Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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PARTLY SUNNY,
mot SHOWER OR T-STORM

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LOW

Volume: 105 No.259

Dorsett to run for
PLP chairmanship

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE battle for the chair-
manship of the Progressive
Liberal Party got a jump start
yesterday when Kenred
Dorsett officially announced
his intent to run against
Glenys Hanna-Martin for the
coveted post.

Running on a
platform of
“Progress
Now!”, Mr
Dorsett said he
is committed to
| bringing change

— to the Opposi-
KENRED tion and

DORSETT unleashing the

party's “real
potential."

Due to his experience as a
branch member, national par-
ty vice-chairman and the cur-
rent PLP deputy chairman,
Mr Dorsett said he knows
what has worked for and
against the party recently.

"Tam not offering myself
for the position...to oppose
any man or woman within the
PLP. I seek the chairmanship
to move the party machinery
forward, to reconnect our par-
ty with supporters. ..And con-
nect the party to the people of
this our beloved Common-
wealth," Mr Dorsett said at a
press conference at his law

SEE page 11



Hotel union files
Suit against bank

THE Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union has filed a suit against
Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
for the return of nearly
$700,000 that was allegedly
transferred from the union's
accounts by "unauthorised"
union executives.

The union claims BOB
failed to adhere to the man-
dated requirements of the
bank/customer relationship
between the two agencies in
respect to disbursements pur-
portedly effected on or about
August, 24 from the union's
account at BOB “without
lawful authority” of the union.

According to a writ filed in
the Supreme Court on Sep-
tember 3, during the time
period in question the only
persons legally entitled to
authorise disbursements from
the union's account at BOB
"were exclusively and at all
material times” any combina-
tion of three executives
including: Leo Douglas, Basil

SEE page 11



The Tribune &

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

PICTURES:. Tommy Turnquest breezed past protesters calling his name (photos 1 and 2), but had enough time to chat to police officers (photo 3) and the media (photo 4).

i 7 Scunet
families tell Minister

Placard-waving protesters
eather in Rawson Square
to sound call for justice

BRENTON SMITH PRESTON FERGUSON

PROSTESTING family and friends of victims of
violence shouted for the Minister of National Secu-
rity’s resignation after they claimed he breezed past
them yesterday morning flanked by two uniformed
police officers.

Around 40 people had gathered in Rawson Square
yesterday to sound a call for “justice” to parlia-
mentarians who were returning to the House of
Assembly for the first time in a month.

Marching and waving placards, family and friends
of Preston Ferguson, Brenton Smith, Kristoff Coop-
er and Delroy Pratt came together to demand better
policing, improvements to the justice system and
more communication between police and victims’
families.

Mr Ferguson’s family claim that rather than dying
in an Exuma traffic accident, as police determined,
he was a victim of murder and police are not doing
what they should. Kristoff Cooper’s brother and

SEE page two

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
JOHN TRAVOLTA and his wife are
shown going to court yesterday.

ALM EV MAMOLSIOL ne mS pec Ui

MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest walks past demonstrators yesterday in Rawson Square.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia. net

HOLLYWOOD celebrity John Travolta
testified yesterday that he had been informed
that stories that would imply that he had inten-
tionally caused the death of his son would be
released to the media if he did not comply
with a demand for $25 million.

Jurors in the trial of ex-PLP Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver
Tarino Lightbourne yesterday also heard a



Travolta tells of pressure to
meet $25 million demand



taped conversation between Bridgewater and
Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson regarding a
meeting set with an attorney for the 55-year-
old actor.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused of

SEE page 12

Janaees Uniform

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/



PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Families call on
Minister to resig

teow

FROM page one

father say they want to know
how the 21-year-old ended up
with a bullet in his head after
a police chase, while 18-year-
old Brenton Smith’s family
say they still have not been
given a date for the holding of
an inquest into his death from
a bullet fired by a police offi-
cer.

When National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest
appeared on the scene yes-
terday morning he did not to
stop to address the crowd,
only waving to one person
who shouted his name.

Our
nation,
our youth
are in per-
il. Our son
is dead
and there
are more
dying.

Hector
Smith



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks past protesters.

As he crossed the road
towards parliament, the
crowd started to shout in uni-
son, “We want justice!” and
“Tommy needs to go!”

Speaking to The Tribune,
Hector Smith, Brenton’s
father said the grieving fami-
lies contacted each other and
are now unified in their call
for justice for their relatives
and other victims.

“We will never forget our
loved ones and the country
must stand behind us to make
sure it does not happen to
them.”

“They (politicians) need to

CUSTOMER LOYALTY CARD

see that we the people want
change. Our nation, our youth
are in peril. Our son is dead
and there are more dying.
You need to show an exam-
ple. You need just to go
ahead and serve justice,” he
said.

Monique Smith, niece of
Preston Ferguson, who was
killed on August 2, said: “We
are trying to let the people
that we have elected to gov-
ern this country hear our unit-
ed voice saying that ‘enough is
enough, justice has to be
served.’

“We speak for those peo-

PROTEST: VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE

ple who can no longer hear
for themselves. We are the
family members who have
been left hurting without
answers. The police are not
giving us answers, and we
want them to know we are
not going away.”

Mervin Johnson, Preston’s
uncle, said: “Exuma is in total
uprising right now. They
understand, it was obvious
and the message in Exuma is
something has to change.
Something has to happen.”

Speaking with the media
briefly before heading into
parliament, Mr Turnquest

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PLACARD-WAVING PROTESTERS outside the House of Assembly yesterday.

said The Bahamas is a “coun-
try of laws and we want to
ensure that the law is fol-
lowed.”

“When the law is not fol-
lowed, there are procedures
in place that will be carried
out,” he added.

In relation to the Brenton
Smith case, which saw police
admit that an officer shot the
18 year old while in pursuit
of an armed robber, Mr Turn-
quest said the matter will be
“dealt with by the coroner’s
court.”

“I don’t want to second
guess the police officer who
was on duty responding to
that situation, but there are
procedures in place to deal
with that.”

Meanwhile, referring to the
case of Preston Ferguson, Mr
Turnquest said he was “dis-
appointed” to hear the vic-

eR
PHONE: 322-2157



BRENTON SMITH’S father, Hector Smith, pauses for a drink of water.

ede le
UL eS

ret
COLD BLOODED
MURDER

JUSTICE 4 PR

tim’s family claim that he had
failed to contact them.

“T was away when that hap-
pened and I wasn’t really
aware of the circumstances.
The family met with the com-
missioner of police, they indi-
cated they weren’t satisfied,
they then came to meet with
me. Within two days of speak-
ing to me, I spoke back to a
family member, indicated to
them the situation with
regards to it, what the police
was doing with respect to that.

“So I was somewhat disap-
pointed to hear on Sunday in
the press that the family say-
ing they hadn’t heard from
the commissioner or the min-
ister.

“Well they surely could-
n't say the minister because
it is a matter that is still under
investigation and we’re deal-
ing with it.”

1

Felipe Major
/Tribune staff



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



SUPREME COURT: DEATH OF
POLICE OFFICER EDDISON BAIN

Court hears
about robbery
and killing plot

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Lead police
investigator Darrell Rolle told
the Supreme Court that mur-
der accused Wilfred McPhee
Jr told him that co-accused
Edwin Bauld Jr hatched a
plan to rob and kill his own
cousin.

Sgt Rolle testified that
McPhee told him he only
wanted to rob Police Corporal
Eddison Bain, but Bauld
wanted to kill him. Bauld and
McPhee are on trial for the
murder, kidnapping and rob-
bery of Bain, whose body was
found in a shallow ditch near
the Casuarinas Bridge on
October 22, 2007. His hands
and feet were bound and a
large stone had been put on
top of his face.

Sgt Rolle took a statement
from McPhee on October 23.
He read the entire 13-page
document in court yesterday.
Before taking the statement,
Rolle said he asked if the
accused wanted a lawyer pre-
sent, but McPhee declined.

In the statement, McPhee
claimed Bauld told him they
were going to make some
money by robbing his cousin
after using his girlfriend, Gah-
nise Campbell, to set Bain up.

Bauld went over the plan
with his girlfriend in a hotel
room, but she was hesitant.
They argued and she finally
agreed to go through with it,
the statement said.

Statement

The statement claims Gah-
nise called the victim and told
him to pick her up, and that
he and Bauld waited in some
bushes near the Island Seas
armed with a fake gun
wrapped in a towel. When
Gahnise arrived with Bain,
the two men accosted the offi-
cer, robbed him of his ATM
card, got the pin number, put
him in the trunk of his car,
and went to Commonwealth
Bank in the Sea Horse Plaza,
the statement said.

McPhee said he covered his
face with a black shirt and
tried to withdraw money from
Bain’s account, but was
unsuccessful.

Bauld then went in and
withdrew $1,000 cash from the
account.

They went to Boulevard
Service Station with Bain still
in the trunk.

They put gas in the vehicle
and drove over the bridge.
McPhee said Bain pleaded
with them to let him go.

Bain told them that he
would not report the matter
because he was a police offi-
cer and was ashamed. McPhee
said he did not know Bain was
a police officer at the time.

He told Bauld to let Bain
go, but Bauld threatened to
also put him in the hole if he
did not assist him in killing
Bain.

Sgt Rolle said McPhee told
him that Bain was still alive
when Bauld rolled a large
stone over the hole.

Video

Lawyer Brian Hanna, who
is defending Bauld, asked Sgt
Rolle whether he actually saw
Bauld on a video taken at the
bank. Sgt Rolle said he did
not because the persons on
the video had covered their
faces with a shirt.

Mr Hanna also asked Rolle
if he slapped Bauld and
coerced him into signing a
statement so that the police
would not charge his girl-
friend. Rolle denied hitting or
coercing Bauld.

Mario Gray, who repre-
sents McPhee, suggested that
Sgt Rolle punched his client in
the head, and another officer
poked McPhee in the chest
with a baseball bat.

He further suggested that
Sgt Rolle promised his client
that he would give a deal for
his co-operation. Sgt Rolle
denied the assertions. Mr
Grey also asked Sgt Rolle
whether his client was made
aware of his constitutional
right to speak to an attorney
while in police custody, and
whether this information was
posted in the room where the
men were kept in custody.

Sgt Rolle said he was not
aware if any postings, but said
he had asked McPhee if he
wished to speak with a lawyer,
but the accused declined.

The trial resumes on Thurs-
day. Acting Justice Jethro
Miller is presiding. ca Kemp
and Vernal Collie are the
prosecutors.

MEN KILLED AS CAR PLOUGHS INTO UTILITY POLE NEAR LAKE CUNNINGHAM

Two die after high-speed
police chase ends in crash

A HIGH-SPEED police
chase in the early hours of yes-
terday resulted in the death of
two suspects after they were
involved in a horrific crash.

The men died at the scene
on John F Kennedy Drive
around 3am after their car
crashed into a utility pole near
Lake Cunningham, “cutting the
vehicle in half,” Asst Commis-
sioner Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune. Investigations into the
accident were still underway at
press time last night and the
identities of the men had not
been released. But police
believe the victims may have
been driving a stolen car.

Officers were on patrol on

Fire Trail Road just before 3am
when they spotted a car with
two men near the Texaco Ser-
vice Station. The vehicle
“aroused suspicion” as it did
not have the necessary inspec-
tion certificates, Mr Hanna said.

The officers attempted to
perform a routine “stop and
search” exercise on the 2003
Nissan Sentra, which was bear-
ing the licence plate number
118308. However, the Nissan
sped off down Fire Trail Road.
The police pursued and a high
speed chase led them first onto
Gladstone Road, then onto
John F Kennedy Drive, Asst
Supt Walter Evans said. Short-
ly after turning onto the road

BAHAMAS HOTEL, CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION
\ 2 » s .
A-Team leader Nicole Martin declared hotel union president

‘A-TEAM’ leader Nicole
Martin has again emerged vic-
torious, having been declared
president of the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union for the second
time this year.

Ms Martin was forced to give
up her seat when the elections
of May 28 were declared null
and void by a Supreme Court
order. However an over-
whelming number of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) members who
cast their votes on Tuesday
again chose Ms Martin and the
‘A-Team’.

Ms Martin was thrilled with
the result, and said she felt it
was a validation of her initial
victory 60 days before.

She has become the first
woman president in the history
of the union, established more
than 50 years ago, and she
approached the election with

Seaman dies after
diving accident

ROYAL Bahamas Defence
Force marine seaman Charles
Heastie died on Tuesday
night following a diving acci-
dent two weeks ago.

Mr Heastie, 21, fell into a
coma after a scuba diving
accident during a RBDF
training exercise on Wednes-
day, September 17. He was
swimming laps in one of the
community pools in South
Beach with several other offi-
cers when he failed to surface.
His comrades rushed to pull
him from the water and per-
form cardiopulmonary resus-
citation (CPR) while they
waited for an ambulance to
arrive. The marine was rushed
to Doctors Hospital where he
remained in a coma for nearly
two weeks.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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RAL |



HOTEL union members vote.

confidence under the slogan,
‘Lets do it again’.

A total of four teams ran for
leadership of the 5,000-mem-
ber union, the largest union in
the country for hotel and cater-
ing industry employees.

Tyrone Butler, leader of the
“M Group”, graciously accept-
ed defeat, while Team
Redemption leader Sidney
Rolle said he was disappoint-

Fence/Rails

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PYC Routed Picket

fence
ras

leading to Lynden Pindling
International Airport, the dri-
ver of the Nissan lost control
of the vehicle and crashed into
a utility pole.

Thrown

Police said the two passen-
gers were thrown from the car,
which was “completely man-
gled” in the crash.

Witnesses said the Nissan
“split the pole in two.”

The two men are the coun-
try’s 38th and 39th traffic fatal-
ities for the year so far. Just 10
days ago, one-year-old Randia
Dean and her 20-year-old aunt

ed by the loss as he had expect-
ed to win the election this time.

He thanked members in
Grand Bahama and Cat Island
who voted for him.

Kirk Wilson, head of Team
Deliverance, warned he may
take legal action as three mem-
bers of his team were not
allowed to be nominated.

Mr Wilson, former first vice-
president of the union, was
involved in the feud over the
May election dates which led
to Justice John Isaacs scrapping
the May 4 nominations and
May 28 elections by means of a
Supreme Court Order. Incum-
bent President Roy Colebrooke
and Secretary General Leo
Douglas, who temporarily
regained the reigns of the union
on July 31 after Ms Martin's
team were forced to step down,
declined to offer again for lead-
ership — likely because they
only received 270 votes in the
May election.

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Levonya Miller died in an acci-
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master








































































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Politics turned dangerous in US

I HATE TO write about this, but I have
actually been to this play before and it is
really disturbing.

I was in Israel interviewing Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin just before he was assassi-
nated in 1995. We had a beer in his office.
He needed one. I remember the ugly mood
in Israel then — a mood in which extreme
right-wing settlers and politicians were doing
all they could to delegitimize Rabin, who
was committed to trading land for peace as
part of the Oslo accords. They questioned his
authority. They accused him of treason. They
created pictures depicting him as a Nazi SS
officer, and they shouted death threats at and even his character all you want. I know
rallies. His political opponents winked at it politics is a tough business. But if we destroy
all. the legitimacy of another president to lead or

And in so doing they created a poisonous to pull the country together for what most
political environment that was interpreted by Americans want most right now — nation-
one right-wing Jewish settler as a license to building at home — we are in serious trou-
kill Rabin — he must have heard, “God will ble. We can’t go 24 years without a legiti-
be on your side” — and so he did so. mate president — not without being

Others have already remarked on this swamped by the problems that we will end
analogy, but I want to add my voice because up postponing because we can’t address
the parallels to Israel then and America them rationally.
today turn my stomach: I have no problem The American political system was, as the
with any of the substantive criticism of Pres- saying goes, “designed by geniuses so it could
ident Barack Obama from the right or left. be run by idiots.” But a cocktail of political
But something very dangerous is happen- and technological trends have converged in
ing. Criticism from the far right has begun the last decade that are making it possible for
tipping over into delegitimation and creating the idiots of all political stripes to overwhelm
the same kind of climate here that existed in and paralyze the genius of our system.
Israel on the eve of the Rabin assassination. Those factors are: the wild excess of mon-

What kind of madness is it that someone ey in politics; the gerrymandering of political
would create a poll on Facebook asking districts, making them permanently Repub-
respondents, “Should Obama be killed?” lican or Democratic and erasing the political
The choices were: “No, Maybe, Yes, and middle; a 24/7 cable news cycle that makes
Yes if he cuts my health care.” The Secret all politics a daily battle of tactics that over-
Service is now investigating. I hope they put whelm strategic thinking; and a blogosphere
the jerk in jail and throw away the key that at its best enriches our debates, adding
because this is exactly what was being done new checks on the establishment, and at its
to Rabin. Even if you are not worried that worst coarsens our debates to a whole new
someone might draw from these vitriolic level, giving a new power to anonymous
attacks a license to try to hurt the president, slanderers to send lies around the world.
you have to be worried about what is hap- Finally, on top of it all, we now have a per-
pening to American politics more broadly. manent presidential campaign that encour-

Our leaders, even the president, can no ages all partisanship, all the time among our
longer utter the word “we” with a straight leading politicians. I would argue that togeth-
face. There is no more “we” in American er these changes add up to a difference of
politics at a time when “we” have these huge degree that is a difference in kind — a dif-
problems — the deficit, the recession, health ferent kind of American political scene that
care, climate change and wars in Iraq and makes me wonder whether we can seriously
Afghanistan — that “we” can only manage, discuss serious issues any longer and make
let alone fix, if there is a collective “we” at decisions on the basis of the national interest.
work. We can’t change this overnight, but what

Sometimes I wonder whether George we can change, and must change, is people
H.W. Bush, president “41,” will be remem- crossing the line between criticising the pres-
bered as our last “legitimate” president. The ident and tacitly encouraging the unthink-
right impeached Bill Clinton and hounded able and the unforgivable.
him from Day 1 with the bogus Whitewater (This article was written by Thomas L.
“scandal.” George W. Bush was elected Friedman —
under a cloud because of the Florida voting c.2009 New York Times News Service).

mess, and his critics on the left never let him
forget it.

And Obama is now having his legitimacy
attacked by a concerted campaign from the
right fringe. They are using everything from
smears that he is a closet “socialist” to call-
ing him a “liar” in the middle of a joint ses-
sion of Congress to fabricating doubts about
his birth in America and whether he is even
a citizen. And these attacks are not just com-
ing from the fringe. Now they come from
Lou Dobbs on CNN and from members of
the House of Representatives.

Again, hack away at the man’s policies

SFirst Baptist Church

289 Market 31. South « P.O. Box N-TS84 © Nassau, Bahamas
THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK |

“God Delights In The Earnest
Prayers Of His People.”

SUNDAY SERVICES
Tam, &00an, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCES JUP0.0.

Observations
regarding the
‘Straw Market’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The following is a compi-
lation of ideas from business
operators between Bay
Street and Woodes Rogers
Walk with our observations
on the straw market:

Because of the nature of
most of the vendors and
their wares — and those
who are not vendors of
straw — and those who
greet and rip off tourists by
welcoming them with a
“free” gift which is taken
back after the tourists refuse
to pay for it, and push drugs,
fake cigars and arrange
assignments for the evening
— and those who do noth-
ing else but hang around the
straw market — and the way
they present themselves and
the image that they present
of the Bahamas, the “straw
market” will never by its
own nature be anything but
a third rate sideshow.

The only way to improve
the situation in town is to
have the “straw market”
moved and monitored.
Maybe Arawak Cay where
visitors can take a short cab
ride and have a total “cul-
tural” experience as in Mex-
ico and several other desti-
nations or in the old customs
building on Prince George
Dock where monitoring of
workers and goods is more
feasible. It would be the first
and the last place for ship
visitors to experience a real
straw market with real
Bahamian made goods —
rather than cheap imports
from everywhere else in the
world sold as Bahamian, and
illegal copies of name brand
bags, wallets, etc. Serious
businesses nearby the cur-
rent straw market are dis-
gusted with having to put up
with the attitudes, of the
slovenliness, the acceptance
of criminal behaviour as an
everyday “cultural” thing —
it should never have been
allowed to pervade our cul-
ture so thoroughly, and it is
time to eliminate it entirely
and thoroughly.

The towns people are
tired of it — the ones who
pay the property taxes, busi-
ness licences and all manner
of other fees are held back
by those who don’t pay and
don’t care — those who feel
that it is their right to ignore

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LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



law and civility and the sen-
sibilities of others.

Before the fire that
destroyed the straw market,
Beaumont House and
Colony Place, the placement
of the straw market and the
annoyance given by the
market people discouraged
continuing foot traffic going
west beyond the market
itself, and as a result all busi-
nesses from Market Street
going west were severely
negatively affected by the
halt in the flow of pedestrian
tourist traffic. Should the
straw market return to mid-
downtown the same would
happen again. When the
shopping and commercial
extension is expanded going
east of Rawson Square and
the pedestrian flow pools
further in that direction, any
such blockage as a straw
market returning to mid-
town would isolate anything
west of it. This would be
another nail in the coffin for
businesses and further thin
out any potential business
that might make its way
through the straw market
gauntlet. As it is, our tourists
are a fickle and untrusting
of the unfamiliar, they dis-
like confrontation with loud,
aggressive people and will
return to the haven of their
ship at the first feeling of
discomfort. This suits the
ships nicely as they are guar-
anteed more on board
spending!

Putting this straw market
and these people who man it
and hang around it back in
the centre of prime business
area of the capital will again
lower our credibility of
being a serious business cen-
tre and show the world that
a few loud, rude people get
in the way of true progress
in providing and maintaining
our destination as a thing of
beauty and business. It will
show the world that our
town and our attitude
towards international com-
mercial acceptance and our
intentions for international
recognition and success is
hardly more than a fifth rate
joke. We will never progress
as other nations do and we
must look forward. We are
already way behind the
mark, the rest of the region
take serious positive and
competitive steps to get
ahead, we seem quite satis-
fied by happily ignoring the

shambles that currently exist
and allowing a slap-happy
attitude towards regional
competition. If it were not
for the proximity of the
USA little dirty Nassau
would have long been lost
in the dust. It is imperative
that the presentation of our
downtown showpiece be
alive, strong and purpose-
ful. Should we allow the
straw market to go back to
the centre of town we might
as well throw in the towel
and give up as the rats will
be running the city with
rudeness, carelessness, dis-
gusting attitudes with unpo-
liced lawlessness — and the
feeling that they can — and
they do — get away with
everything that only goes to
destroy rather than enhance
life. The beauty that exist-
ed here when we first
became a tourist destination
is sadly gone, and along with
that the attitudes of helpful-
ness, pride and honesty.

Please put something
worthwhile in the old straw
market space — to be com-
petitive we must show our
best. Commercial buildings
and a beautiful cool area to
offer respite is what is need-
ed there. We have a lot of
catching up to do, and the
straw market does not
belong there. Those who are
“working” there and those
who hang around there
preying on tourists and near-
by businesses tend to
destroy any prospects of
improvement, and as much
as they are happy to live in
their filth, they are not hap-
py until they drag all sur-
rounding businesses down
to their level.

Progress nationally or
with individual businesses is
impossible with this type of
overwhelming negativity,
and should the market not
be removed from the down-
town area, our lack of plan-
ning and foresight will seal
our fate and we will deserve
to drown in the squalor and
results of our short sighted-
ness that I assure you will
come to pass. We should
look towards greater sub-
stance by improving our
tourist product perhaps we
can also improve our tourist
quality and regain some
pride in our attitudes and
surroundings. Thank you for
your space and time.

THE BUSINESS OPER-
ATORS who have dealt
with this for far too long.

Nassau,
September, 2009.

Executive Motors Ltd.
PARTS & SERVICE

DEPARTMENTS
At the Auto Mall, Shirley Street

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN estimated 32,000 chil-
dren, students and elderly peo-
ple burdened by the cost of
medication for chronic diseases
will soon be eligible to get them
for free from both government
and private pharmacies.

This was revealed as parlia-
mentarians yesterday began
debate on the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan, which is
set to entitle certain people to
get previously costly prescrip-
tion medications and medical
supplies at no cost.

Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, stating that it is gov-
ernment’s intent to ensure all
Bahamians have “full access to
quality and affordable health-
care,” described the drug plan
as the first step by government
towards the introduction of a
comprehensive, universal health
care plan that covers the cost
of not only medication, but oth-
er key healthcare needs.

The drug plan — supported
yesterday by both government
and opposition MPs, despite
some reservations — is expected
to need $5.4 million in funding
per year in its first phase, to be
provided in part by contribu-
tions by employers and employ-

ees equivalent to one per cent
of their insurable wage.

Ninety-three medications
which treat 11 different Chron-
ic Non-Communicable Diseases
(CNCDs) — arthritis, asthma,
breast cancer, diabetes mellitus,
glaucoma, high cholesterol,
hypertension, ischaemic heart
disease, major depression,
prostate cancer and psychosis —
will be accessible through the
plan.

National Insurance Board
Pensioners, those on NIB retire-
ment benefits, those on Nation-
al Insurance invalidity benefits,
children under the age of 18 and
young people up to the age of
25 in full time education suffer-
ing from these diseases are eli-
gible under the first phase.

Highlighting the significance
of the legislation, Dr Minnis
noted that one in three people
in the Bahamas suffer from a
CNCD, 48.5 per cent of all hos-
pital beds are occupied by peo-
ple suffering from these diseases
or associated problems and 60
per cent of all deaths are direct-
ly linked to CNCDs.

At present, the financial bur-
den on those who have to buy
medications to treat these dis-
eases is huge, suggested Dr
Minnis, as is the strain placed
on healthcare services and the
economy when businesses see

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

_ he! —
MINISTER of health Doctor Hubert Minnis in the House yesterday.






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Debate begins on drug plan

employees fall sick and insur-
ance premiums rise in line with
greater demand for treatment
for such conditions.

Pineridge MP Kwasi Thomp-
son noted that the strips and
syringes alone required by a dia-
betes sufferer can amount to
$1,500 a year.

Which medications and con-
ditions will be covered in the
first instance under the initial
phase of the plan was deter-
mined “scientifically” by a
group of medical professionals,
not by the Minister of Health,
and will be reviewed at and
adjusted at various stages, Dr
Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said that while he
always fully supported the prin-
ciple of a comprehensive health-
care plan, the advice of experts
suggests such a plan would not
be “sustainable” at present.

“These same consultants rec-
ommended that the National
Health Insurance plan be intro-
duced in a phased approach
rather than comprehensively
and this is what we are tabling
with the drug plan,” he said.

He added that under a future
phase of the plan, 48,000 people
are anticipated to benefit, as all
employed and self-employed
people, voluntary contributing
people, the indigent and public
service employees will join the
list of those able to access to
free medications.

Aside from treating the
symptoms of CNCDs, Dr Min-
nis said a key part of the Chron-
ic Disease Prescription Drug
Plan will be promotion efforts
aimed at raising awareness
about the need for healthy
lifestyles that can help reduce
the likelihood of a person suf-
fering from such a condition in
the first place and which can
help educate those who suffer
from CNCDs in how to best
manage their condition.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

IN THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 24,
2009, Chinese People’s Libera-
tion Army soldiers march dur-
ing a training for China’s 60th
anniversary military parade at a
military base in Beijing, China.
China's capital was wrapped in
tight security and thick fog
Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009, as
police blocked off Tiananmen
Square, the Forbidden City and
other popular tourist landmarks
ahead of a massive parade on
Oct. 1 marking 60 years of
communist rule.

(AP Photo)






































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Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is critical.
If you or your loved ones have questions about
this disease, there are answers.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical
Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with
two of the world's most renowned specialists on
Friday, October 2, 2009. The clinics are open to the
public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

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Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also
the current Director General and CEO of McGill
University Health Centre and author of more than 300
articles on cancer research.

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Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's
first independent Medical School at the University of
Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used
cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the
United Kingdom.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion

please contact: 502-9610.
e 72 Collins Avenue

Chinese Embassy
holds reception
at Sheraton Hotel

THE Chinese Embassy held
a reception at the Sheraton
Hotel last night to celebrate the
60th anniversary of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

A massive celebration in
Tian'anmen Square, Beijing, at
which President Hu Jintao will
give a keynote speech, will also
be held on October 1 in com-
memoration of the landmark.

A military parade and mass
pageant will follow, according
to a spokesperson for the 60th
National Day celebration
preparation committee of the
Beijing municipal government.

The parade will highlight
China’s achievements in the
defence sector over the past six
decades and showcase its reso-
lution to safeguard world and
regional peace and stability, the
spokesperson said.

The mass pageant will
involve about 200,000 citizens
and 60 floats, and will be held
under the theme: "Motherland
and I Marching Together".

The spokesperson said that
later that night, a gala event at
Tian'anmen Square will feature
“colourful performances and a
splendid fireworks display”,
with senior party and govern-
ment leaders present.

On September 30 a huge
reception, hosted by the State
Council, will be held in the
Great Hall of the People.

From October 1 to 3, major
parks in Beijing are to host par-

"We will try our best
to create a festive
environment at an
economical cost.
Preparation is going
on smoothly, we will
make sure of a suc-
cessful celebration."

a
ties and functions to celebrate
National Day.

In addition, an exhibition
highlighting China's progress
during the past 60 years will be
held in the Beijing Exhibition
Centre near the city zoo over
the last two weeks in Septem-
ber.

Also during that time, a
grand musical, "Road to
Revival", with a cast of about
3,200, will be staged at the
Great Hall of the People. It will
depict the past 169 years of Chi-
nese history chronologically
from the Opium War to the
present.

"We will try our best to cre-
ate a festive environment at an
economical cost," said the
spokesperson. "Preparation is
going on smoothly, we will
make sure of a successful cele-
bration."

The Chinese Embassy in
Nassau will be closed until
October 5.

A BANQUET is
held marking the
60th anniversary
of the founding
of the People’s
Republic of

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7



Millions of dollars expected to be saved in water costs a year

Gena Gibbs/BIS Photo











A BEC WORKER carefully excavates around electrical lines to make
room for WSC to work and replace the old pipes and infrastructure.



WITH five million imperial
gallons of water estimated to
be lost every day to due to
leaks, Water and Sewerage
Corporation engineers and
technicians have been working
late into the night repairing and
stabilising the 83-year-old
underground pipes in New
Providence.

The Corporation expects to
save millions of dollars a year in
water costs and significantly
increase its revenue intake fol-
lowing the system upgrade.

“The sewerage system was
built back in 1926, so the infra-
structure we are renewing is old
and fragile,” said Phenton Ney-
mour, Minister of State in the
Ministry of the Environment.

“It’s also time to repave
Shirley Street and this project
extends from Village Road to
Frederick Street and is expect-
ed to be completed in Decem-
ber 2009. So while the works
are being carried out, we will
improve the drive.”

Since the project started on
August 31, the Corporation has
updated a third of the aging
pipes to save Nassau residents
from paying for lost gallons of
water, much of which is barged
in from Andros.

The Corporation estimates

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daily exception reports to ensure corrective action taken as necessary

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water losses of up to five mil-
lion imperial gallons per day.

“By correcting the leaky
pipes, every one million gallons
daily of lost water - that is
equivalent to almost $3 Million
annually in additional cost for
water purchases - will be
saved,” said Mr Neymour.
“And if this one million gallons
daily of water is sold, the addi-
tional revenue would be more
than $5 million annually.

Challenges

“Water and Sewerage has
faced a number of challenges
due to the age of the infra-
structure that translates to non-
revenue water.

“Water is produced and lost
before it reaches the customer
or is billed to customers,
through either leaks, theft, or
metering inaccuracies.”

Leslie Hutchinson, senior
engineer of the Project Man-
agement Unit at the WSC, said

they are working with Bahamas
Hot Mix and Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation to complete
the government’s plan to repair
the water system and resurface
the roadway.

“Our focus is on the water
service lines and the sewer lat-
erals,” said Mr Hutchinson.

“Ninety per cent of our leaks
are on service lines.

“This project addresses
renewing the service saddles in
direct contact with the pipe and
the actual service lines that go
out to the various properties.

“We are also addressing the
main sewer lines that tie into
corners.”

The WSC took special mea-
sures so that environmental
protection procedures are fol-
lowed.

They also wanted to ease the
inconvenience to the driving
public.

“There is a very good traffic
management plan and the trac-
tor is taken care to minimise

the amount of dust,” said Mr
Hutchinson.

“We also display signs that
tell the drivers to slow down
because there is road work
ahead.”

Mr Neymour said the Cor-
poration pays careful attention
to the choice of their materials
and to installing ducts around
the service lines so that when
the road paving takes place, it
eliminates the threat of dam-
age to those service lines.

“We have a coordination
committee that ties the project
together, where the utilities cor-
porations share plans with each
other about the project.”

Minister Neymour said he is
pleased with the efforts of the
contractors so far.

“We received no complaints
in respect to any detrimental
effects to the environment.
Contractors are quick to repair
any damage to property and
maintain good customer rela-
tions,” he said

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



a BY ae) Me)


























BY KHYLE QUINCY
PARKER

Press Attaché

Embassy of The Bahamas

(Price Reduced)

HAILED for her foresight
and leadership skills, and for
positioning the Bahamas as a
voice to be heard internation-
ally on public health matters,
Chief Medical Officer Dr Mer-
celine Dahl-Regis accepted the
Pan American Health Organi-
sation Award (PAHO) for
Administration for 2009.

The PAHO award commit-
tee noted that Dr Dahl-Regis
was awarded for her contribu-
tion to healthcare management
and research, and to medical
education in primary health-
care.

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from Argentina, Bolivia and
the United States, the commit-
tee also cited her leadership in
institutionalising public health
surveillance across all of the
Bahamas and in evaluating and
redefining the parameters for
Caribbean cooperation in
health. The award was given at
a special reception held in
Washington, DC, last week dur-
ing a meeting of the 49th
Directing Council of the
PAHO.

Dr Dahl-Regis said the
award was an honour not only
for her, but for those who work
in public health, “particularly
the women, and my country,
the Bahamas.”

“T think it’s very special to
be recognised in such an are-
na,” she said.

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BR = Daa TET

Trinity Methodist Church

Teachers, Students and Parents

| Trinity Methodist Church held ite annual Back-to-School Sunday on

=

==

September 13, with a special Worship Service followed by a biuncheon. As
usual, the focus was on teachers, students and parents, with prayers being
offered for all as the new echool year has started.

There are thirteen teachers who are a part of the Trinity Family, serving in
various public and private schools, all af whom were present. They were
given a gift along with words of appreciation and encouragement. Special
tribute was paid to Sharon Wilson, a member of the Trinity Family all her
life, on her appointment as Principal of St. Andrew's School. She is the firat
| fermale to hold this position

All of the students were presented a gift - this year aluminum water bottles
were piven, in support of using less plastic and practicing a safer and
healthy lifestyle. Parents, while not given a gift, were included in words of
encouragement, appreciation, and challenge. The entire oe
enjoyed the luncheon after the service in the Fellowship

Teachers and students participated in the Worship Service by serving aa
ushers, reading the Scripture lessons, as well as sharing reflections on |
school life. Six young students (from preschool through grade 7), along

with one student from grade 12, and an administrator with the Ministry of |
Education, all spoke. Special music was a ee of the service, featurin
solos by students Carrington McKenzie and Osano Neely, and instrumenta

pleces by fautiat Sharmond Smith, and Trinity's organiat, Kendrick
Coleby, on the piano.



Rev. Bill Higgs presents a gift

to Mins. Sharon Wilson



More of the students, inchading puest
soloists Osane Neely (front row, left] and
Carrington McKenzle
(front row, third from the left)

The teachers of Trinity Methodist Church

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

During her formal remarks,
she said that public service and
public health have been the
most rewarding experiences of
her medical career.

“As T accept this award, I do
so remembering that I did not
accomplish this on my own,”
Dr Dahl-Regis said, lauding her
parents, mentors, family and
friends.

“T envisage a public health-
care system where it is second
nature for practitioners to put
their clients first, where prac-
tice is based on evidence rather
than economics, where preven-
tative healthcare has become
the flagship of healthcare sys-
tems globally, providing equi-
table, culturally relevant care.”

Also at the special ceremony
was Labour and Social Devel-
opment Minister Senator Dion
Foulkes. He described Dr
Dahl-Regis as a “daughter of
the soil,” and spoke of her
“tremendous investment in
advancing the health and well-
being of the people of the
Bahamas, the Caribbean and
the world.”

“Dr Dahl-Regis, because you
are at the helm as the Chief
Medical Officer of the Com-

Chief Medical Officer receives award















MINISTER of Labour and
Social Development Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes (right)
shares a light moment
with Chief Medical Officer
Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis
(centre) and Director Gen-
eral of the World Health
Organisation Dr Margaret
Chan. Dr Dahl-Regis won
the Pan American Health
Organisation/World Health
Organisation Award In
Administration for 2009.

monwealth of the Bahamas,
and because of your proven
commitment to preparedness,
prevention and people, we
sleep at night when the chal-
lenges of hurricanes, malaria,
SARS, tuberculosis, dengue, A
HIN1 and other diseases threat-
en to destabilise our economy,
quality of life and overall well-
being,” he said.

Dr Dahl-Regis’ leadership
has been recognised through-
out the region, as recently as
the caucus of CARICOM Min-
isters of Health a week ago,
where references were made to
her active engagement in
addressing the health chal-
lenges faced by the region.

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UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

OTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS on

(1) Preliminary Cetermination on Types of OSligations on Bahamas



Telecommunications Company Ltd (BTC) under Section 116(3) of the
Communications &4ct 2009,

(2) Preliminary Determination on Types of Obligations on Cable Bahamas Ltd under
Section 116[9) of the Communications Act 2009

(3) Oraft Guidelines on Accounting Separation and Cost Accounting to The Bahamas
Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC)

(4) Draft Guidelines on Accounting Separation and Cost Accounting te Cable Bahamas Ltd {OBL
(5) Graft Guidelines on Access & Interconnection
The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URICA) is pleased to invite comments

from interested partes on its consultation documents and related guidelines released
on 30 September 2005. Interested parties can give comments by 16 November 2008.

Copies of the consultation documents can be obtained
from the URCA office in New Providence or downloaded
from the URCA website at www.urcabahamas.bs and
comments emailed to info@urcabahamas.bs

TAKE PART IN THE NEW REGULATORY REGIME.
YOUR OPINIONS COUNT.



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9



Friday premiere of

TaDa’s new video













NATIONAL YOUTH MONTH

Showcasing contributions of the young

BY ERIC ROSE

A HOST of activities to
“highlight, recognise and
encourage the contributions of
young Bahamians” will be held
as the Bahamas celebrates
National Youth Month in Octo-
ber, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said.

“It is our objective to show-
case and celebrate the many
positive youth role models
within our communities, while
encouraging our unattached



Raymond A Bethel/BIS

PICTURED from left are executive director of Junior Achievement
Bahamas Lionel Elliott; Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister; Acting Director of Youth Gregory Butler; Permanent Secre-
tary Archie Nairn; youth officer Patty Miller, and youth representative
Deon Ellis.


























young men and young women
to focus on getting involved in
meaningful programmes and
projects in our communities,”
Mr Bannister said.

“The month set aside for
youth will also provide an
avenue for young people to
express their views on national
issues that concern them.”

Held under the theme ‘Cele-
brating Youth - Our Pride, Our
Investment and Our Heritage’,
this year’s activities will also
seek to “motivate our youth to
focus on positive alternatives,”
the minister said.

“The youth of the Bahamas
are indeed our pride,” he said
last week during a press con-
ference. We are investing in

ie

THIS Friday, the
Uptown Lounge will
play host to the premiere
of TaDa’s new music
video “No One Else”
from her album “I’m
That Girl.”

As with her previous
videos - the seminal
“TaDa” and “Keep
Moving” featuring Tia
Thomas and Saba - the
new release is a sleek,
quality production that
sets a new standard for
Bahamian music videos.
When TaDa’s self-




Division, is working with
Bahamian youth leaders to
facilitate and equip them to be
able to deliver character-build-
ing programmes throughout the
country. New initiatives will be
implemented this year, includ-
ing the highlighting of a
“unique” workshop hosted by
the Johnson and Wales Uni-
versity on October 21, he said.

“This event will allow all
interested young Bahamians
the opportunity to be exposed
to an institution that specialises
in hospitality and culinary ter-
tiary education,” Minister Ban-
nister said. “My ministry

believes in providing this type
of exposure to as many young
Bahamians as possible. We

desire to see more youth to
begin now to maximise their
potential in order to be in a

position to take full advantage
of new careers as they become
available,” he said. “As the
economy of the Bahamas
improves, so will new doors be
opened.”

This year’s Youth Band
Encounter will be held in Gov-
ernor’s Harbour, Eleuthera on
October 24. “This is the first
time my ministry has embarked
upon a project such as this,” Mr
Bannister said. “We look for-
ward to the fellowship and
camaraderie between New
Providence and Eleuthera
bands that will demonstrate the
powerful positive influence of
music.”

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SONGSTRESS:
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ere mce anni Ate}

them and we look for great
returns on our investment in
the future.”

Mr Bannister said that the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, through its Youth



























of producing a quality
product, they had no
other choice but to do so.

With New York City
as her backdrop, TaDa’s
new video offers a
sophisticated, soulful and
polished package.

The song was pro-
duced by another local
artist, “Sketch”, whose
reputation for creating
sounds comparable to
any other international
producer is growing.

One would be tempt-
ed to be call TaDa a per-
fectionist, and any prod-
uct with her name
attached to it, is one of
high quality. Tickets for
the music video’s pre-
miere are sold at the
Jukebox.

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE








ow 1E5 COMAy, fe,
5 Oy,



OF THe pAHAM”

TENDER NOTICE 01/09

EXTERNAL AUDIT AND ADVISORY SERVICES

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas ("the Commission") is a statutory body established
in 1995 pursuant to the Securities Board Act, 1995, which was repealed and replaced by the
Securities Industry Act, 1999 (the SLA). The Commission is responsible for the administration of
the Investment Funds Act, 2003 (the IFA) and the SIA pursuant to which it supervises and
regulates the activities of the investment funds, securities and capital markets. The Commission,
having been appointed Inspector of Financial and Corporate Service Providers January 1, 2008,

U

is also responsible for administering the Financial and Corporate Service Providers Act, 2000. AUTHOR Utah Taylor Rolle paid a courtesy on the Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister, on Thursday, September 24, 2009 at the Ministry’s conference room.
From left are Author Utah Taylor Rolle; Minister Bannister; and Permanent Secretary, Archie Nairn.

The Commission invites proposals for the provision of external audit services in respect of its
financial statements prepared in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards for
the year ended December 31, 2009,

Contact the Commission for supplemental information as follows:
E-mail = infojd’sch.gow-bs
Tel: 242-356-6291/2
Fax: 242-356-7530

Address tenders te:

The Executive Director
Securities Commission of the Bahamas
3" Floor Charlotte House
Shirley and Charlotte Streets
P.O. Box N-8347
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for detivery to the Commission is on or before October 15, 2009
Tender submissions should be marked 2s follows:
Tender (11/109
Proposal to provide external audit servicet to. the Commission
Jor the year ending December 3], 21009

The Commission reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals.



Colinalmperial

The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray
Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis
Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams
Ruthesa Glendera Dean
Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Alma Clarke

Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes
Bettrah Belanda Mitchell
Bridgette Neely

Carl Rudolph Johnson

Charlene Dawkins-Bevans

Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Clarence Rolle
Cleaver W. Robinson
Cordero Farrington
Coresa Deveaux
Cynthia Wilson
Dedrick Storr
Derek Nottage
Desmond Pinder
Douglas Richards
Francina Scott
Francis Clarke
Frederica Hamilton
Fredie Smith
George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle
Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee
John A. Webb
Kardeo Heild

Kevin Remond Culmer
Kirkwood Campbell
Laytoya Cargill-Gray
Leila Wood

Lorenzo M. Carroll
Malriae Lauree Ferguson
Mavis Vanderpool
Melissa Evans
Michael White
Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Mervin Dean

Mervin |. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
Pamela Taylor

Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Sharon Creary

Sharon Hanna

Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

Stanley Wood

Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha O Brien
Trevor Mcneil Basden
Valentino Gay

Velma Cox

Veronica Samuel

Virginia P. Culmer Woodside
Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills



‘Controversy TV’ host Taylor-Rolle

presents Minister with his book

BIS PHOTO: Raymond A Bethel

UTAH Taylor-Rolle, one of two hosts _ life-long search for his biological father,
of the popular show “Controversy TV” whom he finally found in 2008. The
on Cable 12, recently paid a visit on Min- author and television producer said he
ister of Youth, Sports and Culture — has only known his father - Charles Rolle,
Desmond Bannister and presented him the assistant deputy superintendent at
with his book “The Tears I Cried.”

Mr Taylor-Rolle’s book chronicles his already has a great relationship with him.

SCHOOL SUPPLIES DONATION

Her Majesty's Prison - a short time, but he

BUILDING E

4

THE WOMEN of Evangelistic Centre Ministries
made a donation of school supplies to the Oakes
Field Primary School. They presented the sup-
plies to the school’s principal Beryl Gray and
described the donation as an act of community
service. Christopher Smith, Director for Security
for the Ministry of Education, was also on hand
for the photo along with the school’s students.

PHOTO: Patrick Hanna

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 11



Ex-Chief Justice sworn in as judge on International Criminal Tribunal
ee ieee el



JUDGE BURTON HALL takes the
oath of office during a ceremony
to mark his appointment to the
International Criminal Tribunal
for the former Yugoslavia.

President of the Interna-
tional Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia,
Patrick Robinson, described
Judge Burton Hall's contri-
butions to the justice system
of the Bahamas as “invalu-
able” and said his election as
a permanent judge rewards
an “illustrious” career in the
public service.

“T have no doubt that he
will also contribute immea-
surably to the international
community as a judge of this
tribunal.

“Tam indeed grateful for
his undertaking of this ser-
vice.”

Judge Hall thanked the

government of the Bahamas
for its support and for “releas-
ing” him. He also thanked the
international community for
his appointment.

“T trust that the work that I
have done before would
indeed enable me to fulfill the
awesome responsibilities
attendant upon the work of
this tribunal,” he said.

Oath

Sir Burton was one of three
permanent judges to take
their oath of office on Sep-
tember 2 at a special ceremo-
ny in The Hague, where the
International Criminal Tri-

It's official: Kenred Dorsett
to run for PLP chairmanship

FROM page one

office yesterday.

He added that his vision for the party "is
practical, results oriented and inclusive.

"The ethos of ‘Progress Now’ is teamwork.
We need all PLPs to recommit themselves to
our party and work together with a single pur-
pose of restoring the PLP as the government of
the Bahamas," said Mr Dorsett, who said he
supports incumbent party leader Perry
Christie.

Former PLP chairman Bradley Roberts was
among the small group of supporters at yes-
terday's press conference and threw his sup-
port behind Mr Dorsett's bid.

"T think Mr Dorsett is a good man. He's an
outstanding young man, check his credentials
and history with the party," Mr Roberts told
The Tribune after the announcement.

But Mr Roberts, who recently said he had
not ruled out the chance of running for the
post again, remained vague when asked if he
had decided not to challenge Ms Hanna-Mar-
tin himself.

"A lot of people are asking me to do so
(run for PLP chairman). I am still praying over
the matter," he said.

Meantime Mr Dorsett said his team will ful-
ly unveil its platform for change on Sunday. He



said the plan
will focus on
ten areas:
Timely and
aggressive
messaging,
membership
relations,
reviewing the
roles of leader
and chairman
and revitaliz-
ing our
branches,
campaign
education and
training,
recruitment
and candidate
selection,
financing and sustainable funding, empowering
of youth and women, recognising and empow-
ering party supporters, family island develop-
ment and participation.

Several positions within the PLP will be
contested going in to its convention later this
month. So far only one person — lawyer Paul
Moss — has officially launched a campaign
against party leader Perry Christie.

The PLP convention is slated for October 21
to 23.

Glenys Hanna-Martin

bunal for the former
Yugoslavia (ICTY) is based.

Judges Guy Delvoie of Bel-
gium and Howard Morrison
of the United Kingdom were
also sworn in. They were
appointed by Secretary-Gen-
eral Ban Ki-Moon and have

replaced Judges Christine
Van Den Wyngaert, Lord
Iain Bonomy and Mohamed
Shahabuddeen.
Established in 1993, the
ICTY was set up to try per-
sons for serious violations of
international humanitarian

OF THE BAHAMAS

law committed in the territo-
ry of the former Yugoslavia
since 1991.

Judge Hall served for eight
years as Chief Justice of the
Bahamas. He resigned as
head of the judiciary on
August 23, 2009.

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FROM page one

McKenzie, Kayla Bodie and
Ian Neely.

The union also argued that
the bank breached its man-
date by making "unauthorised
payments" from its bank
account and is calling for an
account and inquiry into its
account at the bank.

The writ also directs Bank
of the Bahamas to pay the
union whatever sum is found
due to the plaintiff after the
mentioned inquiry. The union
is also suing for interest, costs
and whatever relief deemed

just by the Supreme Court.

Back in August, around
$665,000 was transferred from
the union's bank account at
the Harrold Road branch of
Bank of the Bahamas.

The transfer requests were
reportedly made by union
assistant treasurer Samantha
Gray, trustee Ian Neely and
purported assistant secretary
general Raymond Wright
days after Nicole Martin was
ousted as the union's presi-
dent.

According to a newspaper
report, Mr Wright was to
receive $73,600 of the request-

ed money, while Ms Gray and
Ms Neely were to receive
$21,450 and $30,026 respec-
tively. The transfer also
included $140,000 in legal fees
intended to cover the chal-
lenge led by then first vice-
president Kirk Wilson, which
nullified the May election that
brought Ms Martin to power.

In August, Bank of the
Bahamas maintained it acted
"legally and in full accordance
with its fiduciary responsibil-
ity in executing disburse-
ments, following authorisa-
tion by and instructions from
the union."

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one



attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from the 55-year-old
actor. Bridgewater is also
charged with abetment to
extort.

Mr Travolta testified yes-
terday that on January 16, he
was informed by his longtime
friend and employee Ronald
Zupancic that there was a
threat against him and a
demand for money. Accord-
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regarding the “release paper”
he had signed in the Bahamas
and that if $25 million was not
paid certain stories connected
to the document would be
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the requirements during the time of election.

Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
Sth October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.



CAMERAMEN line the street outside the courts yesterday




co

as John Travolta goes

ble in some way.” Mr Travol-
ta said that he told Mr Zupan-
cic that he would speak to his
attorney about the matter and
that they needed to do what-
ever they needed to do to
investigate the situation. He
further testified that he later
spoke to Michael McDermott
— one of his attorneys — who
gave him certain instructions.

“T gave him permission to
go to the authorities based on
the information he told me,”
Mr Travolta said.

Under cross-examination
Mr Travolta admitted that he
did not know Bridgewater nor
Lightbourne, although he had
met Lightbourne before. Mr
Travolta also admitted that
no direct threats or demands
for money were made by
either of the accused although
Lightbourne’s attorney Carl-
son Shurland pointed out that
his client had a telephone
number for Mr Travolta’s
office in California, which he
had obtained from the
“release” document.

Mr Travolta also admitted
that he could not say “cate-
gorically” that what his rep-
resentatives had told him was
correct.

Following Mr Travolta’s
testimony, PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson was
recalled to the witness stand
as the brief taped conversa-
tion she had with Bridgewater
on January 17 was played in
court. During the telephone
conversation Mrs Maynard-
Gibson told Bridgewater that
she had spoken to Mr McDer-
mott who she said was flying
to Nassau to speak with her
(Bridgewater) specifically.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson asked
Ms Bridgewater if she could
give McDermott her cellular
phone number and Bridge-
water agreed to her giving Mr
McDermott both her cell and
office number.

“My people have been call-
ing me today and telling me
they have a deadline,” Bridge-
water told Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son. Mrs Maynard-Gibson
told her that the fact that Mr
McDermott was coming
showed to Nassau that the
matter was being taken seri-

demand



“Stories that
would imply that
the death of my
son was
intentional and I
was culpable in

some way.”
——E—E>E>EEEEL_ _ EL _ SI

John Travolta

ously. Responding to a ques-
tion raised by the jury as to
whether Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son had ever told Bridgewater
that what she was doing was
illegal she responded: “T said
Pleasant you know what you
are doing is wrong.” Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that she
told Bridgewater this while
en route to the airport fol-
lowing a meeting with her in
Freeport. According to Mrs
Maynard-Gibson, Bridgewa-
ter said that her client’s posi-
tion was that he could have
her or a “jungalist” lawyer.
When asked why she had not
mentioned this in her state-
ment to police Mrs Maynard-
Gibson responded by saying
that while making her state-
ment she was only speaking
specifically to her client’s con-
cerns.

Attorney Michael McDer-
mott also took the witness
stand yesterday. He told the
court that after receiving a
telephone call from attorney
Michael Ossi, he made a
phone call to West End and
Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe. Mr McDermott told
the court that he “initially
spoke to a male and subse-
quently a female.” That con-
versation he said lasted for
about 18 minutes. Mr McDer-
mott further testified that
while in Nassau on January
18 around 9.17pm, he had a
taped telephone conversation
in his room (328) at the Sher-
aton Hotel, Cable Beach. Mr
McDermott said that he had
given police authorisation to
tap his telephone and that the
conversation lasted for about
15 or 20 minutes. Mr McDer-
mott further testified that on
January 19, he met with
Bridgewater in his hotel room
for about 40 minutes.

Mr McDermott is expect-
ed to be recalled this morning
when the trial continues
before Senior Justice Anita
Allen.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner, Neil
Brathwaite and Garvin
Gaskin are prosecuting the
case. Ms Bridgewater is rep-
resented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr
Lightbourne is represented by
attorney Carlson Shurland
and Mary Bain.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS



A PORTRAIT of the
late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson (below)
was mounted at the
entrance to Loyola



REFEREES Randy Cunningham (second from left), Freddie Brown and Christian Wilmore (far right) pay
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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



It seems as if Boxing Commission has

Mackey’s future hanging in the balance
STUBBS

ONE minor boxing title is
supposed to lead to a major
title as a boxer tries to
improve on his world rank-
ing.

In the case of Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey, the
Commonwealth Boxing
Council has decided to strip
him after he fought and lost to
Haitian-born Canadian Ado-
nis ‘Superman’ Stevenson on
Saturday night.

The fifth-round technical
knockout forced the move by
the CBC as Mackey had a
mandatory defense of his
British Commonwealth title
fight lined up against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium at
the end of the month.

Mackey, 29, risked it all
when he journeyed to Mon-
treal, Canada, to face the

undefeated Stevenson in the
co-main event for the vacant
World Boxing Council’s
International title.

Now his future is also in
jeopardy because of the loss.

Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion’s chairman Pat “The Cen-
treville Assassin’ Strachan, in
a press release yesterday, indi-
cated that after their meeting
on Tuesday, they unanimous-
ly decided to act on the rec-
ommendation of the medical
committee, headed by Dr
Munir Rashad, as to when
Mackey will be allowed to
fight again.

The release further indicat-
ed that a medical team will
meet with Mackey today for
the purpose of an examina-
tion. Rashad is then expected
to report the findings to the
commission and a decision

pr charts

) meing

— A - ave oth



OPINION
a _

will be made on how long
Mackey will be mandated to
refrain from engaging in a
boxing match.

It seems as if the commis-
sion has Mackey’s future
hanging in the balance.

But is it fair to Mackey,
who should have the right to
choose to either hold onto a
title, relinquish it and goa
totally different route, if he
so desires.

The commission has a big
decision ahead of them. So
does Mackey and his han-
dlers, Ray Minus Jr and
Michelle Minus of First Class
Promotions.

Maybe, it might be in the
best interest of all concerned
if everybody can come togeth-
er and sort out the dilemma
because whatever decision is
made, the future of one of the

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country’s most outstanding
professional fighters is on the
line.

I can understand all of the
concern the commission has
had about Mackey taking the
fight with his British Com-
monwealth title defense on
the horizon.

He’s the only Caribbean
who holds one of the titles in
the organisation and many
had him held in high esteem
because of his achievement.

By the same token, you
really couldn’t fault Mackey
for taking a gamble and going
after a more prestigious title
that would have helped him
to climb up the ladder in the
WBC’s rankings.

It’s not that the British
Commonwealth title would
have weighed in more than
the WBC’s International title,
when consideration would
have been given to Mackey
in the future for a possible
title shot.

Mackey would have had to
be seen by the WBC in order
to secure a ranking. So it
might have been a good move
by his camp. It was just unfor-
tunate that he was unable to
complete the fight after get-
ting cut over his right eye.

Over the years, Mackey is
not the first Bahamian to
have taken a chance to go
after a title fight and lost. ’m
sure he won’t be the last
either.

It’s just that he had a little
more at stake at the time than

any of the others.

Hopefully it won’t be a set-
back that will hinder him
from making a comeback, if
not this year, next year when
he’s given the green light by
the commission to step back
into the ring.

HOME

CELEBRATIONS

THE Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture is prepar-
ing to bring Team Bahamas
members home for celebra-
tions following for their per-
formance at the 12th IAAF
World Championships in
Athletics.

The championships were
held in August in Berlin, Ger-
many, but the celebrations
have been delayed until this
month because some of the
athletes were still competing
on the international circuit.

The ministry, however, has
not yet disclosed the specific
plans for the celebrations,
which are not expected to be
as elaborate as those in the
past. Part of that is a result of
the current worldwide eco-
nomic crisis.

But whatever happens, the
athletes deserve a reception,
especially veteran sprinters
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
and Chandra Sturrup, who
helped the Bahamas secure
the two medals — silver and
bronze.

We just have to wait and
see what type of celebrations
will be staged.



ADONIS Stevenson (left) punches Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey dur-
ing their WBC International match last Friday in Montreal. Stevenson
won the title with a fifth round TKO...

‘Choo Choo’
taking ‘a couple
of weeks off’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HAVING been down the
same road before, Ray Minus
Jr said there’s no concern
about Jermaine “Choo Choo”
Mackey getting stripped of
his British Commonwealth
super middleweight title.

On Tuesday, the Common-
wealth Boxing Council
stripped Mackey of the title
and has declared it vacant
after Mackey lost Saturday
night to Haitian-born Cana-
dian Adonis Stevenson in his
bid for the World Boxing
Council’s International
Championships in Montreal,
Canada.

Mackey, 29, was scheduled
to make a mandatory title
defense against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the end
of the month at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

It would have been Mack-
ey’s first defense since win-
ning the title on July 19, 2008,
on points over Michael Gben-
ga at the KGLI Gymnasium.

But on Saturday night,
Mackey suffered a technical
knockout 20 seconds into the
fifth round after a cut he
received from the third round
by Stevenson was too severe
for him to continue.

It was the second time
Mackey has lost in Canada.
In fact, all four of his losses
since he turned pro on Feb-
ruary 28, 2004, with a second
round KO over Eugene
Williams have been on the
road.

Minus Jr, who was in
Mackey’s corner during the
fight, said it was an opportu-
nity for Mackey to improve
on his ranking in an attempt
to get closer to a world title

shot.

“We don’t have no gripes.
We feel okay with the ruling.
We see the sense in it,” Minus
Jr said. “We expected it. We
knew ahead of time that we
would have jeopardised the
title if he had lost.

“But we are excited, we are
moving forward and we are
looking at getting back at it as
soon as we can.”

During his days as a ban-
tam weight and lightweight,
Minus Jr also held the British
Commonwealth titles, but he
relinquished them when he
took the opportunity to go
after a world title.

Minus fought and lost in
three attempts.

Mackey, who had to get
some stitches to close up the
cut after the fight, was given a
45-day suspension in which
he is not allowed to fight,
which ruined his chance to
defend his British Common-
wealth title against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the end
of the month.

“He’s going to take a cou-
ple of weeks off, then we will
get him back into the gym,”
Minus Jr said. “Hopefully he
will be ready to fight again in
December.

“We’re just going to keep
fighting and try to line up a
lot of matches as soon as pos-
sible and get him on a nice
win streak again.”

As the manager of Mackey,
Minus Jr said they just wants
to box and whenever the
opportunity for another title
shot comes up, they want to
be in a position to go for it.

“We have our goals and we
hope that we can get the
opportunity,” he said. “We
love boxing and we just want
to take advantage of every
opportunity to box.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

S
i
T

PAGE 14



PAGE 15



FAMILY MEMBERS of the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson attend his
memorial service at Loyola Hall. Shown (I-r) are Ferguson’s son
Alex, his wife Mary and daughter Anne-Marie. See photos on page 73...

Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson was a
mentor and
father figure

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE many people
remember Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson as an extraordi-
nary sportsman and educa-
tor, members of the
Bahamas Association of
Basketball Officials
(BABO) think of him as a
mentor.

Tony Williams, president
of the BABO, said the late
Ferguson was responsible
for grooming him and a
number of the persons who
are officiating basketball
today.

Ferguson, 71, will be laid
to rest today in the Catholic
Cemetery on Tyler Street,
Chippingham, following his
2pm funeral service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street.

According to Williams,
Ferguson was instrumental
in getting him certified as an
international referee.

“As the president of
BABO, Vince made sure
that I went to Jamaica to
take the course and I
obtained my license through
him,” he said.

As vice president serving
under Ferguson during his
tenure as president,
Williams said if it wasn’t for
his mentor and friend, he
probably would not have
still been involved in the
association.

“T remember asking him
one question: ‘Why can’t
referees associate with play-
ers?’ If you know him as a
disciplinary person, he asked
me ‘no you tell me why.’
That was the beginning of
our relationship and through
his persistence and his disci-
pline, I am still involved in
the sport today as a refer-
ee.”

Having Ferguson as a
mentor had its positive side
as Williams said he was not
just taught the game, but he
was given the opportunity to
go throughout the Bahamas
and even the Caribbean
lending his expertise.

“He took me under his
wings many days under the
tree at R M Bailey as he
made it a point to discipline
me,” Williams said. “I
always remember one thing
he used to tell me and that is
you can’t always be on top
of the fence.

“And every time he saw
me, he used to say: ‘Oh,
you’re still on top of the
fence, until I became the
president of BABO that I
really realised what he was
trying to say about what he





TONY WILLIAMS

meant about being on top of
the fence.”

Not only did he help to
groom him, but Williams
said he remembered how
Ferguson took him, Keith
Reid and Rodney Johnson
to his house and instructed
them on life.

“He encouraged me to go
back to school and further
my education and he also
encouraged me to get mar-
ried,” said Williams, who
looked at Ferguson as a
father figure.

“He was just a tough char-
acter and I’m really sad that
he is gone. He also used to
say to me ‘Little Tony, who
are going to inherit the land.
I guess what he meant is
now is my time to step up to
the plate and run the associ-
ation.”

If there is any regret,
Williams said it’s probably
the fact that members of
BABO and other officials
didn’t spend more time
being instructed by Fergu-
son on the game.

“Just before his passing,
we were thinking about hav-
ing a Vince Ferguson Day,”
Williams pointed out. “But
when we went to see him, he
said he wasn’t up to speed
and he wasn’t feeling well.”

Four or five days later,
Williams said they got the
sad news that Ferguson had
passed away.

“We should have done it
earlier. All we can do is say
thanks for all that you’ve
done for the association,”
said Williams, to Ferguson’s
family that includes his wife,
Mary and children Anne-
Marie and Alex.

As a personal note,
Williams said he’s grateful
for the manner in which Fer-
guson impacted his life so
that he is now able to make
a contribution to the sport.



-

;

ei
r 7 | F

4

ees

Ie

HURSDAY, OCTOBER 1,

at 1%

\\"
I

ae
non

A NUMBER of sporting
and educational personalities
attended a memorial service
for the late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson (portrait top right)
at Loyola Hall on Tuesday
night. He was 72.

Ferguson reportedly died
at his home after a massive
heart attack. He was suffer-
ing from prostate cancer.

His funeral service is sched-
uled to be held 2pm today at
St Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Street. Ferguson will be
buried in the Catholic Ceme-
tery on Tyler Street.

He is survived by his wife
Mary and two children, Anne-
Marie and Alex. Among
those who paid tribute to Fer-
guson during the memorial

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Hundreds flock to
memorial service

service was Jackie Wright, a
member of the Former Past
& Present Professional Base-
ball Players Association that
was headed by Ferguson.
Others included Martin
Lundy, director of sports in
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture, who worked
with Ferguson at St
Augustine’s College, Keith
Thompson, who worked with
Ferguson at Aquinas College,
Ellen Adderley, who worked
with Ferguson in the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion, and Val Maura, of Us
Too Cancer Support Group.
The service was conducted
by Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, a
former educator who also
worked with Ferguson.

© 2009 Starbucks Cofiee Company. All rights reserved. FAL109-06614



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ea TRIBUNE

Dus!





Resort predicted
to have $54-90m
economic impact

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A MAJOR mixed-use
resort project is projected to
generate an annual economic
impact ranging from $54 mil-
lion to $90 million for the
Bahamian economy, its prin-
cipals told Tribune Business
yesterday, adding that the 291
lot sales they have closed have
brought “hundreds of visitors
to Long Island”.

In a series of e-mailed
answers to Tribune Business’s
questions, Ian Moorcroft, one
of the principals behind the
Port St George project, ear-
marked for a site next to Long
Island’s existing Stella Maris
subdivision, said being debt
free had been “critical” to its
ability to weather the global
recession and credit crunch.

“Many projects have run
into difficulties because
bankers withdrew lines of
credit or, worse still, recalled
outstanding loans,” Mr Moor-
croft told Tribune Business.

“Real estate development
is long term and capital inten-
sive. Consequently, most
developers are reliant upon
lines of credit, and many have

been heavily geared in recent
years. Because the Port St
George project is free of any
external debt we did not suf-
fer from the same difficul-
ties.”

Mr Moorcroft added that
the economic impact analysis
conducted for Port St George
by Norton Consulting, and
submitted to the Bahamas
Investment Authority as part
of the project applications,
predicted that the develop-
ment would have an annual
economic impact of between
$54 million and $90 million.

Although unable to con-
tract any lot pre-sales at Port
St George until subdivision
approval was obtained, Mr
Moorcroft said the develop-
ers had instead been able to
sell real estate in the neigh-
bouring Stella Maris subdivi-
sion.

“Our original target was
300 sales and we have closed
291 to date, so we are very
pleased with the sales results.
These sales have resulted in
hundreds of visitors to Long
Island, most of whom stay at
the Stella Maris Resort Club,”

SEE page 7B

90-day year end audit
file reform is ‘touchy’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Securities Commis-
sion yesterday said it would
“in very short order” send
what it hopes is the final draft
of the Securities Industry Act
and its accompanying regula-
tions off for ministerial
approval, the most “touchy”
reform proposal being the
requirement for public com-
panies to file audited finan-
cial statements within 90 days
of year-end.

Hillary Deveaux, the Com-
mission’s executive director,
told Tribune Business that the
regulator was hoping the new
Act and regulations, which
are badly needed to mod-
ernise the sector, “will be
brought into force before the
end of the year”.

The timing, though, will
depend on what happens
when the Ministry of Finance
and Attorney General’s
Office review the final draft of
the legislation and regulations
that will be presented to them
by the Securities Commission.

Mr Deveaux told Tribune
Business that most of the
industry feedback on the pro-
posed reforms centred on the
Securities Commission’s pow-
ers, enforcement, disclosure,

* Securities Commission
to send final Securities
Industry Act draft to
government ‘in very
short order’, and hoping
passed by Parliament
before 2009 is out

the “ongoing requirements of
public companies”, and the
move to file the audited finan-
cial statements of Bahamian
public companies within 90
days of year-end, rather than
the current 120 days.

The reforms are also
proposing that Bahamian
public companies file their
unaudited quarterly manage-
ment accounts within 60 days
of period end, rather than the
current 90 days they are
allowed.

“The touchy one really was
the requirement to have
audited financial statements
move from a 120-day filing to
a 90-day filing, and there’s
going to have to be a major
discussion,” Mr Deveaux told
Tribune Business.

“T think our approach to
dealing with the transition

SEE page 10B

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2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

y

Sandals ‘110% committed’
to Emerald Bay’s success

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

andals has “stayed
true” to its pro-
jected $12 million
investment in
upgrading the newly-
acquired Emerald Bay
resort, its chief executive
said yesterday, with 80 con-
struction workers now on
site and the chain “110 per
cent committed” to making
the development a success.
Adam Stewart, Sandals
International Resorts’ chief
executive, told Tribune
Business in an interview
from London that Sandals
has “no doubt we can make
this resort a success”, with
construction work having
already started on creating
the one-acre pool and deck
for Sandals Emerald Bay.
“We have about 80 peo-
ple on site,” Mr Stewart
said. “It goes from a low of
about 70 to a high of about
220 [on the construction
side]. That is estimated.
“Construction has started
on the pool, which is the
largest infrastructure we are
doing. We are on target to
open on January 22.”
Mr Stewart said the $12

ARTIST’S impression of the one-acre pool and deck at Sandals
Emerald Bay
* Resort chain ‘staying true’ to $12m upgrades
budget for newly-acquired Exuma property
* Renovations to include one-acre pool and
deck, and largest jacuzzi in Caribbean
* 80 construction workers already
on site to work on pool, with numbers
to range from 70 to 220 peak
* Sandals’ operational team based at Emerald
Bay for past 12 days, analysing plans
million budget Sandals had
set for much-needed
upgrades and renovations

at Emerald Bay had
“stayed true”, with the

pool, landscaping, interiors
and furnishings forming the
bulk of that investment.

SEE page 9B



‘Captain of the ship must calm the passengers’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham must
speak more frequently
about what his govern-
ment is doing to arrest
the ailing economy, a for-
mer Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce president
said yesterday, warning
that business and
investor confidence could
be further damaged in
the absence of clear

direction from the administration.
Arguing that the Bahamas “needs a captain



D’AGUILAR

* Ex-Chamber chief says PM needs to
speak more frequently on economic
matters to bolster public, investor
and business confidence

president, told Tribune Business: “The full
effects of this recession are beginning to be
felt.”

“It’s beginning to flat line a little, and the
mood is very glum and gloomy,” Mr D’Aguilar
said of the Bahamian business community.
“The mood in the country is really sour and
really gloomy.”

Tribune Business previously revealed that
many businesses, especially those in the retail

of the ship who can keep the passengers calm”,

Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s

SEE page 4B

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Hotel's
Occupancy
‘holding’ at
70 per cent

Resort chain’s chief
executive says entire
company ‘never had to
work harder in our lives’
to stimulate demand

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Sandals Royal
Bahamian resort’s occupan-
cy levels are “holding” in the
70 per cent range, the resort
chain’s chief executive told
Tribune Business yesterday,
adding that the whole com-
pany has “never worked hard-
er in our lives” to maintain
business levels in the face of
the global recession.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness from London, Adam
Stewart, who is also the son of
Sandals Resorts Internation-
al’s chairman, Gordon ‘Butch’
Stewart, said the company’s
Nassau-based resort was like-

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





ee emt)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/CLE/gen/01745
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
KASSON K. NEWTON
Defendant
To: Kasson K. Newton

TAKE NOTICE that:

1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited in the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of
Summons filed on the 22nd of October
2008 being Action No. 2008/CLE/
gen/01745, wherein the Plaintiff’s claim is
for the total sum of $23,294.64 which
represents the principal sum of $10,752.09
together with accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $11,526.62, add-
on charges in the sum of $561.90, and
interest on the said add-on charges in
the sum of $454.03 due under a loan
numbered 1503359.

It has been ordered that service of the Writ
of Summons in the said action be effected
on you by virtue of this advertisement.

You must within 21 days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive
of the day of such publication, acknowledge
service of the said Writ of Summons by
entering an Memorandum of Appearance
on the Attorneys whose name and address
appear below, otherwise judgment may be

entered against you.

Dated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Target the young
to combat crime

LAST Sunday saw my daughter and I
at the launch of this year’s Junior
Achievement Programme. I was pleas-
antly surprised to see the ballroom at
the British Colonial Hilton filled to
capacity with parents and students alike.

On a Sunday afternoon, to see that
many young people out and, most impor-
tantly, supported by their parents is crit-
ical to developing a successful Bahamas.
Investing in our future is good business
practice, as it ensures continuity of cul-
ture and nationhood. It, in my opinion,
instills the ethics, discipline and quality
assurance necessary to succeed in today’s
global environment. Kudos to the numer-
ous corporate sponsors represented, who
have invested in young people, BTC,
BEC, Deloitte & Touche and the Police
Staff Association, just to name a few.

This ‘standing room only’ turn out was
a pleasant reminder that all is not lost.
Despite the bombardment of negative
news, we must be reminded that these
horrific stories that have filled the head-
lines over the last few years are, in the
first instance, being committed by a
handful of perpetrators. Good news,
however, does not sell, thus the poor
turnout of the media during this event.
Second, many of the crimes today are
being committed by repeat offenders.
Thus I can still comfortably say that it is
not as bad as it may seem, albeit there is
room for improvement.

You might be saying at this point:
What does this have to do with crime
and loss prevention? Where does youth
development and nurturing fit into crime
fighting? Simply put: ‘Everything’. Invest-
ing in these young minds, via pro-
grammes such as Junior Achievement,
the Boys and Girls Brigade /Scouts and
your church’s Sunday school programme,
begins the lifelong molding process nec-
essary to develop good character, ethics
and morals.

This does not mean that none of these
persons will become criminals tomor-
row. However, what we are saying is, as
mentioned, a small majority will fall to
the way side and there is no excuse for
criminal and deviant behavior. I will ven-
ture to say that there is no young person
in this Bahamas, past or present, who
has not been exposed to, or given an
opportunity, to benefit from some posi-
tive programme. Our claim to a Christian

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

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operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.
Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

server iSsues.

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.
Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-virus,
data back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these

systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

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Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and

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Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network

issues.

Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide

reasoned recommendations.



heritage has ensured that the great
majority have been exposed to church
in some form or the other.

Yet you will see by the statistics that
crime, especially violent crimes, are being
committed by our young people. So, what
has gone wrong? I say nothing!

I say we are experiencing the fact that
we cannot save them all. We live in a
world where some of us will come up
short and not meet the mark. Unfortu-
nately, we are focusing on the failure
and not the successes. I put it to you that
if you train up a child while they are
young, when they are old they shall not
depart from it. This, of course, means
directing their paths at an early stage to
avoid putting ourselves in a position of
trying to correct the decay years in the
making.

We are allowing the fear of crime to
take us down a path of potential desper-
ation and panic, thus reducing our abili-
ty as a society to think of rational solu-
tions. For example, I am a proponent of
the death penalty. Not because of its
deterrent qualities, but because it is ‘pun-
ishment’, simple and straightforward. It is
not ‘problem solving’, ‘ a reduction’ or
‘deterrent’, although if these residual
effects occur then that is an added bene-
fit.

Solutions to our crime problem are
multifaceted. I do not think there is a
magic bullet. Thus the argument that the
death penalty is not going to reduce
crime is very true, as the sentence is only
given after the crime of murder has
already been committed. The ‘penalty’
can only be given after the ‘foul’. To stop
the crime, we must make serious efforts
in assisting our youth ,especially young
men and women, to better manage their
anger and aggression. The cry for more
hanging is, in my opinion, bordering on a
lynch mob mentality, as it is a sign of
desperation and frustration - an emo-
tional grasping at straws. We are attempt-

ing to use punishment as a way to halt to
deviant behavior, as opposed to pre-
venting opportunities for the behaviour
to occur.

What, then, you may ask. Well, I will
not contradict myself. Let us continue
to pray, not for peace, but ways to create
peace. You see, peace and safety do not,
and will not, fall from the sky. We must
create this culture, a society of peace.
This begins with teaching our young peo-
ple structure and order, and demon-
strating the benefits of the same. They
need to understand that rules and regu-
lations lend to a civil society and direct-
ly affect the level of peace a nation expe-
riences.

Now, what about the young adults,
those who are no longer children? Are
we to toss them aside? Well, as the say-
ing goes: “Bend the tree while it is young’.
If we have missed this opportunity, then
a more aggressive bending process needs
to take place. Boat builders who wish to
fashion wood for boats usually expose
the wood to heat/steam andpressure.
Similarly, our young adults who have
fallen by the wayside must be pressured
and exposed to heat that will attempt to
purge the negative tendency. Boot
Camps, which are geared to reintroduc-
ing social and problem-solving skills that
demand team work and group efforts.
We need not wait for them to break the
law, for I believe that by the time they
are actually caught breaking the law they
have gotten away at least ten times
before. Alas folks, as mentioned earli-
er, some will fall to the wayside as the
‘Parable of the Sower’ so clearly illus-
trates.

Remember and support, with your
time and money, the Junior Achievers,
Brigades and Scouts, the numerous pos-
itive youth groups that have proven suc-
cessful. All is not lost

NB: Gamal Newry is the president of
Preventative Measures, a loss preven-
tion and asset protection training and
consulting company, specialising in pol-
icy and procedure development, busi-
ness security reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis management. Com-
ments can be sent to PO Box N-3154
Nassau, Bahamas. or, e-mail
gnewry@gmail.com or visit us at
www.preventativemeasures.net

FOR SALE

60 tonne packaged
Air Conditioning Unit
18yrs old
7’4”° width
6’5”height
33’length

Can be viewed at
Carl G. Treco
Construction

120 Mackey Street South

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

All offers will be
considered!

302-9875

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B





Slow season occupancies down 75 per cent

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOME FAMILY Island
resorts have suffered a lower
than average slow season,
down some 75 per cent com-
pared to last year’s 30 per
cent occupancy levels, accord-
ing to the Abaco Beach
Resort’s general manager.
Some properties have closed
altogether for the two-month
slow period.

Bob Kramm said business
was markedly down at many
resorts across the wider
Bahamas, adding that the
economy has everything to do
with it.

Mr Kramm operates the
largest marina in the
Bahamas, and one of Abaco’s
foremost resorts. However,
he said the 25 to 30 per cent
occupancy range his property
has traditionally enjoyed year-
on-year during September
and October has been further
reduced by close to 75 per
cent.

When Tribune Business vis-
ited the property last week,
the marina, typically contain-

ing a mass of pleasure yachts
and sail boats, moored only
several boat spread across its
expanse.

“Normally there are more
boats here,” said Mr Kramm.

Like many resorts, the
Abaco Beach Resort has not
abandoned marketing cam-
paigns despite the financially
straining economic conditions.

According to Mr Kramm,
his resort continues to adver-
tise on the Internet and in
specialist boating magazines.

While some hotels have
been able to stabilise their vis-
itor inflows through targeting
niche markets, others have
used the traditional slow sea-
son to conduct infrastructural
upgrades and expand their
room portfolio.

The Coral Sands hotel in
Harbour Island, North
Eleuthera, is currently con-
structing four new cottages on
their property, which are
scheduled to be open by year-
end.

General Manager, Pamela
Berry, told Tribune Business
that 2009 will be the first year
her resort will be open for the
annual North Eleuthera

NOTICE

to

SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN ANT
BAHAMLAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH,
BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON
WILL BE CLOSED ON

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATE ITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DAY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES
CAUSED AS A RESULT OF OUR CLOSING.

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belong together

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The AnyWareâ„¢ Plus silverware
are CMC PMOL Coe 8] tee
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Regatta. She said the town
council asked if the resort
could be opened, as the regat-
ta often demands much of the
island’s available rooms, with
visitors pouring in from Nas-
sau and other Family Islands.

Ms Berry said Coral Sands’
occupancy levels have been
down like many other resorts
across the Bahamas, but said
the traditionally strong peri-
ods, such as Spring Break and
the August European vaca-
tion season, were marginally
good.

In August, Coral Sands was
also host to a delegation of
Miss Universe contestants,
who dined for lunch and
posed for photos on the beach
adjacent to the resort.

Many resorts across the
Caribbean have resorted to
slashing rates, but many
Bahamian resorts have been
reluctant to do this because
of their high operating costs.

Minister of Tourism and
Aviation, Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, recently said
most Bahamian resorts offer
discounts to residents in an
effort to boost domestic
tourism.

Ms Berry said Coral Sands
will offer a special 20 per cent
off their room rates for this
year’s regatta.

With stopover arrivals to
New Providence down some
14 per cent, Baha Mar recent-
ly had to shut down its Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino in order
to reduce operational costs
during the traditionally slow
season.

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Vice President of External
Affairs at the resort, Robert
Sands, said it was still too ear-
ly to say if the closure had the
desired effect, but he revealed
that the resort and casino will
be reopening as planned on
October 5.

“Staff have been gradually
coming back with a larger
build up coming Thursday
and Friday,” said Mr Sands.

According to him, bookings
for the month of October for
the property have been pick-
ing up, though he asserts that
the month will see very soft
occupancy levels.

“We anticipate some good
local business because of local
groups and two political party
conventions during the month
of October, and a number of
gaming events planned for the
week after opening, which will
also stimulate business as well
as local food and beverage
functions scheduled,” said Mr
Sands.

He said all but one of the
resort’s vendors are scheduled
to return, and cab drivers who
were forced to join the Sher-
aton’s queue will now be able
to return to the Wyndham.

Mr Sands contends that
closing the resort for two
months was one of the better
strategic decisions Baha Mar
has made.

“As we review the details

of this event we will be at a
position internally to review
the full impact of the closing,”
he said.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TEAK FURNITURE
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The Partners and Staff of:

GLINTON

COUNSEL & ATTORMETS-AT-LAW

are pleased to announce that

PATRICK H. RYAN

Sheraton appoints travel sales chief

The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort
has appointed André R. Newbold to the
newly-created position of business trav-

el sales manager.

Based in Nassau, Mr Newbold will be
responsible for deveoping new and exist-
ing corporate accounts throughout the
Bahamas. He will also attend trade
shows, community events and industry
meetings on behalf of the resort to devel-
op new client relationships and business

FROM page 1B

sector, saw year-over-year
sales decreases of anywhere
between 15 per cent to 30 per
cent in August, the largest
comparative declines against
2008 to date.

This newspaper under-
stands that trend has carried
over into September, tradi-
tionally one of the weakest
months for the economy as it
is the low point in the tourism
season. Tribune Business has
been told that some business,
including retailers of high-end
products, have seen sales
declines ranging from 30 per
cent to 50 per cent.

| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

Has joined the firm as an Associate Attorney in the Litigation Department




with effect from July 2000. Mr. Ryan eared his LLB from the University




of Buckingham, Buckingham, England in 2006 and was called to the Bar of




England and Wales in 2007 and the Bahamas Bar in September 2009. We




welcome Mr, Ryan to our team and look forward to him further enhancing




our ability to provide clients with efficient and effective legal services.














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leads.

industry.

“September is always a par-
ticularly gloomy month, but
when you hear the Minister
of Tourism and there’s noth-
ing positive coming out, and
group bookings are down it’s
not a good sign,” the former
Chamber president said.

He added that “for the life
of me, I don’t understand why
they do not want to do what is
necessary” to enact the
reforms necessary to enable
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry to compete with
its offshore rivals, even though
Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, had been “pleading,
screaming” for this to happen.

“T can’t for the life of me
understand why they are not

Mr Newbold comes to the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort with ten years of
luxury resort experience and over 20
years of experience in the hospitality

For the past 10 years, he served as the
director of sales at Sandals’ Royal
Bahamian Resort Spa & Offshore Island,
where he acted as the department head
for sales and marketing and weddings,

and supported the general manager on

operational issues. He also orchestrated
numerous domestic and international
events ranging from 100-1000 attendees.

Prior to that, Mr Newbold spent 10

years as director of sales and marketing

jumping on that,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said of the Gov-
ernment and financial services
reform.

“T feel like we’re on a ship
that, when you hit turbulence
and go through a rough peri-
od, the captain calms every-
one down. I feel it’s impor-
tant that our leaders try and
calm everyone down and say
what’s positive.

“We just don’t hear from
the captain of the ship. You
don’t hear anything, and
everyone’s thinking what they
want to think. This blackout
on everything is not good.”

The former Chamber pres-
ident added: “Hubert Ingra-
ham’s approach of not saying
anything unless you’ve got

LOT FOR SALE

ASEVEN THOTSAND (7,000) 54. FT.
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SALE IN GAMBIER ESTATES (OPPOSITE COMPASS
POINT). THE LOT COMES WITH TWO SETS OF
TWO RENDITIONS) FOR A SINGLE FAMILY HOME.
OWNER HAS CLEAR TITLE, ASKING $170,000,00 (CROSS)

CALL S75 - O75

NOTICE

All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited
to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009
p.m. in the Board room of the Michael Eldon
Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

YACKY REALTY and CONSTRUCTION INC.
Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the
above company commenced on the 29th day of
September, 2009. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of
Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator

of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

*Baautiful Pristing Beaches

at the Sheraton British Colonial Beach
Resort, where he managed and super-
vised sales and marketing functions for
the 300-room hotel and supported the
general manager on operational issues.

something to say is not nec-
essarily a good thing. You
need the captain of the ship
to keep the passengers calm.

“But you’re not hearing
anything. The Hubert Ingra-
ham of 2009 is not the Hubert
Ingraham of 2002..... ’m sure
he has a plan, knows what he’s
doing, got a direction he’s
going in, but no one knows.
That’s why we got blindsided
in Abaco [on BEC’s Wilson
City power plant], why we got
blindsided on the Arawak Cay
port, because no one is say-
ing anything.”

Apart from keeping the
Bahamian public abreast of
developments, Mr D’Aguilar
said the information vacuum
was also hurting confidence
in the business and investment
community, often the most
critical factor in untying the
purse strings.

He added that, in the
absence of a clearly defined
policy and strategic direction
outlined by the Prime Minis-
ter, no information was being
given to the business commu-
nity since no other minister
was releasing pertinent details.

However, in an address to
the Conference of the Amer-
icas on Tuesday, the Prime
Minister said that while the
Bahamas’ government debt to
gross domestic product
(GDP) ratio was likely to rise
above 50 per cent, his admin-
istration was committed to
retreating with “all deliberate
haste” from such a high debt
level as soon as possible.

Mr Ingraham said the

Bahamas will also move swift-
ly to create “even more head-
room to see us through the
next inevitable downturn on
the assumption that no mira-
cle economic model will
emerge to relegate economic
cycles to the dustbin of histo-
ry.”
He added: “These lessons
indicate the following: We
must make an honest assess-
ment of the risks posed to our
global economic and financial
systems and avoid placing
blame where it is not due; we
must have a better means of
assessing and responding to
systemic risk in the global
financial architecture and one
that demonstrates equity in
calling all economies, those of
the developed and develop-
ing world, into account.

“We must promote greater
equity in the international
development process so as to
make the prospects for sus-
tained growth of the world
economy more enduring and
widespread, and we must bet-
ter co-ordinate global
resources in order to max-
imise use. This is especially
true with respect to those
resources channelled by the
multilateral lending and aid
agencies.”



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5B





EU nations to hammer
out financial oversight

By AOIFE WHITE
AP Business Writer

BRUSSELS (AP) — Euro-
pean Union finance ministers
will hammer out a new finan-
cial oversight framework for
Europe during a two-day
meeting a week after the
world’s rich and developing
nations pledged that they
would not allow a return to
banking as usual.

At talks Thursday and Fri-
day in Goteborg, Sweden, EU
ministers will also start map-
ping out how they should start
withdrawing economic stim-
ulus packages that are helping
to pull Europe out of the
worst recession since the
1930s.

Last week’s Group of 20
summit in Pittsburgh called
on countries to make sure
their regulatory system for
banks “reins in the excesses
that led to the crisis.”

Putting that into practice in
Europe means adding a new
EU layer to a patchwork of
financial supervision across
the bloc’s 27 countries.

It could also see a new
energetic push for more coun-
tries to sign up to curbs on
bonuses that encouraged
banks to make risky invest-
ments. Sweden, which will
lead the talks as the current
holder of the EU presidency,
said EU guidelines on bonus-
es “need to be sharpened”
and possibly made binding
across Europe.

France, the Netherlands
and Germany have already
drafted new rules linking
banking pay to performance
but Britain — home to
Europe’s biggest trading cen-
ter — has been slower to
move. Banks claim that bonus
curbs will make it harder for
them to attract top-drawer tal-
ent.

Governments will hold
their first talks on a new econ-
omy watchdog, the European
Systemic Risk Board, which
would be tasked with moni-
toring emerging risks to the
economy such as banks run-
ning up large exposure to loss-
es, swelling asset bubbles and
any worrying trends on finan-
cial markets.

The board would issue rec-
ommendations and warnings

Ty

For the stories
TAT Ta Ca A
Wr ES
Te ES



JEAN-CLAUDE TRICHET

to national governments —
but would not be able to force
them to act. European Cen-
tral Bank President Jean-
Claude Trichet insisted Mon-
day that the board would be
far from toothless because it
would require governments
or national supervisors “to

take remedial action or oth-
erwise to justify why they
have not acted.”

The ECB, which sets bor-
rowing costs for the 16 nations
that use the euro, will help
run the new board and its
president will likely lead it.
This has triggered concern
among EU countries outside
the eurozone that this will
give the ECB a say over coun-
tries that don’t use the euro.

To allay this, EU officials
have hinted that the governor
of the Bank of England,
Mervyn King, could become
the board’s deputy. Britain is
outside the eurozone.

The new oversight frame-
work also foresees new bank-
ing, insurance and market
authorities gaining some pow-
er to rule against national
supervisors in some cases —
and only if most other EU
nations agree.

Governments are likely to
want to limit the circum-
stances under which the EU
authorities could overrule






































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STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* RUDOLF K. KING
* MARVETTE GAITOR

* GRAFTON IFILL
* DENNIS MCKENZIE

them. The EU executive sug-
gests it should only be as a
last resort to resolve a dispute
between different national
supervisors or to order a
nation to bring technical
financial standards in line with
others.

EU ministers will also try
to set out principles for how
they should end stimulus pro-
grams that are stoking growth
this year and next year and
how they should start paying
off mounting public debt and
swelling deficits caused by res-
cuing banks and spending to



stave off the downturn.

The recession also high-
lights one of Europe’s longer
term problems: people who
lose their jobs may never find
another one because rigid
labor conditions make com-
panies reluctant to hire peo-
ple they can’t easily fire.

With unemployment at a
10-year high and still rising,
ministers will talk about dif-
ferent ways to reduce lasting
unemployment. Denmark has
promoted a model with more
flexible contracts where work-
ers get regular skills training

=e

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Practice Areas:
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Nassau, The Bahamas

so they can shift between jobs
more easily.

Sweden is also keen for EU
nations to strike a deal on
how much Europe should
pledge to developing nations
to help them tackle climate
change — a package that the
EU wants in place to help
secure an ambitious deal to
curb global greenhouse gas
emissions at December talks
in Copenhagen.

e Associated Press writer
Louise Nordstrom contributed
to this story from Stockholm

Llewellyn Boyer-Cartwright

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

APPLICATION SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database

infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company as

required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server related

issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.
Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.

Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.
Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new

technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Knowledge of the AS400 and Windows Operating systems required.
Experience with ATM and POS hardware.
Knowledge of credit card processing and experience working with
branded networks (VISA, Mastercard, AMEX etc) a plus.

Ability to consult Management and developers regarding application
software performance and use.
Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned

* MARCO JOHNSON
* PAUL MORTIMER
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recommendations.

Must be a Team player and possess the ability to work in a demanding
environment.

Ability to communicate and document clearly and effectively required.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

* DENICE FRANCIS
* MELISSA EVENS
*RICARDO TROTMAN

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and qualifi-
cations; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance; pension
scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Stor-it-all
Soldier Road

(by Lowe's Wholesale),

Telephone: 393-0964

sTor-It-all

Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com





TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

Y, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B

Resort predicted
to have $54-90m
economic impact

FROM page 1B

Mr Moorcroft told Tribune
Business.

This newspaper reported
last week that many of these
sales had been to European
buyers and international
sports personalities. Right to
Buy agreements to secure lots
on the main Port St George
site have been entered into
with the purchasers, who must
pay a 10 per cent deposit once
subdivision drawings are fin-
ished, the balance being due
when infrastructure is com-
pleted.

Although no sales can be
concluded in the absence of
subdivision approval, the Port
St George developers said

then: “A high conversion rate
of right to buy agreements
into sales agreements is
expected, as the price at
which right to buy holders are
entitled to purchase is
extremely attractive. This has
led to some right to buy
agreements changing hands
for a considerable premium.

“Whilst the pre-sales from
the right to buy agreements
are expected to result in

approximately 25 per cent of

the plots at Port St George
being sold at a substantial dis-
count, the early revenue gen-
erated is expected to more
than cover the costs of infra-
structure to the entire site,
including construction of the

Real | EE: | |

Tel: 502 2356

for ad rates

marina and golf course.”

When asked why Port St
George would succeed, when
many other Family Island-
based resort projects had
failed to match expectations,
stalling or going into hiber-
nation until new financing
became available, Mr Moor-
croft told Tribune Business:
“Planning, quality and pru-
dent finances.

“Every facet of the project
has been fastidiously
researched, and we are work-
ing with industry leaders in
every field. Whilst we are
keen to make progress as
quickly as we can, it's also
important to get things right.

“We have all heard of pro-
jects where construction has
begun only to be halted after
a few months for one reason
or another. We are deter-
mined that Port St. George
will not become another
name on the list of such pro-
jects. By following the proper
procedures, without cutting
corners or making plans based
on assumptions when, with a
little more time, they can be
based on facts, we believe that
Port St George will be a
resounding success.”

Mr Moorcroft told Tribune
Business that Long Island’s
“spectacular beauty” but,
more importantly, its people,
would be what makes Port St
George special and differen-
tiates it from rival resorts.

“The Long Islanders work
ethic is known throughout the
Bahamas, but it is their gen-
uine warmth and friendliness
that is striking to the visitor.
When checking in at the Stel-
la Maris Resort Club guests
don't even need a room key,
so safe and secure is the envi-
ronment. I know of no other
hotel anywhere in the world
where that is the case,” Mr
Moorcroft said.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking

operations, seeks to

Risk Manager

identify

suitable candidates for

the position of:

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the
organizational or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business
decisions through the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:

° Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program
in a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the
organization while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best

practices;

Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing
and estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the

business;

Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in

carrying out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;

Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;

Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;

Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and
implementing systems, policies, and procedures for the identification,
collection and analysis of risk related information, that is comparing
estimated risks with risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk
management;

Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some
regulatory bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KY C, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
Bank of The Bahamas
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment
Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
LETTS A

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NOTICE
Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.
Applications are available from:
The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
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For more informtaion call; 397-2601/2 or
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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/00119

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
KELPHINE D. JOHNSON
Defendant
To: Kelphine D. Johnson

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Umited in the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on
the 30th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/
gen/00119, wherein the Plaintiffs claim is for the total
5um of $28,367.40 which represents the principal
sum of $15,047.39, accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $10,751.51, add-on charges
in the sum of $912.85, and interest on the said add-
on charges in the sum of $1,655.65 due under a loan
numbered 1579053 and the principal sum of $1,118.76
due under a Mastercard No. 5449 68501002 7759.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of
this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Hotel’s occupancy
‘holding’ at 70 per cent

FROM page one

ly to remain in the 70 per cent
occupancy range “for a little
while” - through the lean
months of September and
October.

“We have had some service
issues within the hotel,” Mr
Stewart said of Sandals Royal
Bahamian. “We have invested
quite a bit in the property
itself in renovations and

upgrades. We could always be
doing better as a property, as
a company.”

He added that occupancy
levels were only one method
of gauging a resort property’s
performance, implying that
Sandals was having to dis-
count heavily on rates and
sacrifice margins to drive busi-
ness to not only the Bahamas
but all its other properties.

“The business we’re get-
ting, you have to look at the
cost of getting it in,” Mr Stew-

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art explained. “The dollars we
have spent in advertising, in
driving demand, in getting
customers to dial the 1-800
Sandals and call their travel
agent...

“This is a very rough year
for all of us. We have never
worked harder in our lives to
keep our hotels in the occu-
pancies we have, from the
chairman - my father - down
to the line staff. We’ve had to
do more work to drive
demand.”

Sandals Royal Bahamian
laid-off some 150 of its then-
650 strong staff in late 2008
in response to the economic
downturn and sharply declin-
ing business levels, before ter-
minating a further 80 work-
ers this year just prior to the
start of the September slow
season.

Despite this, Mr Stewart
said yesterday: “Our occu-
pancies in Nassau are strong
overall. We’re in the 70 per
cents, and are going to hold
there for a little while. Sep-
tember and October are the
two roughest months.

“T don’t think they'll [occu-
pancies] go below the 60 per
cents, which is not great but,

of course, we'd like to remain
in the 80s. It’s very hard to
run Sandals with that kind of
occupancy.”

Mr Stewart praised the
“strong leadership” at San-
dals Royal Bahamian, adding
that they were in contact with
the chain’s head office almost
every day to suggest or work
on some type of initiative to
drive visitor demand.’

“We are not taking our eye
off the ball, and are trying to
drive sales in the UK,” the
Sandals chief executive
added, explaining that as part
of its efforts to stimulate
excitement and demand it had
just signed an agreement to
make every wedding it hosted
a Martha Stewart Wedding.

Mr Stewart also told Tri-
bune Business that Sandals’
business from Canada was
“substantially better than in
the past”, thanks to the work
done by its sales and market-
ing team in that nation.

However, the main issue
remained that “everyone
wants a deal” in the current
recessionary environment,
hence the pressure not just on
Sandals, but the entire resort
industry’s, margins and rates.

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Civil Avintion Gartificate # PFLA-7T468

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Apart from the pool and
deck area, Mr Stewart said
that when completed, Sandals
Emerald Bay would feature
the largest jacuzzi in the
Caribbean - bigger than the
existing record holder, which
was located at another of its
resorts. Other features includ-
ed an authentic British pub,
swim bar and barefoot
seafood restaurant.

“We feel strongly that we
can do it,” Mr Stewart said,
when asked how Sandals
could make a success of
Emerald Bay, given that the
resort had endured a two-year
receivership after its initial
owners/developers had been
unable to meet debt repay-
ments.

“We gave our commitment
to give 110 per cent and do

our part. We will do our best.
We have no doubt that we
can make this resort a suc-
cess.” Mr Stewart said the
‘110 per cent effort’ commit-
ment had been given to Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and his ministers, likely to
include Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, minister of tourism
and aviation.
Acknowledging that San-
dals had wanted to re-open
Emerald Bay earlier than Jan-
uary 22, 2010, Mr Stewart,
addressing concerns from
some Exumians that Sandals
had been less than frank
about its plans for the prop-
erty, said the chain “cannot
divulge information” before
it had been determined and
it knew what it was doing.
The Sandals chief executive
said the company was “no
more than a couple of weeks

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

away” from being able to pro-
vide Exumians with firm
details on its plans, including
the number of persons it
intended to hire for full-time
operations.

“As soon as we have firm
information, we will let the
community know exactly
what we are doing,” Mr Stew-
art told Tribune Business.
“We will take into account
every member of the commu-
nity. We’re on the brink of
disclosing what we feel” Exu-
mians want to know.

He added that Sandals





“entire operations team”,
including the chain’s director
of operations, general man-
ager and financial controller,
had been based at Emerald
Bay for the past 12 days,
assessing and analysing “every
single detail” of the chain’s
plans for the property.

“This is going to be the first
hotel in Sandals history that
has a dedicated butler for
every room,” Mr Stewart told
Tribune Business, explaining
that Emerald Bay would be
positioned near the peak of
the chain’s resorts, alongside

NOTICE

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES







THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9B

Sandals Royal Bahamian and
Sandals Royal Plantation.
“This development is almost
like a big country club.”
“We really try to focus on
investing as much as we can
afford back into the physical
plant of our resorts,” he





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

added. Emerald Bay will be
the second Sandals property
to possess a golf course, after
Ocho Rios, and also the first
one with a marina. It is only
the second 500-acre property
to be included in Sandals
portfolio.

2009/CLE/gen/00007

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division









BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Plaintiff

AND
KIM M. MORLEY

To: Kim M. Morley

TAKE NOTICE that:

Defendant

AND CHARGES 1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited in the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of
Summons filed on the 6th of January 2009
being Action No. 2009/CLE/gen/00007,
wherein the Plaintiff’s claim is for the total
sum of $15,760.63 due under a Visacard
No. 4539 3850 1006 0033.

It has been ordered that service of the Writ
of Summons in the said action be effected on
you by virtue of this advertisement.

You must within 21 days from the

publication of this advertisement inclusive of
the day of such publication, acknowledge
service of the said Writ of Summons by
entering an Memorandum of Appearance on
the Attorneys whose name and address appear
below, otherwise judgment may be entered
against you.

Itishereby notified pursuanttoregulation 4(10)
(b) of the Airport Authority (Amendment)
Regulations, 2009 that the Airport
Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of
September, 2009 imposed and or varied
fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as follows:

MU

BARRO - THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN COOKING has tro [3%
peewhor open ber coated GRAERAL, MANAGERS

‘This potion ts best acted for a mature, focused and goal onewted parson,
nilss ben irom cheurr: tee Giler ca challengers enitha Geemahe; deskermccatics
to succeed The indivedial enust be open to comsiructive feedback and Nex
bis to oocnedes alice: means of gpal arcoenpliboert

The applicont must also possess the Followrinyy

Hevthe rust hove wrong merce nial, aril sical and imterporvorel skills,
Alea fen yar experience in msturant management preferably in a
fat wence food eearonmens.

Geel admisdateaive della seid dhe abality is bear gaee dilla and
techempurs canly

The ahilitvio mock ruth menial superiaen and duection

Profecuedly deal ceiemted aned a airenuy value sytem emnphosieney qualicy
food corel, serice one cleanness.

The ahilitvio direct and motivate junior salt wath an understanding of
their vermililites aod differences. It
Applicat meust be able aed eolhioe te work a erasure bite hee werk,
weckench ad bobches mcleded mo work scck,

Poaeia rekable ranspertaticn.

Salary is competion with iimdlar food establakenents, nih mages medical
roup menue AMS) included, Bormess are isble Guten based purely
upen company aid individusl perlermonce.
Please & mail pour reeame in:
The Mareuguiig Director ork Bi bare bahamas. com

BO TELEPHONE INTERVIEWS A

Aeronautical Fees

a) Landing Fees increase 23.6%

b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1%

c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%
d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1%

is further notified that the said
imposition and or variation of Fees and
Charges shall take effect at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport ninety days
from the date of first publication of this notice.

Dated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

GN-929

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

VACANCY NOTICE

CHIEF PUBLIC ANALYST, GRAND BAHAMA

FOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

The Department of Environmental Services invites applications for suitably
qualified individuals for the position of Chief Public Analyst, Grand Bahama.
The Chief Public Analyst reports to the Director or Director.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

A Master degree in Chemistry plus a Diploma or Certificate in Microbioloy
and must have membership in a professional organization with (12) twelve
years post graduate experience. Experience with industrial and institutional
organizations would be an asset.

TENDER

Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited :

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Responible for the management and administration of the
Environmental Monitoring and Risk assessment Division,Grand
Bahama

Plans andimplements programs designed to provide for monitoring
activities inGrand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas.
Monitors the effect of industry and provides relevant reports
Coordinates all Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment
activities

Serves as the Department of Environmental Services representative
at technical meetins, both local and international as requested.
Provides proposals and recommendations for staff training.
Submit monthly and annual reports on the activities of Environmental
Monitoring and Risk Assessment.

Assist with staff training.

Provides support for Family Island Officers

Ensures the generation of reports of all evaluations and assessment
and provides recommendations for rectification of environmental
nuisances and risks.

Serves as expert witness in court prosecutions.

Evaluates development projects and novel industries.
Provides active support for initiatives enhancing the quality of the
environment and awareness and preparedness for emergencies.
Responds to complaints and issues of technology.

Ensures that testing services are provided as requested.
Fosters public and staff awareness of environmental issues
Any other related duties

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-
ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BIC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 97:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ ond should be delivered to the at-
tention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO. Applicants who meet the above requirements are invited to forward a resume
and a PSC 7 application by October 5, 2009 to

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,

OR ALL TENDERS

www.btcbahamas.com aa Py |

Director
Department Of Environmental Health Services
P.O. Box SS19048
Farrington Road
Nassau, The Bahamas

a a



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Economy dips at 0.7 per cent pace in Q2

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The
economy shrank less than expected
in the second quarter as businesses
and consumers trimmed their spend-
ing at a slower pace, buttressing
beliefs that the economy is now
growing.

The 0.7 per cent dip in gross
domestic product for the April-June
quarter follows the 6.4 per cent
annualized drop in the first three
months of this year, the worst slide in
nearly three decades. In the final
quarter of last year, the economy
sank at a rate of 5.4 per cent

The new reading on second-quar-
ter GDP, reported by the Commerce
Department on Wednesday, shows
the economy shrinking less than the
one per cent pace previously esti-
mated. It also was better than the
annualized 1.1 per cent drop that
economists were predicting.

The final revision of second-quar-
ter GDP comes on the last day of
the third quarter, in which many ana-
lysts predict the economy started
growing again at a pace of about
three per cent.

"Growth should be solidly posi-
tive," said Mark Vitner, economist at
Wells Fargo Securities.

AUDIT, from 1B

Gross domestic product measures
the value of all goods and services —
from machines to manicures — pro-
duced in the US. It is the best esti-
mate of the nation's economic
health.

A main reason for the second-
quarter upgrade: businesses didn't
cut back spending on equipment and
software nearly as deeply as the gov-
ernment had thought. Consumers
also didn't trim their spending as
much.

But on Wall Street, a surprise drop
in the Chicago Purchasing Managers
Index, considered a precursor to the
national Institute for Supply Man-
agement index to be released on
Thursday, sent stocks reeling. The
Dow Jones industrial average lost
more than 80 points in midday trad-
ing, and broader indices also fell.

Many analysts predict the econo-
my started growing again in the July-
September quarter, due partly to
President Barack Obama's $787 bil-
lion stimulus package and the gov-
ernment's now defunct Cash for
Clunkers programme, which had
ginned up auto sales. It offered peo-
ple rebates of up to $4,500 to buy
new cars and trade in less efficient
gas guzzlers.

Earlier this month, Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke

"We all ardently want to believe
the nation is on the economic
comeback trail. I don't think we
are served by declaring prema-
turely that we're in the clear. In

TIVTToTceTo earl OTOL MCB REwOy Tek a
recommend for now a mindset
of measured optimism."

— Dennis Lockhart, president of
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta



said the recession, which started in
December 2007, is "very likely
over."

But he warned that pain will per-
sist — especially for the nearly 15
million unemployed Americans.

Because the recovery is expected
to slow to a more plodding pace in
the coming months, the nation's
unemployment rate — now at a 26-
year high of 9.7 per cent — is expect-
ed top 10 per cent this year. Econo-
mists predict it will have nudged up
to 9.8 per cent for September when
the government releases that report
Friday.

The economy has now contract-
ed for a record four straight quarters

for the first time on records dating to
1947, underscoring the toll the reces-
sion has taken on consumers and
businesses. Economic activity shrank
3.8 per cent since the second quarter
of last year, marking the worst reces-
sion since the 1930s.

In the second quarter, consumers
trimmed their spending at a rate of
0.9 per cent. That was slightly less
than the one per cent annualized
drop estimated a month ago, but
marked a reversal from the first
quarter when consumers boosted
spending 0.6 per cent.

Many analysts predict that con-
sumer spending will move back into
positive territory again in the third
quarter. But worries linger that rising
unemployment and still hard-to-get
credit could crimp such spending,
which accounts for about 70 per cent
of economic activity, and hobble the
recovery.

Those potentially negative forces
— along with the troubled commer-
cial real-estate market — provide
reasons for caution, a Fed official
said Wednesday.

"We all ardently want to believe
the nation is on the economic come-
back trail,” Dennis Lockhart, presi-
dent of the Federal Reserve Bank
of Atlanta, said in a speech in
Mobile, Ala. "I don't think we are

served by declaring prematurely that
we're in the clear. In thinking about
the recovery, I recommend for now
a mindset of measured optimism."

Meanwhile, less drastic cuts in
business spending contributed to the
second-quarter's improved showing.

Businesses trimmed spending on
equipment and software at a pace
of 4.9 per cent. That wasn't as deep
as the 8.4 per cent annualized drop
previously estimated for the second
quarter, and marked a big improve-
ment from an annualized plunge of
36.4 per cent in the first quarter.

A key area where businesses did
cut more deeply in the spring was
inventories.

They slashed spending at a record
pace of $160.2 billion. But there's a
silver lining to that: With invento-
ries at rock-bottom, businesses have
started to boost production to satis-
fy customer demand, one of the
forces that should lift GDP in the
third quarter, analysts say.

The report also showed that after-
tax profits of US corporations rose
0.9 per cent in the spring, the second
straight quarterly gain.

Spending on housing projects fell
at a rate of 23.3 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter, also not as deep as the
annualized drop of 38.2 per cent in
the first quarter.

period for that will be based
on how prepared the compa-
nies are - whether they have
the proper systems in place
for them to get the financial
statements, management
accounts to the auditor, along
with supporting documents,
to ensure this can be accom-
plished.”

Mr Deveaux added that the
Securities Commission was
“overly concerned that we
don’t put in into law a provi-
sion that can’t be maintained
or sustained, and then have
people inferring that the juris-
diction is unable to adhere to
the legislation. It has some

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

serious implications for the
jurisdiction.”

Mr Deveaux told Tribune
Business that the Securities
Industry Act was also being
reformed to ensure the
Bahamas complied with the
standards and practices
endorsed by the international
body for securities regulators,
IOSCO, especially when it
came to information sharing
with fellow supervisors.

“We’re hoping this legis-
lation will be brought into
force before the end of the
year,” the Commission’s exec-
utive director said. “I think
we’ve done a thorough con-

2009/CLE/gen/00040

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

sultation, and hopefully we
can get this final draft, as far
as we’re concerned, to the
Ministry of Finance and the
Attorney General’s Office as
soon as possible, and for
onward transmission to the
Cabinet and the various
Houses of Parliament for
sign-off and bringing into
force.”

Apart from meeting with
individual industry partici-
pants, the Securities Com-
mission also consulted with
the major industry represen-
tative bodies and focus
groups, such as the Bahamas
Financial Services Board,

Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA),
Bahamas Bar Association and
Bahamas Association of
Compliance Officers
(BACO).

Mr Deveaux said the regu-
lator was also reviewing the
feedback received, “and mak-
ing what adjustments need to
be made to the final draft”.
All input and comments were
being documented, to ensure
that the Securities Commis-
sion could later explain why
some suggestions were even-
tually incorporated into the
legislation, while others were
not.

NOTICE is hereby given that WIDSON AZOR of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1% day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ROGER JAMES
BOUCHER of MCKINNEY DRIVE, CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O.
BOX SB-52414, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 1% day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
BARBARA A. DEVEAUX
Defendant
To: Barbara Deveuax

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you by
Scotiabank (Bahamas) limited in the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on the 15th of January
2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/ gen/00040, wherein the
Plaintiff's claim is for the total sum of $34,279.08 which
represents the principal sum of $24,266.51, accrued
interest on the said principal in the sum of $9,316.57,
add-on charges in the sum of $616.00, interest on the said
add-on charges in the sum of $127.14 and late fees in the
sum of $80.00 due under a loan numbered 1746456.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you
by virtue of this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

ONE SANDYPORT PLAZA
West Bay Street

www, boahamascommercial.com
www. cbrichardellis.com

RENT

RETAIL/OFFICE SPACE

| ,042 - 2,264 $q. ft.

Ample Parking

Immediate Occupancy

For more information call 376-0000

se @¢ @

Ministry Finance
RE: Real property tax Surcharge Waiver Notice

The general public is here by advised of the
provisions of the Real Property Tax Act. The
principal Act is amended by the insertion
immediately after section 21 of the following
new section 21 A and 21 B respectfully;

Section 21 A Waiver of surcharge.

Notwithstanding section 21, any surcharge
which has accumulated in respcct of

* (a) owner-occupies property with a market
value of up to two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars ($250,000.00) shall be
waived.

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars,
shall be waived if the outstanding real
property tax is paid on or before
December 31,2009: and

* (c) other property, shall be waived by fifty
per cent if the outstanding real property
tax is paid before December 31,2009.

Section 21 B Revival of Surcharge
lf after December 31,2009 any real property
tax remains outstanding in respect of

* (a) owner-occupied property with a market
with a market value of up to two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00)

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand.

(c) other property

The owner of such property, shall be liable to
pay anew surcharge of five per centum (5%)
of such tax tax per annum.



BAHAMAS REALTY tp

COMMERCIAL

if aeecialion Wile

CBRE

CB RICHARD ELLIS

HAVIGATING A MEW WORLD





Ministry Of The Environment
PORT DEPARTMENT

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the following Contract Service for the
Port Department, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ Private Security Services for Royal Caribbean
Cruise Line Prince George Dock

Interested parties may obtain further information,
and may collect the bidding document as of 23rd
September, 2009 from:

The Port Department

Prince George Dock

Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone No. (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
through Friday.

Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in a
sealed envelope(s) Marked Tender for Private
Security Services for Royal Caribbean Cruise Line
-Prince George Dock addressed to:

The Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

No later than 5:00pm on the 9th October, 2009.

Tenders will be opened at 10:00am on the 13th
October, 2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board,
Ministry of Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
TENDERS.



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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



THE CARNIVAL cruise ship Fantasy is lit up at the Port of New Orleans. Carnival Corp. Tuesday said
its third-quarter profit sank nearly 20 per cent, but the results were still better than expected.

(AP Photo: Andy Newman)

Carnival stops
calls on Antigua

mba ®* Tourism minister says
upset Carnival Corporation

is taking the island off a island nation will lo Se

ship’s itinerary.
Beginning January 3, Car- e
nival will substitute St $401 nin revenue

Maarten for Antigua on the

Carnival Victory’s weekly 4 4 9 4 ‘
six-stop, seven-day trips out . Cruise line S Q profit
of Puerto Rico.

Tourism minister John S 1 nks ne arly 2? 0%

Maginley says the island
nation will lose $40 million

in revenue.
He says local officials
weren't consulted, and the malicious damage after had nothing to do with the
change comes just after six refusing to pay a cab fare incident.
American tourists from the they thought was excessive A spokeswoman says the
ship were arrested. and later scuffling with itinerary was four years old
The passengers were police. and simply needed an
charged with assault and Carnival says the change update.

BAIC
In Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

Will Host

6 Weeks Business Empowerment or Enrereneur- Lecture Sens

To sensitize Bahamiaas af
the besiness oppartunities
available to them aow, aad
REGISTRATION FORM ‘nial
exploit such apportenities,
thereby empowering them
to become self employed,

October B-Savenber 2 20
ADDRESS (See Selodule Below]
70 pan, Lecture, Presentation

Interactive Panel Discussin
followed by Ealrepreacar
Testimonials and JA session.

TELEPHONE CONTACTS:

FAX NUMBER:
VENUE: « Contre far Performing Asis
ade Siva)

Change your baying habits, “BUY te SES"
re e.
seats become self employed and create wealth.

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

Thunday October 22, D009 Thursday November 05, 2009
ain hirereeieraraia Hudgeting, Forecasting and Pricing /
Performing Ars «Shirky 3 nadomy of am Entrepreneur
Presenters C08 Prolessae Ann da
Customers Service Rep. ~ Atlas Cenmre foe Performing Ars.» Shirky 8
Presenters » CON Professor /Conpariht Exe.

Thursday November 12, 208
seinen tne

pun Tle dieu Ce sting = Sy 8

Agric
Canine for Pertinreineg Arms» Shirley Si,

Presaiers « Ageieltoral Practitioners and indus ‘Thursday November 19, 2009

ee Cli Ceremony Cirtfiate Pesewaion

(Chicces Rewiurind - COB CHMI
Prenicr- fe. Crear Fite!

CONTACT: Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BANC) at 322-3740 or 328-1912
Ms, Lisa Ferguson! Mrs, Tonjia BurrowsMrs, Antoinette Rain



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







PG 24 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009

EBENEZER Methodist Church =
celebrates 207 years of
excellence, commitment,
and loyalty to Methodism.



RELIGION





EBENEZER CELEBRATES IT
207TH ANNIVERSARY

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

EBENEZER Methodist Church will cel-
ebrate 207 years of excellence, com-
mitment, and loyalty to Methodism
with a commemoration service to be

held on Sunday, October 4 at 11am.

Before Emancipation, before blockade running,
and even before the Bahamas gained Independence,
Ebenezer Methodist Church was firmly established
since 1802 and is indeed one of the oldest churches in
the Bahamas and has a long history of ministry and
outreach.

John Phillpot, Congregational Board Chairman at
Ebenezer Methodist Church, spoke to Tribune
Religion about the work Ebenezer has done over the
years. “From the early days, Ebenezer has been a
mainstay in the community along with St Matthew’s
Church, the two oldest churches from 1802. The
church has a large focus on social outreach and help-
ing the local communities,” he said.

“Over the years, our members have traveled to
other islands to help with home repairs after the
storms, taking food and clothing supplies along with
them, he said.

“They are also making sure the less fortunate per-
sons have food to eat and clothes to wear. The church
has a large social outreach with a soup kitchen that
serves over 100 people every Thursday. There is also
a clothing pantry for those in need,” he said.

Their efforts in the past to improve the education in
the Bahamas did not go unnoticed either. According

establishment of what is today known as Queen’s
College”, the website stated.

Closeness and Togetherness are principles that the
people of the church abide by. These principles have }
allowed the church over the years to remain close :

with neighbouring churches and the community.

Ebenezer has worked with other churches in the :
area giving assistance to the homeless and the poor. :
The church is very people oriented providing several }
different avenues for fellowship, he said. “We are }

always welcoming visitors,” he said.

Youth ministry, Sunday school, junior church choir, }
men’s group, women’s fellowship, choir, prayer :
groups, evangelism, and social outreach are just afew }
of the ministries at Ebenezer that enforce and pro- }

mote fellowship in Christ.

Over the years there have been many ministers at
Ebenezer, but now the church is happy to welcome }
their new acting minister, Rev Godfrey Bethell from }
Central Eleuthera. With years of education and expe- }

rience, they anticipate he will be a great leader.

“Rev Godfrey Bethell has been in the church since :
the early age at Coke Memorial and Rhodes :
Memorial Methodist Church in Nassau and St Paul }
Methodist Church in Freeport. He is joined in Nassau
with his wife Elmena Bethell, current Vice President ;
of the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church. }
We look forward to working with both Rev and Mrs :

Bethell in all of our ministries,” he said.

: Christopher Church, in observance of
: Assisi, the patron saint of animals. The service is the
? brainchild of the Bahamas Humane Society and
: parishioners at St Christopher Church, to commemo-
: rate World Animal Day. Last year, events were held in
: 66 countries in celebration of World Animal Day.

The Tribune

Blessing of

the aerate

By REUBEN SHEARER
: Tribune Features Reporter

ON a typical Sunday morning, church pews are filled

i with worshippers praising and getting spiritual enrich-
? ment from the Word of God. It’s a unique occasion
? planned at one church this Sunday, however. At 4.30
? pm St Christopher Church in Lyford Cay will be hav-
: ing their ‘St Francis of Assisi Day and Blessing of the
? Animals’.
: invited to bring their four legged, and feathered friends
: to the afternoon service.

All animal lovers from across the island are

This is the third time the service will be held at St
St Francis

Officiating the service will be Father Keith

: Cartwright, archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas and
: The Turks and Caicos Islands.
? also a member of the Bahamas Humane Society board.

Father Cartwright is

Last year, 23 birds, dogs, cats, and turtles attended

i and were prayed for at the service. They all behaved,
? and nobody tried to bite or fight each other.
? Organisers ensure good animal behavior by having the
: service for no more than half an hour, to prevent the
: animals from getting restless, Tribune Religion was told
? yesterday.

“The service is a celebration of God’s creation,”

i Father Cartwright told Tribune Religion yesterday.
to www.ebenezermethodist.org, “In 1870, a group of
laymen from Ebenezer and Trinity met to discuss the }
feasibility of establishing an educational institution }
which would provide secondary education for their ;

children, and these discussions eventually led to the : ; Y
: we believe that is a sin. We need to create a lot of

? awareness about that.”

“God made the entire cosmos and a part of that creat-
ed animals and creatures, and we give God thanks for
the wonderful beauty of animals and pets.”

“We want to highlight the importance and care of
God’s creatures. There’s a lot of cruelty to animals and

“Animals were put here for different purposes. One
of those purposes happens to be where they are com-
panions of human beings,” he said.

Father Cartwright’s dog, ‘Kay Kay’ will be present at
Sunday’s service.

Following the service, Father Cartwright will be
head down to the canine dog unit in Lyford Cay to pray
for and bless the security dogs, which are used to pro-

SEE page 25



A USS mon scnes at last year’s Src)



The Tribune





6

RELIGION
THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

PART 46

The Baptist Movements
in the 20th Century

A LETTER in the Nassau Guardian
of 16th March 16, 1892 deplored the
dismissal of Rev Daniel Wilshire from
the Baptist Missionary Society calling
his treatment “uncourteous and there-
fore uncharitable.” The letter was
signed by John James Kerr and mem-
bers of the New Zion Baptist Church,
Moses Rahming and all members of Mt
Carey Baptist Church, Joseph Smith
and the entire Gambier and Adelaide
Baptist Church, Hercules Rolle, Cat
Island and all churches under his pas-
toral care and Richard A Morrison of
Exuma with all members of the church
there.

A special meeting of the Pastor and
committee was convened at Zion
Baptist Church Nassau on April 4 with
Rev J J Kerr as chairman. Attending
were representatives from Cat Island,
Exuma, Andros, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Ragged Island and Long
Island. An agreement was reached to
form the Bahamas Baptist Union and
appointed Rev Daniel Wilshire as
superintendent.

It should be noted that not all
churches remained within the Union
and about 15 churches remained with
Wilshire. In 1893, a lot that previously
housed livery stables on Parliament
Street was purchased and Mrs Wilshire
laid the foundation stone of the Sunday
School Building which later became
Salem Union Baptist Church. The
building is now Magistrates Court #1.
The Wilshires lived behind the church
and were assisted by jeweler, Rev J
Demeritte and Rev J J Kerr was the
pastor of the Nassau churches in the
Baptist Union.

From Rev Wilshire's speech at the
laying of the stone, we can glean that
the formation of the Bahamas Baptist
Union caused the English Baptists to
send a deputation to investigate the sit-
uation in the Bahamas. As a result the
committee decided that ‘steps will be
taken to make the churches in the
Bahamas self supporting, and help will
be offered through Calabar College
(Jamaica) toward providing them with
an efficient native ministry.’ Wilshire's
reply was that the Baptist Union pre-
ferred to work out its own salvation as
God shall help, choosing its own native
ministry.

Mrs Charlotte Wilshire died in 1894
and Rev Wilshire married again to his
widowed housekeeper, Mrs Rigby.

In 1901, Wilshire bought a sailboat

j JM
» LAWLOR
=

Experience and used it to visit the out
island churches. He also pursued an
expansion of the Bahamas Baptist
Union into Florida, where many
Bahamians had migrated to work
there. Seven churches were built in
Florida which brought the total of 28
churches and 1500 members.

Wilshire died in 1932 and was suc-
ceeded by his assistant Rev Enoch
Backford, who became Pastor of Salem
Church in 1933 and Superintendent of
the Bahamas Baptist Union later that
same year.

Enoch Backford was born at
Deadman's Cay, Long Island in 1893.
He was educated in the USA at
Morehouse College and _ Florida
Memorial College. He served in the
trenches as an American soldier during
World War 1. Backford proved to be an
able administrator, organising the
Baptist Union into districts each with a
Convention of Woman's Auxilliary,
Sunday School and _ Training
Convention. His great emphasis was on
Baptist doctrine, democracy and stew-
ardship, church discipline and missions.

The Salem Church building became
inadequate for the growing member-
ship so another site was purchased on
Taylor Street. The corner stone was
laid in 1960 and dedicated in 1967.
Backford retired as pastor of Salem in
1974 and was succeeded by Rev
Charles Saunders. Rev Backford
remained as Superintendent of the
Bahamas Baptist Union until his death
at 83 in 1976.

Father Leopold Duncan Cox, born at
Fox Hill in 1900 , was elected as
Superintendent of the Bahamas Baptist
Union in 1976. He previously had been
Pastor at Mt Carey Union Baptist
Church.

Bahamas Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention 1935 - 1970

In May 1925, Rev J R Evans and Mrs
Jamie Morris made two trips to the
Bahamas to make a general survey of
Baptist participation in the islands. As a
result they bought $50,000 of literature

Churches in the Bahamas. Rev Evans
continued to visit annually and eventu-
ally succeeded in persuading both the St

Particular Baptists and the Union
Baptists Association to agree to merge
into the Bahamas Baptist Missionary
many meetings and a
the Bahamas

and

session of
Missionary

Baptist
Educational

Baptist Church on May 25,1936.

Board of the National

school named in honour of Dr L G

1948.
Southern Baptist Mission of the
Southern Baptist Convention

In the summer of 1949, students of the
Southwestern Baptist

missionary couples, Dr

Street in 1957.

The Central Baptist Church was }
organised in the Institute building later :
in 1957. It was also felt that there was a } Patrick Paul.
great need for a high school and so in }
1961 the Institute building was also used : follow the lead,” she said. She and

to house the Prince Williams High :

School.
When problems severed the relation-

Missionary and Education Convention

Prince Williams High School on the

Southern Baptist Mission began operat-
ing the Bahamas Baptist College which
moved to Jean Street in 1968.

i ing for animals.
? Cartwright witnessed the miraculous

? healing of her dog who was not feeling

and Educational Convention. After } well.

temporary :

arrangement in 1935, the first annual } with me having dinner while my dog was

i having a heart attack, and we rushed

L 1" + downtown to the animal clinic.
Convention took place at St John's i prayed for the animal and she survived.
is ae ia F paeeaeae ? I believe she survived because Father
n , al the invitation of Fresident ¢ Cartwright prayed for her,” she said.
Enoch Backford, the Foreign Missions } ae :
C : d 1 Baptist : pets, she said.

onvention started an elementary : animals are God’s creatures too. We are

; ? custodians of the planet and it is our
hese of Re ae ot ae ae ? unbounded duty to treat animals as God
ae ee eee ene 12 = intended us to in a kind manner.”

Chippingham until it moved to Baillou }
Hi Rees ey Wale ice ask of those who bring their dogs is
was the first headmaster from 1943 to : 8 8

: to ensure that they have access to water,
: and bring a form of waste disposal in

? case the animal has an accident.

Thursday, October 1, 2009 ® PG 25

SEE page 24

: tect the gated community.

This year, New Providence will be the

: only observers of the unique service.
? However, they’re asking other parishes
? in the family islands to join the band-
? wagon.
? picked up the ball and had a service in
? the garden in the Grove.

from the National Baptist Convention }
Inc and distributed freely to all Baptist :

Last year, Grand Bahama

Bahamas Humane Society president
Kim Arahna said, “I took my 7 year old

i freshwater turtle, Big Mama last year
? and my 14 year old potcake whois a can-
? cer survivor.”

John's Baptist Society Churches of }

Mrs Arahna is a firm believer in pray-
She and Father

“Last year, Father Cartwright was

He

“We hope the kids will bring their

“We seem to forget that

The only thing organisers of the serv-

“We’ve absolutely had no problems so

far with this however, but ask that you

Theological : bring it just in case they make a mess”

Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas began } she said.

sending teams to hold Bible schools i.
throughout The Bahamas. In 1951, The } will be prayed for and blessed, and those
Southern Baptist Convention sent two ; Who behave during the service will be
and Mrsi
McMillan and Dr and Mrs Main. Along
with local Baptist leaders the missionar- } !
ies decided that the greatest need was } tanks,” Mrs Arahna added. According
theological training and toward that end } to her, Father Cartwright makes house-
the Bahamas Baptist Institute was }
opened in the house of the Mains and }
moved to new quarters on Rosetta }

: and love to animals in other churches,”

On Sunday’s service, animals present

sprinkled with holy water, Mrs Arahna
said.
“He'll sprinkle holy water into the fish

calls at the request of parishioners
request to pray for their animals.
With a drive to “bring more respect

Mrs Aranha recently met with
Christian Council president Reverend
“We would really like to
have as many of the other churches to

Reverend Paul are talking over intro-

: ducing the service to congregations
? under the Christian Council.
ship between the Bahamas Baptist }

Mrs Arahna emphasised that anyone

i on the island is more than welcomed to
and the Bahamas Southern Baptist :
Mission, the Convention reorganised }

attend.
“We’re hoping for a great showing

l he ? from the public. The fact that we are
Jordan Memorial Campus. The Baptist } behind the gates shouldn’t stop people
? from coming in. We want as many per-
isons from New Providence to be

E there.”



PG 26 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Creating teams for ministry

“What, after all, is Apollos? And
what is Paul? Only servants,
through whom you came to
believe--as the Lord has assigned to
each his task. I planted the seed,
Apollos watered it, but God made
it grow. So neither he who plants
nor he who waters is anything, but
only God, who makes things grow.
The man who plants and the man
who waters have one purpose, and
each will be rewarded according to
his own labour” 1 Cor 3:5-8.

Why Arawak, why

MATTH the people that I know we
are (Bahamians that loves drama, gos-
sip and anything that will appeal to
one’s emotion); I knew that this topic
“Why Arawak, Why” would get your
attention seeing that Arawak Homes
and the church destruction is one of the
most talked about matters today.

As a religious nation I know that
most of us (in particular Christians)
have already settled in our hearts and
ruled on this matter thereby condemn-
ing Arawak Homes for demolishing
the church building.

Okay, that’s your right; you're enti-
tled to think and conclude as you wish,
but can I say to you that Father
Yahweh is not tripping or freaking out
at what happened. Always remember
that “Nothing can ever catch God by
surprise or off guard” Here's some-
thing that I want you to also remember
or consider: Religious thinking mixed
with heated emotion at times will cause
one to totally overlook or ignore the
facts.

With that being said, before we (reli-
gious Christians) begin to demonise the
principles of Arawak Homes; let's stop
for a few minutes and look at some
facts and the law. Please understand
this, I don't know Franklin Wilson nor
have I ever met him. I just felt led of
the Spirit to bring some sobering
thoughts to the forefront of this
Arawak Homes / church saga. It is
obvious that folks’ religious emotions
are overshadowing some key facts in
this matter.

The religious Christian community is
upset and venting its anger in the
wrong direction (at Arawak Homes)
when they should be angry at whoever
sold the church the land.

As you're reading this article, would

REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

Qualities of A Good Team Player

1. Team Spirit (not a solo perform-
ance)
2. Committed and dedicated



PASTOR

you ponder these few questions as I
supply what I believe to be some hon-
est answers.

Is it about the money? --- No, it's not
about money

Is Arawak Homes hurting financial-
ly? ---- No, they're not.

Is it that the principles of Arawak
Homes are bad people? No, by no
means are they bad people.

The destruction of this place of wor-
ship was nothing personal between the
pastor / members and the principles of
Arawak Homes, for had it been so this
act would have taken place a long time
ago. Rather this was a timely spiritual
message sent to the nation by the prin-
cipalities and powers that are
acclaimed over this nation.
Unfortunately, this anti-Christ spirit
saw an opportunity to make its pres-
ence felt.

The carnal minded and also some
religious minded Bahamians would
never see the spiritual connotation
that’s attached to this saga. The only
winner in the destruction of this house
of worship is the anti-Christ spirit (not
Arawak Homes and its principles). For
I would want to believe that deep with-
in, Arawak Homes now regrets taking
such actions as a result of the negative
backlash and publicity that has and is
yet to come. Watch this! It's not as if
the principles of Arawak Homes don't
go to church themselves or believe in
God. That's right they're not anti-

3. Pulls own weight

4. Goes beyond the call of duty

5. A good communicator (listener
and speaker)

6. Willing to compromise (not
morals or principles)

7. Able to admit faults

8. Willing to negotiate

9. No superiority or inferiority
complexes

10. Honest and reliable

11. Pleasant, friendly even humor-
ous at times

12. Encourager (not overly critical)

a

church. I also believe that at any given
time the owner of Arawak Homes
would give generously to their home
church or any other as they would feel
led to.

Watch this ! How many families
throughout the history of the Bahamas
and to this present day have suffered
some kind of loss or injustice as a result
of unethical practice.

As I've stated before, so do I again.
The restoration of the country’s spiritu-
al connection to Father Yahweh has to
come via the church of which Yeshuwa
Messiah died for. Therefore God will
use whatever means to expose ungodly,
unethical practices. So, again before
you self righteous, religious hypocrites,
demonise Arawak Homes; could it be
that God has allowed this act to happen
via the church to wake this nation from
its chosen position of sleep to corrup-
tion and unethical practices?

How many of us within and outside
the church know of, or may have taken
part in some form of ungodly, unethical
behavior and practices. But now that a
church building / a place of worship (a4
sacred cow) is at the center of this saga;
religiously and ignorantly you're crying
foul. Listen, I'm not saying “let's tear
down church buildings, but what I am
saying is that; let's not wait until the

13. Visionary yet also supportive of
that of others

14. Shares in triumphs and failures
of the team

Additional Qualities of a Ministry
Team Player

1. Prayerful

2. Student of the Scriptures

3. Regular worshipper

4, Enthusiastic witness

5. Faithful worker for the Lord

6. Filled with the Holy Spirit

seeds of corruption and unethical
practices bears fruits and then cry out”

For those of you who are bent on
holding your religious position as it
relates to your places of worship or the
one in question; Yeshuwa Messiah also
encountered the religious spirit of
which has gotten hold of you. Watch
this! The Woman of Samaria John.4:
20. Our fathers worshipped in this
mountain; and ye say, that in
Jerusalem is the place where men
ought to worship. : 21. Jesus saith
unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour
cometh, when ye shall neither in this
mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, wer-
ship the Father. : 22. Ye worship ye
know not what: we know what we wor-
ship: for salvation is of the Jews. : 23.
But the hour cometh, and now is, when
the true worshippers shall worship the
Father in spirit and in truth: for the
Father seeketh such to worship him. :
24. Ged is a Spirit: and they that wor-
ship him must worship him in spirit
and in truth.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.1-242-441 -2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays





The Tribune

Hurting people
healing words

Rev CLEVELAND
D.X.WELLS

“Hurting People, Healing
Words”, is a monthly article writ-
ten to assist those persons who are
hurting and to share with them the
hurts of others and how they were
able to overcome them. It also
seeks to show, by way of scripture,
what God has to say to those who
are hurting and to encourage per-
sons to look beyond the temporary
hurt, to a God that covers us
through the ages. “Hurting
People, Healing Words”, seeks to
heal the broken hearted and free
those who have been held captive
with the power of God.

I will never forget the day, some
thirty five years ago, that I heard
my mother scream. I was only a lit-
tle boy growing up on the island of
Andros, but I will never forget that
day because I discovered that a
man was using his fist to hit my
mother. Being only six years old,
my first instinct was to run to her. I
grabbed the man by his leg and bit
him. It got his attention; he
stopped hitting my mother and
turned his focus to me. The man
reacted by kicking me off and then
he stormed out in a rage. I didn’t
know what the outcome would be,
but somehow I had to act, and as
was seen, the act proved fruitful;
the man stopped hitting my moth-
er and that is all I wanted.

I watched my mother on the
ground crying and as a little boy I
went to her and hugged her and
said to her, “I love you mommy,”
with great hopes to hear her say, “I
love you son,” but she never did. I
often wondered why she didn’t use
those words, but now I’ve come to
understand that her hurt was
deeper than I had realised.

You see, my name is Cleveland
Dwight Xavier Wells and my
namesake, my father, had left my
mother years ago with three chil-
dren never to return. It was my
father who made her promises that
he never kept and to hear my
name, triggered something in my
mother toward me. It wasn’t really
for me, but for my father.
Nevertheless, he was gone and I
was still there.

You can put a spin on things
because ‘What the devil meant for
bad, God will put a spin on it and
work it out for your good.

“Hurting
Words”

People Healing

Ive come to understand that
hurting one person actually hurts
many people. You see, my father
hurt my mother and my mother in
turn hurt me. However, I’ve decid-
ed to put a spin on things. I’ve
learned how to let go so that I can
grow. Since my mother had experi-
enced hurt, she decided to give me
to a family she believed could love
and care for me. It’s with this fam-
ily that I accepted Jesus Christ as
my Lord and personal saviour and
the journey of healing started.
Now God has blessed me with two
beautiful girls and a gorgeous wife.

I longed to hear my mother and
father say, “I love you son”, how-
ever my daughters have absolutely
no longing to hear these words. I
use them frequently, expressing
the love that I have for them and
for their mother.

You see, you don’t have to carry
on where others left off. You can
literally stop and start your new
chapter. That’s what I have done.
My healing words came from
God’s Holy word that states, “I
will never leave you or forsake
you”. To me, I am never alone and
once you have accepted him as
Lord and personal saviour. God
has a way of turning a bad situa-
tion into a good one. This hap-
pened with Joseph, who was
thrown in a pit, sold into slavery,
sold to Potifer, lied on by Potifer’s
wife and thrown in jail.

Despite all of the events that
happened to him, when Joseph
saw his brothers again years later
he told them, “You intended to
harm me, but God intended it for
good to accomplish what is now
being done, the saving of many
lives” [Genesis 50 and 20]. I
believe Joseph wanted to hear
from his brothers, “You will be
alright, you can make it and ’m
here for you”, but these words
would seem like a foreign lan-
guage to angry brothers. Because
Joseph was in God and God in
him, deep within his inner being he
knew that he would be alright, that
he’d make it and that God would
always be there for him.

So when you are hurting,
remember that you will be alright,
you can make it and that God will
always be there for you. Only you
can stop you from growing.

Remember when you allow
people to anger you, you give
them power over you, so take back
the power over your life. Hurting
people, = Healing words.

RELIGION Thursday, October 1, 2009 ® PG 27

Bahamas Faith Ministries International (BFMI)
Children’s Fine Arts Conservatory (CFAC)

is auditioning for a 30 members children’s conservatory choir.
Children will be performing music from various genres,
original works, musical dramas and will be afforded national
and international travel ministry opportunities.

Successful applicants will also be a member of the
specialized production team for the
2010 BFMI Culture-Up Kids Leadership Congress.

Auditions will be held from 11am to 4pm on
Saturday, October 3rd, 2009
for children ages § to 14 years old at BFMI Carmichael Road.

For audition appointments parents/ guardian should email the
name of the child, age and a telephone contact number to:

The Choral Director at cfac,.bfmi@ gmail.com.

Walk-in auditions accepted.
Persons auditioning should prepare a song from
memory and bring along a copy of the song.
Past performance recordings can be submitted for review.

PUR Te ee
PP ee ee et mmr tn ie
Tel: 242-4616400 * Fax: 242-361-2260 * www. bimmm.com





PG 28 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

WEEK

Ebenezer Methodist
Church is this week’s
church of the week.
Ebenezer was estab-
lished in 1802, and is
one of the oldest
churches in the
Bahamas. The
church will celebrate
its 207th anniversary
on Sunday, October
4. Over the years, the
church has made
meaningful contribu-
tions to the commu-
nity and the country
through its many
social outreach pro-
grames.

Photos Felipe Major/Tribune Staff



BREAST CANCER
Awareness Month

t 3 = . 3 } |
areke | HEPETTI SCY
——————— ait Pa Gourmet

Scab Prichard Ereezes Griteh Colonial Milton Gable Beach Goll Course Caribbean Spice Cale
Community Pharmacy The Gicket Qub Greycliff -hie Entemprees Ocean Liquors Purity Bakery
Sanda’ Royal Bahamian Subrany

Albany Deveio per Comgort House Minihies Florence Crovewle, Point View Notion
Police Callege Queens College

For More Infanmation or ta Place an Order Call

Pe ee rere ees ee tae 7 : "LAL ae





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PARTLY SUNNY,
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Volume: 105 No.259

Dorsett to run for
PLP chairmanship

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE battle for the chair-
manship of the Progressive
Liberal Party got a jump start
yesterday when Kenred
Dorsett officially announced
his intent to run against
Glenys Hanna-Martin for the
coveted post.

Running on a
platform of
“Progress
Now!”, Mr
Dorsett said he
is committed to
| bringing change

— to the Opposi-
KENRED tion and

DORSETT unleashing the

party's “real
potential."

Due to his experience as a
branch member, national par-
ty vice-chairman and the cur-
rent PLP deputy chairman,
Mr Dorsett said he knows
what has worked for and
against the party recently.

"Tam not offering myself
for the position...to oppose
any man or woman within the
PLP. I seek the chairmanship
to move the party machinery
forward, to reconnect our par-
ty with supporters. ..And con-
nect the party to the people of
this our beloved Common-
wealth," Mr Dorsett said at a
press conference at his law

SEE page 11



Hotel union files
Suit against bank

THE Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers
Union has filed a suit against
Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
for the return of nearly
$700,000 that was allegedly
transferred from the union's
accounts by "unauthorised"
union executives.

The union claims BOB
failed to adhere to the man-
dated requirements of the
bank/customer relationship
between the two agencies in
respect to disbursements pur-
portedly effected on or about
August, 24 from the union's
account at BOB “without
lawful authority” of the union.

According to a writ filed in
the Supreme Court on Sep-
tember 3, during the time
period in question the only
persons legally entitled to
authorise disbursements from
the union's account at BOB
"were exclusively and at all
material times” any combina-
tion of three executives
including: Leo Douglas, Basil

SEE page 11



The Tribune &

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

PICTURES:. Tommy Turnquest breezed past protesters calling his name (photos 1 and 2), but had enough time to chat to police officers (photo 3) and the media (photo 4).

i 7 Scunet
families tell Minister

Placard-waving protesters
eather in Rawson Square
to sound call for justice

BRENTON SMITH PRESTON FERGUSON

PROSTESTING family and friends of victims of
violence shouted for the Minister of National Secu-
rity’s resignation after they claimed he breezed past
them yesterday morning flanked by two uniformed
police officers.

Around 40 people had gathered in Rawson Square
yesterday to sound a call for “justice” to parlia-
mentarians who were returning to the House of
Assembly for the first time in a month.

Marching and waving placards, family and friends
of Preston Ferguson, Brenton Smith, Kristoff Coop-
er and Delroy Pratt came together to demand better
policing, improvements to the justice system and
more communication between police and victims’
families.

Mr Ferguson’s family claim that rather than dying
in an Exuma traffic accident, as police determined,
he was a victim of murder and police are not doing
what they should. Kristoff Cooper’s brother and

SEE page two

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
JOHN TRAVOLTA and his wife are
shown going to court yesterday.

ALM EV MAMOLSIOL ne mS pec Ui

MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest walks past demonstrators yesterday in Rawson Square.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia. net

HOLLYWOOD celebrity John Travolta
testified yesterday that he had been informed
that stories that would imply that he had inten-
tionally caused the death of his son would be
released to the media if he did not comply
with a demand for $25 million.

Jurors in the trial of ex-PLP Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver
Tarino Lightbourne yesterday also heard a



Travolta tells of pressure to
meet $25 million demand



taped conversation between Bridgewater and
Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson regarding a
meeting set with an attorney for the 55-year-
old actor.

Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused of

SEE page 12

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Families call on
Minister to resig

teow

FROM page one

father say they want to know
how the 21-year-old ended up
with a bullet in his head after
a police chase, while 18-year-
old Brenton Smith’s family
say they still have not been
given a date for the holding of
an inquest into his death from
a bullet fired by a police offi-
cer.

When National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest
appeared on the scene yes-
terday morning he did not to
stop to address the crowd,
only waving to one person
who shouted his name.

Our
nation,
our youth
are in per-
il. Our son
is dead
and there
are more
dying.

Hector
Smith



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks past protesters.

As he crossed the road
towards parliament, the
crowd started to shout in uni-
son, “We want justice!” and
“Tommy needs to go!”

Speaking to The Tribune,
Hector Smith, Brenton’s
father said the grieving fami-
lies contacted each other and
are now unified in their call
for justice for their relatives
and other victims.

“We will never forget our
loved ones and the country
must stand behind us to make
sure it does not happen to
them.”

“They (politicians) need to

CUSTOMER LOYALTY CARD

see that we the people want
change. Our nation, our youth
are in peril. Our son is dead
and there are more dying.
You need to show an exam-
ple. You need just to go
ahead and serve justice,” he
said.

Monique Smith, niece of
Preston Ferguson, who was
killed on August 2, said: “We
are trying to let the people
that we have elected to gov-
ern this country hear our unit-
ed voice saying that ‘enough is
enough, justice has to be
served.’

“We speak for those peo-

PROTEST: VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE

ple who can no longer hear
for themselves. We are the
family members who have
been left hurting without
answers. The police are not
giving us answers, and we
want them to know we are
not going away.”

Mervin Johnson, Preston’s
uncle, said: “Exuma is in total
uprising right now. They
understand, it was obvious
and the message in Exuma is
something has to change.
Something has to happen.”

Speaking with the media
briefly before heading into
parliament, Mr Turnquest

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PLACARD-WAVING PROTESTERS outside the House of Assembly yesterday.

said The Bahamas is a “coun-
try of laws and we want to
ensure that the law is fol-
lowed.”

“When the law is not fol-
lowed, there are procedures
in place that will be carried
out,” he added.

In relation to the Brenton
Smith case, which saw police
admit that an officer shot the
18 year old while in pursuit
of an armed robber, Mr Turn-
quest said the matter will be
“dealt with by the coroner’s
court.”

“I don’t want to second
guess the police officer who
was on duty responding to
that situation, but there are
procedures in place to deal
with that.”

Meanwhile, referring to the
case of Preston Ferguson, Mr
Turnquest said he was “dis-
appointed” to hear the vic-

eR
PHONE: 322-2157



BRENTON SMITH’S father, Hector Smith, pauses for a drink of water.

ede le
UL eS

ret
COLD BLOODED
MURDER

JUSTICE 4 PR

tim’s family claim that he had
failed to contact them.

“T was away when that hap-
pened and I wasn’t really
aware of the circumstances.
The family met with the com-
missioner of police, they indi-
cated they weren’t satisfied,
they then came to meet with
me. Within two days of speak-
ing to me, I spoke back to a
family member, indicated to
them the situation with
regards to it, what the police
was doing with respect to that.

“So I was somewhat disap-
pointed to hear on Sunday in
the press that the family say-
ing they hadn’t heard from
the commissioner or the min-
ister.

“Well they surely could-
n't say the minister because
it is a matter that is still under
investigation and we’re deal-
ing with it.”

1

Felipe Major
/Tribune staff



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



SUPREME COURT: DEATH OF
POLICE OFFICER EDDISON BAIN

Court hears
about robbery
and killing plot

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Lead police
investigator Darrell Rolle told
the Supreme Court that mur-
der accused Wilfred McPhee
Jr told him that co-accused
Edwin Bauld Jr hatched a
plan to rob and kill his own
cousin.

Sgt Rolle testified that
McPhee told him he only
wanted to rob Police Corporal
Eddison Bain, but Bauld
wanted to kill him. Bauld and
McPhee are on trial for the
murder, kidnapping and rob-
bery of Bain, whose body was
found in a shallow ditch near
the Casuarinas Bridge on
October 22, 2007. His hands
and feet were bound and a
large stone had been put on
top of his face.

Sgt Rolle took a statement
from McPhee on October 23.
He read the entire 13-page
document in court yesterday.
Before taking the statement,
Rolle said he asked if the
accused wanted a lawyer pre-
sent, but McPhee declined.

In the statement, McPhee
claimed Bauld told him they
were going to make some
money by robbing his cousin
after using his girlfriend, Gah-
nise Campbell, to set Bain up.

Bauld went over the plan
with his girlfriend in a hotel
room, but she was hesitant.
They argued and she finally
agreed to go through with it,
the statement said.

Statement

The statement claims Gah-
nise called the victim and told
him to pick her up, and that
he and Bauld waited in some
bushes near the Island Seas
armed with a fake gun
wrapped in a towel. When
Gahnise arrived with Bain,
the two men accosted the offi-
cer, robbed him of his ATM
card, got the pin number, put
him in the trunk of his car,
and went to Commonwealth
Bank in the Sea Horse Plaza,
the statement said.

McPhee said he covered his
face with a black shirt and
tried to withdraw money from
Bain’s account, but was
unsuccessful.

Bauld then went in and
withdrew $1,000 cash from the
account.

They went to Boulevard
Service Station with Bain still
in the trunk.

They put gas in the vehicle
and drove over the bridge.
McPhee said Bain pleaded
with them to let him go.

Bain told them that he
would not report the matter
because he was a police offi-
cer and was ashamed. McPhee
said he did not know Bain was
a police officer at the time.

He told Bauld to let Bain
go, but Bauld threatened to
also put him in the hole if he
did not assist him in killing
Bain.

Sgt Rolle said McPhee told
him that Bain was still alive
when Bauld rolled a large
stone over the hole.

Video

Lawyer Brian Hanna, who
is defending Bauld, asked Sgt
Rolle whether he actually saw
Bauld on a video taken at the
bank. Sgt Rolle said he did
not because the persons on
the video had covered their
faces with a shirt.

Mr Hanna also asked Rolle
if he slapped Bauld and
coerced him into signing a
statement so that the police
would not charge his girl-
friend. Rolle denied hitting or
coercing Bauld.

Mario Gray, who repre-
sents McPhee, suggested that
Sgt Rolle punched his client in
the head, and another officer
poked McPhee in the chest
with a baseball bat.

He further suggested that
Sgt Rolle promised his client
that he would give a deal for
his co-operation. Sgt Rolle
denied the assertions. Mr
Grey also asked Sgt Rolle
whether his client was made
aware of his constitutional
right to speak to an attorney
while in police custody, and
whether this information was
posted in the room where the
men were kept in custody.

Sgt Rolle said he was not
aware if any postings, but said
he had asked McPhee if he
wished to speak with a lawyer,
but the accused declined.

The trial resumes on Thurs-
day. Acting Justice Jethro
Miller is presiding. ca Kemp
and Vernal Collie are the
prosecutors.

MEN KILLED AS CAR PLOUGHS INTO UTILITY POLE NEAR LAKE CUNNINGHAM

Two die after high-speed
police chase ends in crash

A HIGH-SPEED police
chase in the early hours of yes-
terday resulted in the death of
two suspects after they were
involved in a horrific crash.

The men died at the scene
on John F Kennedy Drive
around 3am after their car
crashed into a utility pole near
Lake Cunningham, “cutting the
vehicle in half,” Asst Commis-
sioner Hulan Hanna told The
Tribune. Investigations into the
accident were still underway at
press time last night and the
identities of the men had not
been released. But police
believe the victims may have
been driving a stolen car.

Officers were on patrol on

Fire Trail Road just before 3am
when they spotted a car with
two men near the Texaco Ser-
vice Station. The vehicle
“aroused suspicion” as it did
not have the necessary inspec-
tion certificates, Mr Hanna said.

The officers attempted to
perform a routine “stop and
search” exercise on the 2003
Nissan Sentra, which was bear-
ing the licence plate number
118308. However, the Nissan
sped off down Fire Trail Road.
The police pursued and a high
speed chase led them first onto
Gladstone Road, then onto
John F Kennedy Drive, Asst
Supt Walter Evans said. Short-
ly after turning onto the road

BAHAMAS HOTEL, CATERING AND ALLIED WORKERS UNION
\ 2 » s .
A-Team leader Nicole Martin declared hotel union president

‘A-TEAM’ leader Nicole
Martin has again emerged vic-
torious, having been declared
president of the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union for the second
time this year.

Ms Martin was forced to give
up her seat when the elections
of May 28 were declared null
and void by a Supreme Court
order. However an over-
whelming number of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU) members who
cast their votes on Tuesday
again chose Ms Martin and the
‘A-Team’.

Ms Martin was thrilled with
the result, and said she felt it
was a validation of her initial
victory 60 days before.

She has become the first
woman president in the history
of the union, established more
than 50 years ago, and she
approached the election with

Seaman dies after
diving accident

ROYAL Bahamas Defence
Force marine seaman Charles
Heastie died on Tuesday
night following a diving acci-
dent two weeks ago.

Mr Heastie, 21, fell into a
coma after a scuba diving
accident during a RBDF
training exercise on Wednes-
day, September 17. He was
swimming laps in one of the
community pools in South
Beach with several other offi-
cers when he failed to surface.
His comrades rushed to pull
him from the water and per-
form cardiopulmonary resus-
citation (CPR) while they
waited for an ambulance to
arrive. The marine was rushed
to Doctors Hospital where he
remained in a coma for nearly
two weeks.

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HOTEL union members vote.

confidence under the slogan,
‘Lets do it again’.

A total of four teams ran for
leadership of the 5,000-mem-
ber union, the largest union in
the country for hotel and cater-
ing industry employees.

Tyrone Butler, leader of the
“M Group”, graciously accept-
ed defeat, while Team
Redemption leader Sidney
Rolle said he was disappoint-

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leading to Lynden Pindling
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ver of the Nissan lost control
of the vehicle and crashed into
a utility pole.

Thrown

Police said the two passen-
gers were thrown from the car,
which was “completely man-
gled” in the crash.

Witnesses said the Nissan
“split the pole in two.”

The two men are the coun-
try’s 38th and 39th traffic fatal-
ities for the year so far. Just 10
days ago, one-year-old Randia
Dean and her 20-year-old aunt

ed by the loss as he had expect-
ed to win the election this time.

He thanked members in
Grand Bahama and Cat Island
who voted for him.

Kirk Wilson, head of Team
Deliverance, warned he may
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bers of his team were not
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Mr Wilson, former first vice-
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master








































































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Politics turned dangerous in US

I HATE TO write about this, but I have
actually been to this play before and it is
really disturbing.

I was in Israel interviewing Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin just before he was assassi-
nated in 1995. We had a beer in his office.
He needed one. I remember the ugly mood
in Israel then — a mood in which extreme
right-wing settlers and politicians were doing
all they could to delegitimize Rabin, who
was committed to trading land for peace as
part of the Oslo accords. They questioned his
authority. They accused him of treason. They
created pictures depicting him as a Nazi SS
officer, and they shouted death threats at and even his character all you want. I know
rallies. His political opponents winked at it politics is a tough business. But if we destroy
all. the legitimacy of another president to lead or

And in so doing they created a poisonous to pull the country together for what most
political environment that was interpreted by Americans want most right now — nation-
one right-wing Jewish settler as a license to building at home — we are in serious trou-
kill Rabin — he must have heard, “God will ble. We can’t go 24 years without a legiti-
be on your side” — and so he did so. mate president — not without being

Others have already remarked on this swamped by the problems that we will end
analogy, but I want to add my voice because up postponing because we can’t address
the parallels to Israel then and America them rationally.
today turn my stomach: I have no problem The American political system was, as the
with any of the substantive criticism of Pres- saying goes, “designed by geniuses so it could
ident Barack Obama from the right or left. be run by idiots.” But a cocktail of political
But something very dangerous is happen- and technological trends have converged in
ing. Criticism from the far right has begun the last decade that are making it possible for
tipping over into delegitimation and creating the idiots of all political stripes to overwhelm
the same kind of climate here that existed in and paralyze the genius of our system.
Israel on the eve of the Rabin assassination. Those factors are: the wild excess of mon-

What kind of madness is it that someone ey in politics; the gerrymandering of political
would create a poll on Facebook asking districts, making them permanently Repub-
respondents, “Should Obama be killed?” lican or Democratic and erasing the political
The choices were: “No, Maybe, Yes, and middle; a 24/7 cable news cycle that makes
Yes if he cuts my health care.” The Secret all politics a daily battle of tactics that over-
Service is now investigating. I hope they put whelm strategic thinking; and a blogosphere
the jerk in jail and throw away the key that at its best enriches our debates, adding
because this is exactly what was being done new checks on the establishment, and at its
to Rabin. Even if you are not worried that worst coarsens our debates to a whole new
someone might draw from these vitriolic level, giving a new power to anonymous
attacks a license to try to hurt the president, slanderers to send lies around the world.
you have to be worried about what is hap- Finally, on top of it all, we now have a per-
pening to American politics more broadly. manent presidential campaign that encour-

Our leaders, even the president, can no ages all partisanship, all the time among our
longer utter the word “we” with a straight leading politicians. I would argue that togeth-
face. There is no more “we” in American er these changes add up to a difference of
politics at a time when “we” have these huge degree that is a difference in kind — a dif-
problems — the deficit, the recession, health ferent kind of American political scene that
care, climate change and wars in Iraq and makes me wonder whether we can seriously
Afghanistan — that “we” can only manage, discuss serious issues any longer and make
let alone fix, if there is a collective “we” at decisions on the basis of the national interest.
work. We can’t change this overnight, but what

Sometimes I wonder whether George we can change, and must change, is people
H.W. Bush, president “41,” will be remem- crossing the line between criticising the pres-
bered as our last “legitimate” president. The ident and tacitly encouraging the unthink-
right impeached Bill Clinton and hounded able and the unforgivable.
him from Day 1 with the bogus Whitewater (This article was written by Thomas L.
“scandal.” George W. Bush was elected Friedman —
under a cloud because of the Florida voting c.2009 New York Times News Service).

mess, and his critics on the left never let him
forget it.

And Obama is now having his legitimacy
attacked by a concerted campaign from the
right fringe. They are using everything from
smears that he is a closet “socialist” to call-
ing him a “liar” in the middle of a joint ses-
sion of Congress to fabricating doubts about
his birth in America and whether he is even
a citizen. And these attacks are not just com-
ing from the fringe. Now they come from
Lou Dobbs on CNN and from members of
the House of Representatives.

Again, hack away at the man’s policies

SFirst Baptist Church

289 Market 31. South « P.O. Box N-TS84 © Nassau, Bahamas
THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK |

“God Delights In The Earnest
Prayers Of His People.”

SUNDAY SERVICES
Tam, &00an, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCES JUP0.0.

Observations
regarding the
‘Straw Market’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The following is a compi-
lation of ideas from business
operators between Bay
Street and Woodes Rogers
Walk with our observations
on the straw market:

Because of the nature of
most of the vendors and
their wares — and those
who are not vendors of
straw — and those who
greet and rip off tourists by
welcoming them with a
“free” gift which is taken
back after the tourists refuse
to pay for it, and push drugs,
fake cigars and arrange
assignments for the evening
— and those who do noth-
ing else but hang around the
straw market — and the way
they present themselves and
the image that they present
of the Bahamas, the “straw
market” will never by its
own nature be anything but
a third rate sideshow.

The only way to improve
the situation in town is to
have the “straw market”
moved and monitored.
Maybe Arawak Cay where
visitors can take a short cab
ride and have a total “cul-
tural” experience as in Mex-
ico and several other desti-
nations or in the old customs
building on Prince George
Dock where monitoring of
workers and goods is more
feasible. It would be the first
and the last place for ship
visitors to experience a real
straw market with real
Bahamian made goods —
rather than cheap imports
from everywhere else in the
world sold as Bahamian, and
illegal copies of name brand
bags, wallets, etc. Serious
businesses nearby the cur-
rent straw market are dis-
gusted with having to put up
with the attitudes, of the
slovenliness, the acceptance
of criminal behaviour as an
everyday “cultural” thing —
it should never have been
allowed to pervade our cul-
ture so thoroughly, and it is
time to eliminate it entirely
and thoroughly.

The towns people are
tired of it — the ones who
pay the property taxes, busi-
ness licences and all manner
of other fees are held back
by those who don’t pay and
don’t care — those who feel
that it is their right to ignore

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LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



law and civility and the sen-
sibilities of others.

Before the fire that
destroyed the straw market,
Beaumont House and
Colony Place, the placement
of the straw market and the
annoyance given by the
market people discouraged
continuing foot traffic going
west beyond the market
itself, and as a result all busi-
nesses from Market Street
going west were severely
negatively affected by the
halt in the flow of pedestrian
tourist traffic. Should the
straw market return to mid-
downtown the same would
happen again. When the
shopping and commercial
extension is expanded going
east of Rawson Square and
the pedestrian flow pools
further in that direction, any
such blockage as a straw
market returning to mid-
town would isolate anything
west of it. This would be
another nail in the coffin for
businesses and further thin
out any potential business
that might make its way
through the straw market
gauntlet. As it is, our tourists
are a fickle and untrusting
of the unfamiliar, they dis-
like confrontation with loud,
aggressive people and will
return to the haven of their
ship at the first feeling of
discomfort. This suits the
ships nicely as they are guar-
anteed more on board
spending!

Putting this straw market
and these people who man it
and hang around it back in
the centre of prime business
area of the capital will again
lower our credibility of
being a serious business cen-
tre and show the world that
a few loud, rude people get
in the way of true progress
in providing and maintaining
our destination as a thing of
beauty and business. It will
show the world that our
town and our attitude
towards international com-
mercial acceptance and our
intentions for international
recognition and success is
hardly more than a fifth rate
joke. We will never progress
as other nations do and we
must look forward. We are
already way behind the
mark, the rest of the region
take serious positive and
competitive steps to get
ahead, we seem quite satis-
fied by happily ignoring the

shambles that currently exist
and allowing a slap-happy
attitude towards regional
competition. If it were not
for the proximity of the
USA little dirty Nassau
would have long been lost
in the dust. It is imperative
that the presentation of our
downtown showpiece be
alive, strong and purpose-
ful. Should we allow the
straw market to go back to
the centre of town we might
as well throw in the towel
and give up as the rats will
be running the city with
rudeness, carelessness, dis-
gusting attitudes with unpo-
liced lawlessness — and the
feeling that they can — and
they do — get away with
everything that only goes to
destroy rather than enhance
life. The beauty that exist-
ed here when we first
became a tourist destination
is sadly gone, and along with
that the attitudes of helpful-
ness, pride and honesty.

Please put something
worthwhile in the old straw
market space — to be com-
petitive we must show our
best. Commercial buildings
and a beautiful cool area to
offer respite is what is need-
ed there. We have a lot of
catching up to do, and the
straw market does not
belong there. Those who are
“working” there and those
who hang around there
preying on tourists and near-
by businesses tend to
destroy any prospects of
improvement, and as much
as they are happy to live in
their filth, they are not hap-
py until they drag all sur-
rounding businesses down
to their level.

Progress nationally or
with individual businesses is
impossible with this type of
overwhelming negativity,
and should the market not
be removed from the down-
town area, our lack of plan-
ning and foresight will seal
our fate and we will deserve
to drown in the squalor and
results of our short sighted-
ness that I assure you will
come to pass. We should
look towards greater sub-
stance by improving our
tourist product perhaps we
can also improve our tourist
quality and regain some
pride in our attitudes and
surroundings. Thank you for
your space and time.

THE BUSINESS OPER-
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with this for far too long.

Nassau,
September, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AN estimated 32,000 chil-
dren, students and elderly peo-
ple burdened by the cost of
medication for chronic diseases
will soon be eligible to get them
for free from both government
and private pharmacies.

This was revealed as parlia-
mentarians yesterday began
debate on the Chronic Disease
Prescription Drug Plan, which is
set to entitle certain people to
get previously costly prescrip-
tion medications and medical
supplies at no cost.

Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, stating that it is gov-
ernment’s intent to ensure all
Bahamians have “full access to
quality and affordable health-
care,” described the drug plan
as the first step by government
towards the introduction of a
comprehensive, universal health
care plan that covers the cost
of not only medication, but oth-
er key healthcare needs.

The drug plan — supported
yesterday by both government
and opposition MPs, despite
some reservations — is expected
to need $5.4 million in funding
per year in its first phase, to be
provided in part by contribu-
tions by employers and employ-

ees equivalent to one per cent
of their insurable wage.

Ninety-three medications
which treat 11 different Chron-
ic Non-Communicable Diseases
(CNCDs) — arthritis, asthma,
breast cancer, diabetes mellitus,
glaucoma, high cholesterol,
hypertension, ischaemic heart
disease, major depression,
prostate cancer and psychosis —
will be accessible through the
plan.

National Insurance Board
Pensioners, those on NIB retire-
ment benefits, those on Nation-
al Insurance invalidity benefits,
children under the age of 18 and
young people up to the age of
25 in full time education suffer-
ing from these diseases are eli-
gible under the first phase.

Highlighting the significance
of the legislation, Dr Minnis
noted that one in three people
in the Bahamas suffer from a
CNCD, 48.5 per cent of all hos-
pital beds are occupied by peo-
ple suffering from these diseases
or associated problems and 60
per cent of all deaths are direct-
ly linked to CNCDs.

At present, the financial bur-
den on those who have to buy
medications to treat these dis-
eases is huge, suggested Dr
Minnis, as is the strain placed
on healthcare services and the
economy when businesses see

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

_ he! —
MINISTER of health Doctor Hubert Minnis in the House yesterday.






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Debate begins on drug plan

employees fall sick and insur-
ance premiums rise in line with
greater demand for treatment
for such conditions.

Pineridge MP Kwasi Thomp-
son noted that the strips and
syringes alone required by a dia-
betes sufferer can amount to
$1,500 a year.

Which medications and con-
ditions will be covered in the
first instance under the initial
phase of the plan was deter-
mined “scientifically” by a
group of medical professionals,
not by the Minister of Health,
and will be reviewed at and
adjusted at various stages, Dr
Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said that while he
always fully supported the prin-
ciple of a comprehensive health-
care plan, the advice of experts
suggests such a plan would not
be “sustainable” at present.

“These same consultants rec-
ommended that the National
Health Insurance plan be intro-
duced in a phased approach
rather than comprehensively
and this is what we are tabling
with the drug plan,” he said.

He added that under a future
phase of the plan, 48,000 people
are anticipated to benefit, as all
employed and self-employed
people, voluntary contributing
people, the indigent and public
service employees will join the
list of those able to access to
free medications.

Aside from treating the
symptoms of CNCDs, Dr Min-
nis said a key part of the Chron-
ic Disease Prescription Drug
Plan will be promotion efforts
aimed at raising awareness
about the need for healthy
lifestyles that can help reduce
the likelihood of a person suf-
fering from such a condition in
the first place and which can
help educate those who suffer
from CNCDs in how to best
manage their condition.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

IN THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 24,
2009, Chinese People’s Libera-
tion Army soldiers march dur-
ing a training for China’s 60th
anniversary military parade at a
military base in Beijing, China.
China's capital was wrapped in
tight security and thick fog
Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009, as
police blocked off Tiananmen
Square, the Forbidden City and
other popular tourist landmarks
ahead of a massive parade on
Oct. 1 marking 60 years of
communist rule.

(AP Photo)






































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Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is critical.
If you or your loved ones have questions about
this disease, there are answers.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical
Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with
two of the world's most renowned specialists on
Friday, October 2, 2009. The clinics are open to the
public.

The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur Porter
PC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA

Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer
Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also
the current Director General and CEO of McGill
University Health Centre and author of more than 300
articles on cancer research.

Dr. Karol Sikora
MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM

Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The
Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's
first independent Medical School at the University of
Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used
cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the
United Kingdom.

The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two
medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the
American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO)
and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western
Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification.

For more information,
Centreville Medical Pavilion

please contact: 502-9610.
e 72 Collins Avenue

Chinese Embassy
holds reception
at Sheraton Hotel

THE Chinese Embassy held
a reception at the Sheraton
Hotel last night to celebrate the
60th anniversary of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China.

A massive celebration in
Tian'anmen Square, Beijing, at
which President Hu Jintao will
give a keynote speech, will also
be held on October 1 in com-
memoration of the landmark.

A military parade and mass
pageant will follow, according
to a spokesperson for the 60th
National Day celebration
preparation committee of the
Beijing municipal government.

The parade will highlight
China’s achievements in the
defence sector over the past six
decades and showcase its reso-
lution to safeguard world and
regional peace and stability, the
spokesperson said.

The mass pageant will
involve about 200,000 citizens
and 60 floats, and will be held
under the theme: "Motherland
and I Marching Together".

The spokesperson said that
later that night, a gala event at
Tian'anmen Square will feature
“colourful performances and a
splendid fireworks display”,
with senior party and govern-
ment leaders present.

On September 30 a huge
reception, hosted by the State
Council, will be held in the
Great Hall of the People.

From October 1 to 3, major
parks in Beijing are to host par-

"We will try our best
to create a festive
environment at an
economical cost.
Preparation is going
on smoothly, we will
make sure of a suc-
cessful celebration."

a
ties and functions to celebrate
National Day.

In addition, an exhibition
highlighting China's progress
during the past 60 years will be
held in the Beijing Exhibition
Centre near the city zoo over
the last two weeks in Septem-
ber.

Also during that time, a
grand musical, "Road to
Revival", with a cast of about
3,200, will be staged at the
Great Hall of the People. It will
depict the past 169 years of Chi-
nese history chronologically
from the Opium War to the
present.

"We will try our best to cre-
ate a festive environment at an
economical cost," said the
spokesperson. "Preparation is
going on smoothly, we will
make sure of a successful cele-
bration."

The Chinese Embassy in
Nassau will be closed until
October 5.

A BANQUET is
held marking the
60th anniversary
of the founding
of the People’s
Republic of

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7



Millions of dollars expected to be saved in water costs a year

Gena Gibbs/BIS Photo











A BEC WORKER carefully excavates around electrical lines to make
room for WSC to work and replace the old pipes and infrastructure.



WITH five million imperial
gallons of water estimated to
be lost every day to due to
leaks, Water and Sewerage
Corporation engineers and
technicians have been working
late into the night repairing and
stabilising the 83-year-old
underground pipes in New
Providence.

The Corporation expects to
save millions of dollars a year in
water costs and significantly
increase its revenue intake fol-
lowing the system upgrade.

“The sewerage system was
built back in 1926, so the infra-
structure we are renewing is old
and fragile,” said Phenton Ney-
mour, Minister of State in the
Ministry of the Environment.

“It’s also time to repave
Shirley Street and this project
extends from Village Road to
Frederick Street and is expect-
ed to be completed in Decem-
ber 2009. So while the works
are being carried out, we will
improve the drive.”

Since the project started on
August 31, the Corporation has
updated a third of the aging
pipes to save Nassau residents
from paying for lost gallons of
water, much of which is barged
in from Andros.

The Corporation estimates

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water losses of up to five mil-
lion imperial gallons per day.

“By correcting the leaky
pipes, every one million gallons
daily of lost water - that is
equivalent to almost $3 Million
annually in additional cost for
water purchases - will be
saved,” said Mr Neymour.
“And if this one million gallons
daily of water is sold, the addi-
tional revenue would be more
than $5 million annually.

Challenges

“Water and Sewerage has
faced a number of challenges
due to the age of the infra-
structure that translates to non-
revenue water.

“Water is produced and lost
before it reaches the customer
or is billed to customers,
through either leaks, theft, or
metering inaccuracies.”

Leslie Hutchinson, senior
engineer of the Project Man-
agement Unit at the WSC, said

they are working with Bahamas
Hot Mix and Bahamas Elec-
tricity Corporation to complete
the government’s plan to repair
the water system and resurface
the roadway.

“Our focus is on the water
service lines and the sewer lat-
erals,” said Mr Hutchinson.

“Ninety per cent of our leaks
are on service lines.

“This project addresses
renewing the service saddles in
direct contact with the pipe and
the actual service lines that go
out to the various properties.

“We are also addressing the
main sewer lines that tie into
corners.”

The WSC took special mea-
sures so that environmental
protection procedures are fol-
lowed.

They also wanted to ease the
inconvenience to the driving
public.

“There is a very good traffic
management plan and the trac-
tor is taken care to minimise

the amount of dust,” said Mr
Hutchinson.

“We also display signs that
tell the drivers to slow down
because there is road work
ahead.”

Mr Neymour said the Cor-
poration pays careful attention
to the choice of their materials
and to installing ducts around
the service lines so that when
the road paving takes place, it
eliminates the threat of dam-
age to those service lines.

“We have a coordination
committee that ties the project
together, where the utilities cor-
porations share plans with each
other about the project.”

Minister Neymour said he is
pleased with the efforts of the
contractors so far.

“We received no complaints
in respect to any detrimental
effects to the environment.
Contractors are quick to repair
any damage to property and
maintain good customer rela-
tions,” he said

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



a BY ae) Me)


























BY KHYLE QUINCY
PARKER

Press Attaché

Embassy of The Bahamas

(Price Reduced)

HAILED for her foresight
and leadership skills, and for
positioning the Bahamas as a
voice to be heard internation-
ally on public health matters,
Chief Medical Officer Dr Mer-
celine Dahl-Regis accepted the
Pan American Health Organi-
sation Award (PAHO) for
Administration for 2009.

The PAHO award commit-
tee noted that Dr Dahl-Regis
was awarded for her contribu-
tion to healthcare management
and research, and to medical
education in primary health-
care.

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from Argentina, Bolivia and
the United States, the commit-
tee also cited her leadership in
institutionalising public health
surveillance across all of the
Bahamas and in evaluating and
redefining the parameters for
Caribbean cooperation in
health. The award was given at
a special reception held in
Washington, DC, last week dur-
ing a meeting of the 49th
Directing Council of the
PAHO.

Dr Dahl-Regis said the
award was an honour not only
for her, but for those who work
in public health, “particularly
the women, and my country,
the Bahamas.”

“T think it’s very special to
be recognised in such an are-
na,” she said.

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Trinity Methodist Church

Teachers, Students and Parents

| Trinity Methodist Church held ite annual Back-to-School Sunday on

=

==

September 13, with a special Worship Service followed by a biuncheon. As
usual, the focus was on teachers, students and parents, with prayers being
offered for all as the new echool year has started.

There are thirteen teachers who are a part of the Trinity Family, serving in
various public and private schools, all af whom were present. They were
given a gift along with words of appreciation and encouragement. Special
tribute was paid to Sharon Wilson, a member of the Trinity Family all her
life, on her appointment as Principal of St. Andrew's School. She is the firat
| fermale to hold this position

All of the students were presented a gift - this year aluminum water bottles
were piven, in support of using less plastic and practicing a safer and
healthy lifestyle. Parents, while not given a gift, were included in words of
encouragement, appreciation, and challenge. The entire oe
enjoyed the luncheon after the service in the Fellowship

Teachers and students participated in the Worship Service by serving aa
ushers, reading the Scripture lessons, as well as sharing reflections on |
school life. Six young students (from preschool through grade 7), along

with one student from grade 12, and an administrator with the Ministry of |
Education, all spoke. Special music was a ee of the service, featurin
solos by students Carrington McKenzie and Osano Neely, and instrumenta

pleces by fautiat Sharmond Smith, and Trinity's organiat, Kendrick
Coleby, on the piano.



Rev. Bill Higgs presents a gift

to Mins. Sharon Wilson



More of the students, inchading puest
soloists Osane Neely (front row, left] and
Carrington McKenzle
(front row, third from the left)

The teachers of Trinity Methodist Church

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

During her formal remarks,
she said that public service and
public health have been the
most rewarding experiences of
her medical career.

“As T accept this award, I do
so remembering that I did not
accomplish this on my own,”
Dr Dahl-Regis said, lauding her
parents, mentors, family and
friends.

“T envisage a public health-
care system where it is second
nature for practitioners to put
their clients first, where prac-
tice is based on evidence rather
than economics, where preven-
tative healthcare has become
the flagship of healthcare sys-
tems globally, providing equi-
table, culturally relevant care.”

Also at the special ceremony
was Labour and Social Devel-
opment Minister Senator Dion
Foulkes. He described Dr
Dahl-Regis as a “daughter of
the soil,” and spoke of her
“tremendous investment in
advancing the health and well-
being of the people of the
Bahamas, the Caribbean and
the world.”

“Dr Dahl-Regis, because you
are at the helm as the Chief
Medical Officer of the Com-

Chief Medical Officer receives award















MINISTER of Labour and
Social Development Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes (right)
shares a light moment
with Chief Medical Officer
Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis
(centre) and Director Gen-
eral of the World Health
Organisation Dr Margaret
Chan. Dr Dahl-Regis won
the Pan American Health
Organisation/World Health
Organisation Award In
Administration for 2009.

monwealth of the Bahamas,
and because of your proven
commitment to preparedness,
prevention and people, we
sleep at night when the chal-
lenges of hurricanes, malaria,
SARS, tuberculosis, dengue, A
HIN1 and other diseases threat-
en to destabilise our economy,
quality of life and overall well-
being,” he said.

Dr Dahl-Regis’ leadership
has been recognised through-
out the region, as recently as
the caucus of CARICOM Min-
isters of Health a week ago,
where references were made to
her active engagement in
addressing the health chal-
lenges faced by the region.

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UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

OTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS on

(1) Preliminary Cetermination on Types of OSligations on Bahamas



Telecommunications Company Ltd (BTC) under Section 116(3) of the
Communications &4ct 2009,

(2) Preliminary Determination on Types of Obligations on Cable Bahamas Ltd under
Section 116[9) of the Communications Act 2009

(3) Oraft Guidelines on Accounting Separation and Cost Accounting to The Bahamas
Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC)

(4) Draft Guidelines on Accounting Separation and Cost Accounting te Cable Bahamas Ltd {OBL
(5) Graft Guidelines on Access & Interconnection
The Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URICA) is pleased to invite comments

from interested partes on its consultation documents and related guidelines released
on 30 September 2005. Interested parties can give comments by 16 November 2008.

Copies of the consultation documents can be obtained
from the URCA office in New Providence or downloaded
from the URCA website at www.urcabahamas.bs and
comments emailed to info@urcabahamas.bs

TAKE PART IN THE NEW REGULATORY REGIME.
YOUR OPINIONS COUNT.
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9



Friday premiere of

TaDa’s new video













NATIONAL YOUTH MONTH

Showcasing contributions of the young

BY ERIC ROSE

A HOST of activities to
“highlight, recognise and
encourage the contributions of
young Bahamians” will be held
as the Bahamas celebrates
National Youth Month in Octo-
ber, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said.

“It is our objective to show-
case and celebrate the many
positive youth role models
within our communities, while
encouraging our unattached



Raymond A Bethel/BIS

PICTURED from left are executive director of Junior Achievement
Bahamas Lionel Elliott; Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister; Acting Director of Youth Gregory Butler; Permanent Secre-
tary Archie Nairn; youth officer Patty Miller, and youth representative
Deon Ellis.


























young men and young women
to focus on getting involved in
meaningful programmes and
projects in our communities,”
Mr Bannister said.

“The month set aside for
youth will also provide an
avenue for young people to
express their views on national
issues that concern them.”

Held under the theme ‘Cele-
brating Youth - Our Pride, Our
Investment and Our Heritage’,
this year’s activities will also
seek to “motivate our youth to
focus on positive alternatives,”
the minister said.

“The youth of the Bahamas
are indeed our pride,” he said
last week during a press con-
ference. We are investing in

ie

THIS Friday, the
Uptown Lounge will
play host to the premiere
of TaDa’s new music
video “No One Else”
from her album “I’m
That Girl.”

As with her previous
videos - the seminal
“TaDa” and “Keep
Moving” featuring Tia
Thomas and Saba - the
new release is a sleek,
quality production that
sets a new standard for
Bahamian music videos.
When TaDa’s self-




Division, is working with
Bahamian youth leaders to
facilitate and equip them to be
able to deliver character-build-
ing programmes throughout the
country. New initiatives will be
implemented this year, includ-
ing the highlighting of a
“unique” workshop hosted by
the Johnson and Wales Uni-
versity on October 21, he said.

“This event will allow all
interested young Bahamians
the opportunity to be exposed
to an institution that specialises
in hospitality and culinary ter-
tiary education,” Minister Ban-
nister said. “My ministry

believes in providing this type
of exposure to as many young
Bahamians as possible. We

desire to see more youth to
begin now to maximise their
potential in order to be in a

position to take full advantage
of new careers as they become
available,” he said. “As the
economy of the Bahamas
improves, so will new doors be
opened.”

This year’s Youth Band
Encounter will be held in Gov-
ernor’s Harbour, Eleuthera on
October 24. “This is the first
time my ministry has embarked
upon a project such as this,” Mr
Bannister said. “We look for-
ward to the fellowship and
camaraderie between New
Providence and Eleuthera
bands that will demonstrate the
powerful positive influence of
music.”

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SONGSTRESS:
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ere mce anni Ate}

them and we look for great
returns on our investment in
the future.”

Mr Bannister said that the
Ministry of Youth, Sports and
Culture, through its Youth



























of producing a quality
product, they had no
other choice but to do so.

With New York City
as her backdrop, TaDa’s
new video offers a
sophisticated, soulful and
polished package.

The song was pro-
duced by another local
artist, “Sketch”, whose
reputation for creating
sounds comparable to
any other international
producer is growing.

One would be tempt-
ed to be call TaDa a per-
fectionist, and any prod-
uct with her name
attached to it, is one of
high quality. Tickets for
the music video’s pre-
miere are sold at the
Jukebox.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE








ow 1E5 COMAy, fe,
5 Oy,



OF THe pAHAM”

TENDER NOTICE 01/09

EXTERNAL AUDIT AND ADVISORY SERVICES

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas ("the Commission") is a statutory body established
in 1995 pursuant to the Securities Board Act, 1995, which was repealed and replaced by the
Securities Industry Act, 1999 (the SLA). The Commission is responsible for the administration of
the Investment Funds Act, 2003 (the IFA) and the SIA pursuant to which it supervises and
regulates the activities of the investment funds, securities and capital markets. The Commission,
having been appointed Inspector of Financial and Corporate Service Providers January 1, 2008,

U

is also responsible for administering the Financial and Corporate Service Providers Act, 2000. AUTHOR Utah Taylor Rolle paid a courtesy on the Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister, on Thursday, September 24, 2009 at the Ministry’s conference room.
From left are Author Utah Taylor Rolle; Minister Bannister; and Permanent Secretary, Archie Nairn.

The Commission invites proposals for the provision of external audit services in respect of its
financial statements prepared in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards for
the year ended December 31, 2009,

Contact the Commission for supplemental information as follows:
E-mail = infojd’sch.gow-bs
Tel: 242-356-6291/2
Fax: 242-356-7530

Address tenders te:

The Executive Director
Securities Commission of the Bahamas
3" Floor Charlotte House
Shirley and Charlotte Streets
P.O. Box N-8347
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for detivery to the Commission is on or before October 15, 2009
Tender submissions should be marked 2s follows:
Tender (11/109
Proposal to provide external audit servicet to. the Commission
Jor the year ending December 3], 21009

The Commission reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals.



Colinalmperial

The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray
Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis
Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams
Ruthesa Glendera Dean
Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Alma Clarke

Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes
Bettrah Belanda Mitchell
Bridgette Neely

Carl Rudolph Johnson

Charlene Dawkins-Bevans

Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Clarence Rolle
Cleaver W. Robinson
Cordero Farrington
Coresa Deveaux
Cynthia Wilson
Dedrick Storr
Derek Nottage
Desmond Pinder
Douglas Richards
Francina Scott
Francis Clarke
Frederica Hamilton
Fredie Smith
George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle
Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee
John A. Webb
Kardeo Heild

Kevin Remond Culmer
Kirkwood Campbell
Laytoya Cargill-Gray
Leila Wood

Lorenzo M. Carroll
Malriae Lauree Ferguson
Mavis Vanderpool
Melissa Evans
Michael White
Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Mervin Dean

Mervin |. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
Pamela Taylor

Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Sharon Creary

Sharon Hanna

Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

Stanley Wood

Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha O Brien
Trevor Mcneil Basden
Valentino Gay

Velma Cox

Veronica Samuel

Virginia P. Culmer Woodside
Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills



‘Controversy TV’ host Taylor-Rolle

presents Minister with his book

BIS PHOTO: Raymond A Bethel

UTAH Taylor-Rolle, one of two hosts _ life-long search for his biological father,
of the popular show “Controversy TV” whom he finally found in 2008. The
on Cable 12, recently paid a visit on Min- author and television producer said he
ister of Youth, Sports and Culture — has only known his father - Charles Rolle,
Desmond Bannister and presented him the assistant deputy superintendent at
with his book “The Tears I Cried.”

Mr Taylor-Rolle’s book chronicles his already has a great relationship with him.

SCHOOL SUPPLIES DONATION

Her Majesty's Prison - a short time, but he

BUILDING E

4

THE WOMEN of Evangelistic Centre Ministries
made a donation of school supplies to the Oakes
Field Primary School. They presented the sup-
plies to the school’s principal Beryl Gray and
described the donation as an act of community
service. Christopher Smith, Director for Security
for the Ministry of Education, was also on hand
for the photo along with the school’s students.

PHOTO: Patrick Hanna

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 11



Ex-Chief Justice sworn in as judge on International Criminal Tribunal
ee ieee el



JUDGE BURTON HALL takes the
oath of office during a ceremony
to mark his appointment to the
International Criminal Tribunal
for the former Yugoslavia.

President of the Interna-
tional Criminal Tribunal for
the former Yugoslavia,
Patrick Robinson, described
Judge Burton Hall's contri-
butions to the justice system
of the Bahamas as “invalu-
able” and said his election as
a permanent judge rewards
an “illustrious” career in the
public service.

“T have no doubt that he
will also contribute immea-
surably to the international
community as a judge of this
tribunal.

“Tam indeed grateful for
his undertaking of this ser-
vice.”

Judge Hall thanked the

government of the Bahamas
for its support and for “releas-
ing” him. He also thanked the
international community for
his appointment.

“T trust that the work that I
have done before would
indeed enable me to fulfill the
awesome responsibilities
attendant upon the work of
this tribunal,” he said.

Oath

Sir Burton was one of three
permanent judges to take
their oath of office on Sep-
tember 2 at a special ceremo-
ny in The Hague, where the
International Criminal Tri-

It's official: Kenred Dorsett
to run for PLP chairmanship

FROM page one

office yesterday.

He added that his vision for the party "is
practical, results oriented and inclusive.

"The ethos of ‘Progress Now’ is teamwork.
We need all PLPs to recommit themselves to
our party and work together with a single pur-
pose of restoring the PLP as the government of
the Bahamas," said Mr Dorsett, who said he
supports incumbent party leader Perry
Christie.

Former PLP chairman Bradley Roberts was
among the small group of supporters at yes-
terday's press conference and threw his sup-
port behind Mr Dorsett's bid.

"T think Mr Dorsett is a good man. He's an
outstanding young man, check his credentials
and history with the party," Mr Roberts told
The Tribune after the announcement.

But Mr Roberts, who recently said he had
not ruled out the chance of running for the
post again, remained vague when asked if he
had decided not to challenge Ms Hanna-Mar-
tin himself.

"A lot of people are asking me to do so
(run for PLP chairman). I am still praying over
the matter," he said.

Meantime Mr Dorsett said his team will ful-
ly unveil its platform for change on Sunday. He



said the plan
will focus on
ten areas:
Timely and
aggressive
messaging,
membership
relations,
reviewing the
roles of leader
and chairman
and revitaliz-
ing our
branches,
campaign
education and
training,
recruitment
and candidate
selection,
financing and sustainable funding, empowering
of youth and women, recognising and empow-
ering party supporters, family island develop-
ment and participation.

Several positions within the PLP will be
contested going in to its convention later this
month. So far only one person — lawyer Paul
Moss — has officially launched a campaign
against party leader Perry Christie.

The PLP convention is slated for October 21
to 23.

Glenys Hanna-Martin

bunal for the former
Yugoslavia (ICTY) is based.

Judges Guy Delvoie of Bel-
gium and Howard Morrison
of the United Kingdom were
also sworn in. They were
appointed by Secretary-Gen-
eral Ban Ki-Moon and have

replaced Judges Christine
Van Den Wyngaert, Lord
Iain Bonomy and Mohamed
Shahabuddeen.
Established in 1993, the
ICTY was set up to try per-
sons for serious violations of
international humanitarian

OF THE BAHAMAS

law committed in the territo-
ry of the former Yugoslavia
since 1991.

Judge Hall served for eight
years as Chief Justice of the
Bahamas. He resigned as
head of the judiciary on
August 23, 2009.

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FROM page one

McKenzie, Kayla Bodie and
Ian Neely.

The union also argued that
the bank breached its man-
date by making "unauthorised
payments" from its bank
account and is calling for an
account and inquiry into its
account at the bank.

The writ also directs Bank
of the Bahamas to pay the
union whatever sum is found
due to the plaintiff after the
mentioned inquiry. The union
is also suing for interest, costs
and whatever relief deemed

just by the Supreme Court.

Back in August, around
$665,000 was transferred from
the union's bank account at
the Harrold Road branch of
Bank of the Bahamas.

The transfer requests were
reportedly made by union
assistant treasurer Samantha
Gray, trustee Ian Neely and
purported assistant secretary
general Raymond Wright
days after Nicole Martin was
ousted as the union's presi-
dent.

According to a newspaper
report, Mr Wright was to
receive $73,600 of the request-

ed money, while Ms Gray and
Ms Neely were to receive
$21,450 and $30,026 respec-
tively. The transfer also
included $140,000 in legal fees
intended to cover the chal-
lenge led by then first vice-
president Kirk Wilson, which
nullified the May election that
brought Ms Martin to power.

In August, Bank of the
Bahamas maintained it acted
"legally and in full accordance
with its fiduciary responsibil-
ity in executing disburse-
ments, following authorisa-
tion by and instructions from
the union."

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one



attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from the 55-year-old
actor. Bridgewater is also
charged with abetment to
extort.

Mr Travolta testified yes-
terday that on January 16, he
was informed by his longtime
friend and employee Ronald
Zupancic that there was a
threat against him and a
demand for money. Accord-
ing to Mr Travolta, he was
told that the threat was
regarding the “release paper”
he had signed in the Bahamas
and that if $25 million was not
paid certain stories connected
to the document would be
sold to the media. When
asked by lead prosecutor and
Director of Public Prosecu-



LAWYER for Travolta Michael
McDermott outside court.

SENATOR Pleasant Bridgewater
smiles as she leaves court.

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what kind of stories he
referred to, Mr Travolta
replied:

“Stories that would imply
that the death of my son was
intentional and I was culpa-

COM Le Ded
SPECIAL CALL
MEETING

To: All Members of National Workers
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San Salvador and Exuma.

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Societies Act 2005, notice is hereby given that all
members of National Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited (NWCCU) are urged to
attend a Special Call Meeting on Friday,
October 2nd, 2009 at the British Colonial
Hilton, Salon BC commencing at 10:00am to
discuss and vote on important matters pertaining to

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The closure of the East Bay Branch, effective

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the requirements during the time of election.

Tender
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads,

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telephone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed ta:
Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
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Deadline for delivery to BEC:
Sth October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:
Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.



CAMERAMEN line the street outside the courts yesterday




co

as John Travolta goes

ble in some way.” Mr Travol-
ta said that he told Mr Zupan-
cic that he would speak to his
attorney about the matter and
that they needed to do what-
ever they needed to do to
investigate the situation. He
further testified that he later
spoke to Michael McDermott
— one of his attorneys — who
gave him certain instructions.

“T gave him permission to
go to the authorities based on
the information he told me,”
Mr Travolta said.

Under cross-examination
Mr Travolta admitted that he
did not know Bridgewater nor
Lightbourne, although he had
met Lightbourne before. Mr
Travolta also admitted that
no direct threats or demands
for money were made by
either of the accused although
Lightbourne’s attorney Carl-
son Shurland pointed out that
his client had a telephone
number for Mr Travolta’s
office in California, which he
had obtained from the
“release” document.

Mr Travolta also admitted
that he could not say “cate-
gorically” that what his rep-
resentatives had told him was
correct.

Following Mr Travolta’s
testimony, PLP Senator
Allyson Maynard-Gibson was
recalled to the witness stand
as the brief taped conversa-
tion she had with Bridgewater
on January 17 was played in
court. During the telephone
conversation Mrs Maynard-
Gibson told Bridgewater that
she had spoken to Mr McDer-
mott who she said was flying
to Nassau to speak with her
(Bridgewater) specifically.
Mrs Maynard-Gibson asked
Ms Bridgewater if she could
give McDermott her cellular
phone number and Bridge-
water agreed to her giving Mr
McDermott both her cell and
office number.

“My people have been call-
ing me today and telling me
they have a deadline,” Bridge-
water told Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son. Mrs Maynard-Gibson
told her that the fact that Mr
McDermott was coming
showed to Nassau that the
matter was being taken seri-

demand



“Stories that
would imply that
the death of my
son was
intentional and I
was culpable in

some way.”
——E—E>E>EEEEL_ _ EL _ SI

John Travolta

ously. Responding to a ques-
tion raised by the jury as to
whether Mrs Maynard-Gib-
son had ever told Bridgewater
that what she was doing was
illegal she responded: “T said
Pleasant you know what you
are doing is wrong.” Mrs
Maynard-Gibson said that she
told Bridgewater this while
en route to the airport fol-
lowing a meeting with her in
Freeport. According to Mrs
Maynard-Gibson, Bridgewa-
ter said that her client’s posi-
tion was that he could have
her or a “jungalist” lawyer.
When asked why she had not
mentioned this in her state-
ment to police Mrs Maynard-
Gibson responded by saying
that while making her state-
ment she was only speaking
specifically to her client’s con-
cerns.

Attorney Michael McDer-
mott also took the witness
stand yesterday. He told the
court that after receiving a
telephone call from attorney
Michael Ossi, he made a
phone call to West End and
Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe. Mr McDermott told
the court that he “initially
spoke to a male and subse-
quently a female.” That con-
versation he said lasted for
about 18 minutes. Mr McDer-
mott further testified that
while in Nassau on January
18 around 9.17pm, he had a
taped telephone conversation
in his room (328) at the Sher-
aton Hotel, Cable Beach. Mr
McDermott said that he had
given police authorisation to
tap his telephone and that the
conversation lasted for about
15 or 20 minutes. Mr McDer-
mott further testified that on
January 19, he met with
Bridgewater in his hotel room
for about 40 minutes.

Mr McDermott is expect-
ed to be recalled this morning
when the trial continues
before Senior Justice Anita
Allen.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner, Neil
Brathwaite and Garvin
Gaskin are prosecuting the
case. Ms Bridgewater is rep-
resented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr
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TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 13
SPORTS



A PORTRAIT of the
late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson (below)
was mounted at the
entrance to Loyola



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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



It seems as if Boxing Commission has

Mackey’s future hanging in the balance
STUBBS

ONE minor boxing title is
supposed to lead to a major
title as a boxer tries to
improve on his world rank-
ing.

In the case of Jermaine
‘Choo Choo’ Mackey, the
Commonwealth Boxing
Council has decided to strip
him after he fought and lost to
Haitian-born Canadian Ado-
nis ‘Superman’ Stevenson on
Saturday night.

The fifth-round technical
knockout forced the move by
the CBC as Mackey had a
mandatory defense of his
British Commonwealth title
fight lined up against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium at
the end of the month.

Mackey, 29, risked it all
when he journeyed to Mon-
treal, Canada, to face the

undefeated Stevenson in the
co-main event for the vacant
World Boxing Council’s
International title.

Now his future is also in
jeopardy because of the loss.

Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion’s chairman Pat “The Cen-
treville Assassin’ Strachan, in
a press release yesterday, indi-
cated that after their meeting
on Tuesday, they unanimous-
ly decided to act on the rec-
ommendation of the medical
committee, headed by Dr
Munir Rashad, as to when
Mackey will be allowed to
fight again.

The release further indicat-
ed that a medical team will
meet with Mackey today for
the purpose of an examina-
tion. Rashad is then expected
to report the findings to the
commission and a decision

pr charts

) meing

— A - ave oth



OPINION
a _

will be made on how long
Mackey will be mandated to
refrain from engaging in a
boxing match.

It seems as if the commis-
sion has Mackey’s future
hanging in the balance.

But is it fair to Mackey,
who should have the right to
choose to either hold onto a
title, relinquish it and goa
totally different route, if he
so desires.

The commission has a big
decision ahead of them. So
does Mackey and his han-
dlers, Ray Minus Jr and
Michelle Minus of First Class
Promotions.

Maybe, it might be in the
best interest of all concerned
if everybody can come togeth-
er and sort out the dilemma
because whatever decision is
made, the future of one of the

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country’s most outstanding
professional fighters is on the
line.

I can understand all of the
concern the commission has
had about Mackey taking the
fight with his British Com-
monwealth title defense on
the horizon.

He’s the only Caribbean
who holds one of the titles in
the organisation and many
had him held in high esteem
because of his achievement.

By the same token, you
really couldn’t fault Mackey
for taking a gamble and going
after a more prestigious title
that would have helped him
to climb up the ladder in the
WBC’s rankings.

It’s not that the British
Commonwealth title would
have weighed in more than
the WBC’s International title,
when consideration would
have been given to Mackey
in the future for a possible
title shot.

Mackey would have had to
be seen by the WBC in order
to secure a ranking. So it
might have been a good move
by his camp. It was just unfor-
tunate that he was unable to
complete the fight after get-
ting cut over his right eye.

Over the years, Mackey is
not the first Bahamian to
have taken a chance to go
after a title fight and lost. ’m
sure he won’t be the last
either.

It’s just that he had a little
more at stake at the time than

any of the others.

Hopefully it won’t be a set-
back that will hinder him
from making a comeback, if
not this year, next year when
he’s given the green light by
the commission to step back
into the ring.

HOME

CELEBRATIONS

THE Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture is prepar-
ing to bring Team Bahamas
members home for celebra-
tions following for their per-
formance at the 12th IAAF
World Championships in
Athletics.

The championships were
held in August in Berlin, Ger-
many, but the celebrations
have been delayed until this
month because some of the
athletes were still competing
on the international circuit.

The ministry, however, has
not yet disclosed the specific
plans for the celebrations,
which are not expected to be
as elaborate as those in the
past. Part of that is a result of
the current worldwide eco-
nomic crisis.

But whatever happens, the
athletes deserve a reception,
especially veteran sprinters
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
and Chandra Sturrup, who
helped the Bahamas secure
the two medals — silver and
bronze.

We just have to wait and
see what type of celebrations
will be staged.



ADONIS Stevenson (left) punches Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey dur-
ing their WBC International match last Friday in Montreal. Stevenson
won the title with a fifth round TKO...

‘Choo Choo’
taking ‘a couple
of weeks off’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

HAVING been down the
same road before, Ray Minus
Jr said there’s no concern
about Jermaine “Choo Choo”
Mackey getting stripped of
his British Commonwealth
super middleweight title.

On Tuesday, the Common-
wealth Boxing Council
stripped Mackey of the title
and has declared it vacant
after Mackey lost Saturday
night to Haitian-born Cana-
dian Adonis Stevenson in his
bid for the World Boxing
Council’s International
Championships in Montreal,
Canada.

Mackey, 29, was scheduled
to make a mandatory title
defense against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the end
of the month at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

It would have been Mack-
ey’s first defense since win-
ning the title on July 19, 2008,
on points over Michael Gben-
ga at the KGLI Gymnasium.

But on Saturday night,
Mackey suffered a technical
knockout 20 seconds into the
fifth round after a cut he
received from the third round
by Stevenson was too severe
for him to continue.

It was the second time
Mackey has lost in Canada.
In fact, all four of his losses
since he turned pro on Feb-
ruary 28, 2004, with a second
round KO over Eugene
Williams have been on the
road.

Minus Jr, who was in
Mackey’s corner during the
fight, said it was an opportu-
nity for Mackey to improve
on his ranking in an attempt
to get closer to a world title

shot.

“We don’t have no gripes.
We feel okay with the ruling.
We see the sense in it,” Minus
Jr said. “We expected it. We
knew ahead of time that we
would have jeopardised the
title if he had lost.

“But we are excited, we are
moving forward and we are
looking at getting back at it as
soon as we can.”

During his days as a ban-
tam weight and lightweight,
Minus Jr also held the British
Commonwealth titles, but he
relinquished them when he
took the opportunity to go
after a world title.

Minus fought and lost in
three attempts.

Mackey, who had to get
some stitches to close up the
cut after the fight, was given a
45-day suspension in which
he is not allowed to fight,
which ruined his chance to
defend his British Common-
wealth title against Charles
Adamu of Ghana at the end
of the month.

“He’s going to take a cou-
ple of weeks off, then we will
get him back into the gym,”
Minus Jr said. “Hopefully he
will be ready to fight again in
December.

“We’re just going to keep
fighting and try to line up a
lot of matches as soon as pos-
sible and get him on a nice
win streak again.”

As the manager of Mackey,
Minus Jr said they just wants
to box and whenever the
opportunity for another title
shot comes up, they want to
be in a position to go for it.

“We have our goals and we
hope that we can get the
opportunity,” he said. “We
love boxing and we just want
to take advantage of every
opportunity to box.”

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THE TRIBUNE

S
i
T

PAGE 14



PAGE 15



FAMILY MEMBERS of the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson attend his
memorial service at Loyola Hall. Shown (I-r) are Ferguson’s son
Alex, his wife Mary and daughter Anne-Marie. See photos on page 73...

Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson was a
mentor and
father figure

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHILE many people
remember Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson as an extraordi-
nary sportsman and educa-
tor, members of the
Bahamas Association of
Basketball Officials
(BABO) think of him as a
mentor.

Tony Williams, president
of the BABO, said the late
Ferguson was responsible
for grooming him and a
number of the persons who
are officiating basketball
today.

Ferguson, 71, will be laid
to rest today in the Catholic
Cemetery on Tyler Street,
Chippingham, following his
2pm funeral service at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street.

According to Williams,
Ferguson was instrumental
in getting him certified as an
international referee.

“As the president of
BABO, Vince made sure
that I went to Jamaica to
take the course and I
obtained my license through
him,” he said.

As vice president serving
under Ferguson during his
tenure as president,
Williams said if it wasn’t for
his mentor and friend, he
probably would not have
still been involved in the
association.

“T remember asking him
one question: ‘Why can’t
referees associate with play-
ers?’ If you know him as a
disciplinary person, he asked
me ‘no you tell me why.’
That was the beginning of
our relationship and through
his persistence and his disci-
pline, I am still involved in
the sport today as a refer-
ee.”

Having Ferguson as a
mentor had its positive side
as Williams said he was not
just taught the game, but he
was given the opportunity to
go throughout the Bahamas
and even the Caribbean
lending his expertise.

“He took me under his
wings many days under the
tree at R M Bailey as he
made it a point to discipline
me,” Williams said. “I
always remember one thing
he used to tell me and that is
you can’t always be on top
of the fence.

“And every time he saw
me, he used to say: ‘Oh,
you’re still on top of the
fence, until I became the
president of BABO that I
really realised what he was
trying to say about what he





TONY WILLIAMS

meant about being on top of
the fence.”

Not only did he help to
groom him, but Williams
said he remembered how
Ferguson took him, Keith
Reid and Rodney Johnson
to his house and instructed
them on life.

“He encouraged me to go
back to school and further
my education and he also
encouraged me to get mar-
ried,” said Williams, who
looked at Ferguson as a
father figure.

“He was just a tough char-
acter and I’m really sad that
he is gone. He also used to
say to me ‘Little Tony, who
are going to inherit the land.
I guess what he meant is
now is my time to step up to
the plate and run the associ-
ation.”

If there is any regret,
Williams said it’s probably
the fact that members of
BABO and other officials
didn’t spend more time
being instructed by Fergu-
son on the game.

“Just before his passing,
we were thinking about hav-
ing a Vince Ferguson Day,”
Williams pointed out. “But
when we went to see him, he
said he wasn’t up to speed
and he wasn’t feeling well.”

Four or five days later,
Williams said they got the
sad news that Ferguson had
passed away.

“We should have done it
earlier. All we can do is say
thanks for all that you’ve
done for the association,”
said Williams, to Ferguson’s
family that includes his wife,
Mary and children Anne-
Marie and Alex.

As a personal note,
Williams said he’s grateful
for the manner in which Fer-
guson impacted his life so
that he is now able to make
a contribution to the sport.



-

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HURSDAY, OCTOBER 1,

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non

A NUMBER of sporting
and educational personalities
attended a memorial service
for the late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson (portrait top right)
at Loyola Hall on Tuesday
night. He was 72.

Ferguson reportedly died
at his home after a massive
heart attack. He was suffer-
ing from prostate cancer.

His funeral service is sched-
uled to be held 2pm today at
St Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Street. Ferguson will be
buried in the Catholic Ceme-
tery on Tyler Street.

He is survived by his wife
Mary and two children, Anne-
Marie and Alex. Among
those who paid tribute to Fer-
guson during the memorial

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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Hundreds flock to
memorial service

service was Jackie Wright, a
member of the Former Past
& Present Professional Base-
ball Players Association that
was headed by Ferguson.
Others included Martin
Lundy, director of sports in
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture, who worked
with Ferguson at St
Augustine’s College, Keith
Thompson, who worked with
Ferguson at Aquinas College,
Ellen Adderley, who worked
with Ferguson in the
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion, and Val Maura, of Us
Too Cancer Support Group.
The service was conducted
by Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, a
former educator who also
worked with Ferguson.

© 2009 Starbucks Cofiee Company. All rights reserved. FAL109-06614



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
ea TRIBUNE

Dus!





Resort predicted
to have $54-90m
economic impact

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

A MAJOR mixed-use
resort project is projected to
generate an annual economic
impact ranging from $54 mil-
lion to $90 million for the
Bahamian economy, its prin-
cipals told Tribune Business
yesterday, adding that the 291
lot sales they have closed have
brought “hundreds of visitors
to Long Island”.

In a series of e-mailed
answers to Tribune Business’s
questions, Ian Moorcroft, one
of the principals behind the
Port St George project, ear-
marked for a site next to Long
Island’s existing Stella Maris
subdivision, said being debt
free had been “critical” to its
ability to weather the global
recession and credit crunch.

“Many projects have run
into difficulties because
bankers withdrew lines of
credit or, worse still, recalled
outstanding loans,” Mr Moor-
croft told Tribune Business.

“Real estate development
is long term and capital inten-
sive. Consequently, most
developers are reliant upon
lines of credit, and many have

been heavily geared in recent
years. Because the Port St
George project is free of any
external debt we did not suf-
fer from the same difficul-
ties.”

Mr Moorcroft added that
the economic impact analysis
conducted for Port St George
by Norton Consulting, and
submitted to the Bahamas
Investment Authority as part
of the project applications,
predicted that the develop-
ment would have an annual
economic impact of between
$54 million and $90 million.

Although unable to con-
tract any lot pre-sales at Port
St George until subdivision
approval was obtained, Mr
Moorcroft said the develop-
ers had instead been able to
sell real estate in the neigh-
bouring Stella Maris subdivi-
sion.

“Our original target was
300 sales and we have closed
291 to date, so we are very
pleased with the sales results.
These sales have resulted in
hundreds of visitors to Long
Island, most of whom stay at
the Stella Maris Resort Club,”

SEE page 7B

90-day year end audit
file reform is ‘touchy’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Securities Commis-
sion yesterday said it would
“in very short order” send
what it hopes is the final draft
of the Securities Industry Act
and its accompanying regula-
tions off for ministerial
approval, the most “touchy”
reform proposal being the
requirement for public com-
panies to file audited finan-
cial statements within 90 days
of year-end.

Hillary Deveaux, the Com-
mission’s executive director,
told Tribune Business that the
regulator was hoping the new
Act and regulations, which
are badly needed to mod-
ernise the sector, “will be
brought into force before the
end of the year”.

The timing, though, will
depend on what happens
when the Ministry of Finance
and Attorney General’s
Office review the final draft of
the legislation and regulations
that will be presented to them
by the Securities Commission.

Mr Deveaux told Tribune
Business that most of the
industry feedback on the pro-
posed reforms centred on the
Securities Commission’s pow-
ers, enforcement, disclosure,

* Securities Commission
to send final Securities
Industry Act draft to
government ‘in very
short order’, and hoping
passed by Parliament
before 2009 is out

the “ongoing requirements of
public companies”, and the
move to file the audited finan-
cial statements of Bahamian
public companies within 90
days of year-end, rather than
the current 120 days.

The reforms are also
proposing that Bahamian
public companies file their
unaudited quarterly manage-
ment accounts within 60 days
of period end, rather than the
current 90 days they are
allowed.

“The touchy one really was
the requirement to have
audited financial statements
move from a 120-day filing to
a 90-day filing, and there’s
going to have to be a major
discussion,” Mr Deveaux told
Tribune Business.

“T think our approach to
dealing with the transition

SEE page 10B

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SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

y

Sandals ‘110% committed’
to Emerald Bay’s success

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

andals has “stayed
true” to its pro-
jected $12 million
investment in
upgrading the newly-
acquired Emerald Bay
resort, its chief executive
said yesterday, with 80 con-
struction workers now on
site and the chain “110 per
cent committed” to making
the development a success.
Adam Stewart, Sandals
International Resorts’ chief
executive, told Tribune
Business in an interview
from London that Sandals
has “no doubt we can make
this resort a success”, with
construction work having
already started on creating
the one-acre pool and deck
for Sandals Emerald Bay.
“We have about 80 peo-
ple on site,” Mr Stewart
said. “It goes from a low of
about 70 to a high of about
220 [on the construction
side]. That is estimated.
“Construction has started
on the pool, which is the
largest infrastructure we are
doing. We are on target to
open on January 22.”
Mr Stewart said the $12

ARTIST’S impression of the one-acre pool and deck at Sandals
Emerald Bay
* Resort chain ‘staying true’ to $12m upgrades
budget for newly-acquired Exuma property
* Renovations to include one-acre pool and
deck, and largest jacuzzi in Caribbean
* 80 construction workers already
on site to work on pool, with numbers
to range from 70 to 220 peak
* Sandals’ operational team based at Emerald
Bay for past 12 days, analysing plans
million budget Sandals had
set for much-needed
upgrades and renovations

at Emerald Bay had
“stayed true”, with the

pool, landscaping, interiors
and furnishings forming the
bulk of that investment.

SEE page 9B



‘Captain of the ship must calm the passengers’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

PRIME Minister
Hubert Ingraham must
speak more frequently
about what his govern-
ment is doing to arrest
the ailing economy, a for-
mer Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce president
said yesterday, warning
that business and
investor confidence could
be further damaged in
the absence of clear

direction from the administration.
Arguing that the Bahamas “needs a captain



D’AGUILAR

* Ex-Chamber chief says PM needs to
speak more frequently on economic
matters to bolster public, investor
and business confidence

president, told Tribune Business: “The full
effects of this recession are beginning to be
felt.”

“It’s beginning to flat line a little, and the
mood is very glum and gloomy,” Mr D’Aguilar
said of the Bahamian business community.
“The mood in the country is really sour and
really gloomy.”

Tribune Business previously revealed that
many businesses, especially those in the retail

of the ship who can keep the passengers calm”,

Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s

SEE page 4B

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Hotel's
Occupancy
‘holding’ at
70 per cent

Resort chain’s chief
executive says entire
company ‘never had to
work harder in our lives’
to stimulate demand

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Sandals Royal
Bahamian resort’s occupan-
cy levels are “holding” in the
70 per cent range, the resort
chain’s chief executive told
Tribune Business yesterday,
adding that the whole com-
pany has “never worked hard-
er in our lives” to maintain
business levels in the face of
the global recession.

Speaking to Tribune Busi-
ness from London, Adam
Stewart, who is also the son of
Sandals Resorts Internation-
al’s chairman, Gordon ‘Butch’
Stewart, said the company’s
Nassau-based resort was like-

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THE TRIBUNE





ee emt)

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/CLE/gen/01745
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
KASSON K. NEWTON
Defendant
To: Kasson K. Newton

TAKE NOTICE that:

1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited in the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of
Summons filed on the 22nd of October
2008 being Action No. 2008/CLE/
gen/01745, wherein the Plaintiff’s claim is
for the total sum of $23,294.64 which
represents the principal sum of $10,752.09
together with accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $11,526.62, add-
on charges in the sum of $561.90, and
interest on the said add-on charges in
the sum of $454.03 due under a loan
numbered 1503359.

It has been ordered that service of the Writ
of Summons in the said action be effected
on you by virtue of this advertisement.

You must within 21 days from the
publication of this advertisement inclusive
of the day of such publication, acknowledge
service of the said Writ of Summons by
entering an Memorandum of Appearance
on the Attorneys whose name and address
appear below, otherwise judgment may be

entered against you.

Dated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Target the young
to combat crime

LAST Sunday saw my daughter and I
at the launch of this year’s Junior
Achievement Programme. I was pleas-
antly surprised to see the ballroom at
the British Colonial Hilton filled to
capacity with parents and students alike.

On a Sunday afternoon, to see that
many young people out and, most impor-
tantly, supported by their parents is crit-
ical to developing a successful Bahamas.
Investing in our future is good business
practice, as it ensures continuity of cul-
ture and nationhood. It, in my opinion,
instills the ethics, discipline and quality
assurance necessary to succeed in today’s
global environment. Kudos to the numer-
ous corporate sponsors represented, who
have invested in young people, BTC,
BEC, Deloitte & Touche and the Police
Staff Association, just to name a few.

This ‘standing room only’ turn out was
a pleasant reminder that all is not lost.
Despite the bombardment of negative
news, we must be reminded that these
horrific stories that have filled the head-
lines over the last few years are, in the
first instance, being committed by a
handful of perpetrators. Good news,
however, does not sell, thus the poor
turnout of the media during this event.
Second, many of the crimes today are
being committed by repeat offenders.
Thus I can still comfortably say that it is
not as bad as it may seem, albeit there is
room for improvement.

You might be saying at this point:
What does this have to do with crime
and loss prevention? Where does youth
development and nurturing fit into crime
fighting? Simply put: ‘Everything’. Invest-
ing in these young minds, via pro-
grammes such as Junior Achievement,
the Boys and Girls Brigade /Scouts and
your church’s Sunday school programme,
begins the lifelong molding process nec-
essary to develop good character, ethics
and morals.

This does not mean that none of these
persons will become criminals tomor-
row. However, what we are saying is, as
mentioned, a small majority will fall to
the way side and there is no excuse for
criminal and deviant behavior. I will ven-
ture to say that there is no young person
in this Bahamas, past or present, who
has not been exposed to, or given an
opportunity, to benefit from some posi-
tive programme. Our claim to a Christian

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.
Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

server iSsues.

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.
Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-virus,
data back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these

systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.

Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and

upgrades.

Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network

issues.

Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide

reasoned recommendations.



heritage has ensured that the great
majority have been exposed to church
in some form or the other.

Yet you will see by the statistics that
crime, especially violent crimes, are being
committed by our young people. So, what
has gone wrong? I say nothing!

I say we are experiencing the fact that
we cannot save them all. We live in a
world where some of us will come up
short and not meet the mark. Unfortu-
nately, we are focusing on the failure
and not the successes. I put it to you that
if you train up a child while they are
young, when they are old they shall not
depart from it. This, of course, means
directing their paths at an early stage to
avoid putting ourselves in a position of
trying to correct the decay years in the
making.

We are allowing the fear of crime to
take us down a path of potential desper-
ation and panic, thus reducing our abili-
ty as a society to think of rational solu-
tions. For example, I am a proponent of
the death penalty. Not because of its
deterrent qualities, but because it is ‘pun-
ishment’, simple and straightforward. It is
not ‘problem solving’, ‘ a reduction’ or
‘deterrent’, although if these residual
effects occur then that is an added bene-
fit.

Solutions to our crime problem are
multifaceted. I do not think there is a
magic bullet. Thus the argument that the
death penalty is not going to reduce
crime is very true, as the sentence is only
given after the crime of murder has
already been committed. The ‘penalty’
can only be given after the ‘foul’. To stop
the crime, we must make serious efforts
in assisting our youth ,especially young
men and women, to better manage their
anger and aggression. The cry for more
hanging is, in my opinion, bordering on a
lynch mob mentality, as it is a sign of
desperation and frustration - an emo-
tional grasping at straws. We are attempt-

ing to use punishment as a way to halt to
deviant behavior, as opposed to pre-
venting opportunities for the behaviour
to occur.

What, then, you may ask. Well, I will
not contradict myself. Let us continue
to pray, not for peace, but ways to create
peace. You see, peace and safety do not,
and will not, fall from the sky. We must
create this culture, a society of peace.
This begins with teaching our young peo-
ple structure and order, and demon-
strating the benefits of the same. They
need to understand that rules and regu-
lations lend to a civil society and direct-
ly affect the level of peace a nation expe-
riences.

Now, what about the young adults,
those who are no longer children? Are
we to toss them aside? Well, as the say-
ing goes: “Bend the tree while it is young’.
If we have missed this opportunity, then
a more aggressive bending process needs
to take place. Boat builders who wish to
fashion wood for boats usually expose
the wood to heat/steam andpressure.
Similarly, our young adults who have
fallen by the wayside must be pressured
and exposed to heat that will attempt to
purge the negative tendency. Boot
Camps, which are geared to reintroduc-
ing social and problem-solving skills that
demand team work and group efforts.
We need not wait for them to break the
law, for I believe that by the time they
are actually caught breaking the law they
have gotten away at least ten times
before. Alas folks, as mentioned earli-
er, some will fall to the wayside as the
‘Parable of the Sower’ so clearly illus-
trates.

Remember and support, with your
time and money, the Junior Achievers,
Brigades and Scouts, the numerous pos-
itive youth groups that have proven suc-
cessful. All is not lost

NB: Gamal Newry is the president of
Preventative Measures, a loss preven-
tion and asset protection training and
consulting company, specialising in pol-
icy and procedure development, busi-
ness security reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis management. Com-
ments can be sent to PO Box N-3154
Nassau, Bahamas. or, e-mail
gnewry@gmail.com or visit us at
www.preventativemeasures.net

FOR SALE

60 tonne packaged
Air Conditioning Unit
18yrs old
7’4”° width
6’5”height
33’length

Can be viewed at
Carl G. Treco
Construction

120 Mackey Street South

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

All offers will be
considered!

302-9875

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B





Slow season occupancies down 75 per cent

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

SOME FAMILY Island
resorts have suffered a lower
than average slow season,
down some 75 per cent com-
pared to last year’s 30 per
cent occupancy levels, accord-
ing to the Abaco Beach
Resort’s general manager.
Some properties have closed
altogether for the two-month
slow period.

Bob Kramm said business
was markedly down at many
resorts across the wider
Bahamas, adding that the
economy has everything to do
with it.

Mr Kramm operates the
largest marina in the
Bahamas, and one of Abaco’s
foremost resorts. However,
he said the 25 to 30 per cent
occupancy range his property
has traditionally enjoyed year-
on-year during September
and October has been further
reduced by close to 75 per
cent.

When Tribune Business vis-
ited the property last week,
the marina, typically contain-

ing a mass of pleasure yachts
and sail boats, moored only
several boat spread across its
expanse.

“Normally there are more
boats here,” said Mr Kramm.

Like many resorts, the
Abaco Beach Resort has not
abandoned marketing cam-
paigns despite the financially
straining economic conditions.

According to Mr Kramm,
his resort continues to adver-
tise on the Internet and in
specialist boating magazines.

While some hotels have
been able to stabilise their vis-
itor inflows through targeting
niche markets, others have
used the traditional slow sea-
son to conduct infrastructural
upgrades and expand their
room portfolio.

The Coral Sands hotel in
Harbour Island, North
Eleuthera, is currently con-
structing four new cottages on
their property, which are
scheduled to be open by year-
end.

General Manager, Pamela
Berry, told Tribune Business
that 2009 will be the first year
her resort will be open for the
annual North Eleuthera

NOTICE

to

SBARRO- THE HOME OF FRESH ITALIAN ANT
BAHAMLAN COOKING IN CABLE BEACH,
BAY STREET AND THE MALL AT MARATHON
WILL BE CLOSED ON

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4â„¢ 2009
TO CELEBRATE ITS ANNUAL STAFF FUN DAY

WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCES
CAUSED AS A RESULT OF OUR CLOSING.

Some things just
belong together

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The AnyWareâ„¢ Plus silverware
are CMC PMOL Coe 8] tee
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Regatta. She said the town
council asked if the resort
could be opened, as the regat-
ta often demands much of the
island’s available rooms, with
visitors pouring in from Nas-
sau and other Family Islands.

Ms Berry said Coral Sands’
occupancy levels have been
down like many other resorts
across the Bahamas, but said
the traditionally strong peri-
ods, such as Spring Break and
the August European vaca-
tion season, were marginally
good.

In August, Coral Sands was
also host to a delegation of
Miss Universe contestants,
who dined for lunch and
posed for photos on the beach
adjacent to the resort.

Many resorts across the
Caribbean have resorted to
slashing rates, but many
Bahamian resorts have been
reluctant to do this because
of their high operating costs.

Minister of Tourism and
Aviation, Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, recently said
most Bahamian resorts offer
discounts to residents in an
effort to boost domestic
tourism.

Ms Berry said Coral Sands
will offer a special 20 per cent
off their room rates for this
year’s regatta.

With stopover arrivals to
New Providence down some
14 per cent, Baha Mar recent-
ly had to shut down its Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and
Crystal Palace Casino in order
to reduce operational costs
during the traditionally slow
season.

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Vice President of External
Affairs at the resort, Robert
Sands, said it was still too ear-
ly to say if the closure had the
desired effect, but he revealed
that the resort and casino will
be reopening as planned on
October 5.

“Staff have been gradually
coming back with a larger
build up coming Thursday
and Friday,” said Mr Sands.

According to him, bookings
for the month of October for
the property have been pick-
ing up, though he asserts that
the month will see very soft
occupancy levels.

“We anticipate some good
local business because of local
groups and two political party
conventions during the month
of October, and a number of
gaming events planned for the
week after opening, which will
also stimulate business as well
as local food and beverage
functions scheduled,” said Mr
Sands.

He said all but one of the
resort’s vendors are scheduled
to return, and cab drivers who
were forced to join the Sher-
aton’s queue will now be able
to return to the Wyndham.

Mr Sands contends that
closing the resort for two
months was one of the better
strategic decisions Baha Mar
has made.

“As we review the details

of this event we will be at a
position internally to review
the full impact of the closing,”
he said.

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Ta satisfied!


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





TEAK FURNITURE
%* SALE xx

10-50% OFF

Gifts, Handicrafts & Batik Clothing
Sept. 26th - 24th Oct.

OPEN 10am - 5pm

KURA KURA

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389
1 bik west of Hilton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquoise building, on one way westbound street

Wi

=e FATA






















The Partners and Staff of:

GLINTON

COUNSEL & ATTORMETS-AT-LAW

are pleased to announce that

PATRICK H. RYAN

Sheraton appoints travel sales chief

The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort
has appointed André R. Newbold to the
newly-created position of business trav-

el sales manager.

Based in Nassau, Mr Newbold will be
responsible for deveoping new and exist-
ing corporate accounts throughout the
Bahamas. He will also attend trade
shows, community events and industry
meetings on behalf of the resort to devel-
op new client relationships and business

FROM page 1B

sector, saw year-over-year
sales decreases of anywhere
between 15 per cent to 30 per
cent in August, the largest
comparative declines against
2008 to date.

This newspaper under-
stands that trend has carried
over into September, tradi-
tionally one of the weakest
months for the economy as it
is the low point in the tourism
season. Tribune Business has
been told that some business,
including retailers of high-end
products, have seen sales
declines ranging from 30 per
cent to 50 per cent.

| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

Has joined the firm as an Associate Attorney in the Litigation Department




with effect from July 2000. Mr. Ryan eared his LLB from the University




of Buckingham, Buckingham, England in 2006 and was called to the Bar of




England and Wales in 2007 and the Bahamas Bar in September 2009. We




welcome Mr, Ryan to our team and look forward to him further enhancing




our ability to provide clients with efficient and effective legal services.














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leads.

industry.

“September is always a par-
ticularly gloomy month, but
when you hear the Minister
of Tourism and there’s noth-
ing positive coming out, and
group bookings are down it’s
not a good sign,” the former
Chamber president said.

He added that “for the life
of me, I don’t understand why
they do not want to do what is
necessary” to enact the
reforms necessary to enable
the Bahamian financial ser-
vices industry to compete with
its offshore rivals, even though
Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, had been “pleading,
screaming” for this to happen.

“T can’t for the life of me
understand why they are not

Mr Newbold comes to the Sheraton
Nassau Beach Resort with ten years of
luxury resort experience and over 20
years of experience in the hospitality

For the past 10 years, he served as the
director of sales at Sandals’ Royal
Bahamian Resort Spa & Offshore Island,
where he acted as the department head
for sales and marketing and weddings,

and supported the general manager on

operational issues. He also orchestrated
numerous domestic and international
events ranging from 100-1000 attendees.

Prior to that, Mr Newbold spent 10

years as director of sales and marketing

jumping on that,” Mr
D’ Aguilar said of the Gov-
ernment and financial services
reform.

“T feel like we’re on a ship
that, when you hit turbulence
and go through a rough peri-
od, the captain calms every-
one down. I feel it’s impor-
tant that our leaders try and
calm everyone down and say
what’s positive.

“We just don’t hear from
the captain of the ship. You
don’t hear anything, and
everyone’s thinking what they
want to think. This blackout
on everything is not good.”

The former Chamber pres-
ident added: “Hubert Ingra-
ham’s approach of not saying
anything unless you’ve got

LOT FOR SALE

ASEVEN THOTSAND (7,000) 54. FT.
SINGLE/MIULTI FAMILY LOT Wi OCEAN VIEWS IS FOR
SALE IN GAMBIER ESTATES (OPPOSITE COMPASS
POINT). THE LOT COMES WITH TWO SETS OF
TWO RENDITIONS) FOR A SINGLE FAMILY HOME.
OWNER HAS CLEAR TITLE, ASKING $170,000,00 (CROSS)

CALL S75 - O75

NOTICE

All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited
to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009
p.m. in the Board room of the Michael Eldon
Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

YACKY REALTY and CONSTRUCTION INC.
Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the
above company commenced on the 29th day of
September, 2009. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of
Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets,
Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator

of the Company.

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

*Baautiful Pristing Beaches

at the Sheraton British Colonial Beach
Resort, where he managed and super-
vised sales and marketing functions for
the 300-room hotel and supported the
general manager on operational issues.

something to say is not nec-
essarily a good thing. You
need the captain of the ship
to keep the passengers calm.

“But you’re not hearing
anything. The Hubert Ingra-
ham of 2009 is not the Hubert
Ingraham of 2002..... ’m sure
he has a plan, knows what he’s
doing, got a direction he’s
going in, but no one knows.
That’s why we got blindsided
in Abaco [on BEC’s Wilson
City power plant], why we got
blindsided on the Arawak Cay
port, because no one is say-
ing anything.”

Apart from keeping the
Bahamian public abreast of
developments, Mr D’Aguilar
said the information vacuum
was also hurting confidence
in the business and investment
community, often the most
critical factor in untying the
purse strings.

He added that, in the
absence of a clearly defined
policy and strategic direction
outlined by the Prime Minis-
ter, no information was being
given to the business commu-
nity since no other minister
was releasing pertinent details.

However, in an address to
the Conference of the Amer-
icas on Tuesday, the Prime
Minister said that while the
Bahamas’ government debt to
gross domestic product
(GDP) ratio was likely to rise
above 50 per cent, his admin-
istration was committed to
retreating with “all deliberate
haste” from such a high debt
level as soon as possible.

Mr Ingraham said the

Bahamas will also move swift-
ly to create “even more head-
room to see us through the
next inevitable downturn on
the assumption that no mira-
cle economic model will
emerge to relegate economic
cycles to the dustbin of histo-
ry.”
He added: “These lessons
indicate the following: We
must make an honest assess-
ment of the risks posed to our
global economic and financial
systems and avoid placing
blame where it is not due; we
must have a better means of
assessing and responding to
systemic risk in the global
financial architecture and one
that demonstrates equity in
calling all economies, those of
the developed and develop-
ing world, into account.

“We must promote greater
equity in the international
development process so as to
make the prospects for sus-
tained growth of the world
economy more enduring and
widespread, and we must bet-
ter co-ordinate global
resources in order to max-
imise use. This is especially
true with respect to those
resources channelled by the
multilateral lending and aid
agencies.”



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5B





EU nations to hammer
out financial oversight

By AOIFE WHITE
AP Business Writer

BRUSSELS (AP) — Euro-
pean Union finance ministers
will hammer out a new finan-
cial oversight framework for
Europe during a two-day
meeting a week after the
world’s rich and developing
nations pledged that they
would not allow a return to
banking as usual.

At talks Thursday and Fri-
day in Goteborg, Sweden, EU
ministers will also start map-
ping out how they should start
withdrawing economic stim-
ulus packages that are helping
to pull Europe out of the
worst recession since the
1930s.

Last week’s Group of 20
summit in Pittsburgh called
on countries to make sure
their regulatory system for
banks “reins in the excesses
that led to the crisis.”

Putting that into practice in
Europe means adding a new
EU layer to a patchwork of
financial supervision across
the bloc’s 27 countries.

It could also see a new
energetic push for more coun-
tries to sign up to curbs on
bonuses that encouraged
banks to make risky invest-
ments. Sweden, which will
lead the talks as the current
holder of the EU presidency,
said EU guidelines on bonus-
es “need to be sharpened”
and possibly made binding
across Europe.

France, the Netherlands
and Germany have already
drafted new rules linking
banking pay to performance
but Britain — home to
Europe’s biggest trading cen-
ter — has been slower to
move. Banks claim that bonus
curbs will make it harder for
them to attract top-drawer tal-
ent.

Governments will hold
their first talks on a new econ-
omy watchdog, the European
Systemic Risk Board, which
would be tasked with moni-
toring emerging risks to the
economy such as banks run-
ning up large exposure to loss-
es, swelling asset bubbles and
any worrying trends on finan-
cial markets.

The board would issue rec-
ommendations and warnings

Ty

For the stories
TAT Ta Ca A
Wr ES
Te ES



JEAN-CLAUDE TRICHET

to national governments —
but would not be able to force
them to act. European Cen-
tral Bank President Jean-
Claude Trichet insisted Mon-
day that the board would be
far from toothless because it
would require governments
or national supervisors “to

take remedial action or oth-
erwise to justify why they
have not acted.”

The ECB, which sets bor-
rowing costs for the 16 nations
that use the euro, will help
run the new board and its
president will likely lead it.
This has triggered concern
among EU countries outside
the eurozone that this will
give the ECB a say over coun-
tries that don’t use the euro.

To allay this, EU officials
have hinted that the governor
of the Bank of England,
Mervyn King, could become
the board’s deputy. Britain is
outside the eurozone.

The new oversight frame-
work also foresees new bank-
ing, insurance and market
authorities gaining some pow-
er to rule against national
supervisors in some cases —
and only if most other EU
nations agree.

Governments are likely to
want to limit the circum-
stances under which the EU
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STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with items left in storage:

* RUDOLF K. KING
* MARVETTE GAITOR

* GRAFTON IFILL
* DENNIS MCKENZIE

them. The EU executive sug-
gests it should only be as a
last resort to resolve a dispute
between different national
supervisors or to order a
nation to bring technical
financial standards in line with
others.

EU ministers will also try
to set out principles for how
they should end stimulus pro-
grams that are stoking growth
this year and next year and
how they should start paying
off mounting public debt and
swelling deficits caused by res-
cuing banks and spending to



stave off the downturn.

The recession also high-
lights one of Europe’s longer
term problems: people who
lose their jobs may never find
another one because rigid
labor conditions make com-
panies reluctant to hire peo-
ple they can’t easily fire.

With unemployment at a
10-year high and still rising,
ministers will talk about dif-
ferent ways to reduce lasting
unemployment. Denmark has
promoted a model with more
flexible contracts where work-
ers get regular skills training

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Sweden is also keen for EU
nations to strike a deal on
how much Europe should
pledge to developing nations
to help them tackle climate
change — a package that the
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secure an ambitious deal to
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e Associated Press writer
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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

APPLICATION SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database

infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company as

required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server related

issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.
Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.

Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.
Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new

technologies.

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THE TRIBUNE

Y, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B

Resort predicted
to have $54-90m
economic impact

FROM page 1B

Mr Moorcroft told Tribune
Business.

This newspaper reported
last week that many of these
sales had been to European
buyers and international
sports personalities. Right to
Buy agreements to secure lots
on the main Port St George
site have been entered into
with the purchasers, who must
pay a 10 per cent deposit once
subdivision drawings are fin-
ished, the balance being due
when infrastructure is com-
pleted.

Although no sales can be
concluded in the absence of
subdivision approval, the Port
St George developers said

then: “A high conversion rate
of right to buy agreements
into sales agreements is
expected, as the price at
which right to buy holders are
entitled to purchase is
extremely attractive. This has
led to some right to buy
agreements changing hands
for a considerable premium.

“Whilst the pre-sales from
the right to buy agreements
are expected to result in

approximately 25 per cent of

the plots at Port St George
being sold at a substantial dis-
count, the early revenue gen-
erated is expected to more
than cover the costs of infra-
structure to the entire site,
including construction of the

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marina and golf course.”

When asked why Port St
George would succeed, when
many other Family Island-
based resort projects had
failed to match expectations,
stalling or going into hiber-
nation until new financing
became available, Mr Moor-
croft told Tribune Business:
“Planning, quality and pru-
dent finances.

“Every facet of the project
has been fastidiously
researched, and we are work-
ing with industry leaders in
every field. Whilst we are
keen to make progress as
quickly as we can, it's also
important to get things right.

“We have all heard of pro-
jects where construction has
begun only to be halted after
a few months for one reason
or another. We are deter-
mined that Port St. George
will not become another
name on the list of such pro-
jects. By following the proper
procedures, without cutting
corners or making plans based
on assumptions when, with a
little more time, they can be
based on facts, we believe that
Port St George will be a
resounding success.”

Mr Moorcroft told Tribune
Business that Long Island’s
“spectacular beauty” but,
more importantly, its people,
would be what makes Port St
George special and differen-
tiates it from rival resorts.

“The Long Islanders work
ethic is known throughout the
Bahamas, but it is their gen-
uine warmth and friendliness
that is striking to the visitor.
When checking in at the Stel-
la Maris Resort Club guests
don't even need a room key,
so safe and secure is the envi-
ronment. I know of no other
hotel anywhere in the world
where that is the case,” Mr
Moorcroft said.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking

operations, seeks to

Risk Manager

identify

suitable candidates for

the position of:

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the
organizational or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business
decisions through the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:

° Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program
in a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the
organization while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best

practices;

Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing
and estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the

business;

Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in

carrying out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;

Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;

Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;

Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and
implementing systems, policies, and procedures for the identification,
collection and analysis of risk related information, that is comparing
estimated risks with risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk
management;

Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some
regulatory bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KY C, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
Bank of The Bahamas
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment
Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Or via email to: institutional.leadership@ gmail.com


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
LETTS A

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

2009/CLE/gen/00119

BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
KELPHINE D. JOHNSON
Defendant
To: Kelphine D. Johnson

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Umited in the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on
the 30th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/
gen/00119, wherein the Plaintiffs claim is for the total
5um of $28,367.40 which represents the principal
sum of $15,047.39, accrued interest on the said
principal in the sum of $10,751.51, add-on charges
in the sum of $912.85, and interest on the said add-
on charges in the sum of $1,655.65 due under a loan
numbered 1579053 and the principal sum of $1,118.76
due under a Mastercard No. 5449 68501002 7759.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of
this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

Hotel’s occupancy
‘holding’ at 70 per cent

FROM page one

ly to remain in the 70 per cent
occupancy range “for a little
while” - through the lean
months of September and
October.

“We have had some service
issues within the hotel,” Mr
Stewart said of Sandals Royal
Bahamian. “We have invested
quite a bit in the property
itself in renovations and

upgrades. We could always be
doing better as a property, as
a company.”

He added that occupancy
levels were only one method
of gauging a resort property’s
performance, implying that
Sandals was having to dis-
count heavily on rates and
sacrifice margins to drive busi-
ness to not only the Bahamas
but all its other properties.

“The business we’re get-
ting, you have to look at the
cost of getting it in,” Mr Stew-

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art explained. “The dollars we
have spent in advertising, in
driving demand, in getting
customers to dial the 1-800
Sandals and call their travel
agent...

“This is a very rough year
for all of us. We have never
worked harder in our lives to
keep our hotels in the occu-
pancies we have, from the
chairman - my father - down
to the line staff. We’ve had to
do more work to drive
demand.”

Sandals Royal Bahamian
laid-off some 150 of its then-
650 strong staff in late 2008
in response to the economic
downturn and sharply declin-
ing business levels, before ter-
minating a further 80 work-
ers this year just prior to the
start of the September slow
season.

Despite this, Mr Stewart
said yesterday: “Our occu-
pancies in Nassau are strong
overall. We’re in the 70 per
cents, and are going to hold
there for a little while. Sep-
tember and October are the
two roughest months.

“T don’t think they'll [occu-
pancies] go below the 60 per
cents, which is not great but,

of course, we'd like to remain
in the 80s. It’s very hard to
run Sandals with that kind of
occupancy.”

Mr Stewart praised the
“strong leadership” at San-
dals Royal Bahamian, adding
that they were in contact with
the chain’s head office almost
every day to suggest or work
on some type of initiative to
drive visitor demand.’

“We are not taking our eye
off the ball, and are trying to
drive sales in the UK,” the
Sandals chief executive
added, explaining that as part
of its efforts to stimulate
excitement and demand it had
just signed an agreement to
make every wedding it hosted
a Martha Stewart Wedding.

Mr Stewart also told Tri-
bune Business that Sandals’
business from Canada was
“substantially better than in
the past”, thanks to the work
done by its sales and market-
ing team in that nation.

However, the main issue
remained that “everyone
wants a deal” in the current
recessionary environment,
hence the pressure not just on
Sandals, but the entire resort
industry’s, margins and rates.

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Civil Avintion Gartificate # PFLA-7T468

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Recently Constructed Six-Plex

Five Units:
One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:
Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:
One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should
submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

FROM page 1B

Apart from the pool and
deck area, Mr Stewart said
that when completed, Sandals
Emerald Bay would feature
the largest jacuzzi in the
Caribbean - bigger than the
existing record holder, which
was located at another of its
resorts. Other features includ-
ed an authentic British pub,
swim bar and barefoot
seafood restaurant.

“We feel strongly that we
can do it,” Mr Stewart said,
when asked how Sandals
could make a success of
Emerald Bay, given that the
resort had endured a two-year
receivership after its initial
owners/developers had been
unable to meet debt repay-
ments.

“We gave our commitment
to give 110 per cent and do

our part. We will do our best.
We have no doubt that we
can make this resort a suc-
cess.” Mr Stewart said the
‘110 per cent effort’ commit-
ment had been given to Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and his ministers, likely to
include Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, minister of tourism
and aviation.
Acknowledging that San-
dals had wanted to re-open
Emerald Bay earlier than Jan-
uary 22, 2010, Mr Stewart,
addressing concerns from
some Exumians that Sandals
had been less than frank
about its plans for the prop-
erty, said the chain “cannot
divulge information” before
it had been determined and
it knew what it was doing.
The Sandals chief executive
said the company was “no
more than a couple of weeks

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

away” from being able to pro-
vide Exumians with firm
details on its plans, including
the number of persons it
intended to hire for full-time
operations.

“As soon as we have firm
information, we will let the
community know exactly
what we are doing,” Mr Stew-
art told Tribune Business.
“We will take into account
every member of the commu-
nity. We’re on the brink of
disclosing what we feel” Exu-
mians want to know.

He added that Sandals





“entire operations team”,
including the chain’s director
of operations, general man-
ager and financial controller,
had been based at Emerald
Bay for the past 12 days,
assessing and analysing “every
single detail” of the chain’s
plans for the property.

“This is going to be the first
hotel in Sandals history that
has a dedicated butler for
every room,” Mr Stewart told
Tribune Business, explaining
that Emerald Bay would be
positioned near the peak of
the chain’s resorts, alongside

NOTICE

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT
IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES







THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9B

Sandals Royal Bahamian and
Sandals Royal Plantation.
“This development is almost
like a big country club.”
“We really try to focus on
investing as much as we can
afford back into the physical
plant of our resorts,” he





COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

added. Emerald Bay will be
the second Sandals property
to possess a golf course, after
Ocho Rios, and also the first
one with a marina. It is only
the second 500-acre property
to be included in Sandals
portfolio.

2009/CLE/gen/00007

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division









BETWEEN

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Plaintiff

AND
KIM M. MORLEY

To: Kim M. Morley

TAKE NOTICE that:

Defendant

AND CHARGES 1. An action has been commenced against you
by Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited in the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of
Summons filed on the 6th of January 2009
being Action No. 2009/CLE/gen/00007,
wherein the Plaintiff’s claim is for the total
sum of $15,760.63 due under a Visacard
No. 4539 3850 1006 0033.

It has been ordered that service of the Writ
of Summons in the said action be effected on
you by virtue of this advertisement.

You must within 21 days from the

publication of this advertisement inclusive of
the day of such publication, acknowledge
service of the said Writ of Summons by
entering an Memorandum of Appearance on
the Attorneys whose name and address appear
below, otherwise judgment may be entered
against you.

Itishereby notified pursuanttoregulation 4(10)
(b) of the Airport Authority (Amendment)
Regulations, 2009 that the Airport
Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of
September, 2009 imposed and or varied
fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport as follows:

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Aeronautical Fees

a) Landing Fees increase 23.6%

b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1%

c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%
d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1%

is further notified that the said
imposition and or variation of Fees and
Charges shall take effect at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport ninety days
from the date of first publication of this notice.

Dated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

GN-929

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

VACANCY NOTICE

CHIEF PUBLIC ANALYST, GRAND BAHAMA

FOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD

The Department of Environmental Services invites applications for suitably
qualified individuals for the position of Chief Public Analyst, Grand Bahama.
The Chief Public Analyst reports to the Director or Director.

PUBLIC NOTICE

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:

A Master degree in Chemistry plus a Diploma or Certificate in Microbioloy
and must have membership in a professional organization with (12) twelve
years post graduate experience. Experience with industrial and institutional
organizations would be an asset.

TENDER

Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Telecommunications
Company Limited :

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

Responible for the management and administration of the
Environmental Monitoring and Risk assessment Division,Grand
Bahama

Plans andimplements programs designed to provide for monitoring
activities inGrand Bahama and the Northern Bahamas.
Monitors the effect of industry and provides relevant reports
Coordinates all Environmental Monitoring and Risk Assessment
activities

Serves as the Department of Environmental Services representative
at technical meetins, both local and international as requested.
Provides proposals and recommendations for staff training.
Submit monthly and annual reports on the activities of Environmental
Monitoring and Risk Assessment.

Assist with staff training.

Provides support for Family Island Officers

Ensures the generation of reports of all evaluations and assessment
and provides recommendations for rectification of environmental
nuisances and risks.

Serves as expert witness in court prosecutions.

Evaluates development projects and novel industries.
Provides active support for initiatives enhancing the quality of the
environment and awareness and preparedness for emergencies.
Responds to complaints and issues of technology.

Ensures that testing services are provided as requested.
Fosters public and staff awareness of environmental issues
Any other related duties

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Lim-
ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BIC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 97:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ ond should be delivered to the at-
tention of the “Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO. Applicants who meet the above requirements are invited to forward a resume
and a PSC 7 application by October 5, 2009 to

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,

OR ALL TENDERS

www.btcbahamas.com aa Py |

Director
Department Of Environmental Health Services
P.O. Box SS19048
Farrington Road
Nassau, The Bahamas

a a



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PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Economy dips at 0.7 per cent pace in Q2

By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The
economy shrank less than expected
in the second quarter as businesses
and consumers trimmed their spend-
ing at a slower pace, buttressing
beliefs that the economy is now
growing.

The 0.7 per cent dip in gross
domestic product for the April-June
quarter follows the 6.4 per cent
annualized drop in the first three
months of this year, the worst slide in
nearly three decades. In the final
quarter of last year, the economy
sank at a rate of 5.4 per cent

The new reading on second-quar-
ter GDP, reported by the Commerce
Department on Wednesday, shows
the economy shrinking less than the
one per cent pace previously esti-
mated. It also was better than the
annualized 1.1 per cent drop that
economists were predicting.

The final revision of second-quar-
ter GDP comes on the last day of
the third quarter, in which many ana-
lysts predict the economy started
growing again at a pace of about
three per cent.

"Growth should be solidly posi-
tive," said Mark Vitner, economist at
Wells Fargo Securities.

AUDIT, from 1B

Gross domestic product measures
the value of all goods and services —
from machines to manicures — pro-
duced in the US. It is the best esti-
mate of the nation's economic
health.

A main reason for the second-
quarter upgrade: businesses didn't
cut back spending on equipment and
software nearly as deeply as the gov-
ernment had thought. Consumers
also didn't trim their spending as
much.

But on Wall Street, a surprise drop
in the Chicago Purchasing Managers
Index, considered a precursor to the
national Institute for Supply Man-
agement index to be released on
Thursday, sent stocks reeling. The
Dow Jones industrial average lost
more than 80 points in midday trad-
ing, and broader indices also fell.

Many analysts predict the econo-
my started growing again in the July-
September quarter, due partly to
President Barack Obama's $787 bil-
lion stimulus package and the gov-
ernment's now defunct Cash for
Clunkers programme, which had
ginned up auto sales. It offered peo-
ple rebates of up to $4,500 to buy
new cars and trade in less efficient
gas guzzlers.

Earlier this month, Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke

"We all ardently want to believe
the nation is on the economic
comeback trail. I don't think we
are served by declaring prema-
turely that we're in the clear. In

TIVTToTceTo earl OTOL MCB REwOy Tek a
recommend for now a mindset
of measured optimism."

— Dennis Lockhart, president of
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta



said the recession, which started in
December 2007, is "very likely
over."

But he warned that pain will per-
sist — especially for the nearly 15
million unemployed Americans.

Because the recovery is expected
to slow to a more plodding pace in
the coming months, the nation's
unemployment rate — now at a 26-
year high of 9.7 per cent — is expect-
ed top 10 per cent this year. Econo-
mists predict it will have nudged up
to 9.8 per cent for September when
the government releases that report
Friday.

The economy has now contract-
ed for a record four straight quarters

for the first time on records dating to
1947, underscoring the toll the reces-
sion has taken on consumers and
businesses. Economic activity shrank
3.8 per cent since the second quarter
of last year, marking the worst reces-
sion since the 1930s.

In the second quarter, consumers
trimmed their spending at a rate of
0.9 per cent. That was slightly less
than the one per cent annualized
drop estimated a month ago, but
marked a reversal from the first
quarter when consumers boosted
spending 0.6 per cent.

Many analysts predict that con-
sumer spending will move back into
positive territory again in the third
quarter. But worries linger that rising
unemployment and still hard-to-get
credit could crimp such spending,
which accounts for about 70 per cent
of economic activity, and hobble the
recovery.

Those potentially negative forces
— along with the troubled commer-
cial real-estate market — provide
reasons for caution, a Fed official
said Wednesday.

"We all ardently want to believe
the nation is on the economic come-
back trail,” Dennis Lockhart, presi-
dent of the Federal Reserve Bank
of Atlanta, said in a speech in
Mobile, Ala. "I don't think we are

served by declaring prematurely that
we're in the clear. In thinking about
the recovery, I recommend for now
a mindset of measured optimism."

Meanwhile, less drastic cuts in
business spending contributed to the
second-quarter's improved showing.

Businesses trimmed spending on
equipment and software at a pace
of 4.9 per cent. That wasn't as deep
as the 8.4 per cent annualized drop
previously estimated for the second
quarter, and marked a big improve-
ment from an annualized plunge of
36.4 per cent in the first quarter.

A key area where businesses did
cut more deeply in the spring was
inventories.

They slashed spending at a record
pace of $160.2 billion. But there's a
silver lining to that: With invento-
ries at rock-bottom, businesses have
started to boost production to satis-
fy customer demand, one of the
forces that should lift GDP in the
third quarter, analysts say.

The report also showed that after-
tax profits of US corporations rose
0.9 per cent in the spring, the second
straight quarterly gain.

Spending on housing projects fell
at a rate of 23.3 per cent in the sec-
ond quarter, also not as deep as the
annualized drop of 38.2 per cent in
the first quarter.

period for that will be based
on how prepared the compa-
nies are - whether they have
the proper systems in place
for them to get the financial
statements, management
accounts to the auditor, along
with supporting documents,
to ensure this can be accom-
plished.”

Mr Deveaux added that the
Securities Commission was
“overly concerned that we
don’t put in into law a provi-
sion that can’t be maintained
or sustained, and then have
people inferring that the juris-
diction is unable to adhere to
the legislation. It has some

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

serious implications for the
jurisdiction.”

Mr Deveaux told Tribune
Business that the Securities
Industry Act was also being
reformed to ensure the
Bahamas complied with the
standards and practices
endorsed by the international
body for securities regulators,
IOSCO, especially when it
came to information sharing
with fellow supervisors.

“We’re hoping this legis-
lation will be brought into
force before the end of the
year,” the Commission’s exec-
utive director said. “I think
we’ve done a thorough con-

2009/CLE/gen/00040

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division

BETWEEN

sultation, and hopefully we
can get this final draft, as far
as we’re concerned, to the
Ministry of Finance and the
Attorney General’s Office as
soon as possible, and for
onward transmission to the
Cabinet and the various
Houses of Parliament for
sign-off and bringing into
force.”

Apart from meeting with
individual industry partici-
pants, the Securities Com-
mission also consulted with
the major industry represen-
tative bodies and focus
groups, such as the Bahamas
Financial Services Board,

Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA),
Bahamas Bar Association and
Bahamas Association of
Compliance Officers
(BACO).

Mr Deveaux said the regu-
lator was also reviewing the
feedback received, “and mak-
ing what adjustments need to
be made to the final draft”.
All input and comments were
being documented, to ensure
that the Securities Commis-
sion could later explain why
some suggestions were even-
tually incorporated into the
legislation, while others were
not.

NOTICE is hereby given that WIDSON AZOR of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1% day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ROGER JAMES
BOUCHER of MCKINNEY DRIVE, CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O.
BOX SB-52414, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 1% day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Plaintiff
AND
BARBARA A. DEVEAUX
Defendant
To: Barbara Deveuax

TAKE NOTICE that

1. An action has been commenced against you by
Scotiabank (Bahamas) limited in the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas by Writ of Summons filed on the 15th of January
2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/ gen/00040, wherein the
Plaintiff's claim is for the total sum of $34,279.08 which
represents the principal sum of $24,266.51, accrued
interest on the said principal in the sum of $9,316.57,
add-on charges in the sum of $616.00, interest on the said
add-on charges in the sum of $127.14 and late fees in the
sum of $80.00 due under a loan numbered 1746456.

2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of
Summons in the said action be effected on you
by virtue of this advertisement

3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this
advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication,
acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons
by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the
Attorneys whose name and address appear below,
otherwise judgment may be entered against you.

Dated the 22nd day of September A.D., 2009

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO.,
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

ONE SANDYPORT PLAZA
West Bay Street

www, boahamascommercial.com
www. cbrichardellis.com

RENT

RETAIL/OFFICE SPACE

| ,042 - 2,264 $q. ft.

Ample Parking

Immediate Occupancy

For more information call 376-0000

se @¢ @

Ministry Finance
RE: Real property tax Surcharge Waiver Notice

The general public is here by advised of the
provisions of the Real Property Tax Act. The
principal Act is amended by the insertion
immediately after section 21 of the following
new section 21 A and 21 B respectfully;

Section 21 A Waiver of surcharge.

Notwithstanding section 21, any surcharge
which has accumulated in respcct of

* (a) owner-occupies property with a market
value of up to two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars ($250,000.00) shall be
waived.

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars,
shall be waived if the outstanding real
property tax is paid on or before
December 31,2009: and

* (c) other property, shall be waived by fifty
per cent if the outstanding real property
tax is paid before December 31,2009.

Section 21 B Revival of Surcharge
lf after December 31,2009 any real property
tax remains outstanding in respect of

* (a) owner-occupied property with a market
with a market value of up to two hundred
and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00)

* (b) owner-occupied property which exceeds
two hundred and fifty thousand.

(c) other property

The owner of such property, shall be liable to
pay anew surcharge of five per centum (5%)
of such tax tax per annum.



BAHAMAS REALTY tp

COMMERCIAL

if aeecialion Wile

CBRE

CB RICHARD ELLIS

HAVIGATING A MEW WORLD





Ministry Of The Environment
PORT DEPARTMENT

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the following Contract Service for the
Port Department, Ministry of The Environment.

¢ Private Security Services for Royal Caribbean
Cruise Line Prince George Dock

Interested parties may obtain further information,
and may collect the bidding document as of 23rd
September, 2009 from:

The Port Department

Prince George Dock

Nassau, The Bahamas
Telephone No. (242) 356-5639

Between the hours of 9:00am and 5:00pm Monday
through Friday.

Tenders are to be submitted in Triplicate (3) in a
sealed envelope(s) Marked Tender for Private
Security Services for Royal Caribbean Cruise Line
-Prince George Dock addressed to:

The Chairman

Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Building
Cable Beach

P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

No later than 5:00pm on the 9th October, 2009.

Tenders will be opened at 10:00am on the 13th
October, 2009 at the Office of the Tenders Board,
Ministry of Finance.

THE GOVERNMENT RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL
TENDERS.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
BULLION
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PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



THE CARNIVAL cruise ship Fantasy is lit up at the Port of New Orleans. Carnival Corp. Tuesday said
its third-quarter profit sank nearly 20 per cent, but the results were still better than expected.

(AP Photo: Andy Newman)

Carnival stops
calls on Antigua

mba ®* Tourism minister says
upset Carnival Corporation

is taking the island off a island nation will lo Se

ship’s itinerary.
Beginning January 3, Car- e
nival will substitute St $401 nin revenue

Maarten for Antigua on the

Carnival Victory’s weekly 4 4 9 4 ‘
six-stop, seven-day trips out . Cruise line S Q profit
of Puerto Rico.

Tourism minister John S 1 nks ne arly 2? 0%

Maginley says the island
nation will lose $40 million

in revenue.
He says local officials
weren't consulted, and the malicious damage after had nothing to do with the
change comes just after six refusing to pay a cab fare incident.
American tourists from the they thought was excessive A spokeswoman says the
ship were arrested. and later scuffling with itinerary was four years old
The passengers were police. and simply needed an
charged with assault and Carnival says the change update.

BAIC
In Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

Will Host

6 Weeks Business Empowerment or Enrereneur- Lecture Sens

To sensitize Bahamiaas af
the besiness oppartunities
available to them aow, aad
REGISTRATION FORM ‘nial
exploit such apportenities,
thereby empowering them
to become self employed,

October B-Savenber 2 20
ADDRESS (See Selodule Below]
70 pan, Lecture, Presentation

Interactive Panel Discussin
followed by Ealrepreacar
Testimonials and JA session.

TELEPHONE CONTACTS:

FAX NUMBER:
VENUE: « Contre far Performing Asis
ade Siva)

Change your baying habits, “BUY te SES"
re e.
seats become self employed and create wealth.

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

Thunday October 22, D009 Thursday November 05, 2009
ain hirereeieraraia Hudgeting, Forecasting and Pricing /
Performing Ars «Shirky 3 nadomy of am Entrepreneur
Presenters C08 Prolessae Ann da
Customers Service Rep. ~ Atlas Cenmre foe Performing Ars.» Shirky 8
Presenters » CON Professor /Conpariht Exe.

Thursday November 12, 208
seinen tne

pun Tle dieu Ce sting = Sy 8

Agric
Canine for Pertinreineg Arms» Shirley Si,

Presaiers « Ageieltoral Practitioners and indus ‘Thursday November 19, 2009

ee Cli Ceremony Cirtfiate Pesewaion

(Chicces Rewiurind - COB CHMI
Prenicr- fe. Crear Fite!

CONTACT: Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BANC) at 322-3740 or 328-1912
Ms, Lisa Ferguson! Mrs, Tonjia BurrowsMrs, Antoinette Rain



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

PG 24 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009

EBENEZER Methodist Church =
celebrates 207 years of
excellence, commitment,
and loyalty to Methodism.



RELIGION





EBENEZER CELEBRATES IT
207TH ANNIVERSARY

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

EBENEZER Methodist Church will cel-
ebrate 207 years of excellence, com-
mitment, and loyalty to Methodism
with a commemoration service to be

held on Sunday, October 4 at 11am.

Before Emancipation, before blockade running,
and even before the Bahamas gained Independence,
Ebenezer Methodist Church was firmly established
since 1802 and is indeed one of the oldest churches in
the Bahamas and has a long history of ministry and
outreach.

John Phillpot, Congregational Board Chairman at
Ebenezer Methodist Church, spoke to Tribune
Religion about the work Ebenezer has done over the
years. “From the early days, Ebenezer has been a
mainstay in the community along with St Matthew’s
Church, the two oldest churches from 1802. The
church has a large focus on social outreach and help-
ing the local communities,” he said.

“Over the years, our members have traveled to
other islands to help with home repairs after the
storms, taking food and clothing supplies along with
them, he said.

“They are also making sure the less fortunate per-
sons have food to eat and clothes to wear. The church
has a large social outreach with a soup kitchen that
serves over 100 people every Thursday. There is also
a clothing pantry for those in need,” he said.

Their efforts in the past to improve the education in
the Bahamas did not go unnoticed either. According

establishment of what is today known as Queen’s
College”, the website stated.

Closeness and Togetherness are principles that the
people of the church abide by. These principles have }
allowed the church over the years to remain close :

with neighbouring churches and the community.

Ebenezer has worked with other churches in the :
area giving assistance to the homeless and the poor. :
The church is very people oriented providing several }
different avenues for fellowship, he said. “We are }

always welcoming visitors,” he said.

Youth ministry, Sunday school, junior church choir, }
men’s group, women’s fellowship, choir, prayer :
groups, evangelism, and social outreach are just afew }
of the ministries at Ebenezer that enforce and pro- }

mote fellowship in Christ.

Over the years there have been many ministers at
Ebenezer, but now the church is happy to welcome }
their new acting minister, Rev Godfrey Bethell from }
Central Eleuthera. With years of education and expe- }

rience, they anticipate he will be a great leader.

“Rev Godfrey Bethell has been in the church since :
the early age at Coke Memorial and Rhodes :
Memorial Methodist Church in Nassau and St Paul }
Methodist Church in Freeport. He is joined in Nassau
with his wife Elmena Bethell, current Vice President ;
of the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church. }
We look forward to working with both Rev and Mrs :

Bethell in all of our ministries,” he said.

: Christopher Church, in observance of
: Assisi, the patron saint of animals. The service is the
? brainchild of the Bahamas Humane Society and
: parishioners at St Christopher Church, to commemo-
: rate World Animal Day. Last year, events were held in
: 66 countries in celebration of World Animal Day.

The Tribune

Blessing of

the aerate

By REUBEN SHEARER
: Tribune Features Reporter

ON a typical Sunday morning, church pews are filled

i with worshippers praising and getting spiritual enrich-
? ment from the Word of God. It’s a unique occasion
? planned at one church this Sunday, however. At 4.30
? pm St Christopher Church in Lyford Cay will be hav-
: ing their ‘St Francis of Assisi Day and Blessing of the
? Animals’.
: invited to bring their four legged, and feathered friends
: to the afternoon service.

All animal lovers from across the island are

This is the third time the service will be held at St
St Francis

Officiating the service will be Father Keith

: Cartwright, archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas and
: The Turks and Caicos Islands.
? also a member of the Bahamas Humane Society board.

Father Cartwright is

Last year, 23 birds, dogs, cats, and turtles attended

i and were prayed for at the service. They all behaved,
? and nobody tried to bite or fight each other.
? Organisers ensure good animal behavior by having the
: service for no more than half an hour, to prevent the
: animals from getting restless, Tribune Religion was told
? yesterday.

“The service is a celebration of God’s creation,”

i Father Cartwright told Tribune Religion yesterday.
to www.ebenezermethodist.org, “In 1870, a group of
laymen from Ebenezer and Trinity met to discuss the }
feasibility of establishing an educational institution }
which would provide secondary education for their ;

children, and these discussions eventually led to the : ; Y
: we believe that is a sin. We need to create a lot of

? awareness about that.”

“God made the entire cosmos and a part of that creat-
ed animals and creatures, and we give God thanks for
the wonderful beauty of animals and pets.”

“We want to highlight the importance and care of
God’s creatures. There’s a lot of cruelty to animals and

“Animals were put here for different purposes. One
of those purposes happens to be where they are com-
panions of human beings,” he said.

Father Cartwright’s dog, ‘Kay Kay’ will be present at
Sunday’s service.

Following the service, Father Cartwright will be
head down to the canine dog unit in Lyford Cay to pray
for and bless the security dogs, which are used to pro-

SEE page 25



A USS mon scnes at last year’s Src)
The Tribune





6

RELIGION
THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

PART 46

The Baptist Movements
in the 20th Century

A LETTER in the Nassau Guardian
of 16th March 16, 1892 deplored the
dismissal of Rev Daniel Wilshire from
the Baptist Missionary Society calling
his treatment “uncourteous and there-
fore uncharitable.” The letter was
signed by John James Kerr and mem-
bers of the New Zion Baptist Church,
Moses Rahming and all members of Mt
Carey Baptist Church, Joseph Smith
and the entire Gambier and Adelaide
Baptist Church, Hercules Rolle, Cat
Island and all churches under his pas-
toral care and Richard A Morrison of
Exuma with all members of the church
there.

A special meeting of the Pastor and
committee was convened at Zion
Baptist Church Nassau on April 4 with
Rev J J Kerr as chairman. Attending
were representatives from Cat Island,
Exuma, Andros, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Ragged Island and Long
Island. An agreement was reached to
form the Bahamas Baptist Union and
appointed Rev Daniel Wilshire as
superintendent.

It should be noted that not all
churches remained within the Union
and about 15 churches remained with
Wilshire. In 1893, a lot that previously
housed livery stables on Parliament
Street was purchased and Mrs Wilshire
laid the foundation stone of the Sunday
School Building which later became
Salem Union Baptist Church. The
building is now Magistrates Court #1.
The Wilshires lived behind the church
and were assisted by jeweler, Rev J
Demeritte and Rev J J Kerr was the
pastor of the Nassau churches in the
Baptist Union.

From Rev Wilshire's speech at the
laying of the stone, we can glean that
the formation of the Bahamas Baptist
Union caused the English Baptists to
send a deputation to investigate the sit-
uation in the Bahamas. As a result the
committee decided that ‘steps will be
taken to make the churches in the
Bahamas self supporting, and help will
be offered through Calabar College
(Jamaica) toward providing them with
an efficient native ministry.’ Wilshire's
reply was that the Baptist Union pre-
ferred to work out its own salvation as
God shall help, choosing its own native
ministry.

Mrs Charlotte Wilshire died in 1894
and Rev Wilshire married again to his
widowed housekeeper, Mrs Rigby.

In 1901, Wilshire bought a sailboat

j JM
» LAWLOR
=

Experience and used it to visit the out
island churches. He also pursued an
expansion of the Bahamas Baptist
Union into Florida, where many
Bahamians had migrated to work
there. Seven churches were built in
Florida which brought the total of 28
churches and 1500 members.

Wilshire died in 1932 and was suc-
ceeded by his assistant Rev Enoch
Backford, who became Pastor of Salem
Church in 1933 and Superintendent of
the Bahamas Baptist Union later that
same year.

Enoch Backford was born at
Deadman's Cay, Long Island in 1893.
He was educated in the USA at
Morehouse College and _ Florida
Memorial College. He served in the
trenches as an American soldier during
World War 1. Backford proved to be an
able administrator, organising the
Baptist Union into districts each with a
Convention of Woman's Auxilliary,
Sunday School and _ Training
Convention. His great emphasis was on
Baptist doctrine, democracy and stew-
ardship, church discipline and missions.

The Salem Church building became
inadequate for the growing member-
ship so another site was purchased on
Taylor Street. The corner stone was
laid in 1960 and dedicated in 1967.
Backford retired as pastor of Salem in
1974 and was succeeded by Rev
Charles Saunders. Rev Backford
remained as Superintendent of the
Bahamas Baptist Union until his death
at 83 in 1976.

Father Leopold Duncan Cox, born at
Fox Hill in 1900 , was elected as
Superintendent of the Bahamas Baptist
Union in 1976. He previously had been
Pastor at Mt Carey Union Baptist
Church.

Bahamas Baptist Missionary and
Educational Convention 1935 - 1970

In May 1925, Rev J R Evans and Mrs
Jamie Morris made two trips to the
Bahamas to make a general survey of
Baptist participation in the islands. As a
result they bought $50,000 of literature

Churches in the Bahamas. Rev Evans
continued to visit annually and eventu-
ally succeeded in persuading both the St

Particular Baptists and the Union
Baptists Association to agree to merge
into the Bahamas Baptist Missionary
many meetings and a
the Bahamas

and

session of
Missionary

Baptist
Educational

Baptist Church on May 25,1936.

Board of the National

school named in honour of Dr L G

1948.
Southern Baptist Mission of the
Southern Baptist Convention

In the summer of 1949, students of the
Southwestern Baptist

missionary couples, Dr

Street in 1957.

The Central Baptist Church was }
organised in the Institute building later :
in 1957. It was also felt that there was a } Patrick Paul.
great need for a high school and so in }
1961 the Institute building was also used : follow the lead,” she said. She and

to house the Prince Williams High :

School.
When problems severed the relation-

Missionary and Education Convention

Prince Williams High School on the

Southern Baptist Mission began operat-
ing the Bahamas Baptist College which
moved to Jean Street in 1968.

i ing for animals.
? Cartwright witnessed the miraculous

? healing of her dog who was not feeling

and Educational Convention. After } well.

temporary :

arrangement in 1935, the first annual } with me having dinner while my dog was

i having a heart attack, and we rushed

L 1" + downtown to the animal clinic.
Convention took place at St John's i prayed for the animal and she survived.
is ae ia F paeeaeae ? I believe she survived because Father
n , al the invitation of Fresident ¢ Cartwright prayed for her,” she said.
Enoch Backford, the Foreign Missions } ae :
C : d 1 Baptist : pets, she said.

onvention started an elementary : animals are God’s creatures too. We are

; ? custodians of the planet and it is our
hese of Re ae ot ae ae ? unbounded duty to treat animals as God
ae ee eee ene 12 = intended us to in a kind manner.”

Chippingham until it moved to Baillou }
Hi Rees ey Wale ice ask of those who bring their dogs is
was the first headmaster from 1943 to : 8 8

: to ensure that they have access to water,
: and bring a form of waste disposal in

? case the animal has an accident.

Thursday, October 1, 2009 ® PG 25

SEE page 24

: tect the gated community.

This year, New Providence will be the

: only observers of the unique service.
? However, they’re asking other parishes
? in the family islands to join the band-
? wagon.
? picked up the ball and had a service in
? the garden in the Grove.

from the National Baptist Convention }
Inc and distributed freely to all Baptist :

Last year, Grand Bahama

Bahamas Humane Society president
Kim Arahna said, “I took my 7 year old

i freshwater turtle, Big Mama last year
? and my 14 year old potcake whois a can-
? cer survivor.”

John's Baptist Society Churches of }

Mrs Arahna is a firm believer in pray-
She and Father

“Last year, Father Cartwright was

He

“We hope the kids will bring their

“We seem to forget that

The only thing organisers of the serv-

“We’ve absolutely had no problems so

far with this however, but ask that you

Theological : bring it just in case they make a mess”

Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas began } she said.

sending teams to hold Bible schools i.
throughout The Bahamas. In 1951, The } will be prayed for and blessed, and those
Southern Baptist Convention sent two ; Who behave during the service will be
and Mrsi
McMillan and Dr and Mrs Main. Along
with local Baptist leaders the missionar- } !
ies decided that the greatest need was } tanks,” Mrs Arahna added. According
theological training and toward that end } to her, Father Cartwright makes house-
the Bahamas Baptist Institute was }
opened in the house of the Mains and }
moved to new quarters on Rosetta }

: and love to animals in other churches,”

On Sunday’s service, animals present

sprinkled with holy water, Mrs Arahna
said.
“He'll sprinkle holy water into the fish

calls at the request of parishioners
request to pray for their animals.
With a drive to “bring more respect

Mrs Aranha recently met with
Christian Council president Reverend
“We would really like to
have as many of the other churches to

Reverend Paul are talking over intro-

: ducing the service to congregations
? under the Christian Council.
ship between the Bahamas Baptist }

Mrs Arahna emphasised that anyone

i on the island is more than welcomed to
and the Bahamas Southern Baptist :
Mission, the Convention reorganised }

attend.
“We’re hoping for a great showing

l he ? from the public. The fact that we are
Jordan Memorial Campus. The Baptist } behind the gates shouldn’t stop people
? from coming in. We want as many per-
isons from New Providence to be

E there.”
PG 26 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009

RELIGION

The Tribune

Creating teams for ministry

“What, after all, is Apollos? And
what is Paul? Only servants,
through whom you came to
believe--as the Lord has assigned to
each his task. I planted the seed,
Apollos watered it, but God made
it grow. So neither he who plants
nor he who waters is anything, but
only God, who makes things grow.
The man who plants and the man
who waters have one purpose, and
each will be rewarded according to
his own labour” 1 Cor 3:5-8.

Why Arawak, why

MATTH the people that I know we
are (Bahamians that loves drama, gos-
sip and anything that will appeal to
one’s emotion); I knew that this topic
“Why Arawak, Why” would get your
attention seeing that Arawak Homes
and the church destruction is one of the
most talked about matters today.

As a religious nation I know that
most of us (in particular Christians)
have already settled in our hearts and
ruled on this matter thereby condemn-
ing Arawak Homes for demolishing
the church building.

Okay, that’s your right; you're enti-
tled to think and conclude as you wish,
but can I say to you that Father
Yahweh is not tripping or freaking out
at what happened. Always remember
that “Nothing can ever catch God by
surprise or off guard” Here's some-
thing that I want you to also remember
or consider: Religious thinking mixed
with heated emotion at times will cause
one to totally overlook or ignore the
facts.

With that being said, before we (reli-
gious Christians) begin to demonise the
principles of Arawak Homes; let's stop
for a few minutes and look at some
facts and the law. Please understand
this, I don't know Franklin Wilson nor
have I ever met him. I just felt led of
the Spirit to bring some sobering
thoughts to the forefront of this
Arawak Homes / church saga. It is
obvious that folks’ religious emotions
are overshadowing some key facts in
this matter.

The religious Christian community is
upset and venting its anger in the
wrong direction (at Arawak Homes)
when they should be angry at whoever
sold the church the land.

As you're reading this article, would

REV. ANGELA
PALACIOUS

Qualities of A Good Team Player

1. Team Spirit (not a solo perform-
ance)
2. Committed and dedicated



PASTOR

you ponder these few questions as I
supply what I believe to be some hon-
est answers.

Is it about the money? --- No, it's not
about money

Is Arawak Homes hurting financial-
ly? ---- No, they're not.

Is it that the principles of Arawak
Homes are bad people? No, by no
means are they bad people.

The destruction of this place of wor-
ship was nothing personal between the
pastor / members and the principles of
Arawak Homes, for had it been so this
act would have taken place a long time
ago. Rather this was a timely spiritual
message sent to the nation by the prin-
cipalities and powers that are
acclaimed over this nation.
Unfortunately, this anti-Christ spirit
saw an opportunity to make its pres-
ence felt.

The carnal minded and also some
religious minded Bahamians would
never see the spiritual connotation
that’s attached to this saga. The only
winner in the destruction of this house
of worship is the anti-Christ spirit (not
Arawak Homes and its principles). For
I would want to believe that deep with-
in, Arawak Homes now regrets taking
such actions as a result of the negative
backlash and publicity that has and is
yet to come. Watch this! It's not as if
the principles of Arawak Homes don't
go to church themselves or believe in
God. That's right they're not anti-

3. Pulls own weight

4. Goes beyond the call of duty

5. A good communicator (listener
and speaker)

6. Willing to compromise (not
morals or principles)

7. Able to admit faults

8. Willing to negotiate

9. No superiority or inferiority
complexes

10. Honest and reliable

11. Pleasant, friendly even humor-
ous at times

12. Encourager (not overly critical)

a

church. I also believe that at any given
time the owner of Arawak Homes
would give generously to their home
church or any other as they would feel
led to.

Watch this ! How many families
throughout the history of the Bahamas
and to this present day have suffered
some kind of loss or injustice as a result
of unethical practice.

As I've stated before, so do I again.
The restoration of the country’s spiritu-
al connection to Father Yahweh has to
come via the church of which Yeshuwa
Messiah died for. Therefore God will
use whatever means to expose ungodly,
unethical practices. So, again before
you self righteous, religious hypocrites,
demonise Arawak Homes; could it be
that God has allowed this act to happen
via the church to wake this nation from
its chosen position of sleep to corrup-
tion and unethical practices?

How many of us within and outside
the church know of, or may have taken
part in some form of ungodly, unethical
behavior and practices. But now that a
church building / a place of worship (a4
sacred cow) is at the center of this saga;
religiously and ignorantly you're crying
foul. Listen, I'm not saying “let's tear
down church buildings, but what I am
saying is that; let's not wait until the

13. Visionary yet also supportive of
that of others

14. Shares in triumphs and failures
of the team

Additional Qualities of a Ministry
Team Player

1. Prayerful

2. Student of the Scriptures

3. Regular worshipper

4, Enthusiastic witness

5. Faithful worker for the Lord

6. Filled with the Holy Spirit

seeds of corruption and unethical
practices bears fruits and then cry out”

For those of you who are bent on
holding your religious position as it
relates to your places of worship or the
one in question; Yeshuwa Messiah also
encountered the religious spirit of
which has gotten hold of you. Watch
this! The Woman of Samaria John.4:
20. Our fathers worshipped in this
mountain; and ye say, that in
Jerusalem is the place where men
ought to worship. : 21. Jesus saith
unto her, Woman, believe me, the hour
cometh, when ye shall neither in this
mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, wer-
ship the Father. : 22. Ye worship ye
know not what: we know what we wor-
ship: for salvation is of the Jews. : 23.
But the hour cometh, and now is, when
the true worshippers shall worship the
Father in spirit and in truth: for the
Father seeketh such to worship him. :
24. Ged is a Spirit: and they that wor-
ship him must worship him in spirit
and in truth.

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.1-242-441 -2021

Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen
Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays


The Tribune

Hurting people
healing words

Rev CLEVELAND
D.X.WELLS

“Hurting People, Healing
Words”, is a monthly article writ-
ten to assist those persons who are
hurting and to share with them the
hurts of others and how they were
able to overcome them. It also
seeks to show, by way of scripture,
what God has to say to those who
are hurting and to encourage per-
sons to look beyond the temporary
hurt, to a God that covers us
through the ages. “Hurting
People, Healing Words”, seeks to
heal the broken hearted and free
those who have been held captive
with the power of God.

I will never forget the day, some
thirty five years ago, that I heard
my mother scream. I was only a lit-
tle boy growing up on the island of
Andros, but I will never forget that
day because I discovered that a
man was using his fist to hit my
mother. Being only six years old,
my first instinct was to run to her. I
grabbed the man by his leg and bit
him. It got his attention; he
stopped hitting my mother and
turned his focus to me. The man
reacted by kicking me off and then
he stormed out in a rage. I didn’t
know what the outcome would be,
but somehow I had to act, and as
was seen, the act proved fruitful;
the man stopped hitting my moth-
er and that is all I wanted.

I watched my mother on the
ground crying and as a little boy I
went to her and hugged her and
said to her, “I love you mommy,”
with great hopes to hear her say, “I
love you son,” but she never did. I
often wondered why she didn’t use
those words, but now I’ve come to
understand that her hurt was
deeper than I had realised.

You see, my name is Cleveland
Dwight Xavier Wells and my
namesake, my father, had left my
mother years ago with three chil-
dren never to return. It was my
father who made her promises that
he never kept and to hear my
name, triggered something in my
mother toward me. It wasn’t really
for me, but for my father.
Nevertheless, he was gone and I
was still there.

You can put a spin on things
because ‘What the devil meant for
bad, God will put a spin on it and
work it out for your good.

“Hurting
Words”

People Healing

Ive come to understand that
hurting one person actually hurts
many people. You see, my father
hurt my mother and my mother in
turn hurt me. However, I’ve decid-
ed to put a spin on things. I’ve
learned how to let go so that I can
grow. Since my mother had experi-
enced hurt, she decided to give me
to a family she believed could love
and care for me. It’s with this fam-
ily that I accepted Jesus Christ as
my Lord and personal saviour and
the journey of healing started.
Now God has blessed me with two
beautiful girls and a gorgeous wife.

I longed to hear my mother and
father say, “I love you son”, how-
ever my daughters have absolutely
no longing to hear these words. I
use them frequently, expressing
the love that I have for them and
for their mother.

You see, you don’t have to carry
on where others left off. You can
literally stop and start your new
chapter. That’s what I have done.
My healing words came from
God’s Holy word that states, “I
will never leave you or forsake
you”. To me, I am never alone and
once you have accepted him as
Lord and personal saviour. God
has a way of turning a bad situa-
tion into a good one. This hap-
pened with Joseph, who was
thrown in a pit, sold into slavery,
sold to Potifer, lied on by Potifer’s
wife and thrown in jail.

Despite all of the events that
happened to him, when Joseph
saw his brothers again years later
he told them, “You intended to
harm me, but God intended it for
good to accomplish what is now
being done, the saving of many
lives” [Genesis 50 and 20]. I
believe Joseph wanted to hear
from his brothers, “You will be
alright, you can make it and ’m
here for you”, but these words
would seem like a foreign lan-
guage to angry brothers. Because
Joseph was in God and God in
him, deep within his inner being he
knew that he would be alright, that
he’d make it and that God would
always be there for him.

So when you are hurting,
remember that you will be alright,
you can make it and that God will
always be there for you. Only you
can stop you from growing.

Remember when you allow
people to anger you, you give
them power over you, so take back
the power over your life. Hurting
people, = Healing words.

RELIGION Thursday, October 1, 2009 ® PG 27

Bahamas Faith Ministries International (BFMI)
Children’s Fine Arts Conservatory (CFAC)

is auditioning for a 30 members children’s conservatory choir.
Children will be performing music from various genres,
original works, musical dramas and will be afforded national
and international travel ministry opportunities.

Successful applicants will also be a member of the
specialized production team for the
2010 BFMI Culture-Up Kids Leadership Congress.

Auditions will be held from 11am to 4pm on
Saturday, October 3rd, 2009
for children ages § to 14 years old at BFMI Carmichael Road.

For audition appointments parents/ guardian should email the
name of the child, age and a telephone contact number to:

The Choral Director at cfac,.bfmi@ gmail.com.

Walk-in auditions accepted.
Persons auditioning should prepare a song from
memory and bring along a copy of the song.
Past performance recordings can be submitted for review.

PUR Te ee
PP ee ee et mmr tn ie
Tel: 242-4616400 * Fax: 242-361-2260 * www. bimmm.com


PG 28 ® Thursday, October 1, 2009 RELIGION The Tribune

WEEK

Ebenezer Methodist
Church is this week’s
church of the week.
Ebenezer was estab-
lished in 1802, and is
one of the oldest
churches in the
Bahamas. The
church will celebrate
its 207th anniversary
on Sunday, October
4. Over the years, the
church has made
meaningful contribu-
tions to the commu-
nity and the country
through its many
social outreach pro-
grames.

Photos Felipe Major/Tribune Staff



BREAST CANCER
Awareness Month

t 3 = . 3 } |
areke | HEPETTI SCY
——————— ait Pa Gourmet

Scab Prichard Ereezes Griteh Colonial Milton Gable Beach Goll Course Caribbean Spice Cale
Community Pharmacy The Gicket Qub Greycliff -hie Entemprees Ocean Liquors Purity Bakery
Sanda’ Royal Bahamian Subrany

Albany Deveio per Comgort House Minihies Florence Crovewle, Point View Notion
Police Callege Queens College

For More Infanmation or ta Place an Order Call

Pe ee rere ees ee tae 7 : "LAL ae






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.259THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY, SHOWEROR T-STORM HIGH 88F LOW 78F The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com HOWMINISTER ’IGNORED’ RELATIVESOF ‘MURDER’ VICTIMS MINISTER OF NATIONAL SECURITY Tommy Turnquest walks past demonstrators yesterday in Rawson Square. PROSTESTING family and friends of victims of violence shouted for the Minister of National Security’s resignation after they claimed he breezed past them yesterday morning flanked by two uniformed police officers. Around 40 people had gathered in Rawson Square yesterday to sound a call for “justice” to parliamentarians who were returning to the House of Assembly for the first time in a month. Marching and waving placards, family and friends of Preston Ferguson, Brenton Smith, Kristoff Cooper and Delroy Pratt came together to demand better policing, improvements to the justice system and more communication between police and victims’ families. Mr Ferguson’s family claim that rather than dying in an Exuma traffic accident, as police determined, he was a victim of murder and police are not doing what they should. Kristoff Cooper’s brother and Quit now! ‘Shunned’ families tell Minister PRESTON FERGUSON BRENTON SMITH SEE page two By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net HOLLYWOOD celebrity John Travolta testified yesterday that he had been informed that stories that would imply that he had intentionally caused the death of his son would be released to the media if he did not comply with a demand for $25 million. Jurors in the trial of ex-PLP Senator Pleas ant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne yesterday also heard a taped conversation between Bridgewater and Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson regarding a meeting set with an attorney for the 55-yearold actor. Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused of T ravolta tells of pressure to meet $25 million demand PICTURES: . Tommy Turnquest breezed past protesters calling his name (photos 1 and 2photo 3photo 4 Placard-waving protesters gather in Rawson Square to sound call for justice Felip Major /Tribune staff JOHN TRAVOLTA and his wife are shown going to court yesterday. TRAVOLTA TRIAL: WEEKTW0 SEE page 12 By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE battle for the chairmanship of the Progressive Liberal Party got a jump start yesterday when Kenred Dorsett officially announced his intent to run against Glenys Hanna-Martin for the coveted post. Running on a platform of “Progress Now!”, Mr Dorsett said he is committed to bringing change to the Opposition and unleashing the party's "real potential." Due to his experience as a branch member, national party vice-chairman and the current PLP deputy chairman, Mr Dorsett said he knows what has worked for and against the party recently. "I am not offering myself for the positionto oppose any man or woman within the PLP. I seek the chairmanship to move the party machinery forward, to reconnect our party with supporters. . .And connect the party to the people of this our beloved Common wealth," Mr Dorsett said at a p ress conference at his law Dorsett to run for PLP chairmanship KENRED DORSETT THE Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union has filed a suit against Bank of the Bahamas (BOB for the return of nearly $700,000 that was allegedly transferred from the union's accounts by "unauthorised" union executives. The union claims BOB failed to adhere to the mandated requirements of the bank/customer relationship between the two agencies in respect to disbursements pur portedly effected on or about August, 24 from the union's account at BOB "without lawful authority" of the union. According to a writ filed in the Supreme Court on Sep tember 3, during the time period in question the only persons legally entitled to authorise disbursements from the union's account at BOB "were exclusively and at all material times" any combination of three executives including: Leo Douglas, Basil Hotel union files suit against bank SEE page 11 SEE page 11 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

father say they want to know how the 21-year-old ended up with a bullet in his head after a police chase, while 18-yearold Brenton Smith’s family say they still have not been given a date for the holding of an inquest into his death from a bullet fired by a police officer. When National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest appeared on the scene yesterday morning he did not to stop to address the crowd, only waving to one person who shouted his name. As he crossed the road towards parliament, the crowd started to shout in unison, “We want justice!” and “Tommy needs to go!” Speaking to The Tribune , Hector Smith, Brenton’s father said the grieving families contacted each other and are now unified in their call for justice for their relatives and other victims. “We will never forget our loved ones and the country must stand behind us to make sure it does not happen to them.” “They (politicians see that we the people want change. Our nation, our youth are in peril. Our son is dead and there are more dying. You need to show an example. You need just to go ahead and serve justice,” he said. Monique Smith, niece of Preston Ferguson, who was killed on August 2, said: “We are trying to let the people that we have elected to govern this country hear our united voice saying that ‘enough is enough, justice has to be served.’ “We speak for those people who can no longer hear for themselves. We are the family members who have been left hurting without answers. The police are not giving us answers, and we want them to know we are not going away.” Mervin Johnson, Preston’s uncle, said: “Exuma is in total uprising right now. They understand, it was obvious and the message in Exuma is something has to change. Something has to happen.” Speaking with the media briefly before heading into parliament, Mr Turnquest said The Bahamas is a “country of laws and we want to ensure that the law is followed.” “When the law is not followed, there are procedures in place that will be carried out,” he added. In relation to the Brenton Smith case, which saw police admit that an officer shot the 18 year old while in pursuit of an armed robber, Mr Turnquest said the matter will be “dealt with by the coroner’s court.” “I don’t want to second guess the police officer who was on duty responding to that situation, but there are procedures in place to deal with that.” Meanwhile, referring to the case of Preston Ferguson, Mr Turnquest said he was “disappointed” to hear the vic tim’s family claim that he had failed to contact them. “I was away when that happened and I wasn’t really aware of the circumstances. The family met with the commissioner of police, they indicated they weren’t satisfied, they then came to meet with me. Within two days of speaking to me, I spoke back to a family member, indicated to them the situation with regards to it, what the police was doing with respect to that. “So I was somewhat disappointed to hear on Sunday in the press that the family saying they hadn’t heard from the commissioner or the minister. “Well they surely couldn’t say the minister because it is a matter that is still under investigation and we’re dealing with it.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Add Hash Browns for $1.25. See stores for details.SIZEDOESMATTERBigHunger.Bigsatisfaction.Use the Card... Earn Free Dunkin’Visit www.Dunkinbahamas.com to learn more.CUSTOMER LOYALTY CARD $4.25*Bigger Beer Ham or Bacon, Egg & Cheese Breakfast Sandwich w/ Medium CoeeYOURCHOICE CROISSANTAGEL ORENGLISHMUFFIN* Substitute Ham or Bacon with Sausage for 50. PROTEST: VICTIMSOFVIOLENCE PLACARD-WAVING PROTESTERS outside the House of Assembly yesterday. Families call on Minister to resign PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham walks past protesters. BRENTON SMITH’S father, Hector Smith, pauses for a drink of water. PHOTOS: Felip Major /T ribune staff F ROM page one O ur n ation, o ur youth a re in peri l. Our son i s dead a nd ther e a re more dying. Hector Smith

PAGE 3

A-TEAM’ leader Nicole Martin has again emerged vic t orious, having been declared president of the BahamasH otel, Catering and Allied Workers Union for the second t ime this year. M s Martin was forced to give up her seat when the elections o f May 28 were declared null and void by a Supreme Court o rder. However an overwhelming number of theB ahamas Hotel, Catering and Allied Workers Union ( BHCAWU) members who cast their votes on Tuesday again chose Ms Martin and the A-Team’. Ms Martin was thrilled with t he result, and said she felt it was a validation of her initial v ictory 60 days before. She has become the first woman president in the history of the union, established more than 50 years ago, and she a pproached the election with confidence under the slogan, Lets do it again’. A total of four teams ran for l eadership of the 5,000-member union, the largest union in t he country for hotel and catering industry employees. Tyrone Butler, leader of the “M Group”, graciously accept ed defeat, while TeamR edemption leader Sidney Rolle said he was disappointe d by the loss as he had expected to win the election this time. H e thanked members in Grand Bahama and Cat Islandw ho voted for him. Kirk Wilson, head of Team D eliverance, warned he may t ake legal action as three members of his team were not a llowed to be nominated. Mr Wilson, former first vicep resident of the union, was involved in the feud over theM ay election dates which led to Justice John Isaacs scrapping t he May 4 nominations and May 28 elections by means of a Supreme Court Order. Incumb ent President Roy Colebrooke and Secretary General LeoD ouglas, who temporarily regained the reigns of the union o n July 31 after Ms Martin's team were forced to step down, declined to offer again for leadership – likely because they only received 270 votes in the M ay election. A HIGH-SPEED police chase in the early hours of yest erday resulted in the death of two suspects after they were involved in a horrific crash. The men died at the scene o n John F Kennedy Drive around 3am after their car crashed into a utility pole near Lake Cunningham, “cutting the v ehicle in half,” Asst Commissioner Hulan Hanna told The Tribune. Investigations into the accident were still underway atp ress time last night and the identities of the men had not been released. But police believe the victims may haveb een driving a stolen car. Officers were on patrol on Fire Trail Road just before 3am when they spotted a car with t wo men near the Texaco Service Station. The vehicle “aroused suspicion” as it did not have the necessary inspec-t ion certificates, Mr Hanna said. The officers attempted to perform a routine “stop and search” exercise on the 2003 N issan Sentra, which was bearing the licence plate number 118308. However, the Nissan sped off down Fire Trail Road.T he police pursued and a high speed chase led them first onto Gladstone Road, then onto John F Kennedy Drive, AsstS upt Walter Evans said. Shortly after turning onto the road leading to Lynden Pindling I nternational Airport, the driver of the Nissan lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a utility pole. Thrown Police said the two passengers were thrown from the car, w hich was “completely mangled” in the crash. W itnesses said the Nissan “split the pole in two.” The two men are the country’s 38th and 39th traffic fatalities for the year so far. Just 10 days ago, one-year-old Randia Dean and her 20-year-old aunt Levonya Miller died in an accid ent on Marathon Road. The pair were passengers in a water t ruck that was travelling on Marathon Road when there was a collision with a maroon c oloured Cadillac Seville, which was heading south. B oth passengers were thrown from the vehicle. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Two die after high-speed police chase ends in crash A-Team’ leader Nicole Martin declared hotel union president R OYAL Bahamas Defence Force marine seaman Charles H eastie died on Tuesday night following a diving acci d ent two weeks ago. Mr Heastie, 21, fell into a coma after a scuba diving accident during a RBDF training exercise on Wednes d ay, September 17. He was swimming laps in one of the c ommunity pools in South Beach with several other offic ers when he failed to surface. His comrades rushed to pull him from the water and perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR waited for an ambulance to arrive. The marine was rushedt o Doctors Hospital where he remained in a coma for nearly two weeks. Seaman dies after diving accident By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Lead police investigator Darrell Rolle told the Supreme Court that murder accused Wilfred McPhee Jr told him that co-accused Edwin Bauld Jr hatched a plan to rob and kill his own cousin. S gt Rolle testified that McPhee told him he only wanted to rob Police Corporal Eddison Bain, but Bauld wanted to kill him. Bauld and McPhee are on trial for the murder, kidnapping and robbery of Bain, whose body was found in a shallow ditch near t he Casuarinas Bridge on October 22, 2007. His hands and feet were bound and a large stone had been put on top of his face. Sgt Rolle took a statement from McPhee on October 23. He read the entire 13-page d ocument in court yesterday. Before taking the statement, R olle said he asked if the accused wanted a lawyer pre-s ent, but McPhee declined. I n the statement, McPhee c laimed Bauld told him they w ere going to make some money by robbing his cousin a fter using his girlfriend, Gahnise Campbell, to set Bain up. B auld went over the plan with his girlfriend in a hotelr oom, but she was hesitant. They argued and she finally a greed to go through with it, the statement said. Statement The statement claims Gahn ise called the victim and told him to pick her up, and that h e and Bauld waited in some bushes near the Island Seas armed with a fake gun wrapped in a towel. When Gahnise arrived with Bain, the two men accosted the offi cer, robbed him of his ATM c ard, got the pin number, put him in the trunk of his car,a nd went to Commonwealth Bank in the Sea Horse Plaza, t he statement said. McPhee said he covered his face with a black shirt and tried to withdraw money from Bain’s account, but was u nsuccessful. Bauld then went in and w ithdrew $1,000 cash from the account. T hey went to Boulevard Service Station with Bain still in the trunk. They put gas in the vehicle and drove over the bridge. M cPhee said Bain pleaded with them to let him go. B ain told them that he would not report the matter b ecause he was a police officer and was ashamed. McPhee s aid he did not know Bain was a police officer at the time. He told Bauld to let Bain go, but Bauld threatened to also put him in the hole if hed id not assist him in killing Bain. Sgt Rolle said McPhee told him that Bain was still alive when Bauld rolled a large stone over the hole. Video Lawyer Brian Hanna, who is defending Bauld, asked Sgt Rolle whether he actually saw Bauld on a video taken at the bank. Sgt Rolle said he did not because the persons on the video had covered their faces with a shirt. Mr Hanna also asked Rolle if he slapped Bauld and coerced him into signing a statement so that the police would not charge his girlfriend. Rolle denied hitting or coercing Bauld. Mario Gray, who repre sents McPhee, suggested that Sgt Rolle punched his client in the head, and another officer poked McPhee in the chest with a baseball bat. He further suggested that Sgt Rolle promised his client that he would give a deal for his co-operation. Sgt Rolle denied the assertions. Mr Grey also asked Sgt Rolle whether his client was made aware of his constitutional right to speak to an attorney while in police custody, and whether this information was posted in the room where the men were kept in custody. Sgt Rolle said he was not aware if any postings, but said he had asked McPhee if he wished to speak with a lawyer, but the accused declined. The trial resumes on Thursday. Acting Justice Jethro Miller is presiding. ca Kemp and Vernal Collie are the prosecutors. Court hears about robbery and killing plot S UPREMECOURT: D EATHOF POLICEOFFICEREDDISONBAIN HOTEL union members vote. M ENKILLEDASCARPLOUGHSINTOUTILITYPOLENEAR L AKE C UNNINGHAM BAHAMASHOTEL, CATERINGANDALLIEDWORKERS UNION

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EDITOR, The Tribune. T he following is a compilation of ideas from business operators between BayS treet and Woodes Rogers Walk with our observations on the straw market: Because of the nature of m ost of the vendors and t heir wares and those who are not vendors of s traw and those who greet and rip off tourists by welcoming them with a “free” gift which is taken b ack after the tourists refuse to pay for it, and push drugs, f ake cigars and arrange assignments for the evening and those who do nothi ng else but hang around the straw market and the way they present themselves and the image that they present of the Bahamas, the “strawm arket” will never by its own nature be anything but a third rate sideshow. T he only way to improve the situation in town is toh ave the “straw market” moved and monitored. M aybe Arawak Cay where visitors can take a short cab ride and have a total “cul-t ural” experience as in Mex ico and several other desti n ations or in the old customs building on Prince George Dock where monitoring ofw orkers and goods is more feasible. lt would be the first and the last place for ship visitors to experience a real straw market with realB ahamian made goods rather than cheap imports from everywhere else in the world sold as Bahamian, and illegal copies of name brandb ags, wallets, etc. Serious businesses nearby the cur rent straw market are disg usted with having to put up with the attitudes, of the s lovenliness, the acceptance of criminal behaviour as an everyday “cultural” thing i t should never have been allowed to pervade our cult ure so thoroughly, and it is time to eliminate it entirely and thoroughly. The towns people are tired of it the ones who pay the property taxes, busi ness licences and all manner of other fees are held back by those who don’t pay and don’t care those who feel that it is their right to ignore law and civility and the sens ibilities of others. Before the fire that d estroyed the straw market, Beaumont House and Colony Place, the placemento f the straw market and the annoyance given by the m arket people discouraged continuing foot traffic going west beyond the marketi tself, and as a result all businesses from Market Street g oing west were severely negatively affected by the halt in the flow of pedestriant ourist traffic. Should the straw market return to middowntown the same would happen again. When the shopping and commerciale xtension is expanded going east of Rawson Square and the pedestrian flow poolsf urther in that direction, any such blockage as a straw m arket returning to midtown would isolate anything west of it. This would bea nother nail in the coffin for businesses and further thin o ut any potential business that might make its way through the straw marketg auntlet. As it is, our tourists are a fickle and untrusting of the unfamiliar, they dis l ike confrontation with loud, aggressive people and will return to the haven of theirs hip at the first feeling of discomfort. This suits the s hips nicely as they are guar anteed more on board spending! P utting this straw market and these people who man it and hang around it back in the centre of prime business area of the capital will againl ower our credibility of being a serious business cen tre and show the world that a few loud, rude people get in the way of true progressi n providing and maintaining our destination as a thing of b eauty and business. It will show the world that our town and our attitude towards international commercial acceptance and our intentions for international recognition and success is hardly more than a fifth rate joke. We will never progress as other nations do and we must look forward. We are already way behind the mark, the rest of the region take serious positive and competitive steps to get ahead, we seem quite satisfied by happily ignoring the shambles that currently exist a nd allowing a slap-happy a ttitude towards regional competition. If it were not for the proximity of theU SA little dirty Nassau would have long been lost in the dust. It is imperativet hat the presentation of our downtown showpiece be a live, strong and purposef ul. Should we allow the straw market to go back to t he centre of town we might as well throw in the towel and give up as the rats will be running the city with r udeness, carelessness, disgusting attitudes with unpol iced lawlessness and the feeling that they can and they do get away withe verything that only goes to destroy rather than enhance life. The beauty that existed here when we first became a tourist destinationi s sadly gone, and along with that the attitudes of helpfulness, pride and honesty. P lease put something worthwhile in the old strawm arket space to be com petitive we must show our b est. Commercial buildings and a beautiful cool area to offer respite is what is need-e d there. We have a lot of catching up to do, and the s traw market does not belong there. Those who are “working” there and thosew ho hang around there preying on tourists and near by businesses tend to destroy any prospects of improvement, and as mucha s they are happy to live in their filth, they are not happy until they drag all sur rounding businesses down to their level. P rogress nationally or with individual businesses is impossible with this type ofo verwhelming negativity, and should the market not b e removed from the down town area, our lack of plan ning and foresight will seal o ur fate and we will deserve to drown in the squalor and r esults of our short sightedness that I assure you will come to pass. We should look towards greater substance by improving our tourist product perhaps we can also improve our tourist quality and regain some pride in our attitudes and surroundings. Thank you for your space and time. THE BUSINESS OPERATORS who have dealt with this for far too long. Nassau, September, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm I HATE TO write about this, but I have a ctually been to this play before and it is really disturbing. I was in Israel interviewing Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin just before he was assassi n ated in 1995. We had a beer in his office. He needed one. I remember the ugly moodi n Israel then a mood in which extreme right-wing settlers and politicians were doing a ll they could to delegitimize Rabin, who was committed to trading land for peace as part of the Oslo accords. They questioned his authority. They accused him of treason. They created pictures depicting him as a Nazi SSo fficer, and they shouted death threats at rallies. His political opponents winked at ita ll. And in so doing they created a poisonous political environment that was interpreted by one right-wing Jewish settler as a license to kill Rabin he must have heard, “God will b e on your side” and so he did so. Others have already remarked on this a nalogy, but I want to add my voice because the parallels to Israel then and America t oday turn my stomach: I have no problem with any of the substantive criticism of President Barack Obama from the right or left. But something very dangerous is happen ing. Criticism from the far right has begun t ipping over into delegitimation and creating the same kind of climate here that existed inI srael on the eve of the Rabin assassination. What kind of madness is it that someone w ould create a poll on Facebook asking respondents, “Should Obama be killed?” The choices were: “No, Maybe, Yes, and Yes if he cuts my health care.” The Secret Service is now investigating. I hope they put t he jerk in jail and throw away the key because this is exactly what was being done t o Rabin. Even if you are not worried that someone might draw from these vitriolic a ttacks a license to try to hurt the president, you have to be worried about what is hap pening to American politics more broadly. Our leaders, even the president, can no longer utter the word “we” with a straight f ace. There is no more “we” in American politics at a time when “we” have these huge p roblems the deficit, the recession, health care, climate change and wars in Iraq andA fghanistan that “we” can only manage, let alone fix, if there is a collective “we” at w ork. Sometimes I wonder whether George H .W. Bush, president ,” will be remembered as our last “legitimate” president. The r ight impeached Bill Clinton and hounded him from Day 1 with the bogus Whitewater “scandal.” George W. Bush was elected under a cloud because of the Florida voting m ess, and his critics on the left never let him f orget it. And Obama is now having his legitimacy a ttacked by a concerted campaign from the right fringe. They are using everything from s mears that he is a closet “socialist” to calling him a “liar” in the middle of a joint ses-s ion of Congress to fabricating doubts about his birth in America and whether he is even a citizen. And these attacks are not just coming from the fringe. Now they come from Lou Dobbs on CNN and from members of the House of Representatives. Again, hack away at the man’s policies a nd even his character all you want. I know politics is a tough business. But if we destroyt he legitimacy of another president to lead or to pull the country together for what most Americans want most right now nationbuilding at home we are in serious trou ble. We can’t go 24 years without a legitim ate president not without being swamped by the problems that we will endu p postponing because we can’t address them rationally. T he American political system was, as the saying goes, “designed by geniuses so it could be run by idiots.” But a cocktail of political and technological trends have converged in the last decade that are making it possible for t he idiots of all political stripes to overwhelm and paralyze the genius of our system. T hose factors are: the wild excess of money in politics; the gerrymandering of political d istricts, making them permanently Repub lican or Democratic and erasing the political middle; a 24/7 cable news cycle that makes all politics a daily battle of tactics that over whelm strategic thinking; and a blogospheret hat at its best enriches our debates, adding new checks on the establishment, and at its w orst coarsens our debates to a whole new level, giving a new power to anonymous s landerers to send lies around the world. Finally, on top of it all, we now have a per manent presidential campaign that encour ages all partisanship, all the time among our leading politicians. I would argue that togeth e r these changes add up to a difference of degree that is a difference in kind a dif f erent kind of American political scene that makes me wonder whether we can seriouslyd iscuss serious issues any longer and make decisions on the basis of the national interest. W e can’t change this overnight, but what we can change, and must change, is people c rossing the line between criticising the president and tacitly encouraging the unthinka ble and the unforgivable. (This article was written by Thomas L. Friedman – c.2009 New York Times News Service). Observations regarding the ‘Straw Market’ LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Politics turned dangerous in US

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B y ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AN estimated 32,000 children, students and elderly people burdened by the cost of medication for chronic diseases will soon be eligible to get them f or free from both government and private pharmacies. This was revealed as parliamentarians yesterday began debate on the Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan, which is set to entitle certain people to get previously costly prescription medications and medical s upplies at no cost. Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis, stating that it is government’s intent to ensure all Bahamians have “full access to quality and affordable healthcare,” described the drug plan as the first step by government towards the introduction of a c omprehensive, universal health care plan that covers the cost of not only medication, but other key healthcare needs. The drug plan – supported yesterday by both government and opposition MPs, despite some reservations – is expected to need $5.4 million in funding per year in its first phase, to be p rovided in part by contribu tions by employers and employees equivalent to one per cent of their insurable wage. Ninety-three medications which treat 11 different Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases (CNCDs breast cancer, diabetes mellitus, glaucoma, high cholesterol, hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, major depression, prostate cancer and psychosis – will be accessible through the plan. National Insurance Board Pensioners, those on NIB retirement benefits, those on National Insurance invalidity benefits, children under the age of 18 and young people up to the age of 25 in full time education suffering from these diseases are eligible under the first phase. Highlighting the significance of the legislation, Dr Minnis noted that one in three people in the Bahamas suffer from a CNCD, 48.5 per cent of all hospital beds are occupied by people suffering from these diseases or associated problems and 60 per cent of all deaths are directly linked to CNCDs. At present, the financial burden on those who have to buy medications to treat these diseases is huge, suggested Dr Minnis, as is the strain placed on healthcare services and the economy when businesses see employees fall sick and insurance premiums rise in line with greater demand for treatment for such conditions. Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson noted that the strips and syringes alone required by a diabetes sufferer can amount to $1,500 a year. Which medications and conditions will be covered in the first instance under the initial phase of the plan was determined “scientifically” by a group of medical professionals, not by the Minister of Health, and will be reviewed at and adjusted at various stages, Dr Minnis said. Dr Minnis said that while he always fully supported the principle of a comprehensive healthcare plan, the advice of experts suggests such a plan would not be “sustainable” at present. “These same consultants recommended that the National Health Insurance plan be introduced in a phased approach rather than comprehensively and this is what we are tabling with the drug plan,” he said. He added that under a future phase of the plan, 48,000 people are anticipated to benefit, as all employed and self-employed people, voluntary contributing people, the indigent and public service employees will join the list of those able to access to free medications. Aside from treating the symptoms of CNCDs, Dr Minnis said a key part of the Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan will be promotion efforts aimed at raising awareness about the need for healthy lifestyles that can help reduce the likelihood of a person suffering from such a condition in the first place and which can help educate those who suffer from CNCDs in how to best manage their condition. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM D D e e b b a a t t e e b b e e g g i i n n s s o o n n d d r r u u g g p p l l a a n n MINISTER of health Doctor Hubert Minnis in the House yesterday. Minnis: All Bahamains should have ‘full a ccess to quality and affordable healthcare’ F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is critical. If you or your loved ones have questions about this disease, there are answers. The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with two of the world's most renowned specialists on Friday, October 2, 2009. The clinics are open to the public.The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur PorterPC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also the current Director General and CEO of McGill University Health Centre and author of more than 300 articles on cancer research.Dr. Karol Sikora MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's first independent Medical School at the University of Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the United Kingdom. The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification. For more information, please contact: 502-9610. Centreville Medical Pavilion y y 72 Collins Avenue THE Chinese Embassy held a reception at the Sheraton H otel last night to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. A massive celebration in T ian'anmen Square, Beijing, at which President Hu Jintao will give a keynote speech, will also be held on October 1 in comm emoration of the landmark. A military parade and mass pageant will follow, according to a spokesperson for the 60th National Day celebration preparation committee of the Beijing municipal government. The parade will highlight China’s achievements in the d efence sector over the past six decades and showcase its resolution to safeguard world and regional peace and stability, the s pokesperson said. The mass pageant will involve about 200,000 citizens and 60 floats, and will be held under the theme: "Motherlanda nd I Marching Together". The spokesperson said that later that night, a gala event at Tian'anmen Square will feature colourful performances and a splendid fireworks display”, with senior party and government leaders present. O n September 30 a huge r eception, hosted by the State Council, will be held in the Great Hall of the People. From October 1 to 3, major p arks in Beijing are to host par ties and functions to celebrate National Day. I n addition, an exhibition h ighlighting China's progress during the past 60 years will be held in the Beijing Exhibition Centre near the city zoo over t he last two weeks in September. Also during that time, a g rand musical, "Road to Revival", with a cast of about 3,200, will be staged at the Great Hall of the People. It willd epict the past 169 years of Chin ese history chronologically from the Opium War to the present. "We will try our best to crea te a festive environment at an economical cost," said the spokesperson. "Preparation is going on smoothly, we willm ake sure of a successful celeb ration." The Chinese Embassy in Nassau will be closed until October 5. Chinese Embassy holds reception at Sheraton Hotel 60TH ANNIVERSARYOFTHEPEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA IN THIS PHOTO taken Sept. 24, 2009, Chinese People’s Liberation Army soldiers march during a training for China’s 60th anniversary military parade at a military base in Beijing, China. China’s capital was wrapped in tight security and thick fog Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2009, as police blocked off Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden City and other popular tourist landmarks ahead of a massive parade on Oct. 1 marking 60 years of communist rule. (AP Photo "We will try our best to create a festive environment at ane conomical cost. Preparation is going on smoothly, we willm ake sure of a successful celebration." A BANQUET is held marking the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China on Wednesday at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China.

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WITH five million imperial gallons of water estimated to be lost every day to due to leaks, Water and Sewerage Corporation engineers and technicians have been working late into the night repairing and stabilising the 83-year-old underground pipes in New P rovidence. The Corporation expects to save millions of dollars a year inw ater costs and significantly increase its revenue intake following the system upgrade. The sewerage system was built back in 1926, so the infrastructure we are renewing is old a nd fragile,” said Phenton Neymour, Minister of State in the Ministry of the Environment. “It’s also time to repave Shirley Street and this project extends from Village Road to Frederick Street and is expect-e d to be completed in December 2009. So while the works are being carried out, we will i mprove the drive.” Since the project started on August 31, the Corporation has updated a third of the aging pipes to save Nassau residents from paying for lost gallons of water, much of which is bargedi n from Andros. The Corporation estimates water losses of up to five million imperial gallons per day. By correcting the leaky pipes, every one million gallons d aily of lost water that is equivalent to almost $3 Million annually in additional cost for water purchases will be saved,” said Mr Neymour. And if this one million gallons daily of water is sold, the addit ional revenue would be more than $5 million annually. C hallenges “Water and Sewerage has faced a number of challenges due to the age of the infra-s tructure that translates to nonrevenue water. Water is produced and lost before it reaches the customer or is billed to customers, through either leaks, theft, or metering inaccuracies.” Leslie Hutchinson, senior engineer of the Project Management Unit at the WSC, said they are working with Bahamas Hot Mix and Bahamas Electricity Corporation to complete the government’s plan to repair the water system and resurface the roadway. “Our focus is on the water service lines and the sewer laterals,” said Mr Hutchinson. “Ninety per cent of our leaks a re on service lines. “This project addresses r enewing the service saddles in direct contact with the pipe andt he actual service lines that go out to the various properties. We are also addressing the main sewer lines that tie into corners.” The WSC took special measures so that environmental protection procedures are followed. They also wanted to ease the inconvenience to the driving public. “There is a very good traffic management plan and the tractor is taken care to minimise the amount of dust,” said Mr Hutchinson. “We also display signs that tell the drivers to slow down because there is road work ahead.” Mr Neymour said the Corp oration pays careful attention t o the choice of their materials and to installing ducts around the service lines so that when the road paving takes place, it eliminates the threat of damage to those service lines. “We have a coordination committee that ties the project together, where the utilities corp orations share plans with each o ther about the project.” M inister Neymour said he is pleased with the efforts of the contractors so far. “We received no complaints in respect to any detrimental effects to the environment. Contractors are quick to repair any damage to property and maintain good customer relations,” he said C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM POSITION AVAILABLEFINANCE MANGERAmajorinternational nancial institution is seeking the services of a Finance Manager, The successful candidate must possess: Duties to include: Candidate should also: This position reports to the Financial Controller Manager Human Resources HSBC P.O. Box N-4917 Suite 306, Centre of Commerce One Bay Street Nassau, Bahamas Fax: 502-2566/2577Friday, 09 October 2009 Millions of dollars expected to be saved in water costs a year A BEC WORKER carefully excavates around electrical lines to make room for WSC to work and replace the old pipes and infrastructure. G e n a G i b b s / B I S P h o t o

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B Y KHYLE QUINCY PARKER Press Attach Embassy of The Bahamas HAILED for her foresight and leadership skills, and for positioning the Bahamas as a voice to be heard internation-a lly on public health matters, Chief Medical Officer Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis accepted the Pan American Health Organis ation Award (PAHO Administration for 2009. The PAHO award committee noted that Dr Dahl-Regis was awarded for her contribu-t ion to healthcare management and research, and to medical education in primary healthcare. M ade up of representatives from Argentina, Bolivia and the United States, the committ ee also cited her leadership in institutionalising public health surveillance across all of the Bahamas and in evaluating and r edefining the parameters for C aribbean cooperation in health. The award was given ata special reception held in Washington, DC, last week duri ng a meeting of the 49th Directing Council of the PAHO. Dr Dahl-Regis said the a ward was an honour not only f or her, but for those who work in public health, “particularly the women, and my country, the Bahamas.” I think it’s very special to be recognised in such an arena,” she said. D uring her formal remarks, she said that public service and public health have been the most rewarding experiences of her medical career. As I accept this award, I do so remembering that I did not accomplish this on my own,” Dr Dahl-Regis said, lauding herp arents, mentors, family and friends. “I envisage a public healthcare system where it is second nature for practitioners to put t heir clients first, where practice is based on evidence rather than economics, where preventative healthcare has becomet he flagship of healthcare systems globally, providing equitable, culturally relevant care.” Also at the special ceremony was Labour and Social Develo pment Minister Senator Dion Foulkes. He described Dr Dahl-Regis as a “daughter of t he soil,” and spoke of her “tremendous investment in a dvancing the health and wellbeing of the people of the Bahamas, the Caribbean and the world.” “Dr Dahl-Regis, because you are at the helm as the ChiefM edical Officer of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and because of your provenc ommitment to preparedness, prevention and people, we sleep at night when the challenges of hurricanes, malaria, SARS, tuberculosis, dengue, A H IN1 and other diseases threaten to destabilise our economy, quality of life and overall wellbeing,” he said. Dr Dahl-Regis’ leadership has been recognised through-o ut the region, as recently as t he caucus of CARICOM Mini sters of Health a week ago, where references were made to her active engagement ina ddressing the health chall enges faced by the region. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Chief Medical Officer receives award MINISTER of Labour and S ocial Development Senator Dion Foulkes (right shares a light moment with Chief Medical Officer Dr Merceline Dahl-Regis( centre) and Director General of the World Health Organisation Dr Margaret Chan. Dr Dahl-Regis won t he Pan American Health Organisation/World Health Organisation Award In Administration for 2009.

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B Y ERIC ROSE A HOST of activities to “highlight, recognise and encourage the contributions ofy oung Bahamians” will be held as the Bahamas celebrates National Youth Month in October, Minister of Youth, Sports a nd Culture Desmond Bannister said. “It is our objective to showcase and celebrate the many positive youth role modelsw ithin our communities, while encouraging our unattached young men and young women to focus on getting involved in m eaningful programmes and projects in our communities,” Mr Bannister said. “The month set aside for youth will also provide ana venue for young people to express their views on national issues that concern them.” Held under the theme ‘Celeb rating Youth Our Pride, Our Investment and Our Heritage’, this year’s activities will also seek to “motivate our youth to focus on positive alternatives,”t he minister said. “The youth of the Bahamas are indeed our pride,” he saidl ast week during a press conference. We are investing in them and we look for great returns on our investment in t he future.” Mr Bannister said that the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, through its Youth Division, is working with B ahamian youth leaders to f acilitate and equip them to be able to deliver character-building programmes throughout the country. New initiatives will bei mplemented this year, including the highlighting of a “unique” workshop hosted by the Johnson and Wales Univ ersity on October 21, he said. This event will allow all interested young Bahamians the opportunity to be exposed to an institution that specialisesi n hospitality and culinary tertiary education,” Minister Bannister said. “My ministry believes in providing this type of exposure to as many young Bahamians as possible. We desire to see more youth to b egin now to maximise their p otential in order to be in a position to take full advantage of new careers as they become a vailable,” he said. “As the e conomy of the Bahamas improves, so will new doors be opened.” This year’s Youth Band E ncounter will be held in Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera on October 24. “This is the first time my ministry has embarked u pon a project such as this,” Mr B annister said. “We look forward to the fellowship and camaraderie between New Providence and Eleuthera b ands that will demonstrate the powerful positive influence of music.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The New C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.T he new C-Class is a pleasure to behold offering a new interpretation of driving p leasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of e ffortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the new C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.M NEW CONDOFOR SALESt. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath, 3 Storey Townhouse. Well Appointed I nterior Gated Property With Pool.$239,000Bank Financing Available 325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489 Friday premiere of TaDa’s new video Showcasing contributions of the young SONGSTRESS: TaDa performing THIS Friday, the U ptown Lounge will play host to the premiere of TaDa’s new music video “No One Else” from her album “I’mT hat Girl.” As with her previous videos the seminal “TaDa” and “Keep M oving” featuring Tia Thomas and Saba the new release is a sleek, q uality production that sets a new standard for Bahamian music videos. W hen TaDa’s selftitled music video first a ppeared on local and international airwaves its ent a message to Bahamian artists that not o nly were they capable of producing a quality product, they had no other choice but to do so. With New York City a s her backdrop, TaDa’s new video offers as ophisticated, soulful and polished package. The song was produced by another local artist, “Sketch”, whose r eputation for creating sounds comparable to a ny other international producer is growing. O ne would be tempt ed to be call TaDa a perfectionist, and any product with her name attached to it, is one of h igh quality. Tickets for the music video’s prem iere are sold at the Jukebox. NATIONALYOUTHMONTH PICTURED from left are executive director of Junior Achievement Bahamas Lionel Elliott; Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond B annister; Acting Director of Youth Gregory Butler; Permanent Secret ary Archie Nairn; youth officer Patty Miller, and youth representative Deon Ellis. R a y m o n d A B e t h e l / B I S

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148) Alexander Burrows AlexisRoberts Almina Hanna Alvin Cunningham Andrew Thompson Angela Neymour Arlington Brice Bernice Culmer Beverly M ather Bradford Wildgoose Cecil Gray Cravaughn M cKay Cyril Gibson Danielle Davis Danny Toussaint Daphnie Saunders Douglas Smith Ellis Miller Elvis Bullard Isadell Howells Jerome Pinder Latoya Cargill Gray Loretta Hart Lynn Woodside-Sands Mandi Pedican Philip Hinzey Roland Clarke Roosevelt Burrows Ruth Williams Ruthesa Glendera Dean Selle Julie Brindle Sherry Armaly Hall Terrence King Vanria Johnson Vilna Adderley Vincent Grant The following Government Employees are asked to contact the respective representatives at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: Alma Clarke Anthony Rolle Anthony Fawkes Bettrah Belanda Mitchell Bridgette Neely Carl Rudolph Johnson Charlene Dawkins-Bevans Cheryl Bowe-Moss Clarence Rolle Cleaver W. Robinson Cordero Farrington Coresa Deveaux Cynthia Wilson Dedrick Storr Derek Nottage Desmond Pinder Douglas Richards Francina Scott Francis Clarke Frederica Hamilton Fredie Smith George Bruney Gloria Estella Rolle Jasmar Higgs Jewel A. Mcphee John A. Webb Kardeo Heild Kevin Remond Culmer Kirkwood Campbell Laytoya Cargill-Gray Leila Wood Lorenzo M. Carroll Malriae Lauree Ferguson Mavis Vanderpool Melissa Evans Michael White Melonie Adderley Mervalette L. Dean Mervin Dean Mervin J. Dean Michael Duvalier Muriel Johnson Natashia Andrews Pamela Taylor Petre Darwin Curry Philip Turner Raymond Butler Reginald Taylor Rhonda Gibson Samuel A Gay Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs Shannon Akira Butterfield Shannon Akira Butterfield Sharon Creary Sharon Hanna Sheniqua Brennen-Curry Shorn Douglas Gibson Solomon Rolle Sonia Smith Stanley Wood Stephen D. Moss Theresa Cooper Tina Samantha O Brien Trevor Mcneil Basden Valentino Gay Velma Cox Veronica Samuel Virginia P. Culmer Woodside Wayde Russell William Mckenzie Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152) SCHOOL SUPPLIES DONATION THE WOMEN of Evangelistic Centre Ministries made a donation of school supplies to the Oakes Field Primary School. They presented the sup plies to the school’s principal Beryl Gray and d escribed the donation as an act of community service. Christopher Smith, Director for Security for the Ministry of Education, was also on hand for the photo along with the school’s students. U TAH Taylor-Rolle, one of two hosts of the popular show “Controversy TV” on Cable 12, recently paid a visit on Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister and presented him with his book “The Tears I Cried.” Mr Taylor-Rolle’s book chronicles his l ife-long search for his biological father, whom he finally found in 2008. The author and television producer said he has only known his father Charles Rolle, the assistant deputy superintendent at Her Majesty's Prison a short time, but he already has a great relationship with him. ‘Controversy TV’ host Taylor-Rolle presents Minister with his book AUTHOR Utah Taylor Rolle paid a courtesy on the Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister, on Thursday, September 24, 2009 at the Ministry’s conference room. From left are Author Utah Taylor Rolle; Minister Bannister; and Permanent Secretary, Archie Nairn. B I S P H O T O : R a y m o n d A B e t h e l PHOTO: Patrick Hanna

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President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Patrick Robinson, described Judge Burton Hall's contributions to the justice system of the Bahamas as “invaluable” and said his election asa permanent judge rewards an “illustrious” career in the public service. “I have no doubt that he will also contribute immeasurably to the international community as a judge of this tribunal. “I am indeed grateful for his undertaking of this service.” Judge Hall thanked the government of the Bahamas for its support and for “releasing” him. He also thanked the international community for his appointment. “I trust that the work that I have done before would indeed enable me to fulfill the awesome responsibilities attendant upon the work of this tribunal,” he said. Oath Sir Burton was one of three p ermanent judges to take t heir oath of office on Sept ember 2 at a special ceremony in The Hague, where the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY Judges Guy Delvoie of Belgium and Howard Morrison of the United Kingdom were also sworn in. They were appointed by Secretary–General Ban Ki-Moon and have replaced Judges Christine Van Den Wyngaert, Lord Iain Bonomy and Mohamed Shahabuddeen. Established in 1993, the ICTY was set up to try persons for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991. Judge Hall served for eight years as Chief Justice of the Bahamas. He resigned as head of the judiciary on August 23, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Ex-Chief Justice sworn in as judge on International Criminal Tribunal J UDGE BURTON HALL t akes the oath of office during a ceremony to mark his appointment to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. office yesterday. He added that his vision for the party "is practical, results oriented and inclusive. "The ethos of ‘Progress Now’ is teamwork. We need all PLPs to recommit themselves to o ur party and work together with a single purpose of restoring the PLP as the government of t he Bahamas," said Mr Dorsett, who said he supports incumbent party leader Perry Christie. Former PLP chairman Bradley Roberts was among the small group of supporters at yesterday's press conference and threw his support behind Mr Dorsett's bid. "I think Mr Dorsett is a good man. He's an outstanding young man, check his credentials and history with the party," Mr Roberts told The Tribune after the announcement. But Mr Roberts, who recently said he had not ruled out the chance of running for the post again, remained vague when asked if hehad decided not to challenge Ms Hanna-Mar tin himself. "A lot of people are asking me to do so (run for PLP chairman the matter," he said. Meantime Mr Dorsett said his team will fully unveil its platform for change on Sunday. He said the plan will focus on ten areas: Timely and aggressive messaging, membership relations, reviewing the roles of leader and chairman and revitalizing our branches, campaign education and training, recruitment and candidate selection, financing and sustainable funding, empowering of youth and women, recognising and empowering party supporters, family island development and participation. Several positions within the PLP will be contested going in to its convention later this month. So far only one person lawyer Paul Moss has officially launched a campaign against party leader Perry Christie. The PLP convention is slated for October 21 to 23. It’s official: Kenred Dorsett to run for PLP chairmanship F ROM page one McKenzie, Kayla Bodie and Ian Neely. The union also argued that the bank breached its mandate by making "unauthorised payments" from its bank account and is calling for an account and inquiry into its account at the bank. The writ also directs Bank of the Bahamas to pay theu nion whatever sum is found due to the plaintiff after the mentioned inquiry. The union is also suing for interest, costs and whatever relief deemed just by the Supreme Court. Back in August, around $665,000 was transferred from the union's bank account at the Harrold Road branch of Bank of the Bahamas. The transfer requests were r eportedly made by union assistant treasurer Samantha Gray, trustee Ian Neely and purported assistant secretary general Raymond Wright days after Nicole Martin was ousted as the union's presi dent. A ccording to a newspaper report, Mr Wright was to receive $73,600 of the request ed money, while Ms Gray and Ms Neely were to receive $21,450 and $30,026 respectively. The transfer also included $140,000 in legal fees intended to cover the challenge led by then first vice-p resident Kirk Wilson, which nullified the May election that brought Ms Martin to power. In August, Bank of the Bahamas maintained it acted "legally and in full accordance with its fiduciary responsibil ity in executing disburse-m ents, following authorisation by and instructions from the union." FROM page one Hotel union files suit against Bank of the Bahamas Glenys Hanna-Martin

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attempting to extort $25 million from the 55-year-old actor. Bridgewater is also charged with abetment to extort. Mr Travolta testified yesterday that on January 16, he was informed by his longtime friend and employee Ronald Zupancic that there was a threat against him and a demand for money. According to Mr Travolta, he was told that the threat was regarding the “release paper” he had signed in the Bahamas and that if $25 million was not paid certain stories connected to the document would be sold to the media. When asked by lead prosecutor and Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner as to what kind of stories he referred to, Mr Travolta replied: “Stories that would imply that the death of my son was intentional and I was culpable in some way.” Mr Travolta said that he told Mr Zupancic that he would speak to his attorney about the matter and that they needed to do whatever they needed to do to investigate the situation. He further testified that he laters poke to Michael McDermott one of his attorneys who gave him certain instructions. “I gave him permission to go to the authorities based on the information he told me,” Mr Travolta said. Under cross-examination Mr Travolta admitted that he did not know Bridgewater nor Lightbourne, although he had met Lightbourne before. Mr Travolta also admitted that no direct threats or demands for money were made by either of the accused although Lightbourne’s attorney Carlson Shurland pointed out that his client had a telephone number for Mr Travolta’s office in California, which he had obtained from the “release” document. Mr Travolta also admitted that he could not say “categorically” that what his representatives had told him was correct. Following Mr Travolta’s testimony, PLP Senator Allyson Maynard-Gibson was recalled to the witness stand as the brief taped conversation she had with Bridgewater on January 17 was played in court. During the telephone conversation Mrs MaynardGibson told Bridgewater that she had spoken to Mr McDermott who she said was flying to Nassau to speak with her (Bridgewater Mrs Maynard-Gibson asked Ms Bridgewater if she could give McDermott her cellular phone number and Bridge w ater agreed to her giving Mr McDermott both her cell and office number. “My people have been calling me today and telling me they have a deadline,” Bridgewater told Mrs Maynard-Gib s on. Mrs Maynard-Gibson t old her that the fact that Mr McDermott was coming showed to Nassau that the matter was being taken seriously. Responding to a question raised by the jury as to whether Mrs Maynard-Gibson had ever told Bridgewater that what she was doing was illegal she responded: “I said Pleasant you know what you are doing is wrong.” Mrs Maynard-Gibson said that she told Bridgewater this while en route to the airport following a meeting with her in Freeport. According to Mrs M aynard-Gibson, Bridgewat er said that her client’s posit ion was that he could have her or a “jungalist” lawyer. When asked why she had not mentioned this in her statement to police Mrs MaynardGibson responded by saying that while making her statement she was only speaking specifically to her client’s concerns. Attorney Michael McDermott also took the witness stand yesterday. He told the court that after receiving a telephone call from attorney Michael Ossi, he made a phone call to West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe. Mr McDermott told the court that he “initially spoke to a male and subsequently a female.” That conversation he said lasted for about 18 minutes. Mr McDer mott further testified that while in Nassau on January 18 around 9.17pm, he had a taped telephone conversation in his room (328 aton Hotel, Cable Beach. Mr McDermott said that he had given police authorisation to tap his telephone and that the conversation lasted for about 15 or 20 minutes. Mr McDermott further testified that on January 19, he met with Bridgewater in his hotel room for about 40 minutes. Mr McDermott is expected to be recalled this morning when the trial continues before Senior Justice Anita Allen. Director of Public Prosecu tions Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. Ms Bridgewater is represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carlson Shurland and Mary Bain. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Travolta tells of pressure to meet $25m demand F ROM page one LAWYER for Travolta Michael McDermott outside court. CAMERAMEN line the street outside the courts yesterday as John Travolta goes to testify. SENATOR Pleasant Bridgewater smiles as she leaves court. “Stories that w ould imply that t he death of my son was i ntentional and I w as culpable in some way.” John Travolta

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Vincent Lloyd Ferguson to be laid to rest today C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 13 .,'=&,7< 6$/( %,* TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM REFEREES Randy Cunningham (second from leftfar right their respects at the memorial service... A PORTRAIT of the l ate Vincent Lloyd Ferguson (below was mounted at the e ntrance to Loyola Hall... A NUMBER o f people attended a memorial service for the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson at Loyola Hall on Tuesday night... Photos by Felip Major /Tribune staff

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It seems as if Boxing Commission has Mackes future hanging in the balance C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net HAVING been down the same road before, Ray Minus Jr said there’s no concern about Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey getting stripped of his British Commonwealth super middleweight title. On Tuesday, the Common wealth Boxing Council stripped Mackey of the title and has declared it vacant after Mackey lost Saturday night to Haitian-born Canadian Adonis Stevenson in his bid for the World Boxing Council’s International Championships in Montreal, Canada. Mackey, 29, was scheduled to make a mandatory title defense against Charles Adamu of Ghana at the end of the month at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. It would have been Mack ey’s first defense since win ning the title on July 19, 2008, on points over Michael Gbenga at the KGLI Gymnasium. But on Saturday night, Mackey suffered a technical knockout 20 seconds into the fifth round after a cut he received from the third round by Stevenson was too severe for him to continue. It was the second time Mackey has lost in Canada. In fact, all four of his losses since he turned pro on February 28, 2004, with a second round KO over Eugene Williams have been on the road. Minus Jr, who was in Mackey’s corner during the fight, said it was an opportu nity for Mackey to improve on his ranking in an attempt to get closer to a world title shot. “We don’t have no gripes. We feel okay with the ruling. We see the sense in it,” Minus Jr said. “We expected it. We knew ahead of time that we would have jeopardised the title if he had lost. “But we are excited, we are moving forward and we are looking at getting back at it as soon as we can.” During his days as a ban tam weight and lightweight, Minus Jr also held the British Commonwealth titles, but he relinquished them when he took the opportunity to go after a world title. Minus fought and lost in three attempts. Mackey, who had to get some stitches to close up the cut after the fight, was given a 45-day suspension in which he is not allowed to fight, which ruined his chance to defend his British Common wealth title against Charles Adamu of Ghana at the end of the month. “He’s going to take a couple of weeks off, then we will get him back into the gym,” Minus Jr said. “Hopefully he will be ready to fight again in December. “We’re just going to keep fighting and try to line up a lot of matches as soon as possible and get him on a nice win streak again.” As the manager of Mackey, Minus Jr said they just wants to box and whenever the opportunity for another title shot comes up, they want to be in a position to go for it. “We have our goals and we hope that we can get the opportunity,” he said. “We love boxing and we just want to take advantage of every opportunity to box.” ‘Choo Choo’ taking ‘a couple of weeks off ONE minor boxing title is supposed to lead to a major title as a boxer tries toi mprove on his world ranki ng. In the case of Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey, the Commonwealth Boxing Council has decided to strip him after he fought and lost to H aitian-born Canadian Adon is ‘Superman’ Stevenson on Saturday night. The fifth-round technical knockout forced the move by the CBC as Mackey had a mandatory defense of his B ritish Commonwealth title f ight lined up against Charles Adamu of Ghana at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium at the end of the month. M ackey, 29, risked it all when he journeyed to Montreal, Canada, to face the undefeated Stevenson in the co-main event for the vacant World Boxing Council’sI nternational title. N ow his future is also in jeopardy because of the loss. Bahamas Boxing Commission’s chairman Pat ‘The Centreville Assassin’ Strachan, in a press release yesterday, indic ated that after their meeting o n Tuesday, they unanimously decided to act on the recommendation of the medical committee, headed by Dr Munir Rashad, as to when Mackey will be allowed to f ight again. T he release further indicated that a medical team will meet with Mackey today for the purpose of an examina-t ion. Rashad is then expected to report the findings to the commission and a decision will be made on how long Mackey will be mandated to refrain from engaging in ab oxing match. I t seems as if the commission has Mackey’s future hanging in the balance. But is it fair to Mackey, who should have the right to choose to either hold onto a t itle, relinquish it and go a t otally different route, if he so desires. The commission has a big decision ahead of them. So does Mackey and his handlers, Ray Minus Jr and M ichelle Minus of First Class P romotions. Maybe, it might be in the best interest of all concerned if everybody can come togeth-e r and sort out the dilemma because whatever decision is made, the future of one of the country’s most outstanding professional fighters is on the line. I can understand all of the c oncern the commission has had about Mackey taking the fight with his British Commonwealth title defense on the horizon. He’s the only Caribbean w ho holds one of the titles in t he organisation and many had him held in high esteem because of his achievement. By the same token, you really couldn’t fault Mackey for taking a gamble and going a fter a more prestigious title t hat would have helped him to climb up the ladder in the WBC’s rankings. It’s not that the British C ommonwealth title would have weighed in more than the WBC’s International title, when consideration would have been given to Mackey in the future for a possible title shot. M ackey would have had to be seen by the WBC in order to secure a ranking. So itm ight have been a good move by his camp. It was just unfortunate that he was unable toc omplete the fight after gett ing cut over his right eye. Over the years, Mackey is not the first Bahamian to h ave taken a chance to go after a title fight and lost. I’m sure he won’t be the laste ither. I t’s just that he had a little more at stake at the time than any of the others. Hopefully it won’t be a setback that will hinder himf rom making a comeback, if n ot this year, next year when he’s given the green light by the commission to step back into the ring. HOME C ELEBRATIONS T HE Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture is preparing to bring Team Bahamas members home for celebrations following for their performance at the 12th IAAF W orld Championships in A thletics. The championships were held in August in Berlin, Germany, but the celebrationsh ave been delayed until this month because some of the athletes were still competing on the international circuit. The ministry, however, has not yet disclosed the specific plans for the celebrations,w hich are not expected to be as elaborate as those in the past. Part of that is a result oft he current worldwide economic crisis. But whatever happens, the a thletes deserve a reception, e specially veteran sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup, who h elped the Bahamas secure the two medals – silver and bronze. W e just have to wait and s ee what type of celebrations will be staged. OPINION STUBBS ADONIS Stevenson (left ing their WBC International match last Friday in Montreal. Stevenson won the title with a fifth round TKO...

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FAMILY MEMBERS of the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson attend his memorial service at Loyola Hall. Shown (l-r Alex, his wife Mary and daughter Anne-Marie. See photos on page 13... B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WHILE many people remember Vincent Lloyd Ferguson as an extraordi-n ary sportsman and educator, members of the Bahamas Association of Basketball Officials (BABO mentor. Tony Williams, president o f the BABO, said the late Ferguson was responsible for grooming him and a number of the persons who are officiating basketball today. Ferguson, 71, will be laid to rest today in the Catholic Cemetery on Tyler Street,C hippingham, following his 2pm funeral service at St Francis Xavier Cathedral, W est Hill Street. According to Williams, Ferguson was instrumental in getting him certified as an international referee. “As the president of BABO, Vince made sure that I went to Jamaica to take the course and I obtained my license through him,” he said. As vice president serving under Ferguson during his tenure as president, Williams said if it wasn’t for his mentor and friend, he probably would not have still been involved in the association. “I remember asking him one question: ‘Why can’t referees associate with play ers?’ If you know him as a disciplinary person, he asked me ‘no you tell me why.’ That was the beginning of our relationship and through his persistence and his discipline, I am still involved in the sport today as a referee.” Having Ferguson as a mentor had its positive side as Williams said he was not just taught the game, but hewas given the opportunity to go throughout the Bahamas and even the Caribbean lending his expertise. “He took me under his wings many days under the tree at R M Bailey as he made it a point to discipline me,” Williams said. “I always remember one thinghe used to tell me and that is you can’t always be on top of the fence. “And every time he saw me, he used to say: ‘Oh, you’re still on top of the fence, until I became the president of BABO that I really realised what he was trying to say about what he meant about being on top of t he fence.” Not only did he help to groom him, but Williams said he remembered how Ferguson took him, Keith Reid and Rodney Johnson to his house and instructed them on life. “He encouraged me to go back to school and further my education and he also encouraged me to get married,” said Williams, who looked at Ferguson as a father figure. “He was just a tough char acter and I’m really sad that he is gone. He also used to say to me ‘Little Tony, who are going to inherit the land.I guess what he meant is now is my time to step up to the plate and run the association.” If there is any regret, Williams said it’s probably the fact that members of BABO and other officials didn’t spend more time being instructed by Ferguson on the game. “Just before his passing, we were thinking about having a Vince Ferguson Day,” Williams pointed out. “But when we went to see him, he said he wasn’t up to speed and he wasn’t feeling well.” Four or five days later, Williams said they got the sad news that Ferguson had passed away. “We should have done it earlier. All we can do is say thanks for all that you’ve done for the association,” said Williams, to Ferguson’s family that includes his wife, Mary and children AnneMarie and Alex. As a personal note, Williams said he’s grateful for the manner in which Fer guson impacted his life so that he is now able to makea contribution to the sport. TONY WILLIAMS V incent Lloyd Fer guson was a mentor and father figure C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 14 ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey taking ‘a couple of weeks off’... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A NUMBER of sporting and educational personalities attended a memorial service for the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson (portrait top right at Loyola Hall on Tuesday night. He was 72. Ferguson reportedly died at his home after a massive heart attack. He was suffer-i ng from prostate cancer. H is funeral service is schedu led to be held 2pm today at S t Francis Xavier Cathedral, West Street. Ferguson will be buried in the Catholic Cemetery on Tyler Street. He is survived by his wife M ary and two children, AnneMarie and Alex. Among t hose who paid tribute to Ferg uson during the memorial service was Jackie Wright, a member of the Former Past& Present Professional Baseball Players Association that was headed by Ferguson. Others included Martin Lundy, director of sports in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, who worked with Ferguson at StA ugustine’s College, Keith T hompson, who worked with F erguson at Aquinas College, E llen Adderley, who worked with Ferguson in the Bahamas Basketball Federation, and Val Maura, of Us Too Cancer Support Group. T he service was conducted by Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd, a f ormer educator who also w orked with Ferguson. Hundreds flock to memorial service P h o t o s b y F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor S andals has “stayed true” to its projected $12 million investment in upgrading the newly-acquired Emerald Bay resort, its chief executive said yesterday, with 80 construction workers now on site and the chain per cent committed” to making the development a success. Adam Stewart, Sandals International Resorts’ chief executive, told Tri bune Business in an interview from London that Sandals has “no doubt we can make this resort a success”, with construction work having Sandals % committed’ to Emerald Bay’s success By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor T HE Sandals Royal Bahamian resort’s occupancy levels are “holding” in the 70 per cent range, the resort chain’s chief executive toldT ribune Business yesterday, adding that the whole company has “never worked harder in our lives” to maintain business levels in the face of the global recession. S peaking to Tribune Busin ess from London, Adam Stewart, who is also the son of Sandals Resorts Internation-a l’s chairman, Gordon ‘Butch’ Stewart, said the company’s Nassau-based resort was like By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor A MAJOR mixed-use resort project is projected to generate an annual economici mpact ranging from $54 mill ion to $90 million for the Bahamian economy, its principals told Tribune Business yesterday, adding that the 291 l ot sales they have closed have brought “hundreds of visitors t o Long Island”. In a series of e-mailed answers to Tribune Business’s questions, Ian Moorcroft, one of the principals behind the P ort St George project, earm arked for a site next to Long I sland’s existing Stella Maris s ubdivision, said being debt free had been “critical” to its a bility to weather the global recession and credit crunch. Many projects have run i nto difficulties because bankers withdrew lines of credit or, worse still, recalled outstanding loans,” Mr Moorc roft told Tribune Business. “Real estate development is long term and capital inten-s ive. Consequently, most d evelopers are reliant upon lines of credit, and many have been heavily geared in recent years. Because the Port St George project is free of anye xternal debt we did not suff er from the same difficult ies.” M r Moorcroft added that t he economic impact analysis c onducted for Port St George b y Norton Consulting, and submitted to the Bahamas I nvestment Authority as part o f the project applications, predicted that the developm ent would have an annual economic impact of between $54 million and $90 million. Although unable to contract any lot pre-sales at Port S t George until subdivision approval was obtained, Mr M oorcroft said the develope rs had instead been able to sell real estate in the neighbouring Stella Maris subdivision. Our original target was 3 00 sales and we have closed 291 to date, so we are very p leased with the sales results. These sales have resulted in h undreds of visitors to Long Island, most of whom stay at the Stella Maris Resort Club,” C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.17 B y NEIL HARTNELL B usiness Editor P RIME Minister Hubert Ingraham must speak more frequently about what his government is doing to arrest the ailing economy, a former Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president s aid yesterday, warning that business and investor confidence could be further damaged in t he absence of clear d irection from the administration. Arguing that the Bahamas “needs a captain o f the ship who can keep the passengers calm”, Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, told Tribune Business: “The full e ffects of this recession are beginning to be f elt.” It’s beginning to flat line a little, and the m ood is very glum and gloomy,” Mr D’Aguilar said of the Bahamian business community. “The mood in the country is really sour and really gloomy.” Tribune Business previously revealed that m any businesses, especially those in the retail ‘Captain of the ship must calm the passengers’ * Ex-Chamber chief says PM needs to speak more frequently on economic matters to bolster public, investor and business confidence D’AGUILAR SEE page 4B B y NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor THE Securities Commission yesterday said it would “in very short order” send w hat it hopes is the final draft of the Securities Industry Act and its accompanying regula t ions off for ministerial approval, the most “touchy” reform proposal being ther equirement for public com panies to file audited finan cial statements within 90 days o f year-end. H illary Deveaux, the Com mission’s executive director, t old Tribune Business that the regulator was hoping the new Act and regulations, which are badly needed to mod ernise the sector, “will be brought into force before the end of the year”. The timing, though, will depend on what happens when the Ministry of Finance and Attorney General’s Office review the final draft of the legislation and regulations that will be presented to them by the Securities Commission. Mr Deveaux told Tribune Business that most of the industry feedback on the proposed reforms centred on the Securities Commission’s powers, enforcement, disclosure, the “ongoing requirements of public companies”, and the move to file the audited finan c ial statements of Bahamian public companies within 90 days of year-end, rather than the current 120 days. The reforms are also proposing that Bahamian public companies file their unaudited quarterly manage ment accounts within 60 days of period end, rather than the current 90 days they are allowed. “The touchy one really was the requirement to have audited financial statements move from a 120-day filing to a 90-day filing, and there’s going to have to be a major discussion,” Mr Deveaux told Tribune Business. “I think our approach to dealing with the transition 90-day year end audit file r eform is ‘touchy’ SEE page 10B SEE page 7B SEE page 8B * Securities Commission to send final Securities Industry Act draft to government ‘in very short order’, and hoping passed by Parliament before 2009 is out Resort predicted to have $54-90m economic impact Hotel’s occupancy ‘holding’ at 70 per cent Resort chain’s chief executive says entire company ‘never had to work harder in our lives’ to stimulate demand Sandals % committed’ to Emerald Bay’s success By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor S andals has “stayed true” to its projected $12 million i nvestment in u pgrading the newlyacquired Emerald Bay r esort, its chief executive said yesterday, with 80 con struction workers now on site and the chain per cent committed” to making t he development a success. A dam Stewart, Sandals I nternational Resorts’ chief e xecutive, told Tribune Business in an interview f rom London that Sandals has “no doubt we can maket his resort a success”, with c onstruction work having a lready started on creating the one-acre pool and deck for Sandals Emerald Bay. We have about 80 peo ple on site,” Mr Stewart said. “It goes from a low ofa bout 70 to a high of about 220 [on the construction side]. That is estimated. “Construction has started on the pool, which is the l argest infrastructure we are doing. We are on target to o pen on January 22.” Mr Stewart said the $12 m illion budget Sandals had set for much-needed upgrades and renovations at Emerald Bay had stayed true”, with the p ool, landscaping, interiors and furnishings forming the bulk of that investment. ARTIST’S impression of the one-acre pool and deck at Sandals E merald Bay * Resort chain ‘staying true’ to $12m upgrades b udget for newly-acquired Exuma property * Renovations to include one-acre pool and deck, and largest jacuzzi in Caribbean * 80 construction workers already on site to work on pool, with numbers t o range from 70 to 220 peak * Sandals’ operational team based at Emerald Bay for past 12 days, analysing plans SEE page 9B

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Target the young to combat crime L AST Sunday saw my daughter and I at the launch of this year’s Junior Achievement Programme. I was pleasantly surprised to see the ballroom at the British Colonial Hilton filled to c apacity with parents and students alike. On a Sunday afternoon, to see that many young people out and, most importantly, supported by their parents is critical to developing a successful Bahamas.I nvesting in our future is good business practice, as it ensures continuity of cult ure and nationhood. It, in my opinion, instills the ethics, discipline and quality assurance necessary to succeed in today’sg lobal environment. Kudos to the numerous corporate sponsors represented, who h ave invested in young people, BTC, BEC, Deloitte & Touche and the Police Staff Association, just to name a few. T his ‘standing room only’ turn out was a pleasant reminder that all is not lost. Despite the bombardment of negative news, we must be reminded that theseh orrific stories that have filled the headl ines over the last few years are, in the first instance, being committed by a handful of perpetrators. Good news, however, does not sell, thus the poor t urnout of the media during this event. S econd, many of the crimes today are b eing committed by repeat offenders. Thus I can still comfortably say that it is n ot as bad as it may seem, albeit there is r oom for improvement. Y ou might be saying at this point: What does this have to do with crime and loss prevention? Where does youth d evelopment and nurturing fit into crime f ighting? Simply put: 'Everything'. Investi ng in these young minds, via programmes such as Junior Achievement, the Boys and Girls Brigade /Scouts and your church’s Sunday school programme, begins the lifelong molding process nec-e ssary to develop good character, ethics a nd morals. This does not mean that none of these persons will become criminals tomorrow. However, what we are saying is, as mentioned, a small majority will fall to t he way side and there is no excuse for criminal and deviant behavior. I will ven ture to say that there is no young person in this Bahamas, past or present, who has not been exposed to, or given an opportunity, to benefit from some posi tive programme. Our claim to a Christian heritage has ensured that the great m ajority have been exposed to church in some form or the other. Yet you will see by the statistics that crime, especially violent crimes, are beingc ommitted by our young people. So, what has gone wrong? I say nothing! I say we are experiencing the fact that we cannot save them all. We live in a world where some of us will come up short and not meet the mark. Unfortunately, we are focusing on the failurea nd not the successes. I put it to you that i f you train up a child while they are young, when they are old they shall not depart from it. This, of course, means directing their paths at an early stage toa void putting ourselves in a position of t rying to correct the decay years in the making. We are allowing the fear of crime to t ake us down a path of potential despera tion and panic, thus reducing our ability as a society to think of rational solutions. For example, I am a proponent of the death penalty. Not because of its d eterrent qualities, but because it is 'pun ishment', simple and straightforward. It is not 'problem solving', ‘ a reduction' or ' deterrent', although if these residual effects occur then that is an added benef it. Solutions to our crime problem are multifaceted. I do not think there is a m agic bullet. Thus the argument that the death penalty is not going to reduce crime is very true, as the sentence is only given after the crime of murder hasa lready been committed. The 'penalty' c an only be given after the 'foul'. To stop the crime, we must make serious efforts in assisting our youth ,especially young m en and women, to better manage their a nger and aggression. The cry for more h anging is, in my opinion, bordering on a lynch mob mentality, as it is a sign of desperation and frustration an emotional grasping at straws. We are attempt i ng to use punishment as a way to halt to deviant behavior, as opposed to preventing opportunities for the behaviour to occur. What, then, you may ask. Well, I will n ot contradict myself. Let us continue to pray, not for peace, but ways to create peace. You see, peace and safety do not, and will not, fall from the sky. We must create this culture, a society of peace.T his begins with teaching our young people structure and order, and demons trating the benefits of the same. They need to understand that rules and regulations lend to a civil society and direct-l y affect the level of peace a nation experiences. N ow, what about the young adults, those who are no longer children? Are we to toss them aside? Well, as the say-i ng goes: ‘Bend the tree while it is young’. If we have missed this opportunity, then a more aggressive bending process needs to take place. Boat builders who wish tof ashion wood for boats usually expose t he wood to heat/steam andpressure. Similarly, our young adults who have fallen by the wayside must be pressured and exposed to heat that will attempt to p urge the negative tendency. Boot C amps, which are geared to reintroduci ng social and problem-solving skills that demand team work and group efforts. W e need not wait for them to break the l aw, for I believe that by the time they a re actually caught breaking the law they have gotten away at least ten times before. Alas folks, as mentioned earlie r, some will fall to the wayside as the Parable of the Sower’ so clearly illust rates. Remember and support, with your time and money, the Junior Achievers, Brigades and Scouts, the numerous positive youth groups that have proven suc-c essful. All is not lost NB: Gamal Newry is the president of Preventative Measures, a loss prevention and asset protection training and consulting company, specialising in poli cy and procedure development, business security reviews and audits, and emergency and crisis management. Com ments can be sent to PO Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas or, e-mail gnewry@gmail.com or visit us at www.preventativemeasures.net C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN Core Responsibilities: Knowledge Skills and Abilities: Institutional.leadership@gmail.com FOR SALE60 tonne packaged Air Conditioning Unit 18yrs old 7”width 6”height 33’length Can be viewed at Carl G. Treco Construction 120 Mackey Street South All offers will be considered!302-9875 COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/CLE/gen/01745I N THE SUPREME COURT C ommon Law & Equity Division B ETWEEN SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS P laintiff AND K ASSON K. NEWTON D efendant To: Kasson K. Newton TAKE NOTICE that:1.An action has been commenced against you by Scotiabank (Bahamas Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of S ummons led on the 22nd of October 2 008 being Action No. 2008/CLE/ gen/01745, wherein the Plaintiffs claim is for the total sum of $23,294.64 which represents the principal sum of $10,752.09 together with accrued interest on the said principal in the sum of $11,526.62, addon charges in the sum of $561.90, and interest on the said add-on charges in t he sum of $454.03 due under a loan n umbered 1503359. 2.It has been ordered that service of the Writ of Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of this advertisement. 3.You must within 21 days from the publication of this advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication, acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons by entering an Memorandum of Appearance o n the Attorneys whose name and address appear below, otherwise judgment may be entered against you. D ated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009 G RAHAM, THOMPSON & CO., Chambers, Sassoon House, S hirley Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas. A ttorneys for the Plaintiff Safe & Secure by Gamal Newry To advertise, call 502-2371

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net S OME FAMILY Island resorts have suffered a lower t han average slow season, down some 75 per cent compared to last year’s 30 per cent occupancy levels, according to the Abaco Beach Resort’s general manager.S ome properties have closed altogether for the two-month slow period. Bob Kramm said business was markedly down at many resorts across the wider Bahamas, adding that thee conomy has everything to do with it. Mr Kramm operates the largest marina in the Bahamas, and one of Abaco’s f oremost resorts. However, he said the 25 to 30 per cent occupancy range his propertyh as traditionally enjoyed yearo n-year during September and October has been further reduced by close to 75 per cent. W hen Tribune Business visited the property last week, t he marina, typically containing a mass of pleasure yachts and sail boats, moored onlys everal boat spread across its e xpanse. “Normally there are more boats here,” said Mr Kramm. Like many resorts, the Abaco Beach Resort has not abandoned marketing cam-p aigns despite the financially s training economic conditions. According to Mr Kramm, his resort continues to advertise on the Internet and in specialist boating magazines. W hile some hotels have b een able to stabilise their visi tor inflows through targeting niche markets, others have used the traditional slow season to conduct infrastructural upgrades and expand theirr oom portfolio. T he Coral Sands hotel in Harbour Island, North Eleuthera, is currently constructing four new cottages on their property, which ares cheduled to be open by yearend. General Manager, Pamela B erry, told Tribune Business t hat 2009 will be the first year her resort will be open for the annual North Eleuthera Regatta. She said the town council asked if the resortc ould be opened, as the regatt a often demands much of the island’s available rooms, with visitors pouring in from Nassau and other Family Islands. Ms Berry said Coral Sands’ occupancy levels have beend own like many other resorts a cross the Bahamas, but said the traditionally strong periods, such as Spring Break and the August European vacation season, were marginally g ood. I n August, Coral Sands was a lso host to a delegation of Miss Universe contestants, who dined for lunch and posed for photos on the beach adjacent to the resort. M any resorts across the C aribbean have resorted to slashing rates, but many Bahamian resorts have been reluctant to do this because of their high operating costs. M inister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, recently said m ost Bahamian resorts offer d iscounts to residents in an effort to boost domestic tourism. Ms Berry said Coral Sands will offer a special 20 per cent off their room rates for thisy ear’s regatta. With stopover arrivals to New Providence down some 14 per cent, Baha Mar recently had to shut down its Wyndham Nassau Resort and C rystal Palace Casino in order t o reduce operational costs during the traditionally slow season. Vice President of External Affairs at the resort, RobertS ands, said it was still too earl y to say if the closure had the desired effect, but he revealed that the resort and casino will be reopening as planned on October 5. “Staff have been gradually c oming back with a larger b uild up coming Thursday and Friday,” said Mr Sands. According to him, bookings for the month of October for the property have been picki ng up, though he asserts that t he month will see very soft o ccupancy levels. “We anticipate some good local business because of local groups and two political party conventions during the montho f October, and a number of g aming events planned for the week after opening, which will also stimulate business as well as local food and beverage functions scheduled,” said MrS ands. He said all but one of the resort’s vendors are scheduled t o return, and cab drivers who w ere forced to join the Sheraton’s queue will now be able to return to the Wyndham. Mr Sands contends that closing the resort for two months was one of the betters trategic decisions Baha Mar has made. “As we review the details of this event we will be at a position internally to reviewt he full impact of the closing,” h e said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Slow season occupancies down 75 per cent For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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sector, saw year-over-year sales decreases of anywhere b etween 15 per cent to 30 per cent in August, the largest comparative declines against 2008 to date. This newspaper understands that trend has carried over into September, traditionally one of the weakest months for the economy as it is the low point in the tourism season. Tribune Business has b een told that some business, including retailers of high-end products, have seen sales declines ranging from 30 per cent to 50 per cent. “September is always a particularly gloomy month, but when you hear the Minister of Tourism and there’s nothing positive coming out, and group bookings are down it’s not a good sign,” the former Chamber president said. He added that “for the life of me, I don’t understand why they do not want to do what is necessary” to enact the reforms necessary to enable the Bahamian financial ser-v ices industry to compete with i ts offshore rivals, even though Brian Moree, senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, had been “pleading, screaming” for this to happen. I can’t for the life of me u nderstand why they are not jumping on that,” Mr D’Aguilar said of the Government and financial services reform. “I feel like we’re on a ship that, when you hit turbulence and go through a rough period, the captain calms everyone down. I feel it’s important that our leaders try and calm everyone down and say what’s positive. “We just don’t hear from the captain of the ship. Youd on’t hear anything, and e veryone’s thinking what they want to think. This blackout on everything is not good.” The former Chamber president added: “Hubert Ingra-h am’s approach of not saying a nything unless you’ve got something to say is not necessarily a good thing. You need the captain of the ship to keep the passengers calm. “But you’re not hearing anything. The Hubert Ingraham of 2009 is not the Hubert Ingraham of 2002..... I’m sure he has a plan, knows what he’s doing, got a direction he’s going in, but no one knows. That’s why we got blindsided in Abaco [on BEC’s Wilson City power plant], why we gotb lindsided on the Arawak Cay p ort, because no one is saying anything.” Apart from keeping the Bahamian public abreast of developments, Mr D’Aguilars aid the information vacuum w as also hurting confidence in the business and investment community, often the most c ritical factor in untying the p urse strings. H e added that, in the a bsence of a clearly defined p olicy and strategic direction outlined by the Prime Minist er, no information was being given to the business community since no other minister was releasing pertinent details. H owever, in an address to the Conference of the Amer i cas on Tuesday, the Prime M inister said that while the Bahamas’ government debt to gross domestic product (GDP above 50 per cent, his admin-i stration was committed to r etreating with “all deliberate h aste” from such a high debt level as soon as possible. M r Ingraham said the Bahamas will also move swiftly to create “even more headroom to see us through the next inevitable downturn on the assumption that no mirac le economic model will emerge to relegate economic c ycles to the dustbin of histo ry.” H e added: “These lessons i ndicate the following: We m ust make an honest assessm ent of the risks posed to our g lobal economic and financial systems and avoid placing blame where it is not due; we must have a better means of assessing and responding to systemic risk in the global f inancial architecture and one that demonstrates equity in c alling all economies, those of the developed and developing world, into account. We must promote greater equity in the international d evelopment process so as to make the prospects for sustained growth of the world economy more enduring and widespread, and we must bet ter co-ordinate global resources in order to maximise use. This is especially true with respect to those resources channelled by the multilateral lending and aid agencies.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the October 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsCall 1 888 496 6173 (toll free to fast-track your career MBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Hallam University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders) University of WalesOnline/distance learning from RDI in the Bahamas Develop your career while studying No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included Free membership of International Management Academy UNIVERSITY OF WALES University of Wales BA (Hons Business (top up Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA(Hons Business&Management(top up), BA (Hons Financial Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons Psychology University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons) Business Computing (top up) BSc (Hons Tourism (top up BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES MASTERS All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009 p.m . in the Board room of the Michael Eldon Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas. NOTICE NOTICE OF DISSOLUTIONof YACKYREALTYand CONSTRUCTION INC. Notice is hereby given that liquidation of the above company commenced on the 29th day of September, 2009. Credit Suisse Trust Limited of Bahamas Financial Centre, Shirley & Charlotte Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas has been appointed Liquidator of the Company. ___________________________ Credit Suisse Trust Limited Liquidator The Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort has appointed Andr R. Newbold to the newly-created position of business trav-e l sales manager. B ased in Nassau, Mr Newbold will be r esponsible for deveoping new and existing corporate accounts throughout the Bahamas. He will also attend trade shows, community events and industry meetings on behalf of the resort to devel-o p new client relationships and business leads. Mr Newbold comes to the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort with ten years ofl uxury resort experience and over 20 y ears of experience in the hospitality i ndustry. For the past 10 years, he served as the director of sales at Sandals’ Royal Bahamian Resort Spa & Offshore Island, where he acted as the department headf or sales and marketing and weddings, and supported the general manager on operational issues. He also orchestrated numerous domestic and internationale vents ranging from 100-1000 attendees. P rior to that, Mr Newbold spent 10 y ears as director of sales and marketing at the Sheraton British Colonial Beach Resort, where he managed and supervised sales and marketing functions for the 300-room hotel and supported theg eneral manager on operational issues. Sheraton appoints travel sales chief FROM page 1B

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B y AOIFE WHITE A P Business Writer BRUSSELS (AP pean Union finance ministers will hammer out a new financial oversight framework forE urope during a two-day m eeting a week after the world’s rich and developing nations pledged that they would not allow a return to banking as usual. A t talks Thursday and Friday in Goteborg, Sweden, EU m inisters will also start mapp ing out how they should start withdrawing economic stimulus packages that are helpingt o pull Europe out of the worst recession since the1 930s. L ast week’s Group of 20 s ummit in Pittsburgh called on countries to make sure their regulatory system forb anks “reins in the excesses that led to the crisis.” P utting that into practice in E urope means adding a new E U layer to a patchwork of f inancial supervision across the bloc’s 27 countries. I t could also see a new energetic push for more coun-t ries to sign up to curbs on b onuses that encouraged banks to make risky investments. Sweden, which will lead the talks as the current h older of the EU presidency, s aid EU guidelines on bonuses “need to be sharpened” a nd possibly made binding across Europe. France, the Netherlands and Germany have alreadyd rafted new rules linking banking pay to performance but Britain home to E urope’s biggest trading cen ter has been slower to move. Banks claim that bonus curbs will make it harder for t hem to attract top-drawer tal ent. Governments will hold their first talks on a new econ o my watchdog, the European Systemic Risk Board, which would be tasked with moni toring emerging risks to the economy such as banks running up large exposure to loss e s, swelling asset bubbles and a ny worrying trends on finan cial markets. The board would issue recommendations and warnings to national governments but would not be able to force them to act. European Central Bank President JeanC laude Trichet insisted Mond ay that the board would be far from toothless because it would require governmentso r national supervisors “to take remedial action or otherwise to justify why they have not acted.” The ECB, which sets borr owing costs for the 16 nations that use the euro, will help run the new board and its president will likely lead it. This has triggered concern among EU countries outside the eurozone that this willg ive the ECB a say over countries that don’t use the euro. To allay this, EU officials have hinted that the governor of the Bank of England, M ervyn King, could become t he board’s deputy. Britain is outside the eurozone. T he new oversight framew ork also foresees new banking, insurance and market a uthorities gaining some power to rule against national supervisors in some cases and only if most other EU nations agree. G overnments are likely to want to limit the circums tances under which the EU a uthorities could overrule them. The EU executive suggests it should only be as a last resort to resolve a dispute between different nationals upervisors or to order a nation to bring technical financial standards in line with others. EU ministers will also try to set out principles for how they should end stimulus pro-g rams that are stoking growth this year and next year and how they should start paying off mounting public debt and swelling deficits caused by resc uing banks and spending to stave off the downturn. The recession also highlights one of Europe’s longer term problems: people whol ose their jobs may never find another one because rigid labor conditions make companies reluctant to hire people they can’t easily fire. With unemployment at a 10-year high and still rising,m inisters will talk about different ways to reduce lasting unemployment. Denmark has promoted a model with more flexible contracts where worke rs get regular skills training so they can shift between jobs more easily. Sweden is also keen for EU nations to strike a deal onh ow much Europe should pledge to developing nations to help them tackle climate change a package that the EU wants in place to help secure an ambitious deal to curb global greenhouse gase missions at December talks in Copenhagen. Associated Press writer Louise Nordstrom contributed t o this story from Stockholm C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY APPLICATION SUPPORTTECHNICIAN Core Responsibilities: Knowledge Skills and Abilities: Institutional.leadership@gmail.com EU nations to hammer out financial oversight INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays JEAN-CLAUDE TRICHET

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 7B EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Core Responsibilities: Job Requirements: Or via email to: institutional.leadership@gmail.com M r Moorcroft told Tribune Business. This newspaper reported last week that many of these sales had been to European buyers and international sports personalities. Right toB uy agreements to secure lots on the main Port St George site have been entered into with the purchasers, who must pay a 10 per cent deposit once subdivision drawings are fini shed, the balance being due when infrastructure is comp leted. A lthough no sales can be concluded in the absence of s ubdivision approval, the Port St George developers said then: “A high conversion rate o f right to buy agreements into sales agreements is expected, as the price at which right to buy holders are entitled to purchase is extremely attractive. This has led to some right to buya greements changing hands for a considerable premium. “Whilst the pre-sales from the right to buy agreements are expected to result in approximately 25 per cent of t he plots at Port St George being sold at a substantial disc ount, the early revenue gen e rated is expected to more than cover the costs of infras tructure to the entire site, including construction of the marina and golf course.” W hen asked why Port St George would succeed, when many other Family Islandbased resort projects had failed to match expectations, stalling or going into hibernation until new financingb ecame available, Mr Moorcroft told Tribune Business: “Planning, quality and prudent finances. “Every facet of the project has been fastidiously r esearched, and we are working with industry leaders in e very field. Whilst we are k een to make progress as quickly as we can, it's also i mportant to get things right. “We have all heard of projects where construction has b egun only to be halted after a few months for one reason o r another. We are determ ined that Port St. George w ill not become another n ame on the list of such projects. By following the proper p rocedures, without cutting c orners or making plans based o n assumptions when, with a l ittle more time, they can be based on facts, we believe that Port St George will be a resounding success.” M r Moorcroft told Tribune B usiness that Long Island’s “spectacular beauty” but, m ore importantly, its people, would be what makes Port St George special and differentiates it from rival resorts. “The Long Islanders work ethic is known throughout the Bahamas, but it is their gen uine warmth and friendliness t hat is striking to the visitor. When checking in at the Stella Maris Resort Club guests d on't even need a room key, so safe and secure is the environment. I know of no otherh otel anywhere in the world w here that is the case,” Mr Moorcroft said. Resort predicted to have $54-90m economic impact FROM page 1B

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ly to remain in the 70 per cent occupancy range “for a little while” through the lean months of September andO ctober. “We have had some service issues within the hotel,” Mr Stewart said of Sandals Royal Bahamian. “We have invested quite a bit in the property itself in renovations and u pgrades. We could always be doing better as a property, as a company.” He added that occupancy levels were only one method of gauging a resort property’s p erformance, implying that S andals was having to discount heavily on rates and sacrifice margins to drive business to not only the Bahamas but all its other properties. “The business we’re gett ing, you have to look at the c ost of getting it in,” Mr Stewa rt explained. “The dollars we have spent in advertising, in driving demand, in getting customers to dial the 1-800 Sandals and call their travel agent.... This is a very rough year f or all of us. We have never worked harder in our lives to keep our hotels in the occupancies we have, from the chairman my father down to the line staff. We’ve had to d o more work to drive d emand.” Sandals Royal Bahamian laid-off some 150 of its then650 strong staff in late 2008i n response to the economic downturn and sharply declining business levels, before terminating a further 80 workers this year just prior to the start of the September slow season. D espite this, Mr Stewart said yesterday: “Our occu pancies in Nassau are strong o verall. We’re in the 70 per cents, and are going to hold there for a little while. Sep-t ember and October are the t wo roughest months. “I don’t think they’ll [occupancies] go below the 60 per c ents, which is not great but, o f course, we’d like to remain in the 80s. It’s very hard to run Sandals with that kind of occupancy.” Mr Stewart praised the “strong leadership” at Sand als Royal Bahamian, adding t hat they were in contact with the chain’s head office almost every day to suggest or work on some type of initiative to drive visitor demand.’ “We are not taking our eye o ff the ball, and are trying to d rive sales in the UK,” the Sandals chief executive added, explaining that as part of its efforts to stimulatee xcitement and demand it had just signed an agreement to make every wedding it hosted a Martha Stewart Wedding. Mr Stewart also told Tribune Business that Sandals’ business from Canada was substantially better than in the past”, thanks to the work done by its sales and market-i ng team in that nation. However, the main issue remained that “everyonew ants a deal” in the current r ecessionary environment, hence the pressure not just on Sandals, but the entire resort i ndustry’s, margins and rates. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM &20021:($/7+(%$+$0$6 ,17+((0(&2857 &RPPRQ/DZt(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ %(7:((1 6&27,$%$1.%$+$0$6f/,0,7(' 3ODLQWLII $1' .(/3+,1('-2+1621 'HIHQGDQW 7R.HOSKLQH'-RKQVRQ 7$.(,&(WKDW$QDFWLRQKDVEHHQFRPPHQFHGDJDLQVW\RX 6FRWLDEDQN%DKDPDVf8PLWHGLQWKH6XSUHPH &RXUWRI7KH%DKDPDV:ULWRI6XPPRQVRQ WKHRI-DQXDU\EHLQJ$FWLRQ ZKHUHLQWKH3ODLQWLIIFODLPLVIRUWKHWRWDO RIZKLFKUHSUHVHQWVWKHSULQFLSDO VXPRIDFFUXHGLQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLG SULQFLSDOLQWKHVXPRIDGGRQFKDUJHV LQWKHVXPRIDQGLQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLGDGG RQFKDUJHVLQWKHVXPRIGXHXQGHUORDQ QXPEHUHGDQGWKHSULQFLSDOVXPRI GXHXQGHU0DVWHUFDUG ,WKDVEHHQRUGHUHGWKDWVHUYLFHRIWKH:ULWRI 6XPPRQVLQWKHVDLGDFWLRQEHHIIHFWHGRQ\RXYLUWXHRI WKLVDGYHUWLVHPHQW
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Apart from the pool and deck area, Mr Stewart said that when completed, Sandals Emerald Bay would featuret he largest jacuzzi in the C aribbean bigger than the existing record holder, which was located at another of its resorts. Other features included an authentic British pub, s wim bar and barefoot s eafood restaurant. We feel strongly that we can do it,” Mr Stewart said, when asked how Sandals could make a success of Emerald Bay, given that ther esort had endured a two-year r eceivership after its initial owners/developers had been unable to meet debt repayments. “We gave our commitment to give 110 per cent and do our part. We will do our best. We have no doubt that we can make this resort a suc-c ess.” Mr Stewart said the 110 per cent effort’ commitm ent had been given to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his ministers, likely to include Vincent VanderpoolWallace, minister of tourisma nd aviation. A cknowledging that Sandals had wanted to re-open Emerald Bay earlier than January 22, 2010, Mr Stewart, addressing concerns from some Exumians that Sandals had been less than franka bout its plans for the property, said the chain “cannot divulge information” before it had been determined and it knew what it was doing. The Sandals chief executive said the company was “nom ore than a couple of weeks away” from being able to provide Exumians with firm details on its plans, includingt he number of persons it i ntended to hire for full-time o perations. “As soon as we have firm information, we will let the community know exactly what we are doing,” Mr Stew-a rt told Tribune Business. We will take into account every member of the community. We’re on the brink of disclosing what we feel” Exumians want to know. He added that Sandals “entire operations team”, including the chain’s director of operations, general man-a ger and financial controller, h ad been based at Emerald B ay for the past 12 days, assessing and analysing “every single detail” of the chain’s plans for the property. “This is going to be the first h otel in Sandals history that h as a dedicated butler for every room,” Mr Stewart told Tribune Business, explaining that Emerald Bay would be positioned near the peak of the chain’s resorts, alongside Sandals Royal Bahamian and Sandals Royal Plantation. “This development is almostl ike a big country club.” We really try to focus on i nvesting as much as we can afford back into the physical plant of our resorts,” he added. Emerald Bay will be the second Sandals property to possess a golf course, afterO cho Rios, and also the first o ne with a marina. It is only t he second 500-acre property to be included in Sandals portfolio. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICELYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL A IRPORT IMPOSTION/VARIATION OF FEES AND CHARGES It is hereby notied pursuant to regulation 4(10 (bthe Airport Authority (Amendment Regulations, 2009 that the Airport Authority at a meeting on the 30th day of September, 2009 imposed and or varied fees and charges at the Lynden Pindling International Airport as follows: Aeronautical Fees a) Landing Fees increase 23.6% b) Terminal Fees increase 6.1% c) Aircraft Loading Bridge Fees increase 6.1%d) Aircraft Parking Fees increase 6.1% It is further notied that the said imposition and or variation of Fees and Charges shall take effect at the Lynden Pindling International Airport ninety days from the date of rst publication of this notice. COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009/CLE/gen/00007IN THE SUPREME COURT Common Law & Equity DivisionB ETWEEN SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS P laintiff AND KIM M. MORLEY D efendant To: Kim M. Morley TAKE NOTICE that: 1. An action has been commenced against you by Scotiabank (Bahamas Supreme Court of The Bahamas by Writ of Summons led on the 6th of January 2009 being Action No. 2009/CLE/gen/00007, wherein the Plaintiffs claim is for the total sum of $15,760.63 due under a Visacard No. 4539 3850 1006 0033. 2. It has been ordered that service of the Writ of Summons in the said action be effected on you by virtue of this advertisement. 3. You must within 21 days from the publication of this advertisement inclusive of the day of such publication, acknowledge service of the said Writ of Summons by entering an Memorandum of Appearance on the Attorneys whose name and address appear below, otherwise judgment may be entered against you. Dated the 30th day of September A.D., 2009 GRAHAM, THOMPSON & CO., Chambers, Sassoon House, Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas. Attorneys for the Plaintiff F ROM page 1B

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p eriod for that will be based on how prepared the companies are whether they have the proper systems in place for them to get the financial statements, management accounts to the auditor, alongw ith supporting documents, to ensure this can be accomplished.” Mr Deveaux added that the Securities Commission was “overly concerned that we d on’t put in into law a provis ion that can’t be maintained or sustained, and then have people inferring that the juris-d iction is unable to adhere to the legislation. It has some s erious implications for the jurisdiction.” Mr Deveaux told Tribune Business that the Securities Industry Act was also being reformed to ensure the Bahamas complied with thes tandards and practices endorsed by the international body for securities regulators, IOSCO, especially when it came to information sharing with fellow supervisors. We’re hoping this legisl ation will be brought into force before the end of the year,” the Commission’s exec-u tive director said. “I think we’ve done a thorough cons ultation, and hopefully we can get this final draft, as far as we’re concerned, to the Ministry of Finance and the Attorney General’s Office as soon as possible, and for onward transmission to theC abinet and the various Houses of Parliament for sign-off and bringing into force.” Apart from meeting with individual industry particip ants, the Securities Comm ission also consulted with the major industry represen tative bodies and focus g roups, such as the Bahamas Financial Services Board, B ahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA Bahamas Bar Association and Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers (BACO Mr Deveaux said the regu l ator was also reviewing the feedback received, “and making what adjustments need to be made to the final draft”. All input and comments were being documented, to ensure t hat the Securities Commiss ion could later explain why some suggestions were even tually incorporated into the l egislation, while others were not. B y JEANNINE AVERSA A P Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP economy shrank less than expected in the second quarter as businesses and consumers trimmed their spend-i ng at a slower pace, buttressing b eliefs that the economy is now growing. The 0.7 per cent dip in gross domestic product for the April-June quarter follows the 6.4 per centa nnualized drop in the first three m onths of this year, the worst slide in nearly three decades. In the final quarter of last year, the economy sank at a rate of 5.4 per cent The new reading on second-quarter GDP, reported by the CommerceD epartment on Wednesday, shows t he economy shrinking less than the one per cent pace previously estimated. It also was better than the annualized 1.1 per cent drop that economists were predicting. T he final revision of second-quarter GDP comes on the last day of the third quarter, in which many ana l ysts predict the economy started g rowing again at a pace of about three per cent. "Growth should be solidly posit ive," said Mark Vitner, economist at Wells Fargo Securities. Gross domestic product measures the value of all goods and services from machines to manicures pro-d uced in the US. It is the best estim ate of the nation's economic health. A main reason for the secondquarter upgrade: businesses didn't cut back spending on equipment and software nearly as deeply as the government had thought. Consumersa lso didn't trim their spending as much. But on Wall Street, a surprise drop in the Chicago Purchasing Managers Index, considered a precursor to the national Institute for Supply Management index to be released onT hursday, sent stocks reeling. The Dow Jones industrial average lost more than 80 points in midday trading, and broader indices also fell. Many analysts predict the economy started growing again in the JulyS eptember quarter, due partly to President Barack Obama's $787 bill ion stimulus package and the gov e rnment's now defunct Cash for Clunkers programme, which had g inned up auto sales. It offered people rebates of up to $4,500 to buy new cars and trade in less efficient g as guzzlers. Earlier this month, Federal R eserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said the recession, which started in December 2007, is "very likely o ver." B ut he warned that pain will persist especially for the nearly 15 million unemployed Americans. Because the recovery is expected to slow to a more plodding pace int he coming months, the nation's unemployment rate now at a 26year high of 9.7 per cent is expecte d top 10 per cent this year. Econom ists predict it will have nudged up to 9.8 per cent for September when the government releases that reportF riday. The economy has now contracte d for a record four straight quarters for the first time on records dating to 1947, underscoring the toll the recession has taken on consumers andb usinesses. Economic activity shrank 3 .8 per cent since the second quarter of last year, marking the worst recession since the 1930s. In the second quarter, consumers trimmed their spending at a rate of 0.9 per cent. That was slightly less than the one per cent annualizedd rop estimated a month ago, but marked a reversal from the first quarter when consumers boosted spending 0.6 per cent. Many analysts predict that consumer spending will move back into positive territory again in the thirdq uarter. But worries linger that rising unemployment and still hard-to-get credit could crimp such spending, which accounts for about 70 per cent of economic activity, and hobble the recovery. T hose potentially negative forces along with the troubled commerc ial real-estate market provide r easons for caution, a Fed official said Wednesday. " We all ardently want to believe the nation is on the economic comeback trail," Dennis Lockhart, presid ent of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, said in a speech inM obile, Ala. "I don't think we are served by declaring prematurely that we're in the clear. In thinking about the recovery, I recommend for nowa mindset of measured optimism." M eanwhile, less drastic cuts in business spending contributed to the second-quarter's improved showing. Businesses trimmed spending on equipment and software at a pace of 4.9 per cent. That wasn't as deep as the 8.4 per cent annualized dropp reviously estimated for the second quarter, and marked a big improvement from an annualized plunge of 36.4 per cent in the first quarter. A key area where businesses did cut more deeply in the spring was inventories. T hey slashed spending at a record pace of $160.2 billion. But there's a silver lining to that: With inventories at rock-bottom, businesses have started to boost production to satisfy customer demand, one of the f orces that should lift GDP in the third quarter, analysts say. T he report also showed that aftert ax profits of US corporations rose 0.9 per cent in the spring, the second s traight quarterly gain. Spending on housing projects fell at a rate of 23.3 per cent in the seco nd quarter, also not as deep as the annualized drop of 38.2 per cent int he first quarter. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 0LQLVWU\)LQDQFH5(HDOSURSHUW\WD[XUFKDUJH:DLYHURWLFH 7KHJHQHUDOSXEOLFLVKHUHDGYLVHGRIWKH SURYLVLRQVRIWKH5HDO3URSHUW\7D[$FWKH SULQFLSDO$FWLVDPHQGHGWKHLQVHUWLRQ LPPHGLDWHO\DIWHUVHFWLRQRIWKHIROORZLQJ QHZVHFWLRQ$DQGUHVSHFWIXOO\ $DLYHURIVXUFKDUJH 1RWZLWKVWDQGLQJVHFWLRQDQ\VXUFKDUJH ZKLFKKDVDFFXPXODWHGLQUHVSFFWRI DfRZQHURFFXSLHVSURSHUW\ZLWKDPDUNHW YDOXHRIXSWRWZRKXQGUHGDQGIW\ ZDLYHG EfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZKLFKH[FHHGV WZRKXQGUHGDQGIW\WKRXVDQGGROODUV VKDOOEHZDLYHGLIWKHRXWVWDQGLQJUHDO SURSHUW\WD[LVSDLGRQRUEHIRUH FfRWKHUSURSHUW\VKDOOEHZDLYHGE\IW\ SHUFHQWLIWKHRXWVWDQGLQJUHDOSURSHUW\ 6HFWLRQ%HYLYDORIXUFKDUJH ,IDIWHU'HFHPEHUDQ\UHDOSURSHUW\ WD[UHPDLQVRXWVWDQGLQJLQUHVSHFWRI DfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZLWKDPDUNHW ZLWKDPDUNHWYDOXHRIXSWRWZRKXQGUHG EfRZQHURFFXSLHGSURSHUW\ZKLFKH[FHHGV WZRKXQGUHGDQGIW\WKRXVDQG FfRWKHUSURSHUW\ 7KHRZQHURIVXFKSURSHUW\VKDOOEHOLDEOHWR SD\DQHZVXUFKDUJHRI RIVXFKWD[WD[SHUDQQXP &20021:($/7+(%$+$0$6 7+((0(&2857 &RPPRQ/DZt(TXLW\'LYLVLRQ % (7:((1 6&27,$%$1.%$+$0$6f/,0,7(' 3 ODLQWLII $1' % $5%$5$$'(9($8; 'HIHQGDQW 7 R%DUEDUD'HYHXD[ 7$.(,&(WKDW$QDFWLRQKDVEHHQFRPPHQFHGDJDLQVW\RX 6 FRWLDEDQN%DKDPDVfOLPLWHGLQWKH6XSUHPH&RXUWRI7KH %DKDPDV:ULWRI6XPPRQVRQWKHRI-DQXDU\ EHLQJZKHUHLQWKH 3ODLQWLIIFODLPLVIRUWKHWRWDOVXPRIZKLFK UHSUHVHQWVWKHSULQFLSDOVXPRIDFFUXHG LQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLGSULQFLSDOLQWKHVXPRI DGGRQFKDUJHVLQWKHVXPRILQWHUHVWRQWKHVDLG DGGRQFKDUJHVLQWKHVXPRIDQGODWHIHHVLQWKH ,WKDVEHHQRUGHUHGWKDWVHUYLFHRIWKH:ULWRI 6XPPRQVLQWKHVDLGDFWLRQEHHIIHFWHGRQ\RX E\YLUWXHRIWKLVDGYHUWLVHPHQW
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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE CARNIVAL cruise ship Fantasy is lit up at the Port of New Orleans. Carnival Corp. Tuesday said i ts third-quarter profit sank nearly 20 per cent, but the results were still better than expected. (AP Photo: Andy Newman MIAMI (AP and Barbuda officials areu pset Carnival Corporation i s taking the island off a ship’s itinerary. Beginning January 3, Carn ival will substitute St Maarten for Antigua on the Carnival Victory’s weeklys ix-stop, seven-day trips out of Puerto Rico. Tourism minister John Maginley says the island nation will lose $40 million in revenue. He says local officials w eren’t consulted, and the change comes just after six American tourists from the ship were arrested. The passengers were charged with assault and m alicious damage after refusing to pay a cab fare they thought was excessive and later scuffling with p olice. Carnival says the change h ad nothing to do with the incident. A spokeswoman says the itinerary was four years old a nd simply needed an update. Carnival stops calls on Antigua Tourism minister says island nation will lose $40m in revenue Cruise line’s Q3 profit sinks nearly 20%

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS PAGE 23The Tribune THURSDAY October 1, 2009

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The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, October 1 , 2009 RELIGION By JEFF ARAH GIBSON EBENEZER Me thodist Church will celebrate 207 years of excellence, commitment, and loyalty to Methodism wit h a commemoration service to be held on Sunda y, October 4 at 11am. Befor e Emancipation, befor e blockade r unning, and even before the Bahamas gained Independence, Ebenezer Methodist Church was firmly established since 1802 and is indeed one of the oldest chur ches in the Bahamas and has a long histor y of ministr y and outr each. John Phillpot, Congregational Board Chairman at Ebenezer Methodist Church, spoke to Tribune Religion about the work Ebenezer has done over the years. “Fr om the early days, Ebenezer has been a mainstay in the community along with St Matthew’s Church, the two oldest churches from 1802. The church has a large focus on social outreach and helping the local communities,” he said. “Over the years, our members have traveled to other islands to help with home repairs after the stor ms, taking food and clothing supplies along with them, he said. “They ar e also making sure the less fortunate persons have food to eat and clothes to wear. The church has a large social outreach with a soup kitchen that ser ves over 100 people ever y Thursday . Ther e is also a clothing pantr y for those in need,” he said. Their efforts in the past to improve the education in the Bahamas did not go unnoticed either. According to www.ebenezermethodist.org, “In 1870, a group of laymen from Ebenezer and Trinity met to discuss the feasibility of establishing an educational institution which would provide secondary education for their children, and these discussions eventually led to the establishment of what is today known as Queen’s College”, the website stated. Closeness and Togetherness are principles that the people of the church abide by. These principles have allowed the church over the years to remain close with neighbouring chur ches and the community . Ebenezer has worked with other chur ches in the area giving assistance to the homeless and the poor. The church is very people oriented providing several dif fer ent avenues for fellowship, he said. W e ar e always welcoming visitors,” he said. Youth ministry, Sunday school, junior church choir, men’s group, women’s fellowship, choir, prayer gr oups, evangelism, and social outr each ar e just a few of the ministries at Ebenezer that enfor ce and pr omote fellowship in Christ. Over the years there have been many ministers at Ebenezer, but now the church is happy to welcome their new acting minister , Rev Godfr ey Bethell fr om Central Eleuthera. W ith years of education and experience, they anticipate he will be a great leader. “Rev Godfrey Bethell has been in the church since the early age at Coke Memorial and Rhodes Memorial Methodist Chur ch in Nassau and St Paul Methodist Church in Freeport. He is joined in Nassau with his wife Elmena Bethell, current Vice President of the Bahamas Confer ence of the Methodist Chur ch. W e look for war d to working with both Rev and Mrs Bethell in all of our ministries,” he said. EBENEZER CELEBRATES IT 207TH ANNIVERSARY B y REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter ON a typical Sunday morning, church pews are filled with worshippers praising and getting spiritual enrichm ent from the Word of God. It’s a unique occasion planned at one church this Sunday, however. At 4.30 pm St Christopher Chur ch in Lyford Cay will be having their ‘St Francis of Assisi Day and Blessing of the Animals’. All animal lovers from across the island are invited to bring their four legged, and feathered friends to the afternoon service. This is the third time the service will be held at St Christopher Church, in observance of St Francis Assisi, the patron saint of animals. The service is the brainchild of the Bahamas Humane Society and parishioners at St Christopher Chur ch, to commemorate World Animal Day. Last year, events were held in 66 countries in celebration of World Animal Day. Officiating the service will be Father Keith Cartwright, archdeacon of the Southern Bahamas and The Turks and Caicos Islands. Father Cartwright is also a member of the Bahamas Humane Society board. Last year, 23 birds, dogs, cats, and turtles attended and were prayed for at the service. They all behaved, and nobody tried to bite or fight each other . Or ganisers ensure good animal behavior by having the ser vice for no mor e than half an hour, to prevent the animals fr om getting restless, T ribune Religion was told yester day . “The ser vice is a celebration of God’s creation,” Father Cartwright told Tribune Religion yesterday. “God made the entire cosmos and a part of that created animals and cr eatur es, and we give God thanks for the wonder ful beauty of animals and pets.” e want to highlight the importance and care of God’s creatures. There’s a lot of cruelty to animals and we believe that is a sin. We need to create a lot of awar eness about that.” “Animals were put here for different purposes. One of those purposes happens to be where they are companions of human beings,” he said. Father Car twright’ s dog, ‘Kay Kay’ will be pr esent at Sunday’s service. Following the service, Father Cartwright will be head down to the canine dog unit in Lyford Cay to pray for and bless the security dogs, which ar e used to pr o Blessing of the animals E BENEZER M ethodist Church celebrates 207 years of excellence, commitment, and loyalty to Methodism. SEE page 25 ANIMALS receive blessings at last year’s service.

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THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS The Tribune Thursday, October 1 , 2009 PG 25 RELIGION The Baptist Movements in the 20th Century PART 46 A LETTERin the Nassau Guardian of 16th March 16, 1892 deplored the dismissal of Rev Daniel Wilshire from the Baptist Missionary Society calling his treatment “uncourteous and therefore uncharitable.” The letter was signed by John James Kerr and members of the New Zion Baptist Church, Moses Rahming and all members of Mt Car ey Baptist Church, Joseph Smith and the entire Gambier and Adelaide Baptist Church, Hercules Rolle, Cat Island and all churches under his pastoral care and Richard A Morrison of Exuma with all members of the church there. A special meeting of the Pastor and committee was convened at Zion Baptist Chur ch Nassau on April 4 with Rev J J Kerr as chairman. Attending wer e representatives from Cat Island, Exuma, Andros, Eleuthera, Grand Bahama, Ragged Island and Long Island. An agr eement was r eached to form the Bahamas Baptist Union and appointed Rev Daniel Wilshire as superintendent. It should be noted that not all chur ches remained within the Union and about 15 chur ches remained with Wilshire. In 1893, a lot that previously housed livery stables on Parliament Street was purchased and Mrs Wilshire laid the foundation stone of the Sunday School Building which later became Salem Union Baptist Chur ch. The building is now Magistrates Court #1. The W ilshir es lived behind the church and wer e assisted by jeweler , Rev J Demeritte and Rev J J Kerr was the pastor of the Nassau chur ches in the Baptist Union. Fr om Rev W ilshire's speech at the laying of the stone, we can glean that the formation of the Bahamas Baptist Union caused the English Baptists to send a deputation to investigate the situation in the Bahamas. As a r esult the committee decided that 'steps will be taken to make the churches in the Bahamas self suppor ting, and help will be of fered through Calabar College (Jamaica d pr oviding them with an efficient native ministry.' Wilshire's reply was that the Baptist Union prefer r ed to work out its own salvation as God shall help, choosing its own native ministr y . Mrs Charlotte Wilshire died in 1894 and Rev Wilshire married again to his widowed housekeeper, Mrs Rigby. In 1901, W ilshire bought a sailboat Experience and used it to visit the out island chur ches. He also pursued an expansion of the Bahamas Baptist Union into Florida, where many Bahamians had migrated to work there. Seven churches were built in Florida which brought the total of 28 churches and 1500 members. W ilshire died in 1932 and was succeeded by his assistant Rev Enoch Backfor d, who became Pastor of Salem Chur ch in 1933 and Superintendent of the Bahamas Baptist Union later that same year . Enoch Backford was born at Deadman's Cay , Long Island in 1893. He was educated in the USA at Mor ehouse College and Florida Memorial College. He served in the trenches as an American soldier duringW orld War 1. Backford proved to be an able administrator, organising the Baptist Union into districts each with a Convention of Woman's Auxilliary, Sunday School and Training Convention. His gr eat emphasis was on Baptist doctrine, democracy and stew ardship, church discipline and missions. The Salem Church building became inadequate for the gr owing member ship so another site was pur chased on T aylor Str eet. The corner stone was laid in 1960 and dedicated in 1967. Backford retired as pastor of Salem in 1974 and was succeeded by Rev Charles Saunders. Rev Backfor d r emained as Superintendent of the Bahamas Baptist Union until his death at 83 in 1976. Father Leopold Duncan Cox, born at Fox Hill in 1900 , was elected as Superintendent of the Bahamas Baptist Union in 1976. He previously had been Pastor at Mt Car ey Union Baptist Chur ch. Bahamas Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention 1935 1970 In May 1925, Rev J R Evans and Mrs Jamie Morris made two trips to the Bahamas to make a general survey of Baptist participation in the islands. As ar esult they bought $50,000 of literatur e from the National Baptist Convention Inc and distributed freely to all Baptist Churches in the Bahamas. Rev Evans continued to visit annually and eventually succeeded in persuading both the St John's Baptist Society Churches of Particular Baptists and the Union Baptists Association to agree to merge into the Bahamas Baptist Missionar y and Educational Convention. After many meetings and a temporary arrangement in 1935, the first annual session of the Bahamas Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention took place at St John's Baptist Church on May 25,1936. In 1943, at the invitation of President Enoch Backfor d, the Foreign Missions Boar d of the National Baptist Convention started an elementary school named in honour of Dr L G Jordan of that society. The school was housed in the Goodwill Centr e in Chippingham until it moved to Baillou Hill Road in 1946. Rev William Albury was the first headmaster from 1943 to 1948. Souther n Baptist Mission of the Souther n Baptist Convention In the summer of 1949, students of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas began sending teams to hold Bible schools throughout The Bahamas. In 1951, The Souther n Baptist Convention sent two missionary couples, Dr and Mrs McMillan and Dr and Mrs Main. Along with local Baptist leaders the missionar ies decided that the greatest need was theological training and towar d that end the Bahamas Baptist Institute was opened in the house of the Mains and moved to new quarters on Rosetta Street in 1957. The Central Baptist Chur ch was organised in the Institute building later in 1957. It was also felt that ther e was a great need for a high school and so in 1961 the Institute building was also used to house the Prince W illiams High School. When pr oblems sever ed the relationship between the Bahamas Baptist Missionary and Education Convention and the Bahamas Souther n Baptist Mission, the Convention r eorganised Prince W illiams High School on the Jordan Memorial Campus. The Baptist Southern Baptist Mission began operating the Bahamas Baptist College which moved to Jean Str eet in 1968. JIM LAWLOR tect the gated community. This year, New Providence will be the only observers of the unique service. However, they’re asking other parishesi n the family islands to join the bandw agon. Last year, Grand Bahama picked up the ball and had a service in the garden in the Grove. Bahamas Humane Society president Kim Arahna said, “I took my 7 year old freshwater turtle, Big Mama last year and my 14 year old potcake who is a cancer survivor Mrs Arahna is a fir m believer in praying for animals. She and Father Cartwright witnessed the miraculous healing of her dog who was not feeling well. “Last year, Father Cartwright was with me having dinner while my dog was having a heart attack, and we rushed downtown to the animal clinic. He prayed for the animal and she survived. I believe she survived because Father Cartwright prayed for her,” she said. e hope the kids will bring their pets, she said. “W e seem to for get that animals ar e God’ s creatures too. We are custodians of the planet and it is our unbounded duty to treat animals as God intended us to in a kind manner The only thing organisers of the service ask of those who bring their dogs is to ensure that they have access to water, and bring a form of waste disposal in case the animal has an accident. e’ve absolutely had no problems so far with this however , but ask that you bring it just in case they make a mess” she said. On Sunday’s service, animals present will be prayed for and blessed, and those who behave during the ser vice will be sprinkled with holy water, Mrs Arahna said. “He’ll sprinkle holy water into the fish tanks,” Mrs Arahna added. Accor ding to her, Father Cartwright makes housecalls at the request of parishioners r equest to pray for their animals. W ith a drive to “bring mor e r espect and love to animals in other churches,” Mrs Aranha recently met with Christian Council president Reverend Patrick Paul. “W e would r eally like to have as many of the other chur ches to follow the lead,” she said. She and Reverend Paul are talking over introducing the ser vice to congr egations under the Christian Council. Mrs Arahna emphasised that anyone on the island is more than welcomed to attend. e’r e hoping for a gr eat showing fr om the public. The fact that we are behind the gates shouldn’t stop people fr om coming in. We want as many persons fr om New Pr ovidence to be ther e.” Blessing of the animals SEE page 24

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“What, after all, is Apollos? And what is Paul? Only servants,t hrough whom you came to believe--as the Lord has assigned to each his task. I planted the seed,A pollos watered it, but God made it grow. So neither he who plants nor he who waters is anything, but only God, who makes things grow. The man who plants and the man who waters have one purpose, and each will be rewarded according to his own labour” 1 Cor 3:5-8. Qualities of A Good Team Player 1. Team Spirit (not a solo performance) 2. Committed and dedicated 3. Pulls own weight 4.Goes beyond the call of duty5 .A good communicator (listener and speaker) 6.Willing to compromise (notm orals or principles) 7.Able to admit faults 8.Willing to negotiate 9.No superiority or inferiority complexes 10. Honest and reliable 11. Pleasant, friendly even humorous at times 12. Encourager (not overly critical 13. Visionary yet also supportive of that of others1 4. Shares in triumphs and failures o f the team Additional Qualities of a Ministry Team Player 1. Prayerful 2. Student of the Scriptures 3. Regular worshipper 4. Enthusiastic witness 5. Faithful worker for the Lord 6. Filled with the Holy Spirit The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, October 1 , 2009 RELIGION Creating teams for ministry REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS Why Arawak, why ? MATTHthe people that I know we ar e (Bahamians that loves drama, gossip and anything that will appeal to one’ s emotion); I knew that this topic “Why Arawak, Why” would get your attention seeing that Arawak Homes and the church destruction is one of the most talked about matters today. As a r eligious nation I know that most of us (in particular Christians have already settled in our hearts and ruled on this matter thereby condemning Arawak Homes for demolishing the chur ch building. Okay, that's your right; you're entitled to think and conclude as you wish, but can I say to you that Father Y ahweh is not tripping or fr eaking out at what happened. Always r emember that “Nothing can ever catch God by surprise or off guard” Here's something that I want you to also remember or consider: Religious thinking mixed with heated emotion at times will cause one to totally overlook or ignore the facts. W ith that being said, befor e we (r eligious Christians) begin to demonise the principles of Arawak Homes; let's stopfor a few minutes and look at some facts and the law. Please understand this, I don't know Franklin W ilson nor have I ever met him. I just felt led of the Spirit to bring some sobering thoughts to the forefront of this Arawak Homes / chur ch saga. It is obvious that folks’ religious emotions ar e overshadowing some key facts in this matter. The religious Christian community is upset and venting its anger in the wr ong dir ection (at Arawak Homes when they should be angr y at whoever sold the church the land. As you'r e reading this article, would you ponder these few questions as I supply what I believe to be some hon est answers. Is it about the money? --No, it's not about money Is Arawak Homes hur ting financial ly? ---No, they're not. Is it that the principles of Arawak Homes are bad people? No, by no means ar e they bad people. The destruction of this place of worship was nothing personal between the pastor / members and the principles of Arawak Homes, for had it been so this act would have taken place a long time ago. Rather this was a timely spiritual message sent to the nation by the prin cipalities and powers that are acclaimed over this nation. Unfortunately, this anti-Christ spirit saw an opportunity to make its presence felt. The car nal minded and also some religious minded Bahamians would never see the spiritual connotation that's attached to this saga. The only winner in the destr uction of this house of worship is the anti-Christ spirit (not Arawak Homes and its principles). ForI would want to believe that deep within, Arawak Homes now r egr ets taking such actions as a r esult of the negative backlash and publicity that has and is yet to come. Watch this! It's not as if the principles of Arawak Homes don't go to chur ch themselves or believe in God. That's right they're not antichurch. I also believe that at any given time the owner of Arawak Homes would give generously to their home chur ch or any other as they would feel led to. W atch this ! How many families throughout the history of the Bahamas and to this present day have suffered some kind of loss or injustice as a r esult of unethical practice. As I've stated before, so do I again. The restoration of the country's spiritual connection to Father Y ahweh has to come via the chur ch of which Yeshuwa Messiah died for. Therefore God will use whatever means to expose ungodly, unethical practices. So, again before you self righteous, r eligious hypocrites, demonise Arawak Homes; could it be that God has allowed this act to happen via the church to wake this nation from its chosen position of sleep to corruption and unethical practices? How many of us within and outside the church know of, or may have taken part in some form of ungodly, unethical behavior and practices. But now that a chur ch building / a place of worship (a sacred cow) is at the center of this saga; r eligiously and ignorantly you're crying foul. Listen, I'm not saying “let's tear down chur ch buildings, but what I am saying is that; let's not wait until the seeds of corruption and unethical practices bears fr uits and then cry out” For those of you who are bent on holding your r eligious position as it relates to your places of worship or the one in question; Y eshuwa Messiah also encountered the religious spirit of which has gotten hold of you. Watch this! The W oman of Samaria John.4: 20. Our fathers worshipped in this mountain; and ye say, that in Jerusalem is the place where men ought to worship. : 21. Jesus saith unto her , Woman, believe me, the hour cometh, when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father.: 22. Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we wor ship: for salvation is of the Jews. : 23. But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. : 24. God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth. For questions or comments contact us via E-mail:pastormallen@yahoo.com or Ph.1-242-441-2021 Pastors Matthew & Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center Int'l. P ASTOR MA TTHEW ALLEN INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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The Tribune T hursday, October 1 , 2009 PG 27 RELIGION R ev CLEVELAND D.X.WELLS “Hurting People, Healing Words”, is a monthly article written to assist those persons who are hurting and to share with them the hurts of others and how they were able to over come them. It also seeks to show, by way of scripture, what God has to say to those who are hurting and to encourage persons to look beyond the temporary hurt, to a God that covers us through the ages. “Hurting People, Healing Words”, seeks to heal the broken hearted and free those who have been held captive with the power of God. I will never forget the day, some thirty five years ago, that I heard my mother scream. I was only a little boy growing up on the island of Andr os, but I will never forget that day because I discovered that a man was using his fist to hit my mother . Being only six years old, my first instinct was to r un to her. I grabbed the man by his leg and bit him. It got his attention; he stopped hitting my mother and turned his focus to me. The man r eacted by kicking me of f and then he stor med out in a rage. I didn’t know what the outcome would be, but somehow I had to act, and as was seen, the act proved fruitful; the man stopped hitting my moth er and that is all I wanted. I watched my mother on the ground crying and as a little boy I went to her and hugged her and said to her, “I love you mommy with great hopes to hear her say, “I love you son,” but she never did. I often wonder ed why she didn’ t use those wor ds, but now I’ve come to understand that her hurt was deeper than I had realised. Y ou see, my name is Cleveland Dwight Xavier Wells and my namesake, my father, had left my mother years ago with three childr en never to r etur n. It was my father who made her pr omises that he never kept and to hear my name, trigger ed something in my mother toward me. It wasn’t really for me, but for my father. Nevertheless, he was gone and I was still ther e. You can put a spin on things because ‘What the devil meant for bad, God will put a spin on it and work it out for your good. “Hur ting People Healing W ords” I’ve come to understand that hurting one person actually hurts many people. You see, my father hurt my mother and my mother in turn hurt me. However, I’ve decided to put a spin on things. I’ve learned how to let go so that I can grow. Since my mother had experienced hurt, she decided to give me to a family she believed could love and care for me. It’s with this family that I accepted Jesus Christ as my Lord and personal saviour and the jour ney of healing started. Now God has blessed me with two beautiful girls and a gorgeous wife. I longed to hear my mother and father say, “I love you son”, however my daughters have absolutely no longing to hear these words. I use them frequently, expressing the love that I have for them and for their mother . You see, you don’t have to carry on wher e others left of f. You can literally stop and start your new chapter . That’s what I have done. My healing wor ds came from God’s Holy word that states, “I will never leave you or forsake you”. T o me, I am never alone and once you have accepted him as Lord and personal saviour. God has a way of turning a bad situation into a good one. This hap pened with Joseph, who was thrown in a pit, sold into slavery, sold to Potifer, lied on by Potifer’s wife and thrown in jail. Despite all of the events that happened to him, when Joseph saw his br others again years later he told them, “Y ou intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives” [Genesis 50 and 20]. I believe Joseph wanted to hear from his brothers, “You will be alright, you can make it and I’m her e for you”, but these wor ds would seem like a for eign lan guage to angr y br others. Because Joseph was in God and God in him, deep within his inner being he knew that he would be alright, that he’d make it and that God would always be there for him. So when you ar e hur ting, r emember that you will be alright, you can make it and that God will always be there for you. Only you can stop you fr om gr owing. Remember when you allow people to anger you, you give them power over you, so take back the power over your life. Hurting people, = Healing wor ds. Hurting people healing words

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The Tribune PG 28 T hursday, October 1 , 2009 RELIGION Ebenezer Methodist Church is this week’s church of the week. Ebenezer was established in 1802, and is one of the oldest churches in the Bahamas. The church will celebrate its 207th anniversary on Sunday, October 4. Over the years, the church has made meaningful contributions to the community and the country through its many social outreach programes. CHURCH OF THE WEEK Photos Felipe Major /T ribune Staff