Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
“WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito

m Lhe Iribu

USA TODAY.

SSF
75F

BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

FSTORM
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

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CARS FOR SALE,
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Women charged
in pilot murder

Defendants aged 20 and 19 in court
Pair also accused of attempted murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



‘Bridgewater's
meeting with
Travolta lawyer
secretly recorded’

FORMER PLP
Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and
former premedic
Tarino
Lightbourne
lawyer Carlson
Shurland
yesterday.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO young women
charged with the murder of
Bahamasair pilot Lionel
McQueen were arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Genear McKenzie, 20, of
Warren Street alias “Nettie”,
and Rhonda Knowles, 19, of
Winton Estates, alias “Ganja
Baby”, have been charged
with the murder of McQueen,
29.

McQueen was found dead

SEE page 12

AN attorney for Hollywood celebrity John Travolta
allowed police to set up recording devices in his hotel
room for a meeting with former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater, it was revealed in court Monday.

Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino

SEE page 12

Move to boost Bahamas tourism

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net





LINKING the Bahamas to the world and the islands to one
another is the key focus for the development of the country’s
largest industry, Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday.

As promotions of the Bahamas in the $5.8 million 2009 Miss
Universe pageant showing the islands as a chain of unique

SEE page 12
New date for National Tourism Week, Cacique Awards

TOTAL COST OF MISS
UNIVERSE REVEALED

PHOTOS: NATIONAL Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards will
1 Tim Clarke not be held in January as planned but in 2011, the Ministry of

CROWN LAND “USED AS ‘Tribune staff Tourism and Aviation announced yesterday.
A POLITICAL TOOL’ ic ae . — The week to promote tourism and the award ceremony held

during that week to reward high performers in the tourism

SEE page 12

Two face dangerous
drugs allegation

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GENEAR MCKENZIE, 20

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!



RHONDA KNOWLES, 19

RT We TST
Surveys director was asked to quit

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter








TT

sce



MONDAY night football
was cancelled at the Green
Parrot bar and restaurant on

FREEPORT — Two men
were charged with possession
of dangerous drugs on Mon-
day in the Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court.

Leroy Miller, 41, of
Freeport, and Davonne

tthompson@tribunemedia. net












FORMER Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest
was asked to resign earlier this year because he could not rea-
sonably explain how several beach-front parcels of Crown
land granted to his relatives were fast-tracked through the
backlogged system.

Uvianvalarge
Pio hagas

ngsgagetiaymedium,
‘i Fado) (oho) OMe,

Mr Turnquest also could not reasonably explain to Prime Brown, 29, of Nassau,
Minister Hubert Ingraham, the minister responsible for
SEE page 12 SEE page 12

Download a Nomination Form from:
http://www.fidelitygroup.com/ndta



ee) [fe Mey itmel mite le} et



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS? EEADING NEWSPAPER

Bay Street last night as flat
screen televisions in the bar
were stolen over the week-
end.

The Green thParrot man-
agement hopes to replace the
televisions before Monday
night football next week.

Anyone with any informa-

SEE page 12

Help Your Favourite Teacher WIN $1000!

Nominate a Teacher by September 30th, 2009 for

The Fidelity Sir Gerald Cash National Distinguished Teachers’ Awards

lise



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





ES
Top official admits Crown land

has been used as a ‘political tool’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE promise of crown land
grants has been used as a polit-






















































35 Collins Ave, 328.0783

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

ical tool by successive govern-
ments, Permanent Secretary in
the Ministry of Lands David
Davis revealed.

He said the practice of offer-
ing free tracts of land in return

eana

LOCAL NEWS
HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY SELECT COMMITTEE

for political allegiance has been
going on for many years, adding
however that these promises are
often not fulfilled in the after-
math of an election. "The trend
has been established. Before

NAW MoMMeo

Sandyport 327.5483

every election, plenty letters get
issued which are not honoured
after election. But I want to ask
you, when did them people get
their grant? Some of them nev-
er get it.

"Some of them letters didn't
originate in the department —
I'm not calling any years — the
minister responsible for lands
can issue letters, he can give
instructions to issue letters," Mr
Davis told the House of Assem-
bly's Select Committee on
Crown Land issues yesterday.

Questions

He was responding to ques-
tions put to him by committee
member Philip “Brave” Davis,
who suggested that the depart-
ment was usually mobilised to
issue approval letters before
elections.

Committee member Kenyat-
ta Gibson suggested that the
approval process should become
the responsibility of a qualified
committee rather than one per-
son — to avoid the appearance of
nepotism or corruption.

To this Mr Davis replied:
"Land is a very emotive issue,
land is also a very political issue.
T haven't seen any government
that's prepared to bring trans-
parency to the process — all gov-

Each year Doctors Hospital
makes a donation to the
Bahamas Children’s Emergency
Hostel in support of its efforts
to provide temporary shelter,
food, clothing, and other neces-
sities to abused, abandoned and
neglected children.

The hostel houses more than
30 children ages one to 11, and
is a charitable non-profit organ-
isation that survives on dona-
tions and fundraising from the
church, civic and business
organisations, the government,
and individuals from the private
sector.

The cost of running the facil-
ity increases every year, and the
organisers say the hostel is now
facing financial challenges.

The hospital’s latest fundrais-
ing initiative focused on help-
ing pay for the hostel’s hand-
book on teenage pregnancy —

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ernments try to hold onto that
power, the power to give crown
land — or objectivity. It's like a
perk." When asked what was
being done on a day-to-day
basis to avoid corruption, Act-
ing Director Richard Hardy —
who is responsible for issuing
approval recommendations to
the minister of lands — said he
closely monitors all submissions
for approval and outgoing cor-
respondence.

"That is the best control I
have. .. To know what is hap-
pening. And it is my intention,
as long as I am acting director,
that it is done fairly."

Mr Hardy stressed that the
department makes no decisions
on applications; only recom-
mendations to the minister.

Audley Greaves, under-sec-
retary in the department,
agreed, saying the best that can
be done to avoid corruption is
toremain "fair and open-hand-
ed." Significant reform of the
department, which is plagued
with inefficiencies and an exten-
sive backlog, is needed, the wit-
nesses testified. Mr Davis admit-
ted that there are deficiencies
in the department's filing sys-
tem, adding: "Given the sheer
volume (of applications)...
many of them get lost."

He added that a number of

crown land applications lan-
guish in the system because they
are incomplete and the depart-
ment has no means of contact-
ing the applicants.

Mr Hardy also admitted that
over the past few years a num-
ber of applications have gone
unanswered, but said it was his
intention going forward to have
all applications acknowledged.

In order to improve its pro-
cessing system and keep track of
applications, the department is
also looking at implementing an
electronic system that would
allow officials to quickly access
a list of all applicants and check
on the status of their applica-
tions, Mr Hardy said.

The department’s backlog is
due in part to a lack of qualified
land surveyors. Mr Davis said
that since 1992, the department
has been grappling with the
"impossible task" of trying to
recruit Bahamian surveyors and
has now had to turn to foreign-
ers. Over the last few months
the department has recruited
about four or five surveyors
from abroad, mostly from
Guyana or other Caribbean
countries. The committee,
scheduled to meet every Mon-
day, is expected to present their
findings to parliament on Janu-
ary 27, 2010.



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Chadwick Williamson, VP MIS, Doctors
Hospital; Jasmine Davis, VP Patient Finance, Doctors Hospital:



Michele Rassin, VP Operations, Doctors Hospital; Nakita Smith,
Assistant Administrator, Bahamas Children’s Emergency Hostel;

Stanley Forbes, Book Assistant, Bahamas Children’s Emergency
Hostel; KellyAnne Smith, Graphic Designer, Doctors Hospital.



an effort to educate youths,
especially young women, who
may be promiscuous, pregnant
or the victims of sexual assault.

Those interested in helping
the Bahamas Children’s Emer-
gency Hostel can donate funds
or supplies, lend a hand, spon-
sor a project or event, or par-
ticipate in the hostel’s corpo-

rate fundraising programme or
charitable foundation pro-
gramme.

All donations and gifts are
welcome, administrators say,
including clothes, shoes, books
and toys.

School supplies, such as
books, stationary and school
uniforms are urgently needed.

es Pe eS
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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 3





TTY

TSE Ce A

A ABU TT

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — MORE than $22 million in illegal drugs and
cash seizures have been recorded so far this year on Grand
Bahama.

Cocaine seizures amounted to over $19 million, according to sta-
tistical reports released by police officials here.

Eight major seizures occurred at the Freeport Container Port
between January and August of this year, with the single largest
seizure pegged at $6,250,000.

The first seizure was made on January 14 when DEU officers
seized 56 kilos of cocaine with an estimated street value of $1.4 mil-
lion. On February 5, Drug Enforcement Unit (DEV) officers dis-
covered five large duffle bags containing some 250 kilos of cocaine
estimated at $6,250,000 at the port.

Two months later, 200 kilos of cocaine worth $4 million were dis-
covered in a container.

From July 13 to August 26, cocaine seizures totalled some
$7,350,000 at the port.

Marijuana

According to reports, marijuana seizures totalled some $851,700
so far this year. Of the six major seizures, five occurred in the
Freeport area and one in East Grand Bahama. About 851.7 pounds
of marijuana were seized between May and September, 2009.

Grand Bahama police have also seized nearly $3 million in cash
this year. In April, police discovered $2,772,764 in United States
currency at the Grand Bahama International Airport.

According to reports, the money was found hidden in various
appliances and items that were onboard a private charter aircraft
that had arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

As the items were being inspected and cleared by Bahamas
Customs at the airport, large sums of US currency notes were
found concealed in a small refrigerator, two television sets and oth-
er items. In another incident, police seized some $164,319.52 at a
residence in Freeport in April. Grand Bahama police said they are
grateful to the community for its continued support in the fight
against crime.

Man thought to have drowned
on Rose Island is identified

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE man found dead on Rose Island on Saturday after-
noon has been identified as 49-year-old Spencer Anthony
Archer.

The body of Mr Archer, of Bilney Lane off Shirley Street, was
discovered at around 6pm on Saturday.

He is believed to have drowned.

According to Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel, an
autopsy to officially determine the cause of Mr Archer’s death
should be completed by the end of this week.

ASP Bethel said Mr Archer was on Rose Island “with others
when this tragedy occurred.”

PM Ingraham to address Annual
Americas Conference in Florida

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham will attend the 2009 Annu-
al Americas Conference to be held at the Biltmore Hotel in
Coral Gables, Florida on September 29-30.

The conference, sponsored by the State of Florida, the World
Bank, the Miami Herald and Florida International University,
is a business and political forum that focuses on United
States/Latin American issues.

This year’s conference is being held under the theme: “After
the crisis: emerging challenges and political stability.”

Prime Minister Ingraham will deliver the first of three prin-
cipal addresses on the opening day of the conference.

He will depart on Nassau on Tuesday, September 29, and
return the same day.

Miss Universe pageant

Tourism Minister says amount
was much less than expected

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE 2009 Miss Universe
pageant cost the government
$5.8 million in total, Minister
of Tourism Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace revealed
in a press conference yesterday.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the cost was much less than
expected and far lower than
many previous hosts of the
international beauty contest
have paid for the privilege.

The pageant gave the
Bahamas nearly 10 minutes of
coverage on prime-time televi-
sion shown on 647 media
broadcasts in 180 countries
around the world and was
viewed by an estimated
115,936,797 million people,
including 7.1 million in the
United States.

All of those people would
have learned that the Bahamas
is a network of individual
islands each with their own
character, as they followed Miss
Universe 2008 Dayana Men-
doza, of Venezuela, to Exuma,
Andros, and Cat Island, and all
84 contestants to Harbour
Island, Bimini and Grand
Bahama.

The $5.8 million paid by the
Ministry of Tourism included
all transportation of contestants
by air, sea and land, Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace told the media
at the British Colonial Hilton in
downtown Nassau, yesterday.

The minister compared the
price-tag to the $2 million cost
of 30 seconds of advertising
during a Super Bowl game, and
the $15 million Vietnam paid
to host Miss Universe 2008.

The minister said: “We real-
ly have to thank the private sec-
tor because without their sup-
port there’s no way we could
have done what we did with the
kind of outcome that we had.

“Never before have I seen a
level of co-operation, co-ordi-
nation, inter-government co-
operation, like that. There were
things we were trying to get
fixed for years and as soon as
Miss Universe was coming, it
was done.

“There was amazing co-oper-
ation and amazing outcome.”

Director of Tourism Vernice
Walkine said she fought to
showcase the individual islands,
each with its unique appeal, in
the pageant show.

She said: “We saw an oppor-
tunity to get these beautiful
women moving through the
islands to promote to the world
that we have multiple islands
which is the mission, I think,
we accomplished.

“I fought for us to get
Dayana Mendoza to do her
adventures in the Bahamas and
that’s not typical because she
would normally have one des-
tination.

“So I got everything I wanted
and then some.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the exposure attracted many
more people to the Ministry of
Tourism website, and particu-
larly to pages about the Family

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come that we had.”



Islands, after the event.

Miss Universe 2009 also
boosted local businesses, with
events such as the fashion show
highlighting the fabrics of
Androsia and Bahama Hand
Prints.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “Miss Universe had the
biggest impact we have had
ever. It’s something that was
just extraordinary in terms of
what it is.

“We have never in the his-
tory of the Bahamas got cov-
erage of that sort.

“In a two hour telecast we
had the best commercial for the
Bahamas that we will ever get.

“We got almost 10 minutes
of fantastic coverage we could
never have paid for out of our
budget.

“It was a conversation and
negotiation and outcome we
are very proud of. People say it
was an outstanding production,
an amazing accomplishment,
and $5.8 million is much less
than we expected to pay.

“Tt was much, much less than
anybody has paid for Miss Uni-
verse in the last several years, in
Vietnam, in Trinidad, the cost
was much higher, so we paid
much less than in recent years
and in many other years.”



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited What would Sir

ae ee Et { enne Du pu c h? S
editorials have said?



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EDITOR, The Tribune. vive will be the older folks
IM wl that migrated to New Provi-
From a young boy my dad dence from the family islands

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

US can’t walk away from Afghanistan

THE admonition that “those who ignore
history are destined to repeat it” is as valid
today as when it was coined long ago. But
then, as today, it is a devilishly perplexing
guide because history is not monotonic.

Today, the United States confronts a crit-
ical challenge in Afghanistan: Should we
send in more troops at the cost of greater
casualties and with success uncertain?

Or should we withdraw, leaving the Tal-
iban to seize power again and re-establish a
homeland for al-Qaida-like terrorists?

The lessons taught by Vietnam and Iraq
are contradictory.

Oversimplifying, the U.S. lost in Vietnam
despite deployment of hundreds of thou-
sands of troops and the arsenal of a super-
power.

Iraq became a quagmire out of which a
sustainable solution is still to be extracted
because the U.S. committed too few forces,
permitting chaos, insecurity and insurgen-
cies to flourish.

Afghanistan today is regarded as “the nec-
essary war” in the words of President Oba-
ma. The American military command rec-
ognizes that the war in Afghanistan cannot
be won without creating the kind of securi-
ty for the people that was defaulted in Iraq.

This takes many more troops to shrink
the reach of the Taliban while the social and
governmental institutions are established to
elicit support from a people alienated
because of endemic official corruption.

The Taliban are feared by most Afghanis
for their cruel justice and harsh fundamen-
talist governance.

But what they are not is corrupt. Thereby
they pose an alternative for people suffering
in their everyday lives from pervasive cor-
ruption that is tolerated if not practised in
the presidential halls and reaches to the cop
on the street and all stops in between.

In the Obama assessment now in progress,
this corruption should be at the heart of
determining American policy, because a pos-
itive outcome from the international inter-
vention that cannot succeed without sub-
stantial support from the populace.

If President Hamid Karzai’s regime,
presently charged with widespread fraud in
the recent election, cannot be convinced or
compelled to change the ways of his admin-
istration, then not enough American or
European military forces exist to impose

peace and stability and a Taliban and al-
Qaida-free Afghanistan.

Yet the U.S. abandons Afghanistan only
at the more drastic peril of having a defeat
there reinforce the Taliban in neighbouring
Pakistan, which is the proud possessor of
an arsenal of 50 nuclear bombs.

On both sides of the border, the Taliban
are ethnic Pashtuns before they are Afgha-
nis or Pakistanis.

Their fanatic determination is to take over
Pakistan no less than Afghanistan to impose
an extremist Islamic government.

The horror is unbearable that such a
regime would control nuclear weapons and
seek eventual wider domination.

Therefore, walking away from
Afghanistan, no matter how layered and
daunting the challenge, is not acceptable,
more for what could happen in Pakistan.

Some Pakistani intelligence elements are
said by American officials to be keeping ties
to the Taliban, which they utilize as an
instrument serving their interests. These ties
are susceptible to being more broadly
renewed if it appears the U.S. might pull
out of Afghanistan.

The more recent success of U.S. drone
missile attacks against Taliban and al-Qaida
elements in Pakistan is apparently attribut-
able to intelligence previously withheld by
the Pakistanis. They seem to be working
both sides of the street, at times one side
harder than the other.

Given that ambivalence and the stake of a
nuclear arsenal falling into extremist hands,
the practical course for the U.S. and the
world is to build up Afghani civil institu-
tions, train their army and police forces to
enable them to increasingly take a larger
role in their country and continue to entice
Pakistani support in hunting down their own
insurgents.

It would be a long, costly commitment
whose successes at first would likely be mod-
est and not complete in the long term. If
there is a better alternative, it is yet to be dis-
cerned.

(This article was written by Harry Rosen-
feld-
C.2009 Albany Times Union).



always insisted that I read Sir
Etienne Dupuch’s editorials. I
realised later their historical
value. As I recall, he always
looked behind and around to
look forward.

With the United States far
adrift, far flung, tearing at its
seams, doomed historically
and too deep in a hole to
recover, the Bahamas, too,
stands on a precipice of
gloom. The pillars of Bahami-
an elitist local wealth, Real
Estate and the Legal Empire
are hysterical at the prospect
that the local man on the
street cannot afford a prop-
erty or pay his rent with incor-
porating legal fees. From Bib-
lical prophecies, the saviours
from the East, the Chinese
are here.

Many systems of stresses
are impacting the Bahamian
families, and our indigenous
happy-go-lucky lifestyle is
crumbling. But we are a peo-
ple who have survived the
advent of African and Euro-
pean Diasporas, the coming
and going of slavery, colo-
nialism, rum-running, spong-
ing, drug trafficking, and ille-

letters@triounemedia.net



gal immigration. But all of the
above are an integral part of
who we are as a people with a
set historical fingerprint. That
tourism, that has fueled our
lifeblood for the past fifty
years is fading — now what?

We are adrift upon high
ocean swells. We long for the
good old days and fear what’s
beyond the horizon. With
family income on the decline
will we gain our Christianity,
or was it already lost in the
fog of more affluent days
when a hundred dollars laid
around every comer.

With each Bahamian fami-
ly experiencing a different
and multiple layers of stresses
the impacts are being felt in
humbling ways. As despera-
tion exposes gaping social
wounds, crime, hopelessness
and faith in God will increase
while child welfare and edu-
cational needs will decrease.
Nowadays survival will come
first.

Those most likely to sur-

or lived through the thirties.
Like my dad always said,
"Life was simple. Life was
hard. We were all happy.
Bahamians helped each other
out. There was no crime as
such, except between man
and woman."

God forbid we have to fish
and toil the land. But should
America go into another his-
torical deep depression we
will have to find out how the
older folks made it. Both
leaders, Obama and Ingra-
ham are on the tipping point
of history. The international
decks of cards are being shuf-
fled. As America fights far
flung wars, the Chinese, Ira-
nians, and Russians have
moved through her back
door. With America broken,
to the victor go the spoils.

CARLTON
ROBINSON
Nassau,

September 22, 2009.

(Sir Etienne always pre-
dicted that civilisation would
go full circle, returning to the
East with China the world
leader. — Ed).

As a marital rape victim I totally
support this important legislation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As A female victim of marital rape by my
then husband for over twenty-five years, I sup-
port this important piece of legislation one

hundred percent.

The result of such sexual abuse was seven
unplanned and unwanted pregnancies — one
every year. Consequently, seven maladjusted
dysfunctional children were produced.

When he forced himself on me he would
say, he paid for the right to have sex with me

whenever he wanted.

The man made my life a nightmare and
because of his abuse I often took it out on the

children.

I often felt dirty, disgusted, hopeless and
not in control of my own body.

Since leaving nineteen years ago, I have not

had a relationship with any other man —
scars are too deep. I vowed never to have to go
through that kind of sexual abuse ever again!

Thank you, Mrs Turner, for paving the way
for women to have a recourse and to be
allowed to have control over their own bodies.

Tam sure a lot of women appreciate it.

Many times I was left bruised and sore for

days.

On two occasions I even contracted sexual-

ly transmitted diseases.

He was a chronic “sweethearter” — even to
relations with a baby-sitter and a maid.

A MARITAL

RAPE
VICTIM
Nassau,
2009.

We can ill-afford this madness

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I know that James Catalyan
is performing at the Dundas
but I suspect there is a cer-
tain amount of mid-summer
madness in the air reading
and listening to local com-
mentators and callers to the
Talk Shows.

Example.....Bahamasair will
be flying to Europe - Asia.....
we will create 10,000 new jobs
a year.....a caller to a Talk



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PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative

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NOTICE OF SPECIAL

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ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR

SCREENED ROOM

GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of

the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative

Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in

The Patrick A. Bain Training Room

at

The Bahamas Co-operative League Building

Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek

alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright

~

ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT

Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

Show suggests the Chinese
build a bridge between Nas-
sau and Andros (ain’t he
heard of the tongue of the
ocean!)

Others advocate the imme-
diate hanging of everyone on
death row for what are clear-
ly “bedroom-murders of pas-
sion.”

Hasn’t anyone been listen-
ing or reading that the ques-
tion of the use of capital pun-
ishment is totally controlled
by a Privy Council judgment?
Bahamas, we can ill-afford
this madness at these serious
times — can someone slap
someone and get us back on
track or have we slipped the
track and there is no hope?

The 19-year-old girl calling
in More 94 yesterday said a
lot....all my graduating class
girlfriends have already had
a baby and the men are either
smoking or following with the
Rastas......what a testimonial
for billions of dollars of tax
payers’ money spent on edu-
cation.

Surely we need to have
some qualifier for some of
these Talk Show hosts — a
certain one with an Abaco-
Eleutheran twang talks real
stupidity most of the time.



W THOMPSON
Nassau,
September 23, 2009.

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PARTS & SERVICE

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At the Auto Mall, Shirley Street

Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
OCTOBER 1
to
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We apologise to our valued customers and
regret any inconvenience this may cause.
NEW CAR SALES will be open for business as usual.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Adopt ‘green’ lifestyles, Bahamians urged

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should not
wait on BEC to become more
environmentally friendly, but
act independently by imple-
menting “green” lifestyle
changes, Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux said.

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune yesterday that it is the
behaviour of individual house-
holds and businesses that is key
to making the Bahamas more
“green”.

Admitting the public may
have “justified cynicism” about
BEC’s commitment to renew-
able energy, Mr Deveaux said if
more businesses and house-
holds implemented environ-
mentally friendly practices they
could not only save themselves
money, but help the cash-
strapped corporation cut its oil
usage and “free up investment
dollars” that it can use to buy
into renewables.

Don’t wait for BEC to become more environmentally friendly, says Minister

Acknowl-
edging that a
recent pre-
sentation by
BEC on
renewable
energy pro-
vided little



hope that
EARL this country
DEVEAUX can reduce

its reliance
on fossil fuel anytime soon, the
minister said instead of waiting
on BEC, the public should act
independently.

“BEC in the short-run may
have a five per cent impact on
reducing its energy load (by
building a waste-to-energy con-
version plant in New Provi-
dence as it currently intends to
do). The short-run being 15 to
18 months. But the households
and the businesses, if they do
three or four things, can have a

PTT REET

USS TC CS





BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette called on the
United Nations (UN) to reduce
the unjust financial burden
placed on small developing
countries like the Bahamas who
are asked to pay a dispropor-
tionate percentage of the inter-
national organisation’s expens-
es.

Speaking at the 64th Session
of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York on Sep-
tember 25, Mr Symonette asked
the UN to review the member-
ship fee as it relates to small
island developing states.

This year, the General
Assembly will consider the scale
of assessments for the appor-
tionment of the expenses of the
United Nations for 2010 — 2012,
as well as the scale of assess-
ments for the apportionment of
the expenses of UN peace-
keeping operations.

During his address, Mr
Symonette reiterated the
Bahamas’ position that the per
capita gross national income
(GNI) should not be given
undue weight in determining
“capacity to pay”, as it often
leads to distortions.

This distortion is more visi-
ble in the case of the scale of
assessments for peacekeeping
operations, he noted.

The current scale places the
Bahamas, a small island devel-
oping state, in the same catego-
ry as the most developed
economies of the world, with
the exception of the permanent
members of the Security Coun-
cil, he said.

“This unjust formula creates
an onerous burden and we call
upon this body to address this
inequity, which seriously under-

ie
Sasa es
eRe UE
ul ee ara

mines the development objec-
tives of the Bahamas and other
developing countries,” Mr
Symonette said. “Clearly, the
GNI criterion does not proper-
ly reflect either the vulnerabili-
ty of our economy, or the extra-
ordinary costs associated with
the duplication of infrastructure
required because of our archi-
pelagic configuration.”

Despite this, he said “the
Bahamas has never wavered
from its responsibilities” as a
fully-fledged member of the
international community, “and
will continue to meet its obliga-
tions to the UN” in the manner
prescribed and agreed.

“While my government is
committed to paying its assessed
contributions, in full and in a
timely manner, we believe that
the proposed scale of assess-
ments is unfairly and unduly
burdensome for countries such
as the Bahamas and should
therefore be reconsidered and
adjusted, taking into account
those considerations that reflect
our vulnerabilities,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

30-40 per cent impact on their
energy load,” he said.

Mr Deveaux laid out his case
at the recent town meeting on
the Wilson City Power Plant in
Abaco, where opponents have
been calling on the government
to consider using renewable
energy rather than building the
traditional heavy fuel-burning
power plant in what has been
described as an ecologically
sensitive area.

During the same meeting,
BEC gave a presentation in
which it concluded that, con-
trary to statements from critics
of the plant, it would not be
feasible for the government to
power Abaco with renewable
energy at this time as the vari-
ous options would be too cost-
ly, require too much land or
simply would not be able to
provide enough electricity.

The Environment Minister



DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent

suggested that rather than “get-
ting caught up” in cynicism
about the likelihood that BEC
will ever become more “green”,
people should take individual
action. He said households and
businesses can do several key
things to bring down their ener-
gy consumption - paint their
roofs white (reduces heat
absorption, thereby lessening
air-conditioning requirements);
replace their hot water heaters
with solar water heaters that
use the sun’s energy; convert
lightbulbs to CFL or LED
bulbs that use less energy, and
buy appliances such as
microwaves, dishwashers or
fridges that have a high energy
efficiency or “SEER” (Season-
al Energy Efficiency Ratio) rat-
ing. The government present-
ly provides a tax incentive for
the purchase of such items,
offering reduced duty charges.




Photos/UN

Symonette addresses the 64th Session of the United Nations Gener-
al Assembly in New York on September 25.

He also addressed the impact
the global economic recession
has had on the Bahamian econ-
omy, climate change, maritime
safety and security, illicit traf-
ficking in narcotics, and the
Caribbean Community’s com-
mitment to a stable Haitt.

“The economic fall-out for
the Bahamas has been consid-
erable,” he said.

“Ours is a small, very open
economy that is closely linked
to the performance of more
developed economies. Tourism
matters in the Bahamas. It is
our primary industry and it

Gi loyso me)
Inventory

The Shoe Village,
Madeira Shopping Plaza,
will be closed to take inventory
Wednesday Sepi. 30th, and will reopen
9:30am Thursday Oct. Ist, 2009.

The Shoe Village,
Marathon Mall,
will be closed to take inventory
Thursday Oct. Ist, and will reopen
10:00am Friday Oct. 2nd, 2009

Clarks
Marathon Mall
will be closed to take inventory
Thursday Oct. Ist, and will reopen
10:00am Friday Oct. 2nd, 2009
We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

FOE CONAICIOMTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

September Bill Delay

Bue to the curment upgrade of our billing
system, post-paid cellular customers may find
that their September bills may be delayed in
getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
tomers are advised to contact BIC at 225-5282
or visit any of our Multi Service Centers nation-
wide to obtain their outstanding bill in order to
avoid disruption of service.

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THEIR LOYAL PATRONAGE

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affects all aspects of economic
life in our country.” To deal
with this, the government “act-
ed quickly” to soften the impact
of the international economic
downturn, he explained.

“Tt took appropriate steps to
ensure the continued integrity
of the domestic financial sys-
tem, we accelerated capital
works to generate employment
and economic activity, and we
increased targeted social relief
to those most disadvantaged by
the crisis,” Mr Symonettte said.


























DISCOVER



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1954-2009

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Perhaps you spoke the kindest
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Perhaps you were not there al
all, just. thought. of us that. day.

Whatever you did to console
our hearts we thank you so much
lor whatever part.

The family of Dorcas
Elizabeth Thompson-Laing

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss BAHAMAS UNIVERSITY ORGANISATION AMBASSADORS VISIT SCHOOLS

Beauty queens raise
child abuse awareness

DUA em ath LES ae el geyi

THREE beauty ambassadors
of the Miss Bahamas Universe
Organisation are working
together to create awareness
among school children of the
effects and signs of child abuse.

Miss International Bahamas
Amanda Appleyard, Miss
Earth Bahamas Krystle Brown
and Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman are in the
process of visiting the country’s
schools on a mission to educate
primary school students about
child abuse in an age-appropri-
ate manner.

Miss Bahamas Universe
Organisation president Gaynell
Rolle said: “We are pleased to
have been so well received by
the principals, faculty and entire
student body of the schools.”

Miss International Bahamas
Amanda Appleyard, who
leaves next month for the Miss
International Pageant being



b

1 7”
antey=ym OY=r-U0] WAKO [e110 1S

held in Japan and China, said:
“This is a wonderful opportu-
nity for me to sharpen my com-
munication skills and to be at
ease speaking before large and
diverse groupings. Not only is
the message a timely one for
the kids, but it is one that needs
to be addressed nonetheless. I
truly enjoyed each moment and
am looking forward to a con-
tinuous working relationship
with the schools.”

Miss Earth Bahamas Krystle
Brown told the students that
they are special and have “spe-
cial body parts that need to be
protected and not taken advan-
tage off.”

“You must promise me to
say ‘no’ if anyone wants to
touch you in any of those pri-
vate places,” she said.

Ms Brown said she also
enjoyed lending her crown to
one lucky girl to wear for a day.

MISSION TO EDUCATE: All smiles for a beauty queen.

“You should see how their
eyes light up, it’s like a most
unbelievable moment for them.
I know they will never forget
it.”

Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman said one of her
most memorable visits was to
the Albury Sayles Primary
School, where the entire school
body wore whistles to symbol-
ise ‘blowing the whistle on child
abuse’.

“This was truly creative and
most memorable, one I will
take with me for time to come.
Albury Sayles showed me in
grand style how to let go and
blow the whistle on child abuse
in a way I never imagined. All
of the schools I visited wel-
comed me with open arms, the
children were so well behaved
and curious to meet Miss
Bahamas. They made my jour-



ney as Miss Bahamas so
rewarding, I look forward to
meeting the other students,”
she said.

Ms Rolle said to date the
beauty queens have visited
Mable Walker; Gerald Cash;
Sandilands; Garvin Tynes; Yel-
low Elder; Thelma Gibson;
Gambier; Oakes Field; Ridge-
land; Stephen Dillet; Albury
Sayles, and Uriah McPhee Pri-
mary Schools. “This week we
will visit Kingsways Academy;
C W Sawyer; Naomi Blatch;
Carmichael; E P Roberts;
Columbus; Palmdale, and
Woodcock primary schools. I
am so pleased (with) the par-
ticipation of our queens, they
really enjoyed speaking to the
children and it showed through
their delivery.” In total, the
beauty queens will visit 21 of
the Bahamas’ schools.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAVEN ROCK LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE OF
SPECIAL CALL

MEETING

To: All Members of National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited,
New Providence, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,
San Salvador and Exuma.

Pursuant to Section 21, 22 & 99 of the Co-operative
Societies Act 2005, notice is hereby given that all
members of National Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited (NWCCU) are urged to
attend a Special Call Meeting on Friday,
October 2nd, 2009 at the British Colonial
Hilton, Salon BC commencing at 10:00am to
discuss and vote on important matters pertaining to
your Credit Union.

* National Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited (NWCCU) Merger with Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited
(BUCCUL)

The closure of the East Bay Branch, effective
October 31st, 2009.

The acquisition of property for the purpose of
constructing a building for housing NCCCU
head office.

To address the matter pertaining to the member
of the Supervisory Committee who did not meet
the requirements during the time of election.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HARVEST VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Keep a lookout
tor ‘Lookout’

Homeless potcake is
now a movie star

ONE little brown potcake went from being an
unwanted dog to a celebrity.

The production crew from the movie “Wind Jam-
mers’ - an independent film production about an
American girl who learns to sail in the Bahamas
but learns much more about herself and the world
around her - contacted the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety to see if they could help with some potcakes to
appear in a couple of scenes of the movie.

The Humane Society staff immediately thought
of ‘Lookout’ as she is a shelter favourite with a
friendly personality.

‘Lookout’ went along to the movie set with her
new friends Whylie Coyote, a black potcake; Tiger
Lilli, a brindle potcake, and Roxy. The four dogs
were great representatives for the potcake breed.

Adoption

‘Lookout’ was at the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety for adoption, however, she behaved so well
on her outings she is now going to be the Soci-
ety’s education dog and visit schools with their
education officer. There are, however, many oth-
er adoption dogs at the shelter and the Bahamas
Humane Society is asking anyone who has room in
their heart and a home for their own potcake star
to visit the dogs at the Society.

“And remember,” said a spokesman, “when
you hear about the release of Wind Jammers keep
a lookout for ‘Lookout’ and her friends. The
Bahamas Humane Society would also like to thank
the Wind Jammers production for their generous
donation which will help fund our adoption pro-
gramme.”



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BARCABAL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIVA OCEAN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HOLDING PATTERN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 7



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS: First resident scholars

Exploring Bahamas’ race relations history

RESEARCH being conduct-
ed by the College of the
Bahamas’ first resident schol-
ars is expected to uncover valu-
able historical data on race rela-
tions and the educational devel-
opment in the Bahamas.

Dr Keva Bethel, president
emerita of the College of the
Bahamas, and Dr Gail Saun-
ders, former director general of
Heritage, are the College’s first
resident scholars.

Scholars in residence pro-
grammes allow universities to
strengthen expertise and
enhance research capacity in
academic areas of particular sig-
nificance to those institutions.
They typically allow visiting
scholars to explore new dimen-
sions in their disciplines and cre-
ate unique opportunities for
intellectual engagement with the
university’s faculty and students.





uniquely positioned for this pro-
ject having been COB’s first
president, following 13 years as
the institution’s principal; the
only woman to have held that
post.

Dr Bethel will examine and
record significant events and
milestones in the first 35 years
of the institution’s history.

Concept

“The whole concept of the
(Scholars-in-Residence) Pro-
gramme, when you put aside
the personalities involved in this
instance, is a very important
reflection of the new dimension
that the College is taking on its
transition to university status,”

For the host university, such
work often leads to the enrich-
ment of existing courses or the
creation of new ones.

Dr Bethel and Dr Saunders
bring a combined experience
and expertise that spans decades
of important work in the

DR KEVA BETHEL

Bahamas, COB said.

Dr Bethel’s current work, a
two-year project, will study the
history of post-secondary edu-
cation in the Bahamas with par-

DR GAIL SAUNDERS

ticular emphasis on the history
of COB.

The veteran educator, who
has devoted some 50 years to
education in the Bahamas, is

Dr Bethel said.

“T think it can focus the pub-
lic’s understanding that we have
moved to a different stage in
our development and in addi-
tion to the instructional respon-
sibilities that we have had over
the years, we now value both

Concerned citizens form community outreach group to help youths in the area

FOR quite some time now the
Pinewood community has received a
lot of negative publicity for allegedly
being a haven for criminals, criminal
activity and violence. But residents in
the area want to change this.

A group of concerned citizens have
joined together and formed the
Pinewood Community Outreach
Group with the focus of bringing pos-
itive publicity to the area by creating
programmes and activities to occupy
the free time of the community’s
youth, thereby eliminating time for
negative influences.

“The facts do reveal that a high per-
centage of the country’s latest murders
and crimes have been committed by
Pinewood residents.

“This, however, does not mean that
Pinewood Gardens is completely a
terrible area. It is still a community of
hard working, sociable and caring cit-
izens,” the group said.

Pinewood Community Outreach is
partnering with the area’s Urban
Renewal Programme and many other
initiatives.

“Together we will use our resources
and present a ‘Stop the Violence
Community Festival’ under the theme
‘Bringing Peace Back to Pinewood’.
The event will be held on October 2
and 3 at the Pinewood Park.”

This event will incorporate a
junkanoo rush-out and marching
bands through the streets of
Pinewood. A family cultural show by

NOTICE

Early diagnosis and treatment
If you or your loved ones have questions about

this disease, there are answers.

Colage, a candle lighting and prayer
ceremony for crime victims and their
families will be held on Friday
evening, October 2.

Then on Saturday, October 3, a fun
day will be held.

Sunland Entertainment’s
“Pinewood Tittants” will host other
teams in a junior football competi-
tion. This will be followed by a concert
headlined by Erate which will include
performances by Christian Massive,
Land Lord and others.

“The event will also elevate social
interaction between all resident and
surrounding neighbourhoods as a
strong message is sent to the crimi-
nals in the community and to the gen-
eral public,” the outreach group said.

Research also into country’s educational development

the experience, knowledge and
research abilities of mature
scholars.”

Her research will investigate
the social imperatives and aspi-
rations that impacted the early
post-independence period when
the College was established;
including the prevailing reali-
ties and perceptions of educa-
tion in the Bahamas and edu-
cational opportunities for
Bahamians that governed that
time, and the kinds of changes
that eventually emerged.

Dr Saunders’ work, also a
two-year project, is for her
planned book ‘Race Relations
in the Colonial Bahamas’.

Calling the research neces-
sary and important, Dr Saun-
ders hopes to fuel greater dia-
logue on what for many remains
a compelling and sensitive issue.

“A lot of Bahamians don’t
like to discuss race because it
can be rather sensitive, but I
think we need to look at it dis-
passionately and objectively and

that’s what I hope to achieve,”
she said.

In-person interviews will be a
critical support to the docu-
mentary investigations she will
conduct.

“T just wish those things that
existed then were here. So many
of the people I really need to
interview are gone.

“T hope to travel to the major
islands to interview strategic
people, mainly senior citizens,
but some people in their 50s and
40s because their parents talked
to them.”

The Scholars in Residence
Programme is an important first
for The College, which has
placed great emphasis on build-
ing its research agenda.

The appointment of Dr
Bethel and Dr Saunders as the
first such scholars, each distin-
guished experts in their own
right, underscores the kind of
distinction the College places
on the programme, COB said.

It also underpins the impor-
tance the College places in
developing research in areas of
significance to development in
the Bahamas.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

Risk Manager

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the
organizational or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business
decisions through the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:

° Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program
in a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the
organization while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best
practices;
Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing
and estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the
business;
Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in
carrying out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;
Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;
Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;
Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and
implementing systems, policies, and procedures for the identification,
collection and analysis of risk related information, that is comparing
estimated risks with risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk
management;
Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some
regulatory bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KYC, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
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Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
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Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



International Coastal Cann Dayal Kanada success

STUDENTS from various
Grand Bahama schools came
together last week to partici-
pate in the International
Coastal Cleanup Day at
Xanadu Beach.

They were also were assisted
by members of the Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents. Zone cap-
tains Gail Woon of EARTH-
CARE and Cecilia Bodie of
Bahamas National Trust wel-
comed the eager students.

After being briefed on how
to fill out the data cards and
what sorts of items should not
be touched, the groups of four
and five set out to clean the
beach. The Ocean Conservancy
based in Washington, DC, coor-
dinates the massive worldwide
data gathering effort. The types
of marine debris found in each
area are noted on data cards
and the results are tabulated to
form a global report each year.

This year, the majority of
marine debris items consisted
of debris from shoreline and
recreational activities such as
fast food containers and
garbage left by beach-goers.

aa UP KINGS: Students show en ne

There were a variety of bever-
age bottles, cups, plates, forks
etc. Notable items included
underwear, tennis shoes, a
clothes hamper, a syringe, con-
doms, diapers and electrical
wire. Discarded fishing gear
included fishing lines, nets,
traps and rope.

The children were careful to
separate the aluminum cans for
recycling at Presto Recycling
on Queen’s Highway.

Ms Woon was impressed by
the turn-out on September 19.

“The weather was looking
like rain at 8am yet the students
were out in full force. We have
to thank the teachers, parents

UTILITIES REGULATION AWD COMPETITION AUTHORITY

URCA has recently published a

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www.urcabahamas.bs

These inmcluche:

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* Statement of Reaults - Access & Inbercennection Gansultation
* Merger Control - Procedural Guidance, Substantive Guidance, Regulation on Fees



and anyone who helped to get
the students out to all of the 12
beaches on Grand Bahama
island this year. This effort
would not happen without your
help and support,” she said.

Participants this year at
Xanadu Beach included stu-
dents from Mary Star of the
Sea School - the largest group
and quite possibly the most
experienced, with many chil-
dren being seasoned ICC beach
cleaners. The Hugh Campbell
Primary School always backs
this clean-up effort. The Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents also partici-
pated this year.

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ited is pleased to invite tenders to assist with Public
Relations initiatives for the company.

Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009,

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
lention of {he ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

Reopening Thursday October 1st

PLEASE CALL FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION 327 0965/327 0962



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Top-seeded Satina,
Venus Williams
ousted in Japan }

TENNIS
TOKYO
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion Dinara
Safina and Venus Williams were
knocked out of the second round by
qualifiers at the Toray Pan Pacific
Open on Monday.

Chang Kai-chen, an 18-year-old
from Taiwan, upset the top-ranked
Safina 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5. Russian teenag-
er Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova edged
Williams 7-6 (6), 7-5 to reach the third
round.

Safina was serving for the match in
the third set when she double-faulted
to give up a break. Chang, ranked
132nd and playing only the fourth time
in a WTA main draw, held her serve
and broke Safina again for victory.

“The double-fault didn’t affect me
that much,” Safina said. “Whether it’s
a double-fault or a mistake it’s the
same. It’s just the way I played at 5-4.
It wasn’t the right game, I didn’t use
my first serve the whole game.”

A dejected Williams made a hasty
exit from Ariake Colosseum, saying
only she was looking forward to her
next match in Beijing.

Williams took a 3-0 lead in the first
set but the 18-year-old Pavlyuchenko-
va fought back, breaking Williams to
tie it 5-5 before holding serve and win-
ning the tiebreak.

Pavlyuchenkova hit a forehand
down the line to go up 6-5 in the sec-
ond set. She had a triple-match point in
the 12th game and won when Williams’
return was long.

Chang converted her third match
point on Safina’s forehand error after
the Russian had fought back from 0-40
to 30-40.

“On match point, I was just thinking
the same thing as always,” Chang said.
“T wasn’t thinking ’Oh, I have match

AMERICAN Venus Williams serves the ball
against Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Rus-
sia during their first round match in the
Pan Pacific Open tennis tournament.

a lot of matches but she follows the
live scoring, and I was thinking about

Aah

what she thought when she saw today’s

score,” Chang said.

point, ’'m going to win.”’

Chang said her thoughts turned to

her parents after the upset.

Chang made her Grand Slam debut
at this year’s U.S. Open, advancing to

the second round.

“My mother doesn’t get out to watch

Top sailing honour for the ‘Sea Wolf’

As the first Bahamian to
receive the recognition in sail-
ing, Knowles said he’s calling
on all of the other sporting
disciplines to come out and
support the event.

The organising committee
is headed by local journalist
Fred Sturrup and Jamaican
businessman Al Hamilton,
now living in London, Eng-
land. Hamilton, who serves
as a special advisor to the
Commonwealth Boxing
Council, also headed by Stur-
rup, has successfully ran the
Commonwealth Sports
Awards for the past 20 years.

Last year, the newly formed
CASI awards banquet includ-
ed netball. But this year, they
have decided to replace that
discipline with basketball.

Sturrup, who was the guest
speaker at the initial awards
banquet, said the event serves
as an opportunity to pay fun-
damental tribute to those
sports persons who have so
greatly boosted the image of
the Caribbean through sports
since the late 1940s.

Sturrup said they are hon-
oured, not just to have had
Knowles present for the press
conference, but to be able to
honour him as one of the two
living legends of the 1940s era
when he competed in the
Olympic Games for the
British Empire.

The other is George Rho-
den of Jamaica, who is one of
the nominees for the most
outstanding male track and
field athlete. Rhoden won the
400 metres in the 1948
Olympics in London, Eng-
land, and was on the 4 x 400
relay team that won the gold
in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland.

“It’s a tremendous tribute
to him and George Rhoden
for the longevity that they
both had,” Sturrup said.

Sturrup also thanked the
presidents of the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas — Wellington Miller,
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion, Lawrence Hepburn,
Bahamas Softball Federation,
Burkett Dorsett and the
Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion, chaired by Pat ‘the Cen-
treville Assassin’ Strachan, for
endorsing the CAST 2009
Week.

The banquet is being organ-
ised by Hamilton, who along
with Sturrup and three other
individuals, will determine the

eventual winners from the list
of honourees for cricket, foot-
ball (soccer), athletics male,
athletics female, basketball,
boxing and
administrator/coach.

During the week of activi-
ties, Sturrup said each asso-
ciation/federation will organ-
ise a night of activities for
their various disciplines
before the awards banquet
takes place on Friday,
November 20.

Here’s the list of honourees

for the various disciplines:

Cricket - Sir Everton
Weekes (Barbados); Sir
Vivian Richards (Antigua);
Brian Lara (Trinidad & Toba-
go); Clive Lloyd (Guyana)
and Michael Holding
(Jamaica).

Football (soccer) - Clyde
Best (Bermuda); Dwight
Yorke (Trinidad & Tobago);
Leroy ‘Uncle Lee’ Archer
(Bahamas) and Theodore
Whitmore (Jamaica).

Athletics male - Javier
Sotomayor (Cuba); Lennox
Miller Jamaica); Troy Kemp
(Bahamas); Donald Quarrie
(Jamaica); Usain Bolt
(Jamaica); Wendell Motley
(Trinidad & Tobago); Hase-
ley Crawford (Trinidad &
Tobago) and George Rhoden
(Jamaica).

Athletics female - Tonique
Williams-Darling (Bahamas);
Merlene Ottey (Jamaica);
Shelly-Ann Fraser (Jamaica);
Bridgette Foster-Hylton
(Jamaica); Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (Bahamas) and
Ana Fedelia Quirot (Cuba).

Basketball - Mychal ‘Sweet
Bells’ Thompson (Bahamas);
Patrick Ewing (Jamaica); Old-
en Polynice (Haiti); Rick Fox
(Bahamas) and Tim Duncan
(Virgin Islands).

Boxing - Emile Griffith
(Virgin Islands); Oswald
‘Elisha Obed’ Ferguson
(Bahamas); Tefelio Steven-
son (Cuba); Leslie Stewart
(Trinidad & Tobago);
Andrew Lewis (Guyana) and
Claude Noel (Trinidad &
Tobago).

Administrator/Coach - Glo-
ria Ballentine (St Vincent &
The Grenadines); Mike Fen-
nell (Jamaica); Anton Sealy
(Bahamas); Kathy Harper-
Hall (Barbados) and Richard
Peterkin (St. Lucia).

International Sailing Extra-
ordinaire - Sir Durward
Knowles (Bahamas)





es as

Koji Sasahara/AP Photos

- Dolphins await
_ lest results
_ on Pennington

? FOOTBALL
i DAVIE, Fla.
: Associated Press

WHILE the Miami Dol-

i phins await test results on
i injured quarterback Chad
i Pennington, teammates are
i braced for the possibility he
i won’t be back soon.

Pennington underwent

? tests Monday his right
i shoulder, which he hurt ear-
? ly in the third quarter of
? Sunday’s 23-13 loss at San
i Diego. He missed the rest
i of the game, and coach
i Tony Sparano says he does-
i n’t know how long Pen-
i nington will be sidelined.

_ Bills lose CB
| MeKelvin, §
_ Whither to injuries

! FOOTBALL
: ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
Associated Press

THE Bills secondary is

i minus two starters with cor-
i nerback Leodis McKelvin
i out indefinitely with a bro-
i ken bone in his leg and
i safety Donte Whitner
i requiring surgery to repair
i an injured thumb.

Coach Dick Jauron said

i Monday that McKelvin’s
i injury is the most serious
? and he isn’t sure when the
i player will return after he
i was hurt in the first half of a
i 27-7 loss to New Orleans
? on Sunday. Jauron said
i Whitner’s status will be
i monitored on a weekly
i basis, though the coach did
i not reveal the exact nature
i of the injury.

That means a defense

already missing starting
i middle linebacker Paul
i Poslusnzy (broken left

: arm), will be further deplet-

DINARA SAFINA of Russia reacts during her singles match against Chang Kai-chen of |: ed on Sunday when Buffalo

Taiwan at the Pan Pacific Open tennis tournament in Tokyo, Monday, Sept. 29, 2009. : (1-2) travels to play at Mia-

Chang won 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5.

ColinalImperial

: mi (0-3).

The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-21 48)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray
Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis
Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams
Ruthesa Glendera Dean
Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Alma Clarke

Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes
Bettrah Belanda Mitchell
Bridgette Neely

Carl Rudolph Johnson

Charlene Dawkins-Bevans

Cheryl Bowe-Moss
Clarence Rolle
Cleaver W. Robinson
Cordero Farrington
Coresa Deveaux
Cynthia Wilson
Dedrick Storr
Derek Nottage
Desmond Pinder
Douglas Richards
Francina Scott
Francis Clarke
Frederica Hamilton
Fredie Smith
George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle
Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee
John A. Webb
Kardeo Heild

Kevin Remond Culmer
Kirkwood Campbell
Laytoya Cargill-Gray
Leila Wood

Lorenzo M. Carroll
Malriae Lauree Ferguson
Mavis Vanderpool
Melissa Evans
Michael White
Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Mervin Dean

Mervin J. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
Pamela Taylor

Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Sharon Creary

Sharon Hanna

Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

Stanley Wood

Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha © Brien
Trevor Mcneil Basden
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Velma Cox

Veronica Samuel

Virginia P. Culmer Woodside
Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Vixens roll over Truckers, Defenders defeat Technicians in five sets

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association opened its 2009 season
on Sunday at the D W Davis Gym-
nasium with both defending cham-
pions executing their game plans to
pull off nail-biting, thrilling victo-
ries.

In the women’s match, Cheryse
Rolle once again led the Scottsdale
Vixens over the Lady Truckers by
scoring a game high 13 kills in the 25-
17, 25-20 and 25-19 win.

In a losing effort, Kelsie Johnson
led the Lady Truckers with six kills

and two blocks.
Action

Over to the men’s action, it took
five exciting sets for the Scotiabank
Defenders to defeat the Technicians



VOLLEYBALL

20-25, 25-22, 25-22, 24-26 and 15-9.
Shedrick Forbes and Ian ‘Wire’
Pinder led the Defenders with 17

and 16 kills respectively.

Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith con-
tributed 29 excellent passes.

In a losing effort, Jamaal Ferguson
led the technicians with 13 kills.
Adalbert Ingraham contributed
eight.

Royal
Bahamas
Defence
Force track
competition

FROM page 11

Togs conmrcnayeto fal WHoeEo

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

| | vehicle type | | ehicle Type
1998 Ford F-250)/0 Truth
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Charlie and Delta. Over the
past few years, the Delta team
has been the powerhouse of
the RBDF.

But this night belonged to
the Bravo team, which domi-
nated the overall event with a
total of 404 points, followed
by Charlie, then Delta third
and Alpha fourth.

Marine Seaman James
Carey of the Charlie Team
was voted most outstanding
male athlete.

Woman Marine Michelle
Colebrooke, also a member
of the Bravo team, placed first
in the long jump, 400 meters,
and was a member of the win-
ning 4 x 400 female relay
team.

She also placed third in the
100 meters and the 4 x 100
female relay team competi-
tions. Carey was victorious
in the 400 meters, and placed
in the 200, long jump and 4x
100 meter relay events.

There were special races for
the children of members of
the RBDF, whose ages
ranged from 5-13. They ran
in various races geared just
for them. Parents, athletes
and spectators all cheered the
children on, as they ran their
races with pride and determi-
nation.

There were also special
races for the officers and
marines in different weight
classes.

“The night was successful
and exciting,” said organiser
of the event, petty officer
Ramone Storr. “The support
from especially the athletes
was of a high magnitude and
based on their performances,
this year’s event was one of
the best ever.

“We definitely look for-
ward to continue having big-
ger and better track and field
events in the future.”

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Vehicles can be viewed at Perpall Tract from 7:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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| 2045
_ 442

:
[1007] :

Interested persons should submit bids to BIC's Head Office lo-
cated at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, Bids
should be received by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, September 30,
2009. Bids are to be clearly marked, “Used & Salvaged Ve-
hicles” and should be addressed to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin

ACTING PRESIDENT & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive, P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OF





TOP — RBDF officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and
field competition at Thomas A Robinson sports stadium.

ABOVE — Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the over-
all event with a total of 404 points...

Photos by Leading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

In-house clinic for
basketball officials

THE New Providence Association of Basketball Offi-
cials (NPABO) is proud to officially announce that it will be
implementing a number of programmes in an effort to
update, re-certify and reclassify its present membership.
This undertaking will take on the form of an in-house clin-
ic of three sessions (theoretical) and on court evaluations
(practical) of each official.

The mentioned ‘in-house clinic' and workshops is sched-
uled to be held October 1-6 at the residence of Tony
Williams, president of the NPABO, on Lumumba Drive,
Fox Hill.

Each evening session is slated to begin at 7pm. The prac-
tical aspect will scrutinize rule interpretations and floor
mechanics during the upcoming series of the Bankers Ath-
letic Association Basketball League.

Williams will serve as the chief clinician, Norman 'Mouch'
Humes as clinician and Melchoir Francis, interpreter and
chairman of the education committee, will perform the
duties of assistant clinician.

Of note is that the former two gentlemen have a wealth of
knowledge and experience in rules and regulations of FIBA,
having attended many clinics and seminars abroad with
regards to rules and having attained the status of becoming
international certified referees.

The ‘spotters’ will be Sharon Storr and Chris Saunders of
the NPABO's education committee.

The NPABO offers this course of study as another serious
and deliberative step to prepare its membership for the
highest level of competency in the interpreting and admin-
istrating of FIBA rules and regulations.

The intent is to create a unified approach and continue to
develop ‘professionalism’ in the officiating of basketball in
the country. On the completion of this exercise, an intense
qualification and certification course will be offered for
new candidates and/or former referees.

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‘I too brought my package
but was overlooked...”

am too and I will succeed soon,” he projected.

Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot and former basketball player,
thanked the Bahamian public who supported him both at
home and while he was on the road.

“Tt’s not an easy one but with God spear heading my path-
way, I believe my day will come and come real soon,” Stubbs
noted. “Thanks for the prayers and encouraging words I receive
from the many friends and fans. May God continue to pour out
his many blessings upon your lives.”

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THE TRIBUNE

S
- a h a
TUESDAY,

SIR DURWARD KNOWLES

PAGE 11





‘T too brought my
package but was
overlooked...”

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH he didn’t
achieve his goal of making
the top 10, 42-year-old Joel
Stubbs felt he performed
very well against the 22-
man field at Mr Olympia
in Las Vegas, Nevada, over
the weekend.

“This was considered the
greatest and most highly
contested competition in
the history of the Mr
Olympia showdown,”
Stubbs said. “The compe-
tition was intense and com-
petitive.

“Some would of figure it
was very hard to judge
because all the bodies were
so sharp, conditioned and
detailed for battle. I too
brought my package but
was overlooked.”

Stubbs finished tied with
six other competitors for
16th place with a total of
80 points from the first two
rounds. They didn’t
advance to the final two
rounds where the top com-
petitors were determined.

“T didn’t get a proper
chance to be compared to
some of the top body-
builders unfortunately,”
Stubbs reflected. “At this
Olympia showdown, every-
one placed ahead of me
had either won an IFBB
show this season or was the
runner up.

“That was how tough the
show was. But I’m happy
with my placing and the
opportunity to display my
physique to the world as I
see it. As long as you have
made improvements to
your body each time you
compete, you are already
a winner, as it is a major
accomplishment.”

This was Stubbs’ first
appearance on the biggest
stage in the sport and he
noted that the atmosphere
was more than he had
anticipated.

“ve been there many

Mumia



JOEL STUBBS

times but sitting in the are-
na watching,” he said.
“However this time I was
one of them looking down
on the audience and having
fun.

“Tt’s just so overwhelm-
ing to see fans from all
around the world just
screaming out your name
as you perform. Also there
was a Bahamian contin-
gent that followed my foot
steps here to lend the sup-
port and encouragement.”

As he reflects on the
show, Stubbs said he’s
eager to work on the areas
that he felt was a major
downfall for him in his
quest to get back on the
elite stage next year.

“As you would study the
pictures you would see that
the upper body is super
massive and can’t be touch
but the quads still need to
catch up,” he said. “So I
would say I need to work
on more quadriceps mus-
cles. They are improving
so don’t count me out just
yet.”

Now that the champi-
onship is over, Stubbs said
he will take a much needed
break to recuperate, then
it’s back in the gym to pre-
pare for next year.

“T just haven’t given up
as yet and I hope everyone
is still holding the faith as I

SEE page 10

r

‘ts

SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

for th

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hroughout his career, Sir
Durward ‘Sea Wolf’
Knowles has received a
number of accolades. But
he said he’s thrilled that he
has been considered for a CASI award.

The Caribbean Awards Sports Icon
Foundation is expected to honour
Knowles for international sailing during
the week of November 15-20 in the
Bahamas.

Included in the activities is a four-day
schedule of basketball, softball, boxing
and a grand awards banquet to be held at
host resort Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach.

During a press conference yesterday at
the hotel, Knowles said this is definitely
the highest award he has achieved and
he’s delighted to be included.

“T never heard about this until it was
held in Jamaica and I went there,” said



Top-seeded Safina,
Venus Williams
ousted in Japan

See page 9

1 y
Sea Wolf



SHOWN (I-r) are Al Hamilton, Sir Durward Knowles, Fred Sturrup and Pat Strachan...

Knowles, referring to the initial awards ed, I’m an individual that appreciates

banquet held last year in Kingston, anytime that ’m being honoured. This is

Jamaica. one of the most outstanding honours that
“But I know Bahamians recognise it I have ever received.”

and since Fred (Sturrup) and Al (Hamil-

ton) decided that sailing would be includ- SEE page 9

Bravo team dominates

WITH guts and determina-
tion, the men and women of
Bravo Team vowed to
dethrone the Delta Team dur-
ing the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF) track
and field competition at
Thomas A Robinson sports nari
stadium.

al Security Tommy Turn-
quest, RBDF commodore
Clifford Scavella and other
senior defence officers,
attended the annual event,
featuring the officers and
marines showcasing their ath-
letic prowess in track and
field.

Athletes were grouped into
four teams — Alpha, Bravo,

SEE page 10

——r< i
. A hi
A number of dignitaries, | rei | |
including Minister of Nation- = [77 =





TOP — RBDF women officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and field competition at Thomas
A Robinson sports stadium.
ABOVE — Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the overall event with a total of 404 points...

Photos by Leading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

























































BASKETBALL
ADDERLEY/
FERGUSON
TOURNEY

THE Archdiocese of
Nassau has announced
that their sixth annual
Deacon Leviticus ‘Uncle
Low’ Adderley and Vin-
cent Ferguson All Catholic
Basketball Tournament is
scheduled to take place
over the weekend of Octo-
ber 9-12 at Loyola Hall,
Gladstone Road.

The first game is set to
be played at 7:45 pm. This
year’s tournament will be
a very special one as it
comes right on the heels
of the death and burial of
the late Ferguson, one of
the two honourees.

Ferguson, 71, died last
Wednesday. His funeral
service is slated for 2pm
Thursday at St Francis
Cathedral. A memorial
service is set for 7:30pm
tonight at Loyola Hall.
Adderley has been
deceased for a number of
years.

VOLLEYBALL
NPVA
REGISTRATION

WITH the 2009 season
underway, DeVince
Smith, president of the
New Providence Volley-
ball Association, is
reminding all teams that
their rosters must be sub-
mitted by today as the
deadline has already
expired.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Bridgewater’s meeting with Travolta lawyer secretly recorded’

Two women
charged in
pilot murder

FROM page one

in his Golden Palms Estates
home, near Kennedy subdi-
vision, shortly after 4am on
Sunday, September 29. He
was shot several times.
McQueen was engaged to be
married in February next
year.

McKenzie and Knowles,
who appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane, were not
required to enter a plea to the
murder charge.

They have also been
charged with the attempted
murder of McQueen’s cousin
and roommate, Martez Saun-
ders, who was also shot mul-
tiple times. It is alleged that
the women while armed with
handguns and being con-
cerned with others intention-
ally caused McQueen’s death
and attempted to cause the
death of Saunders. McKenzie
and Knowles are also accused
of conspiring to rob McQueen
and Saunders. They are also
accused of conspiring to rob
Enan Hanna, and robbing
him of a $260 Motorola cellu-
lar phone, and $150 cash.

The accused were not
required to enter a plea to the
charges and were remanded
to her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill. The case was adjourned
to October 6 and transferred
to Court 5, Bank Lane.

TV thieves strike
FROM page one

tion about the theft should
call police urgently on 911,
919 or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

que

Bereard fd ~ Macher si - [boarpeen Bird

FROM page one

Lightbourne are accused of attempting
to extort $25 million from the 55-year-
old actor in January of this year.
Detective Inspector Sean Saunders
told the court yesterday that Michael
McDermott — an attorney for the
Travoltas — consented to wearing a
body wire, as well as having police set
up hidden cameras and recording
devices in his hotel room.

Inspector Saunders testified that
on January 18, he and ASP Ricardo
Taylor met with Mr McDermott at his
room (328) in the Sheraton Hotel,
Cable Beach. He told the court that
Mr McDermott consented to having
police record conversations from his
telephone. He said that a recorder was
connected to the telephone and short-
ly afterwards Mr McDermott made a
phone call. Inspector Saunders said
that the voice mail came on and Mr
McDermott left a message. Mr
McDermott, he said, then made
another phone call and this time a

man answered. Inspector Saunders
told the court that Mr McDermott
spoke to the man and subsequently, a
woman, who identified herself as
“Pleasant,” came on the phone.

Inspector Saunders also told the
court that the next day, he, ASP Tay-
lor and Detective Sergeant 1492 Fer-
guson went back to Mr McDermott’s
hotel room. He said that after speak-
ing with Mr McDermott, he config-
ured a transmitter with concealed
cameras and a microphone in the
room.

“Mr McDermott gave consent to
record all video and audio of his
room,” Inspector Saunders said. The
Inspector told the court that the adja-
cent room (326) was used as a moni-
toring point. According to Inspector
Saunders, Mr McDermott consented
to having himself outfitted with a body
wire to monitor all of his conversa-
tions. Inspector Saunders said that

sometime around 10.20 am on January
19, Mr McDermott left his hotel room,
returning five minutes later with a
woman. Inspector Saunders told the
court that he recognised the woman to
be Pleasant Bridgewater. He testified
that a recording was made of the
meeting between Bridgewater and Mr
McDermott. Ronald Zupancic, a
longtime employee and friend of Mr
Travolta, said that on January 13, he
received a phone call from attorney
Michael McDermott.

“He told me he had been contacted
by an attorney from Nassau named
Pleasant Bridgewater,” he said.
According to Mr Zupancic, Mr
McDermott told him that Bridgewater
had a client — the ambulance driver
— who was the first to arrive at the
scene at Old Bahama Bay on Janu-
ary 2. According to Mr Zupancic, Mr
McDermott told him that the man had
a document that he claimed was

“incriminating to John Travolta” and
was going to release the information to
the international media if $25 million
was not paid.

Mr Zupancic said that on January
16, he told Mr Travolta what Mr
McDermott had said regarding the
threat and phoned Mr McDermott on
what Mr Travolta had said. During
cross-examination by Mr Ducille, Mr
Zupancic admitted that he had acted
as an intermediary between Mr Tra-
volta and Mr McDermott, but that he
did not know Bridgewater.

The trial resumes today before
Senior Justice Anita Allen.

Bridgewater is represented by
attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta
Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented
by attorney Carlson Shurland and
Mary Bain. Director of Public Prose-
cutions Bernard Turner, Neil Brath-
waite and Garvin Gaskin are prose-
cuting the case.



FROM page one

islands will be worthless if
travel cannot be provided at
competitive prices.

The current cost of air trav-
el is so high customers can fly
from Miami to Montego Bay,
Puerto Rico or Las Vegas for
the same price as a ticket to
Grand Bahama, Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said yesterday,

But a new promotion is
advertising tickets to Grand
Bahama from $19 one-way,
and rooms at Our Lucaya are
available from just $35 per
night.And new aviation routes
can bring up to 293,320 more
airline passengers to Nassau
next year, and 39,520 to
Grand Bahama, that is a total
of 383,280 more visitors fly-
ing into the country.

Plans are in place to reduce
the cost of airfares by drop-
ping airport landing and han-
dling fees, and the $400 mil-
lion renovation of the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport will make it an effi-
cient centre where people can
move easily to the Out
Islands, the Minister said.

He added: “It’s very impor-
tant for us to get aggressive
in terms of competing with
what’s out there.

“Affordable accessible air
service is absolutely critical.

“Infrastructure is critically
important. We have to put the
infrastructure in place to

Tourism

make sure that the promotion
works. “Imagine Paradise
Island without the bridges? If
we had to go by boats and the
boats only go every six hours?

“Each of the airline flights
is like a bridge, and if it was
$1 all of a sudden we would
all go. On the day we do that
Iam confident we are going
to see some extraordinary
changes.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is
also keen to lower rates of
accommodation and travel in
the Family Islands to encour-
age domestic tourism, and he
said that will follow when the
number of visitors increases.

Tourists visiting Grand
Bahama fell by 27.5 per cent
last year, and by 24.9 per cent
in the Family Islands in 2008,
while air arrivals to the
Bahamas dropped by 13.8 per
cent. Keeping the tourism
industry afloat during the
recession are the cruise lines
which offer affordable pack-
age deals from a fast increas-
ing number of ports opening
in the United States.

Around 70 per cent of
cruises from these ports on
the east coast of the US sail
exclusively to the Bahamas,
and Nassau has around two
million cruise passengers dock
at its port each year, with 19.9
per cent of visitors to Nassau

and Paradise Island arriving
by cruise ship.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is
keen to net the potential rev-
enue presented by these stop-
over visitors by developing
downtown Nassau and
increasing opening hours for
shops and restaurants.

He said: “We’re not in the
business of counting heads,
what’s most important is stop
over visitor numbers.

“The total visitor number
is irrelevant because we want
to take more about the econ-
omy of the Bahamas rather
than head count.”

However the number of
stopover visitors also fell last
year and by the end of Janu-
ary had dropped by 63,000,
with 33,000 less in the Family
Islands and 25,988 fewer in
Grand Bahama.

There are no solid projec-
tions of visitor numbers for
the upcoming winter months
because it is still not clear
what shape the recession will
take, or how long it will last,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

In the meanwhile the min-
istry will continue to work
behind the scenes, by open-
ing a 1-800-Bahamas call cen-
tre, bringing in film crews to
document the different
islands, encouraging sports
teams of all kinds to compete
in the country, and working
on reducing energy costs to
be more competitive with oth-
er destinations in the region.

Two men charged with possession of dangerous drugs

FROM page one

appeared in Court 1 before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

It is alleged the accused
men were found in possession
of a large quantity of illegal
drugs at an apartment com-
plex in Freeport. Miller and
Brown pleaded not guilty to
possession of dangerous drugs
with intent to supply. Brown
was granted $20,000 bail.
Miller was denied bail. The

case was adjourned to March
23 for trial in Court 2.

FIREARM CHARGE

An American man was
charged with possession of an
unlicensed firearm and
ammunition in Magistrate’s
Court on Monday.

William Stephanos, 31, a
US citizen and a resident of
Florida, appeared before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

It is alleged on September

27, the accused attempted to
leave the Bahamas on a flight
at Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport to Florida
when an unlicensed firearm
was allegedly found in his lug-
gage. Stephanos pleaded
“guilty” to the charges. He
was fined $3,000 or two years
imprisonment. He was also
fined $3,000, or one year in
prison on the ammunition
possession charge, the sen-
tences to run concurrently.

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New date for National Tourism
Week, Cacique Awards

FROM page one

industry will be held every two years from January 2011, instead
of annually as in previous years, ministry officials said in a
press conference at the British Colonial Hilton in Nassau.

In the absence of the events the ministry will undertake a
review of the week to determine its effectiveness and implement
necessary changes.

The break will also allow possible Cacique award nominees
the opportunity to hone their talents and skills, Permanent
Secretary Hyacinth Pratt said.

And it will give the general public more time to identify
and gather information about individuals and organisations
that should to be nominated for the prestigious tourism award,
she said. Ms Pratt also said that part of the motivation for
holding the events every two years is the smaller number of peo-
ple now involved in the event.

She said: “Now the pool is not as great we decided to hold it
every two years to allow people to better hone their skills.

“The new National Tourism Week is expected to bring even
greater focus to discussions of national issues that are critical to
the Bahamas’ tourism-based economy.

“The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation remains committed
to the advancement of tourism through meaningful input on
tourism matters from all residents and looks forward to the
return of the National Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards
in 2011.”

The Cacique Awards is held in conjunction with the Bahamas
Hotel Association and rewards individuals and businesses
across the tourism sector.

RT TT Wa SET

TT AROSE CUCL

FROM page one



lands, why the applicants in question all used the same lawyer
and realtor for the transactions.

This was revealed by David Davis, permanent secretary in the
Office of the Prime Minister and the Ministry of Land and
Local Government, during the first day of sworn statements
before the House of Assembly's Select Committee on Crown
Land. "There was great public commentary on the matter, in
the interest of being able to respond sensibly to the public the
(former) director was called in by the minister responsible for
lands and asked to explain a number of things. . .(such as)
how did these applications move through the system so quick-
ly when there are others in the queue? Was it just coinci-
dence?

"How did all of these lands end up being listed with the
same realtor, is that a coincidence? How did the same lawyer
happen to deal with all of these transactions, is that a coinci-
dence? The then director was unable to give what the minister,
in my view, deemed were satisfactory answers and so he was
invited to resign," said Mr Davis, before a packed room of
observers yesterday.

Controversy

Mr Turnquest resigned from the department in May amidst
a flurry of controversy stemming from allegations of corruption
and nepotism within the department. The move came after a
series of articles in The Tribune revealed that relatives of the
former director — including his mother-in-law — were grant-
ed prime beach-front Crown land in Exuma for less than $2,500
between 2001 and 2003.

Responding to a question put to him by Committee Chair
Fred Mitchell, Mr Davis said there was no way the Ministry of
Lands and Surveys could have known that five beach-front
lots in Exuma were granted to a few of Mr Turnquest's relatives.

Mr Davis added that the relatives in question did not breach
any ministry policy because as Bahamians they are "entitled to
apply in the normal course."

Audley Greaves, the department's under-secretary, added
that Mr Turnquest's relatives were a small number of persons
who were processed at that time, adding that only the individ-
uals concerned would have known their relationship to the
ex-director. But Mr Davis said the department is considering
amending the application for Crown land grants to allow space
for applicants to disclose if they are public officers, retiring or
retired public officers, or, if applicable, which public officers
they are related to in the Department of Lands and Surveys.

The speed at which the applications in question moved
through the system drew the attention of ministry officials,
Mr Davis said. He added that red flags were also raised when
four of the properties — which had been granted on the expec-
tation that they would be used to build second homes — were
"flipped" to foreigners a few years later for more than $550,000.

When asked if the ministry could prevent undeveloped
Crown land from being "flipped", Mr Davis said he did not
know if it was legal to place conditions on what persons could
do with their property.

Mr Davis said that the four parcels of land in question are the
only ones that have been investigated by officials but it was
unlikely that others approved during the same time period
were "flipped", because they were not prime property.

The land in question was granted during a government exer-
cise to approve applications for persons who wanted to build
retirement homes on the family islands, many of whom had gen-
erational ties or leases to the property.

In addition to Mr Davis and Mr Greaves, the Acting Direc-
tor of Lands Richard Hardy also testified before the commit-
tee yesterday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

tlantis does not expect
its important group
travel business to
recover until 2011 or
2012, and has not seen
a turnaround from extensive market-

THE TRIBUNE

Us

TUESDAY,



ing campaigns, Kerzner International
(Bahamas) president and managing

director told Tribune Business yester-

day.

George Markantonis confirmed that
room occupancy levels have been as
low as 30 per cent at the Paradise



THE ATLANTIS resort on Paradise Island

Island-based resort for the month of
September, with employee work
weeks drastically reduced and staff
asked to take two weeks’ mandatory
unpaid vacation to cut costs.

SEPTEMBER 29,

However, despite the depressed
business environment, Mr Markanto-
nis also denied rumours of further lay-
offs at Atlantis, saying it would not be
wise to make preemptive announce-
ments of redundancy exercises in the

ness

2009

media.

He was responding to claims in
some business and high society circles
in Nassau that Kerzner International
was preparing to lay-off between 1,000-
1800 workers at its Paradise Island

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



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(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT
(242) 351-3010

MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

royalfidelity.com

Atlantis: No group rebound until 2011/12

* Occupancy levels fall as low as 30% in September,
with staff on one and two-day weeks and mandatory
two weeks’ unpaid vacation in effect

* Promotional campaigns yet to have desired effect

properties. Two sources have repeated

such claims to Tribune Business in the
past week, but the numbers being
speculated on appear somewhat on

SEE page 5B

Miss Universe bill ‘$10m less’ for Bahamas than others

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE FINAL domestic bill
for the Miss Universe Pageant
was almost $10 million less than
most former host countries
have spent on the US orginated
pageant, the Ministry of
Tourism revealed yesterday,
while touting the benefits to
the Bahamas as “priceless”.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, said the Bahamas has
never received the kind of glob-
al exposure the Miss Universe
Pageant provided, with up to
115 million individuals reached

Nation spent $5.8m on pageant, and ‘won many battles’ for organiser concessions

through the worldwide broad-
cast event.

According to Mr Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, the
Bahamas spent $5.8 million to
host the Pageant. He said Viet-
nam spent around $15 million
to host the event in 2008.

The Bahamas also negotiat-
ed certain concessions with the
event coordinators that had
never been given to former
host countries.

Director-General at the Min-
istry of Tourism, Vernice
Walkine, said she personally

Regulators back
‘no interconnect
fee’ for local calls

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REGULATORS have
agreed with arguments by
the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company’s (BTC)
only legal fixed-line com-
petitor that the state-owned
incumbent should not
impose interconnection
charges on its rivals for the
termination of free local,
“intra-island” calls.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems
Resource Group (SRG),
parent of IndiGo Networks,
warned that if BTC was
allowed to impose intercon-
nection charges on rival
operators for terminating
local calls from their net-
work, “the effect would be
fatal to competition”.

In SRG’s response to the
Government’s consultation
on access and interconnec-
tion issues in the communi-
cations industry, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said former regu-
lator, the Public Utilities
Commission (PUC), had
never implemented the prin-
ciple that interconnection
and access charges should be
cost-orientated.

BS a

Rival fears that if BTC
imposes charge on other
operators for free local
call termination on its
network, ‘effect would
be fatal to competition’

Instead, it had argued that
since accurate cost informa-
tion could not be obtained
from BTC, access and inter-
connection charges should
be ‘retail minus’.

“This situation has exist-
ed for five years, and has
served to significantly distort
the market to the detriment
of the new entrant and the
consumer, and to the advan-
tage of the dominant opera-
tor,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

Pointing out that the
access and interconnection
consultation was silent on
how cost information would
be obtained, audited and the
timeframe for this, the SRG
president nevertheless
agreed with the notion that
an operator should not ‘dou-
ble dip’ - charging a cus-

SEE page 6B

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lobbied for 2008-2009 Miss
Universe, Dayana Mendoza, to
hold her final “adventures” as
queen here in the Bahamas,
something she said organisers
of the pageant seldom do.

She also fought for the con-
testants to visit several of the
islands as a part of the final
nine-minute package the
Bahamas received during
Pageant night, and pushed for
the National Youth Choir’s
finale performance following
the crowing of the 2009-2010
queen.

Firms warned:

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN employers
have been warned that failure
to pay the correct amount of
severance pay to laid-off
employees will lead to wrongful
dismissal legal actions, a Higgs
& Johnson partner saying she
“goes to court on a lot of cases
of this type”.

Tara Archer, addressing a
Nassau-based seminar staged
by the law firm, said: “It is
incumbent on the employer to
pay the correct amount of sev-
erance pay to the employee to
avoid ending up in litigation.

“Should not the correct
amount be paid, you could find

PNG Oe

There have been numerous
critics of the Government’s
investment in the Miss Uni-
verse pageant. Some local web-
sites have criticised the Gov-
ernment for not revealing the
total cost of the pageant only
weeks after its conclusion,
alleging that government may
have spent upwards of $10 mil-
lion.

Local entertainment leaders
also criticised the Government
for the lack of local talent dur-
ing the broadcast.

Ms Walkine said the pro-

duction side of the pageant,
which is marketed to young
women between 13 and 30, is
out of the hands of the host
country. Inevitably, she con-
tended, the host country is sim-
ply that.

However, she asserted that
the negotiations put forth by
the Bahamas government for
the coverage received was more
than any former host countries
have been afforded in the past.

“You have to choose your
battles,” said Ms Walkine. “My
battles were won.”

Make correct severance pay

legal action [taken against you]
for wrongful dismissal.”

Ms Archer recommended
that Bahamian employers and
companies consult their attor-
neys on the amount of sever-
ance pay that should be paid to
terminated/laid-off employees,
as the total sum was “not clear
cut”.

Apart from the statutory pay
stipulated by the Employment
Act, laid-off employees were
also entitled to payment for
unused vacation time, contrac-
tual bonuses, other benefit pay-
ments and any allowances they
had been enjoying, such as gas
and meal allowances, during
their notice period if they
worked it out. National Insur-

ance Board (NIB) contribu-
tions also needed to be deduct-
ed for employees during their
notice period.

In addition, under the
Employment Act laid-off
employees at companies where
they had a pension plan have
to choose between taking their
pension entitlement or accept-
ing statutory severance pay.
Parliament seemingly passed
the law requiring employees to
make that choice in order to
not over-burden companies
with severance costs.

Ms Archer said it was critical
for employers “to have clear,
concise employment contracts”

SEE page 3B

Sure you'll win the Lotto!
oat ad a ee

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace sug-
gested that the private sector
rallied to assist the Govern-
ment in making the pageant a
success for the country, and
keeping total overall public
expenditure low.

He also surmised that some
capital works projects and pri-
vate maintenance projects may
not have gotten done without
the impending arrival of the
Miss Universe delegation.

“There were some things we
were trying to get done for
years,” he said.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLONAY INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FUZZY VISSION CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
















Legal Notice

NOTICE

JAGUAR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ADAMS INVESTMENTS HOLDINGS

LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Fixing crime’s threat
to nation’s well-being

FOR several weeks now, I
have been struggling with writ-
ing an article that reflects the
utter despair about the state of
crime. Violent crimes, such as
homicide, are now a daily fix-
ture in our lives. I have been
shocked at how pervasive, but
so far private, the level of out-
rage is in our society over this
situation.

Lack of Public Outrage

If a general election were to
be held today, I believe there
would be numerous political
casualties because of the crime
situation. Admittedly, howev-
er, if you look at public state-
ments only, issues such as the
proposed marital rape law and
the removal of the casuarina
trees from public beaches have

Financial

Focus



seemingly gathered more trac-
tion than concerns over the
steady diet of shootings and
stabbings that we are being fed
on a daily basis. It is the lack of
public outrage that is conspicu-
ously absent. What does it take
for churches, community organ-
isations, civic and service clubs
to develop a consistent voice?
One school of thought is that
if those credible voices are
silent, then we should not criti-
cise the Government for seem-
ingly doing far too little. How-

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ever, the other school of
thought suggests that when the
sheer outrage over crime gal-
vanises into cohesive voices, the
political leadership will have
problems on its hands. The
Government of the day must
be seen to be doing more about
crime. They must demonstrate
that:

* They recognise crime as a
major problem

* That they are committed
to reducing the level of violent
crime

* They are prepared to make
the required changes

* They are up to the task of
doing something about it

This seemingly docile
approach to crime, which is a
cause of concern throughout
the nation, is simply ‘not cut-
ting it’.

Police Frustration

In speaking with a senior
police officer recently, he
admitted that a high level of
frustration exists within the
force over the number of crim-
inals charged with the most
serious offences, who are being
given bail and committing new
offences while on bail. His basic
question was: “How many
times do they have to pick up
the same person only to see him
on bail a few months later per-
petrating new crimes”? This
situation is most demoralising
to say the least.

The current situation
demands that we try new ideas.
Major US cities have had sig-
nificant success in reducing
their crime rate. Why can’t we
replicate some of those suc-
cessful initiatives? Why haven’t
we tried curfews? Curfews
would certainly reduce move-
ment on the streets at night. I
am told that many would resist
curfews because the perception
arising from their imposition
could hurt tourism, but my
question is: “How many young
Bahamians are we prepared to
let die on the streets before we
deal with the problem at

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hand”?

When it is someone else’s
child being gunned down or
stabbed, it is easy to dismiss the
problem. However, when the
crime comes into your neigh-
borhood or directly affects your
family, then it becomes an issue
in need of attention. Crime
should not have to become per-
sonalised before the nation
recognises it for what it is...a
severe problem that threatens
our national well-being. Our
economic lifeblood depends
upon foreign investment. Are
we so naive as to believe that
potential investors (both for-
eign and domestic) are not
being frightened by the level of
crime in our society?

While the Police Force, as an
organisation, has it problems,
it has many professional and
dedicated officers working in a
system than is less than opti-
mal. I am not sure it has the
tools, manpower and other
resources necessary to complete
the job at hand. However, this
is not a determination for me to
make, but rather one for the
force hierarchy and the Gov-
ernment to make.

Court System

We must fix the courts sys-
tem immediately. Last year
there were just under 80 mur-
ders, and the number of murder
cases concluded in 2008 was less
than 20. That leaves a deficit
of more than 60 cases for 2008
alone. Further analysis shows
that of those cases concluded,
they were for offences commit-
ted about three years ago, on
average.

On one hand we are build-
ing up a significant backlog of
untried murder and other crim-
inal cases, while on the other
hand our courts are simultane-
ously over-taxed. Why can’t we
bring in temporary judges (be
they local or foreign) for a fixed
period to clear the backlog of
serious criminal cases? Just as
we can provide temporary
accommodations for the Privy
Council, we can create tempo-
rary criminal courts. After six
months, let us then assess the
impact this initiative has had
on the backlog of criminal cas-
es.

If we are going to follow a
Privy Council ruling that says
“one is entitled to a bail hearing
if no charges are brought with-
in three months”, then we must
‘step up our game’ to ensure
that our criminal justice system
is more efficient.

Weak Economy

Finally, as the economy con-
tinues to weaken and more
people are displaced from the
workforce, the prospect of
increased levels of criminal
activity is real. What may start
out as a petty robbery can eas-
ily end up as a homicide. The
short-term prognosis is not
encouraging, as we have not
seen the worst of the economic
downturn yet.

Urgent Action Required

A blind man can see that
urgent action is required, yet
to the average observer it
appears that the Government
is not seeing it. If something
substantial is being done, it
must be communicated to the
public at large.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions, Colo-
nial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

TH

ARs
WAT

ia aT
ME
Mondays



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 , PAGE 3B



OOo eeu NESS eee
Bahamas to get 383,000 extra airline seats

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A FALL-OFF in group
arrivals to the Bahamas has
stymied the Government’s abil-
ity to forecast arrival numbers,
the Minister of Tourism and
Aviation said yesterday,

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said he could not say what
the winter tourism season - the
high season - will be like for
the Bahamas, but lamented
that the numbers have been
scattered.

Mr Vanderpool- Wallace
alluded to a drastic decline this

FIRMS, from 1B

stipulating staff job descrip-
tions, pay and benefits, and that
these be reviewed continually -
on an annual basis.

She explained that if an
employee had been promoted
through several positions since
joining a company, and the
employment contract had not
been renewed, the courts would
look at the present terms of
employment - not the contract -
if a dispute arose.

Ms Archer also advised
employers to “obtain a signed
declaration of release” from
laid-off employees once they
had received their severance
pay to stop them bringing any
legal action against the compa-
ny.
“aaathes common area of
dispute surrounding lay-offs
was whether an employee was a
manager/supervisor, and enti-
tled to four weeks’ pay for
every year worked, or a line
worker and entitled to two
weeks’ payment for each year.

Ms Archer said that in such
cases, courts would assess issues
such as whether the employee
could hire, discipline or transfer
other staff, the degree of deci-
sion-making and management
control they had, and whether
they received overtime pay to
determine whether the worker
had supervisory authority. The
terms of the employment con-
tract were also crucial.

Ms Archer also warned
employees asked to work out
their two or four-week notice
period not to “burn bridges”

winter season year-on-year, as
group arrivals, typically booked
months in advanced, have tra-
ditionally been used to gauge
arrival numbers.

With the onset of the global
economic downturn, the
dynamics of booking vacations
changed, with travelers book-
ing airfare and hotel accom-
modations only weeks in
advance.

Group travel took a hit ear-
ly this year as corporations cut
down on travel, the US gov-
ernment even scolding large
corporations for spending on
travel as the economy began
to tighten.

by sabotaging or undermining
their former employer, adding:
“It’s a small community, and
one would not want to leave a
bad impression because a ref-
erence may be required.

“An employer may find an
employee may prefer to leave
rather than work out their
notice period, so ask them to
take accrued vacation pay. The
employee gets what he wants,
and the employer gets what he
wants.”

Given the current economic
downturn, Ms Archer acknowl-
edged: “Those who have a job
are finding it increasingly diffi-
cult to focus on their duties
because they think they’re
going to be next to receive a
pink slip.”

Oscar Johnson, a fellow Hig-
gs & Johnson attorney and
partner, said: “In these circum-
stances, it is clear there is an
imperative faced by employers
to rein in costs to weather the
economic downturn they are
facing.

“That is a reality that is

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the decline in stopover visitors
has left the Bahamian economy
in a bad position, even as cruise
arrivals gains were recognised
year-on-year.

However, he suggested
counting arrivals to the island
per head has been a misleading
method of calculating visitor
spending.

The minister said stopover
visitor arrivals have plummeted
14 per cent, while cruise pas-
senger arrivals are up by the
same number.

He insisted that the Ministry
of Tourism is working with the
Bahamas Hotel Association to

inescapable. Employers facing
dire circumstances need to
rationalise cost structures”,
meaning they were assessing
staff complements, their suit-
ability and skill sets.

“It has to be understood, if
one is an employer and one is
an employee, that litigation is a
costly affair, and especially in
an economic downturn it
should be avoided if at all pos-
sible. The propensity to litigate
is something an employer
should look at, as they should
structure decisions taken to
avoid this if at all possible.”

Mr Johnson also warned
Bahamian employers not to
“sacrifice long-term value for
short-term relief” in terminat-
ing employees. While many
firms felt that if they reduced
costs by a certain percentage,
they would have a specific bot-
tom line impact, in doing this
they could lose valuable work-
ers “and may prevent your
company from recovering as
speedily. Sound decisions need
to be taken”.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that CLIFFORD JACKSON FAUSTIN of
YOUNG STREET, EAST STREET, P.O. BOX N-8832, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of

The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29'" day of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.



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introduce more airlift to the
country beginning by year-end.

He said new airline passen-
ger capacity to Abaco and
Eleuthera will increase by
65,520 seats with the addition
of two daily American Eagle
flights .

In Grand Bahama, an addi-
tional 39,000 seats will be
added with the introduction of
WestJet, American Airlines,
Delta and Spirit Airlines.

And a total of 293,320 more
seats will be added to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island arrivals.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the Bahamas is to receive an
annual total of 383,280 more

Among the lay-off alterna-
tives, Mr Johnson said, were to
reduce salaries and work hours,
reduce paid vacations, imple-
ment ‘work from home’ rules,
and reassign employees - espe-
cially productive, highly-skilled
ones - to growth areas in a busi-
ness.

“Often times, people feel
that if they are bound to an
employee contract, there is no
flexibility,” Mr Johnson said.
“T can assure you that in today’s
environment, employees are
prepared to be flexible. They
want to retain their income.”

On redundancy, Mr Johnson
said employers could only make
workers redundant if they were
closing a business, specific loca-
tion or eliminating a certain
post altogether.

airline seats than before.

According to him, the new
Lynden Pindling International
Airport expansion presently
underway will allow for a much
larger capacity of visitor
arrivals and open the door for
New Providence to become a
connection hub for travel to
the Family Islands.

“Right now it is impossible
to make the connection in Nas-

sau to get to the Family
Islands,” he said.

The Ministry has also moved
to brand Abaco separately
from the other islands in order
to market it and its own desti-
nation.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
many more of the Family
Islands will be branded and
marketed in this way in the
future.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

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KLEIN PROPERTIES S.A.
In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), KLEIN PROPERTIES S.A. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 28th day

of September, 2009.

Yolanda Hamanji
of 12 Bell Lane, Gibraltar
Liquidator



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THE TRIBUNE

SS ea

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00560

Whereas CASTELLA MERCIANA BOWLEG, of No. 14 Richard’s
Court, Oakes Field, in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EARLE
A BOWLEG late of No. 14 Richard’s Court, Oakesfield, in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00562

Whereas KYLE ALBURY, of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ARLENE MARGARET ALBURY late of Trinity Way, Stapledon
Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00563

Whereas EMMA BRAYNEN (nee) FERGUSON, of Seven Hills
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of MICHAEL MITCHELL, late of St Barts Road,
Golden Gates No. 2 in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00564

Whereas NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II, of Chancery House, The
Mall, in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ZBIGNIEW
EMILIAN MAZUREK late of 437 Golden Isles Drive in the City
of Hallandale, in the State of Florida, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



FROM page 1B

the high side, and other Kerzn-
er International sources have
denied that any lay-offs are
being contemplated.

Mr Markantonis said yester-
day that many of the staff at
Atlantis, the country’s largest
private sector employer, have
been placed on one to two-day
work weeks, while employees
across the board have been
asked to take a mandatory two-
week unpaid vacation.

“That includes me,” he said.
“T applaud them for having
been able to do that.”

Atlantis was forced to lay off
800 workers in November 2008
as declining economic condi-
tions deepened, following the

BKG/410.03

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5B

Atlantis: No group
rebound until 2011/12

credit crunch that toppled
major banks in the US.

Despite the economic condi-
tions, Atlantis continues to
aggressively promote itself. Mr
Markantonis told Tribune Busi-
ness that his resort recently
bought two full page ads in the
New York Times that could cost
up to $290,000 on the high end
at the particular US newspa-
per. And Atlantis is running
two new television ad cam-
paigns as well.

“Tf that doesn’t work...,” he
said.

However, Mr Markantonis
asserted that the 2009 promo-
tional campaigns have not had
the desired effect this year.

“They are really not work-
ing very well. A lot of that is

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 94-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Successful tenderers, who

will be advised should take up their bills against payment on
Friday, October 2, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multi-
ples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable
from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

OR OR OR OR AR ARR OR OK OK OK OK OR OK OR RR OR OR OOK OK KOR KR RR ROR ORK KOK KKK RK RR

|
1



because people in the US are
not willing to travel,” said Mr
Markantonis.

He argued that attracting vis-
itors under the current eco-
nomic conditions has been an
“uphill struggle”.

“Leisure guests are now
looking for the best deals they
can get, and tend to focus on
much cheaper vacations like
cruise trips,” he said.

Mr Markantonis suggested
Atlantis’ packages that offer
value, such as inclusive ameni-
ties, are not being picked up by
would-be travelers.

The fact Atlantis does not
expect group and convention
bookings to recover until 2011
or 2012 is significant, and indi-
cates the wider Bahamian econ-
omy may not rebound until
winter 2010-2011. Group book-
ings are important to the likes
of Atlantis and Baha Mar
because they are booked far
out, and take up specific ameni-
ties, enabling the resorts to fix
their leisure business around
these occupancy blocks.

The Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation recently released
tourist arrival statistics reveal-
ing stopover arrivals were down
year-over-year almost 14 per
cent, while cruise arrivals were
up by about the same number.

According to Mr Markanto-
nis, the Atlantis Dubai proper-
ty’s business remains steady
due to strong patronage from
Middle Eastern visitors, espe-
cially within the oil-rich United
Arab Emirates where the resort
is located. He also said a new
500-room casino property is
under construction in Moroc-
co.

The resort recently hosted
the Miss Universe Pageant,
which has been heralded as the
preeminent promotional spot
for the Bahamas - greater than
last year’s Super Bowl spot.

Mr Markantonis said the
global exposure his resort
received during the pageant
was priceless and should posi-
tion Atlantis and the Bahamas
for the future.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.
Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

server issues.

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.
Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-virus,
data back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these
systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

° Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and

upgrades.

Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network

issues.

Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;

pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Regulators back ‘no interconnect fee’ for local calls

tomer to receive a call, and also
imposing an interconnection
charge on a rival to terminate a
call on its network.
“However, the access and
interconnection consultation is
silent with respect to the long-
standing practice in the

Bahamas of BTC making no
tariff charge to the consumer
for terminating intra-island
domestic calls, and the impact
that such a practice has on




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007







IN THE SUPREME COURT

Equity Side

No. 00098

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot



of land containing 13.77 Acres and situate at




Warren’s Harbour and to the Southern side of the




road leading from Moss Town Settlement on Cat



Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of






The Bahamas

AND





IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act,



1959 (Chapter 393 Statute law of The Bahamas

interconnection charges,” Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny warned.

Currently, interconnection
charges for local, inter-island
calls between SRG and BTC’s
networks involved no charges
to either operator.

However, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny explained that if
BTC, under the proposed ref-
erence access/interconnection
offer (RAIO) that will be intro-
duced under the new regulato-
ry regime, imposed an inter-
connection charge for local ter-
mination, “another operator
would at the time then be faced
with passing that new charge
on to its existing customers,
who have hitherto paid noth-
ing to terminate local calls
regardless of the network on
which the called party resides.

“Tn such a case, business real-

ity would force those customers
of the other operator to take
circuits from BTC to terminate
calls to BTC customers, thereby
avoiding the new termination
charge,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
added.

“Common sense dictates that
such distortion of the market
in favour of the SMP (Signifi-
cant Market Power) operator
cannot be the intent of the Act
or of the interconnection policy.

“SRG is of the strong view
that as long as a situation per-
sists where BTC chooses to
impose no tariff for termina-
tion of intra-island calls on its
network from its own cus-
tomers, then BTC cannot be
allowed to impose an intercon-
nection charge on other opera-
tors for termination of those
calls to those same customers.”






revised edition 2001)

AND

NOTICE





IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Anna

All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited




Cartherine Carantonis-Grant

NOTICE

ANNA CATHERINE CARANTONIS-GRANT
the Petitioner claims to be the owner in fee simple
in possession of the said piece parcel or lot of land
has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the said piece
parcel or lot of land investigated and the nature
and extend thereto determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Copies of the diagram or plan showing the positions
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the
said piece parcel or lot of land may be inspected
under normal working hours at the following

places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bitco
Building, East Street in the City of Nassau,

The Bahamas’
(b)

The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,

4th Floor, Sheraton Hilton, Suite 400 #1
Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
drawn a right of Dower or an adverse claim not
recognized in the Petition shall within thirty (30)
days after the appearance of the Notice herein file
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City
of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of her claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be

filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of claim within thirty (30) days herein
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 6th day of May, A.D. 2009

DAVIS & CO.
Chambers
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce
No. 1 Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner

to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009
p.m. in the Board room of the Michael Eldon
Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JOULIANE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAMAT S.A.

——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of RAMAT S.A. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Roney ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.89 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.47 | YTD % -12.23
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

The Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA) agreed with SRG’s
position, confirming that no
interconnection charges would
be levied by telecoms opera-
tors for domestic, intra-island
calls, until Bahamian consumer
started to be charged for these
calls.

Previously, BTC had sub-
sidised free domestic calls
through its unbalanced inter-
national fixed-line long distance
charges, yet the arrival of com-
petition from IndiGo and unli-
censed Voice over Internet Pro-
tocol (VoIP) providers had
forced it to reduce the latter. It
had subsequently attempted to
make up for the losses this had
called by increasing line rental
charges as of January 1, 2006.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
SRG’s concern was that, given
that free domestic calls had to
be subsidised by another BTC
business line, they were being
priced at below cost - “the clas-
sic case of predatory pricing in
a competitive market”.

If interconnection charges
were levied, he argued: “In such

a case, BTC would have dis-
torted the market in intra-island
fixed voice such that sustain-
able competition is unachiev-
able.

“After all, no competitor will
invest in infrastructure or offer
competing services whilst the
market rate to the consumer
has been set by the dominant
operator at below cost.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also
complained that BTC had
refused to facilities share, when
it came to shared access to the
latter’s masts and towers, for
some five years.

“SRG first wrote to BTC on
the subject of requesting shared
access to BTC’s masts and tow-
ers on August 16, 2004. Despite
copious further correspondence
from SRG, and requests for
assistance from the PUC, SRG
is no nearer shared access to
BTC’s facilities today than it
was five years ago,” he said.

Regardless of whether the
issue was dealt with via an
access/interconnection offer or
some other agreement, the
SRG president said URCA
needed to ensure facilities shar-
ing offers were “made prompt-
ly, in good faith and on non-
discriminatory and cost-orien-
tated terms”.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

APOLLOS VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAPPAHANNOCK INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAPPAHANNOCK INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Employment Opportunity

Sales Representative

We are seeking to hire talented, assertive, charismatic and
outgoing individuals with an aptitude for sales and a desire to

succeed.

Skills and Requirements

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Today's Close Daily Vol. _ EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.10 O.127
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 a.992
5.90 5.90 0.244
0.63 0.63 -0.877
3.15 3.15 0.125
2.14 2.37 0.055
10.00 10.03 1.406
2.74 2.74 0.249
5.26 5.87 0.419
0.111
0.625
0.420
0.322
0.631
0.332
9.000

Excellent oral and written communication skills
52wk-Hi Previous Close
TF

10.75

5.30

0.63

3.15

Change
0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Ability to work in a fast paced environment

2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.43
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50
1.00

Strong mathematic capabilities
Ability to multitask

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

1.27
1.32
6.60
8.80
10.00
4.50
1.00
0.27
5.49
9.98
10.00

Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0.952
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds e
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $

3.33
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50
1.00
0.27

Excellent interpersonal skills
5.50

0.27
5.50

0.035
0.407

A team player with the ability to work independently

S2wk-Hi 5S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Professional appearance

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

A desire and passion to get ahead

52wk-Low Symbol EPS $ Div $ P/E
7.02 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

Minimum Requirements

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

Associate degree in marketing or business
administration

52wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941

12.3870

100.0000
93.1992

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.4038
2.8990
1.4905
3.0941
13.1136
101.6693
96.7398

3.72
-1.39
3.96
-8.61
3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
3.38

5.20
-4.16
5.49
-13.59
5.87
1.87
-4.18
0.00
-1.44
5.14
2.05
4.93

31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

18-Sep-09

31-Aug-09 e
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Sales experience desired but not essential
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319 -0.11
1.0673 2.89
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Paid training and benefits program available

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dee 02 = 1,000.00

52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price fer daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

salesrepresentativeneeded@gmail.com

PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 5/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE



Bt

TAMPA

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 67° F/19°C
@

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5

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ORLANDO |
High:89°F/32°C

Low:65°F/18°C
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THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST









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Partly cloudy.

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At-storm in spots in the

o|1|2

LOW

&

Some sun with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a



















afternoon. shower or t-storm. possible. possible. thunderstorm.
High: 88° High: 88° High: 86° High: 87°
High: 88° Low: 77° Low: 77° Low: 78° Low: 77° Low: 79°
EE ai ae PETE
106° F 104°-82° F 98°-85° F 97°-75° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.
‘nea _ for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday
Jemperature
High: 90° F/32° C IGN: sesssasedvsseesslacesonaeiectiediared saeco, 86" F/30° C Friday
~The ° LOW eee 77° F/25° C
a Low: 76° F/24°C Normal high... 87° F/30° C
7; Normal low 74° F/23° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Migh .....ccccsccsceene 90° F/32° C
High: 90° F/32° C Last year's LOW oo. eseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 75° F/24° C















3|4[5

MODERATE

High

3:56 a.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:43 a.m.
5:03 p.m.
5:26 a.m.
5:44 p.m.

6:06 a.m.
6:22 p.m.








HIGH | V.HIGH

Ht. (ft.

2.5 10:03 a.m.
2.9 10:45 p.m.

2. 10:53 a.m.
2.9 11:24 p.m.

2.8 11:38 a.m.

Vv
'|8|9|10

EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

Low _Ht. (ft

1.2
1.2

1.0
0.9

0.9

3.0 00

3.0 12:00 a.m.
3.0 12:20 p.m.



0.7
0.7

' Low: 72° F/22°C a Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:01am. Moonrise .... 4:16 p.m.
ie . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccscssssssscsssssseeen 0.76" ‘Sunset....... 6:59 p.m. Moonset ..... 2:51 a.m.
ail FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT j AN Year to date 3. Full Last New First
' mm High: 91°F/33°C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsecsesscsseeseeeeeee 37.92" 7 a
Low: 76° F/24°C = Low: 74° F/23°C oe te ie
& AccuWeather.com {°° =
@ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by . ay .
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct.18 Oct. 25
er High: 90° F/32° C ELEUTHERA
it Low: 74° F/23° Cc NASSAU High: a1" F/33° C
High: 88° F/31 °C Low: 78 F/26 C
— Low: 77° F/25°C
3 i. Y cae cz
KEY WEST a So _ CATISLAND
High: 30 eZee High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 79° F/26°C a. ) Low: 75° F/24°C
ot x
- GREATEXUMA hi
” 1 SAN SALVADOR
i High: 90° F/32° C High: 90° F/32° c
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 76° F/24° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS ,
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33°C ye er
Low: 75° F/24°C i. : -.
ma â„¢
LONGISLAND
a ire
Low: 76° F/24° C 6
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday -*. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W (~ High: 91° F/33° C
FIC F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC Ay Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 85/29 59/15 pe 82/27 52/1 pc Indianapolis 62/16 44/6 pe 67/19 46/7 s Philadelphia 68/20 53/11 pe 68/20 51/10 pc
Anchorage 48/8 40/4 sh 49/9 38/3 sh Jacksonville 83/28 54/12 s 80/26 55/12 ¢$ Phoenix 104/40 78/25 s 96/35 65/18 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 72/22 5010 s 74/23 53/11 s Kansas City 72/22 51/10 s 76/24 60/15 s Pittsburgh 56/13. 47/8 sh 57/13 43/6 c RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:93°F/34"c
Atlantic City 71/21 50/10 pc 69/20 45/7 pc Las Vegas 96/35 67/19 s 79/26 56/3 s Portland,OR 60/45 48/8 sh 63/17 499 c High: 91° F/33° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 68/20 51/10 pce 68/20 47/8 pc Little Rock 77/25 52/1 = s 80/26 60/15 s Raleigh-Durham 74/23 48/8 s 73/22 49/9 s Low: 75°F/24°C i
Boston 70/21 53/11 pe 67/19 49/9 pc Los Angeles 75/23 60/15 pce 78/25 58/14 pc St. Louis 69/20 47/8 s 73/22 58/14 s .
Buffalo 58/14 46/7 sh 54412 43/6 c Louisville 68/20 46/7 s 70/21 45/7 s Salt Lake City 86/30 53/11 pce 56/13 35/1. sh GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 81/27 53/11 s 76/24 55/12 $s Memphis 75/23 52/11 s 78/25 57/13 $s San Antonio 86/30 72/22 t 88/31 75/23 t High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 57/13 43/6 c 6216 46/7 s Miami 90/32 74/23 pc 88/31 74/23 t San Diego 72/22 64417 peo 73/22 61/16 pc Low. 78° F26°C
Cleveland 58/14 49/9 sh 58/14 414 pc Minneapolis 60/15 38/3 s 6317 47/8 s San Francisco 65/18 52/11 pce 69/20 53/11 s 7
Dallas 83/28 66/18 s 88/31 72/22 pc Nashville 69/20 48/8 s 72/22 51/10 s Seattle 58/14 45/7 sh 60/5 48/8 ¢
Denver 82/27 52/11 pe 72/22 36/2 t New Orleans 82/27 64/17 $s 82/27 64/17 $s Tallahassee 85/29 51/10 s 82/27 50/10 s
Detroit 58/14 46/7 c 6116 45/7 pc New York 69/20 55/12 po 66/18 54/12 pc Tampa 88/31 67/19 pc 84/28 65/18 s
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 79/26 58/14 s 82/27 66/18 pc Tucson 99/37 72/22 s 94/34 63/17 s$
Houston 87/30 67/19 pc 87/30 70/21 pc Orlando 89/31 65/18 pce 84/28 63/17 s Washington, DC 70/21 53/11 pce 69/20 52/11 pc

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Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

Ti

High
F/C
93/33
64/17
72/22
81/27
63/17
92/33
87/30
74/23
81/27
74/23
75/23
65/18
83/28
68/20
66/18
72/22
57/13
89/31
91/32
62/16
91/32
81/27
79/26
57/13
63/17
66/18
72/22
64/17
90/32
50/10
86/30
106/41
72/22
76/24
72/22
89/31
74/23
70/21
75/23
86/30
75/23
93/33
61/16
55/12
64/17
87/30
99/37
54/12
72/22
64/17
70/21
100/37
75/23
90/32
63/17
89/31
64/17
86/30
61/16
77/25
52/11
70/21
82/27
79/26
58/14
72/22
60/15
67/19
63/17
56/13

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
39/3
67/19
54/12
77/25
77/25
62/16
57/13
69/20
50/10
44/6
77/25
42/5
50/10
49/9
36/2
69/20
84/28
36/2
73/22
72/22
62/16
46/7
43/8
52/11
49/9
49/9
72/22
39/3
79/26
71/21
62/16
58/14
50/10
79/26
60/15
54/12
52/11
77/25
57/13
72/22
43/8
37/2
45/7
55/12
77/25
34/1
46/7
50/10
61/16
69/20
ale
81/27
33/3
73/22
39/3
74/23
52/11
61/16
36/2
52/11
79/26
68/20
46/7
59/15
45/7
51/10
41/5
36/2

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High
F/C
92/33
63/17
73/22
81/27
58/14
92/33
86/30
75/23
77/25
74/23
71/21
61/16
83/28
69/20
70/21
66/18
61/16
88/31
93/33
50/10
88/31
83/28
80/26
64/17
63/17
68/20
73/22
61/16
88/31
52/11
86/30
108/42
66/18
75/23
72/22
88/31
75/23
68/20
81/27
86/30
75/23
93/33
54/12
50/10
69/20
86/30
99/37
50/10
70/21
61/16
69/20
97/36
75/23
88/31
72/22
86/30
68/20
85/29
59/15
77/25
52/11
82/27
86/30
72/22
54/12
85/29
57/13
66/18
57/13
56/13

Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
43/6
63/17
51/10
77/25
77/25
63/17
60/15
69/20
53/11
43/6
75/23
41/5
52/11
46/7
46/7
68/20
82/27
31/0
73/22
73/22
63/17
48/8
46/7
50/10
53/11
43/8
70/21
37/2
81/27
69/20
54/12
59/15
50/10
78/25
61/16
48/8
56/13
77/25
57/13
74/23
41/5
36/2
47/8
55/12
73/22
34/1
48/8
50/10
62/16
69/20
57/13
80/26
41/5
73/22
39/3
73/22
57/13
57/13
37/2
59/15
77/25
67/19
43/6
66/18
43/8
55/12
45/7
33/3

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th, 2009, PAGE 11B




INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: WSW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: WSW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: WNW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: NNW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: W at 7-14 Knots 3-5 Feet 6 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: W at 3-6 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 84° F



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60/38

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82/52 72/51

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- You Can Be Blown
Away 3 A Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that Yowhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

coy ay ma [pl pe i



Full Text

PAGE 1

‘Bridgewater’ s meeting with Travolta lawyer secretly recorded’ N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.256TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER T-STORM INSPOTS HIGH 88F LOW 75F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Choosing the right SEEPAGENINE Relationships Honour for ‘SEAWOLF’ Pair also accused of attempted murder The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E GENEAR MCKENZIE, 20 RHONDA KNOWLES, 19 TRA VOLTA TRIAL: WEEK TWO B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net AN attorney for Hollywood celebrity John Travolta allowed police to set up recording devices in his hotel room for a meeting with former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater, it was revealed in court Monday. Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino INSIDE TOTALCOSTOFMISS UNIVERSEREVEALED PAGE THREE CROWN LAND ‘USED AS A POLITICAL TOOL’ PAGE TWO By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net TWO young women charged with the murder of Bahamasair pilot Lionel McQueen were arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Genear McKenzie, 20, of Warren Street alias “Nettie”, and Rhonda Knowles, 19, of Winton Estates, alias “Ganja Baby”, have been charged with the murder of McQueen, 29. McQueen was found dead W omen charged in pilot murder SEE page 12 Defendants aged 20 and 19 in court NATIONAL Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards will not be held in January as planned but in 2011, the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation announced yesterday. The week to promote tourism and the award ceremony held during that week to reward high performers in the tourism New date for National T ourism W eek, Cacique A war ds By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FORMER Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest was asked to resign earlier this year because he could not reasonably explain how several beach-front parcels of Crown land granted to his relatives were fast-tracked through the backlogged system. Mr Turnquest also could not reasonably explain to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, the minister responsible for Revealed: why for mer Lands and Surveys director was asked to quit SEE page 12 By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Two men were charged with possession of dangerous drugs on Monday in the Freeport Magis trate’s Court. Leroy Miller, 41, of Freeport, and Davonne Brown, 29, of Nassau, T T w w o o f f a a c c e e d d a a n n g g e e r r o o u u s s d d r r u u g g s s a a l l l l e e g g a a t t i i o o n n FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former premedic Tarino Lightbourne lawyer Carlson Shurland yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 12 MONDAY night football was cancelled at the Green Parrot bar and restaurant on Bay Street last night as flat screen televisions in the bar were stolen over the week end. The Green thParrot management hopes to replace the televisions before Monday night football next week. Anyone with any informa TV thieves r uin Monday football SEE page 12 PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SEE page 12 SEE page 12 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net LINKING the Bahamas to the world and the islands to one another is the key focus for the development of the country’s largest industry, Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday. As promotions of the Bahamas in the $5.8 million 2009 Miss Universe pageant showing the islands as a chain of unique Move to boost Bahamas tourism SEE page 12

PAGE 2

E ach year Doctors Hospital makes a donation to the B ahamas Children’s Emergency Hostel in support of its efforts t o provide temporary shelter, food, clothing, and other necessities to abused, abandoned and neglected children. The hostel houses more than 3 0 children ages one to 11, and is a charitable non-profit organ i sation that survives on donations and fundraising from the c hurch, civic and business organisations, the government, and individuals from the private sector. The cost of running the facili ty increases every year, and the organisers say the hostel is nowf acing financial challenges. The hospital’s latest fundrais i ng initiative focused on helping pay for the hostel’s hand book on teenage pregnancy – an effort to educate youths, e specially young women, who may be promiscuous, pregnant o r the victims of sexual assault. Those interested in helping t he Bahamas Children’s Emer gency Hostel can donate funds or supplies, lend a hand, sponsor a project or event, or participate in the hostel’s corporate fundraising programme or c haritable foundation programme. A ll donations and gifts are welcome, administrators say, i ncluding clothes, shoes, books and toys. School supplies, such as books, stationary and school uniforms are urgently needed. By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net T HE promise of crown land grants has been used as a political tool by successive governments, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Lands David Davis revealed . H e said the practice of offering free tracts of land in return for political allegiance has been going on for many years, adding however that these promises are often not fulfilled in the after-m ath of an election. "The trend has been established. Before every election, plenty letters get issued which are not honoured after election. But I want to ask you, when did them people gett heir grant? Some of them never get it. "Some of them letters didn't originate in the department – I 'm not calling any years – the minister responsible for lands can issue letters, he can give instructions to issue letters," Mr Davis told the House of Assem-b ly's Select Committee on Crown Land issues yesterday. Questions H e was responding to questions put to him by committee member Philip “Brave” Davis, who suggested that the department was usually mobilised to issue approval letters before elections. Committee member Kenyatt a Gibson suggested that the approval process should become the responsibility of a qualifiedc ommittee rather than one person – to avoid the appearance ofn epotism or corruption. To this Mr Davis replied: " Land is a very emotive issue, land is also a very political issue. I haven't seen any government that's prepared to bring transparency to the process – all gov ernments try to hold onto that power, the power to give crown land – or objectivity. It's like a perk." When asked what wasb eing done on a day-to-day basis to avoid corruption, Acting Director Richard Hardy – who is responsible for issuing a pproval recommendations to the minister of lands – said he closely monitors all submissions for approval and outgoing correspondence. " That is the best control I have. . . To know what is happening. And it is my intention, as long as I am acting director, t hat it is done fairly." Mr Hardy stressed that the department makes no decisions on applications; only recommendations to the minister. A udley Greaves, under-secretary in the department, agreed, saying the best that can be done to avoid corruption is to remain "fair and open-handed." Significant reform of thed epartment, which is plagued with inefficiencies and an exten-s ive backlog, is needed, the witnesses testified. Mr Davis admitt ed that there are deficiencies in the department's filing syst em, adding: "Given the sheer volume (of applications many of them get lost." H e added that a number of crown land applications languish in the system because they are incomplete and the department has no means of contact-i ng the applicants. Mr Hardy also admitted that over the past few years a number of applications have gone u nanswered, but said it was his intention going forward to have all applications acknowledged. In order to improve its processing system and keep track ofa pplications, the department is also looking at implementing an electronic system that would allow officials to quickly access a list of all applicants and check on the status of their applications, Mr Hardy said. The department’s backlog is due in part to a lack of qualifiedl and surveyors. Mr Davis said that since 1992, the department has been grappling with the "impossible task" of trying to recruit Bahamian surveyors and has now had to turn to foreign e rs. Over the last few months the department has recruiteda bout four or five surveyors from abroad, mostly from G uyana or other Caribbean countries. The committee, s cheduled to meet every Monday, is expected to present their findings to parliament on Janu a ry 27, 2010. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Helping our youngsters FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Chadwick Williamson, VP MIS, Doctors Hospital; Jasmine Davis, VP Patient Finance, Doctors Hospital; Michele Rassin, VP Operations, Doctors Hospital; Nakita Smith, Assistant Administrator, Bahamas Children’s Emergency Hostel; Stanley Forbes, Book Assistant, Bahamas Children’s Emergency Hostel; KellyAnne Smith, Graphic Designer, Doctors Hospital. D OCTORS H OSPITALSUPPORTSHANDBOOKONTEENAGEPREGNANCY Top official admits Crown land has been used as a ‘political tool’ HOUSEOFASSEMBLYSELECTCOMMITTEE

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THE 2009 Miss Universe pageant cost the government$ 5.8 million in total, Minister of Tourism Senator Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace revealed in a press conference yesterday. M r Vanderpool-Wallace said the cost was much less than expected and far lower than many previous hosts of the international beauty contesth ave paid for the privilege. The pageant gave the Bahamas nearly 10 minutes of coverage on prime-time televis ion shown on 647 media broadcasts in 180 countries around the world and was viewed by an estimated 115,936,797 million people, including 7.1 million in the U nited States. All of those people would h ave learned that the Bahamas is a network of individuali slands each with their own character, as they followed Miss U niverse 2008 Dayana Mendoza, of Venezuela, to Exuma, Andros, and Cat Island, and all 84 contestants to Harbour Island, Bimini and GrandB ahama. The $5.8 million paid by the M inistry of Tourism included all transportation of contestants b y air, sea and land, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace told the media at the British Colonial Hilton in d owntown Nassau, yesterday. The minister compared the p rice-tag to the $2 million cost of 30 seconds of advertising d uring a Super Bowl game, and the $15 million Vietnam paid to host Miss Universe 2008. The minister said: “We really have to thank the private sect or because without their support there’s no way we could h ave done what we did with the kind of outcome that we had. Never before have I seen a level of co-operation, co-ordination, inter-government cooperation, like that. There were things we were trying to get f ixed for years and as soon as Miss Universe was coming, it w as done. “There was amazing co-oper a tion and amazing outcome.” Director of Tourism Vernice W alkine said she fought to showcase the individual islands, each with its unique appeal, in the pageant show. She said: “We saw an opport unity to get these beautiful women moving through thei slands to promote to the world that we have multiple islands w hich is the mission, I think, we accomplished. “I fought for us to get Dayana Mendoza to do her adventures in the Bahamas andt hat’s not typical because she would normally have one des t ination. “So I got everything I wanted and then some.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the exposure attracted many more people to the Ministry of Tourism website, and particularly to pages about the Family I slands, after the event. Miss Universe 2009 also b oosted local businesses, with events such as the fashion show highlighting the fabrics of A ndrosia and Bahama Hand Prints. M r Vanderpool-Wallace said: “Miss Universe had the b iggest impact we have had ever. It’s something that was just extraordinary in terms of what it is. “We have never in the his tory of the Bahamas got coverage of that sort. “In a two hour telecast we had the best commercial for the B ahamas that we will ever get. “We got almost 10 minutes of fantastic coverage we could never have paid for out of our budget. “It was a conversation and negotiation and outcome we are very proud of. People say it was an outstanding production, a n amazing accomplishment, and $5.8 million is much less than we expected to pay. “It was much, much less than anybody has paid for Miss Uni verse in the last several years, in Vietnam, in Trinidad, the cost was much higher, so we paid much less than in recent years a nd in many other years.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – MORE than $22 million in illegal drugs and cash seizures have been recorded so far this year on Grand Bahama. C ocaine seizures amounted to over $19 million, according to statistical reports released by police officials here. Eight major seizures occurred at the Freeport Container Port between January and August of this year, with the single largest s eizure pegged at $6,250,000. The first seizure was made on January 14 when DEU officers seized 56 kilos of cocaine with an estimated street value of $1.4 million. On February 5, Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU covered five large duffle bags containing some 250 kilos of cocainee stimated at $6,250,000 at the port. Two months later, 200 kilos of cocaine worth $4 million were discovered in a container. From July 13 to August 26, cocaine seizures totalled some $7,350,000 at the port. Mar ijuana According to reports, marijuana seizures totalled some $851,700 s o far this year. Of the six major seizures, five occurred in the Freeport area and one in East Grand Bahama. About 851.7 pounds o f marijuana were seized between May and September, 2009. Grand Bahama police have also seized nearly $3 million in cash this year. In April, police discovered $2,772,764 in United States currency at the Grand Bahama International Airport. According to reports, the money was found hidden in various a ppliances and items that were onboard a private charter aircraft that had arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. A s the items were being inspected and cleared by Bahamas Customs at the airport, large sums of US currency notes were f ound concealed in a small refrigerator, two television sets and other items. In another incident, police seized some $164,319.52 at a residence in Freeport in April. Grand Bahama police said they are grateful to the community for its continued support in the fight against crime. More than $22m in drugs and cash seizures this year Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham will attend the 2009 Annu al Americas Conference to be held at the Biltmore Hotel inC oral Gables, Florida on September 29-30. The conference, sponsored by the State of Florida, the World Bank, the Miami Herald and Florida International University, is a business and political forum that focuses on United States/Latin American issues. This year’s conference is being held under the theme: “After the crisis: emerging challenges and political stability.” Prime Minister Ingraham will deliver the first of three principal addresses on the opening day of the conference. He will depart on Nassau on Tuesday, September 29, and return the same day. PM Ingraham to addr ess Annual Americas Conference in Florida Miss Universe pageant cost government $5.8m n GRANDBAHAMA Tourism Minister says amount was much less than expected V INCENT VANDERPOOL-WALLACE We really have to thank the private sector because without their support there’s no way we could have done what we did with the kind of outcome that we had.” By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE man found dead on Rose Island on Saturday after noon has been identified as 49-year-old Spencer Anthony Archer. The body of Mr Archer, of Bilney Lane off Shirley Street, was discovered at around 6pm on Saturday. He is believed to have drowned. According to Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel, an autopsy to officially determine the cause of Mr Archer’s death should be completed by the end of this week. ASP Bethel said Mr Archer was on Rose Island “with others when this tragedy occurred.” Man thought to have drowned on Rose Island is identified In brief

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. I know that James Catalyan is performing at the Dundas but I suspect there is a certain amount of mid-summer madness in the air reading and listening to local com mentators and callers to the Talk Shows. Example.....Bahamasair will be flying to Europe Asia..... we will create 10,000 new jobsa year.....a caller to a Talk Show suggests the Chinese build a bridge between Nassau and Andros (ain’t he heard of the tongue of the ocean!) Others advocate the imme diate hanging of everyone on death row for what are clear ly “bedroom-murders of pas sion.” Hasn’t anyone been listening or reading that the question of the use of capital punishment is totally controlled by a Privy Council judgment? Bahamas, we can ill-afford this madness at these serious times can someone slap someone and get us back on track or have we slipped the track and there is no hope? The 19-year-old girl calling in More 94 yesterday said a lot....all my graduating class girlfriends have already had a baby and the men are either smoking or following with the Rastas......what a testimonial for billions of dollars of tax payers’ money spent on education. Surely we need to have some qualifier for some of these Talk Show hosts a certain one with an AbacoEleutheran twang talks real stupidity most of the time. W THOMPSON Nassau, September 23, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. From a young boy my dad always insisted that I read Sir Etienne Dupuch’s editorials. I realised later their historical value. As I recall, he always looked behind and around to look forward. With the United States far adrift, far flung, tearing at its seams, doomed historically and too deep in a hole to recover, the Bahamas, too, stands on a precipice of gloom. The pillars of Bahamian elitist local wealth, Real Estate and the Legal Empire a re hysterical at the prospect that the local man on the street cannot afford a property or pay his rent with incorporating legal fees. From Bib l ical prophecies, the saviours from the East, the Chinese are here. Many systems of stresses are impacting the Bahamian families, and our indigenous happy-go-lucky lifestyle is crumbling. But we are a people who have survived the advent of African and European Diasporas, the coming and going of slavery, colonialism, rum-running, sponging, drug trafficking, and illegal immigration. But all of the above are an integral part of who we are as a people with a set historical fingerprint. That tourism, that has fueled our lifeblood for the past fifty years is fading now what? We are adrift upon high ocean swells. We long for the good old days and fear what’s beyond the horizon. With family income on the decline will we gain our Christianity, or was it already lost in the fog of more affluent days when a hundred dollars laid around every comer. With each Bahamian family experiencing a different and multiple layers of stresses the impacts are being felt in humbling ways. As desperation exposes gaping social wounds, crime, hopelessness and faith in God will increase while child welfare and educational needs will decrease. Nowadays survival will come first. Those most likely to survive will be the older folks that migrated to New Providence from the family islands or lived through the thirties. Like my dad always said, "Life was simple. Life was hard. We were all happy. Bahamians helped each other out. There was no crime as such, except between man and woman." God forbid we have to fish and toil the land. But should America go into another historical deep depression we will have to find out how the older folks made it. Both leaders, Obama and Ingrah am are on the tipping point of history. The international decks of cards are being shuffled. As America fights far flung wars, the Chinese, Ira n ians, and Russians have moved through her back door. With America broken, to the victor go the spoils. CARLTON ROBINSON Nassau, September 22, 2009. (Sir Etienne always predicted that civilisation would go full circle, returning to the East with China the world leader. Ed). C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE admonition that “those who ignore h istory are destined to repeat it” is as valid today as when it was coined long ago. But then, as today, it is a devilishly perplexingg uide because history is not monotonic. Today, the United States confronts a critical challenge in Afghanistan: Should we s end in more troops at the cost of greater c asualties and with success uncertain? Or should we withdraw, leaving the Tal i ban to seize power again and re-establish a homeland for al-Qaida-like terrorists? The lessons taught by Vietnam and Iraq are contradictory. O versimplifying, the U.S. lost in Vietnam despite deployment of hundreds of thousands of troops and the arsenal of a super power. Iraq became a quagmire out of which a sustainable solution is still to be extracted because the U.S. committed too few forces, p ermitting chaos, insecurity and insurgen cies to flourish. Afghanistan today is regarded as “the nec essary war” in the words of President Obama. The American military command recognizes that the war in Afghanistan cannotbe won without creating the kind of security for the people that was defaulted in Iraq. This takes many more troops to shrink the reach of the Taliban while the social andg overnmental institutions are established to elicit support from a people alienated because of endemic official corruption. T he Taliban are feared by most Afghanis for their cruel justice and harsh fundamentalist governance. But what they are not is corrupt. Thereby they pose an alternative for people suffering in their everyday lives from pervasive corruption that is tolerated if not practised int he presidential halls and reaches to the cop on the street and all stops in between. In the Obama assessment now in progress, t his corruption should be at the heart of determining American policy, because a positive outcome from the international inter vention that cannot succeed without substantial support from the populace. If President Hamid Karzai’s regime, p resently charged with widespread fraud in t he recent election, cannot be convinced or compelled to change the ways of his administration, then not enough American or European military forces exist to impose peace and stability and a Taliban and alQaida-free Afghanistan. Yet the U.S. abandons Afghanistan only at the more drastic peril of having a defeat t here reinforce the Taliban in neighbouring Pakistan, which is the proud possessor of an arsenal of 50 nuclear bombs. On both sides of the border, the Taliban are ethnic Pashtuns before they are Afgha nis or Pakistanis. Their fanatic determination is to take over Pakistan no less than Afghanistan to imposea n extremist Islamic government. T he horror is unbearable that such a regime would control nuclear weapons and seek eventual wider domination. T herefore, walking away from A fghanistan, no matter how layered and daunting the challenge, is not acceptable, more for what could happen in Pakistan. S ome Pakistani intelligence elements are s aid by American officials to be keeping ties to the Taliban, which they utilize as an instrument serving their interests. These tiesa re susceptible to being more broadly r enewed if it appears the U.S. might pull out of Afghanistan. The more recent success of U.S. drone missile attacks against Taliban and al-Qaida elements in Pakistan is apparently attributable to intelligence previously withheld byt he Pakistanis. They seem to be working both sides of the street, at times one side harder than the other. Given that ambivalence and the stake of a n uclear arsenal falling into extremist hands, the practical course for the U.S. and the world is to build up Afghani civil institu tions, train their army and police forces toe nable them to increasingly take a larger r ole in their country and continue to entice Pakistani support in hunting down their own insurgents. I t would be a long, costly commitment whose successes at first would likely be modest and not complete in the long term. If there is a better alternative, it is yet to be discerned. (This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld – C.2009 Albany Times Union). What would Sir Etienne Dupuch’s editorials have said? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net US can’t walk away from Afghanistan W e can ill-afford this madness EDITOR, The Tribune. As A female victim of marital rape by my then husband for over twenty-five years, I support this important piece of legislation one hundred percent. The result of such sexual abuse was seven unplanned and unwanted pregnancies one every year. Consequently, seven maladjusted dysfunctional children were produced. When he forced himself on me he would s ay, he paid for the right to have sex with me whenever he wanted. Many times I was left bruised and sore for days. On two occasions I even contracted sexually transmitted diseases. He was a chronic “sweethearter” even to relations with a baby-sitter and a maid. The man made my life a nightmare and because of his abuse I often took it out on the children. I often felt dirty, disgusted, hopeless and not in control of my own body. Since leaving nineteen years ago, I have not had a relationship with any other man scars are too deep. I vowed never to have to go through that kind of sexual abuse ever again! Thank you, Mrs Turner, for paving the way for women to have a recourse and to bea llowed to have control over their own bodies. I am sure a lot of women appreciate it. A MARITAL RAPE VICTIM Nassau, 2009. As a marital rape victim I totally support this important legislation

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BY LINDSAY THOMPSON DEPUTY Prime Minister a nd Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette called on theU nited Nations (UN the unjust financial burden p laced on small developing countries like the Bahamas who are asked to pay a disproportionate percentage of the international organisation’s expens e s. Speaking at the 64th Session o f the United Nations General Assembly in New York on September 25, Mr Symonette asked the UN to review the member ship fee as it relates to small i sland developing states. This year, the General A ssembly will consider the scale of assessments for the apport ionment of the expenses of the United Nations for 2010 – 2012, as well as the scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of UN peacekeeping operations. During his address, Mr S ymonette reiterated the Bahamas’ position that the per c apita gross national income (GNI undue weight in determining “capacity to pay”, as it often leads to distortions. This distortion is more visi ble in the case of the scale ofa ssessments for peacekeeping operations, he noted. T he current scale places the Bahamas, a small island devel oping state, in the same category as the most developed economies of the world, with the exception of the permanent members of the Security Coun-c il, he said. “This unjust formula creates an onerous burden and we call upon this body to address this inequity, which seriously undermines the development object ives of the Bahamas and other developing countries,” Mr Symonette said. “Clearly, the GNI criterion does not proper-l y reflect either the vulnerabilit y of our economy, or the extraordinary costs associated with the duplication of infrastructure required because of our archip elagic configuration.” Despite this, he said “the Bahamas has never wavered from its responsibilities” as af ully-fledged member of the international community, “and will continue to meet its obliga tions to the UN” in the manner prescribed and agreed. While my government is committed to paying its assessedc ontributions, in full and in a timely manner, we believe that t he proposed scale of assess ments is unfairly and unduly burdensome for countries such as the Bahamas and should therefore be reconsidered and adjusted, taking into account those considerations that reflect o ur vulnerabilities,” Mr Symonette said. H e also addressed the impact the global economic recessionh as had on the Bahamian economy, climate change, maritime s afety and security, illicit traf ficking in narcotics, and the Caribbean Community’s commitment to a stable Haiti. “The economic fall-out for t he Bahamas has been considerable,” he said. Ours is a small, very open economy that is closely linked t o the performance of more developed economies. Tourism matters in the Bahamas. It is our primary industry and it a ffects all aspects of economic life in our country.” To dealw ith this, the government “acted quickly” to soften the impact o f the international economic downturn, he explained. “It took appropriate steps to ensure the continued integrity of the domestic financial syst em, we accelerated capital works to generate employmenta nd economic activity, and we increased targeted social relief t o those most disadvantaged by the crisis,” Mr Symonettte said. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net BAHAMIANS should not wait on BEC to become more environmentally friendly, but a ct independently by implementing “green” lifestyle changes, Minister of the Environment Earl Deveaux said. M r Deveaux told T he Trib une y esterday that it is the behaviour of individual households and businesses that is keyto making the Bahamas more green”. Admitting the public may have “justified cynicism” about BEC’s commitment to renewa ble energy, Mr Deveaux said if m ore businesses and households implemented environmentally friendly practices they could not only save themselves m oney, but help the cashstrapped corporation cut its oil usage and “free up investment dollars” that it can use to buy i nto renewables. Acknowledging that a recent presentation by B EC on renewable energy provided little hope that this country can reduce its reliance on fossil fuel anytime soon, the m inister said instead of waiting on BEC, the public should act independently. “BEC in the short-run may have a five per cent impact on reducing its energy load (by building a waste-to-energy conversion plant in New Providence as it currently intends to d o). The short-run being 15 to 18 months. But the households and the businesses, if they do three or four things, can have a 30-40 per cent impact on their energy load,” he said. Mr Deveaux laid out his case at the recent town meeting on t he Wilson City Power Plant in Abaco, where opponents have been calling on the government to consider using renewable energy rather than building the traditional heavy fuel-burning power plant in what has been described as an ecologically sensitive area. D uring the same meeting, BEC gave a presentation in which it concluded that, contrary to statements from critics of the plant, it would not be feasible for the government to power Abaco with renewable energy at this time as the various options would be too costl y, require too much land or simply would not be able to provide enough electricity. The Environment Minister suggested that rather than “getting caught up” in cynicism about the likelihood that BEC will ever become more “green”, p eople should take individual action. He said households and businesses can do several key things to bring down their energy consumption paint their roofs white (reduces heat absorption, thereby lessening air-conditioning requirements); replace their hot water heaters w ith solar water heaters that use the sun’s energy; convert lightbulbs to CFL or LED bulbs that use less energy, and buy appliances such as microwaves, dishwashers or fridges that have a high energy efficiency or “SEER” (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) rati ng. The government presently provides a tax incentive for the purchase of such items, offering reduced duty charges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT.COM 242.327.6200 WEST BAY STREET AT CABLE BEACHTHE TROPICAL TREASURESOCTOBER 8 12DISCOVERInvite your family, friends, neighbors & co-workers to take Discovery Day Weekend o and come Discover the Tropical Treasures at the Wyndham Nassasu Resort.Join in the Discovery Day Weekend Activities: Take advantage of our Forever Summer Sale with rates starting at $114.00 per room, per night Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing Pirates Dinner Party on the beach(prize for best-looking pirate) Mystery photo scavenger hunt Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team Golf t ournament (green fees additional charge) Dive-in movie with popcorn Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night Club featuring the VIP Band Dance contests & prizes 8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables, dance floor, rock slide & water slide Adopt ‘green’ lifestyles, Bahamians urged Don’t wait for BECto become more environmentally friendly, says Minister EARL DEVEAUX Reduce our financial bur den, DPM Symonette tells UN DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette addresses the 64th Session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on September 25. P h o t o s / U N

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Keep a lookout for ‘Lookout’ C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICE BARCABAL INC.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the24th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE SIVA OCEAN LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) L egal NoticeN OTICE HARVEST VENTURES LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE HOLDING PATTERN LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeN OTICE RAVEN ROCK LIMITED(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) THREE beauty ambassadors of the Miss Bahamas Universe O rganisation are working together to create awareness among school children of the e ffects and signs of child abuse. M iss International Bahamas Amanda Appleyard, Miss E arth Bahamas Krystle Brown and Miss Bahamas Universe K iara Sherman are in the process of visiting the country’ss chools on a mission to educate primary school students about c hild abuse in an age-appropriate manner. Miss Bahamas Universe Organisation president Gaynell Rolle said: “We are pleased toh ave been so well received by the principals, faculty and entires tudent body of the schools.” Miss International Bahamas Amanda Appleyard, who leaves next month for the Miss International Pageant being held in Japan and China, said: “This is a wonderful opportun ity for me to sharpen my communication skills and to be at ease speaking before large and d iverse groupings. Not only is t he message a timely one for the kids, but it is one that needs t o be addressed nonetheless. I truly enjoyed each moment and a m looking forward to a continuous working relationshipw ith the schools.” Miss Earth Bahamas Krystle B rown told the students that they are special and have “special body parts that need to be protected and not taken advantage off.” You must promise me to say ‘no’ if anyone wants tot ouch you in any of those pri vate places,” she said. Ms Brown said she also enjoyed lending her crown to one lucky girl to wear for a day. “You should see how their eyes light up, it’s like a most unbelievable moment for them. I know they will never forget it.” Miss Bahamas Universe Kiara Sherman said one of herm ost memorable visits was to the Albury Sayles PrimaryS chool, where the entire school body wore whistles to symboli se ‘blowing the whistle on child abuse’. “This was truly creative and most memorable, one I will take with me for time to come.A lbury Sayles showed me in grand style how to let go andb low the whistle on child abuse in a way I never imagined. All o f the schools I visited welcomed me with open arms, the c hildren were so well behaved and curious to meet Miss Bahamas. They made my journey as Miss Bahamas so rewarding, I look forward to meeting the other students,” she said. Ms Rolle said to date the beauty queens have visited Mable Walker; Gerald Cash;S andilands; Garvin Tynes; Yellow Elder; Thelma Gibson;G ambier; Oakes Field; Ridgeland; Stephen Dillet; Albury S ayles, and Uriah McPhee Primary Schools. “This week we will visit Kingsways Academy; C W Sawyer; Naomi Blatch; Carmichael; E P Roberts;C olumbus; Palmdale, and Woodcock primary schools. Ia m so pleased (with ticipation of our queens, they r eally enjoyed speaking to the children and it showed through t heir delivery.” In total, the beauty queens will visit 21 of the Bahamas’ schools. Beauty queens raise child abuse awareness ONE little brown potcake went from being an unwanted dog to a celebrity. T he production crew from the movie ‘Wind Jammers’ an independent film production about an American girl who learns to sail in the Bahamas but learns much more about herself and the worlda round her contacted the Bahamas Humane Society to see if they could help with some potcakes to a ppear in a couple of scenes of the movie. The Humane Society staff immediately thought of ‘Lookout’ as she is a shelter favourite with af riendly personality. ‘Lookout’ went along to the movie set with her new friends Whylie Coyote, a black potcake; TigerL illi, a brindle potcake, and Roxy. The four dogs were great representatives for the potcake breed. Adoption ‘Lookout’ was at the Bahamas Humane Socie ty for adoption, however, she behaved so well on her outings she is now going to be the Socie ty’s education dog and visit schools with their education officer. There are, however, many other adoption dogs at the shelter and the BahamasH umane Society is asking anyone who has room in their heart and a home for their own potcake star t o visit the dogs at the Society. “And remember,” said a spokesman, “when you hear about the release of Wind Jammers keepa lookout for ‘Lookout’ and her friends. The Bahamas Humane Society would also like to thank the Wind Jammers production for their generous donation which will help fund our adoption pro gramme.” Homeless potcake is now a movie star M ISS B AHAMAS U NIVERSITY O RGANISATIONAMBASSADORSVISITSCHOOLS MAKINGFRIENDS: Children meet beauty queens. MISSIONTOEDUCATE: All smiles for a beauty queen.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICE Early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is critical. If you or your loved ones have questions about this disease, there are answers. The Cancer Centre Bahamas at Centreville Medical Pavilion will be hosting individual cancer clinics with two of the world's most renowned specialists on Friday, October 2, 2009. The clinics are open to the public.The Hon. Prof. Dr. Arthur PorterPC, MD, MBA, FACR, FACRO, FAAMA Dr. Porter serves as Managing Director of The Cancer Centre and Director of Radiation Oncology. He is also the current Director General and CEO of McGill University Health Centre and author of more than 300 articles on cancer research.Dr. Karol Sikora MA, MBBCh, PhD, FRCR, FRCP, FFPM Dr. Sikora is the Director of Medical Oncology at The Cancer Centre. He also serves as the Dean of Britain's first independent Medical School at the University of Buckingham and is the author of the most widely-used cancer textbook in graduate medical school in the United Kingdom. The Cancer Centre Bahamas is one of only two medical facilities outside the U.S. certified by the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO and the only non-U.S. facility in the Western Hemisphere to qualify for ACRO certification. For more information, please contact: 502-9610. Centreville Medical Pavilion y y 72 Collins Avenue RESEARCH being conducted by the College of the Bahamas’ first resident scholars is expected to uncover valuable historical data on race relations and the educational development in the Bahamas. Dr Keva Bethel, president emerita of the College of the Bahamas, and Dr Gail Saunders, former director general of Heritage, are the College’s first resident scholars. Scholars in residence programmes allow universities to strengthen expertise and enhance research capacity in academic areas of particular significance to those institutions. They typically allow visiting scholars to explore new dimensions in their disciplines and create unique opportunities for intellectual engagement with the u niversity’s faculty and students. For the host university, such work often leads to the enrichment of existing courses or the creation of new ones. D r Bethel and Dr Saunders bring a combined experience and expertise that spans decades of important work in the Bahamas, COB said. Dr Bethel’s current work, a two-year project, will study the history of post-secondary education in the Bahamas with part icular emphasis on the history of COB. The veteran educator, who h as devoted some 50 years to education in the Bahamas, is uniquely positioned for this project having been COB’s first president, following 13 years as the institution’s principal; the only woman to have held that post. Dr Bethel will examine and record significant events and milestones in the first 35 years o f the institution’s history. Concept The whole concept of the (Scholars-in-Residence gramme, when you put aside the personalities involved in this instance, is a very important reflection of the new dimensiont hat the College is taking on its t ransition to university status,” Dr Bethel said. “I think it can focus the public’s understanding that we have moved to a different stage in our development and in addition to the instructional responsibilities that we have had over the years, we now value both the experience, knowledge and research abilities of matures cholars.” Her research will investigate the social imperatives and aspirations that impacted the earlyp ost-independence period when t he College was established; including the prevailing realities and perceptions of education in the Bahamas and educational opportunities for Bahamians that governed thatt ime, and the kinds of changes that eventually emerged. Dr Saunders’ work, also a two-year project, is for herp lanned book ‘Race Relations in the Colonial Bahamas’. Calling the research necessary and important, Dr Saunders hopes to fuel greater dialogue on what for many remains a compelling and sensitive issue. “A lot of Bahamians don’t like to discuss race because it can be rather sensitive, but It hink we need to look at it dispassionately and objectively and that’s what I hope to achieve,” she said. In-person interviews will be a critical support to the documentary investigations she will conduct. “I just wish those things that existed then were here. So many of the people I really need to interview are gone. “I hope to travel to the major islands to interview strategic people, mainly senior citizens, but some people in their 50s and 40s because their parents talked to them.” The Scholars in Residence Programme is an important first for The College, which has placed great emphasis on building its research agenda. The appointment of Dr Bethel and Dr Saunders as the first such scholars, each disting uished experts in their own right, underscores the kind of distinction the College places on the programme, COB said. It also underpins the import ance the College places in developing research in areas of significance to development in the Bahamas. Exploring Bahamas’ race relations history FOR quite some time now the P inewood community has received a lot of negative publicity for allegedly b eing a haven for criminals, criminal activity and violence. But residents in the area want to change this. A group of concerned citizens have joined together and formed the P inewood Community Outreach Group with the focus of bringing pos itive publicity to the area by creating p rogrammes and activities to occupy the free time of the community’s youth, thereby eliminating time for negative influences. “The facts do reveal that a high per c entage of the country’s latest murders and crimes have been committed by Pinewood residents. “This, however, does not mean that P inewood Gardens is completely a terrible area. It is still a community of h ard working, sociable and caring citizens,” the group said. Pinewood Community Outreach is p artnering with the area’s Urban Renewal Programme and many other i nitiatives. “Together we will use our resources and present a ‘Stop the ViolenceC ommunity Festival’ under the theme ‘Bringing Peace Back to Pinewood’. The event will be held on October 2 and 3 at the Pinewood Park.” This event will incorporate a j unkanoo rush-out and marching bands through the streets of Pinewood. A family cultural show by Colage, a candle lighting and prayer c eremony for crime victims and their families will be held on Friday e vening, October 2. Then on Saturday, October 3, a fun day will be held. S unland Entertainment’s “Pinewood Tittants” will host other t eams in a junior football competition. This will be followed by a concert headlined by Erate which will includep erformances by Christian Massive, Land Lord and others. “The event will also elevate social interaction between all resident and surrounding neighbourhoods as as trong message is sent to the crimi nals in the community and to the general public,” the outreach group said. Changing the image of Pinewood D RKEVABETHEL DRGAILSAUNDERS Research also into country’s educational development THECOLLEGEOFTHEBAHAMAS: First resident scholars Concerned citizens form community outreach group to help youths in the area

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY C ore Responsibilities: J ob Requirements: Or via email to: institutional.leadership@gmail.com S TUDENTS from various Grand Bahama schools came together last week to participate in the International C oastal Cleanup Day at X anadu Beach. They were also were assisted by members of the Grand Bahama Committee for Conc erned Residents. Zone captains Gail Woon of EARTHCARE and Cecilia Bodie of Bahamas National Trust welc omed the eager students. A fter being briefed on how to fill out the data cards and what sorts of items should not be touched, the groups of four a nd five set out to clean the beach. The Ocean Conservancy based in Washington, DC, coordinates the massive worldwide d ata gathering effort. The types o f marine debris found in each area are noted on data cards and the results are tabulated to form a global report each year. T his year, the majority of marine debris items consisted of debris from shoreline and recreational activities such as f ast food containers and g arbage left by beach-goers. There were a variety of beverage bottles, cups, plates, forks etc. Notable items includedu nderwear, tennis shoes, a clothes hamper, a syringe, condoms, diapers and electrical wire. Discarded fishing gear i ncluded fishing lines, nets, traps and rope. The children were careful to separate the aluminum cans for recycling at Presto Recyclingo n Queen’s Highway. Ms Woon was impressed by the turn-out on September 19. “The weather was looking l ike rain at 8am yet the students were out in full force. We have to thank the teachers, parents and anyone who helped to get the students out to all of the 12 beaches on Grand Bahamai sland this year. This effort would not happen without your help and support,” she said. Participants this year at X anadu Beach included students from Mary Star of the Sea School the largest group and quite possibly the most experienced, with many chil-d ren being seasoned ICC beach cleaners. The Hugh Campbell Primary School always backs this clean-up effort. The Grand B ahama Committee for Concerned Residents also participated this year. International Coastal Cleanup Day at Xanadu ‘a success’ CLEAN-UP KINGS: Students show community spirit.

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T ENNIS T OKYO Associated Press DEFENDINGchampion Dinara Safina and Venus Williams were k nocked out of the second round by q ualifiers at the Toray Pan Pacific Open on Monday. Chang Kai-chen, an 18-year-old from Taiwan, upset the top-ranked Safina 7-6 (5 er Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova edgedW illiams 7-6 (6 round. S afina was serving for the match in the third set when she double-faulted to give up a break. Chang, ranked 132nd and playing only the fourth time in a WTA main draw, held her serve and broke Safina again for victory. The double-fault didn’t affect me t hat much,” Safina said. “Whether it’s a double-fault or a mistake it’s the same. It’s just the way I played at 5-4. I t wasn’t the right game, I didn’t use my first serve the whole game.” A dejected Williams made a hasty e xit from Ariake Colosseum, saying o nly she was looking forward to her next match in Beijing. Williams took a 3-0 lead in the first set but the 18-year-old Pavlyuchenkova fought back, breaking Williams to tie it 5-5 before holding serve and win-n ing the tiebreak. Pavlyuchenkova hit a forehand down the line to go up 6-5 in the second set. She had a triple-match point in the 12th game and won when Williams’ return was long. Chang converted her third match p oint on Safina’s forehand error after the Russian had fought back from 0-40 to 30-40. On match point, I was just thinking t he same thing as always,” Chang said. “I wasn’t thinking ’Oh, I have match p oint, I’m going to win.”’ Chang said her thoughts turned to her parents after the upset. “My mother doesn’t get out to watch a lot of matches but she follows the l ive scoring, and I was thinking about what she thought when she saw today’s score,” Chang said. C hang made her Grand Slam debut a t this year’s U.S. Open, advancing to the second round. Top-seeded Safina, Venus Williams ousted in Japan C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 9 Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148) Alexander Burrows AlexisRoberts Almina Hanna Alvin Cunningham Andrew Thompson Angela Neymour Arlington Brice Bernice Culmer Beverly M ather Bradford Wildgoose Cecil Gray Cravaughn McKay Cyril Gibson Danielle Davis Danny Toussaint Daphnie Saunders Douglas Smith Ellis Miller Elvis Bullard Isadell Howells Jerome Pinder Latoya Cargill Gray Loretta Hart Lynn Woodside-Sands Mandi Pedican Philip Hinzey Roland Clarke Roosevelt Burrows Ruth Williams Ruthesa Glendera Dean Selle Julie Brindle Sherry Armaly Hall Terrence King Vanria Johnson Vilna Adderley Vincent Grant The following Government Employees are asked to contact the respective representatives at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: Alma Clarke Anthony Rolle Anthony Fawkes Bettrah Belanda Mitchell Bridgette Neely Carl Rudolph Johnson Charlene Dawkins-Bevans Cheryl Bowe-Moss Clarence Rolle Cleaver W. Robinson Cordero Farrington Coresa Deveaux Cynthia Wilson Dedrick Storr Derek Nottage Desmond Pinder Douglas Richards Francina Scott Francis Clarke Frederica Hamilton Fredie Smith George Bruney Gloria Estella Rolle Jasmar Higgs Jewel A. Mcphee John A. Webb Kardeo Heild Kevin Remond Culmer Kirkwood Campbell Laytoya Cargill-Gray Leila Wood Lorenzo M. Carroll Malriae Lauree Ferguson Mavis Vanderpool Melissa Evans Michael White Melonie Adderley Mervalette L. Dean Mervin Dean Mervin J. Dean Michael Duvalier Muriel Johnson Natashia Andrews Pamela Taylor Petre Darwin Curry Philip Turner Raymond Butler Reginald Taylor Rhonda Gibson Samuel A Gay Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs Shannon Akira Butterfield Shannon Akira Butterfield Sharon Creary Sharon Hanna Sheniqua Brennen-Curry Shorn Douglas Gibson Solomon Rolle Sonia Smith Stanley Wood Stephen D. Moss Theresa Cooper Tina Samantha O Brien Trevor Mcneil Basden Valentino Gay Velma Cox Veronica Samuel Virginia P. Culmer Woodside Wayde Russell William Mckenzie Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152) TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM AMERICAN Venus Williams serves the ball a gainst Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia during their first round match in the P an Pacific Open tennis tournament. DINARA SAFINA of Russia reacts during her singles match against Chang Kai-chen of Taiwan at the Pan Pacific Open tennis tournament in Tokyo, Monday, Sept. 29, 2009. Chang won 7-6 (5 Koji Sasahara/ AP Photos FOOTBALL DAVIE, Fla. Associated Press W HILEthe Miami Dolp hins await test results on injured quarterback Chad Pennington, teammates are braced for the possibility he won’t be back soon. Pennington underwent t ests Monday his right shoulder, which he hurt early in the third quarter of Sunday’s 23-13 loss at San Diego. He missed the rest of the game, and coach Tony Sparano says he does-n ’t know how long Penn ington will be sidelined. Dolphins await test results on Pennington FOOTBALL O RCHARD PARK, N.Y. A ssociated Press T HEBills secondary is m inus two starters with corn erback Leodis McKelvin out indefinitely with a brok en bone in his leg and safety Donte Whitnerr equiring surgery to repair a n injured thumb. Coach Dick Jauron said Monday that McKelvin’s injury is the most serious a nd he isn’t sure when the p layer will return after he was hurt in the first half of a 2 7-7 loss to New Orleans on Sunday. Jauron said Whitner’s status will be monitored on a weekly basis, though the coach did n ot reveal the exact nature of the injury. T hat means a defense already missing starting middle linebacker Paul Poslusnzy (broken left a rm), will be further deplet ed on Sunday when Buffalo (1-2 mi (0-3 Bills lose CB McKelvin, S Whitner to injuries As the first Bahamian to r eceive the recognition in sail ing, Knowles said he’s calling on all of the other sporting d isciplines to come out and support the event. The organising committee is headed by local journalist F red Sturrup and Jamaican businessman Al Hamilton, now living in London, Eng-l and. Hamilton, who serves as a special advisor to the Commonwealth BoxingC ouncil, also headed by Stur r up, has successfully ran the Commonwealth Sports Awards for the past 20 years. Last year, the newly formed CASI awards banquet includ ed netball. But this year, they have decided to replace that discipline with basketball. Sturrup, who was the guest speaker at the initial awards banquet, said the event serves as an opportunity to pay fun damental tribute to those sports persons who have so greatly boosted the image of the Caribbean through sports since the late 1940s. Sturrup said they are honoured, not just to have had Knowles present for the press conference, but to be able to honour him as one of the two living legends of the 1940s era when he competed in the Olympic Games for the British Empire. The other is George Rho den of Jamaica, who is one of the nominees for the most outstanding male track and field athlete. Rhoden won the 400 metres in the 1948 Olympics in London, England, and was on the 4 x 400 relay team that won the gold in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland. “It’s a tremendous tribute to him and George Rhoden for the longevity that they both had,” Sturrup said. Sturrup also thanked the presidents of the Amateur Boxing Association of the Bahamas –Wellington Miller, Bahamas Basketball Federa tion, Lawrence Hepburn, Bahamas Softball Federation, Burkett Dorsett and the Bahamas Boxing Commis sion, chaired by Pat ‘the Cen treville Assassin’ Strachan, for endorsing the CASI 2009 Week. The banquet is being organ ised by Hamilton, who along with Sturrup and three other individuals, will determine the eventual winners from the list o f honourees for cricket, foot ball (soccer athletics female, basketball, b oxing and administrator/coach. During the week of activi ties, Sturrup said each assoc iation/federation will organise a night of activities for their various disciplinesb efore the awards banquet takes place on Friday, November 20. H ere’s the list of honourees f or the various disciplines: Cricket Sir Everton Weekes (Barbados Vivian Richards (Antigua Brian Lara (Trinidad & Toba go); Clive Lloyd (Guyana) and Michael Holding (Jamaica Football (soccer Clyde Best (Bermuda Yorke (Trinidad & Tobago Leroy ‘Uncle Lee’ Archer (Bahamas Whitmore (Jamaica Athletics male Javier Sotomayor (Cuba Miller (Jamaica (Bahamas (Jamaica (Jamaica (Trinidad & Tobago ley Crawford (Trinidad & Tobago) and George Rhoden (Jamaica Athletics female Tonique Williams-Darling (Bahamas Merlene Ottey (Jamaica Shelly-Ann Fraser (Jamaica Bridgette Foster-Hylton (Jamaica McKenzie (Bahamas Ana Fedelia Quirot (Cuba Basketball Mychal ‘Sweet Bells’ Thompson (Bahamas Patrick Ewing (Jamaica en Polynice (Haiti (Bahamas (Virgin Islands Boxing Emile Griffith (Virgin Islands ‘Elisha Obed’ Ferguson (Bahamas son (Cuba (Trinidad & Tobago Andrew Lewis (Guyana Claude Noel (Trinidad & Tobago). Administrator/Coach Gloria Ballentine (St Vincent & The Grenadines); Mike Fen nell (Jamaica (Bahamas Hall (Barbados Peterkin (St. Lucia International Sailing Extra ordinaire Sir Durward Knowles (Bahamas T op sailing honour for the ‘Sea Wolf

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Charlie and Delta. Over the past few years, the Delta team has been the powerhouse of the RBDF. B ut this night belonged to the Bravo team, which dominated the overall event with a t otal of 404 points, followed b y Charlie, then Delta third and Alpha fourth. Marine Seaman James Carey of the Charlie Team was voted most outstanding male athlete. W oman Marine Michelle Colebrooke, also a member of the Bravo team, placed first in the long jump, 400 meters, and was a member of the winning 4 x 400 female relay t eam. S he also placed third in the 100 meters and the 4 x 100 female relay team competi-t ions. Carey was victorious in the 400 meters, and placed in the 200, long jump and 4 x 1 00 meter relay events. T here were special races for the children of members of the RBDF, whose ages r anged from 5-13. They ran in various races geared just for them. Parents, athletesa nd spectators all cheered the c hildren on, as they ran their races with pride and determi n ation. There were also special races for the officers and marines in different weight c lasses. “The night was successful and exciting,” said organiser of the event, petty officer Ramone Storr. “The support from especially the athletes was of a high magnitude and b ased on their performances, this year’s event was one of the best ever. We definitely look forward to continue having big ger and better track and field e vents in the future.” T HE New Providence Volleyball A ssociation opened its 2009 season on Sunday at the D W Davis Gymnasium with both defending champions executing their game plans to pull off nail-biting, thrilling victories. I n the women’s match, Cheryse R olle once again led the Scottsdale Vixens over the Lady Truckers by scoring a game high 13 kills in the 2517, 25-20 and 25-19 win. In a losing effort, Kelsie Johnson led the Lady Truckers with six kills a nd two blocks. Action Over to the men’s action, it took five exciting sets for the Scotiabank Defenders to defeat the Technicians 20-25, 25-22, 25-22, 24-26 and 15-9. S hedrick Forbes and Ian ‘Wire’ P inder led the Defenders with 17 a nd 16 kills respectively. M aurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith contributed 29 excellent passes. In a losing effort, Jamaal Ferguson led the technicians with 13 kills. Adalbert Ingraham contributed eight. THE New Providence Association of Basketball Offi cials (NPABO implementing a number of programmes in an effort to update, re-certify and reclassify its present membership. This undertaking will take on the form of an in-house clinic of three sessions (theoretical (practical The mentioned 'in-house clinic' and workshops is scheduled to be held October 1-6 at the residence of Tony Williams, president of the NPABO, on Lumumba Drive, Fox Hill. Each evening session is slated to begin at 7pm. The practical aspect will scrutinize rule interpretations and floor mechanics during the upcoming series of the Bankers Ath letic Association Basketball League. Williams will serve as the chief clinician, Norman 'Mouch' Humes as clinician and Melchoir Francis, interpreter and chairman of the education committee, will perform the duties of assistant clinician. Of note is that the former two gentlemen have a wealth of knowledge and experience in rules and regulations of FIBA, having attended many clinics and seminars abroad with regards to rules and having attained the status of becoming international certified referees. The 'spotters' will be Sharon Storr and Chris Saunders of the NPABO's education committee. The NPABO offers this course of study as another serious and deliberative step to prepare its membership for the highest level of competency in the interpreting and admin istrating of FIBA rules and regulations. The intent is to create a unified approach and continue to develop 'professionalism' in the officiating of basketball in the country. On the completion of this exercise, an intense qualification and certification course will be offered for new candidates and/or former referees. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ‘I too br ought m y pac ka g e but was overlooked... am too and I will succeed soon,” he projected. Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot and former basketball player, thanked the Bahamian public who supported him both at home and while he was on the road. “It’s not an easy one but with God spear heading my pathway, I believe my day will come and come real soon,” Stubbs noted. “Thanks for the prayers and encouraging words I receive from the many friends and fans. May God continue to pour out his many blessings upon your lives.” In-house c linic for basketball officials Vixens roll over Truckers, Defenders defeat Technicians in five sets V V O O L L L L E E Y Y B B A A L L L L Royal Bahamas Defence Force track competition F ROM page 11 TOP RBDF officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and field competition at Thomas A Robinson sports stadium. ABOVE – Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the over all event with a total of 404 points... P hotos by L eading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

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S IR DURWARD KNOWLES B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net T hroughout his career, Sir Durward ‘Sea Wolf’ Knowles has received a n umber of accolades. But h e said he’s thrilled that he h as been considered for a CASI award. T he Caribbean Awards Sports Icon Foundation is expected to honour K nowles for international sailing during the week of November 15-20 in theB ahamas. I ncluded in the activities is a four-day schedule of basketball, softball, boxing and a grand awards banquet to be held at host resort Superclubs Breezes, Cable B each. D uring a press conference yesterday at the hotel, Knowles said this is definitely t he highest award he has achieved and he’s delighted to be included. “I never heard about this until it was held in Jamaica and I went there,” said Knowles, referring to the initial awards banquet held last year in Kingston, J amaica. “But I know Bahamians recognise it and since Fred (Sturrup) and Al (Hamil t on) decided that sailing would be included, I’m an individual that appreciates anytime that I’m being honoured. This is o ne of the most outstanding honours that I have ever received.” C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 PAGE 9 International sports news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B ASKETBALL ADDERLEY/ FERGUSON TOURNEY THE Archdiocese of N assau has announced that their sixth annual Deacon Leviticus ‘UncleL ou’ Adderley and Vincent Ferguson All Catholic Basketball Tournament is scheduled to take place over the weekend of Octo ber 9-12 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone Road. T he first game is set to be played at 7:45 pm. This year’s tournament will be a very special one as it comes right on the heels of the death and burial of the late Ferguson, one of the two honourees. Ferguson, 71, died last Wednesday. His funeral service is slated for 2pm Thursday at St Francis Cathedral. A memorial service is set for 7:30pm tonight at Loyola Hall. Adderley has been deceased for a number of years. VOLLEYBALL NPVA REGISTRATION WITH the 2009 season underway, DeVince Smith, president of the New Providence Volley ball Association, is reminding all teams that their rosters must be submitted by today as the deadline has already expired. Top sailing honour for the ‘Sea Wolf ‘I too brought my package but was overlooked...” SPOR TS IN BRIEF WITH guts and determina t ion, the men and women of Bravo Team vowed to dethrone the Delta Team dur ing the Royal Bahamas Defence Force (RBDF and field competition at Thomas A Robinson sports s tadium. A number of dignitaries, including Minister of Nation-a l Security Tommy Turn quest, RBDF commodore Clifford Scavella and other senior defence officers, a ttended the annual event, featuring the officers and marines showcasing their ath-l etic prowess in track and field. Athletes were grouped into four teams – Alpha, Bravo, Bravo team dominates Defence Force track meet B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH he didn’t achieve his goal of makingt he top 10, 42-year-old Joel S tubbs felt he performed very well against the 22man field at Mr Olympiai n Las Vegas, Nevada, over the weekend. “This was considered the g reatest and most highly contested competition in the history of the Mr Olympia showdown,” S tubbs said. “The compe tition was intense and competitive. “Some would of figure it was very hard to judge because all the bodies weres o sharp, conditioned and detailed for battle. I too brought my package butw as overlooked.” Stubbs finished tied with six other competitors for 16th place with a total of 80 points from the first two rounds. They didn’t advance to the final two rounds where the top competitors were determined. “I didn’t get a proper chance to be compared to some of the top body builders unfortunately,” Stubbs reflected. “At this Olympia showdown, every one placed ahead of me had either won an IFBB show this season or was the runner up. “That was how tough the show was. But I’m happy with my placing and the opportunity to display my physique to the world as I see it. As long as you have made improvements to your body each time you compete, you are already a winner, as it is a major accomplishment.” This was Stubbs’ first appearance on the biggest stage in the sport and he noted that the atmosphere was more than he had anticipated. “I’ve been there many times but sitting in the arena watching,” he said. However this time I was one of them looking down on the audience and havingf un. “It’s just so overwhelming to see fans from alla round the world just screaming out your name as you perform. Also there was a Bahamian contin-g ent that followed my foot steps here to lend the support and encouragement.” As he reflects on the show, Stubbs said he’s eager to work on the areas that he felt was a major downfall for him in his quest to get back on the elite stage next year. “As you would study the pictures you would see that the upper body is super massive and can’t be touch but the quads still need to catch up,” he said. “So I would say I need to work on more quadriceps muscles. They are improving so don’t count me out just yet.” Now that the champi onship is over, Stubbs said he will take a much needed break to recuperate, then it’s back in the gym to pre pare for next year. “I just haven’t given up as yet and I hope everyone is still holding the faith as I JOEL STUBBS SEE page 10 SEE page 10 S EE page 9 SHOWN (l-r Top-seeded Safina, Venus Williams ousted in Japan S ee page 9 TOP RBDF women officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and field competition at Thomas A Robinson sports stadium. ABOVE – Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the overall event with a total of 404 points... Photos by Leading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $4.25*Add Hash Browns for $1.25. See stores for details.SIZEDOESMATTERBigHunger.Bigsatisfaction.Bigger Beer Ham or Bacon, Egg & Cheese Breakfast Sandwich w/ Medium CoeeYOURCHOICEOF CROISSANTAGEL ORENGLISHMUFFINUse the Card... Earn Free Dunkin’Visit www.Dunkinbahamas.com to learn more.CUSTOMERLOYALTY CARD * Substitute Ham or Bacon with Sausage for 50. in his Golden Palms Estates home, near Kennedy subdivision, shortly after 4am on Sunday, September 29. He was shot several times. McQueen was engaged to be married in February next year. McKenzie and Knowles, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane, were not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. They have also been charged with the attempted murder of McQueen’s cousin and roommate, Martez Saunders, who was also shot multiple times. It is alleged that the women while armed with h andguns and being concerned with others intentionally caused McQueen’s death and attempted to cause the death of Saunders. McKenzie and Knowles are also accused of conspiring to rob McQueen and Saunders. They are also accused of conspiring to rob Enan Hanna, and robbing him of a $260 Motorola cellular phone, and $150 cash. The accused were not required to enter a plea to the charges and were remanded to her Majesty’s Prison, Fox Hill. The case was adjourned to October 6 and transferred to Court 5, Bank Lane. T wo women charged in p ilot murder F ROM page one Lightbourne are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from the 55-yearold actor in January of this year. Detective Inspector Sean Saunders told the court yesterday that Michael McDermott an attorney for the Travoltas consented to wearing a body wire, as well as having police set up hidden cameras and recording devices in his hotel room. Inspector Saunders testified that on January 18, he and ASP Ricardo Taylor met with Mr McDermott at his room (328 Cable Beach. He told the court that Mr McDermott consented to having police record conversations from his telephone. He said that a recorder was connected to the telephone and shortly afterwards Mr McDermott made a phone call. Inspector Saunders said that the voice mail came on and Mr McDermott left a message. Mr McDermott, he said, then made another phone call and this time a man answered. Inspector Saunders told the court that Mr McDermott spoke to the man and subsequently, a woman, who identified herself as “Pleasant,” came on the phone. Inspector Saunders also told the court that the next day, he, ASP Taylor and Detective Sergeant 1492 Ferguson went back to Mr McDermott’s hotel room. He said that after speaking with Mr McDermott, he configured a transmitter with concealed cameras and a microphone in the room. “Mr McDermott gave consent to record all video and audio of his room,” Inspector Saunders said. The Inspector told the court that the adjacent room (326 toring point. According to Inspector Saunders, Mr McDermott consented to having himself outfitted with a body wire to monitor all of his conversations. Inspector Saunders said that sometime around 10.20 am on January 19, Mr McDermott left his hotel room, returning five minutes later with a woman. Inspector Saunders told the court that he recognised the woman to be Pleasant Bridgewater. He testified that a recording was made of the meeting between Bridgewater and Mr McDermott. Ronald Zupancic, a longtime employee and friend of Mr Travolta, said that on January 13, he received a phone call from attorney Michael McDermott. “He told me he had been contacted by an attorney from Nassau named Pleasant Bridgewater,” he said. According to Mr Zupancic, Mr McDermott told him that Bridgewater had a client the ambulance driver who was the first to arrive at the scene at Old Bahama Bay on January 2. According to Mr Zupancic, Mr McDermott told him that the man had a document that he claimed was “incriminating to John Travolta” and was going to release the information to the international media if $25 million was not paid. Mr Zupancic said that on January 16, he told Mr Travolta what Mr McDermott had said regarding the threat and phoned Mr McDermott on what Mr Travolta had said. During cross-examination by Mr Ducille, Mr Zupancic admitted that he had acted as an intermediary between Mr Travolta and Mr McDermott, but that he did not know Bridgewater. The trial resumes today before Senior Justice Anita Allen. Bridgewater is represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented by attorney Carlson Shurland and Mary Bain. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner, Neil Brathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. F ROM page one ‘Bridgewater’s meeting with Travolta lawyer secretly recorded’ l ands, why the applicants in question all used the same lawyer and realtor for the transactions. This was revealed by David Davis, permanent secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister and the Ministry of Land and Local Government, during the first day of sworn statements before the House of Assembly's Select Committee on Crown Land. "There was great public commentary on the matter, in the interest of being able to respond sensibly to the public the (former lands and asked to explain a number of things. . .(such as how did these applications move through the system so quickly when there are others in the queue? Was it just coincidence? "How did all of these lands end up being listed with the same realtor, is that a coincidence? How did the same lawyer happen to deal with all of these transactions, is that a coincidence? The then director was unable to give what the minister, in my view, deemed were satisfactory answers and so he was invited to resign," said Mr Davis, before a packed room of observers yesterday. Controversy Mr Turnquest resigned from the department in May amidst a flurry of controversy stemming from allegations of corruption and nepotism within the department. The move came after a series of articles in The Tribune revealed that relatives of the former director including his mother-in-law were granted prime beach-front Crown land in Exuma for less than $2,500 between 2001 and 2003. Responding to a question put to him by Committee Chair Fred Mitchell, Mr Davis said there was no way the Ministry of Lands and Surveys could have known that five beach-front lots in Exuma were granted to a few of Mr Turnquest's relatives. Mr Davis added that the relatives in question did not breach any ministry policy because as Bahamians they are "entitled to apply in the normal course." Audley Greaves, the department's under-secretary, added that Mr Turnquest's relatives were a small number of persons who were processed at that time, adding that only the individuals concerned would have known their relationship to the ex-director. But Mr Davis said the department is considering amending the application for Crown land grants to allow space for applicants to disclose if they are public officers, retiring or retired public officers, or, if applicable, which public officers they are related to in the Department of Lands and Surveys. The speed at which the applications in question moved through the system drew the attention of ministry officials, Mr Davis said. He added that red flags were also raised when four of the properties – which had been granted on the expec tation that they would be used to build second homes were "flipped" to foreigners a few years later for more than $550,000. When asked if the ministry could prevent undeveloped Crown land from being "flipped", Mr Davis said he did not know if it was legal to place conditions on what persons could do with their property. Mr Davis said that the four parcels of land in question are the only ones that have been investigated by officials but it was unlikely that others approved during the same time period were "flipped", because they were not prime property. The land in question was granted during a government exercise to approve applications for persons who wanted to build retirement homes on the family islands, many of whom had gen erational ties or leases to the property. In addition to Mr Davis and Mr Greaves, the Acting Direc tor of Lands Richard Hardy also testified before the commit tee yesterday. Revealed: why former Lands and Sur veys director was asked to quit FROM page one islands will be worthless if travel cannot be provided at competitive prices. T he current cost of air trave l is so high customers can fly f rom Miami to Montego Bay, Puerto Rico or Las Vegas for the same price as a ticket to Grand Bahama, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday, But a new promotion is advertising tickets to Grand Bahama from $19 one-way, and rooms at Our Lucaya are available from just $35 per night.And new aviation routes can bring up to 293,320 more airline passengers to Nassau next year, and 39,520 to Grand Bahama, that is a total of 383,280 more visitors flying into the country. Plans are in place to reduce the cost of airfares by dropping airport landing and handling fees, and the $400 million renovation of the Lynden Pindling International Airport will make it an effi cient centre where people can move easily to the Out Islands, the Minister said. He added: “It’s very important for us to get aggressive in terms of competing with what’s out there. “Affordable accessible air service is absolutely critical. “Infrastructure is critically important. We have to put the infrastructure in place to make sure that the promotion works. “Imagine Paradise Island without the bridges? If we had to go by boats and the boats only go every six hours? “Each of the airline flights is like a bridge, and if it was $1 all of a sudden we woulda ll go. On the day we do that I am confident we are going to see some extraordinary changes.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is also keen to lower rates of accommodation and travel in the Family Islands to encourage domestic tourism, and he said that will follow when the number of visitors increases. Tourists visiting Grand Bahama fell by 27.5 per cent l ast year, and by 24.9 per cent i n the Family Islands in 2008, w hile air arrivals to the Bahamas dropped by 13.8 per cent. Keeping the tourism industry afloat during the recession are the cruise lines which offer affordable package deals from a fast increas ing number of ports opening in the United States. Around 70 per cent of cruises from these ports on the east coast of the US sail exclusively to the Bahamas, and Nassau has around two million cruise passengers dock at its port each year, with 19.9 per cent of visitors to Nassau and Paradise Island arriving by cruise ship. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is keen to net the potential revenue presented by these stopo ver visitors by developing d owntown Nassau and i ncreasing opening hours for shops and restaurants. He said: “We’re not in the business of counting heads, what’s most important is stop over visitor numbers. “The total visitor number is irrelevant because we want to take more about the economy of the Bahamas rather than head count.” However the number of stopover visitors also fell last year and by the end of January had dropped by 63,000, with 33,000 less in the Family Islands and 25,988 fewer in Grand Bahama. There are no solid projections of visitor numbers for the upcoming winter months because it is still not clear what shape the recession will take, or how long it will last, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said. In the meanwhile the ministry will continue to work behind the scenes, by opening a 1-800-Bahamas call centre, bringing in film crews to document the different islands, encouraging sports teams of all kinds to compete in the country, and working on reducing energy costs to be more competitive with oth er destinations in the region. F ROM page one Tourism industry will be held every two years from January 2011, instead of annually as in previous years, ministry officials said in a press conference at the British Colonial Hilton in Nassau. In the absence of the events the ministry will undertake a review of the week to determine its effectiveness and implement necessary changes. The break will also allow possible Cacique award nominees the opportunity to hone their talents and skills, Permanent Secretary Hyacinth Pratt said. And it will give the general public more time to identify and gather information about individuals and organisations that should to be nominated for the prestigious tourism award, she said. Ms Pratt also said that part of the motivation for holding the events every two years is the smaller number of people now involved in the event. She said: “Now the pool is not as great we decided to hold it every two years to allow people to better hone their skills. “The new National Tourism Week is expected to bring even greater focus to discussions of national issues that are critical to the Bahamas’ tourism-based economy. “The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation remains committed to the advancement of tourism through meaningful input on tourism matters from all residents and looks forward to the return of the National Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards in 2011.” The Cacique Awards is held in conjunction with the Bahamas Hotel Association and rewards individuals and businesses across the tourism sector. New date for National Tourism Week, Cacique Awards F ROM page one t ion about the theft should call police urgently on 911, 9 19 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 TVthieves strike F ROM page one appeared in Court 1 before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson. It is alleged the accused men were found in possession of a large quantity of illegal drugs at an apartment complex in Freeport. Miller and Brown pleaded not guilty to possession of dangerous drugs with intent to supply. Brown was granted $20,000 bail. Miller was denied bail. The case was adjourned to March 23 for trial in Court 2. FIREARM CHARGE An American man was charged with possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition in Magistrate’s Court on Monday. William Stephanos, 31, a US citizen and a resident of Florida, appeared before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson. It is alleged on September 27, the accused attempted to leave the Bahamas on a flight at Grand Bahama International Airport to Florida when an unlicensed firearm was allegedly found in his luggage. Stephanos pleaded “guilty” to the charges. He was fined $3,000 or two years imprisonment. He was also fined $3,000, or one year in prison on the ammunition possession charge, the sentences to run concurrently. T wo men char ged with possession of dangerous drugs FROM page one

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By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE FINAL domestic bill f or the Miss Universe Pageant was almost $10 million less thanm ost former host countries have spent on the US orginated pageant, the Ministry of Tourism revealed yesterday, while touting the benefits to the Bahamas as “priceless”. Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Vincent VanderpoolWallace, said the Bahamas has never received the kind of glob-al exposure the Miss Universe Pageant provided, with up to 115 million individuals reached through the worldwide broadcast event. According to Mr Vincent V anderpool-Wallace, the Bahamas spent $5.8 million to host the Pageant. He said Vietnam spent around $15 million to host the event in 2008. The Bahamas also negotiated certain concessions with the event coordinators that had never been given to former host countries. Director-General at the Min istry of Tourism, Vernice Walkine, said she personally lobbied for 2008-2009 Miss Universe, Dayana Mendoza, to hold her final “adventures” asq ueen here in the Bahamas, something she said organisers of the pageant seldom do. She also fought for the contestants to visit several of the islands as a part of the final nine-minute package the Bahamas received during Pageant night, and pushed for the National Youth Choir’s finale performance following the crowing of the 2009-2010 queen. There have been numerous critics of the Government’s investment in the Miss Uni-v erse pageant. Some local websites have criticised the Government for not revealing the total cost of the pageant only weeks after its conclusion, alleging that government may have spent upwards of $10 mil lion. Local entertainment leaders also criticised the Government for the lack of local talent dur ing the broadcast. Ms Walkine said the production side of the pageant, which is marketed to young women between 13 and 30, iso ut of the hands of the host country. Inevitably, she contended, the host country is simply that. However, she asserted that the negotiations put forth by the Bahamas government for the coverage received was more than any former host countries have been afforded in the past. “You have to choose your battles,” said Ms Walkine. “My battles were won.” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace suggested that the private sector rallied to assist the Govern-m ent in making the pageant a success for the country, and keeping total overall public expenditure low. He also surmised that some capital works projects and private maintenance projects may not have gotten done without the impending arrival of the Miss Universe delegation. “There were some things we were trying to get done for years,” he said. Regulators back ‘no interconnect fee’ for local calls C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.17 " "%!"&nb%" $%!!%"% && $ "%"#! "!& &# r!" !#"%"!#! $!%""!%"! &"$#!%rbf By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor REGULATORS have agreed with arguments by the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC only legal fixed-line competitor that the state-owned incumbent should not impose interconnection charges on its rivals for the termination of free local, “intra-island” calls. Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of Systems Resource Group (SRG parent of IndiGo Networks, warned that if BTC was allowed to impose intercon nection charges on rival operators for terminating local calls from their network, “the effect would be fatal to competition”. In SRG’s response to the Government’s consultation on access and interconnection issues in the communications industry, Mr HuttonAshkenny said former regu lator, the Public Utilities Commission (PUC never implemented the principle that interconnection and access charges should be cost-orientated. Instead, it had argued that since accurate cost information could not be obtained from BTC, access and inter connection charges should be ‘retail minus’. “This situation has existed for five years, and has served to significantly distort the market to the detriment of the new entrant and the consumer, and to the advantage of the dominant operator,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said. Pointing out that the access and interconnection consultation was silent on how cost information would be obtained, audited and the timeframe for this, the SRG president nevertheless agreed with the notion that an operator should not ‘dou ble dip’ charging a cusBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN employers have been warned that failure to pay the correct amount of severance pay to laid-off employees will lead to wrongful dismissal legal actions, a Higgs & Johnson partner saying she “goes to court on a lot of cases of this type”. Tara Archer, addressing a Nassau-based seminar staged by the law firm, said: “It is incumbent on the employer to pay the correct amount of severance pay to the employee to avoid ending up in litigation. “Should not the correct amount be paid, you could find legal action [taken against you] for wrongful dismissal.” Ms Archer recommended that Bahamian employers and companies consult their attorneys on the amount of severance pay that should be paid to terminated/laid-off employees, as the total sum was “not clear cut”. Apart from the statutory pay stipulated by the Employment Act, laid-off employees were also entitled to payment for unused vacation time, contractual bonuses, other benefit payments and any allowances they had been enjoying, such as gas and meal allowances, during their notice period if they worked it out. National Insur ance Board (NIB tions also needed to be deduct ed for employees during their notice period. In addition, under the Employment Act laid-off employees at companies where they had a pension plan have to choose between taking their pension entitlement or accept ing statutory severance pay. Parliament seemingly passed the law requiring employees to make that choice in order to not over-burden companies with severance costs. Ms Archer said it was critical for employers “to have clear, concise employment contracts” Firms warned: Make correct severance pay Rival fears that if BTC imposes charge on other operators for free local call termination on its network, ‘effect would be fatal to competition’ SEE page 3B SEE page 6B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A tlantis does not expect its important group travel business to recover until 2011 or 2012, and has not seen a turnaround from extensive marketing campaigns, Kerzner International (Bahamas director told Tribune Business yesterday. George Markantonis confirmed that room occupancy levels have been as low as 30 per cent at the Paradise Island-based resort for the month of September, with employee work weeks drastically reduced and staff asked to take two weeks’ mandatory unpaid vacation to cut costs. However, despite the depressed business environment, Mr Markantonis also denied rumours of further lay offs at Atlantis, saying it would not be wise to make preemptive announcements of redundancy exercises in the media. He was responding to claims in some business and high society circles in Nassau that Kerzner International was preparing to lay-off between 1,0001800 workers at its Paradise Island properties. Two sources have repeated such claims to Tribune Business in the past week, but the numbers being speculated on appear somewhat on Atlantis: No group rebound until 2011/12 * Occupancy levels fall as low as 30% in September, with staff on one and two-day weeks and mandatory two weeks’ unpaid vacation in effect * Promotional campaigns yet to have desired effect Miss Universe bill ‘$10m less’ for Bahamas than others Nation spent $5.8m on pageant, and ‘won many battles’ for organiser concessions THE ATLANTIS resort on Paradise Island S EE page 5B

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FOR several weeks now, I have been struggling with writing an article that reflects the utter despair about the state of crime. Violent crimes, such as homicide, are now a daily fixture in our lives. I have been shocked at how pervasive, but so far private, the level of outrage is in our society over this situation. Lack of Public Outrage If a general election were to be held today, I believe there would be numerous political casualties because of the crime situation. Admittedly, however, if you look at public statements only, issues such as the proposed marital rape law and the removal of the casuarina trees from public beaches have seemingly gathered more traction than concerns over the steady diet of shootings and stabbings that we are being fed on a daily basis. It is the lack of public outrage that is conspicuously absent. What does it take for churches, community organisations, civic and service clubs to develop a consistent voice? One school of thought is that if those credible voices are silent, then we should not criticise the Government for seemingly doing far too little. However, the other school of thought suggests that when the sheer outrage over crime galvanises into cohesive voices, the political leadership will have problems on its hands. The Government of the day must be seen to be doing more about crime. They must demonstrate that: * They recognise crime as a major problem * That they are committed to reducing the level of violent crime * They are prepared to make the required changes * They are up to the task of doing something about it This seemingly docile approach to crime, which is a cause of concern throughout the nation, is simply ‘not cutting it’. Police Frustration In speaking with a senior police officer recently, he admitted that a high level of frustration exists within the force over the number of criminals charged with the most serious offences, who are being given bail and committing new offences while on bail. His basic question was: “How many times do they have to pick up the same person only to see him on bail a few months later perpetrating new crimes”? This situation is most demoralising to say the least. The current situation demands that we try new ideas. Major US cities have had significant success in reducing their crime rate. Why can’t we replicate some of those successful initiatives? Why haven’t we tried curfews? Curfews would certainly reduce movement on the streets at night. I am told that many would resist curfews because the perception arising from their imposition could hurt tourism, but my question is: “How many young Bahamians are we prepared to let die on the streets before we deal with the problem at hand”? When it is someone else’s child being gunned down or stabbed, it is easy to dismiss the problem. However, when the crime comes into your neighborhood or directly affects your family, then it becomes an issue in need of attention. Crime should not have to become personalised before the nation recognises it for what it isa severe problem that threatens our national well-being. Our economic lifeblood depends upon foreign investment. Are we so na•ve as to believe that potential investors (both foreign and domestic) are not being frightened by the level of crime in our society? While the Police Force, as an organisation, has it problems, it has many professional and dedicated officers working in a system than is less than optimal. I am not sure it has the tools, manpower and other resources necessary to complete the job at hand. However, this is not a determination for me to make, but rather one for the force hierarchy and the Government to make. Court System We must fix the courts sys tem immediately. Last year there were just under 80 murders, and the number of murder cases concluded in 2008 was less than 20. That leaves a deficit of more than 60 cases for 2008 alone. Further analysis shows that of those cases concluded, they were for offences commit ted about three years ago, on average. On one hand we are building up a significant backlog of untried murder and other criminal cases, while on the other hand our courts are simultaneously over-taxed. Why can’t we bring in temporary judges (be they local or foreign) for a fixed period to clear the backlog of serious criminal cases? Just as we can provide temporary accommodations for the Privy Council, we can create temporary criminal courts. After six months, let us then assess the impact this initiative has had on the backlog of criminal cas es. If we are going to follow a Privy Council ruling that says “one is entitled to a bail hearing if no charges are brought with in three months”, then we must ‘step up our game’ to ensure that our criminal justice system is more efficient. Weak Economy Finally, as the economy continues to weaken and more people are displaced from the workforce, the prospect of increased levels of criminal activity is real. What may start out as a petty robbery can easily end up as a homicide. The short-term prognosis is not encouraging, as we have not seen the worst of the economic downturn yet. Urgent Action Required A blind man can see that urgent action is required, yet to the average observer it appears that the Government is not seeing it. If something substantial is being done, it must be communicated to the public at large. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vice-president pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas subsidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to rlgibson@atlantic house.com.bs C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Legal NoticeNOTICE ADAMS INVESTMENTS HOLDINGS LIMITED(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the24th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE F UZZY VISSION CORP.( In Voluntary Liquidation)N otice is hereby given that the above-named C ompany is in dissolution, which commenced on t he24th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator i sArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, B ahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeN OTICE BLONAY INVESTMENT LTD.( In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the24th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. A RGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeN OTICE JAGUAR LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) FOR SALE60 tonne packaged Air Conditioning Unit 18yrs old 7”width 6”height 33’length Can be viewed at Carl G. Treco Construction 120 Mackey Street South All offers will be considered!302-9875 P AGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Fixing crime’s threat to nation’s well-being Financial Focus By Larry Gibson INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

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B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A FALL-OFF in group arrivals to the Bahamas has stymied the Government’s ability to forecast arrival numbers, the Minister of Tourism and Aviation said yesterday, Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace said he could not say what the winter tourism season the high season will be like for the Bahamas, but lamented that the numbers have been scattered. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace alluded to a drastic decline this winter season year-on-year, as group arrivals, typically booked months in advanced, have traditionally been used to gauge arrival numbers. With the onset of the global economic downturn, the dynamics of booking vacations changed, with travelers booking airfare and hotel accommodations only weeks in advance. Group travel took a hit early this year as corporations cut down on travel, the US government even scolding large corporations for spending on travel as the economy began to tighten. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the decline in stopover visitors has left the Bahamian economy in a bad position, even as cruise arrivals gains were recognised year-on-year. However, he suggested counting arrivals to the island per head has been a misleading method of calculating visitor spending. The minister said stopover visitor arrivals have plummeted 14 per cent, while cruise passenger arrivals are up by the same number. He insisted that the Ministry of Tourism is working with the Bahamas Hotel Association to introduce more airlift to the country beginning by year-end. He said new airline passenger capacity to Abaco and Eleuthera will increase by 65,520 seats with the addition of two daily American Eagle flights . In Grand Bahama, an additional 39,000 seats will be added with the introduction of WestJet, American Airlines, Delta and Spirit Airlines. And a total of 293,320 more seats will be added to Nassau/Paradise Island arrivals. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said the Bahamas is to receive an annual total of 383,280 more airline seats than before. According to him, the new Lynden Pindling International Airport expansion presently underway will allow for a much larger capacity of visitor arrivals and open the door for New Providence to become a connection hub for travel to the Family Islands. “Right now it is impossible to make the connection in Nassau to get to the Family Islands,” he said. The Ministry has also moved to brand Abaco separately from the other islands in order to market it and its own destination. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said many more of the Family Islands will be branded and marketed in this way in the future. stipulating staff job descriptions, pay and benefits, and that these be reviewed continually on an annual basis. She explained that if an employee had been promoted through several positions since joining a company, and the employment contract had not been renewed, the courts would look at the present terms of employment not the contract -if a dispute arose. Ms Archer also advised employers to “obtain a signed declaration of release” from laid-off employees once they had received their severance pay to stop them bringing any legal action against the company. Another common area of dispute surrounding lay-offs was whether an employee was a manager/supervisor, and entitled to four weeks’ pay for every year worked, or a line worker and entitled to two weeks’ payment for each year. Ms Archer said that in such cases, courts would assess issues such as whether the employee could hire, discipline or transfer other staff, the degree of decision-making and management c ontrol they had, and whether they received overtime pay to determine whether the worker had supervisory authority. The terms of the employment con tract were also crucial. Ms Archer also warned employees asked to work out their two or four-week noticep eriod not to “burn bridges” by sabotaging or undermining their former employer, adding: “It’s a small community, and one would not want to leave a bad impression because a reference may be required. “An employer may find an employee may prefer to leave rather than work out their notice period, so ask them to take accrued vacation pay. The employee gets what he wants, and the employer gets what he wants.” Given the current economic downturn, Ms Archer acknowledged: “Those who have a job are finding it increasingly difficult to focus on their duties because they think they’re going to be next to receive a pink slip.” Oscar Johnson, a fellow Higgs & Johnson attorney and partner, said: “In these circumstances, it is clear there is an imperative faced by employers to rein in costs to weather the economic downturn they are facing. “That is a reality that is inescapable. Employers facing dire circumstances need to rationalise cost structures”, meaning they were assessing staff complements, their suitability and skill sets. “It has to be understood, if one is an employer and one is an employee, that litigation is a costly affair, and especially in an economic downturn it should be avoided if at all possible. The propensity to litigate is something an employer should look at, as they should structure decisions taken to avoid this if at all possible.” Mr Johnson also warned Bahamian employers not to “sacrifice long-term value for short-term relief” in terminating employees. While many firms felt that if they reduced costs by a certain percentage, they would have a specific bottom line impact, in doing this they could lose valuable workers “and may prevent your company from recovering as speedily. Sound decisions need to be taken”. Among the lay-off alternatives, Mr Johnson said, were to reduce salaries and work hours, reduce paid vacations, implement ‘work from home’ rules, and reassign employees especially productive, highly-skilled ones to growth areas in a business. “Often times, people feel that if they are bound to an employee contract, there is no flexibility,” Mr Johnson said. “I can assure you that in today’s environment, employees are prepared to be flexible. They want to retain their income.” On redundancy, Mr Johnson said employers could only make workers redundant if they were closing a business, specific location or eliminating a certain post altogether. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 , PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* &'!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY APPLICATION SUPPORTTECHNICIAN Core Responsibilities: Knowledge Skills and Abilities: Institutional.leadership@gmail.com NOTICE is hereby given that CLIFFORD JACKSON FAUSTIN of YOUNG STREET, EAST STREET, P.O. BOX N-8832, NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of T he Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization shouldnot be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29th day of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible f or nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7 147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Bahamas to get 383,000 extra airline seats F IRMS, from 1B

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the high side, and other Kerzner International sources have denied that any lay-offs are being contemplated. Mr Markantonis said yesterday that many of the staff at Atlantis, the country’s largest private sector employer, have been placed on one to two-day work weeks, while employees across the board have been asked to take a mandatory twoweek unpaid vacation. “That includes me,” he said. “I applaud them for having been able to do that.” Atlantis was forced to lay off 800 workers in November 2008 as declining economic conditions deepened, following the credit crunch that toppled major banks in the US. Despite the economic conditions, Atlantis continues to aggressively promote itself. Mr Markantonis told Tribune Business that his resort recently bought two full page ads in the New York Times that could cost up to $290,000 on the high end at the particular US newspaper. And Atlantis is running two new television ad campaigns as well. “If that doesn’t work...,” he said. However, Mr Markantonis asserted that the 2009 promotional campaigns have not had the desired effect this year. “They are really not working very well. A lot of that is because people in the US are not willing to travel,” said Mr Markantonis. He argued that attracting visitors under the current economic conditions has been an “uphill struggle”. “Leisure guests are now looking for the best deals they can get, and tend to focus on much cheaper vacations like cruise trips,” he said. Mr Markantonis suggested Atlantis’ packages that offer value, such as inclusive amenities, are not being picked up by would-be travelers. The fact Atlantis does not expect group and convention bookings to recover until 2011 or 2012 is significant, and indicates the wider Bahamian economy may not rebound until winter 2010-2011. Group bookings are important to the likes of Atlantis and Baha Mar because they are booked far out, and take up specific amenities, enabling the resorts to fix their leisure business around these occupancy blocks. The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation recently released tourist arrival statistics revealing stopover arrivals were down year-over-year almost 14 per cent, while cruise arrivals were up by about the same number. According to Mr Markantonis, the Atlantis Dubai property’s business remains steady due to strong patronage from Middle Eastern visitors, especially within the oil-rich United Arab Emirates where the resort is located. He also said a new 500-room casino property is under construction in Morocco. The resort recently hosted the Miss Universe Pageant, which has been heralded as the preeminent promotional spot for the Bahamas greater than last year’s Super Bowl spot. Mr Markantonis said the global exposure his resort received during the pageant was priceless and should position Atlantis and the Bahamas for the future. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN Core Responsibilities: Knowledge Skills and Abilities: Institutional.leadership@gmail.com ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS GOVERNMENTTREASURY BILLSBKG/410.03 Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 94-Day Treasury Bills will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Successful tenderers, who will be advised should take up their bills against payment on Friday, October 2, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks. Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.***************************************** Atlantis: No group rebound until 2011/12 F ROM page 1B

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tomer to receive a call, and also imposing an interconnection charge on a rival to terminate a call on its network. “However, the access and interconnection consultation is silent with respect to the longstanding practice in the Bahamas of BTC making no tariff charge to the consumer for terminating intra-island domestic calls, and the impact that such a practice has on interconnection charges,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny warned. Currently, interconnection charges for local, inter-island calls between SRG and BTC’s networks involved no charges to either operator. However, Mr HuttonAshkenny explained that if BTC, under the proposed reference access/interconnection offer (RAIO duced under the new regulatory regime, imposed an interconnection charge for local termination, “another operator would at the time then be faced with passing that new charge on to its existing customers, who have hitherto paid nothing to terminate local calls regardless of the network on which the called party resides. “In such a case, business reality would force those customers of the other operator to take circuits from BTC to terminate calls to BTC customers, thereby avoiding the new termination charge,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny added. “Common sense dictates that such distortion of the market in favour of the SMP (Significant Market Power) operator cannot be the intent of the Act or of the interconnection policy. “SRG is of the strong view that as long as a situation persists where BTC chooses to impose no tariff for termination of intra-island calls on its network from its own customers, then BTC cannot be allowed to impose an interconnection charge on other operators for termination of those calls to those same customers.” The Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA position, confirming that no interconnection charges would be levied by telecoms operators for domestic, intra-island calls, until Bahamian consumer started to be charged for these calls. Previously, BTC had subsidised free domestic calls through its unbalanced international fixed-line long distance charges, yet the arrival of competition from IndiGo and unlicensed Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP forced it to reduce the latter. It had subsequently attempted to make up for the losses this had called by increasing line rental charges as of January 1, 2006. Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said SRG’s concern was that, given that free domestic calls had to be subsidised by another BTC business line, they were being priced at below cost - “the classic case of predatory pricing in a competitive market”. If interconnection charges were levied, he argued: “In such a case, BTC would have distorted the market in intra-island fixed voice such that sustainable competition is unachievable. “After all, no competitor will invest in infrastructure or offer competing services whilst the market rate to the consumer has been set by the dominant operator at below cost.” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also complained that BTC had refused to facilities share, when it came to shared access to the latter’s masts and towers, for some five years. “SRG first wrote to BTC on the subject of requesting shared access to BTC’s masts and towers on August 16, 2004. Despite copious further correspondence from SRG, and requests for assistance from the PUC, SRG is no nearer shared access to BTC’s facilities today than it was five years ago,” he said. Regardless of whether the issue was dealt with via an access/interconnection offer or some other agreement, the SRG president said URCA needed to ensure facilities sharing offers were “made promptly, in good faith and on nondiscriminatory and cost-orientated terms”. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.03AML Foods Limited1.071.100.0310,4910.1270.0008.70.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9.305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1250.09025.22.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0310.030.004571.4060.2507.12.49% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7 .505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1 5.875.870.000.4190.30014.05.11% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.433.33-0.100.1110.05230.01.56% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.6250.0803.33.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.009000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.6310.35015.83.50%5 .534.50Focol (S 4.504.500.001000.3320.15013.63.33% 1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.002,0000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0 .450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.009.98J. S. Johnson9.989.980.000.9520.64010.56.41% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelityBankNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 MONDAY,28SEPTEMBER2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.89 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.47 | YTD % -12.23BISX LISTEDDEBTSECURITIES (BondstradeonaPercentagePricingbases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% BISXLISTED& TRADEDSECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330|FACSIMILE:242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.49051.4119CFAL Money Market Fund1.49053.965.49 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775FidelityInternationalInvestmentFund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FGFinancialPreferredIncomeFund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93BISXALLSHAREINDEX -19Dec02=1,000.00 YIELD -last12monthdividendsdividedbyclosingprice 52wk-Hi -Highestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Bid$ -BuyingpriceofColinaandFidelity 52wk-Low -Lowestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Ask $ -SellingpriceofColinaandfidelity PreviousClose -Previousday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume LastPrice -Lasttradedover-the-counterprice Today'sClose -Currentday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume WeeklyVol. -Tradingvolumeofthepriorweek Change -Changeinclosingpricefromdaytoday EPS$ -Acompany'sreportedearningspershareforthelast12mths DailyVol. -Numberoftotalsharestradedtoday NAV -NetAssetValue DIV$ -Dividendspersharepaidinthelast12months N/M -NotMeaningful P/E -Closingpricedividedbythelast12monthearnings FINDEX -TheFidelityBahamasStockIndex.January1,1994=100 (S)-4-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate8/8/2007 (S1)-3-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09FidelityOver-The-CounterSecurities ColinaOver-The-CounterSecurities BISX ListedMutualFunds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TOTRADECALL:COLINA242-502-7010|ROYALFIDELITY242-356-7764|FGCAPITALMARKETS242-396-4000|COLONIAL242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 18-Sep-09 31-Aug-09MARKETTERMS Legal NoticeNOTICE RAPPAHANNOCK INC.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Business Companies Act 2000, t he dissolution ofRAPPAHANNOCK INC. h as been the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICE RAMAT S.A.Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8Business Companies Act 2000, the dissolution ofRAMATS.A. has been the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Employment Opportunity Sales RepresentativeWe are seeking to hire talented, assertive, charismatic and outgoing individuals with an aptitude for sales and a desire to succeed. Skills and Requirements xExcellent oral and written communication skills xProficient in Microsoft Office applications xAbility to work in a fast paced environmentxStrong mathematic capabilities xAbility to multitask xPossess excellent planning, organizational and implementation skills xExcellent interpersonal skillsxA team player with the ability to work independently xProfessional appearance xA desire and passion to get ahead Minimum Requirements xAssociate degree in marketing or business administrationxSales experience desired but not essential Paid training and benefits program available APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: salesrepresentativeneeded@gmail.com Legal NoticeN OTICE APOLLOS VALLEY INC.( In Voluntary Liquidation)N otice is hereby given that the above-named C ompany is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. A RGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) Legal NoticeNOTICE J OULIANE INVESTMENTS LTD.( In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the25th day of September 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, B ahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator) All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009 p.m . in the Board room of the Michael Eldon Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas. NOTICE Regulators back ‘no interconnect fee’ for local calls

PAGE 18

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 65F/18C Low: 67F/19C Low: 72F/22C Low: 76F/24C Low: 74 F/23 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 89F/32C High: 88F/31C High: 90 F/32 C High: 91 F/33 C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32C High: 88F/31C Low: 76F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 75F/24C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32 Low: 75F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 93F/34C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 78F/26C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 75F/24C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST A t-storm in spots in the afternoon. Partly cloudy.Some sun with a shower or t-storm. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 77 High: 88 High: 88 High: 86 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny with a thunderstorm. High: 87 Low: 77 Low: 78 Low: 77 AccuWeather RealFeel 106F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 85F 104-82F 98-85F 97-75F 91-84F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................87F/30C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 75 F/24C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.76" Year to date ................................................31.40" Normal year to date ....................................37.92" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Full Last New First Oct. 4 Oct. 11Oct. 18Oct. 25 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:01 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:59 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 4:16 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 2:51 a.m. Today Wednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 3:56 a.m.2.510:03 a.m.1.2 4:20 p.m.2.910:45 p.m.1.2 4:43 a.m.2.710:53 a.m.1.0 5:03 p.m.2.911:24 p.m.0.9 5:26 a.m.2.811:38 a.m.0.9 5:44 p.m.3.0----6:06 a.m.3.012:00 a.m.0.7 6:22 p.m.3.012:20 p.m.0.7 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26pc92/3377/25pc Amsterdam64/1754/12sh63/1750/10r Ankara, Turkey72/2239/3s73/2243/6s Athens81/2767/19pc81/2763/17s Auckland63/1754/12r58/1451/10r Bangkok92/3377/25pc92/3377/25t Barbados87/3077/25sh86/3077/25s Barcelona74/2362/16pc75/2363/17pc Beijing81/2757/13s77/2560/15pc Beirut74/2369/20s74/2369/20s Belgrade75/2350/10s71/2153/11s Berlin65/1844/6sh61/1643/6r Bermuda83/2877/25sh83/2875/23sh Bogota68/2042/5c69/2041/5pc Brussels66/1850/10s70/2152/11pc Budapest72/2249/9pc66/1846/7pc Buenos Aires57/1336/2s61/1646/7pc Cairo89/3169/20pc88/3168/20s Calcutta91/3284/28r93/3382/27r Calgary62/1636/2pc50/1031/0sh Cancun91/3273/22pc88/3173/22t Caracas81/2772/22pc83/2873/22t Casablanca79/2662/16s80/2663/17s Copenhagen57/1346/7s64/1748/8r Dublin63/1748/8pc63/1746/7pc Frankfurt66/1852/11c68/2050/10pc Geneva 72/22 49/9 s 73/2253/11s Halifax 64/17 49/9 r 61/16 48/8 pc Havana 90/32 72/22 t 88/31 70/21 sh Helsinki 50/10 39/3pc52/1137/2sh Hong Kong 86/30 79/26 r 86/30 81/27r Islamabad 106/41 71/21 s 108/42 69/20 s Istanbul72/2262/16s66/1854/12s Jerusalem 76/24 58/14s75/2359/15s Johannesburg 72/2250/10pc72/2250/10pc Kingston 89/3179/26r88/3178/25r Lima74/2360/15pc75/2361/16pc London70/2154/12pc68/2048/8pc Madrid75/2352/11t81/2756/13t Manila86/3077/25t86/3077/25t Mexico City75/2357/13t75/2357/13t Monterrey93/3372/22t93/3374/23pc Montreal61/1648/8sh54/1241/5c Moscow55/1237/2r50/1036/2s Munich64/1745/7pc69/2047/8pc Nairobi87/3055/12pc86/3055/12pc New Delhi 99/3777/25s99/3773/22s Oslo54/1234/1s50/1034/1pc Paris72/2246/7pc70/2148/8s Prague 64/17 50/10 r 61/16 50/10 sh Rio de Janeiro70/2161/16r69/2062/16r Riyadh100/3769/20s97/3669/20s Rome 75/23 57/13 s 75/23 57/13 s St. Thomas90/3281/27sh88/3180/26s San Juan63/1738/3pc72/2241/5s San Salvador 89/31 73/22 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 64/1739/3s68/2039/3pc Santo Domingo86/3074/23sh85/2973/22sh Sao Paulo 61/16 52/11 r 59/15 57/13r Seoul77/2561/16s77/2557/13pc Stockholm 52/11 36/2 pc 52/11 37/2 r Sydney 70/21 52/11 s82/2759/15s Taipei82/2779/26sh86/3077/25sh T okyo 79/26 68/20 r 72/22 67/19 r T oronto 58/1446/7sh54/1243/6c Trinidad72/2259/15sh85/2966/18s V ancouver 60/15 45/7 sh 57/1348/8c Vienna 67/1951/10pc66/1855/12pc W arsaw 63/17 41/5 r 57/13 45/7 pc Winnipeg 56/13 36/2 s 56/1338/3pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:WSW at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet6 Miles85F Wednesday:WSW at 4-8 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles85F Today:WNW at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet6 Miles86F Wednesday:NNW at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:W at 7-14 Knots3-5 Feet6 Miles84F Wednesday:W at 3-6 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque85/2959/15pc82/2752/11pc Anchorage48/840/4sh49/938/3sh Atlanta72/2250/10s74/2353/11s Atlantic City71/2150/10pc69/2045/7pc Baltimore68/2051/10pc68/2047/8pc Boston70/2153/11pc67/1949/9pc Buffalo58/1446/7sh54/1243/6c Charleston, SC81/2753/11s76/2455/12s Chicago57/1343/6c62/1646/7s Cleveland58/1449/9sh58/1441/5pc Dallas83/2866/18s88/3172/22pc Denver82/2752/11pc72/2236/2t Detroit58/1446/7c61/1645/7pc Honolulu88/3175/23s88/3175/23pc Houston87/3067/19pc87/3070/21pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayWednesday TodayWednesdayTodayWednesday Indianapolis62/1644/6pc67/1946/7s Jacksonville83/2854/12s80/2655/12s Kansas City72/2251/10s76/2460/15s Las Vegas96/3567/19s79/2656/13s Little Rock77/2552/11s80/2660/15s Los Angeles75/2360/15pc78/2558/14pc Louisville68/2046/7s70/2145/7s Memphis75/2352/11s78/2557/13s Miami90/3274/23pc88/3174/23t Minneapolis60/1538/3s63/1747/8s Nashville69/2048/8s72/2251/10s New Orleans82/2764/17s82/2764/17s New York69/2055/12pc66/1854/12pc Oklahoma City79/2658/14s82/2766/18pc Orlando89/3165/18pc84/2863/17s Philadelphia68/2053/11pc68/2051/10pc Phoenix 104/40 78/25 s 96/3565/18s Pittsburgh56/1347/8sh57/1343/6c Portland, OR 60/1548/8sh63/1749/9c Raleigh-Durham 74/23 48/8 s 73/22 49/9 s St. Louis69/2047/8s73/2258/14s Salt Lake City 86/30 53/11 pc 56/1335/1sh San Antonio 86/30 72/22 t 88/31 75/23 t San Diego72/2264/17pc73/2261/16pc San Francisco 65/18 52/11 pc 69/2053/11s Seattle58/1445/7sh60/1548/8c T allahassee 85/2951/10s82/2750/10s T ampa 88/31 67/19 pc 84/28 65/18s Tucson99/3772/22s94/3463/17s W ashington, DC 70/21 53/11pc69/2052/11pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


“WAKE UP!

Sausage & Egg
Burrito

m Lhe Iribu

USA TODAY.

SSF
75F

BAHAMAS EDITION
www.tribune242.com

FSTORM
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

TEX IN SPOTS
CARS FOR SALE,
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Women charged
in pilot murder

Defendants aged 20 and 19 in court
Pair also accused of attempted murder

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net



‘Bridgewater's
meeting with
Travolta lawyer
secretly recorded’

FORMER PLP
Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and
former premedic
Tarino
Lightbourne
lawyer Carlson
Shurland
yesterday.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

By NATARIO
McKENZIE

Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

TWO young women
charged with the murder of
Bahamasair pilot Lionel
McQueen were arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Genear McKenzie, 20, of
Warren Street alias “Nettie”,
and Rhonda Knowles, 19, of
Winton Estates, alias “Ganja
Baby”, have been charged
with the murder of McQueen,
29.

McQueen was found dead

SEE page 12

AN attorney for Hollywood celebrity John Travolta
allowed police to set up recording devices in his hotel
room for a meeting with former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater, it was revealed in court Monday.

Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino

SEE page 12

Move to boost Bahamas tourism

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net





LINKING the Bahamas to the world and the islands to one
another is the key focus for the development of the country’s
largest industry, Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said yesterday.

As promotions of the Bahamas in the $5.8 million 2009 Miss
Universe pageant showing the islands as a chain of unique

SEE page 12
New date for National Tourism Week, Cacique Awards

TOTAL COST OF MISS
UNIVERSE REVEALED

PHOTOS: NATIONAL Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards will
1 Tim Clarke not be held in January as planned but in 2011, the Ministry of

CROWN LAND “USED AS ‘Tribune staff Tourism and Aviation announced yesterday.
A POLITICAL TOOL’ ic ae . — The week to promote tourism and the award ceremony held

during that week to reward high performers in the tourism

SEE page 12

Two face dangerous
drugs allegation

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

GENEAR MCKENZIE, 20

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!



RHONDA KNOWLES, 19

RT We TST
Surveys director was asked to quit

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter








TT

sce



MONDAY night football
was cancelled at the Green
Parrot bar and restaurant on

FREEPORT — Two men
were charged with possession
of dangerous drugs on Mon-
day in the Freeport Magis-
trate’s Court.

Leroy Miller, 41, of
Freeport, and Davonne

tthompson@tribunemedia. net












FORMER Director of Lands and Surveys Tex Turnquest
was asked to resign earlier this year because he could not rea-
sonably explain how several beach-front parcels of Crown
land granted to his relatives were fast-tracked through the
backlogged system.

Uvianvalarge
Pio hagas

ngsgagetiaymedium,
‘i Fado) (oho) OMe,

Mr Turnquest also could not reasonably explain to Prime Brown, 29, of Nassau,
Minister Hubert Ingraham, the minister responsible for
SEE page 12 SEE page 12

Download a Nomination Form from:
http://www.fidelitygroup.com/ndta



ee) [fe Mey itmel mite le} et



NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISCANDS? EEADING NEWSPAPER

Bay Street last night as flat
screen televisions in the bar
were stolen over the week-
end.

The Green thParrot man-
agement hopes to replace the
televisions before Monday
night football next week.

Anyone with any informa-

SEE page 12

Help Your Favourite Teacher WIN $1000!

Nominate a Teacher by September 30th, 2009 for

The Fidelity Sir Gerald Cash National Distinguished Teachers’ Awards

lise
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





ES
Top official admits Crown land

has been used as a ‘political tool’

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



THE promise of crown land
grants has been used as a polit-






















































35 Collins Ave, 328.0783

“Lowest Prices On The Island”

ical tool by successive govern-
ments, Permanent Secretary in
the Ministry of Lands David
Davis revealed.

He said the practice of offer-
ing free tracts of land in return

eana

LOCAL NEWS
HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY SELECT COMMITTEE

for political allegiance has been
going on for many years, adding
however that these promises are
often not fulfilled in the after-
math of an election. "The trend
has been established. Before

NAW MoMMeo

Sandyport 327.5483

every election, plenty letters get
issued which are not honoured
after election. But I want to ask
you, when did them people get
their grant? Some of them nev-
er get it.

"Some of them letters didn't
originate in the department —
I'm not calling any years — the
minister responsible for lands
can issue letters, he can give
instructions to issue letters," Mr
Davis told the House of Assem-
bly's Select Committee on
Crown Land issues yesterday.

Questions

He was responding to ques-
tions put to him by committee
member Philip “Brave” Davis,
who suggested that the depart-
ment was usually mobilised to
issue approval letters before
elections.

Committee member Kenyat-
ta Gibson suggested that the
approval process should become
the responsibility of a qualified
committee rather than one per-
son — to avoid the appearance of
nepotism or corruption.

To this Mr Davis replied:
"Land is a very emotive issue,
land is also a very political issue.
T haven't seen any government
that's prepared to bring trans-
parency to the process — all gov-

Each year Doctors Hospital
makes a donation to the
Bahamas Children’s Emergency
Hostel in support of its efforts
to provide temporary shelter,
food, clothing, and other neces-
sities to abused, abandoned and
neglected children.

The hostel houses more than
30 children ages one to 11, and
is a charitable non-profit organ-
isation that survives on dona-
tions and fundraising from the
church, civic and business
organisations, the government,
and individuals from the private
sector.

The cost of running the facil-
ity increases every year, and the
organisers say the hostel is now
facing financial challenges.

The hospital’s latest fundrais-
ing initiative focused on help-
ing pay for the hostel’s hand-
book on teenage pregnancy —

eK BRR Rie
IAA Lal
AW Tey
ee Pa ety
322-2157

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING ns

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STORE HOURS:

Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

STILL ALIVE

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald's Furniture
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SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

ernments try to hold onto that
power, the power to give crown
land — or objectivity. It's like a
perk." When asked what was
being done on a day-to-day
basis to avoid corruption, Act-
ing Director Richard Hardy —
who is responsible for issuing
approval recommendations to
the minister of lands — said he
closely monitors all submissions
for approval and outgoing cor-
respondence.

"That is the best control I
have. .. To know what is hap-
pening. And it is my intention,
as long as I am acting director,
that it is done fairly."

Mr Hardy stressed that the
department makes no decisions
on applications; only recom-
mendations to the minister.

Audley Greaves, under-sec-
retary in the department,
agreed, saying the best that can
be done to avoid corruption is
toremain "fair and open-hand-
ed." Significant reform of the
department, which is plagued
with inefficiencies and an exten-
sive backlog, is needed, the wit-
nesses testified. Mr Davis admit-
ted that there are deficiencies
in the department's filing sys-
tem, adding: "Given the sheer
volume (of applications)...
many of them get lost."

He added that a number of

crown land applications lan-
guish in the system because they
are incomplete and the depart-
ment has no means of contact-
ing the applicants.

Mr Hardy also admitted that
over the past few years a num-
ber of applications have gone
unanswered, but said it was his
intention going forward to have
all applications acknowledged.

In order to improve its pro-
cessing system and keep track of
applications, the department is
also looking at implementing an
electronic system that would
allow officials to quickly access
a list of all applicants and check
on the status of their applica-
tions, Mr Hardy said.

The department’s backlog is
due in part to a lack of qualified
land surveyors. Mr Davis said
that since 1992, the department
has been grappling with the
"impossible task" of trying to
recruit Bahamian surveyors and
has now had to turn to foreign-
ers. Over the last few months
the department has recruited
about four or five surveyors
from abroad, mostly from
Guyana or other Caribbean
countries. The committee,
scheduled to meet every Mon-
day, is expected to present their
findings to parliament on Janu-
ary 27, 2010.



FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Chadwick Williamson, VP MIS, Doctors
Hospital; Jasmine Davis, VP Patient Finance, Doctors Hospital:



Michele Rassin, VP Operations, Doctors Hospital; Nakita Smith,
Assistant Administrator, Bahamas Children’s Emergency Hostel;

Stanley Forbes, Book Assistant, Bahamas Children’s Emergency
Hostel; KellyAnne Smith, Graphic Designer, Doctors Hospital.



an effort to educate youths,
especially young women, who
may be promiscuous, pregnant
or the victims of sexual assault.

Those interested in helping
the Bahamas Children’s Emer-
gency Hostel can donate funds
or supplies, lend a hand, spon-
sor a project or event, or par-
ticipate in the hostel’s corpo-

rate fundraising programme or
charitable foundation pro-
gramme.

All donations and gifts are
welcome, administrators say,
including clothes, shoes, books
and toys.

School supplies, such as
books, stationary and school
uniforms are urgently needed.

es Pe eS
If YOu Sce tALS beautiful

i

YOUNG lady today,

4%

2a ff <
wish AEE a

Happy



WSitthda Y

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 3





TTY

TSE Ce A

A ABU TT

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — MORE than $22 million in illegal drugs and
cash seizures have been recorded so far this year on Grand
Bahama.

Cocaine seizures amounted to over $19 million, according to sta-
tistical reports released by police officials here.

Eight major seizures occurred at the Freeport Container Port
between January and August of this year, with the single largest
seizure pegged at $6,250,000.

The first seizure was made on January 14 when DEU officers
seized 56 kilos of cocaine with an estimated street value of $1.4 mil-
lion. On February 5, Drug Enforcement Unit (DEV) officers dis-
covered five large duffle bags containing some 250 kilos of cocaine
estimated at $6,250,000 at the port.

Two months later, 200 kilos of cocaine worth $4 million were dis-
covered in a container.

From July 13 to August 26, cocaine seizures totalled some
$7,350,000 at the port.

Marijuana

According to reports, marijuana seizures totalled some $851,700
so far this year. Of the six major seizures, five occurred in the
Freeport area and one in East Grand Bahama. About 851.7 pounds
of marijuana were seized between May and September, 2009.

Grand Bahama police have also seized nearly $3 million in cash
this year. In April, police discovered $2,772,764 in United States
currency at the Grand Bahama International Airport.

According to reports, the money was found hidden in various
appliances and items that were onboard a private charter aircraft
that had arrived from Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

As the items were being inspected and cleared by Bahamas
Customs at the airport, large sums of US currency notes were
found concealed in a small refrigerator, two television sets and oth-
er items. In another incident, police seized some $164,319.52 at a
residence in Freeport in April. Grand Bahama police said they are
grateful to the community for its continued support in the fight
against crime.

Man thought to have drowned
on Rose Island is identified

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE man found dead on Rose Island on Saturday after-
noon has been identified as 49-year-old Spencer Anthony
Archer.

The body of Mr Archer, of Bilney Lane off Shirley Street, was
discovered at around 6pm on Saturday.

He is believed to have drowned.

According to Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel, an
autopsy to officially determine the cause of Mr Archer’s death
should be completed by the end of this week.

ASP Bethel said Mr Archer was on Rose Island “with others
when this tragedy occurred.”

PM Ingraham to address Annual
Americas Conference in Florida

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham will attend the 2009 Annu-
al Americas Conference to be held at the Biltmore Hotel in
Coral Gables, Florida on September 29-30.

The conference, sponsored by the State of Florida, the World
Bank, the Miami Herald and Florida International University,
is a business and political forum that focuses on United
States/Latin American issues.

This year’s conference is being held under the theme: “After
the crisis: emerging challenges and political stability.”

Prime Minister Ingraham will deliver the first of three prin-
cipal addresses on the opening day of the conference.

He will depart on Nassau on Tuesday, September 29, and
return the same day.

Miss Universe pageant

Tourism Minister says amount
was much less than expected

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THE 2009 Miss Universe
pageant cost the government
$5.8 million in total, Minister
of Tourism Senator Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace revealed
in a press conference yesterday.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the cost was much less than
expected and far lower than
many previous hosts of the
international beauty contest
have paid for the privilege.

The pageant gave the
Bahamas nearly 10 minutes of
coverage on prime-time televi-
sion shown on 647 media
broadcasts in 180 countries
around the world and was
viewed by an estimated
115,936,797 million people,
including 7.1 million in the
United States.

All of those people would
have learned that the Bahamas
is a network of individual
islands each with their own
character, as they followed Miss
Universe 2008 Dayana Men-
doza, of Venezuela, to Exuma,
Andros, and Cat Island, and all
84 contestants to Harbour
Island, Bimini and Grand
Bahama.

The $5.8 million paid by the
Ministry of Tourism included
all transportation of contestants
by air, sea and land, Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace told the media
at the British Colonial Hilton in
downtown Nassau, yesterday.

The minister compared the
price-tag to the $2 million cost
of 30 seconds of advertising
during a Super Bowl game, and
the $15 million Vietnam paid
to host Miss Universe 2008.

The minister said: “We real-
ly have to thank the private sec-
tor because without their sup-
port there’s no way we could
have done what we did with the
kind of outcome that we had.

“Never before have I seen a
level of co-operation, co-ordi-
nation, inter-government co-
operation, like that. There were
things we were trying to get
fixed for years and as soon as
Miss Universe was coming, it
was done.

“There was amazing co-oper-
ation and amazing outcome.”

Director of Tourism Vernice
Walkine said she fought to
showcase the individual islands,
each with its unique appeal, in
the pageant show.

She said: “We saw an oppor-
tunity to get these beautiful
women moving through the
islands to promote to the world
that we have multiple islands
which is the mission, I think,
we accomplished.

“I fought for us to get
Dayana Mendoza to do her
adventures in the Bahamas and
that’s not typical because she
would normally have one des-
tination.

“So I got everything I wanted
and then some.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the exposure attracted many
more people to the Ministry of
Tourism website, and particu-
larly to pages about the Family

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Islands, after the event.

Miss Universe 2009 also
boosted local businesses, with
events such as the fashion show
highlighting the fabrics of
Androsia and Bahama Hand
Prints.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “Miss Universe had the
biggest impact we have had
ever. It’s something that was
just extraordinary in terms of
what it is.

“We have never in the his-
tory of the Bahamas got cov-
erage of that sort.

“In a two hour telecast we
had the best commercial for the
Bahamas that we will ever get.

“We got almost 10 minutes
of fantastic coverage we could
never have paid for out of our
budget.

“It was a conversation and
negotiation and outcome we
are very proud of. People say it
was an outstanding production,
an amazing accomplishment,
and $5.8 million is much less
than we expected to pay.

“Tt was much, much less than
anybody has paid for Miss Uni-
verse in the last several years, in
Vietnam, in Trinidad, the cost
was much higher, so we paid
much less than in recent years
and in many other years.”



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited What would Sir

ae ee Et { enne Du pu c h? S
editorials have said?



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EDITOR, The Tribune. vive will be the older folks
IM wl that migrated to New Provi-
From a young boy my dad dence from the family islands

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

US can’t walk away from Afghanistan

THE admonition that “those who ignore
history are destined to repeat it” is as valid
today as when it was coined long ago. But
then, as today, it is a devilishly perplexing
guide because history is not monotonic.

Today, the United States confronts a crit-
ical challenge in Afghanistan: Should we
send in more troops at the cost of greater
casualties and with success uncertain?

Or should we withdraw, leaving the Tal-
iban to seize power again and re-establish a
homeland for al-Qaida-like terrorists?

The lessons taught by Vietnam and Iraq
are contradictory.

Oversimplifying, the U.S. lost in Vietnam
despite deployment of hundreds of thou-
sands of troops and the arsenal of a super-
power.

Iraq became a quagmire out of which a
sustainable solution is still to be extracted
because the U.S. committed too few forces,
permitting chaos, insecurity and insurgen-
cies to flourish.

Afghanistan today is regarded as “the nec-
essary war” in the words of President Oba-
ma. The American military command rec-
ognizes that the war in Afghanistan cannot
be won without creating the kind of securi-
ty for the people that was defaulted in Iraq.

This takes many more troops to shrink
the reach of the Taliban while the social and
governmental institutions are established to
elicit support from a people alienated
because of endemic official corruption.

The Taliban are feared by most Afghanis
for their cruel justice and harsh fundamen-
talist governance.

But what they are not is corrupt. Thereby
they pose an alternative for people suffering
in their everyday lives from pervasive cor-
ruption that is tolerated if not practised in
the presidential halls and reaches to the cop
on the street and all stops in between.

In the Obama assessment now in progress,
this corruption should be at the heart of
determining American policy, because a pos-
itive outcome from the international inter-
vention that cannot succeed without sub-
stantial support from the populace.

If President Hamid Karzai’s regime,
presently charged with widespread fraud in
the recent election, cannot be convinced or
compelled to change the ways of his admin-
istration, then not enough American or
European military forces exist to impose

peace and stability and a Taliban and al-
Qaida-free Afghanistan.

Yet the U.S. abandons Afghanistan only
at the more drastic peril of having a defeat
there reinforce the Taliban in neighbouring
Pakistan, which is the proud possessor of
an arsenal of 50 nuclear bombs.

On both sides of the border, the Taliban
are ethnic Pashtuns before they are Afgha-
nis or Pakistanis.

Their fanatic determination is to take over
Pakistan no less than Afghanistan to impose
an extremist Islamic government.

The horror is unbearable that such a
regime would control nuclear weapons and
seek eventual wider domination.

Therefore, walking away from
Afghanistan, no matter how layered and
daunting the challenge, is not acceptable,
more for what could happen in Pakistan.

Some Pakistani intelligence elements are
said by American officials to be keeping ties
to the Taliban, which they utilize as an
instrument serving their interests. These ties
are susceptible to being more broadly
renewed if it appears the U.S. might pull
out of Afghanistan.

The more recent success of U.S. drone
missile attacks against Taliban and al-Qaida
elements in Pakistan is apparently attribut-
able to intelligence previously withheld by
the Pakistanis. They seem to be working
both sides of the street, at times one side
harder than the other.

Given that ambivalence and the stake of a
nuclear arsenal falling into extremist hands,
the practical course for the U.S. and the
world is to build up Afghani civil institu-
tions, train their army and police forces to
enable them to increasingly take a larger
role in their country and continue to entice
Pakistani support in hunting down their own
insurgents.

It would be a long, costly commitment
whose successes at first would likely be mod-
est and not complete in the long term. If
there is a better alternative, it is yet to be dis-
cerned.

(This article was written by Harry Rosen-
feld-
C.2009 Albany Times Union).



always insisted that I read Sir
Etienne Dupuch’s editorials. I
realised later their historical
value. As I recall, he always
looked behind and around to
look forward.

With the United States far
adrift, far flung, tearing at its
seams, doomed historically
and too deep in a hole to
recover, the Bahamas, too,
stands on a precipice of
gloom. The pillars of Bahami-
an elitist local wealth, Real
Estate and the Legal Empire
are hysterical at the prospect
that the local man on the
street cannot afford a prop-
erty or pay his rent with incor-
porating legal fees. From Bib-
lical prophecies, the saviours
from the East, the Chinese
are here.

Many systems of stresses
are impacting the Bahamian
families, and our indigenous
happy-go-lucky lifestyle is
crumbling. But we are a peo-
ple who have survived the
advent of African and Euro-
pean Diasporas, the coming
and going of slavery, colo-
nialism, rum-running, spong-
ing, drug trafficking, and ille-

letters@triounemedia.net



gal immigration. But all of the
above are an integral part of
who we are as a people with a
set historical fingerprint. That
tourism, that has fueled our
lifeblood for the past fifty
years is fading — now what?

We are adrift upon high
ocean swells. We long for the
good old days and fear what’s
beyond the horizon. With
family income on the decline
will we gain our Christianity,
or was it already lost in the
fog of more affluent days
when a hundred dollars laid
around every comer.

With each Bahamian fami-
ly experiencing a different
and multiple layers of stresses
the impacts are being felt in
humbling ways. As despera-
tion exposes gaping social
wounds, crime, hopelessness
and faith in God will increase
while child welfare and edu-
cational needs will decrease.
Nowadays survival will come
first.

Those most likely to sur-

or lived through the thirties.
Like my dad always said,
"Life was simple. Life was
hard. We were all happy.
Bahamians helped each other
out. There was no crime as
such, except between man
and woman."

God forbid we have to fish
and toil the land. But should
America go into another his-
torical deep depression we
will have to find out how the
older folks made it. Both
leaders, Obama and Ingra-
ham are on the tipping point
of history. The international
decks of cards are being shuf-
fled. As America fights far
flung wars, the Chinese, Ira-
nians, and Russians have
moved through her back
door. With America broken,
to the victor go the spoils.

CARLTON
ROBINSON
Nassau,

September 22, 2009.

(Sir Etienne always pre-
dicted that civilisation would
go full circle, returning to the
East with China the world
leader. — Ed).

As a marital rape victim I totally
support this important legislation

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As A female victim of marital rape by my
then husband for over twenty-five years, I sup-
port this important piece of legislation one

hundred percent.

The result of such sexual abuse was seven
unplanned and unwanted pregnancies — one
every year. Consequently, seven maladjusted
dysfunctional children were produced.

When he forced himself on me he would
say, he paid for the right to have sex with me

whenever he wanted.

The man made my life a nightmare and
because of his abuse I often took it out on the

children.

I often felt dirty, disgusted, hopeless and
not in control of my own body.

Since leaving nineteen years ago, I have not

had a relationship with any other man —
scars are too deep. I vowed never to have to go
through that kind of sexual abuse ever again!

Thank you, Mrs Turner, for paving the way
for women to have a recourse and to be
allowed to have control over their own bodies.

Tam sure a lot of women appreciate it.

Many times I was left bruised and sore for

days.

On two occasions I even contracted sexual-

ly transmitted diseases.

He was a chronic “sweethearter” — even to
relations with a baby-sitter and a maid.

A MARITAL

RAPE
VICTIM
Nassau,
2009.

We can ill-afford this madness

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I know that James Catalyan
is performing at the Dundas
but I suspect there is a cer-
tain amount of mid-summer
madness in the air reading
and listening to local com-
mentators and callers to the
Talk Shows.

Example.....Bahamasair will
be flying to Europe - Asia.....
we will create 10,000 new jobs
a year.....a caller to a Talk



DON STAINTON
PROTECTION
WE SELL OUTER SPACE

TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160

The Bahamas Utilities Co-operative

Credit Union Limited

NOTICE OF SPECIAL

Free Estimates

ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR

SCREENED ROOM

GENERAL MEETING

A Special General Meeting of

the Bahamas Utilities Co-operative

Credit Union Limited
will be held on

Friday, October 2nd, 2009

at
6:00 p.m.
in

The Patrick A. Bain Training Room

at

The Bahamas Co-operative League Building

Russell Road, Oakes Field

PURPOSE OF THE MEETING

The purpose of the meeting is to seek approval
from the membership for a merger with National
Workers Co-operative Credit Union Limited. Note
that the Annual General Meeting held May 28th,
2009, authorized the Board of Directors to seek

alliance with a larger credit union.

Secretary: Dexter Cartwright

~

ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT

Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978

Show suggests the Chinese
build a bridge between Nas-
sau and Andros (ain’t he
heard of the tongue of the
ocean!)

Others advocate the imme-
diate hanging of everyone on
death row for what are clear-
ly “bedroom-murders of pas-
sion.”

Hasn’t anyone been listen-
ing or reading that the ques-
tion of the use of capital pun-
ishment is totally controlled
by a Privy Council judgment?
Bahamas, we can ill-afford
this madness at these serious
times — can someone slap
someone and get us back on
track or have we slipped the
track and there is no hope?

The 19-year-old girl calling
in More 94 yesterday said a
lot....all my graduating class
girlfriends have already had
a baby and the men are either
smoking or following with the
Rastas......what a testimonial
for billions of dollars of tax
payers’ money spent on edu-
cation.

Surely we need to have
some qualifier for some of
these Talk Show hosts — a
certain one with an Abaco-
Eleutheran twang talks real
stupidity most of the time.



W THOMPSON
Nassau,
September 23, 2009.

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We apologise to our valued customers and
regret any inconvenience this may cause.
NEW CAR SALES will be open for business as usual.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Adopt ‘green’ lifestyles, Bahamians urged

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMIANS should not
wait on BEC to become more
environmentally friendly, but
act independently by imple-
menting “green” lifestyle
changes, Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux said.

Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune yesterday that it is the
behaviour of individual house-
holds and businesses that is key
to making the Bahamas more
“green”.

Admitting the public may
have “justified cynicism” about
BEC’s commitment to renew-
able energy, Mr Deveaux said if
more businesses and house-
holds implemented environ-
mentally friendly practices they
could not only save themselves
money, but help the cash-
strapped corporation cut its oil
usage and “free up investment
dollars” that it can use to buy
into renewables.

Don’t wait for BEC to become more environmentally friendly, says Minister

Acknowl-
edging that a
recent pre-
sentation by
BEC on
renewable
energy pro-
vided little



hope that
EARL this country
DEVEAUX can reduce

its reliance
on fossil fuel anytime soon, the
minister said instead of waiting
on BEC, the public should act
independently.

“BEC in the short-run may
have a five per cent impact on
reducing its energy load (by
building a waste-to-energy con-
version plant in New Provi-
dence as it currently intends to
do). The short-run being 15 to
18 months. But the households
and the businesses, if they do
three or four things, can have a

PTT REET

USS TC CS





BY LINDSAY THOMPSON

DEPUTY Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette called on the
United Nations (UN) to reduce
the unjust financial burden
placed on small developing
countries like the Bahamas who
are asked to pay a dispropor-
tionate percentage of the inter-
national organisation’s expens-
es.

Speaking at the 64th Session
of the United Nations General
Assembly in New York on Sep-
tember 25, Mr Symonette asked
the UN to review the member-
ship fee as it relates to small
island developing states.

This year, the General
Assembly will consider the scale
of assessments for the appor-
tionment of the expenses of the
United Nations for 2010 — 2012,
as well as the scale of assess-
ments for the apportionment of
the expenses of UN peace-
keeping operations.

During his address, Mr
Symonette reiterated the
Bahamas’ position that the per
capita gross national income
(GNI) should not be given
undue weight in determining
“capacity to pay”, as it often
leads to distortions.

This distortion is more visi-
ble in the case of the scale of
assessments for peacekeeping
operations, he noted.

The current scale places the
Bahamas, a small island devel-
oping state, in the same catego-
ry as the most developed
economies of the world, with
the exception of the permanent
members of the Security Coun-
cil, he said.

“This unjust formula creates
an onerous burden and we call
upon this body to address this
inequity, which seriously under-

ie
Sasa es
eRe UE
ul ee ara

mines the development objec-
tives of the Bahamas and other
developing countries,” Mr
Symonette said. “Clearly, the
GNI criterion does not proper-
ly reflect either the vulnerabili-
ty of our economy, or the extra-
ordinary costs associated with
the duplication of infrastructure
required because of our archi-
pelagic configuration.”

Despite this, he said “the
Bahamas has never wavered
from its responsibilities” as a
fully-fledged member of the
international community, “and
will continue to meet its obliga-
tions to the UN” in the manner
prescribed and agreed.

“While my government is
committed to paying its assessed
contributions, in full and in a
timely manner, we believe that
the proposed scale of assess-
ments is unfairly and unduly
burdensome for countries such
as the Bahamas and should
therefore be reconsidered and
adjusted, taking into account
those considerations that reflect
our vulnerabilities,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

30-40 per cent impact on their
energy load,” he said.

Mr Deveaux laid out his case
at the recent town meeting on
the Wilson City Power Plant in
Abaco, where opponents have
been calling on the government
to consider using renewable
energy rather than building the
traditional heavy fuel-burning
power plant in what has been
described as an ecologically
sensitive area.

During the same meeting,
BEC gave a presentation in
which it concluded that, con-
trary to statements from critics
of the plant, it would not be
feasible for the government to
power Abaco with renewable
energy at this time as the vari-
ous options would be too cost-
ly, require too much land or
simply would not be able to
provide enough electricity.

The Environment Minister



DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent

suggested that rather than “get-
ting caught up” in cynicism
about the likelihood that BEC
will ever become more “green”,
people should take individual
action. He said households and
businesses can do several key
things to bring down their ener-
gy consumption - paint their
roofs white (reduces heat
absorption, thereby lessening
air-conditioning requirements);
replace their hot water heaters
with solar water heaters that
use the sun’s energy; convert
lightbulbs to CFL or LED
bulbs that use less energy, and
buy appliances such as
microwaves, dishwashers or
fridges that have a high energy
efficiency or “SEER” (Season-
al Energy Efficiency Ratio) rat-
ing. The government present-
ly provides a tax incentive for
the purchase of such items,
offering reduced duty charges.




Photos/UN

Symonette addresses the 64th Session of the United Nations Gener-
al Assembly in New York on September 25.

He also addressed the impact
the global economic recession
has had on the Bahamian econ-
omy, climate change, maritime
safety and security, illicit traf-
ficking in narcotics, and the
Caribbean Community’s com-
mitment to a stable Haitt.

“The economic fall-out for
the Bahamas has been consid-
erable,” he said.

“Ours is a small, very open
economy that is closely linked
to the performance of more
developed economies. Tourism
matters in the Bahamas. It is
our primary industry and it

Gi loyso me)
Inventory

The Shoe Village,
Madeira Shopping Plaza,
will be closed to take inventory
Wednesday Sepi. 30th, and will reopen
9:30am Thursday Oct. Ist, 2009.

The Shoe Village,
Marathon Mall,
will be closed to take inventory
Thursday Oct. Ist, and will reopen
10:00am Friday Oct. 2nd, 2009

Clarks
Marathon Mall
will be closed to take inventory
Thursday Oct. Ist, and will reopen
10:00am Friday Oct. 2nd, 2009
We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

FOE CONAICIOMTO THE WORLD

PUBLIC NOTICE

September Bill Delay

Bue to the curment upgrade of our billing
system, post-paid cellular customers may find
that their September bills may be delayed in
getting to the post office. Accordingly, cus-
tomers are advised to contact BIC at 225-5282
or visit any of our Multi Service Centers nation-
wide to obtain their outstanding bill in order to
avoid disruption of service.

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affects all aspects of economic
life in our country.” To deal
with this, the government “act-
ed quickly” to soften the impact
of the international economic
downturn, he explained.

“Tt took appropriate steps to
ensure the continued integrity
of the domestic financial sys-
tem, we accelerated capital
works to generate employment
and economic activity, and we
increased targeted social relief
to those most disadvantaged by
the crisis,” Mr Symonettte said.


























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Perhaps you spoke the kindest
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Perhaps you were not there al
all, just. thought. of us that. day.

Whatever you did to console
our hearts we thank you so much
lor whatever part.

The family of Dorcas
Elizabeth Thompson-Laing

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Miss BAHAMAS UNIVERSITY ORGANISATION AMBASSADORS VISIT SCHOOLS

Beauty queens raise
child abuse awareness

DUA em ath LES ae el geyi

THREE beauty ambassadors
of the Miss Bahamas Universe
Organisation are working
together to create awareness
among school children of the
effects and signs of child abuse.

Miss International Bahamas
Amanda Appleyard, Miss
Earth Bahamas Krystle Brown
and Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman are in the
process of visiting the country’s
schools on a mission to educate
primary school students about
child abuse in an age-appropri-
ate manner.

Miss Bahamas Universe
Organisation president Gaynell
Rolle said: “We are pleased to
have been so well received by
the principals, faculty and entire
student body of the schools.”

Miss International Bahamas
Amanda Appleyard, who
leaves next month for the Miss
International Pageant being



b

1 7”
antey=ym OY=r-U0] WAKO [e110 1S

held in Japan and China, said:
“This is a wonderful opportu-
nity for me to sharpen my com-
munication skills and to be at
ease speaking before large and
diverse groupings. Not only is
the message a timely one for
the kids, but it is one that needs
to be addressed nonetheless. I
truly enjoyed each moment and
am looking forward to a con-
tinuous working relationship
with the schools.”

Miss Earth Bahamas Krystle
Brown told the students that
they are special and have “spe-
cial body parts that need to be
protected and not taken advan-
tage off.”

“You must promise me to
say ‘no’ if anyone wants to
touch you in any of those pri-
vate places,” she said.

Ms Brown said she also
enjoyed lending her crown to
one lucky girl to wear for a day.

MISSION TO EDUCATE: All smiles for a beauty queen.

“You should see how their
eyes light up, it’s like a most
unbelievable moment for them.
I know they will never forget
it.”

Miss Bahamas Universe
Kiara Sherman said one of her
most memorable visits was to
the Albury Sayles Primary
School, where the entire school
body wore whistles to symbol-
ise ‘blowing the whistle on child
abuse’.

“This was truly creative and
most memorable, one I will
take with me for time to come.
Albury Sayles showed me in
grand style how to let go and
blow the whistle on child abuse
in a way I never imagined. All
of the schools I visited wel-
comed me with open arms, the
children were so well behaved
and curious to meet Miss
Bahamas. They made my jour-



ney as Miss Bahamas so
rewarding, I look forward to
meeting the other students,”
she said.

Ms Rolle said to date the
beauty queens have visited
Mable Walker; Gerald Cash;
Sandilands; Garvin Tynes; Yel-
low Elder; Thelma Gibson;
Gambier; Oakes Field; Ridge-
land; Stephen Dillet; Albury
Sayles, and Uriah McPhee Pri-
mary Schools. “This week we
will visit Kingsways Academy;
C W Sawyer; Naomi Blatch;
Carmichael; E P Roberts;
Columbus; Palmdale, and
Woodcock primary schools. I
am so pleased (with) the par-
ticipation of our queens, they
really enjoyed speaking to the
children and it showed through
their delivery.” In total, the
beauty queens will visit 21 of
the Bahamas’ schools.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAVEN ROCK LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE OF
SPECIAL CALL

MEETING

To: All Members of National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited,
New Providence, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,
San Salvador and Exuma.

Pursuant to Section 21, 22 & 99 of the Co-operative
Societies Act 2005, notice is hereby given that all
members of National Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited (NWCCU) are urged to
attend a Special Call Meeting on Friday,
October 2nd, 2009 at the British Colonial
Hilton, Salon BC commencing at 10:00am to
discuss and vote on important matters pertaining to
your Credit Union.

* National Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited (NWCCU) Merger with Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited
(BUCCUL)

The closure of the East Bay Branch, effective
October 31st, 2009.

The acquisition of property for the purpose of
constructing a building for housing NCCCU
head office.

To address the matter pertaining to the member
of the Supervisory Committee who did not meet
the requirements during the time of election.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HARVEST VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

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Keep a lookout
tor ‘Lookout’

Homeless potcake is
now a movie star

ONE little brown potcake went from being an
unwanted dog to a celebrity.

The production crew from the movie “Wind Jam-
mers’ - an independent film production about an
American girl who learns to sail in the Bahamas
but learns much more about herself and the world
around her - contacted the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety to see if they could help with some potcakes to
appear in a couple of scenes of the movie.

The Humane Society staff immediately thought
of ‘Lookout’ as she is a shelter favourite with a
friendly personality.

‘Lookout’ went along to the movie set with her
new friends Whylie Coyote, a black potcake; Tiger
Lilli, a brindle potcake, and Roxy. The four dogs
were great representatives for the potcake breed.

Adoption

‘Lookout’ was at the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety for adoption, however, she behaved so well
on her outings she is now going to be the Soci-
ety’s education dog and visit schools with their
education officer. There are, however, many oth-
er adoption dogs at the shelter and the Bahamas
Humane Society is asking anyone who has room in
their heart and a home for their own potcake star
to visit the dogs at the Society.

“And remember,” said a spokesman, “when
you hear about the release of Wind Jammers keep
a lookout for ‘Lookout’ and her friends. The
Bahamas Humane Society would also like to thank
the Wind Jammers production for their generous
donation which will help fund our adoption pro-
gramme.”



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BARCABAL INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SIVA OCEAN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HOLDING PATTERN LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 7



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS: First resident scholars

Exploring Bahamas’ race relations history

RESEARCH being conduct-
ed by the College of the
Bahamas’ first resident schol-
ars is expected to uncover valu-
able historical data on race rela-
tions and the educational devel-
opment in the Bahamas.

Dr Keva Bethel, president
emerita of the College of the
Bahamas, and Dr Gail Saun-
ders, former director general of
Heritage, are the College’s first
resident scholars.

Scholars in residence pro-
grammes allow universities to
strengthen expertise and
enhance research capacity in
academic areas of particular sig-
nificance to those institutions.
They typically allow visiting
scholars to explore new dimen-
sions in their disciplines and cre-
ate unique opportunities for
intellectual engagement with the
university’s faculty and students.





uniquely positioned for this pro-
ject having been COB’s first
president, following 13 years as
the institution’s principal; the
only woman to have held that
post.

Dr Bethel will examine and
record significant events and
milestones in the first 35 years
of the institution’s history.

Concept

“The whole concept of the
(Scholars-in-Residence) Pro-
gramme, when you put aside
the personalities involved in this
instance, is a very important
reflection of the new dimension
that the College is taking on its
transition to university status,”

For the host university, such
work often leads to the enrich-
ment of existing courses or the
creation of new ones.

Dr Bethel and Dr Saunders
bring a combined experience
and expertise that spans decades
of important work in the

DR KEVA BETHEL

Bahamas, COB said.

Dr Bethel’s current work, a
two-year project, will study the
history of post-secondary edu-
cation in the Bahamas with par-

DR GAIL SAUNDERS

ticular emphasis on the history
of COB.

The veteran educator, who
has devoted some 50 years to
education in the Bahamas, is

Dr Bethel said.

“T think it can focus the pub-
lic’s understanding that we have
moved to a different stage in
our development and in addi-
tion to the instructional respon-
sibilities that we have had over
the years, we now value both

Concerned citizens form community outreach group to help youths in the area

FOR quite some time now the
Pinewood community has received a
lot of negative publicity for allegedly
being a haven for criminals, criminal
activity and violence. But residents in
the area want to change this.

A group of concerned citizens have
joined together and formed the
Pinewood Community Outreach
Group with the focus of bringing pos-
itive publicity to the area by creating
programmes and activities to occupy
the free time of the community’s
youth, thereby eliminating time for
negative influences.

“The facts do reveal that a high per-
centage of the country’s latest murders
and crimes have been committed by
Pinewood residents.

“This, however, does not mean that
Pinewood Gardens is completely a
terrible area. It is still a community of
hard working, sociable and caring cit-
izens,” the group said.

Pinewood Community Outreach is
partnering with the area’s Urban
Renewal Programme and many other
initiatives.

“Together we will use our resources
and present a ‘Stop the Violence
Community Festival’ under the theme
‘Bringing Peace Back to Pinewood’.
The event will be held on October 2
and 3 at the Pinewood Park.”

This event will incorporate a
junkanoo rush-out and marching
bands through the streets of
Pinewood. A family cultural show by

NOTICE

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If you or your loved ones have questions about

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Colage, a candle lighting and prayer
ceremony for crime victims and their
families will be held on Friday
evening, October 2.

Then on Saturday, October 3, a fun
day will be held.

Sunland Entertainment’s
“Pinewood Tittants” will host other
teams in a junior football competi-
tion. This will be followed by a concert
headlined by Erate which will include
performances by Christian Massive,
Land Lord and others.

“The event will also elevate social
interaction between all resident and
surrounding neighbourhoods as a
strong message is sent to the crimi-
nals in the community and to the gen-
eral public,” the outreach group said.

Research also into country’s educational development

the experience, knowledge and
research abilities of mature
scholars.”

Her research will investigate
the social imperatives and aspi-
rations that impacted the early
post-independence period when
the College was established;
including the prevailing reali-
ties and perceptions of educa-
tion in the Bahamas and edu-
cational opportunities for
Bahamians that governed that
time, and the kinds of changes
that eventually emerged.

Dr Saunders’ work, also a
two-year project, is for her
planned book ‘Race Relations
in the Colonial Bahamas’.

Calling the research neces-
sary and important, Dr Saun-
ders hopes to fuel greater dia-
logue on what for many remains
a compelling and sensitive issue.

“A lot of Bahamians don’t
like to discuss race because it
can be rather sensitive, but I
think we need to look at it dis-
passionately and objectively and

that’s what I hope to achieve,”
she said.

In-person interviews will be a
critical support to the docu-
mentary investigations she will
conduct.

“T just wish those things that
existed then were here. So many
of the people I really need to
interview are gone.

“T hope to travel to the major
islands to interview strategic
people, mainly senior citizens,
but some people in their 50s and
40s because their parents talked
to them.”

The Scholars in Residence
Programme is an important first
for The College, which has
placed great emphasis on build-
ing its research agenda.

The appointment of Dr
Bethel and Dr Saunders as the
first such scholars, each distin-
guished experts in their own
right, underscores the kind of
distinction the College places
on the programme, COB said.

It also underpins the impor-
tance the College places in
developing research in areas of
significance to development in
the Bahamas.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

Risk Manager

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the
organizational or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business
decisions through the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:

° Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program
in a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the
organization while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best
practices;
Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing
and estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the
business;
Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in
carrying out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;
Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;
Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;
Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and
implementing systems, policies, and procedures for the identification,
collection and analysis of risk related information, that is comparing
estimated risks with risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk
management;
Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some
regulatory bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bachelor’s degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KYC, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
Bank of The Bahamas
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced
environment
Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



International Coastal Cann Dayal Kanada success

STUDENTS from various
Grand Bahama schools came
together last week to partici-
pate in the International
Coastal Cleanup Day at
Xanadu Beach.

They were also were assisted
by members of the Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents. Zone cap-
tains Gail Woon of EARTH-
CARE and Cecilia Bodie of
Bahamas National Trust wel-
comed the eager students.

After being briefed on how
to fill out the data cards and
what sorts of items should not
be touched, the groups of four
and five set out to clean the
beach. The Ocean Conservancy
based in Washington, DC, coor-
dinates the massive worldwide
data gathering effort. The types
of marine debris found in each
area are noted on data cards
and the results are tabulated to
form a global report each year.

This year, the majority of
marine debris items consisted
of debris from shoreline and
recreational activities such as
fast food containers and
garbage left by beach-goers.

aa UP KINGS: Students show en ne

There were a variety of bever-
age bottles, cups, plates, forks
etc. Notable items included
underwear, tennis shoes, a
clothes hamper, a syringe, con-
doms, diapers and electrical
wire. Discarded fishing gear
included fishing lines, nets,
traps and rope.

The children were careful to
separate the aluminum cans for
recycling at Presto Recycling
on Queen’s Highway.

Ms Woon was impressed by
the turn-out on September 19.

“The weather was looking
like rain at 8am yet the students
were out in full force. We have
to thank the teachers, parents

UTILITIES REGULATION AWD COMPETITION AUTHORITY

URCA has recently published a

number of new documents that

are now available at URCA’s website

www.urcabahamas.bs

These inmcluche:

* Statement of Results - Retail Price Regulation Consultation
* Statement of Reaults - Access & Inbercennection Gansultation
* Merger Control - Procedural Guidance, Substantive Guidance, Regulation on Fees



and anyone who helped to get
the students out to all of the 12
beaches on Grand Bahama
island this year. This effort
would not happen without your
help and support,” she said.

Participants this year at
Xanadu Beach included stu-
dents from Mary Star of the
Sea School - the largest group
and quite possibly the most
experienced, with many chil-
dren being seasoned ICC beach
cleaners. The Hugh Campbell
Primary School always backs
this clean-up effort. The Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents also partici-
pated this year.

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Interested firms or individuals may collect a Tender
Specification from the BTC's security desk at John F.
Kennedy, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 5:30
p.m., Monday through Friday from September 18th,
2009,

The deadline for submission of tenders is Thursday Oc-
tober 2nd, 2009. Tenders should be sealed and marked
‘PROPOSAL FOR PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSISTANCE INI-
TIATIVES FOR THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED’ and should be delivered to the at
lention of {he ‘Mr. |. Kirk Griffin Acting President and
CEO.’

BIC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY,
OR ALL TENDERS

Reopening Thursday October 1st

PLEASE CALL FOR RESERVATIONS & INFORMATION 327 0965/327 0962



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



Top-seeded Satina,
Venus Williams
ousted in Japan }

TENNIS
TOKYO
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion Dinara
Safina and Venus Williams were
knocked out of the second round by
qualifiers at the Toray Pan Pacific
Open on Monday.

Chang Kai-chen, an 18-year-old
from Taiwan, upset the top-ranked
Safina 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5. Russian teenag-
er Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova edged
Williams 7-6 (6), 7-5 to reach the third
round.

Safina was serving for the match in
the third set when she double-faulted
to give up a break. Chang, ranked
132nd and playing only the fourth time
in a WTA main draw, held her serve
and broke Safina again for victory.

“The double-fault didn’t affect me
that much,” Safina said. “Whether it’s
a double-fault or a mistake it’s the
same. It’s just the way I played at 5-4.
It wasn’t the right game, I didn’t use
my first serve the whole game.”

A dejected Williams made a hasty
exit from Ariake Colosseum, saying
only she was looking forward to her
next match in Beijing.

Williams took a 3-0 lead in the first
set but the 18-year-old Pavlyuchenko-
va fought back, breaking Williams to
tie it 5-5 before holding serve and win-
ning the tiebreak.

Pavlyuchenkova hit a forehand
down the line to go up 6-5 in the sec-
ond set. She had a triple-match point in
the 12th game and won when Williams’
return was long.

Chang converted her third match
point on Safina’s forehand error after
the Russian had fought back from 0-40
to 30-40.

“On match point, I was just thinking
the same thing as always,” Chang said.
“T wasn’t thinking ’Oh, I have match

AMERICAN Venus Williams serves the ball
against Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Rus-
sia during their first round match in the
Pan Pacific Open tennis tournament.

a lot of matches but she follows the
live scoring, and I was thinking about

Aah

what she thought when she saw today’s

score,” Chang said.

point, ’'m going to win.”’

Chang said her thoughts turned to

her parents after the upset.

Chang made her Grand Slam debut
at this year’s U.S. Open, advancing to

the second round.

“My mother doesn’t get out to watch

Top sailing honour for the ‘Sea Wolf’

As the first Bahamian to
receive the recognition in sail-
ing, Knowles said he’s calling
on all of the other sporting
disciplines to come out and
support the event.

The organising committee
is headed by local journalist
Fred Sturrup and Jamaican
businessman Al Hamilton,
now living in London, Eng-
land. Hamilton, who serves
as a special advisor to the
Commonwealth Boxing
Council, also headed by Stur-
rup, has successfully ran the
Commonwealth Sports
Awards for the past 20 years.

Last year, the newly formed
CASI awards banquet includ-
ed netball. But this year, they
have decided to replace that
discipline with basketball.

Sturrup, who was the guest
speaker at the initial awards
banquet, said the event serves
as an opportunity to pay fun-
damental tribute to those
sports persons who have so
greatly boosted the image of
the Caribbean through sports
since the late 1940s.

Sturrup said they are hon-
oured, not just to have had
Knowles present for the press
conference, but to be able to
honour him as one of the two
living legends of the 1940s era
when he competed in the
Olympic Games for the
British Empire.

The other is George Rho-
den of Jamaica, who is one of
the nominees for the most
outstanding male track and
field athlete. Rhoden won the
400 metres in the 1948
Olympics in London, Eng-
land, and was on the 4 x 400
relay team that won the gold
in 1952 in Helsinki, Finland.

“It’s a tremendous tribute
to him and George Rhoden
for the longevity that they
both had,” Sturrup said.

Sturrup also thanked the
presidents of the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas — Wellington Miller,
Bahamas Basketball Federa-
tion, Lawrence Hepburn,
Bahamas Softball Federation,
Burkett Dorsett and the
Bahamas Boxing Commis-
sion, chaired by Pat ‘the Cen-
treville Assassin’ Strachan, for
endorsing the CAST 2009
Week.

The banquet is being organ-
ised by Hamilton, who along
with Sturrup and three other
individuals, will determine the

eventual winners from the list
of honourees for cricket, foot-
ball (soccer), athletics male,
athletics female, basketball,
boxing and
administrator/coach.

During the week of activi-
ties, Sturrup said each asso-
ciation/federation will organ-
ise a night of activities for
their various disciplines
before the awards banquet
takes place on Friday,
November 20.

Here’s the list of honourees

for the various disciplines:

Cricket - Sir Everton
Weekes (Barbados); Sir
Vivian Richards (Antigua);
Brian Lara (Trinidad & Toba-
go); Clive Lloyd (Guyana)
and Michael Holding
(Jamaica).

Football (soccer) - Clyde
Best (Bermuda); Dwight
Yorke (Trinidad & Tobago);
Leroy ‘Uncle Lee’ Archer
(Bahamas) and Theodore
Whitmore (Jamaica).

Athletics male - Javier
Sotomayor (Cuba); Lennox
Miller Jamaica); Troy Kemp
(Bahamas); Donald Quarrie
(Jamaica); Usain Bolt
(Jamaica); Wendell Motley
(Trinidad & Tobago); Hase-
ley Crawford (Trinidad &
Tobago) and George Rhoden
(Jamaica).

Athletics female - Tonique
Williams-Darling (Bahamas);
Merlene Ottey (Jamaica);
Shelly-Ann Fraser (Jamaica);
Bridgette Foster-Hylton
(Jamaica); Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie (Bahamas) and
Ana Fedelia Quirot (Cuba).

Basketball - Mychal ‘Sweet
Bells’ Thompson (Bahamas);
Patrick Ewing (Jamaica); Old-
en Polynice (Haiti); Rick Fox
(Bahamas) and Tim Duncan
(Virgin Islands).

Boxing - Emile Griffith
(Virgin Islands); Oswald
‘Elisha Obed’ Ferguson
(Bahamas); Tefelio Steven-
son (Cuba); Leslie Stewart
(Trinidad & Tobago);
Andrew Lewis (Guyana) and
Claude Noel (Trinidad &
Tobago).

Administrator/Coach - Glo-
ria Ballentine (St Vincent &
The Grenadines); Mike Fen-
nell (Jamaica); Anton Sealy
(Bahamas); Kathy Harper-
Hall (Barbados) and Richard
Peterkin (St. Lucia).

International Sailing Extra-
ordinaire - Sir Durward
Knowles (Bahamas)





es as

Koji Sasahara/AP Photos

- Dolphins await
_ lest results
_ on Pennington

? FOOTBALL
i DAVIE, Fla.
: Associated Press

WHILE the Miami Dol-

i phins await test results on
i injured quarterback Chad
i Pennington, teammates are
i braced for the possibility he
i won’t be back soon.

Pennington underwent

? tests Monday his right
i shoulder, which he hurt ear-
? ly in the third quarter of
? Sunday’s 23-13 loss at San
i Diego. He missed the rest
i of the game, and coach
i Tony Sparano says he does-
i n’t know how long Pen-
i nington will be sidelined.

_ Bills lose CB
| MeKelvin, §
_ Whither to injuries

! FOOTBALL
: ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
Associated Press

THE Bills secondary is

i minus two starters with cor-
i nerback Leodis McKelvin
i out indefinitely with a bro-
i ken bone in his leg and
i safety Donte Whitner
i requiring surgery to repair
i an injured thumb.

Coach Dick Jauron said

i Monday that McKelvin’s
i injury is the most serious
? and he isn’t sure when the
i player will return after he
i was hurt in the first half of a
i 27-7 loss to New Orleans
? on Sunday. Jauron said
i Whitner’s status will be
i monitored on a weekly
i basis, though the coach did
i not reveal the exact nature
i of the injury.

That means a defense

already missing starting
i middle linebacker Paul
i Poslusnzy (broken left

: arm), will be further deplet-

DINARA SAFINA of Russia reacts during her singles match against Chang Kai-chen of |: ed on Sunday when Buffalo

Taiwan at the Pan Pacific Open tennis tournament in Tokyo, Monday, Sept. 29, 2009. : (1-2) travels to play at Mia-

Chang won 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-5.

ColinalImperial

: mi (0-3).

The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-21 48)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray
Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis
Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams
Ruthesa Glendera Dean
Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Alma Clarke

Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes
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Clarence Rolle
Cleaver W. Robinson
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Cynthia Wilson
Dedrick Storr
Derek Nottage
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Francina Scott
Francis Clarke
Frederica Hamilton
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George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle
Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee
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Kardeo Heild

Kevin Remond Culmer
Kirkwood Campbell
Laytoya Cargill-Gray
Leila Wood

Lorenzo M. Carroll
Malriae Lauree Ferguson
Mavis Vanderpool
Melissa Evans
Michael White
Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Mervin Dean

Mervin J. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
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Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

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Shannon Akira Butterfield
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Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

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Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha © Brien
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Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Vixens roll over Truckers, Defenders defeat Technicians in five sets

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association opened its 2009 season
on Sunday at the D W Davis Gym-
nasium with both defending cham-
pions executing their game plans to
pull off nail-biting, thrilling victo-
ries.

In the women’s match, Cheryse
Rolle once again led the Scottsdale
Vixens over the Lady Truckers by
scoring a game high 13 kills in the 25-
17, 25-20 and 25-19 win.

In a losing effort, Kelsie Johnson
led the Lady Truckers with six kills

and two blocks.
Action

Over to the men’s action, it took
five exciting sets for the Scotiabank
Defenders to defeat the Technicians



VOLLEYBALL

20-25, 25-22, 25-22, 24-26 and 15-9.
Shedrick Forbes and Ian ‘Wire’
Pinder led the Defenders with 17

and 16 kills respectively.

Maurice ‘Cheeks’ Smith con-
tributed 29 excellent passes.

In a losing effort, Jamaal Ferguson
led the technicians with 13 kills.
Adalbert Ingraham contributed
eight.

Royal
Bahamas
Defence
Force track
competition

FROM page 11

Togs conmrcnayeto fal WHoeEo

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

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1998 Ford F-250)/0 Truth
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Charlie and Delta. Over the
past few years, the Delta team
has been the powerhouse of
the RBDF.

But this night belonged to
the Bravo team, which domi-
nated the overall event with a
total of 404 points, followed
by Charlie, then Delta third
and Alpha fourth.

Marine Seaman James
Carey of the Charlie Team
was voted most outstanding
male athlete.

Woman Marine Michelle
Colebrooke, also a member
of the Bravo team, placed first
in the long jump, 400 meters,
and was a member of the win-
ning 4 x 400 female relay
team.

She also placed third in the
100 meters and the 4 x 100
female relay team competi-
tions. Carey was victorious
in the 400 meters, and placed
in the 200, long jump and 4x
100 meter relay events.

There were special races for
the children of members of
the RBDF, whose ages
ranged from 5-13. They ran
in various races geared just
for them. Parents, athletes
and spectators all cheered the
children on, as they ran their
races with pride and determi-
nation.

There were also special
races for the officers and
marines in different weight
classes.

“The night was successful
and exciting,” said organiser
of the event, petty officer
Ramone Storr. “The support
from especially the athletes
was of a high magnitude and
based on their performances,
this year’s event was one of
the best ever.

“We definitely look for-
ward to continue having big-
ger and better track and field
events in the future.”

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Vehicles can be viewed at Perpall Tract from 7:00 a.m. and
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| 2045
_ 442

:
[1007] :

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cated at #21 John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau Bahamas, Bids
should be received by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, September 30,
2009. Bids are to be clearly marked, “Used & Salvaged Ve-
hicles” and should be addressed to the attention of:

Mr. | Kirk Griffin

ACTING PRESIDENT & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
#21 John F. Kennedy Drive, P.O. Box N-3048, Nassau N.P., Bahamas

BTC RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY, OF





TOP — RBDF officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and
field competition at Thomas A Robinson sports stadium.

ABOVE — Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the over-
all event with a total of 404 points...

Photos by Leading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

In-house clinic for
basketball officials

THE New Providence Association of Basketball Offi-
cials (NPABO) is proud to officially announce that it will be
implementing a number of programmes in an effort to
update, re-certify and reclassify its present membership.
This undertaking will take on the form of an in-house clin-
ic of three sessions (theoretical) and on court evaluations
(practical) of each official.

The mentioned ‘in-house clinic' and workshops is sched-
uled to be held October 1-6 at the residence of Tony
Williams, president of the NPABO, on Lumumba Drive,
Fox Hill.

Each evening session is slated to begin at 7pm. The prac-
tical aspect will scrutinize rule interpretations and floor
mechanics during the upcoming series of the Bankers Ath-
letic Association Basketball League.

Williams will serve as the chief clinician, Norman 'Mouch'
Humes as clinician and Melchoir Francis, interpreter and
chairman of the education committee, will perform the
duties of assistant clinician.

Of note is that the former two gentlemen have a wealth of
knowledge and experience in rules and regulations of FIBA,
having attended many clinics and seminars abroad with
regards to rules and having attained the status of becoming
international certified referees.

The ‘spotters’ will be Sharon Storr and Chris Saunders of
the NPABO's education committee.

The NPABO offers this course of study as another serious
and deliberative step to prepare its membership for the
highest level of competency in the interpreting and admin-
istrating of FIBA rules and regulations.

The intent is to create a unified approach and continue to
develop ‘professionalism’ in the officiating of basketball in
the country. On the completion of this exercise, an intense
qualification and certification course will be offered for
new candidates and/or former referees.

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‘I too brought my package
but was overlooked...”

am too and I will succeed soon,” he projected.

Stubbs, a Bahamasair pilot and former basketball player,
thanked the Bahamian public who supported him both at
home and while he was on the road.

“Tt’s not an easy one but with God spear heading my path-
way, I believe my day will come and come real soon,” Stubbs
noted. “Thanks for the prayers and encouraging words I receive
from the many friends and fans. May God continue to pour out
his many blessings upon your lives.”

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baw AMET oT
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THE TRIBUNE

S
- a h a
TUESDAY,

SIR DURWARD KNOWLES

PAGE 11





‘T too brought my
package but was
overlooked...”

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH he didn’t
achieve his goal of making
the top 10, 42-year-old Joel
Stubbs felt he performed
very well against the 22-
man field at Mr Olympia
in Las Vegas, Nevada, over
the weekend.

“This was considered the
greatest and most highly
contested competition in
the history of the Mr
Olympia showdown,”
Stubbs said. “The compe-
tition was intense and com-
petitive.

“Some would of figure it
was very hard to judge
because all the bodies were
so sharp, conditioned and
detailed for battle. I too
brought my package but
was overlooked.”

Stubbs finished tied with
six other competitors for
16th place with a total of
80 points from the first two
rounds. They didn’t
advance to the final two
rounds where the top com-
petitors were determined.

“T didn’t get a proper
chance to be compared to
some of the top body-
builders unfortunately,”
Stubbs reflected. “At this
Olympia showdown, every-
one placed ahead of me
had either won an IFBB
show this season or was the
runner up.

“That was how tough the
show was. But I’m happy
with my placing and the
opportunity to display my
physique to the world as I
see it. As long as you have
made improvements to
your body each time you
compete, you are already
a winner, as it is a major
accomplishment.”

This was Stubbs’ first
appearance on the biggest
stage in the sport and he
noted that the atmosphere
was more than he had
anticipated.

“ve been there many

Mumia



JOEL STUBBS

times but sitting in the are-
na watching,” he said.
“However this time I was
one of them looking down
on the audience and having
fun.

“Tt’s just so overwhelm-
ing to see fans from all
around the world just
screaming out your name
as you perform. Also there
was a Bahamian contin-
gent that followed my foot
steps here to lend the sup-
port and encouragement.”

As he reflects on the
show, Stubbs said he’s
eager to work on the areas
that he felt was a major
downfall for him in his
quest to get back on the
elite stage next year.

“As you would study the
pictures you would see that
the upper body is super
massive and can’t be touch
but the quads still need to
catch up,” he said. “So I
would say I need to work
on more quadriceps mus-
cles. They are improving
so don’t count me out just
yet.”

Now that the champi-
onship is over, Stubbs said
he will take a much needed
break to recuperate, then
it’s back in the gym to pre-
pare for next year.

“T just haven’t given up
as yet and I hope everyone
is still holding the faith as I

SEE page 10

r

‘ts

SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

for th

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hroughout his career, Sir
Durward ‘Sea Wolf’
Knowles has received a
number of accolades. But
he said he’s thrilled that he
has been considered for a CASI award.

The Caribbean Awards Sports Icon
Foundation is expected to honour
Knowles for international sailing during
the week of November 15-20 in the
Bahamas.

Included in the activities is a four-day
schedule of basketball, softball, boxing
and a grand awards banquet to be held at
host resort Superclubs Breezes, Cable
Beach.

During a press conference yesterday at
the hotel, Knowles said this is definitely
the highest award he has achieved and
he’s delighted to be included.

“T never heard about this until it was
held in Jamaica and I went there,” said



Top-seeded Safina,
Venus Williams
ousted in Japan

See page 9

1 y
Sea Wolf



SHOWN (I-r) are Al Hamilton, Sir Durward Knowles, Fred Sturrup and Pat Strachan...

Knowles, referring to the initial awards ed, I’m an individual that appreciates

banquet held last year in Kingston, anytime that ’m being honoured. This is

Jamaica. one of the most outstanding honours that
“But I know Bahamians recognise it I have ever received.”

and since Fred (Sturrup) and Al (Hamil-

ton) decided that sailing would be includ- SEE page 9

Bravo team dominates

WITH guts and determina-
tion, the men and women of
Bravo Team vowed to
dethrone the Delta Team dur-
ing the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force (RBDF) track
and field competition at
Thomas A Robinson sports nari
stadium.

al Security Tommy Turn-
quest, RBDF commodore
Clifford Scavella and other
senior defence officers,
attended the annual event,
featuring the officers and
marines showcasing their ath-
letic prowess in track and
field.

Athletes were grouped into
four teams — Alpha, Bravo,

SEE page 10

——r< i
. A hi
A number of dignitaries, | rei | |
including Minister of Nation- = [77 =





TOP — RBDF women officers compete in this year’s Defence Force track and field competition at Thomas
A Robinson sports stadium.
ABOVE — Bravo team members celebrate after dominating the overall event with a total of 404 points...

Photos by Leading Seaman Jonathan Rolle

























































BASKETBALL
ADDERLEY/
FERGUSON
TOURNEY

THE Archdiocese of
Nassau has announced
that their sixth annual
Deacon Leviticus ‘Uncle
Low’ Adderley and Vin-
cent Ferguson All Catholic
Basketball Tournament is
scheduled to take place
over the weekend of Octo-
ber 9-12 at Loyola Hall,
Gladstone Road.

The first game is set to
be played at 7:45 pm. This
year’s tournament will be
a very special one as it
comes right on the heels
of the death and burial of
the late Ferguson, one of
the two honourees.

Ferguson, 71, died last
Wednesday. His funeral
service is slated for 2pm
Thursday at St Francis
Cathedral. A memorial
service is set for 7:30pm
tonight at Loyola Hall.
Adderley has been
deceased for a number of
years.

VOLLEYBALL
NPVA
REGISTRATION

WITH the 2009 season
underway, DeVince
Smith, president of the
New Providence Volley-
ball Association, is
reminding all teams that
their rosters must be sub-
mitted by today as the
deadline has already
expired.

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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Bridgewater’s meeting with Travolta lawyer secretly recorded’

Two women
charged in
pilot murder

FROM page one

in his Golden Palms Estates
home, near Kennedy subdi-
vision, shortly after 4am on
Sunday, September 29. He
was shot several times.
McQueen was engaged to be
married in February next
year.

McKenzie and Knowles,
who appeared before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez in
Court 1, Bank Lane, were not
required to enter a plea to the
murder charge.

They have also been
charged with the attempted
murder of McQueen’s cousin
and roommate, Martez Saun-
ders, who was also shot mul-
tiple times. It is alleged that
the women while armed with
handguns and being con-
cerned with others intention-
ally caused McQueen’s death
and attempted to cause the
death of Saunders. McKenzie
and Knowles are also accused
of conspiring to rob McQueen
and Saunders. They are also
accused of conspiring to rob
Enan Hanna, and robbing
him of a $260 Motorola cellu-
lar phone, and $150 cash.

The accused were not
required to enter a plea to the
charges and were remanded
to her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill. The case was adjourned
to October 6 and transferred
to Court 5, Bank Lane.

TV thieves strike
FROM page one

tion about the theft should
call police urgently on 911,
919 or call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

que

Bereard fd ~ Macher si - [boarpeen Bird

FROM page one

Lightbourne are accused of attempting
to extort $25 million from the 55-year-
old actor in January of this year.
Detective Inspector Sean Saunders
told the court yesterday that Michael
McDermott — an attorney for the
Travoltas — consented to wearing a
body wire, as well as having police set
up hidden cameras and recording
devices in his hotel room.

Inspector Saunders testified that
on January 18, he and ASP Ricardo
Taylor met with Mr McDermott at his
room (328) in the Sheraton Hotel,
Cable Beach. He told the court that
Mr McDermott consented to having
police record conversations from his
telephone. He said that a recorder was
connected to the telephone and short-
ly afterwards Mr McDermott made a
phone call. Inspector Saunders said
that the voice mail came on and Mr
McDermott left a message. Mr
McDermott, he said, then made
another phone call and this time a

man answered. Inspector Saunders
told the court that Mr McDermott
spoke to the man and subsequently, a
woman, who identified herself as
“Pleasant,” came on the phone.

Inspector Saunders also told the
court that the next day, he, ASP Tay-
lor and Detective Sergeant 1492 Fer-
guson went back to Mr McDermott’s
hotel room. He said that after speak-
ing with Mr McDermott, he config-
ured a transmitter with concealed
cameras and a microphone in the
room.

“Mr McDermott gave consent to
record all video and audio of his
room,” Inspector Saunders said. The
Inspector told the court that the adja-
cent room (326) was used as a moni-
toring point. According to Inspector
Saunders, Mr McDermott consented
to having himself outfitted with a body
wire to monitor all of his conversa-
tions. Inspector Saunders said that

sometime around 10.20 am on January
19, Mr McDermott left his hotel room,
returning five minutes later with a
woman. Inspector Saunders told the
court that he recognised the woman to
be Pleasant Bridgewater. He testified
that a recording was made of the
meeting between Bridgewater and Mr
McDermott. Ronald Zupancic, a
longtime employee and friend of Mr
Travolta, said that on January 13, he
received a phone call from attorney
Michael McDermott.

“He told me he had been contacted
by an attorney from Nassau named
Pleasant Bridgewater,” he said.
According to Mr Zupancic, Mr
McDermott told him that Bridgewater
had a client — the ambulance driver
— who was the first to arrive at the
scene at Old Bahama Bay on Janu-
ary 2. According to Mr Zupancic, Mr
McDermott told him that the man had
a document that he claimed was

“incriminating to John Travolta” and
was going to release the information to
the international media if $25 million
was not paid.

Mr Zupancic said that on January
16, he told Mr Travolta what Mr
McDermott had said regarding the
threat and phoned Mr McDermott on
what Mr Travolta had said. During
cross-examination by Mr Ducille, Mr
Zupancic admitted that he had acted
as an intermediary between Mr Tra-
volta and Mr McDermott, but that he
did not know Bridgewater.

The trial resumes today before
Senior Justice Anita Allen.

Bridgewater is represented by
attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta
Smith. Mr Lightbourne is represented
by attorney Carlson Shurland and
Mary Bain. Director of Public Prose-
cutions Bernard Turner, Neil Brath-
waite and Garvin Gaskin are prose-
cuting the case.



FROM page one

islands will be worthless if
travel cannot be provided at
competitive prices.

The current cost of air trav-
el is so high customers can fly
from Miami to Montego Bay,
Puerto Rico or Las Vegas for
the same price as a ticket to
Grand Bahama, Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said yesterday,

But a new promotion is
advertising tickets to Grand
Bahama from $19 one-way,
and rooms at Our Lucaya are
available from just $35 per
night.And new aviation routes
can bring up to 293,320 more
airline passengers to Nassau
next year, and 39,520 to
Grand Bahama, that is a total
of 383,280 more visitors fly-
ing into the country.

Plans are in place to reduce
the cost of airfares by drop-
ping airport landing and han-
dling fees, and the $400 mil-
lion renovation of the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport will make it an effi-
cient centre where people can
move easily to the Out
Islands, the Minister said.

He added: “It’s very impor-
tant for us to get aggressive
in terms of competing with
what’s out there.

“Affordable accessible air
service is absolutely critical.

“Infrastructure is critically
important. We have to put the
infrastructure in place to

Tourism

make sure that the promotion
works. “Imagine Paradise
Island without the bridges? If
we had to go by boats and the
boats only go every six hours?

“Each of the airline flights
is like a bridge, and if it was
$1 all of a sudden we would
all go. On the day we do that
Iam confident we are going
to see some extraordinary
changes.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is
also keen to lower rates of
accommodation and travel in
the Family Islands to encour-
age domestic tourism, and he
said that will follow when the
number of visitors increases.

Tourists visiting Grand
Bahama fell by 27.5 per cent
last year, and by 24.9 per cent
in the Family Islands in 2008,
while air arrivals to the
Bahamas dropped by 13.8 per
cent. Keeping the tourism
industry afloat during the
recession are the cruise lines
which offer affordable pack-
age deals from a fast increas-
ing number of ports opening
in the United States.

Around 70 per cent of
cruises from these ports on
the east coast of the US sail
exclusively to the Bahamas,
and Nassau has around two
million cruise passengers dock
at its port each year, with 19.9
per cent of visitors to Nassau

and Paradise Island arriving
by cruise ship.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace is
keen to net the potential rev-
enue presented by these stop-
over visitors by developing
downtown Nassau and
increasing opening hours for
shops and restaurants.

He said: “We’re not in the
business of counting heads,
what’s most important is stop
over visitor numbers.

“The total visitor number
is irrelevant because we want
to take more about the econ-
omy of the Bahamas rather
than head count.”

However the number of
stopover visitors also fell last
year and by the end of Janu-
ary had dropped by 63,000,
with 33,000 less in the Family
Islands and 25,988 fewer in
Grand Bahama.

There are no solid projec-
tions of visitor numbers for
the upcoming winter months
because it is still not clear
what shape the recession will
take, or how long it will last,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said.

In the meanwhile the min-
istry will continue to work
behind the scenes, by open-
ing a 1-800-Bahamas call cen-
tre, bringing in film crews to
document the different
islands, encouraging sports
teams of all kinds to compete
in the country, and working
on reducing energy costs to
be more competitive with oth-
er destinations in the region.

Two men charged with possession of dangerous drugs

FROM page one

appeared in Court 1 before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

It is alleged the accused
men were found in possession
of a large quantity of illegal
drugs at an apartment com-
plex in Freeport. Miller and
Brown pleaded not guilty to
possession of dangerous drugs
with intent to supply. Brown
was granted $20,000 bail.
Miller was denied bail. The

case was adjourned to March
23 for trial in Court 2.

FIREARM CHARGE

An American man was
charged with possession of an
unlicensed firearm and
ammunition in Magistrate’s
Court on Monday.

William Stephanos, 31, a
US citizen and a resident of
Florida, appeared before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

It is alleged on September

27, the accused attempted to
leave the Bahamas on a flight
at Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport to Florida
when an unlicensed firearm
was allegedly found in his lug-
gage. Stephanos pleaded
“guilty” to the charges. He
was fined $3,000 or two years
imprisonment. He was also
fined $3,000, or one year in
prison on the ammunition
possession charge, the sen-
tences to run concurrently.

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New date for National Tourism
Week, Cacique Awards

FROM page one

industry will be held every two years from January 2011, instead
of annually as in previous years, ministry officials said in a
press conference at the British Colonial Hilton in Nassau.

In the absence of the events the ministry will undertake a
review of the week to determine its effectiveness and implement
necessary changes.

The break will also allow possible Cacique award nominees
the opportunity to hone their talents and skills, Permanent
Secretary Hyacinth Pratt said.

And it will give the general public more time to identify
and gather information about individuals and organisations
that should to be nominated for the prestigious tourism award,
she said. Ms Pratt also said that part of the motivation for
holding the events every two years is the smaller number of peo-
ple now involved in the event.

She said: “Now the pool is not as great we decided to hold it
every two years to allow people to better hone their skills.

“The new National Tourism Week is expected to bring even
greater focus to discussions of national issues that are critical to
the Bahamas’ tourism-based economy.

“The Ministry of Tourism and Aviation remains committed
to the advancement of tourism through meaningful input on
tourism matters from all residents and looks forward to the
return of the National Tourism Week and the Cacique Awards
in 2011.”

The Cacique Awards is held in conjunction with the Bahamas
Hotel Association and rewards individuals and businesses
across the tourism sector.

RT TT Wa SET

TT AROSE CUCL

FROM page one



lands, why the applicants in question all used the same lawyer
and realtor for the transactions.

This was revealed by David Davis, permanent secretary in the
Office of the Prime Minister and the Ministry of Land and
Local Government, during the first day of sworn statements
before the House of Assembly's Select Committee on Crown
Land. "There was great public commentary on the matter, in
the interest of being able to respond sensibly to the public the
(former) director was called in by the minister responsible for
lands and asked to explain a number of things. . .(such as)
how did these applications move through the system so quick-
ly when there are others in the queue? Was it just coinci-
dence?

"How did all of these lands end up being listed with the
same realtor, is that a coincidence? How did the same lawyer
happen to deal with all of these transactions, is that a coinci-
dence? The then director was unable to give what the minister,
in my view, deemed were satisfactory answers and so he was
invited to resign," said Mr Davis, before a packed room of
observers yesterday.

Controversy

Mr Turnquest resigned from the department in May amidst
a flurry of controversy stemming from allegations of corruption
and nepotism within the department. The move came after a
series of articles in The Tribune revealed that relatives of the
former director — including his mother-in-law — were grant-
ed prime beach-front Crown land in Exuma for less than $2,500
between 2001 and 2003.

Responding to a question put to him by Committee Chair
Fred Mitchell, Mr Davis said there was no way the Ministry of
Lands and Surveys could have known that five beach-front
lots in Exuma were granted to a few of Mr Turnquest's relatives.

Mr Davis added that the relatives in question did not breach
any ministry policy because as Bahamians they are "entitled to
apply in the normal course."

Audley Greaves, the department's under-secretary, added
that Mr Turnquest's relatives were a small number of persons
who were processed at that time, adding that only the individ-
uals concerned would have known their relationship to the
ex-director. But Mr Davis said the department is considering
amending the application for Crown land grants to allow space
for applicants to disclose if they are public officers, retiring or
retired public officers, or, if applicable, which public officers
they are related to in the Department of Lands and Surveys.

The speed at which the applications in question moved
through the system drew the attention of ministry officials,
Mr Davis said. He added that red flags were also raised when
four of the properties — which had been granted on the expec-
tation that they would be used to build second homes — were
"flipped" to foreigners a few years later for more than $550,000.

When asked if the ministry could prevent undeveloped
Crown land from being "flipped", Mr Davis said he did not
know if it was legal to place conditions on what persons could
do with their property.

Mr Davis said that the four parcels of land in question are the
only ones that have been investigated by officials but it was
unlikely that others approved during the same time period
were "flipped", because they were not prime property.

The land in question was granted during a government exer-
cise to approve applications for persons who wanted to build
retirement homes on the family islands, many of whom had gen-
erational ties or leases to the property.

In addition to Mr Davis and Mr Greaves, the Acting Direc-
tor of Lands Richard Hardy also testified before the commit-
tee yesterday.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

tlantis does not expect
its important group
travel business to
recover until 2011 or
2012, and has not seen
a turnaround from extensive market-

THE TRIBUNE

Us

TUESDAY,



ing campaigns, Kerzner International
(Bahamas) president and managing

director told Tribune Business yester-

day.

George Markantonis confirmed that
room occupancy levels have been as
low as 30 per cent at the Paradise



THE ATLANTIS resort on Paradise Island

Island-based resort for the month of
September, with employee work
weeks drastically reduced and staff
asked to take two weeks’ mandatory
unpaid vacation to cut costs.

SEPTEMBER 29,

However, despite the depressed
business environment, Mr Markanto-
nis also denied rumours of further lay-
offs at Atlantis, saying it would not be
wise to make preemptive announce-
ments of redundancy exercises in the

ness

2009

media.

He was responding to claims in
some business and high society circles
in Nassau that Kerzner International
was preparing to lay-off between 1,000-
1800 workers at its Paradise Island

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Atlantis: No group rebound until 2011/12

* Occupancy levels fall as low as 30% in September,
with staff on one and two-day weeks and mandatory
two weeks’ unpaid vacation in effect

* Promotional campaigns yet to have desired effect

properties. Two sources have repeated

such claims to Tribune Business in the
past week, but the numbers being
speculated on appear somewhat on

SEE page 5B

Miss Universe bill ‘$10m less’ for Bahamas than others

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE FINAL domestic bill
for the Miss Universe Pageant
was almost $10 million less than
most former host countries
have spent on the US orginated
pageant, the Ministry of
Tourism revealed yesterday,
while touting the benefits to
the Bahamas as “priceless”.

Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation, Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace, said the Bahamas has
never received the kind of glob-
al exposure the Miss Universe
Pageant provided, with up to
115 million individuals reached

Nation spent $5.8m on pageant, and ‘won many battles’ for organiser concessions

through the worldwide broad-
cast event.

According to Mr Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace, the
Bahamas spent $5.8 million to
host the Pageant. He said Viet-
nam spent around $15 million
to host the event in 2008.

The Bahamas also negotiat-
ed certain concessions with the
event coordinators that had
never been given to former
host countries.

Director-General at the Min-
istry of Tourism, Vernice
Walkine, said she personally

Regulators back
‘no interconnect
fee’ for local calls

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REGULATORS have
agreed with arguments by
the Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company’s (BTC)
only legal fixed-line com-
petitor that the state-owned
incumbent should not
impose interconnection
charges on its rivals for the
termination of free local,
“intra-island” calls.

Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems
Resource Group (SRG),
parent of IndiGo Networks,
warned that if BTC was
allowed to impose intercon-
nection charges on rival
operators for terminating
local calls from their net-
work, “the effect would be
fatal to competition”.

In SRG’s response to the
Government’s consultation
on access and interconnec-
tion issues in the communi-
cations industry, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said former regu-
lator, the Public Utilities
Commission (PUC), had
never implemented the prin-
ciple that interconnection
and access charges should be
cost-orientated.

BS a

Rival fears that if BTC
imposes charge on other
operators for free local
call termination on its
network, ‘effect would
be fatal to competition’

Instead, it had argued that
since accurate cost informa-
tion could not be obtained
from BTC, access and inter-
connection charges should
be ‘retail minus’.

“This situation has exist-
ed for five years, and has
served to significantly distort
the market to the detriment
of the new entrant and the
consumer, and to the advan-
tage of the dominant opera-
tor,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

Pointing out that the
access and interconnection
consultation was silent on
how cost information would
be obtained, audited and the
timeframe for this, the SRG
president nevertheless
agreed with the notion that
an operator should not ‘dou-
ble dip’ - charging a cus-

SEE page 6B

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lobbied for 2008-2009 Miss
Universe, Dayana Mendoza, to
hold her final “adventures” as
queen here in the Bahamas,
something she said organisers
of the pageant seldom do.

She also fought for the con-
testants to visit several of the
islands as a part of the final
nine-minute package the
Bahamas received during
Pageant night, and pushed for
the National Youth Choir’s
finale performance following
the crowing of the 2009-2010
queen.

Firms warned:

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN employers
have been warned that failure
to pay the correct amount of
severance pay to laid-off
employees will lead to wrongful
dismissal legal actions, a Higgs
& Johnson partner saying she
“goes to court on a lot of cases
of this type”.

Tara Archer, addressing a
Nassau-based seminar staged
by the law firm, said: “It is
incumbent on the employer to
pay the correct amount of sev-
erance pay to the employee to
avoid ending up in litigation.

“Should not the correct
amount be paid, you could find

PNG Oe

There have been numerous
critics of the Government’s
investment in the Miss Uni-
verse pageant. Some local web-
sites have criticised the Gov-
ernment for not revealing the
total cost of the pageant only
weeks after its conclusion,
alleging that government may
have spent upwards of $10 mil-
lion.

Local entertainment leaders
also criticised the Government
for the lack of local talent dur-
ing the broadcast.

Ms Walkine said the pro-

duction side of the pageant,
which is marketed to young
women between 13 and 30, is
out of the hands of the host
country. Inevitably, she con-
tended, the host country is sim-
ply that.

However, she asserted that
the negotiations put forth by
the Bahamas government for
the coverage received was more
than any former host countries
have been afforded in the past.

“You have to choose your
battles,” said Ms Walkine. “My
battles were won.”

Make correct severance pay

legal action [taken against you]
for wrongful dismissal.”

Ms Archer recommended
that Bahamian employers and
companies consult their attor-
neys on the amount of sever-
ance pay that should be paid to
terminated/laid-off employees,
as the total sum was “not clear
cut”.

Apart from the statutory pay
stipulated by the Employment
Act, laid-off employees were
also entitled to payment for
unused vacation time, contrac-
tual bonuses, other benefit pay-
ments and any allowances they
had been enjoying, such as gas
and meal allowances, during
their notice period if they
worked it out. National Insur-

ance Board (NIB) contribu-
tions also needed to be deduct-
ed for employees during their
notice period.

In addition, under the
Employment Act laid-off
employees at companies where
they had a pension plan have
to choose between taking their
pension entitlement or accept-
ing statutory severance pay.
Parliament seemingly passed
the law requiring employees to
make that choice in order to
not over-burden companies
with severance costs.

Ms Archer said it was critical
for employers “to have clear,
concise employment contracts”

SEE page 3B

Sure you'll win the Lotto!
oat ad a ee

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace sug-
gested that the private sector
rallied to assist the Govern-
ment in making the pageant a
success for the country, and
keeping total overall public
expenditure low.

He also surmised that some
capital works projects and pri-
vate maintenance projects may
not have gotten done without
the impending arrival of the
Miss Universe delegation.

“There were some things we
were trying to get done for
years,” he said.

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLONAY INVESTMENT LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FUZZY VISSION CORP.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
















Legal Notice

NOTICE

JAGUAR LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DIMARI HOLDINGS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ADAMS INVESTMENTS HOLDINGS

LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Fixing crime’s threat
to nation’s well-being

FOR several weeks now, I
have been struggling with writ-
ing an article that reflects the
utter despair about the state of
crime. Violent crimes, such as
homicide, are now a daily fix-
ture in our lives. I have been
shocked at how pervasive, but
so far private, the level of out-
rage is in our society over this
situation.

Lack of Public Outrage

If a general election were to
be held today, I believe there
would be numerous political
casualties because of the crime
situation. Admittedly, howev-
er, if you look at public state-
ments only, issues such as the
proposed marital rape law and
the removal of the casuarina
trees from public beaches have

Financial

Focus



seemingly gathered more trac-
tion than concerns over the
steady diet of shootings and
stabbings that we are being fed
on a daily basis. It is the lack of
public outrage that is conspicu-
ously absent. What does it take
for churches, community organ-
isations, civic and service clubs
to develop a consistent voice?
One school of thought is that
if those credible voices are
silent, then we should not criti-
cise the Government for seem-
ingly doing far too little. How-

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ever, the other school of
thought suggests that when the
sheer outrage over crime gal-
vanises into cohesive voices, the
political leadership will have
problems on its hands. The
Government of the day must
be seen to be doing more about
crime. They must demonstrate
that:

* They recognise crime as a
major problem

* That they are committed
to reducing the level of violent
crime

* They are prepared to make
the required changes

* They are up to the task of
doing something about it

This seemingly docile
approach to crime, which is a
cause of concern throughout
the nation, is simply ‘not cut-
ting it’.

Police Frustration

In speaking with a senior
police officer recently, he
admitted that a high level of
frustration exists within the
force over the number of crim-
inals charged with the most
serious offences, who are being
given bail and committing new
offences while on bail. His basic
question was: “How many
times do they have to pick up
the same person only to see him
on bail a few months later per-
petrating new crimes”? This
situation is most demoralising
to say the least.

The current situation
demands that we try new ideas.
Major US cities have had sig-
nificant success in reducing
their crime rate. Why can’t we
replicate some of those suc-
cessful initiatives? Why haven’t
we tried curfews? Curfews
would certainly reduce move-
ment on the streets at night. I
am told that many would resist
curfews because the perception
arising from their imposition
could hurt tourism, but my
question is: “How many young
Bahamians are we prepared to
let die on the streets before we
deal with the problem at

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hand”?

When it is someone else’s
child being gunned down or
stabbed, it is easy to dismiss the
problem. However, when the
crime comes into your neigh-
borhood or directly affects your
family, then it becomes an issue
in need of attention. Crime
should not have to become per-
sonalised before the nation
recognises it for what it is...a
severe problem that threatens
our national well-being. Our
economic lifeblood depends
upon foreign investment. Are
we so naive as to believe that
potential investors (both for-
eign and domestic) are not
being frightened by the level of
crime in our society?

While the Police Force, as an
organisation, has it problems,
it has many professional and
dedicated officers working in a
system than is less than opti-
mal. I am not sure it has the
tools, manpower and other
resources necessary to complete
the job at hand. However, this
is not a determination for me to
make, but rather one for the
force hierarchy and the Gov-
ernment to make.

Court System

We must fix the courts sys-
tem immediately. Last year
there were just under 80 mur-
ders, and the number of murder
cases concluded in 2008 was less
than 20. That leaves a deficit
of more than 60 cases for 2008
alone. Further analysis shows
that of those cases concluded,
they were for offences commit-
ted about three years ago, on
average.

On one hand we are build-
ing up a significant backlog of
untried murder and other crim-
inal cases, while on the other
hand our courts are simultane-
ously over-taxed. Why can’t we
bring in temporary judges (be
they local or foreign) for a fixed
period to clear the backlog of
serious criminal cases? Just as
we can provide temporary
accommodations for the Privy
Council, we can create tempo-
rary criminal courts. After six
months, let us then assess the
impact this initiative has had
on the backlog of criminal cas-
es.

If we are going to follow a
Privy Council ruling that says
“one is entitled to a bail hearing
if no charges are brought with-
in three months”, then we must
‘step up our game’ to ensure
that our criminal justice system
is more efficient.

Weak Economy

Finally, as the economy con-
tinues to weaken and more
people are displaced from the
workforce, the prospect of
increased levels of criminal
activity is real. What may start
out as a petty robbery can eas-
ily end up as a homicide. The
short-term prognosis is not
encouraging, as we have not
seen the worst of the economic
downturn yet.

Urgent Action Required

A blind man can see that
urgent action is required, yet
to the average observer it
appears that the Government
is not seeing it. If something
substantial is being done, it
must be communicated to the
public at large.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst, is
vice-president - pensions, Colo-
nial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

TH

ARs
WAT

ia aT
ME
Mondays



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 , PAGE 3B



OOo eeu NESS eee
Bahamas to get 383,000 extra airline seats

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A FALL-OFF in group
arrivals to the Bahamas has
stymied the Government’s abil-
ity to forecast arrival numbers,
the Minister of Tourism and
Aviation said yesterday,

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said he could not say what
the winter tourism season - the
high season - will be like for
the Bahamas, but lamented
that the numbers have been
scattered.

Mr Vanderpool- Wallace
alluded to a drastic decline this

FIRMS, from 1B

stipulating staff job descrip-
tions, pay and benefits, and that
these be reviewed continually -
on an annual basis.

She explained that if an
employee had been promoted
through several positions since
joining a company, and the
employment contract had not
been renewed, the courts would
look at the present terms of
employment - not the contract -
if a dispute arose.

Ms Archer also advised
employers to “obtain a signed
declaration of release” from
laid-off employees once they
had received their severance
pay to stop them bringing any
legal action against the compa-
ny.
“aaathes common area of
dispute surrounding lay-offs
was whether an employee was a
manager/supervisor, and enti-
tled to four weeks’ pay for
every year worked, or a line
worker and entitled to two
weeks’ payment for each year.

Ms Archer said that in such
cases, courts would assess issues
such as whether the employee
could hire, discipline or transfer
other staff, the degree of deci-
sion-making and management
control they had, and whether
they received overtime pay to
determine whether the worker
had supervisory authority. The
terms of the employment con-
tract were also crucial.

Ms Archer also warned
employees asked to work out
their two or four-week notice
period not to “burn bridges”

winter season year-on-year, as
group arrivals, typically booked
months in advanced, have tra-
ditionally been used to gauge
arrival numbers.

With the onset of the global
economic downturn, the
dynamics of booking vacations
changed, with travelers book-
ing airfare and hotel accom-
modations only weeks in
advance.

Group travel took a hit ear-
ly this year as corporations cut
down on travel, the US gov-
ernment even scolding large
corporations for spending on
travel as the economy began
to tighten.

by sabotaging or undermining
their former employer, adding:
“It’s a small community, and
one would not want to leave a
bad impression because a ref-
erence may be required.

“An employer may find an
employee may prefer to leave
rather than work out their
notice period, so ask them to
take accrued vacation pay. The
employee gets what he wants,
and the employer gets what he
wants.”

Given the current economic
downturn, Ms Archer acknowl-
edged: “Those who have a job
are finding it increasingly diffi-
cult to focus on their duties
because they think they’re
going to be next to receive a
pink slip.”

Oscar Johnson, a fellow Hig-
gs & Johnson attorney and
partner, said: “In these circum-
stances, it is clear there is an
imperative faced by employers
to rein in costs to weather the
economic downturn they are
facing.

“That is a reality that is

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the decline in stopover visitors
has left the Bahamian economy
in a bad position, even as cruise
arrivals gains were recognised
year-on-year.

However, he suggested
counting arrivals to the island
per head has been a misleading
method of calculating visitor
spending.

The minister said stopover
visitor arrivals have plummeted
14 per cent, while cruise pas-
senger arrivals are up by the
same number.

He insisted that the Ministry
of Tourism is working with the
Bahamas Hotel Association to

inescapable. Employers facing
dire circumstances need to
rationalise cost structures”,
meaning they were assessing
staff complements, their suit-
ability and skill sets.

“It has to be understood, if
one is an employer and one is
an employee, that litigation is a
costly affair, and especially in
an economic downturn it
should be avoided if at all pos-
sible. The propensity to litigate
is something an employer
should look at, as they should
structure decisions taken to
avoid this if at all possible.”

Mr Johnson also warned
Bahamian employers not to
“sacrifice long-term value for
short-term relief” in terminat-
ing employees. While many
firms felt that if they reduced
costs by a certain percentage,
they would have a specific bot-
tom line impact, in doing this
they could lose valuable work-
ers “and may prevent your
company from recovering as
speedily. Sound decisions need
to be taken”.

MUU

NOTICE is hereby given that CLIFFORD JACKSON FAUSTIN of
YOUNG STREET, EAST STREET, P.O. BOX N-8832, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of

The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 29'" day of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N-7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

APPLICATION SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database

infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company as

required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server related

issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.
Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.

Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.
Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new

technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Knowledge of the AS400 and Windows Operating systems required.
Experience with ATM and POS hardware.
Knowledge of credit card processing and experience working with
branded networks (VISA, Mastercard, AMEX etc) a plus.

Ability to consult Management and developers regarding application
software performance and use.
Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned

recommendations.

Must be a Team player and possess the ability to work in a demanding

environment.

Ability to communicate and document clearly and effectively required.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.
Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and qualifi-
cations; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance; pension

scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:



Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com

introduce more airlift to the
country beginning by year-end.

He said new airline passen-
ger capacity to Abaco and
Eleuthera will increase by
65,520 seats with the addition
of two daily American Eagle
flights .

In Grand Bahama, an addi-
tional 39,000 seats will be
added with the introduction of
WestJet, American Airlines,
Delta and Spirit Airlines.

And a total of 293,320 more
seats will be added to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island arrivals.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
the Bahamas is to receive an
annual total of 383,280 more

Among the lay-off alterna-
tives, Mr Johnson said, were to
reduce salaries and work hours,
reduce paid vacations, imple-
ment ‘work from home’ rules,
and reassign employees - espe-
cially productive, highly-skilled
ones - to growth areas in a busi-
ness.

“Often times, people feel
that if they are bound to an
employee contract, there is no
flexibility,” Mr Johnson said.
“T can assure you that in today’s
environment, employees are
prepared to be flexible. They
want to retain their income.”

On redundancy, Mr Johnson
said employers could only make
workers redundant if they were
closing a business, specific loca-
tion or eliminating a certain
post altogether.

airline seats than before.

According to him, the new
Lynden Pindling International
Airport expansion presently
underway will allow for a much
larger capacity of visitor
arrivals and open the door for
New Providence to become a
connection hub for travel to
the Family Islands.

“Right now it is impossible
to make the connection in Nas-

sau to get to the Family
Islands,” he said.

The Ministry has also moved
to brand Abaco separately
from the other islands in order
to market it and its own desti-
nation.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said
many more of the Family
Islands will be branded and
marketed in this way in the
future.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)
KLEIN PROPERTIES S.A.
In Voluntary liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137
(4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of
2000), KLEIN PROPERTIES S.A. is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 28th day

of September, 2009.

Yolanda Hamanji
of 12 Bell Lane, Gibraltar
Liquidator



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
Eattage Lat With Private Beach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Mario A. Carey, CRS, CIPS, CLHMS

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

www.marioca reyrea

2,

F

k
'

180

info@mariocareyrealty.com

e PICTET

5
PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

com

As

Mario Carey Realty
Dt's abaut yaw... Let's talk.

GLOBAL CUSTODY ADMINISTRATOR

The qualified candidate will...
- Assistthe Senior Relationship Manager in alll adeninistrative aspects of his activities,
~ Provide support and service 10 existing ehent relationships,
~ Act as the main contact person for clients for the daily administration of their

BOCOuNIS.

- Co-ordinate ihe paperwork involved in opening accounts/account restracturing.
~ Interact with Compliance and Legal departments to ensure due diligence

requanenvents are ie,

~ Coordinate implementation of new service requirements.
~ Upelate the client relationship database.
« Visit clients with the relationship manager when required
« Keep the relationship manager updated on all issues regarding client accounts.
~ NEIEIN positive working relations with clients and all Pictet departments, including
Chose collaboration with Operations divisions.

UALIFICATIONS/SKILLS:



~ CRAICEA

» Bachelors degree in Business! Finance
» Series 7 (intematsanal) or equivalent qualification,

« knowledge of another language (French, Spanish) would bean asset.

Working knowledge of investment mstruments.
-S years’ banking experience, preferably in Global Custod)y'Family Office.
~ Ability to manage money market, forex and trading desks.
Good PC skills (Word, Excel, Power Point,

~ Excel kent commenicatar
~ Enthusiastic personality.

« Ability to work under pressure.
= Independent and self motivated,
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offers new challenges,

Hand deliver Resume, cover letter and two (2) references BY SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 (a:-

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Pietet Bank & Trost Limited
Bayside Excewtive Park
West Bay St, & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED,

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneve, ig Kong, Landen, Erecembou

Offices in

¢, Mirdrid, ififan, (Montreal, Norrsew,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

SS ea

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00560

Whereas CASTELLA MERCIANA BOWLEG, of No. 14 Richard’s
Court, Oakes Field, in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EARLE
A BOWLEG late of No. 14 Richard’s Court, Oakesfield, in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00562

Whereas KYLE ALBURY, of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ARLENE MARGARET ALBURY late of Trinity Way, Stapledon
Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00563

Whereas EMMA BRAYNEN (nee) FERGUSON, of Seven Hills
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of MICHAEL MITCHELL, late of St Barts Road,
Golden Gates No. 2 in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00564

Whereas NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II, of Chancery House, The
Mall, in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ZBIGNIEW
EMILIAN MAZUREK late of 437 Golden Isles Drive in the City
of Hallandale, in the State of Florida, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



FROM page 1B

the high side, and other Kerzn-
er International sources have
denied that any lay-offs are
being contemplated.

Mr Markantonis said yester-
day that many of the staff at
Atlantis, the country’s largest
private sector employer, have
been placed on one to two-day
work weeks, while employees
across the board have been
asked to take a mandatory two-
week unpaid vacation.

“That includes me,” he said.
“T applaud them for having
been able to do that.”

Atlantis was forced to lay off
800 workers in November 2008
as declining economic condi-
tions deepened, following the

BKG/410.03

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009, PAGE 5B

Atlantis: No group
rebound until 2011/12

credit crunch that toppled
major banks in the US.

Despite the economic condi-
tions, Atlantis continues to
aggressively promote itself. Mr
Markantonis told Tribune Busi-
ness that his resort recently
bought two full page ads in the
New York Times that could cost
up to $290,000 on the high end
at the particular US newspa-
per. And Atlantis is running
two new television ad cam-
paigns as well.

“Tf that doesn’t work...,” he
said.

However, Mr Markantonis
asserted that the 2009 promo-
tional campaigns have not had
the desired effect this year.

“They are really not work-
ing very well. A lot of that is

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$71,000,000.00 of 94-Day Treasury Bills
will be received by the Banking Manager, The Central Bank
of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on
Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Successful tenderers, who

will be advised should take up their bills against payment on
Friday, October 2, 2009. These bills will be in minimum multi-
ples of B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable
from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of the
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

OR OR OR OR AR ARR OR OK OK OK OK OR OK OR RR OR OR OOK OK KOR KR RR ROR ORK KOK KKK RK RR

|
1



because people in the US are
not willing to travel,” said Mr
Markantonis.

He argued that attracting vis-
itors under the current eco-
nomic conditions has been an
“uphill struggle”.

“Leisure guests are now
looking for the best deals they
can get, and tend to focus on
much cheaper vacations like
cruise trips,” he said.

Mr Markantonis suggested
Atlantis’ packages that offer
value, such as inclusive ameni-
ties, are not being picked up by
would-be travelers.

The fact Atlantis does not
expect group and convention
bookings to recover until 2011
or 2012 is significant, and indi-
cates the wider Bahamian econ-
omy may not rebound until
winter 2010-2011. Group book-
ings are important to the likes
of Atlantis and Baha Mar
because they are booked far
out, and take up specific ameni-
ties, enabling the resorts to fix
their leisure business around
these occupancy blocks.

The Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation recently released
tourist arrival statistics reveal-
ing stopover arrivals were down
year-over-year almost 14 per
cent, while cruise arrivals were
up by about the same number.

According to Mr Markanto-
nis, the Atlantis Dubai proper-
ty’s business remains steady
due to strong patronage from
Middle Eastern visitors, espe-
cially within the oil-rich United
Arab Emirates where the resort
is located. He also said a new
500-room casino property is
under construction in Moroc-
co.

The resort recently hosted
the Miss Universe Pageant,
which has been heralded as the
preeminent promotional spot
for the Bahamas - greater than
last year’s Super Bowl spot.

Mr Markantonis said the
global exposure his resort
received during the pageant
was priceless and should posi-
tion Atlantis and the Bahamas
for the future.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A major financial institution with both commercial and private banking
operations, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

NETWORK OPERATIONS TECHNICIAN

Core Responsibilities:

Provides user support for the company’s networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.
Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.
Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including

server issues.

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and

operations.

Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.
Assist with the administration of the company’s networked anti-virus,
data back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these
systems are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

° Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP
operating systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support
and to troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.

Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and

upgrades.

Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network

issues.

Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.

Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;

pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 6, 2009 to:

Institutional .leadership@ gmail.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Regulators back ‘no interconnect fee’ for local calls

tomer to receive a call, and also
imposing an interconnection
charge on a rival to terminate a
call on its network.
“However, the access and
interconnection consultation is
silent with respect to the long-
standing practice in the

Bahamas of BTC making no
tariff charge to the consumer
for terminating intra-island
domestic calls, and the impact
that such a practice has on




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007







IN THE SUPREME COURT

Equity Side

No. 00098

IN THE MATTER OF all that piece parcel or lot



of land containing 13.77 Acres and situate at




Warren’s Harbour and to the Southern side of the




road leading from Moss Town Settlement on Cat



Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of






The Bahamas

AND





IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act,



1959 (Chapter 393 Statute law of The Bahamas

interconnection charges,” Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny warned.

Currently, interconnection
charges for local, inter-island
calls between SRG and BTC’s
networks involved no charges
to either operator.

However, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny explained that if
BTC, under the proposed ref-
erence access/interconnection
offer (RAIO) that will be intro-
duced under the new regulato-
ry regime, imposed an inter-
connection charge for local ter-
mination, “another operator
would at the time then be faced
with passing that new charge
on to its existing customers,
who have hitherto paid noth-
ing to terminate local calls
regardless of the network on
which the called party resides.

“Tn such a case, business real-

ity would force those customers
of the other operator to take
circuits from BTC to terminate
calls to BTC customers, thereby
avoiding the new termination
charge,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
added.

“Common sense dictates that
such distortion of the market
in favour of the SMP (Signifi-
cant Market Power) operator
cannot be the intent of the Act
or of the interconnection policy.

“SRG is of the strong view
that as long as a situation per-
sists where BTC chooses to
impose no tariff for termina-
tion of intra-island calls on its
network from its own cus-
tomers, then BTC cannot be
allowed to impose an intercon-
nection charge on other opera-
tors for termination of those
calls to those same customers.”






revised edition 2001)

AND

NOTICE





IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Anna

All members of G.H.S. class of 69 are invited




Cartherine Carantonis-Grant

NOTICE

ANNA CATHERINE CARANTONIS-GRANT
the Petitioner claims to be the owner in fee simple
in possession of the said piece parcel or lot of land
has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3
of the Quieting Titles Act to have the said piece
parcel or lot of land investigated and the nature
and extend thereto determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the Act.

Copies of the diagram or plan showing the positions
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the
said piece parcel or lot of land may be inspected
under normal working hours at the following

places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Bitco
Building, East Street in the City of Nassau,

The Bahamas’
(b)

The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,

4th Floor, Sheraton Hilton, Suite 400 #1
Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having
drawn a right of Dower or an adverse claim not
recognized in the Petition shall within thirty (30)
days after the appearance of the Notice herein file
in the Registry of the Supreme Court in the City
of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the Petitioner or
the undersigned a statement of her claim in the
prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit to be

filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of claim within thirty (30) days herein
will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated the 6th day of May, A.D. 2009

DAVIS & CO.
Chambers
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce
No. 1 Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner

to a meeting on Friday, October 2nd, 2009
p.m. in the Board room of the Michael Eldon
Buidling, Colllege of the Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JOULIANE INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAMAT S.A.

——

i

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of RAMAT S.A. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Roney ot Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.89 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.47 | YTD % -12.23
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

The Utilities Regulation and
Competition Authority
(URCA) agreed with SRG’s
position, confirming that no
interconnection charges would
be levied by telecoms opera-
tors for domestic, intra-island
calls, until Bahamian consumer
started to be charged for these
calls.

Previously, BTC had sub-
sidised free domestic calls
through its unbalanced inter-
national fixed-line long distance
charges, yet the arrival of com-
petition from IndiGo and unli-
censed Voice over Internet Pro-
tocol (VoIP) providers had
forced it to reduce the latter. It
had subsequently attempted to
make up for the losses this had
called by increasing line rental
charges as of January 1, 2006.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said
SRG’s concern was that, given
that free domestic calls had to
be subsidised by another BTC
business line, they were being
priced at below cost - “the clas-
sic case of predatory pricing in
a competitive market”.

If interconnection charges
were levied, he argued: “In such

a case, BTC would have dis-
torted the market in intra-island
fixed voice such that sustain-
able competition is unachiev-
able.

“After all, no competitor will
invest in infrastructure or offer
competing services whilst the
market rate to the consumer
has been set by the dominant
operator at below cost.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also
complained that BTC had
refused to facilities share, when
it came to shared access to the
latter’s masts and towers, for
some five years.

“SRG first wrote to BTC on
the subject of requesting shared
access to BTC’s masts and tow-
ers on August 16, 2004. Despite
copious further correspondence
from SRG, and requests for
assistance from the PUC, SRG
is no nearer shared access to
BTC’s facilities today than it
was five years ago,” he said.

Regardless of whether the
issue was dealt with via an
access/interconnection offer or
some other agreement, the
SRG president said URCA
needed to ensure facilities shar-
ing offers were “made prompt-
ly, in good faith and on non-
discriminatory and cost-orien-
tated terms”.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

APOLLOS VALLEY INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 25th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
RAPPAHANNOCK INC.

—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of RAPPAHANNOCK INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Employment Opportunity

Sales Representative

We are seeking to hire talented, assertive, charismatic and
outgoing individuals with an aptitude for sales and a desire to

succeed.

Skills and Requirements

WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Security Today's Close Daily Vol. _ EPS $ Div $ P/E
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.10 O.127
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 a.992
5.90 5.90 0.244
0.63 0.63 -0.877
3.15 3.15 0.125
2.14 2.37 0.055
10.00 10.03 1.406
2.74 2.74 0.249
5.26 5.87 0.419
0.111
0.625
0.420
0.322
0.631
0.332
9.000

Excellent oral and written communication skills
52wk-Hi Previous Close
TF

10.75

5.30

0.63

3.15

Change
0.03
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Proficient in Microsoft Office applications
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)

Ability to work in a fast paced environment

2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.43
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50
1.00

Strong mathematic capabilities
Ability to multitask

Possess excellent planning, organizational and
implementation skills

1.27
1.32
6.60
8.80
10.00
4.50
1.00
0.27
5.49
9.98
10.00

Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol ($)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0.952
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series ©) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds e
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $

3.33
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50
1.00
0.27

Excellent interpersonal skills
5.50

0.27
5.50

0.035
0.407

A team player with the ability to work independently

S2wk-Hi 5S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest Professional appearance

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

A desire and passion to get ahead

52wk-Low Symbol EPS $ Div $ P/E
7.02 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

Minimum Requirements

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

Associate degree in marketing or business
administration

52wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941

12.3870

100.0000
93.1992

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund

1.4038
2.8990
1.4905
3.0941
13.1136
101.6693
96.7398

3.72
-1.39
3.96
-8.61
3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
3.38

5.20
-4.16
5.49
-13.59
5.87
1.87
-4.18
0.00
-1.44
5.14
2.05
4.93

31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

18-Sep-09

31-Aug-09 e
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

Sales experience desired but not essential
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CPFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319 -0.11
1.0673 2.89
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Paid training and benefits program available

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dee 02 = 1,000.00

52Wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price fer daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

salesrepresentativeneeded@gmail.com

PIE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 5/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



Bt

TAMPA

High: 88° F/31°C
Low: 67° F/19°C
@

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ORLANDO |
High:89°F/32°C

Low:65°F/18°C
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THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST









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Partly cloudy.

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At-storm in spots in the

o|1|2

LOW

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Some sun with a Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny, a t-storm Partly sunny with a



















afternoon. shower or t-storm. possible. possible. thunderstorm.
High: 88° High: 88° High: 86° High: 87°
High: 88° Low: 77° Low: 77° Low: 78° Low: 77° Low: 79°
EE ai ae PETE
106° F 104°-82° F 98°-85° F 97°-75° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.
‘nea _ for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Thursday
Jemperature
High: 90° F/32° C IGN: sesssasedvsseesslacesonaeiectiediared saeco, 86" F/30° C Friday
~The ° LOW eee 77° F/25° C
a Low: 76° F/24°C Normal high... 87° F/30° C
7; Normal low 74° F/23° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Migh .....ccccsccsceene 90° F/32° C
High: 90° F/32° C Last year's LOW oo. eseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 75° F/24° C















3|4[5

MODERATE

High

3:56 a.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:43 a.m.
5:03 p.m.
5:26 a.m.
5:44 p.m.

6:06 a.m.
6:22 p.m.








HIGH | V.HIGH

Ht. (ft.

2.5 10:03 a.m.
2.9 10:45 p.m.

2. 10:53 a.m.
2.9 11:24 p.m.

2.8 11:38 a.m.

Vv
'|8|9|10

EXT.

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

Low _Ht. (ft

1.2
1.2

1.0
0.9

0.9

3.0 00

3.0 12:00 a.m.
3.0 12:20 p.m.



0.7
0.7

' Low: 72° F/22°C a Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:01am. Moonrise .... 4:16 p.m.
ie . a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccscssssssscsssssseeen 0.76" ‘Sunset....... 6:59 p.m. Moonset ..... 2:51 a.m.
ail FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT j AN Year to date 3. Full Last New First
' mm High: 91°F/33°C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date .......c.ccsecsecsesscsseeseeeeeee 37.92" 7 a
Low: 76° F/24°C = Low: 74° F/23°C oe te ie
& AccuWeather.com {°° =
@ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by . ay .
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct.4 Oct.11 Oct.18 Oct. 25
er High: 90° F/32° C ELEUTHERA
it Low: 74° F/23° Cc NASSAU High: a1" F/33° C
High: 88° F/31 °C Low: 78 F/26 C
— Low: 77° F/25°C
3 i. Y cae cz
KEY WEST a So _ CATISLAND
High: 30 eZee High: 88° F/31° C
Low: 79° F/26°C a. ) Low: 75° F/24°C
ot x
- GREATEXUMA hi
” 1 SAN SALVADOR
i High: 90° F/32° C High: 90° F/32° c
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 76° F/24° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS ,
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33°C ye er
Low: 75° F/24°C i. : -.
ma â„¢
LONGISLAND
a ire
Low: 76° F/24° C 6
Today Wednesday Today Wednesday Today Wednesday -*. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W (~ High: 91° F/33° C
FIC F/C FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FC FC FIC FC Ay Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 85/29 59/15 pe 82/27 52/1 pc Indianapolis 62/16 44/6 pe 67/19 46/7 s Philadelphia 68/20 53/11 pe 68/20 51/10 pc
Anchorage 48/8 40/4 sh 49/9 38/3 sh Jacksonville 83/28 54/12 s 80/26 55/12 ¢$ Phoenix 104/40 78/25 s 96/35 65/18 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 72/22 5010 s 74/23 53/11 s Kansas City 72/22 51/10 s 76/24 60/15 s Pittsburgh 56/13. 47/8 sh 57/13 43/6 c RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:93°F/34"c
Atlantic City 71/21 50/10 pc 69/20 45/7 pc Las Vegas 96/35 67/19 s 79/26 56/3 s Portland,OR 60/45 48/8 sh 63/17 499 c High: 91° F/33° C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 68/20 51/10 pce 68/20 47/8 pc Little Rock 77/25 52/1 = s 80/26 60/15 s Raleigh-Durham 74/23 48/8 s 73/22 49/9 s Low: 75°F/24°C i
Boston 70/21 53/11 pe 67/19 49/9 pc Los Angeles 75/23 60/15 pce 78/25 58/14 pc St. Louis 69/20 47/8 s 73/22 58/14 s .
Buffalo 58/14 46/7 sh 54412 43/6 c Louisville 68/20 46/7 s 70/21 45/7 s Salt Lake City 86/30 53/11 pce 56/13 35/1. sh GREATINAGUA
Charleston, SC 81/27 53/11 s 76/24 55/12 $s Memphis 75/23 52/11 s 78/25 57/13 $s San Antonio 86/30 72/22 t 88/31 75/23 t High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 57/13 43/6 c 6216 46/7 s Miami 90/32 74/23 pc 88/31 74/23 t San Diego 72/22 64417 peo 73/22 61/16 pc Low. 78° F26°C
Cleveland 58/14 49/9 sh 58/14 414 pc Minneapolis 60/15 38/3 s 6317 47/8 s San Francisco 65/18 52/11 pce 69/20 53/11 s 7
Dallas 83/28 66/18 s 88/31 72/22 pc Nashville 69/20 48/8 s 72/22 51/10 s Seattle 58/14 45/7 sh 60/5 48/8 ¢
Denver 82/27 52/11 pe 72/22 36/2 t New Orleans 82/27 64/17 $s 82/27 64/17 $s Tallahassee 85/29 51/10 s 82/27 50/10 s
Detroit 58/14 46/7 c 6116 45/7 pc New York 69/20 55/12 po 66/18 54/12 pc Tampa 88/31 67/19 pc 84/28 65/18 s
Honolulu 88/31 75/23 s 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 79/26 58/14 s 82/27 66/18 pc Tucson 99/37 72/22 s 94/34 63/17 s$
Houston 87/30 67/19 pc 87/30 70/21 pc Orlando 89/31 65/18 pce 84/28 63/17 s Washington, DC 70/21 53/11 pce 69/20 52/11 pc

#

AY rr NY }



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

Ti

High
F/C
93/33
64/17
72/22
81/27
63/17
92/33
87/30
74/23
81/27
74/23
75/23
65/18
83/28
68/20
66/18
72/22
57/13
89/31
91/32
62/16
91/32
81/27
79/26
57/13
63/17
66/18
72/22
64/17
90/32
50/10
86/30
106/41
72/22
76/24
72/22
89/31
74/23
70/21
75/23
86/30
75/23
93/33
61/16
55/12
64/17
87/30
99/37
54/12
72/22
64/17
70/21
100/37
75/23
90/32
63/17
89/31
64/17
86/30
61/16
77/25
52/11
70/21
82/27
79/26
58/14
72/22
60/15
67/19
63/17
56/13

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
54/12
39/3
67/19
54/12
77/25
77/25
62/16
57/13
69/20
50/10
44/6
77/25
42/5
50/10
49/9
36/2
69/20
84/28
36/2
73/22
72/22
62/16
46/7
43/8
52/11
49/9
49/9
72/22
39/3
79/26
71/21
62/16
58/14
50/10
79/26
60/15
54/12
52/11
77/25
57/13
72/22
43/8
37/2
45/7
55/12
77/25
34/1
46/7
50/10
61/16
69/20
ale
81/27
33/3
73/22
39/3
74/23
52/11
61/16
36/2
52/11
79/26
68/20
46/7
59/15
45/7
51/10
41/5
36/2

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Wednesday

High
F/C
92/33
63/17
73/22
81/27
58/14
92/33
86/30
75/23
77/25
74/23
71/21
61/16
83/28
69/20
70/21
66/18
61/16
88/31
93/33
50/10
88/31
83/28
80/26
64/17
63/17
68/20
73/22
61/16
88/31
52/11
86/30
108/42
66/18
75/23
72/22
88/31
75/23
68/20
81/27
86/30
75/23
93/33
54/12
50/10
69/20
86/30
99/37
50/10
70/21
61/16
69/20
97/36
75/23
88/31
72/22
86/30
68/20
85/29
59/15
77/25
52/11
82/27
86/30
72/22
54/12
85/29
57/13
66/18
57/13
56/13

Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
43/6
63/17
51/10
77/25
77/25
63/17
60/15
69/20
53/11
43/6
75/23
41/5
52/11
46/7
46/7
68/20
82/27
31/0
73/22
73/22
63/17
48/8
46/7
50/10
53/11
43/8
70/21
37/2
81/27
69/20
54/12
59/15
50/10
78/25
61/16
48/8
56/13
77/25
57/13
74/23
41/5
36/2
47/8
55/12
73/22
34/1
48/8
50/10
62/16
69/20
57/13
80/26
41/5
73/22
39/3
73/22
57/13
57/13
37/2
59/15
77/25
67/19
43/6
66/18
43/8
55/12
45/7
33/3

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th, 2009, PAGE 11B




INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: WSW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6 Miles 85° F
Wednesday: WSW at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: WNW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 6 Miles 86° F
Wednesday: NNW at 7-14 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: W at 7-14 Knots 3-5 Feet 6 Miles 84° F
Wednesday: W at 3-6 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 84° F



Seattle
58/45,
a

(COOLER)

om ,
Minneapolis

60/38

Kansas
82/52 72/51

@

‘Ailantal
it
PLEASANT

Houston S
87/67









Showers Mlain|
T-storms -

Rain Fronts
[x4 Elim Shown are noon positions of weather systems and es

Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ifitnfie
[yv_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary eguafit
10s ts [Os 10s 20s (05) 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s /G0s\)/il0e—/ii0s)



~ hed ay

- You Can Be Blown
Away 3 A Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that Yowhave excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
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