Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
=~ Lhe Tribune Boe

» O49 ° 'm lovin’ it
| PUR Doel. si ? ite PUL cm eren ig tran 71)
drive-thru is now open

{HIGH _89F a ee ye Melt ge

\LOW 79F | Fridays & Saturdays

CLOUDS with | ee Ona lea
se? STORMS | BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

Volume: 105 No.261 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)









'

ere

nS

iE





Hotel
union

x split
| » y ) i | By DENISE



MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

a : dmaycock@tribunemedia:net
: FREEPORT - A for-
; _ | mer Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union executive claims
EB | that a majority of the union
members in Grand





Bahama have expressed a
strong desire to “break
away” from the Hotel
Workers Union. |
Lionel Morley, former
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) 2nd vice
. president, said hotel work-





SEE page 7
ee CLICO policies
i FORMER Deputy Prime Minister Sir Clement _terday. She said her father was conscious in the fate revealed
Maynard died yesterday-afternoon at hishome. He moments leading up to his death. AOS ae F
was 81. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham issued a state- within weeks
Sir Clement died with his family by his side, includ- | ment yesterday evening telling of his “deep regret” : :
ing Lady Maynard, his wife of over 63 years, and his upon hearing of the passing of Sir Clement. CLICO insurance poli-
children and grandchildren. ; Noting that he was the longest serving cabinet cy holders can expect “an
“It was a very peaceful death,” his daughter Sen- announcement” about the
j ator Allyson Maynard-Gibson told The Tribune yes- SEE page 3 : future of their insurance
coverage in the next “two
to three weeks,” The Tri-

bune has learned.

According to Tribune
sources, this could see
court-appointed liquida-
tor for the insurer, Craig
Gomez, reveal which oth-
er insurance company—
or companies — has been”
selected to take control
of policies that up until
now still belong to the
defunct insurer.

In the meantime,
sources reveal that nego-
tiations are already
underway with Doctor’s
Hospital to try to per-

SEE page 7



Bahamas told:
Divorce from





POINTING THE WAY - Former . Tene : “ “ . \ ; Privy Council
Deputy Prime Minister Sir Clement CR «
Maynard at the height of his political A CC @ By TANEKA
career. (Tribune file photo) OO \ THOMPSON .
seein Tribune Staff
Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net



® 6° : 9 THE Bahamas should

® seize the opportunity to

Judge: Travolta trial ‘is not a theatre show’ | gs":

€ United Kingdom's Privy

Council and have its final

: iio — a Soe appellate cases heard by

the Caribbean Court of

Justice, a former attorney
general advised.

Alfred. Sears, who
served as attorney gener-
al during paft of the
Christie administration,
likened recent comments
of Lord Nicholas Phillips,
Britain's Supreme Court
president, to a tenant
receiving a notice of-evic-

,

@ By NATARIO mott, who represents Holly- | McDermott had to be repeat-
MCKENZIE wood celebrity John Travolta, edly warned by Senior Justice
Tribune Staff Reporter 55, was back on the witness Allen about engaging in com-
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net stand yesterday for more mentary.

cross-examination by defence “This is not a theatre and
SENIOR Justice Anita attorneys. Before attorney not a show. We are about

Allen delivered astern warn- Murrio Ducille was allowed — serious business. I expect

ing against incivility in the to continue his cross-exami- | respect between the witness

courtroom yesterday as the . Nation yesterday, however, and counsel. Questions are
attempted $25 million extor- Senior Justice Allen stated going to be asked without
tion trial of ex-PLP Senator that there would be “none of | commentary, answers are

Pleasant Bridgewater and for- the behaviour” displayed in going to be given without

mer paramedic Tarino Light- the courtroom on Phursday. comments. I understand the

bourne continued in the [here were tense moments in

Supreme Court. the high profile trial on Thurs- SEE page qT

Attorney Michael McDer- day as Mr Ducille and Mr



SEE page 7






WS
NEW

Sa SEES EEE





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 iHt TRIBUNE



Story set
to help
campaign
breathe a
bit easier

A SPECIAL ‘story time in
the park’ is being held today
to raise money for the
‘Breathe Easy’ campaign ben-
efitting the Princess Margaret
Hospital's Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit.

The book club “The Little I
think I Can" will be hosting
the event starting at 3pm in
the park adjacent to the Liv-
ing in Paradise condominiums
on Paradise Island.

The 'Breathe Easy’ cam-
paign will provide incubators
and ventilators designed to
breathe. for infants who are
physically unable to do so.

SOOCOCOTO ETO CEEH SEES SES SEES ETE SESS OES ESO OES OS OO HOES



Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham spoke in praise of those honoured.
Governor-General Hanna and Prime Minister Ingraham are pictured with
those who received awards. (BIS photo: Letisha Henderson) .

NINETY-SIX persons were honoured by the Queen during ceremonies at the
upper gardens of Government House presided over by the Governor-General
Axthur Hanna on Thursday. |

CO CCCOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOOOSOSO EHS OOOO OHOODSSOHO SOOO OOOO TOSSO OOOOH SOHO HOSOOSHOS ST SOOHOSOOSOOTOE SOOO HOHHHEOSOOHOEEOOSHOSHHHHHOHHTOSHEOSOLOOOSSSECRD99000

The donated ventilators will
support breathing until the
infant's respiratory efforts are
sufficient.

So far, the campaign has
managed to raise more than
half of its intended goal of
$300,000.

The organisers include Tri-
bune Media, the Builder's
Mall, Tile King, Doctors Hos-
pital, The Rotary Club of East
Nassau and Bahamas Realty.

Persons interested in
attending ‘story time in the
park’ can contact Stella Saun-
ders at 393-6225.





PCOS O HT CELESOOEE EE OOOO OOO HOCH EEO OOES CO OEE EE ODOOETOSOS

Family’s fire deaths
aro as murder

Homicide rate hits 67 for 2009 to-date

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WHILE police have classi-
fied the deaths of four peo-
ple in last month’s Englerston
fire as homicides, they are still
in the dark as to why some-
one would have wanted to kill
the group of women.

However, a senior officer
said that police are currently
following some leads and
hope to wrap up their investi-
gations shortly.

Members of three genera-



LOBE LLLLER LALA ELL RULE I LLLIUORLLAOLLLE OUI LLIULLELAUOEOLULEUREULMLLLLLLRLLL IMLS LOLLY

tions of one family - Theresa
Brown, 51, her daughter
Kayshala Bodie, 18, and
granddaughter Telair John-
son, one:— with their neigh-
bour, 18-year-old Savanna
Stuart — all died in a sus-

~ pected arson attack on Thurs-

day, September 17.

The reclassification of the
women’s deaths takes the
country’s murder rate for the
year up to 67. This time last
year the murder rate hovered
around 56.

The women. and child all
died. of smoke inhalation in
the Wilson Tract home after’a
deadly blaze was sparked

around 7am. ;

“We are following some
leads but we still haven’t iden-
tified a possible motive,” Asst
Commissioner in charge of
crime Raymond Gibson said
yesterday.

Nonetheless, Mr Gibson
said he is “quite happy with
the way the investigation is
progressing” and is hopeful it
will be solved “in a short
time.”

He appealed to anyone
who might have information
that could assist the police in
their investigations to come
forward, or call the police
incident room on 322-2561-3.

“Their identities will be
kept in the strictest confi-
dence,” he said.

Meanwhile, the senior offi-
cer said that despite the high
number of murders for the
year so far, in addition to
those cases that remain open
from previous years, police
are “doing (their) best to stay
on top” of the situation.

Mr Gibson said he believes

that the officers at the Central

Detective Unit (CDU) are
“doing a commendable job.”
“J think we have the
resources, and the officers are
going beyond the call of duty
to get things done,” he said.

PM heads for World
Bank, IMF summits

PRIME Minister Hubert

Ingraham leaves the Bahamas,

tonight to attend the 2009
Meeting of the World Bank

Group and the International .

Monetary Fund (IMF) in

* Istanbul, Turkey.

He will leave Nassau at
9.35pm ‘and travel by British
Airways by way of London to
Turkey.

Topping this year’ s agenda

at the meetings is the outlook.

for the global economy.
Developments in financial
markets, as well as other
pressing issues within the
IMF’s mandate also will be
discussed.
The Development Com-

{CGT
SHAT

(eo op



elrcrmnur unt

- mittee will advise the Boards
_ of Governors of the Bank and

Fund on critical development
issues and on the financial

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SBARRO - THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN COOKING has two (2)
‘ positions open for restaurant GENERAL MANAGERS.

‘This position is best suited for a mature, ficou dee goal oncnicd noe

who has a strong désire to take on challenges witha dogmatic determination
| tosucceed. The individual must be open to ‘consinuctive feedback anid flex:

©) ble to consider ali¢mative means of goal accomplishment,

The applicant must also possess the following:

He/she must have strong managerial, analytical and interpersonal skills;
Aleast five years experience in restaurant management preferably ina

fast service food environment.

Good administrative skills and the ability to:leam new skills and:

techniques easily.

The ability to work with minimal supervision and direction:
Profoimidly detail oriented and a strong value system emphasizing quality |}
food control, service and cleanliness. ‘

The ability to direct arid motivate junior staff with an nushobeibe of
their sensibilities and differences.

Applicant must be.able and willing to work a minimum fifty hour week,
weekerids and holidays included in work week.

@ Possess reliable transportation.

Salary is competitive with similar food establishments, with major medical
sfoup insurance (50%) included. Bonuses are available but arc based purely
upon company and individual performance.

Please ¢ -mail your resumi¢ to:

The Managing Director.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS ACCEPTED.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



resources required to pro-
mote economic development
in developing countries. At
the conclusion of each of
these meetings, communiqués
will be released, and will be
followed by a press confer-
ence.

Following these meetings,
a plenary session will be held,
which will feature major
addresses from the host gov-
ernment, heads of institutions,
and the Governors of the
Bank and Fund. |

Some 13,000 people, includ-
ing the governors themselves
and their alternates, as well
as members of their delega-
tions, observers from other
inter-governmental organisa-
tions such as the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation
and Development and the
Organisation of the Petrole-
um Exporting Countries, to
name just a few, are expected
to attend.

.The prime minister returns
to the Bahamas on Tuesday,
October 13. He is accompa-
nied his wife, C C Sweeting
Senior High principal Mrs
Delores Ingraham.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 3









Motorist’s ‘sitting ducks’
fears after failed snatch

A MOTORIST is warning others to be on
the alert for thieves after a schoolboy alleged-
ly tried to rip her necklace from her as she sat
in traffic just off Village Road.

The woman said she wants others to be
watchful of their surroundings and belong-
ings while they are on the road, as they can be
“sitting ducks” for robbers.

Her alert follows others that have recently
been circulating about crime threats in the
Eastern Road area. Five people are now
believed to have been robbed or followed by
culprits travelling in what warnings circulated
by e-mail and on social networking sites have

identified as a green Honda occupied by two
men.

According to the concerned woman driver
who gave this latest warning, she was target-
ted as she was stuck in traffic on Parkgate
Road heading for Village Road at 4.10pm
one day last week.

“Anyone who goes that way in the evening
knows how that traffic is. My windows were
down.

“Four school boys — looked to be about 14
to 16 years old — came up from the back
and one of them tried to grab my chain. Luck-
ily it popped and fell into my blouse,” she

‘said.

Not willing to be victimised so easily, the
woman said she followed the boys after they
ran away from the scene.

“Two ran through Ann’s Town and the
other two ran through Dean’s Building Sup-
ply yard: I turned around to head to: the
Kemp Road light.

“This took a bit of time because cars are
both in the back and front of me. I think that
is why they do it in this area because you

can't move. I drove to Strachan’s Alley, and.

there they were, walking through.”
“They spotted the car first and ran up to the

: police’s policies,”

track road by Queen’s College’s back gate. I
came back down and asked a young man if he
knew who they were,” said the motorist.

Having been informed that one of the boys
was from. Balls Alley, the woman said she
then saw the group run into a nearby house.

“T went to the Wulff Road police station to
alert them of the situation but they told me
that nothing could be done because the chain
was not actually stolen.

“J didn’t want them to do anything, I want-
ed them to put it on record because I know it
will happen again, but I guess that’s our .
she said.





FROM page one

minister in the PLP govern-
ment under the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling, Mr Ingraham
said the 81 year old was a
“towering presence in the
Bahamian political arena for
half a century.”

“Sir Clement was noted for |

his dignified bearing in and
out of the political arena and
maintained long-lasting
friendships on both sides of
the political divide.”

“My colleagues and I
should like to express the
gratitude of the nation for the
service of Sir Clement and we
extend our deepest sympathy
to Lady Maynard, their chil-
dren and the entire Maynard
family. May he rest in peace,”
said the Prime Minister.

Allyson Maynard Gibson
said yesterday that the family
had not yet determined when



Perry: Chfistie expressed his
deep sadness yesterday on
learning of the.death of for-
mer Deputy Prime Minister
Sir Clement Maynard. :

’ “He was a great national

the modern Bahamas, espe-
cially in the development of
the Bahamian tourism
industry,” Mr Christie said.
“Above all,” he said, “he
was a patriot whose disci-
plined devotion to public
service and outstanding abil-
ity, both as a minister of the
Government and as a Mem-
ber of Parliament, set a stan-
dard of excellence that few
have been able to match.”

Mr Christie said that Sir
Clement was

“one of the last surviving
members of the original
Majority Rule Cabinet of
1967.” He said that only
Governor General Arthur



“OPPOSITION ‘Leader

hero and a major builder of ©

Hanna and Warren Levarity



Sir Clement remembered

his funeral will take place.

“He was the best father
that anyone could ever think
of having, a wonderful exam-
ple not only of manhood but
also a wonderful husband and
father. Not only to us, he had
a deep, deep caring for people
of this country; he was a real
patriot,” Mrs Mayanrd-Gib-
son said.

She said even after her
father left the House of
Assembly up until the time of
his debilitating stroke people
would come and ask him for
assistance.

“They regarded him still
as their MP, or father and he
always helped them, he
always said that if you can
help someone you should,
that’s the way he lived his life
he was a deep man of deep
faith,” Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said. -

In January of 2008 Sir

PLP leader praises
‘a great Bahamian’

“For a-full .

now remain.
quarter of.a century,. Sir
Clement served with dis-
tinction in a.succession of
Ministries, none more
notably than the Ministry of
Tourism,” said Mr Christie.

Sir. Clement, said Mr
Christie, was also a “long
time Deputy Leader of the
Progressive Liberal Party
and in:the first. rank of Stal-
wart Councillors of the Par-
ty. ;
Jt is also'a matter of his-
torical record that he was

. the first: President of the

Bahamas Public Services
Union,.a post he held prior
to. his induction into Cabi-
net and his appointment to:

. the Senate in 1967.

“Sir Clement was a true
role model not only as a
statesman but as a family
man, Anglican churchman,
and community builder as
well. He was the consum-
mate gentleman, always



Clement suffered a stroke and
was airlifted to Miami for
treatment.

Earlier last year Sir
Clement was in stable condi-
tion and his family was opti-
mistic that his condition
would further improve to
allow for rehabilitative thera-

py:

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
he did undergo some rehabil-
itation after his stroke, but
declined “naturally with age”
afterwards.

Sir Clement was deputy
leader of the PLP, Minister
of Foreign Affairs and Minis-
ter of Tourism, Government
Leader in Parliament and was
responsible for the Public Ser-
vice.

Sir Clement, was first
appointed Minister of
Tourism in October, 1967
having previously served as

Minster of Works. He also




deporting himself with great
dignity and demonstrating
the true meaning of civili-
ty.”

Mr Christie said he was
“personally indebted to Sir
Clement for his advice,
inspiration and example
over many long years, as
indeed is the case, I am sure,
for numerous others in the
political arena on both sides
of the political aisle.

“On behalf of the entire
PLP family, my wife,
Bernadette, and on my own
behalf,” said Mr Christie, “I
extend deepest condolences
to Lady Maynard on the loss
of her husband and to Peter; ©
Allyson, David and Clement
III, on the loss of their
father.

“A truly great Bahamian
has now passed on and our
nation is all the poorer for
his passing.

“May he rest in peace,”
said Mr Christie. —























*LAST DAY*
1¢ SALE

BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR PRICE & GET THE 3RD

a3
STOCK OF
Dey

ANU AL Ce te

ARYA
& DRAPERY:

ONEFORT GH! |

e LINEN + COTTON
*LAMOUR « SILK

* BROADES ¢ CHIFFON
° BRIDAL

© SPECIAL OCCASION

* TROPICAL FABRICS.

* ALL DRAPERY FABRICS
© ALL COTTON PRINTS
* ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES

OUTDOOR
FABRIC

1008

BAHAMAS BATIK &
BAHAMAS ALLOVER

© NET ITEMS NOT INCLUDED IN SALE) Vinyl, Plastic, Felt, Net & Tulle

eer ee ed

Home Fabrics

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 © Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080



Si mone Maynard

served as an interim Minister
of Health.

After having served in
Tourism for a decade, he
became Minster of Labour
and Home Affairs in 1979.

His early political career
started in 1954 the year after
the PLP was formed and Lyn-
den Pindling became legal
adviser. In January 1967,
when the party was successful
at the polls and became the
new government, Sir Clement
was appointed Government
leader in the Senate and also
Minister without portfolio.

In April 1968 when a gen-
eral election was called Sena-
tor Maynard contested the
House seat in his home con-
stituency of Gambier.

The popular politician won

opponent and it was then that

. he was given his assignment

as Minister of Works.
He was named deputy
prime minister after the res-

ignation of Arthur Hanna’

from the Pindling Cabinet in
1984.
He held. this post until the
PLP’s defeat in 1992. §
Under Sir Clement’s direc-
tion an Airline Negotiating
Committee succeeded in




ero gty

Fhe
BOX OPPRICE







al airline Bahamasair.

The flag carrier went into
service on June 18, 1973 and
in 1978 began modernizing its
fleet of jet and conventional

aircraft. -

Sir Clement is survived by
his wife, his daughter, Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson, and
three sons, Peter, David and
Clement III. He: was prede-
ceased by his eldest son,
Julian.

oe

ft WE cowitioesen
SAT 10:3 ANE DAILY




EFFECTIVE OCTOBER = OCTOBER ein eae Ts a

Proworsian new | 10 840 | Wa | oxo | 0:25 [1030 |

[somoanres | we
Bias Sas a eae | ae [Tae

PPANDOR UM Sua. $300 | 820



FAME

sai [wa [eas | [tooo

CLOUDY WITHA CHANCE OF MEAT a | 4:18 | 3:40 | rae [kT ee [ [tn

GENMIFER’S BOOY Ss
THE PTHEINFORMANT c
ES

ZOMBIELAND

FPANDORUM A



Seeman 7a aes eee
'senonrrrnow___e [as [nas [wa [os] sas,
STHEFINAL DESTINATION c_(| «MA | wa [WA | wa | 8:40 [10:55 |
panuowetn2 | |

ee

GALLERIA 6 - JFK DRIVE

IAS. YOM SC at Rs SESERUE PORE TS MT 290-4645 ON WI GALLE RIACINE MAS GOSS

nEW {00 [ as [wa | eo | a0 | so:so]



ESR | | tae

| sa_| g90 | e:20 | so:40 |
600 | s:20 | 10:50 |

| 3:35 | [ma | os | [a | NAR [RA |
Ee

fsimonares—sew[ s5 | ais | WA | 6s | 0:5 | 1055
ane WR | |

site | sas | 20)

[etevorwernn cee —e [sao [a40 [na | er aan | some
fesrorno 6 [var [ee [ow [om [|e

3 80-FLI x

Lise your e-oard to reserve lckets at 380-3848 or visit us at
www bahamesiocal.cor

STUNNING LACHES FASHIONS

AT UNBEATABLE PRICES

Juniors, Misses, and Plus Sizes Available: Tops, Dresses, Skirts, Jeans,
Dress Pants, Jackets, Linen Pants, Wraps, Shoes, Belts, Handbags,
Clutches, Wallets, Earrings, Necklaces, Bracelets and lots mo

by a wide margin over his

forming the country’s nation-



‘Mon rose Avenue and Ox ord Street 0 doors North of Mult Discoun)
P.O. Box N-1552 — ‘

: Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460
Monday Erkey - 9:30 aM 5:30 PM, Saturday - 9AM - 5PM

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO TAT TUT ETE





PAGE 4, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



‘Iran plant could defer Israel strike

JERUSALEM — It may seem counter-
intuitive, but the news that Iran has a sec-
ond, clandestine uranium enrichment plant,
and has just test-fired long-range missiles,
could actually put off any plans for a quick
Israeli strike.

To be sure, Israel still sees an Iran with
nuclear weapons as its greatest threat and
has not taken a military assault off the table.
Its defence minister, Ehud Barak, said as
much in London on Tuesday.

Neutralizing the threat remains Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's top
priority. And the spectacle of upgraded
missiles flying across Israel's TV screens
only feeds its resolve to keep Iran at bay.

Yet the latest developments are likely to
push world powers to impose the tough
sanctions that Israel has been seeking. Giv-
ing Israel's position a higher profile on the
world stage may also make it less inclined to
act unilaterally.

’ For years, Israel has warned that Iran
was. not being honest about the size and
nature of its nuclear programme, which
Tehran claims is designed to produce ener-
gy. Israel has portrayed last week's disclo-
sure of the second facility, hidden in the

_arid mountains near the holy city of Qom,
as confirmation of its suspicions.

‘ "If there ever was.a thought of (Israel) |. °

_ going witha military option, it's been put
off," said Ephraim Kam, the deputy direc-
tor of Tel Aviv University's Institute of
National Security Studies. "Iran was caught
lying again, it's clearly moving toward
becoming a nuclear power.

"Now the Americans are better able to
try to persuade the Europeans, and even

the Russians, to go for tougher sanctions," ”

he said.

Meir Javedanfar, an Iranian-born analyst
working in Israel, agreed.

"It's likely that Israel will now be includ-
ed more in the decision-making process," he
said. "The more Israel sees itself as part of
the process of dealing with the Iranian
nuclear question, the less likely it is that it
will take part in a unilateral action."

In a meeting with British Defence Min-
ister Bob Ainsworth, Israel's Barak said
the existence of the second plant should
trigger harsh sanctions, according to a.state-
ment from his office which added that Israel
"is not removing any option from the
table."

The reference to "options" is seen as a
signal that an Israeli military strike remains
a possibility.

Iran's nuclear chief, Vice President Ali



} N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN AND |
BAHAMIAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH, |
_ | BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON }

WILL BE CLOSED ON

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATE ITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES | |
CAUSED AS ARESULT OF OUR CLOSING. |






PaO) nee

NOTICE is hereby given that Ideniel Jean Baptiste of
CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted; should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 3rd day of October, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

Akbar Salehi, said Tuesday that his country
built the newly revealed facility inside a
mountain and next to a military site to pro-
tect it from attack. He didn't identify the
potential attackers.

Iran said the Shahab-3 and Sajjil mis-
siles it tested had a range of 1,200 miles

‘and can "target any place that threatens

Iran." Israel, parts of Europe and U.S. mil-
itary bases in the Mideast are within that
range.

Iran's nuclear programme, its missiles
and its patronage of Palestinian and
Lebanese militants on Israel's northern and

‘southern flanks combined to make it Israel's

most formidable foe. Iranian President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's repeated refer-
ences to Israel's eventual destruction have
only intensified concerns. .

"The most urgent challenge facing this
body is to prevent the tyrants of Tehran
from acquiring nuclear weapons,"
Netanyahu told the U.N. General Assembly
last week.

Netanyahu has said sanctions are the best
option, especially considering Iran's weak-

ened economy and its domestic turmoil fol- ...

lowing contested elections. The revelation
of the Qom facility did not significantly
alter the preference for diplomacy because
world intélligence agencies, including
Israel's, have reportedly known about its
existence for years.
Israel's 1981 air attack on an unfinished
nuclear reactor in Iraq has long spurred
speculation that such a strike might be repli-
cated against Iran. But Iran's nuclear facil-
ities are scattered across the country and
highly fortified. Military experts are divid-
ed over whether Israel could cripple them

or just set the programme back a few years.

Washington has sent out multiple sig-
nals that it opposes a military strike and
wants to see if sanctions can do the job. If

Israeli warplanes flew to Iran, they would

probably need permission to cross air space
controlled by the U.S. and other countries.
But the threat of attack can serve diplo-

‘macy well, said Hazhir Teimourian, a

British-based historian of the Middle East.
"I think Israel's threats to resort to mil-
itary action have been taken seriously by

the Americans and the Europeans, and that

concentrates their minds," Teimourian said.

"They will resort to sanctions more tead-- |

ily and more deeply than they might oth-

erwise do," he said. "It suits the West for .
_ Israel to shout about it."

(This article was written by Amy Teibel,
Associated Press writer).













EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOUISE PIERRE of FIRETRAIL
ROAD, P.O. BOX CB-12627, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be grantéd, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
| Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OMAWATTIO CHEA KNOWLES
of PINE AVENUE, GLENISTON GARDENS, 'P.O.
BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that ‘any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147;Nassau;Bahamas,.

NOTICE

NOTICE ishereby giventhat YOLANDA BELTRE CONTRERAS
of FAITH GARDENS #2, MIRRIAN CLOSE, APT #16,
P.O. BOX GT-2014, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

BOX N-8180, NASSAU,



THE TRIBUNE

Running out
of patience
with officials

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wonder, has there ever
been a study done to deter-
mine how much the average
citizen in a democratic coun-
try will put up with from their
elected political officials
before they finally rebel?

I would be willing to bet.

that a lot of people will put
up with one hell of a lot of
rubbish from their govern-
ment. In fact, using Bahami-

ans as a model, I would have

to assume that there are those
unfortunate individuals who
will swallow whatever crap
they are handed by their lead-
ers from disappointment to
disappointment without end.

I have to be very honest
and tell you that as of this
moment in the life of Bahami-
an existence, I have very little
respect for any elected offi-
cial — in their capacity as an
elected official — and I have
absolutely no hope that the
Bahamas will ever grow into
anything better than it is right
now. The Bahamas has
become stagnant:to growth,
and the reasons are because
of less than sensational lead-
ership, and the attitude of
Bahamians themselves. We
still act like citizens of a third
world country in many ways
and I suppose it’s difficult not
to when the government is the
biggest employer in the coun-
try, while also controlling the
most necessary of modern
human utilities like electricity,
phone service, etc, etc.

In truly democratic first
world countries, the govern-
ment exists in the background
while its citizens bask in the
glory of private enterprise

... that is strengthened and pro-

tected by the. government.
Perhaps my American friends
are taking note. My warning
to them is —. you’re moving
backwards! And my admoni-
tion to my fellow Bahamians
is — we have to start thinking
outside the box! We simply
cannot maintain the status
quo and expect to get new or
different results.

Now because I live in Aba-
co, one should assume that I

Loses






letters@triobunemedia.net

would be most concerned
with what is going on in Aba-
co. First and foremost on
everybody’s mind seemingly
these days, is the new BEC
station being constructed.
While the environment is a
very important concern, it is
not my area of expertise, and
I therefore will not ‘get into
that. And quite honestly,
environmental concerns have
become too much akin to reli-
gious beliefs to too many peo-
ple.

building of a new airport that
has apparently come to a
grinding halt, or at least a seri-
ous go slow. The new airstrip
is quite beautiful when
observing it from the air upon
landing in Marsh Harbour,
but as of yet we haven’t been
able to actually land on that
new airstrip. So I am assum-
ing that however many mil-
lion dollars it cost us taxpay-

" ers, in the eyes of our illustri-

ous leaders it must have been
worth the investment to have
something nice to look at
when we reach back in Aba-
co.
If I’m being terribly honest
— and that is something that
is needed very badly these
days — Marsh Harbour is not
the most appealing sight to
the eyes, but now with a new
airstrip laying parallel to the
old one, it makes the
approach by air a little more
interesting at least. Obviously
this is the work of very com-
mitted politicians. This whole
sordid affair prompts me to

. offer a new riddle: How many

politicians does it take to get a
new airstrip built in the
Bahamas? Answer: Very
many! In fact, that same
answer applies to most every
facet of Bahamian life, does-
n’t it?

Of course when, and if, this
new airstrip ever comes into
use, the dedication of it will
be attended by a whole slew

There is, however, the

of politicians and community
leaders, reverends and the
like, who will all be slapping
each other on the back for a

" job well done. What absolute

nonsense! I hope I might be
fortunate enough to attend
this inevitable event so I
might pose a few difficult
questions to the elite. That is
if they will allow peasants to
attend such a thing. By the
way, I’m not carrying my
camera, because it will not be
a day of celebration, but
rather one of “so what?” to
me.

Finally, let me close by
making a summary statement.
Abaco is one of the most
important top three partners
in any governmental attempt
to accomplish anything any-

. where in this country of ours,

yet we are still treated like an
outside child. We have no
effective local representation,
and the permanent residents
of Abaco seem satisfied with
the way things are, otherwise
I would have to assume that
there might be an uprising of
some sort to inform the gov-

_ ernment — any. government

— that we have-had enough,
and we will not any longer
participate in a system of gov-
ernance where. we must con-
tinually come to the table beg-
ging for. whatever scraps we
might be able to get. We

. deserve better because we are

on par with — or above —
the other revenue producers
in this country, and until we
demand better, things will
stay exactly the way they are.
I guess I can hack it if y’all
can. Tank Gawd I born a
roughneck!

Thank you sincerely,
Madam Editor, for the space
in your editorial column.
Hopefully I have said some-
thing intelligent that will stir
the hearts and minds of a few
fellow Bahamians.

Stagnated and continually
disappointed in Abaco. .

WILLIAM (BILLY) ©
ROBERTS

Abaco,

September 26, 2009.

Editorial’s science
failed to make grade

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Ironic, I never thought I
would be accusing The Tri-
bune of “irresponsible jour-

nalism”, but I have to say, this _

editorial (The Tribune -Sept.
23 — Removal of the Casuari-
na), is as close as The Tribune
has come. What was the point










naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



of this editorial? I am sorry,
but the science on casuarina's
is clear. Just because the gen-
eral public and the editor of
The Tribune can't or doesn't
want to understand doesn't
make it less clear. Scientific
journals are peer reviewed for
precisely that reason. The sci-
entific consensus on this mat-
ter, that casuarinas and beach
dunes don't mix is 100 per
cent clear. There are indeed
places where casuarinas and
plants can coincide, but these
places happen to be generally
on private property where
someone is regularly raking

and cleaning the poisonous

nettles: away from the other
plants. Also, doesn't it occur
to anyone that just because a
plant survives for a while
under a casuarina that it won't
survive forever? It isn't as if
the nettles drop to the ground
and uproot the plant physi-
cally. Have you observed the
plant kingdom? They are
devoid of hands and claws
and other 'instant' acting
devices. Poison takes a while.
‘This whole debate has been
disingenuous, trite and silly.
If environmentalists, or at the
very least, people who are
inclined towards saving the
environment, are actually pre-
pared to do away with science
as the objective criteria upon
which to base environmental-
ism and if “responsible jour-
nals” like The Tribune are
likewise so casually dismissive
of. science, what hope does
environmentalism have?
What other objective criteria
that can convince people to
change their ways to save civ-
ilization as we know it will
you appeal to? Perhaps The
Tribune would be better
served in running a front page
story or serious editorial

about the Pacific Islands that"

are actually already under

water or the Maldives that are
about to disappear, quite lit-
erally, rather than waste our
time blathering about 'the
view' of casuarinas that need
to be removed to save the

_beach dune and thus save the

integrity of the shoreline. I

- am sorry, I have great respect

for the editor of The Tribune
and for the work it does, but
this was the single worst edi-
torial I have ever read from
The Tribune and that had to
be said. Your judgment is usu-
ally spot on and very reliable,
so this came as quite a shock.
Informed decisions mean
everything in the 21st century
and obfuscating an issue that
should be clear cut is not a
path to the enlightenment of
the Bahamian mind. It is a
path that leads to more doubt
and less purpose in matters
pertaining to science. You
create doubt in science in
society at our own peril. Right
now, the Bahamas is in the
top 10 countries at risk for sea
level rise, guaranteed. Is this
really the time to start seeding
doubt in science? Come on
Tribune, you know better!
The Tribune of the people is a
serious position. Respect your
ancient title please!

ERASMUS FOLLY

Nassau,
September 24, 2009

Pee oeeoesee esses eoSOOSOOOSoe

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight on
Mondays

Cece ceceeccssooccoesecoecoece

COCCHEEOSOEEE ES EOO OO EOL OOEDOOOOO®

eoscocs

Poeeccevoccsovacecoeooeseoenn



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 5



"I vex that our govern-
ment spent millions on this
so-called road improvement
project and yet every time I
drive, my car fall in one
crater after another. Who is
in charge of these projects
and why they ain' fix Shirley
Street?

"Those fellas from Min-
istry of Works mussy have
hover cars because they
can't pos-
sibly be
driving
through
o ur
streets
and not
notice
that
there are
three feet
holes in
the road.
Someone
needs to
so better,
man."

- Mad
Motorist.

"How
come
every
time I am
in. the
foodstore
on the 10
items of
less
check-

out, the —

person in front of me always
have 40 to 50 items and just
stands there and will not say
to me 'you can go since you
only have one item — a
Diet Coke’.

"Boy I am vex as .s hell."

- Ms Deb.

"Man I so sick and tired
of booking the earliest flight
on Bahamasair and they
stress to passengers to be
‘there at least two hours

ahead of time and they (the
staff) still do not come
strolling in until after Spm,
everyone with their mouths
pinned — but I have to get
there early to make my doc-
tor's appointed times."

- Oh so vex.

Clinic to |

prepare
residents
for flu

HELPING prepare resi-

dents for the coming flu sea-
son, the Killarney Con-
stituency Office is holding a
vaccine clinic at Sandyport for
the area’s residents between
2pm and 6pm today.

The vaccine to be adminis-
tered is the seasonal flu vac-
cine and not the vaccine
against the H1N1 virus (swine
flu) which is still unavailable
at this time, said Barbara
Donathan, a registered nurse
and secretary of the Killarney
Constituency Association.

A second shipment of sea-
sonal flu vaccines will be
available next week.

Influenza vaccine provides
adults and children with

active immunity against the’

virus. The vaccine cannot give
persons the flu because it does
not contain live virus.

Persons can still get the flu,
but will be less sick if they are
vaccinated. In elderly people
this vaccine can prevent pneu-
monia in about six out of 10
cases, and can prevent death
in more than eight out of 10
cases. Children under the age
of six months should not be
vaccinated. Persons with the
following should also not be
given the flu vaccine:

e Severe allergy to eggs, egg

- products or chicken.

‘e Previous severe reactions
to the Influenza vaccine.

e Allergy to thimerosal (a
preservative added to the
influenza vaccine to keep the
vaccine from spoiling),
neomycin (Vaxigrip only),
Triton X-100, sodium phos-
phate dibasic heptahydrate
(Fluviral only) or sodium
deoxycholate (Fluviral only).

e An active neurological

disorder or a past history of.

Guillan-Barre Syndrome.

e Serious febrile illness (you
can still have the vaccine if
you havea mild infection
without a fever).

However, pregnant women
or those who are breastfeed-
ing can be vaccinated.



"Why is there so much
attention garnered towards
this John Travolta case
when we have so many oth-
er pressing issues before our
country? That case. move
through the system so quick,
when normal Bahamians
gatty wait years to see their
matter before the court. But
that's just how Bahamians
go, treating foreigners bet-
ter than
they own,
no won-
der we in
this mess
now.
That's my
only
gripe.” .

- Court
Observ-
er.

"I hap-
Pp y
because I
splitting
my sides
laughing
at these
govern-
ment offi-
cials at da
Crown
Lands
Commit-
tee saying

that can
be done
to avoid corruption is to
remain ‘fair and open-mind-
ed'. Please, sir, with all due
respect, all government offi-
cials should be ‘fair and

‘open-minded' and keep

their hands preferably
closed with a pen doing
their job..

"Another official said,
‘given the sheer volume of
applications... many of them
get lost’. This begs the ques-
tion (of) what gets lost on a
desk top measuring approx-
imately three feet by six
feet? Some fall off eh?"

- Concerned Citizen.

Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyou-
vex@tribunemedia.net.

the best’

Domestic violence
a ‘major’ problem

THE problem of domestic
violence in the Bahamas is a
“significant” one which
requires renewed attention by
all sectors of society.

This was one of the find-
ings of a recent workshop
held by the police and com-
munity leaders who have
joined forces in an effort to
heighten awareness and min-
imise the increased incidents
of domestic olnee. in the
country.

The one-day programme
held by the police’s south-
eastern division in conjunc-
tion with the area’s commu-
nity leaders was entitled
‘Domestic Violence Preven-
tion and Intervention Certi-
fication Workshop’ and was
held at the All Saints Angli-
can Church.

Held under the theme
‘Family Focus - Stronger
Community”, the workshop
was designed to equip police
officers and community lead-
ers with the necessary -skills
to intervene and mediate in
incidences of domestic vio-
lence they may encounter.

A total of 60 persons par-

Wha

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC LE GRAND of BACARDI

‘ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 26"" day of September,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
~Phone:322-1722 » Fax: 326-7452

EXTRA, EXTRA,

Hurry,

EXTRA,

Large Shipment

of
Used Cars

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry and

Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing
Bank And Inourance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before nuying

Pa

"TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM |



ticipated in the workshop.
One of the speakers at the

workshop, Father Sebastian.
Campbell, said the problem .

of domestic violence in the
Bahamas is “significant and
requires renewed attention

not only from the church, the:

government, the police and
social workers, but society in
general.”

“While this problem cuts
across all boundaries, its

countermeasures requires a

multifaceted and active
approach in every communi-

ty.”

at the workshop, National
Security Minister Tommy

Turnquest said domestic vio-:

lence is a matter of special
concern for his government.

“This (domestic violence)
is an‘age old problem to
which the Royal Bahamas

Police Force southeastern.

division, including the police

and community leaders, have

turned their attention. Be it
habitual abuse of a spouse, a
child, older people, or a












Delivering opening remarks

60 tonne packaged -
Air Conditioning Unit
18yrs old
74” width
6’5”height
33’length

friend; whether it takes place
within the bounds of a mar-
riage, in a home, on a date or

on our streets; be it physical.,.

emotional, sexual or caused
by threat or intimidation,
domestic violence is funda-
mentally wrong,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said that in a
high percentage of murders
committed in the Bahamas
this year domestic violence
played a role.

“While it cannot be denied —

that men can also be victims
of domestic violence, too

- often that violence, including

murder, is directed against
women and children, and par-
ticularly girl children. Studies
have shown that women suf-
fer greater rates of injury due
to domestic violence,” he said.

The workshop, he said, is

in keeping with the strong

position the United Nations
as well as regional and hemi-
spheric organisations have
taken against domestic vio-
lence and on violence against
women.
“Indeed, the work of the

Can be viewed at
Carl G. Treco
Construction

120 Mackey Street South

All offers will be
considered!

302-9875



United Nations and its agen-
cies and other organisations

._ have been said to have moved

domestic violence from
behind closed doors; and to
bring it to the centre of the
agenda of governments, gov-
ernmental organisations and
non-governmental and com-
munity based organisations,”
Mr Turnquest said.

“We have to guard against
‘accepting domestic violence
as a ‘routine’ and expected
matter in our society. It is
contrary to the law and to
morality.

“So, if you are a witness to
domestic violence, call the
police. If you know a victim of
domestic violence, take them
to one Pouce









PAGE 6, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009











MEET Bryan. This handsome fellow is a three-year-
old Akita mix that boasts a healthy chocolate coat with
vanilla markings and has a smile that would win over even
the most skeptical of hearts.

His good looks are matched by an awesome personality.
He is an avid and obedient walker, has mastered the ‘sit’
command and gets along well with other dogs.

Also, being affectionate and “kissy”, he has the reputa-
tion at the Bahamas Humane Society (BHS) of being quite
. the charmer...

But this friendly disposition is not to say that he would
not make an excellent protector as ce is also quite “boun-
cy and vocal.”

Regrettably, he does suffer from a high degree of both
heartworm and the tick-bourne disease erhlichea.

But, as most animal lovers know, both of these ailments
can often be easily treated with medication, a little extra
love and time.

‘In fact, many of the staff at the BHS have taken home
dogs in similar, if not worse, conditions and the success rate
has been phenomenal.

Please open up your keart and home to this lovely little
guy as he really needs help. .

The necessary treatments are low in cost and otherwise
relatively simple. Bryan will be eternally grateful and you
will not regret your choice to save a life.

Persons are.also encouraged to ask about his best friend
Toby with whom he came to the BHS, as they would pre-
fer to be adopted together if possible. ‘

Day Care centre enjoys

its fifth anniversary

ST JOSEPH’S Adult Day Care Centre celebrates its
fifth anniversary” on Sunday, the feast of St Francis of
ASSISL. 3.)

To mark the occasion the Centre will hold an open
house on Monday, October 5, from 10 am to 5pm.

Sister Cecilia Albury, administrator of the Centre,
thanks all “volunteers, benefactors and friends who con-
tinue to help in our ministry.”

ele) att br sd) 1
ea

SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Warship SOrviCe wssceseaeese pew 830 aM.
* Sunday School for all AGES Hownine 845 3H.
* Worship Service ... ww $100 am,
* Spanish Service ... 11:00 am.
* FADS Youth Church(Grades 7-12}

First & Third Sunday 14:30 am.
* POWER CREW ChurchiAges 10-11 yrs.)

--Second & Fourth Sunday we ENBO arn.
* Beng SESE ~ 630 pm,

WEDNESDAY. FRIDAY —
at 7:30 p.m. at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching * Youth Ministry Meeting
* Royal Rangers [Boys Club} 4-16 yrs. [Grades 7-12}

* Missionettes (Girls Club} 4-16 yrs.

* Spanish Bible Study

| RADIO MINISTRY on Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME
| Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God





LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







Man’s true ‘Amigo’
honoured in the US

Hopes for renewed animal protection law push

THE late Bahamian potcake star
‘Amigo’ (pictured above) was honoured
by the Humane Society of the United
States (HSUS), which recently named
“The Amigo Humane Recognition .
Awards” after him at a special Humane
Law Enforcement dinner and award cer-
emony held in Washington, DC.

It was a fitting tribute to the beloved
potcake who, with his touching ‘rags to
riches story’, was seen by many as an
example of what can happen when
‘someone cares’.

During his lifetime, he put a face to
many tragic issues facing animals
throughout the islands of the Bahamas \
and elsewhere.

Frances Singer-Hayward, who
described herself as his “partner”, said

paign and appearing with HSUS presi-

Frances Singer-Hayward (left), Jane Berry one of the.recipients of the Amigo Humane
Recognition Awards and Humane Society of the United States president Wayne Pacelle.
Michelle Riley/The Humane Society of the United States)



about Amigo, told of how she found him
as a tragic stray potcake, but how with

she hopes Amigo will inspire the
Bahamas to continue to join “the merci-
ful global trend of enacting animal pro-
tection laws with appropriately stiff pun-
ishments.”

“Laws dealing with animal protection
are now becoming more and more pow-
erful, mainstream and expected, and if
Amigo through his story and his work
can in any way help to inspire the passage
of such laws in the Bahamas, he will, in
his own sweet way, have truly made a
difference,” she said.

Taking his message abroad, Amigo
became very involved with HSUS, part-
nering with them in the BEKIND Cam-

dent Wayne Pacelle in public service’

announcements (PSA). Amigo’s very last
effort before he died was to appear in
an anti-dog fighting PSA with hip hop
mogul Russell Simmons and Mr Pacelle.

At the award ceremony in Washing-
ton, DC, Ms Singer-Hayward along with
Mr Pacelle presented the awards in his
name to what she termed “a room filled
with heroes” from all parts of the US,
including those in law enforcement who

had risked their lives saving animals, \

prosecutors who fought to put animal
abusers behind bars, and politicians who
devoted themselves to passing animal
protection laws.

Ms Singer-Hayward in her speech

love and nurturing he became a ‘super-
star’ in the Bahamas as the face-of the
Grand Bahama Humane Society’s “Cru-
sade Against Animal Suffering” and as

‘the ‘poster dog’ for its spay and neuter

campaign.

She spoke of how deeply she loved
him and how he would forever be the
inspiration behind her passionate work
on behalf of animal welfare.

Her talk touched the hearts of many in
the audience, who told her afterwards
how moved they were by Amigo’s story.
The weekend ironically marked the sec-
ond anniversary of the potcake’s untime-
_ly death from cancer. .









Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching 11am &7:30pm + EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:-H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 893-0563 ¢ Box N-362





“CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL *

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel 325-2921





“ Hie, A: M. Speaker
Pastor Perry Wallace

October is Missions Month At Central

“Bible Chiga: G48 am. + Breaking of Broad Service: Th45 am.
dniunity Qutresah: $4590 gi. * Bveniig Service: M08 pan.
oon Midwank Senics 70 pun. Aednesdaysk |

fers eye Meating: 1: Oe a Bt oe Fhureday af sich er)







Grace and ete Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
Worship Time: Ha.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m:

Church School during Worsh ip Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUERDA ILYSSE JEAN

BAPTISTE of CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should |
send a written and signed statement of the facts within

twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009 to the

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-742:
(wwiwgivesiey.org)

| SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4TH, 2009

eam | Rev, Carla Culmer/Sis, Tezel Anderson -

‘ 410m Rev, Carla Culmer/Contirmation Service (HC)

7:08 pm Sis, Nathalie Thompson/Sis, Marilyn Tinker

coated i Team ca Raid ei

y LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

_ Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-57
EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs

PNT XR BESO MU AMUN yy eR A!





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 7



i

Union facing
Freeport split

FROM page one

ers have started signing a peti-
tion for a poll to be created to
allow the next union that is
vying to be the bargaining
agent for workers at Our
Lucaya Resort to operate.

The A-Team, led by Nicole
Martin, won union elections
on September 28. Ms Martin,
who was also elected in May,
was re-elected as the new
president of the Hotel Work-
ers Union.

Although Ms Martin cap-
tured a majority of the votes
in New Providence, she was
not as successful in Freeport.
Presidential candidate, Kirk
Wilson, leader of the Team
Deliverance, won in Grand
Bahama.

Wilson captured 598 votes
compared to the 70 votes Ms
Martin picked up in Freeport.

Mr Morley, who was also a
candidate with Team Deliv-
erance, said workers have
expressed a lack of confidence
in the new president.

“At this time they want to
break away, they do not feel
comfortable with the level of
representation and they do
not feel they are skilled
enough or understand the
people here they are dealing
with,” he said.

- “I do not encourage them
leaving Hotel Workers
Union, but if it is their wish
and desire, which they have
expressed that to me, then I
believe I have a moral respon-
sibility to assist the best way I
can,” he said. Mr Morley said
workers have galvanised
enough support and are in the
‘process of approaching the
Minister of Labour in short
order concerning their desire.

The former union execu- ~
tive said that many hotel

workers felt disenfranchised
during the last union election.

He claims that more than -

150 voters were left off the
register in Freeport, and 2,500
persons were not put on the
register in New Providence.

“Those 2,500 persons that
were not put on the register
could have proven they had
paid union dues because they
had their cheque stubs to
prove it, but were not allowed
to vote in Nassau,” he said.

Leanne Thompson of
Grand Bahama was disap-
pointed she was not allowed
to vote in the last elections.

“J yoted in the May.elec-
tions, but was not gn the
March register list for this
election. I am up to date on
all my union dues,” she said.

Ms Thompson went on
maternity leave for 13 weeks
in January, and later took
three weeks: vacation leave.
She returned to work im April.

Although dues are not
deducted from maternity ben-
efits, she said dues were taken
out of her vacation pay.

“It is just not fair that
myself and a lot, of people
who took time to go down to
Workers House to exercise
our right to vote were turned
away because our names were
not on the register,”’ said the
former shop steward of seven
years.

Mr Morley said that the rel-
evant authorities must put
better methods in place for
more transparent elections,
especially at polling divisions.

He claimed that Team
Deliverance candidate Ray-
mand, Wright — who he said
was deliberately left off the
register — had discovered two
ballot boxes already filled
with ballot papers at a polling
station before the elections
started and was attacked by
a candidate on the A-Team.

“It means that the A-Team
was ahead and the Team
Deliverance was down, 800
votes before the elections
started,” he said.

“We are calling on the rel-
evant persons, inclusive of the
Prime Minister, to find the
relevant resolution and
method to put in place so we
can have transparent elec-
tions,”’ he said.

Behaviour warning
over Travolta case

_FROM page one.

passion but there is no need
for incivility,” Senior Justice
Allen said.

Bridgewater and former ©

paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne are accused of
attempts to extort $25 million
from the actor following the
death of his 16-year-old son,
Jett, in Grand Bahamas on
January 2.

During yesterday’ S Cross-
examination Mr Ducille asked
Mr McDermott whether he
was the one who had instruct-
ed PLP Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, who is a lawyer,
to go to Freeport to meet with
Ms Bridgewater.

Mr McDermott replied,
“J authorised her brother
Clement Maynard to instruct
her to go to Freeport. I didn’t
speak to her directly.” When
asked by Mr Ducille why he

wanted Mrs Maynard-Gibson.

to go to Freeport, Mr McDer-
mott explained that he want-
ed to have more information
so that they could go to the
police. Mr McDermott said
that the first time he heard
about the $25 million demand
was through Mrs Maynard-
Gibson.

Mr Ducille then asked,
“When you came to Nassau
‘on January 17, did you intend
to negotiate with anyone?”
Mr McDermott replied,
“No. > f

“My suggestion to you is
that when you came to Nas-
sau on the 17 of January you
had evil intent in your heart,”
Mr Ducille said. Mr McDer-
mott again replied, “No.”

_ Mr Ducille further sug-
gested to Mr McDermott that
his sole mission was to set up
Ms Bridgewater. Mr McDer-
mott replied, “No, sir. It was
to report to law enforcement
what had transpired on that
day.”

“What was all this with the
video and audio apparatus
being set up in your room?”
Mr Ducille then asked.

Mr McDermott replied, “I
reported the circumstances to
police. They were not set up
at my request.” Mr Ducille
further suggested that there
had been no demand, that he



had been up to no good and
that his trip to the Bahamas
was a “sham.”

Mr McDermott replied,
“My journey to the Bahamas

was to inform authorities . -

about all that had happened.”

Mr Ducille then suggested
that he was the one who‘had
made the offer of money and
that he was the one who had

pushed the negotiations. Mr.

McDermott denied the sug-
gestion. Mr Ducille asked Mr
McDermott if he had felt
threatened by anyone in com-
ing to the Bahamas. Mr
McDermott replied, “No.”
During cross-examination
by Lightbourne’s attorney

‘Carlson Shurland, Mr McDer-

mott was asked whether he
had brought a contingent of
lawyers when he came to Nas-
sau in, January. Mr McDer-

mott said three attorneys

accompanied him.

“Up to January 18, you did
not know Tarino Light-
bourne, the man?” Mr Shur-
land asked. Mr McDermott
responded by saying, “No I
did not know him at all.”

Mr McDermott said he

_ had relayed the facts to law

enforcement officials and it
was up to them to do ‘what
they wanted to do with it,”
Mr McDermott told the court.

Mr Shurland then suggest-
ed that the facts he gave
regarding Tarino was based
on hearsay evidence. Mr
McDermott said that his com-
plaint was based on conver-

~ gations he had with West End

and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Ms Bridgewater,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
Ronald Zupancic and discus-
sions with Clement Maynard
III, regarding the.application
of Bahamian law.

Jurors in the attempted
extortion trial are expected
to hear the taped meetings
between Bridgewater, Light-
bourne and Mr McDermott
on Monday. Senior Justice
Allen decided yesterday that
rather than fragment the evi-
dence by playing a taped tele-
phone conversation between
Bridgewater and McDermott
yesterday and the two video-
taped meetings on Monday,
it would be better to have the
jury see all on the same day.

UNESCO summit
head recognised

A recognition reception
was held for career diplomat
Dr Davidson Hepburn who
has been appointed to the
presidency of the United
Nations Educational, Scien-
tific and Cultural Organisa-
tion’s (UNESCO) 35th Gen-
eral Conference.

It was held on September
28, at Comers House,

headquarters of the Antiqui-
ties, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation (AMMC)

‘ where Dr Hepburn serves as

chairman.

Dr Hepburn and his wife
Dr Ada Thompson-Hepburn
are pictured sitting alongside
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel. Theresa Moxey-Ingra-
ham is at right.





Imminent solution for CLICO policyholders awaited

people with policies that originated with CLICO pay up front.
Meanwhile, numerous policyholders, continue to pay their -
insurance premiums, as Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
advised them to do if they wanted to see their policies not fall
by the wayside but be transferred to another insurance company

FROM page one

suade the private hospital to accept CLICO insurance even .

ahead of that announcement.

Despite the failed company’s financial woes, the liquidator,
on behalf of CLICO (Bahamas), has continued to honour
health insurance claims, The Tribune understands.

But this in itself appears to have failed to encourage most

doctors, hospitals and pharmacies to allow customers ‘and
patients to rely on their insurance when they buy services or

supplies from them.

Instead many businesses have continued to demand that

Caribbean Court of Justice switch urged

FROM page one

tion. Mr Sears said the coun-
try should take heed of this
warning and quickly link itself
with the regional appellate
body. instead of waiting for an
immediate threat from the
United Kingdom.

Recently Lord Phillips told

the UK Financial Times that
Law Lords on the Privy
Council, spent a “dispropor-
tionate” amount of time on
cases from former colonies,
mostly in the Caribbean, the

‘ BBC reported,

The region's final appellate
court — the Caribbean Court
of Justice — currently only
hears cases from Guyana and

' Barbados. Mr Sears said the

Bahamas, as a part of CARI-
COM. is already paying a fee
to the CCJ and should make
use of its talented judges.

"I personally believe, and
I'm speaking for myself not
for the PLP, that as a paying
member of CARICOM which
currently makes an annual
contribution to the CCJ that
the Bahamas ought to accept



52wk-Low

the appellate jurisdiction of
the CC] and unlink ourselves
from the Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council with our
thanks for the excellent ser-
vice that it has providéd over
the years.

"I believe that we have the
talent in our region as well as
talent outside of the region
that is available to the region
for the CCJ to perform equal
to the performance of the
Privy Council," Mr Sears told
The Tribune yesterday.

His comments.came a day
after BBC Caribbean report-
ed that Britain's first Supreme

Court officially replaced the °

Privy Council. The new. court
replaces the appellate com-
mittee of Britain's upper leg-
islative chamber, the House
of Lords, BBC Caribbean
said.

BBC Caribbean also
reported that the new
supreme court takes over
from the Privy Council which

‘serves as the final court of

appeal for most Caribbean
countries.

However, local senior attor-
ney Brian Moree disagreed

that could take responsibility for paying their claims.

Yesterday of 10 physicians and medical centres contacted by
this newspaper as well as three pharmacies — Lowe’s, Heaven
Sent and the Prescription Parlour Pharmacy — all confirmed
that they do not accept CLICO insurance, following the sudden
liquidation of the insurer. Doctor’s Hospital declined to com-
ment on the matter when contacted yesterday.

with the information reported
and explained that it was the
Judicial Committee of the
House of Lords — the upper
house of British Parliament
— that was replaced by
Britain's Supreme Court.
"Britain has not dumped
the Privy Council and has not
indicated through political
channels or through judicial
channels that it is not pre-
pared to continue to provide
the services of the Privy
Council to those countries

that would continue to wish .

to use it as its final appellate
court."

"The judicial committee of
the House of Lords is a dif-
ferent court than the Judicial
Committee of the Privy
Council even though the same
Law Lords sit in both courts.
In fact, apart from a very nar-
row area, the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Council is
not a domestic court in
Britain, its function — apart
from a narrow area of law —
is to provide a final court of
appeal to former colonies,"
Mr Moree told The Tribune.

He added that due to the.

respect, credibility and wealth
of experience held by the
. judges. on the Privy Council
the Bahamas should not
abandon the body as its final
court of appeal just yet.

"It is regarded by most
independent observes as one °
.of the most competent, expe-
rienced and independent
courts in the world. As a
country we don't pay for
these services and frankly it
has been a bargain for the
Bahamas," said the senior
partner of McKinney, Ban;

croft and Hughes.: ~~~ ~~~ -

He said the CCJ was too
young a court to have devel-
oped reputable standing in
the community and ques-:
tioned if the appointment of
its judges are free of political
influence.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicve,
Pest Control

Uy eg aT TE ats
322-2157



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

TTT

FRADED
MSG

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

“Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real-Estate

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

* Security ’

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND H

29.00 ABDAB

52wk-Low
1.3344
2.8952
1.4129
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's-Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007"

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

- CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.

7% :

Prime + 1.75%

1% ;
Prime + 1.75%

Last Price | Weekly Vol.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price -
Weekly Vol.

Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES



COLONIAL

Interest

ty
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
KG

0.000

0.000 0.480

31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
25-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

54 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242.99



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100





PAGE 8 FIRDAY, OCTOBER 38, 2009

co

THE TRIBUNE














IT’S AN
OLDER
Guy...

JIM YELICH WOULD'VE:
HAD D’VITO UNDER
SURVEILLANCE. --

WONDER WHAT -
HAPPENED?





i

i

3

=

vt

5

%

a

ipa ms g

I DON’T KNOW... fo =
BUT THEY HAVE “22

" SOMEONE IN CUSTODY! j

THERE'S
ANOTHER GIRL |
AND I: LIKE
HER, BUT SHE

THERE'S THIS!
LITTLE GIRL AT

2 SCHOOL WHO |
Q~, LIKES ME, <
BUT I DON'T.

< 2009 by King Features Syncicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



MOM SANS
TL HAVE To CLEAN fo






YOU'RE THE-ONE WHO HAS To
UWE WITH YOURSELF! I

CANT MAKE You Do WHATS
RIGHT! You CAN HAVE THE





TM NOT GOING To FIGHT
You, MOE! \F YOU WONT
GINE ME MY TRUCK BACK,
FINE! Go AHEAD







Heh heh.



_-- THEY THINK HE'S
ONE OF THE PEOPLE
DIVITO SCAMMEP!



MEN, KID, \F YOU'RE

APT 3-G

I'LL SURE BE }
> GLAD WHEN I
GROW UP AND
ALL THIS GETS
STRAIGHTENED

TELL HER YOURE
NOT VONE GETTIN
IT DieTY !

NOT GONNA SINING,
GET OFF AND LET
SOMEONE ELSE










HOW COME YoU
HAVEN'T TRIED TO
WALK, EOGENE 7

OO

WHAT (5 THE
NAVIGATOR
TRYING JO SAY










NOT ATALL. HOW
WAS YOUR DAY,







IN THE WEDDING
BUSINESS,
ARISTOTLE.

SSE

|
bes



www.kingfeatures.com

AGING PR
Oo

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

HE TENDS TO
FREEZE UP
WHEN HE

GETS EXCITED!

or more can

The Target
uses

FRUSTRATING AND EXHAUSTING!
THERE'S A LOT OF HEAVY LIFTING

S \
GCA
=
cy “My








AND THEN THERE'S THE
BRIDE WHO CAN'T BE
BOTHERED TO LEARN My
NAME AND CALLS ME
HEY yo. U, u 7 <










©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

T HAVE NO DESIRE
To SPEED UP THE

OCESS

HOW many words of four fetters

you make from the

letters shown here? In making a

word, each letter may be used

AND KEEP IT!
once only. Each must contain the

STUPID TRUCK !







words in
I the main

at least one nine-letter word.



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate







Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.
The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from
“Monday to Sunday



}999

No plurals.

body of
Chambers
2\st
Century
Dictionary |

Ai (or more)

ether ferret
hero hetero

adition)



tore’ tree











=,

SREAPING HELPS MRINILSON “COOKIES AN’ A MILKSHAKE
BECOME A WELL-ROUNDED — [0,TOO. "
PERSON.”





Difficulty Level %& ¥



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
Deck or dock (5)
Business head shows

Freed of entanglements 1
volunteered (7) ; 2
Clean down (5)

The French way to get fat (4)

and 9 Down: Not ae

surprising ending

apparently (8,10)

Sharply picked out (10)

Provide two servings of dry

wine in a bit (6)

Produced a publication and |

is taken to court (6)

resolution (8)
Kills a doctor and

_ confesses (6)
Stress follows before a
claim (10)
His victims lose
heart (4)
Pointedly heckled (7)
See 8 Across
Exits in the open
air (8)
Insect settled on
the cheese for a short
while (7)
Asian labourer that is
not friendly to begin
with (6)
Estimated distribution of
trade (5)
Leaf-destraying
parasite (4) -

Unable to work after leaving
the fraternity? (3,2,5)
All too human story in
which evil makes a
comeback (8)
An army entertainer at a .
talk show? (4)
Long time coming to a
point (5)

. Went by inordinately
pleased (7)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution .

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Furthermore, 9 On
trust, 10 Tinge, 11 Hard, 12
Enormous, 114 Nicety, 16 Cannon,
18 Terminus, 19 Till, 22 Imbue, 23
Nonplus, 24 Just the same.
Down: 2 Utter, 3 Taut, 4 Extent, 5
Material, 6 Run-down, 7 Nothing
to it, 8 Less and less, 13 Strident,
15 Caribou, 17 Quench, 20 Islam,
21 Onus.

Across: 1 Arrangement, 9 On the
go, 10 Chill, 11 Dust, 12 Striving, 14
Orator, 16 Target, 18 Passport, 19
Etna, 22 Nurse, 23 Epitaph, 24
Interesting.

Down: 2 Rates, 3 Aces, 4 Growth,
5 Michigan, 6 Nailing, 7 Good com-
pany, 8 Flight paths, 13 Complete,
15 Also ran, 17 Greece, 20 Train,
21 Girt.



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Across

Reparation (7)
A decorative
design (5)

7 Renown (4)

8 In its original
state (8)
To meet as
arranged (10)
Ludicrous (6)
Severe trial (6)
Complex details
(3,3,4)
Accurate (8)
Volition (4)
Give way (5)
Tight-fisted (7)





j
}
| centre letter and there must be
}
j
i
|



TODAY'S TARGET
Good 21; very good 31; excefient

Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION,

fete fore forte free

freer fret here hereof hereto

other reef reefer

refer rete retro rote thee there
THEREFORE thereof three throe



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,
and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more than
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday. ©
























Down

1
2
3

To direct attention (5)
Lessen (8)

Endeavour —

‘earnestly (6)

Disguise oneself (10)

5 To cut to a desired

size (4)

Irritable (7)
Remember (4,2,4)
Distinctive (8)
General pardon (7)
Get to the bottom
of (6)

Resentfully

silent (5)

Advise strongly (4)











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





7/4/6[51.1/3
13/9 216/87

1/815(9/4 2

7/61 4)2 °3/1/5/8
1/8/9|517/2/316
3/5/2|816/1|71914
1/9|3|6|7/4|8]2/5
7/2|415/1/8|3|/6/9

om |8/6/5]2/3'9] 4/7) 1











Nowhere to Hide

West dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
@AJ 103
VAKIY
4103
®K QT ;
WEST EAST
@Q5 #872.
¥84 ¥106532
#AKI9764 #Q
52 A964
SOUTH —
&K964
Â¥Q7
$852
#11083
The bidding:
West North East South
34 Dble Pass 34
Pass 44

Opening lead —— king of diamonds.

Bridge is primarily a game of
percentages, but there are times
when psychological considerations
play a bigger role than probabilities.

Consider this deal from a team
contest where both North-South
pairs reached four spades after West
had opened three diamonds. Both
Wests led the diamond king and con-
tinued with the ace at trick two, East
discarding a low heart.

At the first table, West continued
with the diamond jack, which
declarer ruffed with dummy’s ten of
spades. When East failed to overruff,
it became clear that West had the

Tomorrow: Wrig

queen of spades. So South next led a
low spade to the king and retumed a
spade toward the A-J, picking up
West’s queen. East’s ace of clubs
later scored the defenders’ third and .
last trick, and the contract was made.

Afterward, East reprimanded his:
partner for continuing a third dia-\
mond, thereby revealing the location
of the spade queen, Had West shifted
to another suit at trick three, East
argued, declarer might well have
misguessed the spade position and
gone down.

East’s analysis left something. to
be desired, as evidenced by what
transpired at the other table. There,
West recognized the danger of play-
ing a third diamond, so he shifled to
a club at trick three. '

East took the king with the ace
and returned a club, but after win-
ning with dummy’s queen, South
paused to consider why West had not
led a third diamond in a potential
overruff situation. The only rational
explanation had to be that West was
afraideof giving away information
about his trump holding, so South led
a spade to the king and retuned a
spade toward dummy, and that was
that. ‘
By drawing the proper inference,
declarer was thus sure to make the
contract whether or not West led a
diamond at trick three. There was
simply no place poor West could
hide his queen of spades.

gling out of the trap.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine,
















Fundraising for
Yama Bahama —
underway

FUNDRAISING for
the 2010 Yama Bahama
Festival got under way



yesterday.
Throughout the cam-
paign, -the Yama

Bahama Foundation
aims to encourage spon-
sors to help support and
motivate potential par-
ticipants, especially
those in their respective
communities inclusive of
children, young adults
and senior citizens.

. The first annual Yama
Bahama Festival is.
scheduled to take place :
in July 2010 on North :
Bimini, Bahamas.

With the theme
“Sports Fever” the festi-
val will feature a fun
run/walk, boxing,

basketball and base-
ball.

There will also be an
essay writing contest
with a Yama Bahama
Scholarship awarded to’
the winner. The essay
topic is: Three Major
Steps to Effect Positive

Change in the
Bahamas i

The non-profit orga-:
nization board include
chair persons Penny
Butler, Camille Butler :
and Ebeneezer "Bone- :
fish Ebbie" David; .sec- :
retary Carol Smith- :
Gomez; treasurer
George Weech; Public
relations Janice Levari- :
ty; chairperson fundrais-
ing and Sponsorship Hil-
da James. ;

Other Board Members
include Charlie Robins,
Renee Robins, Leonard
Stuart and Fred Sturrup,
Consultant. -

For more information,
‘visit www.yamaba-





se eeepaseecesencereeaeencnses

hamafest.info



~

NVPA update

IN the lone game .,
played in the New
Provideence Volleyball
Association Thursday
night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas
Caribs men defeated ©
the Saints in three
‘straight sets 25-10, 25-
21 and 27-25. : - :

Anvard Johnson led
all scorers with 10
points for the Caribs in
their victory. William
McKinney had 7 for the
Saints.

The league will be
back in action on Sun- }
day with a triple header :
at the DW Davis Gym. :

© Here’s alook at the :
match-ups: i

3:30 pm Cougars vs
Lady Truckers (L).

4:30 pm Scotia
Defenders vs COB
(M).

5:30 pm Technicians
vs Saints (M).



BASEBALL i

PROFESSIONAL, NOT
SEMEPRO PLAYERS.

_IN an article on Fri-
day about the funeral
service of the late Vin-
cent Lloyd Ferguson,
Inagua’s Etienne Far-

. quharson and Fred
‘Papa’ Smith were |
referred to as semi-pro

baseball players.

. The two were actual
professional players,
who played in the
minor leagues.

The Tribune apolo-
gises to the players for
the error.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER

iS SSSA

By DAHALIA SMITH
For the BSA

JIMMY Lowe won the
2009 Terry McCoy Memori-
al Sunfish Regatta, improv-
ing on last year's fourth
place finish in a very com-
petitive fleet of 18 boats.

He accumulated a score of
seven points by the end of

’ the six-race-series hosted by

the Nassau Yacht Club
(NYC) on Montague Bay.
No white caps, steady 5-10
knot winds and a sunny day
presented favorable condi-
tions on the first day (Sat-
urday, September 26) of sail-
ing.

Going into race one-of-
four, Lowe expected noth-
ing less than winning them
all. iIf you don't go out there
with that mindset you may
as well not go at all,i he said.

By the end of day one
Lowe recorded a third place
finish in the opening race
and three comfortable vic-
tories in races two, three and
four.

Favorite and defending
champion Donald Martin-
borough won the first race,
finished third in the second

‘and fourth races and placed

second in the third race.
After day one St
Andrew's student and junior
Chris Sands emerged as
another front runner for the
overall title. He sailed well
against seasoned skipper

Lowe and world class sailor’

Martinborough. Sands
secured second placements
in Saturday's races. The
youngster was on the world
title holder's, Martinbor-
ough, heals beat by beat in
race one. However the vet-
eran nipped Sands at the
final buoy by a boat's length
for the win. Another notable
face off at the finish line saw
Martinborough edge Lori
Lowe (sole female sailor) in
race three by two boat
lengths for second behind
Jimmie Lowe.

Still trees on the second

SEE page 10

3: 20:09





ALPHEUS ‘Hawk’ Finlyson has announced
that the new date and venue for the launch of
his book: “rom Vancouver to Athens” is Fri-
day, October 9, 5:30-7:00pm at Chapter One,
College of The Bahamas, Oakes Field.

“We hope to see you there,” said Finlayson,

who had to put off the original launching date —

because of the books were not shipped in time.
For those persons who can’t attend, Fin-

TOP KAMAL Ti MO,



layson is asking for them to email him at
aimperial.com or

alpheus.finlayson@colin
contact him at 327-4612.

Anyone wishing to have their books signed
are urged to purchase them from Logos at Har-
bour Bay, The Island Bookstore, Bay Street or

Chapter One.
The price is $29.95.

The books are available in the stores.

Cc







Lowe wins 2009 Sunfish Regatta

BLUEWAV
RALLY TO
DEFEAT
COMETS



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009

ee eee eee eee ee



SAW where the funer-

al for Vince Ferguson

was held today, and
feel | must add my tribute
to all those that have

already done so.

Growing up I always was inter-
ested in sports, and played quite a
few.

With the exception of on or two
that I did excel in, I was always just
good enough to make the team,
but not stand out.

Let me share two stories about
Vince Ferguson, and his methods
of teaching.

When I was about 15 years old, I
played on the Queens College
High School Soccer Team with a
goalie whose family (if I remember
correctly) was from Jamaica, and
his name was Hugh, (can't remem-
ber the last name..) The thing I do
remember is that he played for two
years and never allowed a goal to
be scored against him.

_ Because my nature was not to be
"told what to do" if I thought the
person was offensive, I got into
more than one "disagreement"
with my school teachers, to the
point where it was "suggested" by
the Principal

that maybe I belonged else-
where...

So in the middle of the school
year, I transferred to St.
Augustine's College where I first

- «met Mr. Ferguson.

My first "experience" with Mr

Lowe wins 2099 Sunfish Regatta

FROM page nine»

Ferguson was over the school tie.

Every Friday all young gentle-
men were supposed to come to
school in their bright red St Augus-
tine tie. Of course, considering
myself a "rebel" now, I choose not
to wear the school tie at any time.

Hearing how hard a disciplinari-
an Mr Ferguson was by other stu-
dents, every Friday I did my best
to avoid him, until...

It was right before the bell was

to ring ending the morning break,

when I accidentally "bucked" into
Mr Ferguson, whio asked me
immediately WHY wasn't I wear-*
ing my school tie on Friday as I am
supposed to. I mumbled something
about "forgetting," to which he
said I was to come to his office at
lunch time and I had BETTER
have my tie on...

The rest of the mogning was
filled with apprehension, with me

’ racking my brain, what to do, what

to do? ;
I had been caned once in my life
and didn't relish the thought of

going through that experience

again.

Right before I was to go to his
office, I went to the restroom, and
there, on the floor, pushed into the
corner with the rest of the trash,
was a St Augustine boys tie. True
it had holes in it, and lot's of dirt

spots, but it WAS a tie. I quickly
picked it up, tied it on my neck,
and walked confidently to his
office. ;

When he saw me, the veins in his
head and neck started sticking out,
and his lips and eyes narrowed. He



clenched his teeth and seethed
"What is THAT Mr. Lee?" Feel-
ing a bit nervous, I explained that
he said J MUST have a tie when I
came to his office, and since I
walked to school, and was unable
to get out (they use to lock the
back road, to keep intruders out
during the day;) this was the best
solution I could come up with. He
sat for what seemed like eternity,
eyeing me up and down and finally
said "Mr Lee, let this be the LAST
Friday that you EVER come to St
Augustine's College without your
tie.." And it was...

The other story I have about Mr
Ferguson was also from that same
time.

As I said before, I use to play
soccer for Q.C. Well one after-
noon while walking towards the
back gate, Mr Ferguson drives up
in his Volkswagon Beetle and asks
me why I was not going to soccer
practice as he

knew I played. I told him I was
not interested in playing on the °
SAC team and was on my way
home, besides the season was just
about finished. ae

He said regardless, he wanted
me at practice. I didn't go.

The next time practice was

_ scheduled I was almost on Prince

Charles Drive when he pulled up
in his car again, this time turning it
sideways to block my path. He got
out and DEMANDED that I go
back and join in ©

practice. Seeing that he was per-

- sistent, I gave up and started

attending practice.

I think there was two games left
then the Championship. My
"forte" in soccer was only in strik-
ing the ball towards the net, I was
neither a good dribbler, or a
"magician" at ball handling. So I
was not surprised

when I spend the last two games
on the bench (besides I had just
joined the team..) But I DID start
to wonder WHY Mr Ferguson
made me join... ‘

Then came "Championship
Day." SAC was tied with QC for
wins in the regular seasons, but led
in some statistic like goals scored
or whatever, which gave us the
edge. All we had to do was tie QC
and the

High School Championship was
ours. .

_ The game started, and suddenly
in the first half, QC scored to make
it 1-0. I knew with Hugh in the net
for QC and not given up a goal in
two years, "that was that.."

Suddenly it was half time, and
Mr. Ferguson yelled "Mr Lee, get
ready to go in as a inside forward."
I did what I was told.

No more than two minutes into
the second half, the outside winger
got the ball and crossed it in front
of their goal. I had been following
the play up, and dashed forward
striking the ball towards the goal
with a

sharp left foot volley, I watched
as Hugh leapt towards the ball,
then realised (to my UTTER
amazement) that it was indeed
passing his outstretched hand and
it mad a loud "clang" as it hit the
metal netting

inside the goal. I took a deep
breath, and shook my head...The
game was tied!! "

The game remained that way .
and at the end we were High
School .

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Champions...

AS we met as a group after-
wards, Mr. Ferguson only said that
"when we play as a team, with
everyone having and knowing their
part, we can be victorious..."

These stories indicate the type of
teacher and person Mr Ferguson
was.

Yes he WAS a disciplinarian,
but he made me "creative" enough
to find SOME kind |

of tie.

And regarding the persistence
he showed in demanding I join the.
soccer team, then leaving me on
the bench, only to bring me on to
end up scoring the goal which
proved to be decisive, showed me
what a GENIUS the man was. He
had seen me play at QC he knew
what I could do, and not do. It

might have been out of despera-

tion, (after QC went up 1-0 and
everyone knowing that NOBODY
had ever scored against Hugh) that
he brought me‘on, but in looking ~
back it was a cool, calculated and -
educated guess he took because he
knew if there was one thing I had
was a strong leg and that was prob-

- ably the only way a ball could get

past

Hugh that day. (It was not that I;
had great soccer skills...) It showed:
me the brillance of the man...

I saw Mr Ferguson a few times .
around town since those days forty’
years ago, he was always cordial,
said hello, and (once in awhile)
would shake my hand, and give me:
that wry little smile of his.

So, today we honour the man, he
was so much more than just a
teacher, and he meant so much to
so many. :

May God Bless.and receive you
at his side Mr Vince Ferguson..

WILLIAM LEE.

day of sailing, Sunday, indi-
cated light and variable
winds out to sea nonetheless
the sailors were enthusias-
‘tic. Once they reached the
starting line the winds
picked up but mostly fluctu-
ated.

Results from race five

were-atypical-from.the pre- .

vio

not finish and thrée boats.-_

four which saw Lowe

disqualified for being, over

the starting line early and
were scored OCS (on course
side). That opened the door
for a victory by Martinbor-
ough, another second place-
ment by Sands and a third
place finish by real estate
guru George Damianos.
_ The final race (six) fol-
lowed and Jimmie Lowe
sealed the championship
title with another victory.
Meanwhile Martinborough
was over the starting line
early and registered an OCS,
Sands snagged second and
Damianos picked up anoth-
er third placement. Overall,:
Martinborough was second
with a score of 10 points,
Sands was third also with 10
points and Damianos settled
for fourth with 19 points.
Sands, who recently fin-
ished second at the 2009
Bahamas National Sunfish
Championship, was also the
top junior over four others.
He and four other juniors
(Donico Brown,Brent Bur-
rows II, Michael Holowesko
and Torrington Cartwright)
used this Regatta as a tune
up for the 2009 Sunfish

International Junior Cham-
pionship (October 15-17) to
be hosted by the NYC on
Montague Bay. A number
of senior sailors, such as
Martinborough, also used
this Regatta as a tune up for

‘the 39 th Sunfish World

Championship (October 16-
24) to be hosted by the NYC
on Montague Bay. ae
As’ for: the’ McCoy broth-
ers, Leé outdid Matthew this

year and finished eighth :
overall while Matthew fin- :

ished 11 th. Last year
Matthew finished two spots
ahead of his brother. Lee
noted that this Memorial
Regatta helps carry on his
father's (Terry) legacy.

“I remember my. day
always being involved with
regattas as it relates to orga-

nizing, sailing and assisting :
with the Junior and World :
Championships. He was not :
really a sailor but always :

promoted my brother and I } ae

when it came to sailing. ; CTs going into the playoffs, .

Overall the turnout was ; Johnson noted that “we just
g : have to go out there and play

On arelated note, the late ; the game of softball like we

Mack Knowles Junior Sail- | know how too.

ing Club,based in Long }

Island, was well represent- ; &S played like they were on

ed by Cartwright and junior ; 4 mission as they took a 2-1

Knowles ; advantage in their head-to-

according to the Regatta ; head matchup against the

i Stingrays, winning the last
~. For additional sailing } tw after losing their first
results from the 2009 Terry ; ¢ncounter.
McCoy Memorial Regatta :

log onto ; each of the first four innings

http://www.bahamassail- : until they got the bases

ing.org/results/sunfish_tmc20 : loaded with two out in the

? fifth after Johnson was inten-

good,” said Lee.

sailor Travis

Committee.

09. htm.

FROM page nine |

Thursday night, the Truck-

The Truckers:scored in

Truckers

tionally walked to join
Richard Bastian (hit by a
pitch) and Orlando McPhee

(singled). -

That brought up shortstop
Marvin ‘Tougie’ Wood, who
produced a fly ball to right
field that enabled Bastian to
race home with the walk off
game ending run.

The Stingrays scored first
in the top of the inning on
two unearned runs from
Andy Percentie and Byron
Ferguson.

But their lead was short
lived as the Truckers came

RHESASE
CEng
ey aves
CK

back in the bottom of the

frame and Martin Burrows:
Jr. blasted a three-run shot.

for a 3-2 lead. .

They put another on the
scoreboard in the second as
Bastian led off with a single
and eventually caught a ride
home on Wood’s RBI sacri-
fice fly.

With the bases loaded in
the third, the Stingrays man-
aged to get two more runs
from Greg Burrows Jr. and
Geron Sands on a wild pitch

from Truckers’ starting pitch-

er Indigo Knowles.

After giving up a walk to
James Clarke, manager Perty
Seymour came out of the
dugout and_ replaced



Knowles on the mound with
Anton ‘Bookie’ Gibson, who
closed the door on the
Stingrays, shutting them
down the rest of the game. =

The Truckers continued to
roll along as they produced
four more runs in the third;
highlighted by Bastian’s two=
run single. Both Bastian and
McPhee then scored on a
wild pitch from losing pitcher
Ryan Major. :

In the fourth, Commando
Security got two unearned
runs from Steven ‘Slugger?
Brown and pinch runner Ter=
ran ‘Pooch’ Wood to extend
their lead to 10-4 to set the
stage for the abbreviation in

the fifth.



NEVIS, WEST INDIES ’- While
‘cycling enthusiasts from around the
worid gathered in Mendrisio, Switzer-
land, last month for the 2009 Men’s
and Women’s Road Cycling World
Championships, a gutsy team from ‘the
small dual-island nation of St Kitts &
Nevis composed of Kathryn Bertine,
Monica Ceccon, Reggie Douglas and
James Weekes were among the com-
petitors at'this ultimate challenge.

. To everyone’s delight, they soon -

became the media darlings of the event
held in the beautiful lake country on
the Swiss-Italian border.

Unlikely heroes, the team, all resi-
dents of Nevis, plus their coach -and
Vice President of St Kitts & Nevis
Cycling Federation Winston Crooke
and Technical Manager Amanda

Chavez, were the toast of the town after -

articles about their Cinderella journey
from Nevis to Switzerland came out in
French, Canadian, Norwegian, Swiss
and Italian media outlets including the
Gazzetta Dello Sport newspaper, the
most prestigious sporting publication
in the region.

What’s more, the main Swiss news
television channel ran a two-minute
segment on the St Kitts & Nevis team
seen by 7.5 million people. Monica was
a familiar face, as she is originally from



Castiglione Alona, a town in Italy about
15 km away from Mendrisi, and many
journalists remember her from her days
asa pro rider in Italy.

The experience for the St Kitts &
Nevis cycling team was made possible
by local resident, Oscar Petroboni and
his family, who graciously hosted the
athletes in Switzerland with generous
support from the team’s sponsor, Bio-
Sport/FLY, a new sports hydration
drink.

Reggie and James cycled in the
men’s time trials finishing 65th and

.66th respectively. While not fast

enough for a spot in the final competi-
tion, both men were pleased with their
performance and thrilled to be among
racing’s elite at the prestigious world
championship.

The Canadian Cycling News noted:
“The athletes from St Kitts & Nevis
received the loudest support.” To this,
James commented, “On the way up
the hills, the sound was
deafening.” Kathryn and Monica fin-
ished 37th and 41st respectively in their
time trials, which allowed them to com-
pete in the 130 km women’s racing

finale. While they fought hard to stay -

with the main peloton, in the end, both
were forced to withdraw along with
some 71 other competitors out of the

field of 127 women. Kathryn summed
it.up saying, “I gave it everything.”

The experience for,the St Kitts &
Nevis cycling team was made possible
by Oscar Petroboni and his family, who
graciously hosted the athletes in
Switzerland with generous support
from the team’s sponsor,. Bio-
Sport/FLY, a new sports hydration
drink.

& Nevis team stood on the podium
during the medal ceremony, they were
all champions in their own right.

From the time they arrived until the
trip home, they were asked to pose for
photos, interviews, sign autographs and
were warmly applauded on and off the
racecourse.

They even had the chance to meet
former world champion and Italian
cycling hero Paulo Bettini, who posed
for a photo with Reggie and James.
Reggie summed up his emotions say-
ing: “I was overwhelmed to be at the
World Championships, among good
friends, good people, and to be a part
of such a huge event, amongst athletes
I have admired over the years, like
Fabian Cancellara and Paulo Bettini. I
would also like to thank FLY and the
SKN Cycling Federation for making
all this possible.” “i

In the end, while none of the St Kitts

“It was a wonderful experience for
all concerned. A very tough time trial
course simulated very well the kind of
speeds required during a triathlon bike
leg. Iam sure this will jumpstart their
bike training for the annual Nevis
Triathlon in March next year”, stated

ASHE’
egAAHye

Ce
SANA



SS SSS

ST KITTS & Nevis composed of Kathryn Bertine, Monica Ceccon, Reggie

Crooke.

For more information on the World
Championships, the Nevis Triathlon
and information about the SKN
Cycling Federation and the Nevis Cycle
Club, please visit http:/Avww.neviscy-
cleclub.com



Douglas and James Weekes soon became the media darlings of the event
for the 2009 Men’s and Women’s Road Cycling World Championships.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT






JL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

J ee a cee ee —




















































































Seeley ON ee Ey eG sea aay eu ETS Marine FORECAST
cara ~ Sel ace stale, oe | : WF Se Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High = =Low W NASSAU Today: SSW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
Ramis i Fe UF Sunday: ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 84° F
‘Acapulco’ 93/33 79/26 pe. 93/83 78/25 S FREEPORT Today: WNW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
ey Dae sh. he can sh Sunday: __ Eat 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
: : el “Ankara, Turkey PC : pc’ ABACO Today: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 83° F
Variable clouds with Partly cloudy with a Partly sunny, a couple of Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny witha = * Partly sunny. : _The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens _ 83/28 68/20 sh_ 79/26 67/19 s Hae ; E at 3-6 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 83° F
thunderstorms. passing shower. tstorms. possible. shower possible. oreater.the need for eye and skin protection. eee oe ao ee sophe a sei : Z
High: 89° High: 87° High: 88° High: 90° ss Sate : 32 olen
ee : I . . 3 ‘Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh ~~ 86/30 78/25 -sh 0
High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° | __ Low: 78°__ | __ Low: 79° __Low: 78° EP ES 7121 59/18 § erraniaemm TODAY S U.S. FORECAST
SPST erica Gr eet Beeler nett yee iemc le perigee a (CTE Tpit iret Mester tials neste: ——— 75/23 52/1 -75/23-48/8 f
107° F a id SOS UE a2 (92°-86° F 95°-84° F 100°-91° F_ Ee 80/26 72/22s . 78/25 73/22 s ?
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature’ is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:44a.m. 3.2 12:35am. 0.6 i -. 679 45/7 pc 74/23 53/115 Bon, ; RS Bee kus RRS
: elevation on.the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. - : 6:59 p.m. 3.0 1:01-p.m. 0.6 Berlin 55/12 43/6 ¢ 5713. 41/5 sh. Z I a = E8383) SSSS8 88888
ALMANAG = Sunday (22am, 33 10am. O4 Bermuda’ 93/28 75/23 s - 81/27: 72/22 t fee a Ley
- 7:37 p.m. 3.0 1:42 p.m. 0.4 Bogota 66/18 46/7 sh 66/18 46/7 + Y Ba qe =
Statistics are for Nassau through. 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 800am. 34 1:45 a.m. 0.3 - Brussels 3 6317. «48/8 ec -SSsC«S O/T G/T pc } RSS 3 eZ ‘ .
ABACO Temperature 8:15 p.m. 2.9 2:23p.m. 0.4 Budapest 63/17- 45/7 s 70/21 aN 8 g .
és Hight? sisse aie Sh aicisenst davis sees 88° F/31° C ; : Buenos Aires =~ 73/22 54/12 s 77/25 5s as
High: 87° F/31°C ie 75° Fio4e¢. Twasday ea OS Sie ae alos 3 92/33 71/21 s 95/35 70/21 s vee
Normal Righ ouc......sssscsssssestecsssssseeeee 86° F/30° C : oO Calcutta 92/33 82/27 sh 89/31 82/27 sh Ne
Normal OW ou... eee eeecececeeteeeeeteeeeeeeeee 74° F/23° C Calgary 39/3 25/-3 r 37/2 25/-3 ¢ We
Last year's High .occsccsescssssssssssssseue ae’ F/31°C. PSE Ti WY fatty Cancun x . 90/32 73/22 pc —«-89/31.—- 74/23 pc we
High:88°F/31°C | : Last year's 1OW on... 76° F/25° C Ba Fe Caracas 83/28 74/23 r 82/27: 73/22 t tee
Low:73°F/23°G LE Za Ze - Precipitation Sunrise ..... -7:03. a.m. Moonrise ....6:24p.m. Casablanca. 78/25 6116s: 82/27 60/15 s- =e
Zan As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.08" Sunset, 6:55 p.m. Moonset ..... 6:23 a.m. Copenhagen 5713 49/9 + 56/13 43/6 sh ros
Year to date 31.51" : j _ New Dublin 57/13. 43/6-sh 55/12 — 41/5 pe Re,
High: 87° F/31°C Normal year to date . 38.90" Frankfurt 63/17 48/8 pe B1M6 45/7 ¢ :
Low: 73° F/23° C Geneva. 67/19 45/7 s 67/19 52/11 s :
- AccuWeather.com Halifax «BONS ABT s 510 45/7 6 :
Forecasts and graphics provided by eo aes S en is ne : a pie s a :
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 18 elsinkl = : io SN od fet TF
ELEUTHERA HongKong =—i( High:89°F/32°C Islamabad 103/39 68/20 s 96/35 68/20 s . .
: - Anke Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Low: 77° F/25°C 4stanbul’ g “71/21. 67/19 c — 80/26 65/18 r eee ;
: precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Jerusalem 85/29 61/16 s 88/29 60/15 s Forecast hiohiGir serepersnaes are joraelected cities.
Johannesburg 71/21. 542 t= 58/14 51/10 sh Sa sient
Kingston 88/31 79/26 sh 87/30 79/26 sh ; 4
. 5 6 CAT ISLAND Lima. ee 76/24 60/15 's 75/23 59/5 s
High: 89° F/32°C High: 87°F/31°C London 63/17 48/8 sh 6116 46/7 pc
Low: 78° F/26 = Low:74° F/23°C Madrid B17 542s = 79/26-57/13 pe
: Manila 85/29 77/25 6 - 86/30 77/25 sh
ee GPR6 STS 1 79/26. S73 t
s - ; Monterrey ———_-93/83-_73/22 t 97/36 73/22
‘ace rore eat wore aur ts suo aig
Ta erEDICE Munich = ti (sti(té‘i«ét BAS pS 4B
i ' ' : irobi 13..¢
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's AUN " NAICODI mses ol 9/26. S6N3 87/80... 57/13.
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C New Delhi ~ 96/35 75/23 s 84/28 73/22 t
Low: 76° F/24°C Oslo 48/8 39/3 r 46/7 36/2 c
Paris iM 66/18 48/8 pe. —- 63/17. 52/11 pc
Prague 60/15 45/7 ¢ 216 46/7 pc
Rio de Janeiro 84/28 72/22 pc 80/26 72/22 ¢
= Riyadh 98/36 69/20s 95/35 6518s = | ee
a oe ; : i ; ‘ROME. ee 76/24. 57/4138 8 73/22 573 s~ E : us : #3
Sunes Today aie Sunday MAYAGUANA St.Thomas... 89/31. 78/25.pc __. 89/31._78/25 po easy knowing
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High:89°F/32°C — ‘San Juan 88/31 54/12 pe 94/34 53/11 pc nave excellent iIMsurance
FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC F/G FC FIC Fe FG Low: 75° F/24°C Shane supaaectnines He aye te a te ti : . Cov e no matter which
Albuquerque 75/23 51/10 s 77/25 53/11 pe Indianapolis 6417 45/7 ¢ 65/18 48/8 -s Philadelphia 74/23. 60/15 -t- = 76/24 54/12 pe > meee , Seeua : ae j ‘ cq.
Anchorage 48/8 40/4 c 50/10 39/3 c Jacksonville 86/30 62/16 c 84/28 64/17 pc Phoenix 92/33 73/22 pe 91/32 67/19 t. CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Se Oe ra S500 fe cso f EG TOR, St way Ue wind blows.
Atlanta 78/25 SIMO po 76/24 55/12 pc Kansas City 6417 44/6 pc 68/20 5512 pc Pittsburgh 68/20 46/7 pc | «6116 44/6 pc ° RAGGEDISLAND. Tigh:92'F/s3°c ae nr eae Aas e pelea sia : - oe 2
Atlantic City 74/23 5110 t 75/23 50/10 pc Las Vegas 86/30 61/16 s 80/26 58/14 pc - Portland,OR 61/16 46/7 c 62/16 45/7 pe High: 88° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°G eee eoocue eeeoeiee : Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 75/23 53/11 + 75/23 52/11 pc Little Rock 80/26 54/12 s 66/18 59/15 oF Raleigh-Durham. 82/27 52/11 -pe 81/27 52/11. -s Low: 74° F/23°C : ; 64/17 57/43 66/18 57/13 sh : : oS “4
Boston: 69/20 57/13 + 70/21 5512 + Los Angeles 72/22 58/14 pc 68/20 56/13 pc _ St. Louis. 66/18 48/8 pc. 71/21 51/10 pec ; int aioe 7906 sh aeao 7s .- 8 : -
Buffalo. - 65/18 47/8 c 60/15 46/7 pc Louisville 70/21 49/9 pe 71/21 51/10 s Salt Lake City 68/20 42/5 pe 54/12 38/3 sh GREAT INAGUA f es, 73/22 66/18 t 75/23 66/18 po | 3 — ain :
Charleston, SC 84/28 58/14 pc 84/28 59/15 pc Memphis 76/24 56/13 s 73/22 6015 sh SanAntonio 80/26 70/21 t 91/32 76/24 t High: 92° F/33°C : Noront ne aa ch SAG seine : e MANAGEMENT
Chicago 55/12 45/7 sh 60/15 42/5 pe Miami 88/31 77/25 t 90/32 79/26 pc San Diego 70/21 63/17 pe 65/18 60/15- sh Low. 79° F/26°C a: ed 7/36 72/22 5 -. 99/37 73/22'5 | = = .
Cleveland 62/16 47/8 sh 60/15 46/7 pc Minneapolis 54/12 38/3 c 58/14 42/5 pc SanFrancisco 67/19 51/10 pc 68/20 51/10 pc tS Vancouver 2 6016 aa ne ses aes HAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 76/24 64/17 +r 74/23 71/21 + Nashville 76/24 49/9 s 72/22 52/1 s ~ Seattle - 58/14. 45/7 pe 61/16 44/6 pc Vienna: 62/16 51/10 s 50/10 s_ Abaco Eleuthera Exune
Denver — 63/17 35/1 $s 63/17 43/6 pe New Orleans 80/26 71/21 t 80/26 74/23 t _ Tallahassee 85/29 60/15 t 83/28 63/17 pc Warsaw BOL 41/5, pe = 49/5 sh pit Tek (2 are at hue 67 othe chy 336-2304
Detroit 58/14 47/8 sh 62/16 46/7 pc New York 67/19 S915 t 75/23 59/15 pe Tampa 89/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 pe Winnipeg 52/11 36/2 pe 40/4 po dS weak oda } (242) (282)
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 pe 86/30 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 54/12 s 71/21 59/15 pc ‘Tucson 84/28 68/20 t 85/29 65/18 t on Weather (W): s- -party cloudy, :¢-cloudy -sh:showers. t-thunder- 7 a RL ES a r
Houston... 84/28 72/22 t 86/30 74/23 .t Orlando 89/31 69/20 t 91/32 71/21 pc — Washington, DC 76/24 53/11 r 74/23: 54/12" « pe ain: (WE) 8 sunty.6 party cloudy, .e coud ate



storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 . THE TRIBUNE
royUn my Wool aan

oo Ue | | ee ree ee

jaeress louey Ay Comers’ ©uiee on Thursdays has become somewhat of a party institution
in Nassau. The club is packed every Thursday with a party crowd ready to “brukk out” and have a
crazy time. DJ Pain, DJ Xcitement and various other Dus play the latest in hip hop and dancehall
music, keeping the patrons partying until the wee hours. At Charlie’s you just have to dress ready Pc “

io party, no designer gear necessary to impress - if you want to impress make sure you know the Py We fen ACG
latest dance moves though. At ae eas ;

Admission is free for ladies, so you know the girls will be out in full force every week. Charlie’s is jose es icy We VGN
one of Nassau’s most established clubs and a party spot for locals and tourists alike. It is also a
popular club for concerts, and last Sunday it was the venue for a show by none other than Charly
Black,

Charly Black is one of the hottest new dancehall acts coming out of Jamaica, and the Spintech
Crew brought Charly to the Bahamas for the first time. With three shows, in Abaco, Freeport and
\lassau, Charly has the whole Bahamas “money dreaming” by now. The show at Charlie’s on
Sunday ‘had a good turn-out and the ladies in particular were ready to see the dancehall star live
on stage. Opening for Charly were Bahamian artists Bain. Town Bois, Bahama Boys and Apollo _
re-ed, and just after 3am the man himself went on stage. He delivered a great performance, also
getting some lucky ladies from the audience involved. Charly performed all of his hit songs such
as “Money Dreama’, “Rich This Year”, “Gone To Soon”, “Nuh New Friend”, “Nuh Tell Nuh Lie”
and, “Buddy”.

For more photos of a night at Charlie’s Club see The Tribune website at www.tribune242.com.

stein ieein eanaqt e iahfes g uae tag A ace aM asad satis











Recording artists Bahama Boys
strike a pose at Charlie’s.





Recording artists The Bain Town
Bois Chill at Charlie’s. °























100 JAMZ DJs
Xcitement and
Blacks with a friend.











Gage
AND COOL

Al CHARLIE’S



LOCAL reggae ‘
artist Irate flashes: a
“peace Signi. .u. .-



Dancehall reggae super star Charly
Black with Heike.

Fleike Wollenweber
International Publicist heike.axes@gmail.com
Intemational media and airplay, www.myspace.comiaxesmagazine .

representing artists, producers, Bahamas 242 428 412
labels, promoters and selectasidjs. Jamaica 876 377 5029

SSG

oes Wie hag
= AP Re ENA MeN
sen “hse SKE ieee EON

YAY;
dette
, ist

VERA

USS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





Full Text


=~ Lhe Tribune Boe

» O49 ° 'm lovin’ it
| PUR Doel. si ? ite PUL cm eren ig tran 71)
drive-thru is now open

{HIGH _89F a ee ye Melt ge

\LOW 79F | Fridays & Saturdays

CLOUDS with | ee Ona lea
se? STORMS | BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

Volume: 105 No.261 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)









'

ere

nS

iE





Hotel
union

x split
| » y ) i | By DENISE



MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

a : dmaycock@tribunemedia:net
: FREEPORT - A for-
; _ | mer Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers
Union executive claims
EB | that a majority of the union
members in Grand





Bahama have expressed a
strong desire to “break
away” from the Hotel
Workers Union. |
Lionel Morley, former
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) 2nd vice
. president, said hotel work-





SEE page 7
ee CLICO policies
i FORMER Deputy Prime Minister Sir Clement _terday. She said her father was conscious in the fate revealed
Maynard died yesterday-afternoon at hishome. He moments leading up to his death. AOS ae F
was 81. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham issued a state- within weeks
Sir Clement died with his family by his side, includ- | ment yesterday evening telling of his “deep regret” : :
ing Lady Maynard, his wife of over 63 years, and his upon hearing of the passing of Sir Clement. CLICO insurance poli-
children and grandchildren. ; Noting that he was the longest serving cabinet cy holders can expect “an
“It was a very peaceful death,” his daughter Sen- announcement” about the
j ator Allyson Maynard-Gibson told The Tribune yes- SEE page 3 : future of their insurance
coverage in the next “two
to three weeks,” The Tri-

bune has learned.

According to Tribune
sources, this could see
court-appointed liquida-
tor for the insurer, Craig
Gomez, reveal which oth-
er insurance company—
or companies — has been”
selected to take control
of policies that up until
now still belong to the
defunct insurer.

In the meantime,
sources reveal that nego-
tiations are already
underway with Doctor’s
Hospital to try to per-

SEE page 7



Bahamas told:
Divorce from





POINTING THE WAY - Former . Tene : “ “ . \ ; Privy Council
Deputy Prime Minister Sir Clement CR «
Maynard at the height of his political A CC @ By TANEKA
career. (Tribune file photo) OO \ THOMPSON .
seein Tribune Staff
Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net



® 6° : 9 THE Bahamas should

® seize the opportunity to

Judge: Travolta trial ‘is not a theatre show’ | gs":

€ United Kingdom's Privy

Council and have its final

: iio — a Soe appellate cases heard by

the Caribbean Court of

Justice, a former attorney
general advised.

Alfred. Sears, who
served as attorney gener-
al during paft of the
Christie administration,
likened recent comments
of Lord Nicholas Phillips,
Britain's Supreme Court
president, to a tenant
receiving a notice of-evic-

,

@ By NATARIO mott, who represents Holly- | McDermott had to be repeat-
MCKENZIE wood celebrity John Travolta, edly warned by Senior Justice
Tribune Staff Reporter 55, was back on the witness Allen about engaging in com-
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net stand yesterday for more mentary.

cross-examination by defence “This is not a theatre and
SENIOR Justice Anita attorneys. Before attorney not a show. We are about

Allen delivered astern warn- Murrio Ducille was allowed — serious business. I expect

ing against incivility in the to continue his cross-exami- | respect between the witness

courtroom yesterday as the . Nation yesterday, however, and counsel. Questions are
attempted $25 million extor- Senior Justice Allen stated going to be asked without
tion trial of ex-PLP Senator that there would be “none of | commentary, answers are

Pleasant Bridgewater and for- the behaviour” displayed in going to be given without

mer paramedic Tarino Light- the courtroom on Phursday. comments. I understand the

bourne continued in the [here were tense moments in

Supreme Court. the high profile trial on Thurs- SEE page qT

Attorney Michael McDer- day as Mr Ducille and Mr



SEE page 7






WS
NEW

Sa SEES EEE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 iHt TRIBUNE



Story set
to help
campaign
breathe a
bit easier

A SPECIAL ‘story time in
the park’ is being held today
to raise money for the
‘Breathe Easy’ campaign ben-
efitting the Princess Margaret
Hospital's Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit.

The book club “The Little I
think I Can" will be hosting
the event starting at 3pm in
the park adjacent to the Liv-
ing in Paradise condominiums
on Paradise Island.

The 'Breathe Easy’ cam-
paign will provide incubators
and ventilators designed to
breathe. for infants who are
physically unable to do so.

SOOCOCOTO ETO CEEH SEES SES SEES ETE SESS OES ESO OES OS OO HOES



Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham spoke in praise of those honoured.
Governor-General Hanna and Prime Minister Ingraham are pictured with
those who received awards. (BIS photo: Letisha Henderson) .

NINETY-SIX persons were honoured by the Queen during ceremonies at the
upper gardens of Government House presided over by the Governor-General
Axthur Hanna on Thursday. |

CO CCCOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOO OOOOOSOSO EHS OOOO OHOODSSOHO SOOO OOOO TOSSO OOOOH SOHO HOSOOSHOS ST SOOHOSOOSOOTOE SOOO HOHHHEOSOOHOEEOOSHOSHHHHHOHHTOSHEOSOLOOOSSSECRD99000

The donated ventilators will
support breathing until the
infant's respiratory efforts are
sufficient.

So far, the campaign has
managed to raise more than
half of its intended goal of
$300,000.

The organisers include Tri-
bune Media, the Builder's
Mall, Tile King, Doctors Hos-
pital, The Rotary Club of East
Nassau and Bahamas Realty.

Persons interested in
attending ‘story time in the
park’ can contact Stella Saun-
ders at 393-6225.





PCOS O HT CELESOOEE EE OOOO OOO HOCH EEO OOES CO OEE EE ODOOETOSOS

Family’s fire deaths
aro as murder

Homicide rate hits 67 for 2009 to-date

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WHILE police have classi-
fied the deaths of four peo-
ple in last month’s Englerston
fire as homicides, they are still
in the dark as to why some-
one would have wanted to kill
the group of women.

However, a senior officer
said that police are currently
following some leads and
hope to wrap up their investi-
gations shortly.

Members of three genera-



LOBE LLLLER LALA ELL RULE I LLLIUORLLAOLLLE OUI LLIULLELAUOEOLULEUREULMLLLLLLRLLL IMLS LOLLY

tions of one family - Theresa
Brown, 51, her daughter
Kayshala Bodie, 18, and
granddaughter Telair John-
son, one:— with their neigh-
bour, 18-year-old Savanna
Stuart — all died in a sus-

~ pected arson attack on Thurs-

day, September 17.

The reclassification of the
women’s deaths takes the
country’s murder rate for the
year up to 67. This time last
year the murder rate hovered
around 56.

The women. and child all
died. of smoke inhalation in
the Wilson Tract home after’a
deadly blaze was sparked

around 7am. ;

“We are following some
leads but we still haven’t iden-
tified a possible motive,” Asst
Commissioner in charge of
crime Raymond Gibson said
yesterday.

Nonetheless, Mr Gibson
said he is “quite happy with
the way the investigation is
progressing” and is hopeful it
will be solved “in a short
time.”

He appealed to anyone
who might have information
that could assist the police in
their investigations to come
forward, or call the police
incident room on 322-2561-3.

“Their identities will be
kept in the strictest confi-
dence,” he said.

Meanwhile, the senior offi-
cer said that despite the high
number of murders for the
year so far, in addition to
those cases that remain open
from previous years, police
are “doing (their) best to stay
on top” of the situation.

Mr Gibson said he believes

that the officers at the Central

Detective Unit (CDU) are
“doing a commendable job.”
“J think we have the
resources, and the officers are
going beyond the call of duty
to get things done,” he said.

PM heads for World
Bank, IMF summits

PRIME Minister Hubert

Ingraham leaves the Bahamas,

tonight to attend the 2009
Meeting of the World Bank

Group and the International .

Monetary Fund (IMF) in

* Istanbul, Turkey.

He will leave Nassau at
9.35pm ‘and travel by British
Airways by way of London to
Turkey.

Topping this year’ s agenda

at the meetings is the outlook.

for the global economy.
Developments in financial
markets, as well as other
pressing issues within the
IMF’s mandate also will be
discussed.
The Development Com-

{CGT
SHAT

(eo op



elrcrmnur unt

- mittee will advise the Boards
_ of Governors of the Bank and

Fund on critical development
issues and on the financial

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SBARRO - THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN COOKING has two (2)
‘ positions open for restaurant GENERAL MANAGERS.

‘This position is best suited for a mature, ficou dee goal oncnicd noe

who has a strong désire to take on challenges witha dogmatic determination
| tosucceed. The individual must be open to ‘consinuctive feedback anid flex:

©) ble to consider ali¢mative means of goal accomplishment,

The applicant must also possess the following:

He/she must have strong managerial, analytical and interpersonal skills;
Aleast five years experience in restaurant management preferably ina

fast service food environment.

Good administrative skills and the ability to:leam new skills and:

techniques easily.

The ability to work with minimal supervision and direction:
Profoimidly detail oriented and a strong value system emphasizing quality |}
food control, service and cleanliness. ‘

The ability to direct arid motivate junior staff with an nushobeibe of
their sensibilities and differences.

Applicant must be.able and willing to work a minimum fifty hour week,
weekerids and holidays included in work week.

@ Possess reliable transportation.

Salary is competitive with similar food establishments, with major medical
sfoup insurance (50%) included. Bonuses are available but arc based purely
upon company and individual performance.

Please ¢ -mail your resumi¢ to:

The Managing Director.

NO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS ACCEPTED.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



resources required to pro-
mote economic development
in developing countries. At
the conclusion of each of
these meetings, communiqués
will be released, and will be
followed by a press confer-
ence.

Following these meetings,
a plenary session will be held,
which will feature major
addresses from the host gov-
ernment, heads of institutions,
and the Governors of the
Bank and Fund. |

Some 13,000 people, includ-
ing the governors themselves
and their alternates, as well
as members of their delega-
tions, observers from other
inter-governmental organisa-
tions such as the Organisation
for Economic Cooperation
and Development and the
Organisation of the Petrole-
um Exporting Countries, to
name just a few, are expected
to attend.

.The prime minister returns
to the Bahamas on Tuesday,
October 13. He is accompa-
nied his wife, C C Sweeting
Senior High principal Mrs
Delores Ingraham.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 3









Motorist’s ‘sitting ducks’
fears after failed snatch

A MOTORIST is warning others to be on
the alert for thieves after a schoolboy alleged-
ly tried to rip her necklace from her as she sat
in traffic just off Village Road.

The woman said she wants others to be
watchful of their surroundings and belong-
ings while they are on the road, as they can be
“sitting ducks” for robbers.

Her alert follows others that have recently
been circulating about crime threats in the
Eastern Road area. Five people are now
believed to have been robbed or followed by
culprits travelling in what warnings circulated
by e-mail and on social networking sites have

identified as a green Honda occupied by two
men.

According to the concerned woman driver
who gave this latest warning, she was target-
ted as she was stuck in traffic on Parkgate
Road heading for Village Road at 4.10pm
one day last week.

“Anyone who goes that way in the evening
knows how that traffic is. My windows were
down.

“Four school boys — looked to be about 14
to 16 years old — came up from the back
and one of them tried to grab my chain. Luck-
ily it popped and fell into my blouse,” she

‘said.

Not willing to be victimised so easily, the
woman said she followed the boys after they
ran away from the scene.

“Two ran through Ann’s Town and the
other two ran through Dean’s Building Sup-
ply yard: I turned around to head to: the
Kemp Road light.

“This took a bit of time because cars are
both in the back and front of me. I think that
is why they do it in this area because you

can't move. I drove to Strachan’s Alley, and.

there they were, walking through.”
“They spotted the car first and ran up to the

: police’s policies,”

track road by Queen’s College’s back gate. I
came back down and asked a young man if he
knew who they were,” said the motorist.

Having been informed that one of the boys
was from. Balls Alley, the woman said she
then saw the group run into a nearby house.

“T went to the Wulff Road police station to
alert them of the situation but they told me
that nothing could be done because the chain
was not actually stolen.

“J didn’t want them to do anything, I want-
ed them to put it on record because I know it
will happen again, but I guess that’s our .
she said.





FROM page one

minister in the PLP govern-
ment under the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling, Mr Ingraham
said the 81 year old was a
“towering presence in the
Bahamian political arena for
half a century.”

“Sir Clement was noted for |

his dignified bearing in and
out of the political arena and
maintained long-lasting
friendships on both sides of
the political divide.”

“My colleagues and I
should like to express the
gratitude of the nation for the
service of Sir Clement and we
extend our deepest sympathy
to Lady Maynard, their chil-
dren and the entire Maynard
family. May he rest in peace,”
said the Prime Minister.

Allyson Maynard Gibson
said yesterday that the family
had not yet determined when



Perry: Chfistie expressed his
deep sadness yesterday on
learning of the.death of for-
mer Deputy Prime Minister
Sir Clement Maynard. :

’ “He was a great national

the modern Bahamas, espe-
cially in the development of
the Bahamian tourism
industry,” Mr Christie said.
“Above all,” he said, “he
was a patriot whose disci-
plined devotion to public
service and outstanding abil-
ity, both as a minister of the
Government and as a Mem-
ber of Parliament, set a stan-
dard of excellence that few
have been able to match.”

Mr Christie said that Sir
Clement was

“one of the last surviving
members of the original
Majority Rule Cabinet of
1967.” He said that only
Governor General Arthur



“OPPOSITION ‘Leader

hero and a major builder of ©

Hanna and Warren Levarity



Sir Clement remembered

his funeral will take place.

“He was the best father
that anyone could ever think
of having, a wonderful exam-
ple not only of manhood but
also a wonderful husband and
father. Not only to us, he had
a deep, deep caring for people
of this country; he was a real
patriot,” Mrs Mayanrd-Gib-
son said.

She said even after her
father left the House of
Assembly up until the time of
his debilitating stroke people
would come and ask him for
assistance.

“They regarded him still
as their MP, or father and he
always helped them, he
always said that if you can
help someone you should,
that’s the way he lived his life
he was a deep man of deep
faith,” Mrs Maynard-Gibson
said. -

In January of 2008 Sir

PLP leader praises
‘a great Bahamian’

“For a-full .

now remain.
quarter of.a century,. Sir
Clement served with dis-
tinction in a.succession of
Ministries, none more
notably than the Ministry of
Tourism,” said Mr Christie.

Sir. Clement, said Mr
Christie, was also a “long
time Deputy Leader of the
Progressive Liberal Party
and in:the first. rank of Stal-
wart Councillors of the Par-
ty. ;
Jt is also'a matter of his-
torical record that he was

. the first: President of the

Bahamas Public Services
Union,.a post he held prior
to. his induction into Cabi-
net and his appointment to:

. the Senate in 1967.

“Sir Clement was a true
role model not only as a
statesman but as a family
man, Anglican churchman,
and community builder as
well. He was the consum-
mate gentleman, always



Clement suffered a stroke and
was airlifted to Miami for
treatment.

Earlier last year Sir
Clement was in stable condi-
tion and his family was opti-
mistic that his condition
would further improve to
allow for rehabilitative thera-

py:

Mrs Maynard-Gibson said
he did undergo some rehabil-
itation after his stroke, but
declined “naturally with age”
afterwards.

Sir Clement was deputy
leader of the PLP, Minister
of Foreign Affairs and Minis-
ter of Tourism, Government
Leader in Parliament and was
responsible for the Public Ser-
vice.

Sir Clement, was first
appointed Minister of
Tourism in October, 1967
having previously served as

Minster of Works. He also




deporting himself with great
dignity and demonstrating
the true meaning of civili-
ty.”

Mr Christie said he was
“personally indebted to Sir
Clement for his advice,
inspiration and example
over many long years, as
indeed is the case, I am sure,
for numerous others in the
political arena on both sides
of the political aisle.

“On behalf of the entire
PLP family, my wife,
Bernadette, and on my own
behalf,” said Mr Christie, “I
extend deepest condolences
to Lady Maynard on the loss
of her husband and to Peter; ©
Allyson, David and Clement
III, on the loss of their
father.

“A truly great Bahamian
has now passed on and our
nation is all the poorer for
his passing.

“May he rest in peace,”
said Mr Christie. —























*LAST DAY*
1¢ SALE

BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR PRICE & GET THE 3RD

a3
STOCK OF
Dey

ANU AL Ce te

ARYA
& DRAPERY:

ONEFORT GH! |

e LINEN + COTTON
*LAMOUR « SILK

* BROADES ¢ CHIFFON
° BRIDAL

© SPECIAL OCCASION

* TROPICAL FABRICS.

* ALL DRAPERY FABRICS
© ALL COTTON PRINTS
* ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES

OUTDOOR
FABRIC

1008

BAHAMAS BATIK &
BAHAMAS ALLOVER

© NET ITEMS NOT INCLUDED IN SALE) Vinyl, Plastic, Felt, Net & Tulle

eer ee ed

Home Fabrics

Madeira St [242] 325-8233 © Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080



Si mone Maynard

served as an interim Minister
of Health.

After having served in
Tourism for a decade, he
became Minster of Labour
and Home Affairs in 1979.

His early political career
started in 1954 the year after
the PLP was formed and Lyn-
den Pindling became legal
adviser. In January 1967,
when the party was successful
at the polls and became the
new government, Sir Clement
was appointed Government
leader in the Senate and also
Minister without portfolio.

In April 1968 when a gen-
eral election was called Sena-
tor Maynard contested the
House seat in his home con-
stituency of Gambier.

The popular politician won

opponent and it was then that

. he was given his assignment

as Minister of Works.
He was named deputy
prime minister after the res-

ignation of Arthur Hanna’

from the Pindling Cabinet in
1984.
He held. this post until the
PLP’s defeat in 1992. §
Under Sir Clement’s direc-
tion an Airline Negotiating
Committee succeeded in




ero gty

Fhe
BOX OPPRICE







al airline Bahamasair.

The flag carrier went into
service on June 18, 1973 and
in 1978 began modernizing its
fleet of jet and conventional

aircraft. -

Sir Clement is survived by
his wife, his daughter, Senator
Allyson Maynard Gibson, and
three sons, Peter, David and
Clement III. He: was prede-
ceased by his eldest son,
Julian.

oe

ft WE cowitioesen
SAT 10:3 ANE DAILY




EFFECTIVE OCTOBER = OCTOBER ein eae Ts a

Proworsian new | 10 840 | Wa | oxo | 0:25 [1030 |

[somoanres | we
Bias Sas a eae | ae [Tae

PPANDOR UM Sua. $300 | 820



FAME

sai [wa [eas | [tooo

CLOUDY WITHA CHANCE OF MEAT a | 4:18 | 3:40 | rae [kT ee [ [tn

GENMIFER’S BOOY Ss
THE PTHEINFORMANT c
ES

ZOMBIELAND

FPANDORUM A



Seeman 7a aes eee
'senonrrrnow___e [as [nas [wa [os] sas,
STHEFINAL DESTINATION c_(| «MA | wa [WA | wa | 8:40 [10:55 |
panuowetn2 | |

ee

GALLERIA 6 - JFK DRIVE

IAS. YOM SC at Rs SESERUE PORE TS MT 290-4645 ON WI GALLE RIACINE MAS GOSS

nEW {00 [ as [wa | eo | a0 | so:so]



ESR | | tae

| sa_| g90 | e:20 | so:40 |
600 | s:20 | 10:50 |

| 3:35 | [ma | os | [a | NAR [RA |
Ee

fsimonares—sew[ s5 | ais | WA | 6s | 0:5 | 1055
ane WR | |

site | sas | 20)

[etevorwernn cee —e [sao [a40 [na | er aan | some
fesrorno 6 [var [ee [ow [om [|e

3 80-FLI x

Lise your e-oard to reserve lckets at 380-3848 or visit us at
www bahamesiocal.cor

STUNNING LACHES FASHIONS

AT UNBEATABLE PRICES

Juniors, Misses, and Plus Sizes Available: Tops, Dresses, Skirts, Jeans,
Dress Pants, Jackets, Linen Pants, Wraps, Shoes, Belts, Handbags,
Clutches, Wallets, Earrings, Necklaces, Bracelets and lots mo

by a wide margin over his

forming the country’s nation-



‘Mon rose Avenue and Ox ord Street 0 doors North of Mult Discoun)
P.O. Box N-1552 — ‘

: Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 323-3460
Monday Erkey - 9:30 aM 5:30 PM, Saturday - 9AM - 5PM

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO TAT TUT ETE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm



‘Iran plant could defer Israel strike

JERUSALEM — It may seem counter-
intuitive, but the news that Iran has a sec-
ond, clandestine uranium enrichment plant,
and has just test-fired long-range missiles,
could actually put off any plans for a quick
Israeli strike.

To be sure, Israel still sees an Iran with
nuclear weapons as its greatest threat and
has not taken a military assault off the table.
Its defence minister, Ehud Barak, said as
much in London on Tuesday.

Neutralizing the threat remains Israeli
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's top
priority. And the spectacle of upgraded
missiles flying across Israel's TV screens
only feeds its resolve to keep Iran at bay.

Yet the latest developments are likely to
push world powers to impose the tough
sanctions that Israel has been seeking. Giv-
ing Israel's position a higher profile on the
world stage may also make it less inclined to
act unilaterally.

’ For years, Israel has warned that Iran
was. not being honest about the size and
nature of its nuclear programme, which
Tehran claims is designed to produce ener-
gy. Israel has portrayed last week's disclo-
sure of the second facility, hidden in the

_arid mountains near the holy city of Qom,
as confirmation of its suspicions.

‘ "If there ever was.a thought of (Israel) |. °

_ going witha military option, it's been put
off," said Ephraim Kam, the deputy direc-
tor of Tel Aviv University's Institute of
National Security Studies. "Iran was caught
lying again, it's clearly moving toward
becoming a nuclear power.

"Now the Americans are better able to
try to persuade the Europeans, and even

the Russians, to go for tougher sanctions," ”

he said.

Meir Javedanfar, an Iranian-born analyst
working in Israel, agreed.

"It's likely that Israel will now be includ-
ed more in the decision-making process," he
said. "The more Israel sees itself as part of
the process of dealing with the Iranian
nuclear question, the less likely it is that it
will take part in a unilateral action."

In a meeting with British Defence Min-
ister Bob Ainsworth, Israel's Barak said
the existence of the second plant should
trigger harsh sanctions, according to a.state-
ment from his office which added that Israel
"is not removing any option from the
table."

The reference to "options" is seen as a
signal that an Israeli military strike remains
a possibility.

Iran's nuclear chief, Vice President Ali



} N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN AND |
BAHAMIAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH, |
_ | BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON }

WILL BE CLOSED ON

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATE ITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DA

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES | |
CAUSED AS ARESULT OF OUR CLOSING. |






PaO) nee

NOTICE is hereby given that Ideniel Jean Baptiste of
CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted; should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 3rd day of October, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

Akbar Salehi, said Tuesday that his country
built the newly revealed facility inside a
mountain and next to a military site to pro-
tect it from attack. He didn't identify the
potential attackers.

Iran said the Shahab-3 and Sajjil mis-
siles it tested had a range of 1,200 miles

‘and can "target any place that threatens

Iran." Israel, parts of Europe and U.S. mil-
itary bases in the Mideast are within that
range.

Iran's nuclear programme, its missiles
and its patronage of Palestinian and
Lebanese militants on Israel's northern and

‘southern flanks combined to make it Israel's

most formidable foe. Iranian President
Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's repeated refer-
ences to Israel's eventual destruction have
only intensified concerns. .

"The most urgent challenge facing this
body is to prevent the tyrants of Tehran
from acquiring nuclear weapons,"
Netanyahu told the U.N. General Assembly
last week.

Netanyahu has said sanctions are the best
option, especially considering Iran's weak-

ened economy and its domestic turmoil fol- ...

lowing contested elections. The revelation
of the Qom facility did not significantly
alter the preference for diplomacy because
world intélligence agencies, including
Israel's, have reportedly known about its
existence for years.
Israel's 1981 air attack on an unfinished
nuclear reactor in Iraq has long spurred
speculation that such a strike might be repli-
cated against Iran. But Iran's nuclear facil-
ities are scattered across the country and
highly fortified. Military experts are divid-
ed over whether Israel could cripple them

or just set the programme back a few years.

Washington has sent out multiple sig-
nals that it opposes a military strike and
wants to see if sanctions can do the job. If

Israeli warplanes flew to Iran, they would

probably need permission to cross air space
controlled by the U.S. and other countries.
But the threat of attack can serve diplo-

‘macy well, said Hazhir Teimourian, a

British-based historian of the Middle East.
"I think Israel's threats to resort to mil-
itary action have been taken seriously by

the Americans and the Europeans, and that

concentrates their minds," Teimourian said.

"They will resort to sanctions more tead-- |

ily and more deeply than they might oth-

erwise do," he said. "It suits the West for .
_ Israel to shout about it."

(This article was written by Amy Teibel,
Associated Press writer).













EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LOUISE PIERRE of FIRETRAIL
ROAD, P.O. BOX CB-12627, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be grantéd, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
| Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OMAWATTIO CHEA KNOWLES
of PINE AVENUE, GLENISTON GARDENS, 'P.O.
BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that ‘any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147;Nassau;Bahamas,.

NOTICE

NOTICE ishereby giventhat YOLANDA BELTRE CONTRERAS
of FAITH GARDENS #2, MIRRIAN CLOSE, APT #16,
P.O. BOX GT-2014, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/

BOX N-8180, NASSAU,



THE TRIBUNE

Running out
of patience
with officials

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wonder, has there ever
been a study done to deter-
mine how much the average
citizen in a democratic coun-
try will put up with from their
elected political officials
before they finally rebel?

I would be willing to bet.

that a lot of people will put
up with one hell of a lot of
rubbish from their govern-
ment. In fact, using Bahami-

ans as a model, I would have

to assume that there are those
unfortunate individuals who
will swallow whatever crap
they are handed by their lead-
ers from disappointment to
disappointment without end.

I have to be very honest
and tell you that as of this
moment in the life of Bahami-
an existence, I have very little
respect for any elected offi-
cial — in their capacity as an
elected official — and I have
absolutely no hope that the
Bahamas will ever grow into
anything better than it is right
now. The Bahamas has
become stagnant:to growth,
and the reasons are because
of less than sensational lead-
ership, and the attitude of
Bahamians themselves. We
still act like citizens of a third
world country in many ways
and I suppose it’s difficult not
to when the government is the
biggest employer in the coun-
try, while also controlling the
most necessary of modern
human utilities like electricity,
phone service, etc, etc.

In truly democratic first
world countries, the govern-
ment exists in the background
while its citizens bask in the
glory of private enterprise

... that is strengthened and pro-

tected by the. government.
Perhaps my American friends
are taking note. My warning
to them is —. you’re moving
backwards! And my admoni-
tion to my fellow Bahamians
is — we have to start thinking
outside the box! We simply
cannot maintain the status
quo and expect to get new or
different results.

Now because I live in Aba-
co, one should assume that I

Loses






letters@triobunemedia.net

would be most concerned
with what is going on in Aba-
co. First and foremost on
everybody’s mind seemingly
these days, is the new BEC
station being constructed.
While the environment is a
very important concern, it is
not my area of expertise, and
I therefore will not ‘get into
that. And quite honestly,
environmental concerns have
become too much akin to reli-
gious beliefs to too many peo-
ple.

building of a new airport that
has apparently come to a
grinding halt, or at least a seri-
ous go slow. The new airstrip
is quite beautiful when
observing it from the air upon
landing in Marsh Harbour,
but as of yet we haven’t been
able to actually land on that
new airstrip. So I am assum-
ing that however many mil-
lion dollars it cost us taxpay-

" ers, in the eyes of our illustri-

ous leaders it must have been
worth the investment to have
something nice to look at
when we reach back in Aba-
co.
If I’m being terribly honest
— and that is something that
is needed very badly these
days — Marsh Harbour is not
the most appealing sight to
the eyes, but now with a new
airstrip laying parallel to the
old one, it makes the
approach by air a little more
interesting at least. Obviously
this is the work of very com-
mitted politicians. This whole
sordid affair prompts me to

. offer a new riddle: How many

politicians does it take to get a
new airstrip built in the
Bahamas? Answer: Very
many! In fact, that same
answer applies to most every
facet of Bahamian life, does-
n’t it?

Of course when, and if, this
new airstrip ever comes into
use, the dedication of it will
be attended by a whole slew

There is, however, the

of politicians and community
leaders, reverends and the
like, who will all be slapping
each other on the back for a

" job well done. What absolute

nonsense! I hope I might be
fortunate enough to attend
this inevitable event so I
might pose a few difficult
questions to the elite. That is
if they will allow peasants to
attend such a thing. By the
way, I’m not carrying my
camera, because it will not be
a day of celebration, but
rather one of “so what?” to
me.

Finally, let me close by
making a summary statement.
Abaco is one of the most
important top three partners
in any governmental attempt
to accomplish anything any-

. where in this country of ours,

yet we are still treated like an
outside child. We have no
effective local representation,
and the permanent residents
of Abaco seem satisfied with
the way things are, otherwise
I would have to assume that
there might be an uprising of
some sort to inform the gov-

_ ernment — any. government

— that we have-had enough,
and we will not any longer
participate in a system of gov-
ernance where. we must con-
tinually come to the table beg-
ging for. whatever scraps we
might be able to get. We

. deserve better because we are

on par with — or above —
the other revenue producers
in this country, and until we
demand better, things will
stay exactly the way they are.
I guess I can hack it if y’all
can. Tank Gawd I born a
roughneck!

Thank you sincerely,
Madam Editor, for the space
in your editorial column.
Hopefully I have said some-
thing intelligent that will stir
the hearts and minds of a few
fellow Bahamians.

Stagnated and continually
disappointed in Abaco. .

WILLIAM (BILLY) ©
ROBERTS

Abaco,

September 26, 2009.

Editorial’s science
failed to make grade

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Ironic, I never thought I
would be accusing The Tri-
bune of “irresponsible jour-

nalism”, but I have to say, this _

editorial (The Tribune -Sept.
23 — Removal of the Casuari-
na), is as close as The Tribune
has come. What was the point










naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



of this editorial? I am sorry,
but the science on casuarina's
is clear. Just because the gen-
eral public and the editor of
The Tribune can't or doesn't
want to understand doesn't
make it less clear. Scientific
journals are peer reviewed for
precisely that reason. The sci-
entific consensus on this mat-
ter, that casuarinas and beach
dunes don't mix is 100 per
cent clear. There are indeed
places where casuarinas and
plants can coincide, but these
places happen to be generally
on private property where
someone is regularly raking

and cleaning the poisonous

nettles: away from the other
plants. Also, doesn't it occur
to anyone that just because a
plant survives for a while
under a casuarina that it won't
survive forever? It isn't as if
the nettles drop to the ground
and uproot the plant physi-
cally. Have you observed the
plant kingdom? They are
devoid of hands and claws
and other 'instant' acting
devices. Poison takes a while.
‘This whole debate has been
disingenuous, trite and silly.
If environmentalists, or at the
very least, people who are
inclined towards saving the
environment, are actually pre-
pared to do away with science
as the objective criteria upon
which to base environmental-
ism and if “responsible jour-
nals” like The Tribune are
likewise so casually dismissive
of. science, what hope does
environmentalism have?
What other objective criteria
that can convince people to
change their ways to save civ-
ilization as we know it will
you appeal to? Perhaps The
Tribune would be better
served in running a front page
story or serious editorial

about the Pacific Islands that"

are actually already under

water or the Maldives that are
about to disappear, quite lit-
erally, rather than waste our
time blathering about 'the
view' of casuarinas that need
to be removed to save the

_beach dune and thus save the

integrity of the shoreline. I

- am sorry, I have great respect

for the editor of The Tribune
and for the work it does, but
this was the single worst edi-
torial I have ever read from
The Tribune and that had to
be said. Your judgment is usu-
ally spot on and very reliable,
so this came as quite a shock.
Informed decisions mean
everything in the 21st century
and obfuscating an issue that
should be clear cut is not a
path to the enlightenment of
the Bahamian mind. It is a
path that leads to more doubt
and less purpose in matters
pertaining to science. You
create doubt in science in
society at our own peril. Right
now, the Bahamas is in the
top 10 countries at risk for sea
level rise, guaranteed. Is this
really the time to start seeding
doubt in science? Come on
Tribune, you know better!
The Tribune of the people is a
serious position. Respect your
ancient title please!

ERASMUS FOLLY

Nassau,
September 24, 2009

Pee oeeoesee esses eoSOOSOOOSoe

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight on
Mondays

Cece ceceeccssooccoesecoecoece

COCCHEEOSOEEE ES EOO OO EOL OOEDOOOOO®

eoscocs

Poeeccevoccsovacecoeooeseoenn
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 5



"I vex that our govern-
ment spent millions on this
so-called road improvement
project and yet every time I
drive, my car fall in one
crater after another. Who is
in charge of these projects
and why they ain' fix Shirley
Street?

"Those fellas from Min-
istry of Works mussy have
hover cars because they
can't pos-
sibly be
driving
through
o ur
streets
and not
notice
that
there are
three feet
holes in
the road.
Someone
needs to
so better,
man."

- Mad
Motorist.

"How
come
every
time I am
in. the
foodstore
on the 10
items of
less
check-

out, the —

person in front of me always
have 40 to 50 items and just
stands there and will not say
to me 'you can go since you
only have one item — a
Diet Coke’.

"Boy I am vex as .s hell."

- Ms Deb.

"Man I so sick and tired
of booking the earliest flight
on Bahamasair and they
stress to passengers to be
‘there at least two hours

ahead of time and they (the
staff) still do not come
strolling in until after Spm,
everyone with their mouths
pinned — but I have to get
there early to make my doc-
tor's appointed times."

- Oh so vex.

Clinic to |

prepare
residents
for flu

HELPING prepare resi-

dents for the coming flu sea-
son, the Killarney Con-
stituency Office is holding a
vaccine clinic at Sandyport for
the area’s residents between
2pm and 6pm today.

The vaccine to be adminis-
tered is the seasonal flu vac-
cine and not the vaccine
against the H1N1 virus (swine
flu) which is still unavailable
at this time, said Barbara
Donathan, a registered nurse
and secretary of the Killarney
Constituency Association.

A second shipment of sea-
sonal flu vaccines will be
available next week.

Influenza vaccine provides
adults and children with

active immunity against the’

virus. The vaccine cannot give
persons the flu because it does
not contain live virus.

Persons can still get the flu,
but will be less sick if they are
vaccinated. In elderly people
this vaccine can prevent pneu-
monia in about six out of 10
cases, and can prevent death
in more than eight out of 10
cases. Children under the age
of six months should not be
vaccinated. Persons with the
following should also not be
given the flu vaccine:

e Severe allergy to eggs, egg

- products or chicken.

‘e Previous severe reactions
to the Influenza vaccine.

e Allergy to thimerosal (a
preservative added to the
influenza vaccine to keep the
vaccine from spoiling),
neomycin (Vaxigrip only),
Triton X-100, sodium phos-
phate dibasic heptahydrate
(Fluviral only) or sodium
deoxycholate (Fluviral only).

e An active neurological

disorder or a past history of.

Guillan-Barre Syndrome.

e Serious febrile illness (you
can still have the vaccine if
you havea mild infection
without a fever).

However, pregnant women
or those who are breastfeed-
ing can be vaccinated.



"Why is there so much
attention garnered towards
this John Travolta case
when we have so many oth-
er pressing issues before our
country? That case. move
through the system so quick,
when normal Bahamians
gatty wait years to see their
matter before the court. But
that's just how Bahamians
go, treating foreigners bet-
ter than
they own,
no won-
der we in
this mess
now.
That's my
only
gripe.” .

- Court
Observ-
er.

"I hap-
Pp y
because I
splitting
my sides
laughing
at these
govern-
ment offi-
cials at da
Crown
Lands
Commit-
tee saying

that can
be done
to avoid corruption is to
remain ‘fair and open-mind-
ed'. Please, sir, with all due
respect, all government offi-
cials should be ‘fair and

‘open-minded' and keep

their hands preferably
closed with a pen doing
their job..

"Another official said,
‘given the sheer volume of
applications... many of them
get lost’. This begs the ques-
tion (of) what gets lost on a
desk top measuring approx-
imately three feet by six
feet? Some fall off eh?"

- Concerned Citizen.

Are you vex? Send your
complaints to whyyou-
vex@tribunemedia.net.

the best’

Domestic violence
a ‘major’ problem

THE problem of domestic
violence in the Bahamas is a
“significant” one which
requires renewed attention by
all sectors of society.

This was one of the find-
ings of a recent workshop
held by the police and com-
munity leaders who have
joined forces in an effort to
heighten awareness and min-
imise the increased incidents
of domestic olnee. in the
country.

The one-day programme
held by the police’s south-
eastern division in conjunc-
tion with the area’s commu-
nity leaders was entitled
‘Domestic Violence Preven-
tion and Intervention Certi-
fication Workshop’ and was
held at the All Saints Angli-
can Church.

Held under the theme
‘Family Focus - Stronger
Community”, the workshop
was designed to equip police
officers and community lead-
ers with the necessary -skills
to intervene and mediate in
incidences of domestic vio-
lence they may encounter.

A total of 60 persons par-

Wha

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC LE GRAND of BACARDI

‘ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 26"" day of September,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co,, Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
~Phone:322-1722 » Fax: 326-7452

EXTRA, EXTRA,

Hurry,

EXTRA,

Large Shipment

of
Used Cars

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry and

Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing
Bank And Inourance

On Premises
Check Our Prices
Before nuying

Pa

"TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM |



ticipated in the workshop.
One of the speakers at the

workshop, Father Sebastian.
Campbell, said the problem .

of domestic violence in the
Bahamas is “significant and
requires renewed attention

not only from the church, the:

government, the police and
social workers, but society in
general.”

“While this problem cuts
across all boundaries, its

countermeasures requires a

multifaceted and active
approach in every communi-

ty.”

at the workshop, National
Security Minister Tommy

Turnquest said domestic vio-:

lence is a matter of special
concern for his government.

“This (domestic violence)
is an‘age old problem to
which the Royal Bahamas

Police Force southeastern.

division, including the police

and community leaders, have

turned their attention. Be it
habitual abuse of a spouse, a
child, older people, or a












Delivering opening remarks

60 tonne packaged -
Air Conditioning Unit
18yrs old
74” width
6’5”height
33’length

friend; whether it takes place
within the bounds of a mar-
riage, in a home, on a date or

on our streets; be it physical.,.

emotional, sexual or caused
by threat or intimidation,
domestic violence is funda-
mentally wrong,” he said.

Mr Turnquest said that in a
high percentage of murders
committed in the Bahamas
this year domestic violence
played a role.

“While it cannot be denied —

that men can also be victims
of domestic violence, too

- often that violence, including

murder, is directed against
women and children, and par-
ticularly girl children. Studies
have shown that women suf-
fer greater rates of injury due
to domestic violence,” he said.

The workshop, he said, is

in keeping with the strong

position the United Nations
as well as regional and hemi-
spheric organisations have
taken against domestic vio-
lence and on violence against
women.
“Indeed, the work of the

Can be viewed at
Carl G. Treco
Construction

120 Mackey Street South

All offers will be
considered!

302-9875



United Nations and its agen-
cies and other organisations

._ have been said to have moved

domestic violence from
behind closed doors; and to
bring it to the centre of the
agenda of governments, gov-
ernmental organisations and
non-governmental and com-
munity based organisations,”
Mr Turnquest said.

“We have to guard against
‘accepting domestic violence
as a ‘routine’ and expected
matter in our society. It is
contrary to the law and to
morality.

“So, if you are a witness to
domestic violence, call the
police. If you know a victim of
domestic violence, take them
to one Pouce






PAGE 6, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009











MEET Bryan. This handsome fellow is a three-year-
old Akita mix that boasts a healthy chocolate coat with
vanilla markings and has a smile that would win over even
the most skeptical of hearts.

His good looks are matched by an awesome personality.
He is an avid and obedient walker, has mastered the ‘sit’
command and gets along well with other dogs.

Also, being affectionate and “kissy”, he has the reputa-
tion at the Bahamas Humane Society (BHS) of being quite
. the charmer...

But this friendly disposition is not to say that he would
not make an excellent protector as ce is also quite “boun-
cy and vocal.”

Regrettably, he does suffer from a high degree of both
heartworm and the tick-bourne disease erhlichea.

But, as most animal lovers know, both of these ailments
can often be easily treated with medication, a little extra
love and time.

‘In fact, many of the staff at the BHS have taken home
dogs in similar, if not worse, conditions and the success rate
has been phenomenal.

Please open up your keart and home to this lovely little
guy as he really needs help. .

The necessary treatments are low in cost and otherwise
relatively simple. Bryan will be eternally grateful and you
will not regret your choice to save a life.

Persons are.also encouraged to ask about his best friend
Toby with whom he came to the BHS, as they would pre-
fer to be adopted together if possible. ‘

Day Care centre enjoys

its fifth anniversary

ST JOSEPH’S Adult Day Care Centre celebrates its
fifth anniversary” on Sunday, the feast of St Francis of
ASSISL. 3.)

To mark the occasion the Centre will hold an open
house on Monday, October 5, from 10 am to 5pm.

Sister Cecilia Albury, administrator of the Centre,
thanks all “volunteers, benefactors and friends who con-
tinue to help in our ministry.”

ele) att br sd) 1
ea

SUNDAY SERVICES

* Early Warship SOrviCe wssceseaeese pew 830 aM.
* Sunday School for all AGES Hownine 845 3H.
* Worship Service ... ww $100 am,
* Spanish Service ... 11:00 am.
* FADS Youth Church(Grades 7-12}

First & Third Sunday 14:30 am.
* POWER CREW ChurchiAges 10-11 yrs.)

--Second & Fourth Sunday we ENBO arn.
* Beng SESE ~ 630 pm,

WEDNESDAY. FRIDAY —
at 7:30 p.m. at 7:30 p.m.

* Selective Bible Teaching * Youth Ministry Meeting
* Royal Rangers [Boys Club} 4-16 yrs. [Grades 7-12}

* Missionettes (Girls Club} 4-16 yrs.

* Spanish Bible Study

| RADIO MINISTRY on Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME
| Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God





LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE







Man’s true ‘Amigo’
honoured in the US

Hopes for renewed animal protection law push

THE late Bahamian potcake star
‘Amigo’ (pictured above) was honoured
by the Humane Society of the United
States (HSUS), which recently named
“The Amigo Humane Recognition .
Awards” after him at a special Humane
Law Enforcement dinner and award cer-
emony held in Washington, DC.

It was a fitting tribute to the beloved
potcake who, with his touching ‘rags to
riches story’, was seen by many as an
example of what can happen when
‘someone cares’.

During his lifetime, he put a face to
many tragic issues facing animals
throughout the islands of the Bahamas \
and elsewhere.

Frances Singer-Hayward, who
described herself as his “partner”, said

paign and appearing with HSUS presi-

Frances Singer-Hayward (left), Jane Berry one of the.recipients of the Amigo Humane
Recognition Awards and Humane Society of the United States president Wayne Pacelle.
Michelle Riley/The Humane Society of the United States)



about Amigo, told of how she found him
as a tragic stray potcake, but how with

she hopes Amigo will inspire the
Bahamas to continue to join “the merci-
ful global trend of enacting animal pro-
tection laws with appropriately stiff pun-
ishments.”

“Laws dealing with animal protection
are now becoming more and more pow-
erful, mainstream and expected, and if
Amigo through his story and his work
can in any way help to inspire the passage
of such laws in the Bahamas, he will, in
his own sweet way, have truly made a
difference,” she said.

Taking his message abroad, Amigo
became very involved with HSUS, part-
nering with them in the BEKIND Cam-

dent Wayne Pacelle in public service’

announcements (PSA). Amigo’s very last
effort before he died was to appear in
an anti-dog fighting PSA with hip hop
mogul Russell Simmons and Mr Pacelle.

At the award ceremony in Washing-
ton, DC, Ms Singer-Hayward along with
Mr Pacelle presented the awards in his
name to what she termed “a room filled
with heroes” from all parts of the US,
including those in law enforcement who

had risked their lives saving animals, \

prosecutors who fought to put animal
abusers behind bars, and politicians who
devoted themselves to passing animal
protection laws.

Ms Singer-Hayward in her speech

love and nurturing he became a ‘super-
star’ in the Bahamas as the face-of the
Grand Bahama Humane Society’s “Cru-
sade Against Animal Suffering” and as

‘the ‘poster dog’ for its spay and neuter

campaign.

She spoke of how deeply she loved
him and how he would forever be the
inspiration behind her passionate work
on behalf of animal welfare.

Her talk touched the hearts of many in
the audience, who told her afterwards
how moved they were by Amigo’s story.
The weekend ironically marked the sec-
ond anniversary of the potcake’s untime-
_ly death from cancer. .









Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching 11am &7:30pm + EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:-H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 893-0563 ¢ Box N-362





“CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL *

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS « Tel 325-2921





“ Hie, A: M. Speaker
Pastor Perry Wallace

October is Missions Month At Central

“Bible Chiga: G48 am. + Breaking of Broad Service: Th45 am.
dniunity Qutresah: $4590 gi. * Bveniig Service: M08 pan.
oon Midwank Senics 70 pun. Aednesdaysk |

fers eye Meating: 1: Oe a Bt oe Fhureday af sich er)







Grace and ete Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
North America

WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED
Worship Time: Ha.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m:

Church School during Worsh ip Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O. Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUERDA ILYSSE JEAN

BAPTISTE of CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why

registration/naturalization should not be granted, should |
send a written and signed statement of the facts within

twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of October, 2009 to the

Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-742:
(wwiwgivesiey.org)

| SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4TH, 2009

eam | Rev, Carla Culmer/Sis, Tezel Anderson -

‘ 410m Rev, Carla Culmer/Contirmation Service (HC)

7:08 pm Sis, Nathalie Thompson/Sis, Marilyn Tinker

coated i Team ca Raid ei

y LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm

_ Place:
The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rey. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles
P.O.Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-57
EMAIL - lynnk @batelnet.bs

PNT XR BESO MU AMUN yy eR A!


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009, PAGE 7



i

Union facing
Freeport split

FROM page one

ers have started signing a peti-
tion for a poll to be created to
allow the next union that is
vying to be the bargaining
agent for workers at Our
Lucaya Resort to operate.

The A-Team, led by Nicole
Martin, won union elections
on September 28. Ms Martin,
who was also elected in May,
was re-elected as the new
president of the Hotel Work-
ers Union.

Although Ms Martin cap-
tured a majority of the votes
in New Providence, she was
not as successful in Freeport.
Presidential candidate, Kirk
Wilson, leader of the Team
Deliverance, won in Grand
Bahama.

Wilson captured 598 votes
compared to the 70 votes Ms
Martin picked up in Freeport.

Mr Morley, who was also a
candidate with Team Deliv-
erance, said workers have
expressed a lack of confidence
in the new president.

“At this time they want to
break away, they do not feel
comfortable with the level of
representation and they do
not feel they are skilled
enough or understand the
people here they are dealing
with,” he said.

- “I do not encourage them
leaving Hotel Workers
Union, but if it is their wish
and desire, which they have
expressed that to me, then I
believe I have a moral respon-
sibility to assist the best way I
can,” he said. Mr Morley said
workers have galvanised
enough support and are in the
‘process of approaching the
Minister of Labour in short
order concerning their desire.

The former union execu- ~
tive said that many hotel

workers felt disenfranchised
during the last union election.

He claims that more than -

150 voters were left off the
register in Freeport, and 2,500
persons were not put on the
register in New Providence.

“Those 2,500 persons that
were not put on the register
could have proven they had
paid union dues because they
had their cheque stubs to
prove it, but were not allowed
to vote in Nassau,” he said.

Leanne Thompson of
Grand Bahama was disap-
pointed she was not allowed
to vote in the last elections.

“J yoted in the May.elec-
tions, but was not gn the
March register list for this
election. I am up to date on
all my union dues,” she said.

Ms Thompson went on
maternity leave for 13 weeks
in January, and later took
three weeks: vacation leave.
She returned to work im April.

Although dues are not
deducted from maternity ben-
efits, she said dues were taken
out of her vacation pay.

“It is just not fair that
myself and a lot, of people
who took time to go down to
Workers House to exercise
our right to vote were turned
away because our names were
not on the register,”’ said the
former shop steward of seven
years.

Mr Morley said that the rel-
evant authorities must put
better methods in place for
more transparent elections,
especially at polling divisions.

He claimed that Team
Deliverance candidate Ray-
mand, Wright — who he said
was deliberately left off the
register — had discovered two
ballot boxes already filled
with ballot papers at a polling
station before the elections
started and was attacked by
a candidate on the A-Team.

“It means that the A-Team
was ahead and the Team
Deliverance was down, 800
votes before the elections
started,” he said.

“We are calling on the rel-
evant persons, inclusive of the
Prime Minister, to find the
relevant resolution and
method to put in place so we
can have transparent elec-
tions,”’ he said.

Behaviour warning
over Travolta case

_FROM page one.

passion but there is no need
for incivility,” Senior Justice
Allen said.

Bridgewater and former ©

paramedic Tarino Light-
bourne are accused of
attempts to extort $25 million
from the actor following the
death of his 16-year-old son,
Jett, in Grand Bahamas on
January 2.

During yesterday’ S Cross-
examination Mr Ducille asked
Mr McDermott whether he
was the one who had instruct-
ed PLP Senator Allyson May-
nard-Gibson, who is a lawyer,
to go to Freeport to meet with
Ms Bridgewater.

Mr McDermott replied,
“J authorised her brother
Clement Maynard to instruct
her to go to Freeport. I didn’t
speak to her directly.” When
asked by Mr Ducille why he

wanted Mrs Maynard-Gibson.

to go to Freeport, Mr McDer-
mott explained that he want-
ed to have more information
so that they could go to the
police. Mr McDermott said
that the first time he heard
about the $25 million demand
was through Mrs Maynard-
Gibson.

Mr Ducille then asked,
“When you came to Nassau
‘on January 17, did you intend
to negotiate with anyone?”
Mr McDermott replied,
“No. > f

“My suggestion to you is
that when you came to Nas-
sau on the 17 of January you
had evil intent in your heart,”
Mr Ducille said. Mr McDer-
mott again replied, “No.”

_ Mr Ducille further sug-
gested to Mr McDermott that
his sole mission was to set up
Ms Bridgewater. Mr McDer-
mott replied, “No, sir. It was
to report to law enforcement
what had transpired on that
day.”

“What was all this with the
video and audio apparatus
being set up in your room?”
Mr Ducille then asked.

Mr McDermott replied, “I
reported the circumstances to
police. They were not set up
at my request.” Mr Ducille
further suggested that there
had been no demand, that he



had been up to no good and
that his trip to the Bahamas
was a “sham.”

Mr McDermott replied,
“My journey to the Bahamas

was to inform authorities . -

about all that had happened.”

Mr Ducille then suggested
that he was the one who‘had
made the offer of money and
that he was the one who had

pushed the negotiations. Mr.

McDermott denied the sug-
gestion. Mr Ducille asked Mr
McDermott if he had felt
threatened by anyone in com-
ing to the Bahamas. Mr
McDermott replied, “No.”
During cross-examination
by Lightbourne’s attorney

‘Carlson Shurland, Mr McDer-

mott was asked whether he
had brought a contingent of
lawyers when he came to Nas-
sau in, January. Mr McDer-

mott said three attorneys

accompanied him.

“Up to January 18, you did
not know Tarino Light-
bourne, the man?” Mr Shur-
land asked. Mr McDermott
responded by saying, “No I
did not know him at all.”

Mr McDermott said he

_ had relayed the facts to law

enforcement officials and it
was up to them to do ‘what
they wanted to do with it,”
Mr McDermott told the court.

Mr Shurland then suggest-
ed that the facts he gave
regarding Tarino was based
on hearsay evidence. Mr
McDermott said that his com-
plaint was based on conver-

~ gations he had with West End

and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe, Ms Bridgewater,
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,
Ronald Zupancic and discus-
sions with Clement Maynard
III, regarding the.application
of Bahamian law.

Jurors in the attempted
extortion trial are expected
to hear the taped meetings
between Bridgewater, Light-
bourne and Mr McDermott
on Monday. Senior Justice
Allen decided yesterday that
rather than fragment the evi-
dence by playing a taped tele-
phone conversation between
Bridgewater and McDermott
yesterday and the two video-
taped meetings on Monday,
it would be better to have the
jury see all on the same day.

UNESCO summit
head recognised

A recognition reception
was held for career diplomat
Dr Davidson Hepburn who
has been appointed to the
presidency of the United
Nations Educational, Scien-
tific and Cultural Organisa-
tion’s (UNESCO) 35th Gen-
eral Conference.

It was held on September
28, at Comers House,

headquarters of the Antiqui-
ties, Monuments and Muse-
ums Corporation (AMMC)

‘ where Dr Hepburn serves as

chairman.

Dr Hepburn and his wife
Dr Ada Thompson-Hepburn
are pictured sitting alongside
Minister of Education Carl
Bethel. Theresa Moxey-Ingra-
ham is at right.





Imminent solution for CLICO policyholders awaited

people with policies that originated with CLICO pay up front.
Meanwhile, numerous policyholders, continue to pay their -
insurance premiums, as Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
advised them to do if they wanted to see their policies not fall
by the wayside but be transferred to another insurance company

FROM page one

suade the private hospital to accept CLICO insurance even .

ahead of that announcement.

Despite the failed company’s financial woes, the liquidator,
on behalf of CLICO (Bahamas), has continued to honour
health insurance claims, The Tribune understands.

But this in itself appears to have failed to encourage most

doctors, hospitals and pharmacies to allow customers ‘and
patients to rely on their insurance when they buy services or

supplies from them.

Instead many businesses have continued to demand that

Caribbean Court of Justice switch urged

FROM page one

tion. Mr Sears said the coun-
try should take heed of this
warning and quickly link itself
with the regional appellate
body. instead of waiting for an
immediate threat from the
United Kingdom.

Recently Lord Phillips told

the UK Financial Times that
Law Lords on the Privy
Council, spent a “dispropor-
tionate” amount of time on
cases from former colonies,
mostly in the Caribbean, the

‘ BBC reported,

The region's final appellate
court — the Caribbean Court
of Justice — currently only
hears cases from Guyana and

' Barbados. Mr Sears said the

Bahamas, as a part of CARI-
COM. is already paying a fee
to the CCJ and should make
use of its talented judges.

"I personally believe, and
I'm speaking for myself not
for the PLP, that as a paying
member of CARICOM which
currently makes an annual
contribution to the CCJ that
the Bahamas ought to accept



52wk-Low

the appellate jurisdiction of
the CC] and unlink ourselves
from the Judicial Committee
of the Privy Council with our
thanks for the excellent ser-
vice that it has providéd over
the years.

"I believe that we have the
talent in our region as well as
talent outside of the region
that is available to the region
for the CCJ to perform equal
to the performance of the
Privy Council," Mr Sears told
The Tribune yesterday.

His comments.came a day
after BBC Caribbean report-
ed that Britain's first Supreme

Court officially replaced the °

Privy Council. The new. court
replaces the appellate com-
mittee of Britain's upper leg-
islative chamber, the House
of Lords, BBC Caribbean
said.

BBC Caribbean also
reported that the new
supreme court takes over
from the Privy Council which

‘serves as the final court of

appeal for most Caribbean
countries.

However, local senior attor-
ney Brian Moree disagreed

that could take responsibility for paying their claims.

Yesterday of 10 physicians and medical centres contacted by
this newspaper as well as three pharmacies — Lowe’s, Heaven
Sent and the Prescription Parlour Pharmacy — all confirmed
that they do not accept CLICO insurance, following the sudden
liquidation of the insurer. Doctor’s Hospital declined to com-
ment on the matter when contacted yesterday.

with the information reported
and explained that it was the
Judicial Committee of the
House of Lords — the upper
house of British Parliament
— that was replaced by
Britain's Supreme Court.
"Britain has not dumped
the Privy Council and has not
indicated through political
channels or through judicial
channels that it is not pre-
pared to continue to provide
the services of the Privy
Council to those countries

that would continue to wish .

to use it as its final appellate
court."

"The judicial committee of
the House of Lords is a dif-
ferent court than the Judicial
Committee of the Privy
Council even though the same
Law Lords sit in both courts.
In fact, apart from a very nar-
row area, the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Council is
not a domestic court in
Britain, its function — apart
from a narrow area of law —
is to provide a final court of
appeal to former colonies,"
Mr Moree told The Tribune.

He added that due to the.

respect, credibility and wealth
of experience held by the
. judges. on the Privy Council
the Bahamas should not
abandon the body as its final
court of appeal just yet.

"It is regarded by most
independent observes as one °
.of the most competent, expe-
rienced and independent
courts in the world. As a
country we don't pay for
these services and frankly it
has been a bargain for the
Bahamas," said the senior
partner of McKinney, Ban;

croft and Hughes.: ~~~ ~~~ -

He said the CCJ was too
young a court to have devel-
oped reputable standing in
the community and ques-:
tioned if the appointment of
its judges are free of political
influence.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicve,
Pest Control

Uy eg aT TE ats
322-2157



FG CAPITAL MARKETS

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

TTT

FRADED
MSG

AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund

Bank of Bahamas

“Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

Premier Real-Estate

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

* Security ’

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND H

29.00 ABDAB

52wk-Low
1.3344
2.8952
1.4129
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's-Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007"

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

- CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Last Sale

Change Daily Vol.

7% :

Prime + 1.75%

1% ;
Prime + 1.75%

Last Price | Weekly Vol.

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price -
Weekly Vol.

Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES



COLONIAL

Interest

ty
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
KG

0.000

0.000 0.480

31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
25-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

54 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242.99



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100


PAGE 8 FIRDAY, OCTOBER 38, 2009

co

THE TRIBUNE














IT’S AN
OLDER
Guy...

JIM YELICH WOULD'VE:
HAD D’VITO UNDER
SURVEILLANCE. --

WONDER WHAT -
HAPPENED?





i

i

3

=

vt

5

%

a

ipa ms g

I DON’T KNOW... fo =
BUT THEY HAVE “22

" SOMEONE IN CUSTODY! j

THERE'S
ANOTHER GIRL |
AND I: LIKE
HER, BUT SHE

THERE'S THIS!
LITTLE GIRL AT

2 SCHOOL WHO |
Q~, LIKES ME, <
BUT I DON'T.

< 2009 by King Features Syncicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



MOM SANS
TL HAVE To CLEAN fo






YOU'RE THE-ONE WHO HAS To
UWE WITH YOURSELF! I

CANT MAKE You Do WHATS
RIGHT! You CAN HAVE THE





TM NOT GOING To FIGHT
You, MOE! \F YOU WONT
GINE ME MY TRUCK BACK,
FINE! Go AHEAD







Heh heh.



_-- THEY THINK HE'S
ONE OF THE PEOPLE
DIVITO SCAMMEP!



MEN, KID, \F YOU'RE

APT 3-G

I'LL SURE BE }
> GLAD WHEN I
GROW UP AND
ALL THIS GETS
STRAIGHTENED

TELL HER YOURE
NOT VONE GETTIN
IT DieTY !

NOT GONNA SINING,
GET OFF AND LET
SOMEONE ELSE










HOW COME YoU
HAVEN'T TRIED TO
WALK, EOGENE 7

OO

WHAT (5 THE
NAVIGATOR
TRYING JO SAY










NOT ATALL. HOW
WAS YOUR DAY,







IN THE WEDDING
BUSINESS,
ARISTOTLE.

SSE

|
bes



www.kingfeatures.com

AGING PR
Oo

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

HE TENDS TO
FREEZE UP
WHEN HE

GETS EXCITED!

or more can

The Target
uses

FRUSTRATING AND EXHAUSTING!
THERE'S A LOT OF HEAVY LIFTING

S \
GCA
=
cy “My








AND THEN THERE'S THE
BRIDE WHO CAN'T BE
BOTHERED TO LEARN My
NAME AND CALLS ME
HEY yo. U, u 7 <










©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

T HAVE NO DESIRE
To SPEED UP THE

OCESS

HOW many words of four fetters

you make from the

letters shown here? In making a

word, each letter may be used

AND KEEP IT!
once only. Each must contain the

STUPID TRUCK !







words in
I the main

at least one nine-letter word.



©1989 Universal Press Syndicate







Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.
The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from
“Monday to Sunday



}999

No plurals.

body of
Chambers
2\st
Century
Dictionary |

Ai (or more)

ether ferret
hero hetero

adition)



tore’ tree











=,

SREAPING HELPS MRINILSON “COOKIES AN’ A MILKSHAKE
BECOME A WELL-ROUNDED — [0,TOO. "
PERSON.”





Difficulty Level %& ¥



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across Down
Deck or dock (5)
Business head shows

Freed of entanglements 1
volunteered (7) ; 2
Clean down (5)

The French way to get fat (4)

and 9 Down: Not ae

surprising ending

apparently (8,10)

Sharply picked out (10)

Provide two servings of dry

wine in a bit (6)

Produced a publication and |

is taken to court (6)

resolution (8)
Kills a doctor and

_ confesses (6)
Stress follows before a
claim (10)
His victims lose
heart (4)
Pointedly heckled (7)
See 8 Across
Exits in the open
air (8)
Insect settled on
the cheese for a short
while (7)
Asian labourer that is
not friendly to begin
with (6)
Estimated distribution of
trade (5)
Leaf-destraying
parasite (4) -

Unable to work after leaving
the fraternity? (3,2,5)
All too human story in
which evil makes a
comeback (8)
An army entertainer at a .
talk show? (4)
Long time coming to a
point (5)

. Went by inordinately
pleased (7)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution .

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Furthermore, 9 On
trust, 10 Tinge, 11 Hard, 12
Enormous, 114 Nicety, 16 Cannon,
18 Terminus, 19 Till, 22 Imbue, 23
Nonplus, 24 Just the same.
Down: 2 Utter, 3 Taut, 4 Extent, 5
Material, 6 Run-down, 7 Nothing
to it, 8 Less and less, 13 Strident,
15 Caribou, 17 Quench, 20 Islam,
21 Onus.

Across: 1 Arrangement, 9 On the
go, 10 Chill, 11 Dust, 12 Striving, 14
Orator, 16 Target, 18 Passport, 19
Etna, 22 Nurse, 23 Epitaph, 24
Interesting.

Down: 2 Rates, 3 Aces, 4 Growth,
5 Michigan, 6 Nailing, 7 Good com-
pany, 8 Flight paths, 13 Complete,
15 Also ran, 17 Greece, 20 Train,
21 Girt.



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Across

Reparation (7)
A decorative
design (5)

7 Renown (4)

8 In its original
state (8)
To meet as
arranged (10)
Ludicrous (6)
Severe trial (6)
Complex details
(3,3,4)
Accurate (8)
Volition (4)
Give way (5)
Tight-fisted (7)





j
}
| centre letter and there must be
}
j
i
|



TODAY'S TARGET
Good 21; very good 31; excefient

Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION,

fete fore forte free

freer fret here hereof hereto

other reef reefer

refer rete retro rote thee there
THEREFORE thereof three throe



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is
to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the
sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left,
and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its
top. No number may be used in the same block more than
once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases
from Monday to Sunday. ©
























Down

1
2
3

To direct attention (5)
Lessen (8)

Endeavour —

‘earnestly (6)

Disguise oneself (10)

5 To cut to a desired

size (4)

Irritable (7)
Remember (4,2,4)
Distinctive (8)
General pardon (7)
Get to the bottom
of (6)

Resentfully

silent (5)

Advise strongly (4)











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





7/4/6[51.1/3
13/9 216/87

1/815(9/4 2

7/61 4)2 °3/1/5/8
1/8/9|517/2/316
3/5/2|816/1|71914
1/9|3|6|7/4|8]2/5
7/2|415/1/8|3|/6/9

om |8/6/5]2/3'9] 4/7) 1











Nowhere to Hide

West dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
@AJ 103
VAKIY
4103
®K QT ;
WEST EAST
@Q5 #872.
¥84 ¥106532
#AKI9764 #Q
52 A964
SOUTH —
&K964
Â¥Q7
$852
#11083
The bidding:
West North East South
34 Dble Pass 34
Pass 44

Opening lead —— king of diamonds.

Bridge is primarily a game of
percentages, but there are times
when psychological considerations
play a bigger role than probabilities.

Consider this deal from a team
contest where both North-South
pairs reached four spades after West
had opened three diamonds. Both
Wests led the diamond king and con-
tinued with the ace at trick two, East
discarding a low heart.

At the first table, West continued
with the diamond jack, which
declarer ruffed with dummy’s ten of
spades. When East failed to overruff,
it became clear that West had the

Tomorrow: Wrig

queen of spades. So South next led a
low spade to the king and retumed a
spade toward the A-J, picking up
West’s queen. East’s ace of clubs
later scored the defenders’ third and .
last trick, and the contract was made.

Afterward, East reprimanded his:
partner for continuing a third dia-\
mond, thereby revealing the location
of the spade queen, Had West shifted
to another suit at trick three, East
argued, declarer might well have
misguessed the spade position and
gone down.

East’s analysis left something. to
be desired, as evidenced by what
transpired at the other table. There,
West recognized the danger of play-
ing a third diamond, so he shifled to
a club at trick three. '

East took the king with the ace
and returned a club, but after win-
ning with dummy’s queen, South
paused to consider why West had not
led a third diamond in a potential
overruff situation. The only rational
explanation had to be that West was
afraideof giving away information
about his trump holding, so South led
a spade to the king and retuned a
spade toward dummy, and that was
that. ‘
By drawing the proper inference,
declarer was thus sure to make the
contract whether or not West led a
diamond at trick three. There was
simply no place poor West could
hide his queen of spades.

gling out of the trap.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine,













Fundraising for
Yama Bahama —
underway

FUNDRAISING for
the 2010 Yama Bahama
Festival got under way



yesterday.
Throughout the cam-
paign, -the Yama

Bahama Foundation
aims to encourage spon-
sors to help support and
motivate potential par-
ticipants, especially
those in their respective
communities inclusive of
children, young adults
and senior citizens.

. The first annual Yama
Bahama Festival is.
scheduled to take place :
in July 2010 on North :
Bimini, Bahamas.

With the theme
“Sports Fever” the festi-
val will feature a fun
run/walk, boxing,

basketball and base-
ball.

There will also be an
essay writing contest
with a Yama Bahama
Scholarship awarded to’
the winner. The essay
topic is: Three Major
Steps to Effect Positive

Change in the
Bahamas i

The non-profit orga-:
nization board include
chair persons Penny
Butler, Camille Butler :
and Ebeneezer "Bone- :
fish Ebbie" David; .sec- :
retary Carol Smith- :
Gomez; treasurer
George Weech; Public
relations Janice Levari- :
ty; chairperson fundrais-
ing and Sponsorship Hil-
da James. ;

Other Board Members
include Charlie Robins,
Renee Robins, Leonard
Stuart and Fred Sturrup,
Consultant. -

For more information,
‘visit www.yamaba-





se eeepaseecesencereeaeencnses

hamafest.info



~

NVPA update

IN the lone game .,
played in the New
Provideence Volleyball
Association Thursday
night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium, the Col-
lege of the Bahamas
Caribs men defeated ©
the Saints in three
‘straight sets 25-10, 25-
21 and 27-25. : - :

Anvard Johnson led
all scorers with 10
points for the Caribs in
their victory. William
McKinney had 7 for the
Saints.

The league will be
back in action on Sun- }
day with a triple header :
at the DW Davis Gym. :

© Here’s alook at the :
match-ups: i

3:30 pm Cougars vs
Lady Truckers (L).

4:30 pm Scotia
Defenders vs COB
(M).

5:30 pm Technicians
vs Saints (M).



BASEBALL i

PROFESSIONAL, NOT
SEMEPRO PLAYERS.

_IN an article on Fri-
day about the funeral
service of the late Vin-
cent Lloyd Ferguson,
Inagua’s Etienne Far-

. quharson and Fred
‘Papa’ Smith were |
referred to as semi-pro

baseball players.

. The two were actual
professional players,
who played in the
minor leagues.

The Tribune apolo-
gises to the players for
the error.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER

iS SSSA

By DAHALIA SMITH
For the BSA

JIMMY Lowe won the
2009 Terry McCoy Memori-
al Sunfish Regatta, improv-
ing on last year's fourth
place finish in a very com-
petitive fleet of 18 boats.

He accumulated a score of
seven points by the end of

’ the six-race-series hosted by

the Nassau Yacht Club
(NYC) on Montague Bay.
No white caps, steady 5-10
knot winds and a sunny day
presented favorable condi-
tions on the first day (Sat-
urday, September 26) of sail-
ing.

Going into race one-of-
four, Lowe expected noth-
ing less than winning them
all. iIf you don't go out there
with that mindset you may
as well not go at all,i he said.

By the end of day one
Lowe recorded a third place
finish in the opening race
and three comfortable vic-
tories in races two, three and
four.

Favorite and defending
champion Donald Martin-
borough won the first race,
finished third in the second

‘and fourth races and placed

second in the third race.
After day one St
Andrew's student and junior
Chris Sands emerged as
another front runner for the
overall title. He sailed well
against seasoned skipper

Lowe and world class sailor’

Martinborough. Sands
secured second placements
in Saturday's races. The
youngster was on the world
title holder's, Martinbor-
ough, heals beat by beat in
race one. However the vet-
eran nipped Sands at the
final buoy by a boat's length
for the win. Another notable
face off at the finish line saw
Martinborough edge Lori
Lowe (sole female sailor) in
race three by two boat
lengths for second behind
Jimmie Lowe.

Still trees on the second

SEE page 10

3: 20:09





ALPHEUS ‘Hawk’ Finlyson has announced
that the new date and venue for the launch of
his book: “rom Vancouver to Athens” is Fri-
day, October 9, 5:30-7:00pm at Chapter One,
College of The Bahamas, Oakes Field.

“We hope to see you there,” said Finlayson,

who had to put off the original launching date —

because of the books were not shipped in time.
For those persons who can’t attend, Fin-

TOP KAMAL Ti MO,



layson is asking for them to email him at
aimperial.com or

alpheus.finlayson@colin
contact him at 327-4612.

Anyone wishing to have their books signed
are urged to purchase them from Logos at Har-
bour Bay, The Island Bookstore, Bay Street or

Chapter One.
The price is $29.95.

The books are available in the stores.

Cc







Lowe wins 2009 Sunfish Regatta

BLUEWAV
RALLY TO
DEFEAT
COMETS
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009

ee eee eee eee ee



SAW where the funer-

al for Vince Ferguson

was held today, and
feel | must add my tribute
to all those that have

already done so.

Growing up I always was inter-
ested in sports, and played quite a
few.

With the exception of on or two
that I did excel in, I was always just
good enough to make the team,
but not stand out.

Let me share two stories about
Vince Ferguson, and his methods
of teaching.

When I was about 15 years old, I
played on the Queens College
High School Soccer Team with a
goalie whose family (if I remember
correctly) was from Jamaica, and
his name was Hugh, (can't remem-
ber the last name..) The thing I do
remember is that he played for two
years and never allowed a goal to
be scored against him.

_ Because my nature was not to be
"told what to do" if I thought the
person was offensive, I got into
more than one "disagreement"
with my school teachers, to the
point where it was "suggested" by
the Principal

that maybe I belonged else-
where...

So in the middle of the school
year, I transferred to St.
Augustine's College where I first

- «met Mr. Ferguson.

My first "experience" with Mr

Lowe wins 2099 Sunfish Regatta

FROM page nine»

Ferguson was over the school tie.

Every Friday all young gentle-
men were supposed to come to
school in their bright red St Augus-
tine tie. Of course, considering
myself a "rebel" now, I choose not
to wear the school tie at any time.

Hearing how hard a disciplinari-
an Mr Ferguson was by other stu-
dents, every Friday I did my best
to avoid him, until...

It was right before the bell was

to ring ending the morning break,

when I accidentally "bucked" into
Mr Ferguson, whio asked me
immediately WHY wasn't I wear-*
ing my school tie on Friday as I am
supposed to. I mumbled something
about "forgetting," to which he
said I was to come to his office at
lunch time and I had BETTER
have my tie on...

The rest of the mogning was
filled with apprehension, with me

’ racking my brain, what to do, what

to do? ;
I had been caned once in my life
and didn't relish the thought of

going through that experience

again.

Right before I was to go to his
office, I went to the restroom, and
there, on the floor, pushed into the
corner with the rest of the trash,
was a St Augustine boys tie. True
it had holes in it, and lot's of dirt

spots, but it WAS a tie. I quickly
picked it up, tied it on my neck,
and walked confidently to his
office. ;

When he saw me, the veins in his
head and neck started sticking out,
and his lips and eyes narrowed. He



clenched his teeth and seethed
"What is THAT Mr. Lee?" Feel-
ing a bit nervous, I explained that
he said J MUST have a tie when I
came to his office, and since I
walked to school, and was unable
to get out (they use to lock the
back road, to keep intruders out
during the day;) this was the best
solution I could come up with. He
sat for what seemed like eternity,
eyeing me up and down and finally
said "Mr Lee, let this be the LAST
Friday that you EVER come to St
Augustine's College without your
tie.." And it was...

The other story I have about Mr
Ferguson was also from that same
time.

As I said before, I use to play
soccer for Q.C. Well one after-
noon while walking towards the
back gate, Mr Ferguson drives up
in his Volkswagon Beetle and asks
me why I was not going to soccer
practice as he

knew I played. I told him I was
not interested in playing on the °
SAC team and was on my way
home, besides the season was just
about finished. ae

He said regardless, he wanted
me at practice. I didn't go.

The next time practice was

_ scheduled I was almost on Prince

Charles Drive when he pulled up
in his car again, this time turning it
sideways to block my path. He got
out and DEMANDED that I go
back and join in ©

practice. Seeing that he was per-

- sistent, I gave up and started

attending practice.

I think there was two games left
then the Championship. My
"forte" in soccer was only in strik-
ing the ball towards the net, I was
neither a good dribbler, or a
"magician" at ball handling. So I
was not surprised

when I spend the last two games
on the bench (besides I had just
joined the team..) But I DID start
to wonder WHY Mr Ferguson
made me join... ‘

Then came "Championship
Day." SAC was tied with QC for
wins in the regular seasons, but led
in some statistic like goals scored
or whatever, which gave us the
edge. All we had to do was tie QC
and the

High School Championship was
ours. .

_ The game started, and suddenly
in the first half, QC scored to make
it 1-0. I knew with Hugh in the net
for QC and not given up a goal in
two years, "that was that.."

Suddenly it was half time, and
Mr. Ferguson yelled "Mr Lee, get
ready to go in as a inside forward."
I did what I was told.

No more than two minutes into
the second half, the outside winger
got the ball and crossed it in front
of their goal. I had been following
the play up, and dashed forward
striking the ball towards the goal
with a

sharp left foot volley, I watched
as Hugh leapt towards the ball,
then realised (to my UTTER
amazement) that it was indeed
passing his outstretched hand and
it mad a loud "clang" as it hit the
metal netting

inside the goal. I took a deep
breath, and shook my head...The
game was tied!! "

The game remained that way .
and at the end we were High
School .

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Champions...

AS we met as a group after-
wards, Mr. Ferguson only said that
"when we play as a team, with
everyone having and knowing their
part, we can be victorious..."

These stories indicate the type of
teacher and person Mr Ferguson
was.

Yes he WAS a disciplinarian,
but he made me "creative" enough
to find SOME kind |

of tie.

And regarding the persistence
he showed in demanding I join the.
soccer team, then leaving me on
the bench, only to bring me on to
end up scoring the goal which
proved to be decisive, showed me
what a GENIUS the man was. He
had seen me play at QC he knew
what I could do, and not do. It

might have been out of despera-

tion, (after QC went up 1-0 and
everyone knowing that NOBODY
had ever scored against Hugh) that
he brought me‘on, but in looking ~
back it was a cool, calculated and -
educated guess he took because he
knew if there was one thing I had
was a strong leg and that was prob-

- ably the only way a ball could get

past

Hugh that day. (It was not that I;
had great soccer skills...) It showed:
me the brillance of the man...

I saw Mr Ferguson a few times .
around town since those days forty’
years ago, he was always cordial,
said hello, and (once in awhile)
would shake my hand, and give me:
that wry little smile of his.

So, today we honour the man, he
was so much more than just a
teacher, and he meant so much to
so many. :

May God Bless.and receive you
at his side Mr Vince Ferguson..

WILLIAM LEE.

day of sailing, Sunday, indi-
cated light and variable
winds out to sea nonetheless
the sailors were enthusias-
‘tic. Once they reached the
starting line the winds
picked up but mostly fluctu-
ated.

Results from race five

were-atypical-from.the pre- .

vio

not finish and thrée boats.-_

four which saw Lowe

disqualified for being, over

the starting line early and
were scored OCS (on course
side). That opened the door
for a victory by Martinbor-
ough, another second place-
ment by Sands and a third
place finish by real estate
guru George Damianos.
_ The final race (six) fol-
lowed and Jimmie Lowe
sealed the championship
title with another victory.
Meanwhile Martinborough
was over the starting line
early and registered an OCS,
Sands snagged second and
Damianos picked up anoth-
er third placement. Overall,:
Martinborough was second
with a score of 10 points,
Sands was third also with 10
points and Damianos settled
for fourth with 19 points.
Sands, who recently fin-
ished second at the 2009
Bahamas National Sunfish
Championship, was also the
top junior over four others.
He and four other juniors
(Donico Brown,Brent Bur-
rows II, Michael Holowesko
and Torrington Cartwright)
used this Regatta as a tune
up for the 2009 Sunfish

International Junior Cham-
pionship (October 15-17) to
be hosted by the NYC on
Montague Bay. A number
of senior sailors, such as
Martinborough, also used
this Regatta as a tune up for

‘the 39 th Sunfish World

Championship (October 16-
24) to be hosted by the NYC
on Montague Bay. ae
As’ for: the’ McCoy broth-
ers, Leé outdid Matthew this

year and finished eighth :
overall while Matthew fin- :

ished 11 th. Last year
Matthew finished two spots
ahead of his brother. Lee
noted that this Memorial
Regatta helps carry on his
father's (Terry) legacy.

“I remember my. day
always being involved with
regattas as it relates to orga-

nizing, sailing and assisting :
with the Junior and World :
Championships. He was not :
really a sailor but always :

promoted my brother and I } ae

when it came to sailing. ; CTs going into the playoffs, .

Overall the turnout was ; Johnson noted that “we just
g : have to go out there and play

On arelated note, the late ; the game of softball like we

Mack Knowles Junior Sail- | know how too.

ing Club,based in Long }

Island, was well represent- ; &S played like they were on

ed by Cartwright and junior ; 4 mission as they took a 2-1

Knowles ; advantage in their head-to-

according to the Regatta ; head matchup against the

i Stingrays, winning the last
~. For additional sailing } tw after losing their first
results from the 2009 Terry ; ¢ncounter.
McCoy Memorial Regatta :

log onto ; each of the first four innings

http://www.bahamassail- : until they got the bases

ing.org/results/sunfish_tmc20 : loaded with two out in the

? fifth after Johnson was inten-

good,” said Lee.

sailor Travis

Committee.

09. htm.

FROM page nine |

Thursday night, the Truck-

The Truckers:scored in

Truckers

tionally walked to join
Richard Bastian (hit by a
pitch) and Orlando McPhee

(singled). -

That brought up shortstop
Marvin ‘Tougie’ Wood, who
produced a fly ball to right
field that enabled Bastian to
race home with the walk off
game ending run.

The Stingrays scored first
in the top of the inning on
two unearned runs from
Andy Percentie and Byron
Ferguson.

But their lead was short
lived as the Truckers came

RHESASE
CEng
ey aves
CK

back in the bottom of the

frame and Martin Burrows:
Jr. blasted a three-run shot.

for a 3-2 lead. .

They put another on the
scoreboard in the second as
Bastian led off with a single
and eventually caught a ride
home on Wood’s RBI sacri-
fice fly.

With the bases loaded in
the third, the Stingrays man-
aged to get two more runs
from Greg Burrows Jr. and
Geron Sands on a wild pitch

from Truckers’ starting pitch-

er Indigo Knowles.

After giving up a walk to
James Clarke, manager Perty
Seymour came out of the
dugout and_ replaced



Knowles on the mound with
Anton ‘Bookie’ Gibson, who
closed the door on the
Stingrays, shutting them
down the rest of the game. =

The Truckers continued to
roll along as they produced
four more runs in the third;
highlighted by Bastian’s two=
run single. Both Bastian and
McPhee then scored on a
wild pitch from losing pitcher
Ryan Major. :

In the fourth, Commando
Security got two unearned
runs from Steven ‘Slugger?
Brown and pinch runner Ter=
ran ‘Pooch’ Wood to extend
their lead to 10-4 to set the
stage for the abbreviation in

the fifth.



NEVIS, WEST INDIES ’- While
‘cycling enthusiasts from around the
worid gathered in Mendrisio, Switzer-
land, last month for the 2009 Men’s
and Women’s Road Cycling World
Championships, a gutsy team from ‘the
small dual-island nation of St Kitts &
Nevis composed of Kathryn Bertine,
Monica Ceccon, Reggie Douglas and
James Weekes were among the com-
petitors at'this ultimate challenge.

. To everyone’s delight, they soon -

became the media darlings of the event
held in the beautiful lake country on
the Swiss-Italian border.

Unlikely heroes, the team, all resi-
dents of Nevis, plus their coach -and
Vice President of St Kitts & Nevis
Cycling Federation Winston Crooke
and Technical Manager Amanda

Chavez, were the toast of the town after -

articles about their Cinderella journey
from Nevis to Switzerland came out in
French, Canadian, Norwegian, Swiss
and Italian media outlets including the
Gazzetta Dello Sport newspaper, the
most prestigious sporting publication
in the region.

What’s more, the main Swiss news
television channel ran a two-minute
segment on the St Kitts & Nevis team
seen by 7.5 million people. Monica was
a familiar face, as she is originally from



Castiglione Alona, a town in Italy about
15 km away from Mendrisi, and many
journalists remember her from her days
asa pro rider in Italy.

The experience for the St Kitts &
Nevis cycling team was made possible
by local resident, Oscar Petroboni and
his family, who graciously hosted the
athletes in Switzerland with generous
support from the team’s sponsor, Bio-
Sport/FLY, a new sports hydration
drink.

Reggie and James cycled in the
men’s time trials finishing 65th and

.66th respectively. While not fast

enough for a spot in the final competi-
tion, both men were pleased with their
performance and thrilled to be among
racing’s elite at the prestigious world
championship.

The Canadian Cycling News noted:
“The athletes from St Kitts & Nevis
received the loudest support.” To this,
James commented, “On the way up
the hills, the sound was
deafening.” Kathryn and Monica fin-
ished 37th and 41st respectively in their
time trials, which allowed them to com-
pete in the 130 km women’s racing

finale. While they fought hard to stay -

with the main peloton, in the end, both
were forced to withdraw along with
some 71 other competitors out of the

field of 127 women. Kathryn summed
it.up saying, “I gave it everything.”

The experience for,the St Kitts &
Nevis cycling team was made possible
by Oscar Petroboni and his family, who
graciously hosted the athletes in
Switzerland with generous support
from the team’s sponsor,. Bio-
Sport/FLY, a new sports hydration
drink.

& Nevis team stood on the podium
during the medal ceremony, they were
all champions in their own right.

From the time they arrived until the
trip home, they were asked to pose for
photos, interviews, sign autographs and
were warmly applauded on and off the
racecourse.

They even had the chance to meet
former world champion and Italian
cycling hero Paulo Bettini, who posed
for a photo with Reggie and James.
Reggie summed up his emotions say-
ing: “I was overwhelmed to be at the
World Championships, among good
friends, good people, and to be a part
of such a huge event, amongst athletes
I have admired over the years, like
Fabian Cancellara and Paulo Bettini. I
would also like to thank FLY and the
SKN Cycling Federation for making
all this possible.” “i

In the end, while none of the St Kitts

“It was a wonderful experience for
all concerned. A very tough time trial
course simulated very well the kind of
speeds required during a triathlon bike
leg. Iam sure this will jumpstart their
bike training for the annual Nevis
Triathlon in March next year”, stated

ASHE’
egAAHye

Ce
SANA



SS SSS

ST KITTS & Nevis composed of Kathryn Bertine, Monica Ceccon, Reggie

Crooke.

For more information on the World
Championships, the Nevis Triathlon
and information about the SKN
Cycling Federation and the Nevis Cycle
Club, please visit http:/Avww.neviscy-
cleclub.com



Douglas and James Weekes soon became the media darlings of the event
for the 2009 Men’s and Women’s Road Cycling World Championships.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT






JL (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

J ee a cee ee —




















































































Seeley ON ee Ey eG sea aay eu ETS Marine FORECAST
cara ~ Sel ace stale, oe | : WF Se Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High = =Low W NASSAU Today: SSW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
Ramis i Fe UF Sunday: ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 84° F
‘Acapulco’ 93/33 79/26 pe. 93/83 78/25 S FREEPORT Today: WNW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
ey Dae sh. he can sh Sunday: __ Eat 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 84° F
: : el “Ankara, Turkey PC : pc’ ABACO Today: SW at 7-14 Knots 2-4 Feet 83° F
Variable clouds with Partly cloudy with a Partly sunny, a couple of Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny witha = * Partly sunny. : _The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens _ 83/28 68/20 sh_ 79/26 67/19 s Hae ; E at 3-6 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 83° F
thunderstorms. passing shower. tstorms. possible. shower possible. oreater.the need for eye and skin protection. eee oe ao ee sophe a sei : Z
High: 89° High: 87° High: 88° High: 90° ss Sate : 32 olen
ee : I . . 3 ‘Barbados 86/30 77/25 sh ~~ 86/30 78/25 -sh 0
High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° | __ Low: 78°__ | __ Low: 79° __Low: 78° EP ES 7121 59/18 § erraniaemm TODAY S U.S. FORECAST
SPST erica Gr eet Beeler nett yee iemc le perigee a (CTE Tpit iret Mester tials neste: ——— 75/23 52/1 -75/23-48/8 f
107° F a id SOS UE a2 (92°-86° F 95°-84° F 100°-91° F_ Ee 80/26 72/22s . 78/25 73/22 s ?
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature’ is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:44a.m. 3.2 12:35am. 0.6 i -. 679 45/7 pc 74/23 53/115 Bon, ; RS Bee kus RRS
: elevation on.the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. - : 6:59 p.m. 3.0 1:01-p.m. 0.6 Berlin 55/12 43/6 ¢ 5713. 41/5 sh. Z I a = E8383) SSSS8 88888
ALMANAG = Sunday (22am, 33 10am. O4 Bermuda’ 93/28 75/23 s - 81/27: 72/22 t fee a Ley
- 7:37 p.m. 3.0 1:42 p.m. 0.4 Bogota 66/18 46/7 sh 66/18 46/7 + Y Ba qe =
Statistics are for Nassau through. 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 800am. 34 1:45 a.m. 0.3 - Brussels 3 6317. «48/8 ec -SSsC«S O/T G/T pc } RSS 3 eZ ‘ .
ABACO Temperature 8:15 p.m. 2.9 2:23p.m. 0.4 Budapest 63/17- 45/7 s 70/21 aN 8 g .
és Hight? sisse aie Sh aicisenst davis sees 88° F/31° C ; : Buenos Aires =~ 73/22 54/12 s 77/25 5s as
High: 87° F/31°C ie 75° Fio4e¢. Twasday ea OS Sie ae alos 3 92/33 71/21 s 95/35 70/21 s vee
Normal Righ ouc......sssscsssssestecsssssseeeee 86° F/30° C : oO Calcutta 92/33 82/27 sh 89/31 82/27 sh Ne
Normal OW ou... eee eeecececeeteeeeeteeeeeeeeee 74° F/23° C Calgary 39/3 25/-3 r 37/2 25/-3 ¢ We
Last year's High .occsccsescssssssssssssseue ae’ F/31°C. PSE Ti WY fatty Cancun x . 90/32 73/22 pc —«-89/31.—- 74/23 pc we
High:88°F/31°C | : Last year's 1OW on... 76° F/25° C Ba Fe Caracas 83/28 74/23 r 82/27: 73/22 t tee
Low:73°F/23°G LE Za Ze - Precipitation Sunrise ..... -7:03. a.m. Moonrise ....6:24p.m. Casablanca. 78/25 6116s: 82/27 60/15 s- =e
Zan As of 2 p.m. yesterday . 0.08" Sunset, 6:55 p.m. Moonset ..... 6:23 a.m. Copenhagen 5713 49/9 + 56/13 43/6 sh ros
Year to date 31.51" : j _ New Dublin 57/13. 43/6-sh 55/12 — 41/5 pe Re,
High: 87° F/31°C Normal year to date . 38.90" Frankfurt 63/17 48/8 pe B1M6 45/7 ¢ :
Low: 73° F/23° C Geneva. 67/19 45/7 s 67/19 52/11 s :
- AccuWeather.com Halifax «BONS ABT s 510 45/7 6 :
Forecasts and graphics provided by eo aes S en is ne : a pie s a :
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 18 elsinkl = : io SN od fet TF
ELEUTHERA HongKong =—i( High:89°F/32°C Islamabad 103/39 68/20 s 96/35 68/20 s . .
: - Anke Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
Low: 77° F/25°C 4stanbul’ g “71/21. 67/19 c — 80/26 65/18 r eee ;
: precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Jerusalem 85/29 61/16 s 88/29 60/15 s Forecast hiohiGir serepersnaes are joraelected cities.
Johannesburg 71/21. 542 t= 58/14 51/10 sh Sa sient
Kingston 88/31 79/26 sh 87/30 79/26 sh ; 4
. 5 6 CAT ISLAND Lima. ee 76/24 60/15 's 75/23 59/5 s
High: 89° F/32°C High: 87°F/31°C London 63/17 48/8 sh 6116 46/7 pc
Low: 78° F/26 = Low:74° F/23°C Madrid B17 542s = 79/26-57/13 pe
: Manila 85/29 77/25 6 - 86/30 77/25 sh
ee GPR6 STS 1 79/26. S73 t
s - ; Monterrey ———_-93/83-_73/22 t 97/36 73/22
‘ace rore eat wore aur ts suo aig
Ta erEDICE Munich = ti (sti(té‘i«ét BAS pS 4B
i ' ' : irobi 13..¢
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's AUN " NAICODI mses ol 9/26. S6N3 87/80... 57/13.
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C New Delhi ~ 96/35 75/23 s 84/28 73/22 t
Low: 76° F/24°C Oslo 48/8 39/3 r 46/7 36/2 c
Paris iM 66/18 48/8 pe. —- 63/17. 52/11 pc
Prague 60/15 45/7 ¢ 216 46/7 pc
Rio de Janeiro 84/28 72/22 pc 80/26 72/22 ¢
= Riyadh 98/36 69/20s 95/35 6518s = | ee
a oe ; : i ; ‘ROME. ee 76/24. 57/4138 8 73/22 573 s~ E : us : #3
Sunes Today aie Sunday MAYAGUANA St.Thomas... 89/31. 78/25.pc __. 89/31._78/25 po easy knowing
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High:89°F/32°C — ‘San Juan 88/31 54/12 pe 94/34 53/11 pc nave excellent iIMsurance
FIC FIC FIC FIC FC FIC FIC F/G FC FIC Fe FG Low: 75° F/24°C Shane supaaectnines He aye te a te ti : . Cov e no matter which
Albuquerque 75/23 51/10 s 77/25 53/11 pe Indianapolis 6417 45/7 ¢ 65/18 48/8 -s Philadelphia 74/23. 60/15 -t- = 76/24 54/12 pe > meee , Seeua : ae j ‘ cq.
Anchorage 48/8 40/4 c 50/10 39/3 c Jacksonville 86/30 62/16 c 84/28 64/17 pc Phoenix 92/33 73/22 pe 91/32 67/19 t. CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Se Oe ra S500 fe cso f EG TOR, St way Ue wind blows.
Atlanta 78/25 SIMO po 76/24 55/12 pc Kansas City 6417 44/6 pc 68/20 5512 pc Pittsburgh 68/20 46/7 pc | «6116 44/6 pc ° RAGGEDISLAND. Tigh:92'F/s3°c ae nr eae Aas e pelea sia : - oe 2
Atlantic City 74/23 5110 t 75/23 50/10 pc Las Vegas 86/30 61/16 s 80/26 58/14 pc - Portland,OR 61/16 46/7 c 62/16 45/7 pe High: 88° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°G eee eoocue eeeoeiee : Nobody does it better.
Baltimore 75/23 53/11 + 75/23 52/11 pc Little Rock 80/26 54/12 s 66/18 59/15 oF Raleigh-Durham. 82/27 52/11 -pe 81/27 52/11. -s Low: 74° F/23°C : ; 64/17 57/43 66/18 57/13 sh : : oS “4
Boston: 69/20 57/13 + 70/21 5512 + Los Angeles 72/22 58/14 pc 68/20 56/13 pc _ St. Louis. 66/18 48/8 pc. 71/21 51/10 pec ; int aioe 7906 sh aeao 7s .- 8 : -
Buffalo. - 65/18 47/8 c 60/15 46/7 pc Louisville 70/21 49/9 pe 71/21 51/10 s Salt Lake City 68/20 42/5 pe 54/12 38/3 sh GREAT INAGUA f es, 73/22 66/18 t 75/23 66/18 po | 3 — ain :
Charleston, SC 84/28 58/14 pc 84/28 59/15 pc Memphis 76/24 56/13 s 73/22 6015 sh SanAntonio 80/26 70/21 t 91/32 76/24 t High: 92° F/33°C : Noront ne aa ch SAG seine : e MANAGEMENT
Chicago 55/12 45/7 sh 60/15 42/5 pe Miami 88/31 77/25 t 90/32 79/26 pc San Diego 70/21 63/17 pe 65/18 60/15- sh Low. 79° F/26°C a: ed 7/36 72/22 5 -. 99/37 73/22'5 | = = .
Cleveland 62/16 47/8 sh 60/15 46/7 pc Minneapolis 54/12 38/3 c 58/14 42/5 pc SanFrancisco 67/19 51/10 pc 68/20 51/10 pc tS Vancouver 2 6016 aa ne ses aes HAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Dallas 76/24 64/17 +r 74/23 71/21 + Nashville 76/24 49/9 s 72/22 52/1 s ~ Seattle - 58/14. 45/7 pe 61/16 44/6 pc Vienna: 62/16 51/10 s 50/10 s_ Abaco Eleuthera Exune
Denver — 63/17 35/1 $s 63/17 43/6 pe New Orleans 80/26 71/21 t 80/26 74/23 t _ Tallahassee 85/29 60/15 t 83/28 63/17 pc Warsaw BOL 41/5, pe = 49/5 sh pit Tek (2 are at hue 67 othe chy 336-2304
Detroit 58/14 47/8 sh 62/16 46/7 pc New York 67/19 S915 t 75/23 59/15 pe Tampa 89/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 pe Winnipeg 52/11 36/2 pe 40/4 po dS weak oda } (242) (282)
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 pe 86/30 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 75/23 54/12 s 71/21 59/15 pc ‘Tucson 84/28 68/20 t 85/29 65/18 t on Weather (W): s- -party cloudy, :¢-cloudy -sh:showers. t-thunder- 7 a RL ES a r
Houston... 84/28 72/22 t 86/30 74/23 .t Orlando 89/31 69/20 t 91/32 71/21 pc — Washington, DC 76/24 53/11 r 74/23: 54/12" « pe ain: (WE) 8 sunty.6 party cloudy, .e coud ate



storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2009 . THE TRIBUNE
royUn my Wool aan

oo Ue | | ee ree ee

jaeress louey Ay Comers’ ©uiee on Thursdays has become somewhat of a party institution
in Nassau. The club is packed every Thursday with a party crowd ready to “brukk out” and have a
crazy time. DJ Pain, DJ Xcitement and various other Dus play the latest in hip hop and dancehall
music, keeping the patrons partying until the wee hours. At Charlie’s you just have to dress ready Pc “

io party, no designer gear necessary to impress - if you want to impress make sure you know the Py We fen ACG
latest dance moves though. At ae eas ;

Admission is free for ladies, so you know the girls will be out in full force every week. Charlie’s is jose es icy We VGN
one of Nassau’s most established clubs and a party spot for locals and tourists alike. It is also a
popular club for concerts, and last Sunday it was the venue for a show by none other than Charly
Black,

Charly Black is one of the hottest new dancehall acts coming out of Jamaica, and the Spintech
Crew brought Charly to the Bahamas for the first time. With three shows, in Abaco, Freeport and
\lassau, Charly has the whole Bahamas “money dreaming” by now. The show at Charlie’s on
Sunday ‘had a good turn-out and the ladies in particular were ready to see the dancehall star live
on stage. Opening for Charly were Bahamian artists Bain. Town Bois, Bahama Boys and Apollo _
re-ed, and just after 3am the man himself went on stage. He delivered a great performance, also
getting some lucky ladies from the audience involved. Charly performed all of his hit songs such
as “Money Dreama’, “Rich This Year”, “Gone To Soon”, “Nuh New Friend”, “Nuh Tell Nuh Lie”
and, “Buddy”.

For more photos of a night at Charlie’s Club see The Tribune website at www.tribune242.com.

stein ieein eanaqt e iahfes g uae tag A ace aM asad satis











Recording artists Bahama Boys
strike a pose at Charlie’s.





Recording artists The Bain Town
Bois Chill at Charlie’s. °























100 JAMZ DJs
Xcitement and
Blacks with a friend.











Gage
AND COOL

Al CHARLIE’S



LOCAL reggae ‘
artist Irate flashes: a
“peace Signi. .u. .-



Dancehall reggae super star Charly
Black with Heike.

Fleike Wollenweber
International Publicist heike.axes@gmail.com
Intemational media and airplay, www.myspace.comiaxesmagazine .

representing artists, producers, Bahamas 242 428 412
labels, promoters and selectasidjs. Jamaica 876 377 5029

SSG

oes Wie hag
= AP Re ENA MeN
sen “hse SKE ieee EON

YAY;
dette
, ist

VERA

USS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENUKX4FG5_QOESZR INGEST_TIME 2012-01-27T17:28:06Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01434
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES