Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 PRICE-75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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Murder sparks

Soit targets fear

Employee is
gunned down
outside of shop

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MORE “innocent” blood
will be shed as armed bandits
home in on vulnerable "soft-
targets" in the business com-
munity, a local activist fears.

Reverend C B Moss, head
of civic group Bahamas
Against Crime, spoke out as
police probe the murder of
44-year-old Nelson Goodman
who may be the third in a
string of employees shot by
armed robbers on company
property.

Mr Goodman, who worked
at Bertha's Go-Go Ribs take-
away on Poinciana Avenue,
was gunned down outside the
shop shortly after midnight
yesterday.

Police said they had not
ruled robbery out as a motive,
but could not say if anything
was stolen from the restau-
rant or if Mr Goodman was
robbed of any personal or
company property.

But Rev Moss said the
recent string of attacks should

be a wake-up call to Govern-
ment to immediately buffer
the spill-over of violent crime
into the business sector.

"T feel that the crime now is
spilling into the commercial
area more than before. They
are hitting soft targets in areas
not heavily policed and those
who may not have their own
private security force or the
security systems which could
offer them protection," Mr
Moss told The Tribune.

"Unless this is addressed
immediately, it is going to
escalate to other areas of the
business community and then
it's going to hit the area every-
one is concerned about — the
tourism sector, but by then it
will be too late," he warned.

When asked yesterday if
police were treating armed
robbery-related murders as
an emerging trend, Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson was hesitant to brand
the incidents as reason for
alarm.

"Most armed robberies are

SEE page six

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net




A MOTHER who was
attacked by two pit bull
terriers has revealed how
she has been left scarred
for life.

In an exclusive inter-
view from her hospital
bed, Zelma Maura told
how she was savaged by
the dogs and is now in
constant pain.

The 30-year-old reliv-
ed the terrifying moments
when the dogs chased her
as she tried to run away
from them in Abundant
Life Road, and sank their
teeth into her arm and
| leg when she tripped and
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SEE page six





ZELMA MAURA, 30, was savagely attacked by two pit bulls last
week and will have surgery at Princess Margaret Hospital today.

‘Tentative’ date set for Harl Taylor murder retrial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR Justice Anita Allen
yesterday set November 4 as
the “tentative” date for the start
of the retrial of Troyniko
McNeil who is accused of mur-
dering handbag designer Harl
Taylor.

The date has been set pend-
ing the outcome of an applica-
tion by McNeil’s attorney Mur-

British
American

rio Ducille to have the judge
recuse herself from hearing the
retrial as well as the status of
another trial in Freeport in
which Mr Ducille is also
involved. The hearing of the
application is scheduled for
September 29.

McNeil, 22, remains on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison
as he awaits the retrial. Novem-
ber 2 was initially set for the
start.

Yesterday, however, Mr

Ducille informed the court he is
scheduled to be in Freeport for
a case which is expected to run
from November 9 to 27.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner said the
matter in Freeport can com-
mence on completion of the
McNeil trial. Mr Ducille said,
however, that the matter in
Freeport is an old case that had
been set for trial since Easter.

SEE page six





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Myles Munroe
Calls for wider
(lehate on the
marital rape issue

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

LEADING pastor,
author and motivational
speaker Myles Munroe is
calling for a wider debate
on the proposed amend-
ment to outlaw marital
rape now that the issue
has divided the Christian
community.

Dr Munroe has out-
lined a series of questions
he wants government to
address before passing
the amendment to the
Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act
that would make it illegal
for a man to rape his wife.

The Catholic Archdio-
cese, the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist
Church, and the Seventh-
Day Adventist Church
have all expressed sup-
port for the proposed
amendment.

But the Bahamas
Christian Council, the
largest religious body in
the country, has rejected
the proposed amend-
ment.

Former Council presi-
dent Bishop Simeon Hall
criticised the Council’s

SEE page six



Chinese firm
expects Baha
Mar resort to
open by 2013

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Chinese company set
to build the 1,000-acre Baha
Mar resort at Cable Beach
has announced it expects con-
struction to go ahead early
next year in time for the
resort to open its doors by
2013.

China State Construction
and Engineering Company
(CSCEC), which signed a $1.9
billion deal with Baha Mar
Resorts Limited last Friday,
also revealed in a statement to
the Chinese media that by
investing $99 million in the
project it will obtain a 2.75
per cent equity stake.

This latest update comes
days after the Bahamas Gov-
ernment signed an accord
with the Chinese on the “Pro-
motion and Protection” of
investments made by The
Bahamas and China in each
other’s territories.

At the same time as that
agreement was signed, Prime

SEE page six

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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Dire crime prediction

as violence escalates
Activist calls for

immediate action

AS violence continues to
escalate, 2009 could end up
being “the worst year ever for
crime” warned Rev CB Moss,
executive director of Bahamas
Against Crime.

Rev Moss issued a strong
statement yesterday calling for
all crime committees and com-
missions to be brought to an
end and action to be taken
immediately.

His comments follow the
shooting death of a 44-year-old
man outside Bertha’s Go-Go
Ribs on Poinciana Drive early
yesterday morning (see lead sto-
ry, page 1).

“This is madness,” Rev Moss
said, “58 homicides in addition
to countless other crimes in an
ever increasing tide is plunging
our society into the depths of
social chaos.”

He warned that the “soul” of
the Bahamian people is at risk,
because there seems to be no
concern about the well-being of
others.

“There is no outcry until our
personal interests are invaded,”
he said.

According to Rev Moss, the
December 2007 appointment of
the National Advisory Council
on crime was “unnecessary and
an absolute waste of time and
public funds.”

This, he noted, was confirmed
by the advisory council itself on
page three of its official report,
which said: “Members were

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amazed, in some instances
shocked that the information
gathered had been part of pre-
vious national reports, while it is
clear that in some instances sev-
eral suggestions from previous
reports were implemented, in
the main, we seem to be blow-
ing bubbles when it comes to
seriously addressing crime and
its causes.”

Rev Moss said: “There it is
from the council. The clearest
evidence that the year it spent in
deliberations was a shameful
waste of time while nearly 150
murders and thousands of other
serious crimes took place.”

He also went on to note that
in a 1994 report, the Consulta-
tive Committee on National
Youth Development noted that:
“Crime and violence of all
kinds, namely armed robberies,
serious harm and other assaults
against the person and gang vio-
lence had reached epidemic
proportions in our community.
These acts of crime and vio-
lence are uniformly condemned
by our society, yet they persist.”

According to Rev Moss, the
situation has become “tremen-
dously worse” since that report
was delivered 15 years ago, yet
successive governments contin-
ue to appoint committees and
commissions to examine the
problem of crime.

“The time for talking must
stop now and immediate action
taken,” he said.

BISHOP SIMEON HALL of New Covenant Baptist Church walks
towards a memorial wall for murder victims. Bishop Hall plans

in Alo LOhot)



He said that while remaining
thankful to members of past
crime councils and commissions
for their efforts, Bahamas
Against Crime believes all such
bodies still in operation should
be dissolved immediately,
including the House of Assem-
bly select committee on crime,
which is now holding hearings.

“We are aware of the prob-
lems; let’s now implement the
many recommendations in
reports sitting on shelves in offi-
cial offices for many, many
years,” Rev Moss said.

He said responsibility for the
situation now falls squarely at
the doorstep of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

“As leader of the govern-
ment, he must accept the
responsibility of his government
to provide a reasonable level of
security for the citizenry, which
is one of the primary responsi-
bilities of any and all govern-
ments,” Rev Moss said.

“The prime minister must
step up to the plate and lead
the nation out of this deep crisis.
The time is now and Bahamas
Against Crime, and others we
know, stand ready to assist. In
the meantime, fervent prayers
must be offered for our nation.”



to post the names of all persons murdered in the country within

the past 10 years.

Police to destroy nine
seized slot machines

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
police have announced they will
destroy nine slot machines that
were seized during a raid on a
liquor store in Freeport in March.

The destruction of the
machines is in accordance with a
court order issued by Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson on July 2.

COURT MATTER

Three men were charged with
firearm and ammunition posses-
sion in the Freeport Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Troy McIntosh, 40; Reno
Surin, 32; and Garth Hall, 35,
were arraigned in the Eight Mile
Rock Magistrate’s Court before

Magistrate Gwendolyn Claude.

It is alleged that on Septem-
ber 6, the accused men were
found in possession of a .44 Mag-
num along with 14 live rounds of
ammunition.

The men pleaded not guilty to
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and ammunition. They
were represented by attorney K
Brian Hanna.

Hall was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

McIntosh and Surin were each
granted $5,000 bail with one sure-
ty on the condition that they sur-
render their travel documents to
the court and report to the Eight
Mile Rock Police Station before
9am every Friday until the com-
pletion of the case.

The matter was adjourned to
December 16 for trial.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Weathers vac

Eee reeset eer emeaeers P14

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Man accused of
Stealing from
former minister by
reason of service

A MAN accused of steal-
ing nearly $24,000 from for-
mer Cabinet minister and
businessman Leslie Miller
by reason of service was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Bruce Newbold, 53, of
Treasure Cove, is accused
of stealing $23,850 in cash
from Mr Miller by reason
of his service. It is alleged
that Newbold stole the
money between Friday,
June 26, and Friday,
August 7.

Newbold had been
hired to install air- condi-
tioning vents at Mario’s
Place.

Newbold, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Guillimena Archer in
Court 10, Nassau Street,
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000. The
case was adjourned to
December 9.

Mr Miller told The Tri-
bune yesterday that despite
the setbacks, his bowling
and entertainment centre
is now scheduled to open
on October 20.

Justices of the
Peace association
to hold meeting

THE recently formed
National Association of
Justices of the Peace will
hold its regular meeting at
the Police Training College
on Thompson Boulevard
on Wednesday, September
16.

The meeting will begin
at 7.30pm. All justices of
the peace are invited to
attend.

At the following meet-
ing on Wednesday, Sep-
tember 23, Commissioner
of Police Reginald Fergu-
son will speak on the topic:
“The Role of Justices of
the Peace in the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.”

Minister Neko Grant’s
daughter dies in Florida

THE daughter of Works
Minister Neko Grant died in
hospital in Florida after losing
a battle with pneumonia.

Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on
September 6 — the day after Mr
Grant buried his mother, Reva
Grant and only months after
the death of his father.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Grant said
he and his family were “surviv-
ing” thanks to support from
friends and family.

"I'm surviving and thankful
for friends and my colleagues,
including the prime minister
and my fellow Cabinet minis-
ters who have been very sup-
portive. It is a very difficult
time.

“We are distressed as is

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intensive care unit of the Cleve-
land Clinic in Florida, where
she later died.

Ms Grant, a mother-of-one,
was graduated from St Mary's
University in the United States
with a bachelors degree in his-
tory before studying law at the
University of Leeds, where she
was graduated with honours in
2000.

In early 2001 she was called
to the English Bar and in Sep-
tember of that year she was
called to the Bahamas Bar.

Condolences have been

pouring in to the local online
message board bahamasis-
sues.com and the social net-
working site, Facebook.

"I knew her well, she was
one of the nicest and kindest
people you would ever meet.
She was down to earth and
could chill with anyone, never
using her politics for any sort of
attention. She will be missed.
My prayers for her family,"
wrote one person.

Funeral services for Ms
Grant are expected to be held
this Saturday.

expected,” Mr Grant said from
his home on Grand Bahama,
his voice breaking with emo-
tion.

Nekcarla, an attorney who

NEKCARLA GRANT

worked for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's legal depart-
ment, was described yesterday
by her father as a "sweet" and



NEKO GRANT

"promising" young woman.
She was admitted to Doc-

tor's Hospital for treatment

before being transferred to the

Former PLP MP says he would
represent Exuma again if asked

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER PLP MP George Smith said he
would once again represent the island of Exuma if
and when he is called on to return to the House of
Assembly.

While hoping that some other younger person
from the island would step forward to represent the
constituency in the next general election, Mr Smith
—who has remained vocal on behalf of the people
of Exuma — said that he would have no difficulty
in serving his people once again.

“Tf that is what my people want, and if I can
serve the people of Exuma in these difficult times,
I would have no difficulty serving them in that
purpose,” Mr Smith told The Tribune yesterday.

While some will undoubtedly welcome the
thought of Mr Smith returning to front-line politics,
it is highly unlikely that the area’s current MP
Anthony Moss will share that view.

Mr Smith said he hopes the PLP will nominate
someone in Exuma who is at the very least “com-
petent.”

“Exuma is my home, and I hope for both parties
to run good individuals. Obviously I want my par-
ty, the PLP, to win and I want them to have some-
one who knows what is happening in the world and

has an ability to recognise what are the right things
to push for, to promote in the Bahamas,” he said.

Issues worth fighting for, Mr Smith said, include
improving education and the healthcare system,
reducing the high levels of violent crime, secur-
ing the country’s borders and strengthening the
Bahamas’ economy.

“Exuma needs someone who can contribute in
all those areas, and I believe there are possibilities
out there. I would not be presumptuous to think I
am the only person, but I can be someone. But I
would much prefer for the party to identify some-
one who can be a contributor around the table —
be it at the party caucus or to serve on the Cabinet
level and be a clarion voice for the Bahamian peo-
ple in Cabinet.

“The problems of today are more immense and
troubling than ever faced in the history of this
Bahamas. And every Bahamian should have a
representative who can speak clearly and interact
with the prime minister of the Bahamas even if they
are on opposite sides of the political divide,” Mr
Smith said.

The FNM was once rumoured to be looking to
run former Ambassador Joshua Sears in the Exu-
ma constituency.

However, it is now believed the party might
change this plan and run FNM Senator Anthony
Musgrove instead.

Former state minister: COLE ETRE ETE MTT Dams CTT ACA TT UT

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER state finance
minister yesterday said the gov-
ernment may not have “fully
appreciated the depth of the
recession” when it made its bud-
get forecasts and may have to
cut back public spending even
further.

James Smith, commenting on
the prime minister’s admission
that revenue intake fell around
$30 million below anticipation
in July and August, said he
expects the government to deliv-
er a mid-term budget early next
year which will “reflect realities.”

“T don’t think the government
had full appreciation for depth of
the recession... I think it was
still hopeful that this was just a
blip, and then the budget was
done predicated on this not
being as deep as it has shown
itself to be.”

“So what really needs to hap-
pen is go back, take a look to
see how long this will be and
adjust expenditure,” said Mr
Smith, minister of state for
finance between 2002 and 2007,
and former governor of the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

“The options are
clear — you either have
to adjust expenditure
to meet revenue down-
fall or borrow more
and that may not be
advisable given the
growth in the debt over
the next year or so.”

Speaking to another
daily last week, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said government
took in around $30 mil-
lion less than expected

like.”



JAMES SMITH

Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing
told The Tribune yes-
terday that it is hard to
predict revenue as it is
“always a function of
economic activity, and
economic activity is not
as predictable as you’d

“Youre dealing with
human conduct in terms
of economic transac-
he added.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing
reiterated that “what is

tions,”

is “sufficient evidence” already
available to determine that eco-
nomic conditions are unlikely to
improve before the end of 2009,
and therefore actual revenue col-
lected by the government is not
likely to pick up any time soon.

“Unless there’s some kind of
minor miracle I really don’t
expect to see a turn around. It’s
going to be a very soft winter,”
said Mr Smith, referring in par-
ticular to signs coming from the
tourism industry.

Delivering its annual budget

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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
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Telephone: (242) 323-8240 » Fax: (242) 326-9953
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in July and August, the
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budget year.

“Revenue is not performing
thus far as we expected,” said
Mr Ingraham.

However, suggesting that it is
too early to make gloomy pre-
dictions about how the budget
is set to perform overall, Mr
Ingraham noted that last year in
July and August revenue
appeared “normal” only to drop
off precipitously and unexpect-
edly in September when the
global financial crisis struck.

“And so what has happened
now in July and August (2009)
does not in and of itself give us a
sufficient yardstick to compare,”
said the prime minister.

meaningful” for gov-
ernment as it seeks to determine
how revenue is performing going
forward is how much money
comes into its coffers in Sep-
tember and October 2009.

“We always have contingen-
cies in terms of how we respond
to revenue performance and
what has to be done but those
are contingencies that would be
put into place once you arrive
at that point where you’ve got a
concrete determination of where
you are,” he added, noting that it
is “not unusual” for the govern-
ment to take in “less of its rev-
enue in the first half of the (bud-
get) year than the second.”

But Mr Smith suggested there

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

It’s time for Americans to get help

MAYBE the economic stress has been
too much. Looking back at the past few
months, it’s fair to wonder if America isn’t
going through a nervous breakdown.

The political debate has been poisoned
by birthers, deathers and wackos who smile
proudly while carrying signs comparing the
president to the Nazis. People who don’t
even know that Medicare is a government
programme have been trying to instruct us on
the best ways to reform health care.

The administration’s most popular anti-
recession initiative was a startlingly creative
economic breakthrough known as the cash-
for-clunkers programme. Over the weekend
(presumably while the president was sleep-
ing, because this occurred in the wee hours of
the morning), White House officials whis-
pered the official announcement that Van
Jones would no longer be working in the
administration.

The White House wishes it had never
heard of Jones, who was hired to be its point
person on green jobs. It turns out that Jones
had used a nasty anatomical slur to refer to
Republicans and once signed a petition sug-
gesting that President George W. Bush had
advance knowledge of the September 11
attacks.

There is no end to the craziness. The entire
Republican Party has decided that it is in
favour of absolutely nothing. The presiden-
t’s stimulus package? No way. Health care
reform? Forget about it.

There is not a thing you can come up with
that the GOP is for. Sunshine in the morn-
ing? Harry Reid couldn’t persuade a single
Senate Republican to vote yes.

Incredibly, the party’s poll numbers are
going up.

We need therapy. President Barack Oba-
ma _ addressed the nation’s public school
students Tuesday, urging them to work hard
and stay in school. The folks who bray at
the moon are outraged. Some of the cater-
wauling on the right has likened Obama to
Chairman Mao (and, yes, Hitler), and a fair
number of parents have bought into the
imbecilic notion that this is an effort at social-
ist or Communist indoctrination.

As one father from Texas, put it: “I don’t
want our schools turned over to some social-
ist movement.”

The wackiness is increasing, not dimin-
ishing, and it has a great potential for destruc-
tion. There is a real need for people who
know better to speak out in a concerted
effort to curb the appeal of the apostles of
the absurd.

But there is another type of disturbing
behaviour, coming from our political leaders

NISSAN PICKUP
Tough Body
Trouble-free

Easy to Maintain

and the public at large, that is also sympto-
matic of a society at loose ends. We seem
unable to face up to many of the hard truths
confronting the U.S. as we approach the end
of the first decade of the 21st century.

The Obama administration’s biggest
domestic priority is health care reform. But
the biggest issue confronting ordinary Amer-
icans right now — the biggest by far — is the
devastatingly weak employment environ-
ment. Politicians talk about it, but aggressive
job-creation efforts are not part of the poli-
cy mix.

Nearly 15 million Americans are unem-
ployed, according to official statistics. The
real numbers are far worse. The unemploy-
ment rate for black Americans is a back-
breaking 15.1 per cent.

Five million people have been unem-
ployed for more than six months, and the
consensus is that even when the recession
ends, the employment landscape will remain
dismal. A full recovery in employment will
take years. With jobless recoveries becoming
the norm, there is a real question as to
whether the U.S. economy is capable of pro-
viding sufficient employment for all who
want and need to work.

This is an overwhelming crisis that is not
being met with anything like the urgency
required. We’ve also been unable or unwill-
ing to face the hard truths about the wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan and the terrible toll
they are taking on America’s young fighting
men and women. Most of us don’t want to
know. Moreover, we’ve put the costs of these
wars on a credit card, without so much as a
second thought about what that does to our
long-term budget deficits or how it under-
mines much-needed initiatives here at home.

There are many other issues that we
remain in deep denial about. It’s not just the
bad economy that has thrown state and local
budgets into turmoil from coast to coast. It’s
our refusal to provide the tax revenues need-
ed to pay for essential public services. Exhib-
it A is California, which is now a basket case.

The serious wackos, the obsessive-com-
pulsive absurdists, may be beyond therapy.
But the rest of us could use some serious
adult counselling. We’ve forgotten many of
the fundamentals: how to live within our
means, the benefits of shared sacrifice, the
responsibilities that go with citizenship, the
importance of a well-rounded education, and
tolerance.

The first step, of course, is to recognize
that we have a problem.

(This article was written by Bob Herbert —
c.2009 New York Times News Service).






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Heartbroken
to read about
Abaco’s new
power plant

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After reading the very infor-
mative article by Larry Smith
about Abaco’s new power
plant, I am heartbroken to
know that it is actually hap-
pening. Deep in the pine for-
est of Wilson City Abaco, the
lowest grade, most undesirable
fuel available called Bunker C
will be used to accommodate
the rapid growth of Abaco. The
oil ships will reportedly pass
right by our National Park reefs
near the Pelican Cays. Most
people are not aware this is
happening. Serious health
issues and environmental dis-
asters could be a result of this
type of plant.

Meanwhile, the top story of
the latest Abaconian newspa-
per starts off with “the northern
communities of Abaco came
out in full force for the arrival
of the 19 Miss Universe Con-
testants.” I really hope that we
have our priorities straight, and
come out in full force to the
meeting on September 10th
that will present the details of
the new power plant.

There are other ways to gen-
erate electricity which will not
potentially cause acid rain, can-
cer, waste management prob-
lems or devastating oil spills.

We live in a land with abun-
dant sunshine, steady ocean
breeze, and plenty of trash that
we need to recycle. The only
solution to the power problem
we are facing is to harness our
natural resources and build
solar and wind power plants,
and turn trash into electricity. If
this Bunker C power plant goes
up we will be contributing to
global warming, risking our
health and our beautiful reefs

letters@tribunemedia.net



and beaches. It sounds like the
tar that we used to step in on
the beach might be back, but
that was small things in com-
parison to what could happen.

Bunker C “sludge” is cur-
rently being used in the Clifton
Pier power plant in New Prov-
idence. After years of oily water
being discharged, reportedly
more than a million gallons of
oil have recently been recov-
ered from the caves below the
cliffs, costing over a million dol-
lars. On behalf of the people
of Abaco and the rest of the
Bahamas, no thank you!

Bunker C is the bottom of
the barrel, sludge like fuel that
has already devastated other
areas around the globe. Look it
up on the internet, you will be
shocked!

It cannot be recycled, so
what do we plan to do with it?
Whatever the plan is, someone
will be stuck with it. Although it
may be the least expensive fuel,
the costs of clean up and dis-
posal will soon add up. I
thought our country’s motto is
“forward, upward, onward,
together”. So much for “It’s
better in the Bahamas.”

We can’t just blame the gov-
ernment, we are all guilty of
indulgence which leads to this
problem. The ideal scenario for
most of us involves cooling out
in the AC while the clothes are
in the dryer, dishes in the dish-
washer, TV and computer on,
and, oh yes, gotta have hot
water all day long, even if we
don’t use it! Our government

is trying to meet our demands,
and we need to give them the
guidance and support to do so
in a conscious, healthy, and sus-
tainable manner. Renewable
energy is going mainstream in
other countries, and we need
to jump on board and get with
the programme.

Tread that renewable energy
options are “not yet feasible for
Abaco on a utility scale because
winds are inconsistent, solar
collectors require too much
land and the island’s current
waste stream cannot generate
enough power to meet
demand.” There is plenty of
land in Abaco, and it can be
used wisely to accommodate
the current growth that our
existing power plant cannot.
And it’s hard to believe that we
don’t have enough trash to turn
into power.

If everyone does their part
and makes an effort to reduce,
reuse and recycle, we can make
it work. Are you planning on
building a house? Start with
something as simple as an on
demand gas water heater. Why
waste electricity to heat water
when it’s not being used?

Thank you for taking the
time to read this, now please
go to the meeting on Septem-
beir 10th in Marsh Harbour,
(call BEC for time and place)
and do your research online.

Let’s get back to basics
before it’s too late! And since I
have your attention, just one
more thing — “When the pow-
er of love overwhelms the love
of power, the world will know
peace.” — author unknown.

ANONYMOUS
Nassau,
September, 2009.

A message to the PM: We
are awaiting hangman’s day

EDITOR, The Tribune.

mane? We are living behind bars just how the
prisoners are kept at Her Majesty prison, if a

Kindly grant me this request to print the fol-
lowing on the front page of your newspaper:

Honourable Prime Minister Sir, the time has
come when the people of the Bahamas are now
crying out to you or whoever is responsible to set
aside a hangman’s day. There is absolutely too
much killing in our land. We are now having
murders in threes in less than 24 hours, isn’t that
a shame.

We can no longer stand by and watch innocent
lives being taken away, even if it means we all
march around parliament and shut Bay Street
down until our cries are heard. We no longer
want to hear it’s inhumane, sir, we now want life
for life — just the other day a young mother of
two was nursing her three-month-old baby when
a nasty gunman came by and her life was brutal-
ly taken away. Is this inhumane, sir? A young
mother of three working ever so hard to sup-
port her children when suddenly she was shot
in the face by some nasty thugs. Sir, is this inhu-









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fire should ever break out God help us all
because there are absolutely no known escapes.
Sir, the people of this country are crying out to
you for help, have mercy, Mr Prime Minister,
and let the country know when you are going to
set aside a day only for hangman’s day, don’t
wait until it reaches your doorstep, sir, do some-
thing right now before it is to late.

Sir, can truly say the people of this country
are waiting for that day because the laws are on
the books or do we have to get consent from the
Privy Council, are we fully independent or not?

Sir, we are awaiting hangman’s day, we are
sick and tried of hearing empty voices we need
action and we need it right now.

ANGRY AND
VERY IRATE
CITIZEN
Nassau,

August 24, 2009.

What is with
RT

TDC



EDITOR, The Tribune.

What is with the blacked out,
one-way glass that pervades
every government office?

T have never seen such an act
of “customer unfriendliness”
anywhere.

Goodness knows what it is
they don’t want the public to
see but I hate trying to com-
municate with people through a
tiny hole, or leaning down to
talk under the slot below so
that they can hear me — it is
disgraceful.

Don’t tell me it is for securi-
ty because the banks don’t have
it. But here is the final straw —
it is now installed at Wulff
Road Police Station!

I can’t imagine how the
police intend to strengthen rela-
tionships with the communities
if we are met with such a phys-
ical barrier.

Come on government minis-
ters open up!

All the best!





KEN CHAPLIN
BRI, CRS
Broker/Realtor
Nassau,

August 31, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Hotel Union ruling
sparks action from
concerned parties

THE ruling on Monday by }
Justice Neville Adderley that }
there should be nominations }
in the Bahamas Hotel Cater- }
ing and Allied Workers }
Union has caused all con- }
cerned parties to spring into }
action. :

Yesterday, Sydney Rolle, a }
recent third vice-president }
with the union, officially }
offered himself for the pres- }
idency. }

He said: “I know that God }
has prepared me for a time }
such as this. I believe that }
everything happens for a rea- }
son and everyone serves fora }
season. My season is now.” }

Mr Rolle, a member of the }
‘Redemption Team’ within }
the BHCAWU, said in his }
opinion the union has suf- }
fered enough. :

“I believe that my reputa- }
tion, integrity and the way I }
treat people will give the }
workers a choice and even- }
tually cause the union to }
have the person who has the }
workers best interest at }
heart.” he said. i

A former employee of }
Holiday Inn Hotel, where he }
worked from 1987 to 1995 }
and became a shop steward, }
Mr Rolle later moved to }
Atlantis where he was made }
chief shop steward for 13 }
years. :

He won the third vice- }
president position in the }
BHCAWU’s 2006 election. }

Mr Rolle promised that }
the redemption team will }
help the workers to “see a }
new day where they would }
be a participant in the union }
affairs not a spectator.” i

“The union belongs to the }
workers not the leaders,” he }
said. :

The hotel union’s nomina- }
tions were scheduled to take }
place last week, but Regis- }
trar of Trade Unions Har- }
court Brown had sought clar- }
ification on which nomina- }
tion day - May 11 or August }
31 - was the proper and cor- }
rect date to hold nomina- }
tions. ;

Legendary artist ‘Scrap Iron’ dies

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LEGENDARY artist
William ‘Scrap Iron’ Cole-
brooke will be buried in Red
Bays, north-west Andros, this
weekend, following his death
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital.

Mr Colebrooke, 79, of Red

Bays, Andros, had been
admitted to hospital in early
August, and received surgery
for a brain hemorrhage.

Although the well-loved
father of five, and grandfather
of six, recovered from the
operation and was due to
return home this week, he
went into cardiac arrest on the
morning of Sunday, August
23, and his heart failed.

His family will take his body
back to Andros on Friday for
the funeral on Saturday.

Mr Colebrooke, also known
as ‘OP Tron’, was raised in the
historical Seminole settlement
of Red Bays in north-west
Andros, where he learned the
ancient art of basket-weaving
from his aunt, Omelia Mar-
shall.

As a youngster he was edu-

~ BAHAMAS FILM COMMISSIONER Craig Woods with Renel Brown after her return from Los Angeles.

RENEL Brown, the young Bahamian actress
praised for her outstanding performance in the
internationally acclaimed movie ‘Rain’, got a
chance to hone her craft during a two-week course
in acting and theatre at the University of California
(UCLA) this summer.

Renel, a 12th grader at C V Bethel High School,
studied under outstanding contemporary actors
and directors, who helped broaden her horizons
and acting insights. Under the tutelage of director
Philip Charles MacKenzie (Roseanne, Frasier,
Suddenly Susan, Just Shoot Me and the George
Lopez Show), the young actress learned about
developing characters as part of her Acting for
the Camera class.

Meanwhile, talent agent Maggie Murphy gave
tips on audition techniques and Broadway veteran
April Shawhan helped Renel with her other acting
techniques. Her other instructors included H
Richard Greene, an actor who has shared the stage
with James Earl Jones at the Yale Repertory The-
atre. In addition, he has appeared on such television
shows as The District, NYPD Blue and Without a
Trace. Renel broke onto the entertainment scene
when she was just 14 years old by landing the title
role of ‘Rain’ in her first film effort.

‘Rain’, directed by Bahamian Maria Govan, was
shown at Toronto International Film Festival and
opened the Bahamas International Film Festival in
December, 2008.

Now, at 16 years old, Renel is determined to
land other roles and possibly make a career of act-



ing. Her goals led her to enroll in UCLA’s Arts
Camp to study Acting for the Camera and Theatre.

“Right now I just want to concentrate on acting,”
she said. “Probably later on I'll try screen writing or
directing or something. But right now, my main
goal is acting.”

As she completes the 12th grade at C V Bethel
High School, Renel is content to wait on another
acting opportunity in the Bahamas. But she is will-
ing to travel and put her audition skills to the test
if the right opening presents itself.

Renel acknowledges that she was able to obtain
a lot of useful knowledge into the two-week trip to
Los Angeles. She had full days that began at
6.30am. After breakfast, she would walk one mile
to classes, where she would work from 9am to
5.30pm.

“The trip was really fun,” she said. “I met a lot of
people, I made a lot of friends. The teachers were
really, really nice. Sometimes they would spend
one-on-one time with you, and they would give you
exercises to put you in the state of mind that you
want to be in. And they would teach you how to
become the character instead of just acting like
the character.”

Renel says she is aware of the many people who
want to see her succeed. The long list of people
includes her family, teachers, school friends, and Dr
Keith Wisdom, director of public affairs at Cable
Bahamas. Renel pointed out that it was in large
part due to his interest that she had the opportunity
to study in Los Angeles.

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cated at the Red Bays All-
Age School and made a liv-
ing by fishing and sponging
before he was contracted to
work on the ‘project’- picking
fruit in the United States.

It was when he returned
home to Red Bays that Ms
Marshall, now 91, trained him
in the straw work and basket-
weaving techniques preserved
in the community for genera-
tions.

As he indulged his passion
and his talent for weaving,
‘Scrap Iron’ became interna-
tionally renowned and his
remarkable work is still on
display at the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington,
DC.

His granddaughter, Delissa
Barr, 24, said: “The wealth of
knowledge imparted to him
combined with his talented
hands help to make the name
‘Scrap Iron Colebrooke’ an
infamous name in North
Andros, throughout the
Bahamas and around the
world.

“OP Tron was truly a good-
will ambassador for his coun-
try. Some of his baskets are
displayed in the Smithsonian
Museum in Washington, DC,
and the largest basket on
record ever sold in the
Bahamas was sewn by OI!’
Tron Scrap Colebrooke. It was
so big that all 72 inches or six
feet of him was able to lie
down inside of it and not be
seen.”

She added: “Sewing bas-
kets was OI’ Iron’s passion.
He continued sewing baskets
and representing the Bahamas
all around the United States
of America.

“He made great strides for







William ‘Scrap Iron’ Colebrooke

the Ministry of Tourism and
his country.”

Although he sold large bas-
kets for around $900 a piece,
Mr Colebrooke struggled to
make sales in his later life. He
started to suffer from
headaches and ill-health, and
in 2008 he was diagnosed with
prostate cancer.

In the months before his
death Mr Colebrooke lived in
a dilapidated shack near his
family’s home in Red Bays,
and died with just $200 in his
savings account and no life
insurance.

Ms Barr said: “It’s very sad.
A lot of people liked him, he
was widely renowned for the
quality of his work, and he did
so much for this country.

“T regarded him as an elder
and he was very friendly to
everybody. He would call out
to us as kids to ask us about
school and encourage us, and
we used to call him “OP Iron’
because he worked with iron
when he was young, and his
hand was so hard, it was like
old iron.”

His funeral will be held at
Salem Baptist Church at 11am
on Saturday.

Donations can be made to
Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel in Mt Royal Avenue.

PARALEGAL

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The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Campetition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime,

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persans in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition ta the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA's
website (www.urcabahamas.6s). These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)
Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Cormmission and the Television Regulatery Authority

The new regime encourages participation by all

continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Carmins
Act, the Unlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Litlities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

the website will also give you an

opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comme Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day tor all persons in The Bahamas.

Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St. Matthew’s Church)
Open Mon to Fri 8am - 5:30pm rary

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12.444 P 282,525, 7288



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Murer sparks ‘soft targets’ fear

FROM page one

being done with people with
guns to effect the armed
robbery and intimidate peo-
ple,” said Mr Ferguson.

"We've had a couple of
those things happen.
Whether we determine it as
a rising trend, it’s something
that could happen anytime.”

Mr Ferguson added that
armed robberies are often
carried out by young, inex-
perienced gunmen who may
have wanted to only scare
their targets.

"I say to people and to
would-be victims that you
have to be careful with peo-
ple armed with a gun. Often
they are young people and
they are more frightened
than you are on the receiv-
ing end. It might not be the
intent for them to shoot, but
it happens.”

Still, he said that more
police patrols in vulnerable
areas are needed to help
deter armed robberies in the
commercial sector and cau-
tioned business owners to
implement more stringent
security measures.

Mr Goodman, who lived
at Pinewood Gardens, was
standing outside the restau-
rant when several people
approached and sprayed
him with bullets.

ASP Walter Evans said
moments later three men
were seen fleeing the scene
on foot in a northern direc-
tion.

"The employee was dis-
covered lying on the ground
with gunshot injuries. EMS
personnel were called and






Murder retrial date

examined the victim who
had passed away," Mr
Evans said yesterday.

Mr Goodman's death —
which marked the 58th
homicide for the year —
comes three days after a
dreadlocked gunman shot
23-year-old Alex Dean
inside his family's hardware
store on Parkgate Road dur-
ing a brazen daylight armed
robbery attempt.

Mr Dean underwent
surgery for bullet wounds
to his back and was in dire
need of blood. The gunman
and his accomplice fled the
scene on foot.

About two weeks earlier,
mother-of-three Wendy
Bullard was gunned down
in front of her work place.
Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in
the face as two masked men
held up 21st Century Steel
Welding on Royal Palm
Street, just yards away from
St Gregory's Anglican
Church.

In the face of the rising
murder count, Bishop Sime-
on Hall of New Covenant
Baptist Church announced
his congregation has con-
structed a memorial wall for
murdered victims.

He plans to post the
names of all persons mur-
dered in the country within
the past 10 years.

ASP Evans said Mr
Goodman's death is being
investigated and several
people were being ques-
tioned.

¢ MEMORIAL
FOR VICTIMS:
SEE PAGE TWO

LOCAL NEWS

Myles Munroe calls for wider
debate on marital rape issue

FROM page one

current administration for failing to seek
consensus on the issue, and creating a
divide within the Christian community on
Monday.

While Dr Munroe describes rape as
“wrong, inhumane, unacceptable” and
something which “should not be named
among members of civil society in or out-
side a marital covenant”, he questions
whether “the long arm of the government”
should extend to the “marriage bed.”

He said: “The highly debated and sensi-
tive bill addressing the issue of ‘marital
rape’ is gravely serious, complex, compli-
cated and multi-dimensional, and has the
potential of levelling far-reaching and cross-
generational affects on any western society
built on Judaeo-Christian principles. The
impact and implications of such a law could
be incalculable.”

Dr Munroe said the Bill attempts to
criminalise the act of sex without linking it
to violence which may lead up to the act.

He said: “If the activities preceding the
sexual act are considered acts of force, vio-
lence, abuse and unreasonable pressure in
the context of marriage, then this can be
considered domestic violence, and if it ends
in sexual intercourse, then it could, and
perhaps should, be considered rape.

“Tt is important that no law be created to
criminalise the legitimate act of sex between
a married couple, but it should criminalise
any and all acts of forced violence, even if
the act results in sexual intercourse.”

The current law states: Rape is the act of
any person not under 14 years of age hav-
ing sexual intercourse with another person
who is not his spouse, and the amendment

would remove the words ‘who is not his
spouse’.

But Dr Munroe said the law should be
revised to include an act of violence or
forced sexual intercourse of “another per-
son who may or may not be his spouse.”

He said: “The amendment should not
allow the marital covenant to be used as a
shield to protect the individual from any act
of violence against another person whether
they are married, separated or divorced.

“However it should be focused on,
against and to address the preceding acts of
violence, extortion, threat and act of fraud
rather than against the act of sexual inter-
course.”

He has submitted a number of detailed
questions to government and called for the
passing of the Bill to be postponed while
they are carefully considered.

Dr Munroe wants a National Committee
to be established to study the concerns,
and hold broad consultation with the
“diverse minds” of the community.

He added: “Reconsider the vague ter-
minology of ‘marital rape’ as a broad paint
brush to address and cover a very compli-
cated and complex intimate and private
issue as sexual relations in marriage.

“Agree that this issue is not just a legal or
social issue but a moral and spiritually con-
fidential issue of a grave magnitude.

“Agree that ‘violent rape’ could and may
occur in marriage and should be legally
prevented, and judged by society, but the
framework and context for this judgment
must not jeopardize the security and in
some cases the fragility of the marriage
institution.

“Agree that caution and postponement is
evidence of strength and wisdom not weak-
ness and failure.”



MYLES MUNROE

Woman attacked by pit bulls scarred for life

Sands depot.

FROM page one

Choice and the Butler and

I would have been dead and
my baby would have had no
mother.”

Thanking Mr Dupuch for





























































FROM page one

Mr Ducille said there was always a difficulty in getting the
four attorneys for the four defendants in the case together.
He also told the court he is on the verge of filing a constitutional
motion for unreasonable delay in that case.

Senior Justice Allen scheduled the retrial for November 4
pending the outcome of Mr Ducille’s application and whether
or not the trial in Freeport will go on.

In July, McNeil’s three-week-long trial ended in a hung jury.

He is accused of causing the death of 37-year-old Harl Tay-
lor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18,
2008, while being concerned with another.

The internationally-renowned designer was found dead in his
bedroom at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street with mul-
tiple stab wounds. A broken knife was found on his bed.

McNeil has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and stat-
ed he did not kill Mr Taylor. He has been denied bail four times.

ZELMA MAURA, 30, was savagely attacked by the dogs.

Chinese firm expects Baha
Mar resort to open by 2013
FROM page one

Minister Hubert Ingraham said Government places “a very
high priority on the development of (Cable Beach/Baha Mar)”,
telling Chairman Wu that “tourism is an essential part of our
economy and the extent to which the Cable Beach strip can be
developed will be of immense benefit to the people of the
Bahamas.”

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice president of external
affairs, said yesterday the redevelopment is still set to take
place along the lines initially envisioned before the company
had to look for new financing.

He added that Bahamian contractors were likely to gain the
majority of work, “if not 100 per cent”, on the first phase of the
Cable Beach redevelopment whenever it went ahead.

Meanwhile, Baha Mar continues to hammer out an arrange-
ment on financing for the multi-billion dollar Baha Mar project
with the China Export-Import (Exim) Bank.

A framework agreement signed last Friday between Baha
Mar and the Chinese establishing the commercial terms for the
participation of the Exim Bank and CSCEC in the Baha Mar
Resort project was heralded as “an important milestone” in this
regard.

The resort is seeking to replace the financing it had been
promised at an earlier stage by Harrah’s Entertainment, who
afterwards pulled out of the arrangement, resulting in legal
action.

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Ms Maura, of Collies
Avenue, Kennedy Subdivi-
sion, said the dogs were “‘eat-
ing” her arm and leg for a
“good while” before she saw
a white truck stop at the near-
by traffic lights and she cried
out for help.

The single mother of a two-
year-old son said she was
grateful to still be alive when
Charles Dupuch, 49, stopped
his truck and opened the
door for her to crawl in over
him, bleeding, with torn
pieces of flesh hanging from
her leg.

Mr Dupuch, who collects
refuse from Bamboo Shack
restaurants, drove the injured
woman to the Bamboo Shack
in Soldier Road, from where
Emergency Medical Services
took her to hospital.

Ms Maura received five
stitches in her left hand and
arm, and six in her leg. But
three gaping holes in her low-
er left leg have been left open
while an infection clears up
before surgery.

She said: “It’s an ordeal
every day. I’m in pain all day
every day, I’m _ taking
painkillers and infection med-
ication all day, every day. I
will be scarred for life on my
arm and leg, and I just lie
here thinking about the dogs,
reliving the moment I was
attacked, and the fact that I
could be dead instead of liv-
ing.

“The pain was just unbear-
able, an unbearable pain that
just didn’t go away.

“T was afraid for my life,
and it all boiled down to the
fact that if those dogs got me,

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saving her life, Ms Maura
said: “When I saw how bad
my leg was, and how bad my
hand was, I wanted to pass
out. It was just so painful.
They were biting me for a
good while before he saved
me.”

Before going into surgery
yesterday to have skin grafts
on her leg, Ms Maura called
for tougher regulations to
control such dangerous dogs.

She said: “The police told
me it had to be a pit bull
because any other dog, when
they bite, normally let go and
don’t take out chunks of your
flesh. I think the dogs that
attacked me should be shot,
because I don’t want anyone
else to feel the pain I feel.

“We shouldn’t have vicious
dogs which escape and attack
people. They shouldn’t be
there.”

Ms Maura is so haunted by
the attack, she said she is now
afraid to go out at night, and
wary of all dogs.

She said: “I’m so scared, I
think of those dogs attacking
me. I’m going to be staying
home from now on.

“T feel like the dogs are
going to attack me every-
where I go.”

Chelsea’s Choice general
manager Tina Knowles said if
their dogs had breached the
area’s secure boundary, an
alarm would have been
raised. She said there are pit
bulls roaming the area who
have been known to attack
people.

Police are investigating the
incident, which happened at
about 4am last Friday.

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THE TRIBUNE



Cn
Education in the Bahamas: Are

we overlooking our teachers?

YOUR SAY



By THE NASSAU INSTITUTE

THE Nassau Institute recently
interviewed a former teacher for
an "insider's" perspective on the
failing education system in the
Bahamas. The interview follows:

Nassau Institute (NI): What do
you see as one of the most funda-
mental issues facing education in
the Bahamas?

Teacher: The basic issue that
virtually no one addresses is the
teachers. Essentially the overriding
problem is the poor quality of
teachers in the government
schools and most of the smaller
schools run by scripture-oriented
religious groups. As long as the
teachers are incompetent absolute-
ly nothing else will work.

NE: Well how does that jive with
the point that our parents do not
do their part?

Teacher: While lack of proper
parenting is a contributing factor,
there is no doubt that bad teachers
are the problem.

NI: That is a serious allegation.
Care to expand on that?

Teacher: The qualifications and
performance of many of the teach-
ers leave a lot to be desired. They
teach by rote and are deadly slow
so they can't get through the syl-
labus. Many have inferior qualifi-
cations and if they are head of sub-
jects this has the effect of chasing
out good teachers. In many cases
the older teachers can be said to
‘have retired on the job' to use a
term they use themselves. They
are teaching with the same poor
materials and methods they used
30 years ago.

NI: How do you know this?
Teacher: Many young teachers

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the help of government scholar-
ships, returned home to work for
the government schools to pay
back their loan requirement. Hay-
ing met some of them again they
said they had bought out of the
government schools, or left as
soon as they could, because some
incompetent and disinterested
teacher was in charge and they
couldn't do their job properly.

NI: Well doesn't this happen in
the private school system as well?

Teacher: In the private system,
schools can fire bad teachers, and,
in most cases they do if the results
are poor. Unfortunately some of
these schools pay really low wages
and require absolute religious con-
formity and so can't afford to fire
anyone, they just want someone
in the classroom, so these pull
down the results in the private sec-
tor.

NI: What about the mainstream
religious schools. Don't some of
them maintain excellent results?

Teacher: Well yes, but they
seem to have risen above their
religious affiliation. They don't
require teachers or students to be
strict devotees to their own
denomination. Nevertheless reli-
gious education can be an issue. It
can dominate the curriculum to
the detriment of basic teaching, A
look at the number of entries in
the BGCSE tables show that this is
the third most entered subject
after math and English.

NI: So why can't we change this
to encourage more accountability
from the teachers and schools, and
more time on key subjects?

Teacher: Both the religious
aspect and the teachers are cul-
turally untouchable issues, there
is no way any politician is going to
suggest spending less time on reli-
gion and retiring or replacing
teachers.

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NI: Well what about privatisa-
tion? Something we think will
help.

Teacher: Privatisation would
only help at the top end of the sys-
tem, where it already works. We
already have a large number of
under-performing private schools,
so no point in making people or
the government pay for more of
this.

NI: So how can we overcome
this problem of incompetent
teachers?

Teacher: One possible approach
is to require teachers to have, say,
five-yearly re-certification based
on professional assessments and
compulsory retraining where nec-
essary. I understand that the Col-
lege of the Bahamas basically has
this system in place for its faculty,
although it is not necessarily
enforced.

NI: So what do we do about
schools that are failing across the
board?

Teacher: Similarly, schools need
to be approved and licensed, and
also re-certified periodically or
closed down. There have to be
consequences for failure to edu-
cate our children.

NI: Any thing else you would
like to say?

Teacher: To reiterate, if the
country does not deal with the
sub-par teachers in the system,
there will be little improvement
in education. Equally, just one
inspired teacher can transform a
generation of students.

NI: Thank you for your time.

Teacher: My pleasure. Let's
hope for the best for our children.

The Nassau Institute is an inde-
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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Commission
of Inquiry
report

for the TCI

THE unexpurgated
266-page Commission
of Inquiry report for
the Turks & Caicos
Islands was published
for the first time by an
Internet whistleblowing
service. This site,
called WikiLeaks,
offers a unique forum
for dissidents and jour-
nalists struggling
against official secrecy,
government corruption
and back-room dealing.

The British-appoint-
ed inquiry into high-
level corruption in the
TCI issued its final
report on July 18.

But authorities
removed sections of the
document (after some
of those named filed
law suits) and then
pulled it altogether,
issuing a media gag
order to boot.

Report

However, a few hours
later the full report was
published on Wik-
iLeaks and, realising
that the information
was now in the public
domain, the gag order
was lifted by the TCI's
chief justice on July 21.

WikiLeaks says it is
dedicated to revealing
the unethical behaviour
of governments and
institutions around the
world.

Documents that are
"classified, censored or
otherwise opaque to
the public record” can
now be published
anonymously on this
site, which was founded
by dissidents, journal-
ists and techies from
the US, Taiwan,
Europe, Australia and
South Africa. Wik-
iLeaks has been
described as acting like
a global freedom of
information act or “an
intelligence agency for
the people."

WikiLeaks portrays
itself as following in the
tradition of the famous
1971 US Supreme
Court ruling in the Pen-
tagon Papers case.

That ruling declared
that only a free and
unrestrained press can
effectively expose
deception in govern-
ment.

Turks and Caicos
and the Bahamas

By LARRY SMITH

IF YOU wanted a good
laugh, you should have tuned
in last week to Wendall
Jones’ conversation with for-
mer Turks & Caicos premier
Michael Misick.

Misick said he was being
punished for his success in
developing the TCI as the
Monte Carlo of the
Caribbean: "The British used
allegations of corruption to
stop our move towards inde-
pendence,” he asserted. "We
never violated the laws or
the constitution."

In a variation on this
theme, he also told The Lon-
don Times that the recent
suspension of the TCI con-
stitution "has less to do with
the corruption and more to
do with (British) policy, par-
ticularly in relation to tax
havens."

Talk about putting lipstick
on a pig!

The reality that the British
are still in control of TCI is
an historical oddity — noth-
ing more. In fact, they have
been trying to offload the
islands since the early days
of decolonisation, beginning
with the short-lived West
Indies Federation in the
1950s. But it is in no-one's
interest to create a failed
mini-state.

Although the TCI are part
of the Bahamian archipelago
and share a similar history,
responsibility for their
administration over the past
300 years has shifted from
Bermuda to the Bahamas to
Jamaica and back to the
Bahamas. They are now one
of 14 self-governing rem-
nants of the former British
Empire scattered around the
globe and known collective-
ly as the Overseas Territo-
ries.

Although salt-raking was
a big business in the early
days of colonisation, for most
of their history the TCI have
been dirt poor and sparsely
populated. In fact, for most
of the 20th century the
islands exported labour to
the Bahamas, much like
Haiti does today.

In 1958, Britain tried to
group as many of its
Caribbean possessions as
possible into a Federation
based in Trinidad that would
become independent as a sin-
gle unit. But it turned out to
be financially and politically
impractical, and the Federa-
tion was dissolved in 1962.
Jamaica and Trinidad gained

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eel ae cee

independence shortly after.

But the TCI did not want
to be part of an independent
Jamaica, so in 1964 the
British officially proposed a
merger with the Bahamas. A
TCI delegation met with a
United Bahamian Party gov-
ernment delegation at the
Carlton House downtown
that same year.

Sir Arthur Foulkes, then a
member of the opposition
Progressive Liberal Party,
recalls those meetings: "Most
of us in the PLP were sym-
pathetic to closer ties, but
after 1967 (when the PLP
came to power) there were
other things to do and I don't
recall any structured talks
about it."

At the time the TCI was
not as developed as it is now
and Turks Islanders came
freely to The Bahamas to
work, often considering
themselves Bahamians. One
of the issues in the 1964 talks
was the level of subsidy that
the British would provide for
the Bahamas to take on
responsibility for the 6,000
Turks Islanders.

Talks

Obviously, no agreement
came out of those explorato-
ry talks, but in the hope that
a union could eventually be
achieved, Britain made the
governor of the Bahamas the
governor of the Turks and
Caicos. But when we became
independent in 1973 there
seemed no further prospect
of a merger. The TCI asked
for an association with Cana-
da, but that was turned down
by the Canadian government
in 1974.

Two years later the TCI
received its own Westmin-
ster-style constitution with a
resident governor, and polit-
ical parties were formed. The
first elections were won by
the People’s Democratic
Movement, led by James
‘JAGS' McCartney who
pressed for full self-govern-
ment. In 1979, the British —
who were heavily subsidis-
ing the territory's annual
budget — set an 18-month
deadline for independence.

But this plan was derailed



when McCartney died in a
plane crash in 1980. The
commitment to indepen-
dence had been unpopular
with voters anyway and in
the subsequent election the
“conservative” Progressive
National Party led by Nor-
man Saunders came to pow-
er. According to historian
George Drower's book
about the Overseas Territo-
ries, Saunders “preferred to
shelve the idea of decolo-
nization and concentrate on
developing the economy."

And that is just what he
did — in his own special way
— turning the TCI into a
drug transshipment haven,
following the Bahamian
example. In 1985, Saunders
and his development minis-
ter Stafford Missick, who was
a former official of the
Bahamas Central Bank, were
arrested in Miami on drug
trafficking and bribery
charges. They were convicted
and imprisoned, and the
British suspended the con-
stitution and appointed a
commission of inquiry.

The 1986 Inquiry cited
evidence of persistent uncon-
stitutional behaviour, con-
traventions of fundamental
freedoms, political discrimi-
nation, and maladministra-
tion at every level of the TCI
government. A new consti-
tution was implemented in
1988 and tourism and off-
shore finance became the
twin pillars of the economy
— again, following the
Bahamian example. In fact,
during the years leading up
to the present global eco-
nomic crisis, the territory's
growth was among the high-
est in the world.

That was then, this is now.
The most recent inquiry has
identified "systemic corrup-
tion" in government, the leg-
islature and the civil service
— mainly the acceptance of
bribes from overseas devel-
opers and investors during
the economic bubble that
preceded the current reces-
sion.

The inquiry also pointed
to a serious deterioration in
the territory's systems of gov-
ernance as well as to financial
collapse, caused by the
"extravagant and ill-judged



FORMER Turks & Caicos
premier Michael Misick

commitments of those in
public office," and the
absence of effective checks
and balances.

Criminal investigations of
five cabinet ministers have
been launched — including
Missick — and a special judi-
cial process for prosecutions
has been recommended. The
inquiry report called for
direct rule from London
while constitutional and legal
reforms are enacted over the
next two years by a gover-
nor-in-council. Elections are
now set for July 2011.

Investigation

A veteran fraud investi-
gator has been brought in by
the governor to act as spe-
cial prosecutor, but Misick
and his fellow ministers have
yet to be charged. In fact, the
investigations could take
more than a year.

The inquiry report also
referred to widespread alle-
gations of vote buying and
rigging of constituency rolls
in a territory where suffrage
is limited to less than half of
the adult population —
about 7,000 people. Misick
himself was said to have
adopted a lifestyle and
spending habits that far
exceeded his income as pre-
mier, while his private busi-
ness interests expanded
exponentially.

"The PNP funded him to
the tune of $500,000 follow-
ing the 2003 election,” the
report said. "He was at lib-
erty to spend party funds at
will — with hundreds of
thousands going out to his
wife's US stylist and to pay
for household bric a brac.
This was supplemented by
personal donations to him
largely made through his

LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING

ih
(Gill UU

brother and including
$500,000 from a developer
who received belongership,
and lavish spending of gov-
ernment funds for worldwide
travel, a private jet and con-
tracts for his wife.

"The government provid-
ed him with two official resi-
dences and covered house-
hold expenses. He received a
number of land grants as well
as commissions and finders
fees from developers seek-
ing land. He also received
interests in several business-
es and millions in loans that
he did not have to repay. He
failed to disclose his interests
or to respond to the com-
mission's inquiries."

In short, the report said,
quoting the humorist P G
Wodehouse, Misick's behav-
iour as premier “would have
caused raised eyebrows in
the foc'sle of a pirate sloop."

Perhaps the most telling
recommendation of the
inquiry was to remove the
wide discretionary powers of
ministers in the disposal of
crown land, the award of
contracts, the approval of
developments, and immigra-
tion matters. The discre-
tionary powers of cabinet
ministers is an issue of great
concern in the Bahamas too.

It would be fair to say that
the 2009 TCI inquiry report
(you can read it here:
http://88.80.16.63/leak/
tci-inquiry-final-report-
unredacted-2009.pdf) is
equally, if not more damn-
ing than the 1967 inquiry into
government corruption from
casino gambling under the
UBP, or the 1984 inquiry
into official corruption from
drug smuggling under the
PLP

Back in the 1960s, the
TCI's impoverished inhabi-
tants would have added two
seats to our House of Assem-
bly as well as an unwanted,
but relatively modest, bur-
den on government finances.
But otherwise, we can sur-
mise that it would have pro-
ceeded fairly easily.

In the light of the inquiry
report, acting on Misick's
recent suggestion of a self-
governing federation with
the Bahamas today would
present enormous practical
difficulties and raise some
critical governance issues.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL SPORTS



www.tribume2

MARK KNOWLES (left) AND MAHESH BHUPATHI had to fight off their stiffest challenge so far at the US Open Grand Slam Tournament
by pulling off a 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (4) decision yesterday over the team of Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia and Michael Llodra of France.

Knowles, Bhupathi
advance to semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was probably the most
difficult match for Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi, but they survived a
gruelling three-setter to
advance to the semifinal of
the men’s doubles in Flush-
ing Meadows, New York.

The number three seeded
team had to fight off their
stiffest challenge so far at the
US Open Grand Slam Tour-
nament by pulling off a 6-4,
4-6, 7-6 (4) decision yester-
day over the team of Ivan
Ljubicic of Croatia and
Michael Llodra of France.

The third set tie-breaker
lasted 49 minutes whereas
they completed the first set
in just 32 minutes and need-
ed another 35 to play the sec-
ond.

“Tt was a tough match, but
we played very well. It was a
good match to win,” said
Knowles, who is still playing
with nine stitches in his right
ring finger from an accident
he suffered in the elevator
at the Tennis Center last
Tuesday.

After easily taking the first
set, Knowles said they really
got surprised when Ljubicic
and Llodra rallied back to
even the score in the second
set.

In the third, they battled
to a 4-4 tie before Knowles

Ry
a |



US OPEN

and Bhupathi were able to
open a slight 6-4 advantage
and they managed to go on
to secure the win.

“We felt comfortable
going in. We felt great about
our performance,” said
Knowles, who noted that
Llodra is a great doubles
player and Lyjubicic is a for-
mer number three singles
player in the world.

“They (Llodra and Ljubi-
cic) have a lot of fire power.
We thought we could win it
in two sets, but they raised
their level, which was a cred-
it to them. We didn’t have
too many opportunities in
the third set, so I had a feel-
ing that it would have gone
down to a tie breaker. We
were just fortunate to win at
the end.”

While he was glad that
they got the win, Knowles
admitted that they didn’t
anticipate having to play
right down the wire.

“We didn’t panic when we
were put in that situation,”
he said. “We were able to
get the W and move on.
We’re in the semifinal now
and we’re playing good ten-
nis. We will have to play
even better tennis to move
on. But we’re looking for-
ward to the challenge.”

They will play either the

be a ra a i,

No.2 team of Daniel Nestor
of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic from Serbia or the
No.5 team of Max Mirnyi
from Belarus and Andy Ram
of Israel.

No doubt the match-up
that everyone wants to see
is against Nestor and Zimon-
jic.

Nestor is a former partner
of Knowles. Together, the
duo won the US Open title
in 2004. They also won the
Australian Open in 2002 and
the French Open at Roland
Garros in 2007.

This year, they have split
their recent head-to-head
match-up with Knowles and
Bhupathi winning in the
semifinal in Montreal, Cana-
da, at the ATP World Tour
Masters before Nestor and
Zimonjic came right back to
return the favour at the ATP
World Tour Masters in
Cincinnati, Ohio.

“We know each other very
well. Obviously there is a lot
of history there,” Knowles
said. “But we are going to be
focused on winning, no mat-
ter who we get. We just want
to win to get to another
Grand Slam final.”

Knowles said he’s still
playing with the nine stitches
in his right hand, but he’s
recovering very well. He just
wants to block it out and try
to play as best as he can.

So far this year, Knowles
and Bhupathi have only won

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS







JUSTIN LUNN

Lunn bows
out of tourney
With hip injury

Duo are named for tennis camp in Cuba







JUSTIN Roberts (#1 COTECC)
and Erin Strachan have been named
for an International Tennis Federa-
tion 13 & Under Regional Training
Camp in Havana, Cuba.

The camp is part of the ITF Devel-
opment Programme, which is
financed by the ITF and Grand Slam
Development Fund.

The camp will be conducted by
Anthony Jeremiah (ITF Develop-
ment Officer for the Caribbean),
Juan Pino, Henry Wilfredo and
Belkis Rodriguez (Cuba).

The camp is set for September 11-
20 at the Hotel Occidental Miramar
in Havana, Cuba, and will focus on
the players’ fitness, tactical ability,
mental and physical ability to per-
form at a high level.

At the end of the camp the players
may have the opportunity to be
selected on to the ITF/COTECC
Touring Team to COSAT from the
middle of January 2010 to compete in
four weeks of competition from
Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and



Bolivia.

During the period 1986-2008,
more than US$67million has been
invested by the ITF and the Grand
Slam Nations in tennis development
activities in 150 countries worldwide.

Programme

In 2008, US$4.4million was spent
on the Development Programme
with US$2.7million being invested
by the ITF and the balance of
US$1.7million contributed by the
Grand Slam nations to the Grand
Slam Development Fund partly from
proceeds generated from the ATP
World Tour Finals.

This year’s ATP World Tour
Finals is scheduled to be held in Lon-
don, England, November 22-29, 2009.

With the aim of raising the level of
tennis worldwide and increasing the
number of countries competing in
mainstream international tennis, the
ITF Development Programme
includes a broad range of initiatives

in less developed countries ranging
from the grass roots to Grand Slams.

Activities include ITF/Grand Slam
touring teams, funding for junior and
professional tournaments, training
centres, coaches education, the sup-
ply of tennis equipment and the ITF
Junior Tennis Initiative —a 14 &
under player development pro-
gramme, which encompasses the
School Tennis Initiative and Perfor-
mance Tennis Initiative programmes.

Special emphasis has been placed
on junior tennis where regional tour-
nament circuits have been developed
and teams of young players compete
outside their own region.

In 2008, 25 regional circuits were
supported by the Development Pro-
gramme providing much needed
competition for the best players at
18, 16 and 14 & under age groups
across the globe (Central America
& Caribbean, South America, East-
ern Europe, Africa, Asia and Pacific
Oceania).

Players who perform well at these

regional circuits are invited to join
an international touring team.

The ITF/Grand Slam touring team
programme aims to facilitate the
transition of talented players through
regional and international competi-
tions and onto the professional ranks.

In 2008, there were 19 ITF/Grand
Slam Touring Teams involving 160
players from 68 different countries.

Former ITF/Grand Slam Touring
Team members include: Gustavo
Kuerten (Brazil), Nicolas Massu
(Chile), Nicolas Lapentti (Ecuador),
Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi
(India), Angelique Widjaja (Indone-
sia), Eleni Daniilidou (Greece),
Younes El Aynaoui (Morocco),
Paradorn Srichaphan (Thailand),
Cara Black (Zimbabwe), Jarkko
Nieminen (Finland), Florin Mergea
(Romania), Marcos Baghdatis
(Cyprus), Kateryna Bondarenko
(Ukraine), Viktoria Azarenka
(Belarus), Uladzimir Ignatik
(Belarus) and Ricardas Berankis
(Lithuania).

AFTER getting through
the first two rounds, Justin
Lunn had to bow out of the
third round of the Miramar
Summer Open Tennis
Tournament in Florida with
a hip injury.

Lunn defeated South
Korean player Shin
Yeoung Ahn in the first
round of the Miramar Sum-
mer Open Tennis Tourna-
ment in Florida with a 3-6,
7-6 (4), 7-5 victory.

In the second round,
Lunn defeated the No. 1
seed of the tournament
Viju George (USA) 6-3, 7-
6(3).

This was a great win for
Lunn as George has a
Florida Men's Open Singles
seeding ranking of number
five (5) and an ATP rank-
ing of 1554.

But in the third round,
Lunn was playing Jean
March Bazanne after trail-
ing 6-4, 2-0, he was forced
to retire with a hip injury.

Lunn now has his eyes set
on attaining ATP points
and becoming a member of
the 2010 Bahamas Davis
Cup Team.

Masters
track
meeting
tonight

THE Masters Track and
Field Association will hold
ameeting tonight at the
Ministry of Education’s
Conference Room at 7 pm
for all those persons who
are interested in being a
part of the association.

Those interested must be
35 years and older.

The interim committee Is
being headed by Foster
Dorsett.

‘Father of mixed martial
arts’ to headline Science
of Violence seminar

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tripunemedia.net

THE budding growth of the
Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) com-
munity will receive an additional
boost of exposure when "the father
of MMA in the Bahamas" head-
lines a top event.

Personal Protection Concepts is
scheduled to host a seminar enti-
tled the "Science of Violence" on
September 19 at the British Colo-
nial Hilton, featuring former pro-
fessional MMA fighter Scott Groff.

The four-hour event, which
begins at 10am, will feature tutori-
als on fighting strategies, various
techniques, and nuances of the
sport ranging from the most basic
principles to advanced.

Groff is credited with populariz-
ing the sport of MMA in the
Bahamas, training some of the
sport's first local participants as far
back as 1992.

He brings over 20 years of expe-
rience training others in the sport
and spent years on professional cir-
cuits in the United States and
Japan.

Oran Rolle, chief instructor at
Personal Protection Concepts, said
the event should serve as a means
to help those interested in the sport
with a headstart towards training.

"As of this moment we know we
have a lot of people eager to get
involved and we expect this event
to be a great one, not just for the
MMA community but for those on
the outside looking to get involved
for the first time," he said. "I think
we are capable of hosting a major
MMA event in the near future. We
have the grassroots support and
the interest is there so that is defi-

FORMER professional Mixed Martial Arts fighter Scott Groff...

nitely something that can be
looked into."

Rolle said the profile of the sport
continues to grow. “We have been
trying to have at least one event
per month to increase the expo-
sure of the sport. People know
much about martial arts but MMA
is something that has taken off and
exploded in popularity recently all
over the world," he said.

"MMA has just started to get
bigger here at home. We have the
talent and the training, with bet-
ter facilities we could see fighters
represent the Bahamas all over in
various promotions and represent-
ing the country."

Bahamians making major
impacts on the international MMA
scene include Yves Edwards, cred-
ited with inventing the "Thug-Jit-
su" fighting style and as a light-
weight fighter in organisations such
as the UFC, PRIDE, Bodog-
FIGHT, and EliteXC; and Inter-
net sensation turned MMA fighter,
Kevin "Kimbo Slice" Ferguson.

"Those guys have done so much
because local fighters were able to
see Bahamians reach the top level
in the sport so it lets them know
that opportunity is there if they
continue to pursue the sport in the
right way,” Rolle said.

“MMA is one of those disci-
plines for versatile athletes that
have been largely under exposed.
We have a great talent pool to
choose from here and when we
have martial artists that travel, tra-
ditionally they do very well so we
know the base is there for MMA
training. We are eager about the
turnout of the seminar and we
expect it to be a stepping stone to
greater MMA ventures in the
future."



Forbes back as GSSSA boss after more than decade

FROM page 11

persons attended the meeting.

“We're going to try to get back to
where we used to be, getting the
schedule on time and hopefully ini-
tiate some new sports for exhibi-
tion purposes so that we can even-
tually build them into the school
sports programme,” Forbes pro-
jected.

“But we have a lot of work ahead
of us. We had some not too cor-
dial relationships with some peo-
ple, namely the Principals Associa-
tion and the Ministry of Education
as well as Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture.”

One of the first orders of busi-
ness off the playing field, according
to Forbes, will be to bury the hatch-

et with the above mentioned enti-
ties and eventually get the associa-
tion back to where it should be.
“lm not happy to say that ’m
pleased with where we are right
now because I feel if we had the
same administration in place when
I served, we would have been much
further ahead,” Forbes said.

Bumps

“That being said, you have to
accept the bumps being in the road
and the hills and valleys to cross
over, but what pleased me most
was the show of confidence that
the people had in me especially.”

Conyers, a physical education
teacher at CH Reeves, said they
can only go forward, leaving all of

the problems they encountered in
the past behind them.

“He has some good ideas and I
think we all can work together as a
team, so we’re looking forward to
some great things happening for
them,” Conyers said.

Forbes, who is stationed at CI
Gibson, said after the service that
Conyers, Toote, Pratt-Miller and
Gibson rendered up to last year
when the association experienced
further turmoil in its leadership, he
was happy that they continued to
stay on.

The GSSSA will now prepare for
the start of its new season with the
commencement of volleyball on
Monday, September 28 and they
will also revert back to the origi-
nal constitution that they had in

place before some changes were
made to a new one that has not yet
been ratified.

Games

While the senior boys and girls
will play their games at the DW
Davis and CI Gibson Gymnasiums,
the junior boys and girls will play at
the RM Bailey and Tom ‘The Bird’
Grant volleyball outdoor courts.

“We had some discussion about
whether we would change volley-
ball to softball because all of the
associations are now playing soft-
ball, even the parent associations
are playing softball right now,”
Forbes said.

“But because we ended it with
softball last year, some people start-

ed practicing volleyball before the
school year was completed, so we
thought we will continue with that
this year and hopefully the next
year we will make the switch with
softball at the start.”

Bill Morgan is expected to once
again serve as the chairman of the
scheduling committee for all sports.

Going into the new season, there
have been some notable changes
in the Physical Education Depart-
ment.

Pratt-Miller has been moved
from AF Adderley Junior High to
RM Bailey, Chevy Simmons has
gone from SC McPherson Junior
High to RM Bailey and Torsheka
Cox is now at Government High
Secondary after working at the new
Anatol Rodgers High School.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

3 |

WEDNESDAY,



_
i

PAGE 11

Or





ts

SEPTEMBER 9,




2009

PAGE 10 @ ‘Father of mixed martial arts...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

overnment
has decided
to recognise
veteran tour-
ing tennis
pro Mark Knowles during a
dinner celebration at Gov-
ernment House on Sunday.
He will be honoured for
teaming up with his German
partner Anna-Lena Groene-
fled in July to win the mixed
doubles Grand Slam title at
Wimbledon, England.

“Again because of what’s
happening in the economy,
we won't do anything big,”
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister told The Tribune yes-
terday. He said Knowles will
be presented with a plaque.

As for Knowles’ achieve-
ment, Bannister said he’s
delighted to be sitting in the
chair as the minister of sports
when there are performances
turned in at that level in the
sport.

The Grand Slams are the
four most prestigious tour-
naments in the world, com-
prising of the Australian
Open, Roland Garros (the
French Open), Wimbledon
and the US Open. They are
distinguished by the fact that

MARK KNOWLES

they draw the top players in
the world and are held over a
two week period.

And with the IAAF’s 12th
World Championships in
Athletics over and the track
and field season winding
down, there has been a lot
of questions surrounding a

celebration for Team
Bahamas.
Bannister says the

Bahamas Government has
some tentative plans to hon-
our the 24-member team that
won two medals last month
in Berlin, Germany.

But he noted that the exact
plans could not be released
until they have been
approved. However, he did
indicate that there will be
some type of celebration in
October.

“Because of the state of
the economy, we won’t do

Forbes back
as GSSSA boss
after more than
one decade

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER more than a
decade away from office,
Alfred Forbes is back at the
helm as the president of the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association
(GSSSA).

During the election of offi-
cers on Monday at R M Bai-
ley Secondary High School,
Forbes reassumed the top
post of the association.

“Tm excited really because
of the way things have been
going for the last 3-4 years,”
said Forbes in his initial com-
ments as he makes his return
to office after he served as
president from 1993-2003.

“It’s been in a downward
spiral I think, but now that
we have some new blood, I
think we’re going to see a
resurgence of the GSSSA as
it used to be and hopefully
we will even take it to anoth-
er level.”

Dubbing his new two-year
term in office as “The Next
Level,” Forbes will have
some familiar faces who
were involved over the last
few years to work with him
on his staff.

Lenora Conyers will be the
first vice president, Kevin
‘KJ? Johnson second vice
president, Keisha Pratt-
Miller secretary, Melonie
Gibson assistant secretary,
Marilyn Toote treasurer and
Floyd Armbrister, assistant
treasurer.

All of the officers were
voted in unopposed by the
15 schools registered in the
association. More than 50

SEE page 10



ALFRED FORBES



“T’m excited really
because of the way
things have been
going for the last
3-4 years...It’s been
in a downward
spiral I think, but
now that we have
some new blood, I
think we’re going to
see a resurgence of
the GSSSA as it used
to be and hopefully
we will even take it
to another level.”

—A Forbes



anything like we’ve done in
the past,” was all that Ban-
nister was willing to disclose
at the time.

Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie won an individual bronze
medal in the women’s 200
metres and she anchored the
women’s 4 x 100 relay team
of Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson
(pop-off), Chandra Sturrup
(second) and Christine
Amertil (third) to a silver
medal.

Bannister said Knowles,
who has also won the Aus-
tralian Open, Roland Gar-
ros and French Open with
former men’s doubles part-
ner Daniel Nestor of Cana-
da, has achieved his success
with a lot of perseverance.

“T want to commend








Knowles,
Bhupathi
advance

to semis...
See page 9

Sports minister says government
has tentative plans to honour the
Bahamas’ 24-member team that
won silver and bronze medals

at the World Championships

Mark, but I can’t do it with-
out commending his moth-
er, Vickie, who has been
there with him through all of
his ups and downs,” Bannis-
ter stressed.

Despite having to get nine
stitches to repair a cut on his
right ring finger from the
door of the elevator at the
Tennis Center in Flushing
Meadows, Knowles and
Groenefeld were denied a
chance to add the US mixed
title to their ledger.

But Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi of India are now
in the semifinal of the men’s
doubles (See full story on
page 9). They are hoping to
win their first Grand Slam
title for the year after coming
so close when they were run-

# The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

Madeira St., Palmdale
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: 242-322-677-1441

ners-up to American identi-
cal twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan in the final of
the Australian Open in Jan-
uary.

When contacted after their
gruelling quarter-final win
over Ivan Ljubicic and
Michael Llodra, Knowles
said he’s thrilled that he’s
going to be recognised.

“T tried to represent my
country, the Bahamas, to the
best of my ability for the past
25 years, the last 20 years on
the circuit,” he said. “I’m
now carrying the flag alone,
so I enjoy representing the
Bahamas.

“Tm very pleased that they
are honouring me and I
would like nothing more
than to share my Wimble-

The power you’ve

always trusted.
Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.



don title and my other
achievements with the
Bahamian people because
they have been so supportive
throughout my career.”
Not having the kind of
support that many of the oth-
er athletes do with their local
entourages cheering them on
during their matches on the
circuit, Knowles said it’s
good to be able to come
home for such an honour.
He said he would have
liked for Bhupathi to join
him, but he has Davis Cup
duties for India in South
Africa. So Knowles will be
sharing the moment with his
family, including his wife,
Dawn, and their two sons,
Graham and Brody.

Ped

OM Waa hg

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

since opening

ON SEPTEMBER 4 Ross
University Bahamas on
Grand Bahama commenced
its third semester since offi-
cially opening in January
2009.

New students were greet-
ed with a breakfast and a full
day of on-site orientation,
where they learned about all
aspects of their academic and
island life including the Ross
hurricane preparedness plan.

Faculty and administration
were introduced to the stu-
dents. Members of the Grand
Bahama Health Services and
doctors from the Rand Hos-
pital who are participating in
the clinical education pro-
gramme with Ross were also
introduced.

Students

Faculty and administration
were introduced to the stu-
dents. Members of the Grand
Bahama Health Services and
doctors from the Rand Hos-
pital who are participating in
the Clinical Education Pro-
gram with Ross were also
introduced.

Dr Frank Bartlett, chief
medical officer at the Rand
Memorial Hospital, was on
hand to speak directly to the
students and introduce his



BOB MEDL we ‘Your Preserip fia

team which will work direct-
ly with the students as part
of their clinical education
partnership. Those doctors
are Dr Elaine Lundy; Dr
Lucio Pedro; Dr Frementus
Leon; Dr Cynthis Ng; Dr
Augustine Ohueyi; Dr Ger-
hard Klassen and Dr Bartlett
himself.

The students welcome the
opportunity to improve their
skills in history taking and
physical examination. They
will be afforded first-hand
experience during supervised
clinical rotations at either the
Rand Hospital or the Eight
Mile Rock Clinic.

Ross University operates
three semesters a year which
begin in January, May and
September, respectively.

In between semesters the
students have a short 10-day
to two-week break, and often
this time is spent moving to
their next Ross University
academic location which
could be either in Dominica,
West Indies; Miami, Florida;
Freeport, Bahamas; or
Saganaw, Michigan.

"We have a very success-
ful programme and we want
to continue to build on that.
We are pleased to welcome
two new faculty this semes-
ter," said Dr Michael Robin-
son, assistant dean of curric-

A
ad
c ey

ular and faculty affairs at
Ross University Bahamas.

Dr Anthony Munroe, exec-
utive administrator to Ross
University Bahamas said:
"We are extremely excited
about the future of Ross here
in Grand Bahama.

Experience

“Our medical students are
receiving an outstanding edu-
cational experience through
our Ross University Schoo
of Medicine faculty and it is
enhanced through our part-
nership with the Grand
Bahama Health Services,
where our students get
exceptional preceptorship by
the Rand Hospital and Eight
Mile Rock Clinic medical
staff, which allows our stu-
dents the opportunity to help
the wonderful people of
Grand Bahama."

Sharon Williams, adminis-
trator of Grand Bahama
Health Services, was also in
attendance at the morning
session and said, "We are
very pleased to be a part of
the Ross University partner-
ship to educate their stu-
dents, and we welcome them
to our community and wish
them a successful initiative
for the year."

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Robbin Whachell

FROM LEFT: Dr Augustine Ohueyi, Rand Hospital; Dr Anthony Munroe, Ross Bahamas executive administrator;
Dr Michael Robinson, Ross Bahamas assistant dean, curricular and faculty affairs; Dr Elaine Lundy, Rand Hos-
pital; Sharon Williams, administrator, Grand Bahama Health Services; Dr Frank Bartlett, chief medical officer, Rand
Memorial Hospital; Dr Lucio Pedro, Rand Hospital; Nicholle Bethel, Rand Hospital; Dr Frumentus Leon, Rand Hos-
pital, and Dr Gerhard Klassen, Rand Hospital. Also present but not in the photo was Dr Cynthis Ng.



ROSS UNIVERSITY BAHAMAS students during new semester orientation day on September 4 at their
Bahamas educational site in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

WemCo gives back

to the community

THE security company WemCo gave back to the communi-
ty this past weekend, supplying some 500 children with a back-
to-school treats.

Henry Wemyss, president of WemCo Security and Collec-
tions, handed out school supplies for the children of his staff and
the surrounding community.

“Our staff here at WemCo are very important to us,” said
Acribba Wemyss, the company’s vice-president.

“Our president thought it only befitting that we show our
appreciation in these economically challenging times by assist-
ing with these school supplies. Even though it’s a little late, and
most children are officially back to school, Mr Wemyss was
determined that they children would not return to school with-
out receiving something from WemCo.

“At first we set out only to give the supplies to the children
of our staff, but we could not leave out the neighbourhood chil-
dren. We hope to make it even bigger and better next year,” she
said.

Some 500 children received exercise books, folders, pencil-
cases filled with supplies, crayons, colouring books, gel grips for
pens/pencils and filing paper. Not only younger children come
out to take advantage of this kind gesture, but also teenagers in
high school.

Grateful for the gifts, eight-year-old Jermaine Williams of
Centreville Primary said: “I am a grade four student in my
school and I live in Mason’s Addition. I am very happy that I
got the school supplies. I was just passing and I saw them giv-
ing out stuff. The supplies will be helpful to me in my school
work.”

The children were also treated to chilli-cheese hot dogs, a
variety of chips and juices.

“Realising how the economy is at this time, we decided to do
this outreach to the community via school supplies,” said
Monique Glinton, WemCo human resources manager. “We
have had other back-to-school giveaways in the past but this is
the first one that we actually held on our grounds.”

Children of all ages attended the event until late in the day,
receiving the treats and enjoying the company and well wishes
of staff members who were distributing them.



VICE PRESIDENT Acribba Wemyss gives supplies to the littlest recipient







New car sales
up 16% over
first quarter

* But some auto dealers
facing ‘inevitable reality’
of lay-offs, and ‘reviewing
this internally’

* 2009 second quarter over
first quarter rise cannot
disguise impact of 42%
year-over-year
drop in first half

* Consumers likely to
see 5-10% increase in
new car prices for
2010 season

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN auto dealer-
ships yesterday expressed cau-
tious optimism that the worst
of the recession may be over as
new car sales rose 15.81 per
cent quarter-over-quarter for
the three months to June 30,
2009, yet they warned that
some firms were facing the
“ievitable reality” of having
to lay-off staff.

While Bahamas Motor Deal-
ers Association (BMDA) mem-
bers pointed to the 15.81 per
cent increase in new car sales in
the 2009 second quarter, when
compared to the first quarter
numbers, as a sign of modest
encouragement, there was no
disguising the sharp year-over-
year fall-off during the 2009
first half.

BMDA members confirmed
to Tribune Business that year-
over-year new car sales were
down 41.71 per cent for the six
months to June 30, 2009, due
to a slump in consumer demand
induced by the recession, ris-
ing unemployment and reduced
incomes. Reduced credit
demand and stricter borrowing
requirements imposed by
Bahamian commercial banks
are a further factor.

Rick Lowe, a director and
operations manager at Nassau
Motor Company (NMC), a
BMDA member, told Tribune
Business that the possibility of
lay-offs in the auto dealership
sector - adding further to ris-
ing unemployment levels - was
“certainly a reality”.

“We’re all looking at that
possibility,” he confirmed.
“We’re concerned and, obvi-
ously, we all have to do what’s
in the best interest of keeping
our separate companies going.

“We're not seeing the sales
levels we all need. We’re get-
ting fewer people through the
process, because people have
been laid-off. Customer traffic
is not at the levels we'd like to
see,” Mr Lowe added.

“It’s a drastic decline. It’s
tough. We find ourselves really
hurting. This is the time we
need to shore up. In our indus-
try, particularly on the service
side, if we do not get cars fixed
first time, you have frustrated
people, so we’ve got to put our
best foot forward as far as cus-
tomer service is concerned.”

Bahamian auto dealers are
thus having to confront the
same reality being faced by
most sectors of this nation’s
economy, namely that with
reduced top line/sales revenue
growth, most businesses are

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE ©

u



WEDNESDAY,

Me



SEPTEMBER 9,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

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Bahamians to get ‘majority’
of $200m Baha Mar phase

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian contractors will

gain “the overall majority, if

not 100 per cent” of con-

tracts for the $150-$200 mil-
lion first phase Cable Beach redevelop-
ment if the Baha Mar project goes
ahead, two senior executives with the
developer confirmed yesterday, as it
sticks to its 2009 year-end target of con-
cluding negotiations with two Chinese
state-owned entities.

Both Don Robinson, president of
Baha Mar Resorts, and Robert Sands,
the company’s senior vice-president of
external and governmental affairs, con-
firmed to Tribune Business that the
developer would “try to do everything to
ensure” maximum possible participa-
tion by Bahamian construction compa-
nies and workers, even though its equi-
ty partner is likely to be a Chinese con-
struction firm.

“There’s going to be plenty of oppor-
tunities for Bahamian contractors. It’s a
huge project, so everyone will have a
chance to participate,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business.

He pointed out that the first phase of
the planned $2.6 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment, which would involve the
West Bay Street re-routing and con-
struction of the Commercial Village to
house the relocated banks, government



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DON ROBINSON, president of Baha Mar Resorts...

offices, Straw Market and police/fire sta-
tion currently on the Cable Beach strip,
would involve the issuance of smaller
contracts and tenders that are ideally
suited to Bahamian participation.

“I think the number we have been
working with is $150-$200 million worth
of work in the first phase,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business. “The re-routing
of West Bay Street, the development of

Small hotels slash rates up to 40%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

SMALL Family Island hotels are
making adjustments to room rates and
dreaming up special package deals as
they try to adjust to the traditionally
slow month of September, which has
been exacerbated by the recession, the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president said yesterday.

Robert Sands said many hotels were
attempting to adjust to market pressures
that are pushing small properties to offer
more value.

“In this unfortunately slow period
they are trying to get some traction in
order to attract business,” said Mr Sands.
“Under normal circumstances, Septem-
ber is a difficult month.”

He said small Bahamian hotels were
doing whatever they can to increase their

Hotel
consultancy
in Bahamas

move

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

A GLOBAL hotel/leisure
services and consulting organi-
sation yesterday announced the
opening of its first Caribbean
regional office in the Bahamas.

Parris Jordan, managing
director of HVS’s Caribbean
operations, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the company was not
new to the Bahamas, but had
decided to open an office in this
nation to service the region.

“This office will specialise in
valuation and consulting work
in the Caribbean, Central
America and the United
States,” said a company press
release.

According to Mr Jordan, his
company has done studies for
the Bahamas government,
Baha Mar and Atlantis. HVS
boasts 25 offices globally,
staffed by more than 400 “‘sea-
soned industry professionals”.

Mr Jordan himself has
worked on numerous mid- and
large-scale mixed-use develop-
ments, valuations, feasibility
studies, and operator searches,
and has provided strategic
advice, return on investment
and market studies in the Unit-
ed States, Mexico, and the
Caribbean.

”A native of Trinidad, Jor-
dan brings the right combina-
tion of consulting experience
and cultural knowledge of the
region to better understand the
market and sub-markets on the
various islands, and the nuances

SEE page 3B

occupancy levels in light of severe eco-
nomic conditions and reductions in air-
lift.

The Government has been working
at attracting more airlift to the Bahamas
this year, and has secured several high
profile airlines scheduled to begin direct
airlift near year-end.

One of the most popular discount air-
lines in the US, AirTran, has moved to
initiate almost daily direct flights to this
country from hubs in Atlanta and Orlan-
do.

Mr Sands said the BHA has also lis-
tened to the concerns of small Family
Island hotels, who are affected by small-
er visitor numbers much more than New
Providence.

He said those hotels have been very
creative in the way they are attracting
business during this difficult economic

SEE page 5B

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the Commercial Village, the police sta-
tion, banks and Straw Market - all of
that has to be replaced. This is intended
to jump start construction activity with
Bahamian contractors, and we would
quickly start once the project gets
going.”

And Mr Sands added: “What we have
said is that Phase One of the project,
the road re-routing, the building of the

Commercial Village, the securing of the
site, if not close to 100 per cent, the
overall majority of it will go to Bahami-
an contractors.”

This corresponded with the position as
understood by Bahamian contractors.
Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahamian Con-
tractors Association’s (BCA) president,
said yesterday that the organisation
understood that the plan was for China
State Construction Engineering Com-
pany (CSC) to build the core project,
featuring the casino and major hotels,
with much of the work outside the main
Baha Mar campus going to Bahamian
firms.

Adding that the BCA hoped to meet
with Baha Mar on the issue “sooner
rather than later”, Mr Wrinkle said the
organisation was unlikely to protest too
loudly if CSC brought the majority of
workers and construction materials with
it from China, since the Cable Beach
redevelopment was “‘very important to
the country” and could potentially play
a major part in turning the economy
around.

“T would anticipate good participa-
tion, and that every individual Bahami-
an contractor will be involved in the
project,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “They can’t bring everyone over
from China.

“When a project like Baha Mar

SEE page 5B

Bahamas must tackle the
economy’s ‘sacred cows’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas may have to confront
“sacred cows” such as the automatic 15
per cent gratuity and strong trade unions
in making much-needed structural
reforms to its economy, a former Central
Bank governor said yesterday, arguing
that operating costs were simply too
high for most businesses.

T. B. Donaldson, who is also Com-
monwealth Bank’s chairman, told Tri-
bune Business that the reduction in cred-
it demand and consumer spending was a
‘double-edged sword’ for the Bahamian
economy. He explained that while it aid-
ed families in staying afloat, it prevent-
ed an increase in consumption that could
pull the economy out of recession.

“From my point of view, we need to
look at structural changes,” Mr Don-
aldson said. “The cost of operating a
business is too high. We don’t confront
the sacred cows of the unions and the 15
per cent gratuity. The overhead costs
are enormous. We really have to look at
what sort of economy we want to run.”

While he did not have “‘a magic bul-
let” that would solve all the Bahamian
economy’s ills, Mr Donaldson added
that the reduction in consumer spending
was actually preventing the economy
from pulling itself out of recession.

“It’s one thing to tell people to go
and save money, and they follow you
and your admonition, and then you say
you've got to spend to get out of a reces-

SEE page 2B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas must tackle the
economy’s ‘sacred cows’

FROM page 1B

sion,” the former Central Bank governor
added.

“They see jobs being lost, and don’t
know when they’re going to lose theirs,
so they are saving. The rate of savings
has gone up for possibly the first time,

NOTICE

because people are not as reckless as
they used to be.

“And that’s the problem. We’re a con-
sumer driven economy. In an economy
that consumes, not produces, that’s ter-
rible. And there’s such a correlation
between the rate at which we consume
and the rate at which the Government
collects its taxes, that it has such an
extremely adverse and wide impact.”

Mr Donaldson confirmed that Com-
monwealth Bank was “seeing a lot” of
loan consolidations, which had grown
by almost $38 million across the Bahami-
an commercial banking system during
the 2009 first half, as persons amortised
existing debt to enable them to afford
repayments and enhance cash flow.

“That is part of what we did with the
hotel workers, consolidate their auto

debt, mortgages and whatever other
debts they had,” he added.

“The chickens have come home to
roost. The world has been living above
its means for a number of years, and
the good old days are not coming back
any time soon.

“We're in for a long, rough ride, and
have to buckle our seat belts and hope
we end up right side up.”

IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
Franklin Eugene Knowles

(8.9, 11, 14)

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COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS $= 2007

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/581

Common Law & Equity Side

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an estimated
22,385 square feet and situate in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence and bounded on the North by the Sea on the
NORTHEAST by land now or formerly the property of Dr Herbert
Olander on the SOUTHEAST by West Bay Street and on the
SOUTHWEST partly by land the property of Little Jerusalem
Church and by land now or formerly the property of Barbara
Smith.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND

N THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JENNIFER VESTRA HUYLER FORBES

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of JENNIFER VESTRA HUYLER FORBES of
the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an estimated 22,385
square feet and situate in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence and bounded on the North by the Sea on the
NORTHEAST by land now or formerly the property of Dr Herbert
Olander on the SOUTHEAST by West Bay Street and on the
SOUTHWEST partly by land the property of Little Jerusalem
Church and by land now or formerly the Property of Barbara
Smith, WHICH SAID PIECE PARCEL OR LOT OF LAND
IS PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY THE PLAN FILED
IN THIS ACTION AND THEREON COLOURED Pink.

The Petitioner, Jennifer Vestra Huyler Forbes, claims to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above action to have her title
to the said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N-P., and
at the Chambers of Donna Dorsett Major & Co., Columbus House,
East and Shirley Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or right to dower or any adverse claim not recognized in the
Petition shall before the 17th day of December A.D., 2009 file in
the said Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the above Donna Dorsett Major & Co. a statement of such
claim. Failure of any such to file and serve a statement of such
claim by the above time will operate as a bar to such claim

DATED this 3rd day of September A.D., 2009

DORSETT MAJOR & CO.
Attorneys for the Petitioner



FROM page 1B

being forced to do ‘more with
less’.

With new car sales, the
largest and most critical rev-
enue driver for new car deal-
erships, down by almost 42 per
cent, companies have little
choice but to realign staffing
levels and other operating costs
to remain profitable. “Concerns
exist that some layoffs might
be inevitable, but member firms
are reviewing this internally.
We are all hopeful of main-
taining employee levels where
ever possible,” the BMDA said
in a statement.

Mr Lowe yesterday told Tri-
bune Business that a further

factor set to impact Bahamian
new car dealerships was a like-
ly increase in vehicle prices for
2010, with BMDA members
now starting to place orders for
the new model year as they run
low on inventory.

“A couple of us have been
told 5-10 per cent” by factories
and suppliers, Mr Lowe said of
the likely consumer price
increases. “So by the time you
extrapolate that, it could be a
significant chunk for an expen-
sive car. If people are able to do
anything now, it’s probably in
their best interests to buy now.”

The drastic drop in new car
sales has not only impacted the
dealerships and their employ-
ees, with government revenue
from import/stamp duties on

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REGINALD SALOMON of #15A
TASMAN CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXENE BAZILE of OKRA
HILL,off SHIRLEY ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2nd September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TRAFFIC DELAYS POSSIBLE

SHIRLEY STREET
VILLAGE ROAD TO
FREDRICK STREET

DUE TO

WATER & SEWER
REPLACEMENT WORKS
31st August to 1st December 2009

In an effort to upgrade existing
Water & Sewer Services the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
have contracted Bahamas Hot Mix
Company Ltd to replace existing
service connections at the above
location. As a consequent traffic

vehicle imports having plunged
“big time”.

“Most of us have started to
order a few 2010 models, so the
Government should see rev-
enue in the next couple of
months, but nothing will come
in the near term,” Mr Lowe
said. “Our order cycles are
three to four months depending
on where the car is coming
from - Japan, Korea, Brazil, or
90 days for North America.”

While Bahamian auto deal-
ers were slightly more opti-
mistic given the benefit of hind-
sight provided by the 2009 sec-
ond quarter results, and the
quarter-over-quarter compari-
son, Mr Lowe indicated the
industry was uncertain about
the recovery’s strength. This

Nae emerL tg



TB DONALDSON

New car sales up 16% over 01

was especially since August and
September were traditionally
the softest part of the year for
new car sales.

One anomaly noticed by
BMDA members had been the
growth in passenger and sports
utility vehicle (SUV) sales com-
pared to the first quarter.
“None of us can get a handle on
it. You’d think people would
be moving from SUVs to small-
er passenger cars. It stood out
like a sore thumb,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business.

“You'd have thought they
would move to something more
fuel efficient. We generally find
in our trends that we’re five
years behind North America.
It seemed like a big jump in
SUVs.”

PM etc TUL MATEO aah Tar

NOTICE

MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Credo having debls

Company are required to

september, A.0., 2008 .

or clims against the above-named
Send = pawtculars thereof to the
undersigned al PO, Box N64 on
In detault thereof they will be excluded

of belore the 30h cay of

{rom thee bereft of any destibulion made by the Liquidator,

Dated the Sth day of September, 4.0., 2009

Matt Raban
Liquidator

NOTICE

management involving road
closures and temporary traffic
diversions may be in operation

during the following times:

Daily between 7:00 pm
to 6:00 am

Local diversions will be sign
posted in due course and further
information will be provided
through the local media.

MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

In accordance with Section 228 of The Companies Act.
NOTICE is hereby given that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of tha Company held on the 25th August, 4.D..
2009 the following Resolutions were passed:

1. That MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED be
wound wp volurtarily.

2. That Matt Raban be appointed the Liquidator for the

purpose of such winding up
Dated the 8th dayof September, A.D... 2009

Matt Raban
Liquidator



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B



Sector policy
footprint has
chilly climate

By AUDREY INGRAM
ROBERTS

Executive Director
Source Development
Consultants

& Enigin Partner

THE draft Telecommunica-
tions Sector policy dated
August 5, 2009, which was pub-
lished by the Bahamian gov-
ernment a week later, articu-
lates a set of objectives and
vision statement completely
devoid of any reference to Cli-
mate Change.

Despite admission of defi-
ciencies and claims of wide-
ranging reform in the introduc-
tion to the draft, basically it’s a
“business as usual” document
that adds little or no value to
our capacity to meet key chal-
lenges, especially those that will
be the most crucial of this cen-
tury.

On a global scale, the infor-
mation and communications
technology (ICT) sector, which
includes the electronics com-
munications segment, plays a
key role in addressing climate
change and facilitating efficient
and low carbon development.
Not only does it facilitate other
sectors, but its role in emission
reduction and energy savings
in the industry itself is signifi-
cant. Therefore, it behooves
countries such as the Bahamas,
who have signed the Kyoto
Protocol, to articulate the sec-
tor’s creative responsibilities in
this respect.

The birth of the digital age
came with the invention of the
transistor in the 1950s. Through
this means personal computing
was introduced on the one
hand, and high capacity, fixed
and mobile telecommunications
on the other. Both technolo-
gies come together in the ubiq-
uitous Internet.

As the use of digital tech-
nologies grows, so does the car-

bon footprint of the sector. It is
appropriate for a policy paper
on the sector to articulate how
it will meet its footprint reduc-
tion challenge, especially in an
archipelago where electronic
communications are essential
for development and where
there is so much reliance on
foreign direct investment. A
reliance which should mean
that governance standards set
by the policymakers truly
strengthen conservation capac-
ity, even as they meet investors’
expectations.

Policy

If, as it seems, there is no pol-
icy objective that addresses the
need to identify the carbon
footprint of an individual piece
of electronic communications
hardware, such as a mobile
phone, which is relatively easy
to do, is it likely, then, to expect
that carbon footprints from
more complex and converged
network services such as broad-
band Internet will be identi-
fied? I think not!

Electronic communications
networks link the Bahamas into
a global system, so one might
expect a visionary outlook on
the sector’s role with respect to
an issue as pressing and rele-
vant to all as climate change.

What might an enabling role
in climate change adaptation
and mitigation in the Bahamas
mean for the electronic com-
munications sector? It could
mean three things at least:

* Measuring the direct car-
bon footprint of the sector

* Enabling quantifiable emis-
sions reductions through ICT
applications in other sectors of
the economy

* Tdentifying new market
opportunities for the sector and
other sectors involved with real-
ising these reductions

This sector is unique is in its
ability to make energy con-
sumption and carbon emissions
visible through its products and
services. Yet no link between
the sector’s stated objectives is
made to those of other utility
suppliers, such as BEC or the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion in this regard.

Because electronic commu-
nications products and services
can enable the monitoring and
mapping of energy, it is possible
to know where inefficiencies
occur throughout the processes
and workflows of various sec-
tors in the economy. This
means that infrastructure can
be radically transformed.

Points 13-17 of the draft sec-
tor policy deal with liberalisa-
tion (a subhead of the vision) as
an entirely market-driven con-
cept, when perhaps the most
important point about the elec-
tronic communications indus-
try is the benefits from the
adoption of ICT technologies
to influence and transform the
way our society works, and the
way people behave.

Hardly anything is said about
the transformative aspects of
the sector. Point 63 of subhead
Consumer Protection deals
obliquely with this in one sen-
tence only. It states that
URCA, the industry regulator,
will actively promote public
awareness campaigns to inform
customers of their rights and
obligations.

Nowhere is it stated that the
opportunities for transforma-
tion and promotion of sustain-
able development for all (peo-
ple and environment) through-
out the archipelago is enhanced
by electronic communications.
Or that the sector’s products
and services are crucial com-
ponents of the Bahamas’ tran-
sition to a low carbon econo-
my.

Hotel consultancy in Bahamas move

FROM page 1B

in the way business is conduct-
ed locally,” the company's
release continued.

HVS will formally introduce
itself to the Bahamas at its

grand opening reception tomor-
row at the British Colonial
Hilton, where founder and
chief executive of the company,
Steve Rushmore, is expected
to unveil its new operation.
“The economies of
Caribbean nations are highly

NOTICE

FREEPORT TRADING CO. LIMITED
{In Voluntary Liquidation)

In &cordanmce wilh

Acl, NOTICE

A.B.. 2008

1. That FREEPORT TRACING C

voluntarily

Seclon
is hereby given
General Meeting of the Company held
the following Resolutions were passed

#26 oof The Gonmpanes
inal el an Extraordinary
an the 251A August

O. LIMITED be wound up

?, That fat Raban be appointed the Liquidator for the

dependent on the hotel indus-
try,” said Mr Rushmore.

Hotel

“The hotel and greater ser-
vice industry will continue to
play a vital role for individual
islands and the region as a
whole. The time is right for
HVS to establish a physical
presence in the region, as sup-
ported by recent hotel devel-
opment activity and the need
of existing hotel owners and
operators to assess current and
future needs.”

HVS is expect to move its
Caribbean office to a location
within the Caves Village com-
plex.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.

Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million
Web Listing # 8377

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

As

Mario Carey Realty

info@mariocareyrealty.com

www.marioca reyrea

com

Pts adaut yaw... Let's talk.

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

Bank of The Bahamas wishes to
advise our valued customers that our
Card Centre numbers have changed
for all Prepaid, Credit and Medline
Card holders.

Please note that the new numbers

are.

Local: 242-396-6010
International: 1-877-204-5110 toll Free
Family Island: 1-242-300-0111 tol Free

www.BankBahamas.com

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,510.69] CHG -16.82] %CHG -1.10 | YTD -201.67 | YTD % -11.78

=



FG CAPITAL

Ss
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERY1LCES

CI2c7eLcoa NT AL

a of Such wiring up FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.00 0.127
0.00 0.992
0.00 0.244
0.00 -0.877
0.00 0.078
0.00 0.055
-0.50 1.406
0.00 0.249
-0.23 0.419
-0.01 0.111
0.00 0.382
0.00 0.420
0.00 0.322
0.00 0.794

0.332

0.000

0.035

0.407

0.952

0.180
ases)

Interest

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (8)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.09 10.09 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 10
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid S$ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4005 3.48 5.15
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4867 3.70 5.40
3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
13.0484 3.41 5.84
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0663 2.59 6.63
1.0215 -1.11 2.15
1.0611 2.29 6.11
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Previous Close Today's Close
1.15 1.15
11.00 11.00
6.25 6.25
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.00 10.50
2.74 2.74
5.49 5.26
3.69 3.68
2.03 2.03
6.60 6.60
9.30 9.30
10.30 10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50

AD

Dated ihe &th day of September 200,

Matt Raban
Liquidator

5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

NOTICE

FREEPORT TRADING CO. LIMITED

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

; 29 May 2015
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M
256.6
Creditor having debls or cans against thé above-named
Company ara required to send particulars thereof to the
UES igre al P.O, Box N-G24 on e betore the 30th Gay tf
September, A.D, n default thereof they will be excuded
from fee benefit of any Gestnbulion made by the Liguidabar

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
28-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

1.3320
2.8952
1.4105
3.1031
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

7009 .

ows

Dated the 8th day of September, A.0., 2000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Matt Raban
Liquidator

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





SS Se a

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00510

Whereas VIRGINIA CAPRON BAIN of Sunshine Park, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of Administration of the Real
and Personal Estate of MERTHEREEN DEAN a.k.a. MERTHEREEN F.
DEAN a.k.a. MERTHEREEN DEAN-PICKSTOCK late of Sunshine Park,
Southern District, New Providence, The Bahamas, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00511

Whereas SHANNELLE SMITH of the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for GERALDINE M. HALL has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of JOHN LEROY HALL late of 311 Beacon Point Lane, Grover,
St Louis,Missouri, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00512

Whereas SIR WILLIAM CLIFFORD ALLEN of Olde Fort Bay, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of DAVID LAFLEUR late
of Saint Anne’s, Fox Hill, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00515

Whereas JUANITA BEATRICE KNOWLES of the City of Freeport of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by
Deed of Power of Attorney for CHRISTOPHER TIMOTHY KNOWLES
AND AMANDA CHRISTINA KNOWLES, the lawful children has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of RAYMOND RONALD KNOWLES a.k.a.
RAYMOND “PANCHO” KNOWLES late of the Settlement of Mangrove
Bush on the Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00514

IN THE ESTATE OF DORIS STEWARD, late of Flat 1 Charlton Manor
Charlton Manor Drive in the Town of Knaresborough in the County of North
Yorkshire in England, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by HARRY BRACTON SANDS, of Skyline Drive in the
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to SUSAN
LINDA STEWARD, the Executrix and Trustee, by the District Probate Registry
of the High Court of Justice at Newcastle Upon Tyne in England of America, on
the 25th day of June, 2009.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



a
Bahamians to get ‘majority’

of $200m Baha Mar phase

FROM page 1B

begins, it could completely turn
the economy around, and there
will be spin-offs for the con-
struction industry in the wider
economy. We look at all the
viable spin-offs that come from
a project like this. It could turn
the entire economy around.”

Mr Wrinkle added that the
BCA would soon seek to meet
with Baha Mar Development
Company officials again, fol-
lowing last week’s signings of
the agreements between CSC
and the China Export-Import
Bank on one side, and the
developer on the other.

“There is no question that
the Chinese participation is
going to be substantial, it is
going to be extensive and it is
going to be dominant,” the
BCA president added.

“T would anticipate us get-
ting together with Baha Mar
before Christmas to try and get
things moving. Once the Chi-
nese decide to move, they will
move very quickly, and once
CSC is committed as an
investor it will be in a strong
position as owner, contractor
and developer. The ball is start-
ing to move, and the BCA
needs to be out in the forefront

to make sure we all have an
opportunity to participate in
what will be one of the biggest
projects in the Caribbean.

“We need to offset Atlantis
and support marketing efforts.
It’s beginning to show that
Atlantis can’t carry the coun-
try.”

CSC said in a statement that
under the terms of the deal
being worked out with Baha
Mar, it would acquire a 2.75 per
cent stake in the project with a
$99 million investment. That is
much less than the 43 per cent
equity stake, and $212 million
contribution, Baha Mar’s pre-
vious partner, Harrah’s Enter-
tainment, was scheduled to
make.

The value of the construc-
tion contract was pegged at $1.9
billion, with CSC saying work
on the 1,000-acre project was
due to start in early 2010, with
an opening in late 2013.

Baha Mar, has moved swiftly
to manage and dampen
Bahamian expectations regard-
ing the possibility of progress
on the Cable Beach redevelop-
ment, pointing out that it is not
a ‘done deal’ yet. Having been
in this position before with Har-
rah’s, and with the Bahamas
desperate for some good eco-
nomic news, the last thing the

developer wants to do is raise
false hopes.

“A number of things have
been concluded. A lot of uncer-
tainty has been taken care of
with the signing of the agree-
ment last week,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business. “It’s still
a journey in progress, and there
are a number of things to
resolve.

“A number of these things
could potentially be pretty seri-
ous, but we have had indica-
tions there are solutions to all
of them. It will take a lot of
work, and we are nowhere near
done.

“Until we have a signed doc-
ument, there’s the possibility
of something going awry. We’re
trying to keep things low key,
one of the lessons learnt in the
past.”

Mr Robinson pointed out
that apart from agreeing busi-
ness terms, there was “a huge
amount” of legal work and due
diligence that also remained to
be done by year-end.

Baha Mar’s “internal target”
was to conclude negotiations
with the Chinese by year-end,
although it was still unclear
whether this target would be
hit. After that, there was then
the matter of Bahamian gov-
ernment approvals.

Small hotels slash rates

up to 40 per cent

FROM page 1B

time.

The Cape Santa Maria resort in Long Island
has listed online an almost 20 per cent decrease in
its room rate, beginning from November 1 until

December 2009.

Marley Resort in Nassau has slashed room
rates almost 40 per cent for its “September to

Remember” promotion.

Operations Manager at Marley Resort, Rory
Shepherd, told this paper that they have taken the
initiative to put together a package for the resort
to encourage visitors. The resort has also created



reflect the special September deals.
Mr Shepherd suggested that the quality of the
product remains untouched.

“We have just been open for a year and two
months, and last year was challenging,” he said.
“We are just trying to get ourselves out there.”

Mr Sands argued that marketing initiatives

generated by the Ministry of Tourism could assist
some small hotels this year, but asserted that the

long-term investments made by the ministry will

spa and boutique deals, and remixed its menu to said.

be also valuable.

“We are parlaying an investment in the oppor-
tunity that as things get better, the Bahamas
brand will be top of mind in its consumers,” he

Clifton Heritage National Park
CLIFTON HERITAGE AUTHORITY

South West Bay Road + P.O. Box SP-63846

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 1(242) 362-4386 or 1(242) 362-5121 or he
I

Email: park.clifton@ yahoo.com

Fax: 362-5017

potent
a

Employment Opportunity

The Clitton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of an individual to
fill the position of Managing Director in accordance with Section 14 of the
Clitton Heritage Authority Act 2004,

The individual would be required to provide executive leadership,
supervision and direction to units of the Clifton Heritage Authority's
office and the Heritage Park, while ensuring the research and promotion
of its historical, cultural resources,

Duties and Responsibilities:
Responsible for the implementation of policies, programs and goals and
objectives for the efficient management of the Clifton Heritage Authority
Ensures the development and implementation of a strategic plan for the
management of the Clifton Heritage Park ensuring that accepted operating
standards and practices are employed.
Coordinate and supervise all activities related to safety issues, best
environment practices, and all matters related to the preservation of historic

structures and conservation of natural resources at the park

Serve ad Principal Advisor to the Clitton Heritage Authonty Board on
matters and issues relative to the maintenance and upkeep of the park.
Oversee and coordinate all public and private use ot facilities and
recreational spaces at the Clifton Heritage Authority Park and establish user

fees

Liaise with other government, non-government, regional and international

agencies to explore opportunities to promote the sustainable development
and management of the Clitton Hentage Authority Park.
Direct and coordinate the employment of staff, develop and implement
opening policies, standards and procedures to ensure performance and
maintain a stable working environment.
Conduct perboxdic assessments of facilities and intrastnacture and
recommend improvements or repairs as necessary.
Prepare and submit a monthly report to the Board of Directors on the
operations of the Authority.
Liaise with the Marketing and Public Relations officer material for the
promotion of the Clifton Heritage Park.

Post Qualification:

* Aminimum of a graduate degree in Administration or discipline, and for 10)

years experience in an administrative discipline,
Application are available at the Authority's office South West Road
Clifton Cay and should be submitted along with resume by 4pm
14 September, 2009,
Telephone contact 362-5121 or 362-6729



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE



The Tribune





Creative Relations/Photo





back in business

By REUBEN SHEARER

The new Dunkin Donuts on Bay Street

Dunkin’ Donuts

Tribune Features Reporter

IF YOU frequent the downtown area anytime during the day, you
are likely to come across persons strolling down Bay Street with a

Dunking’ Donuts cup and a tasty treat in hand. Under new manage-

ment, it is definitely making a comeback. With a new face-lift, the
downtown donut giant poses a threat to other bistro big names like

Starbucks-and rightfully so due to new exciting menu options and inno-

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lunch inspired flatbreads, and donuts from
their Bahamian line are proving to be a
hit among customers.

You will find a wide variety of donuts
like the usual old-fashioned, maple frosted,
Bavarian creme and glazed donut. Other
favourites are the Boston Kreme- a choco-
late delight, and the pina colada- pineapple
flavoured donut with vanilla and coconut
topping. The guava donut, which is Mr
Rahms’ personal favourite, is tasty as well,
and proves to be one of the more popular
donuts in the Bahamian line.

“We want to do mango flavoured, pina
colada, and a coconut rum donut soon.
We are playing with some Bahamian
recipes, and we want to make it as Bahami-
an friendly as possible,” Mr Rahms
explained.

For breakfast and lunch, there are an
array of nutritious options that will keep
you fueled throughout the day.

The turkey cheddar bacon and egg white
veggie flatbread has the right combination
of flavours, and are the perfect choice for
the more health conscious consumer.
Served on whole wheat flatbread, with
melted cheese, these toasted calorie coun-
ters are light and refreshing.

“We want to do as much as possible with
our breakfast sandwiches,” Mr Rahms said.
“Currently we have a bacon egg and
cheese croissant, that is bigger than the
normal size breakfast sandwich you get at
other fast food chains.”

They are also testing different soup
flavours, like chili, gumbo, chicken noodle,
clam and conch chowder, which will be for
sale in the near future. “No conch donuts
though,” Mr Rahms said jokingly, “except
for maybe a conch flatbread.”

The downtown location caters to busi-

In addition to the downtown store, Dunkin’
Donuts has two new locations upstairs in the
US departure lounge and downstairs near the
international departures desk at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport. “The locations
have experienced steady success with travel-
ers, that keep coming back,” said Peter
Rahms, Director of Operations for Bahamas
QSR Limited- franchise holder for Dunkin’
Donuts.

The airport stores open at 5 and 6am in the
morning, both closing at 7pm or until the last
flight leaves.

According to Mr Rahms, the principles that
the company is building this time around are
consistent products, and quick, efficient ser-
vice. “We try to give the service that every-
one who walks through this store deserves,”
he said.

This high standard seems to be at the core
of the downtown location’s success, with a
steady flow of customers frequenting the
restaurant during the day, The Tribune team
noticed. A quick customer line moved on
location and business is like that all day, Mr
Rahms said.

The franchise itself has been through sev-
eral management companies over the last 20
years and it’s proving to live up to the expec-
tations of management, who describe public
response as “fantastic.”

“Bahamas QSR Limited owns all three
stores, and we own the franchise for the coun-
try,” said Mr Rahms. “Every Dunkin’ Donut
restaurant you see from here on in will be
developed by us. We’re gauging market
response right now, and things look so good,
we may consider opening new locations on
the island.”

With the downtown location’s ‘high-end’
facelift, inspired from Dunkin’ Donuts loca-
tions in Spain and the United States, the
donut store definitely stands out on the west
side of Bay Street. This store opens at 6am,
and closes at 8pm throughout the week and
10pm on weekends.

“We’re pleased with how it came out, and
we want to expand our seating, finish plans
for a meeting area, and make wireless Inter-
net capabilities available for our customers.
We also have seating for 10 persons, board-
room style, and a 42-inch flat-panel monitor
with PC connectivity.”

New menu choices like the breakfast and



ts available at the three locations.



nesses in the Nassau area. The catering
menu offers different combo options for
servings of up to 10 people. The catering
combos include 1 dozen donuts, 50
Munchkin size donuts, 1 dozen bagels, 1
dozen muffins, 1/2 dozen muffins, 1/2
dozen bagels, including a “box 0’ joe” [cof-
fee in a jug-size].

For drinks, there are unlimited options:
strawberry, watermelon, and coffee
Coolatta’s are really chillingly refreshing.
If you need a “cup 0’ joe” to wake up your
insides, their steamed coffee and iced lattes
will start your day off on a good note.

“This September, we’re starting our loy-
alty card program. You get ten points for
every dollar, and this month its double
points. You can redeem the points for our
food and beverage products,” Mr Rahms
added.

Dunkin’ Donuts most recent venture has
been the Jet Blue promotion, where cus-
tomers purchase cold beverages and have
a chance to enter the drawing of a vacation
prize to New York City and Ft Lauderdale.
Both vacation prizes come with Visa deb-
it cards totaling $500 and $1000 each. A
winner is picked live on air of “Naughty
Niggs” radio show on More 94 FM.

Promotions like this one, which is open
to all adult Bahamians, have been designed
to keep a consistent flow of Bahamian cus-
tomers. In times like this with tourism
down you have to look after your own peo-
ple,” Mr. Rahms said.

He added: “What we found in many cas-
es is that in may cases Bahamians don’t
give other Bahamians good service. But
at the end of the day, Bahamians are our
bread and butter. We promise to offer
the same quality service to Bahamians and
visitors hands down.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune







taraBASTIAN

Acclaimed
Bahamian artist
gets ready to
launch Nassau's
first digitised
fashion art
society showcase!

From the creator of KINE-
SIS and co- creator of
STYLEZINE, comes a new 4
part event. Scharad Light-
bourne presents, CLICK- a
digital art showcase like

never before!

Known for “stepping out of the box”
and taking Bahamian artistry to a high-
er level, Scharad said, “I wish to
expose Bahamians of all backgrounds
to asociety of new age, arts and culture
in The Bahamas- inspirations that
blend into one another- all being fash-
ion, music and art related. This is what
makes me an artist and it is my inten-
tion to share this with others in an
innovative and unique way.”

Also known as a dynamic graphic
artist, Scharad said that “click” not
only refers to the sound of his com-
puter’s mouse; it takes on a multitude
of meanings.

“The event hopes to join different
social types together through fashion,
art, music and culture; its a merging
of ‘cliques.’ Additionally, I use my
passion for photography, by “clicking”
my camera to capture my social envi-
ronments- hence the play on words
with more towards the common under-
standing of what I do as an artist.”

Hosting the event is co writer for



Stylezine's Moda, Tara Bastian and
fashion guru and founder of The Big
Give Organization, Kedar Clarke.
They will expose the public to the
more diverse sides of art and culture in
The Bahamas.

The event will feature a number of
Bahamian enterprises- Airbrush
Junkies, Talk 242, Stylezine Maga-
zine, Aura Amore Swimwear, Final
Accents, Switcha and internationally
acclaimed design label, House of St
John.

Delivering on his promise to truly
expose the talent and culture of The
Bahamas to the world, the event will
be streamed live over the Internet
with on screen texting- the first of its
kind

Patrons will truly be in for a treat as
they mix- and- mingle with industry
insiders- they will also have the chance
to win a myriad of prizes including:
the grand prize: a $1,000 photo shoot
package from Scharad, makeup ser-
vices from Face Inc., shopping at
Obsession Boutique and a pair of
shoes from Head Over Heels.

Other prizes include, four tickets to
Islands of the World Fashion Week
events, John Bull gift certificates, VIP
passes to Nassau's newest and hottest
lounge, the Viper Room, 3 month gym
membership to Bally Total Fitness,
an appearance in Nassau's hottest
online magazine, Stylezine, apparel
from popular brand, Conchience
Clothing and so much more!

Can't wait until the actual event?
The public is invited to get their early
“Click- Fix” by visiting the website:
www.thisistheclick.com to download
the official event song, produced by
popular Bahamian musician, Christo-
pher “Sketch” Carey.

The first of this dynamic four part
series takes place on Friday Septem-
ber 11 at the Poop Deck West from
8pm-11.30pm. Admission to this
unforgettable event is $20. For more
information, please visit the website or
contact Scharad Lightbourne.

=

=

"a

a q
Â¥

Ser
3 sachardLIGHTBOURNE



A kedarCLARKE

‘Blige, Brown
to perform at
Vienna Jackson
{tribute

: VIENNA
i Associated Press

MARY J. BLIGE, Chris

? Brown and Natalie Cole will
i be among the top artists
i performing at a Sept. 26
? Michael Jackson tribute
? concert in Vienna, organiz-
i ers said Tuesday.

But they left open the

i possibility that major stars
? such as Madonna might still
? be part of the show that will
? take place outside a 17th-
i century palace in the Aus-
i trian capital.

“Just hold your horses!”

i Jackson’s brother Jermaine
? told reporters at a packed
i news conference in Vien-
? na’s city hall.

Event promoter Georg

i Kindel said that up to 25
? performers are expected to
i participate in concert that
i is being billed as the main
? global tribute for the King
? of Pop, who died June 25 in
i Los Angeles. More names
? will be unveiled later this
? week in London and Berlin,
i Kindel said.

Sister Sledge, Akon,

i: Angela Bassett, and the
? Germany-based boy band
i USS also are among the 13
i artists confirmed so far, Jer-
? maine Jackson said. In addi-
i? tion, Jackson’s original band
i and dancers will take part.

“We’re very excited —

i the list is growing more and
i more,” Jermaine Jackson
i said, adding that “many
? major Bollywood names”
? and artists from the Middle
i East also
? involved.

would be

All the artists will play

i some of Jackson’s greatest
i hits at the concert, including
i “Thriller,” “Billie Jean,”
i “Black or White” and
i “Bad.”

“We will honor on this

? night not only the musician
i and artist Michael Jackson
i but also the humanitarian,”
i Kindel said. “He’s really
i someone who changed the
i history of music.”

Jackson’s family and chil-

i dren — as well as 65,000
i fans — are expected to
i attend the tribute to be held
i on a large stage with a
i crown on its roof and two
i runways in front of Vien-
ina’s former
? Schoenbrunn Palace, one of
i the Austrian capital’s top
i tourist attractions, Kindel
? said. A “significant portion”
i of the proceeds from the
i event will be donated to
i charity, he added.

imperial

Over the course of the

i evening, Jermaine will sing
? a duet with his late brother,
? with video of Michael likely
i to be projected onto nearby
i walls, organizers said. All
i artists will sing either “Heal
? the World” or “We are the
i World” as a grand finale.

Bassett, an actress, will pre-

i sent one part of Michael Jack-
i? son’s life, a statement said.

When asked why stars

i such as Madonna and Whit-
i ney Houston — mentioned
i in Austrian media reports
i — were not on the list made
: public Tuesday, a defensive
i Kindel stressed the list of

performers was still not set
in stone. “This is not the
final lineup — maybe some
of the names you mentioned
you will hear within the
next couple of days,” he
said.

ATOM Le XU



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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

This weekend pro-
vides a chance to get
healthy, tackle some
fishing and take in some
art.

1. The Ministry of
Health in conjunction
with Caricom will host
Caribbean Wellness Day
on Saturday at the Min-
istry of Health Grounds,
Augusta/Delancy/Meet-
ing Streets. The Mega
Health Extravaganza will
involve demonstrations
of various physical activ-
ities, such as salsa danc-
ing, a step show, karate,
marching bands, and

other activities.

For adults attending
the event, there will be
an array of free health
screenings, including
blood cholesterol, blood
pressure, blood sugar,
weight screening, and
healthy food demonstra-
tions. For the children
there will be a fully
supervised bouncing
castle, and in the late
afternoon everyone will
be able to get their “bod-
ies in motion” to the
rhythmic beat of the One
Family Junkanoo rush
out. The event take place
between 11 am and 7pm.

2. The Bank of the
Bahamas will host a day-
long health and wellness
expo with top medical,
fitness and nutrition
experts, including lead-
ing surgeons, physicians
and other professionals
from The Bahamas and
South Florida. The event
takes place at the Shera-
ton Cable Beach Resort,
Saturday September 12
from 10am to 4.30pm.
There is no charge and
partners are offering
numerous giveaways,
including two weekend
stays at Opera Suites and
Marina on Biscayne Bay.
For more information
contact 396-6010.

3. Noted Bahamian
artist Anthony Morley
launched his latest col-
lection Island in Da Sun
at the Ladder Gallery at
New Providence Com-
munity Center Blake
Road this week. The col-
lection features an excit-
ing collection of oil paint-
ings on canvas.

4. Enjoy an evening
of great music and food
at the Marley Resort on
Cable Beach every
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday evening from
8pm-11 pm when noted
Bahamian musicians
Paul and Tanya Hanna
perform. For reserva-
tions call (242) 702-
2800.

5. The 5th Annual
Green Parrot/Salty Tackle
“Lords Of The Deep”
Deep Drop Fishing Tour-
nament will be held from
7am - 3pm. 2 Electric / 2

Manual Reels

(totally non-IGFA).
Captains’ meeting will be
held on Thursday, Sep-
tember 10 at 6 pm at
Green Parrot Bar, East
Bay St. A vessel repre-
sentative must attend.
Entrance fee:

$500 (per boat) or
$200 Calcutta (optional,
per boat). All entrance
fees will be returned as
prizes/money and may
be paid to Chris Lloyd at
BASRA or at the Cap-
tain's Meeting. Contact
Chris at 477-2941 or

Saltytackle@coralwave.c
om

THE TRIBUNE

TECHNO fans turned out in
droves to the Imagination
Workshop's Transcendental
Party at the Hub last week.
Party-goers waved their com-
plimentary glow-sticks in the
air as they danced and sipped
on free Jell-O shots all night.

Spinner DJ Chedda manned
the wheels-of-steel all night
and pumped out crowd
favourites and popular dance-
trance tunes that the local
rave-heads were starving for.

The event's organisers were
thrilled with the turnout and
said they have been getting a
lot of requests for an encore.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





ee

THE WEATHER REPORT

a oe Rats oa

5-Day FORECAST




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tie ZR | Ea | ak | Se
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ORLANDO



High:90°F/32°C = — A couple of showers Overcast with a t-storm A t-storm; overcast, Clouds and sun, a Clouds and sun, a Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
PE Se eee and a t-storm. in spots. then some sun. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 73° F/23°C _, : ; ; 5 ; 5 : .
a & Fan High: 88 High: 89 High: 90 High: 90
c a ‘ High: 88° Low: 77° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° see EE
TAMPA in} aE UE
High: 90° F/32° C [ 06°-84° F 99°-90° F 106°-87° F 111°-85° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C ot r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:26am. 3.1 5:02am. 0.3
aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:47pm. 25 5:52pm. 05
" 1, i 6:48 pm. 06
} i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 40am. 24 64lam. 04
i , er ABACO Temperature 17pm. 3.0 751pm. 06
¢ : > r GMM es cscs crates Qaceereree tateresauce taceeeast 91° F/33° C : :
; ; # High: 88° F/31°C os Saturday 1:43am. 24 7:45am. 04
J Fe Mey LOW ecesssseenee 79° F/26° C
, - HY — Low: 80° F/27°¢ Normal high... Baer ge See
- 7, Normal low 75° F/24° C
q es @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's HIQh cece sor rs2c | NTI UCI
4 el High: 88° F/31°C : Last year's lOW oe eee 77° F/25° C
oe Low: 76° F/24° C Py Precipitation ——————_—sSurise....... 6:54 a.m. Moonrise ... 10:21 p.m.
ra a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccsssessscseeesssseeeee 0.40" Sunset....... 7:20 p.m. Moonset .... 11:24 a.m.
alll, ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT ] AN Year to date 20. New First
High: 87°F/31°C @ High:87° F/31°C Normal year to date ......c.ccsecscssesscseecseeseeee 33.21" :
Low: 78° F/26°C = Low: 77° F/25° C ie
Gf AccuWeather.com a
x @ a a Forecasts and graphics provided by -
, MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.11 Sep.18 Sep. 26
1 High: 88° F/31°C CUTER
~ft Low: 78° F/26° C NASSAU igh: 89° F/32"
= Low: 77° F/25° C
5 i. , @ ert
KEY WEST ee “og —_CATISLAND
High: 88° F/31" C High: 87° F/31° C
Low: 79° F/26° C — y Low: 75° F/24°C
@ >
ee : ¢ Ry <— P
7 > GREAT EXUMA et SAN SALVADOR
i High: 88° F/31°C High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 77° F/25° C Low: 76° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; ANDROS | - . f
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C —— .
Low: 77° F/25° C i. S -,
ae Ay
LONG ISLAND
Ce cree
Low: 76° F/24°C 6
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday -*. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll i High: 90° F/32° C
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC = F/C FC F/C FIC FIC i) Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 85/29 63/17 t 81/27 61/46 t Indianapolis 82/27 61/6 t 81/27 62/16 pc Philadelphia 72/22 6417 4+ 65/18 60/15 1 :
Anchorage 61/16 49/9 sh 61/16 48/8 c Jacksonville 90/32 71/21 pc 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 102/38 81/27 pc 102/38 81/27 t CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 86/30 67/19 po 84/28 66/18 t Kansas City 82/27 65/18 t 81/27 6216 t Pittsburgh 74/23 57/13 pe 70/21 57/13 c RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:92°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 72/22 6246 + 68/20 SO/15 + Las Vegas 98/36 73/22 pe 102/38 79/26 s Portland,OR 76/24 58/414 pc 81/27 57/13 s High: 89° F/32° C Low: 76° F/24°C
Baltimore 71/21 60/115 +r 70/21 60/415 fr Little Rock 90/32 69/20 pc 86/30 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 80/26 64/17 c 85/29 64/17 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a %
Boston 66/18 55/12 c 63/117 55/12 c Los Angeles 84/28 64/117 pc 86/80 64/17 s St. Louis 84/28 67/19 pc 86/30 68/20 t .
Buffalo 74/23 5613 pce 70/21 5412 c Louisville 84/28 63/17 t 84/28 64/117 pc Salt Lake City 88/31 60/15 s 90/32 60/15 s GREAT INAGUA wr
Charleston, SC 88/31 67/19 pc 84/28 67/19 pc Memphis 88/31 70/21 pc 89/31 70/21 pc San Antonio 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 71/21 t High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 78/25 58/14 t 79/26 5915 t Miami 88/31 78/25 t 88/31 78/25 t San Diego 78/25 67/19 pe 77/25 68/20 pc Low 77°F25°C
Cleveland 78/25 59/15 t 71/21 55/412 t Minneapolis 77/25 60/15 t 81/27 63/17 pc San Francisco 77/25 57/13 s 80/26 57/13 pc .
Dallas 94/34 74/23 t 96/35 73/22 t Nashville 85/29 62/16 t 86/30 65/18 pc Seattle 68/20 53/11 c 75/23 56/13 s
Denver 80/26 55/12 pce 90/82 51/10 s New Orleans 89/31 73/22 t 89/31 75/23 t Tallahassee 92/33 69/20 pe 90/32 71/21 t
Detroit 76/24 60/15 t 76/24 5915 t New York 70/21 61/16 + 616 6146 Fr Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 74/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/32 68/20 t 91/32 68/20 t Tucson 94/34 73/22 t 95/35 72/22 t
Houston 89/31 72/22 t 93/33 72/22 t Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 76/24 63/17 r 67/19 5743 46





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\. HIGH EXT.





HIGH









a

A

Wor_p Cities



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
70/21
75/23
76/24
62/16
90/32
86/30
80/26
84/28
79/26
73/22
75/23
81/27
68/20
77/25
77/25
56/12
95/35
91/32
69/20
90/32
82/27
86/30
72/22
63/17
82/27
80/26
67/19
88/31
70/21
91/32
102/38
76/24
83/28
79/26
89/31
70/21
70/21
90/32
82/27
73/22
838/31
72/22
72/22
74/23
85/29
84/28
66/18
82/27
73/22
89/31
104/40
17/25
88/31
66/18
90/32
59/15
90/32
79/26
81/27
72/22
68/20
89/31
81/27
74/23
86/30
62/16
72/22
72/22
74/23

lil

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
54/12
50/10
68/20
46/7
79/26
77/25
64/17
59/15
73/22
60/15
59/15
74/23
41/5
54/12
57/13
36/2
72/22
83/28
44/6
73/22
74/23
73/22
57/13
50/10
59/15
49/9
46/7
72/22
54/12
81/27
71/21
66/18
59/15
52/11
79/26
ale
52/11
61/16
77/25
55/12
72/22
50/10
52/11
51/10
55/12
75/23
45/7
61/16
52/11
74/23
77/25
59/15
80/26
37/2
70/21
37/2
73/22
62/16
54/12
50/10
45/7
75/23
66/18
55/12
63/17
54/12
59/15
56/13
52/11







pe

High
F/C
92/33
63/17
17/25
79/26
61/16
90/32
86/30
78/25
82/27
78/25
81/27
73/22
81/27
68/20
68/20
83/28
59/15
94/34
92/33
61/16
90/32
83/28
84/28
64/17
64/17
79/26
75/23
64/17
89/31
66/18
90/32
102/38
74/23
78/25
74/23
87/30
70/21
72/22
88/31
82/27
73/22
89/31
68/20
72/22
17/25
85/29
82/27
63/17
73/22
76/24
83/28
103/39
76/24
89/31
63/17
89/31
66/18
85/29
76/24
81/27
66/18
70/21
91/32
83/28
68/20
75/23
67/19
76/24
73/22
79/26

Thursday
Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
52/11
67/19
49/9
79/26
78/25
63/17
61/16
74/23
61/16
55/12
74/23
37/2
50/10
55/12
39/3
71/21
83/28
39/3
73/22
72/22
72/22
50/10
50/10
55/12
54/12
52/11
71/21
50/10
81/27
72/22
66/18
62/16
53/11
79/26
ile
52/11
61/16
77/25
55/12
69/20
59/15
54/12
53/11
55/12
73/22
47/8
54/12
52/11
70/21
76/24
61/16
79/26
37/2
73/22
41/5
74/23
61/16
57/13
50/10
46/7
77/25
68/20
55/12
61/16
55/12
58/14
54/12
59/15

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Thursday: _ E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
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Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 82°F



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in business See page nine
See page eight



SOME of the performers involved in the artist 4 peace concert.
the group includes well known bahamian artists such as: Land-
lord, DJ Counsellor, Najie Dun, Bodine, Kenyatta Taylor, Padrino,
Sammie Starr and Sketch.

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

LOCAL leaders are joining forces with tradi-
tional, hip hop, reggae, contemporary
gospel and other entertainers to fight an epi-
demic of what they say is “shocking” criminal
activity. It’s all part of the Artists 4 Peace
movement - a nationwide effort to curb crime

in the community.

The goal of the Artists 4 Peace Concert, set for Septem-
ber 19 at Arawak Cay, is to promote ideas of peace through
the power of performance art, including poetry, drama,
visual arts, and music. Artist from around the country,
including Ronnie Butler, Kenyatta Taylor, Ricardo Clark
and Sammie Starr have volunteered their talents to assist
this message.

Organisers for the event said in a statement: "As one
absorbs that these statistics represent devastated lives, fami-
lies and dreams it is evident that society must promote the
message of non-violence. In the national crime environ-
ment, no one can afford to operate as a single agency or as a
single organisation. Collaborative partnerships need to be
entered into to combat the challenges of modern-day
crime."

The concert seeks to do the following:

e Utilise the power of the arts to empower youth and heal
the wounds caused by community violence and social injus-
tice;

eEngage in a non-violence dialogue through the medium
of the arts;

eFeature expression of peace, love and coexistence
through performance art;

eEncourage non violence throughout the Bahamas;

eTransform anxiety about the current situation in the
Bahamas into positive manifestations for peace;

ePlatform the transformative power of music and the arts;

eInitiation of individualistic commitment to peace, con-
nection empowerment and renewal;

eCommunicate positive change for the Bahamas.

A spokesperson added: “There’s a social impact because
you look upon your neighbours as strangers and
enemies. And, there’s an economic impact because death
has a cost.”

National statistics concerning crime over the past six
month are alarming: 25 per cent increase in murder; 12 per
cent increase in arm robberies and 29 per cent increase in
robberies.

The Fort Charlotte Community Centre, Sea Grape Festi-
val, and FamFest coordinator Mark Cartwright are key
coordinators for the concert.





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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 PRICE-75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

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Murder sparks

Soit targets fear

Employee is
gunned down
outside of shop

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MORE “innocent” blood
will be shed as armed bandits
home in on vulnerable "soft-
targets" in the business com-
munity, a local activist fears.

Reverend C B Moss, head
of civic group Bahamas
Against Crime, spoke out as
police probe the murder of
44-year-old Nelson Goodman
who may be the third in a
string of employees shot by
armed robbers on company
property.

Mr Goodman, who worked
at Bertha's Go-Go Ribs take-
away on Poinciana Avenue,
was gunned down outside the
shop shortly after midnight
yesterday.

Police said they had not
ruled robbery out as a motive,
but could not say if anything
was stolen from the restau-
rant or if Mr Goodman was
robbed of any personal or
company property.

But Rev Moss said the
recent string of attacks should

be a wake-up call to Govern-
ment to immediately buffer
the spill-over of violent crime
into the business sector.

"T feel that the crime now is
spilling into the commercial
area more than before. They
are hitting soft targets in areas
not heavily policed and those
who may not have their own
private security force or the
security systems which could
offer them protection," Mr
Moss told The Tribune.

"Unless this is addressed
immediately, it is going to
escalate to other areas of the
business community and then
it's going to hit the area every-
one is concerned about — the
tourism sector, but by then it
will be too late," he warned.

When asked yesterday if
police were treating armed
robbery-related murders as
an emerging trend, Commis-
sioner of Police Reginald Fer-
guson was hesitant to brand
the incidents as reason for
alarm.

"Most armed robberies are

SEE page six

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By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net




A MOTHER who was
attacked by two pit bull
terriers has revealed how
she has been left scarred
for life.

In an exclusive inter-
view from her hospital
bed, Zelma Maura told
how she was savaged by
the dogs and is now in
constant pain.

The 30-year-old reliv-
ed the terrifying moments
when the dogs chased her
as she tried to run away
from them in Abundant
Life Road, and sank their
teeth into her arm and
| leg when she tripped and
fell in a grassy area
between Chelsea’s
















SEE page six





ZELMA MAURA, 30, was savagely attacked by two pit bulls last
week and will have surgery at Princess Margaret Hospital today.

‘Tentative’ date set for Harl Taylor murder retrial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

SENIOR Justice Anita Allen
yesterday set November 4 as
the “tentative” date for the start
of the retrial of Troyniko
McNeil who is accused of mur-
dering handbag designer Harl
Taylor.

The date has been set pend-
ing the outcome of an applica-
tion by McNeil’s attorney Mur-

British
American

rio Ducille to have the judge
recuse herself from hearing the
retrial as well as the status of
another trial in Freeport in
which Mr Ducille is also
involved. The hearing of the
application is scheduled for
September 29.

McNeil, 22, remains on
remand at Her Majesty’s Prison
as he awaits the retrial. Novem-
ber 2 was initially set for the
start.

Yesterday, however, Mr

Ducille informed the court he is
scheduled to be in Freeport for
a case which is expected to run
from November 9 to 27.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner said the
matter in Freeport can com-
mence on completion of the
McNeil trial. Mr Ducille said,
however, that the matter in
Freeport is an old case that had
been set for trial since Easter.

SEE page six





NASSAU AND BAHAM/

Oo) CIN) Ded JG) BY DY Di (CEs IY) BA, CSI BY 22) 3) 8

BAHAMAS BIGGEST



Myles Munroe
Calls for wider
(lehate on the
marital rape issue

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@
tribunemedia.net

LEADING pastor,
author and motivational
speaker Myles Munroe is
calling for a wider debate
on the proposed amend-
ment to outlaw marital
rape now that the issue
has divided the Christian
community.

Dr Munroe has out-
lined a series of questions
he wants government to
address before passing
the amendment to the
Sexual Offences and
Domestic Violence Act
that would make it illegal
for a man to rape his wife.

The Catholic Archdio-
cese, the Bahamas Con-
ference of the Methodist
Church, and the Seventh-
Day Adventist Church
have all expressed sup-
port for the proposed
amendment.

But the Bahamas
Christian Council, the
largest religious body in
the country, has rejected
the proposed amend-
ment.

Former Council presi-
dent Bishop Simeon Hall
criticised the Council’s

SEE page six



Chinese firm
expects Baha
Mar resort to
open by 2013

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Chinese company set
to build the 1,000-acre Baha
Mar resort at Cable Beach
has announced it expects con-
struction to go ahead early
next year in time for the
resort to open its doors by
2013.

China State Construction
and Engineering Company
(CSCEC), which signed a $1.9
billion deal with Baha Mar
Resorts Limited last Friday,
also revealed in a statement to
the Chinese media that by
investing $99 million in the
project it will obtain a 2.75
per cent equity stake.

This latest update comes
days after the Bahamas Gov-
ernment signed an accord
with the Chinese on the “Pro-
motion and Protection” of
investments made by The
Bahamas and China in each
other’s territories.

At the same time as that
agreement was signed, Prime

SEE page six

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

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Ministry of Health Grounds; Augusta / Delancy / Meeting Streets

Dire crime prediction

as violence escalates
Activist calls for

immediate action

AS violence continues to
escalate, 2009 could end up
being “the worst year ever for
crime” warned Rev CB Moss,
executive director of Bahamas
Against Crime.

Rev Moss issued a strong
statement yesterday calling for
all crime committees and com-
missions to be brought to an
end and action to be taken
immediately.

His comments follow the
shooting death of a 44-year-old
man outside Bertha’s Go-Go
Ribs on Poinciana Drive early
yesterday morning (see lead sto-
ry, page 1).

“This is madness,” Rev Moss
said, “58 homicides in addition
to countless other crimes in an
ever increasing tide is plunging
our society into the depths of
social chaos.”

He warned that the “soul” of
the Bahamian people is at risk,
because there seems to be no
concern about the well-being of
others.

“There is no outcry until our
personal interests are invaded,”
he said.

According to Rev Moss, the
December 2007 appointment of
the National Advisory Council
on crime was “unnecessary and
an absolute waste of time and
public funds.”

This, he noted, was confirmed
by the advisory council itself on
page three of its official report,
which said: “Members were

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amazed, in some instances
shocked that the information
gathered had been part of pre-
vious national reports, while it is
clear that in some instances sev-
eral suggestions from previous
reports were implemented, in
the main, we seem to be blow-
ing bubbles when it comes to
seriously addressing crime and
its causes.”

Rev Moss said: “There it is
from the council. The clearest
evidence that the year it spent in
deliberations was a shameful
waste of time while nearly 150
murders and thousands of other
serious crimes took place.”

He also went on to note that
in a 1994 report, the Consulta-
tive Committee on National
Youth Development noted that:
“Crime and violence of all
kinds, namely armed robberies,
serious harm and other assaults
against the person and gang vio-
lence had reached epidemic
proportions in our community.
These acts of crime and vio-
lence are uniformly condemned
by our society, yet they persist.”

According to Rev Moss, the
situation has become “tremen-
dously worse” since that report
was delivered 15 years ago, yet
successive governments contin-
ue to appoint committees and
commissions to examine the
problem of crime.

“The time for talking must
stop now and immediate action
taken,” he said.

BISHOP SIMEON HALL of New Covenant Baptist Church walks
towards a memorial wall for murder victims. Bishop Hall plans

in Alo LOhot)



He said that while remaining
thankful to members of past
crime councils and commissions
for their efforts, Bahamas
Against Crime believes all such
bodies still in operation should
be dissolved immediately,
including the House of Assem-
bly select committee on crime,
which is now holding hearings.

“We are aware of the prob-
lems; let’s now implement the
many recommendations in
reports sitting on shelves in offi-
cial offices for many, many
years,” Rev Moss said.

He said responsibility for the
situation now falls squarely at
the doorstep of Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

“As leader of the govern-
ment, he must accept the
responsibility of his government
to provide a reasonable level of
security for the citizenry, which
is one of the primary responsi-
bilities of any and all govern-
ments,” Rev Moss said.

“The prime minister must
step up to the plate and lead
the nation out of this deep crisis.
The time is now and Bahamas
Against Crime, and others we
know, stand ready to assist. In
the meantime, fervent prayers
must be offered for our nation.”



to post the names of all persons murdered in the country within

the past 10 years.

Police to destroy nine
seized slot machines

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand Bahama
police have announced they will
destroy nine slot machines that
were seized during a raid on a
liquor store in Freeport in March.

The destruction of the
machines is in accordance with a
court order issued by Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson on July 2.

COURT MATTER

Three men were charged with
firearm and ammunition posses-
sion in the Freeport Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Troy McIntosh, 40; Reno
Surin, 32; and Garth Hall, 35,
were arraigned in the Eight Mile
Rock Magistrate’s Court before

Magistrate Gwendolyn Claude.

It is alleged that on Septem-
ber 6, the accused men were
found in possession of a .44 Mag-
num along with 14 live rounds of
ammunition.

The men pleaded not guilty to
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and ammunition. They
were represented by attorney K
Brian Hanna.

Hall was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

McIntosh and Surin were each
granted $5,000 bail with one sure-
ty on the condition that they sur-
render their travel documents to
the court and report to the Eight
Mile Rock Police Station before
9am every Friday until the com-
pletion of the case.

The matter was adjourned to
December 16 for trial.

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News
Editorial/Letters

BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION

Weathers vac

Eee reeset eer emeaeers P14

CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Man accused of
Stealing from
former minister by
reason of service

A MAN accused of steal-
ing nearly $24,000 from for-
mer Cabinet minister and
businessman Leslie Miller
by reason of service was
arraigned in the Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday.

Bruce Newbold, 53, of
Treasure Cove, is accused
of stealing $23,850 in cash
from Mr Miller by reason
of his service. It is alleged
that Newbold stole the
money between Friday,
June 26, and Friday,
August 7.

Newbold had been
hired to install air- condi-
tioning vents at Mario’s
Place.

Newbold, who was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Guillimena Archer in
Court 10, Nassau Street,
pleaded not guilty to the
charge and was granted bail
in the sum of $10,000. The
case was adjourned to
December 9.

Mr Miller told The Tri-
bune yesterday that despite
the setbacks, his bowling
and entertainment centre
is now scheduled to open
on October 20.

Justices of the
Peace association
to hold meeting

THE recently formed
National Association of
Justices of the Peace will
hold its regular meeting at
the Police Training College
on Thompson Boulevard
on Wednesday, September
16.

The meeting will begin
at 7.30pm. All justices of
the peace are invited to
attend.

At the following meet-
ing on Wednesday, Sep-
tember 23, Commissioner
of Police Reginald Fergu-
son will speak on the topic:
“The Role of Justices of
the Peace in the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas.”

Minister Neko Grant’s
daughter dies in Florida

THE daughter of Works
Minister Neko Grant died in
hospital in Florida after losing
a battle with pneumonia.

Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on
September 6 — the day after Mr
Grant buried his mother, Reva
Grant and only months after
the death of his father.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Grant said
he and his family were “surviv-
ing” thanks to support from
friends and family.

"I'm surviving and thankful
for friends and my colleagues,
including the prime minister
and my fellow Cabinet minis-
ters who have been very sup-
portive. It is a very difficult
time.

“We are distressed as is

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intensive care unit of the Cleve-
land Clinic in Florida, where
she later died.

Ms Grant, a mother-of-one,
was graduated from St Mary's
University in the United States
with a bachelors degree in his-
tory before studying law at the
University of Leeds, where she
was graduated with honours in
2000.

In early 2001 she was called
to the English Bar and in Sep-
tember of that year she was
called to the Bahamas Bar.

Condolences have been

pouring in to the local online
message board bahamasis-
sues.com and the social net-
working site, Facebook.

"I knew her well, she was
one of the nicest and kindest
people you would ever meet.
She was down to earth and
could chill with anyone, never
using her politics for any sort of
attention. She will be missed.
My prayers for her family,"
wrote one person.

Funeral services for Ms
Grant are expected to be held
this Saturday.

expected,” Mr Grant said from
his home on Grand Bahama,
his voice breaking with emo-
tion.

Nekcarla, an attorney who

NEKCARLA GRANT

worked for the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's legal depart-
ment, was described yesterday
by her father as a "sweet" and



NEKO GRANT

"promising" young woman.
She was admitted to Doc-

tor's Hospital for treatment

before being transferred to the

Former PLP MP says he would
represent Exuma again if asked

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

FORMER PLP MP George Smith said he
would once again represent the island of Exuma if
and when he is called on to return to the House of
Assembly.

While hoping that some other younger person
from the island would step forward to represent the
constituency in the next general election, Mr Smith
—who has remained vocal on behalf of the people
of Exuma — said that he would have no difficulty
in serving his people once again.

“Tf that is what my people want, and if I can
serve the people of Exuma in these difficult times,
I would have no difficulty serving them in that
purpose,” Mr Smith told The Tribune yesterday.

While some will undoubtedly welcome the
thought of Mr Smith returning to front-line politics,
it is highly unlikely that the area’s current MP
Anthony Moss will share that view.

Mr Smith said he hopes the PLP will nominate
someone in Exuma who is at the very least “com-
petent.”

“Exuma is my home, and I hope for both parties
to run good individuals. Obviously I want my par-
ty, the PLP, to win and I want them to have some-
one who knows what is happening in the world and

has an ability to recognise what are the right things
to push for, to promote in the Bahamas,” he said.

Issues worth fighting for, Mr Smith said, include
improving education and the healthcare system,
reducing the high levels of violent crime, secur-
ing the country’s borders and strengthening the
Bahamas’ economy.

“Exuma needs someone who can contribute in
all those areas, and I believe there are possibilities
out there. I would not be presumptuous to think I
am the only person, but I can be someone. But I
would much prefer for the party to identify some-
one who can be a contributor around the table —
be it at the party caucus or to serve on the Cabinet
level and be a clarion voice for the Bahamian peo-
ple in Cabinet.

“The problems of today are more immense and
troubling than ever faced in the history of this
Bahamas. And every Bahamian should have a
representative who can speak clearly and interact
with the prime minister of the Bahamas even if they
are on opposite sides of the political divide,” Mr
Smith said.

The FNM was once rumoured to be looking to
run former Ambassador Joshua Sears in the Exu-
ma constituency.

However, it is now believed the party might
change this plan and run FNM Senator Anthony
Musgrove instead.

Former state minister: COLE ETRE ETE MTT Dams CTT ACA TT UT

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER state finance
minister yesterday said the gov-
ernment may not have “fully
appreciated the depth of the
recession” when it made its bud-
get forecasts and may have to
cut back public spending even
further.

James Smith, commenting on
the prime minister’s admission
that revenue intake fell around
$30 million below anticipation
in July and August, said he
expects the government to deliv-
er a mid-term budget early next
year which will “reflect realities.”

“T don’t think the government
had full appreciation for depth of
the recession... I think it was
still hopeful that this was just a
blip, and then the budget was
done predicated on this not
being as deep as it has shown
itself to be.”

“So what really needs to hap-
pen is go back, take a look to
see how long this will be and
adjust expenditure,” said Mr
Smith, minister of state for
finance between 2002 and 2007,
and former governor of the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

“The options are
clear — you either have
to adjust expenditure
to meet revenue down-
fall or borrow more
and that may not be
advisable given the
growth in the debt over
the next year or so.”

Speaking to another
daily last week, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said government
took in around $30 mil-
lion less than expected

like.”



JAMES SMITH

Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing
told The Tribune yes-
terday that it is hard to
predict revenue as it is
“always a function of
economic activity, and
economic activity is not
as predictable as you’d

“Youre dealing with
human conduct in terms
of economic transac-
he added.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing
reiterated that “what is

tions,”

is “sufficient evidence” already
available to determine that eco-
nomic conditions are unlikely to
improve before the end of 2009,
and therefore actual revenue col-
lected by the government is not
likely to pick up any time soon.

“Unless there’s some kind of
minor miracle I really don’t
expect to see a turn around. It’s
going to be a very soft winter,”
said Mr Smith, referring in par-
ticular to signs coming from the
tourism industry.

Delivering its annual budget

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Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
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Telephone: (242) 323-8240 » Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
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in July and August, the
first two months of this
budget year.

“Revenue is not performing
thus far as we expected,” said
Mr Ingraham.

However, suggesting that it is
too early to make gloomy pre-
dictions about how the budget
is set to perform overall, Mr
Ingraham noted that last year in
July and August revenue
appeared “normal” only to drop
off precipitously and unexpect-
edly in September when the
global financial crisis struck.

“And so what has happened
now in July and August (2009)
does not in and of itself give us a
sufficient yardstick to compare,”
said the prime minister.

meaningful” for gov-
ernment as it seeks to determine
how revenue is performing going
forward is how much money
comes into its coffers in Sep-
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“We always have contingen-
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get) year than the second.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM




PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

It’s time for Americans to get help

MAYBE the economic stress has been
too much. Looking back at the past few
months, it’s fair to wonder if America isn’t
going through a nervous breakdown.

The political debate has been poisoned
by birthers, deathers and wackos who smile
proudly while carrying signs comparing the
president to the Nazis. People who don’t
even know that Medicare is a government
programme have been trying to instruct us on
the best ways to reform health care.

The administration’s most popular anti-
recession initiative was a startlingly creative
economic breakthrough known as the cash-
for-clunkers programme. Over the weekend
(presumably while the president was sleep-
ing, because this occurred in the wee hours of
the morning), White House officials whis-
pered the official announcement that Van
Jones would no longer be working in the
administration.

The White House wishes it had never
heard of Jones, who was hired to be its point
person on green jobs. It turns out that Jones
had used a nasty anatomical slur to refer to
Republicans and once signed a petition sug-
gesting that President George W. Bush had
advance knowledge of the September 11
attacks.

There is no end to the craziness. The entire
Republican Party has decided that it is in
favour of absolutely nothing. The presiden-
t’s stimulus package? No way. Health care
reform? Forget about it.

There is not a thing you can come up with
that the GOP is for. Sunshine in the morn-
ing? Harry Reid couldn’t persuade a single
Senate Republican to vote yes.

Incredibly, the party’s poll numbers are
going up.

We need therapy. President Barack Oba-
ma _ addressed the nation’s public school
students Tuesday, urging them to work hard
and stay in school. The folks who bray at
the moon are outraged. Some of the cater-
wauling on the right has likened Obama to
Chairman Mao (and, yes, Hitler), and a fair
number of parents have bought into the
imbecilic notion that this is an effort at social-
ist or Communist indoctrination.

As one father from Texas, put it: “I don’t
want our schools turned over to some social-
ist movement.”

The wackiness is increasing, not dimin-
ishing, and it has a great potential for destruc-
tion. There is a real need for people who
know better to speak out in a concerted
effort to curb the appeal of the apostles of
the absurd.

But there is another type of disturbing
behaviour, coming from our political leaders

NISSAN PICKUP
Tough Body
Trouble-free

Easy to Maintain

and the public at large, that is also sympto-
matic of a society at loose ends. We seem
unable to face up to many of the hard truths
confronting the U.S. as we approach the end
of the first decade of the 21st century.

The Obama administration’s biggest
domestic priority is health care reform. But
the biggest issue confronting ordinary Amer-
icans right now — the biggest by far — is the
devastatingly weak employment environ-
ment. Politicians talk about it, but aggressive
job-creation efforts are not part of the poli-
cy mix.

Nearly 15 million Americans are unem-
ployed, according to official statistics. The
real numbers are far worse. The unemploy-
ment rate for black Americans is a back-
breaking 15.1 per cent.

Five million people have been unem-
ployed for more than six months, and the
consensus is that even when the recession
ends, the employment landscape will remain
dismal. A full recovery in employment will
take years. With jobless recoveries becoming
the norm, there is a real question as to
whether the U.S. economy is capable of pro-
viding sufficient employment for all who
want and need to work.

This is an overwhelming crisis that is not
being met with anything like the urgency
required. We’ve also been unable or unwill-
ing to face the hard truths about the wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan and the terrible toll
they are taking on America’s young fighting
men and women. Most of us don’t want to
know. Moreover, we’ve put the costs of these
wars on a credit card, without so much as a
second thought about what that does to our
long-term budget deficits or how it under-
mines much-needed initiatives here at home.

There are many other issues that we
remain in deep denial about. It’s not just the
bad economy that has thrown state and local
budgets into turmoil from coast to coast. It’s
our refusal to provide the tax revenues need-
ed to pay for essential public services. Exhib-
it A is California, which is now a basket case.

The serious wackos, the obsessive-com-
pulsive absurdists, may be beyond therapy.
But the rest of us could use some serious
adult counselling. We’ve forgotten many of
the fundamentals: how to live within our
means, the benefits of shared sacrifice, the
responsibilities that go with citizenship, the
importance of a well-rounded education, and
tolerance.

The first step, of course, is to recognize
that we have a problem.

(This article was written by Bob Herbert —
c.2009 New York Times News Service).






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Heartbroken
to read about
Abaco’s new
power plant

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

After reading the very infor-
mative article by Larry Smith
about Abaco’s new power
plant, I am heartbroken to
know that it is actually hap-
pening. Deep in the pine for-
est of Wilson City Abaco, the
lowest grade, most undesirable
fuel available called Bunker C
will be used to accommodate
the rapid growth of Abaco. The
oil ships will reportedly pass
right by our National Park reefs
near the Pelican Cays. Most
people are not aware this is
happening. Serious health
issues and environmental dis-
asters could be a result of this
type of plant.

Meanwhile, the top story of
the latest Abaconian newspa-
per starts off with “the northern
communities of Abaco came
out in full force for the arrival
of the 19 Miss Universe Con-
testants.” I really hope that we
have our priorities straight, and
come out in full force to the
meeting on September 10th
that will present the details of
the new power plant.

There are other ways to gen-
erate electricity which will not
potentially cause acid rain, can-
cer, waste management prob-
lems or devastating oil spills.

We live in a land with abun-
dant sunshine, steady ocean
breeze, and plenty of trash that
we need to recycle. The only
solution to the power problem
we are facing is to harness our
natural resources and build
solar and wind power plants,
and turn trash into electricity. If
this Bunker C power plant goes
up we will be contributing to
global warming, risking our
health and our beautiful reefs

letters@tribunemedia.net



and beaches. It sounds like the
tar that we used to step in on
the beach might be back, but
that was small things in com-
parison to what could happen.

Bunker C “sludge” is cur-
rently being used in the Clifton
Pier power plant in New Prov-
idence. After years of oily water
being discharged, reportedly
more than a million gallons of
oil have recently been recov-
ered from the caves below the
cliffs, costing over a million dol-
lars. On behalf of the people
of Abaco and the rest of the
Bahamas, no thank you!

Bunker C is the bottom of
the barrel, sludge like fuel that
has already devastated other
areas around the globe. Look it
up on the internet, you will be
shocked!

It cannot be recycled, so
what do we plan to do with it?
Whatever the plan is, someone
will be stuck with it. Although it
may be the least expensive fuel,
the costs of clean up and dis-
posal will soon add up. I
thought our country’s motto is
“forward, upward, onward,
together”. So much for “It’s
better in the Bahamas.”

We can’t just blame the gov-
ernment, we are all guilty of
indulgence which leads to this
problem. The ideal scenario for
most of us involves cooling out
in the AC while the clothes are
in the dryer, dishes in the dish-
washer, TV and computer on,
and, oh yes, gotta have hot
water all day long, even if we
don’t use it! Our government

is trying to meet our demands,
and we need to give them the
guidance and support to do so
in a conscious, healthy, and sus-
tainable manner. Renewable
energy is going mainstream in
other countries, and we need
to jump on board and get with
the programme.

Tread that renewable energy
options are “not yet feasible for
Abaco on a utility scale because
winds are inconsistent, solar
collectors require too much
land and the island’s current
waste stream cannot generate
enough power to meet
demand.” There is plenty of
land in Abaco, and it can be
used wisely to accommodate
the current growth that our
existing power plant cannot.
And it’s hard to believe that we
don’t have enough trash to turn
into power.

If everyone does their part
and makes an effort to reduce,
reuse and recycle, we can make
it work. Are you planning on
building a house? Start with
something as simple as an on
demand gas water heater. Why
waste electricity to heat water
when it’s not being used?

Thank you for taking the
time to read this, now please
go to the meeting on Septem-
beir 10th in Marsh Harbour,
(call BEC for time and place)
and do your research online.

Let’s get back to basics
before it’s too late! And since I
have your attention, just one
more thing — “When the pow-
er of love overwhelms the love
of power, the world will know
peace.” — author unknown.

ANONYMOUS
Nassau,
September, 2009.

A message to the PM: We
are awaiting hangman’s day

EDITOR, The Tribune.

mane? We are living behind bars just how the
prisoners are kept at Her Majesty prison, if a

Kindly grant me this request to print the fol-
lowing on the front page of your newspaper:

Honourable Prime Minister Sir, the time has
come when the people of the Bahamas are now
crying out to you or whoever is responsible to set
aside a hangman’s day. There is absolutely too
much killing in our land. We are now having
murders in threes in less than 24 hours, isn’t that
a shame.

We can no longer stand by and watch innocent
lives being taken away, even if it means we all
march around parliament and shut Bay Street
down until our cries are heard. We no longer
want to hear it’s inhumane, sir, we now want life
for life — just the other day a young mother of
two was nursing her three-month-old baby when
a nasty gunman came by and her life was brutal-
ly taken away. Is this inhumane, sir? A young
mother of three working ever so hard to sup-
port her children when suddenly she was shot
in the face by some nasty thugs. Sir, is this inhu-









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fire should ever break out God help us all
because there are absolutely no known escapes.
Sir, the people of this country are crying out to
you for help, have mercy, Mr Prime Minister,
and let the country know when you are going to
set aside a day only for hangman’s day, don’t
wait until it reaches your doorstep, sir, do some-
thing right now before it is to late.

Sir, can truly say the people of this country
are waiting for that day because the laws are on
the books or do we have to get consent from the
Privy Council, are we fully independent or not?

Sir, we are awaiting hangman’s day, we are
sick and tried of hearing empty voices we need
action and we need it right now.

ANGRY AND
VERY IRATE
CITIZEN
Nassau,

August 24, 2009.

What is with
RT

TDC



EDITOR, The Tribune.

What is with the blacked out,
one-way glass that pervades
every government office?

T have never seen such an act
of “customer unfriendliness”
anywhere.

Goodness knows what it is
they don’t want the public to
see but I hate trying to com-
municate with people through a
tiny hole, or leaning down to
talk under the slot below so
that they can hear me — it is
disgraceful.

Don’t tell me it is for securi-
ty because the banks don’t have
it. But here is the final straw —
it is now installed at Wulff
Road Police Station!

I can’t imagine how the
police intend to strengthen rela-
tionships with the communities
if we are met with such a phys-
ical barrier.

Come on government minis-
ters open up!

All the best!





KEN CHAPLIN
BRI, CRS
Broker/Realtor
Nassau,

August 31, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



Hotel Union ruling
sparks action from
concerned parties

THE ruling on Monday by }
Justice Neville Adderley that }
there should be nominations }
in the Bahamas Hotel Cater- }
ing and Allied Workers }
Union has caused all con- }
cerned parties to spring into }
action. :

Yesterday, Sydney Rolle, a }
recent third vice-president }
with the union, officially }
offered himself for the pres- }
idency. }

He said: “I know that God }
has prepared me for a time }
such as this. I believe that }
everything happens for a rea- }
son and everyone serves fora }
season. My season is now.” }

Mr Rolle, a member of the }
‘Redemption Team’ within }
the BHCAWU, said in his }
opinion the union has suf- }
fered enough. :

“I believe that my reputa- }
tion, integrity and the way I }
treat people will give the }
workers a choice and even- }
tually cause the union to }
have the person who has the }
workers best interest at }
heart.” he said. i

A former employee of }
Holiday Inn Hotel, where he }
worked from 1987 to 1995 }
and became a shop steward, }
Mr Rolle later moved to }
Atlantis where he was made }
chief shop steward for 13 }
years. :

He won the third vice- }
president position in the }
BHCAWU’s 2006 election. }

Mr Rolle promised that }
the redemption team will }
help the workers to “see a }
new day where they would }
be a participant in the union }
affairs not a spectator.” i

“The union belongs to the }
workers not the leaders,” he }
said. :

The hotel union’s nomina- }
tions were scheduled to take }
place last week, but Regis- }
trar of Trade Unions Har- }
court Brown had sought clar- }
ification on which nomina- }
tion day - May 11 or August }
31 - was the proper and cor- }
rect date to hold nomina- }
tions. ;

Legendary artist ‘Scrap Iron’ dies

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

LEGENDARY artist
William ‘Scrap Iron’ Cole-
brooke will be buried in Red
Bays, north-west Andros, this
weekend, following his death
at the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital.

Mr Colebrooke, 79, of Red

Bays, Andros, had been
admitted to hospital in early
August, and received surgery
for a brain hemorrhage.

Although the well-loved
father of five, and grandfather
of six, recovered from the
operation and was due to
return home this week, he
went into cardiac arrest on the
morning of Sunday, August
23, and his heart failed.

His family will take his body
back to Andros on Friday for
the funeral on Saturday.

Mr Colebrooke, also known
as ‘OP Tron’, was raised in the
historical Seminole settlement
of Red Bays in north-west
Andros, where he learned the
ancient art of basket-weaving
from his aunt, Omelia Mar-
shall.

As a youngster he was edu-

~ BAHAMAS FILM COMMISSIONER Craig Woods with Renel Brown after her return from Los Angeles.

RENEL Brown, the young Bahamian actress
praised for her outstanding performance in the
internationally acclaimed movie ‘Rain’, got a
chance to hone her craft during a two-week course
in acting and theatre at the University of California
(UCLA) this summer.

Renel, a 12th grader at C V Bethel High School,
studied under outstanding contemporary actors
and directors, who helped broaden her horizons
and acting insights. Under the tutelage of director
Philip Charles MacKenzie (Roseanne, Frasier,
Suddenly Susan, Just Shoot Me and the George
Lopez Show), the young actress learned about
developing characters as part of her Acting for
the Camera class.

Meanwhile, talent agent Maggie Murphy gave
tips on audition techniques and Broadway veteran
April Shawhan helped Renel with her other acting
techniques. Her other instructors included H
Richard Greene, an actor who has shared the stage
with James Earl Jones at the Yale Repertory The-
atre. In addition, he has appeared on such television
shows as The District, NYPD Blue and Without a
Trace. Renel broke onto the entertainment scene
when she was just 14 years old by landing the title
role of ‘Rain’ in her first film effort.

‘Rain’, directed by Bahamian Maria Govan, was
shown at Toronto International Film Festival and
opened the Bahamas International Film Festival in
December, 2008.

Now, at 16 years old, Renel is determined to
land other roles and possibly make a career of act-



ing. Her goals led her to enroll in UCLA’s Arts
Camp to study Acting for the Camera and Theatre.

“Right now I just want to concentrate on acting,”
she said. “Probably later on I'll try screen writing or
directing or something. But right now, my main
goal is acting.”

As she completes the 12th grade at C V Bethel
High School, Renel is content to wait on another
acting opportunity in the Bahamas. But she is will-
ing to travel and put her audition skills to the test
if the right opening presents itself.

Renel acknowledges that she was able to obtain
a lot of useful knowledge into the two-week trip to
Los Angeles. She had full days that began at
6.30am. After breakfast, she would walk one mile
to classes, where she would work from 9am to
5.30pm.

“The trip was really fun,” she said. “I met a lot of
people, I made a lot of friends. The teachers were
really, really nice. Sometimes they would spend
one-on-one time with you, and they would give you
exercises to put you in the state of mind that you
want to be in. And they would teach you how to
become the character instead of just acting like
the character.”

Renel says she is aware of the many people who
want to see her succeed. The long list of people
includes her family, teachers, school friends, and Dr
Keith Wisdom, director of public affairs at Cable
Bahamas. Renel pointed out that it was in large
part due to his interest that she had the opportunity
to study in Los Angeles.

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cated at the Red Bays All-
Age School and made a liv-
ing by fishing and sponging
before he was contracted to
work on the ‘project’- picking
fruit in the United States.

It was when he returned
home to Red Bays that Ms
Marshall, now 91, trained him
in the straw work and basket-
weaving techniques preserved
in the community for genera-
tions.

As he indulged his passion
and his talent for weaving,
‘Scrap Iron’ became interna-
tionally renowned and his
remarkable work is still on
display at the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington,
DC.

His granddaughter, Delissa
Barr, 24, said: “The wealth of
knowledge imparted to him
combined with his talented
hands help to make the name
‘Scrap Iron Colebrooke’ an
infamous name in North
Andros, throughout the
Bahamas and around the
world.

“OP Tron was truly a good-
will ambassador for his coun-
try. Some of his baskets are
displayed in the Smithsonian
Museum in Washington, DC,
and the largest basket on
record ever sold in the
Bahamas was sewn by OI!’
Tron Scrap Colebrooke. It was
so big that all 72 inches or six
feet of him was able to lie
down inside of it and not be
seen.”

She added: “Sewing bas-
kets was OI’ Iron’s passion.
He continued sewing baskets
and representing the Bahamas
all around the United States
of America.

“He made great strides for







William ‘Scrap Iron’ Colebrooke

the Ministry of Tourism and
his country.”

Although he sold large bas-
kets for around $900 a piece,
Mr Colebrooke struggled to
make sales in his later life. He
started to suffer from
headaches and ill-health, and
in 2008 he was diagnosed with
prostate cancer.

In the months before his
death Mr Colebrooke lived in
a dilapidated shack near his
family’s home in Red Bays,
and died with just $200 in his
savings account and no life
insurance.

Ms Barr said: “It’s very sad.
A lot of people liked him, he
was widely renowned for the
quality of his work, and he did
so much for this country.

“T regarded him as an elder
and he was very friendly to
everybody. He would call out
to us as kids to ask us about
school and encourage us, and
we used to call him “OP Iron’
because he worked with iron
when he was young, and his
hand was so hard, it was like
old iron.”

His funeral will be held at
Salem Baptist Church at 11am
on Saturday.

Donations can be made to
Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel in Mt Royal Avenue.

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The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act), which gives Utilities Regulation &
Campetition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime,

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persans in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition ta the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA's
website (www.urcabahamas.6s). These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees

Individual Operating and Spectrum licences

Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)
Various forms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and an Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Cormmission and the Television Regulatery Authority

The new regime encourages participation by all

continue in force to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Carmins
Act, the Unlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Litlities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

the website will also give you an

opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comme Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector is the
beginning of a new day tor all persons in The Bahamas.

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12.444 P 282,525, 7288
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Murer sparks ‘soft targets’ fear

FROM page one

being done with people with
guns to effect the armed
robbery and intimidate peo-
ple,” said Mr Ferguson.

"We've had a couple of
those things happen.
Whether we determine it as
a rising trend, it’s something
that could happen anytime.”

Mr Ferguson added that
armed robberies are often
carried out by young, inex-
perienced gunmen who may
have wanted to only scare
their targets.

"I say to people and to
would-be victims that you
have to be careful with peo-
ple armed with a gun. Often
they are young people and
they are more frightened
than you are on the receiv-
ing end. It might not be the
intent for them to shoot, but
it happens.”

Still, he said that more
police patrols in vulnerable
areas are needed to help
deter armed robberies in the
commercial sector and cau-
tioned business owners to
implement more stringent
security measures.

Mr Goodman, who lived
at Pinewood Gardens, was
standing outside the restau-
rant when several people
approached and sprayed
him with bullets.

ASP Walter Evans said
moments later three men
were seen fleeing the scene
on foot in a northern direc-
tion.

"The employee was dis-
covered lying on the ground
with gunshot injuries. EMS
personnel were called and






Murder retrial date

examined the victim who
had passed away," Mr
Evans said yesterday.

Mr Goodman's death —
which marked the 58th
homicide for the year —
comes three days after a
dreadlocked gunman shot
23-year-old Alex Dean
inside his family's hardware
store on Parkgate Road dur-
ing a brazen daylight armed
robbery attempt.

Mr Dean underwent
surgery for bullet wounds
to his back and was in dire
need of blood. The gunman
and his accomplice fled the
scene on foot.

About two weeks earlier,
mother-of-three Wendy
Bullard was gunned down
in front of her work place.
Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in
the face as two masked men
held up 21st Century Steel
Welding on Royal Palm
Street, just yards away from
St Gregory's Anglican
Church.

In the face of the rising
murder count, Bishop Sime-
on Hall of New Covenant
Baptist Church announced
his congregation has con-
structed a memorial wall for
murdered victims.

He plans to post the
names of all persons mur-
dered in the country within
the past 10 years.

ASP Evans said Mr
Goodman's death is being
investigated and several
people were being ques-
tioned.

¢ MEMORIAL
FOR VICTIMS:
SEE PAGE TWO

LOCAL NEWS

Myles Munroe calls for wider
debate on marital rape issue

FROM page one

current administration for failing to seek
consensus on the issue, and creating a
divide within the Christian community on
Monday.

While Dr Munroe describes rape as
“wrong, inhumane, unacceptable” and
something which “should not be named
among members of civil society in or out-
side a marital covenant”, he questions
whether “the long arm of the government”
should extend to the “marriage bed.”

He said: “The highly debated and sensi-
tive bill addressing the issue of ‘marital
rape’ is gravely serious, complex, compli-
cated and multi-dimensional, and has the
potential of levelling far-reaching and cross-
generational affects on any western society
built on Judaeo-Christian principles. The
impact and implications of such a law could
be incalculable.”

Dr Munroe said the Bill attempts to
criminalise the act of sex without linking it
to violence which may lead up to the act.

He said: “If the activities preceding the
sexual act are considered acts of force, vio-
lence, abuse and unreasonable pressure in
the context of marriage, then this can be
considered domestic violence, and if it ends
in sexual intercourse, then it could, and
perhaps should, be considered rape.

“Tt is important that no law be created to
criminalise the legitimate act of sex between
a married couple, but it should criminalise
any and all acts of forced violence, even if
the act results in sexual intercourse.”

The current law states: Rape is the act of
any person not under 14 years of age hav-
ing sexual intercourse with another person
who is not his spouse, and the amendment

would remove the words ‘who is not his
spouse’.

But Dr Munroe said the law should be
revised to include an act of violence or
forced sexual intercourse of “another per-
son who may or may not be his spouse.”

He said: “The amendment should not
allow the marital covenant to be used as a
shield to protect the individual from any act
of violence against another person whether
they are married, separated or divorced.

“However it should be focused on,
against and to address the preceding acts of
violence, extortion, threat and act of fraud
rather than against the act of sexual inter-
course.”

He has submitted a number of detailed
questions to government and called for the
passing of the Bill to be postponed while
they are carefully considered.

Dr Munroe wants a National Committee
to be established to study the concerns,
and hold broad consultation with the
“diverse minds” of the community.

He added: “Reconsider the vague ter-
minology of ‘marital rape’ as a broad paint
brush to address and cover a very compli-
cated and complex intimate and private
issue as sexual relations in marriage.

“Agree that this issue is not just a legal or
social issue but a moral and spiritually con-
fidential issue of a grave magnitude.

“Agree that ‘violent rape’ could and may
occur in marriage and should be legally
prevented, and judged by society, but the
framework and context for this judgment
must not jeopardize the security and in
some cases the fragility of the marriage
institution.

“Agree that caution and postponement is
evidence of strength and wisdom not weak-
ness and failure.”



MYLES MUNROE

Woman attacked by pit bulls scarred for life

Sands depot.

FROM page one

Choice and the Butler and

I would have been dead and
my baby would have had no
mother.”

Thanking Mr Dupuch for





























































FROM page one

Mr Ducille said there was always a difficulty in getting the
four attorneys for the four defendants in the case together.
He also told the court he is on the verge of filing a constitutional
motion for unreasonable delay in that case.

Senior Justice Allen scheduled the retrial for November 4
pending the outcome of Mr Ducille’s application and whether
or not the trial in Freeport will go on.

In July, McNeil’s three-week-long trial ended in a hung jury.

He is accused of causing the death of 37-year-old Harl Tay-
lor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18,
2008, while being concerned with another.

The internationally-renowned designer was found dead in his
bedroom at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street with mul-
tiple stab wounds. A broken knife was found on his bed.

McNeil has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and stat-
ed he did not kill Mr Taylor. He has been denied bail four times.

ZELMA MAURA, 30, was savagely attacked by the dogs.

Chinese firm expects Baha
Mar resort to open by 2013
FROM page one

Minister Hubert Ingraham said Government places “a very
high priority on the development of (Cable Beach/Baha Mar)”,
telling Chairman Wu that “tourism is an essential part of our
economy and the extent to which the Cable Beach strip can be
developed will be of immense benefit to the people of the
Bahamas.”

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice president of external
affairs, said yesterday the redevelopment is still set to take
place along the lines initially envisioned before the company
had to look for new financing.

He added that Bahamian contractors were likely to gain the
majority of work, “if not 100 per cent”, on the first phase of the
Cable Beach redevelopment whenever it went ahead.

Meanwhile, Baha Mar continues to hammer out an arrange-
ment on financing for the multi-billion dollar Baha Mar project
with the China Export-Import (Exim) Bank.

A framework agreement signed last Friday between Baha
Mar and the Chinese establishing the commercial terms for the
participation of the Exim Bank and CSCEC in the Baha Mar
Resort project was heralded as “an important milestone” in this
regard.

The resort is seeking to replace the financing it had been
promised at an earlier stage by Harrah’s Entertainment, who
afterwards pulled out of the arrangement, resulting in legal
action.

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Ms Maura, of Collies
Avenue, Kennedy Subdivi-
sion, said the dogs were “‘eat-
ing” her arm and leg for a
“good while” before she saw
a white truck stop at the near-
by traffic lights and she cried
out for help.

The single mother of a two-
year-old son said she was
grateful to still be alive when
Charles Dupuch, 49, stopped
his truck and opened the
door for her to crawl in over
him, bleeding, with torn
pieces of flesh hanging from
her leg.

Mr Dupuch, who collects
refuse from Bamboo Shack
restaurants, drove the injured
woman to the Bamboo Shack
in Soldier Road, from where
Emergency Medical Services
took her to hospital.

Ms Maura received five
stitches in her left hand and
arm, and six in her leg. But
three gaping holes in her low-
er left leg have been left open
while an infection clears up
before surgery.

She said: “It’s an ordeal
every day. I’m in pain all day
every day, I’m _ taking
painkillers and infection med-
ication all day, every day. I
will be scarred for life on my
arm and leg, and I just lie
here thinking about the dogs,
reliving the moment I was
attacked, and the fact that I
could be dead instead of liv-
ing.

“The pain was just unbear-
able, an unbearable pain that
just didn’t go away.

“T was afraid for my life,
and it all boiled down to the
fact that if those dogs got me,

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saving her life, Ms Maura
said: “When I saw how bad
my leg was, and how bad my
hand was, I wanted to pass
out. It was just so painful.
They were biting me for a
good while before he saved
me.”

Before going into surgery
yesterday to have skin grafts
on her leg, Ms Maura called
for tougher regulations to
control such dangerous dogs.

She said: “The police told
me it had to be a pit bull
because any other dog, when
they bite, normally let go and
don’t take out chunks of your
flesh. I think the dogs that
attacked me should be shot,
because I don’t want anyone
else to feel the pain I feel.

“We shouldn’t have vicious
dogs which escape and attack
people. They shouldn’t be
there.”

Ms Maura is so haunted by
the attack, she said she is now
afraid to go out at night, and
wary of all dogs.

She said: “I’m so scared, I
think of those dogs attacking
me. I’m going to be staying
home from now on.

“T feel like the dogs are
going to attack me every-
where I go.”

Chelsea’s Choice general
manager Tina Knowles said if
their dogs had breached the
area’s secure boundary, an
alarm would have been
raised. She said there are pit
bulls roaming the area who
have been known to attack
people.

Police are investigating the
incident, which happened at
about 4am last Friday.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE



Cn
Education in the Bahamas: Are

we overlooking our teachers?

YOUR SAY



By THE NASSAU INSTITUTE

THE Nassau Institute recently
interviewed a former teacher for
an "insider's" perspective on the
failing education system in the
Bahamas. The interview follows:

Nassau Institute (NI): What do
you see as one of the most funda-
mental issues facing education in
the Bahamas?

Teacher: The basic issue that
virtually no one addresses is the
teachers. Essentially the overriding
problem is the poor quality of
teachers in the government
schools and most of the smaller
schools run by scripture-oriented
religious groups. As long as the
teachers are incompetent absolute-
ly nothing else will work.

NE: Well how does that jive with
the point that our parents do not
do their part?

Teacher: While lack of proper
parenting is a contributing factor,
there is no doubt that bad teachers
are the problem.

NI: That is a serious allegation.
Care to expand on that?

Teacher: The qualifications and
performance of many of the teach-
ers leave a lot to be desired. They
teach by rote and are deadly slow
so they can't get through the syl-
labus. Many have inferior qualifi-
cations and if they are head of sub-
jects this has the effect of chasing
out good teachers. In many cases
the older teachers can be said to
‘have retired on the job' to use a
term they use themselves. They
are teaching with the same poor
materials and methods they used
30 years ago.

NI: How do you know this?
Teacher: Many young teachers

who completed degrees in the
United States, or COB/UWI, with









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the help of government scholar-
ships, returned home to work for
the government schools to pay
back their loan requirement. Hay-
ing met some of them again they
said they had bought out of the
government schools, or left as
soon as they could, because some
incompetent and disinterested
teacher was in charge and they
couldn't do their job properly.

NI: Well doesn't this happen in
the private school system as well?

Teacher: In the private system,
schools can fire bad teachers, and,
in most cases they do if the results
are poor. Unfortunately some of
these schools pay really low wages
and require absolute religious con-
formity and so can't afford to fire
anyone, they just want someone
in the classroom, so these pull
down the results in the private sec-
tor.

NI: What about the mainstream
religious schools. Don't some of
them maintain excellent results?

Teacher: Well yes, but they
seem to have risen above their
religious affiliation. They don't
require teachers or students to be
strict devotees to their own
denomination. Nevertheless reli-
gious education can be an issue. It
can dominate the curriculum to
the detriment of basic teaching, A
look at the number of entries in
the BGCSE tables show that this is
the third most entered subject
after math and English.

NI: So why can't we change this
to encourage more accountability
from the teachers and schools, and
more time on key subjects?

Teacher: Both the religious
aspect and the teachers are cul-
turally untouchable issues, there
is no way any politician is going to
suggest spending less time on reli-
gion and retiring or replacing
teachers.

Synergy Bahamas —



NI: Well what about privatisa-
tion? Something we think will
help.

Teacher: Privatisation would
only help at the top end of the sys-
tem, where it already works. We
already have a large number of
under-performing private schools,
so no point in making people or
the government pay for more of
this.

NI: So how can we overcome
this problem of incompetent
teachers?

Teacher: One possible approach
is to require teachers to have, say,
five-yearly re-certification based
on professional assessments and
compulsory retraining where nec-
essary. I understand that the Col-
lege of the Bahamas basically has
this system in place for its faculty,
although it is not necessarily
enforced.

NI: So what do we do about
schools that are failing across the
board?

Teacher: Similarly, schools need
to be approved and licensed, and
also re-certified periodically or
closed down. There have to be
consequences for failure to edu-
cate our children.

NI: Any thing else you would
like to say?

Teacher: To reiterate, if the
country does not deal with the
sub-par teachers in the system,
there will be little improvement
in education. Equally, just one
inspired teacher can transform a
generation of students.

NI: Thank you for your time.

Teacher: My pleasure. Let's
hope for the best for our children.

The Nassau Institute is an inde-
pendent, a-political, non-profit
institute that promotes economic
growth in a free market economy
with limited government, in a soci-
ety that embraces the rule of law
and the right to private property.

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7

ACCREDITED CERTIFICATE COURSE

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

This course covers personnel functions and procedures with
Emphases on human resource planning, personnel selection,
training and development of employees, compensation,

appraisal and job analysis.
12 September, 2009
Credit Cards Accepted
ESD emer
Tel: 324-4625

Registration deadline:

POSITION AVAILABLE

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT - PRIVATE BANKING

Applications are invited from persons for the position
of Assistant Vice-President, Private Banking

Job Summary

The Candidate must have an established international
client base with the proven ability to generate new client
relationships and develop the client base in line with the
Bank’s products and services.

Responsibilities

* Develop and introduce new business in line with the
institution’s established policies and procedures

* Perform necessary client administrative duties and promote
established products and services

¢ Have a sound working knowledge of The Bahamas’ KYC
and AML requirements

¢ Assist with communication and translation of foreign
correspondence

* Provide and /or communicate investment services /
mandates to clients

¢ Travel will be required

Qualifications/Requirements:

¢ Prior experience in marketing in the financial services
environment for a minimum of eight years is expected.

* Knowledge and experience in the private banking and
investments is required

* Must have established clientele

¢ Must be fluent in English and French.

Remuneration is commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may apply by submitting
resumes by e-mail to
bsa.resume@gmail.com
reference
“Assistant Vice President Private Banking”
on or before Friday, 18" September, 2009.



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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Commission
of Inquiry
report

for the TCI

THE unexpurgated
266-page Commission
of Inquiry report for
the Turks & Caicos
Islands was published
for the first time by an
Internet whistleblowing
service. This site,
called WikiLeaks,
offers a unique forum
for dissidents and jour-
nalists struggling
against official secrecy,
government corruption
and back-room dealing.

The British-appoint-
ed inquiry into high-
level corruption in the
TCI issued its final
report on July 18.

But authorities
removed sections of the
document (after some
of those named filed
law suits) and then
pulled it altogether,
issuing a media gag
order to boot.

Report

However, a few hours
later the full report was
published on Wik-
iLeaks and, realising
that the information
was now in the public
domain, the gag order
was lifted by the TCI's
chief justice on July 21.

WikiLeaks says it is
dedicated to revealing
the unethical behaviour
of governments and
institutions around the
world.

Documents that are
"classified, censored or
otherwise opaque to
the public record” can
now be published
anonymously on this
site, which was founded
by dissidents, journal-
ists and techies from
the US, Taiwan,
Europe, Australia and
South Africa. Wik-
iLeaks has been
described as acting like
a global freedom of
information act or “an
intelligence agency for
the people."

WikiLeaks portrays
itself as following in the
tradition of the famous
1971 US Supreme
Court ruling in the Pen-
tagon Papers case.

That ruling declared
that only a free and
unrestrained press can
effectively expose
deception in govern-
ment.

Turks and Caicos
and the Bahamas

By LARRY SMITH

IF YOU wanted a good
laugh, you should have tuned
in last week to Wendall
Jones’ conversation with for-
mer Turks & Caicos premier
Michael Misick.

Misick said he was being
punished for his success in
developing the TCI as the
Monte Carlo of the
Caribbean: "The British used
allegations of corruption to
stop our move towards inde-
pendence,” he asserted. "We
never violated the laws or
the constitution."

In a variation on this
theme, he also told The Lon-
don Times that the recent
suspension of the TCI con-
stitution "has less to do with
the corruption and more to
do with (British) policy, par-
ticularly in relation to tax
havens."

Talk about putting lipstick
on a pig!

The reality that the British
are still in control of TCI is
an historical oddity — noth-
ing more. In fact, they have
been trying to offload the
islands since the early days
of decolonisation, beginning
with the short-lived West
Indies Federation in the
1950s. But it is in no-one's
interest to create a failed
mini-state.

Although the TCI are part
of the Bahamian archipelago
and share a similar history,
responsibility for their
administration over the past
300 years has shifted from
Bermuda to the Bahamas to
Jamaica and back to the
Bahamas. They are now one
of 14 self-governing rem-
nants of the former British
Empire scattered around the
globe and known collective-
ly as the Overseas Territo-
ries.

Although salt-raking was
a big business in the early
days of colonisation, for most
of their history the TCI have
been dirt poor and sparsely
populated. In fact, for most
of the 20th century the
islands exported labour to
the Bahamas, much like
Haiti does today.

In 1958, Britain tried to
group as many of its
Caribbean possessions as
possible into a Federation
based in Trinidad that would
become independent as a sin-
gle unit. But it turned out to
be financially and politically
impractical, and the Federa-
tion was dissolved in 1962.
Jamaica and Trinidad gained

Otc oe: eee der) eee ce]

aS Bahamas

REGISTRATION NOW UNTIL

eel ae cee

independence shortly after.

But the TCI did not want
to be part of an independent
Jamaica, so in 1964 the
British officially proposed a
merger with the Bahamas. A
TCI delegation met with a
United Bahamian Party gov-
ernment delegation at the
Carlton House downtown
that same year.

Sir Arthur Foulkes, then a
member of the opposition
Progressive Liberal Party,
recalls those meetings: "Most
of us in the PLP were sym-
pathetic to closer ties, but
after 1967 (when the PLP
came to power) there were
other things to do and I don't
recall any structured talks
about it."

At the time the TCI was
not as developed as it is now
and Turks Islanders came
freely to The Bahamas to
work, often considering
themselves Bahamians. One
of the issues in the 1964 talks
was the level of subsidy that
the British would provide for
the Bahamas to take on
responsibility for the 6,000
Turks Islanders.

Talks

Obviously, no agreement
came out of those explorato-
ry talks, but in the hope that
a union could eventually be
achieved, Britain made the
governor of the Bahamas the
governor of the Turks and
Caicos. But when we became
independent in 1973 there
seemed no further prospect
of a merger. The TCI asked
for an association with Cana-
da, but that was turned down
by the Canadian government
in 1974.

Two years later the TCI
received its own Westmin-
ster-style constitution with a
resident governor, and polit-
ical parties were formed. The
first elections were won by
the People’s Democratic
Movement, led by James
‘JAGS' McCartney who
pressed for full self-govern-
ment. In 1979, the British —
who were heavily subsidis-
ing the territory's annual
budget — set an 18-month
deadline for independence.

But this plan was derailed



when McCartney died in a
plane crash in 1980. The
commitment to indepen-
dence had been unpopular
with voters anyway and in
the subsequent election the
“conservative” Progressive
National Party led by Nor-
man Saunders came to pow-
er. According to historian
George Drower's book
about the Overseas Territo-
ries, Saunders “preferred to
shelve the idea of decolo-
nization and concentrate on
developing the economy."

And that is just what he
did — in his own special way
— turning the TCI into a
drug transshipment haven,
following the Bahamian
example. In 1985, Saunders
and his development minis-
ter Stafford Missick, who was
a former official of the
Bahamas Central Bank, were
arrested in Miami on drug
trafficking and bribery
charges. They were convicted
and imprisoned, and the
British suspended the con-
stitution and appointed a
commission of inquiry.

The 1986 Inquiry cited
evidence of persistent uncon-
stitutional behaviour, con-
traventions of fundamental
freedoms, political discrimi-
nation, and maladministra-
tion at every level of the TCI
government. A new consti-
tution was implemented in
1988 and tourism and off-
shore finance became the
twin pillars of the economy
— again, following the
Bahamian example. In fact,
during the years leading up
to the present global eco-
nomic crisis, the territory's
growth was among the high-
est in the world.

That was then, this is now.
The most recent inquiry has
identified "systemic corrup-
tion" in government, the leg-
islature and the civil service
— mainly the acceptance of
bribes from overseas devel-
opers and investors during
the economic bubble that
preceded the current reces-
sion.

The inquiry also pointed
to a serious deterioration in
the territory's systems of gov-
ernance as well as to financial
collapse, caused by the
"extravagant and ill-judged



FORMER Turks & Caicos
premier Michael Misick

commitments of those in
public office," and the
absence of effective checks
and balances.

Criminal investigations of
five cabinet ministers have
been launched — including
Missick — and a special judi-
cial process for prosecutions
has been recommended. The
inquiry report called for
direct rule from London
while constitutional and legal
reforms are enacted over the
next two years by a gover-
nor-in-council. Elections are
now set for July 2011.

Investigation

A veteran fraud investi-
gator has been brought in by
the governor to act as spe-
cial prosecutor, but Misick
and his fellow ministers have
yet to be charged. In fact, the
investigations could take
more than a year.

The inquiry report also
referred to widespread alle-
gations of vote buying and
rigging of constituency rolls
in a territory where suffrage
is limited to less than half of
the adult population —
about 7,000 people. Misick
himself was said to have
adopted a lifestyle and
spending habits that far
exceeded his income as pre-
mier, while his private busi-
ness interests expanded
exponentially.

"The PNP funded him to
the tune of $500,000 follow-
ing the 2003 election,” the
report said. "He was at lib-
erty to spend party funds at
will — with hundreds of
thousands going out to his
wife's US stylist and to pay
for household bric a brac.
This was supplemented by
personal donations to him
largely made through his

LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING

ih
(Gill UU

brother and including
$500,000 from a developer
who received belongership,
and lavish spending of gov-
ernment funds for worldwide
travel, a private jet and con-
tracts for his wife.

"The government provid-
ed him with two official resi-
dences and covered house-
hold expenses. He received a
number of land grants as well
as commissions and finders
fees from developers seek-
ing land. He also received
interests in several business-
es and millions in loans that
he did not have to repay. He
failed to disclose his interests
or to respond to the com-
mission's inquiries."

In short, the report said,
quoting the humorist P G
Wodehouse, Misick's behav-
iour as premier “would have
caused raised eyebrows in
the foc'sle of a pirate sloop."

Perhaps the most telling
recommendation of the
inquiry was to remove the
wide discretionary powers of
ministers in the disposal of
crown land, the award of
contracts, the approval of
developments, and immigra-
tion matters. The discre-
tionary powers of cabinet
ministers is an issue of great
concern in the Bahamas too.

It would be fair to say that
the 2009 TCI inquiry report
(you can read it here:
http://88.80.16.63/leak/
tci-inquiry-final-report-
unredacted-2009.pdf) is
equally, if not more damn-
ing than the 1967 inquiry into
government corruption from
casino gambling under the
UBP, or the 1984 inquiry
into official corruption from
drug smuggling under the
PLP

Back in the 1960s, the
TCI's impoverished inhabi-
tants would have added two
seats to our House of Assem-
bly as well as an unwanted,
but relatively modest, bur-
den on government finances.
But otherwise, we can sur-
mise that it would have pro-
ceeded fairly easily.

In the light of the inquiry
report, acting on Misick's
recent suggestion of a self-
governing federation with
the Bahamas today would
present enormous practical
difficulties and raise some
critical governance issues.

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net
Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL SPORTS



www.tribume2

MARK KNOWLES (left) AND MAHESH BHUPATHI had to fight off their stiffest challenge so far at the US Open Grand Slam Tournament
by pulling off a 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (4) decision yesterday over the team of Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia and Michael Llodra of France.

Knowles, Bhupathi
advance to semis

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was probably the most
difficult match for Mark
Knowles and Mahesh Bhu-
pathi, but they survived a
gruelling three-setter to
advance to the semifinal of
the men’s doubles in Flush-
ing Meadows, New York.

The number three seeded
team had to fight off their
stiffest challenge so far at the
US Open Grand Slam Tour-
nament by pulling off a 6-4,
4-6, 7-6 (4) decision yester-
day over the team of Ivan
Ljubicic of Croatia and
Michael Llodra of France.

The third set tie-breaker
lasted 49 minutes whereas
they completed the first set
in just 32 minutes and need-
ed another 35 to play the sec-
ond.

“Tt was a tough match, but
we played very well. It was a
good match to win,” said
Knowles, who is still playing
with nine stitches in his right
ring finger from an accident
he suffered in the elevator
at the Tennis Center last
Tuesday.

After easily taking the first
set, Knowles said they really
got surprised when Ljubicic
and Llodra rallied back to
even the score in the second
set.

In the third, they battled
to a 4-4 tie before Knowles

Ry
a |



US OPEN

and Bhupathi were able to
open a slight 6-4 advantage
and they managed to go on
to secure the win.

“We felt comfortable
going in. We felt great about
our performance,” said
Knowles, who noted that
Llodra is a great doubles
player and Lyjubicic is a for-
mer number three singles
player in the world.

“They (Llodra and Ljubi-
cic) have a lot of fire power.
We thought we could win it
in two sets, but they raised
their level, which was a cred-
it to them. We didn’t have
too many opportunities in
the third set, so I had a feel-
ing that it would have gone
down to a tie breaker. We
were just fortunate to win at
the end.”

While he was glad that
they got the win, Knowles
admitted that they didn’t
anticipate having to play
right down the wire.

“We didn’t panic when we
were put in that situation,”
he said. “We were able to
get the W and move on.
We’re in the semifinal now
and we’re playing good ten-
nis. We will have to play
even better tennis to move
on. But we’re looking for-
ward to the challenge.”

They will play either the

be a ra a i,

No.2 team of Daniel Nestor
of Canada and Nenad
Zimonjic from Serbia or the
No.5 team of Max Mirnyi
from Belarus and Andy Ram
of Israel.

No doubt the match-up
that everyone wants to see
is against Nestor and Zimon-
jic.

Nestor is a former partner
of Knowles. Together, the
duo won the US Open title
in 2004. They also won the
Australian Open in 2002 and
the French Open at Roland
Garros in 2007.

This year, they have split
their recent head-to-head
match-up with Knowles and
Bhupathi winning in the
semifinal in Montreal, Cana-
da, at the ATP World Tour
Masters before Nestor and
Zimonjic came right back to
return the favour at the ATP
World Tour Masters in
Cincinnati, Ohio.

“We know each other very
well. Obviously there is a lot
of history there,” Knowles
said. “But we are going to be
focused on winning, no mat-
ter who we get. We just want
to win to get to another
Grand Slam final.”

Knowles said he’s still
playing with the nine stitches
in his right hand, but he’s
recovering very well. He just
wants to block it out and try
to play as best as he can.

So far this year, Knowles
and Bhupathi have only won

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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS







JUSTIN LUNN

Lunn bows
out of tourney
With hip injury

Duo are named for tennis camp in Cuba







JUSTIN Roberts (#1 COTECC)
and Erin Strachan have been named
for an International Tennis Federa-
tion 13 & Under Regional Training
Camp in Havana, Cuba.

The camp is part of the ITF Devel-
opment Programme, which is
financed by the ITF and Grand Slam
Development Fund.

The camp will be conducted by
Anthony Jeremiah (ITF Develop-
ment Officer for the Caribbean),
Juan Pino, Henry Wilfredo and
Belkis Rodriguez (Cuba).

The camp is set for September 11-
20 at the Hotel Occidental Miramar
in Havana, Cuba, and will focus on
the players’ fitness, tactical ability,
mental and physical ability to per-
form at a high level.

At the end of the camp the players
may have the opportunity to be
selected on to the ITF/COTECC
Touring Team to COSAT from the
middle of January 2010 to compete in
four weeks of competition from
Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and



Bolivia.

During the period 1986-2008,
more than US$67million has been
invested by the ITF and the Grand
Slam Nations in tennis development
activities in 150 countries worldwide.

Programme

In 2008, US$4.4million was spent
on the Development Programme
with US$2.7million being invested
by the ITF and the balance of
US$1.7million contributed by the
Grand Slam nations to the Grand
Slam Development Fund partly from
proceeds generated from the ATP
World Tour Finals.

This year’s ATP World Tour
Finals is scheduled to be held in Lon-
don, England, November 22-29, 2009.

With the aim of raising the level of
tennis worldwide and increasing the
number of countries competing in
mainstream international tennis, the
ITF Development Programme
includes a broad range of initiatives

in less developed countries ranging
from the grass roots to Grand Slams.

Activities include ITF/Grand Slam
touring teams, funding for junior and
professional tournaments, training
centres, coaches education, the sup-
ply of tennis equipment and the ITF
Junior Tennis Initiative —a 14 &
under player development pro-
gramme, which encompasses the
School Tennis Initiative and Perfor-
mance Tennis Initiative programmes.

Special emphasis has been placed
on junior tennis where regional tour-
nament circuits have been developed
and teams of young players compete
outside their own region.

In 2008, 25 regional circuits were
supported by the Development Pro-
gramme providing much needed
competition for the best players at
18, 16 and 14 & under age groups
across the globe (Central America
& Caribbean, South America, East-
ern Europe, Africa, Asia and Pacific
Oceania).

Players who perform well at these

regional circuits are invited to join
an international touring team.

The ITF/Grand Slam touring team
programme aims to facilitate the
transition of talented players through
regional and international competi-
tions and onto the professional ranks.

In 2008, there were 19 ITF/Grand
Slam Touring Teams involving 160
players from 68 different countries.

Former ITF/Grand Slam Touring
Team members include: Gustavo
Kuerten (Brazil), Nicolas Massu
(Chile), Nicolas Lapentti (Ecuador),
Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi
(India), Angelique Widjaja (Indone-
sia), Eleni Daniilidou (Greece),
Younes El Aynaoui (Morocco),
Paradorn Srichaphan (Thailand),
Cara Black (Zimbabwe), Jarkko
Nieminen (Finland), Florin Mergea
(Romania), Marcos Baghdatis
(Cyprus), Kateryna Bondarenko
(Ukraine), Viktoria Azarenka
(Belarus), Uladzimir Ignatik
(Belarus) and Ricardas Berankis
(Lithuania).

AFTER getting through
the first two rounds, Justin
Lunn had to bow out of the
third round of the Miramar
Summer Open Tennis
Tournament in Florida with
a hip injury.

Lunn defeated South
Korean player Shin
Yeoung Ahn in the first
round of the Miramar Sum-
mer Open Tennis Tourna-
ment in Florida with a 3-6,
7-6 (4), 7-5 victory.

In the second round,
Lunn defeated the No. 1
seed of the tournament
Viju George (USA) 6-3, 7-
6(3).

This was a great win for
Lunn as George has a
Florida Men's Open Singles
seeding ranking of number
five (5) and an ATP rank-
ing of 1554.

But in the third round,
Lunn was playing Jean
March Bazanne after trail-
ing 6-4, 2-0, he was forced
to retire with a hip injury.

Lunn now has his eyes set
on attaining ATP points
and becoming a member of
the 2010 Bahamas Davis
Cup Team.

Masters
track
meeting
tonight

THE Masters Track and
Field Association will hold
ameeting tonight at the
Ministry of Education’s
Conference Room at 7 pm
for all those persons who
are interested in being a
part of the association.

Those interested must be
35 years and older.

The interim committee Is
being headed by Foster
Dorsett.

‘Father of mixed martial
arts’ to headline Science
of Violence seminar

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tripunemedia.net

THE budding growth of the
Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) com-
munity will receive an additional
boost of exposure when "the father
of MMA in the Bahamas" head-
lines a top event.

Personal Protection Concepts is
scheduled to host a seminar enti-
tled the "Science of Violence" on
September 19 at the British Colo-
nial Hilton, featuring former pro-
fessional MMA fighter Scott Groff.

The four-hour event, which
begins at 10am, will feature tutori-
als on fighting strategies, various
techniques, and nuances of the
sport ranging from the most basic
principles to advanced.

Groff is credited with populariz-
ing the sport of MMA in the
Bahamas, training some of the
sport's first local participants as far
back as 1992.

He brings over 20 years of expe-
rience training others in the sport
and spent years on professional cir-
cuits in the United States and
Japan.

Oran Rolle, chief instructor at
Personal Protection Concepts, said
the event should serve as a means
to help those interested in the sport
with a headstart towards training.

"As of this moment we know we
have a lot of people eager to get
involved and we expect this event
to be a great one, not just for the
MMA community but for those on
the outside looking to get involved
for the first time," he said. "I think
we are capable of hosting a major
MMA event in the near future. We
have the grassroots support and
the interest is there so that is defi-

FORMER professional Mixed Martial Arts fighter Scott Groff...

nitely something that can be
looked into."

Rolle said the profile of the sport
continues to grow. “We have been
trying to have at least one event
per month to increase the expo-
sure of the sport. People know
much about martial arts but MMA
is something that has taken off and
exploded in popularity recently all
over the world," he said.

"MMA has just started to get
bigger here at home. We have the
talent and the training, with bet-
ter facilities we could see fighters
represent the Bahamas all over in
various promotions and represent-
ing the country."

Bahamians making major
impacts on the international MMA
scene include Yves Edwards, cred-
ited with inventing the "Thug-Jit-
su" fighting style and as a light-
weight fighter in organisations such
as the UFC, PRIDE, Bodog-
FIGHT, and EliteXC; and Inter-
net sensation turned MMA fighter,
Kevin "Kimbo Slice" Ferguson.

"Those guys have done so much
because local fighters were able to
see Bahamians reach the top level
in the sport so it lets them know
that opportunity is there if they
continue to pursue the sport in the
right way,” Rolle said.

“MMA is one of those disci-
plines for versatile athletes that
have been largely under exposed.
We have a great talent pool to
choose from here and when we
have martial artists that travel, tra-
ditionally they do very well so we
know the base is there for MMA
training. We are eager about the
turnout of the seminar and we
expect it to be a stepping stone to
greater MMA ventures in the
future."



Forbes back as GSSSA boss after more than decade

FROM page 11

persons attended the meeting.

“We're going to try to get back to
where we used to be, getting the
schedule on time and hopefully ini-
tiate some new sports for exhibi-
tion purposes so that we can even-
tually build them into the school
sports programme,” Forbes pro-
jected.

“But we have a lot of work ahead
of us. We had some not too cor-
dial relationships with some peo-
ple, namely the Principals Associa-
tion and the Ministry of Education
as well as Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture.”

One of the first orders of busi-
ness off the playing field, according
to Forbes, will be to bury the hatch-

et with the above mentioned enti-
ties and eventually get the associa-
tion back to where it should be.
“lm not happy to say that ’m
pleased with where we are right
now because I feel if we had the
same administration in place when
I served, we would have been much
further ahead,” Forbes said.

Bumps

“That being said, you have to
accept the bumps being in the road
and the hills and valleys to cross
over, but what pleased me most
was the show of confidence that
the people had in me especially.”

Conyers, a physical education
teacher at CH Reeves, said they
can only go forward, leaving all of

the problems they encountered in
the past behind them.

“He has some good ideas and I
think we all can work together as a
team, so we’re looking forward to
some great things happening for
them,” Conyers said.

Forbes, who is stationed at CI
Gibson, said after the service that
Conyers, Toote, Pratt-Miller and
Gibson rendered up to last year
when the association experienced
further turmoil in its leadership, he
was happy that they continued to
stay on.

The GSSSA will now prepare for
the start of its new season with the
commencement of volleyball on
Monday, September 28 and they
will also revert back to the origi-
nal constitution that they had in

place before some changes were
made to a new one that has not yet
been ratified.

Games

While the senior boys and girls
will play their games at the DW
Davis and CI Gibson Gymnasiums,
the junior boys and girls will play at
the RM Bailey and Tom ‘The Bird’
Grant volleyball outdoor courts.

“We had some discussion about
whether we would change volley-
ball to softball because all of the
associations are now playing soft-
ball, even the parent associations
are playing softball right now,”
Forbes said.

“But because we ended it with
softball last year, some people start-

ed practicing volleyball before the
school year was completed, so we
thought we will continue with that
this year and hopefully the next
year we will make the switch with
softball at the start.”

Bill Morgan is expected to once
again serve as the chairman of the
scheduling committee for all sports.

Going into the new season, there
have been some notable changes
in the Physical Education Depart-
ment.

Pratt-Miller has been moved
from AF Adderley Junior High to
RM Bailey, Chevy Simmons has
gone from SC McPherson Junior
High to RM Bailey and Torsheka
Cox is now at Government High
Secondary after working at the new
Anatol Rodgers High School.

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THE TRIBUNE

3 |

WEDNESDAY,



_
i

PAGE 11

Or





ts

SEPTEMBER 9,




2009

PAGE 10 @ ‘Father of mixed martial arts...’

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

overnment
has decided
to recognise
veteran tour-
ing tennis
pro Mark Knowles during a
dinner celebration at Gov-
ernment House on Sunday.
He will be honoured for
teaming up with his German
partner Anna-Lena Groene-
fled in July to win the mixed
doubles Grand Slam title at
Wimbledon, England.

“Again because of what’s
happening in the economy,
we won't do anything big,”
Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Ban-
nister told The Tribune yes-
terday. He said Knowles will
be presented with a plaque.

As for Knowles’ achieve-
ment, Bannister said he’s
delighted to be sitting in the
chair as the minister of sports
when there are performances
turned in at that level in the
sport.

The Grand Slams are the
four most prestigious tour-
naments in the world, com-
prising of the Australian
Open, Roland Garros (the
French Open), Wimbledon
and the US Open. They are
distinguished by the fact that

MARK KNOWLES

they draw the top players in
the world and are held over a
two week period.

And with the IAAF’s 12th
World Championships in
Athletics over and the track
and field season winding
down, there has been a lot
of questions surrounding a

celebration for Team
Bahamas.
Bannister says the

Bahamas Government has
some tentative plans to hon-
our the 24-member team that
won two medals last month
in Berlin, Germany.

But he noted that the exact
plans could not be released
until they have been
approved. However, he did
indicate that there will be
some type of celebration in
October.

“Because of the state of
the economy, we won’t do

Forbes back
as GSSSA boss
after more than
one decade

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER more than a
decade away from office,
Alfred Forbes is back at the
helm as the president of the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association
(GSSSA).

During the election of offi-
cers on Monday at R M Bai-
ley Secondary High School,
Forbes reassumed the top
post of the association.

“Tm excited really because
of the way things have been
going for the last 3-4 years,”
said Forbes in his initial com-
ments as he makes his return
to office after he served as
president from 1993-2003.

“It’s been in a downward
spiral I think, but now that
we have some new blood, I
think we’re going to see a
resurgence of the GSSSA as
it used to be and hopefully
we will even take it to anoth-
er level.”

Dubbing his new two-year
term in office as “The Next
Level,” Forbes will have
some familiar faces who
were involved over the last
few years to work with him
on his staff.

Lenora Conyers will be the
first vice president, Kevin
‘KJ? Johnson second vice
president, Keisha Pratt-
Miller secretary, Melonie
Gibson assistant secretary,
Marilyn Toote treasurer and
Floyd Armbrister, assistant
treasurer.

All of the officers were
voted in unopposed by the
15 schools registered in the
association. More than 50

SEE page 10



ALFRED FORBES



“T’m excited really
because of the way
things have been
going for the last
3-4 years...It’s been
in a downward
spiral I think, but
now that we have
some new blood, I
think we’re going to
see a resurgence of
the GSSSA as it used
to be and hopefully
we will even take it
to another level.”

—A Forbes



anything like we’ve done in
the past,” was all that Ban-
nister was willing to disclose
at the time.

Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie won an individual bronze
medal in the women’s 200
metres and she anchored the
women’s 4 x 100 relay team
of Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson
(pop-off), Chandra Sturrup
(second) and Christine
Amertil (third) to a silver
medal.

Bannister said Knowles,
who has also won the Aus-
tralian Open, Roland Gar-
ros and French Open with
former men’s doubles part-
ner Daniel Nestor of Cana-
da, has achieved his success
with a lot of perseverance.

“T want to commend








Knowles,
Bhupathi
advance

to semis...
See page 9

Sports minister says government
has tentative plans to honour the
Bahamas’ 24-member team that
won silver and bronze medals

at the World Championships

Mark, but I can’t do it with-
out commending his moth-
er, Vickie, who has been
there with him through all of
his ups and downs,” Bannis-
ter stressed.

Despite having to get nine
stitches to repair a cut on his
right ring finger from the
door of the elevator at the
Tennis Center in Flushing
Meadows, Knowles and
Groenefeld were denied a
chance to add the US mixed
title to their ledger.

But Knowles and Mahesh
Bhupathi of India are now
in the semifinal of the men’s
doubles (See full story on
page 9). They are hoping to
win their first Grand Slam
title for the year after coming
so close when they were run-

# The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

Madeira St., Palmdale
Nassau, BAHAMAS
Tel: 242-322-677-1441

ners-up to American identi-
cal twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan in the final of
the Australian Open in Jan-
uary.

When contacted after their
gruelling quarter-final win
over Ivan Ljubicic and
Michael Llodra, Knowles
said he’s thrilled that he’s
going to be recognised.

“T tried to represent my
country, the Bahamas, to the
best of my ability for the past
25 years, the last 20 years on
the circuit,” he said. “I’m
now carrying the flag alone,
so I enjoy representing the
Bahamas.

“Tm very pleased that they
are honouring me and I
would like nothing more
than to share my Wimble-

The power you’ve

always trusted.
Kills flying and crawling insects
with a long lasting effect.



don title and my other
achievements with the
Bahamian people because
they have been so supportive
throughout my career.”
Not having the kind of
support that many of the oth-
er athletes do with their local
entourages cheering them on
during their matches on the
circuit, Knowles said it’s
good to be able to come
home for such an honour.
He said he would have
liked for Bhupathi to join
him, but he has Davis Cup
duties for India in South
Africa. So Knowles will be
sharing the moment with his
family, including his wife,
Dawn, and their two sons,
Graham and Brody.

Ped

OM Waa hg

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PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

since opening

ON SEPTEMBER 4 Ross
University Bahamas on
Grand Bahama commenced
its third semester since offi-
cially opening in January
2009.

New students were greet-
ed with a breakfast and a full
day of on-site orientation,
where they learned about all
aspects of their academic and
island life including the Ross
hurricane preparedness plan.

Faculty and administration
were introduced to the stu-
dents. Members of the Grand
Bahama Health Services and
doctors from the Rand Hos-
pital who are participating in
the clinical education pro-
gramme with Ross were also
introduced.

Students

Faculty and administration
were introduced to the stu-
dents. Members of the Grand
Bahama Health Services and
doctors from the Rand Hos-
pital who are participating in
the Clinical Education Pro-
gram with Ross were also
introduced.

Dr Frank Bartlett, chief
medical officer at the Rand
Memorial Hospital, was on
hand to speak directly to the
students and introduce his



BOB MEDL we ‘Your Preserip fia

team which will work direct-
ly with the students as part
of their clinical education
partnership. Those doctors
are Dr Elaine Lundy; Dr
Lucio Pedro; Dr Frementus
Leon; Dr Cynthis Ng; Dr
Augustine Ohueyi; Dr Ger-
hard Klassen and Dr Bartlett
himself.

The students welcome the
opportunity to improve their
skills in history taking and
physical examination. They
will be afforded first-hand
experience during supervised
clinical rotations at either the
Rand Hospital or the Eight
Mile Rock Clinic.

Ross University operates
three semesters a year which
begin in January, May and
September, respectively.

In between semesters the
students have a short 10-day
to two-week break, and often
this time is spent moving to
their next Ross University
academic location which
could be either in Dominica,
West Indies; Miami, Florida;
Freeport, Bahamas; or
Saganaw, Michigan.

"We have a very success-
ful programme and we want
to continue to build on that.
We are pleased to welcome
two new faculty this semes-
ter," said Dr Michael Robin-
son, assistant dean of curric-

A
ad
c ey

ular and faculty affairs at
Ross University Bahamas.

Dr Anthony Munroe, exec-
utive administrator to Ross
University Bahamas said:
"We are extremely excited
about the future of Ross here
in Grand Bahama.

Experience

“Our medical students are
receiving an outstanding edu-
cational experience through
our Ross University Schoo
of Medicine faculty and it is
enhanced through our part-
nership with the Grand
Bahama Health Services,
where our students get
exceptional preceptorship by
the Rand Hospital and Eight
Mile Rock Clinic medical
staff, which allows our stu-
dents the opportunity to help
the wonderful people of
Grand Bahama."

Sharon Williams, adminis-
trator of Grand Bahama
Health Services, was also in
attendance at the morning
session and said, "We are
very pleased to be a part of
the Ross University partner-
ship to educate their stu-
dents, and we welcome them
to our community and wish
them a successful initiative
for the year."

'

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Robbin Whachell

FROM LEFT: Dr Augustine Ohueyi, Rand Hospital; Dr Anthony Munroe, Ross Bahamas executive administrator;
Dr Michael Robinson, Ross Bahamas assistant dean, curricular and faculty affairs; Dr Elaine Lundy, Rand Hos-
pital; Sharon Williams, administrator, Grand Bahama Health Services; Dr Frank Bartlett, chief medical officer, Rand
Memorial Hospital; Dr Lucio Pedro, Rand Hospital; Nicholle Bethel, Rand Hospital; Dr Frumentus Leon, Rand Hos-
pital, and Dr Gerhard Klassen, Rand Hospital. Also present but not in the photo was Dr Cynthis Ng.



ROSS UNIVERSITY BAHAMAS students during new semester orientation day on September 4 at their
Bahamas educational site in Freeport, Grand Bahama.

WemCo gives back

to the community

THE security company WemCo gave back to the communi-
ty this past weekend, supplying some 500 children with a back-
to-school treats.

Henry Wemyss, president of WemCo Security and Collec-
tions, handed out school supplies for the children of his staff and
the surrounding community.

“Our staff here at WemCo are very important to us,” said
Acribba Wemyss, the company’s vice-president.

“Our president thought it only befitting that we show our
appreciation in these economically challenging times by assist-
ing with these school supplies. Even though it’s a little late, and
most children are officially back to school, Mr Wemyss was
determined that they children would not return to school with-
out receiving something from WemCo.

“At first we set out only to give the supplies to the children
of our staff, but we could not leave out the neighbourhood chil-
dren. We hope to make it even bigger and better next year,” she
said.

Some 500 children received exercise books, folders, pencil-
cases filled with supplies, crayons, colouring books, gel grips for
pens/pencils and filing paper. Not only younger children come
out to take advantage of this kind gesture, but also teenagers in
high school.

Grateful for the gifts, eight-year-old Jermaine Williams of
Centreville Primary said: “I am a grade four student in my
school and I live in Mason’s Addition. I am very happy that I
got the school supplies. I was just passing and I saw them giv-
ing out stuff. The supplies will be helpful to me in my school
work.”

The children were also treated to chilli-cheese hot dogs, a
variety of chips and juices.

“Realising how the economy is at this time, we decided to do
this outreach to the community via school supplies,” said
Monique Glinton, WemCo human resources manager. “We
have had other back-to-school giveaways in the past but this is
the first one that we actually held on our grounds.”

Children of all ages attended the event until late in the day,
receiving the treats and enjoying the company and well wishes
of staff members who were distributing them.



VICE PRESIDENT Acribba Wemyss gives supplies to the littlest recipient




New car sales
up 16% over
first quarter

* But some auto dealers
facing ‘inevitable reality’
of lay-offs, and ‘reviewing
this internally’

* 2009 second quarter over
first quarter rise cannot
disguise impact of 42%
year-over-year
drop in first half

* Consumers likely to
see 5-10% increase in
new car prices for
2010 season

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN auto dealer-
ships yesterday expressed cau-
tious optimism that the worst
of the recession may be over as
new car sales rose 15.81 per
cent quarter-over-quarter for
the three months to June 30,
2009, yet they warned that
some firms were facing the
“ievitable reality” of having
to lay-off staff.

While Bahamas Motor Deal-
ers Association (BMDA) mem-
bers pointed to the 15.81 per
cent increase in new car sales in
the 2009 second quarter, when
compared to the first quarter
numbers, as a sign of modest
encouragement, there was no
disguising the sharp year-over-
year fall-off during the 2009
first half.

BMDA members confirmed
to Tribune Business that year-
over-year new car sales were
down 41.71 per cent for the six
months to June 30, 2009, due
to a slump in consumer demand
induced by the recession, ris-
ing unemployment and reduced
incomes. Reduced credit
demand and stricter borrowing
requirements imposed by
Bahamian commercial banks
are a further factor.

Rick Lowe, a director and
operations manager at Nassau
Motor Company (NMC), a
BMDA member, told Tribune
Business that the possibility of
lay-offs in the auto dealership
sector - adding further to ris-
ing unemployment levels - was
“certainly a reality”.

“We’re all looking at that
possibility,” he confirmed.
“We’re concerned and, obvi-
ously, we all have to do what’s
in the best interest of keeping
our separate companies going.

“We're not seeing the sales
levels we all need. We’re get-
ting fewer people through the
process, because people have
been laid-off. Customer traffic
is not at the levels we'd like to
see,” Mr Lowe added.

“It’s a drastic decline. It’s
tough. We find ourselves really
hurting. This is the time we
need to shore up. In our indus-
try, particularly on the service
side, if we do not get cars fixed
first time, you have frustrated
people, so we’ve got to put our
best foot forward as far as cus-
tomer service is concerned.”

Bahamian auto dealers are
thus having to confront the
same reality being faced by
most sectors of this nation’s
economy, namely that with
reduced top line/sales revenue
growth, most businesses are

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
fesponsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



THE TRIBUNE ©

u



WEDNESDAY,

Me



SEPTEMBER 9,

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

ROYAL FIDELITY

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Bahamians to get ‘majority’
of $200m Baha Mar phase

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ahamian contractors will

gain “the overall majority, if

not 100 per cent” of con-

tracts for the $150-$200 mil-
lion first phase Cable Beach redevelop-
ment if the Baha Mar project goes
ahead, two senior executives with the
developer confirmed yesterday, as it
sticks to its 2009 year-end target of con-
cluding negotiations with two Chinese
state-owned entities.

Both Don Robinson, president of
Baha Mar Resorts, and Robert Sands,
the company’s senior vice-president of
external and governmental affairs, con-
firmed to Tribune Business that the
developer would “try to do everything to
ensure” maximum possible participa-
tion by Bahamian construction compa-
nies and workers, even though its equi-
ty partner is likely to be a Chinese con-
struction firm.

“There’s going to be plenty of oppor-
tunities for Bahamian contractors. It’s a
huge project, so everyone will have a
chance to participate,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business.

He pointed out that the first phase of
the planned $2.6 billion Cable Beach
redevelopment, which would involve the
West Bay Street re-routing and con-
struction of the Commercial Village to
house the relocated banks, government



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DON ROBINSON, president of Baha Mar Resorts...

offices, Straw Market and police/fire sta-
tion currently on the Cable Beach strip,
would involve the issuance of smaller
contracts and tenders that are ideally
suited to Bahamian participation.

“I think the number we have been
working with is $150-$200 million worth
of work in the first phase,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business. “The re-routing
of West Bay Street, the development of

Small hotels slash rates up to 40%

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

SMALL Family Island hotels are
making adjustments to room rates and
dreaming up special package deals as
they try to adjust to the traditionally
slow month of September, which has
been exacerbated by the recession, the
Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA)
president said yesterday.

Robert Sands said many hotels were
attempting to adjust to market pressures
that are pushing small properties to offer
more value.

“In this unfortunately slow period
they are trying to get some traction in
order to attract business,” said Mr Sands.
“Under normal circumstances, Septem-
ber is a difficult month.”

He said small Bahamian hotels were
doing whatever they can to increase their

Hotel
consultancy
in Bahamas

move

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia. net

A GLOBAL hotel/leisure
services and consulting organi-
sation yesterday announced the
opening of its first Caribbean
regional office in the Bahamas.

Parris Jordan, managing
director of HVS’s Caribbean
operations, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the company was not
new to the Bahamas, but had
decided to open an office in this
nation to service the region.

“This office will specialise in
valuation and consulting work
in the Caribbean, Central
America and the United
States,” said a company press
release.

According to Mr Jordan, his
company has done studies for
the Bahamas government,
Baha Mar and Atlantis. HVS
boasts 25 offices globally,
staffed by more than 400 “‘sea-
soned industry professionals”.

Mr Jordan himself has
worked on numerous mid- and
large-scale mixed-use develop-
ments, valuations, feasibility
studies, and operator searches,
and has provided strategic
advice, return on investment
and market studies in the Unit-
ed States, Mexico, and the
Caribbean.

”A native of Trinidad, Jor-
dan brings the right combina-
tion of consulting experience
and cultural knowledge of the
region to better understand the
market and sub-markets on the
various islands, and the nuances

SEE page 3B

occupancy levels in light of severe eco-
nomic conditions and reductions in air-
lift.

The Government has been working
at attracting more airlift to the Bahamas
this year, and has secured several high
profile airlines scheduled to begin direct
airlift near year-end.

One of the most popular discount air-
lines in the US, AirTran, has moved to
initiate almost daily direct flights to this
country from hubs in Atlanta and Orlan-
do.

Mr Sands said the BHA has also lis-
tened to the concerns of small Family
Island hotels, who are affected by small-
er visitor numbers much more than New
Providence.

He said those hotels have been very
creative in the way they are attracting
business during this difficult economic

SEE page 5B

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the Commercial Village, the police sta-
tion, banks and Straw Market - all of
that has to be replaced. This is intended
to jump start construction activity with
Bahamian contractors, and we would
quickly start once the project gets
going.”

And Mr Sands added: “What we have
said is that Phase One of the project,
the road re-routing, the building of the

Commercial Village, the securing of the
site, if not close to 100 per cent, the
overall majority of it will go to Bahami-
an contractors.”

This corresponded with the position as
understood by Bahamian contractors.
Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahamian Con-
tractors Association’s (BCA) president,
said yesterday that the organisation
understood that the plan was for China
State Construction Engineering Com-
pany (CSC) to build the core project,
featuring the casino and major hotels,
with much of the work outside the main
Baha Mar campus going to Bahamian
firms.

Adding that the BCA hoped to meet
with Baha Mar on the issue “sooner
rather than later”, Mr Wrinkle said the
organisation was unlikely to protest too
loudly if CSC brought the majority of
workers and construction materials with
it from China, since the Cable Beach
redevelopment was “‘very important to
the country” and could potentially play
a major part in turning the economy
around.

“T would anticipate good participa-
tion, and that every individual Bahami-
an contractor will be involved in the
project,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Busi-
ness. “They can’t bring everyone over
from China.

“When a project like Baha Mar

SEE page 5B

Bahamas must tackle the
economy’s ‘sacred cows’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas may have to confront
“sacred cows” such as the automatic 15
per cent gratuity and strong trade unions
in making much-needed structural
reforms to its economy, a former Central
Bank governor said yesterday, arguing
that operating costs were simply too
high for most businesses.

T. B. Donaldson, who is also Com-
monwealth Bank’s chairman, told Tri-
bune Business that the reduction in cred-
it demand and consumer spending was a
‘double-edged sword’ for the Bahamian
economy. He explained that while it aid-
ed families in staying afloat, it prevent-
ed an increase in consumption that could
pull the economy out of recession.

“From my point of view, we need to
look at structural changes,” Mr Don-
aldson said. “The cost of operating a
business is too high. We don’t confront
the sacred cows of the unions and the 15
per cent gratuity. The overhead costs
are enormous. We really have to look at
what sort of economy we want to run.”

While he did not have “‘a magic bul-
let” that would solve all the Bahamian
economy’s ills, Mr Donaldson added
that the reduction in consumer spending
was actually preventing the economy
from pulling itself out of recession.

“It’s one thing to tell people to go
and save money, and they follow you
and your admonition, and then you say
you've got to spend to get out of a reces-

SEE page 2B

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Money at Work


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas must tackle the
economy’s ‘sacred cows’

FROM page 1B

sion,” the former Central Bank governor
added.

“They see jobs being lost, and don’t
know when they’re going to lose theirs,
so they are saving. The rate of savings
has gone up for possibly the first time,

NOTICE

because people are not as reckless as
they used to be.

“And that’s the problem. We’re a con-
sumer driven economy. In an economy
that consumes, not produces, that’s ter-
rible. And there’s such a correlation
between the rate at which we consume
and the rate at which the Government
collects its taxes, that it has such an
extremely adverse and wide impact.”

Mr Donaldson confirmed that Com-
monwealth Bank was “seeing a lot” of
loan consolidations, which had grown
by almost $38 million across the Bahami-
an commercial banking system during
the 2009 first half, as persons amortised
existing debt to enable them to afford
repayments and enhance cash flow.

“That is part of what we did with the
hotel workers, consolidate their auto

debt, mortgages and whatever other
debts they had,” he added.

“The chickens have come home to
roost. The world has been living above
its means for a number of years, and
the good old days are not coming back
any time soon.

“We're in for a long, rough ride, and
have to buckle our seat belts and hope
we end up right side up.”

IN THE MATTER of the Estate of Franklin
Eugene Knowles late of the Eastern District
in the Island of New Providence, deceased

Pursuant to Section 50 of the Supreme Court Act,
1996 Notice is hereby given that any person having
a claim against the Estate of the late Franklin Eugene
Knowles must deliver the same to the Manager,
ScotiaBank (Bahamas) Limited, Paradise Island,
Nassau on or before the 15th day of October, A.D.
2009.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Attorneys for Jason S. Knowles
Franklin Eugene Knowles

(8.9, 11, 14)

evish Coferial Halton Hobel
Marlborcugh St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE

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Everything for $20
Free parking at the Hilton

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knotting,
Wiring, Dnling and The Snack Fix System and
The Mystery Clasps

Paarls and Bread Strands Wholesale and Retail
P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com

ga making clases starts
amber sign up now

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS $= 2007

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/QUI/581

Common Law & Equity Side

ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an estimated
22,385 square feet and situate in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence and bounded on the North by the Sea on the
NORTHEAST by land now or formerly the property of Dr Herbert
Olander on the SOUTHEAST by West Bay Street and on the
SOUTHWEST partly by land the property of Little Jerusalem
Church and by land now or formerly the property of Barbara
Smith.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Quieting of Titles Act, 1959
AND

N THE MATTER OF THE Petition of
JENNIFER VESTRA HUYLER FORBES

NOTICE OF PETITION

The Petition of JENNIFER VESTRA HUYLER FORBES of
the Western District of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of ALL
THAT piece parcel or lot of land comprising an estimated 22,385
square feet and situate in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence and bounded on the North by the Sea on the
NORTHEAST by land now or formerly the property of Dr Herbert
Olander on the SOUTHEAST by West Bay Street and on the
SOUTHWEST partly by land the property of Little Jerusalem
Church and by land now or formerly the Property of Barbara
Smith, WHICH SAID PIECE PARCEL OR LOT OF LAND
IS PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY THE PLAN FILED
IN THIS ACTION AND THEREON COLOURED Pink.

The Petitioner, Jennifer Vestra Huyler Forbes, claims to be the
owner in of the fee simple estate in possession of the said land
and has applied to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas under S.
3 of the Quieting Titles, Act in the above action to have her title
to the said land investigated and declared.

Copies of the said plan may be inspected during normal working
hours at the Registry of the Supreme Court, East Street, N-P., and
at the Chambers of Donna Dorsett Major & Co., Columbus House,
East and Shirley Streets, Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower
or right to dower or any adverse claim not recognized in the
Petition shall before the 17th day of December A.D., 2009 file in
the said Registry of the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner
or the above Donna Dorsett Major & Co. a statement of such
claim. Failure of any such to file and serve a statement of such
claim by the above time will operate as a bar to such claim

DATED this 3rd day of September A.D., 2009

DORSETT MAJOR & CO.
Attorneys for the Petitioner



FROM page 1B

being forced to do ‘more with
less’.

With new car sales, the
largest and most critical rev-
enue driver for new car deal-
erships, down by almost 42 per
cent, companies have little
choice but to realign staffing
levels and other operating costs
to remain profitable. “Concerns
exist that some layoffs might
be inevitable, but member firms
are reviewing this internally.
We are all hopeful of main-
taining employee levels where
ever possible,” the BMDA said
in a statement.

Mr Lowe yesterday told Tri-
bune Business that a further

factor set to impact Bahamian
new car dealerships was a like-
ly increase in vehicle prices for
2010, with BMDA members
now starting to place orders for
the new model year as they run
low on inventory.

“A couple of us have been
told 5-10 per cent” by factories
and suppliers, Mr Lowe said of
the likely consumer price
increases. “So by the time you
extrapolate that, it could be a
significant chunk for an expen-
sive car. If people are able to do
anything now, it’s probably in
their best interests to buy now.”

The drastic drop in new car
sales has not only impacted the
dealerships and their employ-
ees, with government revenue
from import/stamp duties on

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that REGINALD SALOMON of #15A
TASMAN CLOSE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
2nd day of SEPTEMBER, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAXENE BAZILE of OKRA
HILL,off SHIRLEY ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 2nd September, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

TRAFFIC DELAYS POSSIBLE

SHIRLEY STREET
VILLAGE ROAD TO
FREDRICK STREET

DUE TO

WATER & SEWER
REPLACEMENT WORKS
31st August to 1st December 2009

In an effort to upgrade existing
Water & Sewer Services the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
have contracted Bahamas Hot Mix
Company Ltd to replace existing
service connections at the above
location. As a consequent traffic

vehicle imports having plunged
“big time”.

“Most of us have started to
order a few 2010 models, so the
Government should see rev-
enue in the next couple of
months, but nothing will come
in the near term,” Mr Lowe
said. “Our order cycles are
three to four months depending
on where the car is coming
from - Japan, Korea, Brazil, or
90 days for North America.”

While Bahamian auto deal-
ers were slightly more opti-
mistic given the benefit of hind-
sight provided by the 2009 sec-
ond quarter results, and the
quarter-over-quarter compari-
son, Mr Lowe indicated the
industry was uncertain about
the recovery’s strength. This

Nae emerL tg



TB DONALDSON

New car sales up 16% over 01

was especially since August and
September were traditionally
the softest part of the year for
new car sales.

One anomaly noticed by
BMDA members had been the
growth in passenger and sports
utility vehicle (SUV) sales com-
pared to the first quarter.
“None of us can get a handle on
it. You’d think people would
be moving from SUVs to small-
er passenger cars. It stood out
like a sore thumb,” Mr Lowe
told Tribune Business.

“You'd have thought they
would move to something more
fuel efficient. We generally find
in our trends that we’re five
years behind North America.
It seemed like a big jump in
SUVs.”

PM etc TUL MATEO aah Tar

NOTICE

MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Credo having debls

Company are required to

september, A.0., 2008 .

or clims against the above-named
Send = pawtculars thereof to the
undersigned al PO, Box N64 on
In detault thereof they will be excluded

of belore the 30h cay of

{rom thee bereft of any destibulion made by the Liquidator,

Dated the Sth day of September, 4.0., 2009

Matt Raban
Liquidator

NOTICE

management involving road
closures and temporary traffic
diversions may be in operation

during the following times:

Daily between 7:00 pm
to 6:00 am

Local diversions will be sign
posted in due course and further
information will be provided
through the local media.

MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

In accordance with Section 228 of The Companies Act.
NOTICE is hereby given that at an Extraordinary General
Meeting of tha Company held on the 25th August, 4.D..
2009 the following Resolutions were passed:

1. That MARINE AGENTS AND BROKERS LIMITED be
wound wp volurtarily.

2. That Matt Raban be appointed the Liquidator for the

purpose of such winding up
Dated the 8th dayof September, A.D... 2009

Matt Raban
Liquidator



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B



Sector policy
footprint has
chilly climate

By AUDREY INGRAM
ROBERTS

Executive Director
Source Development
Consultants

& Enigin Partner

THE draft Telecommunica-
tions Sector policy dated
August 5, 2009, which was pub-
lished by the Bahamian gov-
ernment a week later, articu-
lates a set of objectives and
vision statement completely
devoid of any reference to Cli-
mate Change.

Despite admission of defi-
ciencies and claims of wide-
ranging reform in the introduc-
tion to the draft, basically it’s a
“business as usual” document
that adds little or no value to
our capacity to meet key chal-
lenges, especially those that will
be the most crucial of this cen-
tury.

On a global scale, the infor-
mation and communications
technology (ICT) sector, which
includes the electronics com-
munications segment, plays a
key role in addressing climate
change and facilitating efficient
and low carbon development.
Not only does it facilitate other
sectors, but its role in emission
reduction and energy savings
in the industry itself is signifi-
cant. Therefore, it behooves
countries such as the Bahamas,
who have signed the Kyoto
Protocol, to articulate the sec-
tor’s creative responsibilities in
this respect.

The birth of the digital age
came with the invention of the
transistor in the 1950s. Through
this means personal computing
was introduced on the one
hand, and high capacity, fixed
and mobile telecommunications
on the other. Both technolo-
gies come together in the ubiq-
uitous Internet.

As the use of digital tech-
nologies grows, so does the car-

bon footprint of the sector. It is
appropriate for a policy paper
on the sector to articulate how
it will meet its footprint reduc-
tion challenge, especially in an
archipelago where electronic
communications are essential
for development and where
there is so much reliance on
foreign direct investment. A
reliance which should mean
that governance standards set
by the policymakers truly
strengthen conservation capac-
ity, even as they meet investors’
expectations.

Policy

If, as it seems, there is no pol-
icy objective that addresses the
need to identify the carbon
footprint of an individual piece
of electronic communications
hardware, such as a mobile
phone, which is relatively easy
to do, is it likely, then, to expect
that carbon footprints from
more complex and converged
network services such as broad-
band Internet will be identi-
fied? I think not!

Electronic communications
networks link the Bahamas into
a global system, so one might
expect a visionary outlook on
the sector’s role with respect to
an issue as pressing and rele-
vant to all as climate change.

What might an enabling role
in climate change adaptation
and mitigation in the Bahamas
mean for the electronic com-
munications sector? It could
mean three things at least:

* Measuring the direct car-
bon footprint of the sector

* Enabling quantifiable emis-
sions reductions through ICT
applications in other sectors of
the economy

* Tdentifying new market
opportunities for the sector and
other sectors involved with real-
ising these reductions

This sector is unique is in its
ability to make energy con-
sumption and carbon emissions
visible through its products and
services. Yet no link between
the sector’s stated objectives is
made to those of other utility
suppliers, such as BEC or the
Water and Sewerage Corpora-
tion in this regard.

Because electronic commu-
nications products and services
can enable the monitoring and
mapping of energy, it is possible
to know where inefficiencies
occur throughout the processes
and workflows of various sec-
tors in the economy. This
means that infrastructure can
be radically transformed.

Points 13-17 of the draft sec-
tor policy deal with liberalisa-
tion (a subhead of the vision) as
an entirely market-driven con-
cept, when perhaps the most
important point about the elec-
tronic communications indus-
try is the benefits from the
adoption of ICT technologies
to influence and transform the
way our society works, and the
way people behave.

Hardly anything is said about
the transformative aspects of
the sector. Point 63 of subhead
Consumer Protection deals
obliquely with this in one sen-
tence only. It states that
URCA, the industry regulator,
will actively promote public
awareness campaigns to inform
customers of their rights and
obligations.

Nowhere is it stated that the
opportunities for transforma-
tion and promotion of sustain-
able development for all (peo-
ple and environment) through-
out the archipelago is enhanced
by electronic communications.
Or that the sector’s products
and services are crucial com-
ponents of the Bahamas’ tran-
sition to a low carbon econo-
my.

Hotel consultancy in Bahamas move

FROM page 1B

in the way business is conduct-
ed locally,” the company's
release continued.

HVS will formally introduce
itself to the Bahamas at its

grand opening reception tomor-
row at the British Colonial
Hilton, where founder and
chief executive of the company,
Steve Rushmore, is expected
to unveil its new operation.
“The economies of
Caribbean nations are highly

NOTICE

FREEPORT TRADING CO. LIMITED
{In Voluntary Liquidation)

In &cordanmce wilh

Acl, NOTICE

A.B.. 2008

1. That FREEPORT TRACING C

voluntarily

Seclon
is hereby given
General Meeting of the Company held
the following Resolutions were passed

#26 oof The Gonmpanes
inal el an Extraordinary
an the 251A August

O. LIMITED be wound up

?, That fat Raban be appointed the Liquidator for the

dependent on the hotel indus-
try,” said Mr Rushmore.

Hotel

“The hotel and greater ser-
vice industry will continue to
play a vital role for individual
islands and the region as a
whole. The time is right for
HVS to establish a physical
presence in the region, as sup-
ported by recent hotel devel-
opment activity and the need
of existing hotel owners and
operators to assess current and
future needs.”

HVS is expect to move its
Caribbean office to a location
within the Caves Village com-
plex.

LYFORD CAY, E.P. TAYLOR DR.
“Eattage Lat With Private Beach
FOR SALE

Great investment opportunity in a safe environment.

Best price ever on E. P. Taylor Drive!

Exclusively offered by Mario Carey Realty at US:$1.5 million
Web Listing # 8377

Tel: 242-677-825 | Cell: 357-7013

As

Mario Carey Realty

info@mariocareyrealty.com

www.marioca reyrea

com

Pts adaut yaw... Let's talk.

Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL

Bank of The Bahamas wishes to
advise our valued customers that our
Card Centre numbers have changed
for all Prepaid, Credit and Medline
Card holders.

Please note that the new numbers

are.

Local: 242-396-6010
International: 1-877-204-5110 toll Free
Family Island: 1-242-300-0111 tol Free

www.BankBahamas.com

ROYAL = FIDELITY

Money at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
TUESDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,510.69] CHG -16.82] %CHG -1.10 | YTD -201.67 | YTD % -11.78

=



FG CAPITAL

Ss
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERY1LCES

CI2c7eLcoa NT AL

a of Such wiring up FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.00 0.127
0.00 0.992
0.00 0.244
0.00 -0.877
0.00 0.078
0.00 0.055
-0.50 1.406
0.00 0.249
-0.23 0.419
-0.01 0.111
0.00 0.382
0.00 0.420
0.00 0.322
0.00 0.794

0.332

0.000

0.035

0.407

0.952

0.180
ases)

Interest

Securit y
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (8)
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 10.09 10.09 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 10
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid S$ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.00
2.00 6.25 4.00
0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4005 3.48 5.15
2.8990 -1.39 -4.16
1.4867 3.70 5.40
3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
13.0484 3.41 5.84
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0663 2.59 6.63
1.0215 -1.11 2.15
1.0611 2.29 6.11
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Previous Close Today's Close
1.15 1.15
11.00 11.00
6.25 6.25
0.63 0.63
3.15 3.15
2.37 2.37
11.00 10.50
2.74 2.74
5.49 5.26
3.69 3.68
2.03 2.03
6.60 6.60
9.30 9.30
10.30 10.30
5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50

AD

Dated ihe &th day of September 200,

Matt Raban
Liquidator

5.12
1.00
0.30
5.50

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

NOTICE

FREEPORT TRADING CO. LIMITED

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

7%
Prime + 1.75%
7%
Prime + 1.75%

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

; 29 May 2015
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000

0.001

Div $
0.000
0.480
0.000

P/E
N/M
N/M
256.6
Creditor having debls or cans against thé above-named
Company ara required to send particulars thereof to the
UES igre al P.O, Box N-G24 on e betore the 30th Gay tf
September, A.D, n default thereof they will be excuded
from fee benefit of any Gestnbulion made by the Liguidabar

ABDAB
RND Holdings

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
28-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

1.3320
2.8952
1.4105
3.1031
12.3870
100.0000
93.1992
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

7009 .

ows

Dated the 8th day of September, A.0., 2000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Matt Raban
Liquidator

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


SS Se a

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00510

Whereas VIRGINIA CAPRON BAIN of Sunshine Park, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of Administration of the Real
and Personal Estate of MERTHEREEN DEAN a.k.a. MERTHEREEN F.
DEAN a.k.a. MERTHEREEN DEAN-PICKSTOCK late of Sunshine Park,
Southern District, New Providence, The Bahamas, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00511

Whereas SHANNELLE SMITH of the Western District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for GERALDINE M. HALL has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of JOHN LEROY HALL late of 311 Beacon Point Lane, Grover,
St Louis,Missouri, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00512

Whereas SIR WILLIAM CLIFFORD ALLEN of Olde Fort Bay, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters
of Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of DAVID LAFLEUR late
of Saint Anne’s, Fox Hill, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00515

Whereas JUANITA BEATRICE KNOWLES of the City of Freeport of Grand
Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by
Deed of Power of Attorney for CHRISTOPHER TIMOTHY KNOWLES
AND AMANDA CHRISTINA KNOWLES, the lawful children has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of RAYMOND RONALD KNOWLES a.k.a.
RAYMOND “PANCHO” KNOWLES late of the Settlement of Mangrove
Bush on the Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court at
the expiration of 21 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
10TH SEPTEMBER, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00514

IN THE ESTATE OF DORIS STEWARD, late of Flat 1 Charlton Manor
Charlton Manor Drive in the Town of Knaresborough in the County of North
Yorkshire in England, deceased

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the date
hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by HARRY BRACTON SANDS, of Skyline Drive in the
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, is the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to SUSAN
LINDA STEWARD, the Executrix and Trustee, by the District Probate Registry
of the High Court of Justice at Newcastle Upon Tyne in England of America, on
the 25th day of June, 2009.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B



a
Bahamians to get ‘majority’

of $200m Baha Mar phase

FROM page 1B

begins, it could completely turn
the economy around, and there
will be spin-offs for the con-
struction industry in the wider
economy. We look at all the
viable spin-offs that come from
a project like this. It could turn
the entire economy around.”

Mr Wrinkle added that the
BCA would soon seek to meet
with Baha Mar Development
Company officials again, fol-
lowing last week’s signings of
the agreements between CSC
and the China Export-Import
Bank on one side, and the
developer on the other.

“There is no question that
the Chinese participation is
going to be substantial, it is
going to be extensive and it is
going to be dominant,” the
BCA president added.

“T would anticipate us get-
ting together with Baha Mar
before Christmas to try and get
things moving. Once the Chi-
nese decide to move, they will
move very quickly, and once
CSC is committed as an
investor it will be in a strong
position as owner, contractor
and developer. The ball is start-
ing to move, and the BCA
needs to be out in the forefront

to make sure we all have an
opportunity to participate in
what will be one of the biggest
projects in the Caribbean.

“We need to offset Atlantis
and support marketing efforts.
It’s beginning to show that
Atlantis can’t carry the coun-
try.”

CSC said in a statement that
under the terms of the deal
being worked out with Baha
Mar, it would acquire a 2.75 per
cent stake in the project with a
$99 million investment. That is
much less than the 43 per cent
equity stake, and $212 million
contribution, Baha Mar’s pre-
vious partner, Harrah’s Enter-
tainment, was scheduled to
make.

The value of the construc-
tion contract was pegged at $1.9
billion, with CSC saying work
on the 1,000-acre project was
due to start in early 2010, with
an opening in late 2013.

Baha Mar, has moved swiftly
to manage and dampen
Bahamian expectations regard-
ing the possibility of progress
on the Cable Beach redevelop-
ment, pointing out that it is not
a ‘done deal’ yet. Having been
in this position before with Har-
rah’s, and with the Bahamas
desperate for some good eco-
nomic news, the last thing the

developer wants to do is raise
false hopes.

“A number of things have
been concluded. A lot of uncer-
tainty has been taken care of
with the signing of the agree-
ment last week,” Mr Robinson
told Tribune Business. “It’s still
a journey in progress, and there
are a number of things to
resolve.

“A number of these things
could potentially be pretty seri-
ous, but we have had indica-
tions there are solutions to all
of them. It will take a lot of
work, and we are nowhere near
done.

“Until we have a signed doc-
ument, there’s the possibility
of something going awry. We’re
trying to keep things low key,
one of the lessons learnt in the
past.”

Mr Robinson pointed out
that apart from agreeing busi-
ness terms, there was “a huge
amount” of legal work and due
diligence that also remained to
be done by year-end.

Baha Mar’s “internal target”
was to conclude negotiations
with the Chinese by year-end,
although it was still unclear
whether this target would be
hit. After that, there was then
the matter of Bahamian gov-
ernment approvals.

Small hotels slash rates

up to 40 per cent

FROM page 1B

time.

The Cape Santa Maria resort in Long Island
has listed online an almost 20 per cent decrease in
its room rate, beginning from November 1 until

December 2009.

Marley Resort in Nassau has slashed room
rates almost 40 per cent for its “September to

Remember” promotion.

Operations Manager at Marley Resort, Rory
Shepherd, told this paper that they have taken the
initiative to put together a package for the resort
to encourage visitors. The resort has also created



reflect the special September deals.
Mr Shepherd suggested that the quality of the
product remains untouched.

“We have just been open for a year and two
months, and last year was challenging,” he said.
“We are just trying to get ourselves out there.”

Mr Sands argued that marketing initiatives

generated by the Ministry of Tourism could assist
some small hotels this year, but asserted that the

long-term investments made by the ministry will

spa and boutique deals, and remixed its menu to said.

be also valuable.

“We are parlaying an investment in the oppor-
tunity that as things get better, the Bahamas
brand will be top of mind in its consumers,” he

Clifton Heritage National Park
CLIFTON HERITAGE AUTHORITY

South West Bay Road + P.O. Box SP-63846

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 1(242) 362-4386 or 1(242) 362-5121 or he
I

Email: park.clifton@ yahoo.com

Fax: 362-5017

potent
a

Employment Opportunity

The Clitton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of an individual to
fill the position of Managing Director in accordance with Section 14 of the
Clitton Heritage Authority Act 2004,

The individual would be required to provide executive leadership,
supervision and direction to units of the Clifton Heritage Authority's
office and the Heritage Park, while ensuring the research and promotion
of its historical, cultural resources,

Duties and Responsibilities:
Responsible for the implementation of policies, programs and goals and
objectives for the efficient management of the Clifton Heritage Authority
Ensures the development and implementation of a strategic plan for the
management of the Clifton Heritage Park ensuring that accepted operating
standards and practices are employed.
Coordinate and supervise all activities related to safety issues, best
environment practices, and all matters related to the preservation of historic

structures and conservation of natural resources at the park

Serve ad Principal Advisor to the Clitton Heritage Authonty Board on
matters and issues relative to the maintenance and upkeep of the park.
Oversee and coordinate all public and private use ot facilities and
recreational spaces at the Clifton Heritage Authority Park and establish user

fees

Liaise with other government, non-government, regional and international

agencies to explore opportunities to promote the sustainable development
and management of the Clitton Hentage Authority Park.
Direct and coordinate the employment of staff, develop and implement
opening policies, standards and procedures to ensure performance and
maintain a stable working environment.
Conduct perboxdic assessments of facilities and intrastnacture and
recommend improvements or repairs as necessary.
Prepare and submit a monthly report to the Board of Directors on the
operations of the Authority.
Liaise with the Marketing and Public Relations officer material for the
promotion of the Clifton Heritage Park.

Post Qualification:

* Aminimum of a graduate degree in Administration or discipline, and for 10)

years experience in an administrative discipline,
Application are available at the Authority's office South West Road
Clifton Cay and should be submitted along with resume by 4pm
14 September, 2009,
Telephone contact 362-5121 or 362-6729



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



TASTE



The Tribune





Creative Relations/Photo





back in business

By REUBEN SHEARER

The new Dunkin Donuts on Bay Street

Dunkin’ Donuts

Tribune Features Reporter

IF YOU frequent the downtown area anytime during the day, you
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ment, it is definitely making a comeback. With a new face-lift, the
downtown donut giant poses a threat to other bistro big names like

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lunch inspired flatbreads, and donuts from
their Bahamian line are proving to be a
hit among customers.

You will find a wide variety of donuts
like the usual old-fashioned, maple frosted,
Bavarian creme and glazed donut. Other
favourites are the Boston Kreme- a choco-
late delight, and the pina colada- pineapple
flavoured donut with vanilla and coconut
topping. The guava donut, which is Mr
Rahms’ personal favourite, is tasty as well,
and proves to be one of the more popular
donuts in the Bahamian line.

“We want to do mango flavoured, pina
colada, and a coconut rum donut soon.
We are playing with some Bahamian
recipes, and we want to make it as Bahami-
an friendly as possible,” Mr Rahms
explained.

For breakfast and lunch, there are an
array of nutritious options that will keep
you fueled throughout the day.

The turkey cheddar bacon and egg white
veggie flatbread has the right combination
of flavours, and are the perfect choice for
the more health conscious consumer.
Served on whole wheat flatbread, with
melted cheese, these toasted calorie coun-
ters are light and refreshing.

“We want to do as much as possible with
our breakfast sandwiches,” Mr Rahms said.
“Currently we have a bacon egg and
cheese croissant, that is bigger than the
normal size breakfast sandwich you get at
other fast food chains.”

They are also testing different soup
flavours, like chili, gumbo, chicken noodle,
clam and conch chowder, which will be for
sale in the near future. “No conch donuts
though,” Mr Rahms said jokingly, “except
for maybe a conch flatbread.”

The downtown location caters to busi-

In addition to the downtown store, Dunkin’
Donuts has two new locations upstairs in the
US departure lounge and downstairs near the
international departures desk at Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport. “The locations
have experienced steady success with travel-
ers, that keep coming back,” said Peter
Rahms, Director of Operations for Bahamas
QSR Limited- franchise holder for Dunkin’
Donuts.

The airport stores open at 5 and 6am in the
morning, both closing at 7pm or until the last
flight leaves.

According to Mr Rahms, the principles that
the company is building this time around are
consistent products, and quick, efficient ser-
vice. “We try to give the service that every-
one who walks through this store deserves,”
he said.

This high standard seems to be at the core
of the downtown location’s success, with a
steady flow of customers frequenting the
restaurant during the day, The Tribune team
noticed. A quick customer line moved on
location and business is like that all day, Mr
Rahms said.

The franchise itself has been through sev-
eral management companies over the last 20
years and it’s proving to live up to the expec-
tations of management, who describe public
response as “fantastic.”

“Bahamas QSR Limited owns all three
stores, and we own the franchise for the coun-
try,” said Mr Rahms. “Every Dunkin’ Donut
restaurant you see from here on in will be
developed by us. We’re gauging market
response right now, and things look so good,
we may consider opening new locations on
the island.”

With the downtown location’s ‘high-end’
facelift, inspired from Dunkin’ Donuts loca-
tions in Spain and the United States, the
donut store definitely stands out on the west
side of Bay Street. This store opens at 6am,
and closes at 8pm throughout the week and
10pm on weekends.

“We’re pleased with how it came out, and
we want to expand our seating, finish plans
for a meeting area, and make wireless Inter-
net capabilities available for our customers.
We also have seating for 10 persons, board-
room style, and a 42-inch flat-panel monitor
with PC connectivity.”

New menu choices like the breakfast and



ts available at the three locations.



nesses in the Nassau area. The catering
menu offers different combo options for
servings of up to 10 people. The catering
combos include 1 dozen donuts, 50
Munchkin size donuts, 1 dozen bagels, 1
dozen muffins, 1/2 dozen muffins, 1/2
dozen bagels, including a “box 0’ joe” [cof-
fee in a jug-size].

For drinks, there are unlimited options:
strawberry, watermelon, and coffee
Coolatta’s are really chillingly refreshing.
If you need a “cup 0’ joe” to wake up your
insides, their steamed coffee and iced lattes
will start your day off on a good note.

“This September, we’re starting our loy-
alty card program. You get ten points for
every dollar, and this month its double
points. You can redeem the points for our
food and beverage products,” Mr Rahms
added.

Dunkin’ Donuts most recent venture has
been the Jet Blue promotion, where cus-
tomers purchase cold beverages and have
a chance to enter the drawing of a vacation
prize to New York City and Ft Lauderdale.
Both vacation prizes come with Visa deb-
it cards totaling $500 and $1000 each. A
winner is picked live on air of “Naughty
Niggs” radio show on More 94 FM.

Promotions like this one, which is open
to all adult Bahamians, have been designed
to keep a consistent flow of Bahamian cus-
tomers. In times like this with tourism
down you have to look after your own peo-
ple,” Mr. Rahms said.

He added: “What we found in many cas-
es is that in may cases Bahamians don’t
give other Bahamians good service. But
at the end of the day, Bahamians are our
bread and butter. We promise to offer
the same quality service to Bahamians and
visitors hands down.”

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9B



ENTERTAINMENT



The Tribune







taraBASTIAN

Acclaimed
Bahamian artist
gets ready to
launch Nassau's
first digitised
fashion art
society showcase!

From the creator of KINE-
SIS and co- creator of
STYLEZINE, comes a new 4
part event. Scharad Light-
bourne presents, CLICK- a
digital art showcase like

never before!

Known for “stepping out of the box”
and taking Bahamian artistry to a high-
er level, Scharad said, “I wish to
expose Bahamians of all backgrounds
to asociety of new age, arts and culture
in The Bahamas- inspirations that
blend into one another- all being fash-
ion, music and art related. This is what
makes me an artist and it is my inten-
tion to share this with others in an
innovative and unique way.”

Also known as a dynamic graphic
artist, Scharad said that “click” not
only refers to the sound of his com-
puter’s mouse; it takes on a multitude
of meanings.

“The event hopes to join different
social types together through fashion,
art, music and culture; its a merging
of ‘cliques.’ Additionally, I use my
passion for photography, by “clicking”
my camera to capture my social envi-
ronments- hence the play on words
with more towards the common under-
standing of what I do as an artist.”

Hosting the event is co writer for



Stylezine's Moda, Tara Bastian and
fashion guru and founder of The Big
Give Organization, Kedar Clarke.
They will expose the public to the
more diverse sides of art and culture in
The Bahamas.

The event will feature a number of
Bahamian enterprises- Airbrush
Junkies, Talk 242, Stylezine Maga-
zine, Aura Amore Swimwear, Final
Accents, Switcha and internationally
acclaimed design label, House of St
John.

Delivering on his promise to truly
expose the talent and culture of The
Bahamas to the world, the event will
be streamed live over the Internet
with on screen texting- the first of its
kind

Patrons will truly be in for a treat as
they mix- and- mingle with industry
insiders- they will also have the chance
to win a myriad of prizes including:
the grand prize: a $1,000 photo shoot
package from Scharad, makeup ser-
vices from Face Inc., shopping at
Obsession Boutique and a pair of
shoes from Head Over Heels.

Other prizes include, four tickets to
Islands of the World Fashion Week
events, John Bull gift certificates, VIP
passes to Nassau's newest and hottest
lounge, the Viper Room, 3 month gym
membership to Bally Total Fitness,
an appearance in Nassau's hottest
online magazine, Stylezine, apparel
from popular brand, Conchience
Clothing and so much more!

Can't wait until the actual event?
The public is invited to get their early
“Click- Fix” by visiting the website:
www.thisistheclick.com to download
the official event song, produced by
popular Bahamian musician, Christo-
pher “Sketch” Carey.

The first of this dynamic four part
series takes place on Friday Septem-
ber 11 at the Poop Deck West from
8pm-11.30pm. Admission to this
unforgettable event is $20. For more
information, please visit the website or
contact Scharad Lightbourne.

=

=

"a

a q
Â¥

Ser
3 sachardLIGHTBOURNE



A kedarCLARKE

‘Blige, Brown
to perform at
Vienna Jackson
{tribute

: VIENNA
i Associated Press

MARY J. BLIGE, Chris

? Brown and Natalie Cole will
i be among the top artists
i performing at a Sept. 26
? Michael Jackson tribute
? concert in Vienna, organiz-
i ers said Tuesday.

But they left open the

i possibility that major stars
? such as Madonna might still
? be part of the show that will
? take place outside a 17th-
i century palace in the Aus-
i trian capital.

“Just hold your horses!”

i Jackson’s brother Jermaine
? told reporters at a packed
i news conference in Vien-
? na’s city hall.

Event promoter Georg

i Kindel said that up to 25
? performers are expected to
i participate in concert that
i is being billed as the main
? global tribute for the King
? of Pop, who died June 25 in
i Los Angeles. More names
? will be unveiled later this
? week in London and Berlin,
i Kindel said.

Sister Sledge, Akon,

i: Angela Bassett, and the
? Germany-based boy band
i USS also are among the 13
i artists confirmed so far, Jer-
? maine Jackson said. In addi-
i? tion, Jackson’s original band
i and dancers will take part.

“We’re very excited —

i the list is growing more and
i more,” Jermaine Jackson
i said, adding that “many
? major Bollywood names”
? and artists from the Middle
i East also
? involved.

would be

All the artists will play

i some of Jackson’s greatest
i hits at the concert, including
i “Thriller,” “Billie Jean,”
i “Black or White” and
i “Bad.”

“We will honor on this

? night not only the musician
i and artist Michael Jackson
i but also the humanitarian,”
i Kindel said. “He’s really
i someone who changed the
i history of music.”

Jackson’s family and chil-

i dren — as well as 65,000
i fans — are expected to
i attend the tribute to be held
i on a large stage with a
i crown on its roof and two
i runways in front of Vien-
ina’s former
? Schoenbrunn Palace, one of
i the Austrian capital’s top
i tourist attractions, Kindel
? said. A “significant portion”
i of the proceeds from the
i event will be donated to
i charity, he added.

imperial

Over the course of the

i evening, Jermaine will sing
? a duet with his late brother,
? with video of Michael likely
i to be projected onto nearby
i walls, organizers said. All
i artists will sing either “Heal
? the World” or “We are the
i World” as a grand finale.

Bassett, an actress, will pre-

i sent one part of Michael Jack-
i? son’s life, a statement said.

When asked why stars

i such as Madonna and Whit-
i ney Houston — mentioned
i in Austrian media reports
i — were not on the list made
: public Tuesday, a defensive
i Kindel stressed the list of

performers was still not set
in stone. “This is not the
final lineup — maybe some
of the names you mentioned
you will hear within the
next couple of days,” he
said.

ATOM Le XU



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

This weekend pro-
vides a chance to get
healthy, tackle some
fishing and take in some
art.

1. The Ministry of
Health in conjunction
with Caricom will host
Caribbean Wellness Day
on Saturday at the Min-
istry of Health Grounds,
Augusta/Delancy/Meet-
ing Streets. The Mega
Health Extravaganza will
involve demonstrations
of various physical activ-
ities, such as salsa danc-
ing, a step show, karate,
marching bands, and

other activities.

For adults attending
the event, there will be
an array of free health
screenings, including
blood cholesterol, blood
pressure, blood sugar,
weight screening, and
healthy food demonstra-
tions. For the children
there will be a fully
supervised bouncing
castle, and in the late
afternoon everyone will
be able to get their “bod-
ies in motion” to the
rhythmic beat of the One
Family Junkanoo rush
out. The event take place
between 11 am and 7pm.

2. The Bank of the
Bahamas will host a day-
long health and wellness
expo with top medical,
fitness and nutrition
experts, including lead-
ing surgeons, physicians
and other professionals
from The Bahamas and
South Florida. The event
takes place at the Shera-
ton Cable Beach Resort,
Saturday September 12
from 10am to 4.30pm.
There is no charge and
partners are offering
numerous giveaways,
including two weekend
stays at Opera Suites and
Marina on Biscayne Bay.
For more information
contact 396-6010.

3. Noted Bahamian
artist Anthony Morley
launched his latest col-
lection Island in Da Sun
at the Ladder Gallery at
New Providence Com-
munity Center Blake
Road this week. The col-
lection features an excit-
ing collection of oil paint-
ings on canvas.

4. Enjoy an evening
of great music and food
at the Marley Resort on
Cable Beach every
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday evening from
8pm-11 pm when noted
Bahamian musicians
Paul and Tanya Hanna
perform. For reserva-
tions call (242) 702-
2800.

5. The 5th Annual
Green Parrot/Salty Tackle
“Lords Of The Deep”
Deep Drop Fishing Tour-
nament will be held from
7am - 3pm. 2 Electric / 2

Manual Reels

(totally non-IGFA).
Captains’ meeting will be
held on Thursday, Sep-
tember 10 at 6 pm at
Green Parrot Bar, East
Bay St. A vessel repre-
sentative must attend.
Entrance fee:

$500 (per boat) or
$200 Calcutta (optional,
per boat). All entrance
fees will be returned as
prizes/money and may
be paid to Chris Lloyd at
BASRA or at the Cap-
tain's Meeting. Contact
Chris at 477-2941 or

Saltytackle@coralwave.c
om

THE TRIBUNE

TECHNO fans turned out in
droves to the Imagination
Workshop's Transcendental
Party at the Hub last week.
Party-goers waved their com-
plimentary glow-sticks in the
air as they danced and sipped
on free Jell-O shots all night.

Spinner DJ Chedda manned
the wheels-of-steel all night
and pumped out crowd
favourites and popular dance-
trance tunes that the local
rave-heads were starving for.

The event's organisers were
thrilled with the turnout and
said they have been getting a
lot of requests for an encore.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


ee

THE WEATHER REPORT

a oe Rats oa

5-Day FORECAST




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tie ZR | Ea | ak | Se
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ORLANDO



High:90°F/32°C = — A couple of showers Overcast with a t-storm A t-storm; overcast, Clouds and sun, a Clouds and sun, a Partly sunny, a t-storm The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
PE Se eee and a t-storm. in spots. then some sun. t-storm possible. t-storm possible. possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
Low: 73° F/23°C _, : ; ; 5 ; 5 : .
a & Fan High: 88 High: 89 High: 90 High: 90
c a ‘ High: 88° Low: 77° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° see EE
TAMPA in} aE UE
High: 90° F/32° C [ 06°-84° F 99°-90° F 106°-87° F 111°-85° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low —_Ht.(ft
Low: 75° F/24°C ot r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 11:26am. 3.1 5:02am. 0.3
aa @ ’ 2 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 11:47pm. 25 5:52pm. 05
" 1, i 6:48 pm. 06
} i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Friday 40am. 24 64lam. 04
i , er ABACO Temperature 17pm. 3.0 751pm. 06
¢ : > r GMM es cscs crates Qaceereree tateresauce taceeeast 91° F/33° C : :
; ; # High: 88° F/31°C os Saturday 1:43am. 24 7:45am. 04
J Fe Mey LOW ecesssseenee 79° F/26° C
, - HY — Low: 80° F/27°¢ Normal high... Baer ge See
- 7, Normal low 75° F/24° C
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i High: 88° F/31°C High: 90° F/32°C
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highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C —— .
Low: 77° F/25° C i. S -,
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Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday -*. 4 MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W alll i High: 90° F/32° C
FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC = F/C FC F/C FIC FIC i) Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 85/29 63/17 t 81/27 61/46 t Indianapolis 82/27 61/6 t 81/27 62/16 pc Philadelphia 72/22 6417 4+ 65/18 60/15 1 :
Anchorage 61/16 49/9 sh 61/16 48/8 c Jacksonville 90/32 71/21 pc 88/31 72/22 t Phoenix 102/38 81/27 pc 102/38 81/27 t CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 86/30 67/19 po 84/28 66/18 t Kansas City 82/27 65/18 t 81/27 6216 t Pittsburgh 74/23 57/13 pe 70/21 57/13 c RAGGEDISLAND — Uigh:92°F/83°¢
Atlantic City 72/22 6246 + 68/20 SO/15 + Las Vegas 98/36 73/22 pe 102/38 79/26 s Portland,OR 76/24 58/414 pc 81/27 57/13 s High: 89° F/32° C Low: 76° F/24°C
Baltimore 71/21 60/115 +r 70/21 60/415 fr Little Rock 90/32 69/20 pc 86/30 68/20 t Raleigh-Durham 80/26 64/17 c 85/29 64/17 pc Low: 74°F/23°C a %
Boston 66/18 55/12 c 63/117 55/12 c Los Angeles 84/28 64/117 pc 86/80 64/17 s St. Louis 84/28 67/19 pc 86/30 68/20 t .
Buffalo 74/23 5613 pce 70/21 5412 c Louisville 84/28 63/17 t 84/28 64/117 pc Salt Lake City 88/31 60/15 s 90/32 60/15 s GREAT INAGUA wr
Charleston, SC 88/31 67/19 pc 84/28 67/19 pc Memphis 88/31 70/21 pc 89/31 70/21 pc San Antonio 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 71/21 t High: 92° F/33° C
Chicago 78/25 58/14 t 79/26 5915 t Miami 88/31 78/25 t 88/31 78/25 t San Diego 78/25 67/19 pe 77/25 68/20 pc Low 77°F25°C
Cleveland 78/25 59/15 t 71/21 55/412 t Minneapolis 77/25 60/15 t 81/27 63/17 pc San Francisco 77/25 57/13 s 80/26 57/13 pc .
Dallas 94/34 74/23 t 96/35 73/22 t Nashville 85/29 62/16 t 86/30 65/18 pc Seattle 68/20 53/11 c 75/23 56/13 s
Denver 80/26 55/12 pce 90/82 51/10 s New Orleans 89/31 73/22 t 89/31 75/23 t Tallahassee 92/33 69/20 pe 90/32 71/21 t
Detroit 76/24 60/15 t 76/24 5915 t New York 70/21 61/16 + 616 6146 Fr Tampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 74/23 t
Honolulu 89/31 76/24 s 89/31 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/32 68/20 t 91/32 68/20 t Tucson 94/34 73/22 t 95/35 72/22 t
Houston 89/31 72/22 t 93/33 72/22 t Orlando 90/32 73/22 t 88/31 74/23 t Washington, DC 76/24 63/17 r 67/19 5743 46





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a

A

Wor_p Cities



Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
91/32
70/21
75/23
76/24
62/16
90/32
86/30
80/26
84/28
79/26
73/22
75/23
81/27
68/20
77/25
77/25
56/12
95/35
91/32
69/20
90/32
82/27
86/30
72/22
63/17
82/27
80/26
67/19
88/31
70/21
91/32
102/38
76/24
83/28
79/26
89/31
70/21
70/21
90/32
82/27
73/22
838/31
72/22
72/22
74/23
85/29
84/28
66/18
82/27
73/22
89/31
104/40
17/25
88/31
66/18
90/32
59/15
90/32
79/26
81/27
72/22
68/20
89/31
81/27
74/23
86/30
62/16
72/22
72/22
74/23

lil

Today

Low
F/C
77/25
54/12
50/10
68/20
46/7
79/26
77/25
64/17
59/15
73/22
60/15
59/15
74/23
41/5
54/12
57/13
36/2
72/22
83/28
44/6
73/22
74/23
73/22
57/13
50/10
59/15
49/9
46/7
72/22
54/12
81/27
71/21
66/18
59/15
52/11
79/26
ale
52/11
61/16
77/25
55/12
72/22
50/10
52/11
51/10
55/12
75/23
45/7
61/16
52/11
74/23
77/25
59/15
80/26
37/2
70/21
37/2
73/22
62/16
54/12
50/10
45/7
75/23
66/18
55/12
63/17
54/12
59/15
56/13
52/11







pe

High
F/C
92/33
63/17
17/25
79/26
61/16
90/32
86/30
78/25
82/27
78/25
81/27
73/22
81/27
68/20
68/20
83/28
59/15
94/34
92/33
61/16
90/32
83/28
84/28
64/17
64/17
79/26
75/23
64/17
89/31
66/18
90/32
102/38
74/23
78/25
74/23
87/30
70/21
72/22
88/31
82/27
73/22
89/31
68/20
72/22
17/25
85/29
82/27
63/17
73/22
76/24
83/28
103/39
76/24
89/31
63/17
89/31
66/18
85/29
76/24
81/27
66/18
70/21
91/32
83/28
68/20
75/23
67/19
76/24
73/22
79/26

Thursday
Low
F/C
77/25
50/10
52/11
67/19
49/9
79/26
78/25
63/17
61/16
74/23
61/16
55/12
74/23
37/2
50/10
55/12
39/3
71/21
83/28
39/3
73/22
72/22
72/22
50/10
50/10
55/12
54/12
52/11
71/21
50/10
81/27
72/22
66/18
62/16
53/11
79/26
ile
52/11
61/16
77/25
55/12
69/20
59/15
54/12
53/11
55/12
73/22
47/8
54/12
52/11
70/21
76/24
61/16
79/26
37/2
73/22
41/5
74/23
61/16
57/13
50/10
46/7
77/25
68/20
55/12
61/16
55/12
58/14
54/12
59/15

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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MARINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
Thursday: Eat 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
Thursday: _ E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 81°F
Thursday: _E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 82°F



Billings)
85/53)

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Miami
88/78

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Rain Fronts
[x4 Plucios Shown are noon positions of weather systems and —

Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ifitni@e
[y_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary eguafi-
10s' ts Os 10s 20s (05) 40s [50s Gos 70s 80s /G0s\)/il0e—/ii0s)

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Te: (242) 4-55 f Tet: gata) 330-2060 fT (282) 336-2308

that yowhave excellent insurance
INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

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©
i} (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

way the wind blows.
| New Providence Deere buen


wae

Dunkin’ Experience
Donuts hack CLICK!

in business See page nine
See page eight



SOME of the performers involved in the artist 4 peace concert.
the group includes well known bahamian artists such as: Land-
lord, DJ Counsellor, Najie Dun, Bodine, Kenyatta Taylor, Padrino,
Sammie Starr and Sketch.

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

LOCAL leaders are joining forces with tradi-
tional, hip hop, reggae, contemporary
gospel and other entertainers to fight an epi-
demic of what they say is “shocking” criminal
activity. It’s all part of the Artists 4 Peace
movement - a nationwide effort to curb crime

in the community.

The goal of the Artists 4 Peace Concert, set for Septem-
ber 19 at Arawak Cay, is to promote ideas of peace through
the power of performance art, including poetry, drama,
visual arts, and music. Artist from around the country,
including Ronnie Butler, Kenyatta Taylor, Ricardo Clark
and Sammie Starr have volunteered their talents to assist
this message.

Organisers for the event said in a statement: "As one
absorbs that these statistics represent devastated lives, fami-
lies and dreams it is evident that society must promote the
message of non-violence. In the national crime environ-
ment, no one can afford to operate as a single agency or as a
single organisation. Collaborative partnerships need to be
entered into to combat the challenges of modern-day
crime."

The concert seeks to do the following:

e Utilise the power of the arts to empower youth and heal
the wounds caused by community violence and social injus-
tice;

eEngage in a non-violence dialogue through the medium
of the arts;

eFeature expression of peace, love and coexistence
through performance art;

eEncourage non violence throughout the Bahamas;

eTransform anxiety about the current situation in the
Bahamas into positive manifestations for peace;

ePlatform the transformative power of music and the arts;

eInitiation of individualistic commitment to peace, con-
nection empowerment and renewal;

eCommunicate positive change for the Bahamas.

A spokesperson added: “There’s a social impact because
you look upon your neighbours as strangers and
enemies. And, there’s an economic impact because death
has a cost.”

National statistics concerning crime over the past six
month are alarming: 25 per cent increase in murder; 12 per
cent increase in arm robberies and 29 per cent increase in
robberies.

The Fort Charlotte Community Centre, Sea Grape Festi-
val, and FamFest coordinator Mark Cartwright are key
coordinators for the concert.








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.239WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 87F LOW 77F F E A T U R E S SEEINSIDE ‘THEARTS’ SECTION Artists 4Peace SEEPAGEEIGHT Larry Smith’s Tough Call By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net MORE "innocent" blood will be shed as armed bandits home in on vulnerable "softtargets" in the business com munity, a local activist fears. Reverend C B Moss, head of civic group Bahamas Against Crime, spoke out as police probe the murder of 44-year-old Nelson Goodman who may be the third in a string of employees shot by armed robbers on company property. Mr Goodman, who worked at Bertha's Go-Go Ribs take away on Poinciana Avenue, was gunned down outside the shop shortly after midnight yesterday. Police said they had not ruled robbery out as a motive, but could not say if anything was stolen from the restaurant or if Mr Goodman was robbed of any personal or company property. But Rev Moss said the recent string of attacks should be a wake-up call to Government to immediately buffer the spill-over of violent crime into the business sector. "I feel that the crime now is spilling into the commercial area more than before. They are hitting soft targets in areas not heavily policed and those who may not have their own private security force or the security systems which could offer them protection," Mr Moss told The Tribune . "Unless this is addressed immediately, it is going to escalate to other areas of the business community and then it's going to hit the area everyone is concerned about the tourism sector, but by then it will be too late," he warned. When asked yesterday if police were treating armed robbery-related murders as an emerging trend, Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson was hesitant to brand the incidents as reason for alarm. "Most armed robberies are Employee is gunned do wn outside of shop The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com Mur der sparks ‘soft targets’ fear I N S I D E BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E SEE page six Myles Munroe calls for wider debate on the marital rape issue B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@ tribunemedia.net LEADING pastor, author and motivational speaker Myles Munroe is calling for a wider debate o n the proposed amendment to outlaw marital r ape now that the issue has divided the Christian community. Dr Munroe has outlined a series of questions h e wants government to address before passing t he amendment to the Sexual Offences and D omestic Violence Act that would make it illegal for a man to rape his wife. The Catholic Archdio cese, the Bahamas Con f erence of the Methodist Church, and the SeventhD ay Adventist Church have all expressed supp ort for the proposed amendment. But the Bahamas Christian Council, the largest religious body in the country, has rejected the proposed amendment. Former Council presid ent Bishop Simeon Hall criticised the Council’s SEE page six By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@ tribunemedia.net A MOTHER who was attacked by two pit bull terriers has revealed how she has been left scarred for life. In an exclusive interview from her hospital bed, Zelma Maura told how she was savaged by the dogs and is now in constant pain. The 30-year-old reliv edthe terrifying moments when the dogs chased her as she tried to run away from them in Abundant Life Road, and sank their teeth into her arm and leg when she tripped and fell in a grassy area between Chelsea’s W OMAN ATTACKED BY PIT BULLS SCARRED FOR LIFE ZELMA MAURA , 30, was savagely attacked by two pit bulls last week and will have surgery at Princess Margaret Hospital today. SEE page six By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Chinese company set to build the 1,000-acre Baha Mar resort at Cable Beach has announced it expects con struction to go ahead early next year in time for the resort to open its doors by 2013. China State Construction and Engineering Company (CSCEC billion deal with Baha Mar Resorts Limited last Friday, also revealed in a statement to the Chinese media that by investing $99 million in the project it will obtain a 2.75 per cent equity stake. This latest update comes days after the Bahamas Government signed an accord with the Chinese on the “Pro motion and Protection” of investments made by The Bahamas and China in each other’s territories. At the same time as that agreement was signed, Prime Chinese firm expects Baha Mar resort to open by 2013 SEE page six By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net SENIOR Justice Anita Allen yesterday set November 4 as the “tentative” date for the start of the retrial of Troyniko McNeil who is accused of murdering handbag designer Harl Taylor. The date has been set pend ing the outcome of an application by McNeil’s attorney Mur rio Ducille to have the judge recuse herself from hearing the retrial as well as the status of another trial in Freeport in which Mr Ducille is also involved. The hearing of the application is scheduled for September 29. McNeil, 22, remains on remand at Her Majesty’s Prison as he awaits the retrial. Novem ber 2 was initially set for the start. Yesterday, however, Mr Ducille informed the court he is scheduled to be in Freeport for a case which is expected to run from November 9 to 27. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner said the matter in Freeport can com mence on completion of the McNeil trial. Mr Ducille said, however, that the matter in Freeport is an old case that had been set for trial since Easter. entative’ date set for Harl Taylor murder retrial SEE page six

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters........................................P4 Sports ...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/ARTS SECTION Business...........................................P1,2,3,5 Advts......................................................P4,7 Comics......................................................P6 Taste.......................................................P8,9 Arts.....................................................P10,12W eather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES AS violence continues to escalate, 2009 could end up being “the worst year ever for crime” warned Rev CB Moss, executive director of Bahamas Against Crime. Rev Moss issued a strong statement yesterday calling for all crime committees and commissions to be brought to an end and action to be taken immediately. His comments follow the shooting death of a 44-year-old man outside Bertha’s Go-Go Ribs on Poinciana Drive early yesterday morning (see lead story, page 1). “This is madness,” Rev Moss said, homicides in addition to countless other crimes in an ever increasing tide is plunging our society into the depths of social chaos.” He warned that the “soul” of the Bahamian people is at risk, because there seems to be no concern about the well-being of others. “There is no outcry until our personal interests are invaded,” he said. According to Rev Moss, the December 2007 appointment of the National Advisory Council on crime was “unnecessary and an absolute waste of time and public funds.” This, he noted, was confirmed by the advisory council itself on page three of its official report, which said: “Members were amazed, in some instances shocked that the information gathered had been part of previous national reports, while it is clear that in some instances several suggestions from previous reports were implemented, in the main, we seem to be blowing bubbles when it comes to seriously addressing crime and its causes.” Rev Moss said: “There it is from the council. The clearest evidence that the year it spent in deliberations was a shameful waste of time while nearly 150 murders and thousands of other serious crimes took place.” He also went on to note that in a 1994 report, the Consultative Committee on National Youth Development noted that: “Crime and violence of all kinds, namely armed robberies, serious harm and other assaults against the person and gang violence had reached epidemic proportions in our community. These acts of crime and violence are uniformly condemned by our society, yet they persist.” According to Rev Moss, the situation has become “tremendously worse” since that report was delivered 15 years ago, yet successive governments continue to appoint committees and commissions to examine the problem of crime. “The time for talking must stop now and immediate action taken,” he said. He said that while remaining thankful to members of past crime councils and commissions for their efforts, Bahamas Against Crime believes all such bodies still in operation should be dissolved immediately, including the House of Assembly select committee on crime, which is now holding hearings. “We are aware of the problems; let’s now implement the many recommendations in reports sitting on shelves in official offices for many, many years,” Rev Moss said. He said responsibility for the situation now falls squarely at the doorstep of Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. “As leader of the govern ment, he must accept the responsibility of his government to provide a reasonable level of security for the citizenry, which is one of the primary responsi bilities of any and all governments,” Rev Moss said. “The prime minister must step up to the plate and lead the nation out of this deep crisis. The time is now and Bahamas Against Crime, and others we know, stand ready to assist. In the meantime, fervent prayers must be offered for our nation.” Dire crime prediction as violence escalates Activist calls for immediate action R EVCBMOSS MEMORIAL FOR MURDERVICTIMS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f BISHOP SIMEON HALL of New Covenant Baptist Church walks towards a memorial wall for murder victims. Bishop Hall plans t o post the names of all persons murdered in the country within t he past 10 years. By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand Bahama police have announced they will destroy nine slot machines that were seized during a raid on a liquor store in Freeport in March. The destruction of the machines is in accordance with a court order issued by Magistrate Debbye Ferguson on July 2. COURT MATTER Three men were charged with firearm and ammunition possession in the Freeport Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Troy McIntosh, 40; Reno Surin, 32; and Garth Hall, 35, were arraigned in the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court before Magistrate Gwendolyn Claude. It is alleged that on Septem ber 6, the accused men were found in possession of a .44 Mag num along with 14 live rounds of ammunition. The men pleaded not guilty to possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. They were represented by attorney K Brian Hanna. Hall was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. McIntosh and Surin were each granted $5,000 bail with one sure ty on the condition that they sur render their travel documents to the court and report to the Eight Mile Rock Police Station before 9am every Friday until the com pletion of the case. The matter was adjourned to December 16 for trial. Police to destr oy nine seized slot machines

PAGE 3

By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A FORMER state finance m inister yesterday said the government may not have “fully appreciated the depth of the recession” when it made its bud get forecasts and may have to cut back public spending even further. James Smith, commenting on the prime minister’s admission t hat revenue intake fell around $30 million below anticipation in July and August, said he expects the government to deliver a mid-term budget early next year which will “reflect realities.” “I don’t think the government h ad full appreciation for depth of the recession I think it was still hopeful that this was just a blip, and then the budget was done predicated on this not being as deep as it has shown itself to be.” “So what really needs to happen is go back, take a look to see how long this will be and adjust expenditure,” said Mr Smith, minister of state for finance between 2002 and 2007, and former governor of the Cen tral Bank of the Bahamas. “The options are clear – you either have to adjust expenditure to meet revenue down fall or borrow more and that may not be advisable given the growth in the debt over the next year or so.” Speaking to another daily last week, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said government took in around $30 mil lion less than expected in July and August, the first two months of this budget year. “Revenue is not performing thus far as we expected,” said Mr Ingraham. However, suggesting that it is too early to make gloomy predictions about how the budgetis set to perform overall, Mr Ingraham noted that last year in July and August revenue appeared “normal” only to drop off precipitously and unexpect edly in September when the global financial crisis struck. “And so what has happened now in July and August (2009 does not in and of itself give us a sufficient yardstick to compare,” said the prime minister. Minister of State for Finance Zhivargo Laing told The Tribune yes terday that it is hard to predict revenue as it is “always a function of economic activity, and economic activity is not as predictable as you’d like.” “You’re dealing with human conduct in terms of economic transactions,” he added. Meanwhile, Mr Laing reiterated that “what is meaningful” for government as it seeks to determine how revenue is performing going forward is how much money comes into its coffers in September and October 2009. “We always have contingencies in terms of how we respond to revenue performance and what has to be done but those are contingencies that would be put into place once you arrive at that point where you’ve got a concrete determination of where you are,” he added, noting that it is “not unusual” for the government to take in “less of its revenue in the first half of the (bud get) year than the second.” But Mr Smith suggested there is “sufficient evidence” already available to determine that eco nomic conditions are unlikely to improve before the end of 2009, and therefore actual revenue col lected by the government is not likely to pick up any time soon. “Unless there’s some kind of minor miracle I really don’t expect to see a turn around. It’s going to be a very soft winter,” said Mr Smith, referring in particular to signs coming from the tourism industry. Delivering its annual budget in May of this year, the govern ment revealed that it was cutting back spending almost across the board in light of expectations of diminished revenue intake. Nonetheless, it was predicted by the government that overall the 2009/2010 budgetary period would see a six per cent revenue increase – despite expectations that Bahamian Gross Domestic Product (GDP during the same period by one per cent. THE daughter of Works Minister Neko Grant died in hospital in Florida after losing a battle with pneumonia. Nekcarla Grant, 36, died on September 6 – the day after Mr Grant buried his mother, Reva Grant and only months after the death of his father. When contacted by The Tribune yesterday, Mr Grant said he and his family were "surviving" thanks to support from friends and family. "I'm surviving and thankful for friends and my colleagues, including the prime minister and my fellow Cabinet ministers who have been very supportive. It is a very difficult time. “We are distressed as is expected," Mr Grant said from his home on Grand Bahama, his voice breaking with emo tion. Nekcarla, an attorney who worked for the Grand Bahama Port Authority's legal department, was described yesterday by her father as a "sweet" and "promising" young woman. She was admitted to Doctor's Hospital for treatment before being transferred to the intensive care unit of the Cleveland Clinic in Florida, where she later died. Ms Grant, a mother-of-one, was graduated from St Mary's University in the United States with a bachelors degree in history before studying law at the University of Leeds, where she was graduated with honours in 2000. In early 2001 she was called to the English Bar and in September of that year she was called to the Bahamas Bar. Condolences have been pouring in to the local online message board bahamasissues.com and the social networking site, Facebook. "I knew her well, she was one of the nicest and kindest people you would ever meet. She was down to earth and could chill with anyone, never using her politics for any sort of attention. She will be missed. My prayers for her family," wrote one person. Funeral services for Ms Grant are expected to be held this Saturday. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net FORMER PLP MP George Smith said he would once again represent the island of Exuma if and when he is called on to return to the House of Assembly. While hoping that some other younger person from the island would step forward to represent the constituency in the next general election, Mr Smith who has remained vocal on behalf of the people of Exuma said that he would have no difficulty in serving his people once again. “If that is what my people want, and if I can serve the people of Exuma in these difficult times, I would have no difficulty serving them in that purpose,” Mr Smith told The Tribune yesterday. While some will undoubtedly welcome the thought of Mr Smith returning to front-line politics, i t is highly unlikely that the area’s current MP Anthony Moss will share that view. Mr Smith said he hopes the PLP will nominate someone in Exuma who is at the very least “competent.” “Exuma is my home, and I hope for both parties to run good individuals. Obviously I want my party, the PLP, to win and I want them to have someone who knows what is happening in the world and has an ability to recognise what are the right things to push for, to promote in the Bahamas,” he said. Issues worth fighting for, Mr Smith said, include i mproving education and the healthcare system, reducing the high levels of violent crime, securi ng the country’s borders and strengthening the Bahamas’ economy. “Exuma needs someone who can contribute in all those areas, and I believe there are possibilities out there. I would not be presumptuous to think I am the only person, but I can be someone. But I would much prefer for the party to identify someo ne who can be a contributor around the table be it at the party caucus or to serve on the Cabinet level and be a clarion voice for the Bahamian people in Cabinet. “The problems of today are more immense and troubling than ever faced in the history of this Bahamas. And every Bahamian should have a representative who can speak clearly and interact with the prime minister of the Bahamas even if they are on opposite sides of the political divide,” Mr Smith said. The FNM was once rumoured to be looking to run former Ambassador Joshua Sears in the Exuma constituency. However, it is now believed the party might change this plan and run FNM Senator Anthony Musgrove instead. Former PLP MP says he would represent Exuma again if asked A MAN accused of stealing nearly $24,000 from former Cabinet minister and businessman Leslie Miller by reason of service was arraigned in the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Bruce Newbold, 53, of Treasure Cove, is accusedo f stealing $23,850 in cash from Mr Miller by reasono f his service. It is alleged that Newbold stole the money between Friday, June 26, and Friday, August 7. N ewbold had been hired to install airconditioning vents at Mario’s Place. Newbold, who was arraigned before Magistrate Guillimena Archer inC ourt 10, Nassau Street, p leaded not guilty to the c harge and was granted bail in the sum of $10,000. The case was adjourned to D ecember 9. M r Miller told T he Trib une y esterday that despite the setbacks, his bowling and entertainment centre is now scheduled to open on October 20. Man accused of stealing from f ormer minister by reason of service THE recently formed National Association of J ustices of the Peace will h old its regular meeting at the Police Training College on Thompson Boulevard o n Wednesday, September 16. T he meeting will begin at 7.30pm. All justices of t he peace are invited to attend. At the following meet i ng on Wednesday, Sep tember 23, Commissioner of Police Reginald Ferguson will speak on the topic: The Role of Justices of the Peace in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.” Justices of the Peace association to hold meeting Minister Neko Grant’s daughter dies in Florida NEKCARLA GRANT D e r e k C a r r o l l NEKOGRANT Former state minister:govt may have to cut back public spending even further J AMES SMITH

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EDITOR, The Tribune. K indly grant me this request to print the following on the front page of your newspaper: H onourable Prime Minister Sir, the time has c ome when the people of the Bahamas are now crying out to you or whoever is responsible to set aside a hangman’s day. There is absolutely too much killing in our land. We are now having murders in threes in less than 24 hours, isn’t that a shame. W e can no longer stand by and watch innocent lives being taken away, even if it means we all march around parliament and shut Bay Street down until our cries are heard. We no longer want to hear it’s inhumane, sir, we now want life for life just the other day a young mother of two was nursing her three-month-old baby whena nasty gunman came by and her life was brutally taken away. Is this inhumane, sir? A young mother of three working ever so hard to support her children when suddenly she was shot in the face by some nasty thugs. Sir, is this inhumane? We are living behind bars just how the prisoners are kept at Her Majesty prison, if af ire should ever break out God help us all because there are absolutely no known escapes.S ir, the people of this country are crying out to y ou for help, have mercy, Mr Prime Minister, and let the country know when you are going to set aside a day only for hangman’s day, don’t wait until it reaches your doorstep, sir, do something right now before it is to late. Sir, I can truly say the people of this country a re waiting for that day because the laws are on the books or do we have to get consent from the Privy Council, are we fully independent or not? Sir, we are awaiting hangman’s day, we are sick and tried of hearing empty voices we need action and we need it right now. ANGRY AND VERY IRATE CITIZEN Nassau, August 24, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. A fter reading the very informative article by Larry Smith about Abaco’s new power plant, I am heartbroken to know that it is actually happening. Deep in the pine forest of Wilson City Abaco, the lowest grade, most undesirable fuel available called Bunker C w ill be used to accommodate the rapid growth of Abaco. The oil ships will reportedly pass r ight by our National Park reefs near the Pelican Cays. Mostp eople are not aware this is happening. Serious health i ssues and environmental disasters could be a result of this type of plant. Meanwhile, the top story of the latest Abaconian newspa p er starts off with “the northern communities of Abaco cameo ut in full force for the arrival of the 19 Miss Universe Cont estants.” I really hope that we have our priorities straight, and come out in full force to the meeting on September 10th that will present the details of t he new power plant. There are other ways to gene rate electricity which will not potentially cause acid rain, can cer, waste management problems or devastating oil spills. We live in a land with abun d ant sunshine, steady ocean breeze, and plenty of trash that w e need to recycle. The only solution to the power problem w e are facing is to harness our natural resources and build solar and wind power plants, and turn trash into electricity. If this Bunker C power plant goes u p we will be contributing to global warming, risking our h ealth and our beautiful reefs and beaches. It sounds like the tar that we used to step in on the beach might be back, but t hat was small things in comparison to what could happen. Bunker C “sludge” is currently being used in the Clifton Pier power plant in New Providence. After years of oily water b eing discharged, reportedly more than a million gallons of o il have recently been recovered from the caves below thec liffs, costing over a million dollars. On behalf of the people o f Abaco and the rest of the Bahamas, no thank you! Bunker C is the bottom of the barrel, sludge like fuel that has already devastated othera reas around the globe. Look it up on the internet, you will bes hocked! It cannot be recycled, so w hat do we plan to do with it? Whatever the plan is, someone will be stuck with it. Although it m ay be the least expensive fuel, the costs of clean up and disp osal will soon add up. I thought our country’s motto is forward, upward, onward, together”. So much for “It’s better in the Bahamas.” We can’t just blame the gov ernment, we are all guilty ofi ndulgence which leads to this problem. The ideal scenario for m ost of us involves cooling out in the AC while the clothes are i n the dryer, dishes in the dishwasher, TV and computer on, and, oh yes, gotta have hot water all day long, even if we don’t use it! Our government is trying to meet our demands, and we need to give them the g uidance and support to do so in a conscious, healthy, and sustainable manner. Renewable energy is going mainstream in other countries, and we need to jump on board and get with the programme. I read that renewable energy options are “not yet feasible for A baco on a utility scale because winds are inconsistent, solar collectors require too much l and and the island’s current waste stream cannot generatee nough power to meet demand.” There is plenty of l and in Abaco, and it can be used wisely to accommodate the current growth that our existing power plant cannot. And it’s hard to believe that wed on’t have enough trash to turn into power. I f everyone does their part and makes an effort to reduce, r euse and recycle, we can make it work. Are you planning on building a house? Start with something as simple as an on demand gas water heater. Why w aste electricity to heat water when it’s not being used? T hank you for taking the time to read this, now please go to the meeting on Septembeir 10th in Marsh Harbour, (call BEC for time and place a nd do your research online. Let’s get back to basics b efore it’s too late! And since I have your attention, just one m ore thing “When the power of love overwhelms the love of power, the world will know peace.” author unknown. A NONYMOUS Nassau, S eptember, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm MAYBE the economic stress has been t oo much. Looking back at the past few months, it’s fair to wonder if America isn’tg oing through a nervous breakdown. The political debate has been poisoned b y birthers, deathers and wackos who smile proudly while carrying signs comparing the president to the Nazis. People who don’t even know that Medicare is a government programme have been trying to instruct us ont he best ways to reform health care. The administration’s most popular antir ecession initiative was a startlingly creative economic breakthrough known as the cashf or-clunkers programme. Over the weekend (presumably while the president was sleeping, because this occurred in the wee hours of t he morning), White House officials whispered the official announcement that Van J ones would no longer be working in the administration. T he White House wishes it had never heard of Jones, who was hired to be its point person on green jobs. It turns out that Jones had used a nasty anatomical slur to refer to Republicans and once signed a petition sug g esting that President George W. Bush had advance knowledge of the September 11 a ttacks. There is no end to the craziness. The entire R epublican Party has decided that it is in favour of absolutely nothing. The presiden t’s stimulus package? No way. Health care reform? Forget about it. There is not a thing you can come up with that the GOP is for. Sunshine in the morning? Harry Reid couldn’t persuade a singleS enate Republican to vote yes. Incredibly, the party’s poll numbers are g oing up. We need therapy. President Barack Oba ma addressed the nation’s public school students Tuesday, urging them to work hard and stay in school. The folks who bray at the moon are outraged. Some of the caterwauling on the right has likened Obama to Chairman Mao (and, yes, Hitler number of parents have bought into the i mbecilic notion that this is an effort at social ist or Communist indoctrination. A s one father from Texas, put it: “I don’t want our schools turned over to some socialist movement.” The wackiness is increasing, not diminishing, and it has a great potential for destruc-t ion. There is a real need for people who know better to speak out in a concerted e ffort to curb the appeal of the apostles of the absurd. B ut there is another type of disturbing behaviour, coming from our political leaders and the public at large, that is also sympto m atic of a society at loose ends. We seem unable to face up to many of the hard truthsc onfronting the U.S. as we approach the end of the first decade of the 21st century. T he Obama administration’s biggest domestic priority is health care reform. But the biggest issue confronting ordinary Americans right now the biggest by far is the devastatingly weak employment environ m ent. Politicians talk about it, but aggressive job-creation efforts are not part of the poli-c y mix. Nearly 15 million Americans are unemp loyed, according to official statistics. The real numbers are far worse. The unemployment rate for black Americans is a backb reaking 15.1 per cent. Five million people have been unem p loyed for more than six months, and the consensus is that even when the recession e nds, the employment landscape will remain dismal. A full recovery in employment will take years. With jobless recoveries becoming the norm, there is a real question as to whether the U.S. economy is capable of pro v iding sufficient employment for all who want and need to work. T his is an overwhelming crisis that is not being met with anything like the urgency r equired. We’ve also been unable or unwilling to face the hard truths about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the terrible toll they are taking on America’s young fighting men and women. Most of us don’t want to know. Moreover, we’ve put the costs of these wars on a credit card, without so much as as econd thought about what that does to our long-term budget deficits or how it underm ines much-needed initiatives here at home. There are many other issues that we remain in deep denial about. It’s not just the bad economy that has thrown state and local budgets into turmoil from coast to coast. It’s our refusal to provide the tax revenues needed to pay for essential public services. Exhibit A is California, which is now a basket case. The serious wackos, the obsessive-comp ulsive absurdists, may be beyond therapy. But the rest of us could use some serious a dult counselling. We’ve forgotten many of the fundamentals: how to live within our means, the benefits of shared sacrifice, the responsibilities that go with citizenship, the importance of a well-rounded education, andt olerance. The first step, of course, is to recognize t hat we have a problem. ( This article was written by Bob Herbert c.2009 New York Times News Service). Heartbroken to read about Abaco’s new power plant LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net It’s time for Americans to get help For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comCaves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites A message to the PM: We are awaiting hangman’ s day EDITOR, The Tribune. What is with the blacked out, one-way glass that pervades every government office? I have never seen such an act of “customer unfriendliness” anywhere. Goodness knows what it is they don’t want the public to see but I hate trying to communicate with people through a tiny hole, or leaning down to talk under the slot below so that they can hear me it is disgraceful. Don’t tell me it is for securi ty because the banks don’t have it. But here is the final straw it is now installed at Wulff Road Police Station! I can’t imagine how the police intend to strengthen relationships with the communities if we are met with such a phys ical barrier. Come on government ministers open up! All the best! KEN CHAPLIN BRI, CRS Broker/Realtor Nassau, August 31, 2009. What is with the government office blackouts?

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net LEGENDARY artist William ‘Scrap Iron’ Cole-b rooke will be buried in Red Bays, north-west Andros, this weekend, following his death at the Princess Margaret Hospital. Mr Colebrooke, 79, of Red Bays, Andros, had been admitted to hospital in early August, and received surgery for a brain hemorrhage. Although the well-loved father of five, and grandfathero f six, recovered from the operation and was due to return home this week, he went into cardiac arrest on the morning of Sunday, August 23, and his heart failed. His family will take his body back to Andros on Friday for the funeral on Saturday. Mr Colebrooke, also known as ‘Ol’ Iron’, was raised in the historical Seminole settlemento f Red Bays in north-west Andros, where he learned the ancient art of basket-weaving from his aunt, Omelia Marshall. As a youngster he was educated at the Red Bays AllAge School and made a living by fishing and sponging before he was contracted to work on the ‘project’picking fruit in the United States. I t was when he returned home to Red Bays that Ms Marshall, now 91, trained him in the straw work and basketweaving techniques preserved in the community for genera-t ions. A s he indulged his passion and his talent for weaving, ‘Scrap Iron’ became internationally renowned and his remarkable work is still on display at the SmithsonianI nstitution in Washington, D C. His granddaughter, Delissa Barr, 24, said: “The wealth of knowledge imparted to him combined with his talented hands help to make the name Scrap Iron Colebrooke’ an infamous name in North A ndros, throughout the B ahamas and around the w orld. “Ol’ Iron was truly a goodwill ambassador for his country. Some of his baskets are displayed in the SmithsonianM useum in Washington, DC, and the largest basket on r ecord ever sold in the B ahamas was sewn by Ol’ Iron Scrap Colebrooke. It was so big that all 72 inches or six f eet of him was able to lie d own inside of it and not be s een.” She added: “Sewing bask ets was Ol’ Iron’s passion. He continued sewing baskets a nd representing the Bahamas a ll around the United States o f America. He made great strides for the Ministry of Tourism and his country.” Although he sold large bask ets for around $900 a piece, Mr Colebrooke struggled tom ake sales in his later life. He started to suffer from headaches and ill-health, and in 2008 he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. I n the months before his death Mr Colebrooke lived in a dilapidated shack near his family’s home in Red Bays, and died with just $200 in his s avings account and no life i nsurance. Ms Barr said: “It’s very sad. A lot of people liked him, he w as widely renowned for the quality of his work, and he did so much for this country. I regarded him as an elder and he was very friendly to e verybody. He would call out to us as kids to ask us about school and encourage us, and we used to call him ‘Ol’ Iron’ because he worked with ironw hen he was young, and his hand was so hard, it was like old iron.” His funeral will be held at Salem Baptist Church at 11am on Saturday. D onations can be made to G ateway Memorial Funeral Chapel in Mt Royal Avenue. Legendary artist ‘Scrap Iron’ dies 3$5$/(*$/6WXGHQWVZKRKDYHVXFFHVVIXOO\FRPSOHWHGIRUPDO3DUDOHJDO H[DPLQDWLRQVPD\DSSO\IRUH[HPSWLRQDWWKHUHTXLUHGOHYHOLQ RUGHUWRTXDOLI\IRUWKH$VVRFLDWH'HJUHHLQPRQWKV&$//,167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&(& 5(',7&$5'6$&&(37('&RXUVHVDSSURYHGE\WKHLQLVWU\RI(GXFDWLRQDQG 'HSDUWPHQWRIXEOLFHUVRQQHO THE ruling on Monday by Justice Neville Adderley that there should be nominationsi n the Bahamas Hotel Cateri ng and Allied Workers U nion has caused all concerned parties to spring into action. Yesterday, Sydney Rolle, a recent third vice-presidentw ith the union, officially o ffered himself for the presi dency. He said: “I know that God has prepared me for a time such as this. I believe that everything happens for a rea-s on and everyone serves for a s eason. My season is now.” Mr Rolle, a member of the ‘Redemption Team’ within the BHCAWU, said in his opinion the union has suffered enough. “I believe that my reputation, integrity and the way It reat people will give the workers a choice and even-t ually cause the union to h ave the person who has the w orkers best interest at heart.” he said. A former employee of H oliday Inn Hotel, where he worked from 1987 to 1995a nd became a shop steward, M r Rolle later moved to A tlantis where he was made chief shop steward for 13 years. H e won the third vicep resident position in the BHCAWU’s 2006 election. M r Rolle promised that the redemption team will help the workers to “see a new day where they would be a participant in the union a ffairs not a spectator.” “The union belongs to the w orkers not the leaders,” he said. The hotel union’s nominations were scheduled to take p lace last week, but Regis trar of Trade Unions Harcourt Brown had sought clarification on which nomina t ion day May 11 or August 31 was the proper and corr ect date to hold nominat ions. Hotel Union ruling sparks action from concerned parties RENEL Brown, the young Bahamian actress praised for her outstanding performance in the internationally acclaimed movie ‘Rain’, got a chance to hone her craft during a two-week course in acting and theatre at the University of California( UCLA) this summer. Renel, a 12th grader at C V Bethel High School, s tudied under outstanding contemporary actors and directors, who helped broaden her horizons and acting insights. Under the tutelage of director Philip Charles MacKenzie (Roseanne, Frasier, Suddenly Susan, Just Shoot Me and the George Lopez Show), the young actress learned about developing characters as part of her Acting fort he Camera class. Meanwhile, talent agent Maggie Murphy gave t ips on audition techniques and Broadway veteran April Shawhan helped Renel with her other acting techniques. Her other instructors included H Richard Greene, an actor who has shared the stage with James Earl Jones at the Yale Repertory Theatre. In addition, he has appeared on such television shows as The District, NYPD Blue and Without a Trace. Renel broke onto the entertainment scene when she was just 14 years old by landing the titler ole of ‘Rain’ in her first film effort. ‘Rain’, directed by Bahamian Maria Govan, was shown at Toronto International Film Festival and opened the Bahamas International Film Festival in December, 2008. Now, at 16 years old, Renel is determined to land other roles and possibly make a career of acting. Her goals led her to enroll in UCLA’s Arts Camp to study Acting for the Camera and Theatre. “Right now I just want to concentrate on acting,” she said. “Probably later on I’ll try screen writing or directing or something. But right now, my maing oal is acting.” As she completes the 12th grade at C V Bethel H igh School, Renel is content to wait on another acting opportunity in the Bahamas. But she is willing to travel and put her audition skills to the test if the right opening presents itself. Renel acknowledges that she was able to obtain a lot of useful knowledge into the two-week trip to Los Angeles. She had full days that began at6 .30am. After breakfast, she would walk one mile to classes, where she would work from 9am to 5 .30pm. “The trip was really fun,” she said. “I met a lot of people, I made a lot of friends. The teachers were really, really nice. Sometimes they would spend one-on-one time with you, and they would give you exercises to put you in the state of mind that you want to be in. And they would teach you how to become the character instead of just acting like the character.” R enel says she is aware of the many people who want to see her succeed. The long list of people includes her family, teachers, school friends, and Dr Keith Wisdom, director of public affairs at Cable Bahamas. Renel pointed out that it was in large part due to his interest that she had the opportunity to study in Los Angeles. W illiam ‘Scrap Iron’ Colebrooke BAHAMIAN ACTRESS HONES CRAFT IN LOS ANGELES BAHAMAS FILM COMMISSIONER Craig Woods with Renel Brown after her return from Los Angeles.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM being done with people with guns to effect the armed robbery and intimidate peo-p le," said Mr Ferguson. "We've had a couple of those things happen. Whether we determine it asa rising trend, it’s something that could happen anytime.” M r Ferguson added that a rmed robberies are often carried out by young, inexperienced gunmen who may have wanted to only scare their targets. "I say to people and to w ould-be victims that you h ave to be careful with people armed with a gun. Often they are young people and they are more frightenedthan you are on the receiving end. It might not be thei ntent for them to shoot, but it happens." Still, he said that more p olice patrols in vulnerable a reas are needed to help d eter armed robberies in the c ommercial sector and cau tioned business owners to i mplement more stringent s ecurity measures. M r Goodman, who lived a t Pinewood Gardens, was standing outside the restaurant when several people approached and sprayed h im with bullets. A SP Walter Evans said moments later three men w ere seen fleeing the scene on foot in a northern direction. "The employee was discovered lying on the ground w ith gunshot injuries. EMS personnel were called and examined the victim who had passed away," Mr Evans said yesterday. Mr Goodman's death w hich marked the 58th homicide for the year c omes three days after a dreadlocked gunman shot 23-year-old Alex Dean inside his family's hardware store on Parkgate Road dur-i ng a brazen daylight armed robbery attempt. Mr Dean underwent surgery for bullet wounds to his back and was in dire need of blood. The gunman and his accomplice fled the s cene on foot. A bout two weeks earlier, mother-of-three Wendy Bullard was gunned down in front of her work place. Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in the face as two masked men held up 21st Century Steel W elding on Royal Palm Street, just yards away from St Gregory's Anglican Church. I n the face of the rising m urder count, Bishop Simeon Hall of New Covenant Baptist Church announced his congregation has constructed a memorial wall for murdered victims. H e plans to post the n ames of all persons murdered in the country within the past 10 years. ASP Evans said Mr Goodman's death is being investigated and severalp eople were being questioned. Choice and the Butler and Sands depot. Ms Maura, of Collies A venue, Kennedy Subdivision, said the dogs were “eat i ng” her arm and leg for a “good while” before she saw a white truck stop at the nearb y traffic lights and she cried o ut for help. The single mother of a twoyear-old son said she wasg rateful to still be alive when C harles Dupuch, 49, stopped his truck and opened the door for her to crawl in over him, bleeding, with torn pieces of flesh hanging from her leg. M r Dupuch, who collects refuse from Bamboo Shack restaurants, drove the injured woman to the Bamboo Shack i n Soldier Road, from where Emergency Medical Services took her to hospital. Ms Maura received five stitches in her left hand anda rm, and six in her leg. But three gaping holes in her lowe r left leg have been left open while an infection clears up before surgery. She said: “It’s an ordeal every day. I’m in pain all day every day, I’m taking painkillers and infection med ication all day, every day. I will be scarred for life on my arm and leg, and I just lie here thinking about the dogs, reliving the moment I was attacked, and the fact that I could be dead instead of liv ing. “The pain was just unbearable, an unbearable pain that just didn’t go away. “I was afraid for my life, and it all boiled down to the fact that if those dogs got me, I would have been dead and my baby would have had no mother.” Thanking Mr Dupuch for s aving her life, Ms Maura said: “When I saw how bad my leg was, and how bad my h and was, I wanted to pass o ut. It was just so painful. They were biting me for a g ood while before he saved m e.” Before going into surgery yesterday to have skin graftso n her leg, Ms Maura called f or tougher regulations to control such dangerous dogs. She said: “The police told me it had to be a pit bull because any other dog, when they bite, normally let go and d on’t take out chunks of your flesh. I think the dogs that attacked me should be shot, because I don’t want anyone e lse to feel the pain I feel. “We shouldn’t have vicious dogs which escape and attack p eople. They shouldn’t be there.” Ms Maura is so haunted by t he attack, she said she is now afraid to go out at night, and wary of all dogs. S he said: “I’m so scared, I t hink of those dogs attacking me. I’m going to be staying home from now on. “I feel like the dogs are going to attack me everywhere I go.” Chelsea’s Choice general manager Tina Knowles said if their dogs had breached the area’s secure boundary, an alarm would have been raised. She said there are pit bulls roaming the area who have been known to attack people. Police are investigating the incident, which happened at about 4am last Friday. Mr Ducille said there was always a difficulty in getting the four attorneys for the four defendants in the case together.He also told the court he is on the verge of filing a constitutional motion for unreasonable delay in that case. Senior Justice Allen scheduled the retrial for November 4 pending the outcome of Mr Ducille’s application and whether or not the trial in Freeport will go on. In July, McNeil’s three-week-long trial ended in a hung jury. He is accused of causing the death of 37-year-old Harl Tay lor between Saturday, November 17, and Sunday, November 18, 2008, while being concerned with another. The internationally-renowned designer was found dead in his bedroom at Mountbatten House on West Hill Street with multiple stab wounds. A broken knife was found on his bed. McNeil has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge and stated he did not kill Mr Taylor. He has been denied bail four times. current administration for failing to seek consensus on the issue, and creating a divide within the Christian community on Monday. While Dr Munroe describes rape as “wrong, inhumane, unacceptable” and something which “should not be named among members of civil society in or outside a marital covenant”, he questions whether “the long arm of the government” should extend to the “marriage bed.” He said: “The highly debated and sensitive bill addressing the issue of ‘marital rape’ is gravely serious, complex, complicated and multi-dimensional, and has the potential of levelling far-reaching and crossgenerational affects on any western society built on Judaeo-Christian principles. The impact and implications of such a law could be incalculable.” Dr Munroe said the Bill attempts to criminalise the act of sex without linking it to violence which may lead up to the act. He said: “If the activities preceding the sexual act are considered acts of force, violence, abuse and unreasonable pressure in the context of marriage, then this can be considered domestic violence, and if it ends in sexual intercourse, then it could, and perhaps should, be considered rape. “It is important that no law be created to criminalise the legitimate act of sex betweena married couple, but it should criminalise any and all acts of forced violence, even if the act results in sexual intercourse.” The current law states: Rape is the act of any person not under 14 years of age hav ing sexual intercourse with another person who is not his spouse, and the amendment would remove the words ‘who is not his spouse’. But Dr Munroe said the law should be revised to include an act of violence or forced sexual intercourse of “another person who may or may not be his spouse.” H e said: “The amendment should not allow the marital covenant to be used as a shield to protect the individual from any act of violence against another person whether they are married, separated or divorced. “However it should be focused on, against and to address the preceding acts of violence, extortion, threat and act of fraud rather than against the act of sexual intercourse.” He has submitted a number of detailed questions to government and called for the passing of the Bill to be postponed while they are carefully considered. Dr Munroe wants a National Committee to be established to study the concerns, and hold broad consultation with the “diverse minds” of the community. He added: “Reconsider the vague terminology of ‘marital rape’ as a broad paint brush to address and cover a very complicated and complex intimate and private issue as sexual relations in marriage. “Agree that this issue is not just a legal or social issue but a moral and spiritually confidential issue of a grave magnitude. “Agree that ‘violent rape’ could and may occur in marriage and should be legally prevented, and judged by society, but the framework and context for this judgment must not jeopardize the security and in some cases the fragility of the marriage institution. “Agree that caution and postponement is evidence of strength and wisdom not weakness and failure.” Minister Hubert Ingraham said Government places “a very h igh priority on the development of (Cable Beach/Baha Mar telling Chairman Wu that “tourism is an essential part of our economy and the extent to which the Cable Beach strip can be developed will be of immense benefit to the people of the Bahamas.” Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice president of external affairs, said yesterday the redevelopment is still set to take place along the lines initially envisioned before the company had to look for new financing. He added that Bahamian contractors were likely to gain the majority of work, “if not 100 per cent”, on the first phase of the Cable Beach redevelopment whenever it went ahead. Meanwhile, Baha Mar continues to hammer out an arrangement on financing for the multi-billion dollar Baha Mar project with the China Export-Import (Exim A framework agreement signed last Friday between Baha Mar and the Chinese establishing the commercial terms for the participation of the Exim Bank and CSCEC in the Baha Mar Resort project was heralded as “an important milestone” in this regard. The resort is seeking to replace the financing it had been promised at an earlier stage by Harrah’s Entertainment, who afterwards pulled out of the arrangement, resulting in legal action. SEE TODAY’S BUSINESS SECTION M YLESMUNROE Myles Munroe calls for wider debate on marital rape issue FROM page one Murder retrial date FROM page one Murder sparks ‘soft targets’ fear MEMORIAL FOR VICTIMS: SEE PAGE TWO FROM page one W oman attacked by pit bulls scarred for life Chinese firm expects Baha Mar resort to open by 2013 FROM page one ZELMA MAURA , 30, was savagely attacked by the dogs. FROM page one

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By THE NASSAU INSTITUTE THE Nassau Institute recently interviewed a former teacher for an "insider's" perspective on thef ailing education system in the Bahamas. The interview follows: Nassau Institute (NI What do you see as one of the most fundamental issues facing education in the Bahamas? Teacher: The basic issue that v irtually no one addresses is the teachers. Essentially the overriding problem is the poor quality of teachers in the government schools and most of the smaller schools run by scripture-oriented religious groups. As long as the teachers are incompetent absolutely nothing else will work. NI: Well how does that jive with the point that our parents do not do their part? Teacher: While lack of proper parenting is a contributing factor, there is no doubt that bad teachers a re the problem. NI: That is a serious allegation. Care to expand on that? Teacher: The qualifications and performance of many of the teachers leave a lot to be desired. They teach by rote and are deadly slow s o they can't get through the syllabus. Many have inferior qualific ations and if they are head of subjects this has the effect of chasing out good teachers. In many cases the older teachers can be said to 'have retired on the job' to use a term they use themselves. Theyare teaching with the same poor m aterials and methods they used 30 years ago. NI: How do you know this? Teacher: Many young teachers who completed degrees in the United States, or COB/UWI, with the help of government scholarships, returned home to work for the government schools to pay back their loan requirement. Having met some of them again they said they had bought out of the government schools, or left as soon as they could, because some incompetent and disinterested teacher was in charge and they couldn't do their job properly. NI: Well doesn't this happen in the private school system as well? Teacher: In the private system, schools can fire bad teachers, and, in most cases they do if the results are poor. Unfortunately some of these schools pay really low wages and require absolute religious conformity and so can't afford to fire anyone, they just want someone in the classroom, so these pull down the results in the private sector. NI: What about the mainstream r eligious schools. Don't some of them maintain excellent results? Teacher: Well yes, but they seem to have risen above their religious affiliation. They don't require teachers or students to be strict devotees to their own denomination. Nevertheless relig ious education can be an issue. It can dominate the curriculum to the detriment of basic teaching, A look at the number of entries in the BGCSE tables show that this is the third most entered subject after math and English. NI: So why can't we change this t o encourage more accountability from the teachers and schools, and more time on key subjects? Teacher: Both the religious aspect and the teachers are culturally untouchable issues, there is no way any politician is going to suggest spending less time on reli g ion and retiring or replacing teachers. NI: Well what about privatisation? Something we think will help. Teacher: Privatisation would only help at the top end of the system, where it already works. We already have a large number of under-performing private schools, so no point in making people or the government pay for more of this. NI: So how can we overcome this problem of incompetent teachers? Teacher: One possible approach is to require teachers to have, say, five-yearly re-certification based on professional assessments and compulsory retraining where necessary. I understand that the College of the Bahamas basically has this system in place for its faculty, although it is not necessarily enforced. NI: So what do we do about schools that are failing across the board? Teacher: Similarly, schools need to be approved and licensed, and also re-certified periodically or closed down. There have to be consequences for failure to educate our children. NI: Any thing else you would like to say? Teacher: To reiterate, if the country does not deal with the sub-par teachers in the system, there will be little improvement in education. Equally, just one inspired teacher can transform a generation of students. NI: Thank you for your time. Teacher: My pleasure. Let's hope for the best for our children. The Nassau Institute is an independent, a-political, non-profit institute that promotes economic growth in a free market economy with limited government, in a society that embraces the rule of law and the right to private property. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $&&5(',7('&(57,),&$7(&2856( +80$1(6285&($1$*(0(17 & UHGLW&DUGV$FFHSWHG , QVWLWXWHRI%XVLQHVVDQG&RPPHUFH 7 RUSSELL’S WAREHOUSE CLOSING SALE20’x30’Tent $2,500.00, 5 Ton Split A/C Unit $1,500.00, 15kw diesel Generator, Asst. Fixtures and Fittings, for Slatwall & Gridwall, Rivet Rite Shelving, Gondolas, Glass Shelves, 2 Arm Display Racks, Slotted Standards, and Hardware. Kids & Adult Hangers Men’s Coverall’s $5.00, S/S & L/S White Shirts $1-$5, Blank CD’s $0.50, Men’s Jeans sz. 48-50, $15, Grey & White Boys Neck Ties $0.50, Mirrors, Desk, Blank ID Cards bx of 500 $45.00, 1 Stand Fans $20.00, And MORE.Location: Madeira Shopping Center Behind Mystical Gym Entrance to Aquinas First left-First stairs on left. Hours: Tuesday Thursday 9:00am. to 5:00pm. Contact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•HTXLUHPHQWV 3ULRUH[SHULHQFHLQPDUNHWLQJLQWKHQDQFLDOVHUYLFHV HQYLURQPHQWIRUDPLQLPXPRIHLJKW\HDUVLVH[SHFWHG .QRZOHGJHDQGH[SHULHQFHLQWKHSULYDWHEDQNLQJDQG LQYHVWPHQWVLVUHTXLUHG 0XVWKDYHHVWDEOLVKHGFOLHQWHOH 0XVWEHXHQWLQ(QJOLVKDQG 5HPXQHUDWLRQLVFRPPHQVXUDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFH, QWHUHVWHGSHUVRQVPD\DSSO\E\VXEPLWWLQJ UHVXPHVE\HPDLOWR EVDUHVXPH#JPDLOFRP UHIHUHQFH $VVLVWDQW9LFHUHVLGHQWULYDWH%DQNLQJ R Q RUEHIRUH)ULGD\WK 6HSWHPEHU Education in the Bahamas: Are we overlooking our teachers? Y OUR S AY

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM B y LARRYSMITH IF YOU wanted a good laugh, you should have tuned in last week to Wendall Jones' conversation with former Turks & Caicos premier Michael Misick. Misick said he was being punished for his success in developing the TCI as the Monte Carlo of the Caribbean: "The British used allegations of corruption to stop our move towards independence," he asserted. "We n ever violated the laws or the constitution." I n a variation on this theme, he also told The London Times that the recent s uspension of the TCI cons titution "has less to do with t he corruption and more to do with (British ticularly in relation to tax havens." Talk about putting lipstick on a pig! T he reality that the British are still in control of TCI is a n historical oddity noth ing more. In fact, they have b een trying to offload the islands since the early days of decolonisation, beginning with the short-lived West Indies Federation in the 1950s. But it is in no-one's interest to create a failed mini-state. Although the TCI are part of the Bahamian archipelago and share a similar history, responsibility for their administration over the past 3 00 years has shifted from B ermuda to the Bahamas to Jamaica and back to the B ahamas. They are now one of 14 self-governing rem n ants of the former British Empire scattered around the globe and known collective l y as the Overseas Territo ries. Although salt-raking was a big business in the early days of colonisation, for most of their history the TCI have been dirt poor and sparsely populated. In fact, for most of the 20th century the islands exported labour to the Bahamas, much like Haiti does today. In 1958, Britain tried to group as many of its C aribbean possessions as possible into a Federation b ased in Trinidad that would become independent as a single unit. But it turned out to be financially and politically impractical, and the Federa tion was dissolved in 1962. Jamaica and Trinidad gained independence shortly after. B ut the TCI did not want to be part of an independent Jamaica, so in 1964 the B ritish officially proposed a m erger with the Bahamas. A T CI delegation met with a U nited Bahamian Party gove rnment delegation at the C arlton House downtown that same year. Sir Arthur Foulkes, then a member of the opposition Progressive Liberal Party, recalls those meetings: "Most of us in the PLP were symp athetic to closer ties, but after 1967 (when the PLP came to power) there were o ther things to do and I don't r ecall any structured talks a bout it." At the time the TCI was n ot as developed as it is now a nd Turks Islanders came freely to The Bahamas to work, often considering themselves Bahamians. One of the issues in the 1964 talks was the level of subsidy that the British would provide for t he Bahamas to take on r esponsibility for the 6,000 Turks Islanders. T alks O bviously, no agreement c ame out of those explorato ry talks, but in the hope that a union could eventually be a chieved, Britain made the governor of the Bahamas the governor of the Turks and Caicos. But when we becamei ndependent in 1973 there seemed no further prospect of a merger. The TCI askedf or an association with Cana da, but that was turned down by the Canadian government in 1974. T wo years later the TCI r eceived its own Westmin ster-style constitution with a resident governor, and politi cal parties were formed. The first elections were won by the People's Democratic M ovement, led by James ' JAGS' McCartney who p ressed for full self-government. In 1979, the British who were heavily subsidising the territory's annual budget set an 18-month deadline for independence. But this plan was derailed when McCartney died in a p lane crash in 1980. The commitment to independence had been unpopular w ith voters anyway and in t he subsequent election the conservative” Progressive N ational Party led by Norm an Saunders came to pow e r. According to historian George Drower's book about the Overseas Territo ries, Saunders "preferred to shelve the idea of decolonization and concentrate on developing the economy." A nd that is just what he did in his own special way turning the TCI into a d rug transshipment haven, f ollowing the Bahamian e xample. In 1985, Saunders and his development minis-t er Stafford Missick, who was a former official of the Bahamas Central Bank, were arrested in Miami on drug trafficking and bribery charges. They were convicted and imprisoned, and the British suspended the cons titution and appointed a c ommission of inquiry. The 1986 Inquiry cited e vidence of persistent uncons titutional behaviour, con traventions of fundamental freedoms, political discrimination, and maladministra t ion at every level of the TCI government. A new constitution was implemented in 1988 and tourism and off-s hore finance became the twin pillars of the economy again, following the Bahamian example. In fact,d uring the years leading up to the present global economic crisis, the territory's growth was among the high-e st in the world. That was then, this is now. The most recent inquiry hasi dentified "systemic corruption" in government, the legislature and the civil service mainly the acceptance of b ribes from overseas develo pers and investors during the economic bubble that preceded the current recess ion. The inquiry also pointed to a serious deterioration in the territory's systems of governance as well as to financial collapse, caused by the "extravagant and ill-judged c ommitments of those in p ublic office," and the a bsence of effective checks and balances. Criminal investigations of five cabinet ministers have been launched including Missick and a special judic ial process for prosecutions h as been recommended. The i nquiry report called for d irect rule from London while constitutional and legalr eforms are enacted over the next two years by a governor-in-council. Elections are now set for July 2011. Investigation A veteran fraud investigator has been brought in by the governor to act as spe cial prosecutor, but Misicka nd his fellow ministers have y et to be charged. In fact, the i nvestigations could take m ore than a year. T he inquiry report also referred to widespread alle gations of vote buying and rigging of constituency rolls in a territory where suffragei s limited to less than half of the adult population about 7,000 people. Misick himself was said to have a dopted a lifestyle and spending habits that far exceeded his income as premier, while his private business interests expanded exponentially. " The PNP funded him to the tune of $500,000 follow ing the 2003 election," the report said. "He was at liberty to spend party funds atw ill with hundreds of thousands going out to his wife's US stylist and to pay for household bric a brac. This was supplemented by personal donations to him largely made through his b rother and including $500,000 from a developer who received belongership, and lavish spending of gove rnment funds for worldwide travel, a private jet and contracts for his wife. "The government provided him with two official residences and covered house-h old expenses. He received a number of land grants as well as commissions and finders f ees from developers seeking land. He also received i nterests in several businesse s and millions in loans that he did not have to repay. He f ailed to disclose his interests o r to respond to the commission's inquiries." In short, the report said, quoting the humorist P G Wodehouse, Misick's behaviour as premier "would have caused raised eyebrows int he foc'sle of a pirate sloop." Perhaps the most telling recommendation of the i nquiry was to remove the w ide discretionary powers of m inisters in the disposal of c rown land, the award of contracts, the approval of d evelopments, and immigration matters. The discretionary powers of cabinet ministers is an issue of great concern in the Bahamas too. I t would be fair to say that t he 2009 TCI inquiry report (you can read it here: h ttp://88.80.16.63/leak/ tci-inquiry-final-reportunredacted-2009.pdf ) is equally, if not more damn ing than the 1967 inquiry into g overnment corruption from c asino gambling under the U BP, or the 1984 inquiry i nto official corruption from drug smuggling under theP LP. Back in the 1960s, the TCI's impoverished inhabi tants would have added two seats to our House of Assem bly as well as an unwanted, but relatively modest, burden on government finances. But otherwise, we can surmise that it would have proceeded fairly easily. In the light of the inquiry report, acting on Misick's recent suggestion of a selfgoverning federation with the Bahamas today would present enormous practical difficulties and raise some critical governance issues. What do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net Or visit www.bahamapundit.com Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas THE unexpurgated 266-page Commission of Inquiry report for t he Turks & Caicos I slands was published f or the first time by an Internet whistleblowing service. This site, called WikiLeaks, offers a unique forum for dissidents and jour-n alists struggling a gainst official secrecy, g overnment corruption a nd back-room dealing. The British-appointed inquiry into highlevel corruption in the TCI issued its final r eport on July 18. But authorities r emoved sections of the document (after some of those named filedl aw suits) and then pulled it altogether, i ssuing a media gag order to boot. Report However, a few hours later the full report was published on WikiLeaks and, realising t hat the information was now in the public domain, the gag order w as lifted by the TCI's c hief justice on July 21. W ikiLeaks says it is dedicated to revealing the unethical behaviouro f governments and institutions around the world. Documents that are " classified, censored or otherwise opaque to the public record" can now be publisheda nonymously on this site, which was founded by dissidents, journal-i sts and techies from t he US, Taiwan, Europe, Australia and South Africa. Wik iLeaks has beend escribed as acting like a global freedom of information act or "ani ntelligence agency for the people." WikiLeaks portrays i tself as following in the t radition of the famous 1 971 US Supreme Court ruling in the Pentagon Papers case. T hat ruling declared that only a free and unrestrained press can effectively expose deception in govern ment. Commission of Inquiry report for the TCI FORMER Turks & Caicos premier Michael Misick

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By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net IT was probably the most d ifficult match for Mark Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi, but they survived ag ruelling three-setter to advance to the semifinal of the men’s doubles in Flush i ng Meadows, New York. The number three seeded team had to fight off their stiffest challenge so far at theU S Open Grand Slam Tournament by pulling off a 6-4,4 -6, 7-6 (4 d ay over the team of Ivan Ljubicic of Croatia and M ichael Llodra of France. The third set tie-breaker l asted 49 minutes whereas t hey completed the first set in just 32 minutes and need e d another 35 to play the second. “It was a tough match, but we played very well. It was a good match to win,” said Knowles, who is still playing with nine stitches in his right ring finger from an accident he suffered in the elevator at the Tennis Center last Tuesday. After easily taking the first set, Knowles said they really got surprised when Ljubicic and Llodra rallied back to even the score in the second set. In the third, they battled to a 4-4 tie before Knowles and Bhupathi were able to open a slight 6-4 advantage and they managed to go on to secure the win. We felt comfortable going in. We felt great about our performance,” saidK nowles, who noted that Llodra is a great doubles player and Ljubicic is a for-m er number three singles player in the world. “They (Llodra and Ljubic ic) have a lot of fire power. We thought we could win it in two sets, but they raisedt heir level, which was a cred i t to them. We didn’t have too many opportunities in the third set, so I had a feel-i ng that it would have gone down to a tie breaker. We were just fortunate to win at the end.” While he was glad that they got the win, Knowles admitted that they didn’t anticipate having to play right down the wire. “We didn’t panic when we were put in that situation,” he said. “We were able to get the W and move on. We’re in the semifinal now and we’re playing good tennis. We will have to play even better tennis to move on. But we’re looking forward to the challenge.” They will play either the N o.2 team of Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad Zimonjic from Serbia or theN o.5 team of Max Mirnyi from Belarus and Andy Ram o f Israel. No doubt the match-up that everyone wants to seei s against Nestor and Zimon jic. Nestor is a former partner of Knowles. Together, thed uo won the US Open title in 2004. They also won the Australian Open in 2002 andt he French Open at Roland Garros in 2007. This year, they have split t heir recent head-to-head match-up with Knowles and Bhupathi winning in the semifinal in Montreal, Cana da, at the ATP World Tour Masters before Nestor and Z imonjic came right back to return the favour at the ATP World Tour Masters in Cincinnati, Ohio. “We know each other very well. Obviously there is a lot of history there,” Knowles said. “But we are going to be focused on winning, no mat ter who we get. We just want to win to get to another Grand Slam final.” Knowles said he’s still playing with the nine stitches in his right hand, but he’s recovering very well. He just wants to block it out and try to play as best as he can. So far this year, Knowles and Bhupathi have only won o ne title in Canada. But Knowles also teamed up with American Mardy Fish to wina title in Memphis, Tennessee. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Quality Auto SalesPRE-OWNED CARS & TRUCKS TRADE-INS ON NEW CAR SALES ACCEPTEDNOWIN STOCK!O PEN: Mon to Fri 8:30am 5:30pm Sat 8:30am 12:30pm HYUNDAI COUPE HYUNDAI SANTA FE HYUNDAI ELANTRA HYUNDAI TERRACAN HYUNDAI H1 VAN HYUNDAI SONATA 01 MAZDA MPV VAN HYUNDAI SONATA TOYOTA CAMRY HONDA ACCORD DAEWOO LANOS KIA SPORTAGE FORD TAURUS FORD ESCAPE TOYOTA WINDOM To advertise in The Tribune , just call 502-2371 today! Knowles, Bhupathi advance to semis U U S S O O P P E E N N MARK KNOWLES (left had to fight off their stiffest challenge so far at the US Open Grand Slam Tournament b y pulling off a 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (4 (AP Photo

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A FTER getting through t he first two rounds, Justin L unn had to bow out of the t hird round of the Miramar S ummer Open Tennis Tournament in Florida with a hip injury. Lunn defeated South K orean player Shin Yeoung Ahn in the first round of the Miramar Sum m er Open Tennis Tourna m ent in Florida with a 3-6, 7-6 (4 I n the second round, L unn defeated the No. 1 seed of the tournament Viju George (USA6 (3 This was a great win for Lunn as George has a F lorida Men's Open Singles seeding ranking of number five (5i ng of 1554. But in the third round, Lunn was playing Jean March Bazanne after trail ing 6-4, 2-0, he was forced to retire with a hip injury. L unn now has his eyes set o n attaining ATP points and becoming a member oft he 2010 Bahamas Davis Cup Team. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL SPORTS PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE Masters Track and Field Association will hold a meeting tonight at the Ministry of Education’s Conference Room at 7 pm for all those persons who are interested in being a part of the association. Those interested must be 35 years and older. The interim committee is being headed by Foster Dorsett. Masters track meeting tonight Duo are named for tennis camp in Cuba Lunn bows out of tourney with hip injury J USTIN Roberts (#1 COTECC and Erin Strachan have been named for an International Tennis Federat ion 13 & Under Regional Training Camp in Havana, Cuba. The camp is part of the ITF Develo pment Programme, which is financed by the ITF and Grand Slam Development Fund. The camp will be conducted by A nthony Jeremiah (ITF Development Officer for the Caribbean), J uan Pino, Henry Wilfredo and B elkis Rodriguez (Cuba The camp is set for September 112 0 at the Hotel Occidental Miramar i n Havana, Cuba, and will focus on the players’ fitness, tactical ability,m ental and physical ability to perf orm at a high level. A t the end of the camp the players m ay have the opportunity to be s elected on to the ITF/COTECC Touring Team to COSAT from them iddle of January 2010 to compete in four weeks of competition from C olombia, Ecuador, Peru and B olivia. During the period 1986, more than US$67million has been i nvested by the ITF and the Grand Slam Nations in tennis development activities in 150 countries worldwide. Programme In 2008, US$4.4million was spent o n the Development Programme with US$2.7million being invested b y the ITF and the balance of U S$1.7million contributed by the Grand Slam nations to the Grand S lam Development Fund partly from p roceeds generated from the ATP World Tour Finals. T his year’s ATP World Tour F inals is scheduled to be held in Lond on, England, November 22-29, 2009. W ith the aim of raising the level of t ennis worldwide and increasing the number of countries competing inm ainstream international tennis, the ITF Development Programme i ncludes a broad range of initiatives i n less developed countries ranging from the grass roots to Grand Slams. Activities include ITF/Grand Slam t ouring teams, funding for junior and professional tournaments, training centres, coaches education, the supp ly of tennis equipment and the ITF Junior Tennis Initiative – a 14 & under player development programme, which encompasses the S chool Tennis Initiative and Performance Tennis Initiative programmes. S pecial emphasis has been placed o n junior tennis where regional tournament circuits have been developed a nd teams of young players compete o utside their own region. In 2008, 25 regional circuits were s upported by the Development Prog ramme providing much needed c ompetition for the best players at 1 8, 16 and 14 & under age groups a cross the globe (Central America & Caribbean, South America, East-e rn Europe, Africa, Asia and Pacific Oceania). P layers who perform well at these r egional circuits are invited to join an international touring team. The ITF/Grand Slam touring team p rogramme aims to facilitate the transition of talented players through regional and international competit ions and onto the professional ranks. In 2008, there were 19 ITF/Grand Slam Touring Teams involving 160 players from 68 different countries. F ormer ITF/Grand Slam Touring Team members include: Gustavo K uerten (Brazil ( Chile), Nicolas Lapentti (Ecuador), Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi ( India), Angelique Widjaja (Indones ia), Eleni Daniilidou (Greece), Younes El Aynaoui (MoroccoP aradorn Srichaphan (Thailand C ara Black (Zimbabwe N ieminen (Finland ( Romania), Marcos Baghdatis ( Cyprus), Kateryna Bondarenko (Ukraine( Belarus), Uladzimir Ignatik (Belarus ( Lithuania). JUSTIN LUNN ‘Father of mixed martial arts’ to headline Science of V iolence seminar By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net THE budding growth of the Mixed Martial Arts (MMAm unity will receive an additional boost of exposure when "the father o f MMA in the Bahamas" headlines a top event. Personal Protection Concepts is scheduled to host a seminar enti tled the "Science of Violence" on S eptember 19 at the British Colo nial Hilton, featuring former pro fessional MMA fighter Scott Groff. The four-hour event, which begins at 10am, will feature tutoria ls on fighting strategies, various techniques, and nuances of the sport ranging from the most basic p rinciples to advanced. G roff is credited with popularizing the sport of MMA in the Bahamas, training some of the sport's first local participants as far back as 1992. He brings over 20 years of experience training others in the sport and spent years on professional circuits in the United States and Japan. Oran Rolle, chief instructor at Personal Protection Concepts, said the event should serve as a means to help those interested in the sport with a headstart towards training. "As of this moment we know we have a lot of people eager to get involved and we expect this event to be a great one, not just for the MMA community but for those on the outside looking to get involved for the first time," he said. "I think we are capable of hosting a major MMA event in the near future. We have the grassroots support and the interest is there so that is definitely something that can be looked into." Rolle said the profile of the sport c ontinues to grow. “We have been trying to have at least one event per month to increase the expo s ure of the sport. People know m uch about martial arts but MMA is something that has taken off and exploded in popularity recently all over the world," he said. "MMA has just started to get b igger here at home. We have the talent and the training, with better facilities we could see fighters represent the Bahamas all over in various promotions and represent ing the country." Bahamians making major impacts on the international MMA scene include Yves Edwards, cred ited with inventing the "Thug-Jitsu" fighting style and as a lightweight fighter in organisations such as the UFC, PRIDE, BodogFIGHT, and EliteXC; and Inter net sensation turned MMA fighter, Kevin "Kimbo Slice" Ferguson. "Those guys have done so much because local fighters were able to see Bahamians reach the top level in the sport so it lets them know that opportunity is there if they continue to pursue the sport in the right way," Rolle said. “MMA is one of those disciplines for versatile athletes that have been largely under exposed. We have a great talent pool to choose from here and when we have martial artists that travel, traditionally they do very well so we know the base is there for MMA training. We are eager about the turnout of the seminar and we expect it to be a stepping stone to greater MMA ventures in the future." FORMER professional Mixed Martial Arts fighter Scott Groff... Forbes back as GSSSA boss after more than decade persons attended the meeting. “We’re going to try to get back to where we used to be, getting the schedule on time and hopefully initiate some new sports for exhibi tion purposes so that we can eventually build them into the school sports programme,” Forbes projected. “But we have a lot of work ahead of us. We had some not too cordial relationships with some peo ple, namely the Principals Association and the Ministry of Education as well as Youth, Sports and Culture.” One of the first orders of business off the playing field, according to Forbes, will be to bury the hatch et with the above mentioned enti ties and eventually get the association back to where it should be. “I’m not happy to say that I’m pleased with where we are right now because I feel if we had the same administration in place when I served, we would have been much further ahead,” Forbes said. Bumps “That being said, you have to accept the bumps being in the road and the hills and valleys to cross over, but what pleased me most was the show of confidence that the people had in me especially.” Conyers, a physical education teacher at CH Reeves, said they can only go forward, leaving all of the problems they encountered in the past behind them. “He has some good ideas and I think we all can work together as a team, so we’re looking forward to some great things happening for them,” Conyers said. Forbes, who is stationed at CI Gibson, said after the service that Conyers, Toote, Pratt-Miller and Gibson rendered up to last year when the association experienced further turmoil in its leadership, he was happy that they continued to stay on. The GSSSA will now prepare for the start of its new season with the commencement of volleyball on Monday, September 28 and they will also revert back to the original constitution that they had in place before some changes were made to a new one that has not yet been ratified. Games While the senior boys and girls will play their games at the DW Davis and CI Gibson Gymnasiums, the junior boys and girls will play at the RM Bailey and Tom ‘The Bird’ Grant volleyball outdoor courts. “We had some discussion about whether we would change volleyball to softball because all of the associations are now playing softball, even the parent associations are playing softball right now,” Forbes said. “But because we ended it with softball last year, some people started practicing volleyball before the school year was completed, so we thought we will continue with that this year and hopefully the next year we will make the switch with softball at the start.” Bill Morgan is expected to once again serve as the chairman of the scheduling committee for all sports. Going into the new season, there have been some notable changes in the Physical Education Depart ment. Pratt-Miller has been moved from AF Adderley Junior High to RM Bailey, Chevy Simmons has gone from SC McPherson Junior High to RM Bailey and Torsheka Cox is now at Government High Secondary after working at the new Anatol Rodgers High School. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net G o vernment has decidedt o recognise veteran touring tennis pro Mark Knowles during ad inner celebration at Government House on Sunday. He will be honoured for t eaming up with his German partner Anna-Lena Groenefled in July to win the mixed d oubles Grand Slam title at Wimbledon, England. “Again because of what’s h appening in the economy, we won’t do anything big,” Minister of Youth, Sportsa nd Culture Desmond Bannister told The Tribune yesterday. He said Knowles will be presented with a plaque. A s for Knowles’ achievem ent, Bannister said he’s delighted to be sitting in the c hair as the minister of sports when there are performances turned in at that level in the sport. The Grand Slams are the f our most prestigious tour naments in the world, comprising of the Australian Open, Roland Garros (theF rench Open), Wimbledon and the US Open. They are d istinguished by the fact that t hey draw the top players in the world and are held over a two week period. A nd with the IAAF’s 12th World Championships inA thletics over and the track and field season winding down, there has been a lot of questions surrounding a celebration for Team Bahamas. Bannister says the Bahamas Government hass ome tentative plans to hono ur the 24-member team that won two medals last month i n Berlin, Germany. B ut he noted that the exact plans could not be released u ntil they have been approved. However, he did indicate that there will be some type of celebration inO ctober. “Because of the state of the economy, we won’t do a nything like we’ve done in the past,” was all that Bannister was willing to disclose a t the time. Debbie Ferguson-McKenz ie won an individual bronze medal in the women’s 200 metres and she anchored the women’s 4 x 100 relay team of Sheniqua ‘Q’ Ferguson (pop-off (second Amertil (thirdm edal. B annister said Knowles, who has also won the Aust ralian Open, Roland Garr os and French Open with former men’s doubles part n er Daniel Nestor of Cana da, has achieved his success with a lot of perseverance. “I want to commend Mark, but I can’t do it witho ut commending his mothe r, Vickie, who has been there with him through all ofh is ups and downs,” Bannister stressed. Despite having to get nine stitches to repair a cut on his right ring finger from the door of the elevator at the Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, Knowles and Groenefeld were denied ac hance to add the US mixed title to their ledger. But Knowles and Mahesh B hupathi of India are now in the semifinal of the men’sd oubles (See full story on page 9). They are hoping to w in their first Grand Slam title for the year after coming so close when they were run ners-up to American identic al twin brothers Bob and M ike Bryan in the final of the Australian Open in Jan-u ary. When contacted after their gruelling quarter-final win over Ivan Ljubicic and Michael Llodra, Knowles said he’s thrilled that he’s going to be recognised. “I tried to represent my country, the Bahamas, to theb est of my ability for the past 25 years, the last 20 years on the circuit,” he said. “I’m n ow carrying the flag alone, so I enjoy representing theB ahamas. “I’m very pleased that they a re honouring me and I would like nothing more than to share my Wimble don title and my other a chievements with the B ahamian people because they have been so supportivet hroughout my career.” Not having the kind of support that many of the other athletes do with their local entourages cheering them on during their matches on the circuit, Knowles said it’s good to be able to come home for such an honour. H e said he would have liked for Bhupathi to join him, but he has Davis Cup d uties for India in South Africa. So Knowles will bes haring the moment with his family, including his wife, D awn, and their two sons, Graham and Brody. C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 PAGE 10 ‘Father of mixed martial arts...’ TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net AFTER more than a decade away from office, Alfred Forbes is back at the helm as the president of the Government Secondary Schools Sports Association (GSSSA During the election of offi cers on Monday at R M Bai ley Secondary High School, Forbes reassumed the top post of the association. “I’m excited really because of the way things have been going for the last 3-4 years,” said Forbes in his initial com ments as he makes his return to office after he served as president from 1993-2003. “It’s been in a downward spiral I think, but now that we have some new blood, I think we’re going to see a resurgence of the GSSSA as it used to be and hopefully we will even take it to another level.” Dubbing his new two-year term in office as “The Next Level,” Forbes will have some familiar faces who were involved over the last few years to work with him on his staff. Lenora Conyers will be the first vice president, Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson second vice president, Keisha PrattMiller secretary, Melonie Gibson assistant secretary, Marilyn Toote treasurer and Floyd Armbrister, assistant treasurer. All of the officers were voted in unopposed by the 15 schools registered in the association. More than 50 Forbes back as GSSSA boss after more than one decade ALFRED FORBES S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 “I’m excited really because of the way things have been going for the last 3-4 years...It’s been in a downward spiral I think, but now that we have some new blood, I think we’re going to see a resurgence of the GSSSA as it used to be and hopefully we will even take it to another level.” A Forbes K nowles, Bhupathi advance to semis... See page 9 Tennis ace to be honoured Sports minister says government has tentative plans to honour the Bahamas’ 24-member team that won silver and bronze medals at the World Championships MARK KNOWLES

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T HE security company WemCo gave back to the communi ty this past weekend, supplying some 500 children with a backto-school treats. H enry Wemyss, president of WemCo Security and Collect ions, handed out school supplies for the children of his staff and the surrounding community. “Our staff here at WemCo are very important to us,” said Acribba Wemyss, the company’s vice-president. “Our president thought it only befitting that we show our appreciation in these economically challenging times by assist-i ng with these school supplies. Even though it’s a little late, and most children are officially back to school, Mr Wemyss was determined that they children would not return to school with o ut receiving something from WemCo. “At first we set out only to give the supplies to the children of our staff, but we could not leave out the neighbourhood children. We hope to make it even bigger and better next year,” shes aid. Some 500 children received exercise books, folders, pencilcases filled with supplies, crayons, colouring books, gel grips forp ens/pencils and filing paper. Not only younger children come out to take advantage of this kind gesture, but also teenagers in high school. Grateful for the gifts, eight-year-old Jermaine Williams of Centreville Primary said: “I am a grade four student in my school and I live in Mason’s Addition. I am very happy that I got the school supplies. I was just passing and I saw them giving out stuff. The supplies will be helpful to me in my school work.” The children were also treated to chilli-cheese hot dogs, a variety of chips and juices. “Realising how the economy is at this time, we decided to do this outreach to the community via school supplies,” said Monique Glinton, WemCo human resources manager. “We have had other back-to-school giveaways in the past but this is the first one that we actually held on our grounds.” Children of all ages attended the event until late in the day, receiving the treats and enjoying the company and well wishes of staff members who were distributing them. Ross University Bahamas begins its third semester since opening ON SEPTEMBER4 Ross University Bahamas on Grand Bahama commenced its third semester since officially opening in January 2009. New students were greeted with a breakfast and a full day of on-site orientation, where they learned about all aspects of their academic and island life including the Ross hurricane preparedness plan. Faculty and administration were introduced to the students. Members of the Grand Bahama Health Services and doctors from the Rand Hospital who are participating in the clinical education programme with Ross were also introduced. Students Faculty and administration were introduced to the students. Members of the GrandB ahama Health Services and doctors from the Rand Hosp ital who are participating in the Clinical Education Program with Ross were also introduced. Dr Frank Bartlett, chief medical officer at the Rand Memorial Hospital, was onh and to speak directly to the students and introduce his team which will work directly with the students as part of their clinical education partnership. Those doctors are Dr Elaine Lundy; Dr Lucio Pedro; Dr Frementus Leon; Dr Cynthis Ng; Dr Augustine Ohueyi; Dr Gerhard Klassen and Dr Bartlett himself. The students welcome the opportunity to improve their skills in history taking and physical examination. They will be afforded first-hand experience during supervised clinical rotations at either the Rand Hospital or the Eight Mile Rock Clinic. Ross University operates three semesters a year which begin in January, May and September, respectively. In between semesters the students have a short 10-day to two-week break, and often this time is spent moving to their next Ross University academic location which could be either in Dominica, West Indies; Miami, Florida; Freeport, Bahamas; or Saganaw, Michigan. "We have a very successful programme and we want to continue to build on that. We are pleased to welcome two new faculty this semester," said Dr Michael Robinson, assistant dean of curricular and faculty affairs at Ross University Bahamas. Dr Anthony Munroe, executive administrator to Ross University Bahamas said: "We are extremely excited about the future of Ross here in Grand Bahama. Experience “Our medical students are receiving an outstanding educational experience through our Ross University School of Medicine faculty and it is enhanced through our partnership with the Grand Bahama Health Services, where our students get exceptional preceptorship byt he Rand Hospital and Eight Mile Rock Clinic medical staff, which allows our stu dents the opportunity to help the wonderful people of Grand Bahama." Sharon Williams, administ rator of Grand Bahama Health Services, was also in a ttendance at the morning session and said, "We are very pleased to be a part of the Ross University partnership to educate their students, and we welcome them to our community and wisht hem a successful initiative for the year." WemCo gives back to the community CHILDREN flock to WemCo for school supplies VICE PRESIDENT Acribba Wemyss gives supplies to the littlest recipient FROM LEFT: Dr Augustine Ohueyi, Rand Hospital; Dr Anthony Munroe, Ross Bahamas executive administrator; Dr Michael Robinson, Ross Bahamas assistant dean, curricular and faculty affairs; Dr Elaine Lundy, Rand Hospital; Sharon Williams, administrator, Grand Bahama Health Services; Dr Frank Bartlett, chief medical officer, Rand Memorial Hospital; Dr Lucio Pedro, Rand Hospital; Nicholle Bethel, Rand Hospital; Dr Frumentus Leon, Rand Hospital, and Dr Gerhard Klassen, Rand Hospital. Also present but not in the photo was Dr Cynthis Ng. ROSS UNIVERSITY BAHAMAS students during new semester orientation day on September 4 at their B ahamas educational site in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Robbin Whachell

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Small hotels slash rates up to 40% C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.25 $4.16 $4.26 * But some auto dealers facing ‘inevitable reality’ o f lay-offs, and ‘reviewing t his internally’ * 2009 second quarter over f irst quarter rise cannot disguise impact of 42% year-over-year d rop in first half * Consumers likely to see 5-10% increase in n ew car prices for 2010 season By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMIAN auto dealers hips yesterday expressed cautious optimism that the worst o f the recession may be over as new car sales rose 15.81 per c ent quarter-over-quarter for the three months to June 30, 2009, yet they warned that some firms were facing the “inevitable reality” of having t o lay-off staff. While Bahamas Motor Deale rs Association (BMDA bers pointed to the 15.81 per c ent increase in new car sales in the 2009 second quarter, when c ompared to the first quarter numbers, as a sign of modest encouragement, there was no disguising the sharp year-overyear fall-off during the 2009 f irst half. BMDA members confirmed t o Tribune Business that yearover-year new car sales were d own 41.71 per cent for the six months to June 30, 2009, due to a slump in consumer demand induced by the recession, ris ing unemployment and reduced i ncomes. Reduced credit demand and stricter borrowingr equirements imposed by Bahamian commercial banks a re a further factor. Rick Lowe, a director and operations manager at Nassau M otor Company (NMC BMDA member, told Tribune B usiness that the possibility of lay-offs in the auto dealership s ector adding further to ris ing unemployment levels was “certainly a reality”. “We’re all looking at that possibility,” he confirmed. We’re concerned and, obviously, we all have to do what’s in the best interest of keeping our separate companies going. “We’re not seeing the sales levels we all need. We’re getting fewer people through the process, because people have been laid-off. Customer traffic is not at the levels we’d like to see,” Mr Lowe added. “It’s a drastic decline. It’s tough. We find ourselves really hurting. This is the time we need to shore up. In our industry, particularly on the service side, if we do not get cars fixed first time, you have frustrated people, so we’ve got to put our best foot forward as far as cus tomer service is concerned.” Bahamian auto dealers are thus having to confront the same reality being faced by most sectors of this nation’s economy, namely that with reduced top line/sales revenue growth, most businesses are New car sales up 16% over first quarter S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor B ahamian contractors will gain “the overall majority, if n ot 100 per cent” of cont racts for the $150-$200 million first phase Cable Beach redevelopment if the Baha Mar project goes ahead, two senior executives with thed eveloper confirmed yesterday, as it s ticks to its 2009 year-end target of concluding negotiations with two Chinese state-owned entities. Both Don Robinson, president of Baha Mar Resorts, and Robert Sands,t he company’s senior vice-president of external and governmental affairs, con-f irmed to Tribune Business that the developer would “try to do everything to e nsure” maximum possible participation by Bahamian construction companies and workers, even though its equity partner is likely to be a Chinese construction firm. There’s going to be plenty of opportunities for Bahamian contractors. It’s ah uge project, so everyone will have a chance to participate,” Mr Robinson t old Tribune Business. He pointed out that the first phase of t he planned $2.6 billion Cable Beach redevelopment, which would involve the West Bay Street re-routing and construction of the Commercial Village to house the relocated banks, government o ffices, Straw Market and police/fire station currently on the Cable Beach strip, would involve the issuance of smaller c ontracts and tenders that are ideally suited to Bahamian participation. I think the number we have been working with is $150-$200 million worth o f work in the first phase,” Mr Robinson told Tribune Business. “The re-routing of West Bay Street, the development of t he Commercial Village, the police station, banks and Straw Market all of that has to be replaced. This is intended t o jump start construction activity with Bahamian contractors, and we wouldq uickly start once the project gets going.” A nd Mr Sands added: “What we have said is that Phase One of the project, the road re-routing, the building of the Commercial Village, the securing of the site, if not close to 100 per cent, the overall majority of it will go to Bahamia n contractors.” This corresponded with the position as understood by Bahamian contractors. Stephen Wrinkle, the Bahamian Contractors Association’s (BCAs aid yesterday that the organisation understood that the plan was for China State Construction Engineering Com p any (CSC featuring the casino and major hotels,w ith much of the work outside the main B aha Mar campus going to Bahamian f irms. A dding that the BCA hoped to meet with Baha Mar on the issue “sooner r ather than later”, Mr Wrinkle said the organisation was unlikely to protest too l oudly if CSC brought the majority of workers and construction materials withi t from China, since the Cable Beach redevelopment was “very important to t he country” and could potentially play a major part in turning the economy around. “I would anticipate good participation, and that every individual Bahami a n contractor will be involved in the project,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Busi n ess. “They can’t bring everyone over from China. “When a project like Baha Mar Bahamians to get ‘majority’ of $200m Baha Mar phase DON ROBINSON , president of Baha Mar Resorts... T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net A GLOBAL hotel/leisure services and consulting organisation yesterday announced the opening of its first Caribbean regional office in the Bahamas. Parris Jordan, managing director of HVS’s Caribbean operations, told Tribune Busi ness that the company was not new to the Bahamas, but had decided to open an office in this nation to service the region. “This office will specialise in valuation and consulting work in the Caribbean, Central America and the United States,” said a company press release. According to Mr Jordan, his company has done studies for the Bahamas government, Baha Mar and Atlantis. HVS boasts 25 offices globally, staffed by more than 400 “seasoned industry professionals”. Mr Jordan himself has worked on numerous midand large-scale mixed-use developments, valuations, feasibility studies, and operator searches, and has provided strategic advice, return on investment and market studies in the United States, Mexico, and the Caribbean. ”A native of Trinidad, Jordan brings the right combination of consulting experience and cultural knowledge of the region to better understand the market and sub-markets on the various islands, and the nuances Hotel consultancy in Bahamas move S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net SMALL Family Island hotels are m aking adjustments to room rates and dreaming up special package deals as t hey try to adjust to the traditionally slow month of September, which has been exacerbated by the recession, the Bahamas Hotel Association’s (BHA president said yesterday. Robert Sands said many hotels were attempting to adjust to market pressures that are pushing small properties to offer more value. In this unfortunately slow period they are trying to get some traction in order to attract business,” said Mr Sands. “Under normal circumstances, September is a difficult month.” He said small Bahamian hotels were doing whatever they can to increase their occupancy levels in light of severe economic conditions and reductions in airl ift. The Government has been working a t attracting more airlift to the Bahamas this year, and has secured several high p rofile airlines scheduled to begin direct airlift near year-end. One of the most popular discount airlines in the US, AirTran, has moved to initiate almost daily direct flights to this c ountry from hubs in Atlanta and Orlando. M r Sands said the BHA has also lis tened to the concerns of small Family I sland hotels, who are affected by smaller visitor numbers much more than New Providence. He said those hotels have been very creative in the way they are attracting business during this difficult economic B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas may have to confront sacred cows” such as the automatic 15 per cent gratuity and strong trade unions in making much-needed structural reforms to its economy, a former Central Bank governor said yesterday, arguing t hat operating costs were simply too high for most businesses. T . B. Donaldson, who is also Com monwealth Bank’s chairman, told Tri b une Business that the reduction in credit demand and consumer spending was a ‘double-edged sword’ for the Bahamiane conomy. He explained that while it aided families in staying afloat, it prevente d an increase in consumption that could pull the economy out of recession. From my point of view, we need to look at structural changes,” Mr Don a ldson said. “The cost of operating a business is too high. We don’t confront t he sacred cows of the unions and the 15 per cent gratuity. The overhead costs are enormous. We really have to look at what sort of economy we want to run.” While he did not have “a magic bul l et” that would solve all the Bahamian economy’s ills, Mr Donaldson added t hat the reduction in consumer spending was actually preventing the economy f rom pulling itself out of recession. “It’s one thing to tell people to go and save money, and they follow you and your admonition, and then you say you’ve got to spend to get out of a recesBahamas must tackle the economy’s ‘sacr ed cows’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0$;(1( %$=,/( RI 2.5$ +,//RII6+,5/(<671$66$8%$+$0$6 LV DSSO\LQJ W R WKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS IRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDV DQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\U HJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOG VHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQ WZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH QG 6HSWHPEHU WR WKH 0 LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3 127,&( 127,&(75$)),&'(/$<6,%/(6+,5/(<((7 9,//$*($' )5('5,&.((7'8(:$ 5(3/$&(0(17:25.6,QDQHIIRUWWRXSJUDGHH[LVWLQJ :DWHU6HZHU6HUYLFHVWKH :DWHU6HZHUDJH&RUSRUDWLRQ KDYHFRQWUDFWHG%DKDPDV+RW0L[ &RPSDQ\/WGWRUHSODFHH[LVWLQJ VHUYLFHFRQQHFWLRQVDWWKHDERYH ORFDWLRQ$VFRQVHTXHQWWUDIF PDQDJHPHQWLQYROYLQJURDG FORVXUHVDQGWHPSRUDU\WUDIF GLYHUVLRQVPD\EHLQRSHUDWLRQ GXULQJWKHIROORZLQJWLPHV /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQ SRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHG WKURXJKWKHORFDOPHGLD being forced to do ‘more with less’. W ith new car sales, the largest and most critical revenue driver for new car dealerships, down by almost 42 per cent, companies have littlec hoice but to realign staffing l evels and other operating costs to remain profitable. “Concerns exist that some layoffs might be inevitable, but member firms are reviewing this internally.W e are all hopeful of maintaining employee levels wheree ver possible,” the BMDA said in a statement. M r Lowe yesterday told Tribune Business that a further factor set to impact Bahamian new car dealerships was a likely increase in vehicle prices for2 010, with BMDA members now starting to place orders for the new model year as they run low on inventory. A couple of us have been told 5-10 per cent” by factories and suppliers, Mr Lowe said of the likely consumer price i ncreases. “So by the time you extrapolate that, it could be a s ignificant chunk for an expensive car. If people are able to do a nything now, it’s probably in their best interests to buy now.” T he drastic drop in new car sales has not only impacted the d ealerships and their employees, with government revenue from import/stamp duties on vehicle imports having plunged “big time”. “Most of us have started to o rder a few 2010 models, so the Government should see revenue in the next couple of months, but nothing will come i n the near term,” Mr Lowe said. “Our order cycles are three to four months depending on where the car is coming f rom Japan, Korea, Brazil, or 90 days for North America.” W hile Bahamian auto dealers were slightly more opti m istic given the benefit of hindsight provided by the 2009 sec-o nd quarter results, and the quarter-over-quarter comparis on, Mr Lowe indicated the industry was uncertain about the recovery’s strength. This was especially since August and September were traditionally the softest part of the year forn ew car sales. One anomaly noticed by BMDA members had been the growth in passenger and sports u tility vehicle (SUV pared to the first quarter. “None of us can get a handle on it. You’d think people would b e moving from SUVs to smaller passenger cars. It stood out l ike a sore thumb,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. You’d have thought they would move to something moref uel efficient. We generally find in our trends that we’re five y ears behind North America. It seemed like a big jump in SUVs.” New car sales up 16% over Q1 Bahamas must tackle the economy’s ‘sacred cows’ s ion,” the former Central Bank governor added. “They see jobs being lost, and don’t know when they’re going to lose theirs, so they are saving. The rate of savingsh as gone up for possibly the first time, because people are not as reckless as they used to be. And that’s the problem. We’re a consumer driven economy. In an economy that consumes, not produces, that’s terrible. And there’s such a correlation b etween the rate at which we consume and the rate at which the Government collects its taxes, that it has such an extremely adverse and wide impact.” Mr Donaldson confirmed that Commonwealth Bank was “seeing a lot” ofl oan consolidations, which had grown by almost $38 million across the Bahamian commercial banking system during the 2009 first half, as persons amortised e xisting debt to enable them to afford repayments and enhance cash flow. “That is part of what we did with the hotel workers, consolidate their auto debt, mortgages and whatever other debts they had,” he added. The chickens have come home to roost. The world has been living above its means for a number of years, and the good old days are not coming back a ny time soon. “We’re in for a long, rough ride, and have to buckle our seat belts and hope we end up right side up.” F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B T B DONALDSON

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in the way business is conduct ed locally,” the company's release continued. HVS will formally introduce i tself to the Bahamas at its grand opening reception tomor r ow at the British Colonial Hilton, where founder and chief executive of the company, Steve Rushmore, is expected to unveil its new operation. The economies of Caribbean nations are highly dependent on the hotel indus t ry,” said Mr Rushmore. Hotel “The hotel and greater serv ice industry will continue to play a vital role for individuali slands and the region as a whole. The time is right for H VS to establish a physical presence in the region, as supp orted by recent hotel development activity and the need o f existing hotel owners and operators to assess current and f uture needs.” HVS is expect to move its Caribbean office to a location within the Caves Village com plex. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.811.15Abaco Markets1.151.150.000.1270.0009.10.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.2010.18Cable Bahamas11.0010.50-0.501,0001.4060.2507.52.38% 2.882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.495.26-0.2328,1490.4190.30012.65.70% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.693.68-0.010.1110.05233.21.41% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.032.030.000.3820.0805.33.94% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.509.30Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.125.120.000.3320.15015.42.93% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 12.0010.09J. S. Johnson10.0910.090.000.9520.64010.66.34% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 TUESDAY, 8 SEPTEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,510.69| CHG -16.82| %CHG -1.10 | YTD -201.67 | YTD % -11.78BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 1 9 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestF INDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.0010 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48671.4105CFAL Money Market Fund1.48673.705.40 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06631.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06632.596.63 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0215-1.112.15 1.06111.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06112.296.11 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 NAV Date 31-Jul-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 28-Aug-09 31-Jul-09MARKET TERMS btrt tfb r f r!%* '!$() ))!*&*# tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** www.BankBahamas.comBank of The Bahamas wishes to advise our valued customers that our Card Centre numbers have changed for all Prepaid, Credit and Medline Card holders. Please note that the new numbers are: NOTICELocal: 242-396-6010 International: 1-877-204-5110 Toll FreeFamily Island: 1-242-300-0111 Toll Free By AUDREY INGRAM R OBERTS Executive Director Source Development Consultants & Enigin Partner THE draft Telecommunications Sector policy dated August 5, 2009, which was pub-l ished by the Bahamian government a week later, articulates a set of objectives and vision statement completely d evoid of any reference to Clim ate Change. Despite admission of deficiencies and claims of wideranging reform in the introduc-t ion to the draft, basically it’s a business as usual” document that adds little or no value to our capacity to meet key challenges, especially those that will be the most crucial of this cen-t ury. On a global scale, the inform ation and communications technology (ICT i ncludes the electronics communications segment, plays a key role in addressing climate change and facilitating efficient and low carbon development.N ot only does it facilitate other sectors, but its role in emissionr eduction and energy savings in the industry itself is signific ant. Therefore, it behooves countries such as the Bahamas, w ho have signed the Kyoto Protocol, to articulate the sector’s creative responsibilities in this respect. The birth of the digital age c ame with the invention of the transistor in the 1950s. Throught his means personal computing was introduced on the one h and, and high capacity, fixed and mobile telecommunications on the other. Both technolo gies come together in the ubiq uitous Internet. A s the use of digital technologies grows, so does the carbon footprint of the sector. It is appropriate for a policy paper on the sector to articulate how i t will meet its footprint reduction challenge, especially in an archipelago where electronic communications are essential for development and wheret here is so much reliance on foreign direct investment. A reliance which should mean that governance standards set b y the policymakers truly strengthen conservation capacity, even as they meet investors’ expectations. P olicy If, as it seems, there is no pol i cy objective that addresses the need to identify the carbonf ootprint of an individual piece o f electronic communications h ardware, such as a mobile p hone, which is relatively easy to do, is it likely, then, to expect t hat carbon footprints from more complex and converged n etwork services such as broadband Internet will be identi-f ied? I think not! Electronic communications n etworks link the Bahamas into a global system, so one might expect a visionary outlook on the sector’s role with respect to an issue as pressing and rele v ant to all as climate change. What might an enabling role i n climate change adaptation and mitigation in the Bahamas mean for the electronic communications sector? It could mean three things at least: * Measuring the direct car b on footprint of the sector * Enabling quantifiable emis s ions reductions through ICT applications in other sectors of the economy * Identifying new market opportunities for the sector and o ther sectors involved with realising these reductions This sector is unique is in its ability to make energy cons umption and carbon emissions visible through its products and services. Yet no link between the sector’s stated objectives is made to those of other utilitys uppliers, such as BEC or the Water and Sewerage Corporation in this regard. Because electronic commun ications products and services can enable the monitoring and mapping of energy, it is possible to know where inefficiencies occur throughout the processesa nd workflows of various sectors in the economy. This means that infrastructure canb e radically transformed. Points 13-17 of the draft sect or policy deal with liberalisa t ion (a subhead of the vision a n entirely market-driven conc ept, when perhaps the most important point about the elect ronic communications industry is the benefits from the a doption of ICT technologies to influence and transform thew ay our society works, and the way people behave. H ardly anything is said about the transformative aspects of the sector. Point 63 of subhead Consumer Protection deals obliquely with this in one sen t ence only. It states that URCA, the industry regulator, w ill actively promote public awareness campaigns to inform customers of their rights and obligations. Nowhere is it stated that the o pportunities for transformation and promotion of sustain a ble development for all (people and environment) through o ut the archipelago is enhanced by electronic communications. Or that the sector’s products and services are crucial components of the Bahamas’ trans ition to a low carbon economy. Sector policy footprint has chilly climate Hotel consultancy in Bahamas move F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM begins, it could completely turn the economy around, and there will be spin-offs for the construction industry in the widere conomy. We look at all the viable spin-offs that come froma project like this. It could turn the entire economy around.” M r Wrinkle added that the BCA would soon seek to meet with Baha Mar Development Company officials again, following last week’s signings oft he agreements between CSC and the China Export-Import Bank on one side, and the developer on the other. There is no question that the Chinese participation is going to be substantial, it is going to be extensive and it is going to be dominant,” theB CA president added. “I would anticipate us getting together with Baha Mar before Christmas to try and get t hings moving. Once the Chinese decide to move, they will move very quickly, and once C SC is committed as an i nvestor it will be in a strong position as owner, contractor a nd developer. The ball is starting to move, and the BCA n eeds to be out in the forefront to make sure we all have an opportunity to participate in what will be one of the biggest p rojects in the Caribbean. “We need to offset Atlantis and support marketing efforts. It’s beginning to show that Atlantis can’t carry the coun-t ry.” CSC said in a statement that under the terms of the deal being worked out with Baha M ar, it would acquire a 2.75 per cent stake in the project with a $99 million investment. That is much less than the 43 per cent equity stake, and $212 millionc ontribution, Baha Mar’s previous partner, Harrah’s Entertainment, was scheduled to make. T he value of the construction contract was pegged at $1.9 billion, with CSC saying work on the 1,000-acre project was due to start in early 2010, witha n opening in late 2013. Baha Mar, has moved swiftly to manage and dampen Bahamian expectations regardi ng the possibility of progress on the Cable Beach redevelop m ent, pointing out that it is not a ‘done deal’ yet. Having been i n this position before with Harrah’s, and with the Bahamas d esperate for some good economic news, the last thing the developer wants to do is raise false hopes. “A number of things have b een concluded. A lot of uncertainty has been taken care of with the signing of the agreement last week,” Mr Robinson told Tribune Business. “It’s stilla journey in progress, and there are a number of things to resolve. “A number of these things c ould potentially be pretty serious, but we have had indications there are solutions to all of them. It will take a lot of work, and we are nowhere neard one. “Until we have a signed document, there’s the possibility of something going awry. We’re t rying to keep things low key, one of the lessons learnt in the past.” Mr Robinson pointed out that apart from agreeing busi-n ess terms, there was “a huge amount” of legal work and due diligence that also remained to be done by year-end. B aha Mar’s “internal target” was to conclude negotiations w ith the Chinese by year-end, a lthough it was still unclear w hether this target would be hit. After that, there was then t he matter of Bahamian government approvals. Bahamians to get ‘majority’ of $200m Baha Mar phase Small hotels slash rates up to 40 per cent t ime. The Cape Santa Maria resort in Long Island has listed online an almost 20 per cent decrease in its room rate, beginning from November 1 until December 2009. M arley Resort in Nassau has slashed room rates almost 40 per cent for its “September toR emember” promotion. Operations Manager at Marley Resort, Rory S hepherd, told this paper that they have taken the initiative to put together a package for the resort to encourage visitors. The resort has also created spa and boutique deals, and remixed its menu to r eflect the special September deals. Mr Shepherd suggested that the quality of the p roduct remains untouched. “We have just been open for a year and two m onths, and last year was challenging,” he said. “We are just trying to get ourselves out there.” Mr Sands argued that marketing initiatives generated by the Ministry of Tourism could assist some small hotels this year, but asserted that the l ong-term investments made by the ministry will be also valuable. We are parlaying an investment in the opportunity that as things get better, the Bahamas b rand will be top of mind in its consumers,” he said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 78 F/26 C Low: 79F/26C Low: 77 F/25 C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 90F/32C High: 90F/32C High: 88 F/31 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 88 F/31C High: 88F/31C Low: 80F/27C High: 88F/31C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 89 F/32 C Low: 77F/25C High: 88 F/31 Low: 75F/24C High: 87F/31C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 77F/25C High: 92 F/33 C Low: 77F/25C High: 89F/32C High: 87 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 09 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST A couple of showers and a t-storm. Overcast with a t-storm in spots. A t-storm; overcast, then some sun. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. Clouds and sun, a t-storm possible. High: 88 Low: 77 High: 88 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 96F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 81F 96-84F 99-90F 106-87F 111-85F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................79F/26C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 89 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.40" Year to date ................................................27.60" Normal year to date ....................................33.21" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Sep. 11 Sep. 18Sep. 26Oct. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:54 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:20 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:21 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:24 a.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:26 a.m.3.15:02 a.m.0.3 11:47 p.m.2.55:52 p.m.0.5 12:17 p.m.3.15:47 a.m.0.3 -----6:48 p.m.0.6 12:40 a.m.2.46:41 a.m.0.4 1:17 p.m.3.07:51 p.m.0.6 1:43 a.m.2.47:45 a.m.0.4 2:24 p.m.3.08:59 p.m.0.6 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco91/3277/25t92/3377/25t Amsterdam70/2154/12sh63/1750/10pc Ankara, Turkey75/2350/10t77/2552/11pc Athens76/2468/20pc79/2667/19s Auckland62/1646/7s61/1649/9c Bangkok90/3279/26r90/3279/26r Barbados86/3077/25pc86/3078/25s Barcelona80/2664/17s78/2563/17s Beijing84/2859/15pc82/2761/16s Beirut79/2673/22s78/2574/23s Belgrade73/2260/15pc81/2761/16c Berlin75/2359/15s73/2255/12c Bermuda81/2774/23sh81/2774/23sh Bogota68/2041/5pc68/2037/2pc Brussels77/2554/12pc68/2050/10pc Budapest77/2557/13pc83/2855/12s Buenos Aires55/1236/2s59/1539/3s Cairo95/3572/22pc94/3471/21s Calcutta91/3283/28r92/3383/28sh Calgary69/2044/6pc61/1639/3s Cancun90/3273/22t90/3273/22pc Caracas82/2774/23pc83/2872/22t Casablanca86/3073/22pc84/2872/22c Copenhagen72/2257/13sh64/1750/10s Dublin63/1750/10pc64/1750/10s Frankfurt82/2759/15pc79/2655/12r Geneva 80/26 49/9 s 75/2354/12pc Halifax 67/19 46/7 pc 64/17 52/11 s Havana 88/31 72/22 t 89/31 71/21 sh Helsinki 70/21 54/12pc66/1850/10pc Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 sh 90/32 81/27pc Islamabad 102/38 71/21 s 102/38 72/22 s Istanbul76/2466/18t74/2366/18sh Jerusalem 83/28 59/15s78/2562/16s Johannesburg 79/2652/11s74/2353/11pc Kingston 89/3179/26sh87/3079/26r Lima70/2157/13pc70/2157/13pc London70/2152/11sh72/2252/11pc Madrid90/3261/16pc88/3161/16pc Manila82/2777/25r82/2777/25r Mexico City73/2255/12t73/2255/12t Monterrey88/3172/22t89/3169/20t Montreal72/2250/10s68/2059/15pc Moscow72/2252/11pc72/2254/12pc Munich74/2351/10s77/2553/11s Nairobi85/2955/12pc85/2955/12r New Delhi 84/2875/23t82/2773/22t Oslo66/1845/7s63/1747/8s Paris82/2761/16pc73/2254/12sh Prague 73/22 52/11 s 76/24 52/11 s Rio de Janeiro89/3174/23s83/2870/21pc Riyadh104/4077/25s103/3976/24s Rome 77/25 59/15 s 76/24 61/16 s St. Thomas88/3180/26sh89/3179/26sh San Juan66/1837/2s63/1737/2pc San Salvador 90/32 70/21 pc 89/31 73/22 t Santiago 59/1537/2s66/1841/5pc Santo Domingo90/3273/22pc85/2974/23sh Sao Paulo 79/26 62/16 t 76/24 61/16c Seoul81/2754/12s81/2757/13pc Stockholm 72/22 50/10 pc 66/18 50/10 pc Sydney 68/20 45/7 s70/2146/7s Taipei89/3175/23pc91/3277/25pc T okyo 81/27 66/18 pc 83/28 68/20 s T oronto 74/2355/12pc68/2055/12t Trinidad86/3063/17c75/2361/16pc V ancouver 62/16 54/12 r 67/1955/12s Vienna 72/2259/15s76/2458/14pc W arsaw 72/22 56/13 s 73/22 54/12 s Winnipeg 74/23 52/11 pc 79/2659/15pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles86F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles86F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles85F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles85F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles81F Thursday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles82F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque85/2963/17t81/2761/16t Anchorage61/1649/9sh61/1648/8c Atlanta86/3067/19pc84/2866/18t Atlantic City72/2262/16r68/2059/15r Baltimore71/2160/15r70/2160/15r Boston66/1855/12c63/1755/12c Buffalo74/2356/13pc70/2154/12c Charleston, SC88/3167/19pc84/2867/19pc Chicago78/2558/14t79/2659/15t Cleveland78/2559/15t71/2155/12t Dallas94/3474/23t96/3573/22t Denver80/2655/12pc90/3251/10s Detroit76/2460/15t76/2459/15t Honolulu89/3176/24s89/3174/23pc Houston89/3172/22t93/3372/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis82/2761/16t81/2762/16pc Jacksonville90/3271/21pc88/3172/22t Kansas City82/2765/18t81/2762/16t Las Vegas98/3673/22pc102/3879/26s Little Rock90/3269/20pc86/3068/20t Los Angeles84/2864/17pc86/3064/17s Louisville84/2863/17t84/2864/17pc Memphis88/3170/21pc89/3170/21pc Miami88/3178/25t88/3178/25t Minneapolis77/2560/15t81/2763/17pc Nashville85/2962/16t86/3065/18pc New Orleans89/3173/22t89/3175/23t New York70/2161/16r61/1661/16r Oklahoma City90/3268/20t91/3268/20t Orlando90/3273/22t88/3174/23t Philadelphia72/2264/17r65/1860/15r Phoenix 102/38 81/27 pc 102/3881/27t Pittsburgh74/2357/13pc70/2157/13c Portland, OR 76/2458/14pc81/2757/13s Raleigh-Durham 80/26 64/17 c 85/29 64/17 pc St. Louis84/2867/19pc86/3068/20t Salt Lake City 88/31 60/15 s 90/3260/15s San Antonio 90/32 73/22 t 89/31 71/21 t San Diego78/2567/19pc77/2568/20pc San Francisco 77/25 57/13 s 80/2657/13pc Seattle68/2053/11c75/2356/13s T allahassee 92/3369/20pc90/3271/21t T ampa 90/32 75/23 t 88/31 74/23t Tucson94/3473/22t95/3572/22t W ashington, DC 76/24 63/17r67/1957/13r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T h e T r i b u n e By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter IF YOU frequent the downtown area anytime during the day, you are likely to come across persons strolling down Bay Street with a Dunking’ Donuts cup and a t asty tr eat in hand. U nder ne w management, it is definitely making a comeback. With a new face-lift, the downtown donut giant poses a threat to other bistro big names like Starbucks-and rightfully so due to new exciting menu options and innovative marketing strategies. Dunkin’ Donuts back in business In addition to the downtown store, Dunkin’ Donuts has two new locations upstairs in the US departure lounge and downstairs near the international departures desk at Lynden Pindling International Airport. “The locations have experienced steady success with travelers, that keep coming back,” said Peter Rahms, Director of Operations for Bahamas QSR Limitedfranchise holder for Dunkin’ Donuts. The airport stores open at 5 and 6am in the morning, both closing at 7pm or until the last flight leaves. According to Mr Rahms, the principles that the company is building this time around are consistent products, and quick, efficient service. “We try to give the service that everyone who walks through this store deserves,” he said. This high standard seems to be at the core of the downtown location’s success, with a steady flow of customers frequenting the restaurant during the day, The Tribune team noticed. A quick customer line moved on location and business is like that all day, Mr Rahms said. The franchise itself has been through several management companies over the last 20 years and it’s proving to live up to the expectations of management, who describe public response as “fantastic.” “Bahamas QSR Limited owns all three stores, and we own the franchise for the country,” said Mr Rahms. “Every Dunkin’ Donut restaurant you see from here on in will be developed by us. We’re gauging market response right now, and things look so good, we may consider opening new locations on the island.” With the downtown location’s ‘high-end’ facelift, inspired from Dunkin’ Donuts locations in Spain and the United States, the donut store definitely stands out on the west side of Bay Street. This store opens at 6am, and closes at 8pm throughout the week and 10pm on weekends. “We’re pleased with how it came out, and we want to expand our seating, finish plans for a meeting area, and make wireless Internet capabilities available for our customers. We also have seating for 10 persons, boardroom style, and a 42-inch flat-panel monitor with PC connectivity.” New menu choices like the breakfast and lunch inspired flatbreads, and donuts from their Bahamian line are proving to be a hit among customers. You will find a wide variety of donuts like the usual old-fashioned, maple frosted, Bavarian creme and glazed donut. Other favourites are the Boston Kremea chocolate delight, and the pina coladapineapple flavoured donut with vanilla and coconut topping. The guava donut, which is Mr Rahms’ personal favourite, is tasty as well, and proves to be one of the more popular donuts in the Bahamian line. “We want to do mango flavoured, pina colada, and a coconut rum donut soon. We are playing with some Bahamian recipes, and we want to make it as Bahamian friendly as possible,” Mr Rahms explained. For breakfast and lunch, there are an array of nutritious options that will keep you fueled throughout the day. The turkey cheddar bacon and egg white veggie flatbread has the right combination of flavours, and are the perfect choice for the more health conscious consumer. Served on whole wheat flatbread, with melted cheese, these toasted calorie coun ters are light and refreshing. “We want to do as much as possible with our breakfast sandwiches,” Mr Rahms said. “Currently we have a bacon egg and cheese croissant, that is bigger than the normal size breakfast sandwich you get at other fast food chains.” They are also testing different soup flavours, like chili, gumbo, chicken noodle, clam and conch chowder, which will be for sale in the near future. “No conch donuts though,” Mr Rahms said jokingly, “except for maybe a conch flatbread.” The downtown location caters to businesses in the Nassau area. The catering menu offers different combo options for servings of up to 10 people. The catering combos include 1 dozen donuts, 50 Munchkin size donuts, 1 dozen bagels, 1 dozen muffins, 1/2 dozen muffins, 1/2 dozen bagels, including a “box o’ joe” [coffee in a jug-size]. For drinks, there are unlimited options: strawberry, watermelon, and coffee Coolatta’s are really chillingly refreshing. If you need a “cup o’ joe” to wake up your insides, their steamed coffee and iced lattes will start your day off on a good note. “This September, we’re starting our loy alty card program. You get ten points for every dollar, and this month its double points. You can redeem the points for our food and beverage products,” Mr Rahms added. Dunkin’ Donuts most recent venture has been the Jet Blue promotion, where cus tomers purchase cold beverages and have a chance to enter the drawing of a vacation prize to New York City and Ft Lauderdale. Both vacation prizes come with Visa debit cards totaling $500 and $1000 each. A winner is picked live on air of “Naughty Niggs” radio show on More 94 FM. Promotions like this one, which is open to all adult Bahamians, have been designed to keep a consistent flow of Bahamian customers. In times like this with tourismd own you have to look after your own people,” Mr. Rahms said. He added: “W hat we found in many cases is that in may cases Bahamians don’t give other Bahamians good service. But at the end of the day, Bahamians are our bread and butter. We promise to offer the same quality service to Bahamians and visitors hands down.” The new Dunkin Donuts on Bay Street A sample of the dozens of donuts available at the three locations. Creative Relations/ Photo Ava Turnquest/ Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K ENTERTAINMENT THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009, PAGE 9B T h e T r i b u n e Jermaine Jackson VIENNA A ssociated Press MARY J. BLIGE, Chris Brown and Natalie Cole will be among the top artists p erforming at a Sept. 26 M ichael Jackson tribute c oncert in Vienna, organizers said Tuesday. But they left open the possibility that major stars such as Madonna might still be part of the show that will take place outside a 17thcentury palace in the Austrian capital. “Just hold your horses!” Jackson’s brother Jermaine told reporters at a packed news conference in Vienn a’s city hall. Event promoter Georg Kindel said that up to 25 performers are expected to participate in concert that is being billed as the main global tribute for the King of Pop, who died June 25 in Los Angeles. More names will be unveiled later this week in London and Berlin, Kindel said. Sister Sledge, Akon, Angela Bassett, and the Germany-based boy band US5 also are among the 13 artists confirmed so far, Jer maine Jackson said. In addition, Jackson’s original band and dancers will take part. “We’re very excited the list is growing more and more,” Jermaine Jackson said, adding that “many major Bollywood names” and artists from the Middle East also would be involved. All the artists will play some of Jackson’s greatest hits at the concert, including “Thriller,” “Billie Jean,” “Black or White” and “Bad.” “We will honor on this night not only the musician and artist Michael Jackson but also the humanitarian,” Kindel said. “He’s really someone who changed the history of music.” Jackson’s family and chil dren as well as 65,000 fans are expected to attend the tribute to be held on a large stage with a crown on its roof and two runways in front of Vienna’s former imperial Schoenbrunn Palace, one of the Austrian capital’s top tourist attractions, Kindel said. A “significant portion” of the proceeds from the event will be donated to charity, he added. Over the course of the evening, Jermaine will singa duet with his late brother, with video of Michael likely to be projected onto nearby walls, organizers said. All artists will sing either “Heal the World” or “We are the World” as a grand finale. Bassett, an actress, will present one part of Michael Jack son’s life, a statement said. When asked why stars such as Madonna and Whitney Houston mentioned in Austrian media reports were not on the list made public Tuesday, a defensive Kindel stressed the list of performers was still not set in stone. “This is not the final lineup maybe some of the names you mentioned you will hear within the next couple of days,” he said. Blige, Brown to perform at Vienna Jackson tribute From the creator of KINESIS and cocreator of S T YLEZINE, comes a ne w 4 part event. Scharad Lightbourne presents, CLICK a digital art showcase like never before! Known for “ s tepping out of the box” and taking Bahamian artistry to a high-er level, Scharad said, “I wish to expose Bahamians of all backgrounds to a society of new age, arts and culture in The Bahamasinspirations that blend into one anotherall being fashion, music and art related. This is what makes me an artist and it is my inten tion to share this with others in an innovative and unique way.” Also known as a dynamic graphic artist, Scharad said that “click” not only refers to the sound of his computer's mouse; it takes on a multitude of meanings. “The event hopes to join different social types together through fashion, art, music and culture; its a merging of ‘cliques.’ Additionally, I use my passion for photography, by “clicking” my camera to capture my social environmentshence the play on words with more towards the common under standing of what I do as an artist.” Hosting the event is co writer for Stylezine's Moda, Tara Bastian and fashion guru and founder of The Big Give Organization, Kedar Clarke. They will expose the public to the more diverse sides of art and culture in The Bahamas. The event will feature a number of Bahamian enterprisesAirbrush Junkies, Talk 242, Stylezine Magazine, Aura Amore Swimwear, Final Accents, Switcha and internationally acclaimed design label, House of St John. Delivering on his promise to truly expose the talent and culture of The Bahamas to the world, the event will be streamed live over the Internet with on screen textingthe first of its kind Patrons will truly be in for a treat as they mixandmingle with industry insidersthey will also have the chance to win a myriad of prizes including: the grand prize: a $1,000 photo shoot package from Scharad, makeup ser vices from Face Inc., shopping at Obsession Boutique and a pair of shoes from Head Over Heels. Other prizes include, four tickets to Islands of the World Fashion Week events, John Bull gift certificates, VIP passes to Nassau's newest and hottest lounge, the Viper Room, 3 month gym membership to Bally Total Fitness, an appearance in Nassau's hottest online magazine, Stylezine, apparel from popular brand, Conchience Clothing and so much more! Can't wait until the actual event? The public is invited to get their early “ClickFix” by visiting the website: www.thisistheclick.com to download the official event song, produced by popular Bahamian musician, Christopher “Sketch” Carey. The first of this dynamic four part series takes place on Friday September 11 at the Poop Deck West from 8pm-11.30pm. Admission to this unforgettable event is $20. For more information, please visit the website or contact Scharad Lightbourne. Acclaimed Bahamian artist gets ready to launch Nassau's first digitised fashion art society showcase! CLIC K! Experience TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM tara BASTIAN kedar CLARKE s achard LIGHTBOURNE

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM This weekend provides a chance to get healthy, tackle somef ishing and take in some art. 1. T he Ministry of Health in conjunction w ith Caricom will host Caribbean Wellness Day on Saturday at the Ministry of Health Grounds, Augusta/Delancy/Meeting Streets. The Mega H ealth Extravaganza will i nvolve demonstrations o f various physical activi ties, such as salsa dancing, a step show, karate, marching bands, and other activities. F or adults attending the event, there will be an array of free healths creenings, including blood cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar,w eight screening, and healthy food demonstrat ions. For the children there will be a fully supervised bouncingc astle, and in the late afternoon everyone will b e able to get their “bodies in motion” to the rhythmic beat of the OneF amily Junkanoo rush out. The event take place b etween 11 am and 7pm. 2 . The Bank of the Bahamas will host a daylong health and wellness expo with top medical, fitness and nutrition e xperts, including leadi ng surgeons, physicians a nd other professionals from The Bahamas and S outh Florida. The event t akes place at the Sherat on Cable Beach Resort, Saturday September 12 from 10am to 4.30pm. There is no charge and partners are offering numerous giveaways, including two weekend stays at Opera Suites andM arina on Biscayne Bay. F or more information contact 396-6010. 3. Noted Bahamian artist Anthony Morley launched his latest collection Island in Da Sun at the Ladder Gallery at New Providence Community Center Blake Road this week. The collection features an exciting collection of oil paintings on canvas. 4. Enjoy an evening of great music and food at the Marley Resort on Cable Beach every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening from 8pm-11 pm when noted Bahamian musicians Paul and Tanya Hanna perform. For reservations call (242 2800. 5. The 5th Annual Green Parrot/Salty Tackle “Lords Of The Deep” Deep Drop Fishing Tour nament will be held from7 am 3pm. 2 Electric / 2 Manual Reels (totally non-IGFA Captains’ meeting will be held on Thursday, September 10 at 6 pm at Green Parrot Bar, East Bay St. A vessel representative must attend. Entrance fee: $500 (per boat $200 Calcutta (optional, per boat). All entrance fees will be returned as prizes/money and maybe paid to Chris Lloyd at BASRA or at the Captain's Meeting. Contact Chris at 477-2941 or saltytackle@coralwave.c om things 2 DO TECHNO fans turned out in dr oves to the Imagination Workshop's Transcendental Party at the Hub last week. Party-goers waved their complimentary glow-sticks in the air as they danced and sipped on free Jell-O shots all night. Spinner DJ Chedda manned the wheels-of-steel all night and pumped out crowd favourites and popular dancetrance tunes that the local rave-heads wer e starving for. The event's organisers were thrilled with the turnout and said they have been getting a lot of requests for an encore. TECHNO THRILLS AND JELL-O-SHOTS

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C M Y K C M Y K I N S I D E Dunkin’ Donuts back in business See page eight WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 Experience CLICK! See page nine SOME of the performers involved in the artist 4 peace concert. the group includes well known bahamian artists such as: Land lord, DJ Counsellor, Najie Dun, Bodine, Kenyatta Taylor, Padrino, Sammie Starr and Sketch. By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter L OC AL leaders ar e joining f orces with traditional, hip hop, reggae, contemporary gospel and o t her entertainers to fight an epidemic of what they say is “shocking” criminal activity. It’s all part of the Artists 4 Peace mo v ement a nation wide ef f or t to curb crime in the community. The goal of the Artists 4 PeaceConcert, set for September 19 at Arawak Cay, is to promote ideas of peace through the power of performance art, including poetry, drama, visual arts, and music. Artist from around the country, including Ronnie Butler, Kenyatta Taylor, Ricardo Clark and Sammie Starr have volunteered their talents to assist this message. Organisers for the event said in a statement: "As one absorbs that these statistics represent devastated lives, fami lies and dreams it is evident that society must promote the message of non-violence. In the national crime environ ment, no one can afford to operate as a single agency or as a single organisation. Collaborative partnerships need to be entered into to combat the challenges of modern-day crime." The concert seeks to do the following: Utilise the power of the arts to empower youth and heal the wounds caused by community violence and social injus tice; Engage in a non-violence dialogue through the medium of the arts; Feature expression of peace, love and coexistence through performance art; Encourage non violence throughout the Bahamas; Transform anxiety about the current situation in the Bahamas into positive manifestations for peace; Platform the transformative power of music and the arts; Initiation of individualistic commitment to peace, connection empowerment and renewal; Communicate positive change for the Bahamas. A spokesperson added: “There’s a social impact because you look upon your neighbours as strangers and enemies. And, there’s an economic impact because death has a cost.” National statistics concerning crime over the past six month are alarming: 25 per cent increase in murder; 12 per cent increase in arm robberies and 29 per cent increase in robberies. The Fort Charlotte Community Centre, Sea Grape Festival, and FamFest coordinator Mark Cartwright are key coordinators for the concert. ARTISTS 4 PEACE TO COMBAT CRIME CONCERT The Tribune SECTIONB