Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
m Lhe Iribune

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Volume: 105 No.279









FEATURES



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

Te
TaN
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PPE Tt






Govt plans to
tackle illegal

selling

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE Government }
laid out its plans yes-
terday to remedy a
myriad of land use
problems including
the illegal sale of |
unauthorised lots and
the lack of utilities
available in some
developed neighbourhoods.

The Planning and Subdivi-
sion Bill will also introduce
stricter zoning laws which will
address the "unplanned inva-
sion” of businesses into resi-
dential areas; the problem of
building permits granted in
unapproved subdivisions; the
issuance of building permits
before utility services have been
installed; and review subdivi-
sion fees.

The new laws will lay out
development guidelines in
order to avoid situations where

EARL DEVEAUX



of lots

there is a lack of basic
infrastructure in
planned subdivisions;
a lack of develop-
ment and construc-
tion standards; and
the inefficiencies
relating to develop-
ment/construction
applications and the
approval process.

While leading the
debate on the legisla-
tion in the House yes-
terday, Environment
Minister Earl
Deveaux said the Bill would
provide for a land use planning
based development control sys-
tem led by policy, land use des-
ignations and zoning.

Mr Deveaux also said that,
among other things, the new
laws will prevent the indiscrim-
inate division and development
of land; promote sustainable
development in a healthy nat-
ural environment; and provide
for planning processes that are
fair by making them open,

SEE page eight

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28-YEAR-OLD Jamal Sargent leaves court vealed after being charged.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of having
$15,500 in fake bank notes
and materials to produce con-
terfeit cash was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Jamal Sargent, 28, was
arrested in a police raid on
Friday and charged on two
counts.



He stood silently before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court Eight, Bank Lane,
wearing faded stonewashed
jeans and a bright red T-shirt
emblazoned with cartoon
designs, and simple white
Nike sneakers.

Sargent is charged with pos-
session of materials for forg-
ing notes and having in his
possession a quantity of
papers with impressions of

Coenorarnicntes 3

currency notes.

The charge states Sargent
had nine Bahamian $10
notes,173 Bahamian $20
notes,109 Bahamian $50
notes, and 65 Bahamian $100
notes while knowing them to
be forged and puporting them
to be genuine currency.

The counterfeit cash said
to be in Sargent’s possession

SEE page eight

SEE PAGE ELEVEN

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Man fount
Shot dead
in street

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunmedia.net

A MURDER
investigation has been
launched to find the
killers of a 33-year-old
man found dead in a
Pinewood Gardens
street early yesterday
morning.

Renard Denver
Miller/Mackey, of
Sugar Apple Street,
Pinewood Gardens,
was shot in the head
and left to die in
Jacaranda Street, just
four blocks from his
home.

Police were called
at around 3.40am yes-
terday and received
reports of gunshots
being fired in Jacaran-
da Street.

When officers
arrived at the scene
they found the body
of Mr Miller, who also
goes by Mr Mackey,
lying in the road with
an apparent gunshot
to the head, accord-
ing to Superintendent

SEE page eight

Former
minister
hits back

at MP over
land claims

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of Trade
and Industry Leslie Miller has
issued a scathing attack on
FNM MP Brensil Rolle who
suggested that the former Blue
Hills MP had been responsible
for illegally excavating land and
selling it back to the govern-
ment.

During his communication on
the Planning and Subdivision
Act, Mr Rolle stated that the
PLP dreaded the passing of the
Bill as one of their “former”
cabinet ministers had promised
to have the operators who ille-
gally excavated land charged
before the courts.

“But that was only talk,” Mr
Rolle said in Parliament yester-
day. “In fact, I was informed
the reason why nothing was
done was because he was the

SEE page eight

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

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THE TRIBUNE





Fred Mitchell raises
questions over Bill

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION MP Fred
Mitchell questioned whether
government is capable of
enforcing the host of new
"complicated" guidelines out-
lined in the Town Planning
and Subdivision Bill.

Mr Mitchell also questioned
if government would commit
the resources necessary to
implement the provisions in
the Bill and whether the pub-
lic service is equipped to meet
the challenging demands cre-
ated by the new laws.

He said that neither Envi-
ronment Minister Earl
Deveaux or Parliamentary
Secretary in the Ministry of
Housing Brensil Rolle - who
both spoke before him on the
issue - touched on the ques-

Derek Smith/BIS photo

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MP says new Town
Planning and Subdivision
guidelines are ‘complicated’

tion of whether the public ser-
vice has the capacity to deal
with the provisions set forth
in the Bill.

"Is there the capacity to
meet the demands this Bill
would impose on the public
service?” Mr Mitchell asked
while giving his contribution
to the debate in the House of
Assembly yesterday. "And
would the government com-
mit the resources, which are
necessary, or which would be
necessary to carry out the pro-
visions of this Bill? There's no
question that the provisions
are complicated. . . (they) will

impose new and strict stan-
dards and the public service
and the politicians will have
to comply with those stan-
dards".

According to Mr Rolle, the
Bill will protect the public's
interest because details of all
potential developments will
be posted so they can be
analysed for possible negative
effects.

He added that the new leg-
islation would "further
strengthen and empower" the
Town Planning Committee
and reduce the amount of red
tape that currently impedes



ILO representatives to review

approval of subdivisions.

Mr Rolle explained that the
new Bill seeks to: restrict
indiscriminate land use; estab-
lish a comprehensive national
land use plan; focus on strate-
gic zoning requirements; and
place subdivision and town
planning under the portfolio
of one minister.

He added that the use of
land for practices other than
those allowed under zoning
restrictions continues to be a
common challenge facing the
Department of Physical Plan-
ning.

"While many of these
changes are related to eco-
nomic conditions, a substan-
tial number of them are out-
right abuse of system,” he
said, referring to auto-body
shops popping up in residen-
tial areas and the proliferation
of bars next to churches.

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INTERNATIONAL Labour Orga- Pailicameae Sorct cen Rey Sb, Tel 222-2956 er LETLET
nization representatives visited Fea: TM
some of the courses offered
under the National Empower-
ment Training Program at the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute on Monday.
They are pictured speaking to
an instructor of the marine out-
board engine class.

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National Empowerment

a For Children
Training Programme

Ue em eT PRS eit embs gE DIm
AUR Mea aod EM

REPRESENTATIVES of
the International Labour
Organisation (ILO) are in the
Bahamas to meet with stake-
holders of the National
Empowerment Training Pro-
gramme, an _ initiative
launched by the government
to help displaced workers
learn new trades.

Luesette Howell and Has-
san Bata Ndahi, from the
ILO sub-regional office in the
Caribbean, are examining
whether the expectations of
students and employers will
be met at the completion of
the programme.

They also want to ensure
that after finishing the pro-
gramme, some of the students
will have the skills needed to
become self-employed.

Ms Howell, senior special-

ist in employers’ activities,
said after they have complet-
ed their observations, they
will provide feedback and
offer recommendations to the
government on how to
improve the programme so
as to better fulfill its objec-
tives.

The representatives toured
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute on Mon-
day and reviewed several
courses offered under the
programme.

They also met with Charles
Hunt, a consultant for the
programme from the Ministry
of Labour; Deborah Bethel,
senior labour officer; Sean
Adderely, public relations
officer for the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocational Institute,
and Dr Pandora Johnson, VP

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business

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at the College of the
Bahamas.

They will also tour the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and
meet with the Minister of
Labour and Social Develop-
ment Senator Dion Foulkes
and other government offi-
cials, National Empowerment
Training Committee mem-
bers and the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce.



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an
NaS,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Tourism chief
hits out at ‘bait

and switch trick’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Senior deputy
director-general of tourism
David Johnson believes Grand
Bahama must stop seeking to
fool tourists if the island’s
tourism industry is ever to be
revived.

He noted that hotels have
been using the “bait and switch”
trick for years — offering low
room prices to lure visitors, who
are then slapped with excessive
taxes and other charges that
double the room price.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism has received a lot
negative feedback from visitors
who felt they were “tricked.”

“The customer needs to
know what it costs without
being tricked. We got away with
this in the early 90s and beyond
when the US consumer protec-
tion laws were not as keen as
they are now.

“We invited customers here
at very low prices and then
when they are checking in or
checking out, presented a sur-
prise on the total.

“We had much negative feed-
back because they were not
even advised of those charges,”
he said.

Mr Johnson said visitors
expect their rooms to come with
certain services — and that any
additional charge would be 10
or 15 per cent, not 100 per cent.

Because hoteliers are now
required by law to disclose all
charges, he said, they are now
having a difficult time getting
customers.

“The customer today is fierce
in their commitment to seek val-
ue and it is very distasteful
whenever they encounter any
merchant or provider who is
seeking to pull the wool over
their eyes,” Mr Johnson said.

ede
Sas eS

SRA
PHONE: 322-2157





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322-3213

Proudly Serving the Bahamian People since 1974

Grand Bahama set for new
air services from Canada, US

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Tourist
arrivals on Grand Bahama are
expected to get a much-need-
ed boost this quarter with the
introduction of new air services
from Canada and the United
States.

David Johnson, senior deputy
director-general of Tourism,
told The Tribune that new ser-
vices from Canada should begin
as early as next week.

He also reported that new
services from New York are
expected to start by December.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism and the Grand
Bahama Airport Company
have made much progress in the
last 12 months in terms of low-
ering turnaround costs for air-
lines flying to Grand Bahama
International Airport.

High airport fees and taxes
have been a major deterrent in
recent years for many airlines
wishing to fly to Grand
Bahama.

In an effort to attract more
airlines to the island, Ministry of
Tourism officials have been
working with airport officials to
lower the fees.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism is pleased with the
progress that has been made so
far.

“We stepped up our market-
ing and as a result we have been
able to attract new services, and
we will see services coming from
Canada as early as next week,
from New York by December,
and additional air services from
Florida.

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“We are not where we want
to be, but we made a big dent in
the right direction of bringing
some relief to the airlines and
passengers. We are committed
to getting our cost lower, but of

A
AP

Teeynloagreent £

course more volume will help
get there as well,” said Mr John-
son.

The airline West Jet will
begin services from Canada to
Grand Bahama on November
2.

The low-cost carrier will pro-
vide two weekly non-stop flights
from Toronto on a 737 aircraft.
This is expected to bring 12,000
visitors to the island this win-
ter.

Grand Bahama was the num-
ber one destination for Cana-
dian visitors 35 years ago, and
tourism officials are trying to
win back that market. They feel
the island's close proximity to
the eastern seaboard of Canada
was one of the main reasons

REQUEST FOR
TENDER

LPIA Expansion Project Stage

US Departures Terminal

behind the earlier popularity.

Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace believes
that Grand Bahama’s proximity
to the biggest market in the
world should be reflected in
how much it costs to get to
Freeport.

“We cannot sit here and
believe it is fine every single day
that it is more expensive to
come to Grand Bahama than
to our competing destination,"
said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace in
July.

The minister said it is impor-
tant that all partners in Grand
Bahama work together with the
Ministry of Tourism to exploit
the island's proximity advan-
tage.

or is seek ng contractars to as ssist in completio wy of Stage | of the LPLA, Expansian

Proect (US Departures

encouraged to parbcipate in this significant nati

Terrninal). All cormtractars,

complete the fit out of the new terminal include

particulary Bahannian contractors, are

anal praject, Scopes to be tendered to

« Weed and Mila Doorn, Coiling Goons, Praares and Door Harchware

+ Carpeting

* Seailient Proorny

+ Tote?! Partifons, does eoies, Como Guards and Lochors

* Bock Equipment

+ Getry Mare and Frames

A quilificarcion package must be sumiceed prior or ac the bid closing. Only bick fram concractors
deemed qualtied will be considered. Qualifications will be based on the following criteria:
2A demanitratian of Grancial capacirg

* Experience
* Retorences

* Bahamian Genership! Concent

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REQUIRED.

Thuulilication and tender packages will be weailable for pickup at the Ledeor Construction Bahamas
Lirnited Site Office ac the Lynden Piredling international Airport. YWindsor Field Road. For queries call the

Sate office at 242-677-5417.

The chosing dace for the tender and prequalificacion packages will be at 2:00pm Friday Movember

13%, 200%.

CREDIT Suisse

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
Shared Services



is presently considering applications for an

Accountant

The Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an

Accountant:

Requirements:

2-3 years Accounting & Banking experience

Associate or Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Banking & Finance

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Strong mathematical capabilities

Able to multitask

A team player with the ability to work in a fast paced environment
Possess excellent planning, organization and implementation skills
Excellent interpersonal skills

A commitment to service excellence

Duties will include:

Management of Service Level Agreements (SLA) and inter-company/
divisional expense allocation process
Responsible for accounts payable

Responsible for maintenance, analyzing, reconciliation and reporting of

expense

Assist with the booking of monthly accruals
Reconciliation of all general ledger accounts at the appropriate level of

frequency

Respond to queries relating to clients’ and internal expenses
Responsible for International Reporting

Assist Cashier

Benefits provided include:

° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BEIN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

NOVEMBER 6, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Butler’s Funeral Aomes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 383-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

FLORENCE ELIZABETH
PRITCHARD, 87

of Murphy Ville,
formerly of
Hamilton's, Long
Island, will be held on
Wednesday, October
28, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.
at Christ Church
Cathedral, George and
King Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Dean
Patrick Adderley,
assisted by The Rev. Fr. Michael Gittens. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Lefi to cherished her memories are her two sons:
Christopher and Michael Pritchard her two
daughters; Rencina Knowles and Wendy Wong:;
five grandchildern; Carol, Allanah, Leah, Wade
and Barry; one great-grandchild; Adrian; two
sons-in-law: Allan Knowles and Peter Wong, seven
sisters; Lucy Knowles, Angela Treco, Ruth
Burrows, Vera Petrie, Meriel Knowles, Carolyn
Knowles and Maithyn Jones; one brother; Leon
Cartwright, numerous nieces, nephews, and
cousins, and other relatives and friends
including: Sheila Pritchard Alvarez, caregivers
Rev. Kendal Capron; Rev. Dr. Enid Capron and
Katherine Taylor of the Golden Age Retirement
Home .

Friends may make a floral memorial or donations
to Christ Church Cathedral Endowment Fund in
memory of Florence Pritchard at George Street P.
QO, Box N 653, or 322-4186,

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Emest & York
Streets on Tuesday, 27th October at 11:00 a. m.
until $:00 p.m. and on Wednesday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.



Oe

PRESENTS

LOCAL NEWS



Poll: the new PLP team is not
strong enough to win election

TRIBUNE readers are over-
whelmingly of the view that the
PLP’s new “CDR” team is not
strong enough to win the next
general election.

In one of the most successful
tribune242.com polls to date,
almost three times as many read-
ers said they think the opposi-
tion’s new leadership team
would not attract enough sup-
port to unseat the FNM. Many
also called for the old guard of
both parties to be replaced by
younger politicians.

Readers were asked if Perry
Christie, Philip “Brave” Davis
and Bradley Roberts have what
it takes to lead the PLP to victo-
ry in the next general election.
Of the 299 people who voted,
218 said “no” while only 81
answered “yes”.

Commenting on the matter,
Bertram W said: “Christie, Davis
and Roberts are the old boys
and so are the three top leaders
in the government. Their days
are numbered. There is no new
thing that they can bring to the
table. All of them need to step
aside.

“We need to stop awarding
people with high positions just



PHILP DAVIS, Perry Christie and Bradley Roberts at the convention.

because they have been there a
long time. If they are ineffective
they must go. The Bahamas
needs new leaders at this time.
Do not gave this country back
to Christie, nor Davis. When you
take it from Ingraham gave it to
a new breed of Bahamians.

“T don’t know if you remem-
ber but there was a law firm
some years ago called Christie,

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BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON (VICTORIA ROOM)



Ingraham and Co. The ‘Co’ was
Davis. Do not let this country
be passed around, giving each
of them a turn to be prime min-
ister. Its about time that the peo-
ple take back the Bahamas from
the chosen few.”

Real Talk added: “I only voted
‘no’ because ‘HELL NO?’ was-
n't an option. I don't think these
people (PLP and FNM) under-
stand that despite what their
diehards are telling them, they're
going about this all wrong.
Excluding the “new blood” is a
recipe for disaster. But I guess as
long as we keep putting them
back in, they'll never get it.”

Lady Bowe called for
“change we can believe in”, say-
ing: “Mr Christie said that he
wanted to change things for the
party and head the party in a
new direction. Well from where
I am sitting it is the same and
nothing has changed. Instead we
heard whispers of people voting
who were not financial, and peo-
ple nominating who were not
financial, hence their positions
should be null and void. That is
certainly not change we can
believe in.”

According to Jack, “Christie,
Brave and Roberts represent a
dramatic regression. They have
blocked the advance of younger
people in the PLP leadership and
indicated a trend that will not be
acceptable to Bahamians whose
support the PLP needs to win.

“The move might be popular
within the party, but these days

[=

[OT IP a

there is a growing community of
voters who are not bound to any
party, unimpressed by the big
bad bully tactics, unswayed by
emotion, and looking for sub-
stance. Every event in the con-
vention gave me more reasons to
reject the PLP and fear for the
future of the two-party system.
When it wasn't a wake for
Urban Renewal, the convention
seemed more like a circus. It
failed to promote itself as a par-
ty seeking to impress Bahami-
ans to choose them to be the
next government. It failed to
address the issues that caused it
to be rejected by the electorate
the last time.”

George G asked what the
PLP’s plan is. He said that he
was “totally lost” by party chair-
man-elect Bradley Roberts’
comment: "I have come to bite
and to bite hard.” The reader
said it seems Mr Roberts’ “semi-
retirement” left him angry and
confused.

“That was the message in the
whole convention, I didn't hear
anything else that made me go,
‘Oh wow! It was the same old
promises they made and didn't
deliver while they were in office.
I looked in the audience; there
were very few young people in
there, but they boast of being
the party for the youths.

“So if they call Bradley young,
they need to check their mem-
bers’ date of birth again,” he
said.

However, Tony Cash said: “I
am a building contractor, I voted
FNM in 2007. At that time things
were good in the construction
industry.

“As it stands now, the reces-
sion is on and we do expect
things to stop, but contractors
who own heavy equipment see
how the foreign companies are
able to come to the Bahamas
and bring their own equipment,
while our equipment is parked
and for sale. I think anyone who
is in the construction industry or
who has relatives in the con-
struction industry should see by
now that the PLP government
cared more about Bahamian
contractors.

“The FNM takes all of the
country’s stimulus money and
pumps it into foreign companies.
I wish election was today to vote
them out.”

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an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Roberts hits Thought For Today

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NEWLY appointed chair-
man of the Progressive Liberal
Party Bradley Roberts has
wasted no time joining the fray
— launching a second scathing
attack on the FNM after the
governing party criticised
remarks he made during the
PLP’s 51st national convention.

Stating that “truth” is on the
side of the PLP, Mr Roberts
said it is truth which will build
trust in the hearts and minds of
the Bahaman people.

“Scream as they will, the
FNM will do well to reflect on
the truth of what more and
more Bahamians feel every day
— that while Perry Christie was

MTT i
RUT
OSM HU

THE Montagu Fore-
shore Steering Committee
will host a public meeting
on Thursday to hear the
views of residents, vendors,
businesses and others with
an interest in the preserva-
tion and usage of the fore-
shore.

The area, which extends
east from the Nassau Yacht
Club to the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club and includes
Fort Montagu, has attract-
ed particular attention
because of the boat ramp at
its eastern end, which many
view as little more than a
traffic obstruction and a
nuisance.

“We have been working
to understand the uses of
Montagu foreshore, the
commerce on the ramp and
the recreational traffic and
uses since the committee
was formed under the aus-
pices of Montagu MP and
Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta But-
ler-Turner in July,” said
Diane Phillips, chairman.

“Now we are most eager
to get public input as we
prepare to draft a report
for the minister’s consider-
ation. When the minister
charged this committee
with its task, she empha-
sised that the future of
Montagu is not a political
issue, it is a community
issue. Public opinion is crit-
ical and toward that end,
we have prepared a ques-
tionnaire which will be dis-
tributed on Thursday at the
meeting. People may com-
plete it that evening.”

According to Mrs
Phillips, the 14-member
committee has been
engaged in on-site reviews,
photography and inter-
views.



PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts at last week's convention.

prime minister there were more
jobs and less pain and suffer-
ings. As but one example, nev-
er were there 9,000 households
without electricity supply.

“Under Hubert Ingraham,
the standard of living of the
average Bahamian is declining,
through less and less real
income. Further, from what is
earned, a higher and higher
percentage of their income is
going to pay taxes,” he said.

Mr Roberts also said the
FNM is now saddled with more
“scandals” than the PLP was
any time under Mr Christie’s
leadership.

“Scream as they will, the
FNM will do well to reflect
on the truth that the country’s
finances are in worse shape
than at any time while Perry
Christie was prime minister.

. After all, more and more
persons who entered into con-

tract with the government are
reporting increasing delays in
being paid by the govern-
ment.

“It appears that the govern-
ment is broke or is increasingly
close to being broke.

“Another truth on the side
of the PLP is that technology
increasingly provides greater
and greater means for the par-
ty to get out to the public its
message of truth.

“Tt is this combination of the
truth being on the side of the
PLP and the availability of
more modern means of getting
out the facts that will result in
the public seeing stronger and
clearer evidence of the incom-
petence and mismanagement
of the FNM and the reality that
Hubert Ingraham is out of step
with the most widely accepted
principles for team leadership
in the 21st century,” he said.

ar lr Le
for

Roger Carron

will be held at
St. Francis Cathedral

on



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The More You Laugh,
The Less You Fret
The More You Do Unselfishly,
The More You Live Abundantly
The More Of Everything You Share,
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For Only What We Give Away Enriches

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West Street
at 3pm

on

saturday, October 31

Instead of flowers those who wish may make
donations in his memory to either the Breathe
Easy campaign or St. Martin’s Convent. For
the Breathe Easy campaign cheques may be
sent to Ms Michelle Rassin (tel. 302-4707),
Doctors Hospital, P.O. Box N972. Or donations
can be sent to St. Martin's Convent,
Nassau Street, PO. Box 940,

“The first thing people
talk about is the traffic con-
gestion because it is a reali-
ty that persons who live in
the East face on a daily
basis, but there are other
serious issues about land
use, recreation, erosion fac-
tors,” said Mrs Phillips.
“This is an opportunity to
be heard and we hope
there will be an excellent
turn-out.”

Both Mrs Butler-Turner
and Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux are
scheduled to be at the
meeting, set for 6pm at the
Nassau Yacht Club, East
Bay Street.

HUMAN RESOURCES

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British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip
About Stage IV Breast Cancer



In Stage TV breast cancer, also called secondary breast cancer or metastatic breast cancer cells
have metastasized, or tras ‘eled to other parts of the body. Common sites are the bones, the lungs, /—
the brain or the liver.

You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of

mammogram and physical exams are crucial steps that every woman should eniploy. os

B\\ British Sandra Rolle »
. =

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Breast Cancer Survivor for 6 years

The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man found
shot dead

e
in str eet FROM page one
added to $15,500.
FROM page one Sargent, of Victoria Gar-
den, off Gladstone Road,
Elsworth Moss. western New Providence,

pleaded not guilty to both
counts and opted to have his
case heard in Magistrate’s
Court rather than the
Supreme Court.

Mr Moss added: “At this stage we
don’t have a motive for the shooting,
and we are appealling to the public to
assist police as we are continuing our
investigations.”

No witnesses have yet come forward
to help police form a profile of the
killer or killers.

Anyone with information which may
relate to the murder should call police
urgently on 919, 322-3333, or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477).

FROM page one

accessible and efficient.



trated homeowners.

THE MAN was shot in the head and left
to die in Jacaranda Street, just four blocks
from his home.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff































































Deveaux.

. =e z ; . ; : : inefficiencies," he added.
Nova Southeastern University, is a private, coeducational, research university located in Broward

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Install and configure hardware and penpherals, as assigned,
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Assist in mowing PCs and other technology equipment within University facilities to other locations on and off campus
Acirely participate in inter-O°T departmental training offerings.

FROM page one

biggest violator and was him-
self excavating land illegally and
his company was selling the fill
to the government.”

As a former Minister who
also had responsibility for Agri-
culture, Mr Miller took the
media on numerous tours
throughout New Providence
exposing incidents where
unscrupulous contractors had
excavated government owned
land and was in some instances
re-selling it to the government
via the city dump.

While seeking to have these
individuals arrested and charged
before the courts, the former
MP was frustrated in his efforts
as the police, who often were
called to the scenes with the
media, claimed that the issue
was beyond their control and
could do nothing “without
instructions.”

Moreover, as it pertains to
the issue of being implicit with
such actions himself, Mr Miller

-Agaast in disaster preparedness | recovery efforts as sssigned.

“Work onlaboratively with other technology support units within OFT and throughout the University community


“Avadabie on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for emergency situations or to cower when other technologies specalst as are
not avemabke:

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- High Sehoal Daplama or Equivalent
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- Previous @aqperience in a customer service environment
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Man accused of
_ having fake bank notes

His attorney, Tamara Saun-
ders-Munnings, introduced
herself to the magistrate stat-
ing it was the first time she
was representing a defendent
in a criminal case.

Ms Bethel called for Sar-
gent and Mrs Saunders-
Munnings to appear in Court
Eight at 10am on Wednesday,
October 28, to fix a date for
the trial.

Mr Deveaux pointed out examples of poor subdivision planning,
including the recently built Pride Estates government subdivision
which he said was built between a hill and a wetland.

He explained that about 100 new homes were built in rectangular
blocks "resembling a parking lot" without a school, limited access
to public open spaces - a prescription for congestion that frus-

"We lament the unplanned invasion of businesses and industry
into residential communities; we decry the absence of basic infra-
structure in what is supposed to be planned subdivisions; we com-
plain about the failure of too many to observe correct standards in
development and construction; we criticise the inefficiency and
delay in our development/construction applications and approval
processes; and we bemoan conflicting and competing legislation
which are meant to govern and regulate our development,” said Mr

"This legislation is meant to address many of these concerns and

The Bill will also establish a new structure within the Department
of Physical Planning creating two new areas: a Policy Planning Divi-
sion and a Development Review Division.

Provisions for the creation of a Subdivision and Development
Appeal Board are laid out in the Bill, which will hear complaints
based on appeal of decisions made by the Town Planninf Com-

The Bill will also address a number of subdivisions left unfin-
ished, which Mr Deveaux said was a common occurrence in Exu-

Under the Act, approvals for development will include: a land
use amendment approval; zoning by-law amendment approval;
minor variance approval; notice of zoning compliance; site plan
approval; architectural design approval; subdivision approval and

A key provision of the Bill is the creation of Land Use Plans for
each Bahamian island and it will also require an Environmental
Impact Assessment for future developments.

The Bill repeals the Private Roads and Subdivision Act, the
Town Planning Act and the Town Planning (Out Islands) Act.

Former minister
hits back at MP
over land claims

said that nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth.

“Normally I don’t respond to
cowards like Brensil Rolle, who
is nothing but a two-bit MP for
the good people of Garden
Hills; and if he wants to know
what good representation is all
about he can ask any of his con-
stituents the type of represen-
tation they got from Leslie
Miller.

“First of all, I sold no fill to
the government of the Bahamas
while I was the Minister respon-
sible. None whatsoever. I never
had a contract with them for my
five years as a Minister,” Mr
Miller said.

In fact, the former Blue Hills
MP reminded Mr Rolle that he
was congratulated in Parliament
by the former FNM MP Pierre
Dupuch for selling fill from his
own property to the FNM gov-
ernment at below rock bottom
prices.

“From 1992 to 2002 I did sell
the FNM government some
500,000 yards of fill at a price of
$0.75 a yard whereas I could
have gotten $6 a yard for it but
I gave it to them at $0.75 a
yard. I gave them the fill
because they said they didn’t
have any money in the budget
and there was a great fire at
the dump and I gave the gov-
ernment the fill at $0.75 a yard.

“But that was my gift to the
people of my country because
it was a national emergency
and the dump was raging for
days and days and they needed
all the fill they could have got-
ten. That was my contribu-
tion,” Mr Miller exclaimed.

Highlighting that the fill was
taken from his own family’s
land, Mr Miller cautioned Mr
Rolle for making such un-Par-
liamentary remarks when
addressing issues that are near
and dear to his heart.

“Tf he really wants to be
involved in assisting people
from destroying our land, why
does he sit on his — and allow
persons to rape the land on
Harrold Road right next to the
Seventh-Day Adventist
Church? There is a peak there
about 80 feet off the ground
and I have reported that to the
Ministry of Works over and
repeatedly that they should not
allow them to destroy the land
below the level of the church
road.

“But I suppose because this
person is one of the FNM’s
great white supporters he (Mr
Rolle) couldn’t even mention
that. But that is the kind of
coward he is. But you wouldn’t
expect anymore out of him,”
Mr Miller said.







PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Scottsdale Vixens beat Lady Caribs

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association continued its 2009 regular
season on Sunday with another triple
header at the D W Davis Gymnasium.

In the first match, the Scottsdale
Vixens defeated the COB Lady
Caribs in three sets 25-22, 25-13 and
25-22.

Krystal Rolle led the Vixens with
eight points and Kenisha Thompson
led all scorers with 10 points in a los-



VOLLEYBALL

ing effort.

The second game saw the Champi-
ons come from behind to beat the
Saints 19-25, 29-27, 25-19 and 25-20.

Muller Petit led the Champions
Club and all scorers with 24 points
for the win. William McKinney scored

- ieee eel a ORM ines leo

NOVEMBER 13 & 14

(FRIDAY & SATURDAY)

=

a hcl



¢ Champions defeat Saints
¢ Caribs upset Crimestoppers

14 points for the Saints.

In the final game, the COB Caribs
pulled off an exciting win and upset
the Police Crimestoppers in five sets
25-16, 25-23, 17-25, 18-25 and 15-8.

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Drew
Brees angrily stomped to the
sideline, while behind him the
Miami Dolphins celebrated a
big defensive play.

The scene kept repeating,
and soon the New Orleans
Saints trailed by three touch-
downs.

"You're looking at the
scoreboard and it's 24-3, and
you say, ‘How did this game
get out of hand like this?'"
Brees said.

For the NFL's highest-scor-
ing team, the deficit proved
surmountable. Unbeaten New
Orleans scored 43 points in
the final 30:02 to rally past the
Miami Dolphins 46-34 Sun-
day.

The Saints topped 40 points
for the fourth time and
outscored the Dolphins 22-0
in the fourth quarter.

"There was no doubt on
our sideline we would come
back and win," Brees said.

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an American Icon

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Signature series

Rayon Brooks took charge for the
Caribs with 15 big points.

In a losing effort, Carl Rolle would
match a side high 15 points for the
Crimestoppers.



DREW BREES is sacked by Dolphins safety Yeremiah Bell during the
second quarter of Sunday’s game in Miari...
(AP Photo: Jeffrey M Boan)

Saints outscore
Dolphins 22-0
in 4th for win

"They had given us their best
shot, and we had played
about as bad as we could play.
All we had to do was string
together a few drives and gain
the momentum back. We
knew it was going to happen,
and it did."

Brees had his roughest day
of the season, with three inter-
ceptions, a lost fumble, five
sacks and two cuts to the face.
But he led long touchdown
drives on three successive
possessions in the second half
to put New Orleans ahead.

Tracy Porter's 54-yard
interception return then
sealed the win for the Saints
(6-0), who are off to their best
start since 1991 and are the
only unbeaten team in the
NFC.

"This was a test we hadn't
faced yet, and we couldn't be
happier with the way we
responded,” linebacker Scott
Shanle said.

Ellis nominated
for ISF Hall of
Fame induction

said. “The enjoyment I know
is not there anymore like
when we played. We played
very competitively and we
had a goal to play.

“But now it seems like the
young people are playing
together just to get out of the
house and get on the field to
have fun and party. They are
not as serious as when we
played.”

Although she’s © still
employed at JBR Building
Supplies Limited, Ellis admits
that age has certainly caught
up with her and so she’s not
as athletically inclined as she
was in the past.

But she noted that she’s
grateful to God for having
been nominated and elected
to the Hall of Fame.

“Tjust give him thanks and
praise for it,” she said. “I also
want to thank Bobby Baylor
Fernander who was the main-
stay behind it. He was the one
who was really pushing to get
me there.”

Full details about Ellis’
induction have not been
released as BSF president
Burkett Dorsett, vice presi-
dent Ted Miller and immedi-
ate past president Rommel

SPORTS

naa

Hardaway
‘finally getting
his Heat banner

: BASKETBALL
: MIAMI
Associated Press



TIM HARDAWAY

i already has one banner cel-
i ebrating his achievements
? with the Miami Heat. He’s
; about to get another.

The Heat will retire Hard-

? away’s No. 10 jersey before
i Wednesday night’s season-
i opener against the New
? York Knicks. He’ll be just
i the second player to receive
i that honor from the fran-
? chise. Alonzo Mourning’s
i No. 33 was hoisted last sea-
i son by Miami.

Hardaway’s previous ban-

i? ner was one celebrating the
? 2000 Olympic gold medal he
i won while with the Heat.

aT Le)



Tebow frustrated
es
Offensive problems
i? COLLEGE FOOTBALL

: GAINESVILLE, Fla.
Associated Press

FLORIDA quarterback

? Tim Tebow is frustrated.
i He’s tired of the intercep-
i tions, the sacks and the red-
i zone struggles.

Although the top-ranked

i Gators are still undefeated
i heading into Saturday’s
igame against Georgia,
i Tebow admits he would like
i to have “prettier” wins. But
i he adds that, “If they’re all
i ugly, that’s OK. We’ll be
i undefeated.”

Tebow also apologized

i Monday for blowing off
i postgame interviews follow-
i ing Saturday’s 29-19 victory
i at Mississippi State. Tebow
i says he wanted to hang out
? with family and former posi-
i tion coach, current MSU
? coach Dan Mullen.

Tebow says Mullen told

ihim to go win another
? national championship.

For that to happen,

though, the Gators probably
i need perform better near the
i goal line.

Dolphins CB
Allen out
for season

DAVIE, Fla. (AP) —

i Miami Dolphins cornerback
? Will Allen is out for the sea-
? son with a left knee injury.

Allen hurt his anterior

i cruciate ligament in the third
? quarter of the Dolphins’ loss
i to New Orleans and will
i require surgery, coach Tony
? Sparano said Monday.

Allen has missed only one

i game since joining the Dol-
i phins in 2006. He leads the
? team with two interceptions
i this year.

He'll be replaced by 2009

: first-round draft pick Von-
i tae Davis, which means the
? Dolphins will start two rook-
i ie cornerbacks Sunday at the
i New York Jets.

Second-round pick Sean

i Smith has been starting
i opposite Allen.

Knowles are scheduled to
return home from the con-
gress today.

Also during the congress,
Knowles was voted in as vice
president of the Americas, a
region that is designated for
the US and the Caribbean.
Knowles is the first Bahamian
to hold such a post on the
international scene.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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Insight on
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27,

2009





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Saints outscore
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in 4th for win...
See page 10



Ellis nominated for [SF Hall of Fame induction

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

{ter retiring

about a decade

ago, Naomi Ellis

is finally going
to get some international
recognition for her achieve-
ment in softball.

At the International Soft-
ball Federation’s Congress
over the weekend in
Venezuela, Ellis’ name was
submitted by the Bahamas
Softball Federation (BSF) for
nomination for the Hall of
Fame 2009 induction class.

Her nomination by BSF
president Burkett Dorsett was
accepted as Ellis will become



Loring Sunfish
Worlds winner

2009 Sunfish Worlds winner David Loring receives his
award from Pierre Colle, senior vice president of Pictet

Bank & Trust.

Photo by Robert Dunkley

‘Pain’: Training
1S going great’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major
Knows that if he’s going to be
successful next Friday night,
he will have to go through
some intense workout sessions
in Hollywood, Florida.

For the past two weeks,
Major has been back in Flori-
da with trainer Anthony
‘Chills’ Wilson as he prepares
for his NABO mandatory
lightweight title defense
against American Dorin
Spivey.

The two are scheduled to
clash on November 6 at the
Convention Center in Buffalo,
New York, as Major cele-
brates his 28th birthday
(Wednesday, October 28) and
his mother’s on October 31 in
grand style.

“Everything is going great,”
said Major, who will be
defending the title he was
recently awarded after his
bout with American Michael
Clark ended in a no contest
June 19 in Buffalo. “Training
has been going great. Always
something new to work on.”

Major, who is accommodat-
ing amateur boxer Valentino
Knowles for a few months, is
slated to leave November 4 for
Buffalo.

“T just want to go out there
and be successful,” said Major,
who will take a 16-3-1 win-
loss-draw record with 14
knockouts in the 12-round
bout against Spivey’s 35-6
record with 28 KO.

“Thanks to my trainers,
Anthony Wilson, Nathaniel
Knowles and Gregory Storr
and everybody who has sup-
ported me, I feel I can go out
there and execute my talent,
perform to the best of my abil-
ity and I’m very confident that
I can come out victorious.”

Wilson, who has been train-
ing Major extensively for the
fight, said they are looking for-
ward to returning to Buffalo.

“Since he came in, I was
working with his timing,” Wil-
son stressed. “He came in here
in great shape, so I really did-
n’t have to worry too much
about that.

“He’s the type of fighter
that fights from his heart, so
regardless of who the oppo-
nent is, he is always ready. He
has all the skills, so I’m just
trying to keep him sharp so
that he can be ready.”

At this point in his training,



MEACHER MAJOR

Major said he has already
reached his fight limit, which
he has never done before in
any of his previous fights.

“T came here in great shape
and I just had to work on get-
ting fine tuned,” Major said.
“So I know I’m ready and I’m
going to go to New York and
make the best of the opportu-
nity.

“Whether I win or lose, I
will be very happy with myself
because I know that I would
have gone out and gave it my
best shot. But ’'m not going
into the fight thinking that ’m
going to lose.”

A confident Major said
despite the fact that Spivey is
36-years-old, he’s not going to
let his age play a factor in
whether or not he is successful.

“T’ve already told my han-
dlers that this is my time to
shine and although this guy
has been around, what he
haven’t achieve yet, it’s not
my fault when I beat him,”
Major stressed. “This is my
time.”

Giving the credit to his
father, Anthony Major Sr,
Major said he has the belief
that he can beat anybody in
the world and he’s hoping that
after this fight, he will get clos-
er to securing a world title
shot.

“My father is really the one
who pushes me so hard,” he
pointed out. “He’s not in the
gym when I’m training, but he
has sat me down and talked
to me like a father to a son
and he has installed the quali-
ties in me to go out there and
perform.

“So I really want to thank
him because he’s the main rea-
son why I’m in the position
that I am today.”

Whenever he gets a shot at
the world title, Major said he
will definitely dedicate it to his
father.

only the second Bahamian to
be inducted, following on the
heels of Grand Bahama’s
Candice DeGregory-Culmer
in the 2007 class.

“Tm elated. It’s been a long
time, but it’s never too late,”
said Ellis, who began playing
softball at the age of 19 and
retired 10 years ago when she
was 49.

Ellis, who turns 60 on May
3, will bring the Bahamas’
total of inductees up to 12
since the ISF began the induc-
tion of administrators, man-
agers, coaches, players and
umpires in 1981.

The other Bahamians
inducted were as follows:

e Leon ‘Apache’ Knowles,
player/coach in 1987;
Churchill Tener-Knowles,
administrator/organiser in



NAOMI ELLIS
Photo by Tim Clarke

1991; Neko Grant, adminis-
trator/organiser in 1997;
Arthur Thompson, umpire in
2001; Greg Christie, adminis-
trator; Sidney “Bobby Baylor’
Fernander, coach and Dud-

ley ‘Douggie’ Smith, player,
all in 2003 and DeGregory-
Culmer, player; Richard ‘the
Lion’Heart’ Johnson, player;
Austin ‘King Snake’ Knowles,
meritorious service and God-
frey ‘Gully’ Pinder, coach, all
in 2007.

Like all of the above, Ellis
has made tremendous strides
on the international scene,
having represented the
Bahamas on just about every
national team with the excep-
tion of two during her tenure.

“The greatest highlight for
me was when we got third in
the world,” said Ellis. “When
we did that, I was on top of
the world.”

During her career, Ellis
suited up to play under the
management of Eddie Ford,
Bobby Fernander, Colin

“Troppy’ Knowles, the late
Peter ‘Pa-B’ Bethell and God-
frey Pinder.

She also played with such
players as Carmetta Christie-
Lockhart, Ernestine Butler-
Stubbs, Vangy Bowleg, Mavis
Whymmns, Judy Allan, Joanne
Thompson, Muriel Anderson,
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, Jean-
nie ‘Bubbles’ Mynez,
Hyacinth Farrington and
Ingrid Rose.

“T don’t have any regrets
because I know I did my
best,” she stated.

But looking at the sport
now compared to the days
when she participated, Ellis
said there is no comparison.

“The caliber of softball has
gone down very much,” she

SEE page 10

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 27,

USINCSS

TUESDAY,

2009

‘Don’t throw baby
out with bath water’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government has

been urged not to

“throw the baby out

with the bath water” and

delay moving the Plan-
ning and Subdivision Bill moving
through Parliament to allow for more
consultation, with realtors expressing
concern that its provisions could
“strangle the economic development
of the Bahamas”.

William Wong, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent, last night told Tribune Business
that his 700-strong membership had
“some very serious concerns” over
the Planning and Subdivisions Bill,
having discussed the issue with devel-
opers and other impacted professions.

Mr Wong said the Bill, by outlining
a prescriptive approval process for all
commercial and residential real estate
developments in the Bahamas, with
specified timelines for all stages, would
“create another layer of bureaucracy
and red tape” that developers would
have to overcome.

Time and delays cost developers
money, the BREA president pointed
out, and this increase in development

WILLIAM WONG

costs would likely to be passed on to
the consumer or real estate purchaser,
raising the possibility that more
Bahamians could be priced out of the
market.

Addressing BREA’s specific con-
cerns, some of which were outlined
in a letter to Prime Minister Hubert

Ingraham, Mr Wong told Tribune
Business that the Government
appeared to be “putting the cart
before the horse” by moving to pass
the Planning and Subdivisions Bill
before it had completed its Land Use
Plans for all Bahamians islands.

These plans, addressed in Section 35
of the Planning and Subdivisions Bill,
were, according to Mr Wong, sched-
uled to be completed in six months
for New Providence and 12 months
for the Family Islands. They were
designed to address the zoning of land
for particular uses, such as commercial
and residential, utilities, land use pol-
icy, road corridors and the preserva-
tion of historical and cultural sites.

“They should get this Land Use
Plan finished first before the Planning
and Subdivisions Bill,” Mr Wong told
Tribune Business. He added in his let-
ter to the Prime Minister: “This poli-
cy has been needed for decades and
can be the solution to what is profes-
sionally known as ‘sprawl’, and is reg-
ular throughout the length and
breadth of the country

“All Bahamian professionals that I
have consulted with are strongly in
favour of an organised and sustain-
able strategy for the growth of our
islands. This Bill, however, puts ‘the

cart before the horse’ and releases the
Government of their responsibility to
provide the platform for Bahamians to
have the opportunity to be a major
stakeholder in the development of the
Bahamas.”

Arguing that the Planning and Sub-
divisions Bill appeared to have been
written more by someone experienced
in environmental matters, as opposed
to development, Mr Wong told Tri-
bune Business: “It doesn’t in any way
consider these tough economic times.

“It’s going to affect the Bahamian
man and woman who want to buy
property and will put it out of their
reach. It will strangle the economic
development of the Bahamas, partic-
ularly in these very difficult econom-
ic climate.”

Mr Wong said the need for public
consultation and town meetings could
stymie foreign developers who, after
acquiring land for a development,
could find themselves blocked by the
complaints of nearby residents and
see the Town Planning Committee
refuse planning permission.

The BREA questioned what hap-
pened to land caught up in such dis-
putes, whether it would sit there and

SEE page 2B



Early December target for
Waste recycling facility

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste yester-
day said it expected to have its
cardboard recycling facility “up
and running” by the beginning
of December 2009, and is tar-
geting 500 tonnes of cardboard
per month for processing.

Francisco de Cardenas, the
BISX-listed company’s manag-
ing director, also confirmed to
Tribune Business yesterday that
it hoped to “be making
biodiesel in the first quarter”
2010, once all necessary gov-
ernment permits and approvals
were received.

Adding that Bahamas Waste
had enjoyed “‘a nice third quar-
ter” this year from a financial
performance perspective, Mr
de Cardenas said that in rela-
tion to the company’s card-
board recycling initiative,
“we’re basically waiting on a
few more parts for the bailer.

“We then go through a peri-
od of testing on the machine,
and then we’ll be good to go. I
would say that within the next
month, probably by the begin-
ning of December, we’ll be up
and running. We’re going to be
trying to get about 500 tonnes
of cardboard in a month.”

Mr de Cardenas said
Bahamas Waste would be
recovering a product it nor-
mally dumped in the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway

* BISX-listed firm targeting
500 tonnes of cardboard
per month for processing

* Hoping to get approvals to
start biodiesel production
in 2010 Q1, hoping to
produce 100,000 gallons
in year one and have
20-50% vehicle usage

landfill, processing and recy-
cling it, and then attempting to
sell it for export.

He added that the company
would be going through a
“learning curve” with the card-
board recycling facility, and it
would take time to reach the
500 tonnes per month level.

Hinting that Bahamas Waste
would eventually look at other
recycling efforts, said: “Card-
board is the beginning, and we
will see what else, but right now
we’re focusing efforts on card-
board.”

As for Bahamas Waste’s
biodiesel plans, Mr de Carde-
nas told Tribune Business:
“The equipment is being man-
ufactured, we are sourcing our
tankage and working with the
BEST Commission on the
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment and Environmental Man-
agement Plan.

SEE page 4B

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The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BIC suffers 50.7% profit fall in ‘08

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) suf-
fered a 50.7 per cent net income
reduction in 2008, as profits
were squeezed by a slight top-
line decline and $18.7 million
rise in operating expenses,
although that did not stop the
Government taking a $50 mil-
lion dividend from the compa-
ny post year-end.

Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting
president and chief executive,
writing in BTC’s 2008 annual
report acknowledged that the
state-owned incumbent’s net
income had fallen to $21.1 mil-
lion from $42.8 million the year
before, “resulting principally

* Government takes $50m
dividend from state-owned
incumbent in 2009, and
likely to extract some
$105m in 18-24
month period

* Privatisation talks likely
to include focus on
$25.387m pension liability

* Drop in 2008 performance
caused by 6% or $18.7m
rise in operating expenses,
and 1% revenue fall

SEE page 2B

A

Sure you'll win the Lotto!

Now what

lll

—

's Plan B?

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Cael

ee eo ey

NAS SAL
(242) 3

FREEPORT
(242) 951-3010

MARSH HARBOUR

(242) 367-3135

ey DCC Leer

Chamber plans
Institute to give
husiness support

* Chamber president says
development bank needed
to support start-ups
through growing pains,
pinting out his business
lost $180k in first year
on $250k turnover

* Says bank’s lending
constraints will kill some
entrepreneurs’ ideas
and leave key void

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T H E
Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce is
planning
“next month”
to launch a
Chamber
Institute
designed to
provide a
technical sup-
port package
to its members and Bahamian
businesses, its president yester-
day urging cash-strapped insti-
tutions such as the Bahamas
Development Bank (BDB) to
continue playing a role in small
business financing.

Khaalis Rolle explained that
the Chamber Institute would
play a facilitation/co-ordination
role in its plans to assist small
business development, creating
the curriculum and support
package before outsourcing the
delivery to members involved
in that line of work.

Confirming to Tribune Busi-
ness that the Chamber Institute
was set “to come next month”,
Mr Rolle explained: “We will
be offering the type of support
that businesses need. We're try-
ing to move beyond the strong
advocacy role we’ve played in
the past to a more technical
support organisation.”

The proposed support pack-
ages would involve the likes of
marketing, accounting and
leadership training, “all of the
things businesses need to
understand how to efficiently



SEE page 4B

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ar rth ky
Nassau; 247,356,9801
Freeport: 242.951.3010

PL a
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

Pee Li ats

eR meer italia ae)

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

eel le Lely





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BTC, from page 1B

from a 1 per cent or $3.5 million
decline in revenues and a 6 per
cent or $18.7 million increase
in operating expenses”.

On the revenue front, Mr
Griffin attributed the drop from
$356.915 million in 2007 to
$353.369 million to an 18 per
cent or $9.9 million drop in net
roaming revenues.

This provides a further indi-
cation of the wide-ranging
impact that the global econom-
ic crisis and decline in tourist
arrivals has had on all facets of
the Bahamian economy, since
BTC’s roaming revenues are
largely derived from tourists
who, via agreements signed by
BTC and their own home coun-
try carriers, are able to use their
cell phones in the Bahamas.
Fewer tourists equates to lower
roaming revenues.

Mr Griffin said the decline
in roaming revenues had been

offset to some extent by a 12
per cent increase in broadband
Internet revenues to $16 mil-
lion in 2008.

Elsewhere, BTC’s cellular
wireless revenues from post-
paid subscribers fell by 9.6 per
cent or $5.2 million, partly due
to the migration of former
TDMA postpaid customers to
the new GSM prepaid platform.
Revenues from the latter
increased by $7.2 million to
$143.1 million.

BTC’s income statement
again showed that the company
is largely now a glorified cellu-
lar company, something that
was effectively admitted by
executive chairman Julian Fran-
cis in the 2008 annual report,
who said this business segment
now accounted for 70 per cent
of the company’s total rev-
enues.

BTC’s current monopoly in
cellular service provision in the
Bahamas, something that will

Forklift, like new,

end two years after its privati-
sation, has been critical to the
company’s profitability and per-
formance. It also indicates why
Digicel, a 100 per cent cellular
operator throughout the
Caribbean, is interested in
acquiring BTC - as it is, to all
intents and purposes, a cellu-
lar company - despite the state-
owned incumbent’s interests in
fixed-line, Internet and, possi-
bly, Internet Protocol TV.

Elsewhere, Mr Griffin said
BTC’s payroll and benefits
increased by 15 per cent to $83
million in 2008, largely due to
the finalisation and implemen-
tation of the new industrial
agreement for the period 2007-
2010.

While most other operating
expense categories remained
flat, what was termed as ‘Plant
Expense’ rose by more than $20
million - from $152.308 million
to $172.683 million. As a result,
total operating expenses
increased from $313.397 mil-
lion in 2007 to $332.052 million
a year later.

BREA, from 1B

become “dead land” with
reduced value, and what would

in very good

happen to the investor and the

condition, with

warranty

Phone: 436-9776



Bahamas’ reputation/standing
in investment circles.

“All this is going to drive up
the cost of development,” Mr
Wong argued. “You frustrate
the developer and drive up the
cost of development. Guess
who pays for it? The consumer.

Unbundling plant expense,
it can be seen that payroll costs
rose by 8.6 per cent in 2008
from $42.976 million to $46.679
million. Also on the rise were
vendor discounts, which rose
by 23 per cent from $27.348 mil-
lion to $33.74 million.

Utilities costs, mainly the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC), rose by more than
$4 million from $7.567 million
to $11.915 million.

In his report, Mr Griffin said
BTC had paid a $25 million div-
idend to the Government, in
the form of the Public Trea-
sury, in June 2008. That same
year, some $16.4 million in cus-
toms duties and franchise fees
were also paid by the company,
along with $4 million in regula-
tory fees to the former Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).

However, the annual report’s
notes also revealed that BTC’s
Board of Directors, all of whom
are appointed by the Govern-
ment, declared a $50 million
dividend at their April 23, 2009,
meeting, which was subse-

One way or another, this Bill
is going to drive up the cost of
land for Bahamians.

“The Government is putting
all these roadblocks and
bureaucracy in place, costing
the developer time and mon-
ey.” Mr Wong expressed fears
that the Bill could act as a dis-
incentive to subdivision devel-
opment and, as a result, the

quently paid on April 27, 2009.
Taken with the previous $25
million dividend, and the Gov-
ernment’s plans to take a fur-
ther $30 million dividend from
BTC prior to privatisation, that
$50 million windfall means that
the Ingraham administration is
likely to extract a total $105
million from the state-owned
incumbent within a probable
18-month to two-year period.
Some might question
whether it is prudent to take
such a large dividend from a
company that suffered a more
than-50 per cent cut in net
income in 2008, but BTC still
had $118.6 million in cash on
the balance sheet as at Decem-
ber 31 of that year - albeit a
lower amount than the previ-
ous year’s $135.351 million.
Added to that is the Gov-
ernment’s desperate need for
every cent of revenue it can lay
its hands on to plug the growing
fiscal deficit and national debt,
and with BEC’s problems, it is
clear BTC remains the ‘crown
jewel’ in its asset portfolio,



a |

although all things are relative.

BTC also incurred some
$4.778 million in privatisation
costs on behalf of the Govern-
ment in 2008, the annual report
revealed, which the directors
dealt with by issuing a dividend
in-kind.

And the report also high-
lighted another issue that will
have to be resolved between
the Government and any buyer
in BTC’s privatisation - namely
who deals with, and fills, the
$25.387 million pension liabili-
ty the company’s defined ben-
efit pension plan is sitting on. It
is possible such an amount may
be deducted from the purchase
price.

BTC’s annual report showed
that its employee pension plan
was suffering from a $63.475
million deficit, with the value
of future obligations to pen-
sioners standing at $252.941
million, yet the fair value of
plan assets languishing at
$189.466 million. The value of
unrecognised actuarial losses
was pegged at $38.088 million.



PTE TET

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

~—f a



supply of homes/lots would be
unable to match demand as the
population grew, further push-
ing prices above the reach of
Bahamians via a
supply/demand mismatch.
Urging the Government to
“hold back” and “delay” the
Bill’s passage for further con-
sultation, Mr Wong said the
provision that prevented
Bahamians from dividing prop-
erty in their will to their chil-
dren could lead to further prob-
lems with generational proper-
ty, leaving “tens of thousands of























CTIZT Dy
CEN
i sors

OT

eee aa ors

The Four-Way Test

“Of the things we think,

say or do

1. Is it the truth?

2. Is it fair to all
concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?

4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?”

From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
It asks the following four
questions:

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help us, not the kind of stuff
that makes it more frustrating,”

Mr Wong added.

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Rules:

1, Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each category.

. Write a essay answering the following subject:
“What does the Four-Way Test mean to me.” Explain
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to
your life, experiences, and/or society in general.”
Your essay must include the four principles.

. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words. Address: a the factors driving differing market outlooks at
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. One winner will be chosen from each age category. The
decision of the judges is final.

. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will
be published in the newspaper.

. Mail essay and completed newspaper clipping to
The Four-Way Test Essay Competition,
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of East Nassau,
P.O. Box SS-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3B





Government urged to
‘divest itself of BAIC
and BDB roles

Organisation has ‘deep concerns’ over
Development Bank’s ‘severe liquidity issues’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government was yes-
terday urged to “divest itself” of
the Bahamas Development
Bank (BDB) and the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and turn them
over to private sector manage-
ment, as a Bahamian small
business organisation said it had
“deep concerns” about the lim-
its placed on the former’s lend-
ing capacity.

Arguing that there were “too
many separate organisations”
involved in small business
financing and support activities
from a government perspective,
Marvin Smith, the Bahamas
Business Association’s chair-
man, told Tribune Business that
management of the likes of
BDB and BAIC should be
handed to the private sector,
with these entities replaced by a
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration.

“What we need in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas is
for the Government of the
Bahamas to divest itself of
responsibilities that really
belong to the private sector,”
Mr Smith said.

“Going forward, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas can-
not be all things to all people,
and needs to turn things over to
the private sector. We suggest
the creation of a Bahamas
Development Corporation.

“The Governments of the
Bahamas, past and future, need
to really divest themselves of
the BDB and BAIC, and turn
that over to private sector
groupings or organisations.”

Mr Smith said the Bahamas
Business Association had “a
deep concern” over the “severe

liquidity issues” plaguing the
BDB, which minister of state
for finance, Zhivargo Laing,
said had left it unable to write
“any meaningful loans”. Some
“50 per cent-plus” of its loan
portfolio was in default.

Speaking from the perspec-
tive of small business access to
credit and debt financing, espe-
cially during a recession, Mr
Smith told Tribune Business:
“This is a deep concern of ours,
because for many of the small
and medium-sized businesses
unable to get loans from com-
mercial banks, the only way to
get credit is from the BDB and
the venture capital fund.

“Since the Government has
taken a more conservative
stance on that, perhaps they
need to be more creative in
how businesses get funding
from outside the Bahamas. The
Government and the Central
Bank stand in the way of that
with the current legislation.”

Yte Mr Smith added: “This
tunnel is not as dark as it
appears. The Government has
to come to the position that
they do not have all the answers
or solutions to these problems
we face together.

“Before they take the aggres-
sive stance to terminate funding
in this period where we need
to create jobs, they need to get
everyone together to discuss
solutions to the problems they
are having right now.”

While thanking all BDB and
BAIC employees for their ser-
vices over the years, Mr Smith

said they needed to be “rede-
ployed in other areas of the
public service where they are
needed, so we can establish the
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration” and raise funding for
the economy’s productive sec-
tors.

Arguing that this organisa-
tion needed to be completely
run, driven and managed by the
private sector, Mr Smith said:
“One of its primary objectives
is to see the creation of
Bahamians owning the majori-
ty or a large percentage of the
tourism industry, and the agri-
culture or food security part of
the economy.”

Given that the Government
had previously given Crown
Land grants and other incen-
tives to encourage foreign
direct investment in the
Bahamas, Mr Smith said a
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration should receive similar
assets for the purpose of
empowering Bahamians in all
islands.

“Hopefully, the Bahamas
Development Corporation will
be listed and traded on the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX) for the
purpose of raising capital for
onward lending to small, medi-
um and larger-sized businesses
in the Bahamas,” he added.

“The Bahamas Development
Corporation will have access to
secure funds locally and inter-
nationally, whether its bonds,
stocks or more creative forms
of financing.”

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER - REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and
the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than

miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in
New Providence and the Family Islands
Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers
Prepares the Sales Budget
Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing

software

Prepares monthly Board Reports
Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of

Statistics

Provides statistical billing information for Family Island Managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in

the Family Islands

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required
during acquisition of new locations
Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the
efficient operation of the department

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounts or equivalent
A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability to interpret financial reports

Good time management skills

Project Management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Baha-

mas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

Bahamas on or before: Tuesday, November 3, 2009.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



N-7509 Nassau

Mr Smith said that while the
private sector understood the
need to encourage foreign
direct investment in the
Bahamas, any developer receiv-
ing a Heads of Agreement-type
of arrangements, plus incen-
tives and land grants, must be
required to do business with
Bahamian companies.

“This Bahamas Develop-
ment Corporation is to encour-
age legislation for the advance-
ment of the interests of the
Bahamian people and/or busi-
nesses,” Mr Smith said, adding
that the Bahamas had “for too
long relied” on the two main
political parties to safeguard
their interests via policy, rather
than statute law.

He pointed to the fact that
the likes of Singapore, Barba-
dos and Trinidad & Tobago all
had Business Development or
Small and Medium-Sized Busi-
ness Acts to encourage devel-
opment in these sectors, argu-
ing that the Bahamas needed
similar laws to outline what was
permissible and what was not.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN

EDWARD AND OLGA ROSSI
Complainants
AND

KENDALL KNOWLES
Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal, will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 28th day of October, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd Floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 21st day of October, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



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6

THE TRIBUNE





STS

Offices:

1. 1, 200sq.ft @ $2,500.00 per month
2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month
3. 400sq.ft. @ $750.00 per month
4. 350sq.ft @ $700.00 per month

Stores:

1. 3,000 sq.ft @ $5,000.00 per month
2. 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1,700.00 per month

ALL SPACES LOCATED ON THE NORTH
EASTERN CORNER OF BAY STREET &
ELIZABETH AVENUE.

All Spaces are exclusive of utilities

All Inquires Call 326-4222



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009





IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/00409

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act
Chamber 393 Statute Law of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THOSE lots pieces or
parcels of land situate in the Southwestern portion of
the Island of South Bimini one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and comprising a
portion of the Port Royal Subdivision being the Lot
Numbered Sixty-one (61) in Block Numbered Five
(5) a portion of the Lot Numbered Sixty-two (62)
in Block Numbered Five (5) and a portion of Tract
“A” in Block Numbered Five (5) and situate on the
Eastern Side of Ocean Drive and approximately Two
hundred and Seventy-two (272) feet Southwesterly
from North Road and being bounded as follows
towards the NORTH on the other portion of the
Lot Numbered Sixty-two (62) in Block Numbered
Five (5) and running thereon One hundred and ten
(110.00) feet towards the EAST on a portion of Tract
“A” in the Block Numbered Five (5) and running
thereon Ninety-two (92.00) feet towards the SOUTH
on the Lot Numbered Sixty (60) in Block Numbered
Five (5) and running thereon One hundred and ten
(110.00) feet towards the WEST on a Thirty (30)
feet wide road reservation known as Ocean Drive
and running thereon Ninety-two (92.00) feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition, of
William C. Northen and Valerie J. Northen

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 18th day of March, A. D.
2009 William C. Northen and Valerie J. Northen of
South Bimini one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas (hereinafter called “the Petitioners’)
claim to be the owners in fee simple in possession
of the above captioned pieces parcels or lots of land
and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have their title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:-

i, The Registry of The Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

The Chambers of Deyane E. Russell
Grove Avenue and Marine Drive,
The Grove, West Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or
right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition must on or before the
expiry of Thirty (30) days following final publication
of this Notice file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioners and the undersigned a Statement
of his Claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith together with a plan
of the area claimed and an abstract of title to the said
area claimed by him. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of his claim on or before
the Thirtieth (30) day following final publication
of this notice will operate as a bar of such claim.

DEYANE E. RUSSELL
Chambers,

Grove Avenue and Marine Drive,
The Grove, West Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorney for the Petitioners



Chamber plans Institute to give business support

manage a business”.

“Hopefully, we can expand
that in the future by being a
broker for capital investment,”
Mr Rolle said, “being the go-
between between our members
and potential members and
lending institutions and venture
capital organisations.”

When asked how the Cham-
ber would run its proposed
Institute programme, Mr Rolle
said: “We’re going to outsource
that to the guys who offer those
services. We will offer that
through our existing members
with our brand on it. We will
develop the curriculum.”

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle said
the “severe liquidity issues”
that had impacted the Bahamas
Development Bank’s (BDB)
ability to originate “any mean-
ingful loans” was “symptomatic
of all the structural issues we’re
facing” in both the private and
public sectors.

WASTE, from 1B

“Our plans have been sub-

He argued, though, that the
economy needed institutions
such as the BDB “to continue
to assist in business develop-
ment”, as they were critical to
providing debt financing to
start-ups that would otherwise
be starved of capital and never
get off the ground.

Many entrepreneurs, Mr
Rolle said, “invested everything
in it” in terms of capital, yet
had to endure a “ramp up peri-
od” before they made any mon-
ey, often sustaining a loss in
their first year of operation.

Taking his Nassau Water
Ferries venture as an example,
Mr Rolle said he suffered a
$180,000 loss during his first
year in operations on a
$250,000 turnover, before mak-
ing a $70,000 profit on $500,000
turnover in his second year.

“With a start-up, unless you
have lots of capital, you are
almost doomed from the outset

mitted, and we’re hoping we
will not have any glitches and

NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEY SIFFORD of Toote
Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statementof the facts within twenty-eightdays from
the 20th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON EDOUARD of South
Beach, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
27th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

(a) Mushy Kiwis Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 25th day of September, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY
BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN

Complainant

KENDALL KNOWLES
Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 28th day of October, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd Floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 21st day of October, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Council
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



and most businesses lose mon-
ey in their first year of opera-
tions,” the Chamber president
explained. “That’s why we need
institutions like the Bahamas
Development Bank to continue
to assist in business develop-
ment.”

Mr Rolle argued that while
the Government should not
waste money or throw it away,
it must not look at institutions
such as the BDB as ‘a profit
centre”. Rather, it was an insti-
tution designed to encourage
business development, innova-
tion and ideas, and the emer-
gence of a new generation of
entrepreneurs.

The Chamber president also
questioned whether small busi-
nesses and start-ups were mak-
ing best use of the Govern-
ment’s business support ser-
vices, and whether the agencies
involved were structured cor-
rectly to maximise delivery in

that everything will move for-
ward. We suspect we’ll possi-
bly be making biodiesel in the
first quarter.”

Mr de Cardenas said he
“wouldn’t be surprised if we
make 100,000 gallons of
biodiesel in the first year”, with
any product it produces entire-
ly for use in its own vehicle
fleet.

Explaining that the biodiesel
facility was conceived partly in
response to the impact escalat-
ing global oil prices were having
on Bahamas Waste’s cost base,
Mr de Cardenas said a key chal-
lenge would be to switch the

this area.

However, the “big question”
was where the BDB, the Gov-
ernment and private sector
went now, Mr Rolle suggesting
the latter had to step in if the
public sector entities were
unable to lend.

“It [the BDB] plays a criti-
cal role,” he said. “It is the pre-
mier organisation that small
businesses go to for lending
outside the commercial banks,
and that process is designed to
encourage small business in this
country.

“If the BDB is not able to
fulfill its mandate, and com-
mercial banks are not bullish,
you will have a decline in small
business growth in this coun-
try. There’s no ‘if’s’ and ‘but’s’
about it.”

He added that some ideas
currently held by entrepreneurs
would “not be realised” due to
the BDB’s lending constraints.

biodiesel.

With there being relatively
little technical information pub-
lished on biodiesel and its use
by heavy duty vehicles, Mr de
Cardenas said: “We’re doing a
lot of studying and investiga-
tion of what we can and can’t
do.”

He suggested that Bahamas
Waste’s vehicles could use
between 20-50 per cent
biodiesel, with the older vehi-
cles likely to be able to use a
higher percentage. “We’re
going to try and use as much
as we can,” Mr de Cardenas
said. “Some vehicles might be

company’s fleet to use

able to use 100 per cent.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EAGLE STARS INVESTMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
INTERMATIONAL BUSINESS COMPAMES ACT

Wo, 45 of 2000
ANADERO LIMITED

Mobca is hereby givan that in accordance wih Section 137 of The Inemebor Business
Companies Ad No. 44 of 2000, AMADERO LIMITED is in dissolution, The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 2rd day of Cetsber 2008. Dillon Dean of Nassau
Sahamias & he Liquidator of ANADERO LIMITED.

Dillon Daan
LOUIDATOR



NOTICE

In the Estate of GEORGES EMILE JEAN FRANKE late of
14 Woodland Road, off Village Road in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Businessman, Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims or
demands against the above-named Estate are requested to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on
or before Friday, the 27th day of November, A.D. 2009 after
which the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the
deceased among the persons entiled thereto having requard
only to the claims of which the undersigned shall have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.
Chambers

308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-8181

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Executors



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THE TRIBUNE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

B

ealth

O De









a message of

Opey

The story of a breast cancer surv

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

“RESILIENCE’ has been the key-
word for 60-year-old Virginia
Sawyer in facing breast cancer.

Perhaps it’s the reason why she
has had such a successful fight
against the disease; she is the perfect
example of what faith and focus can
do for someone in her condition.

Ms Sawyer, who is described by
others as a “poised, reserved and
private person”, agreed to share her
story about her battle against breast
cancer with Tribune Health.

It’s been 25 years since she had
her mastectomy, and today Ms
Sawyer continues to live life to its
fullest.

Now in ‘remission’ (a term used to
classify cancer patients with no
recurrences for up to 12 to 15 years),
Ms Sawyer said breast cancer is no
longer something that she constant-
ly broods or frets about.

“Over the years so many people
have been diagnosed, so I realise
like many others that it’s just anoth-
er challenge that I have to face,” she
said.

With an effective combination of
eating right, exercising, prayer, and
involvement in various activities, she
is determined to keep herself as
physically and spiritually healthy as
possible.

She’s never viewed her breast can-

cer as a death sentence, and in fact
has developed more zest for life
because of the disease.

Ms Sawyer is involved in several
civic organisations, including the
Bahamas Communications and Pub-
lic Officers Retirees Association and
the Surgical Suite Breast Cancer
Support Group.

She is also a very active member
at Evangelistic Temple Church on
Collins Avenue.

But it hasn’t always been that way
for this retiree, who has no reserva-
tions telling you she is a “sexy 60.”

One of the most inspirational
things of her life has been her
involvement in the Surgical Suite
Breast Cancer Support Group for
20 plus years, she said.

Ms Sawyer said the group has
helped her deal with the disease over
the years and has given her the
opportunity to lend her support to
fellow cancer survivors.

The 60-year-old’s experience with
breast cancer hasn’t been as diffi-
cult as that of some women; she nev-
er underwent any chemotherapy or
radiation.

“Tt was not until I joined the Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Support Group
that I found out how sick people
were. Because I didn’t have to take
the treatments, people were saying I
didn’t have breast cancer,” she said.

Shortly after being diagnosed with
breast cancer in her 30s, Ms Sawyer

had her breast removed - a fairly
radical surgery for a disease that
was still in the early stages, but one
that has proved instrumental to her
survival.

Her physician, Dr Charles Diggiss
of the Surgical Suite, said the reason
she didn’t have chemotherapy is
because treatment for the disease is
different in every case.

“One has to be careful to under-
stand how breast cancer has evolved
and treatment has evolved,” he said.
“We need to be aware of the aggres-
siveness of breast cancer in the black
Bahamian community.”

Speaking to Ms Sawyer’s condi-
tion, Dr Diggiss said her recovery
story is remarkable.

“(In the) 25 years at my practice
there aren’t many women who con-
tinue to survive. It is certainly com-
mendable and fortunate for her,” he
said.

Dr Diggiss said he believes Ms
Sawyer’s religiously undergoing an
annual mammogram and discovering
the cancer at such an early stage was
crucial.

“Early detection is the key in
order to avoid long rounds of chemo
and radiation treatment,” Ms Sawyer
said.

“Through God’s grace I was able
to avoid a lot of what other cancer
patients go through.”

“In early May of 1984, a young
man who worked with me said ‘Ms
Sawyer, let’s switch vacation, it
would be really good for me to use
that time’.”

“Because of switching with him,
I went for my check-up,” she said.

“The doctor found a small lump,
and he sent me to a surgeon who
told me to come back in a month or
more, because sometimes the lumps
appear and then disappear.

“When I went back to see him,

the lump was still
there. I had a biop-
sy, and after that,
that was the first
pain I ever felt.”

Results of the
biopsy showed that
the lump was in
fact cancerous. Ms
Sawyer said she
was depressed at
first, but deter-
mined to fight the
disease.

“T had to have
surgery (a mastec-
tomy). Then I was
sent to Dr (John)
Lunn, who told
one of the nurses,
‘come here let me
show you some-
thing, this woman
is healed’. Dr Lunn
said the doctors
did a wonderful
job on you. You
don’t need any
chemotherapy or
radiation,” she
said.

She continued to see the doctor
for about six months, and afterwards
went for mammograms once a year.
To this day, she performs self breast
exams and continues to have her
annual check-up.

Ms Sawyer also continues to eat
healthy and is consistent with her
exercise regime. She tries to exer-
cise twice a day.

Her eating habits include small
portions of leafy green vegetables,
especially broccoli and carrots that
she tries to steam or eat raw some-
times.

“T try to use sweeteners that the
doctors recommend, and I automat-
ically cut down on the salt to stay



Virginia
Sawyer

away from hypertension.

“Now and then I eat rice and pota-
toes,” she said, and jokes that from
time to time she does cut herself
some slack by treating herself to
food she wouldn’t typically have.

Dr Diggiss had this to say about
Ms Sawyer’s story of survival: “It
gives a message of hope that you
need not die from breast cancer. As
few as the numbers may be for per-
sons who survive, it certainly offers
hope.

Women helping women

Zonta Club and Sister
Sister Breast Cancer
support Group join forces

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

HATS off to the Zonta
Club of New Providence
which paid tribute to cancer
survivors of the Surgical Suite
Sister Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group this weekend.

Some 100 women turned
out to the Hat Show and Tea
Party held on the upstairs deck
overlooking the garden at
Government House on Sun-
day afternoon.

Andrea Sweeting, president
of the Surgical Suite Sister Sis-
ter Breast Cancer support
group said: “It was a wonder-
ful venture between the two
organisations. It was a way of
women helping women, which
is the motto of the Zonta
Club,” she said.

The Zonta Club is a group
of businesswomen that work
together to advance the status
of women. The Sister Sister
Breast Cancer support group
is a subsidiary of the Surgical
Suite, an oncology practice,
presided over by local practi-
tioner Dr Charles Diggiss.

Oralee’s Fashions; the
Amazing Fashions Centre;
Just Stunning; LaRose Bou-
tique; Judy’s Hat Shop, and
other vendors presented their
hat collections to the host of
attendees from different civic
and church organisations.

Attendees enjoyed salmon

and pinwheel sandwiches,
quiches, and a variety of
herbal teas.

The ladies were also treated
to a fashion show hosted by
Pepper Johnson of LaRose
Boutique, as members of var-
ious Zonta Club chapters on
the island modelled their hats.

Part of the proceeds gener-
ated from the high tea event
were donated to the Surgical
Suite Sister Sister Support
group.

Each month, Sister Sister
purchases three porth-a-caths
to administer chemotherapy
in an easy and efficient way.

Port-a-cath’s cost around
$500 each, and the organisa-
tion donates three of them a
month to the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas.

“We welcome any dona-
tions to the Sister Sister Sup-
port Group because as it
comes in, it goes back out,”
said Nurse Charlene McPhee,
a spokesperson for the group.

She explained that the dona-
tions from the Zonta Club of
New Providence will be allo-
cated toward purchasing these

devices. This will help defray
the group’s monthly expendi-
tures of $1,500.

Part of the proceeds will
also go to assist members of
the group with medication and
other needs.

Officially formed in 2001,
the Surgical Suite Sister Sister
Breast Cancer Support Group
is made up of breast cancer
survivors young and old. For
most of the members, thank-
fully, their cancer is in remis-
sion.

Their youngest member is
28-years-old, proving that
breast cancer does not dis-
criminate when it comes to
age.

Nurse McPhee told Tribune
Health that the way women
respond to a breast cancer
diagnosis is very important.

“Women who attend sup-
port groups tend to do much
better than those who don’t
have support, so we know it’s
vital,” she explained. “It helps
you to know that you can
make it too.”

Outlining what the Sister
Sister group offers, she said:

Prayer vigil to conclude Breast
Cancer Awareness Month

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

TO bring the National
Breast Cancer Awareness
Month to a close, the Surgical
Suite Sister Sister Breast Can-
cer Support Group will par-
ticipate in a candle light walk
and prayer vigil this Saturday
at Rawson Square.

The members will be divid-
ed into two groups. One
group will begin the march on
Elizabeth Avenue and the
other group will begin on
George Street; they will meet
at Rawson Square.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

At the centre of the square
the group’s members will hold
a prayer vigil in honour of
women who have died from
the disease, perform musical
selections, and survivors will
share their inspirational sto-
ries.

Since it’s conception in
2007, the walk has become an
annual event to say thanks to
the public for their support.

The Surgical Suite Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group has been in existence
since September 2000. It has
grown from approximately 15

members to over 150 active
members.

They act as a support sys-
tem offering hope to women
who are diagnosed with breast
cancer. Their main goal has
always been to wage war
against the disease, and edu-
cate the public.

The walk is set to begin at
5pm and members of the pub-
lic are asked to come out in
support of the cause and to
bring a candle.

For more information call
376-0054 or contact Nurse
Charlene at 326-1929.

“There’s a time of laughter,
crying, information, empow-
erment, spiritual help - they
take care of the whole woman.
It’s more empowering for
everyone in the group to know
they can live with cancer and
know it doesn’t have to kill
them.”

Breast cancer is one of the
causes avidly supported by the
Zonta Club.

Their motto, “Women Help-
ing Women’, is at the heart of
their programme and they

“live that out in every sense
of the way,” a representative
of the organisation said.

Adena Minus of the Zonta
Club said that the whole pur-
pose of the tea party and hat
show was to create an event
where the women could
escape from their worries and
just enjoy themselves.

“We try to focus on uplifting
the ladies,” Ms Minus said.

Zonta International is a
worldwide service organisa-
tion of executives in business

and the professions working
together to advance the status
of women.

The Surgical Suite Sister Sis-
ter support group meets every
second Wednesday at the
Southern Community Centre
on Soldier Road.

Meetings begin at 5.30pm
and end at 8pm.

“The ladies are an exciting
group,” said Nurse McPhee.

“They talk, talk, and don’t
stop talking,” she said with a
smile.

The sign of great things to come!

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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Have you filed your Ex?

HOW is your relationship desk
these days? Do you have a lot of
working files that you look at fre-
quently and you add to on a regular
basis? Do you have a lot of unfinished
work that you just procrastinate over?
Or do you have many files that are

completed and filed away?

We hear over and over that we
need to put time and effort into our
relationships, but what happens when
they just do not work out and they
come to an end?

The end of a relationship is almost
always painful, but at times it can be
a relief.

Closing that particular file, how-
ever, may not be that easy. Depend-
ing if there is a particular ‘dumper ’,
‘dumpee’ or if it is a mutual agree-
ment will determine how you move
on in the future.

Ideally all questions, unresolved
problems, good times and things
learnt from the relationship will be
aired.

Of course this requires a great deal
of respect and consideration, both of



which are often missing when things
come to a close.

What happens when it all ends ina
big chaotic mess? You may be left out
to dry, or perhaps you are the one too
cowardly to face the music. If we do
not wrap things up, and feel every-
thing has been taken care of, then we
drag it around with us into the next
relationship. We punish or treat the
next person as if they were a shadow
of the last.

It is not surprising that we go
through life wondering why we can
not get it right. Are we always choos-
ing the wrong people, or is it us?

People assume that long relation-
ships are the hardest to get over. Cer-

Maintain strong

bones with exercise

OSTEOPOROSIS can steal the
strength from your bones, leaving
you stooped-shouldered and prone
to fractures. But you can do some-

thing with your muscles to help low-
er your risk of a break - exercise.
Osteoporosis means “porous
bones”. With this disease your bone
strength decreases and your bones
slowly lose mineral content and
their internal support structure.
Eventually, your bones can
become so weak they can easily
fracture. But research indicates that
exercise may not only help prevent

@ GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack ff

osteoporosis, but may treat it as
well.

Exercise can also help improve
your balance, reducing your risk of
falling. The key is to know which
exercises to do and how to do them
properly.

Bone is living and dynamic tis-
sue that responds to exercise by
becoming stronger. Each time you
put your bones to work they receive
a chemical message telling them
they need to be strong. Without
physical challenges to trigger that
bone-building message your bones

tainly there is more history, possibly
children and joint property. However,
all too often we see that their life
together has ‘played out’ and that it
has reached a natural conclusion.
Short relationships, however, may
have terminated before their time and
the expected course of things did not
take place.

The questions of ‘what if? and
‘might have been’ remain floating in
the air unanswered. One thing we
know for sure is that no matter what
type of ending you have it is all emo-
tionally draining, and something we
would all like to avoid.

The work needed before we can
close that particular file can vary in
time depending on the individuals
involved and their circumstances. Ini-
tially you may feel sad, angry or you
may feel nothing. If you feel sad then
you more than likely are turning
events inwards and blaming yourself
for the loss. Or you may direct angry
feelings outwards and blame the oth-
er person. Feeling nothing may mean
you are just avoiding the whole deluge



with lose mass and strength.

Weight-bearing and strength
training (resistance) exercises put
the right kind of demands on your
bones to make them build density
and strength.

Weight-bearing exercises causes
your bones and muscles to work
against gravity. Every time you take
a step, land on your feet, hit a tennis
ball, dance, jump, and jog, chemical
messages rush to your legs and arms
warning them to get ready for the
next impact and stimulate your

A variety of root crops

IT was root crops more than any-
thing else that kept Europeans and
early American settlers going dur-
ing the cold winter months when lit-
tle could be grown. Most root crops
could be stored, often underground
in barrows below the frost line, and
retrieved for use as food.

Perhaps it is because we do not
have a history of root crop storage in
the balmy Bahamas that we do not
favour potatoes, rutabagas, turnips,
carrots and such as much as Euro-
peans do.

Nevertheless, root crops deserve
a place in the garden and on our din-
ner plates.

The fastest growing root vegetable
is the radish. Radishes can be picked
within a month of sowing the seeds
and are often recommended as can-
didates for children to grow so they
can appreciate the beauty of planting
and growing.

Unfortunately, one of the great
joys of gardening is the consumption
of what we grow and few children
enjoy radishes. Come to think of it,
very few adults enjoy radishes.

If you have heavy soil you can sow
radish seeds along with carrot seeds.
The quick growing radishes will
break up the surface soil and make
life easier for the more tender carrot
seedlings. By the time the radishes
are pulled the carrots should be
established.

The most popular carrot variety is
Chantenay, eight to ten inches long
and lightly tapered. Nantes is more
cylindrical and has excellent flavour.
Danvers is a broad-shouldered,
strongly tapered carrot that forces its
way into heavy soil. If you are
impressed by size and have deep soil
you should try Imperator as your
main crop.

Carrots are a long season crop and
take at least 120 days to mature,
though at the thinning-out stage you
can enjoy baby carrots lightly pre-
pared. (By the way, those ‘baby car-
rots’ that come in cellophane bags
in the supermarket are not baby car-

rots at all but large carrots that have
been sculpted into cylindrical
nuggets.)

Carrots enjoy fertile soil but
should not be sown where there has
been an application of fresh com-
post or manure in the past six
months. This over-rich condition
encourages the production of side
roots. Well-fertilised sandy soil is
perfect for carrots.

You save space by growing car-
rots, and most root vegetables, in
blocks rather than in rows.

What we call beet seeds are actu-
ally seed capsules that contain

several seeds. This means we have
to thin the seedlings once they are
three or four inches tall.

Pick enough and you have a deli-

| Lg ee ee .
MOST root vegetables are more tender and sweeter when pulled fairly early, like these carrots and beets.

cious side dish of baby greens; later
on the mature leaves give a more
robust flavour.

Beets (or beetroot as the English
call them) are a 90-day crop and
should be picked when approaching
maturity rather than left in the
ground to grow fibrous. The stan-
dard beet is Detroit Dark Red.

It grows readily in most soils and
has an excellent flavour.

Turnips are very popular in
Europe but a rarity in the Bahamas.
Those sold in markets are usually
over mature and coarse in flavour. If
you grow your own and pick them
early you may begin to appreciate
their buttery earthiness.

Rutabagas (or swedes) grow to
the size of a barked coconut and are

SEUSS)

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

of emotions.

Discovering why something hap-
pened, and the person that we emerge
as, allows the forgiveness to take place.
We can then step aside and release
ourselves from the pain. This is what is
meant to be and this is the direction
our life is meant to take.

The scenario of letting go and
accepting the loss of a relationship
would seem like the natural process of
things. For some people the course of
events is blocked by the other person.
This is often seen when children are
used as bargaining power. We may
feel as if we are held hostage in the
relationship and closure seems impos-
sible. Even if this takes place we need
to find a way to release ourselves as
individuals so that we can move on
with our lives.

Hopefully at some point this file
will be closed and filed away. You will
Know by then if it will remain in the
back of the filing cabinet, never to be
reopened.

On the other hand because of mutu-
al reasons, such as children, it may

bones to increase their strength.

Weight training or resistance
exercises use your muscular
strength to improve muscle mass
and strengthen bone. Your muscles
are attached to your bones by ten-
dons that tug against the bones
when the muscle contract. This tug-
ging stimulates the bones to grow.
The stronger your muscles, the
more stimulation they provide. The
stronger your bones and muscles,
the better your protection against
osteoporosis.

Strength training exercises can
employ dumbbells, and/or weight
or resistance type machines. You
should begin strength training slow-
ly and progressively, repeating exer-
cises over time until they are com-
fortable.

Other protective measure to stop
osteoporosis is not to smoke and to
drink in moderation. Smokers show



4 Ye {

closely related to turnips, but milder.
As with most root crops, younger is
better.

Peeled, cubed and boiled in salted
water, rutabagas are an interesting
potato substitute. In Europe they
are often cooked this way and
mashed with boiled potatoes, then

ed and peppered. Rutabagas are

very easy to grow and very hard to }
? a more intense level of exfoliation,
? look to non-abrasive exfoliants con-
i? taining chemicals like salicylic or
? lactic acid. Pair a more gentle regi-
? men with professional exfoliation
? treatments from your professional
? skin therapist to enjoy smoother

¢ For any questions or comments you
can e-mail gardenerjack@coralwave.com. }

give away.

Potatoes are the most popular root
crop world wide but are best grown
after Christmas. We will consider
them at a later date.







have to be brought out every now and
then. When you do it is important to
remember to handle your children’s
feelings with care because they will
be experiencing similar emotions.

Things may still be more compli-
cated and you may have a stagnant
relationship that keeps you in limbo.
Relationships like this are suffocating
and very unhealthy. It is essential that
we continue working at our relation-
ships, or close them and file them
away. The goal is always to remember
to surround ourselves with good qual-
ity relationships that enrich our lives,
and keep away from those that pull us
down.

¢ Margaret Bain is an individual and cou-
ples relationship therapist. She is a regis-
tered nurse and a certified clinical sex
therapist. For appointments call 364-7230
or e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She
is also available for speaking engage-
ments.

a higher incidence of fracture than
non-smokers do. Smoking interferes
with the body's production of estro-
gen.

Women who smoke are shown to
lose five to 10 per cent or their mass
prior to menopause. Heavy drinkers
also suffer more fractures than nor-
mal. This may be due to the fact
that alcohol is a diuretic, which
causes fluid loss.

Good nutrition, foods rich in cal-
cium, plus calcium supplements on
a daily basis are definitely an impor-
tant prevention in stopping osteo-
porosis. The recommended dosage
is 1,500 milligrams daily, especially
after menopause.

With these lifestyle changes, a
regular exercise programme and
regular chiropractic care, you
should be able to grow old with a
strong healthy spine and beautiful
posture.

Exfoliation - how
| much is too much?

EXFOLIATION delivers a

: tighter, firmer, smoother look and
? feel of skin. Because of this result,
: many fall into the trap of over-exfo-
? lation: An over-zealous approach
? that can actually reduce skin's vital-
i ity and make it more susceptible to
? damage from UV light.

Over-exfoliation triggers an

i inflammatory response, leading to a
? compromised lipid barrier that
| i won't function properly, a sensi-
: tised skin condition, and accelerat-
i ed premature aging.

i TELL-TALE SIGNS OF OVER-

: EXFOLIATED SKIN INCLUDE:

? ¢ Noticeable dehydration

i * Patchy areas of dryness

i « Skin tautness

: e Redness and itchiness

i © Increased sensitivity

=| i ° Inflammatory acne and irritation

If you're showing the signs of

? over-exfoliation, speak with a pro-
i? fessional skin therapist, who will
i most likely prescribe a calming
: cleanser and toner, and a protec-
: tive moisturiser to start the recovery
i process. Sun protection is a must,
? wear a sunscreen with physical UV
? blockers titanium dioxide or zinc
? oxide that won't irritate skin.

heavily buttered and liberally salt-
tating with a gentle exfoliant

After skin recovery, begin exfoli-

designed for daily use. If you desire

skin without the undesirable side
effects.

Histatussin DM

COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT







an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 11B





A Bahamian woman in Japan

By COFFI MCPHEE

or one year and

three months | had

the opportunity to
live and work in Tokushi-
ma, Japan. | worked as
an English Language
Coordinator at Seiko
Gakuen for children ages

three to six.

Join me each week as I explore
the land of the rising sun from a
Bahamian’s perspective.

THE TRIP

IT was okay, but my goodness it
was long: Nassau to Miami, Miami to
Chicago, and Chicago to Osaka.
Every time I went to sleep and woke
up I was still on an airplane. I had a
neighbour who was a bit too friend-
ly even for my taste. He insisted on
conversation and while that is all
well and good, I don’t want to talk to
anybody for 16 hours straight.

He was typically Japanese in that
he apologised for everything.

If I dropped my pen, he was sorry
that I dropped my pen and offered
to pick it up. If I had to go to the
bathroom, he was sorry that I had to
go to the bathroom and was sorry
that he didn’t get up quick enough
for me to get out of my seat. I was
like, “its okay man.” That was my
preferred sentence for most of the
trip.

After arriving at the airport it was-
n’t too bad in terms of my luggage, (I
had two really heavy bags plus my
purse and my laptop). I then had to
take a two-hour bus ride to get to my
city. I was really exhausted but tried
to stay alert so I wouldn’t miss my
stop; that was not easy.

THE BUS STATION

I was really proud of myself. I fol-

THE WEATHER REPORT [fi

lowed all the directions that they
gave me and got off the bus stop
expecting to see the person who was
supposed to pick me up, but I didn’t.
So I told my self that maybe she was
just late. But then I said to myself,
“hold up Japanese people are never
late.”

One hour later - I didn’t panic, I
just tried to dial the number that
they gave me to call. When I tried to
call the operator said something in
Japanese, but of course I didn’t get
what she was saying. So I tried to
ask someone if I had the right area
code but no one spoke English,
French or Spanish. I had a few
phrases in Japanese but they are use-
less if you don’t understand the
answers.

So the next step, I looked in the
phone book for the operator’s num-
ber but of course everything was
written in Japanese. I saw a drawing
of a fireman so I called the fire sta-
tion to see if they could help, but
that was useless as well. He was nice
but the only thing he could say was
“T don’t speak English can you
please speak Japanese.” So I hung
up.

Next step, the police station.
(They) understood me better, but
not really. Two minutes later two
police officers came riding on their
bikes with their guns. I was like,
“woah, I’m not a terrorist, all I want
to do is to dial a number.”

Apparently a friend of the
boyfriend of the police officer spoke
English and tried to help me. But
surprise, the number I had didn’t
work. However, thankfully they had
the numbers of all the teachers in
the city. And all this time (the per-
son I was supposed to meet) was
waiting for me on the other side of
the train station. I never got that
message that I had to wait on the
other side. I got in at the station at
9pm and I left almost at midnight
after two days of travelling. Needless
to say that I was beat.

% S

mote ona beautiful, clear day.

THE APARTMENT

It’s not bad; not the shoeboxes
that Japan is known for. It is big-
ger than my Paris studio (Ms
McPhee used to live in France). I
have everything that I need. Dishes,
sheets, TV (even though I don’t
know what they are saying) bed,
desk, chair, washing machine and a
balcony to hang out clothes. The
only thing I needed to buy was food
and washing powder.

All the foreign teachers live on
the same floor. So we form a little
community. They are from the
USA, Canada and Australia.

THE JOB

I have three classes of K3, K4 and
K, but I am not with them all the
time. K3 - 20 minutes, K4 - 30 min-
utes and K5 - 45 minutes. Between
classes I prepare my lessons (which
is not difficult). I also help in organ-
ising outside activities for the stu-
dents; out of town trips etc. The kids
are really cute and adorable and
well behaved.

AFTER WORK

I take Japanese classes on
Wednesday evenings, Saturday
afternoons and soon Sunday morn-
ings. I have a lot of opportunities
to practice because I am the only

<=»

— in

English teacher on my campus and
the other teachers do not speak
English, so communicating is quite
entertaining. We draw, do actions,
and use fragmented words out of
the dictionary. It normally takes
about 15 minutes to get our point
across but some how we make do. I
am also learning a traditional Japan-
ese dance with a group. There is a
big music festival here in August
that lasts about one week and I will
be participating with them. I’ll have
on the traditional dress, shoes and
hat. It should be fun.

I plan to take some cooking class-
es as well. Lord knows I need it.

NIGHT LIFE

I was afraid that I would find
myself in a village with only fields of
rice, but there is a night life. I am
not living in the swinging part of

town, however, the social scene
it is just a 25-minute bike ride across
the bridge and there you have all
the bars, restaurants, and cafés. So I
am not bored on Saturday nights.

COST OF LIVING

Not as bad as everyone said it
would be. It is expensive, but like
anywhere you just have to know
where to shop.

I can find pretty good deals. The



nan

food is good, fresh and pretty cheap
if you buy Japanese items. It is when
you want exotic goods that things
become expensive (there is no way
that I am going to buy a $6 man-
go). But for the moment I don’t
think that I’ll starve. Going to the
movies is expensive though, almost
$15. So I will be streaming my
movies.

THE JAPANESE ATTITUDE
TOWARDS FOREIGNERS

They do stare, but not in a mean
way. More like, ‘wow I can’t believe
what I am seeing’. They are not
mean, but quite polite and they like
when you try to speak their lan-
guage. Just like anywhere you have
prejudiced people and you have
really sweet ones.

IN SUMMARY

The time over here will definitely
be a learning experience and I am
looking forward to it, especially
learning a new language. This job
definitely combines my passions:
Languages, education, culture and
tourism. And for the moment I
don’t have any complaints.

“Travel is more than the seeing of
sights; it is a change that goes on,
deep and permanent, in the ideas
of the living.” - St Augustine

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

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at) ee

Limon
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get ee










By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

BEAUTY is often measured by the external, and if you believe today’s
media, it’s all right for a woman to have some curves, just as long as
they are in the right places and she is still skinny overall.

But for one woman, who is on a mission to
bring voluptuous back, this interpretation of
beauty is not acceptable.

Rayette McDonald, president and director
of the Ms Full Figured Bahamas Organisa-
tion, said her goal is to free full figured
women from these kinds of beauty stereo-
types.

The full figured community is making an
impression the world over and the Ms Full
Figured Organisation has committed itself to
being a part of this revolution.

Speaking with Tribune Woman, Ms
McDonald said full-figured women often feel

THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

To help plus size women recognise their
true value and potential, Ms McDonald first
organised the Ms Full Figured Bahamas
Pageant in 2006.

“T’ve always wanted to enter a beauty
pageant. Looks and intelligence are not a
problem for me. I had everything else, but
because of my size I would never be able to
participate,” she said.

Ms McDonald said it bothers her to see
that the type of women who win traditional
beauty pageants are celebrated as the female
norm.

But instead of letting bitterness about the



pressured to compete with women who are
thinner than they are and this can affect their
perception of what true beauty is.

situation consume her, Ms McDonald decided = ol
to let her dissatisfaction with the status quo

fuel a productive endeavour. Figured competition.

MS Full Figured Bahamas 2008 Mona-Lisa Smith poses with other Bahamian beauty queens.

For the third year in a row now, Esteem
Productions will host the Ms Full Figured
Bahamas Pageant on Sunday, November 8.
“We are endeavoring to display the beauty,
elegance, talent and intelligence of the volup-
tuous woman in the Bahamas. This event is a
journey that these brave women embark
upon in hopes of gaining a better appreciation
for themselves, voicing their concerns
through their platform and making lasting
friendships,” Ms McDonald said.

“This organisation can be branded as a cel-
ebration of who we are. The pageant,
although fun, is very serious about enhancing
the lives of the young women. They partici-
pate in six weeks of self-development classes,
20 hours of community service and 20 hours
of physical training.”

This year, the emphasis is on cultivating
three qualities that define a woman’s worth:
Serving, giving back and self-
esteem, Ms McDonald said.

While there is a $30,000-budget
for the event, she said that she has
always had a tough time garnering
financial support for the pageant.

Is it that sponsors just can’t get
past the weight factor? Maybe so,
Ms McDonald said.

But the metamorphosis the
contestants go through during
the competition should be rea-
son enough for persons to sup-
port the pageant, she said.

“Every year we have girls
that come in a certain way and
leave the competition totally
different. We want to develop

and polish girls, but that’s not
going to happen in a (short)
space of (time).

“What you’re hoping is that
you embed something into
these ladies so that they will
continue to flourish in their
lives. We want to take them

on the journey of becoming a

better person,” she said.
In six weeks of training,
the contestants embark on a
journey which includes eti-
quette training and activities
that cater to the “whole
woman”, Ms McDonald
said.
cy This year, the ladies par-
ticipated in Toastmasters
speech classes in prepara-


























i 2008
CONTESTANTS from Ms Full Figured Bahamas

Put your best skin out there



OUTGOING Ms Full Figured Bahamas and Ms Teen Bahamas 2009, with contestants of this year’s Full

tion for their spokesmodel competition next
week.

Additionally, they took part in exercise
programmes and even experienced some mar-
tial arts during a few karate sessions.

A representative from Black Opal prod-
ucts, the makeup line that Michelle Obama
uses, showed them how to ensure they look
their best.

Next week, the contestants will participate
in an array of pre-pageant activities, including
a float parade this Saturday, in preparation
for the big finale.

The pageant has also reached out to the
Crisis Centre to assist in sensitising the public
to the child abuse issues we face in our coun-
try. In this vein an event is planned for Satur-
day, November 10, at the Marathon Mall.
Dubbed ‘Every Child Counts’, it will feature
a number of local acts and Dr Sandra Dean
Patterson, Director of the Crisis Centre, will
bring brief remarks.

Recently, a special cocktail reception was
held for the nine beautiful and voluptuous
contestants in this year’s Ms Full Figured
Bahamas pageant.

Montague Gardens was the event’s venue
and some 250 persons watched as the contes-
tants arrived in stretch limousines.

They were not disappointed as the ladies
exited the vehicles gorgeously dressed in
apparel from La Chica Caliente.

The beauties were poised, elegant and
articulate as they greeted friends, family and
well-wishers who had the opportunity to mix
and mingle with them for the first time in
their new role as contestants.

The audience was also treated to a mini
fashion show sponsored by the Elegant
Women Boutique and featuring some former
contestants.

The pageant’s winner will go on to repre-
sent the Bahamas in the Miss Bold and Beau-
tiful pageant in Puerto Rico.

Last year, Mona-Lisa Smith was crowned
Ms Full Figured Bahamas. She became the
second runner-up overall in the Miss Bold
and Beautiful pageant and received a special
honour in the evening gown segment.

This position has afforded her an opportu-
nity to accompany the new Ms Full Figured

Bahamas and the first runner-up to Puerto
Rico for the 2010 pageant.

Ms McDonald promises that this year’s
competition finale will be outstanding.

To view the gallery of the nine contestants
vying for the Miss Full Figured Bahamas title
visit www.msfullfiguredbahamas.com.



Full Text
m Lhe Iribune

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

Volume: 105 No.279









FEATURES



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

Te
TaN
NCU fs

PPE Tt






Govt plans to
tackle illegal

selling

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE Government }
laid out its plans yes-
terday to remedy a
myriad of land use
problems including
the illegal sale of |
unauthorised lots and
the lack of utilities
available in some
developed neighbourhoods.

The Planning and Subdivi-
sion Bill will also introduce
stricter zoning laws which will
address the "unplanned inva-
sion” of businesses into resi-
dential areas; the problem of
building permits granted in
unapproved subdivisions; the
issuance of building permits
before utility services have been
installed; and review subdivi-
sion fees.

The new laws will lay out
development guidelines in
order to avoid situations where

EARL DEVEAUX



of lots

there is a lack of basic
infrastructure in
planned subdivisions;
a lack of develop-
ment and construc-
tion standards; and
the inefficiencies
relating to develop-
ment/construction
applications and the
approval process.

While leading the
debate on the legisla-
tion in the House yes-
terday, Environment
Minister Earl
Deveaux said the Bill would
provide for a land use planning
based development control sys-
tem led by policy, land use des-
ignations and zoning.

Mr Deveaux also said that,
among other things, the new
laws will prevent the indiscrim-
inate division and development
of land; promote sustainable
development in a healthy nat-
ural environment; and provide
for planning processes that are
fair by making them open,

SEE page eight

The Taste

on

Tuesdays!!

ey)
Praca

Fiop

7 Yeolfef=)
nae yn

ppingseagelia medium,

ors

STM ele





Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

28-YEAR-OLD Jamal Sargent leaves court vealed after being charged.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MAN accused of having
$15,500 in fake bank notes
and materials to produce con-
terfeit cash was arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Jamal Sargent, 28, was
arrested in a police raid on
Friday and charged on two
counts.



He stood silently before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court Eight, Bank Lane,
wearing faded stonewashed
jeans and a bright red T-shirt
emblazoned with cartoon
designs, and simple white
Nike sneakers.

Sargent is charged with pos-
session of materials for forg-
ing notes and having in his
possession a quantity of
papers with impressions of

Coenorarnicntes 3

currency notes.

The charge states Sargent
had nine Bahamian $10
notes,173 Bahamian $20
notes,109 Bahamian $50
notes, and 65 Bahamian $100
notes while knowing them to
be forged and puporting them
to be genuine currency.

The counterfeit cash said
to be in Sargent’s possession

SEE page eight

SEE PAGE ELEVEN

PRICE — 75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Man fount
Shot dead
in street

By MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff
Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunmedia.net

A MURDER
investigation has been
launched to find the
killers of a 33-year-old
man found dead in a
Pinewood Gardens
street early yesterday
morning.

Renard Denver
Miller/Mackey, of
Sugar Apple Street,
Pinewood Gardens,
was shot in the head
and left to die in
Jacaranda Street, just
four blocks from his
home.

Police were called
at around 3.40am yes-
terday and received
reports of gunshots
being fired in Jacaran-
da Street.

When officers
arrived at the scene
they found the body
of Mr Miller, who also
goes by Mr Mackey,
lying in the road with
an apparent gunshot
to the head, accord-
ing to Superintendent

SEE page eight

Former
minister
hits back

at MP over
land claims

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER Minister of Trade
and Industry Leslie Miller has
issued a scathing attack on
FNM MP Brensil Rolle who
suggested that the former Blue
Hills MP had been responsible
for illegally excavating land and
selling it back to the govern-
ment.

During his communication on
the Planning and Subdivision
Act, Mr Rolle stated that the
PLP dreaded the passing of the
Bill as one of their “former”
cabinet ministers had promised
to have the operators who ille-
gally excavated land charged
before the courts.

“But that was only talk,” Mr
Rolle said in Parliament yester-
day. “In fact, I was informed
the reason why nothing was
done was because he was the

SEE page eight

‘The Fidelity Sir Gerald Cash
National Distinguished Teachers’ Awards

FON Trachers

Ars. Candee Bee hho foe Pomory, Arco
Fars. Mei bestea



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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

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The event, held at The
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Road, featured the

Mini Famous Bowl e ‘i / work of over 40

1 Mini Bowl, 1 Dinner Boll t ! “wreath yf Bahamian artists.

pak we - Visitors were treated
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a 2 Snackers i. sculptures on show
throughout the

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an
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THE TRIBUNE





Fred Mitchell raises
questions over Bill

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION MP Fred
Mitchell questioned whether
government is capable of
enforcing the host of new
"complicated" guidelines out-
lined in the Town Planning
and Subdivision Bill.

Mr Mitchell also questioned
if government would commit
the resources necessary to
implement the provisions in
the Bill and whether the pub-
lic service is equipped to meet
the challenging demands cre-
ated by the new laws.

He said that neither Envi-
ronment Minister Earl
Deveaux or Parliamentary
Secretary in the Ministry of
Housing Brensil Rolle - who
both spoke before him on the
issue - touched on the ques-

Derek Smith/BIS photo

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3

LOCAL NEWS

MP says new Town
Planning and Subdivision
guidelines are ‘complicated’

tion of whether the public ser-
vice has the capacity to deal
with the provisions set forth
in the Bill.

"Is there the capacity to
meet the demands this Bill
would impose on the public
service?” Mr Mitchell asked
while giving his contribution
to the debate in the House of
Assembly yesterday. "And
would the government com-
mit the resources, which are
necessary, or which would be
necessary to carry out the pro-
visions of this Bill? There's no
question that the provisions
are complicated. . . (they) will

impose new and strict stan-
dards and the public service
and the politicians will have
to comply with those stan-
dards".

According to Mr Rolle, the
Bill will protect the public's
interest because details of all
potential developments will
be posted so they can be
analysed for possible negative
effects.

He added that the new leg-
islation would "further
strengthen and empower" the
Town Planning Committee
and reduce the amount of red
tape that currently impedes



ILO representatives to review

approval of subdivisions.

Mr Rolle explained that the
new Bill seeks to: restrict
indiscriminate land use; estab-
lish a comprehensive national
land use plan; focus on strate-
gic zoning requirements; and
place subdivision and town
planning under the portfolio
of one minister.

He added that the use of
land for practices other than
those allowed under zoning
restrictions continues to be a
common challenge facing the
Department of Physical Plan-
ning.

"While many of these
changes are related to eco-
nomic conditions, a substan-
tial number of them are out-
right abuse of system,” he
said, referring to auto-body
shops popping up in residen-
tial areas and the proliferation
of bars next to churches.

ae et

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INTERNATIONAL Labour Orga- Pailicameae Sorct cen Rey Sb, Tel 222-2956 er LETLET
nization representatives visited Fea: TM
some of the courses offered
under the National Empower-
ment Training Program at the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute on Monday.
They are pictured speaking to
an instructor of the marine out-
board engine class.

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National Empowerment

a For Children
Training Programme

Ue em eT PRS eit embs gE DIm
AUR Mea aod EM

REPRESENTATIVES of
the International Labour
Organisation (ILO) are in the
Bahamas to meet with stake-
holders of the National
Empowerment Training Pro-
gramme, an _ initiative
launched by the government
to help displaced workers
learn new trades.

Luesette Howell and Has-
san Bata Ndahi, from the
ILO sub-regional office in the
Caribbean, are examining
whether the expectations of
students and employers will
be met at the completion of
the programme.

They also want to ensure
that after finishing the pro-
gramme, some of the students
will have the skills needed to
become self-employed.

Ms Howell, senior special-

ist in employers’ activities,
said after they have complet-
ed their observations, they
will provide feedback and
offer recommendations to the
government on how to
improve the programme so
as to better fulfill its objec-
tives.

The representatives toured
the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute on Mon-
day and reviewed several
courses offered under the
programme.

They also met with Charles
Hunt, a consultant for the
programme from the Ministry
of Labour; Deborah Bethel,
senior labour officer; Sean
Adderely, public relations
officer for the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocational Institute,
and Dr Pandora Johnson, VP

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

Business

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

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of research and development
at the College of the
Bahamas.

They will also tour the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and
meet with the Minister of
Labour and Social Develop-
ment Senator Dion Foulkes
and other government offi-
cials, National Empowerment
Training Committee mem-
bers and the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce.



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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Tourism chief
hits out at ‘bait

and switch trick’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Senior deputy
director-general of tourism
David Johnson believes Grand
Bahama must stop seeking to
fool tourists if the island’s
tourism industry is ever to be
revived.

He noted that hotels have
been using the “bait and switch”
trick for years — offering low
room prices to lure visitors, who
are then slapped with excessive
taxes and other charges that
double the room price.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism has received a lot
negative feedback from visitors
who felt they were “tricked.”

“The customer needs to
know what it costs without
being tricked. We got away with
this in the early 90s and beyond
when the US consumer protec-
tion laws were not as keen as
they are now.

“We invited customers here
at very low prices and then
when they are checking in or
checking out, presented a sur-
prise on the total.

“We had much negative feed-
back because they were not
even advised of those charges,”
he said.

Mr Johnson said visitors
expect their rooms to come with
certain services — and that any
additional charge would be 10
or 15 per cent, not 100 per cent.

Because hoteliers are now
required by law to disclose all
charges, he said, they are now
having a difficult time getting
customers.

“The customer today is fierce
in their commitment to seek val-
ue and it is very distasteful
whenever they encounter any
merchant or provider who is
seeking to pull the wool over
their eyes,” Mr Johnson said.

ede
Sas eS

SRA
PHONE: 322-2157





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Grand Bahama set for new
air services from Canada, US

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Tourist
arrivals on Grand Bahama are
expected to get a much-need-
ed boost this quarter with the
introduction of new air services
from Canada and the United
States.

David Johnson, senior deputy
director-general of Tourism,
told The Tribune that new ser-
vices from Canada should begin
as early as next week.

He also reported that new
services from New York are
expected to start by December.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism and the Grand
Bahama Airport Company
have made much progress in the
last 12 months in terms of low-
ering turnaround costs for air-
lines flying to Grand Bahama
International Airport.

High airport fees and taxes
have been a major deterrent in
recent years for many airlines
wishing to fly to Grand
Bahama.

In an effort to attract more
airlines to the island, Ministry of
Tourism officials have been
working with airport officials to
lower the fees.

Mr Johnson said the Ministry
of Tourism is pleased with the
progress that has been made so
far.

“We stepped up our market-
ing and as a result we have been
able to attract new services, and
we will see services coming from
Canada as early as next week,
from New York by December,
and additional air services from
Florida.

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“We are not where we want
to be, but we made a big dent in
the right direction of bringing
some relief to the airlines and
passengers. We are committed
to getting our cost lower, but of

A
AP

Teeynloagreent £

course more volume will help
get there as well,” said Mr John-
son.

The airline West Jet will
begin services from Canada to
Grand Bahama on November
2.

The low-cost carrier will pro-
vide two weekly non-stop flights
from Toronto on a 737 aircraft.
This is expected to bring 12,000
visitors to the island this win-
ter.

Grand Bahama was the num-
ber one destination for Cana-
dian visitors 35 years ago, and
tourism officials are trying to
win back that market. They feel
the island's close proximity to
the eastern seaboard of Canada
was one of the main reasons

REQUEST FOR
TENDER

LPIA Expansion Project Stage

US Departures Terminal

behind the earlier popularity.

Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace believes
that Grand Bahama’s proximity
to the biggest market in the
world should be reflected in
how much it costs to get to
Freeport.

“We cannot sit here and
believe it is fine every single day
that it is more expensive to
come to Grand Bahama than
to our competing destination,"
said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace in
July.

The minister said it is impor-
tant that all partners in Grand
Bahama work together with the
Ministry of Tourism to exploit
the island's proximity advan-
tage.

or is seek ng contractars to as ssist in completio wy of Stage | of the LPLA, Expansian

Proect (US Departures

encouraged to parbcipate in this significant nati

Terrninal). All cormtractars,

complete the fit out of the new terminal include

particulary Bahannian contractors, are

anal praject, Scopes to be tendered to

« Weed and Mila Doorn, Coiling Goons, Praares and Door Harchware

+ Carpeting

* Seailient Proorny

+ Tote?! Partifons, does eoies, Como Guards and Lochors

* Bock Equipment

+ Getry Mare and Frames

A quilificarcion package must be sumiceed prior or ac the bid closing. Only bick fram concractors
deemed qualtied will be considered. Qualifications will be based on the following criteria:
2A demanitratian of Grancial capacirg

* Experience
* Retorences

* Bahamian Genership! Concent

The project @ covered by Contractors Deut Insurance in lieu of bonding, MO BONDING WILL BE

REQUIRED.

Thuulilication and tender packages will be weailable for pickup at the Ledeor Construction Bahamas
Lirnited Site Office ac the Lynden Piredling international Airport. YWindsor Field Road. For queries call the

Sate office at 242-677-5417.

The chosing dace for the tender and prequalificacion packages will be at 2:00pm Friday Movember

13%, 200%.

CREDIT Suisse

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch
Shared Services



is presently considering applications for an

Accountant

The Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an

Accountant:

Requirements:

2-3 years Accounting & Banking experience

Associate or Bachelors Degree in Accounting, Banking & Finance

Excellent oral and written communication skills

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Strong mathematical capabilities

Able to multitask

A team player with the ability to work in a fast paced environment
Possess excellent planning, organization and implementation skills
Excellent interpersonal skills

A commitment to service excellence

Duties will include:

Management of Service Level Agreements (SLA) and inter-company/
divisional expense allocation process
Responsible for accounts payable

Responsible for maintenance, analyzing, reconciliation and reporting of

expense

Assist with the booking of monthly accruals
Reconciliation of all general ledger accounts at the appropriate level of

frequency

Respond to queries relating to clients’ and internal expenses
Responsible for International Reporting

Assist Cashier

Benefits provided include:

° Competitive salary and benefits

APPLICATIONS MUST BEIN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

NOVEMBER 6, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Butler’s Funeral Aomes

& Crematorium

Telephone: 383-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

FLORENCE ELIZABETH
PRITCHARD, 87

of Murphy Ville,
formerly of
Hamilton's, Long
Island, will be held on
Wednesday, October
28, 2009, at 11:00 a.m.
at Christ Church
Cathedral, George and
King Streets.
Officiating will be
Venerable Dean
Patrick Adderley,
assisted by The Rev. Fr. Michael Gittens. Interment
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Lefi to cherished her memories are her two sons:
Christopher and Michael Pritchard her two
daughters; Rencina Knowles and Wendy Wong:;
five grandchildern; Carol, Allanah, Leah, Wade
and Barry; one great-grandchild; Adrian; two
sons-in-law: Allan Knowles and Peter Wong, seven
sisters; Lucy Knowles, Angela Treco, Ruth
Burrows, Vera Petrie, Meriel Knowles, Carolyn
Knowles and Maithyn Jones; one brother; Leon
Cartwright, numerous nieces, nephews, and
cousins, and other relatives and friends
including: Sheila Pritchard Alvarez, caregivers
Rev. Kendal Capron; Rev. Dr. Enid Capron and
Katherine Taylor of the Golden Age Retirement
Home .

Friends may make a floral memorial or donations
to Christ Church Cathedral Endowment Fund in
memory of Florence Pritchard at George Street P.
QO, Box N 653, or 322-4186,

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’
Funeral Homes & Crematorium, Emest & York
Streets on Tuesday, 27th October at 11:00 a. m.
until $:00 p.m. and on Wednesday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.



Oe

PRESENTS

LOCAL NEWS



Poll: the new PLP team is not
strong enough to win election

TRIBUNE readers are over-
whelmingly of the view that the
PLP’s new “CDR” team is not
strong enough to win the next
general election.

In one of the most successful
tribune242.com polls to date,
almost three times as many read-
ers said they think the opposi-
tion’s new leadership team
would not attract enough sup-
port to unseat the FNM. Many
also called for the old guard of
both parties to be replaced by
younger politicians.

Readers were asked if Perry
Christie, Philip “Brave” Davis
and Bradley Roberts have what
it takes to lead the PLP to victo-
ry in the next general election.
Of the 299 people who voted,
218 said “no” while only 81
answered “yes”.

Commenting on the matter,
Bertram W said: “Christie, Davis
and Roberts are the old boys
and so are the three top leaders
in the government. Their days
are numbered. There is no new
thing that they can bring to the
table. All of them need to step
aside.

“We need to stop awarding
people with high positions just



PHILP DAVIS, Perry Christie and Bradley Roberts at the convention.

because they have been there a
long time. If they are ineffective
they must go. The Bahamas
needs new leaders at this time.
Do not gave this country back
to Christie, nor Davis. When you
take it from Ingraham gave it to
a new breed of Bahamians.

“T don’t know if you remem-
ber but there was a law firm
some years ago called Christie,

NEW
BOOK

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The Walk of a Bahamian Doctor
By Dr. Harold Munnings

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Available at Grosvenor Medical Centre

Tel: 328-5550

At selected local bookstores and online at xlibris.com

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BRITISH COLONIAL HILTON (VICTORIA ROOM)



Ingraham and Co. The ‘Co’ was
Davis. Do not let this country
be passed around, giving each
of them a turn to be prime min-
ister. Its about time that the peo-
ple take back the Bahamas from
the chosen few.”

Real Talk added: “I only voted
‘no’ because ‘HELL NO?’ was-
n't an option. I don't think these
people (PLP and FNM) under-
stand that despite what their
diehards are telling them, they're
going about this all wrong.
Excluding the “new blood” is a
recipe for disaster. But I guess as
long as we keep putting them
back in, they'll never get it.”

Lady Bowe called for
“change we can believe in”, say-
ing: “Mr Christie said that he
wanted to change things for the
party and head the party in a
new direction. Well from where
I am sitting it is the same and
nothing has changed. Instead we
heard whispers of people voting
who were not financial, and peo-
ple nominating who were not
financial, hence their positions
should be null and void. That is
certainly not change we can
believe in.”

According to Jack, “Christie,
Brave and Roberts represent a
dramatic regression. They have
blocked the advance of younger
people in the PLP leadership and
indicated a trend that will not be
acceptable to Bahamians whose
support the PLP needs to win.

“The move might be popular
within the party, but these days

[=

[OT IP a

there is a growing community of
voters who are not bound to any
party, unimpressed by the big
bad bully tactics, unswayed by
emotion, and looking for sub-
stance. Every event in the con-
vention gave me more reasons to
reject the PLP and fear for the
future of the two-party system.
When it wasn't a wake for
Urban Renewal, the convention
seemed more like a circus. It
failed to promote itself as a par-
ty seeking to impress Bahami-
ans to choose them to be the
next government. It failed to
address the issues that caused it
to be rejected by the electorate
the last time.”

George G asked what the
PLP’s plan is. He said that he
was “totally lost” by party chair-
man-elect Bradley Roberts’
comment: "I have come to bite
and to bite hard.” The reader
said it seems Mr Roberts’ “semi-
retirement” left him angry and
confused.

“That was the message in the
whole convention, I didn't hear
anything else that made me go,
‘Oh wow! It was the same old
promises they made and didn't
deliver while they were in office.
I looked in the audience; there
were very few young people in
there, but they boast of being
the party for the youths.

“So if they call Bradley young,
they need to check their mem-
bers’ date of birth again,” he
said.

However, Tony Cash said: “I
am a building contractor, I voted
FNM in 2007. At that time things
were good in the construction
industry.

“As it stands now, the reces-
sion is on and we do expect
things to stop, but contractors
who own heavy equipment see
how the foreign companies are
able to come to the Bahamas
and bring their own equipment,
while our equipment is parked
and for sale. I think anyone who
is in the construction industry or
who has relatives in the con-
struction industry should see by
now that the PLP government
cared more about Bahamian
contractors.

“The FNM takes all of the
country’s stimulus money and
pumps it into foreign companies.
I wish election was today to vote
them out.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Roberts hits Thought For Today

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

NEWLY appointed chair-
man of the Progressive Liberal
Party Bradley Roberts has
wasted no time joining the fray
— launching a second scathing
attack on the FNM after the
governing party criticised
remarks he made during the
PLP’s 51st national convention.

Stating that “truth” is on the
side of the PLP, Mr Roberts
said it is truth which will build
trust in the hearts and minds of
the Bahaman people.

“Scream as they will, the
FNM will do well to reflect on
the truth of what more and
more Bahamians feel every day
— that while Perry Christie was

MTT i
RUT
OSM HU

THE Montagu Fore-
shore Steering Committee
will host a public meeting
on Thursday to hear the
views of residents, vendors,
businesses and others with
an interest in the preserva-
tion and usage of the fore-
shore.

The area, which extends
east from the Nassau Yacht
Club to the Royal Nassau
Sailing Club and includes
Fort Montagu, has attract-
ed particular attention
because of the boat ramp at
its eastern end, which many
view as little more than a
traffic obstruction and a
nuisance.

“We have been working
to understand the uses of
Montagu foreshore, the
commerce on the ramp and
the recreational traffic and
uses since the committee
was formed under the aus-
pices of Montagu MP and
Minister of State for Social
Development Loretta But-
ler-Turner in July,” said
Diane Phillips, chairman.

“Now we are most eager
to get public input as we
prepare to draft a report
for the minister’s consider-
ation. When the minister
charged this committee
with its task, she empha-
sised that the future of
Montagu is not a political
issue, it is a community
issue. Public opinion is crit-
ical and toward that end,
we have prepared a ques-
tionnaire which will be dis-
tributed on Thursday at the
meeting. People may com-
plete it that evening.”

According to Mrs
Phillips, the 14-member
committee has been
engaged in on-site reviews,
photography and inter-
views.



PLP CHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts at last week's convention.

prime minister there were more
jobs and less pain and suffer-
ings. As but one example, nev-
er were there 9,000 households
without electricity supply.

“Under Hubert Ingraham,
the standard of living of the
average Bahamian is declining,
through less and less real
income. Further, from what is
earned, a higher and higher
percentage of their income is
going to pay taxes,” he said.

Mr Roberts also said the
FNM is now saddled with more
“scandals” than the PLP was
any time under Mr Christie’s
leadership.

“Scream as they will, the
FNM will do well to reflect
on the truth that the country’s
finances are in worse shape
than at any time while Perry
Christie was prime minister.

. After all, more and more
persons who entered into con-

tract with the government are
reporting increasing delays in
being paid by the govern-
ment.

“It appears that the govern-
ment is broke or is increasingly
close to being broke.

“Another truth on the side
of the PLP is that technology
increasingly provides greater
and greater means for the par-
ty to get out to the public its
message of truth.

“Tt is this combination of the
truth being on the side of the
PLP and the availability of
more modern means of getting
out the facts that will result in
the public seeing stronger and
clearer evidence of the incom-
petence and mismanagement
of the FNM and the reality that
Hubert Ingraham is out of step
with the most widely accepted
principles for team leadership
in the 21st century,” he said.

ar lr Le
for

Roger Carron

will be held at
St. Francis Cathedral

on



The More You Give The More You Get
The More You Laugh,
The Less You Fret
The More You Do Unselfishly,
The More You Live Abundantly
The More Of Everything You Share,
The More You'll Always Have To Share

The More You Love, The More You'll Find
That Life Is Good And Friens Are Kind
For Only What We Give Away Enriches

Us From Day To Day

- Unknown Aurthor

=) FIDELITY

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, and a passion to succeed.

If you have it, we want you.

We are growing!
Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:

- SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR -

nent

BS degree in Computer Science, Information systems, or related specialty or equivalent
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ust have an understanding of general business principles, and how to translate business needs
into quality technical solutions

A genuine focus on internal customer satisfaction and a positive, friendly demeanor is required.
Functional experience with databases, SQL scripting, or other programming experience
Knowledge of IIS configuration and management

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Strong organization and prioritization skills

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ust be able to work both independently and as a valued member of a team

Crystal Reports and Microsoft Reporting Services experience a plus



ire N elon WILL INCLUDE:

Reviews, analyzes, evaluates and applies solutions to end-user support requests for the Banks’s
networked and SQL-based applications.

Troubleshoot applications to resolve technical related issues including application and data
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Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial
implementations, enhancements, or upgrades.

Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting
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nstall and deploy SQL databases, create backup plans, test disaster recovery scenarios, and
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Document processes and help design improvements

Communicate clearly and professionally with internal customers including technical and
non-technical staff, management, and vendors



West Street
at 3pm

on

saturday, October 31

Instead of flowers those who wish may make
donations in his memory to either the Breathe
Easy campaign or St. Martin’s Convent. For
the Breathe Easy campaign cheques may be
sent to Ms Michelle Rassin (tel. 302-4707),
Doctors Hospital, P.O. Box N972. Or donations
can be sent to St. Martin's Convent,
Nassau Street, PO. Box 940,

“The first thing people
talk about is the traffic con-
gestion because it is a reali-
ty that persons who live in
the East face on a daily
basis, but there are other
serious issues about land
use, recreation, erosion fac-
tors,” said Mrs Phillips.
“This is an opportunity to
be heard and we hope
there will be an excellent
turn-out.”

Both Mrs Butler-Turner
and Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux are
scheduled to be at the
meeting, set for 6pm at the
Nassau Yacht Club, East
Bay Street.

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: System Administrator, 51 Frederick Street | ABSOLUTELY NO
P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108 PHONE CALLS
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
October 31%, 2009 to:

Only persons shortlisted
will be contacted

A competitive compensation package will be commensurate
with relevant experience and qualification.



British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip
About Stage IV Breast Cancer



In Stage TV breast cancer, also called secondary breast cancer or metastatic breast cancer cells
have metastasized, or tras ‘eled to other parts of the body. Common sites are the bones, the lungs, /—
the brain or the liver.

You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of

mammogram and physical exams are crucial steps that every woman should eniploy. os

B\\ British Sandra Rolle »
. =

"American 6

Breast Cancer Survivor for 6 years

The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man found
shot dead

e
in str eet FROM page one
added to $15,500.
FROM page one Sargent, of Victoria Gar-
den, off Gladstone Road,
Elsworth Moss. western New Providence,

pleaded not guilty to both
counts and opted to have his
case heard in Magistrate’s
Court rather than the
Supreme Court.

Mr Moss added: “At this stage we
don’t have a motive for the shooting,
and we are appealling to the public to
assist police as we are continuing our
investigations.”

No witnesses have yet come forward
to help police form a profile of the
killer or killers.

Anyone with information which may
relate to the murder should call police
urgently on 919, 322-3333, or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477).

FROM page one

accessible and efficient.



trated homeowners.

THE MAN was shot in the head and left
to die in Jacaranda Street, just four blocks
from his home.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff































































Deveaux.

. =e z ; . ; : : inefficiencies," he added.
Nova Southeastern University, is a private, coeducational, research university located in Broward

County, Florida, with one of its many educational centers located in Nassau, Bahamas. The university 1s
the largest independent institution of higher education in the southeastern United States and is the sixth-
largest not-for-profit independent university nationwide

BAHOO!

mittee.

Information Technologies Specialist 1

Job Description ee
Provide basic level beachnical support services to the students, faculty and staff in the use of techmology resources provided by the
University. Including but mot limited to the installation, configuration, maintenance and support of hardware and sofware for
desktoos, laptops, handhelds (POA/Blackberny Treo), Windows-based servers, peripierals, wideoconferencing, wireless, LANs,
WANS 8nd digital media -- at locations induding smart cassroars, Hectronk dassroams, offices, clinics, videoconferencing class-
rooms and all other University facilities on campus or off, 46 required.

severance approval.

-Prowide support at all facilities including smart classrooms, electronic dassrooms, offices, clinics, videoconferencing classrooms,
and all University locations on campus or off, a5 requined,
“Assist Faculty and/or staff encountering hardware, sofiware and other problems relating te bechnelegies’ resources.
“ASSIST in he ingpecton and maintenance of equipment housed in University facilities: offices, smart dassroams, electronic class-
rooms, Videooonferencing cdassrooms, clinics, a5 assigned.
“Assist with first-line technology equipment repairs, as assigned.
Install and configure hardware and penpherals, as assigned,
-Install sofware as assigned,

“When requested, use appropriate departmental sofhware bo log and track weer requests and problem reports.
Assist in mowing PCs and other technology equipment within University facilities to other locations on and off campus
Acirely participate in inter-O°T departmental training offerings.

FROM page one

biggest violator and was him-
self excavating land illegally and
his company was selling the fill
to the government.”

As a former Minister who
also had responsibility for Agri-
culture, Mr Miller took the
media on numerous tours
throughout New Providence
exposing incidents where
unscrupulous contractors had
excavated government owned
land and was in some instances
re-selling it to the government
via the city dump.

While seeking to have these
individuals arrested and charged
before the courts, the former
MP was frustrated in his efforts
as the police, who often were
called to the scenes with the
media, claimed that the issue
was beyond their control and
could do nothing “without
instructions.”

Moreover, as it pertains to
the issue of being implicit with
such actions himself, Mr Miller

-Agaast in disaster preparedness | recovery efforts as sssigned.

“Work onlaboratively with other technology support units within OFT and throughout the University community


“Avadabie on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for emergency situations or to cower when other technologies specalst as are
not avemabke:

Required Qualifications and Job Functions
- High Sehoal Daplama or Equivalent
- No experience required
- Previous @aqperience in a customer service environment
Previous experience in an educational institution.
- Basic knowledge of operating systerns
“Willingness to travel as required,
“Willingness to work evenings and weekends as needed.
“Ability to lift objects weighing up to 100 pounds and te climb ladders if required.
- Basic knowledge of productivity software including Microsoft Word, Access, Excel, etc.

To apply, go to https: wew.nsujobs.com, and search for positon BAHOO1. Your application will not be
reviewed iF you do mot apply to a specific job opening. You will receive a confirmation number when you have
successfully completed applying

A eae ele
Please complete application at
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br eect e

Website: www.hondabahamas.com Tel: (242) 328-2985 » Fax: (242) 323-7272



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Man accused of
_ having fake bank notes

His attorney, Tamara Saun-
ders-Munnings, introduced
herself to the magistrate stat-
ing it was the first time she
was representing a defendent
in a criminal case.

Ms Bethel called for Sar-
gent and Mrs Saunders-
Munnings to appear in Court
Eight at 10am on Wednesday,
October 28, to fix a date for
the trial.

Mr Deveaux pointed out examples of poor subdivision planning,
including the recently built Pride Estates government subdivision
which he said was built between a hill and a wetland.

He explained that about 100 new homes were built in rectangular
blocks "resembling a parking lot" without a school, limited access
to public open spaces - a prescription for congestion that frus-

"We lament the unplanned invasion of businesses and industry
into residential communities; we decry the absence of basic infra-
structure in what is supposed to be planned subdivisions; we com-
plain about the failure of too many to observe correct standards in
development and construction; we criticise the inefficiency and
delay in our development/construction applications and approval
processes; and we bemoan conflicting and competing legislation
which are meant to govern and regulate our development,” said Mr

"This legislation is meant to address many of these concerns and

The Bill will also establish a new structure within the Department
of Physical Planning creating two new areas: a Policy Planning Divi-
sion and a Development Review Division.

Provisions for the creation of a Subdivision and Development
Appeal Board are laid out in the Bill, which will hear complaints
based on appeal of decisions made by the Town Planninf Com-

The Bill will also address a number of subdivisions left unfin-
ished, which Mr Deveaux said was a common occurrence in Exu-

Under the Act, approvals for development will include: a land
use amendment approval; zoning by-law amendment approval;
minor variance approval; notice of zoning compliance; site plan
approval; architectural design approval; subdivision approval and

A key provision of the Bill is the creation of Land Use Plans for
each Bahamian island and it will also require an Environmental
Impact Assessment for future developments.

The Bill repeals the Private Roads and Subdivision Act, the
Town Planning Act and the Town Planning (Out Islands) Act.

Former minister
hits back at MP
over land claims

said that nothing could be fur-
ther from the truth.

“Normally I don’t respond to
cowards like Brensil Rolle, who
is nothing but a two-bit MP for
the good people of Garden
Hills; and if he wants to know
what good representation is all
about he can ask any of his con-
stituents the type of represen-
tation they got from Leslie
Miller.

“First of all, I sold no fill to
the government of the Bahamas
while I was the Minister respon-
sible. None whatsoever. I never
had a contract with them for my
five years as a Minister,” Mr
Miller said.

In fact, the former Blue Hills
MP reminded Mr Rolle that he
was congratulated in Parliament
by the former FNM MP Pierre
Dupuch for selling fill from his
own property to the FNM gov-
ernment at below rock bottom
prices.

“From 1992 to 2002 I did sell
the FNM government some
500,000 yards of fill at a price of
$0.75 a yard whereas I could
have gotten $6 a yard for it but
I gave it to them at $0.75 a
yard. I gave them the fill
because they said they didn’t
have any money in the budget
and there was a great fire at
the dump and I gave the gov-
ernment the fill at $0.75 a yard.

“But that was my gift to the
people of my country because
it was a national emergency
and the dump was raging for
days and days and they needed
all the fill they could have got-
ten. That was my contribu-
tion,” Mr Miller exclaimed.

Highlighting that the fill was
taken from his own family’s
land, Mr Miller cautioned Mr
Rolle for making such un-Par-
liamentary remarks when
addressing issues that are near
and dear to his heart.

“Tf he really wants to be
involved in assisting people
from destroying our land, why
does he sit on his — and allow
persons to rape the land on
Harrold Road right next to the
Seventh-Day Adventist
Church? There is a peak there
about 80 feet off the ground
and I have reported that to the
Ministry of Works over and
repeatedly that they should not
allow them to destroy the land
below the level of the church
road.

“But I suppose because this
person is one of the FNM’s
great white supporters he (Mr
Rolle) couldn’t even mention
that. But that is the kind of
coward he is. But you wouldn’t
expect anymore out of him,”
Mr Miller said.




PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Scottsdale Vixens beat Lady Caribs

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association continued its 2009 regular
season on Sunday with another triple
header at the D W Davis Gymnasium.

In the first match, the Scottsdale
Vixens defeated the COB Lady
Caribs in three sets 25-22, 25-13 and
25-22.

Krystal Rolle led the Vixens with
eight points and Kenisha Thompson
led all scorers with 10 points in a los-



VOLLEYBALL

ing effort.

The second game saw the Champi-
ons come from behind to beat the
Saints 19-25, 29-27, 25-19 and 25-20.

Muller Petit led the Champions
Club and all scorers with 24 points
for the win. William McKinney scored

- ieee eel a ORM ines leo

NOVEMBER 13 & 14

(FRIDAY & SATURDAY)

=

a hcl



¢ Champions defeat Saints
¢ Caribs upset Crimestoppers

14 points for the Saints.

In the final game, the COB Caribs
pulled off an exciting win and upset
the Police Crimestoppers in five sets
25-16, 25-23, 17-25, 18-25 and 15-8.

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Drew
Brees angrily stomped to the
sideline, while behind him the
Miami Dolphins celebrated a
big defensive play.

The scene kept repeating,
and soon the New Orleans
Saints trailed by three touch-
downs.

"You're looking at the
scoreboard and it's 24-3, and
you say, ‘How did this game
get out of hand like this?'"
Brees said.

For the NFL's highest-scor-
ing team, the deficit proved
surmountable. Unbeaten New
Orleans scored 43 points in
the final 30:02 to rally past the
Miami Dolphins 46-34 Sun-
day.

The Saints topped 40 points
for the fourth time and
outscored the Dolphins 22-0
in the fourth quarter.

"There was no doubt on
our sideline we would come
back and win," Brees said.

Introducing The All NEW

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Signature series

Rayon Brooks took charge for the
Caribs with 15 big points.

In a losing effort, Carl Rolle would
match a side high 15 points for the
Crimestoppers.



DREW BREES is sacked by Dolphins safety Yeremiah Bell during the
second quarter of Sunday’s game in Miari...
(AP Photo: Jeffrey M Boan)

Saints outscore
Dolphins 22-0
in 4th for win

"They had given us their best
shot, and we had played
about as bad as we could play.
All we had to do was string
together a few drives and gain
the momentum back. We
knew it was going to happen,
and it did."

Brees had his roughest day
of the season, with three inter-
ceptions, a lost fumble, five
sacks and two cuts to the face.
But he led long touchdown
drives on three successive
possessions in the second half
to put New Orleans ahead.

Tracy Porter's 54-yard
interception return then
sealed the win for the Saints
(6-0), who are off to their best
start since 1991 and are the
only unbeaten team in the
NFC.

"This was a test we hadn't
faced yet, and we couldn't be
happier with the way we
responded,” linebacker Scott
Shanle said.

Ellis nominated
for ISF Hall of
Fame induction

said. “The enjoyment I know
is not there anymore like
when we played. We played
very competitively and we
had a goal to play.

“But now it seems like the
young people are playing
together just to get out of the
house and get on the field to
have fun and party. They are
not as serious as when we
played.”

Although she’s © still
employed at JBR Building
Supplies Limited, Ellis admits
that age has certainly caught
up with her and so she’s not
as athletically inclined as she
was in the past.

But she noted that she’s
grateful to God for having
been nominated and elected
to the Hall of Fame.

“Tjust give him thanks and
praise for it,” she said. “I also
want to thank Bobby Baylor
Fernander who was the main-
stay behind it. He was the one
who was really pushing to get
me there.”

Full details about Ellis’
induction have not been
released as BSF president
Burkett Dorsett, vice presi-
dent Ted Miller and immedi-
ate past president Rommel

SPORTS

naa

Hardaway
‘finally getting
his Heat banner

: BASKETBALL
: MIAMI
Associated Press



TIM HARDAWAY

i already has one banner cel-
i ebrating his achievements
? with the Miami Heat. He’s
; about to get another.

The Heat will retire Hard-

? away’s No. 10 jersey before
i Wednesday night’s season-
i opener against the New
? York Knicks. He’ll be just
i the second player to receive
i that honor from the fran-
? chise. Alonzo Mourning’s
i No. 33 was hoisted last sea-
i son by Miami.

Hardaway’s previous ban-

i? ner was one celebrating the
? 2000 Olympic gold medal he
i won while with the Heat.

aT Le)



Tebow frustrated
es
Offensive problems
i? COLLEGE FOOTBALL

: GAINESVILLE, Fla.
Associated Press

FLORIDA quarterback

? Tim Tebow is frustrated.
i He’s tired of the intercep-
i tions, the sacks and the red-
i zone struggles.

Although the top-ranked

i Gators are still undefeated
i heading into Saturday’s
igame against Georgia,
i Tebow admits he would like
i to have “prettier” wins. But
i he adds that, “If they’re all
i ugly, that’s OK. We’ll be
i undefeated.”

Tebow also apologized

i Monday for blowing off
i postgame interviews follow-
i ing Saturday’s 29-19 victory
i at Mississippi State. Tebow
i says he wanted to hang out
? with family and former posi-
i tion coach, current MSU
? coach Dan Mullen.

Tebow says Mullen told

ihim to go win another
? national championship.

For that to happen,

though, the Gators probably
i need perform better near the
i goal line.

Dolphins CB
Allen out
for season

DAVIE, Fla. (AP) —

i Miami Dolphins cornerback
? Will Allen is out for the sea-
? son with a left knee injury.

Allen hurt his anterior

i cruciate ligament in the third
? quarter of the Dolphins’ loss
i to New Orleans and will
i require surgery, coach Tony
? Sparano said Monday.

Allen has missed only one

i game since joining the Dol-
i phins in 2006. He leads the
? team with two interceptions
i this year.

He'll be replaced by 2009

: first-round draft pick Von-
i tae Davis, which means the
? Dolphins will start two rook-
i ie cornerbacks Sunday at the
i New York Jets.

Second-round pick Sean

i Smith has been starting
i opposite Allen.

Knowles are scheduled to
return home from the con-
gress today.

Also during the congress,
Knowles was voted in as vice
president of the Americas, a
region that is designated for
the US and the Caribbean.
Knowles is the first Bahamian
to hold such a post on the
international scene.

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For the stories
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27,

2009





hy

Saints outscore
Dolphins 22-0

in 4th for win...
See page 10



Ellis nominated for [SF Hall of Fame induction

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

{ter retiring

about a decade

ago, Naomi Ellis

is finally going
to get some international
recognition for her achieve-
ment in softball.

At the International Soft-
ball Federation’s Congress
over the weekend in
Venezuela, Ellis’ name was
submitted by the Bahamas
Softball Federation (BSF) for
nomination for the Hall of
Fame 2009 induction class.

Her nomination by BSF
president Burkett Dorsett was
accepted as Ellis will become



Loring Sunfish
Worlds winner

2009 Sunfish Worlds winner David Loring receives his
award from Pierre Colle, senior vice president of Pictet

Bank & Trust.

Photo by Robert Dunkley

‘Pain’: Training
1S going great’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major
Knows that if he’s going to be
successful next Friday night,
he will have to go through
some intense workout sessions
in Hollywood, Florida.

For the past two weeks,
Major has been back in Flori-
da with trainer Anthony
‘Chills’ Wilson as he prepares
for his NABO mandatory
lightweight title defense
against American Dorin
Spivey.

The two are scheduled to
clash on November 6 at the
Convention Center in Buffalo,
New York, as Major cele-
brates his 28th birthday
(Wednesday, October 28) and
his mother’s on October 31 in
grand style.

“Everything is going great,”
said Major, who will be
defending the title he was
recently awarded after his
bout with American Michael
Clark ended in a no contest
June 19 in Buffalo. “Training
has been going great. Always
something new to work on.”

Major, who is accommodat-
ing amateur boxer Valentino
Knowles for a few months, is
slated to leave November 4 for
Buffalo.

“T just want to go out there
and be successful,” said Major,
who will take a 16-3-1 win-
loss-draw record with 14
knockouts in the 12-round
bout against Spivey’s 35-6
record with 28 KO.

“Thanks to my trainers,
Anthony Wilson, Nathaniel
Knowles and Gregory Storr
and everybody who has sup-
ported me, I feel I can go out
there and execute my talent,
perform to the best of my abil-
ity and I’m very confident that
I can come out victorious.”

Wilson, who has been train-
ing Major extensively for the
fight, said they are looking for-
ward to returning to Buffalo.

“Since he came in, I was
working with his timing,” Wil-
son stressed. “He came in here
in great shape, so I really did-
n’t have to worry too much
about that.

“He’s the type of fighter
that fights from his heart, so
regardless of who the oppo-
nent is, he is always ready. He
has all the skills, so I’m just
trying to keep him sharp so
that he can be ready.”

At this point in his training,



MEACHER MAJOR

Major said he has already
reached his fight limit, which
he has never done before in
any of his previous fights.

“T came here in great shape
and I just had to work on get-
ting fine tuned,” Major said.
“So I know I’m ready and I’m
going to go to New York and
make the best of the opportu-
nity.

“Whether I win or lose, I
will be very happy with myself
because I know that I would
have gone out and gave it my
best shot. But ’'m not going
into the fight thinking that ’m
going to lose.”

A confident Major said
despite the fact that Spivey is
36-years-old, he’s not going to
let his age play a factor in
whether or not he is successful.

“T’ve already told my han-
dlers that this is my time to
shine and although this guy
has been around, what he
haven’t achieve yet, it’s not
my fault when I beat him,”
Major stressed. “This is my
time.”

Giving the credit to his
father, Anthony Major Sr,
Major said he has the belief
that he can beat anybody in
the world and he’s hoping that
after this fight, he will get clos-
er to securing a world title
shot.

“My father is really the one
who pushes me so hard,” he
pointed out. “He’s not in the
gym when I’m training, but he
has sat me down and talked
to me like a father to a son
and he has installed the quali-
ties in me to go out there and
perform.

“So I really want to thank
him because he’s the main rea-
son why I’m in the position
that I am today.”

Whenever he gets a shot at
the world title, Major said he
will definitely dedicate it to his
father.

only the second Bahamian to
be inducted, following on the
heels of Grand Bahama’s
Candice DeGregory-Culmer
in the 2007 class.

“Tm elated. It’s been a long
time, but it’s never too late,”
said Ellis, who began playing
softball at the age of 19 and
retired 10 years ago when she
was 49.

Ellis, who turns 60 on May
3, will bring the Bahamas’
total of inductees up to 12
since the ISF began the induc-
tion of administrators, man-
agers, coaches, players and
umpires in 1981.

The other Bahamians
inducted were as follows:

e Leon ‘Apache’ Knowles,
player/coach in 1987;
Churchill Tener-Knowles,
administrator/organiser in



NAOMI ELLIS
Photo by Tim Clarke

1991; Neko Grant, adminis-
trator/organiser in 1997;
Arthur Thompson, umpire in
2001; Greg Christie, adminis-
trator; Sidney “Bobby Baylor’
Fernander, coach and Dud-

ley ‘Douggie’ Smith, player,
all in 2003 and DeGregory-
Culmer, player; Richard ‘the
Lion’Heart’ Johnson, player;
Austin ‘King Snake’ Knowles,
meritorious service and God-
frey ‘Gully’ Pinder, coach, all
in 2007.

Like all of the above, Ellis
has made tremendous strides
on the international scene,
having represented the
Bahamas on just about every
national team with the excep-
tion of two during her tenure.

“The greatest highlight for
me was when we got third in
the world,” said Ellis. “When
we did that, I was on top of
the world.”

During her career, Ellis
suited up to play under the
management of Eddie Ford,
Bobby Fernander, Colin

“Troppy’ Knowles, the late
Peter ‘Pa-B’ Bethell and God-
frey Pinder.

She also played with such
players as Carmetta Christie-
Lockhart, Ernestine Butler-
Stubbs, Vangy Bowleg, Mavis
Whymmns, Judy Allan, Joanne
Thompson, Muriel Anderson,
Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, Jean-
nie ‘Bubbles’ Mynez,
Hyacinth Farrington and
Ingrid Rose.

“T don’t have any regrets
because I know I did my
best,” she stated.

But looking at the sport
now compared to the days
when she participated, Ellis
said there is no comparison.

“The caliber of softball has
gone down very much,” she

SEE page 10

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THE TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 27,

USINCSS

TUESDAY,

2009

‘Don’t throw baby
out with bath water’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government has

been urged not to

“throw the baby out

with the bath water” and

delay moving the Plan-
ning and Subdivision Bill moving
through Parliament to allow for more
consultation, with realtors expressing
concern that its provisions could
“strangle the economic development
of the Bahamas”.

William Wong, the Bahamas Real
Estate Association’s (BREA) presi-
dent, last night told Tribune Business
that his 700-strong membership had
“some very serious concerns” over
the Planning and Subdivisions Bill,
having discussed the issue with devel-
opers and other impacted professions.

Mr Wong said the Bill, by outlining
a prescriptive approval process for all
commercial and residential real estate
developments in the Bahamas, with
specified timelines for all stages, would
“create another layer of bureaucracy
and red tape” that developers would
have to overcome.

Time and delays cost developers
money, the BREA president pointed
out, and this increase in development

WILLIAM WONG

costs would likely to be passed on to
the consumer or real estate purchaser,
raising the possibility that more
Bahamians could be priced out of the
market.

Addressing BREA’s specific con-
cerns, some of which were outlined
in a letter to Prime Minister Hubert

Ingraham, Mr Wong told Tribune
Business that the Government
appeared to be “putting the cart
before the horse” by moving to pass
the Planning and Subdivisions Bill
before it had completed its Land Use
Plans for all Bahamians islands.

These plans, addressed in Section 35
of the Planning and Subdivisions Bill,
were, according to Mr Wong, sched-
uled to be completed in six months
for New Providence and 12 months
for the Family Islands. They were
designed to address the zoning of land
for particular uses, such as commercial
and residential, utilities, land use pol-
icy, road corridors and the preserva-
tion of historical and cultural sites.

“They should get this Land Use
Plan finished first before the Planning
and Subdivisions Bill,” Mr Wong told
Tribune Business. He added in his let-
ter to the Prime Minister: “This poli-
cy has been needed for decades and
can be the solution to what is profes-
sionally known as ‘sprawl’, and is reg-
ular throughout the length and
breadth of the country

“All Bahamian professionals that I
have consulted with are strongly in
favour of an organised and sustain-
able strategy for the growth of our
islands. This Bill, however, puts ‘the

cart before the horse’ and releases the
Government of their responsibility to
provide the platform for Bahamians to
have the opportunity to be a major
stakeholder in the development of the
Bahamas.”

Arguing that the Planning and Sub-
divisions Bill appeared to have been
written more by someone experienced
in environmental matters, as opposed
to development, Mr Wong told Tri-
bune Business: “It doesn’t in any way
consider these tough economic times.

“It’s going to affect the Bahamian
man and woman who want to buy
property and will put it out of their
reach. It will strangle the economic
development of the Bahamas, partic-
ularly in these very difficult econom-
ic climate.”

Mr Wong said the need for public
consultation and town meetings could
stymie foreign developers who, after
acquiring land for a development,
could find themselves blocked by the
complaints of nearby residents and
see the Town Planning Committee
refuse planning permission.

The BREA questioned what hap-
pened to land caught up in such dis-
putes, whether it would sit there and

SEE page 2B



Early December target for
Waste recycling facility

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS Waste yester-
day said it expected to have its
cardboard recycling facility “up
and running” by the beginning
of December 2009, and is tar-
geting 500 tonnes of cardboard
per month for processing.

Francisco de Cardenas, the
BISX-listed company’s manag-
ing director, also confirmed to
Tribune Business yesterday that
it hoped to “be making
biodiesel in the first quarter”
2010, once all necessary gov-
ernment permits and approvals
were received.

Adding that Bahamas Waste
had enjoyed “‘a nice third quar-
ter” this year from a financial
performance perspective, Mr
de Cardenas said that in rela-
tion to the company’s card-
board recycling initiative,
“we’re basically waiting on a
few more parts for the bailer.

“We then go through a peri-
od of testing on the machine,
and then we’ll be good to go. I
would say that within the next
month, probably by the begin-
ning of December, we’ll be up
and running. We’re going to be
trying to get about 500 tonnes
of cardboard in a month.”

Mr de Cardenas said
Bahamas Waste would be
recovering a product it nor-
mally dumped in the Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway

* BISX-listed firm targeting
500 tonnes of cardboard
per month for processing

* Hoping to get approvals to
start biodiesel production
in 2010 Q1, hoping to
produce 100,000 gallons
in year one and have
20-50% vehicle usage

landfill, processing and recy-
cling it, and then attempting to
sell it for export.

He added that the company
would be going through a
“learning curve” with the card-
board recycling facility, and it
would take time to reach the
500 tonnes per month level.

Hinting that Bahamas Waste
would eventually look at other
recycling efforts, said: “Card-
board is the beginning, and we
will see what else, but right now
we’re focusing efforts on card-
board.”

As for Bahamas Waste’s
biodiesel plans, Mr de Carde-
nas told Tribune Business:
“The equipment is being man-
ufactured, we are sourcing our
tankage and working with the
BEST Commission on the
Environmental Impact Assess-
ment and Environmental Man-
agement Plan.

SEE page 4B

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The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



BIC suffers 50.7% profit fall in ‘08

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Telecommu-
nications Company (BTC) suf-
fered a 50.7 per cent net income
reduction in 2008, as profits
were squeezed by a slight top-
line decline and $18.7 million
rise in operating expenses,
although that did not stop the
Government taking a $50 mil-
lion dividend from the compa-
ny post year-end.

Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting
president and chief executive,
writing in BTC’s 2008 annual
report acknowledged that the
state-owned incumbent’s net
income had fallen to $21.1 mil-
lion from $42.8 million the year
before, “resulting principally

* Government takes $50m
dividend from state-owned
incumbent in 2009, and
likely to extract some
$105m in 18-24
month period

* Privatisation talks likely
to include focus on
$25.387m pension liability

* Drop in 2008 performance
caused by 6% or $18.7m
rise in operating expenses,
and 1% revenue fall

SEE page 2B

A

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(242) 3

FREEPORT
(242) 951-3010

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(242) 367-3135

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Chamber plans
Institute to give
husiness support

* Chamber president says
development bank needed
to support start-ups
through growing pains,
pinting out his business
lost $180k in first year
on $250k turnover

* Says bank’s lending
constraints will kill some
entrepreneurs’ ideas
and leave key void

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

T H E
Bahamas
Chamber of
Commerce is
planning
“next month”
to launch a
Chamber
Institute
designed to
provide a
technical sup-
port package
to its members and Bahamian
businesses, its president yester-
day urging cash-strapped insti-
tutions such as the Bahamas
Development Bank (BDB) to
continue playing a role in small
business financing.

Khaalis Rolle explained that
the Chamber Institute would
play a facilitation/co-ordination
role in its plans to assist small
business development, creating
the curriculum and support
package before outsourcing the
delivery to members involved
in that line of work.

Confirming to Tribune Busi-
ness that the Chamber Institute
was set “to come next month”,
Mr Rolle explained: “We will
be offering the type of support
that businesses need. We're try-
ing to move beyond the strong
advocacy role we’ve played in
the past to a more technical
support organisation.”

The proposed support pack-
ages would involve the likes of
marketing, accounting and
leadership training, “all of the
things businesses need to
understand how to efficiently



SEE page 4B

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Nassau; 247,356,9801
Freeport: 242.951.3010

PL a
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ROYAL FIDELITY

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eel le Lely


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BTC, from page 1B

from a 1 per cent or $3.5 million
decline in revenues and a 6 per
cent or $18.7 million increase
in operating expenses”.

On the revenue front, Mr
Griffin attributed the drop from
$356.915 million in 2007 to
$353.369 million to an 18 per
cent or $9.9 million drop in net
roaming revenues.

This provides a further indi-
cation of the wide-ranging
impact that the global econom-
ic crisis and decline in tourist
arrivals has had on all facets of
the Bahamian economy, since
BTC’s roaming revenues are
largely derived from tourists
who, via agreements signed by
BTC and their own home coun-
try carriers, are able to use their
cell phones in the Bahamas.
Fewer tourists equates to lower
roaming revenues.

Mr Griffin said the decline
in roaming revenues had been

offset to some extent by a 12
per cent increase in broadband
Internet revenues to $16 mil-
lion in 2008.

Elsewhere, BTC’s cellular
wireless revenues from post-
paid subscribers fell by 9.6 per
cent or $5.2 million, partly due
to the migration of former
TDMA postpaid customers to
the new GSM prepaid platform.
Revenues from the latter
increased by $7.2 million to
$143.1 million.

BTC’s income statement
again showed that the company
is largely now a glorified cellu-
lar company, something that
was effectively admitted by
executive chairman Julian Fran-
cis in the 2008 annual report,
who said this business segment
now accounted for 70 per cent
of the company’s total rev-
enues.

BTC’s current monopoly in
cellular service provision in the
Bahamas, something that will

Forklift, like new,

end two years after its privati-
sation, has been critical to the
company’s profitability and per-
formance. It also indicates why
Digicel, a 100 per cent cellular
operator throughout the
Caribbean, is interested in
acquiring BTC - as it is, to all
intents and purposes, a cellu-
lar company - despite the state-
owned incumbent’s interests in
fixed-line, Internet and, possi-
bly, Internet Protocol TV.

Elsewhere, Mr Griffin said
BTC’s payroll and benefits
increased by 15 per cent to $83
million in 2008, largely due to
the finalisation and implemen-
tation of the new industrial
agreement for the period 2007-
2010.

While most other operating
expense categories remained
flat, what was termed as ‘Plant
Expense’ rose by more than $20
million - from $152.308 million
to $172.683 million. As a result,
total operating expenses
increased from $313.397 mil-
lion in 2007 to $332.052 million
a year later.

BREA, from 1B

become “dead land” with
reduced value, and what would

in very good

happen to the investor and the

condition, with

warranty

Phone: 436-9776



Bahamas’ reputation/standing
in investment circles.

“All this is going to drive up
the cost of development,” Mr
Wong argued. “You frustrate
the developer and drive up the
cost of development. Guess
who pays for it? The consumer.

Unbundling plant expense,
it can be seen that payroll costs
rose by 8.6 per cent in 2008
from $42.976 million to $46.679
million. Also on the rise were
vendor discounts, which rose
by 23 per cent from $27.348 mil-
lion to $33.74 million.

Utilities costs, mainly the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC), rose by more than
$4 million from $7.567 million
to $11.915 million.

In his report, Mr Griffin said
BTC had paid a $25 million div-
idend to the Government, in
the form of the Public Trea-
sury, in June 2008. That same
year, some $16.4 million in cus-
toms duties and franchise fees
were also paid by the company,
along with $4 million in regula-
tory fees to the former Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).

However, the annual report’s
notes also revealed that BTC’s
Board of Directors, all of whom
are appointed by the Govern-
ment, declared a $50 million
dividend at their April 23, 2009,
meeting, which was subse-

One way or another, this Bill
is going to drive up the cost of
land for Bahamians.

“The Government is putting
all these roadblocks and
bureaucracy in place, costing
the developer time and mon-
ey.” Mr Wong expressed fears
that the Bill could act as a dis-
incentive to subdivision devel-
opment and, as a result, the

quently paid on April 27, 2009.
Taken with the previous $25
million dividend, and the Gov-
ernment’s plans to take a fur-
ther $30 million dividend from
BTC prior to privatisation, that
$50 million windfall means that
the Ingraham administration is
likely to extract a total $105
million from the state-owned
incumbent within a probable
18-month to two-year period.
Some might question
whether it is prudent to take
such a large dividend from a
company that suffered a more
than-50 per cent cut in net
income in 2008, but BTC still
had $118.6 million in cash on
the balance sheet as at Decem-
ber 31 of that year - albeit a
lower amount than the previ-
ous year’s $135.351 million.
Added to that is the Gov-
ernment’s desperate need for
every cent of revenue it can lay
its hands on to plug the growing
fiscal deficit and national debt,
and with BEC’s problems, it is
clear BTC remains the ‘crown
jewel’ in its asset portfolio,



a |

although all things are relative.

BTC also incurred some
$4.778 million in privatisation
costs on behalf of the Govern-
ment in 2008, the annual report
revealed, which the directors
dealt with by issuing a dividend
in-kind.

And the report also high-
lighted another issue that will
have to be resolved between
the Government and any buyer
in BTC’s privatisation - namely
who deals with, and fills, the
$25.387 million pension liabili-
ty the company’s defined ben-
efit pension plan is sitting on. It
is possible such an amount may
be deducted from the purchase
price.

BTC’s annual report showed
that its employee pension plan
was suffering from a $63.475
million deficit, with the value
of future obligations to pen-
sioners standing at $252.941
million, yet the fair value of
plan assets languishing at
$189.466 million. The value of
unrecognised actuarial losses
was pegged at $38.088 million.



PTE TET

Everywhere The Buyers Are!

~—f a



supply of homes/lots would be
unable to match demand as the
population grew, further push-
ing prices above the reach of
Bahamians via a
supply/demand mismatch.
Urging the Government to
“hold back” and “delay” the
Bill’s passage for further con-
sultation, Mr Wong said the
provision that prevented
Bahamians from dividing prop-
erty in their will to their chil-
dren could lead to further prob-
lems with generational proper-
ty, leaving “tens of thousands of























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From the earliest days of the
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“In this kind of environment, —{
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that makes it more frustrating,”

Mr Wong added.

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age categories: 10 - 13 years and 14-16 years for a first
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THE TRIBUNE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3B





Government urged to
‘divest itself of BAIC
and BDB roles

Organisation has ‘deep concerns’ over
Development Bank’s ‘severe liquidity issues’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government was yes-
terday urged to “divest itself” of
the Bahamas Development
Bank (BDB) and the Bahamas
Agricultural and Industrial Cor-
poration (BAIC) and turn them
over to private sector manage-
ment, as a Bahamian small
business organisation said it had
“deep concerns” about the lim-
its placed on the former’s lend-
ing capacity.

Arguing that there were “too
many separate organisations”
involved in small business
financing and support activities
from a government perspective,
Marvin Smith, the Bahamas
Business Association’s chair-
man, told Tribune Business that
management of the likes of
BDB and BAIC should be
handed to the private sector,
with these entities replaced by a
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration.

“What we need in the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas is
for the Government of the
Bahamas to divest itself of
responsibilities that really
belong to the private sector,”
Mr Smith said.

“Going forward, the Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas can-
not be all things to all people,
and needs to turn things over to
the private sector. We suggest
the creation of a Bahamas
Development Corporation.

“The Governments of the
Bahamas, past and future, need
to really divest themselves of
the BDB and BAIC, and turn
that over to private sector
groupings or organisations.”

Mr Smith said the Bahamas
Business Association had “a
deep concern” over the “severe

liquidity issues” plaguing the
BDB, which minister of state
for finance, Zhivargo Laing,
said had left it unable to write
“any meaningful loans”. Some
“50 per cent-plus” of its loan
portfolio was in default.

Speaking from the perspec-
tive of small business access to
credit and debt financing, espe-
cially during a recession, Mr
Smith told Tribune Business:
“This is a deep concern of ours,
because for many of the small
and medium-sized businesses
unable to get loans from com-
mercial banks, the only way to
get credit is from the BDB and
the venture capital fund.

“Since the Government has
taken a more conservative
stance on that, perhaps they
need to be more creative in
how businesses get funding
from outside the Bahamas. The
Government and the Central
Bank stand in the way of that
with the current legislation.”

Yte Mr Smith added: “This
tunnel is not as dark as it
appears. The Government has
to come to the position that
they do not have all the answers
or solutions to these problems
we face together.

“Before they take the aggres-
sive stance to terminate funding
in this period where we need
to create jobs, they need to get
everyone together to discuss
solutions to the problems they
are having right now.”

While thanking all BDB and
BAIC employees for their ser-
vices over the years, Mr Smith

said they needed to be “rede-
ployed in other areas of the
public service where they are
needed, so we can establish the
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration” and raise funding for
the economy’s productive sec-
tors.

Arguing that this organisa-
tion needed to be completely
run, driven and managed by the
private sector, Mr Smith said:
“One of its primary objectives
is to see the creation of
Bahamians owning the majori-
ty or a large percentage of the
tourism industry, and the agri-
culture or food security part of
the economy.”

Given that the Government
had previously given Crown
Land grants and other incen-
tives to encourage foreign
direct investment in the
Bahamas, Mr Smith said a
Bahamas Development Cor-
poration should receive similar
assets for the purpose of
empowering Bahamians in all
islands.

“Hopefully, the Bahamas
Development Corporation will
be listed and traded on the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange (BISX) for the
purpose of raising capital for
onward lending to small, medi-
um and larger-sized businesses
in the Bahamas,” he added.

“The Bahamas Development
Corporation will have access to
secure funds locally and inter-
nationally, whether its bonds,
stocks or more creative forms
of financing.”

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER - REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and
the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than

miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in
New Providence and the Family Islands
Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers
Prepares the Sales Budget
Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget

Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing

software

Prepares monthly Board Reports
Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of

Statistics

Provides statistical billing information for Family Island Managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in

the Family Islands

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required
during acquisition of new locations
Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the
efficient operation of the department

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounts or equivalent
A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing
Sound reasoning and good judgment skills
Ability to interpret financial reports

Good time management skills

Project Management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Baha-

mas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

Bahamas on or before: Tuesday, November 3, 2009.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



N-7509 Nassau

Mr Smith said that while the
private sector understood the
need to encourage foreign
direct investment in the
Bahamas, any developer receiv-
ing a Heads of Agreement-type
of arrangements, plus incen-
tives and land grants, must be
required to do business with
Bahamian companies.

“This Bahamas Develop-
ment Corporation is to encour-
age legislation for the advance-
ment of the interests of the
Bahamian people and/or busi-
nesses,” Mr Smith said, adding
that the Bahamas had “for too
long relied” on the two main
political parties to safeguard
their interests via policy, rather
than statute law.

He pointed to the fact that
the likes of Singapore, Barba-
dos and Trinidad & Tobago all
had Business Development or
Small and Medium-Sized Busi-
ness Acts to encourage devel-
opment in these sectors, argu-
ing that the Bahamas needed
similar laws to outline what was
permissible and what was not.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Just like NEW, Nissan
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Asking $23,000 or

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Phone: 436-9776

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN

EDWARD AND OLGA ROSSI
Complainants
AND

KENDALL KNOWLES
Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal, will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 28th day of October, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd Floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 21st day of October, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Association
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

6

THE TRIBUNE





STS

Offices:

1. 1, 200sq.ft @ $2,500.00 per month
2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month
3. 400sq.ft. @ $750.00 per month
4. 350sq.ft @ $700.00 per month

Stores:

1. 3,000 sq.ft @ $5,000.00 per month
2. 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1,700.00 per month

ALL SPACES LOCATED ON THE NORTH
EASTERN CORNER OF BAY STREET &
ELIZABETH AVENUE.

All Spaces are exclusive of utilities

All Inquires Call 326-4222



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009





IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/00409

Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act
Chamber 393 Statute Law of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas

AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL THOSE lots pieces or
parcels of land situate in the Southwestern portion of
the Island of South Bimini one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and comprising a
portion of the Port Royal Subdivision being the Lot
Numbered Sixty-one (61) in Block Numbered Five
(5) a portion of the Lot Numbered Sixty-two (62)
in Block Numbered Five (5) and a portion of Tract
“A” in Block Numbered Five (5) and situate on the
Eastern Side of Ocean Drive and approximately Two
hundred and Seventy-two (272) feet Southwesterly
from North Road and being bounded as follows
towards the NORTH on the other portion of the
Lot Numbered Sixty-two (62) in Block Numbered
Five (5) and running thereon One hundred and ten
(110.00) feet towards the EAST on a portion of Tract
“A” in the Block Numbered Five (5) and running
thereon Ninety-two (92.00) feet towards the SOUTH
on the Lot Numbered Sixty (60) in Block Numbered
Five (5) and running thereon One hundred and ten
(110.00) feet towards the WEST on a Thirty (30)
feet wide road reservation known as Ocean Drive
and running thereon Ninety-two (92.00) feet.

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition, of
William C. Northen and Valerie J. Northen

NOTICE OF PETITION

Take notice that by Petition filed in the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas on the 18th day of March, A. D.
2009 William C. Northen and Valerie J. Northen of
South Bimini one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas (hereinafter called “the Petitioners’)
claim to be the owners in fee simple in possession
of the above captioned pieces parcels or lots of land
and have made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have their title to
the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court
in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.
A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:-

i, The Registry of The Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.

The Chambers of Deyane E. Russell
Grove Avenue and Marine Drive,
The Grove, West Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Take notice that any person having dower or
right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not
recognized in the Petition must on or before the
expiry of Thirty (30) days following final publication
of this Notice file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioners and the undersigned a Statement
of his Claim in the prescribed form, verified by an
Affidavit to be filed therewith together with a plan
of the area claimed and an abstract of title to the said
area claimed by him. Failure of any such person to
file and serve a Statement of his claim on or before
the Thirtieth (30) day following final publication
of this notice will operate as a bar of such claim.

DEYANE E. RUSSELL
Chambers,

Grove Avenue and Marine Drive,
The Grove, West Bay Street,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Attorney for the Petitioners



Chamber plans Institute to give business support

manage a business”.

“Hopefully, we can expand
that in the future by being a
broker for capital investment,”
Mr Rolle said, “being the go-
between between our members
and potential members and
lending institutions and venture
capital organisations.”

When asked how the Cham-
ber would run its proposed
Institute programme, Mr Rolle
said: “We’re going to outsource
that to the guys who offer those
services. We will offer that
through our existing members
with our brand on it. We will
develop the curriculum.”

Meanwhile, Mr Rolle said
the “severe liquidity issues”
that had impacted the Bahamas
Development Bank’s (BDB)
ability to originate “any mean-
ingful loans” was “symptomatic
of all the structural issues we’re
facing” in both the private and
public sectors.

WASTE, from 1B

“Our plans have been sub-

He argued, though, that the
economy needed institutions
such as the BDB “to continue
to assist in business develop-
ment”, as they were critical to
providing debt financing to
start-ups that would otherwise
be starved of capital and never
get off the ground.

Many entrepreneurs, Mr
Rolle said, “invested everything
in it” in terms of capital, yet
had to endure a “ramp up peri-
od” before they made any mon-
ey, often sustaining a loss in
their first year of operation.

Taking his Nassau Water
Ferries venture as an example,
Mr Rolle said he suffered a
$180,000 loss during his first
year in operations on a
$250,000 turnover, before mak-
ing a $70,000 profit on $500,000
turnover in his second year.

“With a start-up, unless you
have lots of capital, you are
almost doomed from the outset

mitted, and we’re hoping we
will not have any glitches and

NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEY SIFFORD of Toote
Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible

for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statementof the facts within twenty-eightdays from
the 20th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSON EDOUARD of South
Beach, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
27th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4) (a), (b)
and (c) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, notice is hereby given that: -

(a) Mushy Kiwis Ltd. is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 25th day of September, A.D., 2009 and

(c) the Liquidator is C.B. Strategy Ltd., of 308
East Bay St.

C.B. Strategy Ltd.
LIQUIDATOR

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION ACT, 1992
AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST COUNSEL
AND ATTORNEY
BETWEEN

SOLOMON GUTSTEIN

Complainant

KENDALL KNOWLES
Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 28th day of October, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd Floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Kendall Knowles, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within seven (7) days from the date hereof,
an address to which the Decision may be sent by prepaid
Registered Post.

Dated the 21st day of October, A.D., 2009

Bahamas Bar Council
Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas



and most businesses lose mon-
ey in their first year of opera-
tions,” the Chamber president
explained. “That’s why we need
institutions like the Bahamas
Development Bank to continue
to assist in business develop-
ment.”

Mr Rolle argued that while
the Government should not
waste money or throw it away,
it must not look at institutions
such as the BDB as ‘a profit
centre”. Rather, it was an insti-
tution designed to encourage
business development, innova-
tion and ideas, and the emer-
gence of a new generation of
entrepreneurs.

The Chamber president also
questioned whether small busi-
nesses and start-ups were mak-
ing best use of the Govern-
ment’s business support ser-
vices, and whether the agencies
involved were structured cor-
rectly to maximise delivery in

that everything will move for-
ward. We suspect we’ll possi-
bly be making biodiesel in the
first quarter.”

Mr de Cardenas said he
“wouldn’t be surprised if we
make 100,000 gallons of
biodiesel in the first year”, with
any product it produces entire-
ly for use in its own vehicle
fleet.

Explaining that the biodiesel
facility was conceived partly in
response to the impact escalat-
ing global oil prices were having
on Bahamas Waste’s cost base,
Mr de Cardenas said a key chal-
lenge would be to switch the

this area.

However, the “big question”
was where the BDB, the Gov-
ernment and private sector
went now, Mr Rolle suggesting
the latter had to step in if the
public sector entities were
unable to lend.

“It [the BDB] plays a criti-
cal role,” he said. “It is the pre-
mier organisation that small
businesses go to for lending
outside the commercial banks,
and that process is designed to
encourage small business in this
country.

“If the BDB is not able to
fulfill its mandate, and com-
mercial banks are not bullish,
you will have a decline in small
business growth in this coun-
try. There’s no ‘if’s’ and ‘but’s’
about it.”

He added that some ideas
currently held by entrepreneurs
would “not be realised” due to
the BDB’s lending constraints.

biodiesel.

With there being relatively
little technical information pub-
lished on biodiesel and its use
by heavy duty vehicles, Mr de
Cardenas said: “We’re doing a
lot of studying and investiga-
tion of what we can and can’t
do.”

He suggested that Bahamas
Waste’s vehicles could use
between 20-50 per cent
biodiesel, with the older vehi-
cles likely to be able to use a
higher percentage. “We’re
going to try and use as much
as we can,” Mr de Cardenas
said. “Some vehicles might be

company’s fleet to use

able to use 100 per cent.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EAGLE STARS INVESTMENT LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
INTERMATIONAL BUSINESS COMPAMES ACT

Wo, 45 of 2000
ANADERO LIMITED

Mobca is hereby givan that in accordance wih Section 137 of The Inemebor Business
Companies Ad No. 44 of 2000, AMADERO LIMITED is in dissolution, The date of
commencement of dissolution was the 2rd day of Cetsber 2008. Dillon Dean of Nassau
Sahamias & he Liquidator of ANADERO LIMITED.

Dillon Daan
LOUIDATOR



NOTICE

In the Estate of GEORGES EMILE JEAN FRANKE late of
14 Woodland Road, off Village Road in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands in the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Businessman, Deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claims or
demands against the above-named Estate are requested to
send the same duly certified in writing to the undersigned on
or before Friday, the 27th day of November, A.D. 2009 after
which the Executors will proceed to distribute the assets of the
deceased among the persons entiled thereto having requard
only to the claims of which the undersigned shall have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before
the date hereinbefore mentioned.

DUPUCH & TURNQUEST & CO.
Chambers

308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-8181

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Executors



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an
Nay,

THE TRIBUNE

(en)
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

B

ealth

O De









a message of

Opey

The story of a breast cancer surv

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

“RESILIENCE’ has been the key-
word for 60-year-old Virginia
Sawyer in facing breast cancer.

Perhaps it’s the reason why she
has had such a successful fight
against the disease; she is the perfect
example of what faith and focus can
do for someone in her condition.

Ms Sawyer, who is described by
others as a “poised, reserved and
private person”, agreed to share her
story about her battle against breast
cancer with Tribune Health.

It’s been 25 years since she had
her mastectomy, and today Ms
Sawyer continues to live life to its
fullest.

Now in ‘remission’ (a term used to
classify cancer patients with no
recurrences for up to 12 to 15 years),
Ms Sawyer said breast cancer is no
longer something that she constant-
ly broods or frets about.

“Over the years so many people
have been diagnosed, so I realise
like many others that it’s just anoth-
er challenge that I have to face,” she
said.

With an effective combination of
eating right, exercising, prayer, and
involvement in various activities, she
is determined to keep herself as
physically and spiritually healthy as
possible.

She’s never viewed her breast can-

cer as a death sentence, and in fact
has developed more zest for life
because of the disease.

Ms Sawyer is involved in several
civic organisations, including the
Bahamas Communications and Pub-
lic Officers Retirees Association and
the Surgical Suite Breast Cancer
Support Group.

She is also a very active member
at Evangelistic Temple Church on
Collins Avenue.

But it hasn’t always been that way
for this retiree, who has no reserva-
tions telling you she is a “sexy 60.”

One of the most inspirational
things of her life has been her
involvement in the Surgical Suite
Breast Cancer Support Group for
20 plus years, she said.

Ms Sawyer said the group has
helped her deal with the disease over
the years and has given her the
opportunity to lend her support to
fellow cancer survivors.

The 60-year-old’s experience with
breast cancer hasn’t been as diffi-
cult as that of some women; she nev-
er underwent any chemotherapy or
radiation.

“Tt was not until I joined the Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Support Group
that I found out how sick people
were. Because I didn’t have to take
the treatments, people were saying I
didn’t have breast cancer,” she said.

Shortly after being diagnosed with
breast cancer in her 30s, Ms Sawyer

had her breast removed - a fairly
radical surgery for a disease that
was still in the early stages, but one
that has proved instrumental to her
survival.

Her physician, Dr Charles Diggiss
of the Surgical Suite, said the reason
she didn’t have chemotherapy is
because treatment for the disease is
different in every case.

“One has to be careful to under-
stand how breast cancer has evolved
and treatment has evolved,” he said.
“We need to be aware of the aggres-
siveness of breast cancer in the black
Bahamian community.”

Speaking to Ms Sawyer’s condi-
tion, Dr Diggiss said her recovery
story is remarkable.

“(In the) 25 years at my practice
there aren’t many women who con-
tinue to survive. It is certainly com-
mendable and fortunate for her,” he
said.

Dr Diggiss said he believes Ms
Sawyer’s religiously undergoing an
annual mammogram and discovering
the cancer at such an early stage was
crucial.

“Early detection is the key in
order to avoid long rounds of chemo
and radiation treatment,” Ms Sawyer
said.

“Through God’s grace I was able
to avoid a lot of what other cancer
patients go through.”

“In early May of 1984, a young
man who worked with me said ‘Ms
Sawyer, let’s switch vacation, it
would be really good for me to use
that time’.”

“Because of switching with him,
I went for my check-up,” she said.

“The doctor found a small lump,
and he sent me to a surgeon who
told me to come back in a month or
more, because sometimes the lumps
appear and then disappear.

“When I went back to see him,

the lump was still
there. I had a biop-
sy, and after that,
that was the first
pain I ever felt.”

Results of the
biopsy showed that
the lump was in
fact cancerous. Ms
Sawyer said she
was depressed at
first, but deter-
mined to fight the
disease.

“T had to have
surgery (a mastec-
tomy). Then I was
sent to Dr (John)
Lunn, who told
one of the nurses,
‘come here let me
show you some-
thing, this woman
is healed’. Dr Lunn
said the doctors
did a wonderful
job on you. You
don’t need any
chemotherapy or
radiation,” she
said.

She continued to see the doctor
for about six months, and afterwards
went for mammograms once a year.
To this day, she performs self breast
exams and continues to have her
annual check-up.

Ms Sawyer also continues to eat
healthy and is consistent with her
exercise regime. She tries to exer-
cise twice a day.

Her eating habits include small
portions of leafy green vegetables,
especially broccoli and carrots that
she tries to steam or eat raw some-
times.

“T try to use sweeteners that the
doctors recommend, and I automat-
ically cut down on the salt to stay



Virginia
Sawyer

away from hypertension.

“Now and then I eat rice and pota-
toes,” she said, and jokes that from
time to time she does cut herself
some slack by treating herself to
food she wouldn’t typically have.

Dr Diggiss had this to say about
Ms Sawyer’s story of survival: “It
gives a message of hope that you
need not die from breast cancer. As
few as the numbers may be for per-
sons who survive, it certainly offers
hope.

Women helping women

Zonta Club and Sister
Sister Breast Cancer
support Group join forces

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

HATS off to the Zonta
Club of New Providence
which paid tribute to cancer
survivors of the Surgical Suite
Sister Sister Breast Cancer
Support Group this weekend.

Some 100 women turned
out to the Hat Show and Tea
Party held on the upstairs deck
overlooking the garden at
Government House on Sun-
day afternoon.

Andrea Sweeting, president
of the Surgical Suite Sister Sis-
ter Breast Cancer support
group said: “It was a wonder-
ful venture between the two
organisations. It was a way of
women helping women, which
is the motto of the Zonta
Club,” she said.

The Zonta Club is a group
of businesswomen that work
together to advance the status
of women. The Sister Sister
Breast Cancer support group
is a subsidiary of the Surgical
Suite, an oncology practice,
presided over by local practi-
tioner Dr Charles Diggiss.

Oralee’s Fashions; the
Amazing Fashions Centre;
Just Stunning; LaRose Bou-
tique; Judy’s Hat Shop, and
other vendors presented their
hat collections to the host of
attendees from different civic
and church organisations.

Attendees enjoyed salmon

and pinwheel sandwiches,
quiches, and a variety of
herbal teas.

The ladies were also treated
to a fashion show hosted by
Pepper Johnson of LaRose
Boutique, as members of var-
ious Zonta Club chapters on
the island modelled their hats.

Part of the proceeds gener-
ated from the high tea event
were donated to the Surgical
Suite Sister Sister Support
group.

Each month, Sister Sister
purchases three porth-a-caths
to administer chemotherapy
in an easy and efficient way.

Port-a-cath’s cost around
$500 each, and the organisa-
tion donates three of them a
month to the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas.

“We welcome any dona-
tions to the Sister Sister Sup-
port Group because as it
comes in, it goes back out,”
said Nurse Charlene McPhee,
a spokesperson for the group.

She explained that the dona-
tions from the Zonta Club of
New Providence will be allo-
cated toward purchasing these

devices. This will help defray
the group’s monthly expendi-
tures of $1,500.

Part of the proceeds will
also go to assist members of
the group with medication and
other needs.

Officially formed in 2001,
the Surgical Suite Sister Sister
Breast Cancer Support Group
is made up of breast cancer
survivors young and old. For
most of the members, thank-
fully, their cancer is in remis-
sion.

Their youngest member is
28-years-old, proving that
breast cancer does not dis-
criminate when it comes to
age.

Nurse McPhee told Tribune
Health that the way women
respond to a breast cancer
diagnosis is very important.

“Women who attend sup-
port groups tend to do much
better than those who don’t
have support, so we know it’s
vital,” she explained. “It helps
you to know that you can
make it too.”

Outlining what the Sister
Sister group offers, she said:

Prayer vigil to conclude Breast
Cancer Awareness Month

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

TO bring the National
Breast Cancer Awareness
Month to a close, the Surgical
Suite Sister Sister Breast Can-
cer Support Group will par-
ticipate in a candle light walk
and prayer vigil this Saturday
at Rawson Square.

The members will be divid-
ed into two groups. One
group will begin the march on
Elizabeth Avenue and the
other group will begin on
George Street; they will meet
at Rawson Square.

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At the centre of the square
the group’s members will hold
a prayer vigil in honour of
women who have died from
the disease, perform musical
selections, and survivors will
share their inspirational sto-
ries.

Since it’s conception in
2007, the walk has become an
annual event to say thanks to
the public for their support.

The Surgical Suite Sister
Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group has been in existence
since September 2000. It has
grown from approximately 15

members to over 150 active
members.

They act as a support sys-
tem offering hope to women
who are diagnosed with breast
cancer. Their main goal has
always been to wage war
against the disease, and edu-
cate the public.

The walk is set to begin at
5pm and members of the pub-
lic are asked to come out in
support of the cause and to
bring a candle.

For more information call
376-0054 or contact Nurse
Charlene at 326-1929.

“There’s a time of laughter,
crying, information, empow-
erment, spiritual help - they
take care of the whole woman.
It’s more empowering for
everyone in the group to know
they can live with cancer and
know it doesn’t have to kill
them.”

Breast cancer is one of the
causes avidly supported by the
Zonta Club.

Their motto, “Women Help-
ing Women’, is at the heart of
their programme and they

“live that out in every sense
of the way,” a representative
of the organisation said.

Adena Minus of the Zonta
Club said that the whole pur-
pose of the tea party and hat
show was to create an event
where the women could
escape from their worries and
just enjoy themselves.

“We try to focus on uplifting
the ladies,” Ms Minus said.

Zonta International is a
worldwide service organisa-
tion of executives in business

and the professions working
together to advance the status
of women.

The Surgical Suite Sister Sis-
ter support group meets every
second Wednesday at the
Southern Community Centre
on Soldier Road.

Meetings begin at 5.30pm
and end at 8pm.

“The ladies are an exciting
group,” said Nurse McPhee.

“They talk, talk, and don’t
stop talking,” she said with a
smile.

The sign of great things to come!

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OFMiSO fa




PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





(CY LOVING RELATIONSHIPS

Have you filed your Ex?

HOW is your relationship desk
these days? Do you have a lot of
working files that you look at fre-
quently and you add to on a regular
basis? Do you have a lot of unfinished
work that you just procrastinate over?
Or do you have many files that are

completed and filed away?

We hear over and over that we
need to put time and effort into our
relationships, but what happens when
they just do not work out and they
come to an end?

The end of a relationship is almost
always painful, but at times it can be
a relief.

Closing that particular file, how-
ever, may not be that easy. Depend-
ing if there is a particular ‘dumper ’,
‘dumpee’ or if it is a mutual agree-
ment will determine how you move
on in the future.

Ideally all questions, unresolved
problems, good times and things
learnt from the relationship will be
aired.

Of course this requires a great deal
of respect and consideration, both of



which are often missing when things
come to a close.

What happens when it all ends ina
big chaotic mess? You may be left out
to dry, or perhaps you are the one too
cowardly to face the music. If we do
not wrap things up, and feel every-
thing has been taken care of, then we
drag it around with us into the next
relationship. We punish or treat the
next person as if they were a shadow
of the last.

It is not surprising that we go
through life wondering why we can
not get it right. Are we always choos-
ing the wrong people, or is it us?

People assume that long relation-
ships are the hardest to get over. Cer-

Maintain strong

bones with exercise

OSTEOPOROSIS can steal the
strength from your bones, leaving
you stooped-shouldered and prone
to fractures. But you can do some-

thing with your muscles to help low-
er your risk of a break - exercise.
Osteoporosis means “porous
bones”. With this disease your bone
strength decreases and your bones
slowly lose mineral content and
their internal support structure.
Eventually, your bones can
become so weak they can easily
fracture. But research indicates that
exercise may not only help prevent

@ GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack ff

osteoporosis, but may treat it as
well.

Exercise can also help improve
your balance, reducing your risk of
falling. The key is to know which
exercises to do and how to do them
properly.

Bone is living and dynamic tis-
sue that responds to exercise by
becoming stronger. Each time you
put your bones to work they receive
a chemical message telling them
they need to be strong. Without
physical challenges to trigger that
bone-building message your bones

tainly there is more history, possibly
children and joint property. However,
all too often we see that their life
together has ‘played out’ and that it
has reached a natural conclusion.
Short relationships, however, may
have terminated before their time and
the expected course of things did not
take place.

The questions of ‘what if? and
‘might have been’ remain floating in
the air unanswered. One thing we
know for sure is that no matter what
type of ending you have it is all emo-
tionally draining, and something we
would all like to avoid.

The work needed before we can
close that particular file can vary in
time depending on the individuals
involved and their circumstances. Ini-
tially you may feel sad, angry or you
may feel nothing. If you feel sad then
you more than likely are turning
events inwards and blaming yourself
for the loss. Or you may direct angry
feelings outwards and blame the oth-
er person. Feeling nothing may mean
you are just avoiding the whole deluge



with lose mass and strength.

Weight-bearing and strength
training (resistance) exercises put
the right kind of demands on your
bones to make them build density
and strength.

Weight-bearing exercises causes
your bones and muscles to work
against gravity. Every time you take
a step, land on your feet, hit a tennis
ball, dance, jump, and jog, chemical
messages rush to your legs and arms
warning them to get ready for the
next impact and stimulate your

A variety of root crops

IT was root crops more than any-
thing else that kept Europeans and
early American settlers going dur-
ing the cold winter months when lit-
tle could be grown. Most root crops
could be stored, often underground
in barrows below the frost line, and
retrieved for use as food.

Perhaps it is because we do not
have a history of root crop storage in
the balmy Bahamas that we do not
favour potatoes, rutabagas, turnips,
carrots and such as much as Euro-
peans do.

Nevertheless, root crops deserve
a place in the garden and on our din-
ner plates.

The fastest growing root vegetable
is the radish. Radishes can be picked
within a month of sowing the seeds
and are often recommended as can-
didates for children to grow so they
can appreciate the beauty of planting
and growing.

Unfortunately, one of the great
joys of gardening is the consumption
of what we grow and few children
enjoy radishes. Come to think of it,
very few adults enjoy radishes.

If you have heavy soil you can sow
radish seeds along with carrot seeds.
The quick growing radishes will
break up the surface soil and make
life easier for the more tender carrot
seedlings. By the time the radishes
are pulled the carrots should be
established.

The most popular carrot variety is
Chantenay, eight to ten inches long
and lightly tapered. Nantes is more
cylindrical and has excellent flavour.
Danvers is a broad-shouldered,
strongly tapered carrot that forces its
way into heavy soil. If you are
impressed by size and have deep soil
you should try Imperator as your
main crop.

Carrots are a long season crop and
take at least 120 days to mature,
though at the thinning-out stage you
can enjoy baby carrots lightly pre-
pared. (By the way, those ‘baby car-
rots’ that come in cellophane bags
in the supermarket are not baby car-

rots at all but large carrots that have
been sculpted into cylindrical
nuggets.)

Carrots enjoy fertile soil but
should not be sown where there has
been an application of fresh com-
post or manure in the past six
months. This over-rich condition
encourages the production of side
roots. Well-fertilised sandy soil is
perfect for carrots.

You save space by growing car-
rots, and most root vegetables, in
blocks rather than in rows.

What we call beet seeds are actu-
ally seed capsules that contain

several seeds. This means we have
to thin the seedlings once they are
three or four inches tall.

Pick enough and you have a deli-

| Lg ee ee .
MOST root vegetables are more tender and sweeter when pulled fairly early, like these carrots and beets.

cious side dish of baby greens; later
on the mature leaves give a more
robust flavour.

Beets (or beetroot as the English
call them) are a 90-day crop and
should be picked when approaching
maturity rather than left in the
ground to grow fibrous. The stan-
dard beet is Detroit Dark Red.

It grows readily in most soils and
has an excellent flavour.

Turnips are very popular in
Europe but a rarity in the Bahamas.
Those sold in markets are usually
over mature and coarse in flavour. If
you grow your own and pick them
early you may begin to appreciate
their buttery earthiness.

Rutabagas (or swedes) grow to
the size of a barked coconut and are

SEUSS)

AVAILABLE AT ALL LEADING DRUG STORES.

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of emotions.

Discovering why something hap-
pened, and the person that we emerge
as, allows the forgiveness to take place.
We can then step aside and release
ourselves from the pain. This is what is
meant to be and this is the direction
our life is meant to take.

The scenario of letting go and
accepting the loss of a relationship
would seem like the natural process of
things. For some people the course of
events is blocked by the other person.
This is often seen when children are
used as bargaining power. We may
feel as if we are held hostage in the
relationship and closure seems impos-
sible. Even if this takes place we need
to find a way to release ourselves as
individuals so that we can move on
with our lives.

Hopefully at some point this file
will be closed and filed away. You will
Know by then if it will remain in the
back of the filing cabinet, never to be
reopened.

On the other hand because of mutu-
al reasons, such as children, it may

bones to increase their strength.

Weight training or resistance
exercises use your muscular
strength to improve muscle mass
and strengthen bone. Your muscles
are attached to your bones by ten-
dons that tug against the bones
when the muscle contract. This tug-
ging stimulates the bones to grow.
The stronger your muscles, the
more stimulation they provide. The
stronger your bones and muscles,
the better your protection against
osteoporosis.

Strength training exercises can
employ dumbbells, and/or weight
or resistance type machines. You
should begin strength training slow-
ly and progressively, repeating exer-
cises over time until they are com-
fortable.

Other protective measure to stop
osteoporosis is not to smoke and to
drink in moderation. Smokers show



4 Ye {

closely related to turnips, but milder.
As with most root crops, younger is
better.

Peeled, cubed and boiled in salted
water, rutabagas are an interesting
potato substitute. In Europe they
are often cooked this way and
mashed with boiled potatoes, then

ed and peppered. Rutabagas are

very easy to grow and very hard to }
? a more intense level of exfoliation,
? look to non-abrasive exfoliants con-
i? taining chemicals like salicylic or
? lactic acid. Pair a more gentle regi-
? men with professional exfoliation
? treatments from your professional
? skin therapist to enjoy smoother

¢ For any questions or comments you
can e-mail gardenerjack@coralwave.com. }

give away.

Potatoes are the most popular root
crop world wide but are best grown
after Christmas. We will consider
them at a later date.







have to be brought out every now and
then. When you do it is important to
remember to handle your children’s
feelings with care because they will
be experiencing similar emotions.

Things may still be more compli-
cated and you may have a stagnant
relationship that keeps you in limbo.
Relationships like this are suffocating
and very unhealthy. It is essential that
we continue working at our relation-
ships, or close them and file them
away. The goal is always to remember
to surround ourselves with good qual-
ity relationships that enrich our lives,
and keep away from those that pull us
down.

¢ Margaret Bain is an individual and cou-
ples relationship therapist. She is a regis-
tered nurse and a certified clinical sex
therapist. For appointments call 364-7230
or e-mail her at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She
is also available for speaking engage-
ments.

a higher incidence of fracture than
non-smokers do. Smoking interferes
with the body's production of estro-
gen.

Women who smoke are shown to
lose five to 10 per cent or their mass
prior to menopause. Heavy drinkers
also suffer more fractures than nor-
mal. This may be due to the fact
that alcohol is a diuretic, which
causes fluid loss.

Good nutrition, foods rich in cal-
cium, plus calcium supplements on
a daily basis are definitely an impor-
tant prevention in stopping osteo-
porosis. The recommended dosage
is 1,500 milligrams daily, especially
after menopause.

With these lifestyle changes, a
regular exercise programme and
regular chiropractic care, you
should be able to grow old with a
strong healthy spine and beautiful
posture.

Exfoliation - how
| much is too much?

EXFOLIATION delivers a

: tighter, firmer, smoother look and
? feel of skin. Because of this result,
: many fall into the trap of over-exfo-
? lation: An over-zealous approach
? that can actually reduce skin's vital-
i ity and make it more susceptible to
? damage from UV light.

Over-exfoliation triggers an

i inflammatory response, leading to a
? compromised lipid barrier that
| i won't function properly, a sensi-
: tised skin condition, and accelerat-
i ed premature aging.

i TELL-TALE SIGNS OF OVER-

: EXFOLIATED SKIN INCLUDE:

? ¢ Noticeable dehydration

i * Patchy areas of dryness

i « Skin tautness

: e Redness and itchiness

i © Increased sensitivity

=| i ° Inflammatory acne and irritation

If you're showing the signs of

? over-exfoliation, speak with a pro-
i? fessional skin therapist, who will
i most likely prescribe a calming
: cleanser and toner, and a protec-
: tive moisturiser to start the recovery
i process. Sun protection is a must,
? wear a sunscreen with physical UV
? blockers titanium dioxide or zinc
? oxide that won't irritate skin.

heavily buttered and liberally salt-
tating with a gentle exfoliant

After skin recovery, begin exfoli-

designed for daily use. If you desire

skin without the undesirable side
effects.

Histatussin DM

COUGH SUPPRESSANT & RESPIRATORY DECONGESTANT




an
NEY,

THE TRIBUNE

(en
Na LY,

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 11B





A Bahamian woman in Japan

By COFFI MCPHEE

or one year and

three months | had

the opportunity to
live and work in Tokushi-
ma, Japan. | worked as
an English Language
Coordinator at Seiko
Gakuen for children ages

three to six.

Join me each week as I explore
the land of the rising sun from a
Bahamian’s perspective.

THE TRIP

IT was okay, but my goodness it
was long: Nassau to Miami, Miami to
Chicago, and Chicago to Osaka.
Every time I went to sleep and woke
up I was still on an airplane. I had a
neighbour who was a bit too friend-
ly even for my taste. He insisted on
conversation and while that is all
well and good, I don’t want to talk to
anybody for 16 hours straight.

He was typically Japanese in that
he apologised for everything.

If I dropped my pen, he was sorry
that I dropped my pen and offered
to pick it up. If I had to go to the
bathroom, he was sorry that I had to
go to the bathroom and was sorry
that he didn’t get up quick enough
for me to get out of my seat. I was
like, “its okay man.” That was my
preferred sentence for most of the
trip.

After arriving at the airport it was-
n’t too bad in terms of my luggage, (I
had two really heavy bags plus my
purse and my laptop). I then had to
take a two-hour bus ride to get to my
city. I was really exhausted but tried
to stay alert so I wouldn’t miss my
stop; that was not easy.

THE BUS STATION

I was really proud of myself. I fol-

THE WEATHER REPORT [fi

lowed all the directions that they
gave me and got off the bus stop
expecting to see the person who was
supposed to pick me up, but I didn’t.
So I told my self that maybe she was
just late. But then I said to myself,
“hold up Japanese people are never
late.”

One hour later - I didn’t panic, I
just tried to dial the number that
they gave me to call. When I tried to
call the operator said something in
Japanese, but of course I didn’t get
what she was saying. So I tried to
ask someone if I had the right area
code but no one spoke English,
French or Spanish. I had a few
phrases in Japanese but they are use-
less if you don’t understand the
answers.

So the next step, I looked in the
phone book for the operator’s num-
ber but of course everything was
written in Japanese. I saw a drawing
of a fireman so I called the fire sta-
tion to see if they could help, but
that was useless as well. He was nice
but the only thing he could say was
“T don’t speak English can you
please speak Japanese.” So I hung
up.

Next step, the police station.
(They) understood me better, but
not really. Two minutes later two
police officers came riding on their
bikes with their guns. I was like,
“woah, I’m not a terrorist, all I want
to do is to dial a number.”

Apparently a friend of the
boyfriend of the police officer spoke
English and tried to help me. But
surprise, the number I had didn’t
work. However, thankfully they had
the numbers of all the teachers in
the city. And all this time (the per-
son I was supposed to meet) was
waiting for me on the other side of
the train station. I never got that
message that I had to wait on the
other side. I got in at the station at
9pm and I left almost at midnight
after two days of travelling. Needless
to say that I was beat.

% S

mote ona beautiful, clear day.

THE APARTMENT

It’s not bad; not the shoeboxes
that Japan is known for. It is big-
ger than my Paris studio (Ms
McPhee used to live in France). I
have everything that I need. Dishes,
sheets, TV (even though I don’t
know what they are saying) bed,
desk, chair, washing machine and a
balcony to hang out clothes. The
only thing I needed to buy was food
and washing powder.

All the foreign teachers live on
the same floor. So we form a little
community. They are from the
USA, Canada and Australia.

THE JOB

I have three classes of K3, K4 and
K, but I am not with them all the
time. K3 - 20 minutes, K4 - 30 min-
utes and K5 - 45 minutes. Between
classes I prepare my lessons (which
is not difficult). I also help in organ-
ising outside activities for the stu-
dents; out of town trips etc. The kids
are really cute and adorable and
well behaved.

AFTER WORK

I take Japanese classes on
Wednesday evenings, Saturday
afternoons and soon Sunday morn-
ings. I have a lot of opportunities
to practice because I am the only

<=»

— in

English teacher on my campus and
the other teachers do not speak
English, so communicating is quite
entertaining. We draw, do actions,
and use fragmented words out of
the dictionary. It normally takes
about 15 minutes to get our point
across but some how we make do. I
am also learning a traditional Japan-
ese dance with a group. There is a
big music festival here in August
that lasts about one week and I will
be participating with them. I’ll have
on the traditional dress, shoes and
hat. It should be fun.

I plan to take some cooking class-
es as well. Lord knows I need it.

NIGHT LIFE

I was afraid that I would find
myself in a village with only fields of
rice, but there is a night life. I am
not living in the swinging part of

town, however, the social scene
it is just a 25-minute bike ride across
the bridge and there you have all
the bars, restaurants, and cafés. So I
am not bored on Saturday nights.

COST OF LIVING

Not as bad as everyone said it
would be. It is expensive, but like
anywhere you just have to know
where to shop.

I can find pretty good deals. The



nan

food is good, fresh and pretty cheap
if you buy Japanese items. It is when
you want exotic goods that things
become expensive (there is no way
that I am going to buy a $6 man-
go). But for the moment I don’t
think that I’ll starve. Going to the
movies is expensive though, almost
$15. So I will be streaming my
movies.

THE JAPANESE ATTITUDE
TOWARDS FOREIGNERS

They do stare, but not in a mean
way. More like, ‘wow I can’t believe
what I am seeing’. They are not
mean, but quite polite and they like
when you try to speak their lan-
guage. Just like anywhere you have
prejudiced people and you have
really sweet ones.

IN SUMMARY

The time over here will definitely
be a learning experience and I am
looking forward to it, especially
learning a new language. This job
definitely combines my passions:
Languages, education, culture and
tourism. And for the moment I
don’t have any complaints.

“Travel is more than the seeing of
sights; it is a change that goes on,
deep and permanent, in the ideas
of the living.” - St Augustine

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get ee







By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

BEAUTY is often measured by the external, and if you believe today’s
media, it’s all right for a woman to have some curves, just as long as
they are in the right places and she is still skinny overall.

But for one woman, who is on a mission to
bring voluptuous back, this interpretation of
beauty is not acceptable.

Rayette McDonald, president and director
of the Ms Full Figured Bahamas Organisa-
tion, said her goal is to free full figured
women from these kinds of beauty stereo-
types.

The full figured community is making an
impression the world over and the Ms Full
Figured Organisation has committed itself to
being a part of this revolution.

Speaking with Tribune Woman, Ms
McDonald said full-figured women often feel

THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009

To help plus size women recognise their
true value and potential, Ms McDonald first
organised the Ms Full Figured Bahamas
Pageant in 2006.

“T’ve always wanted to enter a beauty
pageant. Looks and intelligence are not a
problem for me. I had everything else, but
because of my size I would never be able to
participate,” she said.

Ms McDonald said it bothers her to see
that the type of women who win traditional
beauty pageants are celebrated as the female
norm.

But instead of letting bitterness about the



pressured to compete with women who are
thinner than they are and this can affect their
perception of what true beauty is.

situation consume her, Ms McDonald decided = ol
to let her dissatisfaction with the status quo

fuel a productive endeavour. Figured competition.

MS Full Figured Bahamas 2008 Mona-Lisa Smith poses with other Bahamian beauty queens.

For the third year in a row now, Esteem
Productions will host the Ms Full Figured
Bahamas Pageant on Sunday, November 8.
“We are endeavoring to display the beauty,
elegance, talent and intelligence of the volup-
tuous woman in the Bahamas. This event is a
journey that these brave women embark
upon in hopes of gaining a better appreciation
for themselves, voicing their concerns
through their platform and making lasting
friendships,” Ms McDonald said.

“This organisation can be branded as a cel-
ebration of who we are. The pageant,
although fun, is very serious about enhancing
the lives of the young women. They partici-
pate in six weeks of self-development classes,
20 hours of community service and 20 hours
of physical training.”

This year, the emphasis is on cultivating
three qualities that define a woman’s worth:
Serving, giving back and self-
esteem, Ms McDonald said.

While there is a $30,000-budget
for the event, she said that she has
always had a tough time garnering
financial support for the pageant.

Is it that sponsors just can’t get
past the weight factor? Maybe so,
Ms McDonald said.

But the metamorphosis the
contestants go through during
the competition should be rea-
son enough for persons to sup-
port the pageant, she said.

“Every year we have girls
that come in a certain way and
leave the competition totally
different. We want to develop

and polish girls, but that’s not
going to happen in a (short)
space of (time).

“What you’re hoping is that
you embed something into
these ladies so that they will
continue to flourish in their
lives. We want to take them

on the journey of becoming a

better person,” she said.
In six weeks of training,
the contestants embark on a
journey which includes eti-
quette training and activities
that cater to the “whole
woman”, Ms McDonald
said.
cy This year, the ladies par-
ticipated in Toastmasters
speech classes in prepara-


























i 2008
CONTESTANTS from Ms Full Figured Bahamas

Put your best skin out there



OUTGOING Ms Full Figured Bahamas and Ms Teen Bahamas 2009, with contestants of this year’s Full

tion for their spokesmodel competition next
week.

Additionally, they took part in exercise
programmes and even experienced some mar-
tial arts during a few karate sessions.

A representative from Black Opal prod-
ucts, the makeup line that Michelle Obama
uses, showed them how to ensure they look
their best.

Next week, the contestants will participate
in an array of pre-pageant activities, including
a float parade this Saturday, in preparation
for the big finale.

The pageant has also reached out to the
Crisis Centre to assist in sensitising the public
to the child abuse issues we face in our coun-
try. In this vein an event is planned for Satur-
day, November 10, at the Marathon Mall.
Dubbed ‘Every Child Counts’, it will feature
a number of local acts and Dr Sandra Dean
Patterson, Director of the Crisis Centre, will
bring brief remarks.

Recently, a special cocktail reception was
held for the nine beautiful and voluptuous
contestants in this year’s Ms Full Figured
Bahamas pageant.

Montague Gardens was the event’s venue
and some 250 persons watched as the contes-
tants arrived in stretch limousines.

They were not disappointed as the ladies
exited the vehicles gorgeously dressed in
apparel from La Chica Caliente.

The beauties were poised, elegant and
articulate as they greeted friends, family and
well-wishers who had the opportunity to mix
and mingle with them for the first time in
their new role as contestants.

The audience was also treated to a mini
fashion show sponsored by the Elegant
Women Boutique and featuring some former
contestants.

The pageant’s winner will go on to repre-
sent the Bahamas in the Miss Bold and Beau-
tiful pageant in Puerto Rico.

Last year, Mona-Lisa Smith was crowned
Ms Full Figured Bahamas. She became the
second runner-up overall in the Miss Bold
and Beautiful pageant and received a special
honour in the evening gown segment.

This position has afforded her an opportu-
nity to accompany the new Ms Full Figured

Bahamas and the first runner-up to Puerto
Rico for the 2010 pageant.

Ms McDonald promises that this year’s
competition finale will be outstanding.

To view the gallery of the nine contestants
vying for the Miss Full Figured Bahamas title
visit www.msfullfiguredbahamas.com.






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.279TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNWITH T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 76F F E A T U R E S S EEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Ms Full Figured Bahamas SEEPAGEELEVEN Hall of Fame nomination By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net THE Government laid out its plans yesterday to remedy a myriad of land use p roblems including the illegal sale of unauthorised lots and the lack of utilities available in some developed neighbourhoods. The Planning and Subdivision Bill will also introduce stricter zoning laws which will address the "unplanned invasion" of businesses into residential areas; the problem of building permits granted in unapproved subdivisions; the issuance of building permits before utility services have been installed; and review subdivi sion fees. The new laws will lay out development guidelines in order to avoid situations where there is a lack of basic infrastructure in planned subdivisions; a lack of develop ment and construction standards; and the inefficiencies relating to development/construction applications and the approval process. While leading the debate on the legisla tion in the House yes terday, EnvironmentM inister Earl Deveaux said the Bill would provide for a land use planning based development control system led by policy, land use designations and zoning. Mr Deveaux also said that, among other things, the new laws will prevent the indiscrim inate division and development of land; promote sustainable development in a healthy natural environment; and provide for planning processes that are fair by making them open, Go vt plans to tackle illegal selling of lots The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Bill to get tough on land issues SEE page eight 28-YEAR-OLD Jamal Sargent leaves court yesterday after being charged. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A MAN accused of having $15,500 in fake bank notes and materials to produce con terfeit cash was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Jamal Sargent, 28, was arrested in a police raid on Friday and charged on two counts. He stood silently before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court Eight, Bank Lane, wearing faded stonewashed jeans and a bright red T-shirt emblazoned with cartoon designs, and simple white Nike sneakers. Sargent is charged with possession of materials for forging notes and having in his possession a quantity of papers with impressions of currency notes. The charge states Sargent had nine Bahamian $10 notes,173 Bahamian $20 notes,109 Bahamian $50 notes, and 65 Bahamian $100 notes while knowing them to be forged and puporting them to be genuine currency. The counterfeit cash said to be in Sargent’s possession SEE page eight T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff R eporter m reynolds@ tribunmedia.net A MURDER i nvestigation has been launched to find the killers of a 33-year-old man found dead in aP inewood Gardens street early yesterday morning. R enard Denver Miller/Mackey, of Sugar Apple Street, Pinewood Gardens,w as shot in the head and left to die in Jacaranda Street, just four blocks from hish ome. Police were called at around 3.40am yes-t erday and received r eports of gunshots being fired in Jacaran da Street. When officers a rrived at the scene they found the body of Mr Miller, who also g oes by Mr Mackey, l ying in the road with an apparent gunshot to the head, according to Superintendent Man found shot dead in street SEE page eight By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller has issued a scathing attack on FNM MP Brensil Rolle who suggested that the former Blue Hills MP had been responsible for illegally excavating land and selling it back to the govern ment. During his communication on the Planning and Subdivision Act, Mr Rolle stated that the PLP dreaded the passing of the Bill as one of their “former” cabinet ministers had promised to have the operators who illegally excavated land charged before the courts. “But that was only talk,” Mr Rolle said in Parliament yesterday. “In fact, I was informed the reason why nothing was done was because he was the SEE page eight Former minister hits back at MP over land claims MAN A CCUSED OF HA VING FAKE BANK NOTES E ARL DEVEAUX

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM S CENES from the 19th Annual Wine and Art F estival which took place at the weekend. The event, held at The Retreat on Village R oad, featured the work of over 40 Bahamian artists. Visitors were treatedt o paintings and sculptures on showt hroughout the grounds. Felipe Major /Tribune Staff WINE & ARTS FESTIVAL

PAGE 3

REPRESENTATIVES of t he International Labour O rganisation (ILO Bahamas to meet with stakeholders of the National Empowerment Training Pro-gramme, an initiative launched by the governmentto help displaced workers l earn new trades. Luesette Howell and Hassan Bata Ndahi, from the ILO sub-regional office in the Caribbean, are examining whether the expectations of students and employers will be met at the completion of the programme. They also want to ensure that after finishing the programme, some of the students will have the skills needed to become self-employed. Ms Howell, senior special ist in employers’ activities, s aid after they have complete d their observations, they will provide feedback and offer recommendations to the government on how to improve the programme so as to better fulfill its objectives. T he representatives toured the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute on Monday and reviewed several courses offered under the programme. They also met with Charles Hunt, a consultant for the programme from the Ministry of Labour; Deborah Bethel, senior labour officer; Sean Adderely, public relations officer for the Bahamas Tech nical and Vocational Institute, and Dr Pandora Johnson, VP of research and development a t the College of the B ahamas. They will also tour the College of the Bahamas and meet with the Minister of Labour and Social Development Senator Dion Foulkes and other government offi c ials, National Empowerment Training Committee members and the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News...........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters.......................................P4 Advts .................................................P9,12 Sports...............................................P10,11 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business......................................... P1,2,3,4 Advts................................................P5,6,7 Comics...................................................P8 Woman....................................P9,10,11,12 CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net O PPOSITION MP Fred Mitchell questioned whether government is capable of enforcing the host of new "complicated" guidelines outlined in the Town Planningand Subdivision Bill. Mr Mitchell also questioned if government would commit the resources necessary to implement the provisions in the Bill and whether the public service is equipped to meet t he challenging demands crea ted by the new laws. He said that neither Environment Minister Earl Deveaux or Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry of Housing Brensil Rolle who both spoke before him on the issue touched on the question of whether the public service has the capacity to deal with the provisions set forth in the Bill. "Is there the capacity to meet the demands this Bill would impose on the public service?" Mr Mitchell asked while giving his contribution to the debate in the House of Assembly yesterday. "And would the government comm it the resources, which are necessary, or which would be necessary to carry out the provisions of this Bill? There's no question that the provisions are complicated. . . (they impose new and strict standards and the public service and the politicians will have to comply with those standards". According to Mr Rolle, the Bill will protect the public's interest because details of all potential developments will be posted so they can be analysed for possible negative effects. H e added that the new legislation would "further strengthen and empower" the Town Planning Committee and reduce the amount of red tape that currently impedes approval of subdivisions. Mr Rolle explained that the new Bill seeks to: restrict indiscriminate land use; establish a comprehensive national land use plan; focus on strateg ic zoning requirements; and p lace subdivision and town planning under the portfolio of one minister. He added that the use of land for practices other than those allowed under zoning restrictions continues to be a common challenge facing the Department of Physical Planning. "While many of these changes are related to economic conditions, a substantial number of them are outright abuse of system," he said, referring to auto-body shops popping up in residential areas and the proliferation of bars next to churches. Fred Mitchell raises questions over Bill MP says new Town P lanning and Subdivision guidelines are ‘complicated’ ILO representatives to review National Empowerment Training Programme I NTERNATIONAL L abour Organization representatives visited some of the courses offeredu nder the National Empowerment Training Program at the B ahamas Technical and Vocational Institute on Monday. They are pictured speaking toa n instructor of the marine outboard engine class. D e r e k S m i t h / B I S p h o t o

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Tourist arrivals on Grand Bahama are expected to get a much-needed boost this quarter with the introduction of new air services from Canada and the United States. David Johnson, senior deputy director-general of Tourism, told The Tribune that new services from Canada should begin as early as next week. He also reported that new services from New York are expected to start by December. Mr Johnson said the Ministry of Tourism and the Grand Bahama Airport Company have made much progress in the last 12 months in terms of lowering turnaround costs for airlines flying to Grand Bahama International Airport. High airport fees and taxes have been a major deterrent in recent years for many airlines wishing to fly to Grand Bahama. In an effort to attract more airlines to the island, Ministry of Tourism officials have been working with airport officials to lower the fees. Mr Johnson said the Ministry of Tourism is pleased with the progress that has been made so far. “We stepped up our marketing and as a result we have been able to attract new services, and we will see services coming from Canada as early as next week, from New York by December, and additional air services from Florida. “We are not where we want to be, but we made a big dent in the right direction of bringing some relief to the airlines and passengers. We are committed to getting our cost lower, but of course more volume will help get there as well,” said Mr Johnson. The airline West Jet will begin services from Canada to Grand Bahama on November 2. The low-cost carrier will provide two weekly non-stop flights from Toronto on a 737 aircraft. This is expected to bring 12,000 visitors to the island this winter. Grand Bahama was the number one destination for Canadian visitors 35 years ago, and tourism officials are trying to win back that market. They feel the island's close proximity to the eastern seaboard of Canada was one of the main reasons behind the earlier popularity. Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace believes that Grand Bahama’s proximity to the biggest market in the world should be reflected in how much it costs to get to Freeport. “We cannot sit here and believe it is fine every single day that it is more expensive to come to Grand Bahama than to our competing destination," said Mr Vanderpool-Wallace in July. The minister said it is important that all partners in Grand Bahama work together with the Ministry of Tourism to exploit the island's proximity advantage. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM is presently considering applications for anAccountantThe Financial Accounting Department is accepting applications for an Accountant:Requirements: frequency Applications should be submitted to: Human Resources Department P.O. Box N-4928 Nassau, Bahamas or via fax 356-8148DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OFAPPLICATIONS IS: NOVEMBER 6, 2009 rtbr rtbr tbtr tbtr * Remove & Replace Engine * Head Jobs * Tune-Ups * Timing * Complete Overhaul * Rebuild Alternator & Starter* OIL CHANGE---------$20.00* Come in or call us today and let us get you rollin! OAKES FIELD COLLEGE AVE. Tel: 323-5835/323-5436 INGRAHAM’S AUTO SPECIAL Grand Bahama set for new air services from Canada, US By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Senior deputy director-general of tourism David Johnson believes Grand Bahama must stop seeking to fool tourists if the island’s tourism industry is ever to be revived. He noted that hotels have been using the “bait and switch” trick for years – offering low room prices to lure visitors, who are then slapped with excessive taxes and other charges that double the room price. Mr Johnson said the Ministry of Tourism has received a lot negative feedback from visitors who felt they were “tricked.” “The customer needs to know what it costs without being tricked. We got away with this in the early 90s and beyond when the US consumer protection laws were not as keen as they are now. “We invited customers here a t very low prices and then when they are checking in or checking out, presented a surprise on the total. “We had much negative feedback because they were not even advised of those charges,” he said. M r Johnson said visitors expect their rooms to come with certain services – and that any additional charge would be 10 or 15 per cent, not 100 per cent. Because hoteliers are now required by law to disclose all charges, he said, they are now having a difficult time gettingc ustomers. “The customer today is fierce in their commitment to seek value and it is very distasteful whenever they encounter any merchant or provider who is seeking to pull the wool over their eyes,” Mr Johnson said. Tourism chief hits out at ‘bait and switch trick’ PROGRESS has been made in the last 12 months in terms of lowering turnaround costs for airlines flying to Grand Bahama International Airport.

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TRIBUNE readers are overwhelmingly of the view that the P LP’s new “CDR” team is not strong enough to win the next general election. In one of the most successful tribune242.com polls to date, almost three times as many readers said they think the opposition’s new leadership team would not attract enough sup-p ort to unseat the FNM. Many also called for the old guard of both parties to be replaced by younger politicians. Readers were asked if Perry Christie, Philip “Brave” Davis and Bradley Roberts have what it takes to lead the PLP to victory in the next general election.O f the 299 people who voted, 218 said “no” while only 81 answered “yes”. Commenting on the matter, Bertram W said: “Christie, Davis and Roberts are the old boys and so are the three top leaders in the government. Their days are numbered. There is no newt hing that they can bring to the table. All of them need to step aside. “We need to stop awarding people with high positions just because they have been there a long time. If they are ineffective they must go. The Bahamas needs new leaders at this time. Do not gave this country back to Christie, nor Davis. When you take it from Ingraham gave it to a new breed of Bahamians. “I don’t know if you remember but there was a law firm some years ago called Christie, Ingraham and Co. The ‘Co’ was Davis. Do not let this country be passed around, giving each of them a turn to be prime minister. Its about time that the people take back the Bahamas from the chosen few.” Real Talk added: “I only voted ‘no’ because ‘HELL NO’ wasn't an option. I don't think these people (PLP and FNM stand that despite what their diehards are telling them, they're going about this all wrong. Excluding the “new blood” is a recipe for disaster. But I guess as long as we keep putting them back in, they'll never get it.” Lady Bowe called for “change we can believe in”, saying: “Mr Christie said that he wanted to change things for the party and head the party in a new direction. Well from where I am sitting it is the same and nothing has changed. Instead we heard whispers of people voting who were not financial, and people nominating who were not financial, hence their positions should be null and void. That is certainly not change we can believe in.” According to Jack , “Christie, Brave and Roberts represent a dramatic regression. They have blocked the advance of younger people in the PLP leadership and indicated a trend that will not be acceptable to Bahamians whose support the PLP needs to win. “The move might be popular within the party, but these days there is a growing community of voters who are not bound to any p arty, unimpressed by the big bad bully tactics, unswayed by emotion, and looking for substance. Every event in the convention gave me more reasons to reject the PLP and fear for the future of the two-party system. When it wasn't a wake for Urban Renewal, the conventions eemed more like a circus. It failed to promote itself as a party seeking to impress Bahamians to choose them to be the next government. It failed to address the issues that caused it to be rejected by the electorate the last time.” George G asked what the P LP’s plan is. He said that he was “totally lost” by party chairman-elect Bradley Roberts’ comment: "I have come to bite and to bite hard.” The reader said it seems Mr Roberts’ “semiretirement” left him angry and confused. “That was the message in the w hole convention, I didn't hear anything else that made me go, ‘Oh wow!’ It was the same old promises they made and didn't deliver while they were in office. I looked in the audience; there were very few young people in there, but they boast of being the party for the youths. “So if they call Bradley young, t hey need to check their members’ date of birth again,” he said. However, Tony Cash said: “I am a building contractor, I voted FNM in 2007. At that time things were good in the construction industry. “As it stands now, the recession is on and we do expect things to stop, but contractors who own heavy equipment see how the foreign companies are able to come to the Bahamas and bring their own equipment, while our equipment is parked and for sale. I think anyone who is in the construction industry or who has relatives in the con struction industry should see by now that the PLP government cared more about Bahamian contractors. “The FNM takes all of the country’s stimulus money and pumps it into foreign companies.I wish election was today to vote them out.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Poll:the new PLP team is not strong enough to win election PHILP DAVIS , Perry Christie and Bradley Roberts at the convention.

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By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporters pturnquest@tribunemedia.net NEWLY appointed chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party Bradley Roberts has wasted no time joining the fray launching a second scathing attack on the FNM after the governing party criticised remarks he made during the P LP’s 51st national convention. Stating that “truth” is on the side of the PLP, Mr Roberts said it is truth which will build trust in the hearts and minds of the Bahaman people. “Scream as they will, the FNM will do well to reflect on the truth of what more and m ore Bahamians feel every day that while Perry Christie was prime minister there were more jobs and less pain and sufferings. As but one example, never were there 9,000 households without electricity supply. “Under Hubert Ingraham, the standard of living of the a verage Bahamian is declining, through less and less real i ncome. Further, from what is earned, a higher and higher percentage of their income is going to pay taxes,” he said. Mr Roberts also said the FNM is now saddled with more “scandals” than the PLP was a ny time under Mr Christie’s leadership. Scream as they will, the FNM will do well to reflect on the truth that the country’s finances are in worse shape than at any time while Perry Christie was prime minister.. . After all, more and more p ersons who entered into contract with the government are reporting increasing delays in being paid by the government. “It appears that the government is broke or is increasingly close to being broke. Another truth on the side of the PLP is that technology i ncreasingly provides greater and greater means for the par ty to get out to the public its message of truth. “It is this combination of the truth being on the side of the PLP and the availability of m ore modern means of getting out the facts that will result in t he public seeing stronger and clearer evidence of the incompetence and mismanagement of the FNM and the reality that Hubert Ingraham is out of step with the most widely accepted principles for team leadership i n the 21st century,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 8QNQRZQ$XUWKRU A nentrepreneurialspirit,originalthinking,andapassiontosucceed. If you haveit,wewant you . W e are growing! Fidelity Bank invites applications for the position of:ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE October 31st, 2009 to: HUMAN RESOURCES Re: System Administrator, 51 Frederick Street P.O. Box N-4853 | Nassau | F: 328.1108 careers@fidelitybahamas.comP ROFILE: BS degree in Computer Science, Information systems, or related specialty or equivalent experience/training 2+ years experience in application support in a financial institution Must have an understanding of general business principles, and how to translate business needs into quality technical solutions A genuine focus on internal customer satisfaction and a positive, friendly demeanor is required. Functional experience with databases, SQL scripting, or other programming experience Knowledge of IIS configuration and management Experience with ASP, HTML, and .NET applications preferred Experience with AS/400 applications an advantage Strong organization and prioritization skills Strong customer service experience preferred Must be able to work both independently and as a valued member of a team Crystal Reports and Microsoft Reporting Services experience a plusRESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE: Reviews, analyzes, evaluates and applies solutions to end-user support requests for the Banks’s networked and SQL-based applications. Troubleshoot applications to resolve technical related issues including application and data problems. Develops, maintains, and executes testing plans for applications including initial implementations, enhancements, or upgrades. Administer support requests and participates in developing, supporting, and meeting department Service Level Agreements (SLA Install and deploy SQL databases, create backup plans, test disaster recovery scenarios, and a dminister security Document processes and help design improvements Communicate clearly and professionally with internal customers including technical and non-technical staff, management, and vendorsA competitive compensation package will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.-SYSTEMADMINISTRATORO nly persons shortlisted will be contacted Roberts hits back at FNM THE Montagu Foreshore Steering Committee will host a public meeting on Thursday to hear thev iews of residents, vendors, businesses and others with a n interest in the preservation and usage of the foreshore. The area, which extends east from the Nassau Yacht Club to the Royal Nassau Sailing Club and includesF ort Montagu, has attracted particular attention b ecause of the boat ramp at its eastern end, which many view as little more than a traffic obstruction and a nuisance. “We have been working to understand the uses of Montagu foreshore, the commerce on the ramp and the recreational traffic and uses since the committee was formed under the auspices of Montagu MP and Minister of State for Social Development Loretta But ler-Turner in July,” said Diane Phillips, chairman. “Now we are most eager to get public input as we prepare to draft a report for the minister’s consideration. When the minister charged this committee with its task, she emphasised that the future ofM ontagu is not a political issue, it is a community i ssue. Public opinion is critical and toward that end, we have prepared a ques tionnaire which will be dis tributed on Thursday at the meeting. People may complete it that evening.” A ccording to Mrs Phillips, the 14-member c ommittee has been engaged in on-site reviews, photography and interviews. “The first thing people talk about is the traffic congestion because it is a reali ty that persons who live in the East face on a daily basis, but there are other serious issues about land use, recreation, erosion fac tors,” said Mrs Phillips. “This is an opportunity to be heard and we hope there will be an excellent turn-out.” Both Mrs Butler-Turner and Minister of the Envi ronment Earl Deveaux are scheduled to be at the meeting, set for 6pm at the Nassau Yacht Club, East Bay Street. Montagu Foreshore Steering Committee to host meeting PLPCHAIRMAN Bradley Roberts at last week’s convention.

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biggest violator and was himself excavating land illegally and his company was selling the fill to the government.” As a former Minister who also had responsibility for Agri culture, Mr Miller took the media on numerous tours throughout New Providence exposing incidents where unscrupulous contractors had excavated government owned land and was in some instances re-selling it to the government via the city dump. While seeking to have these individuals arrested and charged before the courts, the former MP was frustrated in his efforts as the police, who often were called to the scenes with the media, claimed that the issue was beyond their control and could do nothing “without instructions.” Moreover, as it pertains to the issue of being implicit with such actions himself, Mr Miller said that nothing could be fur ther from the truth. “Normally I don’t respond to cowards like Brensil Rolle, who is nothing but a two-bit MP for the good people of Garden Hills; and if he wants to know what good representation is all about he can ask any of his con stituents the type of represen tation they got from Leslie M iller. “First of all, I sold no fill to the government of the Bahamas while I was the Minister responsible. None whatsoever. I never had a contract with them for my five years as a Minister,” Mr Miller said. In fact, the former Blue Hills M P reminded Mr Rolle that he was congratulated in Parliament by the former FNM MP Pierre Dupuch for selling fill from his own property to the FNM government at below rock bottom prices. “From 1992 to 2002 I did sell the FNM government some 500,000 yards of fill at a price of $0.75 a yard whereas I could have gotten $6 a yard for it but I gave it to them at $0.75 a yard. I gave them the fill because they said they didn’t have any money in the budget and there was a great fire at the dump and I gave the government the fill at $0.75 a yard. “But that was my gift to the people of my country because it was a national emergency and the dump was raging for days and days and they needed all the fill they could have gotten. That was my contribu tion,” Mr Miller exclaimed. Highlighting that the fill was taken from his own family’s land, Mr Miller cautioned Mr Rolle for making such un-Par liamentary remarks when addressing issues that are near and dear to his heart. “If he really wants to be involved in assisting people from destroying our land, why does he sit on his ––– and allow persons to rape the land on Harrold Road right next to the Seventh-Day Adventist Church? There is a peak there about 80 feet off the ground and I have reported that to the Ministry of Works over and repeatedly that they should not allow them to destroy the land below the level of the church road. “But I suppose because this person is one of the FNM’s great white supporters he (Mr Rolle) couldn’t even mention that. But that is the kind of coward he is. But you wouldn’t expect anymore out of him,” Mr Miller said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM accessible and efficient. Mr Deveaux pointed out examples of poor subdivision planning, including the recently built Pride Estates government subdivision which he said was built between a hill and a wetland. He explained that about 100 new homes were built in rectangular blocks "resembling a parking lot" without a school, limited access to public open spaces a prescription for congestion that frustrated homeowners. "We lament the unplanned invasion of businesses and industry into residential communities; we decry the absence of basic infrastructure in what is supposed to be planned subdivisions; we complain about the failure of too many to observe correct standards in development and construction; we criticise the inefficiency and delay in our development/construction applications and approval processes; and we bemoan conflicting and competing legislation which are meant to govern and regulate our development," said Mr Deveaux. "This legislation is meant to address many of these concerns and inefficiencies," he added. The Bill will also establish a new structure within the Department of Physical Planning creating two new areas: a Policy Planning Division and a Development Review Division. Provisions for the creation of a Subdivision and Development Appeal Board are laid out in the Bill, which will hear complaints based on appeal of decisions made by the Town Planninf Committee. The Bill will also address a number of subdivisions left unfinished, which Mr Deveaux said was a common occurrence in Exuma. Under the Act, approvals for development will include: a land use amendment approval; zoning by-law amendment approval; minor variance approval; notice of zoning compliance; site plan approval; architectural design approval; subdivision approval and severance approval. A key provision of the Bill is the creation of Land Use Plans for each Bahamian island and it will also require an Environmental Impact Assessment for future developments. The Bill repeals the Private Roads and Subdivision Act, the Town Planning Act and the Town Planning (Out Islands a dded to $15,500. S argent, of Victoria Garden, off Gladstone Road, western New Providence, pleaded not guilty to both counts and opted to have hisc ase heard in Magistrate’s C ourt rather than the Supreme Court. His attorney, Tamara Saunders-Munnings, introduced herself to the magistrate stating it was the first time shew as representing a defendent i n a criminal case. Ms Bethel called for Sargent and Mrs SaundersMunnings to appear in Court Eight at 10am on Wednesday, O ctober 28, to fix a date for the trial. E lsworth Moss. M r Moss added: “At this stage we d on’t have a motive for the shooting, and we are appealling to the public to assist police as we are continuing our investigations.” No witnesses have yet come forward to help police form a profile of the killer or killers. Anyone with information which may relate to the murder should call police urgently on 919, 322-3333, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328TIPS (8477 FROM page one For mer minister hits back at MP over land claims FROM page one Bill to get tough on land issues Man accused of having fake bank notes FROM page one Man found shot dead in street F ROM page one THEMAN was shot in the head and left t o die in Jacaranda Street, just four blocks from his home. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI (AP Brees angrily stomped to the sideline, while behind him the Miami Dolphins celebrated a big defensive play. The scene kept repeating, and soon the New Orleans Saints trailed by three touch downs. "You're looking at the scoreboard and it's 24-3, and you say, 'How did this game get out of hand like this?'" Brees said. For the NFL's highest-scor ing team, the deficit proved surmountable. Unbeaten New Orleans scored 43 points in the final 30:02 to rally past the Miami Dolphins 46-34 Sun day. The Saints topped 40 points for the fourth time and outscored the Dolphins 22-0 in the fourth quarter. "There was no doubt on our sideline we would come back and win," Brees said. "They had given us their best shot, and we had playeda bout as bad as we could play. All we had to do was string together a few drives and gain the momentum back. We knew it was going to happen, and it did." Brees had his roughest day o f the season, with three inter ceptions, a lost fumble, five sacks and two cuts to the face. But he led long touchdown drives on three successive possessions in the second half to put New Orleans ahead. T racy Porter's 54-yard interception return then sealed the win for the Saints (6-0 start since 1991 and are the only unbeaten team in the NFC. "This was a test we hadn't faced yet, and we couldn't be happier with the way we responded," linebacker Scott Shanle said. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPORTS IN BRIEF B ASKETBALL MIAMI Associated Press TIM HARDAWAY already has one banner celebrating his achievements with the Miami Heat. He’s about to get another. The Heat will retire Hardaway’s No. 10 jersey before Wednesday night’s seasonopener against the New York Knicks. He’ll be just the second player to receive that honor from the franchise. Alonzo Mourning’s No. 33 was hoisted last seas on by Miami. H ardaway’s previous banner was one celebrating the 2000 Olympic gold medal he won while with the Heat. Hardaway finally getting his Heat banner COLLEGE FOOTBALL G AINESVILLE, Fla. Associated Press FLORIDAquarterback Tim Tebow is frustrated. He’s tired of the intercep tions, the sacks and the redzone struggles. Although the top-ranked Gators are still undefeated heading into Saturday’s game against Georgia, Tebow admits he would like to have “prettier” wins. But he adds that, “If they’re all ugly, that’s OK. We’ll be undefeated.” T ebow also apologized M onday for blowing off postgame interviews following Saturday’s 29-19 victory at Mississippi State. Tebow says he wanted to hang out with family and former posi tion coach, current MSU coach Dan Mullen. Tebow says Mullen told him to go win another national championship. For that to happen, though, the Gators probably need perform better near the goal line. Tebow frustrated with Florida’s offensive problems Tim Tebow T HE New Providence Volleyball Association continued its 2009 regular season on Sunday with another triple h eader at the D W Davis Gymnasium. In the first match, the Scottsdale Vixens defeated the COB Lady Caribs in three sets 25-22, 25-13 and 25-22. Krystal Rolle led the Vixens with eight points and Kenisha Thompsonl ed all scorers with 10 points in a losing effort. The second game saw the Champions come from behind to beat the Saints 19-25, 29-27, 25-19 and 25-20. M uller Petit led the Champions Club and all scorers with 24 points for the win. William McKinney scored 14 points for the Saints. In the final game, the COB Caribs p ulled off an exciting win and upset the Police Crimestoppers in five sets 25-16, 25-23, 17-25, 18-25 and 15-8. Rayon Brooks took charge for the Caribs with 15 big points. I n a losing effort, Carl Rolle would match a side high 15 points for the Crimestoppers. Scottsdale Vixens beat Lady Caribs Champions defeat Saints Caribs upset Crimestoppers V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L DAVIE, Fla. (AP Miami Dolphins cornerback Will Allen is out for the season with a left knee injury. Allen hurt his anterior cruciate ligament in the third quarter of the Dolphins' loss to New Orleans and will require surgery, coach Tony Sparano said Monday. Allen has missed only one game since joining the Dolphins in 2006. He leads the team with two interceptions this year. He'll be replaced by 2009 first-round draft pick Vontae Davis, which means the Dolphins will start two rook ie cornerbacks Sunday at the New York Jets. Second-round pick Sean Smith has been starting opposite Allen. Dolphins CB Allen out for season F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s Saints outscore Dolphins 22-0 in 4th for win DREW BREES is sacked by Dolphins safety Yeremiah Bell during the second quarter of Sunday’s game in Miami... (AP Photo: Jeffrey M Boan said. “The enjoyment I know is not there anymore like when we played. We played very competitively and we had a goal to play. “But now it seems like the young people are playing together just to get out of the house and get on the field to have fun and party. They are not as serious as when we played.” Although she’s still employed at JBR Building Supplies Limited, Ellis admits that age has certainly caught up with her and so she’s not as athletically inclined as she was in the past. But she noted that she’s grateful to God for having been nominated and elected to the Hall of Fame. “I just give him thanks and praise for it,” she said. “I also want to thank Bobby Baylor Fernander who was the mainstay behind it. He was the one who was really pushing to get me there.” Full details about Ellis’ induction have not been released as BSF president Burkett Dorsett, vice presi dent Ted Miller and immediate past president Rommel Knowles are scheduled to return home from the congress today. Also during the congress, Knowles was voted in as vice president of the Americas, a region that is designated for the US and the Caribbean. Knowles is the first Bahamian to hold such a post on the international scene. Ellis nominated for ISF Hall of Fame induction

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net A fter retiring about a decade ago, Naomi Ellis is finally going to get some international recognition for her achievement in softball. At the International Softball Federation’s Congresso ver the weekend in Venezuela, Ellis’ name was submitted by the Bahamas Softball Federation (BSF nomination for the Hall of Fame 2009 induction class. Her nomination by BSF president Burkett Dorsett was accepted as Ellis will become only the second Bahamian to be inducted, following on theh eels of Grand Bahama’s Candice DeGregory-Culmer in the 2007 class. “I’m elated. It’s been a long time, but it’s never too late,” said Ellis, who began playing softball at the age of 19 and retired 10 years ago when she was 49. Ellis, who turns 60 on May 3, will bring the Bahamas’ total of inductees up to 12 since the ISF began the induction of administrators, managers, coaches, players and umpires in 1981. The other Bahamians inducted were as follows: Leon ‘Apache’ Knowles, player/coach in 1987; Churchill Tener-Knowles, administrator/organiser in 1 991; Neko Grant, administrator/organiser in 1997; Arthur Thompson, umpire in 2001; Greg Christie, administrator; Sidney ‘Bobby Baylor’ Fernander, coach and Dudley ‘Douggie’ Smith, player, all in 2003 and DeGregory-C ulmer, player; Richard ‘the Lion’Heart’ Johnson, player; Austin ‘King Snake’ Knowles, meritorious service and Godfrey ‘Gully’ Pinder, coach, all in 2007. Like all of the above, Ellis has made tremendous strides on the international scene, having represented the Bahamas on just about every national team with the exception of two during her tenure. “The greatest highlight for me was when we got third in the world,” said Ellis. “When we did that, I was on top of the world.” During her career, Ellis suited up to play under the management of Eddie Ford, Bobby Fernander, Colin ‘Troppy’ Knowles, the late Peter ‘Pa-B’ Bethell and God-f rey Pinder. She also played with such players as Carmetta ChristieLockhart, Ernestine ButlerStubbs, Vangy Bowleg, Mavis Whymms, Judy Allan, Joanne Thompson, Muriel Anderson, Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt, Jeannie ‘Bubbles’ Mynez, Hyacinth Farrington and Ingrid Rose. “I don’t have any regrets because I know I did my best,” she stated. But looking at the sport now compared to the days when she participated, Ellis said there is no comparison. “The caliber of softball has gone down very much,” she C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Scottsdale Vixens beat Lady Caribs... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Saints outscore Dolphins 22-0 i n 4th for win... See page 10 2009 Sunfish Worlds winner David Loring receives his award from Pierre Colle, senior vice president of Pictet Bank & Trust. P P h h o o t t o o b b y y R R o o b b e e r r t t D D u u n n k k l l e e y y Loring Sunfish W orlds winner By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MEACHER ‘Pain’ Major knows that if he’s going to be successful next Friday night, he will have to go through some intense workout sessionsi n Hollywood, Florida. For the past two weeks, Major has been back in Florida with trainer Anthony Chills’ Wilson as he prepares for his NABO mandatory lightweight title defense against American DorinS pivey. The two are scheduled to clash on November 6 at the Convention Center in Buffalo, New York, as Major cele brates his 28th birthday (Wednesday, October 28 his mother’s on October 31 in grand style. “Everything is going great,” said Major, who will be defending the title he was recently awarded after his bout with American Michael Clark ended in a no contest June 19 in Buffalo. “Training has been going great. Always something new to work on.” Major, who is accommodat ing amateur boxer Valentino Knowles for a few months, is slated to leave November 4 for Buffalo. “I just want to go out there and be successful,” said Major, who will take a 16-3-1 winloss-draw record with 14 knockouts in the 12-round bout against Spivey’s 35-6 record with 28 KO. “Thanks to my trainers, Anthony Wilson, Nathaniel Knowles and Gregory Storr and everybody who has supported me, I feel I can go out there and execute my talent, perform to the best of my abil ity and I’m very confident that I can come out victorious.” Wilson, who has been training Major extensively for the fight, said they are looking forward to returning to Buffalo. “Since he came in, I was working with his timing,” Wilson stressed. “He came in here in great shape, so I really didn’t have to worry too much about that. “He’s the type of fighter that fights from his heart, so regardless of who the oppo nent is, he is always ready. He has all the skills, so I’m just trying to keep him sharp so that he can be ready.” At this point in his training, Major said he has already reached his fight limit, which he has never done before in any of his previous fights. “I came here in great shape and I just had to work on getting fine tuned,” Major said. “So I know I’m ready and I’m going to go to New York and make the best of the opportu nity. “Whether I win or lose, I will be very happy with myself because I know that I would have gone out and gave it my best shot. But I’m not going into the fight thinking that I’m going to lose.” A confident Major said despite the fact that Spivey is 36-years-old, he’s not going to let his age play a factor in whether or not he is successful. “I’ve already told my han dlers that this is my time to shine and although this guy has been around, what he haven’t achieve yet, it’s not my fault when I beat him,” Major stressed. “This is my time.” Giving the credit to his father, Anthony Major Sr, Major said he has the belief that he can beat anybody in the world and he’s hoping that after this fight, he will get clos er to securing a world title shot. “My father is really the one who pushes me so hard,” he pointed out. “He’s not in the gym when I’m training, but he has sat me down and talked to me like a father to a son and he has installed the qualities in me to go out there and perform. “So I really want to thank him because he’s the main reason why I’m in the position that I am today.” Whenever he gets a shot at the world title, Major said he will definitely dedicate it to his father. ain’: T r aining ‘is g oing g reat’ MEACHER MAJOR NAOMI ELLIS P hoto by T im Clarke S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 Ellis nominated for ISF Hall of Fame induction

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.97 $3.88 $4.00 ! f%!& f$ ! # #! $ !!! ("!)"'$ "!&!)#"$&" '!&)$%%'$&)%"#% #""%%$&!!%"'$&%nbnfrbt B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce isp lanning “next month”t o launch a Chamber I nstitute designed to provide a technical support package to its members and Bahamian businesses, its president yesterd ay urging cash-strapped institutions such as the BahamasD evelopment Bank (BDB continue playing a role in small b usiness financing. Khaalis Rolle explained that the Chamber Institute would play a facilitation/co-ordination role in its plans to assist small b usiness development, creating the curriculum and supportp ackage before outsourcing the delivery to members involved i n that line of work. Confirming to Tribune Busi ness that the Chamber Institute was set “to come next month”, Mr Rolle explained: “We will b e offering the type of support that businesses need. We’re tryi ng to move beyond the strong advocacy role we’ve played in t he past to a more technical support organisation.” The proposed support packages would involve the likes of marketing, accounting and l eadership training, “all of the things businesses need to u nderstand how to efficiently Chamber plans Institute to give business support B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Telecommun ications Company (BTC fered a 50.7 per cent net income reduction in 2008, as profits were squeezed by a slight topline decline and $18.7 million r ise in operating expenses, although that did not stop the G overnment taking a $50 mil lion dividend from the compan y post year-end. Kirk Griffin, BTC’s acting president and chief executive, writing in BTC’s 2008 annual report acknowledged that the s tate-owned incumbent’s net income had fallen to $21.1 mill ion from $42.8 million the year before, “resulting principally BTC suffers 50.7% profit fall in * Chamber president says development bank needed to support start-ups through growing pains, pinting out his business lost $180k in first year on $250k turnover * Says bank’s lending constraints will kill some entrepreneurs’ ideas and leave key void ROLLE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B * Government takes $50m d ividend from state-owned incumbent in 2009, and likely to extract some $105m in 18-24 month period * Privatisation talks likely to include focus on $25.387m pension liability * Drop in 2008 performance caused by 6% or $18.7m rise in operating expenses, and 1% revenue fall B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMAS Waste yesterd ay said it expected to have its cardboard recycling facility “up and running” by the beginning of December 2009, and is targeting 500 tonnes of cardboard p er month for processing. Francisco de Cardenas, the B ISX-listed company’s managing director, also confirmed to T ribune Business yesterday that it hoped to “be making biodiesel in the first quarter” 2010, once all necessary government permits and approvals w ere received. Adding that Bahamas Waste h ad enjoyed “a nice third quar ter” this year from a financial p erformance perspective, Mr de Cardenas said that in relat ion to the company’s cardboard recycling initiative, “we’re basically waiting on a few more parts for the bailer. “We then go through a period of testing on the machine, and then we’ll be good to go. I would say that within the next month, probably by the beginning of December, we’ll be up and running. We’re going to be trying to get about 500 tonnes of cardboard in a month.” Mr de Cardenas said Bahamas Waste would be recovering a product it nor mally dumped in the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway landfill, processing and recy cling it, and then attempting to sell it for export. He added that the company w ould be going through a “learning curve” with the card b oard recycling facility, and it would take time to reach the 5 00 tonnes per month level. Hinting that Bahamas Waste would eventually look at other recycling efforts, said: “Cardboard is the beginning, and we will see what else, but right now we’re focusing efforts on card board.” As for Bahamas Waste’s biodiesel plans, Mr de Cardenas told Tribune Business: “The equipment is being manufactured, we are sourcing our tankage and working with the BEST Commission on the Environmental Impact Assess ment and Environmental Management Plan. Early December target for Waste recycling facility * BISX-listed firm targeting 500 tonnes of cardboard per month for processing * Hoping to get approvals to start biodiesel production in 2010 Q1, hoping to produce 100,000 gallons in year one and have 20-50% vehicle usage S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B ‘Don’t throw baby out with bath water’ By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor T he Government has been urged not to throw the baby out w ith the bath water” and d elay moving the Planning and Subdivision Bill movingt hrough Parliament to allow for more consultation, with realtors expressing c oncern that its provisions could “strangle the economic development of the Bahamas”. William Wong, the Bahamas Real Estate Association’s (BREAd ent, last night told Tribune Business that his 700-strong membership had some very serious concerns” over the Planning and Subdivisions Bill, h aving discussed the issue with developers and other impacted professions. Mr Wong said the Bill, by outlining a prescriptive approval process for all commercial and residential real estate developments in the Bahamas, with specified timelines for all stages, would create another layer of bureaucracy and red tape” that developers wouldh ave to overcome. Time and delays cost developers m oney, the BREA president pointed out, and this increase in development c osts would likely to be passed on to the consumer or real estate purchaser,r aising the possibility that more Bahamians could be priced out of the m arket. Addressing BREA’s specific con cerns, some of which were outlined in a letter to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Mr Wong told Tribune Business that the Government appeared to be “putting the cart b efore the horse” by moving to pass the Planning and Subdivisions Bill before it had completed its Land Use Plans for all Bahamians islands. T hese plans, addressed in Section 35 of the Planning and Subdivisions Bill, w ere, according to Mr Wong, scheduled to be completed in six months f or New Providence and 12 months for the Family Islands. They wered esigned to address the zoning of land for particular uses, such as commercial a nd residential, utilities, land use policy, road corridors and the preservation of historical and cultural sites. They should get this Land Use Plan finished first before the Planning a nd Subdivisions Bill,” Mr Wong told Tribune Business. He added in his let-t er to the Prime Minister: “This poli cy has been needed for decades and c an be the solution to what is professionally known as ‘sprawl’, and is regular throughout the length and b readth of the country “All Bahamian professionals that I h ave consulted with are strongly in favour of an organised and sustain a ble strategy for the growth of our islands. This Bill, however, puts ‘the cart before the horse’ and releases the Government of their responsibility to provide the platform for Bahamians to h ave the opportunity to be a major stakeholder in the development of the Bahamas.” Arguing that the Planning and Subd ivisions Bill appeared to have been written more by someone experienced i n environmental matters, as opposed to development, Mr Wong told Tri b une Business: “It doesn’t in any way consider these tough economic times. It’s going to affect the Bahamian man and woman who want to buy p roperty and will put it out of their reach. It will strangle the economic development of the Bahamas, particu larly in these very difficult economic climate.” M r Wong said the need for public consultation and town meetings coulds tymie foreign developers who, after acquiring land for a development, c ould find themselves blocked by the complaints of nearby residents and see the Town Planning Committee r efuse planning permission. The BREA questioned what hap p ened to land caught up in such disputes, whether it would sit there and S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B WILLIAM WONG

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become “dead land” with r educed value, and what would happen to the investor and the Bahamas’ reputation/standing in investment circles. All this is going to drive up t he cost of development,” Mr W ong argued. “You frustrate t he developer and drive up the c ost of development. Guess who pays for it? The consumer. One way or another, this Bill i s going to drive up the cost of land for Bahamians. “The Government is putting all these roadblocks and b ureaucracy in place, costing t he developer time and mone y.” Mr Wong expressed fears t hat the Bill could act as a disi ncentive to subdivision development and, as a result, the s upply of homes/lots would be unable to match demand as the p opulation grew, further pushing prices above the reach ofB ahamians via a supply/demand mismatch. U rging the Government to “hold back” and “delay” the Bill’s passage for further consultation, Mr Wong said the provision that preventedB ahamians from dividing property in their will to their chil-d ren could lead to further prob lems with generational property, leaving “tens of thousands of acres you can’t use”. “In this kind of environment, w e need a stimulus package to help us, not the kind of stufft hat makes it more frustrating,” Mr Wong added. from a 1 per cent or $3.5 million d ecline in revenues and a 6 per cent or $18.7 million increase in operating expenses”. On the revenue front, Mr G riffin attributed the drop from $356.915 million in 2007 to $353.369 million to an 18 per cent or $9.9 million drop in net roaming revenues. T his provides a further indication of the wide-ranging impact that the global econom-ic crisis and decline in tourist a rrivals has had on all facets of the Bahamian economy, since BTC’s roaming revenues are largely derived from tourists who, via agreements signed byB TC and their own home country carriers, are able to use their cell phones in the Bahamas. Fewer tourists equates to lower r oaming revenues. Mr Griffin said the decline in roaming revenues had been offset to some extent by a 12 p er cent increase in broadband Internet revenues to $16 million in 2008. Elsewhere, BTC’s cellular wireless revenues from post-p aid subscribers fell by 9.6 per cent or $5.2 million, partly due to the migration of former TDMA postpaid customers to t he new GSM prepaid platform. Revenues from the latter increased by $7.2 million to $143.1 million. BTC’s income statement a gain showed that the company is largely now a glorified cellular company, something that was effectively admitted by e xecutive chairman Julian Francis in the 2008 annual report, who said this business segment now accounted for 70 per cent of the company’s total rev-e nues. BTC’s current monopoly in cellular service provision in the Bahamas, something that will end two years after its privatis ation, has been critical to the company’s profitability and performance. It also indicates why Digicel, a 100 per cent cellular operator throughout theC aribbean, is interested in acquiring BTC as it is, to all intents and purposes, a cellular company despite the stateo wned incumbent’s interests in fixed-line, Internet and, possibly, Internet Protocol TV. Elsewhere, Mr Griffin said BTC’s payroll and benefitsi ncreased by 15 per cent to $83 million in 2008, largely due to the finalisation and implementation of the new industrial a greement for the period 20072010. While most other operating expense categories remained flat, what was termed as ‘PlantE xpense’ rose by more than $20 million from $152.308 million to $172.683 million. As a result, total operating expenses i ncreased from $313.397 million in 2007 to $332.052 million a year later. Unbundling plant expense, i t can be seen that payroll costs rose by 8.6 per cent in 2008 from $42.976 million to $46.679 million. Also on the rise were vendor discounts, which roseb y 23 per cent from $27.348 million to $33.74 million. Utilities costs, mainly the Bahamas Electricity Corporat ion (BEC $4 million from $7.567 million to $11.915 million. In his report, Mr Griffin said BTC had paid a $25 million div-i dend to the Government, in the form of the Public Treasury, in June 2008. That same year, some $16.4 million in cust oms duties and franchise fees were also paid by the company, along with $4 million in regulatory fees to the former Public Utilities Commission (PUC H owever, the annual report’s notes also revealed that BTC’s Board of Directors, all of whom are appointed by the Governm ent, declared a $50 million dividend at their April 23, 2009, meeting, which was subsequently paid on April 27, 2009. T aken with the previous $25 million dividend, and the Government’s plans to take a further $30 million dividend from BTC prior to privatisation, that$ 50 million windfall means that the Ingraham administration is likely to extract a total $105 million from the state-owned i ncumbent within a probable 18-month to two-year period. Some might question whether it is prudent to take such a large dividend from ac ompany that suffered a more than-50 per cent cut in net income in 2008, but BTC still had $118.6 million in cash on t he balance sheet as at December 31 of that year albeit a lower amount than the previous year’s $135.351 million. Added to that is the Gove rnment’s desperate need for every cent of revenue it can lay its hands on to plug the growing fiscal deficit and national debt, a nd with BEC’s problems, it is clear BTC remains the ‘crown jewel’ in its asset portfolio, although all things are relative. B TC also incurred some $4.778 million in privatisation costs on behalf of the Government in 2008, the annual report revealed, which the directorsd ealt with by issuing a dividend in-kind. And the report also highlighted another issue that will h ave to be resolved between the Government and any buyer in BTC’s privatisation namely who deals with, and fills, the $25.387 million pension liabili-t y the company’s defined benefit pension plan is sitting on. It is possible such an amount may be deducted from the purchase p rice. BTC’s annual report showed that its employee pension plan was suffering from a $63.475 million deficit, with the valueo f future obligations to pensioners standing at $252.941 million, yet the fair value of plan assets languishing at $ 189.466 million. The value of unrecognised actuarial losses was pegged at $38.088 million. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FOR SALEPhone: 436-9776 Forklift, like new, in very good condition, with warranty B B T T C C , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B B B R R E E A A , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION VACANCY NOTICE MANAGER REVENUE ACCOUNTING CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION Avacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue Accounting. The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous receivables. Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following: New Providence and the Family Islands software the Family Islands Job requirements include: Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation Tuesday, November 3, 2009. FOR SALEPhone: 436-9776 J ust like NEW, Nissan F ORKLIFT in very good condition. A sking $23,000 or nearest offer By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Government was yesterday urged to “divest itself” of the Bahamas DevelopmentB ank (BDB Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC over to private sector managem ent, as a Bahamian small b usiness organisation said it had “deep concerns” about the limits placed on the former’s lending capacity. A rguing that there were “too many separate organisations” involved in small business financing and support activities from a government perspective, Marvin Smith, the BahamasB usiness Association’s chairman, told Tribune Business thatm anagement of the likes of BDB and BAIC should be h anded to the private sector, with these entities replaced by a Bahamas Development Corporation. “What we need in the Comm onwealth of the Bahamas is for the Government of theB ahamas to divest itself of responsibilities that really b elong to the private sector,” Mr Smith said. “Going forward, the Government of the Bahamas cannot be all things to all people,and needs to turn things over to the private sector. We suggest t he creation of a Bahamas Development Corporation. The Governments of the Bahamas, past and future, need t o really divest themselves of the BDB and BAIC, and turn that over to private sectorgroupings or organisations.” Mr Smith said the Bahamas B usiness Association had “a deep concern” over the “severe liquidity issues” plaguing the B DB, which minister of state for finance, Zhivargo Laing, said had left it unable to write “any meaningful loans”. Some per cent-plus” of its loanp ortfolio was in default. Speaking from the perspective of small business access to credit and debt financing, espec ially during a recession, Mr Smith told Tribune Business: This is a deep concern of ours, b ecause for many of the small a nd medium-sized businesses unable to get loans from comm ercial banks, the only way to get credit is from the BDB and t he venture capital fund. “Since the Government has t aken a more conservative stance on that, perhaps they n eed to be more creative in how businesses get funding from outside the Bahamas. The Government and the Central Bank stand in the way of thatw ith the current legislation.” Yte Mr Smith added: “This t unnel is not as dark as it appears. The Government has to come to the position that they do not have all the answers or solutions to these problems w e face together. “Before they take the aggres s ive stance to terminate funding in this period where we need t o create jobs, they need to get everyone together to discuss solutions to the problems they are having right now.” While thanking all BDB and B AIC employees for their services over the years, Mr Smith said they needed to be “redep loyed in other areas of the public service where they are needed, so we can establish the Bahamas Development Corporation” and raise funding fort he economy’s productive sectors. Arguing that this organisation needed to be completely r un, driven and managed by the private sector, Mr Smith said: One of its primary objectives i s to see the creation of B ahamians owning the majority or a large percentage of the t ourism industry, and the agriculture or food security part of t he economy.” Given that the Government h ad previously given Crown Land grants and other incent ives to encourage foreign direct investment in the Bahamas, Mr Smith said a Bahamas Development Corporation should receive similara ssets for the purpose of empowering Bahamians in alli slands. “Hopefully, the Bahamas Development Corporation will be listed and traded on the Bahamas International Securit ies Exchange (BISX purpose of raising capital foro nward lending to small, medium and larger-sized businesses i n the Bahamas,” he added. “The Bahamas Development Corporation will have access to secure funds locally and internationally, whether its bonds, s tocks or more creative forms of financing.” Mr Smith said that while the p rivate sector understood the need to encourage foreign direct investment in the Bahamas, any developer receiving a Heads of Agreement-typeo f arrangements, plus incentives and land grants, must be required to do business with Bahamian companies. This Bahamas Development Corporation is to encour a ge legislation for the advancem ent of the interests of the B ahamian people and/or businesses,” Mr Smith said, adding t hat the Bahamas had “for too long relied” on the two main p olitical parties to safeguard their interests via policy, rathert han statute law. He pointed to the fact that t he likes of Singapore, Barbados and Trinidad & Tobago all had Business Development or Small and Medium-Sized Business Acts to encourage devel o pment in these sectors, arguing that the Bahamas neededs imilar laws to outline what was permissible and what was not. Government urged to ‘divest itself’ of BAIC and BDB roles Organisation has ‘deep concerns’ over Development Bank’s ‘severe liquidity issues’ I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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“Our plans have been subm itted, and we’re hoping we will not have any glitches and t hat everything will move forward. We suspect we’ll possibly be making biodiesel in the first quarter.” M r de Cardenas said he “wouldn’t be surprised if we make 100,000 gallons of biodiesel in the first year”, with a ny product it produces entirely for use in its own vehicle f leet. Explaining that the biodiesel f acility was conceived partly in response to the impact escalat-i ng global oil prices were having on Bahamas Waste’s cost base, M r de Cardenas said a key challenge would be to switch the company’s fleet to use b iodiesel. With there being relatively little technical information published on biodiesel and its use b y heavy duty vehicles, Mr de Cardenas said: “We’re doing a lot of studying and investigation of what we can and can’t d o.” He suggested that Bahamas W aste’s vehicles could use between 20-50 per cent b iodiesel, with the older vehicles likely to be able to use ah igher percentage. “We’re going to try and use as much a s we can,” Mr de Cardenas said. “Some vehicles might be able to use 100 per cent.” m anage a business”. “Hopefully, we can expand that in the future by being a broker for capital investment,” M r Rolle said, “being the gobetween between our members and potential members and lending institutions and venture capital organisations.” W hen asked how the Chamber would run its proposed Institute programme, Mr Rolle said: “We’re going to outsource t hat to the guys who offer those services. We will offer that through our existing members with our brand on it. We will develop the curriculum.” M eanwhile, Mr Rolle said the “severe liquidity issues” that had impacted the Bahamas Development Bank’s (BDB a bility to originate “any meaningful loans” was “symptomatic of all the structural issues we’re facing” in both the private and public sectors. H e argued, though, that the economy needed institutions such as the BDB “to continue to assist in business developm ent”, as they were critical to providing debt financing to start-ups that would otherwise be starved of capital and never get off the ground. M any entrepreneurs, Mr Rolle said, “invested everything in it” in terms of capital, yet had to endure a “ramp up perio d” before they made any money, often sustaining a loss in their first year of operation. Taking his Nassau Water Ferries venture as an example,M r Rolle said he suffered a $180,000 loss during his first year in operations on a $250,000 turnover, before maki ng a $70,000 profit on $500,000 turnover in his second year. “With a start-up, unless you have lots of capital, you are almost doomed from the outset a nd most businesses lose money in their first year of operations,” the Chamber president explained. “That’s why we need i nstitutions like the Bahamas Development Bank to continue to assist in business development.” Mr Rolle argued that while t he Government should not waste money or throw it away, it must not look at institutions such as the BDB as ‘a profit c entre”. Rather, it was an institution designed to encourage business development, innovation and ideas, and the emergence of a new generation ofe ntrepreneurs. The Chamber president also questioned whether small businesses and start-ups were maki ng best use of the Government’s business support services, and whether the agencies involved were structured correctly to maximise delivery in t his area. However, the “big question” was where the BDB, the Government and private sector w ent now, Mr Rolle suggesting the latter had to step in if the public sector entities were unable to lend. “It [the BDB] plays a critic al role,” he said. “It is the premier organisation that small businesses go to for lending outside the commercial banks, a nd that process is designed to encourage small business in this country. “If the BDB is not able to fulfill its mandate, and com-m ercial banks are not bullish, you will have a decline in small business growth in this country. There’s no ‘if’s’ and ‘but’s’ a bout it.” He added that some ideas currently held by entrepreneurs would “not be realised” due to the BDB’s lending constraints. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEYSIFFORD of Toote Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326 NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20thday of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE '838&+t(67t&2 &KDPEHUV 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV $WWRUQH\VIRUWKH([HFXWRUV SPACES FOR RENTOffices:1. 1, 200sq.ft @ $2,500.00 per month 2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month 3. 400sq.ft. @ $750.00 per month 4. 350 sq.ft @ $700.00 per monthStores:1 . 3,000 sq.ft @ $5,000.00 per month 2. 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1,700.00 per month ALL SPACES LOCATED ON THE NORTH EASTERN CORNER OF BAY STREET & ELIZABETH AVENUE. All Spaces are exclusive of utilitiesAll Inquires Call 326-4222 NOTICEPursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (4ab a nd (cAct, 2000, notice is hereby given that:(a Mushy Kiwis Ltd. is in dissolution; ( b) The date of commencement of the dissolution is the 25th day of September, A.D., 2009 and (c East Bay St. C.B. Strategy Ltd. LIQUIDATOR C OMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009 IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/00409 Common Law and Equity Division IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act Chamber 393 Statute Law of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas AND I N THE MATTER of ALL THOSE lots pieces or p arcels of land situate in the Southwestern portion of t he Island of South Biminione of the Islands of the C ommonwealth of The Bahamas and comprising a portion of the Port Royal Subdivision being the Lot Numbered Sixty-one (61Block Numbered Five (562 in Block Numbered Five (5and a portion of Tract “A” in Block Numbered Five (5on the Eastern Side of Ocean Drive and approximately Two hundred and Seventy-two (272 from North Road and being bounded as follows towards the NORTH on the other portion of the Lot Numbered Sixty-two (62Numbered Five (5and running thereon One hundred and ten (110.00towards the EAST on a portion of Tract in the Block Numbered Five (5 thereon Ninety-two (92.00 SOUTH on the Lot Numbered Sixty (60 Five (5and running thereon One hundred and ten (110.00 WEST on a Thirty (30 feet wide road reservation known as Ocean Drive and running thereon Ninety-two (92.00 AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition, of William C. Northen and Valerie J. Northen NOTICE OF PETITION of The Bahamas on the 18th day of March, A. D. 2009 WilliamC. Northen and Valerie J. Northen of South Bimini one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas (hereinafter called “the Petitioners”) claim to be the owners in fee simple in possession of the above captioned pieces parcels or lots of land and have made applicationto the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959, to have their title to the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in accordancewith the provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land may be inspected during 1.The Registry of The Supreme Court, Ansbacher House, East Street, Nassau, Bahamas. 2.The Chambers of Deyane E. Russell Grove Avenue and Marine Drive, The Grove, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Take notice that any person having dower or right of dower or any adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petitionmust on or before the on the Petitioners and the undersigned a Statement of the area claimed and an abstract of title to the said area claimed by him. Failure of any such person to of this notice will operate as a bar of such claim. DEYANE E. RUSSELL Chambers, Grove Avenue and Marine Drive, The Grove, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. Attorney for the Petitioners N OTICE is hereby given that WILSON EDOUARD of South Beach, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/ naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any p erson who knows any reason why registration/naturalization s hould not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts withintwenty-eight days from the 27th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE /HJDORWLFH 127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHG RQGD\RI2FWREHU 7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV Chamber plans Institute to give business support W W A A S S T T E E , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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By REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter ‘RESILIENCE’ has been the keyword for 60-year-old Virginia Sawyer in facing breast cancer. P erhaps it’s the reason why she h as had such a successful fight against the disease; she is the perfect example of what faith and focus can do for someone in her condition. Ms Sawyer, who is described by others as a “poised, reserved andp rivate person”, agreed to share her story about her battle against breast cancer with Tribune Health . It’s been 25 years since she had her mastectomy, and today Ms Sawyer continues to live life to its f ullest. N ow in ‘remission’ (a term used to classify cancer patients with no recurrences for up to 12 to 15 years),M s Sawyer said breast cancer is no longer something that she constantly broods or frets about. Over the years so many people h ave been diagnosed, so I realise like many others that it’s just another challenge that I have to face,” she s aid. With an effective combination of eating right, exercising, prayer, and involvement in various activities, she i s determined to keep herself as physically and spiritually healthy as possible. S he’s never viewed her breast can c er as a death sentence, and in fact h as developed more zest for life because of the disease. M s Sawyer is involved in several c ivic organisations, including the Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Retirees Association and the Surgical Suite Breast Cancer S upport Group. S he is also a very active member a t Evangelistic Temple Church on Collins Avenue. But it hasn’t always been that way f or this retiree, who has no reservat ions telling you she is a “sexy 60.” One of the most inspirational t hings of her life has been her involvement in the Surgical Suite Breast Cancer Support Group for 20 plus years, she said. Ms Sawyer said the group has h elped her deal with the disease over the years and has given her the o pportunity to lend her support to fellow cancer survivors. The 60-year-old’s experience with breast cancer hasn’t been as difficult as that of some women; she neve r underwent any chemotherapy or radiation. “It was not until I joined the Sister S ister Breast Cancer Support Group that I found out how sick people w ere. Because I didn’t have to take t he treatments, people were saying I didn’t have breast cancer,” she said. Shortly after being diagnosed with b reast cancer in her 30s, Ms Sawyer had her breast removed a fairly radical surgery for a disease that was still in the early stages, but one that has proved instrumental to her s urvival. H er physician, Dr Charles Diggiss of the Surgical Suite, said the reason she didn’t have chemotherapy is because treatment for the disease is different in every case. One has to be careful to understand how breast cancer has evolved and treatment has evolved,” he said. We need to be aware of the aggress iveness of breast cancer in the black Bahamian community.” Speaking to Ms Sawyer’s condit ion, Dr Diggiss said her recovery story is remarkable. (In the t here aren’t many women who continue to survive. It is certainly comm endable and fortunate for her,” he said. Dr Diggiss said he believes Ms Sawyer’s religiously undergoing an annual mammogram and discoveringt he cancer at such an early stage was crucial. “Early detection is the key in order to avoid long rounds of chemo and radiation treatment,” Ms Sawyer said. Through God’s grace I was able t o avoid a lot of what other cancer patients go through.” “In early May of 1984, a young m an who worked with me said ‘Ms Sawyer, let’s switch vacation, it would be really good for me to use t hat time’.” “Because of switching with him, I went for my check-up,” she said. The doctor found a small lump, a nd he sent me to a surgeon who told me to come back in a month or more, because sometimes the lumpsa ppear and then disappear. “When I went back to see him, the lump was still there. I had a biopsy, and after that, that was the first p ain I ever felt.” R esults of the biopsy showed that the lump was in fact cancerous. Ms Sawyer said shew as depressed at first, but determined to fight the d isease. I had to have surgery (a mastec tomy). Then I was s ent to Dr (John Lunn, who told o ne of the nurses, come here let me show you somet hing, this woman is healed’. Dr Lunn said the doctors did a wonderful job on you. Youd on’t need any chemotherapy or radiation,” she said. She continued to see the doctor for about six months, and afterwards w ent for mammograms once a year. T o this day, she performs self breast exams and continues to have her annual check-up. M s Sawyer also continues to eat healthy and is consistent with her exercise regime. She tries to exerc ise twice a day. Her eating habits include small portions of leafy green vegetables,e specially broccoli and carrots that s he tries to steam or eat raw some times. “I try to use sweeteners that the d octors recommend, and I automatically cut down on the salt to stay away from hypertension. Now and then I eat rice and potatoes,” she said, and jokes that from time to time she does cut herself some slack by treating herself tof ood she wouldn’t typically have. Dr Diggiss had this to say about Ms Sawyer’s story of survival: “It g ives a message of hope that you need not die from breast cancer. As few as the numbers may be for per-s ons who survive, it certainly offers h ope. B y REUBEN SHEARER T ribune Features Reporter H ATS off to the Zonta Club of New Providence which paid tribute to cancer survivors of the Surgical Suite Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group this weekend. Some 100 women turned o ut to the Hat Show and Tea Party held on the upstairs deck overlooking the garden atG overnment House on Sunday afternoon. Andrea Sweeting, president of the Surgical Suite Sister Sister Breast Cancer support group said: “It was a wonder ful venture between the two organisations. It was a way of women helping women, whichis the motto of the Zonta Club,” she said. The Zonta Club is a group of businesswomen that work together to advance the status of women. The Sister Sister Breast Cancer support groupis a subsidiary of the Surgical Suite, an oncology practice, presided over by local practitioner Dr Charles Diggiss. Oralee’s Fashions; the Amazing Fashions Centre; Just Stunning; LaRose Boutique; Judy’s Hat Shop, and other vendors presented their hat collections to the host of attendees from different civic and church organisations. Attendees enjoyed salmon a nd pinwheel sandwiches, quiches, and a variety of herbal teas. T he ladies were also treated to a fashion show hosted by Pepper Johnson of LaRose Boutique, as members of various Zonta Club chapters on the island modelled their hats. Part of the proceeds generated from the high tea event were donated to the Surgical Suite Sister Sister Support group. Each month, Sister Sister purchases three porth-a-caths to administer chemotherapy in an easy and efficient way. Port-a-cath’s cost around $500 each, and the organisa tion donates three of them a month to the Cancer Society of the Bahamas. “We welcome any donations to the Sister Sister Support Group because as it comes in, it goes back out,” said Nurse Charlene McPhee,a spokesperson for the group. She explained that the dona tions from the Zonta Club of New Providence will be allocated toward purchasing these d evices. This will help defray the group’s monthly expenditures of $1,500. P art of the proceeds will also go to assist members of the group with medication and other needs. Officially formed in 2001, the Surgical Suite Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group is made up of breast cancer survivors young and old. For most of the members, thankfully, their cancer is in remission. Their youngest member is 28-years-old, proving that breast cancer does not discriminate when it comes to age. Nurse McPhee told Tribune Health that the way women respond to a breast cancer diagnosis is very important. “Women who attend support groups tend to do much better than those who don’t have support, so we know it’s vital,” she explained. “It helps you to know that you can make it too.” Outlining what the Sister Sister group offers, she said: “There’s a time of laughter, crying, information, empow erment, spiritual help they take care of the whole woman.I t’s more empowering for everyone in the group to know they can live with cancer and know it doesn’t have to killt hem.” Breast cancer is one of the causes avidly supported by the Zonta Club. Their motto, ‘Women Help ing Women’, is at the heart of their programme and they “live that out in every sense of the way,” a representative of the organisation said. Adena Minus of the Zonta C lub said that the whole purpose of the tea party and hat show was to create an event where the women coulde scape from their worries and just enjoy themselves. “We try to focus on uplifting the ladies,” Ms Minus said. Zonta International is a worldwide service organisation of executives in business and the professions working together to advance the status of women. The Surgical Suite Sister Sist er support group meets every second Wednesday at the Southern Community Centre on Soldier Road. M eetings begin at 5.30pm and end at 8pm. “The ladies are an exciting group,” said Nurse McPhee. “They talk, talk, and don’t stop talking,” she said with a smile. C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e By JEFFARAH GIBSON TO bring the National Breast Cancer Awareness Month to a close, the Surgical Suite Sister Sister Breast Can cer Support Group will participate in a candle light walkand prayer vigil this Saturday at Rawson Square. The members will be divided into two groups. One group will begin the march on Elizabeth Avenue and the other group will begin on George Street; they will meet at Rawson Square. At the centre of the square the group’s members will holda prayer vigil in honour of women who have died from the disease, perform musical selections, and survivors will share their inspirational sto ries. Since it’s conception in 2007, the walk has become an annual event to say thanks to the public for their support. The Surgical Suite Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group has been in existence since September 2000. It has grown from approximately 15 members to over 150 active members. They act as a support system offering hope to women who are diagnosed with breast cancer. Their main goal has always been to wage war against the disease, and educate the public. The walk is set to begin at 5pm and members of the public are asked to come out in support of the cause and to bring a candle. For more information call 376-0054 or contact Nurse Charlene at 326-1929. Prayer vigil to conclude Br east Cancer Awareness Month Women helping women Zonta Club and Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group join forces hope a message of The story of a breast cancer survivor health Virginia Sawyer

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By SARAH BEEK O STEOPOROSIS can steal the s trength from your bones, leaving you stooped-shouldered and prone to fractures. But you can do somet hing with your muscles to help low er your risk of a break exercise. O steoporosis means “porous b ones”. With this disease your bone s trength decreases and your bones slowly lose mineral content and t heir internal support structure. Eventually, your bones can become so weak they can easily f racture. But research indicates that e xercise may not only help prevent o steoporosis, but may treat it as w ell. Exercise can also help improve your balance, reducing your risk of f alling. The key is to know which exercises to do and how to do them p roperly. B one is living and dynamic tiss ue that responds to exercise by becoming stronger. Each time you p ut your bones to work they receive a chemical message telling them they need to be strong. Without p hysical challenges to trigger that b one-building message your bones with lose mass and strength. Weight-bearing and strength training (resistance the right kind of demands on yourb ones to make them build density a nd strength. W eight-bearing exercises causes y our bones and muscles to work against gravity. Every time you take a step, land on your feet, hit a tennis b all, dance, jump, and jog, chemical messages rush to your legs and arms w arning them to get ready for the n ext impact and stimulate your bones to increase their strength. W eight training or resistance e xercises use your muscular s trength to improve muscle mass a nd strengthen bone. Your muscles a re attached to your bones by tendons that tug against the bones when the muscle contract. This tugging stimulates the bones to grow.T he stronger your muscles, the m ore stimulation they provide. The s tronger your bones and muscles, t he better your protection against o steoporosis. S trength training exercises can employ dumbbells, and/or weight or resistance type machines. You should begin strength training slowly and progressively, repeating exercises over time until they are comfortable. O ther protective measure to stop osteoporosis is not to smoke and to drink in moderation. Smokers show a higher incidence of fracture than n on-smokers do. Smoking interferes w ith the body's production of estrog en. W omen who smoke are shown to l ose five to 10 per cent or their mass prior to menopause. Heavy drinkers also suffer more fractures than normal. This may be due to the factt hat alcohol is a diuretic, which c auses fluid loss. G ood nutrition, foods rich in calc ium, plus calcium supplements on a daily basis are definitely an import ant prevention in stopping osteoporosis. The recommended dosage is 1,500 milligrams daily, especially after menopause. With these lifestyle changes, a regular exercise programme and regular chiropractic care, you s hould be able to grow old with a strong healthy spine and beautiful posture. By SUSAN DONALD D.C. E XFOLIATION delivers a tighter, firmer, smoother look and feel of skin. Because of this result,m any fall into the trap of over-exfo liation: An over-zealous approach that can actually reduce skin's vitality and make it more susceptible to d amage from UV light. Over-exfoliation triggers an inflammatory response, leading to ac ompromised lipid barrier that won't function properly, a sensitised skin condition, and accelerated premature aging. TELL-TALE SIGNS OF OVEREXFOLIATED SKIN INCLUDE: Noticeable dehydration Patchy areas of dryness Skin tautness Redness and itchiness Increased sensitivity Inflammatory acne and irritation If you're showing the signs of over-exfoliation, speak with a professional skin therapist, who will most likely prescribe a calming cleanser and toner, and a protective moisturiser to start the recovery process. Sun protection is a must, wear a sunscreen with physical UV blockers titanium dioxide or zinc oxide that won't irritate skin. After skin recovery, begin exfoliating with a gentle exfoliant designed for daily use. If you desirea more intense level of exfoliation, look to non-abrasive exfoliants con taining chemicals like salicylic or lactic acid. Pair a more gentle regi men with professional exfoliation treatments from your professional skin therapist to enjoy smoother skin without the undesirable side effects. Exfoliation how much is too much? H OW is your relationship desk these days? Do you have a lot of working files that you look at frequently and you add to on a regular basis? Do you have a lot of unfinished work that you just procrastinate over? Or do you have many files that are completed and filed away? We hear over and over that we need to put time and effort into our relationships, but what happens whent hey just do not work out and they come to an end? The end of a relationship is almost always painful, but at times it can be a relief. Closing that particular file, however, may not be that easy. Depending if there is a particular ‘dumper ’, ‘dumpee’ or if it is a mutual agreement will determine how you move on in the future. I deally all questions, unresolved problems, good times and things learnt from the relationship will be aired. Of course this requires a great deal of respect and consideration, both of which are often missing when things c ome to a close. What happens when it all ends in a big chaotic mess? You may be left out to dry, or perhaps you are the one too cowardly to face the music. If we do not wrap things up, and feel everything has been taken care of, then we drag it around with us into the next relationship. We punish or treat the next person as if they were a shadow of the last. It is not surprising that we go through life wondering why we can not get it right. Are we always choosing the wrong people, or is it us? People assume that long relationships are the hardest to get over. Cert ainly there is more history, possibly children and joint property. However, all too often we see that their life together has ‘played out’ and that it has reached a natural conclusion. Short relationships, however, may have terminated before their time and the expected course of things did not take place. The questions of ‘what if’ and ‘might have been’ remain floating int he air unanswered. One thing we know for sure is that no matter what type of ending you have it is all emotionally draining, and something we would all like to avoid. The work needed before we can close that particular file can vary in time depending on the individuals involved and their circumstances. Initially you may feel sad, angry or you may feel nothing. If you feel sad then y ou more than likely are turning events inwards and blaming yourself for the loss. Or you may direct angry feelings outwards and blame the other person. Feeling nothing may mean you are just avoiding the whole deluge o f emotions. Discovering why something happened, and the person that we emerge as, allows the forgiveness to take place. We can then step aside and release ourselves from the pain. This is what is meant to be and this is the direction our life is meant to take. The scenario of letting go and accepting the loss of a relationship would seem like the natural process oft hings. For some people the course of events is blocked by the other person. This is often seen when children are used as bargaining power. We may feel as if we are held hostage in the relationship and closure seems impossible. Even if this takes place we need to find a way to release ourselves as individuals so that we can move on with our lives. Hopefully at some point this file w ill be closed and filed away. You will know by then if it will remain in the back of the filing cabinet, never to be reopened. On the other hand because of mutual reasons, such as children, it may h ave to be brought out every now and then. When you do it is important to remember to handle your children’s feelings with care because they will be experiencing similar emotions. Things may still be more complicated and you may have a stagnant relationship that keeps you in limbo. Relationships like this are suffocating and very unhealthy. It is essential that we continue working at our relation-s hips, or close them and file them away. The goal is always to remember to surround ourselves with good quality relationships that enrich our lives, and keep away from those that pull us down. Margaret Bain is an individual and couples relationship therapist. She is a registered nurse and a certified clinical sex therapist. For appointments call 364-7230 or e-mail her at relatebahamas@yahoo.com or www.relatebahamas.blogspot.com. She is also available for speaking engagements. Have you filed your Ex? By MAGGIE BAIN L OVING RELATIONSHIPS Maintain strong bones with exercise GREEN SCENE By Gardener Jack A variety of root crops IT was root crops more than anyt hing else that kept Europeans and early American settlers going during the cold winter months when little could be grown. Most root crops could be stored, often underground in barrows below the frost line, and retrieved for use as food. P erhaps it is because we do not have a history of root crop storage in the balmy Bahamas that we do notf avour potatoes, rutabagas, turnips, carrots and such as much as Euro peans do. Nevertheless, root crops deserve a place in the garden and on our dinner plates. The fastest growing root vegetable i s the radish. Radishes can be picked within a month of sowing the seeds and are often recommended as candidates for children to grow so they can appreciate the beauty of planting and growing. Unfortunately, one of the great joys of gardening is the consumption of what we grow and few children enjoy radishes. Come to think of it, very few adults enjoy radishes. If you have heavy soil you can sow radish seeds along with carrot seeds. The quick growing radishes will break up the surface soil and makelife easier for the more tender carrot seedlings. By the time the radishes are pulled the carrots should be established. The most popular carrot variety is Chantenay, eight to ten inches long and lightly tapered. Nantes is more cylindrical and has excellent flavour. Danvers is a broad-shouldered, strongly tapered carrot that forces its way into heavy soil. If you are impressed by size and have deep soilyou should try Imperator as your main crop. Carrots are a long season crop and take at least 120 days to mature, though at the thinning-out stage you can enjoy baby carrots lightly pre pared. (By the way, those ‘baby car rots’ that come in cellophane bags in the supermarket are not baby carrots at all but large carrots that have been sculpted into cylindrical nuggets.) Carrots enjoy fertile soil but should not be sown where there has been an application of fresh compost or manure in the past six months. This over-rich condition encourages the production of side roots. Well-fertilised sandy soil is perfect for carrots. You save space by growing carrots, and most root vegetables, in blocks rather than in rows. What we call beet seeds are actually seed capsules that contain several seeds. This means we have to thin the seedlings once they are three or four inches tall. Pick enough and you have a delicious side dish of baby greens; later on the mature leaves give a more robust flavour. Beets (or beetroot as the English call them) are a 90-day crop and should be picked when approaching maturity rather than left in the ground to grow fibrous. The stan dard beet is Detroit Dark Red. It grows readily in most soils and has an excellent flavour. Turnips are very popular in Europe but a rarity in the Bahamas. Those sold in markets are usually over mature and coarse in flavour. If you grow your own and pick them early you may begin to appreciate their buttery earthiness. Rutabagas (or swedes the size of a barked coconut and are closely related to turnips, but milder. As with most root crops, younger is better. Peeled, cubed and boiled in salted water, rutabagas are an interesting potato substitute. In Europe they are often cooked this way and mashed with boiled potatoes, then heavily buttered and liberally salt ed and peppered. Rutabagas are very easy to grow and very hard to give away. Potatoes are the most popular root crop world wide but are best grown after Christmas. We will consider them at a later date. For any questions or comments you can e-mail gardenerjack@coralwave.com. MOST root vegetables are more tender and sweeter when pulled fairly early, like these carrots and beets.

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C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By COFFI MCPHEE F or one year and three months I had t he opportunity to l ive and work in Tokushima, Japan. I worked as an English Language C oordinator at Seiko G akuen for children ages three to six. Join me each week as I explore the land of the rising sun from a Bahamian’s perspective. THE TRIP IT was okay, but my goodness it was long: Nassau to Miami, Miami to Chicago, and Chicago to Osaka. Every time I went to sleep and woke u p I was still on an airplane. I had a neighbour who was a bit too friendl y even for my taste. He insisted on conversation and while that is allwell and good, I don’t want to talk to a nybody for 16 hours straight. H e was typically Japanese in that h e apologised for everything. If I dropped my pen, he was sorry that I dropped my pen and offered to pick it up. If I had to go to the bathroom, he was sorry that I had tog o to the bathroom and was sorry that he didn’t get up quick enough f or me to get out of my seat. I was like, “its okay man.” That was my preferred sentence for most of the trip. A fter arriving at the airport it wasn ’t too bad in terms of my luggage, (I had two really heavy bags plus my purse and my laptop). I then had tot ake a two-hour bus ride to get to my city. I was really exhausted but tried to stay alert so I wouldn’t miss my s top; that was not easy. T HE BUS STATION I was really proud of myself. I followed all the directions that they gave me and got off the bus stop expecting to see the person who wass upposed to pick me up, but I didn’t. So I told my self that maybe she wasj ust late. But then I said to myself, “hold up Japanese people are never late.” One hour later I didn’t panic, I just tried to dial the number thatt hey gave me to call. When I tried to call the operator said something inJ apanese, but of course I didn’t get what she was saying. So I tried to ask someone if I had the right area code but no one spoke English, French or Spanish. I had a fewp hrases in Japanese but they are useless if you don’t understand the answers. So the next step, I looked in the phone book for the operator’s number but of course everything was written in Japanese. I saw a drawing o f a fireman so I called the fire station to see if they could help, but t hat was useless as well. He was nice but the only thing he could say was “I don’t speak English can you p lease speak Japanese.” So I hung u p. N ext step, the police station. (They not really. Two minutes later two police officers came riding on their bikes with their guns. I was like, woah, I’m not a terrorist, all I want to do is to dial a number.” A pparently a friend of the b oyfriend of the police officer spoke English and tried to help me. But surprise, the number I had didn’t w ork. However, thankfully they had t he numbers of all the teachers in the city. And all this time (the per son I was supposed to meet) was w aiting for me on the other side of the train station. I never got that message that I had to wait on the o ther side. I got in at the station at 9 pm and I left almost at midnight a fter two days of travelling. Needless to say that I was beat. THE APARTMENT I t’s not bad; not the shoeboxes that Japan is known for. It is bigger than my Paris studio (Ms McPhee used to live in France). I have everything that I need. Dishes, sheets, TV (even though I don’t know what they are saying) bed, d esk, chair, washing machine and a b alcony to hang out clothes. The o nly thing I needed to buy was food and washing powder. A ll the foreign teachers live on t he same floor. So we form a little c ommunity. They are from the U SA, Canada and Australia. THE JOB I have three classes of K3, K4 and K, but I am not with them all the time. K3 20 minutes, K4 30 min-u tes and K5 45 minutes. Between classes I prepare my lessons (which is not difficult). I also help in organi sing outside activities for the stud ents; out of town trips etc. The kids are really cute and adorable and well behaved. AFTER WORK I take Japanese classes on Wednesday evenings, Saturday afternoons and soon Sunday mornings. I have a lot of opportunities t o practice because I am the only English teacher on my campus and the other teachers do not speakE nglish, so communicating is quite e ntertaining. We draw, do actions, and use fragmented words out of the dictionary. It normally takes about 15 minutes to get our point across but some how we make do. I a m also learning a traditional Japanese dance with a group. There is a big music festival here in Augustt hat lasts about one week and I will be participating with them. I’ll have on the traditional dress, shoes and hat. It should be fun. I plan to take some cooking classes as well. Lord knows I need it. NIGHT LIFE I was afraid that I would find m yself in a village with only fields of rice, but there is a night life. I am n ot living in the swinging part of town, however, the social scene it is just a 25-minute bike ride across the bridge and there you have all the bars, restaurants, and cafs. So I a m not bored on Saturday nights. C OST OF LIVING Not as bad as everyone said it w ould be. It is expensive, but like a nywhere you just have to know where to shop. I can find pretty good deals. The food is good, fresh and pretty cheap i f you buy Japanese items. It is when y ou want exotic goods that things b ecome expensive (there is no way that I am going to buy a $6 mango). But for the moment I don’t think that I’ll starve. Going to the movies is expensive though, almost$ 15. So I will be streaming my movies. THE JAPANESE ATTITUDE T OWARDS FOREIGNERS They do stare, but not in a mean w ay. More like, ‘wow I can’t believe what I am seeing’. They are not mean, but quite polite and they likew hen you try to speak their language. Just like anywhere you have prejudiced people and you have really sweet ones. IN SUMMARY The time over here will definitely be a learning experience and I am looking forward to it, especiallyl earning a new language. This job definitely combines my passions: L anguages, education, culture and tourism. And for the moment I don’t have any complaints. “Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on,d eep and permanent, in the ideas of the living.” St Augustine A Bahamian woman in Japan Tokushima on a beautiful, clear day. Coffi McPhee

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONB HEALTH: Body and mind TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2009 BRINGING voluptuous BACK Real Women, True Curves But for one woman, who is on a mission to bring voluptuous back, this interpretation of beauty is not acceptable. Rayette McDonald, president and director of the Ms Full Figured Bahamas Organisation, said her goal is to free full figuredw omen from these kinds of beauty stereot ypes. T he full figured community is making an i mpression the world over and the Ms Full Figured Organisation has committed itself to being a part of this revolution. Speaking with Tribune Woman , Ms M cDonald said full-figured women often feel pressured to compete with women who are thinner than they are and this can affect their perception of what true beauty is. To help plus size women recognise their true value and potential, Ms McDonald first organised the Ms Full Figured Bahamas Pageant in 2006. “I’ve always wanted to enter a beauty pageant. Looks and intelligence are not ap roblem for me. I had everything else, but b ecause of my size I would never be able to p articipate,” she said. M s McDonald said it bothers her to see that the type of women who win traditional beauty pageants are celebrated as the female norm. B ut instead of letting bitterness about the situation consume her, Ms McDonald decided to let her dissatisfaction with the status quo fuel a productive endeavour. B y REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter BEAUTY is often measured by the external, and if you believe today’s media, it’s all right for a woman to have some curves, just as long as they are in the right places and she is still skinny overall. For the third year in a row now, Esteem Productions will host the Ms Full Figured Bahamas Pageant on Sunday, November 8. We are endeavoring to display the beauty, elegance, talent and intelligence of the voluptuous woman in the Bahamas. This event is a journey that these brave women embarku pon in hopes of gaining a better appreciation for themselves, voicing their concernst hrough their platform and making lasting friendships,” Ms McDonald said. “This organisation can be branded as a cel ebration of who we are. The pageant, a lthough fun, is very serious about enhancing the lives of the young women. They participate in six weeks of self-development classes, 20 hours of community service and 20 hours of physical training.” This year, the emphasis is on cultivating three qualities that define a woman’s worth: S erving, giving back and selfe steem, Ms McDonald said. While there is a $30,000-budget for the event, she said that she has always had a tough time garnering financial support for the pageant. Is it that sponsors just can’t get past the weight factor? Maybe so, Ms McDonald said. But the metamorphosis the contestants go through during the competition should be reason enough for persons to support the pageant, she said. “Every year we have girls that come in a certain way and leave the competition totally different. We want to develop and polish girls, but that’s not going to happen in a (short space of (time “What you’re hoping is that you embed something into these ladies so that they will continue to flourish in their lives. We want to take them on the journey of becoming a better person,” she said. In six weeks of training, the contestants embark on a journey which includes etiquette training and activities that cater to the “whole woman”, Ms McDonald said. This year, the ladies participated in Toastmasters speech classes in preparation for their spokesmodel competition next week. Additionally, they took part in exercise p rogrammes and even experienced some martial arts during a few karate sessions. A representative from Black Opal products, the makeup line that Michelle Obamau ses, showed them how to ensure they look their best. N ext week, the contestants will participate in an array of pre-pageant activities, including a float parade this Saturday, in preparation for the big finale. T he pageant has also reached out to the Crisis Centre to assist in sensitising the public to the child abuse issues we face in our country. In this vein an event is planned for Satur day, November 10, at the Marathon Mall. Dubbed ‘Every Child Counts’, it will feature a number of local acts and Dr Sandra DeanP atterson, Director of the Crisis Centre, will b ring brief remarks. Recently, a special cocktail reception was held for the nine beautiful and voluptuous contestants in this year’s Ms Full Figured Bahamas pageant. Montague Gardens was the event’s venue and some 250 persons watched as the contestants arrived in stretch limousines. They were not disappointed as the ladies exited the vehicles gorgeously dressed in apparel from La Chica Caliente. The beauties were poised, elegant and articulate as they greeted friends, family and well-wishers who had the opportunity to mix and mingle with them for the first time in their new role as contestants. The audience was also treated to a mini fashion show sponsored by the Elegant Women Boutique and featuring some former contestants. The pageant’s winner will go on to represent the Bahamas in the Miss Bold and Beautiful pageant in Puerto Rico. Last year, Mona-Lisa Smith was crowned Ms Full Figured Bahamas. She became the second runner-up overall in the Miss Bold and Beautiful pageant and received a special honour in the evening gown segment. This position has afforded her an opportunity to accompany the new Ms Full Figured Bahamas and the first runner-up to Puerto Rico for the 2010 pageant. Ms McDonald promises that this year’s competition finale will be outstanding. To view the gallery of the nine contestants vying for the Miss Full Figured Bahamas title visit www.msfullfiguredbahamas.com. MS Full Figured Bahamas 2008 Mona-Lisa Smith poses with other Bahamian beauty queens. O UTGOING M s Full Figured Bahamas and Ms Teen Bahamas 2009, with contestants of this year’s Full Figured competition. C ONTESTANTS a t the beginning of the Ms Full Figured Bahamas competition 2008. C O N T E S T A N T S f r o m M s F u l l F i g u r e d B a h a m a s 2 0 0 8