Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.237

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=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Dangerous man is
wanted after Killing

Police warn
public after
stabbing
death

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police have warned
the public to be on the look
out for an “extremely dan-
gerous” 23-year-old man
wanted for questioning in
connection with the island’s
eighth homicide.

Ashley Joel Smith, 22, of
South Bahamia, was stabbed
Friday evening in the
Freeport area. He was taken
to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, where he later died of
his injuries.

Police have issued an all
points bulletin for Godfrey
Virgil Jr, alias ‘Dollar Mur-
der’ of Bass Lane.

Virgil has two distinctive
tattoos — one bearing the

SEE page 10

GODFREY VIRGIL JR,
alias ‘Dollar Murder’



ASHLEY JOEL SMITH died of
his injuries

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO THE
LABOUR DAY HOLIDAY IN THE UNITED
STATES, THERE WILL BE NO USA TODAY

SECTION IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

' 30x60 Desk

w/ Return




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a
DP

WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Sta

a : + te





PIM is set to
announce 500
temporary jobs

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham
announced that government
will soon make an announce-
ment of a temporary jobs pro-
gramme for some 500 or more
unemployed people on Grand
Bahama.

While in Grand Bahama on
Sunday, Mr Ingraham told the
media that government is doing
a number of things to assist
Grand Bahama during this dif-

SEE page 10





2

¥ —— a di J
nding Committee of the National People’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China presented a model of the

national stadium — which is currently under construction — to the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette. Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security look on.

Man shot
in armed
robbery
attempt

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A BRAZEN attempted
armed robbery of a hardware
store in daylight has left a
young man in hospital in seri-
ous condition after being shot
twice.

The 23-year-old employee
of the store, identified by his
family as Alexander Dean,
was shot in the abdomen and
back after a dreadlocked gun-
man and his accomplice
entered Dean’s Building Sup-

SEE page nine



SR Verret

have drowned

A 65-YEAR-OLD man
was found dead in the water
near the shoreline at Good-
mans Bay on Friday
evening.

The man, whose identity
has not yet been confirmed
by police, was found at
around 6pm on Friday.

A doctor in the area
attempted to provide med-
ical assistance but was
unsuccessful.

The man, believed to be
from McKinney Drive, Nas-
sau, was pronounced dead
at the scene.

Police suspect the man
drowned.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the
cause of death.

Foul play is not suspect-

¢ SEE SPORTS ON PAGES ELEVEN AND TWELVE

PM disappointed over inefficiency
enenoravcimn) Of Grand Bahama Power Company

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Govern-
ment is concerned that the
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny may have sought to max-
imise profits at the expense of
its distribution and generation
system, according to Prime

Minister Hubert Ingraham.
Expressing his disappoint-
ment over the inefficiency in
power generation on Grand
Bahama, Mr Ingraham said
government is considering
whether to have the Grand
Bahama Power Company reg-

SEE page 10

Police in high speed chase shootout

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A HIGH speed chase raced through the streets of southern
New Providence on Friday night as police dodged bullets
and fired back while in pursuit of two men in a silver coloured

Honda accord.

The officers were on patrol in Pinewood Gardens when

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BHS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING :

THE Bahamas Humane |
Society will hold its annual }

General Meeting for 2009

tomorrow.

All Humane Society mem- }
bers are invited to attend the }
event, which will be held at }
the Sheraton Nassau Beach }
hotel on Cable Beach. The }
meeting will begin at 6.30pm. ;

ee
Ut

aU ee tah)
PHONE: 322-2157



LOCAL NEWS

Govt hails ‘historic’ Chairman Wu visit

BAHAMIAN government
officials hailed the visit of Wu
Bangguo, Chairman of the
Standing Committee of the
National People’s Congress of
The People’s Republic of Chi-
na, as an “historic” one that will
prove beneficial to the country.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette led a group
of high-ranking officials from
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
on Thursday in welcoming
Chairman Wu and a 120-plus
delegation, including 19 jour-



WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National Pag:
ple’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China sits with Prime Minis- 9uo, Vice-Chairman of the

ter the Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham at the head table during the Official Din-
ner hosted by the Prime Minister in honour of Chairman Wu at Atlantis on
Friday, September 4. Sitting in the middle is Interpreter, He Rulong.

nalists, on a four-day visit to
the Bahamas.

Bahamian cultural display when

the People’s Republic of China
to the Bahamas, the diplomatic
staff of the Embassy of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China, and
members of the Chinese com-
munity.

Solange Allen, a student of
Xavier’s Lower School, and
Davanna Collie of St Thomas
More Catholic School present-
ed Chairman Wu, and Li Jian-

National People’s Congress,
with floral bouquets.

In a written press release,
Chairman Wu said: “China
attaches great importance to

S/ORM FRAME

WINDOWS

Joining Mr Symonette in
greeting the visitors were Dr
Patricia Rodgers, Permanent
Secretary; Elma Campbell, Res-
ident Ambassador of the
Bahamas to the People’s
Republic of China; Joshua
Sears, Director General of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Despite overcast skies, the
visiting delegation received a

they landed at Lynden Pindling
International Airport in a two-
storey jumbo 747-jet. As they
disembarked the plane, they
were greeted by two receiving
lines and the rhythmic sounds
and smooth gyrations of a
“mixed” junkanoo group that
performed in bright coloured
costumes.

The receiving lines included
Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of

developing relations with the
Bahamas, which it views as a
key partner of cooperation in
the Caribbean.

“Since establishing diplo-
matic ties, our two countries
have made good progress in the
bilateral relationship, increas-
ing political mutual trust,
expanding economic coopera-
tion and trade, forging rich and
diverse cultural and people-to-

people ties, and maintaining
close coordination and cooper-
ation in international affairs.

“This proves that the friend-
ly relationship between China
and the Bahamas serves the
fundamental interests of our
two countries and two peoples.
By paying this visit I hope to
further promote the compre-
hensive in-depth growth of our
friendly ties and cooperation.”

Chairman Wu said during his
visit he would have “in-depth”
exchange of views with
Bahamian leaders with a view
to “enhancing political mutual
trust, expanding mutually ben-
eficial cooperation and other
issues of shared interest.”

“T believe that with the host’s
thoughtful arrangements, this
shared visit will be a complete
success,” he added.

The delegation was whisked
away in an official convoy to
the Royal Towers, Atlantis
Resort, where they are resid-
ing.

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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DOZENS of Bahamians online jumped to
the defence of their country over the week-
end after an Australian magazine published
a story about the “Bahamas Nightmare” of
the wife of an international tennis champion
living in New Providence.

“Women’s Day” magazine ran a front
page story about the “hellish” experience of
Bec Hewitt, the 26-year-old wife of Aus-
tralian tennis champ Lleyton Hewitt, who
recently moved to the gated-community of
Old Fort Bay out west.

The story, which tells of the crime fears
and loneliness of Mrs Hewitt in her Bahamas
home, was also reproduced online at
http://womansday.ninemsn.com.au/
celebrity/inthemag/855245/becs-bahamas-
nightmare

While some Bahamian readers felt the
characterisation of The Bahamas as a whole
as a poverty-stricken and crime-ridden place
was unfair, what raised their ire most were
the photographs illustrating the story, which
claimed to show the average lives of Bahami-
ans with images said to represent “typical
Bahamian housing”, “impoverished locals”,

“unkempt streets” and “barred windows.”

In a bit of bad international publicity for
The Bahamas, the pictures, far from being
“typical”, showed what appear to be the
worst of the worst that Nassau has to offer —



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TENNIS ace Lleyton Hewitt (AP)

including a shanty-type house boarded up
with plywood, a miserable and dirty looking
man sitting shoeless on a sidewalk and a
derelict building surrounded by rubbish.

The story, published in the August 31 edi-
tion of the publication, read: “The look of
fear on Bec Hewitt's face when she leaves the
high-security Bahamas mansion she and
Lleyton call home is warranted, Annette
Witheridge discovers.

“When her tennis ace husband Lleyton
Hewitt announced they were moving to the
Bahamas, Bec probably expected to find a
sizzling new social life among the rich and
famous. If so, she must be sorely disap-
pointed.

“To outsiders, the high-security gated com-
munity of Old Fort Bay looks like an idyllic
place to bring up children. But in reality, the
197-hectare ‘village’ is a gilded cage, sur-
rounded by spiked fences and barbed wire.



nightmare’ sparks defence of the country

“Just 25 minutes drive away, locals live in
abject poverty in the slums of Nassau, and
Bec's neighbours warn that it is a dangerous
place blighted by crime, poverty and high
unemployment. Armed robberies are com-
monplace, and last week a 34-year-old moth-
er of three became the country's 53rd murder
victim this year when she was gunned down
metres from a church. A few days later two
more people were killed.”

Now the former soap opera star is “want-
ing out” of The Bahamas, continued the
piece.

While some Australians sympathised with
Mrs Hewitt’s plight — “My advice to Bec is
get the hell out of there. How dare (Lleyton
Hewitt) put his wife and child in such a lone-
ly and dangerous place for his own selfish
desires,” wrote one. Some Bahamians who
saw the piece let it be known that they felt it
was not an accurate portrayal of their home-
land.

“Richard,” said: “Have any of you even
visited the Bahamas before? We’re not
impoverished gun toting drug addicts. If
they’re so miserable they should get out of
our country! No one is forcing them to stay.”

Meanwhile, “Maura” in Nassau, wrote,
“T wondered if she has ever been to NYC,
Chicago or any other big city where you can
live in a great neighbourhood that’s not gat-
ed but a few blocks away it’s crime central.”

However, others said they felt the arti-
cle’s representation “may not be far from
the truth” about Nassau.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3



Another region-wide power cut in Abaco

Man has throat —
Slit in the Kemp
Road area

A STABBING in the }
Kemp Road area alarmed
residents when a man’s}
throat was slit early Satur- }

day morning.

A 28-year-old resident of }
Elizabeth Street said the }
man was attacked outside }
her front gate, which is near }
the junction with Kemp }

Road.

However, no record of the }
stabbing was filed in the }
weekend police report and }
police press liaison officer }
Walter Evans failed to }
respond to inquiries from }
The Tribune before press }

time yesterday.

Kemp Road residents :
want to know the condition }
of the injured man and cir- }

cumstances of the attack.

Weapons ant
ammunition
found after tip

A LARGE stash of }
weapons and ammunition }
are off the streets today }
after a tip from a member }

of the public.

According to police, three }
handguns — a .44mm, a 22 }
mm and a .38 mm — and }
168 live bullets were dis- }
covered in a plastic bag in }
an area off Kemp Road at }

around 11am Saturday.

No arrests have been :
made in connection with the }
find, but police investiga- }

tions are continuing.

Bahanians asked to

observe Caribbean
Wellness Day

BAHAMIANS are being }
challenged to improve their }
observe }
“Caribbean Wellness Day” next }
Saturday as part of the effort to ;
eradicate non-communicable }

health and _ to

chronic diseases in the region.

Caribbean Heads of Govern- }
ment, including Prime Minister ;
Hubert Ingraham, in response }
to the heavy burden of non-com- }
municable diseases on the citi- }
zens of the region, issued the :
Port of Spain Declaration in Sep-
tember 2007, “Uniting to Stop }
the Epidemic of Chronic Non- }
Communicable Diseases” and
declared that the second Satur- }
day in September should be cel-
ebrated each year as Caribbean i

Wellness Day.

The Ministry of Health invites }
all Bahamians to attend an “All }
Day Mega Health Extravagan- }
za” on September 12 on the :
grounds of the ministry’s com- }
plex at the juncture of Augusta, }

Delancy and Meeting Streets.

For the adults attending there :
will be a range of free health }
screenings, including blood cho-
lesterol, blood pressure, blood }
sugar and weight screening; ;
healthy food demonstrations; the
showcase of a range of activities }
in which to engage in daily to }
maintain a moderate level of ;
physical activity. For the children }
there will be a fully supervised }
bouncing castle, and in the late }
afternoon everyone will be able }
to get their “bodies in motion” to }
the rhythmic beat of the One }

Family junkanoo rush out.

There also will be booths }
organised by various gyms, spas }
and wholesalers featuring spe- }
cial give-aways throughout the }
day; a “punchboard” where }
patrons, for a minimum dona- }
tion, will be eligible to try for a }
variety of prizes; as well as ven- }
dors with healthy Bahamian }

foods for sale.

eB RSs le
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AW TEU)
ye Py
322-2197

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ABACO residents suffered
the second region-wide power
cut in a week on Saturday night
as controversy heats up over
plans for a Bunker C Fuel pow-
er plant in Wilson City.

Homes across Abaco were
plunged into darkness as elec-
tricity failed across the islands
at around 8.30 on Saturday
night and was not restored for
abut three hours.

The powercut was the sec-
ond Abaco-wide shortage in a
week, and the third power out-
age in Green Turtle Cay, resi-
dents say.

They are calling on the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) to explain why the
power fails on a weekly, or dai-
ly basis during the summer
months, while they continue to
pay high electricity bills.

An Abaco resident wrote on
the website
Bahamasissues.com: “It is bad
enough that it goes out so much
— on Wednesday it went off
from 4am until 10am, then it
went off again from lpm until
2.30pm, only to go off again
from 4.30pm until 5.30pm —
but it goes down to maybe 40 or
50 volts and just stays there for
several minutes.

“We are lucky that every-

thing we have is not burnt up.”

BEC and government offi-
cials intend to address power
supply issues by constructing a
48 mega-watt Bunker C Fuel
power plant in Wilson City, on
the Bight of Old Robinson,
South Abaco, to be operational
by March 2010.

But environmentalists are
concerned the power plant, like
the one in Clifton Pier, New
Providence, will be hugely
detrimental to the environment.

Although the fuel type is
cheaper than diesel, they say it
will not cut electricity prices for
residents, and it will lead to
potential oil spills, toxic air
emissions, acid rain, and car-
bon emissions in a pristine
tourist area just three miles
from the protected Pelican
Land and Sea National Park.

Hope Town resident Matt
McCoy, 30, said: “If properly
maintained and run the plant
will be about as toxic as an
equivalent diesel plant, but it
will require tons of mainte-
nance and operations manage-
ment. Can BEC handle this? I
don't think so. And an accident
with this stuff will be much,
much worse than diesel.”

Mr McCoy understands five
out of 15 generators at the cur-
rent Marsh Harbour power
plant are broken, in addition to
power lines going to the cays.

He said: “The current Marsh



MINISTER of the Environment Ear!
Deveaux (left) and Phenton Ney-
mour, Minister of State for the
Environment with responsibility for
utilities, will hear Abaco residents’
concerns in a public meeting.

Harbour power plant generates
around 16 megawatts of power
which is adequate in the win-
ter, but not summer. However,
if all of the diesel generators
were working, they would have
around 24 megawatts of power,
enough to supply all of Abaco
all year round.

“But they want 48 megawatts
at Wilson City! Why double the
power?

“Instead of bringing in more
complicated equipment that
requires diligent maintenance,
why not fix what is already here
and broken?”

Elbow Cay resident Attila



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Feszt said: “More power is
needed, but the plant they are
planning on building could
damage the whole area.

“Bunker C fuel is the cheap-
est stuff they can get and it will
possibly cause pollution of the
water. It’s a short term fix.”

Mr Feszt, Mr McCoy and
other concerned Abaco resi-
dents are calling on govern-
ment to explore alternative fuel
or energy sources and identify
a site that will have less impact
on the environment and
tourism.

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux and Phenton
Neymour, Minister of State for
the Environment with respon-
sibility for utilities, will hear
their concerns in a public meet-
ing at New Visions Ministries,
in Jerusalem Drive, Marsh
Harbour, at 7pm on Thursday.

A statement released by
BEC in relation to power cuts
across the Bahamas maintains
the corporation is confronting
and resolving inconsistencies
in power supply as a priority.

A spokesman for the Cor-
poration said specialists have






Proati




been brought in from the Unit-
ed States to review operations
and make recommendations
for improvements, and $150
million is being invested in a
number of capital projects to
upgrade electricity supplies in
the Family Islands.

The BEC spokesman said:
“Furthermore, the Corpora-
tion remains committed to
implementing a renewable
energy programme on a utility
scale.

“The Corporation is taking
the proper steps to ensure that
such a programme can address
the unique energy needs and
the protection of the fragile
ecosystems of the Bahamas.

“Consumers should also
note that the BEC claims
department stands ready to
investigate and process claims
of damage to electrical appli-
ances. Further information
regarding the Corporation’s
claims services is available at
www.my-bec.com or by tele-
phoning the department during
regular business hours.”

BEC can be contacted at
302-1000.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

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Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Married women need protection

THERE ARE those religious ministers
— presumably the unidentified voices behind
the Bahamas Christian Council’s objection
to government’s extending the offence of
rape to the marital bed —who fear there
would be “far reaching consequences” to
the institution of marriage if a man were
answerable before the law for raping his
wife.

Some of these pastors predict a complete
breakdown in society if sexual violence by a
man against his wife were classified as rape.

The ministers fear that a rejected, vio-
lent man would lose faith in marriage and
start to roam outside the home in search of
new comfort if he could not use his wife as
his sexual chattel. In the Bahamas culture of
the “macho” man, this is rather a ridiculous
fear.

There are many fine, upstanding and
faithful husbands in this society. However,
there are too many “macho” men, who have
loving wives, but who roam anyway and
proudly boast of the number of children
they have “outside.” In their own rough cir-
cle this is the way they prove their manhood
— it’s the game of one upmanship over their
equally crude peers.

We have had many embarrassing
moments at The Tribune when a legitimate
family has placed a death notice for their
dearly beloved father in the newspaper only
to have the “outsides” call to berate the edi-
tor for leaving them out of the list of sur-
vivors.

We distinctly remember when this first
happened to us in our early days at The Tri-
bune. A gentleman, who held a good posi-
tion in this town, died. His family brought in
his death notice and it was published. It was
just another routine death notice. Nothing
seemed out of the ordinary until we got a
telephone call the following day. The male
voice at the other end of the telephone was
frothing with anger — he was so angry that
we could hardly understand what he was
saying. He was also well known in the com-
munity. He maintained that this was his
father and that we had left his name and
the names of his many brothers, and possibly
sisters, out of the list of survivors.

We tried desperately to extricate our-
selves from his father’s extra marital aber-
ration, but he would have none of it. He
was holding our feet to the fire and blaming
The Tribune for disrespecting his position in
the family circle.

The only way around the dilemma was to
allow the “outside” family to pay for a sec-
ond notice announcing the father’s death
and listing them as his sole survivors. And so
this elderly gentleman, who while he lived
held his head high in the community, was
sent to his grave with two death notices —
one by his inside family, ignoring the “out-
side” and a second by his “outside” ignoring
the “in.” In this case the “outside” far out-

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numbered the “inside”. We later learned
that there were many more, but these other
outsiders decided to let him rest in peace
and keep their secret to themselves.

We often laughed at our American moth-
er who encountered this unusual social phe-
nomenon in her first weeks of marriage. Our
father, who was then the representative in
the House of Assembly, for the island of
Inagua, was starting his honeymoon when an
election was called. He took his bride cam-
paigning with him in Inagua. A young school
teacher, completely out of her element, she
tried her best to be sociable. That evening
she confronted her husband: “Etienne,” she
said, “every man that I asked today about
how many children he had gave me a certain
number of ‘inside’ and another number of
‘outside.’ What’s this outside-inside thing
all about?” That little schoolteacher had a lot
to learn in her almost 80 years in the
Bahamas. Some of it she never understood
and would dismiss with a shrug of the shoul-
der.

And so for Bahamian men to be encour-
aged to wander if they were to be punished
for sexually violating their wives is to mock
history — that type man wanders anyway,
and has always done so, with or without the
rape law. In his ignorance he thinks he’s
smart.

However, we can see how, if this law
were not passed, it could indeed undermine
marriage and further breakdown the family
and consequently society.

There has been so much debate over this
amendment that many women have proba-
bly learned for the first time that if they are
sexually abused when not married the law
will protect them against the violence, but as
soon as they marry they forfeit that protec-
tion. They might well opt to have an open
relationship without marriage to ensure that
they can turn to the law for protection should
their common law mate violate them.

Christian Council, those of you who are
so fearful of this law destroying marriage,
just think of how much more damage it
could do if it is not passed. The woman could
shun the marriage contract.

And when we talk of violence in the bed-
room — and remember the law follows
crime wherever it is committed, even to the
bedroom — read the letter that will be pub-
lished in the letters column on this page
tomorrow.

This letter writer has had the courage —
on reading the Christian Council’s state-
ment over the weekend — to break her
silence about the violence that her own
mother suffered.

We thank her for her sense of duty in an
attempt to help women who are caught in
this terrible web of physical violence against
their person. These are the women who need
protection — they are the women who need
the amendment.



TWO)



THE TRIBUNE



Bewildered by
Bahamas Christian
Council statement

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tread with dismay, the state-
ment in opposition to the pro-
posed out-lawing of rape
against a spouse by the Presi-
dent of the Christian Council
in this morning's paper which
he purported to issue on behalf
of the Bahamas Christian
Council.

I thought the Christian
Council represented all Christ-
ian denominations in The
Bahamas. The Heads of four
major Christian denominations
in our country: the Seventh-
Day Adventists, the Methodist,
the Roman Catholic and the
Anglicans, have all indicated
publicly their support for the
amendment of the law.

I am bewildered then, that
the Rev. Patrick Paul issued his
statement, which is diametri-
cally opposite to the thoughtful

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



positions of support for the
amendment taken by those four
Church Heads, as a position of
the Council.

I understand that in some
denominations, each Church
operates as an independent
body and each sends a repre-
sentative to the Christian Coun-
cil even if their individual
church has only a very small
number of members. In this
way, these denominations have
been permitted to dominate the
Christian Council for decades,
to the detriment of the Council
in many instances, as in this
case, I believe.

I have read in the newspa-

pers some Neanderthal state-
ments by some churchmen who
oppose this progressive and
necessary amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act. At a time
when a disproportionate per-
centage of assaults, and indeed
homicides, in our country
involve family members, the
Christian Church must speak
uniformly against violence.
Rape is always accompanied by
violence or the threat of vio-
lence!

Any suggestion that forcible
sexual relations is ever “non-
violent” and ever “not rape” is
incredulous, unbefitting and
inappropriate for any person
who claims to preach the gospel
of Jesus Christ.

INCREDULOUS
Nassau,
September 5, 2009.

Who and what is the Christian Council?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I think it is totally wrong for the Bahamas
Christian Council to send out a message in its
name to confuse the public. Whenever the Chris-
tian Council makes a statement, the public
assumes that the statement is from all this coun-
try’s Christian churches speaking in unison. Obvi-
ously this is not the case as in the recent rape
amendment controversy the four leading Chris-
tian denominations supported the amendment.
Therefore, we are to assume that they are not
included in the Christian Council’s statement,

not include all the major denominations, please
let us know, and consider doing us an even bigger

which is against the amendment. If this is so, is the

Christian Council deliberately trying to mislead

the country?

We would now like to know: Who and what is

Nassau,

the Christian Council. If its membership does

Whom does Christian Council speak for?

Congratulations

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To: The President, BCMC

Congratulations for giving
support to the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act. You make me
proud to be a Methodist. Kind
personal regards and best wish-
es for the new church year.

PATRICK BETHEL
Nassau,
September 3, 2009.

Predictable response

EDITOR, The Tribune

The Bahamas Christian
Counsel's response to the gov-
ernment's proposed marital
rape law was predictable and
regrettably highlights the inse-
curities of far too many
Bahamian men.

These worthy stalwarts are
still living in an era when the
worth of the Bahamian woman
was measured by her ability to
fry fish and give comfort.

Small wonder our illegiti-
macy rate is so incredibly high
when our young women are still
led to believe, by the clergy no
less, that they are nothing more
than mere chattels.

IAN MABON

Nassau,
September 5, 2009

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

favour by changing the Council’s name —
because it doesn’t say much for a christian body
that would attempt to mislead a community.

If this was not a unanimous statement by each
member of the Council, then the Council is duty
bound to tell the public who made the statement.
A list of all the signatories to that statement
would be much appreciated. Be men enough to
stand up for what you believe in and not hide
behind others whose denominational reputation
carries more weight in this community.

CONFUSED AND OFFENDED

September 5, 2009

Clearly the Bahamas Christian Council has by its release and
opinion as to the proposals on the table to amend the legal position
of rape within a marriage has parted from at least one of the
largest denominations which now raises a long standing question
as to who does the Bahamas Christian Council speak for?

Some years ago I obtained a true copy of the Constitution of the
BCC and was surprised that for example any faith/denomination
which was administrated or controlled by an external source could
not be a member of the BCC. Clearly therefore the Roman
Catholics, The Greek Orthodox, Lutherans, Southern Baptists
possibly even some of the Pentecostals were in fact denied mem-
bership. Further it is an Article of the BCC Constitution that
whenever there is a dissenting view the Council in any release is
required by the Constitution to identify the difference and name the
faith that dissented. We certainly have never seen that from the
BCC, ever and not today on this controversial matter.

Watching television last evening a thought came to me which I
think will bring some sense to the matter — when you are young
and in love there is absolutely no way that either the male or
female look at each other in any manner of way of nothing more
than being one and equal so why are we making all this noise?

I agree the time period of two-years as I understand that either
party can bring or allege rape is far too long as this complicates the
issue if the parties reconcile and forget to rescind the charge or
report — either party may hold this over each other.

The question of common-law arrangements — of consenting
homosexuals residing together be they males or females and, of
course, the sweetheart position to me this amendment does not cov-
er those relationships although as they are not statutorily married
I presume you can bring rape charges under the Penal Code.

It is sad that the Christian Council could not discuss and debate
the issue internally before issuing this statement as obviously now

they have created a controversy.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
September, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Lands Committee |
extents Headline
for public to

submit concerns

AFTER meeting on
Friday, the House Com-
mittee on publicly held
lands has agreed to
extend the deadline for
concerned members of
the public to make sub-
missions or requests to
the investigative group-
ing.

Having issued a prior

notice to the public solic- {

iting information on
their concerns about
publicly-owned lands,
the parliamentary com-
mittee’s meeting on Fri-
day saw them consider
that information before
deciding that the final

deadline for the public to
provide such input would ;

be extended to this Fri-
day, September 18.

“Accordingly all peo-
ple who are interested in
making submissions
before the committee
and or appearing before
the committee should
write the clerk of the
House of Assembly with
their submissions or
requests.

“The committee has
agreed to respond to all
those who have written
letters and made submis-
sions and to draw up a
schedule of witnesses for

those who wish to appear

before the Committee,”
said Committee chair-
man, MP for Fox Hill,
Fred Mitchell.

The Committee
adjourned to Monday,
September 21, at 10 a.m.

Any submissions or
requests should be sent
to the Chief Clerk,
House of Assembly
at PO Box N 3003, Nas-
sau, Bahamas or by fax
no 322-1118 or at the e-
mail address: houseo-
fassembly@bahamas. gov.
bs, or by hand to the
House of Assembly, Bay
Street, Nassau.

Davis welcomes Wilchcombe
to PLP deputy leadership race

PHILIP “Brave” Davis, contender for
the deputy leadership of the PLP, yesterday
issued a statement “welcoming” MP for
West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe

to the race for the post.

The statement comes two days after Mr
Wilchcombe officially launched his bid for
the deputy leadership in Grand Bahama
on Friday, becoming the second to

announce such intentions.

MP for Rum Cay, Cat Island and San
Salvador, Mr Davis said the declaration by
Mr Wilchcombe is “another sign of democ-

racy at work in the PLP” and, signalling

PHILIP DAVIS

that more bids will soon be launched, he

said that the “various candidates, whether announced or unan-

nouced, all have the best interest of the party and country at heart.”
Mr Davis reiterated that the fundamental issues forming the basis

of his campaign are education, crime and the judiciary; and “the

creation of a new economic model compatible with the changing

needs of the country.”

Speaking on Friday Mr Wilchcombe said that if elected as Deputy
Leader he would address crime, employment, enhancing the tourism
product, improving the education system and re-energising Grand

Bahama’s flagging economy.

e SEE PAGE SIX

Agro-Tourism Symposium being
held at College of the Bahamas

LINKING Bahamian farm-
ers with those in the tourism
sector is the aim of an “Agro-
Tourism Symposium” being
held at the College of the
Bahamas this Thursday.

Organised by the Bahamas
Agricultural Producers Associ-
ation in partnership with the
Inter-American Institution for
Cooperation on Agriculture,
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion and The Bahamas Hotel
Association the forum will offer
a chance for producers to net-
work with chefs and food and
beverage directors who might
be interested in purchasing
their produce.

Speaking at the event, held
under the title “Linking Hotels
and Local Farmers”, will be Ms
Ena Harvey, a hemispheric spe-
cialist in agro tourism from Bar-
bados, Edison Key, MP for
South Abaco and Chairman of
BAIC, Robert Sands, President
of the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion as well as Chef Keshlah

Smith and Leslie Minnis, senior
marketing officer, Department
of Agriculture.

Registration is $25 per per-
son including meals and sym-
posium material. The venue is
Choices Restaurant, The Culi-
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Bahamas, Thompson Boule-
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or for more information.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7



Guyana: Economic prospects
and political uncertainties

insight

By RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

DESPITE uncertainties
that mar the Guyana politi-
cal scene, the country’s eco-
nomic prospects appear to
be brighter than they have
been in three decades. Sev-
eral developments account
for this and they bring hope
to a country that has been
blighted by political turmoil
and economic setbacks.

Amongst the develop-
ments is the considerable
reduction in the ratio of debt
to gross domestic product.
Guyana has moved from
being one of the world’s
highly indebted poor coun-
tries to a situation in which
the Government is manag-
ing its debt and has more
breathing space in which to
take policy decisions of
social and economic benefit
to the Guyanese people. It is
an accomplishment for
which Guyana’s President
Bharrat Jagdeo deserves full
credit.

Epitomizing the new eco-
nomic optimism for Guyana
is the formal opening, sched-
uled for September 14, of a
bridge over the Takutu Riv-
er, the narrowest point at
which Guyana and its
sprawling neighbour, Brazil,
connect. Both Guyana’s
President and Brazil’s Pres-
ident Iancio Lula Da Silva
will be part of the opening
ceremony.

The Brazilian govern-
ment, with the full agree-
ment of the Guyanese gov-
ernment, has built the bridge
capable of carrying heavy
vehicles to transport con-
tainers with a wide variety
of commodities as well as
people. The bridge is the
first step in infrastructure
that would allow business-
men from Brazil's Northern-
most State of Roaraima to
truck commodities through
Guyana to a port on
Guyana's Atlantic coast and
then to markets in North
America and Europe.

What has to follow is a
dry-weather road from the
bridge on the Guyana side
to the town of Linden which
is already connected by a
highway to Guyana’s capi-
tal, Georgetown, on the
Atlantic Coast. Then a deep
water harbour has to be con-
structed. But even without
the harbour immediately,
the bridge and road would
give Roraima businesses the
access to the Atlantic they
now need. The system
would be considerably
cheaper for businesses that
now have to transport goods
across the vastness of Brazil
to its far-away ports. The
Brazilians have a vested
interest in financing the
building of the harbour.

Guyanese businesses
would also be able to use
the bridge for transporting
goods for sale in Brazil pro-
vided they are able to estab-
lish markets. At the
moment, while Brazilian
goods are increasing in the
Guyana market, largely due

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



WORLD VIEW



“It is estimated
that there are
about 3,000
Brazilians now
operating gold
mines in
Guyana and
making a good
living from

it while
contributing to
the economy.”



to the influx of Brazilians
into Guyana, Guyanese
exports have been limited
to wood, wood products and
bauxite. But, there is every
reason to believe that
exports of rice in particular
would be possible.

It is estimated that there
are about 3,000 Brazilians
now operating gold mines in
Guyana and making a good
living from it while con-
tributing to the economy.
They have brought in new
technology and are getting
higher production yields.
Consequently, the govern-
ment is getting more taxes,
and the Guyana Gold Board
which purchases the pro-
duction is selling it on the
international market at a
profit.

Once traffic starts
between Roraima and
Georgetown, several forms
of new economic activity
will spring from it, includ-
ing new villages in areas that
are now sparsely populated.
The road points the way not
only for a cheaper outlet for
Northern Brazil to the
Atlantic and therefore to
Europe and North Ameri-
ca, but for a considerable
boost to the economy of
Guyana.

The construction of the
road and the harbour will
increase employment and
production in the Guyanese
economy in the near term.
Given the sustained eco-
nomic activity that they will
generate, new and lasting
employment will also be cre-
ated.

Aligned to the business
links to Brazil is the Guyana
government’s decision to
designate Ogle, an area on
the Atlantic Coast of
Guyana, as a second Inter-
national Airport. The
arrangements for this are
almost complete. Ogle will
accommodate flights on air-
craft such as those operat-
ed in the Caribbean by





LIAT and Caribbean Air-
ways as well as the Brazil-
ian airline, Mehta. Ogle is
15 minutes from George-
town and less than 10 min-
utes from the Secretariat of
the Caribbean Community
and Common Market
(CARICOM).

President Jagdeo is also
working feverishly to put
together the means to build
a hydro-electric power sta-
tion in Guyana. With its
many rivers and waterfalls,
Guyana lends itself to
hydro-power. Once hydro-
power is established, ener-
gy costs — now one of the
big expenses of doing busi-
ness and accounting for as
much as 20 per cent of GDP
— would drop significantly
opening the distinct possi-
bility for less expensive pro-
duction of sugar and bauxite
and reduced costs in the
mining and timber sectors.

Then, there is oil explo-
ration off shore in an area
where the maritime bound-
ary with Suriname is now
legally settled. The Canadi-
an company, CGX, which
has been exploring the area,
made some hopeful state-
ments in August. Amongst
them was that “the cost esti-
mate to drill the Eagle Deep
Well has been reduced sig-
nificantly to below $70 mil-
lion from US$90 million”
and they were encouraged
by the seismic data
processed during the first
half of 2009. If this leads to
the renewal of drilling next
year, it would be a further
boost to the Guyana econo-
my.

However, the prospects
for economic improvement
are dimmed by political
uncertainties. President
Jagdeo’s term of office ends
in 2011, and his Peoples Pro-
gressive Party (PPP) will
have to choose a Presiden-
tial candidate next year.
That candidate will have to
be someone in whom the
electorate, beyond the tra-
ditional PPP support, has
confidence both to manage
the economy and lead a
multi-racial nation.

A recent convention of
the main opposition, Peo-
ples National Congress
(PNC), to elect its leader
and other officers turned out
to be a fractious affair.
While Robert Corbin was
re-elected leader, the PNC is
now split into many parts
with its middle class support
severely disenchanted. The
main beneficiary of the
PNC’s internal confusion
appears to be a third party,
the Alliance for Change,
which promotes itself vigor-
ously as a non-racial group-

SIR RONALD SANDERS



ing dedicated to a one-
nation Guyana.

But, the telling political
battles will be fought next
year — first within the two
main parties and then at the
national level.

Within sight of all the
parties is the prospect of real
economic opportunities for
Guyana if the politics can
be managed with maturity.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com















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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



US-German rift emerges
over Afghan deaths case

KABUL

AN AIRSTRIKE by USS.
fighter jets that appears to have
killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute for
NATO allies Germany and the
United States, as tensions began
rising between them Sunday
over Germany’s role in ordering
the attack, according to Assoct-
ated Press.

Afghan officials say up to 70
people were killed in the early
morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz
after Taliban militants stole two

tanker trucks of fuel and vil-
lagers gathered to siphon off
gas.

Afghan and NATO investi-
gations are just beginning, but
both German and US. officials
already appeared to be trying
to deflect blame.

German Defense Minister
Franz Josef Jung said the Tal-
iban’s possession of the two
tankers “posed an acute threat
to our soldiers.” German offi-
cials have said the tankers might
have been used as suicide
bombs.

“Tf there were civilian casu-

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clearly behind our commander’s
decision” to order the air strike.

Meanwhile, Rear Adm. Gre-
gory J. Smith, the top U.S. and
NATO spokesman in the coun-
try, said German troops let too
many hours pass before visiting
the site of the bombing Friday.

He explained that it’s impor-
tant to hold the ground after a
strike and determine what hap-

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pened before the enemy comes
out with its own version of
events.

The top U.S. and NATO
commander in Afghanistan,
USS. Gen. Stanley McChrystal,
visited the site Saturday where
two charred trucks and yellow
gas cans sat on a riverbed. He
asked a top commander in
Regional Command North
about the response time.

“Why didn’t RC-North come
here quicker?” McChrystal
asked Col. Georg Klein, the
commander of the German base
in Kunduz.

“T can honestly say it was a
mistake,” Klein answered, in a
discussion witnessed by an Asso-
ciated Press reporter.

On Sunday, Smith said that
in McChrystal’s judgment the
response time “was probably
longer than it should have
been.”

German troops in
Afghanistan have long been crit-
icized for avoiding combat oper-
ations, even as militants have
increasingly infiltrated northern
Afghanistan the last year, desta-
bilizing the once-peaceful
region.

Taliban militants stole two
fuel tankers late Friday that
became stuck on a riverbed out-
side Kunduz. Villagers — either
forced by the militants or
enticed by offers of free fuel —
gathered near the trucks, even
as U.S. jets patrolled overhead.

German commanders watch-
ing images from the USS. air-
craft could see about 120 people,
McChrystal said Saturday. The
commanders decided that the
people were militants and
ordered the airstrikes, Smith
said, even though images pro-
vided by the USS. aircraft would
have been grainy and difficult
to see.

Whether the German com-
manders or the U’S. pilot are at



fault for any civilian casualties
may turn into an inner-NATO
tussle.

Smith said the ground force
commander “is the decision
maker for close air support.
That’s doctrine.” But he also
conceded that a pilot can refuse
an order to drop a bomb.

Klein, in an interview with
The Associated Press on Sun-
day, declined to say whether
images provided by the U.S. jets
had been clear enough for
weapons to be seen among
Afghans on the ground, citing
the ongoing investigation.

A German Joint Terminal
Air Controller, or JTAC, who
spoke on condition that his
name not be used because he
wasn’t authorized to speak pub-
licly, said the rules for ordering
an attack clearly state that the
ultimate decision rests with the
ground commander.

But rules also require that
both the pilot and the JTAC get
a good positive identification of
the target before the comman-
der can order a weapon
deployed, the JTAC said.

“Only when both are sure
that what we see is a target, only
then will the pilot drop the
bomb,” the JTAC said.

The German Defense Min-
istry, meanwhile, pushed back
against a story published in the
Washington Post that German
officials said painted their com-
mander in a poor light and
played up the U.S. version of
events. The ministry said the
article “will definitely influence
at least the preliminary investi-
gation by the various bodies.”

“The Defense Ministry is very
surprised about the unusual pro-
cedure of using a journalist as
a source to reveal initial investi-
gation results,” the ministry said.

Kris Coratti, director of com-
munications for the Washing-
ton Post, said in an e-mail: “The

GERMAN COLONEL Georg Klein is
pictured at the German base in Kun-
duz, Afghanistan, Sunday, Sept. 6,
2009. An airstrike ordered by a Ger-
man commander Klein and carried
out by U.S. fighter jets that appears
to have killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute between
the two NATO allies, as tensions
began rising Sunday over Germany's
role in the attack. Afghan officials
say up to 70 people were killed in the
early morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz after
Taliban militants stole two tanker
trucks of fuel and villagers gathered

| to siphon off gas.

story speaks for itself.”

Smith said a trip to Kunduz
by military officials from Kabul
was not an official investigation
but a fact-finding trip.

“And I think it’s much, much
better for people to understand
the facts,” he said of the decision
to allow a journalist to witness
the discussion among military
officials.

No NATO officials will yet
say how many civilians they
think may have died. Smith on
Saturday said the preliminary
overall death toll was believed
to be 56. Afghan officials say
it’s in the low 70s.

Smith said he hopes a U.S.-
German rift does not develop
over the strike. “I hope every-
one allows the investigation to
proceed and we’ll determine
what we know more precisely
and move on from there,” Smith
said.

The director of an Afghan
human rights group criticized
NATO ’s International Security
Assistance Force for the deaths.
“Tt was carelessness in terms of
ISAF using force without doing
enough to investigate whether
this is a civilian location,” Ajmal
Samadi of Afghan Rights Mon-
itor said.

German troops have long
been criticized for restrictions
that limit the battle their troops
see. A U.S. based military ana-
lyst, Anthony Cordesman, said
German troops don’t have “the
situational and combat experi-
ence” to confront Taliban on
the ground.

“They’re as oriented toward
staying in their armored vehi-
cles as any group I’ve met,”
Cordesman said. “They’re not
active enough to present much
of a threat to the Taliban most
of the time.”

Klein rejected the claim that
his troops lacked combat expe-
rience.

NEW REGULATORY REGIME NOW IN FORCE

The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act}, which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime,

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.bs), These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees
Individual Operating and Spectrum licences
Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)
Various farms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and ain Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatery Authority
continue in farce to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comins
Act, the Unlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all

the website will also give you an

opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comms Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector ié the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

AT URCA WE WILL BE DOING OUR BEST TO MINIMISE DISRUPTIONS.

UTILITIES REGULATION & COMPETITION AUTHORITY

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

in armed —
robbery
attempt

FROM page one

plies on Parkgate Road and
demanded cash, police said.

The incident occurred at
around 3pm on Saturday. The
two men fled the scene on
foot.

Alexander’s brother and
son of the store’s owner, Mar-
cus Dean Jnr, said the family
have been told to expect
Alexander to pull through,
but doctors have warned that
he may be left crippled.

“He was shot in the back
and he’s going into spinal
surgery tonight. They say
they’re going to take the oth-
er bullet out this Friday
because they want him to
recover from the surgery
tonight,” said Mr Dean Jnr.

Police had warned his fam-
ily about crime in the area
when they opened the store
and therefore he felt in many
ways that such an attack was
“only a matter of time,” but
nonetheless, Alexander’s
brother said the incident left
him feeling “helpless.”

“[’m just praying for him.
I’m glad he’s alive but I’m
hoping he isn’t left crippled.”
Mr Dean Jnr also called for
anyone who can to donate
blood at Doctor’s Hospital as
they are in “dire need.”

Police hunting the two
criminals are also calling for
the public’s help in connec-
tion with the incident.

“We are seeking the help
of residents in the area or
anyone who may have been
passing the Park Gate Road
area noticing two men run-
ning, to contact us at tele-
phone numbers 919, 502-9991,
322-3816, or 328- TIPS,” said
Police Press Liaison Officer
Walter Evans.

According to Assistant
Superintendent Evans, the
dreadlocked gunman was
wearing a white shirt and blue
jeans. No description of the
second man was provided.

The potentially deadly
shooting came a little over
two weeks after mother of
three Wendy Bullard was bru-
tally gunned down in front of
her place of work.

Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in
the face when two masked
men held up 21st Century
Steel Welding Limited off
Royal Palm Street, just sev-
eral yards south of St
George’s Anglican Church.

FROM page one

i ie pulled up next to the
i car in Breadfruit Street
: where it was blocking traf-
i fic sometime after 9pm.

As they approached the

? 32-year-old driver sped off
i and the officers pursued. As
: Shots were fired from the
i car, police returned fire,
? while driving at high speed
i across southern New Provi-
? dence.

The chase ended when

Kia Sephia car and a Dodge
Ram truck in Croton and
Buttonwood Streets.

The passenger escaped
from the vehicle and ran off
while police arrested the dri-
ver.

He had a gunshot injury
in the back of his neck and
police believe he may have
been hit in the gunfire
exchange.

Emergency Medical Ser-
vices took the victim to hos-
pital where he is in stable
condition.

Police are appealing for

the Honda crashed into a

NOTICE

TRAFFIC DELAYS POSSIBLE

SHIRLEY STREET
VILLAGE ROAD TO
FREDRICK STREET

DUE TO

WATER & SEWER
REPLACEMENT WORKS
31st August to 1st December 2009

In an effort to upgrade existing
Water & Sewer Services the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
have contracted Bahamas Hot Mix
Company Ltd to replace existing
service connections at the above
location. As a consequent traffic
management involving road
closures and temporary traffic
diversions may be in operation

during the following times:

Daily between 7:00 pm
to 6:00 am

Local diversions will be sign
posted in due course and further
information will be provided
through the local media.



information to lead to the
arrest of the passenger in the
Honda Accord as an investi-
gation into the shooting con-
tinues.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9

Man shot Police in high speed chase shootout

Anyone with any infor-
mation that might assist
investigations should call
police on 911, 919, or call the
Criminal Detective Unit on

352-2015. To submit infor-
mation under total anonymi-
ty call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM is set to announce

500 temporary jobs

FROM page one

ficult time.

He said that a new $17 million gov-
ernment office complex will be built
for Customs and Immigration here on
the island.

According to the prime minister,
the project, which involves the con-
struction of a 60,000 sq ft building
complex, will provide many construc-
tion jobs in Freeport.

Mr Ingraham said the announce-
ment for pre-qualification for con-
tractors will be made on Tuesday of
this week.

“Contractors who are interested in
bidding on the job who are qualified
to bid are urged to pick up the pack-
ages and to seek to become pre-qual-
ified to bid on the job,” he said.

The unemployment situation, the
closure of hotel properties, and the
decline in tourism on Grand Bahama
are pressing concerns for residents.

Mr Ingraham stated that the gov-
ernment intends to create a major
cruise port in Freeport at the Williams
Town site.

“We have taken steps to acquire a
total of 55 acres of land. That process
is going to take several months to be
completed.

“Those who own the land will have
the opportunity to come forward and

provide evidence of their ownership.
The land would be assessed in terms
of its value and government will cause
to be paid the assessed value,” he said.

Prime Minister Ingraham said per-
sons who are dissatisfied with the
assessment will be able to take action
in the Supreme Court.

“We will abide by whatever deci-
sions is made by such a process. In
the meantime, we propose to conclude
an acquisition and cause a cruise port
at Williams Town which will have sig-
nificant economic benefits for Grand
Bahama,” he stated.

Mr Ingraham also noted that gov-
ernment is paying the cost for contin-
ued operation of the casino at Our
Lucaya Resort.

Treasure Bay is taking over opera-
tion of the casino after the Isle of
Capri closed its operation.

“The government is paying the cost
for the continued operation of the
casino in Our Lucaya. It is not a deci-
sion I am not comfortable with.

“Tam not comfortable with the
Bahamas government having to take
money from the Treasury to run a

casino, but these are unusual times
and we are taking some usual deci-
sions to support Freeport, and the
employment of 200-plus people who
are employed there,” he said.

“We would like to have at Our
Lucaya not just a new casino opera-
tor...but we will continue to try to do
what we think the best is,” said Mr
Ingraham.

Prime Minister said government is
grateful to Hutchison, which owns
Our Lucaya Resort, for what it is
doing in terms of supporting and sus-
taining the number of jobs for
Bahamians at the hotel property.

However, he believes that there are
some other things that could be done
with the assistance of the government.

“We are prepared to offer support
from the government to Hutchison to
cause some additional things to be
done to enhance Grand Bahama as a
tourist destination,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Government is expected to meet
with the ownership of Hutchison in
London sometime in early October
to further discuss this.

According to Mr Ingraham, Har-
court, the owners of the Royal Oasis
property, has not yet indicated their
ability to proceed with plans for recon-
struction and opening of the resort in
Freeport.

When asked about the Ginn pro-
ject at West End, he said the devel-
opers of Ginn have informed the gov-
ernment that it has adequate sums of
money to continue at some point next
year.

“They are seeking to access addi-
tional funding and they are hopeful, in
the meantime they have several hun-
dred people working at Ginn as far
as I know,” he said.

The government, he said, is also
providing support and substantial
sums of money to the Ministry of
Tourism to promote Grand Bahama.

“We are advertising Grand Bahama
on television in a way its never been
before.

“You can turn to almost any of the
cable channels and see Grand Bahama
in advertisements as a place for people
to come,” he said.

According to Mr Ingraham, the
industrial sector has not been signifi-
cantly impacted on the island.

He noted that government is in dis-
cussion over the sale of the old Burma
terminal facility at East Grand
Bahama and expects to have a possi-
ble decision before end of the month.

HUBERT INGRAHAM



“VOPAK is continuing on its
expansion and the container port con-
tinues to provide good jobs,” said Mr
Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said the NIB Unem-
ployment Programme has provided
assistance to 2,230 residents of Grand
Bahama, in addition to assistance from
Social Services.

FROM page one

ulated by the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority (URCA).

Mr Ingraham said Govern-
ment is concerned that the
GBPC has not “reinvested
adequate sums of money into
its generation and distribution
system, and the company has
over the years taken its profits
out in cash rather than rein-
vesting it in its operation.”

The Power Company here
has recently come under fire
over reliability issues, among
other things, including the high
cost of electricity.

Local community activists
Troy Garvey and Joseph
Darville, vice president of the
Grand Bahama Human Rights

PM disappointed over inefficiency
of Grand Bahama Power Company

Association, said that the GB
Power has a monopoly on
power and should be regulated
by government.

They feel that rates and fuel
surcharge are too high.

The Prime Minister stated
that in so far as the fuel cost is
concerned, Grand Bahama
Power is able to access fuel
costs at a lower rate than BEC.

“They did not pay any cus-
toms duties or the rest of it;
they are able to service their
suppliers outside the area in
bonded vehicles and so that
ought to account for something
in terms of electricity cost here
in Grand Bahama,” he said.

‘Bethel Brothers Morticians
| ar. Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

STATE RECOGNIZED

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR



Former Member
of Parliament the late
HON. CLAUDIUS

LEANDER MINNIS,
O.B.E., LP., 78

of Faith Avenue South, off
Cannichee! Road and foemerty of
Calabash Bay, Andras, will be
held on Wednesday th, 11:00

Speaking in Grand Bahama
on Sunday, where he met with
the press at the Government
Office Complex to take ques-
tions on various pressing
issues, the Prime Minister
revealed that Government is
“disappointed in the Japanese
company, Marubeni” which,
until very recently, owned the
majority stake in the GBPC.

“We expected that they
would have brought greater
efficiency to Grand Bahama’s
electrical generating supply
and that has not happened,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham explained that
the original intent to have
Freeport was that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority would
regulate the electrical supply,
water, and telephone opera-
tors in Freeport.

He noted that the GBPC is
now supplying electricity, out-
side of Freeport, to the entire
island of Grand Bahama.

Mr Ingraham emphasised
that private sector enterprises
should be operating more effi-
ciently than public/government
enterprises.

“We are disappointed that
the number of power outages
that you have here in Grand

Bahama is far in excess of
government enterprises, and
as we all know government

enterprise is supposed to be
less efficient than the private
sector.

“And so the GBPC is not

giving us confidence that pri-
vate sector by itself is the
answer, so we will have dis-
cussions with them about the
various issues that have been
raised by the people of Grand
Bahama,” said Mr Ingraham.

With Grand Bahama’s econ-
omy in recession, residents
here have complained that the
Power Company has been
insensitive to how it enforces
its policies with disconnections
at this difficult time when so
many are unemployed, and
especially when power cuts are
so frequent.

Meanwhile, last week Greg
Ebelhar, head of Polymers
International's Freeport oper-
ations, told Tribune Business
that the electricity tariffs
charged by Grand Bahama
Power Company are “a huge
issue” for his company and
other manufacturers, as the
relatively high prices were tak-
ing a huge chunk out of their
bottom line and making their
prices/operations uncompeti-
tive compared to their global
rivals.

Mr Ebelhar suggested that
Freeport “absolutely cannot”
remain a viable, competitive
manufacturing base in the
medium to long term with such
relatively high power costs.

Mr Ingraham said: “We are
giving consideration to
whether or not the power com-
pany in Freeport, like BEC,
ought not to be regulated by
the new regulatory authority
which the government has
established called URCA (the
Utilities Regulation and Com-
petition Authority), and its
regulatory commission author-

ity which came into effect on
September 1, under the Com-
munication Act,” he said.
Mr Ingraham suggested
that there are standard profits
that utility companies are
expected to make that are
determined by regulatory
authorities, as well as stan-
dard sums of money that
ought to be kept for reinvest-
ment in upgrade of plant and
distribution systems, and this

could be addressed by URCA
if it were to regulate the
GBPC.

A town meeting was held
by a group of local communi-
ty activists on Friday evening
at Workers House so that the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany could address the con-
cerns of residents.

Excell Ferrell, CEO and
president of GBPC, attended
the meeting.

‘Dangerous’ man is
MET TUE Cd MCT

FROM page one

word “MOB” on his left arm, along with a marijuana leaf,
and another of a tear drop under his left eye.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the police are seeking
the assistance of the public in locating Virgil.

According to reports, sometime around 9.10pm police
responded to a call at Les Fountain Building No 2 on East

Sunrise Highway.

On arrival police discovered a male lying on the floor of
a business at the complex. The victim was suffering from
apparent stab wounds to the body.

The victim, later identified as Smith, was taken to the hos-
pital where he was pronounced dead around 10pm.

Curious onlookers remained in the area as police
processed the crime scene. A bystander who knew the vic-
tim believes that the altercation was over a girl.

However, police have not confirmed a motive for the
stabbing and are continuing their investigations.

They believe that the attack occurred in another location
and the victim ran to Les Fountain Building No 2 where he

collapsed in a store.

ASP Mackey is appealing to anyone with information
concerning the matter and the whereabouts of Virgil to
contact police at 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911.

aim. at St. Barnabas Anglican
Church, Gaillow Hill & Wullf
Roads. Fr. Michael Maragh,
assisted by other Ministers of the:
Diocese will officiate. Interment
will follow in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.



Left to cherish the memomies ore his: Wife of 53 years, Mildred; Sens:
Howard, Roger Se., Edward, Don, Nigel, and Cecil Minnis; Danughiters:
Laverme Swaby, Claudia Almanzar, Verna Minnis, and §. Denise
Russell; Extended children: Ednal, Goorge, Berard, Edgar Minnis,
and Jackie Russell; Grandchildren: Glenn Minnis, Darren Claud,
Rashad Minnis, Neco Minnis, Cordero Minnis, Cecil Minnis Jr.,
Antonio Almanzar, Roger Minnis Jr, Leon Swaby, Naren Minnis,
Reu Minnis, and Ricardo Saunders, Shari Dawn, 0" Biara, Rhea, Aisha,
Ceacilly, Juliette, Lacheka Rukiya, and Celine Minnis, Michelle and
Makiah Swaby, Tonysha, Adia, and Anaya Russell, Latesich Carey,
Samantha Martin, Tinta and Tinkka Bam, Cherse King, and Adnane
Burrows; Extended grandchildren: Lamar, Nikita, Jordan, Indira,
Gin, George, Eve, Eden, Semyde, Joyo, Chatonique, Indi, Eric, Ethan,
Victoria, and Kath; Great-prandchlldren: Asher, Tyler, Jonathan,
Lyndesha, Jaimec, Olivia, and Lyric; Brothers: Ivan and Dudric
Minis; Sisters Coname Rolle of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Brothers-
in-law: William Major and Rebert Barmett, Sc; Sisters-in-llaw:
Kathleen and Miralda Minnis, Mae Ward-Pratt, Sylvia Ward, and
Marcia Martin; Soms-in-law: Michael Swahy, Marces Almancar, and
Amhony Russell, Steven Russell; Daughters-ln-law: Latonia and
Jasmine Dale, Yvette, Carla, and Erica Minnis; Numerous neces
and nephews including: Leon, Gary, and Nathan Martin, Floyd
Ingraham, Prescott Minnis, Jason, Jamaal, Cedric, and Stephan Bolle,
Genmld Knowles, Rabert Barnett Ir, Adnan, Whrick, Sherain, and
Enric Pratt, Lois McCoy, Elizabeth Carey, Kim Minnis-Collie,
Kendertyn Minnis-Theophilus, Adama Minnis-McPhee, Miriam
Martin, Codricka and Stephanie Rolle, Patricia Dean and Terrie Rolle,
(Cannel Armbriter, Joyo Pratt, Lorraine Knowles, Elaine Farqubarson,
Minerva Bacon, Adeyla Hennett, Jean and Ann Barnett, Valane
Darville, Rose Martin-Fountain, Marilyn Martin-Stubbs and Susan
Mitchell; Other relatives and friends including: His Excellency
Sir Clifford Darling and family, Henry F. Storr and family; Kenneth
Brennen and family, Berlin Pratt and family, Rowena Ferguson and
family, Hester Kerr and family, Randolph Mincia and famuly: Cyril
“Boxer” Minnis and family, Virgimia Mortimer and family, Burk
Edgecombe and family, Effie Walkes, George, Alphonsa, and Maxwell
Conkley and family, Dr. Patrick Cargall and family, Louise Cargill,
Dr. Hubert Mirmis and family, the Turner family, Sterlin Minnis and
family, the Curlings from Curlings Hardware, Francina Bastian and
farnily, Macmi Pinder, Stanley Bethel, Jr. and family, Max Julian and
family, Beryl, Cora and Douglas from Tamanec, Florida, Barbara
Minnis, Julie Saunders, Angela Ward, Victoria Andrews, Melanie
Lynes, Deacon Peter Rahming and family, Canon Basil Tynes and
family, St. Barnabas Anglican Church family, Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church family, Pastor Jeremiah Duncombe ated farniby,
Roscoe Dames and family, Nora MoCalla and famaly, Charlene Stuart,
Bettymae Simms, Cheryl Minnas, Mitel Swaby, Dr, Kevin Moss, Era
and Malina Ferguson, His Excellency Sir Arthar 2, Hanno and family,
the Hon. Peery Christic and family, the Hon. Brave Davis and family,
the Hon. Paul L. Adderley and family, the Hom. Gleneys Hanna-
Martin, the Right Hon Hubert A. Ingraham, the Hon. Desmond
Bannister, Stalwart Councilors and the members of the Progressive
Liberal Party and a host of other relatives ond friends

The body will lic im state in the Foyer of the House of Assembly on
Tuesaday, September Sih, | lam te bpm

There will be no viewing af the church.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avene, Palmdale
Nassau, AP. The Bahamas

A Funeral Service

MRS. ETHELYN
VIRGINIA
" Jean "
PINDER, 75

of Winton Meadows, Nassau,
The Bahamas, will be held at fj
St. Anne's Anglican Church,
Fox Hill Road, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 8th September, 2009
at 4:00pm.

Reverend Father Croshey WN.

Walkine will officiate andâ„¢

Interment will be in St. Anne's Cemetery, Fox Hill Road,
Nassau.

Mrs. Pinder is predeceased by her parents, Alexander C.
Knowles Sr, and Agnes L, Knowles and her brother, James
F. Knowles. She is survived by her hushand, Jetferson Williarn
Pinder; two sons, William Craig Pinder of Ely, England and
Richard Perry Pinder of Nassau; a granddaughter, Alice
Johnson; brothers, Alex, Emerick, Patrick, Geoffrey and
Charlton Knowles; sisters, Ruby Collins, Doris Anderson,
Yvonne Knowles, Deborah Koowles and Julianna Green:
uncle, Hilbert B. Pinder; brothers-in-law, Richard Anderson
Sr. James Green and David Pinder, sisters-in-law, Joan Pinder,
Shirley, Amarylis, Brenda, Rosa and Linda Knowles, other
relatives and friends including Ruth Moushaheck, Mike and
Marsha Stewart, Robert and Linda Brown, Claire Brown,
Johnny Brown and Mary Knowles, Julia and Steve Monti,
Joanne and Thirey Lamare, Ray and Flora Claridge, Mary
Low and Cedric Saunders, Doreen Kemp, Lori Dawson, Joan
Albury, Cora and Morton Carey, Patou Regent, many nephews
and nieces and other relatives and fnends too many bo mention.

With special thanks to Shirley Knowles, Amarylis Knowles,
Delores Rolle, Wellington King and Cynthia Taylor who
assisted so much during her illness,

Also, a special thanks to Dr. John Lunn and his entire staif
and to the Nurses at Doctors Hospital, Nassau,

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas, P}O. Box 5.5, 6534, Nassau or to
St. Anne's Anglican Church, P.O. Box N. 1569, Nassau in
memory of Mrs. Ethelyn Virginia "Jean" Pinder.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Virgil is considered armed and extremely dangerous.

Around 5’ 9” tall and 135 pounds, he has a dark brown
complexion and dark brown eyes.

TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.

High School

A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.

Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.

Only Born Again Christians should

apply.

The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.







Sports

Boxing duo
training in
lialy despite
elimination

VALENTINO KNOWLES

BOXING

ALTHOUGH they have
both been eliminated from
further competition at the
AIBA World Champi-
onships in Milan, Italy, the
two-man team of Valenti-
no Knowles and Carl Hield
will remain until the end.

The duo, along with
coach Andre Seymour, will
not be back home until
Sunday.

Knowles, who made his-
tory when he became the
first Bahamian to win a
first round match before he
lost in the second round,
said he intends to take
advantage of the opportu-
nity to continue to train.

“This is going to be my
training ground until I
return home,” he said.
“Tve already got a taste of
what it’s like to make his-
tory and I know there’s a
lot more to come.”

The goal, he said, is to
get ready for the 2012
Olympic Games in Lon-
don, England.

Knowles said he and
Hield, who lost in the first
round, have been going out
and watching the other
competition going on when
they are not training.

BOXING

Mackey
hack home



CHA lee le Cy

AFTER spending about
three weeks in a training
camp in Berlin, Germany,
Bahamas super mid-
dleweight champion Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’ Mack-
ey is back home.

Mackey, who is prepar-
ing to defend his British
Commonwealth title in
October, was training with
world champion Mikkel
Kessler.

However, the sparring
sessions didn’t go as Mack-
ey had anticipated as
Kessler was not available
every day.



MONDAY,



‘SUPERMAN’ IS BACK!

Leevan Sands soars to big victory in Italy

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ITH the heartbreak-
ing performance of
the 12th IAAF World
Championships in

SEPTEMBER 7,



2009



Athletics behind him, Leevan ‘Super-
man’ Sands came back to soar to a big
victory yesterday as he prepares for the
IAAF World Athletic Final this week-

end.

Se GACT UT Ta ay

PEARAMEIESM -A- 5 RUA |

The Thaeas A. Aabieton Nationa! > radium Prope! Aided bry Pea

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEGEND THOMAS ROBINSON along with H.E Mr WU Bangguo unveils the new cornerstone to be
placed at the entrance of the new stadium. His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing
Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China presented a mod-
el of the national stadium to the Deputy prime Minister Brent Symonette along with Desmond Ban-
nister, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture and Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest,
Minister of National Security.

TENNIS: US OPEN 2009
Knowles wins first encounter
with rising star Ryan Sweeting

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SOONER or later, Mark
Knowles knew that he would
have to face rising young star
Ryan Sweeting.

That opportunity came
sooner than later as the two
were on opposite side of the
court in the second round of
the men’s doubles at the US
Open in Flushing Meadows,
New York on Saturday.

Knowles and his Indian
partner Mahesh Bhupathi,
seeded number three, took
advantage of the less experi-
enced team of Sweeting and
his American partner Jesse
Levine for a 7-5, 6-2 win.

Playing through the pain
he’s experiencing after his
right ring finger was cut in an
elevator at the Tennis Center
last Tuesday requiring some
nine stitches, Knowles said he
was quite contented in win-
ning a couple of matches so
far, including his first head-
to-head encounter with
Sweeting.

Tough

“Tt was interesting playing
Ryan,” said Knowles of the
former Bahamian Davis Cup
player, now an American cit-
izen. “It was a tough match.

“He’s a good player with a
big serve.

“He hits the ball very well
and he’s a very good doubles
player. I think he’s being
doing well lately and he
should have a bright future.”

While Knowles and Bhu-
pathi had a 81-64 winning per-
centage edge on Ist serve and
62-32 on 2nd serve, Sweeting
and Levine got the better on
winners (including service) as
they finished 12-10.

However, Knowles and
Bhupathi dominated on
receiving points won 45-27%
and break point conversion
4-of-8 for a 50-33 % (1-of-3)
to accumulate an advantage
of 65-47 total points won.

“We’re playing very well.
Obviously, I have a little bit of

}



UL a Cen Tests)



US OPEN: See Page 14

es
adversity, we’ve played well
so far in the two matches we
have played,” said Knowles,
after they won their first
round match 6-3, 6-4 over
American James Cerretani
and Lovro Zovko from Croa-
tia.

“Our draw is pretty easy.
But we obviously feel great
about the way we’re playing
and we felt great coming into
the event. So it’s just a matter
of trying to get better and bet-
ter each day and getting fit.”

Knowles and Bhupathi are
scheduled to play their third
round match today against the
team of Yen-Hsun Lu of
Taipei and Dudi Sela of
Israel.

Yesterday, Knowles had
mixed doubles duties. He and
his German partner, Anna-
Lena Groenefeld, the No.4
seeds, faced Knowles’ former
partner Zi Yan from China
and Mariusz Fyrstenberg
from Poland.

However, Yan and Fyrsten-
berg got the best of the
match-up with identical set
scores of 6-3, 6-3 over
Knowles and Groenefeld, the
winners of the Wimbledon
title in July.

Competing along with Shamar Sands
at a meet in Rieti, Italy, Sands cleared
16.77 metres or 55-feet, 01/4-inches to
snatch first place in the men’s triple jump.




Pain in. ~
belly for Rafa, E
Page 14 =



His winning leap came on the second
of his four attempts. He opened with
16.12 or 52-10 3/4 that placed him in sec-
ond behind Cuba’s Arnie David Girat.

But after taking the lead, Sands went
on to post 16.52 or 54-2 1/2 in the third
round and 16.60 or 54-5 1/2 in the last

SEE page 13



aol’ s Reputtic of China

oa
~
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

oll

m8 8

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from

the Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone
No. 302-1158,

SEE PAGE 12

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 2009,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas



66

It was interesting
playing Ryan. It was
a tough match

i 99

Marked: Tender Wo. 7O7/09
Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Corporation reserves the right ta accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the

Mark Carporation deems necessary,

Knowles













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Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

meatal tal dies,

Byron Lynden Pearce, 37

a resident of Collins Avenue, will be held at Calvary Bible
Church, Collins Ave, on Friday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will
be Pastor Frederick Arnett, assisted by Pastor Thomas Albury.
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother Eloise Pearce & a host of other
relatives & friends.

Henry Adam Reckley 83

a resident of Father Callan Lane, will be held at St. John's
Native Baptist Cathedral, Meeting Street, on Saturday at
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Michael E. Symonette & Rev. Dr.
Hermis Bain. Interment follows in the Church's Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Claudiemae Reckley; 1 son: Daniel
Reckley; 2 daughters: Louise Albertha Sherman & Judy Reckley; 2 sisters: Venis
Reckley & Sarah Fisher; 1 brother: Rev. Hermix Reckley.

: ‘ Rosina Delores Simmons, 95

}| a resident of Palm Avenue & formerly of Lorimors, Turks
Island will be held at Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley
| Street, on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor T.
G. Morrison. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens,

Left to cherish her memories are her daughters: Carol Bonamy, Marion Williams
& Laverne Bani-Hani; 1 stepson: George Simmons; 11 grandchildren: Antionette,
Edward, Gaetano & Gillianno Bonamy, Deon Munroe, Danobury & Trenton
Williams, Kristi Thompson & Nakia Williams.

Jeffery Oswald Sturrup, 39

a resident of Arundel Street, will be held at St. Georges's

| Anglican Church, Montrose Ave., on Friday at 1 :00 p.m.

| Officiating will be Fr. Kingsley Knowles. Interment follows
| in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Bernice Sturrup; sisters: Delores
Sturrup Carter, Willimae Sturrup, Shirley Travis of Detroit Michigan & Edith
Sturrup; brothers: Charles, Edwin, George, Tyrone & Pedro Sturrup; aunts:
Marietta Storr & Daisy Evans of Miami, FI.

Eliza Josepha Brooks Wilkinson, 76

a resident of Dunmore Street, will be held at St. Mary the Virgin
Anglican Parish, Virginia Street, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be The Rev'd Fr. Dwight M. Bowe, Canon
Warren H. Rolle & the Rev'd Dr. Peter Grist. Interment follows
in the church cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her 5 children: Elroy (deceased), Sidney Jr.,
Keith, Edward Wilkinson Sr.; 1 daughter: Mrs. Joy Anne Wilkinson Moss; 2 step
children: Karrington Wilkinson & Dora Culmer; 2 brothers: Nathaniel Brooks
Sr. & Mickey Brooks; 2 daughters-in-law: Sherry & Valarie Wilkinson; 14 grand
children; 6 great grandchildren; 1 uncle: Lloyd Quant; 1 aunt: Annie Adams &
a host of other relatives & friends.

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50

a resident of Peter Street West, died at her residence on Thursday
3 Sept. 2009.

She is survived by her father: Simeon Richardson; 1 son:
Thurman Knowles; 1 daughter: Cecelia Richardson; 3
grandchildren, 3 sisters, 3 brothers & a host of other relatives
& friends.

Sangster Smith, 42

a resident of Goldern Gates #2 & formelry of Grand Turks,
died at PMH on 28 August., 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Kaynell Smith; 3 sons: Randy,
Zhivago & Leander; 1 daughter: Celena; 2 brother: Basil Smith
& Gomez Smith; 1 sister: Lorraine Smith.

Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Corner & formerly of Eneas Jumper
Corner, died on Sunday 30 August, 2009.

She is survived by her 5 sons: Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace,
Junior Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters:
Margaret Huymes, Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne

PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Minister: ‘The Chinese

are going incredibly fast’

The Thomas A. Robins



TRIBUNE SPORTS

ional Stadium Project

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEGENDARY Thomas A. Robinson, whom the new national stadium will be named after, is congratulated by Wu
Bangguo, the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of

China.

Bannister hails
efficiency of
the company

working on new
national stadium

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said he’s really surprised at
the efficiency with which the
Qilu Construction Group Cor-
poration are preparing to have
the new national stadium com-
pleted by 2011.

“The Chinese are going
incredibly fast,” said Bannister
after the official tour of the con-
struction site on Saturday with
the 120-plus delegation from
the National People’s Congress
of the People’s Republic of Chi-
na, headed by Wu Bangguo,
the chairman of the standing
committee.

“T don’t think that there’s
anybody who work as quickly
as they’re working and are as
organized and extremely quiet
as they are.

Pleased

“We are very pleased with
the way they are working.”

When completed, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations is hoping that
they will be able to host the
Carifta Games from April to
coincide with the official open-

WU Bangguo on Saturday.





CHINESE WORKERS at the sports centre lineo wait for the arrival of

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CHINESE STAFF pose with WU Bangguo.



ing ceremonies and the naming
of the new 15,000 seat state-of-
the-art Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium that
could be explanded to accom-
modate a total of 23,000 seats.

If they are successful in
securing the bid from Grena-
da, who is currently trying to
repair their stadium after they
were hit by hurricane, it will be

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the seventh time that the
Bahamas has hosted the top
junior regional competition.

The last time the Bahamas
hosted Carifta was in 2002
when Bannister served as pres-
ident of the BAAA.

The BAAA, which will go to
the polls in November to select
a new executive board for the
next three years, is currently
headed by Curt ‘Mr. H’
Hollingsworth.

Bannister, who on Saturday
spoke about the “economic
benefits” that will derive for
the Bahamas when the stadi-
um is completed, thanked the
Chinese government for “what
they are doing for us and how
they are doing it. I can’t wait
until it’s finished.”

Leading up to the Olympic
Games last year in Beijing, Chi-
na, the Chinese government
created two national stadiums
that have surpassed all con-
structed anywhere else in the
world.

Marvelled

Everybody marvleled as the
‘Bird’s Nest’ national track and
field stadium, which hosted the
opening and closing ceremonies
as well as the track and field
competition at the Olympics
and the ‘Blue tube’ national
swim complex next to it that
hosted the swimming competi-
tion.

If that’s any indication, Ban-
nister said the new stadium at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center, which will sit in
between the current Thomas
A. Robinson Track and Field
(which will become a practice
track) and the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center, will defi-
nitely be the envy of the
Caribbean.

“This is the biggest stadium
that the Chinese are building

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice said.

Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand, 10 great grand; 1 uncle: Bill Simmons; outside of China,” Bannister

2 aunts: Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons. “Theyare dommilisdtaxee

ting it done. They are a very
dedicated and hardworking
people and I’m sure that there’s
some lessons there that we can
all learn.”

A number of government
ministers, headed by Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette and including Robinson,
watched as Wu unveiled the
cornerstone for the stadium.

Wu also presented a relica
of the national stadium to
Symonette during the brief cer-
emony.

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He is survived by his mother: Menesha Ingraham; father:

George Fernander; grandparents: Ivalean & Thomas Ingraham,
Velma & Harris Fernander; sisters: Cortrea Cooper & Shanice Fox; brother:
Jeffery Cooper.







TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



NEVV PROVIDENCE SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION
Teams jockeying
for playoff positions



SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Mynez Cargill makes the play at the plate to get Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Varnette Nairn

out at first base.

WITH the regular season
winding down, teams are now
jockeying for playoff positions
in the New Providence Softball
Association.

Saturday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, a triple
header was played with some
playoff implications as both the
ladies and men’s defending
champions stayed in the hunt.

Brackettes 13, Lady Sharks
9: In a rematch of last year’s
finals, the defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes out-
slugged runners-up Proper
Care Pool Lady Stingrays 13-
9.

Brackettes’ veteran Ernes-
tine Butler-Stubbs got the bet-
ter of the pitching dual with
youthful Thela Johnson of
Proper Care Pool as the Brack-
ettes pushed their third place
record to 8-5. The Lqdy Sharks
fell to 10-5 to remain in second
behind idled front-running
Pineapple Air Wildcats, who
are 12-2.

Vandette Smith sparked Sig-
ma’s offensive attack with a 2-
for-5 night with two runs batted
in and scoring three times. Zel-
la Symonette was just as
impressive with a 3-for-5 out-
ting, driving in a pair of runs
and scoring as many.

Antonia Simmons helped out
by going 2-for-3 with a RBI,
scoring twice and Cassie Smith
was also 2-for3 with a pair of
runs scored.

For Proper Care Pool,
Keisha Pratt went 2-for4 with a
RBI and a run scored; Shanelle
Symonette was 2-for4 with two
RBI and Cleo Symonette went
1-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice.

Truckers 12, New Breed 0:
The defending men’s champi-
ons Commodo Security Truck-
ers stayed close to the Pricewa-
terhouse Stingrays in third
place as they blanked the rook-
ie New Breed 12-0.

Anton Gibson fired a one-
hitter for the win for the Truck-
ers, who improved to 11-5, 1
1/2 game behind idled Price-
waterhouse Stingrays, who are
14-3 as they both trail front run-
ning Dorcey Park Boyz, who
are 16-1.

Darren Mortimer enjoyed a
2-for-3 night at the plate with
two runs batted in, scoring
twice to lead a balanced offen-
sive attack. Richard Bastian
was 2-for-3 with three RBI,
scoring a run on a solo in-the-
park home run in the bottom
of the second.

Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Ferguson
was 2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice; Martin Burrows Jr. was a
perfect 2-for-2 with two RBIs
and three runs scored, including
hitting a two-run homer in the
fourth and Julian Taylor was
also a perfect 2-for-2 with two
runs.

@ CURRENT SOFTBALL STANDINGS

AFTER the New Providence Softball Associa-
tion’s triple header on Saturday night at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex, here’s a look at the
current standings going into Tuesday night’s

double header:

Ladies Division
Teams W L Pet. GB

Pineapple Air Wildscats 12 2 .857 -

Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks 10 5 .666 21/2
Sigma Brackettes 8 5 .615 31/2

Boomer G Lady Swingers 3 11.2149

Queen’s 1 12 .076 101/2
Men’s Division
Dorcey Park Boyz 161 .941 -







TE
TWIT

Sands is back

FROM page 11

round to maintain his posi-
tion.

Sands, who celebrated his
28th birthday when he com-
peted in the qualifying round
of the World’s in Berlin, Ger-
many last month, just missed
out on the bronze medal
when Cuban Alexis Copello
passed him in the last round.

Sands is the bronze medal-
ist from the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China last year.

Girat, who was fifth in
Berlin, took second place with
his best mark of 16.67 or 54-8
1/4 on his first attempt. Mom-
chil Karailiev of Bulgeria was
third with 16.61 or 54-6.

Sands will now join sprint-
ers Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie and Chandra Sturrup
along with quarter-miler Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown in the
IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final this weekend in
Thessaloniki, Greece.

Ranked

Sands is the second ranked
competitor in the triple jump
behind Girat. Sturrup and
Ferguson-McKenzie are No.4
and 5 respectively in the
women’s 100 with Ferguson-
McKenzie topping the list in
the 200. Brown is No.2 in the
men’s 400. Also at the meet
yesterday, Shamar Sands had
to settle for a sixth place finish
in the men’s 110 hurdles in
13.65 seconds.

Jamaca got a 1-2 sweep
from Dwight Thomas (13.36)





SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Thelma Johnson goes to work as she delivers a pitch
to the Sigma Brackettes.



PROPER and Maurice Wignall (13.48).
‘| CARE POOL Sean’ :
| LADY pain’s Jackson Quinonez
SHARKS’ was third in 13.49.
batter Shamar Sands, 24, got
»| Varnette fourth in his heat of the semi-
7 Nairn final and didn’t advance to
avoided the final in Berlin.
ut While Leevan Sands has
PROPER CARE POOL LADY SHARKS’ batter Varnetta Nairn squares off to put idee qualified for the World Ath-
down the bunt. Sj oA y letic Final, Shamar Sands has
“| Sackatfee! not. Only the top eight
catcher atheltes will compete and
Cassie Sands is sitting in the 12th
Smith, spot.

ANEW
GENERATION

SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Renee ‘Sunshine’ Davis tries to catch the ball before
Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Thela Johnson reaches first base.

ERNESTINE BUTLER-STUBBS in action on the mound.

For Young Breed, who the win on the mound over
slipped into a two-way tie for C a or di on ai l
fifth at 6-10 with the idled Roy- Gilbert and he got all the help \N
al Bahamas Defense Force he needed offensively to join
Commodores, Roberto Larri- | New Breed in a two-way tie for
more had the lone hit on asin- fifth at 6-10.

HILUX DOUBLE CAB FEATURES:

2.7 litre VVTI engine ee URAL nee CLL CR SUL

gle in the third.

Outlaws 11, Hitmen 7: The
Roscoe Thompson Heavy
Equipment gained some
ground with their big victory
over Robin Hood and the loss
to their little brother team New
Breed.

Bruce Mackey went 2-for-4
with five RBI and a run scored.
He had a two-run double and a
three-run triple. Juliano
Thompson was 2-for4 with two
RBI and a run scored and Kedo
Johnson was 1-for-2 with three
runs. Shavargo Archer was 2-

automatic transmission
mp3/cd player
TA a LU
air conditioning

erate ashe
oT AMT)
side steps
re.



Roscoe Thompson secured _ for-4 with two runs scored.

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the Hilux sets the standard for a new generation.

Pricewaterhouse Stingrays 14 3 .823 2

Commando Truckers 11 5 .687 41/2

Robin Hood Hitmen 9 7 .5621/2 61/2

Young Breed 6 10 .375 91/2

RBDF Commodores 6 10 .375 91/2

Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws 7 11
388 91/2

Morgan’s Buccaneers 4 14 .222 121/2

Mighty Mits 3 15 .166 131/2

Tuesday’s schedule

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Ue da ah

Pain in the ... belly, but

Nadal

EDDIE PELLS,
AP National Writer
NEW YORK

Rafael Nadal encountered
as much trouble from his own
body as his opponent in a
third-round victory at the U.S.
Open.

The third-seeded Nadal,
who missed Wimbledon with
sore knees, needed a 10-
minute injury break for a
trainer to work on his abdom-
inals early in the third set of
his 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over
No. 32 Nicolas Almagro on
Sunday.

The stomach injury first
cropped up for Nadal last
month at a tournament in
Cincinnati.

While Nadal laid on the
ground to receive treatment,
Almagro was laying down to
get work done on his back.

The Spaniards popped back
up and Nadal finished the
work, staying in the hunt to
complete his career Grand
Slam, though it has yet to be
seen what kind of toll this
match took on him.

"T feel it a little bit now, but
I'll try my best to recover for
the next match," said Nadal,
who has insisted all week that
he's been feeling fine. "I'm
here to work hard and try my
best all the time.”

In other early action Sun-
day, 11th-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez defeated 17th-seed-
ed Tomas Berdych, 7-5, 6-4, 6-
4, and No. 9 Gilles Simon of
France retired because of a
knee injury while trailing No.
24 Juan Carlos Ferrero 1-6,
6-4, 7-6 (5), 1-0.

"Sometimes, I don't know
why, I just feel a big pain,"
said Simon, who added that
he's had problems with the
knee since the French Open
in May.

In the other early women's
match, No. 18 Li Na of China
ousted No. 26 Francesca Schi-

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



AP Photo/Kathy Willens

RAFAEL NADAL of Spain has his abdomen taped by a trainer during a break in his match against Nico-
las Almagro of Spain in the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, yesterday.

AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill

Serena Williams, of the United States, returns to

NEW YORK

Defending champion Serena
Williams has powered her way into
the U.S. Open quarterfinals, winning
the last 10 games to beat No. 22-seed-
ed Daniela Hantuchova 6-2, 6-0.

Williams finished with eight aces
and a 27-9 advantage in winners in
Sunday's first match in Arthur Ashe

Stadium.

No. 1 Dinara Safina was upset Sat-
urday night, meaning No. 2 Williams is
the highest-ranked woman left in the
field. Safina will remain atop the rank-
ings, though, even if Williams were to
win a second consecutive U.S. Open
title and fourth overall.

Williams has reached the quarterfi-
nals at 11 of the past 12 major tourna-

Daniela Hantuchova, of Slovakia.

avone of Italy, 6-2, 6-3.

No. 3 Venus Williams had
an afternoon match against
unseeded Kim Clijsters, who
is facing, by far, the toughest

match in her first appearance
at the U.S. Open since she
won it in 2005.

Also later, No. 2 Andy
Murray was scheduled to play

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ments and won the title at three of the
past four.



195th-ranked Taylor Dent of
Newport Beach, Calif., who
has won two rounds in his
inspirational comeback from



RAFAEL NADAL, of Spain, returns to Nicolas Almagro, also of
Spain, during the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 6, 2009.

MEN

Juan Carlos Ferrero (24), Spain, def. Gilles Simon (9), France, 1-
6, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 1-0, retired.

Fernando Gonzalez (11), Chile, def. Tomas Berdych (17), Czech
Republic, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4.
j a Nadal (3), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (32), Spain, 7-5, 6-

Women

FOURTH ROUND

Serena Williams (2), United States, def. Daniela Hantuchova
(22), Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2.

Li Na (18), China, def. Francesca Schiavone (26), Italy, 6-2, 6-3.

tae

N
THIRD ROUND
Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, and Michael Llodra, France, def. Juan
Ignacio Chela, Argentina, and Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 7-5, 2-6, 6-
3

WOMEN

THIRD ROUND

Maria Kirilenko and Elena Vesnina (10), Russia, def. Alexa Glatch
and Carly Gullickson, United States, 7-6 (3), 6-2.

Alisa Kleybanova and Ekaterina Makarova (13), Russia, def.
Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano Pascual (2), Spain, 7-
6 (3), 6-3.

Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Nadia Petrova (8), Rus-
sia, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Patty Schnyder (9),
Switzerland, 6-7 (6), 3-6, 6-3.

Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (1), United States, def.
Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-4, 5-7,

AP Photo/Kathy Willens



back surgery.

CRICKET: ENGLAND vs AUSTRALIA, NATWEST SERIES

Photo/PA, Rebecca Naden

AUSTRALIA'S BRETT LEE, ri right, eolebratss atter aang the wick:
et of England's Paul Collingwood during the second one day inter-
national cricket match at Lord's cricket ground, London, Sunday
Sept. 6, 2009.

Second defeat for England

England fell further behind in the NatWest Series after failing to
overhaul a moderate Australia total for the second time in three
days. Andrew Strauss’ team lost by 39 runs to go 2-0 down in the
seven-match campaign, having lost their way badly in pursuit of 250
at Lord's, following the last-ball decider on Friday evening. The
Ashes winners appeared on course to the level the series when they
entered the 15th over on 74 without loss but a cluster of wickets,
which mirrored a similar pattern at the same stage of Australia's
innings, altered the outlook. Shane Watson's introduction was
more in desperation than inspiration given that he was the sixth
bowler employed inside the first two sets of powerplays.

But his dismissal of Ravi Bopara, who fatally ambled across
his stumps to be plumb lbw, halted the momentum built up against
the new ball.

Strauss and opening partner Ravi Bopara had England cruising
towards victory at Lord's before losing four wickets for 23 runs and
eventually getting bowled out for 210.

"Having been 70-odd for none we were in a great position to
come home comfortably but we were the architects of our own
downfall to an extent," Strauss said after the 39-run defeat.

Australia vl South Africa 21 1

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SOUTH AFRICA'S Victor Matfiel, right, and Australia’ s James
Horwill jump in the lineout during the Tri-Nations rugby match in
Brisbane, Australia, Saturday Sept. 5, 2009. Satisfied Australia
coach Robbie Deans praised the patience and tenacity shown by
his players after their impressive 21-6 win over South Africa in
Brisbane.The Springboks sit well clear at the top of the table on
17 points ahead of the Kiwis on eight, with the Wallabies a further
point back with one match remaining against New Zealand in
Wellington in a fortnight.



Brazil qualifies
for World Cup;
France struggles

Brazil qualified for its 19th
consecutive World Cup, leav-
ing Argentina to join Portugal
and France with difficult paths
to reach next year’s tourna-
ment, according to Associated
Press.

Defending World Cup cham-
pion Italy and European cham-
pion Spain maintained their
leads in Europe, while England
and Germany won exhibition
games ahead of qualifiers on
Wednesday. And in Africa,
Cameroon boosted itself with
its first victory in the final round
of qualifying. The United States
came from behind at home for
the second straight qualifier,
defeating El Salvador 2-1 to
move up one spot into second
place in North and Central
America and the Caribbean.

Luisao put Brazil ahead in
the 24th minute at Rosario,
Argentina, and Luis Fabiano
scored in the 30th and 67th.
Jesus Datolo got a goal in the
65th for Argentina, which will
face pressure to remove coach
Diego Maradona. Brazil (8-1-
6) leads South American qual-
ifying with 30 points, three
ahead of Chile and Paraguay
(both 8-4-3) and eight in front
of Argentina (6-5-4) with three
matches remaining.

The top four teams advance
to next year’s tournament,
while the No. 5 nation goes to a
playoff against the No. 4 nation
in North and Central America
and the Caribbean.

Brazil became the seventh
nation to join host South Africa
in next year’s 32-nation field,
following Australia, Japan, the
Netherlands, North Korea and
South Korea and the Nether-
lands. Argentina lost a home
qualifier for the first time since
a 5-0 defeat to Colombia in
1993. Cristiano Ronaldo is in
danger of missing the World
Cup after Portugal needed a
last-minute goal by Liedson for
a 1-1 tie against Denmark.
Nicklas Bendtner gave the
Danes the lead in the 41st
minute. Denmark (5-0-2) leads
Group One with 17 points, four
ahead of Hungary (4-2-1),
which lost 2-1 at home to Swe-
den when Zlatan Ibrahimovic
scored in injury time. Sweden
(3-1-3) is third with 12 points,
and Portugal (2-1-4) has 10
heading into Wednesday’s
game at Hungary.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 15



Crews work to hold California wildfire's eastern edge

LOS ANGELES

WITH the massive wildfire
burning north of Los Angeles
more than half contained, hand
crews were working Sunday to
keep the fire's eastern flank from
crossing a rural mountain high-
way, a U.S. Forest Service
spokeswoman said, according to
Associated Press.

The fire, which started Aug.
26, has killed two firefighters,
blackened nearly 246 square
miles of the Angeles National
Forest and destroyed at least 76
homes. Fire agencies so far have
spent $43.5 million fighting the
blaze.

Authorities on Sunday were



trying to determine who set the
deadly fire.

At least a dozen investigators
were working to analyze clues
found at a burnt hillside near
Angeles Crest Highway where
the fire started. But officials, who
say the cause of the fire was
arson, were hesitant to release
any of their findings to the
media.

The fire was 51 percent con-
tained Sunday as crews built new
protective lines near Highway 39
in the San Gabriel Wilderness,
U.S. Forest Service spokes-
woman Jennifer Sanchez said.

No homes were immediately
threatened.

The weekend weather fore-

cast called for cooler tempera-
tures and slightly higher humid-
ity that could help firefighters
further surround the blaze.
Because of the reduced heat,
about 400 firefighters assigned
to protect structures were dis-
missed Saturday. About 4,800
firefighters remained.

Los Angeles County firefight-
ers Tedmund Hall and Arnaldo
Quinones were killed Aug. 30
while seeking an escape route

for their inmate fire crew after
flames overran their camp on
Mount Gleason. The two died
when their truck plunged 800
feet off a steep mountain road.

Sheriff's detectives opened a
homicide investigation after the
fire was ruled arson earlier this
week, and Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger has offered
$100,000 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
the culprit.








A CLOUD of
vapor and
smoke is seen
from Victory
Park near
Pasadena, as
the Station Fire
continues to
burn on the East
| side of the the
Angeles Nation-
) al Forest.

Damian

== + Dovarganes/AP

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THE TRIBUNE

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

US!

e



MONDAY,

SEPTEMBER 7,



2009





ColinaImperial

Confidence For Life

0% public building
energy drop target

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

h e
Bahamas
should
target a
30 per cent reduc-
tion in energy usage
by public buildings
by 2010, and
attempt to reduce
New Providence
commute times by
20 per cent by next
year, the National
Energy Policy Committee’s first
report has urged, a government min-
ister telling Tribune Business that
developing an energy policy was
“critical” for this nation’s economic
and environmental sustainability.
Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, told Tri-
bune Business that while some target
dates in the committee’s first report
were likely to be adjusted, since the
document was drafted in 2008, the
Government still intended to pro-
duce a National Energy Policy



NEYMOUR

Government assesses

* National Energy Policy formulation still ‘critical’ for
government, as BEC’s last annual bill reaches $376m
* Bahamas among world’s five most vulnerable nations to climate change,
but public not recognising fossil fuel use’s impact on ‘life and death matter’
* Committee's first report sets short-term targets of 10-20% public
transport use increase, and 20% commute reduction time by 2010
* Renewable energy should be 10-20% of energy supply mix within 10 years,
report says, with 20-30% of households using solar water heater

(NEP) document “at the end of the
day”.

Although unable to give a target
deadline for the policy’s completion
and publication, due to the fact that
the Government wanted to “max-
imise input” from the Bahamian
public and other stakeholders, Mr
Neymour reiterated that the Ingra-
ham administration saw it as criti-
cal in guiding efforts to reduce this
nation’s energy spend and environ-
mental/carbon footprint.

“In my view, it’s critical,” Mr Ney-
mour said of the need for a Bahami-
an National Energy Policy. “For
instance, if you look at BEC alone,
BEC’s fuel bill for its last Budget
year was $376 million. That sum
demonstrates the magnitude of gov-
ernment spending for consumption
of petroleum products and energy.
We're trying to minimise it. It affects
significantly our foreign exchange
reserves and our foreign spending.”

Apart from the economics, Mr

Neymour said that addressing
Bahamian consumption of petrole-
um products, and the almost-total
dependence on fossil fuels for elec-
trical generation, had important
implications for the environment -
especially given this nation’s vul-
nerability to rising sea levels and cli-
mate change.

“The Bahamas is considered one
of the top five countries that are neg-
atively impacted by climate change,”
the minister added, explaining that

the work being done by the Nation-
al Energy Policy Committee in this
area was “critical” to this nation.

“It’s a life and death matter for
the Bahamas moving forward. It’s a
critical issue,” Mr Neymour said of
climate change and global warming,
and the role played by energy con-
sumption patterns.

“Tt’s not taken root with the pub-
lic as it should. We generally look at
energy usage when we get our elec-
tricity bills, but I think Bahamians
should be more concerned with the
environmental impact of an energy
policy.”

Figures produced recently showed
that the Bahamas’ per capita carbon
dioxide emissions, resulting from
fossil fuel consumption, had
increased by 40 per cent since 1996.
Emissions per capita now stood at
16.48, with the amount of carbon
dioxide emitted by this nation, as
measured in millions of tonnes, hav-
ing increased from 2.2 million in
1992 to 3.5 million in 2000 and 5 mil-
lion in 2006.

SEE page 4B

Film Studios principal

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT
has been moving slowly in
drafting a new Heads of
Agreement for the Bahamas
Film Studios because it wants
to determine whether its cur-
rent chairman and owner,
who has threatened to close
the project down, is a man it
wants to do business with, the
Permanent Secretary in the
Prime Minister’s Office told
Tribune Business.

David Davis said the Gov-

Determining whether to do
business with him, as Heads
redrafting ongoing amid
threats of closure

ernment has been attempting
to draft a new Heads of
Agreement for the Grand
Bahama-based development
for some time, ever since
Nashville-based investment
banker, Ross Fuller, took con-
trol.

Mr Davis said the lease of

SEE page 11B

Gap between rich, poor to widen

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE ‘wealth gap’ between
rich and poor in the Bahamas
is likely to widen as a result of
the current recession, a for-
mer finance minister has told
‘Tribune Business, with he and
others believing this nation is
undergoing a “major struc-
tural change” and could face a
relatively ‘jobless’ recovery.

James Smith, CFAL’s

SEE page 8B

* Bahamas facing prospect of
‘jobless recovery’ and major
structural changes that will be
permanent, with prolonged
high unemployment likely

* ‘Painful days’ ahead, with next
five years ‘unlike previous five
to 10 years of prosperity’

* Bahamian businesses urged to
restructure now and do more
with less, as demand and sales
likely to be in retreat
for some time

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Bahamian firm allies
with Caribbean player

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

A PAN-CARIBBEAN project management
and property development consultancy is plan-
ning an alliance with a Bahamian company
offering much the same services, in a bid to
give them increased scale and an ability to bet-
ter compete in bidding for major construction
and engineering projects.

An executive with Construction Cost Engi-
neering (Bahamas), David Lavin, told Tri-
bune Business that their association with
BCQS International will allow them to expand

SEE page 5B

Governments delay
critical NIB reforms

‘Enormous social implications’ if
pressing amendments not enacted

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SUCCESSIVE governments have failed for
more than 15 years to implement long-sug-
gested reforms vital to the National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) long-term sustainability, two
investment advisers have told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that the Bahamas faced “enor-
mous social implications” if amendments were
not enacted soon.

SEE page 10B

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It starts wait you



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Insurer’s
income
declines by
86.4 per cent

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First General
Insurance Company saw its
net income for 2008 slump by
some 86.4 per cent to $1.656
million, largely due to an
almost $12 million swing into
the red on the unrealised loss-
es suffered on its equity
investment portfolio, a devel-
opment that negated an
underwriting performance
improvement.

The insurance carrier,
which has now published its
results separate from those of
its parent, Bahamas First
Holdings, which enjoyed net

Ty

For the stories

TART aA
WA
EES



THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas First suffers $11.8m

swing on investment portfolio,

and contributes less than 50%
of parent’s 2008 profits

income of $3.465 million for
the 12 months to December
31, 2008, saw its own figures
drop from a $12.209 million
profit in 2007 to just $1.656
million.

Figures

The figures also show that
the carrier contributed just
47.8 per cent of its parent’s
net 2008 profit, Bahamas First
Holdings’ figures also includ-
ing, for example, the perfor-
mance of its various fully-
owned agencies.

Due to the vast swing in the
value of its Commonwealth
Bank holdings, Bahamas First
Insurance Company saw the
value of its unrealised invest-
ments move from an $8.959
million gain to a $2.922 mil-
lion loss in 2008, the main fac-
tor behind the substantial
drop in net income.

The insurance carrier also
saw outgoing management
fees increase from $956,699
to $2.06 million, a rise of more

than $1 million.

These developments more
than negated a 39.9 per cent
increase in net underwriting
income for the year, which
expanded from $6.106 million
in 2007 to $8.541 million in
2008.

While Bahamas First Insur-
ance Company saw a modest
$1 million decline in gross
written premiums to $103.096
million, a $3 million reversal
on movement in unearned
premiums, coupled with a $2
million increase in commis-
sions earned from reinsurers,
propelled the firm’s total
underwriting income to
$54.759 million, compared to
$51.566 million.

This more than compensat-
ed for a $1.4 million increase
in net claims incurred to
$8.592 million, compared to
$7.159 million the previous
year. Total underwriting
expenses remained relatively
flat at $46.218 million, com-
pared to $45.46 million in
2007.

CONGRATULATIONS

DANIEL AND SAMUEL JENNINGS
ON YOUR BGCSE RESULTS

DANIEL JENNINGS
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SAMUEL JENNINGS

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B

PHYSICS

TQ GOD BE THE GLORY

“YOU CAN DO ALL THINGS THROUGH CHRIST
WHO STRENGTHENS YOU"

LOVE FROM YOUR PROUD PARENTS

IAN AND JANET JENNINGS

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



Non-pertorming loans
breach $500m threshold

‘Continued strains in the credit market’, with only loan category
showing 2009 growth debt consolidation - at almost $38m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOTAL non-performing
loans made by Bahamian
banks to the private sector
breached the $500 million
mark in July 2009, a Central
Bank of the Bahamas report
has revealed, with the increas-
ing strain the recession is
placing on businesses and
households exposed by the
fact that the only consumer
lending category showing
growth is debt consolidation -
an almost-$38 million increase
since the New Year.

The Central Bank, in its lat-
est monthly economic and
financial developments report
for July, showed a combina-
tion of slumping credit
demand and defaults on exist-
ing loans, as the contracting
economy and rising unem-
ployment continue to exact a
toll, with $902.5 million com-
mercial bank loans now in
arrears.

A further $64.7 million
worth of loans fell into arrears
during July 2009, marking a
7.7 per cent increase in the
number that were past due.
Total loans in arrears, in rela-
tion to the total number of
loans outstanding, increased
by 0.8 per cent to 14.5 per
cent.

Non-performing loans,
those which are more than 90
days past due and regarded
as more critical by the com-
mercial banks, as they have
stopped accruing interest,
rose by $31.3 million or 6.7
per cent in July. Non-per-
forming loans now account
for 8.1 per cent of all loans
issued by the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system.

Meanwhile, loans in the
delinquent category - that is,
31-90 days past due, also
increased by $33.4 million in
July to $401.4 million, taking

WE

those loans to 6.5 per cent of
all credit issued to the private
sector by commercial banks.

The Central Bank said the
July arrears increase was gen-
erated by a $30 million, or 8.2
per cent, hike in mortgage
delinquencies to $396.1 mil-
lion, while commercial loans
in default grew by $28.5 mil-
lion or 14.5 per cent to $224.4
million - likely putting this
over 20 per cent, meaning
that more than one in every
five business loans is in
default.

Consumer loans in arrears
increased by$6.3 million, or
2.3 per cent, to $282 million.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank said a breakdown of
consumer lending during the
first six to seven months of
2009 “revealed continued
strains in the credit market,
as the majority of the loan
categories contracted, amid
elevated levels of arrears.

Credit card and private
vehicle lending showed year-
over-year declines of $15.8

million and $15.4 million
respectively, along with
reductions in travel and home
improvement loan growth of
$9.1 million and $5.1 million
respectively. Contractions of
less than $5 million were seen
in most other lending cate-
gories.

But the Central Bank
added: “Accretions to debt
consolidation loans - loans
which have been rewritten -
rose to $37.9 million, slightly
higher than the previous
year’s expansion.”

Not surprisingly, the Cen-
tral Bank repeated that the
outlook was bleak, with eco-
nomic recovery not anticipat-
ed until the 2010 second half.
Tourism stopover arrivals and
hotel occupancies were pro-
jected to remain weak, along
with foreign direct investment
inflows and construction.

Although public sector
works programmes were
designed to provide a “mod-
est offset” to rising unem-
ployment, the Government’s

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

NOTICE

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School and Guidance Counselling Degree
Programme in collaboration with
Kent State University
Saturday, 19th September, 2009,
Executive Boardroom,
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10:00 a.m. to 12:00) p.m.

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fiscal deficit and debt-to-GDP
ratios were still heading
south, and while reduced
import demand was aiding
the current account and for-
eign exchange reserves lev-
els, there was likely to be
some impact in the next few
months as businesses drew
down foreign currency to
replenish inventory levels.

The Government’s fiscal
deficit expanded by $139.2
million to $219 million for the
first 11 months of its 2008-
2009 fiscal year, with revenue
collections down by 6.1 per
cent year-over-year at $1.201
billion. Tax revenues were off
25.5 per cent, with taxes on
imports down 13 per cent,
stamp taxes down 22.8 per
cent, departure taxes show-
ing a 15.6 per cent decline,
and motor vehicle taxes drop-
ping 3.8 per cent.

Total spending by govern-
ment, driven by a 5.3 per cent
rise in recurrent outlays,
increased by 4.5 per cent to
$1.42 billion.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO ———OOoeaentUS INES eee
30% public building energy drop target

FROM page 1B

Mr Neymour said several
government agencies and
departments had already
moved to enhance energy effi-

ciency and consumption, cit-
ing the Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s decision to pro-
vide energy-efficient pumps
in its products.

The opportunities the

to become a renewable ener-
gy leader, and reduce its fossil
fuel consumption and associ-
ated energy costs, were graph-
ically illustrated by two exam-
ples cited in the National

Bahamas has missed to date

Energy Policy Committee’s




























































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report.

The report said: “The pro-
motion of solar water heating
systems in Barbados has been
successful due to an innova-
tive combination of circum-
stances, policy interventions,
tax incentives and awareness
raising efforts on the potential
benefits of solar water heaters
to the economy.

“The solar water heating
industry in Barbados is esti-
mated to have saved about
130,000 barrels of oil annual-
ly. Currently, about 35,000
solar water heaters are
installed in homes, commer-
cial establishments and hotels,
saving about $16 million
(assuming electricity usage at
normal rates to heat the
water) and about 65 million
kWh annually, with a ratepay-
er value of $12.5 million.”

The Bahamas, according to
the report, consumes about
26,000 barrels of imported
petroleum products per day
to meet its energy needs.

A further example was
highlighted by Germany’s
feed-in tariff system that has
“proven effective in fostering
the rapid and sustained

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growth in renewable energy
penetration in its national
energy mix”.

The National Energy Policy
Committee Report added: “In
addition to the creation of
214,000 jobs, German
achievements include, since
the start, ion 2006, the avoid-
ance of 97 million tonnes of
carbon dioxide emissions,
penetration of an 11.8 per
cent share of total gross elec-
tricity consumption from
renewable energy sources,
and creation of a 5.3 per cent
share of total primary energy
consumption from renewable
energy. These achievements
were realised at a cost of
approximately $6.50 per
household per month.”

Both examples illustrate the
difference between what is
and what could be in the
Bahamas as regards renew-
able energy, the committee’s
report stating that this nation
had “potential for diverse
renewable energy sources”,
including biomass, ocean,
solar and wind.

Embracing and expanding
the Bahamas’ involvement in
renewable energies, the

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report added, held the poten-
tial to create new employment
opportunities in industries
related “to assessing energy
usage and improving efficien-
cy” in all types of building;
production, maintenance and
sale of energy from renew-
able sources, and the expor-
tation of technology and
knowledge to other countries;
and jobs from “retrofitting
buildings and facilities with
more energy efficient tech-
nologies, cooling and heating
systems”.

The National Energy Policy
Comuittee’s report suggested
aseries of short, medium and
long-term targets for the
Bahamas to aim at. Advocat-
ing an integrated traffic man-
agement system and public
transport system, the com-
mittee urged targeting a 10-
20 per cent increase in use of
public transport by next year,
with energy efficient lighting
systems for public spaces sup-
ported by traffic management.

Other short-term goals,
which the committee suggest-
ed by achieved over a one to
five-year period, were the
phase-out of all incandescent
light bulbs and their replace-
ment by energy-efficient flu-
orescent ones by 2010.

Over the medium-term,
five to 10 years, the National
Energy Policy Committee rec-
ommended increasing renew-
able energy sources’ penetra-
tion of the Bahamas’ energy
mix to 10-20 per cent of sup-
plies.

It suggested deploying
renewable energy technolo-
gies in small Bahamian com-
munities, and producing 50
per cent of their power needs
from these sources, plus
improving fuel efficiency to
30-35 miles per gallon for 70
per cent of licensed vehicles
through the use of tax incen-
tives to encourage the impor-
tation of more fuel-efficient
cars.

The committee also urged
targeting 20-30 per cent of all
Bahamian households switch-
ing to solar water heaters
within 10 years and, from that
time on, all new water heater
installations to involve solar

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

[BUSINESS
Bahamian

firm allies
with
Caribbean
player

FROM page 1B



the scope of their projects
to countries outside the
Bahamas - mainly in the
Caribbean region.

BCQS, which is involved
with major resort projects
throughout the Caribbean,
operates offices in Barba-
dos, the British Virgin
Islands, Cayman Islands,
St. Lucia and the Truks and
Caicos.

"Both companies’ core
businesses focus in the area
of project management,
quantity surveying and
property development con-
sultancy, whilst BCQS also
undertakes development
management, appraisal and
real estate investment analy-
sis work, with strong links
to the major lending insti-
tutions throughout the
region,” said a Constrcution
Cost Engineering release.

Mr Lavin said the tie-up
will enable the Bahamian
company to offer an
improved strength of ser-
vice, and allow Construction
Cost to specialise across a
larger resource base.

Company

"We are a small company
with a good client list,” said
Mr Lavin.

Liam Day, the Cayman-
based managing director of
BCQS, said: “Over the next
several months we will
strategise with CCE and
promote our new alliance,
soas to fully inform our
mutual clientele of the
opportunities that will arise
because of our new associa-
tion”.

He added: “Both prac-
tices brought together a
combined history of 62
years of operation in the
region, and the association
mirrored the intent of our
corporate tag line ‘Local
Knowledge — Global Expe-
rience’ to the fullest extent.

“Though both firms offer
similar services, Construc-
tion Cost has been pursuing
a pan-Caribbean expansion
and contends the associa-
tion will provide that
opportunity, as well as allow
BCQS to pursue the devel-
opment of large resort pro-
jects across the wider
Bahamas.

"The ‘marriage’ is one
that both companies have
pursued for quite some
time, and the alliance gives
the association the man-
power and resources to
undertake large scale pro-
jects in the Bahamas and
the immediate region, and
provides a broader appeal
to a number of financial and
institutional clients.”

Mr Lavin said BCQS had
worked in over 20 countries
in the Caribbean/Atlantic
region, and was the largest
practice of its type in the
region. “Together with our
local knowledge of the
Bahamian market, we feel
going forward that the com-
bined property and devel-
opment advice we can offer
to our clients will be second
to none," he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



RBC
Royal Bank
_of Canada

=

ial

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5B

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
LGUs TiN Oe eee en:

(A01) Lots #17 & Fl Crown Alloe-
ments, Liane HIN Senile neeerit, Aredines
Cont tining ATwo-slorey res. Appraised

(0G) Lom #1 & 22, Bock S wlth a par
ce) cimuanerl enween Local, Block 3,
Conlaiing 4 bedroom condominaen
Sumset View Villa iy SIPeet.
Appraised vaboe: $750.00

(433) Let 427 at Village Allo
414 in ihe Eastern Dnt, Cor
Lg resid eee sited of Derren Sree
OT Parkgate Road i the Ani’ Tort
Conetiboer ew Prinidence. Prap-
erty size 2.500 soft Building size S40
sgqit. Appraised value: £50, (HH

(400) Pr ropert y Sif tated ir if

am {zr ng thereon asm all grocery
store 48) sqft. and an incomplete 4
= ahem Tse StH) sqft. App radesd

(S00) Lot #2 in block #8. Steward
Boad, Coral Heights East Subelivi
BON SID In VWeesbern Distret od
New Providence, appen. sine HHH)
ag. ft. witha split lewe! containing ten
bead, ma hath, bh Tif, dint iz & tam-
Ir noms, king hie ard ou nility room

approm, slse of b dallding 20S galt

Appr: peed Vale: $523,75

(70) Lit 420) with nesicential prep
erry located Sky ling He-kehirs.
Lporaised valve $2000)

S00) Loatof land 4.44 1Shx 15llon
Chieens Highway juz anith of Palmentn
Pol witha Twostorey stone bulking
CONTA ite TH apart, Each unit
leas 3 bead '2 12 bach, kiechen, living
pote aid) 3 Giner chose ts. Agi praised
value; 3287209

CEO) Lot #14 sineated in the senle-
ment of Lowe Hill of the [skend of
Anidins totalling 20,000 aqit Property
Gonna be sore 5 belrooen, 3
bathroom residence. Agpraised value:
$105,000

(105) Lot cortainitee 2 stony be lp
with Uhnee bed, tae arid a he
residence, and 30" «8 atuated Raikey
Town, Marth Hirnini.

Appraised valor: $255,000

CAO) Lor #18 in Sandilands Alloa-
menton the western side of Cmosewirxd
Road between Se me Lane and
Pineard Road in the Eastern District
of The Island of New Providence The
Bahamas,containing single sin

vane residence conaprising the

Ig covered ery porch, Iving

CIN ge CRITE, kel 1, airy PO,
tary POM, 2 fa, 4 bedice

2 hatha and patio. The total ares
Of land is appemamately 7,61] sapere

(702) Unceweloped kitsi 4A, bi, 17
1Zand 1$bocated Chapman Estates,
West Baye Appratsed value: $348,000)

TOL) Undeweioped bor Aldo, Sex
fan Lane Lucayvan beac Suhided-
rel Bahan, LAPSO 3q fr

i) Wale: TRA

Vacant lotas located Bleuthes mi

1 Shores, Seaside Drive Section Bi.

Bock#15, Feuthera, Bahamas. 9,621
sqft, Appraised value: £27,020

1402) Lots, Block 7 Aberdern Drive,
Bahama Weed Replat Subdivdston,
Freseart, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12, 100 sql

An praised value: S51, (MM

(800) Vacant property locaned By
ik South, Block 16 bor, Fre
Grind Bake consisti

sqft. Appraised value: £52,

(S65) Vacant Lota Aeubt sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “A
Bhork 15, Flew here Island Shores,
Alewthem. Appraised vadue: 5511 14

S05) Vacant pesichene al | ie ee
Sayin) ¢

ply Tow

Appraised value: $18,000

[L00) Vacant Single Family Lod #5
Block #5 Unat) Devonshire
Appraised value 3), MH)

(#2) Vacant Comme»rcial Lit Nix

COMM ERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

356-8568

Tel: 242-
(A00) Mrs Monique Crawlord
(800) Mr Jerome Pinder

(B02) Mr Briain Knakes

(80d) Mir Vandyke Pract

(04) Mirs. Hope Sealey

(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(806) fhlrs, Loss Hollis

(B07) Abr. Lester Cone

(A0E) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(810) Miss LaPalge Gardiner

(810) Mis. Lidia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-32 2-4426/9 or

247-502 3B)

(201) ls. Mikooks Wadkew

(202) Mir. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anva Major



hoot, Apuiraised vale: $209,425

CBO) Tao parcels of bred containing
21 020 S901. situated on le seu ler

f East Shirkey Street arnl LOO feet
vers of its pumction with “Shires” in
the Eastern District, New Providence.
Sitaated thereun isa ‘Gas Station and
Auto Repair Shop. Appraised vadue:
S744 457

(601) Lot ALT locabed Village Alloe-
ment with fourples, Aporaised value:
$500,000

CAO) Lot of and have 1g the nu mibser
Léin Hock wamber bin Section Theee
o€ the Subdivision calhed aed keen
as Sea Ieee Estates situated in the
Eastern District of Mew Proadence.
Progr fiains a three bed, by
rresklence Appralsed wali: $277

(0) Lot of bend being lot monber
Lin Weck number Mhon a plan ce
alloemendts laid out be Village Estates
Linnited and filed in the Depa cd Land
& Surveys as mimber 142 67 and
sinned inthe Easter Districe ot New
Brovidenoe, Property coe taiins (hnee
bend, (ua bath

Appraised valine: $165 000

(SEI Lot # TOLER in Canlden Canes
Estates 42 Sutidiviaion siru
South Wesaen 04 fal che land of
Peceve Prenvichesrie Ingaining a single
Storey priv fe residence 9 becom
2 bath. F Property app pis. size 100
soit Ee uilding approx sine 2.400 soft
Appraised value: $175,176

(205) Lit B- 50 Bt L157 situated
on the north side af Shell Peah Hoacl,
being the third lot west of Fire Tradl
Read and east of Hamster Road with a
one half dupes residential premises.
Appraised value THA

1) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2hath concrete stroctuce Incated Tri
ana Shores Harbour kind, Eleswther.
Property sia: A x 120" x HH) 120 Beet
Appraised values $492,735

M10) Lot #1? Madina Park, a ‘twa
subd hon cn the outekirs cf Tie ré
Cay, Abac ao Eva Tig at area of 144
Sguabe feet re se Cotati A
concrete by une with asptrale
shingle imiprises of thre bexd-

eu bathrooms, lily rum,

MT, d mung | and kitchen.

Senty situabed oan Williams

p) Aad, Mew Prowdidenice,

Bahamas containing, & taste

DHUSe and ain Aptinsent hulking

conslering af Lai agit. Ayyparalsed
Valie 3100, 0M)

uA, Block G0 Bahania Subdivision
ining 3 acres bocaoed Fore
mi Hahanma

hynpeulse t Valuc: 5750, 1H

(108) Vacant Single Fanuily Lot 9
Beek F Baharia South Subdivision
Ap prniged yale $45, 700

(S88) Vacant property| aii

= ile” ‘be

<4 (M00

564) All that posce parcel or bot of
lan eat ane inehe seni of lanes
{ non the Bland of Eeeaachera
One OF thee lands of che Coninent-
wealth ol the Halannas teeasairing
Apparee. 100M) sap. A.

Appraised value TRA

(569) All that pice be parcel or lot of
land being: Le n the tubdivi-
sin knot UMA HARBOUR
in the Island of Coeat Exuma meas
uring D000 sq.ft. Appradsed wali
S70 00M) IMI,

02) Vecant bor of lane comralining
A 114 agit, Lot és, Lowe Estate, Phase
1, 2.300 Tr. souk of Wese Bay Saree
Weetem Disoict, New Providence.
Appraised value $165,011

(202) Vacant lot of land containing
LT acre, situated eastof Kendes
Drive, approximately | 4206. soul
ward of Harrokd Road in the western

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-422-8700

(POL) Mr, James Strachan
(702) Mir Aritonio Byrn
(S01) Mls. Thera Johnsen
(2) Mis. Alicla Thompson iE

MACKEY STREET BRANCH (560) Mrs. Vanessa Scott (Li
NASSAU INT'L ALRAORT
42-5777?
(435) Mrs, Suzette Hall
LYPORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-962-45
(101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8 Tel: 242-35.
902) Wis. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH

Tel: 242-393-0497

(G01) Ms, Cherelle Miantinbarough Tel: 2
JOHN FE KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH



Tel: 242-325-4711

(401) Mrs. Heres Walkine
02) its. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-395-7505 8
(S01) Feb. Jason Sawyer
(SMS) Per. Dnwigait Bling

(205) Ms. Patrick Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH



Tel: 242-327-6077

(460) Mrs, Winifred! Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
“5170/2 -5140

Tel: 242-502

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank. lu Ul cll Se

er i Roya

(366) All thar plese of land being Pa-
oe) 4S and anee!| 4 sinnated on the
Saath side al Prince Charles Detve,
Mea Providence, Baharia contain
mineral buakling hoasinge
1p space on the ground floor
three shop space on the second
Boor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 200 sq ft.
Appraised valu: $4140

(S69) All that piece, parcel of band
having an approsimate area of 2 14K)
sqit situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft Morth of
Peter Sireet and abot 115 ft south of
Laird Streca in the Souther (Nebrict of
New Providence, Rahnnmes contaln-
ing a cx ad hulking hosing
a two bed ome bath unit on thre top
for and a store on the fire: fhe
Appraised value: $154 000

(ee All IAT piece, Parcel oF lol of
Sor Fired [ in
1 ‘wenue lus

ining a du-
ny cf beets -

idence
ples api
2hedm
Appraizs ec value $175,000

(200) All that parcel orlotofland bein
Lots #10 and 11 in Mock 24 of i
nut Gerove Subdivision, fal ning fi
ehvoph ping ma, The lot ba tr um

sr 5M, (ee

i S50) I aot of laa 8? Sea View Substi-
and, 5 ar
Proper siding size
258 sy ft oon 5 =e neem, 2
bath, living roomy, aneat-in kite hen.
om, lauredry Pom, Ge
Landac
water tank, ADD Tabsed value 5451 OHH

black 21 Tianna Shores
Insel 2 bach front penne,
mM, & kitchen, Concrete

i fs IL praperty S600 sqft
ian eel value: 2440045

aL) Lor" kK" Barrack Sireet, Harber
Blan conmlaining a2 ore crete
building with 4 bed 4 bath a nirig
room & kitchen -Euilding 2954.55
soft property 8565 sq

Appraised value: $479 228

1) Properteooncaining Condo “Mil
Unat A= 101, building 57,
TMS, 3 harhinacnes,

Th Ginnie Poco, Line ec hese
& pw ithe . Situated t in the area knee
63 Hirsi’ Hay Hescwr, Biieini, Hetarveas.
Appraised vahae - $485,011

O08) Single Story tri-ples buikding,

district of New Providence, Bahari
Appoilsed value: % 1700

(SNS) Vaccine Papert Ons 1BOF
Lot 724 sinned in the Free-

pont Rklpe Subdivision, Secchin 4]
Freeport, Grand A A, Paap,
An praised value: TRA

(S05) Ten (10) acres of lane situated
an Woods Cay, know nas Little Abaca
between Cooper's Town and
Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas The prog

| erty isundeveoped with aview af the
sta fram both the North amd Sauch
Slice, Appar eae dd vahic: $1,078,754

(569) All char pleoe parce! or log at
lend I 4 S77. FAiewond Cancers

rl ert) Desire, Sew
Previdence Appraiied value; 365,000

(0) All that piece parvel Ob

land on the Island of Great Exum
situated about 10 1/2 miles North-
westward! y of George Town which said
piece parcel or bot of lard is #107)
Bahama Sound CLA.E. 11,2000 soft
Agile value: Sets, (MHI

[008}

de signa f : a

as bal IVES 1h Caled or Eee
1a. High barbed #4 LL22341

sgt. Appraised vz flue: S37,0

(201) Single family residential Lot No,
10705 Bahama Sound Subd. Surber
11) Weest, Great Eau. See: apne
10MM sq ft. Appraised valor S15 (000

OFFICERS













‘901 } rs Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
2-568-207 |
400) Ms. Cypriannia Williams
ALAS PAB U, ABACD

Tel: 2



VACANT PROPERTIES

) Ms. Quincy Fisher

7) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

3) Ms Deidre King

Mrs. Fave Hipp

Ms. Marguerite Jahns
5) Mes. Catherine Davis

Hl) or 242-362-4087

One 2 beaten ard mac | beeen
Ioana nend iy ¢ Amy Lat Mot
, section |, Ba-
Caumbre Chub
di Bahama.
GGL say ft

heama Heel Yi T
Sululivision, F
Property 5

06) Low 52 Crown Allotnsernts
located Munphy Teen, Abaco with
see being [O20 sy ft Containing a
one storey house with 4 bed? bath
ack Siructure
Apparel Tale. SAL O0D

(569) All that plese parcel or lone of
land being Lotta inthe residentially
none aren od Highbury Fark Sebel -
vision inihe Eassern Disiricrat Wew
Providence, Bahamas. Apprax, Land
Site FM sq 7. Property contains &
5-bedricen2~feet hires becca, sea
bemp 1.565 sq. It Aporeised Value
$15) ,000

(S08) Loti 2) Jocabed in the Subdivi
sion. of Spring City Abaco with size
being 8405 sq ft. Containing aoe
snorey worden sinactine hoarse with
3 hed !1 bath of 15 aq i
Apyparaisid vali, S000

(204) Single stooey (riples, situated on
Lor és. Mernkakl Rowlevard, Gold-
en Gates #2 in the Wester Disiriet,
Mew Prov ache oe, Tae Iwo bedroom,
ooe-bathroomn units an one one-
bedroom, ome-baihroom unit. TI

cenit suring 9,082 sq ft
the living area m Iring, 2,742 say ft.
Ayyoradeed waluee S474, 152

(201) Duplex Lot @25 situated on

Faith Awe. North (Claridge Estates
size being 7 git with duplex

thereon. Appraised inti = THA

Cla) All thar piece parcel of lot of anid
ated limp 1 thereon knot

Ac him: | Dhow.

F TeePOET C Grand
ite Mi Apo |
property contains . duplex dwelling.
Appramsed value $5000 0000

fA) Six condcninium units and

fe parcels of vacunt Lend situated

at Regattas of Abaco. Marsh Harbour,

Bahamas. The single multi fmedly resi

dential condominiam, timeshare de

selopment is situated an 4 426acres

d. The pocaiaeaLtas consist

4, 2 harhincms and the

Alennities on Ce Pinca nty tine ‘luces aA
“fl Te

(S68) Loted lind situated an Fire Trail

(201) Multifamily Lot No, 10 Souch-
cast Comer of Mandarin Drive, Supar
Ay iple Koad Sans Soucl Sindy, See
14,353 qf. Appeaised ale $165, 000

(201) Siyebe family pesicbererial Lint Pe,

1) 658 Lire Serine Se ibd “iuiteer
1] West, &

10.428 ag ft Appraised value: 1 000

All that piece parcel of lot of
land being Lat #1 located in Hock 3
inthe Subdivision knw as Eastern
Estates situate in the Fastern District
of theisiand of New Providenoe. Prop
enry appons. BAS sq, 1, Appamalsicd
vali $40,100

What piece parcel or lon al

fed on baripold Road in he
iknowT as Kool Acres, Lal

is appre. 055 sy. fl

Appraised value

(G4) All chat piece parcel of Ine of

land being Lot #152 located in the
Subdivision loan as Vest Hicdpe
land Park situaoed in che Scuchern
Lestat M the Gland of Mew Prov.
ce, Pre nperty fi yprON, HOE capt

Valiie $55,1MM)

(O08) Anundeveloped waterfront bot
land being Lat #120? wilh adie al
106M) 29 81. in the Bahama Sound of
Exuma Subdivision # 1) West
Exuma, Bahamas. Appraises

34, UM)



Allon 041 Maar Provichenioe, Pah arnieis
cm TAIN DOW TOLSe apart eT LTT
ated neo proposed units (ooniple ted
at is). Appraised yabue $297,714

(201) Lot # l4hh7 Bahama Sound
Exuma is located about 1 mikes
morthnes! of Georpe Town Exina
fined ahi | nike sauh of Eneralsd
Ba, The Four Sedans Resor and
Rokers Poing. Wis kecated near the
cer lemments at ME Thoms u au
Farneer’s Hill The proper

LOL) saya feet ir

frontage on the Queens | lighway; the
main road The peuperty isdeveloped
with a partially compkted apartment
consplex containing five, | bedroon
units, 4 cficieney units and | shop
thant, Appmilemt value S4HH, 241)
(300) All that péece parcel of land
or premises being bot ¢ 659 on the
nonhwestem side of Malawi Shrers im
Blienberch Estates East Phase? inne
GT CONEriTerry on The island
Om Mer Providence ‘the Siae af the
lated 5 5,085 f
sink in
bextra

reside

Appraised value $9487)

G0) Lott 549 Gladken Posie St-
fledon Gardens cont

Single amily residence

eMiaency rental until Ansa is panied
for single and enulti family residences
Lot size is GX 120° (96000 sq Ft} en-
Closed car port and perimeter wall
surrounding property. Appraised
value S825, 767

(65) All thar Sourhversstern Mnviety
of Halt Pant oa Lor of Land being
fant ofa Tract of Land mow or 6 ar

feet Sourhesst of Kern F
Ei astern Diatric t of hve Is

Wika ning a disp rg en
a S06 Appraised $61 000.

(38) Lot # & Mock & sitaate on
Rosedale St in the Carey's Sabdivi
sion coating a fear Eesdr ;
bath reste Building « E
§q ft. Propenty shor apprnon 4,511 sq
ht, Appraised Value TRA

(S64) Lot # Aland Boon Mortem side
. emeseari welt basil -
wi for A Warchioise

(56) All that pier

lated situate om

ers Moai and 2783.50 ft South
michael Aud. being: Lot ¢ Soe cleh a
Triples Property sce 20" x LOM (SINK)
sqft) Appraised Value THA

anially developed parcel of

10, 1HM0 90) ft situcibe aboat

1 Sort oF (The Forres Estar

in th ¢ vicinity of the sectlensents af

j and The Forest bering Lat

hi ond her 4800: in Hohamea Sound of

Fuuna6, Eainia. Rabe
valoe $25,000

cit. - A Moy bea

(24) Vacant lend ad Love Beach
Westen District of New Providence
comprising aportion of" LoweEstate”
containing | acre. Appraised value
S03, (MM)

(AM Lote 2 vacane land S0,0005q
ft located Chapman Estates Sashdi-
Von on West Ray Soren with open
zoning. Appraised valiee S600 000.

(AM) Singletimulli family residen-
lial Yacanl lot being a portion of kar
O77 situated on the Southern side al
Fire Trail Fioax) in the Western Dis-
irictofNew Providence. Property sine
110L00M) sipft

Appraised value 23H) (HH

S01) Vecut bot singh: fannily son
Ing, Looe 21 atehe cist livieinay alle it
Somnhie mn hones Camear in Subd hlslon

ce 155] the alker
5 S/F af lanel apaoe,
Agp mised value 325,000



Tel: 242-367-2420

(08) Mr. Toure Holder

(08) Mrs, Sylvia Poitier

(10) Miss Cyprianna Williarnes
BIMINI BRANCH
bel2d2-347-4081

5) Miss. Ganiatu Timubu
GRAYS, LONG ISLAND

Ted: 242-337 0101

Peles



(100) Mrs, Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

bed: 242-346-325]

(008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH





FHS 2

(101-F) M& Garnell Frith
17) Mis. Elaine Collie
Mire. Danita Newbold-Carnwright
(108) Ms. Svlvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tek 242-353-4131 or

242-435-4145
(50) Mer. Walter Carey

RBC Royal
CULO cr



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Spending and unemployment rise
Analysts are trying io peedsct which way thre nation’s eoonocmy will qo
meanwhile oonsuenber spending acoounts for more than FO percent of
the gross Gomesiic product and unemployment continues to rise.
Consumer ope recon as = [Percentage | of GOP

- Semen Qu arterthy seasonally adjuste
0 —period —- oes

astonait fll

Unemployment rate, mo
12 r oa reteset tremens es FAL,

SF He





The National Insurance Boart
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas



Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project 1s
a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in
compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in
good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00
Noon on September 15, 2009.



REQUEST FOR TENDERS FOR 4
HEAVY EQUIPMENTS

‘The Corporation i requesting sealed Tenders for the sale of pwn
beavy equipavent, a Diesel Dreven Excavator and a Diesel Driven
Backhoe. The eqampments are located at WSC's Compound
j Building & Ministry of Works, [FR Drive. The sales will be om a
where is, az is" basis. The Comporation reserves the right to

reyeet any andor all Tenders,

All Teadees aeust he submitted of or before Preday September Ll,
200) at 0 PM to che Office of the Cremeral Manager at Ne. 87
Thompsus Boulevanl, New Providence, Bahamas in a sealed
envelope marked “Tender for Heavy Equipment”

Figure 1 DIESEL ORWEM EXCAWATOR

EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION: Diesel Driven Excavatar
EQUIPMENT NUMBER: Wit 1072
MANUFACTURER: Caterpillar

MODEL NUMBER: Cat 2258

SERIAL NUMBER: raw s277

DATE PURCHSED: TT a87

RUNNING HOURS: 0M?

EQUIPMENT FEATURES:
12V Direct Starti48"1204H 6V Batteries!19 AMP ALTERNATORICAT 3208 ENGI135 HP @
2000RPMIS36CULIN DISPL VBiFuel-65 GAL HYD SÂ¥S152/ 24" Bucket StickiL-f" MAX D21"I"
H191f Seater.
EQUIPMENT GENERAL CONDITION:
Good
EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION: DIESEL DRIVEN BACKHOE
EQUIPMENT NUMBER: We 1025
MANUFACTURER: FORD
MODEL NUMER: FORD 750
i SERIAL NUMER: 2x10325-0100359
_ DATE PURCHASED: 41111994

EQUIPMENT FEATURES:

ui TEV Systom/S1/HP 2 2100 RPM 4CÂ¥L In-Line ese! 256 CU IN

Figwee 2 DNESEL Ohne BACKHOE ~ (OVSPL TRAN 3°3 POW SHFT FUELIL-26', We?", He 12".

EQUIPMENT GENERAL CONDITION: Fair



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7B

Queen’s College

deat Centre for Further Education

P.O. Bow Nefd2?, Nascau, Bahamas
Tek (242) 303-1008 2E06, Fax; (42) 9-348

SAT saturday Classes at QC

Â¥ Planning for college?

Â¥ Oo you want to earn extra credits before entering college 7
Do you want to reduce college cost?

* Do you want to qualify for scholarships?

Grade 10, 11 & 12 students, give yourself the best advantage
by preparing for the PSAT and 8.AT exam with qualified

instructors at Queen's College
PSAT Classes WP

com fenfernn| some fae] se

BAT Lor S395 [Sept 19, 2 | aturday,
Crake 1) & 9200» L200 po
Crmae | 2

whudorita

Current Grade 10 students from all Current Grade 11 & 12 students from

achools are invited te attend. a
wll schools are inviled to abbend,

VPay $120-first payment Sept, 12th, 2009 | YPay $200-first payment Sept.19th, 20409
VPay balance $90 on Oet. 03, 2009 VPav balance $195 on Oet. 10th , 2009

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following position:

BODY GUARD

The incumbent serves as Executive Bodyguard for the Chief of Mission, to protect the
Chief of Mission (COM) port-to-portal from the threat of terronsm or other acts of
violence, While with the COM, the bodyguard will take extraordinary andor special
security precautions to insure the personal safety of the COM. The bodyguard will assist
in the selection of safe routes and remain alert for danger of the COM.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of secondary school. Royal Bahamas Police Force College or
Royal Bahamas Defense Force Training 13 required.

Ten (10) years of experience in Police, Defense Force law enforcement, or
specialized security is required.

Must be familiar with the city of Nassau, Freeport and the Out Islands in the
Bahamas, Must also have knowledge of historical and current events that
could affect the secunty of the protects,

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have the ability to be trained in the use of various firearms. .

Must be flexible and able to adjust to rapid and unexpected schedule changes.
Must be able to work independently with minimum supervision and have
good problem solving skills

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package including
performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life msurance, pension
and opportunities for traming and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for employment
under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy's website nassau.usembassy.gov. under
Key Embassy Links and employment opportunities, Completed applications should be

returned to the Embassy via email to femandermaistate. pow and poitjerra/aistate. pov or

faxed to (242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
September 17" , 2009.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Gap between rich and

FROM page 1B

chairman and a former minis-
ter of state for finance, said
the tourism industry, the
Bahamas’ “major engine of
growth”, was unlikely to “go
back to pre-recession levels”
for quite some time which, in
turn, would have negative
implications for prolonged
unemployment levels in the
Bahamas.

He warned that Bahamas-
based hotel properties were
unlikely to need workforces
of pre-fall 2008 levels due to

increased productivity levels
among staff who had retained
their jobs, and also the fact
that much hotel room inven-
tory remained off-line. As a
result, economic recovery in
the Bahamas, much like in the
US, could be relatively ‘job-
less’, as resorts such as
Atlantis, for example, are
unlikely to re-hire the 800
people they laid-off even if
business levels make a full
recovery.

With Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP)
unlikely to recover to pre-

2008 levels in the short-term,
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness that this nation would
likely “have to suffer high
unemployment rates” for the
next four to five years.

“Tt’s going to take a struc-
tural change in the economy”
to reduce that more rapidly,”
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness, arguing that the
Bahamas needed to “go back
to the drawing board” on its
economic planning in the
medium term and see what
changes could be made.

“There’s a growing gap

between the rich and the
poor, because wealthy people
are still working and taking
advantage of opportunities,”
Mr Smith said. “I can see a
lot of changes taking place
going forward, and not for the
better. The distribution of
income will be more skewed
to the wealthy, and this may
have implications for crime.
“You do not have resources
to give to law enforcement at
a time when they are needed,
because government revenues
are down, and more people
will put more resources into

private security.

“Tm not by nature a pes-
simist, but I can see the next
few years being a challenge
for the Bahamas unless
unforeseen events occur, like
the discovery of oil offshore.”

Bahamian unemployment,
with the national average rate
standing at 14.2 per cent, was
likely to go “a little more”
higher next year, and then
only come down to around 9-
10 per cent, the former
finance minister predicted.

“We’ve got some painful
days ahead of us,” Mr Smith

added of the Bahamian econ-
omy’s recession and unem-
ployment woes. “It’s becom-
ing structural in nature.”
While praising the Govern-
ment for initiating worker re-
training efforts through the
National Training Pro-
gramme, he expressed con-
cerns that those targeted by
the initiative were being re-
trained for areas likely to suf-
fer further lay-offs.

Mr Smith’s analysis was
backed by Anwer Sunderji,

SEE next page

FAMILY ISLAND DISTRICTS
SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer
Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements

for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in
their respective district.

MINISTRY OF HOUSING

ARDASTRA ESTATES - ROAD CONSTRUCTION

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of Housing invites
Qualified contractors to submit tenders for the completion of the road construction in the
Ardastra Estates Subdivesion on the island of New Providence in accordance with the design and
specifications approved by the Ministry of Works and Transport

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the Invitation to Tender from

The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Claughton House
Shirley and Charlotte Sts.
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. = 242-322-9005) 6006

For a non-fetundable fee of $100. The method of payment may be cash or a certified cheque made
payable to the “Ministry of Housing *. The documents will be ready for collection beginning Monday
31", August, 2009 and ending Wednesday 9” September, 2009 between the hours of 9:30 am to 4:30
pm, An information meeting will be held on Wednesday 9” September, 2009 in the conference room at
the Ministry of Housing, Claughton Howse.

Tenders are to be subenitted in a sealed envelope marked a3 indicated im the Tender document to

The Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3" Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Bullding
West Bay St.
Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 10:00 am on Tuesday 1" September. Tenders will be publically opened at 10:01 am on
Tuesday 15" September, 2009 in the conference room at the Tenders Board Meeting at the Ministry of
Finance, 3” Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay St, Nassau, Bahamas. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



roe AT EL

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POSITION WANTED

A private island retreat requires the year round services of a General Manager Couple.
This unique position will require a couple who is comfortable in an environment
where living and working together in isolation creates an energy to help us maintain
our properties to exceptional standards and allows us to deliver exceptional service
to our private guests. The General Manager Couple works closely in collaboration
with the owners and the owner’s representatives to further the mission. The General
Manager Couple is responsible for all aspects of the daily operations and must have
the following requirements:

Experience for one or both members of the team in carpentry, painting, minor
renovation and construction projects, and has a good mechanical aptitude as our
location often requires us to repair and refurbish appliances and equipment in
house.

Oversight of scheduling of island projects and construction, with an emphasis on
the construction.

Must be able to read blueprints and establish with the construction team deadlines
for each phase of the project in progress.

Must have a working knowledge of generators and water desalination systems.
Must know how to maintain and make repairs on both systems.

Marine experience for one or both members of the team with one person in the
team having knowledge of general and preventative maintenance for small fleet of
vessels,

One person in the team processing a captain’s license for a 50 ton vessel or more.
Must be certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors.

Must have a background in hospitality and is familiar with five star hotel

housekeeping standards, fine dining restaurant service methods, and is a competent

cook.

Must be able to create a gourmet menu and compile and order the inventory
necessary to complete that menu.

Furthering a unique business model and mission with the goal of long-term
sustainability. Knowledge of environmentally friendly systems and putting those
systems into place.

Setting goals, communicating these goals to the entire team and coordinating the
work necessary to accomplish them.

Creating and maintaining improvements on all systems and procedures.
Determining budgets and setting & achieving financial goals.

Oversight of ordering and maintaining inventory levels within guidelines.
Oversight of the overall appearance and presentation of the island with particular

emphases on, quality control, safety, health and sanitation regulations and proper

functioning of all equipment.

Familiar with the immigration and labor laws of the Bahamas.

Must have excellent hospitality and communications skills, team players,
self-motivated, professional appearance and manner, dependable and able to work
flexible hours.

Minimum Qualifications

+ years experience at 5* luxury resort or hotel

5+ years experience in a supervisory or management role
Candidate must be proficient in Microsoft Excel, Word, QuickBooks payrolls,
accounting and inventory.
Candidate with experience in Data Pro Inventory System and RNS (Rental
Network Systems) rental program is a plus.

Please fax cover letter, resume, references and police records to 242.328.8008.







THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9B



poor to wide

Fidelity Bank & Trust Inter-
national’s chairman and chief
executive, who told Tribune
Business: “There’s no doubt
the next five years are going
to be very different from the
last five years, and indeed the
last 10 years of prosperity.”

Mr Sunderji said this was
chiefly because the US con-
sumer, who drove three-quar-
ters of US GDP and 20 per
cent of global economic
growth, based on the US
being responsible for 30 per
cent of global economic
growth, was “simply shopped
out and borrowed out”.

Evidence for this came
from the fact that the US con-
sumer savings rate had
jumped to 7 per cent, mean-
ing Americans were saving
$0.07 out of every $1 they
earned, compared to a nega-
tive -2 per cent savings rate
in recent years. The latter
meant that US consumers
were effectively gorging on
cheaper credit, spending more
than they were earning.

Mr Sunderji said these fig-
ures showed a 7-10 per cent
swing in the US consumer
savings rate, and with Amer-
icans deleveraging and cut-
ting spending at a rapid rate,
they were no longer in a posi-
tion to drive global growth.

On the implications for the
Bahamas, Mr Sunderji said
there would be no economic
recovery here until the US
unemployment rate - expect-
ed to peak at 10.5 per cent in
Spring/Summer next year -
came down and robust eco-
nomic growth restarted.

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0.63 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank
10.18

Securit y
1.20 Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
6.25 Bank of Bahamas

Cable Bahamas
2.74 Colina Holdings

“The prospect of a jobless
recovery is a very real threat,
and we are likely to see the
economic situation deterio-
rate through to 2010,” Mr
Sunderji warned.

“Whether it’s government
or the private sector, they
need to be re-tooling their
businesses and their compa-
nies so that they can deal with
the new normal, which is low-
er demand for an extended
period of time.”

Context

In the Bahamian context,
Mr Sunderji urged: “There is
no option. We have to
address the structural issues.
The cost structure is out of
line with revenue. We will see
a prolonged reduction in the
top line. It’s not a short-term
issue. It’s longer term. It
depends on US recovery, and
that’s going to be problemat-
ic and anemic.

“We should not expect the
Bahamian economy to come
back strongly, unlike the
recessions we have had
before. We need to address
the structural issues caused
by a lower top line.”

He added: “Bahamian busi-
nesses will be faced with
declining sales revenues, costs
not in line with sales, and
reduced profitability and cash
flow. To remain in business
they will have to adjust some-
thing to ensure they remain
profitable and have a sustain-
able business model.

“Any time you restructure
a business, you have to con-

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front some big issues.
Restructuring requires hard
choices. A lot depends on
how well capitalised Bahami-
an businesses were to start
with, and most small busi-
nesses have challenges
because they are not as well-
capitalised and are much
more vulnerable to a drop in
business. Small businesses are
more likely to struggle than
larger businesses, because
larger businesses have scale.”

Describing what was hap-
pening as “a permanent shift”
taking place, the Fidelity head
said: “I think the Bahamian
economy faces some very
strong headwinds, and to deal
with these issues we all need
to be reviewing our business
models. That needs to be
done sooner rather than later.

“There’s no doubt we’re
going to have pressure on
productivity, that needs to be
improved; costs, they need to
be lower; and the Bahamas is
an expensive place to do busi-
ness in.”

Mr Sunderji added that he
did not think Bahamian busi-
nesses could “postpone for
too long” the decision on
whether to confront these
issues. “The silver lining is
becoming more efficient and
more competitive. We will
restructure our businesses so
that when the economy recov-



ers, we will be in much better
shape,” he said.

Brian Moree, attorney and
senior partner at McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes, said that
while some economic indica-
tors were showing tentative
signs that a recovery may be
underway, and it was possi-
ble the Bahamas may have
reached or passed the bottom,
it may be 18-24 months before
recovery began in earnest.

“My concern is that it could
be a jobless recovery, here
and elsewhere,” he explained.
“We may see the indicators
and the economy recovery,
but some of the jobs may
have been permanently lost.
Some lines of business may
never recover to the same
extent we had them before,
so they may never get back
to the levels they were at
before the global recession.

“There have been some
permanent changes. The par-
adigm has shifted in certain
areas, and economic recovery
does not mean we will be in
the same place as before the
decline occurred.

“We are going to have to
show we can cross-train peo-
ple, and some people may
find they have to re-tool their
skills and seek employment
in alternative areas..... We
have to demonstrate an abili-
ty to embrace change.”

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ROYAL FIDELITY

Monoy at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,531.48] CHG -22.77| %CHG -1.47 | YTD -180.88 | YTD % -10.56
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.20
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.75
2.74

5.50 Commonwealth Bank (81) 5.95
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.70

1.32 Doctor's Hospital

6.60 Famguard
9.72 Finco

10.30
4.95 Focol (S)

FirstCaribbean Bank

2.03
6.60
9.72
10.30
5.12

1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00

0.30 Freeport Concrete

5.49 ICD Utilities
10.09 J. S. Johnson
10.00

Premier Real Estate

0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.20 0.00
11.00 0.00
6.25 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00
10.75 0.00
2.74 0.00
5.50 -0.45
3.69 -0.01
2.03 0.00
6.60 0.00
9.72 0.00
10.30 0.00
5.12 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.09 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $

ce] deer sme)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cro 1L CoN TAL

Div$ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180 55.6

aN
or
NAD

Nassau Airport
Deveslopment Company

Pest Exterminating Services

Nassau Airpart Development Company (NAD) imites
landers for provision of pest exterminating services
al Lynden Finding Intemaficnal Airport

Mandatory qualifications:

‘Proponents mus be 100% Bahamian-caned &
operated

ual have a current business license

4Â¥iusl demonstrate the atility ta (fil the requirements
setaul in NAD's ofical Request for Proposal

hal be comm ibead bo providing axoallend serine

RFP documents wil be awailable for pick up at NAD's
Sofaoralé offices in the Domesiciensional Terminal sl
Lynden Finding Intemational Airpad between the hours: al
10:00am - 4:00pm, tom September Tth, 2009 ta
September 11, 2008

Deadine for proposal submissions is September 28th,
2009 al 3:00pm

Contact: VANDETTA MOORSHEAD
Supervisor, Contracts Adminstration
Pic (242) POG 1000) Fa: aa) aT
PO. Boe APS) Massey, Bahcenas

LTS eg
Me IR) Perey a BEE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01038

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b YELLOW

Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31,59 29,00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4005 3.48 5.15
CFAL MS! Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 4.16
CFAL Money Market Fund 14867 3.70 5.40
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.0484 3.41 5.84
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0663 2.59 6.63
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0215 -1.11 2.15
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0611 2.29 6.11
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ases)

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Yield
0.00%

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000

0.001

Div$ PIE
0.000 ~=N/M
0.480 NM
0.000 256.6

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or

a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in

the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in

the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a

statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit

to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a

statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 will

operate as a bar to such claim.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

52wk-Low
1.3320
2.8952
1.4105

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
28-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins
Hill), Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

Dated this 31st day of August, A.D. 2009

HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers
Equity House
Mt. Royal Avenue North
(Hawkins Hill)
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner







PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Governments delay
critical NIB reforms

FROM page 1B

Kenwood Kerr, chief exec-
utive of Providence Advisors,
said that the reforms urged in
the NIB’s eighth actuarial
report were similar to what
he and CFAL president,
Anthony Ferguson, had urged
back in a paper they wrote in
1993-1994.

Yet it appears that only
now is the Government act-
ing, Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, telling Tribune Busi-
ness in an exclusive interview
last week that some 25

amendments to the social
security programme’s gov-
erning Act and regulations
were being completed, with a
view to tabling them in Par-
liament by year-end.

Mr Kerr told Tribune Busi-
ness: “To be quite frank with
you, the sentiments, the con-
clusions being drawn in the
[eighth actuarial report] are
not a surprise to me.

“As far back as 1993-1994, I
co-authored a paper with
Anthony Ferguson that called
for all the things the actuarial
report is calling for. The single
most important issue back in

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Applications are available from:

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send enmialls to: swisdomdecob ed us

Application Deadline: 16th October, 2009,



1993-1994, as it is today, was
the long-term growth and sus-
tainability of the fund. The
liquidity to meet its obliga-
tions is critical. That, unfor-
tunately, 15-16 years later, is
the issue - the sustainability
of the Fund to meet its oblig-
ations.”

Mr Ferguson, meanwhile,
told Tribune Business: “The
report made recommenda-
tions the industry has been
stating since 1994. We’re hap-
py to see they’re looking at
addressing it, but it’s a bit late,
and because it’s late it’s going
to cost employers and
employees more to meet their
needs.

“The Government needs to
act expeditiously, not only to
implement those, but they
need to reconsider some of
the investment aspects of the
fund. You can have all the
money with custodians, but if
they’re not meeting the actu-
ary’s targeted investment rate,
NIB will not be making
enough money to cover
costs.”

Mr Cargill last week con-
firmed that NIB had termi-
nated investment manage-
ment contracts with CFAL,
Providence Advisors and
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust, which had been giv-
en a mandate to manage and
invest up to $20 million of its

assets.

The decision was taken on
the grounds that NIB would
reduce costs by having its
assets managed in-house by
its own recently-hired Certi-
fied Financial Analyst (CFA),
but many believe this flies in
the face of recommendations
for the Fund to diversify its
investments, place a greater
proportion with qualified
investment advisors, and
invest more overseas.

Meanwhile, Mr Kerr point-
ed to NIB’s “under invest-
ment”, and added: “NIB has a
role to play in the develop-
ment of capital markets local-
ly, and I don’t think that’s
been sufficiently exploited by
the Fund.”

Recalling the recommen-
dations he and Mr Ferguson
made in 1993-1994, Mr Kerr
said they included ”curtailing
using NIB as a hiring tool,
strengthening collections so
the benefits paid out are less
than the monies they are col-
lecting, to implement a pru-
dent investment programme”.

The duo, he added, also
urged the Government to
increase NIB’s contribution
rate and invest its assets glob-
ally through qualified, expe-
rienced money managers.

“Underlying all that was
the need to educate the pop-
ulation on savings and invest-

ments, and for NIB pensions
to be seen as an option rather
than see them as a replace-
ment for retirement income,”
Mr Kerr said. “It [an NIB
pension] should be used as a
supplement for retirement
income.

“We have no pensions and
minimal savings, and that cre-
ates more of a burden and
drain on NIB.”

Without the Government
making all the necessary
reforms, Mr Kerr said there
was a danger that the Fund
would become insolvent.

“The social implications of
that would be enormous,” he
said. “People who have been
contributing have been left
without it, in the absence of
private savings and private
pensions. They would have
nothing to rely on, and with
the changing demographics
the effects will be significant.”

Mr Cargill last week said
that among the approved
amendments which will be
included in the legislation and
regulation changes to be pre-
sented to Parliament will be
an increase in NIB’s insurable
wage ceiling from the current
$400 to $600 per week, with
future annual increased linked
to inflation via the retail price
index.

Other approved changes,
said Mr Cargill, were an

increase in the 150 weeks or
three years’ worth of NIB
contributions to qualify for a
lifetime pension to 500 weeks
or 10 years, plus an increase in
the wage ceiling for pension-
able civil servants that is cur-
rently frozen at $110 per
week.

Mr Cargill added: “What’s
important is that we’ve start-
ed to address some of the
issues identified in the report
- operational efficiency, col-
lection efficiency. This year,
we’re achieving contribution
revenues above expectations
and above last year, because
we’ve been a little more
assertive to ensure people pay
contributions on time.

“We are focusing on the
recommendations to ensure
the Fund remains strong and
sound. If we don’t make any
changes by 2025, we will have
challenges. We want to make
changes as quickly as possi-
ble to make the Fund strong
and sound.”

NIB’s reserve fund, cur-
rently standing at $1.415 bil-
lion, was projected to be
depleted some time between
2029 and 2035 if urgent
reforms to the social security
programme were not enact-
ed. The NIB Fund’s outgo-
ings projected to exceed
income by $7.868 billion over
the next 60 years.

Legal Notice

UCKFIELD LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ZENNOR VILLAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ORMSKIR VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ZUCCHINI INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., PRO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LT LO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

WINTER THORPE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NIPSON GREEN INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., PRO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ROLLIN STONES COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

STOKOE PLAINES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

Government assesses

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 11B

Film Studios principal

FROM page 1B

the 3,500-acre former US Air
Force Missile Base to the
development was the only
interest the Government has
in the project, apart from oth-
er logistical items.

"We have been for the last
couple of months seeking to
conclude a new Heads of
Agreement with the owner of
the studio,” said Mr Davis.

"That process has not been
as swift as we would have
liked, but we are still in that
process of trying to review a
draft Heads of Agreement."

When Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham re-took
office, he felt the Christie
administration had allowed
the Bahamas Film Studios to
lease too much Crown Land,

having obtained 3,500 acres
at the former US Air Force
Missile Base site in Grand
Bahama.

The Government had
looked to restrict that to 120
acres, covering the water tank
and existing buildings, and
these talks with Mr Fuller
have been going on for more
than a year.

Mr Davis said the Govern-
ment had been vetting Mr
Fuller to establish whether it
wanted to do business with
him, the investment banker
having take ownership and
control at the Bahamas Film
Studios after two of its three
founding partners died. The
third, Paul Quigley, has also
since passed away.

Mr Davis said: "We want
to see if he [Mr Fuller] is the
proper person with which the

Government should be doing
business.

"He came into ownership
by default after the original
owners died. He loaned them
some money and was holding
their assests at Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises [the Film
Studios’ immediate holding
company]."

Investment

Mr Fuller recently told Tri-
bune Business that a $17 mil-
lion investment will be lost as
a result of his decision to close
the project, a move he blamed
on the Government’s alleged
“failure to honour its obliga-
tions” in delivering a new
lease and Heads of Agree-
ment to him.

Amid calls for the Govern-
ment to take “remedial”

Film Studios remained oper-
ational, given the impact the
closure was likely to have on
this nation’s attractiveness as
a filming locale for the global
TV/film industry, many
observers were suspicious that
Mr Fuller was using the ‘clo-
sure’ threat as a negotiating
ploy in an effort to secure or
better a deal with the Ingra-
ham administration.

When Tribune Business put
this to Mr Fuller, that he was
making this announcement as
a tactic to push the Govern-
ment into an agreement, he
answered cryptically in an e-
mail: “You can’t push string.”

When asked to detail the
obligations the Government
had allegedly failed to live up
to, Mr Fuller replied: “Never
delivering a new lease and
Heads of Agreement. Failure

ronmental study, which pre-
cluded us from moving for-
ward.”

Straw

As for the ‘final straw’ that
pushed him to shut down the
Bahamas Film Studios, Mr
Fuller said: “My 50th call to
the Prime Minister’s Office
inquiring if they had the
paperwork that they kept
promising on each of the oth-
er 49 calls.” He declined to
comment when asked by Tri-
bune Business about whether
he would initiate legal action
against the Bahamian gov-



ernment.

Mr Fuller added that some
$17 million had been invested
in the Bahamas Film Studios
project, “which will all be lost
subject to any recovery
efforts”.

As for the closure’s impact
on Grand Bahama and the
wider Bahamas, he said:
“There will never be a film
studio in Grand Bahama.
They will lose about $10 mil-
lion per year in general spend-
ing in the economy, thousands
of room nights in hotels.
Grand Bahama will never be
taken seriously as a site to
film movies.”




NOTICE




DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED




action to ensure the Bahamas to approve the original envi-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS
YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
31st day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our erefstte at weew.cob,edar by

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Mantime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday Sth October, 20009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to §:00 p.m.

(a) © DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 3"
September, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,

Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 7 day of September, A. D. 2009

NOTICE



Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD. is’ in
dissolution as of August 28, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

BAHAMAS FIRST
stad nae Company SKemvitea!
Balance Sheet as at December 31, 2008

LIQUIDATOR

2008 2007
ASSETS
Cash s
Term deposits
Invesiments
Trade accounts receivable
Sundry receivables and prepayments
Receivabla from reinsurers
Interest receivable
Deferrad commission costs
Unpaid claims recoverable from reinsurers
Deferred reinsurance premiums
Deferred reinsurance cost
Receivables from related companies
Property and equipment
Intangible asset

3,061,929
3,671,036
18,342,800
22,617,378
692,983

5 66,813,378
3,479,529
21,265,010
20,742,672
P48 746
2d5 219
91,331
7,009,654
10,670,394
26,827,569
4,035,334
23,293 948
2,044,192
2,692,559

$ 129.949 519

AT

92,922
6,995,985
11,099,148
28,665,499
3,787,991
29,582,108
2,029,929
2,692,559

Accountant

We are looking for a recent college graduate who is interested
in working under the supervision of experienced accountants
and has the goal of eventually sitting the CPA Exam. We
are a small, fast growing retail business owned and operated
by young, dynamic entrepreneurs. This is an exciting
opportunity to work directly with the business owners and
learn the practice of accounting as well as the principles of
entrepreneurship.

Qualifications/Experience/Skills

3.127,532,266

¢ Bachelors Degree in Accounting (Associates Degree :
in Accounting is a minimum requirement) LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

LIABILITIES:
Payable to reinsurers 5
Uneamed commission income
Uneamed premiums

Bank overdraft

* Be proficient in all Microsoft Office Applications 3.415.600 §

6,750,135 5,839,199
42,674,996 42 686,985
4,089,092 -
Payable to agents and brokers 6,915 466,983
Accrued liabilities 2,292 066 1,462,020
Unpaid claims 20,729 176 19,352 79?

79,959,980

14,225,843

¢ Ability to research technical issues and apply
Accounting Theory

¢ Ability to continually develop and expand on
technical skills

¢ Ability to clearly and adequately document work
and maintain an effective audit trail

EQUITY:
Share capital
Contributed surplus
Ganeral reseve
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

¢ Present ideas and facts persuasively and confidently
through verbal and written communication 7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000

1,269,268

7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,269,268

21,203,018 19,546,929

47,572,286 45,916,197
$127,532,266 $129,949,519

|
wa -
he
“SS a —f =
Approved on behalfof the Board of Directors: (Chairman i

4 full copy of the Company s flnancial statements are available on the Company 's website www. bahamasfirst.com

¢ A self-starter who demonstrates creativity in looking
for ways to simplify and improve processes

¢ An effective listener, one who also seeks and accepts
advice and provides feedback

¢ Able to project a poised and self-confident manner
and be perceived as a leader

¢ Demonstrates a willingness to take on new
challenges and responsibilities

* Willing to spend time working in the retail operations
serving customers Director

Interested candidates should submit a
letter of interest and resume to:
accountant.open@ gmail.com

No Resumes will be received after September 11, 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSeS a Sus NESs SS ESS Ss Ee
Customs: ‘We’re not attempting to stymie business’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Comptroller of Cus-
toms has pledged that his
department is not there to
“stymie” business, and
appealed to the private sec-
tor and public to assist in
changing stigmas associated
with doing business with it,

Teme R mais

* AMAZING

following major changes to
the way cargo is imported and
released.

Glenn Gomez did not deny
claims of bad customer ser-
vice and inefficiency at a
meeting with Customs that
was arranged by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.

Mr Gomez, along with oth-
er leading officers from the
Customs Department, sought

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Look for auction items

ONLINE October 2

Le LUE
JOURNEY

to clarify misconceptions and
misunderstandings surround-
ing new Customs rules put in
place earlier this year. This
was done, he said, to correct a
system that had been flawed
for quite some time.

The changes, which imme-
diately affected the business
of Bahamian courier services,
came following a major
shake-up of the Customs

Department, which involved
the former acting comptrol-
ler being replaced by Mr
Gomez.

During the meeting, con-
cerned business owners and
freight companies questioned
Mr Gomez and his team
about the new rules and
offered suggestions as to how
the department could become
more customer friendly and

conduct its business more
quickly.

Major concerns were long
lines at the customer depart-
ment because of a single win-
dow for two different proce-
dures, and the long standing
concern of "terrible" cus-
tomer service at various cus-
toms desks throughout Nas-
sau.

Mr Gomez told anyone

receiving below average ser-
vice from any of his officers to
get their names and report
their complaints to the Cus-
toms department.

The department has been
considering the move to an
online system, but its own
website needs an upgrade and
a separation from the Gov-
ernment website in order to
handle the traffic it receives.

A Courier Association
formed since the implemen-
tation of the new rules was
not out to the town meeting in
force, but one courier said he
was please with the earnest
responses of the Customs
department and clarification
of new procedures.

He said because it was the
law, it has to be followed. Mr
Gomez recently told Tribune
Business that claims of delays
and corruption in the depart-
ment made by some business
people were "gross misrepre-
sentations”.

He said the new processes

of the life and

put in place by the Customs
Department since his arrival
have always been the right
procedures, but had not been
enforced over decades.

Mr Gomez admitted that
the new process became a
challenge for courier services

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during its initial implementa-
tion, but argued that some
concerns brought to him by
the newly-formed courier
association were dealt with
promptly.

However, he said some oth-
er changes requested by the
association would have
required him to negate the
procedures made to the clear-
ing of imported goods.

According to him, the new
processes were introduced
because government was los-
ing millions in revenue due to
an erroneous system he said
should have not been in place.

"They want a system that
is illegal to operate," Mr
Gomez said. "If you're just
upset because you can't cir-
cumvent the system, I can't
help you with that. We are
there to collect duties, not to
stymie businesses.”

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5 |

HERE IS OUR CONTACT INFORMATION
New Providence: |-242-327-9 183-9
Grand Bahamas 1-24?-352-2334-8
Family Islands 1-242-300-1997 | US 1-800-945-8254

Visit our Website in Cyberspace @
www.boahamasypages.com | www.bahamasypmobile.com



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: Low: 75° F/24°C i Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:53 a.m. Moonrise .... 8:58 p.m.
€ ° a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssessscseeesesseeeee 0.24" Sunset... 7:22 p.m. Moonset ..... 9:26 a.m.
fall, ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 AN Year to date 20. Last New First
' High: 87° F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 32.73" a ;
Low: 78° F/26°C Fm Low: 78° F/26° C Ee
a AccuWeather.com i
@ 2 am Forecasts and graphics provided by :
- MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 11 Sep. 18 Sep. 26
-* High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA
or Low: 76°F/24° C NASSAU aa 86" Fst
ae, Low: 79° F/26°C
- 7 @ an
KEY WEST i — CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32°C High: 86° F/30°C
Low: 78 F/26 C i. Low: 76° F/24°C
-—s m4
“Te GREAT EXUMA “ SAN SALVADOR
all High: 88° F/31 SiC: High: 90° F/32° c
; ANDROS Low: 76° F/24° C Low: 76° F/24° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; ae —
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C — PP
Low: 78° F/26° C a yr * -_,
ly “FX
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W Rez. High: 91° F/33° C
FC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC F/C FIC FIC lle Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 86/30 62/16 pc 86/30 62/16 ft Indianapolis 80/26 62/16 t 80/26 62/16 t Philadelphia 78/25 6317 c 79/26 66/18 1
Anchorage 62/16 50/10 c 59/15 49/99 Fr Jacksonville 87/30 69/20 t 90/32 71/21 pc Phoenix 100/37 81/27 pc 100/37 81/27 pc CROOKED rs
Atlanta 84/28 66/18 pc 85/29 67/19 pc Kansas City 82/27 GING pc 84/28 63/17 pc Pittsburgh 75/23 58/14 t 80/26 58/14 t RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:92°F/33"c
Allantic City 73/22 6246 c 76/24 63/17 + Las Vegas 99/37 72/22 s 99/37 75/23 s Portland, OR 70/21 52/11 po 78/25 54/12 5 High: 88° F/31° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 79/26 62/16 c 79/26 64/17 c Little Rock 90/32 69/20 pc 90/32 68/20 pc Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 1 83/28 64/17 c Low: 74°F/23°C = *
Boston 72/22 58/14 pe 79/26 59/15 pc Los Angeles 81/27 64/117 pe 81/27 64/17 pc St. Louis 81/27 67/19 t 85/29 65/18 pc .
Buffalo 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 5915 t Louisville 83/28 65/18 t 85/29 62/16 t Salt Lake City 87/380 58/14 pc 81/27 56/13 s GREAT INAGUA wr
Charleston, SC 86/30 66/18 r 88/31 68/20 pc Memphis 87/30 68/20 t 90/32 71/21 pc San Antonio 94/34 74/23 s 94/34 73/22 pc High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 78/25 56/13 pce 78/25 56/13 pc Miami 88/31 76/24 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 74/23 66/18 pce 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 78/25 61/16 t 79/26 60/15 t Minneapolis 82/27 60/15 s 82/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 72/22 54/12 pe 75/23 57/13 pe 7
Dallas 96/35 74/23 pc 96/35 73/22 pc Nashville 84/28 62/16 t 87/30 63/17 t Seattle 66/18 50/10 pe 71/21 52/11 pe
Denver 89/31 56/3 pce 86/30 5442 t New Orleans 86/30 74/23 t 88/31 73/22 t Tallahassee 89/31 68/20 t 91/32 69/20 t Detroit 75/23 61/6 t 79/26 62/16 t New York 74/23 67/49 pc 80/26 68/20 pc Tampa 91/32 74/23 t 91/32 75/23 t ;
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 pe 88/31 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 66/18 pc Tucson 93/33 72/22 pe 95/35 72/22 t —
Houston 91/32 72/22 pc 93/33 72/22 pc Orlando 88/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Washington, DC 78/25 66/18 c 79/26 64/117 c

THE TRIBUNE

i

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 74° F/23°C
@ i

-

ORLANDO |
_ High:88° F/31°C :
Low: 73° F/23°C

== Variably cloudy with Cloudy with a shower or Mainly cloudy, t-storms; Clouds and sun, Some sun with a Some sun with a
Z ” thunderstorms. t-storm. breezy. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible.
is . High: 90° High: 89° High: 90° High: 90°
F High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79°
, Eee ey ee Ear


























The exclusive AccuWeather ee ee is an neo that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

. ~e ABACO Temperature - -
: - «oh oge ° HIG Mi, ccsscesinett Recs eucreeseceecnceeiccemess 93° F/34° C
ei 4 High: 89° F/32° C Low 81° F/27° C

7 all, t = Low: 79° F/26°C sett teases eteees

as ——— : Normal high... 88° F/31° C
7 Normal low 75° F/24° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH mc [AS Ear 8 NGI sssecececeetieeeasens 90° F/32° C
Last year's LOW o.ceceeceseeeseeeeeees 74° F/23° C

High: 87° F/31°C





I
“Th INDEX TODAY

ov
'|s|9|10

o|1|2

LOW



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





HIGH |

\. HIGH



greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

Ht. (ft.

High
Tote 022 pm
Tuesday ee a
Wednesday i 7 : mi
Thursday 12:17 p.m.



3.1
20

3.1
2.6

3.1
2.5

3.4



Low
3:46 a.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:22 a.m.
5:03 p.m.
5:02 a.m.
5:52 p.m.
5:47 a.m.
6:48 p.m.

0.2
0.4

0.2
0.4

0.3
0.5

0.3
0.6









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
838/31
67/19
86/30
82/27
61/16
90/32
86/30
82/27
68/20
838/31
73/22
69/20
80/26
70/21
72/22
74/23
62/16
95/35
88/31
62/16
92/33
83/28
90/32
65/18
64/17
73/22
75/23
64/17
90/32
64/17
93/33
100/37
75/23
83/28
78/25
88/31
72/22
72/22
90/32
82/27
72/22
94/34
75/23
72/22
71/21
85/29
97/36
61/16
76/24
72/22
90/32
108/42
74/23
90/32
60/15
87/30
58/14
87/30
83/28
82/27
66/18
68/20
91/32
82/27
75/23
100/37
62/16
73/22
66/18
82/27

ii

Today

Low
F/C
80/26
57/13
54/12
66/18
41/5
79/26
77/25
62/16
55/12




77/25 §
51/10 s

56/13
73/22

43/6
56/13

48/8

43/6
75/23
79/26

43/6
72/22
72/22
70/21
56/13
54/12
56/13
51/10
54/12
71/21
54/12
82/27
71/21
68/20
64/17
51/10
79/26
58/14
57/13
64/17
77/25

54/12 t
73/22 t

57/13
56/13

49/9
54/12
77/25
54/12
58/14
52/11
17/25
84/28
54/12
78/25
28/-2
73/22

36/2
74/23
68/20
63/17
54/12
52/11
79/26
73/22
57/13
71/21
53/11
55/12
51/10
63/17

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High
F/C
87/30
76/24
81/27
75/23
61/16
91/32
86/30
74/23
77/25
81/27
71/21
77/25
80/26
68/20
79/26
79/26
55/12
97/36
90/32
63/17
91/32
84/28
85/29
70/21
66/18
81/27
80/26
68/20
87/30
64/17
93/33
103/39
75/23
82/27
76/24
88/31
72/22
81/27
90/32
82/27
72/22
92/33
79/26
70/21
73/22
84/28
93/33
65/18
83/28
73/22
93/33
108/42
80/26
88/31
54/12
87/30
59/15
85/29
85/29
81/27
68/20
68/20
92/33
81/27
75/23
98/36
63/17
73/22
70/21
77/25

Tuesday

Low
F/C
79/26
60/15
54/12
64/17
43/6
81/27
78/25
62/16
54/12
75/23
58/14
61/16
74/23
44/6
61/16
56/13
37/2
74/23
79/26
37/2
72/22
72/22
74/23
61/16
52/11
61/16
52/11
50/10
71/21
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

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72/22
67/19
62/16
50/10
79/26
59/15
59/15
66/18
77/25
54/12
73/22
57/13
57/13

45/7
55/12
17/25
53/11
65/18

49/9
76/24
82/27
56/13
78/25

35/1
73/22

34/1
74/23
64/17
61/16
54/12
50/10
79/26
72/22
57/13
66/18
55/12
55/12

49/9
53/11

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

CUS ae a



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 82°F



(COOLER)

=

Billings
73/51

‘osJAngeles.
81/64!





Miami
88/76

Showers
[XX] T-storms





Rain Fronts
[4 Pintle Shown are noon positions of weather systems and hin

Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itntitentMe
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meuguafi
10s -Os [/0s) 10s 20s [06l) 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s /S0s///iimetiis]





a

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Te eal imal ue ameen



Full Text
Pim bowin’ it

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.237

90F
79F

_2 Sr cLouny,
“e ESTORMS

Back to the

Lae

S43)

m Lhe Tribune

=USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Dangerous man is
wanted after Killing

Police warn
public after
stabbing
death

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Staff Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Grand
Bahama Police have warned
the public to be on the look
out for an “extremely dan-
gerous” 23-year-old man
wanted for questioning in
connection with the island’s
eighth homicide.

Ashley Joel Smith, 22, of
South Bahamia, was stabbed
Friday evening in the
Freeport area. He was taken
to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, where he later died of
his injuries.

Police have issued an all
points bulletin for Godfrey
Virgil Jr, alias ‘Dollar Mur-
der’ of Bass Lane.

Virgil has two distinctive
tattoos — one bearing the

SEE page 10

GODFREY VIRGIL JR,
alias ‘Dollar Murder’



ASHLEY JOEL SMITH died of
his injuries

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO THE
LABOUR DAY HOLIDAY IN THE UNITED
STATES, THERE WILL BE NO USA TODAY

SECTION IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

' 30x60 Desk

w/ Return




Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a
DP

WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Sta

a : + te





PIM is set to
announce 500
temporary jobs

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham
announced that government
will soon make an announce-
ment of a temporary jobs pro-
gramme for some 500 or more
unemployed people on Grand
Bahama.

While in Grand Bahama on
Sunday, Mr Ingraham told the
media that government is doing
a number of things to assist
Grand Bahama during this dif-

SEE page 10





2

¥ —— a di J
nding Committee of the National People’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China presented a model of the

national stadium — which is currently under construction — to the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette. Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security look on.

Man shot
in armed
robbery
attempt

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

A BRAZEN attempted
armed robbery of a hardware
store in daylight has left a
young man in hospital in seri-
ous condition after being shot
twice.

The 23-year-old employee
of the store, identified by his
family as Alexander Dean,
was shot in the abdomen and
back after a dreadlocked gun-
man and his accomplice
entered Dean’s Building Sup-

SEE page nine



SR Verret

have drowned

A 65-YEAR-OLD man
was found dead in the water
near the shoreline at Good-
mans Bay on Friday
evening.

The man, whose identity
has not yet been confirmed
by police, was found at
around 6pm on Friday.

A doctor in the area
attempted to provide med-
ical assistance but was
unsuccessful.

The man, believed to be
from McKinney Drive, Nas-
sau, was pronounced dead
at the scene.

Police suspect the man
drowned.

An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the
cause of death.

Foul play is not suspect-

¢ SEE SPORTS ON PAGES ELEVEN AND TWELVE

PM disappointed over inefficiency
enenoravcimn) Of Grand Bahama Power Company

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Govern-
ment is concerned that the
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny may have sought to max-
imise profits at the expense of
its distribution and generation
system, according to Prime

Minister Hubert Ingraham.
Expressing his disappoint-
ment over the inefficiency in
power generation on Grand
Bahama, Mr Ingraham said
government is considering
whether to have the Grand
Bahama Power Company reg-

SEE page 10

Police in high speed chase shootout

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds @tribunemedia.net

A HIGH speed chase raced through the streets of southern
New Providence on Friday night as police dodged bullets
and fired back while in pursuit of two men in a silver coloured

Honda accord.

The officers were on patrol in Pinewood Gardens when

SEE page nine

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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS? LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





BHS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING :

THE Bahamas Humane |
Society will hold its annual }

General Meeting for 2009

tomorrow.

All Humane Society mem- }
bers are invited to attend the }
event, which will be held at }
the Sheraton Nassau Beach }
hotel on Cable Beach. The }
meeting will begin at 6.30pm. ;

ee
Ut

aU ee tah)
PHONE: 322-2157



LOCAL NEWS

Govt hails ‘historic’ Chairman Wu visit

BAHAMIAN government
officials hailed the visit of Wu
Bangguo, Chairman of the
Standing Committee of the
National People’s Congress of
The People’s Republic of Chi-
na, as an “historic” one that will
prove beneficial to the country.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette led a group
of high-ranking officials from
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
on Thursday in welcoming
Chairman Wu and a 120-plus
delegation, including 19 jour-



WU BANGGUO, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National Pag:
ple’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China sits with Prime Minis- 9uo, Vice-Chairman of the

ter the Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham at the head table during the Official Din-
ner hosted by the Prime Minister in honour of Chairman Wu at Atlantis on
Friday, September 4. Sitting in the middle is Interpreter, He Rulong.

nalists, on a four-day visit to
the Bahamas.

Bahamian cultural display when

the People’s Republic of China
to the Bahamas, the diplomatic
staff of the Embassy of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China, and
members of the Chinese com-
munity.

Solange Allen, a student of
Xavier’s Lower School, and
Davanna Collie of St Thomas
More Catholic School present-
ed Chairman Wu, and Li Jian-

National People’s Congress,
with floral bouquets.

In a written press release,
Chairman Wu said: “China
attaches great importance to

S/ORM FRAME

WINDOWS

Joining Mr Symonette in
greeting the visitors were Dr
Patricia Rodgers, Permanent
Secretary; Elma Campbell, Res-
ident Ambassador of the
Bahamas to the People’s
Republic of China; Joshua
Sears, Director General of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Despite overcast skies, the
visiting delegation received a

they landed at Lynden Pindling
International Airport in a two-
storey jumbo 747-jet. As they
disembarked the plane, they
were greeted by two receiving
lines and the rhythmic sounds
and smooth gyrations of a
“mixed” junkanoo group that
performed in bright coloured
costumes.

The receiving lines included
Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of

developing relations with the
Bahamas, which it views as a
key partner of cooperation in
the Caribbean.

“Since establishing diplo-
matic ties, our two countries
have made good progress in the
bilateral relationship, increas-
ing political mutual trust,
expanding economic coopera-
tion and trade, forging rich and
diverse cultural and people-to-

people ties, and maintaining
close coordination and cooper-
ation in international affairs.

“This proves that the friend-
ly relationship between China
and the Bahamas serves the
fundamental interests of our
two countries and two peoples.
By paying this visit I hope to
further promote the compre-
hensive in-depth growth of our
friendly ties and cooperation.”

Chairman Wu said during his
visit he would have “in-depth”
exchange of views with
Bahamian leaders with a view
to “enhancing political mutual
trust, expanding mutually ben-
eficial cooperation and other
issues of shared interest.”

“T believe that with the host’s
thoughtful arrangements, this
shared visit will be a complete
success,” he added.

The delegation was whisked
away in an official convoy to
the Royal Towers, Atlantis
Resort, where they are resid-
ing.

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By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

DOZENS of Bahamians online jumped to
the defence of their country over the week-
end after an Australian magazine published
a story about the “Bahamas Nightmare” of
the wife of an international tennis champion
living in New Providence.

“Women’s Day” magazine ran a front
page story about the “hellish” experience of
Bec Hewitt, the 26-year-old wife of Aus-
tralian tennis champ Lleyton Hewitt, who
recently moved to the gated-community of
Old Fort Bay out west.

The story, which tells of the crime fears
and loneliness of Mrs Hewitt in her Bahamas
home, was also reproduced online at
http://womansday.ninemsn.com.au/
celebrity/inthemag/855245/becs-bahamas-
nightmare

While some Bahamian readers felt the
characterisation of The Bahamas as a whole
as a poverty-stricken and crime-ridden place
was unfair, what raised their ire most were
the photographs illustrating the story, which
claimed to show the average lives of Bahami-
ans with images said to represent “typical
Bahamian housing”, “impoverished locals”,

“unkempt streets” and “barred windows.”

In a bit of bad international publicity for
The Bahamas, the pictures, far from being
“typical”, showed what appear to be the
worst of the worst that Nassau has to offer —



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TENNIS ace Lleyton Hewitt (AP)

including a shanty-type house boarded up
with plywood, a miserable and dirty looking
man sitting shoeless on a sidewalk and a
derelict building surrounded by rubbish.

The story, published in the August 31 edi-
tion of the publication, read: “The look of
fear on Bec Hewitt's face when she leaves the
high-security Bahamas mansion she and
Lleyton call home is warranted, Annette
Witheridge discovers.

“When her tennis ace husband Lleyton
Hewitt announced they were moving to the
Bahamas, Bec probably expected to find a
sizzling new social life among the rich and
famous. If so, she must be sorely disap-
pointed.

“To outsiders, the high-security gated com-
munity of Old Fort Bay looks like an idyllic
place to bring up children. But in reality, the
197-hectare ‘village’ is a gilded cage, sur-
rounded by spiked fences and barbed wire.



nightmare’ sparks defence of the country

“Just 25 minutes drive away, locals live in
abject poverty in the slums of Nassau, and
Bec's neighbours warn that it is a dangerous
place blighted by crime, poverty and high
unemployment. Armed robberies are com-
monplace, and last week a 34-year-old moth-
er of three became the country's 53rd murder
victim this year when she was gunned down
metres from a church. A few days later two
more people were killed.”

Now the former soap opera star is “want-
ing out” of The Bahamas, continued the
piece.

While some Australians sympathised with
Mrs Hewitt’s plight — “My advice to Bec is
get the hell out of there. How dare (Lleyton
Hewitt) put his wife and child in such a lone-
ly and dangerous place for his own selfish
desires,” wrote one. Some Bahamians who
saw the piece let it be known that they felt it
was not an accurate portrayal of their home-
land.

“Richard,” said: “Have any of you even
visited the Bahamas before? We’re not
impoverished gun toting drug addicts. If
they’re so miserable they should get out of
our country! No one is forcing them to stay.”

Meanwhile, “Maura” in Nassau, wrote,
“T wondered if she has ever been to NYC,
Chicago or any other big city where you can
live in a great neighbourhood that’s not gat-
ed but a few blocks away it’s crime central.”

However, others said they felt the arti-
cle’s representation “may not be far from
the truth” about Nassau.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3



Another region-wide power cut in Abaco

Man has throat —
Slit in the Kemp
Road area

A STABBING in the }
Kemp Road area alarmed
residents when a man’s}
throat was slit early Satur- }

day morning.

A 28-year-old resident of }
Elizabeth Street said the }
man was attacked outside }
her front gate, which is near }
the junction with Kemp }

Road.

However, no record of the }
stabbing was filed in the }
weekend police report and }
police press liaison officer }
Walter Evans failed to }
respond to inquiries from }
The Tribune before press }

time yesterday.

Kemp Road residents :
want to know the condition }
of the injured man and cir- }

cumstances of the attack.

Weapons ant
ammunition
found after tip

A LARGE stash of }
weapons and ammunition }
are off the streets today }
after a tip from a member }

of the public.

According to police, three }
handguns — a .44mm, a 22 }
mm and a .38 mm — and }
168 live bullets were dis- }
covered in a plastic bag in }
an area off Kemp Road at }

around 11am Saturday.

No arrests have been :
made in connection with the }
find, but police investiga- }

tions are continuing.

Bahanians asked to

observe Caribbean
Wellness Day

BAHAMIANS are being }
challenged to improve their }
observe }
“Caribbean Wellness Day” next }
Saturday as part of the effort to ;
eradicate non-communicable }

health and _ to

chronic diseases in the region.

Caribbean Heads of Govern- }
ment, including Prime Minister ;
Hubert Ingraham, in response }
to the heavy burden of non-com- }
municable diseases on the citi- }
zens of the region, issued the :
Port of Spain Declaration in Sep-
tember 2007, “Uniting to Stop }
the Epidemic of Chronic Non- }
Communicable Diseases” and
declared that the second Satur- }
day in September should be cel-
ebrated each year as Caribbean i

Wellness Day.

The Ministry of Health invites }
all Bahamians to attend an “All }
Day Mega Health Extravagan- }
za” on September 12 on the :
grounds of the ministry’s com- }
plex at the juncture of Augusta, }

Delancy and Meeting Streets.

For the adults attending there :
will be a range of free health }
screenings, including blood cho-
lesterol, blood pressure, blood }
sugar and weight screening; ;
healthy food demonstrations; the
showcase of a range of activities }
in which to engage in daily to }
maintain a moderate level of ;
physical activity. For the children }
there will be a fully supervised }
bouncing castle, and in the late }
afternoon everyone will be able }
to get their “bodies in motion” to }
the rhythmic beat of the One }

Family junkanoo rush out.

There also will be booths }
organised by various gyms, spas }
and wholesalers featuring spe- }
cial give-aways throughout the }
day; a “punchboard” where }
patrons, for a minimum dona- }
tion, will be eligible to try for a }
variety of prizes; as well as ven- }
dors with healthy Bahamian }

foods for sale.

eB RSs le
a LL
AW TEU)
ye Py
322-2197

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

ABACO residents suffered
the second region-wide power
cut in a week on Saturday night
as controversy heats up over
plans for a Bunker C Fuel pow-
er plant in Wilson City.

Homes across Abaco were
plunged into darkness as elec-
tricity failed across the islands
at around 8.30 on Saturday
night and was not restored for
abut three hours.

The powercut was the sec-
ond Abaco-wide shortage in a
week, and the third power out-
age in Green Turtle Cay, resi-
dents say.

They are calling on the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) to explain why the
power fails on a weekly, or dai-
ly basis during the summer
months, while they continue to
pay high electricity bills.

An Abaco resident wrote on
the website
Bahamasissues.com: “It is bad
enough that it goes out so much
— on Wednesday it went off
from 4am until 10am, then it
went off again from lpm until
2.30pm, only to go off again
from 4.30pm until 5.30pm —
but it goes down to maybe 40 or
50 volts and just stays there for
several minutes.

“We are lucky that every-

thing we have is not burnt up.”

BEC and government offi-
cials intend to address power
supply issues by constructing a
48 mega-watt Bunker C Fuel
power plant in Wilson City, on
the Bight of Old Robinson,
South Abaco, to be operational
by March 2010.

But environmentalists are
concerned the power plant, like
the one in Clifton Pier, New
Providence, will be hugely
detrimental to the environment.

Although the fuel type is
cheaper than diesel, they say it
will not cut electricity prices for
residents, and it will lead to
potential oil spills, toxic air
emissions, acid rain, and car-
bon emissions in a pristine
tourist area just three miles
from the protected Pelican
Land and Sea National Park.

Hope Town resident Matt
McCoy, 30, said: “If properly
maintained and run the plant
will be about as toxic as an
equivalent diesel plant, but it
will require tons of mainte-
nance and operations manage-
ment. Can BEC handle this? I
don't think so. And an accident
with this stuff will be much,
much worse than diesel.”

Mr McCoy understands five
out of 15 generators at the cur-
rent Marsh Harbour power
plant are broken, in addition to
power lines going to the cays.

He said: “The current Marsh



MINISTER of the Environment Ear!
Deveaux (left) and Phenton Ney-
mour, Minister of State for the
Environment with responsibility for
utilities, will hear Abaco residents’
concerns in a public meeting.

Harbour power plant generates
around 16 megawatts of power
which is adequate in the win-
ter, but not summer. However,
if all of the diesel generators
were working, they would have
around 24 megawatts of power,
enough to supply all of Abaco
all year round.

“But they want 48 megawatts
at Wilson City! Why double the
power?

“Instead of bringing in more
complicated equipment that
requires diligent maintenance,
why not fix what is already here
and broken?”

Elbow Cay resident Attila



FST
| -GERTIFIGATE- |



if VALID UNTIL 1 OFF AN V
SINGLE ITEM :
IN-STORE

r| OR ANY ONE FABRIC PURCHASE (MULTIPLE YARDS) I

30



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aie a ined Dias Tey

Lua LE

Maderia St. and Robinson Rd. Stores Only





















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Mr Feszt, Mr McCoy and
other concerned Abaco resi-
dents are calling on govern-
ment to explore alternative fuel
or energy sources and identify
a site that will have less impact
on the environment and
tourism.

Minister of the Environment
Earl Deveaux and Phenton
Neymour, Minister of State for
the Environment with respon-
sibility for utilities, will hear
their concerns in a public meet-
ing at New Visions Ministries,
in Jerusalem Drive, Marsh
Harbour, at 7pm on Thursday.

A statement released by
BEC in relation to power cuts
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the corporation is confronting
and resolving inconsistencies
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A spokesman for the Cor-
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been brought in from the Unit-
ed States to review operations
and make recommendations
for improvements, and $150
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the Family Islands.

The BEC spokesman said:
“Furthermore, the Corpora-
tion remains committed to
implementing a renewable
energy programme on a utility
scale.

“The Corporation is taking
the proper steps to ensure that
such a programme can address
the unique energy needs and
the protection of the fragile
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“Consumers should also
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department stands ready to
investigate and process claims
of damage to electrical appli-
ances. Further information
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Married women need protection

THERE ARE those religious ministers
— presumably the unidentified voices behind
the Bahamas Christian Council’s objection
to government’s extending the offence of
rape to the marital bed —who fear there
would be “far reaching consequences” to
the institution of marriage if a man were
answerable before the law for raping his
wife.

Some of these pastors predict a complete
breakdown in society if sexual violence by a
man against his wife were classified as rape.

The ministers fear that a rejected, vio-
lent man would lose faith in marriage and
start to roam outside the home in search of
new comfort if he could not use his wife as
his sexual chattel. In the Bahamas culture of
the “macho” man, this is rather a ridiculous
fear.

There are many fine, upstanding and
faithful husbands in this society. However,
there are too many “macho” men, who have
loving wives, but who roam anyway and
proudly boast of the number of children
they have “outside.” In their own rough cir-
cle this is the way they prove their manhood
— it’s the game of one upmanship over their
equally crude peers.

We have had many embarrassing
moments at The Tribune when a legitimate
family has placed a death notice for their
dearly beloved father in the newspaper only
to have the “outsides” call to berate the edi-
tor for leaving them out of the list of sur-
vivors.

We distinctly remember when this first
happened to us in our early days at The Tri-
bune. A gentleman, who held a good posi-
tion in this town, died. His family brought in
his death notice and it was published. It was
just another routine death notice. Nothing
seemed out of the ordinary until we got a
telephone call the following day. The male
voice at the other end of the telephone was
frothing with anger — he was so angry that
we could hardly understand what he was
saying. He was also well known in the com-
munity. He maintained that this was his
father and that we had left his name and
the names of his many brothers, and possibly
sisters, out of the list of survivors.

We tried desperately to extricate our-
selves from his father’s extra marital aber-
ration, but he would have none of it. He
was holding our feet to the fire and blaming
The Tribune for disrespecting his position in
the family circle.

The only way around the dilemma was to
allow the “outside” family to pay for a sec-
ond notice announcing the father’s death
and listing them as his sole survivors. And so
this elderly gentleman, who while he lived
held his head high in the community, was
sent to his grave with two death notices —
one by his inside family, ignoring the “out-
side” and a second by his “outside” ignoring
the “in.” In this case the “outside” far out-

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numbered the “inside”. We later learned
that there were many more, but these other
outsiders decided to let him rest in peace
and keep their secret to themselves.

We often laughed at our American moth-
er who encountered this unusual social phe-
nomenon in her first weeks of marriage. Our
father, who was then the representative in
the House of Assembly, for the island of
Inagua, was starting his honeymoon when an
election was called. He took his bride cam-
paigning with him in Inagua. A young school
teacher, completely out of her element, she
tried her best to be sociable. That evening
she confronted her husband: “Etienne,” she
said, “every man that I asked today about
how many children he had gave me a certain
number of ‘inside’ and another number of
‘outside.’ What’s this outside-inside thing
all about?” That little schoolteacher had a lot
to learn in her almost 80 years in the
Bahamas. Some of it she never understood
and would dismiss with a shrug of the shoul-
der.

And so for Bahamian men to be encour-
aged to wander if they were to be punished
for sexually violating their wives is to mock
history — that type man wanders anyway,
and has always done so, with or without the
rape law. In his ignorance he thinks he’s
smart.

However, we can see how, if this law
were not passed, it could indeed undermine
marriage and further breakdown the family
and consequently society.

There has been so much debate over this
amendment that many women have proba-
bly learned for the first time that if they are
sexually abused when not married the law
will protect them against the violence, but as
soon as they marry they forfeit that protec-
tion. They might well opt to have an open
relationship without marriage to ensure that
they can turn to the law for protection should
their common law mate violate them.

Christian Council, those of you who are
so fearful of this law destroying marriage,
just think of how much more damage it
could do if it is not passed. The woman could
shun the marriage contract.

And when we talk of violence in the bed-
room — and remember the law follows
crime wherever it is committed, even to the
bedroom — read the letter that will be pub-
lished in the letters column on this page
tomorrow.

This letter writer has had the courage —
on reading the Christian Council’s state-
ment over the weekend — to break her
silence about the violence that her own
mother suffered.

We thank her for her sense of duty in an
attempt to help women who are caught in
this terrible web of physical violence against
their person. These are the women who need
protection — they are the women who need
the amendment.



TWO)



THE TRIBUNE



Bewildered by
Bahamas Christian
Council statement

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Tread with dismay, the state-
ment in opposition to the pro-
posed out-lawing of rape
against a spouse by the Presi-
dent of the Christian Council
in this morning's paper which
he purported to issue on behalf
of the Bahamas Christian
Council.

I thought the Christian
Council represented all Christ-
ian denominations in The
Bahamas. The Heads of four
major Christian denominations
in our country: the Seventh-
Day Adventists, the Methodist,
the Roman Catholic and the
Anglicans, have all indicated
publicly their support for the
amendment of the law.

I am bewildered then, that
the Rev. Patrick Paul issued his
statement, which is diametri-
cally opposite to the thoughtful

LETTERS

letters@tripbunemedia.net



positions of support for the
amendment taken by those four
Church Heads, as a position of
the Council.

I understand that in some
denominations, each Church
operates as an independent
body and each sends a repre-
sentative to the Christian Coun-
cil even if their individual
church has only a very small
number of members. In this
way, these denominations have
been permitted to dominate the
Christian Council for decades,
to the detriment of the Council
in many instances, as in this
case, I believe.

I have read in the newspa-

pers some Neanderthal state-
ments by some churchmen who
oppose this progressive and
necessary amendment to the
Sexual Offences Act. At a time
when a disproportionate per-
centage of assaults, and indeed
homicides, in our country
involve family members, the
Christian Church must speak
uniformly against violence.
Rape is always accompanied by
violence or the threat of vio-
lence!

Any suggestion that forcible
sexual relations is ever “non-
violent” and ever “not rape” is
incredulous, unbefitting and
inappropriate for any person
who claims to preach the gospel
of Jesus Christ.

INCREDULOUS
Nassau,
September 5, 2009.

Who and what is the Christian Council?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I think it is totally wrong for the Bahamas
Christian Council to send out a message in its
name to confuse the public. Whenever the Chris-
tian Council makes a statement, the public
assumes that the statement is from all this coun-
try’s Christian churches speaking in unison. Obvi-
ously this is not the case as in the recent rape
amendment controversy the four leading Chris-
tian denominations supported the amendment.
Therefore, we are to assume that they are not
included in the Christian Council’s statement,

not include all the major denominations, please
let us know, and consider doing us an even bigger

which is against the amendment. If this is so, is the

Christian Council deliberately trying to mislead

the country?

We would now like to know: Who and what is

Nassau,

the Christian Council. If its membership does

Whom does Christian Council speak for?

Congratulations

EDITOR, The Tribune.

To: The President, BCMC

Congratulations for giving
support to the proposed
amendment to the Sexual
Offences Act. You make me
proud to be a Methodist. Kind
personal regards and best wish-
es for the new church year.

PATRICK BETHEL
Nassau,
September 3, 2009.

Predictable response

EDITOR, The Tribune

The Bahamas Christian
Counsel's response to the gov-
ernment's proposed marital
rape law was predictable and
regrettably highlights the inse-
curities of far too many
Bahamian men.

These worthy stalwarts are
still living in an era when the
worth of the Bahamian woman
was measured by her ability to
fry fish and give comfort.

Small wonder our illegiti-
macy rate is so incredibly high
when our young women are still
led to believe, by the clergy no
less, that they are nothing more
than mere chattels.

IAN MABON

Nassau,
September 5, 2009

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

favour by changing the Council’s name —
because it doesn’t say much for a christian body
that would attempt to mislead a community.

If this was not a unanimous statement by each
member of the Council, then the Council is duty
bound to tell the public who made the statement.
A list of all the signatories to that statement
would be much appreciated. Be men enough to
stand up for what you believe in and not hide
behind others whose denominational reputation
carries more weight in this community.

CONFUSED AND OFFENDED

September 5, 2009

Clearly the Bahamas Christian Council has by its release and
opinion as to the proposals on the table to amend the legal position
of rape within a marriage has parted from at least one of the
largest denominations which now raises a long standing question
as to who does the Bahamas Christian Council speak for?

Some years ago I obtained a true copy of the Constitution of the
BCC and was surprised that for example any faith/denomination
which was administrated or controlled by an external source could
not be a member of the BCC. Clearly therefore the Roman
Catholics, The Greek Orthodox, Lutherans, Southern Baptists
possibly even some of the Pentecostals were in fact denied mem-
bership. Further it is an Article of the BCC Constitution that
whenever there is a dissenting view the Council in any release is
required by the Constitution to identify the difference and name the
faith that dissented. We certainly have never seen that from the
BCC, ever and not today on this controversial matter.

Watching television last evening a thought came to me which I
think will bring some sense to the matter — when you are young
and in love there is absolutely no way that either the male or
female look at each other in any manner of way of nothing more
than being one and equal so why are we making all this noise?

I agree the time period of two-years as I understand that either
party can bring or allege rape is far too long as this complicates the
issue if the parties reconcile and forget to rescind the charge or
report — either party may hold this over each other.

The question of common-law arrangements — of consenting
homosexuals residing together be they males or females and, of
course, the sweetheart position to me this amendment does not cov-
er those relationships although as they are not statutorily married
I presume you can bring rape charges under the Penal Code.

It is sad that the Christian Council could not discuss and debate
the issue internally before issuing this statement as obviously now

they have created a controversy.

ABRAHAM MOSS
Nassau,
September, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Lands Committee |
extents Headline
for public to

submit concerns

AFTER meeting on
Friday, the House Com-
mittee on publicly held
lands has agreed to
extend the deadline for
concerned members of
the public to make sub-
missions or requests to
the investigative group-
ing.

Having issued a prior

notice to the public solic- {

iting information on
their concerns about
publicly-owned lands,
the parliamentary com-
mittee’s meeting on Fri-
day saw them consider
that information before
deciding that the final

deadline for the public to
provide such input would ;

be extended to this Fri-
day, September 18.

“Accordingly all peo-
ple who are interested in
making submissions
before the committee
and or appearing before
the committee should
write the clerk of the
House of Assembly with
their submissions or
requests.

“The committee has
agreed to respond to all
those who have written
letters and made submis-
sions and to draw up a
schedule of witnesses for

those who wish to appear

before the Committee,”
said Committee chair-
man, MP for Fox Hill,
Fred Mitchell.

The Committee
adjourned to Monday,
September 21, at 10 a.m.

Any submissions or
requests should be sent
to the Chief Clerk,
House of Assembly
at PO Box N 3003, Nas-
sau, Bahamas or by fax
no 322-1118 or at the e-
mail address: houseo-
fassembly@bahamas. gov.
bs, or by hand to the
House of Assembly, Bay
Street, Nassau.

Davis welcomes Wilchcombe
to PLP deputy leadership race

PHILIP “Brave” Davis, contender for
the deputy leadership of the PLP, yesterday
issued a statement “welcoming” MP for
West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe

to the race for the post.

The statement comes two days after Mr
Wilchcombe officially launched his bid for
the deputy leadership in Grand Bahama
on Friday, becoming the second to

announce such intentions.

MP for Rum Cay, Cat Island and San
Salvador, Mr Davis said the declaration by
Mr Wilchcombe is “another sign of democ-

racy at work in the PLP” and, signalling

PHILIP DAVIS

that more bids will soon be launched, he

said that the “various candidates, whether announced or unan-

nouced, all have the best interest of the party and country at heart.”
Mr Davis reiterated that the fundamental issues forming the basis

of his campaign are education, crime and the judiciary; and “the

creation of a new economic model compatible with the changing

needs of the country.”

Speaking on Friday Mr Wilchcombe said that if elected as Deputy
Leader he would address crime, employment, enhancing the tourism
product, improving the education system and re-energising Grand

Bahama’s flagging economy.

e SEE PAGE SIX

Agro-Tourism Symposium being
held at College of the Bahamas

LINKING Bahamian farm-
ers with those in the tourism
sector is the aim of an “Agro-
Tourism Symposium” being
held at the College of the
Bahamas this Thursday.

Organised by the Bahamas
Agricultural Producers Associ-
ation in partnership with the
Inter-American Institution for
Cooperation on Agriculture,
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion and The Bahamas Hotel
Association the forum will offer
a chance for producers to net-
work with chefs and food and
beverage directors who might
be interested in purchasing
their produce.

Speaking at the event, held
under the title “Linking Hotels
and Local Farmers”, will be Ms
Ena Harvey, a hemispheric spe-
cialist in agro tourism from Bar-
bados, Edison Key, MP for
South Abaco and Chairman of
BAIC, Robert Sands, President
of the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion as well as Chef Keshlah

Smith and Leslie Minnis, senior
marketing officer, Department
of Agriculture.

Registration is $25 per per-
son including meals and sym-
posium material. The venue is
Choices Restaurant, The Culi-
nary and Hospitality Manage-
ment Institute, College of the
Bahamas, Thompson Boule-
vard. Call 502 4234 to register
or for more information.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

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¢ SEE PAGE ONE
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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7



Guyana: Economic prospects
and political uncertainties

insight

By RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a Consultant
and former Caribbean
diplomat)

DESPITE uncertainties
that mar the Guyana politi-
cal scene, the country’s eco-
nomic prospects appear to
be brighter than they have
been in three decades. Sev-
eral developments account
for this and they bring hope
to a country that has been
blighted by political turmoil
and economic setbacks.

Amongst the develop-
ments is the considerable
reduction in the ratio of debt
to gross domestic product.
Guyana has moved from
being one of the world’s
highly indebted poor coun-
tries to a situation in which
the Government is manag-
ing its debt and has more
breathing space in which to
take policy decisions of
social and economic benefit
to the Guyanese people. It is
an accomplishment for
which Guyana’s President
Bharrat Jagdeo deserves full
credit.

Epitomizing the new eco-
nomic optimism for Guyana
is the formal opening, sched-
uled for September 14, of a
bridge over the Takutu Riv-
er, the narrowest point at
which Guyana and its
sprawling neighbour, Brazil,
connect. Both Guyana’s
President and Brazil’s Pres-
ident Iancio Lula Da Silva
will be part of the opening
ceremony.

The Brazilian govern-
ment, with the full agree-
ment of the Guyanese gov-
ernment, has built the bridge
capable of carrying heavy
vehicles to transport con-
tainers with a wide variety
of commodities as well as
people. The bridge is the
first step in infrastructure
that would allow business-
men from Brazil's Northern-
most State of Roaraima to
truck commodities through
Guyana to a port on
Guyana's Atlantic coast and
then to markets in North
America and Europe.

What has to follow is a
dry-weather road from the
bridge on the Guyana side
to the town of Linden which
is already connected by a
highway to Guyana’s capi-
tal, Georgetown, on the
Atlantic Coast. Then a deep
water harbour has to be con-
structed. But even without
the harbour immediately,
the bridge and road would
give Roraima businesses the
access to the Atlantic they
now need. The system
would be considerably
cheaper for businesses that
now have to transport goods
across the vastness of Brazil
to its far-away ports. The
Brazilians have a vested
interest in financing the
building of the harbour.

Guyanese businesses
would also be able to use
the bridge for transporting
goods for sale in Brazil pro-
vided they are able to estab-
lish markets. At the
moment, while Brazilian
goods are increasing in the
Guyana market, largely due

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



WORLD VIEW



“It is estimated
that there are
about 3,000
Brazilians now
operating gold
mines in
Guyana and
making a good
living from

it while
contributing to
the economy.”



to the influx of Brazilians
into Guyana, Guyanese
exports have been limited
to wood, wood products and
bauxite. But, there is every
reason to believe that
exports of rice in particular
would be possible.

It is estimated that there
are about 3,000 Brazilians
now operating gold mines in
Guyana and making a good
living from it while con-
tributing to the economy.
They have brought in new
technology and are getting
higher production yields.
Consequently, the govern-
ment is getting more taxes,
and the Guyana Gold Board
which purchases the pro-
duction is selling it on the
international market at a
profit.

Once traffic starts
between Roraima and
Georgetown, several forms
of new economic activity
will spring from it, includ-
ing new villages in areas that
are now sparsely populated.
The road points the way not
only for a cheaper outlet for
Northern Brazil to the
Atlantic and therefore to
Europe and North Ameri-
ca, but for a considerable
boost to the economy of
Guyana.

The construction of the
road and the harbour will
increase employment and
production in the Guyanese
economy in the near term.
Given the sustained eco-
nomic activity that they will
generate, new and lasting
employment will also be cre-
ated.

Aligned to the business
links to Brazil is the Guyana
government’s decision to
designate Ogle, an area on
the Atlantic Coast of
Guyana, as a second Inter-
national Airport. The
arrangements for this are
almost complete. Ogle will
accommodate flights on air-
craft such as those operat-
ed in the Caribbean by





LIAT and Caribbean Air-
ways as well as the Brazil-
ian airline, Mehta. Ogle is
15 minutes from George-
town and less than 10 min-
utes from the Secretariat of
the Caribbean Community
and Common Market
(CARICOM).

President Jagdeo is also
working feverishly to put
together the means to build
a hydro-electric power sta-
tion in Guyana. With its
many rivers and waterfalls,
Guyana lends itself to
hydro-power. Once hydro-
power is established, ener-
gy costs — now one of the
big expenses of doing busi-
ness and accounting for as
much as 20 per cent of GDP
— would drop significantly
opening the distinct possi-
bility for less expensive pro-
duction of sugar and bauxite
and reduced costs in the
mining and timber sectors.

Then, there is oil explo-
ration off shore in an area
where the maritime bound-
ary with Suriname is now
legally settled. The Canadi-
an company, CGX, which
has been exploring the area,
made some hopeful state-
ments in August. Amongst
them was that “the cost esti-
mate to drill the Eagle Deep
Well has been reduced sig-
nificantly to below $70 mil-
lion from US$90 million”
and they were encouraged
by the seismic data
processed during the first
half of 2009. If this leads to
the renewal of drilling next
year, it would be a further
boost to the Guyana econo-
my.

However, the prospects
for economic improvement
are dimmed by political
uncertainties. President
Jagdeo’s term of office ends
in 2011, and his Peoples Pro-
gressive Party (PPP) will
have to choose a Presiden-
tial candidate next year.
That candidate will have to
be someone in whom the
electorate, beyond the tra-
ditional PPP support, has
confidence both to manage
the economy and lead a
multi-racial nation.

A recent convention of
the main opposition, Peo-
ples National Congress
(PNC), to elect its leader
and other officers turned out
to be a fractious affair.
While Robert Corbin was
re-elected leader, the PNC is
now split into many parts
with its middle class support
severely disenchanted. The
main beneficiary of the
PNC’s internal confusion
appears to be a third party,
the Alliance for Change,
which promotes itself vigor-
ously as a non-racial group-

SIR RONALD SANDERS



ing dedicated to a one-
nation Guyana.

But, the telling political
battles will be fought next
year — first within the two
main parties and then at the
national level.

Within sight of all the
parties is the prospect of real
economic opportunities for
Guyana if the politics can
be managed with maturity.

Responses and previous
commentaries at:
www.sirronaldsanders.com















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PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



US-German rift emerges
over Afghan deaths case

KABUL

AN AIRSTRIKE by USS.
fighter jets that appears to have
killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute for
NATO allies Germany and the
United States, as tensions began
rising between them Sunday
over Germany’s role in ordering
the attack, according to Assoct-
ated Press.

Afghan officials say up to 70
people were killed in the early
morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz
after Taliban militants stole two

tanker trucks of fuel and vil-
lagers gathered to siphon off
gas.

Afghan and NATO investi-
gations are just beginning, but
both German and US. officials
already appeared to be trying
to deflect blame.

German Defense Minister
Franz Josef Jung said the Tal-
iban’s possession of the two
tankers “posed an acute threat
to our soldiers.” German offi-
cials have said the tankers might
have been used as suicide
bombs.

“Tf there were civilian casu-

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clearly behind our commander’s
decision” to order the air strike.

Meanwhile, Rear Adm. Gre-
gory J. Smith, the top U.S. and
NATO spokesman in the coun-
try, said German troops let too
many hours pass before visiting
the site of the bombing Friday.

He explained that it’s impor-
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strike and determine what hap-

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pened before the enemy comes
out with its own version of
events.

The top U.S. and NATO
commander in Afghanistan,
USS. Gen. Stanley McChrystal,
visited the site Saturday where
two charred trucks and yellow
gas cans sat on a riverbed. He
asked a top commander in
Regional Command North
about the response time.

“Why didn’t RC-North come
here quicker?” McChrystal
asked Col. Georg Klein, the
commander of the German base
in Kunduz.

“T can honestly say it was a
mistake,” Klein answered, in a
discussion witnessed by an Asso-
ciated Press reporter.

On Sunday, Smith said that
in McChrystal’s judgment the
response time “was probably
longer than it should have
been.”

German troops in
Afghanistan have long been crit-
icized for avoiding combat oper-
ations, even as militants have
increasingly infiltrated northern
Afghanistan the last year, desta-
bilizing the once-peaceful
region.

Taliban militants stole two
fuel tankers late Friday that
became stuck on a riverbed out-
side Kunduz. Villagers — either
forced by the militants or
enticed by offers of free fuel —
gathered near the trucks, even
as U.S. jets patrolled overhead.

German commanders watch-
ing images from the USS. air-
craft could see about 120 people,
McChrystal said Saturday. The
commanders decided that the
people were militants and
ordered the airstrikes, Smith
said, even though images pro-
vided by the USS. aircraft would
have been grainy and difficult
to see.

Whether the German com-
manders or the U’S. pilot are at



fault for any civilian casualties
may turn into an inner-NATO
tussle.

Smith said the ground force
commander “is the decision
maker for close air support.
That’s doctrine.” But he also
conceded that a pilot can refuse
an order to drop a bomb.

Klein, in an interview with
The Associated Press on Sun-
day, declined to say whether
images provided by the U.S. jets
had been clear enough for
weapons to be seen among
Afghans on the ground, citing
the ongoing investigation.

A German Joint Terminal
Air Controller, or JTAC, who
spoke on condition that his
name not be used because he
wasn’t authorized to speak pub-
licly, said the rules for ordering
an attack clearly state that the
ultimate decision rests with the
ground commander.

But rules also require that
both the pilot and the JTAC get
a good positive identification of
the target before the comman-
der can order a weapon
deployed, the JTAC said.

“Only when both are sure
that what we see is a target, only
then will the pilot drop the
bomb,” the JTAC said.

The German Defense Min-
istry, meanwhile, pushed back
against a story published in the
Washington Post that German
officials said painted their com-
mander in a poor light and
played up the U.S. version of
events. The ministry said the
article “will definitely influence
at least the preliminary investi-
gation by the various bodies.”

“The Defense Ministry is very
surprised about the unusual pro-
cedure of using a journalist as
a source to reveal initial investi-
gation results,” the ministry said.

Kris Coratti, director of com-
munications for the Washing-
ton Post, said in an e-mail: “The

GERMAN COLONEL Georg Klein is
pictured at the German base in Kun-
duz, Afghanistan, Sunday, Sept. 6,
2009. An airstrike ordered by a Ger-
man commander Klein and carried
out by U.S. fighter jets that appears
to have killed Afghan civilians could
turn into a major dispute between
the two NATO allies, as tensions
began rising Sunday over Germany's
role in the attack. Afghan officials
say up to 70 people were killed in the
early morning airstrike Friday in the
northern province of Kunduz after
Taliban militants stole two tanker
trucks of fuel and villagers gathered

| to siphon off gas.

story speaks for itself.”

Smith said a trip to Kunduz
by military officials from Kabul
was not an official investigation
but a fact-finding trip.

“And I think it’s much, much
better for people to understand
the facts,” he said of the decision
to allow a journalist to witness
the discussion among military
officials.

No NATO officials will yet
say how many civilians they
think may have died. Smith on
Saturday said the preliminary
overall death toll was believed
to be 56. Afghan officials say
it’s in the low 70s.

Smith said he hopes a U.S.-
German rift does not develop
over the strike. “I hope every-
one allows the investigation to
proceed and we’ll determine
what we know more precisely
and move on from there,” Smith
said.

The director of an Afghan
human rights group criticized
NATO ’s International Security
Assistance Force for the deaths.
“Tt was carelessness in terms of
ISAF using force without doing
enough to investigate whether
this is a civilian location,” Ajmal
Samadi of Afghan Rights Mon-
itor said.

German troops have long
been criticized for restrictions
that limit the battle their troops
see. A U.S. based military ana-
lyst, Anthony Cordesman, said
German troops don’t have “the
situational and combat experi-
ence” to confront Taliban on
the ground.

“They’re as oriented toward
staying in their armored vehi-
cles as any group I’ve met,”
Cordesman said. “They’re not
active enough to present much
of a threat to the Taliban most
of the time.”

Klein rejected the claim that
his troops lacked combat expe-
rience.

NEW REGULATORY REGIME NOW IN FORCE

The Communications Act 2009 (Comms Act}, which gives Utilities Regulation &
Competition Authority (URCA) full powers of regulation and of oversight of the
electronic communications sector in The Bahamas, came into force on 1 September

2009.

This date signals the start of the transition to a new regulatory regime,

Greater

competition will be introduced in the electronic communications sector, to the benefit
of the economy and of all persons in The Bahamas.

To facilitate as smooth a transition to the new licensing regime as possible, a number of
new documents were published on 1 September 2009 and are available at URCA’s
website (www.urcabahamas.bs), These include:
* Preliminary Determination covering several Class Operating and Spectrum
licences, Exemptions, and Types of Fees
Individual Operating and Spectrum licences
Draft Class Operating and Spectrum licences

Licensing Guidelines

Fee schedule

Radio Spectrum Statement (Existing Allocation and Assignment)
Various farms - Full Details Form and Notice of Objection Form for the transition,
and ain Application Form for a licence.

Until new URCA regulatory measures are adopted, all existing regulatory measures
adapted by the Public Utilities Commission and the Television Regulatery Authority
continue in farce to the extent that they do not conflict with provisions of the Comins
Act, the Unlites Regulation & Competition Authority Act, 2009; the Utilities Tribunal
Act, 2009 and any new regulatory measures adopted under these Acts,

The new regime encourages participation by all

the website will also give you an

opportunity to learn more about the new regime with updates on Competition Policy,
Consultation results and determinations and latest news of the regime. This new regime
and the Comms Act coming into force for the electronic communications sector ié the
beginning of a new day for all persons in The Bahamas.

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THE TRIBUNE

in armed —
robbery
attempt

FROM page one

plies on Parkgate Road and
demanded cash, police said.

The incident occurred at
around 3pm on Saturday. The
two men fled the scene on
foot.

Alexander’s brother and
son of the store’s owner, Mar-
cus Dean Jnr, said the family
have been told to expect
Alexander to pull through,
but doctors have warned that
he may be left crippled.

“He was shot in the back
and he’s going into spinal
surgery tonight. They say
they’re going to take the oth-
er bullet out this Friday
because they want him to
recover from the surgery
tonight,” said Mr Dean Jnr.

Police had warned his fam-
ily about crime in the area
when they opened the store
and therefore he felt in many
ways that such an attack was
“only a matter of time,” but
nonetheless, Alexander’s
brother said the incident left
him feeling “helpless.”

“[’m just praying for him.
I’m glad he’s alive but I’m
hoping he isn’t left crippled.”
Mr Dean Jnr also called for
anyone who can to donate
blood at Doctor’s Hospital as
they are in “dire need.”

Police hunting the two
criminals are also calling for
the public’s help in connec-
tion with the incident.

“We are seeking the help
of residents in the area or
anyone who may have been
passing the Park Gate Road
area noticing two men run-
ning, to contact us at tele-
phone numbers 919, 502-9991,
322-3816, or 328- TIPS,” said
Police Press Liaison Officer
Walter Evans.

According to Assistant
Superintendent Evans, the
dreadlocked gunman was
wearing a white shirt and blue
jeans. No description of the
second man was provided.

The potentially deadly
shooting came a little over
two weeks after mother of
three Wendy Bullard was bru-
tally gunned down in front of
her place of work.

Ms Bullard, 34, was shot in
the face when two masked
men held up 21st Century
Steel Welding Limited off
Royal Palm Street, just sev-
eral yards south of St
George’s Anglican Church.

FROM page one

i ie pulled up next to the
i car in Breadfruit Street
: where it was blocking traf-
i fic sometime after 9pm.

As they approached the

? 32-year-old driver sped off
i and the officers pursued. As
: Shots were fired from the
i car, police returned fire,
? while driving at high speed
i across southern New Provi-
? dence.

The chase ended when

Kia Sephia car and a Dodge
Ram truck in Croton and
Buttonwood Streets.

The passenger escaped
from the vehicle and ran off
while police arrested the dri-
ver.

He had a gunshot injury
in the back of his neck and
police believe he may have
been hit in the gunfire
exchange.

Emergency Medical Ser-
vices took the victim to hos-
pital where he is in stable
condition.

Police are appealing for

the Honda crashed into a

NOTICE

TRAFFIC DELAYS POSSIBLE

SHIRLEY STREET
VILLAGE ROAD TO
FREDRICK STREET

DUE TO

WATER & SEWER
REPLACEMENT WORKS
31st August to 1st December 2009

In an effort to upgrade existing
Water & Sewer Services the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
have contracted Bahamas Hot Mix
Company Ltd to replace existing
service connections at the above
location. As a consequent traffic
management involving road
closures and temporary traffic
diversions may be in operation

during the following times:

Daily between 7:00 pm
to 6:00 am

Local diversions will be sign
posted in due course and further
information will be provided
through the local media.



information to lead to the
arrest of the passenger in the
Honda Accord as an investi-
gation into the shooting con-
tinues.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9

Man shot Police in high speed chase shootout

Anyone with any infor-
mation that might assist
investigations should call
police on 911, 919, or call the
Criminal Detective Unit on

352-2015. To submit infor-
mation under total anonymi-
ty call Crime Stoppers
anonymously on 328-TIPS
(8477).

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



PM is set to announce

500 temporary jobs

FROM page one

ficult time.

He said that a new $17 million gov-
ernment office complex will be built
for Customs and Immigration here on
the island.

According to the prime minister,
the project, which involves the con-
struction of a 60,000 sq ft building
complex, will provide many construc-
tion jobs in Freeport.

Mr Ingraham said the announce-
ment for pre-qualification for con-
tractors will be made on Tuesday of
this week.

“Contractors who are interested in
bidding on the job who are qualified
to bid are urged to pick up the pack-
ages and to seek to become pre-qual-
ified to bid on the job,” he said.

The unemployment situation, the
closure of hotel properties, and the
decline in tourism on Grand Bahama
are pressing concerns for residents.

Mr Ingraham stated that the gov-
ernment intends to create a major
cruise port in Freeport at the Williams
Town site.

“We have taken steps to acquire a
total of 55 acres of land. That process
is going to take several months to be
completed.

“Those who own the land will have
the opportunity to come forward and

provide evidence of their ownership.
The land would be assessed in terms
of its value and government will cause
to be paid the assessed value,” he said.

Prime Minister Ingraham said per-
sons who are dissatisfied with the
assessment will be able to take action
in the Supreme Court.

“We will abide by whatever deci-
sions is made by such a process. In
the meantime, we propose to conclude
an acquisition and cause a cruise port
at Williams Town which will have sig-
nificant economic benefits for Grand
Bahama,” he stated.

Mr Ingraham also noted that gov-
ernment is paying the cost for contin-
ued operation of the casino at Our
Lucaya Resort.

Treasure Bay is taking over opera-
tion of the casino after the Isle of
Capri closed its operation.

“The government is paying the cost
for the continued operation of the
casino in Our Lucaya. It is not a deci-
sion I am not comfortable with.

“Tam not comfortable with the
Bahamas government having to take
money from the Treasury to run a

casino, but these are unusual times
and we are taking some usual deci-
sions to support Freeport, and the
employment of 200-plus people who
are employed there,” he said.

“We would like to have at Our
Lucaya not just a new casino opera-
tor...but we will continue to try to do
what we think the best is,” said Mr
Ingraham.

Prime Minister said government is
grateful to Hutchison, which owns
Our Lucaya Resort, for what it is
doing in terms of supporting and sus-
taining the number of jobs for
Bahamians at the hotel property.

However, he believes that there are
some other things that could be done
with the assistance of the government.

“We are prepared to offer support
from the government to Hutchison to
cause some additional things to be
done to enhance Grand Bahama as a
tourist destination,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Government is expected to meet
with the ownership of Hutchison in
London sometime in early October
to further discuss this.

According to Mr Ingraham, Har-
court, the owners of the Royal Oasis
property, has not yet indicated their
ability to proceed with plans for recon-
struction and opening of the resort in
Freeport.

When asked about the Ginn pro-
ject at West End, he said the devel-
opers of Ginn have informed the gov-
ernment that it has adequate sums of
money to continue at some point next
year.

“They are seeking to access addi-
tional funding and they are hopeful, in
the meantime they have several hun-
dred people working at Ginn as far
as I know,” he said.

The government, he said, is also
providing support and substantial
sums of money to the Ministry of
Tourism to promote Grand Bahama.

“We are advertising Grand Bahama
on television in a way its never been
before.

“You can turn to almost any of the
cable channels and see Grand Bahama
in advertisements as a place for people
to come,” he said.

According to Mr Ingraham, the
industrial sector has not been signifi-
cantly impacted on the island.

He noted that government is in dis-
cussion over the sale of the old Burma
terminal facility at East Grand
Bahama and expects to have a possi-
ble decision before end of the month.

HUBERT INGRAHAM



“VOPAK is continuing on its
expansion and the container port con-
tinues to provide good jobs,” said Mr
Ingraham.

Mr Ingraham said the NIB Unem-
ployment Programme has provided
assistance to 2,230 residents of Grand
Bahama, in addition to assistance from
Social Services.

FROM page one

ulated by the Utilities Regu-
lation and Competition
Authority (URCA).

Mr Ingraham said Govern-
ment is concerned that the
GBPC has not “reinvested
adequate sums of money into
its generation and distribution
system, and the company has
over the years taken its profits
out in cash rather than rein-
vesting it in its operation.”

The Power Company here
has recently come under fire
over reliability issues, among
other things, including the high
cost of electricity.

Local community activists
Troy Garvey and Joseph
Darville, vice president of the
Grand Bahama Human Rights

PM disappointed over inefficiency
of Grand Bahama Power Company

Association, said that the GB
Power has a monopoly on
power and should be regulated
by government.

They feel that rates and fuel
surcharge are too high.

The Prime Minister stated
that in so far as the fuel cost is
concerned, Grand Bahama
Power is able to access fuel
costs at a lower rate than BEC.

“They did not pay any cus-
toms duties or the rest of it;
they are able to service their
suppliers outside the area in
bonded vehicles and so that
ought to account for something
in terms of electricity cost here
in Grand Bahama,” he said.

‘Bethel Brothers Morticians
| ar. Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

STATE RECOGNIZED

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR



Former Member
of Parliament the late
HON. CLAUDIUS

LEANDER MINNIS,
O.B.E., LP., 78

of Faith Avenue South, off
Cannichee! Road and foemerty of
Calabash Bay, Andras, will be
held on Wednesday th, 11:00

Speaking in Grand Bahama
on Sunday, where he met with
the press at the Government
Office Complex to take ques-
tions on various pressing
issues, the Prime Minister
revealed that Government is
“disappointed in the Japanese
company, Marubeni” which,
until very recently, owned the
majority stake in the GBPC.

“We expected that they
would have brought greater
efficiency to Grand Bahama’s
electrical generating supply
and that has not happened,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham explained that
the original intent to have
Freeport was that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority would
regulate the electrical supply,
water, and telephone opera-
tors in Freeport.

He noted that the GBPC is
now supplying electricity, out-
side of Freeport, to the entire
island of Grand Bahama.

Mr Ingraham emphasised
that private sector enterprises
should be operating more effi-
ciently than public/government
enterprises.

“We are disappointed that
the number of power outages
that you have here in Grand

Bahama is far in excess of
government enterprises, and
as we all know government

enterprise is supposed to be
less efficient than the private
sector.

“And so the GBPC is not

giving us confidence that pri-
vate sector by itself is the
answer, so we will have dis-
cussions with them about the
various issues that have been
raised by the people of Grand
Bahama,” said Mr Ingraham.

With Grand Bahama’s econ-
omy in recession, residents
here have complained that the
Power Company has been
insensitive to how it enforces
its policies with disconnections
at this difficult time when so
many are unemployed, and
especially when power cuts are
so frequent.

Meanwhile, last week Greg
Ebelhar, head of Polymers
International's Freeport oper-
ations, told Tribune Business
that the electricity tariffs
charged by Grand Bahama
Power Company are “a huge
issue” for his company and
other manufacturers, as the
relatively high prices were tak-
ing a huge chunk out of their
bottom line and making their
prices/operations uncompeti-
tive compared to their global
rivals.

Mr Ebelhar suggested that
Freeport “absolutely cannot”
remain a viable, competitive
manufacturing base in the
medium to long term with such
relatively high power costs.

Mr Ingraham said: “We are
giving consideration to
whether or not the power com-
pany in Freeport, like BEC,
ought not to be regulated by
the new regulatory authority
which the government has
established called URCA (the
Utilities Regulation and Com-
petition Authority), and its
regulatory commission author-

ity which came into effect on
September 1, under the Com-
munication Act,” he said.
Mr Ingraham suggested
that there are standard profits
that utility companies are
expected to make that are
determined by regulatory
authorities, as well as stan-
dard sums of money that
ought to be kept for reinvest-
ment in upgrade of plant and
distribution systems, and this

could be addressed by URCA
if it were to regulate the
GBPC.

A town meeting was held
by a group of local communi-
ty activists on Friday evening
at Workers House so that the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany could address the con-
cerns of residents.

Excell Ferrell, CEO and
president of GBPC, attended
the meeting.

‘Dangerous’ man is
MET TUE Cd MCT

FROM page one

word “MOB” on his left arm, along with a marijuana leaf,
and another of a tear drop under his left eye.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said the police are seeking
the assistance of the public in locating Virgil.

According to reports, sometime around 9.10pm police
responded to a call at Les Fountain Building No 2 on East

Sunrise Highway.

On arrival police discovered a male lying on the floor of
a business at the complex. The victim was suffering from
apparent stab wounds to the body.

The victim, later identified as Smith, was taken to the hos-
pital where he was pronounced dead around 10pm.

Curious onlookers remained in the area as police
processed the crime scene. A bystander who knew the vic-
tim believes that the altercation was over a girl.

However, police have not confirmed a motive for the
stabbing and are continuing their investigations.

They believe that the attack occurred in another location
and the victim ran to Les Fountain Building No 2 where he

collapsed in a store.

ASP Mackey is appealing to anyone with information
concerning the matter and the whereabouts of Virgil to
contact police at 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911.

aim. at St. Barnabas Anglican
Church, Gaillow Hill & Wullf
Roads. Fr. Michael Maragh,
assisted by other Ministers of the:
Diocese will officiate. Interment
will follow in Lakeview Memorial
Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.



Left to cherish the memomies ore his: Wife of 53 years, Mildred; Sens:
Howard, Roger Se., Edward, Don, Nigel, and Cecil Minnis; Danughiters:
Laverme Swaby, Claudia Almanzar, Verna Minnis, and §. Denise
Russell; Extended children: Ednal, Goorge, Berard, Edgar Minnis,
and Jackie Russell; Grandchildren: Glenn Minnis, Darren Claud,
Rashad Minnis, Neco Minnis, Cordero Minnis, Cecil Minnis Jr.,
Antonio Almanzar, Roger Minnis Jr, Leon Swaby, Naren Minnis,
Reu Minnis, and Ricardo Saunders, Shari Dawn, 0" Biara, Rhea, Aisha,
Ceacilly, Juliette, Lacheka Rukiya, and Celine Minnis, Michelle and
Makiah Swaby, Tonysha, Adia, and Anaya Russell, Latesich Carey,
Samantha Martin, Tinta and Tinkka Bam, Cherse King, and Adnane
Burrows; Extended grandchildren: Lamar, Nikita, Jordan, Indira,
Gin, George, Eve, Eden, Semyde, Joyo, Chatonique, Indi, Eric, Ethan,
Victoria, and Kath; Great-prandchlldren: Asher, Tyler, Jonathan,
Lyndesha, Jaimec, Olivia, and Lyric; Brothers: Ivan and Dudric
Minis; Sisters Coname Rolle of Freeport, Grand Bahama; Brothers-
in-law: William Major and Rebert Barmett, Sc; Sisters-in-llaw:
Kathleen and Miralda Minnis, Mae Ward-Pratt, Sylvia Ward, and
Marcia Martin; Soms-in-law: Michael Swahy, Marces Almancar, and
Amhony Russell, Steven Russell; Daughters-ln-law: Latonia and
Jasmine Dale, Yvette, Carla, and Erica Minnis; Numerous neces
and nephews including: Leon, Gary, and Nathan Martin, Floyd
Ingraham, Prescott Minnis, Jason, Jamaal, Cedric, and Stephan Bolle,
Genmld Knowles, Rabert Barnett Ir, Adnan, Whrick, Sherain, and
Enric Pratt, Lois McCoy, Elizabeth Carey, Kim Minnis-Collie,
Kendertyn Minnis-Theophilus, Adama Minnis-McPhee, Miriam
Martin, Codricka and Stephanie Rolle, Patricia Dean and Terrie Rolle,
(Cannel Armbriter, Joyo Pratt, Lorraine Knowles, Elaine Farqubarson,
Minerva Bacon, Adeyla Hennett, Jean and Ann Barnett, Valane
Darville, Rose Martin-Fountain, Marilyn Martin-Stubbs and Susan
Mitchell; Other relatives and friends including: His Excellency
Sir Clifford Darling and family, Henry F. Storr and family; Kenneth
Brennen and family, Berlin Pratt and family, Rowena Ferguson and
family, Hester Kerr and family, Randolph Mincia and famuly: Cyril
“Boxer” Minnis and family, Virgimia Mortimer and family, Burk
Edgecombe and family, Effie Walkes, George, Alphonsa, and Maxwell
Conkley and family, Dr. Patrick Cargall and family, Louise Cargill,
Dr. Hubert Mirmis and family, the Turner family, Sterlin Minnis and
family, the Curlings from Curlings Hardware, Francina Bastian and
farnily, Macmi Pinder, Stanley Bethel, Jr. and family, Max Julian and
family, Beryl, Cora and Douglas from Tamanec, Florida, Barbara
Minnis, Julie Saunders, Angela Ward, Victoria Andrews, Melanie
Lynes, Deacon Peter Rahming and family, Canon Basil Tynes and
family, St. Barnabas Anglican Church family, Hillview Seventh Day
Adventist Church family, Pastor Jeremiah Duncombe ated farniby,
Roscoe Dames and family, Nora MoCalla and famaly, Charlene Stuart,
Bettymae Simms, Cheryl Minnas, Mitel Swaby, Dr, Kevin Moss, Era
and Malina Ferguson, His Excellency Sir Arthar 2, Hanno and family,
the Hon. Peery Christic and family, the Hon. Brave Davis and family,
the Hon. Paul L. Adderley and family, the Hom. Gleneys Hanna-
Martin, the Right Hon Hubert A. Ingraham, the Hon. Desmond
Bannister, Stalwart Councilors and the members of the Progressive
Liberal Party and a host of other relatives ond friends

The body will lic im state in the Foyer of the House of Assembly on
Tuesaday, September Sih, | lam te bpm

There will be no viewing af the church.

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avene, Palmdale
Nassau, AP. The Bahamas

A Funeral Service

MRS. ETHELYN
VIRGINIA
" Jean "
PINDER, 75

of Winton Meadows, Nassau,
The Bahamas, will be held at fj
St. Anne's Anglican Church,
Fox Hill Road, Nassau, on
Tuesday, 8th September, 2009
at 4:00pm.

Reverend Father Croshey WN.

Walkine will officiate andâ„¢

Interment will be in St. Anne's Cemetery, Fox Hill Road,
Nassau.

Mrs. Pinder is predeceased by her parents, Alexander C.
Knowles Sr, and Agnes L, Knowles and her brother, James
F. Knowles. She is survived by her hushand, Jetferson Williarn
Pinder; two sons, William Craig Pinder of Ely, England and
Richard Perry Pinder of Nassau; a granddaughter, Alice
Johnson; brothers, Alex, Emerick, Patrick, Geoffrey and
Charlton Knowles; sisters, Ruby Collins, Doris Anderson,
Yvonne Knowles, Deborah Koowles and Julianna Green:
uncle, Hilbert B. Pinder; brothers-in-law, Richard Anderson
Sr. James Green and David Pinder, sisters-in-law, Joan Pinder,
Shirley, Amarylis, Brenda, Rosa and Linda Knowles, other
relatives and friends including Ruth Moushaheck, Mike and
Marsha Stewart, Robert and Linda Brown, Claire Brown,
Johnny Brown and Mary Knowles, Julia and Steve Monti,
Joanne and Thirey Lamare, Ray and Flora Claridge, Mary
Low and Cedric Saunders, Doreen Kemp, Lori Dawson, Joan
Albury, Cora and Morton Carey, Patou Regent, many nephews
and nieces and other relatives and fnends too many bo mention.

With special thanks to Shirley Knowles, Amarylis Knowles,
Delores Rolle, Wellington King and Cynthia Taylor who
assisted so much during her illness,

Also, a special thanks to Dr. John Lunn and his entire staif
and to the Nurses at Doctors Hospital, Nassau,

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Cancer
Society of The Bahamas, P}O. Box 5.5, 6534, Nassau or to
St. Anne's Anglican Church, P.O. Box N. 1569, Nassau in
memory of Mrs. Ethelyn Virginia "Jean" Pinder.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



Virgil is considered armed and extremely dangerous.

Around 5’ 9” tall and 135 pounds, he has a dark brown
complexion and dark brown eyes.

TEACHING POSITIONS AT
KINGSWAY ACADEMY

Elementary School

A Temporary Computer Studies Teacher
is needed for students in Kindergarten
through grades 6. A trained Elementary
Classroom Teacher is preferred. The
position could be available for several
months.

High School

A Trained Music Teacher is needed for
students in grades 7 through 12. The
successful candidate must be qualified
and able to prepared students for the
various External Music Examinations.

Applications can be collected from the
Human Resources Department at the
Business Office telephone number
324-6269.

Only Born Again Christians should

apply.

The Deadline for applications is
Tuesday, September 15, 2009.




Sports

Boxing duo
training in
lialy despite
elimination

VALENTINO KNOWLES

BOXING

ALTHOUGH they have
both been eliminated from
further competition at the
AIBA World Champi-
onships in Milan, Italy, the
two-man team of Valenti-
no Knowles and Carl Hield
will remain until the end.

The duo, along with
coach Andre Seymour, will
not be back home until
Sunday.

Knowles, who made his-
tory when he became the
first Bahamian to win a
first round match before he
lost in the second round,
said he intends to take
advantage of the opportu-
nity to continue to train.

“This is going to be my
training ground until I
return home,” he said.
“Tve already got a taste of
what it’s like to make his-
tory and I know there’s a
lot more to come.”

The goal, he said, is to
get ready for the 2012
Olympic Games in Lon-
don, England.

Knowles said he and
Hield, who lost in the first
round, have been going out
and watching the other
competition going on when
they are not training.

BOXING

Mackey
hack home



CHA lee le Cy

AFTER spending about
three weeks in a training
camp in Berlin, Germany,
Bahamas super mid-
dleweight champion Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’ Mack-
ey is back home.

Mackey, who is prepar-
ing to defend his British
Commonwealth title in
October, was training with
world champion Mikkel
Kessler.

However, the sparring
sessions didn’t go as Mack-
ey had anticipated as
Kessler was not available
every day.



MONDAY,



‘SUPERMAN’ IS BACK!

Leevan Sands soars to big victory in Italy

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ITH the heartbreak-
ing performance of
the 12th IAAF World
Championships in

SEPTEMBER 7,



2009



Athletics behind him, Leevan ‘Super-
man’ Sands came back to soar to a big
victory yesterday as he prepares for the
IAAF World Athletic Final this week-

end.

Se GACT UT Ta ay

PEARAMEIESM -A- 5 RUA |

The Thaeas A. Aabieton Nationa! > radium Prope! Aided bry Pea

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEGEND THOMAS ROBINSON along with H.E Mr WU Bangguo unveils the new cornerstone to be
placed at the entrance of the new stadium. His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing
Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China presented a mod-
el of the national stadium to the Deputy prime Minister Brent Symonette along with Desmond Ban-
nister, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture and Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest,
Minister of National Security.

TENNIS: US OPEN 2009
Knowles wins first encounter
with rising star Ryan Sweeting

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SOONER or later, Mark
Knowles knew that he would
have to face rising young star
Ryan Sweeting.

That opportunity came
sooner than later as the two
were on opposite side of the
court in the second round of
the men’s doubles at the US
Open in Flushing Meadows,
New York on Saturday.

Knowles and his Indian
partner Mahesh Bhupathi,
seeded number three, took
advantage of the less experi-
enced team of Sweeting and
his American partner Jesse
Levine for a 7-5, 6-2 win.

Playing through the pain
he’s experiencing after his
right ring finger was cut in an
elevator at the Tennis Center
last Tuesday requiring some
nine stitches, Knowles said he
was quite contented in win-
ning a couple of matches so
far, including his first head-
to-head encounter with
Sweeting.

Tough

“Tt was interesting playing
Ryan,” said Knowles of the
former Bahamian Davis Cup
player, now an American cit-
izen. “It was a tough match.

“He’s a good player with a
big serve.

“He hits the ball very well
and he’s a very good doubles
player. I think he’s being
doing well lately and he
should have a bright future.”

While Knowles and Bhu-
pathi had a 81-64 winning per-
centage edge on Ist serve and
62-32 on 2nd serve, Sweeting
and Levine got the better on
winners (including service) as
they finished 12-10.

However, Knowles and
Bhupathi dominated on
receiving points won 45-27%
and break point conversion
4-of-8 for a 50-33 % (1-of-3)
to accumulate an advantage
of 65-47 total points won.

“We’re playing very well.
Obviously, I have a little bit of

}



UL a Cen Tests)



US OPEN: See Page 14

es
adversity, we’ve played well
so far in the two matches we
have played,” said Knowles,
after they won their first
round match 6-3, 6-4 over
American James Cerretani
and Lovro Zovko from Croa-
tia.

“Our draw is pretty easy.
But we obviously feel great
about the way we’re playing
and we felt great coming into
the event. So it’s just a matter
of trying to get better and bet-
ter each day and getting fit.”

Knowles and Bhupathi are
scheduled to play their third
round match today against the
team of Yen-Hsun Lu of
Taipei and Dudi Sela of
Israel.

Yesterday, Knowles had
mixed doubles duties. He and
his German partner, Anna-
Lena Groenefeld, the No.4
seeds, faced Knowles’ former
partner Zi Yan from China
and Mariusz Fyrstenberg
from Poland.

However, Yan and Fyrsten-
berg got the best of the
match-up with identical set
scores of 6-3, 6-3 over
Knowles and Groenefeld, the
winners of the Wimbledon
title in July.

Competing along with Shamar Sands
at a meet in Rieti, Italy, Sands cleared
16.77 metres or 55-feet, 01/4-inches to
snatch first place in the men’s triple jump.




Pain in. ~
belly for Rafa, E
Page 14 =



His winning leap came on the second
of his four attempts. He opened with
16.12 or 52-10 3/4 that placed him in sec-
ond behind Cuba’s Arnie David Girat.

But after taking the lead, Sands went
on to post 16.52 or 54-2 1/2 in the third
round and 16.60 or 54-5 1/2 in the last

SEE page 13



aol’ s Reputtic of China

oa
~
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation

Tender

Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation
invites Tenders for the above named services.

oll

m8 8

Bidders are required to collect bid packages from

the Corporation's Administration Office, Blue Hill &
Tucker Roads by contacting
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour, Telephone
No. 302-1158,

SEE PAGE 12

Tenders are to be delivered on or before 4:00 p.m.
on September 25, 2009,
and addressed as follows:

Mr. Kevin Basden
General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas



66

It was interesting
playing Ryan. It was
a tough match

i 99

Marked: Tender Wo. 7O7/09
Assessment of Capital Projects
Administration Process

The Corporation reserves the right ta accept or
reject the whole or such part of any Tender the

Mark Carporation deems necessary,

Knowles













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Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 « TEL: 323-5782

meatal tal dies,

Byron Lynden Pearce, 37

a resident of Collins Avenue, will be held at Calvary Bible
Church, Collins Ave, on Friday at 11 :00 a.m. Officiating will
be Pastor Frederick Arnett, assisted by Pastor Thomas Albury.
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen & Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother Eloise Pearce & a host of other
relatives & friends.

Henry Adam Reckley 83

a resident of Father Callan Lane, will be held at St. John's
Native Baptist Cathedral, Meeting Street, on Saturday at
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Michael E. Symonette & Rev. Dr.
Hermis Bain. Interment follows in the Church's Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Claudiemae Reckley; 1 son: Daniel
Reckley; 2 daughters: Louise Albertha Sherman & Judy Reckley; 2 sisters: Venis
Reckley & Sarah Fisher; 1 brother: Rev. Hermix Reckley.

: ‘ Rosina Delores Simmons, 95

}| a resident of Palm Avenue & formerly of Lorimors, Turks
Island will be held at Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley
| Street, on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor T.
G. Morrison. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens,

Left to cherish her memories are her daughters: Carol Bonamy, Marion Williams
& Laverne Bani-Hani; 1 stepson: George Simmons; 11 grandchildren: Antionette,
Edward, Gaetano & Gillianno Bonamy, Deon Munroe, Danobury & Trenton
Williams, Kristi Thompson & Nakia Williams.

Jeffery Oswald Sturrup, 39

a resident of Arundel Street, will be held at St. Georges's

| Anglican Church, Montrose Ave., on Friday at 1 :00 p.m.

| Officiating will be Fr. Kingsley Knowles. Interment follows
| in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his mother: Bernice Sturrup; sisters: Delores
Sturrup Carter, Willimae Sturrup, Shirley Travis of Detroit Michigan & Edith
Sturrup; brothers: Charles, Edwin, George, Tyrone & Pedro Sturrup; aunts:
Marietta Storr & Daisy Evans of Miami, FI.

Eliza Josepha Brooks Wilkinson, 76

a resident of Dunmore Street, will be held at St. Mary the Virgin
Anglican Parish, Virginia Street, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be The Rev'd Fr. Dwight M. Bowe, Canon
Warren H. Rolle & the Rev'd Dr. Peter Grist. Interment follows
in the church cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her 5 children: Elroy (deceased), Sidney Jr.,
Keith, Edward Wilkinson Sr.; 1 daughter: Mrs. Joy Anne Wilkinson Moss; 2 step
children: Karrington Wilkinson & Dora Culmer; 2 brothers: Nathaniel Brooks
Sr. & Mickey Brooks; 2 daughters-in-law: Sherry & Valarie Wilkinson; 14 grand
children; 6 great grandchildren; 1 uncle: Lloyd Quant; 1 aunt: Annie Adams &
a host of other relatives & friends.

DEATH ANNOUNCEMENTS

Jennie Lee Albertha Richardson, 50

a resident of Peter Street West, died at her residence on Thursday
3 Sept. 2009.

She is survived by her father: Simeon Richardson; 1 son:
Thurman Knowles; 1 daughter: Cecelia Richardson; 3
grandchildren, 3 sisters, 3 brothers & a host of other relatives
& friends.

Sangster Smith, 42

a resident of Goldern Gates #2 & formelry of Grand Turks,
died at PMH on 28 August., 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Kaynell Smith; 3 sons: Randy,
Zhivago & Leander; 1 daughter: Celena; 2 brother: Basil Smith
& Gomez Smith; 1 sister: Lorraine Smith.

Ethel Humes, 65

a resident of Burial Ground Corner & formerly of Eneas Jumper
Corner, died on Sunday 30 August, 2009.

She is survived by her 5 sons: Wesley Wallace, Henry Wallace,
Junior Mya Sands, Cecil Martin & Lloyd Davis; 4 daughters:
Margaret Huymes, Dena Lorraine Humes, Evangelist Anne

PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Minister: ‘The Chinese

are going incredibly fast’

The Thomas A. Robins



TRIBUNE SPORTS

ional Stadium Project

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LEGENDARY Thomas A. Robinson, whom the new national stadium will be named after, is congratulated by Wu
Bangguo, the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of

China.

Bannister hails
efficiency of
the company

working on new
national stadium

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of Youth, Sports
and Culture Desmond Bannis-
ter said he’s really surprised at
the efficiency with which the
Qilu Construction Group Cor-
poration are preparing to have
the new national stadium com-
pleted by 2011.

“The Chinese are going
incredibly fast,” said Bannister
after the official tour of the con-
struction site on Saturday with
the 120-plus delegation from
the National People’s Congress
of the People’s Republic of Chi-
na, headed by Wu Bangguo,
the chairman of the standing
committee.

“T don’t think that there’s
anybody who work as quickly
as they’re working and are as
organized and extremely quiet
as they are.

Pleased

“We are very pleased with
the way they are working.”

When completed, the
Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations is hoping that
they will be able to host the
Carifta Games from April to
coincide with the official open-

WU Bangguo on Saturday.





CHINESE WORKERS at the sports centre lineo wait for the arrival of

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

CHINESE STAFF pose with WU Bangguo.



ing ceremonies and the naming
of the new 15,000 seat state-of-
the-art Thomas A. Robinson
Track and Field Stadium that
could be explanded to accom-
modate a total of 23,000 seats.

If they are successful in
securing the bid from Grena-
da, who is currently trying to
repair their stadium after they
were hit by hurricane, it will be

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the seventh time that the
Bahamas has hosted the top
junior regional competition.

The last time the Bahamas
hosted Carifta was in 2002
when Bannister served as pres-
ident of the BAAA.

The BAAA, which will go to
the polls in November to select
a new executive board for the
next three years, is currently
headed by Curt ‘Mr. H’
Hollingsworth.

Bannister, who on Saturday
spoke about the “economic
benefits” that will derive for
the Bahamas when the stadi-
um is completed, thanked the
Chinese government for “what
they are doing for us and how
they are doing it. I can’t wait
until it’s finished.”

Leading up to the Olympic
Games last year in Beijing, Chi-
na, the Chinese government
created two national stadiums
that have surpassed all con-
structed anywhere else in the
world.

Marvelled

Everybody marvleled as the
‘Bird’s Nest’ national track and
field stadium, which hosted the
opening and closing ceremonies
as well as the track and field
competition at the Olympics
and the ‘Blue tube’ national
swim complex next to it that
hosted the swimming competi-
tion.

If that’s any indication, Ban-
nister said the new stadium at
the Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center, which will sit in
between the current Thomas
A. Robinson Track and Field
(which will become a practice
track) and the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center, will defi-
nitely be the envy of the
Caribbean.

“This is the biggest stadium
that the Chinese are building

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice said.

Davis-Joseph, Rose Wallace; 28 grand, 10 great grand; 1 uncle: Bill Simmons; outside of China,” Bannister

2 aunts: Marjorie Simmons & Bernice Simmons. “Theyare dommilisdtaxee

ting it done. They are a very
dedicated and hardworking
people and I’m sure that there’s
some lessons there that we can
all learn.”

A number of government
ministers, headed by Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette and including Robinson,
watched as Wu unveiled the
cornerstone for the stadium.

Wu also presented a relica
of the national stadium to
Symonette during the brief cer-
emony.

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Jeffery Cooper.




TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 13



SPORTS



NEVV PROVIDENCE SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION
Teams jockeying
for playoff positions



SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Mynez Cargill makes the play at the plate to get Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Varnette Nairn

out at first base.

WITH the regular season
winding down, teams are now
jockeying for playoff positions
in the New Providence Softball
Association.

Saturday night at the Baillou
Hills Sporting Complex, a triple
header was played with some
playoff implications as both the
ladies and men’s defending
champions stayed in the hunt.

Brackettes 13, Lady Sharks
9: In a rematch of last year’s
finals, the defending champi-
ons Sigma Brackettes out-
slugged runners-up Proper
Care Pool Lady Stingrays 13-
9.

Brackettes’ veteran Ernes-
tine Butler-Stubbs got the bet-
ter of the pitching dual with
youthful Thela Johnson of
Proper Care Pool as the Brack-
ettes pushed their third place
record to 8-5. The Lqdy Sharks
fell to 10-5 to remain in second
behind idled front-running
Pineapple Air Wildcats, who
are 12-2.

Vandette Smith sparked Sig-
ma’s offensive attack with a 2-
for-5 night with two runs batted
in and scoring three times. Zel-
la Symonette was just as
impressive with a 3-for-5 out-
ting, driving in a pair of runs
and scoring as many.

Antonia Simmons helped out
by going 2-for-3 with a RBI,
scoring twice and Cassie Smith
was also 2-for3 with a pair of
runs scored.

For Proper Care Pool,
Keisha Pratt went 2-for4 with a
RBI and a run scored; Shanelle
Symonette was 2-for4 with two
RBI and Cleo Symonette went
1-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice.

Truckers 12, New Breed 0:
The defending men’s champi-
ons Commodo Security Truck-
ers stayed close to the Pricewa-
terhouse Stingrays in third
place as they blanked the rook-
ie New Breed 12-0.

Anton Gibson fired a one-
hitter for the win for the Truck-
ers, who improved to 11-5, 1
1/2 game behind idled Price-
waterhouse Stingrays, who are
14-3 as they both trail front run-
ning Dorcey Park Boyz, who
are 16-1.

Darren Mortimer enjoyed a
2-for-3 night at the plate with
two runs batted in, scoring
twice to lead a balanced offen-
sive attack. Richard Bastian
was 2-for-3 with three RBI,
scoring a run on a solo in-the-
park home run in the bottom
of the second.

Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Ferguson
was 2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring
twice; Martin Burrows Jr. was a
perfect 2-for-2 with two RBIs
and three runs scored, including
hitting a two-run homer in the
fourth and Julian Taylor was
also a perfect 2-for-2 with two
runs.

@ CURRENT SOFTBALL STANDINGS

AFTER the New Providence Softball Associa-
tion’s triple header on Saturday night at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex, here’s a look at the
current standings going into Tuesday night’s

double header:

Ladies Division
Teams W L Pet. GB

Pineapple Air Wildscats 12 2 .857 -

Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks 10 5 .666 21/2
Sigma Brackettes 8 5 .615 31/2

Boomer G Lady Swingers 3 11.2149

Queen’s 1 12 .076 101/2
Men’s Division
Dorcey Park Boyz 161 .941 -







TE
TWIT

Sands is back

FROM page 11

round to maintain his posi-
tion.

Sands, who celebrated his
28th birthday when he com-
peted in the qualifying round
of the World’s in Berlin, Ger-
many last month, just missed
out on the bronze medal
when Cuban Alexis Copello
passed him in the last round.

Sands is the bronze medal-
ist from the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China last year.

Girat, who was fifth in
Berlin, took second place with
his best mark of 16.67 or 54-8
1/4 on his first attempt. Mom-
chil Karailiev of Bulgeria was
third with 16.61 or 54-6.

Sands will now join sprint-
ers Debbie Ferguson-McKen-
zie and Chandra Sturrup
along with quarter-miler Chris
‘Fireman’ Brown in the
IAAF/VTB Bank World Ath-
letics Final this weekend in
Thessaloniki, Greece.

Ranked

Sands is the second ranked
competitor in the triple jump
behind Girat. Sturrup and
Ferguson-McKenzie are No.4
and 5 respectively in the
women’s 100 with Ferguson-
McKenzie topping the list in
the 200. Brown is No.2 in the
men’s 400. Also at the meet
yesterday, Shamar Sands had
to settle for a sixth place finish
in the men’s 110 hurdles in
13.65 seconds.

Jamaca got a 1-2 sweep
from Dwight Thomas (13.36)





SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Thelma Johnson goes to work as she delivers a pitch
to the Sigma Brackettes.



PROPER and Maurice Wignall (13.48).
‘| CARE POOL Sean’ :
| LADY pain’s Jackson Quinonez
SHARKS’ was third in 13.49.
batter Shamar Sands, 24, got
»| Varnette fourth in his heat of the semi-
7 Nairn final and didn’t advance to
avoided the final in Berlin.
ut While Leevan Sands has
PROPER CARE POOL LADY SHARKS’ batter Varnetta Nairn squares off to put idee qualified for the World Ath-
down the bunt. Sj oA y letic Final, Shamar Sands has
“| Sackatfee! not. Only the top eight
catcher atheltes will compete and
Cassie Sands is sitting in the 12th
Smith, spot.

ANEW
GENERATION

SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Renee ‘Sunshine’ Davis tries to catch the ball before
Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Thela Johnson reaches first base.

ERNESTINE BUTLER-STUBBS in action on the mound.

For Young Breed, who the win on the mound over
slipped into a two-way tie for C a or di on ai l
fifth at 6-10 with the idled Roy- Gilbert and he got all the help \N
al Bahamas Defense Force he needed offensively to join
Commodores, Roberto Larri- | New Breed in a two-way tie for
more had the lone hit on asin- fifth at 6-10.

HILUX DOUBLE CAB FEATURES:

2.7 litre VVTI engine ee URAL nee CLL CR SUL

gle in the third.

Outlaws 11, Hitmen 7: The
Roscoe Thompson Heavy
Equipment gained some
ground with their big victory
over Robin Hood and the loss
to their little brother team New
Breed.

Bruce Mackey went 2-for-4
with five RBI and a run scored.
He had a two-run double and a
three-run triple. Juliano
Thompson was 2-for4 with two
RBI and a run scored and Kedo
Johnson was 1-for-2 with three
runs. Shavargo Archer was 2-

automatic transmission
mp3/cd player
TA a LU
air conditioning

erate ashe
oT AMT)
side steps
re.



Roscoe Thompson secured _ for-4 with two runs scored.

PHOTOS: Felipé Major//ribune staff
The Hilux is built on advanced Toyota technology for rugged

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the Hilux sets the standard for a new generation.

Pricewaterhouse Stingrays 14 3 .823 2

Commando Truckers 11 5 .687 41/2

Robin Hood Hitmen 9 7 .5621/2 61/2

Young Breed 6 10 .375 91/2

RBDF Commodores 6 10 .375 91/2

Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws 7 11
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Morgan’s Buccaneers 4 14 .222 121/2

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Ue da ah

Pain in the ... belly, but

Nadal

EDDIE PELLS,
AP National Writer
NEW YORK

Rafael Nadal encountered
as much trouble from his own
body as his opponent in a
third-round victory at the U.S.
Open.

The third-seeded Nadal,
who missed Wimbledon with
sore knees, needed a 10-
minute injury break for a
trainer to work on his abdom-
inals early in the third set of
his 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over
No. 32 Nicolas Almagro on
Sunday.

The stomach injury first
cropped up for Nadal last
month at a tournament in
Cincinnati.

While Nadal laid on the
ground to receive treatment,
Almagro was laying down to
get work done on his back.

The Spaniards popped back
up and Nadal finished the
work, staying in the hunt to
complete his career Grand
Slam, though it has yet to be
seen what kind of toll this
match took on him.

"T feel it a little bit now, but
I'll try my best to recover for
the next match," said Nadal,
who has insisted all week that
he's been feeling fine. "I'm
here to work hard and try my
best all the time.”

In other early action Sun-
day, 11th-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez defeated 17th-seed-
ed Tomas Berdych, 7-5, 6-4, 6-
4, and No. 9 Gilles Simon of
France retired because of a
knee injury while trailing No.
24 Juan Carlos Ferrero 1-6,
6-4, 7-6 (5), 1-0.

"Sometimes, I don't know
why, I just feel a big pain,"
said Simon, who added that
he's had problems with the
knee since the French Open
in May.

In the other early women's
match, No. 18 Li Na of China
ousted No. 26 Francesca Schi-

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



AP Photo/Kathy Willens

RAFAEL NADAL of Spain has his abdomen taped by a trainer during a break in his match against Nico-
las Almagro of Spain in the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, yesterday.

AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill

Serena Williams, of the United States, returns to

NEW YORK

Defending champion Serena
Williams has powered her way into
the U.S. Open quarterfinals, winning
the last 10 games to beat No. 22-seed-
ed Daniela Hantuchova 6-2, 6-0.

Williams finished with eight aces
and a 27-9 advantage in winners in
Sunday's first match in Arthur Ashe

Stadium.

No. 1 Dinara Safina was upset Sat-
urday night, meaning No. 2 Williams is
the highest-ranked woman left in the
field. Safina will remain atop the rank-
ings, though, even if Williams were to
win a second consecutive U.S. Open
title and fourth overall.

Williams has reached the quarterfi-
nals at 11 of the past 12 major tourna-

Daniela Hantuchova, of Slovakia.

avone of Italy, 6-2, 6-3.

No. 3 Venus Williams had
an afternoon match against
unseeded Kim Clijsters, who
is facing, by far, the toughest

match in her first appearance
at the U.S. Open since she
won it in 2005.

Also later, No. 2 Andy
Murray was scheduled to play

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ments and won the title at three of the
past four.



195th-ranked Taylor Dent of
Newport Beach, Calif., who
has won two rounds in his
inspirational comeback from



RAFAEL NADAL, of Spain, returns to Nicolas Almagro, also of
Spain, during the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York,
Sunday, Sept. 6, 2009.

MEN

Juan Carlos Ferrero (24), Spain, def. Gilles Simon (9), France, 1-
6, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 1-0, retired.

Fernando Gonzalez (11), Chile, def. Tomas Berdych (17), Czech
Republic, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4.
j a Nadal (3), Spain, def. Nicolas Almagro (32), Spain, 7-5, 6-

Women

FOURTH ROUND

Serena Williams (2), United States, def. Daniela Hantuchova
(22), Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2.

Li Na (18), China, def. Francesca Schiavone (26), Italy, 6-2, 6-3.

tae

N
THIRD ROUND
Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, and Michael Llodra, France, def. Juan
Ignacio Chela, Argentina, and Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 7-5, 2-6, 6-
3

WOMEN

THIRD ROUND

Maria Kirilenko and Elena Vesnina (10), Russia, def. Alexa Glatch
and Carly Gullickson, United States, 7-6 (3), 6-2.

Alisa Kleybanova and Ekaterina Makarova (13), Russia, def.
Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano Pascual (2), Spain, 7-
6 (3), 6-3.

Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Nadia Petrova (8), Rus-
sia, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Patty Schnyder (9),
Switzerland, 6-7 (6), 3-6, 6-3.

Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (1), United States, def.
Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-4, 5-7,

AP Photo/Kathy Willens



back surgery.

CRICKET: ENGLAND vs AUSTRALIA, NATWEST SERIES

Photo/PA, Rebecca Naden

AUSTRALIA'S BRETT LEE, ri right, eolebratss atter aang the wick:
et of England's Paul Collingwood during the second one day inter-
national cricket match at Lord's cricket ground, London, Sunday
Sept. 6, 2009.

Second defeat for England

England fell further behind in the NatWest Series after failing to
overhaul a moderate Australia total for the second time in three
days. Andrew Strauss’ team lost by 39 runs to go 2-0 down in the
seven-match campaign, having lost their way badly in pursuit of 250
at Lord's, following the last-ball decider on Friday evening. The
Ashes winners appeared on course to the level the series when they
entered the 15th over on 74 without loss but a cluster of wickets,
which mirrored a similar pattern at the same stage of Australia's
innings, altered the outlook. Shane Watson's introduction was
more in desperation than inspiration given that he was the sixth
bowler employed inside the first two sets of powerplays.

But his dismissal of Ravi Bopara, who fatally ambled across
his stumps to be plumb lbw, halted the momentum built up against
the new ball.

Strauss and opening partner Ravi Bopara had England cruising
towards victory at Lord's before losing four wickets for 23 runs and
eventually getting bowled out for 210.

"Having been 70-odd for none we were in a great position to
come home comfortably but we were the architects of our own
downfall to an extent," Strauss said after the 39-run defeat.

Australia vl South Africa 21 1

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SOUTH AFRICA'S Victor Matfiel, right, and Australia’ s James
Horwill jump in the lineout during the Tri-Nations rugby match in
Brisbane, Australia, Saturday Sept. 5, 2009. Satisfied Australia
coach Robbie Deans praised the patience and tenacity shown by
his players after their impressive 21-6 win over South Africa in
Brisbane.The Springboks sit well clear at the top of the table on
17 points ahead of the Kiwis on eight, with the Wallabies a further
point back with one match remaining against New Zealand in
Wellington in a fortnight.



Brazil qualifies
for World Cup;
France struggles

Brazil qualified for its 19th
consecutive World Cup, leav-
ing Argentina to join Portugal
and France with difficult paths
to reach next year’s tourna-
ment, according to Associated
Press.

Defending World Cup cham-
pion Italy and European cham-
pion Spain maintained their
leads in Europe, while England
and Germany won exhibition
games ahead of qualifiers on
Wednesday. And in Africa,
Cameroon boosted itself with
its first victory in the final round
of qualifying. The United States
came from behind at home for
the second straight qualifier,
defeating El Salvador 2-1 to
move up one spot into second
place in North and Central
America and the Caribbean.

Luisao put Brazil ahead in
the 24th minute at Rosario,
Argentina, and Luis Fabiano
scored in the 30th and 67th.
Jesus Datolo got a goal in the
65th for Argentina, which will
face pressure to remove coach
Diego Maradona. Brazil (8-1-
6) leads South American qual-
ifying with 30 points, three
ahead of Chile and Paraguay
(both 8-4-3) and eight in front
of Argentina (6-5-4) with three
matches remaining.

The top four teams advance
to next year’s tournament,
while the No. 5 nation goes to a
playoff against the No. 4 nation
in North and Central America
and the Caribbean.

Brazil became the seventh
nation to join host South Africa
in next year’s 32-nation field,
following Australia, Japan, the
Netherlands, North Korea and
South Korea and the Nether-
lands. Argentina lost a home
qualifier for the first time since
a 5-0 defeat to Colombia in
1993. Cristiano Ronaldo is in
danger of missing the World
Cup after Portugal needed a
last-minute goal by Liedson for
a 1-1 tie against Denmark.
Nicklas Bendtner gave the
Danes the lead in the 41st
minute. Denmark (5-0-2) leads
Group One with 17 points, four
ahead of Hungary (4-2-1),
which lost 2-1 at home to Swe-
den when Zlatan Ibrahimovic
scored in injury time. Sweden
(3-1-3) is third with 12 points,
and Portugal (2-1-4) has 10
heading into Wednesday’s
game at Hungary.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 15



Crews work to hold California wildfire's eastern edge

LOS ANGELES

WITH the massive wildfire
burning north of Los Angeles
more than half contained, hand
crews were working Sunday to
keep the fire's eastern flank from
crossing a rural mountain high-
way, a U.S. Forest Service
spokeswoman said, according to
Associated Press.

The fire, which started Aug.
26, has killed two firefighters,
blackened nearly 246 square
miles of the Angeles National
Forest and destroyed at least 76
homes. Fire agencies so far have
spent $43.5 million fighting the
blaze.

Authorities on Sunday were



trying to determine who set the
deadly fire.

At least a dozen investigators
were working to analyze clues
found at a burnt hillside near
Angeles Crest Highway where
the fire started. But officials, who
say the cause of the fire was
arson, were hesitant to release
any of their findings to the
media.

The fire was 51 percent con-
tained Sunday as crews built new
protective lines near Highway 39
in the San Gabriel Wilderness,
U.S. Forest Service spokes-
woman Jennifer Sanchez said.

No homes were immediately
threatened.

The weekend weather fore-

cast called for cooler tempera-
tures and slightly higher humid-
ity that could help firefighters
further surround the blaze.
Because of the reduced heat,
about 400 firefighters assigned
to protect structures were dis-
missed Saturday. About 4,800
firefighters remained.

Los Angeles County firefight-
ers Tedmund Hall and Arnaldo
Quinones were killed Aug. 30
while seeking an escape route

for their inmate fire crew after
flames overran their camp on
Mount Gleason. The two died
when their truck plunged 800
feet off a steep mountain road.

Sheriff's detectives opened a
homicide investigation after the
fire was ruled arson earlier this
week, and Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger has offered
$100,000 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
the culprit.








A CLOUD of
vapor and
smoke is seen
from Victory
Park near
Pasadena, as
the Station Fire
continues to
burn on the East
| side of the the
Angeles Nation-
) al Forest.

Damian

== + Dovarganes/AP

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SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

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MONDAY,

SEPTEMBER 7,



2009





ColinaImperial

Confidence For Life

0% public building
energy drop target

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

h e
Bahamas
should
target a
30 per cent reduc-
tion in energy usage
by public buildings
by 2010, and
attempt to reduce
New Providence
commute times by
20 per cent by next
year, the National
Energy Policy Committee’s first
report has urged, a government min-
ister telling Tribune Business that
developing an energy policy was
“critical” for this nation’s economic
and environmental sustainability.
Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, told Tri-
bune Business that while some target
dates in the committee’s first report
were likely to be adjusted, since the
document was drafted in 2008, the
Government still intended to pro-
duce a National Energy Policy



NEYMOUR

Government assesses

* National Energy Policy formulation still ‘critical’ for
government, as BEC’s last annual bill reaches $376m
* Bahamas among world’s five most vulnerable nations to climate change,
but public not recognising fossil fuel use’s impact on ‘life and death matter’
* Committee's first report sets short-term targets of 10-20% public
transport use increase, and 20% commute reduction time by 2010
* Renewable energy should be 10-20% of energy supply mix within 10 years,
report says, with 20-30% of households using solar water heater

(NEP) document “at the end of the
day”.

Although unable to give a target
deadline for the policy’s completion
and publication, due to the fact that
the Government wanted to “max-
imise input” from the Bahamian
public and other stakeholders, Mr
Neymour reiterated that the Ingra-
ham administration saw it as criti-
cal in guiding efforts to reduce this
nation’s energy spend and environ-
mental/carbon footprint.

“In my view, it’s critical,” Mr Ney-
mour said of the need for a Bahami-
an National Energy Policy. “For
instance, if you look at BEC alone,
BEC’s fuel bill for its last Budget
year was $376 million. That sum
demonstrates the magnitude of gov-
ernment spending for consumption
of petroleum products and energy.
We're trying to minimise it. It affects
significantly our foreign exchange
reserves and our foreign spending.”

Apart from the economics, Mr

Neymour said that addressing
Bahamian consumption of petrole-
um products, and the almost-total
dependence on fossil fuels for elec-
trical generation, had important
implications for the environment -
especially given this nation’s vul-
nerability to rising sea levels and cli-
mate change.

“The Bahamas is considered one
of the top five countries that are neg-
atively impacted by climate change,”
the minister added, explaining that

the work being done by the Nation-
al Energy Policy Committee in this
area was “critical” to this nation.

“It’s a life and death matter for
the Bahamas moving forward. It’s a
critical issue,” Mr Neymour said of
climate change and global warming,
and the role played by energy con-
sumption patterns.

“Tt’s not taken root with the pub-
lic as it should. We generally look at
energy usage when we get our elec-
tricity bills, but I think Bahamians
should be more concerned with the
environmental impact of an energy
policy.”

Figures produced recently showed
that the Bahamas’ per capita carbon
dioxide emissions, resulting from
fossil fuel consumption, had
increased by 40 per cent since 1996.
Emissions per capita now stood at
16.48, with the amount of carbon
dioxide emitted by this nation, as
measured in millions of tonnes, hav-
ing increased from 2.2 million in
1992 to 3.5 million in 2000 and 5 mil-
lion in 2006.

SEE page 4B

Film Studios principal

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE GOVERNMENT
has been moving slowly in
drafting a new Heads of
Agreement for the Bahamas
Film Studios because it wants
to determine whether its cur-
rent chairman and owner,
who has threatened to close
the project down, is a man it
wants to do business with, the
Permanent Secretary in the
Prime Minister’s Office told
Tribune Business.

David Davis said the Gov-

Determining whether to do
business with him, as Heads
redrafting ongoing amid
threats of closure

ernment has been attempting
to draft a new Heads of
Agreement for the Grand
Bahama-based development
for some time, ever since
Nashville-based investment
banker, Ross Fuller, took con-
trol.

Mr Davis said the lease of

SEE page 11B

Gap between rich, poor to widen

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE ‘wealth gap’ between
rich and poor in the Bahamas
is likely to widen as a result of
the current recession, a for-
mer finance minister has told
‘Tribune Business, with he and
others believing this nation is
undergoing a “major struc-
tural change” and could face a
relatively ‘jobless’ recovery.

James Smith, CFAL’s

SEE page 8B

* Bahamas facing prospect of
‘jobless recovery’ and major
structural changes that will be
permanent, with prolonged
high unemployment likely

* ‘Painful days’ ahead, with next
five years ‘unlike previous five
to 10 years of prosperity’

* Bahamian businesses urged to
restructure now and do more
with less, as demand and sales
likely to be in retreat
for some time

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Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

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and property development consultancy is plan-
ning an alliance with a Bahamian company
offering much the same services, in a bid to
give them increased scale and an ability to bet-
ter compete in bidding for major construction
and engineering projects.

An executive with Construction Cost Engi-
neering (Bahamas), David Lavin, told Tri-
bune Business that their association with
BCQS International will allow them to expand

SEE page 5B

Governments delay
critical NIB reforms

‘Enormous social implications’ if
pressing amendments not enacted

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SUCCESSIVE governments have failed for
more than 15 years to implement long-sug-
gested reforms vital to the National Insurance
Board’s (NIB) long-term sustainability, two
investment advisers have told Tribune Busi-
ness, adding that the Bahamas faced “enor-
mous social implications” if amendments were
not enacted soon.

SEE page 10B

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It starts wait you



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

Insurer’s
income
declines by
86.4 per cent

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First General
Insurance Company saw its
net income for 2008 slump by
some 86.4 per cent to $1.656
million, largely due to an
almost $12 million swing into
the red on the unrealised loss-
es suffered on its equity
investment portfolio, a devel-
opment that negated an
underwriting performance
improvement.

The insurance carrier,
which has now published its
results separate from those of
its parent, Bahamas First
Holdings, which enjoyed net

Ty

For the stories

TART aA
WA
EES



THE TRIBUNE





Bahamas First suffers $11.8m

swing on investment portfolio,

and contributes less than 50%
of parent’s 2008 profits

income of $3.465 million for
the 12 months to December
31, 2008, saw its own figures
drop from a $12.209 million
profit in 2007 to just $1.656
million.

Figures

The figures also show that
the carrier contributed just
47.8 per cent of its parent’s
net 2008 profit, Bahamas First
Holdings’ figures also includ-
ing, for example, the perfor-
mance of its various fully-
owned agencies.

Due to the vast swing in the
value of its Commonwealth
Bank holdings, Bahamas First
Insurance Company saw the
value of its unrealised invest-
ments move from an $8.959
million gain to a $2.922 mil-
lion loss in 2008, the main fac-
tor behind the substantial
drop in net income.

The insurance carrier also
saw outgoing management
fees increase from $956,699
to $2.06 million, a rise of more

than $1 million.

These developments more
than negated a 39.9 per cent
increase in net underwriting
income for the year, which
expanded from $6.106 million
in 2007 to $8.541 million in
2008.

While Bahamas First Insur-
ance Company saw a modest
$1 million decline in gross
written premiums to $103.096
million, a $3 million reversal
on movement in unearned
premiums, coupled with a $2
million increase in commis-
sions earned from reinsurers,
propelled the firm’s total
underwriting income to
$54.759 million, compared to
$51.566 million.

This more than compensat-
ed for a $1.4 million increase
in net claims incurred to
$8.592 million, compared to
$7.159 million the previous
year. Total underwriting
expenses remained relatively
flat at $46.218 million, com-
pared to $45.46 million in
2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



Non-pertorming loans
breach $500m threshold

‘Continued strains in the credit market’, with only loan category
showing 2009 growth debt consolidation - at almost $38m

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TOTAL non-performing
loans made by Bahamian
banks to the private sector
breached the $500 million
mark in July 2009, a Central
Bank of the Bahamas report
has revealed, with the increas-
ing strain the recession is
placing on businesses and
households exposed by the
fact that the only consumer
lending category showing
growth is debt consolidation -
an almost-$38 million increase
since the New Year.

The Central Bank, in its lat-
est monthly economic and
financial developments report
for July, showed a combina-
tion of slumping credit
demand and defaults on exist-
ing loans, as the contracting
economy and rising unem-
ployment continue to exact a
toll, with $902.5 million com-
mercial bank loans now in
arrears.

A further $64.7 million
worth of loans fell into arrears
during July 2009, marking a
7.7 per cent increase in the
number that were past due.
Total loans in arrears, in rela-
tion to the total number of
loans outstanding, increased
by 0.8 per cent to 14.5 per
cent.

Non-performing loans,
those which are more than 90
days past due and regarded
as more critical by the com-
mercial banks, as they have
stopped accruing interest,
rose by $31.3 million or 6.7
per cent in July. Non-per-
forming loans now account
for 8.1 per cent of all loans
issued by the Bahamian com-
mercial banking system.

Meanwhile, loans in the
delinquent category - that is,
31-90 days past due, also
increased by $33.4 million in
July to $401.4 million, taking

WE

those loans to 6.5 per cent of
all credit issued to the private
sector by commercial banks.

The Central Bank said the
July arrears increase was gen-
erated by a $30 million, or 8.2
per cent, hike in mortgage
delinquencies to $396.1 mil-
lion, while commercial loans
in default grew by $28.5 mil-
lion or 14.5 per cent to $224.4
million - likely putting this
over 20 per cent, meaning
that more than one in every
five business loans is in
default.

Consumer loans in arrears
increased by$6.3 million, or
2.3 per cent, to $282 million.

Meanwhile, the Central
Bank said a breakdown of
consumer lending during the
first six to seven months of
2009 “revealed continued
strains in the credit market,
as the majority of the loan
categories contracted, amid
elevated levels of arrears.

Credit card and private
vehicle lending showed year-
over-year declines of $15.8

million and $15.4 million
respectively, along with
reductions in travel and home
improvement loan growth of
$9.1 million and $5.1 million
respectively. Contractions of
less than $5 million were seen
in most other lending cate-
gories.

But the Central Bank
added: “Accretions to debt
consolidation loans - loans
which have been rewritten -
rose to $37.9 million, slightly
higher than the previous
year’s expansion.”

Not surprisingly, the Cen-
tral Bank repeated that the
outlook was bleak, with eco-
nomic recovery not anticipat-
ed until the 2010 second half.
Tourism stopover arrivals and
hotel occupancies were pro-
jected to remain weak, along
with foreign direct investment
inflows and construction.

Although public sector
works programmes were
designed to provide a “mod-
est offset” to rising unem-
ployment, the Government’s

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fiscal deficit and debt-to-GDP
ratios were still heading
south, and while reduced
import demand was aiding
the current account and for-
eign exchange reserves lev-
els, there was likely to be
some impact in the next few
months as businesses drew
down foreign currency to
replenish inventory levels.

The Government’s fiscal
deficit expanded by $139.2
million to $219 million for the
first 11 months of its 2008-
2009 fiscal year, with revenue
collections down by 6.1 per
cent year-over-year at $1.201
billion. Tax revenues were off
25.5 per cent, with taxes on
imports down 13 per cent,
stamp taxes down 22.8 per
cent, departure taxes show-
ing a 15.6 per cent decline,
and motor vehicle taxes drop-
ping 3.8 per cent.

Total spending by govern-
ment, driven by a 5.3 per cent
rise in recurrent outlays,
increased by 4.5 per cent to
$1.42 billion.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



OO ———OOoeaentUS INES eee
30% public building energy drop target

FROM page 1B

Mr Neymour said several
government agencies and
departments had already
moved to enhance energy effi-

ciency and consumption, cit-
ing the Water & Sewerage
Corporation’s decision to pro-
vide energy-efficient pumps
in its products.

The opportunities the

to become a renewable ener-
gy leader, and reduce its fossil
fuel consumption and associ-
ated energy costs, were graph-
ically illustrated by two exam-
ples cited in the National

Bahamas has missed to date

Energy Policy Committee’s




























































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report.

The report said: “The pro-
motion of solar water heating
systems in Barbados has been
successful due to an innova-
tive combination of circum-
stances, policy interventions,
tax incentives and awareness
raising efforts on the potential
benefits of solar water heaters
to the economy.

“The solar water heating
industry in Barbados is esti-
mated to have saved about
130,000 barrels of oil annual-
ly. Currently, about 35,000
solar water heaters are
installed in homes, commer-
cial establishments and hotels,
saving about $16 million
(assuming electricity usage at
normal rates to heat the
water) and about 65 million
kWh annually, with a ratepay-
er value of $12.5 million.”

The Bahamas, according to
the report, consumes about
26,000 barrels of imported
petroleum products per day
to meet its energy needs.

A further example was
highlighted by Germany’s
feed-in tariff system that has
“proven effective in fostering
the rapid and sustained

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growth in renewable energy
penetration in its national
energy mix”.

The National Energy Policy
Committee Report added: “In
addition to the creation of
214,000 jobs, German
achievements include, since
the start, ion 2006, the avoid-
ance of 97 million tonnes of
carbon dioxide emissions,
penetration of an 11.8 per
cent share of total gross elec-
tricity consumption from
renewable energy sources,
and creation of a 5.3 per cent
share of total primary energy
consumption from renewable
energy. These achievements
were realised at a cost of
approximately $6.50 per
household per month.”

Both examples illustrate the
difference between what is
and what could be in the
Bahamas as regards renew-
able energy, the committee’s
report stating that this nation
had “potential for diverse
renewable energy sources”,
including biomass, ocean,
solar and wind.

Embracing and expanding
the Bahamas’ involvement in
renewable energies, the

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report added, held the poten-
tial to create new employment
opportunities in industries
related “to assessing energy
usage and improving efficien-
cy” in all types of building;
production, maintenance and
sale of energy from renew-
able sources, and the expor-
tation of technology and
knowledge to other countries;
and jobs from “retrofitting
buildings and facilities with
more energy efficient tech-
nologies, cooling and heating
systems”.

The National Energy Policy
Comuittee’s report suggested
aseries of short, medium and
long-term targets for the
Bahamas to aim at. Advocat-
ing an integrated traffic man-
agement system and public
transport system, the com-
mittee urged targeting a 10-
20 per cent increase in use of
public transport by next year,
with energy efficient lighting
systems for public spaces sup-
ported by traffic management.

Other short-term goals,
which the committee suggest-
ed by achieved over a one to
five-year period, were the
phase-out of all incandescent
light bulbs and their replace-
ment by energy-efficient flu-
orescent ones by 2010.

Over the medium-term,
five to 10 years, the National
Energy Policy Committee rec-
ommended increasing renew-
able energy sources’ penetra-
tion of the Bahamas’ energy
mix to 10-20 per cent of sup-
plies.

It suggested deploying
renewable energy technolo-
gies in small Bahamian com-
munities, and producing 50
per cent of their power needs
from these sources, plus
improving fuel efficiency to
30-35 miles per gallon for 70
per cent of licensed vehicles
through the use of tax incen-
tives to encourage the impor-
tation of more fuel-efficient
cars.

The committee also urged
targeting 20-30 per cent of all
Bahamian households switch-
ing to solar water heaters
within 10 years and, from that
time on, all new water heater
installations to involve solar

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P.O. Bow AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE

[BUSINESS
Bahamian

firm allies
with
Caribbean
player

FROM page 1B



the scope of their projects
to countries outside the
Bahamas - mainly in the
Caribbean region.

BCQS, which is involved
with major resort projects
throughout the Caribbean,
operates offices in Barba-
dos, the British Virgin
Islands, Cayman Islands,
St. Lucia and the Truks and
Caicos.

"Both companies’ core
businesses focus in the area
of project management,
quantity surveying and
property development con-
sultancy, whilst BCQS also
undertakes development
management, appraisal and
real estate investment analy-
sis work, with strong links
to the major lending insti-
tutions throughout the
region,” said a Constrcution
Cost Engineering release.

Mr Lavin said the tie-up
will enable the Bahamian
company to offer an
improved strength of ser-
vice, and allow Construction
Cost to specialise across a
larger resource base.

Company

"We are a small company
with a good client list,” said
Mr Lavin.

Liam Day, the Cayman-
based managing director of
BCQS, said: “Over the next
several months we will
strategise with CCE and
promote our new alliance,
soas to fully inform our
mutual clientele of the
opportunities that will arise
because of our new associa-
tion”.

He added: “Both prac-
tices brought together a
combined history of 62
years of operation in the
region, and the association
mirrored the intent of our
corporate tag line ‘Local
Knowledge — Global Expe-
rience’ to the fullest extent.

“Though both firms offer
similar services, Construc-
tion Cost has been pursuing
a pan-Caribbean expansion
and contends the associa-
tion will provide that
opportunity, as well as allow
BCQS to pursue the devel-
opment of large resort pro-
jects across the wider
Bahamas.

"The ‘marriage’ is one
that both companies have
pursued for quite some
time, and the alliance gives
the association the man-
power and resources to
undertake large scale pro-
jects in the Bahamas and
the immediate region, and
provides a broader appeal
to a number of financial and
institutional clients.”

Mr Lavin said BCQS had
worked in over 20 countries
in the Caribbean/Atlantic
region, and was the largest
practice of its type in the
region. “Together with our
local knowledge of the
Bahamian market, we feel
going forward that the com-
bined property and devel-
opment advice we can offer
to our clients will be second
to none," he said.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



RBC
Royal Bank
_of Canada

=

ial

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5B

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
LGUs TiN Oe eee en:

(A01) Lots #17 & Fl Crown Alloe-
ments, Liane HIN Senile neeerit, Aredines
Cont tining ATwo-slorey res. Appraised

(0G) Lom #1 & 22, Bock S wlth a par
ce) cimuanerl enween Local, Block 3,
Conlaiing 4 bedroom condominaen
Sumset View Villa iy SIPeet.
Appraised vaboe: $750.00

(433) Let 427 at Village Allo
414 in ihe Eastern Dnt, Cor
Lg resid eee sited of Derren Sree
OT Parkgate Road i the Ani’ Tort
Conetiboer ew Prinidence. Prap-
erty size 2.500 soft Building size S40
sgqit. Appraised value: £50, (HH

(400) Pr ropert y Sif tated ir if

am {zr ng thereon asm all grocery
store 48) sqft. and an incomplete 4
= ahem Tse StH) sqft. App radesd

(S00) Lot #2 in block #8. Steward
Boad, Coral Heights East Subelivi
BON SID In VWeesbern Distret od
New Providence, appen. sine HHH)
ag. ft. witha split lewe! containing ten
bead, ma hath, bh Tif, dint iz & tam-
Ir noms, king hie ard ou nility room

approm, slse of b dallding 20S galt

Appr: peed Vale: $523,75

(70) Lit 420) with nesicential prep
erry located Sky ling He-kehirs.
Lporaised valve $2000)

S00) Loatof land 4.44 1Shx 15llon
Chieens Highway juz anith of Palmentn
Pol witha Twostorey stone bulking
CONTA ite TH apart, Each unit
leas 3 bead '2 12 bach, kiechen, living
pote aid) 3 Giner chose ts. Agi praised
value; 3287209

CEO) Lot #14 sineated in the senle-
ment of Lowe Hill of the [skend of
Anidins totalling 20,000 aqit Property
Gonna be sore 5 belrooen, 3
bathroom residence. Agpraised value:
$105,000

(105) Lot cortainitee 2 stony be lp
with Uhnee bed, tae arid a he
residence, and 30" «8 atuated Raikey
Town, Marth Hirnini.

Appraised valor: $255,000

CAO) Lor #18 in Sandilands Alloa-
menton the western side of Cmosewirxd
Road between Se me Lane and
Pineard Road in the Eastern District
of The Island of New Providence The
Bahamas,containing single sin

vane residence conaprising the

Ig covered ery porch, Iving

CIN ge CRITE, kel 1, airy PO,
tary POM, 2 fa, 4 bedice

2 hatha and patio. The total ares
Of land is appemamately 7,61] sapere

(702) Unceweloped kitsi 4A, bi, 17
1Zand 1$bocated Chapman Estates,
West Baye Appratsed value: $348,000)

TOL) Undeweioped bor Aldo, Sex
fan Lane Lucayvan beac Suhided-
rel Bahan, LAPSO 3q fr

i) Wale: TRA

Vacant lotas located Bleuthes mi

1 Shores, Seaside Drive Section Bi.

Bock#15, Feuthera, Bahamas. 9,621
sqft, Appraised value: £27,020

1402) Lots, Block 7 Aberdern Drive,
Bahama Weed Replat Subdivdston,
Freseart, Grand Bahama, consist-
ing of 12, 100 sql

An praised value: S51, (MM

(800) Vacant property locaned By
ik South, Block 16 bor, Fre
Grind Bake consisti

sqft. Appraised value: £52,

(S65) Vacant Lota Aeubt sqft)
situated in Mango Lane Section “A
Bhork 15, Flew here Island Shores,
Alewthem. Appraised vadue: 5511 14

S05) Vacant pesichene al | ie ee
Sayin) ¢

ply Tow

Appraised value: $18,000

[L00) Vacant Single Family Lod #5
Block #5 Unat) Devonshire
Appraised value 3), MH)

(#2) Vacant Comme»rcial Lit Nix

COMM ERCIAL BANKING CENTRE

356-8568

Tel: 242-
(A00) Mrs Monique Crawlord
(800) Mr Jerome Pinder

(B02) Mr Briain Knakes

(80d) Mir Vandyke Pract

(04) Mirs. Hope Sealey

(805) Mrs. Tiffany Simms O'brien
(806) fhlrs, Loss Hollis

(B07) Abr. Lester Cone

(A0E) Mrs. DaShann Clare-Paul
(810) Miss LaPalge Gardiner

(810) Mis. Lidia Gardiner
PALMDALE SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-32 2-4426/9 or

247-502 3B)

(201) ls. Mikooks Wadkew

(202) Mir. Robert Pantry

(205) Mrs. Anva Major



hoot, Apuiraised vale: $209,425

CBO) Tao parcels of bred containing
21 020 S901. situated on le seu ler

f East Shirkey Street arnl LOO feet
vers of its pumction with “Shires” in
the Eastern District, New Providence.
Sitaated thereun isa ‘Gas Station and
Auto Repair Shop. Appraised vadue:
S744 457

(601) Lot ALT locabed Village Alloe-
ment with fourples, Aporaised value:
$500,000

CAO) Lot of and have 1g the nu mibser
Léin Hock wamber bin Section Theee
o€ the Subdivision calhed aed keen
as Sea Ieee Estates situated in the
Eastern District of Mew Proadence.
Progr fiains a three bed, by
rresklence Appralsed wali: $277

(0) Lot of bend being lot monber
Lin Weck number Mhon a plan ce
alloemendts laid out be Village Estates
Linnited and filed in the Depa cd Land
& Surveys as mimber 142 67 and
sinned inthe Easter Districe ot New
Brovidenoe, Property coe taiins (hnee
bend, (ua bath

Appraised valine: $165 000

(SEI Lot # TOLER in Canlden Canes
Estates 42 Sutidiviaion siru
South Wesaen 04 fal che land of
Peceve Prenvichesrie Ingaining a single
Storey priv fe residence 9 becom
2 bath. F Property app pis. size 100
soit Ee uilding approx sine 2.400 soft
Appraised value: $175,176

(205) Lit B- 50 Bt L157 situated
on the north side af Shell Peah Hoacl,
being the third lot west of Fire Tradl
Read and east of Hamster Road with a
one half dupes residential premises.
Appraised value THA

1) Lot #32 containing 4 bedroom
2hath concrete stroctuce Incated Tri
ana Shores Harbour kind, Eleswther.
Property sia: A x 120" x HH) 120 Beet
Appraised values $492,735

M10) Lot #1? Madina Park, a ‘twa
subd hon cn the outekirs cf Tie ré
Cay, Abac ao Eva Tig at area of 144
Sguabe feet re se Cotati A
concrete by une with asptrale
shingle imiprises of thre bexd-

eu bathrooms, lily rum,

MT, d mung | and kitchen.

Senty situabed oan Williams

p) Aad, Mew Prowdidenice,

Bahamas containing, & taste

DHUSe and ain Aptinsent hulking

conslering af Lai agit. Ayyparalsed
Valie 3100, 0M)

uA, Block G0 Bahania Subdivision
ining 3 acres bocaoed Fore
mi Hahanma

hynpeulse t Valuc: 5750, 1H

(108) Vacant Single Fanuily Lot 9
Beek F Baharia South Subdivision
Ap prniged yale $45, 700

(S88) Vacant property| aii

= ile” ‘be

<4 (M00

564) All that posce parcel or bot of
lan eat ane inehe seni of lanes
{ non the Bland of Eeeaachera
One OF thee lands of che Coninent-
wealth ol the Halannas teeasairing
Apparee. 100M) sap. A.

Appraised value TRA

(569) All that pice be parcel or lot of
land being: Le n the tubdivi-
sin knot UMA HARBOUR
in the Island of Coeat Exuma meas
uring D000 sq.ft. Appradsed wali
S70 00M) IMI,

02) Vecant bor of lane comralining
A 114 agit, Lot és, Lowe Estate, Phase
1, 2.300 Tr. souk of Wese Bay Saree
Weetem Disoict, New Providence.
Appraised value $165,011

(202) Vacant lot of land containing
LT acre, situated eastof Kendes
Drive, approximately | 4206. soul
ward of Harrokd Road in the western

NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-422-8700

(POL) Mr, James Strachan
(702) Mir Aritonio Byrn
(S01) Mls. Thera Johnsen
(2) Mis. Alicla Thompson iE

MACKEY STREET BRANCH (560) Mrs. Vanessa Scott (Li
NASSAU INT'L ALRAORT
42-5777?
(435) Mrs, Suzette Hall
LYPORD CAY BRANCH
Tel: 242-962-45
(101-N) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR, ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8 Tel: 242-35.
902) Wis. Nicole Evans
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH

Tel: 242-393-0497

(G01) Ms, Cherelle Miantinbarough Tel: 2
JOHN FE KENNEDY DRIVE BRANCH



Tel: 242-325-4711

(401) Mrs. Heres Walkine
02) its. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-395-7505 8
(S01) Feb. Jason Sawyer
(SMS) Per. Dnwigait Bling

(205) Ms. Patrick Russell
CABLE BEACH BRANCH



Tel: 242-327-6077

(460) Mrs, Winifred! Roberts
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
“5170/2 -5140

Tel: 242-502

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank. lu Ul cll Se

er i Roya

(366) All thar plese of land being Pa-
oe) 4S and anee!| 4 sinnated on the
Saath side al Prince Charles Detve,
Mea Providence, Baharia contain
mineral buakling hoasinge
1p space on the ground floor
three shop space on the second
Boor with a large storage area in the
rear. Total area 200 sq ft.
Appraised valu: $4140

(S69) All that piece, parcel of band
having an approsimate area of 2 14K)
sqit situated on the Western side of
Blue Hill Road about 70 ft Morth of
Peter Sireet and abot 115 ft south of
Laird Streca in the Souther (Nebrict of
New Providence, Rahnnmes contaln-
ing a cx ad hulking hosing
a two bed ome bath unit on thre top
for and a store on the fire: fhe
Appraised value: $154 000

(ee All IAT piece, Parcel oF lol of
Sor Fired [ in
1 ‘wenue lus

ining a du-
ny cf beets -

idence
ples api
2hedm
Appraizs ec value $175,000

(200) All that parcel orlotofland bein
Lots #10 and 11 in Mock 24 of i
nut Gerove Subdivision, fal ning fi
ehvoph ping ma, The lot ba tr um

sr 5M, (ee

i S50) I aot of laa 8? Sea View Substi-
and, 5 ar
Proper siding size
258 sy ft oon 5 =e neem, 2
bath, living roomy, aneat-in kite hen.
om, lauredry Pom, Ge
Landac
water tank, ADD Tabsed value 5451 OHH

black 21 Tianna Shores
Insel 2 bach front penne,
mM, & kitchen, Concrete

i fs IL praperty S600 sqft
ian eel value: 2440045

aL) Lor" kK" Barrack Sireet, Harber
Blan conmlaining a2 ore crete
building with 4 bed 4 bath a nirig
room & kitchen -Euilding 2954.55
soft property 8565 sq

Appraised value: $479 228

1) Properteooncaining Condo “Mil
Unat A= 101, building 57,
TMS, 3 harhinacnes,

Th Ginnie Poco, Line ec hese
& pw ithe . Situated t in the area knee
63 Hirsi’ Hay Hescwr, Biieini, Hetarveas.
Appraised vahae - $485,011

O08) Single Story tri-ples buikding,

district of New Providence, Bahari
Appoilsed value: % 1700

(SNS) Vaccine Papert Ons 1BOF
Lot 724 sinned in the Free-

pont Rklpe Subdivision, Secchin 4]
Freeport, Grand A A, Paap,
An praised value: TRA

(S05) Ten (10) acres of lane situated
an Woods Cay, know nas Little Abaca
between Cooper's Town and
Harbour in Abaco, Bahamas The prog

| erty isundeveoped with aview af the
sta fram both the North amd Sauch
Slice, Appar eae dd vahic: $1,078,754

(569) All char pleoe parce! or log at
lend I 4 S77. FAiewond Cancers

rl ert) Desire, Sew
Previdence Appraiied value; 365,000

(0) All that piece parvel Ob

land on the Island of Great Exum
situated about 10 1/2 miles North-
westward! y of George Town which said
piece parcel or bot of lard is #107)
Bahama Sound CLA.E. 11,2000 soft
Agile value: Sets, (MHI

[008}

de signa f : a

as bal IVES 1h Caled or Eee
1a. High barbed #4 LL22341

sgt. Appraised vz flue: S37,0

(201) Single family residential Lot No,
10705 Bahama Sound Subd. Surber
11) Weest, Great Eau. See: apne
10MM sq ft. Appraised valor S15 (000

OFFICERS













‘901 } rs Velderine Laroda
ANDROS TOWN BRANCH
2-568-207 |
400) Ms. Cypriannia Williams
ALAS PAB U, ABACD

Tel: 2



VACANT PROPERTIES

) Ms. Quincy Fisher

7) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

3) Ms Deidre King

Mrs. Fave Hipp

Ms. Marguerite Jahns
5) Mes. Catherine Davis

Hl) or 242-362-4087

One 2 beaten ard mac | beeen
Ioana nend iy ¢ Amy Lat Mot
, section |, Ba-
Caumbre Chub
di Bahama.
GGL say ft

heama Heel Yi T
Sululivision, F
Property 5

06) Low 52 Crown Allotnsernts
located Munphy Teen, Abaco with
see being [O20 sy ft Containing a
one storey house with 4 bed? bath
ack Siructure
Apparel Tale. SAL O0D

(569) All that plese parcel or lone of
land being Lotta inthe residentially
none aren od Highbury Fark Sebel -
vision inihe Eassern Disiricrat Wew
Providence, Bahamas. Apprax, Land
Site FM sq 7. Property contains &
5-bedricen2~feet hires becca, sea
bemp 1.565 sq. It Aporeised Value
$15) ,000

(S08) Loti 2) Jocabed in the Subdivi
sion. of Spring City Abaco with size
being 8405 sq ft. Containing aoe
snorey worden sinactine hoarse with
3 hed !1 bath of 15 aq i
Apyparaisid vali, S000

(204) Single stooey (riples, situated on
Lor és. Mernkakl Rowlevard, Gold-
en Gates #2 in the Wester Disiriet,
Mew Prov ache oe, Tae Iwo bedroom,
ooe-bathroomn units an one one-
bedroom, ome-baihroom unit. TI

cenit suring 9,082 sq ft
the living area m Iring, 2,742 say ft.
Ayyoradeed waluee S474, 152

(201) Duplex Lot @25 situated on

Faith Awe. North (Claridge Estates
size being 7 git with duplex

thereon. Appraised inti = THA

Cla) All thar piece parcel of lot of anid
ated limp 1 thereon knot

Ac him: | Dhow.

F TeePOET C Grand
ite Mi Apo |
property contains . duplex dwelling.
Appramsed value $5000 0000

fA) Six condcninium units and

fe parcels of vacunt Lend situated

at Regattas of Abaco. Marsh Harbour,

Bahamas. The single multi fmedly resi

dential condominiam, timeshare de

selopment is situated an 4 426acres

d. The pocaiaeaLtas consist

4, 2 harhincms and the

Alennities on Ce Pinca nty tine ‘luces aA
“fl Te

(S68) Loted lind situated an Fire Trail

(201) Multifamily Lot No, 10 Souch-
cast Comer of Mandarin Drive, Supar
Ay iple Koad Sans Soucl Sindy, See
14,353 qf. Appeaised ale $165, 000

(201) Siyebe family pesicbererial Lint Pe,

1) 658 Lire Serine Se ibd “iuiteer
1] West, &

10.428 ag ft Appraised value: 1 000

All that piece parcel of lot of
land being Lat #1 located in Hock 3
inthe Subdivision knw as Eastern
Estates situate in the Fastern District
of theisiand of New Providenoe. Prop
enry appons. BAS sq, 1, Appamalsicd
vali $40,100

What piece parcel or lon al

fed on baripold Road in he
iknowT as Kool Acres, Lal

is appre. 055 sy. fl

Appraised value

(G4) All chat piece parcel of Ine of

land being Lot #152 located in the
Subdivision loan as Vest Hicdpe
land Park situaoed in che Scuchern
Lestat M the Gland of Mew Prov.
ce, Pre nperty fi yprON, HOE capt

Valiie $55,1MM)

(O08) Anundeveloped waterfront bot
land being Lat #120? wilh adie al
106M) 29 81. in the Bahama Sound of
Exuma Subdivision # 1) West
Exuma, Bahamas. Appraises

34, UM)



Allon 041 Maar Provichenioe, Pah arnieis
cm TAIN DOW TOLSe apart eT LTT
ated neo proposed units (ooniple ted
at is). Appraised yabue $297,714

(201) Lot # l4hh7 Bahama Sound
Exuma is located about 1 mikes
morthnes! of Georpe Town Exina
fined ahi | nike sauh of Eneralsd
Ba, The Four Sedans Resor and
Rokers Poing. Wis kecated near the
cer lemments at ME Thoms u au
Farneer’s Hill The proper

LOL) saya feet ir

frontage on the Queens | lighway; the
main road The peuperty isdeveloped
with a partially compkted apartment
consplex containing five, | bedroon
units, 4 cficieney units and | shop
thant, Appmilemt value S4HH, 241)
(300) All that péece parcel of land
or premises being bot ¢ 659 on the
nonhwestem side of Malawi Shrers im
Blienberch Estates East Phase? inne
GT CONEriTerry on The island
Om Mer Providence ‘the Siae af the
lated 5 5,085 f
sink in
bextra

reside

Appraised value $9487)

G0) Lott 549 Gladken Posie St-
fledon Gardens cont

Single amily residence

eMiaency rental until Ansa is panied
for single and enulti family residences
Lot size is GX 120° (96000 sq Ft} en-
Closed car port and perimeter wall
surrounding property. Appraised
value S825, 767

(65) All thar Sourhversstern Mnviety
of Halt Pant oa Lor of Land being
fant ofa Tract of Land mow or 6 ar

feet Sourhesst of Kern F
Ei astern Diatric t of hve Is

Wika ning a disp rg en
a S06 Appraised $61 000.

(38) Lot # & Mock & sitaate on
Rosedale St in the Carey's Sabdivi
sion coating a fear Eesdr ;
bath reste Building « E
§q ft. Propenty shor apprnon 4,511 sq
ht, Appraised Value TRA

(S64) Lot # Aland Boon Mortem side
. emeseari welt basil -
wi for A Warchioise

(56) All that pier

lated situate om

ers Moai and 2783.50 ft South
michael Aud. being: Lot ¢ Soe cleh a
Triples Property sce 20" x LOM (SINK)
sqft) Appraised Value THA

anially developed parcel of

10, 1HM0 90) ft situcibe aboat

1 Sort oF (The Forres Estar

in th ¢ vicinity of the sectlensents af

j and The Forest bering Lat

hi ond her 4800: in Hohamea Sound of

Fuuna6, Eainia. Rabe
valoe $25,000

cit. - A Moy bea

(24) Vacant lend ad Love Beach
Westen District of New Providence
comprising aportion of" LoweEstate”
containing | acre. Appraised value
S03, (MM)

(AM Lote 2 vacane land S0,0005q
ft located Chapman Estates Sashdi-
Von on West Ray Soren with open
zoning. Appraised valiee S600 000.

(AM) Singletimulli family residen-
lial Yacanl lot being a portion of kar
O77 situated on the Southern side al
Fire Trail Fioax) in the Western Dis-
irictofNew Providence. Property sine
110L00M) sipft

Appraised value 23H) (HH

S01) Vecut bot singh: fannily son
Ing, Looe 21 atehe cist livieinay alle it
Somnhie mn hones Camear in Subd hlslon

ce 155] the alker
5 S/F af lanel apaoe,
Agp mised value 325,000



Tel: 242-367-2420

(08) Mr. Toure Holder

(08) Mrs, Sylvia Poitier

(10) Miss Cyprianna Williarnes
BIMINI BRANCH
bel2d2-347-4081

5) Miss. Ganiatu Timubu
GRAYS, LONG ISLAND

Ted: 242-337 0101

Peles



(100) Mrs, Lucy Wells
EXUMA BRANCH

bed: 242-346-325]

(008) Ms. Jocyelyn Mackey
FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH





FHS 2

(101-F) M& Garnell Frith
17) Mis. Elaine Collie
Mire. Danita Newbold-Carnwright
(108) Ms. Svlvie Carey
SPANISH WELLS

Tek 242-353-4131 or

242-435-4145
(50) Mer. Walter Carey

RBC Royal
CULO cr



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THE TRIBUNE

Spending and unemployment rise
Analysts are trying io peedsct which way thre nation’s eoonocmy will qo
meanwhile oonsuenber spending acoounts for more than FO percent of
the gross Gomesiic product and unemployment continues to rise.
Consumer ope recon as = [Percentage | of GOP

- Semen Qu arterthy seasonally adjuste
0 —period —- oes

astonait fll

Unemployment rate, mo
12 r oa reteset tremens es FAL,

SF He





The National Insurance Boart
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas



Request for Contractors Pre-Qualification

The National Insurance Board (NIB) is seeking to pre-qualify contractors to bid on
works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project 1s
a joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in
compliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme), and in
good standing with the relevant Government agencies.

Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s
Clifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009.

Pre-Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the pre-
qualification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00
Noon on September 15, 2009.



REQUEST FOR TENDERS FOR 4
HEAVY EQUIPMENTS

‘The Corporation i requesting sealed Tenders for the sale of pwn
beavy equipavent, a Diesel Dreven Excavator and a Diesel Driven
Backhoe. The eqampments are located at WSC's Compound
j Building & Ministry of Works, [FR Drive. The sales will be om a
where is, az is" basis. The Comporation reserves the right to

reyeet any andor all Tenders,

All Teadees aeust he submitted of or before Preday September Ll,
200) at 0 PM to che Office of the Cremeral Manager at Ne. 87
Thompsus Boulevanl, New Providence, Bahamas in a sealed
envelope marked “Tender for Heavy Equipment”

Figure 1 DIESEL ORWEM EXCAWATOR

EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION: Diesel Driven Excavatar
EQUIPMENT NUMBER: Wit 1072
MANUFACTURER: Caterpillar

MODEL NUMBER: Cat 2258

SERIAL NUMBER: raw s277

DATE PURCHSED: TT a87

RUNNING HOURS: 0M?

EQUIPMENT FEATURES:
12V Direct Starti48"1204H 6V Batteries!19 AMP ALTERNATORICAT 3208 ENGI135 HP @
2000RPMIS36CULIN DISPL VBiFuel-65 GAL HYD SÂ¥S152/ 24" Bucket StickiL-f" MAX D21"I"
H191f Seater.
EQUIPMENT GENERAL CONDITION:
Good
EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTION: DIESEL DRIVEN BACKHOE
EQUIPMENT NUMBER: We 1025
MANUFACTURER: FORD
MODEL NUMER: FORD 750
i SERIAL NUMER: 2x10325-0100359
_ DATE PURCHASED: 41111994

EQUIPMENT FEATURES:

ui TEV Systom/S1/HP 2 2100 RPM 4CÂ¥L In-Line ese! 256 CU IN

Figwee 2 DNESEL Ohne BACKHOE ~ (OVSPL TRAN 3°3 POW SHFT FUELIL-26', We?", He 12".

EQUIPMENT GENERAL CONDITION: Fair



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7B

Queen’s College

deat Centre for Further Education

P.O. Bow Nefd2?, Nascau, Bahamas
Tek (242) 303-1008 2E06, Fax; (42) 9-348

SAT saturday Classes at QC

Â¥ Planning for college?

Â¥ Oo you want to earn extra credits before entering college 7
Do you want to reduce college cost?

* Do you want to qualify for scholarships?

Grade 10, 11 & 12 students, give yourself the best advantage
by preparing for the PSAT and 8.AT exam with qualified

instructors at Queen's College
PSAT Classes WP

com fenfernn| some fae] se

BAT Lor S395 [Sept 19, 2 | aturday,
Crake 1) & 9200» L200 po
Crmae | 2

whudorita

Current Grade 10 students from all Current Grade 11 & 12 students from

achools are invited te attend. a
wll schools are inviled to abbend,

VPay $120-first payment Sept, 12th, 2009 | YPay $200-first payment Sept.19th, 20409
VPay balance $90 on Oet. 03, 2009 VPav balance $195 on Oet. 10th , 2009

The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the following position:

BODY GUARD

The incumbent serves as Executive Bodyguard for the Chief of Mission, to protect the
Chief of Mission (COM) port-to-portal from the threat of terronsm or other acts of
violence, While with the COM, the bodyguard will take extraordinary andor special
security precautions to insure the personal safety of the COM. The bodyguard will assist
in the selection of safe routes and remain alert for danger of the COM.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

Completion of secondary school. Royal Bahamas Police Force College or
Royal Bahamas Defense Force Training 13 required.

Ten (10) years of experience in Police, Defense Force law enforcement, or
specialized security is required.

Must be familiar with the city of Nassau, Freeport and the Out Islands in the
Bahamas, Must also have knowledge of historical and current events that
could affect the secunty of the protects,

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have the ability to be trained in the use of various firearms. .

Must be flexible and able to adjust to rapid and unexpected schedule changes.
Must be able to work independently with minimum supervision and have
good problem solving skills

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation package including
performance-based incentives, medical and dental insurance, life msurance, pension
and opportunities for traming and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible for employment
under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms can be found on the Embassy's website nassau.usembassy.gov. under
Key Embassy Links and employment opportunities, Completed applications should be

returned to the Embassy via email to femandermaistate. pow and poitjerra/aistate. pov or

faxed to (242)328-8251, addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
September 17" , 2009.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Gap between rich and

FROM page 1B

chairman and a former minis-
ter of state for finance, said
the tourism industry, the
Bahamas’ “major engine of
growth”, was unlikely to “go
back to pre-recession levels”
for quite some time which, in
turn, would have negative
implications for prolonged
unemployment levels in the
Bahamas.

He warned that Bahamas-
based hotel properties were
unlikely to need workforces
of pre-fall 2008 levels due to

increased productivity levels
among staff who had retained
their jobs, and also the fact
that much hotel room inven-
tory remained off-line. As a
result, economic recovery in
the Bahamas, much like in the
US, could be relatively ‘job-
less’, as resorts such as
Atlantis, for example, are
unlikely to re-hire the 800
people they laid-off even if
business levels make a full
recovery.

With Bahamian gross
domestic product (GDP)
unlikely to recover to pre-

2008 levels in the short-term,
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness that this nation would
likely “have to suffer high
unemployment rates” for the
next four to five years.

“Tt’s going to take a struc-
tural change in the economy”
to reduce that more rapidly,”
Mr Smith told Tribune Busi-
ness, arguing that the
Bahamas needed to “go back
to the drawing board” on its
economic planning in the
medium term and see what
changes could be made.

“There’s a growing gap

between the rich and the
poor, because wealthy people
are still working and taking
advantage of opportunities,”
Mr Smith said. “I can see a
lot of changes taking place
going forward, and not for the
better. The distribution of
income will be more skewed
to the wealthy, and this may
have implications for crime.
“You do not have resources
to give to law enforcement at
a time when they are needed,
because government revenues
are down, and more people
will put more resources into

private security.

“Tm not by nature a pes-
simist, but I can see the next
few years being a challenge
for the Bahamas unless
unforeseen events occur, like
the discovery of oil offshore.”

Bahamian unemployment,
with the national average rate
standing at 14.2 per cent, was
likely to go “a little more”
higher next year, and then
only come down to around 9-
10 per cent, the former
finance minister predicted.

“We’ve got some painful
days ahead of us,” Mr Smith

added of the Bahamian econ-
omy’s recession and unem-
ployment woes. “It’s becom-
ing structural in nature.”
While praising the Govern-
ment for initiating worker re-
training efforts through the
National Training Pro-
gramme, he expressed con-
cerns that those targeted by
the initiative were being re-
trained for areas likely to suf-
fer further lay-offs.

Mr Smith’s analysis was
backed by Anwer Sunderji,

SEE next page

FAMILY ISLAND DISTRICTS
SPEECH COMPETITION
TENTH ANNUAL PUBLIC SERVICE WEEK
3RD - 10TH OCTOBER, 2009

The Department of Public Service will host a Speech Competition as one of the
activities for the Tenth Annual Public Service Week. The competition is open to
Senior High School Students in the Northern, Southern and Central Bahamas.

Students interested in participating should prepare a five minute speech to be
delivered on the topic: “The Public Service - Striving for Excellence in Customer
Service.”

The deadline for the names of students participating should be referred to
the attention of Ms Rose Gibson, Chairperson, Public Service Committee,
Department of Public Service by 4th September, 2009.

A Dell Desktop 2400 computer system will be awarded to the winners. The first
runners-up will be awarded a $500 gift certificate.

The winner will be announced during the Tenth Annual Public Service Week
Awards Ceremony scheduled for Saturday, 10th October, 2009.

Students wishing to participate can obtain further details regarding the requirements

for entry from their Language Arts Teacher of Family Island Administrator, in
their respective district.

MINISTRY OF HOUSING

ARDASTRA ESTATES - ROAD CONSTRUCTION

INVITATION TO TENDER

The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas through the Ministry of Housing invites
Qualified contractors to submit tenders for the completion of the road construction in the
Ardastra Estates Subdivesion on the island of New Providence in accordance with the design and
specifications approved by the Ministry of Works and Transport

Interested parties may obtain further information and purchase a copy of the Invitation to Tender from

The Office of the Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Housing
Claughton House
Shirley and Charlotte Sts.
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. = 242-322-9005) 6006

For a non-fetundable fee of $100. The method of payment may be cash or a certified cheque made
payable to the “Ministry of Housing *. The documents will be ready for collection beginning Monday
31", August, 2009 and ending Wednesday 9” September, 2009 between the hours of 9:30 am to 4:30
pm, An information meeting will be held on Wednesday 9” September, 2009 in the conference room at
the Ministry of Housing, Claughton Howse.

Tenders are to be subenitted in a sealed envelope marked a3 indicated im the Tender document to

The Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3" Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Bullding
West Bay St.
Nassau, Bahamas

No later than 10:00 am on Tuesday 1" September. Tenders will be publically opened at 10:01 am on
Tuesday 15" September, 2009 in the conference room at the Tenders Board Meeting at the Ministry of
Finance, 3” Floor, Cecil Wallace Whitfield Building, West Bay St, Nassau, Bahamas. The Government
reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



roe AT EL

Toe Cee OU M ST SR OUeee o)e e

Tl ee Are!

Tel: 502 2356h

for ad rates

POSITION WANTED

A private island retreat requires the year round services of a General Manager Couple.
This unique position will require a couple who is comfortable in an environment
where living and working together in isolation creates an energy to help us maintain
our properties to exceptional standards and allows us to deliver exceptional service
to our private guests. The General Manager Couple works closely in collaboration
with the owners and the owner’s representatives to further the mission. The General
Manager Couple is responsible for all aspects of the daily operations and must have
the following requirements:

Experience for one or both members of the team in carpentry, painting, minor
renovation and construction projects, and has a good mechanical aptitude as our
location often requires us to repair and refurbish appliances and equipment in
house.

Oversight of scheduling of island projects and construction, with an emphasis on
the construction.

Must be able to read blueprints and establish with the construction team deadlines
for each phase of the project in progress.

Must have a working knowledge of generators and water desalination systems.
Must know how to maintain and make repairs on both systems.

Marine experience for one or both members of the team with one person in the
team having knowledge of general and preventative maintenance for small fleet of
vessels,

One person in the team processing a captain’s license for a 50 ton vessel or more.
Must be certified by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors.

Must have a background in hospitality and is familiar with five star hotel

housekeeping standards, fine dining restaurant service methods, and is a competent

cook.

Must be able to create a gourmet menu and compile and order the inventory
necessary to complete that menu.

Furthering a unique business model and mission with the goal of long-term
sustainability. Knowledge of environmentally friendly systems and putting those
systems into place.

Setting goals, communicating these goals to the entire team and coordinating the
work necessary to accomplish them.

Creating and maintaining improvements on all systems and procedures.
Determining budgets and setting & achieving financial goals.

Oversight of ordering and maintaining inventory levels within guidelines.
Oversight of the overall appearance and presentation of the island with particular

emphases on, quality control, safety, health and sanitation regulations and proper

functioning of all equipment.

Familiar with the immigration and labor laws of the Bahamas.

Must have excellent hospitality and communications skills, team players,
self-motivated, professional appearance and manner, dependable and able to work
flexible hours.

Minimum Qualifications

+ years experience at 5* luxury resort or hotel

5+ years experience in a supervisory or management role
Candidate must be proficient in Microsoft Excel, Word, QuickBooks payrolls,
accounting and inventory.
Candidate with experience in Data Pro Inventory System and RNS (Rental
Network Systems) rental program is a plus.

Please fax cover letter, resume, references and police records to 242.328.8008.




THE TRIBUNE



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9B



poor to wide

Fidelity Bank & Trust Inter-
national’s chairman and chief
executive, who told Tribune
Business: “There’s no doubt
the next five years are going
to be very different from the
last five years, and indeed the
last 10 years of prosperity.”

Mr Sunderji said this was
chiefly because the US con-
sumer, who drove three-quar-
ters of US GDP and 20 per
cent of global economic
growth, based on the US
being responsible for 30 per
cent of global economic
growth, was “simply shopped
out and borrowed out”.

Evidence for this came
from the fact that the US con-
sumer savings rate had
jumped to 7 per cent, mean-
ing Americans were saving
$0.07 out of every $1 they
earned, compared to a nega-
tive -2 per cent savings rate
in recent years. The latter
meant that US consumers
were effectively gorging on
cheaper credit, spending more
than they were earning.

Mr Sunderji said these fig-
ures showed a 7-10 per cent
swing in the US consumer
savings rate, and with Amer-
icans deleveraging and cut-
ting spending at a rapid rate,
they were no longer in a posi-
tion to drive global growth.

On the implications for the
Bahamas, Mr Sunderji said
there would be no economic
recovery here until the US
unemployment rate - expect-
ed to peak at 10.5 per cent in
Spring/Summer next year -
came down and robust eco-
nomic growth restarted.

INTER AATION AL
LANGUAGES
4s CULTURES
IN STIT

ILC]

COURSE OFFERING: Beginalng

CONVERSATIONAL CREOLE Da Il
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I
COSVERSATIONAL SPANISH 1-4

CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN [1 & 1
RAGLISH AS A SEOUAT LANG LAGE Tf

COSVERSATIONAL GERMAS |

TELEPHONE: 312-4584, 502-2587 or 502-253

52wk-Low

10.00

0.63 Benchmark

3.15 Bahamas Waste

2.14 Fidelity Bank
10.18

Securit y
1.20 Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
6.25 Bank of Bahamas

Cable Bahamas
2.74 Colina Holdings

“The prospect of a jobless
recovery is a very real threat,
and we are likely to see the
economic situation deterio-
rate through to 2010,” Mr
Sunderji warned.

“Whether it’s government
or the private sector, they
need to be re-tooling their
businesses and their compa-
nies so that they can deal with
the new normal, which is low-
er demand for an extended
period of time.”

Context

In the Bahamian context,
Mr Sunderji urged: “There is
no option. We have to
address the structural issues.
The cost structure is out of
line with revenue. We will see
a prolonged reduction in the
top line. It’s not a short-term
issue. It’s longer term. It
depends on US recovery, and
that’s going to be problemat-
ic and anemic.

“We should not expect the
Bahamian economy to come
back strongly, unlike the
recessions we have had
before. We need to address
the structural issues caused
by a lower top line.”

He added: “Bahamian busi-
nesses will be faced with
declining sales revenues, costs
not in line with sales, and
reduced profitability and cash
flow. To remain in business
they will have to adjust some-
thing to ensure they remain
profitable and have a sustain-
able business model.

“Any time you restructure
a business, you have to con-

tember 14th, 2009
PRICE: 5 25000) per course

LOCA TIO: Miunmbnges Hebets
opext fo KPC across from COR

DURATION: 10 Weekes

E-MAIL: fel ootuedi.bs

front some big issues.
Restructuring requires hard
choices. A lot depends on
how well capitalised Bahami-
an businesses were to start
with, and most small busi-
nesses have challenges
because they are not as well-
capitalised and are much
more vulnerable to a drop in
business. Small businesses are
more likely to struggle than
larger businesses, because
larger businesses have scale.”

Describing what was hap-
pening as “a permanent shift”
taking place, the Fidelity head
said: “I think the Bahamian
economy faces some very
strong headwinds, and to deal
with these issues we all need
to be reviewing our business
models. That needs to be
done sooner rather than later.

“There’s no doubt we’re
going to have pressure on
productivity, that needs to be
improved; costs, they need to
be lower; and the Bahamas is
an expensive place to do busi-
ness in.”

Mr Sunderji added that he
did not think Bahamian busi-
nesses could “postpone for
too long” the decision on
whether to confront these
issues. “The silver lining is
becoming more efficient and
more competitive. We will
restructure our businesses so
that when the economy recov-



ers, we will be in much better
shape,” he said.

Brian Moree, attorney and
senior partner at McKinney,
Bancroft & Hughes, said that
while some economic indica-
tors were showing tentative
signs that a recovery may be
underway, and it was possi-
ble the Bahamas may have
reached or passed the bottom,
it may be 18-24 months before
recovery began in earnest.

“My concern is that it could
be a jobless recovery, here
and elsewhere,” he explained.
“We may see the indicators
and the economy recovery,
but some of the jobs may
have been permanently lost.
Some lines of business may
never recover to the same
extent we had them before,
so they may never get back
to the levels they were at
before the global recession.

“There have been some
permanent changes. The par-
adigm has shifted in certain
areas, and economic recovery
does not mean we will be in
the same place as before the
decline occurred.

“We are going to have to
show we can cross-train peo-
ple, and some people may
find they have to re-tool their
skills and seek employment
in alternative areas..... We
have to demonstrate an abili-
ty to embrace change.”

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Email: energysavingsconsultants @ hotmail.com

Contact 326-6121

ROYAL FIDELITY

Monoy at Work

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,531.48] CHG -22.77| %CHG -1.47 | YTD -180.88 | YTD % -10.56
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%

WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

1.20
11.00
6.25
0.63
3.15
2.37
10.75
2.74

5.50 Commonwealth Bank (81) 5.95
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.70

1.32 Doctor's Hospital

6.60 Famguard
9.72 Finco

10.30
4.95 Focol (S)

FirstCaribbean Bank

2.03
6.60
9.72
10.30
5.12

1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00

0.30 Freeport Concrete

5.49 ICD Utilities
10.09 J. S. Johnson
10.00

Premier Real Estate

0.30
5.50
10.09
10.00

Previous Close Today's Close

Change
1.20 0.00
11.00 0.00
6.25 0.00
0.63 0.00
3.15 0.00
2.37 0.00
10.75 0.00
2.74 0.00
5.50 -0.45
3.69 -0.01
2.03 0.00
6.60 0.00
9.72 0.00
10.30 0.00
5.12 0.00
1.00 0.00
0.30 0.00
5.50 0.00
10.09 0.00
10.00 0.00

Daily Vol.

EPS $

ce] deer sme)

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Cro 1L CoN TAL

Div$ P/E
0.127
0.992
0.244

-0.877

0.078
0.055
1.406
0.249
0.419
0.111
0.382
0.420
0.322
0.794
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180 55.6

aN
or
NAD

Nassau Airport
Deveslopment Company

Pest Exterminating Services

Nassau Airpart Development Company (NAD) imites
landers for provision of pest exterminating services
al Lynden Finding Intemaficnal Airport

Mandatory qualifications:

‘Proponents mus be 100% Bahamian-caned &
operated

ual have a current business license

4Â¥iusl demonstrate the atility ta (fil the requirements
setaul in NAD's ofical Request for Proposal

hal be comm ibead bo providing axoallend serine

RFP documents wil be awailable for pick up at NAD's
Sofaoralé offices in the Domesiciensional Terminal sl
Lynden Finding Intemational Airpad between the hours: al
10:00am - 4:00pm, tom September Tth, 2009 ta
September 11, 2008

Deadine for proposal submissions is September 28th,
2009 al 3:00pm

Contact: VANDETTA MOORSHEAD
Supervisor, Contracts Adminstration
Pic (242) POG 1000) Fa: aa) aT
PO. Boe APS) Massey, Bahcenas

LTS eg
Me IR) Perey a BEE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = 2008

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/qui/01038

COMMON LAW AND EQUITY DIVISION
BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate
in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence containing
8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly Lane, 395 feet
West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY by Kelly
Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26) feet and
EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of Albertha
Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and Twelve
hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or formerly
the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-seven and
Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY by land
now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running thereon
One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths (118.47) feet
which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position shape marks
boundaries and dimensions more particularly described by and
delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured YELLOW

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
GENEVIEVE STRACHAN

NOTICE

The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

The Petition of Genevieve Strachan of Johnson Estates in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of all that piece parcel or
lot of land situate in the Eastern District of the Island of New Providence
containing 8,194 square feet situate on the Southern Side of Kelly
Lane, 395 feet West of Johnson Road and bounded NORTHWARDLY
by Kelly Lane and running thereon Seventy and Twenty-six (70.26)
feet and EASTWARDLY by land now or formerly the property of
Albertha Pratt and running thereon One Hundred and Twenty and
Twelve hundredths (120.12) feet SOUTHWARDLY by land now or
formerly the property of Inez Munroe and running thereon Sixty-
seven and Ninety-two hundredths (67.92) feet and WESTWARDLY
by land now or formerly the property of Ida Ferguson and running
thereon One Hundred and Eighteen and Forty-seven hundredths
(118.47) feet which said piece parcel or lot of land has such position
shape marks boundaries and dimensions more particularly described
by and delineated on the said diagram or plan and thereon coloured

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b YELLOW

Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31,59 29,00
0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
CFAL Bond Fund 1.4005 3.48 5.15
CFAL MS! Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 4.16
CFAL Money Market Fund 14867 3.70 5.40
3.1031 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.1143 -8.01 -12.43
12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.0484 3.41 5.84
100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67
93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00
9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0663 2.59 6.63
1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0215 -1.11 2.15
1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0611 2.29 6.11
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

ases)

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Interest
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Genevieve Strachan claims to be the owner of the fee simple estate
in possession of the tract of land hereinbefore described free from
encumbrances and the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under section 3 of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have her title to the said tract of land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with
the provisions of the said Act.

Yield
0.00%

Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000

0.001

Div$ PIE
0.000 ~=N/M
0.480 NM
0.000 256.6

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any persons having Dower or

a Right to Dower or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in

the Petition shall on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 file in

the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a

statement of his claim in the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit

to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a

statement of his claim on or before the 4th November, A.D. 2009 will

operate as a bar to such claim.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

52wk-Low
1.3320
2.8952
1.4105

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Jul-09
31-Aug-09
28-Aug-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09
31-Jul-09

Copies of the filed Plan may be inspected at:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East
Street North, Nassau, Bahamas;

2. The Chambers of Hope Strachan & Co., attorneys for the
Petitioner, Equity House, Mount Royal Avenue North (Hawkins
Hill), Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

($1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

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Dated this 31st day of August, A.D. 2009

HOPE STRACHAN & CO.
Chambers
Equity House
Mt. Royal Avenue North
(Hawkins Hill)
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner




PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Governments delay
critical NIB reforms

FROM page 1B

Kenwood Kerr, chief exec-
utive of Providence Advisors,
said that the reforms urged in
the NIB’s eighth actuarial
report were similar to what
he and CFAL president,
Anthony Ferguson, had urged
back in a paper they wrote in
1993-1994.

Yet it appears that only
now is the Government act-
ing, Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, telling Tribune Busi-
ness in an exclusive interview
last week that some 25

amendments to the social
security programme’s gov-
erning Act and regulations
were being completed, with a
view to tabling them in Par-
liament by year-end.

Mr Kerr told Tribune Busi-
ness: “To be quite frank with
you, the sentiments, the con-
clusions being drawn in the
[eighth actuarial report] are
not a surprise to me.

“As far back as 1993-1994, I
co-authored a paper with
Anthony Ferguson that called
for all the things the actuarial
report is calling for. The single
most important issue back in

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Master of Science in Elementary Education Degree
Programme in collaboration with Wheelock College.

Applications are available from:

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Application Deadline: 16th October, 2009,



1993-1994, as it is today, was
the long-term growth and sus-
tainability of the fund. The
liquidity to meet its obliga-
tions is critical. That, unfor-
tunately, 15-16 years later, is
the issue - the sustainability
of the Fund to meet its oblig-
ations.”

Mr Ferguson, meanwhile,
told Tribune Business: “The
report made recommenda-
tions the industry has been
stating since 1994. We’re hap-
py to see they’re looking at
addressing it, but it’s a bit late,
and because it’s late it’s going
to cost employers and
employees more to meet their
needs.

“The Government needs to
act expeditiously, not only to
implement those, but they
need to reconsider some of
the investment aspects of the
fund. You can have all the
money with custodians, but if
they’re not meeting the actu-
ary’s targeted investment rate,
NIB will not be making
enough money to cover
costs.”

Mr Cargill last week con-
firmed that NIB had termi-
nated investment manage-
ment contracts with CFAL,
Providence Advisors and
RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank
& Trust, which had been giv-
en a mandate to manage and
invest up to $20 million of its

assets.

The decision was taken on
the grounds that NIB would
reduce costs by having its
assets managed in-house by
its own recently-hired Certi-
fied Financial Analyst (CFA),
but many believe this flies in
the face of recommendations
for the Fund to diversify its
investments, place a greater
proportion with qualified
investment advisors, and
invest more overseas.

Meanwhile, Mr Kerr point-
ed to NIB’s “under invest-
ment”, and added: “NIB has a
role to play in the develop-
ment of capital markets local-
ly, and I don’t think that’s
been sufficiently exploited by
the Fund.”

Recalling the recommen-
dations he and Mr Ferguson
made in 1993-1994, Mr Kerr
said they included ”curtailing
using NIB as a hiring tool,
strengthening collections so
the benefits paid out are less
than the monies they are col-
lecting, to implement a pru-
dent investment programme”.

The duo, he added, also
urged the Government to
increase NIB’s contribution
rate and invest its assets glob-
ally through qualified, expe-
rienced money managers.

“Underlying all that was
the need to educate the pop-
ulation on savings and invest-

ments, and for NIB pensions
to be seen as an option rather
than see them as a replace-
ment for retirement income,”
Mr Kerr said. “It [an NIB
pension] should be used as a
supplement for retirement
income.

“We have no pensions and
minimal savings, and that cre-
ates more of a burden and
drain on NIB.”

Without the Government
making all the necessary
reforms, Mr Kerr said there
was a danger that the Fund
would become insolvent.

“The social implications of
that would be enormous,” he
said. “People who have been
contributing have been left
without it, in the absence of
private savings and private
pensions. They would have
nothing to rely on, and with
the changing demographics
the effects will be significant.”

Mr Cargill last week said
that among the approved
amendments which will be
included in the legislation and
regulation changes to be pre-
sented to Parliament will be
an increase in NIB’s insurable
wage ceiling from the current
$400 to $600 per week, with
future annual increased linked
to inflation via the retail price
index.

Other approved changes,
said Mr Cargill, were an

increase in the 150 weeks or
three years’ worth of NIB
contributions to qualify for a
lifetime pension to 500 weeks
or 10 years, plus an increase in
the wage ceiling for pension-
able civil servants that is cur-
rently frozen at $110 per
week.

Mr Cargill added: “What’s
important is that we’ve start-
ed to address some of the
issues identified in the report
- operational efficiency, col-
lection efficiency. This year,
we’re achieving contribution
revenues above expectations
and above last year, because
we’ve been a little more
assertive to ensure people pay
contributions on time.

“We are focusing on the
recommendations to ensure
the Fund remains strong and
sound. If we don’t make any
changes by 2025, we will have
challenges. We want to make
changes as quickly as possi-
ble to make the Fund strong
and sound.”

NIB’s reserve fund, cur-
rently standing at $1.415 bil-
lion, was projected to be
depleted some time between
2029 and 2035 if urgent
reforms to the social security
programme were not enact-
ed. The NIB Fund’s outgo-
ings projected to exceed
income by $7.868 billion over
the next 60 years.

Legal Notice

UCKFIELD LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ZENNOR VILLAS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ORMSKIR VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ZUCCHINI INVESTMENT LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., PRO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LT LO INTERNATIONAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

WINTER THORPE INC.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., RO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NIPSON GREEN INVESTMENTS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., PRO. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

ROLLIN STONES COMPANY LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

STOKOE PLAINES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 3rd day of September, 2009. The
Liquidator is Agrosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

Government assesses

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 11B

Film Studios principal

FROM page 1B

the 3,500-acre former US Air
Force Missile Base to the
development was the only
interest the Government has
in the project, apart from oth-
er logistical items.

"We have been for the last
couple of months seeking to
conclude a new Heads of
Agreement with the owner of
the studio,” said Mr Davis.

"That process has not been
as swift as we would have
liked, but we are still in that
process of trying to review a
draft Heads of Agreement."

When Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham re-took
office, he felt the Christie
administration had allowed
the Bahamas Film Studios to
lease too much Crown Land,

having obtained 3,500 acres
at the former US Air Force
Missile Base site in Grand
Bahama.

The Government had
looked to restrict that to 120
acres, covering the water tank
and existing buildings, and
these talks with Mr Fuller
have been going on for more
than a year.

Mr Davis said the Govern-
ment had been vetting Mr
Fuller to establish whether it
wanted to do business with
him, the investment banker
having take ownership and
control at the Bahamas Film
Studios after two of its three
founding partners died. The
third, Paul Quigley, has also
since passed away.

Mr Davis said: "We want
to see if he [Mr Fuller] is the
proper person with which the

Government should be doing
business.

"He came into ownership
by default after the original
owners died. He loaned them
some money and was holding
their assests at Gold Rock
Creek Enterprises [the Film
Studios’ immediate holding
company]."

Investment

Mr Fuller recently told Tri-
bune Business that a $17 mil-
lion investment will be lost as
a result of his decision to close
the project, a move he blamed
on the Government’s alleged
“failure to honour its obliga-
tions” in delivering a new
lease and Heads of Agree-
ment to him.

Amid calls for the Govern-
ment to take “remedial”

Film Studios remained oper-
ational, given the impact the
closure was likely to have on
this nation’s attractiveness as
a filming locale for the global
TV/film industry, many
observers were suspicious that
Mr Fuller was using the ‘clo-
sure’ threat as a negotiating
ploy in an effort to secure or
better a deal with the Ingra-
ham administration.

When Tribune Business put
this to Mr Fuller, that he was
making this announcement as
a tactic to push the Govern-
ment into an agreement, he
answered cryptically in an e-
mail: “You can’t push string.”

When asked to detail the
obligations the Government
had allegedly failed to live up
to, Mr Fuller replied: “Never
delivering a new lease and
Heads of Agreement. Failure

ronmental study, which pre-
cluded us from moving for-
ward.”

Straw

As for the ‘final straw’ that
pushed him to shut down the
Bahamas Film Studios, Mr
Fuller said: “My 50th call to
the Prime Minister’s Office
inquiring if they had the
paperwork that they kept
promising on each of the oth-
er 49 calls.” He declined to
comment when asked by Tri-
bune Business about whether
he would initiate legal action
against the Bahamian gov-



ernment.

Mr Fuller added that some
$17 million had been invested
in the Bahamas Film Studios
project, “which will all be lost
subject to any recovery
efforts”.

As for the closure’s impact
on Grand Bahama and the
wider Bahamas, he said:
“There will never be a film
studio in Grand Bahama.
They will lose about $10 mil-
lion per year in general spend-
ing in the economy, thousands
of room nights in hotels.
Grand Bahama will never be
taken seriously as a site to
film movies.”




NOTICE




DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED




action to ensure the Bahamas to approve the original envi-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS
YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
31st day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our erefstte at weew.cob,edar by

NOTICE

Town Meeting for Master of Law (LLM)
in Mantime Law Degree Programme in
collaboration with the University of London,
Monday Sth October, 20009,
Executive Boardroom,

Michael Eldon Complex, 3rd Floor
6:00 p.m. to §:00 p.m.

(a) © DOFA INVESTMENT LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on the 3"
September, 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted
to and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated Ltd.,

Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, BVI

Dated this 7 day of September, A. D. 2009

NOTICE



Verduro Associated Lid.
Liquidator

OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, OSSINA INTERNATIONAL LTD. is’ in
dissolution as of August 28, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

BAHAMAS FIRST
stad nae Company SKemvitea!
Balance Sheet as at December 31, 2008

LIQUIDATOR

2008 2007
ASSETS
Cash s
Term deposits
Invesiments
Trade accounts receivable
Sundry receivables and prepayments
Receivabla from reinsurers
Interest receivable
Deferrad commission costs
Unpaid claims recoverable from reinsurers
Deferred reinsurance premiums
Deferred reinsurance cost
Receivables from related companies
Property and equipment
Intangible asset

3,061,929
3,671,036
18,342,800
22,617,378
692,983

5 66,813,378
3,479,529
21,265,010
20,742,672
P48 746
2d5 219
91,331
7,009,654
10,670,394
26,827,569
4,035,334
23,293 948
2,044,192
2,692,559

$ 129.949 519

AT

92,922
6,995,985
11,099,148
28,665,499
3,787,991
29,582,108
2,029,929
2,692,559

Accountant

We are looking for a recent college graduate who is interested
in working under the supervision of experienced accountants
and has the goal of eventually sitting the CPA Exam. We
are a small, fast growing retail business owned and operated
by young, dynamic entrepreneurs. This is an exciting
opportunity to work directly with the business owners and
learn the practice of accounting as well as the principles of
entrepreneurship.

Qualifications/Experience/Skills

3.127,532,266

¢ Bachelors Degree in Accounting (Associates Degree :
in Accounting is a minimum requirement) LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

LIABILITIES:
Payable to reinsurers 5
Uneamed commission income
Uneamed premiums

Bank overdraft

* Be proficient in all Microsoft Office Applications 3.415.600 §

6,750,135 5,839,199
42,674,996 42 686,985
4,089,092 -
Payable to agents and brokers 6,915 466,983
Accrued liabilities 2,292 066 1,462,020
Unpaid claims 20,729 176 19,352 79?

79,959,980

14,225,843

¢ Ability to research technical issues and apply
Accounting Theory

¢ Ability to continually develop and expand on
technical skills

¢ Ability to clearly and adequately document work
and maintain an effective audit trail

EQUITY:
Share capital
Contributed surplus
Ganeral reseve
Revaluation surplus
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

¢ Present ideas and facts persuasively and confidently
through verbal and written communication 7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000

1,269,268

7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,269,268

21,203,018 19,546,929

47,572,286 45,916,197
$127,532,266 $129,949,519

|
wa -
he
“SS a —f =
Approved on behalfof the Board of Directors: (Chairman i

4 full copy of the Company s flnancial statements are available on the Company 's website www. bahamasfirst.com

¢ A self-starter who demonstrates creativity in looking
for ways to simplify and improve processes

¢ An effective listener, one who also seeks and accepts
advice and provides feedback

¢ Able to project a poised and self-confident manner
and be perceived as a leader

¢ Demonstrates a willingness to take on new
challenges and responsibilities

* Willing to spend time working in the retail operations
serving customers Director

Interested candidates should submit a
letter of interest and resume to:
accountant.open@ gmail.com

No Resumes will be received after September 11, 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SSeS a Sus NESs SS ESS Ss Ee
Customs: ‘We’re not attempting to stymie business’

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

crobards@tribunemedia.net

THE Comptroller of Cus-
toms has pledged that his
department is not there to
“stymie” business, and
appealed to the private sec-
tor and public to assist in
changing stigmas associated
with doing business with it,

Teme R mais

* AMAZING

following major changes to
the way cargo is imported and
released.

Glenn Gomez did not deny
claims of bad customer ser-
vice and inefficiency at a
meeting with Customs that
was arranged by the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.

Mr Gomez, along with oth-
er leading officers from the
Customs Department, sought

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to clarify misconceptions and
misunderstandings surround-
ing new Customs rules put in
place earlier this year. This
was done, he said, to correct a
system that had been flawed
for quite some time.

The changes, which imme-
diately affected the business
of Bahamian courier services,
came following a major
shake-up of the Customs

Department, which involved
the former acting comptrol-
ler being replaced by Mr
Gomez.

During the meeting, con-
cerned business owners and
freight companies questioned
Mr Gomez and his team
about the new rules and
offered suggestions as to how
the department could become
more customer friendly and

conduct its business more
quickly.

Major concerns were long
lines at the customer depart-
ment because of a single win-
dow for two different proce-
dures, and the long standing
concern of "terrible" cus-
tomer service at various cus-
toms desks throughout Nas-
sau.

Mr Gomez told anyone

receiving below average ser-
vice from any of his officers to
get their names and report
their complaints to the Cus-
toms department.

The department has been
considering the move to an
online system, but its own
website needs an upgrade and
a separation from the Gov-
ernment website in order to
handle the traffic it receives.

A Courier Association
formed since the implemen-
tation of the new rules was
not out to the town meeting in
force, but one courier said he
was please with the earnest
responses of the Customs
department and clarification
of new procedures.

He said because it was the
law, it has to be followed. Mr
Gomez recently told Tribune
Business that claims of delays
and corruption in the depart-
ment made by some business
people were "gross misrepre-
sentations”.

He said the new processes

of the life and

put in place by the Customs
Department since his arrival
have always been the right
procedures, but had not been
enforced over decades.

Mr Gomez admitted that
the new process became a
challenge for courier services

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during its initial implementa-
tion, but argued that some
concerns brought to him by
the newly-formed courier
association were dealt with
promptly.

However, he said some oth-
er changes requested by the
association would have
required him to negate the
procedures made to the clear-
ing of imported goods.

According to him, the new
processes were introduced
because government was los-
ing millions in revenue due to
an erroneous system he said
should have not been in place.

"They want a system that
is illegal to operate," Mr
Gomez said. "If you're just
upset because you can't cir-
cumvent the system, I can't
help you with that. We are
there to collect duties, not to
stymie businesses.”

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Family Islands 1-242-300-1997 | US 1-800-945-8254

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: Low: 75° F/24°C i Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:53 a.m. Moonrise .... 8:58 p.m.
€ ° a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday ....ccccccssssessscseeesesseeeee 0.24" Sunset... 7:22 p.m. Moonset ..... 9:26 a.m.
fall, ; FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT 7 AN Year to date 20. Last New First
' High: 87° F/31°C @ High: 88° F/31°C Normal year to date oo... 32.73" a ;
Low: 78° F/26°C Fm Low: 78° F/26° C Ee
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@ 2 am Forecasts and graphics provided by :
- MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep. 11 Sep. 18 Sep. 26
-* High: 88° F/31°C ELEUTHERA
or Low: 76°F/24° C NASSAU aa 86" Fst
ae, Low: 79° F/26°C
- 7 @ an
KEY WEST i — CATISLAND
High: 89° F/32°C High: 86° F/30°C
Low: 78 F/26 C i. Low: 76° F/24°C
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“Te GREAT EXUMA “ SAN SALVADOR
all High: 88° F/31 SiC: High: 90° F/32° c
; ANDROS Low: 76° F/24° C Low: 76° F/24° c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; ae —
highs and tonights's lows. High: 89° F/32°C — PP
Low: 78° F/26° C a yr * -_,
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LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24°C
Today Tuesday Today Tuesday Today Tuesday MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W Rez. High: 91° F/33° C
FC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC FC F/C FIC FIC lle Low: 75° F/24° C
Albuquerque 86/30 62/16 pc 86/30 62/16 ft Indianapolis 80/26 62/16 t 80/26 62/16 t Philadelphia 78/25 6317 c 79/26 66/18 1
Anchorage 62/16 50/10 c 59/15 49/99 Fr Jacksonville 87/30 69/20 t 90/32 71/21 pc Phoenix 100/37 81/27 pc 100/37 81/27 pc CROOKED rs
Atlanta 84/28 66/18 pc 85/29 67/19 pc Kansas City 82/27 GING pc 84/28 63/17 pc Pittsburgh 75/23 58/14 t 80/26 58/14 t RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:92°F/33"c
Allantic City 73/22 6246 c 76/24 63/17 + Las Vegas 99/37 72/22 s 99/37 75/23 s Portland, OR 70/21 52/11 po 78/25 54/12 5 High: 88° F/31° C Low: 77° F/25°C
Baltimore 79/26 62/16 c 79/26 64/17 c Little Rock 90/32 69/20 pc 90/32 68/20 pc Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 1 83/28 64/17 c Low: 74°F/23°C = *
Boston 72/22 58/14 pe 79/26 59/15 pc Los Angeles 81/27 64/117 pe 81/27 64/17 pc St. Louis 81/27 67/19 t 85/29 65/18 pc .
Buffalo 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 5915 t Louisville 83/28 65/18 t 85/29 62/16 t Salt Lake City 87/380 58/14 pc 81/27 56/13 s GREAT INAGUA wr
Charleston, SC 86/30 66/18 r 88/31 68/20 pc Memphis 87/30 68/20 t 90/32 71/21 pc San Antonio 94/34 74/23 s 94/34 73/22 pc High: 93° F/34° C
Chicago 78/25 56/13 pce 78/25 56/13 pc Miami 88/31 76/24 t 89/31 78/25 t San Diego 74/23 66/18 pce 75/23 66/18 pc Low. 77°F/25°C
Cleveland 78/25 61/16 t 79/26 60/15 t Minneapolis 82/27 60/15 s 82/27 62/16 pc San Francisco 72/22 54/12 pe 75/23 57/13 pe 7
Dallas 96/35 74/23 pc 96/35 73/22 pc Nashville 84/28 62/16 t 87/30 63/17 t Seattle 66/18 50/10 pe 71/21 52/11 pe
Denver 89/31 56/3 pce 86/30 5442 t New Orleans 86/30 74/23 t 88/31 73/22 t Tallahassee 89/31 68/20 t 91/32 69/20 t Detroit 75/23 61/6 t 79/26 62/16 t New York 74/23 67/49 pc 80/26 68/20 pc Tampa 91/32 74/23 t 91/32 75/23 t ;
Honolulu 89/31 75/23 pe 88/31 74/23 pc Oklahoma City 90/32 68/20 s 93/33 66/18 pc Tucson 93/33 72/22 pe 95/35 72/22 t —
Houston 91/32 72/22 pc 93/33 72/22 pc Orlando 88/31 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 t Washington, DC 78/25 66/18 c 79/26 64/117 c

THE TRIBUNE

i

TAMPA
High: 91° F/33°C
Low: 74° F/23°C
@ i

-

ORLANDO |
_ High:88° F/31°C :
Low: 73° F/23°C

== Variably cloudy with Cloudy with a shower or Mainly cloudy, t-storms; Clouds and sun, Some sun with a Some sun with a
Z ” thunderstorms. t-storm. breezy. t-storms possible. t-storm possible. t-storm possible.
is . High: 90° High: 89° High: 90° High: 90°
F High: 90° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79°
, Eee ey ee Ear


























The exclusive AccuWeather ee ee is an neo that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.



Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday

. ~e ABACO Temperature - -
: - «oh oge ° HIG Mi, ccsscesinett Recs eucreeseceecnceeiccemess 93° F/34° C
ei 4 High: 89° F/32° C Low 81° F/27° C

7 all, t = Low: 79° F/26°C sett teases eteees

as ——— : Normal high... 88° F/31° C
7 Normal low 75° F/24° C
@ WEST PALM BEACH mc [AS Ear 8 NGI sssecececeetieeeasens 90° F/32° C
Last year's LOW o.ceceeceseeeseeeeeees 74° F/23° C

High: 87° F/31°C





I
“Th INDEX TODAY

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o|1|2

LOW



The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

3|4|5|6

MODERATE





HIGH |

\. HIGH



greater the need for eye and skin protection.

a Pos

Ht. (ft.

High
Tote 022 pm
Tuesday ee a
Wednesday i 7 : mi
Thursday 12:17 p.m.



3.1
20

3.1
2.6

3.1
2.5

3.4



Low
3:46 a.m.
4:20 p.m.
4:22 a.m.
5:03 p.m.
5:02 a.m.
5:52 p.m.
5:47 a.m.
6:48 p.m.

0.2
0.4

0.2
0.4

0.3
0.5

0.3
0.6









Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
838/31
67/19
86/30
82/27
61/16
90/32
86/30
82/27
68/20
838/31
73/22
69/20
80/26
70/21
72/22
74/23
62/16
95/35
88/31
62/16
92/33
83/28
90/32
65/18
64/17
73/22
75/23
64/17
90/32
64/17
93/33
100/37
75/23
83/28
78/25
88/31
72/22
72/22
90/32
82/27
72/22
94/34
75/23
72/22
71/21
85/29
97/36
61/16
76/24
72/22
90/32
108/42
74/23
90/32
60/15
87/30
58/14
87/30
83/28
82/27
66/18
68/20
91/32
82/27
75/23
100/37
62/16
73/22
66/18
82/27

ii

Today

Low
F/C
80/26
57/13
54/12
66/18
41/5
79/26
77/25
62/16
55/12




77/25 §
51/10 s

56/13
73/22

43/6
56/13

48/8

43/6
75/23
79/26

43/6
72/22
72/22
70/21
56/13
54/12
56/13
51/10
54/12
71/21
54/12
82/27
71/21
68/20
64/17
51/10
79/26
58/14
57/13
64/17
77/25

54/12 t
73/22 t

57/13
56/13

49/9
54/12
77/25
54/12
58/14
52/11
17/25
84/28
54/12
78/25
28/-2
73/22

36/2
74/23
68/20
63/17
54/12
52/11
79/26
73/22
57/13
71/21
53/11
55/12
51/10
63/17

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F/C
87/30
76/24
81/27
75/23
61/16
91/32
86/30
74/23
77/25
81/27
71/21
77/25
80/26
68/20
79/26
79/26
55/12
97/36
90/32
63/17
91/32
84/28
85/29
70/21
66/18
81/27
80/26
68/20
87/30
64/17
93/33
103/39
75/23
82/27
76/24
88/31
72/22
81/27
90/32
82/27
72/22
92/33
79/26
70/21
73/22
84/28
93/33
65/18
83/28
73/22
93/33
108/42
80/26
88/31
54/12
87/30
59/15
85/29
85/29
81/27
68/20
68/20
92/33
81/27
75/23
98/36
63/17
73/22
70/21
77/25

Tuesday

Low
F/C
79/26
60/15
54/12
64/17
43/6
81/27
78/25
62/16
54/12
75/23
58/14
61/16
74/23
44/6
61/16
56/13
37/2
74/23
79/26
37/2
72/22
72/22
74/23
61/16
52/11
61/16
52/11
50/10
71/21
57/13

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WwW

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pc
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S$
t
S$
S$
pc
$
pc
pc
Cc
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pc
S$
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S$
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sh
t
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Cc
sh
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Ss
pc
sh
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82/27 s

72/22
67/19
62/16
50/10
79/26
59/15
59/15
66/18
77/25
54/12
73/22
57/13
57/13

45/7
55/12
17/25
53/11
65/18

49/9
76/24
82/27
56/13
78/25

35/1
73/22

34/1
74/23
64/17
61/16
54/12
50/10
79/26
72/22
57/13
66/18
55/12
55/12

49/9
53/11

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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace

CUS ae a



MARINE FORECAST



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 86° F
FREEPORT Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 81°F
Tuesday: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 7-10 Miles 82°F



(COOLER)

=

Billings
73/51

‘osJAngeles.
81/64!





Miami
88/76

Showers
[XX] T-storms





Rain Fronts
[4 Pintle Shown are noon positions of weather systems and hin

Bk. Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm itntitentMe
[v_=] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Meuguafi
10s -Os [/0s) 10s 20s [06l) 40s (50s Gos 70s (80s /S0s///iimetiis]





a

Be Bl
Away u Can J Hurricane

Or you can ue easy knowing
pet pane excellent insurance
rape no matter which
“away he wind blows.

Nobody does it better.
INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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Tel: (242) 354-5555 f Tet:



Te eal imal ue ameen






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.237MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 90F LOW 79F I N S I G H T SEEINSIGHTSECTION S P O R T S Back to the SEEPAGEELEVEN Dark Ages ‘Superman’ is back By DENISE MAYCOCK T ribune Staff Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Grand B ahama Police have warned the public to be on the look out for an “extremely dan gerous” 23-year-old man wanted for questioning in connection with the island’s eighth homicide. A shley Joel Smith, 22, of South Bahamia, was stabbed Friday evening in theF reeport area. He was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital, where he later died of his injuries. P olice have issued an all points bulletin for Godfrey Virgil Jr, alias ‘Dollar Murder’ of Bass Lane. Virgil has two distinctive tattoos one bearing the Police warn public after stabbing death The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate PLEASE N O TE THA T, DUE TO THE L AB OUR DAY HOLIDAY IN THE UNITED S T A TES, THERE WILL BE N O US ATODAY SECTION IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE ‘Danger ous’ man is wanted after killing SEE page 10 GODFREY VIRGIL JR , alias ‘Dollar Murder’ ASHLEY JOEL SMITH died of his injuries By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham announced that government will soon make an announcement of a temporary jobs programme for some 500 or more unemployed people on Grand Bahama. While in Grand Bahama on Sunday, Mr Ingraham told the media that government is doing a number of things to assist Grand Bahama during this difPM is set to announce 500 temporary jobs S EE page 10 STADIUMMODELPRESENTATION WU BANGGUO , Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China presented a model of the national stadium – which is currently under construction – to the Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette. Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security look on. SEE SPORTS ON PAGESELEVEN ANDTWELVE F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net A BRAZEN attempted armed robbery of a hardware store in daylight has left a young man in hospital in seri ous condition after being shot twice. The 23-year-old employee of the store, identified by his family as Alexander Dean, was shot in the abdomen and back after a dreadlocked gun man and his accomplice entered Dean’s Building SupMan shot in ar med r obbery attempt SEE page nine A 65-YEAR-OLD man was found dead in the water near the shoreline at Goodmans Bay on Friday evening. The man, whose identity has not yet been confirmed by police, was found at around 6pm on Friday. A doctor in the area attempted to provide medical assistance but was unsuccessful. The man, believed to be from McKinney Drive, Nassau, was pronounced dead at the scene. Police suspect the man drowned. An autopsy will be performed to determine the cause of death. Foul play is not suspected. 65-year-old man believed to have drowned By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Government is concerned that the Grand Bahama Power Compa ny may have sought to max imise profits at the expense of its distribution and generation system, according to Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. Expressing his disappoint ment over the inefficiency in power generation on Grand Bahama, Mr Ingraham said government is considering whether to have the Grand Bahama Power Company regPM disappointed over inefficiency of Grand Bahama Power Company SEE page 10 By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A HIGH speed chase raced through the streets of southern New Providence on Friday night as police dodged bullets and fired back while in pursuit of two men in a silver coloured Honda accord. The officers were on patrol in Pinewood Gardens when Police in high speed chase shootout SEE page nine

PAGE 2

BAHAMIAN government officials hailed the visit of Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China, as an “historic” one that will prove beneficial to the country. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette led a group of high-ranking officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Thursday in welcoming Chairman Wu and a 120-plus delegation, including 19 journalists, on a four-day visit to the Bahamas. Joining Mr Symonette in greeting the visitors were Dr Patricia Rodgers, Permanent Secretary; Elma Campbell, Resident Ambassador of the Bahamas to the People’s Republic of China; Joshua Sears, Director General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Despite overcast skies, the visiting delegation received a Bahamian cultural display when they landed at Lynden Pindling International Airport in a twostorey jumbo 747-jet. As they disembarked the plane, they were greeted by two receiving lines and the rhythmic sounds and smooth gyrations of a “mixed” junkanoo group that performed in bright coloured costumes. The receiving lines included Hu Dingxian, Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Bahamas, the diplomatic staff of the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China, and members of the Chinese community. Solange Allen, a student of Xavier’s Lower School, and Davanna Collie of St Thomas More Catholic School presented Chairman Wu, and Li Jianguo, Vice-Chairman of the National People’s Congress, with floral bouquets. In a written press release, Chairman Wu said: “China attaches great importance to developing relations with the Bahamas, which it views as a key partner of cooperation in the Caribbean. “Since establishing diplomatic ties, our two countries have made good progress in the bilateral relationship, increasing political mutual trust, expanding economic cooperation and trade, forging rich and diverse cultural and people-topeople ties, and maintaining close coordination and cooperation in international affairs. “This proves that the friendly relationship between China and the Bahamas serves the fundamental interests of our two countries and two peoples. By paying this visit I hope to further promote the comprehensive in-depth growth of our friendly ties and cooperation.” Chairman Wu said during his visit he would have “in-depth” exchange of views with Bahamian leaders with a view to “enhancing political mutual trust, expanding mutually beneficial cooperation and other issues of shared interest.” “I believe that with the host’s thoughtful arrangements, this shared visit will be a complete success,” he added. The delegation was whisked away in an official convoy to the Royal Towers, Atlantis Resort, where they are residing. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DOZENS of Bahamians online jumped to the defence of their country over the weeke nd after an Australian magazine published a story about the “Bahamas Nightmare” of the wife of an international tennis champion living in New Providence. “Women’s Day” magazine ran a front page story about the “hellish” experience of Bec Hewitt, the 26-year-old wife of Australian tennis champ Lleyton Hewitt, who recently moved to the gated-community of O ld Fort Bay out west. The story, which tells of the crime fears and loneliness of Mrs Hewitt in her Bahamas home, was also reproduced online at http://womansday.ninemsn.com.au/ celebrity/inthemag/855245/becs-bahamasnightmare While some Bahamian readers felt the characterisation of The Bahamas as a wholea s a poverty-stricken and crime-ridden place was unfair, what raised their ire most were the photographs illustrating the story, which claimed to show the average lives of Bahami ans with images said to represent “typical Bahamian housing”, “impoverished locals”, “unkempt streets” and “barred windows.” In a bit of bad international publicity for The Bahamas, the pictures, far from being “typical”, showed what appear to be the worst of the worst that Nassau has to offer including a shanty-type house boarded up with plywood, a miserable and dirty looking man sitting shoeless on a sidewalk and a derelict building surrounded by rubbish. The story, published in the August 31 edition of the publication, read: “The look of fear on Bec Hewitt's face when she leaves the high-security Bahamas mansion she and L leyton call home is warranted, Annette Witheridge discovers. “When her tennis ace husband Lleyton Hewitt announced they were moving to the Bahamas, Bec probably expected to find a sizzling new social life among the rich and famous. If so, she must be sorely disap pointed. “To outsiders, the high-security gated com m unity of Old Fort Bay looks like an idyllic place to bring up children. But in reality, the 197-hectare ‘village’ is a gilded cage, surrounded by spiked fences and barbed wire. “Just 25 minutes drive away, locals live in abject poverty in the slums of Nassau, and Bec's neighbours warn that it is a dangerous p lace blighted by crime, poverty and high unemployment. Armed robberies are commonplace, and last week a 34-year-old mother of three became the country's 53rd murder victim this year when she was gunned down metres from a church. A few days later two more people were killed.” Now the former soap opera star is “wanting out” of The Bahamas, continued the p iece. While some Australians sympathised with Mrs Hewitt’s plight “My advice to Bec is get the hell out of there. How dare (Lleyton Hewitt) put his wife and child in such a lonely and dangerous place for his own selfish desires,” wrote one. Some Bahamians who saw the piece let it be known that they felt it was not an accurate portrayal of their homel and. “Richard,” said: “Have any of you even visited the Bahamas before? We’re not impoverished gun toting drug addicts. If they’re so miserable they should get out of our country! No one is forcing them to stay.” Meanwhile, “Maura” in Nassau, wrote, “I wondered if she has ever been to NYC, Chicago or any other big city where you canl ive in a great neighbourhood that’s not gat ed but a few blocks away it’s crime central.” However, others said they felt the arti cle’s representation “may not be far from the truth” about Nassau. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Story of tennis player’s wifs ‘Bahamas nightmare’ sparks defence of the country TENNIS ace Lleyton Hewitt (AP THE Bahamas Humane Society will hold its annual General Meeting for 2009 tomorrow. All Humane Society members are invited to attend the event, which will be held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach hotel on Cable Beach. The meeting will begin at 6.30pm. BHSANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Govt hails ‘historic’ Chairman Wu visit WU BANGGUO , Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of The People’s Republic of China sits with Prime Minister the Rt. Hon. Hubert Ingraham at the head table during the Official Dinner hosted by the Prime Minister in honour of Chairman Wu at Atlantis on Friday, September 4. Sitting in the middle is Interpreter, He Rulong. P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S

PAGE 3

By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net ABACO residents suffered the second region-wide power cut in a week on Saturday night as controversy heats up over plans for a Bunker C Fuel power plant in Wilson City. Homes across Abaco were plunged into darkness as electricity failed across the islands at around 8.30 on Saturday night and was not restored for abut three hours. The powercut was the second Abaco-wide shortage in a week, and the third power outage in Green Turtle Cay, residents say. They are calling on the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC power fails on a weekly, or daily basis during the summer months, while they continue to pay high electricity bills. An Abaco resident wrote on thewebsite Bahamasissues.com: “It is bad enough that it goes out so much on Wednesday it went off from 4am until 10am, then it went off again from 1pm until 2.30pm, only to go off again from 4.30pm until 5.30pm but it goes down to maybe 40 or 50 volts and just stays there for several minutes. “We are lucky that everything we have is not burnt up.” BEC and government officials intend to address power supply issues by constructing a 48 mega-watt Bunker C Fuel power plant in Wilson City, on the Bight of Old Robinson, S outh Abaco, to be operational by March 2010. But environmentalists are concerned the power plant, like the one in Clifton Pier, New Providence, will be hugely detrimental to the environment. Although the fuel type is cheaper than diesel, they say it w ill not cut electricity prices for residents, and it will lead to potential oil spills, toxic air emissions, acid rain, and carbon emissions in a pristine tourist area just three miles from the protected Pelican Land and Sea National Park. Hope Town resident Matt M cCoy, 30, said: “If properly maintained and run the plant will be about as toxic as an equivalent diesel plant, but it will require tons of maintenance and operations management. Can BEC handle this? I don't think so. And an accident with this stuff will be much, m uch worse than diesel.” Mr McCoy understands five out of 15 generators at the current Marsh Harbour power plant are broken, in addition to power lines going to the cays. He said: “The current Marsh Harbour power plant generates around 16 megawatts of power which is adequate in the winter, but not summer. However, if all of the diesel generators were working, they would have around 24 megawatts of power, enough to supply all of Abaco all year round. “But they want 48 megawatts at Wilson City! Why double the power? “Instead of bringing in more complicated equipment that requires diligent maintenance, why not fix what is already here and broken?” E lbow Cay resident Attila Feszt said: “More power is needed, but the plant they are planning on building could damage the whole area. “Bunker C fuel is the cheapest stuff they can get and it will possibly cause pollution of the w ater. It’s a short term fix.” Mr Feszt, Mr McCoy and other concerned Abaco residents are calling on government to explore alternative fuel or energy sources and identify a site that will have less impact on the environment and tourism. M inister of the Environment Earl Deveaux and Phenton Neymour, Minister of State for the Environment with responsibility for utilities, will hear their concerns in a public meeting at New Visions Ministries, in Jerusalem Drive, Marsh Harbour, at 7pm on Thursday. A statement released by BEC in relation to power cuts across the Bahamas maintains the corporation is confronting and resolving inconsistencies in power supply as a priority. A spokesman for the Corporation said specialists have been brought in from the United States to review operations and make recommendations for improvements, and $150 million is being invested in a number of capital projects to upgrade electricity supplies in t he Family Islands. The BEC spokesman said: “Furthermore, the Corporation remains committed to implementing a renewable energy programme on a utility scale. “The Corporation is taking the proper steps to ensure that s uch a programme can address the unique energy needs and the protection of the fragile ecosystems of the Bahamas. “Consumers should also note that the BEC claims department stands ready to investigate and process claims of damage to electrical applia nces. Further information regarding the Corporation’s claims services is available at www.my-bec.com or by telephoning the department during regular business hours.” BEC can be contacted at 302-1000. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsT T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l ll l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242)326 2335 2335Outdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Another region-wide power cut in Abaco MINISTER of the Environment Earl Deveaux (left mour, Minister of State for the Environment with responsibility for utilities, will hear Abaco residents’ concerns in a public meeting. A STABBING in the Kemp Road area alarmedr esidents when a man’s t hroat was slit early Saturday morning. A 28-year-old resident of Elizabeth Street said the man was attacked outside her front gate, which is near t he junction with Kemp R oad. However, no record of the stabbing was filed in the weekend police report and police press liaison officer Walter Evans failed to respond to inquiries from T he Tribune b efore press time yesterday. Kemp Road residents want to know the condition of the injured man and cir-c umstances of the attack. Man has throat slit in the Kemp Road area A LARGE stash of w eapons and ammunition a re off the streets today after a tip from a member of the public. A ccording to police, three handguns a .44mm, a 22 mm and a .38 mm and 1 68 live bullets were disc overed in a plastic bag in a n area off Kemp Road at around 11am Saturday. N o arrests have been made in connection with the find, but police investiga-t ions are continuing. Weapons and ammunition found after tip BAHAMIANS are being challenged to improve their health and to observe “Caribbean Wellness Day” next Saturday as part of the effort to eradicate non-communicable chronic diseases in the region. Caribbean Heads of Government, including Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, in response to the heavy burden of non-com municable diseases on the citizens of the region, issued the Port of Spain Declaration in Sep tember 2007, “Uniting to Stop the Epidemic of Chronic NonCommunicable Diseases” and declared that the second Satur day in September should be celebrated each year as Caribbean Wellness Day. The Ministry of Health invites all Bahamians to attend an “All Day Mega Health Extravagan za” on September 12 on the grounds of the ministry’s complex at the juncture of Augusta, Delancy and Meeting Streets. For the adults attending there will be a range of free health screenings, including blood cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar and weight screening; healthy food demonstrations; the showcase of a range of activities in which to engage in daily to maintain a moderate level of physical activity. For the children there will be a fully supervised bouncing castle, and in the late afternoon everyone will be able to get their “bodies in motion” to the rhythmic beat of the One Family junkanoo rush out. There also will be booths organised by various gyms, spas and wholesalers featuring spe cial give-aways throughout the day; a “punchboard” where patrons, for a minimum dona tion, will be eligible to try for a variety of prizes; as well as ven dors with healthy Bahamian foods for sale. Bahamians asked to observe Caribbean Wellness Day

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EDITOR, The Tribune . I read with dismay, the statement in opposition to the proposed out-lawing of rape against a spouse by the President of the Christian Council in this morning's paper which he purported to issue on behalf of the Bahamas Christian Council. I thought the Christian Council represented all Christian denominations in The Bahamas. The Heads of four major Christian denominations in our country: the SeventhDay Adventists, the Methodist, the Roman Catholic and the Anglicans, have all indicated p ublicly their support for the amendment of the law. I am bewildered then, that the Rev. Patrick Paul issued his statement, which is diametrically opposite to the thoughtful positions of support for the amendment taken by those four Church Heads, as a position of t he Council. I understand that in some denominations, each Church operates as an independent body and each sends a representative to the Christian Council even if their individual church has only a very small number of members. In this w ay, these denominations have been permitted to dominate the Christian Council for decades, to the detriment of the Council in many instances, as in this case, I believe. I have read in the newspapers some Neanderthal statements by some churchmen who o ppose this progressive and necessary amendment to the Sexual Offences Act. At a time when a disproportionate percentage of assaults, and indeed homicides, in our country involve family members, the Christian Church must speak uniformly against violence. R ape is always accompanied by violence or the threat of violence! Any suggestion that forcible sexual relations is ever “nonviolent” and ever “not rape” is incredulous, unbefitting and inappropriate for any person who claims to preach the gospel o f Jesus Christ. INCREDULOUS Nassau, September 5, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm THERE ARE those religious ministers presumably the unidentified voices behind the Bahamas Christian Council’s objection t o government’s extending the offence of r ape to the marital bed who fear there would be “far reaching consequences” to t he institution of marriage if a man were answerable before the law for raping hisw ife. S ome of these pastors predict a complete b reakdown in society if sexual violence by a m an against his wife were classified as rape. The ministers fear that a rejected, viol ent man would lose faith in marriage and start to roam outside the home in search of n ew comfort if he could not use his wife as his sexual chattel. In the Bahamas culture oft he “macho” man, this is rather a ridiculous fear. T here are many fine, upstanding and faithful husbands in this society. However, there are too many “macho” men, who have l oving wives, but who roam anyway and proudly boast of the number of children t hey have “outside.” In their own rough circle this is the way they prove their manhood it’s the game of one upmanship over their equally crude peers. W e have had many embarrassing moments at The Tribune when a legitimate family has placed a death notice for their dearly beloved father in the newspaper only to have the “outsides” call to berate the edi t or for leaving them out of the list of survivors. W e distinctly remember when this first happened to us in our early days at The Trib une. A gentleman, who held a good posi tion in this town, died. His family brought in his death notice and it was published. It was just another routine death notice. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary until we got a t elephone call the following day. The male voice at the other end of the telephone was f rothing with anger he was so angry that we could hardly understand what he was s aying. He was also well known in the com munity. He maintained that this was his father and that we had left his name and the names of his many brothers, and possibly sisters, out of the list of survivors. W e tried desperately to extricate ourselves from his father’s extra marital aber r ation, but he would have none of it. He was holding our feet to the fire and blaming T he Tribune for disrespecting his position in the family circle. The only way around the dilemma was to allow the “outside” family to pay for a second notice announcing the father’s deatha nd listing them as his sole survivors. And so this elderly gentleman, who while he lived h eld his head high in the community, was sent to his grave with two death notices o ne by his inside family, ignoring the “outside” and a second by his “outside” ignoring the “in.” In this case the “outside” far outnumbered the “inside”. We later learned that there were many more, but these other outsiders decided to let him rest in peacea nd keep their secret to themselves. W e often laughed at our American mother who encountered this unusual social phen omenon in her first weeks of marriage. Our father, who was then the representative int he House of Assembly, for the island of I nagua, was starting his honeymoon when an e lection was called. He took his bride camp aigning with him in Inagua. A young school teacher, completely out of her element, she t ried her best to be sociable. That evening she confronted her husband: “Etienne,” she s aid, “every man that I asked today about how many children he had gave me a certainn umber of ‘inside’ and another number of ‘outside.’ What’s this outside-inside thing a ll about?” That little schoolteacher had a lot to learn in her almost 80 years in the Bahamas. Some of it she never understood a nd would dismiss with a shrug of the shoulder. A nd so for Bahamian men to be encouraged to wander if they were to be punished f or sexually violating their wives is to mock history that type man wanders anyway, a nd has always done so, with or without the rape law. In his ignorance he thinks he’s smart. However, we can see how, if this law were not passed, it could indeed undermine m arriage and further breakdown the family and consequently society. T here has been so much debate over this amendment that many women have probab ly learned for the first time that if they are sexually abused when not married the law will protect them against the violence, but as soon as they marry they forfeit that protection. They might well opt to have an open r elationship without marriage to ensure that they can turn to the law for protection should t heir common law mate violate them. Christian Council, those of you who are s o fearful of this law destroying marriage, just think of how much more damage it could do if it is not passed. The woman could shun the marriage contract. And when we talk of violence in the bed r oom and remember the law follows crime wherever it is committed, even to the b edroom read the letter that will be pub lished in the letters column on this page t omorrow. This letter writer has had the courage on reading the Christian Council’s statement over the weekend to break her silence about the violence that her ownm other suffered. We thank her for her sense of duty in an a ttempt to help women who are caught in this terrible web of physical violence against t heir person. These are the women who need protection they are the women who need the amendment. Bewildered by Bahamas Christian Council statement LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Married women need protection NOTICE MARINE NAVIGATION COURSESTraining is necessary in order to voyage over Free First Class of the Terrestrial Navigation Course Seamanship and Celestial Navigation Visit www.bsmn.biz EDITOR, The Tribune. I think it is totally wrong for the Bahamas C hristian Council to send out a message in its name to confuse the public. Whenever the Chris-t ian Council makes a statement, the public assumes that the statement is from all this count ry’s Christian churches speaking in unison. Obviously this is not the case as in the recent rape amendment controversy the four leading Christ ian denominations supported the amendment. Therefore, we are to assume that they are not i ncluded in the Christian Council’s statement, which is against the amendment. If this is so, is theC hristian Council deliberately trying to mislead the country? We would now like to know: Who and what is the Christian Council. If its membership does not include all the major denominations, please l et us know, and consider doing us an even bigger favour by changing the Council’s name b ecause it doesn’t say much for a christian body that would attempt to mislead a community. I f this was not a unanimous statement by each member of the Council, then the Council is duty b ound to tell the public who made the statement. A list of all the signatories to that statement would be much appreciated. Be men enough to s tand up for what you believe in and not hide behind others whose denominational reputation c arries more weight in this community. C ONFUSED AND OFFENDED Nassau, September 5, 2009 Who and what is the Christian Council? E DITOR, The Tribune. C learly the Bahamas Christian Council has by its release and opinion as to the proposals on the table to amend the legal position of rape within a marriage has parted from at least one of the largest denominations which now raises a long standing question as to who does the Bahamas Christian Council speak for? S ome years ago I obtained a true copy of the Constitution of the BCC and was surprised that for example any faith/denomination w hich was administrated or controlled by an external source could not be a member of the BCC. Clearly therefore the Roman C atholics, The Greek Orthodox, Lutherans, Southern Baptists possibly even some of the Pentecostals were in fact denied mem bership. Further it is an Article of the BCC Constitution that whenever there is a dissenting view the Council in any release is required by the Constitution to identify the difference and name the f aith that dissented. We certainly have never seen that from the BCC, ever and not today on this controversial matter. W atching television last evening a thought came to me which I think will bring some sense to the matter when you are younga nd in love there is absolutely no way that either the male or female look at each other in any manner of way of nothing more t han being one and equal so why are we making all this noise? I agree the time period of two-years as I understand that either party can bring or allege rape is far too long as this complicates the issue if the parties reconcile and forget to rescind the charge or report either party may hold this over each other. The question of common-law arrangements of consenting homosexuals residing together be they males or females and, of c ourse, the sweetheart position to me this amendment does not cover those relationships although as they are not statutorily married I presume you can bring rape charges under the Penal Code. It is sad that the Christian Council could not discuss and debate the issue internally before issuing this statement as obviously now they have created a controversy. ABRAHAM MOSS Nassau, September, 2009. Whom does Christian Council speak for? E DITOR, The Tribune. To: The President, BCMC Congratulations for giving s upport to the proposed amendment to the Sexual O ffences Act. You make me proud to be a Methodist. Kind p ersonal regards and best wishes for the new church year. PATRICK BETHEL Nassau, S eptember 3, 2009. Congratulations EDITOR,The Tribune The Bahamas Christian Counsel's response to the government's proposed marital rape law was predictable and regrettably highlights the inse c urities of far too many Bahamian men. T hese worthy stalwarts are still living in an era when the worth of the Bahamian woman was measured by her ability to fry fish and give comfort. Small wonder our illegiti macy rate is so incredibly high when our young women are still led to believe, by the clergy no less, that they are nothing more than mere chattels. IAN MABON Nassau, September 5, 2009 Predictable response

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LINKING Bahamian farmers with those in the tourism sector is the aim of an “AgroTourism Symposium” being held at the College of the B ahamas this Thursday. Organised by the Bahamas Agricultural Producers Association in partnership with the Inter-American Institution for Cooperation on Agriculture, Ministry of Tourism and Aviation and The Bahamas Hotel Association the forum will offer a chance for producers to network with chefs and food and beverage directors who might be interested in purchasing their produce. Speaking at the event, held under the title “Linking Hotels and Local Farmers”, will be Ms Ena Harvey, a hemispheric spe c ialist in agro tourism from Barbados, Edison Key, MP for South Abaco and Chairman of BAIC, Robert Sands, President of the Bahamas Hotel Association as well as Chef Keshlah Smith and Leslie Minnis, senior marketing officer, Department of Agriculture. Registration is $25 per per son including meals and symp osium material. The venue is Choices Restaurant, The Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute, College of the Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard. Call 502 4234 to register or for more information. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Agro-Tourism Symposium being held at College of the Bahamas AFTER meeting on Friday, the House Com-m ittee on publicly held lands has agreed to extend the deadline for concerned members of the public to make submissions or requests to the investigative grouping. H aving issued a prior notice to the public soliciting information on their concerns about publicly-owned lands, t he parliamentary committee’s meeting on Frid ay saw them consider that information before deciding that the final deadline for the public to provide such input wouldbe extended to this Frid ay, September 18. Accordingly all peop le who are interested in m aking submissions before the committee a nd or appearing before the committee shouldw rite the clerk of the H ouse of Assembly with t heir submissions or r equests. “The committee has a greed to respond to all t hose who have written l etters and made submiss ions and to draw up a schedule of witnesses for those who wish to appear before the Committee,” said Committee chair-m an, MP for Fox Hill, Fred Mitchell. T he Committee adjourned to Monday, September 21, at 10 a.m. Any submissions or requests should be sent t o the Chief Clerk, House of Assembly atPO Box N 3003, Nas-s au, Bahamas orby fax no 322-1118 or at the email address: houseo f assembly@bahamas.gov. bs, or by hand to the House of Assembly, Bay Street, Nassau. L ands Committee extends deadline for public to submit concerns PHILIP “Brave” Davis, contender for the deputy leadership of the PLP, yesterday issued a statement “welcoming” MP for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe to the race for the post. The statement comes two days after Mr W ilchcombe officially launched his bid for the deputy leadership in Grand Bahama on Friday, becoming the second to announce such intentions. MP for Rum Cay, Cat Island and San Salvador, Mr Davis said the declaration by Mr Wilchcombe is “another sign of democracy at work in the PLP” and, signalling that more bids will soon be launched, he said that the “various candidates, whether announced or unannouced, all have the best interest of the party and country at heart.” Mr Davis reiterated that the fundamental issues forming the basis of his campaign are education, crime and the judiciary; and “the creation of a new economic model compatible with the changing needs of the country.” Speaking on Friday Mr Wilchcombe said that if elected as Deputy Leader he would address crime, employment, enhancing the tourism product, improving the education system and re-energising Grand Bahama’s flagging economy. SEEPAGESIX Davis welcomes Wilchcombe to PLP deputy leadership race PHILIP DAVIS

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham is pictured answering mediaq uestions on Grand Bahama's e conomy at a press conference held at the Government Complex, Mall Drive, Freeport on Sunday, September 6, 2009. SEEPAGE ONE FORFULLSTORY S h a r o n T u r n e r / B I S PMINGRANDBAHAMA OBIE WILCHCOMBE officially announced his candidacy for the deputy leadership of the PLP party on Friday at the Our LucayaR esort. Mr Wilchcombe, who came on stage in crutches after i njuring his ankle, thanked his beloved mother, supporters, and friends who came out to support him and who have supported h im over the years during his political career. SEE P AGEFIVE D e r e k C a r r o l l WILCHCOMBELAUNCHESCANDIDACY CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. THEastronauts aboard the linked space shuttle and space station are almost finished packi ng up a moving van for return to Earth this week, according to Associated Press. The Italian-built van essentially a giant cylinder flew up aboard Discovery with seven tons of space station supplies and equipment. It will come back filled with a ton of trash and surplus gear. The astronauts will place the van back aboard D iscovery on Monday night, just in time for Tuesday’s shuttle undocking. The shuttle astronauts said Sunday that they’re ready to wrap up their mission and come home. Astronauts pack trash, surplus gear for ride home

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By RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a Consultant a nd former Caribbean diplomat) DESPITE uncertainties that mar the Guyana political scene, the country’s econ omic prospects appear to b e brighter than they have b een in three decades. Seve ral developments account f or this and they bring hope t o a country that has been b lighted by political turmoil a nd economic setbacks. A mongst the developments is the considerable reduction in the ratio of debtt o gross domestic product. Guyana has moved from being one of the world’s highly indebted poor count ries to a situation in which t he Government is managi ng its debt and has more b reathing space in which to take policy decisions of social and economic benefit to the Guyanese people. It is an accomplishment for which Guyana’s President Bharrat Jagdeo deserves full c redit. Epitomizing the new economic optimism for Guyana i s the formal opening, scheduled for September 14, of a b ridge over the Takutu River, the narrowest point at which Guyana and its s prawling neighbour, Brazil, connect. Both Guyana’s P resident and Brazil’s President Iancio Lula Da Silvaw ill be part of the opening c eremony. The Brazilian govern ment, with the full agreem ent of the Guyanese gov ernment, has built the bridge capable of carrying heavy vehicles to transport con t ainers with a wide variety of commodities as well as people. The bridge is the first step in infrastructuret hat would allow business men from Brazil's Northernmost State of Roaraima tot ruck commodities through G uyana to a port on Guyana's Atlantic coast and then to markets in NorthA merica and Europe. W hat has to follow is a dry-weather road from the bridge on the Guyana side t o the town of Linden which i s already connected by a highway to Guyana’s capi-tal, Georgetown, on the Atlantic Coast. Then a deep water harbour has to be con structed. But even without the harbour immediately, the bridge and road would give Roraima businesses the access to the Atlantic they now need. The system would be considerably cheaper for businesses that now have to transport goods across the vastness of Brazil to its far-away ports. The Brazilians have a vested interest in financing the building of the harbour. Guyanese businesses would also be able to use the bridge for transporting goods for sale in Brazil pro vided they are able to estab lish markets. At the moment, while Brazilian goods are increasing in the Guyana market, largely due t o the influx of Brazilians into Guyana, Guyanese exports have been limitedt o wood, wood products and bauxite. But, there is every r eason to believe that exports of rice in particular w ould be possible. It is estimated that there are about 3,000 Brazilians n ow operating gold mines in Guyana and making a good living from it while contributing to the economy. They have brought in new technology and are getting higher production yields.C onsequently, the govern ment is getting more taxes, and the Guyana Gold Boardw hich purchases the pro duction is selling it on the international market at a profit. O nce traffic starts b etween Roraima and Georgetown, several forms of new economic activityw ill spring from it, includ ing new villages in areas that are now sparsely populated. The road points the way noto nly for a cheaper outlet for Northern Brazil to the Atlantic and therefore to Europe and North Ameri-c a, but for a considerable boost to the economy of Guyana. The construction of the road and the harbour will increase employment and production in the Guyanese economy in the near term. Given the sustained eco nomic activity that they will generate, new and lasting employment will also be created. Aligned to the business links to Brazil is the Guyana government’s decision to designate Ogle, an area on the Atlantic Coast of Guyana, as a second Inter national Airport. The arrangements for this are almost complete. Ogle will accommodate flights on aircraft such as those operated in the Caribbean by L IAT and Caribbean Airw ays as well as the Brazilian airline, Mehta. Ogle is 15 minutes from Georgetown and less than 10 minu tes from the Secretariat of t he Caribbean Community a nd Common Market ( CARICOM). P resident Jagdeo is also w orking feverishly to put together the means to builda hydro-electric power stat ion in Guyana. With its many rivers and waterfalls, Guyana lends itself to hydro-power. Once hydrop ower is established, energy costs – now one of the big expenses of doing busin ess and accounting for as much as 20 per cent of GDP would drop significantly opening the distinct possibility for less expensive prod uction of sugar and bauxite and reduced costs in the m ining and timber sectors. Then, there is oil exploration off shore in an area w here the maritime boundary with Suriname is now l egally settled. The Canadian company, CGX, which has been exploring the area,m ade some hopeful statements in August. Amongst t hem was that “the cost esti mate to drill the Eagle Deep Well has been reduced sig nificantly to below $70 mil l ion from US$90 million” and they were encouraged by the seismic datap rocessed during the first h alf of 2009. If this leads to the renewal of drilling next year, it would be a further boost to the Guyana econo m y. However, the prospects for economic improvementa re dimmed by political uncertainties. President Jagdeo’s term of office ends in 2011, and his Peoples Pro gressive Party (PPP have to choose a Presidential candidate next year. That candidate will have to be someone in whom the electorate, beyond the tra ditional PPP support, hasc onfidence both to manage t he economy and lead a multi-racial nation. A recent convention of the main opposition, Peoples National Congress (PNC and other officers turned out to be a fractious affair. While Robert Corbin was re-elected leader, the PNC is now split into many parts with its middle class support severely disenchanted. The main beneficiary of the PNC’s internal confusion appears to be a third party, the Alliance for Change, which promotes itself vigor ously as a non-racial group i ng dedicated to a onen ation Guyana. But, the telling political b attles will be fought next y ear – first within the two main parties and then at the national level. Within sight of all the parties is the prospect of real economic opportunities for Guyana if the politics can b e managed with maturity. R esponses and previous c ommentaries at: w ww.sirronaldsanders.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM For Rente premier choice for serious business”1,550 sq.ft.$5,425.00 p. month incl. CAM fees 1,056 sq.ft.$3,432.00 p. month incl. CAM feesContact Mr. Simon Chappell on 327 1575 or 477-7610Email: simon@cavesheights.comC aves Village Professional Turn Key Office Suites 3$5$/(*$/6WXGHQWVZKRKDYHVXFFHVVIXOO\FRPSOHWHIRUPDO3DUDOHJDO H[DPLQDWLRQVPD\DSSO\IRUH[HPSWLRQDWWKHUHTXLUHGOHYHOLQ RUGHUWRTXDOLI\IRUWKH$VVRFLDWH'HJUHHLQPRQWKV&$//, 167,787()%86,1(66$1'&200(5&(7 & 5(',7&$5'6$&&(37('&RXUVHVDSSURYHGE\WKHLQLVWU\RI(GXFDWLRQDQG 'HSDUWPHQWRIXEOLFHUVRQQHO Guyana: Economic prospects and political uncertainties WORLDVIEW SIRRONALD SANDERS I I t t i i s s e e s s t t i i m m a a t t e e d d t t h h a a t t t t h h e e r r e e a a r r e e a a b b o o u u t t 3 3 , , 0 0 0 0 0 0 B B r r a a z z i i l l i i a a n n s s n n o o w w o o p p e e r r a a t t i i n n g g g g o o l l d d m m i i n n e e s s i i n n G G u u y y a a n n a a a a n n d d m m a a k k i i n n g g a a g g o o o o d d l l i i v v i i n n g g f f r r o o m m i i t t w w h h i i l l e e c c o o n n t t r r i i b b u u t t i i n n g g t t o o t t h h e e e e c c o o n n o o m m y y . . Share your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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KABUL A N AIRSTRIKEby U.S. fighter jets that appears to have killed Afghan civilians could turn into a major dispute for N ATO allies Germany and the United States, as tensions began rising between them Sunday over Germany’s role in ordering t he attack, a ccording to Associa ted Press. Afghan officials say up to 70 people were killed in the early morning airstrike Friday in the n orthern province of Kunduz after Taliban militants stole two tanker trucks of fuel and vill agers gathered to siphon off g as. Afghan and NATO investigations are just beginning, but both German and U.S. officials a lready appeared to be trying to deflect blame. German Defense Minister Franz Josef Jung said the Tali ban’s possession of the two t ankers “posed an acute threat to our soldiers.” German officials have said the tankers might have been used as suicide b ombs. “If there were civilian casualties or injuries, of course we d eeply regret that. At the same t ime, it was clear that our soldiers were in danger,” Jung said in comments to German broadcasters. “Consequently, I stand c learly behind our commander’s decision” to order the air strike. Meanwhile, Rear Adm. Gregory J. Smith, the top U.S. and N ATO spokesman in the count ry, said German troops let too many hours pass before visiting the site of the bombing Friday. He explained that it’s import ant to hold the ground after a strike and determine what happened before the enemy comes out with its own version of e vents. T he top U.S. and NATO commander in Afghanistan, U.S. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, visited the site Saturday where t wo charred trucks and yellow gas cans sat on a riverbed. He asked a top commander in Regional Command North a bout the response time. “Why didn’t RC-North come here quicker?” McChrystal asked Col. Georg Klein, the commander of the German base i n Kunduz. “I can honestly say it was a mistake,” Klein answered, in a discussion witnessed by an Assoc iated Press reporter. On Sunday, Smith said that in McChrystal’s judgment the response time “was probablyl onger than it should have been.” G erman troops in Afghanistan have long been criti cized for avoiding combat operations, even as militants have increasingly infiltrated northern Afghanistan the last year, destabilizing the once-peacefulr egion. Taliban militants stole two f uel tankers late Friday that became stuck on a riverbed outs ide Kunduz. Villagers either forced by the militants or e nticed by offers of free fuel gathered near the trucks, even as U.S. jets patrolled overhead. German commanders watching images from the U.S. airc raft could see about 120 people, McChrystal said Saturday. Thec ommanders decided that the people were militants and o rdered the airstrikes, Smith said, even though images provided by the U.S. aircraft would have been grainy and difficult to see. W hether the German commanders or the U.S. pilot are at fault for any civilian casualties may turn into an inner-NATO t ussle. S mith said the ground force commander “is the decision maker for close air support. That’s doctrine.” But he also c onceded that a pilot can refuse an order to drop a bomb. Klein, in an interview with The Associated Press on Sund ay, declined to say whether images provided by the U.S. jets had been clear enough for weapons to be seen among Afghans on the ground, citing t he ongoing investigation. A German Joint Terminal Air Controller, or JTAC, who spoke on condition that his n ame not be used because he wasn’t authorized to speak publicly, said the rules for ordering an attack clearly state that theu ltimate decision rests with the ground commander. B ut rules also require that both the pilot and the JTAC get a good positive identification of the target before the comman der can order a weapon deployed, the JTAC said. “Only when both are sure t hat what we see is a target, only then will the pilot drop theb omb,” the JTAC said. The German Defense Mini stry, meanwhile, pushed back against a story published in the W ashington Post that German officials said painted their commander in a poor light and played up the U.S. version of events. The ministry said the a rticle “will definitely influence at least the preliminary investi g ation by the various bodies.” “The Defense Ministry is very s urprised about the unusual pro cedure of using a journalist as a source to reveal initial investigation results,” the ministry said. Kris Coratti, director of comm unications for the Washington Post, said in an e-mail: “The story speaks for itself.” Smith said a trip to Kunduz b y military officials from Kabul w as not an official investigation but a fact-finding trip. “And I think it’s much, much better for people to understand t he facts,” he said of the decision to allow a journalist to witness the discussion among military officials. N o NATO officials will yet say how many civilians they think may have died. Smith on Saturday said the preliminary overall death toll was believed t o be 56. Afghan officials say it’s in the low 70s. Smith said he hopes a U.S.German rift does not develop o ver the strike. “I hope every one allows the investigation to proceed and we’ll determine what we know more preciselya nd move on from there,” Smith said. T he director of an Afghan human rights group criticized N ATO’s International Security Assistance Force for the deaths. “It was carelessness in terms of ISAF using force without doing enough to investigate whethert his is a civilian location,” Ajmal Samadi of Afghan Rights Mon-i tor said. German troops have long b een criticized for restrictions that limit the battle their troops s ee. A U.S. based military ana lyst, Anthony Cordesman, said German troops don’t have “the situational and combat experience” to confront Taliban on t he ground. “They’re as oriented toward s taying in their armored vehicles as any group I’ve met,” C ordesman said. “They’re not active enough to present much of a threat to the Taliban most of the time.” Klein rejected the claim that h is troops lacked combat experience. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM US-German rift emerges over Afghan deaths case GERMAN COLONEL Georg Klein is pictured at the German base in Kunduz, Afghanistan, Sunday, Sept. 6, 2 009. An airstrike ordered by a Germ an commander Klein and carried out by U.S. fighter jets that appears to have killed Afghan civilians could turn into a major dispute between t he two NATO allies, as tensions began rising Sunday over Germany's role in the attack. Afghan officials say up to 70 people were killed in the e arly morning airstrike Friday in the n orthern province of Kunduz after Taliban militants stole two tanker trucks of fuel and villagers gathered to siphon off gas. A n j a N i e d r i n g h a u s / A P

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they pulled up next to the car in Breadfruit Street where it was blocking traf-f ic sometime after 9pm. A s they approached the 32-year-old driver sped off and the officers pursued. As shots were fired from the car, police returned fire, while driving at high speed across southern New Provid ence. T he chase ended when t he Honda crashed into a K ia Sephia car and a Dodge R am truck in Croton and B uttonwood Streets. The passenger escaped from the vehicle and ran off while police arrested the driver. He had a gunshot injury in the back of his neck and p olice believe he may have b een hit in the gunfire e xchange. Emergency Medical Services took the victim to hospital where he is in stable condition. Police are appealing for i nformation to lead to the a rrest of the passenger in the H onda Accord as an investigation into the shooting continues. A nyone with any inform ation that might assist i nvestigations should call police on 911, 919, or call the Criminal Detective Unit on 3 52-2015. To submit inform ation under total anonymit y call Crime Stoppers anonymously on 328-TIPS (8477 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 127,&(75$)),&'(/$<6,%/(6+,5/(<((7 9,//$*($' )5('5,&.((7'8(:$ 5(3/$&(0(17:25.6,QDQHIIRUWWRXSJUDGHH[LVWLQJ :DWHU6HZHU6HUYLFHVWKH :DWHU6HZHUDJH&RUSRUDWLRQ KDYHFRQWUDFWHG%DKDPDV+RW0L[ &RPSDQ\/WGWRUHSODFHH[LVWLQJ VHUYLFHFRQQHFWLRQVDWWKHDERYH ORFDWLRQ$VFRQVHTXHQWWUDIF PDQDJHPHQWLQYROYLQJURDG FORVXUHVDQGWHPSRUDU\WUDIF GLYHUVLRQVPD\EHLQRSHUDWLRQ GXULQJWKHIROORZLQJWLPHV /RFDOGLYHUVLRQVZLOOEHVLJQ SRVWHGLQGXHFRXUVHDQGIXUWKHU LQIRUPDWLRQZLOOEHSURYLGHG WKURXJKWKHORFDOPHGLD p lies on Parkgate Road and demanded cash, police said. The incident occurred at around 3pm on Saturday. The two men fled the scene on foot. Alexander’s brother and son of the store’s owner, Mar-c us Dean Jnr, said the family have been told to expect Alexander to pull through, but doctors have warned that he may be left crippled. “He was shot in the back a nd he’s going into spinal surgery tonight. They say t hey’re going to take the other bullet out this Friday because they want him to recover from the surgery tonight,” said Mr Dean Jnr. P olice had warned his family about crime in the area w hen they opened the store a nd therefore he felt in many ways that such an attack was only a matter of time,” but nonetheless, Alexander’sb rother said the incident left h im feeling “helpless.” I’m just praying for him. I ’m glad he’s alive but I’m hoping he isn’t left crippled.” M r Dean Jnr also called for anyone who can to donateb lood at Doctor’s Hospital as t hey are in “dire need.” Police hunting the two criminals are also calling for the public’s help in connect ion with the incident. We are seeking the help of residents in the area or a nyone who may have been p assing the Park Gate Road area noticing two men run ning, to contact us at tele p hone numbers 919, 502-9991, 322-3816, or 328TIPS,” said Police Press Liaison Officer Walter Evans. According to Assistant Superintendent Evans, the dreadlocked gunman was w earing a white shirt and blue jeans. No description of the second man was provided. The potentially deadly s hooting came a little over two weeks after mother of three Wendy Bullard was bru tally gunned down in front of her place of work. M s Bullard, 34, was shot in the face when two masked m en held up 21st Century Steel Welding Limited off Royal Palm Street, just sev-eral yards south of St George’s Anglican Church. Man shot in armed robbery attempt F ROM page one Police in high speed chase shootout F ROM page one

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ulated by the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority (URCA Mr Ingraham said Government is concerned that the GBPC has not “reinvesteda dequate sums of money into its generation and distribution system, and the company has over the years taken its profits out in cash rather than reinvesting it in its operation.” The Power Company here has recently come under fire over reliability issues, among other things, including the high cost of electricity. Local community activists Troy Garvey and Joseph Darville, vice president of the Grand Bahama Human Rights Association, said that the GB Power has a monopoly on power and should be regulated by government. They feel that rates and fuel surcharge are too high. The Prime Minister stated that in so far as the fuel cost is concerned, Grand Bahama Power is able to access fuel costs at a lower rate than BEC. “They did not pay any customs duties or the rest of it; they are able to service their suppliers outside the area in bonded vehicles and so that ought to account for something in terms of electricity cost here in Grand Bahama,” he said. Speaking in Grand Bahama on Sunday, where he met with the press at the Government Office Complex to take questions on various pressing issues, the Prime Minister revealed that Government is “disappointed in the Japanese company, Marubeni” which, until very recently, owned the majority stake in the GBPC. “We expected that they would have brought greater efficiency to Grand Bahama’s electrical generating supply and that has not happened,” he said. Mr Ingraham explained that the original intent to have Freeport was that the Grand Bahama Port Authority would regulate the electrical supply,w ater, and telephone opera tors in Freeport. He noted that the GBPC is now supplying electricity, out side of Freeport, to the entire island of Grand Bahama. Mr Ingraham emphasised that private sector enterprises should be operating more effi-c iently than public/government enterprises. “We are disappointed that the number of power outages that you have here in Grand Bahama is far in excess of government enterprises, and as we all know government enterprise is supposed to be l ess efficient than the private sector. “And so the GBPC is not giving us confidence that private sector by itself is the answer, so we will have disc ussions with them about the various issues that have been raised by the people of Grand Bahama,” said Mr Ingraham. With Grand Bahama’s economy in recession, residents here have complained that the Power Company has been insensitive to how it enforces i ts policies with disconnections at this difficult time when so many are unemployed, and especially when power cuts are so frequent. Meanwhile, last week Greg Ebelhar, head of Polymers International's Freeport operations, told Tribune Business that the electricity tariffs charged by Grand Bahama Power Company are “a huge issue” for his company and other manufacturers, as the relatively high prices were taking a huge chunk out of their bottom line and making their prices/operations uncompetitive compared to their global rivals. Mr Ebelhar suggested that Freeport “absolutely cannot” remain a viable, competitive manufacturing base in the medium to long term with such relatively high power costs. Mr Ingraham said: “We are giving consideration to whether or not the power company in Freeport, like BEC, ought not to be regulated by the new regulatory authority which the government has established called URCA (the Utilities Regulation and Com petition Authority), and its regulatory commission authority which came into effect on September 1, under the Communication Act,” he said. M r Ingraham suggested that there are standard profits that utility companies are expected to make that are determined by regulatory authorities, as well as standard sums of money that ought to be kept for reinvest ment in upgrade of plant and d istribution systems, and this could be addressed by URCA if it were to regulate the GBPC. A town meeting was held by a group of local community activists on Friday evening at Workers House so that the Grand Bahama Power Company could address the concerns of residents. Excell Ferrell, CEO and president of GBPC, attended t he meeting. ficult time. He said that a new $17 million government office complex will be built for Customs and Immigration here on the island. According to the prime minister, the project, which involves the construction of a 60,000 sq ft building complex, will provide many construction jobs in Freeport. Mr Ingraham said the announcement for pre-qualification for contractors will be made on Tuesday of this week. “Contractors who are interested in bidding on the job who are qualified to bid are urged to pick up the packages and to seek to become pre-qualified to bid on the job,” he said. The unemployment situation, the closure of hotel properties, and the decline in tourism on Grand Bahama are pressing concerns for residents. Mr Ingraham stated that the government intends to create a major cruise port in Freeport at the Williams Town site. “We have taken steps to acquire a total of 55 acres of land. That process is going to take several months to be completed. “Those who own the land will have the opportunity to come forward and provide evidence of their ownership. The land would be assessed in terms of its value and government will cause to be paid the assessed value,” he said. Prime Minister Ingraham said persons who are dissatisfied with the assessment will be able to take action in the Supreme Court. “We will abide by whatever decisions is made by such a process. In the meantime, we propose to conclude an acquisition and cause a cruise port at Williams Town which will have significant economic benefits for Grand Bahama,” he stated. Mr Ingraham also noted that government is paying the cost for continued operation of the casino at Our Lucaya Resort. Treasure Bay is taking over operation of the casino after the Isle of Capri closed its operation. “The government is paying the cost for the continued operation of the casino in Our Lucaya. It is not a decision I am not comfortable with. “I am not comfortable with the Bahamas government having to take money from the Treasury to run a casino, but these are unusual times and we are taking some usual decisions to support Freeport, and the employment of 200-plus people who are employed there,” he said. “We would like to have at Our Lucaya not just a new casino operatorbut we will continue to try to do what we think the best is,” said Mr Ingraham. Prime Minister said government is grateful to Hutchison, which owns Our Lucaya Resort, for what it is doing in terms of supporting and sustaining the number of jobs for Bahamians at the hotel property. However, he believes that there are some other things that could be done with the assistance of the government. “We are prepared to offer support from the government to Hutchison to cause some additional things to be done to enhance Grand Bahama as a tourist destination,” Mr Ingraham said. Government is expected to meet with the ownership of Hutchison in London sometime in early October to further discuss this. According to Mr Ingraham, Harcourt, the owners of the Royal Oasis property, has not yet indicated their ability to proceed with plans for reconstruction and opening of the resort in Freeport. When asked about the Ginn project at West End, he said the developers of Ginn have informed the government that it has adequate sums of money to continue at some point next year. “They are seeking to access additional funding and they are hopeful, in the meantime they have several hundred people working at Ginn as far as I know,” he said. The government, he said, is also providing support and substantial sums of money to the Ministry of Tourism to promote Grand Bahama. “We are advertising Grand Bahama on television in a way its never been before. “You can turn to almost any of the cable channels and see Grand Bahama in advertisements as a place for people to come,” he said. According to Mr Ingraham, the industrial sector has not been significantly impacted on the island. He noted that government is in discussion over the sale of the old Burma terminal facility at East Grand Bahama and expects to have a possible decision before end of the month. “VOPAK is continuing on its expansion and the container port continues to provide good jobs,” said Mr Ingraham. Mr Ingraham said the NIB Unemployment Programme has provided assistance to 2,230 residents of Grand Bahama, in addition to assistance from Social Services. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 7($&+,1*,7,216$7 .,1*6:$<$&$'(0<(OHPHQWDU\FKRRO$ 7HPSRUDU\&RPSXWHU6WXGLHV7HDFKHU LVQHHGHGIRUVWXGHQWVLQ.LQGHUJDUWHQ WKURXJKJUDGHVWUDLQHG(OHPHQWDU\ &ODVVURRP7HDFKHULVSUHIHUUHG7KH SRVLWLRQFRXOGEHDYDLODEOHIRUVHYHUDO PRQWKV+LJKFKRRO$ 7UDLQHG0XVLF7HDFKHULVQHHGHGIRU VWXGHQWVLQJUDGHVWKURXJK VXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHPXVWEHTXDOLHG DQGDEOHWRSUHSDUHGVWXGHQWVIRUWKH YDULRXV([WHUQDO0XVLF([DPLQDWLRQV $SSOLFDWLRQVFDQEHFROOHFWHGIURPWKH +XPDQ5HVRXUFHV'HSDUWPHQWDWWKH %XVLQHVV2IFHWHOHSKRQHQXPEHU 2QO\%RUQ$JDLQ&KULVWLDQVVKRXOG DSSO\ 7KH'HDGOLQHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQVLV word “MOB” on his left arm, along with a marijuana leaf, and another of a tear drop under his left eye. A sst Supt Loretta Mackey said the police are seeking the assistance of the public in locating Virgil. According to reports, sometime around 9.10pm police responded to a call at Les Fountain Building No 2 on EastS unrise Highway. On arrival police discovered a male lying on the floor of a business at the complex. The victim was suffering from a pparent stab wounds to the body. The victim, later identified as Smith, was taken to the hos pital where he was pronounced dead around 10pm. C urious o nlookers remained in the area as police p rocessed the crime scene. A bystander who knew the vic tim believes that the altercation was over a girl. However, police have not confirmed a motive for the s tabbing and are continuing their investigations. They believe that the attack occurred in another location and the victim ran to Les Fountain Building No 2 where he collapsed in a store. A SP Mackey is appealing to anyone with information concerning the matter and the whereabouts of Virgil to contact police at 352-9774/5, 350-3107/8 or 911. V irgil is considered armed and extremely dangerous. Around 5’ 9” tall and 135 pounds, he has a dark brown complexion and dark brown eyes. ‘Dangerous’ man is wanted after killing F ROM page one FROM page one PM disappointed over inefficiency of Grand BahamaPower Company FROM page one PM is set to announce 500 temporary jobs HUBERT INGRAHAM

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net SOONER or later, Mark Knowles knew that he would have to face rising young star Ryan Sweeting. That opportunity came sooner than later as the two were on opposite side of the court in the second round of the men’s doubles at the US Open in Flushing Meadows, New York on Saturday. Knowles and his Indian partner Mahesh Bhupathi, seeded number three, took advantage of the less experienced team of Sweeting and his American partner Jesse Levine for a 7-5, 6-2 win. Playing through the pain he’s experiencing after his right ring finger was cut in an elevator at the Tennis Center last Tuesday requiring some nine stitches, Knowles said he was quite contented in winning a couple of matches so far, including his first headto-head encounter with Sweeting. Tough “It was interesting playing Ryan,” said Knowles of the former Bahamian Davis Cup player, now an American cit izen. “It was a tough match. “He’s a good player with a big serve. “He hits the ball very well and he’s a very good doubles player. I think he’s being doing well lately and he should have a bright future.” While Knowles and Bhupathi had a 81-64 winning percentage edge on 1st serve and 62-32 on 2nd serve, Sweeting and Levine got the better on winners (including service they finished 12-10. However, Knowles and Bhupathi dominated on receiving points won 45-27% and break point conversion 4-of-8 for a 50-33 % (1-of-3 to accumulate an advantage of 65-47 total points won. “We’re playing very well. Obviously, I have a little bit of adversity, we’ve played well so far in the two matches we have played,” said Knowles, after they won their first round match 6-3, 6-4 over American James Cerretani and Lovro Zovko from Croatia. “Our draw is pretty easy. But we obviously feel great about the way we’re playing and we felt great coming into the event. So it’s just a matter of trying to get better and better each day and getting fit.” Knowles and Bhupathi are scheduled to play their third round match today against the team of Yen-Hsun Lu of Taipei and Dudi Sela of Israel. Yesterday, Knowles had mixed doubles duties. He and his German partner, AnnaLena Groenefeld, the No.4 seeds, faced Knowles’ former partner Zi Yan from China and Mariusz Fyrstenberg from Poland. However, Yan and Fyrstenberg got the best of the match-up with identical set scores of 6-3, 6-3 over Knowles and Groenefeld, the winners of the Wimbledon title in July. C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE US Open roundup TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Pain in ... b elly for Rafa, P age 14 BOXING A LTHOUGH they have both been eliminated from further competition at theA IBA World Championships in Milan, Italy, the two-man team of Valenti n o Knowles and Carl Hield will remain until the end. The duo, along with c oach Andre Seymour, will not be back home until Sunday. K nowles, who made history when he became the first Bahamian to win af irst round match before he lost in the second round, said he intends to takea dvantage of the opportunity to continue to train. “This is going to be my t raining ground until I return home,” he said. “I’ve already got a taste of what it’s like to make history and I know there’s a lot more to come.” The goal, he said, is to get ready for the 2012 Olympic Games in London, England. Knowles said he and Hield, who lost in the first round, have been going out and watching the other competition going on when they are not training. BOXING Mackey back home AFTER spending about three weeks in a training camp in Berlin, Germany, Bahamas super middleweight champion Jer maine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey is back home. Mackey, who is prepar ing to defend his British Commonwealth title in October, was training withworld champion Mikkel Kessler. However, the sparring sessions didn’t go as Mackey had anticipated as Kessler was not available every day. Boxing duo training in Italy despite elimination Knowles wins first encounter with rising star Ryan Sweeting LEGENDTHOMAS ROBINSON along with H.E Mr WU Bangguo unveils the new cornerstone to be placed at the entrance of the new stadium. His Excellency Wu Bangguo, Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China presented a model of the national stadium to the Deputy prime Minister Brent Symonette along with Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture and Thomas A Robinson and Tommy Turnquest, Minister of National Security. SEE PAGE 12 By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net W ITH the heartbreaking performance of the 12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics behind him, Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands came back to soar to a big victory yesterday as he prepares for the IAAF World Athletic Final this weekend. Competing along with Shamar Sands at a meet in Rieti, Italy, Sands cleared 16.77 metres or 55-feet, 01/4-inches to snatch first place in the men’s triple jump. His winning leap came on the second of his four attempts. He opened with 16.12 or 52-10 3/4 that placed him in second behind Cuba’s Arnie David Girat. But after taking the lead, Sands went on to post 16.52 or 54-2 1/2 in the third round and 16.60 or 54-5 1/2 in the last ‘SUPERMAN’ IS BACK! L EEVAN SANDS sports NOTES STADIUMCORNERSTONEUNVEILED F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f TENNIS: USOPEN 2009 Leevan Sands soars to big victory in Italy S EE page 13 It was interesting playing Ryan. It was a tough match Mark Knowles MARK KNOWLES VALENTINO KNOWLES ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey US OPEN: See P age 14

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of Youth, Sports a nd Culture Desmond Bannister said he’s really surprised att he efficiency with which the Qilu Construction Group Cor p oration are preparing to have the new national stadium completed by 2011. “The Chinese are going incredibly fast,” said Bannister a fter the official tour of the construction site on Saturday witht he 120-plus delegation from the National People’s Congress o f the People’s Republic of Chi na, headed by Wu Bangguo, the chairman of the standing committee. “I don’t think that there’s a nybody who work as quickly as they’re working and are as o rganized and extremely quiet as they are. Pleased “We are very pleased with the way they are working.” When completed, the B ahamas Association of Ath letic Associations is hoping that t hey will be able to host the Carifta Games from April toc oincide with the official openi ng ceremonies and the naming of the new 15,000 seat state-ofthe-art Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium that could be explanded to accom m odate a total of 23,000 seats. If they are successful in s ecuring the bid from Grena da, who is currently trying to r epair their stadium after they were hit by hurricane, it will be t he seventh time that the Bahamas has hosted the top junior regional competition. The last time the Bahamas hosted Carifta was in 2002 w hen Bannister served as pres ident of the BAAA. T he BAAA, which will go to the polls in November to select a new executive board for the next three years, is currently h eaded by Curt ‘Mr. H’ Hollingsworth. Bannister, who on Saturday s poke about the “economic benefits” that will derive for t he Bahamas when the stadium is completed, thanked the Chinese government for “what they are doing for us and how they are doing it. I can’t wait until it’s finished.” Leading up to the Olympic Games last year in Beijing, China, the Chinese government created two national stadiums that have surpassed all con structed anywhere else in the world. Marvelled Everybody marvleled as the ‘Bird’s Nest’ national track and field stadium, which hosted the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the track and field competition at the Olympics and the ‘Blue tube’ national swim complex next to it that hosted the swimming competition. If that’s any indication, Bannister said the new stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center, which will sit in between the current Thomas A. Robinson Track and Field (which will become a practice track) and the Betty Kelly Ken ning Aquatic Center, will defi nitely be the envy of the Caribbean. “This is the biggest stadium that the Chinese are building outside of China,” Bannister said. “They are committed to getting it done. They are a very dedicated and hardworking people and I’m sure that there’s some lessons there that we can all learn.” A number of government ministers, headed by Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and including Robinson, watched as Wu unveiled the cornerstone for the stadium. Wu also presented a relica of the national stadium to Symonette during the brief ceremony. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 12, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Minister: ‘The Chinese are going incredibly fast’ LEGENDARY Thomas A. Robinson, whom the new national stadium will be named after, is congratulated by Wu Bangguo, the Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China. CHINESE STAFF pose with WU Bangguo. C HINESE WORKERS a t the sports centre lineo wait for the arrival of WU Bangguo on Saturday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Bannister hails efficiency of the company working on new national stadium F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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WITH the regular season winding down, teams are now jockeying for playoff positionsi n the New Providence Softball Association. S aturday night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex, a triple h eader was played with some playoff implications as both the ladies and men’s defending champions stayed in the hunt. Brackettes 13, Lady Sharks 9 : I n a rematch of last year’s finals, the defending champi o ns Sigma Brackettes outslugged runners-up Proper C are Pool Lady Stingrays 139. Brackettes’ veteran Ernestine Butler-Stubbs got the bet ter of the pitching dual with youthful Thela Johnson of Proper Care Pool as the Brack e ttes pushed their third place record to 8-5. The Lqdy Sharks f ell to 10-5 to remain in second behind idled front-running Pineapple Air Wildcats, whoare 12-2. Vandette Smith sparked Sigma’s offensive attack with a 2for-5 night with two runs batted i n and scoring three times. Zella Symonette was just as i mpressive with a 3-for-5 outting, driving in a pair of runs and scoring as many. Antonia Simmons helped out by going 2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring twice and Cassie Smith was also 2-for3 with a pair ofr uns scored. For Proper Care Pool, K eisha Pratt went 2-for-4 with a RBI and a run scored; Shanelle S ymonette was 2-for-4 with two RBI and Cleo Symonette went 1 -for-3 with a RBI, scoring twice. Truckers 12, New Breed 0: The defending men’s champions Commodo Security Truck ers stayed close to the Pricewaterhouse Stingrays in third place as they blanked the rookie New Breed 12-0. Anton Gibson fired a onehitter for the win for the Truckers, who improved to 11-5, 1 1/2 game behind idled Pricewaterhouse Stingrays, who are 14-3 as they both trail front running Dorcey Park Boyz, who are 16-1. Darren Mortimer enjoyed a 2-for-3 night at the plate with two runs batted in, scoring twice to lead a balanced offensive attack. Richard Bastian was 2-for-3 with three RBI, scoring a run on a solo in-thepark home run in the bottom of the second. Tommy ‘Bucker T’ Ferguson was 2-for-3 with a RBI, scoring twice; Martin Burrows Jr. was a perfect 2-for-2 with two RBIs and three runs scored, including hitting a two-run homer in the fourth and Julian Taylor was also a perfect 2-for-2 with two runs. For Young Breed, who slipped into a two-way tie for fifth at 6-10 with the idled Roy al Bahamas Defense Force Commodores, Roberto Larrimore had the lone hit on a sin gle in the third. Outlaws 11, Hitmen 7: The Roscoe Thompson Heavy Equipment gained some ground with their big victory over Robin Hood and the loss to their little brother team New Breed. Roscoe Thompson secured the win on the mound over Cardinal Gilbert and he got all the help he needed offensively to join New Breed in a two-way tie for fifth at 6-10. Bruce Mackey went 2-for-4 with five RBI and a run scored. He had a two-run double and a three-run triple. Juliano Thompson was 2-for-4 with two RBI and a run scored and Kedo Johnson was 1-for-2 with three runs. Shavargo Archer was 2for-4 with two runs scored. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Teams jockeying for playoff positions round to maintain his position. Sands, who celebrated his 28th birthday when he competed in the qualifying round of the World’s in Berlin, Germany last month, just missed out on the bronze medal when Cuban Alexis Copello passed him in the last round. Sands is the bronze medalist from the Olympic Games in Beijing, China last year. Girat, who was fifth in Berlin, took second place with his best mark of 16.67 or 54-8 1/4 on his first attempt. Momchil Karailiev of Bulgeria was third with 16.61 or 54-6. Sands will now join sprinters Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie and Chandra Sturrup along with quarter-miler Chris ‘Fireman’ Brown in the IAAF/VTB Bank World Athletics Final this weekend in Thessaloniki, Greece. Ranked Sands is the second ranked competitor in the triple jump behind Girat. Sturrup and Ferguson-McKenzie are No.4 and 5 respectively in the women’s 100 with FergusonMcKenzie topping the list in the 200. Brown is No.2 in the men’s 400. Also at the meet yesterday, Shamar Sands had to settle for a sixth place finish in the men’s 110 hurdles in 13.65 seconds. Jamaca got a 1-2 sweep from Dwight Thomas (13.36 and Maurice Wignall (13.48 Spain’s Jackson Quinonez was third in 13.49. Shamar Sands, 24, got fourth in his heat of the semifinal and didn’t advance to the final in Berlin. W hile Leevan Sands has qualified for the World Athletic Final, Shamar Sands has not. Only the top eight atheltes will compete and Sands is sitting in the 12th spot. Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands is back FROM page 11 NEW PROVIDENCESOFTBALL ASSOCIATION CURRENTSOFTBALLSTANDINGS AFTER the New Providence Softball Association’s triple header on Saturday night at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex, here’s a look at the current standings going into Tuesday night’s double header: Ladies Division Teams W L Pct. GB Pineapple Air Wildscats 12 2 .857 Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks 10 5 .666 21/2 Sigma Brackettes 8 5 .615 31/2 Boomer G Lady Swingers 3 11 .214 9 Queen’s 1 12 .076 101/2 Men’s Division Dorcey Park Boyz 16 1 .941 Pricewaterhouse Stingrays 14 3 .823 2 Commando Truckers 11 5 .687 41/2 Robin Hood Hitmen 9 7 .5621/2 61/2 Young Breed 6 10 .375 91/2 RBDF Commodores 6 10 .375 91/2 Thompson Heavy Equipment Outlaws 7 11 .388 91/2 Morgan’s Buccaneers 4 14 .222 121/2 Mighty Mits 3 15 .166 131/2 Tuesday’s schedule 7 pm Commando Truckers Morgan’s Bucanneers (M 8:30 pm Pricewaterhouse Stingrays vs Robin Hood Hitmen (M PHOTOS: Felip Major / T ribune staff SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Mynez Cargill makes the play at the plate to get Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Varnette Nairn out at first base. SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Thelma Johnson goes to work as she delivers a pitch to the Sigma Brackettes. P ROPER CARE POOL LADY SHARKS’ b atter Varnetta Nairn squares off to put d own the bunt. SIGMA BRACKETTES’ Renee ‘Sunshine’ Davis tries to catch the ball before Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks’ Thela Johnson reaches first base. PROPER CARE POOLL ADY SHARKS’ batter Varnette Nairn avoided getting hit by a pitchc aught by Sigma Brackettes’ catcher Cassie Smith. ERNESTINE BUTLER-STUBBS in action on the mound.

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EDDIE PELLS, AP National Writer NEW YORK Rafael Nadal encountered as much trouble from his own body as his opponent in a third-round victory at the U.S. Open. The third-seeded Nadal, who missed Wimbledon with sore knees, needed a 10minute injury break for a trainer to work on his abdominals early in the third set of his 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over No. 32 Nicolas Almagro on Sunday. The stomach injury first cropped up for Nadal last month at a tournament in Cincinnati. While Nadal laid on the ground to receive treatment, Almagro was laying down to get work done on his back. The Spaniards popped back up and Nadal finished the work, staying in the hunt to c omplete his career Grand S lam, though it has yet to be s een what kind of toll this match took on him. "I feel it a little bit now, but I'll try my best to recover for the next match," said Nadal, who has insisted all week thathe's been feeling fine. "I'm here to work hard and try my best all the time." In other early action Sunday, 11th-seeded Fernando Gonzalez defeated 17th-seed-ed Tomas Berdych, 7-5, 6-4, 64, and No. 9 Gilles Simon of France retired because of a knee injury while trailing No.24 Juan Carlos Ferrero 1-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5 "Sometimes, I don't know why, I just feel a big pain," said Simon, who added that he's had problems with the knee since the French Openin May. In the other early women's match, No. 18 Li Na of China ousted No. 26 Francesca Schiavone of Italy, 6-2, 6-3. No. 3 Venus Williams had an afternoon match against unseeded Kim Clijsters, who is facing, by far, the toughest match in her first appearance at the U.S. Open since she won it in 2005. Also later, No. 2 Andy Murray was scheduled to play 195th-ranked Taylor Dent of Newport Beach, Calif., who has won two rounds in his inspirational comeback from back surgery. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM RAFAEL NADAL of Spain has his abdomen taped by a trainer during a break in his match against Nicolas Almagro of Spain in the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, yesterday. RAFAEL NADAL , of Spain, returns to Nicolas Almagro, also of S pain, during the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, S unday, Sept. 6, 2009. Serena Williams, of the United States, returns to Daniela Hantuchova, of Slovakia. USOPENTENNIS Pain in the ... belly, but Nadal moves on anyway A P P h o t o / K a t h y W i l l e n s A P P h o t o / K a t h y W i l l e n s A P P h o t o / P a u l J . B e r e s w i l l Serena powers into quarterfinals N EW YORK Defending champion Serena W illiams has powered her way into the U.S. Open quarterfinals, winning the last 10 games to beat No. 22-seeded Daniela Hantuchova 6-2, 6-0. W illiams finished with eight aces a nd a 27-9 advantage in winners in Sunday's first match in Arthur Ashe Stadium. No. 1 Dinara Safina was upset Satu rday night, meaning No. 2 Williams is the highest-ranked woman left in the f ield. Safina will remain atop the rankings, though, even if Williams were to w in a second consecutive U.S. Open title and fourth overall. Williams has reached the quarterfinals at 11 of the past 12 major tournaments and won the title at three of the p ast four. USOPENRESULTS AUSTRALIA'S BRETT LEE , right, celebrates after claiming the wick et of England's Paul Collingwood during the second one day international cricket match at Lord's cricket ground, London, Sunday Sept. 6, 2009. CRICKET: ENGLAND vs AUSTRALIA, NATWESTSERIES England fell further behind in the NatWest Series after failing to overhaul a moderate Australia total for the second time in three days. Andrew Strauss' team lost by 39 runs to go 2-0 down in the seven-match campaign, having lost their way badly in pursuit of 250 at Lord's, following the last-ball decider on Friday evening. The Ashes winners appeared on course to the level the series when they entered the 15th over on 74 without loss but a cluster of wickets, which mirrored a similar pattern at the same stage of Australia's innings, altered the outlook. Shane Watson's introduction was more in desperation than inspiration given that he was the sixth bowler employed inside the first two sets of powerplays. But his dismissal of Ravi Bopara, who fatally ambled across his stumps to be plumb lbw, halted the momentum built up against the new ball. Strauss and opening partner Ravi Bopara had England cruising towards victory at Lord's before losing four wickets for 23 runs and eventually getting bowled out for 210. "Having been 70-odd for none we were in a great position to come home comfortably but we were the architects of our own downfall to an extent," Strauss said after the 39-run defeat. A P P h o t o / P A , R e b e c c a N a d e n Second defeat for England SOUTH AFRICA'S Victor Matfield, right, and Australia's James Horwill jump in the lineout during the Tri-Nations rugby match in Brisbane, Australia, Saturday Sept. 5, 2009. Satisfied Australia coach Robbie Deans praised the patience and tenacity shown by his players after their impressive 21-6 win over South Africa in Brisbane.The Springboks sit well clear at the top of the table on 17 points ahead of the Kiwis on eight, with the Wallabies a further point back with one match remaining against New Zealand in Wellington in a fortnight. Australia beat South Africa 21-6 A P P h o t o / S t e v e H o l l a n d Brazil qualified for its 19th consecutive World Cup, leav i ng Argentina to join Portugal and France with difficult paths t o reach next year’s tournament, according to Associated Press . Defending World Cup champion Italy and European champion Spain maintained their leads in Europe, while England and Germany won exhibition games ahead of qualifiers on Wednesday. And in Africa, Cameroon boosted itself with its first victory in the final round of qualifying. The United States came from behind at home for the second straight qualifier, defeating El Salvador 2-1 to move up one spot into second place in North and Central America and the Caribbean. Luisao put Brazil ahead in the 24th minute at Rosario, Argentina, and Luis Fabiano scored in the 30th and 67th. Jesus Datolo got a goal in the 65th for Argentina, which will face pressure to remove coach Diego Maradona. Brazil (8-16) leads South American qualifying with 30 points, three ahead of Chile and Paraguay (both 8-4-3 of Argentina (6-5-4 matches remaining. The top four teams advance to next year’s tournament, while the No. 5 nation goes to a playoff against the No. 4 nation in North and Central America and the Caribbean. Brazil became the seventh nation to join host South Africa in next year’s 32-nation field, following Australia, Japan, the Netherlands, North Korea and South Korea and the Netherlands. Argentina lost a home qualifier for the first time since a 5-0 defeat to Colombia in 1993. Cristiano Ronaldo is in danger of missing the World Cup after Portugal needed a last-minute goal by Liedson for a 1-1 tie against Denmark. Nicklas Bendtner gave the Danes the lead in the 41st minute. Denmark (5-0-2 Group One with 17 points, four ahead of Hungary (4-2-1 which lost 2-1 at home to Sweden when Zlatan Ibrahimovic scored in injury time. Sweden (3-1-3 and Portugal (2-1-4 heading into Wednesday’s game at Hungary. Brazil qualifies for World Cup; France str uggles World Cup MEN Juan Carlos Ferrero (249 6, 6-4, 7-6 (5 Fernando Gonzalez (1117 R epublic, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. Rafael Nadal (332 4 , 6-4. Women F OURTH ROUND Serena Williams (2 (22 Li Na (1826 DOUBLES M EN THIRD ROUND I van Ljubicic, Croatia, and Michael Llodra, France, def. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, and Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 7-5, 2-6, 63 . WOMEN T HIRD ROUND Maria Kirilenko and Elena Vesnina (10 and Carly Gullickson, United States, 7-6 (3 Alisa Kleybanova and Ekaterina Makarova (13 Anabel Medina Garrigues and Virginia Ruano Pascual (2 6 (3 Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Nadia Petrova (8 s ia, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and Patty Schnyder (9 Switzerland, 6-7 (6 C ara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel Huber (1 Olga Govortsova, Belarus, and Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-4, 5-7, 6 -1

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LOS ANGELES WITHthe massive wildfire burning north of Los Angeles more than half contained, hand crews were working Sunday to keep the fire's eastern flank from crossing a rural mountain highway, a U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman said, according to Associated Press. The fire, which started Aug. 26, has killed two firefighters, blackened nearly 246 square miles of the Angeles National Forest and destroyed at least 76 homes. Fire agencies so far have spent $43.5 million fighting the blaze. Authorities on Sunday were trying to determine who set the deadly fire. At least a dozen investigators were working to analyze clues found at a burnt hillside near Angeles Crest Highway where the fire started. But officials, who say the cause of the fire was arson, were hesitant to release any of their findings to the media. The fire was 51 percent contained Sunday as crews built new protective lines near Highway 39 in the San Gabriel Wilderness, U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Jennifer Sanchez said. No homes were immediately threatened. The weekend weather forecast called for cooler temperatures and slightly higher humidity that could help firefighters further surround the blaze. Because of the reduced heat, about 400 firefighters assigned to protect structures were dismissed Saturday. About 4,800 firefighters remained. Los Angeles County firefighters Tedmund Hall and Arnaldo Quinones were killed Aug. 30 while seeking an escape route for their inmate fire crew after flames overran their camp on Mount Gleason. The two died when their truck plunged 800 feet off a steep mountain road. Sheriff's detectives opened a homicide investigation after the fire was ruled arson earlier this week, and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has offered $100,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the culprit. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Dunkin’ time ALL THE timeCustomer Loyalty CardU se the Card... Earn Free Dunkin’Itsallabouttherewards.Itsallaboutyou.Itsthebestof Dunkinforourverybestcustomers.ActivateyourDunkin DonutsCustomerLoyaltyCardat www.dunkinbahamas.com , thenuseitatparticipatinglocationsandstartearningrewards.EARN DOUBLE POINTS WHEN YOU USE YOUR C ARD FROM SEPTST SEPTTH EARNPOINTFOREVERSPENTRedeem your points at participating Dunkin’ Bahamas locations. Visit www.Dunkinbahamas.com tolearnmore,reviewtheprogramand conditions,andactivateyourDunkin DonutsCustomerLoyaltyCard. Crews work to hold California wildfire's eastern edge A CLOUD of vapor and smoke is seenf rom Victory Park near Pasadena, as the Station Fire continues to burn on the East side of the theA ngeles Nationa l Forest. Damian Dovarganes /AP

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Bahamian firm allies with Caribbean player C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.27 $4.16 $4.26 %' %$".%$)%*)%$%&&%')*$).)%b bb'%%'*$%$.%*'('&% %,$'(,""$ %.%*' %*'(%#'.'%%r(&'%".b" &'%&')."*-*'. "".)%&)% "(%$ %.&%%"(.# '%*$ )%""'(%' b b t t r r n n n n b b t t By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Bahamas should target a 30 per cent reduction in energy usage by public buildings by 2010, and attempt to reduce New Providence commute times by 20 per cent by next year, the National Energy Policy Committee’s first report has urged, a government min ister telling Tribune Business that developing an energy policy was “critical” for this nation’s economic and environmental sustainability. Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, told Tribune Business that while some target dates in the committee’s first report were likely to be adjusted, since the document was drafted in 2008, the Government still intended to pro duce a National Energy Policy (NEP day”. Although unable to give a target deadline for the policy’s completion and publication, due to the fact that the Government wanted to “maximise input” from the Bahamian public and other stakeholders, Mr Neymour reiterated that the Ingraham administration saw it as critical in guiding efforts to reduce this nation’s energy spend and environ mental/carbon footprint. “In my view, it’s critical,” Mr Neymour said of the need for a Bahamian National Energy Policy. “For instance, if you look at BEC alone, BEC’s fuel bill for its last Budget year was $376 million. That sum demonstrates the magnitude of government spending for consumption of petroleum products and energy. We’re trying to minimise it. It affects significantly our foreign exchange reserves and our foreign spending.” Apart from the economics, Mr Neymour said that addressing Bahamian consumption of petroleum products, and the almost-total dependence on fossil fuels for electrical generation, had important implications for the environment especially given this nation’s vulnerability to rising sea levels and cli mate change. “The Bahamas is considered one of the top five countries that are neg atively impacted by climate change,” the minister added, explaining that the work being done by the National Energy Policy Committee in this area was “critical” to this nation. “It’s a life and death matter for the Bahamas moving forward. It’s a critical issue,” Mr Neymour said of climate change and global warming, and the role played by energy consumption patterns. It’s not taken root with the publ ic as it should. We generally look at e nergy usage when we get our electricity bills, but I think Bahamians should be more concerned with the environmental impact of an energy policy.” Figures produced recently showed that the Bahamas’ per capita carbon dioxide emissions, resulting from fossil fuel consumption, had increased by 40 per cent since 1996. Emissions per capita now stood at 16.48, with the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by this nation, as measured in millions of tonnes, having increased from 2.2 million in 1992 to 3.5 million in 2000 and 5 mil lion in 2006. 30% public building energy drop target By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE ‘wealth gap’ between rich and poor in the Bahamas is likely to widen as a result of the current recession, a for mer finance minister has told Tribune Business, with he and others believing this nation is undergoing a “major structural change” and could face a relatively ‘jobless’ recovery. James Smith, CFAL’s Gap between rich, poor to widen * National Energy Policy formulation still ‘critical’ for government, as BEC’s last annual bill reaches $376m * Bahamas among world’s five most vulnerable nations to climate change, but public not recognising fossil fuel use’s impact on ‘life and death matter’ * Committee’s first report sets short-term targets of 10-20% public transport use increase, and 20% commute reduction time by 2010 * Renewable energy should be 10-20% of energy supply mix within 10 years, report says, with 20-30% of households using solar water heater NEYMOUR S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B By CHESTER ROBARDS B usiness Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net A PAN-CARIBBEAN project management and property development consultancy is plan ning an alliance with a Bahamian company offering much the same services, in a bid to give them increased scale and an ability to bet-t er compete in bidding for major construction and engineering projects. An executive with Construction Cost Engi neering (Bahamas bune Business that their association with BCQS International will allow them to expand S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B ‘Enormous social implications’ if pressing amendments not enacted By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SUCCESSIVE governments have failed for more than 15 years to implement long-sug gested reforms vital to the National Insurance B oard’s (NIB i nvestment advisers have told Tribune Business, adding that the Bahamas faced “enormous social implications” if amendments were not enacted soon. Governments delay critical NIB reforms By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE GOVERNMENT has been moving slowly in drafting a new Heads of Agreement for the Bahamas Film Studios because it wants to determine whether its cur rent chairman and owner, who has threatened to close the project down, is a man it wants to do business with, the Permanent Secretary in the Prime Minister’s Office told Tribune Business. David Davis said the Government has been attempting to draft a new Heads of Agreement for the Grand Bahama-based development for some time, ever since Nashville-based investment banker, Ross Fuller, took control. Mr Davis said the lease of Government assesses Film Studios principal S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B Determining whether to do business with him, as Heads redrafting ongoing amid threats of closure S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B * Bahamas facing prospect of ‘jobless recovery’ and major structural changes that will be permanent, with prolonged high unemployment likely * ‘Painful days’ ahead, with next five years ‘unlike previous five to 10 years of prosperity’ * Bahamian businesses urged to restructure now and do more with less, as demand and sales likely to be in retreat for some time

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BRITISHAMERICANFINANCIAL C ONGRATULATESOUR www.babnancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport242-352-7209Exuma242-336-3035Abaco242-367-5601Weprovide FinancialSolutionsforLife!AgentoftheMonth Awardees AgentoftheMonthMarchBlue Hills BranchAgentoftheMonthAprilPalmdale BranchAgentoftheMonthMayBlue Hills BranchAgentoftheMonthJuneCarmichael BranchJ anet HannaMarvin Wood C arolie WilsonLilieth Knowles By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMAS First General Insurance Company saw its net income for 2008 slump by some 86.4 per cent to $1.656 million, largely due to an almost $12 million swing into the red on the unrealised losses suffered on its equity investment portfolio, a development that negated an underwriting performance improvement. The insurance carrier, which has now published its results separate from those of its parent, Bahamas First Holdings, which enjoyed net income of $3.465 million for the 12 months to December 31, 2008, saw its own figures drop from a $12.209 million profit in 2007 to just $1.656 million. Figures The figures also show that the carrier contributed just 47.8 per cent of its parent’s net 2008 profit, Bahamas First Holdings’ figures also including, for example, the performance of its various fully-o wned agencies. Due to the vast swing in the value of its Commonwealth Bank holdings, Bahamas First Insurance Company saw the value of its unrealised investments move from an $8.959m illion gain to a $2.922 million loss in 2008, the main factor behind the substantial drop in net income. The insurance carrier also saw outgoing management fees increase from $956,699t o $2.06 million, a rise of more than $1 million. These developments more than negated a 39.9 per cent increase in net underwriting income for the year, which expanded from $6.106 million in 2007 to $8.541 million in 2008. While Bahamas First Insurance Company saw a modest $1 million decline in gross written premiums to $103.096 million, a $3 million reversal on movement in unearned premiums, coupled with a $2 million increase in commis-s ions earned from reinsurers, propelled the firm’s total underwriting income to $54.759 million, compared to $51.566 million. This more than compensated for a $1.4 million increasei n net claims incurred to $8.592 million, compared to $7.159 million the previous year. Total underwriting expenses remained relatively flat at $46.218 million, com pared to $45.46 million in 2 007. Insurer’s income declines by 86.4 per cent Bahamas First suffers $11.8m swing on investment portfolio, and contributes less than 50% of parent’s 2008 profits INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, r ead Insight on Mondays

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor TOTAL non-performing l oans made by Bahamian banks to the private sector breached the $500 million mark in July 2009, a Central Bank of the Bahamas reporth as revealed, with the increasing strain the recession is placing on businesses and households exposed by the fact that the only consumer lending category showing growth is debt consolidation an almost-$38 million increase s ince the New Year. The Central Bank, in its latest monthly economic and f inancial developments report for July, showed a combination of slumping credit demand and defaults on exist-i ng loans, as the contracting economy and rising unemployment continue to exact a toll, with $902.5 million com-m ercial bank loans now in a rrears. A further $64.7 million worth of loans fell into arrears during July 2009, marking a 7.7 per cent increase in then umber that were past due. T otal loans in arrears, in relation to the total number of loans outstanding, increased by 0.8 per cent to 14.5 per cent. N on-performing loans, t hose which are more than 90 days past due and regarded as more critical by the commercial banks, as they have stopped accruing interest, rose by $31.3 million or 6.7p er cent in July. Non-per forming loans now account for 8.1 per cent of all loans issued by the Bahamian com-m ercial banking system. Meanwhile, loans in the d elinquent category that is, 31-90 days past due, also i ncreased by $33.4 million in July to $401.4 million, taking those loans to 6.5 per cent of a ll credit issued to the private sector by commercial banks. The Central Bank said the July arrears increase was generated by a $30 million, or 8.2 per cent, hike in mortgage delinquencies to $396.1 million, while commercial loans i n default grew by $28.5 million or 14.5 per cent to $224.4 million likely putting this over 20 per cent, meaningt hat more than one in every five business loans is in default. C onsumer loans in arrears increased by$6.3 million, or2 .3 per cent, to $282 million. Meanwhile, the Central Bank said a breakdown ofc onsumer lending during the f irst six to seven months of 2009 “revealed continued strains in the credit market, as the majority of the loanc ategories contracted, amid e levated levels of arrears. Credit card and private vehicle lending showed yearover-year declines of $15.8 million and $15.4 million r espectively, along with reductions in travel and home improvement loan growth of $9.1 million and $5.1 million respectively. Contractions of less than $5 million were seen in most other lending categories. B ut the Central Bank added: “Accretions to debt consolidation loans loans which have been rewritten -r ose to $37.9 million, slightly higher than the previous year’s expansion.” N ot surprisingly, the Central Bank repeated that theo utlook was bleak, with economic recovery not anticipated until the 2010 second half.T ourism stopover arrivals and h otel occupancies were projected to remain weak, along with foreign direct investment inflows and construction. A lthough public sector w orks programmes were designed to provide a “modest offset” to rising unemployment, the Government’s fiscal deficit and debt-to-GDP r atios were still heading south, and while reduced import demand was aiding the current account and foreign exchange reserves levels, there was likely to be some impact in the next few months as businesses drew d own foreign currency to replenish inventory levels. The Government’s fiscal deficit expanded by $139.2m illion to $219 million for the first 11 months of its 20082009 fiscal year, with revenuec ollections down by 6.1 per cent year-over-year at $1.201b illion. Tax revenues were off 25.5 per cent, with taxes on imports down 13 per cent,s tamp taxes down 22.8 per c ent, departure taxes showing a 15.6 per cent decline, and motor vehicle taxes dropping 3.8 per cent. T otal spending by governm ent, driven by a 5.3 per cent rise in recurrent outlays, increased by 4.5 per cent to $1.42 billion. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfr f r!%* '!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff !$ %#&!*&*# !%** Vacation in Paradise.Only $69*per person double occupancy.Minimum 2-night stay. Bahamas residents only. Full use of all Atlantis facilities. Plus: Limited-time offer! Reserve today !BSP Job #: CTS-9-N003 JM# 8634 Client: Comfort Suites Description: Stay In Paradise 1/4 pg Bleed: non Color: 1C Black Specs: PDFX1A Mech #3 Date: 2/25/2009 Time: 1:30 Mech Person: GUDimensions: 5.75in x 10.5 in Issue: Nassau Tribune 3/2/2009 Closing: 2/26/09 *$69 per person double occupancy per night Sun. – Wed. Add $20 pp for Thurs. – Sat. Maximum four persons per room. Rates effective through December 15. Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees. Rates quoted are based on standard room category and are subject to availability. Cancellations must be received 48 hours prior to arrival or a one night penalty will apply. G u s U g a r t e 2 / 2 5 4 p m CTS-9-N003_NassauGuardian.indd 2 2/25/09 4:14:07 PM Non-performing loans breach $500m threshold To advertise, call 502-2371 ‘Continued strains in the credit market’, with only loan category s howing 2009 growth debt consolidation at almost $38m

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Mr Neymour said several government agencies and departments had already moved to enhance energy effic iency and consumption, citi ng the Water & Sewerage C orporation’s decision to provide energy-efficient pumps in its products. The opportunities the Bahamas has missed to date t o become a renewable energ y leader, and reduce its fossil f uel consumption and associated energy costs, were graphically illustrated by two examples cited in the National Energy Policy Committee’s r eport. T he report said: “The prom otion of solar water heating systems in Barbados has been successful due to an innovative combination of circumstances, policy interventions, tax incentives and awareness raising efforts on the potential benefits of solar water heaters to the economy. “The solar water heating industry in Barbados is estimated to have saved about 130,000 barrels of oil annually. Currently, about 35,000 solar water heaters are installed in homes, commercial establishments and hotels, saving about $16 million (assuming electricity usage at normal rates to heat the water) and about 65 million kWh annually, with a ratepayer value of $12.5 million.” The Bahamas, according to the report, consumes about 26,000 barrels of imported petroleum products per day to meet its energy needs. A further example was highlighted by Germany’s feed-in tariff system that has proven effective in fostering t he rapid and sustained g rowth in renewable energy p enetration in its national e nergy mix”. The National Energy Policy Committee Report added: “In addition to the creation of 214,000 jobs, German achievements include, since the start, ion 2006, the avoidance of 97 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions, penetration of an 11.8 per cent share of total gross electricity consumption from renewable energy sources, and creation of a 5.3 per cent share of total primary energy consumption from renewable energy. These achievements were realised at a cost of approximately $6.50 per household per month.” Both examples illustrate the difference between what is and what could be in the Bahamas as regards renewable energy, the committee’s report stating that this nation had “potential for diverse renewable energy sources”, including biomass, ocean, solar and wind. Embracing and expanding t he Bahamas’ involvement in r enewable energies, the r eport added, held the potent ial to create new employment o pportunities in industries related “to assessing energy usage and improving efficiency” in all types of building; production, maintenance and sale of energy from renewable sources, and the exportation of technology and knowledge to other countries; and jobs from “retrofitting buildings and facilities with more energy efficient technologies, cooling and heating systems”. The National Energy Policy Committee’s report suggested a series of short, medium and long-term targets for the Bahamas to aim at. Advocating an integrated traffic management system and public transport system, the committee urged targeting a 1020 per cent increase in use of public transport by next year, with energy efficient lighting systems for public spaces supported by traffic management. Other short-term goals, which the committee suggested by achieved over a one to f ive-year period, were the p hase-out of all incandescent l ight bulbs and their replacement by energy-efficient fluorescent ones by 2010. Over the medium-term, five to 10 years, the National Energy Policy Committee recommended increasing renewable energy sources’ penetration of the Bahamas’ energy mix to 10-20 per cent of supplies. It suggested deploying renewable energy technologies in small Bahamian communities, and producing 50 per cent of their power needs from these sources, plus improving fuel efficiency to 30-35 miles per gallon for 70 per cent of licensed vehicles through the use of tax incentives to encourage the importation of more fuel-efficient cars. The committee also urged targeting 20-30 per cent of all Bahamian households switching to solar water heaters within 10 years and, from that time on, all new water heater installations to involve solar C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 30% public building energy drop target F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamian firm allies with Caribbean player the scope of their projects to countries outside the Bahamas mainly in the Caribbean region. BCQS, which is involved with major resort projects throughout the Caribbean, operates offices in Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, St. Lucia and the Truks and Caicos. "Both companies’ core businesses focus in the area of project management, quantity surveying and property development consultancy, whilst BCQS also undertakes development management, appraisal and real estate investment analysis work, with strong links to the major lending institutions throughout the region," said a Constrcution Cost Engineering release. Mr Lavin said the tie-up will enable the Bahamian company to offer an improved strength of service, and allow Construction Cost to specialise across a larger resource base. Company "We are a small company with a good client list," said Mr Lavin. Liam Day, the Caymanbased managing director of BCQS, said: “Over the next several months we will strategise with CCE and promote our new alliance, soas to fully inform our mutual clientele of theo pportunities that will arise b ecause of our new associa tion”. He added: “Both practices brought together a combined history of 62 years of operation in the region, and the associationm irrored the intent of our corporate tag line ‘Local Knowledge – Global Expe rience’ to the fullest extent. “Though both firms offer similar services, Construc tion Cost has been pursuing a pan-Caribbean expansion and contends the associa tion will provide that opportunity, as well as allow BCQS to pursue the development of large resort projects across the wider Bahamas. "The ‘marriage’ is one that both companies have pursued for quite some time, and the alliance gives the association the manpower and resources to undertake large scale projects in the Bahamas and the immediate region, and provides a broader appeal to a number of financial and institutional clients.” Mr Lavin said BCQS had worked in over 20 countries in the Caribbean/Atlantic region, and was the largest practice of its type in the region. “Together with ourlocal knowledge of the Bahamian market, we feel going forward that the com bined property and devel opment advice we can offer to our clients will be secondto none," he said. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 7B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Request for Contractors Pre-QualificationThe National Insurance Board (NIB works to construct a Government Complex at Marsh Harbour, Abaco; the project isa joint venture of NIB and The Bahamas Government. Contractors must be in c ompliance with the National Insurance Act (social security programme good standing with the relevant Government agencies. Pre-qualification documents may be collected from the Security Booth at NIB’s C lifford Darling Complex, Blue Hill Road, from September 3 to September 9, 2009. Pre–Qualification documents should be signed, sealed and dropped in the prequalification box at the Security Booth, Clifford Darling Complex on or before 12:00 Noon on September 15, 2009. The National Insurance Boardof the Commonwealth of The Bahamas T o advertise, call 502-2371

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chairman and a former minister of state for finance, said the tourism industry, the Bahamas’ “major engine of growth”, was unlikely to “go back to pre-recession levels” for quite some time which, in turn, would have negative implications for prolonged unemployment levels in the Bahamas. He warned that Bahamasbased hotel properties were unlikely to need workforces of pre-fall 2008 levels due to increased productivity levels among staff who had retained their jobs, and also the fact that much hotel room inventory remained off-line. As a result, economic recovery in the Bahamas, much like in the US, could be relatively ‘jobless’, as resorts such as Atlantis, for example, are unlikely to re-hire the 800 people they laid-off even if business levels make a full recovery. With Bahamian gross domestic product (GDP unlikely to recover to pre2008 levels in the short-term, Mr Smith told Tribune Business that this nation would likely “have to suffer high unemployment rates” for the next four to five years. “It’s going to take a structural change in the economy” to reduce that more rapidly,” Mr Smith told Tribune Business, arguing that the Bahamas needed to “go back to the drawing board” on its economic planning in the medium term and see what changes could be made. “There’s a growing gap between the rich and the poor, because wealthy people are still working and taking advantage of opportunities,” Mr Smith said. “I can see a lot of changes taking place going forward, and not for the better. The distribution of income will be more skewed to the wealthy, and this may have implications for crime. “You do not have resources to give to law enforcement at a time when they are needed, because government revenues are down, and more people will put more resources into private security. “I’m not by nature a pessimist, but I can see the next few years being a challenge for the Bahamas unless unforeseen events occur, like the discovery of oil offshore.” Bahamian unemployment, with the national average rate standing at 14.2 per cent, was likely to go “a little more” higher next year, and then only come down to around 910 per cent, the former finance minister predicted. “We’ve got some painful days ahead of us,” Mr Smith added of the Bahamian economy’s recession and unemployment woes. “It’s becoming structural in nature.” While praising the Government for initiating worker retraining efforts through the National Training Programme, he expressed concerns that those targeted by the initiative were being retrained for areas likely to suffer further lay-offs. Mr Smith’s analysis was backed by Anwer Sunderji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tDFKLHYLQJQDQFLDOJRDOV 2YHUVLJKWRIRUGHULQJDQGPDLQWDLQLQJLQYHQWRU\OHYHOVZLWKLQJXLGHOLQHV 2YHUVLJKWRIWKHRYHUDOODSSHDUDQFHDQGSUHVHQWDWLRQRIWKHLVODQGZLWKSDUWLFXODU HPSKDVHVRQTXDOLW\FRQWUROVDIHW\KHDOWKDQGVDQLWDWLRQUHJXODWLRQVDQGSURSHU IXQFWLRQLQJRIDOOHTXLSPHQW )DPLOLDUZLWKWKHLPPLJUDWLRQDQGODERUODZVRIWKH%DKDPDV 0XVWKDYHH[FHOOHQWKRVSLWDOLW\DQGFRPPXQLFDWLRQVVNLOOVWHDPSOD\HUV VHOIPRWLYDWHGSURIHVVLRQDODSSHDUDQFHDQGPDQQHUGHSHQGDEOHDQGDEOHWRZRUN H[LEOHKRXUV 0LQLPXPXDOLFDWLRQV \HDUVH[SHULHQFHDWrOX[XU\UHVRUWRUKRWHO \HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQDVXSHUYLVRU\RUPDQDJHPHQWUROH &DQGLGDWHPXVWEHSURFLHQWLQLFURVRIW([FHO:RUGXLFN%RRNVSD\UROOV DFFRXQWLQJDQGLQYHQWRU\ &DQGLGDWHZLWKH[SHULHQFHLQ'DWDUR,QYHQWRU\\VWHPDQGHQWDO 1HWZRUN\VWHPVfUHQWDOSURJUDPLVDSOXV 3OHDVHID[FRYHUOHWWHUUHVXPHUHIHUHQFHVDQGSROLFHUHFRUGVWR Gap between rich and F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B S S E E E E n n e e x x t t p p a a g g e e

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Fidelity Bank & Trust International’s chairman and chief executive, who told Tribune Business: “There’s no doubt the next five years are going to be very different from the last five years, and indeed the last 10 years of prosperity.” Mr Sunderji said this was chiefly because the US consumer, who drove three-quart ers of US GDP and 20 per c ent of global economic growth, based on the US being responsible for 30 per cent of global economic growth, was “simply shopped out and borrowed out”. Evidence for this came from the fact that the US consumer savings rate had jumped to 7 per cent, meaning Americans were saving $0.07 out of every $1 they earned, compared to a negative -2 per cent savings rate in recent years. The latter meant that US consumers were effectively gorging on cheaper credit, spending more than they were earning. Mr Sunderji said these figures showed a 7-10 per cent swing in the US consumer savings rate, and with Americans deleveraging and cutting spending at a rapid rate, they were no longer in a position to drive global growth. On the implications for the Bahamas, Mr Sunderji said there would be no economic recovery here until the US unemployment rate expected to peak at 10.5 per cent inS pring/Summer next year came down and robust economic growth restarted. “The prospect of a jobless recovery is a very real threat, and we are likely to see the economic situation deteriorate through to 2010,” Mr Sunderji warned. “Whether it’s government or the private sector, they need to be re-tooling their businesses and their companies so that they can deal with t he new normal, which is lowe r demand for an extended period of time.” Context In the Bahamian context, Mr Sunderji urged: “There is no option. We have to address the structural issues. The cost structure is out of line with revenue. We will see a prolonged reduction in the top line. It’s not a short-term issue. It’s longer term. It depends on US recovery, and that’s going to be problematic and anemic. “We should not expect the Bahamian economy to come back strongly, unlike the recessions we have had before. We need to address the structural issues caused by a lower top line.” He added: “Bahamian businesses will be faced with declining sales revenues, costs not in line with sales, and reduced profitability and cash flow. To remain in business they will have to adjust something to ensure they remain profitable and have a sustain-a ble business model. “Any time you restructure a business, you have to confront some big issues. Restructuring requires hard choices. A lot depends on how well capitalised Bahamian businesses were to start with, and most small businesses have challenges because they are not as wellcapitalised and are much more vulnerable to a drop in business. Small businesses are m ore likely to struggle than l arger businesses, because larger businesses have scale.” Describing what was happening as “a permanent shift” taking place, the Fidelity head said: “I think the Bahamian economy faces some very strong headwinds, and to deal with these issues we all need to be reviewing our business models. That needs to be done sooner rather than later. “There’s no doubt we’re going to have pressure on productivity, that needs to be improved; costs, they need to be lower; and the Bahamas is an expensive place to do business in.” Mr Sunderji added that he did not think Bahamian businesses could “postpone for too long” the decision on whether to confront these issues. “The silver lining is becoming more efficient and more competitive. We will restructure our businesses so that when the economy recovers, we will be in much better shape,” he said. Brian Moree, attorney and senior partner at McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, said that while some economic indicators were showing tentative signs that a recovery may be underway, and it was possible the Bahamas may have reached or passed the bottom, i t may be 18-24 months before r ecovery began in earnest. “My concern is that it could be a jobless recovery, here and elsewhere,” he explained. “We may see the indicators and the economy recovery, but some of the jobs may have been permanently lost. Some lines of business may never recover to the same extent we had them before, so they may never get back to the levels they were at before the global recession. “There have been some permanent changes. The paradigm has shifted in certain areas, and economic recovery does not mean we will be in the same place as before the decline occurred. “We are going to have to show we can cross-train people, and some people may find they have to re-tool their skills and seek employment in alternative areas..... We have to demonstrate an ability to embrace change.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .811.20Abaco Markets1.201.200.000.1270.0009.40.00% 1 1.8010.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.306.25Bank of Bahamas6.256.250.000.2440.26025.64.16% 0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.0780.09040.42.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.2010.18Cable Bahamas10.7510.750.001.4060.2507.62.33% 2 .882.74Colina Holdings2.742.740.000.2490.04011.01.46% 7.505.50Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.955.50-0.451,5000.4190.30013.15.45% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.703.69-0.010.1110.05233.21.41% 2 .851.32Doctor's Hospital2.032.030.001,0000.3820.0805.33.94% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.509.72Finco9.729.720.000.3220.52030.25.35% 1 1.7110.30FirstCaribbean Bank10.3010.300.000.7940.35013.03.40% 5.534.95Focol (S)5.125.120.000.3320.15015.42.93% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0 .450.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.505.500.000.4070.50013.59.09% 1 2.0010.09J. S. Johnson10.0910.090.000.9520.64010.66.34% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 FRIDAY, 4 SEPTEMBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,531.48| CHG -22.77| %CHG -1.47 | YTD -180.88 | YTD % -10.56BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W W W.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40051.3320CFAL Bond Fund1.40053.485.15 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.48671.4105CFAL Money Market Fund1.48673.705.40 3.60903.1031Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.1143-8.01-12.43 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.04843.415.84 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.06631.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.06632.596.63 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0215-1.112.15 1.06111.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06112.296.11 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Jul-09 NAV Date 31-Jul-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 28-Aug-09 31-Jul-09MARKET TERMS To advertise in The Tribune , just call 502-2371 today! poor to widen

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Kenwood Kerr, chief executive of Providence Advisors, said that the reforms urged in the NIB’s eighth actuarialreport were similar to what he and CFAL president, Anthony Ferguson, had urged back in a paper they wrote in 1993-1994. Yet it appears that only now is the Government acting, Algernon Cargill, NIB’s director, telling Tribune Business in an exclusive interview last week that some 25 amendments to the social security programme’s governing Act and regulations were being completed, with a view to tabling them in Parliament by year-end. Mr Kerr told Tribune Business: “To be quite frank with you, the sentiments, the conclusions being drawn in the [eighth actuarial report] are not a surprise to me. “As far back as 1993-1994, I co-authored a paper with Anthony Ferguson that called for all the things the actuarial report is calling for. The single m ost important issue back in 1993-1994, as it is today, was the long-term growth and sustainability of the fund. The liquidity to meet its obligations is critical. That, unfortunately, 15-16 years later, is the issue the sustainability of the Fund to meet its obligations.” Mr Ferguson, meanwhile, told Tribune Business: “The report made recommendations the industry has been stating since 1994. We’re happy to see they’re looking at addressing it, but it’s a bit late, and because it’s late it’s going t o cost employers and e mployees more to meet their n eeds. “The Government needs to act expeditiously, not only to implement those, but they need to reconsider some of the investment aspects of the fund. You can have all the money with custodians, but if they’re not meeting the actuary’s targeted investment rate, NIB will not be making enough money to cover costs.” M r Cargill last week confirmed that NIB had terminated investment management contracts with CFAL, Providence Advisors and RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust, which had been given a mandate to manage and invest up to $20 million of its assets. The decision was taken on the grounds that NIB would reduce costs by having its assets managed in-house by its own recently-hired Certified Financial Analyst (CFA but many believe this flies in the face of recommendations for the Fund to diversify its investments, place a greater proportion with qualified investment advisors, and invest more overseas. Meanwhile, Mr Kerr pointed to NIB’s “under investment”, and added: “NIB has a r ole to play in the developm ent of capital markets locall y, and I don’t think that’s been sufficiently exploited by the Fund.” Recalling the recommendations he and Mr Ferguson made in 1993-1994, Mr Kerr said they included ”curtailing using NIB as a hiring tool, strengthening collections so the benefits paid out are less than the monies they are collecting, to implement a prudent investment programme”. T he duo, he added, also urged the Government to increase NIB’s contribution rate and invest its assets globally through qualified, experienced money managers. “Underlying all that was the need to educate the population on savings and invest ments, and for NIB pensions to be seen as an option rather than see them as a replacement for retirement income,” Mr Kerr said. “It [an NIB pension] should be used as a supplement for retirement income. “We have no pensions and minimal savings, and that creates more of a burden and drain on NIB.” Without the Government making all the necessary reforms, Mr Kerr said there was a danger that the Fund would become insolvent. The social implications of t hat would be enormous,” he s aid. “People who have been contributing have been left without it, in the absence of private savings and private pensions. They would have nothing to rely on, and with the changing demographics the effects will be significant.” Mr Cargill last week said that among the approved amendments which will be included in the legislation and regulation changes to be pres ented to Parliament will be an increase in NIB’s insurable wage ceiling from the current $400 to $600 per week, with future annual increased linked to inflation via the retail price index. Other approved changes, said Mr Cargill, were an increase in the 150 weeks or three years’ worth of NIB contributions to qualify for a lifetime pension to 500 weeks or 10 years, plus an increase in the wage ceiling for pensionable civil servants that is currently frozen at $110 per week. Mr Cargill added: “What’s important is that we’ve started to address some of the issues identified in the reportoperational efficiency, collection efficiency. This year, we’re achieving contribution revenues above expectations a nd above last year, because w e’ve been a little more a ssertive to ensure people pay contributions on time. “We are focusing on the recommendations to ensure the Fund remains strong and sound. If we don’t make any changes by 2025, we will have challenges. We want to make changes as quickly as possible to make the Fund strong and sound.” NIB’s reserve fund, currently standing at $1.415 bill ion, was projected to be depleted some time between 2029 and 2035 if urgent reforms to the social security programme were not enacted. The NIB Fund’s outgoings projected to exceed income by $7.868 billion over the next 60 years. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Governments delay critical NIB reforms F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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the 3,500-acre former US Air Force Missile Base to the development was the only interest the Government hasin the project, apart from other logistical items. "We have been for the last couple of months seeking to conclude a new Heads of Agreement with the owner of the studio," said Mr Davis. " That process has not been a s swift as we would have liked, but we are still in that process of trying to review a draft Heads of Agreement." When Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham re-took office, he felt the Christie administration had allowed the Bahamas Film Studios to lease too much Crown Land, having obtained 3,500 acres at the former US Air Force Missile Base site in Grand Bahama. The Government had looked to restrict that to 120 acres, covering the water tank and existing buildings, and these talks with Mr Fuller have been going on for more than a year. Mr Davis said the Government had been vetting Mr Fuller to establish whether it wanted to do business with him, the investment banker having take ownership and control at the Bahamas Film Studios after two of its three founding partners died. The third, Paul Quigley, has also since passed away. Mr Davis said: "We want to see if he [Mr Fuller] is the proper person with which the Government should be doing business. "He came into ownership by default after the original owners died. He loaned them some money and was holding their assests at Gold Rock Creek Enterprises [the Film Studios’ immediate holding company]." I nvestment Mr Fuller recently told Tribune Business that a $17 million investment will be lost as a result of his decision to close the project, a move he blamed on the Government’s alleged “failure to honour its obligations” in delivering a new lease and Heads of Agreement to him. Amid calls for the Government to take “remedial” action to ensure the Bahamas Film Studios remained operational, given the impact the closure was likely to have on this nation’s attractiveness as a filming locale for the global TV/film industry, many observers were suspicious that Mr Fuller was using the ‘closure’ threat as a negotiating ploy in an effort to secure or better a deal with the Ingraham administration. When Tribune Business put this to Mr Fuller, that he was making this announcement as a tactic to push the Government into an agreement, he answered cryptically in an email: “You can’t push string.” When asked to detail the obligations the Government had allegedly failed to live up to, Mr Fuller replied: “Never delivering a new lease and Heads of Agreement. Failure to approve the original environmental study, which precluded us from moving forward.” S traw As for the ‘final straw’ that pushed him to shut down the Bahamas Film Studios, Mr Fuller said: “My 50th call to the Prime Minister’s Office inquiring if they had the paperwork that they kept promising on each of the other 49 calls.” He declined to comment when asked by Tribune Business about whether he would initiate legal action against the Bahamian government. Mr Fuller added that some $17 million had been invested in the Bahamas Film Studios project, “which will all be lost subject to any recovery efforts”. As for the closure’s impact on Grand Bahama and the wider Bahamas, he said: “There will never be a film studio in Grand Bahama. They will lose about $10 million per year in general spending in the economy, thousands of room nights in hotels. Grand Bahama will never be taken seriously as a site to film movies.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM N OTICE is hereby given that ANTHON GUILLAUME of LEWIS YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3 1st day of AUGUST, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.NOTICE Government assesses Film Studios principal F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net THE Comptroller of Customs has pledged that his department is not there to “stymie” business, and appealed to the private sector and public to assist in changing stigmas associated with doing business with it, following major changes to the way cargo is imported and released. Glenn Gomez did not deny claims of bad customer service and inefficiency at a meeting with Customs that was arranged by the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. Mr Gomez, along with other leading officers from the Customs Department, sought to clarify misconceptions and misunderstandings surrounding new Customs rules put in place earlier this year. This was done, he said, to correct a system that had been flawed for quite some time. The changes, which immediately affected the business of Bahamian courier services, came following a major shake-up of the Customs Department, which involved the former acting comptroller being replaced by Mr Gomez. During the meeting, concerned business owners and freight companies questioned Mr Gomez and his team about the new rules and offered suggestions as to how the department could become more customer friendly and conduct its business more quickly. Major concerns were long lines at the customer department because of a single window for two different procedures, and the long standing concern of "terrible" customer service at various customs desks throughout Nassau. Mr Gomez told anyone receiving below average service from any of his officers to get their names and report their complaints to the Customs department. The department has been considering the move to an online system, but its own website needs an upgrade anda separation from the Government website in order to handle the traffic it receives. A Courier Association formed since the implementation of the new rules was not out to the town meeting in force, but one courier said he was please with the earnest responses of the Customs department and clarification of new procedures. He said because it was the law, it has to be followed. Mr Gomez recently told Tribune Business that claims of delays and corruption in the department made by some business people were "gross misrepresentations”. He said the new processes put in place by the Customs D epartment since his arrival h ave always been the right p rocedures, but had not been enforced over decades. Mr Gomez admitted that the new process became a challenge for courier services during its initial implementation, but argued that some concerns brought to him by the newly-formed courier association were dealt with promptly. However, he said some other changes requested by the a ssociation would have r equired him to negate the procedures made to the clearing of imported goods. According to him, the new processes were introduced because government was los ing millions in revenue due to an erroneous system he said should have not been in place. "They want a system that is illegal to operate," Mr Gomez said. "If you're just upset because you can't circumvent the system, I can't help you with that. We are there to collect duties, not to stymie businesses." C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Customs: ‘We’re not attempting to stymie business’

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 73F/23C Low: 74F/23C Low: 75F/24C Low: 78F/26C Low: 76 F/24 C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 88F/31C High: 91F/33C High: 87 F/31 C High: 87 F/31 C High: 88F/31C High: 89 F/32C High: 90F/32C Low: 79F/26C High: 89F/32C Low: 80 F/27 C High: 88F/31C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 88 F/31 C Low: 76F/24C High: 88 F/31 Low: 76F/24C High: 86F/30C Low: 76 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 91F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 78F/26C High: 89F/32C High: 88 F/31 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 07 TH , 2009, PAGE 11C THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Variably cloudy with thunderstorms. Cloudy with a shower or t-storm. Mainly cloudy, t-storms; breezy. Clouds and sun, t-storms possible. Some sun with a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 High: 90 High: 89 High: 90 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Some sun with a t-storm possible. High: 90 Low: 79 Low: 79 Low: 78 AccuWeather RealFeel 105F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 83F 98-88F 98-85F 97-85F 100-89F Low: 79 TODAYTONIGHTTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................93F/34C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................88F/31C Normal low ........................................75F/24C Last year's high .................................. 90 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 74 F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.24" Year to date ................................................25.30" Normal year to date ....................................32.73" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Sep. 11 Sep. 18Sep. 26Oct. 4 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:53 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:22 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 8:58 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:26 a.m. Today Tuesday Wednesday Thursday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:02 a.m.3.13:46 a.m.0.2 10:22 p.m.2.74:20 p.m.0.4 10:42 a.m.3.14:22 a.m.0.2 11:02 p.m.2.65:03 p.m.0.4 11:26 a.m.3.15:02 a.m.0.3 11:47 p.m.2.55:52 p.m.0.5 12:17 p.m.3.15:47 a.m.0.3 -----6:48 p.m.0.6 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco88/3180/26t87/3079/26r Amsterdam67/1957/13sh76/2460/15pc Ankara, Turkey86/3054/12s81/2754/12pc Athens82/2766/18t75/2364/17pc Auckland61/1641/5s61/1643/6s Bangkok90/3279/26t91/3281/27t Barbados86/3077/25s86/3078/25s Barcelona82/2762/16s74/2362/16s Beijing68/2055/12sh77/2554/12pc Beirut88/3177/25s81/2775/23s Belgrade73/2251/10s71/2158/14pc Berlin69/2056/13s77/2561/16pc Bermuda80/2673/22sh80/2674/23c Bogota70/2143/6s68/2044/6sh Brussels72/2256/13sh79/2661/16pc Budapest74/2348/8s79/2656/13s Buenos Aires62/1643/6r55/1237/2pc Cairo95/3575/23s97/3674/23s Calcutta88/3179/26r90/3279/26t Calgary62/1643/6pc63/1737/2s Cancun92/3372/22sh91/3272/22sh Caracas83/2872/22t84/2872/22t Casablanca90/3270/21pc85/2974/23pc Copenhagen65/1856/13pc70/2161/16c Dublin64/1754/12pc66/1852/11sh Frankfurt73/2256/13sh81/2761/16pc Geneva 75/23 51/10 s 80/2652/11s Halifax 64/17 54/12 s 68/20 50/10 pc Havana 90/32 71/21 r 87/30 71/21 sh Helsinki 64/17 54/12sh64/1757/13pc Hong Kong 93/33 82/27 s 93/33 82/27s Islamabad 100/37 71/21 s 103/39 72/22 s Istanbul75/2368/20c75/2367/19t Jerusalem 83/28 64/17s82/2762/16s Johannesburg 78/2551/10s76/2450/10s Kingston 88/3179/26r88/3179/26r Lima72/2258/14s72/2259/15s London72/2257/13sh81/2759/15pc Madrid90/3264/17pc90/3266/18pc Manila82/2777/25r82/2777/25r Mexico City72/2254/12t72/2254/12t Monterrey94/3473/22t92/3373/22t Montreal75/2357/13s79/2657/13pc Moscow72/2256/13sh70/2157/13c Munich71/2149/9s73/2245/7s Nairobi85/2954/12c84/2855/12pc New Delhi 97/3677/25s93/3377/25pc Oslo61/1654/12r65/1853/11r Paris76/2458/14pc83/2865/18s Prague 72/22 52/11 s 73/22 49/9 s Rio de Janeiro90/3277/25c93/3376/24s Riyadh108/4284/28s108/4282/27s Rome 74/23 54/12 s 80/26 56/13 s St. Thomas90/3278/25sh88/3178/25sh San Juan60/1528/-2r54/1235/1c San Salvador 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 58/1436/2pc59/1534/1s Santo Domingo87/3074/23r85/2974/23sh Sao Paulo 83/28 68/20 t 85/29 64/17pc Seoul82/2763/17pc81/2761/16pc Stockholm 66/18 54/12 pc 68/20 54/12 pc Sydney 68/20 52/11 r68/2050/10pc Taipei91/3279/26s92/3379/26s T okyo 82/27 73/22 pc 81/27 72/22 sh T oronto 75/2357/13pc75/2357/13t Trinidad100/3771/21s98/3666/18c V ancouver 62/16 53/11 pc 63/1755/12pc Vienna 73/2255/12s73/2255/12s W arsaw 66/18 51/10 pc 70/21 49/9 s Winnipeg 82/27 63/17 pc 77/2553/11t H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles86F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles86F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles85F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles85F Today:SE at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles81F Tuesday:E at 5-10 Knots0-2 Feet7-10 Miles82F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque86/3062/16pc86/3062/16t Anchorage62/1650/10c59/1549/9r Atlanta84/2866/18pc85/2967/19pc Atlantic City73/2262/16c76/2463/17r Baltimore79/2662/16c79/2664/17c Boston72/2258/14pc79/2659/15pc Buffalo78/2559/15t78/2559/15t Charleston, SC86/3066/18r88/3168/20pc Chicago78/2556/13pc78/2556/13pc Cleveland78/2561/16t79/2660/15t Dallas96/3574/23pc96/3573/22pc Denver89/3156/13pc86/3054/12t Detroit75/2361/16t79/2662/16t Honolulu89/3175/23pc88/3174/23pc Houston91/3272/22pc93/3372/22pc HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayTuesday TodayTuesdayTodayTuesday Indianapolis80/2662/16t80/2662/16t Jacksonville87/3069/20t90/3271/21pc Kansas City82/2761/16pc84/2863/17pc Las Vegas99/3772/22s99/3775/23s Little Rock90/3269/20pc90/3268/20pc Los Angeles81/2764/17pc81/2764/17pc Louisville83/2865/18t85/2962/16t Memphis87/3068/20t90/3271/21pc Miami88/3176/24t89/3178/25t Minneapolis82/2760/15s82/2762/16pc Nashville84/2862/16t87/3063/17t New Orleans86/3074/23t88/3173/22t New York74/2367/19pc80/2668/20pc Oklahoma City90/3268/20s93/3366/18pc Orlando88/3173/22t90/3273/22t Philadelphia78/2563/17c79/2666/18r Phoenix 100/37 81/27 pc 100/3781/27pc Pittsburgh75/2358/14t80/2658/14t Portland, OR 70/2152/11pc78/2554/12s Raleigh-Durham 82/27 64/17 r 83/28 64/17 c St. Louis81/2767/19t85/2965/18pc Salt Lake City 87/30 58/14 pc 81/2756/13s San Antonio 94/34 74/23 s 94/34 73/22 pc San Diego74/2366/18pc75/2366/18pc San Francisco 72/22 54/12 pc 75/2357/13pc Seattle66/1850/10pc71/2152/11pc T allahassee 89/3168/20t91/3269/20t T ampa 91/32 74/23 t 91/32 75/23t Tucson93/3372/22pc95/3572/22t W ashington, DC 78/25 66/18c79/2664/17c UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com