forward
to meeting others in the
industry, seeing a broad range
of films, and spending a week
in paradise." +") +: ae

Awards will be presented
to filmmakers at the end of
the festival on Sunday,
December 13 in four cate-
gories: Spirit of Freedom Dra-
ma, Spirit of Freedom Docu-
mentary, Short Film and New
Visions.

A’ Career Achievement
Tribute award-will be pre-
sented to actor Johnny Depp
at the Balmoral on Sunday
and the BIFF Rising Star
Award will be given to actress
Sophie Okonedo on Wednes-
day. |

TROPICAL
Pes

eM
id) ara





FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES




ROYAL @ FIDELITY
Money at Work






SSNS
Securit



52wk-Low
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17



S2wWk-Hi


















9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 F le
5.90 Bank of Bahamas : 5.90 i :
* 0.63 Benchmark : 0.63 i .
3.15 _ Bahamas Waste 3.15. .3.15 0.00 0.125 0.090 2s. 2.86%
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43. 1.69%
9.92 Cable Bahamas 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1
2.72 . Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00 0.249 0.040 10.9
5.26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.73 5.73 0,00 0.419 0.300 13.7
1.27 Consolidated Water BORs 2.58 2.57 -0.01 0.111 0.052 23.2
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.625 0.080 4.1
6.28 Famguard 6.49 6.49 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.5
8.80 Finco ; 9.29 9.29 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9
9.86 FirstCaribbean Bank : 9.86 9.86 0.00 0.631 0.350 15.6
4.11, Focol (S) 4.75 4.75 0.00 0.326 0.150 14.6
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 N/M
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.000 7.7
5.49. ICD Utilities’ 0.500 13.7
J. S. Johnson 0.640 10.5
jer Real Estate | .0 64.1







19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

ze

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Serles B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
idelity Bank Note 15 (Serles D) +

Z










52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low






Prime + 1.75%

100.00 0.00 7%
: Prime + 1.75%




1000.00
1000.00











Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)











ABDAB

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund





















1.3455 1.4199

























13.0351 2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8552 30-Nov-09
1.5050 1.4294 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5050 4-Dec-09
3.4931 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9343 31-Oct-09
13.2400 12.5597 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.2400 31-Oct-09
103.0956 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103.0956 30-Sep-09
100.0000 99.4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.4177 30-Sep-09
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0804 31-Oct-09
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0269 31-Oct-09
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0742 31-Oct-09
9.0775 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund 9.4740 31-Oct-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bab Int'l Investment Fund 10.6301 31-Oct-09



TIGRS, Series 2



Principal Protect
sO




SHARE INDEX ~ 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Chango - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV & - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(: Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/200 ibis te
Wo TRADE CALE: GRAL zap Ne»



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidetity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Laat traded over-the-counter price
Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Not Annet Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100





















1E 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

eee eee eee
Students stabbed in separate attacks outside school gates

THREE high school students
were stabbed in three separate

attacks outside the school gates on -

Thursday afternoon as armed rob-
bers continued to terrorize New
Providence residents.

The stabbing victims included two
Doris Johnson Senior High School
students who were injured within an
hour of each other.

A 17-year-old schoolboy was
knifed in the right and left shoulder
during an.argument with another
student in Prince Charles Drive at
around 12.45pm.

The schoolboy was.taken to hos-
pital by ambulance where he
remains in serious condition. .

An hour later a 16-year-old Doris
Johnson student was stabbed in the
neck with an unknown object.

Armed robbers continue to terrorise New Providence residents

Berry Hill, Fox Hill, when a group of
men attacked and brutally stabbed
him at around 1.40pm.

The school day ended with yet
more violence when a 17-year-old
CC Sweeting Senior High School
girl was stabbed during a fight with
another student.

Police say the students got into a

. fight in Baillou Hill Road and the

victim was stabbed in both her hands
with a knife.
Police arrived at the scene near

the junction with Father Calaan .

Lane at around 4pm and the girl was
taken to hospital by ambulance.

This stabbing was the eighth
attack on a school student in New
Providence this month.

New Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister was unavailable
for comment yesterday. He vowed to
address violent crime in schools
when appointed as minister on
December 1.

Teams

Police are investigating the stab-
bings and are also searching for the
teams of armed robbers responsible

for three attacks on Thursday and

Friday.

The Chinese Food Store in Mar-
ket Street was robbed by two men at
around 10am on Friday.

Police were told one of the men

was armed with a handgun and the
pair stole an undetermined amount
of cash before they fled in an
unknown. direction. The gunman was

' wearing a a white t-shirt and blue

pants while the other man was wear-
ing a black shirt, blue jeans and a

red baseball cap.

A woman was robbed at gunpoint
as she was leaving the Caribbean
Webb Shop in Bernard Road at
around 7.30pm on Thursday.

_A man armed. with a handgun and
another man accosted the woman
as she was getting into her car and
demanded cash, police said.

The armed robbers stole her
purse, containing an undetermined
amount-of cash, and. fled the area

THE TRIBUNE

via a nearby track road. Later that
night, at around 1040pm, three men
robbed a man at his house in Gibbs
Corner.

The armed robbers pulled up ina
Nissan Altima, registration 19173,
while the man was sitting on a wall in
front of his house, police said.

The victim reportedly told police
how one of the men, armed with a
handgun, got out of the car and
ordered him to hand over cash and
his cell phone. When the man told
them he did not have cash, they stole
his.aptop computer.

Intensive investigations have been
launched into all these incidents.

Anyone with information relating
to any of these matters should call’
police immediately. on 919 or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

He had been walking in Blue

FROM page one

Among a.number of mind-
boggling amenities dotted
throughout the ship’s expan-
sive decks are more than 25
restaurants, cafes and bars, 21
swimming pools, shops galore,
an aquatic amphitheatre that
overlooks the ocean and an
indoor theatre that hosts a
broadway musical, an ice-rink,
casino, open-air park, ziplining,
rock-climbing and the longest
jogging track to be found at sea.

In fact, if there was one prob-
lem with the facilities to be
found-inside the enormous
1,187 foot long, 213 foot high
ship, it may be that one would
be hard-pressed as one of its
passengers to find a reason to
step ashore and spend money in
the local port.

In this:regard, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace drew to the attention
of the hundreds of high-level
government, business and
diplomatic representatives
attending the onboard recep-
tion — including RCCL’s Pres-

ident and Vice President,
Adam Goldstein and Brian
Rice — that beyond its legisla-
tive endeavours to attract cruise
business to the country, The
Bahamas has been working
hard to ensure that more tours
than ever before are available
on shore to grab the attention
-of passengers ——a scarcity of
such activities being a common

complaint of visitors and cruise. .

lines over the years.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister °
Ingraham assured those pre-.

sent that “great attention is
being placed on the enhance-
ment of the environment of
Nassau...with a view to improv-

ing its aesthetics as well as
increasing our offerings to res-
idents and visitors alike.”

“This plan is intended to pro-
vide for beautification and
rebuilding as well as the intro-
duction of entertainment. In

short we hope to make the
downtown Nassau experience
such that visitors would be able.

to return home and tell their
friends and relatives that “It’s
better in The Bahamas,” he
said,

With each of the potential

Ola ae) wa uae va
Lic aisle

SUNDAY SERVICES

Z Early Worship Service

_ * Sunday School for all ages .

. ase Service ..
* Spanish Service ... ;







FLOATING GIANT: The tare of ithe: ‘Seas. The vessel is 1,187 feet long and 213 feet high.

5,900 visitors per week expect-
ed to spend an average of $85 -
$100 in Nassau the Oasis of the
Seas may bring tens of millions
of dollars in revenue for local
businesses and tour providers
over the next year and a half

— and that is without consid-~

eration of the money that will
be spent by the cruise ship’s
more than 2,000 crew members.

Adam ‘Goldstein, CEO of
RCCL, heralded the ship’s call
in Nassau as the “crowning
achievement” of a 40-year rela-
tionship between RCL and The
Bahamas, and-thanked the gov-
ernment for its efforts to
accommodate the mega cruise
liner, including the dredging of

Sunday Schoal: 40am
Preaching, ~

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:30pm



the harbour and the provision
of additional security screening
facilities on the pier.

Appreciative

“We are extremely apprecia-
tive and I am personally very
happy to have this opportunity
to express that appreciation and
to have a full room of people
who care about this ship and
the economic good it will do
for this country and the others
it will visit to witness this event.
Thank you again to the gov-
ernment, the Ministry of
Tourism; the Ministry of Works
and all the other ministries that
I know have work tirelessly to

FUNDAMENTAL
diam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622







CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY DECEMBER 13TH, 2009.

Theme: What’s
. 11:30 am Speaker
‘Pastor Emeritus Rex Major

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. + Breaking of Bread Service: 1045 a.m.
® Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
_ # Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
coe Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each: month)




In A Name







Felipé Major/Tri une staff



prepare for this day.”

The ship’s captain William |

Wright also personally com-

mended the government for

providing him the opportunity
to sail into what he now could
term a “world class” port facil-
ity, rather than the “rather chai-
lenging” one that presented
itself to cruise captains prior to
the latest upgrades.

Beginning with this week’s
maiden voyage — that brought
with it a lesser “test-run” fig-
ure of 3,500 passengers — the
Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines
(RCCL) Oasis of the Seas is
scheduled to make 21 consecu-
tive visits to St. Thomas, St.
Maarten and Nassau once.a
week until May 2010. .

It will then come to The |

Bahamas once every two weeks
as the ship alternates between
those destinations and another
western Caribbean itinerary.
A year from now it will be
joined by its sister ship, the
5,600 capacity Allure of the
Seas, at which time one or oth-
er of the vessels will call at Nas-
sau once weekly. Cruise pas-
sengers make up 2.8 million of

the country’s average annual-

4.1 million visitors. RCCL pro-
vides around 700,000 of those
visitors annually.

“duty |

Inaugural visit of biggest cruise ship 1 in the world | ‘ula Amliassator

thanks Bahamas
for helping to
fight US blockade

CUBAN Ambassador to the
Bahamas Jose Luis Ponce
thanked the Bahamas for sup-
porting his country over the
years in its fight against the
“senocidal blockade” imposed
on Cuba by the United States.

At a ceremony to mark the
35th anniversary of the estab-
lishment of relations between
the two countries on Tuesday,
the ambassador noted that the
Bahamas, Cuba’s eighth largest
trading partner, is also one of
the 87 members of the interna-
tional community that since
1992 has voted continuously
against the US’s trade embargo
— which he referred to as a
“failed policy” and a “remnant
of the cold war.”

Ambassador Ponce also
extended gratitude to the gov-
ernments of Jamaica, Barba-
dos, Guyana and Trinidad and
Tobago, which despite foreign
pressures, established relations
with Cuba in 1972. He said he is
confident that had the Bahamas
been independent at the time, it
would have done so as well.

Pollution

The ambassador charged that
Caribbean counties with-open
economies have a collective
to protect’ natural
resources from pollution and
over-exploitation, as well as
from the severe impact of the
“global and comprehensive cri-
sis covering the financial sec-
tor, production, trade, energy,
food and environment.” »

“Much remains to be done,”
said Ambassador Ponce, “these
fraternal countries need an
environment of respect and
understanding, to reach con-
sensus and agreements that will
enables to move forward.”

- Acting Bahamas Minister of
Foreign Affairs Branville
McCartney said the relation-
ship between the two countries
predates the establishment of
diplomatic relations.

“Tt can be traced as far back
as the encounter of two worlds,
with the voyages of Christopher

SEE page 11

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13TH, 2009.

7:00 am Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
11:00 am Sis. Tezel Anderson/Rev. Carla Culmer (B)
7:00 pm Bro. Jamiko Forde. Board of Visitation, Outreach &

Social Witness (HC)

uae nO Ay

Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

* FADS Youth Church(Grades 7-1 2)
: First & Third Sunday...

ee LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
he Free Methodist Church of
Rea Wee a ere

» LEO am,

hiAges 10-11 yrs}
Second & Fourth ee 11:30 am.
‘ Eveing SEIVICE fe seve O90 PIN.

WEDNESDAY FRIDAY
at 7:30 p.m at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching . * Youth Ministry Meeting
* Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs. [Grades 7-12}

* Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs. a

: _* Spanish Bi fe ae :

A Society of

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira

: payer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Shopping Center

Church School during Worship Service

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631

| Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY |

-EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE |
_____ Assembly Of God _
OO ene Umea Leona Lo)

Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.0, Box: N-1506
emple@batelnetbs Web: www.evangelistict

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

: 324-2538
324-2587

Telephone number:
Telefax number:

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009, PAGE 7











This week Elliston Greenslade became acting com-
missioner of police. The successor to Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson, who began pre-retirement leave
on December 4, will be named on January 4, 2010.
Today, In Days Gone By looks back at the swearing ©
in and departure of two former commissioners of police.





FRIDAY AUGUST 6, 1971 — Commissioner John Hindmarsh, the
newly appointed commissioner of police, assumes his duties
following a swearing-in ceremony at Government House. Com-

















missioner Hindmarsh preceded the first Bahamian Commission- igby Hore ace Tac |
er of Police, Salatheil Thompson. cable Beach sip tivaresie
»| Wyndam Crystal Palace and Cag

f e race day at the Hobby Horse 1d



15, 1977.
i you have any recollections of the Ha
them with the public by writing to: rmissil













SATURDAY DECEM-
BER 30, 1967 — Depart-
ing Commissioner Nigel
Morris in the last pho- :
tographs taken during |
his tenure of office in|
Nassau. Shown with his |
wife and daughter Sally.
Commissioner Morris
became the second
police commissioner in
the 1960s to come
under intense scrutiny.
A Commission of
Inquiry was appointed
to investigate the oper-
ation of casinos in
Freeport. During the
investigation, it was dis-
covered that Commis-
sioner Morris had pur-
chased real estate from
the casino operators at
a remarkably low price.
’ According to the Com-
mission, he had accept-
ed a favour, thereby
weakening the effec-
tiveness of his office.
As a result of the situa-
tion, he resigned in July
1968.





























ayneLine aumbsus ix 3ZG7627 ¢
ise £ &] APRIL 1, 1968 - Hen
g aby Missâ„¢


























@ Last week’s Days Gone By




















My family enjoyed the piece In Days Gone by in
yesterday's (December 5) paper (featuring the Hob-
by Horse Hall Racetrack). That was my grand
uncles Henry and Winton who were featured. My
uncle Diamond was a jockey who won several cups
at the Hobby Horse Hall Racetrack — one of the
best jockeys ever!

— Aniska Barton

OM appara,









If you have any memories of
the people and places. featured
In Days Gone By send them to

rmissick@tribunemedia.net






we 7 /2UnitS Available,

__ Units 203,206,207,209,403,604,703A,DS








Y
i
4

Gated Property
Pool |
- Laundry Facilities.
Guard House —







Bids being accept by

Campbell Chase Law
Sim

~ December 8,2009






For more info contact
Marie @ 326-8916 or
noraleonielaw@hotmail.com






GCM RTD Re) oe RON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

pitape tite [aR

THE TRIBUNE









TELL ME
T'S INA
PLASTIC
BAG AND
HASN'T
BEEN MAN-
HANPLED

1s

THAT'S RIGHT,
LIEUTENANT---I
HAVE THE NOTE!

PENT ALL MORNING MAKING A J
ee OF THE CHORES | NEED

- TO TEND TO
THIS WEEKEND

BAGGIES
AND RUBBER
GLOVES ALL
“| THE WAY, JIM!





YOu ANV STRIPE

ARE EATING FROM
THE SAME DISH 7

“10 YOU HAFTA HAVE A PILOT
To FLY YOUR SLEIGH?"

NO, ITS Too MUCH TROUBLE.

FIRST LD HAVE TO GET UP.

THEN UD HANNE TO PUT ON A

COAT. 7HEN I'D HANE TO FIND

MY HAT AND PUT /7 ON. (Sic)

THEN WE'D RUN AROUND AND I'D
1 |GET TIRED, AND WHEN WE CAM
s] IN LD HAVE TO TAKE ALL THAT
51 STUFF OFF. NO WAY.

1 Like a seabird behind the
‘ ship (6)
Recommend someone to °
take legal action (8)
Eric goes wild about the
French girl (6)
Steps outside an upper
window (8)
They may part with a smile
(4)
We're clean out of them (5)
Smart boy (4)
Released a big eruption —
it’s unpleasant (12)
Talk of the natives (6,6)
We’re breaking up. the
vessel (4)
So men are employed
making signs (5)
Fight, probably rigged (4)
Case in which everyone is
involved in the trial (3,5)
No rise for those more
advanced in service, (6)
| can read somehow in
bright light (8)
A round heavy-bodied port
(6)

4

9
10
12
13
14
17

20
23

24

25
28

29
30

31

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lucid, 4 Perhaps, 8 Ova,
9 Free trade, 10 Sutures, 11 Hades,
13 Enrapt, 15 Stored, 18 Radio, 19
Leather, 21 Following, 23 Run, 24
Express, 25 Steve.

Down: 1 Look-see, 2 Chartered, 3
Defer, 4 Please, 5 Ratchet, 6 Ada,
7 Steps, 12 Dark horse, 14
Propose, 16 Derange; 17 Allies, 18
Rifle, 20 Aegis, 22 Lap.





5 LICENSE

wew.Blondie.com

(1S OKAY,
STRIPE...

IM Just
@ING TO

SIT HERE
AND WAIT
FOR A GOOD
TV SHOW To |

SO WHAT ARE.
YOU GOING TO



Monday to Sunday

(C2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Word rights reserved.

TLL TELL YOUR MOM To TURN

















LITTLE LIGHT -HEADED
JUST WRITING IT
ALL DOWN



NOW, LET'S
FIND OUT
WHO REALLY

KILLED DVITOL



yNdicate, Inc. World nights reserved. 7

by North America






©2003

MY HANVS
ARE CLEAN



YOU TOWARD THE LIGHT AND
WATER NOU PERIODICALLY.

= —
IPS

\NSTEAD OF
MAKING SMART

REMARKS, YOU
COULD GET ME
THE REMOTE
CONTROL.



ptis Sudoku increases from

WN
Ps



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.
The: difficulty level of the Conce|

TM AFRAID I HAVE A LONG DRIVE
AHEAD OF ME. CAN I DROP YOU
SOMEWHERE,



PF HOW CAN HIS FRIENDS



IF YOU EVER NEED ME, \
MARGO, T/M HERE FOR
YOU. NEVER FORGET

NO
THANKS,

MARGO? TIM. Z NEED

AND. CHANGED
YOUR DIAPER,
MARVIN

|© 2009 by North America Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,



l WS FRIENDS
MAY SAY

OU BE
% , THAT,

SAY HES THE
SALT OF

THE EARTH! |











HOW many words of four fetters
or more can you make from the
fetters shown here? In making a
word, each fetter may be used
once only. Each must contain the

The Target
uses
words in

: centre fetter and there must be
the main at least one nine-letter word.
body of No plurals.
Chambers roDAY’s TARGET

Good 23; very good 35; excelfent
47 (or more) Solution tomorrow.

aist
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

inept into invite. opine ovine
pewit pine pint pinto pior: piton
pivot point tine top! townie twin
twine vein view VIEWPOINT
vine vino wine wino wipe





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers:1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,



and the sum of each vertical block equals:the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more.than -
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday. :

















lilo] 7
Poo] |
olAl—| 7
@|o1]ro
Nolo] 7
Rlolor] 2
=!



4\2
8|7\6
3 |
3

mola
no}— | onloo





ro|N} co] —









” Difficulty. Level *& %&

Down

|

2

3

Royalty’s own touch of

honour (8)

He’s not on speaking terms

with his brothers (8)

_ Unusual way to serve meat
(4)

An order to execute (5,7)

6 Show fond regard for the

opposite sex (4)

7 Anodd goal in Africa (6)

Offer the wrong type of
inducement (6)

Confront the orchestra —
or the critics (4,3,5)

Silver down at melting-
point? (5)

What a debater. takes to
demolish an opponent (5)
Mummy's nationality (8)
Exchange of repartee that
will bear fruit (4,4)

Sort of tureen that is
neither one thing nor
another (6)

Free beer held up, but put
down again (6)

The goddess of hate? (4)
Exploit that should be
witnessed (4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Chive, 4 Garland, 8
Lip, 9 Ultimatum, 10 Besiege, 11
Ready, 13 Evince, 15 Hebrew, 18
Wagon, 19 Example, 21 To the
fore, 23 Lot, 24 Hygiene, 25
Taste.

Down: 1 Calibre, 2 In passing, 3
Elude, 4 Gutted, 5 Remorse, 6
Act, 7 Dumpy, 12 Acropolis, 14
Concede, 16 Wrestle, 17 Before,
18 Watch, 20 Alert, 22 Tug.



EASY PUZZLE



1
4



Blololo|ni



—|PM







{co \o>





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

12/12

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE , aE

Across

Across



Difficulty Level ek



NM} O;—|NI@













©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

roloala
co|#l00
alot
@|colro
_lolNito
Blal=lo
lola
e





©0[i]a>]oo
Nie
o2|co|—|00



wlcw













NO} ] MO} OO} on} co












Eternal Vigilance
ae |
Pet ole

i

~ East dealer. low from dummy; East produces the .
i | | East-West vulnerable. king, which you win with the ace. If
NORTH ou now start to think about how to
Pe uetoe belt hig 41063 wie you're wasting your time.
oy | | pe Ne le fe | ¥Q 105 You can no longer make the contract,
4K8 whatever you do.
a os ee AQ 1074 Let’s say you draw trumps and
WEST ’ EAST try the club finesse. East wins with
P| Lt Pe aa tk Tle Q9754 4K 82 the king and returns a spade to his
ed | i | i | | ff) 4742 be 6 e panes queen Mee tip ate toa
ar cabelas eles : elses : : 4 sees ae lamond, and you finish down
| el el Ms i | SOUTH But if you take a moment to think
Pee feb tel TBR yo be sie ode about your play at trick one, instead
of at trick two, you\make the con-
: 0 cat a cet concem ine be
ow to keep West out of the lead’ so
. DO 1A A sared ’ ‘

Prestige (6) "| Disdain (8) Gat Sint West North aie fig, ‘iat al jou te
Mythical strong 2 Class of things (8) Pass 1% = Pass. 24 — the matter sufficient thought, you
Ee me a ; a We ” Pas 2% Pass 4% realize that this aim can be achieved

numatl emanaing too

9
10
12
13
14
17
20
23

24
25
28

29
30

31

Afflicted (8)

‘Tense (4)

Disparage (5)
Tiny biting fly (4)
Stingy (12)

Basic runway (7,5)
Damage from use
(4)

Haughty (5)
Blond (4)

An aromatic herb
(8)

Pious (6)

Trusted followers
(8)

Exultant (6)

by ducking East’s king of spades!:
The purpose of the duck is to kill

West’s entry card in spades. Once

you lose the first trick, you are virtu-

Opening lead — five of spades.
ive pening lea ve of spades

Gaming counter (4)
Fondness (6)
Australian

There are many hands where
declarer finds it safer to’ have one

legislature (6)
Unsurpassed
(6,2,4)
Concluding (5)
Over-elaborate (5)
An escape from
prison (8)

Full of life (8)
To change (6)
Infertile (6)
Incautious (4)
Transaction (4)



defender on lead rather than the
other. In these deals, declarer tries to
shape his play in such a way as to
keep the more dangerous opponent
from gaining the lead. The principle

1s certainly sound, but applying it to-

an actual situation is not always as
obvious as it might seem,

Assume you're in four hearts and
West leads a spade. When you play

ally certain to make the contract. If
East returns a spade, you win with
the ace, draw trumps and lead the
jack of clubs.

You lose the finesse to East’s king,
but East is then helpless. Eventually
you score 10 tricks — one spade,
five hearts and four clubs — simply
because you stopped to think out the
proper play at trick one.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,



THE TRIBUNE

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net



THE St. Bede’s Crushers digiosed
of their greatest rival last year. Now
they are set to face Our Lady’s Blue
Flames, who stunned their greatest
threat to dethroning them as cham-
pions

The Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools Basketball Tournament’s
best-of-three championship series
has been set.

But while the Crushers, coached
by Donnie Culmer and Ricardo
Freemantle, are back to defend their
title, they will have a surprising foe in
the Blue Flames, coached by Rohan
‘Parkes.

In the feature contest yesterday
‘at the Loyola Hall on Gladstone
Road, the Blue Flames pulled off a
shocking 36-24 victory over the St.
Cecilia’s Strikers in one half of the
sudden death playoff.

The opener of the other half of
the series saw the Crushers out-dis-
tance St. Thomas More Sparks for a
41-17 rout to secure their berth into
the final.

The best-of-three series will be
played on Monday at 3:30 p.m.
Game two will be held on Wednes-
day.

Tournament director Patricia
Coakley said thé sudden death play-
off was simply an indication of how
competitive the regular season was.

“Our: Lady’s hasn’t. been in the
final in a very long time, so they have
done very well this year,” she said.
“In fact, I was shocked by St. Cecil-
ia’s as well.

“Those teams were at the bottom
of the pile last year, but they played
a very good tournament this year.




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12,

Grishers to take -
on Flames in finals



Of course, St. Bede’s was expected
to be where they are, so we will have
to wait to see What happen in the
final.”

Having only won one game during
the regular season last year, Our
Lady’s four games - two apiece to

St. Bede’s and St. Cecilia’s - this year. .

Thye managed to turn things
around when it counted the most in
the playoffs to avenge the defeats to
the Strikers. Now they are hoping
to go all the way in dethroning the
Crushers in like manner.

e Here’s a summary of how St.
Bede’s and Our Lady’s got into the
championship:

Blue Flames 36, Strikers 24: Dean-
gelo Mackey went on an offensive
tear, scoring 13 of his game high 18
points in the fourth quarter as Our
Lady’s rallied from a 16-10 deficit
at the end of the third quarter.

Joining Mackey in their offensive
attack were Charles Cooper with 11
and Tori Ingraham with three. -

For St. Cecilia’s, who only lost one
game all season long to St. Bede’s,
Cleveland Humes had seven, Ivoine
Ingraham Jr. six and Tyree Cole-
brooke five in the loss.

The Strikers opened up with an
8-4 win at the end of the first quarter.
They extended their lead to 14-7 at
the half before they built it up in the

third, only to watch as the Blue

Flames stormed back.

Crushers 41, Sparks 17: Except for
the first quarter when St. Bede’s
managed to open with a 5-0 lead and

SEE page 10








COACH: Donnie Culmer aves. instructions to the defending Catholic Peamanyé Schools boys basketball champions St. Bede’s



SAN Salvador players try to strip the ball in match up Print H O Nash,



| Action heats

up at Father
Marcian
Peters
Invitational

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE action intensified yesterday as teams jock-
eyed for a spot in one the six divisional finals of the
25th Father Marcian Peters Invitational Basketball
Tournament.

The week-long Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s sponsoréd tournament will wrap up
today .at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with the
champions being crowned in the primary boys
and girls, junior boys and girls, intermediate boys
and senior girls.

e Here’s a summary of some of the matches
played:

.Primary Girls

Temple Christian Academy Suns 17, St. Bede’s
Crushers 2: What started out as a real defensive
battle in the first quarter quickly turned into a
rout in the second as the Suns stayed undefeated
to advance to the championship.

“It was a really sloppy game. Our girls didn’t
really play as well as I expected, but I’m just
thankful that we are back to defend our title,”
said Temple Christian’s coach Keno Demeritte.

Dionnae Culmer scored St. Bede’s only two
points on a pair of free throws in the first quarter.

Freedom Academy 10, Yellow Elder 4: Shelly
Austile was a one-girl wrecking crew as she poured
in all the points for Freedom Academy as they
advanced to the championship.

Melisha Desima, on the other hand, was the
Jone scorer for Yellow Elder with four.

Primary Boys

Our Lady’s Blue Flames 21, St. Cecilia’s Strik-
ers 12: Charles Cooper netted 11 and Deangelo
Mackey eight as the Blue Flames prevailed in a
Catholic Diocesan showdown.

Junior Boys :

Harbour Island: Panthers 25, AF Adderley
Fighting Tigers 21: Rio Saunders scored 11 points
and Edward. Davis added five as the Panthers
kept their hopes alive of taking one of the titles
back to Eleuthera. :

Dario McKenzie and Alvano Miller had 10 and
six points respectively for the Fighting Tigers.

Harbour Island Panthers 40, St. John’s Giants
34: Edward Davis and Rio Saunders once again

had the hot hands, canning 13 apiece and they

got some hgelp from LaShawn Higgs with cigh!

and Torin Sweeting with six in the win fo; the
SEE page 10



O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW. RIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Acti

FROM page nine



Panthers.

Anwar Neely had a game
high 16 and Aaron Campbell
10 in the loss,

Junior Girls

San Salvador 18, North

Andros 1; Erinisa Rolle’s

eight and Trevanna Knowles’
six was enough to lift San Sal-
vador to a big win as they
held their Family Island oppo-

nents scoreless for the first

three quarters.

“This is a really great feel-
ing for us,” said San Sal-
vador’s head coach Stephen
‘S’ Brown. “Our girls played
very well in that game.”

Tiashnique Miller hit the
first of two free throws in the
fourth to break the ice for
North Andros.

Westminister 14, San Sal-

vador 11: Aliyanna Morris
scored all five of her points
in the fourth quarter to help
preserve the win for the Lady
Diplomats as they clinched a
berth in the championship.
Pezrel Pickstock led the way
with eight and Angel Miller
added three.

“Based on our programme
that we started last year, we’re
just continuing to build on it,”
said Westminster’s head
coach Geno Bullard Sr. “This
is our second time in Fr. Mar-
cian. Last year we got third,
but we hope to win it this
year.”

Erininsa Rolle had seven in
the loss.

‘We didn’t play like we did
earlier in the day,” said San
Salvador’s coach Stephen
Brown. “They just didn’t want
it as much as J thought they





See RS SEE

i heats up at Father Marcian Peters Invitational

would.”
Senior girls
University School 57, North

‘Long Island '5: Shanae Arm-

brister connected on a game
high 24 points to lead two
other players in double fig-
ures as Keva Barr had 12
and Chrishanda Rahming 11
in their blowout win.

Annelicia Pinder and
Winique Wilson both scored
a basket in the loss.

RM Bailey Pacers 13,
Westminster 12: Diamonte
Barr came up with seven

and both Latasa Armbrister
Taylor :

and Tessacala
chipped in with four as the
Pacers pulled off a nail-
biter. :

Theagra Hanna matched
the game high honours with
seven in the loss as they got
eliminated.



FROM. page nine

then 8-1 before they took a
10-4 avantage at the break,
this one wasn’t even close.
Although they went on to
out-score St. Thomas More
12-4 in the second and 20-10
in the third, they went on a
: roll in the fourth, thanks to
:*point guard Kyle ‘Flash’
: Turnquest.
: Having gotten off to a slow
start, Turnquest came up big
in the fourth with 10 of his

Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools championship set

SCENES FROM THE
FATHER MARCIAN



ST JOHNS guard goes up for a layup.



ST JOHNS and R M Bailey went head to head yesterday with St Johns
winning the game 32 to 9.



SS Nw

game high f4 to enable St.
Bede’s to further blowout
their rivals from last year’s
final.

Malik Jones and Adrian
Mackey both had eight as
they helped out in the paint
after center Gregory Cooper
got into foul trouble. Michael
Brennen helped on the out-
side with six.

For St. Thomas More,
DeChaz Butler led their
attack with six, Davon Butler
had five and center Randy
forbes was limited to just two.





Nai RS

naa

Broncos running
Game picks up
for stretch run
FOOTBALL

: ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
: Associated Press

? THE NUMBERS don't
i lie. The running game of the
: Denver Broncos is on the
: upswing in time for the
: stretch run.

: The team ran for 136
: yards against the New York
: Giants and a week ago
? amassed 245 yards on the

} ground against Kansas City's

? defense.
: "J think we are pleased
? with what we've done the
: last few weeks," Denver
? coach Josh McDaniels said.
: "We've done it by showing
: improvement in a number
? of areas."
:. That includes Denver's
: output.on short-yardage and
:? goal line situations and a
: reduction to almost no neg-
: ative plays when the Bron-
: cos are running.
: "We struggled a little bit
: in the middle of the year
: with our short yardage and
: goal line," McDaniels said.
"Last week it was important
? for us to convert a few of
: those and also shore up on
: the goal line." |
: - One of the most successful
: short-yardage plays came
: early in the fourth quarter
: of the Kansas City game. On
? fourth-and 1 from the Chiefs
'18, rookie Knowshon
? Moreno scooted around the
: left side of the line, down
: the sideline and into the end
? zone.

"The biggest thing we've



_} always talked about is nega-

: tive plays and last: week I
i think we had 45 carries and
? one negative run," said
: McDaniels. ."That's a. good
i percentage for us and as




“tb long ‘as we continue to do

: that, ‘think we will be effec-
: tive running the ball."

: "It was always there, it
: was just a missed read here
i and there," Moreno said of
: the running game. "I think
? we're coming together more
: and trying to make the best
: of our opportunities."

: And just in time for the
: Broncos' upcoming matchup
: with the unbeaten Indi-
? anapolis Colts.

: ‘During film sessions, Den-
: ver's running game didn't
: get unnoticed by Indianapo-
? lis coach Jim Caldwell.

: "They are a very talented
? team, first of all, and they
: have a really strong running
? attack, too," Caldwell said.
: "Two outstanding backs that
i are doing a great job."

i? Two backs, the young
? Moreno and 31-year old
:-Correll Buckhalter, who are
: a perfect complement to
: each other.

? "Buck is a little faster, has
i a great burst and gets to the
edge on his speed,"
McDaniels said. "Knowshon
is a little bit of a slippery
runner inside the tackles, has
: a little more spin moves and
i does it in a different way."

i "I feed off of him and he
? feeds off of me," Buckhal-
: ter said of Moreno. "The
i guy plays with lot of tenaci-
ty and emotion and he
makes me feel young."







injuries across
{he hoard on
: Packers’ def line

! FOOTBALL
: GREEN BAY, Wis.
: Associated Press

GREEN Bay Packers
: defensive coordinator Dom
: Capers says a team can nev-
: er have enough big guys on
: defense.
i The Packers' top four line-
: men are on the injury report,
: potentially leaving the
: league's No. 1-rated defense
i short-handed going into
: Sunday's game at Chicago.
: Coach Mike McCarthy
: was optimistic after practice
: Friday that the Packers will
: have most of those injured
: players, if not all of them,
: available.
: Starting end Cullen Jenk-
: ins (hamstring) and rookie
: tackle B.J. Raji (ankle) are
i probable for the game.



THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009; PAGE 11



CUBAN AMBASSADOR EXPRESSES GRATITUDE

Bahamas praised for backing fight against ‘genocidal’ US blockade

ee markably refreshing.
“TASTE IT ONCE — DRINK IT FOR LIFE



Kris ingraham/BIS
PICTURED FROM LEFT: Attorney General John Delaney and Mrs
Delaney; Sir Arthur Foulkes, Director General of Bahamas Information
Services; Branville McCartney, Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs;
Cuban Ambassador to the Bahamas Jose Luis Ponce and Mrs Ponce;
Mrs Lisa Sawyer-McCartney; Haitian Ambassador to the Bahamas
Harold Joseph; Lady Joan Foulkes; and Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of
the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas.

FROM page six

Columbus to the New World when the exploitation of this New
World-included the forced labour of indigenous Arawak Lucayan
Indians to work the gold mines of Cuba,” he said.

Mr McCartney expressed his confidence in the further devel-
opment of relations and spoke of the mutual benefits garnered over
the years through a number of bilateral agreements.

Diversity

“These agreements also evidence the rich diversity in our rela-
tions in scholarships, medical services, language teachers, air ser-
vices, tourism, public/private sector contacts and trade; as well as
the challenges still to be overcome in such areas as drug traffick-
ing, migration, and maritime delimitation,” Mr McCartney said.

The minister added: "The Republic of Cuba is truly.a country of
global outreach, with significant relations virtually on every con-
tinent in the world, and international leadership.”

' He cited Cuba’s tenure as immediate past chair of the Non- een Moc
Aligned Movement, an international organisation of 118 nations ih :

that consider themselves independent of any major power bloc, as as |
a testament to that leadership. as

THE WEAT

CRU e or : ea. UN











The higher the AccuWeather UY indexâ„¢ number, the










‘Partly sunny and i Humid with a full day Partly sunny, breezy Sunshine mixing with. Accouple of showers. | y
breezy j of sunshine and humid some clouds __ possible greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 83° High: 83° High: 84° High: 82° as =
Low: 73° Low 70°) Eee

— Low: 72°

Niamey entueiei

Low: ee



Maer ae

Seana reesinnge it ny Sores nnhimabesneeny
Rocca ee eee Henk nee

Seemann onnstniantnsrecionsalin grsomsnarnnsnsense

High HLH.) Low _Hit.ftt

Today 419am. 29 10:47am. 0.1
4:32pm. 2.3 10:42. p.m. -0.3
Sunday Siitam. 29 Ti4étam. 04
5:24pm. 2.2 11:30 p.m. -0.3



The aleve AccuWeather RealFeei Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of SEReRue, wind, Tania. sunshine intensity, cloudiness, RrecoheitOn, pressure,
and elevation on the human body—averything that effects how warm or cold a person ioe Temperatures reflect the: high and the: low for the day.

~A, :































<< . JE ad Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Mo! 559am. 3.0 12:30p.m. 0.0
*Â¥ eee S A, _ Temperature af stad 6:12 p.m. as
High: 77° i ... 86° F/30° C °
10-20 knots Low: 71° F/22° C < os are ee ee



















\ 2M . ; Normal low ...
WESTPALMBEACH “#0 baat yaere hip






2.2
3.0
2.2
67° F/20°C = Wetinesday7:25.a.m. 2.9 12:59am. -0.3
82° F/2B°°C 7:40 p.m. 2.2 1:56pm. 0.0
29
22
9
2

25-35 knots Last year’s:low .... ae 23° F/23° C
. Precipitation _. Thursday 8:05 a. m. 1:40am. -0.4

As of 1 p.m. yesterday . ... trace 8:21 236 p.m. 0.0 |.













- Year to date ............ Friday 8:44am. 2: 2:20am. -0.4
Normal year to date . 3:01pm. 2.2 3:15p.m. 0.0
AccuWeather.com Pow meee
} ELE . Forecasts and graphics provided by Ee hroteeted (Aibud UE eT I ET
§.46 inte ae AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 . ; . ‘ ica
. x : Sunrise ...... 6:45 a.m. Moonrise. .... 3:10 a.m.
Low:75° F/24°C ; Sunset. ...... 5:22 p.m. Moonset... . 2:22 p.m.
Mae y . .

New First Fut



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- Dec. ues Dec. 24. Dec. 31 Jan. 7

High 85° F/28°C
Low: 72°F/22°C -

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ual and tonights's.lows.. :

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High: 86° F/30°C
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Highs: 61°F/16°C are today's highs and
i tonight's lows.
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ozume “ ¢: 90° San Juan. Sunday: - S$ at 8-16 Knots 6-10 Feet 10 Miles 79° F
Highs: 86°F/3Q°C mee High 90 Fee. Cc oHahe: 9 84°F /29°C ANDROS Today: SE at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 81°F
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’ inpeg hs: 5: BS"F2"C rie ee. Domingo eee * High: 5°F/29°C Sunday: __ ESE at 10-20 Knots 4-8 Feet 40 Miles 81°F
_ Highs: Highs: 87°F/31°C « 84° ; CROOKED ISLAND Today: E at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 82°F
s Highs: 84°F/29°¢ Sunday: _ ESE at 12-25 Knots 4-7 Feet 10 Miles 82°F
A i *% ELEUTHERA Today: € at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 80°F
a < ! a Barbados Sunday: __ SE-at'8-18 Knots 4-8 Feet 10 Miles 80° f
ruba Cura ° 2 FREEPORT ©. Today: E at 20-30 Knots 4-7 Feet 10 Mil 8i°
ibe: 88°F/S1°C \NA\ SEH InS ERE FzOE “Sunday: SSW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feot___10Miles Bi°F
NNN © Trinidad GREAT EXUMA = Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 81° F
: ’ a Sunday: __ ESE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feat 10 Miles B1°F
ean a nuh Gifs eo. 3S oH ~R7° ° Sunday: E at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feet 10 Miles 83°
Limon — oh S ae ‘Caracas’ ae re tS LONG ISLAND ee Eat 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles ae
Highs: 82° 12: 9, @: anama Ci tid 5 ‘ ' unday: __E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles :
Gee e ec . “Highs: 90°F732°C Highs: 89°F/32°C + SSS SS3)d- MAYAGUANA Today: Eat 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 10 Miles 82° F
qe Aa ghs : Sunday: ESE at 12-25 Knots 6-10 Feat 10 Miles 82° F
os S883 NASSAU Today: ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-4 Feat 10 Miles 80°F
eR «NAN SA ences Sunday: _ SE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 80° F
e : . 80. . 75, ee 65 60 <~ as \§5 TERS BQS «SAN SALVADOR Today: E at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 82" F
i any POS SNS Sunday: _E at 12-25 Knots 3-6 Feat 10-Miles 82°F
Cold Stationary Showers Rain T-storms Flurries Snow. Ice GEED ISLAND Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 81°F
= ae ARAMA. § 22 == ee i aad cad aad cad . i" a o
MM Gi a, ORV geal mag SSSSSS: Pate ote Se oy Lelelels Sunday: __ ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 81°F



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 2 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009






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PHOTOS by Felipé Major! Tribune staff
AN oasis. IN PARADISE: The aiant cruise is e docked | in Nassau Harbour. The 18- -storey mega eanesis: class vessel can accommodate 5,900 passengers and has been described’ as a “city on the s sea.”

_ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter ; : ;
alowe@tribunemedia.net






. THE climax of a $44 million harbour dredging project was
reached yesterday as Bahamians and visitors thronged Nas-
sau’s harbourside to welcome the much-anticipated arrival of

‘ the world’s biggest cruise ship, the Oasis of the Seas.

And the excitement went a step further for hundreds of
invited Bahamian officials and stakeholders who went
onboard the ship to get‘a taste of the luxurious and fun-filled

“city on the sea,” an experience that the 18-storey mega Gen-
esis-class vessel provides for the 5,900. passengers it can
accommodate.

Speaking during an official reception onboard yesterday,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said it was his “singular .

‘,honour” to welcome the Oasis of the Seas on its first trip to
Nassau. He noted that the ship is “‘all the more welcome and
appreciated” by The Bahamas given that it comes during

“an especially challenging time for tourism amidst a global
economic recession and international Yinancial crisis.’

“We offer our congratulations to"RCCL on the achievement
of this tremendous addition to the cruise industry. My Gov-
ernment will continue to. demonstrate our commitment to
this business as we seck to ensure that the relationship remains
mutually beneficial and that your guests will continue to
demand a Bahamas vacation,” said Mr Ingraham.

Stepping inside the ship yesterday it was possible that aside
from the Prime Minister’s reference to the hard economic
times, one could start ta forget what the concept of “recession”
ever meant.

For an average of between $1500 and $7000 for seven
nights, the happy, well-fed visitors relaxed, dined and were
entertained by brand-new facilities so vast, hi-tech and daz-
zling that it would take days to see, let alone take it all in.

SEE page six



POLICE PATROL the waters as the Oasis of the Seas arrives in port. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham hailed its arrival as a singular honour.





‘Govt set to sign $12m straw market contract






MURDER COUNT HITS 79

Argument at exclusive Cape Eleuthera Resort ends in stabbing





SEE PAGE 3




THE government is sect to
sign a $12 million contract fora
new straw market this Tuesday,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham revealed yesterday.

Speaking at a reception
onboard the Royal Caribbean
Cruise Line’s Oasis of the Seas
ship, which made its inaugural
trip to Nassau yesterday, Mr

Ingraham said the government
anticipates that the 37,000
square foot market will be
operational by spring 2011.

He added that the govern-
ment also intends to soon com-
plete an “All-Bahamian” craft
market for:the display of pre-
mium quality Bahamian made
crafts arid souvenirs.:


iGE 2, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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THE TRIBUNE



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN ARGUMENT between two
men at the exclusive Cape Eleuthera
Resort and Marina resulted in a vio-
lent stabbing and the record-tying 79th
murder of the year yesterday morn-
ing.

The contractors hired to do con-
struction and landscaping work at the
finest hotel in Eleuthera reportedly
got into an argument while working
on the hotel grounds just after 8am.

Twenty-two-year-old Noel Pratt Jr
was stabbed in the neck with a sharp
object and rushed to the Rock Sound
health clinic where, he succumbed to
his injuries. Police arrested a 32-year-
old man in connection with the mur-
der.




LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, DEC

Oth murder ties record in Bahamas

Central Detective Unit investiga-
tors will travel from Nassau to
Eleuthera to assist local police with
the investigation.

Cape Eleuthera Resort and Mari-
na has been rated the third best hotel
out of the 380 establishments across

- the country and exists on an island

witha very low crime rate.

The shocking murder has not only
rocked the local community but has
sent shock waves through the country
as it put the Bahamas is on the brink of
a record year in terms of homicides.

Workers’ Party leader Rodney
Moncur said the murder rate is unac-
ceptable. He said: “We have come to
the end of one of the most tragic years
in the history of the country. We have

witnessed over the last 12 months a
continued degradation of law and
order in this country. Our beloved
country is decomposing like a dead
body and the horrible stench reaches
to high heaven.”

March

Mr Moncur, Workers’ Party mem-
bers and the friends and relatives of
murder victims will march across New
Providence today calling for capital
punishment for killers.

Hundreds of supporters are expect-
ed to take to the streets to put pressure
on the government to address the
unacceptable crime rate and ensure

those on Death Row are hanged.

Mr Moncur said: “There is no uncer-
tainty in our minds that the govern-
ment must remove all of the impedi-
ments that prevent the execution of
murderers. Citizens will continue to
ignore the law, continue to remain
unrestrained, and the murders will con-
tinue to increase.

“Capital punishment guarantees us
that at least the murderer will never
commit the crime again. And the
Workers’ Party, along with the families
of murder victims, invites all members
of the public to join us today.

“We condemn this increase in crime,
the shootings of the police officers.
We condemn the murders. The time
has come for the government to guard

EMBER 12, 2009, PA A



the nation; the nation is unguarded!”

The Workers’ Party is also calling
for CCTV security cameras to be
installed in high crime areas, and for
judges and magistrates to be prohibit-
ed from releasing murder suspects on
bail. Mr Moncur fears that if nothing is
done, it will be the ruin not only of
local communities, but also of the
entire tourism industry, spelling the
crumbling of the Bahamian economy.

But the battle is not just political,
it is spiritual, Mr Moncur said.

“In addition-to the government hav-
ing to influence the law, there’s a spir-
itual battle. where the Devil is taking
over the country; because these crimes
are the work of the Devil,” he said.

The pro-hanging march and motor-
cade will begin at RM Bailey Park in
Robinson Road, across from the Mall
at Marathon, at 9am today.

Private-public partnership brings security to Southeastern residents



By NOELLE NICOLLS
Tribune Staff Reporter
nnicolls@tribunemedia.net

Police officers of the South-
eastern Division of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force are find-
ing innovative ways to bring
peace of mind to residents in
the community. Terry Hanna,
resident of Pinewood for 24
years, is benefiting from the lat-
est initiative, which is a part-
nership with Migrafill Elec-
tronic Security.

Two consecutive daytime
robberies left Mrs Hanna’s
home vandalised. The intrud-
ers rummaged through almost
every draw in the bedroom of
the single mother and that of
her 12-year-old son.

Feeling violated, Hanna
washed every item touched by
the intruders. Her son feared
sleeping alone in his bedroom
for almost two weeks. He cried

‘for several days out of fear and

over.the loss of his electronic
games. :

“T was at work and received a
message to call Superintendent
Stephen Dean. He said he had
a nice Christmas present for
me,” said Mrs Hanna. She was
surprised with an offer from
Migrafill to install an alarm sys-
tem:in her home free of charge.

Mrs Hanna is the first to ben- .



efit from the charitable







GRANTLEY IFILL, General Manager, Migrafill Electronic Security pre-
sents alarm system to Pinewood resident, Terry Hanna.

of the two agencies, but there
are plans for more beneficia-
ries of the public-private sec-
tor partnership. The company’s
general manager Grantley Ifill
says the pilot project will con-
tinue into 2010 based on the
needs of the community and
the availability of resources.
According to the senior offi-
cers at the Southeastern Police

- Division, alarm systems are one

of the most useful tools in crime

‘prevention. They consider this

initiative to be an important
strategy in the fight against
house break-ins.

So, you want everything in life.



Alarm

The alarm system now
installed in Mrs Hanna’s home
is a standard Migrafill model -—
designed to deter criminals,
improve the speed of police
response and reduce false
alarms.

The pilot project was
launched in the southeastern
area out of respect for the
founders of the company, who
have been residents of the Gar-
den Hills community for more
than 30 years.

Following the most recent

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS














break-in, Mrs Hanna was care-
ful to look out for suspicious
activity whenever she came
home. She carried her valuable
belongings with her during the
day and asked. her neighbours
to keep a watchful eye out. _

“We’ve had our share of
crime, but usually after an inci-
dent time passes and things qui-.
et down. Everyone feels
relaxed again,” she said. The
recent break-ins were first in
five years.

“T feel confident now that I
have the alarm to know [the
police and Migrafill] are watch-
ing over me. This experience
has strengthened my faith in
the police force. I never thought
I would be saying this, but I
also have to thank the person
or persons who entered my
home for they have made this’
possible for me,” she said.



TERRY HANNA, Pinewood
4-resident receives new alarm
system from Migrafill Elec-

tronic Security.





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GE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
AGE 4, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. Hi. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Ki, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A.,; LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday -

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Manapement Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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. . WEBSITE oy
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Obama’s case for war in support of peace

WASHINGTON — Barack Obama split
the difference in his Nobel speech, laying
down a doctrine that will likely define his
presidency: a steadfast defence of warfare
against evil mixed with praise of non-vio-
lence and exhortations for mankind to affirm
the "spark of the divine" in everyone.

As he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize,
the world's highest honour for peacemaking,

Obatna voiced his starkest rejection yet: of *

the pre-emptive war doctrine and unilater-
alism articulated by his predecessor.

At the same time, the young president
carefully set forth and sought to explain

what might appear to be contradictory prin- -

ciples that have guided his foreign policy
decisions during his first year in the White
House:

e That military force i is justified to confront
evil or stop organised human depravity.

' @ That alt nations ‘must follow interna-
tional rules of conduct that gover. the-use of
itilitary force,

¢ That the United States cannot act alone
when going to war.

e That lasting peace is built on united .

global pressure on -errant: nations, tough
sanctions — when needed,— to'change the

behaviour of countries such;as Iran-and:- .

North Korea; recognition of the inherent

rights and dignity of every individual, and

assurance of mankind's security’ from fear
and economic want.

In a certain sign that he, for once, had not
automatically offended the conservative
Republican opposition at home, Newt Gin-
grich, the former House’ speaker, said the
president’ s message f in Oslo ' "was actually
very good."

The deeply conseivative Gingrich said
the liberat Obama acknowledged he was
"given the prize prematurely" “but wisely
reminded the Nobel committee "they would-
n't be able to have a peace prize, without
having force. ... § thought i in some ways it's a
very historic speech."

. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, the
GOP vice presidential nominee last year,
also praised Obama's words on the necessi-
ty of war.

"Wow, that really sounded familiar," she
said in an interview with USA Today.

"T talked, too, in my book about the fail-
en nature of man and why war is necessary at
times."

Historian John Baick said ‘Obama ‘had

rejected "the need to choose between ide-.-

alism or realism."

"This speech has got to be the Obama:
doctrine," said Baick, a professor at Western
New England College in Springfield, Mass.

. Zbigniew Brzezinski, President Jimmy

' Carter's national security adviser, said Oba-

ma had taken to Oslo a careful restatement
and refinement of his "grand re-conceptu-:
alization of American foreign policy, a very
broadly stated case that we cannot in all cir-
cumstances avoid war." ;
And to that point, Obama spoke cigars
"I face the world as it is, and cannot stand

_idle in the face of threats to the American
people. For make no mistake: Evil does exist —

in the world. A non-violent movement could :

, not have halted Hitler's armies. Negotia-

tions cannot convince al-Qaida's leaders. to
lay down their arms."

: Obama then turned. philosopher, appar: Ni
ently satisfied with his defence:of the U.S. °
-war in Afghanistan, comfortable.he had

explained how a Nobel laureate had just*

: days earlier ordered 30,000 more U.S. troops

into battle.

He became a preachers ‘issuing-a sermon.
“calling the world to what he said was the

best in people.

"Let us reach for the world that ought to ©
be. — that spark of the divine that still stirs.

within each of our souls," the president said,

. finally drawing applause.

- And.as he wound down toward a conclu-

sion, Obama sought again to embrace. what

he saw as the best and worst in the world,
looking toward an uneven but popeka)
future.

"Clear- -eyed, we can dodoretana that
there will be war, and still strive for.peace.

“.We.can-do. that, for that is:the story:of. - :
human progress; that's the hope of all the

world; and at this moment of challenge, that --
must be our work here on Earth."

A fine message.to a hall full of intellec-
tuals in Oslo.

Will it translate in the grimy, shadowy
corners of a world where war and terrorism

(This. article was: written by Steven R.

_ Hurst, Associated Press Writer, who is based

Save our





‘3 EDITOR, The Tribune. .

They are faceless and name- °
less to a community numb with . -
fear. Known only to the police, -

family and friends, they are the
“throw. away children”, dubbed
-» hoodlums, thugs, hooligans and_° ;
the like; some of whom fall vic- °

tim to:society’s ills, end up
incarcerated, or die untimely
deaths. They start out. as cute,

sweet adorable pre-school and...

primary school lads, eager ‘to
learn, with cognitive. deficits
that go undetected and undiag-

- nosed. From grade to: grade

they are socially. promoted,

while,faced with reading and/or

math failure. Then. they begin

~ to act out because their acade-

mic lack becomes more glaring.
They then become truant,
because school iis frustrating,

- While home, their idle hands

find houses to invade, as their
delinquent parents put work
before’ common sense. They

test the: water housebreaking,
“and then jump in at the°deep ©
end. They are now juvenile ©
delinquents: who mature into
- seasoned criminals. .
These are the present: day.
‘criminals wreaking havoc on

our nation:

Research clearly shows that ©

treading failure leads to aggres-

sive behaviour, crime, includ-.
-. ing'the gang culture, and drugs,.

in study after study. With a
whopping 82 per cent of gradu-
ating seniors failing mathemat-
ics, according to a study. by
Ralph Massey, and more than
one third also reading failures,
we are facing an enormous cri-
sis of underachievement that is
now causing adverse. conse-

* quences. J. Barry Farrington of -

the Coalition of Education

- Reform summed it up this way...
“The overwhelming and criti-

cal national problem. that. we

. -inust address is functional illit-

eracy ona large scale.” (July
30; 2007-Tribune Business).

: These angry marginalized
illiterate under-achievers are

robbing our businesses and our ~

visitors. They are putting the

very survival of our nation in
jeopardy. ;
Former Prime Minister Per- .

_ ry Christie in: September 2002,
lamented that he measured :
“the Bahamas by the failure of.
“the education system to deal
-with children leaving school |

who are unable to read and

_write.” He.asked: “How can we

allow something like this to

’ happen when we have: only °
300,000 people?” (June 20, .

2006, The Tribune).

Three recent stabbings ‘at’
New Providence high schools.
have: reportedly taken place in

four days. God forbid a shoot-

[LETTERS

letters@tribunemecdia.net ll




or killed. Troubled youth given

to violence should be identified
in our schools and
removed immediately, so as to
prevent school stabbings and/or
shootings. Counselling and the

relevant support services
should be provided for these
pupils.

Too many of our young
people have failed to acquire
the language of their parents,
without which, they are reduced
to brute beasts grunting their
way through. They know
instinctively that they are born
to read, but because they can’t,
they fight instead. Nothing
makes sense. It’s no wonder

they’re anti-social; they have”
not learned the language of |

their elders. Caught in a prison
of their, muddled minds—
almost daily involved in acts of

_senseless violence.and gang dis-

putes — they .drink confusion

- and eat folly, barely able to

communicate, because they-are
illiterate. They possess brains
and mouths, but they neither
speak— except to grunt or
curse — read nor write. With
jumbled thoughts, frustrated
hearts and crumpled pants
below their hips, the males
roam, restless and unhappy.
They do not understand and
are not understood. With
absent parents, too busy to
care; the community must raise

these errant ones, before they .
turn on us to tob, to pillage and

to burn.
The truth is, they have
already turned on us. Our lives

~are expendable. “Motivated by
base instincts, they.are. callous.
~ and. calculating. With seared

consciences, they kill without
flinching. They are fatherless,
and the foes of all that is decent

and right. Sadly, their gang

outh and
cr ime

comrades are their fathily?. :

It is critical that we get the
aimless ‘and. idle youth off the
streets and engaged in farming,

-. trades, and life skills and acad-
. emic skills, including basic read-

ing and math. They must also
be taught godly. values. Inte-
grate programmes YEAST and
SURE to assist them. . ©

We must humble ourselves
and pray for our nation like

- never before; and mentor and

care for as many young people
as we can. Delinquent parents
must search their hearts and do
right by their children. Corrup-
tion in high and low places must
cease.

2-Chronicles 7:14: “If My
people who are called by My
name will humble themselves
and pray.and seek. My face and
turn from their wicked. ways,
then I will hear from heaven and
will forgive their sin and heal
their land."

2 Chronicles 16:9: “For the
eyes of the Lord run to and fro

. throughout the whole earth to

show Himself strong on behalf

- of those whose heart is loyal to

Him.”

No more crime councils and
crime studies needed. (Econo-
mist Marlon Johnson did an in-
depth crime study already).
Apply the recommendations
made. Embrace bipartisan-
ship! Enforce the laws! Deal
with the Bail Act! Establish
National Service.

Enough is enough! Crime, a
vexing phenomenon, caused by
multiple factors, needs a multi-
pronged approach.

Our crime rate is at astound-

_ ing levels as the youth leave

chaos in their wake. We must
act swiftly and.decisively to save
the youth of our nation, and in
so doing, save ourselves.

SHERLE KNOWLES ©
Former public school -
teacher

Nassau,
November 28, 2009.

Innigration fees ai permits

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Just why can t Immigration collect fees before i issuing
permits?






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: ing takes place at a public high

UTES NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, -DIKIE

PETIT-FRERE intend to my name to MAX-DICKIE

DORCELIEN. If there are any objections. to this change’
of name by Deed Poll, you may write suchy objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.0.Box N-742; Nassau,

‘Bahamas no later than thirty (30) = after the date of

pean of this notice.



“TEGH TROLS joey

1) ROMPANY 1 HAGE,

ISTORE OPENING & CLOSING ¥
HOURS FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Saturday December 12th & 19th
Open 10am - Spm

Decor 14th to 24th - Mon - Friday

~ Open 9am to 6pm
December 26th - Closed

December 2ath ‘Sst Close For Inventory.

Reopen Monday January Ath, 2010

Tel: 242-328-0048
Fax: 242-328-0049
#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts., Palmdale
‘Nassau, Bahamas
Email: sales@detpe.com



school and persons are re injured |

J listened and read the account from the Department of
Immigration as to why they were still owed over $1,000,000
in immigration fees...

Editor, as long as Ican récall, you paid first and then got
the permit but today it looks as if you get the permit first and

never pay!

My advice — cancel all unpaid for Immigration permits
immediately until they are paid for and further require a
charge for breaking the law, say a fine of $1,200 per permit.

Everyone is saying the Minister of State is doing such a

- fine job — well he might be on television and in phete; Ops
but not collecting for the Freastry

B. . FERGUSON
December 9, 2009.

~ NOTICE



“|. NOTICE is hereby given that BLONDEL VINCENT OF SOUTH

BEACH, P.0:BOX SB-51712, NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is
applying: to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization:should not be granted, should send a written.and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
12TH day of DECEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O: Box N-7147, Ressal The

Bahamas.:

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMA: DORSAINVIL of
CORONATION ROAD, MACKEY STREET, P.O. BOX N-7060,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the. Minister responsible
for Nationality.and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why. registration/naturalization should not be granted,
should send a-written and signed statement of the facts within
‘twenty-eight days from the 12" day of December, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for. nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau; Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EDWIN LOUIS of OKRA HILL, P.O.
BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister

‘| responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 12'" day. of December, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE







Bahamas International
Film Festival

.

Talking movies
Filmmakers converge

on Old Fort Bay to
discuss their work



~
XS

BAHAMIAN FILMMAKER Kareem Mortimer and actor Johnny Ferro preparing-for the world premiere of

Children of God at the Atlantis theatre last night.

FILMMAKERS from all
over the world met in Old
Fort.Bay to discuss their films
on the'eve of the sixth annual
Bahamas International Film
Festival.

The festival, featuring 86
movies from around the
world, kicked off yesterday
with a world premiere of the
first feature film by Bahamian
filmmaker Kareem Mortimer,
Children.of God. ., ~

Mr Mortimer was one of.

around 20 filmmakers, writ-

ers, directors and producers

who discussed their work at

a press conference on Thurs-

day.

The Bahamian filmmaker,
whose film Eleutheran Adven-
ture was shown at BIFF in
2006, was accompanied by

“New York actor Johnny Fer-
ro who plays Johnny in the
movie, which tells the story
of a gay white Bahamian
artist in a homophobic soci-
ety, and his friendship with a
conservative. Christian

Dance concert to benefit _

woman. Mr Mortimer said:
“Tt’s an emotional story about
two polar opposite characters,
-and how we may be different
but we are all essentially the
same.

“T believe films can change
the world, and I can be a part
of that process if I can change
the way people see each oth-

“That’s part of what attract-
ed me to this project and
inspired me to write it."

Documentary

Other films discussed at
Old Fort Bay last night

‘include Lakay, by 21-year-

old Bahamian filmmaker Bri-
an Lee, a documentary
addressing the plight of young
Haitian Bahamians; The
Nature of Existence, a docu-
mentary crossing the globe in
search of the answers to life’s
most profound questions; and
multi-narrative drama Jn /Sig-

cancer patient Tenia, 7

USS) |

WA Sa OTe Sl



THE West Wing Dance Conservatory is asking the pub-
lic to attend the dance concert Seasons of Change tonight at
the Dundas Centre for the Performing Arts on Mackey

Street.

The conservatory is presenting the concert, directed by

Mervin A Smith and Adanceia Kemp, in support 7-year-old

Tenia Cash and her fight against bone cancer.
Tenia was diagnosed with osteogenic sarcoma of the leg

about a month ago. -

Chemotherapy

She is undergoing chemotherapy and is waiting to have a

tumor removed.

The family are doing all they can to avoid the aspiring lit-
tle gymnast having her leg amputated.

The Cash Family said: “Your presence here tonight not
only supports the arts, but also joins hands in the fight
against cancer by providing relief and hope.”



_TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009, ,






FORMER Senator and PLP general secre-
tary Berlin Pratt died on Thursday night fol-
lowing a long battle with cancer.

PLP chairman Bradley Roberts issued a
statement of condolence from the party last
night and said Mr Pratt’s death marks the loss of
a humble servant of the Bahamas and a long
and faithful warrior for the Progressive Liber-
al Party (PLP).

Cat Island native Mr Prait served the country
and his party with the tenets of disciplined duty
and quiet strength, exemplary of Family Island
men of his generation, Mr Roberts said.

He expressed the party’s sympathy to Mr
Pratt’s wife Ruth, children, brothers and sis-
ters. a

Mr Roberts said: “Cat Island has lost anoth-
er of its finer sons.

“Those members of his family left to cherish
his memory can be proud of a great Bahamian
who dedicated so very much of his life to the

causes of a developing Bahamas, having served
in the upper chamber of parliament, and as

secretary general to the smooth functioning of

the internal business of the Progressive Liber-

al Party. “The PLP is forever indebted to Sen-

ator Pratt for the role he played in the conti-

nuity of its inner management.”

The PLP chairman also noted how Mr Pratt
devoted much of his time and energy to his
family and the church as he was secretary of St
John’s Native Particular Baptist Church.

He said: “No doubt it was this spiritual
anchor which gave such a balanced perspec-
tive to his public and family responsibilities.

“We mourn his passing. Yet in our grief we

celebrate his time on earth and celebrate the-
hope of all who die in the Lord.
, “Having run his race and finished his course
we know that our brother Berlin has gone on to
a most deserving reward.

“May he rest in peace.”



















nificant Others, in which char-
acters are linked by a homi-
cide investigation.

The films are from 26 coun-
tries around the world and
filmmakers, producers, direc-
tors, writers and editors said
last night they look forward
to meeting others in the
industry, seeing a broad range
of films, and spending a week
in paradise." +") +: ae

Awards will be presented
to filmmakers at the end of
the festival on Sunday,
December 13 in four cate-
gories: Spirit of Freedom Dra-
ma, Spirit of Freedom Docu-
mentary, Short Film and New
Visions.

A’ Career Achievement
Tribute award-will be pre-
sented to actor Johnny Depp
at the Balmoral on Sunday
and the BIFF Rising Star
Award will be given to actress
Sophie Okonedo on Wednes-
day. |

TROPICAL
Pes

eM
id) ara





FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES




ROYAL @ FIDELITY
Money at Work






SSNS
Securit



52wk-Low
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17



S2wWk-Hi


















9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 F le
5.90 Bank of Bahamas : 5.90 i :
* 0.63 Benchmark : 0.63 i .
3.15 _ Bahamas Waste 3.15. .3.15 0.00 0.125 0.090 2s. 2.86%
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43. 1.69%
9.92 Cable Bahamas 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1
2.72 . Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00 0.249 0.040 10.9
5.26 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 5.73 5.73 0,00 0.419 0.300 13.7
1.27 Consolidated Water BORs 2.58 2.57 -0.01 0.111 0.052 23.2
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.625 0.080 4.1
6.28 Famguard 6.49 6.49 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.5
8.80 Finco ; 9.29 9.29 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9
9.86 FirstCaribbean Bank : 9.86 9.86 0.00 0.631 0.350 15.6
4.11, Focol (S) 4.75 4.75 0.00 0.326 0.150 14.6
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 0.000 N/M
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.000 7.7
5.49. ICD Utilities’ 0.500 13.7
J. S. Johnson 0.640 10.5
jer Real Estate | .0 64.1







19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

ze

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Serles B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
idelity Bank Note 15 (Serles D) +

Z










52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low






Prime + 1.75%

100.00 0.00 7%
: Prime + 1.75%




1000.00
1000.00











Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)











ABDAB

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund





















1.3455 1.4199

























13.0351 2.8266 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8552 30-Nov-09
1.5050 1.4294 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.5050 4-Dec-09
3.4931 2.9343 Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9343 31-Oct-09
13.2400 12.5597 Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.2400 31-Oct-09
103.0956 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 103.0956 30-Sep-09
100.0000 99.4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund 99.4177 30-Sep-09
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0804 31-Oct-09
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0269 31-Oct-09
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0742 31-Oct-09
9.0775 Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund 9.4740 31-Oct-09
Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 1
10.0000 Royal Fidelity Bab Int'l Investment Fund 10.6301 31-Oct-09



TIGRS, Series 2



Principal Protect
sO




SHARE INDEX ~ 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Chango - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV & - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(: Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/200 ibis te
Wo TRADE CALE: GRAL zap Ne»



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidetity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Laat traded over-the-counter price
Weokly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
NAV - Not Annet Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100


















1E 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

eee eee eee
Students stabbed in separate attacks outside school gates

THREE high school students
were stabbed in three separate

attacks outside the school gates on -

Thursday afternoon as armed rob-
bers continued to terrorize New
Providence residents.

The stabbing victims included two
Doris Johnson Senior High School
students who were injured within an
hour of each other.

A 17-year-old schoolboy was
knifed in the right and left shoulder
during an.argument with another
student in Prince Charles Drive at
around 12.45pm.

The schoolboy was.taken to hos-
pital by ambulance where he
remains in serious condition. .

An hour later a 16-year-old Doris
Johnson student was stabbed in the
neck with an unknown object.

Armed robbers continue to terrorise New Providence residents

Berry Hill, Fox Hill, when a group of
men attacked and brutally stabbed
him at around 1.40pm.

The school day ended with yet
more violence when a 17-year-old
CC Sweeting Senior High School
girl was stabbed during a fight with
another student.

Police say the students got into a

. fight in Baillou Hill Road and the

victim was stabbed in both her hands
with a knife.
Police arrived at the scene near

the junction with Father Calaan .

Lane at around 4pm and the girl was
taken to hospital by ambulance.

This stabbing was the eighth
attack on a school student in New
Providence this month.

New Minister of Education
Desmond Bannister was unavailable
for comment yesterday. He vowed to
address violent crime in schools
when appointed as minister on
December 1.

Teams

Police are investigating the stab-
bings and are also searching for the
teams of armed robbers responsible

for three attacks on Thursday and

Friday.

The Chinese Food Store in Mar-
ket Street was robbed by two men at
around 10am on Friday.

Police were told one of the men

was armed with a handgun and the
pair stole an undetermined amount
of cash before they fled in an
unknown. direction. The gunman was

' wearing a a white t-shirt and blue

pants while the other man was wear-
ing a black shirt, blue jeans and a

red baseball cap.

A woman was robbed at gunpoint
as she was leaving the Caribbean
Webb Shop in Bernard Road at
around 7.30pm on Thursday.

_A man armed. with a handgun and
another man accosted the woman
as she was getting into her car and
demanded cash, police said.

The armed robbers stole her
purse, containing an undetermined
amount-of cash, and. fled the area

THE TRIBUNE

via a nearby track road. Later that
night, at around 1040pm, three men
robbed a man at his house in Gibbs
Corner.

The armed robbers pulled up ina
Nissan Altima, registration 19173,
while the man was sitting on a wall in
front of his house, police said.

The victim reportedly told police
how one of the men, armed with a
handgun, got out of the car and
ordered him to hand over cash and
his cell phone. When the man told
them he did not have cash, they stole
his.aptop computer.

Intensive investigations have been
launched into all these incidents.

Anyone with information relating
to any of these matters should call’
police immediately. on 919 or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on
328-TIPS (8477).

He had been walking in Blue

FROM page one

Among a.number of mind-
boggling amenities dotted
throughout the ship’s expan-
sive decks are more than 25
restaurants, cafes and bars, 21
swimming pools, shops galore,
an aquatic amphitheatre that
overlooks the ocean and an
indoor theatre that hosts a
broadway musical, an ice-rink,
casino, open-air park, ziplining,
rock-climbing and the longest
jogging track to be found at sea.

In fact, if there was one prob-
lem with the facilities to be
found-inside the enormous
1,187 foot long, 213 foot high
ship, it may be that one would
be hard-pressed as one of its
passengers to find a reason to
step ashore and spend money in
the local port.

In this:regard, Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace drew to the attention
of the hundreds of high-level
government, business and
diplomatic representatives
attending the onboard recep-
tion — including RCCL’s Pres-

ident and Vice President,
Adam Goldstein and Brian
Rice — that beyond its legisla-
tive endeavours to attract cruise
business to the country, The
Bahamas has been working
hard to ensure that more tours
than ever before are available
on shore to grab the attention
-of passengers ——a scarcity of
such activities being a common

complaint of visitors and cruise. .

lines over the years.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister °
Ingraham assured those pre-.

sent that “great attention is
being placed on the enhance-
ment of the environment of
Nassau...with a view to improv-

ing its aesthetics as well as
increasing our offerings to res-
idents and visitors alike.”

“This plan is intended to pro-
vide for beautification and
rebuilding as well as the intro-
duction of entertainment. In

short we hope to make the
downtown Nassau experience
such that visitors would be able.

to return home and tell their
friends and relatives that “It’s
better in The Bahamas,” he
said,

With each of the potential

Ola ae) wa uae va
Lic aisle

SUNDAY SERVICES

Z Early Worship Service

_ * Sunday School for all ages .

. ase Service ..
* Spanish Service ... ;







FLOATING GIANT: The tare of ithe: ‘Seas. The vessel is 1,187 feet long and 213 feet high.

5,900 visitors per week expect-
ed to spend an average of $85 -
$100 in Nassau the Oasis of the
Seas may bring tens of millions
of dollars in revenue for local
businesses and tour providers
over the next year and a half

— and that is without consid-~

eration of the money that will
be spent by the cruise ship’s
more than 2,000 crew members.

Adam ‘Goldstein, CEO of
RCCL, heralded the ship’s call
in Nassau as the “crowning
achievement” of a 40-year rela-
tionship between RCL and The
Bahamas, and-thanked the gov-
ernment for its efforts to
accommodate the mega cruise
liner, including the dredging of

Sunday Schoal: 40am
Preaching, ~

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:30pm



the harbour and the provision
of additional security screening
facilities on the pier.

Appreciative

“We are extremely apprecia-
tive and I am personally very
happy to have this opportunity
to express that appreciation and
to have a full room of people
who care about this ship and
the economic good it will do
for this country and the others
it will visit to witness this event.
Thank you again to the gov-
ernment, the Ministry of
Tourism; the Ministry of Works
and all the other ministries that
I know have work tirelessly to

FUNDAMENTAL
diam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622







CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY DECEMBER 13TH, 2009.

Theme: What’s
. 11:30 am Speaker
‘Pastor Emeritus Rex Major

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. + Breaking of Bread Service: 1045 a.m.
® Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
_ # Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
coe Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each: month)




In A Name







Felipé Major/Tri une staff



prepare for this day.”

The ship’s captain William |

Wright also personally com-

mended the government for

providing him the opportunity
to sail into what he now could
term a “world class” port facil-
ity, rather than the “rather chai-
lenging” one that presented
itself to cruise captains prior to
the latest upgrades.

Beginning with this week’s
maiden voyage — that brought
with it a lesser “test-run” fig-
ure of 3,500 passengers — the
Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines
(RCCL) Oasis of the Seas is
scheduled to make 21 consecu-
tive visits to St. Thomas, St.
Maarten and Nassau once.a
week until May 2010. .

It will then come to The |

Bahamas once every two weeks
as the ship alternates between
those destinations and another
western Caribbean itinerary.
A year from now it will be
joined by its sister ship, the
5,600 capacity Allure of the
Seas, at which time one or oth-
er of the vessels will call at Nas-
sau once weekly. Cruise pas-
sengers make up 2.8 million of

the country’s average annual-

4.1 million visitors. RCCL pro-
vides around 700,000 of those
visitors annually.

“duty |

Inaugural visit of biggest cruise ship 1 in the world | ‘ula Amliassator

thanks Bahamas
for helping to
fight US blockade

CUBAN Ambassador to the
Bahamas Jose Luis Ponce
thanked the Bahamas for sup-
porting his country over the
years in its fight against the
“senocidal blockade” imposed
on Cuba by the United States.

At a ceremony to mark the
35th anniversary of the estab-
lishment of relations between
the two countries on Tuesday,
the ambassador noted that the
Bahamas, Cuba’s eighth largest
trading partner, is also one of
the 87 members of the interna-
tional community that since
1992 has voted continuously
against the US’s trade embargo
— which he referred to as a
“failed policy” and a “remnant
of the cold war.”

Ambassador Ponce also
extended gratitude to the gov-
ernments of Jamaica, Barba-
dos, Guyana and Trinidad and
Tobago, which despite foreign
pressures, established relations
with Cuba in 1972. He said he is
confident that had the Bahamas
been independent at the time, it
would have done so as well.

Pollution

The ambassador charged that
Caribbean counties with-open
economies have a collective
to protect’ natural
resources from pollution and
over-exploitation, as well as
from the severe impact of the
“global and comprehensive cri-
sis covering the financial sec-
tor, production, trade, energy,
food and environment.” »

“Much remains to be done,”
said Ambassador Ponce, “these
fraternal countries need an
environment of respect and
understanding, to reach con-
sensus and agreements that will
enables to move forward.”

- Acting Bahamas Minister of
Foreign Affairs Branville
McCartney said the relation-
ship between the two countries
predates the establishment of
diplomatic relations.

“Tt can be traced as far back
as the encounter of two worlds,
with the voyages of Christopher

SEE page 11

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13TH, 2009.

7:00 am Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Katherine Rose
11:00 am Sis. Tezel Anderson/Rev. Carla Culmer (B)
7:00 pm Bro. Jamiko Forde. Board of Visitation, Outreach &

Social Witness (HC)

uae nO Ay

Household, We Will Serve the Lord”

* FADS Youth Church(Grades 7-1 2)
: First & Third Sunday...

ee LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Grace and Peace Wesleyan Church
he Free Methodist Church of
Rea Wee a ere

» LEO am,

hiAges 10-11 yrs}
Second & Fourth ee 11:30 am.
‘ Eveing SEIVICE fe seve O90 PIN.

WEDNESDAY FRIDAY
at 7:30 p.m at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching . * Youth Ministry Meeting
* Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs. [Grades 7-12}

* Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs. a

: _* Spanish Bi fe ae :

A Society of

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: The Madeira

: payer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Shopping Center

Church School during Worship Service

Pastor Knowles can be heard each
morning on Joy 101.9 at 8:30 a.m.

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS-5631

| Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY |

-EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE |
_____ Assembly Of God _
OO ene Umea Leona Lo)

Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793. P.0, Box: N-1506
emple@batelnetbs Web: www.evangelistict

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

: 324-2538
324-2587

Telephone number:
Telefax number:

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009, PAGE 7











This week Elliston Greenslade became acting com-
missioner of police. The successor to Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson, who began pre-retirement leave
on December 4, will be named on January 4, 2010.
Today, In Days Gone By looks back at the swearing ©
in and departure of two former commissioners of police.





FRIDAY AUGUST 6, 1971 — Commissioner John Hindmarsh, the
newly appointed commissioner of police, assumes his duties
following a swearing-in ceremony at Government House. Com-

















missioner Hindmarsh preceded the first Bahamian Commission- igby Hore ace Tac |
er of Police, Salatheil Thompson. cable Beach sip tivaresie
»| Wyndam Crystal Palace and Cag

f e race day at the Hobby Horse 1d



15, 1977.
i you have any recollections of the Ha
them with the public by writing to: rmissil













SATURDAY DECEM-
BER 30, 1967 — Depart-
ing Commissioner Nigel
Morris in the last pho- :
tographs taken during |
his tenure of office in|
Nassau. Shown with his |
wife and daughter Sally.
Commissioner Morris
became the second
police commissioner in
the 1960s to come
under intense scrutiny.
A Commission of
Inquiry was appointed
to investigate the oper-
ation of casinos in
Freeport. During the
investigation, it was dis-
covered that Commis-
sioner Morris had pur-
chased real estate from
the casino operators at
a remarkably low price.
’ According to the Com-
mission, he had accept-
ed a favour, thereby
weakening the effec-
tiveness of his office.
As a result of the situa-
tion, he resigned in July
1968.





























ayneLine aumbsus ix 3ZG7627 ¢
ise £ &] APRIL 1, 1968 - Hen
g aby Missâ„¢


























@ Last week’s Days Gone By




















My family enjoyed the piece In Days Gone by in
yesterday's (December 5) paper (featuring the Hob-
by Horse Hall Racetrack). That was my grand
uncles Henry and Winton who were featured. My
uncle Diamond was a jockey who won several cups
at the Hobby Horse Hall Racetrack — one of the
best jockeys ever!

— Aniska Barton

OM appara,









If you have any memories of
the people and places. featured
In Days Gone By send them to

rmissick@tribunemedia.net






we 7 /2UnitS Available,

__ Units 203,206,207,209,403,604,703A,DS








Y
i
4

Gated Property
Pool |
- Laundry Facilities.
Guard House —







Bids being accept by

Campbell Chase Law
Sim

~ December 8,2009






For more info contact
Marie @ 326-8916 or
noraleonielaw@hotmail.com






GCM RTD Re) oe RON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

pitape tite [aR

THE TRIBUNE









TELL ME
T'S INA
PLASTIC
BAG AND
HASN'T
BEEN MAN-
HANPLED

1s

THAT'S RIGHT,
LIEUTENANT---I
HAVE THE NOTE!

PENT ALL MORNING MAKING A J
ee OF THE CHORES | NEED

- TO TEND TO
THIS WEEKEND

BAGGIES
AND RUBBER
GLOVES ALL
“| THE WAY, JIM!





YOu ANV STRIPE

ARE EATING FROM
THE SAME DISH 7

“10 YOU HAFTA HAVE A PILOT
To FLY YOUR SLEIGH?"

NO, ITS Too MUCH TROUBLE.

FIRST LD HAVE TO GET UP.

THEN UD HANNE TO PUT ON A

COAT. 7HEN I'D HANE TO FIND

MY HAT AND PUT /7 ON. (Sic)

THEN WE'D RUN AROUND AND I'D
1 |GET TIRED, AND WHEN WE CAM
s] IN LD HAVE TO TAKE ALL THAT
51 STUFF OFF. NO WAY.

1 Like a seabird behind the
‘ ship (6)
Recommend someone to °
take legal action (8)
Eric goes wild about the
French girl (6)
Steps outside an upper
window (8)
They may part with a smile
(4)
We're clean out of them (5)
Smart boy (4)
Released a big eruption —
it’s unpleasant (12)
Talk of the natives (6,6)
We’re breaking up. the
vessel (4)
So men are employed
making signs (5)
Fight, probably rigged (4)
Case in which everyone is
involved in the trial (3,5)
No rise for those more
advanced in service, (6)
| can read somehow in
bright light (8)
A round heavy-bodied port
(6)

4

9
10
12
13
14
17

20
23

24

25
28

29
30

31

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lucid, 4 Perhaps, 8 Ova,
9 Free trade, 10 Sutures, 11 Hades,
13 Enrapt, 15 Stored, 18 Radio, 19
Leather, 21 Following, 23 Run, 24
Express, 25 Steve.

Down: 1 Look-see, 2 Chartered, 3
Defer, 4 Please, 5 Ratchet, 6 Ada,
7 Steps, 12 Dark horse, 14
Propose, 16 Derange; 17 Allies, 18
Rifle, 20 Aegis, 22 Lap.





5 LICENSE

wew.Blondie.com

(1S OKAY,
STRIPE...

IM Just
@ING TO

SIT HERE
AND WAIT
FOR A GOOD
TV SHOW To |

SO WHAT ARE.
YOU GOING TO



Monday to Sunday

(C2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Word rights reserved.

TLL TELL YOUR MOM To TURN

















LITTLE LIGHT -HEADED
JUST WRITING IT
ALL DOWN



NOW, LET'S
FIND OUT
WHO REALLY

KILLED DVITOL



yNdicate, Inc. World nights reserved. 7

by North America






©2003

MY HANVS
ARE CLEAN



YOU TOWARD THE LIGHT AND
WATER NOU PERIODICALLY.

= —
IPS

\NSTEAD OF
MAKING SMART

REMARKS, YOU
COULD GET ME
THE REMOTE
CONTROL.



ptis Sudoku increases from

WN
Ps



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.
The: difficulty level of the Conce|

TM AFRAID I HAVE A LONG DRIVE
AHEAD OF ME. CAN I DROP YOU
SOMEWHERE,



PF HOW CAN HIS FRIENDS



IF YOU EVER NEED ME, \
MARGO, T/M HERE FOR
YOU. NEVER FORGET

NO
THANKS,

MARGO? TIM. Z NEED

AND. CHANGED
YOUR DIAPER,
MARVIN

|© 2009 by North America Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,



l WS FRIENDS
MAY SAY

OU BE
% , THAT,

SAY HES THE
SALT OF

THE EARTH! |











HOW many words of four fetters
or more can you make from the
fetters shown here? In making a
word, each fetter may be used
once only. Each must contain the

The Target
uses
words in

: centre fetter and there must be
the main at least one nine-letter word.
body of No plurals.
Chambers roDAY’s TARGET

Good 23; very good 35; excelfent
47 (or more) Solution tomorrow.

aist
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

inept into invite. opine ovine
pewit pine pint pinto pior: piton
pivot point tine top! townie twin
twine vein view VIEWPOINT
vine vino wine wino wipe





Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers:1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,



and the sum of each vertical block equals:the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more.than -
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday. :

















lilo] 7
Poo] |
olAl—| 7
@|o1]ro
Nolo] 7
Rlolor] 2
=!



4\2
8|7\6
3 |
3

mola
no}— | onloo





ro|N} co] —









” Difficulty. Level *& %&

Down

|

2

3

Royalty’s own touch of

honour (8)

He’s not on speaking terms

with his brothers (8)

_ Unusual way to serve meat
(4)

An order to execute (5,7)

6 Show fond regard for the

opposite sex (4)

7 Anodd goal in Africa (6)

Offer the wrong type of
inducement (6)

Confront the orchestra —
or the critics (4,3,5)

Silver down at melting-
point? (5)

What a debater. takes to
demolish an opponent (5)
Mummy's nationality (8)
Exchange of repartee that
will bear fruit (4,4)

Sort of tureen that is
neither one thing nor
another (6)

Free beer held up, but put
down again (6)

The goddess of hate? (4)
Exploit that should be
witnessed (4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Chive, 4 Garland, 8
Lip, 9 Ultimatum, 10 Besiege, 11
Ready, 13 Evince, 15 Hebrew, 18
Wagon, 19 Example, 21 To the
fore, 23 Lot, 24 Hygiene, 25
Taste.

Down: 1 Calibre, 2 In passing, 3
Elude, 4 Gutted, 5 Remorse, 6
Act, 7 Dumpy, 12 Acropolis, 14
Concede, 16 Wrestle, 17 Before,
18 Watch, 20 Alert, 22 Tug.



EASY PUZZLE



1
4



Blololo|ni



—|PM







{co \o>





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

12/12

| CRYPTIC PUZZLE , aE

Across

Across



Difficulty Level ek



NM} O;—|NI@













©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

roloala
co|#l00
alot
@|colro
_lolNito
Blal=lo
lola
e





©0[i]a>]oo
Nie
o2|co|—|00



wlcw













NO} ] MO} OO} on} co












Eternal Vigilance
ae |
Pet ole

i

~ East dealer. low from dummy; East produces the .
i | | East-West vulnerable. king, which you win with the ace. If
NORTH ou now start to think about how to
Pe uetoe belt hig 41063 wie you're wasting your time.
oy | | pe Ne le fe | ¥Q 105 You can no longer make the contract,
4K8 whatever you do.
a os ee AQ 1074 Let’s say you draw trumps and
WEST ’ EAST try the club finesse. East wins with
P| Lt Pe aa tk Tle Q9754 4K 82 the king and returns a spade to his
ed | i | i | | ff) 4742 be 6 e panes queen Mee tip ate toa
ar cabelas eles : elses : : 4 sees ae lamond, and you finish down
| el el Ms i | SOUTH But if you take a moment to think
Pee feb tel TBR yo be sie ode about your play at trick one, instead
of at trick two, you\make the con-
: 0 cat a cet concem ine be
ow to keep West out of the lead’ so
. DO 1A A sared ’ ‘

Prestige (6) "| Disdain (8) Gat Sint West North aie fig, ‘iat al jou te
Mythical strong 2 Class of things (8) Pass 1% = Pass. 24 — the matter sufficient thought, you
Ee me a ; a We ” Pas 2% Pass 4% realize that this aim can be achieved

numatl emanaing too

9
10
12
13
14
17
20
23

24
25
28

29
30

31

Afflicted (8)

‘Tense (4)

Disparage (5)
Tiny biting fly (4)
Stingy (12)

Basic runway (7,5)
Damage from use
(4)

Haughty (5)
Blond (4)

An aromatic herb
(8)

Pious (6)

Trusted followers
(8)

Exultant (6)

by ducking East’s king of spades!:
The purpose of the duck is to kill

West’s entry card in spades. Once

you lose the first trick, you are virtu-

Opening lead — five of spades.
ive pening lea ve of spades

Gaming counter (4)
Fondness (6)
Australian

There are many hands where
declarer finds it safer to’ have one

legislature (6)
Unsurpassed
(6,2,4)
Concluding (5)
Over-elaborate (5)
An escape from
prison (8)

Full of life (8)
To change (6)
Infertile (6)
Incautious (4)
Transaction (4)



defender on lead rather than the
other. In these deals, declarer tries to
shape his play in such a way as to
keep the more dangerous opponent
from gaining the lead. The principle

1s certainly sound, but applying it to-

an actual situation is not always as
obvious as it might seem,

Assume you're in four hearts and
West leads a spade. When you play

ally certain to make the contract. If
East returns a spade, you win with
the ace, draw trumps and lead the
jack of clubs.

You lose the finesse to East’s king,
but East is then helpless. Eventually
you score 10 tricks — one spade,
five hearts and four clubs — simply
because you stopped to think out the
proper play at trick one.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
THE TRIBUNE

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net



THE St. Bede’s Crushers digiosed
of their greatest rival last year. Now
they are set to face Our Lady’s Blue
Flames, who stunned their greatest
threat to dethroning them as cham-
pions

The Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools Basketball Tournament’s
best-of-three championship series
has been set.

But while the Crushers, coached
by Donnie Culmer and Ricardo
Freemantle, are back to defend their
title, they will have a surprising foe in
the Blue Flames, coached by Rohan
‘Parkes.

In the feature contest yesterday
‘at the Loyola Hall on Gladstone
Road, the Blue Flames pulled off a
shocking 36-24 victory over the St.
Cecilia’s Strikers in one half of the
sudden death playoff.

The opener of the other half of
the series saw the Crushers out-dis-
tance St. Thomas More Sparks for a
41-17 rout to secure their berth into
the final.

The best-of-three series will be
played on Monday at 3:30 p.m.
Game two will be held on Wednes-
day.

Tournament director Patricia
Coakley said thé sudden death play-
off was simply an indication of how
competitive the regular season was.

“Our: Lady’s hasn’t. been in the
final in a very long time, so they have
done very well this year,” she said.
“In fact, I was shocked by St. Cecil-
ia’s as well.

“Those teams were at the bottom
of the pile last year, but they played
a very good tournament this year.




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12,

Grishers to take -
on Flames in finals



Of course, St. Bede’s was expected
to be where they are, so we will have
to wait to see What happen in the
final.”

Having only won one game during
the regular season last year, Our
Lady’s four games - two apiece to

St. Bede’s and St. Cecilia’s - this year. .

Thye managed to turn things
around when it counted the most in
the playoffs to avenge the defeats to
the Strikers. Now they are hoping
to go all the way in dethroning the
Crushers in like manner.

e Here’s a summary of how St.
Bede’s and Our Lady’s got into the
championship:

Blue Flames 36, Strikers 24: Dean-
gelo Mackey went on an offensive
tear, scoring 13 of his game high 18
points in the fourth quarter as Our
Lady’s rallied from a 16-10 deficit
at the end of the third quarter.

Joining Mackey in their offensive
attack were Charles Cooper with 11
and Tori Ingraham with three. -

For St. Cecilia’s, who only lost one
game all season long to St. Bede’s,
Cleveland Humes had seven, Ivoine
Ingraham Jr. six and Tyree Cole-
brooke five in the loss.

The Strikers opened up with an
8-4 win at the end of the first quarter.
They extended their lead to 14-7 at
the half before they built it up in the

third, only to watch as the Blue

Flames stormed back.

Crushers 41, Sparks 17: Except for
the first quarter when St. Bede’s
managed to open with a 5-0 lead and

SEE page 10








COACH: Donnie Culmer aves. instructions to the defending Catholic Peamanyé Schools boys basketball champions St. Bede’s



SAN Salvador players try to strip the ball in match up Print H O Nash,



| Action heats

up at Father
Marcian
Peters
Invitational

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



THE action intensified yesterday as teams jock-
eyed for a spot in one the six divisional finals of the
25th Father Marcian Peters Invitational Basketball
Tournament.

The week-long Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture’s sponsoréd tournament will wrap up
today .at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with the
champions being crowned in the primary boys
and girls, junior boys and girls, intermediate boys
and senior girls.

e Here’s a summary of some of the matches
played:

.Primary Girls

Temple Christian Academy Suns 17, St. Bede’s
Crushers 2: What started out as a real defensive
battle in the first quarter quickly turned into a
rout in the second as the Suns stayed undefeated
to advance to the championship.

“It was a really sloppy game. Our girls didn’t
really play as well as I expected, but I’m just
thankful that we are back to defend our title,”
said Temple Christian’s coach Keno Demeritte.

Dionnae Culmer scored St. Bede’s only two
points on a pair of free throws in the first quarter.

Freedom Academy 10, Yellow Elder 4: Shelly
Austile was a one-girl wrecking crew as she poured
in all the points for Freedom Academy as they
advanced to the championship.

Melisha Desima, on the other hand, was the
Jone scorer for Yellow Elder with four.

Primary Boys

Our Lady’s Blue Flames 21, St. Cecilia’s Strik-
ers 12: Charles Cooper netted 11 and Deangelo
Mackey eight as the Blue Flames prevailed in a
Catholic Diocesan showdown.

Junior Boys :

Harbour Island: Panthers 25, AF Adderley
Fighting Tigers 21: Rio Saunders scored 11 points
and Edward. Davis added five as the Panthers
kept their hopes alive of taking one of the titles
back to Eleuthera. :

Dario McKenzie and Alvano Miller had 10 and
six points respectively for the Fighting Tigers.

Harbour Island Panthers 40, St. John’s Giants
34: Edward Davis and Rio Saunders once again

had the hot hands, canning 13 apiece and they

got some hgelp from LaShawn Higgs with cigh!

and Torin Sweeting with six in the win fo; the
SEE page 10



O DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW. RIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Acti

FROM page nine



Panthers.

Anwar Neely had a game
high 16 and Aaron Campbell
10 in the loss,

Junior Girls

San Salvador 18, North

Andros 1; Erinisa Rolle’s

eight and Trevanna Knowles’
six was enough to lift San Sal-
vador to a big win as they
held their Family Island oppo-

nents scoreless for the first

three quarters.

“This is a really great feel-
ing for us,” said San Sal-
vador’s head coach Stephen
‘S’ Brown. “Our girls played
very well in that game.”

Tiashnique Miller hit the
first of two free throws in the
fourth to break the ice for
North Andros.

Westminister 14, San Sal-

vador 11: Aliyanna Morris
scored all five of her points
in the fourth quarter to help
preserve the win for the Lady
Diplomats as they clinched a
berth in the championship.
Pezrel Pickstock led the way
with eight and Angel Miller
added three.

“Based on our programme
that we started last year, we’re
just continuing to build on it,”
said Westminster’s head
coach Geno Bullard Sr. “This
is our second time in Fr. Mar-
cian. Last year we got third,
but we hope to win it this
year.”

Erininsa Rolle had seven in
the loss.

‘We didn’t play like we did
earlier in the day,” said San
Salvador’s coach Stephen
Brown. “They just didn’t want
it as much as J thought they





See RS SEE

i heats up at Father Marcian Peters Invitational

would.”
Senior girls
University School 57, North

‘Long Island '5: Shanae Arm-

brister connected on a game
high 24 points to lead two
other players in double fig-
ures as Keva Barr had 12
and Chrishanda Rahming 11
in their blowout win.

Annelicia Pinder and
Winique Wilson both scored
a basket in the loss.

RM Bailey Pacers 13,
Westminster 12: Diamonte
Barr came up with seven

and both Latasa Armbrister
Taylor :

and Tessacala
chipped in with four as the
Pacers pulled off a nail-
biter. :

Theagra Hanna matched
the game high honours with
seven in the loss as they got
eliminated.



FROM. page nine

then 8-1 before they took a
10-4 avantage at the break,
this one wasn’t even close.
Although they went on to
out-score St. Thomas More
12-4 in the second and 20-10
in the third, they went on a
: roll in the fourth, thanks to
:*point guard Kyle ‘Flash’
: Turnquest.
: Having gotten off to a slow
start, Turnquest came up big
in the fourth with 10 of his

Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools championship set

SCENES FROM THE
FATHER MARCIAN



ST JOHNS guard goes up for a layup.



ST JOHNS and R M Bailey went head to head yesterday with St Johns
winning the game 32 to 9.



SS Nw

game high f4 to enable St.
Bede’s to further blowout
their rivals from last year’s
final.

Malik Jones and Adrian
Mackey both had eight as
they helped out in the paint
after center Gregory Cooper
got into foul trouble. Michael
Brennen helped on the out-
side with six.

For St. Thomas More,
DeChaz Butler led their
attack with six, Davon Butler
had five and center Randy
forbes was limited to just two.





Nai RS

naa

Broncos running
Game picks up
for stretch run
FOOTBALL

: ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
: Associated Press

? THE NUMBERS don't
i lie. The running game of the
: Denver Broncos is on the
: upswing in time for the
: stretch run.

: The team ran for 136
: yards against the New York
: Giants and a week ago
? amassed 245 yards on the

} ground against Kansas City's

? defense.
: "J think we are pleased
? with what we've done the
: last few weeks," Denver
? coach Josh McDaniels said.
: "We've done it by showing
: improvement in a number
? of areas."
:. That includes Denver's
: output.on short-yardage and
:? goal line situations and a
: reduction to almost no neg-
: ative plays when the Bron-
: cos are running.
: "We struggled a little bit
: in the middle of the year
: with our short yardage and
: goal line," McDaniels said.
"Last week it was important
? for us to convert a few of
: those and also shore up on
: the goal line." |
: - One of the most successful
: short-yardage plays came
: early in the fourth quarter
: of the Kansas City game. On
? fourth-and 1 from the Chiefs
'18, rookie Knowshon
? Moreno scooted around the
: left side of the line, down
: the sideline and into the end
? zone.

"The biggest thing we've



_} always talked about is nega-

: tive plays and last: week I
i think we had 45 carries and
? one negative run," said
: McDaniels. ."That's a. good
i percentage for us and as




“tb long ‘as we continue to do

: that, ‘think we will be effec-
: tive running the ball."

: "It was always there, it
: was just a missed read here
i and there," Moreno said of
: the running game. "I think
? we're coming together more
: and trying to make the best
: of our opportunities."

: And just in time for the
: Broncos' upcoming matchup
: with the unbeaten Indi-
? anapolis Colts.

: ‘During film sessions, Den-
: ver's running game didn't
: get unnoticed by Indianapo-
? lis coach Jim Caldwell.

: "They are a very talented
? team, first of all, and they
: have a really strong running
? attack, too," Caldwell said.
: "Two outstanding backs that
i are doing a great job."

i? Two backs, the young
? Moreno and 31-year old
:-Correll Buckhalter, who are
: a perfect complement to
: each other.

? "Buck is a little faster, has
i a great burst and gets to the
edge on his speed,"
McDaniels said. "Knowshon
is a little bit of a slippery
runner inside the tackles, has
: a little more spin moves and
i does it in a different way."

i "I feed off of him and he
? feeds off of me," Buckhal-
: ter said of Moreno. "The
i guy plays with lot of tenaci-
ty and emotion and he
makes me feel young."







injuries across
{he hoard on
: Packers’ def line

! FOOTBALL
: GREEN BAY, Wis.
: Associated Press

GREEN Bay Packers
: defensive coordinator Dom
: Capers says a team can nev-
: er have enough big guys on
: defense.
i The Packers' top four line-
: men are on the injury report,
: potentially leaving the
: league's No. 1-rated defense
i short-handed going into
: Sunday's game at Chicago.
: Coach Mike McCarthy
: was optimistic after practice
: Friday that the Packers will
: have most of those injured
: players, if not all of them,
: available.
: Starting end Cullen Jenk-
: ins (hamstring) and rookie
: tackle B.J. Raji (ankle) are
i probable for the game.
THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2009; PAGE 11



CUBAN AMBASSADOR EXPRESSES GRATITUDE

Bahamas praised for backing fight against ‘genocidal’ US blockade

ee markably refreshing.
“TASTE IT ONCE — DRINK IT FOR LIFE



Kris ingraham/BIS
PICTURED FROM LEFT: Attorney General John Delaney and Mrs
Delaney; Sir Arthur Foulkes, Director General of Bahamas Information
Services; Branville McCartney, Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs;
Cuban Ambassador to the Bahamas Jose Luis Ponce and Mrs Ponce;
Mrs Lisa Sawyer-McCartney; Haitian Ambassador to the Bahamas
Harold Joseph; Lady Joan Foulkes; and Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of
the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas.

FROM page six

Columbus to the New World when the exploitation of this New
World-included the forced labour of indigenous Arawak Lucayan
Indians to work the gold mines of Cuba,” he said.

Mr McCartney expressed his confidence in the further devel-
opment of relations and spoke of the mutual benefits garnered over
the years through a number of bilateral agreements.

Diversity

“These agreements also evidence the rich diversity in our rela-
tions in scholarships, medical services, language teachers, air ser-
vices, tourism, public/private sector contacts and trade; as well as
the challenges still to be overcome in such areas as drug traffick-
ing, migration, and maritime delimitation,” Mr McCartney said.

The minister added: "The Republic of Cuba is truly.a country of
global outreach, with significant relations virtually on every con-
tinent in the world, and international leadership.”

' He cited Cuba’s tenure as immediate past chair of the Non- een Moc
Aligned Movement, an international organisation of 118 nations ih :

that consider themselves independent of any major power bloc, as as |
a testament to that leadership. as

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SAA AR SATE ERASMAS ASRS NASSAU SANNA NR NPA HN AHERN RNAS PAS AA ANABAENA ASA ARN MAO AN ARE





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