Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE .
FOR $3.79

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HIGH S6F
LOW TIF

© MOSTLY SUNNY,
~~ STRAY T-STORM

ANY



Volume: 105 No.260




Sales ‘firepower’
to ensure
SHH SSI:

Lr)

ime to ‘chang
justice System

Legal experts speak
out as Britain dumps j@
the Privy Council

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WITH Britain formally abandoning the Privy Council as its
final court of appeal local legal experts again argued the need
for the Bahamas to seek a regional alternative to the council
within the next decade.

In an historical move, Britain's highest court was taken over
by its first Supreme Court after 11 justices were sworn in at a
London ceremony yesterday.

SEE page six

High drama in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THERE were tense
moments in the high profile
attempted extortion trial of ex-
PLP senator Pleasant Bridge-





water and former ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne yes-
terday during cross-examina-
tion of a key prosecution wit-
ness.

The courtroom drama cli-
maxed yesterday afternoon
when a visibly displeased
Senior Justice Anita Allen rose
from the bench for several min-

utes after attorney Murrio
Ducille questioned: “Am I
going to be muzzled in my
cross-examination?”

US attorney Michael
McDermott, who represents
actor John Travolta, 55, was the

SEE page eight



The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, See 2, 2009

=

under aged girl was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Constable Dwight

Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane on the
charge of having sexual inter-

SEE page six

TALS Ur

a

Williamson, 33, of Nassau Vil-
lage was arraigned before Chief







Policeman charged
with under age sex

A POLICE officer charged
with having intercourse with an | |

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DWIGHT WILLIAMSON
leaving court yesterday.



VINCENT LLOYD FERGUSON’S widow Mary Ferguson is comforted by her son, Alex Ferguson (right). Behind is her daughter Anne Marie. The
funeral took place yesterday at St Francis Xavier Cathedral in West Hill Street. Mr Ferguson, a Bahamian sporting icon and school principal,
died on September 23 aged 71. MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2. SEE ALSO FRONT OF SPORTS SECTION

Murder trial suspended as accused | Claims Govtis failing

FINS
RMI CCL

ALAWSUIT
has been filed in
the Supreme
Court accusing
talk show host
Steve McKinney (pictured)
and GEMS Radio of slan-
der.

The writ was filed by 7ri-
bune columnist and public
school teacher Adrian Gib-
son, with whom Mr MckK-
inney had engaged in a

SEE page eight



piro

Available eochuslwely at

Madero Shopp

receives psychiatric tests in hospital

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Officers who went to collect Wilfred McPhee
Jr from his holding cell before court yesterday morning were in
for a big surprise.

The murder trial in the Supreme Court had to be suspended
and McPhee taken to hospital for psychiatric evaluation after
he smeared faeces on the walls of his cell and claimed he was
crazy.

An ambulance and fire truck were summoned to the Garnet
Levarity Justice Centre just before court proceedings were
scheduled to begin at 10am.

McPhee, 26, was restrained and taken out on a stretcher by

SEE page six

mr Pe reo oe



NASSAU AND BAHAM

[ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

to pay bills are denied

FNM Chairman Johnley
Ferguson denied claims that
Government is failing to pay
its contractors and suppliers
“on a timely basis.”

Bradley Roberts, a former
PLP MP and party chairman,
told a meeting of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau yester-
day that he has been informed
that Government is “strug-
gling to meet its obligations.”

He told Rotarians: “Con-
tractors and suppliers are not

SEE page six





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Christian Council calls for more religious education

THE Bahamas Christian Council is calling for
a national re-examination of the church’s Chris-
tian education efforts.

According to the BCC, the number of reli-
gious education programmes existing in the coun-
try is diminishing — and where they do exist,
teachers are often “ill-prepared.”

This “lack of formal teaching of Bible doc-
trine” to children can be linked to rising crime, the
breakdown of the traditional family structure,
and general social unrest, claims the council.
“This is a time for the church to stand up and
bring some level of resolution to the national cri-
sis in the Bahamas.”

“As Bahamians, our social lives in particular
have been modified, reduced, and changed over
the past 10 to 20 years and as a result we have wit-

nessed a significant change, both in the spiritual
and social life in our country.

“Consequently, over the last two years, our
lives have been drastically altered,” the BCC said
in a statement.

Transforming

The BCC said the Bahamas needs a “spiritual
overhaul”, and pastors must be empowered to
“revolutionise” their membership, with the ulti-
mate effect of transforming society.

The council lamented that over the “last 10 to
20 years, 20 per cent of our traditional churches’
Sunday schools and Christian education pro-
grammes have grown weak” while 50 per cent

A ee ee Ce ee

FAREWELL TO
VINCENT

FERGUSON

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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of churches do not have a formal or systematic
teaching of Bible doctrine.

“Over the last 20 or so years, 40 per cent of our
local churches find it difficult to recruit commit-
ted persons to teach Sunday schools.

“The necessary vitality and substance that are
needed to bring a level of stability to our nation’s
youth are missing in the spiritual development of
the next generation.

“Tf the truth be told, there is a lack of inspira-
tion from the pulpit that inspires members of the
congregation to live a life of self-sacrifice and
highlight the importance of integrity; how to love
your neighbour as yourself, and the eternal values
and destiny of man. All this and more should be
passed to the emerging generation,” said the
BCC.






The council suggested that 65 per cent of all
Bahamians “do not know nor do they under-
stand the need for theology.”

Meanwhile, 40 per cent of modern churches in
the Bahamas built their facilities with “no con-
sideration for Christian education or Sunday
schools”, said the council.

“Can all of this contribute to the National Child
Council’s report in 2008 which indicated that
there were 721 cases of child abuse reported in
our country?”

The BCC said that as the “church is restored
the nation will experience a level of social and
economic comfort.”

The church “was, is, and will continue to be the
spiritual, moral and ethical strength of all soci-
eties,” it added.



POLITICIANS walk past the
coffin as they pay their last
respects to Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson.

i Hl
Us
ae tay
Hem ar ay]

Design/Build Teams are invited to submit proposals to construct a
new bridge carrying the Grand Bahama Highway over the Lucayan
Waterway near Freeport, on the island of Grand Bahama.

PRE-QUALIFICATION FOR BRIDGE DESIGN/BUILD CONTRACT

SCOPE OF WORK: ‘The project limits will consist of approximately one
half (1/2) mile of roadway, a bridge over the Lucayan Waterway Canal and
the extension of the existing seawall bulkheads along both sides of the
canal. The intent is for the bridge to span across the Lucayan Waterway
with no piers or marine fenders in the Lucayan Waterway.

BB This bridge is intended to be a four (4) lane facility
(2 Eastbound and 2 Westbound Lanes).

ER The Sidewalk facility should have two (2) lookout points, spaced
approximately fifty (50) feet apart (to overlook the canal).

The work also includes the reconstruction of the approach roadways
eastbound and westbound to the bridge and connection to the existing
four (4) lane divided Grand Bahama Highway beyond the project limits.

INTERESTED DESIGN/BUILD TEAMS MUST SUBMIT INFORMATION O%
THEIR TECHNICAL AND FINANCIAL COMPETENCE FOR QUALIFICATION,

NiO) LATER THAN

FRIDAY OCTOBER 9TH 2009"

MR. DUDLEY FRANCIS
SENIOR PROJECT ENGINEER

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED

Southern Ridge Building

PO. BOX F-42666

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island
Tel: (242) 350-9156

Fax: (242) 351-3473

E-mail: dfrancis@gbpa.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3



Ne a Ohm LO us

Police in
$400,000
drug bust

POLICE apprehended four
men after seizing almost
$400,000 worth of marijuana in
a major drug bust on Exuma.

Acting on a tip, Exuma
police, along with officers of
the Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV), went to Williams Town
at 1lam on Wednesday where
they discovered 100 crocus
sacks containing marijuana near
the shoreline.

A 55-year-old Eleuthera
man was arrested near the dis-

covery site. Officers also found
a 45 handgun with seven live
rounds of ammunition.

Not long after the drug
seizure, police apprehended
three men on a go-fast boat at
the eastern end of New Provi-
dence. It is believed that these
men may have been involved
in the Exuma operation.

The drugs weighed 3,935
pounds and have a local street
value of just under $400,000.

Investigations continue.

Banking transparency
move wins backing

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOVE towards more
transparency in international
banking has been welcomed by
the financial services sector as it
should help mitigate tax haven
concerns leading large banks to
pull out of the Bahamas.

An Amendment to the Crim-
inal Justice International Co-
operation Act tabled in parlia-
ment on Wednesday will
remove restrictions on the types
of offences for which fiscal
information can be shared.

And local banking bosses are
pleased by the move towards
greater transparency in inter-
national banking as it will dispel
the fears of the wealthy G20
countries that the Bahamas is
hiding tax-evaders.

In April of this year, the
Bahamas was included on the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development’s
(OECD) grey list of countries
that do not fully comply with
their international regulations.

Pressure

And last week CEO of
French banking giant BNP
Paribas, Baudouin Prot,
announced the bank will pull
out of Nassau by year end. It is
speculated the bank bowed to
political pressure under French
President Nikolas Sarkozy, and
the fear is other international
banks will follow.

This amendment is only one
of many steps to ensure bank-
ing in the Bahamas is compliant
with international standards.

Minister of Finance Zhivargo
Laing called the move by BNP
Paribas “regrettable” and said
he has been working feverishly
to meet the standards set by the
OECD, including the minimum
requirement to sign 12 Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEA) with other coun-
tries. Former Minister of State
for Finance James Smith said
the Bill to “remove the caveat
on the types of offences for
which assistance can be given,
so that a request which relates
to fiscal offences is no longer
excluded and can be enter-

O In brief

Police car
chase victims
identified

THE two men who died in a
horrific crash following a high-
speed police chase on Wednes-
day have been identified as 20-
year-old Daehn Bowe of
Hawthorne Road and 21-year-
old Dario Bain of Mount Pleas-
ant Village.

The men died at the scene
on John F Kennedy Drive
around 3am after their car, a
grey 2003 Nissan Sentra,
crashed into a utility pole near
Lake Cunningham, “cutting the
vehicle in half,” police said.

Police first became suspicious
of the Nissan on Fire Trail
Road because the car did not
have the necessary inspection
certificates. Attempts were
made to stop the car, which
police believed may have been
stolen. The vehicle with its
occupants sped off at a high
speed. There was a chase which
ended on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve when the driver of the Nis-
san lost control and hit a utility
pole on the side of the road.
Both men were thrown from
the mangled car and were pro-
nounced dead an the scene by
emergency medical personnel.

tained under the act,” will allow
for freer information exchange
between countries when there
is no TIEA in place.

Mr Smith said: “The OECD
is serious about what they’re
doing so they’re calling the
shots, and if we want to stay in
the game we have got to com-
ply with their rules.

“The whole idea is to put the
Bahamas back on an equal
footing with the other jurisdic-
tions in terms of its regime for
information exchange and
transparency, and ultimately,
to be placed on the list of coun-
tries that are totally compliant
with international rules.”

Bank of the Bahamas man-
aging director Paul McWeeney
also welcomes the move, but
said the government must be
careful to rise to regulatory
standards while still retaining
a degree of confidentiality.

He said: “Anything to do
with transparency within the
financial sector is always viewed
positively internationally, and
I imagine these pieces of legis-
lation are intended to improve
the standards of the financial
services sector so we conform
to the new world order.”

WORK CONTINUES at Arawak Cay, where the gov-
ernment has decided to relocate the container port.
There is also a harbour dredging project in progress.

‘no threat to environment’

ROUTINE tests have revealed
that the work around Arawak Cay
has not disturbed the sea floor
enough to create a threat to the
environment, the government
claims.

According to the Environmen-
tal Monitoring and Risk Assess-
ment Division (EMRAD) of the
Department of Environmental
Health Services, the level of tur-
bidity at Arawak Cay and the sur-
rounding areas is well below the
recommended limit of 29 neph-
elometric turbidity units (ntu).

EMRAD said its tests were
based on samples collected from
Orange Hill, The Caves, Dela-

that it is important to remember
that turbidity occurs as a result of
both natural and man-made caus-
es. “In open water, phytoplankton
is a major source of turbidity, but

closer to shore, suspended parti-

porte, Sandyport, Cable Beach,

Goodman’s Bay, Go Slow Bend,
Saunders’
Cay. The government is currently
dredging the harbour to facilitate
access to the world’s largest cruise
ships. Meanwhile, work is contin-
uing at Arawak Cay, where the
container port is to be relocated.

Beach and Arawak

Turbidity refers to how murky

water is. High turbidity levels can
reduce the amount of light reach-
ing lower depths and thereby
inhibit the development of marine
life, particularly shellfish.
EMRAD’s statement noted



cles may be the result of shore-
line erosion, re-suspension of bot-
tom sediments and wastewater dis-
charges,” the statement said.
“Weather patterns also contribute
to the turbidity experienced in
near-shore waters. With heavy
rain, soil and other sediment may
run off into coastal areas, and with
ocean swells bottom sediments are
easily re-suspended in the water
column.”

The statement said it is to be
expected that the ongoing harbour
dredging project would contribute
to the turbidity in surrounding
areas. However, it said, turbidity
levels at all sampled sites were
only slightly higher than in previ-
ous months when there was no
dredging activities going on.

“EMRAD has been conducting
coastal and marine monitoring
since 1991, and thus has a com-
prehensive history of coastal con-
ditions which it draws upon for
comparison and analysis,” the
statement said.

UK filmmakers uiven chance to shoot Family Island film in Bahamas

TALENTED British film-
makers have been invited to
apply for the once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to spend two weeks
in the Bahamas shooting a
short film about one of 14 Fam-
ily Islands.

The 14 Island Films Chal-
lenge was launched by leading
British director Bharat Nalluri
yesterday to start a six month
search for 14 aspiring and pro-
fessional film-makers in the UK
to visit 14 Bahama Islands for
14 days, and produce 14 short
films.

There also will be the chance
to win a grand prize of £14,000
and state-of-the-art camera
equipment.

The Bahamas Tourist Office,
supporting the campaign, will
use the films to promote the
Bahamas.

Mr Nalluri and a panel of
judges, including deputy direc-
tor general of the Bahamas
Tourist Office Tommy Thomp-
son, will select the 14 lucky win-
ners who will work with the
finest producers in the indus-
try, and have their work aired

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Use your e-card to reserve tickets at S60-3549 or visit us at
www. bahamasiocal.com



at a prestigious
red carpet event
at the British
Academy of
Film and Tele-



vision Arts
(BAFTA) in
Bharat March 2010. _
Nalluri To partici-
pate in the chal-

lenge, Britain’s
rising directors are required to
submit a 500 word treatment
on an inspirational person from
their local community and

explain why they should be
chosen.

Judges will then select
around 40 candidates to submit
a short film based on their
treatment, and 14 finalists will
be selected. All entries will be
available for viewing on the
challenge website:

(www.14islandsfilmchal-
lenge.co.uk).

The short-listed filmmakers
will take inspiration from the
warmth of the Bahamian peo-
ple to tell inspiring stories

They will be encouraged to
show the islands in their own
way and demonstrate their cre-
ativity and individuality through
their final cut.

ED BO sie
A La
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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

China zooms ahead in 60th celebrations

NEW YORK — This week, the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China celebrated its 60th
anniversary with a huge display of pomp
and precision in the capital city of Bei-
jing. The road that the world’s most pop-
ulous nation has travelled since Mao
Zedong’s revolution in 1949 is nothing
short of remarkable — from an isolated,
impoverished country to the planet’s sec-
ond-largest economy with corresponding
international power.

If one seeks a measure of the transfor-
mation that China has achieved in just a
lifetime, one need only witness the mixture
of hope and apprehension that attends its
present and future moves on the world
stage.

The long march from then to now has
not been smooth or steady. When your
reporter first visited China in 1972, as part
of the White House press corps covering
President Richard Nixon’s historic visit,
life in the country’s rural areas seemed
— aside from the trains that ran through
them — not much removed from the Mid-
dle Ages. And China in the early 1970s
was mostly rural.

Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution,
along with other of his totalitarian policies
and edicts, was disastrous for his country
and exacted a terrible price on China’s
people. Years later, the Tiananmen
Square protests and their brutal repression
represented another national trauma that
threatened the existence and future of
China as we know it.

It is important, as with all nations where
the citizens do not have a say, to differ-
entiate China, the state, from its people.
From Tiananmen, from the protests of
mothers and fathers grieving over the loss
of their children in schoolhouse collapses
during last year’s Sichuan earthquake,
from the protests of Uighurs and Tibetans
and any number of other attempts to
break free of government suppression and
censorship — it is apparent that the Chi-
nese people desire a greater share of free-
dom and self-expression than their gov-
ernment allows them.

But a case could be made that the Chi-
nese government’s ability to act without

regard to political factions or popular sup-
port is precisely what has given and con-
tinues to give the Chinese state an inter-
national edge in this era of more compe-
tent Chinese leadership. This is a nation
that can, by fiat, enact sweeping changes of
policy — as it has, recently, in aggressive-
ly pursuing the development of green tech-
nologies such as solar power and electric
cars. These are technologies that could
well position China to further develop
and augment its manufacturing and eco-
nomic strength in the century ahead.

The same autocratic approach has
enabled China to pursue economic and
fiscal policies that give it a position of seri-
ous leverage in regard to other nations,
including the U.S., given its holdings in
U.S. currency and treasury debt. At the
same time, China has thoroughly mod-
ernized a military that has never lacked
sheer manpower.

How the Chinese state will exercise its
economic and military muscle remains
one of the biggest and most important
questions in international relations.

In the midst of a conscious effort to
increase its international standing, Chi-
na’s positions on everything from Iran’s
nuclear programme to global climate
change figure to be crucial to how these
crises turn out.

Meanwhile, China continues to aggres-
sively pursue natural resources to drive
its economy, with an apparent disregard
for the regimes with which it does business
in places such as Africa and South Amer-
ica.

Sixty years on, the state founded by
Mao is strong beyond the imaginings of
those who witnessed its early years.

The Chinese people still yearn for basic
civil liberties. While some grow very
wealthy, the gulf between rich and poor
widens.

And the U.S. and its allies find the
future ever more dependent on the Chi-
nese state acting like a responsible global
citizen.

(This article was written by Dan Rather
— c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).

Govt actions
have inflamed.
casuarinas

controversy

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following this
passionate debate on the
removal of the casuarina trees
for the last couple of months.
While I have a problem with
the destruction of any living
tree the sad reality is that they
are invasive and are taking over
many of our islands, displacing
natural vegetation which pro-
vides food and shelter for our
wildlife to survive.

The fact that the govern-
ment chose to take out these
30 trees without recognising
and dealing with the impact of
the rest of the population of
casuarinas, in my mind was and
is a ridiculous move and one
which has served only to
inflame the public. Had the
government announced that
they would begin a systematic
regiment of their removal
across the Bahamas, and
explain why they had to go, I
don’t think there would have
been such an uproar. Instead
we had a bush whacking exer-
cise a few months ago where
armies of men and machines
indiscriminately hacked away
at anything and everything,
often leaving the casuarinas in
place.

T have to wonder if this issue
has inflamed so many because
it is a development which is “in
your face”, as many people
have to drive by and actually
see first hand what is going on.

letters@triobunemedia.net



This and much, much worse is
going on right now in New
Providence and all over our
Family Islands, but it is out of
sight and out of mind.

I find it unbelievable that
those calling for the protection
of the casuarina have not
uttered a word for the acres and
acres of native trees which are
destroyed daily and land left
completely white with not a
blade of grass on it.

Take a ride out west along
the coast and have a look at the
bare white land that exists in
our “business as usual
approach” to development. The
removal of trees on the coast
leads to silt runoff which ends
up in our oceans smothering
coral reefs which protect the
coastline.

Or, go further south and
have a look at the at least 200
plus acres of biodiversity lost
to the Albany golf course and
the Albany/Maillis marinas. Or
you can drive along the south-
ern side of the Airport Indus-
trial Park and see another cou-
ple of hundred acres flattened
and white for a shopping cen-
tre.

While I am encouraged by
the numbers of people who

have written about this, your
passion is desperately needed
elsewhere — lack of transparen-
cy, the need for an energy pol-
icy, destruction of our water
tables, destruction of coral
reefs, dredging for marinas
everywhere you turn, overfish-
ing, animal abuse, lack of plan-
ning, lack of a clear policy for
the environment, no freedom
of information act, no laws to
guide the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment, no National Devel-
opment Plan- just to name a
few.

As for the views to the sea
issue, and that the Orange Hill
Beach area’s replanting exer-
cise has left no view to the sea,
the reality is that in a natural
setting you would have to go
through the bush to see the sea.
The fact that roads were built
right next to the coastline have
afforded us these delightful but
“unnatural” views to the sea.
The beach dunes and vegeta-
tion are there to keep the sand
and build the beach. The
removal of the plants along the
beach would mean the sand
would disappear with every
storm, and then the beach
would become rock. So what is
it that we want? To drive by
and see the sea, or to have a
beach to enjoy?

SAM DUNCOMBE
reEarth,

Nassau,

September, 2009.

$5.8 million on Miss Universe — but
how much on catching criminals?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why doesn’t the Govern-
ment care about us?

$5.8 million was spent on
Miss Universe, but how much
is being spent to catch the
criminals running carefree on
New Providence? Unless
crime gets under control it
will not matter how much we
spend on attracting people to
The Bahamas, they will not
come!

A dark green Honda with
two occupants: one with
dreadlocks, one with short
hair, both slim build, number
plate (the number has been
given to the Commissioner of
Police) has been terrorising
the residents out East for the
last month that I know of.
The police cannot be serious

is currently a movement in
the community to put a boun-
ty on their heads just to get
these two menaces off the
street! What do we have to
do to get action?

Why aren’t the police and
politicians scared? Because
many of them have personal
protection.

Well, sirs and madams of
the government, I pay for that
protection and I want mine
too!

NYC was a city embalmed
in crime and it was not safe to
walk the streets only a decade

ago. How did they beat the
criminals? Why don’t we
accept help from those who
are more knowledgeable than
us because of experience?

Many Bahamians and resi-
dents with a choice will leave
if this continues...crying all the
way that I cannot live safely in
my own country! Help us
before it is too late to save
both tourism and your own
people!

CRIME
Nassau,
September, 2009.




Montagu walkers left in the dark






EDITOR, The Tribune.



about catching them! There As of Tuesday, September 22, 2009 the area around the



NOTICE

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES
AND CHARGES

Itishereby notified pursuant toregulation 4(10)
(b) of the Airport Authority (Amendment)
Regulations, 2009 that the Aijrport
Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of
September, 2009 imposed and or varied
fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as follows:

Aeronautical Fees

a) Landing Fees increase 23.6%

b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1%

c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%
d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1%

It is further notified that the said
imposition and or variation of Fees and
Charges shall take effect at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport ninety days

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA WILLIAMS of SOLDIER
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-1055, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Montagu which is used every morning by Bahamians who
are trying to keep fit, is in darkness due to all the street lights
in the area being out.

This seems to have happened when BEC was seen digging
a hole by the traffic light on the corner of the Montagu and
Village Road turn off. Today, Thursday, September 24,
2009 the hole was filled in and the lights were still out. All
of us who use this area during the early morning hours to
keep fit would appreciate all effects on the part of the
authorities to restore the lights.

JULIE PINDER
Nassau,
September 24s, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5



"It's the responsibility of the government and the Bahamian people have put the government there
to serve on their behalf that the Bahamian people have knowledge of what their government is doing.”

Ryan Pinder

Top tax attorney supports push | Wayne Legett

for Freedom of Information Act

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A PROMINENT tax attor-
ney threw his support behind
the efforts of Opposition
members who are pushing
government to introduce a
Freedom of Information Act.

Ryan Pinder, the Bahamas-
based attorney and represen-
tative for US law firm, Becker
Poliakoff, said it was the gov-
ernment's obligation to pro-
vide to its citizens the right to
see and understand the pro-
cedures of the administration.

He said that most of the
recent public uproar over gov-
ernment projects — the
dredging of Nassau Harbour,
the extension of Arawak Cay
and the proposed power plant
in Abaco — could have been
avoided if such legislation was
already in place.

"It's the responsibility of the
government and the Bahami-
an people have put the gov-
ernment there to serve on
their behalf that the Bahamian
people have knowledge of
what their government is
doing.

“Knowledge of the proce-
dures and whatever decisions
are made by the government,
how that affects them, I think
it is of utmost importance,"
Mr Pinder told The Tribune
at the sidelines of a press con-
ference at which PLP deputy
chairman Ken Dorsett
announced his bid for chair-
man.

"Especially in these times
when we've seen the govern-
ment undertaking certain pro-
jects where there's questions
to whether the government
has followed the proper pro-
cedures and there's questions
to whether certain environ-
mental disclosures were
there."

Mr Pinder said he support-



Mi Ryan Pinder backs PLP members’ call for legislation

VE»

OUTCRY: People protest about the proposed Wilson City power plant.

RYAN PINDER

ed Mr Dorsett and Opposi-
tion Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald in their call to have gov-
ernment implement a Free-
dom of Information Act
(FOIA).

Recently, Mr Fitzgerald told
The Tribune he soon plans to

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Students have chance to jump
start their technical careers

BIVI offering dual enrollment
courses for high school youths

THE Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) is offering high school
students the chance to jump
start their technical and voca-
tional careers by offering dual
enrollment.

Over 45 students are par-
ticipating in the programme
at BTVI this Fall.

Dual enrollment allows stu-
dents to take college courses
and earn post-secondary cred-
it while completing high
school graduation require-
ments.

To enroll in dual enroll-
ment courses, which count for
technical and vocational cred-
it, high school students must
be in grade 12, have a‘C’ or
above average on their BJC
transcripts in math and Eng-
lish, have been granted
approval by principal and
guidance counsellor, and meet
all the entrance requirements
of BTVI.

Assessment

All courses require *C’ or
above scores on assessment
exams.

“We have a great partner-
ship with the high schools,
and this new programme will
provide a wonderful oppor-
tunity for students interested
in furthering their education
in technical areas of study,”
said Sean Adderley, public
relations and dual enrollment
coordinator. This partnership
comes at a time when enroll-
ment in technical programmes
is “through the roof,” Mr
Adderley said.

“There’s a level of excite-
ment in our programmes that
is contagious — it results from
innovative approaches by
BTVI management.”

“The dual enrollment pro-
gramme gives the institution
an opportunity to showcase
our great faculty, and current
students in a way that is so
interactive.

“We in turn get to offer ser-



vice to our students to help
them start their technical and
vocational education,” he
said.

“We feel this programme
helps us to build relationships
with the high schools as well
as the students.

“BTVI’s education system
is about the future.

“Tt is about preparing our
young people for their lives
and careers in the 21st centu-
ry.
“Through dual enrollment
we will give our students an
important advantage that will
benefit them throughout their
careers.

“This investment in our
young people will help to
ensure the Bahamas has a
highly educated and skilled
workforce to face the chal-
lenges and opportunities
ahead.”

BTVI offers a variety of
courses appropriate for high
school students, such as elec-
trical installation; heating,
ventilation, and air-condi-
tioning (HVAC); carpentry;
office administration, and
computer repair.

“This programme provides
a challenge for the students
who are academically strong
and motivated,” Mr Adder-
ley said.

“Tt can reduce the time to
complete a technical and
vocational certificate.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

@ Claims law could have stopped

_

bring his own draft FOIA leg-
islation before the Senate in
an effort to speed up the cre-
ation of the "sunshine" law.

Although he did not partic-
ipate in the crafting of the
draft legislation, Mr Pinder
will be part of the committee
that will review the document.
He said his experience in prac-
tising law in Florida — which
has a thorough FOIA — will
assist him greatly in fine-tun-
ing a Bahamian version.

Draft

He added that he hopes
government will accept the
draft and not view it as a PLP
political tool.

"It was a component to
their platform when they (the



“We have a great
partnership with
the high schools,
and this new
programme will
provide a
wonderful
opportunity for
students interest-
ed in furthering
their education
in technical areas
of study,”



Sean Adderley





govt projects uproar



Inset: the site of the plant.

FNM) ran so I would hope
there would be no objections
to it.

“This is an Act for the
Bahamian people, it's not a
partisan Act by any means, so
it should be put in place fairly
quickly.

Mr Pinder said the chal-
lenges of this type of legisla-
tion lie in carrying out its
guidelines: "(In terms of) what
agency is administrating the
act and having access to doc-
uments, providing it to the
public — that type of process
is the challenging part of it."

In June, the government
said it was taking steps
towards preparing the public
service for the implementa-
tion of a FOIA and for
departments to “open access
to their records."

Hi ACTING WORKSHOP, THE HUB



American actor

WAYNE LEGETTE

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

ASPIRING Bahamian actors will have the opportunity to
gain valuable tools of the trade from prominent American
actor Wayne Legette during a 12 week workshop to take
place at The Hub.

Hosted by Ordain Moss, the workshop serves as a vehicle
to allow aspiring actors to unleash and reach their highest
artistic abilities. Mr Legette is known for his roles in “The
Guiding Light”, “Sins of the City”, “Westside Story”,
“Rags”, “Romeo & Juliet” (the stage play), “The Big Bang”,
“Proposal”, “The Boys Next Door” “The Woman In Black”,
“The Wild Party”, and “November.”

During his time in the Bahamas, Mr Legette will give
classes in stage presence, public speaking, dramatisation,
auditioning, monologue performance, and proper breathing.

Ms Moss recently told Tribune Features she believes the
Bahamas is filled with many talented people who will great-
ly benefit from this type of opportunity.

“T have a passion for performing,
and I love modeling, singing, and
acting. I always wanted to learn how

“e s
to become an actor and the skills He is really

necessary to be good at it. So start- ood at what he
ed the Acting Workshop because I does and what I
feel that there is so much talent in Jegrnt at the

this country that just needs to be ° l
unlocked,” she said. private casos

After taking private lessons with with Mr Legette
Mr Legette, she recognised a has made me so
greater improvement in her skills, myych better.”
and felt her encounter is a needed
experience for actors in the mms
Bahamas.

“T went for a few private lessons with Mr Legette and I
enjoyed it. He is really good at what he does and what I
learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so
much better. I then realised that I had to share this with my
fellow Bahamians,” she said.

Not only will the workshop unlock the talents of actors,
but it will also expose them to a window of opportunities in
the acting field.

“Because we have so much talent, I want Bahamian actors
to be recognised. I want to show Bahamian actors that they
are not limited to the Bahamas because there are so many
roles out there. I want us to see other places and other
places to see just how good we are,” she said. “We want to
see the young talent of this nation so the workshop starts
from age 17 and up,” she said.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be awarded
a certificate of completion.

The workshop is set to begin on October 3 at 11am -3 pm,
with lessons taking place every other Saturday.

KIDZ CY
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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Tel: 328-8391
Rosetta St.

(9 Emerald Ridge Mortuary gi einen
Va) =

& loners Company Tih. {iis oe
Mr Wi enh 1G, Dean 0,

ei’ Maaggiag Perers! Ivrecter Our Serioes Includes:
‘Tiel ahah Ph MD Pes al eed. OT
Honuurvaey Yoon Sie Lie,

Chanting stot Piro Ae een

UR
« Email: sc RTs el ml Feri
UAa peter he nue Lisi a

Opal Funeral Service

jor
Mr. Kenneth John
McPhee Sr., 79

of Soldier Road West and formerly of
Rolleville Exemo will be held cn F malay,
October 12, 20060 at | Lamiat St. Margaret's
Anglican Church, Kemp Read, Rev. Pr.
Joseph Mycklewhite will officiate and
burial will be in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soklier Read,

The: Radiance of this “Opal af A Gea”
will always glow in the hearis of his
Wite of 60 yemrs Cheon:
Two Some: Kenneth Jr. and Anthony McPhee $2.
Ning Daughters: Brenda, Pauline, Ann and Charmaine MePhee, Bdish
Ralle, Manion Stuart, Lorraine Landy. Roth Johnson and Kath jeen Petty:
Trenty Ome Grand Sons: Doren and Joseph Adderley, Dion, Kemmeth
If, Kenve, Kennard, Kennel, Anthony Jr. and Anthon McPhee, Rayrand
ond Torey Knowles, Trevor Stuart, Angelo and Qeasio Lundy, Jamaal
Turmyuest, Densand and Dvlann Innis, Forome and Jason Farquarhson,
Jeffrey Rolle and Caswell Davis Se.;
Twenty Four Grand Daughters Rochelle amd Ancka Rolle, Darlene.
Vanriea and Sonia Knowles, Tanya Lindsey, Sanovia and Mackell Stuart.
Lishien, Kaytecll, krystal, Kelly, Kemien, Cleon, Anitomns and Aussonigim
McPhee, Sophia, Cordenia amd Sherese Landy, Amanda ard Amalia
Johnson, Brittany Ambriscer, Megan Turmques and Jamie Peary;
Forty Great Grand Children: Devin. Darlisia, Dereka, Deniesha, Deandra
Dnacisha, Dion fr, Deran, Tyler, Dior, Nica, Maing, Tonisha, Sidney,
Wiltonique, Verna, Denera, Amtoness, Trevor Jr, Glenda, lesha, Travis,
Alexis, Teanna, Leondrell, #haria, Glen Jr, Castriel, Kemeisho, Kemneth
TV, Tajah. Deshannen, Dchante, Denarj. Parrick Ir., Newaeh, Choristain,
Caswell Jr. Lakiethra, and Jamicko;
One Great, Great Grand Child: Kelis;
One Brother: Cleveland McPhee of Fort Pierce,
One Siger: Melvina Brown
Three Brothers-indlaw: Charles Cooper, Prince of Belglade Phonida and
Janes Bullarel:
Five Sisters-in-law: Betty Cooper, Beretta and Wally Bullard, Lowise
And Where Mic Phe:
Twenty Two Nephews: Joseph, Randolph. Kevin. Neville, Stephen and
Andrew McPhee, Police Sergeant 12% Deayne Kelly, Ivan Berwe, Patrick
Bren, Eugene Parker, Rev. ‘Bobby ani Rix kw Jiohersin, Deerenetrinns Cx (per.
Rudolph, Jonathon, Prince Jr., Bddie of Flowida, Police Inspector Cedric
Captain Henzal, Pastor Cedric, Ambrose and Shawn Bullard:
Twenty Nine Nieces: Phyllis Kelly, Inex Curry, Ampela McPhee, Agnes
Rliller, Debroal, Liga, Licioana, Denice Clarke, Patsy, Sharlene and
Karen, Saundra Patterson, Linda Johnson, Jessielame, Shirkeyjane and
Bremdlajoy of Flormda, Sandra, Pandora, Wendy, Sherry, Rees, Racrina,
Yvette, Rageel, Christine und Anse Bullard, Patrice and Shredreka “Jan*
Cooper ot The US Navy, (Porfolk, ¥Ad;
Four Sons-in-law: Hervis Rolle, Glen Stuart. Livingston Johnson and
James Petty:
One Daaghter-inllaw: Judith McPhee:
Many other loving family and friends inchading: Glenroy, Peggy, boanme
Kulrina, Jessia, Kenny, lan, Dolly and Lava Rolle, Enid Lhoyd, Aubrey
and Johnny Tucker, Clyde and Barbara Forbes, Shirley Walton, Heben,
Edeth, Erwin ere” Lawrence, Loanin Johason, Majone, Sher vi. Bercy
Willams, Domonick Dogier and Theresa Palion (all of the USA), Wilfred
Solomon, Siiney Gwen, Demestria, Uke, Swndera., Asia, Densens
Jr., Dewanie. neat, The Collie. McKenzie, Cooper, Money, Curtis and
Rolle Fanailves, Fr, Mivcklewhie, Rev, Ampela Palecinis, St. Margaret's
Church family, St. Bede’s Chorch family, The Remp Road and Soklier
Road Communities, Lean and Ruth Bullard

Florida;

Visitation will be im the “Emerald Suite” Emernld Ridge Mortuary &
Monument Company Lid. #20 Claridge Road on Thursday, October 01.
200% fram ipm to éom and at St. Margaretis Anglicam Church, Kemp
Road on Friday. Gcraber U2, 2009 from [Dam bo service line

Visit our website; www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements,



© SHOES

IN a commitment to the welfare of
both customers and fellow staff, a num-
ber of Kelly’s Home Centre employees
recently completed the American Heart
Association (AHA) training in how to
perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) and how to apply an automated

external defibrillator (AED).

Twelve staff members are now certi-
fied under the AHA

Heartsaver programme through Doc-
tors Hospital. Training was conducted
by Kelly’s learning and development
manager Ron Guest, who is a certified
AHA instructor.

The courses are the first in a series
that will certify additional employees
and which form part of a comprehensive

Time to ‘ci

FROM page one

According to the BBC News, the new
court will be the final appellate court for
all United Kingdom civil cases and crim-
inal cases from England, Wales and
Northern Ireland. The court replaces the
Privy Council, which served as the last
court of appeal for most Caribbean coun-
tries.

While many suspect the move will have
some impact on the region it is unclear
what, if, any it will have on the Bahamas.

The move comes after Privy Council
president, Lord Nicholas Phillips, recent-
ly complained that the council's Law
Lords spent too much time hearing cases
from former colonies — which are most-
ly in the Caribbean.

Sean McWeeney, a partner in the
Graham, Thompson and Co law firm,
believes the switch will have little impact
on the cases that emanate from the
Caribbean to the Privy Council.

Lord Phillps' comments, not the UK's
move towards the Supreme Court as its
final court of appeal, are what should be
of concern for the Bahamian judiciary,
said Mr McWeeney.

"Basically he was saying 'Go find your
own final court, leave us alone’. That has
already drawn quite a bit of notice from
legal scholars and lawyers in the region

Murder trial suspended as accused
receives psychiatric tests in hospital

FROM page one

medical personnel. He was put in an ambu-
lance and taken to the Diah Ward at the Rand

Memorial Hospital.

McPhee and Edwin Bauld Jr, 26, are on tri-
al for the murder, kidnapping and robbery of
Corporal Eddison Bain on October 22, 2007.

The trial is in its second week.

Sergeant Darrell Rolle, lead police investi-
gator, was scheduled to testify again on Thurs-

day.

According to reports, firemen were called to
the courthouse to hose out the holding cell

where McPhee was being kept.

Reports are that McPhee had defecated in
his clothing and spread faeces on himself and

approach to staff training at Kelly’s.
To give support to the training
received and to provide a safer envi-

PICTURED ARE:
(left to right)
Successful
students Petrona
Adderley,
Terrance Paul,
Shirley Paul,
Andrew
Ganteaume,
Rochelle Hudson,
Ethelyn Wong
and instructor
Ron Guest.

ronment for customers and staff, Kelly’s
have also placed a new AED unit in
the store at Marathon Mall.



ange justice system

and will spur a new round of debate at
the national and regional level of the
need to accelerate new arrangements,"
Mr McWeeney told The Tribune yester-
day.

He believes that the framers of the
Bahamas’ constitution anticipated that
this change would one day be necessary,
adding that the provisions that refer to
the Privy Council are not firmly estab-
lished.

"The provisions of the Bahamian con-
stitution, which established the Privy
Council as the ultimate court of appeal,
those provisions are not entrenched, they
explicitly contain the possibility that some
new arrangement may be made to
replace the Privy Council,” he said.

Currently the Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice (CCJ) is an alternative to the Privy
Council but is not widely used in the
region; it only adjudicates cases from
Guyana and Barbados.

Mr McWeeney lamented over this fact
but believes "a new regional court will
emerge within the next decade."

"Here in the Bahamas there is still a lot
of resistance to it (the CCJ). Now that the
English Law Lords are becoming increas-
ingly vocal, you're going to find that there
will be increased movement towards hav-
ing the Privy Council replaced by a
regional court."

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, retired partner

on the walls of the holding cell.

Many persons had gathered in the area.
McPhee, who proclaimed that he was crazy,

was restrained on a gurney.

out that he was God.

come of an evaluation report.

appear for trial.

Bahamas Property Fund Limited

Consolidated Income Statement

For The Quarter Ended 30 June 2009

(Unaudited)

INCOME

Rental revenues
Other income

OPERATING EXPENSES

Bank Interest
Other expenses

FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS (FFO)

Amortisation of deferred expenses
Bad debt expense

NET INCOME

FFO PER SHARE
EARNINGS PER SHARE

NET ASSET VALUE PER SHARE

Three Months
Ended
30 June 2009

Six Months
Ended

30 June 2009
$

1,952,026
16,430

972,456
8,800
981,256 1,968,456

225,096
174,985

448,294
365,495
400,081 813,789

581,175 1,154,667

(27,809) (55,618)
: (33,752)

553,367 1,065,297

$0,24 $0.48

$0.23 $0.44

$14.39 $14.39



As he was being wheeled off, he shouted

He said that the devil was after him and
muttered something about forgiveness.

Acting Justice Jethro Miller suspended trial
proceedings for the morning pending the out-

Medical officials at the hospital have deter-
mined that McPhee is not crazy and is fit to

Lawyer Mario Gray represents McPhee. K
Brian Hanna represents Edwin Bauld Jr.

Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the Attor-
ney General’s Office are prosecuting the case.

Six Months
Ended
30 June 2008

1,981,894
9,600

1,991,494

568,135
497,135

1,065,270

926,224

(56,488)

869,736

$0.38
$0.36

$13.21

now consultant to the Higgs and Johnson
law firm, said it would only make sense
for the Bahamas to join a regional court
if it were comprised of former British
colonies — which share British common
law.

"T think if we're going to (have a
regional appellate court) I would rather
not be going to a Caribbean court which
has inherited the laws of a lot of counties
that are quite alien to us,” Sir Geoffrey
told The Tribune.

Britain's move to a Supreme Court
was also marked by the implementation
of closed-circuit cameras in the courts.
The British press reported that for the
first time, cases will be broadcast live.

Mr McWeeney said this was to shake
the shroud of secrecy associated with
closed hearings.

He said the trend could possibly catch
on in local courts. However, cost would
be a deterring factor, he said.

"Given the current budgetary
restraints that probably is the last thing
on their minds," he said.

The UK's Supreme Court is the result
of the Constitutional Reform Act of
2005, focused on removing the highest
appeal court from the upper house of
Parliament, and remove Britain's Law
Lords from the legislature, according to
the British press.

ae TFT
ee LU

TC ET ARS



FROM page one

course with a person
between the ages of 14 and
16. It is alleged that the on
August 11, Williamson had
intercourse with a girl under
the age of 16. The teen was
reportedly being held at the
Central Police Station after
her parents had brought her
in as uncontrollable.

Williamson was not
required to enter a plea to
the sex charge and was
granted $8,000 bail with one
surety. He was ordered to
stay away from the com-
plainant. The case was trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

Claims Govt is failing
to pay hills are denied

FROM page one

being paid on a timely basis,
and when payments are made
$ it’s in drip and drabs.

“Tmagine the pressure con-
tractors and suppliers are
being placed with their
bankers.”

This week Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham admitted
that it is only through bor-
rowing that Government is
able to pay its bills at the
moment. He said the Gov-
ernment has close to half of
the $309,724,300 it got parlia-
mentary approval to borrow
in June of this year.

However, Mr Ferguson yes-
terday said it is “not (his)
information or public knowl-
edge” that Government has
failed to pay any of its bills, as
Mr Roberts claimed.

“There’s nobody out there
who I know who worked for
government who complained
that they’re not getting paid
on a timely basis,” he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tensions mount in attempted extortion trial

FROM page one

only witness to testify yester-
day.

“T am going to rise now, I
am tired of it,” Senior Justice
Allen said. After several min-
utes, the judge returned to the
bench and asked Mr Ducille to
withdraw the comment. She
reminded him of directions she
had given to counsel, noting
that after the tape recordings
are played certain witnesses will
be recalled.

Mr Ducille withdrew the
comment stating, “My lady if I
said so, I said it in justice and
fair play.”

During his examination-in-
chief, Mr McDermott told the
court that he spoke to Bridge-
water for the first time on Jan-
uary 12 at 6.27 pm. He said that
during a telephone conversa-
tion, she identified herself as an
attorney from the Bahamas
who was representing a man
who chose to remain anony-
mous. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client was the first on the scene
at Old Bahama Bay on Janu-
ary 2 and was in possession of a
release document signed by Mr
Travolta. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater
explained that the document
was a release form used in the
event that someone refused
medical treatment or trans-
portation to a hospital. Mr
McDermott said that Bridge-
water assured him that no one
else was aware of the document
and that her client had the orig-
inal, while she was in posses-
sion of the only copy.

Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that the
document was not on file in the
official records of the Rand
Memorial Hospital because her
client had taken it home as it
was not necessary to file it and
also because it had a celebrity’s



signature on it.
Mr McDer-
mott told the
court that he
questioned
Bridgewater as
to the signifi-
cance of the
document. He
said that
Bridgewater told him that it was
her client’s contention that the
document was very incriminat-
ing of Mr Travolta as it could
show that he either intentional-
ly killed his son Jett, was negli-
gent in the supervision of his
son, or that he had tried to flee
the jurisdiction with his dead
son. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client had been contacted by
several foreign media entities,
including Inside Edition, Ger-
aldo Rivera, Greta Van Sus-
teren and someone from the
UK regarding the document.
According to Mr McDermott,
Bridgewater also told him that
her client had been contacted
by someone in the media who
had told him that the document
could be worth a substantial
sum of money if it showed that
Mr Travolta had deprived his
son of medical care.

Mr McDermott testified
that Bridgewater told him that
the reason she was calling was
to determine whether Mr Tra-
volta would be interested in
acquiring the document. Mr
McDermott told the court that
he asked Bridgewater what her
client was seeking and whether
he wanted to be reinstated at
his job since she mentioned that
he had been suspended for 30
days for speaking to the media.
Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client wanted money, but at that
time had not set a price.

Mr McDermott told the
court that he said to Bridgewa-

Pleasant
Bridgewater

ter, “Do you realise that what
you are doing constitutes a
criminal offence in the United
States, specifically extortion? If
I go to the authorities you and
the ambulance driver will be in
trouble.”

Mr McDermott said he told
her that no expenses would be
spared to ensure that the entire
Bahamas knew what her client
had done.

According to Mr McDer-
mott, Bridgewater responded
by saying that she had discussed
that with her client and that he
did not care. Mr McDermott
further testified that he asked
Bridgewater to forward him a
copy of the document and that
11 minutes later, Bridgewater
sent him an e-mail stating that
her client did not want her to
forward the document. Accord-
ing to Mr McDermott, Bridge-
water stated in the e-mail that
her client did not want to deal
with it that way as the docu-
ment was too sensitive. He also
told the court that on January
13, he spoke to Ronald Zupan-
cic by telephone and told him
everything Bridgewater had
told him.

He further testified that on
January 16, he spoke to Mr
Zupancic again, then spoke to
Mr Travolta. He told the court
that on Saturday, January 17,
he flew to Nassau, and checked
in to the Sheraton Hotel, Cable
Beach. He also told the court
that there was a meeting
between several lawyers as well
as Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
and ASP Ricardo Taylor at the
Gibson and Co law firm, Shirley
Street. He said that it was at
that time that he brought the
matter to the attention of police
and gave them permission to
instal hidden cameras in his
hotel room and place a wiretap
on him.

Mr McDermott told the

court that later that day he
spoke to Bridgewater and that
that conversation was record-
ed by police. He went on to tes-
tify that the following morning
he met with Bridgewater in his
hotel room around 10.25 am.
Mr McDermott recalled that he
met her in the lobby of the
Sheraton. He said he told her
that he would rather meet in a
more secure location. She
agreed stating that she too did
not want to remain in the lobby
as she was recognizable. He told
the court that he spoke to
Bridgewater again at 3.30pm
over the telephone. He said that
Bridgewater had phoned him
to inform him that her client
had dropped his demand to $15
million and that she was will-
ing to receive the funds. Mr
McDermott said that he told
Bridgewater that he would
speak to his clients and get back
to her as soon as possible. He
also told the court that he later
spoke to her again at 8.15 pm
and told her that Mr Travolta
and his wife were taking the
matter under advisement. He
further testified that at 10.15pm
he spoke to Bridgewater again
and told her that Mr Travolta
had agreed to pay the sum of
$10 million in instalments of
$2.5 million. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater indi-
cated to him that her client was
willing to meet with him per-
sonally. Mr McDermott said
that on January 20, police
returned and set up recording
devices in his room for a meet-
ing with Lightbourne. He said
he spoke with Lightbourne in
his hotel room for about 45
minutes during which time he
also spoke to Bridgewater on a
speaker phone. He said that lat-
er that day he received trans-
fer instructions by e-mail from
Bridgewater.

During Mr Ducille’s cross-
examination, Senior Justice

Allen warned Mr Ducille about
making comments on the ques-
tions he asked Mr McDermott
and admonished Mr McDer-
mott repeatedly not to engage
in any commentary. Mr McDer-
mott at times appeared dis-
pleased with the manner in
which the questions were being
asked, and requested the court
to direct Mr Ducille to correct-
ly pronounce his name as
“McDermott” and not “Mac-
dermott.” Attorney Carlson
Shurland also rose on several
occasions, accusing Mr McDer-
mott of giving the court instruc-
tions. Mr Ducille also claimed
that Mr McDermott was being
defensive and accused him of
starting the spat.

Mr Ducille asked Mr
McDermott whether he had
called Bridgewater first. Mr
McDermott said that he had
called Obie Wilchcombe and
then spoke to Bridgewater, pro-
moting Mr Ducille to ask that
he answer his questions specif-
ically. Mr Ducille went on to
question why he had said that
Bridgewater had told him dur-
ing a telephone conversation
on January 12 that “the rea-

son she was calling was to deter-
mine whether Mr Travolta
would be interested in acquiring
the document” when he hac
stated that he had made the
call. Replied Mr McDermott
“That’s what she said.” He sug.
gested that Bridgewater must
have been nervous, remarking
that “maybe it was her first
extortion.” This prompted 2
stern admonition from the
judge. Mr Ducille further asked
whether his client had made a
demand for money. Mr McDer-
mott explained that Bridgewa-
ter had made a demand for an
unspecified amount. M1
Ducille suggested to M1
McDermott that he was an
untruthful witness and that he
was the Sergeant Major and
leader of the orchestra in the
whole ordeal. Mr McDermott
firmly denied this suggestion.
Mr Ducille also suggested that i
was McDermott who had called
and suggested to make an offer
To this Mr McDermott replied.
“Absolutely not.”

The case resumes at 1(
o’clock this morning when M1
McDermott is expected to be
recalled.

Slander accusation

FROM page one

heated exchange over the newly formed Bahamas National
Press Club, of which Mr McKinney is an officer.

Mr Gibson is seeking damages in connection with the
claim that Mr McKinney, as the host of the talk show ‘Hard
Copy’ which airs on GEMS Radio, “falsely and maliciously”

spoke words which implied that Mr Gibson “was a man
who led an alternative lifestyle.”

The writ claims Mr McKinney also suggested that Mr
Gibson “had to be transferred from one school to another
because he habitually molested children.”

Mr McKinney and Bartlett-McSweeny Communications
Limited, the parent company of Gems Radio 105.9FM, have
been ordered to respond within 14 days of being served

with the writ.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH GLOW VISION LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HIGH GLOW VISION LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KTLA FINES INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KTLA FINES INC, has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PREVONLOUP LTD.

—

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PREVONLOUP LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CIRCUITPOINT INC.

——

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CIRCUITPOINT INC, has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIALEX VISTA LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY MAXIM LTD.

= ——

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPPY MAXIM LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUTREMENT INC.

— -,——

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AUTREMENT INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

—

Z

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of INIGO HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9



ir Us UC TC ate wickets





Defending champ
Tsonga advances
to the quarters

BANGKOK
(AP) — Defending
champion Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga won a
three-tiebreaker

e] 7-6 (5), 6-4. The
48th-ranked Isner
will face fourth-
seeded Viktor
Troicki of Serbia.





match against
Ernests Gulbis 6-7
(3), 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2)
Thursday to advance
to the quarterfinals
of the Thailand
Open.

Gulbis, ranked
99th, staved off a set
point at 4-5 to take
the opener and had
5-4 and 6-5 leads in
the second set. But the
Frenchman held on to force
the tiebreaker.

In the third set, players held
serve to set up another
tiebreaker, when Tsonga
forced Gulbis into errors.

“It was very tough, but I
fought all along,” said Tsonga,
ranked No. 7. “Finally, I won
and I’m happy to win. It’s
important for me to defend
my title.”

John Isner of the United
States also advanced to the
quarterfinals by defeating
Mischa Zverev of Germany

TSONGA



“He hits the ball
really big,” said the
6-foot-9 Isner. “So
do I. It will be a
good match. He has
won a lot of matches
this year. That’s why
he’s 32nd in the
world.”

American Kevin
Kim lost to Gilles
Simon of France 6-2,
6-2. The second-seeded
Simon, who retired with a
knee injury during the U.S.
Open, dominated play with
his baseline game.

Andreas Beck of Germany
also cruised with a 6-1, 6-7 (3),
6-4 victory over Donald
Young of the United States.
Beck will play Jurgen Melzer
of Austria.

In other second round
matches, American Robby
Ginepri lost to Evgeny
Korolev 6-1, 6-1 and Marat
Safin lost to Marco Chi-
udinelli 6-3, 7-6 (4).

Nike: No ’contractual
relationship’ with Vick

NEW YORK (AP) —
Nike said Thursday it does
not have a “contractual rela-
tionship” with Michael Vick, a
day after the quarterback’s
agent announced a deal with
the manufacturer.

In a statement released
Thursday morning, Nike said
it has “agreed to supply prod-
uct to Michael Vick as we do
a number of athletes who are
not under contract with
Nike.”

On Wednesday, Michael
Principe, the managing direc-
tor of BEST, the agency that
represents Vick, announced
the Philadelphia Eagles play-
er had a new deal with Nike
during a panel discussion at
the Sports Sponsorship Sym-
posium.

“He actually just became a

Nike client,” Principe said
Wednesday. “He has a new
deal with Nike that we’re all
very pleased about.”

Principe declined comment
Thursday.

Vick’s agent, Joel Segal,
said later Wednesday that
Vick looked forward to con-
tinuing his relationship with
Nike, adding that the player
and company had agreed not
to release terms of the deal.

Segal did not immediately
return a call for comment
Thursday.

Nike had initially declined
comment Wednesday night.

Nike, which signed Vick as
a rookie in 2001, terminated
his contract in August 2007
after he filed a plea agree-
ment admitting his involve-
ment in a dogfighting ring.

INDIA’S batsman Virat Kohli
plays a shot as West Indies
wicketkeeper Andre Fletcher
looks on during their Champions
Trophy match at the Wanderers
stadium in Johannesburg, South
Africa, on Wednesday...

(AP Photo: Themba Hadebe)

Kohe's
jersey
top seller
In Europe

NEW YORK (AP) —
Kobe Bryant’s jersey is
still more popular in
Europe than those belong-
ing to the NBA’s Euro-
pean players.

Bryant’s Los Angeles
Lakers jersey was the top-
seller in Europe for the
second consecutive year,
the NBA said Thursday.

The list was based on
sales from retail locations
across the continent during
the 2008-09 season.

Bryant, who also is atop
the lists in the United
States and China, is fol-
lowed again by Boston’s
Kevin Garnett. Spain’s
Pau Gasol, Bryant’s NBA
teammate, is third, with
LeBron James fourth and
Dwyane Wade moving up
three spots to round out
the top five.

No. 6 Tony Parker
(France), No. 8 Andrea
Bargnani (Italy) and No. 9
Jose Calderon (Spain) are
the other Europeans in the
top 10.

Radcliffe to defend NYC Marathon title

NEW YORK (AP) — World-record hold-
er Paula Radcliffe will defend her title at the
New York City Marathon next month.

The New York Road Runners announced
Thursday that Radcliffe will attempt to win
her fourth NYC Marathon title overall.

The British runner won the New York City
Half-Marathon in August, but skipped the
world championships in Berlin because she

needed more time to recover from foot
surgery in March. She says her right foot is
“feeling good” and “the pull of New York
was always very strong. I still feel the New
York course is a bit of a challenge for me.”

Other top female contenders in the field
include past champion Ludmila Petrova of
Russia. The 40th running of the NYC
Marathon is November 1.

CLG

kerzner’

Paradise Island
Os a rd re,

The Bahamas Hotel Association

11"Annual Golf Tournament
AT

Cable Beach Golf Course
Sunday, October 4, 2009
Registration 7:15 am. & Tee off Time 7:45am

Would like to say THANK YOU to the
following Sponsors & Prize Donors for
their ah algae donations:

Haden SFONsoRs FOOD SERVICES
CARIBBEAN BOTTLING CO (BAHAMAS) LTO
FIDELITY BANE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
RERZNER INTERNATIONAL
HASSAU/PARADISE ISLAND PROMOTION
HOARD
REC ROYAL BANE OF CANADA
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LTO
THE 4'ALBENAS AGENCY LTO

3

ween

REC Royal Bank
of Canada

PLATINUM SPONSORS
GRAHAM THOMPSON 4 CO.
COMMONWEALTH BANK
Nassau a

GOLD SFonsors
BAHAMAS WHOLESALE AGENCIES LTD
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
BOBCAT RAHAMAS LT
DOCTORS HOSPITAL
15, SBNSOH 6 OO,
HPA
LEMME PATON AT

0. Pe

TOE 1S.

LYFORD GAY CLUB

ROYAL STAR ASSUELACT LTO

The d'Albenas Aveny Lid

(CRAH AM, THOMPGON & Ci,
LOMIRSEL BAT TORMEYS-AT Lay

Amari-Garib International

Butterfield Bank (Bobomaa) Lid.

Clipper Group (Management) Ltd.
Comfort Sultes Paradies Island
Nettie Molter Company Lid.

Ck

COMBIDHWEALTH asec

A.ULA, Insurance Agents & Brokers
Prime Bahamaa Lid,
Providenoe Advisors

Providence Technology Group
ATA Consultants Lid.

Sports, Spine & Rehabilitation Centre
Waoag'a Rubber Samp & Printing Ga. Lid.

PRIZES
Abaco faach Saunt

* Anierlcan Alelines! American Eagle
Anthony's Geill

Badarad Ferries

Gahatasalr

Gancs Gel Semplooe (Overseas) Lid,
Bank af the Bahamas

Erichh Colonia! Miho

TE

Club Land‘Gr

Comfort Seleee Paradies lelaad
Dolphin Excomnters Lid.

Iuland Perchoece

* Kerrier lnneenathonal Bahamas
Aawau Aleport Gevalegment Company
Seale's Cay Mevort, Mangrove Cay,
Andro

Treacure Cay Model Beart A Morisa,
Abate

Wyadbam Masa Mevori

ee eee ee ee ee

: Special Thanks tay
*s, SCOLOMBIAN EMERALDS INT'L “—---__
i +JOHM BULL

*SAND05 BEER

DAMAAR GAOLIP

*Sacedal Thanks co Cable Reach Gelf Club
and aif paijers Mar aanking Mele pons ile
Precand io ape BHA Sober

HAHAMAS HOTEL ASSCKCLA TION



Saturday October 3rd - 8 am until 3pm

Special Prices on Selected Models

ONE DAY Special's ONLY

Economy down,
but fans pony up

Despite the rising cost of
tickets, football fans continue
lo altend games. Throwgh the
first three weeks of this season,
average attendance was higher
Ihanin 2ood.

Average NFL ticket price
$74.99

Average NFL attendance,
Per game.

68,7130°

GS cusaared

y
Racer ene Areca!
On The Spot Financing with Commonwealth Bank, and Insurance with Advantage Insurance Co.

o-4 Os aE

* Thhroveagh VWteek 3



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



SPORTS

INBRIEF

BOXING
BBC STATEMENT ON MACKEY



THE Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC),
after meeting on Tuesday night, released a press
statement to inform the general public of its
position regarding the former Commonwealth
Boxing Council super middleweight champion
Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey.

The commissioners decided unanimously to
act on the recommendation of the medical com-
mittee, chaired by Dr Munir Rashad, as to when
Mackey should be sanctioned to fight again.

A medical team was scheduled to examine
the boxer yesterday. Dr Rashad will then report
the findings to the BBC and a decision will be
made as to how long Mackey will be mandated to
refrain from engaging in a boxing match.

It was also emphasized that while the com-
mission’s secretary, Fred Sturrup, is also presi-
dent of the Commonwealth Boxing Council, the
BBC has absolutely no jurisdiction over the
Commonwealth title picture and acts only on
matters related to the local professional boxing
scene.

BASKETBALL
NPBA REGISTRATION

All NPBA teams/clubs and interested
teams/clubs are reminded that entrance fees and
rosters are due by October 16. The preseason is
scheduled to begin on October 23.

All interested teams are urged to contact
NPBA president Keith Smith or vice president
Alsworth Pickstock for additional information.








Catholic basketball
tourney will be a
very special one

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Repoerter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DEACON Andrew Burrows has
promised that this year’s Catholic
basketball tournament — set for the
holiday weekend of October 9-11 -
will be a very special one.

For the past five years, the
Catholic Archdiocese of the
Bahamas has honoured Deacon
Leviticus ‘Uncle Low Adderley
and Vincent Ferguson with a bas-
ketball tournament.

Deacon Burrows, organiser of
the event, noted that while Adder-
ley passed away prior to the start of
the tournament, he was joined by
Ferguson, who died last Wednes-
day.

Speaking yesterday after Fergu-
son’s funeral service at St Francis
Xavier Cathedral, Burrows said
they are expecting to get every-
body on board this year for the
first time. “I understood that St

FORR CONAICIOMTo THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE
September Bill Delay

Due to the curent upgrade of our billing
system, post-paid cellular customers may find
that their September bills may be delayed in
getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
tomers are advised to contact BIC at 225-5282







SAC to enter team for first time

Augustine’s College is finally going
to put a team in the tournament.
They have never done that
before,” Burrows said.

Adderley was the former princi-
pal of St Augustine’s College and
while Ferguson was the vice presi-
dent, he was responsible for coin-
ing the school’s nickname, ‘Big
Red Machine.’

Burrows said they already have
at least 10 senior teams registered
to take part and are anticipating
four to five junior teams to enter.

“We are still discussing how we
are going to honour both of them
this year, especially now that they
are deceased,” Burrows said. “But
we are looking at doing something
very special in their honour this
year.”

Both Adderley and Ferguson,
according to Burrows, dedicated

MIAMI Dolphins
quarterback Chad
Henne throws against
the San Diego Chargers
in the second half of a
game in San Diego.

(AP Photo: Chris
Carlson)

their lives to the growth and devel-
opment of sports and education in
the country and the Catholic Arch-
diocese will do all it can to keep
their memories alive.

The tournament is expected to
get started October 9 and wrap up
on October 11 with the crowning of
the two champions.

Most Reverend Patrick Pinder,
Archbishop of Nassau, is sched-
uled to officially declare the tour-
nament open. “We are expecting a
very competitive tournament this
year,” Burrows said. “I think there
is a lot of excitement in the air and
all of the teams have been working
hard.”

The tournament is open only to
men, but Burrows said they intend
to have a number of women on
hand to assist with the organising
and operation of the games.



DAVIE, Florida — Chad

















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necessarily mean everything.”

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career.

He suffered a season-end-
ing shoulder injury Sunday at
San Diego.

When Henne makes his
first NFL start Sunday at
home against Buffalo, he will
have the opportunity to show
that he can run the offense,
limit mistakes and provide at
least some of the leadership
Pennington offered.

And Dolphins linebacker

NP Volleyball
Association
regular season

COB
Caribs
defeat

the Lady
Hornets

In men’s match,
Intruders dispose of
Police Crimestoppers

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its regular season with a dou-
ble header at the D W Davis
Gymnasium on Wednesday
night.

In the women’s match, the
College of the Bahamas
(COB) Caribs started out on
a positive note, defeating the
Lady Hornets in four sets, 25-
19, 25-11, 21-25 and 25-17.

The Caribs were led by
Kenisha Thompson's 12 kills
and six aces and Vanricka
Rose assisted with eight kills
and eight aces.

The Lady Hornets were led
by Simona Kerr, who finished
with eight kills and two aces.

Over on the men’s side, the
Intruders saw their first game
against the Police Crimestop-
pers and disposed of them in
four sets, 25-19, 12-25, 25-12
and 25-23.

Prince Wilson and Glen
Rolle lead all scorers with 17
and 15 points respectively in
the win. John Rolle lead the
Crimestoppers with 10 points
in a losing effort.

Henne faces some challenges,
but gives Dolphins a big arm

By EDGAR THOMPSON
c.2009 Cox Newspapers

Porter could miss a game

Joey Porter sat out practice
for the second day in a row
Thursday because of a sore
hamstring, and he could miss
a game for only the seventh
time in his 11-year career.

Porter did light exercises on
the side while the team prac-
ticed. Coach Tony Sparano
said Porter’s hamstring is
improving, but it’s uncertain
whether he’ll play Sunday
against Buffalo.



EMMANUEL Adebayor celebrates in front of Arsenal supporters after
scoring against his former club during their English Premier League
soccer match. Teammate and fellow former Arsenal player Kolo

Toure is behind...

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

Adebayor escapes ban for
celebrating goal, free to play

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

LONDON (AP) — Man-
chester City — striker
Emmanuel Adebayor
escaped a ban for his extrav-
agant goal celebration against
former club Arsenal and is
free to play again on Monday.

Adebayor, who has just fin-
ished a three-game ban for
another incident in the same
game, ran the length of the
field to rejoice in his goal in
front of the Gunners fans dur-
ing City's 4-2 victory last
month and the incident led to
violent scenes in the crowd.

The Football Association
disciplinary commission fined
the Togo international 25,000
pounds ($40,000; 27,500) on
Thursday after he admitted a
charge of improper conduct.
Although it imposed a two-

game ban, it is suspended
until December 2010.

"In reaching its decision,
the commission took into
account his admission of the
charge, public apology and
the extremely provocative
nature of the abuse he
received," the FA said in a
statement.

"However, the commission
also stated that players have a
responsibility to conduct
themselves in a proper man-
ner, and that such celebra-
tions are unacceptable and
have the potential to cause a
serious public-order incident."

Arsenal fans reacted angri-
ly to Adebayor's celebrations,
hurling objects on to the field
with one steward being
knocked unconscious.

Adebayor is now able to
face Aston Villa in the Pre-
mier League on Monday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Sp

PAGE 11





§

RIDAY, OCTOBER 2,

ts

2009



& a

Defending
champ Tsonga
advances to

quarters...
See page 9

Rest in peace Vincent Lloyd Ferguson

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Repoerter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

incent Lloyd

Ferguson was

remembered

as a stern dis-

ciplinarian
who cared for humanity just
as much as he did his family,
commitment to church and
God and country.

Monsignor Preston Moss
read the homily at the rite of
Christian burial for the late
Ferguson yesterday. He
described Ferguson, better
known as ‘Greech,’ as the
consummate Bahamian who
put everybody above himself.

Before a large gathering of
family members, politicians,
educators, sportsmen and well
wishers in St Francis Xavier
Cathedral, Moss said Fergu-
son’s life was like his (Fergu-
son’s) garden where he grew
just about everything you
could think about.

In a lot of ways, Moss said,
Ferguson was able to nurture
and develop the lives of so
many people that he came in
contact with, whether it was in
the classroom, on the court
or field.

And Moss said that even
though Ferguson executed his
duties with a stern hand, he
never held a grudge against
anybody and he also had a
sense of humour and he
would find a way to break out
in a laugh when he faced
some difficult challenges.

Before he took his seat,
Moss said Ferguson certain-
ly “fought a good fight,” he
finished the race and he kept
his faith in God, which
enabled him to help as many
Bahamians as he could as he
went along his way.

Ferguson, 71, died last
Wednesday morning at his
home. He left behind to
mourn his wife Mary, daugh-
ter Anne Marie and son and
daughter-in-law Alex and
Danielle and grandchildren
Kylie and Caden.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister and Minister of
National Security Tommy



PALLBEARERS carry the coffin of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson...

Turnquest headed the list of
dignitaries.

Among the list of sporting
dignitaries on hand were Sir
Arlington Butler, former
president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association, under
whom Ferguson served in his
administration as treasurer.

Outside of the church as
Ferguson’s body was carried
to the Catholic cemetery for
burial, many persons
expressed their sentiments
about the life of the deceased.

Kimberly Rolle, athletic
director at the College of the
Bahamas, said her fondest
memory came when she
served as president of the
New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association.

“We hosted the old-timers
game and he coached one of
our teams, which had Mother
Pratt on it,” Rolle said. “It
was so funny because we were
all laughing to hear him
telling those women who are
60 and 70 years old to get
back on defense.”

According to Rolle, he was
a perfectionist with regard to
discipline.

Former semi-pro baseball
player Etienne Farquharson,
who flew in from Inagua, said
Ferguson was more like a
father-figure to him when he
attended St Augustine’s Col-
lege.

“He used to tell us that you

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have to learn the basics if you
want to move on,” Farquhar-
son said. “He was disciplined,
he was serious and he kept
you on the straight and nar-
row path.”

Peter ‘Sweet P’ Brown, a
former basketball standout
who played under Ferguson’s
administration as president of
the Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration, said Ferguson was a
rare gem.

“A number of us had our
start at the Priory Grounds
and he was the one who
stepped in and helped us to
become the players that we
were,” Brown said.

“T think if he was made the
director of sports at the min-
istry, sports would not have
been in the mess that it is
today. I think his discipline
would have really made a big
difference in the way we do
things today.”

Former national team play-
er Greg Trotman, who now
resides in Luxingburg, said he
just had to attend the funeral
because of what Ferguson
meant to him.

“He was a stabilizing force
for many of us and without
him, I don’t think I would be
where I am today,” Trotman
said.

“We were like the last gen-
eration that came under
Greech. I think we’ve lost
such a great guy, who touched
so many people. He has done
so much for us all. So it’s a
sad moment for all of us. He
was one of the great mentors
that we had. There will never
be another Vince Ferguson.
Here’s the last of his kind, a
dinosaur.”

Ever since he was a little
boy playing basketball, for-
mer veteran basketball coach
Steve “Bullah’ Pinder had a
long-lasting relationship with
Ferguson at St Bernard’s
Sporting Club.

“We were one short and he
already had on a short pants,
so we put him on the team,”
Pinder said. “He hit three
shots back-to-back. In those
days in the 1950s, when you
take a six-point lead, you win
the game.

“That’s how far back I can
remember him. But up until
today, I was there with him
the day before he died
because we were talking
about trying to get the history
of basketball in the country
together.”

Basil ‘The Kid’ Sands, one

of the greatest basketball
players to come out of Grand
Bahama, said Ferguson
taught him the basics about
life.

“He was always very firm, a
disciplinarian, who was very
fair,” Sands said. “He knew
what he wanted out of life and
he went out there and did
what he had to do.”

Fred ‘Papa’ Smith, who had
a double opportunity to asso-
ciate with Ferguson in bas-
ketball and baseball, said the
deceased was “something
else.”

“He was a great man. I
remember I was just a junior
player at the age of 15 when
he invited me to try out for
the junior national basketball

team. As a result, I was cho-
sen on that team and that was
my first trip off the island.”

Smith, who considered Fer-
guson as his mentor, said Fer-
guson helped to groom him
in baseball and he went on to
play semi-pro baseball.

Larry ‘Doc’ Davis, the for-
mer secretary general of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, said it was a very sad day
when he got the news that
Ferguson, whom he worked
with, had passed away.

“He was a great man. He
was great for sports,” Davis
said. “He has gone on, but I
think the legacy that he has
left behind will linger in our
hearts for years to come.”

And Sister Annie Thomp-

son, one of the pioneer female
basketball players, said she
too had a dual role in her
association with Ferguson,
having worked with him in
administration at Aquinas
College.

“You know how he go. We
were pretty much a like. He
told me what he meant and I
told him what I meant,”
Thompson said. “But recent-
ly, we were getting together
with the basketball legends.

“When I told a lot of peo-
ple that I played basketball,
they didn’t believe me. But
we were meeting at our con-
vent, so I had another oppor-
tunity to experience and be
with Vince. I know he’s going
to be missed.”

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Merger to grow
credit union's
assets to $36m

* National Workers
Co-operative Credit
Union sees 4-6%
increase in loan defaults
as result of economy

* Proposed new head
ofsfice building to
cost $1m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN credit
union yesterday said it antici-
pated enjoying a $1-$2 mil-
lion increase in assets to $35-
$36 million if its 6,000 mem-
bers today approve a merger
with a rival, the economic
recession having produced a
4-6 per cent rise in loan
defaults.

Alfred Poitier, chief execu-
tive of the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union,
told Tribune Business that the
proposed merger with the rel-
atively small Bahamas Utili-
ties Cooperative Credit
Union - which members will
vote on today - would give
the latter’s 500-550 members
access to “a lot of the prod-
ucts and services that are the
norm in today’s financial ser-
vices industry”.

Currently, due to its rela-
tively small size, the Utilities
credit union’s members only
had access to basic savings
and loan products, the latter
largely featuring a regulator
consumer loan.

In comparison, Mr Poitier
said the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union
could offer promotional loans,
revolving loans, consumer
loans and mortgages.
“They’ve just not been able
to do that for their members

based on their size,” he }

added.

Workers Co-operative Cred-
it Union offered interest rates
of up to 6.5 per cent on their
term deposits, especially on
products designed to allow
members to save for their
children’s education.

“T don’t think there’s any
comparison in the local mar-
ket, particularly for small

SEE page two

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

ERED AY.

OCTOBER 2,

2009

SECTION B ° business@tribunemedia.net

City Markets ‘days
from closing’ $5m
refinancing deal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ITY MARKETS’ majority

shareholder was yesterday

said to be “just days away
from closing” the supermarket
chain’s $5 million refinancing, its
chief executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness that its customer count was
growing by 2-3 per cent every four
weeks.

Sunil Chatrani, head of Bahamas Super-
markets, the company that trades as the
11-store City Markets chain, said the com-
pany’s Board of Directors hoped to sign
off on the final 2008 audit draft at a meet-
ing next week, with the long-awaited
annual general meeting (AGM) targeted
for end-October - a date some 16 months
after that financial year ended.

The City Markets chief executive also
confirmed to Tribune Business that the
company had, to date, received $1 mil-
lion of the $5 million in new equity capital
to be injected by its 78 per cent majority
shareholder, BSL Holdings. The remain-
der, he explained, was awaiting foreign
exchange control approval from the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

“We’re just days away from closing, to
be honest,” Mr Chatrani told Tribune
Business, when asked yesterday about the

By NEIL HARTNELL

(MPAA) and Television

* Supermarket chain’s customer count
rising 2-3% every four weeks, chief
executive says

* $1m of refinancing received, with
remaining $4m awaiting Central Bank
approval

* Company not waiting on refinancing
to complete 2008 audit, with Board
sign-off hoped for next week and AGM
by month’s end

status of the supermarket chain’s refi-
nancing. “It’s going to be $5 million for
now. We have received $1 million so far,
and there is $4 million to come.”

“Again, it’s just paperwork. We’re hop-
ing that in a week or so it will be all com-
plete. There’s no particular requirement.
It’s just a lot of paperwork, a lot of
bureaucracy on everyone’s part. But there
is no problem. No one has backed out.

“It was just that to bring in the funds we
needed Central Bank approval. I’m not
sure where that is, but we don’t antici-
pate any problems with it. It’s just taking
time.”

Central Bank approval is likely needed
because BSL Holdings’ largest share-
holder, with a 40 per cent stake in the pri-
vate equity consortium that acquired City
Markets from Winn-Dixie for 454 million
in 2006, is Trinidadian conglomerate Neal

SEE page two

International Trade Commis-

: Tribune Business Editor
On the savings side, Mr }
Poitier said the National }

TWO INDUSTRY bodies

i representing US program-
? ming royalty rights holders
i have urged the Obama
? administration to take away
? trade benefits that allow
: Bahamian exports to enter
? the US tariff-free, Tribune
: Business can reveal, on the
? grounds that this nation was
; ? not fulfilling its obligations to
Savers wHOGe pos moneyon 4 protect intellectual property
a regular basis,” Mr Poitier ; rishi
said. He added that the } "8":

i Association of America

Both the Motion Picture

March 2010 deadline for
OECD ‘grey list’ escape

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FRENCH-headquartered
banks have agreed with
their government that they
will withdraw from all so-
called ‘offshore centres’ still
on the OECD’s ‘grey list’
by March 2010, but their
Bahamas-based subsidiaries
yesterday said they were
“very comfortable” this
nation would escape before
that deadline.

If the Bahamas was to
remain on the ‘grey list’, it
would impact French-
owned institutions such as
Credit Agricole (Suisse)
and SG Hambros Bank &
Trust (Bahamas), the latter
of which has 100 employ-
ees, and a former Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB) chairman yesterday
said the situation required
this nation to meet its year-
end commitment for sign-
ing the OECD’s ‘minimum
standard’ of 12 Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs).

Arguing that the French,
as head of the OECD
group that will monitor
compliance with the organ-
isation’s tax transparency
and information exchange
standards, were “trying to
set the tone” and influence
other G-20 nations to apply

similar pressure to their
financial institutions,
Michael Paton said: “This
could start a trend, and this
means we have to proceed
to get the required number
of agreements in place by
March.

“T wasn’t concerned pro-
vided we met the deadline,
but this underscores that it’s
a timeline we need to pull-
off. Hopefully, the Ministry
of Finance can accelerate
the negotiating process, and
I’m sure they are. We have

SEE page five

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Association of Programmers
Latin America urged that the
Bahamas lose its trade bene-
fits under the Caribbean
Basin Economic Recovery
Act (CBERA) due to its com-
pulsory licensing regime for
cable television, under which
Cable Bahamas was allegedly
pirating premium program-
ming satellite signals.

In its submission to the US

call us today at 396-1355

sion’s (USITC) latest report
on the economic impact made
by the CBERA, and its twin
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) programme, the
MPAA alleged that the com-
pulsory licensing regime had
been used by the Bahamas
“to justify the retransmission
of premium pay television
programming to the detri-
ment of US rights holders.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Sales ‘firepower’ to ensure
success at Emerald Bay

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SANDALS believes a sales
and marketing team, which
its chief executive yesterday
described as “the most
sophisticated network of any
hotel group on this side of the
world”, will enable it to suc-
ceed where Emerald Bay’s
previous ownership failed.
The resort chain also antici-
pates having “enough airlift
support” for the property
based on initial negotiations.

Adam Stewart, Sandals
Resorts International’s chief
executive, speaking to Tri-
bune Business from London,
said the resort chain’s distri-
bution network throughout
the US, Canada and UK pro-
vided it with the infrastruc-
ture to drive demand for its
newly-acquired Emerald Bay
property, something the pre-
vious ownership group nev-
er had.

Praising the previous own-
ers for “giving it a good shot”,
Mr Stewart told Tribune
Business: “You have to have

“This compulsory licence

SEE page five

* Sandals chief believes
marketing and distribution
network will enable chain
to succeed where previous
owners failed

* In talks with airlines,
and believes ‘enough
support’ for Exuma resort
on airlift

an infrastructure to market
an Out Island destination or
unique property. It’s not a lit-
tle boutique hotel.

“Sandals has, as far as ’'m
concerned, the most sophisti-
cated marketing and distrib-
ution network of any [hotel]
group on our side of the
world. We’re an organisation
that believes in a destination.
We never build or acquire a
hotel if we do not believe in
the destination.”

He added: “We have a
dedicated force that repre-
sents us, our sales and mar-
keting team, between the
UK, Canada and the US -

SEE page four

US industry bodies call for Bahamas to lose trade benefits

: * Allege that Bahamas
allows cable operators in the
Bahamas - including the par- :
tially government-owned }
Cable Bahamas - to essential- i
ly steal films and program- }
ming from the United States, :
thus destroying the economic }
viability for US pay television : ,
noone that on the rights } Cable Bahamas accuses
to sell films and programming i

cable TV licensing
regime breaching this
nation’s copyright
obligations under
Caribbean Basin Initiative

rights holders of using
US government to
‘coerce’ it

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



5
City Markets ‘days from closing’ $5m refinancing deal

& Massey.

Several sources have sug-
gested that Neal & Massey
is likely to increase its BSL
Holdings stake as a result
of the need to refinance
City Markets, possibly tak-
ing a majority holding in the
group.

That would explain the
need for Central Bank
approval, but this has not
been confirmed, and Mr
Chatrani’s comment that
“no one has backed out”
appears to imply that all
BSL Holdings investors
have contributed in propor-
tion to their existing hold-
ings, thus ensuring no one
is diluted.

Meanwhile, telling Tri-
bune Business that City
Markets was “making

FROM page one

National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union’s interest
rates on regular deposits and
savings accounts stood at 3 per
cent, compared to the 1-1.5

FROM page one

progress on all fronts”, Mr
Chatrani said the new capital
was being earmarked to
restart the company’s direct
import programme -
enabling it to buy high-end
products in bulk from for-
eign suppliers, thus improv-
ing margins and prices.
“Our customers are react-
ing to the prices, noticing the
difference in price,” Mr Cha-
trani added. “Our sales are
strong, reflecting that, and
we're Seeing more of our
customers coming back to
the stores. Our customer
counts are up, and they’re
growing at about 2-3 per
cent ever four-week period.”
City Markets, its operat-
ing parent and BSL Hold-

Credit union

per cent offered by many com-
mercial banks, with the inter-
est increasing as a member’s
level of savings rose to









INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS





NOTICE TO




SHAREHOLDERS





J.S. Johnson & Company Limited hereby notifies




all of its shareholders that based on unaudited

ings have come in for heavy
criticism from minority
shareholders who collective-
ly hold 22 per cent of
Bahamas Supermarkets,
investor value having been
massively eroded as a result
of the $13.429 million net
loss projected by manage-
ment accounts for 2008 -
something that plunged the
company into negative equi-
ty.

More than 15 months after
the 2008 year-end, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ external audi-
tor, KPMG, has yet to sign
off on the audited accounts,
a timeline well outside the
120-day filing period stipu-
lated for public companies.
Many have argued that this
saga has undermined the
integrity of the Bahamian

“encourage asset building”.

Apart from increasing its
asset base from $34 million to
$35-$36 million, Mr Poitier
said the merger with the Util-
ities credit union would fur-
ther diversify the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union’s membership base,
altering the perception in some
quarters that it was just for
hotel industry workers or
union members.

Pointing out that when
things were bad in the hotel
industry everything “dried
up”, Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business that the merger, with
the Utilities credit union’s
membership derived from
BTC, BEC, and Water & Sew-
erage, would help to better
‘recession-proof’ his organisa-

capital markets.

The 2008 audit sign-off
had previously been contin-
gent on City Markets’
receipt of financing from
BSL Holdings, which would
have avoided the accounts
being qualified as a ‘going
concern’.

However, Mr Chatrani
said yesterday: “We’re rush-
ing to have the audit com-
plete with or without the
financing. It’s so old, we
want to get it behind us, with
or without the opinion, so
we can move on to the 2009
audit. We want to get it com-
pleted.

“We had the final [audit]
draft today for review. We
have the opinion in hand,
and should be approving
that some time next week.

tion.

“Over the past five to six
years we’ve worked diligently
in diversifying our member-
ship base, getting the message
out that we’re not owned by
the hotel workers, and that
we’re not a labour organisa-
tion,” Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business.

He acknowledged that the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union had suffered
“some casualties” among its
members as a result of the
recession when it came to
repaying their loan obligations,
having “seen a bout a 4-6 per
cent increase” in loan defaults.

Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union had come up with “cre-
ative ways” to work with




results for the quarter ended September 30, 2009,

Share your ne




the Board of Directors has declared an interim

The Tribune wants to hear from people





dividend of sixteen cents (16¢) per ordinary share

who are making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are




to be paid on October 20, 2009 to all shareholders

raising funds for a good cause,

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60 tonne packaged
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The Board will approve it,
and we will call the annual
general meeting (AGM)
shortly.”

Mr Chatrani said Bahamas
Supermarkets was “aiming
for the end of the month”
for the AGM date, pointing
out that shareholders had to
be given 21 days’ notice.

The City Markets chief
executive said the super-
market chain was “perform-
ing better than expected”
against its revised projec-
tions, which had been down-
graded due to the economic
downturn.

He added that the compa-
ny’s return to profitability
would “be achieved coming
out of Christmas”, and from
there on, “on a period to
period basis we expect to be

members, such as allowing
them to pay interest only until
they went back to work, as in
the case of Wyndham employ-
ees due to the property’s two-
month closure.

Those who had been termi-
nated had been given grace
periods to see if they could
find alternative work, or
allowed to make token pay-
ments. However, members
who failed to come in and
address their situation were
being dealt with to protect
“the people’s money”.

Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union was being “very aggres-
sive”, and while it was “willing
to work with those who are
making a good effort, I hate
to say it, but we’re also
exhausting the route of taking
people to court as necessary”.

The credit union’s members
will also today vote on
whether to acquire a property
for the National Workers Co-
operative Credit Union’s new
head office.

While no site had been
selected, Mr Poitier told Tri-
bune Business that “once we
get a good deal on the proper-
ty, we’re ready to go, as we
have a part of the funds to pur-
chase the property and start

generally profitable on a
consistent basis”.

With sales and customer
counts improving, Mr Cha-
trani said City Markets was
being prepared for its
relaunch “in the next six
weeks”, with different
branding, signage and
images. The deli area and
equipment will also be
improved.

Apart from the $5 million
injected into City Markets
as the operating company, a
significant sum will also be
received by BSL Holdings,
Mr Chatrani indicated.

That sum is likely to be
used to meet its debt
repayment obligations to
Royal Bank of Canada,
and refinance existing cred-
it facilities.

construction. We’re as far as
we can go without buying a
property”.

Draft plans had been drawn
up, and Mr Poitier said the
building itself was likely to cost
$1 million to construct. “As a
financial institution that’s been
in existence for 26-27 years,
it’s only natural we reside in
our own building,” he added,
explaining that it was current-
ly renting property on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
from the hotel union.

In addition, the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union members will also vote
on whether to close its East
Bay Street branch with effect
from October 31, 2009.

Mr Poitier explained that
the building, across the road
from the Outback Steakhouse,
lacked parking and had seen a
reduction in demand as a
result of Kerzner Internation-
al’s lay-offs over the past year.

No lay-offs will result, the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union redeploying
affected staff within its opera-
tions. “There is a possibility
that we’ll be back in the east
within a relatively short period
of time, but in a bigger way
and more convenient,” Mr
Poitier said.

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THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas ‘endures’
economic crisis
better than many

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BAHAMAS has “rea-
sonably endured” the global
recession and fared better than
many other nations in doing
so, the minister of state for
finance believes, its “national
sense of perspective” being
one of “the greatest threats” to
its ability to weather econom-
ic contraction.

Zhivargo Laing, in an
address to a seminar organ-
ised by the Higgs & Johnson
law firm, acknowledged that
while many Bahamians may
not share the same sentiments,
he had seen indications from
his travels that the Bahamas
was coping with the downturn
in business activity better than
most.

“T daresay one of the great-
est threats to our ability to
navigate the this current
dilemma is our national sense
of perspective,” Mr Laing
said.

“To date, we have reason-
ably endured the current glob-
al crisis, recognising not all of
us have the same perspective.
It has been my experience to
travel to a number of coun-
tries, and sit in meetings with
minister of finance from coun-
tries around the world, and I
can tell you the great stress,
grief and shock on their faces
suggests to me that even in
our pained circumstances, we
are in a better situation that
many others are facing.”

As the minister acknowl-
edged, a significant number
of Bahamians are unlikely to
share his views, especially the
10,000-plus number who were
terminated from their jobs
during the 12 months between
May 2008 and May 2009.

However, his message to
the Higgs & Johnson seminar
was designed to give some
modest hope, explain the
Government’s strategy for
guiding the Bahamas through
the current recession - albeit
with a heavy dose of reality,
and provide some perspective
on how this nation was faring
compared to others.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamas, let alone the Gov-
ernment, did not have the
capacity to drag itself out of
recession by itself, Mr Laing
said: “We didn’t give rise to
this economic fallout, and we
do not have the ability to
reverse it. In a real sense we
are in a season; a season of
economic decline.

“We can define the reality
of our economic [condition],
but cannot alter the fact of the
season. We cannot alter the
circumstances or fact of the
season. What we must do is
adapt to see out the season.”

Mr Laing called on Bahami-
ans to display “mental forti-
tude”, determination and a
sense of perspective to help
weather the economic storm
and emerge into good times
all the better for it, adding:
“We will likely know more
about ourselves, for good or
ill, than we have ever known
before.

“Tt is on this basis that we
are able to develop a strategy
for forward movement. It has
been our determination as a
government in these circum-
stances that we must promote
economic stability to the
fullest extent possible. Reduc-
ing job losses, business fail-
ures and economic decline
depends on it.”

To achieve this, Mr Laing
said the Government had
focused on three areas- main-
taining the financial system’s
integrity, “nurturing the econ-
omy during this downturn”,
and providing social relief to
those most impacted.

Besides maintaining fiscal
prudence to the maximum
extent possible, keeping the
fiscal deficit and national debt
under some level of control,
and ensuring the foreign
exchange reserves, bank capi-
talisation and banking system
liquidity stayed at reasonable
levels, Mr Laing said the $12
million expansion in social ser-
vices funding over the last two
budget periods had served to
“buffer consumers in a
storm”.

The Government had opt-

* Minister acknowledges nation cannot pull
itself out of recession on its own, and that
there are limits on what government can do

* Says ‘greatest threat’ to weathering the
storm is ‘national sense of perspective’

ed to do more foreign curren-
cy borrowing to boost the US
dollar reserves, as opposed to
Bahamian currency borrow-
ing, Mr Laing adding: “All of
these things working together
have been an effort to buffer is
to the fullest extent possible.”

Still, the minister effective-
ly admitted there were limits
to what the Government
could do, especially when it
came to preventing the nation-
al debt - something Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham has
admitted could breach the 50
per cent of GDP threshold, or
$3.6-$3.7 billion - getting out

LYFORD CAY, E.P.
Beachfront Home

of control.

“T know the best laid plans
run the risk of failure,” he
added. “We are not in control
of all the forces and are limit-
ed in our resources, so some
forces are so great that they
overwhelm us.

“When we have done all we
can do, in my view, we stand
and leave the rest to God.”

Yet, attempting to strike a
positive note, Mr Laing added:
“We must always maintain
hope. I’m confident we will
come out of this difficult eco-
nomic season and enter a peri-
od of progress and abundance.

FOR SALE

Zhivargo Laing



I cannot say when, but I know
it will happen soon - that we
will emerge.”

He added that the turn-
around, “combined with wise
choices for the future, will
enable us to seize new oppor-
tunities”

TAYLOR

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Tel: 242-677-8255 | Cell: 242-357-7013

info@mariocareyrealty.com

www.mariocareyrealty.com

Important

Notice
SERVICE INTERRUPTION /

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From midnight October 3rd to
5pm October 4th, 2009.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we ask you
to take note that our Electronic Banking System will be
temporarily unavailable during the time listed above while we
conduct routine maintenance. We apologize for the length of
this service interruption, and for any inconvenience this may
cause, but this extended disruption has become necessary due
to the comprehensive nature of the required maintenance.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

e ABM

e VISA transaction via ABM
e Internet Banking
¢ Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary

maintenance.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com







FIRSTCARIBBEAN




INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)
Liquidator s Statement
Pursuant To Section 137(6) Of
The International Business Companies Act

We, Diane E. Fletcher, Liquidator of SHOREWOOD INC.
HEREBY CERTIFY that the winding up and dissolution of
SHOREWOOD INC. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 1st day of October 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY

2007
CLE/qui/00109

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
foot and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as “Englerston Subdivision’ situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on the
North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead Avenue
and running thereon approximately One hundred and Fourteen and
Sixty Eight hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the East
by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the West by
a Road Reservation called and known as Podelec Street and running
thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which said
piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries, shape,
marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on the Plan
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No.3914
N.P.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JANE MCPHEE
NOTICE
The Quieting Titles A

The Petition of JANE MCPHEE of Podoleo Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
feet and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as “Englerston Subdivision’ situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on
the North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead A
venue and running thereon approximately One Hundred and Fourteen
and Sixty Eight Hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the
East by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running
thereon Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the
West by a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and
running thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which
said piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on
the Plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan
NO.3914 N.P.

Jane Mcphee claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the said pieces or parcels of land free from
encumbrances. And the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said pieces
parcels or tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on before 26th November, A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a Statement of his
claim in the prescribed from verified by an Affidavit to be tiled therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of Claim on
or before the 26th November, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:

|. The Registry of the Supreme Court.
2. The Chambers of Messrs ROLLE & ROLLE., Attorneys for the
Petitioner.

Dated the 28th day of September, A.D., 2009.
ROLLE & ROLLE
Chambers Seventh Terrace West, Centerville
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

over 300 people. Every day
they’re hitting the pavement
to promote the islands and
the destinations we’re offer-
ing.”

Mr Stewart acknowledged
that airlift to any Family
Island resort was “a major
challenge”, not just in terms
of establishing service and
getting visitors there, but also
in altering traveller percep-
tions to ensure they knew the
destination was “just a flight
away” and more accessible
than they thought.

“Tt’s a joint effort on many




Emerald Bay

fronts to work with the air-
lines to get service. You have
to have firepower on the
ground to let people know it’s
just a flight away, and you
can get there very easily,” the
Sandals chief executive told
Tribune Business.

He added that the resort
chain had already discussed
airlift to Exuma and Sandals
Emerald Bay with the exist-
ing carriers that served the
island, including Continental
Connection and American
Airlines.

UH

NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHEN G, DAVIES of 8
CAMELOT CT, P.O. BOX F-42766, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2" day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,













Bahamas.

COMMOMAEALTH OF THE DAS.

i THE SUP EENE COURT

COMMON LAW AND BOUITY Devimiod

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“‘We’ve spoken to Air
Canada and took them in the
week we closed on the prop-
erty,” Mr Stewart told Tri-
bune Business. “We’ve had
discussions with other air-
lines, and they’re interested
in going there. At this point,
it’s safe to say we feel we will
have enough support in terms
of airlift into that destination.
With the airlines, it has to be
good for them to be good for
us.”

Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals would attempt to
give as much business as pos-
sible to Exuma-based suppli-
ers and vendors, in keeping

with its long-standing policy
for all its resorts, but warned
that “in this economic climate
today, you have to be com-
petitive”.

Thus the message is that if
you can provide Sandals with
products of the required qual-
ity at a competitive price, and
consistent/reliable supply, the
chain will buy from Exuma-
based suppliers. Its Sandals
Royal Bahamian property
already puts everything out
to tender in Nassau, Mr Stew-
art added.

The Sandals chief execu-
tive said the response of Exu-
mians to Sandals’ acquisition

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.

— -,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAMBOR INC.

——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SAMBOR INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Beach front villa Emerald Bay

of Emerald Bay had “been
overwhelming”, adding:
“Everyone wants to see us be
successful.

“There’s a lot riding on us,
and I’ve had many phone
calls with people offering to
lend a hand, saying that if
there’s anything they can do,
give them a call. It’s been
quite amazing, and we will
just do our best to showcase
Great Exuma to the world.
We feel strongly we can do
it.

“We would really love to
see some of the developments
put on hold, the private

homes and the like, given
confidence by Sandals to con-
tinue and people enjoy the
island.”

Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals Emerald Bay would
“be at the higher end of our
line up”, describing the resort
as a Family Island property
possessing first world facili-
ties and infrastructure.

“We're starting with a
clean sheet with this hotel,”
he added, describing it as “a
magnificent development”
produced by a “big picture
vision” for Exuma and Emer-
ald Bay itself.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.

— *)—

Pi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BON VIVANT COMPANY INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

PARKGATE INVEST & TRADE CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section
Companies Act. 2000,

138(4) of the

International Business
PARKGATE INVEST &

TRADE CORP. is in dissolution as of September 28,

2009.

Marion Coukidou Madella of 284 Arch. Makarios
II Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, 3105
Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

exciting career opportunity?

For further information on this and

our website:

other available positions, please visit

www firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

aA 7°38 f

“a

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



FROM page one

to the Bahamas.”

As a result, the MPAA
argued: “The Bahamas should
not continue to benefit from
preferential access to the US
market while it is simultane-
ously expropriating US rights
holders’ property.”

Also beating the drum for
trade sanctions against the
Bahamas was the Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America, purporting to
represent more than 30 pay
TV channels from that region,
which also laid into the
Bahamas’ compulsory TV
licensing regime for violating
the CBERA’s intellectual
property rights provisions.

Describing the Bahamian
regime as “objectionable”,
the Association accused Cable

Trade

Bahamas of “resorting to
questionable tactics in expro-
priating certain satellite sig-
nals”. It argued that the licens-
ing regime violated the Berne
Convention on intellectual
property rights, and said it
“represents an extremely dan-
gerous precedent, and threat-
ens to erode the foundation
of intellectual property pro-
tection for the US pay televi-
sion programming industry”.

The Association said it was
concerned that other
Caribbean nations may fol-
low the Bahamas’ example,
arguing that these issues “sig-
nificantly” and “adversely”
impacted its members’ ability
to conduct business in the
Bahamas.

Adding to the anti-
Bahamas and Cable Bahamas
offensive, the International
Intellectual Property Alliance
(IIPA) and HBO Latin
America Group backed the
submissions of the other two
groups.

However, in its response to
the US International Trade
Commission, Cable Bahamas
said that “for over five years,
Cable Bahamas has sought a
meeting with Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America and its mem-
bers without success.

“Instead of meeting with
Cable Bahamas, HBO Latin
America and Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America seek to use
the office of the United
States government to coerce
the settlement of their pri-

FROM page one

to move forward and turn the page.”

French-owned banks currently in
the Bahamas yesterday gave no indi-
cation they had any concerns about
the Government’s ability to meet the
March 2010 deadline for escaping the
‘grey list’, and expected to still be
here.

Ivanhoe Sands, head of Credit Agri-
cole (Suisse), said: “We are very, very
comfortable with that, and this is real-
ly no surprise because that was part of
the G-20 agreement. Members of the
G-20 will be obligated to exit ‘tax
havens’ still on the ‘grey list’? by March
2010.”

And an e-mail communication from
SG on its official view of offshore cen-
tres, which has been obtained by Tri-
bune Business, said: “Société
Générale is present in certain coun-
tries which are currently on the grey
list. These countries are in the process

OECD

of signing tax conventions for the
exchange of information according to
the norms set out by the G-20 and it is
expected that they will no longer be
on the list by the end of this year.

“Whatever the country in which we
carry out our activity, we apply the
business ethics rules which are in force
within the Société Générale Group,
in particular with regard to KYC, and
we respect local regulations.

“The business model of SG Private
Banking is based on advising clients
on their wealth by providing concrete
solutions with regard to savings, the
management of their investments and
transmission/inheritance, and is not
based on tax avoidance.”

As for the Bahamas specifically, SG
said: “This country is in the process of
signing conventions and intends to be
off the grey list at the end of the year.”

vate business dispute.”

Cable Bahamas also
argued that the Commission
was not the appropriate
forum in which to discuss
the relevant issues, and
asserted that the Bahamas
met CBERA eligibility
requirements, including
those on intellectual prop-
erty rights, the US govern-
ment not having found that
this nation’s copyright law
was “inconsistent with inter-
national law”.

And in its submission, pro-
vided through its Washing-
ton embassy, the Bahamas
gave assurances that “it will
implement its obligations
with respect to copyright
protection in the Bahamas”.

Trade sanctions appear
highly unlikely, although
they could impact some

i
Michael Paton

$141 million worth of
Bahamian exports that cur-
rently enter the US duty-
free every year. This is
because Cable Bahamas has
been working with the
Bahamian Embassy in
Washington, the Registrar
General’s Office and the US
Embassy in Nassau to try
and resolve the problem,
and has had some success in
negotiating commercial
arrangements with US pro-
gramming rights holders.

The crux of the problem is
that the Bahamas and rest
of the English-speaking
Caribbean are seen as too
small a market by many of
the programming rights
holders, making them disin-
clined to negotiate commer-
cial arrangements with
Cable Bahamas.



Their distribution and
royalty rights do not allow
them to broadcast outside
the US, and the legal fees
and other costs required to
change these agreements
would exceed the revenues
gained from a small market
such as this nation.

Under a 2000 agreement,
the US Trade Representa-
tive's Office was supposed
to encourage the MPAA
and the likes of its individual
members to enter into com-
mercial agreements with
Cable Bahamas, in return
for this nation amending its
compulsory licensing regime
via the 2004 Act amend-
ment. Yet while the

Bahamas believes it has ful-
filled its side of the bargain,
it privately believes the US
has to hold up its end.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL FANORD of
CHARLES VINCENT ST., NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason. why _ registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25'"* day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ri 4q rt
LOT FOR SALE
ASEVEN THOUSAND (7,000) SQ. FT.
SINGLEMULTI FAMILY LOT Wy OCEAN VIEWS IS FOR
SALE IN GAMBIER ESTATES (OPPOSITE COMPASS.
APPROVED ARCHITECTUAL DRAWINGS SHOWING

TWO RENDITIONS) FOR A SINGLE FAMILY HOME.
OWNER HAS CLEAR TITLE. ASKING $170,000.00 (GROSS)

CAL ag — OSES

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 CLEARWATER
MANAGEMENT LIMITED 1s in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th
September 2009. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT LIMITED. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 30th
October 2009.

Fa

»

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) JELENA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on October 1, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 30th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
October 2, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KENDAL WAYNE
ALCIDE of NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend to change
my name to KENDAL WAYNE THOMPSON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.
—_— -)—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MULBERRY SLOPES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Plone et Whork



MUA

NOTICE is hereby given that MACKINS TEHNOR of COLUMBUS
DRIVE 30B, APT #2, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2" day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


























SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN AND
BAHAMIAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH,
BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON
WILL BE CLOSED ON
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATEITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DAY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES
CAUSED AS A RESULT OF OUR CLOSING.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHINEEY CANAL LTD.
——_
4

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHINEEY CANAL LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PG CAPITAL MARKETS

SEC E RAGE Baer SERVICES

MmolLlanN ETAL

BEX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES 25 OF
THURSDAY, 1 OC TOBER 2009
BISE ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,804.67 | CHS =0099 | eC ©0001 | YTD =210.659 | FTO % -1220
FISCes: QULOSE TRaTT || TO 3.40% | 2008 -12 51%
WWW! BIS 2 BAHAMAS OOM | TELEPH OME» 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

ii





~~ > ry

ORLANDO


































High:86°F/30°C : Variably cloudy with Mostly cloudy with Variable clouds with Clouds and sun, Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
pee oe thunderstorms. thunderstorms. thunderstorms. t-storms possible. possible. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 69°F/21°C —
. a —_ . High: 89° High: 87° High: 87° High: 88°
TAMPA ee F High: 87° Low: 77° Low: 77° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° see EE
4 ae i , PETE ees
High: 86° F/30° C ' 8 [ _-92°-82°F | F [| 92°-82°F 95°-81° F High Hi.(ft.) Low
Low: 74° F/23°C e] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:06am. 3.0 12:00am. 0.7
aa @ - 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:22 p.m. 3.0 12:20pm. 0.7
: ; Saturd 6:44am. 3.2 12:35am. 0.6
a | PALMANAG,
) ie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sanliay 70am. 33 140am. 04
L er ABACO Temperature 7:37pm. 3.0 1:42pm. 04
? f - , IGM, seteccshaeee har eceeorecetene tee 86° F/30° C ; ;
; ; 44 High: 85° F/29° C eis Monday 8:00am. 3.4 1:45am. 03
A “a ‘all, " =~, a LOW eeeeeeeeeeeee 77° F/25° C : :
rs a HY — Low: 76° F/24°¢ Normal high serie: ee ep
” ' wy Normal low 74° F/23° C
F Sm @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... se F3ic | NTMI UCI
4 a High:87° F/31°C . Last year's lOW oer 76° F/24° C " "
— Low: 74° F/23°C aa ae a“ = et o Hoontise Sa pin
= S of 2 p.m. yesterday 0... cccceececeeeee 02 eee sia PPOOD MM TUN Mitra coo all
© ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Year to date Sl. Full Last New First
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .o.....c.ccsessecscsseceeeeseeee 38.65" a
Low: 75° F/24°C — Low: 73° F/23° C
gf AccuWeather.com
s @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by ohh _
; , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 4 oct. 11 Oct. 18 = Oct. 25
fy High: 88° F/31° C EL ELT HERA
i Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU Li R 79° F/26°C
High: 87° F/31°C oe:
=a Low: 77° F/25° C
as i. ” 2 _ ¥
KEY WEST a “4 ~—__—CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C | of High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 79° F/26° C " Low: 76° F/24°C
= ~h.
. oy GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
i High: 85 F/29 C High: 87° F/31°C
; ANDROS Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; Oe a
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C —— .
Low: 77° F/25°¢ i. . ih
ee , HX
LONGISLAND
Low: 78° F/26° C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday - MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W all ) High: 87° F/31°C
Fic FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC FC FC FIC FIC heey Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 71/21 43/6 s 75/23 5110 s Indianapolis 66/18 46/7 c 61/16 45/7 c Philadelphia 71/21 62/6 pe 74/23 60/15 t
Anchorage 46/7 37/2 s 48/8 37/2 Jacksonville 85/29 65/18 pc 86/380 68/20 t Phoenix 88/31 68/20 pc 92/33 73/22 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 56/13 t 77/25 56/12 po Kansas City 62/16 44/6 sh 64/17 44/6 pc Pittsburgh 62/16 52/11 1 68/20 46/7 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:89°F/82°c
Atlantic City 72/22 62/16 pce 75/23 55/12 t Las Vegas 85/29 57/13 s 86/30 66/18 s Portland, OR 63/17 47/8 r 61/16 46/7 pc High: 87° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 72/22 59/15 pe 75/23 56/13 + Little Rock 82/27 51/10 s 80/26 52/11 s Raleigh-Durham 79/26 62/16 pc 84/28 52/11 pc Low: 76°F/24°C ~
Boston 62/16 57/13 pe 69/20 57/13 1 Los Angeles 88/31 58/14 $s 72/22 58/14 pe St. Louis 68/20 49/99 pe 65/18 46/7 c . oo
Buffalo 58/14 52/11 + 65/18 47/8 sh Louisville 70/21 53/11 t 70/21 47/8 pe Salt Lake City 63/17 38/3 s 66/18 40/4 pc GREAT INAGUA ee
Charleston, SC 82/27 65/18 pc 85/29 61/16 pc Memphis 77/25 5412 pe 78/25 56/13 s San Antonio 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 70/21 t High: 91° F/33°C
Chicago 61/16 44/6 c 56/12 47/8 sh Miami 88/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25 t San Diego 79/26 62/16 s 70/21 63/17 pe Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 64/17 50/10 r 66/18 47/8 sh Minneapolis 54/12 40/4 r 53/11 43/6 c San Francisco 69/20 53/11 s 67/19 51/10 pe iy
Dallas 82/27 57/13 s 76/24 66/18 ¢ Nashville 74/23 53/11 t 78/25 49/9 s Seattle 58/14 43/6 + 58/14 45/7
Denver 61/16 30/-1 s 63/17 35/1 pe New Orleans 81/27 67/19 t 80/26 69/20 t Tallahassee 80/26 67/19 pc 85/29 65/18 t ‘ll
Detroit 62/16 47/8 + 58/14 45/7 sh New York 66/18 62/16 c 73/22 60/15 t Tampa 86/30 74/23 pe 87/30 71/21 t —
Honolulu 87/30 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 76/24 45/7 s 76/24 56/13 s Tucson 84/28 59/15 pce 84/28 68/20 t
Houston 80/26 63/17 t 81/27 68/20 t Orlando 86/30 69/20 s 89/31 69/20 t Washington, DC 74/23 62/16 pc 79/26 59/15 Fr

Tar rt NY

o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5|

MODERATE





Vv



\. HIGH

7|s|910

| HIGH











Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
57/13
17/25
82/27
63/17
90/32
86/30
72/22
79/26
79/26
66/18
54/12
81/27
68/20
59/15
66/18
68/20
90/32
93/33
54/12
90/32
84/28
78/25
52/11
59/15
57/13
66/18
58/14
90/32
48/8
88/31
104/40
77/25
82/27
67/19
89/31
75/23
63/17
81/27
81/27
79/26
97/36
57/13
45/7
56/13
85/29
93/33
48/8
64/17
54/12
83/28
99/37
74/23
89/31
86/30
86/30
75/23
84/28
80/26
75/23
48/8
72/22
84/28
75/23
59/15
90/32
57/13
57/13
54/12
54/12

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
M25
48/8
45/7
68/20
53/11
77/25
77/25
59/15
55/12
71/21
43/8
39/3
M5128
43/6
46/7
45/7
43/8
70/21
81/27
32/0
72/22
73/22
61/16
45/7
46/7
45/7
45/7
46/7
72/22
36/2
79/26
68/20
64/17
62/16
51/10
79/26
60/15
50/10
52/11
77/25
54/12
75/23
50/10
36/2
42/5
59/15
77/25
34/1
46/7
43/6
73/22
70/21
59/15
79/26
51/10
73/22
50/10
73/22
62/16
54/12
34/1
59/15
77/25
70/21
50/10
70/21
42/5
43/6
37/2
33/3

pc

High
F/C
92/33
61/16
79/26
83/28
59/15
90/32
86/30
71/21
70/21
80/26
63/17
55/12
81/27
66/18
64/17
68/20
72/22
92/33
90/32
42/5
89/31
83/28
78/25
59/15
57/13
63/17
68/20
63/17
88/31
52/11
88/31
103/39
79/26
83/28
74/23
88/31
75/23
64/17
82/27
85/29
77/25
89/31
64/17
46/7
66/18
81/27
95/35
43/6
68/20
62/16
84/28
96/35
73/22
89/31
88/31
87/30
70/21
85/29
76/24
68/20
52/11
68/20
84/28
77/25
61/16
93/33
57/13
60/15
52/11
54/12

Saturday

Low
F/C
79/26
50/10
46/7
68/20
49/9
78/25
77/25
59/15
50/10
72/22
45/7
43/6
73/22
46/7
50/10
45/7
57/13
69/20
80/26
32/0
74/23
74/23
59/15
54/12
43/6
48/8
45/7
50/10
71/21
36/2
77/25
68/20
64/17
61/16
54/12
79/26
60/15
48/8
54/12
77/25
54/12

Ww

pe
C

pe
pe

71/21 t

57/13
34/1
41

56/13

77/25
32/0
48/8
45/7

72/22

69/20

87/13

80/26

54/12

71/21
48/8

73/22

61/16

52/11
43/6

55/12

77/25

68/20

51/10

72/22
41

51/10
416
40/4

c

sh

pe
pe
c
c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





FRIDAY, OCTOBER 02np, 2009, PAGE 7B



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
Saturday: SE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
Saturday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: $ at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
Saturday: __§ at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 84° F



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T-storms

Rain Fronts
tO Shown are noon positions of weather systems and —

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itenifinfite
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary eugaeafi
is [0s 10s 20s [80s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s /a0s) iUUeNi0s)

“an Be Blown
yA Hurricane

_ Or you_can rest easy knowing
that yo have excellent insurance
Tage no matter which
vay he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

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(Els INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.260FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER MOSTLY SUNNY, STRAY T-STORM HIGH 86F LOW 77F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Sales ‘firepower’ to ensure s uccess at Emerald Bay SEESPORT SECTION Catholic basketball TOURNEY Legal experts speak out as Britain dumps the Privy Council The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com Try our B ig Breakfast Sandwich BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELP WANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E VINCENT LLOYD FERGUSON’S widow Mary Ferguson is comforted by her son, Alex Ferguson (right funeral took place yesterday at St Francis Xavier Cathedral in West Hill Street. Mr Ferguson, a Bahamian sporting icon and school principal, died on September 23 aged 71. MOREPHOTOSONPAGE 2. SEEALSO FRONTOFSPORTSSECTION By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net WITH Britain formally abandoning the Privy Council as its final court of appeal local legal experts again argued the need for the Bahamas to seek a regional alternative to the council within the next decade. In an historical move, Britain's highest court was taken over by its first Supreme Court after 11 justices were sworn in at a London ceremony yesterday. Time to ‘change’ justice system SAYINGFAREWELLTOVINCENTLLOYDFERGUSON By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Officers who went to collect Wilfred McPhee Jr from his holding cell before court yesterday morning were in for a big surprise. The murder trial in the Supreme Court had to be suspended and McPhee taken to hospital for psychiatric evaluation after he smeared faeces on the walls of his cell and claimed he was crazy. An ambulance and fire truck were summoned to the Garnet Levarity Justice Centre just before court proceedings were scheduled to begin at 10am. McPhee, 26, was restrained and taken out on a stretcher by Murder trial suspended as accused receives psychiatric tests in hospital SEE page six By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net THERE were tense moments in the high profile attempted extortion trial of exPLP senator Pleasant Bridge water and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne yesterday during cross-examination of a key prosecution witness. The courtroom drama climaxed yesterday afternoon when a visibly displeased Senior Justice Anita Allen rose from the bench for several minutes after attorney Murrio Ducille questioned: “Am I going to be muzzled in my cross-examination?” US attorney Michael McDermott, who represents actor John Travolta, 55, was the High drama in court A POLICE officer charged w ith having intercourse with an u nder aged girl was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Constable Dwight Williamson, 33, of Nassau Village was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane on the charge of having sexual interPoliceman charged with under age sex DWIGHT WILLIAMSON leaving court yesterday. S EE page six T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f TRAVOLTA TRIAL: WEEK T W0 A LAWSUIT has been filed in the Supreme Court accusing talk show host Steve McKinney (pictured and GEMS Radio of slander. The writ was filed by Tri bune columnist and public school teacher Adrian Gib son, with whom Mr McKinney had engaged in a Talk show host accused of slander SEE page eight SEE page eight FNM Chairman Johnley Ferguson denied claims that Government is failing to pay its contractors and suppliers “on a timely basis.” Bradley Roberts, a former PLP MP and party chairman, told a meeting of the Rotary Club of West Nassau yester day that he has been informed that Government is “struggling to meet its obligations.” He told Rotarians: “Contractors and suppliers are not Claims Govt is failing to pay bills are denied SEE page six SEE page six F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE ST FRANCIS XAVIER CATHEDRAL is packed for the funeral service of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson THE Bahamas Christian Council is calling for a national re-examination of the church’s Christ ian education efforts. According to the BCC, the number of religious education programmes existing in the country is diminishing – and where they do exist, teachers are often “ill-prepared.” T his “lack of formal teaching of Bible doctrine” to children can be linked to rising crime, the breakdown of the traditional family structure, and general social unrest, claims the council. This is a time for the church to stand up and bring some level of resolution to the national crisis in the Bahamas.” “As Bahamians, our social lives in particular have been modified, reduced, and changed overt he past 10 to 20 years and as a result we have witnessed a significant change, both in the spiritual and social life in our country. Consequently, over the last two years, our lives have been drastically altered,” the BCC said in a statement. Transforming T he BCC said the Bahamas needs a “spiritual overhaul”, and pastors must be empowered to “revolutionise” their membership, with the ultimate effect of transforming society. T he council lamented that over the “last 10 to 20 years, 20 per cent of our traditional churches’ Sunday schools and Christian education programmes have grown weak” while 50 per cent of churches do not have a formal or systematic teaching of Bible doctrine. Over the last 20 or so years, 40 per cent of our local churches find it difficult to recruit committed persons to teach Sunday schools. “The necessary vitality and substance that are needed to bring a level of stability to our nation’sy outh are missing in the spiritual development of the next generation. “If the truth be told, there is a lack of inspiration from the pulpit that inspires members of the c ongregation to live a life of self-sacrifice and highlight the importance of integrity; how to love your neighbour as yourself, and the eternal values and destiny of man. All this and more should be passed to the emerging generation,” said theB CC. The council suggested that 65 per cent of all Bahamians “do not know nor do they unders tand the need for theology.” Meanwhile, 40 per cent of modern churches in the Bahamas built their facilities with “no consideration for Christian education or Sunday schools”, said the council. Can all of this contribute to the National Child Council’s report in 2008 which indicated that there were 721 cases of child abuse reported in our country?” T he BCC said that as the “church is restored the nation will experience a level of social and economic comfort.” The church “was, is, and will continue to be the spiritual, moral and ethical strength of all soci-e ties,” it added. Christian Council calls for more religious education FAREWELL TO VINCENT FERGUSON PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff F UNERALSERVICEATSTFRANCISXAVIERCATHEDRAL MARY FERGUSON places a white rose on the coffin. POLITICIANS walk past the coffin as they pay their last respects to Vincent Lloyd Fer guson.

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T ALENTED British filmmakers have been invited to apply for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to spend two weeksi n the Bahamas shooting a s hort film about one of 14 Family Islands. The 14 Island Films Challenge was launched by leading B ritish director Bharat Nalluri yesterday to start a six month search for 14 aspiring and professional film-makers in the UKt o visit 14 Bahama Islands for 14 days, and produce 14 short films. There also will be the chance to win a grand prize of ,000 a nd state-of-the-art camera equipment. T he Bahamas Tourist Office, supporting the campaign, will u se the films to promote the Bahamas. Mr Nalluri and a panel of judges, including deputy direc tor general of the Bahamas Tourist Office Tommy Thomp son, will select the 14 lucky win n ers who will work with the finest producers in the indust ry, and have their work aired a t a prestigious red carpet event at the British Academy ofF ilm and Telev ision Arts (BAFTA March 2010. To particip ate in the challenge, Britain’s rising directors are required to submit a 500 word treatmento n an inspirational person from their local community and e xplain why they should be chosen. Judges will then select around 40 candidates to submita short film based on their t reatment, and 14 finalists will be selected. All entries will be available for viewing on the challenge website: ( www.14islandsfilmchallenge.co.uk). The short-listed filmmakers will take inspiration from thew armth of the Bahamian people to tell inspiring stories through their films. T hey will be encouraged to show the islands in their own way and demonstrate their creativity and individuality throught heir final cut. B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A MOVE towards more transparency in international banking has been welcomed byt he financial services sector as it should help mitigate tax havenc oncerns leading large banks to pull out of the Bahamas. A n Amendment to the Criminal Justice International Cooperation Act tabled in parliament on Wednesday will remove restrictions on the types of offences for which fiscal information can be shared. A nd local banking bosses are pleased by the move towardsg reater transparency in international banking as it will dispel t he fears of the wealthy G20 countries that the Bahamas is hiding tax-evaders. In April of this year, the Bahamas was included on the O rganisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s( OECD) grey list of countries that do not fully comply with t heir international regulations. Pr essur e And last week CEO of French banking giant BNP P aribas, Baudouin Prot, announced the bank will pull o ut of Nassau by year end. It is speculated the bank bowed to p olitical pressure under French President Nikolas Sarkozy, and the fear is other international banks will follow. This amendment is only one o f many steps to ensure banking in the Bahamas is compliant w ith international standards. Minister of Finance Zhivargo Laing called the move by BNP Paribas “regrettable” and saidh e has been working feverishly to meet the standards set by the OECD, including the minimum requirement to sign 12 Tax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEA tries. Former Minister of State for Finance James Smith said the Bill to “remove the caveat on the types of offences for which assistance can be given,so that a request which relates to fiscal offences is no longer excluded and can be entert ained under the act,” will allow for freer information exchange b etween countries when there is no TIEA in place. M r Smith said: “The OECD is serious about what they’re d oing so they’re calling the shots, and if we want to stay in the game we have got to comp ly with their rules. “The whole idea is to put the B ahamas back on an equal footing with the other jurisdic-t ions in terms of its regime for information exchange and t ransparency, and ultimately, to be placed on the list of countries that are totally compliant w ith international rules.” Bank of the Bahamas man a ging director Paul McWeeney also welcomes the move, but s aid the government must be careful to rise to regulatory standards while still retaininga degree of confidentiality. He said: “Anything to do w ith transparency within the financial sector is always viewedp ositively internationally, and I imagine these pieces of legis l ation are intended to improve the standards of the financial services sector so we conform to the new world order.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM POLICE apprehended four men after seizing almost $400,000 worth of marijuana in a major drug bust on Exuma. Acting on a tip, Exuma police, along with officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit (DEUa t 11am on Wednesday where they discovered 100 crocus sacks containing marijuana near the shoreline. A 55-year-old Eleuthera man was arrested near the discovery site. Officers also found a .45 handgun with seven live rounds of ammunition. N ot long after the drug seizure, police apprehended three men on a go-fast boat at the eastern end of New Providence. It is believed that thesem en may have been involved in the Exuma operation. The drugs weighed 3,935 pounds and have a local street v alue of just under $400,000. Investigations continue. Police in $400,000 drug bust In brief THE two men who died in a horrific crash following a highspeed police chase on Wednes day have been identified as 20year-old Daehn Bowe of Hawthorne Road and 21-yearold Dario Bain of Mount Pleasant Village. The men died at the scene on John F Kennedy Drive around 3am after their car, a grey 2003 Nissan Sentra, crashed into a utility pole near Lake Cunningham, “cutting the vehicle in half,” police said. Police first became suspicious of the Nissan on Fire Trail Road because the car did not have the necessary inspection certificates. Attempts were made to stop the car, which police believed may have been stolen. The vehicle with its occupants sped off at a high speed. There was a chase which ended on John F Kennedy Dri ve when the driver of the Nis san lost control and hit a utility pole on the side of the road. Both men were thrown from the mangled car and were pronounced dead an the scene by emergency medical personnel. Police car chase victims identified R OUTINE tests have revealed that the work around Arawak Cay has not disturbed the sea floor enough to create a threat to thee nvironment, the government claims. According to the Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment Division (EMRAD D epartment of Environmental Health Services, the level of turbidity at Arawak Cay and the surrounding areas is well below the r ecommended limit of 29 nephe lometric turbidity units (ntu EMRAD said its tests were based on samples collected from Orange Hill, The Caves, Delap orte, Sandyport, Cable Beach, Goodman’s Bay, Go Slow Bend, Saunders’ Beach and Arawak Cay. The government is currentlyd redging the harbour to facilitate access to the world’s largest cruise ships. Meanwhile, work is continuing at Arawak Cay, where the c ontainer port is to be relocated. Turbidity refers to how murky water is. High turbidity levels can reduce the amount of light reaching lower depths and therebyi nhibit the development of marine life, particularly shellfish. E MRAD’s statement noted t hat it is important to remember that turbidity occurs as a result of both natural and man-made causes. “In open water, phytoplanktoni s a major source of turbidity, but closer to shore, suspended particles may be the result of shoreline erosion, re-suspension of bottom sediments and wastewater disc harges,” the statement said. “Weather patterns also contribute to the turbidity experienced in near-shore waters. With heavy r ain, soil and other sediment may r un off into coastal areas, and with ocean swells bottom sediments are easily re-suspended in the water column.” T he statement said it is to be expected that the ongoing harbour dredging project would contribute to the turbidity in surroundinga reas. However, it said, turbidity levels at all sampled sites were only slightly higher than in previous months when there was no d redging activities going on. “EMRAD has been conducting coastal and marine monitoring since 1991, and thus has a comprehensive history of coastal con-d itions which it draws upon for comparison and analysis,” the s tatement said. Tests: Arawak Cay work ‘no threat to environment’ Banking transparency move wins backing UK filmmakers given chance to shoot Family Island film in Bahamas WORK CONTINUES at Arawak Cay, where the government has decided to relocate the container port. There is also a harbour dredging project in progress. Bharat Nalluri

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Why doesn’t the Govern ment care about us? $5.8 million was spent on Miss Universe, but how much is being spent to catch the criminals running carefree on New Providence? Unless crime gets under control it will not matter how much we spend on attracting people to The Bahamas, they will not come! A dark green Honda with two occupants: one with dreadlocks, one with short hair, both slim build, number plate (the number has been given to the Commissioner of Police) has been terrorising the residents out East for the last month that I know of. The police cannot be serious about catching them! There is currently a movement in the community to put a bounty on their heads just to get these two menaces off the street! What do we have to do to get action? Why aren’t the police and politicians scared? Because many of them have personal protection. Well, sirs and madams of the government, I pay for that protection and I want mine too! NYC was a city embalmed in crime and it was not safe to walk the streets only a decade ago. How did they beat the criminals? Why don’t we accept help from those who are more knowledgeable than us because of experience? Many Bahamians and residents with a choice will leave if this continues...crying all the way that I cannot live safely in my own country! Help us before it is too late to save both tourism and your own people! CRIME Nassau, September, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. I have been following this passionate debate on the removal of the casuarina trees f or the last couple of months. While I have a problem with the destruction of any living tree the sad reality is that they a re invasive and are taking over many of our islands, displacing natural vegetation which provides food and shelter for our wildlife to survive. T he fact that the government chose to take out these 3 0 trees without recognising and dealing with the impact of the rest of the population of casuarinas, in my mind was and is a ridiculous move and one which has served only to i nflame the public. Had the government announced that they would begin a systematicr egiment of their removal a cross the Bahamas, and explain why they had to go, I don’t think there would have been such an uproar. Instead we had a bush whacking exercise a few months ago where armies of men and machines indiscriminately hacked away at anything and everything, often leaving the casuarinas in place. I have to wonder if this issue has inflamed so many because it is a development which is “in your face”, as many peopleh ave to drive by and actually see first hand what is going on. This and much, much worse is g oing on right now in New Providence and all over our Family Islands, but it is out of sight and out of mind. I find it unbelievable that those calling for the protection of the casuarina have not uttered a word for the acres and acres of native trees which are d estroyed daily and land left c ompletely white with not a blade of grass on it. Take a ride out west along the coast and have a look at theb are white land that exists in o ur “business as usual a pproach” to development. The removal of trees on the coast leads to silt runoff which ends up in our oceans smotheringc oral reefs which protect the coastline. O r, go further south and have a look at the at least 200 plus acres of biodiversity lost to the Albany golf course and t he Albany/Maillis marinas. Or you can drive along the southern side of the Airport Industrial Park and see another couple of hundred acres flattened and white for a shopping cen-t re. W hile I am encouraged by the numbers of people who h ave written about this, your p assion is desperately needed elsewhere – lack of transparency, the need for an energy policy, destruction of our water tables, destruction of coral reefs, dredging for marinas everywhere you turn, overfishing, animal abuse, lack of planning, lack of a clear policy for the environment, no freedom of information act, no laws to guide the Ministry of the Envi r onment, no National Development Plan– just to name a f ew. As for the views to the sea i ssue, and that the Orange Hill B each area’s replanting exercise has left no view to the sea, the reality is that in a naturals etting you would have to go t hrough the bush to see the sea. The fact that roads were built r ight next to the coastline have afforded us these delightful but “unnatural” views to the sea. The beach dunes and vegetation are there to keep the sand and build the beach. The removal of the plants along theb each would mean the sand would disappear with every storm, and then the beach would become rock. So what is i t that we want? To drive by and see the sea, or to have a beach to enjoy? SAM DUNCOMBE reEarth, N assau, September, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm NEW YORK This week, the People’s Republic of China celebrated its 60th anniversary with a huge display of pomp and precision in the capital city of Beijing. The road that the world’s most populous nation has travelled since Mao Zedong’s revolution in 1949 is nothing short of remarkable from an isolated, impoverished country to the planet’s second-largest economy with corresponding international power. If one seeks a measure of the transformation that China has achieved in just a lifetime, one need only witness the mixture of hope and apprehension that attends its present and future moves on the world stage. The long march from then to now has not been smooth or steady. When your reporter first visited China in 1972, as partof the White House press corps covering President Richard Nixon’s historic visit, life in the country’s rural areas seemed aside from the trains that ran through them not much removed from the Middle Ages. And China in the early 1970swas mostly rural. Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution, along with other of his totalitarian policies and edicts, was disastrous for his country and exacted a terrible price on China’s people. Years later, the Tiananmen Square protests and their brutal repression represented another national trauma that threatened the existence and future of China as we know it. It is important, as with all nations where the citizens do not have a say, to differentiate China, the state, from its people. From Tiananmen, from the protests of mothers and fathers grieving over the loss of their children in schoolhouse collapses during last year’s Sichuan earthquake, from the protests of Uighurs and Tibetans and any number of other attempts to break free of government suppression andc ensorship it is apparent that the Chi nese people desire a greater share of freedom and self-expression than their government allows them. But a case could be made that the Chinese government’s ability to act without regard to political factions or popular support is precisely what has given and continues to give the Chinese state an international edge in this era of more competent Chinese leadership. This is a nation that can, by fiat, enact sweeping changes of policy as it has, recently, in aggressively pursuing the development of green technologies such as solar power and electric cars. These are technologies that could well position China to further develop and augment its manufacturing and economic strength in the century ahead. The same autocratic approach has enabled China to pursue economic and fiscal policies that give it a position of serious leverage in regard to other nations, including the U.S., given its holdings in U.S. currency and treasury debt. At the same time, China has thoroughly modernized a military that has never lacked sheer manpower. How the Chinese state will exercise its economic and military muscle remains one of the biggest and most important questions in international relations. In the midst of a conscious effort to increase its international standing, Chi na’s positions on everything from Iran’s nuclear programme to global climate change figure to be crucial to how these crises turn out. Meanwhile, China continues to aggressively pursue natural resources to drive its economy, with an apparent disregard for the regimes with which it does business in places such as Africa and South America. Sixty years on, the state founded by Mao is strong beyond the imaginings of those who witnessed its early years. The Chinese people still yearn for basic civil liberties. While some grow very wealthy, the gulf between rich and poor widens. And the U.S. and its allies find the f uture ever more dependent on the Chi nese state acting like a responsible global citizen. (This article was written by Dan Rather c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). Govt actions have inflamed casuarinas controversy LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net China zooms ahead in 60th celebrations NOTICELYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES AND CHARGES It is hereby notied pursuant to regulation 4(10 (bthe Airport Authority (Amendment Regulations, 2009 that the Airport Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of September, 2009 imposed and or varied fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling International Airport as follows: Aeronautical Fees a) Landing Fees increase 23.6% b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1% c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1% It is further notied that the said imposition and or variation of Fees and Charges shall take effect at the Lynden Pindling International Airport ninety days from the date of rst publication of this notice. 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW */25,$:,//,$06RI62/',(5 52$'3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHG VWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\ RI 6HSWHPEHU WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLS DVVDX%DKDPDV EDITOR, The Tribune. As of Tuesday, September 22, 2009 the area around the Montagu which is used every morning by Bahamians who are trying to keep fit, is in darkness due to all the street lights in the area being out. This seems to have happened when BEC was seen digging a hole by the traffic light on the corner of the Montagu and Village Road turn off. Today, Thursday, September 24, 2009 the hole was filled in and the lights were still out. All of us who use this area during the early morning hours to keep fit would appreciate all effects on the part of the authorities to restore the lights. JULIE PINDER Nassau, September 24s, 2009. Montagu walkers left in the dark $5.8 million on Miss Universe – but how much on catching criminals?

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THE Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI students the chance to jump start their technical and voca tional careers by offering dual enrollment. Over 45 students are par ticipating in the programme at BTVI this Fall. Dual enrollment allows stu dents to take college courses and earn post-secondary credit while completing high school graduation requirements. To enroll in dual enroll ment courses, which count for technical and vocational credit, high school students must be in grade 12, have a ‘C’ or above average on their BJC transcripts in math and Eng lish, have been granted approval by principal and guidance counsellor, and meet all the entrance requirements of BTVI. Assessment All courses require ‘C’ or above scores on assessment exams. “We have a great partner ship with the high schools, and this new programme will provide a wonderful oppor tunity for students interestedin furthering their education in technical areas of study,”said Sean Adderley, public relations and dual enrollment coordinator. This partnership comes at a time when enrollment in technical programmes is “through the roof,” Mr Adderley said. “There’s a level of excitement in our programmes that is contagious – it results from innovative approaches by BTVI management.” “The dual enrollment programme gives the institution an opportunity to showcase our great faculty, and current students in a way that is so interactive. “We in turn get to offer serv ice to our students to help them start their technical and vocational education,” he said. “We feel this programme helps us to build relationships with the high schools as well as the students. “BTVI’s education system is about the future. “It is about preparing our young people for their lives and careers in the 21st century. “Through dual enrollment we will give our students an important advantage that will benefit them throughout their careers. “This investment in our young people will help to ensure the Bahamas has a highly educated and skilled workforce to face the challenges and opportunities ahead.” BTVI offers a variety of courses appropriate for high school students, such as electrical installation; heating, ventilation, and air-condi tioning (HVAC office administration, and computer repair. “This programme provides a challenge for the students who are academically strong and motivated,” Mr Adderley said. “It can reduce the time to complete a technical and vocational certificate.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM .,'=&,7< 6$/( %,* By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A PROMINENT tax attorney threw his support behind the efforts of Opposition members who are pushing government to introduce a Freedom of Information Act. Ryan Pinder, the Bahamasbased attorney and representative for US law firm, Becker Poliakoff, said it was the government's obligation to provide to its citizens the right to see and understand the procedures of the administration. He said that most of the recent public uproar over government projects the dredging of Nassau Harbour, the extension of Arawak Cay and the proposed power plant in Abaco could have been avoided if such legislation was already in place. "It's the responsibility of the government and the Bahami an people have put the government there to serve on their behalf that the Bahamian people have knowledge of what their government is doing. “Knowledge of the procedures and whatever decisions are made by the government, how that affects them, I think it is of utmost importance," Mr Pinder told The Tribune at the sidelines of a press conference at which PLP deputy chairman Ken Dorsett announced his bid for chairman. "Especially in these times when we've seen the government undertaking certain projects where there's questions to whether the government has followed the proper pro cedures and there's questions to whether certain environmental disclosures were there." Mr Pinder said he supporte d Mr Dorsett and Opposition Senator Jerome Fitzgerald in their call to have government implement a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA Recently, Mr Fitzgerald told The Tribune he soon plans to bring his own draft FOIA legislation before the Senate in an effort to speed up the creation of the "sunshine" law. Although he did not participate in the crafting of the draft legislation, Mr Pinder will be part of the committee that will review the document. He said his experience in practising law in Florida which has a thorough FOIA will assist him greatly in fine-tuning a Bahamian version. Dr aft He added that he hopes government will accept thed raft and not view it as a PLP political tool. "It was a component to their platform when they (the FNM) ran so I would hope there would be no objections to it. “This is an Act for the Bahamian people, it's not a partisan Act by any means, so it should be put in place fairly quickly. Mr Pinder said the chal lenges of this type of legislation lie in carrying out its guidelines: "(In terms of agency is administrating the act and having access to doc u ments, providing it to the public that type of process is the challenging part of it." In June, the government said it was taking steps towards preparing the public service for the implementa-t ion of a FOIA and for d epartments to "open access to their records." Top tax attorney supports push for Freedom of Information Act By JEFFARAH GIBSON ASPIRING Bahamian actors will have the opportunity to gain valuable tools of the trade from prominent American actor Wayne Legette during a 12 week workshop to take place at The Hub. Hosted by Ordain Moss, the workshop serves as a vehicle to allow aspiring actors to unleash and reach their highest artistic abilities. Mr Legette is known for his roles in “The Guiding Light”, “Sins of the City”, “Westside Story”, “Rags”, “Romeo & Juliet” (the stage play “Proposal”, “The Boys Next Door” “The Woman In Black”, The Wild Party”, and “November.” During his time in the Bahamas, Mr Legette will give classes in stage presence, public speaking, dramatisation, auditioning, monologue performance, and proper breathing. Ms Moss recently told Tribune Features she believes the Bahamas is filled with many talented people who will greatly benefit from this type of opportunity. “I have a passion for performing, and I love modeling, singing, and acting. I always wanted to learn how to become an actor and the skills necessary to be good at it. So I started the Acting Workshop because I feel that there is so much talent in this country that just needs to be unlocked,” she said. After taking private lessons with Mr Legette, she recognised a greater improvement in her skills, and felt her encounter is a needed experience for actors in the Bahamas. “I went for a few private lessons with Mr Legette and I enjoyed it. He is really good at what he does and what I learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so much better. I then realised that I had to share this with my fellow Bahamians,” she said. Not only will the workshop unlock the talents of actors, but it will also expose them to a window of opportunities in the acting field. “Because we have so much talent, I want Bahamian actors to be recognised. I want to show Bahamian actors that they are not limited to the Bahamas because there are so many roles out there. I want us to see other places and other places to see just how good we are,” she said. “We want to see the young talent of this nation so the workshop starts from age 17 and up,” she said. At the end of the workshop, participants will be awarded a certificate of completion. The workshop is set to begin on October 3 at 11am -3 pm, with lessons taking place every other Saturday. American actor Wayne Legette to pass on tips to Bahamians Students have chance to jump start their technical careers "It's the responsibility of the government and the Bahamian people have put the government there to serve on their behalf that the Bahamian people have knowledge of what their government is doing.” Ryan Pinder n Ryan Pinder backs PLP members’ call for legislation n C laims law could have stopped govt projects uproar WAYNE LEGETTE RYAN PINDER “He is really good at what he does and what I learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so much better.” n ACTING WORKSHOP, THEHUB THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE BTVI offering dual enrollment courses for high school youths e have a great partnership with the high schools, and this new programme will provide a wonder ful opportunity for students interested in furthering their education in technical areas of study,” Sean Adderley I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s OUTCRY: People protest about the proposed Wilson City power plant. Inset: the site of the plant.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM IN a commitment to the welfare of both customers and fellow staff, a number of Kelly’s Home Centre employees recently completed the American Heart Association (AHA perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR external defibrillator (AED Twelve staff members are now certified under the AHA Heartsaver programme through Doctors Hospital. Training was conducted by Kelly’s learning and development manager Ron Guest, who is a certified AHA instructor. The courses are the first in a series that will certify additional employees and which form part of a comprehensive approach to staff training at Kelly’s. To give support to the training received and to provide a safer environment for customers and staff, Kelly’s have also placed a new AED unit in the store at Marathon Mall. CUSTOMERS CAN FEEL SAFE AT KELLY’S HOME CENTRE PICTURED ARE: (left to right Successful students Petrona A dderley, T errance Paul, Shirley Paul, Andrew Ganteaume, Rochelle Hudson, Ethelyn Wong and instructor Ron Guest. Time to ‘change’ justice system According to the BBC News, the new court will be the final appellate court for all United Kingdom civil cases and criminal cases from England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The court replaces the Privy Council, which served as the last court of appeal for most Caribbean countries. While many suspect the move will have some impact on the region it is unclear what, if, any it will have on the Bahamas. The move comes after Privy Council president, Lord Nicholas Phillips, recently complained that the council's Law Lords spent too much time hearing cases from former colonies which are mostly in the Caribbean. Sean McWeeney, a partner in the Graham, Thompson and Co law firm, believes the switch will have little impact on the cases that emanate from the Caribbean to the Privy Council. Lord Phillps' comments, not the UK's move towards the Supreme Court as its final court of appeal, are what should be of concern for the Bahamian judiciary, said Mr McWeeney. "Basically he was saying 'Go find your own final court, leave us alone'. That has already drawn quite a bit of notice from legal scholars and lawyers in the region a nd will spur a new round of debate at the national and regional level of the need to accelerate new arrangements," Mr McWeeney told The Tribune yesterday. He believes that the framers of the Bahamas’ constitution anticipated that this change would one day be necessary, adding that the provisions that refer to the Privy Council are not firmly established. "The provisions of the Bahamian constitution, which established the Privy Council as the ultimate court of appeal, those provisions are not entrenched, they explicitly contain the possibility that some new arrangement may be made to replace the Privy Council," he said. Currently the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ Council but is not widely used in the region; it only adjudicates cases from Guyana and Barbados. Mr McWeeney lamented over this fact but believes "a new regional court will emerge within the next decade." "Here in the Bahamas there is still a lot of resistance to it (the CCJ English Law Lords are becoming increasingly vocal, you're going to find that there will be increased movement towards having the Privy Council replaced by a regional court." Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, retired partner n ow consultant to the Higgs and Johnson law firm, said it would only make sense for the Bahamas to join a regional court if it were comprised of former British c olonies – which share British common law. "I think if we're going to (have a regional appellate court) I would rather not be going to a Caribbean court which has inherited the laws of a lot of counties that are quite alien to us," Sir Geoffreyt old T he Tribune. Britain's move to a Supreme Court was also marked by the implementationo f closed-circuit cameras in the courts. The British press reported that for the first time, cases will be broadcast live. Mr McWeeney said this was to shake the shroud of secrecy associated with closed hearings. He said the trend could possibly catch on in local courts. However, cost would be a deterring factor, he said. "Given the current budgetary restraints that probably is the last thing on their minds," he said. The UK's Supreme Court is the result of the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005, focused on removing the highest appeal court from the upper house of Parliament, and remove Britain's Law Lords from the legislature, according to the British press. FROM page one Murder trial suspended as accused receives psychiatric tests in hospital medical personnel. He was put in an ambulance and taken to the Diah Ward at the Rand Memorial Hospital. M cPhee and Edwin Bauld Jr, 26, are on tria l for the murder, kidnapping and robbery of Corporal Eddison Bain on October 22, 2007. The trial is in its second week. Sergeant Darrell Rolle, lead police investi gator, was scheduled to testify again on Thurs day. According to reports, firemen were called to the courthouse to hose out the holding cell where McPhee was being kept. Reports are that McPhee had defecated in his clothing and spread faeces on himself and on the walls of the holding cell. Many persons had gathered in the area. McPhee, who proclaimed that he was crazy, was restrained on a gurney. As he was being wheeled off, he shouted out that he was God. He said that the devil was after him and muttered something about forgiveness. Acting Justice Jethro Miller suspended trial proceedings for the morning pending the out come of an evaluation report. Medical officials at the hospital have determined that McPhee is not crazy and is fit to appear for trial. Lawyer Mario Gray represents McPhee. K Brian Hanna represents Edwin Bauld Jr. Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the Attorney General’s Office are prosecuting the case. FROM page one course with a person between the ages of 14 and 16. It is alleged that the on August 11, Williamson had intercourse with a girl under the age of 16. The teen was reportedly being held at theC entral Police Station after h er parents had brought her in as uncontrollable. Williamson was not required to enter a plea to the sex charge and was granted $8,000 bail with one surety. He was ordered to stay away from the complainant. The case was transferred to Court 10, Nassau Street. Policeman charged with under age sex FROM page one Claims Govt is failing to pay bills are denied being paid on a timely basis, and when payments are made it’s in drip and drabs. “Imagine the pressure contractors and suppliers are being placed with their bankers.” This week Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham admitted that it is only through borrowing that Government is able to pay its bills at the moment. He said the Government has close to half of the $309,724,300 it got parliamentary approval to borrow in June of this year. However, Mr Ferguson yesterday said it is “not (his information or public knowl edge” that Government has failed to pay any of its bills, as Mr Roberts claimed. “There’s nobody out there who I know who worked for government who complained that they’re not getting paid on a timely basis,” he said. FROM page one I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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only witness to testify yesterday. “I am going to rise now, I am tired of it,” Senior Justice Allen said. After several minutes, the judge returned to the bench and asked Mr Ducille to withdraw the comment. She r eminded him of directions she had given to counsel, noting that after the tape recordings are played certain witnesses will b e recalled. Mr Ducille withdrew the comment stating, “My lady if I said so, I said it in justice and fair play.” D uring his examination-inchief, Mr McDermott told the court that he spoke to Bridgewater for the first time on Janu ary 12 at 6.27 pm. He said that during a telephone conversation, she identified herself as an attorney from the Bahamas who was representing a manw ho chose to remain anonymous. Mr McDermott said that Bridgewater told him that her client was the first on the scene a t Old Bahama Bay on January 2 and was in possession of a release document signed by Mr Travolta. According to Mr McDermott, Bridgewater explained that the document was a release form used in the event that someone refusedm edical treatment or transportation to a hospital. MrM cDermott said that Bridgewater assured him that no one e lse was aware of the document and that her client had the original, while she was in possession of the only copy. Mr McDermott said that B ridgewater told him that the document was not on file in theo fficial records of the Rand Memorial Hospital because her c lient had taken it home as it was not necessary to file it and also because it had a celebrity’s signature on it. Mr McDerm ott told the c ourt that he questioned Bridgewater as to the signifi-c ance of the document. He said that Bridgewater told him that it was h er client’s contention that the d ocument was very incriminating of Mr Travolta as it could show that he either intentionally killed his son Jett, was negli-g ent in the supervision of his son, or that he had tried to flee the jurisdiction with his dead son. Mr McDermott said that B ridgewater told him that her c lient had been contacted by several foreign media entities, including Inside Edition, Geraldo Rivera, Greta Van Sus-t eren and someone from the UK regarding the document. According to Mr McDermott, Bridgewater also told him that h er client had been contacted b y someone in the media who had told him that the document could be worth a substantial sum of money if it showed thatM r Travolta had deprived his son of medical care. Mr McDermott testified that Bridgewater told him that the reason she was calling was to determine whether Mr Tra-v olta would be interested in acquiring the document. MrM cDermott told the court that he asked Bridgewater what her c lient was seeking and whether he wanted to be reinstated at his job since she mentioned that he had been suspended for 30 days for speaking to the media.M r McDermott said that Bridgewater told him that herc lient wanted money, but at that time had not set a price. M r McDermott told the court that he said to Bridgewa ter, “Do you realise that what you are doing constitutes a c riminal offence in the United S tates, specifically extortion? If I go to the authorities you and the ambulance driver will be in trouble.” M r McDermott said he told her that no expenses would be spared to ensure that the entire Bahamas knew what her client h ad done. A ccording to Mr McDermott, Bridgewater responded by saying that she had discussed that with her client and that hed id not care. Mr McDermott further testified that he asked Bridgewater to forward him a copy of the document and that 1 1 minutes later, Bridgewater s ent him an e-mail stating that her client did not want her to forward the document. According to Mr McDermott, Bridge-w ater stated in the e-mail that her client did not want to deal with it that way as the document was too sensitive. He also t old the court that on January 1 3, he spoke to Ronald Zupancic by telephone and told him everything Bridgewater had told him. H e further testified that on January 16, he spoke to Mr Zupancic again, then spoke to Mr Travolta. He told the court that on Saturday, January 17, he flew to Nassau, and checkedi n to the Sheraton Hotel, Cable Beach. He also told the courtt hat there was a meeting between several lawyers as well a s Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police Marvin Dames and ASP Ricardo Taylor at the Gibson and Co law firm, Shirley Street. He said that it was att hat time that he brought the matter to the attention of policea nd gave them permission to instal hidden cameras in his h otel room and place a wiretap on him. Mr McDermott told the court that later that day he spoke to Bridgewater and that t hat conversation was recorde d by police. He went on to testify that the following morning he met with Bridgewater in his hotel room around 10.25 am.M r McDermott recalled that he met her in the lobby of the Sheraton. He said he told her that he would rather meet in a m ore secure location. She a greed stating that she too did not want to remain in the lobby as she was recognizable. He told the court that he spoke toB ridgewater again at 3.30pm over the telephone. He said that Bridgewater had phoned him to inform him that her client h ad dropped his demand to $15 m illion and that she was willing to receive the funds. Mr McDermott said that he told Bridgewater that he woulds peak to his clients and get back to her as soon as possible. He also told the court that he later spoke to her again at 8.15 pm a nd told her that Mr Travolta a nd his wife were taking the matter under advisement. He further testified that at 10.15pm he spoke to Bridgewater againa nd told her that Mr Travolta had agreed to pay the sum of $10 million in instalments of $2.5 million. According to Mr McDermott, Bridgewater indicated to him that her client wasw illing to meet with him personally. Mr McDermott saidt hat on January 20, police returned and set up recording d evices in his room for a meeting with Lightbourne. He said he spoke with Lightbourne in his hotel room for about 45 minutes during which time hea lso spoke to Bridgewater on a speaker phone. He said that lat-e r that day he received trans fer instructions by e-mail from B ridgewater. During Mr Ducille’s crossexamination, Senior Justice Allen warned Mr Ducille about making comments on the quest ions he asked Mr McDermott a nd admonished Mr McDermott repeatedly not to engage in any commentary. Mr McDermott at times appeared dis-p leased with the manner in which the questions were being asked, and requested the court to direct Mr Ducille to correctl y pronounce his name as McDermott” and not “Macdermott.” Attorney Carlson Shurland also rose on several occasions, accusing Mr McDer-m ott of giving the court instructions. Mr Ducille also claimed that Mr McDermott was being defensive and accused him of s tarting the spat. M r Ducille asked Mr McDermott whether he had called Bridgewater first. Mr McDermott said that he hadc alled Obie Wilchcombe and then spoke to Bridgewater, promoting Mr Ducille to ask that he answer his questions specifi cally. Mr Ducille went on to q uestion why he had said that Bridgewater had told him during a telephone conversation on January 12 that “the reason she was calling was to determine whether Mr Travolta w ould be interested in acquiring t he document” when he had stated that he had made the call. Replied Mr McDermott: “That’s what she said.” He sug-g ested that Bridgewater must have been nervous, remarking that “maybe it was her first extortion.” This prompted a s tern admonition from the j udge. Mr Ducille further asked whether his client had made a demand for money. Mr McDermott explained that Bridgewa-t er had made a demand for an unspecified amount. Mr Ducille suggested to Mr McDermott that he was an u ntruthful witness and that he w as the Sergeant Major and leader of the orchestra in the whole ordeal. Mr McDermott firmly denied this suggestion.M r Ducille also suggested that it was McDermott who had called and suggested to make an offer. To this Mr McDermott replied, Absolutely not.” T he case resumes at 10 o’clock this morning when Mr McDermott is expected to be recalled. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICE PREVONLOUP LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofPREVONLOUPLTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE AUTREMENT INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 38 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofAUTREMENTINC.has been comp leted; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE KTLA FINES INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofKTLAFINES INC. has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE HIGH GLOWVISION LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 ( 8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the dissolution ofHIGH GLOWVISION LTD.has been c ompleted; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofINIGO HOLDINGS LTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE BIALEX VISTA LIMITEDNotice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofBIALEX VISTALIMITED has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofUNITED BILTMORE FORESTLTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE CIRCUITPOINT INC.N otice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the d issolution ofCIRCUITPOINTINC.h as been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and t he Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE HAPPY MAXIM LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofHAPPYMAXIM LTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator heated exchange over the newly formed Bahamas National Press Club, of which Mr McKinney is an officer. Mr Gibson is seeking damages in connection with the claim that Mr McKinney, as the host of the talk show ‘Hard Copy’ which airs on GEMS Radio, “falsely and maliciously” spoke words which implied that Mr Gibson “was a man who led an alternative lifestyle.” The writ claims Mr McKinney also suggested that Mr Gibson “had to be transferred from one school to another because he habitually molested children.” Mr McKinney and Bartlett-McSweeny Communications Limited, the parent company of Gems Radio 105.9FM, have been ordered to respond within 14 days of being served with the writ. Slander accusation F ROM page one Tensions mount in attempted extortion trial F ROM page one Pleasant Bridgewater

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N EW YORK (AP Nike said Thursday it does not have a “contractual relationship” with Michael Vick, a day after the quarterback’s agent announced a deal with the manufacturer. In a statement released Thursday morning, Nike said it has “agreed to supply product to Michael Vick as we do a number of athletes who are not under contract with Nike.” On Wednesday, Michael Principe, the managing direc tor of BEST, the agency that represents Vick, announced the Philadelphia Eagles player had a new deal with Nike during a panel discussion at the Sports Sponsorship Sym posium. “He actually just became a N ike client,” Principe said Wednesday. “He has a new deal with Nike that we’re all very pleased about.” Principe declined comment Thursday. Vick’s agent, Joel Segal, said later Wednesday that Vick looked forward to continuing his relationship with Nike, adding that the player and company had agreed not to release terms of the deal. Segal did not immediately return a call for comment Thursday. Nike had initially declined comment Wednesday night. Nike, which signed Vick as a rookie in 2001, terminated his contract in August 2007 after he filed a plea agree ment admitting his involve ment in a dogfighting ring. C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM India beats West Indies by seven wickets B ANGKOK (AP champion Jo-Wil-f ried Tsonga won a three-tiebreaker match against E rnests Gulbis 6-7 ( 3), 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2) Thursday to advance to the quarterfinals o f the Thailand Open. Gulbis, ranked 9 9th, staved off a set p oint at 4-5 to take the opener and had 5 -4 and 6-5 leads in t he second set. But the Frenchman held on to force the tiebreaker. I n the third set, players held serve to set up another tiebreaker, when Tsonga forced Gulbis into errors. It was very tough, but I fought all along,” said Tsonga, ranked No. 7. “Finally, I won a nd I’m happy to win. It’s important for me to defend my title.” J ohn Isner of the United S tates also advanced to the quarterfinals by defeating Mischa Zverev of Germany 7 -6 (5 48th-ranked Isner will face fourth-s eeded Viktor Troicki of Serbia. “He hits the ball r eally big,” said the 6 -foot-9 Isner. “So do I. It will be a good match. He has w on a lot of matches this year. That’s why he’s 32nd in thew orld.” A merican Kevin Kim lost to Gilles S imon of France 6-2, 6 -2. The second-seeded Simon, who retired with a knee injury during the U.S.O pen, dominated play with his baseline game. Andreas Beck of Germany also cruised with a 6-1, 6-7 (36 -4 victory over Donald Young of the United States. Beck will play Jurgen Melzer o f Austria. In other second round matches, American RobbyG inepri lost to Evgeny K orolev 6-1, 6-1 and Marat Safin lost to Marco Chi udinelli 6-3, 7-6 (4 Defending champ Tsonga advances to the quarters Nike: No ’contractual relationship’ with Vick NEW YORK (AP er Paula Radcliffe will defend her title at theN ew York City Marathon next month. The New York Road Runners announced T hursday that Radcliffe will attempt to win her fourth NYC Marathon title overall. The British runner won the New York City Half-Marathon in August, but skipped the world championships in Berlin because she needed more time to recover from foot surgery in March. She says her right foot is feeling good” and “the pull of New York was always very strong. I still feel the New Y ork course is a bit of a challenge for me.” Other top female contenders in the field include past champion Ludmila Petrova of Russia. The 40th running of the NYC Marathon is November 1. R R a a d d c c l l i i f f f f e e t t o o d d e e f f e e n n d d N N Y Y C C M M a a r r a a t t h h o o n n t t i i t t l l e e TSONGA N EW YORK (AP Kobe Bryant’s jersey is still more popular in E urope than those belongi ng to the NBA’s European players. Bryant’s Los Angeles L akers jersey was the topseller in Europe for the second consecutive year,t he NBA said Thursday. T he list was based on sales from retail locations across the continent duringt he 2008-09 season. Bryant, who also is atop the lists in the United S tates and China, is fol lowed again by Boston’s Kevin Garnett. Spain’s Pau Gasol, Bryant’s NBA t eammate, is third, with LeBron James fourth and Dwyane Wade moving up t hree spots to round out the top five. No. 6 Tony Parker ( France), No. 8 Andrea Bargnani (Italy Jose Calderon (Spaint he other Europeans in the top 10. Kobe’s jersey top seller in Europe INDIA’S batsman Virat Kohli plays a shot as West Indies wicketkeeper Andre Fletcher looks on during their Champions T rophy match at the Wanderers stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Wednesday... (AP Photo: Themba Hadebe

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By EDGAR THOMPSON c.2009 Cox Newspapers DAVIE, Florida Chad Henne doesn’t have Chad Pennington’s experience or track record. But Henne, the new quarterback of the 0-3D olphins, does offer something else. “I think arm strength is the obvious (thing Sparano said. “Now, arm strength in this league doesn’t necessarily mean everything.” But it’s a start, and it is the one thing Pennington -who had shoulder surgery twice in2 005 -has lacked much of his career. He suffered a season-end i ng shoulder injury Sunday at San Diego. When Henne makes his f irst NFL start Sunday at home against Buffalo, he will have the opportunity to show that he can run the offense,l imit mistakes and provide at least some of the leadership Pennington offered. A nd Dolphins linebacker Joey Porter sat out practice for the second day in a row T hursday because of a sore hamstring, and he could miss a game for only the seventh t ime in his 11-year career. Porter did light exercises on the side while the team prac ticed. Coach Tony Sparano s aid Porter’s hamstring is improving, but it’s uncertain whether he’ll play Sundaya gainst Buffalo. COB Caribs defeat the Lady Hornets C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By ROBERT MILLWARD AP Football Writer LONDON (AP chester City striker Emmanuel Adebayor escaped a ban for his extrav agant goal celebration against former club Arsenal and is free to play again on Monday. Adebayor, who has just fin ished a three-game ban for another incident in the same game, ran the length of the field to rejoice in his goal in front of the Gunners fans during City's 4-2 victory last month and the incident led to violent scenes in the crowd. The Football Association disciplinary commission fined the Togo international 25,000 pounds ($40,000; ,500 Thursday after he admitted a charge of improper conduct. Although it imposed a twogame ban, it is suspended until December 2010. "In reaching its decision, the commission took into account his admission of the charge, public apology and the extremely provocative nature of the abuse he received," the FA said in a statement. "However, the commission also stated that players have a responsibility to conduct themselves in a proper manner, and that such celebrations are unacceptable and have the potential to cause a serious public-order incident." Arsenal fans reacted angrily to Adebayor's celebrations, hurling objects on to the field with one steward being knocked unconscious. Adebayor is now able to face Aston Villa in the Pre mier League on Monday. Adebayor escapes ban for celebrating goal, free to play EMMANUEL Adebayor celebrates in front of Arsenal supporters after scoring against his former club during their English Premier League soccer match. Teammate and fellow former Arsenal player Kolo Toure is behind... (AP Photo: Jon Super MIAMI Dolphins q uarterback Chad Henne throws against t he San Diego Chargers i n the second half of a game in San Diego. (AP Photo: Chris C arlson) Henne faces some challenges, but gives Dolphins a big ar m THE New Providence Volleyball Association continued its regular season with a dou-b le header at the D W Davis G ymnasium on Wednesday night. In the women’s match, the C ollege of the Bahamas ( COB) Caribs started out on a positive note, defeating the L ady Hornets in four sets, 2519, 25-11, 21-25 and 25-17. The Caribs were led by K enisha Thompson's 12 kills and six aces and VanrickaR ose assisted with eight kills a nd eight aces. T he Lady Hornets were led by Simona Kerr, who finished with eight kills and two aces. O ver on the men’s side, the Intruders saw their first gamea gainst the Police Crimestopp ers and disposed of them in f our sets, 25-19, 12-25, 25-12 and 25-23. Prince Wilson and Glen R olle lead all scorers with 17 and 15 points respectively in the win. John Rolle lead theC rimestoppers with 10 points i n a losing effort. NP Volleyball Association regular season I n men’s match, I ntruders dispose of P olice Crimestoppers P or ter could miss a game BOXING BBC STATEMENT ON MACKEY T HE Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC after meeting on Tuesday night, released a press statement to inform the general public of its position regarding the former Commonwealth Boxing Council super middleweight champion Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey. T he commissioners decided unanimously to a ct on the recommendation of the medical committee, chaired by Dr Munir Rashad, as to when Mackey should be sanctioned to fight again. A medical team was scheduled to examine the boxer yesterday. Dr Rashad will then report the findings to the BBC and a decision will bem ade as to how long Mackey will be mandated to refrain from engaging in a boxing match. It was also emphasized that while the commission’s secretary, Fred Sturrup, is also president of the Commonwealth Boxing Council, the BBC has absolutely no jurisdiction over the C ommonwealth title picture and acts only on matters related to the local professional boxing s cene. B ASKETBALL N PBA REGISTRATION All NPBA teams/clubs and interested teams/clubs are reminded that entrance fees and r osters are due by October 16. The preseason is s cheduled to begin on October 23. All interested teams are urged to contact NPBA president Keith Smith or vice presidentA lsworth Pickstock for additional information. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Repoerter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DEACON Andrew Burrows has promised that this year’s Catholicb asketball tournament – set for the holiday weekend of October 9-11 – will be a very special one. For the past five years, the C atholic Archdiocese of the B ahamas has honoured Deacon L eviticus ‘Uncle Lou’ Adderley a nd Vincent Ferguson with a bask etball tournament. D eacon Burrows, organiser of the event, noted that while Adderl ey passed away prior to the start of t he tournament, he was joined by F erguson, who died last Wednesd ay. S peaking yesterday after Fergus on’s funeral service at St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Burrows said they are expecting to get everyb ody on board this year for the first time. “I understood that St Augustine’s College is finally going to put a team in the tournament. They have never done thatb efore,” Burrows said. A dderley was the former principal of St Augustine’s College and while Ferguson was the vice presi-d ent, he was responsible for coini ng the school’s nickname, ‘Big R ed Machine.’ Burrows said they already have a t least 10 senior teams registered to take part and are anticipating f our to five junior teams to enter. We are still discussing how we a re going to honour both of them t his year, especially now that they a re deceased,” Burrows said. “But w e are looking at doing something very special in their honour this year.” B oth Adderley and Ferguson, according to Burrows, dedicated their lives to the growth and development of sports and education in the country and the Catholic Arch-d iocese will do all it can to keep t heir memories alive. The tournament is expected to get started October 9 and wrap upo n October 11 with the crowning of t he two champions. M ost Reverend Patrick Pinder, Archbishop of Nassau, is schedu led to officially declare the tournament open. “We are expecting a v ery competitive tournament this y ear,” Burrows said. “I think there i s a lot of excitement in the air and a ll of the teams have been working h ard.” T he tournament is open only to men, but Burrows said they intend to have a number of women on h and to assist with the organising and operation of the games. Catholic basketball tourney will be a very special one SPORTS IN BRIEF SAC to enter team for first time

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Repoerter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net V incent Lloyd Ferguson wasr emembered a s a stern disciplinarian who cared for humanity just as much as he did his family, commitment to church and G od and country. Monsignor Preston Moss read the homily at the rite ofC hristian burial for the late F erguson yesterday. He described Ferguson, better known as ‘Greech,’ as the c onsummate Bahamian who put everybody above himself. Before a large gathering of f amily members, politicians, e ducators, sportsmen and well wishers in St Francis Xavier Cathedral, Moss said Ferguson’s life was like his (Ferguson’s) garden where he grew just about everything youc ould think about. In a lot of ways, Moss said, Ferguson was able to nurture and develop the lives of so many people that he came in c ontact with, whether it was in t he classroom, on the court o r field. And Moss said that even though Ferguson executed hisd uties with a stern hand, he n ever held a grudge against anybody and he also had a sense of humour and hew ould find a way to break out in a laugh when he faced some difficult challenges. B efore he took his seat, Moss said Ferguson certain ly “fought a good fight,” he finished the race and he kept h is faith in God, which enabled him to help as many Bahamians as he could as he went along his way. Ferguson, 71, died last Wednesday morning at hish ome. He left behind to mourn his wife Mary, daughter Anne Marie and son and daughter-in-law Alex and Danielle and grandchildren Kylie and Caden. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister and Minister ofN ational Security Tommy T urnquest headed the list of dignitaries. Among the list of sporting dignitaries on hand were Sir Arlington Butler, former president of the Bahamas O lympic Association, under w hom Ferguson served in his administration as treasurer. Outside of the church as F erguson’s body was carried to the Catholic cemetery for burial, many persons e xpressed their sentiments a bout the life of the deceased. Kimberly Rolle, athletic director at the College of the B ahamas, said her fondest memory came when she served as president of theN ew Providence Women’s B asketball Association. “We hosted the old-timers game and he coached one ofo ur teams, which had Mother Pratt on it,” Rolle said. “It was so funny because we were a ll laughing to hear him telling those women who are 60 and 70 years old to get back on defense.” A ccording to Rolle, he was a perfectionist with regard to discipline. F ormer semi-pro baseball player Etienne Farquharson, who flew in from Inagua, saidF erguson was more like a father-figure to him when he attended St Augustine’s Col-l ege. “He used to tell us that you h ave to learn the basics if you want to move on,” Farquharson said. “He was disciplined, he was serious and he kept you on the straight and narrow path.” P eter ‘Sweet P’ Brown, a f ormer basketball standout who played under Ferguson’s administration as president oft he Bahamas Basketball Federation, said Ferguson was a rare gem. A number of us had our s tart at the Priory Grounds and he was the one who stepped in and helped us to b ecome the players that we were,” Brown said. “I think if he was made the d irector of sports at the mini stry, sports would not have been in the mess that it is today. I think his disciplinew ould have really made a big difference in the way we do things today.” F ormer national team play er Greg Trotman, who now resides in Luxingburg, said he just had to attend the funeral b ecause of what Ferguson meant to him. “He was a stabilizing force f or many of us and without him, I don’t think I would be where I am today,” Trotmans aid. “We were like the last generation that came underG reech. I think we’ve lost such a great guy, who touched so many people. He has done so much for us all. So it’s as ad moment for all of us. He was one of the great mentors that we had. There will never be another Vince Ferguson. Here’s the last of his kind, a dinosaur.” Ever since he was a little boy playing basketball, for mer veteran basketball coach Steve ‘Bullah’ Pinder had a long-lasting relationship with Ferguson at St Bernard’s Sporting Club. “We were one short and he already had on a short pants, so we put him on the team,” Pinder said. “He hit three shots back-to-back. In those days in the 1950s, when you take a six-point lead, you win the game. “That’s how far back I can remember him. But up until today, I was there with him the day before he died because we were talking about trying to get the history of basketball in the country together.” Basil ‘The Kid’ Sands, one of the greatest basketball players to come out of Grand Bahama, said Ferguson taught him the basics aboutl ife. “He was always very firm, a disciplinarian, who was very fair,” Sands said. “He knew what he wanted out of life and he went out there and did w hat he had to do.” Fred ‘Papa’ Smith, who had a double opportunity to asso c iate with Ferguson in basketball and baseball, said the d eceased was “something else.” “He was a great man. I r emember I was just a junior player at the age of 15 whenh e invited me to try out for t he junior national basketball team. As a result, I was chosen on that team and that was my first trip off the island.” Smith, who considered Ferg uson as his mentor, said Ferguson helped to groom him in baseball and he went on to play semi-pro baseball. Larry ‘Doc’ Davis, the former secretary general of the B ahamas Olympic Association, said it was a very sad day w hen he got the news that F erguson, whom he worked with, had passed away. He was a great man. He was great for sports,” Davis said. “He has gone on, but I t hink the legacy that he has left behind will linger in ourh earts for years to come.” A nd Sister Annie Thompson, one of the pioneer female basketball players, said she too had a dual role in her association with Ferguson,h aving worked with him in administration at Aquinas College. “You know how he go. We were pretty much a like. He told me what he meant and I t old him what I meant,” Thompson said. “But recentl y, we were getting together w ith the basketball legends. “When I told a lot of peop le that I played basketball, they didn’t believe me. But we were meeting at our conv ent, so I had another opportunity to experience and bew ith Vince. I know he’s going t o be missed.” C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 PAGE 9 International sports news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM P ALLBEARERS c arry the coffin of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson... Photo by Felip Major Rest in peace Vincent Lloyd Ferguson Defending champ Tsonga advances to quarters... See page 9

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FRENCH-headquartered banks have agreed with their government that they will withdraw from all socalled ‘offshore centres’ stillon the OECD’s ‘grey list’ by March 2010, but their Bahamas-based subsidiaries yesterday said they were “very comfortable” this nation would escape before that deadline. If the Bahamas was to remain on the ‘grey list’, it would impact Frenchowned institutions such as Credit Agricole (Suisse and SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas of which has 100 employ ees, and a former Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB said the situation required this nation to meet its yearend commitment for signing the OECD’s ‘minimum standard’ of 12 Tax Infor mation Exchange Agreements (TIEAs Arguing that the French, as head of the OECD group that will monitor compliance with the organisation’s tax transparency and information exchange standards, were “trying to set the tone” and influence other G-20 nations to apply similar pressure to their financial institutions, Michael Paton said: “This could start a trend, and this means we have to proceed to get the required number of agreements in place by March. “I wasn’t concerned pro vided we met the deadline, but this underscores that it’s a timeline we need to pulloff. Hopefully, the Ministry of Finance can accelerate the negotiating process, and I’m sure they are. We have By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T WO INDUSTRY bodies representing US program ming royalty rights holdersh ave urged the Obama administration to take away trade benefits that allowB ahamian exports to enter the US tariff-free, Tribune Business can reveal, on the g rounds that this nation was not fulfilling its obligations to protect intellectual property rights. Both the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA Association of ProgrammersL atin America urged that the Bahamas lose its trade bene fits under the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA pulsory licensing regime for c able television, under which Cable Bahamas was allegedly p irating premium program m ing satellite signals. In its submission to the US International Trade Commis sion’s (USITC o n the economic impact made by the CBERA, and its twin Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI MPAA alleged that the com pulsory licensing regime had b een used by the Bahamas “to justify the retransmission o f premium pay television p rogramming to the detriment of US rights holders. “This compulsory licence allows cable operators in theB ahamas including the par tially government-owned Cable Bahamas to essentially steal films and program ming from the United States, thus destroying the economicv iability for US pay television networks that own the rights t o sell films and programming By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SANDALS believes a sales and marketing team, which its chief executive yesterday described as “the most sophisticated network of any hotel group on this side of the world”, will enable it to succeed where Emerald Bay’s previous ownership failed. The resort chain also anticipates having “enough airlift support” for the property based on initial negotiations. Adam Stewart, Sandals Resorts International’s chief executive, speaking to Tribune Business from London, said the resort chain’s distribution network throughout the US, Canada and UK pro vided it with the infrastruc ture to drive demand for its newly-acquired Emerald Bay property, something the previous ownership group never had. Praising the previous owners for “giving it a good shot”, Mr Stewart told Tribune Business: “You have to have an infrastructure to market an Out Island destination or unique property. It’s not a little boutique hotel. “Sandals has, as far as I’m concerned, the most sophisti cated marketing and distribution network of any [hotel] group on our side of the world. We’re an organisation that believes in a destination. We never build or acquire a hotel if we do not believe in the destination.” He added: “We have a dedicated force that represents us, our sales and mar keting team, between the UK, Canada and the US C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.17 collegebefore you know itSALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-1355 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating customized investment options guaranteed minimum interest rates exible accumulation periodall of the above invest in an annuity Sales ‘firepower’ to ensure success at Emerald Bay * National Workers Co-operative Credit U nion sees 4-6% increase in loan defaults as result of economy * Proposed n ew head o fsfice building to c ost $1m * Sandals chief believes marketing and distribution network will enable chain to succeed where previous owners failed * In talks with airlines, and believes ‘enough support’ for Exuma resort on airlift SEE page four By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor C I TY MARKETS’majority s hareholder was yesterday said to be “just days away from closing” the supermarket chain’s $5 million refinancing, its c hief executive telling Tribune Busin ess that its customer count was g r o wing by 2-3 per cent every four weeks. Sunil Chatrani, head of Bahamas Superm arkets, the company that trades as the 11-store City Markets chain, said the company’s Board of Directors hoped to sign off on the final 2008 audit draft at a meeting next week, with the long-awaiteda nnual general meeting (AGM f or end-October a date some 16 months after that financial year ended. T he City Markets chief executive also confirmed to Tribune Business that the company had, to date, received $1 mil l ion of the $5 million in new equity capital to be injected by its 78 per cent majority s hareholder, BSL Holdings. The remain der, he explained, was awaiting foreign exchange control approval from the Cen t ral Bank of the Bahamas. “We’re just days away from closing, to be honest,” Mr Chatrani told Tribune Business, when asked yesterday about the status of the supermarket chain’s refin ancing. “It’s going to be $5 million for now. We have received $1 million so far, and there is $4 million to come.” “Again, it’s just paperwork. We’re hoping that in a week or so it will be all com-p lete. There’s no particular requirement. It’s just a lot of paperwork, a lot of bureaucracy on everyone’s part. But there is no problem. No one has backed out. “It was just that to bring in the funds we n eeded Central Bank approval. I’m not sure where that is, but we don’t anticip ate any problems with it. It’s just taking time.” Central Bank approval is likely needed b ecause BSL Holdings’ largest share holder, with a 40 per cent stake in the priv ate equity consortium that acquired City Markets from Winn-Dixie for $54 million in 2006, is Trinidadian conglomerate Neal C C i i t t y y M M a a r r k k e e t t s s d d a a y y s s f f r r o o m m c c l l o o s s i i n n g g $ $ 5 5 m m r r e e f f i i n n a a n n c c i i n n g g d d e e a a l l * Supermarket chain’s customer count rising 2-3% every four weeks, chief executive says * $1m of refinancing received, with remaining $4m awaiting Central Bank approval * Company not waiting on refinancing to complete 2008 audit, with Board sign-off hoped for next week and AGM by month’s end SEE page two US industr y bodies call for Bahamas to lose trade benefits * Allege t hat Bahamas cable TV licensing regime breaching this nation’s copyright o bligations under C aribbean Basin Initiative * Cable Bahamas accuses rights holders of using US government to ‘coerce’ it SEE page five SEE page two By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A BAHAMIAN credit u nion yesterday said it anticipated enjoying a $1-$2 million increase in assets to $35$36 million if its 6,000 members today approve a merger with a rival, the economic recession having produced a 4-6 per cent rise in loan defaults. Alfred Poitier, chief executive of the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union, told Tribune Business that the p roposed merger with the rela tively small Bahamas Utilit ies Cooperative Credit Union which members will vote on today would give the latter’s 500-550 members access to “a lot of the prod ucts and services that are the norm in today’s financial services industry”. Currently, due to its relatively small size, the Utilities credit union’s members only had access to basic savings and loan products, the latter largely featuring a regulator consumer loan. In comparison, Mr Poitier said the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union could offer promotional loans, revolving loans, consumer loans and mortgages. “They’ve just not been able to do that for their members based on their size,” he added. On the savings side, Mr Poitier said the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union offered interest rates of up to 6.5 per cent on their term deposits, especially on products designed to allow members to save for their children’s education. “I don’t think there’s any comparison in the local market, particularly for small savers who deposit money on a regular basis,” Mr Poitier said. He added that the Merger to grow credit union’s assets to $36m March 2010 deadline for OECD ‘grey list’ escape SEE page five

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National Workers Co-operative Credit Union’s interest rates on regular deposits and savings accounts stood at 3 per cent, compared to the 1-1.5 per cent offered by many commercial banks, with the interest increasing as a member’s level of savings rose to “encourage asset building”. Apart from increasing its asset base from $34 million to$ 35-$36 million, Mr Poitier said the merger with the Utilities credit union would fur ther diversify the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union’s membership base, altering the perception in some quarters that it was just for hotel industry workers or union members. Pointing out that when things were bad in the hotel industry everything “driedu p”, Mr Poitier told Tribune Business that the merger, with t he Utilities credit union’s membership derived from BTC, BEC, and Water & Sewerage, would help to better ‘recession-proof’ his organisation. “Over the past five to six years we’ve worked diligentlyi n diversifying our membership base, getting the message out that we’re not owned by the hotel workers, and that we’re not a labour organisation,” Mr Poitier told Tribune Business. He acknowledged that the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union had suffered “some casualties” among its members as a result of the recession when it came tor epaying their loan obligations, having “seen a bout a 4-6 per c ent increase” in loan defaults. Mr Poitier said the National Workers Co-operative Credit Union had come up with “creative ways” to work with members, such as allowing them to pay interest only until they went back to work, as int he case of Wyndham employees due to the property’s twomonth closure. Those who had been terminated had been given grace periods to see if they could find alternative work, or allowed to make token payments. However, members who failed to come in and address their situation were being dealt with to protect “the people’s money”. M r Poitier said the National Workers Co-operative Credit U nion was being “very aggressive”, and while it was “willing to work with those who are making a good effort, I hate to say it, but we’re also exhausting the route of taking people to court as necessary”. The credit union’s members will also today vote on whether to acquire a property for the National Workers Cooperative Credit Union’s new head office. While no site had been selected, Mr Poitier told Tri bune Business that “once we get a good deal on the property, we’re ready to go, as we have a part of the funds to purchase the property and start construction. We’re as far as we can go without buying a property”. D raft plans had been drawn up, and Mr Poitier said the building itself was likely to cost $1 million to construct. “As a financial institution that’s been in existence for 26-27 years, it’s only natural we reside in our own building,” he added, explaining that it was currently renting property on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway from the hotel union. In addition, the National W orkers Co-operative Credit Union members will also vote o n whether to close its East Bay Street branch with effect from October 31, 2009. Mr Poitier explained that the building, across the road from the Outback Steakhouse, lacked parking and had seen a reduction in demand as a result of Kerzner International’s lay-offs over the past year. No lay-offs will result, the National Workers Co-opera tive Credit Union redeploying affected staff within its operations. “There is a possibility that we’ll be back in the east within a relatively short period of time, but in a bigger way and more convenient,” Mr Poitier said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FOR SALE60 tonne packaged Air Conditioning Unit 18yrs old 7”width 6”height 33’length Can be viewed at Carl G. Treco Construction 120 Mackey Street South All offers will be considered!302-9875 POSITION AVAILABLEFINANCE MANGERAmajorinternational nancial institution is seeking the services of a Finance Manager, The successful candidate must possess: Duties to include: Candidate should also: This position reports to the Financial Controller Manager Human Resources HSBC P.O. Box N-4917 Suite 306, Centre of Commerce One Bay Street Nassau, Bahamas Fax: 502-2566/2577Friday, 09 October 2009 & Massey. S everal sources have suggested that Neal & Massey is likely to increase its BSL Holdings stake as a result of the need to refinanceC ity Markets, possibly taking a majority holding in the group. That would explain the need for Central Banka pproval, but this has not been confirmed, and Mr Chatrani’s comment that “no one has backed out” appears to imply that allB SL Holdings investors have contributed in proportion to their existing holdings, thus ensuring no one is diluted. Meanwhile, telling Tribune Business that CityM arkets was “making progress on all fronts”, Mr Chatrani said the new capital was being earmarked to restart the company’s directi mport programme e nabling it to buy high-end products in bulk from foreign suppliers, thus improv-i ng margins and prices. “Our customers are reacting to the prices, noticing the difference in price,” Mr Chatrani added. “Our sales ares trong, reflecting that, and w e’re seeing more of our customers coming back to the stores. Our customer counts are up, and they’re growing at about 2-3 per cent ever four-week period.” C ity Markets, its operating parent and BSL Holdings have come in for heavy c riticism from minority shareholders who collectively hold 22 per cent of Bahamas Supermarkets, investor value having beenm assively eroded as a result of the $13.429 million net loss projected by management accounts for 2008 something that plunged thec ompany into negative equity. More than 15 months after the 2008 year-end, Bahamas Supermarkets’ external audi-t or, KPMG, has yet to sign off on the audited accounts, a timeline well outside the 120-day filing period stipulated for public companies. Many have argued that this saga has undermined thei ntegrity of the Bahamian capital markets. T he 2008 audit sign-off had previously been contingent on City Markets’ receipt of financing from BSL Holdings, which wouldh ave avoided the accounts being qualified as a ‘going concern’. However, Mr Chatrani said yesterday: “We’re rush-i ng to have the audit complete with or without the financing. It’s so old, we want to get it behind us, with or without the opinion, sow e can move on to the 2009 audit. We want to get it completed. “We had the final [audit] draft today for review. We have the opinion in hand, and should be approvingt hat some time next week. The Board will approve it, a nd we will call the annual general meeting (AGM shortly.” Mr Chatrani said Bahamas Supermarkets was “aimingf or the end of the month” for the AGM date, pointing out that shareholders had to be given 21 days’ notice. The City Markets chief e xecutive said the supermarket chain was “performing better than expected” against its revised projections, which had been down-g raded due to the economic downturn. He added that the company’s return to profitability would “be achieved coming out of Christmas”, and from there on, “on a period top eriod basis we expect to be generally profitable on a c onsistent basis”. With sales and customer counts improving, Mr Chatrani said City Markets was being prepared for itsr elaunch “in the next six weeks”, with different branding, signage and images. The deli area and equipment will also bei mproved. Apart from the $5 million injected into City Markets as the operating company, a significant sum will also ber eceived by BSL Holdings, Mr Chatrani indicated. That sum is likely to be used to meet its debt repayment obligations to Royal Bank of Canada, and refinance existing cred-i t facilities. FROM page one FROM page one City Markets ‘days from closing’ $5m refinancing deal Credit union Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their n eighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause,c ampaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE BAHAMAShas “reas onably endured” the global r ecession and fared better than many other nations in doing so, the minister of state for finance believes, its “national sense of perspective” being one of “the greatest threats” to its ability to weather economic contraction. Zhivargo Laing, in an address to a seminar organised by the Higgs & Johnson law firm, acknowledged that while many Bahamians may not share the same sentiments, he had seen indications from his travels that the Bahamas was coping with the downturn in business activity better than most. “I daresay one of the greatest threats to our ability to navigate the this current dilemma is our national sense of perspective,” Mr Laing said. “To date, we have reasonably endured the current global crisis, recognising not all of us have the same perspective. It has been my experience to travel to a number of count ries, and sit in meetings with m inister of finance from countries around the world, and I can tell you the great stress, grief and shock on their faces suggests to me that even in our pained circumstances, we are in a better situation thatm any others are facing.” As the minister acknowl edged, a significant number of Bahamians are unlikely to share his views, especially the 10,000-plus number who were terminated from their jobs during the 12 months between May 2008 and May 2009. However, his message to the Higgs & Johnson seminar was designed to give some modest hope, explain the Government’s strategy for guiding the Bahamas through the current recession albeit with a heavy dose of reality, and provide some perspectiveon how this nation was faring compared to others. Acknowledging that the Bahamas, let alone the Gov ernment, did not have the capacity to drag itself out of recession by itself, Mr Laing said: ‘We didn’t give rise to this economic fallout, and we do not have the ability to reverse it. In a real sense we are in a season; a season of economic decline. “We can define the reality of our economic [condition], but cannot alter the fact of the season. We cannot alter the circumstances or fact of the season. What we must do is adapt to see out the season.” Mr Laing called on Bahami ans to display “mental fortitude”, determination and a sense of perspective to help weather the economic storm and emerge into good times all the better for it, adding: “We will likely know more about ourselves, for good or ill, than we have ever known before. “It is on this basis that we are able to develop a strategy for forward movement. It has been our determination as a government in these circum stances that we must promote economic stability to the fullest extent possible. Reduc ing job losses, business failures and economic decline depends on it.” To achieve this, Mr Laing said the Government had focused on three areasmain taining the financial system’s integrity, “nurturing the econ omy during this downturn”, and providing social relief to those most impacted. Besides maintaining fiscal prudence to the maximum extent possible, keeping the fiscal deficit and national debt under some level of control, and ensuring the foreign exchange reserves, bank capi talisation and banking system liquidity stayed at reasonable levels, Mr Laing said the $12 million expansion in social services funding over the last two budget periods had served to “buffer consumers in a storm”. The Government had opt ed to do more foreign currency borrowing to boost the US dollar reserves, as opposed to Bahamian currency borrowing, Mr Laing adding: “All of these things working togetherh ave been an effort to buffer is to the fullest extent possible.” S till, the minister effectively admitted there were limits to what the Government could do, especially when it came to preventing the national debt something Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has admitted could breach the 50 per cent of GDP threshold, or $3.6-$3.7 billion getting out of control. “I know the best laid plans run the risk of failure,” he added. “We are not in control of all the forces and are limited in our resources, so somef orces are so great that they overwhelm us. When we have done all we can do, in my view, we stand and leave the rest to God.” Yet, attempting to strike a positive note, Mr Laing added: “We must always maintain hope. I’m confident we will come out of this difficult economic season and enter a period of progress and abundance. I cannot say when, but I know it will happen soon that we will emerge.” He added that the turnaround, “combined with wise choices for the future, will enable us to seize new opportunities” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrfrbt t t b b n n r r t trn "& + ("%) #tffnn ##tbnff "%!&" +' +$***" +' +$ tb INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000 (No. 45 of 2000 L iquidator’s Statement Pursuant To Section 137(6 The International Business Companies Act W e, Diane E. Fletcher, Liquidator of SHOREWOOD INC. HEREBYCERTIFY that the winding up and dissolution of SHOREWOOD INC. has been completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution. Dated the 1st day of October 2009. NOTICE Bahamas ‘endures’ economic crisis better than many * Minister acknowledges nation cannot pull i tself out of recession on its own, and that there are limits on what government can do * Says greatest threat’ to weathering the storm is ‘national sense of perspective’ Zhivargo Laing INSIGHT F or the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

PAGE 14

over 300 people. Every day they’re hitting the pavement to promote the islands and the destinations we’re offering.” Mr Stewart acknowledged that airlift to any Family Island resort was “a major challenge”, not just in terms of establishing service and getting visitors there, but also in altering traveller perceptions to ensure they knew the destination was “just a flight away” and more accessible than they thought. “It’s a joint effort on many fronts to work with the airlines to get service. You have to have firepower on the ground to let people know it’s just a flight away, and you can get there very easily,” the Sandals chief executive told Tribune Business. He added that the resort chain had already discussed airlift to Exuma and Sandals Emerald Bay with the existing carriers that served the island, including Continental Connection and American Airlines. ‘We’ve spoken to Air Canada and took them in the week we closed on the property,” Mr Stewart told Tribune Business. “We’ve had discussions with other airlines, and they’re interested in going there. At this point, it’s safe to say we feel we will have enough support in terms of airlift into that destination. With the airlines, it has to be good for them to be good for us.” Mr Stewart pledged that Sandals would attempt to give as much business as possible to Exuma-based suppliers and vendors, in keeping with its long-standing policy for all its resorts, but warned that “in this economic climate today, you have to be competitive”. Thus the message is that if you can provide Sandals with products of the required quality at a competitive price, and consistent/reliable supply, the chain will buy from Exumabased suppliers. Its Sandals Royal Bahamian property already puts everything out to tender in Nassau, Mr Stewart added. The Sandals chief executive said the response of Exumians to Sandals’ acquisition of Emerald Bay had “been overwhelming”, adding: “Everyone wants to see us be successful. “There’s a lot riding on us, and I’ve had many phone calls with people offering to lend a hand, saying that if there’s anything they can do, give them a call. It’s been quite amazing, and we will just do our best to showcase Great Exuma to the world. We feel strongly we can do it. “We would really love to see some of the developments put on hold, the private homes and the like, given confidence by Sandals to continue and people enjoy the island.” Mr Stewart pledged that Sandals Emerald Bay would “be at the higher end of our line up”, describing the resort as a Family Island property possessing first world facilities and infrastructure. “We’re starting with a clean sheet with this hotel,” he added, describing it as “a magnificent development” produced by a “big picture vision” for Exuma and Emerald Bay itself. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICE VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.N otice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the d issolution ofVIDADULCE VENTURES LTD.h as been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been iss ued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICEH EARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 38 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofHEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.h as been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off t he Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofBON VIVANTCOMPANYINC.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator NOTICE PARKGATE INVEST & TRADE CORP. In Voluntary Liquidation Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4Business Companies Act. 2000, PARKGATE INVEST& TRADE CORP. is in dissolution as of September 28, 2009. Marion Coukidou Madella of 284 Arch. Makarios III Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, 3105 Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator. L I Q U I D AT O R ______________________ Legal NoticeNOTICE SAMBOR INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 1 38 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofSAMBOR INC.has been comp leted; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHEN G. DAVIES of 8 CAMELOT CT, P.O. BOX F-42766, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization shouldnot be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days f rom the 2n dd ay of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Emerald Bay F ROM page one Beach front villa Emerald Bay

PAGE 15

t o move forward and turn the page.” F rench-owned banks currently in the Bahamas yesterday gave no indi-c ation they had any concerns about t he Government’s ability to meet the March 2010 deadline for escaping the grey list’, and expected to still be here. Ivanhoe Sands, head of Credit Agricole (Suisse comfortable with that, and this is really no surprise because that was part of the G-20 agreement. Members of the G-20 will be obligated to exit ‘tax havens’ still on the ‘grey list’ by March 2010.” And an e-mail communication from S G on its official view of offshore cent res, which has been obtained by Tribune Business, said: “Socit Gnrale is present in certain coun-t ries which are currently on the grey list. These countries are in the process of signing tax conventions for the exchange of information according tot he norms set out by the G-20 and it is e xpected that they will no longer be on the list by the end of this year. “Whatever the country in which we c arry out our activity, we apply the business ethics rules which are in forcew ithin the Socit Gnrale Group, i n particular with regard to KYC, and we respect local regulations. “The business model of SG Private Banking is based on advising clientso n their wealth by providing concrete solutions with regard to savings, the management of their investments and transmission/inheritance, and is not b ased on tax avoidance.” A s for the Bahamas specifically, SG said: “This country is in the process of s igning conventions and intends to be off the grey list at the end of the year.” to the Bahamas.” A s a result, the MPAA argued: “The Bahamas should not continue to benefit from p referential access to the US market while it is simultaneously expropriating US rights h olders’ property.” Also beating the drum for trade sanctions against the B ahamas was the Television Association of Programmers Latin America, purporting to r epresent more than 30 pay TV channels from that region, which also laid into the Bahamas’ compulsory TV licensing regime for violating t he CBERA’s intellectual property rights provisions. Describing the Bahamian r egime as “objectionable”, t he Association accused Cable B ahamas of “resorting to questionable tactics in expropriating certain satellite signals”. It argued that the licensing regime violated the Berne Convention on intellectualp roperty rights, and said it “represents an extremely dangerous precedent, and threate ns to erode the foundation o f intellectual property protection for the US pay television programming industry”. T he Association said it was concerned that other C aribbean nations may follow the Bahamas’ example, arguing that these issues “sign ificantly” and “adversely” impacted its members’ ability to conduct business in the B ahamas. Adding to the antiBahamas and Cable Bahamas o ffensive, the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA America Group backed the submissions of the other two groups. However, in its response to the US International Trade Commission, Cable Bahamas s aid that “for over five years, Cable Bahamas has sought a meeting with Television A ssociation of Programmers Latin America and its memb ers without success. Instead of meeting with Cable Bahamas, HBO Latin A merica and Television A ssociation of Programmers Latin America seek to use the office of the United S tates government to coerce the settlement of their private business dispute.” Cable Bahamas also a rgued that the Commission was not the appropriate forum in which to discuss the relevant issues, and asserted that the Bahamas met CBERA eligibility requirements, including those on intellectual property rights, the US governm ent not having found that this nation’s copyright law was “inconsistent with intern ational law”. And in its submission, prov ided through its Washingt on embassy, the Bahamas gave assurances that “it will i mplement its obligations w ith respect to copyright protection in the Bahamas”. Trade sanctions appear h ighly unlikely, although they could impact some $141 million worth of Bahamian exports that curr ently enter the US dutyfree every year. This is because Cable Bahamas has been working with the Bahamian Embassy in Washington, the Registrar General’s Office and the US Embassy in Nassau to try and resolve the problem, a nd has had some success in negotiating commercial arrangements with US prog ramming rights holders. The crux of the problem is t hat the Bahamas and rest o f the English-speaking Caribbean are seen as too s mall a market by many of t he programming rights holders, making them disinclined to negotiate commerc ial arrangements with Cable Bahamas. Their distribution and royalty rights do not allow t hem to broadcast outside the US, and the legal fees and other costs required to change these agreements would exceed the revenues gained from a small market such as this nation. Under a 2000 agreement, the US Trade Representat ive's Office was supposed to encourage the MPAA and the likes of its individual m embers to enter into commercial agreements with C able Bahamas, in return f or this nation amending its compulsory licensing regime v ia the 2004 Act amendm ent. Yet while the Bahamas believes it has fulfilled its side of the bargain, i t privately believes the US has to hold up its end. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICE MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofMULBERRYSLOPES LTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0,&+$(/)$125' RI & +$5/(69,1&(17671$66$87+(%$+$0$6 L V DSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDV F LWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGV LJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V IURPWKH W KGD\RI6HSWHPEHU WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[1 127,&( L egal NoticeNOTICE SHINEEY CANAL LTD.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Act 2000, the dissolution ofSHINEEYCANALLTD.has been completed; a Certicate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator .(1'$/:$<1( $/&,'( RI I NOTICE is hereby given that MACKINS TEHNOR of COLUMBUS DRIVE 30B, APT #2, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for r egistration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that a ny person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization s hould not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2n dday of October, 2009 to the Minister responsiblefor nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Legal NoticeNOTICENOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:(a JELENAOVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000. (bThe Dissolution of said Company commenced on October 1, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar General. (cThe Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. (dAll persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required on or before the 30th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, made before such debts are proved. October 2, 2009 LAKEISHA COLLIE LIQUIDATOR OFTHE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY Trade OECD F ROM page one FROM page one Michael Paton

PAGE 16

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 69F/21C Low: 74F/23C Low: 74F/23C Low: 75F/24C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 86F/30C High: 86F/30C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 87 F/31C High: 87F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 85F/29C Low: 79 F/26 C High: 86F/30C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 76F/24C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 78F/26C High: 85 F/29 Low: 76F/24C High: 84F/29C Low: 77 F/25C High: 87F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 86F/30C High: 86 F/30 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 02 ND , 2009, PAGE 7B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Variably cloudy with thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy with thunderstorms. Variable clouds with thunderstorms. Clouds and sun, t-storms possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 87 Low: 77 High: 89 High: 87 High: 87 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a shower possible. High: 88 Low: 77 Low: 79 Low: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel 93F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 92-82F 92-82F 95-81F 95-84F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................86F/30C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 76 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.02" Year to date ................................................31.43" Normal year to date ....................................38.65" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Oct. 4 Oct. 11Oct. 18Oct. 25 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:02 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:56 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 5:51 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:29 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 6:06 a.m.3.012:00 a.m.0.7 6:22 p.m.3.012:20 p.m.0.7 6:44 a.m.3.212:35 a.m.0.6 6:59 p.m.3.01:01 p.m.0.6 7:22 a.m.3.31:10 a.m.0.4 7:37 p.m.3.01:42 p.m.0.4 8:00 a.m.3.41:45 a.m.0.3 8:15 p.m.2.92:23 p.m.0.4 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25pc92/3379/26pc Amsterdam57/1348/8sh61/1650/10c Ankara, Turkey77/2545/7s79/2646/7pc Athens82/2768/20pc83/2868/20pc Auckland63/1753/11r59/1549/9r Bangkok90/3277/25sh90/3278/25t Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3077/25s Barcelona72/2259/15s71/2159/15pc Beijing79/2655/12s70/2150/10s Beirut79/2671/21s80/2672/22s Belgrade66/1848/8sh63/1745/7s Berlin54/1239/3sh55/1243/6r Bermuda81/2775/23pc81/2773/22s Bogota68/2043/6sh66/1846/7sh Brussels59/1546/7c64/1750/10c Budapest66/1845/7pc68/2045/7s Buenos Aires68/2048/8s72/2257/13s Cairo90/3270/21s92/3369/20s Calcutta93/3381/27t90/3280/26t Calgary54/1232/0c42/532/0r Cancun90/3272/22pc89/3174/23pc Caracas84/2873/22t83/2874/23t Casablanca78/2561/16s78/2559/15s Copenhagen52/1145/7sh59/1554/12r Dublin59/1546/7pc57/1343/6sh Frankfurt57/1345/7c63/1748/8pc Geneva 66/18 45/7 pc 68/2045/7s Halifax 58/14 46/7 pc 63/17 50/10 s Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 71/21 sh Helsinki 48/8 36/2sh52/1136/2sh Hong Kong 88/31 79/26 pc 88/31 77/25pc Islamabad 104/40 68/20 s 103/39 68/20 s Istanbul77/2564/17s79/2664/17c Jerusalem 82/27 62/16s83/2861/16s Johannesburg 67/1951/10t74/2354/12c Kingston 89/3179/26t88/3179/26sh Lima75/2360/15s75/2360/15s London63/1750/10pc64/1748/8sh Madrid81/2752/11pc82/2754/12pc Manila81/2777/25sh85/2977/25sh Mexico City79/2654/12t77/2554/12t Monterrey97/3675/23t89/3171/21t Montreal57/1350/10pc64/1757/13r Moscow45/736/2r46/734/1c Munich56/1342/5r66/1841/5s Nairobi85/2959/15t81/2756/13r New Delhi 93/3377/25s95/3577/25s Oslo48/834/1s43/632/0r Paris64/1746/7s68/2048/8s Prague 54/12 43/6 c 62/16 45/7 c Rio de Janeiro83/2873/22pc84/2872/22pc Riyadh99/3770/21s96/3569/20s Rome 74/23 59/15 sh 73/22 57/13 s St. Thomas89/3179/26sh89/3180/26sh San Juan86/3051/10s88/3154/12pc San Salvador 86/30 73/22 t 87/30 71/21 t Santiago 75/2350/10s70/2148/8pc Santo Domingo84/2873/22sh85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 80/26 62/16 t 76/24 61/16t Seoul75/2354/12s68/2052/11s Stockholm 48/8 34/1 pc 52/11 43/6 sh Sydney 72/22 59/15 sh68/2055/12r Taipei84/2877/25sh84/2877/25sh T okyo 75/23 70/21 r 77/25 68/20 c T oronto 59/1550/10r61/1651/10sh Trinidad90/3270/21pc93/3372/22s V ancouver 57/13 42/5 c 57/1341/5pc Vienna 57/1343/6c60/1551/10pc W arsaw 54/12 37/2 sh 52/11 41/5 c Winnipeg 54/12 38/3 pc 54/1240/4c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet5 Miles85F Saturday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet5 Miles85F Today:VAR at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles86F Saturday:SE at 8-16 Knots2-3 Feet10 Miles85F Today:S at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles84F Saturday:S at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet5 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque71/2143/6s75/2351/10s Anchorage46/737/2s48/837/2c Atlanta70/2156/13t77/2555/12pc Atlantic City72/2262/16pc75/2355/12t Baltimore72/2259/15pc75/2356/13r Boston62/1657/13pc69/2057/13r Buffalo58/1452/11r65/1847/8sh Charleston, SC82/2765/18pc85/2961/16pc Chicago61/1644/6c55/1247/8sh Cleveland64/1750/10r66/1847/8sh Dallas82/2757/13s76/2466/18c Denver61/1630/-1s63/1735/1pc Detroit62/1647/8r58/1445/7sh Honolulu87/3075/23s88/3175/23s Houston80/2663/17t81/2768/20t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis66/1846/7c61/1645/7c Jacksonville85/2965/18pc86/3068/20t Kansas City62/1644/6sh64/1744/6pc Las Vegas85/2957/13s86/3066/18s Little Rock82/2751/10s80/2652/11s Los Angeles88/3158/14s72/2258/14pc Louisville70/2153/11t70/2147/8pc Memphis77/2554/12pc78/2556/13s Miami88/3177/25t89/3177/25t Minneapolis54/1240/4r53/1143/6c Nashville74/2353/11t78/2549/9s New Orleans81/2767/19t80/2669/20t New York66/1862/16c73/2260/15t Oklahoma City76/2445/7s76/2456/13s Orlando86/3069/20s89/3169/20t Philadelphia71/2162/16pc74/2360/15t Phoenix 88/31 68/20 pc 92/3373/22pc Pittsburgh62/1652/11r68/2046/7pc Portland, OR 63/1747/8r61/1646/7pc Raleigh-Durham 79/26 62/16 pc 84/28 52/11 pc St. Louis68/2049/9pc65/1846/7c Salt Lake City 63/17 38/3 s 66/1840/4pc San Antonio 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 70/21 t San Diego79/2662/16s70/2163/17pc San Francisco 69/20 53/11 s 67/1951/10pc Seattle58/1443/6r58/1445/7c T allahassee 80/2667/19pc85/2965/18t T ampa 86/30 74/23 pc 87/30 71/21t Tucson84/2859/15pc84/2868/20t W ashington, DC 74/23 62/16pc79/2659/15r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com




TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE .
FOR $3.79

Pm lowin’ it

HIGH S6F
LOW TIF

© MOSTLY SUNNY,
~~ STRAY T-STORM

ANY



Volume: 105 No.260




Sales ‘firepower’
to ensure
SHH SSI:

Lr)

ime to ‘chang
justice System

Legal experts speak
out as Britain dumps j@
the Privy Council

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

WITH Britain formally abandoning the Privy Council as its
final court of appeal local legal experts again argued the need
for the Bahamas to seek a regional alternative to the council
within the next decade.

In an historical move, Britain's highest court was taken over
by its first Supreme Court after 11 justices were sworn in at a
London ceremony yesterday.

SEE page six

High drama in court

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THERE were tense
moments in the high profile
attempted extortion trial of ex-
PLP senator Pleasant Bridge-





water and former ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne yes-
terday during cross-examina-
tion of a key prosecution wit-
ness.

The courtroom drama cli-
maxed yesterday afternoon
when a visibly displeased
Senior Justice Anita Allen rose
from the bench for several min-

utes after attorney Murrio
Ducille questioned: “Am I
going to be muzzled in my
cross-examination?”

US attorney Michael
McDermott, who represents
actor John Travolta, 55, was the

SEE page eight



The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, See 2, 2009

=

under aged girl was arraigned
in Magistrate’s Court yester-
day.

Constable Dwight

Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane on the
charge of having sexual inter-

SEE page six

TALS Ur

a

Williamson, 33, of Nassau Vil-
lage was arraigned before Chief







Policeman charged
with under age sex

A POLICE officer charged
with having intercourse with an | |

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DWIGHT WILLIAMSON
leaving court yesterday.



VINCENT LLOYD FERGUSON’S widow Mary Ferguson is comforted by her son, Alex Ferguson (right). Behind is her daughter Anne Marie. The
funeral took place yesterday at St Francis Xavier Cathedral in West Hill Street. Mr Ferguson, a Bahamian sporting icon and school principal,
died on September 23 aged 71. MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 2. SEE ALSO FRONT OF SPORTS SECTION

Murder trial suspended as accused | Claims Govtis failing

FINS
RMI CCL

ALAWSUIT
has been filed in
the Supreme
Court accusing
talk show host
Steve McKinney (pictured)
and GEMS Radio of slan-
der.

The writ was filed by 7ri-
bune columnist and public
school teacher Adrian Gib-
son, with whom Mr MckK-
inney had engaged in a

SEE page eight



piro

Available eochuslwely at

Madero Shopp

receives psychiatric tests in hospital

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Officers who went to collect Wilfred McPhee
Jr from his holding cell before court yesterday morning were in
for a big surprise.

The murder trial in the Supreme Court had to be suspended
and McPhee taken to hospital for psychiatric evaluation after
he smeared faeces on the walls of his cell and claimed he was
crazy.

An ambulance and fire truck were summoned to the Garnet
Levarity Justice Centre just before court proceedings were
scheduled to begin at 10am.

McPhee, 26, was restrained and taken out on a stretcher by

SEE page six

mr Pe reo oe



NASSAU AND BAHAM

[ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER

to pay bills are denied

FNM Chairman Johnley
Ferguson denied claims that
Government is failing to pay
its contractors and suppliers
“on a timely basis.”

Bradley Roberts, a former
PLP MP and party chairman,
told a meeting of the Rotary
Club of West Nassau yester-
day that he has been informed
that Government is “strug-
gling to meet its obligations.”

He told Rotarians: “Con-
tractors and suppliers are not

SEE page six


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Christian Council calls for more religious education

THE Bahamas Christian Council is calling for
a national re-examination of the church’s Chris-
tian education efforts.

According to the BCC, the number of reli-
gious education programmes existing in the coun-
try is diminishing — and where they do exist,
teachers are often “ill-prepared.”

This “lack of formal teaching of Bible doc-
trine” to children can be linked to rising crime, the
breakdown of the traditional family structure,
and general social unrest, claims the council.
“This is a time for the church to stand up and
bring some level of resolution to the national cri-
sis in the Bahamas.”

“As Bahamians, our social lives in particular
have been modified, reduced, and changed over
the past 10 to 20 years and as a result we have wit-

nessed a significant change, both in the spiritual
and social life in our country.

“Consequently, over the last two years, our
lives have been drastically altered,” the BCC said
in a statement.

Transforming

The BCC said the Bahamas needs a “spiritual
overhaul”, and pastors must be empowered to
“revolutionise” their membership, with the ulti-
mate effect of transforming society.

The council lamented that over the “last 10 to
20 years, 20 per cent of our traditional churches’
Sunday schools and Christian education pro-
grammes have grown weak” while 50 per cent

A ee ee Ce ee

FAREWELL TO
VINCENT

FERGUSON

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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DEVELOPED HY

ANCQx

of churches do not have a formal or systematic
teaching of Bible doctrine.

“Over the last 20 or so years, 40 per cent of our
local churches find it difficult to recruit commit-
ted persons to teach Sunday schools.

“The necessary vitality and substance that are
needed to bring a level of stability to our nation’s
youth are missing in the spiritual development of
the next generation.

“Tf the truth be told, there is a lack of inspira-
tion from the pulpit that inspires members of the
congregation to live a life of self-sacrifice and
highlight the importance of integrity; how to love
your neighbour as yourself, and the eternal values
and destiny of man. All this and more should be
passed to the emerging generation,” said the
BCC.






The council suggested that 65 per cent of all
Bahamians “do not know nor do they under-
stand the need for theology.”

Meanwhile, 40 per cent of modern churches in
the Bahamas built their facilities with “no con-
sideration for Christian education or Sunday
schools”, said the council.

“Can all of this contribute to the National Child
Council’s report in 2008 which indicated that
there were 721 cases of child abuse reported in
our country?”

The BCC said that as the “church is restored
the nation will experience a level of social and
economic comfort.”

The church “was, is, and will continue to be the
spiritual, moral and ethical strength of all soci-
eties,” it added.



POLITICIANS walk past the
coffin as they pay their last
respects to Vincent Lloyd Fer-
guson.

i Hl
Us
ae tay
Hem ar ay]

Design/Build Teams are invited to submit proposals to construct a
new bridge carrying the Grand Bahama Highway over the Lucayan
Waterway near Freeport, on the island of Grand Bahama.

PRE-QUALIFICATION FOR BRIDGE DESIGN/BUILD CONTRACT

SCOPE OF WORK: ‘The project limits will consist of approximately one
half (1/2) mile of roadway, a bridge over the Lucayan Waterway Canal and
the extension of the existing seawall bulkheads along both sides of the
canal. The intent is for the bridge to span across the Lucayan Waterway
with no piers or marine fenders in the Lucayan Waterway.

BB This bridge is intended to be a four (4) lane facility
(2 Eastbound and 2 Westbound Lanes).

ER The Sidewalk facility should have two (2) lookout points, spaced
approximately fifty (50) feet apart (to overlook the canal).

The work also includes the reconstruction of the approach roadways
eastbound and westbound to the bridge and connection to the existing
four (4) lane divided Grand Bahama Highway beyond the project limits.

INTERESTED DESIGN/BUILD TEAMS MUST SUBMIT INFORMATION O%
THEIR TECHNICAL AND FINANCIAL COMPETENCE FOR QUALIFICATION,

NiO) LATER THAN

FRIDAY OCTOBER 9TH 2009"

MR. DUDLEY FRANCIS
SENIOR PROJECT ENGINEER

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED

Southern Ridge Building

PO. BOX F-42666

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island
Tel: (242) 350-9156

Fax: (242) 351-3473

E-mail: dfrancis@gbpa.com



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3



Ne a Ohm LO us

Police in
$400,000
drug bust

POLICE apprehended four
men after seizing almost
$400,000 worth of marijuana in
a major drug bust on Exuma.

Acting on a tip, Exuma
police, along with officers of
the Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV), went to Williams Town
at 1lam on Wednesday where
they discovered 100 crocus
sacks containing marijuana near
the shoreline.

A 55-year-old Eleuthera
man was arrested near the dis-

covery site. Officers also found
a 45 handgun with seven live
rounds of ammunition.

Not long after the drug
seizure, police apprehended
three men on a go-fast boat at
the eastern end of New Provi-
dence. It is believed that these
men may have been involved
in the Exuma operation.

The drugs weighed 3,935
pounds and have a local street
value of just under $400,000.

Investigations continue.

Banking transparency
move wins backing

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A MOVE towards more
transparency in international
banking has been welcomed by
the financial services sector as it
should help mitigate tax haven
concerns leading large banks to
pull out of the Bahamas.

An Amendment to the Crim-
inal Justice International Co-
operation Act tabled in parlia-
ment on Wednesday will
remove restrictions on the types
of offences for which fiscal
information can be shared.

And local banking bosses are
pleased by the move towards
greater transparency in inter-
national banking as it will dispel
the fears of the wealthy G20
countries that the Bahamas is
hiding tax-evaders.

In April of this year, the
Bahamas was included on the
Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development’s
(OECD) grey list of countries
that do not fully comply with
their international regulations.

Pressure

And last week CEO of
French banking giant BNP
Paribas, Baudouin Prot,
announced the bank will pull
out of Nassau by year end. It is
speculated the bank bowed to
political pressure under French
President Nikolas Sarkozy, and
the fear is other international
banks will follow.

This amendment is only one
of many steps to ensure bank-
ing in the Bahamas is compliant
with international standards.

Minister of Finance Zhivargo
Laing called the move by BNP
Paribas “regrettable” and said
he has been working feverishly
to meet the standards set by the
OECD, including the minimum
requirement to sign 12 Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEA) with other coun-
tries. Former Minister of State
for Finance James Smith said
the Bill to “remove the caveat
on the types of offences for
which assistance can be given,
so that a request which relates
to fiscal offences is no longer
excluded and can be enter-

O In brief

Police car
chase victims
identified

THE two men who died in a
horrific crash following a high-
speed police chase on Wednes-
day have been identified as 20-
year-old Daehn Bowe of
Hawthorne Road and 21-year-
old Dario Bain of Mount Pleas-
ant Village.

The men died at the scene
on John F Kennedy Drive
around 3am after their car, a
grey 2003 Nissan Sentra,
crashed into a utility pole near
Lake Cunningham, “cutting the
vehicle in half,” police said.

Police first became suspicious
of the Nissan on Fire Trail
Road because the car did not
have the necessary inspection
certificates. Attempts were
made to stop the car, which
police believed may have been
stolen. The vehicle with its
occupants sped off at a high
speed. There was a chase which
ended on John F Kennedy Dri-
ve when the driver of the Nis-
san lost control and hit a utility
pole on the side of the road.
Both men were thrown from
the mangled car and were pro-
nounced dead an the scene by
emergency medical personnel.

tained under the act,” will allow
for freer information exchange
between countries when there
is no TIEA in place.

Mr Smith said: “The OECD
is serious about what they’re
doing so they’re calling the
shots, and if we want to stay in
the game we have got to com-
ply with their rules.

“The whole idea is to put the
Bahamas back on an equal
footing with the other jurisdic-
tions in terms of its regime for
information exchange and
transparency, and ultimately,
to be placed on the list of coun-
tries that are totally compliant
with international rules.”

Bank of the Bahamas man-
aging director Paul McWeeney
also welcomes the move, but
said the government must be
careful to rise to regulatory
standards while still retaining
a degree of confidentiality.

He said: “Anything to do
with transparency within the
financial sector is always viewed
positively internationally, and
I imagine these pieces of legis-
lation are intended to improve
the standards of the financial
services sector so we conform
to the new world order.”

WORK CONTINUES at Arawak Cay, where the gov-
ernment has decided to relocate the container port.
There is also a harbour dredging project in progress.

‘no threat to environment’

ROUTINE tests have revealed
that the work around Arawak Cay
has not disturbed the sea floor
enough to create a threat to the
environment, the government
claims.

According to the Environmen-
tal Monitoring and Risk Assess-
ment Division (EMRAD) of the
Department of Environmental
Health Services, the level of tur-
bidity at Arawak Cay and the sur-
rounding areas is well below the
recommended limit of 29 neph-
elometric turbidity units (ntu).

EMRAD said its tests were
based on samples collected from
Orange Hill, The Caves, Dela-

that it is important to remember
that turbidity occurs as a result of
both natural and man-made caus-
es. “In open water, phytoplankton
is a major source of turbidity, but

closer to shore, suspended parti-

porte, Sandyport, Cable Beach,

Goodman’s Bay, Go Slow Bend,
Saunders’
Cay. The government is currently
dredging the harbour to facilitate
access to the world’s largest cruise
ships. Meanwhile, work is contin-
uing at Arawak Cay, where the
container port is to be relocated.

Beach and Arawak

Turbidity refers to how murky

water is. High turbidity levels can
reduce the amount of light reach-
ing lower depths and thereby
inhibit the development of marine
life, particularly shellfish.
EMRAD’s statement noted



cles may be the result of shore-
line erosion, re-suspension of bot-
tom sediments and wastewater dis-
charges,” the statement said.
“Weather patterns also contribute
to the turbidity experienced in
near-shore waters. With heavy
rain, soil and other sediment may
run off into coastal areas, and with
ocean swells bottom sediments are
easily re-suspended in the water
column.”

The statement said it is to be
expected that the ongoing harbour
dredging project would contribute
to the turbidity in surrounding
areas. However, it said, turbidity
levels at all sampled sites were
only slightly higher than in previ-
ous months when there was no
dredging activities going on.

“EMRAD has been conducting
coastal and marine monitoring
since 1991, and thus has a com-
prehensive history of coastal con-
ditions which it draws upon for
comparison and analysis,” the
statement said.

UK filmmakers uiven chance to shoot Family Island film in Bahamas

TALENTED British film-
makers have been invited to
apply for the once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to spend two weeks
in the Bahamas shooting a
short film about one of 14 Fam-
ily Islands.

The 14 Island Films Chal-
lenge was launched by leading
British director Bharat Nalluri
yesterday to start a six month
search for 14 aspiring and pro-
fessional film-makers in the UK
to visit 14 Bahama Islands for
14 days, and produce 14 short
films.

There also will be the chance
to win a grand prize of £14,000
and state-of-the-art camera
equipment.

The Bahamas Tourist Office,
supporting the campaign, will
use the films to promote the
Bahamas.

Mr Nalluri and a panel of
judges, including deputy direc-
tor general of the Bahamas
Tourist Office Tommy Thomp-
son, will select the 14 lucky win-
ners who will work with the
finest producers in the indus-
try, and have their work aired

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Use your e-card to reserve tickets at S60-3549 or visit us at
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at a prestigious
red carpet event
at the British
Academy of
Film and Tele-



vision Arts
(BAFTA) in
Bharat March 2010. _
Nalluri To partici-
pate in the chal-

lenge, Britain’s
rising directors are required to
submit a 500 word treatment
on an inspirational person from
their local community and

explain why they should be
chosen.

Judges will then select
around 40 candidates to submit
a short film based on their
treatment, and 14 finalists will
be selected. All entries will be
available for viewing on the
challenge website:

(www.14islandsfilmchal-
lenge.co.uk).

The short-listed filmmakers
will take inspiration from the
warmth of the Bahamian peo-
ple to tell inspiring stories

They will be encouraged to
show the islands in their own
way and demonstrate their cre-
ativity and individuality through
their final cut.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

China zooms ahead in 60th celebrations

NEW YORK — This week, the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China celebrated its 60th
anniversary with a huge display of pomp
and precision in the capital city of Bei-
jing. The road that the world’s most pop-
ulous nation has travelled since Mao
Zedong’s revolution in 1949 is nothing
short of remarkable — from an isolated,
impoverished country to the planet’s sec-
ond-largest economy with corresponding
international power.

If one seeks a measure of the transfor-
mation that China has achieved in just a
lifetime, one need only witness the mixture
of hope and apprehension that attends its
present and future moves on the world
stage.

The long march from then to now has
not been smooth or steady. When your
reporter first visited China in 1972, as part
of the White House press corps covering
President Richard Nixon’s historic visit,
life in the country’s rural areas seemed
— aside from the trains that ran through
them — not much removed from the Mid-
dle Ages. And China in the early 1970s
was mostly rural.

Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution,
along with other of his totalitarian policies
and edicts, was disastrous for his country
and exacted a terrible price on China’s
people. Years later, the Tiananmen
Square protests and their brutal repression
represented another national trauma that
threatened the existence and future of
China as we know it.

It is important, as with all nations where
the citizens do not have a say, to differ-
entiate China, the state, from its people.
From Tiananmen, from the protests of
mothers and fathers grieving over the loss
of their children in schoolhouse collapses
during last year’s Sichuan earthquake,
from the protests of Uighurs and Tibetans
and any number of other attempts to
break free of government suppression and
censorship — it is apparent that the Chi-
nese people desire a greater share of free-
dom and self-expression than their gov-
ernment allows them.

But a case could be made that the Chi-
nese government’s ability to act without

regard to political factions or popular sup-
port is precisely what has given and con-
tinues to give the Chinese state an inter-
national edge in this era of more compe-
tent Chinese leadership. This is a nation
that can, by fiat, enact sweeping changes of
policy — as it has, recently, in aggressive-
ly pursuing the development of green tech-
nologies such as solar power and electric
cars. These are technologies that could
well position China to further develop
and augment its manufacturing and eco-
nomic strength in the century ahead.

The same autocratic approach has
enabled China to pursue economic and
fiscal policies that give it a position of seri-
ous leverage in regard to other nations,
including the U.S., given its holdings in
U.S. currency and treasury debt. At the
same time, China has thoroughly mod-
ernized a military that has never lacked
sheer manpower.

How the Chinese state will exercise its
economic and military muscle remains
one of the biggest and most important
questions in international relations.

In the midst of a conscious effort to
increase its international standing, Chi-
na’s positions on everything from Iran’s
nuclear programme to global climate
change figure to be crucial to how these
crises turn out.

Meanwhile, China continues to aggres-
sively pursue natural resources to drive
its economy, with an apparent disregard
for the regimes with which it does business
in places such as Africa and South Amer-
ica.

Sixty years on, the state founded by
Mao is strong beyond the imaginings of
those who witnessed its early years.

The Chinese people still yearn for basic
civil liberties. While some grow very
wealthy, the gulf between rich and poor
widens.

And the U.S. and its allies find the
future ever more dependent on the Chi-
nese state acting like a responsible global
citizen.

(This article was written by Dan Rather
— c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).

Govt actions
have inflamed.
casuarinas

controversy

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I have been following this
passionate debate on the
removal of the casuarina trees
for the last couple of months.
While I have a problem with
the destruction of any living
tree the sad reality is that they
are invasive and are taking over
many of our islands, displacing
natural vegetation which pro-
vides food and shelter for our
wildlife to survive.

The fact that the govern-
ment chose to take out these
30 trees without recognising
and dealing with the impact of
the rest of the population of
casuarinas, in my mind was and
is a ridiculous move and one
which has served only to
inflame the public. Had the
government announced that
they would begin a systematic
regiment of their removal
across the Bahamas, and
explain why they had to go, I
don’t think there would have
been such an uproar. Instead
we had a bush whacking exer-
cise a few months ago where
armies of men and machines
indiscriminately hacked away
at anything and everything,
often leaving the casuarinas in
place.

T have to wonder if this issue
has inflamed so many because
it is a development which is “in
your face”, as many people
have to drive by and actually
see first hand what is going on.

letters@triobunemedia.net



This and much, much worse is
going on right now in New
Providence and all over our
Family Islands, but it is out of
sight and out of mind.

I find it unbelievable that
those calling for the protection
of the casuarina have not
uttered a word for the acres and
acres of native trees which are
destroyed daily and land left
completely white with not a
blade of grass on it.

Take a ride out west along
the coast and have a look at the
bare white land that exists in
our “business as usual
approach” to development. The
removal of trees on the coast
leads to silt runoff which ends
up in our oceans smothering
coral reefs which protect the
coastline.

Or, go further south and
have a look at the at least 200
plus acres of biodiversity lost
to the Albany golf course and
the Albany/Maillis marinas. Or
you can drive along the south-
ern side of the Airport Indus-
trial Park and see another cou-
ple of hundred acres flattened
and white for a shopping cen-
tre.

While I am encouraged by
the numbers of people who

have written about this, your
passion is desperately needed
elsewhere — lack of transparen-
cy, the need for an energy pol-
icy, destruction of our water
tables, destruction of coral
reefs, dredging for marinas
everywhere you turn, overfish-
ing, animal abuse, lack of plan-
ning, lack of a clear policy for
the environment, no freedom
of information act, no laws to
guide the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment, no National Devel-
opment Plan- just to name a
few.

As for the views to the sea
issue, and that the Orange Hill
Beach area’s replanting exer-
cise has left no view to the sea,
the reality is that in a natural
setting you would have to go
through the bush to see the sea.
The fact that roads were built
right next to the coastline have
afforded us these delightful but
“unnatural” views to the sea.
The beach dunes and vegeta-
tion are there to keep the sand
and build the beach. The
removal of the plants along the
beach would mean the sand
would disappear with every
storm, and then the beach
would become rock. So what is
it that we want? To drive by
and see the sea, or to have a
beach to enjoy?

SAM DUNCOMBE
reEarth,

Nassau,

September, 2009.

$5.8 million on Miss Universe — but
how much on catching criminals?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Why doesn’t the Govern-
ment care about us?

$5.8 million was spent on
Miss Universe, but how much
is being spent to catch the
criminals running carefree on
New Providence? Unless
crime gets under control it
will not matter how much we
spend on attracting people to
The Bahamas, they will not
come!

A dark green Honda with
two occupants: one with
dreadlocks, one with short
hair, both slim build, number
plate (the number has been
given to the Commissioner of
Police) has been terrorising
the residents out East for the
last month that I know of.
The police cannot be serious

is currently a movement in
the community to put a boun-
ty on their heads just to get
these two menaces off the
street! What do we have to
do to get action?

Why aren’t the police and
politicians scared? Because
many of them have personal
protection.

Well, sirs and madams of
the government, I pay for that
protection and I want mine
too!

NYC was a city embalmed
in crime and it was not safe to
walk the streets only a decade

ago. How did they beat the
criminals? Why don’t we
accept help from those who
are more knowledgeable than
us because of experience?

Many Bahamians and resi-
dents with a choice will leave
if this continues...crying all the
way that I cannot live safely in
my own country! Help us
before it is too late to save
both tourism and your own
people!

CRIME
Nassau,
September, 2009.




Montagu walkers left in the dark






EDITOR, The Tribune.



about catching them! There As of Tuesday, September 22, 2009 the area around the



NOTICE

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES
AND CHARGES

Itishereby notified pursuant toregulation 4(10)
(b) of the Airport Authority (Amendment)
Regulations, 2009 that the Aijrport
Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of
September, 2009 imposed and or varied
fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as follows:

Aeronautical Fees

a) Landing Fees increase 23.6%

b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1%

c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%
d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1%

It is further notified that the said
imposition and or variation of Fees and
Charges shall take effect at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport ninety days

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA WILLIAMS of SOLDIER
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-1055, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Montagu which is used every morning by Bahamians who
are trying to keep fit, is in darkness due to all the street lights
in the area being out.

This seems to have happened when BEC was seen digging
a hole by the traffic light on the corner of the Montagu and
Village Road turn off. Today, Thursday, September 24,
2009 the hole was filled in and the lights were still out. All
of us who use this area during the early morning hours to
keep fit would appreciate all effects on the part of the
authorities to restore the lights.

JULIE PINDER
Nassau,
September 24s, 2009.

IN NETWORK WISDOM INSTITUTE

October 2009 - June 2010

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Contact (242) 376-3922
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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5



"It's the responsibility of the government and the Bahamian people have put the government there
to serve on their behalf that the Bahamian people have knowledge of what their government is doing.”

Ryan Pinder

Top tax attorney supports push | Wayne Legett

for Freedom of Information Act

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A PROMINENT tax attor-
ney threw his support behind
the efforts of Opposition
members who are pushing
government to introduce a
Freedom of Information Act.

Ryan Pinder, the Bahamas-
based attorney and represen-
tative for US law firm, Becker
Poliakoff, said it was the gov-
ernment's obligation to pro-
vide to its citizens the right to
see and understand the pro-
cedures of the administration.

He said that most of the
recent public uproar over gov-
ernment projects — the
dredging of Nassau Harbour,
the extension of Arawak Cay
and the proposed power plant
in Abaco — could have been
avoided if such legislation was
already in place.

"It's the responsibility of the
government and the Bahami-
an people have put the gov-
ernment there to serve on
their behalf that the Bahamian
people have knowledge of
what their government is
doing.

“Knowledge of the proce-
dures and whatever decisions
are made by the government,
how that affects them, I think
it is of utmost importance,"
Mr Pinder told The Tribune
at the sidelines of a press con-
ference at which PLP deputy
chairman Ken Dorsett
announced his bid for chair-
man.

"Especially in these times
when we've seen the govern-
ment undertaking certain pro-
jects where there's questions
to whether the government
has followed the proper pro-
cedures and there's questions
to whether certain environ-
mental disclosures were
there."

Mr Pinder said he support-



Mi Ryan Pinder backs PLP members’ call for legislation

VE»

OUTCRY: People protest about the proposed Wilson City power plant.

RYAN PINDER

ed Mr Dorsett and Opposi-
tion Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald in their call to have gov-
ernment implement a Free-
dom of Information Act
(FOIA).

Recently, Mr Fitzgerald told
The Tribune he soon plans to

THE BAHAMAS TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Students have chance to jump
start their technical careers

BIVI offering dual enrollment
courses for high school youths

THE Bahamas Technical
and Vocational Institute
(BTVI) is offering high school
students the chance to jump
start their technical and voca-
tional careers by offering dual
enrollment.

Over 45 students are par-
ticipating in the programme
at BTVI this Fall.

Dual enrollment allows stu-
dents to take college courses
and earn post-secondary cred-
it while completing high
school graduation require-
ments.

To enroll in dual enroll-
ment courses, which count for
technical and vocational cred-
it, high school students must
be in grade 12, have a‘C’ or
above average on their BJC
transcripts in math and Eng-
lish, have been granted
approval by principal and
guidance counsellor, and meet
all the entrance requirements
of BTVI.

Assessment

All courses require *C’ or
above scores on assessment
exams.

“We have a great partner-
ship with the high schools,
and this new programme will
provide a wonderful oppor-
tunity for students interested
in furthering their education
in technical areas of study,”
said Sean Adderley, public
relations and dual enrollment
coordinator. This partnership
comes at a time when enroll-
ment in technical programmes
is “through the roof,” Mr
Adderley said.

“There’s a level of excite-
ment in our programmes that
is contagious — it results from
innovative approaches by
BTVI management.”

“The dual enrollment pro-
gramme gives the institution
an opportunity to showcase
our great faculty, and current
students in a way that is so
interactive.

“We in turn get to offer ser-



vice to our students to help
them start their technical and
vocational education,” he
said.

“We feel this programme
helps us to build relationships
with the high schools as well
as the students.

“BTVI’s education system
is about the future.

“Tt is about preparing our
young people for their lives
and careers in the 21st centu-
ry.
“Through dual enrollment
we will give our students an
important advantage that will
benefit them throughout their
careers.

“This investment in our
young people will help to
ensure the Bahamas has a
highly educated and skilled
workforce to face the chal-
lenges and opportunities
ahead.”

BTVI offers a variety of
courses appropriate for high
school students, such as elec-
trical installation; heating,
ventilation, and air-condi-
tioning (HVAC); carpentry;
office administration, and
computer repair.

“This programme provides
a challenge for the students
who are academically strong
and motivated,” Mr Adder-
ley said.

“Tt can reduce the time to
complete a technical and
vocational certificate.”

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

@ Claims law could have stopped

_

bring his own draft FOIA leg-
islation before the Senate in
an effort to speed up the cre-
ation of the "sunshine" law.

Although he did not partic-
ipate in the crafting of the
draft legislation, Mr Pinder
will be part of the committee
that will review the document.
He said his experience in prac-
tising law in Florida — which
has a thorough FOIA — will
assist him greatly in fine-tun-
ing a Bahamian version.

Draft

He added that he hopes
government will accept the
draft and not view it as a PLP
political tool.

"It was a component to
their platform when they (the



“We have a great
partnership with
the high schools,
and this new
programme will
provide a
wonderful
opportunity for
students interest-
ed in furthering
their education
in technical areas
of study,”



Sean Adderley





govt projects uproar



Inset: the site of the plant.

FNM) ran so I would hope
there would be no objections
to it.

“This is an Act for the
Bahamian people, it's not a
partisan Act by any means, so
it should be put in place fairly
quickly.

Mr Pinder said the chal-
lenges of this type of legisla-
tion lie in carrying out its
guidelines: "(In terms of) what
agency is administrating the
act and having access to doc-
uments, providing it to the
public — that type of process
is the challenging part of it."

In June, the government
said it was taking steps
towards preparing the public
service for the implementa-
tion of a FOIA and for
departments to “open access
to their records."

Hi ACTING WORKSHOP, THE HUB



American actor

WAYNE LEGETTE

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

ASPIRING Bahamian actors will have the opportunity to
gain valuable tools of the trade from prominent American
actor Wayne Legette during a 12 week workshop to take
place at The Hub.

Hosted by Ordain Moss, the workshop serves as a vehicle
to allow aspiring actors to unleash and reach their highest
artistic abilities. Mr Legette is known for his roles in “The
Guiding Light”, “Sins of the City”, “Westside Story”,
“Rags”, “Romeo & Juliet” (the stage play), “The Big Bang”,
“Proposal”, “The Boys Next Door” “The Woman In Black”,
“The Wild Party”, and “November.”

During his time in the Bahamas, Mr Legette will give
classes in stage presence, public speaking, dramatisation,
auditioning, monologue performance, and proper breathing.

Ms Moss recently told Tribune Features she believes the
Bahamas is filled with many talented people who will great-
ly benefit from this type of opportunity.

“T have a passion for performing,
and I love modeling, singing, and
acting. I always wanted to learn how

“e s
to become an actor and the skills He is really

necessary to be good at it. So start- ood at what he
ed the Acting Workshop because I does and what I
feel that there is so much talent in Jegrnt at the

this country that just needs to be ° l
unlocked,” she said. private casos

After taking private lessons with with Mr Legette
Mr Legette, she recognised a has made me so
greater improvement in her skills, myych better.”
and felt her encounter is a needed
experience for actors in the mms
Bahamas.

“T went for a few private lessons with Mr Legette and I
enjoyed it. He is really good at what he does and what I
learnt at the private lessons with Mr Legette has made me so
much better. I then realised that I had to share this with my
fellow Bahamians,” she said.

Not only will the workshop unlock the talents of actors,
but it will also expose them to a window of opportunities in
the acting field.

“Because we have so much talent, I want Bahamian actors
to be recognised. I want to show Bahamian actors that they
are not limited to the Bahamas because there are so many
roles out there. I want us to see other places and other
places to see just how good we are,” she said. “We want to
see the young talent of this nation so the workshop starts
from age 17 and up,” she said.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be awarded
a certificate of completion.

The workshop is set to begin on October 3 at 11am -3 pm,
with lessons taking place every other Saturday.

KIDZ CY
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Tel: 328-8391
Rosetta St.

(9 Emerald Ridge Mortuary gi einen
Va) =

& loners Company Tih. {iis oe
Mr Wi enh 1G, Dean 0,

ei’ Maaggiag Perers! Ivrecter Our Serioes Includes:
‘Tiel ahah Ph MD Pes al eed. OT
Honuurvaey Yoon Sie Lie,

Chanting stot Piro Ae een

UR
« Email: sc RTs el ml Feri
UAa peter he nue Lisi a

Opal Funeral Service

jor
Mr. Kenneth John
McPhee Sr., 79

of Soldier Road West and formerly of
Rolleville Exemo will be held cn F malay,
October 12, 20060 at | Lamiat St. Margaret's
Anglican Church, Kemp Read, Rev. Pr.
Joseph Mycklewhite will officiate and
burial will be in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soklier Read,

The: Radiance of this “Opal af A Gea”
will always glow in the hearis of his
Wite of 60 yemrs Cheon:
Two Some: Kenneth Jr. and Anthony McPhee $2.
Ning Daughters: Brenda, Pauline, Ann and Charmaine MePhee, Bdish
Ralle, Manion Stuart, Lorraine Landy. Roth Johnson and Kath jeen Petty:
Trenty Ome Grand Sons: Doren and Joseph Adderley, Dion, Kemmeth
If, Kenve, Kennard, Kennel, Anthony Jr. and Anthon McPhee, Rayrand
ond Torey Knowles, Trevor Stuart, Angelo and Qeasio Lundy, Jamaal
Turmyuest, Densand and Dvlann Innis, Forome and Jason Farquarhson,
Jeffrey Rolle and Caswell Davis Se.;
Twenty Four Grand Daughters Rochelle amd Ancka Rolle, Darlene.
Vanriea and Sonia Knowles, Tanya Lindsey, Sanovia and Mackell Stuart.
Lishien, Kaytecll, krystal, Kelly, Kemien, Cleon, Anitomns and Aussonigim
McPhee, Sophia, Cordenia amd Sherese Landy, Amanda ard Amalia
Johnson, Brittany Ambriscer, Megan Turmques and Jamie Peary;
Forty Great Grand Children: Devin. Darlisia, Dereka, Deniesha, Deandra
Dnacisha, Dion fr, Deran, Tyler, Dior, Nica, Maing, Tonisha, Sidney,
Wiltonique, Verna, Denera, Amtoness, Trevor Jr, Glenda, lesha, Travis,
Alexis, Teanna, Leondrell, #haria, Glen Jr, Castriel, Kemeisho, Kemneth
TV, Tajah. Deshannen, Dchante, Denarj. Parrick Ir., Newaeh, Choristain,
Caswell Jr. Lakiethra, and Jamicko;
One Great, Great Grand Child: Kelis;
One Brother: Cleveland McPhee of Fort Pierce,
One Siger: Melvina Brown
Three Brothers-indlaw: Charles Cooper, Prince of Belglade Phonida and
Janes Bullarel:
Five Sisters-in-law: Betty Cooper, Beretta and Wally Bullard, Lowise
And Where Mic Phe:
Twenty Two Nephews: Joseph, Randolph. Kevin. Neville, Stephen and
Andrew McPhee, Police Sergeant 12% Deayne Kelly, Ivan Berwe, Patrick
Bren, Eugene Parker, Rev. ‘Bobby ani Rix kw Jiohersin, Deerenetrinns Cx (per.
Rudolph, Jonathon, Prince Jr., Bddie of Flowida, Police Inspector Cedric
Captain Henzal, Pastor Cedric, Ambrose and Shawn Bullard:
Twenty Nine Nieces: Phyllis Kelly, Inex Curry, Ampela McPhee, Agnes
Rliller, Debroal, Liga, Licioana, Denice Clarke, Patsy, Sharlene and
Karen, Saundra Patterson, Linda Johnson, Jessielame, Shirkeyjane and
Bremdlajoy of Flormda, Sandra, Pandora, Wendy, Sherry, Rees, Racrina,
Yvette, Rageel, Christine und Anse Bullard, Patrice and Shredreka “Jan*
Cooper ot The US Navy, (Porfolk, ¥Ad;
Four Sons-in-law: Hervis Rolle, Glen Stuart. Livingston Johnson and
James Petty:
One Daaghter-inllaw: Judith McPhee:
Many other loving family and friends inchading: Glenroy, Peggy, boanme
Kulrina, Jessia, Kenny, lan, Dolly and Lava Rolle, Enid Lhoyd, Aubrey
and Johnny Tucker, Clyde and Barbara Forbes, Shirley Walton, Heben,
Edeth, Erwin ere” Lawrence, Loanin Johason, Majone, Sher vi. Bercy
Willams, Domonick Dogier and Theresa Palion (all of the USA), Wilfred
Solomon, Siiney Gwen, Demestria, Uke, Swndera., Asia, Densens
Jr., Dewanie. neat, The Collie. McKenzie, Cooper, Money, Curtis and
Rolle Fanailves, Fr, Mivcklewhie, Rev, Ampela Palecinis, St. Margaret's
Church family, St. Bede’s Chorch family, The Remp Road and Soklier
Road Communities, Lean and Ruth Bullard

Florida;

Visitation will be im the “Emerald Suite” Emernld Ridge Mortuary &
Monument Company Lid. #20 Claridge Road on Thursday, October 01.
200% fram ipm to éom and at St. Margaretis Anglicam Church, Kemp
Road on Friday. Gcraber U2, 2009 from [Dam bo service line

Visit our website; www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video
tributes, sign guest book, send condolence, sympathy, share
memories and make funeral arrangements,



© SHOES

IN a commitment to the welfare of
both customers and fellow staff, a num-
ber of Kelly’s Home Centre employees
recently completed the American Heart
Association (AHA) training in how to
perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) and how to apply an automated

external defibrillator (AED).

Twelve staff members are now certi-
fied under the AHA

Heartsaver programme through Doc-
tors Hospital. Training was conducted
by Kelly’s learning and development
manager Ron Guest, who is a certified
AHA instructor.

The courses are the first in a series
that will certify additional employees
and which form part of a comprehensive

Time to ‘ci

FROM page one

According to the BBC News, the new
court will be the final appellate court for
all United Kingdom civil cases and crim-
inal cases from England, Wales and
Northern Ireland. The court replaces the
Privy Council, which served as the last
court of appeal for most Caribbean coun-
tries.

While many suspect the move will have
some impact on the region it is unclear
what, if, any it will have on the Bahamas.

The move comes after Privy Council
president, Lord Nicholas Phillips, recent-
ly complained that the council's Law
Lords spent too much time hearing cases
from former colonies — which are most-
ly in the Caribbean.

Sean McWeeney, a partner in the
Graham, Thompson and Co law firm,
believes the switch will have little impact
on the cases that emanate from the
Caribbean to the Privy Council.

Lord Phillps' comments, not the UK's
move towards the Supreme Court as its
final court of appeal, are what should be
of concern for the Bahamian judiciary,
said Mr McWeeney.

"Basically he was saying 'Go find your
own final court, leave us alone’. That has
already drawn quite a bit of notice from
legal scholars and lawyers in the region

Murder trial suspended as accused
receives psychiatric tests in hospital

FROM page one

medical personnel. He was put in an ambu-
lance and taken to the Diah Ward at the Rand

Memorial Hospital.

McPhee and Edwin Bauld Jr, 26, are on tri-
al for the murder, kidnapping and robbery of
Corporal Eddison Bain on October 22, 2007.

The trial is in its second week.

Sergeant Darrell Rolle, lead police investi-
gator, was scheduled to testify again on Thurs-

day.

According to reports, firemen were called to
the courthouse to hose out the holding cell

where McPhee was being kept.

Reports are that McPhee had defecated in
his clothing and spread faeces on himself and

approach to staff training at Kelly’s.
To give support to the training
received and to provide a safer envi-

PICTURED ARE:
(left to right)
Successful
students Petrona
Adderley,
Terrance Paul,
Shirley Paul,
Andrew
Ganteaume,
Rochelle Hudson,
Ethelyn Wong
and instructor
Ron Guest.

ronment for customers and staff, Kelly’s
have also placed a new AED unit in
the store at Marathon Mall.



ange justice system

and will spur a new round of debate at
the national and regional level of the
need to accelerate new arrangements,"
Mr McWeeney told The Tribune yester-
day.

He believes that the framers of the
Bahamas’ constitution anticipated that
this change would one day be necessary,
adding that the provisions that refer to
the Privy Council are not firmly estab-
lished.

"The provisions of the Bahamian con-
stitution, which established the Privy
Council as the ultimate court of appeal,
those provisions are not entrenched, they
explicitly contain the possibility that some
new arrangement may be made to
replace the Privy Council,” he said.

Currently the Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice (CCJ) is an alternative to the Privy
Council but is not widely used in the
region; it only adjudicates cases from
Guyana and Barbados.

Mr McWeeney lamented over this fact
but believes "a new regional court will
emerge within the next decade."

"Here in the Bahamas there is still a lot
of resistance to it (the CCJ). Now that the
English Law Lords are becoming increas-
ingly vocal, you're going to find that there
will be increased movement towards hav-
ing the Privy Council replaced by a
regional court."

Sir Geoffrey Johnstone, retired partner

on the walls of the holding cell.

Many persons had gathered in the area.
McPhee, who proclaimed that he was crazy,

was restrained on a gurney.

out that he was God.

come of an evaluation report.

appear for trial.

Bahamas Property Fund Limited

Consolidated Income Statement

For The Quarter Ended 30 June 2009

(Unaudited)

INCOME

Rental revenues
Other income

OPERATING EXPENSES

Bank Interest
Other expenses

FUNDS FROM OPERATIONS (FFO)

Amortisation of deferred expenses
Bad debt expense

NET INCOME

FFO PER SHARE
EARNINGS PER SHARE

NET ASSET VALUE PER SHARE

Three Months
Ended
30 June 2009

Six Months
Ended

30 June 2009
$

1,952,026
16,430

972,456
8,800
981,256 1,968,456

225,096
174,985

448,294
365,495
400,081 813,789

581,175 1,154,667

(27,809) (55,618)
: (33,752)

553,367 1,065,297

$0,24 $0.48

$0.23 $0.44

$14.39 $14.39



As he was being wheeled off, he shouted

He said that the devil was after him and
muttered something about forgiveness.

Acting Justice Jethro Miller suspended trial
proceedings for the morning pending the out-

Medical officials at the hospital have deter-
mined that McPhee is not crazy and is fit to

Lawyer Mario Gray represents McPhee. K
Brian Hanna represents Edwin Bauld Jr.

Vernal Collie and Erica Kemp of the Attor-
ney General’s Office are prosecuting the case.

Six Months
Ended
30 June 2008

1,981,894
9,600

1,991,494

568,135
497,135

1,065,270

926,224

(56,488)

869,736

$0.38
$0.36

$13.21

now consultant to the Higgs and Johnson
law firm, said it would only make sense
for the Bahamas to join a regional court
if it were comprised of former British
colonies — which share British common
law.

"T think if we're going to (have a
regional appellate court) I would rather
not be going to a Caribbean court which
has inherited the laws of a lot of counties
that are quite alien to us,” Sir Geoffrey
told The Tribune.

Britain's move to a Supreme Court
was also marked by the implementation
of closed-circuit cameras in the courts.
The British press reported that for the
first time, cases will be broadcast live.

Mr McWeeney said this was to shake
the shroud of secrecy associated with
closed hearings.

He said the trend could possibly catch
on in local courts. However, cost would
be a deterring factor, he said.

"Given the current budgetary
restraints that probably is the last thing
on their minds," he said.

The UK's Supreme Court is the result
of the Constitutional Reform Act of
2005, focused on removing the highest
appeal court from the upper house of
Parliament, and remove Britain's Law
Lords from the legislature, according to
the British press.

ae TFT
ee LU

TC ET ARS



FROM page one

course with a person
between the ages of 14 and
16. It is alleged that the on
August 11, Williamson had
intercourse with a girl under
the age of 16. The teen was
reportedly being held at the
Central Police Station after
her parents had brought her
in as uncontrollable.

Williamson was not
required to enter a plea to
the sex charge and was
granted $8,000 bail with one
surety. He was ordered to
stay away from the com-
plainant. The case was trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street.

Claims Govt is failing
to pay hills are denied

FROM page one

being paid on a timely basis,
and when payments are made
$ it’s in drip and drabs.

“Tmagine the pressure con-
tractors and suppliers are
being placed with their
bankers.”

This week Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham admitted
that it is only through bor-
rowing that Government is
able to pay its bills at the
moment. He said the Gov-
ernment has close to half of
the $309,724,300 it got parlia-
mentary approval to borrow
in June of this year.

However, Mr Ferguson yes-
terday said it is “not (his)
information or public knowl-
edge” that Government has
failed to pay any of its bills, as
Mr Roberts claimed.

“There’s nobody out there
who I know who worked for
government who complained
that they’re not getting paid
on a timely basis,” he said.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tensions mount in attempted extortion trial

FROM page one

only witness to testify yester-
day.

“T am going to rise now, I
am tired of it,” Senior Justice
Allen said. After several min-
utes, the judge returned to the
bench and asked Mr Ducille to
withdraw the comment. She
reminded him of directions she
had given to counsel, noting
that after the tape recordings
are played certain witnesses will
be recalled.

Mr Ducille withdrew the
comment stating, “My lady if I
said so, I said it in justice and
fair play.”

During his examination-in-
chief, Mr McDermott told the
court that he spoke to Bridge-
water for the first time on Jan-
uary 12 at 6.27 pm. He said that
during a telephone conversa-
tion, she identified herself as an
attorney from the Bahamas
who was representing a man
who chose to remain anony-
mous. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client was the first on the scene
at Old Bahama Bay on Janu-
ary 2 and was in possession of a
release document signed by Mr
Travolta. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater
explained that the document
was a release form used in the
event that someone refused
medical treatment or trans-
portation to a hospital. Mr
McDermott said that Bridge-
water assured him that no one
else was aware of the document
and that her client had the orig-
inal, while she was in posses-
sion of the only copy.

Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that the
document was not on file in the
official records of the Rand
Memorial Hospital because her
client had taken it home as it
was not necessary to file it and
also because it had a celebrity’s



signature on it.
Mr McDer-
mott told the
court that he
questioned
Bridgewater as
to the signifi-
cance of the
document. He
said that
Bridgewater told him that it was
her client’s contention that the
document was very incriminat-
ing of Mr Travolta as it could
show that he either intentional-
ly killed his son Jett, was negli-
gent in the supervision of his
son, or that he had tried to flee
the jurisdiction with his dead
son. Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client had been contacted by
several foreign media entities,
including Inside Edition, Ger-
aldo Rivera, Greta Van Sus-
teren and someone from the
UK regarding the document.
According to Mr McDermott,
Bridgewater also told him that
her client had been contacted
by someone in the media who
had told him that the document
could be worth a substantial
sum of money if it showed that
Mr Travolta had deprived his
son of medical care.

Mr McDermott testified
that Bridgewater told him that
the reason she was calling was
to determine whether Mr Tra-
volta would be interested in
acquiring the document. Mr
McDermott told the court that
he asked Bridgewater what her
client was seeking and whether
he wanted to be reinstated at
his job since she mentioned that
he had been suspended for 30
days for speaking to the media.
Mr McDermott said that
Bridgewater told him that her
client wanted money, but at that
time had not set a price.

Mr McDermott told the
court that he said to Bridgewa-

Pleasant
Bridgewater

ter, “Do you realise that what
you are doing constitutes a
criminal offence in the United
States, specifically extortion? If
I go to the authorities you and
the ambulance driver will be in
trouble.”

Mr McDermott said he told
her that no expenses would be
spared to ensure that the entire
Bahamas knew what her client
had done.

According to Mr McDer-
mott, Bridgewater responded
by saying that she had discussed
that with her client and that he
did not care. Mr McDermott
further testified that he asked
Bridgewater to forward him a
copy of the document and that
11 minutes later, Bridgewater
sent him an e-mail stating that
her client did not want her to
forward the document. Accord-
ing to Mr McDermott, Bridge-
water stated in the e-mail that
her client did not want to deal
with it that way as the docu-
ment was too sensitive. He also
told the court that on January
13, he spoke to Ronald Zupan-
cic by telephone and told him
everything Bridgewater had
told him.

He further testified that on
January 16, he spoke to Mr
Zupancic again, then spoke to
Mr Travolta. He told the court
that on Saturday, January 17,
he flew to Nassau, and checked
in to the Sheraton Hotel, Cable
Beach. He also told the court
that there was a meeting
between several lawyers as well
as Senior Assistant Commis-
sioner of Police Marvin Dames
and ASP Ricardo Taylor at the
Gibson and Co law firm, Shirley
Street. He said that it was at
that time that he brought the
matter to the attention of police
and gave them permission to
instal hidden cameras in his
hotel room and place a wiretap
on him.

Mr McDermott told the

court that later that day he
spoke to Bridgewater and that
that conversation was record-
ed by police. He went on to tes-
tify that the following morning
he met with Bridgewater in his
hotel room around 10.25 am.
Mr McDermott recalled that he
met her in the lobby of the
Sheraton. He said he told her
that he would rather meet in a
more secure location. She
agreed stating that she too did
not want to remain in the lobby
as she was recognizable. He told
the court that he spoke to
Bridgewater again at 3.30pm
over the telephone. He said that
Bridgewater had phoned him
to inform him that her client
had dropped his demand to $15
million and that she was will-
ing to receive the funds. Mr
McDermott said that he told
Bridgewater that he would
speak to his clients and get back
to her as soon as possible. He
also told the court that he later
spoke to her again at 8.15 pm
and told her that Mr Travolta
and his wife were taking the
matter under advisement. He
further testified that at 10.15pm
he spoke to Bridgewater again
and told her that Mr Travolta
had agreed to pay the sum of
$10 million in instalments of
$2.5 million. According to Mr
McDermott, Bridgewater indi-
cated to him that her client was
willing to meet with him per-
sonally. Mr McDermott said
that on January 20, police
returned and set up recording
devices in his room for a meet-
ing with Lightbourne. He said
he spoke with Lightbourne in
his hotel room for about 45
minutes during which time he
also spoke to Bridgewater on a
speaker phone. He said that lat-
er that day he received trans-
fer instructions by e-mail from
Bridgewater.

During Mr Ducille’s cross-
examination, Senior Justice

Allen warned Mr Ducille about
making comments on the ques-
tions he asked Mr McDermott
and admonished Mr McDer-
mott repeatedly not to engage
in any commentary. Mr McDer-
mott at times appeared dis-
pleased with the manner in
which the questions were being
asked, and requested the court
to direct Mr Ducille to correct-
ly pronounce his name as
“McDermott” and not “Mac-
dermott.” Attorney Carlson
Shurland also rose on several
occasions, accusing Mr McDer-
mott of giving the court instruc-
tions. Mr Ducille also claimed
that Mr McDermott was being
defensive and accused him of
starting the spat.

Mr Ducille asked Mr
McDermott whether he had
called Bridgewater first. Mr
McDermott said that he had
called Obie Wilchcombe and
then spoke to Bridgewater, pro-
moting Mr Ducille to ask that
he answer his questions specif-
ically. Mr Ducille went on to
question why he had said that
Bridgewater had told him dur-
ing a telephone conversation
on January 12 that “the rea-

son she was calling was to deter-
mine whether Mr Travolta
would be interested in acquiring
the document” when he hac
stated that he had made the
call. Replied Mr McDermott
“That’s what she said.” He sug.
gested that Bridgewater must
have been nervous, remarking
that “maybe it was her first
extortion.” This prompted 2
stern admonition from the
judge. Mr Ducille further asked
whether his client had made a
demand for money. Mr McDer-
mott explained that Bridgewa-
ter had made a demand for an
unspecified amount. M1
Ducille suggested to M1
McDermott that he was an
untruthful witness and that he
was the Sergeant Major and
leader of the orchestra in the
whole ordeal. Mr McDermott
firmly denied this suggestion.
Mr Ducille also suggested that i
was McDermott who had called
and suggested to make an offer
To this Mr McDermott replied.
“Absolutely not.”

The case resumes at 1(
o’clock this morning when M1
McDermott is expected to be
recalled.

Slander accusation

FROM page one

heated exchange over the newly formed Bahamas National
Press Club, of which Mr McKinney is an officer.

Mr Gibson is seeking damages in connection with the
claim that Mr McKinney, as the host of the talk show ‘Hard
Copy’ which airs on GEMS Radio, “falsely and maliciously”

spoke words which implied that Mr Gibson “was a man
who led an alternative lifestyle.”

The writ claims Mr McKinney also suggested that Mr
Gibson “had to be transferred from one school to another
because he habitually molested children.”

Mr McKinney and Bartlett-McSweeny Communications
Limited, the parent company of Gems Radio 105.9FM, have
been ordered to respond within 14 days of being served

with the writ.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
HIGH GLOW VISION LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HIGH GLOW VISION LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
KTLA FINES INC.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KTLA FINES INC, has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PREVONLOUP LTD.

—

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PREVONLOUP LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CIRCUITPOINT INC.

——

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of CIRCUITPOINT INC, has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BIALEX VISTA LIMITED

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BIALEX VISTA LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HAPPY MAXIM LTD.

= ——

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HAPPY MAXIM LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
AUTREMENT INC.

— -,——

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of AUTREMENT INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

—

Z

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.

——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of INIGO HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



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TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 9



ir Us UC TC ate wickets





Defending champ
Tsonga advances
to the quarters

BANGKOK
(AP) — Defending
champion Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga won a
three-tiebreaker

e] 7-6 (5), 6-4. The
48th-ranked Isner
will face fourth-
seeded Viktor
Troicki of Serbia.





match against
Ernests Gulbis 6-7
(3), 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2)
Thursday to advance
to the quarterfinals
of the Thailand
Open.

Gulbis, ranked
99th, staved off a set
point at 4-5 to take
the opener and had
5-4 and 6-5 leads in
the second set. But the
Frenchman held on to force
the tiebreaker.

In the third set, players held
serve to set up another
tiebreaker, when Tsonga
forced Gulbis into errors.

“It was very tough, but I
fought all along,” said Tsonga,
ranked No. 7. “Finally, I won
and I’m happy to win. It’s
important for me to defend
my title.”

John Isner of the United
States also advanced to the
quarterfinals by defeating
Mischa Zverev of Germany

TSONGA



“He hits the ball
really big,” said the
6-foot-9 Isner. “So
do I. It will be a
good match. He has
won a lot of matches
this year. That’s why
he’s 32nd in the
world.”

American Kevin
Kim lost to Gilles
Simon of France 6-2,
6-2. The second-seeded
Simon, who retired with a
knee injury during the U.S.
Open, dominated play with
his baseline game.

Andreas Beck of Germany
also cruised with a 6-1, 6-7 (3),
6-4 victory over Donald
Young of the United States.
Beck will play Jurgen Melzer
of Austria.

In other second round
matches, American Robby
Ginepri lost to Evgeny
Korolev 6-1, 6-1 and Marat
Safin lost to Marco Chi-
udinelli 6-3, 7-6 (4).

Nike: No ’contractual
relationship’ with Vick

NEW YORK (AP) —
Nike said Thursday it does
not have a “contractual rela-
tionship” with Michael Vick, a
day after the quarterback’s
agent announced a deal with
the manufacturer.

In a statement released
Thursday morning, Nike said
it has “agreed to supply prod-
uct to Michael Vick as we do
a number of athletes who are
not under contract with
Nike.”

On Wednesday, Michael
Principe, the managing direc-
tor of BEST, the agency that
represents Vick, announced
the Philadelphia Eagles play-
er had a new deal with Nike
during a panel discussion at
the Sports Sponsorship Sym-
posium.

“He actually just became a

Nike client,” Principe said
Wednesday. “He has a new
deal with Nike that we’re all
very pleased about.”

Principe declined comment
Thursday.

Vick’s agent, Joel Segal,
said later Wednesday that
Vick looked forward to con-
tinuing his relationship with
Nike, adding that the player
and company had agreed not
to release terms of the deal.

Segal did not immediately
return a call for comment
Thursday.

Nike had initially declined
comment Wednesday night.

Nike, which signed Vick as
a rookie in 2001, terminated
his contract in August 2007
after he filed a plea agree-
ment admitting his involve-
ment in a dogfighting ring.

INDIA’S batsman Virat Kohli
plays a shot as West Indies
wicketkeeper Andre Fletcher
looks on during their Champions
Trophy match at the Wanderers
stadium in Johannesburg, South
Africa, on Wednesday...

(AP Photo: Themba Hadebe)

Kohe's
jersey
top seller
In Europe

NEW YORK (AP) —
Kobe Bryant’s jersey is
still more popular in
Europe than those belong-
ing to the NBA’s Euro-
pean players.

Bryant’s Los Angeles
Lakers jersey was the top-
seller in Europe for the
second consecutive year,
the NBA said Thursday.

The list was based on
sales from retail locations
across the continent during
the 2008-09 season.

Bryant, who also is atop
the lists in the United
States and China, is fol-
lowed again by Boston’s
Kevin Garnett. Spain’s
Pau Gasol, Bryant’s NBA
teammate, is third, with
LeBron James fourth and
Dwyane Wade moving up
three spots to round out
the top five.

No. 6 Tony Parker
(France), No. 8 Andrea
Bargnani (Italy) and No. 9
Jose Calderon (Spain) are
the other Europeans in the
top 10.

Radcliffe to defend NYC Marathon title

NEW YORK (AP) — World-record hold-
er Paula Radcliffe will defend her title at the
New York City Marathon next month.

The New York Road Runners announced
Thursday that Radcliffe will attempt to win
her fourth NYC Marathon title overall.

The British runner won the New York City
Half-Marathon in August, but skipped the
world championships in Berlin because she

needed more time to recover from foot
surgery in March. She says her right foot is
“feeling good” and “the pull of New York
was always very strong. I still feel the New
York course is a bit of a challenge for me.”

Other top female contenders in the field
include past champion Ludmila Petrova of
Russia. The 40th running of the NYC
Marathon is November 1.

CLG

kerzner’

Paradise Island
Os a rd re,

The Bahamas Hotel Association

11"Annual Golf Tournament
AT

Cable Beach Golf Course
Sunday, October 4, 2009
Registration 7:15 am. & Tee off Time 7:45am

Would like to say THANK YOU to the
following Sponsors & Prize Donors for
their ah algae donations:

Haden SFONsoRs FOOD SERVICES
CARIBBEAN BOTTLING CO (BAHAMAS) LTO
FIDELITY BANE (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
RERZNER INTERNATIONAL
HASSAU/PARADISE ISLAND PROMOTION
HOARD
REC ROYAL BANE OF CANADA
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LTO
THE 4'ALBENAS AGENCY LTO

3

ween

REC Royal Bank
of Canada

PLATINUM SPONSORS
GRAHAM THOMPSON 4 CO.
COMMONWEALTH BANK
Nassau a

GOLD SFonsors
BAHAMAS WHOLESALE AGENCIES LTD
BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
BOBCAT RAHAMAS LT
DOCTORS HOSPITAL
15, SBNSOH 6 OO,
HPA
LEMME PATON AT

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LYFORD GAY CLUB

ROYAL STAR ASSUELACT LTO

The d'Albenas Aveny Lid

(CRAH AM, THOMPGON & Ci,
LOMIRSEL BAT TORMEYS-AT Lay

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Butterfield Bank (Bobomaa) Lid.

Clipper Group (Management) Ltd.
Comfort Sultes Paradies Island
Nettie Molter Company Lid.

Ck

COMBIDHWEALTH asec

A.ULA, Insurance Agents & Brokers
Prime Bahamaa Lid,
Providenoe Advisors

Providence Technology Group
ATA Consultants Lid.

Sports, Spine & Rehabilitation Centre
Waoag'a Rubber Samp & Printing Ga. Lid.

PRIZES
Abaco faach Saunt

* Anierlcan Alelines! American Eagle
Anthony's Geill

Badarad Ferries

Gahatasalr

Gancs Gel Semplooe (Overseas) Lid,
Bank af the Bahamas

Erichh Colonia! Miho

TE

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Comfort Seleee Paradies lelaad
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* Kerrier lnneenathonal Bahamas
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Seale's Cay Mevort, Mangrove Cay,
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DAMAAR GAOLIP

*Sacedal Thanks co Cable Reach Gelf Club
and aif paijers Mar aanking Mele pons ile
Precand io ape BHA Sober

HAHAMAS HOTEL ASSCKCLA TION



Saturday October 3rd - 8 am until 3pm

Special Prices on Selected Models

ONE DAY Special's ONLY

Economy down,
but fans pony up

Despite the rising cost of
tickets, football fans continue
lo altend games. Throwgh the
first three weeks of this season,
average attendance was higher
Ihanin 2ood.

Average NFL ticket price
$74.99

Average NFL attendance,
Per game.

68,7130°

GS cusaared

y
Racer ene Areca!
On The Spot Financing with Commonwealth Bank, and Insurance with Advantage Insurance Co.

o-4 Os aE

* Thhroveagh VWteek 3



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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



SPORTS

INBRIEF

BOXING
BBC STATEMENT ON MACKEY



THE Bahamas Boxing Commission (BBC),
after meeting on Tuesday night, released a press
statement to inform the general public of its
position regarding the former Commonwealth
Boxing Council super middleweight champion
Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey.

The commissioners decided unanimously to
act on the recommendation of the medical com-
mittee, chaired by Dr Munir Rashad, as to when
Mackey should be sanctioned to fight again.

A medical team was scheduled to examine
the boxer yesterday. Dr Rashad will then report
the findings to the BBC and a decision will be
made as to how long Mackey will be mandated to
refrain from engaging in a boxing match.

It was also emphasized that while the com-
mission’s secretary, Fred Sturrup, is also presi-
dent of the Commonwealth Boxing Council, the
BBC has absolutely no jurisdiction over the
Commonwealth title picture and acts only on
matters related to the local professional boxing
scene.

BASKETBALL
NPBA REGISTRATION

All NPBA teams/clubs and interested
teams/clubs are reminded that entrance fees and
rosters are due by October 16. The preseason is
scheduled to begin on October 23.

All interested teams are urged to contact
NPBA president Keith Smith or vice president
Alsworth Pickstock for additional information.








Catholic basketball
tourney will be a
very special one

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Repoerter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

DEACON Andrew Burrows has
promised that this year’s Catholic
basketball tournament — set for the
holiday weekend of October 9-11 -
will be a very special one.

For the past five years, the
Catholic Archdiocese of the
Bahamas has honoured Deacon
Leviticus ‘Uncle Low Adderley
and Vincent Ferguson with a bas-
ketball tournament.

Deacon Burrows, organiser of
the event, noted that while Adder-
ley passed away prior to the start of
the tournament, he was joined by
Ferguson, who died last Wednes-
day.

Speaking yesterday after Fergu-
son’s funeral service at St Francis
Xavier Cathedral, Burrows said
they are expecting to get every-
body on board this year for the
first time. “I understood that St

FORR CONAICIOMTo THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE
September Bill Delay

Due to the curent upgrade of our billing
system, post-paid cellular customers may find
that their September bills may be delayed in
getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
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SAC to enter team for first time

Augustine’s College is finally going
to put a team in the tournament.
They have never done that
before,” Burrows said.

Adderley was the former princi-
pal of St Augustine’s College and
while Ferguson was the vice presi-
dent, he was responsible for coin-
ing the school’s nickname, ‘Big
Red Machine.’

Burrows said they already have
at least 10 senior teams registered
to take part and are anticipating
four to five junior teams to enter.

“We are still discussing how we
are going to honour both of them
this year, especially now that they
are deceased,” Burrows said. “But
we are looking at doing something
very special in their honour this
year.”

Both Adderley and Ferguson,
according to Burrows, dedicated

MIAMI Dolphins
quarterback Chad
Henne throws against
the San Diego Chargers
in the second half of a
game in San Diego.

(AP Photo: Chris
Carlson)

their lives to the growth and devel-
opment of sports and education in
the country and the Catholic Arch-
diocese will do all it can to keep
their memories alive.

The tournament is expected to
get started October 9 and wrap up
on October 11 with the crowning of
the two champions.

Most Reverend Patrick Pinder,
Archbishop of Nassau, is sched-
uled to officially declare the tour-
nament open. “We are expecting a
very competitive tournament this
year,” Burrows said. “I think there
is a lot of excitement in the air and
all of the teams have been working
hard.”

The tournament is open only to
men, but Burrows said they intend
to have a number of women on
hand to assist with the organising
and operation of the games.



DAVIE, Florida — Chad

















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Henne doesn’t have Chad
Pennington’s experience or
track record. But Henne, the
new quarterback of the 0-3
Dolphins, does offer some-
thing else.

“T think arm strength is the
obvious (thing),” coach Tony
Sparano said. “Now, arm
strength in this league doesn’t
necessarily mean everything.”

But it’s a start, and it is the
one thing Pennington -- who
had shoulder surgery twice in
2005 -- has lacked much of his

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career.

He suffered a season-end-
ing shoulder injury Sunday at
San Diego.

When Henne makes his
first NFL start Sunday at
home against Buffalo, he will
have the opportunity to show
that he can run the offense,
limit mistakes and provide at
least some of the leadership
Pennington offered.

And Dolphins linebacker

NP Volleyball
Association
regular season

COB
Caribs
defeat

the Lady
Hornets

In men’s match,
Intruders dispose of
Police Crimestoppers

THE New Providence Vol-
leyball Association continued
its regular season with a dou-
ble header at the D W Davis
Gymnasium on Wednesday
night.

In the women’s match, the
College of the Bahamas
(COB) Caribs started out on
a positive note, defeating the
Lady Hornets in four sets, 25-
19, 25-11, 21-25 and 25-17.

The Caribs were led by
Kenisha Thompson's 12 kills
and six aces and Vanricka
Rose assisted with eight kills
and eight aces.

The Lady Hornets were led
by Simona Kerr, who finished
with eight kills and two aces.

Over on the men’s side, the
Intruders saw their first game
against the Police Crimestop-
pers and disposed of them in
four sets, 25-19, 12-25, 25-12
and 25-23.

Prince Wilson and Glen
Rolle lead all scorers with 17
and 15 points respectively in
the win. John Rolle lead the
Crimestoppers with 10 points
in a losing effort.

Henne faces some challenges,
but gives Dolphins a big arm

By EDGAR THOMPSON
c.2009 Cox Newspapers

Porter could miss a game

Joey Porter sat out practice
for the second day in a row
Thursday because of a sore
hamstring, and he could miss
a game for only the seventh
time in his 11-year career.

Porter did light exercises on
the side while the team prac-
ticed. Coach Tony Sparano
said Porter’s hamstring is
improving, but it’s uncertain
whether he’ll play Sunday
against Buffalo.



EMMANUEL Adebayor celebrates in front of Arsenal supporters after
scoring against his former club during their English Premier League
soccer match. Teammate and fellow former Arsenal player Kolo

Toure is behind...

(AP Photo: Jon Super)

Adebayor escapes ban for
celebrating goal, free to play

By ROBERT MILLWARD
AP Football Writer

LONDON (AP) — Man-
chester City — striker
Emmanuel Adebayor
escaped a ban for his extrav-
agant goal celebration against
former club Arsenal and is
free to play again on Monday.

Adebayor, who has just fin-
ished a three-game ban for
another incident in the same
game, ran the length of the
field to rejoice in his goal in
front of the Gunners fans dur-
ing City's 4-2 victory last
month and the incident led to
violent scenes in the crowd.

The Football Association
disciplinary commission fined
the Togo international 25,000
pounds ($40,000; 27,500) on
Thursday after he admitted a
charge of improper conduct.
Although it imposed a two-

game ban, it is suspended
until December 2010.

"In reaching its decision,
the commission took into
account his admission of the
charge, public apology and
the extremely provocative
nature of the abuse he
received," the FA said in a
statement.

"However, the commission
also stated that players have a
responsibility to conduct
themselves in a proper man-
ner, and that such celebra-
tions are unacceptable and
have the potential to cause a
serious public-order incident."

Arsenal fans reacted angri-
ly to Adebayor's celebrations,
hurling objects on to the field
with one steward being
knocked unconscious.

Adebayor is now able to
face Aston Villa in the Pre-
mier League on Monday.

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THE TRIBUNE

Sp

PAGE 11





§

RIDAY, OCTOBER 2,

ts

2009



& a

Defending
champ Tsonga
advances to

quarters...
See page 9

Rest in peace Vincent Lloyd Ferguson

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Repoerter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

incent Lloyd

Ferguson was

remembered

as a stern dis-

ciplinarian
who cared for humanity just
as much as he did his family,
commitment to church and
God and country.

Monsignor Preston Moss
read the homily at the rite of
Christian burial for the late
Ferguson yesterday. He
described Ferguson, better
known as ‘Greech,’ as the
consummate Bahamian who
put everybody above himself.

Before a large gathering of
family members, politicians,
educators, sportsmen and well
wishers in St Francis Xavier
Cathedral, Moss said Fergu-
son’s life was like his (Fergu-
son’s) garden where he grew
just about everything you
could think about.

In a lot of ways, Moss said,
Ferguson was able to nurture
and develop the lives of so
many people that he came in
contact with, whether it was in
the classroom, on the court
or field.

And Moss said that even
though Ferguson executed his
duties with a stern hand, he
never held a grudge against
anybody and he also had a
sense of humour and he
would find a way to break out
in a laugh when he faced
some difficult challenges.

Before he took his seat,
Moss said Ferguson certain-
ly “fought a good fight,” he
finished the race and he kept
his faith in God, which
enabled him to help as many
Bahamians as he could as he
went along his way.

Ferguson, 71, died last
Wednesday morning at his
home. He left behind to
mourn his wife Mary, daugh-
ter Anne Marie and son and
daughter-in-law Alex and
Danielle and grandchildren
Kylie and Caden.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister and Minister of
National Security Tommy



PALLBEARERS carry the coffin of Vincent Lloyd Ferguson...

Turnquest headed the list of
dignitaries.

Among the list of sporting
dignitaries on hand were Sir
Arlington Butler, former
president of the Bahamas
Olympic Association, under
whom Ferguson served in his
administration as treasurer.

Outside of the church as
Ferguson’s body was carried
to the Catholic cemetery for
burial, many persons
expressed their sentiments
about the life of the deceased.

Kimberly Rolle, athletic
director at the College of the
Bahamas, said her fondest
memory came when she
served as president of the
New Providence Women’s
Basketball Association.

“We hosted the old-timers
game and he coached one of
our teams, which had Mother
Pratt on it,” Rolle said. “It
was so funny because we were
all laughing to hear him
telling those women who are
60 and 70 years old to get
back on defense.”

According to Rolle, he was
a perfectionist with regard to
discipline.

Former semi-pro baseball
player Etienne Farquharson,
who flew in from Inagua, said
Ferguson was more like a
father-figure to him when he
attended St Augustine’s Col-
lege.

“He used to tell us that you

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have to learn the basics if you
want to move on,” Farquhar-
son said. “He was disciplined,
he was serious and he kept
you on the straight and nar-
row path.”

Peter ‘Sweet P’ Brown, a
former basketball standout
who played under Ferguson’s
administration as president of
the Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration, said Ferguson was a
rare gem.

“A number of us had our
start at the Priory Grounds
and he was the one who
stepped in and helped us to
become the players that we
were,” Brown said.

“T think if he was made the
director of sports at the min-
istry, sports would not have
been in the mess that it is
today. I think his discipline
would have really made a big
difference in the way we do
things today.”

Former national team play-
er Greg Trotman, who now
resides in Luxingburg, said he
just had to attend the funeral
because of what Ferguson
meant to him.

“He was a stabilizing force
for many of us and without
him, I don’t think I would be
where I am today,” Trotman
said.

“We were like the last gen-
eration that came under
Greech. I think we’ve lost
such a great guy, who touched
so many people. He has done
so much for us all. So it’s a
sad moment for all of us. He
was one of the great mentors
that we had. There will never
be another Vince Ferguson.
Here’s the last of his kind, a
dinosaur.”

Ever since he was a little
boy playing basketball, for-
mer veteran basketball coach
Steve “Bullah’ Pinder had a
long-lasting relationship with
Ferguson at St Bernard’s
Sporting Club.

“We were one short and he
already had on a short pants,
so we put him on the team,”
Pinder said. “He hit three
shots back-to-back. In those
days in the 1950s, when you
take a six-point lead, you win
the game.

“That’s how far back I can
remember him. But up until
today, I was there with him
the day before he died
because we were talking
about trying to get the history
of basketball in the country
together.”

Basil ‘The Kid’ Sands, one

of the greatest basketball
players to come out of Grand
Bahama, said Ferguson
taught him the basics about
life.

“He was always very firm, a
disciplinarian, who was very
fair,” Sands said. “He knew
what he wanted out of life and
he went out there and did
what he had to do.”

Fred ‘Papa’ Smith, who had
a double opportunity to asso-
ciate with Ferguson in bas-
ketball and baseball, said the
deceased was “something
else.”

“He was a great man. I
remember I was just a junior
player at the age of 15 when
he invited me to try out for
the junior national basketball

team. As a result, I was cho-
sen on that team and that was
my first trip off the island.”

Smith, who considered Fer-
guson as his mentor, said Fer-
guson helped to groom him
in baseball and he went on to
play semi-pro baseball.

Larry ‘Doc’ Davis, the for-
mer secretary general of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion, said it was a very sad day
when he got the news that
Ferguson, whom he worked
with, had passed away.

“He was a great man. He
was great for sports,” Davis
said. “He has gone on, but I
think the legacy that he has
left behind will linger in our
hearts for years to come.”

And Sister Annie Thomp-

son, one of the pioneer female
basketball players, said she
too had a dual role in her
association with Ferguson,
having worked with him in
administration at Aquinas
College.

“You know how he go. We
were pretty much a like. He
told me what he meant and I
told him what I meant,”
Thompson said. “But recent-
ly, we were getting together
with the basketball legends.

“When I told a lot of peo-
ple that I played basketball,
they didn’t believe me. But
we were meeting at our con-
vent, so I had another oppor-
tunity to experience and be
with Vince. I know he’s going
to be missed.”

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Merger to grow
credit union's
assets to $36m

* National Workers
Co-operative Credit
Union sees 4-6%
increase in loan defaults
as result of economy

* Proposed new head
ofsfice building to
cost $1m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN credit
union yesterday said it antici-
pated enjoying a $1-$2 mil-
lion increase in assets to $35-
$36 million if its 6,000 mem-
bers today approve a merger
with a rival, the economic
recession having produced a
4-6 per cent rise in loan
defaults.

Alfred Poitier, chief execu-
tive of the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union,
told Tribune Business that the
proposed merger with the rel-
atively small Bahamas Utili-
ties Cooperative Credit
Union - which members will
vote on today - would give
the latter’s 500-550 members
access to “a lot of the prod-
ucts and services that are the
norm in today’s financial ser-
vices industry”.

Currently, due to its rela-
tively small size, the Utilities
credit union’s members only
had access to basic savings
and loan products, the latter
largely featuring a regulator
consumer loan.

In comparison, Mr Poitier
said the National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union
could offer promotional loans,
revolving loans, consumer
loans and mortgages.
“They’ve just not been able
to do that for their members

based on their size,” he }

added.

Workers Co-operative Cred-
it Union offered interest rates
of up to 6.5 per cent on their
term deposits, especially on
products designed to allow
members to save for their
children’s education.

“T don’t think there’s any
comparison in the local mar-
ket, particularly for small

SEE page two

THE TRIBUNE

usiness

ERED AY.

OCTOBER 2,

2009

SECTION B ° business@tribunemedia.net

City Markets ‘days
from closing’ $5m
refinancing deal

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ITY MARKETS’ majority

shareholder was yesterday

said to be “just days away
from closing” the supermarket
chain’s $5 million refinancing, its
chief executive telling Tribune Busi-
ness that its customer count was
growing by 2-3 per cent every four
weeks.

Sunil Chatrani, head of Bahamas Super-
markets, the company that trades as the
11-store City Markets chain, said the com-
pany’s Board of Directors hoped to sign
off on the final 2008 audit draft at a meet-
ing next week, with the long-awaited
annual general meeting (AGM) targeted
for end-October - a date some 16 months
after that financial year ended.

The City Markets chief executive also
confirmed to Tribune Business that the
company had, to date, received $1 mil-
lion of the $5 million in new equity capital
to be injected by its 78 per cent majority
shareholder, BSL Holdings. The remain-
der, he explained, was awaiting foreign
exchange control approval from the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

“We’re just days away from closing, to
be honest,” Mr Chatrani told Tribune
Business, when asked yesterday about the

By NEIL HARTNELL

(MPAA) and Television

* Supermarket chain’s customer count
rising 2-3% every four weeks, chief
executive says

* $1m of refinancing received, with
remaining $4m awaiting Central Bank
approval

* Company not waiting on refinancing
to complete 2008 audit, with Board
sign-off hoped for next week and AGM
by month’s end

status of the supermarket chain’s refi-
nancing. “It’s going to be $5 million for
now. We have received $1 million so far,
and there is $4 million to come.”

“Again, it’s just paperwork. We’re hop-
ing that in a week or so it will be all com-
plete. There’s no particular requirement.
It’s just a lot of paperwork, a lot of
bureaucracy on everyone’s part. But there
is no problem. No one has backed out.

“It was just that to bring in the funds we
needed Central Bank approval. I’m not
sure where that is, but we don’t antici-
pate any problems with it. It’s just taking
time.”

Central Bank approval is likely needed
because BSL Holdings’ largest share-
holder, with a 40 per cent stake in the pri-
vate equity consortium that acquired City
Markets from Winn-Dixie for 454 million
in 2006, is Trinidadian conglomerate Neal

SEE page two

International Trade Commis-

: Tribune Business Editor
On the savings side, Mr }
Poitier said the National }

TWO INDUSTRY bodies

i representing US program-
? ming royalty rights holders
i have urged the Obama
? administration to take away
? trade benefits that allow
: Bahamian exports to enter
? the US tariff-free, Tribune
: Business can reveal, on the
? grounds that this nation was
; ? not fulfilling its obligations to
Savers wHOGe pos moneyon 4 protect intellectual property
a regular basis,” Mr Poitier ; rishi
said. He added that the } "8":

i Association of America

Both the Motion Picture

March 2010 deadline for
OECD ‘grey list’ escape

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FRENCH-headquartered
banks have agreed with
their government that they
will withdraw from all so-
called ‘offshore centres’ still
on the OECD’s ‘grey list’
by March 2010, but their
Bahamas-based subsidiaries
yesterday said they were
“very comfortable” this
nation would escape before
that deadline.

If the Bahamas was to
remain on the ‘grey list’, it
would impact French-
owned institutions such as
Credit Agricole (Suisse)
and SG Hambros Bank &
Trust (Bahamas), the latter
of which has 100 employ-
ees, and a former Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB) chairman yesterday
said the situation required
this nation to meet its year-
end commitment for sign-
ing the OECD’s ‘minimum
standard’ of 12 Tax Infor-
mation Exchange Agree-
ments (TIEAs).

Arguing that the French,
as head of the OECD
group that will monitor
compliance with the organ-
isation’s tax transparency
and information exchange
standards, were “trying to
set the tone” and influence
other G-20 nations to apply

similar pressure to their
financial institutions,
Michael Paton said: “This
could start a trend, and this
means we have to proceed
to get the required number
of agreements in place by
March.

“T wasn’t concerned pro-
vided we met the deadline,
but this underscores that it’s
a timeline we need to pull-
off. Hopefully, the Ministry
of Finance can accelerate
the negotiating process, and
I’m sure they are. We have

SEE page five

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Association of Programmers
Latin America urged that the
Bahamas lose its trade bene-
fits under the Caribbean
Basin Economic Recovery
Act (CBERA) due to its com-
pulsory licensing regime for
cable television, under which
Cable Bahamas was allegedly
pirating premium program-
ming satellite signals.

In its submission to the US

call us today at 396-1355

sion’s (USITC) latest report
on the economic impact made
by the CBERA, and its twin
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) programme, the
MPAA alleged that the com-
pulsory licensing regime had
been used by the Bahamas
“to justify the retransmission
of premium pay television
programming to the detri-
ment of US rights holders.

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Sales ‘firepower’ to ensure
success at Emerald Bay

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

SANDALS believes a sales
and marketing team, which
its chief executive yesterday
described as “the most
sophisticated network of any
hotel group on this side of the
world”, will enable it to suc-
ceed where Emerald Bay’s
previous ownership failed.
The resort chain also antici-
pates having “enough airlift
support” for the property
based on initial negotiations.

Adam Stewart, Sandals
Resorts International’s chief
executive, speaking to Tri-
bune Business from London,
said the resort chain’s distri-
bution network throughout
the US, Canada and UK pro-
vided it with the infrastruc-
ture to drive demand for its
newly-acquired Emerald Bay
property, something the pre-
vious ownership group nev-
er had.

Praising the previous own-
ers for “giving it a good shot”,
Mr Stewart told Tribune
Business: “You have to have

“This compulsory licence

SEE page five

* Sandals chief believes
marketing and distribution
network will enable chain
to succeed where previous
owners failed

* In talks with airlines,
and believes ‘enough
support’ for Exuma resort
on airlift

an infrastructure to market
an Out Island destination or
unique property. It’s not a lit-
tle boutique hotel.

“Sandals has, as far as ’'m
concerned, the most sophisti-
cated marketing and distrib-
ution network of any [hotel]
group on our side of the
world. We’re an organisation
that believes in a destination.
We never build or acquire a
hotel if we do not believe in
the destination.”

He added: “We have a
dedicated force that repre-
sents us, our sales and mar-
keting team, between the
UK, Canada and the US -

SEE page four

US industry bodies call for Bahamas to lose trade benefits

: * Allege that Bahamas
allows cable operators in the
Bahamas - including the par- :
tially government-owned }
Cable Bahamas - to essential- i
ly steal films and program- }
ming from the United States, :
thus destroying the economic }
viability for US pay television : ,
noone that on the rights } Cable Bahamas accuses
to sell films and programming i

cable TV licensing
regime breaching this
nation’s copyright
obligations under
Caribbean Basin Initiative

rights holders of using
US government to
‘coerce’ it

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



5
City Markets ‘days from closing’ $5m refinancing deal

& Massey.

Several sources have sug-
gested that Neal & Massey
is likely to increase its BSL
Holdings stake as a result
of the need to refinance
City Markets, possibly tak-
ing a majority holding in the
group.

That would explain the
need for Central Bank
approval, but this has not
been confirmed, and Mr
Chatrani’s comment that
“no one has backed out”
appears to imply that all
BSL Holdings investors
have contributed in propor-
tion to their existing hold-
ings, thus ensuring no one
is diluted.

Meanwhile, telling Tri-
bune Business that City
Markets was “making

FROM page one

National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union’s interest
rates on regular deposits and
savings accounts stood at 3 per
cent, compared to the 1-1.5

FROM page one

progress on all fronts”, Mr
Chatrani said the new capital
was being earmarked to
restart the company’s direct
import programme -
enabling it to buy high-end
products in bulk from for-
eign suppliers, thus improv-
ing margins and prices.
“Our customers are react-
ing to the prices, noticing the
difference in price,” Mr Cha-
trani added. “Our sales are
strong, reflecting that, and
we're Seeing more of our
customers coming back to
the stores. Our customer
counts are up, and they’re
growing at about 2-3 per
cent ever four-week period.”
City Markets, its operat-
ing parent and BSL Hold-

Credit union

per cent offered by many com-
mercial banks, with the inter-
est increasing as a member’s
level of savings rose to









INSURANCE AGENTS & BROKERS





NOTICE TO




SHAREHOLDERS





J.S. Johnson & Company Limited hereby notifies




all of its shareholders that based on unaudited

ings have come in for heavy
criticism from minority
shareholders who collective-
ly hold 22 per cent of
Bahamas Supermarkets,
investor value having been
massively eroded as a result
of the $13.429 million net
loss projected by manage-
ment accounts for 2008 -
something that plunged the
company into negative equi-
ty.

More than 15 months after
the 2008 year-end, Bahamas
Supermarkets’ external audi-
tor, KPMG, has yet to sign
off on the audited accounts,
a timeline well outside the
120-day filing period stipu-
lated for public companies.
Many have argued that this
saga has undermined the
integrity of the Bahamian

“encourage asset building”.

Apart from increasing its
asset base from $34 million to
$35-$36 million, Mr Poitier
said the merger with the Util-
ities credit union would fur-
ther diversify the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union’s membership base,
altering the perception in some
quarters that it was just for
hotel industry workers or
union members.

Pointing out that when
things were bad in the hotel
industry everything “dried
up”, Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business that the merger, with
the Utilities credit union’s
membership derived from
BTC, BEC, and Water & Sew-
erage, would help to better
‘recession-proof’ his organisa-

capital markets.

The 2008 audit sign-off
had previously been contin-
gent on City Markets’
receipt of financing from
BSL Holdings, which would
have avoided the accounts
being qualified as a ‘going
concern’.

However, Mr Chatrani
said yesterday: “We’re rush-
ing to have the audit com-
plete with or without the
financing. It’s so old, we
want to get it behind us, with
or without the opinion, so
we can move on to the 2009
audit. We want to get it com-
pleted.

“We had the final [audit]
draft today for review. We
have the opinion in hand,
and should be approving
that some time next week.

tion.

“Over the past five to six
years we’ve worked diligently
in diversifying our member-
ship base, getting the message
out that we’re not owned by
the hotel workers, and that
we’re not a labour organisa-
tion,” Mr Poitier told Tribune
Business.

He acknowledged that the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union had suffered
“some casualties” among its
members as a result of the
recession when it came to
repaying their loan obligations,
having “seen a bout a 4-6 per
cent increase” in loan defaults.

Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union had come up with “cre-
ative ways” to work with




results for the quarter ended September 30, 2009,

Share your ne




the Board of Directors has declared an interim

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dividend of sixteen cents (16¢) per ordinary share

who are making news in their

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The Board will approve it,
and we will call the annual
general meeting (AGM)
shortly.”

Mr Chatrani said Bahamas
Supermarkets was “aiming
for the end of the month”
for the AGM date, pointing
out that shareholders had to
be given 21 days’ notice.

The City Markets chief
executive said the super-
market chain was “perform-
ing better than expected”
against its revised projec-
tions, which had been down-
graded due to the economic
downturn.

He added that the compa-
ny’s return to profitability
would “be achieved coming
out of Christmas”, and from
there on, “on a period to
period basis we expect to be

members, such as allowing
them to pay interest only until
they went back to work, as in
the case of Wyndham employ-
ees due to the property’s two-
month closure.

Those who had been termi-
nated had been given grace
periods to see if they could
find alternative work, or
allowed to make token pay-
ments. However, members
who failed to come in and
address their situation were
being dealt with to protect
“the people’s money”.

Mr Poitier said the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union was being “very aggres-
sive”, and while it was “willing
to work with those who are
making a good effort, I hate
to say it, but we’re also
exhausting the route of taking
people to court as necessary”.

The credit union’s members
will also today vote on
whether to acquire a property
for the National Workers Co-
operative Credit Union’s new
head office.

While no site had been
selected, Mr Poitier told Tri-
bune Business that “once we
get a good deal on the proper-
ty, we’re ready to go, as we
have a part of the funds to pur-
chase the property and start

generally profitable on a
consistent basis”.

With sales and customer
counts improving, Mr Cha-
trani said City Markets was
being prepared for its
relaunch “in the next six
weeks”, with different
branding, signage and
images. The deli area and
equipment will also be
improved.

Apart from the $5 million
injected into City Markets
as the operating company, a
significant sum will also be
received by BSL Holdings,
Mr Chatrani indicated.

That sum is likely to be
used to meet its debt
repayment obligations to
Royal Bank of Canada,
and refinance existing cred-
it facilities.

construction. We’re as far as
we can go without buying a
property”.

Draft plans had been drawn
up, and Mr Poitier said the
building itself was likely to cost
$1 million to construct. “As a
financial institution that’s been
in existence for 26-27 years,
it’s only natural we reside in
our own building,” he added,
explaining that it was current-
ly renting property on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
from the hotel union.

In addition, the National
Workers Co-operative Credit
Union members will also vote
on whether to close its East
Bay Street branch with effect
from October 31, 2009.

Mr Poitier explained that
the building, across the road
from the Outback Steakhouse,
lacked parking and had seen a
reduction in demand as a
result of Kerzner Internation-
al’s lay-offs over the past year.

No lay-offs will result, the
National Workers Co-opera-
tive Credit Union redeploying
affected staff within its opera-
tions. “There is a possibility
that we’ll be back in the east
within a relatively short period
of time, but in a bigger way
and more convenient,” Mr
Poitier said.

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Application Deadline: Friday, 09 October 2009

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THE TRIBUNE



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 3B



Bahamas ‘endures’
economic crisis
better than many

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE BAHAMAS has “rea-
sonably endured” the global
recession and fared better than
many other nations in doing
so, the minister of state for
finance believes, its “national
sense of perspective” being
one of “the greatest threats” to
its ability to weather econom-
ic contraction.

Zhivargo Laing, in an
address to a seminar organ-
ised by the Higgs & Johnson
law firm, acknowledged that
while many Bahamians may
not share the same sentiments,
he had seen indications from
his travels that the Bahamas
was coping with the downturn
in business activity better than
most.

“T daresay one of the great-
est threats to our ability to
navigate the this current
dilemma is our national sense
of perspective,” Mr Laing
said.

“To date, we have reason-
ably endured the current glob-
al crisis, recognising not all of
us have the same perspective.
It has been my experience to
travel to a number of coun-
tries, and sit in meetings with
minister of finance from coun-
tries around the world, and I
can tell you the great stress,
grief and shock on their faces
suggests to me that even in
our pained circumstances, we
are in a better situation that
many others are facing.”

As the minister acknowl-
edged, a significant number
of Bahamians are unlikely to
share his views, especially the
10,000-plus number who were
terminated from their jobs
during the 12 months between
May 2008 and May 2009.

However, his message to
the Higgs & Johnson seminar
was designed to give some
modest hope, explain the
Government’s strategy for
guiding the Bahamas through
the current recession - albeit
with a heavy dose of reality,
and provide some perspective
on how this nation was faring
compared to others.

Acknowledging that the
Bahamas, let alone the Gov-
ernment, did not have the
capacity to drag itself out of
recession by itself, Mr Laing
said: “We didn’t give rise to
this economic fallout, and we
do not have the ability to
reverse it. In a real sense we
are in a season; a season of
economic decline.

“We can define the reality
of our economic [condition],
but cannot alter the fact of the
season. We cannot alter the
circumstances or fact of the
season. What we must do is
adapt to see out the season.”

Mr Laing called on Bahami-
ans to display “mental forti-
tude”, determination and a
sense of perspective to help
weather the economic storm
and emerge into good times
all the better for it, adding:
“We will likely know more
about ourselves, for good or
ill, than we have ever known
before.

“Tt is on this basis that we
are able to develop a strategy
for forward movement. It has
been our determination as a
government in these circum-
stances that we must promote
economic stability to the
fullest extent possible. Reduc-
ing job losses, business fail-
ures and economic decline
depends on it.”

To achieve this, Mr Laing
said the Government had
focused on three areas- main-
taining the financial system’s
integrity, “nurturing the econ-
omy during this downturn”,
and providing social relief to
those most impacted.

Besides maintaining fiscal
prudence to the maximum
extent possible, keeping the
fiscal deficit and national debt
under some level of control,
and ensuring the foreign
exchange reserves, bank capi-
talisation and banking system
liquidity stayed at reasonable
levels, Mr Laing said the $12
million expansion in social ser-
vices funding over the last two
budget periods had served to
“buffer consumers in a
storm”.

The Government had opt-

* Minister acknowledges nation cannot pull
itself out of recession on its own, and that
there are limits on what government can do

* Says ‘greatest threat’ to weathering the
storm is ‘national sense of perspective’

ed to do more foreign curren-
cy borrowing to boost the US
dollar reserves, as opposed to
Bahamian currency borrow-
ing, Mr Laing adding: “All of
these things working together
have been an effort to buffer is
to the fullest extent possible.”

Still, the minister effective-
ly admitted there were limits
to what the Government
could do, especially when it
came to preventing the nation-
al debt - something Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham has
admitted could breach the 50
per cent of GDP threshold, or
$3.6-$3.7 billion - getting out

LYFORD CAY, E.P.
Beachfront Home

of control.

“T know the best laid plans
run the risk of failure,” he
added. “We are not in control
of all the forces and are limit-
ed in our resources, so some
forces are so great that they
overwhelm us.

“When we have done all we
can do, in my view, we stand
and leave the rest to God.”

Yet, attempting to strike a
positive note, Mr Laing added:
“We must always maintain
hope. I’m confident we will
come out of this difficult eco-
nomic season and enter a peri-
od of progress and abundance.

FOR SALE

Zhivargo Laing



I cannot say when, but I know
it will happen soon - that we
will emerge.”

He added that the turn-
around, “combined with wise
choices for the future, will
enable us to seize new oppor-
tunities”

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SERVICE INTERRUPTION /

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From midnight October 3rd to
5pm October 4th, 2009.

As we continue efforts to improve our service to you, we ask you
to take note that our Electronic Banking System will be
temporarily unavailable during the time listed above while we
conduct routine maintenance. We apologize for the length of
this service interruption, and for any inconvenience this may
cause, but this extended disruption has become necessary due
to the comprehensive nature of the required maintenance.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:

e ABM

e VISA transaction via ABM
e Internet Banking
¢ Telephone Banking

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary

maintenance.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com







FIRSTCARIBBEAN




INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)
Liquidator s Statement
Pursuant To Section 137(6) Of
The International Business Companies Act

We, Diane E. Fletcher, Liquidator of SHOREWOOD INC.
HEREBY CERTIFY that the winding up and dissolution of
SHOREWOOD INC. has been completed in accordance
with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 1st day of October 2009.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW AND EQUITY

2007
CLE/qui/00109

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
foot and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as “Englerston Subdivision’ situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on the
North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead Avenue
and running thereon approximately One hundred and Fourteen and
Sixty Eight hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the East
by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running thereon
Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the West by
a Road Reservation called and known as Podelec Street and running
thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which said
piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries, shape,
marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on the Plan
recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan No.3914
N.P.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles
Act 1959
AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of JANE MCPHEE
NOTICE
The Quieting Titles A

The Petition of JANE MCPHEE of Podoleo Street in the Southern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas in respect of:-

ALL THOSE piece parcels or lots of land comprising 9,374 square
feet and being Lot Number One (I) and Lot Number Two (2) situate
in Block Number Forty Three (43) in a Subdivision called and known
as “Englerston Subdivision’ situated at the South-Eastern Junction of
Homestead Avenue and Podeleo Street in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas which said piece parcel or lots of land are bounded on
the North by a Road Reservation called and known as Homestead A
venue and running thereon approximately One Hundred and Fourteen
and Sixty Eight Hundredths (114.68) feet partially on an acre, on the
East by Lots Number 44 and 43 in the said Subdivision and running
thereon Ninety Eight and Twelve Hundredths (98.12) feet and on the
West by a Road Reservation called and known as Podeleo Street and
running thereon Eighty One and Three Hundredths (81.03) feet which
said piece parcels or lots of land have such position, boundaries,
shape, marks and dimensions as are more particularly delineated on
the Plan recorded in the Department of Lands and Surveys as Plan
NO.3914 N.P.

Jane Mcphee claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the said pieces or parcels of land free from
encumbrances. And the Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas under Section
3 of the Quieting Titles Act, 1999 to have title to the said pieces
parcels or tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having a Dower or a right to
Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition
shall on before 26th November, A.D., 2009 file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioners or the undersigned a Statement of his
claim in the prescribed from verified by an Affidavit to be tiled therewith.
Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of Claim on
or before the 26th November, A.D., 2009 will operate as a bar to such
claim.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:

|. The Registry of the Supreme Court.
2. The Chambers of Messrs ROLLE & ROLLE., Attorneys for the
Petitioner.

Dated the 28th day of September, A.D., 2009.
ROLLE & ROLLE
Chambers Seventh Terrace West, Centerville
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner



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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

over 300 people. Every day
they’re hitting the pavement
to promote the islands and
the destinations we’re offer-
ing.”

Mr Stewart acknowledged
that airlift to any Family
Island resort was “a major
challenge”, not just in terms
of establishing service and
getting visitors there, but also
in altering traveller percep-
tions to ensure they knew the
destination was “just a flight
away” and more accessible
than they thought.

“Tt’s a joint effort on many




Emerald Bay

fronts to work with the air-
lines to get service. You have
to have firepower on the
ground to let people know it’s
just a flight away, and you
can get there very easily,” the
Sandals chief executive told
Tribune Business.

He added that the resort
chain had already discussed
airlift to Exuma and Sandals
Emerald Bay with the exist-
ing carriers that served the
island, including Continental
Connection and American
Airlines.

UH

NOTICE is hereby given that STEPHEN G, DAVIES of 8
CAMELOT CT, P.O. BOX F-42766, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 2" day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,













Bahamas.

COMMOMAEALTH OF THE DAS.

i THE SUP EENE COURT

COMMON LAW AND BOUITY Devimiod

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“‘We’ve spoken to Air
Canada and took them in the
week we closed on the prop-
erty,” Mr Stewart told Tri-
bune Business. “We’ve had
discussions with other air-
lines, and they’re interested
in going there. At this point,
it’s safe to say we feel we will
have enough support in terms
of airlift into that destination.
With the airlines, it has to be
good for them to be good for
us.”

Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals would attempt to
give as much business as pos-
sible to Exuma-based suppli-
ers and vendors, in keeping

with its long-standing policy
for all its resorts, but warned
that “in this economic climate
today, you have to be com-
petitive”.

Thus the message is that if
you can provide Sandals with
products of the required qual-
ity at a competitive price, and
consistent/reliable supply, the
chain will buy from Exuma-
based suppliers. Its Sandals
Royal Bahamian property
already puts everything out
to tender in Nassau, Mr Stew-
art added.

The Sandals chief execu-
tive said the response of Exu-
mians to Sandals’ acquisition

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.

— -,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has

been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SAMBOR INC.

——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of SAMBOR INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Beach front villa Emerald Bay

of Emerald Bay had “been
overwhelming”, adding:
“Everyone wants to see us be
successful.

“There’s a lot riding on us,
and I’ve had many phone
calls with people offering to
lend a hand, saying that if
there’s anything they can do,
give them a call. It’s been
quite amazing, and we will
just do our best to showcase
Great Exuma to the world.
We feel strongly we can do
it.

“We would really love to
see some of the developments
put on hold, the private

homes and the like, given
confidence by Sandals to con-
tinue and people enjoy the
island.”

Mr Stewart pledged that
Sandals Emerald Bay would
“be at the higher end of our
line up”, describing the resort
as a Family Island property
possessing first world facili-
ties and infrastructure.

“We're starting with a
clean sheet with this hotel,”
he added, describing it as “a
magnificent development”
produced by a “big picture
vision” for Exuma and Emer-
ald Bay itself.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD.

—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of VIDA DULCE VENTURES LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BON VIVANT COMPANY INC.

— *)—

Pi

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BON VIVANT COMPANY INC. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE

PARKGATE INVEST & TRADE CORP.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section
Companies Act. 2000,

138(4) of the

International Business
PARKGATE INVEST &

TRADE CORP. is in dissolution as of September 28,

2009.

Marion Coukidou Madella of 284 Arch. Makarios
II Ave., Fortuna Court, Block B, 3rd Floor, 3105
Limassol, Cyprus is the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



FROM page one

to the Bahamas.”

As a result, the MPAA
argued: “The Bahamas should
not continue to benefit from
preferential access to the US
market while it is simultane-
ously expropriating US rights
holders’ property.”

Also beating the drum for
trade sanctions against the
Bahamas was the Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America, purporting to
represent more than 30 pay
TV channels from that region,
which also laid into the
Bahamas’ compulsory TV
licensing regime for violating
the CBERA’s intellectual
property rights provisions.

Describing the Bahamian
regime as “objectionable”,
the Association accused Cable

Trade

Bahamas of “resorting to
questionable tactics in expro-
priating certain satellite sig-
nals”. It argued that the licens-
ing regime violated the Berne
Convention on intellectual
property rights, and said it
“represents an extremely dan-
gerous precedent, and threat-
ens to erode the foundation
of intellectual property pro-
tection for the US pay televi-
sion programming industry”.

The Association said it was
concerned that other
Caribbean nations may fol-
low the Bahamas’ example,
arguing that these issues “sig-
nificantly” and “adversely”
impacted its members’ ability
to conduct business in the
Bahamas.

Adding to the anti-
Bahamas and Cable Bahamas
offensive, the International
Intellectual Property Alliance
(IIPA) and HBO Latin
America Group backed the
submissions of the other two
groups.

However, in its response to
the US International Trade
Commission, Cable Bahamas
said that “for over five years,
Cable Bahamas has sought a
meeting with Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America and its mem-
bers without success.

“Instead of meeting with
Cable Bahamas, HBO Latin
America and Television
Association of Programmers
Latin America seek to use
the office of the United
States government to coerce
the settlement of their pri-

FROM page one

to move forward and turn the page.”

French-owned banks currently in
the Bahamas yesterday gave no indi-
cation they had any concerns about
the Government’s ability to meet the
March 2010 deadline for escaping the
‘grey list’, and expected to still be
here.

Ivanhoe Sands, head of Credit Agri-
cole (Suisse), said: “We are very, very
comfortable with that, and this is real-
ly no surprise because that was part of
the G-20 agreement. Members of the
G-20 will be obligated to exit ‘tax
havens’ still on the ‘grey list’? by March
2010.”

And an e-mail communication from
SG on its official view of offshore cen-
tres, which has been obtained by Tri-
bune Business, said: “Société
Générale is present in certain coun-
tries which are currently on the grey
list. These countries are in the process

OECD

of signing tax conventions for the
exchange of information according to
the norms set out by the G-20 and it is
expected that they will no longer be
on the list by the end of this year.

“Whatever the country in which we
carry out our activity, we apply the
business ethics rules which are in force
within the Société Générale Group,
in particular with regard to KYC, and
we respect local regulations.

“The business model of SG Private
Banking is based on advising clients
on their wealth by providing concrete
solutions with regard to savings, the
management of their investments and
transmission/inheritance, and is not
based on tax avoidance.”

As for the Bahamas specifically, SG
said: “This country is in the process of
signing conventions and intends to be
off the grey list at the end of the year.”

vate business dispute.”

Cable Bahamas also
argued that the Commission
was not the appropriate
forum in which to discuss
the relevant issues, and
asserted that the Bahamas
met CBERA eligibility
requirements, including
those on intellectual prop-
erty rights, the US govern-
ment not having found that
this nation’s copyright law
was “inconsistent with inter-
national law”.

And in its submission, pro-
vided through its Washing-
ton embassy, the Bahamas
gave assurances that “it will
implement its obligations
with respect to copyright
protection in the Bahamas”.

Trade sanctions appear
highly unlikely, although
they could impact some

i
Michael Paton

$141 million worth of
Bahamian exports that cur-
rently enter the US duty-
free every year. This is
because Cable Bahamas has
been working with the
Bahamian Embassy in
Washington, the Registrar
General’s Office and the US
Embassy in Nassau to try
and resolve the problem,
and has had some success in
negotiating commercial
arrangements with US pro-
gramming rights holders.

The crux of the problem is
that the Bahamas and rest
of the English-speaking
Caribbean are seen as too
small a market by many of
the programming rights
holders, making them disin-
clined to negotiate commer-
cial arrangements with
Cable Bahamas.



Their distribution and
royalty rights do not allow
them to broadcast outside
the US, and the legal fees
and other costs required to
change these agreements
would exceed the revenues
gained from a small market
such as this nation.

Under a 2000 agreement,
the US Trade Representa-
tive's Office was supposed
to encourage the MPAA
and the likes of its individual
members to enter into com-
mercial agreements with
Cable Bahamas, in return
for this nation amending its
compulsory licensing regime
via the 2004 Act amend-
ment. Yet while the

Bahamas believes it has ful-
filled its side of the bargain,
it privately believes the US
has to hold up its end.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL FANORD of
CHARLES VINCENT ST., NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason. why _ registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25'"* day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

ri 4q rt
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SINGLEMULTI FAMILY LOT Wy OCEAN VIEWS IS FOR
SALE IN GAMBIER ESTATES (OPPOSITE COMPASS.
APPROVED ARCHITECTUAL DRAWINGS SHOWING

TWO RENDITIONS) FOR A SINGLE FAMILY HOME.
OWNER HAS CLEAR TITLE. ASKING $170,000.00 (GROSS)

CAL ag — OSES

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 CLEARWATER
MANAGEMENT LIMITED 1s in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 30th
September 2009. David Thain of Amer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.,
Building 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of
CLEARWATER MANAGEMENT LIMITED. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 30th
October 2009.

Fa

»

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) JELENA OVERSEAS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on October 1, 2009 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 30th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.
October 2, 2009
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, KENDAL WAYNE
ALCIDE of NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend to change
my name to KENDAL WAYNE THOMPSON. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MULBERRY SLOPES LTD.
—_— -)—

é

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MULBERRY SLOPES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Plone et Whork



MUA

NOTICE is hereby given that MACKINS TEHNOR of COLUMBUS
DRIVE 30B, APT #2, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2" day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


























SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN AND
BAHAMIAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH,
BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON
WILL BE CLOSED ON
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATEITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DAY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES
CAUSED AS A RESULT OF OUR CLOSING.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SHINEEY CANAL LTD.
——_
4

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SHINEEY CANAL LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PG CAPITAL MARKETS

SEC E RAGE Baer SERVICES

MmolLlanN ETAL

BEX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES 25 OF
THURSDAY, 1 OC TOBER 2009
BISE ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,804.67 | CHS =0099 | eC ©0001 | YTD =210.659 | FTO % -1220
FISCes: QULOSE TRaTT || TO 3.40% | 2008 -12 51%
WWW! BIS 2 BAHAMAS OOM | TELEPH OME» 242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

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SISK LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - IRends trade on a Percentage Pricing bases! =
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPO

5-Day FORECAST

ii





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ORLANDO


































High:86°F/30°C : Variably cloudy with Mostly cloudy with Variable clouds with Clouds and sun, Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
pee oe thunderstorms. thunderstorms. thunderstorms. t-storms possible. possible. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 69°F/21°C —
. a —_ . High: 89° High: 87° High: 87° High: 88°
TAMPA ee F High: 87° Low: 77° Low: 77° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° see EE
4 ae i , PETE ees
High: 86° F/30° C ' 8 [ _-92°-82°F | F [| 92°-82°F 95°-81° F High Hi.(ft.) Low
Low: 74° F/23°C e] r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 6:06am. 3.0 12:00am. 0.7
aa @ - 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 6:22 p.m. 3.0 12:20pm. 0.7
: ; Saturd 6:44am. 3.2 12:35am. 0.6
a | PALMANAG,
) ie Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sanliay 70am. 33 140am. 04
L er ABACO Temperature 7:37pm. 3.0 1:42pm. 04
? f - , IGM, seteccshaeee har eceeorecetene tee 86° F/30° C ; ;
; ; 44 High: 85° F/29° C eis Monday 8:00am. 3.4 1:45am. 03
A “a ‘all, " =~, a LOW eeeeeeeeeeeee 77° F/25° C : :
rs a HY — Low: 76° F/24°¢ Normal high serie: ee ep
” ' wy Normal low 74° F/23° C
F Sm @ WEST PALMBEACH a Last year's high... se F3ic | NTMI UCI
4 a High:87° F/31°C . Last year's lOW oer 76° F/24° C " "
— Low: 74° F/23°C aa ae a“ = et o Hoontise Sa pin
= S of 2 p.m. yesterday 0... cccceececeeeee 02 eee sia PPOOD MM TUN Mitra coo all
© ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Year to date Sl. Full Last New First
High: 88°F/31°C @ High: 86° F/30° C Normal year to date .o.....c.ccsessecscsseceeeeseeee 38.65" a
Low: 75° F/24°C — Low: 73° F/23° C
gf AccuWeather.com
s @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by ohh _
; , MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct. 4 oct. 11 Oct. 18 = Oct. 25
fy High: 88° F/31° C EL ELT HERA
i Low: 77° F/25° C NASSAU Li R 79° F/26°C
High: 87° F/31°C oe:
=a Low: 77° F/25° C
as i. ” 2 _ ¥
KEY WEST a “4 ~—__—CATISLAND
High: 87° F/31°C | of High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 79° F/26° C " Low: 76° F/24°C
= ~h.
. oy GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
i High: 85 F/29 C High: 87° F/31°C
; ANDROS Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 77° F/25°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; Oe a
highs and tonights's lows. High: 86° F/30° C —— .
Low: 77° F/25°¢ i. . ih
ee , HX
LONGISLAND
Low: 78° F/26° C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday - MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W all ) High: 87° F/31°C
Fic FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC Fic FIC FC FC FIC FIC heey Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 71/21 43/6 s 75/23 5110 s Indianapolis 66/18 46/7 c 61/16 45/7 c Philadelphia 71/21 62/6 pe 74/23 60/15 t
Anchorage 46/7 37/2 s 48/8 37/2 Jacksonville 85/29 65/18 pc 86/380 68/20 t Phoenix 88/31 68/20 pc 92/33 73/22 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 70/21 56/13 t 77/25 56/12 po Kansas City 62/16 44/6 sh 64/17 44/6 pc Pittsburgh 62/16 52/11 1 68/20 46/7 pc RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:89°F/82°c
Atlantic City 72/22 62/16 pce 75/23 55/12 t Las Vegas 85/29 57/13 s 86/30 66/18 s Portland, OR 63/17 47/8 r 61/16 46/7 pc High: 87° F/31°C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 72/22 59/15 pe 75/23 56/13 + Little Rock 82/27 51/10 s 80/26 52/11 s Raleigh-Durham 79/26 62/16 pc 84/28 52/11 pc Low: 76°F/24°C ~
Boston 62/16 57/13 pe 69/20 57/13 1 Los Angeles 88/31 58/14 $s 72/22 58/14 pe St. Louis 68/20 49/99 pe 65/18 46/7 c . oo
Buffalo 58/14 52/11 + 65/18 47/8 sh Louisville 70/21 53/11 t 70/21 47/8 pe Salt Lake City 63/17 38/3 s 66/18 40/4 pc GREAT INAGUA ee
Charleston, SC 82/27 65/18 pc 85/29 61/16 pc Memphis 77/25 5412 pe 78/25 56/13 s San Antonio 88/31 70/21 t 84/28 70/21 t High: 91° F/33°C
Chicago 61/16 44/6 c 56/12 47/8 sh Miami 88/31 77/25 t 89/31 77/25 t San Diego 79/26 62/16 s 70/21 63/17 pe Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 64/17 50/10 r 66/18 47/8 sh Minneapolis 54/12 40/4 r 53/11 43/6 c San Francisco 69/20 53/11 s 67/19 51/10 pe iy
Dallas 82/27 57/13 s 76/24 66/18 ¢ Nashville 74/23 53/11 t 78/25 49/9 s Seattle 58/14 43/6 + 58/14 45/7
Denver 61/16 30/-1 s 63/17 35/1 pe New Orleans 81/27 67/19 t 80/26 69/20 t Tallahassee 80/26 67/19 pc 85/29 65/18 t ‘ll
Detroit 62/16 47/8 + 58/14 45/7 sh New York 66/18 62/16 c 73/22 60/15 t Tampa 86/30 74/23 pe 87/30 71/21 t —
Honolulu 87/30 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 s Oklahoma City 76/24 45/7 s 76/24 56/13 s Tucson 84/28 59/15 pce 84/28 68/20 t
Houston 80/26 63/17 t 81/27 68/20 t Orlando 86/30 69/20 s 89/31 69/20 t Washington, DC 74/23 62/16 pc 79/26 59/15 Fr

Tar rt NY

o|1|2

LOW



3|4|5|

MODERATE





Vv



\. HIGH

7|s|910

| HIGH











Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
57/13
17/25
82/27
63/17
90/32
86/30
72/22
79/26
79/26
66/18
54/12
81/27
68/20
59/15
66/18
68/20
90/32
93/33
54/12
90/32
84/28
78/25
52/11
59/15
57/13
66/18
58/14
90/32
48/8
88/31
104/40
77/25
82/27
67/19
89/31
75/23
63/17
81/27
81/27
79/26
97/36
57/13
45/7
56/13
85/29
93/33
48/8
64/17
54/12
83/28
99/37
74/23
89/31
86/30
86/30
75/23
84/28
80/26
75/23
48/8
72/22
84/28
75/23
59/15
90/32
57/13
57/13
54/12
54/12

ealil

Today

Low
F/C
M25
48/8
45/7
68/20
53/11
77/25
77/25
59/15
55/12
71/21
43/8
39/3
M5128
43/6
46/7
45/7
43/8
70/21
81/27
32/0
72/22
73/22
61/16
45/7
46/7
45/7
45/7
46/7
72/22
36/2
79/26
68/20
64/17
62/16
51/10
79/26
60/15
50/10
52/11
77/25
54/12
75/23
50/10
36/2
42/5
59/15
77/25
34/1
46/7
43/6
73/22
70/21
59/15
79/26
51/10
73/22
50/10
73/22
62/16
54/12
34/1
59/15
77/25
70/21
50/10
70/21
42/5
43/6
37/2
33/3

pc

High
F/C
92/33
61/16
79/26
83/28
59/15
90/32
86/30
71/21
70/21
80/26
63/17
55/12
81/27
66/18
64/17
68/20
72/22
92/33
90/32
42/5
89/31
83/28
78/25
59/15
57/13
63/17
68/20
63/17
88/31
52/11
88/31
103/39
79/26
83/28
74/23
88/31
75/23
64/17
82/27
85/29
77/25
89/31
64/17
46/7
66/18
81/27
95/35
43/6
68/20
62/16
84/28
96/35
73/22
89/31
88/31
87/30
70/21
85/29
76/24
68/20
52/11
68/20
84/28
77/25
61/16
93/33
57/13
60/15
52/11
54/12

Saturday

Low
F/C
79/26
50/10
46/7
68/20
49/9
78/25
77/25
59/15
50/10
72/22
45/7
43/6
73/22
46/7
50/10
45/7
57/13
69/20
80/26
32/0
74/23
74/23
59/15
54/12
43/6
48/8
45/7
50/10
71/21
36/2
77/25
68/20
64/17
61/16
54/12
79/26
60/15
48/8
54/12
77/25
54/12

Ww

pe
C

pe
pe

71/21 t

57/13
34/1
41

56/13

77/25
32/0
48/8
45/7

72/22

69/20

87/13

80/26

54/12

71/21
48/8

73/22

61/16

52/11
43/6

55/12

77/25

68/20

51/10

72/22
41

51/10
416
40/4

c

sh

pe
pe
c
c

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST





FRIDAY, OCTOBER 02np, 2009, PAGE 7B



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
Saturday: SE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
Saturday: SE at 8-16 Knots 2-3 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: $ at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
Saturday: __§ at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5 Miles 84° F



4
pe
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-10s









= bay

Awe ay |





\os/Angeles

88/58

A
80/63) =,
“

Showers

T-storms

Rain Fronts
tO Shown are noon positions of weather systems and —

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itenifinfite
Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary eugaeafi
is [0s 10s 20s [80s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s /a0s) iUUeNi0s)

“an Be Blown
yA Hurricane

_ Or you_can rest easy knowing
that yo have excellent insurance
Tage no matter which
vay he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

ou

(Els INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

ocuee cases] wegen wesc) we salaeema