Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

Uproar at hotel

Factions clash
over legitimacy
of nominees

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A RUCKUS kicked off at
Worker’s House yesterday
morning as nominations
were submitted for the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union’s
(BHCAWU) upcoming
elections.

Supporters and members
of Kirk Wilson’s Deliver-
ance Team were pitted
against those behind Nicole
Martin’s A Team as
BHCAWU president Roy
Colebrooke, general secre-
tary Leo Douglas and Direc-
tor of Labour Harcourt
Brown discussed the legiti-
macy of three nominees
behind closed doors.

Mr Douglas and Mr Cole-
brooke refused to accept
nominations from Tyrone
Beneby, Philippa Dixon and
Raymond Wright running

for the Deliverance Team
as they said the nominees
are not rightful members of
the union according to the
Constitution.

When the Director of
Labour overseeing the
process said Team Deliver-
ance members could still be
nominated, Mr Colebrooke
told him he was ‘sent to
supervise’ and ‘did not have
the power to change the
constitution’, an observer
said.

As they held discussions
in private, commotion
unfolded in the hallway.

An observer — said:
“There’s ruckus inside the
hall, people are screaming
and carrying on, shouting
obscenities, and people from
different sides are threaten-
ing each other.

“The Redemption team,
headed by Sidney Rolle, is

SEE page seven

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Insurance contributions.




JONES COMMUNICATION CEO Wendall Jones is pictured outside of court yesterday.
Mr Jones and several other prominent Bahamian businessmen were in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to give an update on their efforts to pay off years of delinquent National

e SEE STORY ON PAGE THREE

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for
PMH halfway to $300,000 goal

THE ‘Breathe Easy’ cam-
paign - aimed at purchasing
incubators and ventilators
for critically ill newborns at
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) - has managed to
raise more than half of its
intended goal of $300,000.

To date, the campaign has
raised $155,000, and organ-
isers have already ordered
three ventilators as well as
one incubator.

$155,000 has been raised for
incubators and ventilators

Following their successful
drive to raise money for
much needed dialysis units
for the PMH last year, a
group of local companies
recently launched the
‘Breathe Easy’ campaign to
buy four ventilators and six

incubators for the hospital’s
Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit.

The organisers include
Tribune Media, the
Builder's Mall, Tile King,

SEE page seven

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WAKE UP!

Try our
Big Breakfast Sandwich




Paul Moss
formally tells
Christie of his
Upcoming bit
for leadership

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net






























CLAIMING he feels
prompted by ‘God
Himself’ to offer at this
time, PLP
chief Paul
Moss has
formally
advised
party leader
Perry
Christie of
his inten-
tions to
challenge
him at the EMSs
upcoming
national convention .
In his letter addressed
to Mr Christie, and a
second to the party’s
Parliamentary caucus,
Mr Moss said that
although his decision
pits himself directly
against Mr Christie, this
move was not a chal-
lenge of the leader’s
abilities or a statement
of any shortcoming.
“In fact, the truth is







SEE page seven

Pastor of
demolished
church is
‘weighing his

9

legal options

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE pastor whose
church was demolished by
Arawak Homes after a
Supreme Court judgment
said he is weighing his legal
options.

Reverend Eugene Bast-
ian, of Canaan Baptist
Church, believes his church
had the legal right to tear
down the structure - in
accordance with the ruling
handed down nearly two
weeks ago - and said he was
shocked that Arawak
Homes razed the church the
morning after the judgment
was made.

He added that the build-
ing was bulldozed before he

SEE page seven

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



International Cultural
Festival set for October

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE stage has been set for
the 14th Annual International
Cultural Festival (ICF), an
event that will showcase the
diverse communities in the
country, Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette said.

Mr Symonette urged
Bahamians to support the fes-
tival by coming out to see the
displays of 25 countries at the
Botanical Gardens from Octo-
ber 17-18.

The popular festival returns
after a one-year hiatus due to
the retirement of its chairman
James Catalyn and a debate
over whether or not the Botan-
ical Gardens should remain
home to the event.

The International Cultural
Festival, which is under the aus-
pices of the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs, grew out of the
idea to recognise United
Nations (UN) Day. This year,
the Bahamas will join member
countries in celebrating the
64th anniversary of the UN.

An integral part of the festi-
val is the partnership with the
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion, which has embarked on
a series of special advertise-
ments of the event. The new
ICF chairperson is Janet John-
son, director of communica-
tions at the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation.

“As more and more foreign
national groups organised
themselves it took on a life of
its own and by all accounts,
from the countless individuals —

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DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette (centre) announcing plans
for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival to be held October 17-18, 2009. Pictured are ICF
chairperson Janet Johnson, director of communications at the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, and

Eric Carey, committee member.

Bahamian and expatriate alike
- who pleaded with me to bring
it back when it went away last
year, this gathering is the most
popular event on the annual
calendar of events and clearly is
worth reviving,” Mr Symonette
said.

The Deputy Prime Minister
said he was also pleased that
the members of the ICF have
unanimously agreed to donate
10 per cent of their booth earn-
ings to assist with operational
expenses and to support
pledges to UN-related educa-
tional initiatives for Bahamian
youth.

For two days, festival patrons
can experience the food, cul-
ture and heritage of the respec-
tive countries. A new addition
is the Miss Universe Designer
Fashion Show coordinated by
MODE ILES and a glimpse of
the Miss Universe National
Costume photo gallery.

The Bank of the Bahamas
will facilitate the “cashless” fes-
tive environment, a “safety

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mechanism to allow organisers
to gauge the overall fiscal per-
formance of the festival, Mr
Symonette said.

Burns House will unveil their
Christmas wine collection and
the public is welcome to sample
the variety of wines and place
their orders for the Yuletide
season at the Grand Wine and
Food Tasting event between
10am and 2pm.

The United Nations Educa-
tional Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO) is
lending its prestige to the event.

The Miss Universe Bahami-
an Designer Fashion Show,
which features Androsia and
Bahama Hand Print fabrics, as
well as eight costumes donated
to the festival by some of the
Miss Universe contestants, will
be held under the aegis of
UNESCO.

Another new feature will
include the Builders Mall stage
perched atop the hill. Com-
monwealth Building Supplies
is giving the festival site “a

much needed makeover” with
a fresh lick of paint. Island FM
is the official radio station of
the festival; Subway is the
sponsor of the rake ‘n scrape
tradition bearers from Long
Island, and Echo Water is the
official water of the festival.

Mr Symonette commended
the volunteers drawn from
Rotary, Zonta, Girl Guides,
and the Q’s service who will be
involved in this year’s festival.
Zonta will again host the UN-
themed church service at Christ
Church Cathedral on Sunday,
October 25 at 9am.

“Patrons are encouraged to
come and move around from
stall to stall and sample this
unique taste of the universe —
the cuisine, fine wines, special
brews, arts and craft, exciting
raffle prizes and the Western
Union on-stage cultural enter-
tainment line-up.

“Make the 14th Annual
International Cultural Festival
2009 the place to be,” Mr
Symonette said.

JUST a few months after

i being crowned Miss Teen
i World Junior Bahamas,
: Shaquell Demeritte left the
? Bahamas for Europe on Sun-
i day to compete in the world's
? most prestigious and largest
i teen pageant - the Miss
i Princess of the World, for-
? merly the Miss World Junior
i Pageant.

During her three-week stay

: in Europe she will tour vari-
i ous cities, beginning with Lon-
? don in the United Kingdom
? and ending in Prague, Czech
i Republic, where the grand
: finale will take place.

‘Precious’, as the young

beauty queen is commonly
i? called said:

“T cannot wait to promote

the Bahamas throughout
i Europe.

“T know the world knows

i about us now, and the duty of
? all beauty ambassadors is to
i keep the Bahamas current in
i the minds of the world as a
: tourist paradise and invest-
i ment haven.

“T would also like to sign

i on with one of the casting
i agencies at the pageant and
i represent the Bahamas well. I
i am aiming for the goal, but to
i make a notable accomplish-
? ment among the 60 plus con-
i testants will be good".

The pageant focuses on

i introducing the best teenage
i contestants from across the
? world to scouts of modelling
i and casting agencies through-
i out Europe.

The contestants compete in



SHAQUELL DEMERITTE

i talent, model, swimwear and evening gown segments, and the
? winner receives $100,000 in cash and awards.

The event will be broadcast live to millions of viewers on

September 28.

Gaynell Rolle, president of the Miss Teen Bahamas

Pageant, said: "This is an awesome opportunity for Shaque-
i ll and the Bahamas.

“T feel she will do well, she has a good spirit and comes

from a supportive family.”

Debonaire Boutique has teamed up with the organisation

i and is sponsoring the Bahamas’ representative.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3



— Wendall Jones among businessmen

back i in court over NIB contributions



CARLOS DEMETRIUS NOTTAGE

Man wanted for
questioning over’

housebreakings

FREEPORT - Grand }
Bahama Police are search- }
ing for a man wanted for }
questioning in connection }
with a number of house- }
breaking and stealing alle- }

gations.

An all points bulletin has }
been issued for 23-year-old }
Carlos Demetrius Nottage }
of 78 Cabot Drive, Freeport. }

Nottage is of dark brown }
complexion and has dark }

eyes and plaited hair.
He is about five feet,

eight inches tall, of average
build and weighs 150-190 ;}

pounds.

According to police, Not- i
tage should be considered }
armed and extremely dan- }
gerous. Anyone who has }
information concerning his }
whereabouts is asked call }
the police in Grand Bahama }
on 350-3106, 352-9774, 373- }
1112 or 5; 911 or the Crime }
Tipsters Hotline at 352- }

1919.

The Bahamas
Faith Ministries
to hold ‘Singles
Conference’

BAHAMAS Faith Min-
istries has announced that
its “Singles Conference”,
set for September 17 - 20,
has been postponed until
further notice.

Two men caught

hy police after
alleged robbery

TWO men who allegedly
robbed a woman while on
Solider Road were caught
by police after a high-speed
chase through the area.

It was shortly after 3pm
on Monday when a woman
flagged down traffic police,
who were patrolling Soldier
Road near Haven's Road,
and said she was robbed by
two men.

She told the officers that
one of the robbers wore an
undershirt and colourful
shorts, and that the other
man was shirtless, Asst
Supt Walter Evans said.

Moments later police
spotted two men fitting the
descriptions given by the
victim speeding away in a
gold-coloured car.

A high-speed chased
ensued which eventually
ended in a parking lot.

In an attempt to escape,
the occupants got out of the
car and threw items under
the vehicle. Police retrieved
the items which are
believed to be the cash and
jewellery stolen from the
woman.

The two men, aged 19
and 21, are in police cus-
tody.

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JONES Communication
CEO Wendall Jones and
several other prominent
Bahamian businessmen were
back in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to give an update
on their efforts to pay off
years of delinquent National
Insurance contributions.

Bench warrants were
issued yesterday for Bertha’s
Go-Go Ribs owner Mervin
Sweeting, Solomon’s Mines
Managing Director Mark
Finlayson as well as Vaughn
Jones of Jones Brothers
Morticians after they failed
to appear in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street yesterday.

Back in February, the
National insurance Board
NIB brought Jones Commu-
nications CEO Wendall
Jones and other well-known
Bahamian businessmen
before the magistrate's court
in an attempt to collect more
than $1.2 million in missing

THE woman who received
devastating second and third
degree burns about the body
during a house fire on Canaan
Lane has died, police said.

Yesterday, press liaison offi-
cer Asst Supt Walter Evans
identified her as 36-year-old
Dellerease Bowe.

Ms Bowe's home was com-
pletely destroyed by fire last
Thursday around lam.

Police said her fiancé is
reported to have assisted her
from her burning home and
neighbours drove her by pri-
vate car to the hospital, where
she was fighting for her life in
the intensive care unit.

She died in the Princess
Margaret Hospital around
9pm on Sunday, Mr Evans
said.

Police said they were still
investigating the cause of the
fire and could not say what
led to the blaze.

NIB contributions.

Mr Jones pleaded guilty
to owing NIB $430,000 in
delinquent payments. Attor-
ney V. Alfred Gray who
appeared on behalf of Mr
Jones yesterday told the
court he has paid $100,000
of the nearly $180,000, which
represents 40 per cent of the
delinquent amount.

Attorney

Heather Maynard, attor-
ney for NIB, said that once
Mr Jones has paid the full
40 per cent, NIB would be
happy to negotiate to liqui-
date the balance. Mr Gray
said Mr Jones will seek to
pay to the balance by
November 17.

Mr Gray also appeared on
behalf of Global United
CEO Jackson Ritchie who
was charged with failure to
pay $161,079.98 in NIB con-
tributions between May 2007
and June 2008.

Mr Gray said that the NIB

and Mr Ritchie are continu-
ing negotiations with respect
to the delinquent contribu-
tions.

Mr Ritchie is also expect-
ed back in Court 11, Nassau
Street on November 17.

Galen Saunders and his
father Henry Saunders who
own More 94.9 FM and Spir-
it (92.5 FM) radio stations
were also back in court yes-
terday over failure to pay
$253,262 in NIB contribu-
tions.

Ms Maynard said the men
have paid $43,000 so far and
are ‘working in good faith.’
The two men are also
expected back in Court 11,
on November 17.

Magistrate Sub Swain-
LaSalle issued warrant of
arrests yesterday for Mervin
Sweeting, owner of Bertha’s
Go-Go Ribs.

Mr Gray told the court
that on June 29, Sweeting
paid NIB $10,000 and had
negotiated to keep his con-
tributions current while pay-
ing $2,000 a month in delin-



THE remains of mere on Canaan Lane.

However, head of Fire Ser-
vices Supt Jeffrey Deleveaux
speculated that the fire may
have been caused by a candle,
as the home did not have elec-
tricity.

"We haven't pinned it down
yet but we realised that there
was no electricity to the build-
ing and perhaps it could have
been an unattended candle,
but we can't say concretely,"
he told The Tribune yester-
day.

Mr Deleveaux also said Fire
Services had not yet deter-
mined the cause of the house
fire during which a 10-year-
old disabled boy was burnt
beyond recognition on Sun-
day morning in Colony Vil-
lage.

"In a structural fire every-
thing is destroyed and you’re
not able to go and immedi-
ately pinpoint (and say) this
is what happened. It's a slow
process," he said.

Downtown police criticised over
towing of car from Bay Street

By AVA TURNQUEST

CONFUSED and frustrat-
ed by what struck him as an
unfair manipulation of traf-
fic laws, a disgruntled citizen
has lashed out at downtown
police.

Ivoine Ingraham wrote to
The Tribune to complain
about the circumstances sur-
rounding the towing of his car
from Bay Street opposite the
British Colonial Hilton.

Mr Ingraham said he
parked amongst several other
cars, all of which were still
there when he returned about
30 minutes later. He cannot
understand why he was
unfairly targeted.

If he broke the law by
parking in this area, Mr
Ingraham asked why he was
not fined.

"If I violated a traffic
offence and was supposedly
parked in a no parking area,
why was I not charged and
made to pay a fine?” he
asked. “How come no police
formalities were done?"

Mr Ingraham had parked
in that area to attend a brief
meeting in the BOLAM
building last week. Due to its
proximity to restaurants and
businesses, this part of Bay

Street is a popular short-term
parking spot.

Seeing his car gone upon
his return, Mr Ingraham
immediately assumed it had
been stolen, and flagged
down a passing patrol car.

The officers referred him
to the Tourism Police Station.

Mr Ingraham described the
officers at the station as dis-
interested, and said they pro-
vided no explanation save
directions to the lot where he
could find his car.

Number

When he called the num-
ber posted on the lot's fence,
Mr Ingraham was subjected
to what he describes as a
“crude, uncouth, cantanker-
ous voice”.

After waiting over an hour
for someone in authority to
show up, Mr Ingraham
attempted to pay the one indi-
vidual he encountered in the
lot, however this person could
not give him a receipt.

Insisting that he would not
pay unless he was given a
receipt, Mr Ingraham called
the number on the fence
again; this time the voice told
him that for a receipt, he

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

Weather.........:cccccceeeees

pereeete ance eaamurtans suctrrae Po

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



would have to drive to Coral
Harbour.

Mr Ingraham said that at
this point, he decided to “bite
the bullet” and created a
make-shift receipt, which he
asked the attendant to sign.

Frustrated by the ordeal,
Ingraham feels that such inci-
dents are destroying the frag-
ile relationship the police tries
to maintain with the public.

Pressed for an explanation
yesterday, a police source sug-
gested that perhaps the officer
responsible for the towing
had decided to give Mr Ingra-
ham “a break”.

It is not uncommon for offi-
cers to waive a ticket, and let
the fee for the towing stand
as a warning, he said. The
source could not explain why
no other cars were towed.

Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson has urged
the public to communicate
any concerns or complaints to
his office so they can be inves-
tigated.

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

quent payments. Mr Gray,
however, could offer no
explanation as to why Mr
Sweeting was not in court
yesterday. Magistrate
LaSalle noted three warrants
had been issued for Mr
Sweeting’s arrest.

Warrant

“He has a habit of not
showing up,” Magistrate
LaSalle said before issuing
the bench warrant.

A bench warrant was also
issued for Solomon’s Mines
Managing Director Mark
Finlayson. Finlayson was
charged with failure to pay
$377,092.90 in NIB contri-

butions between June 2007
and December 2008. Mr Fin-
layson was ordered to
appear in court yesterday to
inform the court what
arrangement he worked out
with NIB and how much he
had paid.

A bench warrant was also
issued for Vaughn Jones of
Jones Brothers Morticians
who failed to appear in court
yesterday.

NIB has been taking a no-
nonsense approach to pros-
ecuting delinquent employ-
ers since an amnesty the
company extended for delin-
quent employers to come in
and settle accounts ended on
December 31, 2008.

a

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P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
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A world of hurt

President Barack Obama took a bit of a
victory lap on Wall Street on Monday,
declaring that the economy had been
brought back from the abyss and “the storms
of the past two years are beginning to
break.”

The president and his economic team (and
the Federal Reserve) deserve credit for mov-
ing quickly to prevent a full-blown collapse.
A year ago, amid the panic that accompanied
the implosion of Lehman Brothers, there
were serious fears that the United States
was headed toward another Great Depres-
sion.

Now, with the financial sector stabilized
and economists predicting that the Great
Recession is nearing an end, the sighs of
relief coming out of Washington and Lower
Manhattan are understandable. But this is no
time to lose sight of the wreckage all around
us. This recession, a full-blown economic
horror, has left a gaping hole in the heart of
working America that is unlikely to heal for
years, if not decades.

Fifteen million Americans are locked in
the nightmare of unemployment, nearly 10
percent of the work force. A third have been
jobless for more than six months. Thirteen
percent of Latinos and 15 percent of blacks
are out of work. (Those are some of the offi-
cial statistics. The reality is much worse.)

Consider this: Some 9.4 million new jobs
would have to be created to get us back to
the level of employment at the time that the
recession began in December 2007. But last
month, we lost 216,000 jobs. If the reces-
sion technically ends soon and we get to a
point where some modest number of jobs are
created — say, 100,000 or 150,000 a month
— the politicians and the business com-
mentators will celebrate like it’s New Year’s.

But think about how puny that level of job
creation really is in an environment that
needs nearly 10 million jobs just to get us
back to the lean years of the George W.
Bush administration.

We're hurtin’ and there ain’t much healin’
on the horizon.

A national survey of jobless workers by a
pair of professors at Rutgers University
shows just how traumatized the work force
has become in this downturn. Two-thirds of
respondents said that they had become
depressed. More than half said it was the
first time they had ever lost a job, and 80 per-
cent said there was little or no chance that
they would be able to get their jobs back
when the economy improves.

The 1,200 respondents were jobless at
some point over the past year, and most —

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894 — are still unemployed. More than half
said that they had been forced to borrow
money from friends or relatives, and a quar-
ter have missed their mortgage or rent pay-
ments.

The survey found that affluent, well-edu-
cated workers, who had traditionally been
able to withstand a downturn in reasonably
good shape, were being hit hard this time
around.

The professors, Carl Van Horn and Cliff
Zukin, described that phenomenon as “a
metric of the recession’s seismic impact.”
Of the workers who found themselves unem-
ployed for the first time, more than one in
four had been earning $75,000 or more annu-
ally.

“This is not your ordinary dip in the busi-
ness cycle,” said Mr. Van Horn. “Ameri-
cans believe that this is the Katrina of reces-
sions. Folks are on their rooftops without a
boat.”

Stunned by the financial and psychological
toll of the recession, and seeing little in the
way of hopeful signs on the employment
landscape, many of the surveyed workers
showed signs of discouragement. Three-fifths
said that they had experienced feelings of
helplessness.

Said one respondent: “I’ve always worked,
so this is very depressing. At age 60, I never
believed I would be unemployed unless I
chose to be.”

Said another: “I fear for my family and my
future. We are about to be evicted, and bills
are piling. We have sold everything we pos-
sibly can to maintain, and are going under
with little hope of anything.”

At some point the unemployment crisis in
America will have to be confronted head-on.
Poverty rates are increasing. Tax revenues
are plunging. State and local governments
are in a terrible fiscal bind. Unemployment
benefits for many are running out. Families
are doubling up, and the number of homeless
children is rising.

It’s eerie to me how little attention this cri-
sis is receiving. The poor seem to be com-
pletely out of the picture.

If we end up with yet another jobless
recovery, there would seem to be little hope
for impoverished families in America’s big
cities, rural areas and, increasingly, suburban
neighborhoods as well.

The recession may be ending for some.

Tell that to the unemployed.

(By By BOB HERBERT
c.2009 New York Times News Service)



TE

A desperate bid.
to escape long
arms of justice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In an exclusive interview
given to The Tribune of the
Bahamas by the former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos
Islands, which was published
on Monday August 31, 2009,
the former Premier advocated
on behalf of his former gov-
ernment for the Turks and
Caicos Islands to become an
autonomous State under The
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas government.

In my humble opinion, this
is one of the most ridiculous
and hollowed interview ever
given by the former govern-
ment of the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

What planet are these for-
mer ministers living on? This
is clear evidence that the state
of minds of these former min-
isters is of a world far
detached from reality. This
last desperate attempt on
their part to escape the long
arms of justice is beyond dis-
graceful, it is pitiful.

Who in the Turks and
Caicos Islands are they so des-
perately and shamefully lob-
bying on behalf of? Because,
it is unquestionably not the
people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands.

When the former govern-
ment ministers were flying
high above the clouds a few
years ago, the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas and
the people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands were the last
things on their minds. The

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



only thing that was on their
minds was the glamour of
Hollywood, Monaco, the
South of France; and as for
their idea of becoming an
autonomous state under the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that was beneath
them. So why now, are they
being so pretentious?

There is no question that
The Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is a lovely country,
but that is where it ends. And
as for the idea of the Turks
and Caicos Islands becoming
linked to The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas government,
the Turks and Caicos Islands
has already been there and
done that (from 1962 to 1973).
So, as far as progressive think-
ing is concerned, that idea is
“so lame, and so yesterday.”

As late as the early 90s’,
Turks and Caicos Islands cit-
izens were looked down upon
and treated with disrespect by
the citizens and the govern-
ment of The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, this led to
Turks and Caicos islanders
and their descendants who
lived in the Bahamas being
ashamed to acknowledge
their heritage in fear of being
dishonoured and being
deprived of an opportunity,
even though we are all one

people and we helped build
the Bahamas to what it is
today. However, today we
hold no animosity in our
hearts towards the Bahamas
and its citizens, because we
are a forgiving and loving
people. When a country is not
cognoscente of its history, it is
bound to repeat the mistakes
of the past.

Therefore, let me make it
absolutely clear, in my opin-
ion, the future of the Turks
and Caicos Islands does not
rest in the hands of The Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.
We as a people of the Turks
and Caicos Islands have come
this far by faith, perseverance
and hard work, and the cur-
rent state of affairs that we
now find ourselves in will
soon pass. There is a bright
light and a prosperous future
at the end of this tunnel that
we are now in.

Persons of the Turks and
Caicos Islands, the reign of
the previous guards are over.
Let us continue to keep the
faith and stay encouraged,
because you too shall soon
enter into the Promised Land,
and the Turks and Caicos
Islands will once again be the
envy of the Caribbean, if not
the world. “A Belonger that is
proud to be called a Turks
and Caicos Islander”. Thank
you.

ALBRAY
BUTTERFIELD Jr
September, 2009.

The realities of economic turmoil

EDITOR, The Tribune.

If no one is noticing the
people are very frustrated in a
high percentage almost over-
come with depression as they
cannot see through their eco-
nomic/financial troubles that
the US economic recession is
causing.

They honestly felt what
started in the mid-1990’s was
not going to stop.

Up to their armpits in debt
— struggling last year with
the horrific prices for BEC,
gas and food and now layoffs
and absolutely no good news
on the horizon although some
commentators are saying that
everywhere else, other than
the US, are showing econom-
ic signs which would bring a
smile but it is not coming soon
to The Bahamas as the US is
still in recession.

Unless you are blind and
deaf over the past weeks you
have heard the same frustra-
tions in the voice and protests
of the American people

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against the Obama Health
plan as you have heard here
on our issues but reality is the
US is a service economy and
through the obvious scaring
of the same folk who totally
control the US coming out of
Recession on Health Care,
my previous estimates of the
US recession finishing in the
last quarter of 2010 is now
lengthened to no earlier than
late 2011 at the earliest.

The reality even with the
potential television audience
from Miss Universe, yes
potentially 1.2 billion eyes will
see The Bahamas, many for
the first time, but many who
have absolutely no chance of
ever seeing it in reality as they
are unable economically to
visit so could we appreciate a
1-2 or 3 per cent new visitor

arrival base over the coming
3-4 years? Boy, Sunday
August the 23rd, the dice roll.

One thing that economic
downturns do bring is that
employers find all kinds of
new ways to doing business
with less, so excelling is going
to be a serious issue.

Political hog-wash rhetoric
as what I heard from Senator
David Thompson never puts
jam on the bread, Senator,
Grand Bahamians see the
mess and the troubles and
your loose political rah-rah
talk doesn’t help, so please
stop it.

PATRICIA SAWYER
Nassau,
August 21, 2009.

SYR MSS LETTE TT

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Today’s story of The Tribune entitled “Call for the Gov-
ernment to improve the horrific state of Dog Pound”, made

me sick, disgusted and angry.

A few years ago the Reader’s Digest carried the following

statement:

“You can tell a people by the way they treat their animals

and their beaches.”

What a people we have become.

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Fax: 322-6969







THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



CB police concerned
over house hreakings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter }
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand }
Bahama police are concerned ;
over the recent spate of :
house breakings and theft }
here on the island. :

In response to an increase }
in these types of crimes police }
are now advising the public }
not to purchase stolen items }
as it is a criminal offence that }
carries the same penalty as }
stealing. :

Asst Supt Wendell }
Deveaux said the police are ;
seeking the cooperation of }
the general public to inform }
the police of persons attempt- }
ing to sell electronic equip- }
ment and items such as cellu- }
lar phones, flat-screen televi- ;
sions, laptop computers and }
video games, as well as jew- }
ellery and other goods. :

Mr Deveaux said that }
items being offered below }
market value are often ?
believed to be stolen. He is }
also urging residents to}
ensure that their premises are }
properly secured before leav- }
ing home. :

Neighbours should be alert }
and keep a look out for each }
others property, he said. :

Mr Deveaux said people }
should call the police if they }
notice any suspicious persons }
lurking around their neigh- ;
bourhood. :

He said the police also }
encourage residents to form }
crime watch groups and :
neighbourhood watches in
their areas. :





Junkanoo bleachers contract
signed with Bahamian firm

THE government has
signed a $406,000 contract
with C-Cubed Seating on
Monday to provide seats for
the annual junkanoo
parades.

Minister of State in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles May-
nard said that the original
contract of $460,000 has
been reduced to $406,000.

The contract now includes
seats for the Junior
Junkanoo, Boxing and New
Year’s Day Parades; 10,000
seats for New Providence;
2,000 seats for Grand
Bahama and 1,000 seats for
another Family Island to be
named by October of each
year, Mr Maynard said.

Seats

“We are very happy that
C-Cubed, a Bahamian
owned company that
employs many Bahamians
in the execution of their
work every year, has been
able to give us what we
think is a very fair arrange-
ment where we now get
more seats for less money.

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FROM LEFT: Eddie Dames, acting director of Culture; Charles Maynard, Minister of State for the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture: Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture, and Crispin Cleare, president of C-Cubed Seating.

“What we have found out
in the last few years is that
islands like Abaco, Exuma
and Eleuthera have expand-
ed their parades greatly and
need more support from
central government for the

production of their parades.

“We thought that the pro-
vision of seats for these
parades would give them a
jump-start to start to earn
their own revenue. We want
to start with one island first,

ILO monitoring National Training Programme

By LLONELLA GILBERT

THE International Labour
Organisation (ILO) and coun-
tries throughout the region are
monitoring the National Train-
ing Programme to see if it
should become a model for
countries who hope to combine
social with labour development,
Minister of State for Labour
and Social Development Loret-
ta Butler-Turner said.

Speaking at the opening of
the programme at the Kendal
G L Isaacs Gymnasium on
Monday, Mrs Butler-Turner
said that the success of the ven-
ture does not rest upon the gov-
ernment, social partners or the
training institutes.

“It rests upon each of you,”
she said. “You will have to
work hard and study. You will
be required to give up some
leisure activities, but in the long
run it will be worth it.”

The government introduced
the National Training Pro-
gramme to help displaced
workers learn new trades such
as masonry; basic carpentry;
landscaping; heavy equipment
operating; accounting; diesel
mechanics; nail artistry and
design; facial care and technol-
ogy; computer applications, and
straw and shell craft.

The training will take place
at the College of the Bahamas
and the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI).

The programme was created
im conjunction and consultation
with the Bahamas Christian
Council, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation and
trade unions.

Mrs Butler-Turner said the
government wants to give a
“hand-up” to persons who are
“progressive thinkers” and who
wish to take charge of their
future.

“This National Training Pro-
gramme seeks to give each of

Sandal

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

the selected participants new
or additional skills to regain
employment or become entre-
preneurs,” she said.

The state minister said that
depending on the success or
failure of the initiative’s first
run, the government will decide
if a “large scale” national train-
ing programme should become
permanent.

Mrs Butler-Turner said 529
persons were selected for the
programme in New Providence
and 244 from Grand Bahama.

Khaalis Rolle, chairman of
the implementation committee
of the National Training Pro-
gramme, said that the pro-
gramme is a major opportunity
for the participants.

“When you transition out of
this programme, the expecta-
tion is that you get a good job
or become an entrepreneur,”
Mr Rolle said.

He said if the participants
demonstrate commitment and
dedication, there is an oppor-
tunity for them to start their
own business.

Dr Christina Nwosa, associ-
ate vice-president of Outreach
at COB, encouraged partici-

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pants to continuously upgrade
their skills.

“Ongoing training is essen-
tial and there are distinct bene-
fits to a society from a popula-
tion which is adequately pre-
pared to meet a changing eco-
nomic environment,” she said.

“Lifelong learning or contin-
uing education produces a more
knowledgeable and flexible
work force that enables persons

IDIW SS
ONLY

MINISTER OF STATE in the
Ministry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner brought remarks at the
opening of the National Training
Programme on Monday,
September 14, 2009 at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

to realise their individual poten-
tial.”

Dr Nwosa said other bene-
fits of education include career
flexibility, increased skill
requirements, personal satis-
faction and better wages.

“People who upgrade their
work skills and knowledge not
only keep up with the latest
trends and techniques in their
respective areas, but can also
receive other benefits such as
the training needed to realise
additional goals,” she said.

Ui
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PHONE: 822-2157



see how that works out and
then expand it.

“During the course of the
contract we hope that a
number of islands (will) ben-
efit from the 1,000 seats,”
he said.

In Nassau, Mr Maynard
said, a few initiatives have
been introduced to continue
the working relationship
with downtown merchants.

These include the access
of the bleachers from the
back and new seats that
facilitate easy break-down
and setup.

Compromises

“We’ve come up with
some compromises to
ensure that the businesses
are not disadvantaged as a
result of the setting up and
taking down of the bleach-
ers,” he explained.

“We've worked with C-
Cubed during the last two
years to ensure that we
could have a better seating
arrangement for the general
public, the Bay Street mer-
chants and all concerned,”
Mr Maynard said.

President of C-Cubed
Crispin Cleare said over 30
persons will be employed on
this project, and safe, com-
fortable seating will be pro-
vided for the annual
parades.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



are ee
Opponents of martial rape amendment gravely out of touch

By DONNA NICOLLS

IPOSED a philosophical ques-
tion to a wise old lady once: Can
love torment? She advised me no,
the misunderstanding of love tor-
ments. I find her words to be rele-
vant to the current debate about
marital rape believing that a per-
verse misunderstanding of mar-
riage has led to exaggerated claims
and misinformation about the risks
of outlawing marital rape in the
Bahamas.

This misunderstanding is fueling






















YOUR SAY

the outrage over the proposed
amendment to the Sexual Offens-
es and Domestic Violence Act of
1991 that would remove the
impunity given under law to hus-
bands who rape their wives. I
could understand the current
debate if it were taking place in
the 19th century England, when



the presupposition of eternal
union with no possibility of
divorce, and unconditional con-
sent were foundations of marriage
because women were chattel, but
in the 21st century Bahamas, those
views are simply antiquated and
backward.

The real news in this debate is

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Visit our website at www.cob.edu.by

ADMINISTRATIVE VACAN

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Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

position:

Dean, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI) will serve as
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arts, ils programmes, faculty and staff within the College of The Bahamas.

Specific duties and responsibilities will involve formulating with key
stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College's master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
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training. For a detailed job description, visit www.coob.edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or hrapply@cob.edu.bs no later than
Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

that religious leaders would have
me believe that when my husband
and I joined as one in marriage 31
years ago, I signed away my indi-
viduality and thereby sacrificed
my freedom to choose, my own
self-determination and the own-
ership of my own body. My hus-
band and I are still happily married
but there was never any presup-
position of consent for either of
us to do as we wish when we wish
with each other’s body. My body is
still my own and I consent willing-
ly and freely during each sexual
interaction because we have a
healthy relationship built on love
and respect for each other.

If we were to believe the claims
of the Christian community, as
voiced most fervently by the
Bahamas Christian Council, then
we would further be led to believe
that the level of dysfunction in
marital relations within the Chris-
tian community of the Bahamas
is disturbingly pervasive, which
perhaps it is, considering the high
percentage of the population that
comes from unwed unions.

If the proposed amendment
would bring about a massive influx
of vindictive and discontented
wives rushing to incarcerate their
husbands, then we must have big-
ger problems than we thought. In
this case perhaps the energies of
the Christian leadership would be



“Recommendations
for consultation are
only stall tactics that
will deny justice to
individuals who
suffer from lack of
protection under the
law. There is a time
for consultation, but
now is the time for
leaders to lead and
do the right thing by
looking beyond the
dogmatic positions
of Christian
fundamentalists and
other fear-mongers
interested only in
obstructionism.”



more productively put to use in
pre-emptively restoring proper
order to the sacred trust of marital
relationships instead of blocking
justice for those who have already
fallen victim to the violated trust.

People in healthy relationships
have no fear of the proposed
amendment to the law and should
be appalled at the scare tactics.

James Catalyn & Friends

u
SUMMER

ADNESS"

“Revue 2009

The Dundas Centre - Regular Performances
September 16th - 19th 2009 al Spm nightly

Tickets $20.00

AIDS FOUNDATION BENEFIT
Tuesday 15th September at Spm - Tickets $25.00
Rox Office: The Dendas Centre

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(Reserved thekets wat collected by 3:00pm ea day ef performance will he sold |



Many opponents are muddying
the water making others believe
the issue is “complex, complicated,
and multi-dimensional” when it is
none of the above. This is the sim-
ple idea: According to the World
Bank the Bahamas has the highest
number of rapes per capita in the
world; wives are among those suf-
fering and they have inadequate
protection under the law.

Are we going to respond in fear
based on hypothetical situations
and hyperbolae or are we going
to drown out the ignorance with
pragmatic and principled action?
With the Catholic Archdiocese,
the Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church, the Seventh
Day Adventist Church all express-
ing their support for the proposed
amendment, the only thing that is
tragically wrong is the bad rap the
Christian Council is giving the
Christian community.

Recommendations for consul-
tation are only stall tactics that will
deny justice to individuals who suf-
fer from lack of protection under
the law. There is a time for con-
sultation, but now is the time for
leaders to lead and do the right
thing by looking beyond the dog-
matic positions of Christian fun-
damentalists and other fear-mon-
gers interested only in obstruc-
tionism. Marital rape is a crime
under international law, and
according to a 2006 United
Nations report, over 104 countries
around the world have already
made it a crime in their domestic
law. These countries include our
Caribbean neighbors Barbados,
and Trinidad and Tobago, not to
mention the United States, Spain,
and even Zimbabwe, much
ridiculed as backward and anti-
progressive.

There is great need in the
Bahamas to promote best prac-
tices in healthy relationships and to
learn from the successes of many
men and women in healthy mar-
riages; but in the meantime, while
dysfunction is rampant and
women are suffering, we need to
have empathy, stop the melodra-
ma and act.

¢ Donna Nicolls has been an
advocate for women and children’s’
rights for over 20 years. She has a
masters degree in counselling from
the University of the West Indies
and serves as a counsellor at the
Bahamas Crisis Centre. She is mar-
ried with two children.
Contact:
donna.nicolls@gmail.com

eS a ee

The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came inte force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition ta a new regulatory regime.

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic cornmunicatians sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of

new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA's

website (www.urcabahamas.bs). These include:

* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment]
Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adopted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatory Authority
continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comms
Act, the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts.

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comms Act coming inte force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

ATURCA WE WILL BE DOING OUR BEST TO MINIMISE DISRUPTIONS,

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

PO), Geo f-4ab) Nassau, &

wwtalurcabahamas ts



1437 F 242,323,7288

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7

Uproar at |
hotel union

meeting

FROM page one

sitting down, they are not
involved in it, but the A
team headed by Nicole
Martin is screaming at the
Deliverance team headed
by Kirk Wilson.”

Mr Douglas said the nom-
inations are not valid as Mr
Beneby and Ms Dixon have
been redundant since
August last year, and Mr
Wright was terminated from
his position as an organiser
at the union in 2008.

He added: “It clearly
states under the Constitu-
tion that a member should
be deemed non-financial
when he or she is 12 weeks,
or three months, in arrears
of contributions and shall
automatically forfeit his or
her privileges as a member
of the union, so how do you
nominate when you find
they are not members?

“The Constitution also
says no member shall vote

FROM page one

had time to file an appeal against the

ruling.

"My lawyer is looking into that and as

in the election if he or she is
not in good standing in
terms of his financial or oth-
er obligations to the union.”

At the close of nomina-
tions Mr Douglas said 12
nominees were put forward
by the M Group headed by
Tyrone Butler, the A
Group headed by Nicole
Martin, and the Redemp-
tion Team led by Sidney
Rolle.

Only nine of Team Deliv-
erance’s 12 nominations
were accepted, and the
nominees in question have
been called to discuss their
positions at the Attorney
General’s office, Mr Dou-
glas said.

The union’s executive
council arranged for nomi-
nations to take place yes-
terday under the direction
of Justice Neville Adderley.
Elections are set to be held
on September 29.

Confusion over the dates
of the previous election

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wo
cs
>
rey
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=
os
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uw

mee
MEMBERS of Nicole Martin’s
A Team outside the Workers
House building yesterday.

meant Team Deliverance
supporters did not attend
and Mr Wilson took court
action to have the election
declared “null and void”,
forcing Ms Martin, the
union's first woman presi-
dent, to step down.

The register used for the
May 28 elections is expected
to be used again when the
voting process proceeds,
allowing for some 6,000
union members to partici-
pate.



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for
AEE SELECT

FROM page one

Doctors Hospital, The Rotary Club of East Nassau and

Bahamas Realty.

Companies that have donated money to the campaign
so far include Doctors Hospital, Tile King, Kelso Medical
Laboratory and Micronet among others.

The incubators bought with the money raised through
the campaign will be crucial in keeping premature or
otherwise challenged newborns alive, while the ventila-
tors will be used to care for patients in both the adult and
neonatal intensive care units.



Pastor of demolished church

soon as he would have studied the legal
implications we will get together and
decide what to do," Mr Bastian told The
Tribune.

Mr Bastian said he is also in conversa-
tions with the owner of the local real
estate company which sold him the dis-
puted property.

He added that his church's 50-member
congregation, which has moved tem-
porarily services to the Great Commis-
sion Church, is coping with the ordeal.

"We are doing fine in the midst of our
crisis. We know that God is still in control
and we will weather the storm. Hard
times do not last but hard people do and
so with God being our leader and guide
we will prevail,” he said.

As shocked residents of the commu-
nity looked on, Canaan Baptist Church
was reduced to rubble by Arawak Homes
on September 4 at the end of a two year

is ‘weighing his legal options’

court challenge over a land dispute.

After the demolition, spokesman for
Arawak Homes said: "Arawak Homes
wishes to assure the public that the deci-
sion to demolish the structure was only
taken after every reasonable effort, over
several years, was made to effect a dif-
ferent outcome.

"We also wish to confirm that care was
taken to secure all contents which were
met in the structure."

Yesterday, an emotional member of
the church said she was still shook up
about the loss of the building that was the
fruit of years of planning.

"Right now it's bringing us a lot of
tears. It was just like a human being to us
- it took us years to build and it just took
them one hour to destroy. This is not
what (former Prime Minister) Sir Lynden

(Pindling) had envisioned when he put
his name on this subdivision,” said the
church member, who did not want to be
named.

Ultimately, Supreme Court Justice
Cheryl Albury found Arawak Homes
Limited to be the rightful owner of sev-
eral lots on Charles Saunders Highway
on which the church was built in June,
2006.

The justice also ordered that Mr Bas-
tian, Alvin Rolle and Merline Rolle -
who were listed as second and third
defendants respectively - by themselves,
their servants and or agents "demolish
and remove the building or parts of any
buildings constructed on the said lots”.

Justice Albury also ruled that Arawak
Homes had immediate possession of the
lots in question.

Paul Moss formally tells Christie of
his upcoming bid for leadership

FROM page one

to the contrary. I believe that
you achieved much as party
leader and as Prime Minis-
ter,” Mr Moss explained.

“Many of your ideas and
initiatives were ahead of their
time. I have the utmost
respect and affection for you.
But, Sir, there has been a shift
in the dynamics of this coun-
try. ’m certain you must feel
it, anew generation is moving
on the scene and they are cry-
ing out for a leader — a new
vision and, in particular, a
new economic model that
would be anchored in the
deliberate empowerment of
Bahamians.

“T have come forward at
this time because I have heard
their cries. I have come for-
ward because I feel the
prompting of God Himself. I
must hearken to the cries of

0% to 75% o

my fellow Bahami-
ans and I must be
obedient to the
voice of God for,
as His Word says,
‘obedience is bet-
ter than sacrifice’,”
Mr Moss said.
Outlining that
Mr Christie has
served his genera-
tion well, Mr Moss
said the party’s
leader has also had
the privilege of
impacting other
generations. How-
ever, he said, the
time has come for
him and others like him to
serve their own generation.
“Tt’s time for our party to
look ahead and prepare for
those who will come after you
(Mr Christie) — for the next
generation of leaders. In my
bid for leadership, I am
demonstrating my readiness

en pA al a os



to move from the
wings to the stage
for, I believe, the
time is now. While
I can not expect to
have your support
in this race, I do
ask for your
understanding
and your bless-
ing,” he said.

Mr Moss also
encouraged the
party’s Parliamen-
tary block to lis-
ten to the call of
the people and
encouraged them
to support him in
his bid to become leader.

“T believe with all my heart
that in order for our party to
survive; for it to once again
become the Party of choice
for the majority of Bahami-
ans, we must make a concert-
ed, considered and deliberate
effort to encourage and

advance the next generation
of leaders. Bahamians are
waiting, crying out for a
leader.

“Undoubtedly, the time has
come for transition. We are
entering into a new season for
our country and for our
world, and this new season,
like every other, requires its
own breed of leaders. No one
can deny that our fathers
excelled in their generation;
they built a foundation that
is sure, but we can’t stop and
we can’t rest. We must con-
tinue to build. We must find a
new vision and new energies
to propel our party and our
country into a brighter
future,” Mr Moss said.

The leadership candidate
advised the party’s Parlia-
mentary team that if they
wish to discuss his plans any
further he was available for
them to speak with at any
time.

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EXTRA 5%

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.coh,edu. bs

NOTICE

Deadline for applications for
Spring (January) 2010 admission
Friday, September 25th, 2009 at 4:00 pm.



Applications may be accessed online at
www.cob.edu.bs or collected from the
Office of Admissions.

Prinate Family laland Resort Operation
Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements:

CHIEF ENGINEER

Have a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized College/University
At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely
related field

Must be computer literate

Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work
long hours

Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians
with varied trades

LIVE IN MAID

Fully experienced in domestic household chores
and culinary duties

Three years in a similar position would be an assct
Applicant must be willing to live on island

Applications should send email to:
cmajor(@ gerp.sandals.com

CVS

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BEC and the construction of
the Wilson City power plant

By LARRY SMITH

MARSH HARBOUR, Aba-
co - Faced with overwhelming
disapproval from a standing
room-only crowd of Abaconi-
ans upset over the bypassing of
local interests, Bahamas Elec-
trcity Corporation chiefs
orchestrating a town meeting
last week admitted to a failure
of process and promised to
learn from their mistakes.

"Things could have been
handled better," BEC general
manager Kevin Basden told his
critics, referring to construction
of a 48-megawatt oil-fired pow-
er plant on Abaco that pro-
ceeded without any local con-
sultation, "and lessons will be
learnt from this."

The town meeting was hasti-
ly called to address a
groundswell of concern about
the environmental and other
implications of the plant, whose
foundations have already been
laid on a 25-acre site near Wil-
son City, about 14 miles south
of Marsh Harbour. But in many
respects the effort came years
too late.

As BEC chairman Fred Got-
tlieb confirmed at the meeting,
the Christie administration
decided to build the $105 mil-
lion power plant back in 2005,
after years of dithering. And
the construction contracts were
signed by the Ingraham gov-
ernment in December, 2007.
But neither government has
involved the people of Abaco
at any stage of the planning
process.

"The existing plant is 30
years old," Gottlieb explained.
"It has an installed capacity of
27 mw and peak demand is 24
mw, so the loss of a single
engine causes serious load
shedding. The present site is
too close to residential areas
and there is no room for expan-
sion, but Abaco's energy
demand is growing by five per
cent per annum. I met the letter
of intent for the new plant
signed by my predecessor and
we went ahead with it."

The
Ms.

following

Colinal

individuals
Arnette Rahming

From all accounts, the audi-
ence that filled the New Visions
church hall to overflowing on
September 10 was a reasonable
cross section of Abaco com-
munities - including black and
white Bahamians as well as sec-
ond homers from a number of
settlements.

Many said it was the largest
public meeting ever seen on
Abaco outside of an election
campaign. And whether or not
the participants shared strong
feelings about the environmen-
tal implications of the new
plant, there was little doubt as
to their anger over the lack of
meaningful public consultation
on this mssive infrastructure
project.

In fact, Freeport lawyer Fred
Smith - who has taken judicial
review of the Baker's Bay
development on Guana Cay all
the way to the Privy Council -
told the meeting he had been
hired by a group of local and
foreign property owners and
would seek to halt the power
plant project until due process
had been achieved. He defined
"due process" as an opportu-
nity for all interested parties to
provide input.

"This is the biggest capital
expediture in Abaco's history
and there has been no mean-
ingful public consultation,"
Smith told me after the meet-
ing. "I will be writing to the rel-
evant central and local govern-
ment agencies for evidence that
all approvals and permits have
been properly obtained. I don't
expect any answers and they
will probably continue to do
what they are doing, but the
project will then be subject to
judicial review."

During the meeting he sug-
gested that the project could be

are
(356-8328) or

mperial

asked
Ms.



proceeding illegally: "We con-
tinue to disrespect the local
government institutions that the
FNM itself put in place. We
don't know if all statutory per-
mits for this power plant have
been granted. But it is incum-
bent on government to ensure
that due process is respected -
that is the essence of democra-
Cc a

Those "relevant agencies"
include the BEST Commission,
the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services, the
town planning department,
local government councils, the
Ministry of Works, and the
Cabinet Office. But Smith's
threat led BEC to pre-empt
him by halting its own project
temporarily. The Ministry of
Works confirmed on Monday
that the project was on hold
while BEC applied for con-
struction permits.

In response to this, one well-
placed political source
remarked: "Yes, BEC should
follow the rules. But how many
other government construction
projects - from schools to roads
- do you know that get per-
mits?"

Well, Tough Call can't speak
for all such projects, but I know
of at least one that does have
the necessary approvals - the
Nassau airport redevelopment.
The point is - how can BEC
spend $100 million of borrowed
money without going through
the required legal processes?

After years of virtual silence
on its plans for Abaco, BEC
and government officials pulled
out all the stops for the meeting
last week. Representatives from
MAN Diesel Canada (which
has the overall contract for the
plant), KES Environmental
Services (which did the envi-

to contact
Shamara

Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

LEANDRA PINDER

Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH

P. O. Box CB-11825

ronmental impact assessment)
and the BEST Commission all
gave presentations.

Nassau lawyer and Bahamas
National Trust council member
Pericles Maillis also spoke in
support of the project, making
it clear he was there in a per-
sonal capacity. He had been
wrongly identified as a BNT
spokesman on the official pro-
gramme for the meeting.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb
acknowledged rather testily
that the meeting was held in
response to a "surprising, sud-
den opposition" to the power
plant generated by misleading
propaganda, principally a video
published on You Tube. But as
Abaconian newspaper publish-
er Dave Ralph pointed out, this
was "the first public disclosure
of any consequence by BEC or
the government" on this mas-
sive project for the island. So
what do you expect to happen?

And the lack of disclosure is
despite the fact that the deci-
sion was made four years ago,
that contracts were signed
almost two years ago, that
financing was approved by par-
liament in the summer, that
construction is already well
under way, that the chairman
of BEC is a leading Marsh Har-
bour citizen, and that the prime
minister himself represents an
Abaco constituency.

In fact, Hubert Ingraham
slipped into the meeting incog-
nito wearing a baseball hat, and
two senior opposition MPs -
Fred Mitchell and Obie Wilch-
combe - also attended as
observers. One wag noted the
presence of "the next leader of
the PLP" to much laughter, but
it was unclear which one of
those gentlemen he was refer-
ring to.

Until Tough Call reported
on the power plant EIA in this
space a couple of weeks ago,
there was no substantive infor-
mation on this project any-
where in the public domain.
And for some strange reason,
BEC officials were unwilling to
answer basic questions for my
report, which pointed out their
atrocious track record on envi-
ronmental matters. Many of
those questions were answered
at the town meeting, however.

For example, the plant's
state-of-the-art generators will
burn heavy fuel oil so efficient-
ly that cancer-causing particu-
lates will be minimised and
more power will be produced
per unit of fuel.

Also, the fuel used will con-
tain less than two per cent sul-
phur, producing emissions that
are well within World Bank
guidelines. And heavy fuel
power plants already operate
throughout the Bahamas and
Caribbean, as well as in the US
and Europe.

Rising cost estimates for the
plant over the years were attrib-
uted to depreciation of the US
dollar and additional costs for
the fuel terminal, pipeline and

eRe ANEW MCN Mer cela



transmission lines. The plant
should be operational by next
spring, but it is unclear when
the new transmission lines will
be ready, or what other work
needs to be done to decommis-
sion the existing power plant
and upgrade the local grid,
which residents say is in poor
repair.

The town meeting featured
the usual slew of cranks who
took up most of the question
and answer time with lengthy
non-sequitors and personal
advertisements. These incon-
siderate bores can be found at
every public meeting in the
Bahamas, wasting time and
spouting nonsense. They espe-
cially love to talk about them-
selves, and they are a boon to
officials because they divert so
much time and attention from
the real issues.

Cay Mills, a local taxi driver,
said he was glad to see that
Abaconians were finally get-
ting some payback from cen-
tral government for their taxes.
but noted that “we should have
a say in whatever is brought
into our district. The cart is
before the horse with this town
meeting. Abaco people read,
are intelligent and want to be
part of their own future. We
want democracy, not an elected
dictatorship."

It was a sentiment that
seemed to be shared by many
in the audience, and was aptly
illustrated by Dave Ralph in a
recent editorial. He quoted the
prime minister's comments
about someone using the wrong
colour to paint the House of
Assembly: "You shouldn't
allow strangers to come in your
place and determine the decor.
I don't condemn initiative, but
uninformed initiative is not to
be tolerated."

Well, many folks in Abaco
feel the same way about the
power plant issue. According
to Ralph, "Government and
BEC have been negligentabout
informing Abaco on this pro-
ject and in requesting local
input."

Equally negligent is the fact
that there was no public con-
sultation in the EIA process.
The power plant assessment -
contracted to an unknown

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Florida firm with no website -
was completed last October but
is still under review by the
BEST Commission. The EIA
for the fuel terminal and
pipeline has only just been com-
pleted. And no environmental
management plan for the plant
has been produced, yet con-
struction is well under way.

Pericles Maillis likened these
concerns to a storm in a teacup:
"I was president of the BNT
when the Clifton power plant
was being expanded and we
don't have acid rain in Nassau.
These controversies can only
hurt the environmental move-
ment. This plant is not a sur-
prise, it's been years in the
making and was no secret."

But who knows what condi-
tions are at Clifton, or at other
BEC plants around the country,
when there is no public disclo-
sure and we have only the cor-
poration's self-serving state-
ments to rely on?

According to Philip Weech
of the BEST Commission, the
Wilson City EIA is now under
active review with other gov-
ernment agencies, which will
determine what needs to be
done with the environmental
management plan: "Oil tankers
in the Bahamas have an envi-
able safety record," he said.
"and there will be no impacts
on freshwater resources. Wet-
lands will be impacted along
the pipeline corridor, but we
feel that can be safely man-
aged."

Meanwhile, BNT officials
told me after the meeting that
they would be seeking full
involvement in the develop-
ment of the environmental
management plan for the Wil-
son City plant and any moni-
toring initiatives that will be put
in place. And Abaco's home-
grown green activists - Friends
of the Environment - said they
also want to be involved going
forward.

"The number of people that
attended the public meeting
shows not only that the people
of Abaco are concerned about
what happens in their commu-
nity but that they want to be
involved in the decisions that
affect them," Friends executive
director Kristin Williams told
me. "We hope that the govern-
ment and BEC move forward
in good faith and provide the
information necessary to assure
the public that the promises
they made are being kept."

This is not the place for a
technical discussion of the mer-
its of using heavy oil as opposed
to diesel in a power plant. Suf-
fice it to say that - although dif-
ferent spokesmen cited varying
figures at the meeting - using
diesel fuel would add millions
to the annual operating costs,
and it is not clear if the envi-
ronmental benefits would justi-
fy that. However, it is clear that
heavy fuel oil plants require
more maintenance than other
types of plants - and again,
BEC's track record is not very
inspiring.

However, the issue of con-
ventional versus renewable
energy, on Abaco in particular,

has not been sufficiently
explored in my view.

Although BEC is being
dragged kicking and screaming
(by Earl Deveaux, Fred Got-
tlieb and others) towards a
renewable energy future, a
national energy policy that
would promote these initiatives
is nowhere near being imple-
mented.

A consultative committee
chaired by Philip Weech was
formed after the election to
build on earlier efforts by the
Christie administration. A
draft report was completed last
November, but has only just
been posted to the BEST Com-
mission's website (almost a year
later) for public comment. And
a Chamber of Commerce meet-
ing has been scheduled for
tomorrow to discuss this with
Utilities Minister Phenton Ney-
mour.

Consultants funded by the
Inter-American Development
Bank have just been hired to
evaluate the economic disaster
that BEC is now known to be,
and to revamp our existing
energy regulatory regime. But
at this rate, we will all be dead
before any effective energy pol-
icy or fossil fuel reductions can
be implemented.

There is no doubt that con-
ventional energy must continue
to play a big role in power gen-
eration in the Bahamas. But as
one woman put it at the town
meeting: "We should take a
stand for renewable energy,
which could brand our island
and would attract so much
attention worldwide and set a
legacy of green change. This
government could set a huge
precedent in that regard."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM

P. O. Box N-7905 Visit oer erebstie at wee col, edu hs

NOTICE

Tenders are invited forthe provision of cooked food services al
The College of The Bohomas’ Grosvenor Close Campus,
Shirley Street

NASHLAWN CURTIS
BRENDA ADDERLEY

NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
CLAUDE LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5818
P. O. Box SS-5481

New Bight Cat Island NIKITA CURTIS

Tender documents may be collected frm:
Portia Smith Soden Services Centre
The College of The Bahamas
Quakes Field Campus
Contact; Wire, Elvina Bastion ot 507-4514

CYRIL WILLIAMS |
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

Tenders are to be addressed ti:
Wis. Chervl) Simms
V. P., Finance
The College of The Bahamas

DWAYNE DORSETTE RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672
EDNA DEAN

P. O. Box N-4912 SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818
IAN TRECO

P. O. Box N-3693

Deadline for submission
September 30th, 2009 at Spun.

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB
JASON SAUNDERS

Prince Charles Drive Tender document should be marked a5 follows:

Tender (109
PROPOSAL TO FROVIDE COOKED FOOD ON
THE COLLEGE OF THE RAH AIAS'
GROSVESOR CLOSE CAMPUS

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua
JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693 VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive
KEVA FAWKES

Matthew Town, Inagua Phe College of The Bahamas

WELLINGTON DORSETTE : . igh
reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

Site visit will take place on Momdlay September “44d.
Parties are to meet at the Physical Plant building,
The College of The Bahamas, Qakes Field Campus at Mam.

For all enquiries regarding the site visit
Contact Mr. Julian Miller at
(242) BEd, (247-302-4325 or (242)-370-45051





TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



For the best sporting action .. .

www .tribune24 7 .c

‘Not only can we
athletes, but we

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH so many local asso-
ciations and federations feel-
ing the financial pinch,
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion president Wellington
Miller said they may have dis-
covered the answer to their
WOES.

Coming out of a two-day
Solidarity meeting that he and
one of his vice presidents,
Algernon Cargill, attended in
Mexico last month, Miller said
they have formed a partner-
ship with all of the associa-
tions and federations for the
way forward.

At a meeting of the heads
of the sporting bodies last
week, Miller said they were
able to advise them of the fact
that there is sufficient money
available from both the Inter-
national Olympic Association
(BOA) and the Pan Ameri-
can Sports Organisation
(PASO).

“The Solidarity course have
$311 million available to help
federations and their ath-
letes,” Miller disclosed. “Not
only can we get funding for
Olympic athletes, but we can
also go to PASO, who have
$130 million, for those sports



BOA PRESIDENT WELLINGTON MILLER

build sports in the Bahamas
and to help with their travel
when they are sending teams
off.”

Miller, who still serves as
the president of the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas, said the only

“Let us know when you’re
going, where yowre going and
how much money you need,”
Miller said.

“They want to spend mon-
ey on helping the sporting
bodies. Once they plan it
properly and bring all of their

that are not in the Olympics.
“We can get moneys for
those organisations to help



requirement is that the fed-
erations and associations must
submit their plans.

information to us in time, we
can send off the request for
the moneys. But they will

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham greets Mark Knowles’ wife, Dawn...

PM proclaims September
13-19 Marh Knowles Week

sporting icon’s teacher growing up, said he
got goose bumps just sitting in the audience
when the ceremony took place.

“Tt was so disappointing after they went up
one set and they couldn’t hold on for the win,”
Knowles said. “It just happened so quickly.
But ’'m very proud of him, win or lose. He did
us proud just being in the final.”

Hewitt, an Australian now residing in the
Bahamas, said the honour was well deserving
for Knowles. “To have played professional
tennis on the circuit for 20-plus years is a
grind,” Hewitt said. “He’s had a lot of ups
and downs, but to be in the top 10 over 10
years is just amazing.”

At the US Open in Flushing Meadows, New
York, Hewitt got knocked out of the third
round of the men’s singles by Switzerland’s
Roger Federer, whose bid for a six straight
title was ruined by 20-year-old Juan Martin
del Potro of Argentina in yesterday’s final.

While he has dabbled a bit into doubles,
the No.32 ranked player in the world, said he
has never had an opportunity to play against
Knowles.

“But he’s a great player. He’s definitely put
the Bahamas on the map worldwide,” Hewitt
pointed out. “I think the entire country should
really be proud of his accomplishments.”

If there was anyone proud of his achieve-
ments, it was his family.

His father, Sammy Knowles, said he’s final-
ly delighted to see his son receive recognition
by the Bahamas Government, which was long
overdue.

“Tt’s good that finally somebody decided to
recognise him for how he has carried this coun-
try on his shoulder for so long,” he said. “It’s
been a long time. I’m happy that the Prime
Minister, the Minister of Sports and the coun-



MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest
shares a special moment with Mark Knowles...

try have finally recognised his achievements.”

Vicki Knowles, his most loyal fan, said her
son’s achievement will definitely go down as
one of the greatest.

But as a mother, she noted that there’s
mixed reaction whenever she’s in the stands
watching a live match, especially when he
comes out with a loss.

“The losses are difficult because you know
what he’s going through,” she said. “It’s not a
good feeling. But we try to cheer him up when-
ever it happens.”

And Dawn Knowles, his wife who is now his
main cheerleader in the stands, said her hus-
band “loves the Bahamas so much and I’m so
glad that he’s finally being recognised for his
accomplishments.

“He’s been the voice of the Bahamas for so
many years and everywhere he goes around
the world, the only thing he talks about is the
Bahamas. It’s a well deserved recognition for
him and I’m happy to be here to share it with
him.”

Or

i 2

_- moss fee!

A al

get funding for Olympic
can also go to PASO...’






Bahamas Olympic Association
president says they may have

discovered the answer to local
sporting bodies’ financial woes

have to provide us with the
receipts of how the money is
spent so that we can continue
to tap into the funding that is
available.”

If all of the paperwork is
properly done, Miller said
they can have funding avail-
able for the sporting bodies
from both the IOC and
PASO within a month’s time.

“It’s just as easy as that
because the moneys are avail-
able,” he said.

Unfortunately, Miller said
the plight of the Bahamas
Bodybuilding and Fitness
Federation, who is still seek-
ing $19,500 to send it’s 11-
member team off to Grena-
da to defend its title at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships on
September 30, was revealed
a little too late for the BOA
to seek any funding to assist
them.

“We want them to apply to

us in time so we can help
them,” Miller said. “AII they
have to do is provide us with
all your information, filled out
the forms, we will send it off
and you will have your mon-
ey.
“But you can’t come a
week or a month before you
are traveling and expect to
get the money. There’s a lot
of paper work that has to be
filed. But it’s amazing the
amount of money that is
available out there. If they
plan it right, they won’t be
carrying anymore.”

A lot of the countries, espe-
cially in the Caribbean, are
tapping into the Solidarity
funds that is being offered by
the IOC and the Bahamas is
going to take advantage of it
too.

Miller said not just sports,
but the IOC is also providing
funding to assist countries
with the environment, which



helps to make the atmosphere
more conducive for the ath-
letes.

And he said that funding is
also available for scholarships
in anumber of sports related
areas that he hopes that
Bahamians will also take
advantage of.

Today, Miller and Don
Cornish, another vice presi-
dent, will be traveling to Peru,
to take part in a two-day sem-
inar on Olympic Tourism.

“That’s another avenue of
where we can get funding, so
we’re going to try and see
what is available for the
Bahamas,” he said.

“We are heavy in tourism,
so we will see what is avail-
able for us to develop our
product.”

Miller and Cornish, who
doubles as president of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-
tion, will return home on Sun-

day.

Photos by Peter Ramsay/BIS

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Amateur Athletic Union coming to Bahamas Ky WIE

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Amateur Athletic
Union (AAU) is coming to
the Bahamas.

James Parker, the director
of sports for the AAU in
Orlando, Florida, was in town
along with other members to
meet with Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister to discuss the plans
for the Bahamas.

“We have decided to make
this one of our districts, so
next year we will be bringing
some teams over here,” Park-
er said. “We want to get more
teams and more athletes
involved.

“We will bring in some pro-
grammes to start some
leagues here. We will start
with basketball first and then
we will go on to baseball,
track and field, volleyball and
baseball.”

Tanya Ferguson, a former
basketball player turned ref-
eree while she was in the
Louisiana area, will be return-
ing home to serve as the
Bahamian director.

The local programme will
be based out of the College of





SHOWN (I-r) are Amateur Athletic Union members, including Bahamian Tanya Ferguson (fourth from left)
with James Parker (fifth from left), director of AAU, and BBF president Lawrence Hepburn, BOA president
Wellington Miller and coach Mario Bowleg

the Bahamas.

“We will be doing a lot of
regional events, which will be
good for the Bahamas,” Fer-
guson said. “We will have a
lot of teams from all over the
United States and Canada
coming here to compete.”

The players involved in the
programme will be between
the ages of 12-17. However,
there will also be a pony
league for players between
the ages of 8-12.

Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration president Lawrence

Hepburn said for years a lot
of the coaches in the
Bahamas have been longing
for the opportunity to expand
their programmes.

“A lot of the coaches want-
ed to go to their programmes,
now they will have the oppor-
tunity to have them come
here,” Hepburn stressed.
“They will only serve to help
us.
“We’re looking at employ-
ing the services of their coach-
es coming in to help us with
our programme. We will also

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Photo by Patrick Hanna/BIS

have their coaches clinics here
and we want to attract some
of their tournaments here.”
Hepburn said he antici-
pates only good things com-
ing out of the programme.
“Our federation will be
involved, but we will be
reaching out to a lot of peo-
ple,” Hepburn stated. “We
have some coaches here that
are already involved in the
AAU programme, but we
want to get more on board.”
With Ferguson coming
home, Hepburn said she will

bring a wealth of experience
to the programme. Already,
coach Mario Bowleg and
Darryl Sears, of Grand
Bahama, are involved in the
Florida-based programme.

“We want to also reach out
to other sporting bodies
because AAU is not just bas-
ketball,” Hepburn pointed
out. “AAU is a magnet of
many sports, so we’re hoping
that other federations and
associations will use this to
get more exposure for their
sports.”

Bowleg said the pro-
gramme is definitely needed
in the country.

“We have many high
school teams leaving here to
perform in these AAU tour-
naments,” Bowleg stressed.
“What AAU does is it will
allow us to have the tourna-
ments come here so that our
athletes can get the exposure
that they won’t get because
they can’t get to travel.

“Tt will help, not only the
Bahamas student-athletes as
it relates to getting scholar-
ships, but it will help the
teams coming to enhance the
national team programme,
especially during the summer
period.”



INBRIEF

SOCCER
CARIBS IN
ACTION

THE College of the
Bahamas’ men and
women soccer teams are
expected to take their
third and final trip this
weekend when they are
set to face Warner Col-
lege and Webber Col-
lege in Tampa, Florida.

The Caribs are sched-
uled to play Warner
College on Friday in the
women’s opener at 4
pm, followed by the
men at 6 pm. Then on
Sunday, the women are
set to open up against
Webber University at
noon with the men play-
ing at 2 pm.

SOFTBALL
BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to
hold a meeting on Fri-
day at 6 pm at McDon-

i

-

—
as

Goa
: t oe Wo LP P

ald’s, Thompson Boule-
vard, for all churches
interested in participat-
ing in the 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball
Classic.

The Classic is tenta-
tively set to get under-
way on Saturday, Sep-
tember 26 at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.
The Classic will com-
prise of the men, co-ed
and 17-and-under divi-
sions.

Also during the meet-
ing, the BSC will dis-
close plans for the 2009
Nicola Major Track and
Field Classic that is slat-
ed to take place on Sat-
urday, October 10, at
the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadi-
um.



BBF 15/16 National Team - 2nd Place Finish @ PONY Latin American
Caribbean Zone Championships (Highest Finish Ever by a Bahamian
National Baseball Team) - Team is presently ranked 2nd in the
Caribbean - PONY BASEBALL. (On this 16 member Team - Only 5

young men DO NOT attend school abroad)

Very successful
year for BBF

THE Bahamas Baseball Federation con-
tinues to meet its mandate of “Higher Edu-
cation through the Sport of Baseball”.

The BBF had a very successful year on the
international baseball scene with its historic
defeat - (Gurabo) Puerto Rico - 2nd Place
World Ranking by 08 PONY Baseball) - BBF
2nd Place Finish @ 15-16 PONY Latin Amer-
ican Tournament.

But the most outstanding accomplishment
this year is the overwhelming number of
young men whose lives are being impacted in
a positive way with baseball.

The BBF membership, its president and
his executive team, are extremely proud and
excited to announce the 44 young men who
have been afforded the opportunity to further
their education at various high schools and
colleges in the US as a result of baseball.

1) The recent "BBF 7th Annual Andre
Rodgers National Baseball Championships",
hosted in June 09, was a resounding success
on the baseball diamond which continues to
afford our talented young men the opportu-
nity to further their baseball dreams and edu-
cation:

US Colleges Present: Jackson State Uni-
versity (JSU) - (Head Coach - Omar Johnson)
/ North Carolina Central University (NCCU)
(Head Coach - Dr Henry White)

Young men offered

collegiate scholarships:

¢ Desmond Russell - JSU -(Christ School
Stand-Out - All Conference/All State) lead
the Bahamas senior men’s Team: 333 B.A

Coach Johnson was an assistant coach on
the German National Team and witnessed
Desmond's outstanding pitching performance
against the US National Team (Held the US
to 2 runs after 5 Innings)

¢ Aneko Knowles - JSU -(Christ School
Stand-Out - All Conference) - Member of
senior men's national team - Lead the 16-18

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



National Team (425 BA) Little League Latin
American Tournament

e Etienne Farquharson - NCCU - (Gradu-
ate of Pensacola Junior College with Acade-
mic All-American Honours (3.80) GPA:
Received a Baseball Scholarship & Academ-
ic Scholarship to attend NCCU - Member of
the senior men's national team.

2) The first ever BBF/PONY Baseball 2008
INFORMATIONAL\INSTRUCTIONAL
PROSPECT Showcase for High School/Col-
lege recruiting - (hosted Nov 08) was an over-
whelming success with the following young
men being afforded opportunities:

¢ Theodore Trae Sweeting - Christ School
- (BBF 2009 Junior Division 13-15 - MVP &
Recipient of the Charles Johnson Best Catch-
er Award)

¢ Jordon Farquharson - Christ School

¢ Perez Knowles - Rabun Gap

US High Schools Present: Darlington
School, Georgia/Christ School, North Car-
olina/ Christ Church School, Virginia / Rabun
Gap, Georgia

3) BBF Coaches Clinic hosted January of
this year, which was organised by fourth vice
president Etienne Farquharson and conduct-
ed by Troy State University head coach Bob-
by Pierce was a great success.

¢ Patrick Knowles Jr - Troy State - 09 grad-
uate from Christ School in Arden, North Car-
olina (09 All Conference & All State Honors)

¢ Richard Bain - Palm Beach Community
College: Drafted in the 45 Round / 1367 Pick
- of the Recent Major League Draft - Made
the tough decision to enter Junior College
which still allows him an opportunity to be
drafted higher over the next two years

(Once players enter a four-year college,
they can not be drafted until their Junior Grd
year). Players can be drafted from a Junior
College every year of their two-year eligibil-
ity)

The president wishes to thank and con-
gratulate the following persons for making
this years 09 entry class so successful:

¢ Patrick Knowles (Grand Bahama) -
YMCA Baseball Academy

e Will Rutherford (Grand Bahama) -
GBLL

¢ Stephanie Higgs (Grand Bahama) -
GBABA

¢ Etienne Farquharson (Inagua) fourth vice
president Terran Rodgers (Nassau) - JBLN,

¢ Theodore R Sweeting (Nassau)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

——————



PAGE 10

PAGE

WEDNESDAY,

11



t

SEPTEMBER 16,



r

2009

For the best sporting action . . .

www.tribune 242






io



— a

ve
Mass feels av

‘Not only can
we get funding
for Olympic
athletes...’

See page 9

Photos by Peter Ramsay/BIS

BAHAMIAN TENNIS ACE Mark Knowles with Governor General Arthur Dion Hanna (centre) and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at Government House...

PM proclaims September 13-
19 as Mark Knowles Week

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ore than two decades after
he launched his profession-
al tennis career, Mark
Knowles says he never envi-
sioned the response he
received from the Bahamas Government.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham pro-
claimed September 13-19 Mark Knowles
Week at a welcome home dinner reception on
Monday night at Government House. And
he received a citation from Governor General
Arthur D Hanna.

While he would have won all four Grand
Slam titles, albeit in two different doubles
categories, this year alone Knowles played
in three of those finals, winning the mixed
doubles at Wimbledon in July with German
Anna-Lens Groenefled.

However, the 38-year-old five-time

Bahamian tennis ace receives citation from
Governor General during welcome home
dinner reception at Government House

Olympian and his Indian men’s doubles part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi lost in both the Aus-
tralian Open in January and the US Open
on Sunday.

“Tt feels good, especially coming off the
heels of the disappointing loss at the US
Open,” said Knowles, who returned home to
a “here’s welcome” one day after playing a
rain delayed final that had been postponed
since Friday.

“Tt’s nice to be here and be honoured by the

government. To have all of these dignitaries,
along with my family and friends, is very spe-
cial.”

As the country’s most celebrated local and
international player continues to look ahead
to the future, Knowles said he’s even more
inspired to have the support of the nation
behind him.

“Thad a long career and I’ve accomplished
a whole lot, but I still feel that there is still a
lot more for me to accomplish,” he stressed.

“So I’m just going to go ahead and enjoy this
moment.”

Among those sharing the moment with
Knowles was Emile Knowles, his childhood
friend who hit balls with him when he got
started at age five, along with former number
one singles player in the world, Lleyton
Hewitt.

Knowles, who considers himself to be the

SEE page 9

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER ;

usiness

2009

ROYAL FIDELITY

Uae Cla g

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



Recession drives 65%
cremation increase

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

uneral homes have seen a

drastic increase in the less

expensive cremation

option over full burial

year-over-year, some
experiencing an almost 65 per cent
increase, Tribune Business was told
yesterday, as official figures indicated
a7 per cent increase in New Provi-
dence funeral fees - coupled with the
recession - was responsible for the
change.

In the Department of Statistics’ July
consumer price index, New Providence
funerals fees increased by 6.6 per cent,
while fees in Grand Bahama increased
by 7.9 per cent.

Many funeral homes were surprised
by the change, some saying they were

Cheaper option much in vogue, as $1,300
fee much less than $5,000 for full burial

“shocked” to hear that funeral expens-
es had gone up.

Managing director of Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Audley Fraser, said
his company had not increased its fees
in over three years.

According to him, despite the
increased cost of shipping caskets, the
company had tried to absorb the
expense in order to keep their prices
competitive.

However, Mr Fraser suggested the
rising cost of burial in Grand Bahama
- and the markedly depressed market
- may be the reason for that island’s
almost 8 per cent increase in funeral

expenses.

He and other funeral home person-
nel agreed that the number of families
cremating their deceased loved ones
has increased exponentially since 2008.

With the cost of a basic funeral
pegged at almost $5,000, and a direct
cremation at about $1,300, persons
were opting out of the costly and
rapidly declining burial plots.

“Tt has increased drastically,” said
a director at Butlers Funeral Home.
“Tm doing a lot of cremations.”

She told this paper she was busy
working on two full funerals, but that
the requests for cremations far out-

weighed that of the traditional funeral
and burial.

A Secretary at Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium said his
company had seen an almost 65 per
cent increase in the number of crema-
tions performed at their crematorium.

“It’s cheaper than having a funeral
service,” he said.

He suggested that there have been a
lot more deaths recently as well, blam-
ing the increase on an overall decrease
in health throughout New Providence.

“Cremation is the main solution
people resort to these days,” said the
Restview secretary.



Businesses see 15-30% summer sales decreases

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE recession bit even
deeper into the Bahamian
economy in July-August 2009
with many businesses report-
ing year-over-year sales drops
of 15-30 per cent, a former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president yesterday
confirming that his business
had suffered the “most signif-
icant” top line decline year-to-
date last month - more than
10 per cent.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, presi-
dent of the Superwash laun-
dromat chain, told Tribune
Business he “agreed 100 per
cent” that many Bahamian
businesses had suffered their
worst year-over-year sales per-
formances to date during those
two summer months, based on
his company’s performance
and reports he had heard from
other companies.

“Sales were down signifi-
cantly in August,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Overall, my August

sales were down just over 10
per cent. It crashed through
the 10 per cent mark for the
first time. In previous months,
my sales were trending down 6
per cent, 7 per cent, 8 per cent
month to month.

“The most significant drop
so far was in August, for
August 2009 compared to
August 2008. A lot of people
have made mention of that;
that August was probably the
worst month yet. And a lawyer
friend of mine said today that
July was just appalling. I can
concur with that - my business
was down, no doubt about
that.”

Assessing the reasons for
the summer sales declines, Mr
D’Aguilar said many busi-
nesses felt large numbers of
Bahamians were continuing to
shop in Florida, despite the
recession and corresponding
increase in
unemployment/reduction in
disposable incomes.

As a result, he suggested
that both the Government and
private sector organisations

Judicial Review threat
to $105m power plant

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attorney will this week
write to all government agen-
cies involved in the permit-
ting process for BEC’s $105
million Wilson City power
plant to demand that his Aba-
co-based clients be involved
in “meaningful consultation”
on the project, with moves for
a Supreme Court injunction
to follow if construction
recommences.

Fred Smith, a Freeport-
based partner in the Callen-
ders & Co law firm, also
warned that he would launch
a Judicial Review challenge
in the courts - similar to the
one he instigated against Dis-
covery Land Company’s Bak-
er’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Attorney set to demand
meaningful consultation
on BEC project for
clients, and seek possible
injunction to stop work

project on Great Guana Cay,
which has reached the Privy
Council - if BEC attempted
to have the necessary con-
struction permits “rubber
stamped and retroactively
applied” so the power plant
could proceed.

Accusing successive gov-
ernments of failing to heed
the warning given by the Gua-
na Cay situation, when it
came to following statutory
and due process and consult-
ing with all affected parties,
Mr Smith said both the
Christie and Ingraham admin-
istrations had “put the cart
before the horse” when it
came to the BEC power
plant.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment had delivered “a slap in
the face” to democratic insti-
tutions and their processes
through their handling of the
Wilson City project, the Cal-
lenders & Co partner said the
administration itself had been
responsible for generating
opposition by its decision to
“proceed clandestinely,
secretly and without permits”.

Informing Tribune Business
that he represented a number
of Bahamian and foreign
homeowners on Abaco, Mr
Smith said of his clients:
“They are up in arms about

SEE page 2B



DIONISIO D’AGUILAR

needed to start a full-fledged
campaign to encourage
Bahamians to shop at home,
keeping what money was
being generated in the local
economy.

“The perception was that
the airport was stuffed full of
people going to Florida to
shop,” Mr D’Aguilar said.
“People are making their
wages here and shooting them-
selves in the foot. They will
argue that prices are too
expensive here, but they need
to spend in the Bahamas to
support local jobs.

* July and August worst year-over-year comparisons for

many Bahamian firms, as Superwash’s chief confirms

top line decline ‘crashed through 10% for first time in August’
* Return air fares fall below $200 to Miami

“Not enough emphasis is
being placed by the Govern-
ment and organisations like
the Chamber of Commerce on
shopping at home. If people
are going to the US to shop,
there are fewer dollars in the
economy and less money is cir-
culating, which causes even
more disruption.

“There should be real
emphasis, a real marketing
campaign to say consumers
need to stay at home and shop.
The situation is going to get
worse before it gets better.”

What is aiding Bahamian
travel to the US is the dra-
matic drop in air fares, as car-
riers reduce prices to boost
load factors at a time when
travel is reduced during the
tourism season low point. For
instance, a return fare to Mia-
mi on American Eagle now

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

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costs less than $200, some $98
plus $90 in taxes.

“T haven’t flown for under
$200 on American Eagle for
a long time,” the former
Chamber president observed.

Mr D’ Aguilar said retailers
were among the businesses
who had seen the sharpest
downturns in July and August,
something they believed had
not been helped by a shorter
Back-to-School season. Archi-
tects and engineers were also
seeing a shortage of work, with
companies who still had liquid
assets and the ability to borrow
placing all projects on hold.

“All we’re hearing is doom
and gloom,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “We need something big,
and maybe this Baha Mar
thing is big enough to give
people a glimmer of hope, but
that’s still a long way off.”

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BAHAMAS
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FREEPORT
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MARSH HARBOUR
(242) 367-3135

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‘Destabilisation’
fears on change
to NIB strategy

* Former finance minister
‘rather frightened’ at
recommendations for
more aggressive
NIB investments

* Warns of potential asset-
liability mismatch, and
drain on foreign
reserves/pressure on
exchange rate if more
NIB assets placed as
banking system deposits

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance min-
ister yesterday said he was
“rather frightened” by recom-
mendations suggesting that the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) be operated as a pri-
vate pension fund, as this
could ultimately destabilise
this nation’s monetary system
and create pressure for a
devaluation of the Bahamian
dollar.

Both NIB’s eighth actuarial
review and the 2005 Social
Security Reform Commission
report have urged a more
aggressive stance on NIB’s
investments, including limit-
ing the proportion of invest-
ment assets held in govern-
ment and public sector securi-
ties, but James Smith said such
an approach had created the
first “financial crisis” he faced
when taking over as Central
Bank of the Bahamas gover-
nor in the 1980s.

NIB traditionally has a mul-
ti-million doNar sum on
deposit with the Central Bank
at the end of each month, the
Commission’s report noting
that this averaged $91.1 mil-
lion over the 12 months to
December 2004. No interest is
earned on this at all.

However, Mr Smith said
that soon after taking over as
governor, the decision was tak-
en to put these surplus NIB
assets to better use by placing
them in the commercial bank-

SEE page 4B

| Learn more at reyalfidelity.com |

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Don’t sleep on client attention

ZLZZZZZZZZ. Are you putting
your clients, or potential clients, to
sleep? Or are they excited to see
you and talk with you? Are you los-
ing their attention on calls? Or when
you are sitting in front of them? If
you have not asked this question,
now is a good time to do so. If your
client is not involved in the conver-
sation or not asking you questions,
then they are not engaged.

Put the car in gear

If your client is not engaged then
you’re not going anywhere. Just like
a car sitting there with the engine
running, yet you have not put the
car in gear.

I recently read an article where a
professional asked a client about
sales people. His reply was that
“sales people are boring”. They basi-
cally came in, sat down, asked rou-
tine questions like: “How are you?’
(when they really don’t care), run
on about their business and/or them-
selves and then ask for business.
BORING! Yeah, I would be bored
myself... zzzzzzzzzzzz. ’'m actually
already half asleep.

How to keep a client’s attention!
I wrote about this before. Ask
questions. Remember my maxim:
Why? Why? Why? Why? Who?
Who? Who? What? What? GET

Promotional

Marketing

by Scott Farrington



THE POINT YET?

Focus the attention on your client
and not yourself. Stop boring people
to tears. Ask the ‘5Ws’ (discussed
in previous article).

Put yourself into your clients shoes
and see how it feels. Think about
what it feels like to be on the other
end of that conversation, in which

someone is just talking about them-
selves - itis BORING ! That is how
buyers feel when salespeople pitch
instead of ask questions.

So how do you do this? How do
you avoid putting people to sleep?
By the way, if you do put people to
sleep, I know some people who are
sleep deprived and could use your
servic.es

SIMPLE, ask questions, shut up
and listen.

OK, article finished. ’m not a
sleep therapist.

All of these marketing strategies
are certain to keep your business on
top during these challenging eco-
nomic times. Have a productive and

profitable week.
Remember: “THOSE WHO
MARKET WILL MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is president
of SunTee EmbroidMe, a promo-
tional and marketing company spe-
cialisng in uniforms, embroidery, silk
screen printing and promotional
products. Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has assist-
ed Bahamian businesses from vari-
ous industries in marketing them-
selves. Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe on
East Shirley Street, or by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by telephone
at 242-393-3104.

Judicial Review threat to $105m power plant

FROM page 1B

the lack of consultation
through the local government
process, or through the per-
mitting processes of central
government agencies. This is
probably the single largest
capital expenditure by gov-
ernment in Abaco.”

The Wilson City power
plant project was instigated
under the former Christie
administration, which initially
looked at a site at Snake Cay.
That was ultimately rejected,
due to its proximity to a
planned National Park and

environmentally/ecologically
sensitive area, Wilson City
being chosen as the alterna-
tive.

Criticising both govern-
ments for their failure to
involve Abaconians in the
consultative process before
construction started, Mr
Smith said this had created
negative instead of positive
energy in the community’s
attitude towards the Wilson
Cay plant.

“Instead, they proceeded
clandestinely, secretly, with-
out permits, not giving infor-
mation.... They put the cart

before the horse,” Mr Smith
told Tribune Business.

“This all goes back to issues
of central government feeling
it can do what it wants in the
Out Island colonies. It is Nas-
sau treating the Family
Islands as if they have no say.
It is a central government dic-
tatorship once again.

“Generally, government
departments go ahead with
their development plans
before they get permits. This
is something that should not
happen. It’s a slap in the face
to democratic institutions. It
demonstrates that statutory




























The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:



1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com

mechanisms for local govern-
ment permitting, health and
safety, the environment, are
meaningless. This is a repeat
of the Guana Cay fiasco, and
I beg the FNM to proceed dif-
ferently in the future.”

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of the environment, acknowl-
edged in this newspaper yes-
terday that government
departments and utilities
often went ahead with their
development/construction
plans without first obtaining
the necessary permits and
approvals, unlike private
developers, who were
required to go through the
proper processes and chan-
nels.

When asked why the Gov-
ernment appeared not to have
learnt anything from the Gua-
na Cay case and public reac-
tions to other controversial
developments, Mr Smith
replied: “I don’t think they’re
slow learners. They haven’t
learnt at all.”

What is surprising is that
the Government would again
risk incurring the wrath of
Abaconians, a generally well-
educated population well
aware of their rights and
statutory processes, given
what had happened with the
Guana Cay development.

Pointing out the hypocrisy
of requiring private develop-
ers to abide by the laws and
statutory processes, when
government departments
were not, Mr Smith said: “The
Government is not a law unto
itself. Each department, statu-



FRED SMITH

tory authority, BEC and
BTC, are statutory corporate
institutions that are subject to
the law like any private devel-
oper.”

The Government appears
to have anticipated Mr
Smith’s possible legal chal-
lenge to the Wilson City pow-
er plant’s continued con-
struction, having placed all
building on hold until the nec-
essary permits and approvals
are obtained.

The Callender’s & Co part-
ner said he had been instruct-
ed by his clients to write to
all the relevant government
departments and agencies
objecting to the lack of con-
sultation, and request that
they now be involved in a

meaningful process.

Failing that, Mr Smith said
he would seek a Supreme
Court injunction to prevent
construction on the Wilson
City power plant from pro-
ceeding until all the required
permits were in place and his
clients “had an opportunity
to participate in a meaning-
ful consultative process”.

“It’s a question of the
process by which the permits
were applied for, considered
and approved,” Mr Smith
said, adding that the issue
went beyond the permits
themselves.

“Tf they simply rush to get
the permits rubber-stamped
and retroactively applied,
such permits will be chal-
lenged under a Judicial
Review,” he said. “In the 21st
century Bahamas, it is high
time that government institu-
tions respected the relevant
laws and processes.”

Mr Smith said he and his
clients would soon have to
assess whether work on the
Wilson City power plant had
stopped, as the Government
had said. He told Tribune
Business that the last time he
went to the site, he was barred
from entering, and a row with
security guards broke out
after he subsequently started
taking photos outside the
fenced-off site.

To prevent such situations
from occurring again, Mr
Smith said it was incumbent
on all private and public sec-
tor developers to “be account-
able and transparent, provide
the information and interact

2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

with a meaningful consulta-
tion process”.

He added that while BEC’s
general manager, Kevin Bas-
den, had asserted at last
week’s Town Meeting that
three Environmental Impact
Assessments (EIAs) had been
conducted on Wilson City,
this was relatively meaning-
less if local residents were not
given an opportunity to com-
ment, and their concerns
made a part of the process.

His clients’ main concerns,
Mr Smith said, were the loca-
tion of the power plant;
whether Bunker C fuel was
the correct one and the impli-
cations arising from its use;
whether government had
properly explored wind, solar
and other alternative ener-
gies; and environmental and
health and safety issues.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANASTASIA KEMP
and or ANASTASIA KEMP MCPHEE of TURTLE DRIVE,
OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
to change the name to ANASTASIA BRIDGEWATER. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service.
All information will be treated as strictly confidential.



Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supply company which provides a wide range of
premium health care products seeks a qualilied candidate
for the following position:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Ridiniaine istiaa indie

* Assisting in the promotion of current products and
introducing mew item to the Healthcare industry,

The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays

* Monitoring and tracking of clents needs and requests

* Working as part of a team in the promotion of company's
products:

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+ Sualificalions:

years in mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

or Business Administration.

Effective conumunication and presentation ekills (writhen
end orall.

Proven selling skills
Effective trrie-managemnent planning and organizing skills,

Computer literacy. Well-versed with Windows, Word
Pronessing (preferably MS VWard), Spraacdsneets (preferably

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and Exea), Dasktop Publishing, and Data Management.

benefits packages. Interest applications should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

» Sel-motivetor end good tem player The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The position offers a competitive salary with sales
incentives.

Successful candidate must be willing to travel to Family
Islands and the United States, as required.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:

acarey@sunmedicalcompany.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3B



NIB proceeds with
$1.2m prosecutions

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NATIONAL Insur-
ance Board (NIB) continued
with is prosecution of several
prominent Bahamian compa-
nies owing collectively more
than $1.2 million yesterday,
with some of those companies
already settling their arrears
incrementally over time.

Jones Communications
CEO, Wendall Jones, pleaded
guilty to owing NIB $430,000

in delinquent contribution
payments. The company has
since paid back almost
$100,000 of the $180,000
needed to met NIB’s settle-
ment threshold.

Attorney for NIB, Heather
Maynard, told the court that
her company would be happy
to negotiate the liquidation
of Jones Communications’
remaining amount after they
have paid off 40 per cent of
their arrears - almost
$180,000.

Global United chief exevu-

Real | Estate

(En eR ata O mam ACLU ed a [eg

Everywhere The A ey Ll



tive, Jackson Ritchie, has
been charged with owing NIB
$161,079.98 in unpaid contri-
butions. Mr Ritchie has also
entered into negotiations with
NIB to make incremental
payments on the total amount
owed in arrears.

Both Mr Jones and Mr
Ritchie are expected back in
court to continue settlement
arrangements on November
17.

Also expected back in court
are owners of the radio sta-
tions More 94 FM and Spirit
(92.5 FM), Galen and Henry
Saunders. They have been
charge with owning NIB
$256,262 in outstanding con-
tributions. Ms Maynard
revealed that the men had
paid $43,000 thus far of the
total amount owed.

Solomon's Mines managing
director Mark Finlayson, who
was charged with owing NIB
$377,092.90 in contributions
between June 2007 and
December 2008, and pleaded
guilty to the charges, failed to
appear in court yesterday.
Consequently Magistrate
Lasalle issued a bench war-
rant for his arrest.

Mr Finlayson's staff have
also complained that the com-
pany has been delinquent in
paying salaries for several
months this year. He has pre-
viously blamed the economic
downturn for late pay
cheques.

A bench warrant was also
issued for the owner of
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs, Mervin
Sweeting, who has been mak-
ing payment on his delinquent
NIB contribution, but failed
to show up for the hearing.

NIB has constantly said it
regrets having to take legal
action against companies, but
maintain it is a last resort to
negotiating payment arrange-

NOTICE OF

SPECIAL CALLED MEETING

ALL MEMBERS of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited
Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting

Date:

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.
Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



ments.

NIB contends that legal
action is a last resort for past-
due contribution collections,
suggesting it is only imposed
when “they (employers) fail
to take advantage of the rela-
tively generous option of
entering into installment
agreements to resolve
arrears”.

As the economic crisis bore
down on businesses, however,
NIB imposed an amnesty
period to delay the applica-
tion of interest on those
installment agreements.

The eighth actuarial review
tabled in Parliament along-
side the 2008 Annual Report
revealed that the future value
of NIB's expenditure could
exceed reserves in the long
term.

However, NIB is confident
that changes in administra-
tion of the fund will allow for
it meet its long term chal-
lenges. “Presently, the fund
is meeting all its obligation,”
the report said.

* Recording of journal entries

* Handling accounts payable functions

« Preparing submission for franchisors

« Praparation of bank reconciliations
* Preparing financial statements

* Establishing & monitonng internal controls

Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in
Accounting, at laast 5 years experience, knowledge
of retail/food accounting, be proficient in Quickbooks,
Excel and other MS Office applications. Must be able
to multi-task, work with minimum supervision and
possess a high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application/resume to 394-4933
Deadline for applications: Sept 25, 2009



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

Cattage Lat With Private Weach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Tel:242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

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POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:

LOCATION:

OVERALL PURPOSE:

icpatiaceaie la com

com Dt's about you... Let's talk.

Commercial Supervisor
Accounting

L10005

Finance Manager

Country Finance Department or Cluster Office

Position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for a country or group oF
countries within the Cluster. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews ship-
ments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Ac-

counts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
° Manage the Accounting Commercial activities for a country or group of
countries within the Cluster.

discount, and credit

Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs for the country/cluster.
Manage customer profiles.

Establish AR Credit limits.

Principal contact for Commercial controller.

Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.

Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

1st level of approval for Credit notes.

Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

Provide customers analyses, and review customer data base in term of

Performs other assignments as required.
Ability to supervise the accounting staff at local station

eile UM QUALIFICATIONS:
High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
Minimum of 4 years of commercial and accounting experience is required.
Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading an
accounting department.
A background in commercial credit and accounting required.
Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and per

form data analysis.

PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access,

Word, Office

Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does
a lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared

Service Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
° Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent

education

Please email resume to;
Romell K. Knowles I
Country Manager

bahamaboiii@hotmail.com

Resumes can be dropped off to DHL Bahamas corporate office — East Bay Street,
Island Traders Building, Nassau Bahamas.

Please be advised only those applicants whose resumes are taken into
consideration will be contacted. No phone calls will be accepted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BFSB gears to launch top graduate choice

Pictured are members of the
2009 FSI Student Award selec-
tion committee in advance of the
interviews with candidates, the
final step in the selection
process. Left to right (seated)
are Joan Pinder, former chair-
School of Business, College of
the Bahamas; Karen Lockhart,
College of the Bahamas; Kim
Bodie, Bahamas Institute of
Financial Services; and Anastacia
Johnson, Association of Interna-
tional Banks & Trust Companies
in The Bahamas.

Standing are: Renee Barrow, SG
Hambros Bank & Trust; Cypri-
anna Bethel, Central Bank of the

NIB, frompage 1B

ing system, the theory being
that they would generate bet-
ter investment returns as bank
deposits.

While this may have been
the case, Mr Smith explained
that apart from creating an
asset-liability mismatch
between short-term bank
deposits and NIB’s long-term
liabilities, this strategy also
expanded the money supply
and created an unsustainable
credit boom by expanding
funds available for lending.

With much of these funds
going on imports, it led to an
immediate drain on the
Bahamas’ foreign exchange
reserves, Imposing pressure on
this nation’s fixed one:one
exchange rate with the US dol-
lar and raising - at least tem-
porarily - the risk of devalua-
tion.

“Tn fact, in the 1980s when I
took over the Central Bank,
that was when we had our first
financial crisis,” Mr Smith,
now CFAL’s chairman, told
Tribune Business yesterday.

“The reserves went down by
$100 million to $200 million in
the first couple of months.



Bahamas; Nadine Frazier, Insur-

ance Institute of the Bahamas;
and Nicole Pratt-Rolle, Society
of Trust & Estate Practitioners.

Selection Committee members
not pictured include: Mario
Smith, Bahamas Association of

Everyone brought cars in and
government revenues went up,
but after that we had trouble
meeting our foreign commit-
ments.”

As a result, Mr Smith said
any change in NIB’s invest-
ment and asset allocation
strategies should not be made
in isolation, but instead dis-
cussed thoroughly with the
Ministry of Finance and Cen-
tral Bank as the managers of
this nation’s fiscal and mone-
tary affairs respectively. No
decision could be taken in a
vacuum.

“In our case, when we put
[the NIB funds] in the system,
it immediately went to
imports, so many of your
reserves are gone,” Mr Smith
said. “It could destabilise your
monetary system, reduce for-
eign reserves and put pressure
on the exchange rate, which
could lead to devaluation.

“Tm really frightened by
looking at NIB as a private
fund,” he added, urging that
the Bahamian social security
system be viewed from a
national development per-
spective.

Explaining that the Fund
was “a safety net for the Gov-
ernment”, Mr Smith said hav-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ISAGAR ENTERPRISES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)










Compliance Officers, Roger
Brown, Bahamas General Insur-
ance Association; Zelma Wilson,
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants; and Jeremy Dyck,
CFA Society of the Bahamas.

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) has
launched the process to recog-
nise an outstanding 2009 gradu-
ate from within the School of
Business, College of the
Bahamas.

This initiative has been a joint
venture by BFSB, the College
of the Bahamas, and the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas since
2002, with the co-ordinating and
selection committees compris-
ing representatives from the
three sponsoring agencies, plus
the Professional Industry Asso-

ciation Working Group
(PIAWG) -— a representative
body for the various financial
services industry-related associ-
ations here in the Bahamas.

The Student Award pro-
gramme is an integral compo-
nent of BFSB’s ongoing Finan-
cial Centre Focus (FCF) pro-
gramme, which addresses issues
such as challenges impacting the
sustained growth and develop-
ment of the industry; improve-
ments to the level of service; and
attracting and maintaining qual-
ified professionals.

ing a large percentage of the
Crown’s assets owned by NIB
was a distinct advantage if it
ever came to a government
debt restructuring.

“Government has a huge
debt to NIB, and if you run
into repayment - say a bond
falls due - you can restructure
much easier than if you went
to a foreign bank,” the former
minister of state for finance
under the Christie administra-
tion said.

The lack of diversified
investment options in the
Bahamian market remained
painfully obvious at year-end
2008, with $651.35 million or
43.5 per cent of NIB’s invested
assets being held in Bahamas
Government Registered
Stock.

NIB’s eighth actuarial
report revealed this was simi-
lar to the position attained in
2006, when 56 per cent of
NIB's then-$1.35 billion invest-
ment portfolio was held in
government securities, such as
government-registered stock
and Treasury Bills.

According to the report,
some 24 per cent of NIB's
assets were then invested in
short-term securities, such as
Certificates of Deposit (CDs)

and Treasury Bills, with 98.6
per cent of all investments
concentrated in the Bahamas.

Not surprisingly, the eighth
actuarial report concluded:
"With such heavy concentra-
tion in several areas, the
investment portfolio is not well
diversified.

"As a result, the overall
Fund is relatively high risk
with return expectations that
do not justify the current level
of risk.

"It is therefore recom-
mended that gradual reduc-
tions be made to the propor-
tions held in Bahamas Gov-
ernment, quasi-government
securities and short-term
investments, and that the posi-
tion held overseas be
increased gradually to around
20 per cent.”

The eighth actuarial report
found that between 2001 and
2006, the NIB enjoyed an
average 6 per cent yield on its
investments, and a 5.5 per cent
yield on its reserves.

But with inflation averaging
2 per cent per annum over that
period, the real rate of return
on reserves was 3.5 per cent.

And the report by the Social
Security Reform Commission,
appointed by the former

NOTICE
THE CHISWICK RIVERSIDE EXECUTIVES, LP
In Voluntary Liquidation

1. The reason for the winding-up and dissolving is that the
Partnership has ceased to carry on business.

Christie administration, noted
that returns on NIB's reserves,
due to declining interest rates,
had fallen from 10 per cent in
1983 to below 6 per cent in
2003.

The Commission's report
noted the "severe and impru-
dent mismatch" between the
maturity date of NIB's assets
and liabilities, with some 35
per cent of investments in low-
yielding, short-term Treasury
Bills and deposits as at
December 2004.

With long-term liabilities
being matched by short-term
assets, the report warned:
"This enormous mismatch
places significant long-term
risk upon the long-term via-
bility of the National Insur-
ance Fund, as it is presently
structured."

At the point the Commis-
sion's report was written, in
2005, it said NIB was faced
with "re-investment risk", as
a result of needing to find new
investment opportunities for
maturing investments in a
market where interest rates
were declining.

"Stated another way, only
24 per cent of NIB's invest-
ment portfolio has a maturity
of 10 years or more, yet it is
Known that more than 86 per
cent of liabilities and commit-
ments extend more than 10
years,” the report said.

"In the fiscal year 2004,
some $60 million of invest-
ments are due to mature, not
including $350 million of bank

This week, the selection com-
mittee will be completing inter-
views with the finalists, who will
be announced shortly. The 2009
Student of the Year will be
recognised at BFSB’s Annual
Industry Excellence Awards
Ceremony on October 22.

Again this year, SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) has
come on board as sponsor of the
FSI Student of the Year Award,
while Credit Suisse’s Nassau
branch is supporting the student
awards programme as a con-
tributor.

deposits and Treasury Bills
that will also need to be
renewed."

The Commission again
made the point that the NIB
Fund had "too great an expo-
sure" to the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system and
the Government through its
limited investment options,
something that impacted its
ability to negotiate better rates
of return if 1ts funds were not
needed.

This "systematically disad-
vantaged" NIB, as the funds
either end up being placed at
lower rates or are left sitting
idle at the Central Bank. At
end-December 31, 2004, NIB
had $83.2 million on deposit
at the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, earning no interest,
with the previous month-end
balances for the previous 12
months averaging $91.1 mil-
lion.

"Tf these funds were invest-
ed, incremental income of $4.5
million could have been
derived,” the report said. "At
an average of $250 per month,
that incremental interest
income alone could have paid
the annual pension of 1,500
pensioners."

The Commission report said
NIB was exposed to major
country risk due to the fact all
its investments were concen-
trated in the Bahamas, and
with $460 million investments
tied to Bahamian Prime, the
Fund was exposed to even
small changes in interest rates.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DELIGHT FOUNTAIN LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JARETH VENTURES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

2. The Partnership is and will continue to be able to discharge
or pay or provide for the payment of all claims, debts, liabilities
and obligations in full.

3. The winding-up will commence on the date when the Notice
of Dissolution is submitted to the Registrar.

4. The Liquidators are authorized to carry on the business of
the Partnership.

5. The names of Liquidators are Kyrene Kelty and Kristina Fox.
No. remuneration is proposed to be paid to the Liquidators.

6. The Liquidators are not required to send all Limited Partners
a statement of account prepared by or on its instructions in
respect of its actions and transactions.

Dated this 11th day of September, 2009.

Kyrene Kelty and Kristina Fox
Liquidators

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ELGIN VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

YANI INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PAMSCIAM HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 200.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 15, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 14th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supoly company which provides a wide range of
premium health care producia seeks a qualified candidate
for the following, position:

SALES MANAGER
Pri Dutien inchucie:
Spearhoading the growth of current bands‘products, and
introducing new items to the healthcare community, retailers
end the general public in Nassau and the Family Islands.
Supervising and training a small team of salas parsons.

Working with merchandisers to train their staff and promote
products.

Monitoring and tracking sales by category, on a monthly
basis.

Planning and instituting product forecasts,

Planning and organizing prometians and events for the
products.

I
qualifications:

At leased three (3) years @x perience in similar position.

The ability to reat the high standards set out by the
company and manufacturers.

Be solf-motivated with the ability to work independently,
Possess good haadership and inberpersonal skills,

Computer literacy. Well-versed wilh Windows, Word
Processing (preferably WS Word), Spreadsheets (orefaraity
Excel), Dasktop Publishing, and Data Management.

Competitive salary, commensurate with qualifications,
with sales incentives, plus vehicle allowance.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



ils








Bs ORLANDO

















inh:GO°FQ2°R UU Mostly sunny with a Patchy clouds with Clouds and sun with a Some sun with a Periods of sun, a Partly sunny, t-storms . The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
eo ae Pe thunderstorm in spots. showers. thunderstorm around. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
wot ie it | High: 90° High: 88° High: 90° High: 89°
‘ Tet r High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 80° see EOE
TAMPA Ls ; ET ET
High: 90° F/32° C t oie 100° F g9°-85° F 94°-86° F 98°-83° F High _Ht(ft.) Low _Ht. (ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:07am. 3.2 11:20am. 0.3
pi “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 5:36pm. 3.6 11:58pm. 03
@ levati the h bod thing that effects h Id feels. Te tt flect the high and the low for the d p p
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: r —— Temperature 7:15pm. 35 1:10pm. 0.0
r : ; a ek GIN es cscs crate Osteen tatereaaucstcceeeass 91” F/33° C Saturday 74lam. 3.7 31am. 00
y “i all , . Low: 80° F/27°C LOW o.eseretesteeeen 79" F/26° C 8:01pm. 34 2:01pm. 0.0
5 ay , Normal high. .... 88° F/31° CG
C 7; Normal low 75° F/24° C
a pp @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Migh .....ccccsscssssseeesiene ea SUN AND IVIOON
4 Seed High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's LOW oo. eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 78° F/26° C
" Low: 77° F/25°C >a Precipitation |} j || ~~ Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise..... 4:32 a.m.
a a - @ a. As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccccsssssescssessseeee 0.33" ‘Sunset....... 7:13 p.m. Moonset. .... 5:42 p.m.
Wall . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date 29. New First Full Last
High: 88°F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C Normal year to date oo... 34.86" 7
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Low: 79° F/26°C a Low: 77° F/25°C i
a AccuWeather.com as
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“on al High: 91° F/33°C See no ringe
Yn fe Low: 78° F/26° c NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C
——_ Low: 79° F/26° C
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KEY WEST ee = CAT ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C a High: 87°F/31°C
Low. 80°F 27 6 ae Low: 76° F/24°C
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* = B
= GREAT EXUMA —_ SAN SALVADOR
ANDROS Lov: 78°F/26°C eae
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's s ae :
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33°C :
Low: 77° F/25° C FP
a
a
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday in MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C
FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C — x Low: 74° F/23° C
Albuquerque 74/23 56/13 t 72/22 55/12 t Indianapolis 78/25 59/15 pe 78/25 57/13 pe Philadelphia 72/22 59/15 1 69/20 61/16 Fr
Anchorage 58/14 47/8 sh 59/15 47/8 c Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 87/30 72/22 t Phoenix 99/37 75/23 s 99/37 78/25 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 67/19 t 80/26 68/20 t Kansas City 84/28 58/14 pc 80/26 56/13 s Pittsburgh 72/22 5613 pc 69/20 58/14 + RAGGEDISLAND — High:91°F/83°c
Atlantic City 72/22 58/14 + 67/19 584 + Las Vegas 97/36 70/21 s 99/37 75/23 s Portland,OR 76/24 56/13 pc 75/23 53/11 pc High: 88° F/31° C Low: 75° F/24°C
Baltimore 73/22 61/16 4+ 70/21 6447 1 Little Rock 78/25 68/20 + 80/26 67/19 fF Raleigh-Durham 84/28 65/18 c 80/26 65/18 c Low: 74°F/23°C a.
Boston 61/16 49/99 pe 6417 55/12 c Los Angeles 82/27 64/17 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 82/27 63/17 pc 81/27 62/16 pc .
Buffalo 67/19 52/411 s 68/20 53/41 1 Louisville 80/26 65/18 + 78/25 6347 1 Salt Lake City 83/28 60/15 pc 87/80 60/15 s GREAT INAGUA ie
Charleston, SC 88/31 71/21 c 86/30 71/21 c Memphis 80/26 68/20 r 80/26 69/20 r San Antonio 90/32 69/20 pc 90/32 68/20 pc High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 76/24 54/12 s 76/24 50/10 s Miami 91/32 78/25 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 65/18 pe 77/25 65/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 70/21 56/13 s 72/22 55/12 ¢ Minneapolis 79/26 58/14 $s 78/25 60/15 pc San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pce 75/23 56/13 pc i j
Dallas 81/27 67/9 t 81/27 67/49 t Nashville 80/26 65/18 + 80/26 65/18 1 Seattle 72/22 54/12 pe 72/22 53/11 pe \
Denver 76/24 50/10 pce 82/27 50/10 s New Orleans 86/30 73/22 t 85/29 72/22 t Tallahassee 89/31 72/22 t 86/30 71/21 ¢t
Detroit 72/22 52/11 s 76/24 56/3 pc New York 69/20 58/14 r 66/18 62416 1 Tampa 90/32 77/25 89/31 75/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 82/27 64/17 r+ 83/28 62/16 t Tucson 94/34 67/19 s 93/33 69/20 $s
Houston 88/31 72/22 t 90/32 70/21 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 92/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 76/24 64/17 r 71/21 6447 1










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LOW



MODERATE

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HIGH







Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



High
F/C
93/33
65/18
73/22
82/27
64/17
89/31
86/30
71/21
86/30
81/27
84/28
75/23
81/27
66/18
68/20
83/28
68/20
96/35
94/34
84/28
93/33
83/28
77/25
65/18
61/16
72/22
64/17
60/15
91/32
63/17
88/31
103/39
77/25
81/27
84/28
86/30
70/21
70/21
75/23
90/32
75/23
99/37
66/18
66/18
71/21
838/31
95/35
63/17
68/20
75/23
17/25
102/38
73/22
87/30
67/19
88/31
64/17
91/32
76/24
77/25
64/17
77/25
91/32
81/27
66/18
97/36
68/20
75/23
74/23
81/27

lil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
50/10
47/8
68/20
55/12
78/25
78/25
61/16
63/17
76/24
63/17
55/12
M128
43/8
54/12
63/17
52/11
71/21
85/29
48/8
77/25
73/22
59/15
50/10
45/7
57/13
56/13
43/8
73/22
46/7
81/27
74/23
64/17
62/16
53/11
75/23
58/14
54/12
50/10
77/25
55/12
73/22
46/7
43/8
54/12
56/13
77/25
43/6
Sale.
52/11
68/20
76/24
66/18
79/26
50/10
70/21
43/8
73/22
60/15
57/13
45/7
59/15
82/27
68/20
54/12
73/22
54/12
62/16
56/13
57/13






pc
r
pc
$
pe

High
F/C
90/32
65/18
72/22
84/28
65/18
89/31
87/30
69/20
88/31
80/26
85/29
72/22
82/27
65/18
70/21
77/25
66/18
93/33
93/33
78/25
91/32
84/28
77/25
65/18
63/17
75/23
68/20
64/17
88/31
57/13
91/32
102/38
78/25
75/23
84/28
88/31
71/21
68/20
68/20
88/31
77/25
91/32
68/20
63/17
72/22
88/31
97/36
57/13
72/22
78/25
79/26
103/39
17/25
87/30
65/18
86/30
63/17
85/29
75/23
79/26
S7/13
86/30
93/33
79/26
66/18
95/35
67/19
73/22
75/23
76/24

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
49/9
45/7
70/21
52/11
78/25
77/25
61/16
61/16
74/23
61/16
54/12
74/23
43/6
52/11
59/15
52/11
71/21
82/27
43/6
76/24
73/22
58/14
49/9
45/7
55/12
56/13
50/10
72/22
45/7
82/27
74/23
63/17
63/17
52/11
78/25
58/14
52/11
50/10
77/25
55/12
70/21
50/10
46/7
SorilZ
57/13
79/26
45/7
55/12
53/11
70/21
76/24
64/17
78/25
47/8
73/22
43/6
72/22
63/17
61/16
43/6
59/15
83/28
66/18
56/13
77/25
53/11
59/15
55/12
54/12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ww

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S$
$
S$
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S$
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



SUS AS SS ee

MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NNE at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: SSE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
Thursday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: NE at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
Thursday: _ SE at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 84° F









Ieg_4 Hain a Fronts
[*, *| Flurries re Old rw
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Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ATT fieleln
[e_ =] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Monge
10s 0s [Os 10s 20s [03] 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s G0s)/ ARN)





= hea

“You Can Bs Blown

Away By A Hurricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that 3° , ave excellent insurance

age no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Mires] erage ey wt | we



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE





/ BAKE Chicken, peas n' rice, pork

chops and other menu favorites.

Checkmate
BO ae Gr GC OM CNY AUT

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter



INDING a restaurant that offers good ole’

tasty Bahamian food at an affordable price is

seemingly rare these days. Perhaps you may
have overlooked one sif-in dining spot that has been
around for 20 years...Checker’s Cafe.

The restaurant chain just welcomed
another location into the family on
Joe Farrington Road last Thursday.
The new location offers quality
Bahamian food in a comfortably mod-
ern and clean environment for you
and your family to enjoy meals at a
reasonable price of around $10 per
person.

For breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
the menu choices are endless. And
from what we sampled, the food tastes
just like what your grammy would
cook on Sunday. From peas n’ rice
with barbecued ribs and baked chick-
en, to delicious curry chicken dinners-
-your nose will be intoxicated with the
smells of these freshly cooked
Bahamian delights. Dine inside the
restaurant, and let the sweet sounds of
Bahamian artists serenade your ears,
then take in the creative artworks of
Rudy Williams plastered on the dining
room walls.

But back to the food. White rice,
peas n’ rice, and bean n’ rice are
served everyday, and the choices of
meat are unpredictable, as they switch
things up quite often. Bite into bar-
becue ribs that are seasoned to the
bone, but no too salty--just the right
flavour.

What’s more is that the menu isn’t
limited to a specific meal choices,
restaurant manager Nadia Sumner
told Tribune Taste. For example she
explained : If you’re tired of rice, you
can choose from three choices of hot
vegetables.

Side orders are the usual Bahamian
options of cheesy macaroni with a kick
of spicy flavour, and plantains. The
bean soup has the right consistency
of dumplings, beans and ham meat,
and the chicken souse has everything
you want if you prefer a milder dish.

If you are in the mood for fish try
grouper fingers or minced turbot
(which by the way is excellent.) Other
meat options include pork chops,
baked chicken, ribs, steamed ham,
stew beef, or oxtail-just to name a few-
It can’t get more Bahamian than that.

For desert, get your fix of cheese-
cake. There are 5 kinds to choose

from- blueberry, pumpkin, mango,
guava, pineapple. They say that if
you've never had it, you are definite-
ly missing out.

New on the menu is the Family
Meal, which serves 4-6 persons, a per-
fect choice for the “after five customer
“exhausted from work, who doesn’t
want to have to cook a full meal.

The new location is the only restau-
rant with this option. For $30.50, you
can get a family meal that serves four
persons, with rice, three sides, and a
choice of meat. At $45.50, a six-mem-
ber family can eat rice, four sides, and
achoice of meat- or half and half it.

“We made this option open for that
father on his way home from work
that doesn’t want his wife to cook,
and that mother who wants her chil-
dren to have a full nutritious meal,
but is too tired to prepare it,” Mrs
Sumner said.

The drive-thru is opened at nine in
the morning for the customer on the
run. With their efficient serving strat-
egy, the friendly staff will assist in get-
ting your order out on time.

Mrs Sumner said that so far the
crowd has been great and people have
been receptive, especially on the week-
ends. “I think they’re just excited for
once to have a sit down restaurant
with Bahamian food.”

“On Saturday a guy brought in a
bus load of tourists. All of them came
in, sat down, and ate in less than 30
minutes. To be able to have people
come in on short notice with no prob-
lem is remarkable,” she explained.

Store hours for the Joe Farrington
Road location are 6:30am to 9pm. At
present, the location closes on Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday at 11pm.
Mrs Sumner said they are “feeling the
area,” to see what customers want
before finalising a closing time.

“We have no magic oven or
prepackaged ingredients to stick in the
baker, and in 20 minutes it’s ready,”
said Mrs Sumner. “At the end of the
day, we produce freshly cooked
Bahamian meals with no preservatives.
That’s what our customers can expect.”



AN appetizing spread of
Checkers lunch menu.



CHECKERS friendly staff.

aa

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

1. Renowned Bahamian
artist Max Taylor will offi-
cially launch his latest col-
lection- Paperwork:1960 -
1992 at a cocktail recep-
tion at the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas
(NAGB) on Friday, Septem-
ber 18 at 6.30pm. The
event is being held under
the patronage of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and Mrs Delores Ingra-
ham.

RSVP by today at 328-
5800/1. On Thursday, Sep-
tember 24, Mr Taylor will
hold an exhibition walk-
through at the gallery. He
will also talk about his ear-
ly career and his special
facility for woodcuts. The
cost for this event is $3.

2. Doctor's Hospital will
continue its distinguished
free lecture series tomor-
row night when psychia-
trist Dr Brian Humblestone
discusses child obesity.
The presentation begins at
6 pm in the hospital’s con-
Hic AcI ALM AOLO I {em 0) LO ]0T
pressure, glucose and cho-
lesterol tests will take place
between 5-6 pm. Please
RSVP as seating is limited
Flee

3. The National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas will
show the Academy Award
winning animated feature
Wall-E tomorrow evening.
Made in 2008, it is a story
about a garbage collecting
robot who is left to clean
up the mess after the earth
is abandoned because it is
covered with trash. Wall-E
falls in love with a sleek,
dangerous robot sent back
to earth to see if life is
once again sustainable.
The movie will air at 8pm.

4. Dolphin Encounter’s
project Beach in partner-
ship with the Bahamas
National Trust will hold a
clean-up campaign of
Bonefish National Park
Coy TOMO STU COLNE
SUM sEUE UNIO MO) etme)
120 countries taking part
in the 2009 International
Coastal Clean-Up Day. Per-
sons wishing to participate
should wear long pants
and closed in-shoes and
bring gloves, insect repel-
lent, sun block and person-
al water bottles. The Beach
Clean-up can also be
counted as community ser-
vice hours. Bring commu-
nity service forms to be
Signed. Starts at 9 am.
Contact Tanya Moss at
363-7180 or tanym@dol-
phinencounters for further
OLE

5. Roadmasters will
hold a special walk to ben-
efit the Aids Foundation on
Saturday morning begin-
ning at 4.30 am. It takes
place from East Bay Street
to Blake Road. Participants
can chose from 10 miles or
20 miles, but organisers
say it is not a race-walk or
run at your own pace. The
entry fee is $20. Call 341-
7306 or 427-2391 for fur-
ther details.

6. Artists from around
the country will hold a spe-
cial concert on Arawak Cay
on Saturday in an effort to
combat crime. The artists
hope to get their message
across through music,
poetry drama and the visu-
PIV coan MATRA) ATMA CcS
place between noon and
midnight. Performers will
include Ronnie Butler,
Kenyattta Taylor, Ricardo
Clarke and Sammie Starr.
The Fort Charlotte Commu-
nity Centre, Sea Grape Fes-
tival and Mark Cartwright
are amoung those coordi-
nating the event.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7B



HOST Josh Gates with Small Hope Bay Lodge
owner Jeff Birch (right) and expert diver Moose.



SS Ce,

A Sail

MYTH

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

HE beauty of Andros will be on

display to thousands of interna-

tional viewers when the SyFy
channel features the island on its show

Destination Truth this evening.

The idea of this unscripted Syfy channel (previously the SciFi
channel) series focuses on Josh Gates and his team of investiga-
tors traveling to destinations around the world, uncovering the
truths about mythical creatures.

In tonight’s episode, investigators explored the blue holes of
Andros believed to be the dwelling place of legendary mythical
sea monster- the shark jaw octopus tentacle sea monster Lusca.

In addition to extensive footage of the islands natural beauty,
some of the island’s most famous attractions will also be high-
lighted as will a segment on making batik and androsia fabric.

Bahamas Production Coordinator Heather Carey, and Peter
Douglas, head of the Andros Tourist Office, Community Leader,
and “expert” mythologist worked closely with the Destination
Truth crew during their five day stay.

According to Ms Carey, this is one of many films shot in the
Bahamas, her company is involved in. There are two more
underway, one film that was shot in Long Island which will air
sometime in October, and one that will be shot in Bimini, air date
not yet announced.

“The skinny dip” is the title of the fun film shot in Long
Island. “This is a fun film and we have already gotten reactions
from people, because they think the film is based on people
swimming naked” say Mrs Carey.

“The skinny dip” is a Canadian travel show which will be
aired in Canada and all over Europe. This show also highlights
and captures the beautiful scenery of the island.

“In this film the beautiful attractions of the island of which
some Bahamians have not seen will be shown” she said.

The girl in the film travels through the island and ends up on
an adventure which takes her to all the attractions on the island.

Mrs Carey believes that these films will shine a positive light
on the individual islands as well as the rest of the Bahamas.
“The most important thing is to highlight the islands of the
Bahamas showing the interesting scenes, and appeal to a broad-
er spectrum of tourist.”

She also wants the Bahamian people to become more involved
with the films. “We want the Bahamian people to be apart of the
films as well. They were a little cautious, but in the future we want
them to be more comfortable and interactive during filming” she
said.

Bahamian cable viewers can watch Destination Truth this
evening at 10pm on channel 21.



Ricardo Clarke
makes an impact
on Abaco

REGGAE artist Ricardo Clarke performed in
Abaco last week visiting several churches and
schools to give motivational talks and interviews.

He also gave a free concert in Sandy Point organ-
ised by Kingdom Dub Entertainment which was
designed to give the island’s youth a message of
peace and unity.

Ricardo performed alongside fellow artistes Ryan
Jupp, Solo, Mr Beeds and DJ Counsellor.

He also spoke at several schools including Forest
Heights High School, St Francis High School (where
he gave a special presentation to the principal,) SC
Bootle High School and JA Pinder Primary School
and visited Sandy Point AOG, Change Ministries
and the Friendship Tabernacle.



Andros Islan a in quest to find





L BEAST



HEATHER Carey (Production Coordinator), Jeff Birch (Small HOpe Bay
Lodge), Josh Gates (host).



—
| a

RICARDO CLARKE motivates students during a recent visit to Abaco.



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



; â„¢, | President's opinion of Kanye West sparks debate |



i

Randy Sager/AP Photo

IN THIS June 17, 2009 file photograph
originally provided by ABC News, ABC
News’ Terry Moran is shown at the
Treasury Department in Washington.

NEW YORK

PRESIDENT Barack Obama’s can-
did thoughts about Kanye West are
provoking a debate over standards of
journalism in the Twitter age, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

ABC News says it was wrong for its
employees to tweet that Obama had
called West a “jackass” for the rap-
per’s treatment of country singer Tay-
lor Swift. The network said some of its
employees had overheard a conversa-
tion between the president and
CNBC’s John Harwood and didn’t
realize it was considered off the record.

The network apologized to the
White House and CNBC.

Harwood had sat down with the
president to tape an interview follow-
ing his appearance on Wall Street on
Monday. Although they are competi-

tors, CNBC and ABC share a fiber
optic line to save money, and this
enabled some ABC employees to lis-
ten in on the interview as it was being
taped for later use.

Their attention was drawn to chatter
about West, who was widely criticized
for interrupting Swift as she accepted
an award at Sunday’s MTV Video
Music Awards to say that Beyonce
deserved it.

E-mails shot around among ABC
employees about Obama’s comments,
said Jeffrey Schneider, ABC News
spokesman. Before anything was
reported on ABC’s air or Web site, at
least three network employees took
to Twitter to spread the news.

One was Terry Moran, a former
White House correspondent. He
logged on to Twitter and typed: “Pres.
Obama just called Kanye West a ’jack-

ass’ for his outburst at VMAs when
Taylor Swift won. Now THAT'S pres-
idential.”

When ABC News authorities found
out about it, they had the tweets delet-
ed after about an hour, Schneider said.
Moran declined a request to comment.

But the news was out.

Harwood said there was no explicit
agreement with the president that
those comments were off the record.
But he said it is broadcast tradition
that such pre-interview chatter is con-
sidered off the record until the formal
interview begins. Harwood is holding
to that: He would not discuss what the
president said before their interview
and has no plans to do so on CNBC.

He said he was aware that it was
likely someone outside of CNBC was
listening to his conversation with the
president.


























Alastair Grant/AP Photo

Sen iae:cuahire ciency
ree a. hia

P
ee
Ce Let.

JON HOWELLS, press officer for Waterstone's booksellers, poses for the cameras as he reads a signed copy of US author Dan Brown's new book ‘The Lost
Symbol ' in London Monday Sept. 14, 2009. The book will go on sale to the public worldwide on Tuesday Sept. 15, Howells will spend the night reading the book
and give a review as the first copies are sold in London at 0700 Tuesday morning.

Freemasons await

Dan Brown

‘The L

novel

ost Symbol’

WASHINGTON man who is a trial attorney by pro-

fession but otherwise a Junior Grand

HE LODGE room of the Warden at the Grand Lodge of Free

| Naval Masonic Hallisacol- and Accepted Masons of the District
orful and somewhat of Columbia.

inscrutable sight for the nonmember,
with its blue walls, Egyptian symbols,
checkered floor in the center and high
ceiling painted with gold stars,
according to the Associated Press.

Countless secrets supposedly have
been shared in this and thousands of
similar rooms of the Masons around
the world. Facts of life have been
debated, honors bestowed, rituals
enacted. You would need to belong
to a lodge to learn what really goes
on.
Or you could simply ask.

“The emphasis on secrecy is some-
thing that disturbs people,” says
Joseph Crociata, a burly, deep-voiced

“But it’s not a problem getting
Masons to talk about Masonry.
Sometimes, it’s a problem getting
them to stop.”

Despite all the books and Web
sites dedicated to Freemasons, the
Masonic Order has been defined by
mystery, alluring enough to claim
Mozart and George Washington as
members, dark enough to be feared
by the Vatican, Islamic officials, Nazis
and Communists. In the United
States, candidates in the 19th-centu-
ry ran for office on anti-Mason plat-
forms and John Quincy Adams
declared that “Masonry ought forev-
er to be abolished.”

And now arrives Dan Brown.

Six years after Brown intrigued mil-
lions of readers, and infuriated schol-
ars and religious officials, with “The
Da Vinci Code,” he has set his new
novel, “The Lost Symbol,” in Wash-
ington and probed the fraternal order
that well suits his passion for secrets,
signs and puzzles.

Brown’s book, released Tuesday,
has an announced first printing of 5
million copies and topped the best-
seller lists of Amazon.com and
Barnes & Noble online. At Kramer-
books in Washington, about two
dozen copies were purchased the
morning it went on sale and the store
expects to easily sell out its order of
150 books.

In “The Lost Symbol,” symbolist
Robert Langdon is on a mission to
find a Masonic pyramid containing a
code that unlocks an ancient secret to
“unfathomable power.” It’s a story

of hidden history in the nation’s cap-
ital, with Masons the greatest puzzle
of all.

Brown’s research for “The Da Vin-
ci Code” was highly criticized by
some Catholics for suggesting that
Jesus and Mary Magdalene conceived
a child and for portraying Opus Dei
— the conservative religious order
— as a murderous, power-hungry
sect.

The Mason response could well be
milder. Brown goes out of his way in
“The Lost Symbol” to present the
lodge as essentially benign and mis-
understood. Masons are praised for
their religious tolerance and their
elaborate rituals are seen as no more
unusual than those of formal reli-
gions. The plot centers in part on an
“unfair” anti-Masonic video that
“conspiracy theorists would feed on...
like sharks,” Langdon says.

“T have enormous respect for the
Masons,” Brown told The Associated
Press during a recent interview. “In
the most fundamental terms, with dif-
ferent cultures killing each other over
whose version of God is correct, here
is a worldwide organization that
essentially says, ‘We don’t care what
you call God, or what you think
about God, only that you believe in a
god and let’s all stand together as
brothers and look in the same direc-
tion.’

“T think there will be an enormous
number of people who will be inter-
ested in the Masons after this book
(comes out),” Brown said.

Patrick Swayze



-"Dinty Dancing’
_ star Patrick
| Swayze dies at 57

? LOS ANGELES

PATRICK Swayze per-

i sonified a particular kind
i of masculine grace both
i on and off screen, from
i his roles in films like

“Dirty Dancing” and
“Ghost” to the way he

? carried himself in his long
: fight with pancreatic can-
i cer, according to the Asso-
i ciated Pres.

Swayze died from the

i illness on Monday in Los
i Angeles, his publicist said.
i He was 57.

“Patrick Swayze passed
away peacefully today

i with family at his side

after facing the challenges

of his illness for the last
? 20 months,” Annett Wolf
i said in a statement Mon-

day evening. She declined

to give details.

Fans of the actor were

i saddened to learn in
i March 2008 that Swayze
i was suffering from an
i especially deadly form of
i cancer.
? working despite the diag-
i nosis, putting together a
i memoir with his wife and
i shooting “The Beast,” an
i A&E drama series for
i which he had already
: made the pilot.

He continued

Swayze said he chose

i not to use painkillers
i while making “The Beast”
i because they would have
i taken the edge off his per-
i formance. The show drew

a respectable 1.3 million

viewers when the 13
i episodes ran this year, but
i A&E said it reluctantly

decided not to renew it for
a second season.
When he first went pub-

? lic with the illness, some
i reports gave him only
i weeks to live, but his doc-
? tor said his situation was

“considerably more opti-

mistic” than that. Swayze

acknowledged that time

might be running out giv-
i en the grim nature of the

disease.
“Td say five years is

pretty wishful thinking,”

Swayze told ABC’s Bar-

i bara Walters in early
i 2009. “Two years seems
i likely if you’re going to
i believe statistics. I want
i to last until they find a
? cure, which means I’d bet-
i ter get a fire under it.”

And that’s exactly what

he did. In February,

Swayze wrote an op-ed

piece in the Washington
i Post titled, “I’m Battling

Cancer. How About Some

i Help, Congress?” in which
i he urged senators and
i representatives to vote for
? the maximum funding for
i the National Institutes of
i Health to fight cancer as
i part of the economic stim-
i ulus package.

West calls Taylor Swift after “View appearance

NEW YORK

IT LOOKS like Kanye West has
finally given a personal apology to
Taylor Swift, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Representatives from “The
View” say West called the country
sensation after her appearance on
Tuesday’s show. During the broad-
cast, the 19-year-old singer said
West had yet to contact her to apol-
ogize for hijacking her acceptance
speech on the MTV Video Music
Awards on Sunday.

“He has not personally reached
out or anything but if he wanted to
say hi (I would),” said Swift.

After Swift’s comments, West
called her and the two spoke,
according to a statement from “The
View.”

“After the show he spoke per-
sonally to the country music super-
star via telephone and has apolo-
gized to the 19-year-old singer. She
has accepted Mr. West’s apology.

The contents of the phone call are
to remain private,” it read.

It’s the latest in the saga that has
caused a national uproar. The dra-
ma began after Swift beat out Bey-
once and other acts to win best
female video at the VMAs for her
hit “You Belong With Me.”

Swift, the first country act to win
at the VMAs, was exuberant after
her win, but that moment didn’t last
long as West — known for his
awards-show meltdowns — grabbed
the microphone and declared that
Beyonce’s “Single Ladies (Put a
Ring on It)” was one of the “best
videos of all time.”

A shaken Swift did not finish her
speech at that moment, but when
Beyonce later won for video of the
year, she brought Swift out so that
she could have her moment.

When asked about the incident
during her appearance on “The
View,” Swift said: “’m not gonna
say that I wasn’t riled by it. I had to
perform live five minutes later so I

had to get myself back to the place
where I could perform.”

However, she said she was grati-
fied by the outpouring of support
not only from fans, but also from
celebrities and others who offered
support immediately after the inci-
dent occurred.

“There were a lot of people
around me backstage that were say-
ing wonderful, incredible things and
just having my back,” she said. “I
just never imagined that there were
that many people looking out for
me.”

West has taken a drubbing since
then. While he issued two apolo-
gies on his blog after the incident,
he gave another, emotional one on
Monday’s premiere of “The Jay
Leno Show.”

“Tt was rude, period,” West said.
“ ... [need to, after this, take some
time off and just analyze how ’m
going to make it through the rest
of this life, how I’m going to
improve.”



; re “
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SINGER Kanye West takes the microphone from singer Taylor Swift as
she accepts the "Best Female Video" award during the MTV Video Music
Awards on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009 in New York.

Jason DeCrow/AP Photo



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Full Text
Mm blowin’ it

SOF
79F

ee SUNNY WITH

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.245

Uy



m Lhe Tribu

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

Uproar at hotel

Factions clash
over legitimacy
of nominees

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A RUCKUS kicked off at
Worker’s House yesterday
morning as nominations
were submitted for the
Bahamas Hotel Catering
and Allied Workers Union’s
(BHCAWU) upcoming
elections.

Supporters and members
of Kirk Wilson’s Deliver-
ance Team were pitted
against those behind Nicole
Martin’s A Team as
BHCAWU president Roy
Colebrooke, general secre-
tary Leo Douglas and Direc-
tor of Labour Harcourt
Brown discussed the legiti-
macy of three nominees
behind closed doors.

Mr Douglas and Mr Cole-
brooke refused to accept
nominations from Tyrone
Beneby, Philippa Dixon and
Raymond Wright running

for the Deliverance Team
as they said the nominees
are not rightful members of
the union according to the
Constitution.

When the Director of
Labour overseeing the
process said Team Deliver-
ance members could still be
nominated, Mr Colebrooke
told him he was ‘sent to
supervise’ and ‘did not have
the power to change the
constitution’, an observer
said.

As they held discussions
in private, commotion
unfolded in the hallway.

An observer — said:
“There’s ruckus inside the
hall, people are screaming
and carrying on, shouting
obscenities, and people from
different sides are threaten-
ing each other.

“The Redemption team,
headed by Sidney Rolle, is

SEE page seven

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Insurance contributions.




JONES COMMUNICATION CEO Wendall Jones is pictured outside of court yesterday.
Mr Jones and several other prominent Bahamian businessmen were in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to give an update on their efforts to pay off years of delinquent National

e SEE STORY ON PAGE THREE

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for
PMH halfway to $300,000 goal

THE ‘Breathe Easy’ cam-
paign - aimed at purchasing
incubators and ventilators
for critically ill newborns at
Princess Margaret Hospital
(PMH) - has managed to
raise more than half of its
intended goal of $300,000.

To date, the campaign has
raised $155,000, and organ-
isers have already ordered
three ventilators as well as
one incubator.

$155,000 has been raised for
incubators and ventilators

Following their successful
drive to raise money for
much needed dialysis units
for the PMH last year, a
group of local companies
recently launched the
‘Breathe Easy’ campaign to
buy four ventilators and six

incubators for the hospital’s
Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit.

The organisers include
Tribune Media, the
Builder's Mall, Tile King,

SEE page seven

cone



WAKE UP!

Try our
Big Breakfast Sandwich




Paul Moss
formally tells
Christie of his
Upcoming bit
for leadership

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net






























CLAIMING he feels
prompted by ‘God
Himself’ to offer at this
time, PLP
chief Paul
Moss has
formally
advised
party leader
Perry
Christie of
his inten-
tions to
challenge
him at the EMSs
upcoming
national convention .
In his letter addressed
to Mr Christie, and a
second to the party’s
Parliamentary caucus,
Mr Moss said that
although his decision
pits himself directly
against Mr Christie, this
move was not a chal-
lenge of the leader’s
abilities or a statement
of any shortcoming.
“In fact, the truth is







SEE page seven

Pastor of
demolished
church is
‘weighing his

9

legal options

By TANEKA
THOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

THE pastor whose
church was demolished by
Arawak Homes after a
Supreme Court judgment
said he is weighing his legal
options.

Reverend Eugene Bast-
ian, of Canaan Baptist
Church, believes his church
had the legal right to tear
down the structure - in
accordance with the ruling
handed down nearly two
weeks ago - and said he was
shocked that Arawak
Homes razed the church the
morning after the judgment
was made.

He added that the build-
ing was bulldozed before he

SEE page seven

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NASSAU AND BAHAM/?

ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



International Cultural
Festival set for October

By LINDSAY THOMPSON

THE stage has been set for
the 14th Annual International
Cultural Festival (ICF), an
event that will showcase the
diverse communities in the
country, Deputy Prime Minis-
ter and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette said.

Mr Symonette urged
Bahamians to support the fes-
tival by coming out to see the
displays of 25 countries at the
Botanical Gardens from Octo-
ber 17-18.

The popular festival returns
after a one-year hiatus due to
the retirement of its chairman
James Catalyn and a debate
over whether or not the Botan-
ical Gardens should remain
home to the event.

The International Cultural
Festival, which is under the aus-
pices of the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs, grew out of the
idea to recognise United
Nations (UN) Day. This year,
the Bahamas will join member
countries in celebrating the
64th anniversary of the UN.

An integral part of the festi-
val is the partnership with the
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion, which has embarked on
a series of special advertise-
ments of the event. The new
ICF chairperson is Janet John-
son, director of communica-
tions at the Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation.

“As more and more foreign
national groups organised
themselves it took on a life of
its own and by all accounts,
from the countless individuals —

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DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette (centre) announcing plans
for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival to be held October 17-18, 2009. Pictured are ICF
chairperson Janet Johnson, director of communications at the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, and

Eric Carey, committee member.

Bahamian and expatriate alike
- who pleaded with me to bring
it back when it went away last
year, this gathering is the most
popular event on the annual
calendar of events and clearly is
worth reviving,” Mr Symonette
said.

The Deputy Prime Minister
said he was also pleased that
the members of the ICF have
unanimously agreed to donate
10 per cent of their booth earn-
ings to assist with operational
expenses and to support
pledges to UN-related educa-
tional initiatives for Bahamian
youth.

For two days, festival patrons
can experience the food, cul-
ture and heritage of the respec-
tive countries. A new addition
is the Miss Universe Designer
Fashion Show coordinated by
MODE ILES and a glimpse of
the Miss Universe National
Costume photo gallery.

The Bank of the Bahamas
will facilitate the “cashless” fes-
tive environment, a “safety

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mechanism to allow organisers
to gauge the overall fiscal per-
formance of the festival, Mr
Symonette said.

Burns House will unveil their
Christmas wine collection and
the public is welcome to sample
the variety of wines and place
their orders for the Yuletide
season at the Grand Wine and
Food Tasting event between
10am and 2pm.

The United Nations Educa-
tional Scientific and Cultural
Organisation (UNESCO) is
lending its prestige to the event.

The Miss Universe Bahami-
an Designer Fashion Show,
which features Androsia and
Bahama Hand Print fabrics, as
well as eight costumes donated
to the festival by some of the
Miss Universe contestants, will
be held under the aegis of
UNESCO.

Another new feature will
include the Builders Mall stage
perched atop the hill. Com-
monwealth Building Supplies
is giving the festival site “a

much needed makeover” with
a fresh lick of paint. Island FM
is the official radio station of
the festival; Subway is the
sponsor of the rake ‘n scrape
tradition bearers from Long
Island, and Echo Water is the
official water of the festival.

Mr Symonette commended
the volunteers drawn from
Rotary, Zonta, Girl Guides,
and the Q’s service who will be
involved in this year’s festival.
Zonta will again host the UN-
themed church service at Christ
Church Cathedral on Sunday,
October 25 at 9am.

“Patrons are encouraged to
come and move around from
stall to stall and sample this
unique taste of the universe —
the cuisine, fine wines, special
brews, arts and craft, exciting
raffle prizes and the Western
Union on-stage cultural enter-
tainment line-up.

“Make the 14th Annual
International Cultural Festival
2009 the place to be,” Mr
Symonette said.

JUST a few months after

i being crowned Miss Teen
i World Junior Bahamas,
: Shaquell Demeritte left the
? Bahamas for Europe on Sun-
i day to compete in the world's
? most prestigious and largest
i teen pageant - the Miss
i Princess of the World, for-
? merly the Miss World Junior
i Pageant.

During her three-week stay

: in Europe she will tour vari-
i ous cities, beginning with Lon-
? don in the United Kingdom
? and ending in Prague, Czech
i Republic, where the grand
: finale will take place.

‘Precious’, as the young

beauty queen is commonly
i? called said:

“T cannot wait to promote

the Bahamas throughout
i Europe.

“T know the world knows

i about us now, and the duty of
? all beauty ambassadors is to
i keep the Bahamas current in
i the minds of the world as a
: tourist paradise and invest-
i ment haven.

“T would also like to sign

i on with one of the casting
i agencies at the pageant and
i represent the Bahamas well. I
i am aiming for the goal, but to
i make a notable accomplish-
? ment among the 60 plus con-
i testants will be good".

The pageant focuses on

i introducing the best teenage
i contestants from across the
? world to scouts of modelling
i and casting agencies through-
i out Europe.

The contestants compete in



SHAQUELL DEMERITTE

i talent, model, swimwear and evening gown segments, and the
? winner receives $100,000 in cash and awards.

The event will be broadcast live to millions of viewers on

September 28.

Gaynell Rolle, president of the Miss Teen Bahamas

Pageant, said: "This is an awesome opportunity for Shaque-
i ll and the Bahamas.

“T feel she will do well, she has a good spirit and comes

from a supportive family.”

Debonaire Boutique has teamed up with the organisation

i and is sponsoring the Bahamas’ representative.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3



— Wendall Jones among businessmen

back i in court over NIB contributions



CARLOS DEMETRIUS NOTTAGE

Man wanted for
questioning over’

housebreakings

FREEPORT - Grand }
Bahama Police are search- }
ing for a man wanted for }
questioning in connection }
with a number of house- }
breaking and stealing alle- }

gations.

An all points bulletin has }
been issued for 23-year-old }
Carlos Demetrius Nottage }
of 78 Cabot Drive, Freeport. }

Nottage is of dark brown }
complexion and has dark }

eyes and plaited hair.
He is about five feet,

eight inches tall, of average
build and weighs 150-190 ;}

pounds.

According to police, Not- i
tage should be considered }
armed and extremely dan- }
gerous. Anyone who has }
information concerning his }
whereabouts is asked call }
the police in Grand Bahama }
on 350-3106, 352-9774, 373- }
1112 or 5; 911 or the Crime }
Tipsters Hotline at 352- }

1919.

The Bahamas
Faith Ministries
to hold ‘Singles
Conference’

BAHAMAS Faith Min-
istries has announced that
its “Singles Conference”,
set for September 17 - 20,
has been postponed until
further notice.

Two men caught

hy police after
alleged robbery

TWO men who allegedly
robbed a woman while on
Solider Road were caught
by police after a high-speed
chase through the area.

It was shortly after 3pm
on Monday when a woman
flagged down traffic police,
who were patrolling Soldier
Road near Haven's Road,
and said she was robbed by
two men.

She told the officers that
one of the robbers wore an
undershirt and colourful
shorts, and that the other
man was shirtless, Asst
Supt Walter Evans said.

Moments later police
spotted two men fitting the
descriptions given by the
victim speeding away in a
gold-coloured car.

A high-speed chased
ensued which eventually
ended in a parking lot.

In an attempt to escape,
the occupants got out of the
car and threw items under
the vehicle. Police retrieved
the items which are
believed to be the cash and
jewellery stolen from the
woman.

The two men, aged 19
and 21, are in police cus-
tody.

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

area or have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

JONES Communication
CEO Wendall Jones and
several other prominent
Bahamian businessmen were
back in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday to give an update
on their efforts to pay off
years of delinquent National
Insurance contributions.

Bench warrants were
issued yesterday for Bertha’s
Go-Go Ribs owner Mervin
Sweeting, Solomon’s Mines
Managing Director Mark
Finlayson as well as Vaughn
Jones of Jones Brothers
Morticians after they failed
to appear in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street yesterday.

Back in February, the
National insurance Board
NIB brought Jones Commu-
nications CEO Wendall
Jones and other well-known
Bahamian businessmen
before the magistrate's court
in an attempt to collect more
than $1.2 million in missing

THE woman who received
devastating second and third
degree burns about the body
during a house fire on Canaan
Lane has died, police said.

Yesterday, press liaison offi-
cer Asst Supt Walter Evans
identified her as 36-year-old
Dellerease Bowe.

Ms Bowe's home was com-
pletely destroyed by fire last
Thursday around lam.

Police said her fiancé is
reported to have assisted her
from her burning home and
neighbours drove her by pri-
vate car to the hospital, where
she was fighting for her life in
the intensive care unit.

She died in the Princess
Margaret Hospital around
9pm on Sunday, Mr Evans
said.

Police said they were still
investigating the cause of the
fire and could not say what
led to the blaze.

NIB contributions.

Mr Jones pleaded guilty
to owing NIB $430,000 in
delinquent payments. Attor-
ney V. Alfred Gray who
appeared on behalf of Mr
Jones yesterday told the
court he has paid $100,000
of the nearly $180,000, which
represents 40 per cent of the
delinquent amount.

Attorney

Heather Maynard, attor-
ney for NIB, said that once
Mr Jones has paid the full
40 per cent, NIB would be
happy to negotiate to liqui-
date the balance. Mr Gray
said Mr Jones will seek to
pay to the balance by
November 17.

Mr Gray also appeared on
behalf of Global United
CEO Jackson Ritchie who
was charged with failure to
pay $161,079.98 in NIB con-
tributions between May 2007
and June 2008.

Mr Gray said that the NIB

and Mr Ritchie are continu-
ing negotiations with respect
to the delinquent contribu-
tions.

Mr Ritchie is also expect-
ed back in Court 11, Nassau
Street on November 17.

Galen Saunders and his
father Henry Saunders who
own More 94.9 FM and Spir-
it (92.5 FM) radio stations
were also back in court yes-
terday over failure to pay
$253,262 in NIB contribu-
tions.

Ms Maynard said the men
have paid $43,000 so far and
are ‘working in good faith.’
The two men are also
expected back in Court 11,
on November 17.

Magistrate Sub Swain-
LaSalle issued warrant of
arrests yesterday for Mervin
Sweeting, owner of Bertha’s
Go-Go Ribs.

Mr Gray told the court
that on June 29, Sweeting
paid NIB $10,000 and had
negotiated to keep his con-
tributions current while pay-
ing $2,000 a month in delin-



THE remains of mere on Canaan Lane.

However, head of Fire Ser-
vices Supt Jeffrey Deleveaux
speculated that the fire may
have been caused by a candle,
as the home did not have elec-
tricity.

"We haven't pinned it down
yet but we realised that there
was no electricity to the build-
ing and perhaps it could have
been an unattended candle,
but we can't say concretely,"
he told The Tribune yester-
day.

Mr Deleveaux also said Fire
Services had not yet deter-
mined the cause of the house
fire during which a 10-year-
old disabled boy was burnt
beyond recognition on Sun-
day morning in Colony Vil-
lage.

"In a structural fire every-
thing is destroyed and you’re
not able to go and immedi-
ately pinpoint (and say) this
is what happened. It's a slow
process," he said.

Downtown police criticised over
towing of car from Bay Street

By AVA TURNQUEST

CONFUSED and frustrat-
ed by what struck him as an
unfair manipulation of traf-
fic laws, a disgruntled citizen
has lashed out at downtown
police.

Ivoine Ingraham wrote to
The Tribune to complain
about the circumstances sur-
rounding the towing of his car
from Bay Street opposite the
British Colonial Hilton.

Mr Ingraham said he
parked amongst several other
cars, all of which were still
there when he returned about
30 minutes later. He cannot
understand why he was
unfairly targeted.

If he broke the law by
parking in this area, Mr
Ingraham asked why he was
not fined.

"If I violated a traffic
offence and was supposedly
parked in a no parking area,
why was I not charged and
made to pay a fine?” he
asked. “How come no police
formalities were done?"

Mr Ingraham had parked
in that area to attend a brief
meeting in the BOLAM
building last week. Due to its
proximity to restaurants and
businesses, this part of Bay

Street is a popular short-term
parking spot.

Seeing his car gone upon
his return, Mr Ingraham
immediately assumed it had
been stolen, and flagged
down a passing patrol car.

The officers referred him
to the Tourism Police Station.

Mr Ingraham described the
officers at the station as dis-
interested, and said they pro-
vided no explanation save
directions to the lot where he
could find his car.

Number

When he called the num-
ber posted on the lot's fence,
Mr Ingraham was subjected
to what he describes as a
“crude, uncouth, cantanker-
ous voice”.

After waiting over an hour
for someone in authority to
show up, Mr Ingraham
attempted to pay the one indi-
vidual he encountered in the
lot, however this person could
not give him a receipt.

Insisting that he would not
pay unless he was given a
receipt, Mr Ingraham called
the number on the fence
again; this time the voice told
him that for a receipt, he

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

Weather.........:cccccceeeees

pereeete ance eaamurtans suctrrae Po

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES



would have to drive to Coral
Harbour.

Mr Ingraham said that at
this point, he decided to “bite
the bullet” and created a
make-shift receipt, which he
asked the attendant to sign.

Frustrated by the ordeal,
Ingraham feels that such inci-
dents are destroying the frag-
ile relationship the police tries
to maintain with the public.

Pressed for an explanation
yesterday, a police source sug-
gested that perhaps the officer
responsible for the towing
had decided to give Mr Ingra-
ham “a break”.

It is not uncommon for offi-
cers to waive a ticket, and let
the fee for the towing stand
as a warning, he said. The
source could not explain why
no other cars were towed.

Commissioner of Police
Reginald Ferguson has urged
the public to communicate
any concerns or complaints to
his office so they can be inves-
tigated.

Financing Available Through
Commonwealth Bank

Solid Wood

quent payments. Mr Gray,
however, could offer no
explanation as to why Mr
Sweeting was not in court
yesterday. Magistrate
LaSalle noted three warrants
had been issued for Mr
Sweeting’s arrest.

Warrant

“He has a habit of not
showing up,” Magistrate
LaSalle said before issuing
the bench warrant.

A bench warrant was also
issued for Solomon’s Mines
Managing Director Mark
Finlayson. Finlayson was
charged with failure to pay
$377,092.90 in NIB contri-

butions between June 2007
and December 2008. Mr Fin-
layson was ordered to
appear in court yesterday to
inform the court what
arrangement he worked out
with NIB and how much he
had paid.

A bench warrant was also
issued for Vaughn Jones of
Jones Brothers Morticians
who failed to appear in court
yesterday.

NIB has been taking a no-
nonsense approach to pros-
ecuting delinquent employ-
ers since an amnesty the
company extended for delin-
quent employers to come in
and settle accounts ended on
December 31, 2008.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

A world of hurt

President Barack Obama took a bit of a
victory lap on Wall Street on Monday,
declaring that the economy had been
brought back from the abyss and “the storms
of the past two years are beginning to
break.”

The president and his economic team (and
the Federal Reserve) deserve credit for mov-
ing quickly to prevent a full-blown collapse.
A year ago, amid the panic that accompanied
the implosion of Lehman Brothers, there
were serious fears that the United States
was headed toward another Great Depres-
sion.

Now, with the financial sector stabilized
and economists predicting that the Great
Recession is nearing an end, the sighs of
relief coming out of Washington and Lower
Manhattan are understandable. But this is no
time to lose sight of the wreckage all around
us. This recession, a full-blown economic
horror, has left a gaping hole in the heart of
working America that is unlikely to heal for
years, if not decades.

Fifteen million Americans are locked in
the nightmare of unemployment, nearly 10
percent of the work force. A third have been
jobless for more than six months. Thirteen
percent of Latinos and 15 percent of blacks
are out of work. (Those are some of the offi-
cial statistics. The reality is much worse.)

Consider this: Some 9.4 million new jobs
would have to be created to get us back to
the level of employment at the time that the
recession began in December 2007. But last
month, we lost 216,000 jobs. If the reces-
sion technically ends soon and we get to a
point where some modest number of jobs are
created — say, 100,000 or 150,000 a month
— the politicians and the business com-
mentators will celebrate like it’s New Year’s.

But think about how puny that level of job
creation really is in an environment that
needs nearly 10 million jobs just to get us
back to the lean years of the George W.
Bush administration.

We're hurtin’ and there ain’t much healin’
on the horizon.

A national survey of jobless workers by a
pair of professors at Rutgers University
shows just how traumatized the work force
has become in this downturn. Two-thirds of
respondents said that they had become
depressed. More than half said it was the
first time they had ever lost a job, and 80 per-
cent said there was little or no chance that
they would be able to get their jobs back
when the economy improves.

The 1,200 respondents were jobless at
some point over the past year, and most —

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894 — are still unemployed. More than half
said that they had been forced to borrow
money from friends or relatives, and a quar-
ter have missed their mortgage or rent pay-
ments.

The survey found that affluent, well-edu-
cated workers, who had traditionally been
able to withstand a downturn in reasonably
good shape, were being hit hard this time
around.

The professors, Carl Van Horn and Cliff
Zukin, described that phenomenon as “a
metric of the recession’s seismic impact.”
Of the workers who found themselves unem-
ployed for the first time, more than one in
four had been earning $75,000 or more annu-
ally.

“This is not your ordinary dip in the busi-
ness cycle,” said Mr. Van Horn. “Ameri-
cans believe that this is the Katrina of reces-
sions. Folks are on their rooftops without a
boat.”

Stunned by the financial and psychological
toll of the recession, and seeing little in the
way of hopeful signs on the employment
landscape, many of the surveyed workers
showed signs of discouragement. Three-fifths
said that they had experienced feelings of
helplessness.

Said one respondent: “I’ve always worked,
so this is very depressing. At age 60, I never
believed I would be unemployed unless I
chose to be.”

Said another: “I fear for my family and my
future. We are about to be evicted, and bills
are piling. We have sold everything we pos-
sibly can to maintain, and are going under
with little hope of anything.”

At some point the unemployment crisis in
America will have to be confronted head-on.
Poverty rates are increasing. Tax revenues
are plunging. State and local governments
are in a terrible fiscal bind. Unemployment
benefits for many are running out. Families
are doubling up, and the number of homeless
children is rising.

It’s eerie to me how little attention this cri-
sis is receiving. The poor seem to be com-
pletely out of the picture.

If we end up with yet another jobless
recovery, there would seem to be little hope
for impoverished families in America’s big
cities, rural areas and, increasingly, suburban
neighborhoods as well.

The recession may be ending for some.

Tell that to the unemployed.

(By By BOB HERBERT
c.2009 New York Times News Service)



TE

A desperate bid.
to escape long
arms of justice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

In an exclusive interview
given to The Tribune of the
Bahamas by the former Pre-
mier of the Turks and Caicos
Islands, which was published
on Monday August 31, 2009,
the former Premier advocated
on behalf of his former gov-
ernment for the Turks and
Caicos Islands to become an
autonomous State under The
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas government.

In my humble opinion, this
is one of the most ridiculous
and hollowed interview ever
given by the former govern-
ment of the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

What planet are these for-
mer ministers living on? This
is clear evidence that the state
of minds of these former min-
isters is of a world far
detached from reality. This
last desperate attempt on
their part to escape the long
arms of justice is beyond dis-
graceful, it is pitiful.

Who in the Turks and
Caicos Islands are they so des-
perately and shamefully lob-
bying on behalf of? Because,
it is unquestionably not the
people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands.

When the former govern-
ment ministers were flying
high above the clouds a few
years ago, the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas and
the people of the Turks and
Caicos Islands were the last
things on their minds. The

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



only thing that was on their
minds was the glamour of
Hollywood, Monaco, the
South of France; and as for
their idea of becoming an
autonomous state under the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, that was beneath
them. So why now, are they
being so pretentious?

There is no question that
The Commonwealth of the
Bahamas is a lovely country,
but that is where it ends. And
as for the idea of the Turks
and Caicos Islands becoming
linked to The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas government,
the Turks and Caicos Islands
has already been there and
done that (from 1962 to 1973).
So, as far as progressive think-
ing is concerned, that idea is
“so lame, and so yesterday.”

As late as the early 90s’,
Turks and Caicos Islands cit-
izens were looked down upon
and treated with disrespect by
the citizens and the govern-
ment of The Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, this led to
Turks and Caicos islanders
and their descendants who
lived in the Bahamas being
ashamed to acknowledge
their heritage in fear of being
dishonoured and being
deprived of an opportunity,
even though we are all one

people and we helped build
the Bahamas to what it is
today. However, today we
hold no animosity in our
hearts towards the Bahamas
and its citizens, because we
are a forgiving and loving
people. When a country is not
cognoscente of its history, it is
bound to repeat the mistakes
of the past.

Therefore, let me make it
absolutely clear, in my opin-
ion, the future of the Turks
and Caicos Islands does not
rest in the hands of The Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas.
We as a people of the Turks
and Caicos Islands have come
this far by faith, perseverance
and hard work, and the cur-
rent state of affairs that we
now find ourselves in will
soon pass. There is a bright
light and a prosperous future
at the end of this tunnel that
we are now in.

Persons of the Turks and
Caicos Islands, the reign of
the previous guards are over.
Let us continue to keep the
faith and stay encouraged,
because you too shall soon
enter into the Promised Land,
and the Turks and Caicos
Islands will once again be the
envy of the Caribbean, if not
the world. “A Belonger that is
proud to be called a Turks
and Caicos Islander”. Thank
you.

ALBRAY
BUTTERFIELD Jr
September, 2009.

The realities of economic turmoil

EDITOR, The Tribune.

If no one is noticing the
people are very frustrated in a
high percentage almost over-
come with depression as they
cannot see through their eco-
nomic/financial troubles that
the US economic recession is
causing.

They honestly felt what
started in the mid-1990’s was
not going to stop.

Up to their armpits in debt
— struggling last year with
the horrific prices for BEC,
gas and food and now layoffs
and absolutely no good news
on the horizon although some
commentators are saying that
everywhere else, other than
the US, are showing econom-
ic signs which would bring a
smile but it is not coming soon
to The Bahamas as the US is
still in recession.

Unless you are blind and
deaf over the past weeks you
have heard the same frustra-
tions in the voice and protests
of the American people

Worried About Being Left in the Dark?

Hurricane Season

against the Obama Health
plan as you have heard here
on our issues but reality is the
US is a service economy and
through the obvious scaring
of the same folk who totally
control the US coming out of
Recession on Health Care,
my previous estimates of the
US recession finishing in the
last quarter of 2010 is now
lengthened to no earlier than
late 2011 at the earliest.

The reality even with the
potential television audience
from Miss Universe, yes
potentially 1.2 billion eyes will
see The Bahamas, many for
the first time, but many who
have absolutely no chance of
ever seeing it in reality as they
are unable economically to
visit so could we appreciate a
1-2 or 3 per cent new visitor

arrival base over the coming
3-4 years? Boy, Sunday
August the 23rd, the dice roll.

One thing that economic
downturns do bring is that
employers find all kinds of
new ways to doing business
with less, so excelling is going
to be a serious issue.

Political hog-wash rhetoric
as what I heard from Senator
David Thompson never puts
jam on the bread, Senator,
Grand Bahamians see the
mess and the troubles and
your loose political rah-rah
talk doesn’t help, so please
stop it.

PATRICIA SAWYER
Nassau,
August 21, 2009.

SYR MSS LETTE TT

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Today’s story of The Tribune entitled “Call for the Gov-
ernment to improve the horrific state of Dog Pound”, made

me sick, disgusted and angry.

A few years ago the Reader’s Digest carried the following

statement:

“You can tell a people by the way they treat their animals

and their beaches.”

What a people we have become.

SIMMS

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Abaco,

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



CB police concerned
over house hreakings

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter }
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand }
Bahama police are concerned ;
over the recent spate of :
house breakings and theft }
here on the island. :

In response to an increase }
in these types of crimes police }
are now advising the public }
not to purchase stolen items }
as it is a criminal offence that }
carries the same penalty as }
stealing. :

Asst Supt Wendell }
Deveaux said the police are ;
seeking the cooperation of }
the general public to inform }
the police of persons attempt- }
ing to sell electronic equip- }
ment and items such as cellu- }
lar phones, flat-screen televi- ;
sions, laptop computers and }
video games, as well as jew- }
ellery and other goods. :

Mr Deveaux said that }
items being offered below }
market value are often ?
believed to be stolen. He is }
also urging residents to}
ensure that their premises are }
properly secured before leav- }
ing home. :

Neighbours should be alert }
and keep a look out for each }
others property, he said. :

Mr Deveaux said people }
should call the police if they }
notice any suspicious persons }
lurking around their neigh- ;
bourhood. :

He said the police also }
encourage residents to form }
crime watch groups and :
neighbourhood watches in
their areas. :





Junkanoo bleachers contract
signed with Bahamian firm

THE government has
signed a $406,000 contract
with C-Cubed Seating on
Monday to provide seats for
the annual junkanoo
parades.

Minister of State in the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture Charles May-
nard said that the original
contract of $460,000 has
been reduced to $406,000.

The contract now includes
seats for the Junior
Junkanoo, Boxing and New
Year’s Day Parades; 10,000
seats for New Providence;
2,000 seats for Grand
Bahama and 1,000 seats for
another Family Island to be
named by October of each
year, Mr Maynard said.

Seats

“We are very happy that
C-Cubed, a Bahamian
owned company that
employs many Bahamians
in the execution of their
work every year, has been
able to give us what we
think is a very fair arrange-
ment where we now get
more seats for less money.

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=
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FROM LEFT: Eddie Dames, acting director of Culture; Charles Maynard, Minister of State for the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture: Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Culture, and Crispin Cleare, president of C-Cubed Seating.

“What we have found out
in the last few years is that
islands like Abaco, Exuma
and Eleuthera have expand-
ed their parades greatly and
need more support from
central government for the

production of their parades.

“We thought that the pro-
vision of seats for these
parades would give them a
jump-start to start to earn
their own revenue. We want
to start with one island first,

ILO monitoring National Training Programme

By LLONELLA GILBERT

THE International Labour
Organisation (ILO) and coun-
tries throughout the region are
monitoring the National Train-
ing Programme to see if it
should become a model for
countries who hope to combine
social with labour development,
Minister of State for Labour
and Social Development Loret-
ta Butler-Turner said.

Speaking at the opening of
the programme at the Kendal
G L Isaacs Gymnasium on
Monday, Mrs Butler-Turner
said that the success of the ven-
ture does not rest upon the gov-
ernment, social partners or the
training institutes.

“It rests upon each of you,”
she said. “You will have to
work hard and study. You will
be required to give up some
leisure activities, but in the long
run it will be worth it.”

The government introduced
the National Training Pro-
gramme to help displaced
workers learn new trades such
as masonry; basic carpentry;
landscaping; heavy equipment
operating; accounting; diesel
mechanics; nail artistry and
design; facial care and technol-
ogy; computer applications, and
straw and shell craft.

The training will take place
at the College of the Bahamas
and the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BT VI).

The programme was created
im conjunction and consultation
with the Bahamas Christian
Council, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation and
trade unions.

Mrs Butler-Turner said the
government wants to give a
“hand-up” to persons who are
“progressive thinkers” and who
wish to take charge of their
future.

“This National Training Pro-
gramme seeks to give each of

Sandal

Raymond A Bethel/BIS

the selected participants new
or additional skills to regain
employment or become entre-
preneurs,” she said.

The state minister said that
depending on the success or
failure of the initiative’s first
run, the government will decide
if a “large scale” national train-
ing programme should become
permanent.

Mrs Butler-Turner said 529
persons were selected for the
programme in New Providence
and 244 from Grand Bahama.

Khaalis Rolle, chairman of
the implementation committee
of the National Training Pro-
gramme, said that the pro-
gramme is a major opportunity
for the participants.

“When you transition out of
this programme, the expecta-
tion is that you get a good job
or become an entrepreneur,”
Mr Rolle said.

He said if the participants
demonstrate commitment and
dedication, there is an oppor-
tunity for them to start their
own business.

Dr Christina Nwosa, associ-
ate vice-president of Outreach
at COB, encouraged partici-

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pants to continuously upgrade
their skills.

“Ongoing training is essen-
tial and there are distinct bene-
fits to a society from a popula-
tion which is adequately pre-
pared to meet a changing eco-
nomic environment,” she said.

“Lifelong learning or contin-
uing education produces a more
knowledgeable and flexible
work force that enables persons

IDIW SS
ONLY

MINISTER OF STATE in the
Ministry of Labour and Social
Development Loretta Butler-
Turner brought remarks at the
opening of the National Training
Programme on Monday,
September 14, 2009 at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

to realise their individual poten-
tial.”

Dr Nwosa said other bene-
fits of education include career
flexibility, increased skill
requirements, personal satis-
faction and better wages.

“People who upgrade their
work skills and knowledge not
only keep up with the latest
trends and techniques in their
respective areas, but can also
receive other benefits such as
the training needed to realise
additional goals,” she said.

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PHONE: 822-2157



see how that works out and
then expand it.

“During the course of the
contract we hope that a
number of islands (will) ben-
efit from the 1,000 seats,”
he said.

In Nassau, Mr Maynard
said, a few initiatives have
been introduced to continue
the working relationship
with downtown merchants.

These include the access
of the bleachers from the
back and new seats that
facilitate easy break-down
and setup.

Compromises

“We’ve come up with
some compromises to
ensure that the businesses
are not disadvantaged as a
result of the setting up and
taking down of the bleach-
ers,” he explained.

“We've worked with C-
Cubed during the last two
years to ensure that we
could have a better seating
arrangement for the general
public, the Bay Street mer-
chants and all concerned,”
Mr Maynard said.

President of C-Cubed
Crispin Cleare said over 30
persons will be employed on
this project, and safe, com-
fortable seating will be pro-
vided for the annual
parades.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



are ee
Opponents of martial rape amendment gravely out of touch

By DONNA NICOLLS

IPOSED a philosophical ques-
tion to a wise old lady once: Can
love torment? She advised me no,
the misunderstanding of love tor-
ments. I find her words to be rele-
vant to the current debate about
marital rape believing that a per-
verse misunderstanding of mar-
riage has led to exaggerated claims
and misinformation about the risks
of outlawing marital rape in the
Bahamas.

This misunderstanding is fueling






















YOUR SAY

the outrage over the proposed
amendment to the Sexual Offens-
es and Domestic Violence Act of
1991 that would remove the
impunity given under law to hus-
bands who rape their wives. I
could understand the current
debate if it were taking place in
the 19th century England, when



the presupposition of eternal
union with no possibility of
divorce, and unconditional con-
sent were foundations of marriage
because women were chattel, but
in the 21st century Bahamas, those
views are simply antiquated and
backward.

The real news in this debate is

UTILITIES REGULATION AND COMPETITION AUTHORITY





invites all Persons who would have been licensed by
the PUC or licensed under the Broadcasting Act
{Telecommunications, Internet, TV, Broadcasting) to attend its











CICENSING GUIDELINES

WORKSHOPS

10 a.m.—12 noon
Thursday, September 24th
British Colonial Hilton Hotel

Come find out all you need to know about:

























« URCA's requirements for transitioning
to the new licensing regime

« What type(s) of licence/s) you will need

* How to apply for a licence

« Associated fees

Scheduve of workshops for Famiy istanos wa be announced shartip

PROMOTING COMPETITION, SAFEGUARDING CONSUMERS

Fourth Terrace, Collins Avenue | h.O, Box 4860 Nassau, Bahamas

T 242.922-4437 | F 242. 329.7268

www urcabahamas.bs

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.by

ADMINISTRATIVE VACAN

Y

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the following

position:

Dean, Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (CHMI) will serve as
chief academic and stakeholder liaison officer for CHMI providing vision,
leadership, management and advocacy for tourism, hospitality and culinary
arts, ils programmes, faculty and staff within the College of The Bahamas.

Specific duties and responsibilities will involve formulating with key
stakeholders long- and short-range goals for CHMI, including updating the
College's master plan, strategic plan and other planning documents and
processes; providing leadership and coordination in the recruitment, selec-
tion and assignment of faculty and staff; liaising and collaborating with rel-
evant industry, NGOs and private sector stakeholders and working closely
with the employment community to review, develop and implement curric-
ula, courses and certification programmes based upon defined needs.

Applicants should possess a doctoral degree in one of the disciplines of
lourism, hospitality, management or a related field, a minimum of five (5)
years of successful academic leadership at the level of department chair or
above or ten (10) years experience at an executive level within the hospi-
tality industry or an appropriate combination of academic qualification and
training. For a detailed job description, visit www.coob.edu.bs/hrapply.
Interested candidates should submit a detailed resume and cover letter of
interest to: The Director, Human Resources, The College of The Bahamas,
P.O.Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas or hrapply@cob.edu.bs no later than
Wednesday, September 30, 2009.

that religious leaders would have
me believe that when my husband
and I joined as one in marriage 31
years ago, I signed away my indi-
viduality and thereby sacrificed
my freedom to choose, my own
self-determination and the own-
ership of my own body. My hus-
band and I are still happily married
but there was never any presup-
position of consent for either of
us to do as we wish when we wish
with each other’s body. My body is
still my own and I consent willing-
ly and freely during each sexual
interaction because we have a
healthy relationship built on love
and respect for each other.

If we were to believe the claims
of the Christian community, as
voiced most fervently by the
Bahamas Christian Council, then
we would further be led to believe
that the level of dysfunction in
marital relations within the Chris-
tian community of the Bahamas
is disturbingly pervasive, which
perhaps it is, considering the high
percentage of the population that
comes from unwed unions.

If the proposed amendment
would bring about a massive influx
of vindictive and discontented
wives rushing to incarcerate their
husbands, then we must have big-
ger problems than we thought. In
this case perhaps the energies of
the Christian leadership would be



“Recommendations
for consultation are
only stall tactics that
will deny justice to
individuals who
suffer from lack of
protection under the
law. There is a time
for consultation, but
now is the time for
leaders to lead and
do the right thing by
looking beyond the
dogmatic positions
of Christian
fundamentalists and
other fear-mongers
interested only in
obstructionism.”



more productively put to use in
pre-emptively restoring proper
order to the sacred trust of marital
relationships instead of blocking
justice for those who have already
fallen victim to the violated trust.

People in healthy relationships
have no fear of the proposed
amendment to the law and should
be appalled at the scare tactics.

James Catalyn & Friends

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Many opponents are muddying
the water making others believe
the issue is “complex, complicated,
and multi-dimensional” when it is
none of the above. This is the sim-
ple idea: According to the World
Bank the Bahamas has the highest
number of rapes per capita in the
world; wives are among those suf-
fering and they have inadequate
protection under the law.

Are we going to respond in fear
based on hypothetical situations
and hyperbolae or are we going
to drown out the ignorance with
pragmatic and principled action?
With the Catholic Archdiocese,
the Bahamas Conference of the
Methodist Church, the Seventh
Day Adventist Church all express-
ing their support for the proposed
amendment, the only thing that is
tragically wrong is the bad rap the
Christian Council is giving the
Christian community.

Recommendations for consul-
tation are only stall tactics that will
deny justice to individuals who suf-
fer from lack of protection under
the law. There is a time for con-
sultation, but now is the time for
leaders to lead and do the right
thing by looking beyond the dog-
matic positions of Christian fun-
damentalists and other fear-mon-
gers interested only in obstruc-
tionism. Marital rape is a crime
under international law, and
according to a 2006 United
Nations report, over 104 countries
around the world have already
made it a crime in their domestic
law. These countries include our
Caribbean neighbors Barbados,
and Trinidad and Tobago, not to
mention the United States, Spain,
and even Zimbabwe, much
ridiculed as backward and anti-
progressive.

There is great need in the
Bahamas to promote best prac-
tices in healthy relationships and to
learn from the successes of many
men and women in healthy mar-
riages; but in the meantime, while
dysfunction is rampant and
women are suffering, we need to
have empathy, stop the melodra-
ma and act.

¢ Donna Nicolls has been an
advocate for women and children’s’
rights for over 20 years. She has a
masters degree in counselling from
the University of the West Indies
and serves as a counsellor at the
Bahamas Crisis Centre. She is mar-
ried with two children.
Contact:
donna.nicolls@gmail.com

eS a ee

The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came inte force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition ta a new regulatory regime.

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic cornmunicatians sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of

new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA's

website (www.urcabahamas.bs). These include:

* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment]
Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adopted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatory Authority
continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comms
Act, the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts.

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comms Act coming inte force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

ATURCA WE WILL BE DOING OUR BEST TO MINIMISE DISRUPTIONS,

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

PO), Geo f-4ab) Nassau, &

wwtalurcabahamas ts



1437 F 242,323,7288

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7

Uproar at |
hotel union

meeting

FROM page one

sitting down, they are not
involved in it, but the A
team headed by Nicole
Martin is screaming at the
Deliverance team headed
by Kirk Wilson.”

Mr Douglas said the nom-
inations are not valid as Mr
Beneby and Ms Dixon have
been redundant since
August last year, and Mr
Wright was terminated from
his position as an organiser
at the union in 2008.

He added: “It clearly
states under the Constitu-
tion that a member should
be deemed non-financial
when he or she is 12 weeks,
or three months, in arrears
of contributions and shall
automatically forfeit his or
her privileges as a member
of the union, so how do you
nominate when you find
they are not members?

“The Constitution also
says no member shall vote

FROM page one

had time to file an appeal against the

ruling.

"My lawyer is looking into that and as

in the election if he or she is
not in good standing in
terms of his financial or oth-
er obligations to the union.”

At the close of nomina-
tions Mr Douglas said 12
nominees were put forward
by the M Group headed by
Tyrone Butler, the A
Group headed by Nicole
Martin, and the Redemp-
tion Team led by Sidney
Rolle.

Only nine of Team Deliv-
erance’s 12 nominations
were accepted, and the
nominees in question have
been called to discuss their
positions at the Attorney
General’s office, Mr Dou-
glas said.

The union’s executive
council arranged for nomi-
nations to take place yes-
terday under the direction
of Justice Neville Adderley.
Elections are set to be held
on September 29.

Confusion over the dates
of the previous election

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mee
MEMBERS of Nicole Martin’s
A Team outside the Workers
House building yesterday.

meant Team Deliverance
supporters did not attend
and Mr Wilson took court
action to have the election
declared “null and void”,
forcing Ms Martin, the
union's first woman presi-
dent, to step down.

The register used for the
May 28 elections is expected
to be used again when the
voting process proceeds,
allowing for some 6,000
union members to partici-
pate.



‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for
AEE SELECT

FROM page one

Doctors Hospital, The Rotary Club of East Nassau and

Bahamas Realty.

Companies that have donated money to the campaign
so far include Doctors Hospital, Tile King, Kelso Medical
Laboratory and Micronet among others.

The incubators bought with the money raised through
the campaign will be crucial in keeping premature or
otherwise challenged newborns alive, while the ventila-
tors will be used to care for patients in both the adult and
neonatal intensive care units.



Pastor of demolished church

soon as he would have studied the legal
implications we will get together and
decide what to do," Mr Bastian told The
Tribune.

Mr Bastian said he is also in conversa-
tions with the owner of the local real
estate company which sold him the dis-
puted property.

He added that his church's 50-member
congregation, which has moved tem-
porarily services to the Great Commis-
sion Church, is coping with the ordeal.

"We are doing fine in the midst of our
crisis. We know that God is still in control
and we will weather the storm. Hard
times do not last but hard people do and
so with God being our leader and guide
we will prevail,” he said.

As shocked residents of the commu-
nity looked on, Canaan Baptist Church
was reduced to rubble by Arawak Homes
on September 4 at the end of a two year

is ‘weighing his legal options’

court challenge over a land dispute.

After the demolition, spokesman for
Arawak Homes said: "Arawak Homes
wishes to assure the public that the deci-
sion to demolish the structure was only
taken after every reasonable effort, over
several years, was made to effect a dif-
ferent outcome.

"We also wish to confirm that care was
taken to secure all contents which were
met in the structure."

Yesterday, an emotional member of
the church said she was still shook up
about the loss of the building that was the
fruit of years of planning.

"Right now it's bringing us a lot of
tears. It was just like a human being to us
- it took us years to build and it just took
them one hour to destroy. This is not
what (former Prime Minister) Sir Lynden

(Pindling) had envisioned when he put
his name on this subdivision,” said the
church member, who did not want to be
named.

Ultimately, Supreme Court Justice
Cheryl Albury found Arawak Homes
Limited to be the rightful owner of sev-
eral lots on Charles Saunders Highway
on which the church was built in June,
2006.

The justice also ordered that Mr Bas-
tian, Alvin Rolle and Merline Rolle -
who were listed as second and third
defendants respectively - by themselves,
their servants and or agents "demolish
and remove the building or parts of any
buildings constructed on the said lots”.

Justice Albury also ruled that Arawak
Homes had immediate possession of the
lots in question.

Paul Moss formally tells Christie of
his upcoming bid for leadership

FROM page one

to the contrary. I believe that
you achieved much as party
leader and as Prime Minis-
ter,” Mr Moss explained.

“Many of your ideas and
initiatives were ahead of their
time. I have the utmost
respect and affection for you.
But, Sir, there has been a shift
in the dynamics of this coun-
try. ’m certain you must feel
it, anew generation is moving
on the scene and they are cry-
ing out for a leader — a new
vision and, in particular, a
new economic model that
would be anchored in the
deliberate empowerment of
Bahamians.

“T have come forward at
this time because I have heard
their cries. I have come for-
ward because I feel the
prompting of God Himself. I
must hearken to the cries of

0% to 75% o

my fellow Bahami-
ans and I must be
obedient to the
voice of God for,
as His Word says,
‘obedience is bet-
ter than sacrifice’,”
Mr Moss said.
Outlining that
Mr Christie has
served his genera-
tion well, Mr Moss
said the party’s
leader has also had
the privilege of
impacting other
generations. How-
ever, he said, the
time has come for
him and others like him to
serve their own generation.
“Tt’s time for our party to
look ahead and prepare for
those who will come after you
(Mr Christie) — for the next
generation of leaders. In my
bid for leadership, I am
demonstrating my readiness

en pA al a os



to move from the
wings to the stage
for, I believe, the
time is now. While
I can not expect to
have your support
in this race, I do
ask for your
understanding
and your bless-
ing,” he said.

Mr Moss also
encouraged the
party’s Parliamen-
tary block to lis-
ten to the call of
the people and
encouraged them
to support him in
his bid to become leader.

“T believe with all my heart
that in order for our party to
survive; for it to once again
become the Party of choice
for the majority of Bahami-
ans, we must make a concert-
ed, considered and deliberate
effort to encourage and

advance the next generation
of leaders. Bahamians are
waiting, crying out for a
leader.

“Undoubtedly, the time has
come for transition. We are
entering into a new season for
our country and for our
world, and this new season,
like every other, requires its
own breed of leaders. No one
can deny that our fathers
excelled in their generation;
they built a foundation that
is sure, but we can’t stop and
we can’t rest. We must con-
tinue to build. We must find a
new vision and new energies
to propel our party and our
country into a brighter
future,” Mr Moss said.

The leadership candidate
advised the party’s Parlia-
mentary team that if they
wish to discuss his plans any
further he was available for
them to speak with at any
time.

Regular Prices Clothing

STOREWIDE

Sale ends the 30th of September

EXTRA 5%

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
Visit our website at www.coh,edu. bs

NOTICE

Deadline for applications for
Spring (January) 2010 admission
Friday, September 25th, 2009 at 4:00 pm.



Applications may be accessed online at
www.cob.edu.bs or collected from the
Office of Admissions.

Prinate Family laland Resort Operation
Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum
requirements:

CHIEF ENGINEER

Have a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized College/University
At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely
related field

Must be computer literate

Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work
long hours

Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians
with varied trades

LIVE IN MAID

Fully experienced in domestic household chores
and culinary duties

Three years in a similar position would be an assct
Applicant must be willing to live on island

Applications should send email to:
cmajor(@ gerp.sandals.com

CVS

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HOLDERS &

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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BEC and the construction of
the Wilson City power plant

By LARRY SMITH

MARSH HARBOUR, Aba-
co - Faced with overwhelming
disapproval from a standing
room-only crowd of Abaconi-
ans upset over the bypassing of
local interests, Bahamas Elec-
trcity Corporation chiefs
orchestrating a town meeting
last week admitted to a failure
of process and promised to
learn from their mistakes.

"Things could have been
handled better," BEC general
manager Kevin Basden told his
critics, referring to construction
of a 48-megawatt oil-fired pow-
er plant on Abaco that pro-
ceeded without any local con-
sultation, "and lessons will be
learnt from this."

The town meeting was hasti-
ly called to address a
groundswell of concern about
the environmental and other
implications of the plant, whose
foundations have already been
laid on a 25-acre site near Wil-
son City, about 14 miles south
of Marsh Harbour. But in many
respects the effort came years
too late.

As BEC chairman Fred Got-
tlieb confirmed at the meeting,
the Christie administration
decided to build the $105 mil-
lion power plant back in 2005,
after years of dithering. And
the construction contracts were
signed by the Ingraham gov-
ernment in December, 2007.
But neither government has
involved the people of Abaco
at any stage of the planning
process.

"The existing plant is 30
years old," Gottlieb explained.
"It has an installed capacity of
27 mw and peak demand is 24
mw, so the loss of a single
engine causes serious load
shedding. The present site is
too close to residential areas
and there is no room for expan-
sion, but Abaco's energy
demand is growing by five per
cent per annum. I met the letter
of intent for the new plant
signed by my predecessor and
we went ahead with it."

The
Ms.

following

Colinal

individuals
Arnette Rahming

From all accounts, the audi-
ence that filled the New Visions
church hall to overflowing on
September 10 was a reasonable
cross section of Abaco com-
munities - including black and
white Bahamians as well as sec-
ond homers from a number of
settlements.

Many said it was the largest
public meeting ever seen on
Abaco outside of an election
campaign. And whether or not
the participants shared strong
feelings about the environmen-
tal implications of the new
plant, there was little doubt as
to their anger over the lack of
meaningful public consultation
on this mssive infrastructure
project.

In fact, Freeport lawyer Fred
Smith - who has taken judicial
review of the Baker's Bay
development on Guana Cay all
the way to the Privy Council -
told the meeting he had been
hired by a group of local and
foreign property owners and
would seek to halt the power
plant project until due process
had been achieved. He defined
"due process" as an opportu-
nity for all interested parties to
provide input.

"This is the biggest capital
expediture in Abaco's history
and there has been no mean-
ingful public consultation,"
Smith told me after the meet-
ing. "I will be writing to the rel-
evant central and local govern-
ment agencies for evidence that
all approvals and permits have
been properly obtained. I don't
expect any answers and they
will probably continue to do
what they are doing, but the
project will then be subject to
judicial review."

During the meeting he sug-
gested that the project could be

are
(356-8328) or

mperial

asked
Ms.



proceeding illegally: "We con-
tinue to disrespect the local
government institutions that the
FNM itself put in place. We
don't know if all statutory per-
mits for this power plant have
been granted. But it is incum-
bent on government to ensure
that due process is respected -
that is the essence of democra-
Cc a

Those "relevant agencies"
include the BEST Commission,
the Department of Environ-
mental Health Services, the
town planning department,
local government councils, the
Ministry of Works, and the
Cabinet Office. But Smith's
threat led BEC to pre-empt
him by halting its own project
temporarily. The Ministry of
Works confirmed on Monday
that the project was on hold
while BEC applied for con-
struction permits.

In response to this, one well-
placed political source
remarked: "Yes, BEC should
follow the rules. But how many
other government construction
projects - from schools to roads
- do you know that get per-
mits?"

Well, Tough Call can't speak
for all such projects, but I know
of at least one that does have
the necessary approvals - the
Nassau airport redevelopment.
The point is - how can BEC
spend $100 million of borrowed
money without going through
the required legal processes?

After years of virtual silence
on its plans for Abaco, BEC
and government officials pulled
out all the stops for the meeting
last week. Representatives from
MAN Diesel Canada (which
has the overall contract for the
plant), KES Environmental
Services (which did the envi-

to contact
Shamara

Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport, GB

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

LEANDRA PINDER

Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH

P. O. Box CB-11825

ronmental impact assessment)
and the BEST Commission all
gave presentations.

Nassau lawyer and Bahamas
National Trust council member
Pericles Maillis also spoke in
support of the project, making
it clear he was there in a per-
sonal capacity. He had been
wrongly identified as a BNT
spokesman on the official pro-
gramme for the meeting.

BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb
acknowledged rather testily
that the meeting was held in
response to a "surprising, sud-
den opposition" to the power
plant generated by misleading
propaganda, principally a video
published on You Tube. But as
Abaconian newspaper publish-
er Dave Ralph pointed out, this
was "the first public disclosure
of any consequence by BEC or
the government" on this mas-
sive project for the island. So
what do you expect to happen?

And the lack of disclosure is
despite the fact that the deci-
sion was made four years ago,
that contracts were signed
almost two years ago, that
financing was approved by par-
liament in the summer, that
construction is already well
under way, that the chairman
of BEC is a leading Marsh Har-
bour citizen, and that the prime
minister himself represents an
Abaco constituency.

In fact, Hubert Ingraham
slipped into the meeting incog-
nito wearing a baseball hat, and
two senior opposition MPs -
Fred Mitchell and Obie Wilch-
combe - also attended as
observers. One wag noted the
presence of "the next leader of
the PLP" to much laughter, but
it was unclear which one of
those gentlemen he was refer-
ring to.

Until Tough Call reported
on the power plant EIA in this
space a couple of weeks ago,
there was no substantive infor-
mation on this project any-
where in the public domain.
And for some strange reason,
BEC officials were unwilling to
answer basic questions for my
report, which pointed out their
atrocious track record on envi-
ronmental matters. Many of
those questions were answered
at the town meeting, however.

For example, the plant's
state-of-the-art generators will
burn heavy fuel oil so efficient-
ly that cancer-causing particu-
lates will be minimised and
more power will be produced
per unit of fuel.

Also, the fuel used will con-
tain less than two per cent sul-
phur, producing emissions that
are well within World Bank
guidelines. And heavy fuel
power plants already operate
throughout the Bahamas and
Caribbean, as well as in the US
and Europe.

Rising cost estimates for the
plant over the years were attrib-
uted to depreciation of the US
dollar and additional costs for
the fuel terminal, pipeline and

eRe ANEW MCN Mer cela



transmission lines. The plant
should be operational by next
spring, but it is unclear when
the new transmission lines will
be ready, or what other work
needs to be done to decommis-
sion the existing power plant
and upgrade the local grid,
which residents say is in poor
repair.

The town meeting featured
the usual slew of cranks who
took up most of the question
and answer time with lengthy
non-sequitors and personal
advertisements. These incon-
siderate bores can be found at
every public meeting in the
Bahamas, wasting time and
spouting nonsense. They espe-
cially love to talk about them-
selves, and they are a boon to
officials because they divert so
much time and attention from
the real issues.

Cay Mills, a local taxi driver,
said he was glad to see that
Abaconians were finally get-
ting some payback from cen-
tral government for their taxes.
but noted that “we should have
a say in whatever is brought
into our district. The cart is
before the horse with this town
meeting. Abaco people read,
are intelligent and want to be
part of their own future. We
want democracy, not an elected
dictatorship."

It was a sentiment that
seemed to be shared by many
in the audience, and was aptly
illustrated by Dave Ralph in a
recent editorial. He quoted the
prime minister's comments
about someone using the wrong
colour to paint the House of
Assembly: "You shouldn't
allow strangers to come in your
place and determine the decor.
I don't condemn initiative, but
uninformed initiative is not to
be tolerated."

Well, many folks in Abaco
feel the same way about the
power plant issue. According
to Ralph, "Government and
BEC have been negligentabout
informing Abaco on this pro-
ject and in requesting local
input."

Equally negligent is the fact
that there was no public con-
sultation in the EIA process.
The power plant assessment -
contracted to an unknown

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Florida firm with no website -
was completed last October but
is still under review by the
BEST Commission. The EIA
for the fuel terminal and
pipeline has only just been com-
pleted. And no environmental
management plan for the plant
has been produced, yet con-
struction is well under way.

Pericles Maillis likened these
concerns to a storm in a teacup:
"I was president of the BNT
when the Clifton power plant
was being expanded and we
don't have acid rain in Nassau.
These controversies can only
hurt the environmental move-
ment. This plant is not a sur-
prise, it's been years in the
making and was no secret."

But who knows what condi-
tions are at Clifton, or at other
BEC plants around the country,
when there is no public disclo-
sure and we have only the cor-
poration's self-serving state-
ments to rely on?

According to Philip Weech
of the BEST Commission, the
Wilson City EIA is now under
active review with other gov-
ernment agencies, which will
determine what needs to be
done with the environmental
management plan: "Oil tankers
in the Bahamas have an envi-
able safety record," he said.
"and there will be no impacts
on freshwater resources. Wet-
lands will be impacted along
the pipeline corridor, but we
feel that can be safely man-
aged."

Meanwhile, BNT officials
told me after the meeting that
they would be seeking full
involvement in the develop-
ment of the environmental
management plan for the Wil-
son City plant and any moni-
toring initiatives that will be put
in place. And Abaco's home-
grown green activists - Friends
of the Environment - said they
also want to be involved going
forward.

"The number of people that
attended the public meeting
shows not only that the people
of Abaco are concerned about
what happens in their commu-
nity but that they want to be
involved in the decisions that
affect them," Friends executive
director Kristin Williams told
me. "We hope that the govern-
ment and BEC move forward
in good faith and provide the
information necessary to assure
the public that the promises
they made are being kept."

This is not the place for a
technical discussion of the mer-
its of using heavy oil as opposed
to diesel in a power plant. Suf-
fice it to say that - although dif-
ferent spokesmen cited varying
figures at the meeting - using
diesel fuel would add millions
to the annual operating costs,
and it is not clear if the envi-
ronmental benefits would justi-
fy that. However, it is clear that
heavy fuel oil plants require
more maintenance than other
types of plants - and again,
BEC's track record is not very
inspiring.

However, the issue of con-
ventional versus renewable
energy, on Abaco in particular,

has not been sufficiently
explored in my view.

Although BEC is being
dragged kicking and screaming
(by Earl Deveaux, Fred Got-
tlieb and others) towards a
renewable energy future, a
national energy policy that
would promote these initiatives
is nowhere near being imple-
mented.

A consultative committee
chaired by Philip Weech was
formed after the election to
build on earlier efforts by the
Christie administration. A
draft report was completed last
November, but has only just
been posted to the BEST Com-
mission's website (almost a year
later) for public comment. And
a Chamber of Commerce meet-
ing has been scheduled for
tomorrow to discuss this with
Utilities Minister Phenton Ney-
mour.

Consultants funded by the
Inter-American Development
Bank have just been hired to
evaluate the economic disaster
that BEC is now known to be,
and to revamp our existing
energy regulatory regime. But
at this rate, we will all be dead
before any effective energy pol-
icy or fossil fuel reductions can
be implemented.

There is no doubt that con-
ventional energy must continue
to play a big role in power gen-
eration in the Bahamas. But as
one woman put it at the town
meeting: "We should take a
stand for renewable energy,
which could brand our island
and would attract so much
attention worldwide and set a
legacy of green change. This
government could set a huge
precedent in that regard."

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM

P. O. Box N-7905 Visit oer erebstie at wee col, edu hs

NOTICE

Tenders are invited forthe provision of cooked food services al
The College of The Bohomas’ Grosvenor Close Campus,
Shirley Street

NASHLAWN CURTIS
BRENDA ADDERLEY

NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
CLAUDE LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5818
P. O. Box SS-5481

New Bight Cat Island NIKITA CURTIS

Tender documents may be collected frm:
Portia Smith Soden Services Centre
The College of The Bahamas
Quakes Field Campus
Contact; Wire, Elvina Bastion ot 507-4514

CYRIL WILLIAMS |
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

Tenders are to be addressed ti:
Wis. Chervl) Simms
V. P., Finance
The College of The Bahamas

DWAYNE DORSETTE RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672
EDNA DEAN

P. O. Box N-4912 SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818
IAN TRECO

P. O. Box N-3693

Deadline for submission
September 30th, 2009 at Spun.

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB
JASON SAUNDERS

Prince Charles Drive Tender document should be marked a5 follows:

Tender (109
PROPOSAL TO FROVIDE COOKED FOOD ON
THE COLLEGE OF THE RAH AIAS'
GROSVESOR CLOSE CAMPUS

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua
JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693 VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive
KEVA FAWKES

Matthew Town, Inagua Phe College of The Bahamas

WELLINGTON DORSETTE : . igh
reserves the right to accept or reject all proposals

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

Site visit will take place on Momdlay September “44d.
Parties are to meet at the Physical Plant building,
The College of The Bahamas, Qakes Field Campus at Mam.

For all enquiries regarding the site visit
Contact Mr. Julian Miller at
(242) BEd, (247-302-4325 or (242)-370-45051


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS



For the best sporting action .. .

www .tribune24 7 .c

‘Not only can we
athletes, but we

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH so many local asso-
ciations and federations feel-
ing the financial pinch,
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion president Wellington
Miller said they may have dis-
covered the answer to their
WOES.

Coming out of a two-day
Solidarity meeting that he and
one of his vice presidents,
Algernon Cargill, attended in
Mexico last month, Miller said
they have formed a partner-
ship with all of the associa-
tions and federations for the
way forward.

At a meeting of the heads
of the sporting bodies last
week, Miller said they were
able to advise them of the fact
that there is sufficient money
available from both the Inter-
national Olympic Association
(BOA) and the Pan Ameri-
can Sports Organisation
(PASO).

“The Solidarity course have
$311 million available to help
federations and their ath-
letes,” Miller disclosed. “Not
only can we get funding for
Olympic athletes, but we can
also go to PASO, who have
$130 million, for those sports



BOA PRESIDENT WELLINGTON MILLER

build sports in the Bahamas
and to help with their travel
when they are sending teams
off.”

Miller, who still serves as
the president of the Amateur
Boxing Association of the
Bahamas, said the only

“Let us know when you’re
going, where yowre going and
how much money you need,”
Miller said.

“They want to spend mon-
ey on helping the sporting
bodies. Once they plan it
properly and bring all of their

that are not in the Olympics.
“We can get moneys for
those organisations to help



requirement is that the fed-
erations and associations must
submit their plans.

information to us in time, we
can send off the request for
the moneys. But they will

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham greets Mark Knowles’ wife, Dawn...

PM proclaims September
13-19 Marh Knowles Week

sporting icon’s teacher growing up, said he
got goose bumps just sitting in the audience
when the ceremony took place.

“Tt was so disappointing after they went up
one set and they couldn’t hold on for the win,”
Knowles said. “It just happened so quickly.
But ’'m very proud of him, win or lose. He did
us proud just being in the final.”

Hewitt, an Australian now residing in the
Bahamas, said the honour was well deserving
for Knowles. “To have played professional
tennis on the circuit for 20-plus years is a
grind,” Hewitt said. “He’s had a lot of ups
and downs, but to be in the top 10 over 10
years is just amazing.”

At the US Open in Flushing Meadows, New
York, Hewitt got knocked out of the third
round of the men’s singles by Switzerland’s
Roger Federer, whose bid for a six straight
title was ruined by 20-year-old Juan Martin
del Potro of Argentina in yesterday’s final.

While he has dabbled a bit into doubles,
the No.32 ranked player in the world, said he
has never had an opportunity to play against
Knowles.

“But he’s a great player. He’s definitely put
the Bahamas on the map worldwide,” Hewitt
pointed out. “I think the entire country should
really be proud of his accomplishments.”

If there was anyone proud of his achieve-
ments, it was his family.

His father, Sammy Knowles, said he’s final-
ly delighted to see his son receive recognition
by the Bahamas Government, which was long
overdue.

“Tt’s good that finally somebody decided to
recognise him for how he has carried this coun-
try on his shoulder for so long,” he said. “It’s
been a long time. I’m happy that the Prime
Minister, the Minister of Sports and the coun-



MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest
shares a special moment with Mark Knowles...

try have finally recognised his achievements.”

Vicki Knowles, his most loyal fan, said her
son’s achievement will definitely go down as
one of the greatest.

But as a mother, she noted that there’s
mixed reaction whenever she’s in the stands
watching a live match, especially when he
comes out with a loss.

“The losses are difficult because you know
what he’s going through,” she said. “It’s not a
good feeling. But we try to cheer him up when-
ever it happens.”

And Dawn Knowles, his wife who is now his
main cheerleader in the stands, said her hus-
band “loves the Bahamas so much and I’m so
glad that he’s finally being recognised for his
accomplishments.

“He’s been the voice of the Bahamas for so
many years and everywhere he goes around
the world, the only thing he talks about is the
Bahamas. It’s a well deserved recognition for
him and I’m happy to be here to share it with
him.”

Or

i 2

_- moss fee!

A al

get funding for Olympic
can also go to PASO...’






Bahamas Olympic Association
president says they may have

discovered the answer to local
sporting bodies’ financial woes

have to provide us with the
receipts of how the money is
spent so that we can continue
to tap into the funding that is
available.”

If all of the paperwork is
properly done, Miller said
they can have funding avail-
able for the sporting bodies
from both the IOC and
PASO within a month’s time.

“It’s just as easy as that
because the moneys are avail-
able,” he said.

Unfortunately, Miller said
the plight of the Bahamas
Bodybuilding and Fitness
Federation, who is still seek-
ing $19,500 to send it’s 11-
member team off to Grena-
da to defend its title at the
Central American and
Caribbean Championships on
September 30, was revealed
a little too late for the BOA
to seek any funding to assist
them.

“We want them to apply to

us in time so we can help
them,” Miller said. “AII they
have to do is provide us with
all your information, filled out
the forms, we will send it off
and you will have your mon-
ey.
“But you can’t come a
week or a month before you
are traveling and expect to
get the money. There’s a lot
of paper work that has to be
filed. But it’s amazing the
amount of money that is
available out there. If they
plan it right, they won’t be
carrying anymore.”

A lot of the countries, espe-
cially in the Caribbean, are
tapping into the Solidarity
funds that is being offered by
the IOC and the Bahamas is
going to take advantage of it
too.

Miller said not just sports,
but the IOC is also providing
funding to assist countries
with the environment, which



helps to make the atmosphere
more conducive for the ath-
letes.

And he said that funding is
also available for scholarships
in anumber of sports related
areas that he hopes that
Bahamians will also take
advantage of.

Today, Miller and Don
Cornish, another vice presi-
dent, will be traveling to Peru,
to take part in a two-day sem-
inar on Olympic Tourism.

“That’s another avenue of
where we can get funding, so
we’re going to try and see
what is available for the
Bahamas,” he said.

“We are heavy in tourism,
so we will see what is avail-
able for us to develop our
product.”

Miller and Cornish, who
doubles as president of the
Bahamas Volleyball Federa-
tion, will return home on Sun-

day.

Photos by Peter Ramsay/BIS

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

Amateur Athletic Union coming to Bahamas Ky WIE

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Amateur Athletic
Union (AAU) is coming to
the Bahamas.

James Parker, the director
of sports for the AAU in
Orlando, Florida, was in town
along with other members to
meet with Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister to discuss the plans
for the Bahamas.

“We have decided to make
this one of our districts, so
next year we will be bringing
some teams over here,” Park-
er said. “We want to get more
teams and more athletes
involved.

“We will bring in some pro-
grammes to start some
leagues here. We will start
with basketball first and then
we will go on to baseball,
track and field, volleyball and
baseball.”

Tanya Ferguson, a former
basketball player turned ref-
eree while she was in the
Louisiana area, will be return-
ing home to serve as the
Bahamian director.

The local programme will
be based out of the College of





SHOWN (I-r) are Amateur Athletic Union members, including Bahamian Tanya Ferguson (fourth from left)
with James Parker (fifth from left), director of AAU, and BBF president Lawrence Hepburn, BOA president
Wellington Miller and coach Mario Bowleg

the Bahamas.

“We will be doing a lot of
regional events, which will be
good for the Bahamas,” Fer-
guson said. “We will have a
lot of teams from all over the
United States and Canada
coming here to compete.”

The players involved in the
programme will be between
the ages of 12-17. However,
there will also be a pony
league for players between
the ages of 8-12.

Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration president Lawrence

Hepburn said for years a lot
of the coaches in the
Bahamas have been longing
for the opportunity to expand
their programmes.

“A lot of the coaches want-
ed to go to their programmes,
now they will have the oppor-
tunity to have them come
here,” Hepburn stressed.
“They will only serve to help
us.
“We’re looking at employ-
ing the services of their coach-
es coming in to help us with
our programme. We will also

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Photo by Patrick Hanna/BIS

have their coaches clinics here
and we want to attract some
of their tournaments here.”
Hepburn said he antici-
pates only good things com-
ing out of the programme.
“Our federation will be
involved, but we will be
reaching out to a lot of peo-
ple,” Hepburn stated. “We
have some coaches here that
are already involved in the
AAU programme, but we
want to get more on board.”
With Ferguson coming
home, Hepburn said she will

bring a wealth of experience
to the programme. Already,
coach Mario Bowleg and
Darryl Sears, of Grand
Bahama, are involved in the
Florida-based programme.

“We want to also reach out
to other sporting bodies
because AAU is not just bas-
ketball,” Hepburn pointed
out. “AAU is a magnet of
many sports, so we’re hoping
that other federations and
associations will use this to
get more exposure for their
sports.”

Bowleg said the pro-
gramme is definitely needed
in the country.

“We have many high
school teams leaving here to
perform in these AAU tour-
naments,” Bowleg stressed.
“What AAU does is it will
allow us to have the tourna-
ments come here so that our
athletes can get the exposure
that they won’t get because
they can’t get to travel.

“Tt will help, not only the
Bahamas student-athletes as
it relates to getting scholar-
ships, but it will help the
teams coming to enhance the
national team programme,
especially during the summer
period.”



INBRIEF

SOCCER
CARIBS IN
ACTION

THE College of the
Bahamas’ men and
women soccer teams are
expected to take their
third and final trip this
weekend when they are
set to face Warner Col-
lege and Webber Col-
lege in Tampa, Florida.

The Caribs are sched-
uled to play Warner
College on Friday in the
women’s opener at 4
pm, followed by the
men at 6 pm. Then on
Sunday, the women are
set to open up against
Webber University at
noon with the men play-
ing at 2 pm.

SOFTBALL
BSC MEETING

THE Baptist Sports
Council is scheduled to
hold a meeting on Fri-
day at 6 pm at McDon-

i

-

—
as

Goa
: t oe Wo LP P

ald’s, Thompson Boule-
vard, for all churches
interested in participat-
ing in the 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball
Classic.

The Classic is tenta-
tively set to get under-
way on Saturday, Sep-
tember 26 at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex.
The Classic will com-
prise of the men, co-ed
and 17-and-under divi-
sions.

Also during the meet-
ing, the BSC will dis-
close plans for the 2009
Nicola Major Track and
Field Classic that is slat-
ed to take place on Sat-
urday, October 10, at
the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadi-
um.



BBF 15/16 National Team - 2nd Place Finish @ PONY Latin American
Caribbean Zone Championships (Highest Finish Ever by a Bahamian
National Baseball Team) - Team is presently ranked 2nd in the
Caribbean - PONY BASEBALL. (On this 16 member Team - Only 5

young men DO NOT attend school abroad)

Very successful
year for BBF

THE Bahamas Baseball Federation con-
tinues to meet its mandate of “Higher Edu-
cation through the Sport of Baseball”.

The BBF had a very successful year on the
international baseball scene with its historic
defeat - (Gurabo) Puerto Rico - 2nd Place
World Ranking by 08 PONY Baseball) - BBF
2nd Place Finish @ 15-16 PONY Latin Amer-
ican Tournament.

But the most outstanding accomplishment
this year is the overwhelming number of
young men whose lives are being impacted in
a positive way with baseball.

The BBF membership, its president and
his executive team, are extremely proud and
excited to announce the 44 young men who
have been afforded the opportunity to further
their education at various high schools and
colleges in the US as a result of baseball.

1) The recent "BBF 7th Annual Andre
Rodgers National Baseball Championships",
hosted in June 09, was a resounding success
on the baseball diamond which continues to
afford our talented young men the opportu-
nity to further their baseball dreams and edu-
cation:

US Colleges Present: Jackson State Uni-
versity (JSU) - (Head Coach - Omar Johnson)
/ North Carolina Central University (NCCU)
(Head Coach - Dr Henry White)

Young men offered

collegiate scholarships:

¢ Desmond Russell - JSU -(Christ School
Stand-Out - All Conference/All State) lead
the Bahamas senior men’s Team: 333 B.A

Coach Johnson was an assistant coach on
the German National Team and witnessed
Desmond's outstanding pitching performance
against the US National Team (Held the US
to 2 runs after 5 Innings)

¢ Aneko Knowles - JSU -(Christ School
Stand-Out - All Conference) - Member of
senior men's national team - Lead the 16-18

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays



National Team (425 BA) Little League Latin
American Tournament

e Etienne Farquharson - NCCU - (Gradu-
ate of Pensacola Junior College with Acade-
mic All-American Honours (3.80) GPA:
Received a Baseball Scholarship & Academ-
ic Scholarship to attend NCCU - Member of
the senior men's national team.

2) The first ever BBF/PONY Baseball 2008
INFORMATIONAL\INSTRUCTIONAL
PROSPECT Showcase for High School/Col-
lege recruiting - (hosted Nov 08) was an over-
whelming success with the following young
men being afforded opportunities:

¢ Theodore Trae Sweeting - Christ School
- (BBF 2009 Junior Division 13-15 - MVP &
Recipient of the Charles Johnson Best Catch-
er Award)

¢ Jordon Farquharson - Christ School

¢ Perez Knowles - Rabun Gap

US High Schools Present: Darlington
School, Georgia/Christ School, North Car-
olina/ Christ Church School, Virginia / Rabun
Gap, Georgia

3) BBF Coaches Clinic hosted January of
this year, which was organised by fourth vice
president Etienne Farquharson and conduct-
ed by Troy State University head coach Bob-
by Pierce was a great success.

¢ Patrick Knowles Jr - Troy State - 09 grad-
uate from Christ School in Arden, North Car-
olina (09 All Conference & All State Honors)

¢ Richard Bain - Palm Beach Community
College: Drafted in the 45 Round / 1367 Pick
- of the Recent Major League Draft - Made
the tough decision to enter Junior College
which still allows him an opportunity to be
drafted higher over the next two years

(Once players enter a four-year college,
they can not be drafted until their Junior Grd
year). Players can be drafted from a Junior
College every year of their two-year eligibil-
ity)

The president wishes to thank and con-
gratulate the following persons for making
this years 09 entry class so successful:

¢ Patrick Knowles (Grand Bahama) -
YMCA Baseball Academy

e Will Rutherford (Grand Bahama) -
GBLL

¢ Stephanie Higgs (Grand Bahama) -
GBABA

¢ Etienne Farquharson (Inagua) fourth vice
president Terran Rodgers (Nassau) - JBLN,

¢ Theodore R Sweeting (Nassau)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

——————



PAGE 10

PAGE

WEDNESDAY,

11



t

SEPTEMBER 16,



r

2009

For the best sporting action . . .

www.tribune 242






io



— a

ve
Mass feels av

‘Not only can
we get funding
for Olympic
athletes...’

See page 9

Photos by Peter Ramsay/BIS

BAHAMIAN TENNIS ACE Mark Knowles with Governor General Arthur Dion Hanna (centre) and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham at Government House...

PM proclaims September 13-
19 as Mark Knowles Week

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ore than two decades after
he launched his profession-
al tennis career, Mark
Knowles says he never envi-
sioned the response he
received from the Bahamas Government.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham pro-
claimed September 13-19 Mark Knowles
Week at a welcome home dinner reception on
Monday night at Government House. And
he received a citation from Governor General
Arthur D Hanna.

While he would have won all four Grand
Slam titles, albeit in two different doubles
categories, this year alone Knowles played
in three of those finals, winning the mixed
doubles at Wimbledon in July with German
Anna-Lens Groenefled.

However, the 38-year-old five-time

Bahamian tennis ace receives citation from
Governor General during welcome home
dinner reception at Government House

Olympian and his Indian men’s doubles part-
ner Mahesh Bhupathi lost in both the Aus-
tralian Open in January and the US Open
on Sunday.

“Tt feels good, especially coming off the
heels of the disappointing loss at the US
Open,” said Knowles, who returned home to
a “here’s welcome” one day after playing a
rain delayed final that had been postponed
since Friday.

“Tt’s nice to be here and be honoured by the

government. To have all of these dignitaries,
along with my family and friends, is very spe-
cial.”

As the country’s most celebrated local and
international player continues to look ahead
to the future, Knowles said he’s even more
inspired to have the support of the nation
behind him.

“Thad a long career and I’ve accomplished
a whole lot, but I still feel that there is still a
lot more for me to accomplish,” he stressed.

“So I’m just going to go ahead and enjoy this
moment.”

Among those sharing the moment with
Knowles was Emile Knowles, his childhood
friend who hit balls with him when he got
started at age five, along with former number
one singles player in the world, Lleyton
Hewitt.

Knowles, who considers himself to be the

SEE page 9

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THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY,

SEPTEMBER ;

usiness

2009

ROYAL FIDELITY

Uae Cla g

RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company



Recession drives 65%
cremation increase

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

uneral homes have seen a

drastic increase in the less

expensive cremation

option over full burial

year-over-year, some
experiencing an almost 65 per cent
increase, Tribune Business was told
yesterday, as official figures indicated
a7 per cent increase in New Provi-
dence funeral fees - coupled with the
recession - was responsible for the
change.

In the Department of Statistics’ July
consumer price index, New Providence
funerals fees increased by 6.6 per cent,
while fees in Grand Bahama increased
by 7.9 per cent.

Many funeral homes were surprised
by the change, some saying they were

Cheaper option much in vogue, as $1,300
fee much less than $5,000 for full burial

“shocked” to hear that funeral expens-
es had gone up.

Managing director of Cedar Crest
Funeral Home, Audley Fraser, said
his company had not increased its fees
in over three years.

According to him, despite the
increased cost of shipping caskets, the
company had tried to absorb the
expense in order to keep their prices
competitive.

However, Mr Fraser suggested the
rising cost of burial in Grand Bahama
- and the markedly depressed market
- may be the reason for that island’s
almost 8 per cent increase in funeral

expenses.

He and other funeral home person-
nel agreed that the number of families
cremating their deceased loved ones
has increased exponentially since 2008.

With the cost of a basic funeral
pegged at almost $5,000, and a direct
cremation at about $1,300, persons
were opting out of the costly and
rapidly declining burial plots.

“Tt has increased drastically,” said
a director at Butlers Funeral Home.
“Tm doing a lot of cremations.”

She told this paper she was busy
working on two full funerals, but that
the requests for cremations far out-

weighed that of the traditional funeral
and burial.

A Secretary at Restview Memorial
Mortuary and Crematorium said his
company had seen an almost 65 per
cent increase in the number of crema-
tions performed at their crematorium.

“It’s cheaper than having a funeral
service,” he said.

He suggested that there have been a
lot more deaths recently as well, blam-
ing the increase on an overall decrease
in health throughout New Providence.

“Cremation is the main solution
people resort to these days,” said the
Restview secretary.



Businesses see 15-30% summer sales decreases

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE recession bit even
deeper into the Bahamian
economy in July-August 2009
with many businesses report-
ing year-over-year sales drops
of 15-30 per cent, a former
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce president yesterday
confirming that his business
had suffered the “most signif-
icant” top line decline year-to-
date last month - more than
10 per cent.

Dionisio D’Aguilar, presi-
dent of the Superwash laun-
dromat chain, told Tribune
Business he “agreed 100 per
cent” that many Bahamian
businesses had suffered their
worst year-over-year sales per-
formances to date during those
two summer months, based on
his company’s performance
and reports he had heard from
other companies.

“Sales were down signifi-
cantly in August,” Mr
D’Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “Overall, my August

sales were down just over 10
per cent. It crashed through
the 10 per cent mark for the
first time. In previous months,
my sales were trending down 6
per cent, 7 per cent, 8 per cent
month to month.

“The most significant drop
so far was in August, for
August 2009 compared to
August 2008. A lot of people
have made mention of that;
that August was probably the
worst month yet. And a lawyer
friend of mine said today that
July was just appalling. I can
concur with that - my business
was down, no doubt about
that.”

Assessing the reasons for
the summer sales declines, Mr
D’Aguilar said many busi-
nesses felt large numbers of
Bahamians were continuing to
shop in Florida, despite the
recession and corresponding
increase in
unemployment/reduction in
disposable incomes.

As a result, he suggested
that both the Government and
private sector organisations

Judicial Review threat
to $105m power plant

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN attorney will this week
write to all government agen-
cies involved in the permit-
ting process for BEC’s $105
million Wilson City power
plant to demand that his Aba-
co-based clients be involved
in “meaningful consultation”
on the project, with moves for
a Supreme Court injunction
to follow if construction
recommences.

Fred Smith, a Freeport-
based partner in the Callen-
ders & Co law firm, also
warned that he would launch
a Judicial Review challenge
in the courts - similar to the
one he instigated against Dis-
covery Land Company’s Bak-
er’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



Attorney set to demand
meaningful consultation
on BEC project for
clients, and seek possible
injunction to stop work

project on Great Guana Cay,
which has reached the Privy
Council - if BEC attempted
to have the necessary con-
struction permits “rubber
stamped and retroactively
applied” so the power plant
could proceed.

Accusing successive gov-
ernments of failing to heed
the warning given by the Gua-
na Cay situation, when it
came to following statutory
and due process and consult-
ing with all affected parties,
Mr Smith said both the
Christie and Ingraham admin-
istrations had “put the cart
before the horse” when it
came to the BEC power
plant.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment had delivered “a slap in
the face” to democratic insti-
tutions and their processes
through their handling of the
Wilson City project, the Cal-
lenders & Co partner said the
administration itself had been
responsible for generating
opposition by its decision to
“proceed clandestinely,
secretly and without permits”.

Informing Tribune Business
that he represented a number
of Bahamian and foreign
homeowners on Abaco, Mr
Smith said of his clients:
“They are up in arms about

SEE page 2B



DIONISIO D’AGUILAR

needed to start a full-fledged
campaign to encourage
Bahamians to shop at home,
keeping what money was
being generated in the local
economy.

“The perception was that
the airport was stuffed full of
people going to Florida to
shop,” Mr D’Aguilar said.
“People are making their
wages here and shooting them-
selves in the foot. They will
argue that prices are too
expensive here, but they need
to spend in the Bahamas to
support local jobs.

* July and August worst year-over-year comparisons for

many Bahamian firms, as Superwash’s chief confirms

top line decline ‘crashed through 10% for first time in August’
* Return air fares fall below $200 to Miami

“Not enough emphasis is
being placed by the Govern-
ment and organisations like
the Chamber of Commerce on
shopping at home. If people
are going to the US to shop,
there are fewer dollars in the
economy and less money is cir-
culating, which causes even
more disruption.

“There should be real
emphasis, a real marketing
campaign to say consumers
need to stay at home and shop.
The situation is going to get
worse before it gets better.”

What is aiding Bahamian
travel to the US is the dra-
matic drop in air fares, as car-
riers reduce prices to boost
load factors at a time when
travel is reduced during the
tourism season low point. For
instance, a return fare to Mia-
mi on American Eagle now

ROYAL FIDELITY

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costs less than $200, some $98
plus $90 in taxes.

“T haven’t flown for under
$200 on American Eagle for
a long time,” the former
Chamber president observed.

Mr D’ Aguilar said retailers
were among the businesses
who had seen the sharpest
downturns in July and August,
something they believed had
not been helped by a shorter
Back-to-School season. Archi-
tects and engineers were also
seeing a shortage of work, with
companies who still had liquid
assets and the ability to borrow
placing all projects on hold.

“All we’re hearing is doom
and gloom,” Mr D’Aguilar
said. “We need something big,
and maybe this Baha Mar
thing is big enough to give
people a glimmer of hope, but
that’s still a long way off.”

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‘Destabilisation’
fears on change
to NIB strategy

* Former finance minister
‘rather frightened’ at
recommendations for
more aggressive
NIB investments

* Warns of potential asset-
liability mismatch, and
drain on foreign
reserves/pressure on
exchange rate if more
NIB assets placed as
banking system deposits

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A FORMER finance min-
ister yesterday said he was
“rather frightened” by recom-
mendations suggesting that the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) be operated as a pri-
vate pension fund, as this
could ultimately destabilise
this nation’s monetary system
and create pressure for a
devaluation of the Bahamian
dollar.

Both NIB’s eighth actuarial
review and the 2005 Social
Security Reform Commission
report have urged a more
aggressive stance on NIB’s
investments, including limit-
ing the proportion of invest-
ment assets held in govern-
ment and public sector securi-
ties, but James Smith said such
an approach had created the
first “financial crisis” he faced
when taking over as Central
Bank of the Bahamas gover-
nor in the 1980s.

NIB traditionally has a mul-
ti-million doNar sum on
deposit with the Central Bank
at the end of each month, the
Commission’s report noting
that this averaged $91.1 mil-
lion over the 12 months to
December 2004. No interest is
earned on this at all.

However, Mr Smith said
that soon after taking over as
governor, the decision was tak-
en to put these surplus NIB
assets to better use by placing
them in the commercial bank-

SEE page 4B

| Learn more at reyalfidelity.com |

ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Don’t sleep on client attention

ZLZZZZZZZZ. Are you putting
your clients, or potential clients, to
sleep? Or are they excited to see
you and talk with you? Are you los-
ing their attention on calls? Or when
you are sitting in front of them? If
you have not asked this question,
now is a good time to do so. If your
client is not involved in the conver-
sation or not asking you questions,
then they are not engaged.

Put the car in gear

If your client is not engaged then
you’re not going anywhere. Just like
a car sitting there with the engine
running, yet you have not put the
car in gear.

I recently read an article where a
professional asked a client about
sales people. His reply was that
“sales people are boring”. They basi-
cally came in, sat down, asked rou-
tine questions like: “How are you?’
(when they really don’t care), run
on about their business and/or them-
selves and then ask for business.
BORING! Yeah, I would be bored
myself... zzzzzzzzzzzz. ’'m actually
already half asleep.

How to keep a client’s attention!
I wrote about this before. Ask
questions. Remember my maxim:
Why? Why? Why? Why? Who?
Who? Who? What? What? GET

Promotional

Marketing

by Scott Farrington



THE POINT YET?

Focus the attention on your client
and not yourself. Stop boring people
to tears. Ask the ‘5Ws’ (discussed
in previous article).

Put yourself into your clients shoes
and see how it feels. Think about
what it feels like to be on the other
end of that conversation, in which

someone is just talking about them-
selves - itis BORING ! That is how
buyers feel when salespeople pitch
instead of ask questions.

So how do you do this? How do
you avoid putting people to sleep?
By the way, if you do put people to
sleep, I know some people who are
sleep deprived and could use your
servic.es

SIMPLE, ask questions, shut up
and listen.

OK, article finished. ’m not a
sleep therapist.

All of these marketing strategies
are certain to keep your business on
top during these challenging eco-
nomic times. Have a productive and

profitable week.
Remember: “THOSE WHO
MARKET WILL MAKE IT “

NB: Scott Farrington is president
of SunTee EmbroidMe, a promo-
tional and marketing company spe-
cialisng in uniforms, embroidery, silk
screen printing and promotional
products. Established over 27 years
ago, SunTee EmbroidMe has assist-
ed Bahamian businesses from vari-
ous industries in marketing them-
selves. Readers can contact Mr Far-
rington at SunTee EmbroidMe on
East Shirley Street, or by e-mail at
scott@sun-tee.com or by telephone
at 242-393-3104.

Judicial Review threat to $105m power plant

FROM page 1B

the lack of consultation
through the local government
process, or through the per-
mitting processes of central
government agencies. This is
probably the single largest
capital expenditure by gov-
ernment in Abaco.”

The Wilson City power
plant project was instigated
under the former Christie
administration, which initially
looked at a site at Snake Cay.
That was ultimately rejected,
due to its proximity to a
planned National Park and

environmentally/ecologically
sensitive area, Wilson City
being chosen as the alterna-
tive.

Criticising both govern-
ments for their failure to
involve Abaconians in the
consultative process before
construction started, Mr
Smith said this had created
negative instead of positive
energy in the community’s
attitude towards the Wilson
Cay plant.

“Instead, they proceeded
clandestinely, secretly, with-
out permits, not giving infor-
mation.... They put the cart

before the horse,” Mr Smith
told Tribune Business.

“This all goes back to issues
of central government feeling
it can do what it wants in the
Out Island colonies. It is Nas-
sau treating the Family
Islands as if they have no say.
It is a central government dic-
tatorship once again.

“Generally, government
departments go ahead with
their development plans
before they get permits. This
is something that should not
happen. It’s a slap in the face
to democratic institutions. It
demonstrates that statutory




























The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

Notice to Vendors

The National Insurance Board (NIB) 1s preparing to make payments to vendors by direct
bank deposits. To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary
banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not
receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form:



1. APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com

mechanisms for local govern-
ment permitting, health and
safety, the environment, are
meaningless. This is a repeat
of the Guana Cay fiasco, and
I beg the FNM to proceed dif-
ferently in the future.”

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister
of the environment, acknowl-
edged in this newspaper yes-
terday that government
departments and utilities
often went ahead with their
development/construction
plans without first obtaining
the necessary permits and
approvals, unlike private
developers, who were
required to go through the
proper processes and chan-
nels.

When asked why the Gov-
ernment appeared not to have
learnt anything from the Gua-
na Cay case and public reac-
tions to other controversial
developments, Mr Smith
replied: “I don’t think they’re
slow learners. They haven’t
learnt at all.”

What is surprising is that
the Government would again
risk incurring the wrath of
Abaconians, a generally well-
educated population well
aware of their rights and
statutory processes, given
what had happened with the
Guana Cay development.

Pointing out the hypocrisy
of requiring private develop-
ers to abide by the laws and
statutory processes, when
government departments
were not, Mr Smith said: “The
Government is not a law unto
itself. Each department, statu-



FRED SMITH

tory authority, BEC and
BTC, are statutory corporate
institutions that are subject to
the law like any private devel-
oper.”

The Government appears
to have anticipated Mr
Smith’s possible legal chal-
lenge to the Wilson City pow-
er plant’s continued con-
struction, having placed all
building on hold until the nec-
essary permits and approvals
are obtained.

The Callender’s & Co part-
ner said he had been instruct-
ed by his clients to write to
all the relevant government
departments and agencies
objecting to the lack of con-
sultation, and request that
they now be involved in a

meaningful process.

Failing that, Mr Smith said
he would seek a Supreme
Court injunction to prevent
construction on the Wilson
City power plant from pro-
ceeding until all the required
permits were in place and his
clients “had an opportunity
to participate in a meaning-
ful consultative process”.

“It’s a question of the
process by which the permits
were applied for, considered
and approved,” Mr Smith
said, adding that the issue
went beyond the permits
themselves.

“Tf they simply rush to get
the permits rubber-stamped
and retroactively applied,
such permits will be chal-
lenged under a Judicial
Review,” he said. “In the 21st
century Bahamas, it is high
time that government institu-
tions respected the relevant
laws and processes.”

Mr Smith said he and his
clients would soon have to
assess whether work on the
Wilson City power plant had
stopped, as the Government
had said. He told Tribune
Business that the last time he
went to the site, he was barred
from entering, and a row with
security guards broke out
after he subsequently started
taking photos outside the
fenced-off site.

To prevent such situations
from occurring again, Mr
Smith said it was incumbent
on all private and public sec-
tor developers to “be account-
able and transparent, provide
the information and interact

2. Telephone No.: (242) 502-1838, or
3. Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office

with a meaningful consulta-
tion process”.

He added that while BEC’s
general manager, Kevin Bas-
den, had asserted at last
week’s Town Meeting that
three Environmental Impact
Assessments (EIAs) had been
conducted on Wilson City,
this was relatively meaning-
less if local residents were not
given an opportunity to com-
ment, and their concerns
made a part of the process.

His clients’ main concerns,
Mr Smith said, were the loca-
tion of the power plant;
whether Bunker C fuel was
the correct one and the impli-
cations arising from its use;
whether government had
properly explored wind, solar
and other alternative ener-
gies; and environmental and
health and safety issues.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, ANASTASIA KEMP
and or ANASTASIA KEMP MCPHEE of TURTLE DRIVE,
OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, intend
to change the name to ANASTASIA BRIDGEWATER. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than
thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service.
All information will be treated as strictly confidential.



Career
Opportunity

SENIOR TRUST MANAGER

J. P. Morgan is currently seeking applications for a Senior Trust Manager.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supply company which provides a wide range of
premium health care products seeks a qualilied candidate
for the following position:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Ridiniaine istiaa indie

* Assisting in the promotion of current products and
introducing mew item to the Healthcare industry,

The successful candidate will work with Trust and related partners to
ensure that fiduciary services are delivered in a manner consistent with all
legal, regulatory and internal requirements. The candidate will also serve
as a technical resource to wealth advisors, investors and relationship
managers. The Senior Trust Manager will be expected to develop direct
relationships with clients and have the flexibility to travel.

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays

* Monitoring and tracking of clents needs and requests

* Working as part of a team in the promotion of company's
products:

Prospective applicants should have 6+ years of trust experience, with 3+ Sualificalions:

years in mentoring others. Abachelor’s degree or a professional qualification
ideally in law with strong analytical skills; knowledge of investment product
services, fiduciary and trust regulatory requirements and onshore and
offshore jurisdictions; excellent written/verbal communication and creative
problem solving skills; and the ability to assess risk in fiduciary and trust
matters.

or Business Administration.

Effective conumunication and presentation ekills (writhen
end orall.

Proven selling skills
Effective trrie-managemnent planning and organizing skills,

Computer literacy. Well-versed with Windows, Word
Pronessing (preferably MS VWard), Spraacdsneets (preferably

J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers competitive compensation and Exea), Dasktop Publishing, and Data Management.

benefits packages. Interest applications should submit their resume/
curriculum vitae marked “Private and Confidential” to the Human
Resources Manager, J.P. Morgan Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited,
P.O. Box N-4899, Nassau, Bahamas.

» Sel-motivetor end good tem player The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

The position offers a competitive salary with sales
incentives.

Successful candidate must be willing to travel to Family
Islands and the United States, as required.

J.P. Morgan Trust Company
(Bahamas) Limited

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:

acarey@sunmedicalcompany.com

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3B



NIB proceeds with
$1.2m prosecutions

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE NATIONAL Insur-
ance Board (NIB) continued
with is prosecution of several
prominent Bahamian compa-
nies owing collectively more
than $1.2 million yesterday,
with some of those companies
already settling their arrears
incrementally over time.

Jones Communications
CEO, Wendall Jones, pleaded
guilty to owing NIB $430,000

in delinquent contribution
payments. The company has
since paid back almost
$100,000 of the $180,000
needed to met NIB’s settle-
ment threshold.

Attorney for NIB, Heather
Maynard, told the court that
her company would be happy
to negotiate the liquidation
of Jones Communications’
remaining amount after they
have paid off 40 per cent of
their arrears - almost
$180,000.

Global United chief exevu-

Real | Estate

(En eR ata O mam ACLU ed a [eg

Everywhere The A ey Ll



tive, Jackson Ritchie, has
been charged with owing NIB
$161,079.98 in unpaid contri-
butions. Mr Ritchie has also
entered into negotiations with
NIB to make incremental
payments on the total amount
owed in arrears.

Both Mr Jones and Mr
Ritchie are expected back in
court to continue settlement
arrangements on November
17.

Also expected back in court
are owners of the radio sta-
tions More 94 FM and Spirit
(92.5 FM), Galen and Henry
Saunders. They have been
charge with owning NIB
$256,262 in outstanding con-
tributions. Ms Maynard
revealed that the men had
paid $43,000 thus far of the
total amount owed.

Solomon's Mines managing
director Mark Finlayson, who
was charged with owing NIB
$377,092.90 in contributions
between June 2007 and
December 2008, and pleaded
guilty to the charges, failed to
appear in court yesterday.
Consequently Magistrate
Lasalle issued a bench war-
rant for his arrest.

Mr Finlayson's staff have
also complained that the com-
pany has been delinquent in
paying salaries for several
months this year. He has pre-
viously blamed the economic
downturn for late pay
cheques.

A bench warrant was also
issued for the owner of
Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs, Mervin
Sweeting, who has been mak-
ing payment on his delinquent
NIB contribution, but failed
to show up for the hearing.

NIB has constantly said it
regrets having to take legal
action against companies, but
maintain it is a last resort to
negotiating payment arrange-

NOTICE OF

SPECIAL CALLED MEETING

ALL MEMBERS of
Bahama Islands Resorts & Casinos
Cooperative Credit Union (BIRCCCU) Limited
Are Urged To Attend The
Special Called Meeting

Date:

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Location:

Grounds Of The Credit Union

Time:
10:00 A.M.
Purpose of The Meeting:

To Discuss & Vote On The Proposed Opening
Up Of Our Bond To Allow Your Family To
Become Members Of BIRCCCU Ltd.



ments.

NIB contends that legal
action is a last resort for past-
due contribution collections,
suggesting it is only imposed
when “they (employers) fail
to take advantage of the rela-
tively generous option of
entering into installment
agreements to resolve
arrears”.

As the economic crisis bore
down on businesses, however,
NIB imposed an amnesty
period to delay the applica-
tion of interest on those
installment agreements.

The eighth actuarial review
tabled in Parliament along-
side the 2008 Annual Report
revealed that the future value
of NIB's expenditure could
exceed reserves in the long
term.

However, NIB is confident
that changes in administra-
tion of the fund will allow for
it meet its long term chal-
lenges. “Presently, the fund
is meeting all its obligation,”
the report said.

* Recording of journal entries

* Handling accounts payable functions

« Preparing submission for franchisors

« Praparation of bank reconciliations
* Preparing financial statements

* Establishing & monitonng internal controls

Qualifications:

Applicants should possess Bachelors degree in
Accounting, at laast 5 years experience, knowledge
of retail/food accounting, be proficient in Quickbooks,
Excel and other MS Office applications. Must be able
to multi-task, work with minimum supervision and
possess a high level of integrity and professionalism.

Fax application/resume to 394-4933
Deadline for applications: Sept 25, 2009



LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.

Cattage Lat With Private Weach

FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.
Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!
Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million

Web Listing # 8377

Tel:242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

www.marlocareyred

POSITION:
JOB FAMILY:
RCS CODE:
REPORTS TO:

LOCATION:

OVERALL PURPOSE:

icpatiaceaie la com

com Dt's about you... Let's talk.

Commercial Supervisor
Accounting

L10005

Finance Manager

Country Finance Department or Cluster Office

Position is responsible for managing the Commercial Finance activities for a country or group oF
countries within the Cluster. Manages Revenue leakage, establishes credit limits and reviews ship-
ments to profile. Supervises the following staff; Billing Analyst, Duties and Vendor Analyst, Ac-

counts Receivable Analyst.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:
° Manage the Accounting Commercial activities for a country or group of
countries within the Cluster.

discount, and credit

Supervise Billing, Duties, Accounts Receivable and Vendor Analysts.
Prepare and analyze statistics and KPIs for the country/cluster.
Manage customer profiles.

Establish AR Credit limits.

Principal contact for Commercial controller.

Assist with preparation of Customer profitability analysis.

Handle Billing queries from Billing Center.

1st level of approval for Credit notes.

Special projects and ad hoc reports as required.

Provide customers analyses, and review customer data base in term of

Performs other assignments as required.
Ability to supervise the accounting staff at local station

eile UM QUALIFICATIONS:
High school diploma and/or minimal of 5 years applicable experience
Minimum of 4 years of commercial and accounting experience is required.
Minimum of 2 years supervisory or management experience leading an
accounting department.
A background in commercial credit and accounting required.
Experience with a major Enterprise Reporting Package (ERP)
Excellent analytical and interpersonal skills.
Ability to read and interpret data reports. Ability to understand and per

form data analysis.

PC skills should include the basic suite of MS products, Excel, Access,

Word, Office

Excellent communication skills both written and verbal, this function does
a lot of interfacing with internal and external customers and the Shared

Service Center

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
° Bachelor’s degree in Accounting/Finance, a related field or equivalent

education

Please email resume to;
Romell K. Knowles I
Country Manager

bahamaboiii@hotmail.com

Resumes can be dropped off to DHL Bahamas corporate office — East Bay Street,
Island Traders Building, Nassau Bahamas.

Please be advised only those applicants whose resumes are taken into
consideration will be contacted. No phone calls will be accepted.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BFSB gears to launch top graduate choice

Pictured are members of the
2009 FSI Student Award selec-
tion committee in advance of the
interviews with candidates, the
final step in the selection
process. Left to right (seated)
are Joan Pinder, former chair-
School of Business, College of
the Bahamas; Karen Lockhart,
College of the Bahamas; Kim
Bodie, Bahamas Institute of
Financial Services; and Anastacia
Johnson, Association of Interna-
tional Banks & Trust Companies
in The Bahamas.

Standing are: Renee Barrow, SG
Hambros Bank & Trust; Cypri-
anna Bethel, Central Bank of the

NIB, frompage 1B

ing system, the theory being
that they would generate bet-
ter investment returns as bank
deposits.

While this may have been
the case, Mr Smith explained
that apart from creating an
asset-liability mismatch
between short-term bank
deposits and NIB’s long-term
liabilities, this strategy also
expanded the money supply
and created an unsustainable
credit boom by expanding
funds available for lending.

With much of these funds
going on imports, it led to an
immediate drain on the
Bahamas’ foreign exchange
reserves, Imposing pressure on
this nation’s fixed one:one
exchange rate with the US dol-
lar and raising - at least tem-
porarily - the risk of devalua-
tion.

“Tn fact, in the 1980s when I
took over the Central Bank,
that was when we had our first
financial crisis,” Mr Smith,
now CFAL’s chairman, told
Tribune Business yesterday.

“The reserves went down by
$100 million to $200 million in
the first couple of months.



Bahamas; Nadine Frazier, Insur-

ance Institute of the Bahamas;
and Nicole Pratt-Rolle, Society
of Trust & Estate Practitioners.

Selection Committee members
not pictured include: Mario
Smith, Bahamas Association of

Everyone brought cars in and
government revenues went up,
but after that we had trouble
meeting our foreign commit-
ments.”

As a result, Mr Smith said
any change in NIB’s invest-
ment and asset allocation
strategies should not be made
in isolation, but instead dis-
cussed thoroughly with the
Ministry of Finance and Cen-
tral Bank as the managers of
this nation’s fiscal and mone-
tary affairs respectively. No
decision could be taken in a
vacuum.

“In our case, when we put
[the NIB funds] in the system,
it immediately went to
imports, so many of your
reserves are gone,” Mr Smith
said. “It could destabilise your
monetary system, reduce for-
eign reserves and put pressure
on the exchange rate, which
could lead to devaluation.

“Tm really frightened by
looking at NIB as a private
fund,” he added, urging that
the Bahamian social security
system be viewed from a
national development per-
spective.

Explaining that the Fund
was “a safety net for the Gov-
ernment”, Mr Smith said hav-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ISAGAR ENTERPRISES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)










Compliance Officers, Roger
Brown, Bahamas General Insur-
ance Association; Zelma Wilson,
Bahamas Institute of Chartered
Accountants; and Jeremy Dyck,
CFA Society of the Bahamas.

THE Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board (BFSB) has
launched the process to recog-
nise an outstanding 2009 gradu-
ate from within the School of
Business, College of the
Bahamas.

This initiative has been a joint
venture by BFSB, the College
of the Bahamas, and the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas since
2002, with the co-ordinating and
selection committees compris-
ing representatives from the
three sponsoring agencies, plus
the Professional Industry Asso-

ciation Working Group
(PIAWG) -— a representative
body for the various financial
services industry-related associ-
ations here in the Bahamas.

The Student Award pro-
gramme is an integral compo-
nent of BFSB’s ongoing Finan-
cial Centre Focus (FCF) pro-
gramme, which addresses issues
such as challenges impacting the
sustained growth and develop-
ment of the industry; improve-
ments to the level of service; and
attracting and maintaining qual-
ified professionals.

ing a large percentage of the
Crown’s assets owned by NIB
was a distinct advantage if it
ever came to a government
debt restructuring.

“Government has a huge
debt to NIB, and if you run
into repayment - say a bond
falls due - you can restructure
much easier than if you went
to a foreign bank,” the former
minister of state for finance
under the Christie administra-
tion said.

The lack of diversified
investment options in the
Bahamian market remained
painfully obvious at year-end
2008, with $651.35 million or
43.5 per cent of NIB’s invested
assets being held in Bahamas
Government Registered
Stock.

NIB’s eighth actuarial
report revealed this was simi-
lar to the position attained in
2006, when 56 per cent of
NIB's then-$1.35 billion invest-
ment portfolio was held in
government securities, such as
government-registered stock
and Treasury Bills.

According to the report,
some 24 per cent of NIB's
assets were then invested in
short-term securities, such as
Certificates of Deposit (CDs)

and Treasury Bills, with 98.6
per cent of all investments
concentrated in the Bahamas.

Not surprisingly, the eighth
actuarial report concluded:
"With such heavy concentra-
tion in several areas, the
investment portfolio is not well
diversified.

"As a result, the overall
Fund is relatively high risk
with return expectations that
do not justify the current level
of risk.

"It is therefore recom-
mended that gradual reduc-
tions be made to the propor-
tions held in Bahamas Gov-
ernment, quasi-government
securities and short-term
investments, and that the posi-
tion held overseas be
increased gradually to around
20 per cent.”

The eighth actuarial report
found that between 2001 and
2006, the NIB enjoyed an
average 6 per cent yield on its
investments, and a 5.5 per cent
yield on its reserves.

But with inflation averaging
2 per cent per annum over that
period, the real rate of return
on reserves was 3.5 per cent.

And the report by the Social
Security Reform Commission,
appointed by the former

NOTICE
THE CHISWICK RIVERSIDE EXECUTIVES, LP
In Voluntary Liquidation

1. The reason for the winding-up and dissolving is that the
Partnership has ceased to carry on business.

Christie administration, noted
that returns on NIB's reserves,
due to declining interest rates,
had fallen from 10 per cent in
1983 to below 6 per cent in
2003.

The Commission's report
noted the "severe and impru-
dent mismatch" between the
maturity date of NIB's assets
and liabilities, with some 35
per cent of investments in low-
yielding, short-term Treasury
Bills and deposits as at
December 2004.

With long-term liabilities
being matched by short-term
assets, the report warned:
"This enormous mismatch
places significant long-term
risk upon the long-term via-
bility of the National Insur-
ance Fund, as it is presently
structured."

At the point the Commis-
sion's report was written, in
2005, it said NIB was faced
with "re-investment risk", as
a result of needing to find new
investment opportunities for
maturing investments in a
market where interest rates
were declining.

"Stated another way, only
24 per cent of NIB's invest-
ment portfolio has a maturity
of 10 years or more, yet it is
Known that more than 86 per
cent of liabilities and commit-
ments extend more than 10
years,” the report said.

"In the fiscal year 2004,
some $60 million of invest-
ments are due to mature, not
including $350 million of bank

This week, the selection com-
mittee will be completing inter-
views with the finalists, who will
be announced shortly. The 2009
Student of the Year will be
recognised at BFSB’s Annual
Industry Excellence Awards
Ceremony on October 22.

Again this year, SG Hambros
Bank & Trust (Bahamas) has
come on board as sponsor of the
FSI Student of the Year Award,
while Credit Suisse’s Nassau
branch is supporting the student
awards programme as a con-
tributor.

deposits and Treasury Bills
that will also need to be
renewed."

The Commission again
made the point that the NIB
Fund had "too great an expo-
sure" to the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system and
the Government through its
limited investment options,
something that impacted its
ability to negotiate better rates
of return if 1ts funds were not
needed.

This "systematically disad-
vantaged" NIB, as the funds
either end up being placed at
lower rates or are left sitting
idle at the Central Bank. At
end-December 31, 2004, NIB
had $83.2 million on deposit
at the Central Bank of the
Bahamas, earning no interest,
with the previous month-end
balances for the previous 12
months averaging $91.1 mil-
lion.

"Tf these funds were invest-
ed, incremental income of $4.5
million could have been
derived,” the report said. "At
an average of $250 per month,
that incremental interest
income alone could have paid
the annual pension of 1,500
pensioners."

The Commission report said
NIB was exposed to major
country risk due to the fact all
its investments were concen-
trated in the Bahamas, and
with $460 million investments
tied to Bahamian Prime, the
Fund was exposed to even
small changes in interest rates.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

DELIGHT FOUNTAIN LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JARETH VENTURES LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

2. The Partnership is and will continue to be able to discharge
or pay or provide for the payment of all claims, debts, liabilities
and obligations in full.

3. The winding-up will commence on the date when the Notice
of Dissolution is submitted to the Registrar.

4. The Liquidators are authorized to carry on the business of
the Partnership.

5. The names of Liquidators are Kyrene Kelty and Kristina Fox.
No. remuneration is proposed to be paid to the Liquidators.

6. The Liquidators are not required to send all Limited Partners
a statement of account prepared by or on its instructions in
respect of its actions and transactions.

Dated this 11th day of September, 2009.

Kyrene Kelty and Kristina Fox
Liquidators

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ELGIN VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

YANI INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 14th day of September 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PAMSCIAM HOLDINGS LIMITED is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 200.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 15, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar

General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 14th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supoly company which provides a wide range of
premium health care producia seeks a qualified candidate
for the following, position:

SALES MANAGER
Pri Dutien inchucie:
Spearhoading the growth of current bands‘products, and
introducing new items to the healthcare community, retailers
end the general public in Nassau and the Family Islands.
Supervising and training a small team of salas parsons.

Working with merchandisers to train their staff and promote
products.

Monitoring and tracking sales by category, on a monthly
basis.

Planning and instituting product forecasts,

Planning and organizing prometians and events for the
products.

I
qualifications:

At leased three (3) years @x perience in similar position.

The ability to reat the high standards set out by the
company and manufacturers.

Be solf-motivated with the ability to work independently,
Possess good haadership and inberpersonal skills,

Computer literacy. Well-versed wilh Windows, Word
Processing (preferably WS Word), Spreadsheets (orefaraity
Excel), Dasktop Publishing, and Data Management.

Competitive salary, commensurate with qualifications,
with sales incentives, plus vehicle allowance.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
ils








Bs ORLANDO

















inh:GO°FQ2°R UU Mostly sunny with a Patchy clouds with Clouds and sun with a Some sun with a Periods of sun, a Partly sunny, t-storms . The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
eo ae Pe thunderstorm in spots. showers. thunderstorm around. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
wot ie it | High: 90° High: 88° High: 90° High: 89°
‘ Tet r High: 89° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 80° Low: 80° see EOE
TAMPA Ls ; ET ET
High: 90° F/32° C t oie 100° F g9°-85° F 94°-86° F 98°-83° F High _Ht(ft.) Low _Ht. (ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ae r. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:07am. 3.2 11:20am. 0.3
pi “ : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 5:36pm. 3.6 11:58pm. 03
@ levati the h bod thing that effects h Id feels. Te tt flect the high and the low for the d p p
a fa mse 6:27pm. 36000 wn
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: r —— Temperature 7:15pm. 35 1:10pm. 0.0
r : ; a ek GIN es cscs crate Osteen tatereaaucstcceeeass 91” F/33° C Saturday 74lam. 3.7 31am. 00
y “i all , . Low: 80° F/27°C LOW o.eseretesteeeen 79" F/26° C 8:01pm. 34 2:01pm. 0.0
5 ay , Normal high. .... 88° F/31° CG
C 7; Normal low 75° F/24° C
a pp @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's Migh .....ccccsscssssseeesiene ea SUN AND IVIOON
4 Seed High: 90° F/32° C — Last year's LOW oo. eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 78° F/26° C
" Low: 77° F/25°C >a Precipitation |} j || ~~ Sunrise...... 6:56 a.m. Moonrise..... 4:32 a.m.
a a - @ a. As of 2 p.m. yesterday .....cccccccsssssescssessseeee 0.33" ‘Sunset....... 7:13 p.m. Moonset. .... 5:42 p.m.
Wall . FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 Year to date 29. New First Full Last
High: 88°F/31°C High: 89° F/32°C Normal year to date oo... 34.86" 7
@ g B .
Low: 79° F/26°C a Low: 77° F/25°C i
a AccuWeather.com as
x @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by - _
a er MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 18 Sep. 26 Oct. 4
“on al High: 91° F/33°C See no ringe
Yn fe Low: 78° F/26° c NASSAU High: 90° F/32° C
——_ Low: 79° F/26° C
xe a
2 i . a
KEY WEST ee = CAT ISLAND
High: 89° F/32° C a High: 87°F/31°C
Low. 80°F 27 6 ae Low: 76° F/24°C
e *y
* = B
= GREAT EXUMA —_ SAN SALVADOR
ANDROS Lov: 78°F/26°C eae
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's s ae :
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33°C :
Low: 77° F/25° C FP
a
a
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday in MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 91° F/33°C
FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C FIC F/C — x Low: 74° F/23° C
Albuquerque 74/23 56/13 t 72/22 55/12 t Indianapolis 78/25 59/15 pe 78/25 57/13 pe Philadelphia 72/22 59/15 1 69/20 61/16 Fr
Anchorage 58/14 47/8 sh 59/15 47/8 c Jacksonville 88/31 72/22 t 87/30 72/22 t Phoenix 99/37 75/23 s 99/37 78/25 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 80/26 67/19 t 80/26 68/20 t Kansas City 84/28 58/14 pc 80/26 56/13 s Pittsburgh 72/22 5613 pc 69/20 58/14 + RAGGEDISLAND — High:91°F/83°c
Atlantic City 72/22 58/14 + 67/19 584 + Las Vegas 97/36 70/21 s 99/37 75/23 s Portland,OR 76/24 56/13 pc 75/23 53/11 pc High: 88° F/31° C Low: 75° F/24°C
Baltimore 73/22 61/16 4+ 70/21 6447 1 Little Rock 78/25 68/20 + 80/26 67/19 fF Raleigh-Durham 84/28 65/18 c 80/26 65/18 c Low: 74°F/23°C a.
Boston 61/16 49/99 pe 6417 55/12 c Los Angeles 82/27 64/17 pc 84/28 64/17 pc St. Louis 82/27 63/17 pc 81/27 62/16 pc .
Buffalo 67/19 52/411 s 68/20 53/41 1 Louisville 80/26 65/18 + 78/25 6347 1 Salt Lake City 83/28 60/15 pc 87/80 60/15 s GREAT INAGUA ie
Charleston, SC 88/31 71/21 c 86/30 71/21 c Memphis 80/26 68/20 r 80/26 69/20 r San Antonio 90/32 69/20 pc 90/32 68/20 pc High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 76/24 54/12 s 76/24 50/10 s Miami 91/32 78/25 t 90/32 79/26 t San Diego 75/23 65/18 pe 77/25 65/18 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 70/21 56/13 s 72/22 55/12 ¢ Minneapolis 79/26 58/14 $s 78/25 60/15 pc San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pce 75/23 56/13 pc i j
Dallas 81/27 67/9 t 81/27 67/49 t Nashville 80/26 65/18 + 80/26 65/18 1 Seattle 72/22 54/12 pe 72/22 53/11 pe \
Denver 76/24 50/10 pce 82/27 50/10 s New Orleans 86/30 73/22 t 85/29 72/22 t Tallahassee 89/31 72/22 t 86/30 71/21 ¢t
Detroit 72/22 52/11 s 76/24 56/3 pc New York 69/20 58/14 r 66/18 62416 1 Tampa 90/32 77/25 89/31 75/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 s 89/31 75/23 $s Oklahoma City 82/27 64/17 r+ 83/28 62/16 t Tucson 94/34 67/19 s 93/33 69/20 $s
Houston 88/31 72/22 t 90/32 70/21 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 t 92/33 75/23 t Washington, DC 76/24 64/17 r 71/21 6447 1










Ta NG |

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| HIGH — | EXT.









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LOW



MODERATE

3l4|5\«







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HIGH







Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg



High
F/C
93/33
65/18
73/22
82/27
64/17
89/31
86/30
71/21
86/30
81/27
84/28
75/23
81/27
66/18
68/20
83/28
68/20
96/35
94/34
84/28
93/33
83/28
77/25
65/18
61/16
72/22
64/17
60/15
91/32
63/17
88/31
103/39
77/25
81/27
84/28
86/30
70/21
70/21
75/23
90/32
75/23
99/37
66/18
66/18
71/21
838/31
95/35
63/17
68/20
75/23
17/25
102/38
73/22
87/30
67/19
88/31
64/17
91/32
76/24
77/25
64/17
77/25
91/32
81/27
66/18
97/36
68/20
75/23
74/23
81/27

lil

Today

Low
F/C
79/26
50/10
47/8
68/20
55/12
78/25
78/25
61/16
63/17
76/24
63/17
55/12
M128
43/8
54/12
63/17
52/11
71/21
85/29
48/8
77/25
73/22
59/15
50/10
45/7
57/13
56/13
43/8
73/22
46/7
81/27
74/23
64/17
62/16
53/11
75/23
58/14
54/12
50/10
77/25
55/12
73/22
46/7
43/8
54/12
56/13
77/25
43/6
Sale.
52/11
68/20
76/24
66/18
79/26
50/10
70/21
43/8
73/22
60/15
57/13
45/7
59/15
82/27
68/20
54/12
73/22
54/12
62/16
56/13
57/13






pc
r
pc
$
pe

High
F/C
90/32
65/18
72/22
84/28
65/18
89/31
87/30
69/20
88/31
80/26
85/29
72/22
82/27
65/18
70/21
77/25
66/18
93/33
93/33
78/25
91/32
84/28
77/25
65/18
63/17
75/23
68/20
64/17
88/31
57/13
91/32
102/38
78/25
75/23
84/28
88/31
71/21
68/20
68/20
88/31
77/25
91/32
68/20
63/17
72/22
88/31
97/36
57/13
72/22
78/25
79/26
103/39
17/25
87/30
65/18
86/30
63/17
85/29
75/23
79/26
S7/13
86/30
93/33
79/26
66/18
95/35
67/19
73/22
75/23
76/24

Thursday

Low
F/C
79/26
49/9
45/7
70/21
52/11
78/25
77/25
61/16
61/16
74/23
61/16
54/12
74/23
43/6
52/11
59/15
52/11
71/21
82/27
43/6
76/24
73/22
58/14
49/9
45/7
55/12
56/13
50/10
72/22
45/7
82/27
74/23
63/17
63/17
52/11
78/25
58/14
52/11
50/10
77/25
55/12
70/21
50/10
46/7
SorilZ
57/13
79/26
45/7
55/12
53/11
70/21
76/24
64/17
78/25
47/8
73/22
43/6
72/22
63/17
61/16
43/6
59/15
83/28
66/18
56/13
77/25
53/11
59/15
55/12
54/12

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Ww

pc
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$
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S$
$
S$
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S$
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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



SUS AS SS ee

MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NNE at 4-8 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: SSE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
FREEPORT Today: NE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
Thursday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
ABACO Today: NE at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
Thursday: _ SE at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 6 Miles 84° F









Ieg_4 Hain a Fronts
[*, *| Flurries re Old rw
pe Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W

Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ATT fieleln
[e_ =] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Monge
10s 0s [Os 10s 20s [03] 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s G0s)/ ARN)





= hea

“You Can Bs Blown

Away By A Hurricane

Or you can rest easy knowing
that 3° , ave excellent insurance

age no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Mires] erage ey wt | we
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE
TASTE





/ BAKE Chicken, peas n' rice, pork

chops and other menu favorites.

Checkmate
BO ae Gr GC OM CNY AUT

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter



INDING a restaurant that offers good ole’

tasty Bahamian food at an affordable price is

seemingly rare these days. Perhaps you may
have overlooked one sif-in dining spot that has been
around for 20 years...Checker’s Cafe.

The restaurant chain just welcomed
another location into the family on
Joe Farrington Road last Thursday.
The new location offers quality
Bahamian food in a comfortably mod-
ern and clean environment for you
and your family to enjoy meals at a
reasonable price of around $10 per
person.

For breakfast, lunch, and dinner,
the menu choices are endless. And
from what we sampled, the food tastes
just like what your grammy would
cook on Sunday. From peas n’ rice
with barbecued ribs and baked chick-
en, to delicious curry chicken dinners-
-your nose will be intoxicated with the
smells of these freshly cooked
Bahamian delights. Dine inside the
restaurant, and let the sweet sounds of
Bahamian artists serenade your ears,
then take in the creative artworks of
Rudy Williams plastered on the dining
room walls.

But back to the food. White rice,
peas n’ rice, and bean n’ rice are
served everyday, and the choices of
meat are unpredictable, as they switch
things up quite often. Bite into bar-
becue ribs that are seasoned to the
bone, but no too salty--just the right
flavour.

What’s more is that the menu isn’t
limited to a specific meal choices,
restaurant manager Nadia Sumner
told Tribune Taste. For example she
explained : If you’re tired of rice, you
can choose from three choices of hot
vegetables.

Side orders are the usual Bahamian
options of cheesy macaroni with a kick
of spicy flavour, and plantains. The
bean soup has the right consistency
of dumplings, beans and ham meat,
and the chicken souse has everything
you want if you prefer a milder dish.

If you are in the mood for fish try
grouper fingers or minced turbot
(which by the way is excellent.) Other
meat options include pork chops,
baked chicken, ribs, steamed ham,
stew beef, or oxtail-just to name a few-
It can’t get more Bahamian than that.

For desert, get your fix of cheese-
cake. There are 5 kinds to choose

from- blueberry, pumpkin, mango,
guava, pineapple. They say that if
you've never had it, you are definite-
ly missing out.

New on the menu is the Family
Meal, which serves 4-6 persons, a per-
fect choice for the “after five customer
“exhausted from work, who doesn’t
want to have to cook a full meal.

The new location is the only restau-
rant with this option. For $30.50, you
can get a family meal that serves four
persons, with rice, three sides, and a
choice of meat. At $45.50, a six-mem-
ber family can eat rice, four sides, and
achoice of meat- or half and half it.

“We made this option open for that
father on his way home from work
that doesn’t want his wife to cook,
and that mother who wants her chil-
dren to have a full nutritious meal,
but is too tired to prepare it,” Mrs
Sumner said.

The drive-thru is opened at nine in
the morning for the customer on the
run. With their efficient serving strat-
egy, the friendly staff will assist in get-
ting your order out on time.

Mrs Sumner said that so far the
crowd has been great and people have
been receptive, especially on the week-
ends. “I think they’re just excited for
once to have a sit down restaurant
with Bahamian food.”

“On Saturday a guy brought in a
bus load of tourists. All of them came
in, sat down, and ate in less than 30
minutes. To be able to have people
come in on short notice with no prob-
lem is remarkable,” she explained.

Store hours for the Joe Farrington
Road location are 6:30am to 9pm. At
present, the location closes on Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday at 11pm.
Mrs Sumner said they are “feeling the
area,” to see what customers want
before finalising a closing time.

“We have no magic oven or
prepackaged ingredients to stick in the
baker, and in 20 minutes it’s ready,”
said Mrs Sumner. “At the end of the
day, we produce freshly cooked
Bahamian meals with no preservatives.
That’s what our customers can expect.”



AN appetizing spread of
Checkers lunch menu.



CHECKERS friendly staff.

aa

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

1. Renowned Bahamian
artist Max Taylor will offi-
cially launch his latest col-
lection- Paperwork:1960 -
1992 at a cocktail recep-
tion at the National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas
(NAGB) on Friday, Septem-
ber 18 at 6.30pm. The
event is being held under
the patronage of Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
and Mrs Delores Ingra-
ham.

RSVP by today at 328-
5800/1. On Thursday, Sep-
tember 24, Mr Taylor will
hold an exhibition walk-
through at the gallery. He
will also talk about his ear-
ly career and his special
facility for woodcuts. The
cost for this event is $3.

2. Doctor's Hospital will
continue its distinguished
free lecture series tomor-
row night when psychia-
trist Dr Brian Humblestone
discusses child obesity.
The presentation begins at
6 pm in the hospital’s con-
Hic AcI ALM AOLO I {em 0) LO ]0T
pressure, glucose and cho-
lesterol tests will take place
between 5-6 pm. Please
RSVP as seating is limited
Flee

3. The National Art
Gallery of the Bahamas will
show the Academy Award
winning animated feature
Wall-E tomorrow evening.
Made in 2008, it is a story
about a garbage collecting
robot who is left to clean
up the mess after the earth
is abandoned because it is
covered with trash. Wall-E
falls in love with a sleek,
dangerous robot sent back
to earth to see if life is
once again sustainable.
The movie will air at 8pm.

4. Dolphin Encounter’s
project Beach in partner-
ship with the Bahamas
National Trust will hold a
clean-up campaign of
Bonefish National Park
Coy TOMO STU COLNE
SUM sEUE UNIO MO) etme)
120 countries taking part
in the 2009 International
Coastal Clean-Up Day. Per-
sons wishing to participate
should wear long pants
and closed in-shoes and
bring gloves, insect repel-
lent, sun block and person-
al water bottles. The Beach
Clean-up can also be
counted as community ser-
vice hours. Bring commu-
nity service forms to be
Signed. Starts at 9 am.
Contact Tanya Moss at
363-7180 or tanym@dol-
phinencounters for further
OLE

5. Roadmasters will
hold a special walk to ben-
efit the Aids Foundation on
Saturday morning begin-
ning at 4.30 am. It takes
place from East Bay Street
to Blake Road. Participants
can chose from 10 miles or
20 miles, but organisers
say it is not a race-walk or
run at your own pace. The
entry fee is $20. Call 341-
7306 or 427-2391 for fur-
ther details.

6. Artists from around
the country will hold a spe-
cial concert on Arawak Cay
on Saturday in an effort to
combat crime. The artists
hope to get their message
across through music,
poetry drama and the visu-
PIV coan MATRA) ATMA CcS
place between noon and
midnight. Performers will
include Ronnie Butler,
Kenyattta Taylor, Ricardo
Clarke and Sammie Starr.
The Fort Charlotte Commu-
nity Centre, Sea Grape Fes-
tival and Mark Cartwright
are amoung those coordi-
nating the event.



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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7B



HOST Josh Gates with Small Hope Bay Lodge
owner Jeff Birch (right) and expert diver Moose.



SS Ce,

A Sail

MYTH

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

HE beauty of Andros will be on

display to thousands of interna-

tional viewers when the SyFy
channel features the island on its show

Destination Truth this evening.

The idea of this unscripted Syfy channel (previously the SciFi
channel) series focuses on Josh Gates and his team of investiga-
tors traveling to destinations around the world, uncovering the
truths about mythical creatures.

In tonight’s episode, investigators explored the blue holes of
Andros believed to be the dwelling place of legendary mythical
sea monster- the shark jaw octopus tentacle sea monster Lusca.

In addition to extensive footage of the islands natural beauty,
some of the island’s most famous attractions will also be high-
lighted as will a segment on making batik and androsia fabric.

Bahamas Production Coordinator Heather Carey, and Peter
Douglas, head of the Andros Tourist Office, Community Leader,
and “expert” mythologist worked closely with the Destination
Truth crew during their five day stay.

According to Ms Carey, this is one of many films shot in the
Bahamas, her company is involved in. There are two more
underway, one film that was shot in Long Island which will air
sometime in October, and one that will be shot in Bimini, air date
not yet announced.

“The skinny dip” is the title of the fun film shot in Long
Island. “This is a fun film and we have already gotten reactions
from people, because they think the film is based on people
swimming naked” say Mrs Carey.

“The skinny dip” is a Canadian travel show which will be
aired in Canada and all over Europe. This show also highlights
and captures the beautiful scenery of the island.

“In this film the beautiful attractions of the island of which
some Bahamians have not seen will be shown” she said.

The girl in the film travels through the island and ends up on
an adventure which takes her to all the attractions on the island.

Mrs Carey believes that these films will shine a positive light
on the individual islands as well as the rest of the Bahamas.
“The most important thing is to highlight the islands of the
Bahamas showing the interesting scenes, and appeal to a broad-
er spectrum of tourist.”

She also wants the Bahamian people to become more involved
with the films. “We want the Bahamian people to be apart of the
films as well. They were a little cautious, but in the future we want
them to be more comfortable and interactive during filming” she
said.

Bahamian cable viewers can watch Destination Truth this
evening at 10pm on channel 21.



Ricardo Clarke
makes an impact
on Abaco

REGGAE artist Ricardo Clarke performed in
Abaco last week visiting several churches and
schools to give motivational talks and interviews.

He also gave a free concert in Sandy Point organ-
ised by Kingdom Dub Entertainment which was
designed to give the island’s youth a message of
peace and unity.

Ricardo performed alongside fellow artistes Ryan
Jupp, Solo, Mr Beeds and DJ Counsellor.

He also spoke at several schools including Forest
Heights High School, St Francis High School (where
he gave a special presentation to the principal,) SC
Bootle High School and JA Pinder Primary School
and visited Sandy Point AOG, Change Ministries
and the Friendship Tabernacle.



Andros Islan a in quest to find





L BEAST



HEATHER Carey (Production Coordinator), Jeff Birch (Small HOpe Bay
Lodge), Josh Gates (host).



—
| a

RICARDO CLARKE motivates students during a recent visit to Abaco.
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



; â„¢, | President's opinion of Kanye West sparks debate |



i

Randy Sager/AP Photo

IN THIS June 17, 2009 file photograph
originally provided by ABC News, ABC
News’ Terry Moran is shown at the
Treasury Department in Washington.

NEW YORK

PRESIDENT Barack Obama’s can-
did thoughts about Kanye West are
provoking a debate over standards of
journalism in the Twitter age, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

ABC News says it was wrong for its
employees to tweet that Obama had
called West a “jackass” for the rap-
per’s treatment of country singer Tay-
lor Swift. The network said some of its
employees had overheard a conversa-
tion between the president and
CNBC’s John Harwood and didn’t
realize it was considered off the record.

The network apologized to the
White House and CNBC.

Harwood had sat down with the
president to tape an interview follow-
ing his appearance on Wall Street on
Monday. Although they are competi-

tors, CNBC and ABC share a fiber
optic line to save money, and this
enabled some ABC employees to lis-
ten in on the interview as it was being
taped for later use.

Their attention was drawn to chatter
about West, who was widely criticized
for interrupting Swift as she accepted
an award at Sunday’s MTV Video
Music Awards to say that Beyonce
deserved it.

E-mails shot around among ABC
employees about Obama’s comments,
said Jeffrey Schneider, ABC News
spokesman. Before anything was
reported on ABC’s air or Web site, at
least three network employees took
to Twitter to spread the news.

One was Terry Moran, a former
White House correspondent. He
logged on to Twitter and typed: “Pres.
Obama just called Kanye West a ’jack-

ass’ for his outburst at VMAs when
Taylor Swift won. Now THAT'S pres-
idential.”

When ABC News authorities found
out about it, they had the tweets delet-
ed after about an hour, Schneider said.
Moran declined a request to comment.

But the news was out.

Harwood said there was no explicit
agreement with the president that
those comments were off the record.
But he said it is broadcast tradition
that such pre-interview chatter is con-
sidered off the record until the formal
interview begins. Harwood is holding
to that: He would not discuss what the
president said before their interview
and has no plans to do so on CNBC.

He said he was aware that it was
likely someone outside of CNBC was
listening to his conversation with the
president.


























Alastair Grant/AP Photo

Sen iae:cuahire ciency
ree a. hia

P
ee
Ce Let.

JON HOWELLS, press officer for Waterstone's booksellers, poses for the cameras as he reads a signed copy of US author Dan Brown's new book ‘The Lost
Symbol ' in London Monday Sept. 14, 2009. The book will go on sale to the public worldwide on Tuesday Sept. 15, Howells will spend the night reading the book
and give a review as the first copies are sold in London at 0700 Tuesday morning.

Freemasons await

Dan Brown

‘The L

novel

ost Symbol’

WASHINGTON man who is a trial attorney by pro-

fession but otherwise a Junior Grand

HE LODGE room of the Warden at the Grand Lodge of Free

| Naval Masonic Hallisacol- and Accepted Masons of the District
orful and somewhat of Columbia.

inscrutable sight for the nonmember,
with its blue walls, Egyptian symbols,
checkered floor in the center and high
ceiling painted with gold stars,
according to the Associated Press.

Countless secrets supposedly have
been shared in this and thousands of
similar rooms of the Masons around
the world. Facts of life have been
debated, honors bestowed, rituals
enacted. You would need to belong
to a lodge to learn what really goes
on.
Or you could simply ask.

“The emphasis on secrecy is some-
thing that disturbs people,” says
Joseph Crociata, a burly, deep-voiced

“But it’s not a problem getting
Masons to talk about Masonry.
Sometimes, it’s a problem getting
them to stop.”

Despite all the books and Web
sites dedicated to Freemasons, the
Masonic Order has been defined by
mystery, alluring enough to claim
Mozart and George Washington as
members, dark enough to be feared
by the Vatican, Islamic officials, Nazis
and Communists. In the United
States, candidates in the 19th-centu-
ry ran for office on anti-Mason plat-
forms and John Quincy Adams
declared that “Masonry ought forev-
er to be abolished.”

And now arrives Dan Brown.

Six years after Brown intrigued mil-
lions of readers, and infuriated schol-
ars and religious officials, with “The
Da Vinci Code,” he has set his new
novel, “The Lost Symbol,” in Wash-
ington and probed the fraternal order
that well suits his passion for secrets,
signs and puzzles.

Brown’s book, released Tuesday,
has an announced first printing of 5
million copies and topped the best-
seller lists of Amazon.com and
Barnes & Noble online. At Kramer-
books in Washington, about two
dozen copies were purchased the
morning it went on sale and the store
expects to easily sell out its order of
150 books.

In “The Lost Symbol,” symbolist
Robert Langdon is on a mission to
find a Masonic pyramid containing a
code that unlocks an ancient secret to
“unfathomable power.” It’s a story

of hidden history in the nation’s cap-
ital, with Masons the greatest puzzle
of all.

Brown’s research for “The Da Vin-
ci Code” was highly criticized by
some Catholics for suggesting that
Jesus and Mary Magdalene conceived
a child and for portraying Opus Dei
— the conservative religious order
— as a murderous, power-hungry
sect.

The Mason response could well be
milder. Brown goes out of his way in
“The Lost Symbol” to present the
lodge as essentially benign and mis-
understood. Masons are praised for
their religious tolerance and their
elaborate rituals are seen as no more
unusual than those of formal reli-
gions. The plot centers in part on an
“unfair” anti-Masonic video that
“conspiracy theorists would feed on...
like sharks,” Langdon says.

“T have enormous respect for the
Masons,” Brown told The Associated
Press during a recent interview. “In
the most fundamental terms, with dif-
ferent cultures killing each other over
whose version of God is correct, here
is a worldwide organization that
essentially says, ‘We don’t care what
you call God, or what you think
about God, only that you believe in a
god and let’s all stand together as
brothers and look in the same direc-
tion.’

“T think there will be an enormous
number of people who will be inter-
ested in the Masons after this book
(comes out),” Brown said.

Patrick Swayze



-"Dinty Dancing’
_ star Patrick
| Swayze dies at 57

? LOS ANGELES

PATRICK Swayze per-

i sonified a particular kind
i of masculine grace both
i on and off screen, from
i his roles in films like

“Dirty Dancing” and
“Ghost” to the way he

? carried himself in his long
: fight with pancreatic can-
i cer, according to the Asso-
i ciated Pres.

Swayze died from the

i illness on Monday in Los
i Angeles, his publicist said.
i He was 57.

“Patrick Swayze passed
away peacefully today

i with family at his side

after facing the challenges

of his illness for the last
? 20 months,” Annett Wolf
i said in a statement Mon-

day evening. She declined

to give details.

Fans of the actor were

i saddened to learn in
i March 2008 that Swayze
i was suffering from an
i especially deadly form of
i cancer.
? working despite the diag-
i nosis, putting together a
i memoir with his wife and
i shooting “The Beast,” an
i A&E drama series for
i which he had already
: made the pilot.

He continued

Swayze said he chose

i not to use painkillers
i while making “The Beast”
i because they would have
i taken the edge off his per-
i formance. The show drew

a respectable 1.3 million

viewers when the 13
i episodes ran this year, but
i A&E said it reluctantly

decided not to renew it for
a second season.
When he first went pub-

? lic with the illness, some
i reports gave him only
i weeks to live, but his doc-
? tor said his situation was

“considerably more opti-

mistic” than that. Swayze

acknowledged that time

might be running out giv-
i en the grim nature of the

disease.
“Td say five years is

pretty wishful thinking,”

Swayze told ABC’s Bar-

i bara Walters in early
i 2009. “Two years seems
i likely if you’re going to
i believe statistics. I want
i to last until they find a
? cure, which means I’d bet-
i ter get a fire under it.”

And that’s exactly what

he did. In February,

Swayze wrote an op-ed

piece in the Washington
i Post titled, “I’m Battling

Cancer. How About Some

i Help, Congress?” in which
i he urged senators and
i representatives to vote for
? the maximum funding for
i the National Institutes of
i Health to fight cancer as
i part of the economic stim-
i ulus package.

West calls Taylor Swift after “View appearance

NEW YORK

IT LOOKS like Kanye West has
finally given a personal apology to
Taylor Swift, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

Representatives from “The
View” say West called the country
sensation after her appearance on
Tuesday’s show. During the broad-
cast, the 19-year-old singer said
West had yet to contact her to apol-
ogize for hijacking her acceptance
speech on the MTV Video Music
Awards on Sunday.

“He has not personally reached
out or anything but if he wanted to
say hi (I would),” said Swift.

After Swift’s comments, West
called her and the two spoke,
according to a statement from “The
View.”

“After the show he spoke per-
sonally to the country music super-
star via telephone and has apolo-
gized to the 19-year-old singer. She
has accepted Mr. West’s apology.

The contents of the phone call are
to remain private,” it read.

It’s the latest in the saga that has
caused a national uproar. The dra-
ma began after Swift beat out Bey-
once and other acts to win best
female video at the VMAs for her
hit “You Belong With Me.”

Swift, the first country act to win
at the VMAs, was exuberant after
her win, but that moment didn’t last
long as West — known for his
awards-show meltdowns — grabbed
the microphone and declared that
Beyonce’s “Single Ladies (Put a
Ring on It)” was one of the “best
videos of all time.”

A shaken Swift did not finish her
speech at that moment, but when
Beyonce later won for video of the
year, she brought Swift out so that
she could have her moment.

When asked about the incident
during her appearance on “The
View,” Swift said: “’m not gonna
say that I wasn’t riled by it. I had to
perform live five minutes later so I

had to get myself back to the place
where I could perform.”

However, she said she was grati-
fied by the outpouring of support
not only from fans, but also from
celebrities and others who offered
support immediately after the inci-
dent occurred.

“There were a lot of people
around me backstage that were say-
ing wonderful, incredible things and
just having my back,” she said. “I
just never imagined that there were
that many people looking out for
me.”

West has taken a drubbing since
then. While he issued two apolo-
gies on his blog after the incident,
he gave another, emotional one on
Monday’s premiere of “The Jay
Leno Show.”

“Tt was rude, period,” West said.
“ ... [need to, after this, take some
time off and just analyze how ’m
going to make it through the rest
of this life, how I’m going to
improve.”



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SINGER Kanye West takes the microphone from singer Taylor Swift as
she accepts the "Best Female Video" award during the MTV Video Music
Awards on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009 in New York.

Jason DeCrow/AP Photo



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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Uproar at hotel union meeting C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.245WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH T-STORMS HIGH 89F LOW 79F I N S I D E SEEPAGEEIGHT F E A T U R E S SEE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION Islands in-Da-Sun exhibition By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A RUCKUS kicked off at W orker’s House yesterday m orning as nominations w ere submitted for the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union’s ( BHCAWU) upcoming elections. Supporters and members of Kirk Wilson’s Deliver ance Team were pitted against those behind Nicole Martin’s A Team as BHCAWU president Roy Colebrooke, general secretary Leo Douglas and Director of Labour Harcourt Brown discussed the legiti macy of three nominees behind closed doors. Mr Douglas and Mr Colebrooke refused to accept nominations from Tyrone Beneby, Philippa Dixon and Raymond Wright running for the Deliverance Team as they said the nominees are not rightful members of the union according to the Constitution. When the Director of Labour overseeing the process said Team Deliver ance members could still be nominated, Mr Colebrooke t old him he was ‘sent to supervise’ and ‘did not have the power to change the constitution’, an observer said. As they held discussions in private, commotion unfolded in the hallway. An observer said: “There’s ruckus inside the hall, people are screaming and carrying on, shouting obscenities, and people from different sides are threatening each other. “The Redemption team, headed by Sidney Rolle, is F actions c lash over legitimacy of nominees The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich Larry Smith’s Tough Call SEE page seven THE ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign aimed at purchasing incubators and ventilators for critically ill newborns at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH raise more than half of its intended goal of $300,000. To date, the campaign has raised $155,000, and organ isers have already ordered three ventilators as well as one incubator. Following their successful drive to raise money for much needed dialysis units for the PMH last year, a group of local companies recently launched the ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign to buy four ventilators and six incubators for the hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The organisers include TribuneMedia,the Builder's Mall, Tile King, ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for PMHhalfway to $300,000 goal $155,000 has been raised for incubators and ventilators SEE page seven B y PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune StaffR eporter p turnquest@ tribunemedia.net CLAIMING he feels prompted by ‘God Himself’ to offer at thist ime, PLP chief Paul Moss has f ormally advised party leaderP erry Christie of his inten tions to c hallenge him at the upcoming national convention . Inhisletter addressed to Mr Christie, and a second to the party’s P arliamentary caucus, Mr Moss said that although his decisionp its himself directly against Mr Christie, this move was not a chal lenge of the leader’sa bilities or a statement of any shortcoming. “In fact, the truth is Paul Moss formally tells Christie of his upcoming bid for leadership By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net THE pastor whose church was demolished by Arawak Homes after a Supreme Court judgment said he is weighing his legal options. Reverend Eugene Bastian, of Canaan Baptist Church, believes his church had the legal right to tear down the structure in accordance with the ruling handed down nearly two weeks ago and said he was shocked that Arawak Homes razed the church the morning after the judgment was made. He added that the building was bulldozed before he SEE page seven Pastor of demolished church is ‘weighing his legal options’ SEE page seven JONES COMMUNICATION CEO Wendall Jones is pictured outside of court yesterday. Mr Jones and several other prominent Bahamian businessmen were in Magistrate’s Court yesterday to give an update on their efforts to pay off years of delinquent National Insurance contributions. SEE STORY ON PAGE THREE T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f WEND ALL JONES AMONG BUSINESSMEN INCOURT PAUL MOSS

PAGE 2

By LINDSAY THOMPSON THE stage has been set for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival (ICF e vent that will showcase the d iverse communities in the country, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette said. Mr Symonette urged Bahamians to support the fes-t ival by coming out to see the d isplays of 25 countries at the Botanical Gardens from October 17-18. The popular festival returns after a one-year hiatus due to the retirement of its chairmanJ ames Catalyn and a debate o ver whether or not the Botani cal Gardens should remain h ome to the event. T he International Cultural F estival, which is under the ausp ices of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, grew out of the i dea to recognise United N ations (UN the Bahamas will join member c ountries in celebrating the 64th anniversary of the UN. An integral part of the festival is the partnership with the Ministry of Tourism and Aviat ion, which has embarked on a series of special advertise m ents of the event. The new I CF chairperson is Janet Johnson, director of communications at the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. As more and more foreign n ational groups organised themselves it took on a life of i ts own and by all accounts, from the countless individuals – Bahamian and expatriate alike who pleaded with me to bring it back when it went away last year, this gathering is the most popular event on the annualc alendar of events and clearly is worth reviving,” Mr Symonette said. The Deputy Prime Minister said he was also pleased that the members of the ICF have u nanimously agreed to donate 1 0 per cent of their booth earnings to assist with operational expenses and to supportp ledges to UN-related educational initiatives for Bahamian youth. F or two days, festival patrons c an experience the food, culture and heritage of the respective countries. A new addition i s the Miss Universe Designer Fashion Show coordinated by MODE ILES and a glimpse of the Miss Universe National C ostume photo gallery. The Bank of the Bahamas will facilitate the “cashless” fest ive environment, a “safety mechanism to allow organisers to gauge the overall fiscal performance of the festival, Mr Symonette said. Burns House will unveil their C hristmas wine collection and the public is welcome to sample the variety of wines and place their orders for the Yuletide season at the Grand Wine and Food Tasting event between 1 0am and 2pm. T he United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCOl ending its prestige to the event. The Miss Universe Bahamian Designer Fashion Show, w hich features Androsia and B ahama Hand Print fabrics, as well as eight costumes donated to the festival by some of the M iss Universe contestants, will be held under the aegis of UNESCO. Another new feature will i nclude the Builders Mall stage perched atop the hill. Com monwealth Building Supplies i s giving the festival site “a much needed makeover” with a fresh lick of paint. Island FM is the official radio station of the festival; Subway is the sponsor of the rake ‘n scrapet radition bearers from Long Island, and Echo Water is the official water of the festival. Mr Symonette commended the volunteers drawn from Rotary, Zonta, Girl Guides, a nd the Q’s service who will be i nvolved in this year’s festival. Zonta will again host the UNthemed church service at ChristC hurch Cathedral on Sunday, October 25 at 9am. “Patrons are encouraged to c ome and move around from s tall to stall and sample this unique taste of the universe – the cuisine, fine wines, special b rews, arts and craft, exciting raffle prizes and the Western Union on-stage cultural entertainment line-up. Make the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival 2009 the place to be,” Mr S ymonette said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM International Cultural Festival set for October JUST a few months after being crowned Miss Teen World Junior Bahamas, Shaquell Demeritte left the B ahamas for Europe on Sund ay to compete in the world's most prestigious and largest teen pageantthe Miss Princess of the World, formerly the Miss World Junior Pageant. During her three-week stay i n Europe she will tour various cities, beginning with London in the United Kingdom and ending in Prague, Czech Republic, where the grandf inale will take place. ‘Precious’, as the young beauty queen is commonly c alled said: “I cannot wait to promote the Bahamas throughoutE urope. “I know the world knows about us now, and the duty of all beauty ambassadors is to keep the Bahamas current in the minds of the world as a t ourist paradise and investm ent haven. “I would also like to sign on with one of the castinga gencies at the pageant and represent the Bahamas well. I am aiming for the goal, but to m ake a notable accomplishm ent among the 60 plus contestants will be good". The pageant focuses on i ntroducing the best teenage contestants from across the world to scouts of modellinga nd casting agencies througho ut Europe. The contestants compete in talent, model, swimwear and evening gown segments, and the winner receives $100,000 in cash and awards. The event will be broadcast live to millions of viewers on September 28. G aynell Rolle, president of the Miss Teen Bahamas Pageant, said: "This is an awesome opportunity for Shaquell and the Bahamas. “I feel she will do well, she has a good spirit and comes f rom a supportive family.” Debonaire Boutique has teamed up with the organisation a nd is sponsoring the Bahamas’ representative. MISS TEEN WORLD JUNIOR BAHAMAS TO COMPETE IN EUROPEAN PAGEANT SHAQUELL DEMERITTE D EPUTY PRIME MINISTER a nd Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette (centre for the 14th Annual International Cultural Festival to be held October 17-18, 2009. Pictured are ICF chairperson Janet Johnson, director of communications at the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation, and E ric Carey, committee member. K r i s I n g r a h a m / B I S

PAGE 3

THE woman who received devastating second and thirdd egree burns about the body d uring a house fire on Canaan Lane has died, police said. Yesterday, press liaison offic er Asst Supt Walter Evans identified her as 36-year-old Dellerease Bowe. M s Bowe's home was completely destroyed by fire last Thursday around 1am. Police said her fianc is reported to have assisted her from her burning home and neighbours drove her by pri v ate car to the hospital, where she was fighting for her life in the intensive care unit. S he died in the Princess M argaret Hospital around 9pm on Sunday, Mr Evans said. P olice said they were still investigating the cause of the fire and could not say whatl ed to the blaze. However, head of Fire Serv ices Supt Jeffrey Deleveaux speculated that the fire may have been caused by a candle, as the home did not have elec t ricity. "We haven't pinned it down yet but we realised that there was no electricity to the build i ng and perhaps it could have been an unattended candle, b ut we can't say concretely," he told The Tribune yesterday. Mr Deleveaux also said Fire S ervices had not yet determined the cause of the house fire during which a 10-yearold disabled boy was burnt b eyond recognition on Sunday morning in Colony Vil lage. "In a structural fire every t hing is destroyed and you’re not able to go and immedi a tely pinpoint (and say is what happened. It's a slow process," he said. By AVA TURNQUEST CONFUSED and frustrat ed by what struck him as an unfair manipulation of traffic laws, a disgruntled citizen has lashed out at downtown police. Ivoine Ingraham wrote to The Tribune to complain about the circumstances surrounding the towing of his car from Bay Street opposite the British Colonial Hilton. Mr Ingraham said he parked amongst several other cars, all of which were still there when he returned about 30 minutes later. He cannot understand why he was unfairly targeted. If he broke the law by parking in this area, Mr Ingraham asked why he was not fined. "If I violated a traffic offence and was supposedly parked in a no parking area, why was I not charged and made to pay a fine?” he asked. “How come no police formalities were done?" Mr Ingraham had parked in that area to attend a brief meeting in the BOLAM building last week. Due to its proximity to restaurants and businesses, this part of Bay Street is a popular short-term parking spot. Seeing his car gone upon his return, Mr Ingraham immediately assumed it had been stolen, and flagged d own a passing patrol car. The officers referred him to the Tourism Police Station. Mr Ingraham described the officers at the station as disinterested, and said they provided no explanation save d irections to the lot where he could find his car. Number When he called the number posted on the lot's fence, Mr Ingraham was subjected to what he describes as a “crude, uncouth, cantankerous voice”. After waiting over an hour for someone in authority to show up, Mr Ingraham attempted to pay the one individual he encountered in the lot, however this person could not give him a receipt. Insisting that he would not pay unless he was given a receipt, Mr Ingraham called the number on the fence again; this time the voice told him that for a receipt, he would have to drive to Coral Harbour. Mr Ingraham said that at this point, he decided to “bite the bullet” and created a make-shift receipt, which he a sked the attendant to sign. Frustrated by the ordeal, Ingraham feels that such incidents are destroying the frag ile relationship the police tries to maintain with the public. Pressed for an explanation y esterday, a police source suggested that perhaps the officer responsible for the towing had decided to give Mr Ingraham “a break”. It is not uncommon for offi cers to waive a ticket, and let the fee for the towing stand as a warning, he said. The source could not explain why no other cars were towed. Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson has urged the public to communicate any concerns or complaints to his office so they can be investigated. By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net JONES Communication C EO Wendall Jones and several other prominent Bahamian businessmen were back in Magistrate’s Court yesterday to give an updateo n their efforts to pay off years of delinquent National Insurance contributions. Bench warrants were issued yesterday for Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs owner Mervin Sweeting , Solomon’s Mines M anaging Director M ark Finlayson as well as Vaughn Jones of Jones Brothers Morticians after they failed to appear in Court 11, Nas-s au Street yesterday. B ack in February, the N ational insurance Board NIB brought Jones Commun ications CEO Wendall Jones and other well-known Bahamian businessmenb efore the magistrate's court in an attempt to collect more t han $1.2 million in missing NIB contributions. Mr Jones pleaded guilty to owing NIB $430,000 ind elinquent payments. Attorney V. Alfred Gray who appeared on behalf of Mr Jones yesterday told the court he has paid $100,000 of the nearly $180,000, which represents 40 per cent of the d elinquent amount. Attorney H eather Maynard, attorney for NIB, said that once Mr Jones has paid the full 40 per cent, NIB would be happy to negotiate to liqui-d ate the balance. Mr Gray s aid Mr Jones will seek to pay to the balance by N ovember 17. Mr Gray also appeared on behalf of Global United C EO Jackson Ritchie w ho was charged with failure to pay $161,079.98 in NIB contributions between May 2007 a nd June 2008. M r Gray said that the NIB and Mr Ritchie are continuing negotiations with respect to the delinquent contribu-t ions. Mr Ritchie is also expected back in Court 11, Nassau Street on November 17. Galen Saunders and his father Henry Saunders who own More 94.9 FM and Spiri t (92.5 FM r adio stations were also back in court yesterday over failure to pay $253,262 in NIB contributions. Ms Maynard said the men have paid $43,000 so far and are ‘working in good faith.’ T he two men are also expected back in Court 11, on November 17. Magistrate Sub SwainL aSalle issued warrant of arrests yesterday for Mervin S weeting, owner of Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs. Mr Gray told the court that on June 29, Sweeting paid NIB $10,000 and hadn egotiated to keep his contributions current while paying $2,000 a month in delinquent payments. Mr Gray, however, could offer no explanation as to why MrS weeting was not in court yesterday. Magistrate LaSalle noted three warrants had been issued for Mr Sweeting’s arrest. Warrant “He has a habit of not showing up,” Magistrate LaSalle said before issuingt he bench warrant. A bench warrant was also issued for Solomon’s Mines Managing Director Mark Finlayson. Finlayson wasc harged with failure to pay $ 377,092.90 in NIB contributions between June 2007 and December 2008. Mr Finlayson was ordered toa ppear in court yesterday to inform the court what arrangement he worked out with NIB and how much he had paid. A bench warrant was also issued for Vaughn Jones of J ones Brothers Morticians who failed to appear in court yesterday. NIB has been taking a nononsense approach to prosecuting delinquent employers since an amnesty the company extended for delinq uent employers to come in and settle accounts ended on December 31, 2008. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,440 $3,440 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $3,600 $3,600Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e P P i i n n e e C C o o t t t t a a g g e e INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports..............................................P9,10,11 Advt.........................................................P12 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business.........................................P1,2,3,4 Comics....................................................P5 Taste.....................................................P6,7 Arts......................................................P8,10W eather....................................................P9 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES Wendall Jones among businessmen back in court over NIB contributions Downtown police criticised over towing of car from Bay Street WOMAN INJURED IN HOUSE FIRE DIES THE remains of the house on C anaan Lane. FREEPORT – Grand Bahama Police are searching for a man wanted for q uestioning in connection with a number of housebreaking and stealing allegations. A n all points bulletin has b een issued for 23-year-old C arlos Demetrius Nottage o f 78 Cabot Drive, Freeport. Nottage is of dark brown c omplexion and has dark eyes and plaited hair. He is about five feet, e ight inches tall, of average build and weighs 150-190 p ounds. A ccording to police, Nottage should be considered armed and extremely dang erous. Anyone who has i nformation concerning his whereabouts is asked call the police in Grand Bahama o n 350-3106, 352-9774, 3731112 or 5; 911 or the Crime Tipsters Hotline at 3521 919. Man wanted for questioning over housebreakings CARLOS DEMETRIUS NOTTAGE B AHAMAS Faith Mini stries has announced that its “Singles Conference”, set for September 17 20,has been postponed until f urther notice. The Bahamas Faith Ministries to hold ‘Singles Conference’ T WO men who allegedly robbed a woman while on Solider Road were caught by police after a high-speedc hase through the area. It was shortly after 3pm on Monday when a woman f lagged down traffic police, who were patrolling Soldier Road near Haven's Road, and said she was robbed by two men. She told the officers that one of the robbers wore an undershirt and colourful shorts, and that the other man was shirtless, Asst Supt Walter Evans said. Moments later police spotted two men fitting the descriptions given by the victim speeding away in a gold-coloured car. A high-speed chased ensued which eventually ended in a parking lot. In an attempt to escape, the occupants got out of the car and threw items under the vehicle. Police retrieved the items which are believed to be the cash and jewellery stolen from the woman. The two men, aged 19 and 21, are in police custody. T wo men caught by police after alleged r obbery Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. In an exclusive interview given to The Tribune of the Bahamas by the former Premier of the Turks and Caicos Islands, which was published on Monday August 31, 2009, the former Premier advocated on behalf of his former gov-e rnment for the Turks and Caicos Islands to become an autonomous State under The Commonwealth of the Bahamas government. In my humble opinion, this is one of the most ridiculous and hollowed interview ever given by the former government of the Turks and Caicos Islands. What planet are these former ministers living on? This is clear evidence that the state of minds of these former ministers is of a world far detached from reality. This last desperate attempt on t heir part to escape the long arms of justice is beyond disgraceful, it is pitiful. Who in the Turks and Caicos Islands are they so desperately and shamefully lobbying on behalf of? Because, it is unquestionably not the people of the Turks and Caicos Islands. When the former government ministers were flying high above the clouds a few years ago, the Commonwealth of the Bahamas and the people of the Turks and Caicos Islands were the last things on their minds. The only thing that was on their minds was the glamour of Hollywood, Monaco, the South of France; and as for their idea of becoming an autonomous state under the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, that was beneath them. So why now, are they being so pretentious? There is no question that The Commonwealth of the Bahamas is a lovely country, but that is where it ends. And as for the idea of the Turks and Caicos Islands becoming linked to The Commonwealth of the Bahamas government, the Turks and Caicos Islands has already been there and done that (from 1962 to 1973 So, as far as progressive thinking is concerned, that idea is “so lame, and so yesterday.” As late as the early 90s’, Turks and Caicos Islands cit izens were looked down upon and treated with disrespect by the citizens and the government of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas, this led to Turks and Caicos islanders and their descendants who lived in the Bahamas being ashamed to acknowledge their heritage in fear of being dishonoured and being deprived of an opportunity, even though we are all one people and we helped build the Bahamas to what it is today. However, today we hold no animosity in our hearts towards the Bahamas and its citizens, because we are a forgiving and loving people. When a country is not cognoscente of its history, it is bound to repeat the mistakes of the past. Therefore, let me make it absolutely clear, in my opinion, the future of the Turks and Caicos Islands does not rest in the hands of The Commonwealth of the Bahamas. We as a people of the Turksa nd Caicos Islands have come this far by faith, perseverance and hard work, and the current state of affairs that we now find ourselves in will soon pass. There is a bright light and a prosperous future at the end of this tunnel that we are now in. Persons of the Turks and Caicos Islands, the reign of the previous guards are over. Let us continue to keep the faith and stay encouraged, because you too shall soon enter into the Promised Land, and the Turks and Caicos Islands will once again be the envy of the Caribbean, if not the world. “A Belonger that is proud to be called a Turks and Caicos Islander”. Thank you. ALBRAY BUTTERFIELD Jr September, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm President Barack Obama took a bit of a v ictory lap on Wall Street on Monday, d eclaring that the economy had been brought back from the abyss and “the storms o f the past two years are beginning to break.” The president and his economic team (and t he Federal Reserve) deserve credit for moving quickly to prevent a full-blown collapse. A year ago, amid the panic that accompanied the implosion of Lehman Brothers, there were serious fears that the United Statesw as headed toward another Great Depression. N ow, with the financial sector stabilized a nd economists predicting that the Great Recession is nearing an end, the sighs ofr elief coming out of Washington and Lower Manhattan are understandable. But this is not ime to lose sight of the wreckage all around us. This recession, a full-blown economic horror, has left a gaping hole in the heart ofw orking America that is unlikely to heal for years, if not decades. F ifteen million Americans are locked in t he nightmare of unemployment, nearly 10 percent of the work force. A third have been jobless for more than six months. Thirteen percent of Latinos and 15 percent of blacks are out of work. (Those are some of the official statistics. The reality is much worse.) Consider this: Some 9.4 million new jobs w ould have to be created to get us back to the level of employment at the time that the recession began in December 2007. But lastm onth, we lost 216,000 jobs. If the recession technically ends soon and we get to a point where some modest number of jobs are created say, 100,000 or 150,000 a month the politicians and the business com m entators will celebrate like it’s New Year’s. But think about how puny that level of job creation really is in an environment that needs nearly 10 million jobs just to get us back to the lean years of the George W. Bush administration. We’re hurtin’ and there ain’t much healin’ on the horizon. A national survey of jobless workers by a pair of professors at Rutgers Universitys hows just how traumatized the work force has become in this downturn. Two-thirds of respondents said that they had become depressed. More than half said it was the first time they had ever lost a job, and 80 per-c ent said there was little or no chance that they would be able to get their jobs back when the economy improves. The 1,200 respondents were jobless at some point over the past year, and most 894 are still unemployed. More than half said that they had been forced to borrow money from friends or relatives, and a quar-t er have missed their mortgage or rent payments. T he survey found that affluent, well-educ ated workers, who had traditionally been a ble to withstand a downturn in reasonably g ood shape, were being hit hard this time around. T he professors, Carl Van Horn and Cliff Zukin, described that phenomenon as “a metric of the recession’s seismic impact.” Of the workers who found themselves unemployed for the first time, more than one in four had been earning $75,000 or more annually. “This is not your ordinary dip in the business cycle,” said Mr. Van Horn. “Ameri cans believe that this is the Katrina of recessions. Folks are on their rooftops without a boat.” Stunned by the financial and psychological toll of the recession, and seeing little in the way of hopeful signs on the employment landscape, many of the surveyed workers showed signs of discouragement. Three-fifthss aid that they had experienced feelings of h elplessness. Said one respondent: “I’ve always worked, s o this is very depressing. At age 60, I never b elieved I would be unemployed unless I c hose to be.” S aid another: “I fear for my family and my future. We are about to be evicted, and bills are piling. We have sold everything we possibly can to maintain, and are going under with little hope of anything.” At some point the unemployment crisis in America will have to be confronted head-on. Poverty rates are increasing. Tax revenues are plunging. State and local governments are in a terrible fiscal bind. Unemployment benefits for many are running out. Families are doubling up, and the number of homeless children is rising. It’s eerie to me how little attention this crisis is receiving. The poor seem to be completely out of the picture. I f we end up with yet another jobless recovery, there would seem to be little hope for impoverished families in America’s big c ities, rural areas and, increasingly, suburban n eighborhoods as well. T he recession may be ending for some. T ell that to the unemployed. (By By BOB HERBERT c.2009 New York Times News Service) A desperate bid to escape long arms of justice LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net A world of hurt EDITOR, The Tribune. If no one is noticing the people are very frustrated in a high percentage almost over come with depression as they cannot see through their economic/financial troubles that the US economic recession is causing. T hey honestly felt what started in the mid-1990’s was not going to stop. Up to their armpits in debt struggling last year with the horrific prices for BEC, gas and food and now layoffs and absolutely no good news on the horizon although some commentators are saying that everywhere else, other than the US, are showing econom ic signs which would bring a smile but it is not coming soon to The Bahamas as the US is still in recession. Unless you are blind and deaf over the past weeks you have heard the same frustrations in the voice and protests of the American people against the Obama Health plan as you have heard here on our issues but reality is the US is a service economy and through the obvious scaring of the same folk who totally control the US coming out of Recession on Health Care, my previous estimates of the US recession finishing in the l ast quarter of 2010 is now lengthened to no earlier thanl ate 2011 at the earliest. The reality even with the p otential television audience from Miss Universe, yes potentially 1.2 billion eyes will s ee The Bahamas, many for the first time, but many who h ave absolutely no chance of ever seeing it in reality as they are unable economically to visit so could we appreciate a 1-2 or 3 per cent new visitor arrival base over the coming 3-4 years? Boy, Sunday August the 23rd, the dice roll. One thing that economic downturns do bring is that employers find all kinds of new ways to doing business with less, so excelling is going to be a serious issue. Political hog-wash rhetoric as what I heard from Senator David Thompson never puts jam on the bread, Senator, Grand Bahamians see the mess and the troubles and your loose political rah-rah talk doesn’t help, so please stop it. PATRICIA SAWYER Nassau, August 21, 2009. The realities of economic turmoil EDITOR, The Tribune . Today’s story of The Tribune entitled “Call for the Government to improve the horrific state of Dog Pound”, made me sick, disgusted and angry. A few years ago the Reader’s Digest carried the following statement: “You can tell a people by the way they treat their animals and their beaches.” What a people we have become. SIMMS Marsh Harbour, Abaco, September 3, 2009. Sick, disgusted and angry

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ByLLONELLA GILBERT THE International Labour Organisation (ILO tries throughout the region are monitoring the National Traini ng Programme to see if it should become a model for countries who hope to combine social with labour development, Minister of State for Labour and Social Development Loret ta Butler-Turner said. Speaking at the opening of the programme at the KendalG L Isaacs Gymnasium on Monday, Mrs Butler-Turner said that the success of the venture does not rest upon the gov ernment, social partners or the training institutes. “It rests upon each of you,” she said. “You will have to work hard and study. You willb e required to give up some leisure activities, but in the longrun it will be worth it.” The government introduced the National Training Programme to help displaced workers learn new trades such as masonry; basic carpentry; landscaping; heavy equipment operating; accounting; diesel mechanics; nail artistry and design; facial care and technology; computer applications, and straw and shell craft. The training will take place at the College of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI The programme was created in conjunction and consultation with the Bahamas Christian Council, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, the Bahamas Employers Confederation and trade unions. Mrs Butler-Turner said the government wants to give a “hand-up” to persons who are “progressive thinkers” and who wish to take charge of their future. “This National Training Pro gramme seeks to give each of the selected participants new or additional skills to regain employment or become entre preneurs,” she said. The state minister said that depending on the success or failure of the initiative’s first run, the government will decide if a “large scale” national training programme should become permanent. Mrs Butler-Turner said 529 persons were selected for the programme in New Providence and 244 from Grand Bahama. Khaalis Rolle, chairman of the implementation committee of the National Training Programme, said that the programme is a major opportunity for the participants. “When you transition out of this programme, the expectation is that you get a good job or become an entrepreneur,” Mr Rolle said. He said if the participants demonstrate commitment and dedication, there is an oppor tunity for them to start their own business. Dr Christina Nwosa, associ ate vice-president of Outreach at COB, encouraged participants to continuously upgrade their skills. “Ongoing training is essen tial and there are distinct bene fits to a society from a population which is adequately prepared to meet a changing economic environment,” she said. “Lifelong learning or continuing education produces a more knowledgeable and flexible work force that enables persons to realise their individual potential.” Dr Nwosa said other bene fits of education include career flexibility, increased skill requirements, personal satis f action and better wages. “People who upgrade their work skills and knowledge not only keep up with the latest trends and techniques in their respective areas, but can also receive other benefits such as the training needed to realise additional goals,” she said. THE government has s igned a $406,000 contract w ith C-Cubed Seating on M onday to provide seats for the annual junkanoo parades. Minister of State in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard said that the original c ontract of $460,000 has been reduced to $406,000. T he contract now includes seats for the Junior Junkanoo, Boxing and New Year’s Day Parades; 10,000 s eats for New Providence; 2,000 seats for Grand Bahama and 1,000 seats for a nother Family Island to be n amed by October of each y ear, Mr Maynard said. Seats “We are very happy that C -Cubed, a Bahamian owned company that e mploys many Bahamians in the execution of their work every year, has beena ble to give us what we think is a very fair arrangem ent where we now get more seats for less money. “What we have found out in the last few years is that islands like Abaco, Exuma and Eleuthera have expande d their parades greatly and n eed more support from c entral government for the production of their parades. “We thought that the provision of seats for these parades would give them a j ump-start to start to earn t heir own revenue. We want t o start with one island first, see how that works out and then expand it. “During the course of the contract we hope that a n umber of islands (will e fit from the 1,000 seats,” h e said. In Nassau, Mr Maynard s aid, a few initiatives have b een introduced to continue t he working relationship with downtown merchants. These include the access of the bleachers from the back and new seats that facilitate easy break-down and setup. Compromises We’ve come up with some compromises to ensure that the businesses a re not disadvantaged as a r esult of the setting up and t aking down of the bleache rs,” he explained. “We’ve worked with CC ubed during the last two years to ensure that we c ould have a better seating arrangement for the general public, the Bay Street merc hants and all concerned,” Mr Maynard said. P resident of C-Cubed Crispin Cleare said over 30 persons will be employed ont his project, and safe, comfortable seating will be prov ided for the annual parades. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comCaves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites f ntbf 't $ %%%!# Junkanoo bleachers contract signed with Bahamian firm FROM L EFT: Eddie Dames, acting director of Culture; Charles Maynard, Minister of State for the Min istry of Youth, Sports and Culture; Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sportsa nd Culture, and Crispin Cleare, president of C-Cubed Seating. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S ILO monitoring National Training Programme MINISTER OF STATE in the Ministry of Labour and Social Development Loretta ButlerTurner brought remarks at the opening of the National Training Programme on Monday, September 14, 2009 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. R a y m o n d A B e t h e l / B I S By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama police are concerned over the recent spate of house breakings and theft here on the island. In response to an increase in these types of crimes police are now advising the public not to purchase stolen items as it is a criminal offence that carries the same penalty as stealing. Asst Supt Wendell Deveaux said the police ares eeking the cooperation of the general public to inform the police of persons attempting to sell electronic equipment and items such as cellular phones, flat-screen televisions, laptop computers and video games, as well as jewellery and other goods. M r Deveaux said that items being offered below market value are often believed to be stolen. He is also urging residents to ensure that their premises are properly secured before leav ing home. Neighbours should be alert and keep a look out for each others property, he said. Mr Deveaux said people should call the police if they notice any suspicious persons lurking around their neigh-b ourhood. He said the police also e ncourage residents to form crime watch groups and neighbourhood watches in their areas. GBpolice concerned over house breakings

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By DONNA NICOLLS I POSEDa philosophical question to a wise old lady once: Can love torment? She advised me no, the misunderstanding of love torments. I find her words to be relevant to the current debate about marital rape believing that a perverse misunderstanding of marriage has led to exaggerated claims and misinformation about the risks of outlawing marital rape in the Bahamas. This misunderstanding is fueling the outrage over the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offenses and Domestic Violence Act of 1991 that would remove the impunity given under law to husbands who rape their wives. I could understand the current debate if it were taking place in the 19th century England, when the presupposition of eternal union with no possibility of divorce, and unconditional consent were foundations of marriage because women were chattel, but in the 21st century Bahamas, those views are simply antiquated and backward. The real news in this debate is that religious leaders would have me believe that when my husband and I joined as one in marriage 31 years ago, I signed away my individuality and thereby sacrificed my freedom to choose, my own self-determination and the ownership of my own body. My husband and I are still happily married but there was never any presupposition of consent for either of us to do as we wish when we wish with each other’s body. My body is still my own and I consent willingly and freely during each sexuali nteraction because we have a healthy relationship built on love and respect for each other. If we were to believe the claims of the Christian community, as voiced most fervently by the Bahamas Christian Council, then we would further be led to believe that the level of dysfunction inm arital relations within the Christian community of the Bahamas is disturbingly pervasive, which perhaps it is, considering the high percentage of the population that comes from unwed unions. If the proposed amendment would bring about a massive influx of vindictive and discontentedw ives rushing to incarcerate their husbands, then we must have bigger problems than we thought. In this case perhaps the energies of the Christian leadership would be more productively put to use in pre-emptively restoring proper order to the sacred trust of marital relationships instead of blocking justice for those who have already fallen victim to the violated trust. People in healthy relationships have no fear of the proposed amendment to the law and should be appalled at the scare tactics. Many opponents are muddying the water making others believe the issue is “complex, complicated, and multi-dimensional” when it is none of the above. This is the simple idea: According to the World Bank the Bahamas has the highest number of rapes per capita in the world; wives are among those suffering and they have inadequate protection under the law. Are we going to respond in fear based on hypothetical situations and hyperbolae or are we going to drown out the ignorance withp ragmatic and principled action? With the Catholic Archdiocese, the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church, the Seventh Day Adventist Church all expressing their support for the proposed amendment, the only thing that is tragically wrong is the bad rap the Christian Council is giving theC hristian community. Recommendations for consultation are only stall tactics that will deny justice to individuals who suffer from lack of protection under the law. There is a time for consultation, but now is the time for leaders to lead and do the right thing by looking beyond the dog-m atic positions of Christian fundamentalists and other fear-mongers interested only in obstructionism. Marital rape is a crime under international law, and according to a 2006 UnitedN ations report, over 104 countries around the world have already m ade it a crime in their domestic law. These countries include our Caribbean neighbors Barbados, and Trinidad and Tobago, not to mention the United States, Spain, and even Zimbabwe, much ridiculed as backward and anti-p rogressive. There is great need in the B ahamas to promote best practices in healthy relationships and to learn from the successes of many men and women in healthy marriages; but in the meantime, while dysfunction is rampant and women are suffering, we need toh ave empathy, stop the melodrama and act. Donna Nicolls has been an advocate for women and children’s’ rights for over 20 years. She has a masters degree in counselling from the University of the West Indies and serves as a counsellor at the Bahamas Crisis Centre. She is married with two children. C ontact: donna.nicolls@gmail.com C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Opponents of martial rape amendment gravely out of touch Y OUR S AY R R e e c c o o m m m m e e n n d d a a t t i i o o n n s s f f o o r r c c o o n n s s u u l l t t a a t t i i o o n n a a r r e e o o n n l l y y s s t t a a l l l l t t a a c c t t i i c c s s t t h h a a t t w w i i l l l l d d e e n n y y j j u u s s t t i i c c e e t t o o i i n n d d i i v v i i d d u u a a l l s s w w h h o o s s u u f f f f e e r r f f r r o o m m l l a a c c k k o o f f p p r r o o t t e e c c t t i i o o n n u u n n d d e e r r t t h h e e l l a a w w . . T T h h e e r r e e i i s s a a t t i i m m e e f f o o r r c c o o n n s s u u l l t t a a t t i i o o n n , , b b u u t t n n o o w w i i s s t t h h e e t t i i m m e e f f o o r r l l e e a a d d e e r r s s t t o o l l e e a a d d a a n n d d d d o o t t h h e e r r i i g g h h t t t t h h i i n n g g b b y y l l o o o o k k i i n n g g b b e e y y o o n n d d t t h h e e d d o o g g m m a a t t i i c c p p o o s s i i t t i i o o n n s s o o f f C C h h r r i i s s t t i i a a n n f f u u n n d d a a m m e e n n t t a a l l i i s s t t s s a a n n d d o o t t h h e e r r f f e e a a r r m m o o n n g g e e r r s s i i n n t t e e r r e e s s t t e e d d o o n n l l y y i i n n o o b b s s t t r r u u c c t t i i o o n n i i s s m m . .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Harbour Bay Harbour Bay Extra 5% OFF sale items For Privileged Card Holders & Corporate Partners Sale ends the 30th of September sitting down, they are not involved in it, but the A team headed by Nicole M artin is screaming at the D eliverance team headed by Kirk Wilson.” M r Douglas said the nomi nations are not valid as Mr B eneby and Ms Dixon have b een redundant since A ugust last year, and Mr W right was terminated from his position as an organiserat the union in 2008. He added: “It clearly states under the Constitution that a member should be deemed non-financial w hen he or she is 12 weeks, o r three months, in arrears of contributions and shall a utomatically forfeit his or her privileges as a member o f the union, so how do you nominate when you find they are not members? The Constitution also says no member shall vote in the election if he or she is not in good standing in terms of his financial or other obligations to the union.” At the close of nominations Mr Douglas said 12 nominees were put forwardb y the M Group headed by Tyrone Butler, the A Group headed by Nicole Martin, and the Redemption Team led by Sidney Rolle. Only nine of Team Delive rance’s 12 nominations w ere accepted, and the nominees in question have b een called to discuss their p ositions at the Attorney G eneral’s office, Mr Douglas said. The union’s executive c ouncil arranged for nominations to take place yesterday under the direction of Justice Neville Adderley. Elections are set to be held on September 29. Confusion over the dates o f the previous election m eant Team Deliverance s upporters did not attend a nd Mr Wilson took court a ction to have the election d eclared “null and void”, forcing Ms Martin, the union's first woman presi dent, to step down. The register used for the May 28 elections is expected to be used again when the v oting process proceeds, allowing for some 6,000 union members to particip ate. Doctors Hospital, The Rotary Club of East Nassau and B ahamas Realty. C ompanies that have donated money to the campaign so far include Doctors Hospital, Tile King, Kelso Medical L aboratory and Micronet among others. T he incubators bought with the money raised through t he campaign will be crucial in keeping premature or otherwise challenged newborns alive, while the ventilators will be used to care for patients in both the adult andn eonatal intensive care units. to the contrary. I believe t hat you achieved much as party leader and as Prime Minister,” Mr Moss explained. “Many of your ideas and initiatives were ahead of their time. I have the utmost respect and affection for you. But, Sir, there has been a shift in the dynamics of this country. I’m certain you must feel it, a new generation is moving on the scene and they are crying out for a leader – a new vision and, in particular, anew economic model that would be anchored in the deliberate empowerment of Bahamians. “I have come forward at this time because I have heard their cries. I have come for ward because I feel the prompting of God Himself. I must hearken to the cries of my fellow Bahamia ns and I must be obedient to the voice of God for, as His Word says, ‘obedience is better than sacrifice’,” Mr Moss said. Outlining that Mr Christie has served his generation well, Mr Moss said the party’s leader has also had the privilege of impacting other generations. However, he said, the time has come for him and others like him to serve their own generation. “It’s time for our party to look ahead and prepare for those who will come after you (Mr Christie generation of leaders. In my bid for leadership, I am demonstrating my readiness to move from the w ings to the stage for, I believe, the time is now. WhileI can not expect to have your support in this race, I do ask for your understanding and your bless ing,” he said. Mr Moss also encouraged the party’s Parliamentary block to listen to the call of the people and encouraged them to support him in his bid to become leader. “I believe with all my heart that in order for our party to survive; for it to once again become the Party of choice for the majority of Bahamians, we must make a concerted, considered and deliberate effort to encourage and advance the next generation o f leaders. Bahamians are waiting, crying out for a leader. “Undoubtedly, the time has come for transition. We are entering into a new season for our country and for our world, and this new season, like every other, requires its own breed of leaders. No one can deny that our fathers excelled in their generation; they built a foundation that is sure, but we can’t stop and we can’t rest. We must continue to build. We must find a new vision and new energies to propel our party and our country into a brighter future,” Mr Moss said. The leadership candidate advised the party’s Parlia mentary team that if they wish to discuss his plans any further he was available for them to speak with at any time. had time to file an appeal against the r uling. "My lawyer is looking into that and as s oon as he would have studied the legal i mplications we will get together and decide what to do," Mr Bastian told The Tribune . Mr Bastian said he is also in conversa t ions with the owner of the local real estate company which sold him the disputed property. H e added that his church's 50-member c ongregation, which has moved tem porarily services to the Great Commis sion Church, is coping with the ordeal. " We are doing fine in the midst of our c risis. We know that God is still in control and we will weather the storm. Hard t imes do not last but hard people do and so with God being our leader and guide we will prevail," he said. As shocked residents of the commun ity looked on, Canaan Baptist Church was reduced to rubble by Arawak Homes on September 4 at the end of a two year c ourt challenge over a land dispute. After the demolition, spokesman for Arawak Homes said: "Arawak Homes w ishes to assure the public that the deci sion to demolish the structure was only taken after every reasonable effort, overs everal years, was made to effect a diff erent outcome. "We also wish to confirm that care was taken to secure all contents which werem et in the structure." Yesterday, an emotional member of the church said she was still shook upa bout the loss of the building that was the fruit of years of planning. "Right now it's bringing us a lot of tears. It was just like a human being to us it took us years to build and it just took them one hour to destroy. This is not what (former Prime Minister ( Pindling) had envisioned when he put his name on this subdivision," said the church member, who did not want to be n amed. Ultimately, Supreme Court Justice Cheryl Albury found Arawak HomesL imited to be the rightful owner of seve ral lots on Charles Saunders Highway on which the church was built in June, 2006. T he justice also ordered that Mr Bas tian, Alvin Rolle and Merline Rolle who were listed as second and thirdd efendants respectively by themselves, their servants and or agents "demolish and remove the building or parts of any buildings constructed on the said lots". J ustice Albury also ruled that Arawak Homes had immediate possession of the lots in question. PERRY CHRISTIE FROM page one Paul Moss formally tells Christie of his upcoming bid for leadership FROM page one Pastor of demolished church is ‘weighing his legal options’ Uproar at hotel union meeting F ROM page one M EMBERS o f Nicole Martin’s A Team outside the Workers House building yesterday. ‘Breathe Easy’ campaign for PMHhalfway to $300,000 goal F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By LARRYSMITH MARSH HARBOUR, Abaco Faced with overwhelming disapproval from a standing room-only crowd of Abaconians upset over the bypassing of local interests, Bahamas Electrcity Corporation chiefs orchestrating a town meeting last week admitted to a failure of process and promised to learn from their mistakes. "Things could have been handled better," BEC general manager Kevin Basden told his critics, referring to construction of a 48-megawatt oil-fired power plant on Abaco that proceeded without any local consultation, "and lessons will be learnt from this." The town meeting was hastily called to address a groundswell of concern about the environmental and other implications of the plant, whose foundations have already been laid on a 25-acre site near Wil son City, about 14 miles south of Marsh Harbour. But in many respects the effort came years too late. As BEC chairman Fred Got tlieb confirmed at the meeting, the Christie administration decided to build the $105 million power plant back in 2005, after years of dithering. And the construction contracts were signed by the Ingraham government in December, 2007. But neither government has involved the people of Abaco at any stage of the planning process. "The existing plant is 30 years old," Gottlieb explained. "It has an installed capacity of 27 mw and peak demand is 24 mw, so the loss of a single engine causes serious load shedding. The present site is too close to residential areas and there is no room for expansion, but Abaco's energy demand is growing by five per cent per annum. I met the letter of intent for the new plant signed by my predecessor andwe went ahead with it." From all accounts, the audience that filled the New Visions church hall to overflowing on September 10 was a reasonable cross section of Abaco communities including black and white Bahamians as well as second homers from a number of settlements. Many said it was the largest public meeting ever seen on Abaco outside of an election campaign. And whether or not the participants shared strong feelings about the environmental implications of the new plant, there was little doubt as to their anger over the lack of meaningful public consultation on this mssive infrastructure project. In fact, Freeport lawyer Fred Smith who has taken judicial review of the Baker's Bay development on Guana Cay all the way to the Privy Council told the meeting he had been hired by a group of local and foreign property owners and would seek to halt the power plant project until due process had been achieved. He defined "due process" as an opportunity for all interested parties to provide input. "This is the biggest capital expediture in Abaco's history and there has been no meaningful public consultation," Smith told me after the meeting. "I will be writing to the relevant central and local government agencies for evidence that all approvals and permits have been properly obtained. I don't expect any answers and they will probably continue to do what they are doing, but the project will then be subject to judicial review." During the meeting he sug gested that the project could be proceeding illegally: "We continue to disrespect the local government institutions that the FNM itself put in place. We don't know if all statutory permits for this power plant have been granted. But it is incumbent on government to ensure that due process is respected that is the essence of democracy." Those "relevant agencies" include the BEST Commission, the Department of Environmental Health Services, the town planning department, local government councils, the Ministry of Works, and the Cabinet Office. But Smith's threat led BEC to pre-empt him by halting its own project temporarily. The Ministry of Works confirmed on Monday that the project was on hold while BEC applied for construction permits. In response to this, one wellplaced political source remarked: "Yes, BEC should follow the rules. But how many other government construction projects from schools to roadsdo you know that get permits?" Well, Tough Call can't speak for all such projects, but I know of at least one that does have the necessary approvals the Nassau airport redevelopment. The point is how can BEC spend $100 million of borrowed money without going through the required legal processes? After years of virtual silence on its plans for Abaco, BEC and government officials pulled out all the stops for the meeting last week. Representatives from MAN Diesel Canada (which has the overall contract for the plant), KES Environmental Services (which did the environmental impact assessment) and the BEST Commission all gave presentations. Nassau lawyer and Bahamas National Trust council member Pericles Maillis also spoke in support of the project, making it clear he was there in a personal capacity. He had been wrongly identified as a BNT spokesman on the official programme for the meeting. BEC chairman Fred Gottlieb acknowledged rather testily that the meeting was held in response to a "surprising, sudden opposition" to the power plant generated by misleading propaganda, principally a video published on You Tube. But as Abaconian newspaper publisher Dave Ralph pointed out, this was "the first public disclosure of any consequence by BEC or the government" on this massive project for the island. So what do you expect to happen? And the lack of disclosure is despite the fact that the deci sion was made four years ago, that contracts were signed almost two years ago, that financing was approved by parliament in the summer, that construction is already well under way, that the chairman of BEC is a leading Marsh Harbour citizen, and that the prime minister himself represents an Abaco constituency. In fact, Hubert Ingraham slipped into the meeting incognito wearing a baseball hat, and two senior opposition MPs Fred Mitchell and Obie Wilchcombe also attended as observers. One wag noted the presence of "the next leader of the PLP" to much laughter, but it was unclear which one of those gentlemen he was referring to. Until Tough Call reported on the power plant EIA in this space a couple of weeks ago, there was no substantive infor mation on this project anywhere in the public domain. And for some strange reason, BEC officials were unwilling to answer basic questions for my report, which pointed out their atrocious track record on envi ronmental matters. Many of those questions were answered at the town meeting, however. For example, the plant's state-of-the-art generators will burn heavy fuel oil so efficient ly that cancer-causing particu lates will be minimised and more power will be produced per unit of fuel. Also, the fuel used will contain less than two per cent sulphur, producing emissions that are well within World Bank guidelines. And heavy fuel power plants already operate throughout the Bahamas and Caribbean, as well as in the US and Europe. Rising cost estimates for the plant over the years were attributed to depreciation of the US dollar and additional costs for the fuel terminal, pipeline and transmission lines. The plant should be operational by next spring, but it is unclear when the new transmission lines will be ready, or what other work needs to be done to decommission the existing power plant and upgrade the local grid, which residents say is in poor repair. The town meeting featured the usual slew of cranks who took up most of the question and answer time with lengthy non-sequitors and personal advertisements. These inconsiderate bores can be found at every public meeting in the Bahamas, wasting time and spouting nonsense. They especially love to talk about themselves, and they are a boon to officials because they divert so much time and attention from the real issues. Cay Mills, a local taxi driver, said he was glad to see that Abaconians were finally get ting some payback from central government for their taxes. but noted that "we should havea say in whatever is brought into our district. The cart is before the horse with this town meeting. Abaco people read, are intelligent and want to be part of their own future. We want democracy, not an elected dictatorship." It was a sentiment that seemed to be shared by many in the audience, and was aptly illustrated by Dave Ralph in a recent editorial. He quoted the prime minister's comments about someone using the wrong colour to paint the House of Assembly: "You shouldn't allow strangers to come in your place and determine the decor. I don't condemn initiative, but uninformed initiative is not to be tolerated." Well, many folks in Abaco feel the same way about the power plant issue. According to Ralph, "Government and BEC have been negligentabout informing Abaco on this project and in requesting local input." Equally negligent is the fact that there was no public consultation in the EIA process. The power plant assessment contracted to an unknown Florida firm with no website was completed last October but is still under review by the BEST Commission. The EIA for the fuel terminal and pipeline has only just been completed. And no environmental management plan for the plant has been produced, yet construction is well under way. Pericles Maillis likened these concerns to a storm in a teacup: "I was president of the BNT when the Clifton power plant was being expanded and we don't have acid rain in Nassau. These controversies can only hurt the environmental movement. This plant is not a surprise, it's been years in the making and was no secret." But who knows what conditions are at Clifton, or at other BEC plants around the country, when there is no public disclosure and we have only the corporation's self-serving statements to rely on? According to Philip Weech of the BEST Commission, the Wilson City EIA is now under active review with other government agencies, which will determine what needs to be done with the environmental management plan: "Oil tankers in the Bahamas have an enviable safety record," he said. "and there will be no impacts on freshwater resources. Wetlands will be impacted along the pipeline corridor, but we feel that can be safely managed." Meanwhile, BNT officials told me after the meeting that they would be seeking full involvement in the development of the environmental management plan for the Wilson City plant and any monitoring initiatives that will be put in place. And Abaco's homegrown green activists Friends of the Environment said they also want to be involved going forward. "The number of people that attended the public meeting shows not only that the people of Abaco are concerned about what happens in their commu nity but that they want to be involved in the decisions that affect them," Friends executive director Kristin Williams told me. "We hope that the govern ment and BEC move forward in good faith and provide the information necessary to assure the public that the promises they made are being kept." This is not the place for a technical discussion of the merits of using heavy oil as opposed to diesel in a power plant. Suffice it to say that although different spokesmen cited varying figures at the meeting using diesel fuel would add millions to the annual operating costs, and it is not clear if the envi ronmental benefits would justi fy that. However, it is clear that heavy fuel oil plants require more maintenance than other types of plants and again, BEC's track record is not very inspiring. However, the issue of conventional versus renewable energy, on Abaco in particular, has not been sufficiently explored in my view. Although BEC is being dragged kicking and screaming (by Earl Deveaux, Fred Got tlieb and others) towards a renewable energy future, a national energy policy that would promote these initiatives is nowhere near being implemented. A consultative committee chaired by Philip Weech was formed after the election to build on earlier efforts by the Christie administration. A draft report was completed last November, but has only just been posted to the BEST Commission's website (almost a year later) for public comment. And a Chamber of Commerce meet ing has been scheduled for tomorrow to discuss this with Utilities Minister Phenton Ney mour. Consultants funded by the Inter-American Development Bank have just been hired to evaluate the economic disaster that BEC is now known to be, and to revamp our existing energy regulatory regime. But at this rate, we will all be dead before any effective energy pol icy or fossil fuel reductions can be implemented. There is no doubt that con ventional energy must continue to play a big role in power generation in the Bahamas. But as one woman put it at the town meeting: "We should take a stand for renewable energy, which could brand our island and would attract so much attention worldwide and set a legacy of green change. This government could set a huge precedent in that regard." C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ALBERTHA MILLER Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB ANITA L BURROWS Matthew Town, Inagua ANTONIA LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island BRENDA ADDERLEY CLAUDE LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island CYRIL WILLIAMS I Yellow Elder Gardens 2 CYRIL WILLIAMS II Yellow Elder Gardens 2 DWAYNE DORSETTE EDNA DEAN P. O. Box N-4912 IAN TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 JASON SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive JENNIFER TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 KEVA FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua KOVAN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825The following individuals are asked tocontact Ms. Arnette Rahming (356-8328or Ms. Shamara Farquharson (356-8456LEANDRA PINDER Matthew Town, Inagua MERVIN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825 MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 NASHLAWN CURTIS NESHA JASMINE L CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 NIKITA CURTIS OLIVIA GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 RENDAL COLEBY P. O. Box N-8672 SANSCHIA CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 STAFFORD MILLER Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB STEPHEN FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua VICTORIA SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive WELLINGTON DORSETTE WILFRED GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 BEC and the construction of the Wilson City power plant BEC general manager Kevin Basden

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH so many local associations and federations feeling the financial pinch, Bahamas Olympic Association president Wellington Miller said they may have discovered the answer to their woes. Coming out of a two-day Solidarity meeting that he and one of his vice presidents, Algernon Cargill, attended in Mexico last month, Miller said they have formed a partnership with all of the associations and federations for the way forward. At a meeting of the heads of the sporting bodies last w eek, Miller said they were a ble to advise them of the fact t hat there is sufficient money available from both the International Olympic Association (BOA can Sports Organisation (PASO The Solidarity course have $ 311 million available to help federations and their ath letes,” Miller disclosed. “Not only can we get funding for Olympic athletes, but we can also go to PASO, who have $130 million, for those sports that are not in the Olympics. “We can get moneys for those organisations to help build sports in the Bahamas and to help with their travel when they are sending teamso ff.” M iller, who still serves as the president of the Amateur Boxing Association of the Bahamas, said the only requirement is that the fed erations and associations must submit their plans. “Let us know when you’re going, where you’re going and how much money you need,”M iller said. They want to spend mon ey on helping the sporting bodies. Once they plan it properly and bring all of their information to us in time, we can send off the request for the moneys. But they will have to provide us with the receipts of how the money is spent so that we can continue to tap into the funding that is available.” If all of the paperwork is properly done, Miller said they can have funding available for the sporting bodies from both the IOC and PASO within a month’s time. “It’s just as easy as that because the moneys are available,” he said. Unfortunately, Miller said the plight of the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation, who is still seek ing $19,500 to send it’s 11member team off to Grenada to defend its title at the Central American and Caribbean Championships on September 30, was revealeda little too late for the BOA to seek any funding to assist them. “We want them to apply to us in time so we can help them,” Miller said. “All they have to do is provide us with all your information, filled out the forms, we will send it off and you will have your money. “But you can’t come a week or a month before you are traveling and expect to get the money. There’s a lot of paper work that has to be filed. But it’s amazing the amount of money that is available out there. If they plan it right, they won’t be carrying anymore.” A lot of the countries, espe cially in the Caribbean, are tapping into the Solidarity funds that is being offered by the IOC and the Bahamas is going to take advantage of it too. Miller said not just sports, but the IOC is also providing funding to assist countries with the environment, which helps to make the atmosphere more conducive for the athletes. And he said that funding is also available for scholarships in a number of sports related areas that he hopes that Bahamians will also take advantage of. Today, Miller and Don Cornish, another vice president, will be traveling to Peru, to take part in a two-day seminar on Olympic Tourism. “That’s another avenue of where we can get funding, so we’re going to try and see what is available for the Bahamas,” he said. “We are heavy in tourism, so we will see what is available for us to develop our product.” Miller and Cornish, who doubles as president of the Bahamas Volleyball Federa tion, will return home on Sun day. ‘Not only can we get funding for Olympic athletes, but we can also go to PASO...’ Bahamas Olympic Association president says they may have discovered the answer to local sporting bodies’ financial woes BOA PRESIDENT WELLINGTON MILLER PM pr oclaims September 13-19 Mark Knowles Week sporting icon’s teacher growing up, said he got goose bumps just sitting in the audience when the ceremony took place. “It was so disappointing after they went up one set and they couldn’t hold on for the win,” Knowles said. “It just happened so quickly. But I’m very proud of him, win or lose. He did us proud just being in the final.” Hewitt, an Australian now residing in the Bahamas, said the honour was well deserving for Knowles. “To have played professional tennis on the circuit for 20-plus years is a grind,” Hewitt said. “He’s had a lot of ups and downs, but to be in the top 10 over 10 years is just amazing.” At the US Open in Flushing Meadows, New York, Hewitt got knocked out of the third round of the men’s singles by Switzerland’s Roger Federer, whose bid for a six straight title was ruined by 20-year-old Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina in yesterday’s final. While he has dabbled a bit into doubles, the No.32 ranked player in the world, said he has never had an opportunity to play against Knowles. “But he’s a great player. He’s definitely put the Bahamas on the map worldwide,” Hewitt pointed out. “I think the entire country should really be proud of his accomplishments.” If there was anyone proud of his achieve ments, it was his family. His father, Sammy Knowles, said he’s finally delighted to see his son receive recognition by the Bahamas Government, which was long overdue. “It’s good that finally somebody decided to recognise him for how he has carried this country on his shoulder for so long,” he said. “It’s been a long time. I’m happy that the Prime Minister, the Minister of Sports and the country have finally recognised his achievements.” Vicki Knowles, his most loyal fan, said her son’s achievement will definitely go down as one of the greatest. But as a mother, she noted that there’s mixed reaction whenever she’s in the stands watching a live match, especially when he comes out with a loss. “The losses are difficult because you know what he’s going through,” she said. “It’s not a good feeling. But we try to cheer him up when ever it happens.” And Dawn Knowles, his wife who is now his main cheerleader in the stands, said her husband “loves the Bahamas so much and I’m so glad that he’s finally being recognised for his accomplishments. “He’s been the voice of the Bahamas for so many years and everywhere he goes around the world, the only thing he talks about is the Bahamas. It’s a well deserved recognition for him and I’m happy to be here to share it with him.” P h o t o s b y P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest shares a special moment with Mark Knowles... SPORTS MINISTER Desmond Bannister greets Mark Knowles... PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham greets Mark Knowles’ wife, Dawn...

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S S O O C C C C E E R R C C A A R R I I B B S S I I N N A A C C T T I I O O N N THE College of the Bahamas’ men and women soccer teams are expected to take their third and final trip this weekend when they are set to face Warner College and Webber Col-l ege in Tampa, Florida. The Caribs are scheduled to play Warner College on Friday in the women’s opener at 4 pm, followed by the men at 6 pm. Then on Sunday, the women are set to open up against Webber University at noon with the men playing at 2 pm. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L B B S S C C M M E E E E T T I I N N G G THE Baptist Sports Council is scheduled to hold a meeting on Friday at 6 pm at McDonald’s, Thompson Boulevard, for all churches interested in participating in the 2009 Olympia Morris-Evans Softball Classic. The Classic is tentatively set to get underway on Saturday, September 26 at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. The Classic will comprise of the men, co-ed and 17-and-under divi sions. Also during the meeting, the BSC will disclose plans for the 2009 Nicola Major Track andF ield Classic that is slated to take place on Saturday, October 10, at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadi um. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPORTS IN BRIEF By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Amateur Athletic U nion (AAU the Bahamas. James Parker, the director of sports for the AAU in Orlando, Florida, was in town along with other members to meet with Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond B annister to discuss the plans for the Bahamas. “We have decided to make this one of our districts, so next year we will be bringings ome teams over here,” Parker said. “We want to get more teams and more athletes involved. “We will bring in some programmes to start some leagues here. We will start with basketball first and then we will go on to baseball,t rack and field, volleyball and baseball.” T anya Ferguson, a former basketball player turned referee while she was in the Louisiana area, will be return-i ng home to serve as the Bahamian director. The local programme will be based out of the College of the Bahamas. “We will be doing a lot of regional events, which will be good for the Bahamas,” Ferguson said. “We will have a lot of teams from all over the U nited States and Canada coming here to compete.” T he players involved in the programme will be between t he ages of 12-17. However, there will also be a ponyl eague for players between the ages of 8-12. Bahamas Basketball Federation president Lawrence Hepburn said for years a lot of the coaches in the Bahamas have been longing for the opportunity to expand their programmes. “A lot of the coaches wante d to go to their programmes, now they will have the opport unity to have them come here,” Hepburn stressed. They will only serve to help us. We’re looking at employing the services of their coach es coming in to help us with our programme. We will also have their coaches clinics here and we want to attract some of their tournaments here.” Hepburn said he anticipates only good things coming out of the programme. Our federation will be involved, but we will be r eaching out to a lot of people,” Hepburn stated. “We h ave some coaches here that are already involved in theA AU programme, but we want to get more on board.” With Ferguson coming home, Hepburn said she will b ring a wealth of experience to the programme. Already, coach Mario Bowleg and Darryl Sears, of GrandB ahama, are involved in the Florida-based programme. “We want to also reach out to other sporting bodies because AAU is not just basketball,” Hepburn pointed out. “AAU is a magnet of many sports, so we’re hopingt hat other federations and associations will use this to get more exposure for their sports.” Bowleg said the programme is definitely needed in the country. “We have many high s chool teams leaving here to perform in these AAU tournaments,” Bowleg stressed. “What AAU does is it will a llow us to have the tournaments come here so that our athletes can get the exposure t hat they won’t get because they can’t get to travel. It will help, not only the Bahamas student-athletes as it relates to getting scholarships, but it will help the teams coming to enhance then ational team programme, e specially during the summer period.” Amateur Athletic Union coming to Bahamas BBF 15/16 National Team 2nd Place Finish @ PONY Latin American Caribbean Zone Championships (Highest Finish Ever by a Bahamian National Baseball Team) Team is presently ranked 2nd in the Caribbean PONY BASEBALL. (On this 16 member Team Only 5 young men DO NOT attend school abroad) THE Bahamas Baseball Federation continues to meet its mandate of “Higher Education through the Sport of Baseball”. The BBF had a very successful year on the international baseball scene with its historic defeat (Gurabo World Ranking by 08 PONY Baseball) BBF 2nd Place Finish @ 15-16 PONY Latin American Tournament. But the most outstanding accomplishment this year is the overwhelming number of young men whose lives are being impacted in a positive way with baseball. The BBF membership, its president and his executive team, are extremely proud and excited to announce the 44 young men who have been afforded the opportunity to further their education at various high schools and colleges in the US as a result of baseball. 1) The recent "BBF 7th Annual Andre Rodgers National Baseball Championships", hosted in June 09, was a resounding success on the baseball diamond which continues to afford our talented young men the opportu nity to further their baseball dreams and education: U U S S C C o o l l l l e e g g e e s s P P r r e e s s e e n n t t : : Jackson State Uni versity (JSUHead Coach Omar Johnson / North Carolina Central University (NCCU (Head Coach Dr Henry White Y Y o o u u n n g g m m e e n n o o f f f f e e r r e e d d c c o o l l l l e e g g i i a a t t e e s s c c h h o o l l a a r r s s h h i i p p s s : : Desmond Russell JSU -(Christ School Stand-Out All Conference/All State) lead the Bahamas senior men’s Team: 333 B.A Coach Johnson was an assistant coach on the German National Team and witnessed Desmond's outstanding pitching performance against the US National Team (Held the US to 2 runs after 5 Innings) Aneko Knowles JSU -(Christ School Stand-Out All Conference) Member of senior men's national team Lead the 16-18 National Team (425 BA American Tournament Etienne Farquharson NCCU (Graduate of Pensacola Junior College with Acade mic All-American Honours (3.80 Received a Baseball Scholarship & Academ ic Scholarship to attend NCCU Member of the senior men's national team. 2) The first ever BBF/PONY Baseball 2008 INFORMATIONAL\INSTRUCTIONAL PROSPECT Showcase for High School/College recruiting (hosted Nov 08 whelming success with the following young men being afforded opportunities: Theodore Trae Sweeting Christ School (BBF 2009 Junior Division 13-15 MVP & Recipient of the Charles Johnson Best Catcher Award) Jordon Farquharson Christ School Perez Knowles Rabun Gap U U S S H H i i g g h h S S c c h h o o o o l l s s P P r r e e s s e e n n t t : : Darlington School, Georgia/Christ School, North Car olina/ Christ Church School, Virginia / Rabun Gap, Georgia 3) BBF Coaches Clinic hosted January of this year, which was organised by fourth vice president Etienne Farquharson and conduct ed by Troy State University head coach Bobby Pierce was a great success. Patrick Knowles Jr Troy State 09 grad uate from Christ School in Arden, North Carolina (09 All Conference & All State Honors Richard Bain Palm Beach Community College: Drafted in the 45 Round / 1367 Pick of the Recent Major League Draft Made the tough decision to enter Junior College which still allows him an opportunity to be drafted higher over the next two years (Once players enter a four-year college, they can not be drafted until their Junior (3rd year). Players can be drafted from a Junior College every year of their two-year eligibil ity) The president wishes to thank and congratulate the following persons for making this years 09 entry class so successful: Patrick Knowles (Grand Bahama YMCA Baseball Academy Will Rutherford (Grand Bahama GBLL Stephanie Higgs (Grand Bahama GBABA Etienne Farquharson (Inagua president Terran Rodgers (Nassau Theodore R Sweeting (Nassau V er y successful y ear f or BBF INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays SHOWN (l-rfourth from left with James Parker (fifth from left Wellington Miller and coach Mario Bowleg Photo by Patrick Hanna/BIS

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C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Amateur Athletic Union coming to Bahamas... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net M ore than two decades after he launched his profession al tennis career, Mark Knowles says he never envisioned the response he received from the Bahamas Government. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham proclaimed September 13-19 Mark Knowles Week at a welcome home dinner reception on Monday night at Government House. And he received a citation from Governor General Arthur D Hanna. While he would have won all four Grand Slam titles, albeit in two different doubles categories, this year alone Knowles played in three of those finals, winning the mixed doubles at Wimbledon in July with German Anna-Lens Groenefled. However, the 38-year-old five-time Olympian and his Indian men’s doubles partner Mahesh Bhupathi lost in both the Australian Open in January and the US Open on Sunday. “It feels good, especially coming off the heels of the disappointing loss at the US Open,” said Knowles, who returned home to a “here’s welcome” one day after playing a rain delayed final that had been postponed since Friday. “It’s nice to be here and be honoured by the government. To have all of these dignitaries, along with my family and friends, is very special.” As the country’s most celebrated local and international player continues to look ahead to the future, Knowles said he’s even more inspired to have the support of the nation behind him. “I had a long career and I’ve accomplished a whole lot, but I still feel that there is still a lot more for me to accomplish,” he stressed. “So I’m just going to go ahead and enjoy this moment.” Among those sharing the moment with Knowles was Emile Knowles, his childhood friend who hit balls with him when he got started at age five, along with former number one singles player in the world, Lleyton Hewitt. Knowles, who considers himself to be the PM pr oclaims September 1319 as Mark Knowles Week Not only can we get funding f or Olympic athletes...’ See page 9 P h o t o s b y P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S Bahamian tennis ace receives citation from Governor General during welcome home dinner reception at Government House BAHAMIAN TENNIS ACE Mark Knowles with Governor General Arthur Dion Hanna (centre S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net F uneral homes have seen a d rastic increase in the less expensive cremation option over full burial year-over-year, some e xperiencing an almost 65 per cent increase, Tribune Business was told yesterday, as official figures indicated a 7 per cent increase in New Provi-d ence funeral fees coupled with the r ecession was responsible for the change. In the Department of Statistics' July consumer price index, New Providence f unerals fees increased by 6.6 per cent, while fees in Grand Bahama increased by 7.9 per cent. Many funeral homes were surprised by the change, some saying they were “shocked” to hear that funeral expenses had gone up. M anaging director of Cedar Crest F uneral Home, Audley Fraser, said h is company had not increased its fees in over three years. According to him, despite the i ncreased cost of shipping caskets, the company had tried to absorb the e xpense in order to keep their prices competitive. However, Mr Fraser suggested the rising cost of burial in Grand Bahama and the markedly depressed market may be the reason for that island’s almost 8 per cent increase in funeral expenses. He and other funeral home personn el agreed that the number of families c remating their deceased loved ones h as increased exponentially since 2008. With the cost of a basic funeral pegged at almost $5,000, and a directc remation at about $1,300, persons were opting out of the costly and r apidly declining burial plots. “It has increased drastically,” said a director at Butlers Funeral Home. “I’m doing a lot of cremations.” She told this paper she was busy working on two full funerals, but that the requests for cremations far outweighed that of the traditional funeral and burial. A Secretary at Restview Memorial M ortuary and Crematorium said his c ompany had seen an almost 65 per cent increase in the number of cremations performed at their crematorium. It’s cheaper than having a funeral service,” he said. H e suggested that there have been a lot more deaths recently as well, blaming the increase on an overall decrease in health throughout New Providence. “Cremation is the main solution people resort to these days,” said the Restview secretary. By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE recession bit even deeper into the Bahamiane conomy in July-August 2009 with many businesses reporting year-over-year sales drops of 15-30 per cent, a former Bahamas Chamber of Com merce president yesterday c onfirming that his business had suffered the “most significant” top line decline year-todate last month more than 1 0 per cent. Dionisio D’Aguilar, president of the Superwash laun dromat chain, told Tribune B usiness he “agreed 100 per c ent” that many Bahamian businesses had suffered their worst year-over-year sales per-f ormances to date during those t wo summer months, based on his company’s performance and reports he had heard from other companies. Sales were down significantly in August,” Mr D’Aguilar told Tribune Business. “Overall, my August s ales were down just over 10 p er cent. It crashed through the 10 per cent mark for the first time. In previous months, my sales were trending down 6 p er cent, 7 per cent, 8 per cent month to month. “The most significant drop s o far was in August, for A ugust 2009 compared to A ugust 2008. A lot of people have made mention of that; that August was probably thew orst month yet. And a lawyer f riend of mine said today that July was just appalling. I can concur with that my businessw as down, no doubt about t hat.” A ssessing the reasons for t he summer sales declines, Mr D’Aguilar said many businesses felt large numbers ofB ahamians were continuing to s hop in Florida, despite the recession and corresponding increase in unemployment/reduction ind isposable incomes. As a result, he suggested that both the Government and private sector organisations n eeded to start a full-fledged c ampaign to encourage Bahamians to shop at home, keeping what money was being generated in the local e conomy. “The perception was that the airport was stuffed full of people going to Florida to shop,” Mr D’Aguilar said. People are making their wages here and shooting themselves in the foot. They will argue that prices are too expensive here, but they need to spend in the Bahamas to support local jobs. “Not enough emphasis is being placed by the Govern m ent and organisations like t he Chamber of Commerce on shopping at home. If people are going to the US to shop, there are fewer dollars in the e conomy and less money is circulating, which causes even more disruption. “There should be real e mphasis, a real marketing campaign to say consumers need to stay at home and shop. The situation is going to getw orse before it gets better.” W hat is aiding Bahamian t ravel to the US is the dra matic drop in air fares, as carriers reduce prices to boost load factors at a time whent ravel is reduced during the t ourism season low point. For instance, a return fare to Mia mi on American Eagle now costs less than $200, some $98 plus $90 in taxes. I haven’t flown for under $ 200 on American Eagle for a long time,” the former Chamber president observed. Mr D’Aguilar said retailers w ere among the businesses who had seen the sharpest downturns in July and August, something they believed had n ot been helped by a shorter Back-to-School season. Archi tects and engineers were also seeing a shortage of work, withc ompanies who still had liquid a ssets and the ability to borrow p lacing all projects on hold. “All we’re hearing is doom and gloom,” Mr D’Aguilar said. “We need something big,a nd maybe this Baha Mar t hing is big enough to give people a glimmer of hope, but that’s still a long way off.” * Former finance minister ‘rather frightened’ at recommendations for more aggressive NIB investments * Warns of potential assetliability mismatch, and drain on foreign reserves/pressure on exchange rate if more NIB assets placed as banking system deposits B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A FORMER finance min ister yesterday said he was “rather frightened” by recommendations suggesting that the N ational Insurance Board (NIB vate pension fund, as this could ultimately destabilise t his nation’s monetary system and create pressure for a devaluation of the Bahamian dollar. Both NIB’s eighth actuarial review and the 2005 Social Security Reform Commissionr eport have urged a more aggressive stance on NIB’s investments, including limiting the proportion of invest-m ent assets held in government and public sector securities, but James Smith said such an approach had created the first “financial crisis” he faced when taking over as Central Bank of the Bahamas gover nor in the 1980s. N IB traditionally has a mul ti-million dollar sum on d eposit with the Central Bank at the end of each month, the Commission’s report noting that this averaged $91.1 million over the 12 months to December 2004. No interest is earned on this at all. However, Mr Smith said that soon after taking over as governor, the decision was tak en to put these surplus NIB assets to better use by placing them in the commercial bank By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor AN attorney will this week write to all government agen cies involved in the permitting process for BEC’s $105 million Wilson City power plant to demand that his Abaco-based clients be involved in “meaningful consultation” on the project, with moves for a Supreme Court injunction to follow if construction recommences. Fred Smith, a Freeportbased partner in the Callenders & Co law firm, also warned that he would launch a Judicial Review challenge in the courts similar to the one he instigated against Dis covery Land Company’s Bak er’s Bay Golf & Ocean Club project on Great Guana Cay, which has reached the Privy Council if BEC attempted to have the necessary con struction permits “rubber stamped and retroactively applied” so the power plant could proceed. Accusing successive governments of failing to heed the warning given by the Guana Cay situation, when it came to following statutory and due process and consulting with all affected parties, Mr Smith said both the Christie and Ingraham administrations had “put the cart before the horse” when it came to the BEC power plant. Arguing that the Govern ment had delivered “a slap in the face” to democratic institutions and their processes through their handling of the Wilson City project, the Callenders & Co partner said the administration itself had been responsible for generating opposition by its decision to “proceed clandestinely, secretly and without permits”. Informing Tribune Business that he represented a number of Bahamian and foreign homeowners on Abaco, Mr Smith said of his clients: “They are up in arms about C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.25 $4.16 $4.26 Judicial Review threat to $105m power plant Attorney set to demand meaningful consultation on BEC project for clients, and seek possible injunction to stop work S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B ‘Destabilisation’ fears on change to NIB strategy S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B DIONISIO D’AGUILAR Businesses see 15-30% summer sales decr eases Recession drives 65% cremation increase Cheaper option much in vogue, as $1,300 fee much less than $5,000 for full burial * July and August worst year-over-year comparisons for many Bahamian firms, as Superwash’ s chief confirms top line decline ‘crashed through 10% for first time in August’ * Return air fares fall below $200 to Miami

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the lack of consultation through the local government process, or through the permitting processes of central government agencies. This is probably the single largest capital expenditure by government in Abaco.” The Wilson City power plant project was instigated under the former Christie administration, which initially looked at a site at Snake Cay. That was ultimately rejected, due to its proximity to a planned National Park and environmentally/ecologically sensitive area, Wilson City being chosen as the alternative. Criticising both governments for their failure to involve Abaconians in the consultative process beforec onstruction started, Mr Smith said this had created negative instead of positive energy in the community’s attitude towards the Wilson Cay plant. “Instead, they proceeded clandestinely, secretly, without permits, not giving information.... They put the cart before the horse,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business. “This all goes back to issues of central government feeling it can do what it wants in the Out Island colonies. It is Nassau treating the Family Islands as if they have no say.I t is a central government dictatorship once again. “Generally, government departments go ahead with their development plans before they get permits. This is something that should not happen. It’s a slap in the face to democratic institutions. It demonstrates that statutory mechanisms for local government permitting, health and safety, the environment, are meaningless. This is a repeat of the Guana Cay fiasco, andI beg the FNM to proceed differently in the future.” Dr Earl Deveaux, minister o f the environment, acknowledged in this newspaper yesterday that government departments and utilities often went ahead with their development/construction plans without first obtaining the necessary permits and approvals, unlike private developers, who were required to go through the proper processes and channels. W hen asked why the Gove rnment appeared not to have l earnt anything from the Guana Cay case and public reactions to other controversial developments, Mr Smith replied: “I don’t think they’re slow learners. They haven’t learnt at all.” What is surprising is that the Government would again risk incurring the wrath of Abaconians, a generally welleducated population well aware of their rights and statutory processes, given what had happened with the Guana Cay development. Pointing out the hypocrisy of requiring private developers to abide by the laws and statutory processes, when government departments were not, Mr Smith said: “The Government is not a law unto itself. Each department, statutory authority, BEC and BTC, are statutory corporate institutions that are subject to the law like any private devel oper.” The Government appears to have anticipated Mr Smith’s possible legal challenge to the Wilson City power plant’s continued con struction, having placed all building on hold until the necessary permits and approvals are obtained. The Callender’s & Co partner said he had been instructed by his clients to write to all the relevant government departments and agencies objecting to the lack of consultation, and request that they now be involved in a meaningful process. Failing that, Mr Smith said he would seek a Supreme Court injunction to prevent construction on the Wilson City power plant from proceeding until all the required permits were in place and hisc lients “had an opportunity to participate in a meaningful consultative process”. “It’s a question of the process by which the permits were applied for, considered and approved,” Mr Smith said, adding that the issue went beyond the permits themselves. “If they simply rush to get the permits rubber-stamped and retroactively applied, s uch permits will be chall enged under a Judicial R eview,” he said. “In the 21st century Bahamas, it is high time that government institutions respected the relevant laws and processes.” Mr Smith said he and his clients would soon have to assess whether work on the Wilson City power plant had stopped, as the Government had said. He told Tribune Business that the last time he went to the site, he was barred from entering, and a row with security guards broke out after he subsequently started taking photos outside the fenced-off site. To prevent such situations from occurring again, Mr Smith said it was incumbent on all private and public sector developers to “be accountable and transparent, provide the information and interact with a meaningful consulta tion process”. He added that while BEC’s general manager, Kevin Basden, had asserted at last week’s Town Meeting that three Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs conducted on Wilson City, this was relatively meaningless if local residents were not given an opportunity to comment, and their concerns made a part of the process. His clients’ main concerns, Mr Smith said, were the loca tion of the power plant; whether Bunker C fuel was the correct one and the implications arising from its use; whether government had properly explored wind, solar and other alternative energies; and environmental and health and safety issues. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Board The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas The National Insurance Board (NIB b ank deposits.To facilitate this, the NIB is requesting that vendors provide the necessary banking information. Forms will be distributed to vendors for completion. If you do not receive one, please contact us at one of the following to obtain a copy of the form: 1.APBankinginfo@nib-bahamas.com 2.Telephone No.: (242 3.Collect a Form from any New Providence NIB Local Office The NIB requests the cooperation of all vendors as we seek to provide more efficient service. All information will be treated as strictly confidential. Notice to Vendors Z ZZZZZZZZ. Are you putting y our clients, or potential clients, to s leep? Or are they excited to see you and talk with you? Are you losing their attention on calls? Or when you are sitting in front of them? If you have not asked this question, now is a good time to do so. If your client is not involved in the conversation or not asking you questions, then they are not engaged. P P u u t t t t h h e e c c a a r r i i n n g g e e a a r r If your client is not engaged then you’re not going anywhere. Just like a car sitting there with the engine running, yet you have not put the car in gear. I recently read an article where a p rofessional asked a client about s ales people. His reply was that “sales people are boring”. They basically came in, sat down, asked routine questions like: ‘How are you?’ (when they really don’t care on about their business and/or themselves and then ask for business. BORING! Yeah, I would be bored myself.... zzzzzzzzzzzz. I’m actually already half asleep. H H o o w w t t o o k k e e e e p p a a c c l l i i e e n n t t s s a a t t t t e e n n t t i i o o n n ! ! I wrote about this before. Ask questions. Remember my maxim: Why? Why? Why? Why? Who? Who? Who? What? What? GET THE POINT YET? Focus the attention on your client and not yourself. Stop boring people to tears. Ask the Ws’ (discussed in previous article). Put yourself into your clients shoes a nd see how it feels. Think about w hat it feels like to be on the other end of that conversation, in which s omeone is just talking about thems elves it is BORING ! That is how b uyers feel when salespeople pitch instead of ask questions. So how do you do this? How do you avoid putting people to sleep? By the way, if you do put people to sleep, I know some people who are sleep deprived and could use your servic.es SIMPLE, ask questions, shut up and listen. OK, article finished. I’m not a sleep therapist. All of these marketing strategies are certain to keep your business on top during these challenging economic times. Have a productive and p rofitable week. R emember: “THOSE WHO M ARKET WILL MAKE IT “ N N B B : : S S c c o o t t t t F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n i i s s p p r r e e s s i i d d e e n n t t o o f f S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e , , a a p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l a a n n d d m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g c c o o m m p p a a n n y y s s p p e e c c i i a a l l i i s s n n g g i i n n u u n n i i f f o o r r m m s s , , e e m m b b r r o o i i d d e e r r y y , , s s i i l l k k s s c c r r e e e e n n p p r r i i n n t t i i n n g g a a n n d d p p r r o o m m o o t t i i o o n n a a l l p p r r o o d d u u c c t t s s . . E E s s t t a a b b l l i i s s h h e e d d o o v v e e r r 2 2 7 7 y y e e a a r r s s a a g g o o , , S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e h h a a s s a a s s s s i i s s t t e e d d B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s e e s s f f r r o o m m v v a a r r i i o o u u s s i i n n d d u u s s t t r r i i e e s s i i n n m m a a r r k k e e t t i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . R R e e a a d d e e r r s s c c a a n n c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M r r F F a a r r r r i i n n g g t t o o n n a a t t S S u u n n T T e e e e E E m m b b r r o o i i d d M M e e o o n n E E a a s s t t S S h h i i r r l l e e y y S S t t r r e e e e t t , , o o r r b b y y e e m m a a i i l l a a t t s s c c o o t t t t @ @ s s u u n n t t e e e e . . c c o o m m o o r r b b y y t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e a a t t 2 2 4 4 2 2 3 3 9 9 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 4 4 . . Don’t sleep on client attention P romotional Marketing by Scott Farrington Judicial Review threat to $105m power plant F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. FRED SMITH F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE NATIONAL Insurance Board (NIB with is prosecution of several prominent Bahamian companies owing collectively more than $1.2 million yesterday, with some of those companies already settling their arrears incrementally over time. Jones Communications CEO, Wendall Jones, pleaded guilty to owing NIB $430,000 in delinquent contribution payments. The company has since paid back almost $100,000 of the $180,000 needed to met NIB’s settlement threshold. Attorney for NIB, Heather Maynard, told the court that her company would be happy to negotiate the liquidation of Jones Communications’ remaining amount after they have paid off 40 per cent of their arrears almost $180,000. Global United chief exevutive, Jackson Ritchie, has been charged with owing NIB $161,079.98 in unpaid contributions. Mr Ritchie has also entered into negotiations with NIB to make incremental payments on the total amount owed in arrears. Both Mr Jones and Mr Ritchie are expected back in court to continue settlement arrangements on November 17. Also expected back in court are owners of the radio stations More 94 FM and Spirit (92.5 FM Saunders. They have been charge with owning NIB $256,262 in outstanding contributions. Ms Maynard revealed that the men had paid $43,000 thus far of the total amount owed. Solomon's Mines managing director Mark Finlayson, who was charged with owing NIB $377,092.90 in contributions between June 2007 and December 2008, and pleaded guilty to the charges, failed to appear in court yesterday. Consequently Magistrate Lasalle issued a bench warrant for his arrest. Mr Finlayson's staff have also complained that the company has been delinquent in paying salaries for several months this year. He has previously blamed the economic downturn for late pay cheques. A bench warrant was also issued for the owner of Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs, Mervin Sweeting, who has been making payment on his delinquent NIB contribution, but failed to show up for the hearing. NIB has constantly said it regrets having to take legal action against companies, but maintain it is a last resort to negotiating payment arrangements. NIB contends that legal action is a last resort for pastdue contribution collections, suggesting it is only imposed when “they (employers to take advantage of the relatively generous option of entering into installment agreements to resolve arrears”. As the economic crisis bore down on businesses, however, NIB imposed an amnesty period to delay the application of interest on those installment agreements. The eighth actuarial review tabled in Parliament alongside the 2008 Annual Report revealed that the future value of NIB's expenditure could exceed reserves in the long term. However, NIB is confident that changes in administration of the fund will allow for it meet its long term challenges. “Presently, the fund is meeting all its obligation,” the report said. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r !%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** NIB proceeds with $1.2m prosecutions

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ing system, the theory being that they would generate better investment returns as bank deposits. While this may have been the case, Mr Smith explained that apart from creating an asset-liability mismatch between short-term bank deposits and NIB’s long-term liabilities, this strategy also expanded the money supply and created an unsustainable credit boom by expanding funds available for lending. With much of these funds going on imports, it led to an i mmediate drain on the Bahamas’ foreign exchange reserves, imposing pressure on this nation’s fixed one:one e xchange rate with the US dol lar and raising at least temporarily the risk of devalua-t ion. In fact, in the 1980s when I took over the Central Bank, that was when we had our first financial crisis,” Mr Smith, now CFAL’s chairman, told Tribune Business yesterday. “The reserves went down by $ 100 million to $200 million in the first couple of months. Everyone brought cars in and government revenues went up, but after that we had trouble meeting our foreign commitments.” As a result, Mr Smith said any change in NIB’s investment and asset allocation strategies should not be made in isolation, but instead discussed thoroughly with the Ministry of Finance and Central Bank as the managers of t his nation’s fiscal and monet ary affairs respectively. No decision could be taken in a vacuum. “In our case, when we put [ the NIB funds] in the system, it immediately went to imports, so many of your reserves are gone,” Mr Smith said. “It could destabilise your monetary system, reduce foreign reserves and put pressure on the exchange rate, whichc ould lead to devaluation. “I’m really frightened by looking at NIB as a private fund,” he added, urging that the Bahamian social security system be viewed from a national development pers pective. Explaining that the Fund was “a safety net for the Government”, Mr Smith said hav ing a large percentage of the Crown’s assets owned by NIB was a distinct advantage if it ever came to a government debt restructuring. “Government has a huge debt to NIB, and if you run into repayment say a bond falls due you can restructure much easier than if you went to a foreign bank,” the former minister of state for finance under the Christie administrat ion said. T he lack of diversified investment options in the Bahamian market remained painfully obvious at year-end 2 008, with $651.35 million or 43.5 per cent of NIB’s invested assets being held in Bahamas Government Registered Stock. NIB’s eighth actuarial report revealed this was similar to the position attained in2 006, when 56 per cent of NIB's then-$1.35 billion investment portfolio was held in government securities, such as government-registered stock and Treasury Bills. According to the report, s ome 24 per cent of NIB's assets were then invested in short-term securities, such as Certificates of Deposit (CDs and Treasury Bills, with 98.6 per cent of all investments concentrated in the Bahamas. Not surprisingly, the eighth actuarial report concluded: "With such heavy concentration in several areas, the investment portfolio is not well diversified. "As a result, the overall Fund is relatively high risk with return expectations that do not justify the current level o f risk. " It is therefore recommended that gradual reductions be made to the proportions held in Bahamas Gove rnment, quasi-government securities and short-term investments, and that the position held overseas be increased gradually to around 20 per cent." The eighth actuarial report found that between 2001 and2 006, the NIB enjoyed an average 6 per cent yield on its investments, and a 5.5 per cent yield on its reserves. But with inflation averaging 2 per cent per annum over that period, the real rate of return o n reserves was 3.5 per cent. And the report by the Social Security Reform Commission, appointed by the former Christie administration, noted that returns on NIB's reserves, due to declining interest rates, had fallen from 10 per cent in 1983 to below 6 per cent in 2003. The Commission's report noted the "severe and imprudent mismatch" between the maturity date of NIB's assets and liabilities, with some 35 per cent of investments in lowyielding, short-term Treasury B ills and deposits as at D ecember 2004. With long-term liabilities being matched by short-term assets, the report warned: " This enormous mismatch places significant long-term risk upon the long-term viability of the National Insurance Fund, as it is presently structured." At the point the Commission's report was written, in2 005, it said NIB was faced with "re-investment risk", asa result of needing to find new investment opportunities for maturing investments in a market where interest rates were declining. " Stated another way, only 24 per cent of NIB's invest ment portfolio has a maturity of 10 years or more, yet it is known that more than 86 per cent of liabilities and commitments extend more than 10 years," the report said. "In the fiscal year 2004, some $60 million of invest ments are due to mature, not including $350 million of bank deposits and Treasury Bills that will also need to be renewed." The Commission again made the point that the NIB Fund had "too great an exposure" to the Bahamian commercial banking system and the Government through its limited investment options, something that impacted its ability to negotiate better rates of return if its funds were not n eeded. T his "systematically disadvantaged" NIB, as the funds either end up being placed at lower rates or are left sitting i dle at the Central Bank. At end-December 31, 2004, NIB had $83.2 million on deposit at the Central Bank of the Bahamas, earning no interest, with the previous month-end balances for the previous 12 months averaging $91.1 mil-l ion. "If these funds were invested, incremental income of $4.5 million could have been derived," the report said. "At an average of $250 per month, that incremental interest i ncome alone could have paid the annual pension of 1,500 pensioners." The Commission report said NIB was exposed to major country risk due to the fact all its investments were concen trated in the Bahamas, and with $460 million investments tied to Bahamian Prime, the Fund was exposed to even small changes in interest rates. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV /HJDORWLFH127,&( ,QROXQWDU\/LTXLGDWLRQf1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWWKHDERYHQDPHG &RPSDQ\LVLQGLVVROXWLRQZKLFKFRPPHQFHGRQ GD\RI6HSWHPEHU7KH/LTXLGDWRU $UJRVD&RUS1DVVDX %DKDPDV N N I I B B , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B T HE Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB launched the process to recognise an outstanding 2009 graduate from within the School of Business, College of the Bahamas. This initiative has been a joint venture by BFSB, the College of the Bahamas, and the Central Bank of the Bahamas since 2002, with the co-ordinating and selection committees comprisi ng representatives from the three sponsoring agencies, plus the Professional Industry Assoc iation Working Group (PIAWG body for the various financial services industry-related associations here in the Bahamas. The Student Award programme is an integral component of BFSB’s ongoing Financial Centre Focus (FCF gramme, which addresses issues such as challenges impacting the sustained growth and development of the industry; improvem ents to the level of service; and attracting and maintaining qualified professionals. T his week, the selection committee will be completing interviews with the finalists, who will be announced shortly. The 2009 Student of the Year will be recognised at BFSB’s Annual Industry Excellence Awards Ceremony on October 22. Again this year, SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas come on board as sponsor of the FSI Student of the Year Award, while Credit Suisse’s Nassau b ranch is supporting the student awards programme as a contributor. B FSB gears to launch top graduate choice Pictured are members of the 2 009 FSI Student Award select ion committee in advance of the i nterviews with candidates, the final step in the selection process. Left to right (seated are Joan Pinder, former chairSchool of Business, College of the Bahamas; Karen Lockhart, College of the Bahamas; KimB odie, Bahamas Institute of F inancial Services; and Anastacia J ohnson, Association of International Banks & Trust Companies in The Bahamas. Standing are: Renee Barrow, SG Hambros Bank & Trust; Cyprianna Bethel, Central Bank of the Bahamas; Nadine Frazier, Insurance Institute of the Bahamas; and Nicole Pratt-Rolle, Society of Trust & Estate Practitioners. Selection Committee members not pictured include: MarioS mith, Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers, Roger Brown, Bahamas General Insurance Association; Zelma Wilson, Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants; and Jeremy Dyck, CFA Society of the Bahamas.

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C High: 90F/32C High: 90 F/32 C High: 88 F/31 C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32C High: 89F/32C Low: 80F/27C High: 91F/33C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 90F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 78F/26C High: 88 F/31 Low: 76F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 87F/31C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 91F/33C Low: 76F/24C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY,SEPTEMBER 16 TH , 2009, PAGE 9B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny with a thunderstorm in spots. Patchy clouds with showers. Clouds and sun with a thunderstorm around. Some sun with a t-storm possible. Periods of sun, a t-storm possible. High: 89 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 88 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, t-storms . High: 89 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 80 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 89F 99-85F 94-86F 98-83F 95-83F Low: 80 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 78 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.33" Year to date ................................................29.67" Normal year to date ....................................34.86" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Sep. 18 Sep. 26Oct. 4Oct. 11 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:56 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:13 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 4:32 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 5:42 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 5:07 a.m.3.211:20 a.m.0.3 5:36 p.m.3.611:58 p.m.0.3 6:02 a.m.3.412:17 p.m.0.1 6:27 p.m.3.6----6:53 a.m.3.612:45 a.m.0.0 7:15 p.m.3.51:10 p.m.0.0 7:41 a.m.3.71:31 a.m.0.0 8:01 p.m.3.42:01 p.m.0.0 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco93/3379/26pc90/3279/26pc Amsterdam65/1850/10pc65/1849/9pc Ankara, Turkey73/2247/8pc72/2245/7s Athens82/2768/20s84/2870/21pc Auckland64/1755/12pc65/1852/11s Bangkok89/3178/25sh89/3178/25t Barbados86/3078/25t87/3077/25pc Barcelona71/2161/16s69/2061/16sh Beijing86/3063/17s88/3161/16s Beirut81/2776/24s80/2674/23pc Belgrade84/2863/17pc85/2961/16r Berlin75/2355/12s72/2254/12pc Bermuda81/2775/23sh82/2774/23pc Bogota66/1848/8r65/1843/6r Brussels68/2054/12c70/2152/11s Budapest83/2863/17pc77/2559/15r Buenos Aires68/2052/11c66/1852/11c Cairo96/3571/21s93/3371/21s Calcutta94/3485/29sh93/3382/27sh Calgary84/2848/8s78/2543/6sh Cancun93/3377/25s91/3276/24s Caracas83/2873/22t84/2873/22t Casablanca77/2559/15s77/2558/14c Copenhagen65/1850/10s65/1849/9pc Dublin61/1645/7s63/1745/7pc Frankfurt72/2257/13pc75/2355/12pc Geneva 64/17 56/13 sh 68/2056/13pc Halifax 60/15 48/8 pc 64/17 50/10 s Havana 91/32 73/22 t 88/31 72/22 sh Helsinki 63/17 46/7sh57/1345/7pc Hong Kong 88/31 81/27 t 91/32 82/27s Islamabad 103/39 74/23 s 102/38 74/23 s Istanbul77/2564/17s78/2563/17s Jerusalem 81/27 62/16s75/2363/17t Johannesburg 84/2853/11pc84/2852/11pc Kingston 86/3075/23t88/3178/25sh Lima70/2158/14s71/2158/14pc London70/2154/12pc68/2052/11pc Madrid75/2350/10pc68/2050/10t Manila90/3277/25t88/3177/25sh Mexico City75/2355/12t77/2555/12t Monterrey99/3773/22s91/3270/21pc Montreal66/1846/7s68/2050/10s Moscow66/1848/8pc63/1746/7sh Munich71/2154/12pc72/2255/12c Nairobi88/3156/13pc88/3157/13pc New Delhi 95/3577/25s97/3679/26s Oslo63/1743/6pc57/1345/7pc Paris68/2057/13sh72/2255/12r Prague 75/23 52/11 sh 78/25 53/11 s Rio de Janeiro77/2568/20s79/2670/21pc Riyadh102/3876/24s103/3976/24s Rome 73/22 66/18 t 77/25 64/17 pc St. Thomas87/3079/26sh87/3078/25pc San Juan67/1950/10c65/1847/8r San Salvador 88/31 70/21 t 86/30 73/22 t Santiago 64/1748/8pc63/1743/6pc Santo Domingo91/3273/22pc85/2972/22sh Sao Paulo 76/24 60/15 pc 75/23 63/17pc Seoul77/2557/13pc79/2661/16s Stockholm 64/17 45/7 pc 57/13 43/6 pc Sydney 77/25 59/15 pc86/3059/15pc Taipei91/3282/27t93/3383/28s T okyo 81/27 68/20 s 79/26 66/18 s T oronto 66/1854/12s66/1856/13pc Trinidad97/3673/22pc95/3577/25pc V ancouver 68/20 54/12 r 67/1953/11pc Vienna 75/2362/16pc73/2259/15sh W arsaw 74/23 56/13 s 75/23 55/12 pc Winnipeg 81/27 57/13 pc 76/2454/12s H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NNE at 4-8 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles85F Thursday:SSE at 7-14 Knots1-2 Feet7 Miles85F Today:NE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles86F Thursday:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles86F Today:NE at 6-12 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles84F Thursday:SE at 6-12 Knots2-4 Feet6 Miles84F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque74/2356/13t72/2255/12t Anchorage58/1447/8sh59/1547/8c Atlanta80/2667/19t80/2668/20t Atlantic City72/2258/14r67/1958/14r Baltimore73/2261/16r70/2164/17r Boston61/1649/9pc64/1755/12c Buffalo67/1952/11s68/2053/11r Charleston, SC88/3171/21c86/3071/21c Chicago76/2454/12s76/2450/10s Cleveland70/2156/13s72/2255/12c Dallas81/2767/19t81/2767/19t Denver76/2450/10pc82/2750/10s Detroit72/2252/11s76/2456/13pc Honolulu89/3175/23s89/3175/23s Houston88/3172/22t90/3270/21t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis78/2559/15pc78/2557/13pc Jacksonville88/3172/22t87/3072/22t Kansas City84/2858/14pc80/2656/13s Las Vegas97/3670/21s99/3775/23s Little Rock78/2568/20r80/2667/19r Los Angeles82/2764/17pc84/2864/17pc Louisville80/2665/18r78/2563/17r Memphis80/2668/20r80/2669/20r Miami91/3278/25t90/3279/26t Minneapolis79/2658/14s78/2560/15pc Nashville80/2665/18r80/2665/18r New Orleans86/3073/22t85/2972/22t New York69/2058/14r66/1862/16r Oklahoma City82/2764/17r83/2862/16t Orlando92/3375/23t92/3375/23t Philadelphia72/2259/15r69/2061/16r Phoenix 99/37 75/23 s 99/3778/25s Pittsburgh72/2256/13pc69/2058/14r Portland, OR 76/2456/13pc75/2353/11pc Raleigh-Durham 84/28 65/18 c 80/26 65/18 c St. Louis82/2763/17pc81/2762/16pc Salt Lake City 83/28 60/15 pc 87/3060/15s San Antonio 90/32 69/20 pc 90/32 68/20 pc San Diego75/2365/18pc77/2565/18pc San Francisco 73/22 58/14 pc 75/2356/13pc Seattle72/2254/12pc72/2253/11pc T allahassee 89/3172/22t86/3071/21t T ampa 90/32 77/25 t 89/31 75/23t Tucson94/3467/19s93/3369/20s W ashington, DC 76/24 64/17r71/2164/17r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T -storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter F INDIN G a restaurant that offers good ole’ t asty Bahamian food at an affordable price is seemingl y r ar e these days. Perhaps you may have overlooked one sit-in dining spot that has been around for 20 years...Checker’s Cafe. Checkmate FOR NEW CHECKERS RESTAURANT The restaurant chain just welcomed another location into the family on Joe Farrington Road last Thursday. The new location offers quality Bahamian food in a comfortably modern and clean environment for you and your family to enjoy meals at a reasonable price of around $10 per person. For breakfast, lunch, and dinner, the menu choices are endless. And from what we sampled, the food tastes just like what your grammy wouldcook on Sunday. From peas n’ rice with barbecued ribs and baked chicken, to delicious curry chicken dinners-your nose will be intoxicated with the smells of these freshly cooked Bahamian delights. Dine inside the restaurant, and let the sweet sounds of Bahamian artists serenade your ears, then take in the creative artworks of Rudy Williams plastered on the dining room walls. But back to the food. White rice, peas n’ rice, and bean n’ rice are served everyday, and the choices of meat are unpredictable, as they switch things up quite often. Bite into barbecue ribs that are seasoned to the bone, but no too salty--just the right flavour. What’s more is that the menu isn’t limited to a specific meal choices, restaurant manager Nadia Sumner told Tribune Taste. For example she explained : If you’re tired of rice, you can choose from three choices of hot vegetables. Side orders are the usual Bahamian options of cheesy macaroni with a kick of spicy flavour, and plantains. The bean soup has the right consistency of dumplings, beans and ham meat, and the chicken souse has everything you want if you prefer a milder dish. If you are in the mood for fish try grouper fingers or minced turbot (which by the way is excellent. meat options include pork chops, baked chicken, ribs, steamed ham, stew beef, or oxtail-just to name a few-It can’t get more Bahamian than that. For desert, get your fix of cheese cake. There are 5 kinds to choose fromblueberry, pumpkin, mango, guava, pineapple. They say that if you’ve never had it, you are definitely missing out. New on the menu is the Family Meal, which serves 4-6 persons, a perfect choice for the “after five customer “exhausted from work, who doesn’t want to have to cook a full meal. The new location is the only restaurant with this option. For $30.50, you can get a family meal that serves four persons, with rice, three sides, and a choice of meat. At $45.50, a six-mem ber family can eat rice, four sides, and a choice of meator half and half it. “We made this option open for that father on his way home from work that doesn’t want his wife to cook, and that mother who wants her chil dren to have a full nutritious meal, but is too tired to prepare it,” Mrs Sumner said. The drive-thru is opened at nine in the morning for the customer on the run. With their efficient serving strat egy, the friendly staff will assist in getting your order out on time. Mrs Sumner said that so far the crowd has been great and people have been receptive, especially on the weekends. “I think they’re just excited for once to have a sit down restaurant with Bahamian food.” “On Saturday a guy brought in a bus load of tourists. All of them came in, sat down, and ate in less than 30 minutes. To be able to have people come in on short notice with no problem is remarkable,” she explained. Store hours for the Joe Farrington Road location are 6:30am to 9pm. At present, the location closes on Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 11pm. Mrs Sumner said they are “feeling the area,” to see what customers want before finalising a closing time. “We have no magic oven or prepackaged ingredients to stick in the baker, and in 20 minutes it’s ready,” said Mrs Sumner. “At the end of the day, we produce freshly cooked Bahamian meals with no preservatives. That’s what our customers can expect.” BAKE Chicken, peas n' rice, pork chops and other menu favorites. AN appetizing spread of Checkers lunch menu. CHECKERS friendly staff.

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e 1. Renowned Bahamian artist Max Taylor will officially launch his latest col-l ectionPaperwork:1960 1992 at a cocktail reception at the National Art G allery of the Bahamas (NAGB b er 18 at 6.30pm. The event is being held under the patronage of PrimeM inister Hubert Ingraham and Mrs Delores Ingraham. R SVP by today at 3285800/1. On Thursday, Sept ember 24, Mr Taylor will hold an exhibition walkthrough at the gallery. Hew ill also talk about his early career and his special f acility for woodcuts. The cost for this event is $3. 2 . D octor’s Hospital will continue its distinguished f ree lecture series tomorrow night when psychiatrist Dr Brian Humblestoned iscusses child obesity. The presentation begins at 6 pm in the hospital’s conference room. Free blood pressure, glucose and cho-l esterol tests will take place between 5-6 pm. Please RSVP as seating is limited at 302-4603. 3 . T he National Art Gallery of the Bahamas will s how the Academy Award winning animated feature Wall-E tomorrow evening.M ade in 2008, it is a story about a garbage collecting r obot who is left to clean up the mess after the earth is abandoned because it isc overed with trash. Wall-E falls in love with a sleek, dangerous robot sent back to earth to see if life is once again sustainable.T he movie will air at 8pm. 4. Dolphin Encounter’s project Beach in partners hip with the Bahamas National Trust will hold a clean-up campaign of B onefish National Park Cowpen Rd on Saturday. The Bahamas will be one of 120 countries taking part in the 2009 International Coastal Clean-Up Day. Per sons wishing to participate should wear long pants and closed in-shoes and bring gloves, insect repellent, sun block and person al water bottles. The Beach Clean-up can also be counted as community ser vice hours. Bring commu nity service forms to be signed. Starts at 9 am. Contact Tanya Moss at 363-7180 or tanym@dolphinencounters for further details. 5. Roadmasters will hold a special walk to benefit the Aids Foundation on Saturday morning beginning at 4.30 am. It takes place from East Bay Street to Blake Road. Participants can chose from 10 miles or 20 miles, but organisers say it is not a race-walk or run at your own pace. The entry fee is $20. Call 3417306 or 427-2391 for fur ther details. 6. Artists from around the country will hold a special concert on Arawak Cay on Saturday in an effort to combat crime. The artists hope to get their message across through music, poetry drama and the visual arts. The event takes place between noon and midnight. Performers will include Ronnie Butler, Kenyattta Taylor, Ricardo Clarke and Sammie Starr. The Fort Charlotte Community Centre, Sea Grape Fes tival and Mark Cartwright are amoung those coordinating the event. things 2 DO By J EFFARAH GIBSON T HE beauty of Andros will be on display to thousands of international viewers when the SyFy channel features the island on its show Destination T r ut h t his e v ening. The idea of this unscripted Syfy channel (previously the SciFi channel) series focuses on Josh Gates and his team of investiga tors traveling to destinations around the world, uncovering the truths about mythical creatures. In tonight’s episode, investigators explored the blue holes of Andros believed to be the dwelling place of legendary mythical sea monsterthe shark jaw octopus tentacle sea monster Lusca. In addition to extensive footage of the islands natural beauty, some of the island’s most famous attractions will also be highlighted as will a segment on making batik and androsia fabric. Bahamas Production Coordinator Heather Carey, and Peter Douglas, head of the Andros Tourist Office, Community Leader, and “expert” mythologist worked closely with the Destination Truth crew during their five day stay. According to Ms Carey, this is one of many films shot in the Bahamas, her company is involved in. There are two more underway, one film that was shot in Long Island which will air sometime in October, and one that will be shot in Bimini, air date not yet announced. “The skinny dip” is the title of the fun film shot in Long Island. “This is a fun film and we have already gotten reactions from people, because they think the film is based on people swimming naked” say Mrs Carey. “The skinny dip” is a Canadian travel show which will be aired in Canada and all over Europe. This show also highlights and captures the beautiful scenery of the island. “In this film the beautiful attractions of the island of which some Bahamians have not seen will be shown” she said. The girl in the film travels through the island and ends up on an adventure which takes her to all the attractions on the island. Mrs Carey believes that these films will shine a positive light on the individual islands as well as the rest of the Bahamas. “The most important thing is to highlight the islands of the Bahamas showing the interesting scenes, and appeal to a broader spectrum of tourist.” She also wants the Bahamian people to become more involved with the films. “We want the Bahamian people to be apart of the films as well. They were a little cautious, but in the future we want them to be more comfortable and interactive during filming” she said. Bahamian cable viewers can watch Destination Truth this evening at 10pm on channel 21. Andros Island highlighted in quest to find MY THIC AL BEAS T REGGAE artist Ricardo Clarke performed in Abaco last week visiting several churches and schools to give motivational talks and interviews. He also gave a free concert in Sandy Point organised by Kingdom Dub Entertainment which was designed to give the island’s youth a message of peace and unity. Ricardo performed alongside fellow artistes Ryan Jupp, Solo, Mr Beeds and DJ Counsellor. He also spoke at several schools including Forest Heights High School, St Francis High School (where he gave a special presentation to the principal,) SC Bootle High School and JA Pinder Primary School and visited Sandy Point AOG, Change Ministries and the Friendship Tabernacle. Ricardo Clarke makes an impact on Abaco RICARDO CLARKE motivates students during a recent visit to Abaco. HOST Josh Gates with Small Hope Bay Lodge owner Jeff Birch (right PETER Douglas and the Syfy Crew. HEATHER Carey (Production Coordinator), Jeff Birch (Small HOpe Bay Lodge), Josh Gates (host).

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NEW YORK IT LOOKSlike Kanye West has finally given a personal apology to Taylor Swift, according to the Asso ciated Press . Representatives from “The View” say West called the country sensation after her appearance on Tuesday’s show. During the broad cast, the 19-year-old singer said West had yet to contact her to apologize for hijacking her acceptance speech on the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday. “He has not personally reached out or anything but if he wanted to say hi (I would After Swift’s comments, West called her and the two spoke, according to a statement from “The View.” “After the show he spoke per sonally to the country music superstar via telephone and has apolo gized to the 19-year-old singer. She has accepted Mr. West’s apology. The contents of the phone call are to remain private,” it read. It’s the latest in the saga that has caused a national uproar. The drama began after Swift beat out Bey once and other acts to win best female video at the VMAs for her hit “You Belong With Me.” Swift, the first country act to win at the VMAs, was exuberant after her win, but that moment didn’t last long as West known for his awards-show meltdowns grabbed the microphone and declared that Beyonce’s “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” was one of the “best videos of all time.” A shaken Swift did not finish her speech at that moment, but when Beyonce later won for video of the year, she brought Swift out so that she could have her moment. When asked about the incident during her appearance on “The View,” Swift said: “I’m not gonna say that I wasn’t riled by it. I had to perform live five minutes later so I had to get myself back to the place where I could perform.” However, she said she was gratified by the outpouring of support not only from fans, but also from celebrities and others who offered support immediately after the inci dent occurred. “There were a lot of people around me backstage that were saying wonderful, incredible things and just having my back,” she said. “I just never imagined that there were that many people looking out for me.” West has taken a drubbing since then. While he issued two apologies on his blog after the incident, he gave another, emotional one on Monday’s premiere of “The Jay Leno Show.” “It was rude, period,” West said. ... I need to, after this, take some time off and just analyze how I’m going to make it through the rest of this life, how I’m going to improve.” West calls Taylor Swift after ‘View’ appearance SINGER Kanye West takes the microphone from singer Taylor Swift as she accepts the "Best Female Video" award during the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009 in New York. J a s o n D e C r o w / A P P h o t o L OS ANGELES PATRICK Swayze personified a particular kind of masculine grace both on and off screen, from his roles in films like “Dirty Dancing” and “Ghost” to the way he carried himself in his long fight with pancreatic cancer, according to the Associated Pres . Swayze died from the illness on Monday in Los Angeles, his publicist said. He was 57. “Patrick Swayze passed away peacefully today with family at his side after facing the challenges of his illness for the last 20 months,” Annett Wolf said in a statement Monday evening. She declined to give details. Fans of the actor were saddened to learn in March 2008 that Swayze was suffering from an especially deadly form of cancer. He continued working despite the diagnosis, putting together a memoir with his wife and shooting “The Beast,” an A&E drama series for which he had already made the pilot. Swayze said he chose not to use painkillers while making “The Beast” because they would have taken the edge off his per-f ormance. The show drew a respectable 1.3 million viewers when the 13 episodes ran this year, but A&E said it reluctantly decided not to renew it fora second season. When he first went pub l ic with the illness, some reports gave him only weeks to live, but his doc tor said his situation was “considerably more optimistic” than that. Swayze acknowledged that time might be running out given the grim nature of the disease. “I’d say five years is pretty wishful thinking,” Swayze told ABC’s Barbara Walters in early 2009. “Two years seems likely if you’re going to believe statistics. I want to last until they find a cure, which means I’d better get a fire under it.” And that’s exactly what he did. In February, Swayze wrote an op-ed piece in the Washington Post titled, “I’m Battling Cancer. How About Some Help, Congress?” in which he urged senators and representatives to vote for the maximum funding for the National Institutes of Health to fight cancer as part of the economic stimulus package. ’Dirty Dancing’ star Patrick Swayze dies at 57 Patrick Swayze NEW YORK PRESIDENTBarack Obama’s candid thoughts about Kanye West are provoking a debate over standards of journalism in the Twitter age, according to the Associated Press . ABC News says it was wrong for its employees to tweet that Obama had called West a “jackass” for the rapper’s treatment of country singer Taylor Swift. The network said some of its employees had overheard a conversation between the president and CNBC’s John Harwood and didn’t realize it was considered off the record. The network apologized to the White House and CNBC. Harwood had sat down with the president to tape an interview following his appearance on Wall Street on Monday. Although they are competitors, CNBC and ABC share a fiber optic line to save money, and this enabled some ABC employees to listen in on the interview as it was being taped for later use. Their attention was drawn to chatter about West, who was widely criticized for interrupting Swift as she accepted an award at Sunday’s MTV Video Music Awards to say that Beyonce deserved it. E-mails shot around among ABC employees about Obama’s comments, said Jeffrey Schneider, ABC News spokesman. Before anything was reported on ABC’s air or Web site, at least three network employees took to Twitter to spread the news. One was Terry Moran, a former White House correspondent. He logged on to Twitter and typed: “Pres. Obama just called Kanye West a ’jackass’ for his outburst at VMAs when Taylor Swift won. Now THAT’S presidential.” When ABC News authorities found out about it, they had the tweets deleted after about an hour, Schneider said. Moran declined a request to comment. But the news was out. Harwood said there was no explicit agreement with the president that those comments were off the record. But he said it is broadcast tradition that such pre-interview chatter is considered off the record until the formal interview begins. Harwood is holding to that: He would not discuss what the president said before their interview and has no plans to do so on CNBC. He said he was aware that it was likely someone outside of CNBC was listening to his conversation with the president. President’s opinion of Kanye West sparks debate IN THIS June 17, 2009 file photograph o riginally provided by ABC News, ABC News' Terry Moran is shown at the Treasury Department in Washington. Randy Sager/ AP Photo WASHINGTON T HE LODGEroom of the Naval Masonic Hall is a col orful and somewhat inscrutable sight for the nonmember, with its blue walls, Egyptian symbols, checkered floor in the center and high ceiling painted with gold stars, according to the Associated Press . Countless secrets supposedly have been shared in this and thousands of similar rooms of the Masons around the world. Facts of life have been debated, honors bestowed, rituals enacted. You would need to belongto a lodge to learn what really goes on. Or you could simply ask. “The emphasis on secrecy is some thing that disturbs people,” says Joseph Crociata, a burly, deep-voiced man who is a trial attorney by profession but otherwise a Junior Grand Warden at the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the District of Columbia. “But it’s not a problem getting Masons to talk about Masonry. Sometimes, it’s a problem getting them to stop.” Despite all the books and Web sites dedicated to Freemasons, the Masonic Order has been defined by mystery, alluring enough to claim Mozart and George Washington as members, dark enough to be feared by the Vatican, Islamic officials, Nazis and Communists. In the United States, candidates in the 19th-century ran for office on anti-Mason plat forms and John Quincy Adams declared that “Masonry ought forever to be abolished.” And now arrives Dan Brown. Six years after Brown intrigued millions of readers, and infuriated schol ars and religious officials, with “The Da Vinci Code,” he has set his new novel, “The Lost Symbol,” in Washington and probed the fraternal order that well suits his passion for secrets, signs and puzzles. Brown’s book, released Tuesday, has an announced first printing of 5 million copies and topped the bestseller lists of Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble online. At Kramerbooks in Washington, about two dozen copies were purchased the morning it went on sale and the store expects to easily sell out its order of 150 books. In “The Lost Symbol,” symbolist Robert Langdon is on a mission to find a Masonic pyramid containing a code that unlocks an ancient secret to “unfathomable power.” It’s a story of hidden history in the nation’s capital, with Masons the greatest puzzle of all. Brown’s research for “The Da Vin ci Code” was highly criticized by some Catholics for suggesting that Jesus and Mary Magdalene conceiveda child and for portraying Opus Dei the conservative religious order as a murderous, power-hungry sect. The Mason response could well be milder. Brown goes out of his way in “The Lost Symbol” to present the lodge as essentially benign and misunderstood. Masons are praised for their religious tolerance and their elaborate rituals are seen as no more unusual than those of formal reli gions. The plot centers in part on an “unfair” anti-Masonic video that “conspiracy theorists would feed on ... like sharks,” Langdon says. “I have enormous respect for the Masons,” Brown told The Associated Press during a recent interview. “In the most fundamental terms, with dif ferent cultures killing each other over whose version of God is correct, here is a worldwide organization that essentially says, ‘We don’t care what you call God, or what you think about God, only that you believe in a god and let’s all stand together as brothers and look in the same direction.’ “I think there will be an enormous number of people who will be interested in the Masons after this book (comes out Freemasons await Dan Brown novel ‘The Lost Symbol’ JON HOWELLS, press officer for Waterstone's booksellers, poses for the cameras as he reads a signed copy of US author Dan Brown's new book 'The Lost S ymbol ' in London Monday Sept. 14, 2009. The book will go on sale to the public worldwide on Tuesday Sept. 15, Howells will spend the night reading the book and give a review as the first copies are sold in London at 0700 Tuesday morning. A l a s t a i r G r a n t / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter F INDIN G a restaurant that offers good ole’ t asty Bahamian food at an affordable price is seemingl y r ar e these days. Perhaps you may have overlooked one sit-in dining spot that has been around for 20 years...Checker’s Cafe. Checkmate FOR NEW CHECKERS RESTAURANT The restaurant chain just welcomed another location into the family on Joe Farrington Road last Thursday. The new location offers quality Bahamian food in a comfortably modern and clean environment for you and your family to enjoy meals at a reasonable price of around $10 per person. For breakfast, lunch, and dinner, the menu choices are endless. And from what we sampled, the food tastes just like what your grammy wouldcook on Sunday. From peas n’ rice with barbecued ribs and baked chicken, to delicious curry chicken dinners-your nose will be intoxicated with the smells of these freshly cooked Bahamian delights. Dine inside the restaurant, and let the sweet sounds of Bahamian artists serenade your ears, then take in the creative artworks of Rudy Williams plastered on the dining room walls. But back to the food. White rice, peas n’ rice, and bean n’ rice are served everyday, and the choices of meat are unpredictable, as they switch things up quite often. Bite into barbecue ribs that are seasoned to the bone, but no too salty--just the right flavour. What’s more is that the menu isn’t limited to a specific meal choices, restaurant manager Nadia Sumner told Tribune Taste. For example she explained : If you’re tired of rice, you can choose from three choices of hot vegetables. Side orders are the usual Bahamian options of cheesy macaroni with a kick of spicy flavour, and plantains. The bean soup has the right consistency of dumplings, beans and ham meat, and the chicken souse has everything you want if you prefer a milder dish. If you are in the mood for fish try grouper fingers or minced turbot (which by the way is excellent. meat options include pork chops, baked chicken, ribs, steamed ham, stew beef, or oxtail-just to name a few-It can’t get more Bahamian than that. For desert, get your fix of cheese cake. There are 5 kinds to choose fromblueberry, pumpkin, mango, guava, pineapple. They say that if you’ve never had it, you are definitely missing out. New on the menu is the Family Meal, which serves 4-6 persons, a perfect choice for the “after five customer “exhausted from work, who doesn’t want to have to cook a full meal. The new location is the only restaurant with this option. For $30.50, you can get a family meal that serves four persons, with rice, three sides, and a choice of meat. At $45.50, a six-mem ber family can eat rice, four sides, and a choice of meator half and half it. “We made this option open for that father on his way home from work that doesn’t want his wife to cook, and that mother who wants her chil dren to have a full nutritious meal, but is too tired to prepare it,” Mrs Sumner said. The drive-thru is opened at nine in the morning for the customer on the run. With their efficient serving strat egy, the friendly staff will assist in getting your order out on time. Mrs Sumner said that so far the crowd has been great and people have been receptive, especially on the weekends. “I think they’re just excited for once to have a sit down restaurant with Bahamian food.” “On Saturday a guy brought in a bus load of tourists. All of them came in, sat down, and ate in less than 30 minutes. To be able to have people come in on short notice with no problem is remarkable,” she explained. Store hours for the Joe Farrington Road location are 6:30am to 9pm. At present, the location closes on Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 11pm. Mrs Sumner said they are “feeling the area,” to see what customers want before finalising a closing time. “We have no magic oven or prepackaged ingredients to stick in the baker, and in 20 minutes it’s ready,” said Mrs Sumner. “At the end of the day, we produce freshly cooked Bahamian meals with no preservatives. That’s what our customers can expect.” BAKE Chicken, peas n' rice, pork chops and other menu favorites. AN appetizing spread of Checkers lunch menu. CHECKERS friendly staff.