Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.290



The Tribune

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

ST eS



rake police in
id to raid bar

Incident one of five
robberies reported
over the weekend

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIVE men impersonating
police officers who were
attempting to rob a bar had to
flee after they were attacked
by its patrons, say police.

The incident was just one of
five armed robberies or
attempted armed robberies
reported over the weekend.

In one of them, a man was
shot in the left buttock after
being robbed of his wallet.

In another, aman anda
woman had cash and cell-
phones stolen from them at
Goodman’s Bay beach, with the
man subsequently forced into
the trunk of his friend’s car and
driven across the island.

Yesterday, it emerged that
police suspect three of the rob-
beries may have been commit-
ted by the same pair of armed,
masked men. They said they
are “developing information”
which they hope to release to
the public which may help them
capture the culprits.

The robbery spree comes
after former PLP cabinet min-
ister Leslie Miller was attacked
at his business, Sunburst Paint,
by two armed and masked man.

However, Superintendent
Elsworth Moss yesterday
declined to link this incident
with the other three involving
men going by similar descrip-
tions.

The incident in which the cul-
prits were pretending to be
police officers occurred just
after midnight on Saturday at a
bar on Armstrong and
Dowdeswell Street, in Nassau.

Recording the incident as an
armed robbery, police said:
“Five men entered the estab-
lishment, one clad in a police
jacket, another a bullet proof
vest, one in Dickies pants and
stripped shirt, armed with a
handgun entered the establish-
ment and began searching the
patrons.

“The patrons attacked the
men (verbally), who fled in a
white Altima, license plate
number 215959.”

Yesterday, bar owner Walles
Francois said he thought the
robbers were policemen as they
started searching various parts
of his business.

“They went into the kitchen
and started opening up all of
the cupboards. I went in and
asked them what they were

SEE page 11

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

JUST weeks before the
Christmas holidays, more
Grand Bahamians have been
forced out of work.

The 50-room Royal Palm
Resorts and Suites located
on East Mall and Settler’s
Way shut its doors last week,
The Tribune has learned,
although reports vary over
whether the closure is tem-

5

Quiznos

porary or permanent.

Grand Bahama MP Obie
Wilchcombe said he believed
almost 100 people had lost
their jobs. However, contrary
to reports from the Associ-
ated Press, he also claimed
his sources told him the hotel
is only shutting its doors tem-
porarily until tourism picks
up on the island.

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Davis set to be named
Leader of Opposition
Business in the House

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP DEPUTY LEADER Philip ‘Brave’
Davis is set to be named as the Leader of
Opposition Business in the House of Assem-
bly today, The Tribune can reveal.

According to well-placed sources within
the party, former Prime Minister Perry

Christie has opted to not return the post to
his long time friend and one-time rival Dr

SRT S

Bernard Nottage who recently opposed him
during the party’s 51st National Convention.
Having already lost his leadership bid in a landslide to the

SEE page 11

MEMBERS of ee

Bahamas Defence Force

PT at fee ME
Remembrance Day at the
Cenotaph in Nassau yester-
SUE AE ei
Cials gathered to pay their
respects to war veterans.
¢ SEE PAGE NINE


































Attempts to reach resort
representatives to confirm
the details were unsuccess-
ful up to press time yester-
day.

Suggesting that utilities
costs had placed extra pres-
sure on the resort, Mr Wilch-
combe called on the Gov-
ernment to ensure that assis-
tance with electricity bills



PLP to roll out
new election
candidates at
end of month

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal
Party is set to roll out its new
slate of candidates for the
next general election at the
end of this month, party
leader Perry Christie con-
firmed yesterday.

When the nominations are
ratified by the National Gen-
eral Council on the third
Thursday of this month, Mr
Christie says he fully expects
this new face of the PLP to
include a plethora of “young
men and women”.

As the PLP moves to ready
itself for the next general elec-
tion, the party leader said they
will be moving to live up to
the tenants of being a viable
alternative to the present gov-
ernment.

“But there will be a signifi-
cant number of young men
and women who, after the
third Thursday of this month
when we have everything rat-
ified by the National General
Council, we will put to the
Bahamian public so the
Bahamian public could draw
the right conclusions as to
whether or not the PLP is pre-
pared for the future and

SEE page 11

made available in New Prov-
idence extends to Grand
Bahama, which receives its
power from the Grand
Bahama Power Company.
“The Government has to
insist the Grand Bahama
Power Company do same
thing. While Government is

SEE page 11

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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Nurses union chief
to take ‘wait and
see attitude’ on

salary increases

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Nurses Union is to
take a “wait and see attitude”
towards the Prime Minister’s
announcement that the Gov-
ernment now has the money
to pay postponed salary
increases owed to nurses,
teachers and doctors and will
look to implement agreed
health insurance for nurses.

Cleola Hamilton, whose
membership staged a massive
sick-out earlier this year over
the Government’s decision to

postpone health insurance for
nurses, said she personally
had not heard Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments during his
speech on the final night of
the FNM convention and
would rather not conclude
that the payments and health
coverage will go ahead until
she sees it happen.

“Based on experience I am
going to say that we will have
to wait and see. The Govern-
ment made promises before
that it did not fulfil,” said Ms
Hamilton.

Speaking to FNM delegates
and the Bahamas via televi-
sion and radio on Friday

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PM HUBERT INGRAHAM

night, Prime Minister Ingra-
ham said he was “pleased to
announce we are now in a
position to pay what we owe”
to teachers, doctors and nurs-
es under contracts between
the government and the pub-
lic sector unions which repre-
sent those workers.

“We gat the money!” Mr
Ingraham exclaimed.

He said that an $800 lump
sum payment provided for
under a contract between the
government and the Bahamas
Union of Teachers would now
be paid, amounting to a total
cost to the public purse of $3.2
million.

Meanwhile, a four per cent
salary increase would be paid
to nurses, at an annual cost
of $18 million and a 1.5 per
cent increase in doctors’
salaries, equivalent to
$844,000 annually, also would
be forthcoming.

“We will commence dis-
cussions to agree a way for-
ward for the implementation
of the agreed health insurance
coverage for nurses,” said Mr
Ingraham.

All of these payments and
increases were postponed by
the Government mid-year
due to major shortfalls in gov-
ernment revenue. In his
speech, the Prime Minister
said the payments would be
back dated to July, so the
medics and educators could
expect some back pay.

The government will table a
supplementary Appropria-
tions bill for $26.5 million in
parliament on Wednesday to
cover the cost of the payouts
as well as the temporary jobs
programme planned.

“T wish to thank the teach-
ers, doctors and nurses of The
Bahamas for their forbear-
ance during these difficult
economic times,” he added.

Calls to Bahamas Union of
Teachers President Belinda
Wilson and other officials, as
well as Doctor’s Union Presi-
dent Norad Morgan, were not
answered yesterday.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3





LOCAL NEWS
â„¢ BAHAMAS GOUe FEEL TROPICAL STORM WINDS

Four killed in
two-car collision

Community shocked by tragic accident

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A COMMUNITY has been left reeling after a
horrific two-car collision killed four young men
and left another battling for his life in hospital.

Chief of the voluntary Abaco Crash Fire and
Rescue organisation, Colin Albury, said the scene
on Friday was one the most devastating he had
witnessed in 20 years, second only to the plane
crash that killed US popstar Aaliyah in Abaco
eight years ago.

He and a team of five volunteers were called
from their beds to help extract the young victims
from the carnage.

The incident came just hours after a 15-year-
old girl was killed in Nassau Village after being
flung from the Centre for the Deaf school mini-van
she was travelling in when the van was in a collision
with a car, bringing the number of traffic fatalities
for Friday alone to five.

Speaking of the Abaco crash, Mr Albury said:
“The impact when the cars collided was such that
everyone was crushed.

“The families are taking it really hard, naturally,
and where it’s getting close to the holiday season
having to bury a child is going to be very difficult.”

He added that the tight-knit local police force
had also been especially affected by the tragedy.

Man shot dead
hy police in
Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

er od ‘ola

FREEPORT - A MAN
was fatally shot by police Fri-
day evening in the Fawcett
Lane area.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said the incident occurred
around 11.20pm when officers
were dispatched to investigate
a disturbance in the area.

When they arrived at the
scene, officers were confront-
ed by a 27-year-old masn
who, it is claimed, was acting
in a disorderly manner. There
was a scuffle between the
police and the man, who was
then shot.

The man’s identification is
being withheld by police at
this time.

Pinder's Point
residents
expected to
demonstrate

RESIDENTS of Pinder’s
Point are expected to demon-
strate at the BORCO/Vopak
Bahamas today. Community
activist Troy Garvey held a
town meeting on Friday
evening with residents in the
area concerning odour emis-
sions in the settlements and
its impact on the health of res-
idents

Many residents have com-
plained of respiratory and
breathing problems, skin rash-
es, and nausea. They are call-
ing on the executives to meet
with them

Vopak has denied that its
operations are responsible for
making residents sick.



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Though reports are sketchy at this time, The }
Tribune understands that all of the men who died }
in the crash are in their twenties, and all from dif- }
ferent families in the Blackwood Community of }

only around 140 residents.

According to police, two cars — a grey volk- }
swagon Jetta driven by police constable 3229 }
Valentino Burrows, of Cooper’s Town, and a white }
Plymouth Acclaim driven by Ricardo Reckley — }
collided head on along S.C. Bootle Highway, south }
of Andy’s Service Station at around 10.20pm on Fri- ;

day.

New Providence for treatment.

Edison Cornish, a Blackwood resident said:
“Right now there’s a very solemn feeling in the :
town. Everything’s pretty sombre. We're all one }

family here.”
“The families aren’t holding up too good.”

Another Abaco source said: “It’s going to be a

horrible shock for the community.”

A team of police investigators from Nassau have
been sent to the island to help assist with the inves- }

tigation into the tragedy.

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elling solo, while Mr Reckley’s car contained sev- }
eral passengers. PC Burrows, Ricardo Reckley, }
Romeo McIntosh and Tony Curry all died of their }
injuries at the scene, while passenger Valentino }
McIntosh survived and had to be transported to }



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THE northern Bahamas
could experience tropical storm
winds as early Thursday as
Hurricane Ida makes her way
into the Gulf of Mexico.

According to Accuweath-
er.com, Hurricane Ida is
expected to make landfall
somewhere between Louisiana
and the Florida panhandle as
early as Tuesday morning.

The hurricane is expected to
head northeast across the US
southern coast and lose the
majority of its power, being
downgraded later into the week
to a Tropical Storm.

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‘an
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ann'
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Germany celebrates memory of wall falling

BERLIN (AP) — With concerts and
memorials on Monday, Germans will cele-
brate the day the Berlin Wall came crashing
down 20 years ago.

On that cold night, they danced atop the
wall, arms raised in victory, hands clasped in
friendship and giddy hope. Years of separa-
tion and anxiety melted into the unbeliev-
able reality of freedom and a future without
border guards, secret police, informers and
rigid communist control.

Germans are celebrating with concerts
boasting Beethoven and Bon Jovi; a memo-
rial service for the 136 people killed trying to
cross over from 1961 to 1989; candle lightings
and 1,000 towering plastic foam dominoes
to be placed along the wall’s route and tipped
over.

On Nov. 9, 1989, East Germans came in
droves, riding their sputtering Trabants,
motorcycles and rickety bicycles. Hundreds,
then thousands, then hundreds of thousands
crossed over the following days.

Stores in West Berlin stayed open late and
banks gave out 100 Deutschemarks in “wel-
come money,” then worth about $50, to each
East German visitor.

The party lasted four days and by Nov. 12
more than 3 million of East Germany’s 16.6
million people had visited, nearly a third of
them to West Berlin, the rest through gates
opening up along the rest of the fenced,
mined frontier that cut their country in two.

Sections of the nearly 155 kilometers (100
miles) of wall were pulled down and knocked
over. Tourists chiseled off chunks to keep as
souvenirs. Tearful families reunited. Bars
gave out free drinks. Strangers kissed and
toasted each other with champagne.

Klaus-Hubert Fugger, a student at the Free
University in West Berlin, was having drinks
at a pub when people began coming “who
looked a bit different.”

Customers bought the visitors round after
round. By midnight, instead of going home,
Fugger and three others took a taxi to the
Brandenburg Gate, long a no man’s land,
and scaled the 12-foot (nearly four meter)
wall with hundreds of others.

“There were really like a lot of scenes, like
people crying, because they couldn’t get the
situation,” said Fugger, now 43. “A lot of
people came with bottles” of champagne and
sweet German sparkling wine.

Angela Merkel, Germany’s first chancellor
from the former communist East, recalled
the euphoria in an address last week to the
US. Congress.

“Where there was once only a dark wall, a
door suddenly opened and we all walked
through it: onto the streets, into the church-
es, across the borders,” Merkel said. “Every-
one was given the chance to build something

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new, to make a difference, to venture a new
beginning.”

The wall the communists built at the height
of the Cold War and which stood for 28 years
is mostly gone. Some parts still stand, at an
outdoor art gallery or as part of an open-air
museum. Its route through the city is now
streets, shopping centers, apartment houses.
The only reminder of it are a series of inlaid
bricks that trace its path.

Checkpoint Charlie, the prefab that was
long the symbol of the Allied presence and of
Cold War tension, has been moved to a muse-
um in western Berlin.

Potsdamer Platz, the vibrant square that
was destroyed during World War II and
became a no man’s land during the Cold
War, is full of upscale shops selling every-
thing from iPods to grilled bratwursts.

Ata ceremony in Berlin Oct. 31, Helmut
Kohl, the German chancellor who presided
over the opening of the wall, stood side by
side with the superpower presidents of the
time, George H.W. Bush and Mikhail Gor-
bachev.

After the decades of shame that followed
the Nazi era, Kohl suggested, the collapse of
the Berlin Wall and the reunification of their
country 11 months later gave Germans pride.

In an interview in Moscow with Associat-
ed Press Television News, Gorbachev said it
was a catalyst for peace.

“No matter how hard it was, we worked,
we found mutual understanding and we
moved forward. We started cutting down
nuclear weapons, scaling down the armed
forces in Europe and resolving other issues,”
he said.

It all began with a routine late afternoon
news conference.

On Nov. 9, 1989, Guenter Schabowski, a
member of East Germany’s ruling Politburo,
casually declared that East Germans would
be free to travel to the West immediately.

Later, he tried to clarify his comments and
said the new rules would take hold at mid-
night, but events moved faster as the word
spread.

At a remote crossing in Berlin’s south,
Annemarie Reffert and her 15-year-old
daughter made history by becoming the first
East Germans to cross the border.

Years later, Schabowski told a TV inter-
viewer that he had gotten mixed up. It was
not a decision but a draft law that the Polit-
buro was set to discuss.

He thought it was a decision that had
already been approved.

That night, around midnight, border guards
swung open the gates.

(This article is by Matt Moore of the
Associated Press)



Questions
on marital
rape law

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE permit me
some latitude to join the
parade of persons who wish
to vent on the present topic
of choice — the proposed
amendment to the rape
laws/act to include “marital
rape.”

My simple questions are
really directed to Dr San-
dra Dean-Patterson and
Minister Loretta Butler-
Turner as they appear to be
the more visible proponents.

1) What is the statistics of
persons who are being
abused by their spouses who
do not report it. Let me
guess that it would be less
than 50 per cent...and would
you say that the main rea-
sons for not reporting are
fear and need for financial
assistance? Would these sit-
uations change with the pro-
posed amendment?

2) What is the success rate
for rape cases? Will this
amendment improve on this
considering in these cases
both persons will be expect-
ed to be in the home envi-
ronment unlike in many
rape cases?

3) What consideration is
being given to the Divorce
laws in this country? Will
refusal to have sex consti-
tute specific grounds for
divorce? Will refusal to
have sex on the night after
the marriage not make it
impossible to consummate
the marriage as such imme-
diate grounds for annul-
ment?

4) Our present laws con-
tain sufficient clauses to deal
with rape and abuse with-
out time constraints. Can a
spouse file for separation
and rape simultaneously
under present laws?

5) What is the present
divorce rate in our Christian
nation, say 60 - 70 per cent.
In your opinion will this
amendment improve this?
If not do you have any
regard for the “sanctity of
marriage”?

6) We may follow the
powerful UN, but I would
ask how many of the coun-
tries have complete freedom
of religion? Even our great
neighbour to the North has
taken religion out of their
schools and as such is in no
position to provide advice

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on this subject. We should
also note that their divorce
laws are exceedingly more
liberal.

Finally, I think we all
agree that rape is rape and
is unacceptable, however,
there is a small percentage
of men who have married
spiteful and/or vindictive

spouses who will use this as
an opportunity to attempt
to embarrass them by
parading them in front of
the courts because of other
unrelated situations...who
will protect these good
men? In my opinion even if
one innocent man is caught
in this situation that would
be too many. Thank you for
allowing me to vent.

K L BRATHWAITE
Nassau,
August 24, 2009.

The painting of the
House of Assembly

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“Having dwelt and served for more than forty years...” in
Parliament, the Prime Minister said, “and having derived
very great pleasure and advantage therefrom, I, naturally,
would like to see it restored in all essentials to its old form,

convenience and dignity.”

No, this wasn’t Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham express-
ing his “disgust” over some “misguided” artisan changing the
colour of the House of Assembly’s walls from the tradi-

tional green to a pale yellow.

British Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill, expressed
the sentiment in 1943 during a debate on rebuilding the
House of Commons, which had been destroyed by Ger-
man bombs in 1941 — two years after Britain declared war

on Germany.

While some members wanted to replace it with a roomi-
er building that could seat the burgeoning number of MPs,
Churchill and others wanted to recreate the original struc-
ture, which could only accommodate about two-thirds the

number of parliamentarians.

According to Ralph Keyes in The Quote Verifier,
“Churchill thought that being a bit overcrowded lent inten-
sity, drama and a sense of history to parliamentary pro-

ceedings.”

“We shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings

shape us,” Churchill said.

His position carried the day and the House of Commons
was restored to its traditional form in 1950.

At this point it’s still not known who is responsible for
causing taxpayers to have to foot the bill for a double
repainting of the august chambers of our House of Assem-

bly

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
September, 2009.

Issues with the
Montagu foreshore

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD like to con-
gratulate Ms Athena Dami-
anos for so eloquently stat-
ing the feelings of so many
of us that live off Eastern
Road and have to drive past
the Montagu foreshore. The
stench is appalling and we
have to endure it in order
to drive home.

The idea of a feeder road
is excellent and then we
would not have to stop while
somebody is making a pur-
chase, if not of fish then

=

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from the fruit vendor and
now the phone card seller. It
certainly is rather surprising
that some Member of Par-
liament who happens to live
in the Eastern area is not
conscious of the situation.

Perhaps the only alterna-
tive is to get a petition start-
ed and that would very
quickly be signed by many
who must drive past the
area.

HELEN ASTARITA
Nassau,
August 17, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP LEADER Perry Christie

PLP leader ‘felt sorry’ for
FNM Senator Ferguson

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Prime Minister
Perry Christie has said he
felt “sorry” for FNM Sena-
tor Johnley Ferguson who
lost his bid for re-election
to chairmanship of the party
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham personally nomi-
nated Carl Bethel for the
post.

Making light of the fact
that the nomination of Mr
Bethel had come as a sur-
prise to Mr Ferguson who
hours before had been cam-
paigning for the post, Mr
Christie said it was unfortu-
nate to see such an incident
take place to one of the par-
ty’s most loyal of support-
ers.

During his address to the
media yesterday at Gambier
House, Mr Christie noted
that the Prime Minister him-
self said there were discus-
sions taking place “three
months” ago as to who
might best be suited to be
chairman of the party lead-
ing into the next general
election. As such, Mr
Christie said he found it
“amazing” that Mr Fergu-
son was not included in
these talks.

“Well clearly it seems to
me, the FNM and its leader,
planning three months ago
did not tell Johnley Fergu-

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son or Ivoine Ingraham.
Clearly the ethical implica-
tions of that must be impor-
tant to the Bahamian peo-
ple. Key members of their
own organisation who were
campaigning hours before
the convention started for
the position of chairman.
“Yet the Prime Minister
said this decision was con-
templated and discussed and
presumably decided upon
months ago. This is more
interesting and intriguing for
us because this is the party
that questioned the level
and depth of democracy

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Christie warns
PM on ‘labelling’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP Leader Perry Christie warned the
Prime Minister yesterday to avoid the
practice of labelling politicians, as there
were many opportunities for him to
return the favour.

As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
poked fun at the fact that Mr Christie
would be close to 70 years of age when
the next general election is called in
2012, Mr Christie hit back stating that
the PM appears to be “so unfit as a per-
son” that “I labour watching him try to
walk.”

“So from my point of view let me just
say this, the Prime Minister should real-
ly be careful in establishing a culture of

politicians describing each other.
Because you know there are many won-
derful opportunities I would have if I
wanted to say what his friends (call him)
as he said what my friends (call me).
But I don’t want to go there because
that’s not the kind of leadership that I
exemplify,” he said.

PLP chairman Bradley Roberts also
chimed in, describing the Prime Minister
as a person incapable of working with
anyone who disagrees with his views.

“He ridiculed (William) Willy Wong.
Willy Wong represents the real estate
people (the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation).

“He wasn’t just speaking for Willy
Wong. He also did the same thing when
John Rolle, the former Controller of
Customs disagreed with him and offered

within the Mr
Christie said.

The PLP leader added
that it should also be point-
ed out that Mr Ferguson
was not only just the chair-
man of the FNM, but also
the Vice President of the
Senate and as such a mem-
ber of the FNM’s Parlia-

PLP,”

an outburst of laughter at
the party’s headquarters
yesterday.

As such, Mr Christie said
that the country is entitled
to ask why the Prime Minis-
ter would make such a polit-
ically self-serving decision
to the detriment of the Min-
istry of Education.

‘Honda Odyssey

mentary caucus.

“He was a Senator, a part
of the Parliamentary caucus
of the FNM and therefore
privy to the affairs of the
FNM. It is astounding there-
fore in terms of the assump-
tions we can infer, that any
discussions on the chair-
manship that took place
excluded such a person —
the chairman, Vice Presi-
dent of the Senate and a
member of the Parliamen-
tary caucus from those dis-
cussions.

“We use this example sim-
ply to say that the Bahamian
people had had an opportu-
nity to see contested elec-
tions in the PLP, to see the
results fairly arrived at, and
to see the PLP come togeth-
er as a mature party in the
aftermath of those elections
to prepare itself for the next
general elections.

“I feel sorry for people
like Johnley. Here is a man
who believes in his party;
gets up there and goes to his
convention only to find,
‘nobody moves, nobody gets
hurt’,” Mr Christie said to

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his point of view. That is the type of
man Hubert Ingraham is. When you dis-
agree with him then he wants to ridicule
you. That isn’t leadership my friend and
it certainly ain’t trust,” Mr Roberts said.

Speaking to his now rival on the gov-
ernment side, Mr Roberts said he
believes that FNM Chairman Carl
Bethel is a “fine young man” — but as to
his political acumen he has little to offer.

“He obviously is a strong supporter
of his party but I have not seen him per-
form at this level that he has been placed
at. I have been there and done that; 2002
the story is there.

“Bradley Roberts played a meaningful
role as chairman and also as a strong
advocate in the House of Assembly. I
intend to duplicate that whenever the
elections are called,” he said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Migration: A dirty word
or a global opportunity?

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat).

“MIGRATION not infre-
quently gets a bad press. Neg-

ative stereotypes, portraying
migrants as ‘stealing our jobs’
or ‘scrounging off the taxpay-
er’, abound in sections of the
media and public opinion espe-
cially in time of recession.”
That is the opening sentence
of the United Nations Human

Development Report 2009.
The report goes on to say
that “fears about migrants tak-
ing the jobs or lowering the
wages of local people, placing
an unwelcome burden on local
services, or costing the taxpay-
er money, are generally exag-

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gerated.” The Report asserts,
“when migrants’ skills comple-
ment those of local people,
both groups benefit” and it
makes the point that “the pol-
icy response to migration can
be wanting. Many governments
institute increasingly repressive
entry regimes, turn a blind eye
to health and safety violations
by employers, or fail to take a
lead in educating the public on
the benefits of immigration.”

Little wonder, then, that
immigration in most countries
has become a political prob-
lem. In the absence of factual
information on the benefits of
immigration to societies, the
view prevails that immigration
is harmful.

When some governments
release figures on the number
of migrants who have entered a
country, there is seldom, if
ever, a simultaneous release of
the number of people who
have left.

In many places, if the flow
of migrants was mostly out and
little in, the economies would
soon be in trouble as the pop-
ulation shrinks resulting in few-
er skills, a smaller labour force,
less demand for goods and ser-
vices and less money circulating
in the economy.

The global flow on migrants
is also vastly overestimated by
the majority of the world’s peo-
ple particularly because accu-
rate information is not only
sparse; it is simply not made
available to the public. For
example, the UN Report
reveals that the global figure
for international migrants in

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the world’s population has
stayed at only 3 per cent over
the past 50 years.

However, there are some
regions of the world where out-
ward migration has a peculiar-
ly negative impact because of
the type of people who
migrate, and the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) is one
such region where there is a
heavy outflow of tertiary edu-
cated people to the developed
countries, particularly Britain,
Canada and the United States.
Commonwealth Secretariat fig-
ures show that among the
CARICOM countries that
have lost more than 75 per cent
of their tertiary educated grad-
uates are Antigua and Barbu-
da, Belize, Dominica, Guyana,
Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad
and Tobago.

Unless these countries can
produce enough tertiary edu-
cated graduates to retain a suf-
ficient number for their own
development needs, not only
will the public and private sec-
tors suffer from a paucity of
knowledge-based skills and
entrepreneurial insights, but
their economies will become
uncompetitive and will decline.
The case for more investment
in education and human
resource development is there-
fore compelling.

It is a case that should be
developed by the CARICOM
Secretariat and jointly
advanced by CARICOM coun-
tries to the International Finan-
cial Institutions, such as the
World Bank, and the devel-
oped countries that benefit
from this migration, to make a
significant grant contribution
to education in the region.

There is, of course, another
side to the immigration story,
and that is remittances sent
back home from migrants
abroad.

In the 53-nation Common-
wealth, remittances have
become extremely important.
They are greater than official
development assistance and
second only to foreign direct
investment (FDI).

The Organisation for Eco-
nomic Cooperation and Devel-
opment (OECD) reckons that
total global remittances in 2008
were $328 billion as against
official development assistance
of $120 billion.

All CARICOM countries
benefit from remittances. The
leaders in 2008 in terms of
remittances per head of popu-
lation were Jamaica ($826), St
Kitts-Nevis ($760), Barbados
($659), Grenada ($603),
Dominica ($412), Guyana
($365) and Antigua and Bar-
buda ($305).

But, it is clear that in 2009,
the remittance figure declined
indicating that immigrants were
among the principal sufferers
in the countries to which they
had migrated.

Many of them lost jobs or
were constrained to accept low-
er wages and, thus, had less
money to send back home.

In this connection, while
remittances are important to
the economies of many
Caribbean countries, active
policies for attracting invest-
ment from the Caribbean Dias-
pora have to be developed for
the medium term.

Within CARICOM, the

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Fas

SIR RONALD SANDERS



problem of migration has
become a vexed one in the con-
text of the current global reces-
sion. As the 2009 UN Human
Development Report stated:
“The current recession has
made migrants particularly vul-
nerable. Some destination
country governments have
stepped up the enforcement of
migration laws in ways that can
infringe on migrants’ rights.”

It is a human reaction to try
to secure the interests of citi-
zens over migrants at a time of
crisis, particularly when the
migrant community is substan-
tial as in the cases in CARI-
COM of Antigua and Barbuda,
Barbados and Trinidad and
Tobago. Even though the
CARICOM Treaty acknowl-
edges “Freedom of movement
of People”, it is impractical to
simply rely on that as a justifi-
cation for migration. CARI-
COM ought to be considering a
more practical and realistic
approach to the issue until such
time as a Single Market and
Economy is fully completed.

One way of doing this would
be to develop a regional mech-
anism under which there would
be a partnership between coun-
tries of origin and destination,
supervised by a Council of
appropriate officials, to man-
age migration based on labour
needs with full respect for the
rights of workers and their fam-
ilies by the destination coun-
tries.

In early November, the for-
mer Prime Minister of Jamaica,
P J Patterson, quietly began
the Chairmanship of a Com-
mission on Migration and
Development.

The Commission is an initia-
tive of the Ramphal Centre in
London, named after the
Caribbean’s former Common-
wealth Secretary-General, Shri-
dath ‘Sonny’ Ramphal.

The Patterson Commission
is in its fledgling stage and it is
still to be funded fully, but the
meeting attended by represen-
tatives of the United Nations,
the Commonwealth Secretariat
and other multilateral organi-
sations displayed every sign of
new thinking on the issue.

The task before it is huge,
but Patterson has the gravitas
in the international community
to make the Commission’s
report a seminal document in
the international discourse on
how the issue of migration
should be tackled to maximise
its benefits.

Responses and previous

commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

www.icis.bs







THE TRIBUNE





“We have
commenced the

construction of
our health

bridge to the
future, a bridge
to connect all
Family Islands

and eventually
the world.”

HEALTH MINISTER
Hubert Minnis delivered a pas-
sionate convention speech on
Thursday outlining his “dream”
of equal access to quality and
affordable medical care for all
Bahamians.

He told FNM members how
the government is using tech-
nological, infrastructural and
legal advances to “build a
health bridge” to this future.

And he reaffirmed his gov-
ernment’s commitment to a
National Health Insurance
scheme, but criticised the PLP’s
plan in 2006 as unsustainable.

Dr Minnis asserted that the
FNM would introduce a plan
in a phased manner, starting
with the Chronic Non-Com-
municable Disease Prescription
Drug Plan, for which legisla-
tion has already been passed.

The drug plan, which is close
to implementation, provides for
free medications for 11 com-
mon chronic non-communica-
ble diseases such as arthritis,
glaucoma and breast cancer.

Dr Minnis said: “TI dream of a
Bahamas where there is no
poverty and no Starvation, a
Bahamas where quality and
affordable medical care is given
to all... regardless of race,
colour, religious denomination,
political affiliation or econom-
ic status.

“A Bahamas not separated
by water, a Bahamas where
individuals in the southern
islands as far as Inagua, Acklins
and Mayaguana as well as those
in the north such as Walker’s
Cay, Grand Cay and the Aba-
cos, receive the same medical
care and have access to spe-
cialist care without having to
travel to New Providence, plac-
ing extra financial burden upon
themselves and their families.

“A Bahamas where individ-
uals within Andros for exam-
ple, be they in the north, central
or south, have access to the
same quality care as those in
New Providence.”

Dr Minnis said he also
dreams of a time when tech-
nology will allow Bahamians to
get expert medical opinions
from abroad, and when the
country will be in a position to
benefit from the revenue and
job creation that medical
tourism could bring. “This
dream,” he said, “is becoming a
reality.”

“We have commenced the
construction of our health
bridge to the future, a bridge
to connect all Family Islands
and eventually the world,” said
the minister.

Among current and planned
advances in medical treatment,
Dr Minnis noted:

e A tele-medicine pro-
gramme in Abaco that allows
patients to be examined and
assessed by doctors in New
Providence without travelling
to the capital.

e A tele-radiology pro-



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



LOCAL NEWS

Dr Hubert Minnis: My dream
of affordable medical care

DR HUBERT MINNIS

gramme that will allow for
CAT scans performed in Grand
Bahama to be viewed and inter-
preted by doctors in New Prov-
idence and vice versa.

¢ The 52 per cent completion
of the introduction of electron-
ic medical records at all gov-
ernment clinics, providing up
to date patient information that
can be accessed throughout the
islands eliminating the need for
patients to travel with their
medical records, x-rays, et
cetera.

“We will soon say good-bye
to the duplication of patient
records at various clinics...
We will create a paperless envi-
ronment, improving both effi-
ciency and accuracy of medical
information,” said the minister.

Meanwhile, Dr Minnis added
that government has started
decentralising its clinics and
ambulance services in an effort
to improve “efficiency of treat-
ment” and provide faster
response times by dispatching
emergency teams from clinics
in the eastern, southern, and
western districts throughout
New Providence.

Contracts have been signed
for upgrades to the emergency
room at the Rand Memorial
Hospital and for three addi-
tional theatres at the Princess
Margaret Hospital to provide
for more out-patient and
orthopaedic surgery, while ren-
ovations to ease overcrowding
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital emergency room are
already underway,” he said.

Three men
in custody
after alleged
firearm find

THREE men were taken
into custody on Saturday
after allegedly being found
with an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition.

The arrests came at
around 1.15am after police
on patrol in the Collin’s
Avenue area said they
found one of the men in
possession of the .9mm
weapon and seven live
rounds of ammunition.



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.

Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.





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THE TRIBUNE



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BAHAMIANS attending ExpoCuba with Chamber of Commerce first vice-president Gershan Major (right).

Bahamians explore
business opportunities
at ExpoCuba trade fair

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMIAN entrepre-
neurs explored business
opportunities in Cuba, the
Caribbean and around the
world at one of the largest
trade fairs in the region held
in Havana.

A group of 10 Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce
(BCOC) delegates represent-
ing a cross-section of Bahami-
an industry worked their way
through the maze of stalls at
ExpoCuba in suburban
Havana to examine hundreds
of goods and services offered
by 51 countries around the
world.

As the successful business
people representing industries
ranging from construction to
agriculture, and tourism to
electrics, worked their way
through the fair they kept
their eyes peeled for new
products to further their busi-
ness and potential money-
making opportunities.

Inspired

The delegates were both
inspired and excited by the
prospects they found at the
27th Havana International
Trade Fair (FIHAV),
although the shrewdest
among them are holding their
cards close to their chest.

BCOC small businessman
of the year Marvin Stuart,
manager of Eagle Electrical
and Lighting on Harrold
Road, said he was impressed
by the enormity of the fair,
having attended dozens of
trade fairs around the world.

The four-day visit to Cuba
gave him the chance to evalu-
ate a range of new technolo-
gies in energy and electrics at
the fair, and he then stayed
on after the BCOC delega-
tion departed to visit manu-

facturers in Cuba.

Mr Stuart said: “It’s good
to be aware of what’s going
on in the market, especially
what’s in our backyard, and I
identified some good quality
products that would be wel-
come in our community at
affordable prices.

“Tf others are benefiting
from new technology then I
would want to implement that
in the Bahamas also, but if we
are not exposed to it, then
how would we know to take
advantage of it?”

He added: “It’s still too
early to conclude what possi-
bilities there may be in Cuba,
but I can say by all means,
this allows an opportunity to
consider the possibilities and
also the fact that we are
neighbouring countries shar-
ing the same boundary, in
terms of logistics, it could
make trade very easy.”

Top Builders International
president and BCOC director
Odley Aritis said: “The trade
fair was mind-boggling for me
but what stood out the most
was how we in the Bahamas
look north for opportunities
when opportunities are south,
east and west.

“We have become so
Americanised and some do
think that everything has to
come from Florida, but that
is not the case.”

Mr Aritis, who was accom-
panied by his son Arsenio
Martin, 23, a site manager for
Top Builders, identified build-
ing materials and other goods
available in Cuba and other
Caribbean countries.

One of the products that
sparked his interest was
offered by a Trindadian com-
pany providing custom-made
clay tiles at half the price of
those available in the United
States.

And his son identified
products he may be interested
in distributing in the
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Mr Martin said: “I saw dif-
ferent brands of packaged
foods we don’t have, and
there is a market for it, and
these companies don’t have
anyone to distribute their
products in the Bahamas.

“Tt’s a good opportunity
and would be a good invest-
ment.”

While Mr Martin was eval-
uating items for import, Cat
Island businessman Fritz
Stubbs, chairman and CEO of
the Orange Creek Develop-
ment Company Limited, was
looking for manufacturing
equipment to help mitigate
the Bahamas’ dependence on
imports and create products
for export.

As labour and production
costs are high in the Bahamas,
Mr Stubbs hoped to find
equipment that would make
production economically
viable.

He said: “Cuba has one of
the largest and most diverse
trade shows encompassing a
lot of areas that you wouldn’t
normally find.”

Incentives

Mr Stubbs also found it
helpful to meet government
representatives from various
countries to learn about the
incentives they offer, a rare
opportunity at trade shows.

BCOC director and presi-
dent of Epic Battery Limited,
Aaron Brice, said he would
like more Bahamians to get
involved in trade fairs and
travel to explore opportuni-
ties and gain a better under-
standing of the global market.

He said: “We are so shal-
low when it comes to oppor-
tunities. The trade show had
so many products, it showed
me how much other countries
are producing, but as Bahami-
ans we just don’t explore
these things. But we really
need exposure which will
broaden the basis of our
thinking.”

Agricultural entrepreneurs
Carolyn Humes, 45, and her
husband, pastor Orthnel
Humes, of Humes and Co
surveyors, found that Cuba
may be a good place to pur-
chase a wide variety of seeds
for their New Providence
farm off Bacardi Road.

Mrs Humes was impressed
with the show, and the way
Cuba and other counties
came together to promote the
Caribbean.

She said: “I saw how we
can take our farm to a new
dimension, and perhaps make
some new investments. After
this trip I feel our farm will
grow.”

The BCOC now intends to
work with other Caribbean
countries to form a Caribbean
exhibition area at the trade
fair next year, exhibiting
Bahamian products and ser-
vices for export for the first
time.

And Mr Aritis hopes the
Bahamas will then be able to
go one step further.

He said: “It is my dream
to see one day a trade fair like
that in the Bahamas.

“Being a tourist based des-
tination, it would bring a lot
of tourists to attend, and
because of our proximity
between the US and the
south, it would be an ideal
place for everyone to congre-
gate.”





&

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9

&

THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS



REMEMBRANCE

YOUNGSTERS
from the Red
Cross (left) and
from the Brown-
ies (below)
examine the
wreaths at the
Cenotaph yes-
terday during
Remembrance
Day. Pictured at
the bottom of
the page is the
Boys Brigade
marching.



















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PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

IN MEMORY OF BURNS HOUSE JUNKANOO FEST






A a bs , Ns

Se / SX, Ds
ry, Py a a a
* £ : ai = 4

ae

CTE 6

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

AGATHA DENICE NEELY

April §, 1969 - November 9, 2007

If tears could build a stairway and
memories were a lane.
We would walk all the way to heaven
to bring vou home again,

There were no time to say goodbye, you
were gone before we knew it, and only
God knows why.

We missed your smile, your voice
and your laughter.

Our hearts still ache over your departure,
and although secret tears still flows.
What it means to lose you, only God will
ever know,

Lovingly Remembered by your Children,
Larae and Laren Neely, Brother, Aunts,
Uncles, Relatives and Friends.

FYNES FAMIL

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral

f y f | Uy ) pacer fd Al RPO RT
| “\ FUSION OF — ARTWORK
CULTURE & FUR PROGRAM

¢ Home Cookery ¢ Radio Remote
Steak & Cae pze's D wi Star 106.5 |
e “West End” Conch Salad | * Dance 7, ©
¢ Fried Fish & Panny Cake wi DJ-Dion “D f INFORMATION WORKSHOP
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. Hoopla ce iW I Are you 4 Bahamian vauel media amet looking to make your mark in the
e Whist Tournamen on I new terminal buildings at the Lynden Finding International Airport?
Nassau Aion Development Company is seeking local artists to create
permanent ert displays for the new airport facilities. There wil be e Sotal

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project is completed

ana Sur prizes! Our goal is to create a local sense of place’ at our country's major

: — galeway and we need your help. Ve want arists 10 caplure the essence
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7 Bethel Baptist Church Time: 7:15 p.m.

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package at MAD's offices at tha recepton desk on the second floor
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Please RSVP with Mrs. Billy Dorsett
Executive Assistant

Ph: (242) 702-1003 or billy dorsetti@inas. bs
Nassau Alton Development Company
P.O, Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

“ Saturday, November 14, 2009, at The Priory Grounds, West Street

From 12noon Until!

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

doing, because they didn’t show
any warrant. Then I said that I
was going to call Central Police
Station and they started row-
ing with me, saying ‘Shut up,
shut up!’.”

Unable to make contact with
police on 919, Mr Francois said
he left the bar to go to the
police station where he report-
ed the incident. He claims offi-
cers told him that they were not
aware of anyone authorising a
search of his bar.

Meanwhile, the men fled in
the Nissan after people drink-
ing in the bar began verbally
harassing them. “They kept
shouting at them, asking them

Fake police

what right they have to come
in here and do this,” said Fran-
cols.

Yesterday, Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said he was
unaware of claims that any of
the men involved may have
been police officers but said he
would investigate.

Meanwhile, it was around
three hours later at 3.15am that
aman and a woman who were
on Goodman’s Bay beach were
approached by two men wear-
ing dark clothes and masks over
their faces.

Police said the men, armed
with handguns, ordered them

Davis set to be named Leader of
Opposition Business in the House

FROM page one

incumbent leader, many political observers have been waiting
with baited breath to see who would be appointed to the Leader of
Opposition post that Dr Nottage had enjoyed prior to the party’s

convention.

While some observers expressed shock and disappointment
with Mr Christie over this new decision, they pointed out that
the former Prime Minister had always warned there would be
“consequences” for those who had opposed him for the leadership

of the party.

“Tt was always known that something had to give, either a nom-
ination, or the Leader of Opposition post, but we all were holding
out hope that he would make the more politically astute decision
and return the post to Dr Nottage.

“He performed adequately in the post before and has been a stel-
lar Opposition business leader. He is always in the chamber on time
and is a seasoned politician who can carry an argument with the

best of them.

“It’s ashame that those skills and qualities would now be lost to
the party because he ventured too far beyond what the leadership
deemed an acceptable position,” a source added.

When questioned directly by The Tribune yesterday during the
PLP’s press conference at Gambier House, Mr Christie would
only remark that he had made his decision.

Reclining in his chair, the PLP leader said he will make the
announcement of who will be the new leader of Opposition Busi-
ness when the House reconvenes today. It should be noted that dur-
ing yesterday’s press conference, Mr Davis was seated at the podi-
um with Mr Christie and PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts as Dr
Nottage sat with a group of other PLP supporters and Members of

Parliament in the crowd.

Attempts to contact Dr Nottage for comment after the press con-

ference were unsuccessful.

FROM page one

understands the need to have
access to the advice and views
of young people.

“Yes, this is the time not
for flowery speeches. This is
the time for real action and
we are going to show them
real action,” Mr Christie
vowed.

Among the new candidates,
Mr Christie said, are expected
to be qualified professionals
such as the party’s deputy
chairman Alex Storr and
attorney Ryan Pinder.

At the party’s press confer-
ence at Gambier House yes-
terday, Mr Christie also added
that the party will be making
itself available through regu-
lar press briefings so that the
country can be made aware
of the position of the party
and that of its respective can-
didates.

“But certainly the next two

PLP to roll out new
election candidates
at end of month

years in the country will be
exciting years and the PLP
will work assiduously to
ensure that the people of the
Bahamas will have an excel-
lent choice to make, and that
is to see us as the right party
for the job leading into the
next general election. And we
are going to create a lot of
excitement in terms of the
things we do and I believe
people are going to be excited
to see the kind of people who
are prepared to engage in pol-
itics with the PLP,” he said.

In 2007, the PLP ran a can-
didate in 39 constituencies,
winning 17 seats. As it stands,
the party is expected to run
41 candidates in the 2012 gen-
eral election.

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out of the woman’s 1993 Toy-
ota Tercel, and robbed them of
their cell phones and cash.

The man was placed in the
trunk of the car by the
assailants, who then drove them
to Marshall Road at the rear of
Mt. Nebo Baptist, where they
were released. The suspects
sped off in the car belonging to
the woman.

The next strike of the sus-
pected serial robbers took place
at 3.41pm on Saturday after-
noon on Cowpen Road - the
first of two armed robberies
that would take place in that
area

A man who was at a carwash
reported being approached by
two men wearing maks and
dark clothing who robbed him
of his Silver Toyota Windom,
license plate number 902714, a
cellular phone and an undeter-
mined amount of cash. They
then fled in a westerly direc-
tion.

Again at 10.10pm on Satur-
day evening, a man walking
through a short cut between
Hutchinson and Eneas streets

Resort

closure
FROM page one

offering assistance to resi-
dential consumers and busi-
nesses in New Providence,
here in Grand Bahama
there’s nothing being done.
“Hundreds are living with-
out electricity and many busi-
nesses are in dire circum-
stances. People are really
feeling the pinch,” he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said the
extent to which the closure
of the resort further dimin-
ishes the number of hotel
rooms available in Grand

was accosted by a man carry-
ing a dark firearm who
demanded cash, police went on
to report.

“The culprit shot the male in
his left buttock and took his
wallet containing undetermined
amount cash.

“He then made his escape on
foot,” said police.

Hours later, at around
3.30am and again in the Cow-
pen Road area, a woman was
robbed after she opened her
front door to a man she recog-
nised.

“She was at home when she
heard a knock at her door. The
resident looked outside and
recognized a male whom she
knew. She opened the door,
and two masked gunmen clad
in blue jeans pants entered her
home robbing her of three gold
rings and an undetermined
amount of cash.”

The men fled the area in a
grey vehicle in an unknown
direction.

On Sunday police assured
that they are vigorously inves-
tigating each of these incidents.

OBIE WILCHCOMBE

Bahama is another cause for concern at a time when the
island needs to draw as many Visitors as it can, and offer a
range of rooms at varying prices.

He called on the “major players” in Grand Bahama, such
as Hutchinson Whampoa, which owns various assets in
Freeport including the Our Lucaya hotel, to invest more in
promoting the island to visitors.

“You’re in a very slow period and there’s no evidence
there’ll be an early turnaround. Occupancy is very low at
major hotels in Freeport and elsewhere.”

Although the recent introduction of twice-weekly direct
flights by West Jet from Canada to Freeport will boost
tourism, noted Mr Wilchcombe, the airline is set to review
whether it wants to continue with this schedule come April
2010, leaving the future uncertain.

Calls to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and Tourism Min-
ister Vincent Vanderpool Wallace were not returned up

to press time.



SSS
RBC FINCO is considering applications for

Sales Manager,
Mortgage Specialist
RBC FINCO, Mortgage Centre

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

¢ Acollege degree in Banking (or a related field)

¢ Atleast 5 or more years retail banking experience
in a lending role. Previous experience in portfolio
and liability administration would be an asset.

¢ Negotiating/Selling skills

¢ Strong leadership, coaching, relationship building,
problemsolving and confidentiality skills

¢ Ability to manage multiple priorities

¢ Ability to make sound credit analysis

* Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)

Responsibilities include:

¢ Achieving business results through sales and market
management, implementation of strategic direction
and representation in the market place.
Working in partnership with the Network Sales
Teams to implement strategies, processes and
disciplines to achieve sustainable earnings and
revenue growth through the sales force.
Developing an effective adaptable sales force to
maximize revenue and productivity opportunities.
Championing sales management practices to
achieve superior client experience and enhance
employee capability and engagement while

leveraging

RBC Financial Group capabilities

including branches, alternate delivery channels

and service partners.

A competitive compensation package (base salary &
bonus) commensurate with relevant experience and

qualifications is offered.

Please apply by November 9, 2009 to:

Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Bankin

RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office

PO. Box N-7549

Nassau, N.P Bahamas
Via fax: (242)322-1367

Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



ROUND-UP |

MADRID (AP) — Sport- }
ing Gijon beat Espanyol 1-0 }
and Athletic Bilbao topped }
Racing Santander 2-0 to





tied for seventh in the stand-
ings with 16 points. :
Almeria beat Osasuna 2-0 }
following an own-goal by Jose }
"Josetxo" Romero in the sec- }
ond minute and Kalu Uche's }
90th-minute strike. Valladol- ;
id and Xerez drew 0-0. ;
Both Barcelona and Real }
Madrid maintained their }
strong starts to the season }
with victories on Saturday.

FRANKFURT — Ham- }
burger SV and Werder Bre- }
men lost ground in the Bun- }
desliga after draws. :

Jiri Stajner earned and con- }
verted a dubious late penalty }
for Hannover to salvage a 2-2 }
draw with Hamburg, while :
Borussia Dortmund's Lucas }
Barrios scored an equalizer }
for his sixth goal in six games }
inal-1 draw with Bremen. }

Milivoje Novakovic scored }
to give Cologne a 1-0 win at }
bottom-place Hertha Berlin. }

Hamburg and Bremen :
both have 23 points to be }
three behind leader Bayer }
Leverkusen. :

PARIS — Yohan Cabaye }
and Florent Balmont scored }
in the second half to give Lille }
a 2-0 victory over defending }
champion Bordeaux in the }
French league. i

Bordeaux's third defeat of }
the season means Lyon can }
move one point clear at the }
top if it beats Marseille at }
Stade Gerland in Sunday's }
late match. i

GLASGOW, Scotland — }
Celtic conceded a late equal- }
izer in a 3-3 draw at bottom- }
place Falkirk, squandering the }
chance to build a bigger lead }
over second-place Rangers in }
the Scottish title race. i

The draw left Celtic on 24
points, two points clear of }
defending champion Rangers, }
which hasagameinhand. }

Two goals from Kris Boyd }
gave Rangers a 2-1 victory }
against St. Mirren on Satur- }
day. :

RESIDENTIAL
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Terry gives Chelsea
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SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

JOHN TERRY headed Chelsea to
a 1-0 victory over Manchester United
on Sunday that extended his team's
Premier League lead to five points.

Chelsea had been frustrated by
United for 76 minutes, but then prof-
ited from a contentiously awarded
free kick when United midfielder
Darren Fletcher was judged to have
fouled defender Ashley Cole.

Frank Lampard whipped the ball
into the penalty area and captain Ter-
ry connected with a glancing header
to clinch Chelsea's 11th consecutive
win in all competitions at Stamford
Bridge.

"It was a bad decision, but there's
nothing we can do about it. You lose
faith in refereeing sometimes," said
United manager Alex Ferguson, who
is already facing a Football Associa-
tion punishment for criticizing match
officials.

"The referee's position to make
the decision was absolutely ridicu-
lous, he can't see anything,” Ferguson
said. "He's got a Chelsea player (Joe
Cole) standing right in front of him
and he doesn't even move."

A third league loss for Ferguson's
team leaves it, along with Arsenal,
five points adrift of Chelsea going
into the two-week international
break. Sixth-place Liverpool hosts
Birmingham in Monday's match.

Also Sunday, Fulham earned a
point at Wigan after U.S. striker Clint
Dempsey was brought down by Titus
Bramble and then scored from the
resulting penalty kick.

Everton won 2-1 at West Ham and
Hull defeated Stoke by the same
score.

CHELSEA'S JOHN TERRY, left, celebrates scoring the only goal
of the game with teammate Frank Lampard during the English Pre-
mier League match against Manchester United at Stamford Bridge,

London, Sunday Nov. 8, 2009. (AP)
































































CHELSEA'S JOHN TERRY, right, jumpssto
head the ball in to s¢ore against Manchester
United during their English Premier League
soccer match at Stamford Bridge, London,
Sundayy Nov. 892009. (AP)
oy

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Results

Here’s a look at the team
and individual results:
Under 10 girls Team title -
Temple Christian

1 - Danielle Rodgers,
Temple Christian School;
2 - Brinti Fountain,
Queen's College; 3 -
Aaylehya Nixon, Albury
Sayle Primary.

Under 10 Boys Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by Albury Sayles.

1 - Godfrey Arthur, Tem-
ple Christian School; 2 -
Trent Deveaux, Kingsway
Academy; 3 - Ryan
Bethel, Xavier Primary
School.

Under 12 Girls Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by Gerald Cash.

1 - Blayre Catalyn, Saint
Bede's; 2 - Dianea Noe,
Uriah McPhee; 3 - Andira
Ferguson, Temple Christ-
ian Schools.

Under 12 Boys Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by St. John’s

1 - Julius Nottage, Temple
Christian Schools; 2 -
Chavez Cooper, Gerald
Cash Primary; 3 - Vernon
Marshall, Jordan Prince
Williams.

Under 13 Girls Team title
- Queen's College, fol-
lowed by Anatol Rodgers
and CH Reeves.

1 - Dreshanae Rolle, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Keithra Pickstock, Temple
Christian School; 3 -
Charis McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers.

Under 13 Boys Team title
- C.H. Reeves, followed by
Anatol Rodgers and SC
McPherson.

1 - Jackson Knowles, L.W.
Young; 2 - Kinard Rolle,
Saint Augustine's College;
3 - Gamildo Rolle, L.W.
Young.

Under 15 Girls Team title
- T.A. Thompson, fol-
lowed by CH Reeves and
LW Young.

1 - Talia Thompson,
Queen's College; 2 -
Johnique David, T.A.
Thompson; 3 - Vanillian
Walker, Queen's College.
Under 15 Boys Team title
- Queen's College, fol-
lowed by TA Thompson
and CH Reeves.

1 - Keric Rolle, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Darron Young, T.A.
Thompson; 3 - D'Mitry
Charlton, Queen's Col-
lege.

Under 17 Girls Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
RM Bailey and Anatol
Rodgers.

1 - Katrina Seymour,
Queen's College; 2 - Ash-
ley Johnson, Saint
Augustine's College; 3 -
Angela Cherilus, Anatol
Rodgers.

Under 17 Boys Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CC Sweeting and RM Bai-
ley.

1 - Desmond Major, Saint
John's College; 2 - Marvin
Minns, Saint John's Col-
lege ; 3 - Karon Pratt,
Mount Carmel.

Under 20 Girls Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CC Sweeting and CI Gib-
son.

1 - Florazel Russell, C.R.
Walker; 2 - Kendra
Humes, C.R. Walker; 3 -
Oliver Braynen, Aquinas
College.

Under 20 Boys Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CI Gibson and RM Bailey.
1 - Audley Carey, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Leonardo Forbes, Zion
Christian School; 3 - O'Jay
Ferguson, C.R. Walker.

Suns shine as the primary school
champs for fifth consecutive year

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE hill played a factor
in the performances of many
of the competitors who com-
peted in the CH Reeves’
11th annual High School
Invitational Cross Country
Championships on Saturday
at Fort Charlotte.

Hundreds of competitors
from a number of public and
private schools participated
in the event on the obstacle
course at Fort Charlotte, but
it appeared that it didn’t
hamper the Temple Christ-
ian Academy Suns and the
CR Walker Knights.

While the Suns shined for
the fifth consecutive year as
the primary school champi-
ons, winning both the boys
and girls 10-and-under and
12-and-under divisions, the
Knights polished off their
trophy case to add the boys
and girls under-17 and
under-20 crowns.

The junior high division
saw the Queen’s College
Comets capture the under-
13 girls and under-15 boys
titles. Host CH Reeves took
the under-13 boys and T.A.
Thompson carted off the
under-15 girls.

“T’m overwhelmed. I nev-
er anticipated in my wildest
dreams that we would have
this type of crowd. This is
the biggest Cross Country
that we’ve had,” said meet
organiser Fritz Grant.

“God blessed us with
some great weather and the
performance of the athletes
was just outstanding. We
were able to control the
course and made it much
more managerial for the ath-
letes.”

Grant said they are now
looking at further expanding
the championships to the
point where they are going
to invite the Family Islands
and possibly some schools
from the United States to
participate next year.

Trevor Grant, whose com-
pany Windshield House and
Glass Accessories Locator
have been sponsoring the
event for the past three
years, said they have been so
impressed with the consis-
tent growth that they will
definitely be back next year.

“Tt’s much better than we
anticipated. Last year, we
had about 550 students. This
year we doubled those fig-
ures easily. So I’m just elat-
ed that as a corporate spon-
sor, we were able to give
something back,” he said.

“Even in these tough
financial times, we are just
happy to make the effort.
Just to look in the faces of
these young kids and to see
the excitement, we just want
to see this continue.”

A number of the competi-
tors interviewed were quite
excited about their perfor-
mances.

Godfrey Arthur Jr, the
repeat under-10 boys cham-
pion from Temple Christian,
said it was good.

“The hill was hard, but
there was like 20 people
running with me out front.
People were bumping into
each other,” said the nine-

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MEMBERS of the CR Walker Knights celebrate together. Head coach
Floyd Armbrister is at left and assistant coach Tyree Curry at right...

year-old fourth grader.
“When I went up the hill,
everybody started walking,
so that was where I got
away.”

Former Temple Christian
Academy versatile Talia
Thompson, now in the
eighth grade at Queen’s Col-
lege, noted: “It was all right.
The start was hard because
everybody was together.

“The hills was hard. I
know it was crowded so it
was hard to go around so
many people.”

The 13-year-old held off a
strong challenge from
Johnique David, a 13-year-
old ninth grader at TA
Thompson.

“At first it was okay, then
it started getting harder
around the hills. So we just
tried to finish it off,” said

David, who added that she
tried to work with Thomp-
son, who passed her on the
hill to win.

The under-15 boys cham-
pion was Keric Rolle, who












%
%

4
c
wa?
4

won the first victory for his
family after his younger
brother Kinard had to settle
for second in the under-13
boys behind Jackson
Knowles from LW Young,
while bigger brother Cerio
Rolle took home the open
boys title.

Fast

“Tt was good. At first it
started off fast, but I had the
lead, so I had to maintain it.
I just ran my race,” said
Keric, a 14-year-old 10th
grader at St. Augustine’s
College. “On the first lap,
about 10 metres into it, I
took the lead. I feel good.”

Big brother Cerio, an 18-
year-old second year student
at the College of the
Bahamas, held off SAC’s
Audley Carey in a sprint to
claim the open men’s title.

“The race was nice. We
took it out nice and slow and
then we picked it up,” he
said. “I know I didn't have

THE Temple Christian Academy Suns dominated the CH Reeves
Cross Country primary schools division once again. Some of the
athletes pose above with their trophies. At left is coach Sherry Mur-
ray and at right is coach Keno Demeritte...

the fitness, so I just sat in
there and when we came
down to the last 150, I just
had to do my finish kick.”
Carey, the 16-year-old
11th grader who was
crowned the under-20 cham-
pion, said: “It was good. I
felt good while I was run-
ning. I started off with an
even pace.”
The under-17 divisions
were both keenly contested.
In the girls’ race, Queen’s
College 11th grader Katrina
Seymour out-sprinted SAC’s
middle distance runner Ash-
ley Johnson for the title.
“Going into the race, I
was a little scared. Then, I
just listened to my coach
when I was winning the race
and I just gave it all I had,”
said the 16-year-old Sey-
mour, who competed on the
women’s 4 x 400 relay team
at the 12th IAAF world
Championships in Berlin,

Germany in August.

Johnson, however, noted
that she was not intimidated
at all by Seymour.

“Tt wasn't bad. I just felt
like I could have hung on a
little longer. It was a good
race. It was harder than I
expected,” said the 16-year-
old 11th grader.

And in the boys’ under-17
division, Desmond Major
out distanced his St. John’s
teammate Marvin Minns to
secure his win.

“That race was tough. The
hills killed me,” said Bain, a
15-year-old 11th grader.
“Coming down on the last
lap, from the northeast cor-
ner straight to the hills, that
was where I saw Marvin.”

Minns, a 16-year-old 11th
grader, said “It was a good
race. I paced myself and
took them off one by one.
But Desmond is a tough ath-
lete.”

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

an
WY

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



il

MEACHER MAJOR

Meacher
Major loses
title defence

MEACHER ‘Pain’
Major lost his bid to suc-



Baseball elections see
Kemp, Sweeting returned

CRAIG ‘Salty’ Kemp and The-
dore Sweeting were returned as the
two principal figures at the
Bahamas Baseball Federations his-
toric election of officers on Satur-
day.

The elections, held during the
Annual General Meeting, was
staged for the first time outside of
New Providence. But nothing
changed in the post for president
and secretary general as Kemp and
Sweeting were re-elected to those
positions respectively.

Both Kemp and Sweeting were
praised for the job they are doing.

cessfully defend his Others elected are as follows:

NABA lightweight title to Etienee Farquharson from Inagua
American Dorin Spivey Baseball League as the first vice
on Friday night in Buffa- president; Alonzo Pratt from the
ae ae Grand Bahama Amateur Baseball
sinpped the aunt <2 see: Association as second vide presi-

onds into the fourth
round after Spivey
unloaded a booming right
that hurt Major. The blow
came after Spivey
unloaded a flurry of unan-
swered punches.

Spivey, who improved
his record to 36-6 with 29
knockouts, dropped
Major (16-4-1) twice in
round two, the second
one just before the bell
sounded.

Both boxers fought a
spirited third round, trad-
ing bombs on each other
and taking turns shaking
the other one up before
Spivey went to work in
the fourth.

Spivey, 36, was working
with former world cham-
pion Pernell Whitaker in
the lead up to the fight
that was one of the many
exciting bouts on the card
promoted by Nick
Garone of X-Cel World-
wide at the Buffalo Nia-
gara Convention Center
in downtown, Buffalo,
New York.

It was Major’s third
fight under his contract
with X-Cel Worldwide.
Major won his debut on

dent; Bertram Murray from the
JBLN as third vice president and
Edward Claude, of the representa-
tive for the Grand Bahama Little
League District as fourth vice pres-
ident.

The assistant secretary general is
Jeannie Scavalla from Freedom
Farm. The treasurer is Marsha
Munnings from New Providence,
assisted by Stephen Adderley from
the Grand Bahama Little League.

The Major items coming out of
the AGM are as follows:

1) the National Baseball Cham-
pionship will take place from J3-6 in



FRONT ROW: Edward Claude, Marsha Munnings, Craig Kemp, Jeannie Scavella, Theodore Sweeting
Back Row: Stephen Adderley, Etienne Farquarson, Alonzo Pratt, Bertram Murray

Grand Bahama, the first time that
it’s also done outside of New Prov-
idence.

2) the BBF Life Time Achieve-
ment Awards will be presented to
three honorees to be named at a
later date.

3) The Bahamas Government has

given its approval for the BBF and
the Grand Bahama Little League
to host the 2010 Little League 11/12
Caribbean Zone Qualifying Tour-
nament.

The tournament will run from
July 10-17 in Grand Bahama and
the winner will represent the

Caribbean in Williamsport, Penn-
sylvania at the 11-12 Little League
World Series, carried live on ESPN.

The Membership of the BBF has
decided to do its part to assist the
economy of Grand Bahama with
the hosting of its two major events
in 2010 on the island.

| Wildcats take the title

FROM page 15

ons Commando Security Truck-
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In that game, Lyle Sawyer
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mound over Freddie ‘the Skip-
per’ Cornish, who migrated
from Abaco as the ace pitcher
on the island to play in New
Providence.

The Truckers, however, came
back and took their frustration
out on the Panthers with an 11-

February 20 with a sixth 5 decision before Long Island
round TKO over Kevin ran into their problems against
Carmody. Grand Bahama.

However, he ended up
with a “no contest”
against Michael Clark on

Darren Mortimer came in
relief of starter Anton ‘Bookie’
Gibson for the win over Pedro

June 19 for the NABA Marcellus. Terran ‘Pooh’ Wood
title on June 6 after the and Jamal ‘Sarge’ Johnson both
fight was stopped in the homered in the game for the

first round.

Major, 28, was eventu-
ally awarded the decision
and given the title that he
defended against Spivey.
Major was unavailable for
comments. He is due to
return home today.

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COMMANDO SECURITY TRUCKERS’ infielder Julian Collie tags a
Green Turtle Cay Turtles’ player too late as he slides into third
base.

Stingrays beat Warriors

THE V8 Fusion Stingrays
came out with a strict game
plan, to establish the running
game en route to evening
their win loss total.

The Stingrays scored four
rushing touchdowns and
improved their record to .500
at 2-2 with a 36-12 win over
the Kingdom Warriors in
Commonwealth American
Football League play yester-
day at the D.W. Davis field.

Jamal Storr scored led the
way with three touchdowns,
two on the ground and from a
kick return on special teams.

The Stingrays came out on
the game’s opening drive with
eight consecutive run calls,
taking advantage of an under-
sized Warriors defensive line.

Storr capped the opening
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The Stingrays failed to con-
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the Stingrays offense again
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This time Jamal Coleby
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zone.

The Stingrays defence
forced a safety to take a 16-0
lead into the half. The War-
riors reached the end zone for
the first time all season on the
opening drive of the second
half. A nifty quarterback
scrambled gave the Warriors
their first touchdown and
trimmed the deficit to 10, 16-6.

The Stingrays would
respond, once again with
Storr capping a drive with a
touchdown run from 15 yards
out.

Without the conversion the
Stingrays led 22-6.

The Warriors’ second score
of the game came on the
defensive side of the ball as
they recovered a botched
handoff and returned the
fumble for six.

With a tentative 22-12 lead,
the Stingrays defence would
again step up to force the
issue and create big plays
when the team needed it
most.

After the Stingrays failed
to convert on fourth down,
Carl Rolle intercepted a pass
from the safety position to
give the ball back into the
hands of his offence.

V8 Fusion quarterback
Nesley Lucien was then
picked off by the Warriors
defence swinging the momen-
tum back into his team’s
favour.

The team continued to
trade turnovers when Anwar
Godet broke free to sack the
quarterback and force a fum-
ble, which the Stingrays
recovered and advanced into
Warriors territory..

Stingrays running back
Renaldo Dorsett ran in the
team’s fourth rushing touch-
down three plays later, and
Lucien scrambled for the suc-
cessful two point conversion
to give the Stingrays a 30-12
lead with 20 seconds remain-
ing. Storr scored his third
touchdown and capped the
scoring flurry on the game’s
final play.

He recovered the ball on a
squib kick and raced down
the right sideline for a touch-
down for the game’s final
margin.

“We wanted to come out
here and get a win after start-
ing the season on a bad note,”
Storr said, “We knew this was
a team we should beat and we
just wanted to come out here
and do what we had to do.
We want to use this to get
ready for the better teams in
the league because we know
we have to face them again
later on in the season and we
plan to have a better result
next time.”





THE TRIBUNE





PAGE

15



r

‘ts

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

litle as the Flyers
make history

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VESSNA LAING came to
town and made history, but the
Pineapple Air Wildcats over-
shadowed the Grand Bahamian
slugger’s home run feat by
regaining the Bahamas Softball
Federation Ladies Common-
wealth Championship title at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

Back in the national round
robin after a year’s absence, the
Wildcats avenged two straight
losses including game one of
the best of three championship
series against the Bahamasair
Flyers to take the remaining
two games for a 2-1 decision.

In the deciding game, the
Wildcats pulled off a 15-10 vic-
tory to go along with their 4-2
win in game two, both on Sun-
day as they dedicated the cham-
pionship victory to one of their
coaches, Alexander Bain, who
was recovering from a serious
injury.

Marvelle Miller, who got the
starting nod in the clincher, said
she was elated about the team’s
performance, especially as it
was her first victory in the
national championships.

The Flyers who nipped the
Wildcats 1-0 in their round
robin match-up, came from a
12-3 deficit to pull off a come-
from-behind 15-14 decision in
the championship opener on
Saturday night.

In that game, Laing became
the first female player to hit a
home run over the fence at the
Bankers Field.

“My coach just told me to
pick my pitch and drive the ball.
That was what I did,” said
Laing, who took a bow after the
game to the cheers of the
crowd.

“T was shocked that the ball
went out of the park. I thought
it actually bounced under the
fence, but they say ‘the ball out
the park Vessna’ so I just kept
running.”

Laing said she came close to
hitting the ball out of the park in
Grand Bahama during their
slowpitch season, but she was
delighted that she came here
and made history.

“Hey it ain’t nothing like
round robin and driving it out
the park here. It feels awesome.
It's unbelievable. My name is
in the history books.”

Laing finished with a total of
three runs batted in and scored
twice for the Flyers. Latoya
Thomas had a triple with two



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

RBI, scoring three runs in the
victory.

Donette Edwards had a dou-
ble, drove in five runs and
scored three times, while Edge-
combe-Sweeting had a double
with an RBI and three runs
scored.

Nerissa Lockhart was the
winning pitcher and Edge-
combe-Sweeting suffered the
loss.

The men’s version of the
championship took an interest-
ing twist Saturday night when
Long Island’s PJC Panthers for-
feited their game against the



Grand Bahama Elnet Mariners.

Reportedly the Mariners
lodged a protest on one of the
Panthers’ players who had
played in Grand Bahama dur-
ing the regular season and was
on Long Island’s roster.

“They had a technical meet-
ing, they protest the guy, but
they allowed him to play,” said
Panthers’ third baseman Julian
Pratt. “If you come from a tech-
nical meeting and you say he
should not have been allowed
to play, then he should not have
been allowed to play.”

But Pratt said the BSF

ABOVE: Pineapple Air Wildcats’
Marvelle Miller delivers a pitch.

LEFT: Vessna Laing of the
Bahamasair Flyers is flanked by
Grand Bahama’s Softball Asso-
ciation president Hencil Collie
and BSF’s Director of Commu-
nications Daphne McKinney
after her historic home run over
the left field fence on Saturday
against Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe-Sweeting and the
Pineapple Air Wildcats.

allowed their player to play
until they played against Grand
Bahama and they enforced the
rule, disqualifying their player.

“He’s a young ball player.
We can’t allow him to go back
to Long Island with that kind
of dejection,” he said. “We
rather stand with him and let
him walk away then to let him
stand on his own.”

As a result of their decision,
Long Island were eliminated
from further play.

The biggest upset of the tour-
nament came on Saturday as
well as the defending champi-

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Did power
firm suffer
SA00K first
half loss?

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company (GBPC) appears to
have suffered a $400,000 loss
during the 2009 first half on
an equity earnings basis,
according to figures published
by one of its major share-
holders, although a $2.2 mil-
lion third quarter profit put
it firmly back in the black.

Emera, the Canadian ener-
gy giant, which acquired a 25
per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company in
late 2008 via the $41 million-
plus acquisition of Lady Hen-
rietta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake, unveiled
the $2.2 million profit for the
three months to end-Septem-
ber 2009 in its own third quar-
ter results.

Yet for the nine months to
end-September 2009, Emera
reported that Grand Bahama
Power Company had gener-
ated just $1.8 million in net

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE

ul

J

MONDAY,



NOVEMBER 9,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Hilton shareholders in
dispute over $22m loan

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

dispute

has erupted

between the two share-
holders of downtown Nas-
sau’s British Colonial
Hilton over a $22 million
loan that forms part of the resort’s financ-
ing, Tribune Business can reveal, with one
of the parties thought to have moved to
take the matter to arbitration in a bid to

mediate a resolution.

Sources close to the situation, who
requested anonymity because of the mat-
ter’s sensitivity, told this newspaper last
week that the dispute between the Canadi-
an Commercial Workers Industry Pension

Plan (CCWIPP) and Adurion,

the

UK/Swiss boutique investment house and
private equity fund, revolved around an
unsecured loan that formed the foundation
of the latter’s investment in the British

Colonial Hilton.

Adurion acquired a 71 per cent stake in
the entity that owns the hotel’s immediate
holding company, the British Colonial
Development Company (BCDC), from
CCWIPP in December 2006, the Canadian
pension fund retaining a 29 per cent.

Tribune Business understands from its
sources close to developments that rather
than just purely invest its own equity into
the British Colonial Development Compa-
ny, Adurion originated a multi-million dol-
lar loan through its own Bahamas-domi-
ciled investment vehicle, Fort Nassau

Loan defaults $1m
shy of Slbn mark

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
will not return to “sustained
growth before late 2010”, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
has predicted, with private
sector loan defaults just $1
million shy of the psychologi-
cally significant $1 billion
mark at end-September and
hotel revenue receipts of 22
per cent for the first eight
months in 2008.

While the global economy
had shown signs of ‘bottoming
out’ during September 2009,
the Central Bank said there
were no such signs from the
Bahamian economy, as key
indicators worsened, includ-
ing a 61.6 per cent or $17.3
million increase in the Gov-
ernment’s Budget deficit for
the first two months this year.

Due to the “double digit”
decline in stopover visitors
during the first three quarters
of 2009, the Central Bank
said, not surprisingly, that
tourism output contracted,
with hotel revenue receipts
off 22 per cent year-over-year
for the January-August 2009
period.

This, the Central Bank said,
reflected the “combined

* Central Bank: Bahamas
will not return to sustained
economic growth before
late 2010

* Hotel revenues down 22%,
and government budget
deficit up over 61% for
first two months

* Some comfort from sustained
equity-fuelled foreign
investment, while inflation
falling and external
reserves/liquid assets
ahead of 2008 comparatives

impact of a 7.4 percentage
point reduction in average
occupancy rates to 66.2 per
cent, and a 9.6 per cent
decrease in average daily
room rates to $234.55”.

On the monetary front, by
end-September close to one
in six private sector loans
were in default, standing at a
cumulative value of $999 mil-
lion - just $1 million shy of $1
billion - a mark easily set to
have been passed within the
past two months.

During September, the

SEE page 4B

THE BALMORAL

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A VIEW of the British Colonial Hilton...

Investments Ltd.

This made its way into the British Colo-
nial Development Company through the
resort’s complex ownership structure, and
Tribune Business understands that Aduri-
on’s differences with CCWIPP revolve
around the fact that the investment house
believes the loan - said to be for $22 million
- has matured and needs to either be repaid
or refinanced on terms more favourable to
Adurion.

The Canadian pension fund, though, is
understood to believe that this demand for
repayment could negatively impact both
its investment and position in the British
Colonial Development Company, as it fears
the latter is simply unable to repay the loan.

The two sides were said by sources to be
unable to resolve their differences. With
Adurion having Board and management
control at the British Colonial Develop-

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE communications sec-
tor regulator has increased
the capital cost ratios for all
the sectors in which Cable
Bahamas and the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) are deemed to have
Significant Market Power
(SMP), bringing its assess-
ments closer to the estimates
provided by both companies.

In its findings on the Cost of
Capital for Designated SMP

Colina ae



elie e-em el

Bahamians urged to
exploit, not compete,
on Cuba possibilities

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies
“should position themselves
to take advantage” of
trade/business opportunities
with Cuba, including joint ven-
ture partnerships, rather than
seek to compete head-on with
the island as it opens up, a
senior Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce official said.

Philip Simon, the Cham-
ber’s executive director, told
Tribune Business that it would
sign a Memorandum of
Understanding (MoU) with its
Cuban counterpart organisa-
tion within the next year,
adding that the Bahamas -
through the Freeport Con-
tainer Port (FCP) - could act
as a “facilitator” to connect
the Communist island’s busi-
nesses and economy with the
world.

Mr Simon, speaking after he
and a Chamber delegation
returned from the 27th
Havana International Trade
Fair, during which they met
with the Cuban Chamber of
Commerce, suggested that the
two nations could also provide
a joint venture Bahamas/Cuba
travel package to entice visi-

tors from the likes of China
and India to visit both coun-
tries on one trip.

“When you think about
what Cuba has to offer, not
just from the agricultural point
of view, rum and the impor-
tation of foods, there’s tremen-
dous opportunities for us to
export stuff to Cuba - niche
products and services,” Mr
Simon said.

“We can export a lot of our
Know how in different indus-
tries to Cuba, and partner for
travel.”

Pointing out that both the
Bahamas and Cuba had both
been awarded ‘approved des-
tination’ status by the Chinese
government, as locations
where Chinese citizens could
go on vacation, Mr Simon said:
“There’s no reason, when we
have visitors that travel from
that far away, why we can’t
craft create Bahamas-Cuba
travel packages.”

Given that the Bahamas’
expertise lay in tourism and
crafting such packages, Mr
Simon said it was “better for
us to partner than to try to
compete” with Cuba.

SEE page 3B

Regulator raises BTC and
Cable’s capital cost ratios

* Increases bring URCA’s findings closer into line with
estimates of significant market power (SMP) players

* Cable blasts SMP designations as ‘unjustified,
disproportionate and unfair’

* BTC says initial URCA findings ‘unusually low’ and
would have given it poor return on investments

Operators, the Utilities Reg-
ulation & Competition
Authority (URCA) effective-
ly said that the increases in
the weighted average cost of
capital (WACC) ratios for
Cable Bahamas and BTC

would ensure they made a
“reasonable rate of return”
whenever a regulatory mea-
sure impacting them was
being assessed.

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

ee U

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was an active week of trading in
the Bahamian capital markets.
Investors traded in 17 out of the 24
listed securities last week, of which
four advanced, one declined and 12
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 1,506,160 shares changed
hands, representing an increase of
1,470,989 shares compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of 35,171
shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) was
the volume leader, trading 401,090
shares, with its stock price increasing by

$0.17 to close the week at $5.74.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) followed
CBL, trading 253,597 shares to close
the week unchanged at $4.34.

The lead advancer during the week
was Doctors Hospital Health Systems
(DHS), whose share price increased
by $0.26 on a volume of 87,107 shares
traded to close the week at $2.51.

The sole decliner was Consolidated
Water BDRs (CWCB), which fell $0.07
on a volume of 27,673 shares traded
to close the week at $2.88.

BOND MARKET
15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015

traded during the week at par value
of $1,000 for a total value of $15,000.

CONSTRUCTION
SEMINAR 2009

With Nobel Prize Winner Derek Walcott

THEME:

“The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment
(FDI) On the Development of the

Caribbean”

VENUE:

Lecture Theatre, Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute,
Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, Bahamas

FRIDAY, 13th NOVEMBER, 2009

2:30am. -
%Allaam, -

30k. -
10:40am.

REGISTRATION AND WELCOME

PRESENTER: Mr. James Smith, Former Minister of Stave for Finanoe

10:4, -
10:3aum. - | 2:M)pom.

likMlam, COFFEE BREAK

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings released by
any of the publicly traded companies
during the week.

Dividend Notes:

FamGuard Corporation (FAM) has
declared a dividend of $0.06 per share,
payable on November 16, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of record date
November 9, 2009.

FOCOL Holdings Ltd (FCL) has
declared a dividend of $0.060 per share,
payable on November 10, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of record date
October 30, 2009.

&

THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
Eee
Eee
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

$1.17
$0.63
$5.90
$10.75
$10.06
$3.15
$10.00
$5.74
$2.72
$9.87
$2.88
$2.51
$6.50
$2.37
$0.27
$4.34
$1.00
$9.30
$5.59
$9.95
$10.00

$+0.01



APAAAAAAASH

102,309
0

23,988
43,251
0
27,966
50,707
401,090
18,877
138,195
27,673
87,107
7,693
153,706
0

253,597
80,668
55,388
33,945
0

0

CHANGE

-31.58%

28.00%
-1.57%
-16.67%
0.00%
-10.00%
-16.05%
0.00%
-21.65%
-8.81%
-10.36%
0.00%

RSLS FAIR

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KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Mr. Derek Waleett, Nebel Laureate, Poer ane Playwright

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



an
Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE





Real estate firms merge

Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty (CBLR) has
merged the boutique real
estate firm Bahamas Water-
front Properties into its real
estate portfolio.

"As one of the Bahamas’
leading real estate organiza-
tions, Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty will continue to
respond to changing demands
in the real estate industry.
With this merger, we will be
rolling out new and exciting
services to the Bahamas mar-

CUBA, from 1B

“All of these things that go
into establishing a business
foundation, I believe, is where
the opportunity lies in Cuba,”
Mr Simon told Tribune Busi-
ness, citing logistics, construc-
tion and development services
as areas ripe for Bahamian
exports.

“Those with the wherewith-

Greathioes not Helpioes

©

COPD
Day

a | 2009

Hoveambar 16 Foe

Ket that are offered through
the Coldwell Banker world-
wide network," said Mike
Lightbourn, president of Cold-
well Banker Lightbourn Real-

ty.
Owner

Colin Lightbourn, owner of
Bahamas Waterfront Proper-
ties and now managing direc-
tor of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, said: "It's excit-
ing to work with all the incred-

al in the Bahamas should posi-
tion themselves to take advan-
tage of it; we don’t want to
compete with them.”

The Chamber’s executive
director said the Bahamas
should not only use the busi-
ness expertise, “savvy” and
global connections it had built
up for its own benefit, but also
for the benefit of others.

The trading/economic links

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ible marketing services that
come with the Coldwell
Banker franchise. We have a
very sophisticated real estate
market in the Bahamas and
the companies which can meet
the demands of the buyers and
sellers will stay ahead of the
competition.”

The move will add four new
Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation licensed sales agents to
an existing team of 20 at Cold-
well Banker Lightbourn Real-
ty, as well as two property

between the Bahamas and
Cuba “can be as large” as the
two sides want, Mr Simon said,
and added: “We have over in
Grand Bahama a Container
Port that serves as a link to
not just Caribbean markets
but international markets.

“We can act as a facilitator,
because we have the expertise,
the wherewithal, the interna-
tional savvy that is not appar-
ent in Cuban operations,
because they’ve largely been
focused locally. Just as how
the Bahamas can be a gate-
way to Caribbean Markets,
Latin and North America, we
can be the same for Cuba.”

Mr Simon acknowledged
that “the mechanics and how
we go about doing business
with each other” needed to
become clearer to facilitate
increased business between
the Bahamas and Cuba, telling
Tribune Business that this
issue was addressed in the
meeting with their Cuban
counterparts.

The Bahamian Chamber
had “very bluntly” asked the
necessary questions in this
area, including how liberal the
foreign investment process
was, access to human and
financial resources in Cuba,
and any impediments on ship-
ping too and from that nation.

In the past, many concerns
have focused on the lack of
investor protection in Cuba,
with many Spanish, Canadian
and other European-owned
entities said to be owed huge
sums of money by Cuba-state
owned agencies, and no indi-
cation of when this would be
paid. The Castro tendency to
arbitrarily nationalise indus-
















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* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer
» Kids 15 and under, free
+ Pool with swim-up bar

Limtted-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$59 per person, per night, dbl occupancy Sun. thru Wed. Rates effective Nov. 2 thru Dec. 18. Add
$20 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4
persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities
and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability.
Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a 1-night penalty will apply.







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

(en
Na LY,

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B

LAID -OFF WORKERS

Receptionist
Management
Marketing /Sales
MS Word /Excel
QuickBooks
Office Procedures

Entrepreneurship
training.
Marketing research
Business Plans
Funding search

managers.
8 Kusiness Advice

The independently-owned
and operated Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty is part of a
network of approximately
101,000 sales associates and
brokers, and 3,300 residential
offices on six continents, and
47 countries and territories.

It has offices and agents in
Nassau, the Abacos, Andros,
Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera (including Harbour
Island and Spanish Wells),
Exuma and Long Island.

Logan: www.markturngeestconsulting.com

MARK A TURNQUEST & CO LTD
(242) 326-6748 | (242) 427-3640

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALICE VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

tries and businesses has also
not been forgotten.

In addition, the Cuban gov-
ernment effectively treats all
workers as ‘property of the
state’, with staff salaries being
paid to the government -
which takes a cut - first before
going to the workers.

Still, Mr Simon said there
seemed to be a growing aware-
ness in Cuba of the need to
interact more with other
economies.

He added that the Chamber
was now working on creating a
Memorandum of Understand-
ing that it would sign with its
Cuban counterpart within the
next year, prior to the next
Havana International Trade
Fair.

Registration No.105,841B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000)
ALICE VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is
in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against ALICE VENTURES
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is required on or before the 7th
December, 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or in default thereof
they may have excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
claim is approved.

Trevor D. A. Sunderland of P. O. Box 88-6290 - of Pilot House
Condominium-East Bay Street-Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of ALICE
VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED.

Dated the 6th November 2009

Maceo

Trevor D. A. Sunderland
Liquidator



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(WN (Ww
IY IY
THE TRIBUNE
Loan defaults S1m
SS a a eis
shy of $1bn mark
FROM page 1B of provisions to arrears and $45.3 million compared tothe tral Bank said.

cou SM

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total value of loans in default
increased by $35.9 million or
3.7 per cent to hit $999 mil-
lion, with the ratio of loans
arrears to the total portfolio
outstanding rising by 0.5 per-
centage points to 16.4 per
cent.

Loans in the 31-90 days
past due segment increased
by $19.9 million or 4.7 per
cent to $447.5 million, taking
their total ratio to the out-
standing loan portfolio to 7.4
per cent.

And the Central Bank
added: “Likewise, non-per-
forming loans - those more
than 90 days in arrears and
on which banks ceased accru-
ing interest - advanced by
more than $16 million or 3
per cent to $551.5 million, for
a 26 basis point increase in
the loan arrears ratio to 9.1
per cent.

“[The] growth in monthly
arrears reflected a $25.6 mil-
lion or 5.9 per cent rise in
mortgage delinquencies to
$461.9 million and a $13.1 mil-
lion or 5.7 per cent firming in
the commercial segment to
$243.6 million.

“However, consumer loan
arrears fell modestly y $2.7
million or 0.9 per cent to
$293.5 million. Banks’ loan
loss provisions remained rel-
atively unchanged at $210.1
million, resulting in the ratio

non-performing loans declin-
ing by 0.8 and 1.2 percentage
points, to 21 per cent and 38.1
per cent, respectively.”

Due to the slowdown in pri-
vate sector and consumer
credit demand, as Bahamians
eschewed new borrowings to
meet existing obligations, the
Central Bank said credit
growth fell by 43.7 per cent
to $162.2 million for the first
nine months in 2009.

Private sector loan growth
decelerated by $242.5 million
to $50.6 million, while con-
sumer credit dropped by $27.4
million compared to a $101.7
million growth one year ago.
Mortgage growth almost
halved to $90.5 million.

Breaking down consumer
loans by category, the Cen-
tral Bank said all areas had
declined apart from debt con-
solidation loans, which
advanced by $48.7 million in
the eight months to end-
August 2009. This followed a
$57 million expansion one
year ago.

Elsewhere, there was a
$21.4 million contraction in
vehicle loans; a $15.4 million
reduction in credit card bor-
rowing; an $8.9 million con-
traction in travel loans; and a
$6.9 million fall in home
improvement loans.

Meanwhile, for the first two
months of the Government’s
fiscal year, July and August
2009, the fiscal deficit
widened by $17.3 million to

same period in 2008.

The Central Bank said the
reduction in government
spending was “overshadowed
by the fall-off in revenue
receipts” due to declining pri-
vate sector demand, as spend-
ing fell by $12.1 million or 4.9
per cent to $232.6 million.
This reflected a 3.5 per cent
drop in current outlays, which
was linked to declines in sub-
sidies and transfers, and the
purchase of goods and ser-
vices.

Capital spending also fell
by 11.2 per cent to $16.9 mil-
lion, due to lower spending
on infrastructure projects.

“On the revenue side,
aggregate collections con-
tracted by $29.4 million or
13.6 per cent to $187.2 mil-
lion, mainly associated with a
19.7 per cent decline in tax
receipts to $137.9 million, as
lower intakes from property
and tourism-related taxes, as
well as business and profes-
sional fees, eclipsed a timing-
related increase in interna-
tional trade taxes,” the Cen-

“In addition, non-tax rev-
enue was reduced by $1.1 mil-
lion or 6.5 per cent to $15.7
million, occasioned by lower
proceeds from fines, forfeits
and administrative fees.”

Still, despite the ‘doom and
gloom’, there were some
crumbs of optimism. The
Bahamas was still receiving
“stable contributions” from
equity-financed foreign direct
investment projects, even
though construction industry
output was expected to
remain “moribund” due to
the absence of debt-financed
projects. Unemployment was
expected to remain high.

Inflation was easing, too,
down for the 12 month-period
to September by 0.83 per-
centage points at 3.07 per
cent. The foreign reserve lev-
els and excess liquidity in the
banking system also remained
above 2008 levels at end-Sep-
tember 2009, standing at
$752.86 million and $463.94
million, compared to $649.57
million and $337.01 million a
year ago.

NOTICE

THE CASINO AT OUR LUCAYA RESORT

In accordance with Section 34 of the Lotteries and
Gaming Act, 1969 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay G.B.I. Ltd. made
application on the 4" day of November, A.D. 2009 to the
Gaming Board of The Bahamas for a Licence to manage

PKF BAHAMAS

Qualified and Trainee Accountants Required

The Nassau office of PFK, an International Accounting Firm, seeks to
recruit the following:

(1) Professional qualified persons with recognized accounting
qualifications. They must be eligible for membership in The Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants and must have at least two (2) or
three (3) years post qualification experience. Only Bahamains need
apply. Preference will be given to applicants with proven audit and
assurance experience.

(2) Trainees with an accounting degree and eligible to write a profes-
sional examination. Only Bahamians need to apply.

In all cases, salary and benefits subject to negotiation.

Apply in writing to Human Resources Partner, PKF.
P.O. Box N-8335, Nassau Bahamas.

REQUEST FOR
TENDER

Nassau Airport

Development Company

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |

US Departures Terminal

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion

Project (U5 Departures Terminal). All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are

encouraged to participate in this significant national project. scopes to be tendered to

complete the fit out of the new terminal include:

» Architectural Millwork

«Interior Glazing & Mirrors

A qualification package must be submitted prior or at the bid closing. Only bids from contractors deemed
quolified will be considered. Qualifications will be based on the following criteria:

* A demonstration of financial capacity
« Experience

* References

* Bahamian Ownership/Content

The project is covered by Contractors Defoult Insurance in lieu of bonding. NWO BONDING WILL BE REQUIRED.

Qualification and tender packages will be available for pickup at the Ledcor Construction Baharnas Limited Site
Office at the Lynden Pindling International Airport, Windsor Field Road. For queries call the Site office at

242-677-5417.

The closing date for the tender and prequalification packages will be at 2:00pm Thursday November

27, 2009.

the premises known as ‘The Casino at Our Lucaya Resort’
situate in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand
Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas.

Any person who desires to object to the grant of such
licence shall send to the Secretary of the Gaming Board of
The Bahamas, within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the grounds
of his objection.

Dated the 9" day of November, A.D. 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY AND COMPANY
Attorneys for Treasure Bay G.B.I. Ltd.
Chambers
Shirley House
Fifty Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF
THE BAHAMAS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission
(a statutory corporation) is seeking analysts to
assist with the on-site and off-site examination of
insurance companies and intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent

* Responsible for the supervision of other
analysts /directly responsible for the
examination of licensees to ensure that licensees
are compliant with prudential requirements
through on-site and off-site examinations
Prepare/vet the preparation of examination
reports
Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial
analysis, letters and other correspondence as
necessary
Ensure that licensees databases are maintained
Supervision of other analysts/directly
responsible for the assessment of new
applications for licensees
Contributes to the refining of supervisory
methodology, policy development and the
formulation of new/revised legislation and the
related guidelines
Provide advice and information to licensees and
the wider public regarding complaints and
questions about licensees’ performance

Qualifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /
Certification in Insurance/ experience in the
insurance industry
Financial analysis skills
Excellent leadership, communications,

teamwork and organization skills

Proficient in Microsoft office products to
intermediate level

Ability to work independently and multi-task
Excellent written and oral communications
skills

Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation

* A competitive compensation package
commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications.

Deadline

* 13 November 2009

* Application including comprehensive resume to
be submitted by e-mail addresses to:

oric@bahamas.gov.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



aa > =
Hilton shareholders in dispute over $22m loan

FROM page 1B

ment Company and all levels in the
ownership structure, CCWIPP was
said by the same sources to have ini-
tiated some kind of legal proceedings
- believed to be arbitration - to safe-
guard its position.

Whether operations at the 291-
room British Colonial Hilton, which
has just undergone a $15 million ren-
ovation and sits on a 13-acre site,
will ultimately be impacted by the
shareholder dispute remains to be
seen, although Tribune Business was
told that no negative effects would
be seen.

“As far as the hotel and property
are concerned, this is a storm in a

teacup,” one source close to the sit-
uation, who requested anonymity,
said. “It has absolutely no impact
on the financing, the operations and
the status of the operations. That’s
totally self-contained. It has
absolutely nothing to do with the
British Colonial Development Com-

pany.”
Argument

CCWIPP and Adurion were said
to be having “a fairly technical argu-
ment over a small part of the avail-
able financing”, although the source
said the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company’s financing - which is
backed by a mortgage held over the
property by FirstCaribbean Inter-

national Bank - is secure.

Both sides were said to be
“extremely frustrated”, with Aduri-
on understood to feel that it has tak-
en all the risk/done all the work in
providing financing to the British
Colonial Development Company at
below-market terms, refinancing the
original Scotiabank loan with First-
Caribbean, and arranging financing
for the $15 million renovation.

CCWIPP, which invests in the
British Colonial Development Com-
pany through its IF Propco entities,
could not be contacted for comment
before press time. Messages passed
to Adurion also did not elicit com-
ment, although the investment house
indicated it might release a state-
ment on the matter this week.

CCWIPP sold the 71 per cent
stake to Adurion, said to be for $71.7
million, as part of its strategy to
reduce its exposure to the Bahamas,
and the Hilton and South Ocean in
particular, after running into regu-
latory troubles in Canada.

Pension

The pension fund came under
scrutiny from regulators in Ontario
over the size of its investments in
the Bahamas, and whether they
breached prudential and regulatory
guidelines and laws. CCWIPP effec-
tively took over the Hilton and
South Ocean after former Roman
Catholic priest Ron Kelly, whose
acquisitions of the properties it had

backed, defaulted on his loan repay-
ments.

CCWIPP is thought to have sunk
some $160 million into the two
Bahamas resort properties, and it
seems unlikely that it will recover
that sum of money any time soon.

The sale of the Hilton stake to
Adurion was designed to minimise
its Bahamas exposure, bring it back
into line with Canadian regulations
and laws, and also allow CCWIPP to
benefit from any upside Adurion
was able to create through its man-
agement, in a bid to recover at least
some of its investment. It is thought
that Canadian regulators are not
allowing CCWIPP to invest any
more equity in the Bahamas prop-
erties.

BusinessOptions

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A member of Colonial Group International

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CALL 677-6422

or visit www.cgigroup.bm

NASSAU INSURANCE

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rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.

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You will be satisfied!





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MIRREN HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
MIRREN HOLDINGS LIMTED has been Dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by
the Registrar General on the 23rd day of October, 2009

Duncan Llowarch
6 Princes Gate
Knightsbridge

London
SW71QJ
United Kingdom

Liquidator



Did power firm suffer $400k first half loss?

FROM page 1B

income on an equity earnings
basis, appearing to imply that
Grand Bahama’s monopoly
electricity supplier suffered a
$400,000 first half net loss.

E. O. Ferrell, Grand
Bahama Power Company’s
president and chief executive,
did not return a phone mes-
sage left for him seeking com-
ment and an explanation of
the figures before press time.
However, any situation in
which a monopoly provider
is making a net loss is not
good, since they face no com-
petition.

It is no secret that 2009 has
been a difficult year for
Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany, with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham criticising
the company for appearing to
focus on profit maximisation,
rather than investing in
upgrading the reliability/con-
sistency of its distribution and
generation system.

And Mr Ferrell himself was
forced to apologise to Grand
Bahama commercial and res-
idential customers for the
company’s “unacceptable ser-
vice” during May and June.

Tribune Business revealed
two months ago how
GRAND Bahama Power
Company's (GBPC) kilowatt
per hour (kWh) sales fell by
12 per cent year-over-year
during the 2009 first quarter,
continuing a trend that saw a
2 per cent decline in 2008.

Writing in the annual











NOTICE

OF

PRISKA LTD.

report for ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle
that owns a 50 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power
Company, Mr _ Ferrell
acknowledged that 2008 “was
a difficult year” for the
island's monopoly power sup-
plier, even with the benefit of
a 4.87 per cent rate increase
from April onwards.

He added that this rate rise
was "negatively offset" by
Grand Bahama's continued
economic decline, both as a
result of the global recession
and the continued closure of
the Royal Oasis, "and unsea-
sonably cool weather during
the fourth quarter”.

"Overall, 2008 kWh sales
were 2 per cent less than
2007," Mr Ferrell wrote.
"Unfortunately, that trend is
continuing into the first quar-
ter 2009, with kWh sales 12
per cent below the same peri-
od in 2008. There were, how-
ever, items of positive growth
that will be beneficial for
years to come."

For the 12 months to
December 31, 2008, Grand
Bahama Power Company's
net income rose by little over

cent rise in operating rev-
enues, from $94.076 million
to $116.036 million, as total
operating expenses - includ-
ing fuel costs, which peaked in
July last year - rose by a
greater amount, 24.7 per cent,
to $108.752 million compared
to $87.207 million the year
before.

As a consequence, net
operating income grew by
only 6 per cent, to $7.284 mil-
lion compared to $6.869 mil-
hon in 2007. While other
income increased by more
than $1 million, both these
rises were offset by an
increase in interest expense
to $5.154 million, compared
to $3.432 million in 2007.

Grand Bahama Power
Company's long-term debt
had risen by almost 50 per
cent at year-end, growing
from $66.288 million to
$99.512 million, a develop-
ment largely due to the $50
million bond financing it
placed in May and July 2008
to raise funds for capital
expansion projects and refi-
nance existing debt.

That financing appeared to
reduce the outstanding col-







lective balance on various
commercial bank loans from
$55.333 million to $38 million
at year-end 2008.

$100,000 or 3 per cent, to
$3.621 million compared to
$3.516 million the year before.

This was despite a 23.2 per

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 5th November, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-3023,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of
the Company.

PUBLIC NOTICE

———————
INVESTMENT FUND MARKETING POSITION

ROAD TRAFFIC
DEPARTMENT.

A fund management firm operating from the Bahamas is
seeking to recruit an individual to market its investment
products globally. The successful candidate must be a senior
investment professional with ten to twenty years of experience
in the investment industry, primarily in sales, marketing and
client service roles with a highly successful track record of
soliciting investors.

| hereby advise that all
persons/companies who have
not registered their (OT), On
Trial plates for the year 2009/
2010 to come in and register
their plates by December 31,
2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

The position requires extensive experience in marketing and
managing global investor relationships with sophisticated
institutional and high net worth clients. Significant travel will
be required to fulfill the responsibilities required by the position.

NOTICE

OF The successful candidate must hold the US Financial Industry

Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Series 7 license and Uniform
WINDSOR GLOBAL LTD.

Securities Agent State Law Exam Series 63 in order to be
permitted to conduct the required securities activities in the US.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above

company commenced on the Sth November, 2009.

The candidate must be extremely familiar with US Securities and
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial

Exchange Commission and FINRA regulations in connection
with marketing, sales and placement of securities in the US.

Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO. Box N-3023,

Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of

the Company.

Failure to have plates
regularize would result in a
recall of all delinquent plates,
in . accordance with the Road
Traffic Act Chapter 220 Section

33.

The candidate must also have a general working knowledge
of the securities laws in other of the world’s leading financial
centers to ensure that applicable regulations are adhered to
when visiting these markets.

Please send applications and résumés to
HR Coordinator,
P.O. Box N-7776-78,
Nassau, Bahamas
or fax 362 6759.

CONTROLLER

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

“Wy FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

bas

COLON TAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Maney at Wark

HARBORSIDE
| =i yl | BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
= : FRIDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 2009
: HI LAN iy BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.96 | CHG 0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -225.40 | YTD % -13.16
fi VW —S FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127 0.000 9.2
0.992 0.200 10.8
0.244 0.260 24.2

-0.877 0.000 N/M
0.125 0.090 25.2
0.055 0.040 43.1
1.406 0.250 7.1
0.249 0.040 0.9
0.419 0.300 3.7
0.111 0.052 25.9
0.625 0.080 4.0
0.420 0.240 5.5
0.322 0.520 28.9
0.631 0.350 5.6
0.326 0.150 3.3
0.000 0.000 N/M
0.035 0.000 7.7
0.407 0.500 3.7
0.952 0.640 0.5
0.156 0.000 64.1

ases)
Interest

Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17 1.17 0.00

: 9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00

VACATION SERVICES s 5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00
: 0.63

3 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00

COOR Dy) NATO RS : 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00

: 9.92 10.00 10.00 0.00

Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
Cable Bahamas
2.72 Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.74 5.74 0.00

Harborside Resort at Atlantis is currently seeking a oe ea | oan

Sales Vacation Services Coordinators to join our 6.28 Famguard 6.50 6.50 0.00
team. Your goal is to generate qualified tours re Fe saseean Bank pe oe ne

that would produce potential sales, while i a4 4.94 0.00
maintaining a professional and positive image, 0.27 Freeport Consiete aoe 0.27 0.27 0.00

and to uphold company standards of integrity 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00

. . : 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
and professionalism. 0.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.60 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + z . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + x . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D} + 15 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
9 October 2017
9 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Our candidate must have the following
competencies and qualifications:



e Excellent communication skills;

¢ Strong customer service and sales ability;

e Proven success as a preview coordinator
(A Plus);

® Ability to determine guests’ eligibility for
sales tours;

* Strong persuasion skills;

¢ Ability to work with diverse personalities in
a multicultural environment;

e Excellent computer skills, knowledge of
various programs.

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings



Weekly Vol. EPS $ i Yield
-2. 0.000
0.480
0.000
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Yield % NAV Date
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
99.4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
10.0000 __ Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 _ FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

30-Sep-09
23-Oct-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

13.1751
103.0956
99.4177
1.0000
10.5884
1.0757
1.0305
1.0709
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

For consideration please fax a current resume
along with references to:

Attention: Human Resources Manager
942 - 363 -6822 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
or Un einai aera eee
Deliver resume to:
Human Resources Department
3rd Floor Marina One Building
Marina Drive, Paradise Island

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



(hw

THE TRIBUNE

6

(EW

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7B



Regulator raises BTC and Cable’s capital cost ratios

FROM page 1B

In its final determination
on the issue, URCA increased
the WACC determination for
BTC’s fixed-line voice busi-
ness from its initial 8.9 per
cent estimate to 10.29 per
cent. And for cellular and
mobile data services, a market

balance” between its deter-
minations, and those of the
companies, and still provided
“investment incentives” to
existing and new operators.
In its response to URCA’s
consultation, Cable Bahamas
again objected to it being des-
ignated as an operator with
SMP in the cable TV and high

speed data services industries,
and urged the regulator to
reconsider and reverse its
decision.

“Tf it cannot reverse this
designation at this time, the
Authority [URCA] should
ensure that any price regula-
tion should be narrowly
focused and light-handed in

nature,” Cable Bahamas
urged in its October 1, 2009,
letter.

“Tn either of the cases -
reversal of the SMP designa-
tion or light-touch regulation
- the relevance of the cost of
capital measure for the Pay
TV and high-speed services
at issue in this consultation is

greatly reduced, if not elimi-
nated.”

And, in a follow-up Octo-
ber 13, 2009, letter to Usman
Saadat, URCA’s director of
policy and regulation, Cable
Bahamas branded the SMP
designations placed on it and
accompanying responsibilities
as “unjustified, dispropor-

tionate and unfair”.

Meanwhile, in its response,
BTC said the WACC ratios
that URCA initially deter-
mined for its fixed-line and
cellular business segments
were “unusually low” and
would “not reflect a fair
return on BTC’s invest-
ments”.

in which BTC currently has
the monopoly, URCA raised
the WACC threshold from 11
per cent to 11.71 per cent.

These increases brought the
regulator’s findings closer into
line with BTC’s own argu-
ments, the state-owned
incumbent, which is in the
midst of a privatisation exer-
cise, having told URCA that
its WACC estimates for fixed-
line and cellular services were
11.9 and 12.1 per cent respec-
tively.

“BTC’s WACC rates for
fixed and mobile are still sig-
nificantly higher when com-
pared to URCA’s fixed and
mobile WACC rates of 8.9
per cent and 11 per cent
respectively,” Felicity John-
son, BTC’s vice-president for
legal, regulatory and inter-
connection, had written in an
October 16, 2009, letter to
URCA.

Meanwhile, URCA also
increased its initial WACC
estimates of 9.3 per cent and
9.6 per cent for its high speed
data services and cable TV
business, respectively, to 10.86
per cent for both.

Again, this brought the reg-
ulator closer into line with
Cable Bahamas’ own WACC
estimates, Judith Smith, its in-
house legal counsel, informing
URCA on October 1 that
these should be 11.9 per cent
for data and 11.1 per cent for
pay-TV.

“URCA recognises that
setting a rate of return that is
too low could make future
investment unattractive to
investors,” the regulator con-
cluded. “Setting the rate of
return too high would allow TIME: 7:00 PM
the regwated entity to earn |e Food-Handlers health certificate VENUE; St, Paul's Church, Lyford Cay
expense of its wholesale and
retail customers, while also
potentially distorting pricing
signals to investors.”

URCA said it believed the
final WACC rates it had set-
tled on “strikes a reasonable



_ =
or

Join Us for
Proposed Southwest New
Providence Marine Park

Community Meeting

rer DOCTORS HOSPITAI
ee, :

SS fvAcant posrtions]

eae |r met ae cw

Salary commensurate with experience The area off the Southwest Coast of New Providence 1s important due to
Its proxumuly to the land of New Providence. As an important Dive Site,
it has vale

for the touriam industry and has recreational value to New

Providence Fishermen, The Baharnas National Trust is in the process of

COOK - Dietary Dept
\ i. wie ou oh developing a proposal for a National Park to be developed off the South
west coast of New Prowidence Island. The creation of a marine park in
this area has the potential to serve multiple purposes of protecting
resources, providing non-destructive economic benetits, and providing
both recreational and educational opportunities for Bahamians.

We are looking for an enthusiastic, hardworking
cook to join our kitchen team.

ae The Bahamas National Trust firmly believes that engaging both stake
Must have a positive attitude, physically fit, high
school diploma, computer literate, excellent

holders and resource users during the project's development phase is
essential for its suocess. All users of the Southwest Marine Area off of

customer service skills essential. New Providence should try and attend this important meeting.

Join us atone of our scheduled community meetings:
DATE: Thursday, November 19th, 2009

TIME: 7:00) PM
VENUE: Adelaide Union Baptist Church

Qualifications:
¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts
DATE: Wednesday, November 25th, 2004

TIME: 7:00 PM
VENUE: [he Retreat, Village Bical

* Experience in an industrial kitchen
* Special Nutrition knowledge a plus

DATE Wednesday, Decermber Jad, 2009

* Excellent written/oral communication

For additional meeting information call 293-1317 or email

; hintie! baths
Submit mesume to: Human Resources Department

§ Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
TEAL eee) el bee

ee SU kal
eee eS

Preschools
Primary Schools
Junior High Schools
Senior High Schools
Secondary Schools
All Age Schools
Special Schools
Post Secondary Institutions
Tertiary Institutions

Bahamas National Trust is pleased to announce
the launch of an informational page for our most
recent park proposal. The site features up to date

information regarding the proposed Southwest

New Providence Marine Park project.
Log on to view an informational video,
community meeting schedule and to take a
short user survey.

Visit us at www.bnt.bs and look for the

Southwest Marine Park Project link.

National Education Census Day
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Forms may be collected from the Planning and Research
Section of the Ministry of Education, District Education Offices
or downloaded from www.bahamaseducation.com. If you have

any questions regarding this exercise call 502-2721, 502-2722,
502-2774 or 502-8346.

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in slorage

* PHILLIP HUMES
* MARCO JOHNSON

* CHARLENE SMITH
* KATINA ROACH

FORMS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED BY
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27th, 2009.

All fees must be paid in full and items removed no later than Nov. 20th, 2009

stor-it-all
Te) te] tsa ater Ls

ee ieee te
eee ole ir

Complete and submit your form before the deadline and prove that

YOUR INSTITUTION COUNTS!!!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$16m start-up promotes
new deputy chairs

THE start-up IP Solutions
International (IPSI), which is
seeking to raise $16 million
to finance the build-out of its
‘Multiple Play’ infrastructure,
has announced the promotion
of two of its existing board
members.

Owen S-M Bethel, presi-
dent and managing director
of the Montaque Group, and
Brian Quinn, past director-
general of the International
Institute of Communications,
have taken on new roles as
co-deputy chairmen.

Already actively involved
as members of the firm's
board of directors under the
leadership of Sir Orville Turn-
quest, Mr Bethel will perform
administrative oversight at the
board level while Mr Quinn
directs the oversight of tech-
nology.

"The cable and telecom-
munications industries in the
Bahamas are about to under-
go what some may consider
the most significant change to
their overall landscape since

Bu
ee \

their inception,” said IPSI
chairman Sir Orville Turn-
quest.

"Our recent adjustments
are in preparation for the
future, and elevating Mr
Quinn and Mr Bethel, who
take on additional responsi-
bilities, will help to position
IPSI as a formidable force.”

With long experience of the
communications sector in
general, and television in par-
ticular, Mr Quinn has been
chairman of several interna-
tional companies, including
BrightStar, when it was the
world’s largest wideband
satellite carrier.

Mr Bethel has held, and
currently serves in, director
and deputy chairman capaci-
ties for Doctors Hospital,
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas, Historic Bahamas
Foundation and the Bahamas
Investment Authority among
others.

“Brian Quinn and Owen
Bethel bring unique and bold
strengths to their new roles,”

CRUISE
LINE

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vhs Sy Un]

said Edison Sumner, presi-
dent and chief executive of
IPSI and director of The
Montaque Group.

“Mr Quinn, who was the
former chief executive of
what is now Reuters TV, is a
pioneer in the field of mass
information and entertain-
ment. Mr Bethel has been at
the forefront of financial ser-
vices in the Bahamas, from
the days he served as the first
executive director of the
Financial Services Secretariat
to helping to shape a capital
market and introducing the
first mutual fund in Bahamian
dollars.

“We are delighted that both
believe so strongly in the
potential of IPSI that despite
their diverse business obliga-
tions they accepted the invi-
tation to take on expanded
roles preparing for the launch
of a company that will change
the landscape of how this
country gets its news, movies,
music and telephone ser-
vices.”

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AU a RL



NEW ROLES —



IP Solutions International has elected Owen Bethel and Brian Quinn as co-deputy chairmen...

Accounting firm set to
raise fraud awareness

A BAHAMIAN account-
ing firm has announced it will
be participating in Interna-
tional Fraud Awareness
Week, from November 8-15,
as an official supporter to pro-
mote anti-fraud awareness
and education.

HLB Galanis Bain said
Fraud Awareness Week
comes during a time when
intense financial pressures
caused by the economic cri-
sis have led to an increase of
fraud, according to a survey of
experts conducted by the
Association of Certified
Fraud Examiners (ACFE).

During Fraud Awareness
Week, HLB Galanis Bain, as
an official supporter joins the
anti-fraud activities in various
ways, including:

* Providing a free Fraud
Prevention Checkup docu-
ment for interested business-
es

* Providing a sample Inter-
nal Fraud Policy ratified by
the AFCE

* Providing free consulta-
tion to interested organisa-
tions during the week

* Providing a free copy of
the Occupational Fraud
Report

* Conducting employee
surveys to assess levels of
fraud awareness within their
organisation

* Posting articles on its web
site and in newsletters and
teaming with local media to
highlight the problem of
fraud.

HLB Galanis Bain foren-
sic partner John S. Bain, a
Certified Fraud Examiner
(CFE), said the support of
organizations around the
world helps make Fraud
Week an effective tool in rais-
ing anti-fraud awareness in
the Bahamas.

“Fraud continues to be a
serious problem, and our
practice has seen a dramatic
increase in Fraud Examina-
tion requests over the past
two years, from both the pub-
lic and private sectors. The
state of our economy requires
all organisations to be even
more vigilant,” Mr Bain said.

“HLB Galanis Bain wants
to support the international
efforts in Fraud Awareness
Week by helping to shine a
spotlight on the urgent need
for fraud prevention and
detection, and to advise the
local business community on

the steps they can take to do
so.”

In its 2009 report, Occupa-
tional Fraud: A Study of the
Impact of an Economic Reces-
sion, the ACFE found that:

* Employees pose the
greatest fraud threat in the
current economy. When
asked which, if any, of sever-
al categories of fraud
increased during the previous
12 months, the largest number
of survey respondents (48 per
cent) indicated that embez-
zlement was on the rise.

* Lay-offs are affecting
organisations’ internal con-
trol systems. Nearly 60 per
cent of Certified Fraud Exam-
iners who work as in-house
fraud examiners reported that
their companies had experi-
enced lay-offs during the past
year. Among those who had
experienced lay-offs, almost
35 per cent said their compa-
ny had eliminated some anti-
fraud controls.

* Fraud levels are expected
to continue rising. Almost 90
per cent of respondents said
they expect fraud to contin-
ue to increase during the next
12 months.

Bahamas First sees
top rating renewed

A SECOND Bahamian
general insurer has had its top
financial strength and issuer
credit ratings confirmed by A.
M. Best, Bahamas First fol-
lowing RoyalStar Assurance’s
lead from last week.

The leading international
credit rating agency has
affirmed the financial strength
rating of A- (Excellent) and
issuer credit rating of ‘a-’ for
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company, with a stable
outlook for both ratings.

Bahamas First General
Insurance Company is the pri-
mary subsidiary of its parent
company, Bahamas First
Holdings (BFH).

A. M. Best said: “The rat-
ings are based on Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany’s continued solid capi-
talisation, favourable operat-

ing performance and estab-
lished presence in the
Bahamian market. These fac-
tors are supported by the
company's conservative cat-
astrophe programme, under-
writing controls, local market
expertise and enhanced risk
management.
“Historically, Bahamas
First Holdings has contributed
capital to Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company to
support growth initiatives and
to enhance its capital position.
“A.M. Best expects that
Bahamas First Holdings will
continue to support Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany with additional capital
contributions, allowing
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company to maintain
the level of risk-adjusted cap-
italisation necessary for its rat-

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ing level.”

A. M. Best added: “These
positive factors are somewhat
offset by Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company’s
geographic concentration and
subsequent exposure to hur-
ricane activity. However, this
concern is mitigated by
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company’s strong rein-
surance programme with
prominent reinsurance com-
panies. The programme
reduces Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company’s net
probable maximum loss to a
manageable level, but sub-
stantially increases operating
costs. Furthermore, Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany faces increased compe-
tition from indigenous and
outside companies seeking
market share.”

Javon Knowles







MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Ingraham strikes again!

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

mmr IS democracy being stifled

aving criticised the
PLP for not dis-

: e@ ] e

playing true ?
democracy at its 1 | | C ( O V ( T [ | 1 [ | Art

recent National e
Convention, the FNM have done

themselves no favours with their
recent showing.

All the party has done is cement
the notion that nothing happens
within that organisation without
the blessing of the Prime Minis-
ter.

If Perry Christie were to nomi-
nate any candidate in the PLP’s
national convention, the FNM
would have set upon him like a
pack of wild wolves, ripping him to
shreds for “manipulating those
poor old souls” who otherwise
could not make up their own
minds by themselves.

While manipulation will always
have a role to play in party politics,
the blatant interference, the utter
disregard for the process, and the
stifling of the dreams of those
potential candidates who would
have ventured for chairman of the
FNM was almost too painful to
watch.

As The Tribune reported from
the floor only moments after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham nomi-
nated Carl Bethel, the former can-
didate Ivoine Ingraham could only
comfort himself in the bosom of a
party supporter who was fortu-
nately standing nearby.

His tears said it all.

Later he would appear on vari-
ous TV and radio programmes sta-
tioned at the convention explaining
how it would have been political
suicide to face any challenger who
had the outright blessing of the
Prime Minister. That was putting it
politely.

When Prime Minister Ingraham
informed the cheering delegates
that the immediate past chairman
Johnley Ferguson would not be
offering himself for re-election,
Johnley had already been cam-
paigning a few hours before for
the post. In fact, he told The Tri-
bune that he was confident of
being returned to the post.

However, as soon as the Prime
Minister stood and motioned that
Mr Ferguson would not be offering
again for the chairmanship, John-
ley fell right in line and seconded
Mr Bethel’s appointment.

Therefore, with little options
left to him, Ivoine Ingraham
moved for the closing of the nom-
ination process and for Mr Bethel
to be elected unopposed “in the
interest of party unity.”

Here is what he said in his own
words: “If the Prime Minister
stands up, the Prime Minister that
enjoys a great deal of support in
that convention, and nominates
someone I must be the greatest
fool there is to waste my time and
waste the convention's time to
have them vote for a position that
I really have absolutely no chance
in winning.”

Although he put on a brave
front at first, the emotionally
drained candidate was later seen
being consoled by a supporter as









Felipé Major/Tribune sta



SEE page 2C PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his wife, Delores, at a Free National Movement (FNM) convention...

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
INSIGHT

Is democracy being stifled

he wept over the lost oppor-
tunity.

Later, the PLP’s MP for
Fox Hill, Fred Mitchell,
would chime in on that
night’s fiasco criticising the
FNM for their failure to dis-
play any semblance of inter-
nal democracy. As he quite
adequately put it, at least in
the PLP all seats were made
vacant and all positions were
challenged. Say what you will
about the process itself, at
least a fight was had and for
better or worse the public
witnessed men and women
of courage fight for their
right to represent them in a
greater capacity within their
own party.

Sadly, the same cannot be
said in the FNM.

Here is what Mr Mitchell
said: “One of the things we
were proud of showing the
country is that the PLP is
good at internal democracy.
At our convention all seats
were vacant and all positions
were challenged. We were
able to have a fight for those
positions internally and to
survive intact with people
still allies with one another
and not fighting one another.

“And that is what I think
the country expects to see.
It does not expect to see the
maximum leader come and
impose his choices on his
party and you can tell from
the faces of the people who
were the recipients of those
PRIME MINISTER Hubert choices that ate not a hap-
Ingraham is applauded at a py result. And I think the
Free National Movement Bahamian people should
(FNM) convention... take note."





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SEE next page



((;)) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh.edu.hs

f mic Affairs F
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The Collage of The Bahamas invites applications for the fodowing full-time faculty positions at
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fi) Assistant Professor, Paychology

ii) Assistant Professor, Public Adminstration
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iv) Assistant Professor, History

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participating in departmental projects; student recruitment and acvisement; contributing to te
development of teaching matenials; engaging in a research project with the potential for schol-
aly GUDICaION, and Serving on Ceparnental and college wide Conuni thee.

Ta ensure consideration, application materials must be received by Noverber 30ih, 2008. A,
complete apoiication packet consists of:

An ao picabion better

Callege of The Bahamas Apalication Ferm (available online at wavw.cob edu be/hrprofile)
A detailed Gurméulurm vite

Statement of Teaching Philosaphy

Proof of teaching excellence

Capes of all transenpts ionginal imansenpls required upon ennpleyrrvent)

The names and contact infomation for three professional references

hail te:
The College of The Bahamas
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4o12
Attention: Patricia J. Ellis
Assistant Director, Recruitment

OR
hrapply@oob.edu.bs
For detailed information visit www.oob ecu. bshrapply.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

EET eT RADA Ak
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Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854







$ $- $

THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3C
INSIGHT

in the governing party? —

Take note indeed.

The Ministry of Education
is once again thrown into tur-
moil, and one would have
thought with all of the
reports of sexual misconduct
that abound within this min-
istry that this would have
been the one institution that
would have been free from
the political jockeying.

For this ministry to lose its
minister two and a half years
into the government not
because he was performing
below par, but simply
because he is needed to act
as chairman of a political
party sends a very strong and
dangerous message.

Also, the FNM appears to
be suggesting that with
Bradley Roberts’ return to
the PLP, they had no other
choice but to take a cabinet
minister out of his post and
make him chairman to com-
bat the “Big Bad Brad.”

What does that say about
the FNM’s bench? Is there
no one within the ranks of
the party who could act as
chairman? Although many
believe that Sidney Collie is a
lost cause, what about
Kendal Wright? Surely
someone could have been
found other than the Minis-
ter of Education.

But perhaps Bradley
Roberts is more of a threat
to the FNM than meets the
eye. The often rambunctious
and flamboyant FNM Sena-
tor Frederick McAlpine took
the time to berate Mr
Roberts in his convention
speech questioning, “Who’s
afraid of the Big Bad wolf?”

“They now have a Chair-
man (respectfully, I don’t
know if to call him the old-
new Chairman or the new-
old Chairman) who said he
came back to bark and bite
hard — sounds like a French

-_ .
poodle spirit to me. -.

i
“This new-old Chairman .
SEE page 7C DPM BRENT SYMONETTE and Carl Bethel (top right inset) at an FNM convention...

A.G. Electric Co. Ltd THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
WE’ RE SERIOUS ABOUT LIGHTING. ° Visit our website at www.cob.eduhs






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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT



Is democracy

being stifled in

the governing
party?

or old-new Chairman says that his sole

mission in politics in his twilight years is to

dismantle the FNM. Bring it on my broth-
er!” said Senator McAlpine.

“Dismantle the FNM? We’re together.
We have one leader who knows what he
is doing. You don’t have to ever ask who
the leader is on this side. We’re united
and we’re not pretending to be. We’re
not flaming the public. What you see is
what you get!”

Not to be outdone, Mr Roberts was
quick to fire back with his own brand of
vitriol.

“The only serious response to
McAlpine, who really deserves no
response at all, is to warn the Senator
that times have changed since his crude
and embarrassing performance during
the 2007 General Election rallies. Times
have grown serious and serious times
require serious leadership. He was award-
ed for his abandonment of his Christian
vows during that campaign by being
appointed to the Senate. The deep feel-
ings of rejection which fueled his unchris-
tian-like behaviour during the elections,
we had hoped would have been quelled
by time, spiritual reflection, responsibili-
ties to nation building and his many chal-
lenges in a new marriage.

“We hoped for a moment, that as a
Senator, who doubles as a ‘man of the
cloth,’ McAlpine might have used this
opportunity to inspire convention dele-
gates and the Bahamian population at
large, in a different, more meaningful

ut
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CARL BETHEL at a Free National Movement (FNM) convention...

Is democracy
being stifled in
the governing

party?

way. But again, he chose to clownishly sing for his supper,
to please a man over more meaningful principles. He chose
to spew messages of hate and folly over messages of
restoration and timely wisdom — again, during the most
socially and economically challenging period in our coun-
try since the late 1920s.”

If this back and forth is any indicator of things to come
then it is safe to say that the next two and a half years will
be some of the best for the media in this country. As for the
rest of the Bahamian population — your guess is as good
as mine.

What do you think?

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

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DPM BRENT SYMONETTE at an FNM convention...

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The Tribune

=-USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

ST eS



rake police in
id to raid bar

Incident one of five
robberies reported
over the weekend

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIVE men impersonating
police officers who were
attempting to rob a bar had to
flee after they were attacked
by its patrons, say police.

The incident was just one of
five armed robberies or
attempted armed robberies
reported over the weekend.

In one of them, a man was
shot in the left buttock after
being robbed of his wallet.

In another, aman anda
woman had cash and cell-
phones stolen from them at
Goodman’s Bay beach, with the
man subsequently forced into
the trunk of his friend’s car and
driven across the island.

Yesterday, it emerged that
police suspect three of the rob-
beries may have been commit-
ted by the same pair of armed,
masked men. They said they
are “developing information”
which they hope to release to
the public which may help them
capture the culprits.

The robbery spree comes
after former PLP cabinet min-
ister Leslie Miller was attacked
at his business, Sunburst Paint,
by two armed and masked man.

However, Superintendent
Elsworth Moss yesterday
declined to link this incident
with the other three involving
men going by similar descrip-
tions.

The incident in which the cul-
prits were pretending to be
police officers occurred just
after midnight on Saturday at a
bar on Armstrong and
Dowdeswell Street, in Nassau.

Recording the incident as an
armed robbery, police said:
“Five men entered the estab-
lishment, one clad in a police
jacket, another a bullet proof
vest, one in Dickies pants and
stripped shirt, armed with a
handgun entered the establish-
ment and began searching the
patrons.

“The patrons attacked the
men (verbally), who fled in a
white Altima, license plate
number 215959.”

Yesterday, bar owner Walles
Francois said he thought the
robbers were policemen as they
started searching various parts
of his business.

“They went into the kitchen
and started opening up all of
the cupboards. I went in and
asked them what they were

SEE page 11

sale ends November 14th, 2009

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JUST weeks before the
Christmas holidays, more
Grand Bahamians have been
forced out of work.

The 50-room Royal Palm
Resorts and Suites located
on East Mall and Settler’s
Way shut its doors last week,
The Tribune has learned,
although reports vary over
whether the closure is tem-

5

Quiznos

porary or permanent.

Grand Bahama MP Obie
Wilchcombe said he believed
almost 100 people had lost
their jobs. However, contrary
to reports from the Associ-
ated Press, he also claimed
his sources told him the hotel
is only shutting its doors tem-
porarily until tourism picks
up on the island.

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Davis set to be named
Leader of Opposition
Business in the House

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP DEPUTY LEADER Philip ‘Brave’
Davis is set to be named as the Leader of
Opposition Business in the House of Assem-
bly today, The Tribune can reveal.

According to well-placed sources within
the party, former Prime Minister Perry

Christie has opted to not return the post to
his long time friend and one-time rival Dr

SRT S

Bernard Nottage who recently opposed him
during the party’s 51st National Convention.
Having already lost his leadership bid in a landslide to the

SEE page 11

MEMBERS of ee

Bahamas Defence Force

PT at fee ME
Remembrance Day at the
Cenotaph in Nassau yester-
SUE AE ei
Cials gathered to pay their
respects to war veterans.
¢ SEE PAGE NINE


































Attempts to reach resort
representatives to confirm
the details were unsuccess-
ful up to press time yester-
day.

Suggesting that utilities
costs had placed extra pres-
sure on the resort, Mr Wilch-
combe called on the Gov-
ernment to ensure that assis-
tance with electricity bills



PLP to roll out
new election
candidates at
end of month

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal
Party is set to roll out its new
slate of candidates for the
next general election at the
end of this month, party
leader Perry Christie con-
firmed yesterday.

When the nominations are
ratified by the National Gen-
eral Council on the third
Thursday of this month, Mr
Christie says he fully expects
this new face of the PLP to
include a plethora of “young
men and women”.

As the PLP moves to ready
itself for the next general elec-
tion, the party leader said they
will be moving to live up to
the tenants of being a viable
alternative to the present gov-
ernment.

“But there will be a signifi-
cant number of young men
and women who, after the
third Thursday of this month
when we have everything rat-
ified by the National General
Council, we will put to the
Bahamian public so the
Bahamian public could draw
the right conclusions as to
whether or not the PLP is pre-
pared for the future and

SEE page 11

made available in New Prov-
idence extends to Grand
Bahama, which receives its
power from the Grand
Bahama Power Company.
“The Government has to
insist the Grand Bahama
Power Company do same
thing. While Government is

SEE page 11

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS







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Nurses union chief
to take ‘wait and
see attitude’ on

salary increases

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE PRESIDENT of the
Bahamas Nurses Union is to
take a “wait and see attitude”
towards the Prime Minister’s
announcement that the Gov-
ernment now has the money
to pay postponed salary
increases owed to nurses,
teachers and doctors and will
look to implement agreed
health insurance for nurses.

Cleola Hamilton, whose
membership staged a massive
sick-out earlier this year over
the Government’s decision to

postpone health insurance for
nurses, said she personally
had not heard Hubert Ingra-
ham’s comments during his
speech on the final night of
the FNM convention and
would rather not conclude
that the payments and health
coverage will go ahead until
she sees it happen.

“Based on experience I am
going to say that we will have
to wait and see. The Govern-
ment made promises before
that it did not fulfil,” said Ms
Hamilton.

Speaking to FNM delegates
and the Bahamas via televi-
sion and radio on Friday

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PM HUBERT INGRAHAM

night, Prime Minister Ingra-
ham said he was “pleased to
announce we are now in a
position to pay what we owe”
to teachers, doctors and nurs-
es under contracts between
the government and the pub-
lic sector unions which repre-
sent those workers.

“We gat the money!” Mr
Ingraham exclaimed.

He said that an $800 lump
sum payment provided for
under a contract between the
government and the Bahamas
Union of Teachers would now
be paid, amounting to a total
cost to the public purse of $3.2
million.

Meanwhile, a four per cent
salary increase would be paid
to nurses, at an annual cost
of $18 million and a 1.5 per
cent increase in doctors’
salaries, equivalent to
$844,000 annually, also would
be forthcoming.

“We will commence dis-
cussions to agree a way for-
ward for the implementation
of the agreed health insurance
coverage for nurses,” said Mr
Ingraham.

All of these payments and
increases were postponed by
the Government mid-year
due to major shortfalls in gov-
ernment revenue. In his
speech, the Prime Minister
said the payments would be
back dated to July, so the
medics and educators could
expect some back pay.

The government will table a
supplementary Appropria-
tions bill for $26.5 million in
parliament on Wednesday to
cover the cost of the payouts
as well as the temporary jobs
programme planned.

“T wish to thank the teach-
ers, doctors and nurses of The
Bahamas for their forbear-
ance during these difficult
economic times,” he added.

Calls to Bahamas Union of
Teachers President Belinda
Wilson and other officials, as
well as Doctor’s Union Presi-
dent Norad Morgan, were not
answered yesterday.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3





LOCAL NEWS
â„¢ BAHAMAS GOUe FEEL TROPICAL STORM WINDS

Four killed in
two-car collision

Community shocked by tragic accident

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A COMMUNITY has been left reeling after a
horrific two-car collision killed four young men
and left another battling for his life in hospital.

Chief of the voluntary Abaco Crash Fire and
Rescue organisation, Colin Albury, said the scene
on Friday was one the most devastating he had
witnessed in 20 years, second only to the plane
crash that killed US popstar Aaliyah in Abaco
eight years ago.

He and a team of five volunteers were called
from their beds to help extract the young victims
from the carnage.

The incident came just hours after a 15-year-
old girl was killed in Nassau Village after being
flung from the Centre for the Deaf school mini-van
she was travelling in when the van was in a collision
with a car, bringing the number of traffic fatalities
for Friday alone to five.

Speaking of the Abaco crash, Mr Albury said:
“The impact when the cars collided was such that
everyone was crushed.

“The families are taking it really hard, naturally,
and where it’s getting close to the holiday season
having to bury a child is going to be very difficult.”

He added that the tight-knit local police force
had also been especially affected by the tragedy.

Man shot dead
hy police in
Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

er od ‘ola

FREEPORT - A MAN
was fatally shot by police Fri-
day evening in the Fawcett
Lane area.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said the incident occurred
around 11.20pm when officers
were dispatched to investigate
a disturbance in the area.

When they arrived at the
scene, officers were confront-
ed by a 27-year-old masn
who, it is claimed, was acting
in a disorderly manner. There
was a scuffle between the
police and the man, who was
then shot.

The man’s identification is
being withheld by police at
this time.

Pinder's Point
residents
expected to
demonstrate

RESIDENTS of Pinder’s
Point are expected to demon-
strate at the BORCO/Vopak
Bahamas today. Community
activist Troy Garvey held a
town meeting on Friday
evening with residents in the
area concerning odour emis-
sions in the settlements and
its impact on the health of res-
idents

Many residents have com-
plained of respiratory and
breathing problems, skin rash-
es, and nausea. They are call-
ing on the executives to meet
with them

Vopak has denied that its
operations are responsible for
making residents sick.



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Though reports are sketchy at this time, The }
Tribune understands that all of the men who died }
in the crash are in their twenties, and all from dif- }
ferent families in the Blackwood Community of }

only around 140 residents.

According to police, two cars — a grey volk- }
swagon Jetta driven by police constable 3229 }
Valentino Burrows, of Cooper’s Town, and a white }
Plymouth Acclaim driven by Ricardo Reckley — }
collided head on along S.C. Bootle Highway, south }
of Andy’s Service Station at around 10.20pm on Fri- ;

day.

New Providence for treatment.

Edison Cornish, a Blackwood resident said:
“Right now there’s a very solemn feeling in the :
town. Everything’s pretty sombre. We're all one }

family here.”
“The families aren’t holding up too good.”

Another Abaco source said: “It’s going to be a

horrible shock for the community.”

A team of police investigators from Nassau have
been sent to the island to help assist with the inves- }

tigation into the tragedy.

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Mr Burrows — who had only recently been :
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eral passengers. PC Burrows, Ricardo Reckley, }
Romeo McIntosh and Tony Curry all died of their }
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THE northern Bahamas
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er.com, Hurricane Ida is
expected to make landfall
somewhere between Louisiana
and the Florida panhandle as
early as Tuesday morning.

The hurricane is expected to
head northeast across the US
southern coast and lose the
majority of its power, being
downgraded later into the week
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‘an
Na LY,

PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ann'
Na EY,

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Germany celebrates memory of wall falling

BERLIN (AP) — With concerts and
memorials on Monday, Germans will cele-
brate the day the Berlin Wall came crashing
down 20 years ago.

On that cold night, they danced atop the
wall, arms raised in victory, hands clasped in
friendship and giddy hope. Years of separa-
tion and anxiety melted into the unbeliev-
able reality of freedom and a future without
border guards, secret police, informers and
rigid communist control.

Germans are celebrating with concerts
boasting Beethoven and Bon Jovi; a memo-
rial service for the 136 people killed trying to
cross over from 1961 to 1989; candle lightings
and 1,000 towering plastic foam dominoes
to be placed along the wall’s route and tipped
over.

On Nov. 9, 1989, East Germans came in
droves, riding their sputtering Trabants,
motorcycles and rickety bicycles. Hundreds,
then thousands, then hundreds of thousands
crossed over the following days.

Stores in West Berlin stayed open late and
banks gave out 100 Deutschemarks in “wel-
come money,” then worth about $50, to each
East German visitor.

The party lasted four days and by Nov. 12
more than 3 million of East Germany’s 16.6
million people had visited, nearly a third of
them to West Berlin, the rest through gates
opening up along the rest of the fenced,
mined frontier that cut their country in two.

Sections of the nearly 155 kilometers (100
miles) of wall were pulled down and knocked
over. Tourists chiseled off chunks to keep as
souvenirs. Tearful families reunited. Bars
gave out free drinks. Strangers kissed and
toasted each other with champagne.

Klaus-Hubert Fugger, a student at the Free
University in West Berlin, was having drinks
at a pub when people began coming “who
looked a bit different.”

Customers bought the visitors round after
round. By midnight, instead of going home,
Fugger and three others took a taxi to the
Brandenburg Gate, long a no man’s land,
and scaled the 12-foot (nearly four meter)
wall with hundreds of others.

“There were really like a lot of scenes, like
people crying, because they couldn’t get the
situation,” said Fugger, now 43. “A lot of
people came with bottles” of champagne and
sweet German sparkling wine.

Angela Merkel, Germany’s first chancellor
from the former communist East, recalled
the euphoria in an address last week to the
US. Congress.

“Where there was once only a dark wall, a
door suddenly opened and we all walked
through it: onto the streets, into the church-
es, across the borders,” Merkel said. “Every-
one was given the chance to build something

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new, to make a difference, to venture a new
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The wall the communists built at the height
of the Cold War and which stood for 28 years
is mostly gone. Some parts still stand, at an
outdoor art gallery or as part of an open-air
museum. Its route through the city is now
streets, shopping centers, apartment houses.
The only reminder of it are a series of inlaid
bricks that trace its path.

Checkpoint Charlie, the prefab that was
long the symbol of the Allied presence and of
Cold War tension, has been moved to a muse-
um in western Berlin.

Potsdamer Platz, the vibrant square that
was destroyed during World War II and
became a no man’s land during the Cold
War, is full of upscale shops selling every-
thing from iPods to grilled bratwursts.

Ata ceremony in Berlin Oct. 31, Helmut
Kohl, the German chancellor who presided
over the opening of the wall, stood side by
side with the superpower presidents of the
time, George H.W. Bush and Mikhail Gor-
bachev.

After the decades of shame that followed
the Nazi era, Kohl suggested, the collapse of
the Berlin Wall and the reunification of their
country 11 months later gave Germans pride.

In an interview in Moscow with Associat-
ed Press Television News, Gorbachev said it
was a catalyst for peace.

“No matter how hard it was, we worked,
we found mutual understanding and we
moved forward. We started cutting down
nuclear weapons, scaling down the armed
forces in Europe and resolving other issues,”
he said.

It all began with a routine late afternoon
news conference.

On Nov. 9, 1989, Guenter Schabowski, a
member of East Germany’s ruling Politburo,
casually declared that East Germans would
be free to travel to the West immediately.

Later, he tried to clarify his comments and
said the new rules would take hold at mid-
night, but events moved faster as the word
spread.

At a remote crossing in Berlin’s south,
Annemarie Reffert and her 15-year-old
daughter made history by becoming the first
East Germans to cross the border.

Years later, Schabowski told a TV inter-
viewer that he had gotten mixed up. It was
not a decision but a draft law that the Polit-
buro was set to discuss.

He thought it was a decision that had
already been approved.

That night, around midnight, border guards
swung open the gates.

(This article is by Matt Moore of the
Associated Press)



Questions
on marital
rape law

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE permit me
some latitude to join the
parade of persons who wish
to vent on the present topic
of choice — the proposed
amendment to the rape
laws/act to include “marital
rape.”

My simple questions are
really directed to Dr San-
dra Dean-Patterson and
Minister Loretta Butler-
Turner as they appear to be
the more visible proponents.

1) What is the statistics of
persons who are being
abused by their spouses who
do not report it. Let me
guess that it would be less
than 50 per cent...and would
you say that the main rea-
sons for not reporting are
fear and need for financial
assistance? Would these sit-
uations change with the pro-
posed amendment?

2) What is the success rate
for rape cases? Will this
amendment improve on this
considering in these cases
both persons will be expect-
ed to be in the home envi-
ronment unlike in many
rape cases?

3) What consideration is
being given to the Divorce
laws in this country? Will
refusal to have sex consti-
tute specific grounds for
divorce? Will refusal to
have sex on the night after
the marriage not make it
impossible to consummate
the marriage as such imme-
diate grounds for annul-
ment?

4) Our present laws con-
tain sufficient clauses to deal
with rape and abuse with-
out time constraints. Can a
spouse file for separation
and rape simultaneously
under present laws?

5) What is the present
divorce rate in our Christian
nation, say 60 - 70 per cent.
In your opinion will this
amendment improve this?
If not do you have any
regard for the “sanctity of
marriage”?

6) We may follow the
powerful UN, but I would
ask how many of the coun-
tries have complete freedom
of religion? Even our great
neighbour to the North has
taken religion out of their
schools and as such is in no
position to provide advice

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on this subject. We should
also note that their divorce
laws are exceedingly more
liberal.

Finally, I think we all
agree that rape is rape and
is unacceptable, however,
there is a small percentage
of men who have married
spiteful and/or vindictive

spouses who will use this as
an opportunity to attempt
to embarrass them by
parading them in front of
the courts because of other
unrelated situations...who
will protect these good
men? In my opinion even if
one innocent man is caught
in this situation that would
be too many. Thank you for
allowing me to vent.

K L BRATHWAITE
Nassau,
August 24, 2009.

The painting of the
House of Assembly

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“Having dwelt and served for more than forty years...” in
Parliament, the Prime Minister said, “and having derived
very great pleasure and advantage therefrom, I, naturally,
would like to see it restored in all essentials to its old form,

convenience and dignity.”

No, this wasn’t Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham express-
ing his “disgust” over some “misguided” artisan changing the
colour of the House of Assembly’s walls from the tradi-

tional green to a pale yellow.

British Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill, expressed
the sentiment in 1943 during a debate on rebuilding the
House of Commons, which had been destroyed by Ger-
man bombs in 1941 — two years after Britain declared war

on Germany.

While some members wanted to replace it with a roomi-
er building that could seat the burgeoning number of MPs,
Churchill and others wanted to recreate the original struc-
ture, which could only accommodate about two-thirds the

number of parliamentarians.

According to Ralph Keyes in The Quote Verifier,
“Churchill thought that being a bit overcrowded lent inten-
sity, drama and a sense of history to parliamentary pro-

ceedings.”

“We shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings

shape us,” Churchill said.

His position carried the day and the House of Commons
was restored to its traditional form in 1950.

At this point it’s still not known who is responsible for
causing taxpayers to have to foot the bill for a double
repainting of the august chambers of our House of Assem-

bly

SIMON ARTZI
Nassau,
September, 2009.

Issues with the
Montagu foreshore

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD like to con-
gratulate Ms Athena Dami-
anos for so eloquently stat-
ing the feelings of so many
of us that live off Eastern
Road and have to drive past
the Montagu foreshore. The
stench is appalling and we
have to endure it in order
to drive home.

The idea of a feeder road
is excellent and then we
would not have to stop while
somebody is making a pur-
chase, if not of fish then

=

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from the fruit vendor and
now the phone card seller. It
certainly is rather surprising
that some Member of Par-
liament who happens to live
in the Eastern area is not
conscious of the situation.

Perhaps the only alterna-
tive is to get a petition start-
ed and that would very
quickly be signed by many
who must drive past the
area.

HELEN ASTARITA
Nassau,
August 17, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



PLP LEADER Perry Christie

PLP leader ‘felt sorry’ for
FNM Senator Ferguson

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Prime Minister
Perry Christie has said he
felt “sorry” for FNM Sena-
tor Johnley Ferguson who
lost his bid for re-election
to chairmanship of the party
after Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham personally nomi-
nated Carl Bethel for the
post.

Making light of the fact
that the nomination of Mr
Bethel had come as a sur-
prise to Mr Ferguson who
hours before had been cam-
paigning for the post, Mr
Christie said it was unfortu-
nate to see such an incident
take place to one of the par-
ty’s most loyal of support-
ers.

During his address to the
media yesterday at Gambier
House, Mr Christie noted
that the Prime Minister him-
self said there were discus-
sions taking place “three
months” ago as to who
might best be suited to be
chairman of the party lead-
ing into the next general
election. As such, Mr
Christie said he found it
“amazing” that Mr Fergu-
son was not included in
these talks.

“Well clearly it seems to
me, the FNM and its leader,
planning three months ago
did not tell Johnley Fergu-

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son or Ivoine Ingraham.
Clearly the ethical implica-
tions of that must be impor-
tant to the Bahamian peo-
ple. Key members of their
own organisation who were
campaigning hours before
the convention started for
the position of chairman.
“Yet the Prime Minister
said this decision was con-
templated and discussed and
presumably decided upon
months ago. This is more
interesting and intriguing for
us because this is the party
that questioned the level
and depth of democracy

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Christie warns
PM on ‘labelling’

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP Leader Perry Christie warned the
Prime Minister yesterday to avoid the
practice of labelling politicians, as there
were many opportunities for him to
return the favour.

As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
poked fun at the fact that Mr Christie
would be close to 70 years of age when
the next general election is called in
2012, Mr Christie hit back stating that
the PM appears to be “so unfit as a per-
son” that “I labour watching him try to
walk.”

“So from my point of view let me just
say this, the Prime Minister should real-
ly be careful in establishing a culture of

politicians describing each other.
Because you know there are many won-
derful opportunities I would have if I
wanted to say what his friends (call him)
as he said what my friends (call me).
But I don’t want to go there because
that’s not the kind of leadership that I
exemplify,” he said.

PLP chairman Bradley Roberts also
chimed in, describing the Prime Minister
as a person incapable of working with
anyone who disagrees with his views.

“He ridiculed (William) Willy Wong.
Willy Wong represents the real estate
people (the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation).

“He wasn’t just speaking for Willy
Wong. He also did the same thing when
John Rolle, the former Controller of
Customs disagreed with him and offered

within the Mr
Christie said.

The PLP leader added
that it should also be point-
ed out that Mr Ferguson
was not only just the chair-
man of the FNM, but also
the Vice President of the
Senate and as such a mem-
ber of the FNM’s Parlia-

PLP,”

an outburst of laughter at
the party’s headquarters
yesterday.

As such, Mr Christie said
that the country is entitled
to ask why the Prime Minis-
ter would make such a polit-
ically self-serving decision
to the detriment of the Min-
istry of Education.

‘Honda Odyssey

mentary caucus.

“He was a Senator, a part
of the Parliamentary caucus
of the FNM and therefore
privy to the affairs of the
FNM. It is astounding there-
fore in terms of the assump-
tions we can infer, that any
discussions on the chair-
manship that took place
excluded such a person —
the chairman, Vice Presi-
dent of the Senate and a
member of the Parliamen-
tary caucus from those dis-
cussions.

“We use this example sim-
ply to say that the Bahamian
people had had an opportu-
nity to see contested elec-
tions in the PLP, to see the
results fairly arrived at, and
to see the PLP come togeth-
er as a mature party in the
aftermath of those elections
to prepare itself for the next
general elections.

“I feel sorry for people
like Johnley. Here is a man
who believes in his party;
gets up there and goes to his
convention only to find,
‘nobody moves, nobody gets
hurt’,” Mr Christie said to

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his point of view. That is the type of
man Hubert Ingraham is. When you dis-
agree with him then he wants to ridicule
you. That isn’t leadership my friend and
it certainly ain’t trust,” Mr Roberts said.

Speaking to his now rival on the gov-
ernment side, Mr Roberts said he
believes that FNM Chairman Carl
Bethel is a “fine young man” — but as to
his political acumen he has little to offer.

“He obviously is a strong supporter
of his party but I have not seen him per-
form at this level that he has been placed
at. I have been there and done that; 2002
the story is there.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Migration: A dirty word
or a global opportunity?

By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
Diplomat).

“MIGRATION not infre-
quently gets a bad press. Neg-

ative stereotypes, portraying
migrants as ‘stealing our jobs’
or ‘scrounging off the taxpay-
er’, abound in sections of the
media and public opinion espe-
cially in time of recession.”
That is the opening sentence
of the United Nations Human

Development Report 2009.
The report goes on to say
that “fears about migrants tak-
ing the jobs or lowering the
wages of local people, placing
an unwelcome burden on local
services, or costing the taxpay-
er money, are generally exag-

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gerated.” The Report asserts,
“when migrants’ skills comple-
ment those of local people,
both groups benefit” and it
makes the point that “the pol-
icy response to migration can
be wanting. Many governments
institute increasingly repressive
entry regimes, turn a blind eye
to health and safety violations
by employers, or fail to take a
lead in educating the public on
the benefits of immigration.”

Little wonder, then, that
immigration in most countries
has become a political prob-
lem. In the absence of factual
information on the benefits of
immigration to societies, the
view prevails that immigration
is harmful.

When some governments
release figures on the number
of migrants who have entered a
country, there is seldom, if
ever, a simultaneous release of
the number of people who
have left.

In many places, if the flow
of migrants was mostly out and
little in, the economies would
soon be in trouble as the pop-
ulation shrinks resulting in few-
er skills, a smaller labour force,
less demand for goods and ser-
vices and less money circulating
in the economy.

The global flow on migrants
is also vastly overestimated by
the majority of the world’s peo-
ple particularly because accu-
rate information is not only
sparse; it is simply not made
available to the public. For
example, the UN Report
reveals that the global figure
for international migrants in

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the world’s population has
stayed at only 3 per cent over
the past 50 years.

However, there are some
regions of the world where out-
ward migration has a peculiar-
ly negative impact because of
the type of people who
migrate, and the Caribbean
Community and Common
Market (CARICOM) is one
such region where there is a
heavy outflow of tertiary edu-
cated people to the developed
countries, particularly Britain,
Canada and the United States.
Commonwealth Secretariat fig-
ures show that among the
CARICOM countries that
have lost more than 75 per cent
of their tertiary educated grad-
uates are Antigua and Barbu-
da, Belize, Dominica, Guyana,
Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad
and Tobago.

Unless these countries can
produce enough tertiary edu-
cated graduates to retain a suf-
ficient number for their own
development needs, not only
will the public and private sec-
tors suffer from a paucity of
knowledge-based skills and
entrepreneurial insights, but
their economies will become
uncompetitive and will decline.
The case for more investment
in education and human
resource development is there-
fore compelling.

It is a case that should be
developed by the CARICOM
Secretariat and jointly
advanced by CARICOM coun-
tries to the International Finan-
cial Institutions, such as the
World Bank, and the devel-
oped countries that benefit
from this migration, to make a
significant grant contribution
to education in the region.

There is, of course, another
side to the immigration story,
and that is remittances sent
back home from migrants
abroad.

In the 53-nation Common-
wealth, remittances have
become extremely important.
They are greater than official
development assistance and
second only to foreign direct
investment (FDI).

The Organisation for Eco-
nomic Cooperation and Devel-
opment (OECD) reckons that
total global remittances in 2008
were $328 billion as against
official development assistance
of $120 billion.

All CARICOM countries
benefit from remittances. The
leaders in 2008 in terms of
remittances per head of popu-
lation were Jamaica ($826), St
Kitts-Nevis ($760), Barbados
($659), Grenada ($603),
Dominica ($412), Guyana
($365) and Antigua and Bar-
buda ($305).

But, it is clear that in 2009,
the remittance figure declined
indicating that immigrants were
among the principal sufferers
in the countries to which they
had migrated.

Many of them lost jobs or
were constrained to accept low-
er wages and, thus, had less
money to send back home.

In this connection, while
remittances are important to
the economies of many
Caribbean countries, active
policies for attracting invest-
ment from the Caribbean Dias-
pora have to be developed for
the medium term.

Within CARICOM, the

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SIR RONALD SANDERS



problem of migration has
become a vexed one in the con-
text of the current global reces-
sion. As the 2009 UN Human
Development Report stated:
“The current recession has
made migrants particularly vul-
nerable. Some destination
country governments have
stepped up the enforcement of
migration laws in ways that can
infringe on migrants’ rights.”

It is a human reaction to try
to secure the interests of citi-
zens over migrants at a time of
crisis, particularly when the
migrant community is substan-
tial as in the cases in CARI-
COM of Antigua and Barbuda,
Barbados and Trinidad and
Tobago. Even though the
CARICOM Treaty acknowl-
edges “Freedom of movement
of People”, it is impractical to
simply rely on that as a justifi-
cation for migration. CARI-
COM ought to be considering a
more practical and realistic
approach to the issue until such
time as a Single Market and
Economy is fully completed.

One way of doing this would
be to develop a regional mech-
anism under which there would
be a partnership between coun-
tries of origin and destination,
supervised by a Council of
appropriate officials, to man-
age migration based on labour
needs with full respect for the
rights of workers and their fam-
ilies by the destination coun-
tries.

In early November, the for-
mer Prime Minister of Jamaica,
P J Patterson, quietly began
the Chairmanship of a Com-
mission on Migration and
Development.

The Commission is an initia-
tive of the Ramphal Centre in
London, named after the
Caribbean’s former Common-
wealth Secretary-General, Shri-
dath ‘Sonny’ Ramphal.

The Patterson Commission
is in its fledgling stage and it is
still to be funded fully, but the
meeting attended by represen-
tatives of the United Nations,
the Commonwealth Secretariat
and other multilateral organi-
sations displayed every sign of
new thinking on the issue.

The task before it is huge,
but Patterson has the gravitas
in the international community
to make the Commission’s
report a seminal document in
the international discourse on
how the issue of migration
should be tackled to maximise
its benefits.

Responses and previous

commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com

www.icis.bs




THE TRIBUNE





“We have
commenced the

construction of
our health

bridge to the
future, a bridge
to connect all
Family Islands

and eventually
the world.”

HEALTH MINISTER
Hubert Minnis delivered a pas-
sionate convention speech on
Thursday outlining his “dream”
of equal access to quality and
affordable medical care for all
Bahamians.

He told FNM members how
the government is using tech-
nological, infrastructural and
legal advances to “build a
health bridge” to this future.

And he reaffirmed his gov-
ernment’s commitment to a
National Health Insurance
scheme, but criticised the PLP’s
plan in 2006 as unsustainable.

Dr Minnis asserted that the
FNM would introduce a plan
in a phased manner, starting
with the Chronic Non-Com-
municable Disease Prescription
Drug Plan, for which legisla-
tion has already been passed.

The drug plan, which is close
to implementation, provides for
free medications for 11 com-
mon chronic non-communica-
ble diseases such as arthritis,
glaucoma and breast cancer.

Dr Minnis said: “TI dream of a
Bahamas where there is no
poverty and no Starvation, a
Bahamas where quality and
affordable medical care is given
to all... regardless of race,
colour, religious denomination,
political affiliation or econom-
ic status.

“A Bahamas not separated
by water, a Bahamas where
individuals in the southern
islands as far as Inagua, Acklins
and Mayaguana as well as those
in the north such as Walker’s
Cay, Grand Cay and the Aba-
cos, receive the same medical
care and have access to spe-
cialist care without having to
travel to New Providence, plac-
ing extra financial burden upon
themselves and their families.

“A Bahamas where individ-
uals within Andros for exam-
ple, be they in the north, central
or south, have access to the
same quality care as those in
New Providence.”

Dr Minnis said he also
dreams of a time when tech-
nology will allow Bahamians to
get expert medical opinions
from abroad, and when the
country will be in a position to
benefit from the revenue and
job creation that medical
tourism could bring. “This
dream,” he said, “is becoming a
reality.”

“We have commenced the
construction of our health
bridge to the future, a bridge
to connect all Family Islands
and eventually the world,” said
the minister.

Among current and planned
advances in medical treatment,
Dr Minnis noted:

e A tele-medicine pro-
gramme in Abaco that allows
patients to be examined and
assessed by doctors in New
Providence without travelling
to the capital.

e A tele-radiology pro-



The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in their
neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are raising
funds for a good cause,
campaigning for
improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



LOCAL NEWS

Dr Hubert Minnis: My dream
of affordable medical care

DR HUBERT MINNIS

gramme that will allow for
CAT scans performed in Grand
Bahama to be viewed and inter-
preted by doctors in New Prov-
idence and vice versa.

¢ The 52 per cent completion
of the introduction of electron-
ic medical records at all gov-
ernment clinics, providing up
to date patient information that
can be accessed throughout the
islands eliminating the need for
patients to travel with their
medical records, x-rays, et
cetera.

“We will soon say good-bye
to the duplication of patient
records at various clinics...
We will create a paperless envi-
ronment, improving both effi-
ciency and accuracy of medical
information,” said the minister.

Meanwhile, Dr Minnis added
that government has started
decentralising its clinics and
ambulance services in an effort
to improve “efficiency of treat-
ment” and provide faster
response times by dispatching
emergency teams from clinics
in the eastern, southern, and
western districts throughout
New Providence.

Contracts have been signed
for upgrades to the emergency
room at the Rand Memorial
Hospital and for three addi-
tional theatres at the Princess
Margaret Hospital to provide
for more out-patient and
orthopaedic surgery, while ren-
ovations to ease overcrowding
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital emergency room are
already underway,” he said.

Three men
in custody
after alleged
firearm find

THREE men were taken
into custody on Saturday
after allegedly being found
with an unlicensed firearm
and ammunition.

The arrests came at
around 1.15am after police
on patrol in the Collin’s
Avenue area said they
found one of the men in
possession of the .9mm
weapon and seven live
rounds of ammunition.



MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are making
news in their neighbourhoods.

Perhaps you are raising funds
for a good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the area
or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.





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THE TRIBUNE



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BAHAMIANS attending ExpoCuba with Chamber of Commerce first vice-president Gershan Major (right).

Bahamians explore
business opportunities
at ExpoCuba trade fair

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMIAN entrepre-
neurs explored business
opportunities in Cuba, the
Caribbean and around the
world at one of the largest
trade fairs in the region held
in Havana.

A group of 10 Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce
(BCOC) delegates represent-
ing a cross-section of Bahami-
an industry worked their way
through the maze of stalls at
ExpoCuba in suburban
Havana to examine hundreds
of goods and services offered
by 51 countries around the
world.

As the successful business
people representing industries
ranging from construction to
agriculture, and tourism to
electrics, worked their way
through the fair they kept
their eyes peeled for new
products to further their busi-
ness and potential money-
making opportunities.

Inspired

The delegates were both
inspired and excited by the
prospects they found at the
27th Havana International
Trade Fair (FIHAV),
although the shrewdest
among them are holding their
cards close to their chest.

BCOC small businessman
of the year Marvin Stuart,
manager of Eagle Electrical
and Lighting on Harrold
Road, said he was impressed
by the enormity of the fair,
having attended dozens of
trade fairs around the world.

The four-day visit to Cuba
gave him the chance to evalu-
ate a range of new technolo-
gies in energy and electrics at
the fair, and he then stayed
on after the BCOC delega-
tion departed to visit manu-

facturers in Cuba.

Mr Stuart said: “It’s good
to be aware of what’s going
on in the market, especially
what’s in our backyard, and I
identified some good quality
products that would be wel-
come in our community at
affordable prices.

“Tf others are benefiting
from new technology then I
would want to implement that
in the Bahamas also, but if we
are not exposed to it, then
how would we know to take
advantage of it?”

He added: “It’s still too
early to conclude what possi-
bilities there may be in Cuba,
but I can say by all means,
this allows an opportunity to
consider the possibilities and
also the fact that we are
neighbouring countries shar-
ing the same boundary, in
terms of logistics, it could
make trade very easy.”

Top Builders International
president and BCOC director
Odley Aritis said: “The trade
fair was mind-boggling for me
but what stood out the most
was how we in the Bahamas
look north for opportunities
when opportunities are south,
east and west.

“We have become so
Americanised and some do
think that everything has to
come from Florida, but that
is not the case.”

Mr Aritis, who was accom-
panied by his son Arsenio
Martin, 23, a site manager for
Top Builders, identified build-
ing materials and other goods
available in Cuba and other
Caribbean countries.

One of the products that
sparked his interest was
offered by a Trindadian com-
pany providing custom-made
clay tiles at half the price of
those available in the United
States.

And his son identified
products he may be interested
in distributing in the
Bahamas.







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Mr Martin said: “I saw dif-
ferent brands of packaged
foods we don’t have, and
there is a market for it, and
these companies don’t have
anyone to distribute their
products in the Bahamas.

“Tt’s a good opportunity
and would be a good invest-
ment.”

While Mr Martin was eval-
uating items for import, Cat
Island businessman Fritz
Stubbs, chairman and CEO of
the Orange Creek Develop-
ment Company Limited, was
looking for manufacturing
equipment to help mitigate
the Bahamas’ dependence on
imports and create products
for export.

As labour and production
costs are high in the Bahamas,
Mr Stubbs hoped to find
equipment that would make
production economically
viable.

He said: “Cuba has one of
the largest and most diverse
trade shows encompassing a
lot of areas that you wouldn’t
normally find.”

Incentives

Mr Stubbs also found it
helpful to meet government
representatives from various
countries to learn about the
incentives they offer, a rare
opportunity at trade shows.

BCOC director and presi-
dent of Epic Battery Limited,
Aaron Brice, said he would
like more Bahamians to get
involved in trade fairs and
travel to explore opportuni-
ties and gain a better under-
standing of the global market.

He said: “We are so shal-
low when it comes to oppor-
tunities. The trade show had
so many products, it showed
me how much other countries
are producing, but as Bahami-
ans we just don’t explore
these things. But we really
need exposure which will
broaden the basis of our
thinking.”

Agricultural entrepreneurs
Carolyn Humes, 45, and her
husband, pastor Orthnel
Humes, of Humes and Co
surveyors, found that Cuba
may be a good place to pur-
chase a wide variety of seeds
for their New Providence
farm off Bacardi Road.

Mrs Humes was impressed
with the show, and the way
Cuba and other counties
came together to promote the
Caribbean.

She said: “I saw how we
can take our farm to a new
dimension, and perhaps make
some new investments. After
this trip I feel our farm will
grow.”

The BCOC now intends to
work with other Caribbean
countries to form a Caribbean
exhibition area at the trade
fair next year, exhibiting
Bahamian products and ser-
vices for export for the first
time.

And Mr Aritis hopes the
Bahamas will then be able to
go one step further.

He said: “It is my dream
to see one day a trade fair like
that in the Bahamas.

“Being a tourist based des-
tination, it would bring a lot
of tourists to attend, and
because of our proximity
between the US and the
south, it would be an ideal
place for everyone to congre-
gate.”


&

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9

&

THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS



REMEMBRANCE

YOUNGSTERS
from the Red
Cross (left) and
from the Brown-
ies (below)
examine the
wreaths at the
Cenotaph yes-
terday during
Remembrance
Day. Pictured at
the bottom of
the page is the
Boys Brigade
marching.



















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PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS

IN MEMORY OF BURNS HOUSE JUNKANOO FEST






A a bs , Ns

Se / SX, Ds
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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

AGATHA DENICE NEELY

April §, 1969 - November 9, 2007

If tears could build a stairway and
memories were a lane.
We would walk all the way to heaven
to bring vou home again,

There were no time to say goodbye, you
were gone before we knew it, and only
God knows why.

We missed your smile, your voice
and your laughter.

Our hearts still ache over your departure,
and although secret tears still flows.
What it means to lose you, only God will
ever know,

Lovingly Remembered by your Children,
Larae and Laren Neely, Brother, Aunts,
Uncles, Relatives and Friends.

FYNES FAMIL

St. Francis Xavier Cathedral

f y f | Uy ) pacer fd Al RPO RT
| “\ FUSION OF — ARTWORK
CULTURE & FUR PROGRAM

¢ Home Cookery ¢ Radio Remote
Steak & Cae pze's D wi Star 106.5 |
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¢ Conch fritters * Plants ty
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. Hoopla ce iW I Are you 4 Bahamian vauel media amet looking to make your mark in the
e Whist Tournamen on I new terminal buildings at the Lynden Finding International Airport?
Nassau Aion Development Company is seeking local artists to create
permanent ert displays for the new airport facilities. There wil be e Sotal

of seven permanent locations for artwork once the redevelopment
project is completed

ana Sur prizes! Our goal is to create a local sense of place’ at our country's major

: — galeway and we need your help. Ve want arists 10 caplure the essence
for the kids... and culture of the Bahamian way of fife

bouncing casts, balloons, face painti ts ' All inlorested artists are invited ta attend an information workshop to
j toy, and kiddie vides! earn about the LPIA Expansion Project, meet members of the terminal

- arl selection commillee and Io review the process for art submission
Additional Parking: Greek Orthodox Church / VP a2 eee ree pares

National Art Gallery Date: Monday November 16, 2009
7 Bethel Baptist Church Time: 7:15 p.m.

ff a =, i f ak E os . ———F Place: The College of The Bahamas,
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“a ae Yy Ps ae ee) ee Aftandance at the workshop is not mandatory but highly recommended

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package at MAD's offices at tha recepton desk on the second floor
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Please RSVP with Mrs. Billy Dorsett
Executive Assistant

Ph: (242) 702-1003 or billy dorsetti@inas. bs
Nassau Alton Development Company
P.O, Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

“ Saturday, November 14, 2009, at The Priory Grounds, West Street

From 12noon Until!

a (’ For more information call 356-3008/9!

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an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one

doing, because they didn’t show
any warrant. Then I said that I
was going to call Central Police
Station and they started row-
ing with me, saying ‘Shut up,
shut up!’.”

Unable to make contact with
police on 919, Mr Francois said
he left the bar to go to the
police station where he report-
ed the incident. He claims offi-
cers told him that they were not
aware of anyone authorising a
search of his bar.

Meanwhile, the men fled in
the Nissan after people drink-
ing in the bar began verbally
harassing them. “They kept
shouting at them, asking them

Fake police

what right they have to come
in here and do this,” said Fran-
cols.

Yesterday, Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said he was
unaware of claims that any of
the men involved may have
been police officers but said he
would investigate.

Meanwhile, it was around
three hours later at 3.15am that
aman and a woman who were
on Goodman’s Bay beach were
approached by two men wear-
ing dark clothes and masks over
their faces.

Police said the men, armed
with handguns, ordered them

Davis set to be named Leader of
Opposition Business in the House

FROM page one

incumbent leader, many political observers have been waiting
with baited breath to see who would be appointed to the Leader of
Opposition post that Dr Nottage had enjoyed prior to the party’s

convention.

While some observers expressed shock and disappointment
with Mr Christie over this new decision, they pointed out that
the former Prime Minister had always warned there would be
“consequences” for those who had opposed him for the leadership

of the party.

“Tt was always known that something had to give, either a nom-
ination, or the Leader of Opposition post, but we all were holding
out hope that he would make the more politically astute decision
and return the post to Dr Nottage.

“He performed adequately in the post before and has been a stel-
lar Opposition business leader. He is always in the chamber on time
and is a seasoned politician who can carry an argument with the

best of them.

“It’s ashame that those skills and qualities would now be lost to
the party because he ventured too far beyond what the leadership
deemed an acceptable position,” a source added.

When questioned directly by The Tribune yesterday during the
PLP’s press conference at Gambier House, Mr Christie would
only remark that he had made his decision.

Reclining in his chair, the PLP leader said he will make the
announcement of who will be the new leader of Opposition Busi-
ness when the House reconvenes today. It should be noted that dur-
ing yesterday’s press conference, Mr Davis was seated at the podi-
um with Mr Christie and PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts as Dr
Nottage sat with a group of other PLP supporters and Members of

Parliament in the crowd.

Attempts to contact Dr Nottage for comment after the press con-

ference were unsuccessful.

FROM page one

understands the need to have
access to the advice and views
of young people.

“Yes, this is the time not
for flowery speeches. This is
the time for real action and
we are going to show them
real action,” Mr Christie
vowed.

Among the new candidates,
Mr Christie said, are expected
to be qualified professionals
such as the party’s deputy
chairman Alex Storr and
attorney Ryan Pinder.

At the party’s press confer-
ence at Gambier House yes-
terday, Mr Christie also added
that the party will be making
itself available through regu-
lar press briefings so that the
country can be made aware
of the position of the party
and that of its respective can-
didates.

“But certainly the next two

PLP to roll out new
election candidates
at end of month

years in the country will be
exciting years and the PLP
will work assiduously to
ensure that the people of the
Bahamas will have an excel-
lent choice to make, and that
is to see us as the right party
for the job leading into the
next general election. And we
are going to create a lot of
excitement in terms of the
things we do and I believe
people are going to be excited
to see the kind of people who
are prepared to engage in pol-
itics with the PLP,” he said.

In 2007, the PLP ran a can-
didate in 39 constituencies,
winning 17 seats. As it stands,
the party is expected to run
41 candidates in the 2012 gen-
eral election.

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out of the woman’s 1993 Toy-
ota Tercel, and robbed them of
their cell phones and cash.

The man was placed in the
trunk of the car by the
assailants, who then drove them
to Marshall Road at the rear of
Mt. Nebo Baptist, where they
were released. The suspects
sped off in the car belonging to
the woman.

The next strike of the sus-
pected serial robbers took place
at 3.41pm on Saturday after-
noon on Cowpen Road - the
first of two armed robberies
that would take place in that
area

A man who was at a carwash
reported being approached by
two men wearing maks and
dark clothing who robbed him
of his Silver Toyota Windom,
license plate number 902714, a
cellular phone and an undeter-
mined amount of cash. They
then fled in a westerly direc-
tion.

Again at 10.10pm on Satur-
day evening, a man walking
through a short cut between
Hutchinson and Eneas streets

Resort

closure
FROM page one

offering assistance to resi-
dential consumers and busi-
nesses in New Providence,
here in Grand Bahama
there’s nothing being done.
“Hundreds are living with-
out electricity and many busi-
nesses are in dire circum-
stances. People are really
feeling the pinch,” he said.
Mr Wilchcombe said the
extent to which the closure
of the resort further dimin-
ishes the number of hotel
rooms available in Grand

was accosted by a man carry-
ing a dark firearm who
demanded cash, police went on
to report.

“The culprit shot the male in
his left buttock and took his
wallet containing undetermined
amount cash.

“He then made his escape on
foot,” said police.

Hours later, at around
3.30am and again in the Cow-
pen Road area, a woman was
robbed after she opened her
front door to a man she recog-
nised.

“She was at home when she
heard a knock at her door. The
resident looked outside and
recognized a male whom she
knew. She opened the door,
and two masked gunmen clad
in blue jeans pants entered her
home robbing her of three gold
rings and an undetermined
amount of cash.”

The men fled the area in a
grey vehicle in an unknown
direction.

On Sunday police assured
that they are vigorously inves-
tigating each of these incidents.

OBIE WILCHCOMBE

Bahama is another cause for concern at a time when the
island needs to draw as many Visitors as it can, and offer a
range of rooms at varying prices.

He called on the “major players” in Grand Bahama, such
as Hutchinson Whampoa, which owns various assets in
Freeport including the Our Lucaya hotel, to invest more in
promoting the island to visitors.

“You’re in a very slow period and there’s no evidence
there’ll be an early turnaround. Occupancy is very low at
major hotels in Freeport and elsewhere.”

Although the recent introduction of twice-weekly direct
flights by West Jet from Canada to Freeport will boost
tourism, noted Mr Wilchcombe, the airline is set to review
whether it wants to continue with this schedule come April
2010, leaving the future uncertain.

Calls to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and Tourism Min-
ister Vincent Vanderpool Wallace were not returned up

to press time.



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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



ROUND-UP |

MADRID (AP) — Sport- }
ing Gijon beat Espanyol 1-0 }
and Athletic Bilbao topped }
Racing Santander 2-0 to





tied for seventh in the stand-
ings with 16 points. :
Almeria beat Osasuna 2-0 }
following an own-goal by Jose }
"Josetxo" Romero in the sec- }
ond minute and Kalu Uche's }
90th-minute strike. Valladol- ;
id and Xerez drew 0-0. ;
Both Barcelona and Real }
Madrid maintained their }
strong starts to the season }
with victories on Saturday.

FRANKFURT — Ham- }
burger SV and Werder Bre- }
men lost ground in the Bun- }
desliga after draws. :

Jiri Stajner earned and con- }
verted a dubious late penalty }
for Hannover to salvage a 2-2 }
draw with Hamburg, while :
Borussia Dortmund's Lucas }
Barrios scored an equalizer }
for his sixth goal in six games }
inal-1 draw with Bremen. }

Milivoje Novakovic scored }
to give Cologne a 1-0 win at }
bottom-place Hertha Berlin. }

Hamburg and Bremen :
both have 23 points to be }
three behind leader Bayer }
Leverkusen. :

PARIS — Yohan Cabaye }
and Florent Balmont scored }
in the second half to give Lille }
a 2-0 victory over defending }
champion Bordeaux in the }
French league. i

Bordeaux's third defeat of }
the season means Lyon can }
move one point clear at the }
top if it beats Marseille at }
Stade Gerland in Sunday's }
late match. i

GLASGOW, Scotland — }
Celtic conceded a late equal- }
izer in a 3-3 draw at bottom- }
place Falkirk, squandering the }
chance to build a bigger lead }
over second-place Rangers in }
the Scottish title race. i

The draw left Celtic on 24
points, two points clear of }
defending champion Rangers, }
which hasagameinhand. }

Two goals from Kris Boyd }
gave Rangers a 2-1 victory }
against St. Mirren on Satur- }
day. :

RESIDENTIAL
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Terry gives Chelsea
-- win over Man United

SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

JOHN TERRY headed Chelsea to
a 1-0 victory over Manchester United
on Sunday that extended his team's
Premier League lead to five points.

Chelsea had been frustrated by
United for 76 minutes, but then prof-
ited from a contentiously awarded
free kick when United midfielder
Darren Fletcher was judged to have
fouled defender Ashley Cole.

Frank Lampard whipped the ball
into the penalty area and captain Ter-
ry connected with a glancing header
to clinch Chelsea's 11th consecutive
win in all competitions at Stamford
Bridge.

"It was a bad decision, but there's
nothing we can do about it. You lose
faith in refereeing sometimes," said
United manager Alex Ferguson, who
is already facing a Football Associa-
tion punishment for criticizing match
officials.

"The referee's position to make
the decision was absolutely ridicu-
lous, he can't see anything,” Ferguson
said. "He's got a Chelsea player (Joe
Cole) standing right in front of him
and he doesn't even move."

A third league loss for Ferguson's
team leaves it, along with Arsenal,
five points adrift of Chelsea going
into the two-week international
break. Sixth-place Liverpool hosts
Birmingham in Monday's match.

Also Sunday, Fulham earned a
point at Wigan after U.S. striker Clint
Dempsey was brought down by Titus
Bramble and then scored from the
resulting penalty kick.

Everton won 2-1 at West Ham and
Hull defeated Stoke by the same
score.

CHELSEA'S JOHN TERRY, left, celebrates scoring the only goal
of the game with teammate Frank Lampard during the English Pre-
mier League match against Manchester United at Stamford Bridge,

London, Sunday Nov. 8, 2009. (AP)
































































CHELSEA'S JOHN TERRY, right, jumpssto
head the ball in to s¢ore against Manchester
United during their English Premier League
soccer match at Stamford Bridge, London,
Sundayy Nov. 892009. (AP)
oy

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



Results

Here’s a look at the team
and individual results:
Under 10 girls Team title -
Temple Christian

1 - Danielle Rodgers,
Temple Christian School;
2 - Brinti Fountain,
Queen's College; 3 -
Aaylehya Nixon, Albury
Sayle Primary.

Under 10 Boys Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by Albury Sayles.

1 - Godfrey Arthur, Tem-
ple Christian School; 2 -
Trent Deveaux, Kingsway
Academy; 3 - Ryan
Bethel, Xavier Primary
School.

Under 12 Girls Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by Gerald Cash.

1 - Blayre Catalyn, Saint
Bede's; 2 - Dianea Noe,
Uriah McPhee; 3 - Andira
Ferguson, Temple Christ-
ian Schools.

Under 12 Boys Team title
- Temple Christian, fol-
lowed by St. John’s

1 - Julius Nottage, Temple
Christian Schools; 2 -
Chavez Cooper, Gerald
Cash Primary; 3 - Vernon
Marshall, Jordan Prince
Williams.

Under 13 Girls Team title
- Queen's College, fol-
lowed by Anatol Rodgers
and CH Reeves.

1 - Dreshanae Rolle, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Keithra Pickstock, Temple
Christian School; 3 -
Charis McPhee, Anatol
Rodgers.

Under 13 Boys Team title
- C.H. Reeves, followed by
Anatol Rodgers and SC
McPherson.

1 - Jackson Knowles, L.W.
Young; 2 - Kinard Rolle,
Saint Augustine's College;
3 - Gamildo Rolle, L.W.
Young.

Under 15 Girls Team title
- T.A. Thompson, fol-
lowed by CH Reeves and
LW Young.

1 - Talia Thompson,
Queen's College; 2 -
Johnique David, T.A.
Thompson; 3 - Vanillian
Walker, Queen's College.
Under 15 Boys Team title
- Queen's College, fol-
lowed by TA Thompson
and CH Reeves.

1 - Keric Rolle, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Darron Young, T.A.
Thompson; 3 - D'Mitry
Charlton, Queen's Col-
lege.

Under 17 Girls Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
RM Bailey and Anatol
Rodgers.

1 - Katrina Seymour,
Queen's College; 2 - Ash-
ley Johnson, Saint
Augustine's College; 3 -
Angela Cherilus, Anatol
Rodgers.

Under 17 Boys Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CC Sweeting and RM Bai-
ley.

1 - Desmond Major, Saint
John's College; 2 - Marvin
Minns, Saint John's Col-
lege ; 3 - Karon Pratt,
Mount Carmel.

Under 20 Girls Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CC Sweeting and CI Gib-
son.

1 - Florazel Russell, C.R.
Walker; 2 - Kendra
Humes, C.R. Walker; 3 -
Oliver Braynen, Aquinas
College.

Under 20 Boys Team title
- C.R. Walker, followed by
CI Gibson and RM Bailey.
1 - Audley Carey, Saint
Augustine's College; 2 -
Leonardo Forbes, Zion
Christian School; 3 - O'Jay
Ferguson, C.R. Walker.

Suns shine as the primary school
champs for fifth consecutive year

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE hill played a factor
in the performances of many
of the competitors who com-
peted in the CH Reeves’
11th annual High School
Invitational Cross Country
Championships on Saturday
at Fort Charlotte.

Hundreds of competitors
from a number of public and
private schools participated
in the event on the obstacle
course at Fort Charlotte, but
it appeared that it didn’t
hamper the Temple Christ-
ian Academy Suns and the
CR Walker Knights.

While the Suns shined for
the fifth consecutive year as
the primary school champi-
ons, winning both the boys
and girls 10-and-under and
12-and-under divisions, the
Knights polished off their
trophy case to add the boys
and girls under-17 and
under-20 crowns.

The junior high division
saw the Queen’s College
Comets capture the under-
13 girls and under-15 boys
titles. Host CH Reeves took
the under-13 boys and T.A.
Thompson carted off the
under-15 girls.

“T’m overwhelmed. I nev-
er anticipated in my wildest
dreams that we would have
this type of crowd. This is
the biggest Cross Country
that we’ve had,” said meet
organiser Fritz Grant.

“God blessed us with
some great weather and the
performance of the athletes
was just outstanding. We
were able to control the
course and made it much
more managerial for the ath-
letes.”

Grant said they are now
looking at further expanding
the championships to the
point where they are going
to invite the Family Islands
and possibly some schools
from the United States to
participate next year.

Trevor Grant, whose com-
pany Windshield House and
Glass Accessories Locator
have been sponsoring the
event for the past three
years, said they have been so
impressed with the consis-
tent growth that they will
definitely be back next year.

“Tt’s much better than we
anticipated. Last year, we
had about 550 students. This
year we doubled those fig-
ures easily. So I’m just elat-
ed that as a corporate spon-
sor, we were able to give
something back,” he said.

“Even in these tough
financial times, we are just
happy to make the effort.
Just to look in the faces of
these young kids and to see
the excitement, we just want
to see this continue.”

A number of the competi-
tors interviewed were quite
excited about their perfor-
mances.

Godfrey Arthur Jr, the
repeat under-10 boys cham-
pion from Temple Christian,
said it was good.

“The hill was hard, but
there was like 20 people
running with me out front.
People were bumping into
each other,” said the nine-

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MEMBERS of the CR Walker Knights celebrate together. Head coach
Floyd Armbrister is at left and assistant coach Tyree Curry at right...

year-old fourth grader.
“When I went up the hill,
everybody started walking,
so that was where I got
away.”

Former Temple Christian
Academy versatile Talia
Thompson, now in the
eighth grade at Queen’s Col-
lege, noted: “It was all right.
The start was hard because
everybody was together.

“The hills was hard. I
know it was crowded so it
was hard to go around so
many people.”

The 13-year-old held off a
strong challenge from
Johnique David, a 13-year-
old ninth grader at TA
Thompson.

“At first it was okay, then
it started getting harder
around the hills. So we just
tried to finish it off,” said

David, who added that she
tried to work with Thomp-
son, who passed her on the
hill to win.

The under-15 boys cham-
pion was Keric Rolle, who












%
%

4
c
wa?
4

won the first victory for his
family after his younger
brother Kinard had to settle
for second in the under-13
boys behind Jackson
Knowles from LW Young,
while bigger brother Cerio
Rolle took home the open
boys title.

Fast

“Tt was good. At first it
started off fast, but I had the
lead, so I had to maintain it.
I just ran my race,” said
Keric, a 14-year-old 10th
grader at St. Augustine’s
College. “On the first lap,
about 10 metres into it, I
took the lead. I feel good.”

Big brother Cerio, an 18-
year-old second year student
at the College of the
Bahamas, held off SAC’s
Audley Carey in a sprint to
claim the open men’s title.

“The race was nice. We
took it out nice and slow and
then we picked it up,” he
said. “I know I didn't have

THE Temple Christian Academy Suns dominated the CH Reeves
Cross Country primary schools division once again. Some of the
athletes pose above with their trophies. At left is coach Sherry Mur-
ray and at right is coach Keno Demeritte...

the fitness, so I just sat in
there and when we came
down to the last 150, I just
had to do my finish kick.”
Carey, the 16-year-old
11th grader who was
crowned the under-20 cham-
pion, said: “It was good. I
felt good while I was run-
ning. I started off with an
even pace.”
The under-17 divisions
were both keenly contested.
In the girls’ race, Queen’s
College 11th grader Katrina
Seymour out-sprinted SAC’s
middle distance runner Ash-
ley Johnson for the title.
“Going into the race, I
was a little scared. Then, I
just listened to my coach
when I was winning the race
and I just gave it all I had,”
said the 16-year-old Sey-
mour, who competed on the
women’s 4 x 400 relay team
at the 12th IAAF world
Championships in Berlin,

Germany in August.

Johnson, however, noted
that she was not intimidated
at all by Seymour.

“Tt wasn't bad. I just felt
like I could have hung on a
little longer. It was a good
race. It was harder than I
expected,” said the 16-year-
old 11th grader.

And in the boys’ under-17
division, Desmond Major
out distanced his St. John’s
teammate Marvin Minns to
secure his win.

“That race was tough. The
hills killed me,” said Bain, a
15-year-old 11th grader.
“Coming down on the last
lap, from the northeast cor-
ner straight to the hills, that
was where I saw Marvin.”

Minns, a 16-year-old 11th
grader, said “It was a good
race. I paced myself and
took them off one by one.
But Desmond is a tough ath-
lete.”

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

an
WY

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



il

MEACHER MAJOR

Meacher
Major loses
title defence

MEACHER ‘Pain’
Major lost his bid to suc-



Baseball elections see
Kemp, Sweeting returned

CRAIG ‘Salty’ Kemp and The-
dore Sweeting were returned as the
two principal figures at the
Bahamas Baseball Federations his-
toric election of officers on Satur-
day.

The elections, held during the
Annual General Meeting, was
staged for the first time outside of
New Providence. But nothing
changed in the post for president
and secretary general as Kemp and
Sweeting were re-elected to those
positions respectively.

Both Kemp and Sweeting were
praised for the job they are doing.

cessfully defend his Others elected are as follows:

NABA lightweight title to Etienee Farquharson from Inagua
American Dorin Spivey Baseball League as the first vice
on Friday night in Buffa- president; Alonzo Pratt from the
ae ae Grand Bahama Amateur Baseball
sinpped the aunt <2 see: Association as second vide presi-

onds into the fourth
round after Spivey
unloaded a booming right
that hurt Major. The blow
came after Spivey
unloaded a flurry of unan-
swered punches.

Spivey, who improved
his record to 36-6 with 29
knockouts, dropped
Major (16-4-1) twice in
round two, the second
one just before the bell
sounded.

Both boxers fought a
spirited third round, trad-
ing bombs on each other
and taking turns shaking
the other one up before
Spivey went to work in
the fourth.

Spivey, 36, was working
with former world cham-
pion Pernell Whitaker in
the lead up to the fight
that was one of the many
exciting bouts on the card
promoted by Nick
Garone of X-Cel World-
wide at the Buffalo Nia-
gara Convention Center
in downtown, Buffalo,
New York.

It was Major’s third
fight under his contract
with X-Cel Worldwide.
Major won his debut on

dent; Bertram Murray from the
JBLN as third vice president and
Edward Claude, of the representa-
tive for the Grand Bahama Little
League District as fourth vice pres-
ident.

The assistant secretary general is
Jeannie Scavalla from Freedom
Farm. The treasurer is Marsha
Munnings from New Providence,
assisted by Stephen Adderley from
the Grand Bahama Little League.

The Major items coming out of
the AGM are as follows:

1) the National Baseball Cham-
pionship will take place from J3-6 in



FRONT ROW: Edward Claude, Marsha Munnings, Craig Kemp, Jeannie Scavella, Theodore Sweeting
Back Row: Stephen Adderley, Etienne Farquarson, Alonzo Pratt, Bertram Murray

Grand Bahama, the first time that
it’s also done outside of New Prov-
idence.

2) the BBF Life Time Achieve-
ment Awards will be presented to
three honorees to be named at a
later date.

3) The Bahamas Government has

given its approval for the BBF and
the Grand Bahama Little League
to host the 2010 Little League 11/12
Caribbean Zone Qualifying Tour-
nament.

The tournament will run from
July 10-17 in Grand Bahama and
the winner will represent the

Caribbean in Williamsport, Penn-
sylvania at the 11-12 Little League
World Series, carried live on ESPN.

The Membership of the BBF has
decided to do its part to assist the
economy of Grand Bahama with
the hosting of its two major events
in 2010 on the island.

| Wildcats take the title

FROM page 15

ons Commando Security Truck-
ers were nipped 6-5 by the Aba-
co’s Green Turtle Cay Turtles.

In that game, Lyle Sawyer
picked up the win on the
mound over Freddie ‘the Skip-
per’ Cornish, who migrated
from Abaco as the ace pitcher
on the island to play in New
Providence.

The Truckers, however, came
back and took their frustration
out on the Panthers with an 11-

February 20 with a sixth 5 decision before Long Island
round TKO over Kevin ran into their problems against
Carmody. Grand Bahama.

However, he ended up
with a “no contest”
against Michael Clark on

Darren Mortimer came in
relief of starter Anton ‘Bookie’
Gibson for the win over Pedro

June 19 for the NABA Marcellus. Terran ‘Pooh’ Wood
title on June 6 after the and Jamal ‘Sarge’ Johnson both
fight was stopped in the homered in the game for the

first round.

Major, 28, was eventu-
ally awarded the decision
and given the title that he
defended against Spivey.
Major was unavailable for
comments. He is due to
return home today.

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COMMANDO SECURITY TRUCKERS’ infielder Julian Collie tags a
Green Turtle Cay Turtles’ player too late as he slides into third
base.

Stingrays beat Warriors

THE V8 Fusion Stingrays
came out with a strict game
plan, to establish the running
game en route to evening
their win loss total.

The Stingrays scored four
rushing touchdowns and
improved their record to .500
at 2-2 with a 36-12 win over
the Kingdom Warriors in
Commonwealth American
Football League play yester-
day at the D.W. Davis field.

Jamal Storr scored led the
way with three touchdowns,
two on the ground and from a
kick return on special teams.

The Stingrays came out on
the game’s opening drive with
eight consecutive run calls,
taking advantage of an under-
sized Warriors defensive line.

Storr capped the opening
drive with a touchdown run
from 25 yards out.

The Stingrays failed to con-
vert but led 6-0 early.

After a turnover on downs,
the Stingrays offense again
hammered the Warriors
defensive line, marching the
ball up field for yet another
touchdown on the ground.

This time Jamal Coleby
would break several tackles
on his way to a 30 yard touch-
down run. The Stingrays con-
verted and led 14-0.

The front seven harassed
the Warriors passing attack
for much of the game and
turned that pressure into
points with the Warriors
backed against their own end
zone.

The Stingrays defence
forced a safety to take a 16-0
lead into the half. The War-
riors reached the end zone for
the first time all season on the
opening drive of the second
half. A nifty quarterback
scrambled gave the Warriors
their first touchdown and
trimmed the deficit to 10, 16-6.

The Stingrays would
respond, once again with
Storr capping a drive with a
touchdown run from 15 yards
out.

Without the conversion the
Stingrays led 22-6.

The Warriors’ second score
of the game came on the
defensive side of the ball as
they recovered a botched
handoff and returned the
fumble for six.

With a tentative 22-12 lead,
the Stingrays defence would
again step up to force the
issue and create big plays
when the team needed it
most.

After the Stingrays failed
to convert on fourth down,
Carl Rolle intercepted a pass
from the safety position to
give the ball back into the
hands of his offence.

V8 Fusion quarterback
Nesley Lucien was then
picked off by the Warriors
defence swinging the momen-
tum back into his team’s
favour.

The team continued to
trade turnovers when Anwar
Godet broke free to sack the
quarterback and force a fum-
ble, which the Stingrays
recovered and advanced into
Warriors territory..

Stingrays running back
Renaldo Dorsett ran in the
team’s fourth rushing touch-
down three plays later, and
Lucien scrambled for the suc-
cessful two point conversion
to give the Stingrays a 30-12
lead with 20 seconds remain-
ing. Storr scored his third
touchdown and capped the
scoring flurry on the game’s
final play.

He recovered the ball on a
squib kick and raced down
the right sideline for a touch-
down for the game’s final
margin.

“We wanted to come out
here and get a win after start-
ing the season on a bad note,”
Storr said, “We knew this was
a team we should beat and we
just wanted to come out here
and do what we had to do.
We want to use this to get
ready for the better teams in
the league because we know
we have to face them again
later on in the season and we
plan to have a better result
next time.”


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE

15



r

‘ts

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

litle as the Flyers
make history

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

VESSNA LAING came to
town and made history, but the
Pineapple Air Wildcats over-
shadowed the Grand Bahamian
slugger’s home run feat by
regaining the Bahamas Softball
Federation Ladies Common-
wealth Championship title at
the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

Back in the national round
robin after a year’s absence, the
Wildcats avenged two straight
losses including game one of
the best of three championship
series against the Bahamasair
Flyers to take the remaining
two games for a 2-1 decision.

In the deciding game, the
Wildcats pulled off a 15-10 vic-
tory to go along with their 4-2
win in game two, both on Sun-
day as they dedicated the cham-
pionship victory to one of their
coaches, Alexander Bain, who
was recovering from a serious
injury.

Marvelle Miller, who got the
starting nod in the clincher, said
she was elated about the team’s
performance, especially as it
was her first victory in the
national championships.

The Flyers who nipped the
Wildcats 1-0 in their round
robin match-up, came from a
12-3 deficit to pull off a come-
from-behind 15-14 decision in
the championship opener on
Saturday night.

In that game, Laing became
the first female player to hit a
home run over the fence at the
Bankers Field.

“My coach just told me to
pick my pitch and drive the ball.
That was what I did,” said
Laing, who took a bow after the
game to the cheers of the
crowd.

“T was shocked that the ball
went out of the park. I thought
it actually bounced under the
fence, but they say ‘the ball out
the park Vessna’ so I just kept
running.”

Laing said she came close to
hitting the ball out of the park in
Grand Bahama during their
slowpitch season, but she was
delighted that she came here
and made history.

“Hey it ain’t nothing like
round robin and driving it out
the park here. It feels awesome.
It's unbelievable. My name is
in the history books.”

Laing finished with a total of
three runs batted in and scored
twice for the Flyers. Latoya
Thomas had a triple with two



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

RBI, scoring three runs in the
victory.

Donette Edwards had a dou-
ble, drove in five runs and
scored three times, while Edge-
combe-Sweeting had a double
with an RBI and three runs
scored.

Nerissa Lockhart was the
winning pitcher and Edge-
combe-Sweeting suffered the
loss.

The men’s version of the
championship took an interest-
ing twist Saturday night when
Long Island’s PJC Panthers for-
feited their game against the



Grand Bahama Elnet Mariners.

Reportedly the Mariners
lodged a protest on one of the
Panthers’ players who had
played in Grand Bahama dur-
ing the regular season and was
on Long Island’s roster.

“They had a technical meet-
ing, they protest the guy, but
they allowed him to play,” said
Panthers’ third baseman Julian
Pratt. “If you come from a tech-
nical meeting and you say he
should not have been allowed
to play, then he should not have
been allowed to play.”

But Pratt said the BSF

ABOVE: Pineapple Air Wildcats’
Marvelle Miller delivers a pitch.

LEFT: Vessna Laing of the
Bahamasair Flyers is flanked by
Grand Bahama’s Softball Asso-
ciation president Hencil Collie
and BSF’s Director of Commu-
nications Daphne McKinney
after her historic home run over
the left field fence on Saturday
against Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe-Sweeting and the
Pineapple Air Wildcats.

allowed their player to play
until they played against Grand
Bahama and they enforced the
rule, disqualifying their player.

“He’s a young ball player.
We can’t allow him to go back
to Long Island with that kind
of dejection,” he said. “We
rather stand with him and let
him walk away then to let him
stand on his own.”

As a result of their decision,
Long Island were eliminated
from further play.

The biggest upset of the tour-
nament came on Saturday as
well as the defending champi-

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Did power
firm suffer
SA00K first
half loss?

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company (GBPC) appears to
have suffered a $400,000 loss
during the 2009 first half on
an equity earnings basis,
according to figures published
by one of its major share-
holders, although a $2.2 mil-
lion third quarter profit put
it firmly back in the black.

Emera, the Canadian ener-
gy giant, which acquired a 25
per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power Company in
late 2008 via the $41 million-
plus acquisition of Lady Hen-
rietta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake, unveiled
the $2.2 million profit for the
three months to end-Septem-
ber 2009 in its own third quar-
ter results.

Yet for the nine months to
end-September 2009, Emera
reported that Grand Bahama
Power Company had gener-
ated just $1.8 million in net

SEE page 6B

THE TRIBUNE

ul

J

MONDAY,



NOVEMBER 9,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Hilton shareholders in
dispute over $22m loan

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

dispute

has erupted

between the two share-
holders of downtown Nas-
sau’s British Colonial
Hilton over a $22 million
loan that forms part of the resort’s financ-
ing, Tribune Business can reveal, with one
of the parties thought to have moved to
take the matter to arbitration in a bid to

mediate a resolution.

Sources close to the situation, who
requested anonymity because of the mat-
ter’s sensitivity, told this newspaper last
week that the dispute between the Canadi-
an Commercial Workers Industry Pension

Plan (CCWIPP) and Adurion,

the

UK/Swiss boutique investment house and
private equity fund, revolved around an
unsecured loan that formed the foundation
of the latter’s investment in the British

Colonial Hilton.

Adurion acquired a 71 per cent stake in
the entity that owns the hotel’s immediate
holding company, the British Colonial
Development Company (BCDC), from
CCWIPP in December 2006, the Canadian
pension fund retaining a 29 per cent.

Tribune Business understands from its
sources close to developments that rather
than just purely invest its own equity into
the British Colonial Development Compa-
ny, Adurion originated a multi-million dol-
lar loan through its own Bahamas-domi-
ciled investment vehicle, Fort Nassau

Loan defaults $1m
shy of Slbn mark

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
will not return to “sustained
growth before late 2010”, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
has predicted, with private
sector loan defaults just $1
million shy of the psychologi-
cally significant $1 billion
mark at end-September and
hotel revenue receipts of 22
per cent for the first eight
months in 2008.

While the global economy
had shown signs of ‘bottoming
out’ during September 2009,
the Central Bank said there
were no such signs from the
Bahamian economy, as key
indicators worsened, includ-
ing a 61.6 per cent or $17.3
million increase in the Gov-
ernment’s Budget deficit for
the first two months this year.

Due to the “double digit”
decline in stopover visitors
during the first three quarters
of 2009, the Central Bank
said, not surprisingly, that
tourism output contracted,
with hotel revenue receipts
off 22 per cent year-over-year
for the January-August 2009
period.

This, the Central Bank said,
reflected the “combined

* Central Bank: Bahamas
will not return to sustained
economic growth before
late 2010

* Hotel revenues down 22%,
and government budget
deficit up over 61% for
first two months

* Some comfort from sustained
equity-fuelled foreign
investment, while inflation
falling and external
reserves/liquid assets
ahead of 2008 comparatives

impact of a 7.4 percentage
point reduction in average
occupancy rates to 66.2 per
cent, and a 9.6 per cent
decrease in average daily
room rates to $234.55”.

On the monetary front, by
end-September close to one
in six private sector loans
were in default, standing at a
cumulative value of $999 mil-
lion - just $1 million shy of $1
billion - a mark easily set to
have been passed within the
past two months.

During September, the

SEE page 4B

THE BALMORAL

PHONE: 242
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Sal

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-323-4353
WWW.BALMORALBAHAMAS.COM

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A VIEW of the British Colonial Hilton...

Investments Ltd.

This made its way into the British Colo-
nial Development Company through the
resort’s complex ownership structure, and
Tribune Business understands that Aduri-
on’s differences with CCWIPP revolve
around the fact that the investment house
believes the loan - said to be for $22 million
- has matured and needs to either be repaid
or refinanced on terms more favourable to
Adurion.

The Canadian pension fund, though, is
understood to believe that this demand for
repayment could negatively impact both
its investment and position in the British
Colonial Development Company, as it fears
the latter is simply unable to repay the loan.

The two sides were said by sources to be
unable to resolve their differences. With
Adurion having Board and management
control at the British Colonial Develop-

SEE page 5B

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE communications sec-
tor regulator has increased
the capital cost ratios for all
the sectors in which Cable
Bahamas and the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny (BTC) are deemed to have
Significant Market Power
(SMP), bringing its assess-
ments closer to the estimates
provided by both companies.

In its findings on the Cost of
Capital for Designated SMP

Colina ae



elie e-em el

Bahamians urged to
exploit, not compete,
on Cuba possibilities

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN companies
“should position themselves
to take advantage” of
trade/business opportunities
with Cuba, including joint ven-
ture partnerships, rather than
seek to compete head-on with
the island as it opens up, a
senior Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce official said.

Philip Simon, the Cham-
ber’s executive director, told
Tribune Business that it would
sign a Memorandum of
Understanding (MoU) with its
Cuban counterpart organisa-
tion within the next year,
adding that the Bahamas -
through the Freeport Con-
tainer Port (FCP) - could act
as a “facilitator” to connect
the Communist island’s busi-
nesses and economy with the
world.

Mr Simon, speaking after he
and a Chamber delegation
returned from the 27th
Havana International Trade
Fair, during which they met
with the Cuban Chamber of
Commerce, suggested that the
two nations could also provide
a joint venture Bahamas/Cuba
travel package to entice visi-

tors from the likes of China
and India to visit both coun-
tries on one trip.

“When you think about
what Cuba has to offer, not
just from the agricultural point
of view, rum and the impor-
tation of foods, there’s tremen-
dous opportunities for us to
export stuff to Cuba - niche
products and services,” Mr
Simon said.

“We can export a lot of our
Know how in different indus-
tries to Cuba, and partner for
travel.”

Pointing out that both the
Bahamas and Cuba had both
been awarded ‘approved des-
tination’ status by the Chinese
government, as locations
where Chinese citizens could
go on vacation, Mr Simon said:
“There’s no reason, when we
have visitors that travel from
that far away, why we can’t
craft create Bahamas-Cuba
travel packages.”

Given that the Bahamas’
expertise lay in tourism and
crafting such packages, Mr
Simon said it was “better for
us to partner than to try to
compete” with Cuba.

SEE page 3B

Regulator raises BTC and
Cable’s capital cost ratios

* Increases bring URCA’s findings closer into line with
estimates of significant market power (SMP) players

* Cable blasts SMP designations as ‘unjustified,
disproportionate and unfair’

* BTC says initial URCA findings ‘unusually low’ and
would have given it poor return on investments

Operators, the Utilities Reg-
ulation & Competition
Authority (URCA) effective-
ly said that the increases in
the weighted average cost of
capital (WACC) ratios for
Cable Bahamas and BTC

would ensure they made a
“reasonable rate of return”
whenever a regulatory mea-
sure impacting them was
being assessed.

SEE page 7B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

ee U

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was an active week of trading in
the Bahamian capital markets.
Investors traded in 17 out of the 24
listed securities last week, of which
four advanced, one declined and 12
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 1,506,160 shares changed
hands, representing an increase of
1,470,989 shares compared to the pre-
vious week's trading volume of 35,171
shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL) was
the volume leader, trading 401,090
shares, with its stock price increasing by

$0.17 to close the week at $5.74.

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) followed
CBL, trading 253,597 shares to close
the week unchanged at $4.34.

The lead advancer during the week
was Doctors Hospital Health Systems
(DHS), whose share price increased
by $0.26 on a volume of 87,107 shares
traded to close the week at $2.51.

The sole decliner was Consolidated
Water BDRs (CWCB), which fell $0.07
on a volume of 27,673 shares traded
to close the week at $2.88.

BOND MARKET
15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015

traded during the week at par value
of $1,000 for a total value of $15,000.

CONSTRUCTION
SEMINAR 2009

With Nobel Prize Winner Derek Walcott

THEME:

“The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment
(FDI) On the Development of the

Caribbean”

VENUE:

Lecture Theatre, Culinary & Hospitality
Management Institute,
Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, Bahamas

FRIDAY, 13th NOVEMBER, 2009

2:30am. -
%Allaam, -

30k. -
10:40am.

REGISTRATION AND WELCOME

PRESENTER: Mr. James Smith, Former Minister of Stave for Finanoe

10:4, -
10:3aum. - | 2:M)pom.

likMlam, COFFEE BREAK

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases:

There were no earnings released by
any of the publicly traded companies
during the week.

Dividend Notes:

FamGuard Corporation (FAM) has
declared a dividend of $0.06 per share,
payable on November 16, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of record date
November 9, 2009.

FOCOL Holdings Ltd (FCL) has
declared a dividend of $0.060 per share,
payable on November 10, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of record date
October 30, 2009.

&

THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FBB
Eee
Eee
FCLB
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

$1.17
$0.63
$5.90
$10.75
$10.06
$3.15
$10.00
$5.74
$2.72
$9.87
$2.88
$2.51
$6.50
$2.37
$0.27
$4.34
$1.00
$9.30
$5.59
$9.95
$10.00

$+0.01



APAAAAAAASH

102,309
0

23,988
43,251
0
27,966
50,707
401,090
18,877
138,195
27,673
87,107
7,693
153,706
0

253,597
80,668
55,388
33,945
0

0

CHANGE

-31.58%

28.00%
-1.57%
-16.67%
0.00%
-10.00%
-16.05%
0.00%
-21.65%
-8.81%
-10.36%
0.00%

RSLS FAIR

SS A AE

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Mr. Derek Waleett, Nebel Laureate, Poer ane Playwright

12:30pm. - 1:30p.m. - LUNCH

1:30p.m, - 2: 10pm.

PRESENTER; Mr. Ray McKenzie, Civil Engineer

2: )0p.m. - 2:30pm.

PRESENTER: Dr, Olivia Saunders, Associile Professor, College ol The Pabarnas

2:50p.m. -
3:()p.m. -

3-00pm. BREAK
S24 )pom.

PANEL DISCUSSION

PASELISTS: Simon Townend, KPMG; Philip Weech, BEST Commission; Stephen
Wrinkle, Bahamas Contractors Assaciaion; Tyrone MckKensie, Albany

Who Should Attend: The General Public, Archinesrs, Engineers, Building Contractors,

Traksperons Quantity Surveyors, Land Surveyors, Real Estate Agents, Policy Makers, Scholars,
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Registration on the day of the seminar will be an additional $25,00

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Contact: Michael “Bedi Walker (876) 476-3276

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
an
Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE





Real estate firms merge

Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty (CBLR) has
merged the boutique real
estate firm Bahamas Water-
front Properties into its real
estate portfolio.

"As one of the Bahamas’
leading real estate organiza-
tions, Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty will continue to
respond to changing demands
in the real estate industry.
With this merger, we will be
rolling out new and exciting
services to the Bahamas mar-

CUBA, from 1B

“All of these things that go
into establishing a business
foundation, I believe, is where
the opportunity lies in Cuba,”
Mr Simon told Tribune Busi-
ness, citing logistics, construc-
tion and development services
as areas ripe for Bahamian
exports.

“Those with the wherewith-

Greathioes not Helpioes

©

COPD
Day

a | 2009

Hoveambar 16 Foe

Ket that are offered through
the Coldwell Banker world-
wide network," said Mike
Lightbourn, president of Cold-
well Banker Lightbourn Real-

ty.
Owner

Colin Lightbourn, owner of
Bahamas Waterfront Proper-
ties and now managing direc-
tor of Coldwell Banker Light-
bourn Realty, said: "It's excit-
ing to work with all the incred-

al in the Bahamas should posi-
tion themselves to take advan-
tage of it; we don’t want to
compete with them.”

The Chamber’s executive
director said the Bahamas
should not only use the busi-
ness expertise, “savvy” and
global connections it had built
up for its own benefit, but also
for the benefit of others.

The trading/economic links

FREE

LUNG-FUNCTION

TEST

* Do you have a history of smoking?

* Are you regularly exposed to second-

hand smoke?

ifvou have answered “YES”, you may need to
be tested for a chronic lung condition known as

COPD.

WHEN: MWednesday, Nevenber rs", 2009
WHERE: Doctor's Hospital, Conference Room

TIME: 4-4 o.ae.

Refreshments will he served!

Comfort Suites Paradise Island

Fall Special Only $59"
per person double occupancy.

Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only,

Full use of. all Atlantis facilities, Plus:
. Complimen tary continen tal breakfast daily

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Holida 1y G ift of Paradise.
3 days/2 nights in 2010

S$. 299 per voom, double occupanty.
Includes Junior Suite, Continental
Breakfast and full use of A tHlantis facilities.
Please call our Reservations Department
at 363-3680 for details,

Gift Certificate valid from January 2 through

ible marketing services that
come with the Coldwell
Banker franchise. We have a
very sophisticated real estate
market in the Bahamas and
the companies which can meet
the demands of the buyers and
sellers will stay ahead of the
competition.”

The move will add four new
Bahamas Real Estate Associ-
ation licensed sales agents to
an existing team of 20 at Cold-
well Banker Lightbourn Real-
ty, as well as two property

between the Bahamas and
Cuba “can be as large” as the
two sides want, Mr Simon said,
and added: “We have over in
Grand Bahama a Container
Port that serves as a link to
not just Caribbean markets
but international markets.

“We can act as a facilitator,
because we have the expertise,
the wherewithal, the interna-
tional savvy that is not appar-
ent in Cuban operations,
because they’ve largely been
focused locally. Just as how
the Bahamas can be a gate-
way to Caribbean Markets,
Latin and North America, we
can be the same for Cuba.”

Mr Simon acknowledged
that “the mechanics and how
we go about doing business
with each other” needed to
become clearer to facilitate
increased business between
the Bahamas and Cuba, telling
Tribune Business that this
issue was addressed in the
meeting with their Cuban
counterparts.

The Bahamian Chamber
had “very bluntly” asked the
necessary questions in this
area, including how liberal the
foreign investment process
was, access to human and
financial resources in Cuba,
and any impediments on ship-
ping too and from that nation.

In the past, many concerns
have focused on the lack of
investor protection in Cuba,
with many Spanish, Canadian
and other European-owned
entities said to be owed huge
sums of money by Cuba-state
owned agencies, and no indi-
cation of when this would be
paid. The Castro tendency to
arbitrarily nationalise indus-
















Give a

December 20, 2010. Subject to
availability.



+ Junior Suites with King-size or two double beds
* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer
» Kids 15 and under, free
+ Pool with swim-up bar

Limtted-time offer! Reserve today /
Call 242-363-3680

*$59 per person, per night, dbl occupancy Sun. thru Wed. Rates effective Nov. 2 thru Dec. 18. Add
$20 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4
persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities
and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability.
Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a 1-night penalty will apply.







TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

(en
Na LY,

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B

LAID -OFF WORKERS

Receptionist
Management
Marketing /Sales
MS Word /Excel
QuickBooks
Office Procedures

Entrepreneurship
training.
Marketing research
Business Plans
Funding search

managers.
8 Kusiness Advice

The independently-owned
and operated Coldwell Banker
Lightbourn Realty is part of a
network of approximately
101,000 sales associates and
brokers, and 3,300 residential
offices on six continents, and
47 countries and territories.

It has offices and agents in
Nassau, the Abacos, Andros,
Berry Islands, Bimini,
Eleuthera (including Harbour
Island and Spanish Wells),
Exuma and Long Island.

Logan: www.markturngeestconsulting.com

MARK A TURNQUEST & CO LTD
(242) 326-6748 | (242) 427-3640

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ALICE VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

tries and businesses has also
not been forgotten.

In addition, the Cuban gov-
ernment effectively treats all
workers as ‘property of the
state’, with staff salaries being
paid to the government -
which takes a cut - first before
going to the workers.

Still, Mr Simon said there
seemed to be a growing aware-
ness in Cuba of the need to
interact more with other
economies.

He added that the Chamber
was now working on creating a
Memorandum of Understand-
ing that it would sign with its
Cuban counterpart within the
next year, prior to the next
Havana International Trade
Fair.

Registration No.105,841B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000)
ALICE VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is
in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against ALICE VENTURES
INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is required on or before the 7th
December, 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or in default thereof
they may have excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
claim is approved.

Trevor D. A. Sunderland of P. O. Box 88-6290 - of Pilot House
Condominium-East Bay Street-Nassau, Bahamas is the Liquidator of ALICE
VENTURES INTERNATIONAL LIMITED.

Dated the 6th November 2009

Maceo

Trevor D. A. Sunderland
Liquidator



YOU ARE INVITED!

Bahamas Human Resouwves Development Association
cordially invites you, to:
“Round Table Discussion- Labor Law & HR Ethics”.
Dene: DAT LAT

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ALL GOVERNMENT WORKERS, BEC,
BATELCO, WATER & SEWAGE EMPLOYEES

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(WN (Ww
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THE TRIBUNE
Loan defaults S1m
SS a a eis
shy of $1bn mark
FROM page 1B of provisions to arrears and $45.3 million compared tothe tral Bank said.

cou SM

v ew Tel: 502 2356) —





























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Sessional Clinic:

Specializing in:
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Available for Pediatric
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total value of loans in default
increased by $35.9 million or
3.7 per cent to hit $999 mil-
lion, with the ratio of loans
arrears to the total portfolio
outstanding rising by 0.5 per-
centage points to 16.4 per
cent.

Loans in the 31-90 days
past due segment increased
by $19.9 million or 4.7 per
cent to $447.5 million, taking
their total ratio to the out-
standing loan portfolio to 7.4
per cent.

And the Central Bank
added: “Likewise, non-per-
forming loans - those more
than 90 days in arrears and
on which banks ceased accru-
ing interest - advanced by
more than $16 million or 3
per cent to $551.5 million, for
a 26 basis point increase in
the loan arrears ratio to 9.1
per cent.

“[The] growth in monthly
arrears reflected a $25.6 mil-
lion or 5.9 per cent rise in
mortgage delinquencies to
$461.9 million and a $13.1 mil-
lion or 5.7 per cent firming in
the commercial segment to
$243.6 million.

“However, consumer loan
arrears fell modestly y $2.7
million or 0.9 per cent to
$293.5 million. Banks’ loan
loss provisions remained rel-
atively unchanged at $210.1
million, resulting in the ratio

non-performing loans declin-
ing by 0.8 and 1.2 percentage
points, to 21 per cent and 38.1
per cent, respectively.”

Due to the slowdown in pri-
vate sector and consumer
credit demand, as Bahamians
eschewed new borrowings to
meet existing obligations, the
Central Bank said credit
growth fell by 43.7 per cent
to $162.2 million for the first
nine months in 2009.

Private sector loan growth
decelerated by $242.5 million
to $50.6 million, while con-
sumer credit dropped by $27.4
million compared to a $101.7
million growth one year ago.
Mortgage growth almost
halved to $90.5 million.

Breaking down consumer
loans by category, the Cen-
tral Bank said all areas had
declined apart from debt con-
solidation loans, which
advanced by $48.7 million in
the eight months to end-
August 2009. This followed a
$57 million expansion one
year ago.

Elsewhere, there was a
$21.4 million contraction in
vehicle loans; a $15.4 million
reduction in credit card bor-
rowing; an $8.9 million con-
traction in travel loans; and a
$6.9 million fall in home
improvement loans.

Meanwhile, for the first two
months of the Government’s
fiscal year, July and August
2009, the fiscal deficit
widened by $17.3 million to

same period in 2008.

The Central Bank said the
reduction in government
spending was “overshadowed
by the fall-off in revenue
receipts” due to declining pri-
vate sector demand, as spend-
ing fell by $12.1 million or 4.9
per cent to $232.6 million.
This reflected a 3.5 per cent
drop in current outlays, which
was linked to declines in sub-
sidies and transfers, and the
purchase of goods and ser-
vices.

Capital spending also fell
by 11.2 per cent to $16.9 mil-
lion, due to lower spending
on infrastructure projects.

“On the revenue side,
aggregate collections con-
tracted by $29.4 million or
13.6 per cent to $187.2 mil-
lion, mainly associated with a
19.7 per cent decline in tax
receipts to $137.9 million, as
lower intakes from property
and tourism-related taxes, as
well as business and profes-
sional fees, eclipsed a timing-
related increase in interna-
tional trade taxes,” the Cen-

“In addition, non-tax rev-
enue was reduced by $1.1 mil-
lion or 6.5 per cent to $15.7
million, occasioned by lower
proceeds from fines, forfeits
and administrative fees.”

Still, despite the ‘doom and
gloom’, there were some
crumbs of optimism. The
Bahamas was still receiving
“stable contributions” from
equity-financed foreign direct
investment projects, even
though construction industry
output was expected to
remain “moribund” due to
the absence of debt-financed
projects. Unemployment was
expected to remain high.

Inflation was easing, too,
down for the 12 month-period
to September by 0.83 per-
centage points at 3.07 per
cent. The foreign reserve lev-
els and excess liquidity in the
banking system also remained
above 2008 levels at end-Sep-
tember 2009, standing at
$752.86 million and $463.94
million, compared to $649.57
million and $337.01 million a
year ago.

NOTICE

THE CASINO AT OUR LUCAYA RESORT

In accordance with Section 34 of the Lotteries and
Gaming Act, 1969 of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
notice is hereby given that Treasure Bay G.B.I. Ltd. made
application on the 4" day of November, A.D. 2009 to the
Gaming Board of The Bahamas for a Licence to manage

PKF BAHAMAS

Qualified and Trainee Accountants Required

The Nassau office of PFK, an International Accounting Firm, seeks to
recruit the following:

(1) Professional qualified persons with recognized accounting
qualifications. They must be eligible for membership in The Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants and must have at least two (2) or
three (3) years post qualification experience. Only Bahamains need
apply. Preference will be given to applicants with proven audit and
assurance experience.

(2) Trainees with an accounting degree and eligible to write a profes-
sional examination. Only Bahamians need to apply.

In all cases, salary and benefits subject to negotiation.

Apply in writing to Human Resources Partner, PKF.
P.O. Box N-8335, Nassau Bahamas.

REQUEST FOR
TENDER

Nassau Airport

Development Company

LPIA Expansion Project Stage |

US Departures Terminal

Ledcor is seeking contractors to assist in completion of Stage | of the LPIA Expansion

Project (U5 Departures Terminal). All contractors, particularly Bahamian contractors, are

encouraged to participate in this significant national project. scopes to be tendered to

complete the fit out of the new terminal include:

» Architectural Millwork

«Interior Glazing & Mirrors

A qualification package must be submitted prior or at the bid closing. Only bids from contractors deemed
quolified will be considered. Qualifications will be based on the following criteria:

* A demonstration of financial capacity
« Experience

* References

* Bahamian Ownership/Content

The project is covered by Contractors Defoult Insurance in lieu of bonding. NWO BONDING WILL BE REQUIRED.

Qualification and tender packages will be available for pickup at the Ledcor Construction Baharnas Limited Site
Office at the Lynden Pindling International Airport, Windsor Field Road. For queries call the Site office at

242-677-5417.

The closing date for the tender and prequalification packages will be at 2:00pm Thursday November

27, 2009.

the premises known as ‘The Casino at Our Lucaya Resort’
situate in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand
Bahama one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas.

Any person who desires to object to the grant of such
licence shall send to the Secretary of the Gaming Board of
The Bahamas, within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
two (2) copies of a brief statement in writing of the grounds
of his objection.

Dated the 9" day of November, A.D. 2009.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY AND COMPANY
Attorneys for Treasure Bay G.B.I. Ltd.
Chambers
Shirley House
Fifty Shirley Street
Nassau, Bahamas

THE INSURANCE COMMISSION OF
THE BAHAMAS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Analyst

The newly formed Insurance Commission
(a statutory corporation) is seeking analysts to
assist with the on-site and off-site examination of
insurance companies and intermediaries.

Responsibilities

* Reports to the Chief Analyst/Superintendent

* Responsible for the supervision of other
analysts /directly responsible for the
examination of licensees to ensure that licensees
are compliant with prudential requirements
through on-site and off-site examinations
Prepare/vet the preparation of examination
reports
Prepare/vet/approve on-site/off-site financial
analysis, letters and other correspondence as
necessary
Ensure that licensees databases are maintained
Supervision of other analysts/directly
responsible for the assessment of new
applications for licensees
Contributes to the refining of supervisory
methodology, policy development and the
formulation of new/revised legislation and the
related guidelines
Provide advice and information to licensees and
the wider public regarding complaints and
questions about licensees’ performance

Qualifications/Skills

* Professional Accountant / MBA in accounting /
Certification in Insurance/ experience in the
insurance industry
Financial analysis skills
Excellent leadership, communications,

teamwork and organization skills

Proficient in Microsoft office products to
intermediate level

Ability to work independently and multi-task
Excellent written and oral communications
skills

Knowledge of insurance industry an asset

Compensation

* A competitive compensation package
commensurate with relevant experience and
qualifications.

Deadline

* 13 November 2009

* Application including comprehensive resume to
be submitted by e-mail addresses to:

oric@bahamas.gov.bs



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



aa > =
Hilton shareholders in dispute over $22m loan

FROM page 1B

ment Company and all levels in the
ownership structure, CCWIPP was
said by the same sources to have ini-
tiated some kind of legal proceedings
- believed to be arbitration - to safe-
guard its position.

Whether operations at the 291-
room British Colonial Hilton, which
has just undergone a $15 million ren-
ovation and sits on a 13-acre site,
will ultimately be impacted by the
shareholder dispute remains to be
seen, although Tribune Business was
told that no negative effects would
be seen.

“As far as the hotel and property
are concerned, this is a storm in a

teacup,” one source close to the sit-
uation, who requested anonymity,
said. “It has absolutely no impact
on the financing, the operations and
the status of the operations. That’s
totally self-contained. It has
absolutely nothing to do with the
British Colonial Development Com-

pany.”
Argument

CCWIPP and Adurion were said
to be having “a fairly technical argu-
ment over a small part of the avail-
able financing”, although the source
said the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company’s financing - which is
backed by a mortgage held over the
property by FirstCaribbean Inter-

national Bank - is secure.

Both sides were said to be
“extremely frustrated”, with Aduri-
on understood to feel that it has tak-
en all the risk/done all the work in
providing financing to the British
Colonial Development Company at
below-market terms, refinancing the
original Scotiabank loan with First-
Caribbean, and arranging financing
for the $15 million renovation.

CCWIPP, which invests in the
British Colonial Development Com-
pany through its IF Propco entities,
could not be contacted for comment
before press time. Messages passed
to Adurion also did not elicit com-
ment, although the investment house
indicated it might release a state-
ment on the matter this week.

CCWIPP sold the 71 per cent
stake to Adurion, said to be for $71.7
million, as part of its strategy to
reduce its exposure to the Bahamas,
and the Hilton and South Ocean in
particular, after running into regu-
latory troubles in Canada.

Pension

The pension fund came under
scrutiny from regulators in Ontario
over the size of its investments in
the Bahamas, and whether they
breached prudential and regulatory
guidelines and laws. CCWIPP effec-
tively took over the Hilton and
South Ocean after former Roman
Catholic priest Ron Kelly, whose
acquisitions of the properties it had

backed, defaulted on his loan repay-
ments.

CCWIPP is thought to have sunk
some $160 million into the two
Bahamas resort properties, and it
seems unlikely that it will recover
that sum of money any time soon.

The sale of the Hilton stake to
Adurion was designed to minimise
its Bahamas exposure, bring it back
into line with Canadian regulations
and laws, and also allow CCWIPP to
benefit from any upside Adurion
was able to create through its man-
agement, in a bid to recover at least
some of its investment. It is thought
that Canadian regulators are not
allowing CCWIPP to invest any
more equity in the Bahamas prop-
erties.

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MIRREN HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
MIRREN HOLDINGS LIMTED has been Dissolved and struck
off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by
the Registrar General on the 23rd day of October, 2009

Duncan Llowarch
6 Princes Gate
Knightsbridge

London
SW71QJ
United Kingdom

Liquidator



Did power firm suffer $400k first half loss?

FROM page 1B

income on an equity earnings
basis, appearing to imply that
Grand Bahama’s monopoly
electricity supplier suffered a
$400,000 first half net loss.

E. O. Ferrell, Grand
Bahama Power Company’s
president and chief executive,
did not return a phone mes-
sage left for him seeking com-
ment and an explanation of
the figures before press time.
However, any situation in
which a monopoly provider
is making a net loss is not
good, since they face no com-
petition.

It is no secret that 2009 has
been a difficult year for
Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany, with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham criticising
the company for appearing to
focus on profit maximisation,
rather than investing in
upgrading the reliability/con-
sistency of its distribution and
generation system.

And Mr Ferrell himself was
forced to apologise to Grand
Bahama commercial and res-
idential customers for the
company’s “unacceptable ser-
vice” during May and June.

Tribune Business revealed
two months ago how
GRAND Bahama Power
Company's (GBPC) kilowatt
per hour (kWh) sales fell by
12 per cent year-over-year
during the 2009 first quarter,
continuing a trend that saw a
2 per cent decline in 2008.

Writing in the annual











NOTICE

OF

PRISKA LTD.

report for ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle
that owns a 50 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power
Company, Mr _ Ferrell
acknowledged that 2008 “was
a difficult year” for the
island's monopoly power sup-
plier, even with the benefit of
a 4.87 per cent rate increase
from April onwards.

He added that this rate rise
was "negatively offset" by
Grand Bahama's continued
economic decline, both as a
result of the global recession
and the continued closure of
the Royal Oasis, "and unsea-
sonably cool weather during
the fourth quarter”.

"Overall, 2008 kWh sales
were 2 per cent less than
2007," Mr Ferrell wrote.
"Unfortunately, that trend is
continuing into the first quar-
ter 2009, with kWh sales 12
per cent below the same peri-
od in 2008. There were, how-
ever, items of positive growth
that will be beneficial for
years to come."

For the 12 months to
December 31, 2008, Grand
Bahama Power Company's
net income rose by little over

cent rise in operating rev-
enues, from $94.076 million
to $116.036 million, as total
operating expenses - includ-
ing fuel costs, which peaked in
July last year - rose by a
greater amount, 24.7 per cent,
to $108.752 million compared
to $87.207 million the year
before.

As a consequence, net
operating income grew by
only 6 per cent, to $7.284 mil-
lion compared to $6.869 mil-
hon in 2007. While other
income increased by more
than $1 million, both these
rises were offset by an
increase in interest expense
to $5.154 million, compared
to $3.432 million in 2007.

Grand Bahama Power
Company's long-term debt
had risen by almost 50 per
cent at year-end, growing
from $66.288 million to
$99.512 million, a develop-
ment largely due to the $50
million bond financing it
placed in May and July 2008
to raise funds for capital
expansion projects and refi-
nance existing debt.

That financing appeared to
reduce the outstanding col-







lective balance on various
commercial bank loans from
$55.333 million to $38 million
at year-end 2008.

$100,000 or 3 per cent, to
$3.621 million compared to
$3.516 million the year before.

This was despite a 23.2 per

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above
company commenced on the 5th November, 2009.
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial
Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, P.O. Box N-3023,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of
the Company.

PUBLIC NOTICE

———————
INVESTMENT FUND MARKETING POSITION

ROAD TRAFFIC
DEPARTMENT.

A fund management firm operating from the Bahamas is
seeking to recruit an individual to market its investment
products globally. The successful candidate must be a senior
investment professional with ten to twenty years of experience
in the investment industry, primarily in sales, marketing and
client service roles with a highly successful track record of
soliciting investors.

| hereby advise that all
persons/companies who have
not registered their (OT), On
Trial plates for the year 2009/
2010 to come in and register
their plates by December 31,
2009.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

The position requires extensive experience in marketing and
managing global investor relationships with sophisticated
institutional and high net worth clients. Significant travel will
be required to fulfill the responsibilities required by the position.

NOTICE

OF The successful candidate must hold the US Financial Industry

Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Series 7 license and Uniform
WINDSOR GLOBAL LTD.

Securities Agent State Law Exam Series 63 in order to be
permitted to conduct the required securities activities in the US.

Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above

company commenced on the Sth November, 2009.

The candidate must be extremely familiar with US Securities and
Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial

Exchange Commission and FINRA regulations in connection
with marketing, sales and placement of securities in the US.

Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, PO. Box N-3023,

Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of

the Company.

Failure to have plates
regularize would result in a
recall of all delinquent plates,
in . accordance with the Road
Traffic Act Chapter 220 Section

33.

The candidate must also have a general working knowledge
of the securities laws in other of the world’s leading financial
centers to ensure that applicable regulations are adhered to
when visiting these markets.

Please send applications and résumés to
HR Coordinator,
P.O. Box N-7776-78,
Nassau, Bahamas
or fax 362 6759.

CONTROLLER

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

“Wy FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

bas

COLON TAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Maney at Wark

HARBORSIDE
| =i yl | BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
= : FRIDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 2009
: HI LAN iy BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.96 | CHG 0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -225.40 | YTD % -13.16
fi VW —S FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E
0.127 0.000 9.2
0.992 0.200 10.8
0.244 0.260 24.2

-0.877 0.000 N/M
0.125 0.090 25.2
0.055 0.040 43.1
1.406 0.250 7.1
0.249 0.040 0.9
0.419 0.300 3.7
0.111 0.052 25.9
0.625 0.080 4.0
0.420 0.240 5.5
0.322 0.520 28.9
0.631 0.350 5.6
0.326 0.150 3.3
0.000 0.000 N/M
0.035 0.000 7.7
0.407 0.500 3.7
0.952 0.640 0.5
0.156 0.000 64.1

ases)
Interest

Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17 1.17 0.00

: 9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00

VACATION SERVICES s 5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00
: 0.63

3 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00

COOR Dy) NATO RS : 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00

: 9.92 10.00 10.00 0.00

Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00
Cable Bahamas
2.72 Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.74 5.74 0.00

Harborside Resort at Atlantis is currently seeking a oe ea | oan

Sales Vacation Services Coordinators to join our 6.28 Famguard 6.50 6.50 0.00
team. Your goal is to generate qualified tours re Fe saseean Bank pe oe ne

that would produce potential sales, while i a4 4.94 0.00
maintaining a professional and positive image, 0.27 Freeport Consiete aoe 0.27 0.27 0.00

and to uphold company standards of integrity 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00

. . : 9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
and professionalism. 0.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.60 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + z . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + x . 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D} + 15 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Last Price

S2wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
9 October 2017
9 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Our candidate must have the following
competencies and qualifications:



e Excellent communication skills;

¢ Strong customer service and sales ability;

e Proven success as a preview coordinator
(A Plus);

® Ability to determine guests’ eligibility for
sales tours;

* Strong persuasion skills;

¢ Ability to work with diverse personalities in
a multicultural environment;

e Excellent computer skills, knowledge of
various programs.

52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings



Weekly Vol. EPS $ i Yield
-2. 0.000
0.480
0.000
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months

0.000
0.000
Fund Name Yield % NAV Date
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund
99.4177 CFAL Global Equity Fund
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
10.0000 __ Fidelity International Investment Fund
1.0000 _ FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund

30-Sep-09
23-Oct-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

13.1751
103.0956
99.4177
1.0000
10.5884
1.0757
1.0305
1.0709
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

For consideration please fax a current resume
along with references to:

Attention: Human Resources Manager
942 - 363 -6822 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
or Un einai aera eee
Deliver resume to:
Human Resources Department
3rd Floor Marina One Building
Marina Drive, Paradise Island

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
(hw

THE TRIBUNE

6

(EW

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7B



Regulator raises BTC and Cable’s capital cost ratios

FROM page 1B

In its final determination
on the issue, URCA increased
the WACC determination for
BTC’s fixed-line voice busi-
ness from its initial 8.9 per
cent estimate to 10.29 per
cent. And for cellular and
mobile data services, a market

balance” between its deter-
minations, and those of the
companies, and still provided
“investment incentives” to
existing and new operators.
In its response to URCA’s
consultation, Cable Bahamas
again objected to it being des-
ignated as an operator with
SMP in the cable TV and high

speed data services industries,
and urged the regulator to
reconsider and reverse its
decision.

“Tf it cannot reverse this
designation at this time, the
Authority [URCA] should
ensure that any price regula-
tion should be narrowly
focused and light-handed in

nature,” Cable Bahamas
urged in its October 1, 2009,
letter.

“Tn either of the cases -
reversal of the SMP designa-
tion or light-touch regulation
- the relevance of the cost of
capital measure for the Pay
TV and high-speed services
at issue in this consultation is

greatly reduced, if not elimi-
nated.”

And, in a follow-up Octo-
ber 13, 2009, letter to Usman
Saadat, URCA’s director of
policy and regulation, Cable
Bahamas branded the SMP
designations placed on it and
accompanying responsibilities
as “unjustified, dispropor-

tionate and unfair”.

Meanwhile, in its response,
BTC said the WACC ratios
that URCA initially deter-
mined for its fixed-line and
cellular business segments
were “unusually low” and
would “not reflect a fair
return on BTC’s invest-
ments”.

in which BTC currently has
the monopoly, URCA raised
the WACC threshold from 11
per cent to 11.71 per cent.

These increases brought the
regulator’s findings closer into
line with BTC’s own argu-
ments, the state-owned
incumbent, which is in the
midst of a privatisation exer-
cise, having told URCA that
its WACC estimates for fixed-
line and cellular services were
11.9 and 12.1 per cent respec-
tively.

“BTC’s WACC rates for
fixed and mobile are still sig-
nificantly higher when com-
pared to URCA’s fixed and
mobile WACC rates of 8.9
per cent and 11 per cent
respectively,” Felicity John-
son, BTC’s vice-president for
legal, regulatory and inter-
connection, had written in an
October 16, 2009, letter to
URCA.

Meanwhile, URCA also
increased its initial WACC
estimates of 9.3 per cent and
9.6 per cent for its high speed
data services and cable TV
business, respectively, to 10.86
per cent for both.

Again, this brought the reg-
ulator closer into line with
Cable Bahamas’ own WACC
estimates, Judith Smith, its in-
house legal counsel, informing
URCA on October 1 that
these should be 11.9 per cent
for data and 11.1 per cent for
pay-TV.

“URCA recognises that
setting a rate of return that is
too low could make future
investment unattractive to
investors,” the regulator con-
cluded. “Setting the rate of
return too high would allow TIME: 7:00 PM
the regwated entity to earn |e Food-Handlers health certificate VENUE; St, Paul's Church, Lyford Cay
expense of its wholesale and
retail customers, while also
potentially distorting pricing
signals to investors.”

URCA said it believed the
final WACC rates it had set-
tled on “strikes a reasonable



_ =
or

Join Us for
Proposed Southwest New
Providence Marine Park

Community Meeting

rer DOCTORS HOSPITAI
ee, :

SS fvAcant posrtions]

eae |r met ae cw

Salary commensurate with experience The area off the Southwest Coast of New Providence 1s important due to
Its proxumuly to the land of New Providence. As an important Dive Site,
it has vale

for the touriam industry and has recreational value to New

Providence Fishermen, The Baharnas National Trust is in the process of

COOK - Dietary Dept
\ i. wie ou oh developing a proposal for a National Park to be developed off the South
west coast of New Prowidence Island. The creation of a marine park in
this area has the potential to serve multiple purposes of protecting
resources, providing non-destructive economic benetits, and providing
both recreational and educational opportunities for Bahamians.

We are looking for an enthusiastic, hardworking
cook to join our kitchen team.

ae The Bahamas National Trust firmly believes that engaging both stake
Must have a positive attitude, physically fit, high
school diploma, computer literate, excellent

holders and resource users during the project's development phase is
essential for its suocess. All users of the Southwest Marine Area off of

customer service skills essential. New Providence should try and attend this important meeting.

Join us atone of our scheduled community meetings:
DATE: Thursday, November 19th, 2009

TIME: 7:00) PM
VENUE: Adelaide Union Baptist Church

Qualifications:
¢ Certificate in Culinary Arts
DATE: Wednesday, November 25th, 2004

TIME: 7:00 PM
VENUE: [he Retreat, Village Bical

* Experience in an industrial kitchen
* Special Nutrition knowledge a plus

DATE Wednesday, Decermber Jad, 2009

* Excellent written/oral communication

For additional meeting information call 293-1317 or email

; hintie! baths
Submit mesume to: Human Resources Department

§ Hospital | P.O. Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas
TEAL eee) el bee

ee SU kal
eee eS

Preschools
Primary Schools
Junior High Schools
Senior High Schools
Secondary Schools
All Age Schools
Special Schools
Post Secondary Institutions
Tertiary Institutions

Bahamas National Trust is pleased to announce
the launch of an informational page for our most
recent park proposal. The site features up to date

information regarding the proposed Southwest

New Providence Marine Park project.
Log on to view an informational video,
community meeting schedule and to take a
short user survey.

Visit us at www.bnt.bs and look for the

Southwest Marine Park Project link.

National Education Census Day
Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

Forms may be collected from the Planning and Research
Section of the Ministry of Education, District Education Offices
or downloaded from www.bahamaseducation.com. If you have

any questions regarding this exercise call 502-2721, 502-2722,
502-2774 or 502-8346.

The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in slorage

* PHILLIP HUMES
* MARCO JOHNSON

* CHARLENE SMITH
* KATINA ROACH

FORMS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED BY
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27th, 2009.

All fees must be paid in full and items removed no later than Nov. 20th, 2009

stor-it-all
Te) te] tsa ater Ls

ee ieee te
eee ole ir

Complete and submit your form before the deadline and prove that

YOUR INSTITUTION COUNTS!!!

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



$16m start-up promotes
new deputy chairs

THE start-up IP Solutions
International (IPSI), which is
seeking to raise $16 million
to finance the build-out of its
‘Multiple Play’ infrastructure,
has announced the promotion
of two of its existing board
members.

Owen S-M Bethel, presi-
dent and managing director
of the Montaque Group, and
Brian Quinn, past director-
general of the International
Institute of Communications,
have taken on new roles as
co-deputy chairmen.

Already actively involved
as members of the firm's
board of directors under the
leadership of Sir Orville Turn-
quest, Mr Bethel will perform
administrative oversight at the
board level while Mr Quinn
directs the oversight of tech-
nology.

"The cable and telecom-
munications industries in the
Bahamas are about to under-
go what some may consider
the most significant change to
their overall landscape since

Bu
ee \

their inception,” said IPSI
chairman Sir Orville Turn-
quest.

"Our recent adjustments
are in preparation for the
future, and elevating Mr
Quinn and Mr Bethel, who
take on additional responsi-
bilities, will help to position
IPSI as a formidable force.”

With long experience of the
communications sector in
general, and television in par-
ticular, Mr Quinn has been
chairman of several interna-
tional companies, including
BrightStar, when it was the
world’s largest wideband
satellite carrier.

Mr Bethel has held, and
currently serves in, director
and deputy chairman capaci-
ties for Doctors Hospital,
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas, Historic Bahamas
Foundation and the Bahamas
Investment Authority among
others.

“Brian Quinn and Owen
Bethel bring unique and bold
strengths to their new roles,”

CRUISE
LINE

Us pe

“ One-Way

vhs Sy Un]

said Edison Sumner, presi-
dent and chief executive of
IPSI and director of The
Montaque Group.

“Mr Quinn, who was the
former chief executive of
what is now Reuters TV, is a
pioneer in the field of mass
information and entertain-
ment. Mr Bethel has been at
the forefront of financial ser-
vices in the Bahamas, from
the days he served as the first
executive director of the
Financial Services Secretariat
to helping to shape a capital
market and introducing the
first mutual fund in Bahamian
dollars.

“We are delighted that both
believe so strongly in the
potential of IPSI that despite
their diverse business obliga-
tions they accepted the invi-
tation to take on expanded
roles preparing for the launch
of a company that will change
the landscape of how this
country gets its news, movies,
music and telephone ser-
vices.”

ils

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IP Solutions International has elected Owen Bethel and Brian Quinn as co-deputy chairmen...

Accounting firm set to
raise fraud awareness

A BAHAMIAN account-
ing firm has announced it will
be participating in Interna-
tional Fraud Awareness
Week, from November 8-15,
as an official supporter to pro-
mote anti-fraud awareness
and education.

HLB Galanis Bain said
Fraud Awareness Week
comes during a time when
intense financial pressures
caused by the economic cri-
sis have led to an increase of
fraud, according to a survey of
experts conducted by the
Association of Certified
Fraud Examiners (ACFE).

During Fraud Awareness
Week, HLB Galanis Bain, as
an official supporter joins the
anti-fraud activities in various
ways, including:

* Providing a free Fraud
Prevention Checkup docu-
ment for interested business-
es

* Providing a sample Inter-
nal Fraud Policy ratified by
the AFCE

* Providing free consulta-
tion to interested organisa-
tions during the week

* Providing a free copy of
the Occupational Fraud
Report

* Conducting employee
surveys to assess levels of
fraud awareness within their
organisation

* Posting articles on its web
site and in newsletters and
teaming with local media to
highlight the problem of
fraud.

HLB Galanis Bain foren-
sic partner John S. Bain, a
Certified Fraud Examiner
(CFE), said the support of
organizations around the
world helps make Fraud
Week an effective tool in rais-
ing anti-fraud awareness in
the Bahamas.

“Fraud continues to be a
serious problem, and our
practice has seen a dramatic
increase in Fraud Examina-
tion requests over the past
two years, from both the pub-
lic and private sectors. The
state of our economy requires
all organisations to be even
more vigilant,” Mr Bain said.

“HLB Galanis Bain wants
to support the international
efforts in Fraud Awareness
Week by helping to shine a
spotlight on the urgent need
for fraud prevention and
detection, and to advise the
local business community on

the steps they can take to do
so.”

In its 2009 report, Occupa-
tional Fraud: A Study of the
Impact of an Economic Reces-
sion, the ACFE found that:

* Employees pose the
greatest fraud threat in the
current economy. When
asked which, if any, of sever-
al categories of fraud
increased during the previous
12 months, the largest number
of survey respondents (48 per
cent) indicated that embez-
zlement was on the rise.

* Lay-offs are affecting
organisations’ internal con-
trol systems. Nearly 60 per
cent of Certified Fraud Exam-
iners who work as in-house
fraud examiners reported that
their companies had experi-
enced lay-offs during the past
year. Among those who had
experienced lay-offs, almost
35 per cent said their compa-
ny had eliminated some anti-
fraud controls.

* Fraud levels are expected
to continue rising. Almost 90
per cent of respondents said
they expect fraud to contin-
ue to increase during the next
12 months.

Bahamas First sees
top rating renewed

A SECOND Bahamian
general insurer has had its top
financial strength and issuer
credit ratings confirmed by A.
M. Best, Bahamas First fol-
lowing RoyalStar Assurance’s
lead from last week.

The leading international
credit rating agency has
affirmed the financial strength
rating of A- (Excellent) and
issuer credit rating of ‘a-’ for
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company, with a stable
outlook for both ratings.

Bahamas First General
Insurance Company is the pri-
mary subsidiary of its parent
company, Bahamas First
Holdings (BFH).

A. M. Best said: “The rat-
ings are based on Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany’s continued solid capi-
talisation, favourable operat-

ing performance and estab-
lished presence in the
Bahamian market. These fac-
tors are supported by the
company's conservative cat-
astrophe programme, under-
writing controls, local market
expertise and enhanced risk
management.
“Historically, Bahamas
First Holdings has contributed
capital to Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company to
support growth initiatives and
to enhance its capital position.
“A.M. Best expects that
Bahamas First Holdings will
continue to support Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany with additional capital
contributions, allowing
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company to maintain
the level of risk-adjusted cap-
italisation necessary for its rat-

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ing level.”

A. M. Best added: “These
positive factors are somewhat
offset by Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company’s
geographic concentration and
subsequent exposure to hur-
ricane activity. However, this
concern is mitigated by
Bahamas First General Insur-
ance Company’s strong rein-
surance programme with
prominent reinsurance com-
panies. The programme
reduces Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company’s net
probable maximum loss to a
manageable level, but sub-
stantially increases operating
costs. Furthermore, Bahamas
First General Insurance Com-
pany faces increased compe-
tition from indigenous and
outside companies seeking
market share.”

Javon Knowles




MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

Ingraham strikes again!

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

mmr IS democracy being stifled

aving criticised the
PLP for not dis-

: e@ ] e

playing true ?
democracy at its 1 | | C ( O V ( T [ | 1 [ | Art

recent National e
Convention, the FNM have done

themselves no favours with their
recent showing.

All the party has done is cement
the notion that nothing happens
within that organisation without
the blessing of the Prime Minis-
ter.

If Perry Christie were to nomi-
nate any candidate in the PLP’s
national convention, the FNM
would have set upon him like a
pack of wild wolves, ripping him to
shreds for “manipulating those
poor old souls” who otherwise
could not make up their own
minds by themselves.

While manipulation will always
have a role to play in party politics,
the blatant interference, the utter
disregard for the process, and the
stifling of the dreams of those
potential candidates who would
have ventured for chairman of the
FNM was almost too painful to
watch.

As The Tribune reported from
the floor only moments after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham nomi-
nated Carl Bethel, the former can-
didate Ivoine Ingraham could only
comfort himself in the bosom of a
party supporter who was fortu-
nately standing nearby.

His tears said it all.

Later he would appear on vari-
ous TV and radio programmes sta-
tioned at the convention explaining
how it would have been political
suicide to face any challenger who
had the outright blessing of the
Prime Minister. That was putting it
politely.

When Prime Minister Ingraham
informed the cheering delegates
that the immediate past chairman
Johnley Ferguson would not be
offering himself for re-election,
Johnley had already been cam-
paigning a few hours before for
the post. In fact, he told The Tri-
bune that he was confident of
being returned to the post.

However, as soon as the Prime
Minister stood and motioned that
Mr Ferguson would not be offering
again for the chairmanship, John-
ley fell right in line and seconded
Mr Bethel’s appointment.

Therefore, with little options
left to him, Ivoine Ingraham
moved for the closing of the nom-
ination process and for Mr Bethel
to be elected unopposed “in the
interest of party unity.”

Here is what he said in his own
words: “If the Prime Minister
stands up, the Prime Minister that
enjoys a great deal of support in
that convention, and nominates
someone I must be the greatest
fool there is to waste my time and
waste the convention's time to
have them vote for a position that
I really have absolutely no chance
in winning.”

Although he put on a brave
front at first, the emotionally
drained candidate was later seen
being consoled by a supporter as









Felipé Major/Tribune sta



SEE page 2C PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his wife, Delores, at a Free National Movement (FNM) convention...

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
INSIGHT

Is democracy being stifled

he wept over the lost oppor-
tunity.

Later, the PLP’s MP for
Fox Hill, Fred Mitchell,
would chime in on that
night’s fiasco criticising the
FNM for their failure to dis-
play any semblance of inter-
nal democracy. As he quite
adequately put it, at least in
the PLP all seats were made
vacant and all positions were
challenged. Say what you will
about the process itself, at
least a fight was had and for
better or worse the public
witnessed men and women
of courage fight for their
right to represent them in a
greater capacity within their
own party.

Sadly, the same cannot be
said in the FNM.

Here is what Mr Mitchell
said: “One of the things we
were proud of showing the
country is that the PLP is
good at internal democracy.
At our convention all seats
were vacant and all positions
were challenged. We were
able to have a fight for those
positions internally and to
survive intact with people
still allies with one another
and not fighting one another.

“And that is what I think
the country expects to see.
It does not expect to see the
maximum leader come and
impose his choices on his
party and you can tell from
the faces of the people who
were the recipients of those
PRIME MINISTER Hubert choices that ate not a hap-
Ingraham is applauded at a py result. And I think the
Free National Movement Bahamian people should
(FNM) convention... take note."





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SEE next page



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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3C
INSIGHT

in the governing party? —

Take note indeed.

The Ministry of Education
is once again thrown into tur-
moil, and one would have
thought with all of the
reports of sexual misconduct
that abound within this min-
istry that this would have
been the one institution that
would have been free from
the political jockeying.

For this ministry to lose its
minister two and a half years
into the government not
because he was performing
below par, but simply
because he is needed to act
as chairman of a political
party sends a very strong and
dangerous message.

Also, the FNM appears to
be suggesting that with
Bradley Roberts’ return to
the PLP, they had no other
choice but to take a cabinet
minister out of his post and
make him chairman to com-
bat the “Big Bad Brad.”

What does that say about
the FNM’s bench? Is there
no one within the ranks of
the party who could act as
chairman? Although many
believe that Sidney Collie is a
lost cause, what about
Kendal Wright? Surely
someone could have been
found other than the Minis-
ter of Education.

But perhaps Bradley
Roberts is more of a threat
to the FNM than meets the
eye. The often rambunctious
and flamboyant FNM Sena-
tor Frederick McAlpine took
the time to berate Mr
Roberts in his convention
speech questioning, “Who’s
afraid of the Big Bad wolf?”

“They now have a Chair-
man (respectfully, I don’t
know if to call him the old-
new Chairman or the new-
old Chairman) who said he
came back to bark and bite
hard — sounds like a French

-_ .
poodle spirit to me. -.

i
“This new-old Chairman .
SEE page 7C DPM BRENT SYMONETTE and Carl Bethel (top right inset) at an FNM convention...

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7C



INSIGHT



Is democracy

being stifled in

the governing
party?

or old-new Chairman says that his sole

mission in politics in his twilight years is to

dismantle the FNM. Bring it on my broth-
er!” said Senator McAlpine.

“Dismantle the FNM? We’re together.
We have one leader who knows what he
is doing. You don’t have to ever ask who
the leader is on this side. We’re united
and we’re not pretending to be. We’re
not flaming the public. What you see is
what you get!”

Not to be outdone, Mr Roberts was
quick to fire back with his own brand of
vitriol.

“The only serious response to
McAlpine, who really deserves no
response at all, is to warn the Senator
that times have changed since his crude
and embarrassing performance during
the 2007 General Election rallies. Times
have grown serious and serious times
require serious leadership. He was award-
ed for his abandonment of his Christian
vows during that campaign by being
appointed to the Senate. The deep feel-
ings of rejection which fueled his unchris-
tian-like behaviour during the elections,
we had hoped would have been quelled
by time, spiritual reflection, responsibili-
ties to nation building and his many chal-
lenges in a new marriage.

“We hoped for a moment, that as a
Senator, who doubles as a ‘man of the
cloth,’ McAlpine might have used this
opportunity to inspire convention dele-
gates and the Bahamian population at
large, in a different, more meaningful

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (right) and Carl Bethel at a Free National Movement (FNM) convention...

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CARL BETHEL at a Free National Movement (FNM) convention...

Is democracy
being stifled in
the governing

party?

way. But again, he chose to clownishly sing for his supper,
to please a man over more meaningful principles. He chose
to spew messages of hate and folly over messages of
restoration and timely wisdom — again, during the most
socially and economically challenging period in our coun-
try since the late 1920s.”

If this back and forth is any indicator of things to come
then it is safe to say that the next two and a half years will
be some of the best for the media in this country. As for the
rest of the Bahamian population — your guess is as good
as mine.

What do you think?

pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

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DPM BRENT SYMONETTE at an FNM convention...

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.290MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS, SUN, SHOWER HIGH 85F LOW 75F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTFRONT S P O R T S Ingraham strikes again SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Softball By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FIVE men impersonating police officers who were attempting to rob a bar had to f lee after they were attacked by its patrons, say police. The incident was just one of five armed robberies or attempted armed robberies reported over the weekend. In one of them, a man was shot in the left buttock after being robbed of his wallet. I n another, a man and a woman had cash and cellphones stolen from them at Goodman’s Bay beach, with the man subsequently forced into the trunk of his friend’s car and driven across the island. Yesterday, it emerged that police suspect three of the robberies may have been commit ted by the same pair of armed, masked men. They said they are “developing information” which they hope to release to the public which may help them capture the culprits. The robbery spree comes after former PLP cabinet minister Leslie Miller was attacked at his business, Sunburst Paint, by two armed and masked man. However, Superintendent Elsworth Moss yesterdayd eclined to link this incident with the other three involving men going by similar descrip tions. The incident in which the cul prits were pretending to be police officers occurred just after midnight on Saturday at a bar on Armstrong and D owdeswell Street, in Nassau. Recording the incident as an armed robbery, police said: “Five men entered the establishment, one clad in a police jacket, another a bullet proof vest, one in Dickies pants and stripped shirt, armed with a handgun entered the establishment and began searching the patrons. “The patrons attacked the men (verbally white Altima, license plate number 215959.” Yesterday, bar owner Walles Francois said he thought the robbers were policemen as they started searching various parts of his business. “They went into the kitchen and started opening up all of the cupboards. I went in and asked them what they were Incident one of five robberies reported over the weekend The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRI. NOV. 20 McHAPPY DAY www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTION INSIDE Real Estate REMEMBRANCEDAY MEMBERS o f the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and Police Force mark R emembrance Day at the Cenotaph in Nassau yester day. Politicians and offi c ials gathered to pay their respects to war veterans. SEE PAGENINEF e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Championships Fake police in bid to raid bar By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP DEPUTY LEADER Philip ‘Brave’ Davis is set to be named as the Leader of Opposition Business in the House of Assembly today, The Tribune can reveal. According to well-placed sources within the party, former Prime Minister Perry Christie has opted to not return the post to his long time friend and one-time rival Dr Bernard Nottage who recently opposed him during the party’s 51st National Convention. Having already lost his leadership bid in a landslide to the SEE page 11 PHILIP DAVIS By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE Progressive Liberal Party is set to roll out its new slate of candidates for then ext general election at the end of this month, party leader Perry Christie con-f irmed yesterday. When the nominations are ratified by the National General Council on the third Thursday of this month, Mr Christie says he fully expects t his new face of the PLP to include a plethora of “young men and women”. As the PLP moves to ready itself for the next general election, the party leader said they will be moving to live up to the tenants of being a viable alternative to the present gov ernment. “But there will be a signifi cant number of young men and women who, after the third Thursday of this month when we have everything ratified by the National General Council, we will put to the Bahamian public so the Bahamian public could draw the right conclusions as to whether or not the PLP is prepared for the future and PLP to r oll out new election candidates at end of month SEE page 11 JUST weeks before the Christmas holidays, more Grand Bahamians have been forced out of work. The 50-room Royal Palm Resorts and Suites located on East Mall and Settler’s Way shut its doors last week, The Tribune has learned, although reports vary over whether the closure is tem porary or permanent. Grand Bahama MP Obie Wilchcombe said he believed almost 100 people had lost their jobs. However, contrary to reports from the Associ ated Press, he also claimed his sources told him the hotel is only shutting its doors temporarily until tourism picks up on the island. Attempts to reach resort representatives to confirm the details were unsuccessful up to press time yesterday. Suggesting that utilities costs had placed extra pres sure on the resort, Mr Wilch combe called on the Government to ensure that assistance with electricity bills made available in New Providence extends to Grand Bahama, which receives its power from the Grand Bahama Power Company. “The Government has to insist the Grand Bahama Power Company do same thing. While Government is MP says almost 100 jobs lost in resort closure SEE page 11 Davis set to be named Leader of Opposition Business in the House SEE page 11

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE PRESIDENT of the Bahamas Nurses Union is to take a “wait and see attitude” t owards the Prime Minister’s a nnouncement that the Gove rnment now has the money to pay postponed salary increases owed to nurses, teachers and doctors and will look to implement agreed health insurance for nurses. Cleola Hamilton, whose membership staged a massive sick-out earlier this year over the Government’s decision to postpone health insurance for nurses, said she personally had not heard Hubert Ingraham’s comments during his speech on the final night of the FNM convention and would rather not conclude that the payments and health coverage will go ahead until she sees it happen. “Based on experience I am going to say that we will have to wait and see. The Government made promises before that it did not fulfil,” said Ms Hamilton. Speaking to FNM delegates and the Bahamas via television and radio on Friday n ight, Prime Minister Ingrah am said he was “pleased to a nnounce we are now in a position to pay what we owe” to teachers, doctors and nurses under contracts between the government and the pub lic sector unions which represent those workers. “We gat the money!” Mr Ingraham exclaimed. He said that an $800 lump sum payment provided for under a contract between the government and the Bahamas Union of Teachers would now be paid, amounting to a total cost to the public purse of $3.2 million. Meanwhile, a four per cent salary increase would be paid to nurses, at an annual cost of $18 million and a 1.5 per cent increase in doctors’ salaries, equivalent to $844,000 annually, also would be forthcoming. “We will commence discussions to agree a way forward for the implementation of the agreed health insurance coverage for nurses,” said Mr Ingraham. All of these payments and increases were postponed by the Government mid-year due to major shortfalls in gov ernment revenue. In his speech, the Prime Minister said the payments would be back dated to July, so the medics and educators could expect some back pay. The government will table a supplementary Appropriations bill for $26.5 million in parliament on Wednesday to cover the cost of the payouts as well as the temporary jobs programme planned. “I wish to thank the teachers, doctors and nurses of The Bahamas for their forbear ance during these difficult economic times,” he added. Calls to Bahamas Union of Teachers President Belinda Wilson and other officials, as well as Doctor’s Union Presi dent Norad Morgan, were not answered yesterday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News..................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports......................................P12,13,14,15 Advt........................................................P16 BUSINESS SECTION Business.................................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 INSIGHT SECTION Insight........................................P1,2,3,4,7,8 Advt...........................................................P5 Comics......................................................P6 REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES Nurses union chief to take ‘wait and see attitude’ on salary increases PM HUBERT INGRAHAM

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A COMMUNITY has been left reeling after a h orrific two-car collision killed four young men and left another battling for his life in hospital. Chief of the voluntary Abaco Crash Fire and Rescue organisation, Colin Albury, said the scene on Friday was one the most devastating he had witnessed in 20 years, second only to the plane crash that killed US popstar Aaliyah in Abaco eight years ago. He and a team of five volunteers were called f rom their beds to help extract the young victims from the carnage. The incident came just hours after a 15-yearold girl was killed in Nassau Village after being flung from the Centre for the Deaf school mini-van she was travelling in when the van was in a collision with a car, bringing the number of traffic fatalities for Friday alone to five. Speaking of the Abaco crash, Mr Albury said: The impact when the cars collided was such that everyone was crushed. “The families are taking it really hard, naturally, and where it’s getting close to the holiday season having to bury a child is going to be very difficult.” He added that the tight-knit local police force had also been especially affected by the tragedy. Though reports are sketchy at this time, The Tribune understands that all of the men who died in the crash are in their twenties, and all from different families in the Blackwood Community of only around 140 residents. According to police, two cars a grey volkswagon Jetta driven by police constable 3229 Valentino Burrows, of Cooper’s Town, and a white Plymouth Acclaim driven by Ricardo Reckley collided head on along S.C. Bootle Highway, south of Andy’s Service Station at around 10.20pm on Friday. Mr Burrows who had only recently been transferred to Abaco from Freeport was travelling solo, while Mr Reckley’s car contained several passengers. PC Burrows, Ricardo Reckley, Romeo McIntosh and Tony Curry all died of their injuries at the scene, while passenger Valentino McIntosh survived and had to be transported to New Providence for treatment. Edison Cornish, a Blackwood resident said: “Right now there’s a very solemn feeling in the town. Everything’s pretty sombre. We’re all one family here.” “The families aren’t holding up too good.” Another Abaco source said: “It’s going to be a horrible shock for the community.” A team of police investigators from Nassau have been sent to the island to help assist with the investigation into the tragedy. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h he e J Ja a v v a a G G a a l ll l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Four killed in two-car collision Community shocked by tragic accident THE northern Bahamas could experience tropical storm winds as early Thursday as Hurricane Ida makes her way into the Gulf of Mexico. According to Accuweather.com, Hurricane Ida is expected to make landfall somewhere between Louisiana and the Florida panhandle as early as Tuesday morning. The hurricane is expected to head northeast across the US southern coast and lose the majority of its power, being downgraded later into the week to a Tropical Storm. Hurricane Ida is packing winds of up to 100 miles per hour and is travelling northnorthwest at 10 miles per hour. At its last point the storm was located about 95 miles westnorthwest of the western tip of Cuba and 510 miles southsoutheast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. BAHAMASCOULDFEELTROPICALSTORMWINDS A MAN watches t he waves crash in t he resort area of Cancun, Mexico, Sunday. Ida has grown into a hurricane for a second time as it moves o ver the Caribbean. Israel Leal /AP B y DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT A MAN was fatally shot by police Fri-d ay evening in the Fawcett L ane area. A sst Supt Loretta Mackey said the incident occurred around 11.20pm when officers w ere dispatched to investigate a disturbance in the area. When they arrived at the s cene, officers were confronte d by a 27-year-old masn who, it is claimed, was acting in a disorderly manner. There w as a scuffle between the police and the man, who was then shot. T he man’s identification is being withheld by police at this time. Man shot dead by police in Grand Bahama RESIDENTS of Pinder’s Point are expected to demonstrate at the BORCO/Vopak B ahamas today. Community activist Troy Garvey held a town meeting on Friday evening with residents in the area concerning odour emissions in the settlements and its impact on the health of residents Many residents have complained of respiratory and breathing problems, skin rash es, and nausea. They are calling on the executives to meet with them Vopak has denied that its operations are responsible for making residents sick. Pinder s Point residents expected to demonstrate

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EDITOR, The Tribune. PLEASEpermit me some latitude to join the parade of persons who wish to vent on the present topic of choice the proposed a mendment to the rape l aws/act to include “marital r ape.” M y simple questions are r eally directed to Dr San d ra Dean-Patterson and Minister Loretta ButlerTurner as they appear to be the more visible proponents. 1) What is the statistics of p ersons who are being a bused by their spouses who d o not report it. Let me g uess that it would be less than 50 per cent...and would y ou say that the main reasons for not reporting are f ear and need for financial assistance? Would these situations change with the prop osed amendment? 2) What is the success rate f or rape cases? Will this amendment improve on this considering in these casesb oth persons will be expected to be in the home envir onment unlike in many rape cases? 3) What consideration is b eing given to the Divorce l aws in this country? Will refusal to have sex consti tute specific grounds for d ivorce? Will refusal to h ave sex on the night after the marriage not make it impossible to consummate the marriage as such imme d iate grounds for annul ment? 4) Our present laws cont ain sufficient clauses to deal with rape and abuse with out time constraints. Can a spouse file for separationa nd rape simultaneously u nder present laws? 5) What is the present divorce rate in our Christian nation, say 60 70 per cent. In your opinion will this amendment improve this? I f not do you have any r egard for the “sanctity of m arriage”? 6) We may follow the powerful UN, but I would ask how many of the countries have complete freedom of religion? Even our great neighbour to the North has taken religion out of their schools and as such is in no position to provide advice o n this subject. We should also note that their divorcel aws are exceedingly more l iberal. Finally, I think we all agree that rape is rape and is unacceptable, however, there is a small percentage of men who have married spiteful and/or vindictive spouses who will use this as an opportunity to attempt to embarrass them by parading them in front of the courts because of other unrelated situations...who will protect these good m en? In my opinion even if o ne innocent man is caught i n this situation that would b e too many. Thank you for a llowing me to vent. K L BRATHWAITE Nassau, August 24, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising WEBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm Questions on marital rape law LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Germany celebrates memory of wall falling E DITOR, The Tribune. Having dwelt and served for more than forty years...” in P arliament, the Prime Minister said, “and having derived very great pleasure and advantage therefrom, I, naturally,w ould like to see it restored in all essentials to its old form, c onvenience and dignity.” No, this wasn’t Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham expressing his “disgust” over some “misguided” artisan changing the colour of the House of Assembly’s walls from the traditional green to a pale yellow. British Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill, expressed the sentiment in 1943 during a debate on rebuilding theH ouse of Commons, which had been destroyed by Ger m an bombs in 1941 two years after Britain declared war on Germany. While some members wanted to replace it with a roomi e r building that could seat the burgeoning number of MPs, Churchill and others wanted to recreate the original structure, which could only accommodate about two-thirds the number of parliamentarians. A ccording to Ralph Keyes in The Quote Verifier, “Churchill thought that being a bit overcrowded lent inten sity, drama and a sense of history to parliamentary proc eedings.” We shape our buildings and afterwards our buildings shape us,” Churchill said. His position carried the day and the House of Commons was restored to its traditional form in 1950. A t this point it’s still not known who is responsible for causing taxpayers to have to foot the bill for a double repainting of the august chambers of our House of Assem bly SIMON ARTZI Nassau, September, 2009. The painting of the House of Assembly EDITOR, The Tribune. I WOULD like to con gratulate Ms Athena Dami anos for so eloquently stating the feelings of so many of us that live off Eastern Road and have to drive past the Montagu foreshore. The stench is appalling and we have to endure it in order to drive home. The idea of a feeder road is excellent and then we would not have to stop while somebody is making a pur chase, if not of fish then from the fruit vendor and now the phone card seller. It certainly is rather surprising that some Member of Par liament who happens to live in the Eastern area is not conscious of the situation. Perhaps the only alternative is to get a petition start ed and that would very quickly be signed by many who must drive past the area. HELEN ASTARITA Nassau, August 17, 2009. Issues with the Monta gu foreshore BERLIN (AP memorials on Monday, Germans will cele brate the day the Berlin Wall came crashing down 20 years ago. On that cold night, they danced atop the wall, arms raised in victory, hands clasped in friendship and giddy hope. Years of separa tion and anxiety melted into the unbelievable reality of freedom and a future without border guards, secret police, informers and rigid communist control. Germans are celebrating with concerts boasting Beethoven and Bon Jovi; a memorial service for the 136 people killed trying to cross over from 1961 to 1989; candle lightings and 1,000 towering plastic foam dominoes to be placed along the wall’s route and tipped over. On Nov. 9, 1989, East Germans came in droves, riding their sputtering Trabants, motorcycles and rickety bicycles. Hundreds, then thousands, then hundreds of thousands crossed over the following days. Stores in West Berlin stayed open late and banks gave out 100 Deutschemarks in “wel come money,” then worth about $50, to each East German visitor. The party lasted four days and by Nov. 12 more than 3 million of East Germany’s 16.6 million people had visited, nearly a third of them to West Berlin, the rest through gates opening up along the rest of the fenced, mined frontier that cut their country in two. Sections of the nearly 155 kilometers (100 miles) of wall were pulled down and knocked over. Tourists chiseled off chunks to keep as souvenirs. Tearful families reunited. Bars gave out free drinks. Strangers kissed and toasted each other with champagne. Klaus-Hubert Fugger, a student at the Free University in West Berlin, was having drinks at a pub when people began coming “who looked a bit different.” Customers bought the visitors round after round. By midnight, instead of going home, Fugger and three others took a taxi to the Brandenburg Gate, long a no man’s land, and scaled the 12-foot (nearly four meter wall with hundreds of others. “There were really like a lot of scenes, like people crying, because they couldn’t get the situation,” said Fugger, now 43. “A lot of people came with bottles” of champagne and sweet German sparkling wine. Angela Merkel, Germany’s first chancellor from the former communist East, recalled the euphoria in an address last week to the U.S. Congress. “Where there was once only a dark wall, a door suddenly opened and we all walked through it: onto the streets, into the churches, across the borders,” Merkel said. “Every one was given the chance to build something new, to make a difference, to venture a new beginning.” The wall the communists built at the height of the Cold War and which stood for 28 years is mostly gone. Some parts still stand, at an outdoor art gallery or as part of an open-air museum. Its route through the city is now streets, shopping centers, apartment houses. The only reminder of it are a series of inlaid bricks that trace its path. Checkpoint Charlie, the prefab that was long the symbol of the Allied presence and of Cold War tension, has been moved to a museum in western Berlin. Potsdamer Platz, the vibrant square that was destroyed during World War II and became a no man’s land during the Cold War, is full of upscale shops selling everything from iPods to grilled bratwursts. At a ceremony in Berlin Oct. 31, Helmut Kohl, the German chancellor who presided over the opening of the wall, stood side by side with the superpower presidents of the time, George H.W. Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev. After the decades of shame that followed the Nazi era, Kohl suggested, the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of their country 11 months later gave Germans pride. In an interview in Moscow with Associat ed Press Television News, Gorbachev said it was a catalyst for peace. “No matter how hard it was, we worked, we found mutual understanding and we moved forward. We started cutting down nuclear weapons, scaling down the armed forces in Europe and resolving other issues,” he said. It all began with a routine late afternoon news conference. On Nov. 9, 1989, Guenter Schabowski, a member of East Germany’s ruling Politburo, casually declared that East Germans would be free to travel to the West immediately. Later, he tried to clarify his comments and said the new rules would take hold at mid night, but events moved faster as the word spread. At a remote crossing in Berlin’s south, Annemarie Reffert and her 15-year-old daughter made history by becoming the first East Germans to cross the border. Years later, Schabowski told a TV interviewer that he had gotten mixed up. It was not a decision but a draft law that the Politburo was set to discuss. He thought it was a decision that had already been approved. That night, around midnight, border guards swung open the gates. (This article is by Matt Moore of the Associated Press)

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By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net F ORMER Prime Minister P erry Christie has said he felt “sorry” for FNM Senator Johnley Ferguson who lost his bid for re-election to chairmanship of the party after Prime Minister HubertI ngraham personally nominated Carl Bethel for the post. Making light of the fact that the nomination of Mr Bethel had come as a surp rise to Mr Ferguson who hours before had been campaigning for the post, Mr Christie said it was unfortu n ate to see such an incident take place to one of the party’s most loyal of support ers. D uring his address to the media yesterday at Gambier House, Mr Christie noted t hat the Prime Minister himself said there were discus sions taking place “three m onths” ago as to who m ight best be suited to be chairman of the party lead ing into the next general election. As such, Mr Christie said he found it “amazing” that Mr Fergu-s on was not included in these talks. “Well clearly it seems to m e, the FNM and its leader, planning three months ago did not tell Johnley Fergu son or Ivoine Ingraham. Clearly the ethical implica-t ions of that must be import ant to the Bahamian people. Key members of their own organisation who werec ampaigning hours before the convention started for the position of chairman. Yet the Prime Minister said this decision was contemplated and discussed andp resumably decided upon months ago. This is more interesting and intriguing for us because this is the partyt hat questioned the level and depth of democracy within the PLP,” Mr C hristie said. T he PLP leader added that it should also be pointe d out that Mr Ferguson was not only just the chairman of the FNM, but also the Vice President of the Senate and as such a memb er of the FNM’s Parliamentary caucus. He was a Senator, a part of the Parliamentary caucus of the FNM and therefore privy to the affairs of the FNM. It is astounding theref ore in terms of the assumptions we can infer, that any d iscussions on the chairm anship that took place excluded such a person t he chairman, Vice President of the Senate and a member of the Parliamen tary caucus from those dis c ussions. “We use this example simply to say that the Bahamian people had had an opportu n ity to see contested elections in the PLP, to see the results fairly arrived at, and t o see the PLP come together as a mature party in the aftermath of those electionst o prepare itself for the next g eneral elections. “I feel sorry for people like Johnley. Here is a man who believes in his party; gets up there and goes to his convention only to find, ‘nobody moves, nobody gets h urt’,” Mr Christie said to an outburst of laughter at t he party’s headquarters y esterday. As such, Mr Christie said t hat the country is entitled to ask why the Prime Minister would make such a politically self-serving decision to the detriment of the Mini stry of Education. By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP Leader Perry Christie warned the Prime Minister yesterday to avoid the p ractice of labelling politicians, as there w ere many opportunities for him to return the favour. As Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham poked fun at the fact that Mr Christie would be close to 70 years of age when the next general election is called in 2012, Mr Christie hit back stating that t he PM appears to be “so unfit as a person” that “I labour watching him try to walk.” “So from my point of view let me just say this, the Prime Minister should really be careful in establishing a culture of politicians describing each other. Because you know there are many won-d erful opportunities I would have if I w anted to say what his friends (call him as he said what my friends (call me But I don’t want to go there because that’s not the kind of leadership that I exemplify,” he said. PLP chairman Bradley Roberts also c himed in, describing the Prime Minister a s a person incapable of working with anyone who disagrees with his views. “He ridiculed (William Willy Wong represents the real estate people (the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-c iation). “He wasn’t just speaking for Willy W ong. He also did the same thing when John Rolle, the former Controller of Customs disagreed with him and offered his point of view. That is the type of man Hubert Ingraham is. When you dis-a gree with him then he wants to ridicule y ou. That isn’t leadership my friend and it certainly ain’t trust,” Mr Roberts said. Speaking to his now rival on the government side, Mr Roberts said he believes that FNM Chairman Carl Bethel is a “fine young man” but as toh is political acumen he has little to offer. He obviously is a strong supporter of his party but I have not seen him perform at this level that he has been placed at. I have been there and done that; 2002 the story is there. Bradley Roberts played a meaningful role as chairman and also as a strong a dvocate in the House of Assembly. I intend to duplicate that whenever the elections are called,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PLP leader ‘f elt sorry’ for FNMSenator Ferguson Christie warns PM on ‘labelling’ PLPLEADER Perry Christie J OHNLEYFERGUSON

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By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat). MIGRATIONnot infrequently gets a bad press. Negative stereotypes, portraying migrants as ‘stealing our jobs’ or ‘scrounging off the taxpayer’, abound in sections of the media and public opinion especially in time of recession.” T hat is the opening sentence of the United Nations Human Development Report 2009. The report goes on to say that “fears about migrants taking the jobs or lowering the wages of local people, placing an unwelcome burden on local s ervices, or costing the taxpayer money, are generally exaggerated.” The Report asserts, “when migrants’ skills complement those of local people, both groups benefit” and it makes the point that “the policy response to migration can b e wanting. Many governments institute increasingly repressive entry regimes, turn a blind eye to health and safety violations by employers, or fail to take a lead in educating the public on the benefits of immigration.” Little wonder, then, that immigration in most countries has become a political problem. In the absence of factual information on the benefits of immigration to societies, the view prevails that immigration is harmful. When some governments release figures on the number of migrants who have entered a country, there is seldom, if ever, a simultaneous release of the number of people who have left. In many places, if the flow of migrants was mostly out and little in, the economies would soon be in trouble as the population shrinks resulting in fewer skills, a smaller labour force, less demand for goods and services and less money circulating in the economy. The global flow on migrants is also vastly overestimated by the majority of the world’s people particularly because accurate information is not only sparse; it is simply not made available to the public. For example, the UN Report reveals that the global figure for international migrants in the world’s population has stayed at only 3 per cent over the past 50 years. However, there are some regions of the world where outward migration has a peculiarly negative impact because of the type of people who migrate, and the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM such region where there is a heavy outflow of tertiary educated people to the developed countries, particularly Britain, Canada and the United States. Commonwealth Secretariat figures show that among the CARICOM countries that have lost more than 75 per cent of their tertiary educated graduates are Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Guyana, Grenada, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. Unless these countries can produce enough tertiary educated graduates to retain a sufficient number for their own development needs, not only will the public and private sectors suffer from a paucity of knowledge-based skills and entrepreneurial insights, but their economies will become uncompetitive and will decline. The case for more investment in education and human resource development is therefore compelling. It is a case that should be developed by the CARICOM Secretariat and jointly advanced by CARICOM countries to the International Finan cial Institutions, such as the World Bank, and the devel oped countries that benefit from this migration, to make a significant grant contribution to education in the region. There is, of course, another side to the immigration story, and that is remittances sent back home from migrants abroad. In the 53-nation Commonwealth, remittances have become extremely important. They are greater than official development assistance and second only to foreign direct investment (FDI The Organisation for Eco nomic Cooperation and Devel opment (OECD total global remittances in 2008 were $328 billion as against official development assistance of $120 billion. All CARICOM countries benefit from remittances. The leaders in 2008 in terms of remittances per head of population were Jamaica ($826 Kitts-Nevis ($760 ($659$603 Dominica ($412 ($365 buda ($305 But, it is clear that in 2009, the remittance figure declined indicating that immigrants were among the principal sufferers in the countries to which they had migrated. Many of them lost jobs or were constrained to accept lower wages and, thus, had less money to send back home. In this connection, while remittances are important to the economies of many Caribbean countries, active policies for attracting investment from the Caribbean Diaspora have to be developed for the medium term. Within CARICOM, the p roblem of migration has become a vexed one in the context of the current global recession. As the 2009 UN Human Development Report stated: “The current recession has made migrants particularly vulnerable. Some destination country governments have stepped up the enforcement of migration laws in ways that can infringe on migrants’ rights.” It is a human reaction to try to secure the interests of citi zens over migrants at a time of crisis, particularly when the migrant community is substantial as in the cases in CARICOM of Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago. Even though the CARICOM Treaty acknowledges “Freedom of movement of People”, it is impractical to simply rely on that as a justification for migration. CARICOM ought to be considering a more practical and realistic approach to the issue until such time as a Single Market and Economy is fully completed. One way of doing this would be to develop a regional mech anism under which there would be a partnership between coun tries of origin and destination, supervised by a Council of appropriate officials, to man age migration based on labour needs with full respect for the rights of workers and their fam ilies by the destination countries. In early November, the former Prime Minister of Jamaica, P J Patterson, quietly began the Chairmanship of a Commission on Migration and Development. The Commission is an initia tive of the Ramphal Centre in London, named after the Caribbean’s former Commonwealth Secretary-General, Shri dath ‘Sonny’ Ramphal. The Patterson Commission is in its fledgling stage and it is still to be funded fully, but the meeting attended by representatives of the United Nations, the Commonwealth Secretariat and other multilateral organisations displayed every sign of new thinking on the issue. The task before it is huge, but Patterson has the gravitas in the international community to make the Commission’s report a seminal document in the international discourse on how the issue of migration should be tackled to maximise its benefits. Responses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Come and join us to discover how the best school can bring out the best in your child Rigorous International Baccalaureate academics and success in Bahamian examinations State of the art technology Small class sizes; 7:1 student/faculty ratio Diverse international & Bahamian student body Financial aid available (for qualifying Bahamians & Permanent ResidentsFor further information, please contact : Mrs. Rose-Marie Taylor Admissions Director Email: rtaylor@lcis.bs ~ Telephone : 362 4774 x245MAKE THE CHOICE OF A LIFETIME OPEN HOUSE Wednesday, 18th November, 2009 5:30-7:00pmExuma Meeting Room, British Colonial Hilton www.lcis.bs Migration: A dirty word or a global opportunity? WORLDVIEW S IRRONALD SANDERS

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HEALTH MINISTER Hubert Minnis delivered a passionate convention speech on Thursday outlining his “dream” of equal access to quality and affordable medical care for all Bahamians. He told FNM members how the government is using technological, infrastructural and legal advances to “build a health bridge” to this future. And he reaffirmed his government’s commitment to a National Health Insurance scheme, but criticised the PLP’s plan in 2006 as unsustainable. Dr Minnis asserted that the FNM would introduce a planin a phased manner, starting with the Chronic Non-Com municable Disease Prescription Drug Plan, for which legislation has already been passed. The drug plan, which is close to implementation, provides for free medications for 11 com-mon chronic non-communicable diseases such as arthritis, glaucoma and breast cancer. Dr Minnis said: “I dream of a Bahamas where there is no poverty and no starvation, a Bahamas where quality and affordable medical care is givento all . . . regardless of race, colour, religious denomination, political affiliation or econom ic status. Bahamas not separated by water, a Bahamas where individuals in the southern islands as far as Inagua, Acklins and Mayaguana as well as those in the north such as Walker’s Cay, Grand Cay and the Aba cos, receive the same medical care and have access to specialist care without having to travel to New Providence, plac ing extra financial burden upon themselves and their families. Bahamas where individuals within Andros for exam ple, be they in the north, central or south, have access to the same quality care as those in New Providence.” Dr Minnis said he also dreams of a time when tech nology will allow Bahamians to get expert medical opinions from abroad, and when the country will be in a position to benefit from the revenue and job creation that medical tourism could bring. “This dream,” he said, “is becoming a reality.” “We have commenced the construction of our health bridge to the future, a bridge to connect all Family Islands and eventually the world,” said the minister. Among current and planned advances in medical treatment, Dr Minnis noted: A tele-medicine pro gramme in Abaco that allows patients to be examined and assessed by doctors in New Providence without travelling to the capital. A tele-radiology pro gramme that will allow for CAT scans performed in Grand Bahama to be viewed and interpreted by doctors in New Prov idence and vice versa. The 52 per cent completion of the introduction of electronic medical records at all gov ernment clinics, providing up to date patient information that can be accessed throughout the islands eliminating the need for patients to travel with their medical records, x-rays, et cetera. “We will soon say good-bye to the duplication of patient records at various clinics . . . We will create a paperless environment, improving both efficiency and accuracy of medical information,” said the minister. Meanwhile, Dr Minnis added that government has started d ecentralising its clinics and ambulance services in an effort to improve “efficiency of treatment” and provide faster response times by dispatching emergency teams from clinics in the eastern, southern, and western districts throughout New Providence. C ontracts have been signed for upgrades to the emergency room at the Rand Memorial Hospital and for three additional theatres at the Princess Margaret Hospital to provide for more out-patient and orthopaedic surgery, while renovations to ease overcrowdinga t the Princess Margaret Hospital emergency room are already underway,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Dr Hubert Minnis: My dream of affordable medical care Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area o r have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and s hare your story. D RHUBERTMINNIS Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y. W W e e h h a a v v e e c c o o m m m m e e n n c c e e d d t t h h e e c c o o n n s s t t r r u u c c t t i i o o n n o o f f o o u u r r h h e e a a l l t t h h b b r r i i d d g g e e t t o o t t h h e e f f u u t t u u r r e e , , a a b b r r i i d d g g e e t t o o c c o o n n n n e e c c t t a a l l l l F F a a m m i i l l y y I I s s l l a a n n d d s s a a n n d d e e v v e e n n t t u u a a l l l l y y t t h h e e w w o o r r l l d d . . THREE men were taken into custody on Saturday after allegedly being found with an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. The arrests came at around 1.15am after police on patrol in the Collin’s Avenue area said they found one of the men in possession of the .9mm weapon and seven live rounds of ammunition. Three men in custody after alleged fir ear m find

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIAN entrepreneurs explored business opportunities in Cuba, the Caribbean and around the world at one of the largest trade fairs in the region held in Havana. A group of 10 Bahamas Chamber of Commerce (BCOC ing a cross-section of Bahamian industry worked their way through the maze of stalls at ExpoCuba in suburban Havana to examine hundreds of goods and services offered by 51 countries around the world. As the successful business people representing industries ranging from construction to agriculture, and tourism to electrics, worked their way through the fair they kept their eyes peeled for new products to further their busi ness and potential moneymaking opportunities. Inspired The delegates were both inspired and excited by the prospects they found at the 27th Havana International Trade Fair (FIHAV although the shrewdest among them are holding their cards close to their chest. BCOC small businessman of the year Marvin Stuart, manager of Eagle Electrical and Lighting on Harrold Road, said he was impressed by the enormity of the fair, having attended dozens of trade fairs around the world. The four-day visit to Cuba gave him the chance to evaluate a range of new technologies in energy and electrics at the fair, and he then stayed on after the BCOC delega tion departed to visit manu facturers in Cuba. Mr Stuart said: “It’s good to be aware of what’s going on in the market, especially w hat’s in our backyard, and I identified some good quality products that would be welcome in our community at affordable prices. “If others are benefiting from new technology then I would want to implement that in the Bahamas also, but if we a re not exposed to it, then how would we know to take advantage of it?” He added: “It’s still too early to conclude what possibilities there may be in Cuba, but I can say by all means, this allows an opportunity to consider the possibilities and also the fact that we are neighbouring countries shar ing the same boundary, in terms of logistics, it could make trade very easy.” Top Builders International president and BCOC director Odley Aritis said: “The trade fair was mind-boggling for me but what stood out the most was how we in the Bahamas look north for opportunities when opportunities are south, east and west. “We have become so Americanised and some do think that everything has to come from Florida, but that i s not the case.” Mr Aritis, who was accom panied by his son Arsenio Martin, 23, a site manager for Top Builders, identified building materials and other goods available in Cuba and other Caribbean countries. One of the products that s parked his interest was offered by a Trindadian company providing custom-made clay tiles at half the price of those available in the United States. And his son identified products he may be interested in distributing in the Bahamas. Mr Martin said: “I saw different brands of packaged foods we don’t have, and there is a market for it, and t hese companies don’t have anyone to distribute their products in the Bahamas. “It’s a good opportunity and would be a good investment.” While Mr Martin was evaluating items for import, Cat Island businessman Fritz S tubbs, chairman and CEO of the Orange Creek Develop ment Company Limited, was looking for manufacturing equipment to help mitigate the Bahamas’ dependence on imports and create products for export. As labour and production costs are high in the Bahamas, Mr Stubbs hoped to find equipment that would make production economically viable. He said: “Cuba has one of the largest and most diverse trade shows encompassing a lot of areas that you wouldn’t normally find.” Incentiv es Mr Stubbs also found it helpful to meet government representatives from various countries to learn about the incentives they offer, a rare opportunity at trade shows. BCOC director and president of Epic Battery Limited, Aaron Brice, said he would like more Bahamians to get involved in trade fairs and travel to explore opportunities and gain a better understanding of the global market. He said: “We are so shallow when it comes to opportunities. The trade show had so many products, it showed me how much other countries are producing, but as Bahami ans we just don’t explore these things. But we really need exposure which will broaden the basis of our thinking.” Agricultural entrepreneurs Carolyn Humes, 45, and her husband, pastor Orthnel Humes, of Humes and Co surveyors, found that Cuba may be a good place to purchase a wide variety of seeds for their New Providence farm off Bacardi Road. Mrs Humes was impressed with the show, and the way Cuba and other counties came together to promote the Caribbean. She said: “I saw how we can take our farm to a new dimension, and perhaps make some new investments. After this trip I feel our farm will grow.” The BCOC now intends to work with other Caribbean countries to form a Caribbean exhibition area at the trade fair next year, exhibiting Bahamian products and services for export for the first time. And Mr Aritis hopes the Bahamas will then be able to go one step further. He said: “It is my dream to see one day a trade fair like that in the Bahamas. “Being a tourist based destination, it would bring a lot of tourists to attend, and because of our proximity between the US and the south, it would be an ideal place for everyone to congregate.” C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420www.jsjohnson.com ADWORKS 2009Peace of mind comes with knowing were all covered --no matter what Bahamians explore business opportunities at ExpoCuba trade fair BAHAMIANS attending ExpoCuba with Chamber of Commerce first vice-president Gershan Major (right

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY Y OUNGSTERS f rom the Red Cross (left from the Brownies (below examine the wreaths at the Cenotaph yest erday during R emembrance D ay. Pictured at the bottom of the page is the Boys Brigade marching. F elip Major / Tribune staff

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BURNSHOUSEJUNKANOOFEST ASAXONS DRUMMER keeps the rhythm on Saturday night at the first Burns House Junkanoo Fest. The event was held at the Burns H ouse Grounds on Thompson Boulevard. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM doing, because they didn’t show any warrant. Then I said that I was going to call Central Police Station and they started rowing with me, saying ‘Shut up, shut up!’.” Unable to make contact with police on 919, Mr Francois said he left the bar to go to the police station where he reported the incident. He claims officers told him that they were not aware of anyone authorising a search of his bar. Meanwhile, the men fled in the Nissan after people drinking in the bar began verbally harassing them. “They kept shouting at them, asking them what right they have to come in here and do this,” said Francois. Yesterday, Superintendent Elsworth Moss said he was unaware of claims that any of the men involved may have been police officers but said he would investigate. Meanwhile, it was around three hours later at 3.15am that a man and a woman who were on Goodman’s Bay beach were approached by two men wearing dark clothes and masks over their faces. Police said the men, armed with handguns, ordered them out of the woman’s 1993 Toyota Tercel, and robbed them of their cell phones and cash. The man was placed in the trunk of the car by the assailants, who then drove them to Marshall Road at the rear of Mt. Nebo Baptist, where they were released. The suspects sped off in the car belonging to the woman. The next strike of the suspected serial robbers took place at 3.41pm on Saturday afternoon on Cowpen Road the first of two armed robberies that would take place in that area A man who was at a carwash reported being approached by two men wearing maks and dark clothing who robbed him of his Silver Toyota Windom, license plate number 902714, a cellular phone and an undetermined amount of cash. They then fled in a westerly direction. Again at 10.10pm on Saturday evening, a man walking through a short cut between Hutchinson and Eneas streets was accosted by a man carrying a dark firearm who demanded cash, police went on to report. “The culprit shot the male in his left buttock and took his wallet containing undetermined amount cash. “He then made his escape on foot,” said police. Hours later, at around 3.30am and again in the Cowpen Road area, a woman was robbed after she opened her front door to a man she recognised. “She was at home when she heard a knock at her door. The resident looked outside and recognized a male whom she knew. She opened the door, and two masked gunmen clad in blue jeans pants entered her home robbing her of three gold rings and an undetermined amount of cash.” The men fled the area in a grey vehicle in an unknown direction. On Sunday police assured that they are vigorously investigating each of these incidents. incumbent leader, many political observers have been waiting with baited breath to see who would be appointed to the Leader of Opposition post that Dr Nottage had enjoyed prior to the party’s convention. While some observers expressed shock and disappointment with Mr Christie over this new decision, they pointed out that the former Prime Minister had always warned there would be “consequences” for those who had opposed him for the leadership of the party. “It was always known that something had to give, either a nomination, or the Leader of Opposition post, but we all were holding out hope that he would make the more politically astute decisionand return the post to Dr Nottage. “He performed adequately in the post before and has been a stellar Opposition business leader. He is always in the chamber on time and is a seasoned politician who can carry an argument with the best of them. “It’s a shame that those skills and qualities would now be lost to the party because he ventured too far beyond what the leadership deemed an acceptable position,” a source added. When questioned directly by The Tribune yesterday during the PLP’s press conference at Gambier House, Mr Christie would only remark that he had made his decision. Reclining in his chair, the PLP leader said he will make the announcement of who will be the new leader of Opposition Business when the House reconvenes today. It should be noted that during yesterday’s press conference, Mr Davis was seated at the podium with Mr Christie and PLP Chairman Bradley Roberts as Dr Nottage sat with a group of other PLP supporters and Members of Parliament in the crowd. Attempts to contact Dr Nottage for comment after the press conference were unsuccessful. understands the need to have access to the advice and viewso f young people. “Yes, this is the time not for flowery speeches. This is the time for real action andw e are going to show them real action,” Mr Christie v owed. A mong the new candidates, Mr Christie said, are expected to be qualified professionalss uch as the party’s deputy c hairman Alex Storr and attorney Ryan Pinder. At the party’s press confer ence at Gambier House yes terday, Mr Christie also added that the party will be making i tself available through regu lar press briefings so that the country can be made awareo f the position of the party and that of its respective candidates. “But certainly the next two years in the country will be e xciting years and the PLP w ill work assiduously to ensure that the people of the Bahamas will have an excel l ent choice to make, and that is to see us as the right party for the job leading into the next general election. And we are going to create a lot of excitement in terms of the things we do and I believe p eople are going to be excited to see the kind of people who are prepared to engage in pol itics with the PLP,” he said. In 2007, the PLP ran a candidate in 39 constituencies, winning 17 seats. As it stands, the party is expected to run 41 candidates in the 2012 gen-e ral election. o ffering assistance to residential consumers and businesses in New Providence, here in Grand Bahama t here’s nothing being done. Hundreds are living without electricity and many busin esses are in dire circumstances. People are really feeling the pinch,” he said. Mr Wilchcombe said the extent to which the closure o f the resort further diminishes the number of hotel rooms available in GrandB ahama is another cause for concern at a time when the island needs to draw as many visitors as it can, and offer a range of rooms at varying prices. He called on the “major players” in Grand Bahama, such a s Hutchinson Whampoa, which owns various assets in Freeport including the Our Lucaya hotel, to invest more in promoting the island to visitors. You’re in a very slow period and there’s no evidence there’ll be an early turnaround. Occupancy is very low at major hotels in Freeport and elsewhere.” A lthough the recent introduction of twice-weekly direct flights by West Jet from Canada to Freeport will boost tourism, noted Mr Wilchcombe, the airline is set to revieww hether it wants to continue with this schedule come April 2010, leaving the future uncertain. Calls to Labour Minister Dion Foulkes and Tourism Min ister Vincent Vanderpool Wallace were not returned up t o press time. Resort closure F ROM page one OBIEWILCHCOMBE FROM page one Fake police Davis set to be named Leader of Opposition Business in the House F ROM page one FROM page one PLP to r oll out new election candidates at end of month

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS In continuing to recognize the present economic climate and challenges faced by some of its customers, the Bahamas (OHFWULFLW\&RUSRUDWLRQ%(&fKDVPRGLHGLWV&ROOHFWLRQV Programme to assist Residential Consumers. Residential Consumers whose electricity supplies have been disconnected or whose electricity supplies are subject to disconnection are invited to make an arrangement to have their electricity restored or to avoid disconnection. This policy requires that customers pay their last month’s bill and enter into an agreement to repay the remaining balance over the next three years – new billings must also be kept current. For further details please contact the Customer Services Department. Please visit www.my-bec.com for proven conservation tips and hours of operation including our Saturday Mall at Marathon hours.RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERSPAYMENT PLAN TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SOCCER LONDON Associated Press J OHN TERRYheaded Chelsea to a 1-0 victory over Manchester United on Sunday that extended his team's Premier League lead to five points. Chelsea had been frustrated by United for 76 minutes, but then profited from a contentiously awardedf ree kick when United midfielder Darren Fletcher was judged to have fouled defender Ashley Cole. Frank Lampard whipped the ball into the penalty area and captain Terry connected with a glancing header to clinch Chelsea's 11th consecutive win in all competitions at Stamford B ridge. " It was a bad decision, but there's nothing we can do about it. You lose f aith in refereeing sometimes," said United manager Alex Ferguson, who is already facing a Football Associat ion punishment for criticizing match officials. " The referee's position to make t he decision was absolutely ridicul ous, he can't see anything," Ferguson s aid. "He's got a Chelsea player (Joe Cole) standing right in front of him a nd he doesn't even move." A third league loss for Ferguson's team leaves it, along with Arsenal,f ive points adrift of Chelsea going into the two-week international break. Sixth-place Liverpool hosts Birmingham in Monday's match. A lso Sunday, Fulham earned a p oint at Wigan after U.S. striker Clint Dempsey was brought down by Titus B ramble and then scored from the resulting penalty kick. Everton won 2-1 at West Ham and Hull defeated Stoke by the same s core. Terry gives Chelsea win over Man United MADRID (AP ing Gijon beat Espanyol 1-0 and Athletic Bilbao topped Racing Santander 2-0 to maintain their strong early season form in the Spanish league. Sporting and Athletic are tied for seventh in the standings with 16 points. Almeria beat Osasuna 2-0 following an own-goal by Jose "Josetxo" Romero in the second minute and Kalu Uche's 90th-minute strike. Valladolid and Xerez drew 0-0. Both Barcelona and Real Madrid maintained their strong starts to the season with victories on Saturday. FRANKFURT Hamburger SV and Werder Bremen lost ground in the Bundesliga after draws. Jiri Stajner earned and converted a dubious late penalty for Hannover to salvage a 2-2 draw with Hamburg, while Borussia Dortmund's Lucas Barrios scored an equalizer for his sixth goal in six games in a 1-1 draw with Bremen. Milivoje Novakovic scored to give Cologne a 1-0 win at bottom-place Hertha Berlin. Hamburg and Bremen both have 23 points to be three behind leader Bayer Leverkusen. PARIS Yohan Cabaye and Florent Balmont scored in the second half to give Lille a 2-0 victory over defending champion Bordeaux in the French league. Bordeaux's third defeat of the season means Lyon can move one point clear at the top if it beats Marseille at Stade Gerland in Sunday's late match. GLASGOW, Scotland Celtic conceded a late equalizer in a 3-3 draw at bottomplace Falkirk, squandering the chance to build a bigger lead over second-place Rangers in the Scottish title race. The draw left Celtic on 24 points, two points clear of defending champion Rangers, which has a game in hand. Two goals from Kris Boyd gave Rangers a 2-1 victory against St. Mirren on Satur day. SOCCER ROUND-UP CHELSEA'S JOHN TERRY , right, jumps to h ead the ball in to score against Manchester United during their English Premier League soccer match at Stamford Bridge, London, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. (AP C HELSEA'S JOHN TERRY , left, celebrates scoring the only goal of the game with teammate Frank Lampard during the English Pre mier League match against Manchester United at Stamford Bridge, London, Sunday Nov. 8, 2009. (AP

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE hill played a factor in the performances of many of the competitors who competed in the CH Reeves’ 11th annual High School Invitational Cross Country Championships on Saturday at Fort Charlotte. Hundreds of competitors from a number of public and private schools participated in the event on the obstacle course at Fort Charlotte, but it appeared that it didn’t hamper the Temple Christian Academy Suns and the CR Walker Knights. While the Suns shined for the fifth consecutive year as the primary school champions, winning both the boys and girls 10-and-under and 12-and-under divisions, the Knights polished off their trophy case to add the boys and girls under-17 and under-20 crowns. The junior high division saw the Queen’s College Comets capture the under13 girls and under-15 boys titles. Host CH Reeves tookt he under-13 boys and T.A. Thompson carted off the under-15 girls. “I’m overwhelmed. I never anticipated in my wildest dreams that we would havet his type of crowd. This is t he biggest Cross Country that we’ve had,” said meet organiser Fritz Grant. “God blessed us with some great weather and the performance of the athletes was just outstanding. Wew ere able to control the course and made it much more managerial for the athletes.” Grant said they are now looking at further expanding the championships to the point where they are going to invite the Family Islands and possibly some schools from the United States to participate next year. Trevor Grant, whose company Windshield House and Glass Accessories Locator have been sponsoring the event for the past three years, said they have been so impressed with the consistent growth that they will definitely be back next year. “It’s much better than we anticipated. Last year, we had about 550 students. This year we doubled those fig ures easily. So I’m just elated that as a corporate sponsor, we were able to give something back,” he said. “Even in these tough financial times, we are just happy to make the effort. Just to look in the faces of these young kids and to see the excitement, we just want to see this continue.” A number of the competitors interviewed were quite excited about their performances. Godfrey Arthur Jr, the repeat under-10 boys cham pion from Temple Christian, said it was good. “The hill was hard, but there was like 20 people running with me out front. People were bumping into each other,” said the nineyear-old fourth grader. “When I went up the hill, everybody started walking, so that was where I got away.” Former Temple Christian Academy versatile Talia Thompson, now in the eighth grade at Queen’s College, noted: “It was all right. The start was hard because everybody was together. “The hills was hard. I know it was crowded so it was hard to go around so many people.” The 13-year-old held off a strong challenge from Johnique David, a 13-yearold ninth grader at TA Thompson. “At first it was okay, then it started getting harder around the hills. So we just tried to finish it off,” said David, who added that she tried to work with Thompson, who passed her on the hill to win. The under-15 boys cham pion was Keric Rolle, who won the first victory for his family after his younger brother Kinard had to settle for second in the under-13 boys behind Jackson Knowles from LW Young, while bigger brother Cerio Rolle took home the open boys title. Fast “It was good. At first it started off fast, but I had the lead, so I had to maintain it. I just ran my race,” said Keric, a 14-year-old 10th grader at St. Augustine’s College. “On the first lap, about 10 metres into it, I took the lead. I feel good.” Big brother Cerio, an 18year-old second year student at the College of the Bahamas, held off SAC’s Audley Carey in a sprint to claim the open men’s title. “The race was nice. We took it out nice and slow and then we picked it up,” he said. “I know I didn't have the fitness, so I just sat in there and when we came down to the last 150, I just had to do my finish kick.” Carey, the 16-year-old 11th grader who was crowned the under-20 champion, said: “It was good. I felt good while I was running. I started off with an even pace.” T he under-17 divisions were both keenly contested. I n the girls’ race, Queen’s College 11th grader Katrina Seymour out-sprinted SAC’s middle distance runner Ashley Johnson for the title. Going into the race, I w as a little scared. Then, I just listened to my coach when I was winning the race and I just gave it all I had,” said the 16-year-old Seymour, who competed on the women’s 4 x 400 relay team at the 12th IAAF world Championships in Berlin, Germany in August. Johnson, however, noted that she was not intimidated at all by Seymour. “It wasn't bad. I just felt like I could have hung on a little longer. It was a good race. It was harder than I expected,” said the 16-yearold 11th grader. And in the boys’ under-17 d ivision, Desmond Major out distanced his St. John’s t eammate Marvin Minns to secure his win. “That race was tough. The hills killed me,” said Bain, a 15-year-old 11th grader. Coming down on the last l ap, from the northeast cor ner straight to the hills, that was where I saw Marvin.” Minns, a 16-year-old 11th grader, said “It was a good race. I paced myself and took them off one by one. But Desmond is a tough athlete.” C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 13 :$17(' TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Suns shine as the primary school champs for fifth consecutive year Here’s a look at the team and individual results: U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 0 0 g g i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e T T e e m m p p l l e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n 1 Danielle Rodgers, Temple Christian School; 2 Brinti Fountain, Queen's College; 3 Aaylehya Nixon, Albury Sayle Primary. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 0 0 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e T T e e m m p p l l e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y A A l l b b u u r r y y S S a a y y l l e e s s . . 1 Godfrey Arthur, Temple Christian School; 2 Trent Deveaux, Kingsway Academy; 3 Ryan Bethel, Xavier Primary School. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 2 2 G G i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e T T e e m m p p l l e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y G G e e r r a a l l d d C C a a s s h h . . 1 Blayre Catalyn, Saint Bede's; 2 Dianea Noe, Uriah McPhee; 3 Andira Ferguson, Temple Christian Schools. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 2 2 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e T T e e m m p p l l e e C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y S S t t . . J J o o h h n n s s 1 Julius Nottage, Temple Christian Schools; 2 Chavez Cooper, Gerald Cash Primary; 3 Vernon Marshall, Jordan Prince Williams. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 3 3 G G i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e Q Q u u e e e e n n ' ' s s C C o o l l l l e e g g e e , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y A A n n a a t t o o l l R R o o d d g g e e r r s s a a n n d d C C H H R R e e e e v v e e s s . . 1 Dreshanae Rolle, Saint A ugustine's College; 2 Keithra Pickstock, Temple Christian School; 3 -C haris McPhee, Anatol Rodgers. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 3 3 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e C C . . H H . . R R e e e e v v e e s s , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y A A n n a a t t o o l l R R o o d d g g e e r r s s a a n n d d S S C C M M c c P P h h e e r r s s o o n n . . 1 Jackson Knowles, L.W. Young; 2 Kinard Rolle, Saint Augustine's College; 3 Gamildo Rolle, L.W. Young. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 5 5 G G i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e T T . . A A . . T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y C C H H R R e e e e v v e e s s a a n n d d L L W W Y Y o o u u n n g g . . 1 Talia Thompson, Q ueen's College; 2 Johnique David, T.A. Thompson; 3 Vanillian Walker, Queen's College. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 5 5 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e Q Q u u e e e e n n ' ' s s C C o o l l l l e e g g e e , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y T T A A T T h h o o m m p p s s o o n n a a n n d d C C H H R R e e e e v v e e s s . . 1 Keric Rolle, Saint Augustine's College; 2 Darron Young, T.A. Thompson; 3 D'Mitry Charlton, Queen's Col lege. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 7 7 G G i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e C C . . R R . . W W a a l l k k e e r r , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y R R M M B B a a i i l l e e y y a a n n d d A A n n a a t t o o l l R R o o d d g g e e r r s s . . 1 Katrina Seymour, Queen's College; 2 Ash ley Johnson, Saint Augustine's College; 3 Angela Cherilus, Anatol Rodgers. U U n n d d e e r r 1 1 7 7 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e C C . . R R . . W W a a l l k k e e r r , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y C C C C S S w w e e e e t t i i n n g g a a n n d d R R M M B B a a i i l l e e y y . . 1 Desmond Major, Saint John's College; 2 Marvin Minns, Saint John's College; 3 Karon Pratt, Mount Carmel. U U n n d d e e r r 2 2 0 0 G G i i r r l l s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e C C . . R R . . W W a a l l k k e e r r , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y C C C C S S w w e e e e t t i i n n g g a a n n d d C C I I G G i i b b s s o o n n . . 1 Florazel Russell, C.R. Walker; 2 Kendra Humes, C.R. Walker; 3 3 Oliver Braynen, Aquinas College. U U n n d d e e r r 2 2 0 0 B B o o y y s s T T e e a a m m t t i i t t l l e e C C . . R R . . W W a a l l k k e e r r , , f f o o l l l l o o w w e e d d b b y y C C I I G G i i b b s s o o n n a a n n d d R R M M B B a a i i l l e e y y . . 1 Audley Carey, Saint Augustine's College; 2 Leonardo Forbes, Zion Christian School; 3 O'Jay Ferguson, C.R. Walker. Results CH Reeves’ 11th annual High School Invitational Cross Country Championships MEMBERS of the CR Walker Knights celebrate together. Head coach Floyd Armbrister is at left and assistant coach Tyree Curry at right... THE Temple Christian Academy Suns dominated the CH Reeves Cross Country primary schools division once again. Some of the athletes pose above with their trophies. At left is coach Sherry Murr ay and at right is coach Keno Demeritte...

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ons Commando Security Truck e rs were nipped 6-5 by the Aba co’s Green Turtle Cay Turtles. In that game, Lyle Sawyer picked up the win on the m ound over Freddie ‘the Skip per’ Cornish, who migrated from Abaco as the ace pitcher o n the island to play in New Providence. The Truckers, however, came b ack and took their frustration o ut on the Panthers with an 115 decision before Long Island ran into their problems againstG rand Bahama. Darren Mortimer came in relief of starter Anton ‘Bookie’ G ibson for the win over Pedro M arcellus. Terran ‘Pooh’ Wood and Jamal ‘Sarge’ Johnson both homered in the game for theT ruckers. In men’s games played Fri day night, the Turtles blanked t he Panthers 3-0 and the Turtles also knocked off the Savannah Sound Boyz from Grand Bahama 5-2, while the Truckers nipped the Mariners 1-0. CRAIG ‘Salty’ Kemp and Thed ore Sweeting were returned as the two principal figures at the Bahamas Baseball Federations historic election of officers on Saturday. The elections, held during the A nnual General Meeting, was s taged for the first time outside of N ew Providence. But nothing changed in the post for presidenta nd secretary general as Kemp and S weeting were re-elected to those p ositions respectively. B oth Kemp and Sweeting were p raised for the job they are doing. Others elected are as follows: Etienee Farquharson from Inagua B aseball League as the first vice president; Alonzo Pratt from the Grand Bahama Amateur Baseball Association as second vide presid ent; Bertram Murray from the JBLN as third vice president and Edward Claude, of the representat ive for the Grand Bahama Little L eague District as fourth vice pres i dent. The assistant secretary general is J eannie Scavalla from Freedom F arm. The treasurer is Marsha Munnings from New Providence, assisted by Stephen Adderley from the Grand Bahama Little League. The Major items coming out of the AGM are as follows: 1) the National Baseball Champ ionship will take place from J3-6 in Grand Bahama, the first time that it’s also done outside of New Providence. 2 ) the BBF Life Time Achievement Awards will be presented to three honorees to be named at a l ater date. 3 ) The Bahamas Government has given its approval for the BBF and the Grand Bahama Little League to host the 2010 Little League 11/12 C aribbean Zone Qualifying Tournament. The tournament will run from J uly 10-17 in Grand Bahama and t he winner will represent the Caribbean in Williamsport, Pennsylvania at the 11-12 Little League World Series, carried live on ESPN. T he Membership of the BBF has decided to do its part to assist the economy of Grand Bahama with t he hosting of its two major events i n 2010 on the island. Baseball elections see Kemp, Sweeting returned M EACHER ‘Pain’ Major lost his bid to succ essfully defend his N ABA lightweight title to American Dorin Spivey on Friday night in Buffal o, New York. Referee Charlie Fitch s topped the fight 52 seco nds into the fourth r ound after Spivey unloaded a booming right that hurt Major. The blow c ame after Spivey unloaded a flurry of unanswered punches. S pivey, who improved h is record to 36-6 with 29 knockouts, dropped Major (16-4-1 round two, the second one just before the bell sounded. B oth boxers fought a spirited third round, trading bombs on each other and taking turns shaking the other one up before S pivey went to work in t he fourth. S pivey, 36, was working with former world cham pion Pernell Whitaker in t he lead up to the fight t hat was one of the many exciting bouts on the card promoted by NickG arone of X-Cel Worldwide at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center i n downtown, Buffalo, New York. It was Major’s third fight under his contract w ith X-Cel Worldwide. Major won his debut on February 20 with a sixth round TKO over Kevin Carmody. However, he ended up w ith a “no contest” against Michael Clark on June 19 for the NABAt itle on June 6 after the fight was stopped in the first round. Major, 28, was eventually awarded the decision and given the title that he defended against Spivey. Major was unavailable for comments. He is due to return home today. Meacher Major loses title defence MEACHER MAJOR FRONT ROW: Edward Claude, Marsha Munnings, Craig Kemp, Jeannie Scavella, Theodore Sweeting B ack Row: Stephen Adderley, Etienne Farquarson, Alonzo Pratt, Bertram Murray DORA EVANS o f the Andros’ Red Bays Rugrats delivers a pitch to the Pineapple Air Wildcats. COMMANDO SECURITY TRUCKERS’ infielder Julian Collie tags a Green Turtle Cay Turtles’ player too late as he slides into third base. Wildcats take the title THEV8 Fusion Stingrays came out with a strict game plan, to establish the running game en route to evening their win loss total. The Stingrays scored four rushing touchdowns and improved their record to .500 at 2-2 with a 36-12 win over the Kingdom Warriors in Commonwealth American Football League play yesterday at the D.W. Davis field. Jamal Storr scored led the way with three touchdowns, two on the ground and from a kick return on special teams. The Stingrays came out on the game’s opening drive with eight consecutive run calls, taking advantage of an undersized Warriors defensive line. Storr capped the opening drive with a touchdown run from 25 yards out. The Stingrays failed to con vert but led 6-0 early. After a turnover on downs, the Stingrays offense again hammered the Warriors defensive line, marching the ball up field for yet another touchdown on the ground. This time Jamal Coleby would break several tackles on his way to a 30 yard touch down run. The Stingrays con verted and led 14-0. The front seven harassed the Warriors passing attack for much of the game and turned that pressure into points with the Warriors backed against their own end zone. The Stingrays defence forced a safety to take a 16-0 lead into the half. The War riors reached the end zone for the first time all season on the opening drive of the second half. A nifty quarterback scrambled gave the Warriors their first touchdown and trimmed the deficit to 10, 16-6. The Stingrays would respond, once again with Storr capping a drive with a touchdown run from 15 yards out. Without the conversion the Stingrays led 22-6. The Warriors’ second score of the game came on the defensive side of the ball as they recovered a botched handoff and returned the fumble for six. With a tentative 22-12 lead, the Stingrays defence would again step up to force the issue and create big plays when the team needed it most. After the Stingrays failed to convert on fourth down, Carl Rolle intercepted a pass from the safety position to give the ball back into the hands of his offence. V8 Fusion quarterback Nesley Lucien was then picked off by the Warriors defence swinging the momentum back into his team’s favour. The team continued to trade turnovers when Anwar Godet broke free to sack the quarterback and force a fum ble, which the Stingrays recovered and advanced into Warriors territory.. Stingrays running back Renaldo Dorsett ran in the team’s fourth rushing touchdown three plays later, and Lucien scrambled for the suc cessful two point conversion to give the Stingrays a 30-12 lead with 20 seconds remain ing. Storr scored his third touchdown and capped the scoring flurry on the game’s final play. He recovered the ball on a squib kick and raced down the right sideline for a touch down for the game’s final margin. “We wanted to come out here and get a win after start ing the season on a bad note,” Storr said, “We knew this wasa team we should beat and we just wanted to come out here and do what we had to do. We want to use this to get ready for the better teams in the league because we know we have to face them again later on in the season and we plan to have a better result next time.” Stingrays beat W arriors FROM page 15

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net VESSNALAINGcame to t own and made history, but the P ineapple Air Wildcats overs hadowed the Grand Bahamian slugger’s home run feat by regaining the Bahamas Softball F ederation Ladies Commonwealth Championship title at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-p lex. B ack in the national round robin after a year’s absence, the Wildcats avenged two straight losses including game one of the best of three championship series against the BahamasairF lyers to take the remaining two games for a 2-1 decision. In the deciding game, the Wildcats pulled off a 15-10 victory to go along with their 4-2 w in in game two, both on Sunday as they dedicated the cham-p ionship victory to one of their coaches, Alexander Bain, who was recovering from a seriousi njury. M arvelle Miller, who got the starting nod in the clincher, said she was elated about the team’sp erformance, especially as it was her first victory in the national championships. T he Flyers who nipped the Wildcats 1-0 in their round robin match-up, came from a 12-3 deficit to pull off a comef rom-behind 15-14 decision in the championship opener on Saturday night. In that game, Laing became the first female player to hit ahome run over the fence at the B ankers Field. “My coach just told me to pick my pitch and drive the ball.T hat was what I did,” said Laing, who took a bow after the game to the cheers of the crowd. “I was shocked that the ball went out of the park. I thought it actually bounced under the fence, but they say ‘the ball out the park Vessna’ so I just kept running.” Laing said she came close to hitting the ball out of the park in Grand Bahama during their slowpitch season, but she was delighted that she came here and made history. “Hey it ain’t nothing like round robin and driving it out the park here. It feels awesome. It's unbelievable. My name is in the history books.” Laing finished with a total of three runs batted in and scored twice for the Flyers. Latoya Thomas had a triple with two R BI, scoring three runs in the victory. D onette Edwards had a doub le, drove in five runs and scored three times, while Edgecombe-Sweeting had a double with an RBI and three runss cored. Nerissa Lockhart was the winning pitcher and Edge c ombe-Sweeting suffered the l oss. The men’s version of the championship took an interest i ng twist Saturday night when Long Island’s PJC Panthers forfeited their game against the G rand Bahama Elnet Mariners. Reportedly the Mariners l odged a protest on one of the P anthers’ players who had played in Grand Bahama during the regular season and was on Long Island’s roster. They had a technical meeting, they protest the guy, but they allowed him to play,” saidP anthers’ third baseman Julian P ratt. “If you come from a tech nical meeting and you say he should not have been allowedt o play, then he should not have been allowed to play.” But Pratt said the BSF a llowed their player to play u ntil they played against Grand Bahama and they enforced the rule, disqualifying their player. “He’s a young ball player. We can’t allow him to go back to Long Island with that kindo f dejection,” he said. “We rather stand with him and let him walk away then to let him s tand on his own.” As a result of their decision, Long Island were eliminated from further play. T he biggest upset of the tour nament came on Saturday as well as the defending champiC M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 INSIDE International sports news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Wildcats take the title as the Flyers make history A BOVE: P ineapple Air Wildcats’ M arvelle Miller delivers a pitch. SEE page 14 L EFT: V essna Laing of the B ahamasair Flyers is flanked by G rand Bahama’s Softball Association president Hencil Collie a nd BSF’s Director of Communications Daphne McKinney after her historic home run overt he left field fence on Saturday a gainst Mary ‘Cruise’ Edgecombe-Sweeting and the Pineapple Air Wildcats.

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Hilton shareholders in dispute over $22m loan By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN companies “should position themselves to take advantage” of trade/business opportunities with Cuba, including joint venture partnerships, rather than seek to compete head-on with the island as it opens up, a senior Bahamas Chamber of Commerce official said. Philip Simon, the Chamb er’s executive director, told T ribune Business that it would s ign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU Cuban counterpart organisation within the next year, adding that the Bahamas through the Freeport Container Port (FCP as a “facilitator” to connect the Communist island’s businesses and economy with the world. M r Simon, speaking after he and a Chamber delegation returned from the 27th Havana International Trade Fair, during which they met with the Cuban Chamber of Commerce, suggested that the two nations could also providea joint venture Bahamas/Cuba travel package to entice visitors from the likes of China and India to visit both countries on one trip. “When you think about what Cuba has to offer, not just from the agricultural point of view, rum and the importation of foods, there’s tremendous opportunities for us to export stuff to Cuba niche products and services,” Mr Simon said. “We can export a lot of our know how in different industries to Cuba, and partner for travel.” P ointing out that both the B ahamas and Cuba had both been awarded ‘approved destination’ status by the Chinese government, as locations where Chinese citizens could go on vacation, Mr Simon said: “There’s no reason, when we have visitors that travel from that far away, why we can’t craft create Bahamas-Cuba t ravel packages.” G iven that the Bahamas’ expertise lay in tourism and crafting such packages, Mr Simon said it was “better for us to partner than to try to compete” with Cuba. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $4.25 $4.25 B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor G RAND Bahama Power C ompany (GBPC have suffered a $400,000 loss d uring the 2009 first half on an equity earnings basis, according to figures published by one of its major shareholders, although a $2.2 mill ion third quarter profit put it firmly back in the black. E mera, the Canadian energ y giant, which acquired a 25 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power Company in late 2008 via the $41 millionp lus acquisition of Lady Henr ietta St George’s 50 per cent ICD Utilities stake, unveiled t he $2.2 million profit for the three months to end-Septemb er 2009 in its own third quart er results. Y et for the nine months to e nd-September 2009, Emera reported that Grand Bahama Power Company had generated just $1.8 million in net Did power firm suffer $400k first half loss? Bahamians urged to exploit, not compete, on Cuba possibilities By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE communications sector regulator has increased the capital cost ratios for all the sectors in which Cable Bahamas and the Bahamas Telecommunications Compa-n y (BTC Significant Market Power (SMP m ents closer to the estimates provided by both companies. In its findings on the Cost of Capital for Designated SMP O perators , the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCAl y said that the increases in the weighted average cost of capital (WACC Cable Bahamas and BTC w ould ensure they made a “reasonable rate of return” whenever a regulatory mea-s ure impacting them was being assessed. Regulator r aises BTC and Cable’s capital cost ratios By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Bahamian economy will not return to “sustained growth before late 2010”, the C entral Bank of the Bahamas h as predicted, with private sector loan defaults just $1 million shy of the psychologi c ally significant $1 billion mark at end-September and hotel revenue receipts of 22p er cent for the first eight months in 2008. While the global economy had shown signs of ‘bottoming o ut’ during September 2009, the Central Bank said there were no such signs from the Bahamian economy, as key indicators worsened, includ ing a 61.6 per cent or $17.3 million increase in the Government’s Budget deficit for the first two months this year. Due to the “double digit” decline in stopover visitors during the first three quarters of 2009, the Central Bank said, not surprisingly, that tourism output contracted, with hotel revenue receipts off 22 per cent year-over-year for the January-August 2009 period. This, the Central Bank said, reflected the “combined impact of a 7.4 percentage point reduction in average occupancy rates to 66.2 per cent, and a 9.6 per cent decrease in average daily room rates to $234.55”. On the monetary front, by end-September close to one in six private sector loans were in default, standing at a cumulative value of $999 million just $1 million shy of $1 billion a mark easily set to have been passed within the past two months. During September, the Loan defaults $1m shy of $1bn mark * Central Bank: Bahamas will not return to sustained economic growth before late 2010 * Hotel revenues down 22%, and government budget d eficit up over 61% for first two months * Some comfort from sustained equity-fuelled foreign investment, while inflation falling and external reserves/liquid assets ahead of 2008 comparatives S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B * Incr eases br ing URCAs findings closer into line with estimates of significant market power (SMPyers * Cable blasts SMP designations as ‘unjustified, dispr oportionate and unfair’ * BTC sa ys initial URCA findings ‘unusually low’ and w ould have given it poor return on investments By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A dispute has erupted between the two shareholders of downtown Nassau’s British ColonialH ilton over a $22 million loan that forms part of the resort’s financ-i ng, Tribune Business can reveal, with one o f the parties thought to have moved to t ake the matter to arbitration in a bid to mediate a resolution. Sources close to the situation, who r equested anonymity because of the matter’s sensitivity, told this newspaper last week that the dispute between the Canadi-a n Commercial Workers Industry Pension P lan (CCWIPP UK/Swiss boutique investment house and private equity fund, revolved around an unsecured loan that formed the foundation o f the latter’s investment in the British Colonial Hilton. A durion acquired a 71 per cent stake in the entity that owns the hotel’s immediate holding company, the British Colonial Development Company (BCDC CCWIPP in December 2006, the Canadian p ension fund retaining a 29 per cent. T ribune Business understands from its s ources close to developments that rather than just purely invest its own equity into the British Colonial Development Compa-n y, Adurion originated a multi-million doll ar loan through its own Bahamas-domi ciled investment vehicle, Fort Nassau I nvestments Ltd. This made its way into the British Colo n ial Development Company through the r esort’s complex ownership structure, and Tribune Business understands that Adurio n’s differences with CCWIPP revolve around the fact that the investment houseb elieves the loan said to be for $22 million has matured and needs to either be repaid o r refinanced on terms more favourable to A durion. The Canadian pension fund, though, is u nderstood to believe that this demand for repayment could negatively impact bothi ts investment and position in the British C olonial Development Company, as it fears the latter is simply unable to repay the loan. The two sides were said by sources to be unable to resolve their differences. With Adurion having Board and managementc ontrol at the British Colonial Develop S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B A VIEW of the British Colonial Hilton...

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B y RoyalFidelity Capital Markets IT was an active week of trading in the Bahamian capital markets. Investors traded in 17 out of the 24l isted securities last week, of which f our advanced, one declined and 12 remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 1,506,160 shares changed h ands, representing an increase of 1 ,470,989 shares compared to the prev ious week's trading volume of 35,171 shares. Commonwealth Bank (CBL was the volume leader, trading 401,090 shares, with its stock price increasing by $ 0.17 to close the week at $5.74. F OCOL Holdings (FCL f ollowed CBL, trading 253,597 shares to close the week unchanged at $4.34. The lead advancer during the week was Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS , whose share price increased by $0.26 on a volume of 87,107 sharest raded to close the week at $2.51. The sole decliner was Consolidated Water BDRs (CWCB , which fell $0.07 on a volume of 27,673 shares traded to close the week at $2.88. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T 15 FBB Series D Notes Due 2015 traded during the week at par value of $1,000 for a total value of $15,000. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S E E a a r r n n i i n n g g s s R R e e l l e e a a s s e e s s : : There were no earnings released by any of the publicly traded companies during the week. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s : : F amGuard Corporation (FAM h as declared a dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on November 16, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date November 9, 2009. FOCOL Holdings Ltd (FCL has d eclared a dividend of $0.060 per share, payable on November 10, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date October 30, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.cgigroup.bmA member of Colonial Group International Insurance,Health,Pensions,LifeLove your home? Save $$$ on home insurance with NIBA.With NIBA you can join thousands of satisfied customers who pay less to insure their homes.Home insurance with NIBA comes with pleasant surprises like lower premiums,interest-free installment payments,competitive deductibles and an efficient claims service which has settled over $300 million of hurricane-related claims since 2000.Ask for Home Options from NIBA.CALL 677-6422or visit www.cgigroup.bm Home Options Colonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E A ML$1.17 $+0.01102,309-31.58% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$5.90 $-23,988-22.77% BPF$10.75 $-43,251-8.90% BSL$10.06 $-0-1.28% BWL$3.15 $-27,9660.00% CAB$10.00$+0.0850,707-28.72%C BL$5.74 $+0.17 401,090-18.00% C HL$2.72 $-18,877-3.89% CIB$9.87 $-138,195-5.55% CWCB$2.88 $-0.0727,67328.00% DHS$2.51 $+0.2687,107-1.57% FAM$6.50 $-7,693-16.67%F BB$2.37 $-153,7060.00% F CC$0.27 $-0-10.00% F CL$4.34 $-253,597-16.05% FCLB$1.00 $-80,6680.00% FIN$9.30$-55,388-21.65% ICD$5.59 $-33,945-8.81% JSJ $9.95 $-0-10.36% P RE$10.00 $-00.00% T o advertise, call 502-2371

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“All of these things that go into establishing a business foundation, I believe, is where the opportunity lies in Cuba,” Mr Simon told Tribune Business, citing logistics, construction and development servicesas areas ripe for Bahamian e xports. “Those with the wherewithal in the Bahamas should position themselves to take advantage of it; we don’t want to compete with them.” The Chamber’s executive d irector said the Bahamas should not only use the busin ess expertise, “savvy” and global connections it had built up for its own benefit, but also for the benefit of others. The trading/economic links between the Bahamas and Cuba “can be as large” as the two sides want, Mr Simon said, and added: “We have over in Grand Bahama a ContainerP ort that serves as a link to not just Caribbean markets b ut international markets. “We can act as a facilitator, because we have the expertise, the wherewithal, the international savvy that is not apparent in Cuban operations, because they’ve largely been focused locally. Just as how the Bahamas can be a gateway to Caribbean Markets,L atin and North America, we can be the same for Cuba.” Mr Simon acknowledged that “the mechanics and how we go about doing business with each other” needed to become clearer to facilitate increased business between the Bahamas and Cuba, telling Tribune Business that this issue was addressed in the m eeting with their Cuban counterparts. The Bahamian Chamber had “very bluntly” asked the necessary questions in this area, including how liberal the foreign investment process was, access to human and financial resources in Cuba, and any impediments on shipping too and from that nation. In the past, many concerns have focused on the lack of investor protection in Cuba, with many Spanish, Canadian and other European-owned entities said to be owed huge sums of money by Cuba-state owned agencies, and no indication of when this would be paid. The Castro tendency to a rbitrarily nationalise industries and businesses has also not been forgotten. In addition, the Cuban government effectively treats all workers as ‘property of thes tate’, with staff salaries being paid to the government w hich takes a cut first before going to the workers. Still, Mr Simon said there seemed to be a growing awareness in Cuba of the need to interact more with other economies. He added that the Chamber was now working on creating a Memorandum of Understand-i ng that it would sign with its Cuban counterpart within the next year, prior to the next Havana International Trade Fair. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Comfort Suites Paradise IslandFall Special Only $59*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today ! Call242-363-3680 *$59 per person, per night, dbl occupancy Sun. thru Wed. Rates effective Nov. 2 thru Dec. 18. Add $20 pp for Thurs. thru Sat. stays. 3rd and 4th additional adults add $40 each per night. Maximum 4 persons per room. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a 1-night penalty will apply. $299 Givea Holiday Gift of Paradise.*LIW&HUWLFDWHYDOLGIURP-DQXDUKURXJ December 20, 2010. Subject to availability.Please call our Reservations Department at 363-3680 for details. Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty (CBLR merged the boutique real estate firm Bahamas Waterfront Properties into its real estate portfolio. "As one of the Bahamas' leading real estate organizations, Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty will continue to respond to changing demands in the real estate industry. With this merger, we will be rolling out new and exciting services to the Bahamas market that are offered through the Coldwell Banker worldwide network," said Mike Lightbourn, president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty. Owner Colin Lightbourn, owner of Bahamas Waterfront Properties and now managing director of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, said: "It's exciting to work with all the incredible marketing services that come with the Coldwell Banker franchise. We have a very sophisticated real estate market in the Bahamas and the companies which can meet the demands of the buyers and sellers will stay ahead of the competition." The move will add four new Bahamas Real Estate Association licensed sales agents to an existing team of 20 at Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, as well as two property managers. The independently-owned and operated Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty is part of a network of approximately 101,000 sales associates and brokers, and 3,300 residential offices on six continents, and 47 countries and territories. It has offices and agents in Nassau, the Abacos, Andros, Berry Islands, Bimini, Eleuthera (including Harbour Island and Spanish Wells), Exuma and Long Island. Real estate firms merge C C U U B B A A , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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total value of loans in default increased by $35.9 million or 3 .7 per cent to hit $999 mill ion, with the ratio of loans arrears to the total portfolio outstanding rising by 0.5 percentage points to 16.4 per cent. Loans in the 31-90 days past due segment increased b y $19.9 million or 4.7 per cent to $447.5 million, taking their total ratio to the outstanding loan portfolio to 7.4 per cent. A nd the Central Bank added: “Likewise, non-per-f orming loans those more t han 90 days in arrears and on which banks ceased accruing interest advanced bym ore than $16 million or 3 per cent to $551.5 million, for a 26 basis point increase in the loan arrears ratio to 9.1 per cent. “[The] growth in monthly arrears reflected a $25.6 mil-l ion or 5.9 per cent rise in mortgage delinquencies to $461.9 million and a $13.1 million or 5.7 per cent firming in the commercial segment to $243.6 million. However, consumer loan a rrears fell modestly y $2.7 million or 0.9 per cent to $293.5 million. Banks’ loanl oss provisions remained relatively unchanged at $210.1 million, resulting in the ratio of provisions to arrears and non-performing loans declining by 0.8 and 1.2 percentagep oints, to 21 per cent and 38.1 per cent, respectively.” Due to the slowdown in private sector and consumer credit demand, as Bahamians eschewed new borrowings to meet existing obligations, the Central Bank said creditg rowth fell by 43.7 per cent to $162.2 million for the first nine months in 2009. Private sector loan growth decelerated by $242.5 million to $50.6 million, while consumer credit dropped by $27.4m illion compared to a $101.7 million growth one year ago. Mortgage growth almost halved to $90.5 million. Breaking down consumer loans by category, the Cent ral Bank said all areas had declined apart from debt con s olidation loans, which a dvanced by $48.7 million in the eight months to endA ugust 2009. This followed a $ 57 million expansion one year ago. E lsewhere, there was a $21.4 million contraction in vehicle loans; a $15.4 million reduction in credit card borr owing; an $8.9 million con t raction in travel loans; and a $6.9 million fall in home i mprovement loans. Meanwhile, for the first two months of the Government’s fiscal year, July and August 2009, the fiscal deficit w idened by $17.3 million to $45.3 million compared to the same period in 2008. The Central Bank said the r eduction in government spending was “overshadowed by the fall-off in revenue receipts” due to declining private sector demand, as spending fell by $12.1 million or 4.9 per cent to $232.6 million. This reflected a 3.5 per centd rop in current outlays, which was linked to declines in subsidies and transfers, and the purchase of goods and services. Capital spending also fell by 11.2 per cent to $16.9 mil-l ion, due to lower spending on infrastructure projects. “On the revenue side, aggregate collections contracted by $29.4 million or 13.6 per cent to $187.2 mill ion, mainly associated with a 19.7 per cent decline in tax r eceipts to $137.9 million, as l ower intakes from property and tourism-related taxes, as w ell as business and profess ional fees, eclipsed a timingrelated increase in internat ional trade taxes,” the Central Bank said. “In addition, non-tax revenue was reduced by $1.1 mil-l ion or 6.5 per cent to $15.7 million, occasioned by lower proceeds from fines, forfeits and administrative fees.” Still, despite the ‘doom and gloom’, there were some crumbs of optimism. The Bahamas was still receiving stable contributions” from equity-financed foreign direct investment projects, even though construction industry output was expected to remain “moribund” due to the absence of debt-financedp rojects. Unemployment was expected to remain high. Inflation was easing, too, down for the 12 month-period to September by 0.83 percentage points at 3.07 per c ent. The foreign reserve levels and excess liquidity in the b anking system also remained a bove 2008 levels at end-September 2009, standing at $ 752.86 million and $463.94 m illion, compared to $649.57 million and $337.01 million a y ear ago. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3.)%$+$0$6 DoctorsHospital SessionalClinic:PediatricsSpecializingin: diatricAcuteCare ChildrensHealth NewbornDelivery Follow-up Vaccinations WellnessVisits Check-upsDDr.MariaFrancis, PediatricianAHealth&Wellne forourFuture! Availableforiatric Appointments: Monday&Thursday 3:30pm-6:30pmTel242.302.4684Contact DoctorsHospital SessionalClinic: #1CollinsAve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nalyst The newly formed Insurance Commission (a statutory corporationis seeking analysts to assist with the on-site and off-site examination of insurance companies and intermediaries. Responsibilities examination of licensees to ensure that licensees are compliant with prudential requirements through on-site and off-site examinations reports analysis, letters and other correspondence as necessary applications for licensees related guidelines insurance industry teamwork and organization skills skills Compensation Deadline Loan defaults $1m shy of $1bn mark F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM “Business insurance from NIBA:the numbers make sense!”NIBA can offer your business insurance protection backed by Colonial Group International (CGIwhich manages $ 300 million premiums and contributions.You can receive the best insurance cover at the best possible price, supported with excellent claims and customer service.A Business Options policy allows you to use as much,or asl ittle,of the cover you need.Call for a free business risk review.You’ll find the numbers make sense.CALL 677-6422or visit www.cgigroup.bm N ASSAU INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS CO.LTD. Atlantic House,2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O.Box N-7764 Nassau Tel.677-6422 www.cgigroup.bmA member of Colonial Group International Insurance,Health,Pensions,Life Business Options C olonial Group International is rated A-(Excellentby AM Best. Hilton shareholders in dispute over $22m loan ment Company and all levels in the ownership structure, CCWIPP was said by the same sources to have ini-t iated some kind of legal proceedings believed to be arbitration to safeguard its position. Whether operations at the 291room British Colonial Hilton, which has just undergone a $15 million renovation and sits on a 13-acre site, will ultimately be impacted by the s hareholder dispute remains to be seen, although Tribune Business was told that no negative effects wouldbe seen. “As far as the hotel and property a re concerned, this is a storm in a t eacup,” one source close to the situ ation, who requested anonymity, said. “It has absolutely no impact on the financing, the operations and the status of the operations. That’s totally self-contained. It hasa bsolutely nothing to do with the British Colonial Development Comp any.” Argument CCWIPP and Adurion were said to be having “a fairly technical argument over a small part of the available financing”, although the sources aid the British Colonial Developm ent Company’s financing which is b acked by a mortgage held over the property by FirstCaribbean Intern ational Bank is secure. B oth sides were said to be “extremely frustrated”, with Adurion understood to feel that it has taken all the risk/done all the work in providing financing to the BritishC olonial Development Company at below-market terms, refinancing the o riginal Scotiabank loan with FirstCaribbean, and arranging financing for the $15 million renovation. CCWIPP, which invests in the British Colonial Development Com-p any through its IF Propco entities, could not be contacted for comment before press time. Messages passed to Adurion also did not elicit comment, although the investment house indicated it might release a statement on the matter this week. C CWIPP sold the 71 per cent s take to Adurion, said to be for $71.7 million, as part of its strategy to reduce its exposure to the Bahamas, and the Hilton and South Ocean in particular, after running into regu-l atory troubles in Canada. Pension The pension fund came under s crutiny from regulators in Ontario over the size of its investments in the Bahamas, and whether they breached prudential and regulatory guidelines and laws. CCWIPP effec-t ively took over the Hilton and S outh Ocean after former Roman C atholic priest Ron Kelly, whose acquisitions of the properties it had b acked, defaulted on his loan repaym ents. CCWIPP is thought to have sunk some $160 million into the two Bahamas resort properties, and it seems unlikely that it will recovert hat sum of money any time soon. The sale of the Hilton stake to A durion was designed to minimise its Bahamas exposure, bring it back into line with Canadian regulations and laws, and also allow CCWIPP to benefit from any upside Adurionw as able to create through its management, in a bid to recover at least some of its investment. It is thought that Canadian regulators are not allowing CCWIPP to invest any more equity in the Bahamas properties. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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income on an equity earnings basis, appearing to imply that Grand Bahama’s monopolye lectricity supplier suffered a $ 400,000 first half net loss. E. O. Ferrell, Grand Bahama Power Company’s president and chief executive, did not return a phone message left for him seeking com-m ent and an explanation of the figures before press time. However, any situation in which a monopoly provider is making a net loss is not good, since they face no competition. I t is no secret that 2009 has b een a difficult year for Grand Bahama Power Company, with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham criticising the company for appearing tof ocus on profit maximisation, r ather than investing in upgrading the reliability/consistency of its distribution and generation system. And Mr Ferrell himself was forced to apologise to GrandB ahama commercial and resi dential customers for the company’s “unacceptable service” during May and June. Tribune Business revealed two months ago how G RAND Bahama Power C ompany's (GBPC p er hour (kWh 12 per cent year-over-year during the 2009 first quarter, continuing a trend that saw a2 per cent decline in 2008. W riting in the annual report for ICD Utilities, the BISX-listed holding vehicle that owns a 50 per cent stakei n Grand Bahama Power C ompany, Mr Ferrell acknowledged that 2008 "was a difficult year" for the island's monopoly power supplier, even with the benefit of a 4.87 per cent rate increase f rom April onwards. H e added that this rate rise was "negatively offset" by Grand Bahama's continued economic decline, both as a result of the global recession a nd the continued closure of t he Royal Oasis, "and unseas onably cool weather during the fourth quarter". "Overall, 2008 kWh sales were 2 per cent less than 2007," Mr Ferrell wrote." Unfortunately, that trend is c ontinuing into the first quarter 2009, with kWh sales 12 per cent below the same period in 2008. There were, how ever, items of positive growth t hat will be beneficial for years to come." For the 12 months to D ecember 31, 2008, Grand B ahama Power Company's net income rose by little over $100,000 or 3 per cent, to $3.621 million compared to $3.516 million the year before. This was despite a 23.2 per cent rise in operating revenues, from $94.076 million to $116.036 million, as totalo perating expenses includi ng fuel costs, which peaked in July last year rose by a greater amount, 24.7 per cent, to $108.752 million compared to $87.207 million the year before. A s a consequence, net o perating income grew by only 6 per cent, to $7.284 million compared to $6.869 million in 2007. While other income increased by more t han $1 million, both these r ises were offset by an i ncrease in interest expense to $5.154 million, compared to $3.432 million in 2007. Grand Bahama Power Company's long-term debth ad risen by almost 50 per c ent at year-end, growing from $66.288 million to $99.512 million, a development largely due to the $50 million bond financing itp laced in May and July 2008 to raise funds for capital expansion projects and refin ance existing debt. T hat financing appeared to reduce the outstanding collective balance on various commercial bank loans from $55.333 million to $38 million at year-end 2008. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.711.03AML Foods Limited1.171.170.000.1270.0009.20.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9 .305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1250.09025.22.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.209.92Cable Bahamas10.0010.000.001.4060.2507.12.50%2 .882.72Colina Holdings2.722.720.000.2490.04010.91.47% 7 .505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.745.740.000.4190.30013.75.23% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs2.842.880.040.1110.05225.91.81% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.512.510.000.6250.0804.03.19% 8.206.28Famguard6.506.500.000.4200.24015.53.69% 1 2.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.719.87FirstCaribbean Bank9.879.870.000.6310.35015.63.55% 5 .534.11Focol (S)4.344.340.000.3260.15013.33.46% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.009.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.001552wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYieldFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Interest Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%FRIDAY, 6 NOVEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,486.96 | CHG 0.04 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -225.40 | YTD % -13.16BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets10.0611.0614.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8300-3.75-6.75 1.49571.4226CFAL Money Market Fund1.49574.305.13 3.53992.9759Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.9759-12.10-17.54 13.175112.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.17514.425.86 103.0956100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund103.09563.102.52 100.000099.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund99.41773.122.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.588410.0000Fidelity International Investment Fund10.58845.885.88 1.07571.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07573.865.30 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0305-0.240.22 1.07091.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.07093.244.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Sep-09 31-Dec-07 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 23-Oct-09 30-Sep-09MARKET TERMS30-Sep-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 NAV Date 38%/,&,&( 52$'$)),& '(3$570(17 , KHUHE\DGYLVHWKDWDOO SHUVRQVFRPSDQLHVZKRKDYH QRWUHJLVWHUHGWKHLU2Q 7ULDOSODWHVIRUWKH\HDU WRFRPHLQDQGUHJLVWHU WKHLUSODWHV'HFHPEHU )DLOXUHWRKDYHSODWHV UHJXODUL]HZRXOGUHVXOWLQ UHFDOORIDOOGHOLQTXHQWSODWHV LQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKH5RDG 7UDIF$FW&KDSWHU6HFWLRQ &21752//(5 F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Did power firm suffer $400k first half loss?

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In its final determination o n the issue, URCA increased the WACC determination for BTC’s fixed-line voice business from its initial 8.9 per cent estimate to 10.29 per cent. And for cellular and mobile data services, a market in which BTC currently has the monopoly, URCA raised the WACC threshold from 11 per cent to 11.71 per cent. These increases brought the regulator’s findings closer into line with BTC’s own arguments, the state-owned incumbent, which is in the midst of a privatisation exercise, having told URCA that its WACC estimates for fixedline and cellular services were 11.9 and 12.1 per cent respectively. “BTC’s WACC rates for fixed and mobile are still significantly higher when compared to URCA’s fixed and mobile WACC rates of 8.9 per cent and 11 per cent respectively,” Felicity Johnson, BTC’s vice-president for legal, regulatory and interconnection, had written in an October 16, 2009, letter to U RCA. Meanwhile, URCA also increased its initial WACC estimates of 9.3 per cent and 9.6 per cent for its high speed data services and cable TV business, respectively, to 10.86 per cent for both. Again, this brought the regulator closer into line with Cable Bahamas’ own WACC estimates, Judith Smith, its inhouse legal counsel, informing URCA on October 1 that these should be 11.9 per cent for data and 11.1 per cent for pay-TV. “URCA recognises that setting a rate of return that is too low could make future investment unattractive to investors,” the regulator concluded. “Setting the rate of return too high would allow the regulated entity to earn excessive returns at the expense of its wholesale and retail customers, while also potentially distorting pricing signals to investors.” URCA said it believed the final WACC rates it had settled on “strikes a reasonable balance” between its determinations, and those of the companies, and still provided “investment incentives” to existing and new operators. In its response to URCA’s consultation, Cable Bahamas again objected to it being designated as an operator with SMP in the cable TV and high speed data services industries, and urged the regulator to reconsider and reverse its decision. “If it cannot reverse this designation at this time, the Authority [URCA] should ensure that any price regulation should be narrowly focused and light-handed in nature,” Cable Bahamas urged in its October 1, 2009, letter. “In either of the cases reversal of the SMP designation or light-touch regulation the relevance of the cost of capital measure for the Pay TV and high-speed services at issue in this consultation is greatly reduced, if not eliminated.” And, in a follow-up October 13, 2009, letter to Usman Saadat, URCA’s director of policy and regulation, Cable Bahamas branded the SMP designations placed on it and accompanying responsibilities as “unjustified, disproportionate and unfair”. Meanwhile, in its response, BTC said the WACC ratios that URCA initially determined for its fixed-line and cellular business segments were “unusually low” and would “not reflect a fair return on BTC’s investments”. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A A L LL L E E D D U U C C A A T T I I O O N N A A L L I I N N S S T T I I T T U U T T I I O O N N S S W W I I T T H H I I N N T T H H E E C C O O M M M M O O N N W W E E A A L L T T H H O O F F T T H H E E B B A A H H A A M M A A S S P P r r e e s s c c h h o o o o l l s s P P r r i i m m a a r r y y S S c c h h o o o o l l s s J J u u n n i i o o r r H H i i g g h h S S c c h h o o o o l l s s S S e e n n i i o o r r H H i i g g h h S S c c h h o o o o l l s s S S e e c c o o n n d d a a r r y y S S c c h h o o o o l l s s A A l l l l A A g g e e S S c c h h o o o o l l s s S S p p e e c c i i a a l l S S c c h h o o o o l l s s P P o o s s t t S S e e c c o o n n d d a a r r y y I I n n s s t t i i t t u u t t i i o o n n s s T T e e r r t t i i a a r r y y I I n n s s t t i i t t u u t t i i o o n n s s National Education Census Day Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009 Forms may be collected from the Planning and Research Section of the Ministry of Education, District Education Offices or downloaded from www.bahamaseducation.com . If you have any questions regarding this exercise call 502-2721, 502-2722, 502-2774 or 502-8346. FORMS SHOULD BE SUBMITTED BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27th, 2009. Complete and submit your form before the deadline and prove thatYOUR INSTITUTION COUNTS!!! R egulator raises BTC and Cable’s capital cost ratios F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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T HE start-up IP Solutions I nternational (IPSI seeking to raise $16 million to finance the build-out of its ‘Multiple Play’ infrastructure, has announced the promotion o f two of its existing board m embers. O wen S-M Bethel, president and managing director of the Montaque Group, and Brian Quinn, past directorgeneral of the InternationalI nstitute of Communications, h ave taken on new roles as co-deputy chairmen. Already actively involved as members of the firm's board of directors under the l eadership of Sir Orville Turnquest, Mr Bethel will perform administrative oversight at the b oard level while Mr Quinn d irects the oversight of technology. "The cable and telecommunications industries in the Bahamas are about to undergo what some may considert he most significant change to their overall landscape since t heir inception," said IPSI c hairman Sir Orville Turnquest. "Our recent adjustments are in preparation for the future, and elevating Mr Q uinn and Mr Bethel, who t ake on additional responsib ilities, will help to position IPSI as a formidable force." With long experience of the communications sector in general, and television in par-t icular, Mr Quinn has been c hairman of several international companies, including BrightStar, when it was the world’s largest wideband satellite carrier. M r Bethel has held, and currently serves in, director and deputy chairman capacit ies for Doctors Hospital, F inance Corporation of the Bahamas, Historic Bahamas Foundation and the Bahamas Investment Authority among others. “Brian Quinn and Owen B ethel bring unique and bold strengths to their new roles,” s aid Edison Sumner, presid ent and chief executive of IPSI and director of The Montaque Group. “Mr Quinn, who was the former chief executive of w hat is now Reuters TV, is a p ioneer in the field of mass i nformation and entertainment. Mr Bethel has been at the forefront of financial services in the Bahamas, from the days he served as the firste xecutive director of the F inancial Services Secretariat to helping to shape a capital market and introducing the first mutual fund in Bahamian dollars. We are delighted that both believe so strongly in the potential of IPSI that despite t heir diverse business obligat ions they accepted the invitation to take on expanded roles preparing for the launch of a company that will change the landscape of how this country gets its news, movies,m usic and telephone services.” A BAHAMIAN accounti ng firm has announced it will be participating in Internat ional Fraud Awareness Week, from November 8-15, as an official supporter to pro-m ote anti-fraud awareness a nd education. H LB Galanis Bain said Fraud Awareness Week comes during a time when intense financial pressures caused by the economic cri s is have led to an increase of fraud, according to a survey of experts conducted by the A ssociation of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE During Fraud Awareness W eek, HLB Galanis Bain, as an official supporter joins the anti-fraud activities in various ways, including: * Providing a free Fraud Prevention Checkup docu m ent for interested business es * Providing a sample Internal Fraud Policy ratified by t he AFCE * Providing free consultation to interested organisa t ions during the week * Providing a free copy of the Occupational Fraud Report * Conducting employee s urveys to assess levels of fraud awareness within their o rganisation * Posting articles on its web site and in newsletters andt eaming with local media to h ighlight the problem of f raud. HLB Galanis Bain forensic partner John S. Bain, a Certified Fraud Examiner ( CFE), said the support of organizations around the world helps make Fraud W eek an effective tool in rais ing anti-fraud awareness in the Bahamas. Fraud continues to be a serious problem, and our practice has seen a dramatic increase in Fraud Examina-t ion requests over the past two years, from both the public and private sectors. The s tate of our economy requires all organisations to be even more vigilant,” Mr Bain said. “HLB Galanis Bain wants t o support the international efforts in Fraud Awareness Week by helping to shine as potlight on the urgent need for fraud prevention and detection, and to advise the local business community on t he steps they can take to do s o.” In its 2009 report, Occupat ional Fraud: A Study of the Impact of an Economic Recession , the ACFE found that: * Employees pose the g reatest fraud threat in the c urrent economy. When asked which, if any, of several categories of fraud increased during the previous 12 months, the largest number o f survey respondents (48 per cent) indicated that embez zlement was on the rise. * Lay-offs are affecting organisations' internal con t rol systems. Nearly 60 per cent of Certified Fraud Examiners who work as in-house fraud examiners reported thatt heir companies had experienced lay-offs during the past year. Among those who had e xperienced lay-offs, almost 35 per cent said their company had eliminated some antifraud controls. * Fraud levels are expected to continue rising. Almost 90p er cent of respondents said they expect fraud to continue to increase during the next 12 months. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A SECOND Bahamian general insurer has had its top financial strength and issuer credit ratings confirmed by A. M. Best, Bahamas First fol lowing RoyalStar Assurance’s lead from last week. The leading international credit rating agency has affirmed the financial strength rating of A(Excellent issuer credit rating of ‘a-’ for Bahamas First General Insurance Company, with a stable outlook for both ratings. Bahamas First General Insurance Company is the pri mary subsidiary of its parent company, Bahamas First Holdings (BFH A. M. Best said: “The ratings are based on Bahamas First General Insurance Com pany’s continued solid capitalisation, favourable operating performance and estab lished presence in the Bahamian market. These factors are supported by the company's conservative cat astrophe programme, underwriting controls, local market expertise and enhanced risk management. “Historically, Bahamas First Holdings has contributed capital to Bahamas First Gen eral Insurance Company to support growth initiatives and to enhance its capital position. “A.M. Best expects that Bahamas First Holdings will continue to support Bahamas First General Insurance Company with additional capital contributions, allowing Bahamas First General Insurance Company to maintain the level of risk-adjusted capitalisation necessary for its rating level.” A. M. Best added: “These positive factors are somewhat offset by Bahamas First General Insurance Company’s geographic concentration and subsequent exposure to hurricane activity. However, this concern is mitigated by Bahamas First General Insur ance Company’s strong reinsurance programme with prominent reinsurance companies. The programme reduces Bahamas First General Insurance Company’s net probable maximum loss to a manageable level, but sub stantially increases operating costs. Furthermore, Bahamas First General Insurance Company faces increased competition from indigenous and outside companies seeking market share.” Bahamas First sees top rating r enewed $16m start-up promotes new deputy chairs Accounting firm set to raise fraud awareness NEW ROLES – IP Solutions International has elected Owen Bethel and Brian Quinn as co-deputy chairmen...

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 The stories behind the news B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net H a ving criticised the PLP for not disp laying true democracy at its recent National C onvention, the FNM have done t hemselves no favours with their recent showing. A ll the party has done is cement t he notion that nothing happens within that organisation without the blessing of the Prime Minist er. If Perry Christie were to nomin ate any candidate in the PLP’s national convention, the FNM would have set upon him like ap ack of wild wolves, ripping him to s hreds for “manipulating those poor old souls” who otherwise could not make up their own minds by themselves. While manipulation will always h ave a role to play in party politics, the blatant interference, the utter disregard for the process, and thes tifling of the dreams of those p otential candidates who would have ventured for chairman of the F NM was almost too painful to w atch. As The Tribune reported from the floor only moments after PrimeM inister Hubert Ingraham nomi nated Carl Bethel, the former candidate Ivoine Ingraham could onlyc omfort himself in the bosom of a party supporter who was fortu nately standing nearby. H is tears said it all. Later he would appear on various TV and radio programmes sta t ioned at the convention explaining h ow it would have been political suicide to face any challenger whoh ad the outright blessing of the P rime Minister. That was putting it politely. When Prime Minister Ingraham informed the cheering delegates that the immediate past chairman Johnley Ferguson would not be offering himself for re-election, Johnley had already been campaigning a few hours before for the post. In fact, he told The Tri bune that he was confident of being returned to the post. However, as soon as the Prime Minister stood and motioned that Mr Ferguson would not be offering again for the chairmanship, Johnley fell right in line and seconded Mr Bethel’s appointment. Therefore, with little options left to him, Ivoine Ingraham moved for the closing of the nom ination process and for Mr Bethel to be elected unopposed “in the interest of party unity.” Here is what he said in his own words: “If the Prime Minister stands up, the Prime Minister that enjoys a great deal of support in that convention, and nominates someone I must be the greatest fool there is to waste my time and waste the convention's time to have them vote for a position that I really have absolutely no chance in winning.” Although he put on a brave front at first, the emotionally drained candidate was later seen being consoled by a supporter as Ingraham strikes again! Is democracy being stifled in the governing party? PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham and his wife, Delores, at a Free National Movement (FNM F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 2C

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Distributed by N assau Ag enc ies Lt d. 393-4854 he wept over the lost opport unity. Later, the PLP’s MP for Fox Hill, Fred Mitchell, w ould chime in on that night’s fiasco criticising the FNM for their failure to disp lay any semblance of internal democracy. As he quite adequately put it, at least in t he PLP all seats were made vacant and all positions were challenged. Say what you will a bout the process itself, at l east a fight was had and for better or worse the public witnessed men and women o f courage fight for their right to represent them in a greater capacity within their o wn party. Sadly, the same cannot be s aid in the FNM. H ere is what Mr Mitchell said: “One of the things we w ere proud of showing the c ountry is that the PLP is good at internal democracy.A t our convention all seats w ere vacant and all positions w ere challenged. We were a ble to have a fight for those p ositions internally and to survive intact with peoples till allies with one another and not fighting one another. And that is what I think the country expects to see. It does not expect to see the m aximum leader come and impose his choices on hisp arty and you can tell from t he faces of the people who were the recipients of those c hoices that it was not a happ y result. And I think the Bahamian people should t ake note." Is democracy being stifled SEE next page PRIME MINISTER Hubert I ngraham is applauded at a Free National Movement (FNM F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f A FREE National Movement supporter at a convention...

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 4"-& 4FMF DUFEJUFNTPOMZ BMFQSJDFT WBM JEUIS PVHI%F )TRSHM SHLDENQSGDGNKHC@XRr 2@UHMFRNMBG@MCDKHDQR BDHKMFE@MRS@AKDK@LOR @MCNTSCNNQEHWSTQ DRr 3A F in the governing party? Take note indeed. T he Ministry of Education is once again thrown into turmoil, and one would have t hought with all of the reports of sexual misconduct that abound within this mini stry that this would have been the one institution that would have been free from the political jockeying. F or this ministry to lose its minister two and a half years into the government notb ecause he was performing below par, but simply because he is needed to act a s chairman of a political party sends a very strong and dangerous message. A lso, the FNM appears to be suggesting that with B radley Roberts’ return to t he PLP, they had no other choice but to take a cabinet m inister out of his post and m ake him chairman to combat the “Big Bad Brad.” W hat does that say about t he FNM’s bench? Is there n o one within the ranks of t he party who could act as c hairman? Although many believe that Sidney Collie is al ost cause, what about Kendal Wright? Surely s omeone could have been found other than the Minister of Education. B ut perhaps Bradley Roberts is more of a threatt o the FNM than meets the e ye. The often rambunctious and flamboyant FNM Senat or Frederick McAlpine took t he time to berate Mr R oberts in his convention s peech questioning, “Who’s afraid of the Big Bad wolf?” “They now have a Chair man (respectfully, I don’t know if to call him the oldnew Chairman or the new-o ld Chairman) who said he came back to bark and bite h ard sounds like a French p oodle spirit to me. “This new-old Chairman SEE page 7C P h o t o s b y F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f D PM BRENT SYMONETTE a nd Carl Bethel(top right insetat an FNM convention...

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM o r old-new Chairman says that his sole m ission in politics in his twilight years is to dismantle the FNM. Bring it on my brothe r!” said Senator McAlpine. Dismantle the FNM? We’re together. We have one leader who knows what he is doing. You don’t have to ever ask who t he leader is on this side. We’re united and we’re not pretending to be. We’re not flaming the public. What you see is w hat you get!” N ot to be outdone, Mr Roberts was q uick to fire back with his own brand of v itriol. “The only serious response to M cAlpine, who really deserves no r esponse at all, is to warn the Senator that times have changed since his crudea nd embarrassing performance during t he 2007 General Election rallies. Times have grown serious and serious timesr equire serious leadership. He was awarde d for his abandonment of his Christian vows during that campaign by being a ppointed to the Senate. The deep feeli ngs of rejection which fueled his unchristian-like behaviour during the elections, we had hoped would have been quelled by time, spiritual reflection, responsibilities to nation building and his many chall enges in a new marriage. We hoped for a moment, that as a Senator, who doubles as a ‘man of the c loth,’ McAlpine might have used this o pportunity to inspire convention delegates and the Bahamian population at large, in a different, more meaningful Is democracy being stifled in the governing party? SEE next page PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (rightFNM F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sponsored By TheBeautyTour09Presented ByB ringingTM beauty to YouM Nov7th-Nicoles Beauty Supply (FloridaCourt)2pm-6pm Nov17thUniversalBeauty Supplies(CarmichaelRd)2pm-6pm N ov20thOneStop#1Beauty Supplies(BernardRd)2-6pm N ov21stNicoles Beauty Supplies(EastStreet)2-6pm Nov28-DreamGirlsBeauty Supplies (villageRd)2-6pm Nov28thInspirationBeauty Depot(ABACO)12-6pm Dec3rd-StardustBeauty Supplies 4-6pm D ec5th Monts beauty Supplies 2-6pm D ec5th EleuthraShoppingCenter12pm-6pm Dec11thStepIntoFashion(BlueHillRd)2-6pm D ec12th BeautyShack2-6pm Dec18thDreamGirls Beauty Supplies (Rosetta)2pm-6pm D ec19th UniversalBeauty Supplies (EastStreet)10am2pm Dec19thUniqueHair&Nails Salon2pm-6pm D ec23rd Nicoles Beauty Supplies FloridaCourt2-6pm w ay. But again, he chose to clownishly sing for his supper, to please a man over more meaningful principles. He chose to spew messages of hate and folly over messages of restoration and timely wisdom again, during the most socially and economically challenging period in our coun try since the late 1920s.” If this back and forth is any indicator of things to come then it is safe to say that the next two and a half years will be some of the best for the media in this country. As for the rest of the Bahamian population your guess is as good as mine. What do you think? pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Is democracy being stifled in the g overning par ty? DPM BRENT SYMONETTE at an FNM convention... C ARL BETHEL a t a Free National Movement (FNM P h o t o s b y F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f