Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.243

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www .tribune242.com

MONDAY, SE

PTEMBER 14, 2009

‘T left him in hed asleep, .
it was the fast time |
Would see my hoy alive

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A TEN-YEAR-OLD dis-
abled boy died after being
trapped in his bedroom as
flames ripped through his
family's home.

Wheelchair-bound Jer-
maine Mackey was sleeping
in a bedroom while his moth-
er Anastacia Hepburn dashed
out to a nearby food store for
groceries shortly around 8.30
am yesterday morning.

When she returned to their
tiny apartment in Colony Vil-
lage about half an hour later,
she came face-to-face with
every mother's worst night-
mare — a fire-engine parked
outside her smoking home
and the news that her oldest
boy was dead.

"T left him in the bed sleep-
ing not knowing that was the
last time I would ever see
him,” Ms Hepburn, 34, told
The Tribune before breaking
down into tears outside the
charred remains of her home
yesterday.

Boyfriend Rodney Minnis,
37, was at home with Jer-
maine and the couple's four-
year-old child when the
tragedy struck.

He said he nodded off in
the living room sofa with the
four-year-old next to him
watching television as Jer-
maine slept in the bedroom.

Mr Minnis said seemed like
minutes later when the
youngest boy woke him with
screams of 'Daddy! Fire!’

He said his first instinct was
to rescue the four-year-old
and said when he returned for
Jermaine the small home was
engulfed with sickening, black
smoke and huge orange
flames "galloping" along the
ceiling.

Unable to get into the bed-
room, he left to find a neigh-
bour to help - but the thick
smoke and hot flames barred
their entry.

"I can't believe this happen
- I standin’ here - but I can't
believe this happen,” Mr Min-

SEE page 10

36x72
Executive
Desk
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el wi |



ahead with
controversial
$150 million
power plant

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Government is to press
ahead building the controver-
sial $150million Wilson City
power plant on Abaco as con-
cerns linger about its affect on
the environment.

State Minister of Environ-
ment Phenton Neymour says
he is confident the Government
has laid to rest nearly all the
fears on the issue after officials
met with concerned citizens at a
packed town meeting on the
island.

Mr Neymour told The Tri-

SEE page nine

5

Quiznos

TORUS i
HUTS TCL

LOCAL educators
should replay the speech
US President Barack Oba-
ma gave last week on edu-
cation to inspire Bahamian
students, Tribune colum-
nist Sir Ronald Sanders
has urged.

Mr Obama's speech -
broadcast in American
schools last Tuesday -
encouraged students to
strive for their best in the
classroom and to take
responsibility for their
educational careers.

"We can have the most
dedicated teachers, the
most supportive parents,
and the best schools in the
world and none of it will
matter unless all of you

SEE page 10



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





MARK KNOWLES (AP)

KNOWLES AND BHUPATHI
LOSE IN US OPEN FINAL

MARK KNOWLES and
doubles partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi had to settle for runners-
up spot at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York
yesterday.

The pair fell to Lukas
Dlouhy and Leander Paes who
won the final 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.

¢ SEE SPORTS
ON PAGE 12 FOR
FULL STORY



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Inmate
dies after

prison
cell fight

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AN INMATE has
died following a fight
in a cell at Her
Majesty's Prison.

Police are investi-
gating the "suspicious"
death of 55-year-old
Lloyd Allan Albury
who died in hospital
less than a week after
being imprisoned ona
vagrancy charge.

According to a brief
statement released by
the Ministry of Nation-
al Security, Albury was
involved “in an inci-
dent with other
inmates in a cell” at
Her Majesty’s Prison
on Fox Hill Road.

Police yesterday
could not provide
details into Albury's
injuries and said his
death would remain
classified as "suspi-
cious" until an autopsy
could be performed.

"We launched an
investigation on Friday
and a team of investi-
gators went to the
prison to uncover the
circumstance of his
injuries. We are going
to do a lot more work
tomorrow, and we are
going to request an
autopsy,” said head of
the homicide squad

SEE page nine



Police set to
make decision on
teacher accused

of sex assault

POLICE officials could
decide today on how to pro-
ceed against a male teacher
accused of sexually assaulting a
16-year-old student.

While remaining tightlipped
on the investigation, ASP Leon
Bethel said yesterday he
expects to speak with the
Attorney General’s office
about the matter.

The teacher was taken into
custody late last month for
questioning pending further
investigations by police.

It is alleged that in late
August, he drugged and later
assauted a male student who
attends the senior high insti-
tution.

The student reportedly com-
plained to another teacher
about the matter, which caused
the school to contact the
police.

This latest case of molesta-
tion is just the latest in a trou-
bling trend that has spread
across the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Education,
through its minister Carl
Bethel, has vowed to protect
children at all schools, pledging
to bring any sexual perpetra-
tors to justice.

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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LOCAL NEWS



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Man dies after scooter
crashes into parked car

A MAN believed to be in his twenties
died Friday night after his scooter crashed
into a parked car.

The man was riding a XY-150 scooter
north on West Street, near the Greek Ortho-
dox Church, when he lost control and
crashed into a parked Honda Civic.

The accident happened at about 9pm on
Friday.

EMS personnel pronounced the man dead
at the scene. The victim was wearing short
beige trousers, a white T-shirt and white
tennis shoes . Heis described as 6ft 2ins tall.

Police are investigating.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Officers come |

under fire
after chase

POLICE officers came :
under heavy gunfire early Sun- }
day morning following a brief ;

chase in the Fox Hill area.

According to reports, }
mobile division officers were }
on patrol through Step Street, }
Fox Hill, when they saw two }
men in a red Nissan Sentra act- }
ing suspiciously. The vehicle }
sped off as police approached, }
resulting in a brief chase which :
ended through a dead end cor- :

ner just off Step Street.

The occupants of the car }
exited the vehicle, firing shots :
at the officers as they fled. :
None of the officers were }
injured but the police car sus- }
tained damages from gunshots. }

Man in custotly
after loaded
handgun found

A MAN was taken into
police custody after police }
discovered a loaded 9mm i

handgun in his truck.

Drug Enforcement Unit }
officers were on Tonique
Williams Darling Highway at }
about 7pm on Friday when }
they stopped the driver of a }
black 1998 Chevy truck. The }
vehicle was searched and offi- }
cers discovered a 9mm hand- }
gun with five live rounds of }

ammunition inside.

The driver of the truck, a }
37-year-old of Prince Charles }
Drive, was arrested and taken }
into custody. He could :
appear in court today to face :

weapons charges.

The National
Workers
Group meeting

THE National Workers }
group will host a town meet- }
ing on Thursday to assist peo- }
ple with financial challenges. }

Don Saunders, of law firm }
Graham Thompson & Co, }
radio personality Orthland }
Bodie Jr, and Sonia Hamil- }
ton, chairman of National }
Workers Board of Directors, }

are slated to give remarks.

The meeting, to be held at :
Workers House, on Tonique ;
Williams Darling Highway, }
will begin at 7pm under the }
theme “How do you stop }
financial institutions from }

harassing you”.
The event is free.

Huge pythons

Captured in two

Florida cities

m APOPKA, Fla.

WILDLIFE officials are
putting the squeeze on giant ;
pythons in Florida, according to }

Associated Press.

Friday, officials seized }
Delilah, an 18-foot-long, 400 }
pound python who fed on rab- }
bits in an Apopka-area back- }
yard. Concerns about Delilah’s }
size and whether the chain-link }
cage she was in was secure }
enough to contain her prompt- }
ed the visit from the Florida }
Fish and Wildlife Conservation ;

Commission.

Delilah was removed and }
brought to a caregiver with a }
permit to handle large snakes. }
Officials are trying to deter- ;
mine whether the owner has }
the proper permit. Earlier in }
the week in Lakeland, officials }
uncovered two large pythons, }
an 11-foot-long male and its }
female companion, a 17-footer i
weighing more than 150}

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Miss Grand Bahama ‘was stripped.
of her title and responsibilities’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

“We are saddened that we
were forced to dethrone Miss
Hudson, however, we would
have preferred in our tradition-
ally fashion to have a graceful
changing of the guards.

“Miss Hudson is instructed
to immediately cease all refer-
ence to and the further use of
the title of Miss Grand Bahama
2009, in all forms of media
including press conferences,
Facebook and Myspace web-
sites. We wish Miss Hudson, the
best in her future endeavours.”

The organisation said Miss
Severe will complete the
2009/2010 reign and represent
the island in China at the Miss
Friendship International
Pageant in October.

She will also travel to Colom-
bia in January 2010, to repre-
sent the Bahamas in the Miss
Coffee International Pageant.

Miss Severe inherits, among a
whole list of prizes, a full schol-
arship to attain an associate
degree in any discipline of her
choice from Terreve College.

role models for all women,
young and old, alike and are
held at higher standard during
their 12-month reign.

“We do understand the pres-
sures that are associated with
the higher standards of being
Miss Grand Bahama, but that is
why all of our contestants are
vetted and during the six-month
training and preparation for the
pageant they are made fully
aware of what is expected of
the Queen.”

The organisation further stat-
ed that the title of Miss Grand
Bahama and the Miss Grand
Bahama crown and sash are the
property of the Miss Grand
Bahama organisation.

“No queen by being crowned
acquires any rights to retain the
crown or use the title Miss
Grand Bahama or any promo-
tional material as photos,
videos, publicity material etc,
in any endeavours, public or pri-
vate, without the written per-
mission of the president at his
sole discretion.

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THE Miss Grand Bahama
beauty pageant organisation has
announced that Garrelle Hud-
son was stripped of her title and
responsibilities.

Miss Hudson, 19, told the
media last week that she relin-
quished her title over what she
described as “management
issues.”

She also claims she has not
received any of her prizes.

But according to a press
release issued by the organisa-
tion, a new queen was appoint-
ed on Friday to replace Miss
Hudson.

First runner-up Nikki Severe
has now assumed the title of
Miss Grand Bahama 2009/10.

According to the organiza-
tion, Miss Hudson “failed to
cooperate with the organiza-
tion”.

It went on: “The Miss Grand
Bahama beauty pageant organ-
isation places great emphasis on
total cooperation and the abid-
ing of all pageant rules and reg-
ulations.

“We were very disappointed
that Miss Hudson failed to
cooperate with the organisation
and refused to abide byAwith the
organizations rules, regulations
and expectations. As a beauty
queen, our representatives are

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GARRELLE HUDSON was crowed Miss Grand Bahama in March







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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Unity of national purpose needed

WHEN A BOAT is sinking the crew will
put aside their differences in the common
interest of survival and, shoulder-to-shoul-
der, bail until they reach safe harbour.

Today the world community is that boat
and only those countries will recover whose
citizens understand that their only hope is in
unity of national purpose. This is when oppo-
sition parties have to realise that a “loyal”
opposition only opposes that which it sin-
cerely believes is not in the best interest of
the country. It becomes a major part of the
problem when it opposes just for the sake of
opposing. When its politicians believe that
the end justifies the means and those means
can include unfair character assassination
and lies.

Again to return to our sinking ship, it’s
like having the crew bailing to save the ship,
while one or two of their mates are in the
stern, busily drilling more holes to sink her.

This is the type of politics we see in the
Bahamas, and even more alarmingly so in
the United States since the election of Pres-
ident Barack Obama. We say alarming,
because it is of great concern to the
Bahamas, whose future prosperity depends
upon America’s recovery from a world reces-
sion triggered by the uncontrolled financial
greed of Wall Street — a street that history
will record in ignominy.

America is looked up to as the leader of
the free world. However, as we see the spec-
tacle of its “loyal” opposition, putting its
politics before the country, those nations
that depend upon America’s rapid recov-
ery have much to fear. Before us we see a
spectacle of political dishonesty, scare mon-
gering and partisanship to an extent that
threatens America’s position as a world
leader.

Meanwhile, Americans are losing their
jobs, their homes and their security. So are
Bahamians, and for the same reason — a
world recession. Yet we have an opposition
politician in our midst who well knows why
businesses are belt tightening, and citizens
are jobless, yet will say, with his irritatingly
smug smile, that this country’s unemploy-
ment figures add to the “mounting evidence
of the fundamental failure of the Right Hon
Hubert Ingraham as Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.” According
to him, Mr Ingraham is better at winning
elections than governing the country.

Would he say the same about President
Obama whose country’s unemployment fig-
ures continue to climb? And if not, why not?

Can you imagine a Southern Republican
Senator in a fight over health care saying
that “if we’re able to stop Obama on this, it
will be his Waterloo. It will break him”?

The nation is at economic risk, but instead
of concentrating on the real problems, they
are busy trying to break a new president
before he is even given a chance to govern.
The Republicans complain about big gov-

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ernment and heavy debt, forgetting that it
was their party that bequeathed to the new
administration a $1.3 trillion deficit, the
largest in the nation’s history.

But the fight, and lies told by politicians to
block President Obama’s inspiring speech
for delivery to school children last week,
was the most shocking of all. His speech was
designed to encourage young people to stay
in school, take responsibility for their learn-
ing “and put in the hard work it takes to
succeed.”

Many schools refused to air his speech, a
speech that all children should have heard.
Many parents kept their children from
school, because the opposition spread the
false alarm that it was “fascist,” “Hitler
indoctrination,” and “socialist” among many
other things. The political viciousness con-
tinued and was swallowed hook, line and
sinker by the nation’s gullible and ignorant.
Really it was a frightening spectacle.

But most disconcerting of all was the views
of the Florida GOP chairman who did not
want his children to hear the “vision” of
their president. In other words he wanted to
control what they saw and what they heard.
It seems that his children missed a wonder-
ful civics lesson, and he, as a parent, passed
up a golden opportunity to have a discussion
with them on the parts of the speech with
which he disagreed. That is how children
learn.

But if America’s youth are to go through
life with blinkers attached by their parents to
shield them from another man’s point of
view, then indeed, if America is to retain its
position as world leader, the world is in a lot
of trouble. No wonder on BBC’s HardTalk
Thursday evening President George Bush’s
former national security advisor, in dis-
cussing what went wrong in the Iraq war,
had to admit to Stephen Sackur that the
Americans had “to confront an enemy” they
did not understand. And they probably did-
n’t understand Iraq, because, despite Amer-
ica’s strength and wealth, its people on the
whole remain insular, nursing only their own
point of view, and many stupidly shielding
their children from even exploring another
man’s ideas, opinions and culture.

And today many Americans are afraid of
the views of their new President because he
is an international man. He has lived among
and listened to the points of view of many
other nationalities. He listens, he reasons
and he understands. That is why other
nations show far more appreciation for him
than do his fellow Americans. Unlike the
majority of his countrymen his mind encom-
passes broader horizons. In fact he is a
breath of fresh air. We are certain if he were
before the BBC’s Stephen Sackur Thursday
night he could never have made the embar-
rassing admission that he took his country to
war against an adversary he did not under-
stand.


















es

we

eile

Number of clerics
who oppose death
penalty is worrying

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The growing number of
“men of the cloth” advocating
elimination of the death penal-
ty is worrying. They seemingly
do so more from a humanistic
rather than a biblical perspec-
tive.

Progressive thinking, human-
istic, liberal clerics have steered
the church far from biblical
teaching. It is because of such
progressive, humanistic, liberal
thinking that an openly gay
Anglican priest, living in
“union” with his male mate, has
risen to the high office of bish-
op of the church. Moreover, the
fact that notwithstanding his
lifestyle, the bishop was elected
by other bishops of the church
speaks volumes to the perva-
sive extent to which depravity
engulfs the church today.

In an article on the subject
of the death penalty which I
wrote sometime ago, I noted
words with import similar to
the following: “Those opposed
to the death penalty generally
argue that capital punishment
does not deter or prevent an
individual intent on committing
murder from doing so. I pre-
sume they argue from the
standpoint of various studies
on the subject, studies albeit
carried out in someone else’s
jurisdiction rather than ours no
doubt. I don’t intend to argue
otherwise, at least not just yet.

In my earlier article I had
noted that those who focus on
the issue of deterrence surely
miss the point.

The primary purpose of cap-
ital punishment is not to pre-
vent murder any more than the
principal reason of a fine or
incarceration is to prevent any
other form of criminal behav-
iour.

Retribution, recompense if
you will, extracting from an
offender pay-back similar in
degree to the individual's trans-
gression, is the genesis, the
foundation forming the basis
for imposition of a sentence.
The punishment must fit the
crime.”

The death penalty is the ulti-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



mate punishment. It fits the
most egregious of crimes, snuff-
ing out of another’s life.

In my article I also commu-
nicated that proponents and
opponents of capital punish-
ment are so firmly entrenched
in their positions that what I
had to say likely would not
have had much bearing on their
views.

I nevertheless offered a per-
spective which I pronounced to
be somewhat unique and, to a
degree, erudite. I noted that
both the Old Testament and
the New Testament spoke in
clarion clear terms to the issue
of the punishment fitting the
crime. The ultimate punish-
ment, the surrendering of one’s
life, clearly fits the ultimate
crime, the wilful, deliberate,
premeditated taking of anoth-
er’s life.

Laws of the Old Testament
characterize appropriate pun-
ishment as an "eye for an eye,
a tooth for a tooth." In the New
Testament Jesus described it
thusly: "With which measure
ye mete it shall be measured to
you."

Liberalist, modernistic, so-
called progressive thinking New
Testament scholars seek to lim-
it Jesus’ words of “giving back
in equal measure”, to the dis-
pensing of rewards only. I
regard such limitation as being
reflective of intellectual deprav-
ity for surely the dispensing of
punishment (by the appropri-
ate authority), is inherent in the
words uttered.

The second argument
advanced by opponents of the
death penalty, is the possibility
of someone being wrongly con-
victed and punished.

Why limit discourse to the
death penalty? The wrongful
conviction and punishment of
anyone for any crime is abhor-
rent. Do we therefore have the
courts dispense with the impo-
sition of all penalties? God for-

bid. While wrongful convic-
tions can and no doubt do
occur, though with significant
infrequency, I doubt anyone
has the gumption to suggest
courts should discharge every
case that comes before them
because such a risk exists.
Moreover, capital cases by their
very nature receive far more
review than other cases. Hence,
the risk of erroneous judgment
is minimized.

As to the finality of imposi-
tion of the death sentence, I
previously offered the following
perspective from a good rev-
erend gentleman: "Death is a
phase not finality. It is temporal
rather than terminal."

In closing out my previous
note on this subject I opined
that I subscribe to the view that
lawlessness begets lawlessness.
I also noted that lawlessness
may arise from acts of commis-
sion as well as acts of omission
and that the state’s failure to
carry out the capital punish-
ment statute on our law books
might be considered an act of
lawlessness thus begetting the
lawlessness which has become
so prevalent, so rampant in our
once quaint, God-fearing
nation.

Earlier, I suggested that I
did not intend to immediately
argue the merits or otherwise of
the efficacy of capital punish-
ment serving as a deterrent to
murder.

The opportunity is now pre-
sented to study the subject in
a local context.

Murder statistics over the
past seven to eight years that
capital punishment has been
pending is a given. The oppor-
tunity now presents itself for
similar statistics to be looked
at once capital punishment is
resumed.

The opportunity exists. It
ought to be embraced without
delay. "Carpe diem.”

MICHAEL R. MOSS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

June 29, 2008.

What could Bahamas government he thinking?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is facing its
worst recession in many years
with businesses having to
down size and families hav-
ing to cut back wherever pos-
sible to make ends meet.

Rumour has it that cash
flow is hard to come by for
the government, leading to
cut backs in some interesting
places, yet the country opens
a consulate office in Atlanta,
Georgia.

According to the Bahamas
Information Services, the fan-
fare was wonderful. It appears
that no expense was spared.

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Politicos were flown in along
with The Grand Bahama
Youth Choir and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Bands
(Pop and Marching) to enter-
tain the crowd.

I’m sorry, but I'd be will-
ing to bet dollars to donuts
that this expenditure cannot
be justified, particularly dur-
ing these tough economic
times.

The former government in
its ultimate wisdom opened
an Embassy in Cuba, at
tremendous expense, at a
time when they had already
strained relations with our
largest trading partner, and
now this government opens a
representative office, at sig-
nificant expense, when the
country is suffering under the
toughest economic times in
decades.



I realise that governments
think not raising a budget for
expenditure is saving money,
but what could the Bahamas
Government be thinking?

The government at least
owes the Bahamian people a
detailed report of their rea-
sons for this office, along with
an accounting of how they
spent taxpayer money.

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5





Woman questioned over the
drive-by shooting of man, 22

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
woman over the drive-by shoot-
ing of a 22-year-old man in Sun-
shine Park.

ASP Leon Bethel said the
woman, who he described as
middle-aged, was taken into
police custody on Saturday
morning.

“We have interviewed a
number of persons and we have
in our custody a woman who
we are questioning,” ASP
Bethel said.

According to initial police

reports, it was just after 10am
on Friday when 22-year-old
Degario Knowles and another
man were sitting on a wall of a
house on Winward Isles Road
when a green Honda Inspire
drove up and its occupants
opened fire.

As Mr Knowles made a dash
to escape the attack, a gunman
emerged from the back seat of
the car and continued shooting.

Mr Knowles reportedly stag-
gered several feet into a neigh-
bouring yard, managed to hop a
backyard fence before collaps-
ing — leaving a large trail of
blood behind him. The death
pushed the nation's murder

LOCAL NEWS

count to 59.

Meanwhile, just hours after
the Sunshine Park murder,
police were called to the scene
of another incident in the
neighbourhood.

At around 1.30am on Satur-
day, police received reports that
aman was firing shots and had
threatened a woman friend.

Police searched a house in
Garden Hills and found a hand-
gun and ammunition. A 24-
year-old man was taken into
custody.

ASP Leon Bethel said police
are certain the incident was not
connected to the murder of Mr
Knowles.

US AMBASSADOR- Nal CALLS ON BAHAMAS IN WASHINGTON

|



AMBASSADOR-DESIGNATE Nicole Avant (right) is pictured with Rhoda Jackson, Charge D'Affaires, the

Bahamas’ Embassy in Washington.

THE United States' ambassador-designate to
the Bahamas Nicole Avant plans to promote lit-
eracy in children as well as continuing the fight
against illegal drug and weapons trafficking dur-

ing her tenure in this country.

During a courtesy call on Rhoda Jackson,
Charge D' Affaires, at the Bahamas' Embassy in

Washington, DC,

Ms Avant said she was "deeply honoured" to
be the first African-American woman ambas-

Rosetta St.

sador to the Bahamas.

She added that she was passionate about men-
toring local schoolchildren, and wants to pro-
mote ‘Read To Lead’, a literacy program in

Bahamian public schools which grew out of an ini-

tiative started in 2005 by former US Ambassador
to the Bahamas John Rood.

Ms Avant, who is expected to arrive in Nassau

early October, also expressed a keen interest in
humanitarian assistance programmes.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Funeral services
for the daughter of
Minister Neko Grant

FUNERAL services were
held on Saturday for the daugh-
ter of Works Minister Neko
Grant who died in hospital in
Florida after losing a battle with
pneumonia last week.

Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on
September 6 - the day after Mr
Grant buried his mother, Reva
Grant and only months after
the death of his father.

Nekcarla, an attorney who

worked for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's legal depart-
ment, was admitted to Doctor's
Hospital for treatment before
being transferred to the inten-
sive care unit of the Cleveland
Clinic in Florida, where she lat-
er died.

Ms Grant, a mother-of-one,
was graduated from St Mary's
University in the United States
with a bachelors degree in his-

tory before studying law at the
University of Leeds, where she
was graduated with honours in
2000.

In early 2001 she was called
to the English Bar and in Sep-
tember of that year she was
called to the Bahamas Bar.

The funeral was held at
Freeport Bible Church in Grand
Bahama.





ABOVE: Minister of Public

Works and Transport Neko
Grant guides the casket of his
daughter Nekcarla Grant, 36,
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funeral service held Saturday,
September 12, 2009 at Freeport
Bible Church.

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This date signals the start af the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the ecanomy and of all persans in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.hs), These include:

Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum

licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)

Various farms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,

and ain Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatery Authority
continue in farce to the extent that they do nat conflict with provisions of the Comes
Act, the Utlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7





Writing your own
destiny: Barack
Obama’s universal
message for youth

insight

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By RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

Hivervone knows
good sense when they
hear it, and Barack Obama’s
back-to-school address on Sep-
tember 8 to students from
kindergarten to 12th grade in
the United States was perfect
good sense.

It was as applicable to stu-
dents in the tiny Caribbean
Island of Montserrat, in the
overcrowded urban centres of
Brazil, in the leafy suburbs of
France as it was to students in
the United States. And, it was
delivered with an authenticity
that could only come from
someone who had experienced
serious challenges and over-
come them.

The message, broadcast to
schools throughout America,
was compelling: “Where you
are right now doesn't have to
determine where you'll end up.
No one's written your destiny
for you... you write your own
destiny.”

Obama’s observation would
strike a visceral chord in at least
two generations of Caribbean
people who climbed out of
deprivation by absorbing edu-
cation to write a destiny very
different from the future to
which their circumstances
pointed.

When he described his moth-
er giving him extra tuition at
4.30 in the morning because she
couldn’t afford to send him to
the school other American kids
attended in Indonesia where
they lived at the time, men and
women in developing countries
the world over could identify
with the problem and the deter-
mination.

In the Caribbean, waking up
with sun’s rise to study was a
norm for many students in rur-
al areas whose homes had no
electricity and whose parents
could not afford private schools
or extra lessons. In some cases,
study in the light of the early
morning sun preceded work in
the field before setting-off for
school.

Many of the professionals in
Caribbean life today reached
the pinnacles they have by
recognising then what Obama,
from his own similar experi-
ence, could say today: “Each
of you has a responsibility for
your education, (It is) a respon-
sibility you have to yourself.”

And, Obama’s message was
not patronizing.

His was not the voice of a
privileged guy for whom talk is
cheap.

The students saw the Presi-
dent of the United States, but
the voice they heard was that of
a successful man who had once
been a fatherless child, brought
up in tough circumstances by a
single mother. The lesson was
clear.

As he said, “My father left
my family when I was two years
old, and I was raised by a single
mother who struggled at times
to pay the bills and wasn't
always able to give us things
the other kids had. There were
times when I missed having a
father in my life. There were
times when I was lonely and
felt like I didn't fit in. So I was-
n't always as focused as I
should have been. I did some
things I'm not proud of, and
got in more trouble than I
should have. And my life could
have easily taken a turn for the
worse.”

All over the Caribbean
today, there are children aban-
doned by fathers and being
brought-up by struggling single
mothers. The extent to which
this has a deleterious effect on
the children is a matter that
sociologists and others are
studying, but already there is
evidence that many children in
such circumstances find little
motivation in schools and in
formal education.

But, the problem of turning
away from education is not
restricted to children of single
mothers alone. It is particularly
manifest — and worrying — in
Caribbean universities which
today graduate more women

than men because fewer men
than women are seeking higher
education.

There appears to be a dis-
connection between many
young people in the Caribbean
and the formal education sys-
tem. Obviously, given the fact
that President Obama chose to
talk to students throughout the
United States in their first week
back at school, the problem
exists there as well.

He could not be more pas-
sionate in his call to students
to seize education for the good
it will do them. “You can't drop
out of school and just drop into
a good job. You've got to work
for it and train for it and learn
for it”, he said.

In a passage that appealed to
the students to do good not
only for themselves, but for
their country, Obama declared:
“You'll need the knowledge
and problem-solving skills you
learn in science and math to
cure diseases like cancer and
AIDS, and to develop new
energy technologies and pro-
tect our environment. You'll
need the insights and critical
thinking skills you gain in his-
tory and social studies to fight
poverty and homelessness,
crime and discrimination, and
make our nation more fair and
more free. You'll need the cre-
ativity and ingenuity you devel-
op in all your classes to build
new companies that will create
new jobs and boost our econo-
m ge

All that he said to Ameri-
can students, holds true for stu-
dents in the Caribbean, but
even more so. For the
Caribbean needs skills and
knowledge much more than
countries, such as the United
States, in the developed world.
In this regard, the resource that
the Caribbean most needs to
develop is its human resource.
Businesses and governments in
the region require people with
capacity in a range of skills that
include engineering, manage-
ment, accountancy and audit-
ing, marketing and negotiating.

The region’s need for such
skills is worsened, of course, by
their migration out of its bor-
ders into places such as the US,
Canada and the United King-
dom. The fact that over 60 per
cent of tertiary educated people
from the Caribbean have left
(in the case of Jamaica and
Guyana, the figure is over 80
per cent) speaks powerfully to
the importance of educating
even more of the region’s
young people in the skill areas
that are needed.

But to get more young peo-
ple into tertiary education, the
Caribbean has to get them suc-
cessfully through secondary
education.

This is why Obama’s power-
ful message, directed at young
people in America, should be
cheered by every serious busi-
ness entity in the Caribbean.

SIR RONALD SANDERS



For Caribbean youth who
may have missed it, Chambers
of Commerce should join with
schools in arranging for it to be
broadcast in schools in the
region, and discussed by stu-
dents, their teachers and poten-
tial employers. There is a des-
tiny to be written.

(Responses to and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com)

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LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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The Shoe Village, Mall at Marathon

1 Sea

( The Shoe Village, RND Plaza, Freeport
Y The Shoe Village, Madiera Shopping Plaza




oly Cross Anglican Church

presents

5

“Proclaiming the Good News through Mission & Ministry”

Matthew 28:19-20

(Suest Preachers:

Pastor Cedric B, Moss

Pastor, Kingdom Life Church

Pastor TG. Morrison
Pastor, Zion Baptist Church

eats TU oe =e oe
[opic: Transtorming Lives through Mission & Ministry Topic: Equipping the Saints to Proclaim the Good News

The Revd Fr, Mark L. Fox

ee ara | ETL eT |

Gunman riddles
murder victim

pee Dae le Tb eT Piri ris hese bs
oa os ila a

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erase ove ar ee ee

ewe uae charmed eh aie ay) oe
Coes ert sere eet os ret

Prd at! ferris Banty

ae ie bed Berean Hitt LS

Kebomee Never female On she Tee
PN nay Be TRE
ae.

THE ee page of aaPETry (ero)

Tribune242 website



is growing daily

TRIBUNE242, the online
edition of the nation's lead-
ing daily newspaper, is fast
becoming an internet sensa-
tion.

The latest figures released
today show how Tribune242
is growing daily as informa-
tion-hungry surfers log on to
get the latest news, features
and sports reports.

But that’s not all they’re
logging on for, our readers
are also enjoying is one of the
many unique features of Tri-
bune242 ... the opportunity to
comment INSTANTLY on
ANY story they read.

Other websites may lay
claim to having "millions" of
readers, but the figures they
use are based on the number
of "hits" - the amount of traf-
fic a site gets.

For a number of reasons,
these figures do not give an
accurate picture of how many
people are viewing the site.

We at Tribune242 look at
the number of "unique visi-
tors" — the number of NEW
readers — who are logging on

daily ... and this is what really
counts.

On launch day, Monday,
August 10, we recorded 1,926
unique visitors. Since then the
number of new readers has
grown daily, standing at 2,168
on September 7.

And by pure coincidence,
if you subtract our launch day
figure from that of Septem-
ber 7, we have the incredible
number 242.

Tribune Managing Editor
John Fleet said: "To the unin-
formed, these figures may not
look impressive since they
tend to think in terms of hits.

“But in reality, they give us
the bragging rights to being
the best read interactive news
website in the Bahamas, quite
possibly even the Caribbean.

"And this is just the begin-
ning.

“We have many exciting
plans in the pipeline for Tri-
bune242."

To join The Tribune's
growing family of online read-
ers, simply log on to www.tri-
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Caves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites

“The premier choice for serious business”

1,550 sq.ft.
1,056 sq.ft.

$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees
$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM fees

Contact Mr. Simon Chappell on
327 1575 or
477-7610
Email: simon@cavesheights.com

M&E Limited ay

Machinery & Energy Limited (M & E
Limited), the authorized Caterpillar dealer

in The Bahamas,

is looking for Trainee

hector, ot. Peter s Parish, Long Island Technician Candidates 20 to 30 years
old for enrollment in their local Caterpillar
Training Institute.Candidates should be a
graduate of BTVI or an equivalent institution.
Practical experience in repairing diesel
engines and/or electrical equipment is a
plus. Successful candidates will be trained in
M & E’s local training institute by experienced
mechanics and electricians. The training
will be done in Nassau with opportunities
to relocate to M & E’s Freeport or Abaco
branches upon completion.

Topic: Living Your Full Potential within the Body of Christ by Proclaiming the Good News

Dates: Wednesday, September 16 thru Friday, September 18, 2009
- Come & Experience .

Anointed Praise & Worship Ministry
Dynamic Preaching & Biblical Exposition
Prayer & Counseling Ministry

Please address all resumes to:

are Service Manager
P. O. Box N-3238
Nassau, Bahamas.

Resumes can also be eORree Su
at the receptionist desk at

main office in Oakes Field. recite:
must be received no later than Friday,

HOLY CROSS ANGLICAN CHURCH
Rector: The Revd Fr. Norman D, Lightbourne
Assistant Priest: The Rev'd Fr, Ethan P. J. Ferguson | |



September 18", 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.

Highbury Park & Soldier Rd . Nassau, N. P. The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9



FROM page one

bune yesterday: "In the time
we had available, I am of the
view a number of individuals
who originally may have had
some issues with the plant due
to the misinformation and pro-
paganda being spread have now
left that meeting with a posi-
tive view of BEC and the
plant.”

He said he only wished the
Government had more time to
clearly demonstrate how
Bunker C fuel is used world-
wide.

"First of all, we only had one
town meeting to disseminate all
of the information that we had
available to us. If we had more
time it could have been seen
even more clearly that the pow-
er plant is one that is placed
throughout the Caribbean,
North and Central America.

"If we had more time we
could have illustrated the num-
ber locations (that are in)
Bermuda, Brazil, Chile,
Venezuela, Mexico, the Unit-
ed States such as South Flori-
da," said Mr Neymour.

Concerns about the possible
environmental and health
impacts of the power plant hit
fever pitch in recent weeks.

A video claiming the poten-
tially damaging impact of the
heavy oil Bunker C (HFO)
power plant was released on an
Internet video sharing site this
week. An Internet petition to
stop the development had also
been signed by hundreds of
concerned supporters.

The Government has said
that measures to prevent envi-
ronmental destruction will be
taken by ensuring regular main-
tenance of the plant and three
mile pipeline to the tanker port,
providing staff with proper
training and support, and by
appointing an environmental
officer to oversee all such con-
cerns.

Some Abaconians have also
criticized The Government for
not informing them about the
plant before they began con-
struction last month.

But Mr Neymour explained
that the plant had been in the
pipeline under the former PLP-
led administration. He added
that during the FNM's current
term, plans for the plant had
been discussed by the Prime

The
Ms.

following

Arnette Rahming

Minister and during Mr Ney-
mour's budget debate in Par-
lament.

According to Mr Neymour,
Government was not made
aware of any opposition to the
project until recently and
added that the plant was des-
perately needed to supply Aba-
co's growing demand for pow-
er.

"T did not receive significant
concerns about it. BEC, after
selecting a suitable site, began
construction because Abaco
has been impacted by the con-
ditions of the current power
plant. There is a peak demand
of 24-megawatts and the cur-
rent facility currently supplies
27-megawatts.

"So if a generator goes

LOCAL NEWS

fovt presses ahead with controversial $150m power plant

down, normally it leads to a
position where load shedding
occurs. So they felt it was criti-
cal that we begin to meet the
growing needs of Abaco. We,
the Government, are con-
cerned about the development
of Abaco and also concerned
that there may be a few indi-
viduals who may not, or appear
to not, like Abaco to develop
further," he said.

Mr Neymour said now that
the Government has met with
residents of Abaco in an
attempt to dissuade their fears:
"We will continue with the con-
struction of the power facility -
we don't see a reason to stop”.

He added that he is open to
meeting with the environmen-
talists concerned about the Wil-

Prinate Farmily lalamd Rerort Operation

Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum

requirements:

CHIEF ENGINEER

Have a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized College/University
At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely

related field

Must be computer literate
Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work

long hours

Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians

With varied trades

LIVE IN MAID

Fully experienced in domestic household chores

and culinary duties

Three years in a similar position would be an asset
Applicant must be willing to live on island

Applications should send email to:
cmajor@ grp.sandals.com

gos

Colinalmperial

individuals are
(356-8328) or

asked

to contact
Ms. Shamara

Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport,

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

BRENDA ADDERLEY
CLAUDE LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

CYRIL WILLIAMS |
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

DWAYNE DORSETTE

EDNA DEAN
P. O. Box N-4912

IAN TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

JASON SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

KEVA FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

LEANDRA PINDER

GB Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

NASHLAWN CURTIS

NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

NIKITA CURTIS

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672

SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

WELLINGTON DORSETTE

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

son City plant on the country's
national energy policy.

"One of the things that we
would like to do is to have a
meeting with some of the envi-
ronmentalists on a national
energy policy .I am open toa
discussion with them if they are
willing to discuss the energy
policy," said Mr Neymour.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on
this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

A 3-semester

Inmate dies after
prison cell fight

FROM page one





















Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel.

"From our information he was sent to prison for
vagrancy and he was placed in a cell. While in the cell he
received injuries and that’s what we're looking into right
now. He was in prison for less than a week."

Mr Bethel could not say exactly how many inmates
were in the cell at the time of the attack.

He explained that investigators were informed of the
incident late Friday and therefore were still gathering
information on the details surrounding Albury’s death.

Albury was taken to hospital for treatment on Sep-
tember, 8 but died two days later, added the ministry's
statement.




a Certificate Course for
Licensed Practical Nurse

program of study designed to produce Licensed Practical Nurses with the

technical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in
providing safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings

A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a
wide variety of tasks under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or a Physician.

In The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN)

LPNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes,
residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance



companies.

Entry Requirement:
High school graduate with 2.5. GPA
Current Health Certificate
Program Length: 12 months (3 semesters)
Total Credits Required: 45

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minimum U.S. certification
* College-level courses transferable to degree programs
+ Affordable fees, payment plan available
* Convenient evening class times, ideal for working people

Register today!
Space is limited! Contact us at 242-394-8570

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



James Catalyn & Friends

















































Hens reo MADNESS"
SUMMER Ave 2009

The Dundas Centre - Regular Performances
Seplember 16th - 19th 2009 at Bpm nightly
Tickets $20.00

AIDS FOUNDATION BENEFIT
Tuesday 15th September al Spm - Tickets $25.00

Box Office: The Dundas Centre

telephome 393-37 28/394-7)79 - 9:00am - §:00pm Daily
[Reserved lickets not collected by 3:00pm om day af performance will be sald

TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.

High School

A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.

Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.

Only Born Again Christians should

apply.

The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.

Sa Wahi (Sia
By! °

wie

=



Obama speech ‘should be used
to inspire Bahamian students’

FROM page one

fulfill your responsibilities,”
said Mr Obama speaking
from the Wakefield High
School in Arlington, Virginia.

"Unless you show up to
those schools; pay attention
to those teachers; listen to
your parents, grandparents
and other adults; and put in
the hard work it takes to
succeed. And that’s what I
want to focus on today: The
responsibility each of you
has for your education. I
want to start with the
responsibility you have to
yourself."

Mr Obama also stressed
that it was the civic duty of
each student to discover his
or her hidden talents and to
hone those skills.

"We need every single
one of you to develop your
talents, skills and intellect
so you can help solve our
most difficult problems. If
you don't do that, if you quit
on school, you're not just
quitting on yourself, you're
quitting on your country."

He also warned students
that the road to success is
not as glamorous and easily
attained as portrayed on
television shows, adding that
hard work and determina-
tion are the keys to success.

"Whatever you resolve to
do, I want you to commit to
it. | want you to really work
at it... .The truth is, being
successful is hard.

"You won't love every
subject you study. You
won't click with every
teacher. Not every home-
work assignment will seem
completely relevant to your
life right this minute. And
you won't necessarily suc-

ceed at everything the first
time you try.

"That's OK. Some of the
most successful people in
the world are the ones
who've had the most fail-
ures," he said.

For those branded as
problem students, Mr Oba-
ma encouraged them to plod
on despite thier frustration
and not to accept negative
perceptions of themselves.

"If you get in trouble, that
doesn't mean you're a trou-
blemaker, it means you
need to try harder to
behave. If you get a bad
grade, that doesn't mean
you're stupid, it just means
you need to spend more
time studying. No one's
born being good at things,
you become good at things
through hard work.
.You've got to practice.

"Don't be afraid to ask
questions. Don't be afraid
to ask for help when you
need it. I do that every day.
Asking for help isn't a sign
of weakness, it's a sign of
strength. It shows you have
the courage to admit when
you don't know something,
and to learn something new.

"Don't ever give up on
yourself, And even when
you're struggling, even when
you're discouraged, and you
feel like other people have
given up on you - don't ever
give up on yourself. Because
when you give up on your-
self, you give up on your
country,” the president said.

For days leading up to the
speech the president was
demonised by his detractors
for attempting to indoctri-
nate American children into
his so-called "socialist"
agenda.

There was harsh com-

Manager
Needed

Fax Resume to:

394-0324

FOX HILL & JOE FARRINGTON ROAD PH



mentary from right-wing
conservative pundits, some
of whom accused the presi-
dent of trying to drum up
support for his proposed
health care reform, which
has met much resistance
from opponents.

e SIR RONALD
SANDERS: PAGE 7



ESTO aes END)

MUM'S AGONY AS
SON DIES IN FIRE

FROM page one

nis cried as he looked upon the burnt remains of his home in
disbelief.

Mr Minnis said he can still hear Jermaine’s screams for help
and is overcome with grief because he could not help him.

"He was very quiet, he was disabled, he can't do anything for
himself. I feed him, I do everything for him. He would go to
school and if he ain’ see me all day he would hug me and
squeeze me tight - he’s just that sweet loving,” said Ms Hepburn,
a mother-of-three.

ASP Walter Evans said police responded to the fire at the
middle unit of a triplex around 9am. He said firefighters met the
home in flames but quickly extinguished the fire.

The cause of the blaze is under investigation.

A neighbour complained that firefighters took nearly half an
hour to respond to the call and said other neighbours tried to
douse the flames with water.

But an officer at the Elizabeth Estates fire station said they
received the call at 9am and responded at 9.05.

Remarkably, the two adjoining units of the tri-plex were
not damaged by the fire.

Sandals

Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island












Invites application for the position of:
GROUNDS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the
following qualifications

Supervise the day to day maintenance of the
grounds

Work directly with landscape contractor
Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager
Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
irrigation pesticides and fertilizers
Minimum of 3 years experience

Send resume and 3 references to:
mreampbell@erp.sandals.com

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 + Fax: 326-7452

— EXTRA, EXTRA,

| Large Shipment
of

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Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Inouranee

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He

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MONDAY,



‘It’s great to
have the Tank
back in action’

SEPTEMBER 14,





PAGE 14 ¢ Local boxing news

2009 US OPEN DOUBLES FINAL

- Sherman

Knowles ant Bhupathi lose tirler






















ABOVE:

MAHESH BHUPATHI, of India,
top right, serves over his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
against Lukas Dlouhy, of the
Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes, of India, during the men’s
doubles finals match.

RIGHT:

MAHESH BHUPATHI, right, of
India, watches as his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
returns a ball to Lukas Dlouhy, of
the Czech Republic, and Lean-
der Paes, of India.

PHOTOS:

Elise Amendola/
Associated Press

Premier Auto Centre

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By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MARK Knowles said he’s
“super disappointed” that he
and Mahesh Bhupathi “did-
n't get the job done” and had
to settle for the runners-up
title in their second appear-
ance this year at a Grand
Slam final.

The Bahamian-Indian num-
ber three seeds were unable

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect bid packages fram
the Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone
No, 302-1158,

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 2009,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender Wo. 7O7/09
Assossmant of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.

bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

MARK KNOWLES, of the Bahamas, and Mahesh Bhupathi, right, of
India hold their second place trophy for the men’s doubles finals with
Knowles’ son Graham at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. Leander Paes, right, of India, and his partner
Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, won the championship.

I’m ‘super disappointed’,
says Bahamian tennis ace

to withstand the come-from-
behind efforts of No.4 seeds
Lukas Dlouhy and Leander
Paes in the two-day rain
delayed men’s doubles final
at the US Open yesterday.

But the Czech-Indian duo,
who had upset the top seeds
and defending champions
Americans Bob and Mike
Bryans in the semifinal on
Wednesday, rallied for a 3-6,
6-3, 6-2 win as the rain finally
subsided in Flushing Mead-
ows, New York.

“Tt’s extremely disappoint-
ing because we let the guys
back into the match and the
match turned around a little
bit in their favour,” said
Knowles, who was nursing an
injury to his right ring finger
from an elevator accident at
the Tennis Center prior to the
start of the tournament.

The match was originally
scheduled for Friday, but had
to be cancelled because of the
rain. Organisers tried again
on Saturday, but it was the
same result.

“We didn’t play as well as
we should have, having to
wait for three days to play the
final,” he pointed out. “We
had good momentum going,
but at the end of the day, we
didn’t play the way we are
capable of playing. We just
didn’t get the job done.”

Yesterday, Knowles and
Bhupathi seemed headed for
the victory when they took
the first set after they had got
a break for a 4-2 lead and
they never looked back.

“It’s going to be tough (to
absorb the loss) because we
were playing so well in the
tournament. I think my serve
let us down. My serve really
let them back into the match,”
Knowles pointed out. “So it’s
disappointing. It’s going to
take a while for me to get
over this one.”

But in the second set,
Dlouhy and Paes rallied to
return the favor for a break at
4-2 and they got another one
at 5-3 to secure the win to
even the score.

In the critical tie-breaker,
Dlouhy and Paes got the ini-
tial break for a 2-1 lead and
then at 5-2, they went up with
another before they held
serve for the win. It was their
second Grand Slam for the

SEE page 14

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



IAAF /VTB BANK WORLD ATHLETICS FINAL, GREECE



(AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis)
CARMELITA JETER from the U.S.A., far right, wins the Women’s 100 meters during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. While Chandra Sturrup

(far left) took fourth in 11.17 for $7, ‘000, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (second from left) could do no better than 11.24 for sixth and $4,000.

Redemption for
Brown and Sands

Bahamian duo clinch second place finishes



AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis

U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, centre, runs to win the men’s 400-meters ahead of Chris Brown of
Bahamas, left, and David Gillick of Ireland, right during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s
Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was redemption time for
both Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown
and Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
at the IAAF/VTB Bank World
Athletics Final in Thessaloni-
ki, Greece on Saturday.

Both Brown and Sands
clinched second place finish in
their respective events after
they missed out on an opportu-
nity to capture a medal at the
12th IAAF World Champi-
onship in Athletics last month.

Brown, who watched as his
first individual medal at the
championships slipped away
from him in Berlin, Germany
when he had to settle for fifth in
the men’s 400 metres, stormed
to a second place in Greece.

His time of 45.49 seconds
trailed only American LaShawn
Merritt, the back-to-back
Olympic Games and World
Championships gold medalist,
who easily won in 44.93.

Brown, however, would get
revenge on American David
Neville, who dove across the
finish line at last year’s
Olympics in Beijing, China.
Neville followed in third in
45.60.

Both American Jeremy
Wariner and Trinidad &
Tobago’s Renny Qwon, the
World Championships’ silver
and bronze medalists respec-



tive, opted not to compete in
the grand finale.

While Merritt collected
$30,000 for his victory, Brown
was awarded $20,000 for sec-
ond. Neville earned $15,000 for
third. Like Brown, Sands also
picked up $20,000 after he fin-
ished second as well in the
men’s triple jump with his best
leap of 17.19 metres or 56-feet,
4 3/4-inches on the third of his
four attempts.

Cuban Arnie David Girat,
the 2002 World junior champi-
on, took the title with his win-
ning leap of 17.45m or 57-3 on
his second attempt. Bulgarian
Momchil Karailiev was third
with 17.18m or 56-4 1/2.

The only medallist from
Berlin to compete was gold
medalist Phillips Idowu of
Great Britain, who was fourth.
He only took two jumps with
his best being 17.03m or 55-10
1/2 on his second attempt.

Both silver medalist Nelson
Evora of Portugal and bronze
medalist Alexis Copello from
Cuba, didn’t compete.

Sands was sitting in the
bronze medal spot until the
final round when Copello came
from behind to drop him to
fourth.

Also on Saturday, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie had to set-
tle for fourth place in the wom-
en’s 200 metres. The World
Championships’ bronze medal-
ist clocked 22.45. She received

AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis

U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, right, crosses the finish line to win
the men’s 400-meter ahead of Chris Brown of Bahamas, during an
IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium,
Greece, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

$7,000. There was a photo finish
at the line with three-time
World champion Allyson Felix
of the United States holding off
400 champion Sanya Richards.

SEE page 14

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Knowles and
Bhupathi lose
US Open thriller

‘lise Amendola/AP Photo

LEANDER PAES, right, of India, and his partner Lukas Dlouhy,
of the Czech Republic, hold the championship trophy after
winning the men’s doubles finals match over Mahesh Bhu-
pathi, of India, and Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, at the U.S.
Open tennis tournament in New York, Sunday, Sept. 13,
2009. In the center is Dlouhy’s wife Rhea Pillai and their
three-year-old daughter Aiyana.

FROM page 12

year, adding to the French Open at Roland Garros.

Had they won, they would have celebrated with a prize
purse of $210,000 each. Instead, they will earn $105,000
apiece as the runners-up.

Knowles and Bhupathi were also the runners-up at the
Australian Open in January, losing to the Bryans. Their
only victory this year came at the Rogers Cup in Montreal
at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Tournament.

Despite losing, Knowles and Bhupathi joined Dlouhy
and Paes in qualifying for the prestigious Barclays ATP
World Tour Finals in London in November.

Already qualified prior to the US Open are the Bryans
and Wimbledon champions Daniel Nestor and Nenad
Zimonjic.

After taking a couple weeks off to recuperate, Knowles
and Bhupathi will get back together on October 5 to play in
the China Open in Beijing, China, followed by the Shanghai

‘It’s great to have the
Tank back in action’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

SI STERN said _ he’s
delighted to have Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams back in
action.

Stern, the American man-
ager of the Grand Bahamian
heavyweight, said he had
some big plans for Williams,
including the possibility of
fighting here at home, once
he finish his commitment in
Germany next month.

Williams is lined up to fight
German Emmanuel ‘Dia-
mond Boy’ Charro in a live
television show in the 10-
round co-main event on Sat-
urday, October 10 in Warsaw,
East Germany.

It will be Williams’ first
appearance in the ring for the
year as he makes his return
after a hand injury he sus-
tained in January just before
he was to have fought in Key
West, Florida.

“T think he’s going to win
and after he wins, Sherman
will have a lot of very good
fights over there,” Stern said.
“That’s where the money is
in the heavyweight division,
so he just need to go over
there and take care of busi-
ness.”

Although he’s not had a
fight for the year, Stern said
he doesn’t think it will have

i

Sherman Williams’ American manager has
big plans for Grand Bahamian heavyweight

past couple of years, but he
should be in first class shape
by the time he’s done.”

Once he return from Ger-
many successful, Stern said
they intend to have a cele-
bration before Williams get
prepared for a return to Key
West, Florida on January 16.

“Tf he wins, I don’t see any-
thing but positive moves up
for him,” Stern said. “I think
that the promoter in Ger-
many, who is one of the pre-
mier promoters in Europe,
will also want to talk to us
about his next fight in Ger-
many.”

Although he’s been fight-
ing in South Florida and
Europe, Stern said the next
big move is to bring a show to
the Bahamas for Williams to
showcase his skills.

“T really think it’s time for
us to sit down with the people
in the Bahamas because here
we have a guy like Sherman,
who could be one of the best
heavyweights in the world,”
he said.

“T don’t see why when we
do our show in January that
we can’t get ESPN to put
some focus on the Bahamas

ATP Masters in Shanghai, China, starting on October 12.

From there, they will play in the Grand Prix de Tennis de
Lyon from October 26 before they go to London.

But he admitted that it’s going to be a little difficult to
digest their loss in the US final yesterday.

In 2004, Knowles and his former long-time partner Nestor
won the US Open. Also former partners, Bhupathi and
Paes were runners-up in Flushing Meadows in 1999. But
Bhupathi teamed up with Max Mirnyi to win the title in 2002.

Knowles, along with his family, should be back home
around 11:30 am today in time to attend a luncheon at 1 pm
at Government House.

The event is being organized by the Ministry of Youth,

any effect because Williams
has been active in the gym
training as he recovered from
the injury.

“He’s done things like
going over to Germany to
spar, so he’s familiar with the
territory, he’s familiar with
the area,” Stern stressed.

“That’s one of the reason
he’s fighting this fight over
there because they saw him

BACK IN ACTION: Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams

spar over there. He’s kept in
shape going into the gym.”
Over the next three weeks,
Stern said he’s lined up a
series of sparring sessions with
a number of competitors,
including two Russians. He
will be working out with
David Jackson, who is con-
sidered one of the top trainers



in the world. “We brought
them in on purpose so they
could spar with Sherman,”
Stern pointed out.

“So I anticipate he will be
in the best shape he’s been in
for many years.

“His body hasn’t taken its
toll yet because he haven’t
had that many fights over the

with the view of him coming
back home to fight.”

Stern said the Bahamas is
definitely the ideal place for
boxing to come and once
Williams live up to his end of
the bargain by winning in
East Germany, they will defi-
nitely be looking at the possi-
bility of him fighting here
either in December or early
January.

Sports and Culture for his stellar 20-plus career, including his
Wimbledon Grand Slam mixed doubles title with German
Anna-Lena Groenefeld in July in London, England.

Redemption for Brown and ‘Superman’ Sands
FROM page 13

Both were timed in 22.29, a season’s best for Felix. Jamaican Ker-
ron Stewart came through in third in her season’s best of 22.42.

Then on Sunday, Ferguson-McKenzie came back to contest the
100 with Chandra Sturrup. While Sturrup took fourth in 11.17
for $7,000, Ferguson-McKenzie could do no better than 11.24 for
sixth and $4,000.

Jamaican Sherone Simpson slipped in between the pair in 11.20
for fifth and $5,000 and the three medalists from the World Cham-
pionships finished in the top three spots, but in different order.

American bronze medallist Camelita Jeter won in a champi-
onship record of 10.67, Jamaican gold medalist Shelly-Ann Fras-
er was second in 10.89 and Stewart, the silver medallist, was third
in 10.90.



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SPORTSNOTES

TENNIS
KNOWLES CELEBRATIONS

MARK Knowles is due to return home
today around 11:30 am at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport.

He is expected to be greeted by members
of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture in a “welcome reception” in the VIP
lounge where a brief ceremony will take
place.

Then it’s off to Government House
where a luncheon will take place at 1 pm.
The Ministry is honoring Knowles for his
stellar 20-plus year career on the interna-
tional scene.

Knowles and his mixed doubles partner
Anna-Lena Groenefled won the Wimble-
don title in July in London, England. How-
ever, after two days of rain delay, Knowles
and Mahesh Bhupathi lost in the final of the
US Open in the men’s final yesterday in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

BASKETBALL
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their best-of-five championship series
tonight at 7 pm at the DW Davis Gymna-
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SOFTBALL
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THE New Providence Softball Associa-
tion hosted a double header on Saturday
night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

In the ladies’ opener, the Pineapple Air
Wildcats blasted the Mystical Queens in
three innings, while in the feature game,
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THE TRIBUNE



National Training Programme

registration and orientation today

HUNDREDS of job seek-
ers are expected to crowd the
Kendal GL Gymnasium
today as registration and ori-
entation for the governmen-
t’s National Training Pro-
gramme takes place.

The programme is one of
several initiatives taken by
the government in response
to the current economic
downturn, aiming to improve
job skills and the unem-
ployed’s chances of finding
work.

This latest venture was cre-
ated in conjunction with and
consultation from _ the
Bahamas Christian Council,
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, The Bahamas
Employers Confederation,
Trade Unions, The College
of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Training Institute.

The government in its

BUY A HOUSE

2009-2010 Budget allocated
$250,000 for the programme
which is also being conducted
in Grand Bahama. Courses
will be conducted at The
Bahamas Technical Institute.
A total of 1,000 applicants
have been selected for the

courses divided into three 10
week semesters, taking
around 333 trainees per term.

Training courses will be
available in accounting, com-
puter applications, engine
repair, landscaping, as well
as straw and shell craft.

AML Foods Limited announces new director

AML Foods Limited has announced the appointment of Vaughn
Roberts as the company's new director.

Mr Roberts assumed the post on September 1.

“With the evolution and changes in the company, the board of
directors felt it necessary to expand the knowledge base and skill
set of the board. Mr Robert’s background and experience fulfilled
the criteria that the nominating committee was looking for in a
potential director," said Gavin Watchorn, AML's president and
CEO.

Mr Roberts is the director of the Downtown Nassau Partnership
(DNP).

“T am excited to join the board of AML Foods Limited as it con-
tinues to strengthen the core brands; Solomon's, Cost Right and our
franchise Domino’s,” said Mr Roberts. “I accept the responsibili-
ties of directorship and will draw on my expertise to help guide the
company.”



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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SUPER VALUE Semis
Oo) EYoys

alata ta

MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis and Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette are shown
some supplements by a staff member from Ballys
Gym. The Ministry of Health fair took place in
Meeting Street.

PST AME,

be i | : L | 7 | LF i U if i 1 |: iI

t 4 99 Pte der al
L .

‘ bu . Aaah : wa
JR. BACON CHEESEBURGER a i ie a" oe eer a
SUPER VALUE ’ fe a 4) Affairs Brent
is i Ci Pi ag | Symonette
COMBOS at a. . looks at fresh
SWS ee i aie i : a= vegetables at
AU ely |e f a i es the Health Fair
aca i , — on Saturday at
fa = 7 =| the Ministry of
nna) ny oa i 4 Health grounds
oH -: in Meeting
Street.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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‘Fear
factor Is

a bit

* Principal behind $100m
project says Budget
incentives and financing
package, offering closing
cost savings of $30,000-
plus, drive 40% of sales
to first-time buyers

* ‘Turbulent’ few months
show signs of ending, as
some confidence returns

* 27 of 30 first phase units
sold, with construction
worker numbers set to
double in next week

* Yet ‘buying window
shortening’, with project
requiring all ‘four Ps’

to be in place

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A $100 million Bahamian
real estate development
believes the 2009-2010 Bud-
get incentives helped to
ensure 40 per cent of first
phase sales were to first-time
home buyers, its principal
telling Tribune Business that
demand has shown signs of
increasing as “the fear factor”
in the market eases.

Jason Kinsale, head of the
43-acre Balmoral Develop-
ment on Prospect Ridge, said
that while “the last few
months have been turbulent
and there has been a lot fear
in the market”, the developer
had seen “a significant
increase in traffic and people
bringing in deposit cheques
in the last few days”.

Mr Kinsale said the
increased buyer interest was
likely to have been helped by
the previous week’s agree-
ments between the Chinese
and Baha Mar, indicating the
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment may ultimately
proceed, plus the sight of
actual construction taking
place at Balmoral - always a
sight to inspire confidence in
potential purchasers.

However, he added that
“the fear factor is subsiding a
bit”. As an example, Mr Kin-
sale cited two Balmoral pur-
chases that took place last
week, one client being a Baha
Mar employee, the other a
financial services industry
worker.

“There were a lot of people

SEE page 8B

THE TRIBUNE 6

Ul



MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

he

SEPTEMBER



14,

2009



ColinaImperial

Confidence For Life

Ex-PM: ‘Don’t let
subsiding ANChOr resort die’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ormer

Prime

Minister

Perry
Christie has warned
that substandard
infrastructure in
Exuma led to the
demise of the Four
Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort, and
urged the present
Government not to
allow the property
to suffer a similar
fate under Sandals’ ownership..

Mr Christie, speaking at the opening
of HVS (Bahamas), said Exuma's air-
port and roads were unsuited to pro-
vide the service required by a five-star
rated development such as Emerald
Bay, indicating that the situation had
not changed .

Directing his comments towards
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation, the former
prime minister asked that the Ingra-
ham government understand the dis-
parity between its financial resources

Stock
Market

CHRISTIE



* Christie warns that Sandals faced by infrastructure disparity
in seeking to make Emerald Bay resort investment work

* Says his government reduced Atlantis Phase III
incentives to 20% of $1bn investment, compared
to 45% and 38% thresholds for previous phases

and the private sector’s, and the abili-
ty to get things done with existing rev-
enues and capital.

Alluding to the need for massive
public sector capital works improve-
ments in Exuma as an incentive for
Sandals’ development of its recently-
acquired Emerald Bay Property, Mr
Christie digressed in his speech to sug-
gest HVS was the type of company
that could assist with those improve-
ments.

The former prime minister recalled
how HVS had been hired by his gov-
ernment to conduct a study that would
help determine the level of investment
incentives - as a percentage of the total
investment - that were ultimately grant-
ed to Kerzner International for its $1
billion Phase II expansion at Atlantis.

Mr Christie said the issue of Kerzn-

er International’s investment incen-
tives had become increasingly con-
tentious, especially in the political are-
na.
"We determined, having discussed
this matter extensively, that we as a
country ought not to risk the con-
frontation that was developing over
that issue, and we negotiated and asked
questions about whether we should
give concessions," Mr Christie said.
"Using the expertise of HVS, we
moved from the phase one 45 per cent
concession and phase two 38 per cent
concession to a phase three 20 per cent.
"HVS sent their team in and gave
us great insight into the workings of
the private sector, into the workings
of Kerzner, which was truly the suc-
cess story in the Bahamas, and the
organization that helped us to rede-

Use Parliament to curb NIB spending

By NEIL HARTNELL

/ 1 ; * Ex-Chamber chief urges mandating that any increase in
Tribune Business Editor

social security scheme’s administrative spending threshold

fine the Bahamas and redefine tourism
in the Bahamas.

"HVS steered us to the conclusion
that you did not have to give a dollar in
concessions insofar as your country is
concerned and they justified that the
investment was so profitable that the
country could arrive at such a conclu-
sion."

HVS is a global services and con-
sulting organisation focused on the
hotel, restaurant, shared ownership,
gaming, and leisure industries. The
Bahamas office is its first in the
Caribbean.

Managing Director of HVS's
Caribbean operations, Parris Jordan,
told Tribune Business that HVS was
not new to the Bahamas, having pre-
viously done studies for the Bahamas
government, Baha Mar and Atlantis.

to turn in
‘six-eight
months’

Market index only down
5.4% for 2009, compared to
13.2% fall in 2008, as ana-
lysts scent ‘excellent oppor-
tunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian stock mar-
ket is likely to “turn the cor-
ner in the next six to eight
months”, senior investment
analysts have told Tribune
Business, with the drop in
many price/earnings (P/E)
ratios indicating there are
“excellent opportunities” for
buyers to acquire underval-
ued stocks.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, told
Tribune Business that

SEE page 9B

7

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THE Government must be
forced to go to Parliament
and obtain approval for any
increase in the National Insur-
ance Board’s (NIB) adminis-
trative/overhead spending
above already-stated thresh-
olds, a former Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident has urged, citing this as
critical to stopping the social
security programme’s “abuse
by politicians”.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president,
told Tribune Business that

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by approved by Parliament to prevent ‘abuse by politicians’
* Increase in NIB rates a 23% jump, and 50% insurable
wage ceiling hike, resulting in 84% total increase
* Spending limits urged expanded to all public corporations

with the private sector set to
finance the lion’s share of the
expected 2 per cent increase
in NIB contribution rates in
2010, there should be some
additional safeguards on how
this extra revenue was spent
to prevent wastefulness and
abuse.

The likely rise in the NIB
contribution rate from 8.8 per
cent to 10 per cent, something
the Government believes will
be necessary to finance its
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme and national pre-

SEE page 7B

Retirement Planning Series

Finishing Strong

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.







PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

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oP Bahamas Business

= GLOEAL TOCMOERSY OA RE BAC

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian
investors traded in 11 out of
the 24 listed securities, of
which two advanced, seven
declined and two remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 177,611 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 143,611 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
34,000 shares.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the volume leader, seeing
53,000 shares trade as its stock
declined by $0.75 to end the
week at a new 52-week low
of $10.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the advancers, its
share price increasing by $0.44
on a volume of 40,859 shares
to close the week at $5.94.

Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) was the lead decliner,
falling by $1.10 to a new 52-
week low of $9.90, on a vol-
ume of 1,000 shares.

BOND MARKET

There were 235 Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) 15 Series D
notes traded in the Bahamian
market last week, with a value
of $235,000.

COMPANY NEWS

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) released its
unaudited financial results for
the quarter ending July 31,
2009. For the quarter, FIN
reported net income of $3.4
million, compared to $5.4 mil-
lion in the 2008 third quarter,
a decline of $2.1 million or 38
per cent.

Net interest income of $7.2
million increased slightly by
$87,000, quarter-over-quarter,
while the provision for credit

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making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL

$1.15
$0.63
$6.25
$9.90
$10.06
$3.15
$10.00
$5.94
$2.74
$10.29
$3.65
$2.05
$6.60
$2.37
$0.30
$4.99
$1.00
$8.80
$5.50
$10.09
$10.00

$-0.05
$-

losses of $1.7 million
increased by $2.5 million in
comparison to the prior year.

Non-interest expenses of
$3.1 million remained consis-
tent with the same quarter in
the prior year. Total assets
and liabilities at the end of
the 2009 third quarter were
$870 million and $786 million
respectively.

Management indicated that
while the bank continues to
experience good mortgage
growth, adverse economic
conditions are expected to
result in non-accrual loans
remaining high for the bal-
ance of the year.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) released its
unaudited financial results for
the six month period ending
July 31, 2009. DHS reported
net profits of $4 million
($0.41 cents per share) for the
period compared to $1.6 mil-
lion ($0.16 cents per share)
during the same period in the
previous year.

Patient service revenue of
$24 million increased by $3.8
million, which management
attributes to a trend of
increased business volumes
that continued into the sec-
ond quarter of the year, cou-
pled with increases in ICU
patients days of 47 per cent.
All other business sectors
showed positive growth year-
to-date.

Total expenses increased by
$1.5 million over the same six-
month period in the prior
year, primarily due to higher

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

-29.82%
-4.55%
-18.19%
-16.10%
-1.28%
0.00%
-28.72%
-15.14%
-3.18%
-1.53%
62.22%
-19.61%
-15.38%
0.00%
0.00%
-3.48%
0.00%
-25.86%



salaries and benefits and med-
ical supplies and services.

Total assets and liabilities
of DHS stood at $32.5 million
and $5.9 million respectively
at the end of the quarter.

Dividend Notes

e FINCO (FIN) has
declared a dividend of $0.13
per share, payable on Sep-
tember 15, 2009, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date September 9, 2009.

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

e Doctor's Hospital
Healthcare Systems (DHS)
has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 17,
2009.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

e Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6, 2009,
to all ordinary shareholders
of record date October 1,
2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamian airlines in ‘holding
pattern’ over fee increases

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN private air-
lines are “in a holding pattern”
waiting to see whether the Gov-
ernment adopts their recom-
mendations regarding proposed
fee increases, the minister
responsible confirming to Tri-
bune Business that the changes
- scheduled to take effect on
September 10, 2009 - have been
postponed to allow time for
more consultation with the
industry.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and
aviation, said the proposed Civ-
il Aviation Department (CAD)
fee increases had not been
implemented as scheduled
because the process required
the Government to complete
consultation with the private
sector first - something that had
not yet been finished.

“We have another round of
consultations to go, and we
have promised that until that
was completed, we would not
put them [the changes] into
effect,” Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace told tribune Business.

“The process required con-
sultation with the International
Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) and local operators,
and some pieces of that are not
complete. There are a couple
of pieces to put in place.

“The existing regulations
remain in place for the moment
until the final round of consul-
tation is completed with the
industry.”

The minister, though, said
the fee schedule changes would
be implemented “in very short
order” once the consultation

Planned charges do not take effect as intended,
with government planning further consultation

newspaper about the feedback
the Government and CAD had
received from Bahamian pri-
vate airline operators, the min-
ister replied: “I’ve never met
anyone who has welcomed any
increase in taxes or fees, but
the discussions have gone very
well, we understand their con-
cerns and we will address
them.”

Kevin Turnquest, president
of the Bahamas Association of
Air Transport Operators, told
Tribune Business that after the
organisation sent in its response
to the Government on the fee
changes, its concerns were
being reviewed and further
amendments to the proposal
were being contemplated.

“The consultation process
has not been completed, and
the impression clearly given to
us was that needed to contin-
ue,” Mr Turnquest said. “We’ve
not had a formal response from
them, but my understanding is
they may have been contem-
plating a further period of con-
sultation.

“We're in a holding pattern

waiting for a response to the
information we sent in, but our
understanding is that the Gov-
ernment has taken on board
those ideas.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the revenues raised by the fee
increases would go into the
Government’s Consolidated
Fund, and be used to finance
CAD’s operations, rather than
improvements to Family Island
airports.

The sums raised from the fee
increases, he said, would not be
sufficient to meet capital expen-
diture costs in the Family
Islands.

Tribune Business broke the
story of the planned fee increas-
es earlier this year, having been
told that the operator of a five-
seater aircraft flying 50 hours
per month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to

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$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

Other fee increases divulged
to Tribune Business are as fol-
lows:

¢ * Monitoring charge: From
a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000
per cent increase

e * Fleet charge: For a five
seater Aztec aircraft, this will
go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
per cent increase. For a Beech
19 seater aircraft, the fee will
rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
per cent increase

¢ * Charge to lease a foreign
aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:
$4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

e * Charter permit renewal:
Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase

e * Renewal of scheduled
permits: Current: $500 per
annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240
per cent increase. Both large
foreign airlines and Bahamian
operators, including small char-
ter companies, will pay the
same rate

¢ * Pilot licences: From $0 to
$250 for a six-month Air Trans-

port US licence. From $0 to
$200 for a one-year US com-
mercial pilots licence.

¢ * Fuel suppliers to Bahami-
an airlines in the Family Islands

will have to pay a tax equiva-
lent to $0.07 per gallon to the
Civil Aviation Department, on
top of existing government tax-
es

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process was concluded.

“There wouldn’t be very
much delay between now and
when we complete that, and we
will make a decision on what
to do afterwards,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said, when asked
by Tribune Business about the
deadline for completing con-
sultations.

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






























































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eS usINESS
‘Extremely comfortable’

with BEC plant proposal

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ABACONIANS are
"extremely comfortable" with
what BEC has proposed for its
new Wilson City power plant,
which is expected to open in
the 2010 first quarter in central
Abaco, according to the minis-
ter of state for the environment.

Phenton Neymour said he,
along with BEC general man-
ager Kevin Basden, sought to
dispel inaccurate concerns that
Bunker C fuel was highly toxic
and could produce acid rain.

According to him, the major-
ity of Abaco residents who
attended the Town Hall meet-
ing for the construction of the
new power generating plant
thought the plan was good.

"There was a group of indi-
viduals who would oppose the
construction of the plant, but I
think that with a lot of the
incorrect information they had

circulated, Abaconians realise
[the truth]," said Mr Neymour.

"It [the meeting] was very
good. They were extremely
comfortable with what BEC
had proposed."

A group of concerned Aba-
conians had produced a short
documentary about the con-
struction of the power plant and
its possible environmental
impact, which they have circu-
lated on theInternet.

According to them, the fuel
will produce far denser carbon
emissions that other fuels, while
increasing the chance of acid
rain over the islands of the
Bahamas.

They also suggested that oil
spills in this area could affect a
propose marine park nearby,
as well as affect the local sub-
terranean aquifer.

However, Mr Neymour
assured that the aquifer, which
is purportedly directly beneath
the new plant, will be strin-
gently monitored.

Mr Neymour also asserted
that BEC has always used
Bunker C fuel oil in New Prov-
idence, and insisted that the
Wilson City plant will adopt the
most stringent environmental
practices.

"This is a new plant in which
environmental procedures and
processes will be put in place,”
he said. "I am extremely disap-
pointed that these individuals
would have taken the approach
that they have."

Mr Neymour also said pre-
cautions such as double sealed
oil pipelines, to reduce the the
likelihood of a spill, and double
hulled tankers for the trans-
portation of the Bunker C fuel
oil, will make the plant much
more secure than others
throughout the Bahamas.

He said that, when complete,
the Wilson City Plant will pro-
duce 48 megawatts of power,
twice the demand on the island,
as a contingency for expansion.

Pioneers get reward

THE 2009 Pioneers of Pros-
perity Caribbean program ihas
selected Bulkan Timber Works
of Guyana for its grand prize.

Alternative Insurance Com-
pany of Haiti and Totally Male
Ltd of Jamaica were also rec-
ognized.

From a highly competitive
pool of 580 applications, ten
Pioneers of Prosperity
emerged representing some of
the most innovative, dynamic
businesses in the region. Each
one of the finalists has already
won a grant from the Multilat-
eral Investment Fund of the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) of US $40,000 and
will be connected to a global
network of technical expertise,
potential investors, and other
cutting-edge entrepreneurs.

“These 10 entrepreneurs are
role models for all of us. They
built new distribution systems,
found new and attractive mar-
kets, pay high and rising wages

to their employees, and are
outstanding corporate citizens
of their respective nations.
And they do this under chal-
lenging conditions-- never ask-
ing the government for
favours, often beginning with-
out specialised infrastructure
or sufficient skills and abilities,
but always with an eye to the
future and their own self-deter-
mination,” said Michael Fair-
banks, co-founder and co-
director of the Social Equity
Venture Fund.

The Pioneers of Prosperity
Awards Programme is a glob-
al programme made-up of
regional competitions spanning
the Caribbean, Africa and
Central America.

Seven countries participat-
ed in the inaugural Caribbean
competition: Bahamas, Barba-
dos, Belize, Guyana, Haiti,
Jamaica, and Trinidad and
Tobago. The programme will
launch in Central America on
September 14, 2009.



The Pioneers of Prosperity
Programme seeks to inspire a
new generation of entrepre-
neurs in emerging economies
by identifying, rewarding and
promoting outstanding small
to medium size businesses,
who will serve as role models
to their peers.

The Programme is spon-
sored by the Multilateral
Investment Fund of the Inter-
American Development Bank,
the John Templeton Founda-
tion, and the Social Equity
Venture Fund (S.E.VEN
Fund), and was conceived and
initiated by Michael Fairbanks,
a recognised entrepreneur and
author in the area of enterprise
solutions to poverty.

Michael Fairbanks is a co-
founder of S.E.VEN Fund.
The programme has also built
a network of over 35 local part-
ners throughout the
Caribbean. Jamaica Trade and
Invest co-hosted the Final
Awards Ceremony.

THE DOWNTOWN NASSAU PARTNERSHIP

Invites you to attend a Luncheon Discussion

Topic:

Global Trends Affecting Downtowns

Special Guest Speaker:

Brad Segal

President, Progressive Urban Management Associates

Thursday, September 17, 2009

12 noon
British Colonia
Cost: $35

hilton

Discussion will include topics such as:

The creative class
Tourism

Environmentalism and Sustainability

Technology

Demographic and lifestyle changes

Please RSVP

Tal, 326-0992

Fax, 323-2998
Email: ntdb@batelnet.bs

Website: www.downtownnassau.org



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



aaa > =
Government doing ‘host of things’ to aid ease of business

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is doing “a
host of things” to improve the
ease of doing business in the
Bahamas, a minister has told Tri-
bune Business, citing a proposed
National Investment Act and
planned amendments to the Busi-
ness Licensing Act - including the
amalgamation of four processes
into one - as examples of the
reforms being contemplated.

Responding to the Doing Busi-
ness 2010 survey by the World
Bank, which ranked the Bahamas
68th out of 183 countries surveyed
when it came to red tape and
bureaucracy obstacles facing the
private sector, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance, said
the Government was moving
“with a view to optimizing the
ease with which people conduct
business in the Bahamas”.

Stating that he was unsure
whether the World Bank, and its
International Finance Corpora-
tion (IFC) arm that conducted
the survey, were aware of the
Government’s planned reforms,
Mr Laing said he had asked Min-
istry of Finance staff to “fully
evaluate” the criteria used by the
report and then benchmark this
nation against other jurisdictions
to see if and where improvements
were necessary.

Stating that the Bahamas
should use such reports as “a
springboard for improvement”,
Mr Laing told Tribune Business:
“I think what is important for us
to be focused on is what needs to
be done to make doing business
in the Bahamas as efficient as pos-
sible. We’re already doing things
to make the conduct of business
in the Bahamas easier.”

Apart from the proposed Busi-
ness Licence reforms, Mr Laing
said the Government was also
reviewing its tax policies with
respect to business. It was also
“revamping” its online network
to further facilitate e-government,
enabling businesses to fill out
applications and required paper-
work online, and pay the neces-
sary fees, too.

As part of the need to place
policy in statute, to conform with
the trade agreements the
Bahamas will be entering, Mr
Laing said the Ministry of Finance
was also crafting a National
Investment Act with the goal of
“modernising and reforming the
way we do business”.

This Act was described as “a
work in progress”, with no
timescale given for its arrival in

Parliament or details on what
would be included in it. Mr Laing,
though, said some “significant
preliminary” work had been done
on the Bill, including bench-
marking.

The Bahamas slipped from
59th to 68th in the World Bank’s
annual survey, ranking especially
low when it came to dealing with
construction permits (ranked
100th); registering property
(149th); protecting investors
(109th); and enforcing contracts
(120th). The latter two areas are
especially concerning for a nation
that relies heavily on foreign
direct investment to drive its
economy and monetary system,
something noted by Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce president,
Khaalis Rolle.

“There are some noteworthy
areas of concern, particularly for
the investor protection,” Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business. “In an
economy such as ours, investor
confidence is one of the signifi-
cant areas we would try and
encourage and secure. We are
slipping in that areas, and work
needs to be done there. It’s an
obvious area for improvement.”

Arguing that the Bahamas
needed to ensure “a high degree
of confidence” among its
investors, Mr Rolle said this
applied equally to the Bahamian
and foreign variety.

“The transaction costs associ-
ated with domestic investment

need to come down, and domestic
investors need to be confident
that they’re assets and invest-
ments will certainly be protect-
ed,” Mr Rolle said.

“For businesses in property
deals, we want to have costs asso-
ciated with that minimised as
much as possible. For want of a
better expression, it’s a sunk
horse. You write it off immedi-
ately. It’s non-productive at the
end of the day, and goes with the
deal.

“We need to keep property
transaction costs to a minimum.
The cost of doing business has to
be reduced, and anything we can
do bodes well for investment.”

While some of the Bahamas’
permitting systems needed work,
Mr Rolle told Tribune Business
that the Government had already
foreshadowed several much-need-
ed amendments in its 2009-2010
Budget, in addition to its previ-
ously-announced civil service
reforms.

Mr Laing also pointed to the
modernisation of the Business
Licence Act, and the amalgama-
tion of the previous Shop Licence,
Liquor Licence and Music and
Dance Licence into just one Busi-
ness Licence process.

All these licence processes had
been separate, requiring a busi-
ness to appear before different
authorities, and the reforms were
designed to save businessmen “a
lot of time and bureaucracy”.

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Mr Laing added that the Gov-
ernment would also be “mod-
ernising the taxing aspects of the
[Business Licence] Act to take
into account the reality business-
es face. The effort is to take into
account some of the realities peo-
ple face; every business’s gross
revenues are not the same”.

The minister also pointed out
that the World Bank survey
ranked the Bahamas seventh out
of all small island, developing
states. “You could argue whether
the glass is half-full or half-empty,
but you can always improve and
that’s what we’re striving to do,”

Mr Laing said.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas was
ranked 53rd out of 141 countries
in the Economic Freedom of the
World report released yesterday
by the Canada-based Fraser Insti-
tute and its Bahamian partner,
the Nassau Institute.

The Bahamas scored in key
components of economic freedom
(from 1 to 10, where a higher val-
ue indicates a higher level of eco-
nomic freedom): The ratings in
the five components of the Index
are

* Size of government: changed

to 8.2 from 7.85 in last year’s
report

* Legal structures and security
of property rights: changed to 7.1
from 8.47

* Access to sound money:
changed to 6.7 from 7.04

* Freedom to trade interna-
tionally: changed to 5.1 from 4.12

* Regulation of credit, labour
and business: changed to 8.3 from
8.17

However, in the critical areas
of Legal Structure and Sound
Money, the Bahamas was found
to be losing ground.

Book Signing Announcement for:

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Gabrielle F’ Culmer’s New Novel,
published by Vantage Press, Inc.

On Saturday, September 19th, 2009 at Logos, Harbour Bay.
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IMPORTANT NOTICE

We wish to inform the general public that BATCO
WHOLESALE and Mr. GARY FORBES are ™O'’ET
authorized wholesalers, sellers or vendors for any of the
above items.

Please note that Four Js Enterprise is a company that
stands for truth, integrity, genuine and quality products
along with great value.

We cannot guarantee that any company, agency or
individual who’s not authorized and listed by Four Js
Enterprise to sell our line of products will deliver goods

and service at the standards outlined.

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank you our loyal customers and retailers for
your support in making Four Js Enterprise’s vision “Creating A Healthier and
Wealthier Bahamas” a success and we look forward to a continued amicable
relationship as we move FORWARD, UPWARD, ONWARD & TOGETHER.

Please direct any questions or queries to the President of Four J*s Enterprise.

FOUR J’S ENTERPRISE * 242-394-8626 *

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7B



Use Parliament to curb NIB spending

FROM page 1B

scription drug plan, effective-
ly represents a 22.7 per cent
rate increase.

In addition, the proposed
reforms to NIB also include a
50 per cent increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, from
$400 to $600, Mr D’Aguilar
said.

While acknowledging that
he understood why the rates
were being increased, the for-
mer Chamber president told
Tribune Business: “We have
to put in place safeguards to
ensure politicians do not
abuse the money when they
get it in.

“We should put NIB
through the same process as it
goes through to increase the
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling when it comes to
increasing the amount spent
on administration and over-
heads. The minister respon-
sible for NIB should be
responsible for that ceiling,
and he would have to go to
Parliament and ask for an
increase in that ceiling.”

Mr D’ Aguilar recommend-
ed setting an annual thresh-
old for NIB’s administrative
expenses, as a percentage of
forecast contribution income,
and any increase in this had to
be approved by Parliament.

“It’s a real, meaningful
change, and gives us an assur-
ance that money will not be
squandered by politicians
who, in many instances, have
no idea how to run a busi-
ness,” the former Chamber
president said of his proposal.

“There must be a balance. I
totally agree that rates have to
go up, the insurable wage has
to go up, but the Government
has to ensure strong measures
are put in place to ensure the
party of the day does not
abuse NIB.”

By making the process of
obtaining an increase in NIB’s
administrative expenses as
“airtight as possible”, Mr
D’ Aguilar said the system
would be “less subject to
abuse than it has been in the
past.”

He added: “The employers
pay the greater proportion of
it [NIB contributions], and if
they’re coming to the busi-
ness community for more,
then responsible government
is to ensure it is not abused
by the Government of the
day. Everyone knows NIB is

The Nassau Institute, the
Bahamian economic think-
tank, said it had calculated
that, for a small firm with
three employees, the planned
increase in NIB contribution
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling would increase its
annual payments to the social
security scheme by 84 per
cent - from $5,500 to $10,100.

Such an increase, it said,
would provide businesses with
a further incentive to lay-off
workers amid an economic
recession, while eroding the
real income and ‘take home
pay’ of Bahamian workers.
The Nassau Institute added
that the increases would also
spur more employers and the
self-employed to seek new
ways to evade NIB payments.

The eighth actuarial report
on NIB again reiterated that
the social security scheme was
“plagued with high adminis-
trative costs”, averaging 21
per cent of contribution
income per year between
2002 and 2006. Operating
costs over that period grew
by 6.7 per cent per annum,
compared to an average 2 per
cent rise in inflation.

These costs were described
as “excessive’, and largely
caused by “significant over-
staffing” that was in no small
way driven by political con-
siderations.

While a 2003 report had
suggested that NIB’s staffing
levels could be cut by 25 per
cent - from 465 to 350 - with-
out any undue loss of service
quality, this strategy was then
undermined by the then-PLP
government in the run-up to
the 2007 general election, via
the hiring of people who were
likely to have been con-
stituents, friends, relatives and
party members in a bid to but-
tress votes and support.

The eighth actuarial report
revealed that while the Vol-
untary Early Retirement Pro-
gramme reduced staffing lev-
els at NIB by 89, “extensive
hiring in the first half of 2007
has eliminated most of the
savings that would otherwise
have been realised from the
VERP, as in July 2007 the




staff count stood at 496”.

This was higher than when
the 2003 review recommend-
ed a 25 per cent cut, again
showing how political inter-
ference was limiting NIB’s
effectiveness.

The eighth actuarial report
also recommended limiting
the directions a minister can
give to NIB’s Board to policy
only, although there is no
indication yet that this issue
has been taken up, and high-
lighted that “poor governance
practices” had affected many
aspects of NIB’s performance
during its 36-year history.

The report said: “For many
of NIB’s 33 years, practices
that were not in conformance
with the National Insurance
Act and general public expec-
tations have led to sub-par
outcomes in many areas.”

The report listed, as exam-
ples of this, NIB’s relatively
low compliance rates and
“excessive administrative
costs”; the fact the insurable
wage ceiling had only been
increased twice in 36 years;
and that “pension increases
and mass employee hiring
that coincides with general
elections”.

Poor governance, the
report said, had also resulted
in some 75 per cent of NIB’s
investments being made in
government, and government
agency, securities, while NIB
funds had been used “for pur-
poses other than prescribed
in legislation”.

Mr D’Aguilar, meanwhile,
expanded his analysis to the
rest of the public sector,
telling Tribune Business that
the reason many government-
owned corporations made a
loss was due to a lack of cost
controls and the inability of
political decisionmakers to
stop spending, combined with
government fears about the
impact rate rises would have
on the voters.

“No one has put in place
any safeguards to stop expen-
diture, so most public corpo-
rations run at a loss,” Mr
D’Aguilar said. “They hate to
increase revenues and rates,
but love to increase expendi-

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ture.

“It’s a recipe for disaster.
If you allow corporations to
increase expenditure willy nil-
ly, but limit their ability to
raise revenues, every single
one will run into problems
because they’re operating at a
loss.

“They should set a thresh-




















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NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

old and set a mandate. We’re
got to tackle seriously this
whole issue of cost control
and cost containment. If they
put limits on revenues, put
limits on spending. Make it
as difficult to do one as the
other. We’ve got to address
the imbalance in these corpo-
rations.”

Without such spending
safeguards, Mr D’ Aguilar said
politicians would have a
“blank cheque to increase
expenditure, and when the
election gets close they get
crazy. Everybody loses money
because they’re not allowed
to increase rates, but they’re
told to increase hiring”.

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NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidance Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:00 acm. to 12:10 p.m.

flush with money and subject
to abuse by governments.”

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays




Nassau Airport Development Company
Lynden Pindling Intemational Airport

Phe: (242) 377-0209 | Fax: (242) 377-0294
P.O. Bow AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: feedbackiinas.bs

Professional Development

Accounting | (12 Weeks)
Fri. 8/18, 69pm
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Fr. 818, 69pm

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September |4- Novem
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PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Pri Duties include:

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Supervising and training a small team of sales persons.

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products

Monitoring and tracking sales by category, on a monthly
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Planning and instituting product forecasts.

Planning and organizing promotions and avernts for the
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Successful candidate must posess the following
qualifications:

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The ability ta meet the high standards set oul by the
company and manufacturers.

Ba self-motivated with the ability to work independently.
Possess good leadership and interpersonal skills,
Computer literacy, VWiell-versed with Windows, Word
Processing (preferably MS Word), Spreadsheets (preferably
Excel), Geaktop Pubishing, and Date Management.

Competitive salary, commensurate with qualifications,
with sales incentives, plus vehicle allowance.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:



‘Fear factor is
subsiding a bit’

FROM page 1B

that were really sitting on the
fence,” he explained. “A cou-
ple of sales that transacted
last week first came in nine
months ago, but they were
afraid of losing their jobs.
They’re now feeling better,
more secure and they want-
ed to do it.

“For me to sit here and say
the recession has not affected
us would be a lie. But the
reality is that all these people
have to have somewhere to
live. I think the money is sit-
ting in their bank accounts.
It’s a willingness to part with
it. They’ve not necessarily
seen their incomes erode, but
they’re very cautious about
spending it. They’re thinking
twice.”

Out of the 30 units placed
on the market for Balmoral’s
first phase, some 27 have been
sold, with just two Grand
Homes and one Royal Town
Home still available. Mr Kin-
sale confirmed to Tribune
Business that town home con-
struction has started, while
the development’s show
home was “substantially com-
plete”, its roof just being put
on with the windows and
doors set to be installed this
coming week.

Some 35-40 construction





LEGAL

personnel were currently
working at Balmoral, Mr Kin-
sale telling Tribune Business
this number was set to
increase to 70-80 “in the next
week”. All the project’s roads
were in place, and the club-
house had been completed.

He added that properties
in the second phase of the
Balmoral development, which
when fully built-out will con-
sist of 70 single family lots and
200 town homes and con-
struction, were likely to be
placed on the market “maybe
in about another month or
so”, once phase one con-
struction had proceeded to an
appropriate point.

“We’re not in any rush,”
Mr Kinsale added. “We’re
well-capitalised, we bought
the land for cash, and the only
debt is for construction, so
we’re not in a rush to make
decisions we don’t have to
make. If it takes some time
to capitalise on it, that’s what
we'll do.”

Some 40 per cent of Bal-
moral’s current first phase
sales had been to first-time
home buyers, something Mr
Kinsale said had been driven
by the 2009-2010 Budget
incentives, which exempted
this purchaser category from
paying Stamp Tax on all real
estate buys valued at up to

TICE

NOTICE




$500,000, plus exempted them
from real property tax pay-
ments for the first five years if
the real estate was their pri-
mary residence.

With its condominiums
priced in the $300,000 range,
and town homes at around
$559,000, the former certainly
fit into this category for first-
time buyers.

Added

Yet Mr Kinsale added that
the package Balmoral had put
together with Finance Cor-
poration of the Bahamas
(FINCO), involving the pro-
vision of title insurance for
buyers and a reduction in
attorney fees, had also helped
to spur buyer activity by
reducing closing costs.

The Balmoral Develop-
ment principal suggested that
the title insurance was saving
buyers around $4,000-$5,000
in closing costs per transac-
tion, thus giving them an
enhanced “comfort zone” in
which to make their purchase.
In the absence of Stamp Tax
and real property tax, Mr Kin-
sale suggested that Balmoral
purchasers were collectively
saving “in the area of
$30,000” on transaction costs.

Citing a $365,000 Royal
Town Home, and taking the
incentives offered by the Gov-
ernment and Balmoral, Mr
Kinsale said the savings to
first-time buyers included 5
per cent Stamp Tax, equiva-
lent to $18,250; $4,312.50 in
real property tax savings for
the first five years; $5,000 in

attorney fees’ savings; and
$3,280 in mortgage stamp tax
savings. This added up, he
suggested, to $30,843.

Apart from first-time buy-
ers and young Bahamian pro-
fessionals, who accounted for
55 per cent of Balmoral’s
existing sales, Mr Kinsale said
the project was also appeal-
ing to families and “empty
nesters” who were looking to
downsize to a condo package.

“You have to have all the
four ‘Ps’ - price, product,
place and promotion,” said
Mr Kinsale on what was
needed to succeed in the cur-
rent Bahamian real estate
market. “In this economy, you
have to really nail it. You
have to have every compo-
nent driven in.

“Our location is excellent,
the price is reasonable and
people are seeing value in it,
the product is great and the
marketing is excellent.”

However, Mr Kinsale
warned Bahamian real estate
purchasers that favourable
buying conditions were
unlikely to last much longer,
especially in the western New
Providence and Cable Beach
areas where Balmoral was
located, due to the likelihood
that Baha Mar would pro-
ceed.

“This buying window is not
going to last much longer. It
may be here for six, nine
months, but time flies. But if
this Baha Mar deal comes
through, the window shrinks.
Everyone jumps on the Baha
Mar bandwagon and puts
their prices up.”

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)



In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
WILLIAM HILL ADVISERS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SYMPOSIUM FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000 s.137 and section 45
of the Segregated Accounts Companies Act, Chapter 396C.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 11, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 9th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



S.A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES

AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.





@) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View ovr website of www.cohedn.bs

NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:

The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 26 Thompson Bly,
For more informtaion call; 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdomi@ecobedu.hs

Application Deadline: L6th October, 2009,

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
CAMARGAN INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.

IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
the only child of the late
Franklin Eugene Knowles

(S.9, 11, 14)

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9B





FROM page 1B

although it was difficult to
predict when a Bahamian
stock market recovery would
occur, and whether it had yet
reached or passed the bottom
of the current down cycle, the
market would certainly be
through its low point by year-
end/early January 2010.

“T think it’s an excellent
opportunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks,”
Mr Kerr said. “There’s some
sound performers. AML
Foods, which has come off
eight consecutive quarters of
profitability; Commonwealth
Bank, which has stuck to its
niche; even Colina Holdings
and Doctors Hospital Health
Systems.

“There are a few of them
out there, that with good
management and a focus on

the customer, are doing quite
well.”

Mr Kerr added: “I think
we’ll probably be through the
bottom by December into
January, really, and then start
to turn the corner definitively
with the stock market in the
next six to eight months.

“Right now, people are def-
initely selling stocks to raise
cash for back-to-school, or if
they’re out of work.

“Yet there are pockets of
optimism. While we can’t pre-
dict the bottom, I think it’s
pretty good.”

Mr Kerrt’s analysis was sup-
ported by Michael Anderson,
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust’s president, who told
Tribune Business that “the
combination of good prices
and high dividend yields are
normally precursors to a
recovery in equity prices” and

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Legal Notice

the stock market generally.

RoyalFidelity’s FINDEX
index, which measures a
weighted average of stock
price and dividend yields, was
down 5.4 per cent for the year
to September 11, 2009, Mr
Anderson saying equity prices
had risen in July and August,
although not by huge
amounts. All this compared
to the 12.31 per cent decline
suffered by the FINDEX in
2008, thus indicating that the
market deterioration has at
least slowed.

Ratios

Mr Anderson added that
many BISX-listed stocks were
now at extremely attractive
P/E ratios, Doctors Hospital,
for example, with its P/E at
4, implying a 25 per cent
inherent rate of return. AML
Foods, with a P/E of 6, had a
16.7 per cent inherent return,
while the Bahamas Property

Fund was now trading at close
to a 30 per cent discount to
its net asset value (NAV).

“Those are the kinds of
yields you would not normal-
ly see, as you would normally
get a 6-8 per cent equity
yield,” Mr Anderson
explained. “Some stocks,
notwithstanding the fact
they’re at 52-week lows, have
PEs which are difficult to jus-
tify unless you believe the
economy is likely to improve.

“There’s some great value
in those stocks..... Those are
stocks that you cannot justify
where they are. There’s a
bunch of stocks out there that
are good value, and that peo-
ple should invest in today and
make a pile of money on
when they recover in a year’s
time. There’s really good val-
ue if you’re selective.”

Mr Anderson said large
price movements in some
stocks had resulted from very
few or small trades, driven by

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJR INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,—

Stock Market to turn
in ‘six-eight months’

the needs of some investors
to exit stocks and generate
liquidity and cash to meet cur-
rent obligations.

“A large number of securi-
ties have high dividend yields,
where the earnings are still
supporting good dividend
payments but share prices
have been forced down by
indiscriminate selling,” he
added.

Banking stocks, which
account for a major chunk of
BISX’s market capitalisation,
















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had already seen the effects
of the loan portfolio deterio-
ration, and its impact on their
earnings, largely factored into
their share prices, the Royal-
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust president told Tribune
Business.

“The current prices factor
in to a great extent the
depressed earnings of the
stock, so any change in earn-
ings should have an impact
on the stock,” Mr Anderson
added.

bembver 14th, 209
PRICE: § S00 per course

LOCATION: Munnimgs [dg
“Hed! RC acres from OOK

pl ki ATION; 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: Mel@ cobedu.bs

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JJR INVESTMENTS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supoly company which provides a wide range of
premium health care products seeks a qualified candidate
for the following position:

NOTICE
DALI INTERANTIONAL
HOLDINGS LTD.

—

Fg

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of DALI INTER-
NATIONAL HOLDINGS LTD.

has

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASOTHO VENTURES LTD.

— -,——

ff

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BASOTHO VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,——

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD. has

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

been completed; a

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

been

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELSINORE MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

— -,——

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-

tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of ELSINORE MAN-
AGEMENT LIMITED has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

SALES REPRESENTATIVE
sarin bee cia

* Assisting in the promotion of current products and
introducing new Item ta the Healthoare industry,

* /Monitoring and tracking of clients needs and requests

* Working a5 part of a team in the promotion of company's

products.

Bachelors of Associaies degree in allied Heallh Science
or Business Administration.

Effective communication and presentation skills (writhen

and oral).

Proven selling skills

Effective tirme-managenent planning and organizing skills,

Computer literacy. Welleversed with Windows, Word
Pronessing (preferably MS Word), Soreacdshects (preferabty
Excel), Qesktoo Publishing, and Data Management.

Selt-motivater and good team player.

The position offers a competitive salary with sales

incentives.

Successful candidate must be willing to travel to Family
Islands and the United States, as required.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 29 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,528.72] CHG -4.37| %CHG -0.29 | YTD -183.64 | YTD % -10.72

FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

(three (3) references to:

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES

fltaav ica MN © AX LT

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.15
9.90
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.00
2.74
5.26
1.27
1.32
6.60
8.80
10.29
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.09
10.00

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3344
2.8952
1.4105
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets:
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

1.15
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.00
2.74
5.94
3.76
2.03
6.60
8.80
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.15
9.90
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

10.00

10.29

2.74
5.94
3.65
2.05
6.60
8.80

4.99
1.00
0.30
5.50

10.09
10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Daily Vol.

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
2.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

14.00
4.00
0.55

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months

NAV
1.4038
2.8990
1.4880
3.0941

13.1136
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319
1.0673

YTD%

3.72

-1.39

3.79

-8.61

3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
3.38

-0.11

2.89

5.20
-4.16
5.49
-13.59
5.87
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-1.41
5.14
2.05
4.93

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Weekly Vol

0.00

-1.10

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.11

0.02
0.00
0.00

-0.01
-0.13

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Last Price

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

Daily Vol.

20,000
1,500

25,000
20,000

10,000

Weekly Vol.

Div $

EPS $

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

7%

Prime + 1.75%

7%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

10.6
55.6

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

N/M
256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
4-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news







What will the PLP
do going, forward?

" * _ PI

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

the 2007 elections, the PLP won the major-
ity of its votes also in one socioeconomic
group — “those with less than a high school
education.”

“The party will have great difficulty win-
ning elections in the future if it cannot
expand its following among younger voters
and those who are better off.

“The PLP’s narrow demographic base
of support is worrisome. Depending on
older and lower-class voters is not a recipe
for long-term success as the former die off
and the country and its citizens become
more prosperous. With the passage of time,
fewer people associate with the country’s

The question still remains, what will the
PLP do going forward? How will its lead-
ership, which every Bahamian should be
concerned about, position the party to
mount a formidable campaign against the
governing party? Because at the end of the
day to have good governance, you need a
healthy and vibrant Opposition that will
keep any government on its toes. Because
the worst thing that the Bahamas can have
coming out of 2012 is a sweep by either
party with only a handful of Opposition
members in the House of Assembly.

So let us look at what is before the PLP
at present.

Whether those in power want
to acknowledge it or not, the
Progressive Liberal Party is going
to change. A change for the
better or worse is still yet to be
decided, but come October 18,
the PLP will meet and possibly
decide its future and relevance

in the modern Bahamas.
However, do not be mistaken;
the PLP will always be a part

of the Bahamian political system
— but, as many within the party
acknowledge, the PLP can
ill-afford another term in
opposition...

efore we get into the specifics

of this discussion, let us first

accept some hard facts. The

PLP is broke. The coffers are

empty and anyone with com-
mon sense will tell you that PLPs aren’t
really lining up to donate any money at
this time.

Secondly, the PLP has long been associ-
ated with scandal and corruption (despite
the best efforts of the many “spin-doctors”
who seek to blame The Tribune or any oth-
er publication for this long held percep-
tion). Even in the early days of the party
Loftus Roker, one of its first MPs, com-
plained on the floor of the House that cor-
ruption was rocking the party to its very
foundations. It seems that despite their
best efforts the party still manages to find
its way into the national headlines even in

CEpGcht people vitivelly’ chy whence

Oma el Le

FORMER PM PERRY CHRISTIE

opposition. We need not go into details
here of actual cases as we are all well aware
of them.

The PLP (like the FNM) is saddled with
many candidates who, and forgive my
bluntness, are lazy, visionless, and quite
frankly not even qualified to handle scis-
sors. Again, details are not required as this
piece is not meant to embarrass or insult
anyone.

And finally the most damning fact that
must be faced is that the PLP is daily losing
its base — far more rapidly than the FNM.

With the PLP the majority of its support
ranges from 60 years of age and up. As
outlined in the Greenberg Quinlan Ros-
ner Research report commissioned after

colonial legacy, the fight for independence,
and the accomplishment of (Sir) Lynden
Pindling. The PLP needs to update its pos-
ture and rhetoric so that it has greater
appeal to younger and more prosperous
voters,” the report revealed.

But why dwell on things that we already
know? Because the message has yet to be
received. The PLP still believe that they
can win the next election without taking a
long and hard look at their party — without
changing its message, leader, or appeal to a
wider more enlightened audience.

As one political source plainly outlined,
the strategy now is to essentially point the
finger at the FNM and say, “You are the
ones to blame for the state of the economy.
You are the reason why I am unemployed.
You brought this on us, and therefore you
have to go.”

As it is often said, one should never
believe his own propaganda.

This argument being put forward by the
PLP will sadly only be swallowed by those
same persons with less than a high school
diploma who more than likely still believe
that The Tribune (by some miracle) was
able to climb into the Ministry of Housing
and bug the private lines of both the former
Minister Neville Wisdom and his then per-
manent secretary Leila Greene.

But I digress.

A former prime minister who is fighting

to not only remain pertinent in changing
times, but a parliamentary caucus that lacks
the courage to challenge him.

But fair is fair. Despite his many critics it

was under Prime Minister Perry Christie’s
watch that the Bahamas reached econom-
ic heights that others within our region
could only dream of. However, having lost
the 2007 elections, he is now faced with
what Stanley Greenberg, the renowned
polling adviser to Presidents Bill Clinton,
Nelson Mandela, and Prime Minister Tony
Blair described as the worst of political
fates “irrelevance.”

And this brings us to the thrust of the

argument going forward. Will the PLP be a
relevant party in 2012?

As many Bahamians will tell you, there

are persons within the party who would
like to be leader, and some say who are
even capable of being leader. But leader-
ship, as with many things in life, can, and
should not be just handed over. There
should be a fight, and the public should
see that fight, and see that someone is will-
ing to risk it all for the chance to lead them.

But for PLPs such as Dr Bernard Not-

tage and Paul Moss, such a venture if

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



What will the PLP do going forward?

FROM page 1C

“No one challenges the
leader in that organisation,” a
political adviser told Insight.

“The PLP you must under-

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ting leader has ever been chal-
lenged, and you can appreci-
ate what would happen polit-
ically to that candidate who
plays their hand and loses. So,
like with many things, they
will wait and scheme until an
opportunity presents itself.”
A fact that should also be
highlighted is that in 2007 the
Greenberg report stated that
despite Mr Christie’s per-
ceived weakness in leader-
ship, PLPs by and large still
wanted him to continue on as
leader. This fact, it is reported
was further substantiated in
the polling study conducted





























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by PLP deputy leader hopeful
Philip Davis.

Another issue that needs to
be addressed involves the
many persons who are owed
tens of thousands of dollars
by the party after having done
work during the 2007 cam-

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paign. These persons, it is
reported were enraged on
hearing that the party leader
had pledged to financially
assist former Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in meeting
her legal expenses after los-
ing the election court chal-
lenge earlier this year. She,
along with former Attorney
General Allyson Maynard
Gibson, failed to recover their
seats in yet another humiliat-
ing defeat for the PLP.

The only former candidate
to escape this “second humil-
iation” was the former Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry
Leslie Miller who opted not
to challenge the results of
Blue Hills in the court, stating
that elections are won on the
ground, “not in the courts.”

Another disturbing fact
exposed by the infamous
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
Research report revealed that
many of the PLP’s recent
“social” programmes geared
at engaging the youth and the
general public to be more
involved in the inner work-
ings of the party were in fact
strategies created and handed
to them by this research com-
pany to rebuild the party’s
image.

To those who may have
thought that the PLP was
making a real and meaningful
connection with them, this
revelation must have been a
painful one.

But unfortunately this is the
reality in Bahamian politics.
As I have often said, very lit-
tle is left to chance, and often
the moves that we see taking
place today have long been
decided and sanctioned
months before. This, there-
fore, begs some serious ques-
tions about transparency and
control in this society — a dis-
cussion that I hope we as a
people can one day have in a
mature and educated fashion.

What do you think?
pturnquest@

tribunemedia.net
telephone: 502-2361

For the stories
Rae
read /nsight Mondays

| |
fatal at

Tae ica COMM TTC sen ae





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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3C
INSIGHT

Readers have |@ â„¢ cwsceg: mu anius

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTESSION SERVICES

O
( e 1r S a PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042009
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RE: BACK TO THE ACTA a iC | 4000 UNTING FOR BEGINNERS | foltigees* 1p, | 4) DIKe | 10 wks | $740 1}

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LAST week’s Insight i @ S i AaINESS | | | |

argued that the Christian - Mere { CREDIT COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES | telllipre-tie : Se $2540

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make marital rape an . ' + i } | |
offence was less about reli- TOMPUTERS 1 T T t t

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position COMPA? t COMPUTER APU ICA TICS S | belt ipra-W Epes | the x | 355010

“The public statements of \ & ( I = COMPAL ug TROT TO THE ESTERNET | # lam | Tues Wed | Geen | | 52101100
Council members over the N WS 4 | [|

COM PY | fi | QUICER BOK belle me] | 33-5 £15 1)
CUMPO t WEA PAGE DASIN Wee She | eM berre ds beer lhoreFn 13-t bri toys | S550 1K
past several years have a COMPS Ic | WEE PAGE DESIGN WOH SHO I | Otlgned:30om | ThursFri | 22k | Pdevs | S800
made it clear they feel The stories behind the news
social progress — defined

by most of the western
ciciomits'*o | BACK TO THE DARK AGES
rights and democracy —

threatens much of what
th ey hold d ear. After all RUE. se THE Bahamas Christian Council has declared itself opposed to government's efforts to protect

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009



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DRA TDs

<. Women from being raped by their husbands, arguing that the proposed amendment to the Sexual ECT ERM lan Tt TERIOR DECC A TING | = ; 1 4 ‘Gen | Rooke | S750

many of them have become Offences and Domestic Violence Act could threaten the institution of marriage. The council paints Ht — = 1 — , a ik r : . RA * a 4 in oa fanned ; | : = Ta
. e a picture of a society beset on all sides by forces seeking to destroy the foundations upon which it SEALY /% | PCIE Lee ba | iT f | | Peep | Burks | SS IEE
exceedingly comfortable m. is rests. In reality, the government’s proposed marital rape law is a vital component of the enlightened PLOWS LOB AL (HESS folly } _ 7) Hihwks | $7240

their roles as the self-
appointed moral arbiters of
the nation,” it said.

The article generated a
great deal of response from
the public and became the
story to attract most read-
ers’ comments on our web-
site, tribune242.com.

ney to society we should be aspiring to become, and it is the Christian Council that is attempting to drag ; 7 ln Te ; TE EIrTh I : . T T i ect ee :
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Dear Sir,

I know I am a foreigner
living here by the grace of
the Bahamian Government
and people and perhaps it is
none of my business to
comment. But I felt com-
pelled to write and com-
ment on your article in
Insight.

I read your article in
Insight regarding the Chris-
tian Council with dumb-
founded interest.

The nearest modern
equivalent is to be found in . , .
the extreme forms of Islam. to the 6th century. They in traditional clothes, that is
The extremists of which also believe that any
seck to take the world back = woman who is not dressed SEE page 4C

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email penevigtcob.edu.bs



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THE FRONT PAGE of the September 7, 2009 edition oF /NS/GHT...



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PAGE 4C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

Readers have their say...

FROM page 3C

Burkhas etcetera, is an infi-
del and such a woman
should expect to be raped
whomever she is. To them,
women are second class cit-
izens to be used and abused
by men, and there is much
evidence to support this.
An ex-girlfriend of mine
in England had been mar-
ried for 28 years and was
divorced when I met her.
She had been the subject of
repeated marital rape to
the extent that she had lost
her libido completely. Her

husband insisted she have
testosterone injections to
boost her libido. All this
did was make her angry
enough to finally throw him
out. Then after her divorce
she found she had a very
active libido with the lovers
she subsequently took. The
message from this is very
obvious, rape is wrong.

The Christian Council
members are living in
another age and it saddens
me that such folk should be
listened to at all.

Your exposé of their
arguably pathetic views is

oa
‘ay
The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

both timely and necessary,
and I sincerely hope the
women of the Bahamas will
seek to put these prehis-
toric monsters in their place
very firmly. No man has the
right to rape a woman.

Any man with an ounce
of intelligence knows that a
woman who is enjoying sex-
ual intercourse is a much
better lover than one who is
not.

Yours Faithfully,

— Expat

It needed to be said. And
you said it. Thank you

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Paco. Thank you so much.
— Felicity

Good Insight column.
The BCC is an outmoded
entity.

On top of that, Patrick
Paul doesn't seem to know
what it is that he is talking
about.

— Juan McCartney

Beautifully written!
Every point was solid, well

articulated, and backed up.

The Tribune certainly has
come a long way! As a stu-
dent off to school, it's so
refreshing to get good
reporting and be able to
stay up to date on what's
happening back at home.
Thanks!

— Nickie

It is pleasantly refreshing
to see that there are those
willing to stand up for civil
liberties in the Bahamas.
Stay true to your convic-
tions.

— Marlon Johnson

This is by far one of the
best Insight articles ever. It
is so factual, relevant and
articulate. As for the Chris-
tian Council, they have
become a joke to our coun-
try and a disgrace to our
moral fabric. I don’t even
care to know who the presi-
dent is anymore. it takes a
gutsy government to make
this call and I am glad my
government did. Women
are abused too much in our
country and I fully endorse
the bill. As for Mr Paul, will
he please stick to important

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THE TRIBUNE

matters like gambling [lol].
— Ricardo Wright

I am thoroughly
impressed by your decon-
struction of Rev Paul and
the Christian Council’s
positions on marital rape.
You did a masterful job!
That aside I see something
beyond your view that this
resistance by them is pri-
marily a resistance to
change and their need to
maintain their fiefdoms. I
believe it’s also due to a
willingness by the majority
in this society to accept the
lowest common denomina-
tor on most issues of
national importance. It has
been happening on almost
every issue and it’s simply a
case where the loudest,
generally the least
informed, are leading the
debates and directing the
masses. This begs the ques-
tion of leadership (political
and most importantly oth-
erwise). It reminds me of
the movie Gladiator - THE
mob IS Rome...The mob is
The Bahamas!

— Johnny 5

I read this article today in
the paper and I was so
impressed at how well
thought out and how well
articulated this editorial
was. As a young, single
woman this topic is one that
has struck a chord with me
as I have listened intently
to both sides of the argu-
ment. It is so sad that some
men consistently refuse to
put anything else above
their own sexual gratifica-
tion. The portion of scrip-
ture that says wives must
submit to their husbands
also goes on to say that hus-
bands should love their
wives even as Christ loved
the church, that is the key.
Christ never “forced” his
agenda onto anyone, we
were given free will. Even

SEE NEXT page

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those who have picked up packages will be held in the Arawak Lounge at the Airport on
Wednesday, September 30th at 10:00am.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5C

INSIGHT



terlelo me
have their

yh Ae

though wives were mandat-
ed to submit to the husband
in all things, the husbands
were mandated to love
their wives on a divine level
so that the love would be
upheld whether she submit-
ted (disobeyed) or not. Is
that not what salvation is all
about? No matter what we
do we cannot be separated
from God's love and the
Bible also says that love is
patient and kind, not envi-
ous and not full of pride or
boastful. There is no way
that the Almighty would
sanction us to violate the
dignity of spouses that sim-
ply is not what his love is
about.

— My Point of View

It is shocking that the
Christian Council is able to
distort Scripture. Although
marriage can be seen as a
secular contract, to many of
us, marriage has a religious
significance. Scripture
speaks to love of our fellow
human beings and respect-
ing the dignity of every
human being. Nowhere is
this more true than with
marriage, in which many
intimate moments and acts
are shared. Rape is a vio-
lent crime, used for thou-
sands of years as an act of
war. Rape is not a right of
any person, nor should it be
seen as a sexual act by any-
one who promotes "Christ-
ian values.” Christian val-
ues mean respecting every
human being and their
rights. Marital rape under-
mines and destroys the very
basis of good Christian val-
ues.

-L

Nice to see the Christian
Council has moved into the
21st Century — keep it up
guys with attitudes like
yours soon there will be
NO church. Wouldn't it be
a shock if your congrega-
tion sat out on your next
service — or much worse
took back their tithes —
wonder what your tune
would be then? Those who



attend these churches
should show their antiquat-
ed “leaders” the way.

— Xinpa

I wonder... if it were
physically possible for a
woman to force herself
upon a man, thereby invok-
ing her marital rights as
outlined by all those oppos-
ing the law, would we be
having this same discus-
sion? Unfortunately, (or
fortunately for hum... he
can't be forced or raped) if
he's not interested, willing
or able, his penis does not
rise to the occasion, there-
fore making this a non-
issue. Shame women’s vagi-
nas don't seal up when
they're not interested, will-
ing or able.

— Sick and tired of this
foolishness

It is all fine and good to
say each of the persons in a
marriage has "conjugal
rights” when only one of
them can "enforce" these
rights. I wonder too, in cas-
es of men who work hard
and are not always at home
to fulfil their partner's
"needs", is 1t acceptable for
the woman to cheat? How
come the Christian Council
doesn't take a stand against
long office hours for men,
as this may leave his wife
no alternative but to cheat.
The whole thing is hypo-
critical and self serving, but
what do you expect?

— Enough

A wife unjustly forbids
the marital act, quite possi-
bly in an effort to punish
the husband or to exert
control. Which is itself a
violent act. The husband
says if no marital act, then
no allowance, then the wife
can charge rape through
threat (according to Web-
ster). Or should that be
prostitution where the hus-
band is treated as a John?
And that's just as absurd as
supposed "rape" in mar-
riage. There can be no rape

SEE page 8C

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and share your story.

a




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Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50

| aresident of Peter Street West, who died on Thursday 3 September 2009,
will be held at on Saturday. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

She is survived by her father, Simeon Richardson; 1 son, Thurman
Knowles; 1 daughter, Cecelia Richardson; 3 grandchildren; 3 sisters; 3
brothers & a host of other relatives & friends.

Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Corner & formerly of Eneas Jumper Corner,
who died on Sunday 30 August, 2009 will be held at East Street Gospel
Chapel, East Street, on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor
Tom Roberts & Associate Ministers. Interment follows in Old Trail
Cemetery.

| She is survived by her 5 sons, Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace, Junior

Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters, Margaret Humes,
Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand; 10 great
grand; 1 uncle; Bill Simmons; 2 aunts; Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons.

Steven Alexander Fernander 26

a resident of Dominica Way, Carmichael Road, who died on 24 August,
2009, will be held at Church of Christ, 8th Street the Grove, on Saturday
at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor D.W. Dorsette. Interment follows
in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by his mother, Menesha Ingraham; father, George
Fernander; grandparents, Ivalean & Thomas Ingraham, Velma & Harris
Fernander; sisters, Cortrea Cooper & Shanice Fox; brother, Jeffery

Alexander "Junior, Lanton" Wilson, 72

a resident of Fox Hill, who died on Sunday 6 September, 2009, will
be held at St. Anslem Roman Catholic Church, Bernard Road, on Friday
at 4:00 p.m. Officiating will be Monsignor Preston Moss. Interment
follows in the church cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, Margaret Wilson; 6 sons,
Alexander, Daniel, Alfred, Patrick, Andy & Matthew Wilson; 1 daughter,
Alice Smith; 4 sisters, Angela Ferguson, Louise Daniels, Thelma Stewart
& Betty Edwards; 1 brother, Llewelyn Ferguson.



Stephanie Patricia Woodside, 52

a resident of Windsor Lane West, will be held at the Church of God of
Prophecy, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 12:00 noon. Officiating will
be Pastor Samuel Moss. Interment follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her 10 children, Shanette & Shawn
Johnson, Keshee Flowers-Spencer, Steven, Shaneker, Shamarl & Shanaya
Woodside, Ketra, Shian & Shran Flowers; father, Nelson Woodside; 8
grand children, Kevin, Renardo, Cara, Jay, Ryesha, Tamaia, Ashanti & Adrea; sisters,
Stephanie Moxey, Valarie Woodside, Seadrid Ferguson, Violet Bain, Billy Dorsett, Marilyn
McLaunder, Jennis Simmons, Rochelle Woodside & Alva Ritchie; brothers, Charles, Glenn
& Jethro Woodside.

Isadora Archer, 80

a resident of South Beach & formerly of Old Bight, Cat Island, who
died on 28 August, 2009, will be held at Dixie Church of God, Wulff
Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Pastor John Davis
| Jr. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 brother, Bishop John T. Archer
of Fort Pearce, Florida; 2 sisters, Maud Rolle & Verdell Johnson & a
host of other relatives & friends.

Leo "Leah" Taylor, 89

a resident of Grenada Cresent & formerly of Que, North Caicos, Turks
Island, who died on 3 September, 2009, will be held at Southland Church
of God, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Salathiel Rolle. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 daughter, Anamae; 7 grand
children, 15 great grand & 5 great great grand children; 1 sister, Gerita
Lopez & a host of other relatives & friends.

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PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Readers have their say...

insight"

because the two are One
Flesh. Ephesians 5:28-31 In
every culture marriage is a
unity that this anti-Christ-

ian, anti-Marriage law
denies. .. Obviously the pro-
ponents of this law (who
understand it) are more

concerned with overturning
Judeo-Christian values than
they are in protecting
women against spousal

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abuse. They could easily
compromise and get to the
real issue.

-Anthony Taylor

If a man withholds funds

from his wife because she
will not have sex with him, I
think it should give her
grounds for divorce and she
should take him for evety-
thing he has.

If she has any sense, she
will leave him.

— Lady

This issue is so political
that its asham. Women are
the majority in this country
and in the voting demo-
graphics. The economy is in
the gutter, which has been
the single most catalyst for
governmental change dur-
ing recent elections. If, you
propose, then pass a legisla-
tion purporting to advance
the agenda of the majority
voting block you retain
your governmental status
quo. This is a ploy. How
about reading the Sexual
Offences and Domestic
Violence Amended Act
2008.

— Charlton Deveaux

As I read the newspaper
this morning and the
Insight editorial, I was com-
pletely disgusted with the
views that the Christian
Council and Rev Paul share
in regards to the amend-
ment of the marital rape
law. How can they say they
represent Jesus (as Christ is
love) yet are completely
against a woman having the
protection against an abu-
sive husband. It’s funny
how you only hear from
these False Prophets when
it comes to homosexuals
and movies, but you never
hear them speak out
amongst their own "broth-
ers" in regards to buying
flashy Bentley cars and
reaping additional tithes
from already cash strapped
church members. Bahami-
ans, it is time to wake up
and realise the real men



and women of God and see

that the "others" have their

own agendas for control

and possible ambitions —

be it political or otherwise.
— Darinique

As far as I am concerned,
the Christian Council, in
taking this position, is the
equivalent of the Taliban in
Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Christian fundamentalism
is as backwards, ignorant
and disrespectful of peo-
ple's rights, in particular
women’s rights, as their
Muslim “brothers.” Wake
up, Bahamas! Shake off
these false prophets,
shameless scammers and
Bentley driving fools and
think for yourself. Protect
your daughters and moth-
ers and sisters from the evil
men who think that there is
a difference between
“force” and “violence.” I
never heard such a foolish
argument in my life. Rape
apologists... the whole lot of
them... and that doesn't
sound too Christian to me.
I hope more people think
for themselves than follow
these “shallow tins.” I see
nothing but the very same
Scribes and Pharisees that
Jesus so adroitly put in
their place. Time to do the
same in this country. Say
goodbye to these false
prophets!

— Erasmus Folly

What I want to know is
how does the Christian
Council manage to brain-
wash about 50 per cent of
the Bahamian population?
Religion really must be like

HuGcIiEs

Ss Me



crack, or as Karl Marx said
"the opiate of the masses."
It doesn't surprise me that
Rev Paul -— or any self-
appointed moral authority
for that matter - sees noth-
ing sinful with a man raping
his wife. However, I refuse
to believe that these
women who agree — rather,
who are forced to agree, for
if not they will go to Hell —
actually believe in their
hearts that it is proper for a
husband to force himself on
his wife. How could they
truly believe that their God
would want this for them? I
guess the fear of being
thrown into the fires of Hell
is powerful enough to let
themselves get raped. Or
worse, powerful enough for
them to defend the act.
Furthermore, it is a proven
fact that marital rape caus-
es emotional trauma to
women. What sort of
women defend this kind of
act? More importantly,
what sort of church leaders
let that happen?

P

Quote from article: "As it
turns out, there seems to be
no record of huge changes
in a society, the collapse of
the family unit, or an erup-
tion of widespread false
claims as a result of the
passing of such a law." —
That's cause there's no
family left to destroy. The
family unit collapsed
decades ago with Televi-
sion.

The countries that have
the law are no poster chil-
dren for Utopia.

— Anthony Taylor

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Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R ‘I left him in bed asleep, it was the last time I would see my boy alive’ C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.243MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS, SUN, T-STORM HIGH 90F LOW 79F By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net A TEN-YEAR-OLD disabled boy died after being t rapped in his bedroom as flames ripped through his family's home. Wheelchair-bound Jer m aine Mackey was sleeping in a bedroom while his moth er Anastacia Hepburn dashed o ut to a nearby food store for g roceries shortly around 8.30 am yesterday morning. W hen she returned to their tiny apartment in Colony Village about half an hour later, she came face-to-face withe very mother's worst night mare – a fire-engine parked outside her smoking home and the news that her oldest boy was dead. "I left him in the bed sleep ing not knowing that was the last time I would ever see him," Ms Hepburn, 34, told The Tribune before breaking down into tears outside thec harred remains of her home yesterday. Boyfriend Rodney Minnis, 37, was at home with Jermaine and the couple's fouryear-old child when the tragedy struck. He said he nodded off in the living room sofa with the four-year-old next to him watching television as Jermaine slept in the bedroom. Mr Minnis said seemed like minutes later when the youngest boy woke him with screams of 'Daddy! Fire!' He said his first instinct was to rescue the four-year-old and said when he returned for Jermaine the small home was engulfed with sickening, black smoke and huge orange flames "galloping" along the ceiling. Unable to get into the bedroom, he left to find a neighbour to help but the thick smoke and hot flames barred their entry. "I can't believe this happen I standin' here but I can't believe this happen," Mr MinThe Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com B y TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net A N INMATEhas died following a fight in a cell at Her M ajesty's Prison. P olice are investig ating the "suspicious" death of 55-year-old Lloyd Allan Alburyw ho died in hospital less than a week after being imprisoned on a vagrancy charge. According to a brief statement released by the Ministry of Nationa l Security, Albury was i nvolved "in an inci dent with other inmates in a cell" atH er Majesty’s Prison on Fox Hill Road. Police yesterday could not provided etails into Albury's i njuries and said his death would remain classified as "suspi-c ious" until an autopsy could be performed. "We launched an investigation on Fridaya nd a team of investi gators went to the prison to uncover the circumstance of hisi njuries. We are going to do a lot more work tomorrow, and we are going to request an autopsy," said head of the homicide squad Inmate dies after prison cell fight SEE page nine RODNEY MINNIS stands in the area where 10-year-old Jermaine Mackey was trapped in the fire. Mr Minnis and a neighbour were held back by smoke and flames. MUM’SAGONYASDISABLEDSONDIESINFIRE SEE page 10 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net THE Government is to press ahead building the controversial $150million Wilson City power plant on Abaco as con cerns linger about its affect on the environment. State Minister of Environment Phenton Neymour says he is confident the Government has laid to rest nearly all the fears on the issue after officials met with concerned citizens at a packed town meeting on the island. Mr Neymour told The Tri Govt presses ahead with controversial $150 million power plant SEE page nine LOCAL educators should replay the speech US President Barack Oba ma gave last week on education to inspire Bahamian students, Tribune colum nist Sir Ronald Sanders has urged. Mr Obama's speech broadcast in American schools last Tuesday encouraged students to strive for their best in the classroom and to take responsibility for their educational careers. "We can have the most dedicated teachers, the most supportive parents, and the best schools in the world and none of it will matter unless all of you Obama speech ‘should be used to inspir e Bahamian students’ SEE page 10 POLICE officials could decide today on how to pro ceed against a male teacher accused of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old student. Whileremaining tightlipped on the investigation, ASP Leon Bethel said yesterday he expects to speak with the Attorney General’s office about the matter. The teacher was taken into custody late last month for questioning pending further investigations by police. It is alleged that in late August, he drugged and later assauted a male student who attends the senior high institution. The student reportedly complained to another teacher about the matter, which caused the school to contact the police. This latest case of molesta tion is just the latest in a troubling trend that has spread across the Bahamas. The Ministry of Education, through its minister Carl Bethel, has vowed to protect children at all schools, pledging to bring any sexual perpetrators to justice. Police set to make decision on teacher accused of sex assault MARKKNOWLESand doubles partner Mahesh Bhupathi had to settle for runnersup spot at the USOpen in Flushing Meadows, New York yesterday. The pair fell to Lukas Dlouhy and Leander Paes who won the final 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. SEE SPORTS ON PAGE12 FOR FULL STORY MARKKNOWLES(AP KN OWLES ANDBHUPATHI LOSE IN USOPENFINAL

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A MAN believed to be in his twenties d ied Friday night after his scooter crashed i nto a parked car. The man was riding a XY-150 scooter north on West Street, near the Greek Ortho dox Church, when he lost control and crashed into a parked Honda Civic. T he accident happened at about 9pm on F riday. E MS personnel pronounced the man dead at the scene. The victim was wearing short beige trousers, a white T-shirt and white tennis shoes . Heis described as 6ft 2ins tall. Police are investigating. Man dies after scooter crashes into parked car THESCENE of the accident on Friday night. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net THE Miss Grand Bahama beauty pageant organisation has announced that Garrelle Hudson was stripped of her title and responsibilities. Miss Hudson, 19, told the media last week that she relinquished her title over what she described as “management issues.” She also claims she has not received any of her prizes. But according to a press release issued by the organisation, a new queen was appointed on Friday to replace Miss Hudson. First runner-up Nikki Severe has now assumed the title of Miss Grand Bahama 2009/10. According to the organization, Miss Hudson “failed to cooperate with the organization”. It went on: “The Miss Grand Bahama beauty pageant organisation places great emphasis on total cooperation and the abiding of all pageant rules and regulations. “We were very disappointed that Miss Hudson failed to cooperate with the organisation and refused to abide by/with the organizations rules, regulations and expectations. As a beauty queen, our representatives are role models for all women, young and old, alike and are held at higher standard during their 12-month reign. “We do understand the pressures that are associated with t he higher standards of being Miss Grand Bahama, but that is why all of our contestants are vetted and during the six-month training and preparation for the pageant they are made fully aware of what is expected of the Queen.” The organisation further state d that the title of Miss Grand Bahama and the Miss Grand Bahama crown and sash are the property of the Miss Grand Bahama organisation. “No queen by being crowned acquires any rights to retain the crown or use the title Miss Grand Bahama or any promotional material as photos, videos, publicity material etc, in any endeavours, public or private, without the written per mission of the president at his sole discretion. “We are saddened that we were forced to dethrone Miss Hudson, however, we would have preferred in our traditionally fashion to have a graceful changing of the guards. Miss Hudson is instructed to immediately cease all reference to and the further use of the title of Miss Grand Bahama 2009, in all forms of media including press conferences, Facebook and Myspace websites. We wish Miss Hudson, the best in her future endeavours.” T he organisation said Miss Severe will complete the 2009/2010 reign and represent the island in China at the Miss Friendship International Pageant in October. She will also travel to Colombia in January 2010, to represent the Bahamas in the Miss Coffee International Pageant. Miss Severe inherits, among a whole list of prizes, a full scholarship to attain an associate degree in any discipline of her choice from Terreve College. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 3 pc Queen Sleigh Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $4,210 $4,210 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,410 $4,410Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n M M e e d d i i t t e e r r r r a a n n e e a a n n Miss Grand Bahama ‘was stripped of her title and responsibilities’ GARRELLE HUDSON was crowed Miss Grand Bahama in MarchP h o t o : D e r e k C a r r o l l POLICE officers came under heavy gunfire early Sunday morning following a brief chase in the Fox Hill area. According to reports, mobile division officers were on patrol through Step Street, Fox Hill, when they saw two men in a red Nissan Sentra acting suspiciously. The vehicle sped off as police approached, resulting in a brief chase which ended through a dead end corner just off Step Street. The occupants of the car exited the vehicle, firing shots at the officers as they fled. None of the officers were injured but the police car sustained damages from gunshots. Officers come under fire after chase A MAN was taken into police custody after police discovered a loaded 9mm handgun in his truck. Drug Enforcement Unit officers were on Tonique Williams Darling Highway at about 7pm on Friday when they stopped the driver of a black 1998 Chevy truck. The vehicle was searched and offi cers discovered a .9mm handgun with five live rounds of ammunition inside. The driver of the truck, a 37-year-old of Prince Charles Drive, was arrested and taken into custody. He could appear in court today to face weapons charges. Man in custody after loaded handgun found THE National Workers group will host a town meet ing on Thursday to assist peo ple with financial challenges. Don Saunders, of law firm Graham Thompson & Co, radio personality Orthland Bodie Jr, and Sonia Hamil ton, chairman of National Workers Board of Directors, are slated to give remarks. The meeting, to be held at Workers House, on Tonique Williams Darling Highway, will begin at 7pm under the theme “How do you stop financial institutions from harassing you”. The event is free. The National Workers Gr oup meeting n APOPKA, Fla. WILDLIFEofficials are putting the squeeze on giant pythons in Florida, according to Associated Press. Friday, officials seized Delilah, an 18-foot-long, 400 pound python who fed on rab bits in an Apopka-area backyard. Concerns about Delilah’s size and whether the chain-link cage she was in was secure enough to contain her prompted the visit from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Delilah was removed and brought to a caregiver with a permit to handle large snakes. Officials are trying to determine whether the owner has the proper permit. Earlier in the week in Lakeland, officials uncovered two large pythons, an 11-foot-long male and its female companion, a 17-footer weighing more than 150 pounds. Huge pythons captured in two Florida cities

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EDITOR, The Tribune. The Bahamas is facing its worst recession in many years with businesses having to down size and families hav ing to cut back wherever pos-s ible to make ends meet. Rumour has it that cash flow is hard to come by for the government, leading to c ut backs in some interesting places, yet the country opens a consulate office in Atlanta, Georgia. According to the Bahamas Information Services, the fanfare was wonderful. It appears that no expense was spared. Politicos were flown in along with The Grand Bahama Youth Choir and the Royal Bahamas Police Force Bands (Pop and Marching tain the crowd. I’m sorry, but I’d be will ing to bet dollars to donuts that this expenditure cannot be justified, particularly during these tough economic times. The former government in its ultimate wisdom opened an Embassy in Cuba, at tremendous expense, at a time when they had already strained relations with our largest trading partner, and now this government opens a representative office, at significant expense, when the country is suffering under the toughest economic times in decades. I realise that governments think not raising a budget for expenditure is saving money, but what could the Bahamas Government be thinking? The government at least owes the Bahamian people a detailed report of their reasons for this office, along with an accounting of how they spent taxpayer money. RICK LOWE Nassau, August, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. The growing number of “men of the cloth” advocating e limination of the death penalty is worrying. They seemingly do so more from a humanistic rather than a biblical perspective. P rogressive thinking, humani stic, liberal clerics have steered the church far from biblical teaching. It is because of such progressive, humanistic, liberal thinking that an openly gay A nglican priest, living in “union” with his male mate, has risen to the high office of bishop of the church. Moreover, the fact that notwithstanding hisl ifestyle, the bishop was elected b y other bishops of the church speaks volumes to the pervasive extent to which depravitye ngulfs the church today. I n an article on the subject of the death penalty which I w rote sometime ago, I noted words with import similar to the following: “Those opposed to the death penalty generally argue that capital punishment does not deter or prevent ani ndividual intent on committing m urder from doing so. I pres ume they argue from the s tandpoint of various studies on the subject, studies albeit c arried out in someone else’s jurisdiction rather than ours no doubt. I don’t intend to argue otherwise, at least not just yet. In my earlier article I had noted that those who focus on t he issue of deterrence surely miss the point. T he primary purpose of capital punishment is not to prevent murder any more than the p rincipal reason of a fine or incarceration is to prevent any other form of criminal behav iour. Retribution, recompense if you will, extracting from an offender pay-back similar ind egree to the individual's trans gression, is the genesis, the f oundation forming the basis for imposition of a sentence. The punishment must fit thec rime.” The death penalty is the ulti m ate punishment. It fits the most egregious of crimes, snuffing out of another’s life. In my article I also communicated that proponents and o pponents of capital punishment are so firmly entrenched in their positions that what I had to say likely would not h ave had much bearing on their v iews. I nevertheless offered a perspective which I pronounced to be somewhat unique and, to a d egree, erudite. I noted that both the Old Testament and the New Testament spoke in clarion clear terms to the issueo f the punishment fitting the crime. The ultimate punishm ent, the surrendering of one’s life, clearly fits the ultimate c rime, the wilful, deliberate, premeditated taking of anothe r’s life. Laws of the Old Testament characterize appropriate pun-i shment as an "eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth." In the New Testament Jesus described it thusly: "With which measure y e mete it shall be measured to you." L iberalist, modernistic, socalled progressive thinking New Testament scholars seek to limi t Jesus' words of “giving back in equal measure”, to the dis p ensing of rewards only. I regard such limitation as beingr eflective of intellectual deprav ity for surely the dispensing of punishment (by the appropriate authority), is inherent in the words uttered. T he second argument advanced by opponents of the d eath penalty, is the possibility of someone being wrongly con victed and punished. Why limit discourse to the death penalty? The wrongful conviction and punishment of anyone for any crime is abhor r ent. Do we therefore have the courts dispense with the imposition of all penalties? God for bid. While wrongful convict ions can and no doubt do occur, though with significant infrequency, I doubt anyone h as the gumption to suggest c ourts should discharge every case that comes before them because such a risk exists. M oreover, capital cases by their very nature receive far more review than other cases. Hence, the risk of erroneous judgmenti s minimized. As to the finality of imposition of the death sentence, I previously offered the following perspective from a good reverend gentleman: "Death is a phase not finality. It is temporal r ather than terminal." In closing out my previous note on this subject I opined that I subscribe to the view that lawlessness begets lawlessness. I also noted that lawlessness may arise from acts of commission as well as acts of omission and that the state’s failure toc arry out the capital punishm ent statute on our law books might be considered an act ofl awlessness thus begetting the lawlessness which has become so prevalent, so rampant in our once quaint, God-fearing n ation. E arlier, I suggested that I did not intend to immediately a rgue the merits or otherwise of the efficacy of capital punishm ent serving as a deterrent to murder. The opportunity is now presented to study the subject in a local context. Murder statistics over the past seven to eight years that capital punishment has been pending is a given. The oppor tunity now presents itself for similar statistics to be looked at once capital punishment is resumed. T he opportunity exists. It ought to be embraced withoutd elay. "Carpe diem." MICHAEL R. MOSS Freeport, Bahamas, June 29, 2008. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WHEN A BOAT is sinking the crew will put aside their differences in the common i nterest of survival and, shoulder-to-shoulder, bail until they reach safe harbour. Today the world community is that boat and only those countries will recover whose citizens understand that their only hope is in unity of national purpose. This is when oppo-s ition parties have to realise that a “loyal” opposition only opposes that which it sin-c erely believes is not in the best interest of the country. It becomes a major part of the p roblem when it opposes just for the sake of opposing. When its politicians believe that the end justifies the means and those means can include unfair character assassination and lies. A gain to return to our sinking ship, it’s like having the crew bailing to save the ship, while one or two of their mates are in the stern, busily drilling more holes to sink her. T his is the type of politics we see in the Bahamas, and even more alarmingly so in the United States since the election of President Barack Obama. We say alarming, because it is of great concern to the B ahamas, whose future prosperity depends upon America’s recovery from a world recess ion triggered by the uncontrolled financial greed of Wall Street a street that history w ill record in ignominy. America is looked up to as the leader of the free world. However, as we see the spectacle of its “loyal” opposition, putting its politics before the country, those nations that depend upon America’s rapid recovery have much to fear. Before us we see a spectacle of political dishonesty, scare mon gering and partisanship to an extent that t hreatens America’s position as a world leader. Meanwhile, Americans are losing their jobs, their homes and their security. So are Bahamians, and for the same reason a world recession. Yet we have an opposition politician in our midst who well knows why businesses are belt tightening, and citizens are jobless, yet will say, with his irritatingly s mug smile, that this country’s unemploy ment figures add to the “mounting evidence of the fundamental failure of the Right Hon Hubert Ingraham as Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.” According to him, Mr Ingraham is better at winning elections than governing the country. W ould he say the same about President Obama whose country’s unemployment fig u res continue to climb? And if not, why not? Can you imagine a Southern Republican S enator in a fight over health care saying that “if we’re able to stop Obama on this, it will be his Waterloo. It will break him”? The nation is at economic risk, but instead of concentrating on the real problems, theya re busy trying to break a new president before he is even given a chance to govern. The Republicans complain about big government and heavy debt, forgetting that it was their party that bequeathed to the new a dministration a $1.3 trillion deficit, the largest in the nation’s history. But the fight, and lies told by politicians to block President Obama’s inspiring speech for delivery to school children last week, was the most shocking of all. His speech wasd esigned to encourage young people to stay in school, take responsibility for their learn-i ng “and put in the hard work it takes to succeed.” M any schools refused to air his speech, a speech that all children should have heard. Many parents kept their children from school, because the opposition spread the false alarm that it was “fascist,” “Hitleri ndoctrination,” and “socialist” among many other things. The political viciousness continued and was swallowed hook, line and sinker by the nation’s gullible and ignorant. R eally it was a frightening spectacle. But most disconcerting of all was the views of the Florida GOP chairman who did not want his children to hear the “vision” of their president. In other words he wanted to c ontrol what they saw and what they heard. It seems that his children missed a wonderf ul civics lesson, and he, as a parent, passed up a golden opportunity to have a discussion w ith them on the parts of the speech with which he disagreed. That is how children learn. But if America’s youth are to go through life with blinkers attached by their parents to shield them from another man’s point of view, then indeed, if America is to retain its position as world leader, the world is in a lot of trouble. No wonder on BBC’s HardTalk T hursday evening President George Bush’s former national security advisor, in dis cussing what went wrong in the Iraq war, had to admit to Stephen Sackur that the Americans had “to confront an enemy” they did not understand. And they probably didn’t understand Iraq, because, despite America’s strength and wealth, its people on the whole remain insular, nursing only their own p oint of view, and many stupidly shielding their children from even exploring another man’s ideas, opinions and culture. And today many Americans are afraid of the views of their new President because he is an international man. He has lived among and listened to the points of view of many o ther nationalities. He listens, he reasons and he understands. That is why other n ations show far more appreciation for him than do his fellow Americans. Unlike the m ajority of his countrymen his mind encompasses broader horizons. In fact he is a breath of fresh air. We are certain if he were before the BBC’s Stephen Sackur Thursday night he could never have made the embar-r assing admission that he took his country to war against an adversary he did not under stand. Number of clerics who oppose death penalty is worrying LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Unity of national purpose needed What could Bahamas gover nment be thinking?

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net POLICE are questioning a woman over the drive-by shooting of a 22-year-old man in Sunshine Park. ASP Leon Bethel said the woman, who he described as middle-aged, was taken into police custody on Saturday morning. “We have interviewed a number of persons and we have in our custody a woman who we are questioning,” ASP Bethel said. According to initial police reports, it was just after 10am on Friday when 22-year-old Degario Knowles and another man were sitting on a wall of a house on Winward Isles Road when a green Honda Inspire drove up and its occupants opened fire. As Mr Knowles made a dash to escape the attack, a gunman emerged from the back seat of the car and continued shooting. Mr Knowles reportedly staggered several feet into a neighbouring yard, managed to hop a backyard fence before collapsing leaving a large trail of blood behind him. The death pushed the nation's murder count to 59. Meanwhile, just hours after the Sunshine Park murder, police were called to the scene of another incident in the neighbourhood. At around 1.30am on Saturday, police received reports that a man was firing shots and had threatened a woman friend. Police searched a house in Garden Hills and found a handgun and ammunition . A 24year-old man was taken into custody. ASP Leon Bethel said police are certain the incident was not connected to the murder of Mr Knowles. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Woman questioned over the drive-by shooting of man, 22 THE United States' ambassador-designate to the Bahamas Nicole Avant plans to promote literacy in children as well as continuing the fight against illegal drug and weapons trafficking dur ing her tenure in this country. During a courtesy call on Rhoda Jackson, C harge D'Affaires, at the Bahamas' Embassy in Washington, DC, Ms Avant said she was "deeply honoured" to be the first African-American woman ambassador to the Bahamas. She added that she was passionate about mentoring local schoolchildren, and wants to pro mote 'Read To Lead', a literacy program in Bahamian public schools which grew out of an ini tiative started in 2005 by former US Ambassadort o the Bahamas John Rood. Ms Avant, who is expected to arrive in Nassau early October, also expressed a keen interest in humanitarian assistance programmes. U S AMBASSADOR-DESIGNATE CALLS ON BAHAMAS IN WASHINGTON AMBASSADOR-DESIGNATE Nicole Avant (right Bahamas' Embassy in Washington.

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FUNERAL services were held on Saturday for the daughter of Works Minister Neko Grant who died in hospital in Florida after losing a battle with pneumonia last week. Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on September 6 the day after Mr Grant buried his mother, Reva Grant and only months after the death of his father. Nekcarla, an attorney who worked for the Grand Bahama Port Authority's legal department, was admitted to Doctor's Hospital for treatment before being transferred to the intensive care unit of the Cleveland Clinic in Florida, where she later died. Ms Grant, a mother-of-one, was graduated from St Mary's University in the United States with a bachelors degree in history before studying law at the University of Leeds, where she was graduated with honours in 2000. In early 2001 she was called to the English Bar and in September of that year she was called to the Bahamas Bar. The funeral was held at Freeport Bible Church in Grand Bahama. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ,167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&( Funeral services for the daughter of Minister Neko Grant ABOVE : Minister of Public Works and Transport Neko G rant guides the casket of his d aughter Nekcarla Grant, 36, d uring the processional of her f uneral service held Saturday, S eptember 12, 2009 at Freeport B ible Church. LEFT: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham encourages Minister of Public Works and Transport the Neko Grant at the close of the funeral service for Minist er Grant's late daughter Nekc arla Grant held Saturday, September 12, 2009 at Freeport B ible Church. S haron Turner / BIS MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Neko Grant (right is pictured holding his grandson Daniel, son of his late daughterN ekcarla Grant at herfuneral service held Saturday, September 1 2, 2009 at Freeport Bible Church. Also pictured is Mrs Barbara Grant and Mr Grant's son Neko Grant II.

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By RONALD SANDERS ( The writer is Consultant and former Caribbean Diplomat) E VERYONE knows good sense when they h ear it, and Barack Obama’s back-to-school address on September 8 to students fromk indergarten to 12th grade in the United States was perfect good sense. It was as applicable to students in the tiny Caribbean Island of Montserrat, in the overcrowded urban centres of B razil, in the leafy suburbs of France as it was to students in the United States. And, it was delivered with an authenticity that could only come from someone who had experienced serious challenges and overcome them. The message, broadcast to s chools throughout America, was compelling: “Where youare right now doesn't have to determine where you'll end up. No one's written your destiny for you... you write your own destiny.” Obama’s observation would strike a visceral chord in at leastt wo generations of Caribbean people who climbed out of deprivation by absorbing edu cation to write a destiny very different from the future towhich their circumstances pointed. When he described his moth er giving him extra tuition at 4 .30 in the morning because she couldn’t afford to send him to the school other American kids attended in Indonesia where they lived at the time, men and women in developing countries the world over could identify with the problem and the deter mination. I n the Caribbean, waking up with sun’s rise to study was a norm for many students in rur al areas whose homes had no electricity and whose parents could not afford private schools or extra lessons. In some cases, study in the light of the early morning sun preceded work in t he field before setting-off for school. Many of the professionals in Caribbean life today reached the pinnacles they have by recognising then what Obama, from his own similar experience, could say today: “Each of you has a responsibility for your education, (It is sibility you have to yourself.” And, Obama’s message was not patronizing. His was not the voice of a privileged guy for whom talk is cheap. The students saw the Presi dent of the United States, but the voice they heard was that ofa successful man who had once been a fatherless child, brought up in tough circumstances by a single mother. The lesson was clear. As he said, “My father left my family when I was two years old, and I was raised by a single mother who struggled at timesto pay the bills and wasn't always able to give us things the other kids had. There were times when I missed having a father in my life. There were times when I was lonely and felt like I didn't fit in. So I wasn't always as focused as I should have been. I did some things I'm not proud of, and got in more trouble than I should have. And my life could have easily taken a turn for the worse.” All over the Caribbean today, there are children aban doned by fathers and being brought-up by struggling single mothers. The extent to which this has a deleterious effect on the children is a matter that sociologists and others are studying, but already there is evidence that many children in such circumstances find little motivation in schools and in formal education. But, the problem of turning away from education is not restricted to children of single mothers alone. It is particularly manifest – and worrying – in Caribbean universities which today graduate more women than men because fewer men than women are seeking higher education. There appears to be a disconnection between many young people in the Caribbean and the formal education system. Obviously, given the factt hat President Obama chose to talk to students throughout the United States in their first weekb ack at school, the problem exists there as well. He could not be more passionate in his call to students to seize education for the good it will do them. “You can't drop out of school and just drop into a good job. You've got to work for it and train for it and learn for it”, he said. In a passage that appealed to the students to do good not only for themselves, but for their country, Obama declared: “You'll need the knowledge and problem-solving skills you l earn in science and math to cure diseases like cancer and AIDS, and to develop new energy technologies and protect our environment. You'll need the insights and critical thinking skills you gain in history and social studies to fight poverty and homelessness,c rime and discrimination, and make our nation more fair and more free. You'll need the cre ativity and ingenuity you develop in all your classes to build new companies that will create new jobs and boost our econo my.” All that he said to Ameri c an students, holds true for stu dents in the Caribbean, but even more so. For the Caribbean needs skills and knowledge much more than countries, such as the United States, in the developed world. In this regard, the resource that the Caribbean most needs tod evelop is its human resource. Businesses and governments in the region require people with capacity in a range of skills that include engineering, manage ment, accountancy and auditing, marketing and negotiating. The region’s need for such skills is worsened, of course, by t heir migration out of its borders into places such as the US, Canada and the United Kingdom. The fact that over 60 per cent of tertiary educated people from the Caribbean have left (in the case of Jamaica and Guyana, the figure is over 80 per cent) speaks powerfully to the importance of educating even more of the region’s young people in the skill areas that are needed. But to get more young people into tertiary education, the Caribbean has to get them successfully through secondary education. This is why Obama’s power ful message, directed at young people in America, should be cheered by every serious busi ness entity in the Caribbean. For Caribbean youth who may have missed it, Chambers of Commerce should join with schools in arranging for it to be broadcast in schools in the region, and discussed by students, their teachers and potential employers. There is a destiny to be written. ( Responses to and previous commentaries at: www.sirronaldsanders.com) C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM f ntbf 't $ %%%!# Writing your own destiny: Barack Obama’s universal message for youth WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 0DFKLQHU\(QHUJ\/LPLWHG /LPLWHGfWKHDXWKRUL]HG&DWHUSLOODUGHDOHU LQ7KH%DKDPDVLVORRNLQJIRU 7UDLQHH 7HFKQLFLDQ&DQGLGDWHV WR \HDUV ROGIRUHQUROOPHQWLQWKHLUORFDO&DWHUSLOODU 7UDLQLQJ,QVWLWXWH&DQGLGDWHVVKRXOGEH JUDGXDWHRI%79,RUDQHTXLYDOHQWLQVWLWXWLRQ 3UDFWLFDOH[SHULHQFHLQUHSDLULQJGLHVHO HQJLQHVDQGRUHOHFWULFDOHTXLSPHQWLV SOXV6XFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHVZLOOEHWUDLQHGLQ0 t ORFDOWUDLQLQJLQVWLWXWHH[SHULHQFHG PHFKDQLFVDQGHOHFWULFLDQV7KHWUDLQLQJ ZLOOEHGRQHLQ1DVVDXZLWKRSSRUWXQLWLHV WRUHORFDWHWR)UHHSRUWRU$EDFR EUDQFKHVXSRQFRPSOHWLRQ3OHDVHDGGUHVVDOOUHVXPHVWR 7KHHUYLFHDQDJHU 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 5HVXPHVFDQDOVREHGURSSHGRII DWWKHUHFHSWLRQLVWGHVNDW PDLQRIFHLQ2DNHV)LHOG5HVXPHV PXVWEHUHFHLYHGQRODWHUWKDQ)ULGD\ 6HSWHPEHUWK 2QO\SHUVRQV EHLQJLQWHUYLHZHGIRUWKLVWUDLQLQJZLOO EHFRQWDFWHG For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comCaves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites T RIBUNE242, the online edition of the nation's lead-i ng daily newspaper, is fast b ecoming an internet sensat ion. The latest figures released today show how Tribune242 i s growing daily as informa t ion-hungry surfers log on to get the latest news, features a nd sports reports. But that’s not all they’re logging on for, our readers are also enjoying is one of the many unique features of Trib une242 ... the opportunity to comment INSTANTLY on A NY s tory they read. O ther websites may lay claim to having "millions" of readers, but the figures they u se are based on the number of "hits" the amount of traf fic a site gets. For a number of reasons, t hese figures do not give an accurate picture of how many p eople are viewing the site. We at Tribune242 look at the number of "unique visitors" – the number of NEW r eaders – who are logging on d aily ... and this is what really counts. O n launch day, Monday, A ugust 10, we recorded 1,926 u nique visitors. Since then the number of new readers has grown daily, standing at 2,168 o n September 7. A nd by pure coincidence, if you subtract our launch day f igure from that of September 7, we have the incredible number 242 . Tribune Managing Editor John Fleet said: "To the uninf ormed, these figures may not look impressive since they t end to think in terms of hits. But in reality, they give us the bragging rights to being the best read interactive news w ebsite in the Bahamas, quite possibly even the Caribbean. "And this is just the beginning. We have many exciting plans in the pipeline for Tri b une242." To join The Tribune's growing family of online readers, simply log on to www.tri b une242.com T ribune242 website is growing daily T HEhome page of tribune242.com

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bune yesterday: "In the time w e had available, I am of the view a number of individuals who originally may have had some issues with the plant due to the misinformation and pro-p aganda being spread have now left that meeting with a positive view of BEC and the plant." H e said he only wished the Government had more time to clearly demonstrate how Bunker C fuel is used worldwide. "First of all, we only had one town meeting to disseminate all of the information that we had available to us. If we had more t ime it could have been seen even more clearly that the power plant is one that is placed throughout the Caribbean, North and Central America. "If we had more time we could have illustrated the number locations (that are in Bermuda, Brazil, Chile, V enezuela, Mexico, the United States such as South Florida," said Mr Neymour. Concerns about the possible environmental and health impacts of the power plant hit f ever pitch in recent weeks. A video claiming the potent ially damaging impact of the heavy oil Bunker C (HFO p ower plant was released on an Internet video sharing site thisw eek. An Internet petition to s top the development had also been signed by hundreds ofc oncerned supporters. The Government has said t hat measures to prevent environmental destruction will be t aken by ensuring regular maintenance of the plant and threem ile pipeline to the tanker port, providing staff with proper training and support, and by a ppointing an environmental officer to oversee all such conc erns. Some Abaconians have also c riticized The Government for not informing them about the p lant before they began construction last month. But Mr Neymour explained that the plant had been in the pipeline under the former PLPl ed administration. He added that during the FNM's current t erm, plans for the plant had been discussed by the Prime Minister and during Mr Neymour's budget debate in Parliament. According to Mr Neymour, Government was not made a ware of any opposition to the project until recently and added that the plant was desperately needed to supply Abaco's growing demand for power. "I did not receive significant concerns about it. BEC, after selecting a suitable site, began c onstruction because Abaco has been impacted by the conditions of the current power plant. There is a peak demand of 24-megawatts and the current facility currently supplies 27-megawatts. "So if a generator goes down, normally it leads to a position where load shedding occurs. So they felt it was critical that we begin to meet the growing needs of Abaco. We, t he Government, are concerned about the development of Abaco and also concerned that there may be a few individuals who may not, or appear to not, like Abaco to develop further," he said. Mr Neymour said now that the Government has met with r esidents of Abaco in an attempt to dissuade their fears: "We will continue with the construction of the power facility we don't see a reason to stop". He added that he is open to meeting with the environmentalists concerned about the Wilson City plant on the country's national energy policy. "One of the things that we would like to do is to have a meeting with some of the envir onmentalists on a national energy policy . I am open to a discussion with them if they are willing to discuss the energy policy," said Mr Neymour. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A3-semester program of study designed to produce Licensed Practical Nurses with the t echnical knowledge and practical skills required to assist the Registered Nurse or Physician in p roviding safe and competent nursing care to clients in a variety of healthcare settings A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN is a nursing professional who is trained to perform a w ide variety of tasks under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN I n The Bahamas, the LPN is known as the Trained Clinical Nurse (TCN L PNs work in a variety of healthcare settings such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, residential care facilities, schools, laboratories, birthing centers and insurance companies.E ntry Requirement: High school graduate with 2.5. GPA Current Health Certificate P rogram Length: 12 months (3 semesters Total Credits Required: 45 Students will be trained to practice within The Bahamas and to write the NCLEX-PN exam for minimum U.S. certification College-level courses transferable to degree programs Affordable fees, payment plan available Convenient evening class times, ideal for working peopleRegister today! Space is limited!! Contact us at 242-394-8570a Certificate Course forLicensed Practical Nurse ALBERTHA MILLER Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB ANITA L BURROWS Matthew Town, Inagua ANTONIA LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island BRENDA ADDERLEY CLAUDE LESBOTT P. O. Box SS-5481 New Bight Cat Island CYRIL WILLIAMS I Yellow Elder Gardens 2 CYRIL WILLIAMS II Yellow Elder Gardens 2 DWAYNE DORSETTE EDNA DEAN P. O. Box N-4912 IAN TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 JASON SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive JENNIFER TRECO P. O. Box N-3693 KEVA FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua KOVAN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825The following individuals are asked tocontact Ms. Arnette Rahming (356-8328or Ms. Shamara Farquharson (356-8456LEANDRA PINDER Matthew Town, Inagua MERVIN SMITH P. O. Box CB-11825 MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 NASHLAWN CURTIS NESHA JASMINE L CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 NIKITA CURTIS OLIVIA GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM P. O. Box N-7905 RENDAL COLEBY P. O. Box N-8672 SANSCHIA CULMER P. O. Box SS-5818 STAFFORD MILLER Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB STEPHEN FAWKES Matthew Town, Inagua VICTORIA SAUNDERS Prince Charles Drive WELLINGTON DORSETTE WILFRED GAITOR P. O. Box N-5359 Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel. " From our information he was sent to prison for vagrancy and he was placed in a cell. While in the cell he received injuries and that's what we're looking into right now. He was in prison for less than a week." Mr Bethel could not say exactly how many inmates w ere in the cell at the time of the attack. H e explained that investigators were informed of the incident late Friday and therefore were still gathering information on the details surrounding Albury’s death. Albury was taken to hospital for treatment on September, 8 but died two days later, added the ministry'ss tatement. Govt presses ahead with controversial $150m power plant FROM page one Inmate dies after prison cell fight F ROM page one To have your say on this or any other issue, e mail T he Tribune a t: l etters@tribunemedia.net or deliver your letter to The Tribune on Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207

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fulfill your responsibilities," said Mr Obama speaking from the Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia. "Unless you show up to those schools; pay attention to those teachers; listen to your parents, grandparents and other adults; and put in the hard work it takes to succeed. And that’s what I want to focus on today: The responsibility each of you has for your education. I want to start with the responsibility you have to yourself." Mr Obama also stressed that it was the civic duty of each student to discover his or her hidden talents and to hone those skills. "We need every single one of you to develop your talents, skills and intellect so you can help solve our most difficult problems. If you don't do that, if you quit on school, you're not just quitting on yourself, you're quitting on your country." He also warned students that the road to success is not as glamorous and easily attained as portrayed on television shows, adding that hard work and determination are the keys to success. "Whatever you resolve to do, I want you to commit to it. I want you to really work at it. . .The truth is, being successful is hard. "You won't love every subject you study. You won't click with everyt eacher. Not every home work assignment will seem completely relevant to your life right this minute. And you won't necessarily succeed at everything the first time you try. "That's OK. Some of the most successful people in the world are the ones who've had the most failures," he said. For those branded as problem students, Mr Obama encouraged them to plod on despite thier frustration and not to accept negative perceptions of themselves. "If you get in trouble, that doesn't mean you're a troublemaker, it means you need to try harder to behave. If you get a bad grade, that doesn't mean you're stupid, it just means you need to spend more time studying. No one's born being good at things, you become good at things through hard work. . .You've got to practice. "Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't be afraid to ask for help when you need it. I do that every day. Asking for help isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of strength. It shows you have the courage to admit when y ou don't know something, and to learn something new. "Don't ever give up on yourself, And even when you're struggling, even when you're discouraged, and you feel like other people have given up on you don't ever give up on yourself. Because when you give up on yourself, you give up on your country," the president said. For days leading up to the speech the president was demonised by his detractors for attempting to indoctrinate American children into his so-called "socialist" agenda. There was harsh commentary from right-wing conservative pundits, some of whom accused the president of trying to drum up support for his proposed health care reform, which has met much resistance from opponents. SIR RONALD SANDERS: PAGE 7 C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7($&+,1*,7,216$7 .,1*6:$<$&$'(0<(OHPHQWDU\FKRRO$ 7HPSRUDU\&RPSXWHU6WXGLHV7HDFKHU LVQHHGHGIRUVWXGHQWVLQ.LQGHUJDUWHQ WKURXJKJUDGHVWUDLQHG(OHPHQWDU\ &ODVVURRP7HDFKHULVSUHIHUUHG7KH SRVLWLRQFRXOGEHDYDLODEOHIRUVHYHUDO PRQWKV+LJKFKRRO$ 7UDLQHG0XVLF7HDFKHULVQHHGHGIRU V WXGHQWVLQJUDGHVWKURXJK VXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHPXVWEHTXDOLHG DQGDEOHWRSUHSDUHGVWXGHQWVIRUWKH YDULRXV([WHUQDO0XVLF([DPLQDWLRQV $SSOLFDWLRQVFDQEHFROOHFWHGIURPWKH +XPDQ5HVRXUFHV'HSDUWPHQWDWWKH %XVLQHVV2IFHWHOHSKRQHQXPEHU 2QO\%RUQ$JDLQ&KULVWLDQVVKRXOG DSSO\ 7KH'HDGOLQHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQVLV nis cried as he looked upon the burnt remains of his home in disbelief. Mr Minnis said he can still hear Jermaine's screams for help and is overcome with grief because he could not help him. "He was very quiet, he was disabled, he can't do anything for himself. I feed him, I do everything for him. He would go to school and if he ain' see me all day he would hug me and squeeze me tight he's just that sweet loving," said Ms Hepburn,a mother-of-three. ASP Walter Evans said police responded to the fire at the middle unit of a triplex around 9am. He said firefighters met the home in flames but quickly extinguished the fire. The cause of the blaze is under investigation. A neighbour complained that firefighters took nearly half an hour to respond to the call and said other neighbours tried to d ouse the flames with water. B ut an officer at the Elizabeth Estates fire station said they r eceived the call at 9am and responded at 9.05. Remarkably, the two adjoining units of the tri-plex were not damaged by the fire. LOCAL NEWS F ROM page one MUM’SAGONYAS SONDIESINFIRE Obama speech ‘should be used to inspire Bahamian students’ F ROM page one BARACK OBAMA(AP

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net MARK Knowles said he’s “super disappointed” that he and Mahesh Bhupathi “didn’t get the job done” and had to settle for the runners-up title in their second appear ance this year at a Grand Slam final. The Bahamian-Indian num ber three seeds were unable to withstand the come-frombehind efforts of No.4 seeds Lukas Dlouhy and Leander Paes in the two-day rain delayed men’s doubles final at the US Open yesterday. But the Czech-Indian duo, who had upset the top seeds and defending champions Americans Bob and Mike Bryans in the semifinal on Wednesday, rallied for a 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 win as the rain finally subsided in Flushing Meadows, New York. “It’s extremely disappoint ing because we let the guys back into the match and the match turned around a little bit in their favour,” said Knowles, who was nursing an injury to his right ring finger from an elevator accident at the Tennis Center prior to the start of the tournament. The match was originally scheduled for Friday, but had to be cancelled because of the rain. Organisers tried again on Saturday, but it was the same result. “We didn’t play as well as we should have, having to wait for three days to play the final,” he pointed out. “We had good momentum going, but at the end of the day, we didn’t play the way we are capable of playing. We just didn’t get the job done.” Yesterday, Knowles and Bhupathi seemed headed for the victory when they took the first set after they had got a break for a 4-2 lead and they never looked back. “It’s going to be tough (to absorb the loss) because we were playing so well in the tournament. I think my serve let us down. My serve really let them back into the match,” Knowles pointed out. “So it’s disappointing. It’s going to take a while for me to get over this one.” But in the second set, Dlouhy and Paes rallied to return the favor for a break at 4-2 and they got another one at 5-3 to secure the win to even the score. In the critical tie-breaker, Dlouhy and Paes got the initial break for a 2-1 lead and then at 5-2, they went up with another before they held serve for the win. It was their second Grand Slam for the C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 12 PAGE 14 Local boxing news TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM MARK KNOWLES , of the Bahamas, and Mahesh Bhupathi, right, of India hold their second place trophy for the men’s doubles finals withK nowles’ son Graham at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. Leander Paes, right, of India, and his partner Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, won the championship. A BOVE: MAHESH BHUPATHI , of India, top right, serves over his partner Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, against Lukas Dlouhy, of theCzech Republic, and Leander Paes, of India, during the men’s doubles finals match. RIGHT: MAHESH BHUPATHI , right, of India, watches as his partner Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, returns a ball to Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, and Leander Paes, of India. PHOTOS: Elise Amendola/ Associated Press 2009 USOPENDOUBLESFINAL ‘It’s great to have the Tank back in action’ Sherman Williams’ manager Knowles and Bhupathi lose thriller I’m ‘super disappointed’, says Bahamian tennis ace SEE page 14

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net IT was redemption time for both Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown and Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands a t the IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final in Thessaloniki, Greece on Saturday. Both Brown and Sands clinched second place finish in their respective events after they missed out on an opportunity to capture a medal at the 12th IAAF World Championship in Athletics last month. Brown, who watched as his first individual medal at the championships slipped away from him in Berlin, Germany when he had to settle for fifth in the men’s 400 metres, stormed to a second place in Greece. His time of 45.49 seconds trailed only American LaShawn Merritt, the back-to-back Olympic Games and World Championships gold medalist, who easily won in 44.93. Brown, however, would get revenge on American David Neville, who dove across the finish line at last year’s Olympics in Beijing, China. Neville followed in third in 45.60. Both American Jeremy Wariner and Trinidad & Tobago’s Renny Qwon, the World Championships’ silver and bronze medalists respect ive, opted not to compete in the grand finale. While Merritt collected $30,000 for his victory, Brown was awarded $20,000 for second. Neville earned $15,000 for third. Like Brown, Sands also picked up $20,000 after he finished second as well in the men’s triple jump with his best leap of 17.19 metres or 56-feet, 4 3/4-inches on the third of his four attempts. Cuban Arnie David Girat, the 2002 World junior champi on, took the title with his win ning leap of 17.45m or 57-3 on his second attempt. Bulgarian Momchil Karailiev was third with 17.18m or 56-4 1/2. The only medallist from Berlin to compete was gold medalist Phillips Idowu of Great Britain, who was fourth. He only took two jumps with his best being 17.03m or 55-10 1/2 on his second attempt. Both silver medalist Nelson Evora of Portugal and bronze medalist Alexis Copello from Cuba, didn’t compete. Sands was sitting in the bronze medal spot until the final round when Copello came from behind to drop him to fourth. Also on Saturday, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie had to settle for fourth place in the wom en’s 200 metres. The World Championships’ bronze medalist clocked 22.45. She received $ 7,000. There was a photo finish at the line with three-time World champion Allyson Felix of the United States holding off 400 champion Sanya Richards. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ( AP Photo/ Thannasis Stavrakis) CARMELITA JETER from the U.S.A., far right, wins the Women’s 100 meters during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. While Chandra Sturrup (far left) took fourth in 11.17 for $7,000, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (second from left) could do no better than 11.24 for sixth and $4,000. Redemption for Brown and Sands IAAF/VTB BANKWORLDATHLETICSFINAL, GREECE U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, centre, runs to win the men’s 400-meters ahead of Chris Brown of Bahamas, left, and David Gillick of Ireland, right during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009. A P P h o t o / T h a n n a s i s S t a v r a k i s A P P h o t o / T h a n n a s i s S t a v r a k i s Bahamian duo clinch second place finishes U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, right, crosses the finish line to win the men’s 400-meter ahead of Chris Brown of Bahamas, during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009. SEE page 14

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SI STERN said he’s delighted to have Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams back in action. Stern, the American manager of the Grand Bahamian heavyweight, said he had some big plans for Williams, including the possibility of fighting here at home, once he finish his commitment in Germany next month. Williams is lined up to fight German Emmanuel ‘Diamond Boy’ Charro in a live television show in the 10round co-main event on Saturday, October 10 in Warsaw, East Germany. I t will be Williams’ first appearance in the ring for the year as he makes his return after a hand injury he sustained in January just before he was to have fought in Key W est, Florida. “I think he’s going to win and after he wins, Sherman will have a lot of very good fights over there,” Stern said. “That’s where the money is in the heavyweight division, so he just need to go over there and take care of business.” Although he’s not had a fight for the year, Stern said he doesn’t think it will have any effect because Williams has been active in the gym training as he recovered from the injury. “He’s done things like going over to Germany to spar, so he’s familiar with the territory, he’s familiar with the area,” Stern stressed. “That’s one of the reason he’s fighting this fight over there because they saw him spar over there. He’s kept in shape going into the gym.” Over the next three weeks, Stern said he’s lined up a series of sparring sessions witha number of competitors, including two Russians. He will be working out withD avid Jackson, who is considered one of the top trainers in the world. “We brought them in on purpose so they could spar with Sherman,” Stern pointed out. “So I anticipate he will be in the best shape he’s been in for many years. “His body hasn’t taken its t oll yet because he haven’t had that many fights over the past couple of years, but he should be in first class shape by the time he’s done.” Once he return from Germany successful, Stern said they intend to have a celebration before Williams get prepared for a return to Key West, Florida on January 16. “If he wins, I don’t see anything but positive moves up for him,” Stern said. “I think that the promoter in Germany, who is one of the premier promoters in Europe, will also want to talk to us about his next fight in Germany.” Although he’s been fighting in South Florida and Europe, Stern said the next big move is to bring a show to the Bahamas for Williams to showcase his skills. “I really think it’s time for us to sit down with the people in the Bahamas because here we have a guy like Sherman, who could be one of the best heavyweights in the world,” he said. “I don’t see why when we do our show in January that we can’t get ESPN to put some focus on the Bahamas with the view of him coming back home to fight.” Stern said the Bahamas is definitely the ideal place for boxing to come and once Williams live up to his end of the bargain by winning in East Germany, they will definitely be looking at the possi bility of him fighting here either in December or early January. s great to have the Tank back in action’ Sherman Williams’ American manager has big plans for Grand Bahamian heavyweight BACK IN ACTION: Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams year, adding to the French Open at Roland Garros. Had they won, they would have celebrated with a prize purse of $210,000 each. Instead, they will earn $105,000 apiece as the runners-up. Knowles and Bhupathi were also the runners-up at the Australian Open in January, losing to the Bryans. Their only victory this year came at the Rogers Cup in Montreal at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Tournament. Despite losing, Knowles and Bhupathi joined Dlouhy and Paes in qualifying for the prestigious Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London in November. Already qualified prior to the US Open are the Bryans and Wimbledon champions Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic. After taking a couple weeks off to recuperate, Knowles and Bhupathi will get back together on October 5 to play in the China Open in Beijing, China, followed by the Shanghai ATP Masters in Shanghai, China, starting on October 12. From there, they will play in the Grand Prix de Tennis de Lyon from October 26 before they go to London. But he admitted that it’s going to be a little difficult to digest their loss in the US final yesterday. In 2004, Knowles and his former long-time partner Nestor won the US Open. Also former partners, Bhupathi and Paes were runners-up in Flushing Meadows in 1999. But Bhupathi teamed up with Max Mirnyi to win the title in 2002. Knowles, along with his family, should be back home around 11:30 am today in time to attend a luncheon at 1 pm at Government House. The event is being organized by the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture for his stellar 20-plus career, including his Wimbledon Grand Slam mixed doubles title with German Anna-Lena Groenefeld in July in London, England. LEANDER PAES , right, of India, and his partner Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, hold the championship trophy after winning the men’s doubles finals match over Mahesh Bhupathi, of India, and Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. In the center is Dlouhy’s wife Rhea Pillai and their three-year-old daughter Aiyana. l i s e A m e n d o l a / A P P h o t o Knowles and Bhupathi lose USOpen thriller F ROM page 12 B oth were timed in 22.29, a season’s best for Felix. Jamaican Ker ron Stewart came through in third in her season’s best of 22.42. T hen on Sunday, Ferguson-McKenzie came back to contest the 100 with Chandra Sturrup. While Sturrup took fourth in 11.17 for $7,000, Ferguson-McKenzie could do no better than 11.24 for sixth and $4,000. Jamaican Sherone Simpson slipped in between the pair in 11.20 f or fifth and $5,000 and the three medalists from the World Cham pionships finished in the top three spots, but in different order. A merican bronze medallist Camelita Jeter won in a champi onship record of 10.67, Jamaican gold medalist Shelly-Ann Fras-e r was second in 10.89 and Stewart, the silver medallist, was third in 10.90. Redemption for Brown and ‘Superman’ Sands FROM page 13 T ENNIS KNOWLES CELEBRATIONS MARK Knowles is due to return home t oday around 11:30 am at the Lynden Pin dling International Airport. He is expected to be greeted by members of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul ture in a “welcome reception” in the VIP l ounge where a brief ceremony will take place. T hen it’s off to Government House where a luncheon will take place at 1 pm. T he Ministry is honoring Knowles for his stellar 20-plus year career on the international scene. K nowles and his mixed doubles partner Anna-Lena Groenefled won the Wimble d on title in July in London, England. However, after two days of rain delay, Knowles a nd Mahesh Bhupathi lost in the final of the US Open in the men’s final yesterday in Flushing Meadows, New York. BASKETBALL B GDBA FINAL T HE Bahamas Government Depart mental Basketball Association will begin t heir best-of-five championship series tonight at 7 pm at the DW Davis Gymnasium. T he match-up will showcase the Electro Telecom Cybots against the PoliceC rimestoppers. S OFTBALL NPSA ACTION THE New Providence Softball Associa tion hosted a double header on Saturday n ight at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. I n the ladies’ opener, the Pineapple Air Wildcats blasted the Mystical Queens in t hree innings, while in the feature game, the Thompson Heavy Lift Outlaws knocked off the Mighty Mits. SPORTS NOTES

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM HUNDREDS of job seekers are expected to crowd the Kendal GL Gymnasium today as registration and orientation for the government’s National Training Pro-g ramme takes place. The programme is one of several initiatives taken bythe government in response to the current economic downturn, aiming to improvej ob skills and the unemployed’s chances of findingw ork. This latest venture was created in conjunction with and consultation from the Bahamas Christian Council,T he Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, The BahamasE mployers Confederation, Trade Unions, The College of the Bahamas and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Training Institute. The government in its 2009-2010 Budget allocated $250,000 for the programme which is also being conducted in Grand Bahama. Courses will be conducted at The Bahamas Technical Institute.A total of 1,000 applicants have been selected for the courses divided into three 10 week semesters, taking around 333 trainees per term. Training courses will be available in accounting, computer applications, enginer epair, landscaping, as well as straw and shell craft. National Training Programme registration and orientation today A ML Foods Limited has announced the appointment of Vaughn Roberts as the company's new director. Mr Roberts assumed the post on September 1. “With the evolution and changes in the company, the board of directors felt it necessary to expand the knowledge base and skill set of the board. Mr Robert’s background and experience fulfilled the criteria that the nominating committee was looking for in a potential director," said Gavin Watchorn, AML's president andCEO. M r Roberts is the director of the Downtown Nassau Partnership (DNP “I am excited to join the board of AML Foods Limited as it continues to strengthen the core brands; Solomon's, Cost Right and our franchise Domino’s,” said Mr Roberts. “I accept the responsibilities of directorship and will draw on my expertise to help guide the company.” AML Foods Limited announces new director

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE MINISTER of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette looks at fresh vegetables at the Health Fair on Saturday at the Ministry of Health grounds in Meeting Street. NATIONAL DANCE school dancers HEALTH F F A A I I R R P HOTOS: Felip Major / Tribune staff MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette are shown some supplements by a staff member from Ballys Gym. The Ministry of Health fair took place in Meeting Street.

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‘Fear factor is subsiding a bit’ C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$ $4.25 $4.16 $4.26 By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net F ormer Prime Minister P erry Christie has warned that substandard infrastructure in Exuma led to the demise of the FourS easons Emerald Bay Resort, and urged the present Government not to allow the property to suffer a similar fate under Sandals’ ownership.. Mr Christie, speaking at the opening o f HVS (Bahamas port and roads were unsuited to prov ide the service required by a five-star rated development such as Emerald Bay, indicating that the situation had not changed . D irecting his comments towards Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, the former prime minister asked that the Ingraham government understand the dis parity between its financial resources a nd the private sector’s, and the ability to get things done with existing revenues and capital. Alluding to the need for massive public sector capital works improvements in Exuma as an incentive for S andals’ development of its recentlyacquired Emerald Bay Property, Mr Christie digressed in his speech to suggest HVS was the type of companyt hat could assist with those improvements. The former prime minister recalled how HVS had been hired by his gov e rnment to conduct a study that would help determine the level of investment incentives as a percentage of the total investment that were ultimately grant-e d to Kerzner International for its $1 billion Phase III expansion at Atlantis. Mr Christie said the issue of Kerzn e r International’s investment incentives had become increasingly contentious, especially in the political arena. "We determined, having discussed this matter extensively, that we as a c ountry ought not to risk the con frontation that was developing over that issue, and we negotiated and asked questions about whether we shouldg ive concessions," Mr Christie said. "Using the expertise of HVS, we moved from the phase one 45 per cent concession and phase two 38 per cent c oncession to a phase three 20 per cent. "HVS sent their team in and gave us great insight into the workings of the private sector, into the workingso f Kerzner, which was truly the success story in the Bahamas, and the organization that helped us to rede f ine the Bahamas and redefine tourism in the Bahamas. "HVS steered us to the conclusion that you did not have to give a dollar in concessions insofar as your country is concerned and they justified that the i nvestment was so profitable that the country could arrive at such a conclusion." HVS is a global services and cons ulting organisation focused on the hotel, restaurant, shared ownership, gaming, and leisure industries. The Bahamas office is its first in the C aribbean. Managing Director of HVS's Caribbean operations, Parris Jordan, told Tribune Business that HVS wasn ot new to the Bahamas, having previously done studies for the Bahamas government, Baha Mar and Atlantis. Ex-PM: ‘Don’t let anchor resort die’ * Principal behind $100m project says Budget incentives and financing package, offering closing cost savings of $30,000plus, drive 40% of sales to first-time buyers * ‘Turbulent’ few months show signs of ending, as some confidence returns * 27 of 30 first phase units sold, with construction w orker numbers set to double in next week * Yet ‘buying window shortening’, with project requiring all ‘four Ps’ to be in place By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A $100 million Bahamian real estate development believes the 2009-2010 Budget incentives helped to ensure 40 per cent of firstp hase sales were to first-time h ome buyers, its principal telling Tribune Business that demand has shown signs of increasing as “the fear factor” in the market eases. Jason Kinsale, head of the 43-acre Balmoral Develop ment on Prospect Ridge, said that while “the last few months have been turbulent and there has been a lot fear in the market”, the developer had seen “a significant increase in traffic and people bringing in deposit cheques in the last few days”. Mr Kinsale said the increased buyer interest was likely to have been helped by the previous week’s agreements between the Chinese and Baha Mar, indicating the $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment may ultimately proceed, plus the sight of actual construction taking place at Balmoral always a sight to inspire confidence in potential purchasers. However, he added that “the fear factor is subsiding a bit”. As an example, Mr Kin sale cited two Balmoral purchases that took place last week, one client being a Baha Mar employee, the other a financial services industry worker. “There were a lot of people By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government must be forced to go to Parliament and obtain approval for any increase in the National Insur ance Board’s (NIB trative/overhead spending above already-stated thresh olds, a former Bahamas Chamber of Commerce pres ident has urged, citing this as critical to stopping the social security programme’s “abuse by politicians”. Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is also Superwash’s president, told Tribune Business that with the private sector set to finance the lion’s share of the expected 2 per cent increase in NIB contribution rates in 2010, there should be some additional safeguards on how this extra revenue was spent to prevent wastefulness and abuse. The likely rise in the NIB contribution rate from 8.8 per cent to 10 per cent, something the Government believes will be necessary to finance its unemployment benefit programme and national pre Use Parliament to curb NIB spending * Christie warns that Sandals faced by infrastructure disparity in seeking to make Emerald Bay resort investment work * Says his government reduced Atlantis Phase III incentives to 20% of $1bn investment, compared to 45% and 38% thresholds for previous phases CHRISTIE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 7 7 B B * Ex-Chamber chief urges mandating that any increase in social security scheme’ s administrative spending threshold by approved by Parliament to prevent ‘abuse by politicians’ * Increase in NIB rates a 23% jump, and 50% insurable wage ceiling hike, resulting in 84% total increase * Spending limits urged expanded to all public corporations Market index only down 5.4% for 2009, compared to 13.2% fall in 2008, as analysts scent ‘excellent opportunity to pick up some undervalued, quality stocks’ By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian stock market is likely to “turn the corner in the next six to eight months”, senior investment analysts have told Tribune Business, with the drop in many price/earnings (P/E ratios indicating there are “excellent opportunities” for buyers to acquire undervalued stocks. Kenwood Kerr, Providence Advisors’ chief executive, told Tribune Business that Stock Mar k et to turn in ‘six-eight months’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9 B B

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By RoyalFidelity Capital Markets LAST week, Bahamian investors traded in 11 out of the 24 listed securities, of which two advanced, seven declined and two remained unchanged. E E Q Q U U I I T T Y Y M M A A R R K K E E T T A total of 177,611 shares changed hands, representing an increase of 143,611 shares compared to the previous week's trading volume of 34,000 shares. Cable Bahamas (CAB the volume leader, seeing 53,000 shares trade as its stock declined by $0.75 to end the week at a new 52-week low of $10. Commonwealth Bank (CBL share price increasing by $0.44 on a volume of 40,859 shares to close the week at $5.94. Bahamas Property Fund (BPF falling by $1.10 to a new 52week low of $9.90, on a volu me of 1,000 shares. B B O O N N D D M M A A R R K K E E T T There were 235 Fidelity Bank (Bahamas notes traded in the Bahamian market last week, with a value of $235,000. C C O O M M P P A A N N Y Y N N E E W W S S Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FIN unaudited financial results for the quarter ending July 31, 2009. For the quarter, FIN reported net income of $3.4 million, compared to $5.4 million in the 2008 third quarter, a decline of $2.1 million or 38 per cent. Net interest income of $7.2 million increased slightly by $87,000, quarter-over-quarter, while the provision for credit losses of $1.7 million i ncreased by $2.5 million in c omparison to the prior year. N on-interest expenses of $3.1 million remained consistent with the same quarter in the prior year. Total assets and liabilities at the end of the 2009 third quarter were $870 million and $786 million respectively. Management indicated that while the bank continues to experience good mortgage growth, adverse economic conditions are expected to result in non-accrual loans remaining high for the balance of the year. Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS unaudited financial results for the six month period ending July 31, 2009. DHS reported net profits of $4 million ($0.41cents per share period compared to $1.6 million ($0.16 cents per share during the same period in the previous year. Patient service revenue of $24 million increased by $3.8 million, which management attributes to a trend of increased business volumes that continued into the sec ond quarter of the year, coupled with increases in ICU patients days of 47 per cent. All other business sectors showed positive growth yearto-date. Total expenses increased by $1.5 million over the same sixmonth period in the prior year, primarily due to higher salaries and benefits and medi cal supplies and services. T otal assets and liabilities o f DHS stood at $32.5 million and $5.9 million respectively at the end of the quarter. D D i i v v i i d d e e n n d d N N o o t t e e s s FINCO (FIN declared a dividend of $0.13 per share, payable on September 15, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date September 9, 2009. Commonwealth Bank (CBL dend of $0.05 per share, payable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date September 15, 2009. Doctor's Hospital Healthcare Systems (DHS has declared a dividend of $0.02 per share, payable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date September 17, 2009. Cable Bahamas (CAB has declared a dividend of $0.07 per share, payable on September 30, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date September 15, 2009. Consolidated Water BDRs has declared a dividend of $0.015 per share, payable on November 6, 2009, to all ordinary shareholders of record date October 1, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ROYAL FIDELITY MARKETWRAP The Bahamian Stock Market B B I I S S X X C C L L O O S S I I N N G G C C H H A A N N G G E E V V O O L L U U M M E E Y Y T T D D P P R R I I C C E E S S Y Y M M B B O O L L P P R R I I C C E E C C H H A A N N G G E E AML$1.15 $-0.051,000-29.82% BBL$0.63 $-0-4.55% BOB$6.25 $-0-18.19% BPF$9.90 $-1.101,000-16.10% BSL$10.06 $-0-1.28% BWL$3.15 $-00.00% CAB$10.00$-0.7553,000-28.72% CBL$5.94 $0.44 40,859-15.14% CHL$2.74 $-0-3.18% CIB$10.29 $-0.0125,000-1.53% CWCB$3.65 $-0.0420,00062.22% DHS$2.05 $0.021,700-19.61% FAM$6.60 $-0-15.38% FBB$2.37 $-00.00% FCC$0.30 $-00.00% FCL$4.99 $-0.1321,182-3.48% FCLB$1.00 $-00.00% FIN$8.80$-0.702,750-25.86% ICD$5.50 $-10,000-10.28% JSJ$10.09 $-0-9.10% PRE$10.00 $-00.00% Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for ag ood cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B AHAMIAN private airl ines are “in a holding pattern” waiting to see whether the Government adopts their recommendations regarding proposedf ee increases, the minister responsible confirming to Tribune Business that the changesscheduled to take effect on S eptember 10, 2009 have been p ostponed to allow time for more consultation with the industry. Vincent Vanderpool-Wall ace, minister of tourism and aviation, said the proposed Civil Aviation Department (CAD fee increases had not been i mplemented as scheduled b ecause the process required the Government to complete consultation with the private sector first something that hadn ot yet been finished. “We have another round of consultations to go, and we have promised that until that was completed, we would not put them [the changes] intoe ffect,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace told tribune Business. The process required con sultation with the International C ivil Aviation Organisation (ICAO and some pieces of that are not complete. There are a couple of pieces to put in place. The existing regulations remain in place for the momentu ntil the final round of consultation is completed with the i ndustry.” The minister, though, said t he fee schedule changes would be implemented “in very short order” once the consultationprocess was concluded. “There wouldn’t be very m uch delay between now and when we complete that, and wew ill make a decision on what to do afterwards,” Mr Vanderp ool-Wallace said, when asked by Tribune Business about the deadline for completing con sultations. And when asked by this n ewspaper about the feedback the Government and CAD had received from Bahamian private airline operators, the minister replied: “I’ve never meta nyone who has welcomed any increase in taxes or fees, but the discussions have gone very well, we understand their conc erns and we will address them.” Kevin Turnquest, president of the Bahamas Association of Air Transport Operators, toldT ribune Business that after the organisation sent in its response to the Government on the fee changes, its concerns were b eing reviewed and further amendments to the proposal were being contemplated. “The consultation process h as not been completed, and the impression clearly given to u s was that needed to continue,” Mr Turnquest said. “We’ven ot had a formal response from them, but my understanding is t hey may have been contemplating a further period of consultation. “We’re in a holding pattern w aiting for a response to the information we sent in, but our understanding is that the Government has taken on board those ideas.” M r Vanderpool-Wallace confirmed to Tribune Business that the revenues raised by the fee increases would go into the G overnment’s Consolidated Fund, and be used to finance CAD’s operations, rather than improvements to Family Island airports. T he sums raised from the fee increases, he said, would not be sufficient to meet capital expenditure costs in the Family I slands. Tribune Business broke the story of the planned fee increases earlier this year, having been t old that the operator of a fiveseater aircraft flying 50 hours p er month could expect to see a $13,000 per annum fee rise. T his newspaper was told that the fee increases include a t ripling or 200 per cent rise in landing fees at Family Island airports, the rates jumping from a current $18.56 per landing to $ 56 per landing for a 19-seat aircraft. Other fee increases divulged to Tribune Business are as follows: * Monitoring charge: From a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000 per cent increase * Fleet charge: For a five s eater Aztec aircraft, this will go from $0 to $7,000 – a 7,000 per cent increase. For a Beech 19 seater aircraft, the fee will rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000p er cent increase * Charge to lease a foreign aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed: $4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase * Charter permit renewal: Current: $500 per annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent increase * Renewal of scheduled permits: Current: $500 per a nnum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240 per cent increase. Both largef oreign airlines and Bahamian operators, including small chart er companies, will pay the same rate * Pilot licences: From $0 to $250 for a six-month Air Transport US licence. From $0 to $ 200 for a one-year US commercial pilots licence. * Fuel suppliers to Bahamian airlines in the Family Islands will have to pay a tax equival ent to $0.07 per gallon to the Civil Aviation Department, on top of existing government taxes C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today ! BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Bahamian airlines in ‘holding pattern’ over fee increases Planned charges do not take effect as intended, with government planning further consultation

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www.rdicaribbean.com Recruiting Now for the October 2009 intake 27499 Riverview Center Boulevard, Suite 111, Bonita Springs, Florida 34134 USA • Tel 1 239 444 1730 email info@rdicaribbean.com your goalsCall 1 888 496 6173 (toll free to fast-track your career MBA University of Bradford, University of Sunderland, U niversity of Wales M Sc in Public Administration & D evelopment University of Birmingham MSc Marketing & Management University of Bradford MSc Finance, Accounting & Management University of Bradford MSc Information Technology University of Teesside MSc Telecommunications Birmingham City University M Sc International Hospitality M anagement H allam University Diploma in Management University of Wales (pre-MBA for non-degree holders) University of WalesOnline/distance learning from RDI in the Bahamas Develop your career while studying No attendance requirement • Tutor and student support included Free membership of International Management Academy UNIVERSITY OF WALES University of Wales BA (Hons B usiness (top up Marketing, Finance, Banking University of Sunderland BA(Hons Business&Management(top up), BA (Hons Financial Management (top up University of Derby BSc (Hons Psychology University of Teesside LLB, BSc (Hons) Business Computing (top u p) BSc ( Hons) International Hospitality & T ourism (top up BACHELOR DEGREE COURSES MASTERS C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ThursdaySept17th ,0 9 @ 6 P M D o c t o r s H o s p i t a l C o n f e r e n c e R o o m RSVPSeatingisLimited302-4603 DOCTORSHOSPITALDISTINGUISHEDLECTURESERIESTHISMONTHSTOPIC :SCHEDULELECTURESERIES Pleasejoinusasourguesteverythird Thursday of the month for this scintillating seriesofthemostrelevanthealthissues affectingsocietytoday.Purpose:Toeducate thepublicabout the importanthealthissues, presented by distinguished physicians.Screenings:Get your Free Blood Pressure,Cholesterol, and Glucosetesting between 5pm&6pm.RSVP:To ensureavailable seatingPhone: 302-4603LECTURE DATE SPEAKER:Dr. Brian HumblestonePsychiatry ObesityinChildren September 1709Obesity in Children Dr.Brian HumblestoneOctober 1509Breast Cancer Dr.Theodore TurnquestNovember 1909Diabetes Dr.Judson EneasDecember 1709Stress Dr.Ian Kelly By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net ABACONIANS are "extremely comfortable" with w hat BEC has proposed for its new Wilson City power plant, which is expected to open in the 2010 first quarter in central Abaco, according to the minis-t er of state for the environment. Phenton Neymour said he, along with BEC general manager Kevin Basden, sought to d ispel inaccurate concerns that Bunker C fuel was highly toxic and could produce acid rain. According to him, the majority of Abaco residents whoa ttended the Town Hall meeting for the construction of the new power generating plant thought the plan was good. " There was a group of individuals who would oppose the construction of the plant, but I think that with a lot of the incorrect information they had circulated, Abaconians realise [the truth]," said Mr Neymour. "It [the meeting] was very good. They were extremelyc omfortable with what BEC had proposed." A group of concerned Abaconians had produced a short d ocumentary about the construction of the power plant and its possible environmental impact, which they have circulated on theInternet. A ccording to them, the fuel will produce far denser carbon emissions that other fuels, while increasing the chance of acid r ain over the islands of the Bahamas. They also suggested that oil spills in this area could affect a propose marine park nearby,a s well as affect the local subterranean aquifer. However, Mr Neymour assured that the aquifer, which i s purportedly directly beneath the new plant, will be stringently monitored. Mr Neymour also asserted that BEC has always used Bunker C fuel oil in New Providence, and insisted that theW ilson City plant will adopt the most stringent environmental practices. "This is a new plant in which e nvironmental procedures and processes will be put in place," he said. "I am extremely disappointed that these individuals would have taken the approacht hat they have." Mr Neymour also said precautions such as double sealed oil pipelines, to reduce the the l ikelihood of a spill, and double hulled tankers for the transportation of the Bunker C fuel oil, will make the plant much more secure than otherst hroughout the Bahamas. He said that, when complete, the Wilson City Plant will produce 48 megawatts of power, t wice the demand on the island, as a contingency for expansion. ‘Extremely comfortable’ with BEC plant proposal T HE 2009 Pioneers of Prosperity Caribbean program ihas selected Bulkan Timber Works o f Guyana for its grand prize. A lternative Insurance Company of Haiti and Totally Male Ltd of Jamaica were also reco gnized. F rom a highly competitive pool of 580 applications, ten Pioneers of Prosperity emerged representing some of t he most innovative, dynamic b usinesses in the region. E ach one of the finalists has already won a grant from the Multilat e ral Investment Fund of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB will be connected to a globaln etwork of technical expertise, p otential investors, and other cutting-edge entrepreneurs. These 10 entrepreneurs are r ole models for all of us. They built new distribution systems, found new and attractive markets, pay high and rising wages t o their employees, and are outstanding corporate citizens of their respective nations. A nd they do this under chall enging conditions-never asking the government for favours, often beginning with o ut specialised infrastructure o r sufficient skills and abilities, but always with an eye to the future and their own self-determination,” said Michael Fairb anks, co-founder and cod irector of the Social Equity Venture Fund. The Pioneers of Prosperity A wards Programme is a global programme made-up of regional competitions spanning the Caribbean, Africa andC entral America. S even countries participat ed in the inaugural Caribbean competition: Bahamas, Barba-d os, Belize, Guyana, Haiti, J amaica, and Trinidad and Tobago. The programme will launch in Central America on September 14, 2009. T he Pioneers of Prosperity Programme seeks to inspire a new generation of entrepren eurs in emerging economies b y identifying, rewarding and promoting outstanding small to medium size businesses,w ho will serve as role models t o their peers. The Programme is sponsored by the Multilateral Investment Fund of the InterA merican Development Bank, t he John Templeton Founda tion, and the Social Equity Venture Fund (S.E.VENF und), and was conceived and initiated by Michael Fairbanks, a recognised entrepreneur and author in the area of enterprises olutions to poverty. M ichael Fairbanks is a cofounder of S.E.VEN Fund. The programme has also builta network of over 35 local partn ers throughout the Caribbean. Jamaica Trade and Invest co-hosted the Final Awards Ceremony. Pioneers get reward

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B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government is doing “a host of things” to improve thee ase of doing business in the B ahamas, a minister has told Tribune Business, citing a proposed National Investment Act and planned amendments to the Business Licensing Act including the amalgamation of four processesi nto one as examples of the r eforms being contemplated. Responding to the Doing Business 2010 survey by the World Bank, which ranked the Bahamas 68th out of 183 countries surveyed when it came to red tape andb ureaucracy obstacles facing the private sector, Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, said the Government was moving “with a view to optimizing the ease with which people conductb usiness in the Bahamas”. S tating that he was unsure whether the World Bank, and its International Finance Corporation (IFC the survey, were aware of the Government’s planned reforms,M r Laing said he had asked Mini stry of Finance staff to “fully evaluate” the criteria used by the report and then benchmark this nation against other jurisdictions to see if and where improvementsw ere necessary. S tating that the Bahamas should use such reports as “a springboard for improvement”, Mr Laing told Tribune Business: “I think what is important for usto be focused on is what needs to b e done to make doing business i n the Bahamas as efficient as poss ible. We’re already doing things to make the conduct of business in the Bahamas easier.” A part from the proposed Busin ess Licence reforms, Mr Laing said the Government was also r eviewing its tax policies with r espect to business. It was also “revamping” its online network to further facilitate e-government,e nabling businesses to fill out applications and required paperwork online, and pay the necess ary fees, too. A s part of the need to place policy in statute, to conform with the trade agreements theB ahamas will be entering, Mr Laing said the Ministry of Finance was also crafting a NationalI nvestment Act with the goal of “modernising and reforming the way we do business”. T his Act was described as “a w ork in progress”, with no timescale given for its arrival in Parliament or details on what w ould be included in it. Mr Laing, t hough, said some “significant preliminary” work had been done on the Bill, including benchmarking. The Bahamas slipped from 59th to 68th in the World Bank’sa nnual survey, ranking especially l ow when it came to dealing with construction permits (ranked 100th); registering property (149th (109th( 120th). The latter two areas are e specially concerning for a nation that relies heavily on foreign direct investment to drive its economy and monetary system, something noted by Bahamas Chamber of Commerce president,K haalis Rolle. There are some noteworthy areas of concern, particularly for the investor protection,” Mr Rolle told Tribune Business. “In an economy such as ours, investorc onfidence is one of the signific ant areas we would try and encourage and secure. We are slipping in that areas, and work needs to be done there. It’s an obvious area for improvement.” Arguing that the Bahamas n eeded to ensure “a high degree o f confidence” among its investors, Mr Rolle said this applied equally to the Bahamian and foreign variety. “The transaction costs associated with domestic investment need to come down, and domestic i nvestors need to be confident t hat they’re assets and investments will certainly be protected,” Mr Rolle said. “For businesses in property deals, we want to have costs associated with that minimised asm uch as possible. For want of a b etter expression, it’s a sunk horse. You write it off immediately. It’s non-productive at the end of the day, and goes with the deal. We need to keep property t ransaction costs to a minimum. The cost of doing business has to be reduced, and anything we can do bodes well for investment.” While some of the Bahamas’ permitting systems needed work,M r Rolle told Tribune Business t hat the Government had already foreshadowed several much-needed amendments in its 2009-2010 Budget, in addition to its previously-announced civil servicer eforms. M r Laing also pointed to the modernisation of the Business Licence Act, and the amalgamation of the previous Shop Licence, Liquor Licence and Music and Dance Licence into just one Busi-n ess Licence process. A ll these licence processes had been separate, requiring a business to appear before different authorities, and the reforms were designed to save businessmen “a lot of time and bureaucracy”. Mr Laing added that the Gove rnment would also be “mode rnising the taxing aspects of the [Business Licence] Act to take into account the reality businesses face. The effort is to take into account some of the realities people face; every business’s grossr evenues are not the same”. T he minister also pointed out that the World Bank survey ranked the Bahamas seventh out of all small island, developing states. “You could argue whethert he glass is half-full or half-empty, b ut you can always improve and that’s what we’re striving to do,” Mr Laing said. M eanwhile, the Bahamas was r anked 53rd out of 141 countries in the Economic Freedom of the World report released yesterday by the Canada-based Fraser Institute and its Bahamian partner, the Nassau Institute. T he Bahamas scored in key c omponents of economic freedom (from 1 to 10, where a higher value indicates a higher level of economic freedom): The ratings in the five components of the Indexa re * Size of government: changed to 8.2 from 7.85 in last year’s r eport * Legal structures and security of property rights: changed to 7.1 from 8.47 * Access to sound money: changed to 6.7 from 7.04 * Freedom to trade internat ionally: changed to 5.1 from 4.12 * Regulation of credit, labour and business: changed to 8.3 from 8.17 However, in the critical areas o f Legal Structure and Sound M oney, the Bahamas was found to be losing ground. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Government doing ‘host of things’ to aid ease of business

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scription drug plan, effectively represents a 22.7 per cent rate increase. In addition, the proposed reforms to NIB also include a 50 per cent increase in the insurable wage ceiling, from$400 to $600, Mr D’Aguilar said. While acknowledging that he understood why the rates were being increased, the former Chamber president told Tribune Business: “We have to put in place safeguards to ensure politicians do not abuse the money when they get it in. “We should put NIB through the same process as it goes through to increase the rates and the insurable wageceiling when it comes to increasing the amount spent on administration and overheads. The minister responsible for NIB should be responsible for that ceiling, and he would have to go to Parliament and ask for an increase in that ceiling.” M r D’Aguilar recommended setting an annual threshold for NIB’s administrative expenses, as a percentage of forecast contribution income, and any increase in this had tobe approved by Parliament. “It’s a real, meaningful change, and gives us an assurance that money will not be squandered by politicians who, in many instances, have no idea how to run a busin ess,” the former Chamber p resident said of his proposal. There must be a balance. I totally agree that rates have to go up, the insurable wage has to go up, but the Government has to ensure strong measures are put in place to ensure the party of the day does not abuse NIB.” By making the process of obtaining an increase in NIB’s administrative expenses as “airtight as possible”, Mr D’Aguilar said the system would be “less subject to abuse than it has been in the past.” He added: “The employers pay the greater proportion of it [NIB contributions], and if they’re coming to the busi-ness community for more, then responsible government is to ensure it is not abused by the Government of the day. Everyone knows NIB is flush with money and subjectto abuse by governments.” The Nassau Institute, the Bahamian economic thinktank, said it had calculated that, for a small firm with three employees, the planned increase in NIB contribution rates and the insurable wage ceiling would increase its annual payments to the social security scheme by 84 per cent from $5,500 to $10,100. Such an increase, it said, would provide businesses with a further incentive to lay-off workers amid an economic recession, while eroding the real income and ‘take home pay’ of Bahamian workers. The Nassau Institute added that the increases would also spur more employers and the self-employed to seek new ways to evade NIB payments. The eighth actuarial report on NIB again reiterated that t he social security scheme was plagued with high administ rative costs”, averaging 21 per cent of contribution income per year between 2002 and 2006. Operating costs over that period grew by 6.7 per cent per annum, compared to an average 2 per cent rise in inflation. These costs were described as “excessive’, and largely caused by “significant overstaffing” that was in no small way driven by political cons iderations. While a 2003 report had suggested that NIB’s staffing levels could be cut by 25 per cent from 465 to 350 without any undue loss of service quality, this strategy was then undermined by the then-PLP government in the run-up to the 2007 general election, via the hiring of people who were likely to have been con stituents, friends, relatives and party members in a bid to buttress votes and support. The eighth actuarial report revealed that while the Voluntary Early Retirement Pro gramme reduced staffing levels at NIB by 89, “extensive hiring in the first half of 2007 has eliminated most of the savings that would otherwise have been realised from the VERP, as in July 2007 the staff count stood at 496”. This was higher than when the 2003 review recommended a 25 per cent cut, again showing how political interference was limiting NIB’s effectiveness. The eighth actuarial report also recommended limiting the directions a minister can give to NIB’s Board to policy only, although there is no indication yet that this issue has been taken up, and highlighted that “poor governance practices” had affected many aspects of NIB’s performance during its 36-year history. The report said: “For many of NIB’s 33 years, practices that were not in conformance with the National Insurance Act and general public expectations have led to sub-par outcomes in many areas.” T he report listed, as examp les of this, NIB’s relatively l ow compliance rates and “excessive administrative costs”; the fact the insurable wage ceiling had only been increased twice in 36 years; and that “pension increases and mass employee hiring that coincides with general elections”. Poor governance, the report said, had also resulted in some 75 per cent of NIB’s investments being made in g overnment, and government agency, securities, while NIB funds had been used “for purposes other than prescribed in legislation”. Mr D’Aguilar, meanwhile, expanded his analysis to the rest of the public sector, telling Tribune Business that the reason many governmentowned corporations made a loss was due to a lack of cost controls and the inability of political decisionmakers to stop spending, combined with government fears about the impact rate rises would have on the voters. “No one has put in place any safeguards to stop expenditure, so most public corpo rations run at a loss,” Mr D’Aguilar said. “They hate to increase revenues and rates, but love to increase expenditure. “It’s a recipe for disaster. If you allow corporations to increase expenditure willy nilly, but limit their ability to raise revenues, every single one will run into problems because they’re operating at a loss. “They should set a threshold and set a mandate. We’re got to tackle seriously this whole issue of cost control and cost containment. If they put limits on revenues, put limits on spending. Make it as difficult to do one as the other. We’ve got to address the imbalance in these corporations.” Without such spending safeguards, Mr D’Aguilar said politicians would have a “blank cheque to increase expenditure, and when the election gets close they get crazy. Everybody loses money because they’re not allowed to increase rates, but they’re told to increase hiring”. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Use Parliament to curb NIB spending F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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t hat were really sitting on the f ence,” he explained. “A couple of sales that transacted last week first came in nine months ago, but they were afraid of losing their jobs. They’re now feeling better, more secure and they wanted to do it. “For me to sit here and say the recession has not affected us would be a lie. But the reality is that all these people have to have somewhere to live. I think the money is sitting in their bank accounts. It’s a willingness to part with it. They’ve not necessarily seen their incomes erode, but they’re very cautious about spending it. They’re thinking twice.” Out of the 30 units placed on the market for Balmoral’s first phase, some 27 have been sold, with just two Grand Homes and one Royal Town Home still available. Mr Kinsale confirmed to Tribune Business that town home construction has started, while the development’s showh ome was “substantially complete”, its roof just being put o n with the windows and doors set to be installed this c oming week. Some 35-40 construction personnel were currently working at Balmoral, Mr Kinsale telling Tribune Business this number was set to increase to 70-80 “in the next week”. All the project’s roads were in place, and the clubhouse had been completed. He added that properties in the second phase of the Balmoral development, which when fully built-out will consist of 70 single family lots and 200 town homes and construction, were likely to be placed on the market “maybe in about another month or so”, once phase one construction had proceeded to an appropriate point. “We’re not in any rush,” Mr Kinsale added. “We’re well-capitalised, we bought the land for cash, and the onlyd ebt is for construction, so we’re not in a rush to make decisions we don’t have to make. If it takes some time to capitalise on it, that’s what we’ll do.” Some 40 per cent of Balmoral’s current first phase sales had been to first-time home buyers, something Mr Kinsale said had been driven by the 2009-2010 Budget incentives, which exempted t his purchaser category from p aying Stamp Tax on all real e state buys valued at up to $500,000, plus exempted them from real property tax payments for the first five years if the real estate was their primary residence. With its condominiums priced in the $300,000 range, and town homes at around $559,000, the former certainly fit into this category for firsttime buyers. Added Yet Mr Kinsale added that the package Balmoral had put together with Finance Corporation of the Bahamas (FINCO vision of title insurance for buyers and a reduction in attorney fees, had also helped to spur buyer activity by reducing closing costs. T he Balmoral Development principal suggested that the title insurance was saving buyers around $4,000-$5,000 in closing costs per transaction, thus giving them an enhanced “comfort zone” in which to make their purchase. In the absence of Stamp Tax and real property tax, Mr Kinsale suggested that Balmoral purchasers were collectively saving “in the area of $ 30,000” on transaction costs. C iting a $365,000 Royal T own Home, and taking the incentives offered by the Government and Balmoral, Mr Kinsale said the savings to first-time buyers included 5 per cent Stamp Tax, equivalent to $18,250; $4,312.50 in real property tax savings for the first five years; $5,000 in attorney fees’ savings; and $3,280 in mortgage stamp tax savings. This added up, he suggested, to $30,843. Apart from first-time buyers and young Bahamian professionals, who accounted for 55 per cent of Balmoral’s existing sales, Mr Kinsale said the project was also appealing to families and “empty nesters” who were looking to downsize to a condo package. “You have to have all the four ‘Ps’ price, product, place and promotion,” said Mr Kinsale on what was needed to succeed in the current Bahamian real estate market. “In this economy, you have to really nail it. You have to have every component driven in. “Our location is excellent, t he price is reasonable and people are seeing value in it, the product is great and the marketing is excellent.” However, Mr Kinsale warned Bahamian real estate purchasers that favourable buying conditions were unlikely to last much longer, especially in the western New Providence and Cable Beach areas where Balmoral was located, due to the likelihood t hat Baha Mar would proc eed. This buying window is not going to last much longer. It may be here for six, nine months, but time flies. But if this Baha Mar deal comes through, the window shrinks. Everyone jumps on the Baha Mar bandwagon and puts their prices up.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM +(/3:$17(' ‘Fear factor is subsiding a bit’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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although it was difficult to predict when a Bahamian stock market recovery would occur, and whether it had yet reached or passed the bottom of the current down cycle, the market would certainly be through its low point by yearend/early January 2010. “I think it’s an excellent opportunity to pick up some undervalued, quality stocks,” Mr Kerr said. “There’s some sound performers. AML Foods, which has come off eight consecutive quarters of profitability; Commonwealth B ank, which has stuck to its n iche; even Colina Holdings a nd Doctors Hospital Health Systems. “There are a few of them out there, that with good management and a focus on the customer, are doing quite well.” Mr Kerr added: “I think we’ll probably be through the bottom by December into January, really, and then start to turn the corner definitively with the stock market in the next six to eight months. “Right now, people are definitely selling stocks to raise cash for back-to-school, or if they’re out of work. “Yet there are pockets of optimism. While we can’t predict the bottom, I think it’s pretty good.” Mr Kerr’s analysis was supported by Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank& Trust’s president, who told Tribune Business that “the combination of good prices and high dividend yields are n ormally precursors to a r ecovery in equity prices” and the stock market generally. RoyalFidelity’s FINDEX index, which measures a weighted average of stock price and dividend yields, was down 5.4 per cent for the year to September 11, 2009, Mr Anderson saying equity prices had risen in July and August, although not by huge amounts. All this compared to the 12.31 per cent decline suffered by the FINDEX in 2008, thus indicating that the market deterioration has at least slowed. Ratios Mr Anderson added that many BISX-listed stocks were now at extremely attractive P/E ratios, Doctors Hospital, for example, with its P/E at 4 , implying a 25 per cent i nherent rate of return. AML F oods, with a P/E of 6, had a 16.7 per cent inherent return, while the Bahamas Property Fund was now trading at close to a 30 per cent discount to its net asset value (NAV “Those are the kinds of yields you would not normally see, as you would normally get a 6-8 per cent equity yield,” Mr Anderson explained. “Some stocks, notwithstanding the fact they’re at 52-week lows, have PEs which are difficult to justify unless you believe the economy is likely to improve. “There’s some great value in those stocks..... Those are stocks that you cannot justify where they are. There’s a bunch of stocks out there that are good value, and that people should invest in today and make a pile of money on when they recover in a year’s time. There’s really good valu e if you’re selective.” M r Anderson said large p rice movements in some stocks had resulted from very few or small trades, driven by the needs of some investors to exit stocks and generate liquidity and cash to meet current obligations. “A large number of securities have high dividend yields, where the earnings are still supporting good dividend payments but share prices have been forced down by indiscriminate selling,” he added. Banking stocks, which account for a major chunk of BISX’s market capitalisation, had already seen the effects of the loan portfolio deterioration, and its impact on their earnings, largely factored into their share prices, the RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust president told Tribune Business. “The current prices factor in to a great extent the depressed earnings of the stock, so any change in earnings should have an impact on the stock,” Mr Anderson added. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.15AML Foods Limited1.151.150.000.1270.0009.10.00% 1 1.809.90Bahamas Property Fund11.009.90-1.101,0000.9920.20010.02.02% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.00Cable Bahamas10.0010.000.001.4060.2507.12.50% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.945.940.000.4190.30014.25.05% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.763.65-0.1120,0000.1110.05232.91.42% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.032.050.021,5000.3820.0805.43.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco8.808.800.000.3220.52027.35.91% 11.7110.29FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.29-0.0125,0000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.124.99-0.1320,0000.3320.15015.03.01% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.0010,0000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.09J. S. Johnson10.0910.090.000.9520.64010.66.34% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,528.72| CHG -4.37| %CHG -0.29 | YTD -183.64 | YTD % -10.72BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48671.4105CFAL Money Market Fund1.48803.795.49 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 4-Sep-09 31-Aug-09MARKET TERMS Stock Market to turn in ‘six-eight months’ Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 The stories behind the news By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net Whether those in po wer want to acknowledge it or not, the Pr ogressive Liberal Party is going to change. A change for the better or worse is still yet to be decided, but come October 18, the PLP will meet and possib l y decide its future and relevance in the moder n Bahamas. However, do not be mistaken; the PLP will always be a part of the Bahamian political system but, as many within the party acknowledge, the PLP can ill-afford another term in opposition... B efore we get into the specifics of this discussion, let us first accept some hard facts. The PLP is broke. The coffers are empty and anyone with common sense will tell you that PLPs aren’t really lining up to donate any money at this time. Secondly, the PLP has long been associated with scandal and corruption (despite the best efforts of the many “spin-doctors” who seek to blame The Tribune or any other publication for this long held perception). Even in the early days of the party Loftus Roker, one of its first MPs, com plained on the floor of the House that corruption was rocking the party to its very foundations. It seems that despite their best efforts the party still manages to find its way into the national headlines even in opposition. We need not go into details here of actual cases as we are all well aware of them. The PLP (like the FNM many candidates who, and forgive my bluntness, are lazy, visionless, and quite frankly not even qualified to handle scissors. Again, details are not required as this piece is not meant to embarrass or insult anyone. And finally the most damning fact that must be faced is that the PLP is daily losing its base far more rapidly than the FNM. With the PLP the majority of its support ranges from 60 years of age and up. As outlined in the Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research report commissioned after the 2007 elections, the PLP won the majority of its votes also in one socioeconomic group “those with less than a high school education.” “The party will have great difficulty winning elections in the future if it cannot expand its following among younger voters and those who are better off. “The PLP’s narrow demographic base of support is worrisome. Depending on older and lower-class voters is not a recipe for long-term success as the former die off and the country and its citizens become more prosperous. With the passage of time, fewer people associate with the country’s colonial legacy, the fight for independence, and the accomplishment of (Sir Pindling. The PLP needs to update its pos ture and rhetoric so that it has greater appeal to younger and more prosperous voters,” the report revealed. But why dwell on things that we already know? Because the message has yet to be received. The PLP still believe that they can win the next election without taking a long and hard look at their party without changing its message, leader, or appeal to a wider more enlightened audience. As one political source plainly outlined, the strategy now is to essentially point the finger at the FNM and say, “You are the ones to blame for the state of the economy. You are the reason why I am unemployed. You brought this on us, and therefore you have to go.” As it is often said, one should never believe his own propaganda. This argument being put forward by the PLP will sadly only be swallowed by those same persons with less than a high school diploma who more than likely still believe that The Tribune (by some miracle able to climb into the Ministry of Housing and bug the private lines of both the former Minister Neville Wisdom and his then per manent secretary Leila Greene. But I digress. The question still remains, what will the PLP do going forward? How will its leadership, which every Bahamian should be concerned about, position the party to mount a formidable campaign against the governing party? Because at the end of the day to have good governance, you need a healthy and vibrant Opposition that will keep any government on its toes. Because the worst thing that the Bahamas can have coming out of 2012 is a sweep by either party with only a handful of Opposition members in the House of Assembly. So let us look at what is before the PLP at present. A former prime minister who is fighting to not only remain pertinent in changing times, but a parliamentary caucus that lacks the courage to challenge him. But fair is fair. Despite his many critics it was under Prime Minister Perry Christie’s watch that the Bahamas reached economic heights that others within our region could only dream of. However, having lost the 2007 elections, he is now faced with what Stanley Greenberg, the renowned polling adviser to Presidents Bill Clinton, Nelson Mandela, and Prime Minister Tony Blair described as the worst of political fates “irrelevance.” And this brings us to the thrust of the argument going forward. Will the PLP be a relevant party in 2012? As many Bahamians will tell you, there are persons within the party who would like to be leader, and some say who are even capable of being leader. But leadership, as with many things in life, can, and should not be just handed over. There should be a fight, and the public should see that fight, and see that someone is willing to risk it all for the chance to lead them. But for PLPs such as Dr Bernard Not tage and Paul Moss, such a venture if What will the PLP do going forward? The question still remains... FORMER PM PERRY CHRISTIE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 C C

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undertaken and lost will spell their downfall in the party. “No one challenges the leader in that organisation,” a political adviser told Insight . “The PLP you must understand, is a religion. And there are some things that are accepted and some that are out of the question. No sitting leader has ever been challenged, and you can appreciate what would happen politically to that candidate who plays their hand and loses. So, like with many things, they will wait and scheme until an opportunity presents itself.” A fact that should also be highlighted is that in 2007 the Greenberg report stated that despite Mr Christie’s perceived weakness in leadership, PLPs by and large still wanted him to continue on as leader. This fact, it is reported was further substantiated in the polling study conducted by PLP deputy leader hopeful Philip Davis. Another issue that needs to be addressed involves the many persons who are owed tens of thousands of dollars by the party after having done work during the 2007 campaign. These persons, it is reported were enraged on hearing that the party leader had pledged to financially assist former Senator Pleasant Bridgewater in meeting her legal expenses after losing the election court challenge earlier this year. She, along with former Attorney General Allyson Maynard Gibson, failed to recover their seats in yet another humiliating defeat for the PLP. The only former candidate to escape this “second humiliation” was the former Minister of Trade and Industry Leslie Miller who opted not to challenge the results of Blue Hills in the court, stating that elections are won on the ground, “not in the courts.” Another disturbing fact exposed by the infamous Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research report revealed that many of the PLP’s recent “social” programmes geared at engaging the youth and the general public to be more involved in the inner workings of the party were in fact strategies created and handed to them by this research company to rebuild the party’s image. To those who may have thought that the PLP was making a real and meaningful connection with them, this revelation must have been a painful one. But unfortunately this is the reality in Bahamian politics. As I have often said, very little is left to chance, and often the moves that we see taking place today have long been decided and sanctioned months before. This, there fore, begs some serious questions about transparency and control in this society a dis cussion that I hope we as a people can one day have in a mature and educated fashion. What do you think? pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net telephone: 502-2361 C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM What will the PLP do going forward? For the stories behind the news, read Insight Mondays F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 C C

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R R E E : : B B A A C C K K T T O O T T H H E E D D A A R R K K A A G G E E LAST week’s Insight argued that the ChristianC ouncil’s opposition to government’s efforts to make marital rape an o ffence was less about religious concerns and more about protecting its own position. “The public statements of Council members over thep ast several years have made it clear they feel social progress defined by most of the westernw orld as having to do with rights and democracy threatens much of what they hold dear. After all many of them have becomee xceedingly comfortable in their roles as the selfappointed moral arbiters of the nation,” it said. T he article generated a great deal of response from the public and became the story to attract most read-e rs’ comments on our website, tribune242.com. Dear Sir, I know I am a foreigner living here by the grace of the Bahamian Government and people and perhaps it is none of my business to comment. But I felt compelled to write and com-m ent on your article in Insight . I read your article in Insight regarding the Christ ian Council with dumbfounded interest. The nearest modern equivalent is to be found in the extreme forms of Islam. The extremists of which seek to take the world back to the 6th century. They also believe that any woman who is not dressed in traditional clothes, that is C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Readers have their say... FEEDBACK INSIGHT C M Y K C M Y K T he Tribune INSIGHT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 The stories behind the news By PACO NUNEZ T ribune News EditorMy immediate reaction to the Christi an Council’s rejection of the proposed marital rape l aw was utter disgust. Disgust, but not surprise. It was, after all, in keeping with t he council's tendency to ward off p erceived challenges to its own position by branding them threats to pub-l ic morality. T he Catholic Archdiocese, the Bahamas Conference of theM ethodist Church and the SeventhD ay Adventist Church have all given t heir approval to government’s proposed law. The Christian Council a lone claims that while it respects t he rights of individuals, an abiding concern for God's plan for “families a nd nations” prohibits its members f rom lending their support. Anyone who doubts that this stance is self-serving should pauset o ask how the Council can be so concerned about families and nations, when it has so little to saya bout the rampant crime, violence, sexual abuse and corruption that plagues this nation. Indeed, it is only a select few i ssues that tend to frighten Christian Council members into action: homosexuality, the showcasing of " immoral" films and performers, gambling, and now the right of a man to rape his wife. T his is because in a changing w orld, the Council’s main concern has become maintaining a strangle-h old on the conscience on a large p ortion of this society. The public statements of Council members over the past several years h ave made it clear they feel social p rogress – defined by most of the western world as having to do with r ights and democracy – threatens m uch of what they hold dear. After a ll many of them have become exceedingly comfortable in their r oles as the self-appointed moral arbiters of the nation. T his is why violent crime is never high on the Council’s agenda it is opposed universally in modern societies and is therefore not perceived as a threat. Homosexuality, gambling and "unchristian" films, on the other hand, all enjoy wide acceptance int he western world.What’s more, they are symbolic of an outlook that valu es independence of mind and does n ot tolerate self-appointed father figures. T his also explains why the Counc il alone among the religious entit ies that responded to the proposal – d ecided to suggest specific changes to t he amendment, recommending that a man should only be prosecuted for f orcing sex on his wife if there is violence involved – and even then s hould not be incarcerated for the f irst offence, but rather subjected to "rehabilitative steps." T he Council also objected to the words "who is not his spouse" being deleted from the definition of rape, "thereby leaving it as is and allowing rape to only be possible between two persons who are not married to each other." While government made no mention of religion in its proposal, the BACK TO THE DARK AGES THE Bahamas Christian Council has declared itself opposed to government’s efforts to protect women from being raped by their husbands, arguing that the proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences and Domestic Violence Act could threaten the institution of marriage. The council paints a picture of a society beset on all sides by forces seeking to destroy the foundations upon which it rests. In reality, the government’s proposed marital rape law is a vital component of the enlighteneds ociety we should be aspiring to become, and it is the Christian Council that is attempting to drag u s back into the dense gloom of darker ages. INSIGHT reports... SEEpage2CIN REALITY , the government’s proposed marital rape law is a vital component of the enlightened society we should be aspiring to become, and it is the Bahamas Christian Council that is attempting to drag us back into the dense gloom of darker ages... THE FRONT PAGE of the September 7, 2009 edition oF INSIGHT ... S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 C C To advertise, call 502-2371

PAGE 27

Burkhas etcetera, is an infid el and such a woman should expect to be raped whomever she is. To them,w omen are second class citizens to be used and abused by men, and there is much evidence to support this. An ex-girlfriend of mine i n England had been married for 28 years and was divorced when I met her.S he had been the subject of repeated marital rape to t he extent that she had lost her libido completely. Her h usband insisted she have testosterone injections to boost her libido. All thisd id was make her angry enough to finally throw him out. Then after her divorce she found she had a very active libido with the lovers she subsequently took. Them essage from this is very obvious, rape is wrong. T he Christian Council members are living in another age and it saddensm e that such folk should be listened to at all. Y our expos of their arguably pathetic views is b oth timely and necessary, and I sincerely hope the women of the Bahamas wills eek to put these prehistoric monsters in their place very firmly. No man has the right to rape a woman. Any man with an ounce of intelligence knows that a w oman who is enjoying sexual intercourse is a much b etter lover than one who is not. Yours Faithfully, E E x x p p a a t t I t needed to be said. And you said it. Thank you P aco. Thank you so much. F F e e l l i i c c i i t t y y G ood Insight column. The BCC is an outmoded entity. On top of that, Patrick Paul doesn't seem to know what it is that he is talkinga bout. J J u u a a n n M M c c C C a a r r t t n n e e y y Beautifully written! Every point was solid, wella rticulated, and backed up. The Tribune certainly has c ome a long way! As a student off to school, it's so refreshing to get goodr eporting and be able to stay up to date on what's happening back at home.T hanks! N N i i c c k k i i e e I t is pleasantly refreshing to see that there are those willing to stand up for civill iberties in the Bahamas. Stay true to your convictions. M M a a r r l l o o n n J J o o h h n n s s o o n n This is by far one of the b est I nsight a rticles ever. It is so factual, relevant and a rticulate. As for the Christian Council, they have become a joke to our coun-t ry and a disgrace to our moral fabric. I don’t even c are to know who the president is anymore. it takes a gutsy government to maket his call and I am glad my government did. Women are abused too much in ourc ountry and I fully endorse the bill. As for Mr Paul, will he please stick to important m atters like gambling [lol]. R R i i c c a a r r d d o o W W r r i i g g h h t t I am thoroughly impressed by your deconstruction of Rev Paul and the Christian Council’s positions on marital rape. You did a masterful job!T hat aside I see something beyond your view that this r esistance by them is primarily a resistance to change and their need tom aintain their fiefdoms. I believe it’s also due to a w illingness by the majority in this society to accept the lowest common denomina-t or on most issues of national importance. It has been happening on almoste very issue and it’s simply a case where the loudest, generally the leasti nformed, are leading the d ebates and directing the m asses. This begs the question of leadership (political and most importantly oth-e rwise). It reminds me of t he movie Gladiator THE mob IS Rome...The mob is The Bahamas! J J o o h h n n n n y y 5 5 I read this article today in the paper and I was so impressed at how well thought out and how well articulated this editorialw as. As a young, single w oman this topic is one that has struck a chord with me as I have listened intently to both sides of the argu-m ent. It is so sad that some m en consistently refuse to put anything else above their own sexual gratifica t ion. The portion of script ure that says wives must submit to their husbands also goes on to say that husbands should love theirw ives even as Christ loved t he church, that is the key. Christ never “forced” his agenda onto anyone, wew ere given free will. Even C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 4C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bright +Effective 322-2188/9 You’ll wonder how you ever got along without it. Long life Spiral lamps 2 0 0 8 C r e a t i v e R e l a t i o n s . n e t Readers have their say... S S E E E E N N E E X X T T p p a a g g e e F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 3 3 C C

PAGE 28

C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5C TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Readers have their say... t hough wives were mandated to submit to the husband in all things, the husbandsw ere mandated to love their wives on a divine level s o that the love would be upheld whether she submitted (disobeyedt hat not what salvation is all about? No matter what we do we cannot be separatedf rom God's love and the Bible also says that love isp atient and kind, not envious and not full of pride or boastful. There is no way that the Almighty woulds anction us to violate the d ignity of spouses that simp ly is not what his love is about. M M y y P P o o i i n n t t o o f f V V i i e e w w I t is shocking that the Christian Council is able to distort Scripture. Although marriage can be seen as a secular contract, to many of us, marriage has a religious significance. Scripture speaks to love of our fellow human beings and respecting the dignity of every human being. Nowhere is this more true than withm arriage, in which many intimate moments and acts a re shared. Rape is a violent crime, used for thousands of years as an act ofw ar. Rape is not a right of a ny person, nor should it be s een as a sexual act by anyone who promotes "Christ i an values." Christian values mean respecting every human being and their rights. Marital rape underm ines and destroys the very b asis of good Christian val ues. L L N ice to see the Christian Council has moved into the 21st Century keep it up g uys with attitudes like y ours soon there will be NO church. Wouldn't it be a shock if your congregat ion sat out on your next s ervice or much worse t ook back their tithes wonder what your tune would be then? Those who a ttend these churches should show their antiquated "leaders" the way. X X i i n n p p a a I wonder.... if it were physically possible for a woman to force herselfu pon a man, thereby invoking her marital rights as outlined by all those oppos-i ng the law, would we be having this same discus-s ion? Unfortunately, (or fortunately for him... he can't be forced or raped) if he's not interested, willingo r able, his penis does not r ise to the occasion, theref ore making this a nonissue. Shame women’s vaginas don't seal up when they're not interested, willi ng or able. S S i i c c k k a a n n d d t t i i r r e e d d o o f f t t h h i i s s f f o o o o l l i i s s h h n n e e s s s s It is all fine and good to say each of the persons in a marriage has "conjugal rights" when only one of them can "enforce" these rights. I wonder too, in cases of men who work hard and are not always at home to fulfil their partner's" needs", is it acceptable for the woman to cheat? How c ome the Christian Council doesn't take a stand against long office hours for men,a s this may leave his wife n o alternative but to cheat. T he whole thing is hypocritical and self serving, but w hat do you expect? E E n n o o u u g g h h A wife unjustly forbids t he marital act, quite possib ly in an effort to punish the husband or to exertc ontrol. Which is itself a v iolent act. The husband s ays if no marital act, then no allowance, then the wife can charge rape through t hreat (according to Webs ter). Or should that be prostitution where the hus band is treated as a John? A nd that's just as absurd as s upposed "rape" in mar r iage. There can be no rape Share your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 C C

PAGE 29

b ecause the two are One Flesh. Ephesians 5:28-31 In every culture marriage is au nity that this anti-Christi an, anti-Marriage law denies. ..Obviously the proponents of this law (whou nderstand it) are more c oncerned with overturning Judeo-Christian values than they are in protectingw omen against spousal a buse. They could easily compromise and get to the real issue. A A n n t t h h o o n n y y T T a a y y l l o o r r If a man withholds funds from his wife because she will not have sex with him, I think it should give her grounds for divorce and shes hould take him for everything he has. I f she has any sense, she will leave him. L L a a d d y y T his issue is so political that its a sham. Women are t he majority in this country and in the voting demographics. The economy is int he gutter, which has been the single most catalyst for governmental change dur-i ng recent elections. If, you propose, then pass a legislation purporting to advancet he agenda of the majority v oting block you retain y our governmental status quo. This is a ploy. How about reading the SexualO ffences and Domestic V iolence Amended Act 2008. C C h h a a r r l l t t o o n n D D e e v v e e a a u u x x A s I read the newspaper this morning and the Insight editorial, I was completely disgusted with the views that the Christian Council and Rev Paul sharei n regards to the amendm ent of the marital rape law. How can they say they represent Jesus (as Christ is love) yet are completelya gainst a woman having the p rotection against an abusive husband. It’s funny how you only hear fromt hese False Prophets when i t comes to homosexuals and movies, but you never hear them speak out amongst their own "broth e rs" in regards to buying f lashy Bentley cars and reaping additional tithes from already cash strappedc hurch members. Bahamia ns, it is time to wake up and realise the real men a nd women of God and see that the "others" have their own agendas for controla nd possible ambitions be it political or otherwise. D D a a r r i i n n i i q q u u e e As far as I am concerned, t he Christian Council, in taking this position, is the e quivalent of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan. C hristian fundamentalism is as backwards, ignorant and disrespectful of peo-p le's rights, in particular women's rights, as their Muslim “brothers.” Wake up, Bahamas! Shake offt hese false prophets, s hameless scammers and B entley driving fools and think for yourself. Protect your daughters and moth-e rs and sisters from the evil men who think that there is a difference between “force” and “violence.” In ever heard such a foolish a rgument in my life. Rape apologists... the whole lot of them... and that doesn't sound too Christian to me.I hope more people think f or themselves than follow t hese “shallow tins.” I see nothing but the very same S cribes and Pharisees that Jesus so adroitly put in t heir place. Time to do the s ame in this country. Say goodbye to these false prophets! E E r r a a s s m m u u s s F F o o l l l l y y What I want to know is how does the Christian Council manage to brain-w ash about 50 per cent of t he Bahamian population? Religion really must be like c rack, or as Karl Marx said "the opiate of the masses." It doesn't surprise me thatR ev Paul – or any selfappointed moral authority f or that matter – sees nothi ng sinful with a man raping his wife. However, I refuse t o believe that these women who agree – rather, w ho are forced to agree, for if not they will go to Hell – a ctually believe in their hearts that it is proper for a husband to force himself onh is wife. How could they truly believe that their God would want this for them? I guess the fear of beingt hrown into the fires of Hell i s powerful enough to let t hemselves get raped. Or worse, powerful enough for them to defend the act.F urthermore, it is a proven fact that marital rape causes emotional trauma to women. What sort ofw omen defend this kind of a ct? More importantly, what sort of church leaders let that happen? G G P P Q uote from article: "As it t urns out, there seems to be no record of huge changes i n a society, the collapse of the family unit, or an erupt ion of widespread false c laims as a result of the passing of such a law." – That's cause there's nof amily left to destroy. The f amily unit collapsed decades ago with Televi sion. The countries that have t he law are no poster child ren for Utopia. A A n n t t h h o o n n y y T T a a y y l l o o r r C M Y K C M Y K INSIGHT PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FEEDBACK Readers have their say...


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Volume: 105 No.243

The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www .tribune242.com

MONDAY, SE

PTEMBER 14, 2009

‘T left him in hed asleep, .
it was the fast time |
Would see my hoy alive

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A TEN-YEAR-OLD dis-
abled boy died after being
trapped in his bedroom as
flames ripped through his
family's home.

Wheelchair-bound Jer-
maine Mackey was sleeping
in a bedroom while his moth-
er Anastacia Hepburn dashed
out to a nearby food store for
groceries shortly around 8.30
am yesterday morning.

When she returned to their
tiny apartment in Colony Vil-
lage about half an hour later,
she came face-to-face with
every mother's worst night-
mare — a fire-engine parked
outside her smoking home
and the news that her oldest
boy was dead.

"T left him in the bed sleep-
ing not knowing that was the
last time I would ever see
him,” Ms Hepburn, 34, told
The Tribune before breaking
down into tears outside the
charred remains of her home
yesterday.

Boyfriend Rodney Minnis,
37, was at home with Jer-
maine and the couple's four-
year-old child when the
tragedy struck.

He said he nodded off in
the living room sofa with the
four-year-old next to him
watching television as Jer-
maine slept in the bedroom.

Mr Minnis said seemed like
minutes later when the
youngest boy woke him with
screams of 'Daddy! Fire!’

He said his first instinct was
to rescue the four-year-old
and said when he returned for
Jermaine the small home was
engulfed with sickening, black
smoke and huge orange
flames "galloping" along the
ceiling.

Unable to get into the bed-
room, he left to find a neigh-
bour to help - but the thick
smoke and hot flames barred
their entry.

"I can't believe this happen
- I standin’ here - but I can't
believe this happen,” Mr Min-

SEE page 10

36x72
Executive
Desk
ms)

el wi |



ahead with
controversial
$150 million
power plant

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Government is to press
ahead building the controver-
sial $150million Wilson City
power plant on Abaco as con-
cerns linger about its affect on
the environment.

State Minister of Environ-
ment Phenton Neymour says
he is confident the Government
has laid to rest nearly all the
fears on the issue after officials
met with concerned citizens at a
packed town meeting on the
island.

Mr Neymour told The Tri-

SEE page nine

5

Quiznos

TORUS i
HUTS TCL

LOCAL educators
should replay the speech
US President Barack Oba-
ma gave last week on edu-
cation to inspire Bahamian
students, Tribune colum-
nist Sir Ronald Sanders
has urged.

Mr Obama's speech -
broadcast in American
schools last Tuesday -
encouraged students to
strive for their best in the
classroom and to take
responsibility for their
educational careers.

"We can have the most
dedicated teachers, the
most supportive parents,
and the best schools in the
world and none of it will
matter unless all of you

SEE page 10



Felipé Major/Tribune staff





MARK KNOWLES (AP)

KNOWLES AND BHUPATHI
LOSE IN US OPEN FINAL

MARK KNOWLES and
doubles partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi had to settle for runners-
up spot at the US Open in
Flushing Meadows, New York
yesterday.

The pair fell to Lukas
Dlouhy and Leander Paes who
won the final 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.

¢ SEE SPORTS
ON PAGE 12 FOR
FULL STORY



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Inmate
dies after

prison
cell fight

By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

AN INMATE has
died following a fight
in a cell at Her
Majesty's Prison.

Police are investi-
gating the "suspicious"
death of 55-year-old
Lloyd Allan Albury
who died in hospital
less than a week after
being imprisoned ona
vagrancy charge.

According to a brief
statement released by
the Ministry of Nation-
al Security, Albury was
involved “in an inci-
dent with other
inmates in a cell” at
Her Majesty’s Prison
on Fox Hill Road.

Police yesterday
could not provide
details into Albury's
injuries and said his
death would remain
classified as "suspi-
cious" until an autopsy
could be performed.

"We launched an
investigation on Friday
and a team of investi-
gators went to the
prison to uncover the
circumstance of his
injuries. We are going
to do a lot more work
tomorrow, and we are
going to request an
autopsy,” said head of
the homicide squad

SEE page nine



Police set to
make decision on
teacher accused

of sex assault

POLICE officials could
decide today on how to pro-
ceed against a male teacher
accused of sexually assaulting a
16-year-old student.

While remaining tightlipped
on the investigation, ASP Leon
Bethel said yesterday he
expects to speak with the
Attorney General’s office
about the matter.

The teacher was taken into
custody late last month for
questioning pending further
investigations by police.

It is alleged that in late
August, he drugged and later
assauted a male student who
attends the senior high insti-
tution.

The student reportedly com-
plained to another teacher
about the matter, which caused
the school to contact the
police.

This latest case of molesta-
tion is just the latest in a trou-
bling trend that has spread
across the Bahamas.

The Ministry of Education,
through its minister Carl
Bethel, has vowed to protect
children at all schools, pledging
to bring any sexual perpetra-
tors to justice.

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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Patera CMe eee le Bel ws erg Me eed] Better |

LOCAL NEWS



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tS
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fa
=
2
—
=
So
i
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=
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=
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ira

Man dies after scooter
crashes into parked car

A MAN believed to be in his twenties
died Friday night after his scooter crashed
into a parked car.

The man was riding a XY-150 scooter
north on West Street, near the Greek Ortho-
dox Church, when he lost control and
crashed into a parked Honda Civic.

The accident happened at about 9pm on
Friday.

EMS personnel pronounced the man dead
at the scene. The victim was wearing short
beige trousers, a white T-shirt and white
tennis shoes . Heis described as 6ft 2ins tall.

Police are investigating.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

Officers come |

under fire
after chase

POLICE officers came :
under heavy gunfire early Sun- }
day morning following a brief ;

chase in the Fox Hill area.

According to reports, }
mobile division officers were }
on patrol through Step Street, }
Fox Hill, when they saw two }
men in a red Nissan Sentra act- }
ing suspiciously. The vehicle }
sped off as police approached, }
resulting in a brief chase which :
ended through a dead end cor- :

ner just off Step Street.

The occupants of the car }
exited the vehicle, firing shots :
at the officers as they fled. :
None of the officers were }
injured but the police car sus- }
tained damages from gunshots. }

Man in custotly
after loaded
handgun found

A MAN was taken into
police custody after police }
discovered a loaded 9mm i

handgun in his truck.

Drug Enforcement Unit }
officers were on Tonique
Williams Darling Highway at }
about 7pm on Friday when }
they stopped the driver of a }
black 1998 Chevy truck. The }
vehicle was searched and offi- }
cers discovered a 9mm hand- }
gun with five live rounds of }

ammunition inside.

The driver of the truck, a }
37-year-old of Prince Charles }
Drive, was arrested and taken }
into custody. He could :
appear in court today to face :

weapons charges.

The National
Workers
Group meeting

THE National Workers }
group will host a town meet- }
ing on Thursday to assist peo- }
ple with financial challenges. }

Don Saunders, of law firm }
Graham Thompson & Co, }
radio personality Orthland }
Bodie Jr, and Sonia Hamil- }
ton, chairman of National }
Workers Board of Directors, }

are slated to give remarks.

The meeting, to be held at :
Workers House, on Tonique ;
Williams Darling Highway, }
will begin at 7pm under the }
theme “How do you stop }
financial institutions from }

harassing you”.
The event is free.

Huge pythons

Captured in two

Florida cities

m APOPKA, Fla.

WILDLIFE officials are
putting the squeeze on giant ;
pythons in Florida, according to }

Associated Press.

Friday, officials seized }
Delilah, an 18-foot-long, 400 }
pound python who fed on rab- }
bits in an Apopka-area back- }
yard. Concerns about Delilah’s }
size and whether the chain-link }
cage she was in was secure }
enough to contain her prompt- }
ed the visit from the Florida }
Fish and Wildlife Conservation ;

Commission.

Delilah was removed and }
brought to a caregiver with a }
permit to handle large snakes. }
Officials are trying to deter- ;
mine whether the owner has }
the proper permit. Earlier in }
the week in Lakeland, officials }
uncovered two large pythons, }
an 11-foot-long male and its }
female companion, a 17-footer i
weighing more than 150}

pounds.

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Miss Grand Bahama ‘was stripped.
of her title and responsibilities’

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

“We are saddened that we
were forced to dethrone Miss
Hudson, however, we would
have preferred in our tradition-
ally fashion to have a graceful
changing of the guards.

“Miss Hudson is instructed
to immediately cease all refer-
ence to and the further use of
the title of Miss Grand Bahama
2009, in all forms of media
including press conferences,
Facebook and Myspace web-
sites. We wish Miss Hudson, the
best in her future endeavours.”

The organisation said Miss
Severe will complete the
2009/2010 reign and represent
the island in China at the Miss
Friendship International
Pageant in October.

She will also travel to Colom-
bia in January 2010, to repre-
sent the Bahamas in the Miss
Coffee International Pageant.

Miss Severe inherits, among a
whole list of prizes, a full schol-
arship to attain an associate
degree in any discipline of her
choice from Terreve College.

role models for all women,
young and old, alike and are
held at higher standard during
their 12-month reign.

“We do understand the pres-
sures that are associated with
the higher standards of being
Miss Grand Bahama, but that is
why all of our contestants are
vetted and during the six-month
training and preparation for the
pageant they are made fully
aware of what is expected of
the Queen.”

The organisation further stat-
ed that the title of Miss Grand
Bahama and the Miss Grand
Bahama crown and sash are the
property of the Miss Grand
Bahama organisation.

“No queen by being crowned
acquires any rights to retain the
crown or use the title Miss
Grand Bahama or any promo-
tional material as photos,
videos, publicity material etc,
in any endeavours, public or pri-
vate, without the written per-
mission of the president at his
sole discretion.

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THE Miss Grand Bahama
beauty pageant organisation has
announced that Garrelle Hud-
son was stripped of her title and
responsibilities.

Miss Hudson, 19, told the
media last week that she relin-
quished her title over what she
described as “management
issues.”

She also claims she has not
received any of her prizes.

But according to a press
release issued by the organisa-
tion, a new queen was appoint-
ed on Friday to replace Miss
Hudson.

First runner-up Nikki Severe
has now assumed the title of
Miss Grand Bahama 2009/10.

According to the organiza-
tion, Miss Hudson “failed to
cooperate with the organiza-
tion”.

It went on: “The Miss Grand
Bahama beauty pageant organ-
isation places great emphasis on
total cooperation and the abid-
ing of all pageant rules and reg-
ulations.

“We were very disappointed
that Miss Hudson failed to
cooperate with the organisation
and refused to abide byAwith the
organizations rules, regulations
and expectations. As a beauty
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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PRO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Unity of national purpose needed

WHEN A BOAT is sinking the crew will
put aside their differences in the common
interest of survival and, shoulder-to-shoul-
der, bail until they reach safe harbour.

Today the world community is that boat
and only those countries will recover whose
citizens understand that their only hope is in
unity of national purpose. This is when oppo-
sition parties have to realise that a “loyal”
opposition only opposes that which it sin-
cerely believes is not in the best interest of
the country. It becomes a major part of the
problem when it opposes just for the sake of
opposing. When its politicians believe that
the end justifies the means and those means
can include unfair character assassination
and lies.

Again to return to our sinking ship, it’s
like having the crew bailing to save the ship,
while one or two of their mates are in the
stern, busily drilling more holes to sink her.

This is the type of politics we see in the
Bahamas, and even more alarmingly so in
the United States since the election of Pres-
ident Barack Obama. We say alarming,
because it is of great concern to the
Bahamas, whose future prosperity depends
upon America’s recovery from a world reces-
sion triggered by the uncontrolled financial
greed of Wall Street — a street that history
will record in ignominy.

America is looked up to as the leader of
the free world. However, as we see the spec-
tacle of its “loyal” opposition, putting its
politics before the country, those nations
that depend upon America’s rapid recov-
ery have much to fear. Before us we see a
spectacle of political dishonesty, scare mon-
gering and partisanship to an extent that
threatens America’s position as a world
leader.

Meanwhile, Americans are losing their
jobs, their homes and their security. So are
Bahamians, and for the same reason — a
world recession. Yet we have an opposition
politician in our midst who well knows why
businesses are belt tightening, and citizens
are jobless, yet will say, with his irritatingly
smug smile, that this country’s unemploy-
ment figures add to the “mounting evidence
of the fundamental failure of the Right Hon
Hubert Ingraham as Prime Minister of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas.” According
to him, Mr Ingraham is better at winning
elections than governing the country.

Would he say the same about President
Obama whose country’s unemployment fig-
ures continue to climb? And if not, why not?

Can you imagine a Southern Republican
Senator in a fight over health care saying
that “if we’re able to stop Obama on this, it
will be his Waterloo. It will break him”?

The nation is at economic risk, but instead
of concentrating on the real problems, they
are busy trying to break a new president
before he is even given a chance to govern.
The Republicans complain about big gov-

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ernment and heavy debt, forgetting that it
was their party that bequeathed to the new
administration a $1.3 trillion deficit, the
largest in the nation’s history.

But the fight, and lies told by politicians to
block President Obama’s inspiring speech
for delivery to school children last week,
was the most shocking of all. His speech was
designed to encourage young people to stay
in school, take responsibility for their learn-
ing “and put in the hard work it takes to
succeed.”

Many schools refused to air his speech, a
speech that all children should have heard.
Many parents kept their children from
school, because the opposition spread the
false alarm that it was “fascist,” “Hitler
indoctrination,” and “socialist” among many
other things. The political viciousness con-
tinued and was swallowed hook, line and
sinker by the nation’s gullible and ignorant.
Really it was a frightening spectacle.

But most disconcerting of all was the views
of the Florida GOP chairman who did not
want his children to hear the “vision” of
their president. In other words he wanted to
control what they saw and what they heard.
It seems that his children missed a wonder-
ful civics lesson, and he, as a parent, passed
up a golden opportunity to have a discussion
with them on the parts of the speech with
which he disagreed. That is how children
learn.

But if America’s youth are to go through
life with blinkers attached by their parents to
shield them from another man’s point of
view, then indeed, if America is to retain its
position as world leader, the world is in a lot
of trouble. No wonder on BBC’s HardTalk
Thursday evening President George Bush’s
former national security advisor, in dis-
cussing what went wrong in the Iraq war,
had to admit to Stephen Sackur that the
Americans had “to confront an enemy” they
did not understand. And they probably did-
n’t understand Iraq, because, despite Amer-
ica’s strength and wealth, its people on the
whole remain insular, nursing only their own
point of view, and many stupidly shielding
their children from even exploring another
man’s ideas, opinions and culture.

And today many Americans are afraid of
the views of their new President because he
is an international man. He has lived among
and listened to the points of view of many
other nationalities. He listens, he reasons
and he understands. That is why other
nations show far more appreciation for him
than do his fellow Americans. Unlike the
majority of his countrymen his mind encom-
passes broader horizons. In fact he is a
breath of fresh air. We are certain if he were
before the BBC’s Stephen Sackur Thursday
night he could never have made the embar-
rassing admission that he took his country to
war against an adversary he did not under-
stand.


















es

we

eile

Number of clerics
who oppose death
penalty is worrying

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The growing number of
“men of the cloth” advocating
elimination of the death penal-
ty is worrying. They seemingly
do so more from a humanistic
rather than a biblical perspec-
tive.

Progressive thinking, human-
istic, liberal clerics have steered
the church far from biblical
teaching. It is because of such
progressive, humanistic, liberal
thinking that an openly gay
Anglican priest, living in
“union” with his male mate, has
risen to the high office of bish-
op of the church. Moreover, the
fact that notwithstanding his
lifestyle, the bishop was elected
by other bishops of the church
speaks volumes to the perva-
sive extent to which depravity
engulfs the church today.

In an article on the subject
of the death penalty which I
wrote sometime ago, I noted
words with import similar to
the following: “Those opposed
to the death penalty generally
argue that capital punishment
does not deter or prevent an
individual intent on committing
murder from doing so. I pre-
sume they argue from the
standpoint of various studies
on the subject, studies albeit
carried out in someone else’s
jurisdiction rather than ours no
doubt. I don’t intend to argue
otherwise, at least not just yet.

In my earlier article I had
noted that those who focus on
the issue of deterrence surely
miss the point.

The primary purpose of cap-
ital punishment is not to pre-
vent murder any more than the
principal reason of a fine or
incarceration is to prevent any
other form of criminal behav-
iour.

Retribution, recompense if
you will, extracting from an
offender pay-back similar in
degree to the individual's trans-
gression, is the genesis, the
foundation forming the basis
for imposition of a sentence.
The punishment must fit the
crime.”

The death penalty is the ulti-

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



mate punishment. It fits the
most egregious of crimes, snuff-
ing out of another’s life.

In my article I also commu-
nicated that proponents and
opponents of capital punish-
ment are so firmly entrenched
in their positions that what I
had to say likely would not
have had much bearing on their
views.

I nevertheless offered a per-
spective which I pronounced to
be somewhat unique and, to a
degree, erudite. I noted that
both the Old Testament and
the New Testament spoke in
clarion clear terms to the issue
of the punishment fitting the
crime. The ultimate punish-
ment, the surrendering of one’s
life, clearly fits the ultimate
crime, the wilful, deliberate,
premeditated taking of anoth-
er’s life.

Laws of the Old Testament
characterize appropriate pun-
ishment as an "eye for an eye,
a tooth for a tooth." In the New
Testament Jesus described it
thusly: "With which measure
ye mete it shall be measured to
you."

Liberalist, modernistic, so-
called progressive thinking New
Testament scholars seek to lim-
it Jesus’ words of “giving back
in equal measure”, to the dis-
pensing of rewards only. I
regard such limitation as being
reflective of intellectual deprav-
ity for surely the dispensing of
punishment (by the appropri-
ate authority), is inherent in the
words uttered.

The second argument
advanced by opponents of the
death penalty, is the possibility
of someone being wrongly con-
victed and punished.

Why limit discourse to the
death penalty? The wrongful
conviction and punishment of
anyone for any crime is abhor-
rent. Do we therefore have the
courts dispense with the impo-
sition of all penalties? God for-

bid. While wrongful convic-
tions can and no doubt do
occur, though with significant
infrequency, I doubt anyone
has the gumption to suggest
courts should discharge every
case that comes before them
because such a risk exists.
Moreover, capital cases by their
very nature receive far more
review than other cases. Hence,
the risk of erroneous judgment
is minimized.

As to the finality of imposi-
tion of the death sentence, I
previously offered the following
perspective from a good rev-
erend gentleman: "Death is a
phase not finality. It is temporal
rather than terminal."

In closing out my previous
note on this subject I opined
that I subscribe to the view that
lawlessness begets lawlessness.
I also noted that lawlessness
may arise from acts of commis-
sion as well as acts of omission
and that the state’s failure to
carry out the capital punish-
ment statute on our law books
might be considered an act of
lawlessness thus begetting the
lawlessness which has become
so prevalent, so rampant in our
once quaint, God-fearing
nation.

Earlier, I suggested that I
did not intend to immediately
argue the merits or otherwise of
the efficacy of capital punish-
ment serving as a deterrent to
murder.

The opportunity is now pre-
sented to study the subject in
a local context.

Murder statistics over the
past seven to eight years that
capital punishment has been
pending is a given. The oppor-
tunity now presents itself for
similar statistics to be looked
at once capital punishment is
resumed.

The opportunity exists. It
ought to be embraced without
delay. "Carpe diem.”

MICHAEL R. MOSS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

June 29, 2008.

What could Bahamas government he thinking?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The Bahamas is facing its
worst recession in many years
with businesses having to
down size and families hav-
ing to cut back wherever pos-
sible to make ends meet.

Rumour has it that cash
flow is hard to come by for
the government, leading to
cut backs in some interesting
places, yet the country opens
a consulate office in Atlanta,
Georgia.

According to the Bahamas
Information Services, the fan-
fare was wonderful. It appears
that no expense was spared.

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Politicos were flown in along
with The Grand Bahama
Youth Choir and the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Bands
(Pop and Marching) to enter-
tain the crowd.

I’m sorry, but I'd be will-
ing to bet dollars to donuts
that this expenditure cannot
be justified, particularly dur-
ing these tough economic
times.

The former government in
its ultimate wisdom opened
an Embassy in Cuba, at
tremendous expense, at a
time when they had already
strained relations with our
largest trading partner, and
now this government opens a
representative office, at sig-
nificant expense, when the
country is suffering under the
toughest economic times in
decades.



I realise that governments
think not raising a budget for
expenditure is saving money,
but what could the Bahamas
Government be thinking?

The government at least
owes the Bahamian people a
detailed report of their rea-
sons for this office, along with
an accounting of how they
spent taxpayer money.

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
August, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5





Woman questioned over the
drive-by shooting of man, 22

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are questioning a
woman over the drive-by shoot-
ing of a 22-year-old man in Sun-
shine Park.

ASP Leon Bethel said the
woman, who he described as
middle-aged, was taken into
police custody on Saturday
morning.

“We have interviewed a
number of persons and we have
in our custody a woman who
we are questioning,” ASP
Bethel said.

According to initial police

reports, it was just after 10am
on Friday when 22-year-old
Degario Knowles and another
man were sitting on a wall of a
house on Winward Isles Road
when a green Honda Inspire
drove up and its occupants
opened fire.

As Mr Knowles made a dash
to escape the attack, a gunman
emerged from the back seat of
the car and continued shooting.

Mr Knowles reportedly stag-
gered several feet into a neigh-
bouring yard, managed to hop a
backyard fence before collaps-
ing — leaving a large trail of
blood behind him. The death
pushed the nation's murder

LOCAL NEWS

count to 59.

Meanwhile, just hours after
the Sunshine Park murder,
police were called to the scene
of another incident in the
neighbourhood.

At around 1.30am on Satur-
day, police received reports that
aman was firing shots and had
threatened a woman friend.

Police searched a house in
Garden Hills and found a hand-
gun and ammunition. A 24-
year-old man was taken into
custody.

ASP Leon Bethel said police
are certain the incident was not
connected to the murder of Mr
Knowles.

US AMBASSADOR- Nal CALLS ON BAHAMAS IN WASHINGTON

|



AMBASSADOR-DESIGNATE Nicole Avant (right) is pictured with Rhoda Jackson, Charge D'Affaires, the

Bahamas’ Embassy in Washington.

THE United States' ambassador-designate to
the Bahamas Nicole Avant plans to promote lit-
eracy in children as well as continuing the fight
against illegal drug and weapons trafficking dur-

ing her tenure in this country.

During a courtesy call on Rhoda Jackson,
Charge D' Affaires, at the Bahamas' Embassy in

Washington, DC,

Ms Avant said she was "deeply honoured" to
be the first African-American woman ambas-

Rosetta St.

sador to the Bahamas.

She added that she was passionate about men-
toring local schoolchildren, and wants to pro-
mote ‘Read To Lead’, a literacy program in

Bahamian public schools which grew out of an ini-

tiative started in 2005 by former US Ambassador
to the Bahamas John Rood.

Ms Avant, who is expected to arrive in Nassau

early October, also expressed a keen interest in
humanitarian assistance programmes.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Funeral services
for the daughter of
Minister Neko Grant

FUNERAL services were
held on Saturday for the daugh-
ter of Works Minister Neko
Grant who died in hospital in
Florida after losing a battle with
pneumonia last week.

Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on
September 6 - the day after Mr
Grant buried his mother, Reva
Grant and only months after
the death of his father.

Nekcarla, an attorney who

worked for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's legal depart-
ment, was admitted to Doctor's
Hospital for treatment before
being transferred to the inten-
sive care unit of the Cleveland
Clinic in Florida, where she lat-
er died.

Ms Grant, a mother-of-one,
was graduated from St Mary's
University in the United States
with a bachelors degree in his-

tory before studying law at the
University of Leeds, where she
was graduated with honours in
2000.

In early 2001 she was called
to the English Bar and in Sep-
tember of that year she was
called to the Bahamas Bar.

The funeral was held at
Freeport Bible Church in Grand
Bahama.





ABOVE: Minister of Public

Works and Transport Neko
Grant guides the casket of his
daughter Nekcarla Grant, 36,
during the processional of her
funeral service held Saturday,
September 12, 2009 at Freeport
Bible Church.

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MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS and Transport Neko Grant (right)
is pictured holding his grandson Daniel, son of his late daughter
Nekcarla Grant at her funeral service held Saturday, September
12, 2009 at Freeport Bible Church. Also pictured is Mrs Barbara
Grant and Mr Grant's son Neko Grant Il.

JOHNSTON & MURPHY.

THE COMFORTS

NUS UTE ae

Only those short listed will be contacted.

NEW REGULATORY REGIME NOW IN FORCE

The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, cane into force on 1 September
2009.

This date signals the start af the transition to a new regulatory regime, Greater
competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the ecanomy and of all persans in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.hs), These include:

Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum

licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)

Various farms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,

and ain Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatery Authority
continue in farce to the extent that they do nat conflict with provisions of the Comes
Act, the Utlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all - the website will also give you an
opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comms Act coming into torce tor the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.



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wiv .urcabaha ras. bs


THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7





Writing your own
destiny: Barack
Obama’s universal
message for youth

insight

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By RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is Consultant and
former Caribbean Diplomat)

Hivervone knows
good sense when they
hear it, and Barack Obama’s
back-to-school address on Sep-
tember 8 to students from
kindergarten to 12th grade in
the United States was perfect
good sense.

It was as applicable to stu-
dents in the tiny Caribbean
Island of Montserrat, in the
overcrowded urban centres of
Brazil, in the leafy suburbs of
France as it was to students in
the United States. And, it was
delivered with an authenticity
that could only come from
someone who had experienced
serious challenges and over-
come them.

The message, broadcast to
schools throughout America,
was compelling: “Where you
are right now doesn't have to
determine where you'll end up.
No one's written your destiny
for you... you write your own
destiny.”

Obama’s observation would
strike a visceral chord in at least
two generations of Caribbean
people who climbed out of
deprivation by absorbing edu-
cation to write a destiny very
different from the future to
which their circumstances
pointed.

When he described his moth-
er giving him extra tuition at
4.30 in the morning because she
couldn’t afford to send him to
the school other American kids
attended in Indonesia where
they lived at the time, men and
women in developing countries
the world over could identify
with the problem and the deter-
mination.

In the Caribbean, waking up
with sun’s rise to study was a
norm for many students in rur-
al areas whose homes had no
electricity and whose parents
could not afford private schools
or extra lessons. In some cases,
study in the light of the early
morning sun preceded work in
the field before setting-off for
school.

Many of the professionals in
Caribbean life today reached
the pinnacles they have by
recognising then what Obama,
from his own similar experi-
ence, could say today: “Each
of you has a responsibility for
your education, (It is) a respon-
sibility you have to yourself.”

And, Obama’s message was
not patronizing.

His was not the voice of a
privileged guy for whom talk is
cheap.

The students saw the Presi-
dent of the United States, but
the voice they heard was that of
a successful man who had once
been a fatherless child, brought
up in tough circumstances by a
single mother. The lesson was
clear.

As he said, “My father left
my family when I was two years
old, and I was raised by a single
mother who struggled at times
to pay the bills and wasn't
always able to give us things
the other kids had. There were
times when I missed having a
father in my life. There were
times when I was lonely and
felt like I didn't fit in. So I was-
n't always as focused as I
should have been. I did some
things I'm not proud of, and
got in more trouble than I
should have. And my life could
have easily taken a turn for the
worse.”

All over the Caribbean
today, there are children aban-
doned by fathers and being
brought-up by struggling single
mothers. The extent to which
this has a deleterious effect on
the children is a matter that
sociologists and others are
studying, but already there is
evidence that many children in
such circumstances find little
motivation in schools and in
formal education.

But, the problem of turning
away from education is not
restricted to children of single
mothers alone. It is particularly
manifest — and worrying — in
Caribbean universities which
today graduate more women

than men because fewer men
than women are seeking higher
education.

There appears to be a dis-
connection between many
young people in the Caribbean
and the formal education sys-
tem. Obviously, given the fact
that President Obama chose to
talk to students throughout the
United States in their first week
back at school, the problem
exists there as well.

He could not be more pas-
sionate in his call to students
to seize education for the good
it will do them. “You can't drop
out of school and just drop into
a good job. You've got to work
for it and train for it and learn
for it”, he said.

In a passage that appealed to
the students to do good not
only for themselves, but for
their country, Obama declared:
“You'll need the knowledge
and problem-solving skills you
learn in science and math to
cure diseases like cancer and
AIDS, and to develop new
energy technologies and pro-
tect our environment. You'll
need the insights and critical
thinking skills you gain in his-
tory and social studies to fight
poverty and homelessness,
crime and discrimination, and
make our nation more fair and
more free. You'll need the cre-
ativity and ingenuity you devel-
op in all your classes to build
new companies that will create
new jobs and boost our econo-
m ge

All that he said to Ameri-
can students, holds true for stu-
dents in the Caribbean, but
even more so. For the
Caribbean needs skills and
knowledge much more than
countries, such as the United
States, in the developed world.
In this regard, the resource that
the Caribbean most needs to
develop is its human resource.
Businesses and governments in
the region require people with
capacity in a range of skills that
include engineering, manage-
ment, accountancy and audit-
ing, marketing and negotiating.

The region’s need for such
skills is worsened, of course, by
their migration out of its bor-
ders into places such as the US,
Canada and the United King-
dom. The fact that over 60 per
cent of tertiary educated people
from the Caribbean have left
(in the case of Jamaica and
Guyana, the figure is over 80
per cent) speaks powerfully to
the importance of educating
even more of the region’s
young people in the skill areas
that are needed.

But to get more young peo-
ple into tertiary education, the
Caribbean has to get them suc-
cessfully through secondary
education.

This is why Obama’s power-
ful message, directed at young
people in America, should be
cheered by every serious busi-
ness entity in the Caribbean.

SIR RONALD SANDERS



For Caribbean youth who
may have missed it, Chambers
of Commerce should join with
schools in arranging for it to be
broadcast in schools in the
region, and discussed by stu-
dents, their teachers and poten-
tial employers. There is a des-
tiny to be written.

(Responses to and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com)

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



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oly Cross Anglican Church

presents

5

“Proclaiming the Good News through Mission & Ministry”

Matthew 28:19-20

(Suest Preachers:

Pastor Cedric B, Moss

Pastor, Kingdom Life Church

Pastor TG. Morrison
Pastor, Zion Baptist Church

eats TU oe =e oe
[opic: Transtorming Lives through Mission & Ministry Topic: Equipping the Saints to Proclaim the Good News

The Revd Fr, Mark L. Fox

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is growing daily

TRIBUNE242, the online
edition of the nation's lead-
ing daily newspaper, is fast
becoming an internet sensa-
tion.

The latest figures released
today show how Tribune242
is growing daily as informa-
tion-hungry surfers log on to
get the latest news, features
and sports reports.

But that’s not all they’re
logging on for, our readers
are also enjoying is one of the
many unique features of Tri-
bune242 ... the opportunity to
comment INSTANTLY on
ANY story they read.

Other websites may lay
claim to having "millions" of
readers, but the figures they
use are based on the number
of "hits" - the amount of traf-
fic a site gets.

For a number of reasons,
these figures do not give an
accurate picture of how many
people are viewing the site.

We at Tribune242 look at
the number of "unique visi-
tors" — the number of NEW
readers — who are logging on

daily ... and this is what really
counts.

On launch day, Monday,
August 10, we recorded 1,926
unique visitors. Since then the
number of new readers has
grown daily, standing at 2,168
on September 7.

And by pure coincidence,
if you subtract our launch day
figure from that of Septem-
ber 7, we have the incredible
number 242.

Tribune Managing Editor
John Fleet said: "To the unin-
formed, these figures may not
look impressive since they
tend to think in terms of hits.

“But in reality, they give us
the bragging rights to being
the best read interactive news
website in the Bahamas, quite
possibly even the Caribbean.

"And this is just the begin-
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“We have many exciting
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To join The Tribune's
growing family of online read-
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M&E Limited ay

Machinery & Energy Limited (M & E
Limited), the authorized Caterpillar dealer

in The Bahamas,

is looking for Trainee

hector, ot. Peter s Parish, Long Island Technician Candidates 20 to 30 years
old for enrollment in their local Caterpillar
Training Institute.Candidates should be a
graduate of BTVI or an equivalent institution.
Practical experience in repairing diesel
engines and/or electrical equipment is a
plus. Successful candidates will be trained in
M & E’s local training institute by experienced
mechanics and electricians. The training
will be done in Nassau with opportunities
to relocate to M & E’s Freeport or Abaco
branches upon completion.

Topic: Living Your Full Potential within the Body of Christ by Proclaiming the Good News

Dates: Wednesday, September 16 thru Friday, September 18, 2009
- Come & Experience .

Anointed Praise & Worship Ministry
Dynamic Preaching & Biblical Exposition
Prayer & Counseling Ministry

Please address all resumes to:

are Service Manager
P. O. Box N-3238
Nassau, Bahamas.

Resumes can also be eORree Su
at the receptionist desk at

main office in Oakes Field. recite:
must be received no later than Friday,

HOLY CROSS ANGLICAN CHURCH
Rector: The Revd Fr. Norman D, Lightbourne
Assistant Priest: The Rev'd Fr, Ethan P. J. Ferguson | |



September 18", 2009. Only persons
being interviewed for this training will
be contacted.

Highbury Park & Soldier Rd . Nassau, N. P. The Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9



FROM page one

bune yesterday: "In the time
we had available, I am of the
view a number of individuals
who originally may have had
some issues with the plant due
to the misinformation and pro-
paganda being spread have now
left that meeting with a posi-
tive view of BEC and the
plant.”

He said he only wished the
Government had more time to
clearly demonstrate how
Bunker C fuel is used world-
wide.

"First of all, we only had one
town meeting to disseminate all
of the information that we had
available to us. If we had more
time it could have been seen
even more clearly that the pow-
er plant is one that is placed
throughout the Caribbean,
North and Central America.

"If we had more time we
could have illustrated the num-
ber locations (that are in)
Bermuda, Brazil, Chile,
Venezuela, Mexico, the Unit-
ed States such as South Flori-
da," said Mr Neymour.

Concerns about the possible
environmental and health
impacts of the power plant hit
fever pitch in recent weeks.

A video claiming the poten-
tially damaging impact of the
heavy oil Bunker C (HFO)
power plant was released on an
Internet video sharing site this
week. An Internet petition to
stop the development had also
been signed by hundreds of
concerned supporters.

The Government has said
that measures to prevent envi-
ronmental destruction will be
taken by ensuring regular main-
tenance of the plant and three
mile pipeline to the tanker port,
providing staff with proper
training and support, and by
appointing an environmental
officer to oversee all such con-
cerns.

Some Abaconians have also
criticized The Government for
not informing them about the
plant before they began con-
struction last month.

But Mr Neymour explained
that the plant had been in the
pipeline under the former PLP-
led administration. He added
that during the FNM's current
term, plans for the plant had
been discussed by the Prime

The
Ms.

following

Arnette Rahming

Minister and during Mr Ney-
mour's budget debate in Par-
lament.

According to Mr Neymour,
Government was not made
aware of any opposition to the
project until recently and
added that the plant was des-
perately needed to supply Aba-
co's growing demand for pow-
er.

"T did not receive significant
concerns about it. BEC, after
selecting a suitable site, began
construction because Abaco
has been impacted by the con-
ditions of the current power
plant. There is a peak demand
of 24-megawatts and the cur-
rent facility currently supplies
27-megawatts.

"So if a generator goes

LOCAL NEWS

fovt presses ahead with controversial $150m power plant

down, normally it leads to a
position where load shedding
occurs. So they felt it was criti-
cal that we begin to meet the
growing needs of Abaco. We,
the Government, are con-
cerned about the development
of Abaco and also concerned
that there may be a few indi-
viduals who may not, or appear
to not, like Abaco to develop
further," he said.

Mr Neymour said now that
the Government has met with
residents of Abaco in an
attempt to dissuade their fears:
"We will continue with the con-
struction of the power facility -
we don't see a reason to stop”.

He added that he is open to
meeting with the environmen-
talists concerned about the Wil-

Prinate Farmily lalamd Rerort Operation

Invites application for the following positions:

Applicants should satisfy the following minimum

requirements:

CHIEF ENGINEER

Have a Bachelors Degree in Mechanical
Engineering from a recognized College/University
At least minimum 5 years in a similar or closely

related field

Must be computer literate
Be proactive, self motivated and be ready to work

long hours

Be able to lead a team of Engineers and technicians

With varied trades

LIVE IN MAID

Fully experienced in domestic household chores

and culinary duties

Three years in a similar position would be an asset
Applicant must be willing to live on island

Applications should send email to:
cmajor@ grp.sandals.com

gos

Colinalmperial

individuals are
(356-8328) or

asked

to contact
Ms. Shamara

Farquharson (356-8456) at Colinalmperial Insurance Ltd:

ALBERTHA MILLER
Pinder's Point Freeport,

ANITA L BURROWS
Matthew Town, Inagua

ANTONIA LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

BRENDA ADDERLEY
CLAUDE LESBOTT
P. O. Box SS-5481
New Bight Cat Island

CYRIL WILLIAMS |
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

CYRIL WILLIAMS II
Yellow Elder Gardens 2

DWAYNE DORSETTE

EDNA DEAN
P. O. Box N-4912

IAN TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

JASON SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

JENNIFER TRECO
P. O. Box N-3693

KEVA FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

KOVAN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

LEANDRA PINDER

GB Matthew Town, Inagua

MERVIN SMITH
P. O. Box CB-11825

MIRIAM NAOMI INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

NASHLAWN CURTIS

NESHA JASMINE L CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

NIKITA CURTIS

OLIVIA GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

PHILIPPA, INGRAHAM
P. O. Box N-7905

RENDAL COLEBY
P. O. Box N-8672

SANSCHIA CULMER
P. O. Box SS-5818

STAFFORD MILLER
Pinder’s Point Freeport, GB

STEPHEN FAWKES
Matthew Town, Inagua

VICTORIA SAUNDERS
Prince Charles Drive

WELLINGTON DORSETTE

WILFRED GAITOR
P. O. Box N-5359

son City plant on the country's
national energy policy.

"One of the things that we
would like to do is to have a
meeting with some of the envi-
ronmentalists on a national
energy policy .I am open toa
discussion with them if they are
willing to discuss the energy
policy," said Mr Neymour.

‘YOUR VIEW”

To have your say on
this or any other issue,
email The Tribune at:
letters@tribunemedia.net or
deliver your letter to
The Tribune on Shirley Street,
P.O. Box N-3207

A 3-semester

Inmate dies after
prison cell fight

FROM page one





















Assistant Superintendent Leon Bethel.

"From our information he was sent to prison for
vagrancy and he was placed in a cell. While in the cell he
received injuries and that’s what we're looking into right
now. He was in prison for less than a week."

Mr Bethel could not say exactly how many inmates
were in the cell at the time of the attack.

He explained that investigators were informed of the
incident late Friday and therefore were still gathering
information on the details surrounding Albury’s death.

Albury was taken to hospital for treatment on Sep-
tember, 8 but died two days later, added the ministry's
statement.




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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



James Catalyn & Friends

















































Hens reo MADNESS"
SUMMER Ave 2009

The Dundas Centre - Regular Performances
Seplember 16th - 19th 2009 at Bpm nightly
Tickets $20.00

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Tuesday 15th September al Spm - Tickets $25.00

Box Office: The Dundas Centre

telephome 393-37 28/394-7)79 - 9:00am - §:00pm Daily
[Reserved lickets not collected by 3:00pm om day af performance will be sald

TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.

High School

A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.

Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.

Only Born Again Christians should

apply.

The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.

Sa Wahi (Sia
By! °

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Obama speech ‘should be used
to inspire Bahamian students’

FROM page one

fulfill your responsibilities,”
said Mr Obama speaking
from the Wakefield High
School in Arlington, Virginia.

"Unless you show up to
those schools; pay attention
to those teachers; listen to
your parents, grandparents
and other adults; and put in
the hard work it takes to
succeed. And that’s what I
want to focus on today: The
responsibility each of you
has for your education. I
want to start with the
responsibility you have to
yourself."

Mr Obama also stressed
that it was the civic duty of
each student to discover his
or her hidden talents and to
hone those skills.

"We need every single
one of you to develop your
talents, skills and intellect
so you can help solve our
most difficult problems. If
you don't do that, if you quit
on school, you're not just
quitting on yourself, you're
quitting on your country."

He also warned students
that the road to success is
not as glamorous and easily
attained as portrayed on
television shows, adding that
hard work and determina-
tion are the keys to success.

"Whatever you resolve to
do, I want you to commit to
it. | want you to really work
at it... .The truth is, being
successful is hard.

"You won't love every
subject you study. You
won't click with every
teacher. Not every home-
work assignment will seem
completely relevant to your
life right this minute. And
you won't necessarily suc-

ceed at everything the first
time you try.

"That's OK. Some of the
most successful people in
the world are the ones
who've had the most fail-
ures," he said.

For those branded as
problem students, Mr Oba-
ma encouraged them to plod
on despite thier frustration
and not to accept negative
perceptions of themselves.

"If you get in trouble, that
doesn't mean you're a trou-
blemaker, it means you
need to try harder to
behave. If you get a bad
grade, that doesn't mean
you're stupid, it just means
you need to spend more
time studying. No one's
born being good at things,
you become good at things
through hard work.
.You've got to practice.

"Don't be afraid to ask
questions. Don't be afraid
to ask for help when you
need it. I do that every day.
Asking for help isn't a sign
of weakness, it's a sign of
strength. It shows you have
the courage to admit when
you don't know something,
and to learn something new.

"Don't ever give up on
yourself, And even when
you're struggling, even when
you're discouraged, and you
feel like other people have
given up on you - don't ever
give up on yourself. Because
when you give up on your-
self, you give up on your
country,” the president said.

For days leading up to the
speech the president was
demonised by his detractors
for attempting to indoctri-
nate American children into
his so-called "socialist"
agenda.

There was harsh com-

Manager
Needed

Fax Resume to:

394-0324

FOX HILL & JOE FARRINGTON ROAD PH



mentary from right-wing
conservative pundits, some
of whom accused the presi-
dent of trying to drum up
support for his proposed
health care reform, which
has met much resistance
from opponents.

e SIR RONALD
SANDERS: PAGE 7



ESTO aes END)

MUM'S AGONY AS
SON DIES IN FIRE

FROM page one

nis cried as he looked upon the burnt remains of his home in
disbelief.

Mr Minnis said he can still hear Jermaine’s screams for help
and is overcome with grief because he could not help him.

"He was very quiet, he was disabled, he can't do anything for
himself. I feed him, I do everything for him. He would go to
school and if he ain’ see me all day he would hug me and
squeeze me tight - he’s just that sweet loving,” said Ms Hepburn,
a mother-of-three.

ASP Walter Evans said police responded to the fire at the
middle unit of a triplex around 9am. He said firefighters met the
home in flames but quickly extinguished the fire.

The cause of the blaze is under investigation.

A neighbour complained that firefighters took nearly half an
hour to respond to the call and said other neighbours tried to
douse the flames with water.

But an officer at the Elizabeth Estates fire station said they
received the call at 9am and responded at 9.05.

Remarkably, the two adjoining units of the tri-plex were
not damaged by the fire.

Sandals

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The successful candidate should have the
following qualifications

Supervise the day to day maintenance of the
grounds

Work directly with landscape contractor
Report to General Manager & Hotel Manager
Knowledge of plants, insects, disease,
irrigation pesticides and fertilizers
Minimum of 3 years experience

Send resume and 3 references to:
mreampbell@erp.sandals.com

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

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MONDAY,



‘It’s great to
have the Tank
back in action’

SEPTEMBER 14,





PAGE 14 ¢ Local boxing news

2009 US OPEN DOUBLES FINAL

- Sherman

Knowles ant Bhupathi lose tirler






















ABOVE:

MAHESH BHUPATHI, of India,
top right, serves over his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
against Lukas Dlouhy, of the
Czech Republic, and Leander
Paes, of India, during the men’s
doubles finals match.

RIGHT:

MAHESH BHUPATHI, right, of
India, watches as his partner
Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas,
returns a ball to Lukas Dlouhy, of
the Czech Republic, and Lean-
der Paes, of India.

PHOTOS:

Elise Amendola/
Associated Press

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By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MARK Knowles said he’s
“super disappointed” that he
and Mahesh Bhupathi “did-
n't get the job done” and had
to settle for the runners-up
title in their second appear-
ance this year at a Grand
Slam final.

The Bahamian-Indian num-
ber three seeds were unable

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

Bidders are required to collect bid packages fram
the Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone
No, 302-1158,

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 2009,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Marked: Tender Wo. 7O7/09
Assossmant of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the
Corporation deems necessary.

bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

MARK KNOWLES, of the Bahamas, and Mahesh Bhupathi, right, of
India hold their second place trophy for the men’s doubles finals with
Knowles’ son Graham at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. Leander Paes, right, of India, and his partner
Lukas Dlouhy, of the Czech Republic, won the championship.

I’m ‘super disappointed’,
says Bahamian tennis ace

to withstand the come-from-
behind efforts of No.4 seeds
Lukas Dlouhy and Leander
Paes in the two-day rain
delayed men’s doubles final
at the US Open yesterday.

But the Czech-Indian duo,
who had upset the top seeds
and defending champions
Americans Bob and Mike
Bryans in the semifinal on
Wednesday, rallied for a 3-6,
6-3, 6-2 win as the rain finally
subsided in Flushing Mead-
ows, New York.

“Tt’s extremely disappoint-
ing because we let the guys
back into the match and the
match turned around a little
bit in their favour,” said
Knowles, who was nursing an
injury to his right ring finger
from an elevator accident at
the Tennis Center prior to the
start of the tournament.

The match was originally
scheduled for Friday, but had
to be cancelled because of the
rain. Organisers tried again
on Saturday, but it was the
same result.

“We didn’t play as well as
we should have, having to
wait for three days to play the
final,” he pointed out. “We
had good momentum going,
but at the end of the day, we
didn’t play the way we are
capable of playing. We just
didn’t get the job done.”

Yesterday, Knowles and
Bhupathi seemed headed for
the victory when they took
the first set after they had got
a break for a 4-2 lead and
they never looked back.

“It’s going to be tough (to
absorb the loss) because we
were playing so well in the
tournament. I think my serve
let us down. My serve really
let them back into the match,”
Knowles pointed out. “So it’s
disappointing. It’s going to
take a while for me to get
over this one.”

But in the second set,
Dlouhy and Paes rallied to
return the favor for a break at
4-2 and they got another one
at 5-3 to secure the win to
even the score.

In the critical tie-breaker,
Dlouhy and Paes got the ini-
tial break for a 2-1 lead and
then at 5-2, they went up with
another before they held
serve for the win. It was their
second Grand Slam for the

SEE page 14

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



IAAF /VTB BANK WORLD ATHLETICS FINAL, GREECE



(AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis)
CARMELITA JETER from the U.S.A., far right, wins the Women’s 100 meters during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009. While Chandra Sturrup

(far left) took fourth in 11.17 for $7, ‘000, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (second from left) could do no better than 11.24 for sixth and $4,000.

Redemption for
Brown and Sands

Bahamian duo clinch second place finishes



AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis

U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, centre, runs to win the men’s 400-meters ahead of Chris Brown of
Bahamas, left, and David Gillick of Ireland, right during an IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s
Kaftanzoglio stadium, Greece, Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was redemption time for
both Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown
and Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
at the IAAF/VTB Bank World
Athletics Final in Thessaloni-
ki, Greece on Saturday.

Both Brown and Sands
clinched second place finish in
their respective events after
they missed out on an opportu-
nity to capture a medal at the
12th IAAF World Champi-
onship in Athletics last month.

Brown, who watched as his
first individual medal at the
championships slipped away
from him in Berlin, Germany
when he had to settle for fifth in
the men’s 400 metres, stormed
to a second place in Greece.

His time of 45.49 seconds
trailed only American LaShawn
Merritt, the back-to-back
Olympic Games and World
Championships gold medalist,
who easily won in 44.93.

Brown, however, would get
revenge on American David
Neville, who dove across the
finish line at last year’s
Olympics in Beijing, China.
Neville followed in third in
45.60.

Both American Jeremy
Wariner and Trinidad &
Tobago’s Renny Qwon, the
World Championships’ silver
and bronze medalists respec-



tive, opted not to compete in
the grand finale.

While Merritt collected
$30,000 for his victory, Brown
was awarded $20,000 for sec-
ond. Neville earned $15,000 for
third. Like Brown, Sands also
picked up $20,000 after he fin-
ished second as well in the
men’s triple jump with his best
leap of 17.19 metres or 56-feet,
4 3/4-inches on the third of his
four attempts.

Cuban Arnie David Girat,
the 2002 World junior champi-
on, took the title with his win-
ning leap of 17.45m or 57-3 on
his second attempt. Bulgarian
Momchil Karailiev was third
with 17.18m or 56-4 1/2.

The only medallist from
Berlin to compete was gold
medalist Phillips Idowu of
Great Britain, who was fourth.
He only took two jumps with
his best being 17.03m or 55-10
1/2 on his second attempt.

Both silver medalist Nelson
Evora of Portugal and bronze
medalist Alexis Copello from
Cuba, didn’t compete.

Sands was sitting in the
bronze medal spot until the
final round when Copello came
from behind to drop him to
fourth.

Also on Saturday, Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie had to set-
tle for fourth place in the wom-
en’s 200 metres. The World
Championships’ bronze medal-
ist clocked 22.45. She received

AP Photo/Thannasis Stavrakis

U.S. ATHLETE LaShawn Merritt, right, crosses the finish line to win
the men’s 400-meter ahead of Chris Brown of Bahamas, during an
IAAF World Athletics Final at Thessaloniki’s Kaftanzoglio stadium,
Greece, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

$7,000. There was a photo finish
at the line with three-time
World champion Allyson Felix
of the United States holding off
400 champion Sanya Richards.

SEE page 14

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Knowles and
Bhupathi lose
US Open thriller

‘lise Amendola/AP Photo

LEANDER PAES, right, of India, and his partner Lukas Dlouhy,
of the Czech Republic, hold the championship trophy after
winning the men’s doubles finals match over Mahesh Bhu-
pathi, of India, and Mark Knowles, of the Bahamas, at the U.S.
Open tennis tournament in New York, Sunday, Sept. 13,
2009. In the center is Dlouhy’s wife Rhea Pillai and their
three-year-old daughter Aiyana.

FROM page 12

year, adding to the French Open at Roland Garros.

Had they won, they would have celebrated with a prize
purse of $210,000 each. Instead, they will earn $105,000
apiece as the runners-up.

Knowles and Bhupathi were also the runners-up at the
Australian Open in January, losing to the Bryans. Their
only victory this year came at the Rogers Cup in Montreal
at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Tournament.

Despite losing, Knowles and Bhupathi joined Dlouhy
and Paes in qualifying for the prestigious Barclays ATP
World Tour Finals in London in November.

Already qualified prior to the US Open are the Bryans
and Wimbledon champions Daniel Nestor and Nenad
Zimonjic.

After taking a couple weeks off to recuperate, Knowles
and Bhupathi will get back together on October 5 to play in
the China Open in Beijing, China, followed by the Shanghai

‘It’s great to have the
Tank back in action’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

SI STERN said _ he’s
delighted to have Sherman
‘the Tank’ Williams back in
action.

Stern, the American man-
ager of the Grand Bahamian
heavyweight, said he had
some big plans for Williams,
including the possibility of
fighting here at home, once
he finish his commitment in
Germany next month.

Williams is lined up to fight
German Emmanuel ‘Dia-
mond Boy’ Charro in a live
television show in the 10-
round co-main event on Sat-
urday, October 10 in Warsaw,
East Germany.

It will be Williams’ first
appearance in the ring for the
year as he makes his return
after a hand injury he sus-
tained in January just before
he was to have fought in Key
West, Florida.

“T think he’s going to win
and after he wins, Sherman
will have a lot of very good
fights over there,” Stern said.
“That’s where the money is
in the heavyweight division,
so he just need to go over
there and take care of busi-
ness.”

Although he’s not had a
fight for the year, Stern said
he doesn’t think it will have

i

Sherman Williams’ American manager has
big plans for Grand Bahamian heavyweight

past couple of years, but he
should be in first class shape
by the time he’s done.”

Once he return from Ger-
many successful, Stern said
they intend to have a cele-
bration before Williams get
prepared for a return to Key
West, Florida on January 16.

“Tf he wins, I don’t see any-
thing but positive moves up
for him,” Stern said. “I think
that the promoter in Ger-
many, who is one of the pre-
mier promoters in Europe,
will also want to talk to us
about his next fight in Ger-
many.”

Although he’s been fight-
ing in South Florida and
Europe, Stern said the next
big move is to bring a show to
the Bahamas for Williams to
showcase his skills.

“T really think it’s time for
us to sit down with the people
in the Bahamas because here
we have a guy like Sherman,
who could be one of the best
heavyweights in the world,”
he said.

“T don’t see why when we
do our show in January that
we can’t get ESPN to put
some focus on the Bahamas

ATP Masters in Shanghai, China, starting on October 12.

From there, they will play in the Grand Prix de Tennis de
Lyon from October 26 before they go to London.

But he admitted that it’s going to be a little difficult to
digest their loss in the US final yesterday.

In 2004, Knowles and his former long-time partner Nestor
won the US Open. Also former partners, Bhupathi and
Paes were runners-up in Flushing Meadows in 1999. But
Bhupathi teamed up with Max Mirnyi to win the title in 2002.

Knowles, along with his family, should be back home
around 11:30 am today in time to attend a luncheon at 1 pm
at Government House.

The event is being organized by the Ministry of Youth,

any effect because Williams
has been active in the gym
training as he recovered from
the injury.

“He’s done things like
going over to Germany to
spar, so he’s familiar with the
territory, he’s familiar with
the area,” Stern stressed.

“That’s one of the reason
he’s fighting this fight over
there because they saw him

BACK IN ACTION: Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams

spar over there. He’s kept in
shape going into the gym.”
Over the next three weeks,
Stern said he’s lined up a
series of sparring sessions with
a number of competitors,
including two Russians. He
will be working out with
David Jackson, who is con-
sidered one of the top trainers



in the world. “We brought
them in on purpose so they
could spar with Sherman,”
Stern pointed out.

“So I anticipate he will be
in the best shape he’s been in
for many years.

“His body hasn’t taken its
toll yet because he haven’t
had that many fights over the

with the view of him coming
back home to fight.”

Stern said the Bahamas is
definitely the ideal place for
boxing to come and once
Williams live up to his end of
the bargain by winning in
East Germany, they will defi-
nitely be looking at the possi-
bility of him fighting here
either in December or early
January.

Sports and Culture for his stellar 20-plus career, including his
Wimbledon Grand Slam mixed doubles title with German
Anna-Lena Groenefeld in July in London, England.

Redemption for Brown and ‘Superman’ Sands
FROM page 13

Both were timed in 22.29, a season’s best for Felix. Jamaican Ker-
ron Stewart came through in third in her season’s best of 22.42.

Then on Sunday, Ferguson-McKenzie came back to contest the
100 with Chandra Sturrup. While Sturrup took fourth in 11.17
for $7,000, Ferguson-McKenzie could do no better than 11.24 for
sixth and $4,000.

Jamaican Sherone Simpson slipped in between the pair in 11.20
for fifth and $5,000 and the three medalists from the World Cham-
pionships finished in the top three spots, but in different order.

American bronze medallist Camelita Jeter won in a champi-
onship record of 10.67, Jamaican gold medalist Shelly-Ann Fras-
er was second in 10.89 and Stewart, the silver medallist, was third
in 10.90.



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SPORTSNOTES

TENNIS
KNOWLES CELEBRATIONS

MARK Knowles is due to return home
today around 11:30 am at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport.

He is expected to be greeted by members
of the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture in a “welcome reception” in the VIP
lounge where a brief ceremony will take
place.

Then it’s off to Government House
where a luncheon will take place at 1 pm.
The Ministry is honoring Knowles for his
stellar 20-plus year career on the interna-
tional scene.

Knowles and his mixed doubles partner
Anna-Lena Groenefled won the Wimble-
don title in July in London, England. How-
ever, after two days of rain delay, Knowles
and Mahesh Bhupathi lost in the final of the
US Open in the men’s final yesterday in
Flushing Meadows, New York.

BASKETBALL
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SOFTBALL
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THE New Providence Softball Associa-
tion hosted a double header on Saturday
night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
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In the ladies’ opener, the Pineapple Air
Wildcats blasted the Mystical Queens in
three innings, while in the feature game,
the Thompson Heavy Lift Outlaws
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THE TRIBUNE



National Training Programme

registration and orientation today

HUNDREDS of job seek-
ers are expected to crowd the
Kendal GL Gymnasium
today as registration and ori-
entation for the governmen-
t’s National Training Pro-
gramme takes place.

The programme is one of
several initiatives taken by
the government in response
to the current economic
downturn, aiming to improve
job skills and the unem-
ployed’s chances of finding
work.

This latest venture was cre-
ated in conjunction with and
consultation from _ the
Bahamas Christian Council,
The Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, The Bahamas
Employers Confederation,
Trade Unions, The College
of the Bahamas and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Training Institute.

The government in its

BUY A HOUSE

2009-2010 Budget allocated
$250,000 for the programme
which is also being conducted
in Grand Bahama. Courses
will be conducted at The
Bahamas Technical Institute.
A total of 1,000 applicants
have been selected for the

courses divided into three 10
week semesters, taking
around 333 trainees per term.

Training courses will be
available in accounting, com-
puter applications, engine
repair, landscaping, as well
as straw and shell craft.

AML Foods Limited announces new director

AML Foods Limited has announced the appointment of Vaughn
Roberts as the company's new director.

Mr Roberts assumed the post on September 1.

“With the evolution and changes in the company, the board of
directors felt it necessary to expand the knowledge base and skill
set of the board. Mr Robert’s background and experience fulfilled
the criteria that the nominating committee was looking for in a
potential director," said Gavin Watchorn, AML's president and
CEO.

Mr Roberts is the director of the Downtown Nassau Partnership
(DNP).

“T am excited to join the board of AML Foods Limited as it con-
tinues to strengthen the core brands; Solomon's, Cost Right and our
franchise Domino’s,” said Mr Roberts. “I accept the responsibili-
ties of directorship and will draw on my expertise to help guide the
company.”



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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

SUPER VALUE Semis
Oo) EYoys

alata ta

MINISTER OF HEALTH Hubert Minnis and Minis-
ter of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette are shown
some supplements by a staff member from Ballys
Gym. The Ministry of Health fair took place in
Meeting Street.

PST AME,

be i | : L | 7 | LF i U if i 1 |: iI

t 4 99 Pte der al
L .

‘ bu . Aaah : wa
JR. BACON CHEESEBURGER a i ie a" oe eer a
SUPER VALUE ’ fe a 4) Affairs Brent
is i Ci Pi ag | Symonette
COMBOS at a. . looks at fresh
SWS ee i aie i : a= vegetables at
AU ely |e f a i es the Health Fair
aca i , — on Saturday at
fa = 7 =| the Ministry of
nna) ny oa i 4 Health grounds
oH -: in Meeting
Street.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



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‘Fear
factor Is

a bit

* Principal behind $100m
project says Budget
incentives and financing
package, offering closing
cost savings of $30,000-
plus, drive 40% of sales
to first-time buyers

* ‘Turbulent’ few months
show signs of ending, as
some confidence returns

* 27 of 30 first phase units
sold, with construction
worker numbers set to
double in next week

* Yet ‘buying window
shortening’, with project
requiring all ‘four Ps’

to be in place

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A $100 million Bahamian
real estate development
believes the 2009-2010 Bud-
get incentives helped to
ensure 40 per cent of first
phase sales were to first-time
home buyers, its principal
telling Tribune Business that
demand has shown signs of
increasing as “the fear factor”
in the market eases.

Jason Kinsale, head of the
43-acre Balmoral Develop-
ment on Prospect Ridge, said
that while “the last few
months have been turbulent
and there has been a lot fear
in the market”, the developer
had seen “a significant
increase in traffic and people
bringing in deposit cheques
in the last few days”.

Mr Kinsale said the
increased buyer interest was
likely to have been helped by
the previous week’s agree-
ments between the Chinese
and Baha Mar, indicating the
$2.6 billion Cable Beach rede-
velopment may ultimately
proceed, plus the sight of
actual construction taking
place at Balmoral - always a
sight to inspire confidence in
potential purchasers.

However, he added that
“the fear factor is subsiding a
bit”. As an example, Mr Kin-
sale cited two Balmoral pur-
chases that took place last
week, one client being a Baha
Mar employee, the other a
financial services industry
worker.

“There were a lot of people

SEE page 8B

THE TRIBUNE 6

Ul



MONDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

he

SEPTEMBER



14,

2009



ColinaImperial

Confidence For Life

Ex-PM: ‘Don’t let
subsiding ANChOr resort die’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ormer

Prime

Minister

Perry
Christie has warned
that substandard
infrastructure in
Exuma led to the
demise of the Four
Seasons Emerald
Bay Resort, and
urged the present
Government not to
allow the property
to suffer a similar
fate under Sandals’ ownership..

Mr Christie, speaking at the opening
of HVS (Bahamas), said Exuma's air-
port and roads were unsuited to pro-
vide the service required by a five-star
rated development such as Emerald
Bay, indicating that the situation had
not changed .

Directing his comments towards
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minis-
ter of tourism and aviation, the former
prime minister asked that the Ingra-
ham government understand the dis-
parity between its financial resources

Stock
Market

CHRISTIE



* Christie warns that Sandals faced by infrastructure disparity
in seeking to make Emerald Bay resort investment work

* Says his government reduced Atlantis Phase III
incentives to 20% of $1bn investment, compared
to 45% and 38% thresholds for previous phases

and the private sector’s, and the abili-
ty to get things done with existing rev-
enues and capital.

Alluding to the need for massive
public sector capital works improve-
ments in Exuma as an incentive for
Sandals’ development of its recently-
acquired Emerald Bay Property, Mr
Christie digressed in his speech to sug-
gest HVS was the type of company
that could assist with those improve-
ments.

The former prime minister recalled
how HVS had been hired by his gov-
ernment to conduct a study that would
help determine the level of investment
incentives - as a percentage of the total
investment - that were ultimately grant-
ed to Kerzner International for its $1
billion Phase II expansion at Atlantis.

Mr Christie said the issue of Kerzn-

er International’s investment incen-
tives had become increasingly con-
tentious, especially in the political are-
na.
"We determined, having discussed
this matter extensively, that we as a
country ought not to risk the con-
frontation that was developing over
that issue, and we negotiated and asked
questions about whether we should
give concessions," Mr Christie said.
"Using the expertise of HVS, we
moved from the phase one 45 per cent
concession and phase two 38 per cent
concession to a phase three 20 per cent.
"HVS sent their team in and gave
us great insight into the workings of
the private sector, into the workings
of Kerzner, which was truly the suc-
cess story in the Bahamas, and the
organization that helped us to rede-

Use Parliament to curb NIB spending

By NEIL HARTNELL

/ 1 ; * Ex-Chamber chief urges mandating that any increase in
Tribune Business Editor

social security scheme’s administrative spending threshold

fine the Bahamas and redefine tourism
in the Bahamas.

"HVS steered us to the conclusion
that you did not have to give a dollar in
concessions insofar as your country is
concerned and they justified that the
investment was so profitable that the
country could arrive at such a conclu-
sion."

HVS is a global services and con-
sulting organisation focused on the
hotel, restaurant, shared ownership,
gaming, and leisure industries. The
Bahamas office is its first in the
Caribbean.

Managing Director of HVS's
Caribbean operations, Parris Jordan,
told Tribune Business that HVS was
not new to the Bahamas, having pre-
viously done studies for the Bahamas
government, Baha Mar and Atlantis.

to turn in
‘six-eight
months’

Market index only down
5.4% for 2009, compared to
13.2% fall in 2008, as ana-
lysts scent ‘excellent oppor-
tunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian stock mar-
ket is likely to “turn the cor-
ner in the next six to eight
months”, senior investment
analysts have told Tribune
Business, with the drop in
many price/earnings (P/E)
ratios indicating there are
“excellent opportunities” for
buyers to acquire underval-
ued stocks.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, told
Tribune Business that

SEE page 9B

7

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THE Government must be
forced to go to Parliament
and obtain approval for any
increase in the National Insur-
ance Board’s (NIB) adminis-
trative/overhead spending
above already-stated thresh-
olds, a former Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce pres-
ident has urged, citing this as
critical to stopping the social
security programme’s “abuse
by politicians”.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
also Superwash’s president,
told Tribune Business that

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* Increase in NIB rates a 23% jump, and 50% insurable
wage ceiling hike, resulting in 84% total increase
* Spending limits urged expanded to all public corporations

with the private sector set to
finance the lion’s share of the
expected 2 per cent increase
in NIB contribution rates in
2010, there should be some
additional safeguards on how
this extra revenue was spent
to prevent wastefulness and
abuse.

The likely rise in the NIB
contribution rate from 8.8 per
cent to 10 per cent, something
the Government believes will
be necessary to finance its
unemployment benefit pro-
gramme and national pre-

SEE page 7B

Retirement Planning Series

Finishing Strong

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.




PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

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= GLOEAL TOCMOERSY OA RE BAC

By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian
investors traded in 11 out of
the 24 listed securities, of
which two advanced, seven
declined and two remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 177,611 shares
changed hands, representing
an increase of 143,611 shares
compared to the previous
week's trading volume of
34,000 shares.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) was
the volume leader, seeing
53,000 shares trade as its stock
declined by $0.75 to end the
week at a new 52-week low
of $10.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) led the advancers, its
share price increasing by $0.44
on a volume of 40,859 shares
to close the week at $5.94.

Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) was the lead decliner,
falling by $1.10 to a new 52-
week low of $9.90, on a vol-
ume of 1,000 shares.

BOND MARKET

There were 235 Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) 15 Series D
notes traded in the Bahamian
market last week, with a value
of $235,000.

COMPANY NEWS

Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FIN) released its
unaudited financial results for
the quarter ending July 31,
2009. For the quarter, FIN
reported net income of $3.4
million, compared to $5.4 mil-
lion in the 2008 third quarter,
a decline of $2.1 million or 38
per cent.

Net interest income of $7.2
million increased slightly by
$87,000, quarter-over-quarter,
while the provision for credit

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



The Bahamian Stock Market

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL

$1.15
$0.63
$6.25
$9.90
$10.06
$3.15
$10.00
$5.94
$2.74
$10.29
$3.65
$2.05
$6.60
$2.37
$0.30
$4.99
$1.00
$8.80
$5.50
$10.09
$10.00

$-0.05
$-

losses of $1.7 million
increased by $2.5 million in
comparison to the prior year.

Non-interest expenses of
$3.1 million remained consis-
tent with the same quarter in
the prior year. Total assets
and liabilities at the end of
the 2009 third quarter were
$870 million and $786 million
respectively.

Management indicated that
while the bank continues to
experience good mortgage
growth, adverse economic
conditions are expected to
result in non-accrual loans
remaining high for the bal-
ance of the year.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) released its
unaudited financial results for
the six month period ending
July 31, 2009. DHS reported
net profits of $4 million
($0.41 cents per share) for the
period compared to $1.6 mil-
lion ($0.16 cents per share)
during the same period in the
previous year.

Patient service revenue of
$24 million increased by $3.8
million, which management
attributes to a trend of
increased business volumes
that continued into the sec-
ond quarter of the year, cou-
pled with increases in ICU
patients days of 47 per cent.
All other business sectors
showed positive growth year-
to-date.

Total expenses increased by
$1.5 million over the same six-
month period in the prior
year, primarily due to higher

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

CHANGE

-29.82%
-4.55%
-18.19%
-16.10%
-1.28%
0.00%
-28.72%
-15.14%
-3.18%
-1.53%
62.22%
-19.61%
-15.38%
0.00%
0.00%
-3.48%
0.00%
-25.86%



salaries and benefits and med-
ical supplies and services.

Total assets and liabilities
of DHS stood at $32.5 million
and $5.9 million respectively
at the end of the quarter.

Dividend Notes

e FINCO (FIN) has
declared a dividend of $0.13
per share, payable on Sep-
tember 15, 2009, to all ordi-
nary shareholders of record
date September 9, 2009.

¢ Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.05 per share,
payable on September 30,
2009, to all ordinary share-
holders of record date Sep-
tember 15, 2009.

e Doctor's Hospital
Healthcare Systems (DHS)
has declared a dividend of
$0.02 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 17,
2009.

* Cable Bahamas (CAB)
has declared a dividend of
$0.07 per share, payable on
September 30, 2009, to all
ordinary shareholders of
record date September 15,
2009.

e Consolidated Water
BDRs has declared a divi-
dend of $0.015 per share,
payable on November 6, 2009,
to all ordinary shareholders
of record date October 1,
2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3B





Bahamian airlines in ‘holding
pattern’ over fee increases

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN private air-
lines are “in a holding pattern”
waiting to see whether the Gov-
ernment adopts their recom-
mendations regarding proposed
fee increases, the minister
responsible confirming to Tri-
bune Business that the changes
- scheduled to take effect on
September 10, 2009 - have been
postponed to allow time for
more consultation with the
industry.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace, minister of tourism and
aviation, said the proposed Civ-
il Aviation Department (CAD)
fee increases had not been
implemented as scheduled
because the process required
the Government to complete
consultation with the private
sector first - something that had
not yet been finished.

“We have another round of
consultations to go, and we
have promised that until that
was completed, we would not
put them [the changes] into
effect,” Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace told tribune Business.

“The process required con-
sultation with the International
Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) and local operators,
and some pieces of that are not
complete. There are a couple
of pieces to put in place.

“The existing regulations
remain in place for the moment
until the final round of consul-
tation is completed with the
industry.”

The minister, though, said
the fee schedule changes would
be implemented “in very short
order” once the consultation

Planned charges do not take effect as intended,
with government planning further consultation

newspaper about the feedback
the Government and CAD had
received from Bahamian pri-
vate airline operators, the min-
ister replied: “I’ve never met
anyone who has welcomed any
increase in taxes or fees, but
the discussions have gone very
well, we understand their con-
cerns and we will address
them.”

Kevin Turnquest, president
of the Bahamas Association of
Air Transport Operators, told
Tribune Business that after the
organisation sent in its response
to the Government on the fee
changes, its concerns were
being reviewed and further
amendments to the proposal
were being contemplated.

“The consultation process
has not been completed, and
the impression clearly given to
us was that needed to contin-
ue,” Mr Turnquest said. “We’ve
not had a formal response from
them, but my understanding is
they may have been contem-
plating a further period of con-
sultation.

“We're in a holding pattern

waiting for a response to the
information we sent in, but our
understanding is that the Gov-
ernment has taken on board
those ideas.”

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace con-
firmed to Tribune Business that
the revenues raised by the fee
increases would go into the
Government’s Consolidated
Fund, and be used to finance
CAD’s operations, rather than
improvements to Family Island
airports.

The sums raised from the fee
increases, he said, would not be
sufficient to meet capital expen-
diture costs in the Family
Islands.

Tribune Business broke the
story of the planned fee increas-
es earlier this year, having been
told that the operator of a five-
seater aircraft flying 50 hours
per month could expect to see a
$13,000 per annum fee rise.

This newspaper was told that
the fee increases include a
tripling or 200 per cent rise in
landing fees at Family Island
airports, the rates jumping from
a current $18.56 per landing to

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

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NOTICE

$56 per landing for a 19-seat
aircraft.

Other fee increases divulged
to Tribune Business are as fol-
lows:

¢ * Monitoring charge: From
a current $0 to $1,000, a 1,000
per cent increase

e * Fleet charge: For a five
seater Aztec aircraft, this will
go from $0 to $7,000 — a 7,000
per cent increase. For a Beech
19 seater aircraft, the fee will
rise from $0 to $10,000, a 10,000
per cent increase

¢ * Charge to lease a foreign
aircraft: Current: $0. Proposed:
$4,000, a 4,000 per cent increase

e * Charter permit renewal:
Current: $500 per annum. Pro-
posed: $1,200, a 240 per cent
increase

e * Renewal of scheduled
permits: Current: $500 per
annum. Proposed: $1,200, a 240
per cent increase. Both large
foreign airlines and Bahamian
operators, including small char-
ter companies, will pay the
same rate

¢ * Pilot licences: From $0 to
$250 for a six-month Air Trans-

port US licence. From $0 to
$200 for a one-year US com-
mercial pilots licence.

¢ * Fuel suppliers to Bahami-
an airlines in the Family Islands

will have to pay a tax equiva-
lent to $0.07 per gallon to the
Civil Aviation Department, on
top of existing government tax-
es

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process was concluded.

“There wouldn’t be very
much delay between now and
when we complete that, and we
will make a decision on what
to do afterwards,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said, when asked
by Tribune Business about the
deadline for completing con-
sultations.

And when asked by this

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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE






























































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University of Sunderland - BA (Hons}
Business & Management (top
up}, BA (Hons} Accountancy &
Financial Management (top up}

University of Derby - BSc (Hons}
Psychology

University of Teesside - LLB, BSc
(Hons} Business Computing (top
Up)

Sheffield Hallam University - BSc
(Hons} International Hospitality &
Tourism (top up}

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THIS MONTHS TOPIC:

Obesity in Children
LECTURE DATE

Thursday, Sept 17th’09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited * 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

SPEAKER:
Dr. Brian Humblestone
Psychiatry

LECTURE SERIES
Purpose:
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the important health issues,
presented by distinguished eas ;
physicians. Obesity in Children
Dr. Brian Humblestone
Screenings:

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Breast Cancer
Dr. Theodore Turnquest

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Diabetes
Dr. Judson Eneas

Stress
Dr. Ian Kelly

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Health For Life

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

eS usINESS
‘Extremely comfortable’

with BEC plant proposal

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

ABACONIANS are
"extremely comfortable" with
what BEC has proposed for its
new Wilson City power plant,
which is expected to open in
the 2010 first quarter in central
Abaco, according to the minis-
ter of state for the environment.

Phenton Neymour said he,
along with BEC general man-
ager Kevin Basden, sought to
dispel inaccurate concerns that
Bunker C fuel was highly toxic
and could produce acid rain.

According to him, the major-
ity of Abaco residents who
attended the Town Hall meet-
ing for the construction of the
new power generating plant
thought the plan was good.

"There was a group of indi-
viduals who would oppose the
construction of the plant, but I
think that with a lot of the
incorrect information they had

circulated, Abaconians realise
[the truth]," said Mr Neymour.

"It [the meeting] was very
good. They were extremely
comfortable with what BEC
had proposed."

A group of concerned Aba-
conians had produced a short
documentary about the con-
struction of the power plant and
its possible environmental
impact, which they have circu-
lated on theInternet.

According to them, the fuel
will produce far denser carbon
emissions that other fuels, while
increasing the chance of acid
rain over the islands of the
Bahamas.

They also suggested that oil
spills in this area could affect a
propose marine park nearby,
as well as affect the local sub-
terranean aquifer.

However, Mr Neymour
assured that the aquifer, which
is purportedly directly beneath
the new plant, will be strin-
gently monitored.

Mr Neymour also asserted
that BEC has always used
Bunker C fuel oil in New Prov-
idence, and insisted that the
Wilson City plant will adopt the
most stringent environmental
practices.

"This is a new plant in which
environmental procedures and
processes will be put in place,”
he said. "I am extremely disap-
pointed that these individuals
would have taken the approach
that they have."

Mr Neymour also said pre-
cautions such as double sealed
oil pipelines, to reduce the the
likelihood of a spill, and double
hulled tankers for the trans-
portation of the Bunker C fuel
oil, will make the plant much
more secure than others
throughout the Bahamas.

He said that, when complete,
the Wilson City Plant will pro-
duce 48 megawatts of power,
twice the demand on the island,
as a contingency for expansion.

Pioneers get reward

THE 2009 Pioneers of Pros-
perity Caribbean program ihas
selected Bulkan Timber Works
of Guyana for its grand prize.

Alternative Insurance Com-
pany of Haiti and Totally Male
Ltd of Jamaica were also rec-
ognized.

From a highly competitive
pool of 580 applications, ten
Pioneers of Prosperity
emerged representing some of
the most innovative, dynamic
businesses in the region. Each
one of the finalists has already
won a grant from the Multilat-
eral Investment Fund of the
Inter-American Development
Bank (IDB) of US $40,000 and
will be connected to a global
network of technical expertise,
potential investors, and other
cutting-edge entrepreneurs.

“These 10 entrepreneurs are
role models for all of us. They
built new distribution systems,
found new and attractive mar-
kets, pay high and rising wages

to their employees, and are
outstanding corporate citizens
of their respective nations.
And they do this under chal-
lenging conditions-- never ask-
ing the government for
favours, often beginning with-
out specialised infrastructure
or sufficient skills and abilities,
but always with an eye to the
future and their own self-deter-
mination,” said Michael Fair-
banks, co-founder and co-
director of the Social Equity
Venture Fund.

The Pioneers of Prosperity
Awards Programme is a glob-
al programme made-up of
regional competitions spanning
the Caribbean, Africa and
Central America.

Seven countries participat-
ed in the inaugural Caribbean
competition: Bahamas, Barba-
dos, Belize, Guyana, Haiti,
Jamaica, and Trinidad and
Tobago. The programme will
launch in Central America on
September 14, 2009.



The Pioneers of Prosperity
Programme seeks to inspire a
new generation of entrepre-
neurs in emerging economies
by identifying, rewarding and
promoting outstanding small
to medium size businesses,
who will serve as role models
to their peers.

The Programme is spon-
sored by the Multilateral
Investment Fund of the Inter-
American Development Bank,
the John Templeton Founda-
tion, and the Social Equity
Venture Fund (S.E.VEN
Fund), and was conceived and
initiated by Michael Fairbanks,
a recognised entrepreneur and
author in the area of enterprise
solutions to poverty.

Michael Fairbanks is a co-
founder of S.E.VEN Fund.
The programme has also built
a network of over 35 local part-
ners throughout the
Caribbean. Jamaica Trade and
Invest co-hosted the Final
Awards Ceremony.

THE DOWNTOWN NASSAU PARTNERSHIP

Invites you to attend a Luncheon Discussion

Topic:

Global Trends Affecting Downtowns

Special Guest Speaker:

Brad Segal

President, Progressive Urban Management Associates

Thursday, September 17, 2009

12 noon
British Colonia
Cost: $35

hilton

Discussion will include topics such as:

The creative class
Tourism

Environmentalism and Sustainability

Technology

Demographic and lifestyle changes

Please RSVP

Tal, 326-0992

Fax, 323-2998
Email: ntdb@batelnet.bs

Website: www.downtownnassau.org
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5B



aaa > =
Government doing ‘host of things’ to aid ease of business

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is doing “a
host of things” to improve the
ease of doing business in the
Bahamas, a minister has told Tri-
bune Business, citing a proposed
National Investment Act and
planned amendments to the Busi-
ness Licensing Act - including the
amalgamation of four processes
into one - as examples of the
reforms being contemplated.

Responding to the Doing Busi-
ness 2010 survey by the World
Bank, which ranked the Bahamas
68th out of 183 countries surveyed
when it came to red tape and
bureaucracy obstacles facing the
private sector, Zhivargo Laing,
minister of state for finance, said
the Government was moving
“with a view to optimizing the
ease with which people conduct
business in the Bahamas”.

Stating that he was unsure
whether the World Bank, and its
International Finance Corpora-
tion (IFC) arm that conducted
the survey, were aware of the
Government’s planned reforms,
Mr Laing said he had asked Min-
istry of Finance staff to “fully
evaluate” the criteria used by the
report and then benchmark this
nation against other jurisdictions
to see if and where improvements
were necessary.

Stating that the Bahamas
should use such reports as “a
springboard for improvement”,
Mr Laing told Tribune Business:
“I think what is important for us
to be focused on is what needs to
be done to make doing business
in the Bahamas as efficient as pos-
sible. We’re already doing things
to make the conduct of business
in the Bahamas easier.”

Apart from the proposed Busi-
ness Licence reforms, Mr Laing
said the Government was also
reviewing its tax policies with
respect to business. It was also
“revamping” its online network
to further facilitate e-government,
enabling businesses to fill out
applications and required paper-
work online, and pay the neces-
sary fees, too.

As part of the need to place
policy in statute, to conform with
the trade agreements the
Bahamas will be entering, Mr
Laing said the Ministry of Finance
was also crafting a National
Investment Act with the goal of
“modernising and reforming the
way we do business”.

This Act was described as “a
work in progress”, with no
timescale given for its arrival in

Parliament or details on what
would be included in it. Mr Laing,
though, said some “significant
preliminary” work had been done
on the Bill, including bench-
marking.

The Bahamas slipped from
59th to 68th in the World Bank’s
annual survey, ranking especially
low when it came to dealing with
construction permits (ranked
100th); registering property
(149th); protecting investors
(109th); and enforcing contracts
(120th). The latter two areas are
especially concerning for a nation
that relies heavily on foreign
direct investment to drive its
economy and monetary system,
something noted by Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce president,
Khaalis Rolle.

“There are some noteworthy
areas of concern, particularly for
the investor protection,” Mr Rolle
told Tribune Business. “In an
economy such as ours, investor
confidence is one of the signifi-
cant areas we would try and
encourage and secure. We are
slipping in that areas, and work
needs to be done there. It’s an
obvious area for improvement.”

Arguing that the Bahamas
needed to ensure “a high degree
of confidence” among its
investors, Mr Rolle said this
applied equally to the Bahamian
and foreign variety.

“The transaction costs associ-
ated with domestic investment

need to come down, and domestic
investors need to be confident
that they’re assets and invest-
ments will certainly be protect-
ed,” Mr Rolle said.

“For businesses in property
deals, we want to have costs asso-
ciated with that minimised as
much as possible. For want of a
better expression, it’s a sunk
horse. You write it off immedi-
ately. It’s non-productive at the
end of the day, and goes with the
deal.

“We need to keep property
transaction costs to a minimum.
The cost of doing business has to
be reduced, and anything we can
do bodes well for investment.”

While some of the Bahamas’
permitting systems needed work,
Mr Rolle told Tribune Business
that the Government had already
foreshadowed several much-need-
ed amendments in its 2009-2010
Budget, in addition to its previ-
ously-announced civil service
reforms.

Mr Laing also pointed to the
modernisation of the Business
Licence Act, and the amalgama-
tion of the previous Shop Licence,
Liquor Licence and Music and
Dance Licence into just one Busi-
ness Licence process.

All these licence processes had
been separate, requiring a busi-
ness to appear before different
authorities, and the reforms were
designed to save businessmen “a
lot of time and bureaucracy”.

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Mr Laing added that the Gov-
ernment would also be “mod-
ernising the taxing aspects of the
[Business Licence] Act to take
into account the reality business-
es face. The effort is to take into
account some of the realities peo-
ple face; every business’s gross
revenues are not the same”.

The minister also pointed out
that the World Bank survey
ranked the Bahamas seventh out
of all small island, developing
states. “You could argue whether
the glass is half-full or half-empty,
but you can always improve and
that’s what we’re striving to do,”

Mr Laing said.

Meanwhile, the Bahamas was
ranked 53rd out of 141 countries
in the Economic Freedom of the
World report released yesterday
by the Canada-based Fraser Insti-
tute and its Bahamian partner,
the Nassau Institute.

The Bahamas scored in key
components of economic freedom
(from 1 to 10, where a higher val-
ue indicates a higher level of eco-
nomic freedom): The ratings in
the five components of the Index
are

* Size of government: changed

to 8.2 from 7.85 in last year’s
report

* Legal structures and security
of property rights: changed to 7.1
from 8.47

* Access to sound money:
changed to 6.7 from 7.04

* Freedom to trade interna-
tionally: changed to 5.1 from 4.12

* Regulation of credit, labour
and business: changed to 8.3 from
8.17

However, in the critical areas
of Legal Structure and Sound
Money, the Bahamas was found
to be losing ground.

Book Signing Announcement for:

“A Matter of Keeping”

Gabrielle F’ Culmer’s New Novel,
published by Vantage Press, Inc.

On Saturday, September 19th, 2009 at Logos, Harbour Bay.
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 3:00pm.

Special Promotion:

shoppers.

One FREE copy of previous poetry collection
for the first TEN h

Keeping is “engaging, incisive and moving astwo
se to deal with the problems that confront them.

The book emph

s culture historyand bus

acumen, and

provides an interesting setting upon whith creativity and

progression evolve.

The New Novel is also available at:

Logos, Harbour Bay,

Odessa Gardens, Palmdale,
322 8493, and Vantage Press Inc. 1 800 882 3273.



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IMPORTANT NOTICE

We wish to inform the general public that BATCO
WHOLESALE and Mr. GARY FORBES are ™O'’ET
authorized wholesalers, sellers or vendors for any of the
above items.

Please note that Four Js Enterprise is a company that
stands for truth, integrity, genuine and quality products
along with great value.

We cannot guarantee that any company, agency or
individual who’s not authorized and listed by Four Js
Enterprise to sell our line of products will deliver goods

and service at the standards outlined.

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank you our loyal customers and retailers for
your support in making Four Js Enterprise’s vision “Creating A Healthier and
Wealthier Bahamas” a success and we look forward to a continued amicable
relationship as we move FORWARD, UPWARD, ONWARD & TOGETHER.

Please direct any questions or queries to the President of Four J*s Enterprise.

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GET YOURS TODAY

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 7B



Use Parliament to curb NIB spending

FROM page 1B

scription drug plan, effective-
ly represents a 22.7 per cent
rate increase.

In addition, the proposed
reforms to NIB also include a
50 per cent increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, from
$400 to $600, Mr D’Aguilar
said.

While acknowledging that
he understood why the rates
were being increased, the for-
mer Chamber president told
Tribune Business: “We have
to put in place safeguards to
ensure politicians do not
abuse the money when they
get it in.

“We should put NIB
through the same process as it
goes through to increase the
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling when it comes to
increasing the amount spent
on administration and over-
heads. The minister respon-
sible for NIB should be
responsible for that ceiling,
and he would have to go to
Parliament and ask for an
increase in that ceiling.”

Mr D’ Aguilar recommend-
ed setting an annual thresh-
old for NIB’s administrative
expenses, as a percentage of
forecast contribution income,
and any increase in this had to
be approved by Parliament.

“It’s a real, meaningful
change, and gives us an assur-
ance that money will not be
squandered by politicians
who, in many instances, have
no idea how to run a busi-
ness,” the former Chamber
president said of his proposal.

“There must be a balance. I
totally agree that rates have to
go up, the insurable wage has
to go up, but the Government
has to ensure strong measures
are put in place to ensure the
party of the day does not
abuse NIB.”

By making the process of
obtaining an increase in NIB’s
administrative expenses as
“airtight as possible”, Mr
D’ Aguilar said the system
would be “less subject to
abuse than it has been in the
past.”

He added: “The employers
pay the greater proportion of
it [NIB contributions], and if
they’re coming to the busi-
ness community for more,
then responsible government
is to ensure it is not abused
by the Government of the
day. Everyone knows NIB is

The Nassau Institute, the
Bahamian economic think-
tank, said it had calculated
that, for a small firm with
three employees, the planned
increase in NIB contribution
rates and the insurable wage
ceiling would increase its
annual payments to the social
security scheme by 84 per
cent - from $5,500 to $10,100.

Such an increase, it said,
would provide businesses with
a further incentive to lay-off
workers amid an economic
recession, while eroding the
real income and ‘take home
pay’ of Bahamian workers.
The Nassau Institute added
that the increases would also
spur more employers and the
self-employed to seek new
ways to evade NIB payments.

The eighth actuarial report
on NIB again reiterated that
the social security scheme was
“plagued with high adminis-
trative costs”, averaging 21
per cent of contribution
income per year between
2002 and 2006. Operating
costs over that period grew
by 6.7 per cent per annum,
compared to an average 2 per
cent rise in inflation.

These costs were described
as “excessive’, and largely
caused by “significant over-
staffing” that was in no small
way driven by political con-
siderations.

While a 2003 report had
suggested that NIB’s staffing
levels could be cut by 25 per
cent - from 465 to 350 - with-
out any undue loss of service
quality, this strategy was then
undermined by the then-PLP
government in the run-up to
the 2007 general election, via
the hiring of people who were
likely to have been con-
stituents, friends, relatives and
party members in a bid to but-
tress votes and support.

The eighth actuarial report
revealed that while the Vol-
untary Early Retirement Pro-
gramme reduced staffing lev-
els at NIB by 89, “extensive
hiring in the first half of 2007
has eliminated most of the
savings that would otherwise
have been realised from the
VERP, as in July 2007 the




staff count stood at 496”.

This was higher than when
the 2003 review recommend-
ed a 25 per cent cut, again
showing how political inter-
ference was limiting NIB’s
effectiveness.

The eighth actuarial report
also recommended limiting
the directions a minister can
give to NIB’s Board to policy
only, although there is no
indication yet that this issue
has been taken up, and high-
lighted that “poor governance
practices” had affected many
aspects of NIB’s performance
during its 36-year history.

The report said: “For many
of NIB’s 33 years, practices
that were not in conformance
with the National Insurance
Act and general public expec-
tations have led to sub-par
outcomes in many areas.”

The report listed, as exam-
ples of this, NIB’s relatively
low compliance rates and
“excessive administrative
costs”; the fact the insurable
wage ceiling had only been
increased twice in 36 years;
and that “pension increases
and mass employee hiring
that coincides with general
elections”.

Poor governance, the
report said, had also resulted
in some 75 per cent of NIB’s
investments being made in
government, and government
agency, securities, while NIB
funds had been used “for pur-
poses other than prescribed
in legislation”.

Mr D’Aguilar, meanwhile,
expanded his analysis to the
rest of the public sector,
telling Tribune Business that
the reason many government-
owned corporations made a
loss was due to a lack of cost
controls and the inability of
political decisionmakers to
stop spending, combined with
government fears about the
impact rate rises would have
on the voters.

“No one has put in place
any safeguards to stop expen-
diture, so most public corpo-
rations run at a loss,” Mr
D’Aguilar said. “They hate to
increase revenues and rates,
but love to increase expendi-

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at wwer,cob edu by







ture.

“It’s a recipe for disaster.
If you allow corporations to
increase expenditure willy nil-
ly, but limit their ability to
raise revenues, every single
one will run into problems
because they’re operating at a
loss.

“They should set a thresh-




















—\
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

old and set a mandate. We’re
got to tackle seriously this
whole issue of cost control
and cost containment. If they
put limits on revenues, put
limits on spending. Make it
as difficult to do one as the
other. We’ve got to address
the imbalance in these corpo-
rations.”

Without such spending
safeguards, Mr D’ Aguilar said
politicians would have a
“blank cheque to increase
expenditure, and when the
election gets close they get
crazy. Everybody loses money
because they’re not allowed
to increase rates, but they’re
told to increase hiring”.

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NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Education in
School and Guidance Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
10:00 acm. to 12:10 p.m.

flush with money and subject
to abuse by governments.”

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays




Nassau Airport Development Company
Lynden Pindling Intemational Airport

Phe: (242) 377-0209 | Fax: (242) 377-0294
P.O. Bow AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
Email: feedbackiinas.bs

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ete

SU al aries
Tultion, Fees, Course Content,
Course Schedule and Course
PL toa es Ee

Si Me Ete Mle Ee)
ut erste ae |
cancellations.

Pe Me Cm cert te!
er WeeTEe e ibe gree
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





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P.0.Box EE-15827
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Tel: 242-323-1065
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com

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KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

* Outstanding personality

« Current BREA license

* Minimum 2-years experience
* Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas @ kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supply company which provides a wide range of
premium health care products seeks a qualified candidate
for the following position:

Pri Duties include:

* Soearheading the growth of current bands’ products, and
introducing new Hens to the healthoane community, retailers
and the general public in Nassau and the Family islands,
Supervising and training a small team of sales persons.

Working with merchandisers to train their siafl and promote
products

Monitoring and tracking sales by category, on a monthly
basis.

Planning and instituting product forecasts.

Planning and organizing promotions and avernts for the
products.

Successful candidate must posess the following
qualifications:

* At loast three (3) years experience in similar position,

The ability ta meet the high standards set oul by the
company and manufacturers.

Ba self-motivated with the ability to work independently.
Possess good leadership and interpersonal skills,
Computer literacy, VWiell-versed with Windows, Word
Processing (preferably MS Word), Spreadsheets (preferably
Excel), Geaktop Pubishing, and Date Management.

Competitive salary, commensurate with qualifications,
with sales incentives, plus vehicle allowance.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with
(three (3) references to:



‘Fear factor is
subsiding a bit’

FROM page 1B

that were really sitting on the
fence,” he explained. “A cou-
ple of sales that transacted
last week first came in nine
months ago, but they were
afraid of losing their jobs.
They’re now feeling better,
more secure and they want-
ed to do it.

“For me to sit here and say
the recession has not affected
us would be a lie. But the
reality is that all these people
have to have somewhere to
live. I think the money is sit-
ting in their bank accounts.
It’s a willingness to part with
it. They’ve not necessarily
seen their incomes erode, but
they’re very cautious about
spending it. They’re thinking
twice.”

Out of the 30 units placed
on the market for Balmoral’s
first phase, some 27 have been
sold, with just two Grand
Homes and one Royal Town
Home still available. Mr Kin-
sale confirmed to Tribune
Business that town home con-
struction has started, while
the development’s show
home was “substantially com-
plete”, its roof just being put
on with the windows and
doors set to be installed this
coming week.

Some 35-40 construction





LEGAL

personnel were currently
working at Balmoral, Mr Kin-
sale telling Tribune Business
this number was set to
increase to 70-80 “in the next
week”. All the project’s roads
were in place, and the club-
house had been completed.

He added that properties
in the second phase of the
Balmoral development, which
when fully built-out will con-
sist of 70 single family lots and
200 town homes and con-
struction, were likely to be
placed on the market “maybe
in about another month or
so”, once phase one con-
struction had proceeded to an
appropriate point.

“We’re not in any rush,”
Mr Kinsale added. “We’re
well-capitalised, we bought
the land for cash, and the only
debt is for construction, so
we’re not in a rush to make
decisions we don’t have to
make. If it takes some time
to capitalise on it, that’s what
we'll do.”

Some 40 per cent of Bal-
moral’s current first phase
sales had been to first-time
home buyers, something Mr
Kinsale said had been driven
by the 2009-2010 Budget
incentives, which exempted
this purchaser category from
paying Stamp Tax on all real
estate buys valued at up to

TICE

NOTICE




$500,000, plus exempted them
from real property tax pay-
ments for the first five years if
the real estate was their pri-
mary residence.

With its condominiums
priced in the $300,000 range,
and town homes at around
$559,000, the former certainly
fit into this category for first-
time buyers.

Added

Yet Mr Kinsale added that
the package Balmoral had put
together with Finance Cor-
poration of the Bahamas
(FINCO), involving the pro-
vision of title insurance for
buyers and a reduction in
attorney fees, had also helped
to spur buyer activity by
reducing closing costs.

The Balmoral Develop-
ment principal suggested that
the title insurance was saving
buyers around $4,000-$5,000
in closing costs per transac-
tion, thus giving them an
enhanced “comfort zone” in
which to make their purchase.
In the absence of Stamp Tax
and real property tax, Mr Kin-
sale suggested that Balmoral
purchasers were collectively
saving “in the area of
$30,000” on transaction costs.

Citing a $365,000 Royal
Town Home, and taking the
incentives offered by the Gov-
ernment and Balmoral, Mr
Kinsale said the savings to
first-time buyers included 5
per cent Stamp Tax, equiva-
lent to $18,250; $4,312.50 in
real property tax savings for
the first five years; $5,000 in

attorney fees’ savings; and
$3,280 in mortgage stamp tax
savings. This added up, he
suggested, to $30,843.

Apart from first-time buy-
ers and young Bahamian pro-
fessionals, who accounted for
55 per cent of Balmoral’s
existing sales, Mr Kinsale said
the project was also appeal-
ing to families and “empty
nesters” who were looking to
downsize to a condo package.

“You have to have all the
four ‘Ps’ - price, product,
place and promotion,” said
Mr Kinsale on what was
needed to succeed in the cur-
rent Bahamian real estate
market. “In this economy, you
have to really nail it. You
have to have every compo-
nent driven in.

“Our location is excellent,
the price is reasonable and
people are seeing value in it,
the product is great and the
marketing is excellent.”

However, Mr Kinsale
warned Bahamian real estate
purchasers that favourable
buying conditions were
unlikely to last much longer,
especially in the western New
Providence and Cable Beach
areas where Balmoral was
located, due to the likelihood
that Baha Mar would pro-
ceed.

“This buying window is not
going to last much longer. It
may be here for six, nine
months, but time flies. But if
this Baha Mar deal comes
through, the window shrinks.
Everyone jumps on the Baha
Mar bandwagon and puts
their prices up.”

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)



In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
WILLIAM HILL ADVISERS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) SYMPOSIUM FUND LIMITED (SAC) is in dissolution under the provi-
sions of the International Business Companies Act 2000 s.137 and section 45
of the Segregated Accounts Companies Act, Chapter 396C.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 11, 2009
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are required
on or before the 9th day of October 2009 to send their names and addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or,
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution
made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



S.A. T. PREPARATION
CLASSES

AT KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Beginning Saturday September 26 through Saturday
December 5, 2009, Kingsway Academy will hold
S.A.T. Preparation Classes from 9:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon culminating in the writing of the S. A. T.
Examination in January. The cost is $250.00 per

person and includes all materials.

Interested persons are asked to contact the
Business Office at telephone 324-6887 / 324-6269
or the Guidance Conselor at 324-8811 or 324-3409.





@) THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

View ovr website of www.cohedn.bs

NOTICE

Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:

The Graduate Programmes Office,
The College of The Bahamas, Michael H. Eldon
Complex, Room 26 Thompson Bly,
For more informtaion call; 397-2601/2 or
send emails to: swisdomi@ecobedu.hs

Application Deadline: L6th October, 2009,

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
CAMARGAN INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution.
Mrs. Alrena Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nas-
sau Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
25th September, 2009.

IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
the only child of the late
Franklin Eugene Knowles

(S.9, 11, 14)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 9B





FROM page 1B

although it was difficult to
predict when a Bahamian
stock market recovery would
occur, and whether it had yet
reached or passed the bottom
of the current down cycle, the
market would certainly be
through its low point by year-
end/early January 2010.

“T think it’s an excellent
opportunity to pick up some
undervalued, quality stocks,”
Mr Kerr said. “There’s some
sound performers. AML
Foods, which has come off
eight consecutive quarters of
profitability; Commonwealth
Bank, which has stuck to its
niche; even Colina Holdings
and Doctors Hospital Health
Systems.

“There are a few of them
out there, that with good
management and a focus on

the customer, are doing quite
well.”

Mr Kerr added: “I think
we’ll probably be through the
bottom by December into
January, really, and then start
to turn the corner definitively
with the stock market in the
next six to eight months.

“Right now, people are def-
initely selling stocks to raise
cash for back-to-school, or if
they’re out of work.

“Yet there are pockets of
optimism. While we can’t pre-
dict the bottom, I think it’s
pretty good.”

Mr Kerrt’s analysis was sup-
ported by Michael Anderson,
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust’s president, who told
Tribune Business that “the
combination of good prices
and high dividend yields are
normally precursors to a
recovery in equity prices” and

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Legal Notice

the stock market generally.

RoyalFidelity’s FINDEX
index, which measures a
weighted average of stock
price and dividend yields, was
down 5.4 per cent for the year
to September 11, 2009, Mr
Anderson saying equity prices
had risen in July and August,
although not by huge
amounts. All this compared
to the 12.31 per cent decline
suffered by the FINDEX in
2008, thus indicating that the
market deterioration has at
least slowed.

Ratios

Mr Anderson added that
many BISX-listed stocks were
now at extremely attractive
P/E ratios, Doctors Hospital,
for example, with its P/E at
4, implying a 25 per cent
inherent rate of return. AML
Foods, with a P/E of 6, had a
16.7 per cent inherent return,
while the Bahamas Property

Fund was now trading at close
to a 30 per cent discount to
its net asset value (NAV).

“Those are the kinds of
yields you would not normal-
ly see, as you would normally
get a 6-8 per cent equity
yield,” Mr Anderson
explained. “Some stocks,
notwithstanding the fact
they’re at 52-week lows, have
PEs which are difficult to jus-
tify unless you believe the
economy is likely to improve.

“There’s some great value
in those stocks..... Those are
stocks that you cannot justify
where they are. There’s a
bunch of stocks out there that
are good value, and that peo-
ple should invest in today and
make a pile of money on
when they recover in a year’s
time. There’s really good val-
ue if you’re selective.”

Mr Anderson said large
price movements in some
stocks had resulted from very
few or small trades, driven by

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JJR INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,—

Stock Market to turn
in ‘six-eight months’

the needs of some investors
to exit stocks and generate
liquidity and cash to meet cur-
rent obligations.

“A large number of securi-
ties have high dividend yields,
where the earnings are still
supporting good dividend
payments but share prices
have been forced down by
indiscriminate selling,” he
added.

Banking stocks, which
account for a major chunk of
BISX’s market capitalisation,
















INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTI

COURSE OFFERING: Be

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE 1 & 1
COUSVERSATIONAL FRESCH |
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH T= ¥

CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I, 1a U1
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANCLME |

CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN |

TELEPHONE: 302-4584 302-4887 op 302-4804

had already seen the effects
of the loan portfolio deterio-
ration, and its impact on their
earnings, largely factored into
their share prices, the Royal-
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust president told Tribune
Business.

“The current prices factor
in to a great extent the
depressed earnings of the
stock, so any change in earn-
ings should have an impact
on the stock,” Mr Anderson
added.

bembver 14th, 209
PRICE: § S00 per course

LOCATION: Munnimgs [dg
“Hed! RC acres from OOK

pl ki ATION; 10 Weeks

E-MAIL: Mel@ cobedu.bs

Fa

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JJR INVESTMENTS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A medical supoly company which provides a wide range of
premium health care products seeks a qualified candidate
for the following position:

NOTICE
DALI INTERANTIONAL
HOLDINGS LTD.

—

Fg

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of DALI INTER-
NATIONAL HOLDINGS LTD.

has

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BASOTHO VENTURES LTD.

— -,——

ff

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BASOTHO VENTURES LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD.

— -,——

f

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-
tion 138 (8) of the International Business Compa-
nies Act 2000, the dissolution of BLUE RANGE
INVESTMENTS LTD. has

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

been completed; a

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

been

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ELSINORE MANAGEMENT
LIMITED

— -,——

-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Sec-

tion 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of ELSINORE MAN-
AGEMENT LIMITED has been completed; a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

SALES REPRESENTATIVE
sarin bee cia

* Assisting in the promotion of current products and
introducing new Item ta the Healthoare industry,

* /Monitoring and tracking of clients needs and requests

* Working a5 part of a team in the promotion of company's

products.

Bachelors of Associaies degree in allied Heallh Science
or Business Administration.

Effective communication and presentation skills (writhen

and oral).

Proven selling skills

Effective tirme-managenent planning and organizing skills,

Computer literacy. Welleversed with Windows, Word
Pronessing (preferably MS Word), Soreacdshects (preferabty
Excel), Qesktoo Publishing, and Data Management.

Selt-motivater and good team player.

The position offers a competitive salary with sales

incentives.

Successful candidate must be willing to travel to Family
Islands and the United States, as required.

Interested candidates may submit resumes with

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money 29 Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,528.72] CHG -4.37| %CHG -0.29 | YTD -183.64 | YTD % -10.72

FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

(three (3) references to:

FG CAPITAL

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYICES

fltaav ica MN © AX LT

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low
1.15
9.90
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.14
10.00
2.74
5.26
1.27
1.32
6.60
8.80
10.29
4.95
1.00
0.30
5.49
10.09
10.00

Benchmark

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

52wk-Hi__ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

52wk-Low

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3344
2.8952
1.4105
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close
Today's Close
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Bahamas Waste

Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

Premier Real Estate

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets:
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

- Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

1.15
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.00
2.74
5.94
3.76
2.03
6.60
8.80
10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Symbol
FBB17
FBB22
FBB13
FBB15

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.15
9.90
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37

10.00

10.29

2.74
5.94
3.65
2.05
6.60
8.80

4.99
1.00
0.30
5.50

10.09
10.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Daily Vol.

Last Sale
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00

Change
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

Bid $
7.92
2.00
0.35

Ask $

8.42
6.25
0.40

14.00
4.00
0.55

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59

0.55

29.00
0.55

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Last 12 Months

NAV
1.4038
2.8990
1.4880
3.0941

13.1136
101.6693
96.7398
1.0000
9.3399
1.0707
1.0319
1.0673

YTD%

3.72

-1.39

3.79

-8.61

3.93
1.10
0.35
0.00
2.69
3.38

-0.11

2.89

5.20
-4.16
5.49
-13.59
5.87
1.67
-4.18
0.00
-1.41
5.14
2.05
4.93

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Weekly Vol

0.00

-1.10

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

-0.11

0.02
0.00
0.00

-0.01
-0.13

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

Last Price

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

Daily Vol.

20,000
1,500

25,000
20,000

10,000

Weekly Vol.

Div $

EPS $

Div $
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

7%

Prime + 1.75%

7%

Prime + 1.75%

EPS $
-2.246

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

10.6
55.6

ases)

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E

0.000
0.001

N/M
256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90
Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
4-Sep-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09
31-Aug-09

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

INSIGHT

The stories behind the news







What will the PLP
do going, forward?

" * _ PI

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

the 2007 elections, the PLP won the major-
ity of its votes also in one socioeconomic
group — “those with less than a high school
education.”

“The party will have great difficulty win-
ning elections in the future if it cannot
expand its following among younger voters
and those who are better off.

“The PLP’s narrow demographic base
of support is worrisome. Depending on
older and lower-class voters is not a recipe
for long-term success as the former die off
and the country and its citizens become
more prosperous. With the passage of time,
fewer people associate with the country’s

The question still remains, what will the
PLP do going forward? How will its lead-
ership, which every Bahamian should be
concerned about, position the party to
mount a formidable campaign against the
governing party? Because at the end of the
day to have good governance, you need a
healthy and vibrant Opposition that will
keep any government on its toes. Because
the worst thing that the Bahamas can have
coming out of 2012 is a sweep by either
party with only a handful of Opposition
members in the House of Assembly.

So let us look at what is before the PLP
at present.

Whether those in power want
to acknowledge it or not, the
Progressive Liberal Party is going
to change. A change for the
better or worse is still yet to be
decided, but come October 18,
the PLP will meet and possibly
decide its future and relevance

in the modern Bahamas.
However, do not be mistaken;
the PLP will always be a part

of the Bahamian political system
— but, as many within the party
acknowledge, the PLP can
ill-afford another term in
opposition...

efore we get into the specifics

of this discussion, let us first

accept some hard facts. The

PLP is broke. The coffers are

empty and anyone with com-
mon sense will tell you that PLPs aren’t
really lining up to donate any money at
this time.

Secondly, the PLP has long been associ-
ated with scandal and corruption (despite
the best efforts of the many “spin-doctors”
who seek to blame The Tribune or any oth-
er publication for this long held percep-
tion). Even in the early days of the party
Loftus Roker, one of its first MPs, com-
plained on the floor of the House that cor-
ruption was rocking the party to its very
foundations. It seems that despite their
best efforts the party still manages to find
its way into the national headlines even in

CEpGcht people vitivelly’ chy whence

Oma el Le

FORMER PM PERRY CHRISTIE

opposition. We need not go into details
here of actual cases as we are all well aware
of them.

The PLP (like the FNM) is saddled with
many candidates who, and forgive my
bluntness, are lazy, visionless, and quite
frankly not even qualified to handle scis-
sors. Again, details are not required as this
piece is not meant to embarrass or insult
anyone.

And finally the most damning fact that
must be faced is that the PLP is daily losing
its base — far more rapidly than the FNM.

With the PLP the majority of its support
ranges from 60 years of age and up. As
outlined in the Greenberg Quinlan Ros-
ner Research report commissioned after

colonial legacy, the fight for independence,
and the accomplishment of (Sir) Lynden
Pindling. The PLP needs to update its pos-
ture and rhetoric so that it has greater
appeal to younger and more prosperous
voters,” the report revealed.

But why dwell on things that we already
know? Because the message has yet to be
received. The PLP still believe that they
can win the next election without taking a
long and hard look at their party — without
changing its message, leader, or appeal to a
wider more enlightened audience.

As one political source plainly outlined,
the strategy now is to essentially point the
finger at the FNM and say, “You are the
ones to blame for the state of the economy.
You are the reason why I am unemployed.
You brought this on us, and therefore you
have to go.”

As it is often said, one should never
believe his own propaganda.

This argument being put forward by the
PLP will sadly only be swallowed by those
same persons with less than a high school
diploma who more than likely still believe
that The Tribune (by some miracle) was
able to climb into the Ministry of Housing
and bug the private lines of both the former
Minister Neville Wisdom and his then per-
manent secretary Leila Greene.

But I digress.

A former prime minister who is fighting

to not only remain pertinent in changing
times, but a parliamentary caucus that lacks
the courage to challenge him.

But fair is fair. Despite his many critics it

was under Prime Minister Perry Christie’s
watch that the Bahamas reached econom-
ic heights that others within our region
could only dream of. However, having lost
the 2007 elections, he is now faced with
what Stanley Greenberg, the renowned
polling adviser to Presidents Bill Clinton,
Nelson Mandela, and Prime Minister Tony
Blair described as the worst of political
fates “irrelevance.”

And this brings us to the thrust of the

argument going forward. Will the PLP be a
relevant party in 2012?

As many Bahamians will tell you, there

are persons within the party who would
like to be leader, and some say who are
even capable of being leader. But leader-
ship, as with many things in life, can, and
should not be just handed over. There
should be a fight, and the public should
see that fight, and see that someone is will-
ing to risk it all for the chance to lead them.

But for PLPs such as Dr Bernard Not-

tage and Paul Moss, such a venture if

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PAGE 2C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



What will the PLP do going forward?

FROM page 1C

“No one challenges the
leader in that organisation,” a
political adviser told Insight.

“The PLP you must under-

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ting leader has ever been chal-
lenged, and you can appreci-
ate what would happen polit-
ically to that candidate who
plays their hand and loses. So,
like with many things, they
will wait and scheme until an
opportunity presents itself.”
A fact that should also be
highlighted is that in 2007 the
Greenberg report stated that
despite Mr Christie’s per-
ceived weakness in leader-
ship, PLPs by and large still
wanted him to continue on as
leader. This fact, it is reported
was further substantiated in
the polling study conducted





























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by PLP deputy leader hopeful
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Another issue that needs to
be addressed involves the
many persons who are owed
tens of thousands of dollars
by the party after having done
work during the 2007 cam-

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paign. These persons, it is
reported were enraged on
hearing that the party leader
had pledged to financially
assist former Senator Pleas-
ant Bridgewater in meeting
her legal expenses after los-
ing the election court chal-
lenge earlier this year. She,
along with former Attorney
General Allyson Maynard
Gibson, failed to recover their
seats in yet another humiliat-
ing defeat for the PLP.

The only former candidate
to escape this “second humil-
iation” was the former Minis-
ter of Trade and Industry
Leslie Miller who opted not
to challenge the results of
Blue Hills in the court, stating
that elections are won on the
ground, “not in the courts.”

Another disturbing fact
exposed by the infamous
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
Research report revealed that
many of the PLP’s recent
“social” programmes geared
at engaging the youth and the
general public to be more
involved in the inner work-
ings of the party were in fact
strategies created and handed
to them by this research com-
pany to rebuild the party’s
image.

To those who may have
thought that the PLP was
making a real and meaningful
connection with them, this
revelation must have been a
painful one.

But unfortunately this is the
reality in Bahamian politics.
As I have often said, very lit-
tle is left to chance, and often
the moves that we see taking
place today have long been
decided and sanctioned
months before. This, there-
fore, begs some serious ques-
tions about transparency and
control in this society — a dis-
cussion that I hope we as a
people can one day have in a
mature and educated fashion.

What do you think?
pturnquest@

tribunemedia.net
telephone: 502-2361

For the stories
Rae
read /nsight Mondays

| |
fatal at

Tae ica COMM TTC sen ae





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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 3C
INSIGHT

Readers have |@ â„¢ cwsceg: mu anius

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTESSION SERVICES

O
( e 1r S a PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042009
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LAST week’s Insight i @ S i AaINESS | | | |

argued that the Christian - Mere { CREDIT COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES | telllipre-tie : Se $2540

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made it clear they feel The stories behind the news
social progress — defined

by most of the western
ciciomits'*o | BACK TO THE DARK AGES
rights and democracy —

threatens much of what
th ey hold d ear. After all RUE. se THE Bahamas Christian Council has declared itself opposed to government's efforts to protect

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009



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DRA TDs

<. Women from being raped by their husbands, arguing that the proposed amendment to the Sexual ECT ERM lan Tt TERIOR DECC A TING | = ; 1 4 ‘Gen | Rooke | S750

many of them have become Offences and Domestic Violence Act could threaten the institution of marriage. The council paints Ht — = 1 — , a ik r : . RA * a 4 in oa fanned ; | : = Ta
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exceedingly comfortable m. is rests. In reality, the government’s proposed marital rape law is a vital component of the enlightened PLOWS LOB AL (HESS folly } _ 7) Hihwks | $7240

their roles as the self-
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the nation,” it said.

The article generated a
great deal of response from
the public and became the
story to attract most read-
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site, tribune242.com.

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Dear Sir,

I know I am a foreigner
living here by the grace of
the Bahamian Government
and people and perhaps it is
none of my business to
comment. But I felt com-
pelled to write and com-
ment on your article in
Insight.

I read your article in
Insight regarding the Chris-
tian Council with dumb-
founded interest.

The nearest modern
equivalent is to be found in . , .
the extreme forms of Islam. to the 6th century. They in traditional clothes, that is
The extremists of which also believe that any
seck to take the world back = woman who is not dressed SEE page 4C

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email penevigtcob.edu.bs



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

Readers have their say...

FROM page 3C

Burkhas etcetera, is an infi-
del and such a woman
should expect to be raped
whomever she is. To them,
women are second class cit-
izens to be used and abused
by men, and there is much
evidence to support this.
An ex-girlfriend of mine
in England had been mar-
ried for 28 years and was
divorced when I met her.
She had been the subject of
repeated marital rape to
the extent that she had lost
her libido completely. Her

husband insisted she have
testosterone injections to
boost her libido. All this
did was make her angry
enough to finally throw him
out. Then after her divorce
she found she had a very
active libido with the lovers
she subsequently took. The
message from this is very
obvious, rape is wrong.

The Christian Council
members are living in
another age and it saddens
me that such folk should be
listened to at all.

Your exposé of their
arguably pathetic views is

oa
‘ay
The National Insurance Board

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

both timely and necessary,
and I sincerely hope the
women of the Bahamas will
seek to put these prehis-
toric monsters in their place
very firmly. No man has the
right to rape a woman.

Any man with an ounce
of intelligence knows that a
woman who is enjoying sex-
ual intercourse is a much
better lover than one who is
not.

Yours Faithfully,

— Expat

It needed to be said. And
you said it. Thank you

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Paco. Thank you so much.
— Felicity

Good Insight column.
The BCC is an outmoded
entity.

On top of that, Patrick
Paul doesn't seem to know
what it is that he is talking
about.

— Juan McCartney

Beautifully written!
Every point was solid, well

articulated, and backed up.

The Tribune certainly has
come a long way! As a stu-
dent off to school, it's so
refreshing to get good
reporting and be able to
stay up to date on what's
happening back at home.
Thanks!

— Nickie

It is pleasantly refreshing
to see that there are those
willing to stand up for civil
liberties in the Bahamas.
Stay true to your convic-
tions.

— Marlon Johnson

This is by far one of the
best Insight articles ever. It
is so factual, relevant and
articulate. As for the Chris-
tian Council, they have
become a joke to our coun-
try and a disgrace to our
moral fabric. I don’t even
care to know who the presi-
dent is anymore. it takes a
gutsy government to make
this call and I am glad my
government did. Women
are abused too much in our
country and I fully endorse
the bill. As for Mr Paul, will
he please stick to important

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THE TRIBUNE

matters like gambling [lol].
— Ricardo Wright

I am thoroughly
impressed by your decon-
struction of Rev Paul and
the Christian Council’s
positions on marital rape.
You did a masterful job!
That aside I see something
beyond your view that this
resistance by them is pri-
marily a resistance to
change and their need to
maintain their fiefdoms. I
believe it’s also due to a
willingness by the majority
in this society to accept the
lowest common denomina-
tor on most issues of
national importance. It has
been happening on almost
every issue and it’s simply a
case where the loudest,
generally the least
informed, are leading the
debates and directing the
masses. This begs the ques-
tion of leadership (political
and most importantly oth-
erwise). It reminds me of
the movie Gladiator - THE
mob IS Rome...The mob is
The Bahamas!

— Johnny 5

I read this article today in
the paper and I was so
impressed at how well
thought out and how well
articulated this editorial
was. As a young, single
woman this topic is one that
has struck a chord with me
as I have listened intently
to both sides of the argu-
ment. It is so sad that some
men consistently refuse to
put anything else above
their own sexual gratifica-
tion. The portion of scrip-
ture that says wives must
submit to their husbands
also goes on to say that hus-
bands should love their
wives even as Christ loved
the church, that is the key.
Christ never “forced” his
agenda onto anyone, we
were given free will. Even

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009, PAGE 5C

INSIGHT



terlelo me
have their

yh Ae

though wives were mandat-
ed to submit to the husband
in all things, the husbands
were mandated to love
their wives on a divine level
so that the love would be
upheld whether she submit-
ted (disobeyed) or not. Is
that not what salvation is all
about? No matter what we
do we cannot be separated
from God's love and the
Bible also says that love is
patient and kind, not envi-
ous and not full of pride or
boastful. There is no way
that the Almighty would
sanction us to violate the
dignity of spouses that sim-
ply is not what his love is
about.

— My Point of View

It is shocking that the
Christian Council is able to
distort Scripture. Although
marriage can be seen as a
secular contract, to many of
us, marriage has a religious
significance. Scripture
speaks to love of our fellow
human beings and respect-
ing the dignity of every
human being. Nowhere is
this more true than with
marriage, in which many
intimate moments and acts
are shared. Rape is a vio-
lent crime, used for thou-
sands of years as an act of
war. Rape is not a right of
any person, nor should it be
seen as a sexual act by any-
one who promotes "Christ-
ian values.” Christian val-
ues mean respecting every
human being and their
rights. Marital rape under-
mines and destroys the very
basis of good Christian val-
ues.

-L

Nice to see the Christian
Council has moved into the
21st Century — keep it up
guys with attitudes like
yours soon there will be
NO church. Wouldn't it be
a shock if your congrega-
tion sat out on your next
service — or much worse
took back their tithes —
wonder what your tune
would be then? Those who



attend these churches
should show their antiquat-
ed “leaders” the way.

— Xinpa

I wonder... if it were
physically possible for a
woman to force herself
upon a man, thereby invok-
ing her marital rights as
outlined by all those oppos-
ing the law, would we be
having this same discus-
sion? Unfortunately, (or
fortunately for hum... he
can't be forced or raped) if
he's not interested, willing
or able, his penis does not
rise to the occasion, there-
fore making this a non-
issue. Shame women’s vagi-
nas don't seal up when
they're not interested, will-
ing or able.

— Sick and tired of this
foolishness

It is all fine and good to
say each of the persons in a
marriage has "conjugal
rights” when only one of
them can "enforce" these
rights. I wonder too, in cas-
es of men who work hard
and are not always at home
to fulfil their partner's
"needs", is 1t acceptable for
the woman to cheat? How
come the Christian Council
doesn't take a stand against
long office hours for men,
as this may leave his wife
no alternative but to cheat.
The whole thing is hypo-
critical and self serving, but
what do you expect?

— Enough

A wife unjustly forbids
the marital act, quite possi-
bly in an effort to punish
the husband or to exert
control. Which is itself a
violent act. The husband
says if no marital act, then
no allowance, then the wife
can charge rape through
threat (according to Web-
ster). Or should that be
prostitution where the hus-
band is treated as a John?
And that's just as absurd as
supposed "rape" in mar-
riage. There can be no rape

SEE page 8C

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BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
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Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50

| aresident of Peter Street West, who died on Thursday 3 September 2009,
will be held at on Saturday. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, JFK Drive.

She is survived by her father, Simeon Richardson; 1 son, Thurman
Knowles; 1 daughter, Cecelia Richardson; 3 grandchildren; 3 sisters; 3
brothers & a host of other relatives & friends.

Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Corner & formerly of Eneas Jumper Corner,
who died on Sunday 30 August, 2009 will be held at East Street Gospel
Chapel, East Street, on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor
Tom Roberts & Associate Ministers. Interment follows in Old Trail
Cemetery.

| She is survived by her 5 sons, Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace, Junior

Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters, Margaret Humes,
Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand; 10 great
grand; 1 uncle; Bill Simmons; 2 aunts; Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons.

Steven Alexander Fernander 26

a resident of Dominica Way, Carmichael Road, who died on 24 August,
2009, will be held at Church of Christ, 8th Street the Grove, on Saturday
at 1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor D.W. Dorsette. Interment follows
in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by his mother, Menesha Ingraham; father, George
Fernander; grandparents, Ivalean & Thomas Ingraham, Velma & Harris
Fernander; sisters, Cortrea Cooper & Shanice Fox; brother, Jeffery

Alexander "Junior, Lanton" Wilson, 72

a resident of Fox Hill, who died on Sunday 6 September, 2009, will
be held at St. Anslem Roman Catholic Church, Bernard Road, on Friday
at 4:00 p.m. Officiating will be Monsignor Preston Moss. Interment
follows in the church cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, Margaret Wilson; 6 sons,
Alexander, Daniel, Alfred, Patrick, Andy & Matthew Wilson; 1 daughter,
Alice Smith; 4 sisters, Angela Ferguson, Louise Daniels, Thelma Stewart
& Betty Edwards; 1 brother, Llewelyn Ferguson.



Stephanie Patricia Woodside, 52

a resident of Windsor Lane West, will be held at the Church of God of
Prophecy, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 12:00 noon. Officiating will
be Pastor Samuel Moss. Interment follows in Old Trail Cemetery, Old
Trail Road.

Left to cherish her memories are her 10 children, Shanette & Shawn
Johnson, Keshee Flowers-Spencer, Steven, Shaneker, Shamarl & Shanaya
Woodside, Ketra, Shian & Shran Flowers; father, Nelson Woodside; 8
grand children, Kevin, Renardo, Cara, Jay, Ryesha, Tamaia, Ashanti & Adrea; sisters,
Stephanie Moxey, Valarie Woodside, Seadrid Ferguson, Violet Bain, Billy Dorsett, Marilyn
McLaunder, Jennis Simmons, Rochelle Woodside & Alva Ritchie; brothers, Charles, Glenn
& Jethro Woodside.

Isadora Archer, 80

a resident of South Beach & formerly of Old Bight, Cat Island, who
died on 28 August, 2009, will be held at Dixie Church of God, Wulff
Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Pastor John Davis
| Jr. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 brother, Bishop John T. Archer
of Fort Pearce, Florida; 2 sisters, Maud Rolle & Verdell Johnson & a
host of other relatives & friends.

Leo "Leah" Taylor, 89

a resident of Grenada Cresent & formerly of Que, North Caicos, Turks
Island, who died on 3 September, 2009, will be held at Southland Church
of God, Soldier Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Salathiel Rolle. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens.

Left to cherish her memories are her 1 daughter, Anamae; 7 grand
children, 15 great grand & 5 great great grand children; 1 sister, Gerita
Lopez & a host of other relatives & friends.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8C, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT

Readers have their say...

insight"

because the two are One
Flesh. Ephesians 5:28-31 In
every culture marriage is a
unity that this anti-Christ-

ian, anti-Marriage law
denies. .. Obviously the pro-
ponents of this law (who
understand it) are more

concerned with overturning
Judeo-Christian values than
they are in protecting
women against spousal

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abuse. They could easily
compromise and get to the
real issue.

-Anthony Taylor

If a man withholds funds

from his wife because she
will not have sex with him, I
think it should give her
grounds for divorce and she
should take him for evety-
thing he has.

If she has any sense, she
will leave him.

— Lady

This issue is so political
that its asham. Women are
the majority in this country
and in the voting demo-
graphics. The economy is in
the gutter, which has been
the single most catalyst for
governmental change dur-
ing recent elections. If, you
propose, then pass a legisla-
tion purporting to advance
the agenda of the majority
voting block you retain
your governmental status
quo. This is a ploy. How
about reading the Sexual
Offences and Domestic
Violence Amended Act
2008.

— Charlton Deveaux

As I read the newspaper
this morning and the
Insight editorial, I was com-
pletely disgusted with the
views that the Christian
Council and Rev Paul share
in regards to the amend-
ment of the marital rape
law. How can they say they
represent Jesus (as Christ is
love) yet are completely
against a woman having the
protection against an abu-
sive husband. It’s funny
how you only hear from
these False Prophets when
it comes to homosexuals
and movies, but you never
hear them speak out
amongst their own "broth-
ers" in regards to buying
flashy Bentley cars and
reaping additional tithes
from already cash strapped
church members. Bahami-
ans, it is time to wake up
and realise the real men



and women of God and see

that the "others" have their

own agendas for control

and possible ambitions —

be it political or otherwise.
— Darinique

As far as I am concerned,
the Christian Council, in
taking this position, is the
equivalent of the Taliban in
Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Christian fundamentalism
is as backwards, ignorant
and disrespectful of peo-
ple's rights, in particular
women’s rights, as their
Muslim “brothers.” Wake
up, Bahamas! Shake off
these false prophets,
shameless scammers and
Bentley driving fools and
think for yourself. Protect
your daughters and moth-
ers and sisters from the evil
men who think that there is
a difference between
“force” and “violence.” I
never heard such a foolish
argument in my life. Rape
apologists... the whole lot of
them... and that doesn't
sound too Christian to me.
I hope more people think
for themselves than follow
these “shallow tins.” I see
nothing but the very same
Scribes and Pharisees that
Jesus so adroitly put in
their place. Time to do the
same in this country. Say
goodbye to these false
prophets!

— Erasmus Folly

What I want to know is
how does the Christian
Council manage to brain-
wash about 50 per cent of
the Bahamian population?
Religion really must be like

HuGcIiEs

Ss Me



crack, or as Karl Marx said
"the opiate of the masses."
It doesn't surprise me that
Rev Paul -— or any self-
appointed moral authority
for that matter - sees noth-
ing sinful with a man raping
his wife. However, I refuse
to believe that these
women who agree — rather,
who are forced to agree, for
if not they will go to Hell —
actually believe in their
hearts that it is proper for a
husband to force himself on
his wife. How could they
truly believe that their God
would want this for them? I
guess the fear of being
thrown into the fires of Hell
is powerful enough to let
themselves get raped. Or
worse, powerful enough for
them to defend the act.
Furthermore, it is a proven
fact that marital rape caus-
es emotional trauma to
women. What sort of
women defend this kind of
act? More importantly,
what sort of church leaders
let that happen?

P

Quote from article: "As it
turns out, there seems to be
no record of huge changes
in a society, the collapse of
the family unit, or an erup-
tion of widespread false
claims as a result of the
passing of such a law." —
That's cause there's no
family left to destroy. The
family unit collapsed
decades ago with Televi-
sion.

The countries that have
the law are no poster chil-
dren for Utopia.

— Anthony Taylor

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