Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.280

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Teckless outburst

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SUN WITH
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MP apologises
for Travolta
case mistrial

By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

THE MP who} —
brought about the |
mistrial in the John |¢
Travolta $25million |
attempted extortion

case yesterday
issued a public apol-
ogy

South Andros MP
Picewell Forbes described
his outburst at the PLP con-
vention as “reckless” as he
said sorry to Senior Justice
Anita Allen, the judiciary,
and the country at large.

Forbes admitted he did
not verify the information
which was given to him
regarding the alleged acquit-
tal of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater before
he repeated it to the nation
via radio and television.

As a consequence Senior
Justice Allen said she was
forced to call a mistrial and
discharge the jury who had
yet to return a verdict. At



SENIOR JUSTICE
Anita Allen

the time she said
Forbes’s announce-
ment “leaves the
impression that
there may have
been a communica-
tion from the jury
room”.

At a media gath-
ering yesterday, a
"| contrite Forbes said:
“My statements
concerning the
acquittal of Ms
Pleasant Bridgewater were
not true as the jury was still
in deliberations.

“My statements were
reckless and interfered with
the course of justice in that
case and were further capa-
ble of bringing into disre-
pute the whole administra-
tion of justice.”

As a result, the often
colourful and rambunctious
MP said he took sole
responsibility for his actions.

“JT hereby unequivocally
and without qualifications
offer my apology to
Madame Senior Justice Ani-
ta Allen in particular, and

SEE page seven

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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



7
ro
SOUTH ANDROS MP Picewell Forbes speaks yesterday.

John S George president
accused of failure to pay
$100k in NIB contributions

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HARDWARE §s giant
John S George president,
Andrew Wilson, appeared
in Magistrates Court yester-
day accused of failure to pay
more than $100,000 in
National Insurance Board
contributions.

The company president
was one of two employers
arraigned in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, to be ordered to
pay the National Insurance
Board (NIB) a total of
$185,893.14 in missed con-
tributions yesterday.

In the same court on
Monday, 12 employers were
ordered to pay a total of
$86,632.97 in outstanding

Marathon Mall «

contributions.

John S George president
Wilson was charged with
failure to pay $113,412.79 to
the NIB between February
2007 and June 2008, and
again between August 2008
and January 2009, on behalf
of Rose Colby and other
employees.

He was ordered to return
to the court on November
9 for settlement.

Brian Adderley, manag-
ing director of Hyvac
Bahamas Limited, was
charged yesterday with fail-
ure to pay NIB contirbu-
tions amounting to
$72,480.35 between Febru-
ary 2003 and October 2008,
on behalf of Daniel Stubbs

SEE page seven





SEE PAGE ELEVEN





Three accused of armed
robbery of eight tourists

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TWO men and a woman have been accused of rob-
bing eight tourists in downtown Nassau.

Ruben Johnson, 18, of Eneas Jumper Corner, and
Johnny Guerrier, 19, of Soldier Road, each face eight
armed robbery charges. They are also accused of being
armed with a handgun as they robbed eight men and
women of cash and jewellery while concerned with



others.

SEE page eight

Expert says tourism won't
rebound for another year

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WHILE hotel performance
for September and October
appears to be "slightly bet-
ter" than the same period last
year, a tourism expert does
not expect the industry to ful-
ly rebound from the grips of
the economic downturn for at
least another year.

Frank Comito, executive
vice-president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association, said
despite what he expects to be
a modest boost in perfor-
mance over the last two
months, the sector should
remain braced for a rough
ride lasting until late 2010,
early 2011.

He said: "We have a very
difficult several months that
we are going through right
now. We anticipated that this

would be one of the most dif-
ficult periods we would face
but we're hopeful our busi-
ness activity will hold its own
over these couple of months
or be slightly better than last
year at this time.

"Our indicators said that
our activity for September
and October is slightly better
over last year. We don't antic-
ipate coming out of this eco-
nomic difficult time without
any robust activity for at least
the next year but we're hop-
ing we will continue to see
some slow steady improve-
ment as confidence is restored
globally and there are many
signs indicating that."

Mr Comito spoke to The
Tribune on the sidelines of a
press conference to announce
an upcoming energy confer-
ence and business trade show

SEE page eight

393-4155 * Mon-Fri 10am-8pm ¢ Sat 10am-9pm ¢ All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.





ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

BIC optimistic Ardastra Gardens launches

that fiscal year will .
educational workshops

show improvement



THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company says
it is “cautiously optimistic”
that the 2009 fiscal year
will show a marked
improvement in profit per-
formance despite the ongo-
ing recession.

This comes after it was
revealed that BTC earned
$20 million less last year
than the year before.

Acting president and
CEO Kirk Griffin said:
“The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies
all through the Bahamas
and all over the world —
faced a difficult 2008 due
to the severe downturn in
the global and national
economy.”

“As people travelled less,
it meant that there were
less tourists making calls in
the Bahamas. This trans-
lated into a sizable fall-off
in our roaming revenue. As
businesses contracted and
laid staff off, it meant that
there was less money in the
economy for persons to
spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It
really is that simple,” he
said.

BTC added that it has
not been standing idle in
the face of a sluggish econ-



omy, but has been adjust- }
ing accordingly to improve }

its revenue prospects.

“The board and man- }
agement of BTC took deci- }
sive actions to bolster }
exposure of promising }
product lines within the }
marketplace, while at the }
same time, the company }
took aggressive action to }
reduce and contain costs }
without eliminating any of }
its product offerings,” Mr }

Griffin said.

“Because of steps that }
were taken beginning late }
last year, at the end of Sep- }
tember our operating }
expenses are tracking at $8 :
million below the approved }
due to:
enhanced cost-cutting ;

2009 budget

activities.

“At the same time, our }
revenue is up by some $8 }
million above budget due }
to targeted and sustained ;
marketing and promotion- ;

al activities.

“So even as the econo- }
my has yet to rebound out }
of the most severe reces- }
sion since the Great }
Depression, we are track- ;
ing for profitability that ;
would be substantially :
higher than the $21 million ;

earned in 2008,” he said.

‘All About...’
events designed
for children
between

five and 12

ARDASTRA Gardens,
Zoo and Conservation Cen-
tre bustled with activity over
the weekend as the first ever
“All About....” workshop
was launched.

“All About....” is series
educational workshops and
seminars designed specifi-
cally for children between
the ages of 5 and 12 years
old.

The first workshop was
entitled, “All About Enrich-
ment”. Kelly Hobbs, cura-
tor of Ardastra Gardens and
Zoo, told participants that
animals, like humans, can
sometimes get bored.

To alleviate that boredom,
she said, animals need out-
lets through which they can
“learn and discover new
things, new smells, and even
new objects — that’s where
enrichment comes in”.

Ms Hobbs talked about
specific types of enrichment
for various species residing
at Ardastra.

She and the children made
treats which they gave to the
animals and the attendees
were able to witness some
animal enrichment first
hand. This was the highlight
of the seminar, according to
11-year-old Jazmin Agecb,
who attended the workshop
with her brother and cousin.

Michael Jimenez, director

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of business and administra-
tion and creator of the “All
About...” series, said the
workshops were created to
affirm Ardastra’s commit-
ment to education.

“It is a commitment that
was first made by our late
owner Mr Norman Solomon
and we are pleased to con-
tinue his vision. Additional-
ly, these workshops will com-
plement the existing educa-
tional programmes at
Ardastra,” he said.

The workshops take place
one Saturday each month.
On November 28, the topic
will be, “All About Carni-
vores”.

A CAPUCHIN monkey
enjoying a treat bag.

“
SN
>»

GJohnson

Ce ae Oke


























ENRICHMENT bags all made...ready to give the animals.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FRAUD charges were
brought against four men and
one woman arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday accused
of defrauding the Royal Bank
of Canada and other establish-
ments earlier this year.

The five working profession-
als, some of whom faced sever-
al charges, entered not guilty
pleas to all charges against them.

Christoff Hanna, 46, a driver
who lives in Adelaide Gardens,
New Providence, faced four
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. He is accused of obtain-
ing $991.04 from Nassau branch-
es of the Royal Bank of Canada
(RBC) by means of false pre-
tenses.

The four counts against Han-
na allege that he obtained
$247.76 from RBC in Bay Street
on May 8; $247.76 from RBC in
Mackey Street on May 19;
$247.76 from RBC in Mackey
Street on June 3; and $247.76
from RBC in Bay Street on
June 16.

Magistrate Guillimina Archer
granted him $3,000 bail with
sureties.

Businesswoman Bloneva
Mackey, 51, of Adderley and
Dorsette Street, faced five
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. Four counts allege intent
to defraud RBC of a total of
$1,180. She is accused of obtain-
ing $295 in cash from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on May 5;
another $295 from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on June
2; $295 from RBC in
Carmichael Road on June 15;
and $295 from RBC in Prince
Charles Drive on June 29.

Mackey is also accused of
obtaining $295 in goods and
cash from Milo B Butler and
Sons Limited in Peach Street on
May 22.

Mackey pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS

Five accused of defrauding
the Royal Bank of Canada

TRAVARUS BARROW and Christoff Hanna.

$4,000 bail with sureties.

Security officer Travarus Bar-
row, 35, of Alexandria Boule-
vard, Nassau Village, faced
fraud charges on two counts.
Barrow is accused of obtaining
$147.36 from RBC in Prince
Charles drive by means of false
pretenses on May 19, and he is
further accused of intent to
defraud the same bank in Prince
Charles Drive of $146.36 by
means of false pretenses on June
2:

Barrow pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
$1,000 bail with sureties.

Electrician Lamarison Rolle,
24, of Davis and Bain Street,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is alleged to
have obtained $195.60 in goods
and cash from Super Value food
store in Nassau Street on June
19 by means of false pretenses.

Rolle plead not guilty to the
charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.

Surveyor Frank Moxey, 27,
of Isles Way off Soldier Road,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is accused of
intent to defraud RBC in Prince

of er ss !
FRANK MOXEY and Lamarison Rolle

Charles Drive of $363.30 by
means of false pretenses on June

Moxey pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.

All of the accused opted to
have their cases heard in the
Magistrates Court. They are due

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“Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

to return to Court Ten in Nas-
sau Street on March 1, 2010.

A further six people are
expected to be summoned to
court to face similar charges.

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(Ww

6

PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(ln

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Nordic countries top gender gap index again

NEW YORK (AP) — Women
remain far behind men in economic and
political power, but the Nordic coun-
tries come closest to closing the gender
gap, according to a survey of 134 nations
released Tuesday.

The four Nordic countries — Finland,
Iceland, Norway and Sweden — have
topped the Global Gender Gap Index
since it was first released in 2006 by the
Geneva-based World Economic Forum.

They did so again this year, but Ice-
land replaced Norway at the top of the
list with a score of 82.8 percent, meaning
it came closest to 100 percent gender
equality.

Two African countries — South
Africa and Lesotho — entered the list of
the top 10 countries for the first time
while four others remained, New
Zealand, Denmark, Ireland and the
Philippines.

At the bottom of the list were Qatar,
Egypt, Mali, Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia,
Benin, Pakistan, Chad and Yemen in
last place with a score of 46.1 percent.
Several countries near the bottom,
including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India,
Bahrain, Ethiopia and Morocco, made
gains from the 2008 rankings.

While many nations have made some
progress toward gender equality, no
country has closed the gap when it
comes to economic participation and
opportunity, educational attainment,
political empowerment, and health and
survival.

“Girls and women make up one half
of the world’s population,” the forum’s
founder and executive chairman, Klaus
Schwab, said in a statement, “and with-
out their engagement, empowerment
and contribution, we cannot hope to
achieve a rapid economic recovery nor
effectively tackle global challenges such
as climate change, food security and
conflict.”

Saadia Zahidi, head of the forum’s
Women Leaders and Gender Parity
Program, told a news conference launch-
ing the survey that of the 115 countries

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in the original index four years ago, 99
have made progress in closing their gaps
— but 16 haven’t “and have actually
deteriorated.”

The survey shows that on health, “the
world is doing fairly well,” closing over
96 percent of the gap in resources
between women and men, Zahidi said.
On education, about 93 percent of the
gap has been closed but on economic
participation and opportunity only 60
percent has been closed and on political
empowerment only 17 percent.

“So basically what we’re saying is that
across the world, in general, women are
starting to be almost as healthy and
almost as educated as men — obvious-
ly with major exceptions — but those
resources are not being used efficiently
in terms of economic participation and
certainly not in terms of political deci-
sion-making,” Zahidi said.

Melanne Verveer, the U.S. ambas-
sador for global women’s issues, said
the index “underscores that gender
equality is critical to a country’s eco-
nomic prosperity and competitiveness.”

“It remains a simple fact that no coun-
try could prosper if half its people are
left behind,” she said. “Yet, women are
still largely under-represented also in
parliament and legislatures of nearly
every country, and I might add so too in
the boardrooms of corporations.”

In the latest survey, the United States
dropped from 27th place to 31st place in
the rankings as a result of minor drops
in the participation of women in the
economy and improvements in the
scores of previously lower-ranked coun-
tries, according to the survey.

Verveer noted that the first bill Pres-
ident Barack Obama signed into law
was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act
making it easier for workers to sue for
pay discrimination, but she stressed:
“We have a long road to go no matter
where we live.”

(This article is by Edith M Lederer
of the Associated Press)



—=. =



The banking
market in
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to pref-
ace this missive with a short
overview of what has hap-
pened in this country.

First of all, clearly there are
negative manifestations that
have presented itself into our
environment. The ill-paved
roads, filthy sidewalks and
residences hosting derelict
vehicles which is common-
place in New Providence is
by no means an overnight
occurrence.

Secondly, the disparity
between the wealthy and the
poor has grown so dramati-
cally over the past few years
that it has significantly con-
tributed to the weakening of
our social fabric.

Third, ethnic self-hatred
has ingrained itself so deeply
into our society that it has
become almost palpable and
is reflected in the blatant dis-
regard that we have for each
other. Therefore as we pre-
pare ourselves to embrace
globalisation, a move which
1s perhaps a decade too late
but nevertheless one that we
must still undertake, we clear-
ly need to redesign the way
we empower the citizens of
our country.

The Honourable Prime
Minister has made such a pro-
found statement that perhaps
it will be enshrined as his
legacy. Mr Ingraham
expressed concerns as to the
way banks operate in this
country.

Mr Ingraham is quoted as
saying: “I find it very dis-
tasteful, and I am very
annoyed by it quite frankly,
angered would be a better
word, that some of the banks
in The Bahamas are able to
repatriate huge profits from
The Bahamas and pay minus-
cule sums”.

This is the first time in
recent memory that, even as
oblique as this statement is,
a Bahamian leader has shown
that he has grasped the
inequities being meted out on
the citizen by our selfsame
social and financial policies.

It is important that the
underlying meaning of the
Prime Minister’s statement
become a part of a frame-
work to assist the citizen as
we embrace globalisation.
Would it be fair to read into
this statement that perhaps
Mr Ingraham would like to

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LETTERS

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see a change in the way large
institutions contribute to this
country? Could we read into
this statement that the spon-
soring of sporting events and
junkanoo is no longer suffi-
cient in this newly structured
global economy? Can we
read into this statement that
the time has now arrived
whereby a leader of this coun-
try are prepared to assist the
citizen in accessing venture
or risk capital from foreign
institutions, a la, relaxing our
exchange control policies?
Clearly capitalism demands
that apart from, but not lim-
ited to, taxes, due diligence
or employment policies being
imposed on a financial insti-
tution, little should stand in
the way of that institution’s
growth. Therefore local banks
should not be forced to lend

funds if they choose not to.
However; it is comforting to
know that a new day has
dawned which further
demands that the citizen be
given business friendly poli-
cies such as being allowed to
access foreign capital for
investments. Admittedly this
exists in our present banking
system, but only in a very
restrictive form.

So in embracing globalisa-
tion there is hope that future
leaders of this nation will see
the wisdom in making sure
that local banks will not be
our only way to secure fund-
ing for business projects. Per-
haps it is time to encourage
outside competition in our
local banking market, seeing
that the present funds are
being exported anyway. Or
did I misread the Prime Min-
ister’s statement?

DWAYNE

J HANNA
Nassau,
October 2009.

Cabinet speculation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

YOUR speculation that Minister Neko Grant, previously
appointed to the all important Ministry of Tourism and then to
Public Works & Transport, is going to be appointed Ministerial
“over-lord” for Grand Bahama simply indicates that, with respect,
the Hon Minister, who I call “Mr Sauve”, probably the best
dresser in Parliament, has not met the mark as an administrator.
Surely this post should be a Minister-of-State and no higher?

If the Prime Minister wants action in Grand Bahama I suggest
he takes this on and resigns some of the other long list of respon-
sibilities, then Grand Bahama will have the all-important eco-

nomic focus.

Sidney Collie returning to Cabinet is a further speculation
although this most honourable gentleman who followed to the “T’
correct parliamentary practice, something which you don't see too
often these days, I suggest will remain outside of Cabinet. The
recent defeat of the sitting Greek Government and the immedi-
ate resignation of the previous PM on losing further, adds cre-
dence as to what defeated Prime Ministers are required to do
when defeated; some should note.

The choice of the Prime Minister to be AG will be between
Hon Desmond Bannister and Hon Carl Bethel with more support
to Mr Bethel as clearly he has a better understanding of law, but
then who to Education - the monster problem Ministry?

Will we see a resignation from the Senate and an appoint-
ment from there to the Ministry of Education or more than like-
ly to the position of Attorney General which for the latter is an

obvious serious probability?

W THOMPSON
Nassau,
October 8, 2009.

Funeral arrangements

or

Roger Carron

will be held at
St. Francis Cathedral

onl

West Street
at 3pm

on

Saturday, October 31

Instead of flowers those who wish may make
donations in his memory to either the Breathe
Easy campaign or St. Martin’s Convent. For
the Breathe Easy campaign cheques may be
sent to Ms Michelle Rassin (tel. 302-4707),
Doctors Hospital, P.O. Box N972. Or donations
can be sent to St. Martin’s Convent,
Nassau Street, P.O. Box 940),





an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE



(en
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Kerzner employee charged with stealing
$10,000 by reason of employment

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A KERZNER International employ-
ee was charged with stealing $10,000 from
the company by reason of employment
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Lithera Knowles, 28, of Rocky Pine
Road, Nassau, appeared in court ten, Nas-

sau Street, dressed in white linen trousers
and a white button down shirt and stood
as Magistrate Guillimina Archer read the
charges. Knowles is charged on one count
of stealing by reason of employment on
Monday, October 19, in New Providence.

The charge alleges Knowles stole
$10,000 cash from Kerzner International
on Paradise Island, to which she had cus-
tody by reason of her employment.

Private sector to
host alternative
energy conference

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AS the business community
strains under the weight of ris-
ing power costs, the private sec-
tor is hosting a conference to
push for alternative energy poli-
cies.

In addition to being an ener-
gy conference and business
trade show, the event will also
showcase practical energy sav-
ing solutions which can be
implemented immediately to
provide relief to the commer-
cial sector.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, the Bahamas Hotel
Association and the US
Embassy will host the event,
which kicks off on November
12.

Event organisers said partic-
ipants can expect an update on
government's National Energy
Policy at the conference while
the trade show will provide a
platform for vendors to show-
case their goods and services —
which will include solar heaters
and generators and other ener-
gy saving devices.

So far 25 exhibitors are lined
up for the trade show however
organisers expect to match last
year's number with around 70

Yee

ew

exhibitors as more persons sign
up to showcase their wares.

"The issue of energy effi-
ciency is an issue that's glaring
in the minds of many businesses
particularly right now as we're
starting to see a creep of the oil
prices again... We know that
the cost of energy will continue
to be a challenge for all of us
over the coming years and the
move toward looking at renew-
able sources of energy that we
can tap into is ever more impor-
tant," said BHA executive vice-
president Frank Comito.

He explained that the trade
show is not just limited to those
specialising in energy efficient
goods but is open to persons in
the tourism industry, market-
ing, food and beverage supplies
and information technology, as
well as representatives of the
international business commu-
nity that offer goods and ser-
vices to the Caribbean.

"It is an opportunity to bring
together buyers and sellers of
goods and services to promote
new business opportunities and
reinforce existing relationships,"
said Mr Comito, who added
that last year's trade show
attracted around 10,000 visitors.

US Embassy spokesman Jeff
Dubell said the American gov-
ernment supports alternative

Friday & Saturday
$20 and under

- r -
‘ -
Arrivais

14 ee Sate

ae gee

THE EVENT will focus on alternative energy devices such as solar panels.

energy initiatives adding that
over 80 per cent of future green-
house gas emissions is expected
to come from developing coun-
tries. He hopes the dialogue on
alternative energy will be con-
tinued on a regional level during
a similar conference in fall 2010.

"We look at the Bahamas as
a perfect test-bed to test some
of these new technologies — it
is an archipelago, you must pro-
vide all these services to the
islands, each island must by self-
sustaining.

"You can work with US com-
panies, develop those new tech-
nologies, build new companies
that maybe you can export to
Latin America and the rest of

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Knowles, represented by attorney Ian
Cargill, pleaded not guilty to the charge
and opted for her case to be heard in the
Magistrate’s Court rather than by a jury in
the Supreme Court.

Ms Archer ordered Knowles to return
to Court Ten in Nassau Street on Febru-
ary 22 of next year.

She was granted $15,000 bail with two
sureties.



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“ast b ¥
the Caribbean," he said.

The conference will feature
local and international speak-
ers and panelists, including
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, his junior minister
Phenton Neymour and repre-
sentatives from the BEST Com-
mission, the Inter-American
Development Bank, EMERA
and Star Island Resort.

The conference will be held
on November 12 at the Shera-
ton and the trade show is sched-
uled for two days —- November
13 and 14.

ig
aU US
He hay
Hm zara by]

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



CREDIT Suisse

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
Shared Services

is presently considering applications for an
Accountant

The Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an
Accountant:

Requirements:

2-3 years Accounting & Banking experience

Associate or Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Banking & Finance
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications

Strong mathematical capabilities

Able to multitask

A team player with the ability to work in a fast paced environment
Possess excellent planning, organization and implementation skills
Excellent interpersonal skills

A commitment to service excellence

Duties will include:

Management of Service Level Agreements (SLA) and inter-company/
divisional expense allocation process

Responsible for accounts payable

Responsible for maintenance, analyzing, reconciliation and reporting of
expense

Assist with the booking of monthly accruals

Reconciliation of all general ledger accounts at the appropriate level of
frequency

Respond to queries relating to clients’ and internal expenses
Responsible for International Reporting

Assist Cashier

Benefits provided include:

° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BEIN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
NOVEMBER 6, 2009







Grano BaLiaoom, ATLANTIS,

unaADise [LAND

Unoer Tee DistincuisHeo Parmonack OF His Exce.Lencr,
he Nese Gevevend hontning C ch analer, STD, CMG.
Archbishop af Nassaw
THE Banamas Catuouic Boarp oF EDUCATION

INVITES FOU TO A

rl
Sw!

faba (/sall

(CELEBRATING

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=) FIDELITY.

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

If you have it, we want you.

We are growing!
Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:

- SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR -

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Call for Bahamas to back
Cuba’s embargo opposition

UN General Assembly to
vote on draft resolution

By AVA TURNQUEST

THE United Nations
General Assembly meets
today to vote on the draft
resolution submitted by
Cuba requesting an end to
the 50 year US embargo
against the island nation.

On the eve of the vote,
Ambassador of the Repub-
lic of Cuba Jose Luis Ponce
sat down with The Tribune
to emphasise the urgency of
the matter and raise aware-
ness of Cuba’s suffering.

The ambassador
described the US policy
towards his country as a
monumental violation of
human rights, as it discour-
ages other countries from
interacting with Cuba —
essentially “asphyxiating the
Cuban population.”

“T think it’s important for
the international communi-
ty to know, for the Bahami-
an community to know, that
despite their expectations
of the ascension of a new
US government, nothing
has changed,” Mr Ponce
said.

For the past 17 years,
Cuba has submitted the
draft resolution “Necessity
of ending the economic,
commercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States of America
against Cuba” for consider-
ation by the United Nations
General Assembly
(UNGA).

The draft, which will be
presented again today,
reads: “The economic, com-
mercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States against Cuba
50 years ago is the most ele-
vated expression of a cruel

and inhuman policy, lack-
ing in legality and legitima-
cy and deliberately designed
to create hunger, illnesses
and desperation within the
Cuban populace. Nothing
has changed through 10 suc-
cessive US governments
other than a tightening of
this policy. Nothing essen-
tial has changed either since
the new US government
was inaugurated in January
2009.”

As a direct consequence
of the embargo, Cuba has
calculated that as of Decem-
ber 2008, the country has
sustained a total of $96 bil-
lion worth of economic
damage.

Last year, an overwhelm-
ing 185 member states,
including the Bahamas, vot-
ed in favour of the resolu-
tion — a near unanimous
demonstration of the inter-
national community’s rejec-
tion of the US government’s
policy against Cuba. How-
ever nothing has changed.

“Although these mea-
sures are a positive step,
they are also extremely
insufficient and limited. The
complex framework of laws
and administrative provi-
sions which make up the
legal basis of the policy of
blockade, designed to
destroy the Cuban econo-
my, remain in place,” the
ambassador said.

This year’s version of the
draft resolution highlights
US Vice President Joseph
Biden’s remark that the US
will maintain the blockade
as “a tool to apply pressure”
on Cuba.

It adds: “Since the acces-
sion of Barrack Obama to
the Presidency of the Unit-





is} ‘oro di ‘ ‘ i
US VICE PRESIDENT Joseph
Biden’s said the US will main-
tain the blockade as ‘a tool to
apply pressure’ on Cuba. (AP)

ed States more than 50 per
cent of the funds collected
by the Office for Foreign
Assets Control, according
to figures of the Treasury
itself, come from the sanc-
tions applied to enterprises
and entities for alleged vio-
lations of the blockade
against Cuba.”
Ambassador Ponce asked
the Bahamas, and all coun-
tries “committed to the
defence of international
law” to once again support
its resolution at the UN.
During the 64th session
of the UNGA earlier this
year, the Bahamas submit-
ted a statement that read:
“The Bahamas enjoys nor-
mal diplomatic and trade
relations with Cuba. The
Bahamas has not promul-
gated or applied laws or
measures against Cuba that
would prohibit economic,
commercial or financial
relations between the
Bahamas and Cuba.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.eduts

BEES [hey stroll on Sundays dow CO)
Co) Deonningens Street,
passing the bank and the small (50) rrr

a shops

(1 is. Crawines, keeping from the heat
CT throu Danish arches until the street

stops

PROFILE:

BS degree in Computer Science, Information systems, or related specialty or equivalent
experience/training
2+ years experience in application support in a financial institution

e Must have an understanding of general business principles, and how to translate business needs
into quality technical solutions
A genuine focus on internal customer satisfaction and a positive, friendly demeanor is required.
Functional experience with databases, SQL scripting, or other programming experience
Knowledge of IIS configuration and management
Experience with ASP HTML, and .NET applications preferred
Experience with AS/400 applications an advantage
Strong organization and prioritization skills
Strong customer service experience preferred
Must be able to work both independently and as a valued member of a team
Crystal Reports and Microsoft Reporting Services experience a plus

RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

Reviews, analyzes, evaluates and applies solutions to end-user support requests for the Banks's
networked and SQL-based applications.

Troubleshoot applications to resolve technical related issues including application and data
problems.

Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial
implementations, enhancements, or upgrades.

Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting
department Service Level Agreements (SLA).

Install and deploy SQL databases, create backup plans, test disaster recovery scenarios, and
administer security

Document processes and help design improvements

Communicate clearly and professionally with internal customers including technical and
non-technical staff, management, and vendors

HUMAN RESOURCES

at the blac, eustiog harhor, where he
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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS SCHOOL OF ENGLISH STUDIES
INVITES ¥OU TO THE

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PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
October 31%, 2009 to:

Only persons shortlisted
will be contacted

Re: System Administrator, 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

A competitive compensation package will be commensurate
with relevant experience and qualification.

Pe oe Bee Ree



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





an
Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Picewell sorry for
‘reckless’ outburst

FROM page one

to the entire judiciary of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.

“I further offer my unqualified
apology to the Bahamian people,”
he said.

Forbes is to appear before
Senior Justice Allen again tomor-
row to answer as to why he
should not be held in contempt
of court.

While the judge noted that she
did not think the complaint
required an investigation into
whether the discharge of the jury
was proper, Forbes’s announce-



BRIDGEWATER

despite the fact they had yet to
reach a verdict.

Around 9.30 pm that same
night, Forbes took to the conven-
tion stage and told delegates that
Bridgewater had been acquitted.
} He exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free
woman PLPs! God is good PLPs!
Pleasant is a free woman! God still
reigns PLPs!”

At that time however the jury
was still deliberating, and had
been so for more than eight hours.
No verdict had been reached
although convention members cel-
ebrated Bridgewater's supposed
vindication by singing and dancing

















From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
It asks the following four
questions:



The Four-Way Test

“Of the things we think,

say or do

1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”

ment posed a real risk of prejudice to the

administration of justice.

Representing Forbes are attorneys Wayne
Munroe, Anthony McKinney and Alfred

Sears.

The date for the retrial of Bridgewater
and former ambulance driver Torino Light-

bourne has yet to be set.

The nine-member jury were discharged
at 10.54pm on Wednesday, last week,

to “Oh Happy Day”.

The session chairman had to mount the

podium after Mr Forbes’ speech and apolo-
gise for whatever confusion the MP’s pro-

nouncement may have caused.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused
of attempting to extort $25million from

American actor John Travolta between Jan-

uary 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They
both have denied the charges.

John S George president

FROM page one

and other employees.
Adderley has an in-house
application with NIB he is
now paying.

A warrant was issued for
the arrest of Bernard
Dorsett, of Porky’s Texaco
Service Centre, New Provi-
dence, as he failed to appear
in court yesterday.

Dorsett is charged with
failure to pay $48,781.86 to
NIB between August 2005
and October 2007, on behalf
of Shirley Storr and other
employees.

The 12 employers charged
on Monday were ordered to
pay sums to NIB ranging
from around $2,000 to more
than $27,000 in missed pay-
ments.

Desmond Thompson, of
Bahamas Embroidery, was
charged with failure to pay
NIB $27,306.70 between
January 2000 and April
2006, and April and July
2007. He was ordered to pay
the court $10,923 on Mon-
day and $400 per month to
the court until the full
amount has been covered.

Self-employed Samuel
Smith was charged with fail-
ure to pay $20,184.53 to NIB
between January 2003 and
April 2008 and was ordered
to pay $8,000 to the court
on Monday and $350 per
month thereafter.

Self-employed doctor
Walter Gibson, charged
with failure to pay
$12,865.75 between October
1998 and August 2004, did
not appear in court on Mon-
day and a warrant was
issued for the arrest.

Self-employed chiroprac-
tor Philip Huyler was
charged with failure to pay
$5,551.51 to NIB before
December 2003, and was
ordered to pay the amount
in full by December 31.

Bruno Minnis, of Bruno’s,
was charged with failure to
pay $5,081.13 in NIB pay-
ments between January 2003
and March 2009, and Octo-
ber 2008 and March 2009.
He was ordered to pay the

court $1,200 on Monday and
$400 per month thereafter
until his contributions have
been covered.

Bridgette Scavella, of Flo-
ral Fiesta, was charged with
failure to pay $4,969.40 in
NIB contributions between
December 1999 and August
2003, and was ordered to
pay the amount in full by
the end of December this
year.

Domestic employer
Melanie Bridgewater was
charged with failure to pay
$4,630.80 between January
1997 and December 2002.
She paid $1,800 to the court
on Monday and was ordered

to pay $100 per month to
the court.

Linda Taylor, self-
employed, was charged with
failure to pay $3,562.38 to
NIB between October 1997
and April 2006, and was
ordered to pay $500 to the
court on Monday, and $250
per month to the court
thereafter.

Jacqueline Lotmore, of
Three V’s Beauty Supplies,
charged with failure to pay
$2,480.77 in NIB contribu-
tions over various periods
between December 1999
and April 2008, will appear
in Court 11 on November 2
for sentencing.

Christenas Decorations, 20°s34)' Tent $2,500.00, 5 Ton Split Asc Lina
$1 3000, |Skw diesel Generator, Fire Extinguisher, Asst. Ficbores
and Firings for Slatwall & Gridwall, Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas,
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Lingerie, Kids & Adult Hangers, Men's Coverill’s $5.00, S/S & LS

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Contact: 465-Hi4s

SPECIAL RETURN ENGAGEMENT
CATALYN & CURRY'’S

“GUANAHANI’
FEATURING
dames Catalyn & Friends
The Allagro Singers
The Diocesan Charale

Tha National Dance School
The Qunddas Centre for the Performing Arts
Oclobar 299 « 31st 2009 at 6:00 pm. nightly
Tickets $20.00

Box Office at the Dundas (telephones 393-3728/394-7179) opens
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A Tribute To Two of The Bahamas’ Cultural Icons,
Andrew A. Curry | & James J. Catayn



British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

Breast cancer is the fear of every woman. One of the keys to beating this disease is to detect breast cancer in its

earliest stages of develo



















Rules: OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 years for a first Child’sName: —<“—ss—C—C(Cs—sSSSSS
and second place winner in each category. i
2. Write a essay answering the following subject: Age:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain SE:
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to School:
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.” nod: od
Your essay must include the four principles.
3. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words, Address: a
Adults may assist the child in filling out the entry form,
but not in writing the letter. P.O. Box:
4. Limit one essay per child, All entries must be received by
the Rotary Club of East Nassau before Nov 30, 2009. Email Address: _
5. Only essays accompanied by original entry forms clipped =
from the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fax, Parent’s Name:
carbon or other copies will not be accepted.
6. One winner will be chosen from each age category. The 16 Gs f
decision of the judges is final. ob Saue —~
7, Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will :
be published in the newspaper. Telephone contact: (H) (W) :
8. Mail essay and completed newspaper clipping to All entries become property of the Rotary Club of East Nassau and can be used

The Four-Way Test Essay Competition,
Atin: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of East Nassau,
P.O. Box SS-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

Ity Vive, Aly Plowgeeqoor!

and reproduced for any purpose without compensation.



DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Lie

WIN
FREE MAMMOGRA Ms

Enter to WIN Free Mannenograns for Life, by completing
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ent. Asuecessful way of doing this is to regularly perform breast exams on yourself. Every

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BY imerican

The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Beryl Wallace







PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Three accused of armed robbery of tourists

FROM page one

Angie Moss, 37, of Colony
Club, St Albans Drive, was
arraigned in court on Friday
for the same armed rob-
beries and has been remand-
ed in custody.

Magistrate Guillimina
Archer read the charges as
the two men, dressed in
jeans, T-shirts, and sneak-
ers, stood before the bench.






















They are accused of being
concerned together and with
others, armed with an offen-
sive weapon, namely a
handgun, to rob Joan
Walins of $200 on Sunday,
October 11.

The men are also accused
of stealing $60 from Phyllis
Compeau, a gold rope chain
from John Tomillinson, $70
from Gloria Tomillinson,
two rings valued at $40 and

2

$65 in cash from Kelly
Greer, $106 from Ashley
Greer, $60 from Deborah
Greer, and $5 from Frank
Romeo.

Magistrate Archer
quizzed Johnson about a
doctor’s visit as she held
medical documents stating
he had seen a doctor on
Monday.

But Johnson said he had
seen a doctor on Sunday and

The Ministers ‘and Members of The Church of
God of Prophecy East Street Tabernacle
Cordially invite you to the

6th Annual Friends &
Neighbours Day












on

Sunday November lst, 2009 at 11:30 am under the theme
“By My Spirit Saith The Lord”







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Ms Archer said she hoped
he was not lying to the court
but did not clarify when he
had seen the doctor.

Guerrier appeared to have
had some medical attention
as he had a bandage on the
inside of his right elbow
what looked like a medical
bracelet on his left wrist.

Ms Archer said there was
another charge before her
which she could not make
sense of and asked the pros-
ecuter to review it before
bringing the men back
before the court.

Johnson and Guerrier
were not required to enter
a plea for any of the charges
as there will be a premlimi-
nary inquiry into the mat-
ters.

The case was adjourned
until February 12.

Until then all three of the
accused will be remanded in
custody, and have the option
of making a bail application
to the Supreme Court.

Guerrier and Johnson
asked for copies of the dock-
ets and charges, and Ms
Archer said the statements
would be provided.

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FROM page one

hosted by BHA, the Chamber of Commerce
and the US State Department.

"But it's still going to be a tough road par-
ticularly over the next two months and next
season. It's just too early to really predict
where we're going to be at,” he added.

Mr Comito stressed that despite the dismal
market, now is the time for companies to
"buck the trend” and invest in aggressive mar-
keting.

"Both the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism as
well as the industry have marketed themselves
much more aggressively realising that the pie
is smaller and to retain some level of propor-
tionality of market share in the pie we have to
be much more aggresive.”

Mr Comito's assessment is in line with the
International Monetary Fund's recent report
on the state of the region's tourism product.

According to previous reports, the IMF list-
ed the Bahamas among the Caribbean nations
that suffered the highest declines in tourist
arrivals during 2009. The IMF also predicted
that a turnaround in the sector is not expected
before 2011.

For the year up to May tourism arrivals to



RUBEN JOHNSON and Johnny Guerrier at court yesterday.
Angie Moss was arraigned in court on Friday for the same armed
robberies and has been remanded in custody.

Expert on tourism

the Bahamas were down by 14.1 per cent,
compared to a 3.4 per cent increase for
Jamaica and falls of just 2.4 per cent and 9.4
per cent for the Dominican Republic and St
Lucia respectively, said the IMF's assessment
of the Caribbean's tourism outlook.

Also making out slightly better than the
Bahamas were Barbados and Antigua & Bar-
buda, whose tourist arrivals to July 2009 were
down by 10.7 per cent and 12.8 per cent respec-
tively.

According to the report, the only Caribbean
nations dealing with a tougher situation than
the Bahamas were St Vincent & the
Grenadines and St Kitts and Nevis, who were
off by 17.4 per cent and 27 per cent respec-
tively for the year to June 2009.

Meantime, hotel occupancy rates for the
month of September are expected to be
released within "the next couple of days", Mr
Comito said.

"They don't appear to be, on the whole,
worse than September of last year but we'll
have the results shortly on that,” he told The
Tribune.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Conchman Triathlon
set for next month
on Grand Bahama

IN just under two weeks,
the Bahamas’ premier multi-
faceted sporting event is slat-
ed to begin in the nation’s sec-
ond city, featuring swimmers,
bikers and runners from
around the world.

The 23rd annual Conchman
Triathlon to be staged in
Lucaya, Grand Bahama, is
scheduled for November 7
amidst wide boulevard streets
and crystal waters m a tropical
setting.

Possiple competitors can
register online at www.conch-
man.com

The adult race features a
1K swim, 25K bike, and a 5K
run, beginning 8am at Taino
Beach.

The Iron Kids, which
begins at noon, features a
200m swim, a two-mile bike
ride and a half-mile run.

Groups for Iron Kids com-
petition begin at six and
under, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13
and over.

“The event is free courtesy
of the sponsors — Fred Smith
and Sun Alliance Insurance.
The first 100 to finish will
receive T-shirts, medals and
awards,” Smith said in a
release.

And presentations will be
made to the first three finish-
ers in each group (boys and
girls). “All primary and sec-

ondary school students are eli-
gible to participate,” he said.

The Conchman Triathlon
has been a staple of sports
tourism since its inception
almost 23 years ago.

In 1986, the principal
organisers and founders,
Ambrose Gouthro, Bert Bell
and Craig Stewart, saw the
potential of having a Bahami-
an triathlon and decided to
launch it after seeing the suc-
cess of the Iron Man
triathlons in Hawaii and
Bermuda.

Presidents

“Mr Gouthro and Mr Stew-
art, then presidents of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya and
Rotary Club of Freeport,
respectively, aimed to create a
positive community event that
would contribute to charita-
ble organisations, which still
stands in effect today,”
according to the event’s web-
site.

Organisers feel the Conch-
man provides an activity
where Grand Bahama resi-
dents and visitors could come
together to compete, build
and maintain a healthy body
and raise funds for Grand
Bahama Rotary Club pro-
jects, BASRA and Freeport
Aquatics Club.

'

Photos by Felipé Major

At the time, Mr Gouthro
says the proceeds of the event
also went to the Polio Plus
Organisation, which was, and
still is, dedicated to eradicat-
ing polio in the world.

The first race was held at
Xanadu Beach and consisted
of the present distances, 1000
metre (half a mile) swim,
25km (15 miles) bike ride and
a5km (3 miles) run.

According to Mr Stewart,
166 persons participated with
a fair number of entries from
North America and Canada.
There were 30 individual
entries and 44 team entries
that participated but of course
only one winner in each cate-
gory.

Over the next few years,
the Conchman moved from
Xanadu Beach to the former
Holiday Inn, now Our Lucaya
and then to its present loca-
tion at Taino Beach, where it
has garnered a lot of support
and participation.

The upcoming Conchman
promises to be an exciting,
challenging and fun race for
persons of all ages to enjoy.
With the "potential to be big-
ger and better", the Conch-
man has come a long way in
becoming one of The
Bahamas’ most respected and
well-liked sports, hopefully
for many years to come.



—

ST Bede’s Crushers Donald Cash attempts a

dunk yesterday. The Crushers won 54-19...

Andy Roddick all set to play in
Mark Knowles Charity Invitational

FROM page 11

has always wanted to come to
the Bahamas and participate
in the tournament, according
to Knowles.

Paying together in Beijing
solidified this year’s appear-
ance for the No.1 ranked
American player, who won
the 2003 US Open and was a
three-time Wimbledon final-
ist.

“We got a little closer and I
found out that he such a nice
guy,” Knowles said. “He has
his own foundation like the
Andy Roddick Charitable
Organisation, so he under-
stands what it is ’m doing,”
Knowles said.

“With him coming, I think
it’s going to be one of the
greatest ever. To have some-
body like Andy Roddick in
the Bahamas is going to be so
exciting.”

This year, Knowles and his
organisers have switched the
professional tennis exhibition
from Atlantis on Paradise
Island to the National Tennis
Centre, Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, 3pm Saturday,
December 5.

While adults will be
charged an admission fee,
Vicki Knowles-Andrews,
Knowles’ mother, has indi-
cated that they will be allow-
ing children to be admitted
free so as to give as many of
them as possible the oppor-
tunity to meet Roddick up
close and personal.

Tickets will be available
from November 10 at the

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

National Tennis Centre,
Atlantis Tennis Centre, Vil-
lage Squash Club, H G
Christie Ltd and Lyford Cay
School.

Call 359-2542 for further
information.

The major sponsors to date
include Atlantis Resort &
Casino, Lombard Odier Dari-
er Hentsch Private Bank &
Trust, Pictet Bank & Trust
Ltd, Serenity Point, Abaco,
The Balmoral, The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism, Ameri-
can Airlines, The Bank of the
Bahamas, Everkey Global
Fund, Templeton Global
Advisors, Odyssey Aviation,
H30 and The Ministry of
Youth Sports & Culture.

There are a few sponsor-
ship opportunities still avail-
able and interested parties
should contact Vicky
Andrews at vickyk@batel-
net.bs or cell: 357-9670.

The proceeds of the event
will go to aid local children’s
charities. To date, over
$400,000 has been distributed
to various charities.

While the tournament
draws near, Knowles will be
returning to the pro circuit on
Sunday to play in Valencia,
Spain, where he is expected
to team up with Michael Llo-
dra at the Valencia Open 500.

Bhupathi has decided to
take another break, but will
rejoin Knowles in Paris,
France, for the BNP Paribas
Masters from November 11
before they head to the Bar-
clays ATP World Tour Finals
in London, England, starting
on November 22.

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Judo tournament
award in memory of
Humphrey Jackman

THE Bahamas Judo
Federation held its Fall
Classic Judo tournament on
October 24. There were
more than 70 athletes and
200 spectators in atten-
dance.

A team from Abaco as
well as the Special
Olympics Team competed
in regular divisions of the
tournament. There were
several standout perfor-
mances as both male and
female athletes ranging
from ages eight to adult
participated.

“We were delighted with
the level of judo," said
David Rahming, coach of
the Fox Hill Club and Spe-
cial Olympics.

“You are seeing more
dynamic and complex tech- nament.
niques that are seen on the e The Competitors
international stage. We are Award- Tajaro Hudson
definitely leaps and bounds ¢ Best Ippon (Submis-

sion) Award - Cynthia
Rahming

e The Humphrey "Trod"”
Jackman Special Olympics
Award - Zecumba Major

“We are proud to give
this award in memory of
my friend Trod, who died
tragically this year. He was
a Special Olympian and he
should not be forgotten,"
said D’Arcy Rahming,
president of the Bahamas
Judo Federation.

“This tournament was
very important for the
Abaco kids to participate
in and we were delighted
with their performance,"
said Abaco coach Regina
Parotti Kennedy.

Anyone interested in
assisting the Bahamas Judo
Federation can contact the
Federation at 364-6773 or
via e-mail at
daishihan@gmail.com

Humphrey Jackman

above where we were even
a year ago.”

The following awards
have been decided based
on the results of the tour-

THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS TEAM competed in regular divisions of the tournament...
Photo by Woodley Carroll

Crushers ‘light
up’ Sparks

the lower rims, but he noted
that his players didn’t play up
to par.

“My boys had to adjust,
especially with defense on
them. They had to throw the
ball up harder,” he said. “We
haven’t had a chance to play
in rims this low, so we had to
get used to it.”

With Turnquest and Coop-
er (who contributed 10) lead-
ing the offensive attack, the
Crushers also got some solid
defense from Adrian Mack-
ey, Christopher Oliver, Steve-
jay Whylly and Antoine Gib-
son as they staved off the
Sparks’ attack.

D’Chaz Butler paced St
Thomas More with six, Cairo
Curry had five, Randy Forbes
chipped in with three and
both Rohan Kerr and Jeffer-
son Thomas added two.



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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

(-\"\
Na,

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



COMA



iwi- MACS

BOA soagratziotes Knowles
on ISF vice president post

THE Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion (BOA) congratulates its secre-
tary general Romell Knowles on his
election to the international post of
vice president of the International
Softball Federation (ISF).

Knowles has been elected as the
ISF’s first-ever vice president for the
non-Hispanic Caribbean region.

Said BOA president Wellington
Miller: “I know that I speak for all
our colleagues in the Olympic move-
ment in The Bahamas when I say that
as a Bahamian to be the first to hold
this exciting position is an honour
that you well deserve.”

Miller said Knowles’ election is “an
important milestone in the continuing
excellence of Bahamians in the
administration of international sport
and a shining example of good stew-
ardship in the sporting arena.”

“Your success is our success,” he
said. “We are sure that you will make
the most of your new position to the
benefit of all softball playing athletes
in the non-Hispanic Caribbean
region.

“The Bahamas is sure to benefit in
many ways from Mr Knowles’ pres-
ence at such a high level in the Inter-
national Softball Federation.”





















Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ees Lta

1 * &

ROMELL KNOWLES



Titans defeat Police by four wickets
as cricket league action heats up

THE local cricket commu-
nity has experienced a busy
schedule in recent weeks.
League play has intensified
with visiting teams from the
region taking part.

The Dynasty Stars recent-
ly hosted the Lucaya Cricket
Club of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, to a series of exhi-
bition matches over the
weekend.

In the opening match,
Lucaya CC batted first and
scored 182 all out.

The team’s top scorers
included Kenneth Seeram
with 48 runs and Harold Stu-
art with 23.

\ ela

Both Dynasty bowlers,
Venris Bennett and Lee
Melville, took three wickets
apiece.

In their turn at bat, the
Stars topped by scoring 184
runs for the loss of seven
wickets, to win the match by
three wickets.

Ryan Tappin scored 58
runs while Howard Roye
added 30 runs.

Bowling for Lucaya, Keith
Worrell took four wickets.

In the second match of the
series, Lucaya CC rebound-
ed to defeat the Stars by 54
runs. Lucaya scored 149 runs
all out in their turn at bat.

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Worrell scored 46 runs,
Brian Kumar added 28 and
Trevor Bourne chipped in
with 21 runs.

Bowling for the Stars,
Alvin Peters and Alex Her-
nandez took three wickets
each. The Stars failed to
duplicate Saturday's feat and
fell short with just 95 runs.

Gregory Irvin was the top
scorer with 20.

Bowling for Lucaya CC,
Harold Stuart and Worrell
took three and two wickets
respectively.

In local league play, con-
tinuing Sunday at Haynes
Oval, The Dockendale

Titans defeated the Police by
four wickets.

The Police opened the
match with 139 runs.

Mark Taylor and Wayne
Patrick led the effort with 25
runs apiece. Calvin Neita
was the lead bowler for the
Titans and took seven wick-
ets.

Dockendale scored 161
runs for the loss of six wick-
ets for the win. Gargand
Ganpat scored 39 runs and
Narendra Ekanayake added
36 as the top scorers for the
Titans.

Odain Tucker took two
wickets for the Police.

COB Caribs
defeat the
Cougars

Intruders beat
Technicians

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its 2009 regular season with
another double header Mon-
day night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.

In the women’s match, the
COB Caribs defeated the
Cougars in straight sets 25-19,
25-24 and 25-16. Keneisha
Thompson led all scorers for
the win with 19 points. For
the youthful Cougars, Irina
Key led with five points.

In the men’s match, it was a
battle between the Techni-
cians and National Fence
Intruders, each with one loss
for the season.

However, in the end, the
Intruders endured a 23-25, 26-
24, 23-25, 25-16 and 16-14 win
in five tough sets. Glen Rolle
led the charge with 17 kills,
one block and an ace for the
win.

In a losing effort, Renaldo
Knowles scored 19 kills, one
block and an ace.

Games are slated to con-
tinue tonight at the DW Davis
Gymnasium with another
double header on tap.

The Bahamas Cricket
Association will continue its
efforts to gain exposure
against regional competition.
The league is slated to host
the Cayman Islands’ over 40
Masters team November 7-8.

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THE TRIBUNE

S h
| WEDNESDAY,

PAGE 11

r



ANDY RODDICK (right) teamed up with Mark Knowles at Beijing
Open where they reached doubles final...

Cobras dig up Mystic Marlins



ts

OCTOBER 28,

2009



Judo award
in memory of
Humphrey
Jackman...

See page 9

Roddick set to play in Mark
Knowles Charity Invitational

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER teaming up to play together
for the first time in doubles in China a
couple weeks ago, Bahamian tennis ace
Mark Knowles and top ranked American
Andy Roddick will be reunited here.

Roddick, the former No.1 singles play-
er in the world, has agreed to participate
in the 9th Mark Knowles Charity Invita-

tional December 3-5 in an exhibition at
the National Tennis Center.

“Tt’s extremely exciting to have a for-
mer world number one and grand slam
champion and someone as popular as
Andy coming to the event,” said Knowles
yesterday in an interview with The Tri-
bune from his home in Dallas, Texas.

“Tt’s really a huge boost and it has
added a lot of excitement. We are just
waiting on his arrival because he has said
he will be willing to participate in any

event that we have on the schedule.
That’s the type of person he is.”
Knowles and Roddick partnered at the
Beijing Open where they reached the
doubles final when Knowles’ regular
partner Mahesh Bhupathi took a break
to recuperate from a groin injury he sus-
tained playing Davis Cup for India.
Roddick, who has been ranked No.1 in
the world and is currently ranked No.7,

SEE page 9

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s teams jostle for playoff
position late in the GSSSA
volleyball season, a pair of
senior girls teams helped
their cause with wins yes-
terday at the D W Davis Gymnasium...

C C Sweeting Cobras over D J Mystic

Marlins 19-11, 12-19, 15-6

The Cobras dominated the opening set
as they raced out to an early 8-1 advantage
and held on to breeze through the opening
set.

The Mystic Marlins rebounded in the sec-
ond set with renewed determination to get
out to an early lead of their own.

Christia Taylor’s adept play around the
net led the charge for the Mystic Marlins
who went on to separate themselves from an
8-8 tie.

Taylor scored three consecutive kills to
propel her team’s 5-0 run as they held on to
take the set, 19-12.

In the third, the Cobras reasserted their
first-set dominance.

The Mystic Marlins opened with a 4-2
lead, however the Cobras responded with six
consecutive scores.

The Cobras led 8-3 when the teams
switched sides and went on to win the set,

Crushers ‘light
up’ Sparks 54-19

Rattlers beat Pacers

15-6. The Cobras’ Jaynell Cox led all scorers
with eight kills.

CI Gibson Rattlers over

R M Bailey Pacers 19-12, 19-8

In the second matchup of the evening,
the Pacers did little in a losing effort as the
Rattlers eased their way to a two-set sweep.

After a 2-2 tie to begin the opening set,
the Pacers failed to gain momentum and
found themselves behind 10-4 due to a series
of unforced errors.

The Rattlers maintained a seven point
advantage for the remainder of the set to
win 19-12.

Quicker to the ball and returning serves,
C I Gibson opened the second set on a 9-0
run.

Silverni Augustin served for each of the
nine scores, building a lead too big for the
Pacers to overcome.

After an unforced error put R M Bailey
on the scoreboard for the first time in the
set, they rallied to come within six points, 12-
6

A timely C I Gibson time-out corrected
the brief lapse in execution as they pressed
on to take the set and match, 19-8.

League play for seniors is scheduled to
continue at the D W Davis Gymnasium on
Thursday.



C | GIBSON Rattlers’ Silverni Augustin digs the ball yesterday...

ATLANTIS

PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS»

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH they had to
make an adjustment to the
legal six-foot rim height for
mini basketball, the unde-
feated St Bede’s Crushers still
managed to rout the St
Thomas More Sparks.

In a rematch of last year’s
Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools championship series,
the defending champions
Crushers got a game-high 34
points from Kyle ‘Flash’
Turnquest in their 54-19
pounding of the Sparks at St
Thomas More.

While St Bede’s went on to
post their second straight vic-
tory for the season, there was
a lot of suspense as to who
would have been able to put
down a thunderous slam dunk
in the shortened rims.

With the game already out
of reach for St Thomas More,
Turnquest was the first to
come close to achieving the
feat when his attempt on a
two-handed dunk was put
into the rim for a 13-2 lead.

St Bede’s, who held a 6-1
margin at the end of the first
quarter, used an effective trap
defense that enabled Turn-
quest and Gregory Cooper to
go after a few other dunk
attempts as they went on to
post a 19-4 half-time advan-
tage.

“Tjust decided to go for the
lay-ups because I didn’t want
to miss the dunks,” said Turn-
quest, who eventually
bogeyed another attempt in
the fourth quarter.

Turnquest said it certainly
feels good playing in the
shorter rims.

St Thomas More, who got a
couple dunk attempts from
their center Randy Forbes, is
the first school to play with



ST Bede’s Crushers’ Kyle ‘Flash’
Turnquest attempts a dunk...
Photo by Felipé Major

the rims at the regulation
height.

Coach N’Komo Ferguson
said the goal is to make sure
that their players get the
opportunity to play the game
the right way.

But coach Ferguson said it
wasn’t a well played game on
both sides of the court.

“They didn’t look 50 per
cent the way they did in their
first game against Xaviers and
we played 50 per cent better
than we did in our first game
against Our Lady’s,” Fergu-
son stressed.

“But we’re still getting
there. We’re still building. We
will see them again in the sec-
ond half because we are play-
ing each other twice this year.
So we hope to be better by
then.”

St Bede’s coach Donnie
Culmer agreed that it was
good for the players to play in

SEE page 9

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isine

WEDNESDAY,

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Power plant opponents
‘challenge all permits’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

OPPONENTS of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) proposed $105
million Wilson City power plant
yesterday instructed their attor-
ney “to challenge the issuance
of any permits” for its con-
struction on the basis that they
had been unable to voice their
concerns to the authorities that
granted them.

Fred Smith, the Callender’s
& Co attorney and partner, in
an October 27, 2009, letter sent
to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and numerous other
ministers and agencies respon-
sible for various aspects of the
Abaco-based power plant’s
construction, effectively con-
firmed Tribune Business’s



FRED SMITH

October 26, 2009, that the
momentum towards commenc-

OCTOBER 28,



2009

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Car dealers eye ‘bottom’
after 30% Q3 sales drop

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian new car dealers

yesterday told Tribune Busi-

ness they were hopeful that

the industry had “seen the
bottom”, after sector-wide sales for the
2009 third quarter and September came
in almost one-third down on 2008 com-
paratives.

Figures released to Tribune Business
by the Bahamas Motor Dealers Associ-
ation (BMDA) yesterday revealed that
new vehicle sales were down by about
29.89 per cent for the 2009 third quarter
year-over-year, with September’s sales
31.8 per cent behind 2008 comparatives.
Collectively, the Bahamian new car
industry had suffered nine successive

months of sales declines.

Fred Albury, president of Executive
Motors and vice-president of Quality
Auto, told Tribune Business: “My gut
feeling, and I speak on behalf of Execu-
tive and Quality, is that we’ve seen the
bottom and will see a bit of a bump up in
demand” in the 2010 New Year.

He added: “July was a reasonable
month for us, August was so/so, Sep-
tember was not bad and this month is
really flat. Every quarter has had at least
one reasonable month to keep us afloat.
We're keeping our fingers crossed that
things will show signs of recovery in the
first part of next year.”

Mr Albury said Executive and Quali-
ty had benefited from the fact they tend-
ed to “dominate” in the public trans-
portation and taxi cab/van market, and

the companies were “pre-sold up to
somewhere early in the New Year” in
this segment.

“What is of great concern is that the $
is so weak, especially against the euro
and the yen, so that prices are going to
be right up there,” Mr Albury told Tri-
bune Business.

However, compensating for this was
the relative strength of the US dollar
against the South Korean currency, the
country that produced the Kia and Qual-
ity’s Hyundai models. Mr Albury said
new Hyundai models were due to arrive
in the Bahamas next year.

He added that another current prob-
lem was the relatively low inventory lev-
els that Executive and Quality were car-

SEE page 2B

exclusive story on Monday,

SEE page 5B

Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESS executives yesterday said they were hoping to match
last year’s total of 70 exhibitors at the two-day trade show attached
to the upcoming 2009 Energy Conference, with some 25 companies
already confirmed.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA) exec-
utive vice-president, at a press conference to unveil the November
13-14 trade show, emphasised that it was not just designed as a plat-
form for firms in the renewable energy/energy efficient industry,
with manufacturers, marketing and public relations firms, food and
beverage suppliers, IT firms, financial services providers and
tourism-related companies among the 25 already signed-up.

Pointing out that 10,000 persons attended last year’s trade show,
Mr Comito said: “We hope we can reach the amount last year of
having 70 booth exhibitors. It’s a great opportunity for companies
to showcase their latest product and services, and build strategic
alliances with local and international companies.”

Among those scheduled to attend this year’s event is the US-
based Lowe’s, Mr Comito adding that the Trade Show provided
Bahamian firms with an opportunity to interact with key executives
and purchasers/buyers from this nation’s resort and other industries,
establishing new relationships and building on previous ones.

The BHA executive argued that the Trade Show would also pro-
vide an important marketing platform for Bahamian companies,
something they needed to do more than ever in a recession.

“In tough economic times,
SEE page 6B

industry tends to retrench,” Mr

Government urged:

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs “to
move faster” on renewable
energy initiatives and pro-
grammes designed to reduce
electricity costs, business lead-
ers said yesterday, arguing that
import duty exemptions to
facilitate efficiency in the sector
were not having the desired
effect because complementary
equipment was still being heav-
ily taxed.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
executive vice-president, said
one such case was CFL or ener-
gy efficient light bulbs, upon
which the Government had
eliminated all import duties in
the last Budget.



‘Move faster’ over renewable energies

* Business executives say duty exemptions on energy-efficient technology not
having desired effect because complementary products still heavily taxed

* Absence of net metering deterring developers from incorporating renewable
energy, as unable to gain investment return from selling back to BEC grid

However, these bulbs were
now incorporated as part of
energy efficient fixtures, he
explained, and since these fix-
tures were still subject to rela-
tively high import/customs duty
rates, the value of the exemp-
tions for the bulbs was being
eliminated.

And, in turn, businesses and
residential users were being dis-
couraged from purchasing ener-
gy efficient technology because
of the cost involved, and
importers turned away from

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bringing the products in.

“We'd like it to move faster
than it has. We wish they were
moving faster,” Mr Comito said
of the Government’s efforts to
reduce energy costs and
enhance efficiency, which have
involved a search a for renew-
able energy suppliers and the
drafting of an initial National
Energy Policy.

“Last July, with the passage
of the Budget in June, there
was a recommendation enacted
that we in the BHA had been

making for years, to make CFL
(fluorescent light bulbs), energy
efficient light bulbs, duty free,”
Mr Comito explained.

But while this was welcome,
the Government failed to adjust
or eliminate the import duty
rates on “energy efficient fix-
tures”, and “many bulbs are
now part of the fixture”. This,
the BHA executive vice-presi-
dent suggested, showed the
need for a more comprehen-

SEE page 4B

Taxi Union fears
Atlantis ‘hard blow’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Taxi Union
is bracing for what would
potentially be a “hard blow” if
Kerzner International’s Atlantis
resort makes good on the
notice it gave to terminate its
contract for the ground trans-
portation/bussing of the resort’s
employees, Tribune Business
can reveal.

Leon Griffin, the Bahamas
Taxi Union’s president, last
night confirmed that the Par-
adise Island-based resort and
its owner had “given notice”
that they planned to terminate
the ground transportation con-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BTC ‘hopeful’
of return to
$40m profits

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) last
night said it hoped to end its
2009 financial year with net
income back in the $40 million
range, with revenues and oper-
ating expenses as at end-Sep-
tember both running $8 million
better than the budgeted tar-
get.

The state-owned incumbent,
which is in the middle of a pri-
vatisation exercise, said it was
“cautiously optimistic” that its
financial performance for 2009
would show a marked improve-
ment over 2008, when it suf-
fered a 50.7 per cent profit fall
to $21.1 million, compared to
$42.8 million in 2008

Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting
president and chief executive,
said: “The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies all
through the Bahamas and all
over the world — faced a diffi-
cult 2008 due to the severe
downturn in the global and
national economy.

“As people travelled less, it
meant that there were less
tourists making calls in the
Bahamas. This translated into a
sizeable fall-off in our roaming
revenue. As businesses con-
tracted and laid staff off, it
meant that there was less mon-
ey in the economy for persons
to spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It real-
ly is that simple.”

Tribune Business yesterday
identified the decline in tourism
as being the major factor in
BTC’s reduced roaming rev-

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Car dealers eye ‘bottom’ after 30% Q3 sales drop

FROM page 1B

rying, with some 60 days of
stock - as opposed to the nor-
mal 180 day levels - currently
held.

Explaining that the compa-
nies had moved to align inven-
tory with the much lower levels
of consumer demand experi-
enced during summer 2009, Mr
Albury said: “We fell on the
side of caution this particular
summer and now inventory lev-
els are extremely low, to the
point where we now have 60
days in stock, when we nor-

mally have 180 days in stock.
My inventories should build in
December.”

Increasing inventory orders,
as dealers moved to import new
models and replenish stock,
should also boost the Govern-
ment’s tax revenues, Mr Albury
added, as some of the highest
tax rates were imposed on new
car imports.

He said neither Executive,
nor Quality, had laid-off staff
during the recession, instead
opting not to replace those who
left voluntarily.

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“I know one or two BMDA
members who are having a real-
ly rough time of it, and have
had to cut back considerably,”
Mr Albury said. “We’re just
trying to watch expenses as
much as we can. We’ve taken
the opportunity while things are
slow to introduce a new com-
puter system and get trained up
on it. We’re looking at other
avenues to tighten up on. My
gut feeling is that there will be
some recovery in the first half
of 2010.”

Mr Albury’s sentiments were
echoed by Andrew Barr, sales
manager and a director at

Friendly Ford, who told Tri-
bune Business it was “not unex-
pected” that new car sales
would be down 30-40 per cent,
given the depth of the reces-
sion.

He, too, was cautiously opti-
mistic that sales would rebound
to “a satisfactory level” in the
2010 New Year, but warned
that a return to pre-recession
levels, might “take a lot longer
than people might anticipate.
Even getting back to that level
might be a difficult task”.

While Friendly Ford had
been able to avoid any lay-offs
among its 35 staff, Mr Barr,

drawing parallels with a US
economy that overbinged on
credit, said: “I think we were
living in paradise where every-
thing was seen as coming easy
at that time.”

Yet, with new car sales being
sensitive to credit availability,
the lack of confidence on the
part of both banks and con-
sumers was impacting the
industry. “I don’t think there’s
a quick fix to it,” Mr Barr said.
“It’s not something where you
will see, in one to three months,
things going great.” He
explained that with sales down
40-50 per cent year-over-year,

even a 5-10 per cent improve-
ment every quarter would
mean it takes a full year to get
back to pre-recession levels.
Meanwhile, Rick Lowe, Nas-
sau Motor Company’s (NMC)
operations manager, said cus-
tomer floor traffic was down 50
per cent from “where it used
to be”, agreeing with Mr
Albury that October was slow.
Walk-in traffic was down, he
added, arguing that a major fac-
tor in reduced demand was the
difficulty - and a lack of confi-
dence - consumers were having
in obtaining debt financing
from the commercial banks.

Taxi Union fears Atlantis ‘hard blow’

FROM page 1B

tract for ferrying Atlantis
employees to and from the

island.

However, he said the
Bahamas Taxi Union was still
in talks with Atlantis executives

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ERNEST HYLER Treasure
Cay, Abaco 022217 of Treasure Cay, Abaco, one of the islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,intend to change my name to
RALPH ERNEST, If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KATY JEAN of RUSSELL TOWN,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 26th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.













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on the issue, and the contract
termination was not a ‘done
deal’.

Reluctant to comment due
to the fact that there was a pos-
sibility that the Bahamas Taxi
Union might retain its contract
with Atlantis, Mr Griffin told
Tribune Business: “We are still
talking about it with Atlantis,
even though they have given
notice about it.”

Although he did not confirm
the November 1, 2009, termi-
nation date that Tribune Busi-
ness had been given, Mr Griffin
added: “They [Kerzner Inter-
national] did give notice about
it. I can’t go any further
because there’s still hope, and
we're still talking about the con-
tract.”

The Bahamas Taxi Union

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



president said he was awaiting
the outcome of a meeting
between Atlantis executives
that was scheduled for yester-
day morning, and indicated he
might be able to comment fur-
ther today when more infor-
mation was available.

Although not commenting
on the reasons given by Atlantis
for its move to terminate the
ground transportation contract,
Mr Griffin did tell Tribune
Business the likely impact on
the Bahamas Taxi Union if
such a development came to
pass.

He said: “It would not be
devastating, but it would be a
very hard blow, and we would
have to do some readjustments
and all kinds of things.”

Mr Griffin, though, said
reports reaching Tribune Busi-
ness that Atlantis had also can-
celled all Bahamas Taxi Union
tours were not true.

Several sources had suggest-
ed to Tribune Business that
Atlantis was looking to give the
employee ground transporta-
tion contract to Bahamas Expe-
rience, the company that pro-
vides guest transportation ser-
vices and tours to many of the
resort’s visitors.

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an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

an
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B





Internet body hosts renowned speaker

THE Bahamas Internet
Organisation, a newly formed
body, is teaming up with part-
ners in this nation’s e-com-
merce sector to host an inter-
nationally-acclaimed entre-
preneur, author and success
trainer.

Bruce Muzik, the founder
of Designer Life, will stage a
one-day luncheon workshop
hosted by the Bahamas Inter-
net Organisation, during
which he will speak on the
topic, Fight ways to grow your
On-Line business or career.
The event is scheduled for
Thursday, October 29, at
12.30 pm at East Villa Restau-
rant on East Bay Street.

Damien Forsythe, organis-
er of the Bahamas Internet

Organisation, said both e-
commerce and ‘bricks and
mortar’ businesses in the
Bahamas stood to benefit
from the workshop, which is
tailored to meet the needs of
business owners, Internet
marketers, web/graphic
designers and programmers,
marketing managers and any-
one seeking to enter the e-
commerce industry.

Mr Forsythe added: “Over
the years, the Bahamas has
seen a dramatic increase in
the number of Internet-based
businesses, as well as the
number of companies that use
the web for marketing, as the
Internet has proven to be a
very powerful and resourceful
business tool.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), EL PACIFICO INC., is in dissolution. Continental
Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1

906, Belize City, Belize. All

persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

i 1455
Loe Coriiusau! La ohio, le
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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Busine
of 2000), CALISTA INC., is

ss Companies Act, (No. 45
in dissolution. Continental

Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1

906, Belize City, Belize. All

persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

oe Con wux Labiorr, liz
Uquedear





BRUCE MUZIK

“Through this luncheon
workshop we hope to assist
all business owners by inform-
ing them of how they can use
the Internet as well as their
own skills to boost their busi-
nesses. In addition, we hope
to create a more united e-
commerce sector in the
Bahamas.”

He said: “The more that we
can all be on the web and all
be interconnected and make a
more user-friendly presence,
great payment and marketing
systems that work, the possi-
bilities are endless for the e-
commerce sector here in the
Bahamas.”

Mr Forsythe said realtors
have the Bahamas Real
Estate Association; attorneys,
the Bahamas Bar Association;
and businesses, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, so it
would be ideal for e-com-
merce practitioners to have
one unified organisation.

“Local business owners
stand to benefit tremendous-
ly from attending this event.
Mr Muzik’s unique blend of
philosophy and science, com-
bined with his infectious
enthusiasm, have had him on
television, the front cover of
newspapers, and propelled
him to the top of his game as
a sought-after speaker and
teacher worldwide,” Mr
Forsythe said.

Mr Muzik said the work-
shop will focus on assisting
persons in finding their nat-
ural path to creating wealth.

“Tf you study wealthy peo-
ple throughout history, you
will find that they all created
their wealth in one of only
eight different ways. Research
shows that each one of us is
naturally suited to wealth in
one of these eight ways more
than the other. So, based on
our personality types we will
find it easier to make money
if we create wealth in a way
that’s naturally suited to our
personally type,” Mr Muzik
said.

“T think one of the biggest
things people struggle with in

humane

BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HALLOWEEN
FLEA MARKET & FUN DAY

life is that they go about want-
ing to make money and they
start a business, and what
ends up happening is that
they work hard their whole
life, not really finding the kind
of success that entrepreneurs
have and not knowing why,
and it’s usually because they
have taken the wrong path to
wealth. They are following a
strategy that is not natural for
them.”

Registration for the work-
shop is $10 and the lunch, a
three-course meal is $20 (paid
direct to East Villa). Busi-
nesspersons can RSVP by
contactin g
Damien@BahamasInterne-
tAssociation.org or by calling
434-6900.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LEGAL NOTICE
NJORD HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is
accordance

hereby given that in
with Section 238 of The

Companies Act No. 18 of 1992, a resolution
has been passed on the 26th day of October,

2009 requiring NJORD HOLDINGS
LIMITED to be wound up voluntarily. The
voluntary winding up commenced at the time
of passing of the resolution authorizing such
winding up.

&
/ Cor 0

LIQUIDATOR



Government urged: ‘Move faster’ over renewable energies

FROM page 1B

sive, considered tax policy to
ensure that renewable, sustain-
able energy - plus energy effi-
ciency and conservation - were
encouraged in the Bahamas.

“Our sense is that there
needs to be a ‘roll up the
sleeves’ approach to policy at a
different level,” Mr Comito said
yesterday. “There are a num-
ber of categories of equipment
that could be considered for
duty exemptions that are not
going into the mix. It should be
part of the overall National
Energy Policy that is under con-
sideration.”

The BHA executive vice-
president, speaking yesterday
at a conference to unveil the
2009 Energy Conference and
Business Trade Show, an ini-
tiative it is staging in partner-
ship with the Chamber of Com-
merce and the US Embassy in

COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LTD

“I oe
| ca Re

Assistant Engineering Manager

An opportunity awaits a candidate who has the ability to assist with the
coordination of all engineering and maintenance functions, including but not

limited to:

The building and the environment
‘ackaging and Brewing equipment

Utilites equipment - electrical distribution, air compressors and distribution,
Co2 recovery equipment, ammonia cooling equipment and RO water
systems, boiler equipment, waste water treatment plant

Management of the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative

maintenance Program.

Diagnozing equipment malfunctions as necessary.
Evaluating the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,

compiling reports and effectively using performance data.
Maintaining technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements.

The ideal candidate should have a Bachelor's Degree in Engineering or Equivalent,
strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering experience; demonstrate proficiency
in Microsoft word, excel and trouble shooting along with good organizational and
communication skills, Experience in the production industry and knowledge of

PLC's would be a plus.

All interested persons are asked to fax resumes to (242) 302-2939

rr NS
al Ge! is

a ta,
a

i
or



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www cob.edu. bs

STAFF VACANCY

Development Officer, Alumni Relations and Development, responsible
for selected College fundraising activities. The Development Officer is
a position for a candidate with experience in the non-profit industry and
who wishes to continue to build a career in fundraising and/or higher
education advancement. The successful candidate will be someone
with strong organisational skills, who is a good communicator both
verbally and in writing and who enjoys team work.

Specific duties and responsibilities include identifying, cultivating and
soliciting major donors and prospects including individuals, corpora-
tions, and foundations; providing support for the maintenance of the
major gifts prospect pipeline; assisting in the implementation of pro-
grammes and activities designed to increase the visibility of the AR&D
Office and The College to internal and external constituencies and con-
ducting internal and external research/fact gathering in support of fund-

ing proposal development.

A Bachelor's degree, minimum of five years professional experience
and prior fundraising, sales or marketing experience are a must along
with demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills. For

a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/

Interested

candidates should submit a letter of interest, Resume, a completed
Employment Application Form along with all the required documenta-

tion by Thursday, October 29, 2009 to:

The Associate Vice President, H.R.

Human Resources Department OR hra

ly@cob.edu.bs

The College of The Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Nassau, also pushed for public
policy changes that would allow
net metering in the Bahamas.

Mr Comito explained that
this would allow businesses and
residential users “to create
excess energy from their own
[renewable] systems, and the
excess energy would go back
to the [BEC] power grid”.

Those who sold excess ener-
gy to BEC would then receive a
credit on their energy bills,
reducing their utility costs. Mr
Comito said US states, such as
California, had used net meter-
ing very successfully to produce
“a real impact” on energy costs,
usage and the development of
sustainable, renewable energy.

Jeff Dubel, the US Embas-
say’s political/economic chief,
said the absence of net meter-
ing in the Bahamas was also
suffocating efforts by develop-
ers to incorporate renewable
energy and associated tech-
nologies in their projects.

He explained that many
developers spoken to by the US
Embassy wanted to embrace
sustainable energy technologies

in their businesses, but in the
absence of net metering in the
Bahamas - where they could
sell excess electricity back to
the BEC grid - they were
unable to earn a return on this
investment. Without net meter-
ing, the initial costs incurred in
installing renewable energies
was just too prohibitive.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment “urgently” needed to
remove legislative and technical
impediments to Bahamas-based
businesses implementing
renewable energy technologies
and their own power sources,
Yvette Sands, head of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s energy and environ-
ment committee, said electrici-
ty costs were at a point where
they “impeded” business.

“T think we’re at the point
now where it’s becoming an
impediment to doing business,
not allowing businesses to
implement renewable energy
offerings,” she said. ““Business-
es are willing, but policy does
not allow it.”

Referring to the fact that

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ENFIRE HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

existing legislation does not
permit companies and home-
owners to use alternative ener-
gy in areas where BEC’s elec-
tricity supply is present, Ms
Sands added: “Policy needs to
open the gate to allow this to
happen. We need to have leg-
islative relief for the improve-
ments to occur.

“Businesses are primed and
ready, but the environment
does not allow for it. The pace
needs to quicken on getting rid
of impediments, either legisla-
tive or mechanical. There are
some technical issues that need
to be solved. We do want to see
it go a little bit faster.”

Ms Sands acknowledged that
“all is not lost”, with the Gov-
ernment working on numerous
energy-related initiatives with
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), including
the importation of 100,000 CFL
light bulbs for low and middle
income families, plus 30 pilot
programmes featuring solar PV
technology and net metering,
plus 70 pilot solar water heater
installations.

However, she added that the
process of gathering data, writ-
ing reports, discussing them and
then taking action could take
between three to five, even 10
years, a process that needed to
be drastically shortened.

Addressing the press confer-
ence, Ms Sands said: “We need
cleaner energy at stable prices.
It is urgent. The time is now.

“The outcry of the business
community is loud and it con-
tinues to ring in our ears. The
cost of electricity is too high to
be sustained, the law does not
allow for any significant private
generation of power to relieve
the burden, there is no room
for a fast-paced response by
businesses to reduce their ener-
gy bill.

“Bearing such a bill has been
tough to most and devastating
to others - the electricity bill is
one of the most burdensome
costs a business will bear. For
some, passing it on to con-
sumers is the only option short
of shuttering their business. The
result - the cost of living goes up
and up, because of the fluctu-
ating world fuel price.”

Ms Sands said the Bahamas
needed to reduce its depen-
dency on fossil fuels to lower
its carbon footprint and envi-
ronmental impact, and inte-
grate renewable energy into the
mix while also reducing con-
sumption and power demand.

“Businesses need to take a
hard look at their consumption,
and some of the things they can
do to reduce consumption short
of self-generation of power,”
Ms Sands added. “Look at the
tools that are available, and find
ways to reduce consumption to
mitigate against prices going
up.” She warned that renew-
able energy forms might not
always be “the panacea” for
every situation.

Mr Comito added that it was
not enough to demand that
policies and institutions be in
place on the Government side.
“Not enough businesses are
aware of the opportunities that
present themselves,” he added.
“We can’t be knocking the pub-
lic sector if businesses are not
taking advantage of the oppor-
tunities.”

GN-940

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
PARLIAMENTARY REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 11 & 14
George Town, Jolly Hall, Bahama Sound,

Cottage & Master Harbour
In the East Exuma Town Area
OF the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
; i
which was comested, the following was'were elected as Town Committee Member's for

the abowes mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's
surname

STRACHAN

Chther Sames
in fall

Clifton O' Bnan

Occupation
and adalress

Laility Man Mate, Bahama Sound

AND NOTICE is hereby piven thal the numbers of the votes cast for ihe several
candidates in the saad clechon were as follows:-

Candidate's
Surnaitiet

STRACHAN

MORLEY

Ciher Names
In full

Cliferd O° Bran

Soma Unreise

Date: 22â„¢ Cetaber, 20009

Sign: Ivan Ferruson
RETURNING OFFICER



Votes
Falled

gq rt







(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

(EW

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B



BISX continues its investor education

THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) has continued its
investor education pro-
gramme at an October 8,
2009, meeting with Grade 12
Economics and Commerce
students at Queen’s College.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, said: “From BISX’s
standpoint we believe that
educating current and future
investors is a fundamental
and essential role of our
exchange. Our visit to
Queen’s College was reward-
ing in sO many ways, and it
gives us a chance to hear, first
hand, the questions and con-
cerns that students have
regarding stocks, investing
and the stock market.

“Over the last two years,
we have had an opportunity
to speak to a number of dif-
ferent age groups at several
different schools. I always
find it gratifying when a
teacher contacts us request-
ing the opportunity to have
us speak to their students, as
this is a clear indication of an
interested teacher.

“T was especially gratified



KEITH DAVIES, BISX’s chief executive and listings manager, with grade 12 Queen’s College students who
are studying economics and commerce...

by the number of students
who were considering a
career in some aspect of busi-
ness. These students seemed
especially focused on under-
standing the operations of the
stock exchange, and I look
forward to reading about the

accomplishments of all of the
students in the future.”
Coinciding with BISX’s
10th anniversary, Mr Davies
gave a presentation on the
importance of the stock
exchange and the role played
by BISX in the Bahamian

economy.

He added that such efforts
were designed to create
future generations of
informed investors, able to
use and take advantage of the
products and services facili-
tated by BISX.

Power plant opponents
‘challenge all permits’

FROM page 1B

ing Judicial Review proceedings was build-
ing.

“Please be advised that we are instructed
to challenge the issuance of any permits
on the basis that, inter alia, that our clients’
concerns have not been considered or tak-
en into account by the relevant decision-
makers,” Mr Smith warned in the letter.

He then asked the Government agen-
cies to confirm “the nature of the permits
issued” for construction work on the Wilson
City plant to proceed, and to who the per-
mits were issued.

Also requested by Mr Smith and his
clients were the names of government

departments/agencies responsible for issu-
ing the permits, when the permits were
issued, and details of any further approvals
being considered by the authorities. Copies
of the permits approved to date are also
being sought.

“We would be remiss if we did not
express our clients’ extreme disappoint-
ment at the Government’s continued uni-
lateral actions in this matter, despite its
knowledge of our clients’ legitimate con-
cerns,” Mr Smith wrote.

Referring to an October 8 letter sent to
himself and his clients by Benjamin Pin-
der, the assistant administrator of the south
Abaco local government district, in which
he indicated that “the appropriate author-
ities” would respond to all their questions,
Mr Smith said he and his clients were

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“shocked” to learn that a government min-
ister had said all necessary permits had
been obtained by the administration.

The Callender’s & Co partner added that
he and his clients understood that con-
struction work on the Wilson City plant
had resumed.

Referring to the announcement by Phen-
ton Neymour, minister of state for the envi-
ronment, Mr Smith had told Tribune Busi-
ness on Monday: “"In the face of this
announcement, my clients have no alter-
native but to launch Judicial Review pro-
ceedings, which they will be doing shortly,”
Mr Smith told Tribune Business.

"Regrettably, Judicial Review proceed-
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NOTICE

ESTWICK INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
above-named Company commenced on the 16th
day of October, 2009. The Liquidator is John M.
Lawrence of P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 1000,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF ELSIE JANETTE ALBURY
late of Man-O-War Cay, Abaco, Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certthed to the undersigned
on or before 30" Nowember 2008

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time menboned above, the assets ot the late
ELSIE JANETTE ALBURY will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of
which the Executrix of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Aitomeys for the Executors
Attn: Attorney 5. Smith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
FAO), Box NeZi2
Naaawu, Bahamas,



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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BIC ‘hopeful of return to $40m profits

FROM page 1B

enue.

In BTC’s 2008 annual report, Mr
Griffin revealed that the state-owned
incumbent’s net income had fallen to
$21.1 million from $42.8 million the
year before, “resulting principally from
a1 per cent or $3.5 million decline in
revenues and a 6 per cent or $18.7 mil-
lion increase in operating expenses”.

On the revenue front, Mr Griffin
attributed the drop from $356.915 mil-
lion in 2007 to $353.369 million to an
18 per cent or $9.9 million drop in net
roaming revenues.

“We didn’t stand idly by as we
watched the economy deteriorate. The
Board and management of BTC took
decisive actions to bolster exposure of
promising product lines within the
marketplace, while at the same time,
the company took aggressive action
to reduce and contain costs without
eliminating any of its product offer-
ings,” Mr Griffin said in a statement
issued last night.

“Because of steps that were taken
beginning late last year, at the end of
September our operating expenses are
tracking at $8 million below the
approved 2009 budget due to
enhanced cost-cutting activities.

“At the same time, our revenue is
up by some $8 million above budget
due to targeted and sustained market-
ing and promotional activities. So
even as the economy has yet to
rebound out of the most severe reces-
sion since the Great Depression, we
are tracking for profitability that would
be substantially higher than the $21
million earned in 2008.”

Reason

He added: “The reason that we tem-
per our optimism with caution is
because we recognise that the months
of September through November are

traditionally challenging months for
cellular revenue due to low tourism
arrivals and seasonally adjusted
employment in the industry.

“Thus, while we feel good as to
where we are, we are mindful that the
economy is still stressed and we cannot
say with absolute confidence how the
year willend up. Yet, with continued
creative leadership and continued vig-
ilance on our expenditure, I am hope-
ful that we will be able to end the year
with profits approaching the $40 mil-
lion range — more in line with the prof-
its earned in 2006 and 2007”

In December 2008, BTC dropped
its fees on mobile caller ID, call wait-

ing and voicemail, giving back to its
customers some $6 million in project-
ed revenue for 2009. The company
cut its SMS [texting] rate from $0.10 to
$0.05 and increased the bucket of min-
utes in its post-paid packages, effec-
tively reducing the overage fees it
would otherwise earn from customers.

Mr Griffin added: “So even while
we are cutting costs and seeking to
shore up revenues, we recognise that
persons are having a difficult time in
this economy. Thus, even with no man-
date or competitive pressure to do so,
we have searched hard to find ways
to ease the burden where possible for
our customers. “

Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors

FROM page 1B

Comito said. “In the hotel sec-
tor, we’ve realised that we’ve
got to market more aggressive-
ly. Both the Ministry of
Tourism and the private sector



realise the pie is smaller, and
to retain our proportionate
share of the pie we have to
market more aggressively.
“Now is more important than
ever for businesses to promote

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE LEONARD
ADDERLEY late of Burnt Gorownd in the Island of









Long Island one of

the Islands in the

themselves more aggressively
and make buyers aware of what
they offer, and how it makes a
difference.”

Mr Comito said fees for
booth exhibitors would increase
by $200 this year, as organisers
looked to cover their costs after
subsidising exhibitors last year.

While the economic down-
turn was a factor, the Trade
Show having signed up five

more exhibitors this time last
year, Mr Comito emphasised
the event’s value. He said one
start-up, which exhibited after
just obtaining its Business
Licence last year, obtained its
first customer at the show and
was still in business. Another
company used the Trade Show
to introduce another product
line every year, and one sale of
that product was regarded as a

successful show.

On the energy conserva-
tion/efficiency front, with the
conference scheduled for
November 12, 2009, Mr Comito
added: “The issue of energy
efficiency is glaring in the minds
of businesses, particularly now
we’re starting to see a creep up
in oil prices.

“We know the cost of energy
is a challenge for all of us in the
coming years, and it’s ever
more important that we look
at renewable sources of ener-

”

needed to be a “greater under-
standing” of how the retro-
fitting of companies/homes, and
the importation of renewable
energy equipment, could be
financed.

Jeff Dubel, the US
Embassy’s political/economic
chief, said the Bahamas was
“the perfect test bed to test
these new” renewable energy
technologies, given its geogra-
phy and climate. He pointed
out that 80 per cent of future
greenhouse gas emissions
would come from developing
states.

gy:
fi at yy F D Mr Comito added that there

a gL EAM: ts

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased,



MECHANIC HELPER

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30 Nowember 2009,

BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF MARINE ENGINE & BOAT

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
GEORGE LEONARD ADDERLEY will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then



have had Notice,

WUT:

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & 00.
Atormeys for the Exenators
Atte: Attormey &. Senith
Sassacn How
Shirkey Street de Victoria Aweniue
P.O), Row Me?

Nassau, Rabanveas,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GARTH MINARD
THOMPSON late of #43 Ridgeway Drive, Eastern
District, New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30% November 2009.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
GARTH MINARD THOMPSON will be distributed among
the persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims
of which the Executrix of the Estate shall then have had
Notice.

CRAHAM, THOMPSON & O01
Attorneys for the Executions
Attn: Abfomey 5. Senath
Sasenon, Howse
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
PC. Box N-272
Naaaan, Bahacras,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF LIVINGSTON SINCLAIR
MARSHALL, SK. late of the Settlement of George
Town in the Island of Great Exuma ome of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims. or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
onor before 30% Nevernber 2009,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
LIVINGSTON SINCLAIR MARSHALL, 5R. will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Executor of the Estate
shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & C0.
Alinmneys for the Eearuiices
Attre Attomey §. Smith
Sassoon House
Shisley Sires & Victoria Awenie
P.O. Box N-272
MMaseee, Raharas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NOTICE is hereby given that PHANUEL LOUIMA of
Pinewood Gardens, P.O. BOX GT-2914 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF FETER ANDERSON
SWEETING late of the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2009

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
PETER ANDERSON SWEETING will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Exeoutrix of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Attorney's for the Executors
Attn: Attomey 5. Smith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O). Box M-272
Nassau, Bahamas,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CALVIN BERNELL
SAWYER aka. CALVIN BURNAL SAWYER late
of New Plymouth, Green Turtle Cay, Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate ane
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2009.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned abowe, the assets of the late
CALVIN BERNELL SAWYER aka CALVIN BURNAL
SAWYER will be distributed among the persons entitled
thereto having regard only to the claims of which the
Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & C0),
Attomeys for the Executors
Attn: Attomey 5, Seraith
Sassoon Howse
Shirley Street: Victoria Averrae
PAD, Bos: WA2F2
(Massa, Bahamas,

Fe

I:
for ae

502 2356} 7
rates



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOYCE M. SAWYER aka.
JOYCE SAWYER late of Treasure Cay, Abaco,
Bahamas, deceased,

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested tp send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2iN04,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
JOYCE M. SAWYER aka JOYCE SAWYER will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Executor of the Estate
shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON 00,
Atiomeys for the Executors
Abt Aliomey 5, Seaith
Sassoon House
Sharkey Street d& Victoria Avenue
Pod, Bow N-2?2
Naszva,. Rahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SHEVOLYN TANIQUE
ARMBRISTER Late of Jennie Street in the Southern
Thistrict of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands in the Commonwealth of The Baharnas,

deceased,

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30° Novenmber 2009),

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
SHEVOLYN TANIQUE ARMBRISTER will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Administratrix of the Estate shall
then have had Modice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & 001
Altorneys bor the Euacubors
Attn: Altomey §. Soaith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Aversa
P . Ban M272



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune



COCO Palm’s most popular buy, the
Italian pizza, which comes in different :
flavors, topped with green peppers,
mozzarella, and fresh tomatoes.



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

WALK into the Coco
Palm Café and Takeaway
on Bernard Road and you
will experience an inclu-
sive and unique Bahami-
an-ltalian dining experi-
ence.

Whatever is happening in the
kitchen, the aroma from the food,
the heat from the stove, and the
conversation from the cooks - you’re
not excluded from any of it.

There’s no food passing through a
window; instead you have an open
view of the kitchen, seeing your dish
being made from start to finish.

Tribune Taste first featured the
Coco Palm Café this summer, and
since then the restaurant has creat-
ed quite a buzz for itself in the east-
ern part of New Providence.

Adding a twist to the ordinary,
this establishment offers the best in
Bahamian cuisine fused with Ital-
ian flavours and spices.

Mango and raspberry barbecue
wings; coconut curry; chicken fet-
tucinni, and citrus pork are just a
few of the amazing dishes you will
find at the Coco Palm.

Chef Paul Coakley, owner of the
restaurant, claims they have the best
chicken fettuccini on the island, and
it’s made using his personal top-
secret recipe.

Continuing in the Italian vein, thin
crust pizzas are also on the menu.
They are served by the slice or by
the box and finished with fresh
herbs. The pizzas are a bestseller at
the restaurant, and are often
requested by businesses like Audio
Plus who frequently order up to two
boxes a day, Chef Coakley said.

What’s Coco Palm’s secret recipe
that keeps them coming back? Chef
Coakley says the pizza is simply of a
different calibre. And from what we

tast-



TO





ed, it is certainly different from
‘those other guys.’

If you want to try a pizza that is
lighter on the pallet, with less oil,
check out Coco Palm’s cheese, veg-
etarian or ‘meat amor’ pizzas, all of
which are topped with peppers, pep-
peroni, sausage, sliced tomatoes and
mushrooms.

Fresh vegetables, mozzarella
cheese, pepperoni, Italian sausage,
and herbs like garlic and thyme are
also used to finish the restaurant’s
pizzas.

With prices in the $5 to $15 range,
you definitely get your money’s
worth.

Chef Coakley said he believes
that “the average person should be
able to get quality food that is avail-
able at upscale restaurants.”

And the restaurant lives up to his
motto.

If you peruse Coco Palm’s menu,
you'll see tantalising dishes like rasp-
berry snapper, penne pasta (which
has already been an overnight suc-
cess), and even sausage fettuccini
alfredo.

If yow’re feeling a bit adventur-
ous, the chef suggests you try their
raspberry snapper. It may not be
your first choice, but it’s a top notch
dish with a sauce created with an
Asian cooking technique.

The citrus pork is delicious, but
may be more of an acquired taste.
First, Chef Coakley sears the pork
cutlets in a pan with a little oil, then
bastes them with a smooth sauce
made from mangos, oranges, rasp-
berries and grapes. The dish is then
served with vegetable rice and
coleslaw.

When it comes to the coconut cur-
ry served at Coco Palm’s, Chef
Coakley says it is healthier than
your normal Bahamian curry
because it incorporates lemon grass
and thyme flavours. Indian wet and
dry curry are blended together for
this dish.

Each meal at the Coco Palm Café
is served with home-made bread of
your choice of garlic,
coconut, focaccia, white,
or raisin bread.






SOMETHINGS Different Novelty
Cookies and Cakes donated a 4.15
Ibs, triple chocolate cake with
three layers of chocolate ganache
for a raffle at the Wine and Art
Festival held at the Bahamas
National Trust’s Retreat on Satur-
day.

The lucky winner of this dream
in chocolate was Leah Knowles.

SAMANTHA Moree (right), of Somethings Dif-
ferent Novelty Cookies and Cakes, presents
Leah Knowles with her prize chocolate cake.

THE cake was raffled at this year's Wine and
Art Festival and is a lovely example of the
‘Mosaiced Masterpieces’ that are popular as
gifts and as desserts at fine dinner parties this
season.

DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

¢ Caipirinha Explosion Party at
Churrascaria Humidor
This Friday, 8pm to mid-

night: Graycliff's Churrascaria |

at the Humidor is “bringing

back the good ole daz” with a |

Caipirinha Explosion Party fea-
turing the sounds of the 70s
and 80s.

Admission is $25 a person,
and the first Caipirinha - Brazil’s
national cocktail - is free.

There are also complimen-
tary finger foods and a dinner

option is available at a special |

price for attending.
RSVP at: 302-9150 or email
deanne@graycliff.com

¢ Rhythms of Drums

This Friday and Saturday - |

Back by popular demand, Mitzi
Chipman presents “Rhythms

of Drums” - a Broadway style |

show at the Rainforest Theatre
in the Wyndham Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino. Per-
formers include Tony Seymour

Jr, Ronnie Butler, Veronica |
Bishop, and dancers Metellus |

Chipman and Fontella Chip-
man-Rolle.

General admission is $40;
VIP Gold tickets are $75.

Doors open at 6.30pm and
show time is 8.30pm.

For more information con-
tact the Rainforest Theatre Box

Office; the Bahamas Musicians |

and Entertainers Union or the

Junkanoo n’ Things kiosk in }

the Marina Village, Atlantis.

¢ Parish Fair of the Anglican
Church of the Epiphany

This Saturday, 12noon to
6pm, Prince Charles Drive, near

Colony Village - The Anglican |

Church of the Epiphany invites

Bahamians to enjoy a day of |

family fun, culminating with a
fireworks display.

Prior to the fair, there is a
patio sale, plant sale and thrift
shop, starting at 6am.

The fair will offer an array of
delicious food and entertain-

ment for young and old. Kids |

can enjoy a bouncy castle, face-

painting, a merry-go-round and |) Ut I
' will show up. In this case that person

was American actor Wayne Legette.

loads of other fun activities.

¢ BAIC’s 12th Annual
BahamArts Festival

This Friday through Sunday,
10am to 11pm at Arawak Cay -
The Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)

presents the BahamArts Festi- |

val 2009 under the theme 'Tra-
dition Made Modern", promot-

ing Bahamian made arts, crafts |

and souvenirs.

Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Bahamas Defence
Force Band, Gospel Groups, the
Falcon Band and the Pathfind-

ers Marching Band. For more |

information contact Le-Var
Miller, Sharae Collie or Pamela
Deveaux at 322-3740/3.

¢ Free Career Development
Workshop

This Saturday, 10am to |
College of the |

12noon,
Bahamas -Organizational Soul
invites persons seeking a job
or promotion to attend a free
career workshop which aims
to teach people how to empha-

sise their strengths and chart a |

course to improve their earning
potential.

The workshop is sponsored
by Corporate Education Solu-
tions (Bahamas and Caribbean)
and Rotary Club Nassau Sun-
rise, and is hosted by Yvette
Bethel, regional director of CES
Bahamas and Caribbean. For
more information contact 424-
7166. Space is limited so reg-
ister early at info@orgsoul.com.

e First All Ceramic Exhibition

opening night of this must-see

event hosted by Jessica's Tile- |
works Studio, come on out this |

week to see the incredible sub-

missions from local cerami- |

cists and potters.
The exhibition is being held

at Popopstudios located on |

Dunmore Avenue in Chipping-
ham until November 13. Tele-
phone number: 322-7834
Gallery viewing hours are
Wednesdays through Satur-
days from 1pm to 5pm, or by
appointment with Jessica Cole-
brooke, contact 324-3533.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





The Hub hosts a

| six-week acting

course with
American actor
Wayne Legette

By REUBEN SHEARER

| Tribune Features Reporter

ERHAPS one of the

most common com-

plaints of Bahamians is
that there’s not much to do on
this 21 by seven mile island.
You can only go to the
movies, hit up the mall or frol-
ick on the beach so many
times before it gets old. Even
if you are a regular on the
party scene, you can still feel
that your recreational options
are extremely limited.

It was the self-appointed task of Tri-
bune Entertainment to discover new
and exciting activities that you would
normally be reluctant to try. We found
that if you actively search for things
to do, you'll discover that there not
that many limitations to what this
island has to offer.

For instance, we hear there’s a salsa
dance class happening every week at
The Caves out west. Bahamians from

all walks of life are taking advantage of
it, and there’s a dinner afterwards -

|) you can’t beat that! Maybe that’s the

reason why it’s become so popular.
But we’ll get you the scoop on that
for an upcoming edition of Tribune
Entertainment. Today, we concentrate
on a special workshop that is current-
ly underway at The Hub on Bay Street.

Opportunity Knocks

When former Miss Bahamas World
Ordain Moss informed Tribune Enter-
tainment of a six-week acting work-
shop she was hosting on Saturdays,
we thought this would be a great idea.

Of course, Bahamians support any-
thing that seems well-organised and
reputable, and when there is a rep-
utable person behind a cause, people

With 20 years experience in the
business, the actor has played roles in
productions like ‘Westside Story’;
‘Rags’; ‘Romeo and Juliet’ (the stage
play); ‘Proposal’, ‘The Boys Next

| Door’; ‘The Woman In Black’; ‘The

Wild Party’, and ‘November.’
But he doesn’t toot his own horn,
the class speaks for itself.

Workshop Day

First on the schedule were concen-
tration exercises, where participants
were paired up and the task was to
mirror the other person’s movements
without using any sounds.

For those of us that were new to
this activity, let’s just say that the lack
of experience showed. It was good to
keep in mind that it was all in good
fun.

ae

SCENE! The class poses for a photo at the end of the first workshop.

“Great job guys, good concentra-
tion,” Mr Legette would say during
each pair’s concentration exercise.
While he made you think you did a
good job, you’d often wonder if he
was just trying to make you feel good,
after all he is an experienced actor.

Concentration was difficult for
some, with some partners making fun-
ny faces and others showing off dance
moves that date back to the 80’s. The
goal of each pair was to be in-sync
with each other, creating chemistry,
which is the key to a good perfor-
mance.

Mr Legette attempted to explain
the goal of the exercise:

“The mirror acting exercise is just a
simple concentration exercise using
your partner, getting centered, ignor-
ing everyone else in the room, which is
essential to do when you’re perform-
ing.”

At the end of the day you’re only as
good as the person you’re acting with,
Mr Legette said.

“When you’re doing any kind of
acting, 99 per cent of the time you’re
going to be relying on the person
you'll be acting with. In order to doa
scene well with someone you have to
automatically trust them.”

For an actor, this trust must be nur-
tured through activities like improvi-
sation (or ‘improv’) skits, which have
become quite popular in recent times,
because of their spur-of-the-moment
nature.

The only rule to the improv session
was that none of the actors’ could
respond with the word “no,” which
would bring the skit to a halt. I had to
learn that the hard way! With no
memorised lines, I was thrown into
the mix with one overarching thought:
“Move with the flow, say whatever
comes to mind.”

“You will end up doing better work
if you just let it happen,” said Mr Leg-
ette, who paired us up on set to act out
ascene. The characters, location, and

first line of the skit were then decided
on by the class.

Things got interesting as each par-
ticipant morphed into a different char-
acter. In one skit, experienced actor
Onike Archer, who was a cast mem-
ber in the acclaimed Shakespeare in
Paradise production, played opposite
Keisha Johnson.

The setting for their scene was a
train station; their roles, a mother and
daughter, and the first line: “I can’t
believe you just did that!”

It was hilarious and the ladies deliv-
ered the best improv skit, in my opin-
ion, out of everyone who performed.

Monologues and Deep Breathing

Naturally reserved, workshop par-
ticipant Jason Cunningham said he
has never acted before, but that was
hard to believe after having seen his
superb performance during the mono-
logue session.

The 24-year-old played the char-
acter of a neurotic man who didn’t
have much success with women, vent-
ing his frustrations to his best friend.
The class demanded an encore, and
he did just that, with some minor
adjustments to his delivery, but still
looking like a pro out there.

“At one point in life I used to be shy,
but experiences like these have helped
me better express myself in a crowd,”
he told Tribune Entertainment.

Proper breathing exercises were
next. At the instruction of Mr Leg-
ette, each person lay down on the
floor and deeply inhaled, then
exhaled. Switching things up, we
inhaled and held our breath for a few
seconds.

Then we tuned our voices by giving
off “ha” sounds in different tones
while exhaling. The room began to
sound like a full choir warming up for
performance.

Afterwards, a lunch of your choice
of roast beef, turkey, ham, and veggie
sandwiches, (from Tracey Chea’s

&

THE TRIBUNE


















kitchen), chips, and iced tea was
served to us. After a downtime, the
last segment of the day’s workshop
was a series of monologue perfor-
mances, where each student was given
a piece to perform in front of the class.
All participants were rooted to the
spot as they listened to Ordain Moss’
winsome monologue, in which she
spoke about her lover and their rela-
tionship problems.
No stranger to acting, she took pri-
vate lessons with Mr Legette about
two months ago, in Naples, Florida.
“He is really good at what he does
and what I learnt at the private lessons
with Mr Legette has made me so
much better,” she said.

Final Thoughts

Ms Moss described the latest work-
shop session as “amazing,” and said it
turned out to be much better than she
expected.
“Everyone was outgoing and was
eager to participate,” she said.

So far, response to the workshop
has been favourable.

The first workshop started with just
three students on October 3, but num-
bers increased and an additional eight
students joined the sessions at the
second workshop; a few of them
young actors like De-Anthia Johnson,
who will star in an upcoming teenage
drama called ‘Dreamer,’ which is
shooting in a matter of weeks.

The Wayne Legette Acting work-
shop began on October 3 and will con-
tinue until December 12, taking place
every other Saturday.

The third workshop will be held this
Saturday from 11am to 3pm.

You can contact Ordain Moss at
324-2336 or 425-5266 to reserve your
spot for this week’s session. At the
end of the workshop, participants will
be awarded a certificate of comple-
tion.

Interested persons aged 17 and up
are invited to register.

Combatting and Surviving the Recession

The focus of the 9th Annual Home
and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition

EACH year, organisers of the
Bahamas Home and Builders Trade
Show and Exhibition seek to not only
make the show bigger and better, but
also more in sync with what’s happen-
ing locally and globally. Therefore, as
the world and the Bahamas battle the
effects of a global recession, the organ-
isers, Special Events Bahamas Limited,
have decided to dedicate this year’s
event to theme “Combatting and Sur-

|| viving the Recession.”
For those who missed the |

The 9th Annual Home and Builders
Show, which will be held this Satur-
day and Sunday in the ballroom of the
Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach from
10am to 6pm, will focus on how per-
sons can ride out the economic down-
turn while preparing for the way for-
ward.

Along with informative educational
seminars and workshops including spe-
cial “DIY- Do It Yourself” sessions,
exhibitors have been invited to show-
case the latest energy and cost saving
technologies.

President of Special Events
Bahamas Limited Nikita Curtis said:

|| “People need to be prepared for after

this recession is over and attending
this year’s show will show them just
how to do that.”

As usual, the event - which attracted
approximately 4,000 people last year -
will boast over 50 exhibitors from the
Bahamas, the United States, Canada
and even China.

The general public will also have an
opportunity to win over $50,000 in
prizes and give-aways.

The change of focus of this year’s
event will also be reflected in the prizes
that any and everyone can use.
According to Mr Curtis, “The prizes
will be more relevant to the economic
environment.”

Examples of the new and improved
timely prizes include $100 vouchers
which can be used to pay various util-
ity bills along with the ever popular
cellular phone cards.

Mr Curtis and his team invite the
entire family to attend the 9th Annual
Home and Builders Show.

"Even if you aren't building, there is
important timely information that will
be dissimulated at this year's show that
anyone can use.”

== Bia

4)

Exhibition.

The Annual Home and Builders
Trade Show and Exhibition has
evolved into a highly anticipated event
which is frequented by persons direct-
ly and indirectly involved in the con-
struction and home industry. Home
owners, potential home owners, busi-
ness owners, contractors, sub-contac-
tors and persons seeking to spruce up
their home and businesses with more
energy saving devices should plan to

ay

SHOWN here are attendees of last year’s Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and



attend this year's show.

Admission to this year’s event is $3
per person, but attendees can log on to
http:/Awww.bahcon.com and print out
an admission ticket for free, or pick
up a free entry passes at any of the
participating vendor locations. As for
persons who don’t mind paying the
minor fee, this donation will be used
towards a scholarship fund for the
Bahamas Society of Engineers.





an
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

an
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11B

ARTS





High tea and high f

ISS Bahamas World 2009 Joanna

Brown, in her role as goodwill

ambassador, is spearheading a
project that is designed to raise money for
children with special learning needs.

Ms Brown, a Grand
Bahama native, is inviting
Bahamians to join her this
Friday for ‘high tea’ and
high fashion in a major
fundraiser at Government
House on behalf of the Bea-
con School.

The Beacon School was
opened in 1998 for special
needs children.

It was formerly known as
the School for Exceptional
Children. The school pre-
pares its students for life
after school, and in some
cases, its students are
returned to mainstream
education in schools like
Jack Hayward, St Georges,
Eight Mile Rock High and
even in private institutions.
The Beacon School offers
technical and vocational
training in addition to the
core academic subjects like
languages, mathematics and
social sciences.

The technical and voca-
tional curriculum includes
computer enrichment, cos-
metology, home economics,
pottery and agriculture, and
the courses are integral to
the development of daily
and independent living skills
in the school’s students. The
school is committed to the
belief that there is some-
thing that every child can
do.

A total of $50,000 is need-
ed to establish an arts and
crafts centre at the school,
which administrators

MISS Bahamas
World 2009
Joanna Brown



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believe can further help stu-
dents to prepare for pro-
ductive living. A building
just across the street from
the school has been ear-
marked for this centre, how-
ever, it requires some work.

The money raised at the
tea party will go towards
upgrading the building, as
well as providing the sup-
plies for the centre, where
students will be taught to
make commercial jams and
jellies, pottery and other
artworks for sale. A small
shop selling the items cre-
ated by the students will
also be housed in the build-
ing.

"Tf this project is a suc-
cess it will make a differ-
ence in the lives of the kids
at the Beacon School," said
Miss Bahamas Organisation
president Michelle Mal-
colm.

This is the second consec-
utive year that the Miss
Bahamas Organisation has
partnered with the Ministry
of Tourism to stage a Miss
Bahamas World/People to
People Tea Party and fash-
ion show.

The event will be held on
Friday from 4pm to 6pm at
Government House.
Patrons attending the
fundraiser will be treated to
a Beat Retreat by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force
Band, and will entertained
by the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Pop Band and

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Miss Bahamas World Tal-
ent Winner Devera Pinder.
Also on display will be fab-
ulous Androsia and
Bahama Hand print fash-
ions. Patrons attending the
event will be the first to see
Miss Bahamas World’s
wardrobe for her month-
long stay in South Africa at
this year’s Miss World com-
petition.

In addition to raising
funds for the Beacon School
through the silent auction,
Miss Bahamas World will
also lead the charge for
another initiative that will
involve retail shoppers.
More information on that
second phase of her
fundraising efforts will be
announced soon.

ashion in aid of special needs students

Tickets can be purchased
at the event, but those plan-
ning on attending are
advised to RSVP to the
Miss Bahamas Organisation
at their e-mail address
info@missbahamas.net in
order reserve seats. Organ-
isers said while they under-
stand that everyone is feel-
ing the pinch in these tough
economic times, they hope
that Bahamians will support
this worthy cause.

Joanna Brown leaves for
the Miss World Pageant on
November 4.

The pageant will be
broadcast live from Johan-
nesburg, South Africa, on
ZNS TV on December 12,
and on the E! Network in
the United States.

NEW
BOOK

Westward:
The Walk of a Bahamian Doctor

By Dr. Harold Munnings

www.munningswestward.com

Available at Grosvenor Medical Centre

Tel: 328-5550

At selected local bookstores and online at xlibris.com



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS







The Huh
hosts six-
week acting

COUrSE
see page 10













The Bahamas —
meets Italy at-thee

Coco Palm Cafe
See page ninety

5

ae

az

The Tribune SECTION B ¢

t *

eS -















WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009










Exploring
indigenous
raw
materials
to produce
divine
creations

By MARION WRIGHT

ence | felt moved to tell a story about an aggressive and innovative arti-

Te past week after traversing the inner-city streets of central New Provi-
d

san, whose work speaks with total relevance to the current economic cli-
mate and the need for cultural reinforcement.

Renaissance craftsman Troy Nixon,
who also answers to the name ‘Straight
Up’, captivates through the concept of
transforming what is considered refuse,
materials mostly from coconut trees,
into works of art.

Mr Nixon desires for the craft to be
documented and placed within the cur-
riculum of the country’s high schools.

He hopes that getting young, fresh
and creative minds involved in this
genre of expression will, with consistent
effort, usher in a new raw material
trend within the native craft production
industry.

Just consider the role that the straw
plait in its harvested form has played
since the first vendors proudly dis-
played their meticulously hand-crafted
wares for sale.

Today, the straw plait continues to
dominate the craft market scene and
remains an integral part of the tourist
experience.

By his own admission, ‘Straight Up’
has only recently broken the surface in
this craft that permits imaginary aero-
bics and creative brazenness.

In 2003, Mr Nixon was the victim of a
terrible automobile accident. Doctors
told him that he would most likely lose
movement in one leg.

Undergoing 12 surgeries, the 38-year-
old artist said the accident and its con-
sequences led him to reinvent himself.

With lots of free time to spare as he
recovered from his ordeal, Mr Nixon
said that he made the crossover from
more traditional art forms to his current
medium.

He said he was helped in this by the
Almighty God.

For the past ten months now,
‘Straight Up’ said he has been guided
by God towards perfecting his craft. He
explained that he undergoes a religious
rapture at times when he is most pro-
ductive.

In instances such as these, he said, he
cannot focus on anything or anyone
else; it is strictly about releasing the cre-
ativity within for a higher purpose, he
said.

Mr Nixon’s works portray a level of
skill and ingenuity that is perhaps
rivalled in detail by only a practitioner

of taxidermy.

When asked about the source of
inspiration for each piece, Mr Nixon
said it becomes difficult to separate the
apparent spirituality that can be seen in
the work and the feeling which comes
from “the belly.”

One of Straight Up’s pieces, ‘Mother
Africa’, depicts an African woman in
the last trimester of pregnancy. This
piece, he said, is the most poignant of
his creations.

A few of his subjects depict scenes
from the Bahamas’ past, particularly
from his beloved Exuma.

Mr Nixon’s mother hails from
Williams Town and his father comes
from Farmer’s Cay. Smack boats and
dinghies were the workhorses for those
men who chose to support themselves
and their families from what the sea
provided by means of fishing, sponging,
or cargo delivery.

Wind provided the primary source of
power seconded by the technique of
‘sculling’ - using oars to propel a boat or
other craft.

‘Straight Up’ laments the fact that
there are so few authentic Bahamian
souvenirs available to tourists, and it is
his belief that Bahamians will eventual-
ly lose more of our market share as
time progresses.

He said he wants Bahamians to think
in unconventional terms that may not
have factored into past means of pro-
ducing art.

Mr Nixon is also concerned that too
little use of our indigenous materials for
the purpose of producing saleable
goods could furnish others with the
opportunity to discover and develop
production techniques resulting in prof-
it without benefits for Bahamians.

So the next time you catch a glance of
coconut tree webbing, branch stems, or
spent husks, think not only of ‘Straight
Up’, but rather look around further and
investigate your surroundings for that
next readily available indigenous raw
material that will allow you to display
your inner brilliance.

Those interested in ‘Straight Up’s’
work can contact him at troystraight-
up@yahoo.com. The artist will be
launching a website later in the year.



Full Text
Pim bowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.280

6)
ar
(=
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<<
ar
pr



Teckless outburst

S6F
76F

SUN WITH
3° FSTORM

Gani

MP apologises
for Travolta
case mistrial

By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

THE MP who} —
brought about the |
mistrial in the John |¢
Travolta $25million |
attempted extortion

case yesterday
issued a public apol-
ogy

South Andros MP
Picewell Forbes described
his outburst at the PLP con-
vention as “reckless” as he
said sorry to Senior Justice
Anita Allen, the judiciary,
and the country at large.

Forbes admitted he did
not verify the information
which was given to him
regarding the alleged acquit-
tal of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater before
he repeated it to the nation
via radio and television.

As a consequence Senior
Justice Allen said she was
forced to call a mistrial and
discharge the jury who had
yet to return a verdict. At



SENIOR JUSTICE
Anita Allen

the time she said
Forbes’s announce-
ment “leaves the
impression that
there may have
been a communica-
tion from the jury
room”.

At a media gath-
ering yesterday, a
"| contrite Forbes said:
“My statements
concerning the
acquittal of Ms
Pleasant Bridgewater were
not true as the jury was still
in deliberations.

“My statements were
reckless and interfered with
the course of justice in that
case and were further capa-
ble of bringing into disre-
pute the whole administra-
tion of justice.”

As a result, the often
colourful and rambunctious
MP said he took sole
responsibility for his actions.

“JT hereby unequivocally
and without qualifications
offer my apology to
Madame Senior Justice Ani-
ta Allen in particular, and

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/?

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



my Lhe Iribune

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 PRICE -75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

eS
al
AND REAL as

BAHAMAS BIGGEST &

Picewell Sorry '

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



7
ro
SOUTH ANDROS MP Picewell Forbes speaks yesterday.

John S George president
accused of failure to pay
$100k in NIB contributions

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

HARDWARE §s giant
John S George president,
Andrew Wilson, appeared
in Magistrates Court yester-
day accused of failure to pay
more than $100,000 in
National Insurance Board
contributions.

The company president
was one of two employers
arraigned in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street, to be ordered to
pay the National Insurance
Board (NIB) a total of
$185,893.14 in missed con-
tributions yesterday.

In the same court on
Monday, 12 employers were
ordered to pay a total of
$86,632.97 in outstanding

Marathon Mall «

contributions.

John S George president
Wilson was charged with
failure to pay $113,412.79 to
the NIB between February
2007 and June 2008, and
again between August 2008
and January 2009, on behalf
of Rose Colby and other
employees.

He was ordered to return
to the court on November
9 for settlement.

Brian Adderley, manag-
ing director of Hyvac
Bahamas Limited, was
charged yesterday with fail-
ure to pay NIB contirbu-
tions amounting to
$72,480.35 between Febru-
ary 2003 and October 2008,
on behalf of Daniel Stubbs

SEE page seven





SEE PAGE ELEVEN





Three accused of armed
robbery of eight tourists

By MEGAN REYNOLDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TWO men and a woman have been accused of rob-
bing eight tourists in downtown Nassau.

Ruben Johnson, 18, of Eneas Jumper Corner, and
Johnny Guerrier, 19, of Soldier Road, each face eight
armed robbery charges. They are also accused of being
armed with a handgun as they robbed eight men and
women of cash and jewellery while concerned with



others.

SEE page eight

Expert says tourism won't
rebound for another year

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WHILE hotel performance
for September and October
appears to be "slightly bet-
ter" than the same period last
year, a tourism expert does
not expect the industry to ful-
ly rebound from the grips of
the economic downturn for at
least another year.

Frank Comito, executive
vice-president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association, said
despite what he expects to be
a modest boost in perfor-
mance over the last two
months, the sector should
remain braced for a rough
ride lasting until late 2010,
early 2011.

He said: "We have a very
difficult several months that
we are going through right
now. We anticipated that this

would be one of the most dif-
ficult periods we would face
but we're hopeful our busi-
ness activity will hold its own
over these couple of months
or be slightly better than last
year at this time.

"Our indicators said that
our activity for September
and October is slightly better
over last year. We don't antic-
ipate coming out of this eco-
nomic difficult time without
any robust activity for at least
the next year but we're hop-
ing we will continue to see
some slow steady improve-
ment as confidence is restored
globally and there are many
signs indicating that."

Mr Comito spoke to The
Tribune on the sidelines of a
press conference to announce
an upcoming energy confer-
ence and business trade show

SEE page eight

393-4155 * Mon-Fri 10am-8pm ¢ Sat 10am-9pm ¢ All major credit cards accepted. Sorry no debit cards accepted.





ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

BIC optimistic Ardastra Gardens launches

that fiscal year will .
educational workshops

show improvement



THE Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company says
it is “cautiously optimistic”
that the 2009 fiscal year
will show a marked
improvement in profit per-
formance despite the ongo-
ing recession.

This comes after it was
revealed that BTC earned
$20 million less last year
than the year before.

Acting president and
CEO Kirk Griffin said:
“The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies
all through the Bahamas
and all over the world —
faced a difficult 2008 due
to the severe downturn in
the global and national
economy.”

“As people travelled less,
it meant that there were
less tourists making calls in
the Bahamas. This trans-
lated into a sizable fall-off
in our roaming revenue. As
businesses contracted and
laid staff off, it meant that
there was less money in the
economy for persons to
spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It
really is that simple,” he
said.

BTC added that it has
not been standing idle in
the face of a sluggish econ-



omy, but has been adjust- }
ing accordingly to improve }

its revenue prospects.

“The board and man- }
agement of BTC took deci- }
sive actions to bolster }
exposure of promising }
product lines within the }
marketplace, while at the }
same time, the company }
took aggressive action to }
reduce and contain costs }
without eliminating any of }
its product offerings,” Mr }

Griffin said.

“Because of steps that }
were taken beginning late }
last year, at the end of Sep- }
tember our operating }
expenses are tracking at $8 :
million below the approved }
due to:
enhanced cost-cutting ;

2009 budget

activities.

“At the same time, our }
revenue is up by some $8 }
million above budget due }
to targeted and sustained ;
marketing and promotion- ;

al activities.

“So even as the econo- }
my has yet to rebound out }
of the most severe reces- }
sion since the Great }
Depression, we are track- ;
ing for profitability that ;
would be substantially :
higher than the $21 million ;

earned in 2008,” he said.

‘All About...’
events designed
for children
between

five and 12

ARDASTRA Gardens,
Zoo and Conservation Cen-
tre bustled with activity over
the weekend as the first ever
“All About....” workshop
was launched.

“All About....” is series
educational workshops and
seminars designed specifi-
cally for children between
the ages of 5 and 12 years
old.

The first workshop was
entitled, “All About Enrich-
ment”. Kelly Hobbs, cura-
tor of Ardastra Gardens and
Zoo, told participants that
animals, like humans, can
sometimes get bored.

To alleviate that boredom,
she said, animals need out-
lets through which they can
“learn and discover new
things, new smells, and even
new objects — that’s where
enrichment comes in”.

Ms Hobbs talked about
specific types of enrichment
for various species residing
at Ardastra.

She and the children made
treats which they gave to the
animals and the attendees
were able to witness some
animal enrichment first
hand. This was the highlight
of the seminar, according to
11-year-old Jazmin Agecb,
who attended the workshop
with her brother and cousin.

Michael Jimenez, director

“

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Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.

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Tel: 242-322-677-1441

”



of business and administra-
tion and creator of the “All
About...” series, said the
workshops were created to
affirm Ardastra’s commit-
ment to education.

“It is a commitment that
was first made by our late
owner Mr Norman Solomon
and we are pleased to con-
tinue his vision. Additional-
ly, these workshops will com-
plement the existing educa-
tional programmes at
Ardastra,” he said.

The workshops take place
one Saturday each month.
On November 28, the topic
will be, “All About Carni-
vores”.

A CAPUCHIN monkey
enjoying a treat bag.

“
SN
>»

GJohnson

Ce ae Oke


























ENRICHMENT bags all made...ready to give the animals.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION
Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION
Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FRAUD charges were
brought against four men and
one woman arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday accused
of defrauding the Royal Bank
of Canada and other establish-
ments earlier this year.

The five working profession-
als, some of whom faced sever-
al charges, entered not guilty
pleas to all charges against them.

Christoff Hanna, 46, a driver
who lives in Adelaide Gardens,
New Providence, faced four
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. He is accused of obtain-
ing $991.04 from Nassau branch-
es of the Royal Bank of Canada
(RBC) by means of false pre-
tenses.

The four counts against Han-
na allege that he obtained
$247.76 from RBC in Bay Street
on May 8; $247.76 from RBC in
Mackey Street on May 19;
$247.76 from RBC in Mackey
Street on June 3; and $247.76
from RBC in Bay Street on
June 16.

Magistrate Guillimina Archer
granted him $3,000 bail with
sureties.

Businesswoman Bloneva
Mackey, 51, of Adderley and
Dorsette Street, faced five
counts of fraud by false pre-
tenses. Four counts allege intent
to defraud RBC of a total of
$1,180. She is accused of obtain-
ing $295 in cash from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on May 5;
another $295 from RBC in
Prince Charles Drive on June
2; $295 from RBC in
Carmichael Road on June 15;
and $295 from RBC in Prince
Charles Drive on June 29.

Mackey is also accused of
obtaining $295 in goods and
cash from Milo B Butler and
Sons Limited in Peach Street on
May 22.

Mackey pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted

Pe

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth CLS

~ Solid Wood

October 27 -









5 DAYS}

I HALLOWEEN CANDY :

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS

Five accused of defrauding
the Royal Bank of Canada

TRAVARUS BARROW and Christoff Hanna.

$4,000 bail with sureties.

Security officer Travarus Bar-
row, 35, of Alexandria Boule-
vard, Nassau Village, faced
fraud charges on two counts.
Barrow is accused of obtaining
$147.36 from RBC in Prince
Charles drive by means of false
pretenses on May 19, and he is
further accused of intent to
defraud the same bank in Prince
Charles Drive of $146.36 by
means of false pretenses on June
2:

Barrow pleaded not guilty to
the charges and was granted
$1,000 bail with sureties.

Electrician Lamarison Rolle,
24, of Davis and Bain Street,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is alleged to
have obtained $195.60 in goods
and cash from Super Value food
store in Nassau Street on June
19 by means of false pretenses.

Rolle plead not guilty to the
charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.

Surveyor Frank Moxey, 27,
of Isles Way off Soldier Road,
faced one count of fraud by false
pretenses as he is accused of
intent to defraud RBC in Prince

of er ss !
FRANK MOXEY and Lamarison Rolle

Charles Drive of $363.30 by
means of false pretenses on June

Moxey pleaded not guilty to
the charge and was granted $800
bail with sureties.

All of the accused opted to
have their cases heard in the
Magistrates Court. They are due

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“Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

to return to Court Ten in Nas-
sau Street on March 1, 2010.

A further six people are
expected to be summoned to
court to face similar charges.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
a LL
NAO)
gute Pace eC
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an

%\ of Nassau

&

MORLEY Qa FOR MEN

are proud to present their

Annual Soliday
cyfashion Show

in aid of

The Bahamas
Humane Society

on Tuesday, 24th November, 2009
at the

British Colonial Hilton

12 noon - Cocktails
Ipm - Luncheon/Show
Valet Parking Available

Donation $60.00

Tickets at Cole's of Nassau on
Parliament Street
Tel: 322-8393 / 328-7157

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(Ww

6

PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

(ln

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Nordic countries top gender gap index again

NEW YORK (AP) — Women
remain far behind men in economic and
political power, but the Nordic coun-
tries come closest to closing the gender
gap, according to a survey of 134 nations
released Tuesday.

The four Nordic countries — Finland,
Iceland, Norway and Sweden — have
topped the Global Gender Gap Index
since it was first released in 2006 by the
Geneva-based World Economic Forum.

They did so again this year, but Ice-
land replaced Norway at the top of the
list with a score of 82.8 percent, meaning
it came closest to 100 percent gender
equality.

Two African countries — South
Africa and Lesotho — entered the list of
the top 10 countries for the first time
while four others remained, New
Zealand, Denmark, Ireland and the
Philippines.

At the bottom of the list were Qatar,
Egypt, Mali, Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia,
Benin, Pakistan, Chad and Yemen in
last place with a score of 46.1 percent.
Several countries near the bottom,
including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India,
Bahrain, Ethiopia and Morocco, made
gains from the 2008 rankings.

While many nations have made some
progress toward gender equality, no
country has closed the gap when it
comes to economic participation and
opportunity, educational attainment,
political empowerment, and health and
survival.

“Girls and women make up one half
of the world’s population,” the forum’s
founder and executive chairman, Klaus
Schwab, said in a statement, “and with-
out their engagement, empowerment
and contribution, we cannot hope to
achieve a rapid economic recovery nor
effectively tackle global challenges such
as climate change, food security and
conflict.”

Saadia Zahidi, head of the forum’s
Women Leaders and Gender Parity
Program, told a news conference launch-
ing the survey that of the 115 countries

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in the original index four years ago, 99
have made progress in closing their gaps
— but 16 haven’t “and have actually
deteriorated.”

The survey shows that on health, “the
world is doing fairly well,” closing over
96 percent of the gap in resources
between women and men, Zahidi said.
On education, about 93 percent of the
gap has been closed but on economic
participation and opportunity only 60
percent has been closed and on political
empowerment only 17 percent.

“So basically what we’re saying is that
across the world, in general, women are
starting to be almost as healthy and
almost as educated as men — obvious-
ly with major exceptions — but those
resources are not being used efficiently
in terms of economic participation and
certainly not in terms of political deci-
sion-making,” Zahidi said.

Melanne Verveer, the U.S. ambas-
sador for global women’s issues, said
the index “underscores that gender
equality is critical to a country’s eco-
nomic prosperity and competitiveness.”

“It remains a simple fact that no coun-
try could prosper if half its people are
left behind,” she said. “Yet, women are
still largely under-represented also in
parliament and legislatures of nearly
every country, and I might add so too in
the boardrooms of corporations.”

In the latest survey, the United States
dropped from 27th place to 31st place in
the rankings as a result of minor drops
in the participation of women in the
economy and improvements in the
scores of previously lower-ranked coun-
tries, according to the survey.

Verveer noted that the first bill Pres-
ident Barack Obama signed into law
was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act
making it easier for workers to sue for
pay discrimination, but she stressed:
“We have a long road to go no matter
where we live.”

(This article is by Edith M Lederer
of the Associated Press)



—=. =



The banking
market in
the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me to pref-
ace this missive with a short
overview of what has hap-
pened in this country.

First of all, clearly there are
negative manifestations that
have presented itself into our
environment. The ill-paved
roads, filthy sidewalks and
residences hosting derelict
vehicles which is common-
place in New Providence is
by no means an overnight
occurrence.

Secondly, the disparity
between the wealthy and the
poor has grown so dramati-
cally over the past few years
that it has significantly con-
tributed to the weakening of
our social fabric.

Third, ethnic self-hatred
has ingrained itself so deeply
into our society that it has
become almost palpable and
is reflected in the blatant dis-
regard that we have for each
other. Therefore as we pre-
pare ourselves to embrace
globalisation, a move which
1s perhaps a decade too late
but nevertheless one that we
must still undertake, we clear-
ly need to redesign the way
we empower the citizens of
our country.

The Honourable Prime
Minister has made such a pro-
found statement that perhaps
it will be enshrined as his
legacy. Mr Ingraham
expressed concerns as to the
way banks operate in this
country.

Mr Ingraham is quoted as
saying: “I find it very dis-
tasteful, and I am very
annoyed by it quite frankly,
angered would be a better
word, that some of the banks
in The Bahamas are able to
repatriate huge profits from
The Bahamas and pay minus-
cule sums”.

This is the first time in
recent memory that, even as
oblique as this statement is,
a Bahamian leader has shown
that he has grasped the
inequities being meted out on
the citizen by our selfsame
social and financial policies.

It is important that the
underlying meaning of the
Prime Minister’s statement
become a part of a frame-
work to assist the citizen as
we embrace globalisation.
Would it be fair to read into
this statement that perhaps
Mr Ingraham would like to

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see a change in the way large
institutions contribute to this
country? Could we read into
this statement that the spon-
soring of sporting events and
junkanoo is no longer suffi-
cient in this newly structured
global economy? Can we
read into this statement that
the time has now arrived
whereby a leader of this coun-
try are prepared to assist the
citizen in accessing venture
or risk capital from foreign
institutions, a la, relaxing our
exchange control policies?
Clearly capitalism demands
that apart from, but not lim-
ited to, taxes, due diligence
or employment policies being
imposed on a financial insti-
tution, little should stand in
the way of that institution’s
growth. Therefore local banks
should not be forced to lend

funds if they choose not to.
However; it is comforting to
know that a new day has
dawned which further
demands that the citizen be
given business friendly poli-
cies such as being allowed to
access foreign capital for
investments. Admittedly this
exists in our present banking
system, but only in a very
restrictive form.

So in embracing globalisa-
tion there is hope that future
leaders of this nation will see
the wisdom in making sure
that local banks will not be
our only way to secure fund-
ing for business projects. Per-
haps it is time to encourage
outside competition in our
local banking market, seeing
that the present funds are
being exported anyway. Or
did I misread the Prime Min-
ister’s statement?

DWAYNE

J HANNA
Nassau,
October 2009.

Cabinet speculation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

YOUR speculation that Minister Neko Grant, previously
appointed to the all important Ministry of Tourism and then to
Public Works & Transport, is going to be appointed Ministerial
“over-lord” for Grand Bahama simply indicates that, with respect,
the Hon Minister, who I call “Mr Sauve”, probably the best
dresser in Parliament, has not met the mark as an administrator.
Surely this post should be a Minister-of-State and no higher?

If the Prime Minister wants action in Grand Bahama I suggest
he takes this on and resigns some of the other long list of respon-
sibilities, then Grand Bahama will have the all-important eco-

nomic focus.

Sidney Collie returning to Cabinet is a further speculation
although this most honourable gentleman who followed to the “T’
correct parliamentary practice, something which you don't see too
often these days, I suggest will remain outside of Cabinet. The
recent defeat of the sitting Greek Government and the immedi-
ate resignation of the previous PM on losing further, adds cre-
dence as to what defeated Prime Ministers are required to do
when defeated; some should note.

The choice of the Prime Minister to be AG will be between
Hon Desmond Bannister and Hon Carl Bethel with more support
to Mr Bethel as clearly he has a better understanding of law, but
then who to Education - the monster problem Ministry?

Will we see a resignation from the Senate and an appoint-
ment from there to the Ministry of Education or more than like-
ly to the position of Attorney General which for the latter is an

obvious serious probability?

W THOMPSON
Nassau,
October 8, 2009.

Funeral arrangements

or

Roger Carron

will be held at
St. Francis Cathedral

onl

West Street
at 3pm

on

Saturday, October 31

Instead of flowers those who wish may make
donations in his memory to either the Breathe
Easy campaign or St. Martin’s Convent. For
the Breathe Easy campaign cheques may be
sent to Ms Michelle Rassin (tel. 302-4707),
Doctors Hospital, P.O. Box N972. Or donations
can be sent to St. Martin’s Convent,
Nassau Street, P.O. Box 940),


an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE



(en
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Kerzner employee charged with stealing
$10,000 by reason of employment

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A KERZNER International employ-
ee was charged with stealing $10,000 from
the company by reason of employment
in Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Lithera Knowles, 28, of Rocky Pine
Road, Nassau, appeared in court ten, Nas-

sau Street, dressed in white linen trousers
and a white button down shirt and stood
as Magistrate Guillimina Archer read the
charges. Knowles is charged on one count
of stealing by reason of employment on
Monday, October 19, in New Providence.

The charge alleges Knowles stole
$10,000 cash from Kerzner International
on Paradise Island, to which she had cus-
tody by reason of her employment.

Private sector to
host alternative
energy conference

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AS the business community
strains under the weight of ris-
ing power costs, the private sec-
tor is hosting a conference to
push for alternative energy poli-
cies.

In addition to being an ener-
gy conference and business
trade show, the event will also
showcase practical energy sav-
ing solutions which can be
implemented immediately to
provide relief to the commer-
cial sector.

The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, the Bahamas Hotel
Association and the US
Embassy will host the event,
which kicks off on November
12.

Event organisers said partic-
ipants can expect an update on
government's National Energy
Policy at the conference while
the trade show will provide a
platform for vendors to show-
case their goods and services —
which will include solar heaters
and generators and other ener-
gy saving devices.

So far 25 exhibitors are lined
up for the trade show however
organisers expect to match last
year's number with around 70

Yee

ew

exhibitors as more persons sign
up to showcase their wares.

"The issue of energy effi-
ciency is an issue that's glaring
in the minds of many businesses
particularly right now as we're
starting to see a creep of the oil
prices again... We know that
the cost of energy will continue
to be a challenge for all of us
over the coming years and the
move toward looking at renew-
able sources of energy that we
can tap into is ever more impor-
tant," said BHA executive vice-
president Frank Comito.

He explained that the trade
show is not just limited to those
specialising in energy efficient
goods but is open to persons in
the tourism industry, market-
ing, food and beverage supplies
and information technology, as
well as representatives of the
international business commu-
nity that offer goods and ser-
vices to the Caribbean.

"It is an opportunity to bring
together buyers and sellers of
goods and services to promote
new business opportunities and
reinforce existing relationships,"
said Mr Comito, who added
that last year's trade show
attracted around 10,000 visitors.

US Embassy spokesman Jeff
Dubell said the American gov-
ernment supports alternative

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THE EVENT will focus on alternative energy devices such as solar panels.

energy initiatives adding that
over 80 per cent of future green-
house gas emissions is expected
to come from developing coun-
tries. He hopes the dialogue on
alternative energy will be con-
tinued on a regional level during
a similar conference in fall 2010.

"We look at the Bahamas as
a perfect test-bed to test some
of these new technologies — it
is an archipelago, you must pro-
vide all these services to the
islands, each island must by self-
sustaining.

"You can work with US com-
panies, develop those new tech-
nologies, build new companies
that maybe you can export to
Latin America and the rest of

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Knowles, represented by attorney Ian
Cargill, pleaded not guilty to the charge
and opted for her case to be heard in the
Magistrate’s Court rather than by a jury in
the Supreme Court.

Ms Archer ordered Knowles to return
to Court Ten in Nassau Street on Febru-
ary 22 of next year.

She was granted $15,000 bail with two
sureties.



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“ast b ¥
the Caribbean," he said.

The conference will feature
local and international speak-
ers and panelists, including
Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, his junior minister
Phenton Neymour and repre-
sentatives from the BEST Com-
mission, the Inter-American
Development Bank, EMERA
and Star Island Resort.

The conference will be held
on November 12 at the Shera-
ton and the trade show is sched-
uled for two days —- November
13 and 14.

ig
aU US
He hay
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Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



CREDIT Suisse

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
Shared Services

is presently considering applications for an
Accountant

The Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an
Accountant:

Requirements:

2-3 years Accounting & Banking experience

Associate or Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Banking & Finance
Excellent oral and written communication skills

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications

Strong mathematical capabilities

Able to multitask

A team player with the ability to work in a fast paced environment
Possess excellent planning, organization and implementation skills
Excellent interpersonal skills

A commitment to service excellence

Duties will include:

Management of Service Level Agreements (SLA) and inter-company/
divisional expense allocation process

Responsible for accounts payable

Responsible for maintenance, analyzing, reconciliation and reporting of
expense

Assist with the booking of monthly accruals

Reconciliation of all general ledger accounts at the appropriate level of
frequency

Respond to queries relating to clients’ and internal expenses
Responsible for International Reporting

Assist Cashier

Benefits provided include:

° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BEIN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
NOVEMBER 6, 2009




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- SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR -

PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Call for Bahamas to back
Cuba’s embargo opposition

UN General Assembly to
vote on draft resolution

By AVA TURNQUEST

THE United Nations
General Assembly meets
today to vote on the draft
resolution submitted by
Cuba requesting an end to
the 50 year US embargo
against the island nation.

On the eve of the vote,
Ambassador of the Repub-
lic of Cuba Jose Luis Ponce
sat down with The Tribune
to emphasise the urgency of
the matter and raise aware-
ness of Cuba’s suffering.

The ambassador
described the US policy
towards his country as a
monumental violation of
human rights, as it discour-
ages other countries from
interacting with Cuba —
essentially “asphyxiating the
Cuban population.”

“T think it’s important for
the international communi-
ty to know, for the Bahami-
an community to know, that
despite their expectations
of the ascension of a new
US government, nothing
has changed,” Mr Ponce
said.

For the past 17 years,
Cuba has submitted the
draft resolution “Necessity
of ending the economic,
commercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States of America
against Cuba” for consider-
ation by the United Nations
General Assembly
(UNGA).

The draft, which will be
presented again today,
reads: “The economic, com-
mercial and financial
embargo imposed by the
United States against Cuba
50 years ago is the most ele-
vated expression of a cruel

and inhuman policy, lack-
ing in legality and legitima-
cy and deliberately designed
to create hunger, illnesses
and desperation within the
Cuban populace. Nothing
has changed through 10 suc-
cessive US governments
other than a tightening of
this policy. Nothing essen-
tial has changed either since
the new US government
was inaugurated in January
2009.”

As a direct consequence
of the embargo, Cuba has
calculated that as of Decem-
ber 2008, the country has
sustained a total of $96 bil-
lion worth of economic
damage.

Last year, an overwhelm-
ing 185 member states,
including the Bahamas, vot-
ed in favour of the resolu-
tion — a near unanimous
demonstration of the inter-
national community’s rejec-
tion of the US government’s
policy against Cuba. How-
ever nothing has changed.

“Although these mea-
sures are a positive step,
they are also extremely
insufficient and limited. The
complex framework of laws
and administrative provi-
sions which make up the
legal basis of the policy of
blockade, designed to
destroy the Cuban econo-
my, remain in place,” the
ambassador said.

This year’s version of the
draft resolution highlights
US Vice President Joseph
Biden’s remark that the US
will maintain the blockade
as “a tool to apply pressure”
on Cuba.

It adds: “Since the acces-
sion of Barrack Obama to
the Presidency of the Unit-





is} ‘oro di ‘ ‘ i
US VICE PRESIDENT Joseph
Biden’s said the US will main-
tain the blockade as ‘a tool to
apply pressure’ on Cuba. (AP)

ed States more than 50 per
cent of the funds collected
by the Office for Foreign
Assets Control, according
to figures of the Treasury
itself, come from the sanc-
tions applied to enterprises
and entities for alleged vio-
lations of the blockade
against Cuba.”
Ambassador Ponce asked
the Bahamas, and all coun-
tries “committed to the
defence of international
law” to once again support
its resolution at the UN.
During the 64th session
of the UNGA earlier this
year, the Bahamas submit-
ted a statement that read:
“The Bahamas enjoys nor-
mal diplomatic and trade
relations with Cuba. The
Bahamas has not promul-
gated or applied laws or
measures against Cuba that
would prohibit economic,
commercial or financial
relations between the
Bahamas and Cuba.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial
implementations, enhancements, or upgrades.

Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting
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an
Na LY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Picewell sorry for
‘reckless’ outburst

FROM page one

to the entire judiciary of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.

“I further offer my unqualified
apology to the Bahamian people,”
he said.

Forbes is to appear before
Senior Justice Allen again tomor-
row to answer as to why he
should not be held in contempt
of court.

While the judge noted that she
did not think the complaint
required an investigation into
whether the discharge of the jury
was proper, Forbes’s announce-



BRIDGEWATER

despite the fact they had yet to
reach a verdict.

Around 9.30 pm that same
night, Forbes took to the conven-
tion stage and told delegates that
Bridgewater had been acquitted.
} He exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free
woman PLPs! God is good PLPs!
Pleasant is a free woman! God still
reigns PLPs!”

At that time however the jury
was still deliberating, and had
been so for more than eight hours.
No verdict had been reached
although convention members cel-
ebrated Bridgewater's supposed
vindication by singing and dancing

















From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
It asks the following four
questions:



The Four-Way Test

“Of the things we think,

say or do

1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”

ment posed a real risk of prejudice to the

administration of justice.

Representing Forbes are attorneys Wayne
Munroe, Anthony McKinney and Alfred

Sears.

The date for the retrial of Bridgewater
and former ambulance driver Torino Light-

bourne has yet to be set.

The nine-member jury were discharged
at 10.54pm on Wednesday, last week,

to “Oh Happy Day”.

The session chairman had to mount the

podium after Mr Forbes’ speech and apolo-
gise for whatever confusion the MP’s pro-

nouncement may have caused.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused
of attempting to extort $25million from

American actor John Travolta between Jan-

uary 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They
both have denied the charges.

John S George president

FROM page one

and other employees.
Adderley has an in-house
application with NIB he is
now paying.

A warrant was issued for
the arrest of Bernard
Dorsett, of Porky’s Texaco
Service Centre, New Provi-
dence, as he failed to appear
in court yesterday.

Dorsett is charged with
failure to pay $48,781.86 to
NIB between August 2005
and October 2007, on behalf
of Shirley Storr and other
employees.

The 12 employers charged
on Monday were ordered to
pay sums to NIB ranging
from around $2,000 to more
than $27,000 in missed pay-
ments.

Desmond Thompson, of
Bahamas Embroidery, was
charged with failure to pay
NIB $27,306.70 between
January 2000 and April
2006, and April and July
2007. He was ordered to pay
the court $10,923 on Mon-
day and $400 per month to
the court until the full
amount has been covered.

Self-employed Samuel
Smith was charged with fail-
ure to pay $20,184.53 to NIB
between January 2003 and
April 2008 and was ordered
to pay $8,000 to the court
on Monday and $350 per
month thereafter.

Self-employed doctor
Walter Gibson, charged
with failure to pay
$12,865.75 between October
1998 and August 2004, did
not appear in court on Mon-
day and a warrant was
issued for the arrest.

Self-employed chiroprac-
tor Philip Huyler was
charged with failure to pay
$5,551.51 to NIB before
December 2003, and was
ordered to pay the amount
in full by December 31.

Bruno Minnis, of Bruno’s,
was charged with failure to
pay $5,081.13 in NIB pay-
ments between January 2003
and March 2009, and Octo-
ber 2008 and March 2009.
He was ordered to pay the

court $1,200 on Monday and
$400 per month thereafter
until his contributions have
been covered.

Bridgette Scavella, of Flo-
ral Fiesta, was charged with
failure to pay $4,969.40 in
NIB contributions between
December 1999 and August
2003, and was ordered to
pay the amount in full by
the end of December this
year.

Domestic employer
Melanie Bridgewater was
charged with failure to pay
$4,630.80 between January
1997 and December 2002.
She paid $1,800 to the court
on Monday and was ordered

to pay $100 per month to
the court.

Linda Taylor, self-
employed, was charged with
failure to pay $3,562.38 to
NIB between October 1997
and April 2006, and was
ordered to pay $500 to the
court on Monday, and $250
per month to the court
thereafter.

Jacqueline Lotmore, of
Three V’s Beauty Supplies,
charged with failure to pay
$2,480.77 in NIB contribu-
tions over various periods
between December 1999
and April 2008, will appear
in Court 11 on November 2
for sentencing.

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and second place winner in each category. i
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your life, experiences, and/or society in general.” nod: od
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3. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words, Address: a
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Atin: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of East Nassau,
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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Three accused of armed robbery of tourists

FROM page one

Angie Moss, 37, of Colony
Club, St Albans Drive, was
arraigned in court on Friday
for the same armed rob-
beries and has been remand-
ed in custody.

Magistrate Guillimina
Archer read the charges as
the two men, dressed in
jeans, T-shirts, and sneak-
ers, stood before the bench.






















They are accused of being
concerned together and with
others, armed with an offen-
sive weapon, namely a
handgun, to rob Joan
Walins of $200 on Sunday,
October 11.

The men are also accused
of stealing $60 from Phyllis
Compeau, a gold rope chain
from John Tomillinson, $70
from Gloria Tomillinson,
two rings valued at $40 and

2

$65 in cash from Kelly
Greer, $106 from Ashley
Greer, $60 from Deborah
Greer, and $5 from Frank
Romeo.

Magistrate Archer
quizzed Johnson about a
doctor’s visit as she held
medical documents stating
he had seen a doctor on
Monday.

But Johnson said he had
seen a doctor on Sunday and

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Ms Archer said she hoped
he was not lying to the court
but did not clarify when he
had seen the doctor.

Guerrier appeared to have
had some medical attention
as he had a bandage on the
inside of his right elbow
what looked like a medical
bracelet on his left wrist.

Ms Archer said there was
another charge before her
which she could not make
sense of and asked the pros-
ecuter to review it before
bringing the men back
before the court.

Johnson and Guerrier
were not required to enter
a plea for any of the charges
as there will be a premlimi-
nary inquiry into the mat-
ters.

The case was adjourned
until February 12.

Until then all three of the
accused will be remanded in
custody, and have the option
of making a bail application
to the Supreme Court.

Guerrier and Johnson
asked for copies of the dock-
ets and charges, and Ms
Archer said the statements
would be provided.

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FROM page one

hosted by BHA, the Chamber of Commerce
and the US State Department.

"But it's still going to be a tough road par-
ticularly over the next two months and next
season. It's just too early to really predict
where we're going to be at,” he added.

Mr Comito stressed that despite the dismal
market, now is the time for companies to
"buck the trend” and invest in aggressive mar-
keting.

"Both the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism as
well as the industry have marketed themselves
much more aggressively realising that the pie
is smaller and to retain some level of propor-
tionality of market share in the pie we have to
be much more aggresive.”

Mr Comito's assessment is in line with the
International Monetary Fund's recent report
on the state of the region's tourism product.

According to previous reports, the IMF list-
ed the Bahamas among the Caribbean nations
that suffered the highest declines in tourist
arrivals during 2009. The IMF also predicted
that a turnaround in the sector is not expected
before 2011.

For the year up to May tourism arrivals to



RUBEN JOHNSON and Johnny Guerrier at court yesterday.
Angie Moss was arraigned in court on Friday for the same armed
robberies and has been remanded in custody.

Expert on tourism

the Bahamas were down by 14.1 per cent,
compared to a 3.4 per cent increase for
Jamaica and falls of just 2.4 per cent and 9.4
per cent for the Dominican Republic and St
Lucia respectively, said the IMF's assessment
of the Caribbean's tourism outlook.

Also making out slightly better than the
Bahamas were Barbados and Antigua & Bar-
buda, whose tourist arrivals to July 2009 were
down by 10.7 per cent and 12.8 per cent respec-
tively.

According to the report, the only Caribbean
nations dealing with a tougher situation than
the Bahamas were St Vincent & the
Grenadines and St Kitts and Nevis, who were
off by 17.4 per cent and 27 per cent respec-
tively for the year to June 2009.

Meantime, hotel occupancy rates for the
month of September are expected to be
released within "the next couple of days", Mr
Comito said.

"They don't appear to be, on the whole,
worse than September of last year but we'll
have the results shortly on that,” he told The
Tribune.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Conchman Triathlon
set for next month
on Grand Bahama

IN just under two weeks,
the Bahamas’ premier multi-
faceted sporting event is slat-
ed to begin in the nation’s sec-
ond city, featuring swimmers,
bikers and runners from
around the world.

The 23rd annual Conchman
Triathlon to be staged in
Lucaya, Grand Bahama, is
scheduled for November 7
amidst wide boulevard streets
and crystal waters m a tropical
setting.

Possiple competitors can
register online at www.conch-
man.com

The adult race features a
1K swim, 25K bike, and a 5K
run, beginning 8am at Taino
Beach.

The Iron Kids, which
begins at noon, features a
200m swim, a two-mile bike
ride and a half-mile run.

Groups for Iron Kids com-
petition begin at six and
under, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13
and over.

“The event is free courtesy
of the sponsors — Fred Smith
and Sun Alliance Insurance.
The first 100 to finish will
receive T-shirts, medals and
awards,” Smith said in a
release.

And presentations will be
made to the first three finish-
ers in each group (boys and
girls). “All primary and sec-

ondary school students are eli-
gible to participate,” he said.

The Conchman Triathlon
has been a staple of sports
tourism since its inception
almost 23 years ago.

In 1986, the principal
organisers and founders,
Ambrose Gouthro, Bert Bell
and Craig Stewart, saw the
potential of having a Bahami-
an triathlon and decided to
launch it after seeing the suc-
cess of the Iron Man
triathlons in Hawaii and
Bermuda.

Presidents

“Mr Gouthro and Mr Stew-
art, then presidents of the
Rotary Club of Lucaya and
Rotary Club of Freeport,
respectively, aimed to create a
positive community event that
would contribute to charita-
ble organisations, which still
stands in effect today,”
according to the event’s web-
site.

Organisers feel the Conch-
man provides an activity
where Grand Bahama resi-
dents and visitors could come
together to compete, build
and maintain a healthy body
and raise funds for Grand
Bahama Rotary Club pro-
jects, BASRA and Freeport
Aquatics Club.

'

Photos by Felipé Major

At the time, Mr Gouthro
says the proceeds of the event
also went to the Polio Plus
Organisation, which was, and
still is, dedicated to eradicat-
ing polio in the world.

The first race was held at
Xanadu Beach and consisted
of the present distances, 1000
metre (half a mile) swim,
25km (15 miles) bike ride and
a5km (3 miles) run.

According to Mr Stewart,
166 persons participated with
a fair number of entries from
North America and Canada.
There were 30 individual
entries and 44 team entries
that participated but of course
only one winner in each cate-
gory.

Over the next few years,
the Conchman moved from
Xanadu Beach to the former
Holiday Inn, now Our Lucaya
and then to its present loca-
tion at Taino Beach, where it
has garnered a lot of support
and participation.

The upcoming Conchman
promises to be an exciting,
challenging and fun race for
persons of all ages to enjoy.
With the "potential to be big-
ger and better", the Conch-
man has come a long way in
becoming one of The
Bahamas’ most respected and
well-liked sports, hopefully
for many years to come.



—

ST Bede’s Crushers Donald Cash attempts a

dunk yesterday. The Crushers won 54-19...

Andy Roddick all set to play in
Mark Knowles Charity Invitational

FROM page 11

has always wanted to come to
the Bahamas and participate
in the tournament, according
to Knowles.

Paying together in Beijing
solidified this year’s appear-
ance for the No.1 ranked
American player, who won
the 2003 US Open and was a
three-time Wimbledon final-
ist.

“We got a little closer and I
found out that he such a nice
guy,” Knowles said. “He has
his own foundation like the
Andy Roddick Charitable
Organisation, so he under-
stands what it is ’m doing,”
Knowles said.

“With him coming, I think
it’s going to be one of the
greatest ever. To have some-
body like Andy Roddick in
the Bahamas is going to be so
exciting.”

This year, Knowles and his
organisers have switched the
professional tennis exhibition
from Atlantis on Paradise
Island to the National Tennis
Centre, Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, 3pm Saturday,
December 5.

While adults will be
charged an admission fee,
Vicki Knowles-Andrews,
Knowles’ mother, has indi-
cated that they will be allow-
ing children to be admitted
free so as to give as many of
them as possible the oppor-
tunity to meet Roddick up
close and personal.

Tickets will be available
from November 10 at the

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

National Tennis Centre,
Atlantis Tennis Centre, Vil-
lage Squash Club, H G
Christie Ltd and Lyford Cay
School.

Call 359-2542 for further
information.

The major sponsors to date
include Atlantis Resort &
Casino, Lombard Odier Dari-
er Hentsch Private Bank &
Trust, Pictet Bank & Trust
Ltd, Serenity Point, Abaco,
The Balmoral, The Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism, Ameri-
can Airlines, The Bank of the
Bahamas, Everkey Global
Fund, Templeton Global
Advisors, Odyssey Aviation,
H30 and The Ministry of
Youth Sports & Culture.

There are a few sponsor-
ship opportunities still avail-
able and interested parties
should contact Vicky
Andrews at vickyk@batel-
net.bs or cell: 357-9670.

The proceeds of the event
will go to aid local children’s
charities. To date, over
$400,000 has been distributed
to various charities.

While the tournament
draws near, Knowles will be
returning to the pro circuit on
Sunday to play in Valencia,
Spain, where he is expected
to team up with Michael Llo-
dra at the Valencia Open 500.

Bhupathi has decided to
take another break, but will
rejoin Knowles in Paris,
France, for the BNP Paribas
Masters from November 11
before they head to the Bar-
clays ATP World Tour Finals
in London, England, starting
on November 22.

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Judo tournament
award in memory of
Humphrey Jackman

THE Bahamas Judo
Federation held its Fall
Classic Judo tournament on
October 24. There were
more than 70 athletes and
200 spectators in atten-
dance.

A team from Abaco as
well as the Special
Olympics Team competed
in regular divisions of the
tournament. There were
several standout perfor-
mances as both male and
female athletes ranging
from ages eight to adult
participated.

“We were delighted with
the level of judo," said
David Rahming, coach of
the Fox Hill Club and Spe-
cial Olympics.

“You are seeing more
dynamic and complex tech- nament.
niques that are seen on the e The Competitors
international stage. We are Award- Tajaro Hudson
definitely leaps and bounds ¢ Best Ippon (Submis-

sion) Award - Cynthia
Rahming

e The Humphrey "Trod"”
Jackman Special Olympics
Award - Zecumba Major

“We are proud to give
this award in memory of
my friend Trod, who died
tragically this year. He was
a Special Olympian and he
should not be forgotten,"
said D’Arcy Rahming,
president of the Bahamas
Judo Federation.

“This tournament was
very important for the
Abaco kids to participate
in and we were delighted
with their performance,"
said Abaco coach Regina
Parotti Kennedy.

Anyone interested in
assisting the Bahamas Judo
Federation can contact the
Federation at 364-6773 or
via e-mail at
daishihan@gmail.com

Humphrey Jackman

above where we were even
a year ago.”

The following awards
have been decided based
on the results of the tour-

THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS TEAM competed in regular divisions of the tournament...
Photo by Woodley Carroll

Crushers ‘light
up’ Sparks

the lower rims, but he noted
that his players didn’t play up
to par.

“My boys had to adjust,
especially with defense on
them. They had to throw the
ball up harder,” he said. “We
haven’t had a chance to play
in rims this low, so we had to
get used to it.”

With Turnquest and Coop-
er (who contributed 10) lead-
ing the offensive attack, the
Crushers also got some solid
defense from Adrian Mack-
ey, Christopher Oliver, Steve-
jay Whylly and Antoine Gib-
son as they staved off the
Sparks’ attack.

D’Chaz Butler paced St
Thomas More with six, Cairo
Curry had five, Randy Forbes
chipped in with three and
both Rohan Kerr and Jeffer-
son Thomas added two.



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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

(-\"\
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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



COMA



iwi- MACS

BOA soagratziotes Knowles
on ISF vice president post

THE Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion (BOA) congratulates its secre-
tary general Romell Knowles on his
election to the international post of
vice president of the International
Softball Federation (ISF).

Knowles has been elected as the
ISF’s first-ever vice president for the
non-Hispanic Caribbean region.

Said BOA president Wellington
Miller: “I know that I speak for all
our colleagues in the Olympic move-
ment in The Bahamas when I say that
as a Bahamian to be the first to hold
this exciting position is an honour
that you well deserve.”

Miller said Knowles’ election is “an
important milestone in the continuing
excellence of Bahamians in the
administration of international sport
and a shining example of good stew-
ardship in the sporting arena.”

“Your success is our success,” he
said. “We are sure that you will make
the most of your new position to the
benefit of all softball playing athletes
in the non-Hispanic Caribbean
region.

“The Bahamas is sure to benefit in
many ways from Mr Knowles’ pres-
ence at such a high level in the Inter-
national Softball Federation.”





















Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ees Lta

1 * &

ROMELL KNOWLES



Titans defeat Police by four wickets
as cricket league action heats up

THE local cricket commu-
nity has experienced a busy
schedule in recent weeks.
League play has intensified
with visiting teams from the
region taking part.

The Dynasty Stars recent-
ly hosted the Lucaya Cricket
Club of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, to a series of exhi-
bition matches over the
weekend.

In the opening match,
Lucaya CC batted first and
scored 182 all out.

The team’s top scorers
included Kenneth Seeram
with 48 runs and Harold Stu-
art with 23.

\ ela

Both Dynasty bowlers,
Venris Bennett and Lee
Melville, took three wickets
apiece.

In their turn at bat, the
Stars topped by scoring 184
runs for the loss of seven
wickets, to win the match by
three wickets.

Ryan Tappin scored 58
runs while Howard Roye
added 30 runs.

Bowling for Lucaya, Keith
Worrell took four wickets.

In the second match of the
series, Lucaya CC rebound-
ed to defeat the Stars by 54
runs. Lucaya scored 149 runs
all out in their turn at bat.

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Worrell scored 46 runs,
Brian Kumar added 28 and
Trevor Bourne chipped in
with 21 runs.

Bowling for the Stars,
Alvin Peters and Alex Her-
nandez took three wickets
each. The Stars failed to
duplicate Saturday's feat and
fell short with just 95 runs.

Gregory Irvin was the top
scorer with 20.

Bowling for Lucaya CC,
Harold Stuart and Worrell
took three and two wickets
respectively.

In local league play, con-
tinuing Sunday at Haynes
Oval, The Dockendale

Titans defeated the Police by
four wickets.

The Police opened the
match with 139 runs.

Mark Taylor and Wayne
Patrick led the effort with 25
runs apiece. Calvin Neita
was the lead bowler for the
Titans and took seven wick-
ets.

Dockendale scored 161
runs for the loss of six wick-
ets for the win. Gargand
Ganpat scored 39 runs and
Narendra Ekanayake added
36 as the top scorers for the
Titans.

Odain Tucker took two
wickets for the Police.

COB Caribs
defeat the
Cougars

Intruders beat
Technicians

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its 2009 regular season with
another double header Mon-
day night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.

In the women’s match, the
COB Caribs defeated the
Cougars in straight sets 25-19,
25-24 and 25-16. Keneisha
Thompson led all scorers for
the win with 19 points. For
the youthful Cougars, Irina
Key led with five points.

In the men’s match, it was a
battle between the Techni-
cians and National Fence
Intruders, each with one loss
for the season.

However, in the end, the
Intruders endured a 23-25, 26-
24, 23-25, 25-16 and 16-14 win
in five tough sets. Glen Rolle
led the charge with 17 kills,
one block and an ace for the
win.

In a losing effort, Renaldo
Knowles scored 19 kills, one
block and an ace.

Games are slated to con-
tinue tonight at the DW Davis
Gymnasium with another
double header on tap.

The Bahamas Cricket
Association will continue its
efforts to gain exposure
against regional competition.
The league is slated to host
the Cayman Islands’ over 40
Masters team November 7-8.

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PAGE 11

r



ANDY RODDICK (right) teamed up with Mark Knowles at Beijing
Open where they reached doubles final...

Cobras dig up Mystic Marlins



ts

OCTOBER 28,

2009



Judo award
in memory of
Humphrey
Jackman...

See page 9

Roddick set to play in Mark
Knowles Charity Invitational

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER teaming up to play together
for the first time in doubles in China a
couple weeks ago, Bahamian tennis ace
Mark Knowles and top ranked American
Andy Roddick will be reunited here.

Roddick, the former No.1 singles play-
er in the world, has agreed to participate
in the 9th Mark Knowles Charity Invita-

tional December 3-5 in an exhibition at
the National Tennis Center.

“Tt’s extremely exciting to have a for-
mer world number one and grand slam
champion and someone as popular as
Andy coming to the event,” said Knowles
yesterday in an interview with The Tri-
bune from his home in Dallas, Texas.

“Tt’s really a huge boost and it has
added a lot of excitement. We are just
waiting on his arrival because he has said
he will be willing to participate in any

event that we have on the schedule.
That’s the type of person he is.”
Knowles and Roddick partnered at the
Beijing Open where they reached the
doubles final when Knowles’ regular
partner Mahesh Bhupathi took a break
to recuperate from a groin injury he sus-
tained playing Davis Cup for India.
Roddick, who has been ranked No.1 in
the world and is currently ranked No.7,

SEE page 9

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

s teams jostle for playoff
position late in the GSSSA
volleyball season, a pair of
senior girls teams helped
their cause with wins yes-
terday at the D W Davis Gymnasium...

C C Sweeting Cobras over D J Mystic

Marlins 19-11, 12-19, 15-6

The Cobras dominated the opening set
as they raced out to an early 8-1 advantage
and held on to breeze through the opening
set.

The Mystic Marlins rebounded in the sec-
ond set with renewed determination to get
out to an early lead of their own.

Christia Taylor’s adept play around the
net led the charge for the Mystic Marlins
who went on to separate themselves from an
8-8 tie.

Taylor scored three consecutive kills to
propel her team’s 5-0 run as they held on to
take the set, 19-12.

In the third, the Cobras reasserted their
first-set dominance.

The Mystic Marlins opened with a 4-2
lead, however the Cobras responded with six
consecutive scores.

The Cobras led 8-3 when the teams
switched sides and went on to win the set,

Crushers ‘light
up’ Sparks 54-19

Rattlers beat Pacers

15-6. The Cobras’ Jaynell Cox led all scorers
with eight kills.

CI Gibson Rattlers over

R M Bailey Pacers 19-12, 19-8

In the second matchup of the evening,
the Pacers did little in a losing effort as the
Rattlers eased their way to a two-set sweep.

After a 2-2 tie to begin the opening set,
the Pacers failed to gain momentum and
found themselves behind 10-4 due to a series
of unforced errors.

The Rattlers maintained a seven point
advantage for the remainder of the set to
win 19-12.

Quicker to the ball and returning serves,
C I Gibson opened the second set on a 9-0
run.

Silverni Augustin served for each of the
nine scores, building a lead too big for the
Pacers to overcome.

After an unforced error put R M Bailey
on the scoreboard for the first time in the
set, they rallied to come within six points, 12-
6

A timely C I Gibson time-out corrected
the brief lapse in execution as they pressed
on to take the set and match, 19-8.

League play for seniors is scheduled to
continue at the D W Davis Gymnasium on
Thursday.



C | GIBSON Rattlers’ Silverni Augustin digs the ball yesterday...

ATLANTIS

PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS»

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH they had to
make an adjustment to the
legal six-foot rim height for
mini basketball, the unde-
feated St Bede’s Crushers still
managed to rout the St
Thomas More Sparks.

In a rematch of last year’s
Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools championship series,
the defending champions
Crushers got a game-high 34
points from Kyle ‘Flash’
Turnquest in their 54-19
pounding of the Sparks at St
Thomas More.

While St Bede’s went on to
post their second straight vic-
tory for the season, there was
a lot of suspense as to who
would have been able to put
down a thunderous slam dunk
in the shortened rims.

With the game already out
of reach for St Thomas More,
Turnquest was the first to
come close to achieving the
feat when his attempt on a
two-handed dunk was put
into the rim for a 13-2 lead.

St Bede’s, who held a 6-1
margin at the end of the first
quarter, used an effective trap
defense that enabled Turn-
quest and Gregory Cooper to
go after a few other dunk
attempts as they went on to
post a 19-4 half-time advan-
tage.

“Tjust decided to go for the
lay-ups because I didn’t want
to miss the dunks,” said Turn-
quest, who eventually
bogeyed another attempt in
the fourth quarter.

Turnquest said it certainly
feels good playing in the
shorter rims.

St Thomas More, who got a
couple dunk attempts from
their center Randy Forbes, is
the first school to play with



ST Bede’s Crushers’ Kyle ‘Flash’
Turnquest attempts a dunk...
Photo by Felipé Major

the rims at the regulation
height.

Coach N’Komo Ferguson
said the goal is to make sure
that their players get the
opportunity to play the game
the right way.

But coach Ferguson said it
wasn’t a well played game on
both sides of the court.

“They didn’t look 50 per
cent the way they did in their
first game against Xaviers and
we played 50 per cent better
than we did in our first game
against Our Lady’s,” Fergu-
son stressed.

“But we’re still getting
there. We’re still building. We
will see them again in the sec-
ond half because we are play-
ing each other twice this year.
So we hope to be better by
then.”

St Bede’s coach Donnie
Culmer agreed that it was
good for the players to play in

SEE page 9

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(Wy
LY





THE TRIBUNE

isine

WEDNESDAY,

SECTION B e business@tribunemedia.net

Power plant opponents
‘challenge all permits’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

OPPONENTS of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) proposed $105
million Wilson City power plant
yesterday instructed their attor-
ney “to challenge the issuance
of any permits” for its con-
struction on the basis that they
had been unable to voice their
concerns to the authorities that
granted them.

Fred Smith, the Callender’s
& Co attorney and partner, in
an October 27, 2009, letter sent
to Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham and numerous other
ministers and agencies respon-
sible for various aspects of the
Abaco-based power plant’s
construction, effectively con-
firmed Tribune Business’s



FRED SMITH

October 26, 2009, that the
momentum towards commenc-

OCTOBER 28,



2009

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Car dealers eye ‘bottom’
after 30% Q3 sales drop

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian new car dealers

yesterday told Tribune Busi-

ness they were hopeful that

the industry had “seen the
bottom”, after sector-wide sales for the
2009 third quarter and September came
in almost one-third down on 2008 com-
paratives.

Figures released to Tribune Business
by the Bahamas Motor Dealers Associ-
ation (BMDA) yesterday revealed that
new vehicle sales were down by about
29.89 per cent for the 2009 third quarter
year-over-year, with September’s sales
31.8 per cent behind 2008 comparatives.
Collectively, the Bahamian new car
industry had suffered nine successive

months of sales declines.

Fred Albury, president of Executive
Motors and vice-president of Quality
Auto, told Tribune Business: “My gut
feeling, and I speak on behalf of Execu-
tive and Quality, is that we’ve seen the
bottom and will see a bit of a bump up in
demand” in the 2010 New Year.

He added: “July was a reasonable
month for us, August was so/so, Sep-
tember was not bad and this month is
really flat. Every quarter has had at least
one reasonable month to keep us afloat.
We're keeping our fingers crossed that
things will show signs of recovery in the
first part of next year.”

Mr Albury said Executive and Quali-
ty had benefited from the fact they tend-
ed to “dominate” in the public trans-
portation and taxi cab/van market, and

the companies were “pre-sold up to
somewhere early in the New Year” in
this segment.

“What is of great concern is that the $
is so weak, especially against the euro
and the yen, so that prices are going to
be right up there,” Mr Albury told Tri-
bune Business.

However, compensating for this was
the relative strength of the US dollar
against the South Korean currency, the
country that produced the Kia and Qual-
ity’s Hyundai models. Mr Albury said
new Hyundai models were due to arrive
in the Bahamas next year.

He added that another current prob-
lem was the relatively low inventory lev-
els that Executive and Quality were car-

SEE page 2B

exclusive story on Monday,

SEE page 5B

Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BUSINESS executives yesterday said they were hoping to match
last year’s total of 70 exhibitors at the two-day trade show attached
to the upcoming 2009 Energy Conference, with some 25 companies
already confirmed.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA) exec-
utive vice-president, at a press conference to unveil the November
13-14 trade show, emphasised that it was not just designed as a plat-
form for firms in the renewable energy/energy efficient industry,
with manufacturers, marketing and public relations firms, food and
beverage suppliers, IT firms, financial services providers and
tourism-related companies among the 25 already signed-up.

Pointing out that 10,000 persons attended last year’s trade show,
Mr Comito said: “We hope we can reach the amount last year of
having 70 booth exhibitors. It’s a great opportunity for companies
to showcase their latest product and services, and build strategic
alliances with local and international companies.”

Among those scheduled to attend this year’s event is the US-
based Lowe’s, Mr Comito adding that the Trade Show provided
Bahamian firms with an opportunity to interact with key executives
and purchasers/buyers from this nation’s resort and other industries,
establishing new relationships and building on previous ones.

The BHA executive argued that the Trade Show would also pro-
vide an important marketing platform for Bahamian companies,
something they needed to do more than ever in a recession.

“In tough economic times,
SEE page 6B

industry tends to retrench,” Mr

Government urged:

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs “to
move faster” on renewable
energy initiatives and pro-
grammes designed to reduce
electricity costs, business lead-
ers said yesterday, arguing that
import duty exemptions to
facilitate efficiency in the sector
were not having the desired
effect because complementary
equipment was still being heav-
ily taxed.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s (BHA)
executive vice-president, said
one such case was CFL or ener-
gy efficient light bulbs, upon
which the Government had
eliminated all import duties in
the last Budget.



‘Move faster’ over renewable energies

* Business executives say duty exemptions on energy-efficient technology not
having desired effect because complementary products still heavily taxed

* Absence of net metering deterring developers from incorporating renewable
energy, as unable to gain investment return from selling back to BEC grid

However, these bulbs were
now incorporated as part of
energy efficient fixtures, he
explained, and since these fix-
tures were still subject to rela-
tively high import/customs duty
rates, the value of the exemp-
tions for the bulbs was being
eliminated.

And, in turn, businesses and
residential users were being dis-
couraged from purchasing ener-
gy efficient technology because
of the cost involved, and
importers turned away from

ROYAL 9 FIDELITY

bringing the products in.

“We'd like it to move faster
than it has. We wish they were
moving faster,” Mr Comito said
of the Government’s efforts to
reduce energy costs and
enhance efficiency, which have
involved a search a for renew-
able energy suppliers and the
drafting of an initial National
Energy Policy.

“Last July, with the passage
of the Budget in June, there
was a recommendation enacted
that we in the BHA had been

making for years, to make CFL
(fluorescent light bulbs), energy
efficient light bulbs, duty free,”
Mr Comito explained.

But while this was welcome,
the Government failed to adjust
or eliminate the import duty
rates on “energy efficient fix-
tures”, and “many bulbs are
now part of the fixture”. This,
the BHA executive vice-presi-
dent suggested, showed the
need for a more comprehen-

SEE page 4B

Taxi Union fears
Atlantis ‘hard blow’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Taxi Union
is bracing for what would
potentially be a “hard blow” if
Kerzner International’s Atlantis
resort makes good on the
notice it gave to terminate its
contract for the ground trans-
portation/bussing of the resort’s
employees, Tribune Business
can reveal.

Leon Griffin, the Bahamas
Taxi Union’s president, last
night confirmed that the Par-
adise Island-based resort and
its owner had “given notice”
that they planned to terminate
the ground transportation con-

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BTC ‘hopeful’
of return to
$40m profits

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) last
night said it hoped to end its
2009 financial year with net
income back in the $40 million
range, with revenues and oper-
ating expenses as at end-Sep-
tember both running $8 million
better than the budgeted tar-
get.

The state-owned incumbent,
which is in the middle of a pri-
vatisation exercise, said it was
“cautiously optimistic” that its
financial performance for 2009
would show a marked improve-
ment over 2008, when it suf-
fered a 50.7 per cent profit fall
to $21.1 million, compared to
$42.8 million in 2008

Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting
president and chief executive,
said: “The truth of the matter is
that BTC - like companies all
through the Bahamas and all
over the world — faced a diffi-
cult 2008 due to the severe
downturn in the global and
national economy.

“As people travelled less, it
meant that there were less
tourists making calls in the
Bahamas. This translated into a
sizeable fall-off in our roaming
revenue. As businesses con-
tracted and laid staff off, it
meant that there was less mon-
ey in the economy for persons
to spend on phone cards, new
cell phones and the like. It real-
ly is that simple.”

Tribune Business yesterday
identified the decline in tourism
as being the major factor in
BTC’s reduced roaming rev-

SEE page 6B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Car dealers eye ‘bottom’ after 30% Q3 sales drop

FROM page 1B

rying, with some 60 days of
stock - as opposed to the nor-
mal 180 day levels - currently
held.

Explaining that the compa-
nies had moved to align inven-
tory with the much lower levels
of consumer demand experi-
enced during summer 2009, Mr
Albury said: “We fell on the
side of caution this particular
summer and now inventory lev-
els are extremely low, to the
point where we now have 60
days in stock, when we nor-

mally have 180 days in stock.
My inventories should build in
December.”

Increasing inventory orders,
as dealers moved to import new
models and replenish stock,
should also boost the Govern-
ment’s tax revenues, Mr Albury
added, as some of the highest
tax rates were imposed on new
car imports.

He said neither Executive,
nor Quality, had laid-off staff
during the recession, instead
opting not to replace those who
left voluntarily.

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2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month
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Stores:

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“I know one or two BMDA
members who are having a real-
ly rough time of it, and have
had to cut back considerably,”
Mr Albury said. “We’re just
trying to watch expenses as
much as we can. We’ve taken
the opportunity while things are
slow to introduce a new com-
puter system and get trained up
on it. We’re looking at other
avenues to tighten up on. My
gut feeling is that there will be
some recovery in the first half
of 2010.”

Mr Albury’s sentiments were
echoed by Andrew Barr, sales
manager and a director at

Friendly Ford, who told Tri-
bune Business it was “not unex-
pected” that new car sales
would be down 30-40 per cent,
given the depth of the reces-
sion.

He, too, was cautiously opti-
mistic that sales would rebound
to “a satisfactory level” in the
2010 New Year, but warned
that a return to pre-recession
levels, might “take a lot longer
than people might anticipate.
Even getting back to that level
might be a difficult task”.

While Friendly Ford had
been able to avoid any lay-offs
among its 35 staff, Mr Barr,

drawing parallels with a US
economy that overbinged on
credit, said: “I think we were
living in paradise where every-
thing was seen as coming easy
at that time.”

Yet, with new car sales being
sensitive to credit availability,
the lack of confidence on the
part of both banks and con-
sumers was impacting the
industry. “I don’t think there’s
a quick fix to it,” Mr Barr said.
“It’s not something where you
will see, in one to three months,
things going great.” He
explained that with sales down
40-50 per cent year-over-year,

even a 5-10 per cent improve-
ment every quarter would
mean it takes a full year to get
back to pre-recession levels.
Meanwhile, Rick Lowe, Nas-
sau Motor Company’s (NMC)
operations manager, said cus-
tomer floor traffic was down 50
per cent from “where it used
to be”, agreeing with Mr
Albury that October was slow.
Walk-in traffic was down, he
added, arguing that a major fac-
tor in reduced demand was the
difficulty - and a lack of confi-
dence - consumers were having
in obtaining debt financing
from the commercial banks.

Taxi Union fears Atlantis ‘hard blow’

FROM page 1B

tract for ferrying Atlantis
employees to and from the

island.

However, he said the
Bahamas Taxi Union was still
in talks with Atlantis executives

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ERNEST HYLER Treasure
Cay, Abaco 022217 of Treasure Cay, Abaco, one of the islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,intend to change my name to
RALPH ERNEST, If there are any objections to this change of
name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KATY JEAN of RUSSELL TOWN,
EIGHT MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 26th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.













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on the issue, and the contract
termination was not a ‘done
deal’.

Reluctant to comment due
to the fact that there was a pos-
sibility that the Bahamas Taxi
Union might retain its contract
with Atlantis, Mr Griffin told
Tribune Business: “We are still
talking about it with Atlantis,
even though they have given
notice about it.”

Although he did not confirm
the November 1, 2009, termi-
nation date that Tribune Busi-
ness had been given, Mr Griffin
added: “They [Kerzner Inter-
national] did give notice about
it. I can’t go any further
because there’s still hope, and
we're still talking about the con-
tract.”

The Bahamas Taxi Union

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



president said he was awaiting
the outcome of a meeting
between Atlantis executives
that was scheduled for yester-
day morning, and indicated he
might be able to comment fur-
ther today when more infor-
mation was available.

Although not commenting
on the reasons given by Atlantis
for its move to terminate the
ground transportation contract,
Mr Griffin did tell Tribune
Business the likely impact on
the Bahamas Taxi Union if
such a development came to
pass.

He said: “It would not be
devastating, but it would be a
very hard blow, and we would
have to do some readjustments
and all kinds of things.”

Mr Griffin, though, said
reports reaching Tribune Busi-
ness that Atlantis had also can-
celled all Bahamas Taxi Union
tours were not true.

Several sources had suggest-
ed to Tribune Business that
Atlantis was looking to give the
employee ground transporta-
tion contract to Bahamas Expe-
rience, the company that pro-
vides guest transportation ser-
vices and tours to many of the
resort’s visitors.

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THE TRIBUNE

an
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B





Internet body hosts renowned speaker

THE Bahamas Internet
Organisation, a newly formed
body, is teaming up with part-
ners in this nation’s e-com-
merce sector to host an inter-
nationally-acclaimed entre-
preneur, author and success
trainer.

Bruce Muzik, the founder
of Designer Life, will stage a
one-day luncheon workshop
hosted by the Bahamas Inter-
net Organisation, during
which he will speak on the
topic, Fight ways to grow your
On-Line business or career.
The event is scheduled for
Thursday, October 29, at
12.30 pm at East Villa Restau-
rant on East Bay Street.

Damien Forsythe, organis-
er of the Bahamas Internet

Organisation, said both e-
commerce and ‘bricks and
mortar’ businesses in the
Bahamas stood to benefit
from the workshop, which is
tailored to meet the needs of
business owners, Internet
marketers, web/graphic
designers and programmers,
marketing managers and any-
one seeking to enter the e-
commerce industry.

Mr Forsythe added: “Over
the years, the Bahamas has
seen a dramatic increase in
the number of Internet-based
businesses, as well as the
number of companies that use
the web for marketing, as the
Internet has proven to be a
very powerful and resourceful
business tool.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(4) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), EL PACIFICO INC., is in dissolution. Continental
Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1

906, Belize City, Belize. All

persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(4) of the International Busine
of 2000), CALISTA INC., is

ss Companies Act, (No. 45
in dissolution. Continental

Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted at

60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1

906, Belize City, Belize. All

persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before November 26, 2009.

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BRUCE MUZIK

“Through this luncheon
workshop we hope to assist
all business owners by inform-
ing them of how they can use
the Internet as well as their
own skills to boost their busi-
nesses. In addition, we hope
to create a more united e-
commerce sector in the
Bahamas.”

He said: “The more that we
can all be on the web and all
be interconnected and make a
more user-friendly presence,
great payment and marketing
systems that work, the possi-
bilities are endless for the e-
commerce sector here in the
Bahamas.”

Mr Forsythe said realtors
have the Bahamas Real
Estate Association; attorneys,
the Bahamas Bar Association;
and businesses, the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, so it
would be ideal for e-com-
merce practitioners to have
one unified organisation.

“Local business owners
stand to benefit tremendous-
ly from attending this event.
Mr Muzik’s unique blend of
philosophy and science, com-
bined with his infectious
enthusiasm, have had him on
television, the front cover of
newspapers, and propelled
him to the top of his game as
a sought-after speaker and
teacher worldwide,” Mr
Forsythe said.

Mr Muzik said the work-
shop will focus on assisting
persons in finding their nat-
ural path to creating wealth.

“Tf you study wealthy peo-
ple throughout history, you
will find that they all created
their wealth in one of only
eight different ways. Research
shows that each one of us is
naturally suited to wealth in
one of these eight ways more
than the other. So, based on
our personality types we will
find it easier to make money
if we create wealth in a way
that’s naturally suited to our
personally type,” Mr Muzik
said.

“T think one of the biggest
things people struggle with in

humane

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HALLOWEEN
FLEA MARKET & FUN DAY

life is that they go about want-
ing to make money and they
start a business, and what
ends up happening is that
they work hard their whole
life, not really finding the kind
of success that entrepreneurs
have and not knowing why,
and it’s usually because they
have taken the wrong path to
wealth. They are following a
strategy that is not natural for
them.”

Registration for the work-
shop is $10 and the lunch, a
three-course meal is $20 (paid
direct to East Villa). Busi-
nesspersons can RSVP by
contactin g
Damien@BahamasInterne-
tAssociation.org or by calling
434-6900.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LEGAL NOTICE
NJORD HOLDINGS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is
accordance

hereby given that in
with Section 238 of The

Companies Act No. 18 of 1992, a resolution
has been passed on the 26th day of October,

2009 requiring NJORD HOLDINGS
LIMITED to be wound up voluntarily. The
voluntary winding up commenced at the time
of passing of the resolution authorizing such
winding up.

&
/ Cor 0

LIQUIDATOR



Government urged: ‘Move faster’ over renewable energies

FROM page 1B

sive, considered tax policy to
ensure that renewable, sustain-
able energy - plus energy effi-
ciency and conservation - were
encouraged in the Bahamas.

“Our sense is that there
needs to be a ‘roll up the
sleeves’ approach to policy at a
different level,” Mr Comito said
yesterday. “There are a num-
ber of categories of equipment
that could be considered for
duty exemptions that are not
going into the mix. It should be
part of the overall National
Energy Policy that is under con-
sideration.”

The BHA executive vice-
president, speaking yesterday
at a conference to unveil the
2009 Energy Conference and
Business Trade Show, an ini-
tiative it is staging in partner-
ship with the Chamber of Com-
merce and the US Embassy in

COMMONWEALTH BREWERY LTD

“I oe
| ca Re

Assistant Engineering Manager

An opportunity awaits a candidate who has the ability to assist with the
coordination of all engineering and maintenance functions, including but not

limited to:

The building and the environment
‘ackaging and Brewing equipment

Utilites equipment - electrical distribution, air compressors and distribution,
Co2 recovery equipment, ammonia cooling equipment and RO water
systems, boiler equipment, waste water treatment plant

Management of the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative

maintenance Program.

Diagnozing equipment malfunctions as necessary.
Evaluating the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,

compiling reports and effectively using performance data.
Maintaining technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements.

The ideal candidate should have a Bachelor's Degree in Engineering or Equivalent,
strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering experience; demonstrate proficiency
in Microsoft word, excel and trouble shooting along with good organizational and
communication skills, Experience in the production industry and knowledge of

PLC's would be a plus.

All interested persons are asked to fax resumes to (242) 302-2939

rr NS
al Ge! is

a ta,
a

i
or



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www cob.edu. bs

STAFF VACANCY

Development Officer, Alumni Relations and Development, responsible
for selected College fundraising activities. The Development Officer is
a position for a candidate with experience in the non-profit industry and
who wishes to continue to build a career in fundraising and/or higher
education advancement. The successful candidate will be someone
with strong organisational skills, who is a good communicator both
verbally and in writing and who enjoys team work.

Specific duties and responsibilities include identifying, cultivating and
soliciting major donors and prospects including individuals, corpora-
tions, and foundations; providing support for the maintenance of the
major gifts prospect pipeline; assisting in the implementation of pro-
grammes and activities designed to increase the visibility of the AR&D
Office and The College to internal and external constituencies and con-
ducting internal and external research/fact gathering in support of fund-

ing proposal development.

A Bachelor's degree, minimum of five years professional experience
and prior fundraising, sales or marketing experience are a must along
with demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills. For

a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/

Interested

candidates should submit a letter of interest, Resume, a completed
Employment Application Form along with all the required documenta-

tion by Thursday, October 29, 2009 to:

The Associate Vice President, H.R.

Human Resources Department OR hra

ly@cob.edu.bs

The College of The Bahamas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Nassau, also pushed for public
policy changes that would allow
net metering in the Bahamas.

Mr Comito explained that
this would allow businesses and
residential users “to create
excess energy from their own
[renewable] systems, and the
excess energy would go back
to the [BEC] power grid”.

Those who sold excess ener-
gy to BEC would then receive a
credit on their energy bills,
reducing their utility costs. Mr
Comito said US states, such as
California, had used net meter-
ing very successfully to produce
“a real impact” on energy costs,
usage and the development of
sustainable, renewable energy.

Jeff Dubel, the US Embas-
say’s political/economic chief,
said the absence of net meter-
ing in the Bahamas was also
suffocating efforts by develop-
ers to incorporate renewable
energy and associated tech-
nologies in their projects.

He explained that many
developers spoken to by the US
Embassy wanted to embrace
sustainable energy technologies

in their businesses, but in the
absence of net metering in the
Bahamas - where they could
sell excess electricity back to
the BEC grid - they were
unable to earn a return on this
investment. Without net meter-
ing, the initial costs incurred in
installing renewable energies
was just too prohibitive.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment “urgently” needed to
remove legislative and technical
impediments to Bahamas-based
businesses implementing
renewable energy technologies
and their own power sources,
Yvette Sands, head of the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce’s energy and environ-
ment committee, said electrici-
ty costs were at a point where
they “impeded” business.

“T think we’re at the point
now where it’s becoming an
impediment to doing business,
not allowing businesses to
implement renewable energy
offerings,” she said. ““Business-
es are willing, but policy does
not allow it.”

Referring to the fact that

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ENFIRE HILLS INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

existing legislation does not
permit companies and home-
owners to use alternative ener-
gy in areas where BEC’s elec-
tricity supply is present, Ms
Sands added: “Policy needs to
open the gate to allow this to
happen. We need to have leg-
islative relief for the improve-
ments to occur.

“Businesses are primed and
ready, but the environment
does not allow for it. The pace
needs to quicken on getting rid
of impediments, either legisla-
tive or mechanical. There are
some technical issues that need
to be solved. We do want to see
it go a little bit faster.”

Ms Sands acknowledged that
“all is not lost”, with the Gov-
ernment working on numerous
energy-related initiatives with
the Inter-American Develop-
ment Bank (IDB), including
the importation of 100,000 CFL
light bulbs for low and middle
income families, plus 30 pilot
programmes featuring solar PV
technology and net metering,
plus 70 pilot solar water heater
installations.

However, she added that the
process of gathering data, writ-
ing reports, discussing them and
then taking action could take
between three to five, even 10
years, a process that needed to
be drastically shortened.

Addressing the press confer-
ence, Ms Sands said: “We need
cleaner energy at stable prices.
It is urgent. The time is now.

“The outcry of the business
community is loud and it con-
tinues to ring in our ears. The
cost of electricity is too high to
be sustained, the law does not
allow for any significant private
generation of power to relieve
the burden, there is no room
for a fast-paced response by
businesses to reduce their ener-
gy bill.

“Bearing such a bill has been
tough to most and devastating
to others - the electricity bill is
one of the most burdensome
costs a business will bear. For
some, passing it on to con-
sumers is the only option short
of shuttering their business. The
result - the cost of living goes up
and up, because of the fluctu-
ating world fuel price.”

Ms Sands said the Bahamas
needed to reduce its depen-
dency on fossil fuels to lower
its carbon footprint and envi-
ronmental impact, and inte-
grate renewable energy into the
mix while also reducing con-
sumption and power demand.

“Businesses need to take a
hard look at their consumption,
and some of the things they can
do to reduce consumption short
of self-generation of power,”
Ms Sands added. “Look at the
tools that are available, and find
ways to reduce consumption to
mitigate against prices going
up.” She warned that renew-
able energy forms might not
always be “the panacea” for
every situation.

Mr Comito added that it was
not enough to demand that
policies and institutions be in
place on the Government side.
“Not enough businesses are
aware of the opportunities that
present themselves,” he added.
“We can’t be knocking the pub-
lic sector if businesses are not
taking advantage of the oppor-
tunities.”

GN-940

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY
PARLIAMENTARY REGISTRATION DEPARTMENT

NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

Exuma Constituency Polling Division 11 & 14
George Town, Jolly Hall, Bahama Sound,

Cottage & Master Harbour
In the East Exuma Town Area
OF the Exuma District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
; i
which was comested, the following was'were elected as Town Committee Member's for

the abowes mentioned Town Area.

Candidate's
surname

STRACHAN

Chther Sames
in fall

Clifton O' Bnan

Occupation
and adalress

Laility Man Mate, Bahama Sound

AND NOTICE is hereby piven thal the numbers of the votes cast for ihe several
candidates in the saad clechon were as follows:-

Candidate's
Surnaitiet

STRACHAN

MORLEY

Ciher Names
In full

Cliferd O° Bran

Soma Unreise

Date: 22â„¢ Cetaber, 20009

Sign: Ivan Ferruson
RETURNING OFFICER



Votes
Falled

gq rt




(hn

THE TRIBUNE

6

(EW

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B



BISX continues its investor education

THE Bahamas Interna-
tional Securities Exchange
(BISX) has continued its
investor education pro-
gramme at an October 8,
2009, meeting with Grade 12
Economics and Commerce
students at Queen’s College.

Keith Davies, BISX’s chief
executive, said: “From BISX’s
standpoint we believe that
educating current and future
investors is a fundamental
and essential role of our
exchange. Our visit to
Queen’s College was reward-
ing in sO many ways, and it
gives us a chance to hear, first
hand, the questions and con-
cerns that students have
regarding stocks, investing
and the stock market.

“Over the last two years,
we have had an opportunity
to speak to a number of dif-
ferent age groups at several
different schools. I always
find it gratifying when a
teacher contacts us request-
ing the opportunity to have
us speak to their students, as
this is a clear indication of an
interested teacher.

“T was especially gratified



KEITH DAVIES, BISX’s chief executive and listings manager, with grade 12 Queen’s College students who
are studying economics and commerce...

by the number of students
who were considering a
career in some aspect of busi-
ness. These students seemed
especially focused on under-
standing the operations of the
stock exchange, and I look
forward to reading about the

accomplishments of all of the
students in the future.”
Coinciding with BISX’s
10th anniversary, Mr Davies
gave a presentation on the
importance of the stock
exchange and the role played
by BISX in the Bahamian

economy.

He added that such efforts
were designed to create
future generations of
informed investors, able to
use and take advantage of the
products and services facili-
tated by BISX.

Power plant opponents
‘challenge all permits’

FROM page 1B

ing Judicial Review proceedings was build-
ing.

“Please be advised that we are instructed
to challenge the issuance of any permits
on the basis that, inter alia, that our clients’
concerns have not been considered or tak-
en into account by the relevant decision-
makers,” Mr Smith warned in the letter.

He then asked the Government agen-
cies to confirm “the nature of the permits
issued” for construction work on the Wilson
City plant to proceed, and to who the per-
mits were issued.

Also requested by Mr Smith and his
clients were the names of government

departments/agencies responsible for issu-
ing the permits, when the permits were
issued, and details of any further approvals
being considered by the authorities. Copies
of the permits approved to date are also
being sought.

“We would be remiss if we did not
express our clients’ extreme disappoint-
ment at the Government’s continued uni-
lateral actions in this matter, despite its
knowledge of our clients’ legitimate con-
cerns,” Mr Smith wrote.

Referring to an October 8 letter sent to
himself and his clients by Benjamin Pin-
der, the assistant administrator of the south
Abaco local government district, in which
he indicated that “the appropriate author-
ities” would respond to all their questions,
Mr Smith said he and his clients were

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“shocked” to learn that a government min-
ister had said all necessary permits had
been obtained by the administration.

The Callender’s & Co partner added that
he and his clients understood that con-
struction work on the Wilson City plant
had resumed.

Referring to the announcement by Phen-
ton Neymour, minister of state for the envi-
ronment, Mr Smith had told Tribune Busi-
ness on Monday: “"In the face of this
announcement, my clients have no alter-
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NOTICE

ESTWICK INVESTMENTS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
above-named Company commenced on the 16th
day of October, 2009. The Liquidator is John M.
Lawrence of P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 1000,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF ELSIE JANETTE ALBURY
late of Man-O-War Cay, Abaco, Bahamas, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certthed to the undersigned
on or before 30" Nowember 2008

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time menboned above, the assets ot the late
ELSIE JANETTE ALBURY will be distributed among the
persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims of
which the Executrix of the Estate shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Aitomeys for the Executors
Attn: Attorney 5. Smith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
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PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BIC ‘hopeful of return to $40m profits

FROM page 1B

enue.

In BTC’s 2008 annual report, Mr
Griffin revealed that the state-owned
incumbent’s net income had fallen to
$21.1 million from $42.8 million the
year before, “resulting principally from
a1 per cent or $3.5 million decline in
revenues and a 6 per cent or $18.7 mil-
lion increase in operating expenses”.

On the revenue front, Mr Griffin
attributed the drop from $356.915 mil-
lion in 2007 to $353.369 million to an
18 per cent or $9.9 million drop in net
roaming revenues.

“We didn’t stand idly by as we
watched the economy deteriorate. The
Board and management of BTC took
decisive actions to bolster exposure of
promising product lines within the
marketplace, while at the same time,
the company took aggressive action
to reduce and contain costs without
eliminating any of its product offer-
ings,” Mr Griffin said in a statement
issued last night.

“Because of steps that were taken
beginning late last year, at the end of
September our operating expenses are
tracking at $8 million below the
approved 2009 budget due to
enhanced cost-cutting activities.

“At the same time, our revenue is
up by some $8 million above budget
due to targeted and sustained market-
ing and promotional activities. So
even as the economy has yet to
rebound out of the most severe reces-
sion since the Great Depression, we
are tracking for profitability that would
be substantially higher than the $21
million earned in 2008.”

Reason

He added: “The reason that we tem-
per our optimism with caution is
because we recognise that the months
of September through November are

traditionally challenging months for
cellular revenue due to low tourism
arrivals and seasonally adjusted
employment in the industry.

“Thus, while we feel good as to
where we are, we are mindful that the
economy is still stressed and we cannot
say with absolute confidence how the
year willend up. Yet, with continued
creative leadership and continued vig-
ilance on our expenditure, I am hope-
ful that we will be able to end the year
with profits approaching the $40 mil-
lion range — more in line with the prof-
its earned in 2006 and 2007”

In December 2008, BTC dropped
its fees on mobile caller ID, call wait-

ing and voicemail, giving back to its
customers some $6 million in project-
ed revenue for 2009. The company
cut its SMS [texting] rate from $0.10 to
$0.05 and increased the bucket of min-
utes in its post-paid packages, effec-
tively reducing the overage fees it
would otherwise earn from customers.

Mr Griffin added: “So even while
we are cutting costs and seeking to
shore up revenues, we recognise that
persons are having a difficult time in
this economy. Thus, even with no man-
date or competitive pressure to do so,
we have searched hard to find ways
to ease the burden where possible for
our customers. “

Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors

FROM page 1B

Comito said. “In the hotel sec-
tor, we’ve realised that we’ve
got to market more aggressive-
ly. Both the Ministry of
Tourism and the private sector



realise the pie is smaller, and
to retain our proportionate
share of the pie we have to
market more aggressively.
“Now is more important than
ever for businesses to promote

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE LEONARD
ADDERLEY late of Burnt Gorownd in the Island of









Long Island one of

the Islands in the

themselves more aggressively
and make buyers aware of what
they offer, and how it makes a
difference.”

Mr Comito said fees for
booth exhibitors would increase
by $200 this year, as organisers
looked to cover their costs after
subsidising exhibitors last year.

While the economic down-
turn was a factor, the Trade
Show having signed up five

more exhibitors this time last
year, Mr Comito emphasised
the event’s value. He said one
start-up, which exhibited after
just obtaining its Business
Licence last year, obtained its
first customer at the show and
was still in business. Another
company used the Trade Show
to introduce another product
line every year, and one sale of
that product was regarded as a

successful show.

On the energy conserva-
tion/efficiency front, with the
conference scheduled for
November 12, 2009, Mr Comito
added: “The issue of energy
efficiency is glaring in the minds
of businesses, particularly now
we’re starting to see a creep up
in oil prices.

“We know the cost of energy
is a challenge for all of us in the
coming years, and it’s ever
more important that we look
at renewable sources of ener-

”

needed to be a “greater under-
standing” of how the retro-
fitting of companies/homes, and
the importation of renewable
energy equipment, could be
financed.

Jeff Dubel, the US
Embassy’s political/economic
chief, said the Bahamas was
“the perfect test bed to test
these new” renewable energy
technologies, given its geogra-
phy and climate. He pointed
out that 80 per cent of future
greenhouse gas emissions
would come from developing
states.

gy:
fi at yy F D Mr Comito added that there

a gL EAM: ts

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased,



MECHANIC HELPER

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30 Nowember 2009,

BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF MARINE ENGINE & BOAT

Please fax resume to 394-3885.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
GEORGE LEONARD ADDERLEY will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Executor of the Estate shall then



have had Notice,

WUT:

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & 00.
Atormeys for the Exenators
Atte: Attormey &. Senith
Sassacn How
Shirkey Street de Victoria Aweniue
P.O), Row Me?

Nassau, Rabanveas,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF GARTH MINARD
THOMPSON late of #43 Ridgeway Drive, Eastern
District, New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30% November 2009.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
GARTH MINARD THOMPSON will be distributed among
the persons entitled thereto having regard only to the claims
of which the Executrix of the Estate shall then have had
Notice.

CRAHAM, THOMPSON & O01
Attorneys for the Executions
Attn: Abfomey 5. Senath
Sasenon, Howse
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
PC. Box N-272
Naaaan, Bahacras,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF LIVINGSTON SINCLAIR
MARSHALL, SK. late of the Settlement of George
Town in the Island of Great Exuma ome of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims. or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
onor before 30% Nevernber 2009,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
LIVINGSTON SINCLAIR MARSHALL, 5R. will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Executor of the Estate
shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & C0.
Alinmneys for the Eearuiices
Attre Attomey §. Smith
Sassoon House
Shisley Sires & Victoria Awenie
P.O. Box N-272
MMaseee, Raharas

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

NOTICE is hereby given that PHANUEL LOUIMA of
Pinewood Gardens, P.O. BOX GT-2914 NASSAU,
BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 21st day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF FETER ANDERSON
SWEETING late of the Eastern District of the Island
of New Providence, Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2009

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
PETER ANDERSON SWEETING will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Exeoutrix of the Estate shall then
have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.
Attorney's for the Executors
Attn: Attomey 5. Smith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O). Box M-272
Nassau, Bahamas,

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF CALVIN BERNELL
SAWYER aka. CALVIN BURNAL SAWYER late
of New Plymouth, Green Turtle Cay, Bahamas,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate ane
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2009.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned abowe, the assets of the late
CALVIN BERNELL SAWYER aka CALVIN BURNAL
SAWYER will be distributed among the persons entitled
thereto having regard only to the claims of which the
Executor of the Estate shall then have had Notice.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & C0),
Attomeys for the Executors
Attn: Attomey 5, Seraith
Sassoon Howse
Shirley Street: Victoria Averrae
PAD, Bos: WA2F2
(Massa, Bahamas,

Fe

I:
for ae

502 2356} 7
rates



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF JOYCE M. SAWYER aka.
JOYCE SAWYER late of Treasure Cay, Abaco,
Bahamas, deceased,

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested tp send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30" November 2iN04,

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
JOYCE M. SAWYER aka JOYCE SAWYER will be
distributed among the persons entitled thereto having
regard only to the claims of which the Executor of the Estate
shall then have had Notice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON 00,
Atiomeys for the Executors
Abt Aliomey 5, Seaith
Sassoon House
Sharkey Street d& Victoria Avenue
Pod, Bow N-2?2
Naszva,. Rahamas.

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SHEVOLYN TANIQUE
ARMBRISTER Late of Jennie Street in the Southern
Thistrict of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands in the Commonwealth of The Baharnas,

deceased,

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having
claims or demands against the above-named Estate are
requested to send the same duly certified to the undersigned
on or before 30° Novenmber 2009),

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that at the
expiration of the time mentioned above, the assets of the late
SHEVOLYN TANIQUE ARMBRISTER will be distributed
among the persons entitled thereto having regard only to
the claims of which the Administratrix of the Estate shall
then have had Modice,

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & 001
Altorneys bor the Euacubors
Attn: Altomey §. Soaith
Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Aversa
P . Ban M272
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B







The Tribune



COCO Palm’s most popular buy, the
Italian pizza, which comes in different :
flavors, topped with green peppers,
mozzarella, and fresh tomatoes.



By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

WALK into the Coco
Palm Café and Takeaway
on Bernard Road and you
will experience an inclu-
sive and unique Bahami-
an-ltalian dining experi-
ence.

Whatever is happening in the
kitchen, the aroma from the food,
the heat from the stove, and the
conversation from the cooks - you’re
not excluded from any of it.

There’s no food passing through a
window; instead you have an open
view of the kitchen, seeing your dish
being made from start to finish.

Tribune Taste first featured the
Coco Palm Café this summer, and
since then the restaurant has creat-
ed quite a buzz for itself in the east-
ern part of New Providence.

Adding a twist to the ordinary,
this establishment offers the best in
Bahamian cuisine fused with Ital-
ian flavours and spices.

Mango and raspberry barbecue
wings; coconut curry; chicken fet-
tucinni, and citrus pork are just a
few of the amazing dishes you will
find at the Coco Palm.

Chef Paul Coakley, owner of the
restaurant, claims they have the best
chicken fettuccini on the island, and
it’s made using his personal top-
secret recipe.

Continuing in the Italian vein, thin
crust pizzas are also on the menu.
They are served by the slice or by
the box and finished with fresh
herbs. The pizzas are a bestseller at
the restaurant, and are often
requested by businesses like Audio
Plus who frequently order up to two
boxes a day, Chef Coakley said.

What’s Coco Palm’s secret recipe
that keeps them coming back? Chef
Coakley says the pizza is simply of a
different calibre. And from what we

tast-



TO





ed, it is certainly different from
‘those other guys.’

If you want to try a pizza that is
lighter on the pallet, with less oil,
check out Coco Palm’s cheese, veg-
etarian or ‘meat amor’ pizzas, all of
which are topped with peppers, pep-
peroni, sausage, sliced tomatoes and
mushrooms.

Fresh vegetables, mozzarella
cheese, pepperoni, Italian sausage,
and herbs like garlic and thyme are
also used to finish the restaurant’s
pizzas.

With prices in the $5 to $15 range,
you definitely get your money’s
worth.

Chef Coakley said he believes
that “the average person should be
able to get quality food that is avail-
able at upscale restaurants.”

And the restaurant lives up to his
motto.

If you peruse Coco Palm’s menu,
you'll see tantalising dishes like rasp-
berry snapper, penne pasta (which
has already been an overnight suc-
cess), and even sausage fettuccini
alfredo.

If yow’re feeling a bit adventur-
ous, the chef suggests you try their
raspberry snapper. It may not be
your first choice, but it’s a top notch
dish with a sauce created with an
Asian cooking technique.

The citrus pork is delicious, but
may be more of an acquired taste.
First, Chef Coakley sears the pork
cutlets in a pan with a little oil, then
bastes them with a smooth sauce
made from mangos, oranges, rasp-
berries and grapes. The dish is then
served with vegetable rice and
coleslaw.

When it comes to the coconut cur-
ry served at Coco Palm’s, Chef
Coakley says it is healthier than
your normal Bahamian curry
because it incorporates lemon grass
and thyme flavours. Indian wet and
dry curry are blended together for
this dish.

Each meal at the Coco Palm Café
is served with home-made bread of
your choice of garlic,
coconut, focaccia, white,
or raisin bread.






SOMETHINGS Different Novelty
Cookies and Cakes donated a 4.15
Ibs, triple chocolate cake with
three layers of chocolate ganache
for a raffle at the Wine and Art
Festival held at the Bahamas
National Trust’s Retreat on Satur-
day.

The lucky winner of this dream
in chocolate was Leah Knowles.

SAMANTHA Moree (right), of Somethings Dif-
ferent Novelty Cookies and Cakes, presents
Leah Knowles with her prize chocolate cake.

THE cake was raffled at this year's Wine and
Art Festival and is a lovely example of the
‘Mosaiced Masterpieces’ that are popular as
gifts and as desserts at fine dinner parties this
season.

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009

¢ Caipirinha Explosion Party at
Churrascaria Humidor
This Friday, 8pm to mid-

night: Graycliff's Churrascaria |

at the Humidor is “bringing

back the good ole daz” with a |

Caipirinha Explosion Party fea-
turing the sounds of the 70s
and 80s.

Admission is $25 a person,
and the first Caipirinha - Brazil’s
national cocktail - is free.

There are also complimen-
tary finger foods and a dinner

option is available at a special |

price for attending.
RSVP at: 302-9150 or email
deanne@graycliff.com

¢ Rhythms of Drums

This Friday and Saturday - |

Back by popular demand, Mitzi
Chipman presents “Rhythms

of Drums” - a Broadway style |

show at the Rainforest Theatre
in the Wyndham Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino. Per-
formers include Tony Seymour

Jr, Ronnie Butler, Veronica |
Bishop, and dancers Metellus |

Chipman and Fontella Chip-
man-Rolle.

General admission is $40;
VIP Gold tickets are $75.

Doors open at 6.30pm and
show time is 8.30pm.

For more information con-
tact the Rainforest Theatre Box

Office; the Bahamas Musicians |

and Entertainers Union or the

Junkanoo n’ Things kiosk in }

the Marina Village, Atlantis.

¢ Parish Fair of the Anglican
Church of the Epiphany

This Saturday, 12noon to
6pm, Prince Charles Drive, near

Colony Village - The Anglican |

Church of the Epiphany invites

Bahamians to enjoy a day of |

family fun, culminating with a
fireworks display.

Prior to the fair, there is a
patio sale, plant sale and thrift
shop, starting at 6am.

The fair will offer an array of
delicious food and entertain-

ment for young and old. Kids |

can enjoy a bouncy castle, face-

painting, a merry-go-round and |) Ut I
' will show up. In this case that person

was American actor Wayne Legette.

loads of other fun activities.

¢ BAIC’s 12th Annual
BahamArts Festival

This Friday through Sunday,
10am to 11pm at Arawak Cay -
The Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)

presents the BahamArts Festi- |

val 2009 under the theme 'Tra-
dition Made Modern", promot-

ing Bahamian made arts, crafts |

and souvenirs.

Entertainment will be pro-
vided by the Bahamas Defence
Force Band, Gospel Groups, the
Falcon Band and the Pathfind-

ers Marching Band. For more |

information contact Le-Var
Miller, Sharae Collie or Pamela
Deveaux at 322-3740/3.

¢ Free Career Development
Workshop

This Saturday, 10am to |
College of the |

12noon,
Bahamas -Organizational Soul
invites persons seeking a job
or promotion to attend a free
career workshop which aims
to teach people how to empha-

sise their strengths and chart a |

course to improve their earning
potential.

The workshop is sponsored
by Corporate Education Solu-
tions (Bahamas and Caribbean)
and Rotary Club Nassau Sun-
rise, and is hosted by Yvette
Bethel, regional director of CES
Bahamas and Caribbean. For
more information contact 424-
7166. Space is limited so reg-
ister early at info@orgsoul.com.

e First All Ceramic Exhibition

opening night of this must-see

event hosted by Jessica's Tile- |
works Studio, come on out this |

week to see the incredible sub-

missions from local cerami- |

cists and potters.
The exhibition is being held

at Popopstudios located on |

Dunmore Avenue in Chipping-
ham until November 13. Tele-
phone number: 322-7834
Gallery viewing hours are
Wednesdays through Satur-
days from 1pm to 5pm, or by
appointment with Jessica Cole-
brooke, contact 324-3533.

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The Hub hosts a

| six-week acting

course with
American actor
Wayne Legette

By REUBEN SHEARER

| Tribune Features Reporter

ERHAPS one of the

most common com-

plaints of Bahamians is
that there’s not much to do on
this 21 by seven mile island.
You can only go to the
movies, hit up the mall or frol-
ick on the beach so many
times before it gets old. Even
if you are a regular on the
party scene, you can still feel
that your recreational options
are extremely limited.

It was the self-appointed task of Tri-
bune Entertainment to discover new
and exciting activities that you would
normally be reluctant to try. We found
that if you actively search for things
to do, you'll discover that there not
that many limitations to what this
island has to offer.

For instance, we hear there’s a salsa
dance class happening every week at
The Caves out west. Bahamians from

all walks of life are taking advantage of
it, and there’s a dinner afterwards -

|) you can’t beat that! Maybe that’s the

reason why it’s become so popular.
But we’ll get you the scoop on that
for an upcoming edition of Tribune
Entertainment. Today, we concentrate
on a special workshop that is current-
ly underway at The Hub on Bay Street.

Opportunity Knocks

When former Miss Bahamas World
Ordain Moss informed Tribune Enter-
tainment of a six-week acting work-
shop she was hosting on Saturdays,
we thought this would be a great idea.

Of course, Bahamians support any-
thing that seems well-organised and
reputable, and when there is a rep-
utable person behind a cause, people

With 20 years experience in the
business, the actor has played roles in
productions like ‘Westside Story’;
‘Rags’; ‘Romeo and Juliet’ (the stage
play); ‘Proposal’, ‘The Boys Next

| Door’; ‘The Woman In Black’; ‘The

Wild Party’, and ‘November.’
But he doesn’t toot his own horn,
the class speaks for itself.

Workshop Day

First on the schedule were concen-
tration exercises, where participants
were paired up and the task was to
mirror the other person’s movements
without using any sounds.

For those of us that were new to
this activity, let’s just say that the lack
of experience showed. It was good to
keep in mind that it was all in good
fun.

ae

SCENE! The class poses for a photo at the end of the first workshop.

“Great job guys, good concentra-
tion,” Mr Legette would say during
each pair’s concentration exercise.
While he made you think you did a
good job, you’d often wonder if he
was just trying to make you feel good,
after all he is an experienced actor.

Concentration was difficult for
some, with some partners making fun-
ny faces and others showing off dance
moves that date back to the 80’s. The
goal of each pair was to be in-sync
with each other, creating chemistry,
which is the key to a good perfor-
mance.

Mr Legette attempted to explain
the goal of the exercise:

“The mirror acting exercise is just a
simple concentration exercise using
your partner, getting centered, ignor-
ing everyone else in the room, which is
essential to do when you’re perform-
ing.”

At the end of the day you’re only as
good as the person you’re acting with,
Mr Legette said.

“When you’re doing any kind of
acting, 99 per cent of the time you’re
going to be relying on the person
you'll be acting with. In order to doa
scene well with someone you have to
automatically trust them.”

For an actor, this trust must be nur-
tured through activities like improvi-
sation (or ‘improv’) skits, which have
become quite popular in recent times,
because of their spur-of-the-moment
nature.

The only rule to the improv session
was that none of the actors’ could
respond with the word “no,” which
would bring the skit to a halt. I had to
learn that the hard way! With no
memorised lines, I was thrown into
the mix with one overarching thought:
“Move with the flow, say whatever
comes to mind.”

“You will end up doing better work
if you just let it happen,” said Mr Leg-
ette, who paired us up on set to act out
ascene. The characters, location, and

first line of the skit were then decided
on by the class.

Things got interesting as each par-
ticipant morphed into a different char-
acter. In one skit, experienced actor
Onike Archer, who was a cast mem-
ber in the acclaimed Shakespeare in
Paradise production, played opposite
Keisha Johnson.

The setting for their scene was a
train station; their roles, a mother and
daughter, and the first line: “I can’t
believe you just did that!”

It was hilarious and the ladies deliv-
ered the best improv skit, in my opin-
ion, out of everyone who performed.

Monologues and Deep Breathing

Naturally reserved, workshop par-
ticipant Jason Cunningham said he
has never acted before, but that was
hard to believe after having seen his
superb performance during the mono-
logue session.

The 24-year-old played the char-
acter of a neurotic man who didn’t
have much success with women, vent-
ing his frustrations to his best friend.
The class demanded an encore, and
he did just that, with some minor
adjustments to his delivery, but still
looking like a pro out there.

“At one point in life I used to be shy,
but experiences like these have helped
me better express myself in a crowd,”
he told Tribune Entertainment.

Proper breathing exercises were
next. At the instruction of Mr Leg-
ette, each person lay down on the
floor and deeply inhaled, then
exhaled. Switching things up, we
inhaled and held our breath for a few
seconds.

Then we tuned our voices by giving
off “ha” sounds in different tones
while exhaling. The room began to
sound like a full choir warming up for
performance.

Afterwards, a lunch of your choice
of roast beef, turkey, ham, and veggie
sandwiches, (from Tracey Chea’s

&

THE TRIBUNE


















kitchen), chips, and iced tea was
served to us. After a downtime, the
last segment of the day’s workshop
was a series of monologue perfor-
mances, where each student was given
a piece to perform in front of the class.
All participants were rooted to the
spot as they listened to Ordain Moss’
winsome monologue, in which she
spoke about her lover and their rela-
tionship problems.
No stranger to acting, she took pri-
vate lessons with Mr Legette about
two months ago, in Naples, Florida.
“He is really good at what he does
and what I learnt at the private lessons
with Mr Legette has made me so
much better,” she said.

Final Thoughts

Ms Moss described the latest work-
shop session as “amazing,” and said it
turned out to be much better than she
expected.
“Everyone was outgoing and was
eager to participate,” she said.

So far, response to the workshop
has been favourable.

The first workshop started with just
three students on October 3, but num-
bers increased and an additional eight
students joined the sessions at the
second workshop; a few of them
young actors like De-Anthia Johnson,
who will star in an upcoming teenage
drama called ‘Dreamer,’ which is
shooting in a matter of weeks.

The Wayne Legette Acting work-
shop began on October 3 and will con-
tinue until December 12, taking place
every other Saturday.

The third workshop will be held this
Saturday from 11am to 3pm.

You can contact Ordain Moss at
324-2336 or 425-5266 to reserve your
spot for this week’s session. At the
end of the workshop, participants will
be awarded a certificate of comple-
tion.

Interested persons aged 17 and up
are invited to register.

Combatting and Surviving the Recession

The focus of the 9th Annual Home
and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition

EACH year, organisers of the
Bahamas Home and Builders Trade
Show and Exhibition seek to not only
make the show bigger and better, but
also more in sync with what’s happen-
ing locally and globally. Therefore, as
the world and the Bahamas battle the
effects of a global recession, the organ-
isers, Special Events Bahamas Limited,
have decided to dedicate this year’s
event to theme “Combatting and Sur-

|| viving the Recession.”
For those who missed the |

The 9th Annual Home and Builders
Show, which will be held this Satur-
day and Sunday in the ballroom of the
Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach from
10am to 6pm, will focus on how per-
sons can ride out the economic down-
turn while preparing for the way for-
ward.

Along with informative educational
seminars and workshops including spe-
cial “DIY- Do It Yourself” sessions,
exhibitors have been invited to show-
case the latest energy and cost saving
technologies.

President of Special Events
Bahamas Limited Nikita Curtis said:

|| “People need to be prepared for after

this recession is over and attending
this year’s show will show them just
how to do that.”

As usual, the event - which attracted
approximately 4,000 people last year -
will boast over 50 exhibitors from the
Bahamas, the United States, Canada
and even China.

The general public will also have an
opportunity to win over $50,000 in
prizes and give-aways.

The change of focus of this year’s
event will also be reflected in the prizes
that any and everyone can use.
According to Mr Curtis, “The prizes
will be more relevant to the economic
environment.”

Examples of the new and improved
timely prizes include $100 vouchers
which can be used to pay various util-
ity bills along with the ever popular
cellular phone cards.

Mr Curtis and his team invite the
entire family to attend the 9th Annual
Home and Builders Show.

"Even if you aren't building, there is
important timely information that will
be dissimulated at this year's show that
anyone can use.”

== Bia

4)

Exhibition.

The Annual Home and Builders
Trade Show and Exhibition has
evolved into a highly anticipated event
which is frequented by persons direct-
ly and indirectly involved in the con-
struction and home industry. Home
owners, potential home owners, busi-
ness owners, contractors, sub-contac-
tors and persons seeking to spruce up
their home and businesses with more
energy saving devices should plan to

ay

SHOWN here are attendees of last year’s Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and



attend this year's show.

Admission to this year’s event is $3
per person, but attendees can log on to
http:/Awww.bahcon.com and print out
an admission ticket for free, or pick
up a free entry passes at any of the
participating vendor locations. As for
persons who don’t mind paying the
minor fee, this donation will be used
towards a scholarship fund for the
Bahamas Society of Engineers.


an
Na,

THE TRIBUNE

an
Na LY,

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11B

ARTS





High tea and high f

ISS Bahamas World 2009 Joanna

Brown, in her role as goodwill

ambassador, is spearheading a
project that is designed to raise money for
children with special learning needs.

Ms Brown, a Grand
Bahama native, is inviting
Bahamians to join her this
Friday for ‘high tea’ and
high fashion in a major
fundraiser at Government
House on behalf of the Bea-
con School.

The Beacon School was
opened in 1998 for special
needs children.

It was formerly known as
the School for Exceptional
Children. The school pre-
pares its students for life
after school, and in some
cases, its students are
returned to mainstream
education in schools like
Jack Hayward, St Georges,
Eight Mile Rock High and
even in private institutions.
The Beacon School offers
technical and vocational
training in addition to the
core academic subjects like
languages, mathematics and
social sciences.

The technical and voca-
tional curriculum includes
computer enrichment, cos-
metology, home economics,
pottery and agriculture, and
the courses are integral to
the development of daily
and independent living skills
in the school’s students. The
school is committed to the
belief that there is some-
thing that every child can
do.

A total of $50,000 is need-
ed to establish an arts and
crafts centre at the school,
which administrators

MISS Bahamas
World 2009
Joanna Brown



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believe can further help stu-
dents to prepare for pro-
ductive living. A building
just across the street from
the school has been ear-
marked for this centre, how-
ever, it requires some work.

The money raised at the
tea party will go towards
upgrading the building, as
well as providing the sup-
plies for the centre, where
students will be taught to
make commercial jams and
jellies, pottery and other
artworks for sale. A small
shop selling the items cre-
ated by the students will
also be housed in the build-
ing.

"Tf this project is a suc-
cess it will make a differ-
ence in the lives of the kids
at the Beacon School," said
Miss Bahamas Organisation
president Michelle Mal-
colm.

This is the second consec-
utive year that the Miss
Bahamas Organisation has
partnered with the Ministry
of Tourism to stage a Miss
Bahamas World/People to
People Tea Party and fash-
ion show.

The event will be held on
Friday from 4pm to 6pm at
Government House.
Patrons attending the
fundraiser will be treated to
a Beat Retreat by the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force
Band, and will entertained
by the Royal Bahamas
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Miss Bahamas World Tal-
ent Winner Devera Pinder.
Also on display will be fab-
ulous Androsia and
Bahama Hand print fash-
ions. Patrons attending the
event will be the first to see
Miss Bahamas World’s
wardrobe for her month-
long stay in South Africa at
this year’s Miss World com-
petition.

In addition to raising
funds for the Beacon School
through the silent auction,
Miss Bahamas World will
also lead the charge for
another initiative that will
involve retail shoppers.
More information on that
second phase of her
fundraising efforts will be
announced soon.

ashion in aid of special needs students

Tickets can be purchased
at the event, but those plan-
ning on attending are
advised to RSVP to the
Miss Bahamas Organisation
at their e-mail address
info@missbahamas.net in
order reserve seats. Organ-
isers said while they under-
stand that everyone is feel-
ing the pinch in these tough
economic times, they hope
that Bahamians will support
this worthy cause.

Joanna Brown leaves for
the Miss World Pageant on
November 4.

The pageant will be
broadcast live from Johan-
nesburg, South Africa, on
ZNS TV on December 12,
and on the E! Network in
the United States.

NEW
BOOK

Westward:
The Walk of a Bahamian Doctor

By Dr. Harold Munnings

www.munningswestward.com

Available at Grosvenor Medical Centre

Tel: 328-5550

At selected local bookstores and online at xlibris.com



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

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The Huh
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The Bahamas —
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The Tribune SECTION B ¢

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009










Exploring
indigenous
raw
materials
to produce
divine
creations

By MARION WRIGHT

ence | felt moved to tell a story about an aggressive and innovative arti-

Te past week after traversing the inner-city streets of central New Provi-
d

san, whose work speaks with total relevance to the current economic cli-
mate and the need for cultural reinforcement.

Renaissance craftsman Troy Nixon,
who also answers to the name ‘Straight
Up’, captivates through the concept of
transforming what is considered refuse,
materials mostly from coconut trees,
into works of art.

Mr Nixon desires for the craft to be
documented and placed within the cur-
riculum of the country’s high schools.

He hopes that getting young, fresh
and creative minds involved in this
genre of expression will, with consistent
effort, usher in a new raw material
trend within the native craft production
industry.

Just consider the role that the straw
plait in its harvested form has played
since the first vendors proudly dis-
played their meticulously hand-crafted
wares for sale.

Today, the straw plait continues to
dominate the craft market scene and
remains an integral part of the tourist
experience.

By his own admission, ‘Straight Up’
has only recently broken the surface in
this craft that permits imaginary aero-
bics and creative brazenness.

In 2003, Mr Nixon was the victim of a
terrible automobile accident. Doctors
told him that he would most likely lose
movement in one leg.

Undergoing 12 surgeries, the 38-year-
old artist said the accident and its con-
sequences led him to reinvent himself.

With lots of free time to spare as he
recovered from his ordeal, Mr Nixon
said that he made the crossover from
more traditional art forms to his current
medium.

He said he was helped in this by the
Almighty God.

For the past ten months now,
‘Straight Up’ said he has been guided
by God towards perfecting his craft. He
explained that he undergoes a religious
rapture at times when he is most pro-
ductive.

In instances such as these, he said, he
cannot focus on anything or anyone
else; it is strictly about releasing the cre-
ativity within for a higher purpose, he
said.

Mr Nixon’s works portray a level of
skill and ingenuity that is perhaps
rivalled in detail by only a practitioner

of taxidermy.

When asked about the source of
inspiration for each piece, Mr Nixon
said it becomes difficult to separate the
apparent spirituality that can be seen in
the work and the feeling which comes
from “the belly.”

One of Straight Up’s pieces, ‘Mother
Africa’, depicts an African woman in
the last trimester of pregnancy. This
piece, he said, is the most poignant of
his creations.

A few of his subjects depict scenes
from the Bahamas’ past, particularly
from his beloved Exuma.

Mr Nixon’s mother hails from
Williams Town and his father comes
from Farmer’s Cay. Smack boats and
dinghies were the workhorses for those
men who chose to support themselves
and their families from what the sea
provided by means of fishing, sponging,
or cargo delivery.

Wind provided the primary source of
power seconded by the technique of
‘sculling’ - using oars to propel a boat or
other craft.

‘Straight Up’ laments the fact that
there are so few authentic Bahamian
souvenirs available to tourists, and it is
his belief that Bahamians will eventual-
ly lose more of our market share as
time progresses.

He said he wants Bahamians to think
in unconventional terms that may not
have factored into past means of pro-
ducing art.

Mr Nixon is also concerned that too
little use of our indigenous materials for
the purpose of producing saleable
goods could furnish others with the
opportunity to discover and develop
production techniques resulting in prof-
it without benefits for Bahamians.

So the next time you catch a glance of
coconut tree webbing, branch stems, or
spent husks, think not only of ‘Straight
Up’, but rather look around further and
investigate your surroundings for that
next readily available indigenous raw
material that will allow you to display
your inner brilliance.

Those interested in ‘Straight Up’s’
work can contact him at troystraight-
up@yahoo.com. The artist will be
launching a website later in the year.




PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Picewell sorry for ‘reckless’ outburst C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.280WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUN WITH T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 76F F E A T U R E S S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Roddick to play at Invitational By PAUL G TURNQUESTT ribune Staff R eporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net THE MP who brought about the mistrial in the John Travolta $25million attempted extortion case yesterday issued a public apology. South Andros MP Picewell Forbes described his outburst at the PLP convention as “reckless” as he said sorry to Senior Justice Anita Allen, the judiciary, and the country at large. Forbes admitted he did not verify the information which was given to him regarding the alleged acquit tal of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater before he repeated it to the nation via radio and television. As a consequence Senior Justice Allen said she was forced to call a mistrial and discharge the jury who had yet to return a verdict. At the time she said Forbes’s announce ment “leaves the impression that there may haveb een a communicat ion from the jury room”. At a media gathe ring yesterday, a contrite Forbes said: “My statements c oncerning the a cquittal of Ms P leasant Bridgewater were not true as the jury was still in deliberations. “My statements were reckless and interfered with the course of justice in that case and were further capa ble of bringing into disrepute the whole administration of justice.” As a result, the often colourful and rambunctious MP said he took sole responsibility for his actions. “I hereby unequivocally and without qualifications offer my apology to Madame Senior Justice Anita Allen in particular, and MP apolog ises f or Travolta case mistrial The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com /77,:616/ )VaWVM' SEE page seven BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Straight up art SEE ‘THEARTS’ B y MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net TWO men and a woman have been accused of robbing eight tourists in downtown Nassau. Ruben Johnson, 18, of Eneas Jumper Corner, and J ohnny Guerrier, 19, of Soldier Road, each face eight a rmed robbery charges. They are also accused of being armed with a handgun as they robbed eight men and w omen of cash and jewellery while concerned with others. Three accused of armed robbery of eight tourists S EE page eight SOUTH ANDROS MP Picewell Forbes speaks yesterday. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net HARDWARE giant John S George president, Andrew Wilson, appeared in Magistrates Court yesterday accused of failure to pay more than $100,000 in National Insurance Board contributions. The company president was one of two employers arraigned in Court 11, Nassau Street, to be ordered to pay the National Insurance Board (NIB $185,893.14 in missed contributions yesterday. In the same court on Monday, 12 employers were ordered to pay a total of $86,632.97 in outstanding contributions. John S George president Wilson was charged with failure to pay $113,412.79 to the NIB between February 2007 and June 2008, and again between August 2008 and January 2009, on behalf of Rose Colby and other employees. He was ordered to return to the court on November 9 for settlement. Brian Adderley, managing director of Hyvac Bahamas Limited, was charged yesterday with fail ure to pay NIB contirbu tions amounting to $72,480.35 between February 2003 and October 2008, on behalf of Daniel Stubbs By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net WHILE hotel performance for September and October appears to be "slightly better" than the same period last year, a tourism expert does not expect the industry to ful ly rebound from the grips of the economic downturn for at least another year. Frank Comito, executive vice-president of the Bahamas Hotel Association, said despite what he expects to be a modest boost in perfor mance over the last two months, the sector should remain braced for a rough ride lasting until late 2010, early 2011. He said: "We have a very difficult several months that we are going through right now. We anticipated that this would be one of the most difficult periods we would face but we're hopeful our business activity will hold its own over these couple of months or be slightly better than last year at this time. "Our indicators said that our activity for September and October is slightly better over last year. We don't anticipate coming out of this economic difficult time without any robust activity for at least the next year but we're hop ing we will continue to see some slow steady improvement as confidence is restored globally and there are many signs indicating that." Mr Comito spoke to The Tribune on the sidelines of a press conference to announce an upcoming energy confer ence and business trade show J ohn S George president accused of failure to pay $100k in NIB contributions SEE page seven Expert says tourism won’ t rebound for another year SEE page eight T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SENIOR JUSTICE Anita Allen

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports.............................................P9,10,11 Advt........................................................ P12 BUSINESS/AR TS SECTION Business.....................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 Advt..........................................................P7 Comics.....................................................P8 Taste....................................................P9,10 Ar ts......................................................P11,12 CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 P AGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES THE Bahamas Telecommunications Company saysit is “cautiously optimistic” that the 2009 fiscal year will show a marked improvement in profit performance despite the ongoing recession. This comes after it was revealed that BTC earned $20 million less last year than the year before. Acting president and C EO Kirk Griffin said: The truth of the matter is that BTC – like companies a ll through the Bahamas a nd all over the world – faced a difficult 2008 due t o the severe downturn in t he global and national e conomy.” “As people travelled less, i t meant that there were l ess tourists making calls in the Bahamas. This translated into a sizable fall-off in our roaming revenue. As businesses contracted and laid staff off, it meant that there was less money in the e conomy for persons to s pend on phone cards, new c ell phones and the like. It r eally is that simple,” he s aid. B TC added that it has not been standing idle in the face of a sluggish econ omy, but has been adjusting accordingly to improve its revenue prospects. “The board and management of BTC took decisive actions to bolster exposure of promising product lines within the marketplace, while at the same time, the company took aggressive action to reduce and contain costs without eliminating any of i ts product offerings,” Mr G riffin said. “Because of steps that w ere taken beginning late l ast year, at the end of September our operating e xpenses are tracking at $8 m illion below the approved 2 009 budget due to enhanced cost-cuttinga ctivities. At the same time, our revenue is up by some $8 million above budget due to targeted and sustained marketing and promotional activities. “So even as the econom y has yet to rebound out o f the most severe reces s ion since the Great D epression, we are tracki ng for profitability that w ould be substantially higher than the $21 million earned in 2008,” he said. BTC optimistic that fiscal year will show improvement ARDASTRAGardens, Zoo and Conservation Centre bustled with activity over the weekend as the first ever “All About.” workshop was launched. All About.” is series e ducational workshops and seminars designed specific ally for children between t he ages of 5 and 12 years o ld. The first workshop was entitled, “All About Enrich-m ent”. Kelly Hobbs, curator of Ardastra Gardens and Zoo, told participants that animals, like humans, can s ometimes get bored. To alleviate that boredom, she said, animals need outl ets through which they can learn and discover new t hings, new smells, and even new objects – that’s wheree nrichment comes in”. M s Hobbs talked about specific types of enrichment for various species residing at Ardastra. She and the children made treats which they gave to the animals and the attendees w ere able to witness some animal enrichment first hand. This was the highlight of the seminar, according to1 1-year-old Jazmin Ageeb, w ho attended the workshop with her brother and cousin. Michael Jimenez, director o f business and administration and creator of the “All A bout” series, said the workshops were created to affirm Ardastra’s commitm ent to education. “It is a commitment that w as first made by our late owner Mr Norman Solomon and we are pleased to con-t inue his vision. Additionally, these workshops will comp lement the existing educational programmes at Ardastra,” he said. T he workshops take place one Saturday each month. O n November 28, the topic will be, “All About Carni vores”. A CAPUCHIN monkey e njoying a treat bag. Ardastra Gardens launches educational workshops PARTICIPANTS personalising enrichment bags. ENRICHMENT bags all made...ready to give the animals. ‘All About...’ events designed for children between five and 12

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FRAUD charges were brought against four men and one woman arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday accused of defrauding the Royal Bank of Canada and other establishments earlier this year. The five working professionals, some of whom faced sever-al charges, entered not guilty pleas to all charges against them. Christoff Hanna, 46, a driver who lives in Adelaide Gardens, New Providence, faced four counts of fraud by false pretenses. He is accused of obtaining $991.04 from Nassau branches of the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC tenses. The four counts against Hanna allege that he obtained $247.76 from RBC in Bay Street on May 8; $247.76 from RBC in Mackey Street on May 19; $247.76 from RBC in Mackey Street on June 3; and $247.76 from RBC in Bay Street on June 16. Magistrate Guillimina Archer granted him $3,000 bail with sureties. Businesswoman Bloneva Mackey, 51, of Adderley and Dorsette Street, faced five counts of fraud by false pretenses. Four counts allege intent to defraud RBC of a total of $1,180. She is accused of obtaining $295 in cash from RBC in Prince Charles Drive on May 5; another $295 from RBC in Prince Charles Drive on June2; $295 from RBC in Carmichael Road on June 15; and $295 from RBC in Prince Charles Drive on June 29. Mackey is also accused of obtaining $295 in goods and cash from Milo B Butler and Sons Limited in Peach Street on May 22. Mackey pleaded not guilty to the charges and was granted $4,000 bail with sureties. Security officer Travarus Barrow, 35, of Alexandria Boulevard, Nassau Village, faced fraud charges on two counts. Barrow is accused of obtaining $147.36 from RBC in Prince Charles drive by means of false pretenses on May 19, and he is further accused of intent to defraud the same bank in Prince Charles Drive of $146.36 by means of false pretenses on June 2. Barrow pleaded not guilty to the charges and was granted $1,000 bail with sureties. Electrician Lamarison Rolle, 24, of Davis and Bain Street, faced one count of fraud by false pretenses as he is alleged to have obtained $195.60 in goods and cash from Super Value food store in Nassau Street on June 19 by means of false pretenses. Rolle plead not guilty to the charge and was granted $800 bail with sureties. Surveyor Frank Moxey, 27, of Isles Way off Soldier Road, faced one count of fraud by false pretenses as he is accused of intent to defraud RBC in Prince Charles Drive of $363.30 by means of false pretenses on June 3 . Moxey pleaded not guilty to the charge and was granted $800 bail with sureties. All of the accused opted to have their cases heard in the Magistrates Court. They are due to return to Court Ten in Nassau Street on March 1, 2010. A further six people are expected to be summoned to court to face similar charges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,440 $3,440 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza W ong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e Five accused of defrauding the Royal Bank of Canada TRAVARUS BARROW and Christoff Hanna. BLONEVA MACKEY FRANK MOXEY and Lamarison Rolle T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. PLEASEallow me to preface this missive with a short overview of what has happened in this country. First of all, clearly there are n egative manifestations that h ave presented itself into our e nvironment. The ill-paved r oads, filthy sidewalks and r esidences hosting derelict v ehicles which is commonplace in New Providence is by no means an overnight occurrence. Secondly, the disparity b etween the wealthy and the p oor has grown so dramatic ally over the past few years t hat it has significantly contributed to the weakening of o ur social fabric. Third, ethnic self-hatred h as ingrained itself so deeply into our society that it has become almost palpable and i s reflected in the blatant disregard that we have for each o ther. Therefore as we prepare ourselves to embrace globalisation, a move whichi s perhaps a decade too late but nevertheless one that we m ust still undertake, we clearly need to redesign the way we empower the citizens of o ur country. T he Honourable Prime Minister has made such a pro found statement that perhaps i t will be enshrined as his l egacy. Mr Ingraham expressed concerns as to the way banks operate in this country. M r Ingraham is quoted as saying: “I find it very distasteful, and I am verya nnoyed by it quite frankly, angered would be a better word, that some of the banks in The Bahamas are able tor epatriate huge profits from T he Bahamas and pay minus cule sums”. This is the first time in recent memory that, even as oblique as this statement is,a Bahamian leader has shown t hat he has grasped the i nequities being meted out on t he citizen by our selfsame social and financial policies. It is important that the underlying meaning of the Prime Minister’s statement become a part of a frame work to assist the citizen as we embrace globalisation. Would it be fair to read into this statement that perhaps Mr Ingraham would like to s ee a change in the way large institutions contribute to thisc ountry? Could we read into t his statement that the sponsoring of sporting events and junkanoo is no longer sufficient in this newly structured global economy? Can we read into this statement that the time has now arrived w hereby a leader of this count ry are prepared to assist the c itizen in accessing venture o r risk capital from foreign i nstitutions, a la, relaxing our e xchange control policies? Clearly capitalism demands that apart from, but not limited to, taxes, due diligence or employment policies being imposed on a financial institution, little should stand in t he way of that institution’s growth. Therefore local banks should not be forced to lend funds if they choose not to. However; it is comforting to know that a new day has dawned which further demands that the citizen be given business friendly policies such as being allowed to a ccess foreign capital for i nvestments. Admittedly this e xists in our present banking s ystem, but only in a very r estrictive form. S o in embracing globalisation there is hope that future leaders of this nation will see the wisdom in making sure that local banks will not beo ur only way to secure fundi ng for business projects. Perh aps it is time to encourage o utside competition in our local banking market, seeing t hat the present funds are being exported anyway. Or d id I misread the Prime Minister’s statement? D WAYNE J HANNA N assau, October 2009. C M Y K C M Y K E DITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P AGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., ( Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt . P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising A dvertising Manager (242 Circulation Department (242 Nassau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 WEBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm N EW YORK (AP r emain far behind men in economic and political power, but the Nordic countries come closest to closing the gender gap, according to a survey of 134 nations released Tuesday. The four Nordic countries Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden have t opped the Global Gender Gap Index since it was first released in 2006 by the Geneva-based World Economic Forum. T hey did so again this year, but Icel and replaced Norway at the top of the l ist with a score of 82.8 percent, meaning it came closest to 100 percent gender equality. T wo African countries South Africa and Lesotho entered the list of the top 10 countries for the first time while four others remained, NewZ ealand, Denmark, Ireland and the Philippines. At the bottom of the list were Qatar, Egypt, Mali, Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia,B enin, Pakistan, Chad and Yemen in last place with a score of 46.1 percent. Several countries near the bottom,i ncluding Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, B ahrain, Ethiopia and Morocco, made gains from the 2008 rankings. While many nations have made some progress toward gender equality, noc ountry has closed the gap when it comes to economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, political empowerment, and health and survival. “Girls and women make up one half of the world’s population,” the forum’s f ounder and executive chairman, Klaus S chwab, said in a statement, “and with out their engagement, empowerment and contribution, we cannot hope to achieve a rapid economic recovery nor effectively tackle global challenges such as climate change, food security and conflict.” Saadia Zahidi, head of the forum’s Women Leaders and Gender Parity Program, told a news conference launching the survey that of the 115 countries i n the original index four years ago, 99 h ave made progress in closing their gaps but 16 haven’t “and have actually deteriorated.” The survey shows that on health, “the world is doing fairly well,” closing over 96 percent of the gap in resources between women and men, Zahidi said. O n education, about 93 percent of the gap has been closed but on economic participation and opportunity only 60 p ercent has been closed and on political e mpowerment only 17 percent. So basically what we’re saying is that across the world, in general, women are starting to be almost as healthy anda lmost as educated as men obvious ly with major exceptions but those resources are not being used efficiently in terms of economic participation andc ertainly not in terms of political decision-making,” Zahidi said. Melanne Verveer, the U.S. ambas sador for global women’s issues, said t he index “underscores that gender equality is critical to a country’s eco nomic prosperity and competitiveness.” It remains a simple fact that no coun t ry could prosper if half its people are left behind,” she said. “Yet, women are still largely under-represented also in parliament and legislatures of nearlye very country, and I might add so too in the boardrooms of corporations.” In the latest survey, the United States dropped from 27th place to 31st place in the rankings as a result of minor drops in the participation of women in the economy and improvements in the s cores of previously lower-ranked count ries, according to the survey. Verveer noted that the first bill Pres ident Barack Obama signed into law was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act making it easier for workers to sue for pay discrimination, but she stressed: “We have a long road to go no matter where we live.” (This article is by Edith M Lederer of the Associated Press) The banking market in the Bahamas LETTERS l etters@tribunemedia.net Nordic countries top gender gap index again EDITOR, The Tribune. YOURspeculation that Minister Neko Grant, previously a ppointed to the all important Ministry of Tourism and then to Public Works & Transport, is going to be appointed Ministerial “over-lord” for Grand Bahama simply indicates that, with respect,t he Hon Minister, who I call “Mr Sauve”, probably the best d resser in Parliament, has not met the mark as an administrator. Surely this post should be a Minister-of-State and no higher? If the Prime Minister wants action in Grand Bahama I suggest h e takes this on and resigns some of the other long list of responsibilities, then Grand Bahama will have the all-important economic focus. S idney Collie returning to Cabinet is a further speculation although this most honourable gentleman who followed to the ‘T’ correct parliamentary practice, something which you don't see too often these days, I suggest will remain outside of Cabinet. The r ecent defeat of the sitting Greek Government and the immediate resignation of the previous PM on losing further, adds cre dence as to what defeated Prime Ministers are required to do w hen defeated; some should note. The choice of the Prime Minister to be AG will be between Hon Desmond Bannister and Hon Carl Bethel with more supportt o Mr Bethel as clearly he has a better understanding of law, but then who to Education the monster problem Ministry? Will we see a resignation from the Senate and an appointm ent from there to the Ministry of Education or more than likely to the position of Attorney General which for the latter is an obvious serious probability? W THOMPSON Nassau, October 8, 2009. Cabinet speculation

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By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A S the business community strains under the weight of rising power costs, the private sector is hosting a conference topush for alternative energy policies. In addition to being an energy conference and business trade show, the event will also showcase practical energy savi ng solutions which can be implemented immediately to provide relief to the commercial sector. The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, the Bahamas Hotel Association and the US Embassy will host the event, which kicks off on November 1 2. Event organisers said participants can expect an update on government's National Energy Policy at the conference while the trade show will provide a platform for vendors to showcase their goods and services – which will include solar heaters a nd generators and other energy saving devices. So far 25 exhibitors are lined up for the trade show however organisers expect to match last year's number with around 70 exhibitors as more persons sign up to showcase their wares. "The issue of energy effic iency is an issue that's glaring in the minds of many businesses particularly right now as we're starting to see a creep of the oil prices again. . . We know that the cost of energy will continue to be a challenge for all of us over the coming years and the move toward looking at renewable sources of energy that we can tap into is ever more important," said BHA executive vicepresident Frank Comito. He explained that the trade show is not just limited to those specialising in energy efficient goods but is open to persons in the tourism industry, marketing, food and beverage supplies and information technology, as well as representatives of the international business community that offer goods and services to the Caribbean. "It is an opportunity to bring together buyers and sellers of goods and services to promote new business opportunities and reinforce existing relationships," said Mr Comito, who added that last year's trade show attracted around 10,000 visitors. US Embassy spokesman Jeff Dubell said the American gov ernment supports alternative energy initiatives adding that o ver 80 per cent of future greenhouse gas emissions is expected t o come from developing countries. He hopes the dialogue on alternative energy will be continued on a regional level duringa similar conference in fall 2010. "We look at the Bahamas as a perfect test-bed to test some o f these new technologies – it is an archipelago, you must prov ide all these services to the islands, each island must by selfsustaining. "You can work with US companies, develop those new tech nologies, build new companies that maybe you can export to Latin America and the rest of the Caribbean," he said. T he conference will feature local and international speake rs and panelists, including Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, his junior minister Phenton Neymour and representatives from the BEST Commission, the Inter-American Development Bank, EMERAa nd Star Island Resort. The conference will be held o n November 12 at the Sheraton and the trade show is sched uled for two days – November 13 and 14. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM f f f r f tntfnbbnt!&b!"#"nftn&$#"" !###""#$"%# !#! $#$!%# !b tn bt %%% is presently considering applications for anAccountantThe Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an Accountant:Requirements: frequency Applications should be submitted to: Human Resources Department P.O. Box N-4928 Nassau, Bahamas or via fax 356-8148DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OFAPPLICATIONS IS: NOVEMBER 6, 2009 rtbr rtbr tbtr tbtr By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A KERZNER International employe e was charged with stealing $10,000 from t he company by reason of employment in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Lithera Knowles, 28, of Rocky Pine Road, Nassau, appeared in court ten, Nassau Street, dressed in white linen trousers and a white button down shirt and stood a s Magistrate Guillimina Archer read the c harges. Knowles is charged on one count of stealing by reason of employment on Monday, October 19, in New Providence. The charge alleges Knowles stole $10,000 cash from Kerzner Internationalo n Paradise Island, to which she had cust ody by reason of her employment. Knowles, represented by attorney Ian Cargill, pleaded not guilty to the charge a nd opted for her case to be heard in the M agistrate’s Court rather than by a jury in the Supreme Court. Ms Archer ordered Knowles to return to Court Ten in Nassau Street on February 22 of next year. S he was granted $15,000 bail with two s ureties. Kerzner employee charged with stealing $10,000 by reason of employment Private sector to host alternative energy conference THEEVENT will focus on alternative energy devices such as solar panels. Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. LOCAL NEWS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS P AGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Anentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you . We are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 31st, 2009 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re: System Administrator, 51 Frederick Street P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comPROFILE: BS degree in Computer Science, Information systems, or related specialty or equivalent experience/training 2+ years experience in application support in a financial institution Must have an understanding of general business principles, and how to translate business needs i nto quality technical solutions A genuine focus on internal customer satisfaction and a positive, friendly demeanor is required. Functional experience with databases, SQL scripting, or other programming experience Knowledge of IIS configuration and management Experience with ASP, HTML, and .NET applications preferred Experience with AS/400 applications an advantage Strong organization and prioritization skills Strong customer service experience preferred Must be able to work both independently and as a valued member of a team Crystal Reports and Microsoft Reporting Services experience a plusRESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE: Reviews, analyzes, evaluates and applies solutions to end-user support requests for the Banks’s networked and SQL-based applications. Troubleshoot applications to resolve technical related issues including application and data problems. Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial implementations, enhancements, or upgrades. Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting department Service Level Agreements (SLA Install and deploy SQL databases, create backup plans, test disaster recovery scenarios, and administer security Document processes and help design improvements Communicate clearly and professionally with internal customers including technical and non-technical staff, management, and vendorsA competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.-SYSTEMADMINISTRATOROnly persons shortlisted will be contacted By AVA TURNQUEST THE United Nations General Assembly meets t oday to vote on the draft r esolution submitted by C uba requesting an end to the 50 year US embargo against the island nation. On the eve of the vote, Ambassador of the Republ ic of Cuba Jose Luis Ponce sat down with The Tribune t o emphasise the urgency of t he matter and raise awaren ess of Cuba’s suffering. The ambassador d escribed the US policy t owards his country as a monumental violation of human rights, as it discourages other countries from interacting with Cuba – essentially “asphyxiating the Cuban population.” “I think it’s important for the international communit y to know, for the Bahamian community to know, that despite their expectations o f the ascension of a new U S government, nothing h as changed,” Mr Ponce said. F or the past 17 years, C uba has submitted the draft resolution “Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba” for considera tion by the United Nations G eneral Assembly (UNGA T he draft, which will be p resented again today, reads: “The economic, com mercial and financial embargo imposed by theU nited States against Cuba 50 years ago is the most elevated expression of a cruel and inhuman policy, lacking in legality and legitimacy and deliberately designed to create hunger, illnesses a nd desperation within the C uban populace. Nothing h as changed through 10 successive US governments other than a tightening of this policy. Nothing essential has changed either since t he new US government was inaugurated in January 2 009.” A s a direct consequence o f the embargo, Cuba has calculated that as of Decem-b er 2008, the country has s ustained a total of $96 billion worth of economic damage. Last year, an overwhelming 185 member states, including the Bahamas, voted in favour of the resolution – a near unanimous demonstration of the intern ational community’s rejection of the US government’s policy against Cuba. Howe ver nothing has changed. Although these mea s ures are a positive step, they are also extremelyi nsufficient and limited. The c omplex framework of laws and administrative provisions which make up the legal basis of the policy of blockade, designed to destroy the Cuban econo my, remain in place,” thea mbassador said. T his year’s version of the draft resolution highlights U S Vice President Joseph B iden’s remark that the US will maintain the blockade as “a tool to apply pressure” on Cuba. I t adds: “Since the acces sion of Barrack Obama to the Presidency of the Unit ed States more than 50 per c ent of the funds collected b y the Office for Foreign A ssets Control, according t o figures of the Treasury itself, come from the sanctions applied to enterprises and entities for alleged violations of the blockade against Cuba.” Ambassador Ponce asked t he Bahamas, and all countries “committed to the defence of international l aw” to once again support i ts resolution at the UN. D uring the 64th session of the UNGA earlier this year, the Bahamas submit t ed a statement that read: “The Bahamas enjoys normal diplomatic and trader elations with Cuba. The B ahamas has not promul gated or applied laws or measures against Cuba that would prohibit economic,c ommercial or financial relations between the Bahamas and Cuba.” Call for Bahamas to back Cuba’s embargo opposition US VICE PRESIDENT Joseph B iden’s said the US will maint ain the blockade as ‘a tool to apply pressure’ on Cuba. (AP UNGeneral Assembly to vote on draft resolution

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and other employees. Adderley has an in-house application with NIB he is n ow paying. A warrant was issued for t he arrest of Bernard Dorsett, of Porky’s Texaco Service Centre, New Providence, as he failed to appear i n court yesterday. Dorsett is charged with failure to pay $48,781.86 to NIB between August 2005 a nd October 2007, on behalf of Shirley Storr and other e mployees. T he 12 employers charged on Monday were ordered to pay sums to NIB rangingf rom around $2,000 to more t han $27,000 in missed pay ments. Desmond Thompson, of Bahamas Embroidery, wascharged with failure to pay NIB $27,306.70 between J anuary 2000 and April 2006, and April and July 2007. He was ordered to pay the court $10,923 on Mond ay and $400 per month to the court until the full amount has been covered. Self-employed Samuel Smith was charged with failure to pay $20,184.53 to NIB between January 2003 and A pril 2008 and was ordered t o pay $8,000 to the court on Monday and $350 per month thereafter. Self-employed doctor Walter Gibson, charged with failure to pay $12,865.75 between October 1998 and August 2004, did not appear in court on Monday and a warrant was issued for the arrest. Self-employed chiropractor Philip Huyler was charged with failure to pay $5,551.51 to NIB before December 2003, and was ordered to pay the amount in full by December 31. Bruno Minnis, of Bruno’s, was charged with failure to pay $5,081.13 in NIB pay ments between January 2003 and March 2009, and October 2008 and March 2009. He was ordered to pay the c ourt $1,200 on Monday and $ 400 per month thereafter until his contributions have been covered. Bridgette Scavella, of Flor al Fiesta, was charged with f ailure to pay $4,969.40 in NIB contributions between D ecember 1999 and August 2003, and was ordered to p ay the amount in full by the end of December this year. Domestic employer M elanie Bridgewater was charged with failure to pay $4,630.80 between January 1997 and December 2002. S he paid $1,800 to the court on Monday and was ordered t o pay $100 per month to t he court. Linda Taylor, selfemployed, was charged with failure to pay $3,562.38 to N IB between October 1997 a nd April 2006, and was ordered to pay $500 to the c ourt on Monday, and $250 per month to the court t hereafter. Jacqueline Lotmore, of Three V’s Beauty Supplies, charged with failure to pay$ 2,480.77 in NIB contributions over various periods between December 1999 and April 2008, will appear i n Court 11 on November 2 for sentencing. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 to the entire judiciary of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. “I further offer my unqualified apology to the Bahamian people,” h e said. F orbes is to appear before S enior Justice Allen again tomorrow to answer as to why he should not be held in contemptof court. W hile the judge noted that she d id not think the complaint r equired an investigation into whether the discharge of the jury was proper, Forbes’s announcement posed a real risk of prejudice to the administration of justice. Representing Forbes are attorneys Wayne Munroe, Anthony McKinney and Alfred S ears. T he date for the retrial of Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Torino Lightb ourne has yet to be set. The nine-member jury were discharged a t 10.54pm on Wednesday, last week, despite the fact they had yet to r each a verdict. A round 9.30 pm that same night, Forbes took to the convention stage and told delegates that Bridgewater had been acquitted. He exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! God is good PLPs! P leasant is a free woman! God still r eigns PLPs!” At that time however the jury was still deliberating, and had been so for more than eight hours. N o verdict had been reached a lthough convention members cele brated Bridgewater's supposed vindication by singing and dancing to “Oh Happy Day”. The session chairman had to mount the podium after Mr Forbes’ speech and apologise for whatever confusion the MP’s pronouncement may have caused. B ridgewater and Lightbourne are accused o f attempting to extort $25million from American actor John Travolta between Janu ary 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They b oth have denied the charges. FROM page one John S George president Picewell sorry for ‘reckless’ outburst F ROM page one PLEASANT B RIDGEWATER

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Angie Moss, 37, of Colony Club, St Albans Drive, was arraigned in court on Friday for the same armed robberies and has been remande d in custody. M agistrate Guillimina Archer read the charges as the two men, dressed in jeans, T-shirts, and sneakers, stood before the bench. T hey are accused of being concerned together and with others, armed with an offensive weapon, namely a handgun, to rob Joan W alins of $200 on Sunday, October 11. T he men are also accused of stealing $60 from Phyllis Compeau, a gold rope chain from John Tomillinson, $70 from Gloria Tomillinson, two rings valued at $40 and $ 65 in cash from Kelly Greer, $106 from Ashley Greer, $60 from Deborah Greer, and $5 from Frank Romeo. M agistrate Archer quizzed Johnson about a d octor’s visit as she held medical documents stating he had seen a doctor on Monday. But Johnson said he had seen a doctor on Sunday and M s Archer said she hoped he was not lying to the court but did not clarify when he had seen the doctor. Guerrier appeared to have h ad some medical attention as he had a bandage on the i nside of his right elbow what looked like a medical bracelet on his left wrist. Ms Archer said there was another charge before her which she could not make sense of and asked the prosecuter to review it before bringing the men back before the court. Johnson and Guerrier were not required to entera plea for any of the charges a s there will be a premliminary inquiry into the matters. The case was adjourned until February 12. Until then all three of the accused will be remanded inc ustody, and have the option o f making a bail application t o the Supreme Court. Guerrier and Johnson asked for copies of the docke ts and charges, and Ms A rcher said the statements would be provided. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM h osted by BHA, the Chamber of Commerce a nd the US State Department. "But it's still going to be a tough road particularly over the next two months and next season. It's just too early to really predict where we're going to be at," he added. M r Comito stressed that despite the dismal market, now is the time for companies to "buck the trend" and invest in aggressive marketing. "Both the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism as well as the industry have marketed themselves much more aggressively realising that the piei s smaller and to retain some level of proportionality of market share in the pie we have to be much more aggresive.” M r Comito's assessment is in line with the International Monetary Fund's recent report on the state of the region's tourism product. A ccording to previous reports, the IMF list ed the Bahamas among the Caribbean nations that suffered the highest declines in tourist arrivals during 2009. The IMF also predictedt hat a turnaround in the sector is not expected before 2011. For the year up to May tourism arrivals to t he Bahamas were down by 14.1 per cent, compared to a 3.4 per cent increase forJ amaica and falls of just 2.4 per cent and 9.4 p er cent for the Dominican Republic and St L ucia respectively, said the IMF's assessment of the Caribbean's tourism outlook. Also making out slightly better than the B ahamas were Barbados and Antigua & Bar buda, whose tourist arrivals to July 2009 were d own by 10.7 per cent and 12.8 per cent respect ively. A ccording to the report, the only Caribbean nations dealing with a tougher situation than the Bahamas were St Vincent & the G renadines and St Kitts and Nevis, who were off by 17.4 per cent and 27 per cent respectively for the year to June 2009. M eantime, hotel occupancy rates for the m onth of September are expected to be released within "the next couple of days", Mr Comito said. " They don't appear to be, on the whole, worse than September of last year but we'll have the results shortly on that," he told The T ribune. FROM page one Expert on tourism RUBEN JOHNSON and Johnny Guerrierat court yesterday. Angie Moss was arraigned in court on Friday for the same armed robberies and has been remanded in custody. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Three accused of armed robbery of tourists F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM IN just under two weeks, the Bahamas’ premier multifaceted sporting event is slat-ed to begin in the nation’s second city, featuring swimmers, bikers and runners from around the world. The 23rd annual Conchman Triathlon to be staged in Lucaya, Grand Bahama, is scheduled for November 7 amidst wide boulevard streets and crystal waters in a tropical setting. Possiple competitors can register online at www.conchman.com The adult race features a 1K swim, 25K bike, and a 5K run, beginning 8am at Taino Beach. The Iron Kids, which begins at noon, features a 200m swim, a two-mile bikeride and a half-mile run. Groups for Iron Kids competition begin at six and under, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13 and over. “The event is free courtesy of the sponsors Fred Smith and Sun Alliance Insurance. The first 100 to finish will receive T-shirts, medals and a wards,” Smith said in a release. And presentations will be m ade to the first three finishers in each group (boys and girls). “All primary and secondary school students are eligible to participate,” he said. The Conchman Triathlon has been a staple of sports tourism since its inception almost 23 years ago. In 1986, the principal organisers and founders, Ambrose Gouthro, Bert Bell and Craig Stewart, saw the potential of having a Bahamian triathlon and decided to launch it after seeing the success of the Iron Man triathlons in Hawaii and Bermuda. Presidents “Mr Gouthro and Mr Stewart, then presidents of the Rotary Club of Lucaya and Rotary Club of Freeport, respectively, aimed to create a positive community event that would contribute to charitable organisations, which still stands in effect today,” according to the event’s website. Organisers feel the Conchman provides an activity where Grand Bahama residents and visitors could come t ogether to compete, build and maintain a healthy body and raise funds for Grand B ahama Rotary Club projects, BASRA and Freeport Aquatics Club. At the time, Mr Gouthro says the proceeds of the event also went to the Polio Plus Organisation, which was, and still is, dedicated to eradicating polio in the world. The first race was held at Xanadu Beach and consisted of the present distances, 1000 metre (half a mile 25km (15 miles a 5km (3 miles According to Mr Stewart, 166 persons participated with a fair number of entries from North America and Canada. There were 30 individual entries and 44 team entries that participated but of course only one winner in each category. Over the next few years, the Conchman moved from Xanadu Beach to the former Holiday Inn, now Our Lucaya and then to its present location at Taino Beach, where it has garnered a lot of support and participation. The upcoming Conchman promises to be an exciting, challenging and fun race for persons of all ages to enjoy. With the "potential to be bigg er and better", the Conchman has come a long way in becoming one of The B ahamas’ most respected and well-liked sports, hopefully for many years to come. Conchman Triathlon set for next month on Grand Bahama THE Bahamas Judo Federation held its Fall Classic Judo tournament on October 24. There were more than 70 athletes and 200 spectators in attendance. A team from Abaco as well as the Special Olympics Team competed in regular divisions of the tournament. There were several standout performances as both male and female athletes ranging from ages eight to adult participated. “We were delighted with the level of judo," said David Rahming, coach of the Fox Hill Club and Special Olympics. “You are seeing more dynamic and complex techniques that are seen on the international stage. We are definitely leaps and bounds above where we were even a year ago.” The following awards have been decided based on the results of the tournament. The Competitors AwardTajaro Hudson Best Ippon (Submission) Award Cynthia Rahming The Humphrey "Trod" Jackman Special Olympics Award Zecumba Major “We are proud to give this award in memory of my friend Trod, who died tragically this year. He was a Special Olympian and he should not be forgotten," said D’Arcy Rahming, president of the Bahamas Judo Federation. “This tournament was very important for the Abaco kids to participate in and we were delighted with their performance," said Abaco coach Regina Parotti Kennedy. Anyone interested in assisting the Bahamas Judo Federation can contact the Federation at 364-6773 or via e-mail at daishihan@gmail.com Judo tournament award in memory of Humphrey Jackman Humphrey Jackman THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS TEAM competed in regular divisions of the tournament... Photo by W W o o o o d d l l e e y y C C a a r r r r o o l l l l Andy Roddick all set to play in Mark Knowles Charity Invitational has always wanted to come to the Bahamas and participate in the tournament, according to Knowles. Paying together in Beijing solidified this year’s appear ance for the No.1 ranked American player, who won the 2003 US Open and was a three-time Wimbledon finalist. “We got a little closer and I found out that he such a nice guy,” Knowles said. “He has his own foundation like the Andy Roddick Charitable Organisation, so he under stands what it is I’m doing,” Knowles said. “With him coming, I think it’s going to be one of the greatest ever. To have somebody like Andy Roddick in the Bahamas is going to be so exciting.” This year, Knowles and his organisers have switched the professional tennis exhibition from Atlantis on Paradise Island to the National Tennis Centre, Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, 3pm Saturday, December 5. While adults will be charged an admission fee, Vicki Knowles-Andrews, Knowles’ mother, has indicated that they will be allowing children to be admitted free so as to give as many of them as possible the opportunity to meet Roddick up close and personal. Tickets will be available from November 10 at the National Tennis Centre, Atlantis Tennis Centre, Village Squash Club, H G Christie Ltd and Lyford Cay School. Call 359-2542 for further information. The major sponsors to date include Atlantis Resort & Casino, Lombard Odier Darier Hentsch Private Bank & Trust, Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd, Serenity Point, Abaco, The Balmoral, The Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, American Airlines, The Bank of the Bahamas, Everkey Global Fund, Templeton Global Advisors, Odyssey Aviation, H3O and The Ministry of Youth Sports & Culture. There are a few sponsorship opportunities still avail able and interested parties should contact Vicky Andrews at vickyk@batelnet.bs or cell: 357-9670. The proceeds of the event will go to aid local children’s charities. To date, over $400,000 has been distributed to various charities. While the tournament draws near, Knowles will be returning to the pro circuit on Sunday to play in Valencia, Spain, where he is expected to team up with Michael Llodra at the Valencia Open 500. Bhupathi has decided to take another break, but will rejoin Knowles in Paris, France, for the BNP Paribas Masters from November 11 before they head to the Bar clays ATP World Tour Finals in London, England, starting on November 22. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 Crushers ‘light up’ Sparks the lower rims, but he noted that his players didn’t play up to par. “My boys had to adjust, especially with defense on them. They had to throw the ball up harder,” he said. “We haven’t had a chance to play in rims this low, so we had to get used to it.” With Turnquest and Coope r (who contributed 10 ing the offensive attack, the Crushers also got some solid defense from Adrian Mack ey, Christopher Oliver, Stevejay Whylly and Antoine Gibson as they staved off theS parks’ attack. D’Chaz Butler paced St Thomas More with six, Cairo Curry had five, Randy Forbes chipped in with three and both Rohan Kerr and Jefferson Thomas added two. P h o t o s b y F e l i p M a j o r ST Bede’s Crushers Donald Cash attempts a dunk yesterday. The Crushers won 54-19...

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THE local cricket community has experienced a busy schedule in recent weeks. League play has intensified with visiting teams from the region taking part. The Dynasty Stars recently hosted the Lucaya Cricket Club of Freeport, Grand Bahama, to a series of exhi bition matches over the weekend. In the opening match, Lucaya CC batted first and scored 182 all out. The team’s top scorers included Kenneth Seeram with 48 runs and Harold Stu art with 23. Both Dynasty bowlers, Venris Bennett and Lee Melville, took three wickets apiece. In their turn at bat, the Stars topped by scoring 184 runs for the loss of seven wickets, to win the match by three wickets. Ryan Tappin scored 58 runs while Howard Roye added 30 runs. Bowling for Lucaya, Keith Worrell took four wickets. In the second match of the series, Lucaya CC rebounded to defeat the Stars by 54 runs. Lucaya scored 149 runs all out in their turn at bat. Worrell scored 46 runs, Brian Kumar added 28 and Trevor Bourne chipped in with 21 runs. Bowling for the Stars, Alvin Peters and Alex Her nandez took three wickets each. The Stars failed to duplicate Saturday's feat and fell short with just 95 runs. Gregory Irvin was the top scorer with 20. Bowling for Lucaya CC, Harold Stuart and Worrell took three and two wickets respectively. In local league play, continuing Sunday at Haynes Oval, The Dockendale Titans defeated the Police by four wickets. The Police opened the match with 139 runs. Mark Taylor and Wayne Patrick led the effort with 25 runs apiece. Calvin Neita was the lead bowler for the Titans and took seven wick ets. Dockendale scored 161 runs for the loss of six wickets for the win. Gargand Ganpat scored 39 runs and Narendra Ekanayake added 36 as the top scorers for the Titans. Odain Tucker took two wickets for the Police. The Bahamas Cricket Association will continue its efforts to gain exposure against regional competition. The league is slated to host the Cayman Islands’ over 40 Masters team November 7-8. COB Caribs defeat the Cougars C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE New Providence Volleyball Association continued its 2009 regular season with another double header Monday night at the DW Davis Gymnasium. In the women’s match, the COB Caribs defeated the Cougars in straight sets 25-19, 25-24 and 25-16. Keneisha T hompson led all scorers for t he win with 19 points. For t he youthful Cougars, Irina Key led with five points. In the men’s match, it was a battle between the Technicians and National Fence Intruders, each with one loss for the season. However, in the end, the Intruders endured a 23-25, 2624, 23-25, 25-16 and 16-14 win in five tough sets. Glen Rolle led the charge with 17 kills, one block and an ace for the win. In a losing effort, Renaldo Knowles scored 19 kills, one block and an ace. Games are slated to continue tonight at the DW Davis Gymnasium with another double header on tap. Titans defeat Police by four wickets as cricket league action heats up Intruders beat Technicians THE Bahamas Olympic Association (BOA tary general Romell Knowles on his election to the international post of vice president of the International Softball Federation (ISF Knowles has been elected as the ISF’s first-ever vice president for the non-Hispanic Caribbean region. Said BOA president Wellington Miller: “I know that I speak for all our colleagues in the Olympic movement in The Bahamas when I say that as a Bahamian to be the first to hold this exciting position is an honour that you well deserve.” Miller said Knowles’ election is “an important milestone in the continuing excellence of Bahamians in the administration of international sport and a shining example of good stewardship in the sporting arena.” “Your success is our success,” he said. “We are sure that you will make the most of your new position to the benefit of all softball playing athletes in the non-Hispanic Caribbean region. “The Bahamas is sure to benefit in many ways from Mr Knowles’ presence at such a high level in the International Softball Federation.” BOA congratulates Knowles on ISF vice president post ROMELL KNOWLES Share your news The T r ibune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a g ood cause, campaigning for impr o vements in the a r ea or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 9 Conchman Triathlon next month... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM E N T E R T O W I N T O D A Y !B U Y A N Y P C M E A L O R M O R E T O R E C E I V E Y O U R S C R A T C H & W I N G A M E C A R D PROM O TION U N S O C T T H T H R U N O V T H EVERYONE IS A WINNER!Plusentertowin 1of3GrandPrizesEVERYONE IS A WINNER!Plusentertowin 1of3GrandPrizes NASSAUWE ACCEPT: Judo award in memory of Humphrey Jackman... See page 9 ANDY RODDICK (right Open where they reached doubles final... Roddick set to play in Mark Knowles Charity Invitational B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A s teams jostle for playoff position late in the GSSSA v olleyball season, a pair of senior girls teams helped their cause with wins yesterday at the D W Davis Gymnasium... C C C C S S w w e e e e t t i i n n g g C C o o b b r r a a s s o o v v e e r r D D J J M M y y s s t t i i c c M M a a r r l l i i n n s s 1 1 9 9 1 1 1 1 , , 1 1 2 2 1 1 9 9 , , 1 1 5 5 6 6 The Cobras dominated the opening set as they raced out to an early 8-1 advantage and held on to breeze through the opening set. The Mystic Marlins rebounded in the second set with renewed determination to get out to an early lead of their own. Christia Taylor’s adept play around the net led the charge for the Mystic Marlins who went on to separate themselves from an 8-8 tie. Taylor scored three consecutive kills to propel her team’s 5-0 run as they held on to take the set, 19-12. In the third, the Cobras reasserted their first-set dominance. T he Mystic Marlins opened with a 4-2 lead, however the Cobras responded with six consecutive scores. The Cobras led 8-3 when the teams s witched sides and went on to win the set, 15-6. The Cobras’ Jaynell Cox led all scorers w ith eight kills. C C I I G G i i b b s s o o n n R R a a t t t t l l e e r r s s o o v v e e r r R R M M B B a a i i l l e e y y P P a a c c e e r r s s 1 1 9 9 1 1 2 2 , , 1 1 9 9 8 8 In the second matchup of the evening, the Pacers did little in a losing effort as the R attlers eased their way to a two-set sweep. After a 2-2 tie to begin the opening set, the Pacers failed to gain momentum and found themselves behind 10-4 due to a series of unforced errors. The Rattlers maintained a seven point advantage for the remainder of the set to win 19-12. Quicker to the ball and returning serves, C I Gibson opened the second set on a 9-0 run. Silverni Augustin served for each of the nine scores, building a lead too big for theP acers to overcome. After an unforced error put R M Bailey on the scoreboard for the first time in the set, they rallied to come within six points, 12-6 . A timely C I Gibson time-out corrected t he brief lapse in execution as they pressed on to take the set and match, 19-8. League play for seniors is scheduled to continue at the D W Davis Gymnasium onT hursday. Cobras dig up Mystic Marlins Rattlers beat Pacers By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER teaming up to play together for the first time in doubles in China a couple weeks ago, Bahamian tennis ace Mark Knowles and top ranked American Andy Roddick will be reunited here. Roddick, the former No.1 singles player in the world, has agreed to participate in the 9th Mark Knowles Charity Invitational December 3-5 in an exhibition at the National Tennis Center. “It’s extremely exciting to have a former world number one and grand slam champion and someone as popular as Andy coming to the event,” said Knowles yesterday in an interview with The Tribune from his home in Dallas, Texas. “It’s really a huge boost and it has added a lot of excitement. We are just waiting on his arrival because he has said he will be willing to participate in any event that we have on the schedule. That’s the type of person he is.” Knowles and Roddick partnered at the Beijing Open where they reached the doubles final when Knowles’ regular partner Mahesh Bhupathi took a break to recuperate from a groin injury he sustained playing Davis Cup for India. Roddick, who has been ranked No.1 in the world and is currently ranked No.7, S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 C I GIBSON Rattlers’ Silverni Augustin digs the ball yesterday... F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH they had to make an adjustment to the legal six-foot rim height for mini basketball, the undefeated St Bede’s Crushers still managed to rout the St Thomas More Sparks. In a rematch of last year’s Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools championship series, the defending champions Crushers got a game-high 34 points from Kyle ‘Flash’ Turnquest in their 54-19 pounding of the Sparks at St Thomas More. While St Bede’s went on to post their second straight vic tory for the season, there was a lot of suspense as to who would have been able to put down a thunderous slam dunk in the shortened rims. With the game already out of reach for St Thomas More, Turnquest was the first to come close to achieving the feat when his attempt on a two-handed dunk was put into the rim for a 13-2 lead. St Bede’s, who held a 6-1 margin at the end of the first quarter, used an effective trap defense that enabled Turn quest and Gregory Cooper to go after a few other dunk attempts as they went on to post a 19-4 half-time advantage. “I just decided to go for the lay-ups because I didn’t want to miss the dunks,” said Turnquest, who eventually bogeyed another attempt in the fourth quarter. Turnquest said it certainly feels good playing in the shorter rims. St Thomas More, who got a couple dunk attempts from their center Randy Forbes, is the first school to play with the rims at the regulation height. Coach N’Komo Ferguson said the goal is to make sure that their players get the opportunity to play the game the right way. But coach Ferguson said it wasn’t a well played game on both sides of the court. “They didn’t look 50 per cent the way they did in their first game against Xaviers and we played 50 per cent better than we did in our first game against Our Lady’s,” Fergu son stressed. “But we’re still getting there. We’re still building. We will see them again in the second half because we are play ing each other twice this year. So we hope to be better by then.” St Bede’s coach Donnie Culmer agreed that it was good for the players to play in Crushers ‘light up’ Sparks 54-19 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 ST Bede’s Crushers’ Kyle ‘Flash’ Turnquest attempts a dunk... Photo by Felip Major

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $3.88 $4.00 By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T HE Bahamas needs “to move faster” on renewable e nergy initiatives and pro grammes designed to reduce electricity costs, business leaders said yesterday, arguing that import duty exemptions to f acilitate efficiency in the sector were not having the desirede ffect because complementary equipment was still being heavi ly taxed. Frank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA executive vice-president, said one such case was CFL or energ y efficient light bulbs, upon which the Government had e liminated all import duties in the last Budget. However, these bulbs were now incorporated as part of energy efficient fixtures, he e xplained, and since these fixtures were still subject to rela t ively high import/customs duty rates, the value of the exemp t ions for the bulbs was being eliminated. And, in turn, businesses and residential users were being discouraged from purchasing ener g y efficient technology because of the cost involved, and i mporters turned away from bringing the products in. “We’d like it to move faster than it has. We wish they were m oving faster,” Mr Comito said of the Government’s efforts tor educe energy costs and enhance efficiency, which have i nvolved a search a for renew able energy suppliers and the drafting of an initial National Energy Policy. “Last July, with the passage o f the Budget in June, there was a recommendation enacted t hat we in the BHA had been making for years, to make CFL (fluorescent light bulbs efficient light bulbs, duty free,” M r Comito explained. But while this was welcome, t he Government failed to adjust or eliminate the import duty r ates on “energy efficient fix tures”, and “many bulbs are now part of the fixture”. This, the BHA executive vice-president suggested, showed the n eed for a more comprehenGovernment urged: ‘Move faster’ over renewable energies * Business executives say duty exemptions on energy-efficient technology not having desired effect because complementary products still heavily taxed * Absence of net metering deterring developers from incorporating renewable energy , as unable to gain investment return from selling back to BEC grid S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor OPPONENTS of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC m illion Wilson City power plant y esterday instructed their attorney “to challenge the issuance of any permits” for its construction on the basis that they h ad been unable to voice their concerns to the authorities that granted them. Fred Smith, the Callender’s & Co attorney and partner, in a n October 27, 2009, letter sent t o Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and numerous other ministers and agencies responsible for various aspects of the A baco-based power plant’s construction, effectively confirmed Tribune Business’s exclusive story on Monday, October 26, 2009, that the momentum towards commencPower plant opponents ‘challenge all permits’ T HE Bahamas Telecommu nications Company (BTCn ight said it hoped to end its 2009 financial year with net i ncome back in the $40 million range, with revenues and oper ating expenses as at end-September both running $8 million better than the budgeted target. The state-owned incumbent, which is in the middle of a privatisation exercise, said it was “cautiously optimistic” that its financial performance for 2009 would show a marked improvement over 2008, when it suf fered a 50.7 per cent profit fall to $21.1 million, compared to $42.8 million in 2008 Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting president and chief executive, said: “The truth of the matter is that BTC like companies all through the Bahamas and all over the world – faced a diffi cult 2008 due to the severe downturn in the global and national economy. “As people travelled less, it meant that there were less tourists making calls in the Bahamas. This translated into a sizeable fall-off in our roaming revenue. As businesses contracted and laid staff off, it meant that there was less money in the economy for persons to spend on phone cards, new cell phones and the like. It really is that simple.” Tribune Business yesterday identified the decline in tourism as being the major factor in BTC’s reduced roaming revBTC ‘hopeful’ of r eturn to $40m profits FRED SMITH S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Taxi Union i s bracing for what would potentially be a “hard blow” if K erzner International’s Atlantis resort makes good on the n otice it gave to terminate its contract for the ground trans portation/bussing of the resort’s employees, Tribune Business can reveal. Leon Griffin, the Bahamas Taxi Union’s president, last night confirmed that the Paradise Island-based resort and its owner had “given notice” that they planned to terminate the ground transportation conTaxi Union fears Atlantis ‘har d blow’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor B ahamian new car dealers yesterday told Tribune Busi-n ess they were hopeful that the industry had “seen the bottom”, after sector-wide sales for the 2009 third quarter and September came i n almost one-third down on 2008 comp aratives. Figures released to Tribune Business by the Bahamas Motor Dealers Associa tion (BMDA new vehicle sales were down by about 2 9.89 per cent for the 2009 third quarter year-over-year, with September’s sales 31.8 per cent behind 2008 comparatives. Collectively, the Bahamian new car industry had suffered nine successive months of sales declines. Fred Albury, president of Executive Motors and vice-president of QualityA uto, told Tribune Business: “My gut feeling, and I speak on behalf of Executive and Quality, is that we’ve seen the bottom and will see a bit of a bump up in d emand” in the 2010 New Year. He added: “July was a reasonable month for us, August was so/so, September was not bad and this month is really flat. Every quarter has had at least one reasonable month to keep us afloat. W e’re keeping our fingers crossed that things will show signs of recovery in the f irst part of next year.” Mr Albury said Executive and Qualit y had benefited from the fact they tend ed to “dominate” in the public transp ortation and taxi cab/van market, and the companies were “pre-sold up to somewhere early in the New Year” in this segment. What is of great concern is that the $ is so weak, especially against the euro and the yen, so that prices are going to be right up there,” Mr Albury told Trib une Business. However, compensating for this was the relative strength of the US dollar against the South Korean currency, the country that produced the Kia and Quality’s Hyundai models. Mr Albury said n ew Hyundai models were due to arrive in the Bahamas next year. H e added that another current problem was the relatively low inventory lev-e ls that Executive and Quality were car Car dealers eye ‘bottom’ after 30% Q3 sales drop S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BUSINESS executives yesterday said they were hoping to match last year’s total of 70 exhibitors at the two-day trade show attached to the upcoming 2009 Energy Conference, with some 25 companies already confirmed. F rank Comito, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA utive vice-president, at a press conference to unveil the November1 3-14 trade show, emphasised that it was not just designed as a platform for firms in the renewable energy/energy efficient industry, w ith manufacturers, marketing and public relations firms, food and beverage suppliers, IT firms, financial services providers and tourism-related companies among the 25 already signed-up. Pointing out that 10,000 persons attended last year’s trade show, Mr Comito said: “We hope we can reach the amount last year of h aving 70 booth exhibitors. It’s a great opportunity for companies to showcase their latest product and services, and build strategica lliances with local and international companies.” Among those scheduled to attend this year’s event is the USb ased Lowe’s, Mr Comito adding that the Trade Show provided Bahamian firms with an opportunity to interact with key executives and purchasers/buyers from this nation’s resort and other industries, establishing new relationships and building on previous ones. The BHA executive argued that the Trade Show would also pro v ide an important marketing platform for Bahamian companies, something they needed to do more than ever in a recession. In tough economic times, industry tends to retrench,” Mr T rade Show targets 70 exhibitors S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B

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tract for ferrying Atlantis employees to and from the island. However, he said the Bahamas Taxi Union was still i n talks with Atlantis executives on the issue, and the contract termination was not a ‘done deal’. R eluctant to comment due to the fact that there was a possibility that the Bahamas Taxi Union might retain its contract with Atlantis, Mr Griffin toldT ribune Business: “We are still talking about it with Atlantis, even though they have givenn otice about it.” Although he did not confirm t he November 1, 2009, termi nation date that Tribune Busin ess had been given, Mr Griffin a dded: “They [Kerzner International] did give notice about i t. I can’t go any further because there’s still hope, and w e’re still talking about the contract.” T he Bahamas Taxi Union president said he was awaiting the outcome of a meeting between Atlantis executives t hat was scheduled for yesterday morning, and indicated he might be able to comment further today when more information was available. A lthough not commenting on the reasons given by Atlantis for its move to terminate theg round transportation contract, Mr Griffin did tell TribuneB usiness the likely impact on the Bahamas Taxi Union if s uch a development came to p ass. He said: “It would not be d evastating, but it would be a very hard blow, and we would h ave to do some readjustments and all kinds of things.” M r Griffin, though, said reports reaching Tribune Busin ess that Atlantis had also cancelled all Bahamas Taxi Union tours were not true. Several sources had suggested to Tribune Business thatA tlantis was looking to give the employee ground transporta t ion contract to Bahamas Expe rience, the company that provides guest transportation services and tours to many of the resort’s visitors. r ying, with some 60 days of stock as opposed to the normal 180 day levels currently held. Explaining that the companies had moved to align inventory with the much lower levels of consumer demand experienced during summer 2009, Mr A lbury said: “We fell on the side of caution this particular summer and now inventory levels are extremely low, to the point where we now have 60 days in stock, when we normally have 180 days in stock. My inventories should build inD ecember.” Increasing inventory orders, as dealers moved to import new models and replenish stock, s hould also boost the Government’s tax revenues, Mr Albury added, as some of the highest tax rates were imposed on new car imports. H e said neither Executive, nor Quality, had laid-off staff during the recession, instead opting not to replace those who l eft voluntarily. “I know one or two BMDA members who are having a real-l y rough time of it, and have had to cut back considerably,” Mr Albury said. “We’re just trying to watch expenses as m uch as we can. We’ve taken the opportunity while things are slow to introduce a new computer system and get trained up on it. We’re looking at othera venues to tighten up on. My gut feeling is that there will be some recovery in the first half of 2010.” M r Albury’s sentiments were echoed by Andrew Barr, sales manager and a director at Friendly Ford, who told Tribune Business it was “not unex-p ected” that new car sales would be down 30-40 per cent, given the depth of the recession. H e, too, was cautiously optimistic that sales would rebound to “a satisfactory level” in the 2010 New Year, but warned that a return to pre-recessionl evels, might “take a lot longer than people might anticipate. Even getting back to that level might be a difficult task”. W hile Friendly Ford had been able to avoid any lay-offs among its 35 staff, Mr Barr, drawing parallels with a US economy that overbinged onc redit, said: “I think we were living in paradise where everything was seen as coming easy at that time.” Y et, with new car sales being sensitive to credit availability, the lack of confidence on the part of both banks and consumers was impacting thei ndustry. “I don’t think there’s a quick fix to it,” Mr Barr said. “It’s not something where you will see, in one to three months, t hings going great.” He explained that with sales down 40-50 per cent year-over-year, even a 5-10 per cent improvement every quarter wouldm ean it takes a full year to get back to pre-recession levels. Meanwhile, Rick Lowe, Nassau Motor Company’s (NMC o perations manager, said customer floor traffic was down 50 per cent from “where it used to be”, agreeing with Mr Albury that October was slow. W alk-in traffic was down, he added, arguing that a major factor in reduced demand was the difficulty and a lack of confid ence consumers were having in obtaining debt financing from the commercial banks. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPACES FOR RENTOffices:1 . 1, 200sq.ft @ $2,500.00 per month 2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month 3. 400sq.ft. @ $750.00 per month 4. 350 sq.ft @ $700.00 per monthStores:1. 3,000 sq.ft @ $5,000.00 per month 2. 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1,700.00 per month ALL SPACES LOCATED ON THE NORTH EASTERN CORNER OF BAY STREET & ELIZABETH AVENUE. All Spaces are exclusive of utilitiesAll Inquires Call 326-4222 * Remove & Replace Engine * Head Jobs * Tune-Ups * Timing * Complete Overhaul * Rebuild Alternator & Starter* OIL CHANGE---------$20.00* Come in or call us today and let us get you rollin! OAKES FIELD COLLEGE AVE. Tel: 323-5835/323-5436 INGRAHAM’S AUTO SPECIAL The Public is hereby advised that I, ERNEST HYLER Treasure Cay, Abaco 022217 of Treasure Cay, Abaco, one of the islands of t he Commonwealth of The Bahamas,intend to change my name to RALPH ERNEST . If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Ofcer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30a fter the date of publication of this notice. PUBLIC NOTICE INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL Car dealers eye ‘bottom’ after 30% Q3 sales drop F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Taxi Union fears Atlantis ‘hard blow’ I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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THE Bahamas Internet Organisation, a newly formed body, is teaming up with partners in this nation’s e-commerce sector to host an internationally-acclaimed entrepreneur, author and success trainer. Bruce Muzik, the founder of Designer Life , will stage a one-day luncheon workshop hosted by the Bahamas Internet Organisation, during which he will speak on the topic, Eight ways to grow your On-Line business or career . The event is scheduled for Thursday, October 29, at 12.30 pm at East Villa Restaurant on East Bay Street. Damien Forsythe, organiser of the Bahamas Internet Organisation, said both ecommerce and ‘bricks and mortar’ businesses in the Bahamas stood to benefit from the workshop, which is tailored to meet the needs of business owners, Internet marketers, web/graphic designers and programmers, marketing managers and anyone seeking to enter the ecommerce industry. Mr Forsythe added: “Over the years, the Bahamas has seen a dramatic increase in the number of Internet-based businesses, as well as the number of companies that use the web for marketing, as the Internet has proven to be a very powerful and resourceful business tool. “Through this luncheon workshop we hope to assist all business owners by informing them of how they can use the Internet as well as their own skills to boost their businesses. In addition, we hope to create a more united ecommerce sector in the Bahamas.” He said: “The more that we can all be on the web and all be interconnected and make a more user-friendly presence, great payment and marketing systems that work, the possi bilities are endless for the ecommerce sector here in the B ahamas.” M r Forsythe said realtors have the Bahamas Real Estate Association; attorneys, the Bahamas Bar Association; and businesses, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, so it would be ideal for e-commerce practitioners to have one unified organisation. “Local business owners stand to benefit tremendously from attending this event. Mr Muzik’s unique blend of philosophy and science, com b ined with his infectious enthusiasm, have had him on television, the front cover of newspapers, and propelled him to the top of his game asa sought-after speaker and teacher worldwide,” Mr Forsythe said. Mr Muzik said the work shop will focus on assisting persons in finding their natural path to creating wealth. “If you study wealthy people throughout history, you will find that they all created their wealth in one of only eight different ways. Research shows that each one of us is naturally suited to wealth in one of these eight ways more than the other. So, based on our personality types we will find it easier to make money if we create wealth in a way that’s naturally suited to our personally type,” Mr Muzik said. “I think one of the biggest things people struggle with in life is that they go about wanting to make money and they start a business, and what ends up happening is that they work hard their whole life, not really finding the kind of success that entrepreneurs have and not knowing why, and it’s usually because they have taken the wrong path to wealth. They are following a strategy that is not natural for them.” R R e e g g i i s s t t r r a a t t i i o o n n f f o o r r t t h h e e w w o o r r k k s s h h o o p p i i s s $ $ 1 1 0 0 a a n n d d t t h h e e l l u u n n c c h h , , a a t t h h r r e e e e c c o o u u r r s s e e m m e e a a l l i i s s $ $ 2 2 0 0 ( ( p p a a i i d d d d i i r r e e c c t t t t o o E E a a s s t t V V i i l l l l a a ) ) . . B B u u s s i i n n e e s s s s p p e e r r s s o o n n s s c c a a n n R R S S V V P P b b y y c c o o n n t t a a c c t t i i n n g g D D a a m m i i e e n n @ @ B B a a h h a a m m a a s s I I n n t t e e r r n n e e t t A A s s s s o o c c i i a a t t i i o o n n . . o o r r g g o o r r b b y y c c a a l l l l i i n n g g 4 4 3 3 4 4 6 6 9 9 0 0 0 0 . . C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Internet body hosts renowned speaker BRUCE MUZIK

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sive, considered tax policy to e nsure that renewable, sustainable energy plus energy efficiency and conservation were encouraged in the Bahamas. “Our sense is that there n eeds to be a ‘roll up the sleeves’ approach to policy at a different level,” Mr Comito said yesterday. “There are a numb er of categories of equipment that could be considered for duty exemptions that are not going into the mix. It should be part of the overall NationalE nergy Policy that is under consideration.” The BHA executive vicepresident, speaking yesterday a t a conference to unveil the 2009 Energy Conference and Business Trade Show, an initiative it is staging in partnership with the Chamber of Com-m erce and the US Embassy in Nassau, also pushed for public policy changes that would allow net metering in the Bahamas. Mr Comito explained that t his would allow businesses and residential users “to create excess energy from their own [renewable] systems, and the e xcess energy would go back to the [BEC] power grid”. Those who sold excess energy to BEC would then receive a credit on their energy bills,r educing their utility costs. Mr Comito said US states, such as California, had used net metering very successfully to produce a real impact” on energy costs, usage and the development of sustainable, renewable energy. Jeff Dubel, the US Embassay’s political/economic chief,s aid the absence of net metering in the Bahamas was also suffocating efforts by developers to incorporate renewable e nergy and associated technologies in their projects. He explained that many developers spoken to by the US Embassy wanted to embraces ustainable energy technologies in their businesses, but in the absence of net metering in the Bahamas where they could sell excess electricity back tot he BEC grid they were unable to earn a return on this investment. Without net metering, the initial costs incurred in i nstalling renewable energies was just too prohibitive. Arguing that the Government “urgently” needed to remove legislative and technicali mpediments to Bahamas-based businesses implementing renewable energy technologies and their own power sources, Y vette Sands, head of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s energy and environment committee, said electricity costs were at a point wheret hey “impeded” business. “I think we’re at the point now where it’s becoming an impediment to doing business, n ot allowing businesses to implement renewable energy offerings,” she said. “Businesses are willing, but policy does not allow it.” R eferring to the fact that existing legislation does not permit companies and homeowners to use alternative energy in areas where BEC’s elec-t ricity supply is present, Ms Sands added: “Policy needs to open the gate to allow this to happen. We need to have legi slative relief for the improvements to occur. “Businesses are primed and ready, but the environment does not allow for it. The pacen eeds to quicken on getting rid of impediments, either legislative or mechanical. There are some technical issues that need t o be solved. We do want to see it go a little bit faster.” Ms Sands acknowledged that “all is not lost”, with the Government working on numerouse nergy-related initiatives with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB the importation of 100,000 CFL l ight bulbs for low and middle income families, plus 30 pilot programmes featuring solar PV technology and net metering, plus 70 pilot solar water heateri nstallations. However, she added that the process of gathering data, writing reports, discussing them and t hen taking action could take between three to five, even 10 y ears, a process that needed to b e drastically shortened. A ddressing the press conference, Ms Sands said: “We need c leaner energy at stable prices. It is urgent. The time is now. The outcry of the business community is loud and it con-t inues to ring in our ears. The cost of electricity is too high to b e sustained, the law does not allow for any significant private generation of power to relieve the burden, there is no room for a fast-paced response byb usinesses to reduce their energy bill. Bearing such a bill has been tough to most and devastating to others the electricity bill is one of the most burdensome costs a business will bear. For s ome, passing it on to consumers is the only option shorto f shuttering their business. The result the cost of living goes up a nd up, because of the fluctu ating world fuel price.” Ms Sands said the Bahamas needed to reduce its dependency on fossil fuels to lower i ts carbon footprint and environmental impact, and inte g rate renewable energy into the mix while also reducing con s umption and power demand. “Businesses need to take a hard look at their consumption, and some of the things they can do to reduce consumption short o f self-generation of power,” Ms Sands added. “Look at the t ools that are available, and find ways to reduce consumption to m itigate against prices going up.” She warned that renew able energy forms might not always be “the panacea” for every situation. M r Comito added that it was not enough to demand thatp olicies and institutions be in place on the Government side. Not enough businesses are aware of the opportunities that p resent themselves,” he added. “We can’t be knocking the pub l ic sector if businesses are not taking advantage of the opport unities.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI2FWREHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV LEGAL NOTICE NJORD HOLDINGS LIMITED(In Voluntary Liquidation)N otice is hereby given that in a ccordance with Section 238 of The Companies Act No. 18 of 1992, a resolution h as been passed on the 26th day of October, 2009 requiring NJORD HOLDINGS L IMITED to be wound up voluntarily. The v oluntary winding up commenced at the time of passing of the resolution authorizing such w inding up. G overnment urged: ‘Move faster’ over renewable energies F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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THE Bahamas International Securities Exchange ( BISX) has continued its investor education programme at an October 8, 2009, meeting with Grade 12 E conomics and Commerce students at Queen’s College. Keith Davies, BISX’s chief executive, said: “From BISX’s s tandpoint we believe that educating current and future investors is a fundamental and essential role of our e xchange. Our visit to Queen’s College was rewarding in so many ways, and it gives us a chance to hear, first hand, the questions and con-c erns that students have regarding stocks, investing and the stock market. “Over the last two years, we have had an opportunity to speak to a number of different age groups at several different schools. I always find it gratifying when at eacher contacts us requesting the opportunity to have u s speak to their students, as this is a clear indication of an interested teacher. “I was especially gratified b y the number of students who were considering a career in some aspect of business. These students seemed especially focused on under-s tanding the operations of the stock exchange, and I look forward to reading about the a ccomplishments of all of the students in the future.” Coinciding with BISX’s 10th anniversary, Mr Davies gave a presentation on thei mportance of the stock exchange and the role played by BISX in the Bahamian e conomy. He added that such efforts were designed to create future generations of informed investors, able tou se and take advantage of the products and services facilitated by BISX. ing Judicial Review proceedings was build i ng. “Please be advised that we are instructed t o challenge the issuance of any permits on the basis that, inter alia, that our clients’ c oncerns have not been considered or taken into account by the relevant decisionmakers,” Mr Smith warned in the letter. He then asked the Government agen cies to confirm “the nature of the permits issued” for construction work on the Wilson City plant to proceed, and to who the permits were issued. Also requested by Mr Smith and his c lients were the names of government d epartments/agencies responsible for issuing the permits, when the permits werei ssued, and details of any further approvals being considered by the authorities. Copies of the permits approved to date are also being sought. “We would be remiss if we did not e xpress our clients’ extreme disappointment at the Government’s continued uni l ateral actions in this matter, despite its knowledge of our clients’ legitimate con c erns,” Mr Smith wrote. Referring to an October 8 letter sent to himself and his clients by Benjamin Pinder, the assistant administrator of the south Abaco local government district, in which h e indicated that “the appropriate authorities” would respond to all their questions,M r Smith said he and his clients were shocked” to learn that a government minister had said all necessary permits hadb een obtained by the administration. The Callender’s & Co partner added that he and his clients understood that construction work on the Wilson City plant had resumed. R eferring to the announcement by Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the envi r onment, Mr Smith had told Tribune Business on Monday: “"In the face of this a nnouncement, my clients have no alter native but to launch Judicial Review proceedings, which they will be doing shortly," Mr Smith told Tribune Business. "Regrettably, Judicial Review proceedi ngs will be launched very shortly. It will take some time to get all the documentst ogether, but they will be drafted." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BISX continues its investor education KEITH DAVIES , BISX’s chief executive and listings manager, with grade 12 Queen’s College students who are studying economics and commerce... Power plant opponents ‘challenge all permits’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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Comito said. “In the hotel sector, we’ve realised that we’vegot to market more aggressively. Both the Ministry of Tourism and the private sector r ealise the pie is smaller, and to retain our proportionate share of the pie we have to market more aggressively. “Now is more important than e ver for businesses to promote t hemselves more aggressively and make buyers aware of what they offer, and how it makes a difference.” Mr Comito said fees for b ooth exhibitors would increase by $200 this year, as organisers looked to cover their costs after subsidising exhibitors last year. W hile the economic downt urn was a factor, the Trade S how having signed up five m ore exhibitors this time last year, Mr Comito emphasised the event’s value. He said one start-up, which exhibited after just obtaining its BusinessL icence last year, obtained its first customer at the show and was still in business. Another company used the Trade Show t o introduce another product l ine every year, and one sale of t hat product was regarded as a s uccessful show. On the energy conservation/efficiency front, with the conference scheduled for November 12, 2009, Mr Comitoa dded: “The issue of energy efficiency is glaring in the minds of businesses, particularly now we’re starting to see a creep up i n oil prices. We know the cost of energy i s a challenge for all of us in the c oming years, and it’s ever m ore important that we look at renewable sources of energ y.” Mr Comito added that there n eeded to be a “greater understanding” of how the retrofitting of companies/homes, and the importation of renewable energy equipment, could bef inanced. Jeff Dubel, the US Embassy’s political/economic chief, said the Bahamas was the perfect test bed to test t hese new” renewable energy t echnologies, given its geograp hy and climate. He pointed o ut that 80 per cent of future greenhouse gas emissions w ould come from developing states. e nue. In BTC’s 2008 annual report, Mr Griffin revealed that the state-owned incumbent’s net income had fallen to $ 21.1 million from $42.8 million the y ear before, “resulting principally from a 1 per cent or $3.5 million decline in revenues and a 6 per cent or $18.7 million increase in operating expenses”. O n the revenue front, Mr Griffin attributed the drop from $356.915 million in 2007 to $353.369 million to an 18 per cent or $9.9 million drop in net r oaming revenues. “We didn’t stand idly by as we watched the economy deteriorate. The Board and management of BTC took decisive actions to bolster exposure ofp romising product lines within the marketplace, while at the same time, the company took aggressive action to reduce and contain costs without e liminating any of its product offerings,” Mr Griffin said in a statement issued last night. “Because of steps that were taken beginning late last year, at the end ofS eptember our operating expenses are tracking at $8 million below the approved 2009 budget due to enhanced cost-cutting activities. “At the same time, our revenue is up by some $8 million above budget due to targeted and sustained marketing and promotional activities. Soe ven as the economy has yet to rebound out of the most severe recession since the Great Depression, we are tracking for profitability that would b e substantially higher than the $21 million earned in 2008.” Reason H e added: “The reason that we temper our optimism with caution is because we recognise that the months of September through November are traditionally challenging months for cellular revenue due to low tourism arrivals and seasonally adjusted employment in the industry. Thus, while we feel good as to where we are, we are mindful that the economy is still stressed and we cannot say with absolute confidence how the y ear will end up. Yet, with continued creative leadership and continued vigilance on our expenditure, I am hopeful that we will be able to end the year with profits approaching the $40 mil-l ion range – more in line with the profits earned in 2006 and 2007” In December 2008, BTC dropped its fees on mobile caller ID, call waiting and voicemail, giving back to its customers some $6 million in projected revenue for 2009. The company cut its SMS [texting] rate from $0.10 to$ 0.05 and increased the bucket of minutes in its post-paid packages, effectively reducing the overage fees it would otherwise earn from customers. M r Griffin added: “So even while we are cutting costs and seeking to shore up revenues, we recognise that persons are having a difficult time in this economy. Thus, even with no man-d ate or competitive pressure to do so, we have searched hard to find ways to ease the burden where possible for our customers. “ C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE is hereby given that PHANUELLOUIMAof Pinewood Gardens, P.O. BOX GT-2914 NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days f rom the 2 1stdayo fO ctober, 2009t o the Minister responsible f or nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE +(/3:$17(' BTC ‘hopeful’ of return to $40m profits F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Trade Show targets 70 exhibitors

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e B y REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter W ALK int o t he Coco P alm Caf and T akeaway on Ber nard Road and you w ill experience an inclusive and unique Bahamia n-Italian dining experience. W hatever is happening in the kitchen, the aroma from the food, the heat from the stove, and the conversation from the cooks you’re n ot excluded from any of it. There’s no food passing through a window; instead you have an open v iew of the kitchen, seeing your dish being made from start to finish. Tribune Taste first featured the Coco Palm Caf this summer, and s ince then the restaurant has created quite a buzz for itself in the east ern part of New Providence. Adding a twist to the ordinary, this establishment offers the best in Bahamian cuisine fused with Italian flavours and spices. M ango and raspberry barbecue wings; coconut curry; chicken fettucinni, and citrus pork are just af ew of the amazing dishes you will find at the Coco Palm. Chef Paul Coakley, owner of the restaurant, claims they have the best chicken fettuccini on the island, and it’s made using his personal topsecret recipe. Continuing in the Italian vein, thin crust pizzas are also on the menu. They are served by the slice or by the box and finished with fresh herbs. The pizzas are a bestseller at the restaurant, and are often requested by businesses like Audio Plus who frequently order up to two boxes a day, Chef Coakley said. What’s Coco Palm’s secret recipe that keeps them coming back? Chef Coakley says the pizza is simply of a different calibre. And from what we tast ed, it is certainly different from ‘those other guys.’ I f you want to try a pizza that is l ighter on the pallet, with less oil, check out Coco Palm’s cheese, vegetarian or ‘meat amor’ pizzas, all ofw hich are topped with peppers, pepperoni, sausage, sliced tomatoes and mushrooms. F resh vegetables, mozzarella cheese, pepperoni, Italian sausage, and herbs like garlic and thyme are also used to finish the restaurant’sp izzas. With prices in the $5 to $15 range, you definitely get your money’s worth. Chef Coakley said he believes that “the average person should bea ble to get quality food that is avail a ble at upscale restaurants.” And the restaurant lives up to his motto. I f you peruse Coco Palm’s menu, you’ll see tantalising dishes like raspberry snapper, penne pasta (whichh as already been an overnight succ ess), and even sausage fettuccini alfredo. If you’re feeling a bit adventuro us, the chef suggests you try their raspberry snapper. It may not be your first choice, but it’s a top notch dish with a sauce created with anA sian cooking technique. The citrus pork is delicious, but may be more of an acquired taste. First, Chef Coakley sears the pork cutlets in a pan with a little oil, then bastes them with a smooth sauce made from mangos, oranges, rasp berries and grapes. The dish is then served with vegetable rice and coleslaw. When it comes to the coconut cur ry served at Coco Palm’s, Chef Coakley says it is healthier than your normal Bahamian curry because it incorporates lemon grass and thyme flavours. Indian wet and dry curry are blended together for this dish. Each meal at the Coco Palm Caf is served with home-made bread of your choice of garlic, coconut, focaccia, white, or raisin bread. Somethings Different CHICKEN fettuccini and citrus pork are on the fire as Chef Paul Coakley whips up unique Bahamian-Italian dishes. CITRUS pork, vegetable rice, garnished with fresh coleslaw. COCO Palm’s most popular buy, the Italian pizza, which comes in different flavors, topped with green peppers, mozzarella, and fresh tomatoes. SAMANTHA Moree (right ferent Novelty Cookies and Cakes, presents Leah Knowles with her prize chocolate cake. THE cake was raffled at this year's Wine and Art Festival and is a lovely example of the ‘Mosaiced Masterpieces’ that are popular as gifts and as desserts at fine dinner parties this season. SOMETHINGS Different Novelty Cookies and Cakes donated a 4.15 lbs, triple chocolate cake with three layers of chocolate ganache for a raffle at the Wine and Art Festival held at the Bahamas National Trust’s Retreat on Saturday. The lucky winner of this dream in chocolate was Leah Knowles. The Bahamas meets Italy at the Coco Palm Caf

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Caipirinha Explosion Party at Churrascaria Humidor This Friday, 8pm to midn ight: Graycliff's Churrascaria at the Humidor is “bringing back the good ole daz” with a Caipirinha Explosion Party featuring the sounds of the 70s and 80s. A dmission is $25 a person, and the first Caipirinha Brazil’s n ational cocktail is free. T here are also complimentary finger foods and a dinner o ption is available at a special p rice for attending. RSVP at: 302-9150 or email deanne@graycliff.com R hythms of Drums This Friday and Saturday B ack by popular demand, Mitzi Chipman presents “Rhythms of Drums” a Broadway style show at the Rainforest Theatre in the Wyndham Resort and C rystal Palace Casino. Performers include Tony Seymour J r, Ronnie Butler, Veronica B ishop, and dancers Metellus Chipman and Fontella Chipman-Rolle. General admission is $40; V IP Gold tickets are $75. D oors open at 6.30pm and show time is 8.30pm. F or more information con tact the Rainforest Theatre Box O ffice; the Bahamas Musicians and Entertainers Union or the Junkanoo n’ Things kiosk in the Marina Village, Atlantis. Parish Fair of the Anglican Church of the Epiphany This Saturday, 12noon to 6 pm, Prince Charles Drive, near Colony Village The Anglican Church of the Epiphany invites B ahamians to enjoy a day of family fun, culminating with a fireworks display. P rior to the fair, there is a patio sale, plant sale and thrift shop, starting at 6am. The fair will offer an array of d elicious food and entertain ment for young and old. Kids can enjoy a bouncy castle, facepainting, a merry-go-round and l oads of other fun activities. BAIC’s 12th Annual B ahamArts Festival This Friday through Sunday, 10am to 11pm at Arawak Cay The Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC presents the BahamArts Festival 2009 under the theme "Tra dition Made Modern", promoting Bahamian made arts, crafts and souvenirs. Entertainment will be provided by the Bahamas Defence Force Band, Gospel Groups, the Falcon Band and the Pathfinders Marching Band. For more information contact Le-Var Miller, Sharae Collie or Pamela Deveaux at 322-3740/3. Free Career Development Workshop This Saturday, 10am to 12noon, College of the Bahamas -Organizational Soul invites persons seeking a job or promotion to attend a free career workshop which aims to teach people how to empha sise their strengths and chart a course to improve their earning potential. The workshop is sponsored by Corporate Education Solu tions (Bahamas and Caribbean and Rotary Club Nassau Sun rise, and is hosted by Yvette Bethel, regional director of CES Bahamas and Caribbean. For more information contact 4247166. Space is limited so register early at info@orgsoul.com. First All Ceramic Exhibition For those who missed the opening night of this must-see event hosted by Jessica's Tile works Studio, come on out this week to see the incredible submissions from local cerami cists and potters. The exhibition is being held at Popopstudios located on Dunmore Avenue in Chipping ham until November 13. Tele phone number: 322-7834 Gallery viewing hours are Wednesdays through Satur days from 1pm to 5pm, or by appointment with Jessica Colebrooke, contact 324-3533. T h e T r i b u n e things 2 DO EACH year, organisers of the Bahamas Home and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition seek to not only make the show bigger and better, but also more in sync with what’s happen ing locally and globally. Therefore, as the world and the Bahamas battle the effects of a global recession, the organisers, Special Events Bahamas Limited, have decided to dedicate this year’s event to theme “Combatting and Sur viving the Recession.” The 9th Annual Home and Builders Show, which will be held this Satur day and Sunday in the ballroom of the Wyndham hotel on Cable Beach from 10am to 6pm, will focus on how persons can ride out the economic downturn while preparing for the way forward. Along with informative educational seminars and workshops including spe cial “DIYDo It Yourself” sessions, exhibitors have been invited to show case the latest energy and cost saving technologies. President of Special Events Bahamas Limited Nikita Curtis said: “People need to be prepared for after this recession is over and attending this year’s show will show them just how to do that.” As usual, the event which attracted approximately 4,000 people last year will boast over 50 exhibitors from the Bahamas, the United States, Canada and even China. The general public will also have an opportunity to win over $50,000 in prizes and give-aways. The change of focus of this year’s event will also be reflected in the prizes that any and everyone can use. According to Mr Curtis, “The prizes will be more relevant to the economic environment.” Examples of the new and improved timely prizes include $100 vouchers which can be used to pay various util ity bills along with the ever popular cellular phone cards. Mr Curtis and his team invite the entire family to attend the 9th Annual Home and Builders Show. "Even if you aren't building, there is important timely information that will be dissimulated at this year's show that anyone can use.” The Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition has evolved into a highly anticipated event which is frequented by persons directly and indirectly involved in the construction and home industry. Home owners, potential home owners, busi ness owners, contractors, sub-contac tors and persons seeking to spruce up their home and businesses with more energy saving devices should plan to attend this year's show. Admission to this year’s event is $3 per person, but attendees can log on to http://www.bahcon.com and print out an admission ticket for free, or pick up a free entry passes at any of the participating vendor locations. As for persons who don’t mind paying the minor fee, this donation will be used towards a scholarship fund for the Bahamas Society of Engineers. Combatting and Surviving the Recession SHOWN here are attendees of last year’s Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition. The focus of the 9th Annual Home and Builders Trade Show and Exhibition By REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter P ERHAPS one of the most common complaints of Bahamians is that there’s not much to do on this 21 by seven mile island. You can only go to the movies, hit up the mall or frolick on the beach so many times before it gets old. Even if y ou are a regular on the p arty scene, you can still feel that your recreational options are extremely limited. I t was the self-appointed task of T rib une Entertainment t o discover new and exciting activities that you would normally be reluctant to try. We found t hat if you actively search for things to do, you’ll discover that there not that many limitations to what thisi sland has to offer. F or instance, we hear there’s a salsa dance class happening every week at The Caves out west. Bahamians froma ll walks of life are taking advantage of it, and there’s a dinner afterwards you can’t beat that! Maybe that’s ther eason why it’s become so popular. But we’ll get you the scoop on that for an upcoming edition of Tribune Entertainment . Today, we concentrate o n a special workshop that is current ly underway at The Hub on Bay Street. O pportunity Knocks When former Miss Bahamas World Ordain Moss informed Tribune Entert ainment o f a six-week acting work s hop she was hosting on Saturdays, we thought this would be a great idea. Of course, Bahamians support any t hing that seems well-organised and reputable, and when there is a reputable person behind a cause, peoplew ill show up. In this case that person was American actor Wayne Legette. With 20 years experience in the b usiness, the actor has played roles in productions like‘Westside Story’; ‘Rags’; ‘Romeo and Juliet’ (the stage play); ‘Proposal’, ‘The Boys Next Door’; ‘The Woman In Black’; ‘The Wild Party’, and ‘November.’ B ut he doesn’t toot his own horn, the class speaks for itself. Workshop Day First on the schedule were concentration exercises, where participants were paired up and the task was to mirror the other person’s movements without using any sounds. For those of us that were new to this activity, let’s just say that the lack of experience showed. It was good to keep in mind that it was all in good fun. “Great job guys, good concentrat ion,” Mr Legette would say during each pair’s concentration exercise. While he made you think you did a g ood job, you’d often wonder if he w as just trying to make you feel good, after all he is an experienced actor. Concentration was difficult for s ome, with some partners making fun ny faces and others showing off dance moves that date back to the 80’s. Theg oal of each pair was to be in-sync w ith each other, creating chemistry, which is the key to a good perfor mance. M r Legette attempted to explain the goal of the exercise: “The mirror acting exercise is just a s imple concentration exercise using your partner, getting centered, ignor ing everyone else in the room, which is essential to do when you’re performi ng.” At the end of the day you’re only as good as the person you’re acting with, M r Legette said. “When you’re doing any kind of acting, 99 per cent of the time you’reg oing to be relying on the person you’ll be acting with. In order to do a scene well with someone you have toa utomatically trust them.” For an actor, this trust must be nur tured through activities like improvisation (or ‘improv’b ecome quite popular in recent times, because of their spur-of-the-moment nature. The only rule to the improv session was that none of the actors’ could respond with the word “no,” which would bring the skit to a halt. I had to learn that the hard way! With no memorised lines, I was thrown into the mix with one overarching thought: “Move with the flow, say whatever comes to mind.” “You will end up doing better work if you just let it happen,” said Mr Legette, who paired us up on set to act out a scene. The characters, location, and first line of the skit were then decided o n by the class. Things got interesting as each participant morphed into a different chara cter. In one skit, experienced actor O nike Archer, who was a cast member in the acclaimed Shakespeare in Paradise production, played opposite K eisha Johnson. The setting for their scene was a train station; their roles, a mother andd aughter, and the first line: “I can’t b elieve you just did that!” It was hilarious and the ladies deliv ered the best improv skit, in my opini on, out of everyone who performed. Monologues and Deep Breathing N aturally reserved, workshop par ticipant Jason Cunningham said he has never acted before, but that was hard to believe after having seen his s uperb performance during the mono logue session. The 24-year-old played the chara cter of a neurotic man who didn’t have much success with women, venting his frustrations to his best friend.T he class demanded an encore, and he did just that, with some minor adjustments to his delivery, but stilll ooking like a pro out there. “At one point in life I used to be shy, but experiences like these have helped me better express myself in a crowd,”h e told T ribune Entertainment. Proper breathing exercises were next. At the instruction of Mr Legette, each person lay down on the floor and deeply inhaled, then exhaled. Switching things up, we inhaled and held our breath for a few seconds. Then we tuned our voices by giving off “ha” sounds in different tones while exhaling. The room began to sound like a full choir warming up for performance. Afterwards, a lunch of your choice of roast beef, turkey, ham, and veggie sandwiches, (from Tracey Chea’s kitchen), chips, and iced tea was s erved to us. After a downtime, the last segment of the day’s workshop was a series of monologue perform ances, where each student was given a piece to perform in front of the class. All participants were rooted to the spot as they listened to Ordain Moss’ w insome monologue, in which she spoke about her lover and their rela tionship problems. N o stranger to acting, she took priv ate lessons with Mr Legette about two months ago, in Naples, Florida. “He is really good at what he doesa nd what I learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so much better,” she said. Final Thoughts Ms Moss described the latest workshop session as “amazing,” and said it t urned out to be much better than she expected. “Everyone was outgoing and was e ager to participate,” she said. So far, response to the workshop has been favourable. T he first workshop started with just three students on October 3, but numbers increased and an additional eights tudents joined the sessions at the second workshop; a few of them young actors like De-Anthia Johnson, who will star in an upcoming teenaged rama called ‘Dreamer,’ which is shooting in a matter of weeks. The Wayne Legette Acting workshop began on October 3 and will continue until December 12, taking place every other Saturday. The third workshop will be held this Saturday from 11am to 3pm. You can contact Ordain Moss at 324-2336 or 425-5266 to reserve your spot for this week’s session. At the end of the workshop, participants will be awarded a certificate of completion. Interested persons aged 17 and up are invited to register. Get ready for your closeup The Hub hosts a six-week acting course with American actor Wayne Legette S CENE! T he class poses for a photo at the end of the first workshop.

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M s Brown, a Grand B ahama native, is inviting Bahamians to join her this Friday for ‘high tea’ and high fashion in a major fundraiser at Government H ouse on behalf of the Beacon School. The Beacon School was opened in 1998 for special needs children. I t was formerly known as the School for Exceptional Children. The school prepares its students for life after school, and in some cases, its students are returned to mainstream education in schools like Jack Hayward, St Georges,E ight Mile Rock High and even in private institutions. The Beacon School offerst echnical and vocational training in addition to thec ore academic subjects like l anguages, mathematics and s ocial sciences. T he technical and vocational curriculum includes c omputer enrichment, cosm etology, home economics, p ottery and agriculture, and t he courses are integral to t he development of daily and independent living skillsi n the school’s students. The s chool is committed to the belief that there is some-t hing that every child can d o. A total of $50,000 is needed to establish an arts and crafts centre at the school,w hich administrators b elieve can further help stud ents to prepare for productive living. A building just across the street from the school has been earmarked for this centre, howe ver, it requires some work. The money raised at the tea party will go towards upgrading the building, as well as providing the sup-p lies for the centre, where students will be taught to make commercial jams and jellies, pottery and other artworks for sale. A small shop selling the items created by the students will also be housed in the building. " If this project is a success it will make a difference in the lives of the kidsa t the Beacon School," said Miss Bahamas Organisationp resident Michelle Malc olm. T his is the second consecu tive year that the Miss Bahamas Organisation has p artnered with the Ministry o f Tourism to stage a Miss B ahamas World/People to P eople Tea Party and fashi on show. The event will be held on F riday from 4pm to 6pm at G overnment House. Patrons attending thef undraiser will be treated to a Beat Retreat by the Roya l Bahamas Police Force Band, and will entertained by the Royal BahamasP olice Force Pop Band and Miss Bahamas World Talent Winner Devera Pinder. Also on display will be fabu lous Androsia and B ahama Hand print fashi ons. Patrons attending the event will be the first to see Miss Bahamas World’s wardrobe for her monthl ong stay in South Africa at this year’s Miss World competition. In addition to raising funds for the Beacon School through the silent auction, Miss Bahamas World will also lead the charge for another initiative that will involve retail shoppers. M ore information on that s econd phase of her fundraising efforts will be announced soon. Tickets can be purchased at the event, but those planning on attending are a dvised to RSVP to the M iss Bahamas Organisation a t their e-mail address info@missbahamas.net in order reserve seats. Organisers said while they unders tand that everyone is feeling the pinch in these tough economic times, they hope that Bahamians will support this worthy cause. Joanna Brown leaves for the Miss World Pageant on November 4. The pageant will be broadcast live from Johann esburg, South Africa, on Z NS TV on December 12, and on the E! Network in the United States. M ISS Bahamas World 2009 Joanna B rown, in her role as goodwill a mbassador, is spearheading a project that is designed to raise money for children with special learning needs. C M Y K C M Y K ARTS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM High tea and high fashion in aid of special needs students MISS Bahamas W orld 2009 Joanna Brown

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C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E The Hub hosts sixweek acting course See page 10 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2009 The Bahamas meets Italy at the Coco Palm Cafe See page nine B y MARION WRIGHT T H IS past week after traversing the inner-city streets of central New Providence I felt moved to tell a story about an aggressive and innovative artisan, whose work speaks with total relevance to the current economic clim ate and the need for cultural reinforcement. Renaissance craftsman Troy Nixon, who also answers to the name ‘Straight Up’, captivates through the concept of transforming what is considered refuse, materials mostly from coconut trees,i nto works of art. Mr Nixon desires for the craft to be documented and placed within the curriculum of the country’s high schools. He hopes that getting young, fresh and creative minds involved in this genre of expression will, with consistent e ffort, usher in a new raw material trend within the native craft production industry. J ust consider the role that the straw p lait in its harvested form has played since the first vendors proudly displayed their meticulously hand-craftedw ares for sale. Today, the straw plait continues to dominate the craft market scene andr emains an integral part of the tourist experience. By his own admission, ‘Straight Up’ has only recently broken the surface in t his craft that permits imaginary aerobics and creative brazenness. In 2003, Mr Nixon was the victim of a t errible automobile accident. Doctors told him that he would most likely lose movement in one leg. U ndergoing 12 surgeries, the 38-yearold artist said the accident and its consequences led him to reinvent himself. W ith lots of free time to spare as he recovered from his ordeal, Mr Nixon said that he made the crossover from more traditional art forms to his currentm edium. He said he was helped in this by the Almighty God. For the past ten months now, ‘Straight Up’ said he has been guided by God towards perfecting his craft. He explained that he undergoes a religious rapture at times when he is most productive. In instances such as these, he said, he cannot focus on anything or anyone else; it is strictly about releasing the creativity within for a higher purpose, he said. Mr Nixon’s works portray a level of skill and ingenuity that is perhaps rivalled in detail by only a practitioner of taxidermy. When asked about the source of inspiration for each piece, Mr Nixon said it becomes difficult to separate the apparent spirituality that can be seen int he work and the feeling which comes from “the belly.” One of Straight Up’s pieces, ‘Mother Africa’, depicts an African woman in the last trimester of pregnancy. This piece, he said, is the most poignant of his creations. A few of his subjects depict scenes from the Bahamas’ past, particularly from his beloved Exuma. M r Nixon’s mother hails from W illiams Town and his father comes from Farmer’s Cay. Smack boats and dinghies were the workhorses for thosem en who chose to support themselves and their families from what the sea provided by means of fishing, sponging,o r cargo delivery. Wind provided the primary source of power seconded by the technique of ‘sculling’ using oars to propel a boat or o ther craft. ‘Straight Up’ laments the fact that there are so few authentic Bahamian s ouvenirs available to tourists, and it is his belief that Bahamians will eventually lose more of our market share ast ime progresses. He said he wants Bahamians to think in unconventional terms that may noth ave factored into past means of producing art. Mr Nixon is also concerned that too little use of our indigenous materials fort he purpose of producing saleable goods could furnish others with the opportunity to discover and develop production techniques resulting in profit without benefits for Bahamians. So the next time you catch a glance of coconut tree webbing, branch stems, or spent husks, think not only of ‘Straight Up’, but rather look around further and investigate your surroundings for that next readily available indigenous raw material that will allow you to display your inner brilliance. Those interested in ‘Straight Up’s’ work can contact him at troystraight up@yahoo.com . The artist will be launching a website later in the year. Exploring indigenous raw materials to produce divine creations S T R A I G H T U P A R T THE MAJESTIC BEAST UP CLOSE. ADULT AND JUVENILE STINGRAYS. SCULLING BIRD IN THE PROCESS OF COMPLETION. OLD BAHAMA SLOOPS