Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.255

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SEE INSIGHT SECTION





Detective
backing
family of
Preston
Ferguson

BY PACO NUNEZ
NEWS EDITOR
pnunez@tribunemedia.net

A VETERAN New York police inves-
tigator has condemned the “incompe-
tence” displayed by the Bahamas police in
their “botched” investigation into the
death of Preston Ferguson in Exuma.

The family of Mr Ferguson were left
outraged when police ruled that he died as
aresult of injuries sustained in a car acci-
dent.

Mr Ferguson’s grieving relatives, how-
ever, claim all the evidence points to

SEE page 12

NASSAU AND BAHAM

Felipé Major
/Tribune staff



m Lhe Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



Police prove into

I i
hotchet



EMERGENCY PERSONNEL attend ate this Toyota Windom overturned yesterday morning on Coral Harbour Road near
the back of Lynden Pindling International Airport. The condition of the driver is unknown.



Government employees may
be relocated to hotel tower

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 400 govern-
ment employees may soon see
their offices moved from
Thompson Boulevard to a
hotel tower on Cable Beach.

Serious discussions are
under way between the Gov-
ernment and Baha Mar

Quiznos

Resorts Ltd over the possibil-
ity of relocating the opera-
tions of two ministries to a
disused Wyndham hotel tow-
er on Cable Beach.

The move is intended to
help alleviate the health fears
of many of those employed
at the Ministry of Education
and the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture. Those
staff walked off the job last

. | DD ea le
BiG BREAR
sll

w i” el ot

Thursday over a long-stand-
ing mould problem at their
current location, a National
Insurance Board-owned
building on Thompson Boule-
vard, which many believe is
making them sick.
Yesterday, Education Min-
ister Carl Bethel revealed that

SEE page 12

INTRODUCING THE

hol OF OveIGh

Y ARASH



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SPAPER



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE 15

Man, 21, shot
outside his home

A 21-YEAR-OLD man
shot several times in front
of his Chippingham home
is said to be in a stable con-
dition in hospital.

He is one of two men
shot on Friday night. How-
ever police are unclear
about the details of the sec-
ond shooting in Bozene
‘Town, Nassau.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said there is

SEE page 12

Body found
on Rose Island

A MAN whose body was
found on Rose Island on
Saturday evening is
believed to have drowned.

Police have not yet iden-
tified the victim and were
unable to release a descrip-
tion of him yesterday.

The man was found by
beachcombers at around
6pm.

He was taken hospital
where he was pronounced
dead.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the

SEE page 12

Man on $80,000
cocaine charge

A MAN is expected to
appear in court today
charged with attempting to
smuggle $80,000 worth of
cocaine to the United
States in a car part.

Security staff screening
luggage at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
in Nassau found the drugs
stuffed inside a master
brake cylinder packed in a
box bound for Florida.

Police say there were
eight packets of cocaine
hidden in the car part,

SEE page 12

Travolta trial
set to resume

THE trial of two
defendants accused of try-
ing to extort $25 million
from Hollywood superstar
John Travolta will contin-
ue today with PLP sena-
tor Allyson Maynard Gib-
son expected to take the
stand.

Senator Maynard Gib-
son is one of six witnesses

SEE page 12



GUMBU

uous oe





PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























































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LOCAL NEWS

OPPOSITION’S NATIONAL DEPUTY CHAIRMAN HEEDS “CALL OF MY PEOPLE’

Kenred Dorsett enters
PLP leadership race

ANOTHER PLP mem-
ber will throw his hat in the
ring in the race for a leader-
ship position in the party
this week.

Kenred Dorsett, current
National Deputy Chairman
of the PLP, released a state-
ment over the weekend
announcing that he feels it is
his “duty to listen to the call
of my people and offer
myself for greater service in
the leadership of our party”.

“T have spoken to PLPs
throughout the country and
they all agree that our party
is in transition with regard
to its leadership,” he said.

“The mantra of change is
on everyone's mind and has



KENRED DORSETT

been weighing on mine for
quite some time now.

“Our country continues to
be burdened by the spirit of
hopelessness and despair

and I believe a responsive,
caring, proactive PLP can
help.”

Mr Dorsett said he will
make a formal announce-
ment regarding his plans in
the party on Wednesday.

Mr Dorsett has raised his
profile this year through
joining Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald in vocal criticism
of the government’s pro-
posed relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, as part of
the Committee to Protect
and Preserve the Bahamas
for Future Generations.

Mr Fitzgerald formally
launched his bid for the
Deputy Leadership of the
party last week.

‘Armed and extremely dangerous

POLICE issued All Points
Bulletins for three “armed
and extremely dangerous”
men wanted in connection
with murder and armed rob-
bery.

Officers are searching for
Theo Lepny St Cyrin, 22,
Marvin Arnold Coleby, 31,
and Jamal Ferguson, 36,
alias “Balty”.

Wanted

St Cyrin, wanted for mur-
der and armed robbery, is
described as having a “fair”
complexion, around 5ft 9ins
tall and weighing 170lbs.

His last known address
was Lavelle Road, West Bay
Street and Laird Street, Nas-
sau.

Coleby has a dark com-
plexion, weighs around
170lbs, and is about 5tf 9ins
tall.

He was last known to be

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Police issue bulletins for three
men wanted in connection with
murder and armed robbery







residing in Winton Estates
and Iguana Way, Bel Air
Estates.

He is also wanted for mur-
der and armed robbery.

Ferguson, 36, has a medi-
um complexion and is
around 5ft 7ins and190lbs.
He is last known to have
been living on Abraham

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WANTED: Jamal
Ferguson, 36, alias
‘Balty’, who is one of
three men wanted by
Police. The three are
described as ‘armed
and extremely
dangerous.

Street, and is wanted for
armed robbery.

Anyone with information
on these people should call
919, 911, the police control
room at 322 3333, the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 502
9930 or 9991 or Crime Stop-
pers on 328 8477, or their
nearest police station.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS



Masked thugs with gun
terrorise Wendy's staff

Two men escape in car after grabbing cash





































































By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WORKERS at a fast food
restaurant were left shocked
and fearing for their lives yes-
terday after two masked and
armed men burst in and
demanded cash.

According to an eye wit-
ness, the two thugs parked
their car in front of Wendy’s
restaurant on Mackey Street,
Nassau, entered the business
and jumped over the cashier’s
counter.

After staff fled to the back
of the building after seeing
that one of men had a gun,
they were eventually able to
steal two cash register drawers
containing an unknown
amount of money.

No one was hurt during the
robbery, which happened at
about 11.30am, but the inci-
dent resulted in the main din-
ing room part of the restau-
rant being closed for the rest
of the day, leaving only the
drive-through open for
orders.

Cloths

The two men, whose faces
were half-covered with cloths,
were able to escape in the
green Toyota Avalon vehicle
they had left parked outside.

A Wendy’s spokesman
declined to comment on the
incident when contacted by
The Tribune yesterday after-
noon.

0 In brief

Shotgun and
Shells found in
Nassau Sireet

POLICE are seeking the
owner of a shotgun and two
shotgun shells found in Nas-
sau Street at around 2am
yesterday.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477) or call police
urgently on 911 or 919.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Uncertainty over Privy Council future

THE BAHAMAS has always been proud
of its legal system. As a matter of fact so
proud that it has used it as a selling point to
entice the monied to invest in a country with
ancient laws, ably administered.

The Bahamas, say the brochures, has a
legal system based on English common law.
And at the apex of that system is the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council.

The history of the Privy Council can be
traced back to the eleventh century after
the conquest of Britain by the Normans at
the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Over the years we have heard many
investors comment on their reliance on our
British system of justice — an important
reason for feeling comfortable about invest-
ing here. Several have often laughed that if
the locals “mess up” there’s always the Privy
Council waiting in the wings to pick up the
pieces. Even local litigants feel more secure
knowing that there is a final court of appeal
that has neither personal connections nor
interests in the Bahamas. In other words
the Judicial Committee is completely
removed from the local scene.

Its only interest is in interpreting the law
and meting out justice to litigants who to
them are only Messrs. X Y and Z. In other
words the committee has no local ties —
which to many is an important comfort zone.

The importance of the Judicial Committee
was acknowledged no later than April this
year when welcoming the law lords to the
Bahamas on their third trip here to hear
local cases, Thomas Evans, QC, speaking
on behalf of the Inner Bar said: “Your con-
tinued presence at the apex of our court
structure is a source of confidence in our
system to many litigants and practitioners
alike.”

In a break with centuries of tradition the
five law lords chose the Bahamas as the first
overseas jurisdiction in which to sit for sev-
eral days to hear Bahamian cases.

They sat in the Bahamas to decide local
appeals in December 2007, December 2008
and again this year — March-April.

And so it came as an unwelcome surprise
to hear Lord Nicholas Phillips’ comments
in Britain that the time had come to shake
off the institution’s “colonial hangovers” —
the Bahamas included.

Lord Phillips — soon to be president of
the UK Supreme Court and one of those
who sat on appeals in the Bahamas this year
— announced while here that procedural
changes would be introduced under the new
Privy Council rules, one of which would

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tighten time limits for filing applications.

“We do think,” he said, “that it is a good
idea that there should be a sense of urgency
with regard to appeals to the Privy Council. It
is not just that respondents should be left in a
state of uncertainty as to whether or not there
is to be an appeal.”

However, last week The Tribune pub-
lished a report that Lord Phillips had said
that countries like the Bahamas are taking up
too much of Britain’s time and resources.

He would like to see the Privy Council’s
case load reduced.

This has been interpreted as a sign that
Britain may soon move to shake off her colo-
nial burdens, leaving them to find or create
their own appeal courts.

On Friday The Gleaner of Jamaica report-
ed that as a result of these comments,
Jamaica’s Opposition is urging government to
table legislation in Parliament to revive the
process to leave the Privy Council’s Judicial
Committee as its final court of appeal in
favour of the Caribbean Court of Justice.

Lord Phillips’ views could not have come
at a worse time for the Bahamas judiciary,
which is struggling, but so far failing, to regain
the trust of the public.

At one time the judiciary was this nation’s
most honoured profession.

The leading lights of the Inner Bar — those
who had taken silk — were highly respected.

Their views were seldom questioned. They
set the tone for the profession, while members
of the Utter Bar toed the line.

Not so today. The atmosphere had started
to change in the sixties and by the eighties the
drug trade had so taken its toll, that the
integrity of some members were being ques-
tioned.

Whereas before no one would dare criticise
a member of the Bar, today it is almost the
fashion.

On Friday, Bahamas Bar Association Pres-
ident Ruth Bowe-Darville was concerned
that the indictment in the US of the Bar’s
treasurer could set back the Association’s
efforts to improve its public image at home
while diminishing its reputation aboard. This
case is indeed a tragedy.

However, sooner or later the Bahamas
will have to come to grips with a decision
about what court will replace the Privy Coun-
cil should the Council eventually decide to
drop its overseas jurisdictions.

The Bahamas is certainly too small a coun-
try for our present Court of Appeal to have
the final say in local affairs.



THE TRIBUNE





Horrified
by state of
dog pound

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My name is Devlyn
Stubbs, this past July I chap-
eroned our summer camp’s
field trip to the dog pound
where we witnessed first
hand the horrible conditions
there. This is a letter writ-
ten describing our experi-
ence. I have read the other
articles printed regarding
this issue and I would like
to offer my support to this
cause.

DEVLYN STUBBS

Owner/Trainer

Stubsdale Dog Care Cen-
tre

The Pound

THE day promised to be
very fruitful as we prepared
for our field trip to the
Humane Society.

As a surprise for the
campers, I planned a nature
hike through the Botanical
Gardens, and visit to the
pound which happens to be
located on the same facili-
ty.

To my disappointment
and to the horror of the
campers, the facility proved
to be far below any expected
standard.

The kennels were unsan-
itary, poorly lit, badly dilap-
idated, and seemingly gross-
ly underfunded. The 15-20
animals appeared not to be
taken care of; the cages were
filthy with excrement and,
in need of major renova-
tions.

The two adult staff mem-

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



bers, and three to four
younger persons, presum-
ably summer students, were
observed either relaxing
under a tree, on the tele-
phone, or preparing meals
in the staff kitchen, all while
a dead dog lay decompos-
ing ina kennel with its liv-
ing kennelmate. When
asked when the dead dog
would be removed, staff
explained that the keys to
the kennels were not cur-
rently on premises, but they
assured us that the dead dog
would be removed from the
kennel that day.

One kennel in particular
housed a puppy no more
than five months old, seem-
ingly healthy, and begging
for attention.

Mention was made how-
ever of helping eligible pets
find homes, but on this day
the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety was denied the opportu-
nity to find a home for the
pup, and as scheduled the
following day, the pup was
euthanised.

Iam very disappointed in
the staff at The Pound and
embarrassed for my coun-
try because I understand
now why we have a stray
dog problem.

A worker explained to me
that it is not the policy of
the pound to patrol the
streets of Nassau capturing

dogs that roam, and there
are no penalties enforced for
allowing your dog to roam.
The pound only collects
dogs that people call in, and
they are euthanised every
Friday.

Awareness can lead to
change, and that’s what I
hope this letter may help to
bring about. What we are
experiencing in The
Bahamas with regard to the
large stray dog population
is a direct result of our lack-
adaisical attitude toward
yard enclosures, in addition
to refusing to spay and
neuter our pets.

Domestic and stray dogs
alike roam our streets, mat-
ing with other dogs helping
to increase the already large
local dog population.

The Bahamian govern-
ment should be leading the
way. Stray animals on our
streets are not only inhu-
mane, it’s a nuisance to the
citizens, and a constant
health risk to people and
dogs.

I hope that by exposing
The Pound and its inhu-
mane practices, we can per-
haps agitate our minds while
simultaneously warming our
hearts to begin to consider
the plight of our four legged
companions, and perhaps
we will then make a serious
attempt at properly caring
for our pets.

DEVLYN
STUBBS
Nassau,
September, 2009

Only Hutchinson-Whampao can
Own, Operate and manage a port

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I read with interest and
laughed at the obviously
very premature statement
from a Ms Nellini Bethel of
the Ministry of Tourism with
regards to the proposed
Cruise Port in the Grand
Bahama Port zone.

Ms Bethel clearly has not
done any research as she will
have been able to advise the
Director-General of
Tourism who would have
advised her Minister that the
only party who can own-
operate-manage a Port/Har-

\)\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website at weew.cob,edu. by

NOTICE

Tenders are invited forthe provision of cooked fond services al
The College of The Bohomas’ Grosvenor Close Campus,

Shirley Street

Tender documents may be collected frm:
Portia Smith Student Services Cemire
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Ficld Campus
Contact: Mrs. Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Ms. Cheryl Samms
VB, Finance
The Colk:ze of The Baleares

Deadline for submission
September Stith, 2009 at Spun,

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Tender (309
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THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS’
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The College of The Bahamas
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bour in the GBPA zone is
none other than Hutchin-
son-Whampao as much as
the government might wish
otherwise unless some radi-
cal change is made to the
long-standing ownership
position made when
Hutchinson-Whampao pur-
chased on Grand Bahama,
over 15 years ago.

The fact that the Office of
the Prime Minister has been
Gazetting compulsory pur-
chases of land in Williams
Town does not somehow
make it “magically” correct
and a challenge to this in the
courts will discover that the
government has no rights so
endeth yet another idea of
government.

Yes we all know it would
be better in Grand Bahama
with a new Cruise Port but

we don’t want one owned
by Carnival Cruise Lines for
starters — if this project is
going to bids at the least 40
per cent of the Port should
be owned directly by resi-
dents of Grand Bahama —
Government might be
allowed to own 10 per cent.

Hope Ms Bethell at
Tourism now will go and
check her facts and the
OPM will curtail what is in
my opinion an attempt at an
illegal act of compulsorily
purchasing property under
false pretences.

Is this the silly season,
Editor — it seems so.

M EDGECOMBE
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
September 19, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5



MEMORIAL WALL UNVEILED | “°..O ss

Families of
murder victims
call for justice

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BEREAVED families of
murder victims called for jus-
tice and an end to violent crime
as a memorial wall was
unveiled at the New Covenant
Baptist Church yesterday to
honour their loved ones.

The Memorial Wall for Mur-
dered Persons bears the names
of 94 men and women whose
lives were violently taken over
the last 30 years. It is a solemn
reminder of the country’s ris-
ing murder toll.

More than 200 friends and
relatives of the murdered hon-
oured their loved ones at the
service organised by Bishop
Simeon Hall, senior pastor at
the church in the East West
Highway, and attended by Min-
ister of National Security Tom-
my Turnquest and community
activists.

Pastor Carlos Reid, a
reformed gang member who
now runs the youth group
Youth Against Violence
(YAV), called for a gang unit
to be established to target the
gangs infesting almost every
area of our country, and asked
for effective rehabilitation pro-
grammes to prevent offenders
from re-offending on release
from prison.

Mr Reid said: “In our coun-
try today it’s more popular for a
young man to associate himself
with a gang than the boys
brigade or a youth group at
church. Almost every area of
our country is infested with
gangs.

“Do we allow this anti-social
culture to become the social
culture that we live by in the
Bahamas?”

But College of the Bahamas
professor Felix Bethel said it is
not just gangsters unlawfully
taking the lives of innocent
loved ones.

Mr Bethel called for regula-
tion of the police force and for
those officers who have wrong-
fully killed with Royal Bahamas
Police Force weapons to be
brought to justice.

Directing his question at
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest, Dr Bethel
asked: “Who is going to police
the police?

“Police control the coroner’s

court, so I’m told, and I am call-
ing on you Minister to call on
the Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in a manner of the
most urgent priority to investi-
gate the conduct of the coro-
ner’s court, for a real mission of
inquiry into the deaths of our
brothers and sisters.

“Their names and their blood
cry out from the earth for jus-
tice.”

Friends and relatives of
Brenton Smith, the 18-year-old
shot dead by police in Village
Road on July 9, stood around
the memorial wall with plac-
ards calling for justice.

And Diane Bethel, mother
of the late Deron “Sharkie”
Bethel, 20, said she is still wait-
ing for justice for her son shot
dead in Pinewood Gardens on
March 27, 2006, at age 20. A
police officer has been charged
with his murder.

She said: “I am still waiting
for justice, and this wall shows
that my son, and those who
have been murdered have not
been forgotten.”

A symbolic release of seven
white doves by Rev Diana
Ranger and relatives of some
of the murdered named on the
memorial wall was followed by
prayers and music from the
church choir and the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force Band.

Bishop Hall organised the
building of the $6,000 memori-
al wall with a team of support-
ers to both comfort the fami-
lies of those who have been
killed, and to make a stand
against crime.

He told the crowd how losing
a loved one at the hand of a
murderer is the worst kind of
grief, and the memorial wall is
one way of commemorating
those whose lives were taken.

Bishop Hall said: “We want
to do it because we want to
stand with you. We feel your
pain and I pray that we will
learn to stand with one anoth-
er.”

The socially conscious pas-
tor has called for churches in
Grand Bahama and across the
country to make similar efforts
to stand against crime with the
hope to deter criminals.

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said the
murder rate is at an unaccept-
able level, and people must
report crime, teach their chil-

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Me donald

OCAL NEWS

———

ldarryll Saunders

A LITTLE GIRL looks at the names on the memorial wall yesterday

their loved one.

dren right from wrong, and
place a greater value on moral-
ity, honesty, and integrity than
on material gain.

He added: “We can also
emphasise how wrong it is to
take the lives of others, and that
consequences, serious conse-
quences will follow.”

However, the minister made
no mention of the possible re-
introduction of capital punish-
ment.

Mr Turnquest hopes the
unveiling of the memorial wall
will encourage anti-crime inter-
ventions in the community, and
inspire ongoing efforts to
address social tragedies and

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continue to share with you and
to assure you that we will do
all within the laws of the
Bahamas to bring justice to all.”

Adding: “The law in the
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



) Re8 DOCTORS HOSPITAL

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Position: Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information
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Christie blasts plans to axe
Bahamas Hotel Corporation

Organisation’s former deputy chairman George Smith also hits out

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PLP leader Perry Christie
and former Deputy Chair-
man of the Hotel Corpora-
tion George Smith have
slammed Government plans
to axe the Bahamas hotel
Corporation by the end of
the year, terminating the
jobs of an unconfirmed
number of staff.

Confirming the Govern-
ment’s plan to wind up the
operations of the Corpora-
tion and repeal the Hotel
Corporation Act “no later
than December 31, 2009”
Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool Wallace said
the Government feels some
of the HC’s functions can be
“undertaken by other gov-
ernment entities and depart-
ments.”

The Tribune understands
there are fewer than 20 peo-
ple working at the Corpora-
tion, and while some are on
secondment from other min-
istries to which they can
return, others will be termi-
nated and receive severance
packages.

While the Hotel Corpora-
tion has in the past owned
around 12 hotel properties,
thanks to successful sales
over the years, it now only
owns one - the Lighthouse
Beach Hotel in Andros -
along with some large and
valuable landholdings in
Andros and Eleuthera.

Mr Vanderpool said that
for a long time the Corpo-
ration was primarily “push-
ing” these government-
owned properties, rather
than emphasising the touris-
tic development of the

Perry Christie



Bahamas as a whole, and
this does not chime well with
this Government’s vision for
tourism.

Meanwhile, the FNM gov-
ernment, in contrast to the
PLP government, is philo-
sophically opposed to the
idea of government owner-
ship in the tourism industry,
seeing the promotion of pri-
vate rather than public
involvement as the key to
boosting the sector.

Currently in “very serious
negotiations” with a private
developer interested in buy-
ing the Lighthouse Beach
Hotel, Mr Vanderpool Wal-
lace said the Hotel Corpo-
ration expects to sell that
hotel by the end of the year.

Meanwhile, the Govern-
ment is also “having con-
versations” with the I-Group
in Mayaguana about the
way forward there, where
the Hotel Corporation has
a 50 per cent stake in the
development.

“The principals in
Mayaguana know what we
want to do. It’s difficult to be
a partner and a policeman
at same time,” said Mr Van-



“It means that the current govern-
ment is philosophically moving away
from view that there is an advantange
to the government having some
involvement in the industry as now
provided by Hotel Corporation Act.



derpool Wallace. However,
he did not state what the
Government intends to do
with the land the corpora-
tion owns in Andros and
Eleuthera, the latter pur-
portedly worth more than
$100 million.

PLP leader Perry Christie
yesterday said “many ques-
tions are left unanswered”
and the Government owes
a full explanation of what it
intends to do and why.

He and Mr Smith charged
that the Corporation, “cre-
ated out of a perceived need
for government intervention
when things were very bad
in hotel industry” in the
1970s, still has a role to play
in tourism and can be devel-
oped.

“It means that the current
government is philosophi-
cally moving away from
view that there is an advan-
tange to the government
having some involvement in
the industry as now provid-
ed by Hotel Corporation
Act.

“On basis on my own
experience it’d be much to
the advantage of govern-
ment to have some govern-
ment-owned entity with a
focus on ensuring we are
always out there advancing
our country’s interests

through some entity that
would have a focus on it.
The ministries of the gov-
ernment can’t do it effi-
ciently.”

Both Mr Christie and Mr
Smith suggested that the
Hotel Corporation or an
entity similar to it could help
advance tourism, particular-
ly in the out islands, by
building “tourism infra-
structure” such as small
hotels that private develop-
ers might not otherwise be
interested in setting up.

These can be used to stim-
ulate private sector interest
in a particular Bahamian
destination once they can
prove successful, they sug-
gested. “Why so quickly try-
ing to divest itself of an enti-
ty that’s proven beneficially
proven to be to The
Bahamas without announc-
ing what they intend to
replace it with?” said Mr
Smith.

Mr Smith and Mr Christie
emphasised that were it not
for the Hotel Corporation
intervening in the past, the
jobs of many Bahamians
would have been lost at
properties which were clos-
ing down and a public entity
should continue to exist
which can step in if hotels
look set to go bust.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Change the tailed anti-drugs strategy
insight

WORLD VIEW

BY RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat).

N MY commentary

last week I made the

point that the greatest

destabilising force con-
fronting the Caribbean and
Central America is drug traf-
ficking and its attendant crime,
including illegal arms smuggling
and distribution, robberies and
executions.

I called on the United States
to take the lead in organising
collaborative arrangements
with Europe and Latin Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to estab-
lish a comprehensive anti-nar-
cotics programme that address-
es both supply and demand.

This week, I take the appeal
a step further by calling on the
governments of the Caribbean
Common Market and Commu-
nity (CARICOM) to collabo-
rate with Latin American gov-
ernments in engaging the US
government in a dialogue to
fundamentally change the failed
anti-drug trafficking policy that
has been pursued so far.

Tam agreeing with Professor
Norman Girvan, former Secre-
tary-General of the Association
of Caribbean States, who
regards such an engagement as
crucial.

My commentary last week
was taken from an address I
delivered in London to military
officers from all over the world.
In the course of the address, I
had said that “the US, Canadi-
an and European governments
have concentrated on cutting
supply through eradication and
interdiction with limited suc-
cess, and it is clearly time to re-
think this strategy. But, in doing
so, the authorities in these
countries must collaborate ful-
ly with both the producing and
transit countries, both of whom
are as much the victims of the
trade as the countries in which
the huge markets reside.”

The failure of a policy prin-
cipally based on interdiction
and eradication is now painful-
ly obvious.

The policy not only fails to
tackle effectively the problem
of demand in countries such as
the United States of America
and Canada, it also suffers from
its imposed character. It is
essentially a policy created by
the US and imposed on the rest
of the area.

This policy, along with the
criminalization of the posses-
sion of even small amounts of
heroin, cocaine and marijuana,
has filled the jails of the
Caribbean and Latin American
countries.

Even worse, a large number
of people in St Vincent and the
Grenadines and Jamaica are
criminalized because they grow
or pick marijuana for a living.
Largely, these people have no
other means of livelihood, and
are unqualified or untrained for

Four people charged with firearms possession

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FOUR people were charged
with possession of firearms and
ammunition at Freeport Mag-
istrates’ Court on Friday.

Hartley Smith, 29, Romel
Smith, 24, Tamisa Saunders, 30,
and Emilyann Johnson, 17,
appeared in Court One before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

They were charged with four
counts of possession of unli-
censed firearm and two counts
of ammunition possession.

It is alleged that on Septem-
ber 24 at Freeport, Grand
Bahama, the accused were
found in possession four unli-
censed firearms and ammuni-
tion.

Simeon Brown represented
the defendants. They all plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Magistrate Ferguson grant-
ed $36,000 bail to each of the
defendants. The matter was
adjourned to January 11, 2010,
for trial in Magistrate Court
Two.

Pair expected to face
drug charges today

TWO men are expected to
be arraigned on drug posses-
sion charges in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court this week.

The charges are in relation
to a drug seizure in the Lunar
Boulevard area, where police
discovered more than 70 lbs of
suspected marijuana, with an
estimated street value of
$56,800.

The suspects, ages 29 and 40
years, will appear in Court
today to answer to the charge
of possession of dangerous
drugs with intent to supply.



SIR RONALD SANDERS

anything but agricultural
labour.

Banana

In both countries, hundreds
of banana farmers have been
put out of business by the loss
of preferential markets in the
European Union, and the argu-
ment has been made that they
should be allowed to produce
marijuana, under regulated and
supervised conditions, for the
medicinal market.

This is being done in some
States of the United States,
such as California, and is capa-
ble of replication in the
Caribbean where it would pro-
vide employment and con-
tribute to the economy.

The Caribbean alone will
hold little sway with the bigger
powers in the Hemisphere who,
so far, directed the way that the
problem of drugs is handled.

But, there is now a growing
effort in Latin America for a
new and different approach.

It started with the Latin-
American Commission on
Drugs and Democracy co-
chaired by former presidents,
Fernando Henrique Cardoso
(Brazil), César Gaviria (Colom-
bia) and Ernesto Zedillo (Mex-
ico).

The Commission released a
report in February in which it
called for the decriminalisation
of cannabis and criticised “the
criminalization of consump-
tion.” Importantly, the report
concluded: “The deepening of
the debate concerning the poli-
cies on drug consumption must
be grounded on a rigorous eval-
uation of the impact of the
diverse alternatives to the pro-
hibitionist strategy that are



“The failure of a pol-
icy principally based
on interdiction and
eradication is now
painfully obvious.”

being tested in different coun-
tries, focusing on the reduction
of individual and social harm.”

When the report was pub-
lished, Ethan Nadelmann,
Executive Director of the Drug
Policy Alliance, observed that:
“An ever growing number of
Latin American leaders from
across the political spectrum
recognize that the prohibition-
ist approach to drug control has
wreaked havoc throughout the
region, generating crime, vio-
lence and corruption on a scale
that far exceeds what the Unit-
ed States experienced during
alcohol Prohibition in the
1920s.

“Many believe — and a hand-
ful have said publicly — that
the better solution would be to
abandon drug prohibition and
move in the direction of legally
regulating the global drug mar-
kets that are now illegal.”

Now, the Mexican govern-
ment has announced that it will
be eliminating jail sentences for
possession of small amounts of
heroin, cocaine, and marijua-
na, freeing law enforcement
officers to focus on the king-
pins of the trade.

The governments of Brazil
and Uruguay have also
announced the elimination of
measures that penalize people
carrying small amounts of drugs
and Argentina is reported to
be planning the exemption of
drug users from the criminal
justice system.

The Latin countries have
taken bold first steps, but what
is needed is collaboration by all
Latin American and Caribbean
governments and the elabora-
tion of a strategy with the Unit-
ed States and Canada that is
jointly devised, and collectively

implemented.
As University of the West
Indies Professor Alston

Chevannes, who chaired a Task
Force on Drugs in Jamaica
some years ago, recently not-
ed: “Jamaica would like to
decriminalise personal use of
cannabis but is afraid of US
decertification. Other CARI-
COM countries would proba-
bly like to but can't for the
same reason. An international
movement that includes big
players like Mexico and Brazil
would prevent our small coun-
tries from being exposed. If the

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PATRICK
MANNING, Prime
Minister of the

US can be won, then I reckon
the UN would have to come to
its senses and reconsider the

Conventions.” Republic of

_ Prime Minister Patrick Man- Trinidad and
ning of Trinidad and Tobago Tobago
has lead responsibility for secu- addresses the
rity issues in CARICOM. 64th session of

He can initiate these discus- the United

sions within CARICOM and Natlons General
with the Rio Group in time to
place the issue on the agenda of Assembly at the
the scheduled meeting later this United Nations
year between Caribbean Heads headquarters
of government and US Presi- Saturday Sept.

26, 2009. Prime
Minister Patrick
Manning of
Trinidad and
Tobago has lead
responsibility for
security issues in

dent Barack Obama.

In conditions of economic
decline and increased unem-
ployment, drug trafficking and
its attendant other crimes esca-
late, as they are doing now
throughout the region.

Souscscusescucuccucuccucusscvecucsecusserscsssseuss CARICOM.
(Responses and previous

commentaries at: www.str-

ronaldsanders.com (AP Photo/

sanders.com/> )

Stephen Chernin)


































































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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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Transport Minister
Neko Grant highlights
road safety importance

THE importance of road
safety cannot be overem-
phasised, Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant told a young audi-
ence.

Mr Grant was the keynote
speaker at the fourth nation-
al road safety youth sympo-
sium at Worker’s House.

The Road Traffic depart-
ment and Chevron Texaco
Bahamas Limited organised
the symposium, with this
year’s as “Road Safety:
Focusing on the Road
Ahead”.

Participants were junior
and senior high students
from public and private
schools throughout New
Providence.

Workshop

The one-day workshop
covered various aspects of
road safety, including fac-
tors whih contribute to acci-
dents; challenges facing the
disabled in relation to road
safety; and Injuries related
to traffic accidents.

Speakers included Iris
Adderley, consultant, Dis-
ability Affairs Unit, Ministry
of Labour and Social Devel-
opment; Sgt. Garland Rolle,
Traffic Division, Royal
Bahamas Police Force; Bod-
ine Johnson, entertainer and
teacher; and Keniesha
Adderley, Texaco youth
spokesman.

Senior government offi-
cials in attendance included
Jack Thompson, Director of
Immigration; Colin Higgs,

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: ae Minister Neko Grant.

“It is our desire to
reverse this trend.
And in this regard,
the Ministry of
Public Works and
Transport has
sought to achieve
this by advancing
various road safety
education initiatives
while encouraging
multi-sectoral part-
nerships in the

process.”
——EE——EEEE_ Ea

Permanent Secretary, Min-
istry of Public Works and
Transport; Philip Turner,
Controller of Road Traffic;
and Brad Smith, Assistant



Controller of Road Traffic.

Mr Grant said according
to the World Health Orga-
nization, road traffic injuries
are the leading cause of
death globally among young
people between the ages of
10 and 14, 15 to 19 and 20 to
24 years.

He noted that 45 traffic
fatalities were recorded in
The Bahamas during 2008,
and 37 traffic fatalities have
been recorded so far for
2009.

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this trend,” said Mr. Grant.
“And in this regard, the
Ministry of Public Works
and Transport has sought to
achieve this by advancing
various road safety educa-
tion initiatives while encour-
aging multi-sectoral part-
nerships in the process.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9



Industrial action may be looming for
College of Bahamas faculty members

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INDUSTRIAL action
may be on the horizon for
faculty members at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas who
remain disatisfied with the
handling of negotiations
over a new industrial agree-
ment.

The emerging threat
comes as some teaching staff
say that much greater stu-
dent numbers this year have
already put a strain on the
ability of youngsters to get a
quality experience at the col-
lege.

And, some staff claim, the
strife between teaching staff
and College administrators
along with the extra demand
placed on teachers and the
College’s resources by this
year’s increased enrollment
is impeding COB’s momen-
tum towards university sta-
tus. Jennifer Dotson, presi-
dent of the Union of Ter-
tiary Educators of the
Bahamas (UTEB) which
represents faculty at the col-
lege, told The Tribune that
the College is now expect-
ing more of teachers but try-
ing to take away benefits.

“The College needs to be
more open and receptive to
the needs of faculty. It is
asking us to take in more
students, to teach more, but
they are not negotiating a
new industrial agreement.

“They expect things of us
but us but is not willing to
give anything in return,”
claimed the UTEB Presi-
dent, who added that staff

Dissatisfaction remains over negotiations for new agreement



JANYNE HODDER

were only made aware of a
major increase in student
numbers a week before the
fall semester began.

One of the major issues
for faculty in negotiations
over a new industrial agree-
ment is the proposal by the
College that they will be put
on contracts, something
which staff feel will lessen
their ability to get loans or
take on other personal
responsibilities.

Mrs Dotson said the
union does not feel prepared
to “sign away all of its terms
and agreements” that exist-
ed in its previous industrial
agreement, which expired in
mid-2008, and is now
“strategising” over the way
forward.

“If it means taking a strike
vote or withholding students
grades ... we will have to do
what we have to do to make

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sure we have clear terms
and conditions. But those
are drastic steps and we
hope it won’t get to that.”

While disatisfaction has
been growing for months, a
faculty meeting last week
with College president
Janyne Hodder “did not end
well” according to Ms Dot-
son and others who attend-
ed, leaving tensions height-
ened.

Proposals

Staff had been looking to
the President to “justify”
some of the proposals the
College is putting to faculty
in negotiations and some
new policies already being
imposed, but many left dis-
atisfied.

“The faculty were trying
to get answers to questions.
There’s a lot of policies
going into place, a lot of
things happening and we
wanted rationale for whats
going on. In the end she had
to call a recess to the meet-
ing. All the faculty got up
and left,” claimed one lec-
turer, who wished to remain
anonymous.

Yesterday Margot Black-
well, a lecturer who divides
her time between the School
of Education and the School
of Applied Sciences while
also participating on the
UTEB negotiating team,
described the situation as
“heartbreaking.”

“We’ve been without an

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industrial agreement for 14
or 15 months,” she said.

“We can’t move forward
to develop as the University
of the Bahamas if we can’t
agree on terms and condi-
tions under which this can
be done.

“For us to be frustrated at
this point when we should
have common purpose is
beyond me.”

Michael Stevenson, head
of COB’s LLB programme,
said he feels that Ms Hodder
“needs to be more person-

ally in the negotiating
process.”

“What presently has tran-
spired is a feeling that when
UTEB negotiates with the
college they are not neces-
sarily negotiating with the
decision makers and that
needs to be addressed.
There’s alot of misunder-
standing and a lack of real
negotiating.”

As for industrial action,
Mr Stevenson said it’s “not
something we want to do
but it’s always an option.”

When contacted about the
Union’s broad-ranging con-
cerns as well as the outcome
of last week’s faculty meet-
ing on Friday, the College
issued a short statement
which stated that in a “usual
faculty meeting” held last
Thursday during which the
“topic of ongoing union
negotiations did come up.”

“There were cordial dis-
cussions held and it is not
the practice of the College
of The Bahamas to negoti-
ate outside of our normal
internal processes.” A union
spokesperson declined to
comment any further.




































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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

For the stories behind
temas. CMe tle ee / eT 4
on Mondays

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE

Mrs. Barbara Elaine
Kelly Albury, 89

of Village Road, Nassau,
The Bahamas died at her
residence, on
Wednesday 23rd
September, 2009.

Mrs. Albury is
predeceased by her
»| husband, Kenneth H.E.
Albury, her brother,
Dudley Sands and her
daughter-in-law,
Christina Albury.

She is survived by her son, Drew Albury; brother,
Everette Sands and his wife Patricia; grandchildren,
Christian and Stefan Albury; sister-in-law, Valeria
Sands; nephews, John and Jimmy Sands; niece,
Sonia Springle and many other relatives and close
friends.

A Memorial Service will be held for Mrs. Barbara
Elaine Kelly Albury, at Trinity Methodist Church,
Trinity Place and Frederick Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 10th October, 2009 at 3:00p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family request that donations
be sent to Queen's College Foundation, P.O. Box N.
7127, Nassau, in memory of Barbara E.K. Albury.

Please Note date and time: Saturday, 10th
October, 2009 at 3:00pm.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.



Unleash our
own resources

VIEW FROM AFAR

BY JOHN ISSA

THE time has come for us
to move towards less depen-
dence on foreign investment
and more on our own
resources for growth and
development in The
Bahamas. Not only will it be
beneficial to Bahamians in the
short run by speeding up our
recovery from the recession
but the long term benefits will
be profound and substantial.

The actions that I am
going to suggest have been
raised before; however the
urgency for their adoption has
been accelerated by the world
recession. Despite the fact
that technically the US reces-
sion may be coming to an end,
it will be some time before
employment accelerates in
the US to the point where we
will feel the benefits in
Bahamian tourism and invest-
ment. This column does not
think that we can wait that
long without severe damage
being done to the social fabric
of The Bahamas. We are
already seeing the start of this
damage in the rise of the lev-
el of violent crime.

The two actions that will
increase economic growth and
employment with all their
consequential benefits are the
freeing up of Bahamian capi-
tal and entrepreneurial ener-
gy. In order to free up
Bahamian capital which is
held overseas Bahamians
should be permitted to repa-
triate their foreign assets with
the same rights as a foreign
investor and with no penalty
for having breached the for-
eign exchange laws. I know
persons will worry that the
money will leave again but
once it is invested and earning
a return it will stay. We must
all remember that the Foreign
exchange restrictions didn’t
stop the funds from leaving

Let Us Rally A ainst Crime

Join us'in

Tp

' )

aneaent

demonstration at|Rawson Square on
September 30th2009 from"
Jam to 3: 30pmias\we seek from
Parliament Justice for, Brenton Hector
Smith and other:stolen lives of crime/and

violence.

ae

‘ 7 ; ye ;
October 12th.- Marchifor Justice B'H'S.
& Stolen Lives= Depart ‘Arawak Cay

9:00%. am

a?
r i

We invite the family of victims to

contact us at

www.thebrentonfoundation.org;
e-mail: brentonfoundation@gmail.com

or

Ph #426-7001

Together lets bring an end to the Crime
that's Killing our Nation.

J O HN

in the first place.

The second action is the
need to change the business
licensing legislation so that
any qualified Bahamian will
have the right to a business
licence without any consider-
ation being given to protect-
ing existing businesses. This
protectionism which is part of
our history in The Bahamas

| Ss S A

and at one time tried to pre-
serve the social status quo is
now trying to preserve the
economic status quo. Any
country that continues along
this road is condemning a
large number of its young
entrepreneurs to lives in
which they cannot live their
dreams or achieve their
potential.

We need YOU to come in

A

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PTA) by

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italian

RESTAURANT

Wh -Ps







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

The notion we can
govern — but not judge
— ourselves is illogical!

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

JESIGN, SU ND INST

EXTERNAL LANDSCAPING LIGHTING

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified
firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of the exter-
nal landscaping, lighting and irrigation systems. for

YouNG MAN’s VIEW

AST week’s

comments by

the President of

the UK’s new
Supreme Court, Lord
Nicholas Phillips, sent shock-
waves throughout the Com-
monwealth as this prominent
justice claimed that cases from
places such as The Bahamas
are burdensome and have
occupied too much of the
time and resources of the
Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council (JCPC).

ii) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii) the new Northen Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

ADRIAN G IBS ON



“Today, many Bahamians view the
Privy Council as an obstacle to hanging
death row inmates in this era of ram-
pant violent crime.”

Interested parties may obtain further intonation and a copy of lhe Expresspons of Interest
Prequalification Applicution fom trom:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Balamas



In the case of The
Bahamas, which continues to
retain the Privy Council, Lord
Phillips’ comments must have
shocked the judiciary/govern-
ment as this leading British
jurist seems to be clearly urg-
ing countries to develop final
courts of appeal or join
regional networks since the
London-based JCPC may no
longer hear appeals from for-
eign jurisdictions.

In April 2005, the
Caribbean Court of Justice
(CCJ) was established as a
final appellate court for juris-
dictions within the region;
however, although The
Bahamas helps to fund the
CCI, like several other coun-
tries, it does not retain this
court as its final court of
appeal. Frankly, in the inter-
im, until we settle upon our
very own final court, it is in
the Bahamas’ best interest to
continue to retain the Privy
Council.

At present, there is no
comity among the countries
that helped launch the CCJ
and were privy to the agree-
ment for its establishment.
Thus far, these countries have
shown a lack of political will
towards taking a unified
approach to making the nec-
essary Constitutional/legisla-
tive adjustments to give the
court the validity it needs to
operate as the final appellate
court in their respective juris-
dictions. At present, the juris-
diction of the Privy Council
is limited and focused on cer-
tain legal areas. If we are tru-
ly seeking to establish our
sovereignty, why go from
what is perceived in some
quarters as a form of imperi-
alism or hegemony to anoth-
er?

Today, the CCJ is the final

appellate court for Barbados
and Guyana, the latter hav-
ing abolished the JCPC as its
final court several years
before the establishment of
the CCI.

Apex

The Privy Council stands
at the apex of our local judi-
cial system and, amidst some
controversy, has effectively
adjudicated on Bahamian,
and Caribbean, issues that
have come before it. Contrary
to a perception that has arisen
relative to the CCJ, the Privy
Council appears to be a truly
independent body that is not
subject to judicial meddling,
social forces and/or political
pressures. In recent times, in
an attempt to familiarize itself
with local circumstances, the
Privy Council has had repeat-
ed sittings in the Bahamas.

The Bahamas’ Constitution
makes provisions for the Privy
Council, stating its purpose as
being “for the hearing and
determination of appeals
from decisions of any court
in the Bahamas by a panel of
judges.” The JCPC is a safety
net that has protected the
rights of citizens in matters
where trials were seemingly
inequitable and/or set a poor
or disagreeable precedent.

Recent Privy Council deci-
sions, particularly regarding
death row inmates and their
execution, have been loathed
and have led to condemna-
tion of the council and calls
for its abolition as a final
appeals court. Today, many
Bahamians view the Privy
Council as an obstacle to
hanging death row inmates in
this era of rampant violent
crime.

In 1993, in their infamous

CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

Bidders are required to collect bid packages fram
the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telaphone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mir. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
Sth October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
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The Corporation reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all proposals.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Pratt and Morgan decision,
the Privy Council decided that
the execution of a person
after five years on death row
amounted to inhumane treat-
ment. Locally, this meant that
many prisoners on death row
at that time had their sen-
tences converted to life
imprisonment. Moreover, lat-
est hullabaloo came after the
Lambert Wilson case, which
called for the discretionary
use of the death penalty and
stated that the mandatory
death sentence was unconsti-
tutional.

In these times, where orga-
nized and sadistic criminals
are openly challenging the
authority of the state, the
Privy Council has been sub-
ject to harsh criticism, partic-
ularly because certain deci-
sions do not reflect the local
circumstances of countries still
referring to it.

Noted jurists, such as Jus-
tice A Saunders of the
Caribbean Court of Justice,
have criticized the JCPC on
the basis of its perceived hin-

SEE page 12

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on

Tel; 242-302-453 13/4516

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President

College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘Tel: 242-352-9761

Wednesday, 40h September, 2009 in Freeport at a lime and venue to be announced.

BOVs are to be submitted to the bocation(s) indicated in the EOI Prequalification Form in

a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Firms must submit a separate EQ tor each facility. All BOW's are to be submitted by 12:00

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 2008,

Colinalmperial



The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray

Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis

Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams

Ruthesa Glendera Dean

Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Alma Clarke
Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes

Bettrah Belanda Mitchell
Bridgette Neely

Carl Rudolph Johnson
Charlene Dawkins-Bevans
Cheryl Bowe-Moss

Clarence Rolle

Cleaver W. Robinson
Cordero Farrington

Coresa Deveaux
Cynthia Wilson

Dedrick Storr

Derek Nottage
Desmond Pinder
Douglas Richards

Francina Scott
Francis Clarke

Frederica Hamilton

Fredie Smith

George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle

Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee

John A. Webb
Kardeo Heild
Kevin Remond

Culmer

Kirkwood Campbell

Laytoya Cargill
Leila Wood

-Gray

Lorenzo M. Carroll

Malriae Lauree

Ferguson

Mavis Vanderpool

Melissa Evans
Michael White

Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Mervin Dean

Mervin J. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
Pamela Taylor

Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Sharon Creary

Sharon Hanna

Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

Stanley Wood

Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha O Brien
Trevor Mcneil Basden
Valentino Gay

Velma Cox

Veronica Samuel

Virginia P. Culmer Woodside
Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills





PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM PAGE ONE

Police death prove ‘hotched

FROM page one

murder.

And they now have the backing of
retired Detective Sergeant Nathaniel
Santine I, who happened upon the
family’s plight by reading our web-
site Tribune242.com last week.

After reviewing the family’s evi-
dence, he criticised the police for
allowing vital DNA evidence, includ-
ing clothing and hair samples, to go
missing; and for failing to impound
the vehicle in which the body was
found and comb it for forensic evi-
dence and fingerprints.

“Incompetence played a role in
what looks like a botched investiga-
tion. This is not a petty crime where
the consequences are minimal, this
crime resulted in a death and beyond
the capture of the perpetrators, the
investigators failed to secure evi-
dence to protect the rights of the
victim,” Det Santine said.

He said the authorities need to

ELUM ORCA (mst Ce TL
Nathaniel Santine III



explain why the investigation was
carried out in such an unprofession-
al manner, and punish those respon-
sible.

The detective noted a number of
holes in the police’s theory that Mr
Ferguson died while driving alone
as aresult of his head colliding with
a utility pole.

The official version of events sug-
gests he died while sitting on the dri-
ver’s side, but the 40-year veteran,
who spent his career investigating
crimes in King’s County, the Bronx,
Staten Island and New Jersey, said
the blood and glass evidence make
this impossible.

“Tt is obvious that the blood on
the floor of the vehicle was not from
a victim of an accident; but instead is
from a person bleeding and being
laid or slumped on that portion of
the vehicle.

“The velocity of the blood also
created a pattern that trickled onto
the driver’s side. The carpet of the
floor after being sampled should
have been removed to reveal the
settling pattern of the blood on the
metal floor and shift gears.

“The glass evidence also cannot
be explained away. It is impossible
by the law of physics for a traffic
accident to occur, smashing a side
glass and leaving broken glass under

the victim — who was said to be sit-
ting on top of the glass and not hav-
ing any on his person, including frag-
ments in his wound.

“If a collision is violent enough to
cause a fatal injury, the wound must
be explained. This has not been
done, and the body would not be
found in an upright position; but
instead thrown from the vehicle or
tossed within the cab of the vehicle.

According to Det Santine, there is
“more than enough evidence” in the
family’s photos of the crime scene to
suggest that an in-depth investiga-
tion should have been ordered.

“Tt is obvious that proper protocol
was not followed in investigating this
matter. It appears as if the respond-
ing officers in their haste to cate-
gorise a traffic accident, missed or
ignored some key steps.

“This level of incompetence as it
relates to inefficient police investi-
gations should not go unrecognised

or unpunished. The responsible offi-
cers and their superiors should be
held accountable,” he said.

Detective Santine is from a law
enforcement family spanning sever-
al generations. His grandfather,
father and two brothers are all law
enforcement officers.

He worked for more than 25 years
in major crimes, including crime
analysis, community and problem-
oriented policing, beat/manpower
allocation, crime trend analysis, traf-
fic enforcement and analysis and
risk-focused prevention/ juvenile
recreation.

He has a BA in criminal justice
and Sociology from Columbia Uni-
versity in New York and now spends
his spare time actively following the
investigation of cold cases in his
county.

¢ Read the full text of Detective

Santine’s findings on Page 3 of
today’s INSIGHT.

Man, 21, shot

Govt employees may be relocated to hotel tower

FROM page one

the arrangement with Baha Mar to
accomodate the workers, which is “not
yet a done deal” but “under serious
consideration”, could last for
“upwards of six months”.

Potential site, hotel tower “J”, is
one of two of five of the Wyndham
Nassau Resort’s five towers which
have been closed to the public for
eight months, awaiting demolition as
Baha Mar moves ahead with its plans
to re-develop the Cable Beach strip.

Another possible site to put the
ministry staff is the Teachers and
Salaried Workers Cooperative Credit
Union on East Street, although it
appears the hotel is the favoured loca-
tion.

However, Mr Bethel noted that the
Government has been informed by
Baha Mar that they have an “aggres-
sive schedule” to meet in terms of
their own development prospects,
meaning that the building will have
to be vacant and ready for demolition
sometime next year.

Robert Sands, senior vice president
of external affairs for Baha Mar said:
“We have been approached by the
Government and we’re trying to coop-



wa al

erate and assist the Ministry of Edu-
cation and Youth in this venture.
“We have some space that can meet
their short term needs and we’re trying
to match our space with those needs in
shortest possible time period.”
The Government recently received

copies of floor plans of the vacant tow-
er and is now seeking to determine
whether it would suitably accomodate
the temporary relocation of the two
ministries’ offices and staff. Mr Bethel
anticipates that “no less than 100
rooms” would probably be needed to
house them.

Neither Mr Bethel or Mr Sands
would say yesterday how much it is
likely to cost the government to rent
the space, and Mr Bethel would not
conjecture as to the cost to the goven-
rment to fix the problems at the
Thompson Boulevard building or to
physically move its operations to the
hotel tower.

However, Mr Sands said the hotel
accomodations are “certainly not
gratis (free)”. He also noted that cur-
rently the disused tower does not
presently have the information tech-
nology or telecommunications facili-
ties that the ministries would require.

Asked whether the Government
had budgeted for the costs involved in
moving two ministries and fixing the
mould problem, Mr Bethel said “the
government has the capacity to
respond to many challenges.”

“It’s a question at the end of the
day of reordering priorities,” he

added, noting that when it is no longer
using the NIB building it can use some
of the funds which currently go
towards paying rent there to pay Baha
Mar.

Mr Bethel also emphasised that
medical professionals say the mould is
not a threat to the health of workers
unless they have “some other condi-
tion which makes them more suscep-
tible.”

“This is really more to do with com-
fort of the staff and their self-percep-
tion in terms of how they feel com-
ing into a building that does have chal-
lenges that building on Thompson
Boulevard has.

“T think it reflects the concern and
responsibleness of government to seek
to make the situation as comfortable
as possible for the working Bahamian.

“We’re looking at floor plans right
now to detemrine availability of rooms
and sizes and whether all or part of
operations of ministry can be comfort
accomodated there.

“We’ll make some determinations
early this week to make recommen-
dations to the Prime Minister or
requests in terms of him being Minis-
ter with responsibility for the public
service dealing with rentals.”

Jolin Travolta trial set to resume today



TRAVOLTA FAMILY attorney
Michael Ossi outside court.

FROM page one

called by the prosecution in
the case. Her testimony fol-
lows that of Mr Travolta on
Wednesday, and West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe on Friday.

Mr Wilchcombe appeared
in court walking with the aid
of a stick after his foot was
seriously injured in a freak
truck accident.

He testified that former
PLP senator Pleasant Bridge-
water told him she had a
client who had a document
that could be harmful to the
Travoltas. After viewing the
document he called the Tra-
volta family’s doctor and an

attorney for the star, he said.
Mr Wilchcombe also
admitted that Bridgewater
had never told him that her
client was seeking to extract
money from Mr Travolta.
Attorney for John Travol-
ta, Michael Ossi, testified on
Friday that he spoke with Mr
Wilchcombe by telephone
around 5.30pm on January 12.
Following that conversation
he phone Michael McDer-
mott, another attorney for the
Travoltas.

Mr Ossi also told the court
that on Saturday, January 17,
he had a meeting with attor-
neys Allyson Maynard Gib-
son, Damian Gomez, Michael
McDermott, Howard Butler
and Michael Hamilton at the

firm of Gibson and Co.

Mr McDermott is expected
to testify this week as well as
Senator Maynard Gibson. It is
also expected Mr Travolta
will be recalled to the stand.

Superstar Mr Travolta told
the court last week how he
and others made efforts to
save the life of his 16-year-
old son Jett after he suffered a
seizure in Grand Bahama on
December 29 last year.

Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne are accused of
attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from Mr Travolta by
means of threats. Bridgewater
is also accused of abetment
to extort.

The case resumes today.



US ACTOR John Travolta, left,
and wife Kelly Preston leave the
court building iast week.

outside his home
FROM page one

contradictory information
regarding the Bozene Town
shooting and more details will
be released today.

The man shot in Chipping-
ham, who has not yet been
identified by police, was in
front of his house when he
was approached by a man
known to him carrying a gun,
police say.

Several shots were fired
resulting in the victim being
wounded numerous times on
various parts of his body. The
gunman then fled.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call police as a
matter of urgency on 911, 919
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

Body found
on Rose Island

FROM page one

cause of his death.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist police
investigations should call
police on 911, 919, or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously
on 328-TIPS (8477).

Man on $80,000
cocaine charge

FROM page one

thought to have a street value
of around $80,000.

Airport police were called
when the drugs were found
at around 6am on Saturday
and a man was arrested. He is
expected to be arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court today.



THE ADRIAN GIBSON COLUMN
The notion we can govern — but not judge - ourselves is illogical!

FROM page 11

drance to the development of indige-
nous jurisprudence, saying:

“Unquestionably, the existence
of a right of appeal to the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council
affects the confidence of our Courts.
At times, our Courts appear to be
always looking over their shoulders
across the vast ocean of sea towards
the Privy Council for applause and
approbation.

“This subjugation or subservience
of judicial thought and independence
cannot be justified in independent
and sovereign states.”

While the Constitution must be
amended to accommodate our own
final court, and while Justice Saun-
ders’ view holds true in some
respects, it is no reason to join the
CCJ. Frankly, at present, the funding
of the CCJ poses a problem for that
regional high court as it is quite cost-
ly, this being of particular note dur-
ing these economically gloomy times.
By contrast, the Privy Council is rel-
atively cheap and all the countries
using this appellate court share costs.

Furthermore, if more countries—
including the Bahamas—were to
adopt the CCJ as its final appellate
court, will the judges be chosen on
merit or quota? And if so, would
this leave some jurisdictions out?

In his book, ‘An introduction to
law and legal systems of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas”, Dr
Dexter Johnson asserts that:

“The Privy Council does not com-
promise our sovereignty in the man-
ner that a regional court might do
since the latter comes with the shad-
ow of a political union hanging over
it. The regionalists in the Bahamas
might wish to merge us into a region-
al, political and economic entity
which would be subject to the central
final court of this political unit, the
Caribbean Court of Justice. Region-
al and local politics would dictate
the appointments to this court.”

Before joining the CCJ, Guyana
had already established a precedent
by using its Court of Appeal as its
final court. Like New Zealand
(2003), Grenada and Guyana, it is
expected that in the Bahamas there
will be an eventual abolition of
appeals to an overseer court, in this

PE eT A

I WOULD like to wish the
greatest mom, the one queen in
this world — my grandmother
Lenora Gibson of Bunches, Long
Island — a happy birthday!
Tomorrow, my grandmother, who
raised me and is affectionately
called “mammy”’, will celebrate
her 77th birthday.

My grandmother and grandfa-
ther (Edward Gibson) are my
backbone, the pillars I rely on in
good times and times of distress.
Happy birthday mammy, I wish
you continued good health and I
love you both!



instance, the Privy Council.

In establishing the present Court
of Appeal (COA), the Bahamas’
constitution states that “there shall
be a Court of Appeal for the
Bahamas which shall have such juris-
diction and powers as may be con-
ferred upon it by this constitution

or any other law.” In order to estab-
lish the COA as our final appellate
body, the scope of the court must
be broadened, even though it is
presently the final local court on
issues that may fall outside of the
jurisdictional purview of the JCPC.

The Bahamas needs to change its
approach to jurisprudence, as lower
court magistrates should be elected
and the use of a local final appel-
late court should foster greater inter-
pretation of the law in a manner suit-
able to the people.

However, while an indigenous
appellate court is desirable, espe-
cially as it is also familiar with local
lifestyles/customs, our population
size may hamper its establishment
as questions will arise about the pos-
sibility of a fair trial, the threat that
a judge could be openly partisan to
someone coming before him/her,
politically biased, incompetent
and/or crooked.

All must be done to ensure that
this court is insulated and that these
pitfalls must be avoided. Moreover,
there is a need for an independent
legal commission!

Bahamian court decisions have in

the past been praised by Privy Coun-
cil jurists for being erudite and cor-
rect.

Our eventual delinking with the
Privy Council will signal our thrust
towards building a nation without
limitations, signal a move towards
real constitutional reform and
enhance judicial creativity.

The notion that we can govern
ourselves but are not capable of
judging ourselves is a non sequitur
that is simply illogical!

Bahamians are so emotive and
ecstatic about our independence and
sovereignty— particularly around
July 10 every year when throngs of
Bahamians are brandishing flags,
shirts and other related parapher-
nalia—but the reality is that unless
we engage in major constitutional
reform and seriously modify our
legal system, our sovereignty in some
respects is merely theoretical.

The relevance of the law in local
circumstances is best achieved by
locals, not by regional or far distant
courts whose Law Lords’ thinking
is not superior to that of the most
ethical and scrupulous Bahamian
jurists.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

For the best sporting action . . .

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PROPER Care Pool Lady Sharks’ catcher
Debbie McClure reaches safely on base as
Pineapple Air Wildcats’ shortstop Jeanette
Hilton couldn’t hold onto the ball...

WILDCATS’ third baseman Maryann Fowler makes the tag on Proper Care

Pool Lady Sharks’ centerfielder Keisha Miller...

Wildcats ‘bite u
Sharks 13-9

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Pineapple Air Wild-
cats are clicking on all cylin-
ders and that is creating hav-
oc in their quest to regain the
New Providence Softball
Association ladies’ champi-
onship crown.

The pennant winning Wild-
cats posted a 13-9 triumph
over last year's runners-up
Proper Care Pool Lady
Sharks on Saturday night at
the Banker's Field at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex.

With the win, Pineapple
Air pushed their front-run-
ning record to 15-1, while
Proper Care Pool climbed
into second, a half-game
ahead of defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes at 10-

It was the lone game played
as the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Commodores
failed to show up to play the
Thompson Heavy Equipment
Outlaws in the men's opener.

With the loss, the Outlaws
are mathematically out of the
playoff race at 6-13 in seventh
place. The Outlaws are still
in the hunt in fifth place at
10-12, trailing last year's run-
ners-up Robin Hood Hitmen,
who are currently in fourth
place at 11-9.

Wildcats’ manager Jack
Davis said his Wildcats are

Commodores are no show against

une242.c

The

Ojke

WILDCATS’ Marvelle Miller delivers a pitch...

the Outlaws in men’s opener

playing like the true champi-
ons that they established
themselves to be over the
years and that is causing a lot
of problems for their oppo-
nents.

"When you look at the
team, we are gelling right
now,” Davis said. "We're just
getting ready for the playoffs.
So tonight, we tried to use
some of the new players.

"The idea is to get them in
form so that they can step in if
we need them when we get
to the playoffs. So by the time
the playoffs are set, the Wild-
cats will be ready."

Davis said he's confident
that whenever the playoffs get
started, Pineapple Air will
take their game to the next
level as they've consistently
done so over the years.

With ace Mary Edge-
combe-Sweeting playing first
base, Marvelle Miller got the
starting nod. She went the dis-
tance throwing a six-hitter
with a strike out. She also
helped her cause with a 2-for-
4 night with two runs scored.

Sweeting-Edgecombe and

Softball standings

Teams WwW
Ladies’ Division
Pineapple Air Wildcats 15
PC Pool Lady Sharks 10
Sigma Brackettes 9
Bommer G Swingers 4
Queens

Men’s Division

Dorcey Park Boyz 21
Pricewater Stingrays 17
CS Truckers 12
Robin Hood Hitmen 11
R Thompson’s Outlaws 10
Young Breed 7
D Force Commodores 6
Buccaneers

Mighty Mits 3



shortstop Jeanette Hilton
were both 1-for-5 with a run
batted in. They scored three
and two runs respectively.
Catcher Donnette Edwards
was 1-for-4 with three runs
scored.

Pineapple Air rebounded
from a 5-3 deficit in the top of
the third by producing six
unearned runs on just one hit
to stake their claim to anoth-
er victory as they opened a 9-
5 lead.

They put three more on the
scoreboard in the sixth,
sparked by Miller's lead off
triple and ending with
Hilton's run-producing triple.

And for insurance,
Edwards got a one-out single
in the seventh and raced
home with their final run on
an error.

Proper Care Pool managed
one last effort for a comeback
in the seventh when they
marched eight batters to
plate. But their effort was
thwarted after they left the
bases loaded.

In the rally, catcher Deb-
bie McClure reached safely
on a two-base fielding error
and eventually came home on
a wild pitch before shortstop
Vonetta Nairn got on with
another error and caught a
ride home on Jeannine Wal-
lace’s RBI single.

With two out, Wallace
advanced all the way to third,
second sacker Raquel Cooper
got to second and center field-
er Keisha Pratt-Miller was on
base before relief pitcher
Alex Taylor grounded out to
end the game.

Shonel Symonette, the
starting pitcher, got the loss
before she was relieved in the
fourth.

McClure ended up going 2-
for-4 with two RBIs and two
runs scored. Thela Johnson
was also 2-for-4 with a RBI,
scoring a run. Left fielder
Cleo Symonette was 2-for-4,

scoring a run and Raquel
Cooper was 2-for-4 with a
RBI and a pair of runs scored.

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WILDCATS’ Maryann Fowler makes contact with the ball...

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



For the b

www.

Local swim
coaches attend
World Clinic

THE American Swimming
Coaches Association (ASCA)
World Clinic 2009 was held in
beautiful Ft Lauderdale Septem-
ber 7-13.

It hosted over 1,000 American
and international swim coaches
from around the world.

Several top coaches from the
US and Australia were speakers
at the clinic.

The local coaches who attend-
ed the clinic were Andy and Nan-
cy Knowles, Geoff Eneas, Mike
Stewart, Travano McPhee, Iva
Russell, Chikako Christoffersen,
Mancer Roberts, Sara Knowles,
and Ashley Sands.

This year was unique in that
they honoured the nine US
Olympic swim coaches who are
still alive. The coaches showed
videos and shared experiences
from different Olympic Games
over the last 50 years.

“This year’s clinic comes on
the heels of the Roman Circus
that was the World champi-
onships a few weeks ago, and we
are all eagerly looking forward
to resolution from FINA on the
issues relating to the high-tech
swimsuits,” said John Leonard,
executive director of the ASCA.

There was much discussion on
the swim suits, including com-
ments from the top Australian
swim coach Allan Thompson
who compared the problem with
the suits to the drug problem with
the German doping system in the
70s.

This year’s clinic was also dif-
ferent in that Andy and Nancy
Knowles were speakers at the
clinic.

They spoke on the pilot pro-
gramme of teaching government
school children how to swim by
using the swimming pools from
private schools. There was posi-
tive feedback and much interest
from the other coaches.

ASCA is an independent pro-
fessional association based on a
central theme of leadership in
American swimming through
education, certification and co-
operation.

The swim coaches association
plays a leadership role in evalu-
ating past efforts, present con-
cerns and future planning and in
proposing solutions in both the
coaching and swimming commu-
nities.

The leadership function is pro-
vided by synthesizing ideas and
information from throughout the
swimming community into a
coherent direction for action.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s bid for the World
Boxing Council’s Interna-
tional super middleweight
title ended with a severe cut
over his right eye and now
his British Commonwealth
title defence could be in
jeopardy.

On Friday night at the Bell
Centre in Montreal, Canada,
Mackey was forced to stop
fighting 20 seconds into the
fifth round of their scheduled
12-round co-main event bout
against Adonis ‘Superman’
Stevenson.

Back after a year’s
absence, Stevenson scored a
knockdown at the end of the
fourth and he reportedly
pounced and pounded away
at Mackey at the start of the
fifth when referee Adrio
Zannoni stepped in and
stopped the fight.

“Things was going great. I
was in the fight, but after I
got cut in the fourth round,
the referee asked the doctor
to take a look at it and he
said I have to stop the fight,”
Mackey said.

“T told the doctor that I
didn’t want the fight to stop
because I was fighting for a
WBC International title and
world ranking. I was in the
fight.”

But Mackey said the doc-
tor warned him that because
the cut was so severe, if it got
any worse, he would have to
stop the fight.

“Tn the fifth round, Adonis
came right at me and the ref-
eree stepped in and stopped
the fight,” Mackey said.
“They gave Adonis a 17th
ranking in the world, but I
knew that could have been
me if I didn’t get the cut.”

A disappointed Mackey,
who took on the fight just
before he is due to defend
his British Commonwealth
title next month, said had he

sporting action . . .

inbune?4?. (

Severe cut over right |

eye ends Choo Choo’s
bid for WBC title

JERMAINE MACKEY (shown) was forced to stop fighting 20 seconds into the fifth round of a scheduled
12-round co-main event bout against Adonis ‘Superman’ Stevenson...

not been cut, he was con-
vinced that the outcome
would have been a lot differ-
ent.

Not only did Mackey have
to get some stitches for the
cut, but he will also have to
sit out the next 45 days
before he can get back into
the ring to fight again.

“T wasn’t focusing on the
British Commonwealth title.

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I was focusing on getting the
WBC International title and
getting a world ranking,” he
said. “I wanted to get the
Bahamas closer to getting a
world title shot.”

After five days he will be
allowed to have the stitches
removed. Once they are out,
Mackey said he intends to
get right back in the gym to
continue his training for the

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next opportunity to fight.

His trainer Ray Minus Jr,
who accompanied Mackey to
the fight, said it’s not antici-
pated that he will be pre-
pared to fight again until
December.

“He will more than likely
be able to defend his British
Commonwealth title then,”
Minus Jr stressed. “We are
addressing that matter now
to the Commonwealth Box-
ing Commission. We are pro-
viding them with a new date
and hope they will accept it.”

Minus Jr, the former
British Commonwealth ban-
tamweight champion, said
Mackey fought well up until
the time that he suffered the
cut and was unable to con-
tinue.

With the win, Stevenson
remained undefeated at 13-0
with 10 KOs. Mackey
dropped to 18-4 with 14
KOs.

The fight was held under
the main event bout that saw
Montreal’s Jean Pascal suc-
cessfully defend his WBC’s
light heavyweight title with
a 10th round technical
knockout over Italian Silvio
(II Barbaro) Branco.

It was Pascal’s first title
defence as he was matched
against the No.1 challenger
in the 175-pound division.

Mackey thanked his spon-
sors, V8 Splash, Prime

Wa

VINCE FERGUSON
MEMORIAL

A MEMORIAL service
for the late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson is scheduled to
be held 7:30pm Tuesday
at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road. The funeral service
is set for 2pm Thursday at
St Francis Cathedral.

Ferguson, 71, died at his
home on Wednesday
while eating breakfast. He
reportedly had a massive
heart attack. He was suf-
fering from prostate can-
cer.

He left behind his wife
Marie and two children,
Anne-Marie and Vincent
Alex.

VOLLEYBALL
TOM GRANT
RESULTS

THE annual Tom “The
Bird’ Grant High School
Invitational High School
Volleyball Tournament
concluded on Saturday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
sium.

In the senior girls divi-
sion, the C C Sweeting
Cobras knocked off Telios
Christian Academy 22-25,
25-20 and 15-9. Mt Carmel
defeated the CV Bethel
Stingrays 19-17 and 19-17.

Telios Christian Acade-
my, however, won the
senior boys division with
a 25-18 and 25-16 decision
over C V Bethel.

The tournament served
as a prelude to the Gov-
ernment Secondary
Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s 2009 volleyball sea-
son that is expected to kick
off 4pm today.

The senior boys and
girls will play at the D W
Davis and C I Gibson
Gymnasiums, while the
junior boys and girls will
play at the R M Bailey and
Tom Grant outdoor vol-
leyball courts.

TRACK
BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to
hold a meeting 7pm Fri-
day at McDonald’s,
Thompson Blvd. The
meeting is to discuss the
BSC's 2009 Nicola Major
track and field meet that
has been postponed until
Saturday, October 24 at
the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.

The BSC, in the mean-
time, will take a break on
Saturday from its 2009
Olympia Morris-Evans
Softball Classic at the Bail-
lou Hills Sports Complex
for the funeral service of
his brother, Rashad Lewis.

Lewis, who assisted the
BSC in the concession
stand, was killed recently
during an attempted rob-
bery.



Bahamas, Nautilus Water,
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture and his new
sponsor Big Shot Sporting
Lounge, for the assistance
they all rendered in getting
him prepared for the fight.

—SSESE,
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THE TRIBUNE

S h
| MONDAY,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n his first appearance

at the Mr Olympia

bodybuilding cham-

pionships, Joel

Stubbs was looking
forward to at least cracking
the top 10.

But at Saturday’s show at
the Orleans Arena & Las
Vegas Convention Center in
Las Vegas, Nevada, Stubbs
failed to make it out of the
preliminary rounds.

The Bahamasair pilot, who
had switched from playing
basketball to weight training
and then bodybuilding after
he had broken his leg, was
unavailable for comment up
to press time last night.

But prior to the start of the
weekend competition, he not-
ed that he was thrilled to have
been among the elite body-
builders in the world.

Out of the field of 23 com-
petitors who participated in
the two-day event over the
weekend, Stubbs finished tied
for the 16th and final spot
with seven others.

The list included Trinidad
& Tobago’s Darren Charles.

PAGE 15

i

SEPTEMBER 28,



S

2009



JOEL STUBBS didn’t make it out of preliminary rounds at Mr Olympia...

Lebanon.
None of them made it out

The others were Americans
Troy Alves and Bill Wilmore,

Sweden’s Martin Kjellstrom,
German Dennis Wolf, Aus-
tralian Michael Kefalianos
and Ahmad Haidar of

of the two preliminary rounds
after they all accumulated 80
points.

Stubbs, who had earned his

“=e es.

qualification last month in
Dallas, Texas, was the first
Bahamian to have competed
in the most prestigious body-
building event in the world.

For the third consecutive
year, Jay Cutler won the title
as he led an American sweep
of the top five positions with
15 points, scoring the lowest
points of five in all three
rounds.

Branch Warren, who col-
lected 46 points, was second,
while Dexter Jackson got
third with 47. Coming in
fourth with 54 was Kai
Greene and Phil Heath
rounded out the top field with
55.

Cutler joined an elite field
of multiple winners, including
California governor Arnold
Schwarzegger, who has seven
to his ledger. However, both
Lee Haney and Ronnie Cole-
man have captured eight titles
apiece. Dorian Yates is next
in line with six.

Named just like the Chica-
go Bears’ quarter-back, Cutler
told the Las Vegas Sun News-
paper that he “wants to make
history.”

“This is all I think about.
It’s what I live for. I eat, drink
and sleep bodybuilding.”



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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



UNITED KINGDOM

Royal Navy announces major cocaine seizure

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(AP Photo/Ministry of Defense)
IN THIS UNDATED IMAGE released by Britain’s Ministry of Defense
Sunday, Sept. 27, 2009, a U.S. Coast Guard boarding party approach
a fishing boat prior to finding more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound)
bales of cocaine. Britain’s Royal Navy said it had made a record
seizure of cocaine after a frigate operating off the coast of South Amer-
ica captured drugs with an estimated street value of more than 240
million pounds ($384 million).

LONDON

Britain's Royal Navy said it made a record seizure of
cocaine when a frigate operating off the coast of South
America captured drugs with an estimated street value of
more than 240 million pounds ($384 million), according to
Associated Press.

The Ministry of Defense said the HMS Iron Duke found
5.5 tons (about 6 U.S. tons) of cocaine on a fishing boat ear-
lier this month — the Royal Navy's largest drug seizure
ever.

"This surpasses anything we've had and anything the
Navy had previously,” said Commander Andrew Stacey of
the HMS Iron Duke. "It is the largest drugs bust by value,
and by volume in terms of cocaine."

The ministry refused to say exactly where the operation
took place for security reasons.

Suspiciously

The Navy launched the operation after one of its heli-
copters spotted a fishing boat "acting suspiciously" in an area
known for drug trafficking, a ministry statement said. Along
with the U.S. Coast Guard and another British vessel, the
HMS Iron Duke intercepted the boat on Sept. 15 and spent
the next 24 hours searching for contraband.

They found more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound) bales
of cocaine under concrete in the fishing boat's ballast tanks,
the ministry said. The cocaine's final destination is unknown.

Britain's Prince William served a brief tour aboard the
HMS Iron Duke last summer.

While the prince was a crew member, the ship seized
cocaine worth an estimated 45 million pounds after an oper-
ation northeast of Barbados.

Earlier this year, the ship seized drugs worth an estimat-
ed 33 million pounds.

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Baby Boomers’
‘double whammy’
for the economy

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _

T H E
upcoming
retirement of
the Bahamas’

own ‘Baby
Boomers’ will
have “an

enormous
impact on
economic
growth and
development”
because they
form 30 per cent of this
nation’s workforce, a former
minister has warned, while the
effects of the global recession
on their US counterparts
could prove equally troubling.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance in the
Christie administration, said
that while some studies of the
US ‘Baby Boom’ generation —
those born between 1946 and
1964 — suggested economic
growth there could be retard-
ed through the loss of skills
associated with their retire-
ment, the impact on the
Bahamas could potentially be
even greater.

The CFAL chairman,
addressing a seminar organ-
ised by his own investment
advisory firm, said that while
it was estimated that Baby
Boomers accounted for 25 per
cent of the US labour force,
“in the Bahamas that contri-
bution is even higher”.

“Tt represents 30 per cent
of the labour force,” Mr
Smith said of the Bahamian
‘Baby Boom’ generation.
“That is because unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas is par-
ticularly high amongst the
young.

“The productive labour
force are the ones who belong
to the Baby Boomers genera-
tion. They represent a partic-
ular set of dynamics.”

Mr Smith said that if this
generation were to retire
together, and forced early
retirements among older
workers were increasingly
becoming the norm as
employers sought to cut costs
during the recession, “the
vacancies created by the
retirees will be filled by the
pool of young people.

“These people coming in
might not have the same skill
set as those retiring,” the ex-
minister added, warning that
this might have “an enormous
impact on economic growth
and development”.

As for their US counter-
parts, Mr Smith said the main
concern for the Bahamas was
the impact the recession had
on their wealth levels and,
consequently, their spending
and travel habits. Surveys sug-
gested they had spending
power of some $3 trillion per
year, with a hefty chunk of

SEE page 4B

SMITH



THE TRIBUNE

gu



MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ine

SEPTEMBER 28,





ys

2009



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Building structure ‘key’
to 30-50% energy saving

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian businesses and

homeowners could have

properties that are 30-

50 per cent more energy

efficient by simply get-

ting the initial structure right, the

founder of a Bahamas-based con-

struction/consulting company has told

Tribune Business, thereby reducing
future alternative energy demand.

Kymenski Kemp, founder and pres-

ident of Caribbean Greensafe, a new-

ly-formed construction, consulting and

development company, said he had

established the firm as “a one-stop

shop” for the supply, design and devel-

opment of environmentally-friendly

building materials, homes and struc-

* Green construction start-up's founder says electric bill reduction from
getting wall, floor and foundation insulation right could reach 60-70%

* Firm aims to provide ‘one-stop shop' for consulting, design and
delivery of eco-friendly construction, materials and advice

* Aiming to start pre-sales on first Bahamas-based real estate
development ‘within a month'

* Caribbean export eyed as company develops

tures, both in the Bahamas and, even-
tually, the Caribbean.

Mr Kemp, a fully-qualified Bahami-
an architectural engineer, with more
than 20 years’ experience in the Flori-
da construction industry, told Tribune
Business that Caribbean Greensafe

was already planning its first Bahamas-
based real estate development, the 24-
unit Emerald Breezes Villa develop-
ment, with pre-sales due to start “with-
in the next month”.

“Tf you start with your structure, and
make it energy efficient, it’s very fea-

sible to be in the 30-50 per cent [ener-
gy| savings range without going to
alternative energy sources yet and, in
some cases, you can even leapfrog that
— up to 60-70 per cent,” Mr Kemp told

Rivals tell regulator:
Stop Cable distorting
market competition

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

REGULATORS have
been urged to mandate that
Cable Bahamas “provide
unbundled, non-discriminato-
ry access to its network”, rival
operators warning that the
BISX-listed company must
not be allowed to distort mar-
ket competition again, as it
did when it effectively forced
five rival Internet Service
Providers (ISPs) out of busi-
ness to achieve market domi-
nation.

Responding to the Govern-

Bank ‘concern’
on BNP Paribas
departure move

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chairman has
described BNP Paribas’s
decision to quit this juris-
diction by year-end 2010
as “regrettable” given that
this nation does “not need
any of its blue chip banks”
to depart, and expressed
concern about the pres-
sure G-20 nations could
be subjecting their head
offices to.

SEE page 9B



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* SRG chief calls on new
supervisory body to
ensure BISX-listed
company provides
‘unbundled, non-
discriminatory access’
to network to prevent
repeat of Internet debacle,
which forced five
rivals out of business

ment’s consultation on
access/interconnection issues
in the Bahamian communica-
tions industry, Paul Hutton-
Ashkenny, Systems Resource
Group’s (SRG) president,
warned that “it would be
unconscionable for URCA to

SEE page 7B

SEE page 8B

Power firm’s sales drop 12% in ‘09

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company’s (GBPC) kilowatt
per hour (kWh) sales fell by
12 per cent year-over-year
during the 2009 first quarter,
the company’s president and
chief executive has revealed,
continuing a trend that saw a
2 per cent decline in 2008.

Writing in the annual
report for ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle
that owns a 50 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power
Company, E. O. Ferrell
acknowledged that 2008 “was
a difficult year” for the
island’s monopoly power sup-
plier, even with the benefit of
a 4.87 per cent rate increase
from April onwards.

He added that this rate rise
was “negatively offset” by
Grand Bahama’s continued
economic decline, both as a
result of the global recession
and the continued closure of
the Royal Oasis, “and unsea-
sonably cool weather during

the fourth quarter”.

“Overall, 2008 kWh sales
were 2 per cent less than
2007,” Mr Ferrell wrote.
“Unfortunately, that trend is
continuing into the first quar-
ter 2009, with kWh sales 12
per cent below the same peri-
od in 2008. There were, how-
ever, items of positive growth
that will be beneficial for
years to come.”

For the 12 months to
December 31, 2008, Grand
Bahama Power Company’s
net income rose by little over
$100,000 or 3 per cent, to
$3.621 million compared to
$3.516 million the year before.

This was despite a 23.2 per
cent rise in operating rev-
enues, from $94.076 million
to $116.036 million, as total
operating expenses — includ-
ing fuel costs, which peaked in
July last year — rose by a
greater amount, 24.7 per cent,
to $108.752 million compared
to $87.207 million the year
before.

As a consequence, net
operating income grew by

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Service Announcement

ACL is pleased ta announce the grand opening of a new and improves

consolidation warehouse and container terminal.

Effective September 28, 2009, ACL will be relocating to a larger and more

modern facility in Pompano Beach, Florida our new delivery address in

Broward County will be:

This new terminal will facilitate ACL in its pursuit to provide our custamers

with the highest level of customer service at the best possible price. We

appreciate your continued support and look forward to seeing you in our

new Pompano Beach facility,









OU

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

DURING the week,
Bahamian investors traded in
10 out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, of which none advanced,
six declined and four
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 196,878 shares
changed hands, representing a
growth of 131,023 shares com-
pared to the previous week's
trading volume of 65,855
shares.

AML Foods (AML) was
the volume leader, some
65,500 shares trading, its stock
declining by $0.08 to close the
week at $1.07.

Focol Oil Holdings (FCL)
was the lead decliner, its share
price falling by $0.49 to a new
52-week low of $4.50, on a
volume of 42,425 shares.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) share price also fell to
a new 52-week low of $5.90
ona volume of 42,200 shares
traded. First Caribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB), too, experienced a new
52-week low on a volume of
25,000 shares traded to close
the week at $10.

BOND MARKET
There were no bonds trad-
ed on the market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

AML Foods (AML)
released its unaudited finan-
cial results for the quarter
ending July 31, 2009. For the

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quarter, AML reported a net
profit of about $1.2 million,
compared to $162,000 in the
same period last year, an
increase of $1.015 million.

Gross profit of $7.4 million
increased by $1.3 million or
20 per cent quarter-over-quar-
ter. Overall, expenses
increased, but due to the sales
growth during the period its
impact on net profit was not
substantial.

AML/’s chairman indicated
that both sales and gross mar-
gin dollars had increased,
shrinkage in stores had
decreased and liquidity had
improved, resulting in a fur-
ther reduction in the compa-
ny's bank debt.

Total assets and liabilities
at July 31, 2009, were $29.5
million and $15 million
respectively, compared to
$30.6 million and $18.3 mil-
lion at fiscal year-end.

e First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) (CIB)
released its unaudited finan-
cial statement for the quarter
ended July 31, 2009. For the
quarter, CIB reported net
income of $19.4 million com-
pared to $26.7 million for the
same period in the prior year
, a decline of $7.3 million or
27 per cent.

Net interest income of $35.3
million declined by $3.3 mil-
lion or 8.5 per cent quarter-
over-quarter and, as stated by
the bank’s chairman, this was
influenced by the decline in
international interest rates,
partially offset by higher loan
volumes during the quarter.

Loan loss expense in the
third quarter was $6.2 million



leant tae





TT
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SMUT LET Laat

compared to $8.7 million in
the 2008 third quarter. How-
ever, year-to-date CIB has
recorded loan loss expenses
of $20.3 million, compared to
$15 million for the same peri-
od in the prior fiscal year.

Total assets decreased from
$4.2 billion to $3.9 billion, and
total liabilities also declined
from $3.7 billion to $3.2 bil-
lion from the bank's year-end.
However, management indi-
cated that the bank remains
well capitalised with a current
Tier 1 capital ratio of 17.7 per
cent, well in excess of the min-
imum requirement of 14 per
cent.

Dividend Notes

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

¢ Doctor's Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
declared a dividend of $0.02
per share, payable on Sep-
tember 30, 2009, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date September 17, 2009.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

¢ Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6, 2009,
to all ordinary shareholders
of record date October 1,
2009.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B





‘Yeoman’s effort’
needed to beat
recession woes

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A “yeoman’s effort” will be
needed from all Bahamians
and economic sectors if the
Bahamas is to overcome the
challenges created by the cur-
rent global recession, the min-
ister of state for finance
acknowledging that the down-
turn had “exposed some of
the fundamental weaknesses
in our system”.

Addressing a seminar
organised by CFAL, the
investment advisory firm,
Zhivargo Laing conceded that
the Bahamas’ present unem-
ployment rate, estimated at
14 per cent for New Provi-
dence and 17 per cent for
Grand Bahama, was “high”,
adding that an immediate
challenge was “job creating
economic growth” to provide
sustainable long-term employ-
ment.

“Clearly, it is a challenge
to have in excess of 15,000
persons unemployed, both
because of the personal hard-
ship it brings to them and as it
relates to the loss of income
and productivity to the
nation,” Mr Laing said. “Cre-
ating jobs for people today is
important. Being able to cre-
ate jobs in a sustainable fash-
10n 1s even more important.”

The two main drivers of the
Bahamian economy, tourism
and foreign direct investment,
had been heavily impacted by
the global recession, and Mr
Laing said the Government
was focused on maintaining a
sound fiscal position — deriv-
ing enough revenue to sustain
itself, and its capacity to main-
tain debt spending.

Arguing that successive

adminis-
trations
had gener-
ated
enough fis-
cal ‘head
room’ to
allow the
Ingraham
govern-
ment to
sustain a
burgeon-
ing fiscal
deficit and
deb
spending
in the short-term, Mr Laing
acknowledged: “If this down-
turn endures for a long period
of time, it becomes a more
significant challenge. The rev-
enue shortfall against forecast
is more than $30 million
behind.......... Tt will not be
sustainable if this situation
continues much longer. The
greatest vigilance is being paid
by us.”

Although the monetary sec-
tor, in the form of foreign
exchange reserves, and the
commercial banking system
were currently stable, Mr
Laing said: “We sometimes
miss the reality that this crisis
has left thousands of Bahami-
ans” unable to meet their reg-
ular obligations, such as mort-
gages and rent, electricity
bills, school fees and medical
expenses.

The Government had
expanded social services’ bud-
get by some $12 million over
the last two budget periods,
Mr Laing said, and the extra
funding had been much need-
ed. The fact that some 6,000
customers had been discon-
nected for non-payment by
BEC “is just an indication of

LAING



the continuing saga of this
current economic crisis”.

Calling on all Bahamians
and stakeholders to work
together, the minister added:
“Crime has implications for
economic growth, both now
and in the future. Citizens,
businesses and investors all
require an environment
deemed to be safe to flour-
ish. There has to be a reduc-
tion in the levels of crime we
are experiencing.”

Mr Laing also identified
human capital, and the pro-
vision of after-hours training
to those already employed in
the workforce, as one area for
advancement. “We need to
improve our level of produc-
tivity to ensure we’re putting
out a world-class product,” he
added.

Domestic savings needed
to be increased, the minister
added, plus economic diversi-
fication achieved “with exist-
ing domestic dominant sec-
tors and expanded output in
other economic sectors. We
must look for opportunities
in all sectors.

“We need to expand our
global outreach by putting
Bahamian goods and services
into more markets abroad,”
Mr Laing said. “We need to
make it easier to do business
in this country for everyone
by removing bureaucratic
impediments to the establish-
ment and conduct of busi-
ness.”

He also argued that the
Bahamas needed to formal-
ize trade arrangements with
other countries, in order to
provide its businesses and
entrepreneurs with a mecha-
nism of redress to resolve
trade disputes.

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* Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe,

coffee maker, hair dryer

+ Kids 15 and under, free

¢ Pool with swim “up bar

Limited-time offer! Reserve today /

Call 242-363-3680

*$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. - Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. - Sat. Maximum
four persons perroom. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory
taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on
standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours
prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply.



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(-\) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.coh,edu.hs

ADMINISTRATIVE VACANCY

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following
position:

Dean, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI) will serve as
chief academic and stakeholder liaison officer for CHMI providing vision,
leadership, management and advocacy for tourism, hospitality and culinary
arts, 1s programmes, facully and staff within the College of The Bahamas.

Specific duties and responsibilities will involve formulating with key
stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College’s master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
processes; providing leadership and coordination in the recruitment, selec-
tion and assignment of faculty and staff; liaising and collaborating with rel-
evant industry, NGOs and private sector stakeholders and working closely
with the employment community to review, develop and implement curric-
ula, courses and certification programmes based upon defined needs.

Applicants should possess a doctoral degree in one of the disciplines of
tourism, hospitality, management or a related field, a minimum of five (3)
years of successful academic leadership at the level of department chair or
above or ten (10) years expenence at an executive level within the hospi-
tality industry of an appropriate combination of academic qualification and
training. For a detailed job description, visit www.coob,edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply no later
than Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

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FROM page 1B

that going on travel and vaca-
tions.

He added that in one recent
survey, three-quarters of US
Baby Boomers spoken to said
they had “suffered much loss
of wealth” as a result of the
plunge US and global stock
markets sustained in late
2008, since most of their
investments were linked to
this. As a result, the survey
found many “had to adjust
their lifestyles, making fewer
purchases of big-ticket items
and taking fewer vacations”.

With the Bahamas receiv-
ing about 85 per cent of its
visitors from the US, and
many of these wealthy
retirees from the Baby Boom

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389

1 blk west of Hilton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquoise building, on one way westbound street

Em-rtamor

A





















8
és
ee

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:

1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com
2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide mote efficient service.
All information will be treated as strictly confidential.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

BIOLAGE ALFAPARF

PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

USNS
Baby Boomers’ ‘double

whammy’ for the economy

generation, the implications
for this nation are obvious.
“Tf the losses of wealth by this
group translate into a dra-
matic change in spending
behaviour, it could mean a
slower economic recovery in
the US, and an even slower
recovery in the Bahamas if
this most important group of
Americans decided to take
less vacations,” Mr Smith
warned.

“The importance of this
group, and the outlook going
forward over the next few
years, should be of particular
concern to the Bahamas. Any
change in spending habits will
have an impact on the
Bahamian economy.

“The impact for the
Bahamas, if the Baby
Boomers change their spend-
ing habits, to begin with
would be a slowdown in eco-
nomic activity, persistently
high levels of unemployment
and more forced retirements.
Businesses would be likely to
see a slowdown in economic
activity this year, and the year
after, and be likely to contin-
ue downsizing staffing levels.”

Many Bahamians forced
into early retirement as a
result of recession-related
downsizing in the workforce
had not prepared for this
eventuality, Mr Smith

GLINTON

warned, even though it was
generally agreed that retirees
on average needed 75 per
cent of their pre-retirement
income to live on.

To prepare for their retire-
ment needs, Mr Smith urged
Bahamians to develop a Bud-
get matching anticipated
income against likely spend-
ing. If spending appeared to
exceed income, one way to
bridge the gap was to stay in
the labour force beyond the
retirement age of 65.

While early planning was
recommended, he added: “It’s
not a perfect world. Many
people are facing day to day
challenges, and do not have
the time or opportunity to
plan. Those persons forced
into retirement, especially
those in the Bahamas over the
past year or so, have been
forced to make adjustments
to their lifestyles.”

To cope, the former minis-
ter suggested that those
Bahamians forced unexpect-
edly into early retirement
needed to “take a step back”
and perform a self-assessment
of where they were and where
they were going

He warned that it “could
be a mistake” for Bahamians
forced into early retirement
to dip into any retirement
funds they received upon

The Partners and Stalf of:

are pleased to announce that

PATRICK H, RYAN

THE TRIBUNE



leaving the workforce,
explaining: “It would be bet-
ter to resist using that money
too soon. You'll regret it later.
By going into that account too
soon, you'll be giving up the
opportunity of having retire-
ment income and you’re
worse off.”

Mr Smith also urged forced
retirees to maintain their
health insurance coverage,
warning: “There are fewer
events that could devastate a
savings effort than a medical
tragedy. We hope it will not
happen to you, but if you’re
unemployed really try and
keep that coverage up.”

TNH

ARS Us
WA UT

aT
Insight on
Mondays



| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

COUNSEL & ATTORWMETS-AT-LAW

Has joined the firm as an Associate Attorney in the Litigation Department

with effect from July 2009. Mr.

Ryan earned his LLB from the University

of Buckingham, Buckingham, England in 2006 and was called to the Bar of
England and Wales in 2007 and the Bahamas Bar in September 2009. We

welcome Mr. Ryan to our team and look forward to him further enhancing

our ability to provide clients with efficient and effective legal services.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

aT

FURNITURE

FIXTURES & EC

ULPMENT:

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is secking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors'firms to provide services and products tor the design, supply and installation of fur-
niture, fixtures and equipment (FFA) for

(i) the Harry Wloore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and
{ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest
Prequalification Application fonm trom:

The Office of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau. Bahamas

Tel: 242-302-45 13/4516

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President

Colleze of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, (rrand Bahama
‘Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29h September, 2004) and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport ata time and venue to be announced,

EOr's

a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Viet President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

are lo be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOL Prequalification Form in

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Finns must submil a separate BOW for each faciliy. All EOs are to be submitted by 12:04)
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 8th October, 300K),



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bahamas unlikely
to ‘hit bottom’
until 2010's Q1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
is unlikely to “hit bottom”
until the 2010 first quarter, an
investment research analyst
has forecast, with business

Baha Mar hoping for 2010 second quarter start

activity and investment levels
“not expected to return to
2000 levels for three to four
years”.

Jamaal Stubbs, a senior
investment research analyst
with CFAL, told a seminar
organised by the company

that economic recovery in the
Bahamas would only be seen
in the 2010-2011 holiday sea-
son.

“We expect the upcoming
holiday season to be very
slow, very challenging,” he
added, with the Bahamian
economy unlikely to ‘bottom
out’ from the current reces-
sion until the 2010 first quar-
ter or summer next year.

The one potential bright
spot for the economy
remained Baha Mar, Mr
Stubbs added, which was
“hoping to get something
started in the second quarter
next year”.

Meanwhile, Lynden Nairn,
Colinalmperial Insurance
Company’s life division vice-
president, said that while
“only a handful of compa-
nies” in the Bahamas had
pension schemes for their
employees, many of these had
“policies and procedures that

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=\\\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:
The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Rahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 306 Thompson Blvd.
For more informtaion call: 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdom(acoh.edu.hs

Application Deadline: léth October, 24),







































were not very meaningful to
the long-term interest of the
employees”.

“What does this portend for
the future for the average
Bahamian without a pension
plan?” he asked. “In the end,
this means an increased bur-
den on the society. It’s going
to affect us in a big way with
taxation, and is going to
impact our standard of living
if certain things do not hap-
pen.”

Mr Nairn said issues such
as portability, whether an
employee leaving one com-
pany could transfer their pen-
sion plan earnings to a new
employer’s scheme, needed
consideration.

“There are issues relating
to accounting, transparency,
actuarial valuations of a fund,
risk, the return on investment
and the directors of the pen-
sion plan,” Mr Nairn said.
“My experience has been that
not many persons consider-
ing employment at a company
give serious thought to the
pension benefits.”

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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS SSS SESE aaa
Power firm’s sales drop 12% in ‘O9

FROM page 1B

income increased by more
than $1 million, both these
rises were offset by an
increase in interest expense
to $5.154 million, compared

IN THE SUPREME COURT

BETWEEN

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

to $3.432 million in 2007.
Grand Bahama Power
Company’s long-term debt
had risen by almost 50 per
cent at year-end, growing
from $66.288 million to
$99.512 million, a develop-

CLE/qui/01038

ment largely due to the $50
million bond financing it
placed in May and July 2008
to raise funds for capital
expansion projects and refi-
nance existing debt.

Financing

That financing appeared to
reduce the outstanding col-
lective balance on various
commercial bank loans from
$55.333 million to $38 million
at year-end 2008.

While Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company’s results are
interesting, of more pressing
concern to the island’s resi-
dents is likely to be the com-
pany’s performance when it
comes to service and reliabil-
ity, not to mention the rela-
tively high cost of electricity.

Looking back at 2008, Mr
Ferrell acknowledged that the
three island-wide blackouts
suffered by Grand Bahama
Power Company during that
year were “totally unaccept-
able”, and “extensive work is
underway to prevent future
occurrences”, but the same
problems have persisted into
2009.

The monopoly power pro-

ducer/supplier has been hit by
vociferous protests from both
consumers and the business
community, with the latter
complaining that Freeport will
be unable to continue as a
sustainable, long-term manu-
facturing/industrial sector
with the relatively high power
rates companies are forced to
endure.

Several told Tribune Busi-
ness that electricity rates on
Grand Bahama were four to
six times’ higher than else-
where in the world, with some
businesses losing valuable
equipment to power surges
and spikes.

The Japanese company,
Marubeni, which acquired a
majority 55 per cent interest
in Grand Bahama Power
Company several years ago,
subsequently selling 25 per
cent to Abu Dhabi power
producer Taga, has come
under fire from Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, who
criticised its performance to
date.

Many have come to view
Marubeni, and by extension,
Taga, as absentee landlords
in effect, only concerned
about the company’s profits

Attend the

12th Americas

and not its power generation
problems. There is a school
of thought that Marubeni,
which acquired its Grand
Bahama Power Company
stake when it took over
Mirant’s Caribbean opera-
tions, is only really interest-
ed in Jamaica as the biggest
market, and Freeport is a sec-
ondary concern.

Investor

The only investor to seem-

ingly take a real interest in
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany is Emera, the Canadian
power producer which
acquired its 25 per cent stake
in the firm by purchasing
Lady Henrietta St George’s
50 per cent ICD Utilities
stake in September 2008.
Grand Bahama Power
Company’s seven-strong
Board includes three repre-
sentatives from Emera, with
the other four acting on
behalf of Marubeni and Taqa.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and

The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured
YELLOW

addressed to:

Food a Beverage
Show & Conference

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

November 9-10, 2009 EA
Miami Beach ¢
Convention Center

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16", 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).

Take Advantage
of $225 Airfares
to Miami!

Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Director

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2009
CLE/qui/No.00289

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or
a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

ii acariainal IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959

® New Products Shoacese
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AND

Hill), Nassau, Bahamas

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins

aly, Malaysia, Poland, Jamalce, World Trade Cesders

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@USS235 diseoumted arfare avmlable plas. tases! Teed until Ocnober 19th

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eRegeter (ABE at wwecamericasfoodandbererage.com using special
priority registration code: FAS CAR Deadline: October 18th

Register HOW at

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels
of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a
portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate
immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5
miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.

AND

www americasloodandbererage.com

Dated this 31st day of August, A.D. 2009 IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper

HOPE STRACHAN & CO. NOTICE OF PETITION
Chambers eo
Equity House ———— Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
Mt. Royal Avenue North For More Information Contact: of September, A.D. 2009.
(Hawkins Hill) . : a eh ay
Nassau, Bahamas Omar Gonzalez/CBATO (305-536-5304) The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill

Attorneys for the Petitioner Emy Rodriguez at Tel: 305-871-7910 Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of

The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:





ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Wowk

ClIekePecoa AT A OL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.24 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.52 | YTD % -12.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Security Today's Close Daily Vol. _EPS $ Div $ P/E

7.03 AML Foods Limited 7.07 O.127

9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 0.992

5.90 5.90

0.63 0.63

3.15 3.15

2.14

10.00

2.74

5.26

1.27

1.32

6.60

8.80

10.00

4.50

Previous Close
1.08
10.75
5.90
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.34
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50

Change

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)

0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420

2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.43
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.952

Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.180
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 Prime + 1.75%

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be
Best inspected during normal office hours at the following places:
see 0.332
0.27
5.49

1.00
0.27
5.50

1.00
0.27
5.50

0.000
0.035
0.407

eaq000000000000000g
eo000000nvo00q0000 002

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The Administrator’s office at George Town, Exuma.

9.98

10.00

5S2wk-Hi _ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.

Bid $
7.92
2.00

Ask $
8.42
6.25

Last Price
14.00
4.00

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.000
0.480

0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M
0.35 0.40 0.55 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4905 3.96 5.49
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1136
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319 -0.11
1.0673 2.89
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

S2wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941

12.3870

100.0000

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name Div $
CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
18-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00

5.87
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-1.44
5.14
2.05
4.93

2.69
3.38

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009
CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price fer daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day te day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 menths
PYE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



(S. 18, O. 1, 16)





THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7B

Rivals tell regulator: Stop Cable
distorting market competition



FROM page 1B

not learn from recent history
in developing and imple-
menting future policy. The
mistakes of the past must not
be allowed to repeat them-
selves”.

The SRG president, whose
company operates as IndiGo
Networks, said that if the Util-
ities Regulation and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA) was
to meet its competition man-
date, “then Cable Bahamas
as the Significant Market
Power (SMP) operator must
be required to provide unbun-
dled, non-discriminatory
access to its network”.

Recalling recent history, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny recalled
how Cable Bahamas was
issued with an interim ISP
licence on March 3, 2000,
allowing it to introduce Inter-
net services via the cable tele-
vision network infrastructure
it had already developed.

This licence, the SRG pres-
ident said, mandated that
Cable Bahamas establish an
interconnection policy for
rival ISPs to access its cable
television network.

The main terms, he added,
were that Cable Bahamas had
to provide interconnection at
“any technically feasible
point” for rival ISPs upon
request; that it “provided
interconnection services on
non-discriminatory and objec-
tive terms, and of a quality no
less favourable” than the
BISX-listed utility provided
for its own service; and that
interconnection charges be
“orientated to their cost of
provision and sufficiently
unbundled” to that rival ISPs
did not have to pay for com-
ponents they did not require.

“It was mandated that
Cable Bahamas not add any
new Internet customers or any
new Internet accounts until
the terms and rates for inter-
connection services, and the

technical standards and spec-
ifications for interconnection,
had been approved by the
regulator,” Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said.

However, he alleged that
this was never enforced by the
former regulator, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said:
“At the time, five privately-
held ISPs, each of them offer-
ing dial-up Internet access,
indicated to the PUC their
concern that failure by Cable
Bahamas to implement [this]
would inevitably lead to com-
petitive distortion of the Inter-
net sector.

“Those ISPs, amongst them
a subsidiary of SRG, doing
business as Bahamas On-Line,
engaged a consultant from the
United States to advise on
how access to Cable
Bahamas’ network could meet
the above principles and be
made fairly available.”

The five ISPs submitted
their formal proposal to the
PUC on May 12, 2000, but the
then-regulator rejected the
industry’s view and “instead
accepted an alternative put
forward by Cable Bahamas
that, in the view of the ISPs
and their consultant, was com-
mercially unworkable and
failed to meet the principles of
interconnection enshrined in
Cable Bahamas’ licence.

“The ISPs’ prediction for
the industry came to pass,”
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said.
“SRG is not aware of a sin-
gle ISP that was able to effa-
ciously connect to, or utilize,
Cable Bahamas’ network. Not
one of the ISPs in question
was able to remain in busi-
ness, and the Internet market
today is dominated by Cable
Bahamas.”

With Cable Bahamas hav-
ing been “able to leverage its
[cable TV] monopoly into an
entirely new market” via the
Internet, and now seeking to
use its fibre-optic infrastruc-

8 PICTET

1805

ture network to enter the
fixed-line voice and cellular
telecoms industries, Mr Hut-
ton-Ashkenny urged URCA
to guard against the compa-
ny abusing its SMP status.

Given that Cable Bahamas
was given a 15-year monop-
oly in return for constructing
and building a $240 million
fibre-optic cableTV network,
the SRG president said:
“Some might argue that the
Bahamian people helped pay
for construction of that net-
work” through foregoing
competition and the tax
breaks the BISX-listed utili-
ty was granted that allowed it
to escape customs duties on
network components.

He urged the regulator not
to allow Cable Bahamas “to
enter any other markets until
such time as the cable TV net-
work access remedies have
been fully implemented and
proven”.

“Moreover, given the
potential for an SMP operator
to delay to its competitive
advantage, SRG considers
that a reasonable time peri-
od, perhaps a further 180
days, should be required to
elapse between satisfactory
demonstration of implemen-
tation and the SMP operator
being permitted to enter any
new market,” Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny urged.

“Such a mechanism would
accommodate circumstances
where a new entrant might
need time to implement
equipment and make ready to
compete in the SMP opera-
tor’s market, whilst readying
itself for competition by the
SMP operator in its own mar-
Ket.”

Cable Bahamas’ private
placement memorandum for
its recent $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, in which the
company said it had 75 per
cent and 45 per cent penetra-
tion of the Bahamian cable
TV and Internet market

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified apolicants for the following posttion:-

GLOBAL CUSTODY ADMINISTRATOR
The qualified candidate will...

« Assist the Senior Relationship Manager in all administrative aspects of his activities.
« Provide support and service to existing client relationships,
« Act as the main contact persom for clients for the daily adeninistration of their

aOOoUNTS.

~ Co-ordinate the paperwork involved im opening accounts‘account restructuring.
= Interact with Compliance and Legal departments to ensure due diligence

requirements are met.

- Cocedinate implementation of new service requirements.
« Update the client relationship database,
Visit clients with the relationship manager when required,
~ Keep the relationship manager updated om all issues regarding client accounts.
~ Maintain positive working relations with clients and all Pieter departments, inelading
close collaboration with Operations divisions,

UALIFICATIONS/SRKILLS:

“ CPACFA

~ Bachelors degree in Business/Finance
Series 7 (international) or equivalent qualification

- Knowledge of another language (French, Spanish) would be an asset,

“Working knowledge of investment instrunvents.
~ S years’ banking experience, preferably in Global Custody’Family Office.
~ Ability to manage money market, forex and trading desks.
~ Good PE skills (Word, Excel, Power Paint}

- Excellent commvanicetor

~ Enthusiastic personality.

~ Ability to work under pressure.
~ Independent and self motivated,
~ Ability te aceomplish assigned tasks in an organised and disciplined manner.

~ Ability to work with a dynamic team in a professional environment that comtirually

offers new challenges.

Hand deliver Resume, cover letter and two (2) references BY SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 to:-

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay St. & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED

Florener, Frankford, Geneva, Hang Ao

Offices in

p, London, Lirceruboure, Madrid, Milan, Adomtrent, Newnan,

respectively, with its network
passing 94 per cent of all
homes in this nation had, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny © said,
demonstrated in the compa-
ny’s own words why it should
deserve SMP status.

“Given the change in licens-
ing that will, at some point,
permit Cable Bahamas’ lever-
age of their infrastructure in
fixed voice services, it is only
reasonable that unbundling of
their infrastructure by others
should at least permit the pro-
vision of Internet Protocol TV
so that some level of TV com-
petition can be contemplat-
ed,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

“Failure to do so will simply
mean that Cable Bahamas
gains a new market with no
practical improvement in
choice for the consumer in
their core TV market.

“Tt seems reasonable, there-
fore, that Cable Bahamas
would need to demonstrate
convincingly that their net-
work is ready for additional
providers to offer IPTV and
expected multiple HD video
access across their existing
hybrid fibre coaxial network.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also
questioned whether Freeport
would be treated differently,
when it came to the
unbundling of Cable
Bahamas’ network, given that
the latter had claimed its
licence to operate in the sec-
ond city was “separate from
that elsewhere in the
Bahamas”.

The SRG president urged
that Cable Bahamas be
required “to become part of
an Internet exchange for the
Bahamas, through which all
Bahamian ISPs_ could
exchange local Internet traffic.

“Currently, Internet traffic
from one ISP in the Bahamas
to another traverses through
the United States, which is
time consuming, expensive
and a waste of resources.”

WSL

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Five Units:

One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:

One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should

submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009



DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)

Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ENERGY, from 1B

Tribune Business.

“With energy efficiency,
you're spending a lot less
money to keep the interior
cool. You're going to need a
lot less solar energy to keep
that space cool; the amount
of energy used in proportion
to the size of the home.”

These energy savings could
be achieved, he explained, by
focusing on a property’s struc-
ture — its foundations, walls
and roof — as “your insulation
is the key”. Apart from being
safe and structurally sound,
Mr Kemp explained that a
building’s structure — its exte-
rior- was what formed the bar-
rier between its interior, and
those inside, and the environ-
ment outside.

Closed-cell polyurethane



foam provided the best heat
insulation possible, the
Caribbean Greensafe presi-
dent added, in addition to pro-
viding walls with a more rigid
structure. By establishing
these “radiant barriers”
between a property’s exteri-
or and interior, Mr Kemp said:
“Tf you can cut the heat out,
it’s going to reflect directly in
your electricity bill.”

Caribbean Greensafe’s
showroom, based in the Cable
Beach shopping mall that used
to be the former City Markets
supermarket, has already been
open for four weeks to pro-
vide Bahamians “with infor-
mation on building materials
and design concepts where
you can save money”.

While the dollar value of
savings its designs, materials
and constructions could deliv-
er depended on the nature of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WALLBURG INC.

—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section




138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WALLBURG INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and








the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.









ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





the project “and how green
you want to go”, Mr Kemp
said it “was very feasible” that
the company could build a
comparable home in the same
price range as a non-energy
efficient home. The savings
would then accrue rapidly
over time from a lower energy
bill and footprint.

“A home built with energy
efficient methods is going to
appraise higher in five to 10
years because people want
those qualities in the home.
They will appraise at a higher
rate than previously-built
homes,” Mr Kemp told Tri-
bune Business.

He added that Caribbean
Greensafe’s Emerald Breeze
Villas development, located
in Sea Breeze off Joe Farring-
ton Road, would employ
design plans and practices “to
make it affordable to the buy-
er, not just upfront but on a
continual basis”.

Initial price points for the
three-bed, two bath units
would start at around
$215,000, and Mr Kemp said:
“We plan to commence pre-
sales within the next month.

We’re definitely going to be
at a price point that will be
very attractive to buyers look-
ing for a private residence.
They will be very affordable.

“Tf all goes according to
plan, and we get the pre-sales,
we will start looking at the
approvals on the permits, so it
[the construction start] won’t
be any time before January.”

Mr Kemp added that
Caribbean Greensafe was also
looking to supply turnkey
homes, offering potential
clients a “complete package”,
including a variety of floor
plans, plus energy-efficient
plumbing, tiling and even wall
trims.

Prior to starting construc-
tion at Emerald Breezes Vil-
las, Mr Kemp told Tribune
Business that Caribbean
Greensafe planned to make
an impact on the market,
“whether it be a promotion
we put on where we showcase
what these products can do
and how much energy and
money you can save.

“The goal of Caribbean
Greensafe is that, yes, we are
situated in the Bahamas, but

KAY THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Vint oar website at wwe cob edhe

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday Sth October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

we ae looking to expand. We
want to provide Bahamians
and people looking to build
in the Bahamas with the infor-
mation, the contacts and the
products to improve their
designs. There are a lot of
designs and materials out
there, but they’re not really
known......

“T think there’s a growing
demand, and I think it will
continue to grow as people
explore themselves, especially
with the cost of energy
increasing. Bahamians are
very conscious of what is out
there, and I just want to give
them the information to make
it more affordable, more
healthy and more green.

“Tt will become the industry
standard. Florida revised its
Building Code this year to
make new homes 15 per cent
more efficient than homes
built in 2001. It’s putting the
industry standard where you
have to become more energy
efficient.”

A former Queen’s College
(QC) and College of the
Bahamas (COB) graduate, Mr
Kemp worked in posts rang-
ing from senior construction
manager to development/pro-
ject manager during more
than two decades in the Flori-
da construction industry,
developing gated communi-
ties featuring several thousand
homes.

He told Tribune Business
that it was while working as
the former development man-
ager for the Delray Beach
regeneration project that he
became interested in con-
structing homes that were not
only affordable on the initial
purchase, but also for the
long-term.

Having long wanted to own
his own construction firm, Mr
Kemp said he decided to bring
the concepts he had learned
in the US back to the

Bahamas, having started work
on the Caribbean Greensafe
project with his late father.

“Tt is a challenge to start a
development company at this
time, but there is still an
opportunity. People see the
value that it’s going to bring,
and there’s going to be a lot
more people looking to go
green,” Mr Kemp said.

“The interest so far has
been good. A lot of people
have not known we’re here
but the demand is growing.
Architects have called, come
in and sent clients here.
They’re very interested. Peo-
ple building houses want to
go green and see the advan-
tages accruing over time.

“It’s been very encourag-
ing. Even in the downturn,
with how it is now, when the
market turns around I want
to be established and have
numerous projects up and
running.”

Among the products being
offered by Caribbean Green-
safe are wall systems; different
types of roof insulation; resin
products that provide the
same exotic look at less cost
and no maintenance, and
avoid cutting down trees; var-
ious floor and fencing meth-
ods; retro-fitted energy sys-
tems; and, eventually, alter-
native energy forms such as
solar and wind.

Mr Kemp added that
Caribbean Greensafe could
also supply solar tubular lights
which, when fitted in ware-
houses and food stores, would
never cost the property own-
ers any money once the ini-
tial installation costs were
paid.

The company, Mr Kemp
said, also planned to export
its systems and products to
other Caribbean countries,
thereby earning a valuable
source of foreign exchange for
the Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEIJI FIRST GROUP CORPORATION

a a

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of MEIJI FIRST
GROUP CORPORATION has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LA SARRAZS.A.

ee

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LA SARRAZ S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID GROUP INC.

SO

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORCHID GROUP INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OPULENS HOLDINGS INC.

a a

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OPULENS HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ITR SERVICES LIMITED

SS

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ITR SERVICES LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE COLUMBINE INC.

——

2

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WHITE COLUMBINE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IBADAN LIMITED

So

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of IBADAN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B





Bank ‘concern’
on BNP Paribas
departure move

FROM page 1B

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez,
speaking to Tribune Business
about BNP Paribas’s Friday
announcement of its decision
to exit the Bahamas, a move
set to impact about 40 staff
and a client book of business
likely to consist of several bil-
lion dollars, said: “This is a
concern.

“Clearly, European banks
are sensitive, and G-20 mem-
ber countries that have banks
headquartered here are sen-
sitive, to all that is going on.
This is a regrettable situation
for the Bahamas.”

Mr Gomez said the
Bahamian international finan-
cial services industry was
hopeful that the Governmen-
t’s stated goal of meeting the
G-20/OECD minimum of 12
Tax Information Exchange

Agreements (TIEAs) by
year-end would “be a plus”
for the jurisdiction’s standing,
among both global head
offices and current/prospec-
tive clients, and that it would
“have no more departures”.

“The Bahamas as a juris-
diction does not need any of
its banks, particularly is blue
chip banks, to leave this juris-
diction,” Mr Gomez told Tri-
bune Business. While some
might be compelled to leave,
the BFSB chairman said he
knew of no other institutions,
such as BNP Paribas, who
faced a timeline by which any
decision to pull-out or not
might be taken, but urged
those that did to make their
concerns known so they could
be addressed.

Although Mr Gomez did
not specifically address it, Tri-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that

BEORAH BELINDA SMITH-

bune Business understands
that the main concern is that
BNP Paribas’s decision to exit
could prompt others to do the
same, sparking a ‘rolling
snowball’ or chain reaction.

BNP Paribas, though, could
be a special case, in so much
that it is owned directly by
the French government.
Under President Nikolas
Sarkozy, the French have
been one of the champions of
the G-20/OECD drive for
greater tax transparency and
information exchange, and
the indications are that direct
political pressure was imposed
on BNP Paribas to withdraw
from the Bahamas.

Tribune Business had pre-
viously warned that Bahamas-
based banks and trust com-
panies were likely to come
under great pressure, via their
head offices, to leave this
nation, particularly those
whose global headquarters
was located in European-
based G-20/OECD members
such as France, Germany and
the UK.

of the aggressive posture of
the French”, adding that he
was concerned about the
impact on both BNP Parib-
as’s Bahamas-based work-
force and companies that sup-
plied the institution with ser-
vices and products. “BNP par-
ticipated in the local econo-
my in a very positive way,”
he said.

To date, the Bahamas has
signed Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) with Monaco and
San Marino, in addition to the
one it agreed with the US,
taking its total to three.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, last week
defended the Bahamas’
choice of TIEA partners to
date in the face of suggestions
that such deals with fellow
international financial centres
would mean less than ones
with OECD members.

He argued that the fact the
OECD had already account-
ed for the TIEA with Mona-
co, and bumped the Bahamas’
total up to two, showed the

DAVIS of #7 AZURE PLACE, P.O. BOX F-42636, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 21st day of
SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNNY GALLOP INC.

— -,——

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SUNNY GALLOP INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
DELTA HORIZONS LTD.

— -,——

F

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of DELTA HORIZONS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

FirstCaribbean

Mr Gomez said the
Bahamas “must take notice

agreement “must mean some-
thing”.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEWTONVILLE COMPANY LTD.

——

/

Noticeis hereby giventhatinaccordance withSection 138(8)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the dis-
solution of NEWTONVILLE COMPANY LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

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(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PASTE MANAGEMENT CORP. has
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and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

INSIGHT





The stories behind the news





Can any of us trust that
justice will be done?

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

hat happened to

Preston Ferguson

on a dark, lonely

stretch of road on

Great Exuma
should serve as a dire warning to
everyone who lives in or visits this
country.

Nearly two months have passed
since his body was found under
bizarre and gruesome circumstances,
yet it is not how he met his end
which should cause alarm, but rather
what followed.

Violence and criminality exist
everywhere and no one can guaran-
tee they will never become a victim.
Yet we all expect that if a crime can-
not be prevented, the authorities will
do their utmost to ensure that justice
is served in the aftermath.

Preston's family certainly felt this
way until that fateful night in
August, but now say they can't imag-
ine putting faith in an officer of the
law ever again.

And what their perseverance has
exposed about the astonishing
incompetence which can take place
during a routine police investigation
should make us all pause and ask
ourselves what manner of country
is this in which we live.

The family has no doubt that Pre-
ston met his death at the hands of a
murderer and feel they have a good
idea who is responsible, but the
police have insisted — in the face of
seeming mounting evidence to the
contrary — that he died as a result
of a freak accident.

The police's version of events is
that Preston, driving alone, either
stuck his head out of the vehicle to
spit, or that he ended up slumped
out the window after falling asleep.
At the same time, the company truck
he was driving swerved several feet
to the left, just far enough and at
precisely the right moment to make
glancing contact with a utility pole
before turning back onto the road
and somehow coming to a stop.

The impact was only forceful
enough to create shallow scrape
marks along the door and shatter
the driver's side window, leaving the
rest of the vehicle unaffected. Unfor-
tunately for Preston, his head hap-
pened to be out the window at the
time, and therefore struck the pole
full-on, a blow which fractured his
skull and killed him.

Upon hearing this explanation,
my first reaction was that any self-
respecting officer would be embar-
rassed to admit supporting so far-
fetched a scenario, and that the
police must therefore have been
forced by the facts to adopt it.

On the contrary, the family say,
all the evidence points in a very dif-
ferent direction, and according to
them there is nothing to support the
police's official stance beyond the
highly questionable guesswork of
the first few officers on the scene.

Preston's relatives, already

a oe Fs
\ ae

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING



FERGUSON FAMILY members (shown) hold a picture of Preston...

offended by the officers’ careless-
ness, nonchalance and seeming lack
of professionalism, were shocked to
hear one of them speculating loudly
only moments after arriving that,
“Yeah man, yeah man, this suspi-
cious. Somethin’ ain’t right here",
only to change his mind and decide,
"No man, see, you know what I
think? I think he was putting his
head out the window to spit and hit
his head on the lamp post.” A col-
league then volunteered, "Maybe
what happened is, he fell asleep and
hung his head out the window."

This, it seems, was the extent of
the police investigation, as their the-
ory has not evolved beyond this
point.

A retired New York City Police
Department detective who hap-
pened upon the story on tri-
bune242.com bune242.com> became enraged after
reading the official version of the
investigation, and decided to offer
his expertise on how to handle a
crime scene (see story on INSIGHT,
page 3).

He says responding officers must
be alert, observant, and display rig-
orous attention to detail. They must
document, photograph and retain
every possible piece of evidence, and
do their utmost to preserve the crime
scene from contamination. They
must also observe and question
everyone on the scene, as well as
anyone who might have the slightest
possible connection to the case. This
must all be done before any conclu-
sions can be drawn by senior offi-

Well-refined.

nls

1

cers overseeing the case.

Compare this to the performance
of the police in Preston's case. Pre-
ston's family say the officers failed to
question anyone on the scene aside
from a single relative, disregarding
even the two persons who first
reported the discovery of the body.

They did not secure the scene
around the truck — or even the truck
itself, which rather than being pre-
served for forensic testing, was
returned to Preston's employer the
very same day. Likewise, the body
was dispatched to the hospital with-
out being tested in any way, and
without so much as a police escort.

The clothes Preston was wearing
at the time were not tested for DNA
or other samples, nor confiscated by
the officers.

As far as the taking of detailed
photographs, they may well have
done this — before forgetting their
camera on the seat of the truck. The
photos which accompany this arti-
cle were provided by the family.

This wholesale failure to conform
with even basic crime scene protocol
as outlined by the NYPD detective
may begin to explain the startling
logical inconsistencies in the police's
accident theory.

For example, the police version
posits that the window was shattered
when the truck scraped along the
utility pole. This would obviously
require the window to be up at the
time. How would this have been pos-
sible if the theory also requires Pre-
ston to hang his head out of the win-
dow, either because he was sleep-

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ing or in an attempt to spit? If the
window was down, how did the glass
shards jump from within the door
and scatter across the cabin of the
truck? Then again, why would he
have been driving with the window
down if he had the air-conditioning
on, as it was when the body was
found?

The spitting attempt theory is
doubly ridiculous, as it would mean
the wound in the middle of Preston's
forehead must have been incurred
when he drove his own face into a
pole while perfectly alert, in an
attempt to spit directly into the wind.

The sleep theory is not much bet-
ter, as it would entail the car veering
off the road at just the right moment
for Preston's head to strike the pole
— avoiding the long stretches of bush
on either side; a near miraculous feat
of timing and coincidence.

Supposing either version is true,
how is it that he managed to be
found sitting upright, facing forward
in the driver's seat after absorbing a
blow to the head violent enough to
crack his skull? The momentum
would surely have flung him to the
other side of the truck, or perhaps
left his head slumped out the win-
dow, but gently reclining against the
headrest? It would seem to defy the
laws of physics.

How, for that matter, did the
truck manage to find its way back
onto the road after Preston fractured
his skull, drive along for 20 or so
yards, and come to a stop?

And supposing that window did
by some miracle shatter while Pre-





THE pile of glass on the front seat of
Preston Ferguson’s car. His body was
found sitting on the glass but none
was on his person...

ston had his head out of the car, how
is it that no glass came to be found
on his body, or anywhere on the dri-
ver's side other than on the seat
below his buttocks? How did a pile
of glass manage to get underneath
him in the first place?

Then there is the question of
blood. The police version fails to
explain how it is possible that blood
came to be splattered across the pas-
senger's side of the truck, even
reaching around to the far side of
the protuberant middle console and
the space between the seat and the
far door, but there is no trace of it to
be found on the driver's side, and
little on Preston himself. No blood
was found on the steering wheel, the
windshield, the seat, and none on
either the inside or outside of the
driver's side door.

While we are at it, we might as
well ask why no glass or blood was
found at the base of the utility pole,
all of it managing to collect at the
spot down the road where the car
eventually came to a stop.

The death certificate does not
rule out the police's accident theory,
but that is about the most definite
thing which can be said about it.

The document notes that he died
of a "head injury with fracture of
skull bone" and that this is "not
inconsistent with the history of death
due to a road traffic accident." The
language does not suggest the
pathologists came up with the traffic
accident theory, but rather that the
police supplied it, and the doctors
acknowledged that the wound did
not rule it out.

In other words, the autopsy found
that he was struck in the head, and
died, and acknowledges that during
traffic accidents, it is possible for
one to be struck in the head, and
die.

Not exactly an earth shattering
analysis, but then those conducting
the examination were probably only
presented with the body and a pos-
sible cause of death. I wonder what
they would have said had they seen
the evidence detailed above. The
family immediately contacted the
morgue to request a more detailed
examination, but there has been no

reply.
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Tourists told to avoid Bahamas over

Ferguson investigation controversy



Exuma - Unsolved

Murder Capital?

We have cruised the
Bahamas (including The Exu-
mas) many times over the years
and have always had a great
time there — the weather, the
food, and the people. However,
we are now hesitant to make
another trip if crimes like these
are allowed to go unchecked
and unpunished. In the US,
rookie officers see promotions
for cracking clear cut cases like
this. From all accounts in the
article and from what people
close to the island are saying,
this was NO traffic accident.
To say that is an insult to the
family and officials should be
embarrassed to co-sign such
foolishness. I will be forwarding
this article to as many of my
yachting buddies and fellow
travellers to make them aware
of how crimes are "handled"
in that community and to give
them an overall heads up. The
Bahamas has always been good
to us, but I don’t want to wind
up the victim of murder and
have my family told that I fell
overboard (bound and gagged)
in an "accident" or some other
crap. Get it together officials!

— Bill, Rhode Island, NY



=
I

a

PRESTON FERGUSON

Bloodstain Analysis

Conviction

This family needs some clo-
sure and if their own local
police agency is not going to
provide that for them, then
those who are concerned and
have been touched by violent
crime will have to assist.
http://christmanforensics.com/c
s_reconstruction.php My fami-

about story on tribune242.com

ly and I have been helped by
Dan and his team in 2006 after
a similar situation where our
son returned from fighting in
Iraq and his wife and her lover
hatched a plan of murder for
hire; they are both now serv-
ing life sentences for his mur-
der. The blood evidence was
able to convict them. I pray you
find justice in your pursuits.

— Roger Stamos,

Baltimore, M

God is able

Kudos to The Tribune and
their staff for having the balls
to tackle a ground breaking
news story like this one. It has
now come to seeking JUSTICE
in the media; God bless you
and the family.

Looking at some of the
posts; I want to thank the per-
son who wrote the prayer for
the family. I hope they contin-
ue to pray that prayer into the

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— Jerome M

I hope someone at The Tri-
bune presses Tommy Turn-
quest and Reginald Ferguson
for an update in this matter!
The eyes of the world are upon
us and the Emperor is as naked
as a newborn....[ am ashamed
as a Bahamian! Here we are
with some of the best and
brightest minds, and the actions
of a few lazy police make us
out to be no more than a bunch
of backward fishing vil-
lagers.... Thanks a lot Tom-
my/Reginald!

— Ava

SHAME!!!

When will the elected and
appointed officials get it? Peo-
ple will no longer simply take
their feeble reports as gospel
when they can think for them-
selves....and in most cases, solve
matters better than them any-
way!

Was this a case of not want-
ing to interrupt their boiled fish
breakfast with REAL Police
work? Reginald/Tommy -
make them get off their butts
and police....they are Police
Officers, right?!

— Mag Rolle

Keep on pushing
Wait a minute; the centre
for the blind and a group of
kindergarten students could
have done a better investiga-
tion into this crime and pro-
duced better results; going on
evidence alone and proper pro-
tocol. Keep pushing for justice.

— George Munroe

Horrified

As a winter resident and
someone who enjoys living in
Exuma, it was hard to hear
about this tragedy, and more
unnerving to actually read the
story in the newspaper; and my
God the pictures tell the entire
story. My only contact with the
police in Exuma occurred some
years ago when a local guy
removed an inflated tube/boat
from our docking area and Lt.
Cunningham dealt with the
incident; which ended amica-
bly. They were quick to
respond. If only my small voice
could appeal to the police to

bring such a resolution to this
terrible tragedy. Prayers for the
family from Boston.

— John and Rebecca

Spread the word

Flood your e-mail contacts
to get the proper attention to
this and any other matters
where criminal acts are seem-
ingly going unpunished. This is
ridiculous! I am a college stu-
dent in Raleigh, NC and will
surely be sending this link to
everyone I know... Bahamian
and American. Good luck Fer-
guson Family in your fight for
justice!

— D Jones

The fire has been lit!

A fire has been lit in this
here Bahamas today and it is
unfortunate that it took the loss
of life and subsequent mishan-
dling of a case to bring it all to
the forefront. Bahamians, by
and large, are fed up with crime
and lawlessness....even more
so, we are fed up with the lack-
luster performance of the
RBPF and the Minister of
National Security. It is true that
you can’t please all of the peo-
ple ALL of the time — but
how can this many Bahamians
be sick and tired of burying
loved ones prematurely at the
hands of murderers while they
strut around like they are invin-
cible?! Everyone in this praying
nation needs to let the govern-
ment know that we are sick
and tired of this mess. They
may choose to ignore our cries
now, but come next election,
let your voices be heard loud
and clear when they come
around pandering for votes!
Wear every memorial t-shirt,
display every obituary, shed
every tear for those you lost
and speak with ONE VOICE!
ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

— D Roberts

Preston Ferguson

Ihave just finished reading
the article concerning Preston
Ferguson’s death. It appears
from his family’s evidence and
from the articles submitted
from the readers that this was
not an accident! I live in Balti-
more, Maryland and I have
been visiting the Bahamas for
the past 25 years. I have had
the pleasure of meeting a few

of Preston’s family members.
This is a sad situation. When I
come to the Bahamas I would
want to feel safe; how can I feel
safe believing that the
Bahamas police force did not
do the right thing by their own?
Preston didn’t deserve to die
this way. If someone gave our
police officers some informa-
tion about a murder here in
Baltimore, Maryland, you bet
someone would have been
arrested by now! Our police
department asks daily for infor-
mation to be given to them and
a person can give that infor-
mation anonymously. They
don’t always have to give their
names! Sloppy, Sloppy work
on behalf of the police force.
Step up and do your job. I
admire the Ferguson Family
for not giving up the fight to
prove that this was no accident.
The persons responsible should
be brought to justice and held
accountable for Preston’s mur-
der. Thank you for letting me
voice my opinion about this
unfortunate incident.
— Doll

Lf Readers left more than 100 comments

Follow UP Needed!

I trust that the reporters at
The Tribune (and surely the
reporter responsible for this
story) will be reviewing the
comments here to shed further
light on what appears to be a
clear case of mishandling and
mislabelling an actual crime.
When you guys meet with
Reginald Ferguson for the fol-
low up, ask him if he is aware
(as many Exumians already
seem to be) that certain people
seem to have more than a casu-
al involvement in the overall
matter. When will those people
be picked up? Why haven’t
they even been questioned? I
am new to tribune242.com but
was drawn to this story and the
comments posted from near
and far .. . Too much is going
on in this country behind the
scenes and under the cover of
darkness! How many more
must die before the powers that
be take a serious approach to
crime?

—Antoinette

Murder in Exuma
Oooohbhhh my goodness!! I

SEE page 8C

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



Patrol officers should be held
accountable for incompetence

By NATHANIEL
SANTINE Ill
Ret. New York
Police detective

THE cause, manner, and
mechanism of a death is
important to the family, as
well as to law enforcement
and the courts, often for dif-
ferent reasons, yet equally
important. The proper identi-
fication of an accidental death
vs a homicide will profoundly
affect a family and in some
cases, it has the potential to
affect an entire community.

But, it is often the first
responder's first impressions
and interpretation of the evi-
dence or information at a
scene which can direct the ini-
tial course of an investigation.
Successful investigations often
depend on the initial actions
taken by patrol officers
responding to any given scene.
The scene must be secured
and cause is never determined
or categorised at first sight,
but only after careful investi-
gations have been completed;
the responding officer's duties
in the preliminary investiga-
tion may simply be to arrive at
the scene, observe enough to
know that assistance from
investigators is required, and
protect the scene so that evi-
dence is not destroyed,
changed or removed.

What should
have been done?

Responding officers at any
crime scene should:

¢ Secure the scene

¢ Cordon off the area

e Take witness statements

¢ Document the scene (both
written and photographic)

e Collect evidence — bag
everything

e Where a body is found,
photograph the entire area;
measure and document posi-
tioning; photograph wounds

e Once the body has been
removed, take photographs of
the surrounding area

e Photograph shrubs, trees,
tyre marks; the vehicle or
room

e Photograph clothing

e Photograph any sight of
blood (pool, spatter, droplets,
smears, et cetera)

e When a body is found in a
vehicle, once the body is
removed, seal the vehicle and
transport it on plastic tarp on
a flatbed towing truck to pre-
serve evidence.

e Record in writing what-
ever is being said or done at
the scene; be observant

e Convey findings to supe-
rior officers

e Dispatch a team to inform



THE BLOOD covers the passenger seat of the car but none was found on the driver’s side where

the body was found...

next of kin

Any item can and may con-
stitute physical evidence;
therefore, it is imperative that
nothing be touched or moved
at the scene before the arrival
of the investigators. Officers
handling the evidence must
document its location, appear-
ance, condition, and any other
feature that might affect the
investigation, ensuring that it
does not lose its evidentiary
value. Good basic crime scene
procedures are to be followed,
especially when the cause of
death is not abundantly clear.

The investigation starts at
the point where the body is
originally found. The prima-
ry crime scene is where most
of the evidence will be
retrieved. In scenes that
appear staged, there may be
two or more crime scenes in
addition to the location where
the body is found. They
include:

e Where the body was
moved from

¢ Where the actual assault
leading to death took place

e Where any physical or
trace evidence connected with
the crime is discovered

¢ The vehicle used to trans-
port the body to where it is
eventually found (tyre tracks,
oil leaks, should be pho-
tographed).

e A point of forced entry or
where the vehicle was cut off

by another vehicle

e The escape route

e Suspect clothing

The police are usually called
to this location by the person
who discovers the body, a wit-
ness to the crime, in isolated
cases the victim, or even a
potential suspect.

What was done wrong
in the Preston Ferguson
case from an
investigators viewpoint?

The article claims that all
DNA evidence, including
clothing and hair samples,
were missing; this should nev-
er happen. Barring a collision
between two or more vehicles
— an obvious accident — the
evidence should remain intact
and available.

INSIGHT

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The vehicle should have
been sealed and impounded
for the forensic team to comb
for any evidence. Obviously,
this was not done and the
authorities need to explain
why.

Proper procedures should
have been taken to determine
the number of prints found in
the vehicle, and to isolate
those which should not have
been in the vehicle.

The blood evidence is actu-
ally what is going to win this
case. It is obvious that the
blood on the floor of the vehi-

cle was not from a victim of
an accident, but instead is con-
clusive with a person bleed-
ing and being laid or slumped
on that portion of the vehicle.
The velocity of the blood also
created a pattern that trickled
onto the driver’s side. The car-
pet of the floor after being
sampled should have been
removed to reveal the settling
pattern of the blood on the
metal floor and gear shift.

The glass evidence cannot
be explained away; it is impos-
sible by the law of physics for
a traffic accident to occur,
smashing a side glass and find-
ing broken glass under the vic-
tim, who was said to be sitting
on top of the glass and not
having any on his person,
including fragments in his
wound.

If a collision is violent
enough to cause a fatal injury,
the wound must be explained.
This has not been done. Fur-
thermore, the body would not
be found in an upright posi-
tion, but instead would be
found thrown from the vehicle
or tossed within the cab of the
vehicle.

The positioning of the dent
on the driver’s door seems to
be the result of the vehicle
being struck from the side. It is
impossible for an accident to
occur on the side, unless the
vehicle was hit by an oncom-
ing force from the side of
impact.

There was more than
enough evidence from the
photos alone to suggest that
an in-depth investigation
should have been ordered fol-
lowing the preliminary scene
investigation. It is obvious that
proper protocol was not fol-
lowed in investigating this
matter. It appears as if the
responding officers, in their
haste to categorise a traffic

accident, missed or ignored
some key steps.

Incompetence played a role
in what looks like a botched
investigation. This is not a pet-
ty crime where the conse-
quences are minimal; this
crime resulted in a death and
beyond the failure to capture
of the perpetrators, the inves-
tigators failed to secure evi-
dence to protect the rights of
the victim.

This is a level of incompe-
tence as it relates to inefficient
police investigations should
not go unrecognised or unpun-
ished; the responsible officers
and their superiors should be
held accountable. Obviously
a patrol officer cannot close
an investigation, it goes
beyond that officer.

The justice system of a
country, if proven to be out
of syne or imbalanced enough
to allow this kind of action to
go unchecked, will only serve
to erode the moral fiber of a
community. Indeed, it will
spread to affect an entire
nation and destroy the rule of
law established to cultivate a
standard for all citizens, resi-
dents and visitors to be law
abiding, and when they know-
ing and willingly fail to con-
form, be made aware of the
relevant punishment.

Clearly, the perpetrators of
such crimes are comfortable
in their actions and are confi-
dent that law enforcement
agencies/officers are not
equipped or knowledgeable
enough to detect their actions.
If this is allowed to go
unchecked, it leaves an open
door for hurting families to
refuse the help of crisis advo-
cates and resort to vigilantism
as their means of seeing justice
carried out. This will erode a
society like the plague. This
is a serious matter.

aF, cccetuer 23a fe

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Come bring the Family and Celebrate with Us!

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SS ay

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00560

Whereas CASTELLA MERCIANA BOWLEG, of No. 14 Richard’s
Court, Oakes Field, in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EARLE
A BOWLEG late of No. 14 Richard’s Court, Oakesfield, in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00562

Whereas KYLE ALBURY, of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ARLENE MARGARET ALBURY late of Trinity Way, Stapledon
Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00563

Whereas EMMA BRAYNEN (nee) FERGUSON, of Seven Hills
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of MICHAEL MITCHELL, late of St Barts Road,
Golden Gates No. 2 in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00564

Whereas NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II, of Chancery House, The
Mall, in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ZBIGNIEW
EMILIAN MAZUREK late of 437 Golden Isles Drive in the City
of Hallandale, in the State of Florida, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5C



INSIGHT

Can any of us trust
that justice will be done?

FROM page 1C

Compared with the police
version, the family’s answer
to the puzzle is startlingly sim-
ple: “When he got home, peo-
ple were waiting for him, they
accosted him and killed him,
and drove that truck out
there, then brushed it against
the lamp pole and smashed
the window to make it look
like it was an accident."

They believe Preston was
struck in the head with a blunt
object while sitting on the pas-
senger's side, or that his
already lifeless body was
transported to the scene in
the passenger's seat.

After purposely grazing
the truck against the pole and
smashing the window, the cul-
prits moved Preston's body
to the driver's side, to make it
seem as if he was driving
alone.

This theory fits neatly with
all the available evidence —
the glass beneath body on the
driver's seat, the pools of
blood on the passenger's side,
the vehicle having been found
stopped. What is more, the
family claim they know of
someone who would have had
both motive and opportunity
that night.

The victim and his cousin,
Merv Johnson who was visit-
ing from Nassau, went to
Rolleville that evening for a
night on the town.

The men took Mr John-
son's rented car, as Preston
rarely used his company vehi-
cle (the truck his body was
later found in) after work
hours. It was left parked in
front of his house.

After being out for a few
hours, Preston ran into a
woman who the family
believes he may have been
having an affair with, and told
his cousin that she would take
him home.

Driving past the front of
Preston's house some time
later, Mr Johnson noticed the
work truck was gone, a fact

that he found unusual.

The next morning, the
woman whom Preston went
home with and her husband
announced that Preston had
been found dead in his truck.

His relatives believe any
sound investigation of the
case must begin with the
questioning of these two per-
sons, as they may be able to
shed a great deal of light on
the matter. Two months on,
this has yet to be done, they
say.
The family are not alone
in their rejection of the
police's version of events. The
first story about the case to
appear on tribune242.com

attracted a flood of angry
comments from concerned
Bahamians, residents, tourists
and foreign law enforcement
officers. Before last week, the
highest number of comments
in response to any one arti-
cle on the two-month-old
website was 37. The story of
Preston Ferguson has attract-
ed 115 and counting. The day
it was published, the site
boasted a record 76,000 hits.

At this stage, no one can
say with complete certainty
that the family's version is
accurate, or whether the per-
son they suspect is guilty in
any way — simply because a
proper investigation has yet
to be conducted. At the same
time, a great many people
believe the family’s theory to
be far more plausible than the
official one and consider the
police investigation to be
almost criminally negligent.

Personally, I would wager
there is more probability of
being struck by lightning
twice on successive days at
the very instant of winning
the lottery — both times — than
dying in the way the police
claim Preston Ferguson did.

The authorities, however,
seem to be sticking to their
guns. They claim the investi-

Tel! 50

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gation is ongoing, but rather
than trying to recover evi-
dence which has slipped
through their fingers — for
example the blood-spattered
truck — they have instead
promised the family a re-
enactment of the "accident"
conducted by "experts",
which they presumably hope
will demonstrate their theo-
ry to be correct.

I, for one, would love to
be present for this. The spe-
cial effects needed to repro-
duce the spitting-out-of-a-
closed-window trick alone
would make the trip to Exu-
ma worth the trouble.

The relatives of Preston
Ferguson are no doubt
becoming something of a nui-
sance to the Police Force and
the Ministry of National Secu-
rity. But I have a feeling they
will not let up until certain
questions are answered to
their satisfaction. We in the
press know that what they are
going through has been
endured in silence by count-
less others in this country —
but to paraphrase one com-
mentator, it seems they
messed with the wrong family
this time.

At the end of the day,
those who love and miss this
young man are not seeking
special treatment, but rather
something which is supposed
to be basic: that those man-
dated and paid to defend the
interests of justice — from
Minister of National Securi-
ty Tommy Turnquest down
to the lowliest rookie consta-
ble — to do their job to the
best of their ability.

Another commentator sug-
gested that perhaps the case
has been so mishandled that it
is time for the prime minister
to step in. The Tribune under-
stands Mr Ingraham has been
made aware of the facts of the
case, and we will be seeking
comment from his office in
the coming days.

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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



INSIGHT

THE TRIBUNE



Readers have their say...

Re: The Abacos

Megan,

Read with interest your article in
“Insight” on The Abacos (Insight,
Sept. 21, 2009). I thoroughly enjoyed
the article and would wish Govern-
ment would hold a Town Meeting
on development in The Abacos.

I should firstly explain that I wear
two hats — I am a co-owner of IBD-
Reiss the largest Bahamian owned
Civil and Environmental Consul-
tancy in the country — my second
role is that I am vice president of
Lindroth Development Company
on the Schooner Bay project with
responsibilities for engineering and
environment.

In talking with a number of real-
tors they echo what you had in the
your article — they do not need more

FROM page 2C

have been following this story on a
daily basis. Thanks to The Tribune
for this opportunity to openly express
yourself. If this family has name, rank,
and serial numbers on these alleged
murderers, what are they waiting for?
Please, I am pleading to the Prime
Minister to get proper seasoned offi-
cers to investigate this. Not anyone
who has family in Exuma because it
will get swept under the carpet. Fam-
ily, you are brave and I encourage you
to keep up the good fight. Even
though it won't bring your baby broth-
er back, I want to see whoever has
done this walking across Bank Lane. I
don't know you all, but I love you and
feel your pain. KEEP FIGHTING!!
— Joel

Murder or accident???

[have read the story and all of the
comments surrounding Preston Fer-
guson's death. I live in Baltimore,
Maryland and even though I had nev-
er met Preston, I knew one of his sis-
ters — Diane Ferguson and two of his
brothers — Lynn (Maxwell) Fergu-
son and Freddie Ferguson. As all of
the comments from the readers have
indicated, no one deserves to die like
this young man or anyone for that
matter. It appears as though the police
department have not done a good job
of gathering all of the facts surround-
ing this case. My first question is how

[ Haat |

/ , -
HuGei

=£ Apt
7 Fi ea

insight

sales inventory — some say there is
enough for the next 15 years! Then
why is Government giving consid-
eration to the Valencia proposal with
hotels and golf courses on the border
of a National Park and home to the
now endemic Abaco Parrot already
threatened by feral cats.

I personally feel that South Aba-
co should be preserved for Eco
Tours that would also allow consid-
eration for land banking the south-
ern pine forests for carbon seques-
tering, something for Government
to consider for Grand Bahama as

was it that the female friend (who
allegedly was the last one to see him
alive) and her husband show up at the
family residence to deliver some bad
news? Here in the states, if someone
has some information surrounding a
death which appears suspicious, those
individuals would have been ques-
tioned.

By now, someone would have been
charged with this murder! and, yes, I
said murder! This was no accident!
Hopefully this comment and all of the
comments written so far will be
enough to bring these individuals to
justice. Thank you for letting me voice
my opinion.

— Anne Williams

Why the Delay?

When will the prime suspects be
detained for interrogation? Seems
pretty open and shut to me....and
apparently anyone who either lives in
Exuma or is close to the case — except
the backward police!

— A Moss

SAD...

Anyone who has ever lost a loved
one and had the police drag their feet
or issue some lame excuse of a police
report needs to unite and call for more
accountability! From the Minister to
the Commissioner to the rank and file
officers...they are all public servants! I
think they forget this...and as you are
appointed, you can also be removed
from office. Shame, shame, shame in

a i
Li

well. The thought of it let the forests
stand idle and make money on the
carbon credit — maybe too easy!
Abaco is almost recession proof —
the addition of farming on previ-
ously human disturbed areas to
engage a number of the illegal aliens
and unemployed sounds great but
to introduce the mega projects
sounds like disaster other than
Atlantis what else large scale has
survived?

I am a great proponent of eco-
lodges — the birders would come and
this would also put the small lodges
within the reaches of a lot more
Bahamians.

Thanks for the article — I hope
that this and future articles will lend
to discussion of this very important
topic.

— Keith A. Bishop

Bahamaland!
— Mary Higgins

The Fergusons in forest
I don't know Preston’s parents or

older siblings but Preston and I went
to school together. He could not have
done something to be killed. He
always had a smile and was willing to
give you his last. We know who killed
Preston and knowing his family and
how good they are to people, my
grandmother says that Lord will repay
them 100 fold. Please lock up those
who killed him.

— Rachel

Mishandled or covered up? It hap-
pens often enough here. With crime in
this country if not mishandled or
(more correctly) covered up the police
will adopt either a dopey or severe
look then give the lame assurance that
they'll get the guy that did it...and they
never do. I no longer trust the police
to do their jobs and look forward to
the day when that trust can be
restored.

P Lucia E. Broughton

People in Exuma are not going to
rest until these murderers are brought
to justice. This was a decent young
man from a decent family here in Exu-
ma. And I know that his family will
not stop until justice is served. We are
praying for you all, especially his sis-
ters who I went to school with.

Pamela

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

ELBOW CAY — ABACO, the third largest and
fastest -growing economy in the country, has
so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a
somewhat independent economy sustained
by a steady stream of boaters and second
homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its
chain of cays in search of somewhere to
escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even
in arecession



Another piece of paradise
destined for destruction?

“——— DEVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears

hat sets the
islands of the
Bahamas apart
from other
tourist destina-

tions in the Caribbean is that in this
splendid chain ofislands, each has its
own character.

Abaco, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the
country, has so far retained its nat-
ural beauty by virtue of a somewhat
independent economy sustained by
a steady stream of boaters and se¢-
ond homeowners who flee to Great
Abaco and its chain of cays in search
of somewhere to escape, unwind,
and get away from it all. Even in a
recession.

Butboth Abaconians and second
homeowners who find peace in Aba-
co’s pristine beaches, clear waters
and expanse of creeks that lace
Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the
Abaco they know is slipping away,
and that they have little power to
preventit.

Abaco is at a point where further

development is imminent, and there
are groups who want to have a say in
the direction it steers towards the
future, but they feel their concerns
are falling on deaf ears.

They were insulted to leam about
the development of a Bunker C fuel
power plant in Wilson City in a pub-
lic meeting on September 10, over a
month after construction had
already begun.

The Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) admitted it was wrong

not to inform the Abaco public ear-
lier, as nearly 1,000 concemed resi-
dents attended the meeting request
ed by local conservationist group
Friends of the Environment because
of the high level of public concem.

Not all who attended the meet-
ing were against the project, but
there were many who had questions
they wanted to be answered.

They knew the power plant was
planned for Snake Cay, an environ-
mentally sensitive area on Great

Abaco’s east coast, and opposition
formed, as people feared the
destructive impact it could have on
the environment and the health of
the community.

Hence when government and
BEC decided to plough ahead with
the plans for a $105 million, 48 mw
power plant buming Bunker C
(HO) fuel in a new site at Wilson
City — an area intrinsically linked to
the environmentally sensitive Snake
Cay by a complex network of blue

that the land both Abaconians and visitors hold dear
is doomed to become another big city destined for
destruction. Insight explores the problems and the
progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives...

holes — plans were kept quiet.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the project had been agreed
by the Christie administration in
2005, and signed off by the Ingra-
ham government in December 2007,
but as plans moved forward, Aba~
co’s permanent and part-time resi-
dents were left in the dark.

‘Dundas Town resident and moth-
er of two Leazona Bethel-Richard

SEE next page



THE FRONT PAGE of the September 21, 2009 edition of /NS/GHT...

Huggies Maximum
Absorption!

a
HuGcies



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Full Text


Mm blowin’ it

S8F
75F

PARTLY
~ SUNNY

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.255

TTB Se

SEE INSIGHT SECTION





Detective
backing
family of
Preston
Ferguson

BY PACO NUNEZ
NEWS EDITOR
pnunez@tribunemedia.net

A VETERAN New York police inves-
tigator has condemned the “incompe-
tence” displayed by the Bahamas police in
their “botched” investigation into the
death of Preston Ferguson in Exuma.

The family of Mr Ferguson were left
outraged when police ruled that he died as
aresult of injuries sustained in a car acci-
dent.

Mr Ferguson’s grieving relatives, how-
ever, claim all the evidence points to

SEE page 12

NASSAU AND BAHAM

Felipé Major
/Tribune staff



m Lhe Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



Police prove into

I i
hotchet



EMERGENCY PERSONNEL attend ate this Toyota Windom overturned yesterday morning on Coral Harbour Road near
the back of Lynden Pindling International Airport. The condition of the driver is unknown.



Government employees may
be relocated to hotel tower

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AROUND 400 govern-
ment employees may soon see
their offices moved from
Thompson Boulevard to a
hotel tower on Cable Beach.

Serious discussions are
under way between the Gov-
ernment and Baha Mar

Quiznos

Resorts Ltd over the possibil-
ity of relocating the opera-
tions of two ministries to a
disused Wyndham hotel tow-
er on Cable Beach.

The move is intended to
help alleviate the health fears
of many of those employed
at the Ministry of Education
and the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture. Those
staff walked off the job last

. | DD ea le
BiG BREAR
sll

w i” el ot

Thursday over a long-stand-
ing mould problem at their
current location, a National
Insurance Board-owned
building on Thompson Boule-
vard, which many believe is
making them sick.
Yesterday, Education Min-
ister Carl Bethel revealed that

SEE page 12

INTRODUCING THE

hol OF OveIGh

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SPAPER



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

SEE PAGE 15

Man, 21, shot
outside his home

A 21-YEAR-OLD man
shot several times in front
of his Chippingham home
is said to be in a stable con-
dition in hospital.

He is one of two men
shot on Friday night. How-
ever police are unclear
about the details of the sec-
ond shooting in Bozene
‘Town, Nassau.

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said there is

SEE page 12

Body found
on Rose Island

A MAN whose body was
found on Rose Island on
Saturday evening is
believed to have drowned.

Police have not yet iden-
tified the victim and were
unable to release a descrip-
tion of him yesterday.

The man was found by
beachcombers at around
6pm.

He was taken hospital
where he was pronounced
dead.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the

SEE page 12

Man on $80,000
cocaine charge

A MAN is expected to
appear in court today
charged with attempting to
smuggle $80,000 worth of
cocaine to the United
States in a car part.

Security staff screening
luggage at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
in Nassau found the drugs
stuffed inside a master
brake cylinder packed in a
box bound for Florida.

Police say there were
eight packets of cocaine
hidden in the car part,

SEE page 12

Travolta trial
set to resume

THE trial of two
defendants accused of try-
ing to extort $25 million
from Hollywood superstar
John Travolta will contin-
ue today with PLP sena-
tor Allyson Maynard Gib-
son expected to take the
stand.

Senator Maynard Gib-
son is one of six witnesses

SEE page 12



GUMBU

uous oe


PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



























































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LOCAL NEWS

OPPOSITION’S NATIONAL DEPUTY CHAIRMAN HEEDS “CALL OF MY PEOPLE’

Kenred Dorsett enters
PLP leadership race

ANOTHER PLP mem-
ber will throw his hat in the
ring in the race for a leader-
ship position in the party
this week.

Kenred Dorsett, current
National Deputy Chairman
of the PLP, released a state-
ment over the weekend
announcing that he feels it is
his “duty to listen to the call
of my people and offer
myself for greater service in
the leadership of our party”.

“T have spoken to PLPs
throughout the country and
they all agree that our party
is in transition with regard
to its leadership,” he said.

“The mantra of change is
on everyone's mind and has



KENRED DORSETT

been weighing on mine for
quite some time now.

“Our country continues to
be burdened by the spirit of
hopelessness and despair

and I believe a responsive,
caring, proactive PLP can
help.”

Mr Dorsett said he will
make a formal announce-
ment regarding his plans in
the party on Wednesday.

Mr Dorsett has raised his
profile this year through
joining Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald in vocal criticism
of the government’s pro-
posed relocation of the port
to Arawak Cay, as part of
the Committee to Protect
and Preserve the Bahamas
for Future Generations.

Mr Fitzgerald formally
launched his bid for the
Deputy Leadership of the
party last week.

‘Armed and extremely dangerous

POLICE issued All Points
Bulletins for three “armed
and extremely dangerous”
men wanted in connection
with murder and armed rob-
bery.

Officers are searching for
Theo Lepny St Cyrin, 22,
Marvin Arnold Coleby, 31,
and Jamal Ferguson, 36,
alias “Balty”.

Wanted

St Cyrin, wanted for mur-
der and armed robbery, is
described as having a “fair”
complexion, around 5ft 9ins
tall and weighing 170lbs.

His last known address
was Lavelle Road, West Bay
Street and Laird Street, Nas-
sau.

Coleby has a dark com-
plexion, weighs around
170lbs, and is about 5tf 9ins
tall.

He was last known to be

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Police issue bulletins for three
men wanted in connection with
murder and armed robbery







residing in Winton Estates
and Iguana Way, Bel Air
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He is also wanted for mur-
der and armed robbery.

Ferguson, 36, has a medi-
um complexion and is
around 5ft 7ins and190lbs.
He is last known to have
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Street, and is wanted for
armed robbery.

Anyone with information
on these people should call
919, 911, the police control
room at 322 3333, the Cen-
tral Detective Unit at 502
9930 or 9991 or Crime Stop-
pers on 328 8477, or their
nearest police station.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3
LOCAL NEWS



Masked thugs with gun
terrorise Wendy's staff

Two men escape in car after grabbing cash





































































By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WORKERS at a fast food
restaurant were left shocked
and fearing for their lives yes-
terday after two masked and
armed men burst in and
demanded cash.

According to an eye wit-
ness, the two thugs parked
their car in front of Wendy’s
restaurant on Mackey Street,
Nassau, entered the business
and jumped over the cashier’s
counter.

After staff fled to the back
of the building after seeing
that one of men had a gun,
they were eventually able to
steal two cash register drawers
containing an unknown
amount of money.

No one was hurt during the
robbery, which happened at
about 11.30am, but the inci-
dent resulted in the main din-
ing room part of the restau-
rant being closed for the rest
of the day, leaving only the
drive-through open for
orders.

Cloths

The two men, whose faces
were half-covered with cloths,
were able to escape in the
green Toyota Avalon vehicle
they had left parked outside.

A Wendy’s spokesman
declined to comment on the
incident when contacted by
The Tribune yesterday after-
noon.

0 In brief

Shotgun and
Shells found in
Nassau Sireet

POLICE are seeking the
owner of a shotgun and two
shotgun shells found in Nas-
sau Street at around 2am
yesterday.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call Crime Stop-
pers anonymously on 328-
TIPS (8477) or call police
urgently on 911 or 919.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Uncertainty over Privy Council future

THE BAHAMAS has always been proud
of its legal system. As a matter of fact so
proud that it has used it as a selling point to
entice the monied to invest in a country with
ancient laws, ably administered.

The Bahamas, say the brochures, has a
legal system based on English common law.
And at the apex of that system is the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council.

The history of the Privy Council can be
traced back to the eleventh century after
the conquest of Britain by the Normans at
the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Over the years we have heard many
investors comment on their reliance on our
British system of justice — an important
reason for feeling comfortable about invest-
ing here. Several have often laughed that if
the locals “mess up” there’s always the Privy
Council waiting in the wings to pick up the
pieces. Even local litigants feel more secure
knowing that there is a final court of appeal
that has neither personal connections nor
interests in the Bahamas. In other words
the Judicial Committee is completely
removed from the local scene.

Its only interest is in interpreting the law
and meting out justice to litigants who to
them are only Messrs. X Y and Z. In other
words the committee has no local ties —
which to many is an important comfort zone.

The importance of the Judicial Committee
was acknowledged no later than April this
year when welcoming the law lords to the
Bahamas on their third trip here to hear
local cases, Thomas Evans, QC, speaking
on behalf of the Inner Bar said: “Your con-
tinued presence at the apex of our court
structure is a source of confidence in our
system to many litigants and practitioners
alike.”

In a break with centuries of tradition the
five law lords chose the Bahamas as the first
overseas jurisdiction in which to sit for sev-
eral days to hear Bahamian cases.

They sat in the Bahamas to decide local
appeals in December 2007, December 2008
and again this year — March-April.

And so it came as an unwelcome surprise
to hear Lord Nicholas Phillips’ comments
in Britain that the time had come to shake
off the institution’s “colonial hangovers” —
the Bahamas included.

Lord Phillips — soon to be president of
the UK Supreme Court and one of those
who sat on appeals in the Bahamas this year
— announced while here that procedural
changes would be introduced under the new
Privy Council rules, one of which would

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tighten time limits for filing applications.

“We do think,” he said, “that it is a good
idea that there should be a sense of urgency
with regard to appeals to the Privy Council. It
is not just that respondents should be left in a
state of uncertainty as to whether or not there
is to be an appeal.”

However, last week The Tribune pub-
lished a report that Lord Phillips had said
that countries like the Bahamas are taking up
too much of Britain’s time and resources.

He would like to see the Privy Council’s
case load reduced.

This has been interpreted as a sign that
Britain may soon move to shake off her colo-
nial burdens, leaving them to find or create
their own appeal courts.

On Friday The Gleaner of Jamaica report-
ed that as a result of these comments,
Jamaica’s Opposition is urging government to
table legislation in Parliament to revive the
process to leave the Privy Council’s Judicial
Committee as its final court of appeal in
favour of the Caribbean Court of Justice.

Lord Phillips’ views could not have come
at a worse time for the Bahamas judiciary,
which is struggling, but so far failing, to regain
the trust of the public.

At one time the judiciary was this nation’s
most honoured profession.

The leading lights of the Inner Bar — those
who had taken silk — were highly respected.

Their views were seldom questioned. They
set the tone for the profession, while members
of the Utter Bar toed the line.

Not so today. The atmosphere had started
to change in the sixties and by the eighties the
drug trade had so taken its toll, that the
integrity of some members were being ques-
tioned.

Whereas before no one would dare criticise
a member of the Bar, today it is almost the
fashion.

On Friday, Bahamas Bar Association Pres-
ident Ruth Bowe-Darville was concerned
that the indictment in the US of the Bar’s
treasurer could set back the Association’s
efforts to improve its public image at home
while diminishing its reputation aboard. This
case is indeed a tragedy.

However, sooner or later the Bahamas
will have to come to grips with a decision
about what court will replace the Privy Coun-
cil should the Council eventually decide to
drop its overseas jurisdictions.

The Bahamas is certainly too small a coun-
try for our present Court of Appeal to have
the final say in local affairs.



THE TRIBUNE





Horrified
by state of
dog pound

EDITOR, The Tribune.

My name is Devlyn
Stubbs, this past July I chap-
eroned our summer camp’s
field trip to the dog pound
where we witnessed first
hand the horrible conditions
there. This is a letter writ-
ten describing our experi-
ence. I have read the other
articles printed regarding
this issue and I would like
to offer my support to this
cause.

DEVLYN STUBBS

Owner/Trainer

Stubsdale Dog Care Cen-
tre

The Pound

THE day promised to be
very fruitful as we prepared
for our field trip to the
Humane Society.

As a surprise for the
campers, I planned a nature
hike through the Botanical
Gardens, and visit to the
pound which happens to be
located on the same facili-
ty.

To my disappointment
and to the horror of the
campers, the facility proved
to be far below any expected
standard.

The kennels were unsan-
itary, poorly lit, badly dilap-
idated, and seemingly gross-
ly underfunded. The 15-20
animals appeared not to be
taken care of; the cages were
filthy with excrement and,
in need of major renova-
tions.

The two adult staff mem-

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



bers, and three to four
younger persons, presum-
ably summer students, were
observed either relaxing
under a tree, on the tele-
phone, or preparing meals
in the staff kitchen, all while
a dead dog lay decompos-
ing ina kennel with its liv-
ing kennelmate. When
asked when the dead dog
would be removed, staff
explained that the keys to
the kennels were not cur-
rently on premises, but they
assured us that the dead dog
would be removed from the
kennel that day.

One kennel in particular
housed a puppy no more
than five months old, seem-
ingly healthy, and begging
for attention.

Mention was made how-
ever of helping eligible pets
find homes, but on this day
the Bahamas Humane Soci-
ety was denied the opportu-
nity to find a home for the
pup, and as scheduled the
following day, the pup was
euthanised.

Iam very disappointed in
the staff at The Pound and
embarrassed for my coun-
try because I understand
now why we have a stray
dog problem.

A worker explained to me
that it is not the policy of
the pound to patrol the
streets of Nassau capturing

dogs that roam, and there
are no penalties enforced for
allowing your dog to roam.
The pound only collects
dogs that people call in, and
they are euthanised every
Friday.

Awareness can lead to
change, and that’s what I
hope this letter may help to
bring about. What we are
experiencing in The
Bahamas with regard to the
large stray dog population
is a direct result of our lack-
adaisical attitude toward
yard enclosures, in addition
to refusing to spay and
neuter our pets.

Domestic and stray dogs
alike roam our streets, mat-
ing with other dogs helping
to increase the already large
local dog population.

The Bahamian govern-
ment should be leading the
way. Stray animals on our
streets are not only inhu-
mane, it’s a nuisance to the
citizens, and a constant
health risk to people and
dogs.

I hope that by exposing
The Pound and its inhu-
mane practices, we can per-
haps agitate our minds while
simultaneously warming our
hearts to begin to consider
the plight of our four legged
companions, and perhaps
we will then make a serious
attempt at properly caring
for our pets.

DEVLYN
STUBBS
Nassau,
September, 2009

Only Hutchinson-Whampao can
Own, Operate and manage a port

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I read with interest and
laughed at the obviously
very premature statement
from a Ms Nellini Bethel of
the Ministry of Tourism with
regards to the proposed
Cruise Port in the Grand
Bahama Port zone.

Ms Bethel clearly has not
done any research as she will
have been able to advise the
Director-General of
Tourism who would have
advised her Minister that the
only party who can own-
operate-manage a Port/Har-

\)\ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit oar website at weew.cob,edu. by

NOTICE

Tenders are invited forthe provision of cooked fond services al
The College of The Bohomas’ Grosvenor Close Campus,

Shirley Street

Tender documents may be collected frm:
Portia Smith Student Services Cemire
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Ficld Campus
Contact: Mrs. Elvina Bastian at 302-4516

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Ms. Cheryl Samms
VB, Finance
The Colk:ze of The Baleares

Deadline for submission
September Stith, 2009 at Spun,

Tender document should be marked 9s folboews:
Tender (309
PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE COOKED FOOD ON
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS’
GROSVENOR CLOSE CAMPUS

The College of The Bahamas
reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals

Site visit Will take place on Monday September 23nd
Parties are to mee al the Physical Planet building,



The College of The Bahamas, Oakes Field Compus at )0o.m.

For all enquiries regarding the site visit
Contoct Vr. Julian Miller at
(242 )-302-4 007, (242)-302-4925 or (242)-37%6-5041

bour in the GBPA zone is
none other than Hutchin-
son-Whampao as much as
the government might wish
otherwise unless some radi-
cal change is made to the
long-standing ownership
position made when
Hutchinson-Whampao pur-
chased on Grand Bahama,
over 15 years ago.

The fact that the Office of
the Prime Minister has been
Gazetting compulsory pur-
chases of land in Williams
Town does not somehow
make it “magically” correct
and a challenge to this in the
courts will discover that the
government has no rights so
endeth yet another idea of
government.

Yes we all know it would
be better in Grand Bahama
with a new Cruise Port but

we don’t want one owned
by Carnival Cruise Lines for
starters — if this project is
going to bids at the least 40
per cent of the Port should
be owned directly by resi-
dents of Grand Bahama —
Government might be
allowed to own 10 per cent.

Hope Ms Bethell at
Tourism now will go and
check her facts and the
OPM will curtail what is in
my opinion an attempt at an
illegal act of compulsorily
purchasing property under
false pretences.

Is this the silly season,
Editor — it seems so.

M EDGECOMBE
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
September 19, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5



MEMORIAL WALL UNVEILED | “°..O ss

Families of
murder victims
call for justice

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BEREAVED families of
murder victims called for jus-
tice and an end to violent crime
as a memorial wall was
unveiled at the New Covenant
Baptist Church yesterday to
honour their loved ones.

The Memorial Wall for Mur-
dered Persons bears the names
of 94 men and women whose
lives were violently taken over
the last 30 years. It is a solemn
reminder of the country’s ris-
ing murder toll.

More than 200 friends and
relatives of the murdered hon-
oured their loved ones at the
service organised by Bishop
Simeon Hall, senior pastor at
the church in the East West
Highway, and attended by Min-
ister of National Security Tom-
my Turnquest and community
activists.

Pastor Carlos Reid, a
reformed gang member who
now runs the youth group
Youth Against Violence
(YAV), called for a gang unit
to be established to target the
gangs infesting almost every
area of our country, and asked
for effective rehabilitation pro-
grammes to prevent offenders
from re-offending on release
from prison.

Mr Reid said: “In our coun-
try today it’s more popular for a
young man to associate himself
with a gang than the boys
brigade or a youth group at
church. Almost every area of
our country is infested with
gangs.

“Do we allow this anti-social
culture to become the social
culture that we live by in the
Bahamas?”

But College of the Bahamas
professor Felix Bethel said it is
not just gangsters unlawfully
taking the lives of innocent
loved ones.

Mr Bethel called for regula-
tion of the police force and for
those officers who have wrong-
fully killed with Royal Bahamas
Police Force weapons to be
brought to justice.

Directing his question at
Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest, Dr Bethel
asked: “Who is going to police
the police?

“Police control the coroner’s

court, so I’m told, and I am call-
ing on you Minister to call on
the Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham in a manner of the
most urgent priority to investi-
gate the conduct of the coro-
ner’s court, for a real mission of
inquiry into the deaths of our
brothers and sisters.

“Their names and their blood
cry out from the earth for jus-
tice.”

Friends and relatives of
Brenton Smith, the 18-year-old
shot dead by police in Village
Road on July 9, stood around
the memorial wall with plac-
ards calling for justice.

And Diane Bethel, mother
of the late Deron “Sharkie”
Bethel, 20, said she is still wait-
ing for justice for her son shot
dead in Pinewood Gardens on
March 27, 2006, at age 20. A
police officer has been charged
with his murder.

She said: “I am still waiting
for justice, and this wall shows
that my son, and those who
have been murdered have not
been forgotten.”

A symbolic release of seven
white doves by Rev Diana
Ranger and relatives of some
of the murdered named on the
memorial wall was followed by
prayers and music from the
church choir and the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force Band.

Bishop Hall organised the
building of the $6,000 memori-
al wall with a team of support-
ers to both comfort the fami-
lies of those who have been
killed, and to make a stand
against crime.

He told the crowd how losing
a loved one at the hand of a
murderer is the worst kind of
grief, and the memorial wall is
one way of commemorating
those whose lives were taken.

Bishop Hall said: “We want
to do it because we want to
stand with you. We feel your
pain and I pray that we will
learn to stand with one anoth-
er.”

The socially conscious pas-
tor has called for churches in
Grand Bahama and across the
country to make similar efforts
to stand against crime with the
hope to deter criminals.

Minister of National Security
Tommy Turnquest said the
murder rate is at an unaccept-
able level, and people must
report crime, teach their chil-

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Me donald

OCAL NEWS

———

ldarryll Saunders

A LITTLE GIRL looks at the names on the memorial wall yesterday

their loved one.

dren right from wrong, and
place a greater value on moral-
ity, honesty, and integrity than
on material gain.

He added: “We can also
emphasise how wrong it is to
take the lives of others, and that
consequences, serious conse-
quences will follow.”

However, the minister made
no mention of the possible re-
introduction of capital punish-
ment.

Mr Turnquest hopes the
unveiling of the memorial wall
will encourage anti-crime inter-
ventions in the community, and
inspire ongoing efforts to
address social tragedies and

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The minister said: “Regard-
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continue to share with you and
to assure you that we will do
all within the laws of the
Bahamas to bring justice to all.”

Adding: “The law in the
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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



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Christie blasts plans to axe
Bahamas Hotel Corporation

Organisation’s former deputy chairman George Smith also hits out

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PLP leader Perry Christie
and former Deputy Chair-
man of the Hotel Corpora-
tion George Smith have
slammed Government plans
to axe the Bahamas hotel
Corporation by the end of
the year, terminating the
jobs of an unconfirmed
number of staff.

Confirming the Govern-
ment’s plan to wind up the
operations of the Corpora-
tion and repeal the Hotel
Corporation Act “no later
than December 31, 2009”
Tourism Minister Vincent
Vanderpool Wallace said
the Government feels some
of the HC’s functions can be
“undertaken by other gov-
ernment entities and depart-
ments.”

The Tribune understands
there are fewer than 20 peo-
ple working at the Corpora-
tion, and while some are on
secondment from other min-
istries to which they can
return, others will be termi-
nated and receive severance
packages.

While the Hotel Corpora-
tion has in the past owned
around 12 hotel properties,
thanks to successful sales
over the years, it now only
owns one - the Lighthouse
Beach Hotel in Andros -
along with some large and
valuable landholdings in
Andros and Eleuthera.

Mr Vanderpool said that
for a long time the Corpo-
ration was primarily “push-
ing” these government-
owned properties, rather
than emphasising the touris-
tic development of the

Perry Christie



Bahamas as a whole, and
this does not chime well with
this Government’s vision for
tourism.

Meanwhile, the FNM gov-
ernment, in contrast to the
PLP government, is philo-
sophically opposed to the
idea of government owner-
ship in the tourism industry,
seeing the promotion of pri-
vate rather than public
involvement as the key to
boosting the sector.

Currently in “very serious
negotiations” with a private
developer interested in buy-
ing the Lighthouse Beach
Hotel, Mr Vanderpool Wal-
lace said the Hotel Corpo-
ration expects to sell that
hotel by the end of the year.

Meanwhile, the Govern-
ment is also “having con-
versations” with the I-Group
in Mayaguana about the
way forward there, where
the Hotel Corporation has
a 50 per cent stake in the
development.

“The principals in
Mayaguana know what we
want to do. It’s difficult to be
a partner and a policeman
at same time,” said Mr Van-



“It means that the current govern-
ment is philosophically moving away
from view that there is an advantange
to the government having some
involvement in the industry as now
provided by Hotel Corporation Act.



derpool Wallace. However,
he did not state what the
Government intends to do
with the land the corpora-
tion owns in Andros and
Eleuthera, the latter pur-
portedly worth more than
$100 million.

PLP leader Perry Christie
yesterday said “many ques-
tions are left unanswered”
and the Government owes
a full explanation of what it
intends to do and why.

He and Mr Smith charged
that the Corporation, “cre-
ated out of a perceived need
for government intervention
when things were very bad
in hotel industry” in the
1970s, still has a role to play
in tourism and can be devel-
oped.

“It means that the current
government is philosophi-
cally moving away from
view that there is an advan-
tange to the government
having some involvement in
the industry as now provid-
ed by Hotel Corporation
Act.

“On basis on my own
experience it’d be much to
the advantage of govern-
ment to have some govern-
ment-owned entity with a
focus on ensuring we are
always out there advancing
our country’s interests

through some entity that
would have a focus on it.
The ministries of the gov-
ernment can’t do it effi-
ciently.”

Both Mr Christie and Mr
Smith suggested that the
Hotel Corporation or an
entity similar to it could help
advance tourism, particular-
ly in the out islands, by
building “tourism infra-
structure” such as small
hotels that private develop-
ers might not otherwise be
interested in setting up.

These can be used to stim-
ulate private sector interest
in a particular Bahamian
destination once they can
prove successful, they sug-
gested. “Why so quickly try-
ing to divest itself of an enti-
ty that’s proven beneficially
proven to be to The
Bahamas without announc-
ing what they intend to
replace it with?” said Mr
Smith.

Mr Smith and Mr Christie
emphasised that were it not
for the Hotel Corporation
intervening in the past, the
jobs of many Bahamians
would have been lost at
properties which were clos-
ing down and a public entity
should continue to exist
which can step in if hotels
look set to go bust.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Change the tailed anti-drugs strategy
insight

WORLD VIEW

BY RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat).

N MY commentary

last week I made the

point that the greatest

destabilising force con-
fronting the Caribbean and
Central America is drug traf-
ficking and its attendant crime,
including illegal arms smuggling
and distribution, robberies and
executions.

I called on the United States
to take the lead in organising
collaborative arrangements
with Europe and Latin Ameri-
ca and the Caribbean to estab-
lish a comprehensive anti-nar-
cotics programme that address-
es both supply and demand.

This week, I take the appeal
a step further by calling on the
governments of the Caribbean
Common Market and Commu-
nity (CARICOM) to collabo-
rate with Latin American gov-
ernments in engaging the US
government in a dialogue to
fundamentally change the failed
anti-drug trafficking policy that
has been pursued so far.

Tam agreeing with Professor
Norman Girvan, former Secre-
tary-General of the Association
of Caribbean States, who
regards such an engagement as
crucial.

My commentary last week
was taken from an address I
delivered in London to military
officers from all over the world.
In the course of the address, I
had said that “the US, Canadi-
an and European governments
have concentrated on cutting
supply through eradication and
interdiction with limited suc-
cess, and it is clearly time to re-
think this strategy. But, in doing
so, the authorities in these
countries must collaborate ful-
ly with both the producing and
transit countries, both of whom
are as much the victims of the
trade as the countries in which
the huge markets reside.”

The failure of a policy prin-
cipally based on interdiction
and eradication is now painful-
ly obvious.

The policy not only fails to
tackle effectively the problem
of demand in countries such as
the United States of America
and Canada, it also suffers from
its imposed character. It is
essentially a policy created by
the US and imposed on the rest
of the area.

This policy, along with the
criminalization of the posses-
sion of even small amounts of
heroin, cocaine and marijuana,
has filled the jails of the
Caribbean and Latin American
countries.

Even worse, a large number
of people in St Vincent and the
Grenadines and Jamaica are
criminalized because they grow
or pick marijuana for a living.
Largely, these people have no
other means of livelihood, and
are unqualified or untrained for

Four people charged with firearms possession

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FOUR people were charged
with possession of firearms and
ammunition at Freeport Mag-
istrates’ Court on Friday.

Hartley Smith, 29, Romel
Smith, 24, Tamisa Saunders, 30,
and Emilyann Johnson, 17,
appeared in Court One before
Magistrate Debbye Ferguson.

They were charged with four
counts of possession of unli-
censed firearm and two counts
of ammunition possession.

It is alleged that on Septem-
ber 24 at Freeport, Grand
Bahama, the accused were
found in possession four unli-
censed firearms and ammuni-
tion.

Simeon Brown represented
the defendants. They all plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

Magistrate Ferguson grant-
ed $36,000 bail to each of the
defendants. The matter was
adjourned to January 11, 2010,
for trial in Magistrate Court
Two.

Pair expected to face
drug charges today

TWO men are expected to
be arraigned on drug posses-
sion charges in the Freeport
Magistrate’s Court this week.

The charges are in relation
to a drug seizure in the Lunar
Boulevard area, where police
discovered more than 70 lbs of
suspected marijuana, with an
estimated street value of
$56,800.

The suspects, ages 29 and 40
years, will appear in Court
today to answer to the charge
of possession of dangerous
drugs with intent to supply.



SIR RONALD SANDERS

anything but agricultural
labour.

Banana

In both countries, hundreds
of banana farmers have been
put out of business by the loss
of preferential markets in the
European Union, and the argu-
ment has been made that they
should be allowed to produce
marijuana, under regulated and
supervised conditions, for the
medicinal market.

This is being done in some
States of the United States,
such as California, and is capa-
ble of replication in the
Caribbean where it would pro-
vide employment and con-
tribute to the economy.

The Caribbean alone will
hold little sway with the bigger
powers in the Hemisphere who,
so far, directed the way that the
problem of drugs is handled.

But, there is now a growing
effort in Latin America for a
new and different approach.

It started with the Latin-
American Commission on
Drugs and Democracy co-
chaired by former presidents,
Fernando Henrique Cardoso
(Brazil), César Gaviria (Colom-
bia) and Ernesto Zedillo (Mex-
ico).

The Commission released a
report in February in which it
called for the decriminalisation
of cannabis and criticised “the
criminalization of consump-
tion.” Importantly, the report
concluded: “The deepening of
the debate concerning the poli-
cies on drug consumption must
be grounded on a rigorous eval-
uation of the impact of the
diverse alternatives to the pro-
hibitionist strategy that are



“The failure of a pol-
icy principally based
on interdiction and
eradication is now
painfully obvious.”

being tested in different coun-
tries, focusing on the reduction
of individual and social harm.”

When the report was pub-
lished, Ethan Nadelmann,
Executive Director of the Drug
Policy Alliance, observed that:
“An ever growing number of
Latin American leaders from
across the political spectrum
recognize that the prohibition-
ist approach to drug control has
wreaked havoc throughout the
region, generating crime, vio-
lence and corruption on a scale
that far exceeds what the Unit-
ed States experienced during
alcohol Prohibition in the
1920s.

“Many believe — and a hand-
ful have said publicly — that
the better solution would be to
abandon drug prohibition and
move in the direction of legally
regulating the global drug mar-
kets that are now illegal.”

Now, the Mexican govern-
ment has announced that it will
be eliminating jail sentences for
possession of small amounts of
heroin, cocaine, and marijua-
na, freeing law enforcement
officers to focus on the king-
pins of the trade.

The governments of Brazil
and Uruguay have also
announced the elimination of
measures that penalize people
carrying small amounts of drugs
and Argentina is reported to
be planning the exemption of
drug users from the criminal
justice system.

The Latin countries have
taken bold first steps, but what
is needed is collaboration by all
Latin American and Caribbean
governments and the elabora-
tion of a strategy with the Unit-
ed States and Canada that is
jointly devised, and collectively

implemented.
As University of the West
Indies Professor Alston

Chevannes, who chaired a Task
Force on Drugs in Jamaica
some years ago, recently not-
ed: “Jamaica would like to
decriminalise personal use of
cannabis but is afraid of US
decertification. Other CARI-
COM countries would proba-
bly like to but can't for the
same reason. An international
movement that includes big
players like Mexico and Brazil
would prevent our small coun-
tries from being exposed. If the

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PATRICK
MANNING, Prime
Minister of the

US can be won, then I reckon
the UN would have to come to
its senses and reconsider the

Conventions.” Republic of

_ Prime Minister Patrick Man- Trinidad and
ning of Trinidad and Tobago Tobago
has lead responsibility for secu- addresses the
rity issues in CARICOM. 64th session of

He can initiate these discus- the United

sions within CARICOM and Natlons General
with the Rio Group in time to
place the issue on the agenda of Assembly at the
the scheduled meeting later this United Nations
year between Caribbean Heads headquarters
of government and US Presi- Saturday Sept.

26, 2009. Prime
Minister Patrick
Manning of
Trinidad and
Tobago has lead
responsibility for
security issues in

dent Barack Obama.

In conditions of economic
decline and increased unem-
ployment, drug trafficking and
its attendant other crimes esca-
late, as they are doing now
throughout the region.

Souscscusescucuccucuccucusscvecucsecusserscsssseuss CARICOM.
(Responses and previous

commentaries at: www.str-

ronaldsanders.com (AP Photo/

sanders.com/> )

Stephen Chernin)


































































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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



ATTENTIVE: Participants in the road safety symposium.

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Transport Minister
Neko Grant highlights
road safety importance

THE importance of road
safety cannot be overem-
phasised, Public Works and
Transport Minister Neko
Grant told a young audi-
ence.

Mr Grant was the keynote
speaker at the fourth nation-
al road safety youth sympo-
sium at Worker’s House.

The Road Traffic depart-
ment and Chevron Texaco
Bahamas Limited organised
the symposium, with this
year’s as “Road Safety:
Focusing on the Road
Ahead”.

Participants were junior
and senior high students
from public and private
schools throughout New
Providence.

Workshop

The one-day workshop
covered various aspects of
road safety, including fac-
tors whih contribute to acci-
dents; challenges facing the
disabled in relation to road
safety; and Injuries related
to traffic accidents.

Speakers included Iris
Adderley, consultant, Dis-
ability Affairs Unit, Ministry
of Labour and Social Devel-
opment; Sgt. Garland Rolle,
Traffic Division, Royal
Bahamas Police Force; Bod-
ine Johnson, entertainer and
teacher; and Keniesha
Adderley, Texaco youth
spokesman.

Senior government offi-
cials in attendance included
Jack Thompson, Director of
Immigration; Colin Higgs,

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: ae Minister Neko Grant.

“It is our desire to
reverse this trend.
And in this regard,
the Ministry of
Public Works and
Transport has
sought to achieve
this by advancing
various road safety
education initiatives
while encouraging
multi-sectoral part-
nerships in the

process.”
——EE——EEEE_ Ea

Permanent Secretary, Min-
istry of Public Works and
Transport; Philip Turner,
Controller of Road Traffic;
and Brad Smith, Assistant



Controller of Road Traffic.

Mr Grant said according
to the World Health Orga-
nization, road traffic injuries
are the leading cause of
death globally among young
people between the ages of
10 and 14, 15 to 19 and 20 to
24 years.

He noted that 45 traffic
fatalities were recorded in
The Bahamas during 2008,
and 37 traffic fatalities have
been recorded so far for
2009.

“It is our desire to reverse
this trend,” said Mr. Grant.
“And in this regard, the
Ministry of Public Works
and Transport has sought to
achieve this by advancing
various road safety educa-
tion initiatives while encour-
aging multi-sectoral part-
nerships in the process.”

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9



Industrial action may be looming for
College of Bahamas faculty members

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INDUSTRIAL action
may be on the horizon for
faculty members at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas who
remain disatisfied with the
handling of negotiations
over a new industrial agree-
ment.

The emerging threat
comes as some teaching staff
say that much greater stu-
dent numbers this year have
already put a strain on the
ability of youngsters to get a
quality experience at the col-
lege.

And, some staff claim, the
strife between teaching staff
and College administrators
along with the extra demand
placed on teachers and the
College’s resources by this
year’s increased enrollment
is impeding COB’s momen-
tum towards university sta-
tus. Jennifer Dotson, presi-
dent of the Union of Ter-
tiary Educators of the
Bahamas (UTEB) which
represents faculty at the col-
lege, told The Tribune that
the College is now expect-
ing more of teachers but try-
ing to take away benefits.

“The College needs to be
more open and receptive to
the needs of faculty. It is
asking us to take in more
students, to teach more, but
they are not negotiating a
new industrial agreement.

“They expect things of us
but us but is not willing to
give anything in return,”
claimed the UTEB Presi-
dent, who added that staff

Dissatisfaction remains over negotiations for new agreement



JANYNE HODDER

were only made aware of a
major increase in student
numbers a week before the
fall semester began.

One of the major issues
for faculty in negotiations
over a new industrial agree-
ment is the proposal by the
College that they will be put
on contracts, something
which staff feel will lessen
their ability to get loans or
take on other personal
responsibilities.

Mrs Dotson said the
union does not feel prepared
to “sign away all of its terms
and agreements” that exist-
ed in its previous industrial
agreement, which expired in
mid-2008, and is now
“strategising” over the way
forward.

“If it means taking a strike
vote or withholding students
grades ... we will have to do
what we have to do to make

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sure we have clear terms
and conditions. But those
are drastic steps and we
hope it won’t get to that.”

While disatisfaction has
been growing for months, a
faculty meeting last week
with College president
Janyne Hodder “did not end
well” according to Ms Dot-
son and others who attend-
ed, leaving tensions height-
ened.

Proposals

Staff had been looking to
the President to “justify”
some of the proposals the
College is putting to faculty
in negotiations and some
new policies already being
imposed, but many left dis-
atisfied.

“The faculty were trying
to get answers to questions.
There’s a lot of policies
going into place, a lot of
things happening and we
wanted rationale for whats
going on. In the end she had
to call a recess to the meet-
ing. All the faculty got up
and left,” claimed one lec-
turer, who wished to remain
anonymous.

Yesterday Margot Black-
well, a lecturer who divides
her time between the School
of Education and the School
of Applied Sciences while
also participating on the
UTEB negotiating team,
described the situation as
“heartbreaking.”

“We’ve been without an

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industrial agreement for 14
or 15 months,” she said.

“We can’t move forward
to develop as the University
of the Bahamas if we can’t
agree on terms and condi-
tions under which this can
be done.

“For us to be frustrated at
this point when we should
have common purpose is
beyond me.”

Michael Stevenson, head
of COB’s LLB programme,
said he feels that Ms Hodder
“needs to be more person-

ally in the negotiating
process.”

“What presently has tran-
spired is a feeling that when
UTEB negotiates with the
college they are not neces-
sarily negotiating with the
decision makers and that
needs to be addressed.
There’s alot of misunder-
standing and a lack of real
negotiating.”

As for industrial action,
Mr Stevenson said it’s “not
something we want to do
but it’s always an option.”

When contacted about the
Union’s broad-ranging con-
cerns as well as the outcome
of last week’s faculty meet-
ing on Friday, the College
issued a short statement
which stated that in a “usual
faculty meeting” held last
Thursday during which the
“topic of ongoing union
negotiations did come up.”

“There were cordial dis-
cussions held and it is not
the practice of the College
of The Bahamas to negoti-
ate outside of our normal
internal processes.” A union
spokesperson declined to
comment any further.




































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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

For the stories behind
temas. CMe tle ee / eT 4
on Mondays

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

DEATH NOTICE

Mrs. Barbara Elaine
Kelly Albury, 89

of Village Road, Nassau,
The Bahamas died at her
residence, on
Wednesday 23rd
September, 2009.

Mrs. Albury is
predeceased by her
»| husband, Kenneth H.E.
Albury, her brother,
Dudley Sands and her
daughter-in-law,
Christina Albury.

She is survived by her son, Drew Albury; brother,
Everette Sands and his wife Patricia; grandchildren,
Christian and Stefan Albury; sister-in-law, Valeria
Sands; nephews, John and Jimmy Sands; niece,
Sonia Springle and many other relatives and close
friends.

A Memorial Service will be held for Mrs. Barbara
Elaine Kelly Albury, at Trinity Methodist Church,
Trinity Place and Frederick Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 10th October, 2009 at 3:00p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family request that donations
be sent to Queen's College Foundation, P.O. Box N.
7127, Nassau, in memory of Barbara E.K. Albury.

Please Note date and time: Saturday, 10th
October, 2009 at 3:00pm.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.



Unleash our
own resources

VIEW FROM AFAR

BY JOHN ISSA

THE time has come for us
to move towards less depen-
dence on foreign investment
and more on our own
resources for growth and
development in The
Bahamas. Not only will it be
beneficial to Bahamians in the
short run by speeding up our
recovery from the recession
but the long term benefits will
be profound and substantial.

The actions that I am
going to suggest have been
raised before; however the
urgency for their adoption has
been accelerated by the world
recession. Despite the fact
that technically the US reces-
sion may be coming to an end,
it will be some time before
employment accelerates in
the US to the point where we
will feel the benefits in
Bahamian tourism and invest-
ment. This column does not
think that we can wait that
long without severe damage
being done to the social fabric
of The Bahamas. We are
already seeing the start of this
damage in the rise of the lev-
el of violent crime.

The two actions that will
increase economic growth and
employment with all their
consequential benefits are the
freeing up of Bahamian capi-
tal and entrepreneurial ener-
gy. In order to free up
Bahamian capital which is
held overseas Bahamians
should be permitted to repa-
triate their foreign assets with
the same rights as a foreign
investor and with no penalty
for having breached the for-
eign exchange laws. I know
persons will worry that the
money will leave again but
once it is invested and earning
a return it will stay. We must
all remember that the Foreign
exchange restrictions didn’t
stop the funds from leaving

Let Us Rally A ainst Crime

Join us'in

Tp

' )

aneaent

demonstration at|Rawson Square on
September 30th2009 from"
Jam to 3: 30pmias\we seek from
Parliament Justice for, Brenton Hector
Smith and other:stolen lives of crime/and

violence.

ae

‘ 7 ; ye ;
October 12th.- Marchifor Justice B'H'S.
& Stolen Lives= Depart ‘Arawak Cay

9:00%. am

a?
r i

We invite the family of victims to

contact us at

www.thebrentonfoundation.org;
e-mail: brentonfoundation@gmail.com

or

Ph #426-7001

Together lets bring an end to the Crime
that's Killing our Nation.

J O HN

in the first place.

The second action is the
need to change the business
licensing legislation so that
any qualified Bahamian will
have the right to a business
licence without any consider-
ation being given to protect-
ing existing businesses. This
protectionism which is part of
our history in The Bahamas

| Ss S A

and at one time tried to pre-
serve the social status quo is
now trying to preserve the
economic status quo. Any
country that continues along
this road is condemning a
large number of its young
entrepreneurs to lives in
which they cannot live their
dreams or achieve their
potential.

We need YOU to come in

A

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST
FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

The notion we can
govern — but not judge
— ourselves is illogical!

By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

JESIGN, SU ND INST

EXTERNAL LANDSCAPING LIGHTING

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is seeking Expressions of Interest from qualified
firms to provide services and products for the design, supply and installation of the exter-
nal landscaping, lighting and irrigation systems. for

YouNG MAN’s VIEW

AST week’s

comments by

the President of

the UK’s new
Supreme Court, Lord
Nicholas Phillips, sent shock-
waves throughout the Com-
monwealth as this prominent
justice claimed that cases from
places such as The Bahamas
are burdensome and have
occupied too much of the
time and resources of the
Judicial Committee of the
Privy Council (JCPC).

ii) the Harry Moore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and

(ii) the new Northen Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

ADRIAN G IBS ON



“Today, many Bahamians view the
Privy Council as an obstacle to hanging
death row inmates in this era of ram-
pant violent crime.”

Interested parties may obtain further intonation and a copy of lhe Expresspons of Interest
Prequalification Applicution fom trom:

The Office of the Vice President Finance
College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau, Balamas



In the case of The
Bahamas, which continues to
retain the Privy Council, Lord
Phillips’ comments must have
shocked the judiciary/govern-
ment as this leading British
jurist seems to be clearly urg-
ing countries to develop final
courts of appeal or join
regional networks since the
London-based JCPC may no
longer hear appeals from for-
eign jurisdictions.

In April 2005, the
Caribbean Court of Justice
(CCJ) was established as a
final appellate court for juris-
dictions within the region;
however, although The
Bahamas helps to fund the
CCI, like several other coun-
tries, it does not retain this
court as its final court of
appeal. Frankly, in the inter-
im, until we settle upon our
very own final court, it is in
the Bahamas’ best interest to
continue to retain the Privy
Council.

At present, there is no
comity among the countries
that helped launch the CCJ
and were privy to the agree-
ment for its establishment.
Thus far, these countries have
shown a lack of political will
towards taking a unified
approach to making the nec-
essary Constitutional/legisla-
tive adjustments to give the
court the validity it needs to
operate as the final appellate
court in their respective juris-
dictions. At present, the juris-
diction of the Privy Council
is limited and focused on cer-
tain legal areas. If we are tru-
ly seeking to establish our
sovereignty, why go from
what is perceived in some
quarters as a form of imperi-
alism or hegemony to anoth-
er?

Today, the CCJ is the final

appellate court for Barbados
and Guyana, the latter hav-
ing abolished the JCPC as its
final court several years
before the establishment of
the CCI.

Apex

The Privy Council stands
at the apex of our local judi-
cial system and, amidst some
controversy, has effectively
adjudicated on Bahamian,
and Caribbean, issues that
have come before it. Contrary
to a perception that has arisen
relative to the CCJ, the Privy
Council appears to be a truly
independent body that is not
subject to judicial meddling,
social forces and/or political
pressures. In recent times, in
an attempt to familiarize itself
with local circumstances, the
Privy Council has had repeat-
ed sittings in the Bahamas.

The Bahamas’ Constitution
makes provisions for the Privy
Council, stating its purpose as
being “for the hearing and
determination of appeals
from decisions of any court
in the Bahamas by a panel of
judges.” The JCPC is a safety
net that has protected the
rights of citizens in matters
where trials were seemingly
inequitable and/or set a poor
or disagreeable precedent.

Recent Privy Council deci-
sions, particularly regarding
death row inmates and their
execution, have been loathed
and have led to condemna-
tion of the council and calls
for its abolition as a final
appeals court. Today, many
Bahamians view the Privy
Council as an obstacle to
hanging death row inmates in
this era of rampant violent
crime.

In 1993, in their infamous

CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services,

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the Corporation's Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.

Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
at telaphone 302-1158

Tenders are to be addressed to:
Mir. Kevin Basden
General Manager

Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for delivery to BEC:
Sth October 2009 no later than 4:00 p.m.

Submissions should be marked as follows:

Tender No. 711/09
CATERING SERVICES - CAFETERIA
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or reject any or all proposals.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Pratt and Morgan decision,
the Privy Council decided that
the execution of a person
after five years on death row
amounted to inhumane treat-
ment. Locally, this meant that
many prisoners on death row
at that time had their sen-
tences converted to life
imprisonment. Moreover, lat-
est hullabaloo came after the
Lambert Wilson case, which
called for the discretionary
use of the death penalty and
stated that the mandatory
death sentence was unconsti-
tutional.

In these times, where orga-
nized and sadistic criminals
are openly challenging the
authority of the state, the
Privy Council has been sub-
ject to harsh criticism, partic-
ularly because certain deci-
sions do not reflect the local
circumstances of countries still
referring to it.

Noted jurists, such as Jus-
tice A Saunders of the
Caribbean Court of Justice,
have criticized the JCPC on
the basis of its perceived hin-

SEE page 12

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29th September, 2009 and on

Tel; 242-302-453 13/4516

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President

College of The Bahamas
Northern Campus
Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘Tel: 242-352-9761

Wednesday, 40h September, 2009 in Freeport at a lime and venue to be announced.

BOVs are to be submitted to the bocation(s) indicated in the EOI Prequalification Form in

a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Firms must submit a separate EQ tor each facility. All BOW's are to be submitted by 12:00

Vice President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -
insert name of applicable facility

pm (mid-day) on Friday, 9th October, 2008,

Colinalmperial



The following Government Employees are asked to contact
the respective representatives at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148)

Alexander Burrows
Alexis Roberts
Almina Hanna
Alvin Cunningham
Andrew Thompson
Angela Neymour
Arlington Brice
Bernice Culmer
Beverly Mather
Bradford Wildgoose
Cecil Gray

Cravaughn McKay
Cyril Gibson
Danielle Davis

Danny Toussaint
Daphnie Saunders
Douglas Smith

Ellis Miller

Elvis Bullard

Isadell Howells
Jerome Pinder
Latoya Cargill Gray
Loretta Hart

Lynn Woodside-Sands
Mandi Pedican
Philip Hinzey
Roland Clarke
Roosevelt Burrows
Ruth Williams

Ruthesa Glendera Dean

Selle Julie Brindle
Sherry Armaly Hall
Terrence King
Vanria Johnson
Vilna Adderley
Vincent Grant

Alma Clarke
Anthony Rolle

Anthony Fawkes

Bettrah Belanda Mitchell
Bridgette Neely

Carl Rudolph Johnson
Charlene Dawkins-Bevans
Cheryl Bowe-Moss

Clarence Rolle

Cleaver W. Robinson
Cordero Farrington

Coresa Deveaux
Cynthia Wilson

Dedrick Storr

Derek Nottage
Desmond Pinder
Douglas Richards

Francina Scott
Francis Clarke

Frederica Hamilton

Fredie Smith

George Bruney
Gloria Estella Rolle

Jasmar Higgs

Jewel A. Mcphee

John A. Webb
Kardeo Heild
Kevin Remond

Culmer

Kirkwood Campbell

Laytoya Cargill
Leila Wood

-Gray

Lorenzo M. Carroll

Malriae Lauree

Ferguson

Mavis Vanderpool

Melissa Evans
Michael White

Melonie Adderley
Mervalette L. Dean

Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152)

Mervin Dean

Mervin J. Dean

Michael Duvalier

Muriel Johnson

Natashia Andrews
Pamela Taylor

Petre Darwin Curry
Philip Turner

Raymond Butler

Reginald Taylor

Rhonda Gibson

Samuel A Gay

Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Shannon Akira Butterfield
Sharon Creary

Sharon Hanna

Sheniqua Brennen-Curry
Shorn Douglas Gibson
Solomon Rolle

Sonia Smith

Stanley Wood

Stephen D. Moss
Theresa Cooper

Tina Samantha O Brien
Trevor Mcneil Basden
Valentino Gay

Velma Cox

Veronica Samuel

Virginia P. Culmer Woodside
Wayde Russell

William Mckenzie
Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills


PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM PAGE ONE

Police death prove ‘hotched

FROM page one

murder.

And they now have the backing of
retired Detective Sergeant Nathaniel
Santine I, who happened upon the
family’s plight by reading our web-
site Tribune242.com last week.

After reviewing the family’s evi-
dence, he criticised the police for
allowing vital DNA evidence, includ-
ing clothing and hair samples, to go
missing; and for failing to impound
the vehicle in which the body was
found and comb it for forensic evi-
dence and fingerprints.

“Incompetence played a role in
what looks like a botched investiga-
tion. This is not a petty crime where
the consequences are minimal, this
crime resulted in a death and beyond
the capture of the perpetrators, the
investigators failed to secure evi-
dence to protect the rights of the
victim,” Det Santine said.

He said the authorities need to

ELUM ORCA (mst Ce TL
Nathaniel Santine III



explain why the investigation was
carried out in such an unprofession-
al manner, and punish those respon-
sible.

The detective noted a number of
holes in the police’s theory that Mr
Ferguson died while driving alone
as aresult of his head colliding with
a utility pole.

The official version of events sug-
gests he died while sitting on the dri-
ver’s side, but the 40-year veteran,
who spent his career investigating
crimes in King’s County, the Bronx,
Staten Island and New Jersey, said
the blood and glass evidence make
this impossible.

“Tt is obvious that the blood on
the floor of the vehicle was not from
a victim of an accident; but instead is
from a person bleeding and being
laid or slumped on that portion of
the vehicle.

“The velocity of the blood also
created a pattern that trickled onto
the driver’s side. The carpet of the
floor after being sampled should
have been removed to reveal the
settling pattern of the blood on the
metal floor and shift gears.

“The glass evidence also cannot
be explained away. It is impossible
by the law of physics for a traffic
accident to occur, smashing a side
glass and leaving broken glass under

the victim — who was said to be sit-
ting on top of the glass and not hav-
ing any on his person, including frag-
ments in his wound.

“If a collision is violent enough to
cause a fatal injury, the wound must
be explained. This has not been
done, and the body would not be
found in an upright position; but
instead thrown from the vehicle or
tossed within the cab of the vehicle.

According to Det Santine, there is
“more than enough evidence” in the
family’s photos of the crime scene to
suggest that an in-depth investiga-
tion should have been ordered.

“Tt is obvious that proper protocol
was not followed in investigating this
matter. It appears as if the respond-
ing officers in their haste to cate-
gorise a traffic accident, missed or
ignored some key steps.

“This level of incompetence as it
relates to inefficient police investi-
gations should not go unrecognised

or unpunished. The responsible offi-
cers and their superiors should be
held accountable,” he said.

Detective Santine is from a law
enforcement family spanning sever-
al generations. His grandfather,
father and two brothers are all law
enforcement officers.

He worked for more than 25 years
in major crimes, including crime
analysis, community and problem-
oriented policing, beat/manpower
allocation, crime trend analysis, traf-
fic enforcement and analysis and
risk-focused prevention/ juvenile
recreation.

He has a BA in criminal justice
and Sociology from Columbia Uni-
versity in New York and now spends
his spare time actively following the
investigation of cold cases in his
county.

¢ Read the full text of Detective

Santine’s findings on Page 3 of
today’s INSIGHT.

Man, 21, shot

Govt employees may be relocated to hotel tower

FROM page one

the arrangement with Baha Mar to
accomodate the workers, which is “not
yet a done deal” but “under serious
consideration”, could last for
“upwards of six months”.

Potential site, hotel tower “J”, is
one of two of five of the Wyndham
Nassau Resort’s five towers which
have been closed to the public for
eight months, awaiting demolition as
Baha Mar moves ahead with its plans
to re-develop the Cable Beach strip.

Another possible site to put the
ministry staff is the Teachers and
Salaried Workers Cooperative Credit
Union on East Street, although it
appears the hotel is the favoured loca-
tion.

However, Mr Bethel noted that the
Government has been informed by
Baha Mar that they have an “aggres-
sive schedule” to meet in terms of
their own development prospects,
meaning that the building will have
to be vacant and ready for demolition
sometime next year.

Robert Sands, senior vice president
of external affairs for Baha Mar said:
“We have been approached by the
Government and we’re trying to coop-



wa al

erate and assist the Ministry of Edu-
cation and Youth in this venture.
“We have some space that can meet
their short term needs and we’re trying
to match our space with those needs in
shortest possible time period.”
The Government recently received

copies of floor plans of the vacant tow-
er and is now seeking to determine
whether it would suitably accomodate
the temporary relocation of the two
ministries’ offices and staff. Mr Bethel
anticipates that “no less than 100
rooms” would probably be needed to
house them.

Neither Mr Bethel or Mr Sands
would say yesterday how much it is
likely to cost the government to rent
the space, and Mr Bethel would not
conjecture as to the cost to the goven-
rment to fix the problems at the
Thompson Boulevard building or to
physically move its operations to the
hotel tower.

However, Mr Sands said the hotel
accomodations are “certainly not
gratis (free)”. He also noted that cur-
rently the disused tower does not
presently have the information tech-
nology or telecommunications facili-
ties that the ministries would require.

Asked whether the Government
had budgeted for the costs involved in
moving two ministries and fixing the
mould problem, Mr Bethel said “the
government has the capacity to
respond to many challenges.”

“It’s a question at the end of the
day of reordering priorities,” he

added, noting that when it is no longer
using the NIB building it can use some
of the funds which currently go
towards paying rent there to pay Baha
Mar.

Mr Bethel also emphasised that
medical professionals say the mould is
not a threat to the health of workers
unless they have “some other condi-
tion which makes them more suscep-
tible.”

“This is really more to do with com-
fort of the staff and their self-percep-
tion in terms of how they feel com-
ing into a building that does have chal-
lenges that building on Thompson
Boulevard has.

“T think it reflects the concern and
responsibleness of government to seek
to make the situation as comfortable
as possible for the working Bahamian.

“We’re looking at floor plans right
now to detemrine availability of rooms
and sizes and whether all or part of
operations of ministry can be comfort
accomodated there.

“We’ll make some determinations
early this week to make recommen-
dations to the Prime Minister or
requests in terms of him being Minis-
ter with responsibility for the public
service dealing with rentals.”

Jolin Travolta trial set to resume today



TRAVOLTA FAMILY attorney
Michael Ossi outside court.

FROM page one

called by the prosecution in
the case. Her testimony fol-
lows that of Mr Travolta on
Wednesday, and West End
and Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe on Friday.

Mr Wilchcombe appeared
in court walking with the aid
of a stick after his foot was
seriously injured in a freak
truck accident.

He testified that former
PLP senator Pleasant Bridge-
water told him she had a
client who had a document
that could be harmful to the
Travoltas. After viewing the
document he called the Tra-
volta family’s doctor and an

attorney for the star, he said.
Mr Wilchcombe also
admitted that Bridgewater
had never told him that her
client was seeking to extract
money from Mr Travolta.
Attorney for John Travol-
ta, Michael Ossi, testified on
Friday that he spoke with Mr
Wilchcombe by telephone
around 5.30pm on January 12.
Following that conversation
he phone Michael McDer-
mott, another attorney for the
Travoltas.

Mr Ossi also told the court
that on Saturday, January 17,
he had a meeting with attor-
neys Allyson Maynard Gib-
son, Damian Gomez, Michael
McDermott, Howard Butler
and Michael Hamilton at the

firm of Gibson and Co.

Mr McDermott is expected
to testify this week as well as
Senator Maynard Gibson. It is
also expected Mr Travolta
will be recalled to the stand.

Superstar Mr Travolta told
the court last week how he
and others made efforts to
save the life of his 16-year-
old son Jett after he suffered a
seizure in Grand Bahama on
December 29 last year.

Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne are accused of
attempting to extort $25 mil-
lion from Mr Travolta by
means of threats. Bridgewater
is also accused of abetment
to extort.

The case resumes today.



US ACTOR John Travolta, left,
and wife Kelly Preston leave the
court building iast week.

outside his home
FROM page one

contradictory information
regarding the Bozene Town
shooting and more details will
be released today.

The man shot in Chipping-
ham, who has not yet been
identified by police, was in
front of his house when he
was approached by a man
known to him carrying a gun,
police say.

Several shots were fired
resulting in the victim being
wounded numerous times on
various parts of his body. The
gunman then fled.

Anyone with any informa-
tion should call police as a
matter of urgency on 911, 919
or call Crime Stoppers anony-
mously on 328-TIPS (8477).

Body found
on Rose Island

FROM page one

cause of his death.

Anyone with any informa-
tion which may assist police
investigations should call
police on 911, 919, or call
Crime Stoppers anonymously
on 328-TIPS (8477).

Man on $80,000
cocaine charge

FROM page one

thought to have a street value
of around $80,000.

Airport police were called
when the drugs were found
at around 6am on Saturday
and a man was arrested. He is
expected to be arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court today.



THE ADRIAN GIBSON COLUMN
The notion we can govern — but not judge - ourselves is illogical!

FROM page 11

drance to the development of indige-
nous jurisprudence, saying:

“Unquestionably, the existence
of a right of appeal to the Judicial
Committee of the Privy Council
affects the confidence of our Courts.
At times, our Courts appear to be
always looking over their shoulders
across the vast ocean of sea towards
the Privy Council for applause and
approbation.

“This subjugation or subservience
of judicial thought and independence
cannot be justified in independent
and sovereign states.”

While the Constitution must be
amended to accommodate our own
final court, and while Justice Saun-
ders’ view holds true in some
respects, it is no reason to join the
CCJ. Frankly, at present, the funding
of the CCJ poses a problem for that
regional high court as it is quite cost-
ly, this being of particular note dur-
ing these economically gloomy times.
By contrast, the Privy Council is rel-
atively cheap and all the countries
using this appellate court share costs.

Furthermore, if more countries—
including the Bahamas—were to
adopt the CCJ as its final appellate
court, will the judges be chosen on
merit or quota? And if so, would
this leave some jurisdictions out?

In his book, ‘An introduction to
law and legal systems of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas”, Dr
Dexter Johnson asserts that:

“The Privy Council does not com-
promise our sovereignty in the man-
ner that a regional court might do
since the latter comes with the shad-
ow of a political union hanging over
it. The regionalists in the Bahamas
might wish to merge us into a region-
al, political and economic entity
which would be subject to the central
final court of this political unit, the
Caribbean Court of Justice. Region-
al and local politics would dictate
the appointments to this court.”

Before joining the CCJ, Guyana
had already established a precedent
by using its Court of Appeal as its
final court. Like New Zealand
(2003), Grenada and Guyana, it is
expected that in the Bahamas there
will be an eventual abolition of
appeals to an overseer court, in this

PE eT A

I WOULD like to wish the
greatest mom, the one queen in
this world — my grandmother
Lenora Gibson of Bunches, Long
Island — a happy birthday!
Tomorrow, my grandmother, who
raised me and is affectionately
called “mammy”’, will celebrate
her 77th birthday.

My grandmother and grandfa-
ther (Edward Gibson) are my
backbone, the pillars I rely on in
good times and times of distress.
Happy birthday mammy, I wish
you continued good health and I
love you both!



instance, the Privy Council.

In establishing the present Court
of Appeal (COA), the Bahamas’
constitution states that “there shall
be a Court of Appeal for the
Bahamas which shall have such juris-
diction and powers as may be con-
ferred upon it by this constitution

or any other law.” In order to estab-
lish the COA as our final appellate
body, the scope of the court must
be broadened, even though it is
presently the final local court on
issues that may fall outside of the
jurisdictional purview of the JCPC.

The Bahamas needs to change its
approach to jurisprudence, as lower
court magistrates should be elected
and the use of a local final appel-
late court should foster greater inter-
pretation of the law in a manner suit-
able to the people.

However, while an indigenous
appellate court is desirable, espe-
cially as it is also familiar with local
lifestyles/customs, our population
size may hamper its establishment
as questions will arise about the pos-
sibility of a fair trial, the threat that
a judge could be openly partisan to
someone coming before him/her,
politically biased, incompetent
and/or crooked.

All must be done to ensure that
this court is insulated and that these
pitfalls must be avoided. Moreover,
there is a need for an independent
legal commission!

Bahamian court decisions have in

the past been praised by Privy Coun-
cil jurists for being erudite and cor-
rect.

Our eventual delinking with the
Privy Council will signal our thrust
towards building a nation without
limitations, signal a move towards
real constitutional reform and
enhance judicial creativity.

The notion that we can govern
ourselves but are not capable of
judging ourselves is a non sequitur
that is simply illogical!

Bahamians are so emotive and
ecstatic about our independence and
sovereignty— particularly around
July 10 every year when throngs of
Bahamians are brandishing flags,
shirts and other related parapher-
nalia—but the reality is that unless
we engage in major constitutional
reform and seriously modify our
legal system, our sovereignty in some
respects is merely theoretical.

The relevance of the law in local
circumstances is best achieved by
locals, not by regional or far distant
courts whose Law Lords’ thinking
is not superior to that of the most
ethical and scrupulous Bahamian
jurists.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS

For the best sporting action . . .

WWW. trl

PROPER Care Pool Lady Sharks’ catcher
Debbie McClure reaches safely on base as
Pineapple Air Wildcats’ shortstop Jeanette
Hilton couldn’t hold onto the ball...

WILDCATS’ third baseman Maryann Fowler makes the tag on Proper Care

Pool Lady Sharks’ centerfielder Keisha Miller...

Wildcats ‘bite u
Sharks 13-9

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Pineapple Air Wild-
cats are clicking on all cylin-
ders and that is creating hav-
oc in their quest to regain the
New Providence Softball
Association ladies’ champi-
onship crown.

The pennant winning Wild-
cats posted a 13-9 triumph
over last year's runners-up
Proper Care Pool Lady
Sharks on Saturday night at
the Banker's Field at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex.

With the win, Pineapple
Air pushed their front-run-
ning record to 15-1, while
Proper Care Pool climbed
into second, a half-game
ahead of defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes at 10-

It was the lone game played
as the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force Commodores
failed to show up to play the
Thompson Heavy Equipment
Outlaws in the men's opener.

With the loss, the Outlaws
are mathematically out of the
playoff race at 6-13 in seventh
place. The Outlaws are still
in the hunt in fifth place at
10-12, trailing last year's run-
ners-up Robin Hood Hitmen,
who are currently in fourth
place at 11-9.

Wildcats’ manager Jack
Davis said his Wildcats are

Commodores are no show against

une242.c

The

Ojke

WILDCATS’ Marvelle Miller delivers a pitch...

the Outlaws in men’s opener

playing like the true champi-
ons that they established
themselves to be over the
years and that is causing a lot
of problems for their oppo-
nents.

"When you look at the
team, we are gelling right
now,” Davis said. "We're just
getting ready for the playoffs.
So tonight, we tried to use
some of the new players.

"The idea is to get them in
form so that they can step in if
we need them when we get
to the playoffs. So by the time
the playoffs are set, the Wild-
cats will be ready."

Davis said he's confident
that whenever the playoffs get
started, Pineapple Air will
take their game to the next
level as they've consistently
done so over the years.

With ace Mary Edge-
combe-Sweeting playing first
base, Marvelle Miller got the
starting nod. She went the dis-
tance throwing a six-hitter
with a strike out. She also
helped her cause with a 2-for-
4 night with two runs scored.

Sweeting-Edgecombe and

Softball standings

Teams WwW
Ladies’ Division
Pineapple Air Wildcats 15
PC Pool Lady Sharks 10
Sigma Brackettes 9
Bommer G Swingers 4
Queens

Men’s Division

Dorcey Park Boyz 21
Pricewater Stingrays 17
CS Truckers 12
Robin Hood Hitmen 11
R Thompson’s Outlaws 10
Young Breed 7
D Force Commodores 6
Buccaneers

Mighty Mits 3



shortstop Jeanette Hilton
were both 1-for-5 with a run
batted in. They scored three
and two runs respectively.
Catcher Donnette Edwards
was 1-for-4 with three runs
scored.

Pineapple Air rebounded
from a 5-3 deficit in the top of
the third by producing six
unearned runs on just one hit
to stake their claim to anoth-
er victory as they opened a 9-
5 lead.

They put three more on the
scoreboard in the sixth,
sparked by Miller's lead off
triple and ending with
Hilton's run-producing triple.

And for insurance,
Edwards got a one-out single
in the seventh and raced
home with their final run on
an error.

Proper Care Pool managed
one last effort for a comeback
in the seventh when they
marched eight batters to
plate. But their effort was
thwarted after they left the
bases loaded.

In the rally, catcher Deb-
bie McClure reached safely
on a two-base fielding error
and eventually came home on
a wild pitch before shortstop
Vonetta Nairn got on with
another error and caught a
ride home on Jeannine Wal-
lace’s RBI single.

With two out, Wallace
advanced all the way to third,
second sacker Raquel Cooper
got to second and center field-
er Keisha Pratt-Miller was on
base before relief pitcher
Alex Taylor grounded out to
end the game.

Shonel Symonette, the
starting pitcher, got the loss
before she was relieved in the
fourth.

McClure ended up going 2-
for-4 with two RBIs and two
runs scored. Thela Johnson
was also 2-for-4 with a RBI,
scoring a run. Left fielder
Cleo Symonette was 2-for-4,

scoring a run and Raquel
Cooper was 2-for-4 with a
RBI and a pair of runs scored.

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WILDCATS’ Maryann Fowler makes contact with the ball...

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



For the b

www.

Local swim
coaches attend
World Clinic

THE American Swimming
Coaches Association (ASCA)
World Clinic 2009 was held in
beautiful Ft Lauderdale Septem-
ber 7-13.

It hosted over 1,000 American
and international swim coaches
from around the world.

Several top coaches from the
US and Australia were speakers
at the clinic.

The local coaches who attend-
ed the clinic were Andy and Nan-
cy Knowles, Geoff Eneas, Mike
Stewart, Travano McPhee, Iva
Russell, Chikako Christoffersen,
Mancer Roberts, Sara Knowles,
and Ashley Sands.

This year was unique in that
they honoured the nine US
Olympic swim coaches who are
still alive. The coaches showed
videos and shared experiences
from different Olympic Games
over the last 50 years.

“This year’s clinic comes on
the heels of the Roman Circus
that was the World champi-
onships a few weeks ago, and we
are all eagerly looking forward
to resolution from FINA on the
issues relating to the high-tech
swimsuits,” said John Leonard,
executive director of the ASCA.

There was much discussion on
the swim suits, including com-
ments from the top Australian
swim coach Allan Thompson
who compared the problem with
the suits to the drug problem with
the German doping system in the
70s.

This year’s clinic was also dif-
ferent in that Andy and Nancy
Knowles were speakers at the
clinic.

They spoke on the pilot pro-
gramme of teaching government
school children how to swim by
using the swimming pools from
private schools. There was posi-
tive feedback and much interest
from the other coaches.

ASCA is an independent pro-
fessional association based on a
central theme of leadership in
American swimming through
education, certification and co-
operation.

The swim coaches association
plays a leadership role in evalu-
ating past efforts, present con-
cerns and future planning and in
proposing solutions in both the
coaching and swimming commu-
nities.

The leadership function is pro-
vided by synthesizing ideas and
information from throughout the
swimming community into a
coherent direction for action.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s bid for the World
Boxing Council’s Interna-
tional super middleweight
title ended with a severe cut
over his right eye and now
his British Commonwealth
title defence could be in
jeopardy.

On Friday night at the Bell
Centre in Montreal, Canada,
Mackey was forced to stop
fighting 20 seconds into the
fifth round of their scheduled
12-round co-main event bout
against Adonis ‘Superman’
Stevenson.

Back after a year’s
absence, Stevenson scored a
knockdown at the end of the
fourth and he reportedly
pounced and pounded away
at Mackey at the start of the
fifth when referee Adrio
Zannoni stepped in and
stopped the fight.

“Things was going great. I
was in the fight, but after I
got cut in the fourth round,
the referee asked the doctor
to take a look at it and he
said I have to stop the fight,”
Mackey said.

“T told the doctor that I
didn’t want the fight to stop
because I was fighting for a
WBC International title and
world ranking. I was in the
fight.”

But Mackey said the doc-
tor warned him that because
the cut was so severe, if it got
any worse, he would have to
stop the fight.

“Tn the fifth round, Adonis
came right at me and the ref-
eree stepped in and stopped
the fight,” Mackey said.
“They gave Adonis a 17th
ranking in the world, but I
knew that could have been
me if I didn’t get the cut.”

A disappointed Mackey,
who took on the fight just
before he is due to defend
his British Commonwealth
title next month, said had he

sporting action . . .

inbune?4?. (

Severe cut over right |

eye ends Choo Choo’s
bid for WBC title

JERMAINE MACKEY (shown) was forced to stop fighting 20 seconds into the fifth round of a scheduled
12-round co-main event bout against Adonis ‘Superman’ Stevenson...

not been cut, he was con-
vinced that the outcome
would have been a lot differ-
ent.

Not only did Mackey have
to get some stitches for the
cut, but he will also have to
sit out the next 45 days
before he can get back into
the ring to fight again.

“T wasn’t focusing on the
British Commonwealth title.

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I was focusing on getting the
WBC International title and
getting a world ranking,” he
said. “I wanted to get the
Bahamas closer to getting a
world title shot.”

After five days he will be
allowed to have the stitches
removed. Once they are out,
Mackey said he intends to
get right back in the gym to
continue his training for the

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next opportunity to fight.

His trainer Ray Minus Jr,
who accompanied Mackey to
the fight, said it’s not antici-
pated that he will be pre-
pared to fight again until
December.

“He will more than likely
be able to defend his British
Commonwealth title then,”
Minus Jr stressed. “We are
addressing that matter now
to the Commonwealth Box-
ing Commission. We are pro-
viding them with a new date
and hope they will accept it.”

Minus Jr, the former
British Commonwealth ban-
tamweight champion, said
Mackey fought well up until
the time that he suffered the
cut and was unable to con-
tinue.

With the win, Stevenson
remained undefeated at 13-0
with 10 KOs. Mackey
dropped to 18-4 with 14
KOs.

The fight was held under
the main event bout that saw
Montreal’s Jean Pascal suc-
cessfully defend his WBC’s
light heavyweight title with
a 10th round technical
knockout over Italian Silvio
(II Barbaro) Branco.

It was Pascal’s first title
defence as he was matched
against the No.1 challenger
in the 175-pound division.

Mackey thanked his spon-
sors, V8 Splash, Prime

Wa

VINCE FERGUSON
MEMORIAL

A MEMORIAL service
for the late Vincent Lloyd
Ferguson is scheduled to
be held 7:30pm Tuesday
at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road. The funeral service
is set for 2pm Thursday at
St Francis Cathedral.

Ferguson, 71, died at his
home on Wednesday
while eating breakfast. He
reportedly had a massive
heart attack. He was suf-
fering from prostate can-
cer.

He left behind his wife
Marie and two children,
Anne-Marie and Vincent
Alex.

VOLLEYBALL
TOM GRANT
RESULTS

THE annual Tom “The
Bird’ Grant High School
Invitational High School
Volleyball Tournament
concluded on Saturday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymna-
sium.

In the senior girls divi-
sion, the C C Sweeting
Cobras knocked off Telios
Christian Academy 22-25,
25-20 and 15-9. Mt Carmel
defeated the CV Bethel
Stingrays 19-17 and 19-17.

Telios Christian Acade-
my, however, won the
senior boys division with
a 25-18 and 25-16 decision
over C V Bethel.

The tournament served
as a prelude to the Gov-
ernment Secondary
Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s 2009 volleyball sea-
son that is expected to kick
off 4pm today.

The senior boys and
girls will play at the D W
Davis and C I Gibson
Gymnasiums, while the
junior boys and girls will
play at the R M Bailey and
Tom Grant outdoor vol-
leyball courts.

TRACK
BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to
hold a meeting 7pm Fri-
day at McDonald’s,
Thompson Blvd. The
meeting is to discuss the
BSC's 2009 Nicola Major
track and field meet that
has been postponed until
Saturday, October 24 at
the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium.

The BSC, in the mean-
time, will take a break on
Saturday from its 2009
Olympia Morris-Evans
Softball Classic at the Bail-
lou Hills Sports Complex
for the funeral service of
his brother, Rashad Lewis.

Lewis, who assisted the
BSC in the concession
stand, was killed recently
during an attempted rob-
bery.



Bahamas, Nautilus Water,
the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture and his new
sponsor Big Shot Sporting
Lounge, for the assistance
they all rendered in getting
him prepared for the fight.

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THE TRIBUNE

S h
| MONDAY,

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

n his first appearance

at the Mr Olympia

bodybuilding cham-

pionships, Joel

Stubbs was looking
forward to at least cracking
the top 10.

But at Saturday’s show at
the Orleans Arena & Las
Vegas Convention Center in
Las Vegas, Nevada, Stubbs
failed to make it out of the
preliminary rounds.

The Bahamasair pilot, who
had switched from playing
basketball to weight training
and then bodybuilding after
he had broken his leg, was
unavailable for comment up
to press time last night.

But prior to the start of the
weekend competition, he not-
ed that he was thrilled to have
been among the elite body-
builders in the world.

Out of the field of 23 com-
petitors who participated in
the two-day event over the
weekend, Stubbs finished tied
for the 16th and final spot
with seven others.

The list included Trinidad
& Tobago’s Darren Charles.

PAGE 15

i

SEPTEMBER 28,



S

2009



JOEL STUBBS didn’t make it out of preliminary rounds at Mr Olympia...

Lebanon.
None of them made it out

The others were Americans
Troy Alves and Bill Wilmore,

Sweden’s Martin Kjellstrom,
German Dennis Wolf, Aus-
tralian Michael Kefalianos
and Ahmad Haidar of

of the two preliminary rounds
after they all accumulated 80
points.

Stubbs, who had earned his

“=e es.

qualification last month in
Dallas, Texas, was the first
Bahamian to have competed
in the most prestigious body-
building event in the world.

For the third consecutive
year, Jay Cutler won the title
as he led an American sweep
of the top five positions with
15 points, scoring the lowest
points of five in all three
rounds.

Branch Warren, who col-
lected 46 points, was second,
while Dexter Jackson got
third with 47. Coming in
fourth with 54 was Kai
Greene and Phil Heath
rounded out the top field with
55.

Cutler joined an elite field
of multiple winners, including
California governor Arnold
Schwarzegger, who has seven
to his ledger. However, both
Lee Haney and Ronnie Cole-
man have captured eight titles
apiece. Dorian Yates is next
in line with six.

Named just like the Chica-
go Bears’ quarter-back, Cutler
told the Las Vegas Sun News-
paper that he “wants to make
history.”

“This is all I think about.
It’s what I live for. I eat, drink
and sleep bodybuilding.”



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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



UNITED KINGDOM

Royal Navy announces major cocaine seizure

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(AP Photo/Ministry of Defense)
IN THIS UNDATED IMAGE released by Britain’s Ministry of Defense
Sunday, Sept. 27, 2009, a U.S. Coast Guard boarding party approach
a fishing boat prior to finding more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound)
bales of cocaine. Britain’s Royal Navy said it had made a record
seizure of cocaine after a frigate operating off the coast of South Amer-
ica captured drugs with an estimated street value of more than 240
million pounds ($384 million).

LONDON

Britain's Royal Navy said it made a record seizure of
cocaine when a frigate operating off the coast of South
America captured drugs with an estimated street value of
more than 240 million pounds ($384 million), according to
Associated Press.

The Ministry of Defense said the HMS Iron Duke found
5.5 tons (about 6 U.S. tons) of cocaine on a fishing boat ear-
lier this month — the Royal Navy's largest drug seizure
ever.

"This surpasses anything we've had and anything the
Navy had previously,” said Commander Andrew Stacey of
the HMS Iron Duke. "It is the largest drugs bust by value,
and by volume in terms of cocaine."

The ministry refused to say exactly where the operation
took place for security reasons.

Suspiciously

The Navy launched the operation after one of its heli-
copters spotted a fishing boat "acting suspiciously" in an area
known for drug trafficking, a ministry statement said. Along
with the U.S. Coast Guard and another British vessel, the
HMS Iron Duke intercepted the boat on Sept. 15 and spent
the next 24 hours searching for contraband.

They found more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound) bales
of cocaine under concrete in the fishing boat's ballast tanks,
the ministry said. The cocaine's final destination is unknown.

Britain's Prince William served a brief tour aboard the
HMS Iron Duke last summer.

While the prince was a crew member, the ship seized
cocaine worth an estimated 45 million pounds after an oper-
ation northeast of Barbados.

Earlier this year, the ship seized drugs worth an estimat-
ed 33 million pounds.

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Baby Boomers’
‘double whammy’
for the economy

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor _

T H E
upcoming
retirement of
the Bahamas’

own ‘Baby
Boomers’ will
have “an

enormous
impact on
economic
growth and
development”
because they
form 30 per cent of this
nation’s workforce, a former
minister has warned, while the
effects of the global recession
on their US counterparts
could prove equally troubling.

James Smith, former minis-
ter of state for finance in the
Christie administration, said
that while some studies of the
US ‘Baby Boom’ generation —
those born between 1946 and
1964 — suggested economic
growth there could be retard-
ed through the loss of skills
associated with their retire-
ment, the impact on the
Bahamas could potentially be
even greater.

The CFAL chairman,
addressing a seminar organ-
ised by his own investment
advisory firm, said that while
it was estimated that Baby
Boomers accounted for 25 per
cent of the US labour force,
“in the Bahamas that contri-
bution is even higher”.

“Tt represents 30 per cent
of the labour force,” Mr
Smith said of the Bahamian
‘Baby Boom’ generation.
“That is because unemploy-
ment in the Bahamas is par-
ticularly high amongst the
young.

“The productive labour
force are the ones who belong
to the Baby Boomers genera-
tion. They represent a partic-
ular set of dynamics.”

Mr Smith said that if this
generation were to retire
together, and forced early
retirements among older
workers were increasingly
becoming the norm as
employers sought to cut costs
during the recession, “the
vacancies created by the
retirees will be filled by the
pool of young people.

“These people coming in
might not have the same skill
set as those retiring,” the ex-
minister added, warning that
this might have “an enormous
impact on economic growth
and development”.

As for their US counter-
parts, Mr Smith said the main
concern for the Bahamas was
the impact the recession had
on their wealth levels and,
consequently, their spending
and travel habits. Surveys sug-
gested they had spending
power of some $3 trillion per
year, with a hefty chunk of

SEE page 4B

SMITH



THE TRIBUNE

gu



MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ine

SEPTEMBER 28,





ys

2009



Colinalmperial.

Confidence For Life

Building structure ‘key’
to 30-50% energy saving

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian businesses and

homeowners could have

properties that are 30-

50 per cent more energy

efficient by simply get-

ting the initial structure right, the

founder of a Bahamas-based con-

struction/consulting company has told

Tribune Business, thereby reducing
future alternative energy demand.

Kymenski Kemp, founder and pres-

ident of Caribbean Greensafe, a new-

ly-formed construction, consulting and

development company, said he had

established the firm as “a one-stop

shop” for the supply, design and devel-

opment of environmentally-friendly

building materials, homes and struc-

* Green construction start-up's founder says electric bill reduction from
getting wall, floor and foundation insulation right could reach 60-70%

* Firm aims to provide ‘one-stop shop' for consulting, design and
delivery of eco-friendly construction, materials and advice

* Aiming to start pre-sales on first Bahamas-based real estate
development ‘within a month'

* Caribbean export eyed as company develops

tures, both in the Bahamas and, even-
tually, the Caribbean.

Mr Kemp, a fully-qualified Bahami-
an architectural engineer, with more
than 20 years’ experience in the Flori-
da construction industry, told Tribune
Business that Caribbean Greensafe

was already planning its first Bahamas-
based real estate development, the 24-
unit Emerald Breezes Villa develop-
ment, with pre-sales due to start “with-
in the next month”.

“Tf you start with your structure, and
make it energy efficient, it’s very fea-

sible to be in the 30-50 per cent [ener-
gy| savings range without going to
alternative energy sources yet and, in
some cases, you can even leapfrog that
— up to 60-70 per cent,” Mr Kemp told

Rivals tell regulator:
Stop Cable distorting
market competition

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

REGULATORS have
been urged to mandate that
Cable Bahamas “provide
unbundled, non-discriminato-
ry access to its network”, rival
operators warning that the
BISX-listed company must
not be allowed to distort mar-
ket competition again, as it
did when it effectively forced
five rival Internet Service
Providers (ISPs) out of busi-
ness to achieve market domi-
nation.

Responding to the Govern-

Bank ‘concern’
on BNP Paribas
departure move

By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

THE Bahamas Finan-
cial Services Board’s
(BFSB) chairman has
described BNP Paribas’s
decision to quit this juris-
diction by year-end 2010
as “regrettable” given that
this nation does “not need
any of its blue chip banks”
to depart, and expressed
concern about the pres-
sure G-20 nations could
be subjecting their head
offices to.

SEE page 9B



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* SRG chief calls on new
supervisory body to
ensure BISX-listed
company provides
‘unbundled, non-
discriminatory access’
to network to prevent
repeat of Internet debacle,
which forced five
rivals out of business

ment’s consultation on
access/interconnection issues
in the Bahamian communica-
tions industry, Paul Hutton-
Ashkenny, Systems Resource
Group’s (SRG) president,
warned that “it would be
unconscionable for URCA to

SEE page 7B

SEE page 8B

Power firm’s sales drop 12% in ‘09

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

GRAND Bahama Power
Company’s (GBPC) kilowatt
per hour (kWh) sales fell by
12 per cent year-over-year
during the 2009 first quarter,
the company’s president and
chief executive has revealed,
continuing a trend that saw a
2 per cent decline in 2008.

Writing in the annual
report for ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle
that owns a 50 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power
Company, E. O. Ferrell
acknowledged that 2008 “was
a difficult year” for the
island’s monopoly power sup-
plier, even with the benefit of
a 4.87 per cent rate increase
from April onwards.

He added that this rate rise
was “negatively offset” by
Grand Bahama’s continued
economic decline, both as a
result of the global recession
and the continued closure of
the Royal Oasis, “and unsea-
sonably cool weather during

the fourth quarter”.

“Overall, 2008 kWh sales
were 2 per cent less than
2007,” Mr Ferrell wrote.
“Unfortunately, that trend is
continuing into the first quar-
ter 2009, with kWh sales 12
per cent below the same peri-
od in 2008. There were, how-
ever, items of positive growth
that will be beneficial for
years to come.”

For the 12 months to
December 31, 2008, Grand
Bahama Power Company’s
net income rose by little over
$100,000 or 3 per cent, to
$3.621 million compared to
$3.516 million the year before.

This was despite a 23.2 per
cent rise in operating rev-
enues, from $94.076 million
to $116.036 million, as total
operating expenses — includ-
ing fuel costs, which peaked in
July last year — rose by a
greater amount, 24.7 per cent,
to $108.752 million compared
to $87.207 million the year
before.

As a consequence, net
operating income grew by

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only 6 per cent, to $7.284 mil-
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SEE page 6B

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Colinalmperial.
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Service Announcement

ACL is pleased ta announce the grand opening of a new and improves

consolidation warehouse and container terminal.

Effective September 28, 2009, ACL will be relocating to a larger and more

modern facility in Pompano Beach, Florida our new delivery address in

Broward County will be:

This new terminal will facilitate ACL in its pursuit to provide our custamers

with the highest level of customer service at the best possible price. We

appreciate your continued support and look forward to seeing you in our

new Pompano Beach facility,









OU

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

DURING the week,
Bahamian investors traded in
10 out of the 24 listed securi-
ties, of which none advanced,
six declined and four
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 196,878 shares
changed hands, representing a
growth of 131,023 shares com-
pared to the previous week's
trading volume of 65,855
shares.

AML Foods (AML) was
the volume leader, some
65,500 shares trading, its stock
declining by $0.08 to close the
week at $1.07.

Focol Oil Holdings (FCL)
was the lead decliner, its share
price falling by $0.49 to a new
52-week low of $4.50, on a
volume of 42,425 shares.

Bank of the Bahamas
(BOB) share price also fell to
a new 52-week low of $5.90
ona volume of 42,200 shares
traded. First Caribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB), too, experienced a new
52-week low on a volume of
25,000 shares traded to close
the week at $10.

BOND MARKET
There were no bonds trad-
ed on the market last week.

COMPANY NEWS

AML Foods (AML)
released its unaudited finan-
cial results for the quarter
ending July 31, 2009. For the

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quarter, AML reported a net
profit of about $1.2 million,
compared to $162,000 in the
same period last year, an
increase of $1.015 million.

Gross profit of $7.4 million
increased by $1.3 million or
20 per cent quarter-over-quar-
ter. Overall, expenses
increased, but due to the sales
growth during the period its
impact on net profit was not
substantial.

AML/’s chairman indicated
that both sales and gross mar-
gin dollars had increased,
shrinkage in stores had
decreased and liquidity had
improved, resulting in a fur-
ther reduction in the compa-
ny's bank debt.

Total assets and liabilities
at July 31, 2009, were $29.5
million and $15 million
respectively, compared to
$30.6 million and $18.3 mil-
lion at fiscal year-end.

e First Caribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) (CIB)
released its unaudited finan-
cial statement for the quarter
ended July 31, 2009. For the
quarter, CIB reported net
income of $19.4 million com-
pared to $26.7 million for the
same period in the prior year
, a decline of $7.3 million or
27 per cent.

Net interest income of $35.3
million declined by $3.3 mil-
lion or 8.5 per cent quarter-
over-quarter and, as stated by
the bank’s chairman, this was
influenced by the decline in
international interest rates,
partially offset by higher loan
volumes during the quarter.

Loan loss expense in the
third quarter was $6.2 million



leant tae





TT
Try Estate

SMUT LET Laat

compared to $8.7 million in
the 2008 third quarter. How-
ever, year-to-date CIB has
recorded loan loss expenses
of $20.3 million, compared to
$15 million for the same peri-
od in the prior fiscal year.

Total assets decreased from
$4.2 billion to $3.9 billion, and
total liabilities also declined
from $3.7 billion to $3.2 bil-
lion from the bank's year-end.
However, management indi-
cated that the bank remains
well capitalised with a current
Tier 1 capital ratio of 17.7 per
cent, well in excess of the min-
imum requirement of 14 per
cent.

Dividend Notes

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

¢ Doctor's Hospital Health-
care Systems (DHS) has
declared a dividend of $0.02
per share, payable on Sep-
tember 30, 2009, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date September 17, 2009.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

¢ Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6, 2009,
to all ordinary shareholders
of record date October 1,
2009.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B





‘Yeoman’s effort’
needed to beat
recession woes

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A “yeoman’s effort” will be
needed from all Bahamians
and economic sectors if the
Bahamas is to overcome the
challenges created by the cur-
rent global recession, the min-
ister of state for finance
acknowledging that the down-
turn had “exposed some of
the fundamental weaknesses
in our system”.

Addressing a seminar
organised by CFAL, the
investment advisory firm,
Zhivargo Laing conceded that
the Bahamas’ present unem-
ployment rate, estimated at
14 per cent for New Provi-
dence and 17 per cent for
Grand Bahama, was “high”,
adding that an immediate
challenge was “job creating
economic growth” to provide
sustainable long-term employ-
ment.

“Clearly, it is a challenge
to have in excess of 15,000
persons unemployed, both
because of the personal hard-
ship it brings to them and as it
relates to the loss of income
and productivity to the
nation,” Mr Laing said. “Cre-
ating jobs for people today is
important. Being able to cre-
ate jobs in a sustainable fash-
10n 1s even more important.”

The two main drivers of the
Bahamian economy, tourism
and foreign direct investment,
had been heavily impacted by
the global recession, and Mr
Laing said the Government
was focused on maintaining a
sound fiscal position — deriv-
ing enough revenue to sustain
itself, and its capacity to main-
tain debt spending.

Arguing that successive

adminis-
trations
had gener-
ated
enough fis-
cal ‘head
room’ to
allow the
Ingraham
govern-
ment to
sustain a
burgeon-
ing fiscal
deficit and
deb
spending
in the short-term, Mr Laing
acknowledged: “If this down-
turn endures for a long period
of time, it becomes a more
significant challenge. The rev-
enue shortfall against forecast
is more than $30 million
behind.......... Tt will not be
sustainable if this situation
continues much longer. The
greatest vigilance is being paid
by us.”

Although the monetary sec-
tor, in the form of foreign
exchange reserves, and the
commercial banking system
were currently stable, Mr
Laing said: “We sometimes
miss the reality that this crisis
has left thousands of Bahami-
ans” unable to meet their reg-
ular obligations, such as mort-
gages and rent, electricity
bills, school fees and medical
expenses.

The Government had
expanded social services’ bud-
get by some $12 million over
the last two budget periods,
Mr Laing said, and the extra
funding had been much need-
ed. The fact that some 6,000
customers had been discon-
nected for non-payment by
BEC “is just an indication of

LAING



the continuing saga of this
current economic crisis”.

Calling on all Bahamians
and stakeholders to work
together, the minister added:
“Crime has implications for
economic growth, both now
and in the future. Citizens,
businesses and investors all
require an environment
deemed to be safe to flour-
ish. There has to be a reduc-
tion in the levels of crime we
are experiencing.”

Mr Laing also identified
human capital, and the pro-
vision of after-hours training
to those already employed in
the workforce, as one area for
advancement. “We need to
improve our level of produc-
tivity to ensure we’re putting
out a world-class product,” he
added.

Domestic savings needed
to be increased, the minister
added, plus economic diversi-
fication achieved “with exist-
ing domestic dominant sec-
tors and expanded output in
other economic sectors. We
must look for opportunities
in all sectors.

“We need to expand our
global outreach by putting
Bahamian goods and services
into more markets abroad,”
Mr Laing said. “We need to
make it easier to do business
in this country for everyone
by removing bureaucratic
impediments to the establish-
ment and conduct of busi-
ness.”

He also argued that the
Bahamas needed to formal-
ize trade arrangements with
other countries, in order to
provide its businesses and
entrepreneurs with a mecha-
nism of redress to resolve
trade disputes.

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stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College’s master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
processes; providing leadership and coordination in the recruitment, selec-
tion and assignment of faculty and staff; liaising and collaborating with rel-
evant industry, NGOs and private sector stakeholders and working closely
with the employment community to review, develop and implement curric-
ula, courses and certification programmes based upon defined needs.

Applicants should possess a doctoral degree in one of the disciplines of
tourism, hospitality, management or a related field, a minimum of five (3)
years of successful academic leadership at the level of department chair or
above or ten (10) years expenence at an executive level within the hospi-
tality industry of an appropriate combination of academic qualification and
training. For a detailed job description, visit www.coob,edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply no later
than Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

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FROM page 1B

that going on travel and vaca-
tions.

He added that in one recent
survey, three-quarters of US
Baby Boomers spoken to said
they had “suffered much loss
of wealth” as a result of the
plunge US and global stock
markets sustained in late
2008, since most of their
investments were linked to
this. As a result, the survey
found many “had to adjust
their lifestyles, making fewer
purchases of big-ticket items
and taking fewer vacations”.

With the Bahamas receiv-
ing about 85 per cent of its
visitors from the US, and
many of these wealthy
retirees from the Baby Boom

26 Virginia St., Tel: 325 - 1389

1 blk west of Hilton hotel entrance, in large two storey
turquoise building, on one way westbound street

Em-rtamor

A





















8
és
ee

The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:

1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com
2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide mote efficient service.
All information will be treated as strictly confidential.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

BIOLAGE ALFAPARF

PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

USNS
Baby Boomers’ ‘double

whammy’ for the economy

generation, the implications
for this nation are obvious.
“Tf the losses of wealth by this
group translate into a dra-
matic change in spending
behaviour, it could mean a
slower economic recovery in
the US, and an even slower
recovery in the Bahamas if
this most important group of
Americans decided to take
less vacations,” Mr Smith
warned.

“The importance of this
group, and the outlook going
forward over the next few
years, should be of particular
concern to the Bahamas. Any
change in spending habits will
have an impact on the
Bahamian economy.

“The impact for the
Bahamas, if the Baby
Boomers change their spend-
ing habits, to begin with
would be a slowdown in eco-
nomic activity, persistently
high levels of unemployment
and more forced retirements.
Businesses would be likely to
see a slowdown in economic
activity this year, and the year
after, and be likely to contin-
ue downsizing staffing levels.”

Many Bahamians forced
into early retirement as a
result of recession-related
downsizing in the workforce
had not prepared for this
eventuality, Mr Smith

GLINTON

warned, even though it was
generally agreed that retirees
on average needed 75 per
cent of their pre-retirement
income to live on.

To prepare for their retire-
ment needs, Mr Smith urged
Bahamians to develop a Bud-
get matching anticipated
income against likely spend-
ing. If spending appeared to
exceed income, one way to
bridge the gap was to stay in
the labour force beyond the
retirement age of 65.

While early planning was
recommended, he added: “It’s
not a perfect world. Many
people are facing day to day
challenges, and do not have
the time or opportunity to
plan. Those persons forced
into retirement, especially
those in the Bahamas over the
past year or so, have been
forced to make adjustments
to their lifestyles.”

To cope, the former minis-
ter suggested that those
Bahamians forced unexpect-
edly into early retirement
needed to “take a step back”
and perform a self-assessment
of where they were and where
they were going

He warned that it “could
be a mistake” for Bahamians
forced into early retirement
to dip into any retirement
funds they received upon

The Partners and Stalf of:

are pleased to announce that

PATRICK H, RYAN

THE TRIBUNE



leaving the workforce,
explaining: “It would be bet-
ter to resist using that money
too soon. You'll regret it later.
By going into that account too
soon, you'll be giving up the
opportunity of having retire-
ment income and you’re
worse off.”

Mr Smith also urged forced
retirees to maintain their
health insurance coverage,
warning: “There are fewer
events that could devastate a
savings effort than a medical
tragedy. We hope it will not
happen to you, but if you’re
unemployed really try and
keep that coverage up.”

TNH

ARS Us
WA UT

aT
Insight on
Mondays



| SWEETING | O'BRIEN

COUNSEL & ATTORWMETS-AT-LAW

Has joined the firm as an Associate Attorney in the Litigation Department

with effect from July 2009. Mr.

Ryan earned his LLB from the University

of Buckingham, Buckingham, England in 2006 and was called to the Bar of
England and Wales in 2007 and the Bahamas Bar in September 2009. We

welcome Mr. Ryan to our team and look forward to him further enhancing

our ability to provide clients with efficient and effective legal services.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.hy

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (EOI

FOR PREQUALIFICATION FOR

aT

FURNITURE

FIXTURES & EC

ULPMENT:

The College of The Bahamas (COB) is secking Expressions of Interest from qualified ven-
dors'firms to provide services and products tor the design, supply and installation of fur-
niture, fixtures and equipment (FFA) for

(i) the Harry Wloore Library and Information Centre presently under construction at
the Oakes Field Campus of The College and
{ii} the new Northern Bahamas Campus of The College presently under construction
in Freeport, Grand Bahama

Interested parties may obtain further information and a copy of the Expressions of Interest
Prequalification Application fonm trom:

The Office of the Vice President Finance

College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field
Nassau. Bahamas

Tel: 242-302-45 13/4516

Or

The Office of the Associate Vice President

Colleze of The Bahamas

Northern Bahamas Campus

Freeport, (rrand Bahama
‘Tel: 242-352-9761

An information meeting will be held in Nassau, on Tuesday, 29h September, 2004) and on
Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 in Freeport ata time and venue to be announced,

EOr's

a sealed envelope appropriately marked:

Viet President, Finance
College of The Bahamas

are lo be submitted to the location(s) indicated in the EOL Prequalification Form in

EXPRESSIONOF INTEREST - FEE -

insert name of applicable facility

Finns must submil a separate BOW for each faciliy. All EOs are to be submitted by 12:04)
pm (mid-day) on Friday, 8th October, 300K),
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B



Bahamas unlikely
to ‘hit bottom’
until 2010's Q1

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
is unlikely to “hit bottom”
until the 2010 first quarter, an
investment research analyst
has forecast, with business

Baha Mar hoping for 2010 second quarter start

activity and investment levels
“not expected to return to
2000 levels for three to four
years”.

Jamaal Stubbs, a senior
investment research analyst
with CFAL, told a seminar
organised by the company

that economic recovery in the
Bahamas would only be seen
in the 2010-2011 holiday sea-
son.

“We expect the upcoming
holiday season to be very
slow, very challenging,” he
added, with the Bahamian
economy unlikely to ‘bottom
out’ from the current reces-
sion until the 2010 first quar-
ter or summer next year.

The one potential bright
spot for the economy
remained Baha Mar, Mr
Stubbs added, which was
“hoping to get something
started in the second quarter
next year”.

Meanwhile, Lynden Nairn,
Colinalmperial Insurance
Company’s life division vice-
president, said that while
“only a handful of compa-
nies” in the Bahamas had
pension schemes for their
employees, many of these had
“policies and procedures that

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NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:
The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Rahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 306 Thompson Blvd.
For more informtaion call: 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdom(acoh.edu.hs

Application Deadline: léth October, 24),







































were not very meaningful to
the long-term interest of the
employees”.

“What does this portend for
the future for the average
Bahamian without a pension
plan?” he asked. “In the end,
this means an increased bur-
den on the society. It’s going
to affect us in a big way with
taxation, and is going to
impact our standard of living
if certain things do not hap-
pen.”

Mr Nairn said issues such
as portability, whether an
employee leaving one com-
pany could transfer their pen-
sion plan earnings to a new
employer’s scheme, needed
consideration.

“There are issues relating
to accounting, transparency,
actuarial valuations of a fund,
risk, the return on investment
and the directors of the pen-
sion plan,” Mr Nairn said.
“My experience has been that
not many persons consider-
ing employment at a company
give serious thought to the
pension benefits.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSS SSS SESE aaa
Power firm’s sales drop 12% in ‘O9

FROM page 1B

income increased by more
than $1 million, both these
rises were offset by an
increase in interest expense
to $5.154 million, compared

IN THE SUPREME COURT

BETWEEN

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

to $3.432 million in 2007.
Grand Bahama Power
Company’s long-term debt
had risen by almost 50 per
cent at year-end, growing
from $66.288 million to
$99.512 million, a develop-

CLE/qui/01038

ment largely due to the $50
million bond financing it
placed in May and July 2008
to raise funds for capital
expansion projects and refi-
nance existing debt.

Financing

That financing appeared to
reduce the outstanding col-
lective balance on various
commercial bank loans from
$55.333 million to $38 million
at year-end 2008.

While Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company’s results are
interesting, of more pressing
concern to the island’s resi-
dents is likely to be the com-
pany’s performance when it
comes to service and reliabil-
ity, not to mention the rela-
tively high cost of electricity.

Looking back at 2008, Mr
Ferrell acknowledged that the
three island-wide blackouts
suffered by Grand Bahama
Power Company during that
year were “totally unaccept-
able”, and “extensive work is
underway to prevent future
occurrences”, but the same
problems have persisted into
2009.

The monopoly power pro-

ducer/supplier has been hit by
vociferous protests from both
consumers and the business
community, with the latter
complaining that Freeport will
be unable to continue as a
sustainable, long-term manu-
facturing/industrial sector
with the relatively high power
rates companies are forced to
endure.

Several told Tribune Busi-
ness that electricity rates on
Grand Bahama were four to
six times’ higher than else-
where in the world, with some
businesses losing valuable
equipment to power surges
and spikes.

The Japanese company,
Marubeni, which acquired a
majority 55 per cent interest
in Grand Bahama Power
Company several years ago,
subsequently selling 25 per
cent to Abu Dhabi power
producer Taga, has come
under fire from Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, who
criticised its performance to
date.

Many have come to view
Marubeni, and by extension,
Taga, as absentee landlords
in effect, only concerned
about the company’s profits

Attend the

12th Americas

and not its power generation
problems. There is a school
of thought that Marubeni,
which acquired its Grand
Bahama Power Company
stake when it took over
Mirant’s Caribbean opera-
tions, is only really interest-
ed in Jamaica as the biggest
market, and Freeport is a sec-
ondary concern.

Investor

The only investor to seem-

ingly take a real interest in
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany is Emera, the Canadian
power producer which
acquired its 25 per cent stake
in the firm by purchasing
Lady Henrietta St George’s
50 per cent ICD Utilities
stake in September 2008.
Grand Bahama Power
Company’s seven-strong
Board includes three repre-
sentatives from Emera, with
the other four acting on
behalf of Marubeni and Taqa.

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and

The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured
YELLOW

addressed to:

Food a Beverage
Show & Conference

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

November 9-10, 2009 EA
Miami Beach ¢
Convention Center

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16", 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).

Take Advantage
of $225 Airfares
to Miami!

Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Director

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2009
CLE/qui/No.00289

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or
a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in
the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in
the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a
statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit
to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a
statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 will
operate as a bar to such claim.

ii acariainal IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959

® New Products Shoacese
= Boworage Pavilion
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AND

Hill), Nassau, Bahamas

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins

aly, Malaysia, Poland, Jamalce, World Trade Cesders

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@USS235 diseoumted arfare avmlable plas. tases! Teed until Ocnober 19th

= Discounted rooms awaillable

eRegeter (ABE at wwecamericasfoodandbererage.com using special
priority registration code: FAS CAR Deadline: October 18th

Register HOW at

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels
of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a
portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate
immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5
miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,
one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.

AND

www americasloodandbererage.com

Dated this 31st day of August, A.D. 2009 IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper

HOPE STRACHAN & CO. NOTICE OF PETITION
Chambers eo
Equity House ———— Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
Mt. Royal Avenue North For More Information Contact: of September, A.D. 2009.
(Hawkins Hill) . : a eh ay
Nassau, Bahamas Omar Gonzalez/CBATO (305-536-5304) The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill

Attorneys for the Petitioner Emy Rodriguez at Tel: 305-871-7910 Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of

The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:





ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Wowk

ClIekePecoa AT A OL

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.24 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.52 | YTD % -12.24
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Security Today's Close Daily Vol. _EPS $ Div $ P/E

7.03 AML Foods Limited 7.07 O.127

9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 0.992

5.90 5.90

0.63 0.63

3.15 3.15

2.14

10.00

2.74

5.26

1.27

1.32

6.60

8.80

10.00

4.50

Previous Close
1.08
10.75
5.90
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.34
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50

Change

Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)

0.244
-0.877
0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420

2.37
10.03
2.74
5.87
3.43
2.05
6.60
9.30
10.00
4.50

Consolidated Water BDRs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.952

Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.180
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + 100.00 Prime + 1.75%

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + 100.00 7%

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + 100.00 Prime + 1.75%

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be
Best inspected during normal office hours at the following places:
see 0.332
0.27
5.49

1.00
0.27
5.50

1.00
0.27
5.50

0.000
0.035
0.407

eaq000000000000000g
eo000000nvo00q0000 002

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The Administrator’s office at George Town, Exuma.

9.98

10.00

5S2wk-Hi _ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Interest

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.

Bid $
7.92
2.00

Ask $
8.42
6.25

Last Price
14.00
4.00

52wk-Low Symbol
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.000
0.480

0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M
0.35 0.40 0.55 256.6
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4905 3.96 5.49
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1136
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319 -0.11
1.0673 2.89
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths.
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

29.00 ABDAB
0.40 RND Holdings

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

S2wk-Low

1.3344
2.8952
1.4119
3.0941

12.3870

100.0000

93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

Fund Name Div $
CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
18-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00

5.87
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-1.44
5.14
2.05
4.93

2.69
3.38

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009
CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House
West Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorney for the Petitioner

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price fer daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day te day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 menths
PYE - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



(S. 18, O. 1, 16)


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7B

Rivals tell regulator: Stop Cable
distorting market competition



FROM page 1B

not learn from recent history
in developing and imple-
menting future policy. The
mistakes of the past must not
be allowed to repeat them-
selves”.

The SRG president, whose
company operates as IndiGo
Networks, said that if the Util-
ities Regulation and Compe-
tition Authority (URCA) was
to meet its competition man-
date, “then Cable Bahamas
as the Significant Market
Power (SMP) operator must
be required to provide unbun-
dled, non-discriminatory
access to its network”.

Recalling recent history, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny recalled
how Cable Bahamas was
issued with an interim ISP
licence on March 3, 2000,
allowing it to introduce Inter-
net services via the cable tele-
vision network infrastructure
it had already developed.

This licence, the SRG pres-
ident said, mandated that
Cable Bahamas establish an
interconnection policy for
rival ISPs to access its cable
television network.

The main terms, he added,
were that Cable Bahamas had
to provide interconnection at
“any technically feasible
point” for rival ISPs upon
request; that it “provided
interconnection services on
non-discriminatory and objec-
tive terms, and of a quality no
less favourable” than the
BISX-listed utility provided
for its own service; and that
interconnection charges be
“orientated to their cost of
provision and sufficiently
unbundled” to that rival ISPs
did not have to pay for com-
ponents they did not require.

“It was mandated that
Cable Bahamas not add any
new Internet customers or any
new Internet accounts until
the terms and rates for inter-
connection services, and the

technical standards and spec-
ifications for interconnection,
had been approved by the
regulator,” Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said.

However, he alleged that
this was never enforced by the
former regulator, the Public
Utilities Commission (PUC).
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said:
“At the time, five privately-
held ISPs, each of them offer-
ing dial-up Internet access,
indicated to the PUC their
concern that failure by Cable
Bahamas to implement [this]
would inevitably lead to com-
petitive distortion of the Inter-
net sector.

“Those ISPs, amongst them
a subsidiary of SRG, doing
business as Bahamas On-Line,
engaged a consultant from the
United States to advise on
how access to Cable
Bahamas’ network could meet
the above principles and be
made fairly available.”

The five ISPs submitted
their formal proposal to the
PUC on May 12, 2000, but the
then-regulator rejected the
industry’s view and “instead
accepted an alternative put
forward by Cable Bahamas
that, in the view of the ISPs
and their consultant, was com-
mercially unworkable and
failed to meet the principles of
interconnection enshrined in
Cable Bahamas’ licence.

“The ISPs’ prediction for
the industry came to pass,”
Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said.
“SRG is not aware of a sin-
gle ISP that was able to effa-
ciously connect to, or utilize,
Cable Bahamas’ network. Not
one of the ISPs in question
was able to remain in busi-
ness, and the Internet market
today is dominated by Cable
Bahamas.”

With Cable Bahamas hav-
ing been “able to leverage its
[cable TV] monopoly into an
entirely new market” via the
Internet, and now seeking to
use its fibre-optic infrastruc-

8 PICTET

1805

ture network to enter the
fixed-line voice and cellular
telecoms industries, Mr Hut-
ton-Ashkenny urged URCA
to guard against the compa-
ny abusing its SMP status.

Given that Cable Bahamas
was given a 15-year monop-
oly in return for constructing
and building a $240 million
fibre-optic cableTV network,
the SRG president said:
“Some might argue that the
Bahamian people helped pay
for construction of that net-
work” through foregoing
competition and the tax
breaks the BISX-listed utili-
ty was granted that allowed it
to escape customs duties on
network components.

He urged the regulator not
to allow Cable Bahamas “to
enter any other markets until
such time as the cable TV net-
work access remedies have
been fully implemented and
proven”.

“Moreover, given the
potential for an SMP operator
to delay to its competitive
advantage, SRG considers
that a reasonable time peri-
od, perhaps a further 180
days, should be required to
elapse between satisfactory
demonstration of implemen-
tation and the SMP operator
being permitted to enter any
new market,” Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny urged.

“Such a mechanism would
accommodate circumstances
where a new entrant might
need time to implement
equipment and make ready to
compete in the SMP opera-
tor’s market, whilst readying
itself for competition by the
SMP operator in its own mar-
Ket.”

Cable Bahamas’ private
placement memorandum for
its recent $40 million prefer-
ence share issue, in which the
company said it had 75 per
cent and 45 per cent penetra-
tion of the Bahamian cable
TV and Internet market

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified apolicants for the following posttion:-

GLOBAL CUSTODY ADMINISTRATOR
The qualified candidate will...

« Assist the Senior Relationship Manager in all administrative aspects of his activities.
« Provide support and service to existing client relationships,
« Act as the main contact persom for clients for the daily adeninistration of their

aOOoUNTS.

~ Co-ordinate the paperwork involved im opening accounts‘account restructuring.
= Interact with Compliance and Legal departments to ensure due diligence

requirements are met.

- Cocedinate implementation of new service requirements.
« Update the client relationship database,
Visit clients with the relationship manager when required,
~ Keep the relationship manager updated om all issues regarding client accounts.
~ Maintain positive working relations with clients and all Pieter departments, inelading
close collaboration with Operations divisions,

UALIFICATIONS/SRKILLS:

“ CPACFA

~ Bachelors degree in Business/Finance
Series 7 (international) or equivalent qualification

- Knowledge of another language (French, Spanish) would be an asset,

“Working knowledge of investment instrunvents.
~ S years’ banking experience, preferably in Global Custody’Family Office.
~ Ability to manage money market, forex and trading desks.
~ Good PE skills (Word, Excel, Power Paint}

- Excellent commvanicetor

~ Enthusiastic personality.

~ Ability to work under pressure.
~ Independent and self motivated,
~ Ability te aceomplish assigned tasks in an organised and disciplined manner.

~ Ability to work with a dynamic team in a professional environment that comtirually

offers new challenges.

Hand deliver Resume, cover letter and two (2) references BY SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 to:-

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay St. & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED

Florener, Frankford, Geneva, Hang Ao

Offices in

p, London, Lirceruboure, Madrid, Milan, Adomtrent, Newnan,

respectively, with its network
passing 94 per cent of all
homes in this nation had, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny © said,
demonstrated in the compa-
ny’s own words why it should
deserve SMP status.

“Given the change in licens-
ing that will, at some point,
permit Cable Bahamas’ lever-
age of their infrastructure in
fixed voice services, it is only
reasonable that unbundling of
their infrastructure by others
should at least permit the pro-
vision of Internet Protocol TV
so that some level of TV com-
petition can be contemplat-
ed,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny
said.

“Failure to do so will simply
mean that Cable Bahamas
gains a new market with no
practical improvement in
choice for the consumer in
their core TV market.

“Tt seems reasonable, there-
fore, that Cable Bahamas
would need to demonstrate
convincingly that their net-
work is ready for additional
providers to offer IPTV and
expected multiple HD video
access across their existing
hybrid fibre coaxial network.”

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny also
questioned whether Freeport
would be treated differently,
when it came to the
unbundling of Cable
Bahamas’ network, given that
the latter had claimed its
licence to operate in the sec-
ond city was “separate from
that elsewhere in the
Bahamas”.

The SRG president urged
that Cable Bahamas be
required “to become part of
an Internet exchange for the
Bahamas, through which all
Bahamian ISPs_ could
exchange local Internet traffic.

“Currently, Internet traffic
from one ISP in the Bahamas
to another traverses through
the United States, which is
time consuming, expensive
and a waste of resources.”

WSL

Re: Lot # 12, Block # 86, Richmond Park
Subdivision, Unit 3R Freeport, Grand Bahama

Five Units:

One bedroom one bathroom, living and dining
area, kitchen and laundry area.

One Unit:

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, a powder room,
living and dining room, family room, kitchen,
office and laundry room and arctic area.

Potential Income:

One bedroom units $3,250.00 per month
Four bedrooms unit $1,400.00 per month.

For conditions of sale and any
other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608 Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should

submit offer in writing addressed to
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
P. O. Box N-7518 Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us before October 9th, 2009



DUE TO THE LACK OF A QUORUM
ALL MEMBERS Of

Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU)

Limited Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting
Which Will NOW Be Held

Date:

Saturday, October 3", 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.

Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ENERGY, from 1B

Tribune Business.

“With energy efficiency,
you're spending a lot less
money to keep the interior
cool. You're going to need a
lot less solar energy to keep
that space cool; the amount
of energy used in proportion
to the size of the home.”

These energy savings could
be achieved, he explained, by
focusing on a property’s struc-
ture — its foundations, walls
and roof — as “your insulation
is the key”. Apart from being
safe and structurally sound,
Mr Kemp explained that a
building’s structure — its exte-
rior- was what formed the bar-
rier between its interior, and
those inside, and the environ-
ment outside.

Closed-cell polyurethane



foam provided the best heat
insulation possible, the
Caribbean Greensafe presi-
dent added, in addition to pro-
viding walls with a more rigid
structure. By establishing
these “radiant barriers”
between a property’s exteri-
or and interior, Mr Kemp said:
“Tf you can cut the heat out,
it’s going to reflect directly in
your electricity bill.”

Caribbean Greensafe’s
showroom, based in the Cable
Beach shopping mall that used
to be the former City Markets
supermarket, has already been
open for four weeks to pro-
vide Bahamians “with infor-
mation on building materials
and design concepts where
you can save money”.

While the dollar value of
savings its designs, materials
and constructions could deliv-
er depended on the nature of

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WALLBURG INC.

—












Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section




138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WALLBURG INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and








the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.









ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





the project “and how green
you want to go”, Mr Kemp
said it “was very feasible” that
the company could build a
comparable home in the same
price range as a non-energy
efficient home. The savings
would then accrue rapidly
over time from a lower energy
bill and footprint.

“A home built with energy
efficient methods is going to
appraise higher in five to 10
years because people want
those qualities in the home.
They will appraise at a higher
rate than previously-built
homes,” Mr Kemp told Tri-
bune Business.

He added that Caribbean
Greensafe’s Emerald Breeze
Villas development, located
in Sea Breeze off Joe Farring-
ton Road, would employ
design plans and practices “to
make it affordable to the buy-
er, not just upfront but on a
continual basis”.

Initial price points for the
three-bed, two bath units
would start at around
$215,000, and Mr Kemp said:
“We plan to commence pre-
sales within the next month.

We’re definitely going to be
at a price point that will be
very attractive to buyers look-
ing for a private residence.
They will be very affordable.

“Tf all goes according to
plan, and we get the pre-sales,
we will start looking at the
approvals on the permits, so it
[the construction start] won’t
be any time before January.”

Mr Kemp added that
Caribbean Greensafe was also
looking to supply turnkey
homes, offering potential
clients a “complete package”,
including a variety of floor
plans, plus energy-efficient
plumbing, tiling and even wall
trims.

Prior to starting construc-
tion at Emerald Breezes Vil-
las, Mr Kemp told Tribune
Business that Caribbean
Greensafe planned to make
an impact on the market,
“whether it be a promotion
we put on where we showcase
what these products can do
and how much energy and
money you can save.

“The goal of Caribbean
Greensafe is that, yes, we are
situated in the Bahamas, but

KAY THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Vint oar website at wwe cob edhe

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Maritime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday Sth October, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

we ae looking to expand. We
want to provide Bahamians
and people looking to build
in the Bahamas with the infor-
mation, the contacts and the
products to improve their
designs. There are a lot of
designs and materials out
there, but they’re not really
known......

“T think there’s a growing
demand, and I think it will
continue to grow as people
explore themselves, especially
with the cost of energy
increasing. Bahamians are
very conscious of what is out
there, and I just want to give
them the information to make
it more affordable, more
healthy and more green.

“Tt will become the industry
standard. Florida revised its
Building Code this year to
make new homes 15 per cent
more efficient than homes
built in 2001. It’s putting the
industry standard where you
have to become more energy
efficient.”

A former Queen’s College
(QC) and College of the
Bahamas (COB) graduate, Mr
Kemp worked in posts rang-
ing from senior construction
manager to development/pro-
ject manager during more
than two decades in the Flori-
da construction industry,
developing gated communi-
ties featuring several thousand
homes.

He told Tribune Business
that it was while working as
the former development man-
ager for the Delray Beach
regeneration project that he
became interested in con-
structing homes that were not
only affordable on the initial
purchase, but also for the
long-term.

Having long wanted to own
his own construction firm, Mr
Kemp said he decided to bring
the concepts he had learned
in the US back to the

Bahamas, having started work
on the Caribbean Greensafe
project with his late father.

“Tt is a challenge to start a
development company at this
time, but there is still an
opportunity. People see the
value that it’s going to bring,
and there’s going to be a lot
more people looking to go
green,” Mr Kemp said.

“The interest so far has
been good. A lot of people
have not known we’re here
but the demand is growing.
Architects have called, come
in and sent clients here.
They’re very interested. Peo-
ple building houses want to
go green and see the advan-
tages accruing over time.

“It’s been very encourag-
ing. Even in the downturn,
with how it is now, when the
market turns around I want
to be established and have
numerous projects up and
running.”

Among the products being
offered by Caribbean Green-
safe are wall systems; different
types of roof insulation; resin
products that provide the
same exotic look at less cost
and no maintenance, and
avoid cutting down trees; var-
ious floor and fencing meth-
ods; retro-fitted energy sys-
tems; and, eventually, alter-
native energy forms such as
solar and wind.

Mr Kemp added that
Caribbean Greensafe could
also supply solar tubular lights
which, when fitted in ware-
houses and food stores, would
never cost the property own-
ers any money once the ini-
tial installation costs were
paid.

The company, Mr Kemp
said, also planned to export
its systems and products to
other Caribbean countries,
thereby earning a valuable
source of foreign exchange for
the Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MEIJI FIRST GROUP CORPORATION

a a

?

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of MEIJI FIRST
GROUP CORPORATION has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
LA SARRAZS.A.

ee

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of LA SARRAZ S.A. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ORCHID GROUP INC.

SO

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ORCHID GROUP INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
OPULENS HOLDINGS INC.

a a

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of OPULENS HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ITR SERVICES LIMITED

SS

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ITR SERVICES LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
WHITE COLUMBINE INC.

——

2

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WHITE COLUMBINE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP.

— -,——

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of NEW BRIDGEPORT CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD.

—

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SOUTHAVEN HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
IBADAN LIMITED

So

#

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of IBADAN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B





Bank ‘concern’
on BNP Paribas
departure move

FROM page 1B

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez,
speaking to Tribune Business
about BNP Paribas’s Friday
announcement of its decision
to exit the Bahamas, a move
set to impact about 40 staff
and a client book of business
likely to consist of several bil-
lion dollars, said: “This is a
concern.

“Clearly, European banks
are sensitive, and G-20 mem-
ber countries that have banks
headquartered here are sen-
sitive, to all that is going on.
This is a regrettable situation
for the Bahamas.”

Mr Gomez said the
Bahamian international finan-
cial services industry was
hopeful that the Governmen-
t’s stated goal of meeting the
G-20/OECD minimum of 12
Tax Information Exchange

Agreements (TIEAs) by
year-end would “be a plus”
for the jurisdiction’s standing,
among both global head
offices and current/prospec-
tive clients, and that it would
“have no more departures”.

“The Bahamas as a juris-
diction does not need any of
its banks, particularly is blue
chip banks, to leave this juris-
diction,” Mr Gomez told Tri-
bune Business. While some
might be compelled to leave,
the BFSB chairman said he
knew of no other institutions,
such as BNP Paribas, who
faced a timeline by which any
decision to pull-out or not
might be taken, but urged
those that did to make their
concerns known so they could
be addressed.

Although Mr Gomez did
not specifically address it, Tri-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that

BEORAH BELINDA SMITH-

bune Business understands
that the main concern is that
BNP Paribas’s decision to exit
could prompt others to do the
same, sparking a ‘rolling
snowball’ or chain reaction.

BNP Paribas, though, could
be a special case, in so much
that it is owned directly by
the French government.
Under President Nikolas
Sarkozy, the French have
been one of the champions of
the G-20/OECD drive for
greater tax transparency and
information exchange, and
the indications are that direct
political pressure was imposed
on BNP Paribas to withdraw
from the Bahamas.

Tribune Business had pre-
viously warned that Bahamas-
based banks and trust com-
panies were likely to come
under great pressure, via their
head offices, to leave this
nation, particularly those
whose global headquarters
was located in European-
based G-20/OECD members
such as France, Germany and
the UK.

of the aggressive posture of
the French”, adding that he
was concerned about the
impact on both BNP Parib-
as’s Bahamas-based work-
force and companies that sup-
plied the institution with ser-
vices and products. “BNP par-
ticipated in the local econo-
my in a very positive way,”
he said.

To date, the Bahamas has
signed Tax Information
Exchange Agreements
(TIEAs) with Monaco and
San Marino, in addition to the
one it agreed with the US,
taking its total to three.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, last week
defended the Bahamas’
choice of TIEA partners to
date in the face of suggestions
that such deals with fellow
international financial centres
would mean less than ones
with OECD members.

He argued that the fact the
OECD had already account-
ed for the TIEA with Mona-
co, and bumped the Bahamas’
total up to two, showed the

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

INSIGHT





The stories behind the news





Can any of us trust that
justice will be done?

By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

hat happened to

Preston Ferguson

on a dark, lonely

stretch of road on

Great Exuma
should serve as a dire warning to
everyone who lives in or visits this
country.

Nearly two months have passed
since his body was found under
bizarre and gruesome circumstances,
yet it is not how he met his end
which should cause alarm, but rather
what followed.

Violence and criminality exist
everywhere and no one can guaran-
tee they will never become a victim.
Yet we all expect that if a crime can-
not be prevented, the authorities will
do their utmost to ensure that justice
is served in the aftermath.

Preston's family certainly felt this
way until that fateful night in
August, but now say they can't imag-
ine putting faith in an officer of the
law ever again.

And what their perseverance has
exposed about the astonishing
incompetence which can take place
during a routine police investigation
should make us all pause and ask
ourselves what manner of country
is this in which we live.

The family has no doubt that Pre-
ston met his death at the hands of a
murderer and feel they have a good
idea who is responsible, but the
police have insisted — in the face of
seeming mounting evidence to the
contrary — that he died as a result
of a freak accident.

The police's version of events is
that Preston, driving alone, either
stuck his head out of the vehicle to
spit, or that he ended up slumped
out the window after falling asleep.
At the same time, the company truck
he was driving swerved several feet
to the left, just far enough and at
precisely the right moment to make
glancing contact with a utility pole
before turning back onto the road
and somehow coming to a stop.

The impact was only forceful
enough to create shallow scrape
marks along the door and shatter
the driver's side window, leaving the
rest of the vehicle unaffected. Unfor-
tunately for Preston, his head hap-
pened to be out the window at the
time, and therefore struck the pole
full-on, a blow which fractured his
skull and killed him.

Upon hearing this explanation,
my first reaction was that any self-
respecting officer would be embar-
rassed to admit supporting so far-
fetched a scenario, and that the
police must therefore have been
forced by the facts to adopt it.

On the contrary, the family say,
all the evidence points in a very dif-
ferent direction, and according to
them there is nothing to support the
police's official stance beyond the
highly questionable guesswork of
the first few officers on the scene.

Preston's relatives, already

a oe Fs
\ ae

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING



FERGUSON FAMILY members (shown) hold a picture of Preston...

offended by the officers’ careless-
ness, nonchalance and seeming lack
of professionalism, were shocked to
hear one of them speculating loudly
only moments after arriving that,
“Yeah man, yeah man, this suspi-
cious. Somethin’ ain’t right here",
only to change his mind and decide,
"No man, see, you know what I
think? I think he was putting his
head out the window to spit and hit
his head on the lamp post.” A col-
league then volunteered, "Maybe
what happened is, he fell asleep and
hung his head out the window."

This, it seems, was the extent of
the police investigation, as their the-
ory has not evolved beyond this
point.

A retired New York City Police
Department detective who hap-
pened upon the story on tri-
bune242.com bune242.com> became enraged after
reading the official version of the
investigation, and decided to offer
his expertise on how to handle a
crime scene (see story on INSIGHT,
page 3).

He says responding officers must
be alert, observant, and display rig-
orous attention to detail. They must
document, photograph and retain
every possible piece of evidence, and
do their utmost to preserve the crime
scene from contamination. They
must also observe and question
everyone on the scene, as well as
anyone who might have the slightest
possible connection to the case. This
must all be done before any conclu-
sions can be drawn by senior offi-

Well-refined.

nls

1

cers overseeing the case.

Compare this to the performance
of the police in Preston's case. Pre-
ston's family say the officers failed to
question anyone on the scene aside
from a single relative, disregarding
even the two persons who first
reported the discovery of the body.

They did not secure the scene
around the truck — or even the truck
itself, which rather than being pre-
served for forensic testing, was
returned to Preston's employer the
very same day. Likewise, the body
was dispatched to the hospital with-
out being tested in any way, and
without so much as a police escort.

The clothes Preston was wearing
at the time were not tested for DNA
or other samples, nor confiscated by
the officers.

As far as the taking of detailed
photographs, they may well have
done this — before forgetting their
camera on the seat of the truck. The
photos which accompany this arti-
cle were provided by the family.

This wholesale failure to conform
with even basic crime scene protocol
as outlined by the NYPD detective
may begin to explain the startling
logical inconsistencies in the police's
accident theory.

For example, the police version
posits that the window was shattered
when the truck scraped along the
utility pole. This would obviously
require the window to be up at the
time. How would this have been pos-
sible if the theory also requires Pre-
ston to hang his head out of the win-
dow, either because he was sleep-

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ing or in an attempt to spit? If the
window was down, how did the glass
shards jump from within the door
and scatter across the cabin of the
truck? Then again, why would he
have been driving with the window
down if he had the air-conditioning
on, as it was when the body was
found?

The spitting attempt theory is
doubly ridiculous, as it would mean
the wound in the middle of Preston's
forehead must have been incurred
when he drove his own face into a
pole while perfectly alert, in an
attempt to spit directly into the wind.

The sleep theory is not much bet-
ter, as it would entail the car veering
off the road at just the right moment
for Preston's head to strike the pole
— avoiding the long stretches of bush
on either side; a near miraculous feat
of timing and coincidence.

Supposing either version is true,
how is it that he managed to be
found sitting upright, facing forward
in the driver's seat after absorbing a
blow to the head violent enough to
crack his skull? The momentum
would surely have flung him to the
other side of the truck, or perhaps
left his head slumped out the win-
dow, but gently reclining against the
headrest? It would seem to defy the
laws of physics.

How, for that matter, did the
truck manage to find its way back
onto the road after Preston fractured
his skull, drive along for 20 or so
yards, and come to a stop?

And supposing that window did
by some miracle shatter while Pre-





THE pile of glass on the front seat of
Preston Ferguson’s car. His body was
found sitting on the glass but none
was on his person...

ston had his head out of the car, how
is it that no glass came to be found
on his body, or anywhere on the dri-
ver's side other than on the seat
below his buttocks? How did a pile
of glass manage to get underneath
him in the first place?

Then there is the question of
blood. The police version fails to
explain how it is possible that blood
came to be splattered across the pas-
senger's side of the truck, even
reaching around to the far side of
the protuberant middle console and
the space between the seat and the
far door, but there is no trace of it to
be found on the driver's side, and
little on Preston himself. No blood
was found on the steering wheel, the
windshield, the seat, and none on
either the inside or outside of the
driver's side door.

While we are at it, we might as
well ask why no glass or blood was
found at the base of the utility pole,
all of it managing to collect at the
spot down the road where the car
eventually came to a stop.

The death certificate does not
rule out the police's accident theory,
but that is about the most definite
thing which can be said about it.

The document notes that he died
of a "head injury with fracture of
skull bone" and that this is "not
inconsistent with the history of death
due to a road traffic accident." The
language does not suggest the
pathologists came up with the traffic
accident theory, but rather that the
police supplied it, and the doctors
acknowledged that the wound did
not rule it out.

In other words, the autopsy found
that he was struck in the head, and
died, and acknowledges that during
traffic accidents, it is possible for
one to be struck in the head, and
die.

Not exactly an earth shattering
analysis, but then those conducting
the examination were probably only
presented with the body and a pos-
sible cause of death. I wonder what
they would have said had they seen
the evidence detailed above. The
family immediately contacted the
morgue to request a more detailed
examination, but there has been no

reply.
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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Tourists told to avoid Bahamas over

Ferguson investigation controversy



Exuma - Unsolved

Murder Capital?

We have cruised the
Bahamas (including The Exu-
mas) many times over the years
and have always had a great
time there — the weather, the
food, and the people. However,
we are now hesitant to make
another trip if crimes like these
are allowed to go unchecked
and unpunished. In the US,
rookie officers see promotions
for cracking clear cut cases like
this. From all accounts in the
article and from what people
close to the island are saying,
this was NO traffic accident.
To say that is an insult to the
family and officials should be
embarrassed to co-sign such
foolishness. I will be forwarding
this article to as many of my
yachting buddies and fellow
travellers to make them aware
of how crimes are "handled"
in that community and to give
them an overall heads up. The
Bahamas has always been good
to us, but I don’t want to wind
up the victim of murder and
have my family told that I fell
overboard (bound and gagged)
in an "accident" or some other
crap. Get it together officials!

— Bill, Rhode Island, NY



=
I

a

PRESTON FERGUSON

Bloodstain Analysis

Conviction

This family needs some clo-
sure and if their own local
police agency is not going to
provide that for them, then
those who are concerned and
have been touched by violent
crime will have to assist.
http://christmanforensics.com/c
s_reconstruction.php My fami-

about story on tribune242.com

ly and I have been helped by
Dan and his team in 2006 after
a similar situation where our
son returned from fighting in
Iraq and his wife and her lover
hatched a plan of murder for
hire; they are both now serv-
ing life sentences for his mur-
der. The blood evidence was
able to convict them. I pray you
find justice in your pursuits.

— Roger Stamos,

Baltimore, M

God is able

Kudos to The Tribune and
their staff for having the balls
to tackle a ground breaking
news story like this one. It has
now come to seeking JUSTICE
in the media; God bless you
and the family.

Looking at some of the
posts; I want to thank the per-
son who wrote the prayer for
the family. I hope they contin-
ue to pray that prayer into the

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— Jerome M

I hope someone at The Tri-
bune presses Tommy Turn-
quest and Reginald Ferguson
for an update in this matter!
The eyes of the world are upon
us and the Emperor is as naked
as a newborn....[ am ashamed
as a Bahamian! Here we are
with some of the best and
brightest minds, and the actions
of a few lazy police make us
out to be no more than a bunch
of backward fishing vil-
lagers.... Thanks a lot Tom-
my/Reginald!

— Ava

SHAME!!!

When will the elected and
appointed officials get it? Peo-
ple will no longer simply take
their feeble reports as gospel
when they can think for them-
selves....and in most cases, solve
matters better than them any-
way!

Was this a case of not want-
ing to interrupt their boiled fish
breakfast with REAL Police
work? Reginald/Tommy -
make them get off their butts
and police....they are Police
Officers, right?!

— Mag Rolle

Keep on pushing
Wait a minute; the centre
for the blind and a group of
kindergarten students could
have done a better investiga-
tion into this crime and pro-
duced better results; going on
evidence alone and proper pro-
tocol. Keep pushing for justice.

— George Munroe

Horrified

As a winter resident and
someone who enjoys living in
Exuma, it was hard to hear
about this tragedy, and more
unnerving to actually read the
story in the newspaper; and my
God the pictures tell the entire
story. My only contact with the
police in Exuma occurred some
years ago when a local guy
removed an inflated tube/boat
from our docking area and Lt.
Cunningham dealt with the
incident; which ended amica-
bly. They were quick to
respond. If only my small voice
could appeal to the police to

bring such a resolution to this
terrible tragedy. Prayers for the
family from Boston.

— John and Rebecca

Spread the word

Flood your e-mail contacts
to get the proper attention to
this and any other matters
where criminal acts are seem-
ingly going unpunished. This is
ridiculous! I am a college stu-
dent in Raleigh, NC and will
surely be sending this link to
everyone I know... Bahamian
and American. Good luck Fer-
guson Family in your fight for
justice!

— D Jones

The fire has been lit!

A fire has been lit in this
here Bahamas today and it is
unfortunate that it took the loss
of life and subsequent mishan-
dling of a case to bring it all to
the forefront. Bahamians, by
and large, are fed up with crime
and lawlessness....even more
so, we are fed up with the lack-
luster performance of the
RBPF and the Minister of
National Security. It is true that
you can’t please all of the peo-
ple ALL of the time — but
how can this many Bahamians
be sick and tired of burying
loved ones prematurely at the
hands of murderers while they
strut around like they are invin-
cible?! Everyone in this praying
nation needs to let the govern-
ment know that we are sick
and tired of this mess. They
may choose to ignore our cries
now, but come next election,
let your voices be heard loud
and clear when they come
around pandering for votes!
Wear every memorial t-shirt,
display every obituary, shed
every tear for those you lost
and speak with ONE VOICE!
ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

— D Roberts

Preston Ferguson

Ihave just finished reading
the article concerning Preston
Ferguson’s death. It appears
from his family’s evidence and
from the articles submitted
from the readers that this was
not an accident! I live in Balti-
more, Maryland and I have
been visiting the Bahamas for
the past 25 years. I have had
the pleasure of meeting a few

of Preston’s family members.
This is a sad situation. When I
come to the Bahamas I would
want to feel safe; how can I feel
safe believing that the
Bahamas police force did not
do the right thing by their own?
Preston didn’t deserve to die
this way. If someone gave our
police officers some informa-
tion about a murder here in
Baltimore, Maryland, you bet
someone would have been
arrested by now! Our police
department asks daily for infor-
mation to be given to them and
a person can give that infor-
mation anonymously. They
don’t always have to give their
names! Sloppy, Sloppy work
on behalf of the police force.
Step up and do your job. I
admire the Ferguson Family
for not giving up the fight to
prove that this was no accident.
The persons responsible should
be brought to justice and held
accountable for Preston’s mur-
der. Thank you for letting me
voice my opinion about this
unfortunate incident.
— Doll

Lf Readers left more than 100 comments

Follow UP Needed!

I trust that the reporters at
The Tribune (and surely the
reporter responsible for this
story) will be reviewing the
comments here to shed further
light on what appears to be a
clear case of mishandling and
mislabelling an actual crime.
When you guys meet with
Reginald Ferguson for the fol-
low up, ask him if he is aware
(as many Exumians already
seem to be) that certain people
seem to have more than a casu-
al involvement in the overall
matter. When will those people
be picked up? Why haven’t
they even been questioned? I
am new to tribune242.com but
was drawn to this story and the
comments posted from near
and far .. . Too much is going
on in this country behind the
scenes and under the cover of
darkness! How many more
must die before the powers that
be take a serious approach to
crime?

—Antoinette

Murder in Exuma
Oooohbhhh my goodness!! I

SEE page 8C

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3C



INSIGHT



Patrol officers should be held
accountable for incompetence

By NATHANIEL
SANTINE Ill
Ret. New York
Police detective

THE cause, manner, and
mechanism of a death is
important to the family, as
well as to law enforcement
and the courts, often for dif-
ferent reasons, yet equally
important. The proper identi-
fication of an accidental death
vs a homicide will profoundly
affect a family and in some
cases, it has the potential to
affect an entire community.

But, it is often the first
responder's first impressions
and interpretation of the evi-
dence or information at a
scene which can direct the ini-
tial course of an investigation.
Successful investigations often
depend on the initial actions
taken by patrol officers
responding to any given scene.
The scene must be secured
and cause is never determined
or categorised at first sight,
but only after careful investi-
gations have been completed;
the responding officer's duties
in the preliminary investiga-
tion may simply be to arrive at
the scene, observe enough to
know that assistance from
investigators is required, and
protect the scene so that evi-
dence is not destroyed,
changed or removed.

What should
have been done?

Responding officers at any
crime scene should:

¢ Secure the scene

¢ Cordon off the area

e Take witness statements

¢ Document the scene (both
written and photographic)

e Collect evidence — bag
everything

e Where a body is found,
photograph the entire area;
measure and document posi-
tioning; photograph wounds

e Once the body has been
removed, take photographs of
the surrounding area

e Photograph shrubs, trees,
tyre marks; the vehicle or
room

e Photograph clothing

e Photograph any sight of
blood (pool, spatter, droplets,
smears, et cetera)

e When a body is found in a
vehicle, once the body is
removed, seal the vehicle and
transport it on plastic tarp on
a flatbed towing truck to pre-
serve evidence.

e Record in writing what-
ever is being said or done at
the scene; be observant

e Convey findings to supe-
rior officers

e Dispatch a team to inform



THE BLOOD covers the passenger seat of the car but none was found on the driver’s side where

the body was found...

next of kin

Any item can and may con-
stitute physical evidence;
therefore, it is imperative that
nothing be touched or moved
at the scene before the arrival
of the investigators. Officers
handling the evidence must
document its location, appear-
ance, condition, and any other
feature that might affect the
investigation, ensuring that it
does not lose its evidentiary
value. Good basic crime scene
procedures are to be followed,
especially when the cause of
death is not abundantly clear.

The investigation starts at
the point where the body is
originally found. The prima-
ry crime scene is where most
of the evidence will be
retrieved. In scenes that
appear staged, there may be
two or more crime scenes in
addition to the location where
the body is found. They
include:

e Where the body was
moved from

¢ Where the actual assault
leading to death took place

e Where any physical or
trace evidence connected with
the crime is discovered

¢ The vehicle used to trans-
port the body to where it is
eventually found (tyre tracks,
oil leaks, should be pho-
tographed).

e A point of forced entry or
where the vehicle was cut off

by another vehicle

e The escape route

e Suspect clothing

The police are usually called
to this location by the person
who discovers the body, a wit-
ness to the crime, in isolated
cases the victim, or even a
potential suspect.

What was done wrong
in the Preston Ferguson
case from an
investigators viewpoint?

The article claims that all
DNA evidence, including
clothing and hair samples,
were missing; this should nev-
er happen. Barring a collision
between two or more vehicles
— an obvious accident — the
evidence should remain intact
and available.

INSIGHT

For the stories

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The vehicle should have
been sealed and impounded
for the forensic team to comb
for any evidence. Obviously,
this was not done and the
authorities need to explain
why.

Proper procedures should
have been taken to determine
the number of prints found in
the vehicle, and to isolate
those which should not have
been in the vehicle.

The blood evidence is actu-
ally what is going to win this
case. It is obvious that the
blood on the floor of the vehi-

cle was not from a victim of
an accident, but instead is con-
clusive with a person bleed-
ing and being laid or slumped
on that portion of the vehicle.
The velocity of the blood also
created a pattern that trickled
onto the driver’s side. The car-
pet of the floor after being
sampled should have been
removed to reveal the settling
pattern of the blood on the
metal floor and gear shift.

The glass evidence cannot
be explained away; it is impos-
sible by the law of physics for
a traffic accident to occur,
smashing a side glass and find-
ing broken glass under the vic-
tim, who was said to be sitting
on top of the glass and not
having any on his person,
including fragments in his
wound.

If a collision is violent
enough to cause a fatal injury,
the wound must be explained.
This has not been done. Fur-
thermore, the body would not
be found in an upright posi-
tion, but instead would be
found thrown from the vehicle
or tossed within the cab of the
vehicle.

The positioning of the dent
on the driver’s door seems to
be the result of the vehicle
being struck from the side. It is
impossible for an accident to
occur on the side, unless the
vehicle was hit by an oncom-
ing force from the side of
impact.

There was more than
enough evidence from the
photos alone to suggest that
an in-depth investigation
should have been ordered fol-
lowing the preliminary scene
investigation. It is obvious that
proper protocol was not fol-
lowed in investigating this
matter. It appears as if the
responding officers, in their
haste to categorise a traffic

accident, missed or ignored
some key steps.

Incompetence played a role
in what looks like a botched
investigation. This is not a pet-
ty crime where the conse-
quences are minimal; this
crime resulted in a death and
beyond the failure to capture
of the perpetrators, the inves-
tigators failed to secure evi-
dence to protect the rights of
the victim.

This is a level of incompe-
tence as it relates to inefficient
police investigations should
not go unrecognised or unpun-
ished; the responsible officers
and their superiors should be
held accountable. Obviously
a patrol officer cannot close
an investigation, it goes
beyond that officer.

The justice system of a
country, if proven to be out
of syne or imbalanced enough
to allow this kind of action to
go unchecked, will only serve
to erode the moral fiber of a
community. Indeed, it will
spread to affect an entire
nation and destroy the rule of
law established to cultivate a
standard for all citizens, resi-
dents and visitors to be law
abiding, and when they know-
ing and willingly fail to con-
form, be made aware of the
relevant punishment.

Clearly, the perpetrators of
such crimes are comfortable
in their actions and are confi-
dent that law enforcement
agencies/officers are not
equipped or knowledgeable
enough to detect their actions.
If this is allowed to go
unchecked, it leaves an open
door for hurting families to
refuse the help of crisis advo-
cates and resort to vigilantism
as their means of seeing justice
carried out. This will erode a
society like the plague. This
is a serious matter.

aF, cccetuer 23a fe

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Come bring the Family and Celebrate with Us!

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To register bring your receipt to the mall offices
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SS ay

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00560

Whereas CASTELLA MERCIANA BOWLEG, of No. 14 Richard’s
Court, Oakes Field, in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EARLE
A BOWLEG late of No. 14 Richard’s Court, Oakesfield, in the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00562

Whereas KYLE ALBURY, of the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
ARLENE MARGARET ALBURY late of Trinity Way, Stapledon
Gardens in the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00563

Whereas EMMA BRAYNEN (nee) FERGUSON, of Seven Hills
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of MICHAEL MITCHELL, late of St Barts Road,
Golden Gates No. 2 in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

1ST OCTOBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00564

Whereas NEVILLE B. WILCHOMBE II, of Chancery House, The
Mall, in the City of Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ZBIGNIEW
EMILIAN MAZUREK late of 437 Golden Isles Drive in the City
of Hallandale, in the State of Florida, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the
said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5C



INSIGHT

Can any of us trust
that justice will be done?

FROM page 1C

Compared with the police
version, the family’s answer
to the puzzle is startlingly sim-
ple: “When he got home, peo-
ple were waiting for him, they
accosted him and killed him,
and drove that truck out
there, then brushed it against
the lamp pole and smashed
the window to make it look
like it was an accident."

They believe Preston was
struck in the head with a blunt
object while sitting on the pas-
senger's side, or that his
already lifeless body was
transported to the scene in
the passenger's seat.

After purposely grazing
the truck against the pole and
smashing the window, the cul-
prits moved Preston's body
to the driver's side, to make it
seem as if he was driving
alone.

This theory fits neatly with
all the available evidence —
the glass beneath body on the
driver's seat, the pools of
blood on the passenger's side,
the vehicle having been found
stopped. What is more, the
family claim they know of
someone who would have had
both motive and opportunity
that night.

The victim and his cousin,
Merv Johnson who was visit-
ing from Nassau, went to
Rolleville that evening for a
night on the town.

The men took Mr John-
son's rented car, as Preston
rarely used his company vehi-
cle (the truck his body was
later found in) after work
hours. It was left parked in
front of his house.

After being out for a few
hours, Preston ran into a
woman who the family
believes he may have been
having an affair with, and told
his cousin that she would take
him home.

Driving past the front of
Preston's house some time
later, Mr Johnson noticed the
work truck was gone, a fact

that he found unusual.

The next morning, the
woman whom Preston went
home with and her husband
announced that Preston had
been found dead in his truck.

His relatives believe any
sound investigation of the
case must begin with the
questioning of these two per-
sons, as they may be able to
shed a great deal of light on
the matter. Two months on,
this has yet to be done, they
say.
The family are not alone
in their rejection of the
police's version of events. The
first story about the case to
appear on tribune242.com

attracted a flood of angry
comments from concerned
Bahamians, residents, tourists
and foreign law enforcement
officers. Before last week, the
highest number of comments
in response to any one arti-
cle on the two-month-old
website was 37. The story of
Preston Ferguson has attract-
ed 115 and counting. The day
it was published, the site
boasted a record 76,000 hits.

At this stage, no one can
say with complete certainty
that the family's version is
accurate, or whether the per-
son they suspect is guilty in
any way — simply because a
proper investigation has yet
to be conducted. At the same
time, a great many people
believe the family’s theory to
be far more plausible than the
official one and consider the
police investigation to be
almost criminally negligent.

Personally, I would wager
there is more probability of
being struck by lightning
twice on successive days at
the very instant of winning
the lottery — both times — than
dying in the way the police
claim Preston Ferguson did.

The authorities, however,
seem to be sticking to their
guns. They claim the investi-

Tel! 50

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gation is ongoing, but rather
than trying to recover evi-
dence which has slipped
through their fingers — for
example the blood-spattered
truck — they have instead
promised the family a re-
enactment of the "accident"
conducted by "experts",
which they presumably hope
will demonstrate their theo-
ry to be correct.

I, for one, would love to
be present for this. The spe-
cial effects needed to repro-
duce the spitting-out-of-a-
closed-window trick alone
would make the trip to Exu-
ma worth the trouble.

The relatives of Preston
Ferguson are no doubt
becoming something of a nui-
sance to the Police Force and
the Ministry of National Secu-
rity. But I have a feeling they
will not let up until certain
questions are answered to
their satisfaction. We in the
press know that what they are
going through has been
endured in silence by count-
less others in this country —
but to paraphrase one com-
mentator, it seems they
messed with the wrong family
this time.

At the end of the day,
those who love and miss this
young man are not seeking
special treatment, but rather
something which is supposed
to be basic: that those man-
dated and paid to defend the
interests of justice — from
Minister of National Securi-
ty Tommy Turnquest down
to the lowliest rookie consta-
ble — to do their job to the
best of their ability.

Another commentator sug-
gested that perhaps the case
has been so mishandled that it
is time for the prime minister
to step in. The Tribune under-
stands Mr Ingraham has been
made aware of the facts of the
case, and we will be seeking
comment from his office in
the coming days.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009



INSIGHT

THE TRIBUNE



Readers have their say...

Re: The Abacos

Megan,

Read with interest your article in
“Insight” on The Abacos (Insight,
Sept. 21, 2009). I thoroughly enjoyed
the article and would wish Govern-
ment would hold a Town Meeting
on development in The Abacos.

I should firstly explain that I wear
two hats — I am a co-owner of IBD-
Reiss the largest Bahamian owned
Civil and Environmental Consul-
tancy in the country — my second
role is that I am vice president of
Lindroth Development Company
on the Schooner Bay project with
responsibilities for engineering and
environment.

In talking with a number of real-
tors they echo what you had in the
your article — they do not need more

FROM page 2C

have been following this story on a
daily basis. Thanks to The Tribune
for this opportunity to openly express
yourself. If this family has name, rank,
and serial numbers on these alleged
murderers, what are they waiting for?
Please, I am pleading to the Prime
Minister to get proper seasoned offi-
cers to investigate this. Not anyone
who has family in Exuma because it
will get swept under the carpet. Fam-
ily, you are brave and I encourage you
to keep up the good fight. Even
though it won't bring your baby broth-
er back, I want to see whoever has
done this walking across Bank Lane. I
don't know you all, but I love you and
feel your pain. KEEP FIGHTING!!
— Joel

Murder or accident???

[have read the story and all of the
comments surrounding Preston Fer-
guson's death. I live in Baltimore,
Maryland and even though I had nev-
er met Preston, I knew one of his sis-
ters — Diane Ferguson and two of his
brothers — Lynn (Maxwell) Fergu-
son and Freddie Ferguson. As all of
the comments from the readers have
indicated, no one deserves to die like
this young man or anyone for that
matter. It appears as though the police
department have not done a good job
of gathering all of the facts surround-
ing this case. My first question is how

[ Haat |

/ , -
HuGei

=£ Apt
7 Fi ea

insight

sales inventory — some say there is
enough for the next 15 years! Then
why is Government giving consid-
eration to the Valencia proposal with
hotels and golf courses on the border
of a National Park and home to the
now endemic Abaco Parrot already
threatened by feral cats.

I personally feel that South Aba-
co should be preserved for Eco
Tours that would also allow consid-
eration for land banking the south-
ern pine forests for carbon seques-
tering, something for Government
to consider for Grand Bahama as

was it that the female friend (who
allegedly was the last one to see him
alive) and her husband show up at the
family residence to deliver some bad
news? Here in the states, if someone
has some information surrounding a
death which appears suspicious, those
individuals would have been ques-
tioned.

By now, someone would have been
charged with this murder! and, yes, I
said murder! This was no accident!
Hopefully this comment and all of the
comments written so far will be
enough to bring these individuals to
justice. Thank you for letting me voice
my opinion.

— Anne Williams

Why the Delay?

When will the prime suspects be
detained for interrogation? Seems
pretty open and shut to me....and
apparently anyone who either lives in
Exuma or is close to the case — except
the backward police!

— A Moss

SAD...

Anyone who has ever lost a loved
one and had the police drag their feet
or issue some lame excuse of a police
report needs to unite and call for more
accountability! From the Minister to
the Commissioner to the rank and file
officers...they are all public servants! I
think they forget this...and as you are
appointed, you can also be removed
from office. Shame, shame, shame in

a i
Li

well. The thought of it let the forests
stand idle and make money on the
carbon credit — maybe too easy!
Abaco is almost recession proof —
the addition of farming on previ-
ously human disturbed areas to
engage a number of the illegal aliens
and unemployed sounds great but
to introduce the mega projects
sounds like disaster other than
Atlantis what else large scale has
survived?

I am a great proponent of eco-
lodges — the birders would come and
this would also put the small lodges
within the reaches of a lot more
Bahamians.

Thanks for the article — I hope
that this and future articles will lend
to discussion of this very important
topic.

— Keith A. Bishop

Bahamaland!
— Mary Higgins

The Fergusons in forest
I don't know Preston’s parents or

older siblings but Preston and I went
to school together. He could not have
done something to be killed. He
always had a smile and was willing to
give you his last. We know who killed
Preston and knowing his family and
how good they are to people, my
grandmother says that Lord will repay
them 100 fold. Please lock up those
who killed him.

— Rachel

Mishandled or covered up? It hap-
pens often enough here. With crime in
this country if not mishandled or
(more correctly) covered up the police
will adopt either a dopey or severe
look then give the lame assurance that
they'll get the guy that did it...and they
never do. I no longer trust the police
to do their jobs and look forward to
the day when that trust can be
restored.

P Lucia E. Broughton

People in Exuma are not going to
rest until these murderers are brought
to justice. This was a decent young
man from a decent family here in Exu-
ma. And I know that his family will
not stop until justice is served. We are
praying for you all, especially his sis-
ters who I went to school with.

Pamela

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news

ELBOW CAY — ABACO, the third largest and
fastest -growing economy in the country, has
so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a
somewhat independent economy sustained
by a steady stream of boaters and second
homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its
chain of cays in search of somewhere to
escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even
in arecession



Another piece of paradise
destined for destruction?

“——— DEVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears

hat sets the
islands of the
Bahamas apart
from other
tourist destina-

tions in the Caribbean is that in this
splendid chain ofislands, each has its
own character.

Abaco, the third largest and
fastest-growing economy in the
country, has so far retained its nat-
ural beauty by virtue of a somewhat
independent economy sustained by
a steady stream of boaters and se¢-
ond homeowners who flee to Great
Abaco and its chain of cays in search
of somewhere to escape, unwind,
and get away from it all. Even in a
recession.

Butboth Abaconians and second
homeowners who find peace in Aba-
co’s pristine beaches, clear waters
and expanse of creeks that lace
Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the
Abaco they know is slipping away,
and that they have little power to
preventit.

Abaco is at a point where further

development is imminent, and there
are groups who want to have a say in
the direction it steers towards the
future, but they feel their concerns
are falling on deaf ears.

They were insulted to leam about
the development of a Bunker C fuel
power plant in Wilson City in a pub-
lic meeting on September 10, over a
month after construction had
already begun.

The Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration (BEC) admitted it was wrong

not to inform the Abaco public ear-
lier, as nearly 1,000 concemed resi-
dents attended the meeting request
ed by local conservationist group
Friends of the Environment because
of the high level of public concem.

Not all who attended the meet-
ing were against the project, but
there were many who had questions
they wanted to be answered.

They knew the power plant was
planned for Snake Cay, an environ-
mentally sensitive area on Great

Abaco’s east coast, and opposition
formed, as people feared the
destructive impact it could have on
the environment and the health of
the community.

Hence when government and
BEC decided to plough ahead with
the plans for a $105 million, 48 mw
power plant buming Bunker C
(HO) fuel in a new site at Wilson
City — an area intrinsically linked to
the environmentally sensitive Snake
Cay by a complex network of blue

that the land both Abaconians and visitors hold dear
is doomed to become another big city destined for
destruction. Insight explores the problems and the
progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives...

holes — plans were kept quiet.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb con-
firmed the project had been agreed
by the Christie administration in
2005, and signed off by the Ingra-
ham government in December 2007,
but as plans moved forward, Aba~
co’s permanent and part-time resi-
dents were left in the dark.

‘Dundas Town resident and moth-
er of two Leazona Bethel-Richard

SEE next page



THE FRONT PAGE of the September 21, 2009 edition of /NS/GHT...

Huggies Maximum
Absorption!

a
HuGcies



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PAGE 1

Police probe into death ‘botched’ N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.255MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 88F LOW 75F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Will justice SEE PAGE15 be done? Stubbs fails to MAKE CUT Detective bac king family of Preston Ferguson The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate EMERGENCY PERSONNEL attend after this Toyota Windom overturned yesterday morning on Coral Harbour Road near the back of Lynden Pindling International Airport. The condition of the driver is unknown. NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER C M Y K C M Y KVolume: 105 No.250TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHERP ARTLY SUNNY, T -STORM POSSIBLEHIGH 89F L OW 80F The TribuneA NY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITIONTRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISHwww.tribune242.com Victim ofmurder?VICTIM OFTRAGICACCIDENT? ORWAS PRESTON FERGUSON A ... P ULLING TOGETHER: ( sitting) Henriette Smith and E loise Moxey; (standing son, Olga Fordes, Deidre Gray, Dale Ferguson Joseph and Merv Johnson. ACCUSED: Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater pictured on her way to court. TRAVOLTA TRIAL:DAYONE F ORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Lightb ourne going to court yesterday.POLICENAME SLAINBURGERKING MANAGERP AGE FIVEM ANACCUSEDOF WENDYBULLARD MURDERP AGE FIVEF IREDEATHSTOBETREATEDASHOMICIDES’PAGE SIXI NMATESETTOFACEMURDERCHARGE TODAYPAGE SEVEN INSIDEn PRESTONFERGUSON PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/ Tribune Staff By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A JURY was selected yesterday in the case of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former paramedic Tarino Lightbourne, who are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from Hollywood actor John Travolta. Six women and three men were selected to hear evid ence in the case, which will t ake place before Senior Just ice Anita Allen. T he prosecution is expecte d to open its case this morni ng. Defendants plead not guilty to J ohn Travolta extortion chargesS EE page fiveBy NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net DISTRAUGHT family members of Preston Ferguson say that t hey are certain he was murdered and blame police for mishandling the investigation into his death. Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of one, was found dead in a truck on the side of ther oad in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police ini-t ially suspected that he had run off the road and hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the accident was “staged.” F ULLSTORYON PAGES TWOAND THREE BY PACO NUNEZ NEWSEDITOR pnunez@tribunemedia.net A VETERAN New York police inves tigator has condemned the “incompetence” displayed by the Bahamas police in their “botched” investigation into the death of Preston Ferguson in Exuma. The family of Mr Ferguson were left outraged when police ruled that he died as a result of injuries sustained in a car accident. Mr Ferguson’s grieving relatives, how ever, claim all the evidence points to SEE page 12 OVERTHETOP: Car crashes on Coral Harbour Road A MAN whose body was found on Rose Island on Saturday evening is believed to have drowned. Police have not yet iden tified the victim and were unable to release a description of him yesterday. The man was found by beachcombers at around 6pm. He was taken hospital where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy will be performed to determine the Body found on Rose Island A MAN is expected to appear in court today charged with attempting to smuggle $80,000 worth of cocaine to the United States in a car part. Security staff screening luggage at the Lynden Pindling International Airport in Nassau found the drugs stuffed inside a master brake cylinder packed in a box bound for Florida. Police say there were eight packets of cocaine hidden in the car part, Man on $80,000 cocaine charge A 21-YEAR-OLD man shot several times in front of his Chippingham home is said to be in a stable condition in hospital. He is one of two men shot on Friday night. However police are unclear about the details of the second shooting in Bozene Town, Nassau. Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said there is Man, 21, shot outside his home THE trial of two defendants accused of trying to extort $25 million from Hollywood superstar John Travolta will continue today with PLP senator Allyson Maynard Gibson expected to take the stand. Senator Maynard Gib son is one of six witnesses T ravolta trial set to r esume SEE page 12 By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AROUND 400 govern ment employees may soon see their offices moved from Thompson Boulevard to a hotel tower on Cable Beach. Serious discussions are under way between the Government and Baha Mar Resorts Ltd over the possibility of relocating the operations of two ministries to a disused Wyndham hotel tower on Cable Beach. The move is intended to help alleviate the health fears of many of those employed at the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture. Those staff walked off the job last Thursday over a long-standing mould problem at their current location, a National Insurance Board-owned building on Thompson Boulevard, which many believe is making them sick. Yesterday, Education Minister Carl Bethel revealed that Government employees may be relocated to hotel tower SEE page 12 SEE page 12 SEE page 12 SEE page 12 Felip Major /Tribune staff

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P OLICE issued All Points Bulletins for three “armed a nd extremely dangerous” men wanted in connection with murder and armed rob-b ery. Officers are searching for T heo Lepny St Cyrin, 22, Marvin Arnold Coleby, 31, and Jamal Ferguson, 36,a lias “Balty”. Wanted St Cyrin, wanted for murd er and armed robbery, is described as having a “fair” complexion, around 5ft 9ins tall and weighing 170lbs. His last known address w as Lavelle Road, West Bay Street and Laird Street, Nassau. Coleby has a dark complexion, weighs around1 70lbs, and is about 5tf 9ins tall. He was last known to be r esiding in Winton Estates and Iguana Way, Bel Air Estates. H e is also wanted for murder and armed robbery. F erguson, 36, has a medium complexion and is around 5ft 7ins and190lbs.H e is last known to have been living on Abraham Street, and is wanted for armed robbery. Anyone with information on these people should call9 19, 911, the police control room at 322 3333, the Cen tral Detective Unit at 502 9 930 or 9991 or Crime Stoppers on 328 8477, or their n earest police station. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A NOTHER PLP memb er will throw his hat in the ring in the race for a leadership position in the party this week. Kenred Dorsett, current National Deputy Chairman of the PLP, released a statement over the weekend a nnouncing that he feels it is h is “duty to listen to the call of my people and offer m yself for greater service in the leadership of our party”. “I have spoken to PLPs t hroughout the country and t hey all agree that our party is in transition with regard to its leadership,” he said. The mantra of change is on everyone's mind and has been weighing on mine for q uite some time now. “Our country continues to be burdened by the spirit ofh opelessness and despair a nd I believe a responsive, caring, proactive PLP can help.” Mr Dorsett said he will make a formal announcement regarding his plans in the party on Wednesday. Mr Dorsett has raised his profile this year through j oining Senator Jerome Fitzgerald in vocal criticism of the government’s proposed relocation of the port to Arawak Cay, as part of the Committee to Protect and Preserve the Bahamas for Future Generations. Mr Fitzgerald formally launched his bid for the D eputy Leadership of the p arty last week. Kenred Dorsett enters PLP leadership race KENRED DORSETT O PPOSITION S N ATIONAL D EPUTY C HAIRMANHEEDS CALLOFMYPEOPLE ‘Armed and extremely dangerous’ W ANTED: J amal Ferguson, 36, alias ‘Balty’, who is one of three men wanted by Police. The three ared escribed as ‘armed and extremely dangerous. Police issue bulletins for three men wanted in connection with murder and armed robbery

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net WORKERS at a fast food restaurant were left shocked and fearing for their lives yesterday after two masked and armed men burst in and demanded cash. According to an eye witn ess, the two thugs parked their car in front of Wendy’s restaurant on Mackey Street,N assau, entered the business and jumped over the cashier’s counter. After staff fled to the back of the building after seeing that one of men had a gun, they were eventually able to steal two cash register drawers containing an unknown amount of money. No one was hurt during the robbery, which happened at about 11.30am, but the incident resulted in the main dining room part of the restaurant being closed for the rest o f the day, leaving only the drive-through open for orders. Cloths The two men, whose faces were half-covered with cloths, were able to escape in the green Toyota Avalon vehicle they had left parked outside. A Wendy’s spokesman declined to comment on the incident when contacted by The Tribune yesterday after noon. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM x xChairs C hairsx xT ables T ablesx xB enches Benchesx xU mbrellas U mbrellasx xL oungers L oungersx xDrinks Trolleys D rinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables C offee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h he e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. W ong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Masked thugs with gun terrorise Wendy’s staff TARGET: The Wendy’s fast food restaurant where two armed, masked men struck yesterday. They made off with an unknown amount of money Two men escape in car after grabbing cash INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News.............P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,16 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports.......................................P12,13,14,15 BUSINESS SECTION Business......................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 INSIGHT SECTION Insight...........................................P1,2,3,5,8 Advt...........................................................P4 Comics......................................................P6 Weather....................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 20 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Felip Major /Tribune staff POLICE are seeking the owner of a shotgun and two shotgun shells found in Nassau Street at around 2am yesterday. Anyone with any informa tion should call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328TIPS (8477 urgently on 911 or 919. Shotgun and shells found in Nassau Str eet In brief

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E DITOR, The Tribune. I read with interest and l aughed at the obviously very premature statement f rom a Ms Nellini Bethel of the Ministry of Tourism with regards to the proposed Cruise Port in the Grand Bahama Port zone. Ms Bethel clearly has not done any research as she will have been able to advise the Director-General of Tourism who would have advised her Minister that the only party who can ownoperate-manage a Port/Harb our in the GBPA zone is none other than Hutchinson-Whampao as much as the government might wish otherwise unless some radi cal change is made to the long-standing ownership p osition made when H utchinson-Whampao purchased on Grand Bahama, over 15 years ago. The fact that the Office of the Prime Minister has been Gazetting compulsory purchases of land in Williams Town does not somehow make it “magically” correct and a challenge to this in the courts will discover that the government has no rights so endeth yet another idea of government. Yes we all know it would be better in Grand Bahama with a new Cruise Port but w e don’t want one owned b y Carnival Cruise Lines for starters if this project is going to bids at the least 40 per cent of the Port should be owned directly by resi-d ents of Grand Bahama Government might be allowed to own 10 per cent. Hope Ms Bethell at Tourism now will go and check her facts and the OPM will curtail what is in my opinion an attempt at an illegal act of compulsorily purchasing property under false pretences. Is this the silly season, Editor it seems so. M EDGECOMBE Freeport, Grand Bahama, September 19, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune . M y name is Devlyn Stubbs, this past July I chaperoned our summer camp’sf ield trip to the dog pound where we witnessed first hand the horrible conditionst here. This is a letter written describing our experie nce. I have read the other a rticles printed regarding this issue and I would like t o offer my support to this cause. DEVLYN STUBBS Owner/Trainer S tubsdale Dog Care Centre The Pound T HE day promised to be very fruitful as we prepared for our field trip to the Humane Society. As a surprise for the c ampers, I planned a nature hike through the Botanical Gardens, and visit to thep ound which happens to be located on the same facili-t y. To my disappointment a nd to the horror of the campers, the facility proved to be far below any expecteds tandard. The kennels were unsan i tary, poorly lit, badly dilapidated, and seemingly gross ly underfunded. The 15-20 a nimals appeared not to be taken care of; the cages were filthy with excrement and, in need of major renovations. T he two adult staff mem b ers, and three to four y ounger persons, presumably summer students, were o bserved either relaxing under a tree, on the telephone, or preparing mealsi n the staff kitchen, all while a dead dog lay decomposi ng in a kennel with its living kennelmate. When asked when the dead dogw ould be removed, staff explained that the keys to t he kennels were not currently on premises, but they assured us that the dead dogw ould be removed from the kennel that day. One kennel in particular housed a puppy no more than five months old, seem-i ngly healthy, and begging for attention. Mention was made howe ver of helping eligible pets find homes, but on this day the Bahamas Humane Society was denied the opportu-n ity to find a home for the pup, and as scheduled the following day, the pup wase uthanised. I am very disappointed in t he staff at The Pound and embarrassed for my country because I understandn ow why we have a stray dog problem. A worker explained to me that it is not the policy of the pound to patrol thes treets of Nassau capturing dogs that roam, and there a re no penalties enforced for a llowing your dog to roam. The pound only collects dogs that people call in, andt hey are euthanised every Friday. Awareness can lead to c hange, and that’s what I hope this letter may help to b ring about. What we are e xperiencing in The Bahamas with regard to the l arge stray dog population is a direct result of our lackadaisical attitude toward yard enclosures, in addition t o refusing to spay and neuter our pets. D omestic and stray dogs alike roam our streets, mating with other dogs helpingt o increase the already large local dog population. The Bahamian government should be leading the way. Stray animals on ours treets are not only inhumane, it’s a nuisance to the citizens, and a constanth ealth risk to people and dogs. I hope that by exposing The Pound and its inhum ane practices, we can per haps agitate our minds while simultaneously warming ourh earts to begin to consider the plight of our four legged c ompanions, and perhaps we will then make a serious attempt at properly caringf or our pets. DEVLYN STUBBS Nassau, S eptember, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THE BAHAMAS has always been proud o f its legal system. As a matter of fact so p roud that it has used it as a selling point to e ntice the monied to invest in a country with ancient laws, ably administered. The Bahamas, say the brochures, has a legal system based on English common law. And at the apex of that system is the JudicialC ommittee of the Privy Council. T he history of the Privy Council can be traced back to the eleventh century after the conquest of Britain by the Normans at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Over the years we have heard many investors comment on their reliance on our British system of justice an important reason for feeling comfortable about investing here. Several have often laughed that if the locals “mess up” there’s always the PrivyC ouncil waiting in the wings to pick up the pieces. Even local litigants feel more secure k nowing that there is a final court of appeal t hat has neither personal connections nor i nterests in the Bahamas. In other words t he Judicial Committee is completely r emoved from the local scene. I ts only interest is in interpreting the law and meting out justice to litigants who to them are only Messrs. X Y and Z. In other words the committee has no local ties which to many is an important comfort zone. The importance of the Judicial Committee was acknowledged no later than April this year when welcoming the law lords to the Bahamas on their third trip here to hear local cases, Thomas Evans, QC, speaking on behalf of the Inner Bar said: “Your continued presence at the apex of our court structure is a source of confidence in our system to many litigants and practitioners a like.” In a break with centuries of tradition the f ive law lords chose the Bahamas as the first o verseas jurisdiction in which to sit for sev eral days to hear Bahamian cases. They sat in the Bahamas to decide local appeals in December 2007, December 2008a nd again this year March-April. And so it came as an unwelcome surprise to hear Lord Nicholas Phillips’ comments in Britain that the time had come to shake off the institution’s “colonial hangovers” the Bahamas included. Lord Phillips soon to be president of the UK Supreme Court and one of those who sat on appeals in the Bahamas this year announced while here that procedural changes would be introduced under the new Privy Council rules, one of which would tighten time limits for filing applications. We do think,” he said, “that it is a good idea that there should be a sense of urgency w ith regard to appeals to the Privy Council. It i s not just that respondents should be left in a state of uncertainty as to whether or not there is to be an appeal.” However, last week The Tribune publ ished a report that Lord Phillips had said t hat countries like the Bahamas are taking up t oo much of Britain’s time and resources. He would like to see the Privy Council’s case load reduced. T his has been interpreted as a sign that B ritain may soon move to shake off her colon ial burdens, leaving them to find or create their own appeal courts. On Friday The Gleaner of Jamaica reported that as a result of these comments, Jamaica’s Opposition is urging government to t able legislation in Parliament to revive the process to leave the Privy Council’s Judicial Committee as its final court of appeal in favour of the Caribbean Court of Justice. Lord Phillips’ views could not have come at a worse time for the Bahamas judiciary, which is struggling, but so far failing, to regain t he trust of the public. At one time the judiciary was this nation’s most honoured profession. T he leading lights of the Inner Bar those who had taken silk were highly respected. Their views were seldom questioned. They set the tone for the profession, while members o f the Utter Bar toed the line. Not so today. The atmosphere had started to change in the sixties and by the eighties the d rug trade had so taken its toll, that the integrity of some members were being questioned. Whereas before no one would dare criticise a member of the Bar, today it is almost the fashion. On Friday, Bahamas Bar Association Pres i dent Ruth Bowe-Darville was concerned that the indictment in the US of the Bar’s treasurer could set back the Association’s e fforts to improve its public image at home w hile diminishing its reputation aboard. This case is indeed a tragedy. However, sooner or later the Bahamas w ill have to come to grips with a decision about what court will replace the Privy Coun cil should the Council eventually decide to drop its overseas jurisdictions. The Bahamas is certainly too small a country for our present Court of Appeal to have the final say in local affairs. Horrified by state of dog pound LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Uncertainty over Privy Council future O O n n l l y y H H u u t t c c h h i i n n s s o o n n W W h h a a m m p p a a o o c c a a n n o o w w n n , , o o p p e e r r a a t t e e a a n n d d m m a a n n a a g g e e a a p p o o r r t t

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net BEREAVED families of murder victims called for justice and an end to violent crimea s a memorial wall was unveiled at the New Covenant Baptist Church yesterday to honour their loved ones. T he Memorial Wall for Murdered Persons bears the names of 94 men and women whose lives were violently taken over the last 30 years. It is a solemnr eminder of the country’s rising murder toll. More than 200 friends and relatives of the murdered hono ured their loved ones at the s ervice organised by Bishop Simeon Hall, senior pastor at t he church in the East West Highway, and attended by Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest and community activists. P astor Carlos Reid, a reformed gang member whon ow runs the youth group Youth Against Violence ( YAV), called for a gang unit to be established to target the gangs infesting almost every area of our country, and asked for effective rehabilitation pro-g rammes to prevent offenders from re-offending on releasef rom prison. Mr Reid said: “In our count ry today it’s more popular for a young man to associate himself with a gang than the boys brigade or a youth group at church. Almost every area of o ur country is infested with gangs. Do we allow this anti-social culture to become the social c ulture that we live by in the Bahamas?” But College of the Bahamas professor Felix Bethel said it is not just gangsters unlawfully t aking the lives of innocent loved ones. M r Bethel called for regulation of the police force and for t hose officers who have wrong fully killed with Royal Bahamas Police Force weapons to be brought to justice. Directing his question at M inister of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Dr Bethela sked: “Who is going to police the police? Police control the coroner’s c ourt, so I’m told, and I am calling on you Minister to call on the Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham in a manner of the m ost urgent priority to investig ate the conduct of the coroner’s court, for a real mission of inquiry into the deaths of our brothers and sisters. Their names and their blood cry out from the earth for justice.” Friends and relatives of B renton Smith, the 18-year-old shot dead by police in Village Road on July 9, stood around the memorial wall with placards calling for justice. A nd Diane Bethel, mother of the late Deron “Sharkie” Bethel, 20, said she is still waiti ng for justice for her son shot dead in Pinewood Gardens on March 27, 2006, at age 20. A police officer has been charged with his murder. S he said: “I am still waiting for justice, and this wall showst hat my son, and those who have been murdered have not b een forgotten.” A symbolic release of seven white doves by Rev Diana Ranger and relatives of some of the murdered named on them emorial wall was followed by prayers and music from thec hurch choir and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Band. B ishop Hall organised the building of the $6,000 memori a l wall with a team of support ers to both comfort the families of those who have been killed, and to make a stand against crime. H e told the crowd how losing a loved one at the hand of a m urderer is the worst kind of grief, and the memorial wall is o ne way of commemorating those whose lives were taken. Bishop Hall said: “We want to do it because we want to stand with you. We feel your p ain and I pray that we will learn to stand with one anoth e r.” The socially conscious pas t or has called for churches in Grand Bahama and across the country to make similar efforts to stand against crime with the hope to deter criminals. M inister of National Security Tommy Turnquest said them urder rate is at an unacceptable level, and people must r eport crime, teach their children right from wrong, and p lace a greater value on morality, honesty, and integrity than on material gain. He added: “We can also emphasise how wrong it is to t ake the lives of others, and that consequences, serious conseq uences will follow.” However, the minister made n o mention of the possible reintroduction of capital punish ment. Mr Turnquest hopes the unveiling of the memorial wall w ill encourage anti-crime interventions in the community, and i nspire ongoing efforts to address social tragedies and other challenges in the count ry. The minister said: “Regardless of whether it happened 60 years ago or six days ago, we continue to share with you and t o assure you that we will do all within the laws of the B ahamas to bring justice to all.” Adding: “The law in the B ahamas police the police, and we as Bahamians want to be careful how we denigrate our police force because they were the institution that we need to c all in times of trouble.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A LITTLE GIRL looks at the names on the memorial wall yesterday FAMILY AND FRIENDS of Brenton Hector Smith hold up pictures of their loved one. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff Families of murder victims call for justice M E MORIALWALLUNVEILED

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Please submit resumeto: Human ResourcesDepartment | Doctors Hospital P.O.BoxN-3018||Nassau,Bahamas|orEmail:info@doctorshosp.com Vacancy: Physician Liaison Officer Physician Liaison: www.doctorshosp.com P osition:Responsible for the support of the development of clinical information systems that assist physicians in the delivery of patient care. Participates as a member of the MIS department in representing the needs and requirements of the physician community and serves as an advocate of management in promoting the use of information technology in the clinical setting. Works in partnership with Physician Care Management Design and Implementation Teams to translate clinician requirements into specifications for new clinical systems. Helpslead,andfacilitateclinicianadvisorygroupsinthedesignofclinical s ystemstosupportexcellenceinpatientcare.Engagespatientcareproviderswith v aryingrolesincludingphysicians,nursingpractitioners,nursingstaff,ancillary departmentpersonnel,&medicalrecordsprofessionalstocontributetothe developmentanduseoftheclinicalinformationsystem.Developsempathy& understandingofphysicianneeds&buildsrelationshipswithphysicianstogain supportofITinitiatives. technical and application implementation strategies and assists in the development of strategic plans for clinical information systems.Education & Experience: PhD qualification in medicine or a related clinical background. (no physician licensing necessary for the post)Special Range of Skills:Possess excellent interpersonal skills and can work effectively with a diversity of personalities. Must be approachable, show respect for others and be able to present data with effective communication and presentation skills. Must be an effective consensus builder. Possess a good grasp of clinician work flow in both inpatient and outpatient settings, interest in clinical information system and outcomes measurement. B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net PLP leader Perry Christie a nd former Deputy Chairman of the Hotel Corporation George Smith have slammed Government plans to axe the Bahamas hotel C orporation by the end of the year, terminating the j obs of an unconfirmed number of staff. Confirming the Governm ent’s plan to wind up the o perations of the Corporation and repeal the Hotel Corporation Act “no later than December 31, 2009” Tourism Minister VincentV anderpool Wallace said the Government feels some of the HC’s functions can be “undertaken by other gov-e rnment entities and departm ents.” T he Tribune u nderstands there are fewer than 20 people working at the Corporation, and while some are on secondment from other ministries to which they can return, others will be terminated and receive severance p ackages. W hile the Hotel Corporat ion has in the past owned a round 12 hotel properties, thanks to successful sales over the years, it now only owns one the Lighthouse Beach Hotel in Andros along with some large and valuable landholdings in A ndros and Eleuthera. Mr Vanderpool said that f or a long time the Corpo ration was primarily “pushing” these governmentowned properties, rather than emphasising the touris t ic development of the Bahamas as a whole, and t his does not chime well with this Government’s vision for t ourism. Meanwhile, the FNM government, in contrast to the PLP government, is philo-s ophically opposed to the idea of government owners hip in the tourism industry, seeing the promotion of private rather than publici nvolvement as the key to boosting the sector. Currently in “very serious n egotiations” with a private developer interested in buyi ng the Lighthouse Beach Hotel, Mr Vanderpool Wallace said the Hotel Corporation expects to sell that hotel by the end of the year. M eanwhile, the Govern ment is also “having con v ersations” with the I-Group in Mayaguana about the way forward there, wheret he Hotel Corporation has a 50 per cent stake in the d evelopment. “The principals in Mayaguana know what wew ant to do. It’s difficult to be a partner and a policeman at same time,” said Mr Van d erpool Wallace. However, he did not state what the G overnment intends to do with the land the corporation owns in Andros and Eleuthera, the latter purp ortedly worth more than $100 million. P LP leader Perry Christie y esterday said “many quest ions are left unanswered” and the Government owes a full explanation of what it i ntends to do and why. He and Mr Smith charged that the Corporation, “created out of a perceived need for government intervention when things were very badi n hotel industry” in the 1970s, still has a role to play in tourism and can be devel-o ped. “It means that the current government is philosophic ally moving away from view that there is an advant ange to the government h aving some involvement in the industry as now provid ed by Hotel Corporation Act. On basis on my own experience it’d be much to the advantage of government to have some govern m ent-owned entity with a focus on ensuring we are always out there advancing our country’s interests t hrough some entity that would have a focus on it. The ministries of the gov-e rnment can’t do it efficiently.” B oth Mr Christie and Mr Smith suggested that the Hotel Corporation or ane ntity similar to it could help advance tourism, particularl y in the out islands, by building “tourism infrastructure” such as smallh otels that private developers might not otherwise be interested in setting up. These can be used to stimulate private sector interesti n a particular Bahamian destination once they can prove successful, they sug-g ested. “Why so quickly trying to divest itself of an entit y that’s proven beneficially proven to be to The Bahamas without announc-i ng what they intend to replace it with?” said Mr S mith. Mr Smith and Mr Christie emphasised that were it notf or the Hotel Corporation intervening in the past, the jobs of many Bahamians would have been lost at properties which were clos-i ng down and a public entity should continue to exist which can step in if hotels look set to go bust. Christie blasts plans to axe Bahamas Hotel Corporation Organisation’s former deputy chairman George Smith also hits out Perry Christie I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s “It means that the current government is philosophically moving awayf rom view that there is an advantange t o the government having some i nvolvement in the industry as now provided by Hotel Corporation Act.

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B Y RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is a Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat). I N MY commentary last week I made the point that the greatest d estabilising force confronting the Caribbean and Central America is drug trafficking and its attendant crime, i ncluding illegal arms smuggling a nd distribution, robberies and executions. I called on the United States to take the lead in organising c ollaborative arrangements with Europe and Latin America and the Caribbean to establish a comprehensive anti-narc otics programme that addresses both supply and demand. This week, I take the appeal a step further by calling on the governments of the Caribbean Common Market and Community (CARICOM rate with Latin American governments in engaging the US g overnment in a dialogue to fundamentally change the failed anti-drug trafficking policy that has been pursued so far. I am agreeing with Professor Norman Girvan, former Secre-t ary-General of the Association of Caribbean States, who r egards such an engagement as crucial. My commentary last week was taken from an address I delivered in London to militaryo fficers from all over the world. In the course of the address, Ih ad said that “the US, Canadian and European governments h ave concentrated on cutting supply through eradication and interdiction with limited success, and it is clearly time to rethink this strategy. But, in doing so, the authorities in these countries must collaborate ful l y with both the producing and transit countries, both of whom a re as much the victims of the trade as the countries in which t he huge markets reside.” The failure of a policy principally based on interdiction and eradication is now painfully obvious. T he policy not only fails to tackle effectively the problem o f demand in countries such as the United States of America a nd Canada, it also suffers from its imposed character. It is essentially a policy created by the US and imposed on the rest of the area. This policy, along with the criminalization of the posses sion of even small amounts of heroin, cocaine and marijuana, h as filled the jails of the Caribbean and Latin American countries. Even worse, a large number of people in St Vincent and the Grenadines and Jamaica are criminalized because they grow or pick marijuana for a living. Largely, these people have no other means of livelihood, and are unqualified or untrained for a nything but agricultural labour. Banana I n both countries, hundreds of banana farmers have been put out of business by the loss of preferential markets in the European Union, and the argu-m ent has been made that they should be allowed to producem arijuana, under regulated and supervised conditions, for the m edicinal market. This is being done in some S tates of the United States, such as California, and is capa ble of replication in the Caribbean where it would provide employment and cont ribute to the economy. The Caribbean alone will h old little sway with the bigger powers in the Hemisphere who, s o far, directed the way that the problem of drugs is handled. But, there is now a growing effort in Latin America for a new and different approach. It started with the LatinAmerican Commission on D rugs and Democracy cochaired by former presidents, F ernando Henrique Cardoso (Brazil), Csar Gaviria (Colombia) and Ernesto Zedillo (Mexico). The Commission released a report in February in which it called for the decriminalisation o f cannabis and criticised “the criminalization of consumpt ion.” Importantly, the report concluded: “The deepening of the debate concerning the policies on drug consumption must be grounded on a rigorous eval uation of the impact of the diverse alternatives to the prohibitionist strategy that are being tested in different countries, focusing on the reduction of individual and social harm.” When the report was published, Ethan Nadelmann, E xecutive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance, observed that: “An ever growing number of Latin American leaders from across the political spectrum recognize that the prohibitionist approach to drug control has wreaked havoc throughout the r egion, generating crime, violence and corruption on a scale t hat far exceeds what the United States experienced during a lcohol Prohibition in the 1920s. “Many believe – and a handf ul have said publicly that t he better solution would be to a bandon drug prohibition and move in the direction of legally r egulating the global drug markets that are now illegal.” N ow, the Mexican government has announced that it will be eliminating jail sentences for possession of small amounts of heroin, cocaine, and marijua n a, freeing law enforcement officers to focus on the kingp ins of the trade. The governments of Brazil a nd Uruguay have also announced the elimination of measures that penalize people carrying small amounts of drugs and Argentina is reported to be planning the exemption of drug users from the criminal j ustice system. The Latin countries have t aken bold first steps, but what is needed is collaboration by all L atin American and Caribbean governments and the elaboration of a strategy with the Unit ed States and Canada that is jointly devised, and collectively i mplemented. As University of the West I ndies Professor Alston Chevannes, who chaired a Task F orce on Drugs in Jamaica some years ago, recently noted: “Jamaica would like to decriminalise personal use of cannabis but is afraid of US d ecertification. Other CARI COM countries would proba-b ly like to but can't for the same reason. An international m ovement that includes big players like Mexico and Brazil would prevent our small countries from being exposed. If the US can be won, then I reckon the UN would have to come to i ts senses and reconsider the Conventions.” Prime Minister Patrick Manning of Trinidad and Tobago has lead responsibility for security issues in CARICOM. He can initiate these discussions within CARICOM and with the Rio Group in time to p lace the issue on the agenda of the scheduled meeting later this year between Caribbean Heads of government and US President Barack Obama. In conditions of economic decline and increased unemployment, drug trafficking and its attendant other crimes escal ate, as they are doing now throughout the region. (Responses and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com ) C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Change the failed anti-drugs strategy WORLDVIEW PATRICK MANNING , Prime Minister of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago addresses the 64th session of the United Nations General Assembly at the United Nations headquarters Saturday Sept. 26, 2009. Prime Minister Patrick Manning of Trinidad and Tobago has lead responsibility for security issues in CARICOM. ( AP Photo / Stephen Chernin) BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FOUR people were charged with possession of firearms and ammunition at Freeport Magistrates’ Court on Friday. Hartley Smith, 29, Romel Smith, 24, Tamisa Saunders, 30, and Emilyann Johnson, 17, appeared in Court One before Magistrate Debbye Ferguson. They were charged with four counts of possession of unlicensed firearm and two counts of ammunition possession. It is alleged that on September 24 at Freeport, Grand Bahama, the accused were found in possession four unlicensed firearms and ammuni tion. Simeon Brown represented the defendants. They all pleaded not guilty to the charges. Magistrate Ferguson granted $36,000 bail to each of the defendants. The matter was adjourned to January 11, 2010, for trial in Magistrate Court Two. Pair expected to face dr ug char ges today TWO men are expected to be arraigned on drug possession charges in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court this week. The charges are in relation to a drug seizure in the Lunar Boulevard area, where police discovered more than 70 lbs of suspected marijuana, with an estimated street value of $56,800. The suspects, ages 29 and 40 years, will appear in Court today to answer to the charge of possession of dangerous drugs with intent to supply. Four people charged with firearms possession SIR RONALD SANDERS The failure of a policy principally based o n interdiction and e radication is now painfully obvious.”

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THE importance of road safety cannot be overemphasised, Public Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant told a young audience. Mr Grant was the keynote speaker at the fourth national road safety youth symposium at Worker’s House. The Road Traffic department and Chevron Texaco Bahamas Limited organisedt he symposium, with this year’s as “Road Safety: Focusing on the RoadA head”. P articipants were junior a nd senior high students f rom public and private schools throughout New P rovidence. Workshop The one-day workshop c overed various aspects of r oad safety, including fact ors whih contribute to accidents; challenges facing the disabled in relation to roads afety; and Injuries related to traffic accidents. S peakers included Iris Adderley, consultant, Disa bility Affairs Unit, Ministry of Labour and Social Devel opment; Sgt. Garland Rolle,T raffic Division, Royal B ahamas Police Force; Bodine Johnson, entertainer and t eacher; and Keniesha Adderley, Texaco youths pokesman. S enior government officials in attendance included J ack Thompson, Director of Immigration; Colin Higgs, Permanent Secretary, Min i stry of Public Works and Transport; Philip Turner, Controller of Road Traffic;a nd Brad Smith, Assistant Controller of Road Traffic. M r Grant said according to the World Health Organization, road traffic injuriesa re the leading cause of death globally among young p eople between the ages of 10 and 14, 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 years. H e noted that 45 traffic fatalities were recorded in The Bahamas during 2008, and 37 traffic fatalities have been recorded so far for2 009. “It is our desire to reverse this trend,” said Mr. Grant. “And in this regard, the Ministry of Public Worksa nd Transport has sought to achieve this by advancing various road safety educa t ion initiatives while encouraging multi-sectoral partn erships in the process.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the October 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsCall 1 888 496 6173 (toll free to fast-track your career MBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, University of Wales MSc in Public Administration & Development University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University MSc International Hospitality Management Hallam University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders) University of WalesOnline/distance learning from RDI in the Bahamas Develop your career while studying No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included Free membership of International Management Academy UNIVERSITY OF WALES University of Wales BA (Hons Business (top up Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA(Hons Business&Management(top up), BA (Hons Financial Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons Psychology University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons) Business Computing (top up) BSc (Hons Tourism (top up BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES MASTERS Transport Minister Neko Grant highlights road safety importance “It is our desire to r everse this trend. A nd in this regard, the Ministry of Public W o rks and T ransport has sought to achieve this by advancing various road safety education initiatives while encouraging multi-sectoral part nerships in the process.” ATTENTIVE: Participants in the road safety symposium. KEYNOTESPEAKER: Transport Minister Neko Grant. PHOTOS: Letisha Henderson

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By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net INDUSTRIAL action may be on the horizon forf aculty members at the College of the Bahamas who remain disatisfied with the handling of negotiationsover a new industrial agreement. T he emerging threat c omes as some teaching staff say that much greater stud ent numbers this year have already put a strain on the ability of youngsters to get aq uality experience at the college. And, some staff claim, the s trife between teaching staff and College administrators a long with the extra demand placed on teachers and the College’s resources by this year’s increased enrollment i s impeding COB’s momentum towards university stat us. Jennifer Dotson, president of the Union of Tertiary Educators of theB ahamas (UTEB represents faculty at the college, told The Tribune that the College is now expecting more of teachers but try-i ng to take away benefits. “The College needs to be more open and receptive tot he needs of faculty. It is asking us to take in more s tudents, to teach more, but they are not negotiating a n ew industrial agreement. “They expect things of us but us but is not willing tog ive anything in return,” claimed the UTEB Presi d ent, who added that staff w ere only made aware of a major increase in student numbers a week before thef all semester began. One of the major issues for faculty in negotiationso ver a new industrial agreement is the proposal by the C ollege that they will be put on contracts, something which staff feel will lessent heir ability to get loans or take on other personal r esponsibilities. Mrs Dotson said the union does not feel preparedt o “sign away all of its terms and agreements” that existe d in its previous industrial a greement, which expired in mid-2008, and is now “strategising” over the way forward. “If it means taking a strike v ote or withholding students grades ... we will have to do what we have to do to make sure we have clear terms and conditions. But thosea re drastic steps and we hope it won’t get to that.” While disatisfaction has been growing for months, a faculty meeting last weekw ith College president Janyne Hodder “did not end w ell” according to Ms Dotson and others who attende d, leaving tensions heightened. P roposals S taff had been looking to the President to “justify” some of the proposals theC ollege is putting to faculty in negotiations and some n ew policies already being imposed, but many left disatisfied. The faculty were trying to get answers to questions. T here’s a lot of policies going into place, a lot of things happening and wew anted rationale for whats going on. In the end she had to call a recess to the meet-i ng. All the faculty got up and left,” claimed one lect urer, who wished to remain anonymous. Yesterday Margot Blackw ell, a lecturer who divides her time between the School o f Education and the School of Applied Sciences while also participating on theU TEB negotiating team, described the situation as “heartbreaking.” “We’ve been without an industrial agreement for 14 or 15 months,” she said. We can’t move forward to develop as the University of the Bahamas if we can’t agree on terms and conditions under which this canb e done. “For us to be frustrated at t his point when we should have common purpose is b eyond me.” Michael Stevenson, head of COB’s LLB programme,s aid he feels that Ms Hodder “needs to be more personally in the negotiating process.” What presently has transpired is a feeling that when UTEB negotiates with the college they are not necessarily negotiating with thed ecision makers and that needs to be addressed. T here’s alot of misunderstanding and a lack of real n egotiating.” As for industrial action, Mr Stevenson said it’s “nots omething we want to do but it’s always an option.” When contacted about the Union’s broad-ranging concerns as well as the outcome of last week’s faculty meet-i ng on Friday, the College issued a short statement which stated that in a “usual faculty meeting” held last Thursday during which the topic of ongoing union negotiations did come up.” “There were cordial discussions held and it is nott he practice of the College of The Bahamas to negotia te outside of our normal internal processes.” A union spokesperson declined toc omment any further. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Mercedes M-Class. Beauty, brains and brawn. TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz M-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667When you think of the average SUV on the road today, you think of roadhogging, air-polluting gas guzzlers that wouldnt know the meaning of high precision and fuel efficiency if it were emblazoned on their windshields. But there is an alternative. The refined M-Class from Mercedes-Benz. Withits superior German styling utilising only high-grade materials, its robust engine power delivering exemplary turn-on-a-dime performance whilst still being frugal on fuel and its handling of pot-holed roads and 1.5 ft. flooded streets, the Mercedes-Benz M-Class is clearly the best choice in SUVs. Industrial action may be looming for College of Bahamas faculty members Dissatisfaction remains over negotiations for new agreement JANYNEHODDER

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BY JOHN ISSA THE time has come for us to move towards less dependence on foreign investment and more on our own resources for growth and development in The Bahamas. Not only will it be beneficial to Bahamians in the short run by speeding up our recovery from the recession but the long term benefits will be profound and substantial. The actions that I am going to suggest have been raised before; however the urgency for their adoption has been accelerated by the world recession. Despite the fact that technically the US recession may be coming to an end, it will be some time before employment accelerates in the US to the point where we will feel the benefits in Bahamian tourism and investment. This column does not think that we can wait that long without severe damage being done to the social fabric of The Bahamas. We are already seeing the start of this damage in the rise of the level of violent crime. The two actions that will increase economic growth and e mployment with all their c onsequential benefits are the f reeing up of Bahamian capital and entrepreneurial energy. In order to free up Bahamian capital which is held overseas Bahamians should be permitted to repatriate their foreign assets witht he same rights as a foreign investor and with no penalty for having breached the for eign exchange laws. I know persons will worry that the money will leave again but once it is invested and earninga return it will stay. We must all remember that the Foreign exchange restrictions didn’t stop the funds from leaving in the first place. The second action is the need to change the business licensing legislation so that any qualified Bahamian will have the right to a business licence without any consideration being given to protecting existing businesses. This protectionism which is part of our history in The Bahamas and at one time tried to preserve the social status quo is now trying to preserve the economic status quo. Any country that continues along this road is condemning a large number of its young entrepreneurs to lives in which they cannot live their dreams or achieve their potential. As has been said before no crisis should be wasted.” Let’s not waste this one. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Unleash our own resources V IEWFROM A FAR J OHN I SSA I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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By ADRIAN GIBSON ajbahama@hotmail.com L AST week’s comments by the President of the UK’s new Supreme Court, Lord Nicholas Phillips, sent shockwaves throughout the Commonwealth as this prominent justice claimed that cases from places such as The Bahamas are burdensome and have occupied too much of the time and resources of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC In the case of The Bahamas, which continues to retain the Privy Council, Lord Phillips’ comments must have shocked the judiciary/government as this leading British jurist seems to be clearly urging countries to develop final courts of appeal or join regional networks since the London-based JCPC may no longer hear appeals from foreign jurisdictions. In April 2005, the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ final appellate court for juris dictions within the region; however, although The Bahamas helps to fund the CCJ, like several other countries, it does not retain this court as its final court of appeal. Frankly, in the interim, until we settle upon our very own final court, it is in the Bahamas’ best interest to continue to retain the Privy Council. At present, there is no comity among the countries that helped launch the CCJ and were privy to the agreement for its establishment. Thus far, these countries have shown a lack of political will towards taking a unified approach to making the nec essary Constitutional/legislative adjustments to give the court the validity it needs to operate as the final appellate court in their respective juris dictions. At present, the juris diction of the Privy Council is limited and focused on cer tain legal areas. If we are tru ly seeking to establish our sovereignty, why go fromw hat is perceived in some quarters as a form of imperi alism or hegemony to anoth er? Today, the CCJ is the final appellate court for Barbados and Guyana, the latter having abolished the JCPC as its final court several years before the establishment of the CCJ. Apex The Privy Council stands at the apex of our local judicial system and, amidst some controversy, has effectively adjudicated on Bahamian, and Caribbean, issues that have come before it. Contrary to a perception that has arisen relative to the CCJ, the Privy Council appears to be a truly independent body that is not subject to judicial meddling, social forces and/or political pressures. In recent times, in an attempt to familiarize itself with local circumstances, the Privy Council has had repeat-e d sittings in the Bahamas. T he Bahamas’ Constitution makes provisions for the Privy Council, stating its purpose as being “for the hearing and determination of appeals from decisions of any court in the Bahamas by a panel ofj udges.” The JCPC is a safety net that has protected the rights of citizens in matters where trials were seemingly inequitable and/or set a poor or disagreeable precedent. Recent Privy Council deci sions, particularly regarding death row inmates and their execution, have been loathed and have led to condemnation of the council and calls for its abolition as a final appeals court. Today, many Bahamians view the Privy Council as an obstacle to hanging death row inmates in this era of rampant violent crime. In 1993, in their infamous Pratt and Morgan decision, the Privy Council decided that the execution of a person after five years on death row amounted to inhumane treatment. Locally, this meant that many prisoners on death row at that time had their sentences converted to life imprisonment. Moreover, latest hullabaloo came after the Lambert Wilson case, which called for the discretionary use of the death penalty and stated that the mandatory death sentence was unconstitutional. In these times, where organ ized and sadistic criminals are openly challenging the authority of the state, the Privy Council has been sub ject to harsh criticism, particularly because certain decisions do not reflect the localc ircumstances of countries still referring to it. Noted jurists, such as Jus tice A Saunders of the Caribbean Court of Justice, have criticized the JCPC on the basis of its perceived hinC M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Please call Crystal Pintard (396-2148) Alexander Burrows AlexisRoberts Almina Hanna Alvin Cunningham Andrew Thompson Angela Neymour Arlington Brice Bernice Culmer Beverly M ather Bradford Wildgoose Cecil G ray Cravaughn M cKay Cyril Gibson Danielle Davis Danny Toussaint Daphnie Saunders Douglas Smith Ellis Miller Elvis Bullard Isadell Howells Jerome Pinder Latoya Cargill Gray Loretta Hart Lynn Woodside-Sands Mandi Pedican Philip Hinzey Roland Clarke Roosevelt Burrows Ruth Williams Ruthesa Glendera Dean Selle Julie Brindle Sherry Armaly Hall Terrence King Vanria Johnson Vilna Adderley Vincent Grant The following Government Employees are asked to contact the respective representatives at ColinaImperial Insurance Ltd: Alma Clarke Anthony Rolle Anthony Fawkes Bettrah Belanda Mitchell Bridgette Neely Carl Rudolph Johnson Charlene Dawkins-Bevans Cheryl Bowe-Moss Clarence Rolle Cleaver W. Robinson Cordero Farrington Coresa Deveaux Cynthia Wilson Dedrick Storr Derek Nottage Desmond Pinder Douglas Richards Francina Scott Francis Clarke Frederica Hamilton Fredie Smith George Bruney Gloria Estella Rolle Jasmar Higgs Jewel A. Mcphee John A. Webb Kardeo Heild Kevin Remond Culmer Kirkwood Campbell Laytoya Cargill-Gray Leila Wood Lorenzo M. Carroll Malriae Lauree Ferguson Mavis Vanderpool Melissa Evans Michael White Melonie Adderley Mervalette L. Dean Mervin Dean Mervin J. Dean Michael Duvalier Muriel Johnson Natashia Andrews Pamela Taylor Petre Darwin Curry Philip Turner Raymond Butler Reginald Taylor Rhonda Gibson Samuel A Gay Shanita G. Rolle Stubbs Shannon Akira Butterfield Shannon Akira Butterfield Sharon Creary Sharon Hanna Sheniqua Brennen-Curry Shorn Douglas Gibson Solomon Rolle Sonia Smith Stanley Wood Stephen D. Moss Theresa Cooper Tina Samantha O Brien Trevor Mcneil Basden Valentino Gay Velma Cox Veronica Samuel Virginia P. Culmer Woodside Wayde Russell William Mckenzie Zenovia Marie Coakley Mills Please call Charmaine Parker (396-2152) The notion we can govern – but not judge – ourselves is illogical! Y OUNG M AN S V IEW ADRIANGIBSON SEE page 12 Today, many Bahamians view the P rivy Council as an obstacle to hanging d eath row inmates in this era of rampant violent crime.”

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FROM PAGEONE drance to the development of indigenous jurisprudence, saying: “Unquestionably, the existence of a right of appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council affects the confidence of our Courts. At times, our Courts appear to be always looking over their shoulders across the vast ocean of sea towards the Privy Council for applause and approbation. “This subjugation or subservience of judicial thought and independence cannot be justified in independent and sovereign states.” While the Constitution must be amended to accommodate our own final court, and while Justice Saunders’ view holds true in some respects, it is no reason to join the CCJ. Frankly, at present, the funding of the CCJ poses a problem for that regional high court as it is quite cost ly, this being of particular note dur ing these economically gloomy times. By contrast, the Privy Council is rel atively cheap and all the countries using this appellate court share costs. Furthermore, if more countries including the Bahamaswere to adopt the CCJ as its final appellate court, will the judges be chosen on merit or quota? And if so, would this leave some jurisdictions out? In his book, ‘An introduction to law and legal systems of the Com monwealth of the Bahamas”, Dr Dexter Johnson asserts that: “The Privy Council does not compromise our sovereignty in the manner that a regional court might do since the latter comes with the shadow of a political union hanging over it. The regionalists in the Bahamas might wish to merge us into a region al, political and economic entity which would be subject to the central final court of this political unit, the Caribbean Court of Justice. Regional and local politics would dictate the appointments to this court.” Before joining the CCJ, Guyana had already established a precedent by using its Court of Appeal as its final court. Like New Zealand (2003 expected that in the Bahamas there will be an eventual abolition of appeals to an overseer court, in this instance, the Privy Council. In establishing the present Court of Appeal (COA constitution states that “there shall be a Court of Appeal for the Bahamas which shall have such juris diction and powers as may be con ferred upon it by this constitution or any other law.” In order to estab lish the COA as our final appellate body, the scope of the court must be broadened, even though it is presently the final local court on issues that may fall outside of the jurisdictional purview of the JCPC. The Bahamas needs to change its approach to jurisprudence, as lower court magistrates should be elected and the use of a local final appellate court should foster greater interpretation of the law in a manner suitable to the people. However, while an indigenous appellate court is desirable, espe cially as it is also familiar with local lifestyles/customs, our population size may hamper its establishment as questions will arise about the possibility of a fair trial, the threat thata judge could be openly partisan to someone coming before him/her, politically biased, incompetent and/or crooked. All must be done to ensure that this court is insulated and that these pitfalls must be avoided. Moreover, there is a need for an independent legal commission! Bahamian court decisions have in the past been praised by Privy Coun cil jurists for being erudite and correct. Our eventual delinking with the Privy Council will signal our thrust towards building a nation without limitations, signal a move towards real constitutional reform and enhance judicial creativity. The notion that we can govern ourselves but are not capable of judging ourselves is a non sequitur that is simply illogical! Bahamians are so emotive and ecstatic about our independence and sovereignty particularly around July 10 every year when throngs of Bahamians are brandishing flags, shirts and other related parapher naliabut the reality is that unless we engage in major constitutional reform and seriously modify our legal system, our sovereignty in some respects is merely theoretical. The relevance of the law in local circumstances is best achieved by locals, not by regional or far distant courts whose Law Lords’ thinking is not superior to that of the most ethical and scrupulous Bahamian jurists. I WOULD like to wish the greatest mom, the one queen in this world my grandmother Lenora Gibson of Bunches, Long Island a happy birthday! Tomorrow, my grandmother, who raised me and is affectionately called “mammy”, will celebrate her 77th birthday. My grandmother and grandfa ther (Edward Gibson backbone, the pillars I rely on in good times and times of distress. Happy birthday mammy, I wish you continued good health and I love you both! FROM page 11 Happy birthday Grandma! The notion we can govern – but not judge – ourselves is illogical! THEADRIANGIBSONCOLUMN Police death probe ‘botched’ murder. And they now have the backing of retired Detective Sergeant Nathaniel Santine III, who happened upon the family’s plight by reading our website Tribune242.com last week. After reviewing the family’s evidence, he criticised the police for allowing vital DNA evidence, including clothing and hair samples, to go missing; and for failing to impound the vehicle in which the body was found and comb it for forensic evidence and fingerprints. “Incompetence played a role in what looks like a botched investigation. This is not a petty crime where the consequences are minimal, this crime resulted in a death and beyond the capture of the perpetrators, the investigators failed to secure evidence to protect the rights of the victim,” Det Santine said. He said the authorities need to explain why the investigation was carried out in such an unprofessional manner, and punish those responsible. The detective noted a number of holes in the police’s theory that Mr Ferguson died while driving alone as a result of his head colliding with a utility pole. The official version of events suggests he died while sitting on the driver’s side, but the 40-year veteran, who spent his career investigating crimes in King’s County, the Bronx, Staten Island and New Jersey, said the blood and glass evidence make this impossible. “It is obvious that the blood on the floor of the vehicle was not from a victim of an accident; but instead is from a person bleeding and being laid or slumped on that portion of the vehicle. “The velocity of the blood also created a pattern that trickled onto the driver’s side. The carpet of the floor after being sampled should have been removed to reveal the settling pattern of the blood on the metal floor and shift gears. “The glass evidence also cannot be explained away. It is impossibleb y the law of physics for a traffic a ccident to occur, smashing a side g lass and leaving broken glass under the victim – who was said to be sitting on top of the glass and not having any on his person, including fragments in his wound. “If a collision is violent enough to cause a fatal injury, the wound must be explained. This has not been done, and the body would not be found in an upright position; but instead thrown from the vehicle or tossed within the cab of the vehicle. According to Det Santine, there is “more than enough evidence” in the family’s photos of the crime scene to suggest that an in-depth investigation should have been ordered. “It is obvious that proper protocol was not followed in investigating this matter. It appears as if the responding officers in their haste to categorise a traffic accident, missed or ignored some key steps. This level of incompetence as it r elates to inefficient police investig ations should not go unrecognised or unpunished. The responsible officers and their superiors should be held accountable,” he said. Detective Santine is from a law enforcement family spanning several generations. His grandfather, father and two brothers are all law enforcement officers. He worked for more than 25 years in major crimes, including crime analysis, community and problemoriented policing, beat/manpower allocation, crime trend analysis, traffic enforcement and analysis and risk-focused prevention/ juvenile recreation. He has a BA in criminal justice and Sociology from Columbia University in New York and now spends his spare time actively following the investigation of cold cases in his county. Read the full text of Detective S antine’s findings on Page 3 of t oday’s INSIGHT. Retired Detective Sergeant Nathaniel Santine III F ROM page one Govt employees may be relocated to hotel tower the arrangement with Baha Mar to accomodate the workers, which is “not yet a done deal” but “under serious consideration”, could last for “upwards of six months”. Potential site, hotel tower “J”, is one of two of five of the Wyndham Nassau Resort’s five towers which have been closed to the public for eight months, awaiting demolition as Baha Mar moves ahead with its plans to re-develop the Cable Beach strip. Another possible site to put the ministry staff is the Teachers and Salaried Workers Cooperative Credit Union on East Street, although it appears the hotel is the favoured location. However, Mr Bethel noted that the Government has been informed by Baha Mar that they have an “aggres sive schedule” to meet in terms of their own development prospects, meaning that the building will have to be vacant and ready for demolition sometime next year. Robert Sands, senior vice president of external affairs for Baha Mar said: “We have been approached by the Government and we’re trying to cooperate and assist the Ministry of Education and Youth in this venture. “We have some space that can meet their short term needs and we’re trying to match our space with those needs in shortest possible time period.” The Government recently received copies of floor plans of the vacant tower and is now seeking to determine whether it would suitably accomodate t he temporary relocation of the two m inistries’ offices and staff. Mr Bethel anticipates that “no less than 100 rooms” would probably be needed to house them. Neither Mr Bethel or Mr Sands would say yesterday how much it isl ikely to cost the government to rent t he space, and Mr Bethel would not conjecture as to the cost to the govenrment to fix the problems at the Thompson Boulevard building or to physically move its operations to the hotel tower. However, Mr Sands said the hotel a ccomodations are “certainly not gratis (free rently the disused tower does not presently have the information technology or telecommunications facilities that the ministries would require. Asked whether the Government had budgeted for the costs involved in moving two ministries and fixing the mould problem, Mr Bethel said “the government has the capacity to respond to many challenges.” “It’s a question at the end of the day of reordering priorities,” he added, noting that when it is no longer using the NIB building it can use some of the funds which currently go t owards paying rent there to pay Baha M ar. Mr Bethel also emphasised that medical professionals say the mould is not a threat to the health of workers unless they have “some other condition which makes them more suscep-t ible.” This is really more to do with com fort of the staff and their self-perception in terms of how they feel coming into a building that does have chal lenges that building on Thompson Boulevard has. “I think it reflects the concern and r esponsibleness of government to seek to make the situation as comfortable as possible for the working Bahamian. “We’re looking at floor plans right now to detemrine availability of rooms and sizes and whether all or part of operations of ministry can be comfort accomodated there. “We’ll make some determinations early this week to make recommendations to the Prime Minister or requests in terms of him being Minister with responsibility for the public service dealing with rentals.” F ROM page one Man, 21, shot outside his home contradictory information regarding the Bozene Town shooting and more details will be released today. The man shot in Chipping ham, who has not yet been identified by police, was in front of his house when he was approached by a man known to him carrying a gun, police say. Several shots were fired resulting in the victim being wounded numerous times on various parts of his body. The gunman then fled. Anyone with any information should call police as a matter of urgency on 911, 919 or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Body found on Rose Island cause of his death. Anyone with any information which may assist police investigations should call police on 911, 919, or call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 Man on $80,000 cocaine charge thought to have a street value of around $80,000. Airport police were called when the drugs were found at around 6am on Saturday and a man was arrested. He is expected to be arraigned in Magistrate’s Court today. F ROM page one FROM page one FROM page one John T ravolta trial set to resume today called by the prosecution in the case. Her testimony fol lows that of Mr Travolta on Wednesday, and West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe on Friday. Mr Wilchcombe appeared in court walking with the aid of a stick after his foot was seriously injured in a freak truck accident. He testified that former PLP senator Pleasant Bridge water told him she had a client who had a document that could be harmful to the Travoltas. After viewing the document he called the Tra volta family’s doctor and an attorney for the star, he said. Mr Wilchcombe also admitted that Bridgewater had never told him that her client was seeking to extract money from Mr Travolta. Attorney for John Travolta, Michael Ossi, testified on Friday that he spoke with Mr Wilchcombe by telephone around 5.30pm on January 12. Following that conversation he phone Michael McDermott, another attorney for the Travoltas. Mr Ossi also told the court that on Saturday, January 17, he had a meeting with attorneys Allyson Maynard Gibson, Damian Gomez, Michael McDermott, Howard Butler and Michael Hamilton at the firm of Gibson and Co. Mr McDermott is expected to testify this week as well as Senator Maynard Gibson. It is also expected Mr Travolta will be recalled to the stand. Superstar Mr Travolta told the court last week how he and others made efforts to save the life of his 16-yearold son Jett after he suffered a seizure in Grand Bahama on December 29 last year. Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne are accused of attempting to extort $25 mil lion from Mr Travolta by means of threats. Bridgewater is also accused of abetment to extort. The case resumes today. CARL BETHEL TRAVOLTA FAMILY attorney Michael Ossi outside court. FROM page one US ACTOR John Travolta, left, and wife Kelly Preston leave the court building iast week.

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Pineapple Air Wild c ats are clicking on all cylinders and that is creating havoc in their quest to regain the New Providence Softball A ssociation ladies’ championship crown. The pennant winning Wildc ats posted a 13-9 triumph o ver last year's runners-up Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks on Saturday night atthe Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. With the win, Pineapple Air pushed their front-running record to 15-1, while Proper Care Pool climbed into second, a half-game ahead of defending champi ons Sigma Brackettes at 106. It was the lone game played as the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Commodores failed to show up to play the Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws in the men's opener. With the loss, the Outlaws are mathematically out of the playoff race at 6-13 in seventh place. The Outlaws are still in the hunt in fifth place at 10-12, trailing last year's runners-up Robin Hood Hitmen, who are currently in fourth place at 11-9. Wildcats' manager Jack Davis said his Wildcats are playing like the true champi o ns that they established themselves to be over the years and that is causing a lot of problems for their opponents. "When you look at the team, we are gelling right now," Davis said. "We're just getting ready for the playoffs. So tonight, we tried to use some of the new players. "The idea is to get them in form so that they can step in if we need them when we get to the playoffs. So by the time the playoffs are set, the Wildcats will be ready." Davis said he's confident that whenever the playoffs get started, Pineapple Air will take their game to the next level as they've consistently done so over the years. With ace Mary Edge combe-Sweeting playing first base, Marvelle Miller got the starting nod. She went the distance throwing a six-hitter with a strike out. She also helped her cause with a 2-for-4 night with two runs scored. Sweeting-Edgecombe and shortstop Jeanette Hilton w ere both 1-for-5 with a run batted in. They scored three and two runs respectively. Catcher Donnette Edwards was 1-for-4 with three runs scored. Pineapple Air rebounded from a 5-3 deficit in the top of the third by producing six unearned runs on just one hit to stake their claim to anoth er victory as they opened a 95 lead. They put three more on the scoreboard in the sixth, sparked by Miller's lead off triple and ending with Hilton's run-producing triple. And for insurance, Edwards got a one-out single in the seventh and raced home with their final run on an error. Proper Care Pool managed one last effort for a comeback in the seventh when they marched eight batters to plate. But their effort was thwarted after they left the bases loaded. In the rally, catcher Deb bie McClure reached safely on a two-base fielding error and eventually came home ona wild pitch before shortstop Vonetta Nairn got on with another error and caught a ride home on Jeannine Wallace's RBI single. With two out, Wallace advanced all the way to third, second sacker Raquel Cooper got to second and center fielder Keisha Pratt-Miller was on base before relief pitcher Alex Taylor grounded out to end the game. Shonel Symonette, the starting pitcher, got the loss before she was relieved in the fourth. McClure ended up going 2for-4 with two RBIs and two runs scored. Thela Johnson was also 2-for-4 with a RBI, scoring a run. Left fielder Cleo Symonette was 2-for-4, scoring a run and Raquel C ooper was 2-for-4 with a RBI and a pair of runs scored. C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM W ildcats ‘bite up’ Sharks 13-9 TeamsWLPct.GB Ladies’ Division Pineapple Air Wildcats 15 1 .937 PC Pool Lady Sharks 10 6 .625 5 Sigma Brackettes 9 6 .600 51/2 Bommer G Swingers 4 11 .266 101/2 Queens 1 15 .062 14 Men’s Divisio n Dorcey Park Boyz 21 1 .954 Pricewater Stingrays 17 4 .809 3 C S Truckers 12 7 .63171/2 Robin Hood Hitmen 11 9 .550 9 R Thompson’s Outlaws 10 12 .454 11 Young Breed 7 14 .333 131/2 D Force Commodores 6 13 .315 131/2 Buccaneers 5 15 .250 15 Mighty Mits 3 17 .150 17 Commodores are no show against the Outlaws in men’s opener Softball standings WILDCATS’ third baseman Maryann Fowler makes the tag on Proper Care P ool Lady Sharks’ centerfielder Keisha Miller... WILDCATS ’ Maryann Fowler makes contact with the ball... PROPER Care Pool Lady Sharks’ catcher Debbie McClure reaches safely on base asP ineapple Air Wildcats’ shortstop Jeanette Hilton couldn’t hold onto the ball... F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f WILDCATS’ Marvelle Miller delivers a pitch...

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net JERMAINE ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey’s bid for the World Boxing Council’s International super middleweight title ended with a severe cut over his right eye and now his British Commonwealth title defence could be in jeopardy. On Friday night at the Bell Centre in Montreal, Canada, Mackey was forced to stop fighting 20 seconds into the fifth round of their scheduled 12-round co-main event bout against Adonis ‘Superman’ Stevenson. Back after a year’s absence, Stevenson scored a knockdown at the end of the fourth and he reportedly pounced and pounded away at Mackey at the start of the fifth when referee Adrio Zannoni stepped in and stopped the fight. “Things was going great. I was in the fight, but after I got cut in the fourth round, the referee asked the doctor to take a look at it and he said I have to stop the fight,” Mackey said. “I told the doctor that I didn’t want the fight to stop because I was fighting for a WBC International title and world ranking. I was in the fight.” B ut Mackey said the doc t or warned him that because t he cut was so severe, if it got a ny worse, he would have to s top the fight. “In the fifth round, Adonis came right at me and the referee stepped in and stopped the fight,” Mackey said. “They gave Adonis a 17th ranking in the world, but I knew that could have been me if I didn’t get the cut.” A disappointed Mackey, who took on the fight just before he is due to defend his British Commonwealth title next month, said had he not been cut, he was con vinced that the outcome would have been a lot different. Not only did Mackey have to get some stitches for the cut, but he will also have to sit out the next 45 days before he can get back into the ring to fight again. “I wasn’t focusing on the British Commonwealth title. I was focusing on getting the WBC International title and getting a world ranking,” he said. “I wanted to get the Bahamas closer to getting a world title shot.” After five days he will be allowed to have the stitches removed. Once they are out, Mackey said he intends to get right back in the gym to continue his training for the next opportunity to fight. His trainer Ray Minus Jr, who accompanied Mackey to the fight, said it’s not antici pated that he will be prepared to fight again until December. “He will more than likely be able to defend his British Commonwealth title then,” Minus Jr stressed. “We are addressing that matter now to the Commonwealth Boxing Commission. We are providing them with a new date and hope they will accept it.” Minus Jr, the former British Commonwealth bantamweight champion, said Mackey fought well up until the time that he suffered the cut and was unable to continue. With the win, Stevenson remained undefeated at 13-0 with 10 KOs. Mackey dropped to 18-4 with 14 KOs. The fight was held under the main event bout that saw Montreal’s Jean Pascal successfully defend his WBC’s light heavyweight title witha 10th round technical knockout over Italian Silvio (II Barbaro It was Pascal’s first title defence as he was matched against the No.1 challenger in the 175-pound division. Mackey thanked his spon sors, V8 Splash, Prime Bahamas, Nautilus Water, the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture and his new sponsor Big Shot Sporting Lounge, for the assistance they all rendered in getting him prepared for the fight. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM VINCE FERGUSON MEMORIAL A MEMORIAL service f or the late Vincent Lloyd Ferguson is scheduled to be held 7:30pm Tuesday at Loyola Hall, Gladstone Road. The funeral servicei s set for 2pm Thursday at S t Francis Cathedral. Ferguson, 71, died at his h ome on Wednesday while eating breakfast. He reportedly had a massiveh eart attack. He was suffering from prostate cancer. He left behind his wife Marie and two children, Anne-Marie and Vincent A lex. VOLLEYBALL TOM GRANT R ESULTS T HE annual Tom ‘The B ird’ Grant High School I nvitational High School Volleyball Tournament concluded on Saturday at t he Kendal Isaacs Gymna sium. In the senior girls divis ion, the C C Sweeting C obras knocked off Telios Christian Academy 22-25, 25-20 and 15-9. Mt Carmel defeated the CV Bethel Stingrays 19-17 and 19-17. Telios Christian Acade m y, however, won the senior boys division witha 25-18 and 25-16 decision over C V Bethel. T he tournament served as a prelude to the Government Secondary S chools Sports Associa tion’s 2009 volleyball sea son that is expected to kick o ff 4pm today. T he senior boys and girls will play at the D W Davis and C I GibsonG ymnasiums, while the junior boys and girls will play at the R M Bailey andT om Grant outdoor vol leyball courts. T RACK BSC MEETING THE Baptist Sports Council is scheduled to hold a meeting 7pm Fri day at McDonald’s, T hompson Blvd. The meeting is to discuss the B SC's 2009 Nicola Major track and field meet that has been postponed until Saturday, October 24 at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. The BSC, in the mean time, will take a break on Saturday from its 2009 Olympia Morris-Evans Softball Classic at the Baillou Hills Sports Complex for the funeral service of his brother, Rashad Lewis. Lewis, who assisted the BSC in the concession stand, was killed recently during an attempted rob bery. THE American Swimming Coaches Association (ASCA World Clinic 2009 was held in beautiful Ft Lauderdale September 7-13. I t hosted over 1,000 American and international swim coaches from around the world. Several top coaches from the US and Australia were speakers a t the clinic. The local coaches who attended the clinic were Andy and Nancy Knowles, Geoff Eneas, Mike Stewart, Travano McPhee, Iva Russell, Chikako Christoffersen,M ancer Roberts, Sara Knowles, and Ashley Sands. T his year was unique in that they honoured the nine US Olympic swim coaches who are s till alive. The coaches showed v ideos and shared experiences f rom different Olympic Games o ver the last 50 years. “This year’s clinic comes on t he heels of the Roman Circus that was the World championships a few weeks ago, and wea re all eagerly looking forward t o resolution from FINA on the i ssues relating to the high-tech swimsuits,” said John Leonard, executive director of the ASCA. There was much discussion on the swim suits, including com m ents from the top Australian swim coach Allan Thompson who compared the problem with the suits to the drug problem with the German doping system in the 70’s. T his year’s clinic was also different in that Andy and Nancy Knowles were speakers at the clinic. T hey spoke on the pilot programme of teaching government school children how to swim by u sing the swimming pools from private schools. There was positive feedback and much interestf rom the other coaches. A SCA is an independent pro fessional association based on a central theme of leadership inA merican swimming through education, certification and cooperation. T he swim coaches association plays a leadership role in evalu ating past efforts, present concerns and future planning and inp roposing solutions in both the coaching and swimming commu nities. T he leadership function is provided by synthesizing ideas and information from throughout the swimming community into ac oherent direction for action. Local swim coaches attend World Clinic SPORTS IN BRIEF Severe cut over right eye ends Choo Choo’s bid for WBC title J ERMAINE MACKEY ( shown) was forced to stop fighting 20 seconds into the fifth round of a scheduled 12-round co-main event bout against Adonis ‘Superman’ Stevenson...

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NewExtendedBanking Hours Money Centre @ Robin HoodPersonal Loans Savings Accounts Mortgages Visa Cash Card Western Union Asue TM [ Accepts all banks Visa Cards ]Phone CardsProducts & Services Meet Our Team MonFri9:30am7:00pm Saturdays9:00am5:00pm Pictured form (Left to RightJason Ferguson, Operations Manager Shameca Knowles, Personal Banking Ofcer Michelle Bethel, Branch Manager Clarice Gibson, Operations Representative Julie Nixon, Ambassador & Customer Service Representative By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net I n his first appearance at the Mr Olympia bodybuilding championships, Joel S tubbs was looking f orward to at least cracking t he top 10. But at Saturday’s show at the Orleans Arena & Las V egas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, Stubbs f ailed to make it out of the p reliminary rounds. The Bahamasair pilot, who had switched from playing basketball to weight training and then bodybuilding after he had broken his leg, was unavailable for comment upt o press time last night. But prior to the start of the weekend competition, he noted that he was thrilled to have been among the elite bodyb uilders in the world. Out of the field of 23 com petitors who participated in t he two-day event over the weekend, Stubbs finished tied for the 16th and final spotw ith seven others. The list included Trinidad & Tobago’s Darren Charles. T he others were Americans Troy Alves and Bill Wilmore, Sweden’s Martin Kjellstrom, German Dennis Wolf, Aus tralian Michael Kefalianos and Ahmad Haidar of L ebanon. None of them made it out of the two preliminary rounds after they all accumulated 80 points. Stubbs, who had earned his qualification last month in D allas, Texas, was the first B ahamian to have competed in the most prestigious bodybuilding event in the world. For the third consecutive y ear, Jay Cutler won the title a s he led an American sweep of the top five positions with1 5 points, scoring the lowest points of five in all three rounds. B ranch Warren, who coll ected 46 points, was second, w hile Dexter Jackson got third with 47. Coming in fourth with 54 was Kai Greene and Phil Heath rounded out the top field with5 5. Cutler joined an elite field of multiple winners, including California governor Arnold Schwarzegger, who has seven to his ledger. However, both Lee Haney and Ronnie Colem an have captured eight titles apiece. Dorian Yates is next in line with six. N amed just like the Chicago Bears’ quarter-back, Cutler told the Las Vegas Sun News p aper that he “wants to make history.” “This is all I think about. It’s what I live for. I eat, drink a nd sleep bodybuilding.” Stubbs doesn’t make the cut at Mr Olympia J OEL STUBBS d idn’t make it out of preliminary rounds at Mr Olympia... T o adver tise, call 502-2371 Wildcats ‘bite up’ Sharks 13-9... S ee page 13

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $4.25*Add Hash Browns for $1.25. See stores for details.SIZEDOESMATTERBigHunger.Bigsatisfaction.Bigger Beer Breakfast Sandwich w/ Medium CoeeY OURCHOICEOF CROISSANTAGEL O RENGLISHMUFFINU se the Card... Earn Free Dunkin’Visit www.Dunkinbahamas.com to learn more.C USTOMERLOYALTY CARD * Substitute Ham or Bacon with Sausage for 50. LONDON Britain's Royal Navy said it made a record seizure of c ocaine when a frigate operating off the coast of South America captured drugs with an estimated street value of more than 240 million pounds ($384 million according to A ssociated Press . The Ministry of Defense said the HMS Iron Duke found 5 .5 tons (about 6 U.S. tons lier this month the Royal Navy's largest drug seizure ever. " This surpasses anything we've had and anything the Navy had previously," said Commander Andrew Stacey of the HMS Iron Duke. "It is the largest drugs bust by value,a nd by volume in terms of cocaine." The ministry refused to say exactly where the operation t ook place for security reasons. Suspiciously The Navy launched the operation after one of its helic opters spotted a fishing boat "acting suspiciously" in an area known for drug trafficking, a ministry statement said. Along w ith the U.S. Coast Guard and another British vessel, the HMS Iron Duke intercepted the boat on Sept. 15 and spent the next 24 hours searching for contraband. T hey found more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound of cocaine under concrete in the fishing boat's ballast tanks, t he ministry said. The cocaine's final destination is unknown. Britain's Prince William served a brief tour aboard the HMS Iron Duke last summer. W hile the prince was a crew member, the ship seized cocaine worth an estimated 45 million pounds after an operation northeast of Barbados. Earlier this year, the ship seized drugs worth an estimated 33 million pounds. Royal Navy announces major cocaine seizure UNITEDKINGDOM (AP Photo/Ministry of Defense IN THIS UNDATED IMAGE released by Britain’s Ministry of Defense Sunday, Sept. 27, 2009, a U.S. Coast Guard boarding party approach a fishing boat prior to finding more than 200 26-kilogram (57-pound bales of cocaine. Britain’s Royal Navy said it had made a record seizure of cocaine after a frigate operating off the coast of South America captured drugs with an estimated street value of more than 240 million pounds ($384 million

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor GRAND Bahama Power C ompany’s (GBPC per hour (kWh 12 per cent year-over-yeard uring the 2009 first quarter, the company’s president and chief executive has revealed,c ontinuing a trend that saw a 2 per cent decline in 2008. Writing in the annual report for ICD Utilities, theB ISX-listed holding vehicle that owns a 50 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power C ompany, E. O. Ferrell acknowledged that 2008 “was a difficult year” for the i sland’s monopoly power sup p lier, even with the benefit of a 4.87 per cent rate increase from April onwards. H e added that this rate rise was “negatively offset” by Grand Bahama’s continuede conomic decline, both as a result of the global recession and the continued closure oft he Royal Oasis, “and unseasonably cool weather during the fourth quarter”. Overall, 2008 kWh sales were 2 per cent less than 2 007,” Mr Ferrell wrote. “Unfortunately, that trend is continuing into the first quar-t er 2009, with kWh sales 12 per cent below the same period in 2008. There were, how ever, items of positive growth t hat will be beneficial for years to come.” For the 12 months to D ecember 31, 2008, Grand Bahama Power Company’s net income rose by little over$ 100,000 or 3 per cent, to $ 3.621 million compared to $3.516 million the year before. This was despite a 23.2 per c ent rise in operating revenues, from $94.076 million to $116.036 million, as total operating expenses – includ ing fuel costs, which peaked in July last year – rose by ag reater amount, 24.7 per cent, to $108.752 million comparedt o $87.207 million the year before. As a consequence, net operating income grew by only 6 per cent, to $7.284 mill ion compared to $6.869 million in 2007. While other C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.17 B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B a hamian businesses and h omeowners could have p roperties that are 3050 per cent more energy e fficient by simply getting the initial structure right, the founder of a Bahamas-based cons truction/consulting company has told Tribune Business, thereby reducingf uture alternative energy demand. K ymenski Kemp, founder and presi dent of Caribbean Greensafe, a new l y-formed construction, consulting and d evelopment company, said he had established the firm as “a one-stop s hop” for the supply, design and development of environmentally-friendly b uilding materials, homes and struct ures, both in the Bahamas and, event ually, the Caribbean. M r Kemp, a fully-qualified Bahamian architectural engineer, with more than 20 years’ experience in the Florid a construction industry, told Tribune B usiness that Caribbean Greensafe w as already planning its first Bahamasb ased real estate development, the 24u nit Emerald Breezes Villa development, with pre-sales due to start “within the next month”. If you start with your structure, and m ake it energy efficient, it’s very feas ible to be in the 30-50 per cent [energ y] savings range without going to a lternative energy sources yet and, in some cases, you can even leapfrog that – up to 60-70 per cent,” Mr Kemp told Building structure ‘key’ to 30-50% energy saving By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE upcomingr etirement of the Bahamas’ o wn ‘Baby Boomers’ will h ave “an enormous impact on economic growth andd evelopment” b ecause they f orm 30 per cent of this nation’s workforce, a former minister has warned, while the effects of the global recession on their US counterpartsc ould prove equally troubling. James Smith, former minister of state for finance in the Christie administration, said that while some studies of the US ‘Baby Boom’ generation – t hose born between 1946 and 1 964 – suggested economic growth there could be retard ed through the loss of skills a ssociated with their retirement, the impact on the Bahamas could potentially be e ven greater. The CFAL chairman, addressing a seminar organised by his own investment a dvisory firm, said that while it was estimated that Baby Boomers accounted for 25 per cent of the US labour force, “in the Bahamas that contri bution is even higher”. It represents 30 per cent o f the labour force,” Mr Smith said of the Bahamian ‘Baby Boom’ generation. That is because unemployment in the Bahamas is par ticularly high amongst the young. “The productive labour force are the ones who belong to the Baby Boomers genera t ion. They represent a partic ular set of dynamics.” Mr Smith said that if this g eneration were to retire together, and forced early retirements among older workers were increasingly b ecoming the norm as employers sought to cut costs during the recession, “thev acancies created by the retirees will be filled by the pool of young people. “These people coming in might not have the same skill set as those retiring,” the exminister added, warning that this might have “an enormous impact on economic growth and development”. As for their US counterparts, Mr Smith said the main concern for the Bahamas was the impact the recession had on their wealth levels and, consequently, their spending and travel habits. Surveys sug gested they had spending power of some $3 trillion per year, with a hefty chunk of Baby Boomers’ ‘double whammy’ for the economy Power firm’s sales drop 12% in B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor R EGULATORS have been urged to mandate that Cable Bahamas “provideu nbundled, non-discriminator y access to its network”, rival operators warning that the BISX-listed company mustn ot be allowed to distort mar ket competition again, as it did when it effectively forced five rival Internet Service Providers (ISPs ness to achieve market domi n ation. Responding to the Government’s consultation on access/interconnection issuesi n the Bahamian communicat ions industry, Paul HuttonAshkenny, Systems Resource Group’s (SRGw arned that “it would be unconscionable for URCA to Rivals tell regulator: Stop Cable distorting market competition Bank ‘concern’ on BNP Paribas departure move * Green construction start-up's founder says electric bill reduction from g etting wall, floor and foundation insulation right could reach 60-70% * Firm aims to provide 'one-stop shop' for consulting, design and d elivery of eco-friendly construction, materials and advice * Aiming to start pre-sales on first Bahamas-based real estate d evelopment 'within a month' * Caribbean export eyed as company develops S MITH SEE page 4B S EE page 8B S EE page 6B SEE page 7B * SRG chief calls on new supervisory body toe nsure BISX-listed c ompany provides ' unbundled, nondiscriminatory access' to network to preventr epeat of Internet debacle, which forced five rivals out of business By NEIL HARTNELL Business Editor THE Bahamas Financial Services Board’s (BFSB described BNP Paribas’s decision to quit this jurisdiction by year-end 2010 as “regrettable” given that this nation does “not need any of its blue chip banks” to depart, and expressed concern about the pres sure G-20 nations could be subjecting their head offices to. SEE page 9B

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B y RoyalFidelity Capital M arkets DURING the week, Bahamian investors traded in 10 out of the 24 listed securities, of which none advanced,s ix declined and four r emained unchanged. EQUITY MARKET A total of 196,878 shares changed hands, representing a growth of 131,023 shares comp ared to the previous week's t rading volume of 65,855 shares. AML Foods (AML the volume leader, some 65,500 shares trading, its stockd eclining by $0.08 to close the w eek at $1.07. F ocol Oil Holdings (FCL was the lead decliner, its share price falling by $0.49 to a new 52-week low of $4.50, on a volume of 42,425 shares. Bank of the Bahamas (BOB a new 52-week low of $5.90 on a volume of 42,200 shares t raded. First Caribbean Intern ational Bank (Bahamas ( CIB), too, experienced a new 5 2-week low on a volume of 25,000 shares traded to close the week at $10. B OND MARKET T here were no bonds trade d on the market last week. COMPANY NEWS A ML Foods (AML released its unaudited finan-c ial results for the quarter e nding July 31, 2009. For the quarter, AML reported a net profit of about $1.2 million, compared to $162,000 in the same period last year, ani ncrease of $1.015 million. Gross profit of $7.4 million i ncreased by $1.3 million or 20 per cent quarter-over-quarter. Overall, expenses increased, but due to the sales growth during the period itsi mpact on net profit was not substantial. A ML’s chairman indicated that both sales and gross margin dollars had increased, shrinkage in stores had decreased and liquidity hadi mproved, resulting in a further reduction in the company's bank debt. Total assets and liabilities at July 31, 2009, were $29.5 million and $15 million respectively, compared to $ 30.6 million and $18.3 million at fiscal year-end. First Caribbean International Bank (BahamasCIB r eleased its unaudited financ ial statement for the quarter e nded July 31, 2009. For the quarter, CIB reported net income of $19.4 million compared to $26.7 million for the same period in the prior year, a decline of $7.3 million or 27 per cent. N et interest income of $35.3 m illion declined by $3.3 million or 8.5 per cent quarterover-quarter and, as stated by t he bank’s chairman, this was i nfluenced by the decline in international interest rates, partially offset by higher loanv olumes during the quarter. Loan loss expense in the third quarter was $6.2 million compared to $8.7 million in the 2008 third quarter. However, year-to-date CIB has recorded loan loss expenseso f $20.3 million, compared to $15 million for the same peri-o d in the prior fiscal year. Total assets decreased from $4.2 billion to $3.9 billion, and total liabilities also declined from $3.7 billion to $3.2 bil-l ion from the bank's year-end. However, management indi-c ated that the bank remains well capitalised with a current Tier 1 capital ratio of 17.7 per cent, well in excess of the minimum requirement of 14 perc ent. Dividend Notes Commonwealth Bank (CBL dend of $0.05 per share, p ayable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary shareh olders of record date September 15, 2009. Doctor's Hospital Healthc are Systems (DHS d eclared a dividend of $0.02 p er share, payable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date September 17, 2009. Cable Bahamas (CAB h as declared a dividend of $0.07 per share, payable on S eptember 30, 2009, to all o rdinary shareholders of record date September 15, 2009. Consolidated Water B DRs has declared a dividend of $0.015 per share, payable on November 6, 2009,t o all ordinary shareholders of record date October 1, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Certified Service at a bush mechanic!s price !!! In these economic times, We are here to support your engine!M&E will do the job for you with Caterpillar certified technicians, Caterpillar original parts and will g uarantee the jobs!!! Call us323 5701 (Nassau) 352 5081 (Freeport) Discount applies for truck engines V alid until September 30, 2009Other offers available include: Engine oil analysis Electronic diagnostic Fuel tank cleaning Valve and Injectors adjustment Get a full truck engine service starting at $550 including oil, oil filter, fuel filter and labour. Call us today to schedule your servicing needs. ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r !%* '!$()))!*&*# tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !B *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A “yeoman’s effort” will be needed from all Bahamians and economic sectors if the Bahamas is to overcome the challenges created by the curr ent global recession, the mini ster of state for finance a cknowledging that the downturn had “exposed some of the fundamental weaknesses in our system”. A ddressing a seminar organised by CFAL, the investment advisory firm, Z hivargo Laing conceded that t he Bahamas’ present unemployment rate, estimated at 14 per cent for New Providence and 17 per cent for Grand Bahama, was “high”, a dding that an immediate c hallenge was “job creating e conomic growth” to provide sustainable long-term employ ment. Clearly, it is a challenge to have in excess of 15,000p ersons unemployed, both b ecause of the personal hards hip it brings to them and as it relates to the loss of income and productivity to the n ation,” Mr Laing said. “Cre ating jobs for people today is important. Being able to cre-a te jobs in a sustainable fashion is even more important.” The two main drivers of the Bahamian economy, tourism a nd foreign direct investment, had been heavily impacted by the global recession, and MrL aing said the Government was focused on maintaining a sound fiscal position – deriv ing enough revenue to sustain i tself, and its capacity to maintain debt spending. Arguing that successive a dministrations had generated enough fiscal ‘headr oom’ to a llow the Ingraham government to sustain a burgeon-i ng fiscal d eficit and d ebt s pending i n the short-term, Mr Laing a cknowledged: “If this downt urn endures for a long period of time, it becomes a more s ignificant challenge. The rev e nue shortfall against forecast is more than $30 million b ehind. It will not be sustainable if this situation continues much longer. The greatest vigilance is being paid by us.” A lthough the monetary sector, in the form of foreign e xchange reserves, and the c ommercial banking system were currently stable, Mr Laing said: “We sometimes miss the reality that this crisis h as left thousands of Bahamia ns” unable to meet their regular obligations, such as mortg ages and rent, electricity bills, school fees and medical e xpenses. The Government had expanded social services’ bud get by some $12 million over t he last two budget periods, Mr Laing said, and the extra funding had been much needed. The fact that some 6,000 c ustomers had been disconnected for non-payment by BEC “is just an indication of t he continuing saga of this current economic crisis”. Calling on all Bahamians and stakeholders to work together, the minister added: “Crime has implications fore conomic growth, both now a nd in the future. Citizens, businesses and investors all require an environment deemed to be safe to flourish. There has to be a reduction in the levels of crime wea re experiencing.” M r Laing also identified h uman capital, and the prov ision of after-hours training t o those already employed in t he workforce, as one area for a dvancement. “We need to improve our level of product ivity to ensure we’re putting o ut a world-class product,” he added. D omestic savings needed to be increased, the minister added, plus economic diversification achieved “with existing domestic dominant sect ors and expanded output in other economic sectors. We m ust look for opportunities i n all sectors. “We need to expand our global outreach by putting Bahamian goods and services i nto more markets abroad,” M r Laing said. “We need to make it easier to do business i n this country for everyone by removing bureaucratic i mpediments to the establish ment and conduct of business.” He also argued that the B ahamas needed to formalize trade arrangements with other countries, in order to provide its businesses and e ntrepreneurs with a mechanism of redress to resolve trade disputes. eoman’s effort’ needed to beat recession woes LAING

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t hat going on travel and vacations. He added that in one recent survey, three-quarters of US Baby Boomers spoken to said they had “suffered much loss of wealth” as a result of thep lunge US and global stock markets sustained in late 2008, since most of their investments were linked to this. As a result, the survey found many “had to adjust their lifestyles, making fewerp urchases of big-ticket items and taking fewer vacations”. With the Bahamas receiving about 85 per cent of its visitors from the US, and many of these wealthyr etirees from the Baby Boom generation, the implications f or this nation are obvious. If the losses of wealth by this group translate into a dramatic change in spending behaviour, it could mean a slower economic recovery in the US, and an even slowerr ecovery in the Bahamas if t his most important group of Americans decided to take less vacations,” Mr Smith warned. “The importance of this g roup, and the outlook going forward over the next few y ears, should be of particular concern to the Bahamas. Any change in spending habits will have an impact on the Bahamian economy. “The impact for the B ahamas, if the Baby B oomers change their spendi ng habits, to begin with w ould be a slowdown in economic activity, persistently h igh levels of unemployment and more forced retirements. Businesses would be likely tos ee a slowdown in economic activity this year, and the year after, and be likely to continue downsizing staffing levels.” Many Bahamians forced into early retirement as a result of recession-relatedd ownsizing in the workforce had not prepared for this eventuality, Mr Smith warned, even though it was g enerally agreed that retirees o n average needed 75 per cent of their pre-retirement income to live on. To prepare for their retirement needs, Mr Smith urged Bahamians to develop a Bud-g et matching anticipated i ncome against likely spending. If spending appeared to exceed income, one way to bridge the gap was to stay in the labour force beyond the r etirement age of 65. While early planning was r ecommended, he added: “It’s not a perfect world. Many people are facing day to day challenges, and do not have the time or opportunity to plan. Those persons forced i nto retirement, especially t hose in the Bahamas over the p ast year or so, have been f orced to make adjustments to their lifestyles.” T o cope, the former minis ter suggested that those Bahamians forced unexpect-e dly into early retirement needed to “take a step back” and perform a self-assessment of where they were and where they were going He warned that it “could be a mistake” for Bahamiansf orced into early retirement to dip into any retirement funds they received upon leaving the workforce, e xplaining: “It would be bett er to resist using that money too soon. You’ll regret it later. By going into that account too soon, you’ll be giving up the opportunity of having retirement income and you’rew orse off.” M r Smith also urged forced retirees to maintain their health insurance coverage, warning: “There are fewer events that could devastate a s avings effort than a medical tragedy. We hope it will not h appen to you, but if you’re unemployed really try and keep that coverage up.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas The National Insurance Board (NIB bank deposits.To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form: 1.APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com 2 .Telephone No.: (242 3.Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office T he NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service. A ll information will be treated as strictly confidential. Notice to Vendors Baby Boomers’ ‘double whammy’ for the economy INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays F ROM page 1B

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian economy is unlikely to “hit bottom” until the 2010 first quarter, ani nvestment research analyst has forecast, with business activity and investment levels “not expected to return to2 000 levels for three to four years”. Jamaal Stubbs, a senior investment research analystw ith CFAL, told a seminar organised by the companyt hat economic recovery in the Bahamas would only be seen in the 2010-2011 holiday seas on. We expect the upcoming holiday season to be very s low, very challenging,” he added, with the Bahamian economy unlikely to ‘bottom out’ from the current recess ion until the 2010 first quart er or summer next year. The one potential bright s pot for the economy remained Baha Mar, Mr Stubbs added, which was “hoping to get something started in the second quarter n ext year”. Meanwhile, Lynden Nairn, ColinaImperial InsuranceC ompany’s life division vicepresident, said that while “only a handful of compan ies” in the Bahamas had p ension schemes for their e mployees, many of these had “policies and procedures that were not very meaningful to the long-term interest of thee mployees”. “What does this portend for t he future for the average Bahamian without a pension plan?” he asked. “In the end, t his means an increased burd en on the society. It’s going to affect us in a big way with t axation, and is going to impact our standard of living if certain things do not happen.” M r Nairn said issues such a s portability, whether an employee leaving one comp any could transfer their pension plan earnings to a new employer’s scheme, needed consideration. “There are issues relating t o accounting, transparency, actuarial valuations of a fund, risk, the return on investmenta nd the directors of the pension plan,” Mr Nairn said. “My experience has been that n ot many persons consideri ng employment at a company g ive serious thought to the pension benefits.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas unlikely to ‘hit bottom’ until 2010’s Q1 Baha Mar hoping for 2010 second quarter start T o advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in cir culation, just call 502-2371 today!

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income increased by more than $1 million, both theser ises were offset by an increase in interest expense to $5.154 million, compared to $3.432 million in 2007. G rand Bahama Power C ompany’s long-term debt h ad risen by almost 50 per cent at year-end, growing from $66.288 million to $99.512 million, a development largely due to the $50 m illion bond financing it p laced in May and July 2008 t o raise funds for capital expansion projects and refinance existing debt. Financing T hat financing appeared to reduce the outstanding collective balance on various commercial bank loans from $55.333 million to $38 million at year-end 2008. W hile Grand Bahama Power Company’s results are interesting, of more pressing concern to the island’s residents is likely to be the company’s performance when it comes to service and reliabil-i ty, not to mention the relat ively high cost of electricity. Looking back at 2008, Mr Ferrell acknowledged that the three island-wide blackouts suffered by Grand Bahama Power Company during that year were “totally unacceptable”, and “extensive work isu nderway to prevent future occurrences”, but the same problems have persisted into2 009. The monopoly power producer/supplier has been hit by v ociferous protests from both c onsumers and the business c ommunity, with the latter complaining that Freeport will be unable to continue as a sustainable, long-term manufacturing/industrial sectorw ith the relatively high power r ates companies are forced to endure. Several told Tribune Business that electricity rates on Grand Bahama were four to six times’ higher than else-w here in the world, with some businesses losing valuable equipment to power surges and spikes. The Japanese company, Marubeni, which acquired a majority 55 per cent interesti n Grand Bahama Power C ompany several years ago, subsequently selling 25 per cent to Abu Dhabi power producer Taqa, has come under fire from Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, who criticised its performance to date. M any have come to view Marubeni, and by extension, Taqa, as absentee landlordsi n effect, only concerned about the company’s profits and not its power generation p roblems. There is a school o f thought that Marubeni, w hich acquired its Grand Bahama Power Company stake when it took over Mirant’s Caribbean operations, is only really interest-e d in Jamaica as the biggest m arket, and Freeport is a secondary concern. Investor The only investor to seemingly take a real interest in G rand Bahama Power Comp any is Emera, the Canadian p ower producer which acquired its 25 per cent stake in the firm by purchasing Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent ICD Utilitiess take in September 2008. G rand Bahama Power Company’s seven-strong Board includes three representatives from Emera, with the other four acting on behalf of Marubeni and Taqa. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.03AML Foods Limited1.081.07-0.0121,7400.1270.0008.40.00% 1 1.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9 .305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0310.030.001.4060.2507.12.49% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1 5.875.870.000.4190.30014.05.11% 3 .851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.343.430.090.1110.05230.91.52% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.3820.0805.43.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.6310.35015.83.50% 5.534.50Focol (S 4.504.500.000.3320.15013.63.33% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9 .025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.009.98J. S. Johnson9.989.980.000.9520.64010.56.41% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelityBankNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 FRIDAY,25SEPTEMBER2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.84 | CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -209.52 | YTD % -12.24BISX LISTEDDEBTSECURITIES (BondstradeonaPercentagePricingbases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7% Prime + 1.75% 7% BISXLISTED& TRADEDSECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM| TELEPHONE:242-323-2330|FACSIMILE:242-323-23201 9 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.49051.4119CFAL Money Market Fund1.49053.965.49 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775FidelityInternationalInvestmentFund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FGFinancialPreferredIncomeFund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93BISXALLSHAREINDEX -19Dec02=1,000.00 YIELD -last12monthdividendsdividedbyclosingprice 52wk-Hi -Highestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Bid$ -BuyingpriceofColinaandFidelity 52wk-Low -Lowestclosingpriceinlast52weeks Ask $ -SellingpriceofColinaandfidelity PreviousClose -Previousday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume LastPrice -Lasttradedover-the-counterprice Today'sClose -Currentday'sweightedpricefordailyvolume WeeklyVol. -Tradingvolumeofthepriorweek Change -Changeinclosingpricefromdaytoday EPS$ -Acompany'sreportedearningspershareforthelast12mths DailyVol. -Numberoftotalsharestradedtoday NAV -NetAssetValue DIV$ -Dividendspersharepaidinthelast12months N/M -NotMeaningful P/E -Closingpricedividedbythelast12monthearnings FINDEX -TheFidelityBahamasStockIndex.January1,1994=100 (S)-4-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate8/8/2007 (S1)-3-for-1StockSplit-EffectiveDate7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09FidelityOver-The-CounterSecurities ColinaOver-The-CounterSecurities BISX ListedMutualFunds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TOTRADECALL:COLINA242-502-7010|ROYALFIDELITY242-356-7764|FGCAPITALMARKETS242-396-4000|COLONIAL242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 18-Sep-09 31-Aug-09MARKETTERMS COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009IN THE SUPREME COURTCLE/qui/No.00289C ommon Law and Equity Division IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959 AND IN THE MATTER OF ALLTHOSE Three (3 of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a p ortion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas. AND IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper NOTICE OF PETITION Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day of September, A.D. 2009. The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of: ALLTHOSE Three (3 acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certicate Of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act. Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be inspected during normal ofce hours at the following places: (aThe Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas. (bThe Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. (cThe Administrators ofce at George Town, Exuma. Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 after the nal publication of these presents le at the Registry of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form veried by an Afdavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 after the nal publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to such claim. DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009 CHARLES MACKEY & CO. Chambers BSB House West Bay Street Nassau, Bahamas Attorney for the Petitioner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f ' LUHFWRU Power firs sales drop 12% in F ROM page 1B

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not learn from recent history in developing and implementing future policy. The mistakes of the past must notbe allowed to repeat thems elves”. The SRG president, whose company operates as IndiGo Networks, said that if the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA to meet its competition man-d ate, “then Cable Bahamas as the Significant Market Power (SMP operator must be required to provide unbundled, non-discriminatory access to its network”. Recalling recent history, Mr H utton-Ashkenny recalled how Cable Bahamas was i ssued with an interim ISP licence on March 3, 2000, allowing it to introduce Inter-n et services via the cable telev ision network infrastructure it had already developed. This licence, the SRG president said, mandated that Cable Bahamas establish an interconnection policy forr ival ISPs to access its cable television network. The main terms, he added, were that Cable Bahamas had to provide interconnection at “any technically feasible point” for rival ISPs uponr equest; that it “provided interconnection services on non-discriminatory and objec-t ive terms, and of a quality no less favourable” than the BISX-listed utility provided f or its own service; and that i nterconnection charges be “orientated to their cost of provision and sufficientlyu nbundled” to that rival ISPs did not have to pay for com ponents they did not require. “It was mandated that C able Bahamas not add any new Internet customers or any new Internet accounts until t he terms and rates for inter connection services, and the t echnical standards and specifications for interconnection,h ad been approved by the regulator,” Mr HuttonAshkenny said. However, he alleged that this was never enforced by thef ormer regulator, the Public Utilities Commission (PUCM r Hutton-Ashkenny said: “At the time, five privatelyheld ISPs, each of them offering dial-up Internet access, indicated to the PUC their concern that failure by CableB ahamas to implement [this] would inevitably lead to competitive distortion of the Internet sector. “Those ISPs, amongst them a subsidiary of SRG, doing business as Bahamas On-Line, engaged a consultant from theU nited States to advise on how access to Cable Bahamas’ network could meet the above principles and be made fairly available.” T he five ISPs submitted t heir formal proposal to the P UC on May 12, 2000, but the then-regulator rejected the industry’s view and “insteada ccepted an alternative put forward by Cable Bahamas t hat, in the view of the ISPs a nd their consultant, was commercially unworkable and failed to meet the principles of interconnection enshrined in Cable Bahamas’ licence. “The ISPs’ prediction for the industry came to pass,”M r Hutton-Ashkenny said. “SRG is not aware of a single ISP that was able to effaciously connect to, or utilize, Cable Bahamas’ network. Not o ne of the ISPs in question was able to remain in business, and the Internet market today is dominated by Cable Bahamas.” With Cable Bahamas hav i ng been “able to leverage its [cable TV] monopoly into an entirely new market” via the Internet, and now seeking to u se its fibre-optic infrastruct ure network to enter the fixed-line voice and cellulart elecoms industries, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny urged URCA to guard against the company abusing its SMP status. Given that Cable Bahamas w as given a 15-year monopoly in return for constructinga nd building a $240 million fibre-optic cableTV network, the SRG president said: “Some might argue that the Bahamian people helped pay for construction of that net-w ork” through foregoing competition and the tax breaks the BISX-listed utility was granted that allowed it to escape customs duties on network components. He urged the regulator not to allow Cable Bahamas “toe nter any other markets until such time as the cable TV network access remedies have been fully implemented and proven”. Moreover, given the p otential for an SMP operator t o delay to its competitive advantage, SRG considers that a reasonable time peri-o d, perhaps a further 180 days, should be required to e lapse between satisfactory d emonstration of implementation and the SMP operator being permitted to enter any new market,” Mr HuttonAshkenny urged. “Such a mechanism would accommodate circumstancesw here a new entrant might need time to implement equipment and make ready to compete in the SMP operator’s market, whilst readying i tself for competition by the SMP operator in its own market.” Cable Bahamas’ private placement memorandum for its recent $40 million prefer e nce share issue, in which the company said it had 75 per cent and 45 per cent penetration of the Bahamian cable T V and Internet market r espectively, with its network passing 94 per cent of allh omes in this nation had, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said, demonstrated in the company’s own words why it should deserve SMP status. Given the change in licensing that will, at some point,p ermit Cable Bahamas’ leverage of their infrastructure in fixed voice services, it is only reasonable that unbundling of their infrastructure by others should at least permit the pro-v ision of Internet Protocol TV so that some level of TV competition can be contemplated,” Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said. “Failure to do so will simply mean that Cable Bahamas gains a new market with nop ractical improvement in choice for the consumer in their core TV market. “It seems reasonable, therefore, that Cable Bahamas w ould need to demonstrate c onvincingly that their netw ork is ready for additional providers to offer IPTV and expected multiple HD videoa ccess across their existing hybrid fibre coaxial network.” M r Hutton-Ashkenny also q uestioned whether Freeport would be treated differently, when it came to the unbundling of Cable Bahamas’ network, given that the latter had claimed its licence to operate in the sec o nd city was “separate from that elsewhere in the Bahamas”. The SRG president urged that Cable Bahamas be r equired “to become part of an Internet exchange for the Bahamas, through which all Bahamian ISPs could exchange local Internet traffic. “Currently, Internet traffic f rom one ISP in the Bahamas to another traverses through the United States, which is time consuming, expensive a nd a waste of resources.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Rivals tell regulator: Stop Cable distorting market competition FROM page 1B

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T ribune Business. With energy efficiency, y ou’re spending a lot less m oney to keep the interior c ool. You’re going to need a l ot less solar energy to keep t hat space cool; the amount o f energy used in proportion t o the size of the home.” These energy savings could be achieved, he explained, by f ocusing on a property’s structure – its foundations, walls and roof – as “your insulation is the key”. Apart from being safe and structurally sound,Mr Kemp explained that a building’s structure – its exteriorwas what formed the bar-rier between its interior, and those inside, and the environment outside. Closed-cell polyurethane foam provided the best heat insulation possible, the Caribbean Greensafe president added, in addition to providing walls with a more rigid structure. By establishing these “radiant barriers” between a property’s exteri-o r and interior, Mr Kemp said: If you can cut the heat out, i t’s going to reflect directly in y our electricity bill.” C aribbean Greensafe’s s howroom, based in the Cable B each shopping mall that used t o be the former City Markets s upermarket, has already been open for four weeks to provide Bahamians “with information on building materials a nd design concepts where you can save money”. While the dollar value of savings its designs, materials and constructions could deliver depended on the nature of the project “and how green you want to go”, Mr Kemp said it “was very feasible” that the company could build a comparable home in the same price range as a non-energy efficient home. The savings would then accrue rapidlyo ver time from a lower energy b ill and footprint. A home built with energy e fficient methods is going to a ppraise higher in five to 10 y ears because people want t hose qualities in the home. T hey will appraise at a higher r ate than previously-built homes,” Mr Kemp told Tribune Business. He added that Caribbean G reensafe’s Emerald Breeze Villas development, located in Sea Breeze off Joe Farrington Road, would employ design plans and practices “to make it affordable to the buyer, not just upfront but on a continual basis”. Initial price points for the three-bed, two bath units would start at around $215,000, and Mr Kemp said: “We plan to commence pre-s ales within the next month. We’re definitely going to be at a price point that will be very attractive to buyers looking for a private residence. They will be very affordable. “If all goes according to plan, and we get the pre-sales, we will start looking at thea pprovals on the permits, so it [ the construction start] won’t b e any time before January.” M r Kemp added that C aribbean Greensafe was also l ooking to supply turnkey h omes, offering potential c lients a “complete package”, i ncluding a variety of floor plans, plus energy-efficient plumbing, tiling and even wall trims. P rior to starting construction at Emerald Breezes Villas, Mr Kemp told Tribune Business that Caribbean Greensafe planned to make an impact on the market, “whether it be a promotion we put on where we showcase what these products can do and how much energy and money you can save. “The goal of Caribbean Greensafe is that, yes, we ares ituated in the Bahamas, but we ae looking to expand. We want to provide Bahamians and people looking to build in the Bahamas with the information, the contacts and the products to improve their designs. There are a lot of designs and materials outt here, but they’re not really k nown I think there’s a growing d emand, and I think it will c ontinue to grow as people e xplore themselves, especially w ith the cost of energy i ncreasing. Bahamians are v ery conscious of what is out there, and I just want to give them the information to make it more affordable, more h ealthy and more green. “It will become the industry standard. Florida revised its Building Code this year to make new homes 15 per cent more efficient than homes built in 2001. It’s putting the industry standard where you have to become more energy efficient.” A former Queen’s College (QC Bahamas (COBK emp worked in posts rangi ng from senior construction m anager to development/proj ect manager during more than two decades in the Florid a construction industry, developing gated communities featuring several thousand h omes. He told Tribune Business that it was while working ast he former development mana ger for the Delray Beach r egeneration project that he became interested in constructing homes that were not o nly affordable on the initial purchase, but also for the l ong-term. Having long wanted to own his own construction firm, Mr Kemp said he decided to bring the concepts he had learned in the US back to the Bahamas, having started work on the Caribbean Greensafe project with his late father. “It is a challenge to start a development company at this time, but there is still an opportunity. People see the value that it’s going to bring,a nd there’s going to be a lot m ore people looking to go g reen,” Mr Kemp said. The interest so far has b een good. A lot of people h ave not known we’re here b ut the demand is growing. A rchitects have called, come i n and sent clients here. They’re very interested. People building houses want to go green and see the advant ages accruing over time. “It’s been very encouraging. Even in the downturn, with how it is now, when the market turns around I want to be established and have numerous projects up and running.” Among the products being offered by Caribbean Greensafe are wall systems; different types of roof insulation; resin products that provide thes ame exotic look at less cost a nd no maintenance, and a void cutting down trees; vari ous floor and fencing methods; retro-fitted energy syst ems; and, eventually, alternative energy forms such as solar and wind. M r Kemp added that Caribbean Greensafe could also supply solar tubular lightsw hich, when fitted in wareh ouses and food stores, would n ever cost the property owners any money once the initial installation costs were p aid. The company, Mr Kemp s aid, also planned to export its systems and products to other Caribbean countries, thereby earning a valuable source of foreign exchange for the Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM E NERGY, from 1B

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Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, s peaking to Tribune Business about BNP Paribas’s Friday announcement of its decision to exit the Bahamas, a move set to impact about 40 staff and a client book of business likely to consist of several bil-l ion dollars, said: “This is a c oncern. Clearly, European banks are sensitive, and G-20 memb er countries that have banks headquartered here are sensitive, to all that is going on. This is a regrettable situation for the Bahamas.” M r Gomez said the Bahamian international finan c ial services industry was h opeful that the Government’s stated goal of meeting the G-20/OECD minimum of 12 T ax Information Exchange Agreements (TIEAs year-end would “be a plus” for the jurisdiction’s standing, a mong both global head offices and current/prospective clients, and that it would “have no more departures”. “The Bahamas as a jurisd iction does not need any of its banks, particularly is blue chip banks, to leave this jurisdiction,” Mr Gomez told Tribune Business. While some might be compelled to leave,t he BFSB chairman said he knew of no other institutions, s uch as BNP Paribas, who faced a timeline by which any decision to pull-out or not m ight be taken, but urged t hose that did to make their c oncerns known so they could b e addressed. Although Mr Gomez did n ot specifically address it, Tri bune Business understands that the main concern is that BNP Paribas’s decision to exit c ould prompt others to do the same, sparking a ‘rolling snowball’ or chain reaction. BNP Paribas, though, could be a special case, in so mucht hat it is owned directly by the French government. Under President Nikolas Sarkozy, the French have been one of the champions of the G-20/OECD drive forg reater tax transparency and information exchange, and t he indications are that direct political pressure was imposed on BNP Paribas to withdraw f rom the Bahamas. T ribune Business had prev iously warned that Bahamasb ased banks and trust companies were likely to come u nder great pressure, via their head offices, to leave this nation, particularly thosew hose global headquarters w as located in Europeanb ased G-20/OECD members such as France, Germany and the UK. Mr Gomez said the Bahamas “must take notice of the aggressive posture of the French”, adding that he was concerned about the i mpact on both BNP Paribas’s Bahamas-based workforce and companies that supplied the institution with services and products. “BNP par-t icipated in the local economy in a very positive way,” he said. To date, the Bahamas has signed Tax Information Exchange Agreements( TIEAs) with Monaco and San Marino, in addition to the o ne it agreed with the US, taking its total to three. Zhivargo Laing, minister of s tate for finance, last week d efended the Bahamas’ c hoice of TIEA partners to d ate in the face of suggestions that such deals with fellow i nternational financial centres would mean less than ones with OECD members. H e argued that the fact the O ECD had already accounte d for the TIEA with Monaco, and bumped the Bahamas’ total up to two, showed the agreement “must mean something”. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Employment Opportunity Sales RepresentativeWe are seeking to hire talented, assertive, charismatic and outgoing individuals with an aptitude for sales and a desire to succeed. Skills and Requirements xExcellent oral and written communication skills xProficient in Microsoft Office applications xA bility to work in a fast paced environmentxStrong mathematic capabilities xA bility to multitask xPossess excellent planning, organizational and i mplementation skills xExcellent interpersonal skillsxA team player with the ability to work independently xProfessional appearance xA desire and passion to get ahead Minimum Requirements xAssociate degree in marketing or business administrationxSales experience desired but not essential Paid training and benefits program available APPLY VIA EMAIL TO: salesrepresentativeneeded@gmail.com Bank ‘concer on BNP Paribas departure move F ROM page 1B

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 The stories behind the news B y PACO NUEZ T ribune News Editor W hat happened to Preston Ferguson on a dark, lonelys tretch of road on Great Exuma s hould serve as a dire warning to everyone who lives in or visits this country. Nearly two months have passed since his body was found under b izarre and gruesome circumstances, yet it is not how he met his end which should cause alarm, but ratherw hat followed. Violence and criminality exist everywhere and no one can guaran t ee they will never become a victim. Yet we all expect that if a crime cannot be prevented, the authorities will do their utmost to ensure that justice i s served in the aftermath. Preston's family certainly felt this way until that fateful night in A ugust, but now say they can't imag ine putting faith in an officer of the law ever again. A nd what their perseverance has e xposed about the astonishing incompetence which can take place during a routine police investigations hould make us all pause and ask ourselves what manner of country is this in which we live. T he family has no doubt that Pre s ton met his death at the hands of a murderer and feel they have a good idea who is responsible, but thep olice have insisted – in the face of seeming mounting evidence to the contrary – that he died as a resulto f a freak accident. The police's version of events is that Preston, driving alone, either stuck his head out of the vehicle to s pit, or that he ended up slumped out the window after falling asleep. At the same time, the company truck he was driving swerved several feet to the left, just far enough and at precisely the right moment to make glancing contact with a utility pole before turning back onto the road and somehow coming to a stop. The impact was only forceful enough to create shallow scrape marks along the door and shatter the driver's side window, leaving the rest of the vehicle unaffected. Unfortunately for Preston, his head happened to be out the window at the time, and therefore struck the pole full-on, a blow which fractured his skull and killed him. Upon hearing this explanation, my first reaction was that any selfrespecting officer would be embarrassed to admit supporting so farfetched a scenario, and that the police must therefore have been forced by the facts to adopt it. On the contrary, the family say, all the evidence points in a very dif ferent direction, and according to them there is nothing to support the police's official stance beyond the highly questionable guesswork of the first few officers on the scene. Preston's relatives, already offended by the officers' careless ness, nonchalance and seeming lack of professionalism, were shocked to hear one of them speculating loudly only moments after arriving that, “Yeah man, yeah man, this suspi cious. Somethin’ ain’t right here", only to change his mind and decide," No man, see, you know what I think? I think he was putting his head out the window to spit and hit his head on the lamp post." A colleague then volunteered, "Maybe what happened is, he fell asleep and hung his head out the window." This, it seems, was the extent of the police investigation, as their theory has not evolved beyond this point. A retired New York City Police Department detective who happened upon the story on tribune242.com became enraged after reading the official version of the investigation, and decided to offer his expertise on how to handle a crime scene (see story on INSIGHT, page 3). He says responding officers must be alert, observant, and display rigorous attention to detail. They must document, photograph and retain every possible piece of evidence, and do their utmost to preserve the crime scene from contamination. They must also observe and question everyone on the scene, as well as anyone who might have the slightest possible connection to the case. This must all be done before any conclu sions can be drawn by senior offi cers overseeing the case. Compare this to the performance of the police in Preston's case. Preston's family say the officers failed to question anyone on the scene aside from a single relative, disregarding even the two persons who first reported the discovery of the body. T hey did not secure the scene around the truck – or even the truck itself, which rather than being preserved for forensic testing, was returned to Preston's employer the very same day. Likewise, the body was dispatched to the hospital with out being tested in any way, and without so much as a police escort. The clothes Preston was wearing at the time were not tested for DNA or other samples, nor confiscated by the officers. As far as the taking of detailed photographs, they may well have done this – before forgetting their camera on the seat of the truck. The photos which accompany this arti cle were provided by the family. This wholesale failure to conform with even basic crime scene protocol as outlined by the NYPD detective may begin to explain the startling logical inconsistencies in the police's accident theory. For example, the police version posits that the window was shattered when the truck scraped along the utility pole. This would obviously require the window to be up at the time. How would this have been possible if the theory also requires Preston to hang his head out of the win dow, either because he was sleep ing or in an attempt to spit? If the window was down, how did the glass shards jump from within the door and scatter across the cabin of the truck? Then again, why would he have been driving with the window down if he had the air-conditioning on, as it was when the body wasf ound? The spitting attempt theory is doubly ridiculous, as it would mean the wound in the middle of Preston's forehead must have been incurred when he drove his own face into a pole while perfectly alert, in an attempt to spit directly into the wind. The sleep theory is not much better, as it would entail the car veering off the road at just the right moment for Preston's head to strike the pole – avoiding the long stretches of bush on either side; a near miraculous feat of timing and coincidence. Supposing either version is true, how is it that he managed to be found sitting upright, facing forward in the driver's seat after absorbing a blow to the head violent enough to crack his skull? The momentum would surely have flung him to the other side of the truck, or perhaps left his head slumped out the win dow, but gently reclining against the headrest? It would seem to defy the laws of physics. How, for that matter, did the truck manage to find its way back onto the road after Preston fractured his skull, drive along for 20 or so yards, and come to a stop? And supposing that window did by some miracle shatter while Pre s ton had his head out of the car, how i s it that no glass came to be found on his body, or anywhere on the dri v er's side other than on the seat below his buttocks? How did a pile of glass manage to get underneath him in the first place? T hen there is the question of blood. The police version fails to explain how it is possible that blood came to be splattered across the passenger's side of the truck, even reaching around to the far side of the protuberant middle console and t he space between the seat and the far door, but there is no trace of it to be found on the driver's side, andl ittle on Preston himself. No blood was found on the steering wheel, the windshield, the seat, and none one ither the inside or outside of the d river's side door. While we are at it, we might as well ask why no glass or blood wasf ound at the base of the utility pole, all of it managing to collect at the spot down the road where the care ventually came to a stop. The death certificate does not rule out the police's accident theory, but that is about the most definite thing which can be said about it. The document notes that he died of a "head injury with fracture of skull bone" and that this is "not inconsistent with the history of death due to a road traffic accident." The language does not suggest the pathologists came up with the traffic accident theory, but rather that the police supplied it, and the doctors acknowledged that the wound did not rule it out. In other words, the autopsy found that he was struck in the head, and died, and acknowledges that during traffic accidents, it is possible for one to be struck in the head, and die. Not exactly an earth shattering analysis, but then those conducting the examination were probably only presented with the body and a pos sible cause of death. I wonder what they would have said had they seen the evidence detailed above. The family immediately contacted the morgue to request a more detailed examination, but there has been no reply. Can any of us trust that justice will be done? C M Y K C M Y KLOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNETO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PRESTON FERGUSON’S FAMILY: ‘WE KNOWThe family of Preston Ferguson say the p olice’s version of how he died is completely at odds with the evidence. They have posed a number of questions to senior officers, including:UnansweredQuestions IF Preston died because his exposed head struck this utility pole, how did he come to b e driving several feet off the r oad in the first place? IF this was the case, how d id he manage to steer back on to the road after suffering massive head trauma? IF his was out of the driver’s window at the time, should he not have struck the side of his head, rather than the middle of his forehead? DOES the police’s version not suggest he was lookingd irectly at the utility pole as it a pproached his face? IF the police’s version is c orrect, would it not mean P reston was attempting to spit directly into the wind? IF his body was found sitting on top of a pile of smashed glass in the seat with no glass w hatsoever on top of his body. I F Preston died while sitting upright in the driver’s seat, why is there no blood in this area, whereas the passenger’s side of the gearbox, console and floor covered in it? IF Preston died as a result of major trauma caused by his head striking a utility pole, how w as it that he was found sitting in the driver’s seat, with his head against the head-rest? How did the impact force necessary to create his massive head injury not propel any part of his body across into the passenger’s side? IF this is the scuff marks the impact of Preston’s heada gainst the utility pole – causi ng massive trauma – how is there no trace of blood on thep ole, the ground, or either side of the driver’s door? IF the window was smashed a s a result of the vehicle striking the poll, why is there no smashed glass at the base of t he pole, but covers the ground where the vehicle came to rest 2 0 yards down the road? IF Preston had his head out of the window at the time of the a ccident, the window must have been down. If so, how did it shatter upon impact, filling t he interior with glass? NASSAUANDBAHAMAISLANDSLEADINGNEWSPAPER C M Y K C M Y KVolume: 105 No.250TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 W EATHERPARTLY SUNNY, T -STORM POSSIBLEH IGH 89F LOW 80F The TribuneANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITIONTRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISHwww.tribune242.com Victim ofmurder?VICTIM OFTRAGICACCIDENT? ORWAS PRESTON FERGUSON A ... PULLING T OGETHER: ( sitting) Henriette Smith and Eloise Moxey; (standing son, Olga Fordes, Deidre Gray, Dale Ferguson Joseph and Merv Johnson. ACCUSED: Former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater pictured on her way to court. TRAVOLTA TRIAL:DAYONE FORMER PARAMEDIC Tarino Lightbourne going to court yesterday.POLICENAME SLAINBURGERKING MANAGERPAGE FIVEMANACCUSEDOF WENDYBULLARD MURDERPAGE FIVEFIREDEATHSTOBETREATEDASHOMICIDEPAGE SIXINMATESETTOFACEMURDERCHARGE TODAYPAGE SEVEN INSIDEn PRESTONFERGUSON PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/ Tribune Staff By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net A JURY was selected yesterday in the case of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former paramedic Tarino Lightbourne, who are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from Hollywood actor John Travolta. Six women and three men were selected to hear evidence in the case, which will take place before Senior Justice Anita Allen. The prosecution is expected to open its case this morning. Defendants plead not guilty to John Travolta extortion chargesSEE page fiveBy NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net DISTRAUGHT family members of Preston Ferguson say that they are certain he was murdered and blame police for mishandling the investigation into his death. Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police initially suspected that he had run off the road and hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the accident was “staged.” FULLSTORYON PAGES TWOAND THREE FERGUSON FAMILY members (shown SEE page 5C THE pile of glass on the front seat of Preston Ferguson’s car. His body was found sitting on the glass but none was on his person...

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Exuma Unsolved Murder Capital? We have cruised the Bahamas (including The Exumas) many times over the years and have always had a great time there the weather, the food, and the people. However, we are now hesitant to make another trip if crimes like these are allowed to go unchecked and unpunished. In the US, rookie officers see promotions for cracking clear cut cases like this. From all accounts in the article and from what people close to the island are saying, this was NO traffic accident.To say that is an insult to the family and officials should be embarrassed to co-sign such foolishness. I will be forwarding this article to as many of my yachting buddies and fellow travellers to make them aware of how crimes are "handled" in that community and to give them an overall heads up. The Bahamas has always been good to us, but I don’t want to windup the victim of murder and have my family told that I fell overboard (bound and gagged in an "accident" or some other crap. Get it together officials! Bill, Rhode Island, NY Bloodstain Analysis Conviction This family needs some closure and if their own local police agency is not going to provide that for them, then those who are concerned and have been touched by violent crime will have to assist. http://christmanforensics.com/c s_reconstruction.php My family and I have been helped by Dan and his team in 2006 after a similar situation where our son returned from fighting in Iraq and his wife and her lover hatched a plan of murder for hire; they are both now serving life sentences for his murder. The blood evidence was able to convict them. I pray you find justice in your pursuits. Roger Stamos, Baltimore, M God is able Kudos to The Tribune and their staff for having the balls to tackle a ground breaking news story like this one. It has now come to seeking JUSTICE in the media; God bless you and the family. Looking at some of the posts; I want to thank the person who wrote the prayer for the family. I hope they contin ue to pray that prayer into the atmosphere. God is able to do all things. Jerome M I hope someone at The Tribune presses Tommy Turnquest and Reginald Ferguson for an update in this matter! The eyes of the world are upon us and the Emperor is as naked as a newborn....I am ashamed as a Bahamian! Here we are with some of the best and brightest minds, and the actions of a few lazy police make us out to be no more than a bunch of backward fishing vil lagers....Thanks a lot Tommy/Reginald! Ava SHAME!!! When will the elected and appointed officials get it? People will no longer simply take their feeble reports as gospel when they can think for themselves....and in most cases, solve m atters better than them any way! Was this a case of not wanting to interrupt their boiled fish breakfast with REAL Police work? Reginald/Tommy make them get off their butts and police....they are Police Officers, right?! Mag Rolle Keep on pushing Wait a minute; the centre for the blind and a group of kindergarten students could have done a better investiga tion into this crime and produced better results; going on evidence alone and proper protocol. Keep pushing for justice. George Munroe Horrified As a winter resident and someone who enjoys living in Exuma, it was hard to hear about this tragedy, and more unnerving to actually read the story in the newspaper; and my God the pictures tell the entire story. My only contact with the police in Exuma occurred some years ago when a local guyr emoved an inflated tube/boat from our docking area and Lt. Cunningham dealt with the incident; which ended amicably. They were quick to respond. If only my small voice could appeal to the police to bring such a resolution to this terrible tragedy. Prayers for the family from Boston. John and Rebecca Spread the word Flood your e-mail contacts to get the proper attention to this and any other matters where criminal acts are seemingly going unpunished. This is ridiculous! I am a college student in Raleigh, NC and will surely be sending this link to everyone I know . . . Bahamian and American. Good luck Ferguson Family in your fight for justice! D Jones The fire has been lit! A fire has been lit in this here Bahamas today and it is unfortunate that it took the loss of life and subsequent mishandling of a case to bring it all to the forefront. Bahamians, by and large, are fed up with crime a nd lawlessness....even more so, we are fed up with the lackluster performance of the RBPF and the Minister of National Security. It is true that you can’t please all of the people ALL of the time but how can this many Bahamians be sick and tired of burying loved ones prematurely at the hands of murderers while they strut around like they are invincible?! Everyone in this praying nation needs to let the government know that we are sick and tired of this mess. They may choose to ignore our cries now, but come next election, let your voices be heard loud and clear when they come around pandering for votes! Wear every memorial t-shirt, display every obituary, shed every tear for those you lost and speak with ONE VOICE! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! D Roberts Preston Ferguson I have just finished reading the article concerning Preston Ferguson’s death. It appears from his family’s evidence andf rom the articles submitted from the readers that this was not an accident! I live in Baltimore, Maryland and I have been visiting the Bahamas for the past 25 years. I have had the pleasure of meeting a few of Preston’s family members. This is a sad situation. When I come to the Bahamas I would want to feel safe; how can I feel safe believing that the Bahamas police force did not do the right thing by their own? Preston didn’t deserve to die this way. If someone gave our police officers some information about a murder here in Baltimore, Maryland, you bet someone would have been arrested by now! Our police department asks daily for information to be given to them and a person can give that infor mation anonymously. They don’t always have to give their names! Sloppy, Sloppy work on behalf of the police force. Step up and do your job. I admire the Ferguson Family for not giving up the fight to prove that this was no accident. The persons responsible should be brought to justice and held accountable for Preston’s murd er. Thank you for letting me voice my opinion about this unfortunate incident. Doll Follow UP Needed! I trust that the reporters at The Tribune (and surely the reporter responsible for this story) will be reviewing the comments here to shed further light on what appears to be a clear case of mishandling and mislabelling an actual crime. When you guys meet with Reginald Ferguson for the fol low up, ask him if he is aware (as many Exumians already seem to be) that certain people seem to have more than a casu al involvement in the overall matter. When will those people be picked up? Why haven’t they even been questioned? I am new to tribune242.com but was drawn to this story and the comments posted from near and far . . . Too much is going on in this country behind the scenes and under the cover of darkness! How many more must die before the powers that be take a serious approach toc rime? Antoinette Murder in Exuma Oooohhhh my goodness!! I C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Tourists told to avoid Bahamas over Ferguson investigation controversy Readers left more than 100 comments about story on tribune242.com SEE page 8C murder C M Y K C M Y KLOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THAT HIS DEATH WAS NOT AN ACCIDENT IF Preston died of a massive head injury suffered while driving alone, how did his vehicle come to a stop about 20 yards down the road from the scene of the accident? IF Preston did indeed die sitting upright in the driver’s seat of the vehicle, why can blood clearly be seen pouring into the driver’s side of the vehicle from the passenger’s side?VICTIM OF?By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.netDISTRAUGHT family members of Preston Ferguson say that they are certain he was murdered and b lame police for mishandling the i nvestigation into his death.Ferguson, 38, a resident of Exuma and father of one, was found dead in a truck on the side of the road in the area of Ocean Addition East, near the Forest, Exuma, on the morning of August 2. Police initially suspected that he had run off the road and hit a utility pole, however, his family believes the accident was “staged.” They claim they know of an individual with a motive to kill Preston. According to his sister, Eloise Moxey, it is believed that her brother was having an affair with a married woman. “He promised my brother he was going to kill him,” Mrs Moxey alleged. According to Preston’s family, the minimal damage to the vehicle he was found in was not consistent with his massive injury and that the impact could not have caused his death. According to Mr Ferguson’s family, police had raised the theory that Mr Ferguson had perhaps stuck his head out of the truck’s window to spit and hit his head on the lamp pole. The second theory was that Mr Ferguson had fallen asleep and his head fell out of the window. Merv Johnson who had been with his uncle earlier that night said that Mr Ferguson was found sitting upright in the driver’s seat of the truck with his head slumped back. “That was the only visible mark of any kind of trauma to him. There wasn’t any visible damage to the truck. The front of the truck was intact, the windshield was intact, the only damage was a scrape to the driver’s side of the truck and they were saying that’s what killed him,” Mr Johnson said. The family also highlighted the fact that most of the blood was found on the passenger side. “The only thing broken on the truck is the side mirror, not one single drop of blood on the driver’s side,” Mrs Moxey said. She also noted that no broken glass was found on her brother’s body but was found mainly on the passenger seat. “The window was broken out. It’s obvious that the glass was up and was hit from the outside to look like an accident because most of the glass is on the passenger side. He was sitting on glass. “How could he sit on glass if the glass was broken on impact?” Mrs Ferguson wanted to know. She also noted that the air conditioning was left on which further suggested that the windows had been up. The family claims that their evidence suggests that Mr Ferguson was the victim of murder. “The police are deeming this an accident, but we know that this is a murder and we have evidence to substantiate our claim that it was a murder,” Mrs Moxey alleged. According to Mr Ferguson’s family, the deceased was last seen leaving Rolleville with his female friend. “She picked him up as she was leaving Rolleville and he drove with her supposedly back to his place. He said he was going home; he had no reason to come back out,” Mr Ferguson’s nephew said. Mrs Moxey said that she has met with Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson regarding the matter and was recently informed that an investigation is continuing and that “experts are conducting a re-enactment of the accident.” Mrs Moxey said she also met with National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest. Commissioner Ferguson told The Tribune , “We are conducting a thorough investigation into this matter. I am aware of the suspicions as to how he may have died. We have been in touch with his family and will have a meeting very soon to inform them of our findings.” “Someone drove that vehicle to where they staged t his and drove it up against the lamp post. What concerns us is the way this was handled by police,” Mrs Moxey said. “They have gotten rid of every single piece of evidence. They sent the truck back to Grand Isles because my brother worked in the landscaping department at Grand Isles. That was a company truck. That’s the reason he didn’t go out in the truck that night.” M r Ferguson’s family is also wondering whatever became of his clothing and hair samples or DNA that could be extracted from them. They say that the individual they suspect has not as yet been questioned by police. They also say that the woman who was the last person to be seen with him has not been questioned either. The family says that they have been awaiting the results of a toxicology report for about a month. “He left to go home that night. He left with a certain lady who was supposed to be taking him home. The next morning he is dead and who shows up at the door? This lady with her husband to say that he is dead,” Mrs Moxey said. Mr Ferguson who was employed at Grand Isle Villas as a Landscaping Supervisor was the youngest of 12 children. He was laid to rest August 21. He is survived by his son, Preston Jr. P reston Ferguson P RESTON FERGUSON

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B y NATHANIEL SANTINE III Ret. New York Police detective THE cause, manner, and m echanism of a death is i mportant to the family, as well as to law enforcement and the courts, often for different reasons, yet equally important. The proper identif ication of an accidental death v s a homicide will profoundly a ffect a family and in some cases, it has the potential to affect an entire community. But, it is often the first r esponder's first impressions and interpretation of the evidence or information at a s cene which can direct the init ial course of an investigation. Successful investigations often depend on the initial actions taken by patrol officers responding to any given scene. T he scene must be secured a nd cause is never determined o r categorised at first sight, but only after careful investi gations have been completed; t he responding officer's duties in the preliminary investiga-t ion may simply be to arrive at t he scene, observe enough to k now that assistance from investigators is required, and protect the scene so that evid ence is not destroyed, changed or removed. W hat should have been done? Responding officers at any c rime scene should: Secure the scene Cordon off the area Take witness statements Document the scene (both written and photographic) Collect evidence – bag e verything Where a body is found, photograph the entire area; m easure and document posi tioning; photograph wounds Once the body has been r emoved, take photographs of t he surrounding area Photograph shrubs, trees, tyre marks; the vehicle orr oom Photograph clothing Photograph any sight of blood (pool, spatter, droplets, smears, et cetera) When a body is found in a v ehicle, once the body is removed, seal the vehicle andt ransport it on plastic tarp on a flatbed towing truck to preserve evidence. Record in writing what ever is being said or done at the scene; be observant Convey findings to superior officers Dispatch a team to inform next of kin Any item can and may cons titute physical evidence; therefore, it is imperative that nothing be touched or moveda t the scene before the arrival o f the investigators. Officers handling the evidence must document its location, appear a nce, condition, and any other feature that might affect the investigation, ensuring that itd oes not lose its evidentiary value. Good basic crime scene procedures are to be followed, especially when the cause ofd eath is not abundantly clear. The investigation starts at the point where the body is o riginally found. The prima ry crime scene is where most of the evidence will ber etrieved. In scenes that a ppear staged, there may be two or more crime scenes in addition to the location wheret he body is found. They include: Where the body was m oved from Where the actual assault leading to death took place Where any physical or trace evidence connected with the crime is discovered The vehicle used to transport the body to where it is eventually found (tyre tracks, o il leaks, should be pho tographed). A point of forced entry or where the vehicle was cut off by another vehicle The escape route Suspect clothing The police are usually called to this location by the personw ho discovers the body, a witn ess to the crime, in isolated cases the victim, or even a potential suspect. What was done wrong in the Preston Ferguson c ase from an investigators viewpoint? The article claims that all D NA evidence, including clothing and hair samples, were missing; this should nev e r happen. Barring a collision between two or more vehicles an obvious accident – the e vidence should remain intact a nd available. The vehicle should have b een sealed and impounded for the forensic team to comb for any evidence. Obviously,t his was not done and the a uthorities need to explain w hy. Proper procedures should have been taken to determine the number of prints found in the vehicle, and to isolatet hose which should not have been in the vehicle. The blood evidence is actu a lly what is going to win this case. It is obvious that the blood on the floor of the vehi cle was not from a victim of an accident, but instead is conclusive with a person bleedi ng and being laid or slumped o n that portion of the vehicle. The velocity of the blood also created a pattern that trickled onto the driver’s side. The carpet of the floor after being sampled should have beenr emoved to reveal the settling p attern of the blood on the metal floor and gear shift. The glass evidence cannot be explained away; it is impossible by the law of physics fora traffic accident to occur, s mashing a side glass and findi ng broken glass under the vict im, who was said to be sitting o n top of the glass and not h aving any on his person, i ncluding fragments in his w ound. If a collision is violent e nough to cause a fatal injury, t he wound must be explained. This has not been done. Furt hermore, the body would not be found in an upright position, but instead would be found thrown from the vehicle or tossed within the cab of the v ehicle. The positioning of the dent o n the driver’s door seems to b e the result of the vehicle being struck from the side. It is impossible for an accident to occur on the side, unless the v ehicle was hit by an oncomi ng force from the side of impact. T here was more than enough evidence from the p hotos alone to suggest that an in-depth investigation should have been ordered fol lowing the preliminary scene i nvestigation. It is obvious that proper protocol was not fol lowed in investigating this matter. It appears as if the r esponding officers, in their haste to categorise a traffic accident, missed or ignored some key steps. Incompetence played a role i n what looks like a botched i nvestigation. This is not a petty crime where the consequences are minimal; this crime resulted in a death and beyond the failure to capture of the perpetrators, the inves-t igators failed to secure evid ence to protect the rights of the victim. This is a level of incompetence as it relates to inefficient police investigations should not go unrecognised or unpun-i shed; the responsible officers a nd their superiors should be h eld accountable. Obviously a patrol officer cannot close a n investigation, it goes b eyond that officer. T he justice system of a country, if proven to be out o f sync or imbalanced enough t o allow this kind of action to go unchecked, will only serve t o erode the moral fiber of a community. Indeed, it will spread to affect an entire nation and destroy the rule of law established to cultivate a s tandard for all citizens, residents and visitors to be law a biding, and when they knowi ng and willingly fail to conform, be made aware of the relevant punishment. Clearly, the perpetrators of s uch crimes are comfortable i n their actions and are confident that law enforcement a gencies/officers are not equipped or knowledgeable e nough to detect their actions. If this is allowed to go unchecked, it leaves an open door for hurting families tor efuse the help of crisis advocates and resort to vigilantism as their means of seeing justice carried out. This will erode a s ociety like the plague. This is a serious matter. C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 3C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM GE Electronic Room Style+ #AEQ08 #AEQ10 #AEQ12A You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Patrol officers should be held accountable for incompetence Questions IF Preston died because his exposed head struck this utili ty pole, how did he come to be driving several feet off ther oad in the first place? IF this was the case, how did he manage to steer back on to the road after suffering massive head trauma? IF his was out of the driver’s window at the time, should he not have struck the side of his head, rather than the middle of his fore-h ead? DOES the police’s version not suggest he was looking directly at the utility pole as it approached his face? IF the police’s version is correct, would it not meanP reston was attempting to spit directly into the wind? IF his body was found sitting on top of a pile of smashed glass in the seat with no glass whatsoever on top of his body. I F Preston died while sitting upright in the driver’s seat, why is there no blood in this area, whereas the passenger’s side of the gearbox, console and floor covered in it? IF Preston died as a result of major trauma caused by his head striking a utility pole, how w as it that he was found sitting in the driver’s seat, with his head against the head-rest? How d id the impact force necessary to create his massive head injury not propel any part of his b ody across into the passenger’s side? IF this is the scuff marks the i mpact of Preston’s head against the utility pole – causing massive trauma – how is there no trace of blood on the pole, the ground, or either side of the driver’s door? IF the window was smashed as a result of the vehicle striking the poll, why is there no smashed glass at the base of the pole, but covers the ground where the vehicle came to rest 20 yards down the road? IF Preston had his head out of the window at the time of the accident, the window must have been down. If so, how did it shatter upon impact, filling the interior with glass? THE BLOOD covers the passenger seat of the car but none was found on the driver’s side where t he body was found... I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009, PAGE 5C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM C ompared with the police v ersion, the family's answer t o the puzzle is startlingly simple: “When he got home, people were waiting for him, they accosted him and killed him, and drove that truck outt here, then brushed it against t he lamp pole and smashed t he window to make it look like it was an accident." They believe Preston was struck in the head with a blunt object while sitting on the pas-s enger's side, or that his a lready lifeless body was transported to the scene in the passenger's seat. After purposely grazing t he truck against the pole and s mashing the window, the culprits moved Preston's body to the driver's side, to make its eem as if he was driving alone. T his theory fits neatly with a ll the available evidence – the glass beneath body on the driver's seat, the pools of blood on the passenger's side, the vehicle having been found stopped. What is more, the family claim they know ofs omeone who would have had both motive and opportunity that night. The victim and his cousin, Merv Johnson who was visiting from Nassau, went to R olleville that evening for a n ight on the town. The men took Mr John son's rented car, as Preston r arely used his company vehicle (the truck his body was later found in) after work h ours. It was left parked in f ront of his house. After being out for a few hours, Preston ran into a w oman who the family believes he may have been having an affair with, and toldh is cousin that she would take h im home. Driving past the front of Preston's house some timel ater, Mr Johnson noticed the work truck was gone, a fact t hat he found unusual. T he next morning, the w oman whom Preston went home with and her husband announced that Preston had been found dead in his truck. His relatives believe any s ound investigation of the c ase must begin with the q uestioning of these two persons, as they may be able to shed a great deal of light on the matter. Two months on, this has yet to be done, theys ay. T he family are not alone in their rejection of the police's version of events. The first story about the case to a ppear on tribune242.com < http://tribune242.com> attracted a flood of angry comments from concernedB ahamians, residents, tourists and foreign law enforcemento fficers. Before last week, the h ighest number of comments in response to any one article on the two-month-old website was 37. The story of Preston Ferguson has attracted 115 and counting. The day it was published, the siteb oasted a record 76,000 hits. At this stage, no one can say with complete certainty that the family's version is accurate, or whether the person they suspect is guilty in a ny way – simply because a p roper investigation has yet to be conducted. At the same time, a great many peopleb elieve the family's theory to be far more plausible than the official one and consider the p olice investigation to be a lmost criminally negligent. Personally, I would wager there is more probability of b eing struck by lightning twice on successive days at the very instant of winningt he lottery – both times – than d ying in the way the police claim Preston Ferguson did. The authorities, however, s eem to be sticking to their guns. They claim the investig ation is ongoing, but rather t han trying to recover evid ence which has slipped through their fingers – for example the blood-spattered truck – they have instead promised the family a re-e nactment of the "accident" c onducted by "experts", w hich they presumably hope will demonstrate their theory to be correct. I, for one, would love to be present for this. The spe-c ial effects needed to reprod uce the spitting-out-of-aclosed-window trick alone would make the trip to Exuma worth the trouble. T he relatives of Preston F erguson are no doubt becoming something of a nuisance to the Police Force andt he Ministry of National Security. But I have a feeling theyw ill not let up until certain q uestions are answered to their satisfaction. We in the press know that what they are going through has been endured in silence by countless others in this country – but to paraphrase one com-m entator, it seems they messed with the wrong family this time. At the end of the day, those who love and miss this young man are not seeking s pecial treatment, but rather s omething which is supposed to be basic: that those man dated and paid to defend the i nterests of justice – from Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest down t o the lowliest rookie constab le – to do their job to the best of their ability. Another commentator sugg ested that perhaps the case has been so mishandled that it is time for the prime ministert o step in. The Tribune unders tands Mr Ingraham has been made aware of the facts of the case, and we will be seekingc omment from his office in the coming days. Can any of us trust that justice will be done? F ROM page 1C

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C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Re: The Abacos Megan, Read with interest your article in Insight” on The Abacos (Insight, S ept. 21, 2009). I thoroughly enjoyed the article and would wish Government would hold a Town Meeting on development in The Abacos. I should firstly explain that I wear two hats – I am a co-owner of IBDR eiss the largest Bahamian owned C ivil and Environmental Consultancy in the country – my second role is that I am vice president of Lindroth Development Company on the Schooner Bay project with r esponsibilities for engineering and environment. I n talking with a number of realtors they echo what you had in the your article – they do not need more sales inventory – some say there is enough for the next 15 years! Then why is Government giving consideration to the Valencia proposal with hotels and golf courses on the border of a National Park and home to then ow endemic Abaco Parrot already threatened by feral cats. I personally feel that South Abaco should be preserved for Eco Tours that would also allow consideration for land banking the southe rn pine forests for carbon sequest ering, something for Government to consider for Grand Bahama as well. The thought of it let the forests stand idle and make money on the carbon credit – maybe too easy! Abaco is almost recession proof –t he addition of farming on previo usly human disturbed areas to engage a number of the illegal aliens and unemployed sounds great but to introduce the mega projects sounds like disaster other than Atlantis what else large scale hass urvived? I am a great proponent of ecolodges – the birders would come and this would also put the small lodges within the reaches of a lot more Bahamians. T hanks for the article – I hope that this and future articles will lend t o discussion of this very important topic. Keith A. Bishop Readers have their say... FEEDBACK INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT M ONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009The stories behind the news By MEGAN REYNOLDSWhat sets the i slands of the Bahamas apart from other tourist destina t ions in the Caribbean is that in this splendid chain of islands, each has its o wn character. Abaco, the third largest and fastest-growing economy in the country, has so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a somewhat i ndependent economy sustained by a steady stream of boaters and second homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its chain of cays in search of somewhere to escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even in ar ecession. But both Abaconians and second homeowners who find peace in Abaco’s pristine beaches, clear watersa nd expanse of creeks that lace Great Abaco’s coastline, fear the A baco they know is slipping away, and that they have little power to p revent it. Abaco is at a point where further development is imminent, and there a re groups who want to have a say in the direction it steers towards the f uture, but they feel their concerns are falling on deaf ears. T hey were insulted to learn about the development of a Bunker C fuel p ower plant in Wilson City in a public meeting on September 10, over a m onth after construction had already begun. T he Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC not to inform the Abaco public earl ier, as nearly 1,000 concerned residents attended the meeting requeste d by local conservationist group Friends of the Environment because o f the high level of public concern. Not all who attended the meeti ng were against the project, but there were many who had questions t hey wanted to be answered. They knew the power plant was p lanned for Snake Cay, an environmentally sensitive area on Great Abaco’s east coast, and opposition f ormed, as people feared the destructive impact it could have on t he environment and the health of the community. H ence when government and BEC decided to plough ahead with t he plans for a $105 million, 48 mw power plant burning Bunker C ( HFO) fuel in a new site at Wilson City an area intrinsically linked tot he environmentally sensitive Snake Cay by a complex network of blue holes plans were kept quiet. B EC chairman Fred Gottlieb confirmed the project had been agreed b y the Christie administration in 2005, and signed off by the Ingrah am government in December 2007, but as plans moved forward, Abac o’s permanent and part-time residents were left in the dark. D undas Town resident and mother of two Leazona Bethel-RichardT T T T h h h h e e e e A A A A b b b b a a a a c c c c o o o o s s s s . . . . . . . . . . . . Another piece of paradise destined for destruction? D EVELOPMENT in the Abacos has raised local fears that the land both Abaconians and visitors hold dear is doomed to become another big city destined for destruction. Insight explores the problems and the progress Abaco is facing, and the alternatives... E LBOW CAY ABACO , the third largest and f astest-growing economy in the country, has so far retained its natural beauty by virtue of a somewhat independent economy sustained by a steady stream of boaters and second homeowners who flee to Great Abaco and its chain of cays in search of somewhere to escape, unwind, and get away from it all. Even in a recession... S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e T HE FRONT PAGE o f the September 21, 2009 edition of I NSIGHT . .. have been following this story on a daily basis. Thanks to The Tribune for this opportunity to openly express yourself. If this family has name, rank, and serial numbers on these alleged murderers, what are they waiting for? Please, I am pleading to the Prime Minister to get proper seasoned officers to investigate this. Not anyone who has family in Exuma because it will get swept under the carpet. Family, you are brave and I encourage you to keep up the good fight. Even though it won't bring your baby brother back, I want to see whoever has done this walking across Bank Lane. I don't know you all, but I love you and feel your pain. KEEP FIGHTING!! – Joel Murder or accident??? I have read the story and all of the comments surrounding Preston Ferguson's death. I live in Baltimore, Maryland and even though I had never met Preston, I knew one of his sis ters Diane Ferguson and two of his brothers Lynn (Maxwell son and Freddie Ferguson. As all of t he comments from the readers have indicated, no one deserves to die like this young man or anyone for that matter. It appears as though the police department have not done a good job of gathering all of the facts surrounding this case. My first question is how was it that the female friend (who allegedly was the last one to see him alive) and her husband show up at the family residence to deliver some bad news? Here in the states, if someone has some information surrounding a death which appears suspicious, those individuals would have been questioned. By now, someone would have been charged with this murder! and, yes, I said murder! This was no accident! Hopefully this comment and all of the comments written so far will be enough to bring these individuals to justice. Thank you for letting me voice my opinion. – Anne Williams Why the Delay? When will the prime suspects be detained for interrogation? Seems pretty open and shut to me....and apparently anyone who either lives in Exuma or is close to the case except t he backward police! – A Moss SAD.... Anyone who has ever lost a loved one and had the police drag their feet or issue some lame excuse of a police report needs to unite and call for more accountability! From the Minister to the Commissioner to the rank and file officers...they are all public servants! I think they forget this...and as you are appointed, you can also be removed from office. Shame, shame, shame in Bahamaland! – Mary Higgins The Fergusons in forest I don't know Preston’s parents or older siblings but Preston and I went to school together. He could not have done something to be killed. He always had a smile and was willing to give you his last. We know who killed Preston and knowing his family and how good they are to people, my grandmother says that Lord will repay them 100 fold. Please lock up those who killed him. – Rachel Mishandled or covered up? It happens often enough here. With crime in this country if not mishandled or (more correctly will adopt either a dopey or severe look then give the lame assurance that they'll get the guy that did it...and they never do. I no longer trust the police t o do their jobs and look forward to the day when that trust can be restored. P Lucia E. Broughton People in Exuma are not going to rest until these murderers are brought to justice. This was a decent young man from a decent family here in Exuma. And I know that his family will not stop until justice is served. We are praying for you all, especially his sis ters who I went to school with. Pamela F ROM page 2C


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