Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

TINGS TOUGH
McDOUBLE
FOR $3.79

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LOW

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Volume: 105 No.277



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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE

USA TODAY



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

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Travolta retrial
may move to US

Attorney asks
for evidence to
be forwarded
to prosecutors
in America

EN UN

AFTERMATH



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

John Travolta’s attorney has
asked Bahamian authorities to
forward all of the evidence
from the attempted extortion
trial of Pleasant Bridgewater
and Tarino Lightbourne to
prosecutors in the United
States who will see if the case
could be retried there.

Michael Ossi, who also testi-
fied as a witness in the trial, for
which a mistrial verdict was
delivered on Wednesday
evening, told The Tribune that
Bahamian authorities have
agreed to preserve all of the
relevant evidence and the ques-
tion of where the re-trial will
occur is “in the hands of
Bahamian and US prosecu-
tors.”

A decision could be made
within weeks, he suggested.

A mistrial verdict was deliv-
ered and a retrial ordered by
Senior Justice Anita Allen in
the trial of Ms Bridgewater and
Mr Lightboure on Wednesday
after she announced that she
was “very concerned in the
interests of justice” following
an announcement at the PLP
convention by MP Picewell
Forbes that Ms Bridgewater
had been acquitted.

The exclamation by South
Andros representative, Mr
Forbes, came before the jury
had returned its verdict on the
five-week long trial. Justice
Allen said the turn of events
gave the impression that there
had been a communication
from the jury room.

The PLP issued an “unqual-
ified apology” for the statement
made by Mr Forbes, noting that
it was “incorrect” and “not
intended to interfere with the
administration of justice.”

That evening Mr Ossi wel-
comed the mistrial verdict given
the circumstances and noted

SEE page eight

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PICEWELL FORBES, who appeared at a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita Aleen, is pictured with

his attorney Wayne Munroe.
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

SOUTH Andros MP Picewell Forbes is
expected back before a judge next week to
explain why he should not be held in contempt of
court for an outburst at the PLP’s national con-
vention which led to a mistrial in the John Tra-
volta attempted extortion case.

Forbes appeared calm and composed as he
sat behind his team of attorneys in a courtroom
packed with PLP supporters and officials dur-
ing a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita
Allen yesterday. Attorney Wayne Munroe, who

along with Anthony McKinney and Alfred Sears
represents Forbes, told the judge that the MP
had been unable to instruct them on what the
precise allegations were to which he had to

answer.

Senior Justice Allen explained that the hear-
ing had come about as a result of an announce-
ment made at the political convention while the
jury was still deliberating. On Wednesday night,

Forbes took to the convention stage and told

BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS
BUT president withdrew ‘more than
$65,000 from pension fund account’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Union of
Teachers president Belinda
Wilson, who is accused of mis-
appropriating $90,000 of union
funds, withdrew more than
$65,000 from the union’s pen-
sion fund account to make
extraneous payments, the exec-
utive committee announced

yesterday.

Secretary general Stephen
McPhee explained in a press
conference at the union head-
quarters in Bethel Avenue,
New Providence, how the Pen-
sion Fund Account is exclu-
sively for the payment of mem-
bers’ pension benefits.

The president is not autho-
rised to remove funds from the
account for any other reason,
and is also prohibited from

delegates that former PLP senator Pleasant
Bridgewater had been acquitted of all charges in
the attempted extortion case. The judge said

SEE page eight

spending more than $2,500
without approval from the com-
mittee according to the union’s
constitution.

But Mrs Wilson transferred
$43,284 from the pension fund
and wrote cheques amounting
to $22,548.13 on July 21, tak-
ing a total of $65,832.13 from
the account without bringing it

SEE page eight



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SEE PAGE ELEVEN

Christie: I
will return
PLP to power



PHOTO: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
PLP LEADER Perry Christie rallies his troops last night.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REELECTED Progressive Liberal Party leader Perry
Christie instilled new hope in fervent party supporters as
he closed the 51st national party convention last night and
vowed to return the PLP to power.

Mr Christie said he was humbled by his overwhelming
win on Thursday and called for the party to remain uni-
fied at the end of a dramatic race for leadership positions.

To those who did not support Mr Christie, he said he
would prove himself worthy through a number of efforts
addressing social issues, economic strife and rising crime
in the country, promising not to make “the same mistakes

again”.

In an emotional address provoking response from the
crowd at every turn, Mr Christie said as leader he is com-

SEE page eight

NU CRC A A

GB teacher charged with
indecently assaulting student

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Grand
Bahama teacher was charged
at Freeport Magistrate Court
on Thursday with indecently
assaulting a female student.

Edward Buchanan, 56,
appeared in Court Three
before Deputy Chief Magis-
trate Helen Jones.

It is alleged that in Septem-
ber, 2008, Buchanan indecent-
ly assaulted a student while at

SEE page eight



NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

EDWARD BUCHANAN





PAGE 2, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

—— —_—_—a PLP CONVENTION COVERAGE

THE TRIBUNE



RRS CUE



PLP LEADER Perry Christie shakes Bradley Roberts’ hand.

‘I intend to dismantle FNM’

BY AVA TURNQUEST

PLP chairman-elect Bradley Roberts spoke
to a packed ballroom last night with support-
ers giving him immense energy as he rallied
them in his inaugural speech.

True to form, Mr Roberts opened by quip-
ping that he had been reliably informed Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and his colleagues
are extremely troubled over his return and
have already “begun to pack”.

Mr Roberts thanked his supporters pro-
fusely and pledged his steadfast commitment.
He reserved special mention for Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt, whom he commended on her
contributions to the party.

Commended

He also commended former chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin, who he defeated for
the post, acknowledging her achievements.

Mr Roberts said he wanted to see more
“young blood” in parliament and he assured
supporters that his team will ensure that “there
will be a wonderful mix of personalities, of
varying ages, gender and convictions.”

The outspoken former cabinet minister



made it clear he intends to “dismantle” the
FNM, which he described as uncaring, unre-
sponsive and incapable of tackling the issues
that plague the Bahamian people.

“T have come to bite, and bite hard,” he
said. Mr Roberts hit out at many FNM “fail-
ings” — including crime, national debt and the
management of utilities.

He charged that the government is waiting
for the resuscitation of the US economy and
that in 2007 the FNM “inherited an economy
that was booming and robust”.

“The state of the Bahamian economy is in a
greater state of decay than in 2002 and con-
tinues to worsen day by day,” he said.

The chairman elect advised party members
that their task will not be easy — largely
because of a biased press, which he feels
manipulates the minds of the Bahamian peo-
ple against the PLP.

“Fear not my fellow PLPs,” said Mr Roberts,
“with a renewed commitment to our purpose,
marching forward in unity, on one accord, we
will rescue our country yet again from an FNM
party which is all images and no substances.”

Mr Roberts speech ended with a tremen-
dous roar, with the entire room energised and
shouting: “We ready now, PLP, we ready
now!”




BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER - REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and
the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than

miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in
New Providence and the Family Islands
Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers

Prepares the Sales Budget

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing

software

Prepares monthly Board Reports

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of

Statistics

Provides statistical billing information for Family Island Managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in

the Family Islands

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required
during acquisition of new locations

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the
efficient operation of the department

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills

Ability to interpret financial reports

Good time management skills
Project Management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Baha-

mas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

N-7509 Nassau

Bahamas on or before: Tuesday, November 3, 2009.

PLP’S new firebrand
chairman blasts Govt
over eCOnomic woes

THE new chairman of the
PLP has hit the ground run-
ning in typical style, launching
a scathing attack on the gov-
erning FNM party.

Former cabinet minister
and notorious political fire-
brand Bradley Roberts blast-
ed the government for refus-
ing to accept any responsibil-
ity for “the worst recession in
the Bahamas since the Great
Depression”.

He said the FNM’s reluc-
tance to admit its policies
have contributed to the coun-
try’s economic Woes is evi-
dence that the party is unfit
for governance.

Mr Roberts said the
Bahamas enjoyed its greatest
level of capital inflow — in
excess of $2.5 billion — during
the PLP administration of
Perry Christie, during which
$5 billion worth of wealth was
created, annual household
income was substantially
increased, inflation was
reduced, unemployment
shrank, and economic growth
stood at 4.5 per cent.

“The record will show that
the financial crisis occurred
in August 2008, a full 15
months after the FNM came
to power. During that time,
Hubert Ingraham has man-
aged to drive away important
foreign investments with his
poor attitude and poor quali-
ty of governance, under-
pinned by his disastrous stop,
review, and cancel policy.

“The record clearly shows
that the policies of the FNM
brought a halt to the eco-
nomic momentum of the
country and the increased
prosperity of the Bahamian
people, resulting in an

Z



“The record
will show that
the financial cri-
sis occurred in
August 2008, a
full 15 months
after the FNM
came to power.”



increase in unemployment,
unsustainable borrowing, and
the misery index, while house-
hold income, government rev-
enue, and tourist arrivals
plummeted,” Mr Roberts
said.

“The Bahamian Dollar
Government Bond is now
under threat, as it was recent-
ly downgraded, and faces a
further downgrade if current
economic conditions do not
improve. We note that this
sorry state of affairs contin-
ues after the government has
added more than $1 billion to
the national debt and has to
borrow monthly to pay its
bills. The amount of this
monthly borrowing has not
been disclosed to the Bahami-
an people. Clearly the return
of Hubert Ingraham has been
disastrous for the well-being
of the Bahamian people,” Mr
Roberts said.

He added: “The collateral
damage to the social infra-
structure of our beloved coun-
try is incalculable as crime has
gone amuck; totally out of
control and the hapless FNM
government is paralysed to do
anything about it.”

iN

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Tae OTS
IPT i bs
UES A he
internal elections

PR Maas)

RESPONDING to the
FNWM’s criticism of the re-
election of Perry Christie
as PLP leader, new chair-
man Bradley Roberts told
the governing party to
take a look in the mirror.

The FNM issued a state-
ment yesterday calling Mr
Christie’s victory a victory
for the PLP old guard and
a blow to any serious
reform by those who rep-
resent “the worst days of
the Pindling era and the
more recent scandalous
past of the party.”




Reform

Hitting back, Mr
Roberts reminded the
FNM of their own failure
to implement reform
“when they brought back
a retired leader who
claimed he had no inter-
est in the job.”

He said Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s apathy
towards governance is evi-
dent in “the sorry perfor-
mance of the government
and the hopelessness,
despair and misery being
visited upon the people of
the Bahamas.”

“The PLP further
reminds the FNM of their
undemocratic practices
when Sir Arlington But-
ler, Maurice Moore,
Algernon Allen, Pierre
Dupuch, and Tennyson
Wells were unceremoni-
ously driven from the
FNM government because
they demonstrated their
democratic rights,” he
added.

Mr Roberts said the
PLP will not be distract-
ed “‘in its fight for the soul
and future security and
prosperity of the Bahami-
an people.”

CYNTHIA ‘Mother’ Pratt
HNO Ces SMS OLN AST IISR

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major
/Tribune staff



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3

ee PLP CONVENTION COVERAGE



FNM fires back at ‘Big Bad Brad’

Ruling party in scathing rebuttal of Bradley Roberts

WITH the election of Bradley “Big Bad
Brad” Roberts to the chairmanship of the
PLP, the party is clearly gearing up for a
fight. The FNM have not lost a second in
hitting back however — demonstrating that
the governing party is eager and willing to
trade blows.

Following Mr Roberts’ inaugural speech
(see page 2), the FNM immediately
launched a scathing rebuttal — the third
rapid response in three nights of PLP con-
vention speeches.

The FNM’s statement said: “PLP chair-
man Bradley Roberts’ rabid, belligerent
and arrogant convention speech is a return
to the politics the Bahamian people have
moved past. With his typical arrogance, he
likened himself to John the Baptist.

“Rather than preparing the way for gen-
uine deliverance from the problems of the
day, he is preparing the way for the old
guard of his party to return to office with
empty promises, greedy hands, personal
agendas and self-interest.”

The FNM said the country is now unsure

Cheers
waitin
‘Brave’
AAT

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net i

of who the real leader of the PLP is — since
Mr Roberts said that he was brought back
to deal with Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.

“Apparently, Mr Christie is not up to the
job,” the FNM observed.

“Mr Roberts has a long record of char-
acter assassination, but was an ineffective
minister in a government that made delay,
indecision and laziness into an art form.

Patronising

“Mr Roberts’ speech was patronising and
condescending to young Bahamians. After
overthrowing as chairman a second gener-
ation younger PLP woman, Mrs Glenys
Hanna-Martin, in order to re-establish the
control of the old guard, Mr Roberts then
went on to say that he was preparing a way
for young people in the PLP.

“Even as Mr Roberts said that ‘there is a



call these days for younger, fresher faces,’
his return represents stale ideas, old tricks
and a backwards mentality as regards the
new type of politics for which a younger
generation of Bahamians are asking,” the
FNM said.

The party also noted Mr Roberts’ state-
ment that he doesn’t simply want to win
an election, but also destroy and dismantle
the FNM.

“This is not the language that someone
committed to democracy and a healthy two-
party system would be using,” the FNM
said. “It seems that Mr Roberts is proposing
a one-party state in which the PLP has
absolute control. The Bahamian people
have rejected such a political culture before,
and will do so once again.

The FNM said it will welcome “those
PLPs and others who seek a party and a
government committed to a more open
democratic culture”.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

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Lier your @-card to reseewe tickets at 3A0-3549 or visit us at



AN EXUBERANT crowd
cheered on newly elected PLP
deputy leader Philip “Brave”
Davis as he stepped up to the
convention stage last night,
buoyant in his victory and filled
with enthusiasm for his new
post.

The MP for Cat Island, Rum
Cay and San Salvador
exclaimed that he will do every-
thing in his power to move the
party into government and
work in a government of action.

The new deputy leader led
an ardent campaign driven by a
team of tenacious young
Bahamians and seasoned politi-
cians to ensure he would secure
the position above contenders
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and
West End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe.

Mr Davis won around 760
votes, while Mr Wilchcombe
won 400 and Senator Fitzgerald
won 200, and in the same way
Mr Davis intends to ensure the
PLP wins the government in
the 2012 general election. Bow-
ing to former deputy leader
Cynthia “Mother” Pratt, who
held the position for 12 years
and was the country's first
female deputy prime minister,
Mr Davis paid credit to the par-
ty's rich history before he
expounding his vision for the
way forward.

Mr Davis exclaimed: “The
Bahamas is moving in the
wrong direction! Education is
in crisis! There is a serious lack
of economic activity and the
fear of crime is paralysing our
nation!

“The problems of this coun-

‘Halloween’ Craft Cue

try loom large on the horizon
and so while the celebration
that will invariably and
deservedly follow in the next
day or two have their place, we
must remember that our mis-
sion is to change the Bahamas.

“There is much work to do,
but together we can do it,
because we have done it
before.”

Mr Davis vowed to change
the Bahamas for the better by
tackling crime through revision
of the penal code to ensure
there are stiff penalties to deter
offenders.

Social

He also committed to
expanding social programmes
such as Urban Renewal to help
young people in inner city com-
munities, and to raise funding
for causes such as the National
Youth Programme, and estab-
lish more rehabilitation pro-
grammes for juvenile offend-
ers.

Mr Davis said there needs
to be a scientific approach to
fighting crime with new tech-
nologies and innovative strate-
gies.

He said: “We cannot afford
to lose another soul to sense-
less violence.

“The youth of our nation are
calling on the PLP to rescue
them from the hands of this
uncaring FNM government.”

The new deputy leader crit-
icised the FNM for spending $6
million to host the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant, and borrowing

$160 million to pave roads using
only two companies, one of
which is from Argentina.

And he attacked the gov-
ernment for taking police offi-
cers out of violent schools, and
failing to raise the standards of
education from a national “D”
average. The next PLP gov-
ernment will implement an
aggressive programme to
recruit quality teachers and
develop an education system
relevant to the needs of the
economy and the workplace,
Mr Davis said.

As he closed his speech at

Name:

Wyndham Nassau Resort last
night, the new PLP deputy Age:
leader said: “Even a blind man Tel:

can see the FNM is clueless, but -
I am concerned about providing Mobite:
a blueprint for the future. “I Email:

am prepared to make the tough

decisions to do what is neces- Tee ee

sary to rescue the Bahamian
people from the hell they are
catching every day under this
government. Bahamas, join us oMUET BESS
as we take the fight to the
streets in every community!
This is time for work!

“If we can come together as
one body, one voice, no one

$7

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The buck stops in the Oval Office

WASHINGTON —President Obama’s
leadership is being tested on two historic
fronts: health care reform and U.S.
involvement in Afghanistan.

By the time he has made decisions on
these two titanic issues, we will know
whether he has the courage to make tough
calls and we will know more about his
bottom-line principles.

On health care, Obama thought he had
learned lessons from 1993 when Hillary
Clinton, then the first lady, was put in
charge of developing a universal health
plan when her husband was president.

She flunked partly because she did not
touch base with Congress. She didn’t let
the lawmakers in on the takeoff as well as
the landing, as President Lyndon B. John-
son would put it. The result: Congress
wasn’t there for the landing.

This time around, Obama has gone
overboard to win congressional approval
of legislation that has little meaning with-
out a government-sponsored health-insur-
ance program. But his efforts raise ques-
tions of whether he is trying to appease the
opposition at any price and whether he
is willing to fight for a government-run
health insurance program.

Obama should listen to the people who
have voiced their opinions about health
reform. A new Washington Post-ABC
News poll shows a majority favors a gov-
ernment health insurance plan. The pres-
ident and wavering congressional Democ-
rats should heed that view.

The Republicans in the Senate are solid-
ly against the reform plan, except for Sen.
Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, who played
hard to get and seemed to love the atten-
tion and tension she created over her Sen-
ate Finance Committee vote — which
ended up being a “yes.” Now she’s back
playing games again and says she is unsure
how she will vote when the Senate takes
up its final bill.

Obama has tried too hard to woo the so-
called “blue dog” conservative Democ-
rats — who seem to be Republicans at
heart. They are obstructionists when it
comes to health reform and appear eager
to follow the bidding of the health insur-
ance industry.

It’s hard to think that other presidents
— Harry S Truman and the two Roo-
sevelts come to mind — would not have
loudly rebuked the Republican “pluto-
crats” for blocking the vital health plans
being debated.

Package includes:
*Soeaic round-trip boat ride
"Beauillul Pristine Beaches

The president’s other test of leadership
is Afghanistan where he is considering a
request for 40,000 more troops. Any esca-
lation in that rugged primitive land would
be reminiscent of the Vietnam War and
Gen. William Westmoreland’s bids for
more and more men. We know how that
turned out.

Obama has made it clear that he is not
going to be rushed. Perhaps the presiden-
tial caution has been inspired by the U.S.
experience in Iraq, a war that should nev-
er have happened in the first place. It’s
pretty amazing that we still don’t know
the motives of the Bush administration
for pushing, pushing, pushing for an inva-
sion that turned out to be tragically wrong.
The folly of that war and the sacrifices by
Americans and Iragis are beyond painful
to contemplate.

War is too important to be left to the
generals — much as presidents would like
to pass the buck and rely on decisions by
the “commanders on the ground,” as the
civilians like to put it.

But that’s not the way it works in a
democracy.

The buck stops with the president who
has been bombarded with advice in the
last several weeks.

For all that, he would do better if he
reads up on White House decision-making
involving the last few wars, especially Viet-
nam.

Bob Woodward, the Washington Post
reporter, recently described a 2007 inter-
view with Robert S$. McNamara, secre-
tary of defense during the 1960s Vietnam
troop surge.

McNamara told Woodward that LBJ
had ordered U.S. escalation in Vietnam
because the president was very nervous
about political criticism from conserva-
tives eager to accuse him of being soft on
North Vietnam.

So Johnson went along with requests
from “commanders on the ground” — in
this case, Westmoreland — for more
American troops. The result was deeper
U.S. commitment in a war we could never
win.

There’s a lesson there for President
Obama: He should map the way forward
in Afghanistan without worrying about
his conservative critics.

This article is by Helen Thomas (New
York Times News Service clients.)
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers



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Our social
health depends
on culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thomas Carlyle, a great
thinker and writer, employs
the physician’s aphorism
“the healthy knows not of
their health, but only the
sick” in his work ‘Charac-
teristics’. Without ponder,
this application of such a
wide embrace penetrates to
the heart of our nation’s
dilemma.

We in the Bahamas know
we are not well, we know
we are in serious trouble —
a crime epidemic, moral
dilapidation, family disinte-
gration, religious divisive-
ness, a disheveled judiciary,
education and healthcare
meltdowns — yet seem to
be trifling in the face of
great lament.

Culture, on the other
hand, enshrines the pream-
ble to life; it inhabits the
breath of creation; it gleams
in the first words spoken
into light.

Though some may deval-
ue our ancestry while oth-
ers disclaim it, culture
remains the gallant defend-
er of “the true art of living”;
finding its character and
voice with or without snob-
bish elitists and misguided
grassroots.

Upon what model of
progress have our social
instinct been developed; to
what extent have the scope

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



of national advancement
aimed to target untapped
natural treasure within the
individual; from what do we
derive drive and momen-
tum?

This sixth letter appeals
to the sixth sense of a people
seeming to flirt with disas-
ter, to grasp the last glim-
mer of hope and reason,
before the sun sets ona
nation ignominiously bank-
rupted by its arrogance.

As with ‘Les Fleurs du
Mal’ by Charles Baudelaire,
God forbid, the repugnant
illnesses of society take root
in the garden of our hearts.

This country grieves for
its younger minds that, pre-
dominantly, are being
addled by a crude form of
atrophy, in the 242; enticed
into the recesses of an illu-
sive domain where their
souls languish in a stupor of
illiteracy.

The ethos of the Bahami-
an has been seductively infil-
trated, its strain diluted by
subversive ideologies and
trends, now it is quite
unclear who or what bears
the original seal.

Tourism, our sterling pro-
tégé, speaks and augurs well

but departure polls reflect
an opposite view, when per-
ceived expectation is
matched versus product
affirmation. A cultural
revival will bring redemp-
tion and salvation to a beau-
tiful, but besieged people.

Sadly, at the core of this
turmoil is a malignant
tumour within an apathetic,
unproductive civil and pub-
lic service that needs a trans-
fusion to purge rampant cor-
ruption; but who dares to
reprimand a few for the sake
of many.

This country desperately
needs vindication, but is
constrained by its dire nar-
row-minded complex and
continues to see life through
strabismic lens.

Are we as a nation
likened to a man in a small
boat with side-oars, while
sitting therein he rows in
one direction but is facing,
looking the opposite way.

Culture is remedy to the
intricate problems within the
problem; it is with this bless-
ing that all peoples heal
wounded spirits and mend
broken dreams. The uni-
verse cannot contain oceans
of words destined to flow.
Until next time,

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
October 24, 2009.

Saddened no end to learn of
passing of Mr Roger Carron

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It saddened me no end to learn of the
death of Mr Roger Carron, a perfect gen-
tleman.

Although as a student of journalism I sat
at the feet of his wife, Mrs Eileen Dupuch-
Carron, Publisher/Editor of The Tribune,
it was Mr Carron who, during my forma-
tive years as a sports reporter ensured that I
was well grounded in what it takes to survive
in this very challenging profession.

With much patience, and gentleness, and
kindness, and goodness, and faithfulness,

taught me, I taught others.

Whenever new staff joined the newsroom
at The Tribune, Mrs Carron sent them to me
to take through the ropes.

As Mr Carron was to me, I was to them.
And in that way, many young Bahamians
who passed through The Tribune have ben-
efited.

No longer than the other day a young
man stopped to say how appreciative he
was of those days at The Tribune.

Even today I continue to share with others
in the Roger Carron tradition.

To Mrs Carron, on behalf of my family, I

and joy, and yet brooking no nonsense, he
taught me much of what I know so that
today I am the Bahamas’ best, well-rounded
journalist since Independence.

Mr Carron may have left this plane of
existence but, bloody hell, he will forever be
remembered in our hearts because what he

Robert.

Nassau,

October, 2009

say thank you, we love you, we appreciate
everything, and we too grieve with you and

GLADSTONE THURSTON

Shameful testament to changes in our society

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Manners, respect and com-
mon courtesy are as scarce,
in The Bahamas, as oil!

This is a shameful testa-
ment to the changes in our
society, but it is also not sur-
prising. Traditions such as
greeting fellow passers-by or
giving a general greeting
when entering a public area,
such as a waiting room, are
witnessed less and less fre-
quently. Small children of the
nursery and primary school
age still seem to be trained to
do such things, but as they
grow older and into adult-
hood, these courtesies seem
to be left by the wayside.

Giving up your seats in the
bus to elderly or handicapped
persons; helping someone
across the street; basic tele-
phone etiquette; there are
many other instances where
behaviours that were once the
norm in our society have gone
the route of the dinosaur. It is
said to “train up a child in the
way he should go and when
he is old he will not depart
from it”, but either we are not
training our children correct-

ly, or we stop training them
too soon.

Another saying that comes
to mind is “you can’t teach an
old dog new tricks” and per-
haps that is the dilemma that
we are currently facing.

While one might be able to
change an attitude, there must
be an existing foundation to
build on. Courtesy is so much
a part of an individual’s per-
sonality that it really is quite
difficult to effect any real
change if the basic manners
just aren’t there.

Employers have a hard task
then if they are expected to
take an adult — whose per-
sonality is essentially fully
developed — and through the
occasional seminar or train-
ing workshop, mould them
into a polite employee.

If someone doesn’t see the
need to even say “good morn-
ing” to members of their own
household, how then can they
be expected to provide cour-
teous service to a complete
stranger?

If we want to successfully
tackle the growing lack of
courtesy in our society, I will
like to suggest that a new sub-

aU) Ree lenalas

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, Deron Alexander
Mcintosh intend to change my name to Deron Alexander
Bell. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.



ject be introduced in the
school curriculum entitled
“Manners and Behaviour” to
be taught at the elementary
level.

This can take the form of
printed booklets for distribu-
tion to the primary schools.
This I believe will go a long
way in encouraging better
behaviour, good values, and
improved self-esteem in our
children.

Many will disagree with me,
thinking that it is the parents
who should teach manners
and values at home.

Sadly, many of these par-
ents themselves are lacking in
these traits and they cannot
teach what they do not know.
Many parents, however, will
benefit if this subject is taught
to their children at school.

Things like road rage,
swearing, disrespectful behav-
iour, improper use of cell
phones and violence are all
as a result of ignorance.

Many educated persons do
not know the value of an
apology, “please” and “thank
you” simply because they
were not taught this.

This initiative will certainly
bring about better
student/teacher relationships
and will ease the stress of
teaching and parenting.

Also, the children will feel
encouraged each time they
are praised for good behav-
iour and good manners and
this will benefit every area of
their lives right through to
adulthood.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
October 18, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

har RATT)




TT OTC

FNM youth arm lashes out

THE youth arm of the FNM has criticised the PLP for fail-
ing to promote younger members.

According to a statement released by the FNM Torchbear-
ers, the PLP’s Progressive Young Liberals are justified in
pleading for more of a say in the affairs of their party.

“Tn its history not one Young Liberal has been a candidate for
that party,” the youth branch noted. “To date, the Free Nation-
al Movement has had at least seven torchbearers serve in par-
liament and in the Cabinet of the Bahamas, including Carl
Bethel, Tommy Turnquest, Dion Foulkes, Kwasi Thompson,
Kendal Wright, and David Thompson.”

During the PLP convention this week, the Young Liberals
complained about the “D” national grade average, but the
Torchbearers noted that during its time in office, the PLP did
not build a single new school.

“They sent the education administration into disarray by
politicising the Department of Education, by sidelining the
director of education and by having a minister of education who
could not focus on education because he was a part-time min-
ister of education,” the statement said.

It continued: “The president of the Young Liberals was also
misinformed on a number of other issues. He said Urban
Renewal was abandoned and that the Youth Service Pro-
gramme was abandoned. This is untrue. Urban Renewal con-
tinues with a more refined focus, more targeted programmes
and better use of government resources. The National Youth
Service Pilot programme is being better structured for greater
results for the young people of the Bahamas.

“The president of the Young Liberals might wish to know
that while his party talks about young people, the FNM acts for
young people. The FNM increased scholarships from $400,000
under the PLP to $6 million; substantially increased the Ministry
of Youth’s budget; and established the only new programmes
established in the last 20 years, including the Fresh Start Youth
Employment Programme, the Self Starter Programme and the
Youth Enterprise Project.

“In 2006 the PLP granted 21 scholarships. In 2007 the FNM
gave 157 scholarships and national scholarship grants of up to
$10,000 each. In 2008 that number was 153 and in 2009 it is 229.”

The Torchbearers went on to crtitcise the statements of for-
mer deputy leader of the PLP Cynthia “Mother” Pratt.

Noting that Mrs Pratt said far too many Bahamians misun-
derstood and did not appreciate the PLP, the statement said:
“Unfortunately Mother Pratt refuses to accept that the Bahami-
an people became disillusioned with the ineffectual leader-
ship and the personal and public failings of various PLP mem-
bers of parliament and ministers.

“Tt was the PLP who misunderstood the high expectations of
the Bahamian people. It was the PLP who did not appreciate
the faith that the Bahamian people placed in them in 2002 -a
trust they squandered,” it said.

HAVING BAGS OF FUN

e

POLITICS wasn't the only thing on display ..
plenty of interest.





. these bags provoked

=

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5

TUR ADO

PLP DELEGA
the PLP at the convention.



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Shadow Minister points finger over rising crime, school violence

Govt under fire for ‘stop,

THE “stop, review and can-
cel” policy of the current gov-
ernment has led to rising crime,
school violence and an over-
dependence on social services,
the shadow minister of social
services claimed.

Melanie Griffin, MP for
Yamacraw, said the policy of
stopping projects initiated
under the former PLP govern-
ment for review has led to work
being halted on the Urban
Renewal programme, school
policing, the National Youth
Service and social safety net
reform programmes.

Speaking at the party’s 51st
PLP National Convention on
Thursday night, she said all
social and youth help services
created under the PLP must be
re-established if the country is
to work towards a secure
future.

Mrs Griffin further charged
that “we need to establish a
social policy plan which would
include the re-introduction of
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme in its former structure,
making any adjustments
required for better operation.”

“The political manager must
also be replaced with a person
who has not been in front-line
politics for any party,” said the
MP.

The Bahamas has seen “a
staggering rise in the level of
crime among our young men
and violent crime in general,
persistent poverty among chil-
dren, the aged and the disabled,
low academic achievement,

migration and statelessness,
HIV prevalence and domestic
violence and child abuse,” she
said.

In response, Minister of State
for Social Development Loret-
ta Butler Turner accused Ms
Griffin of “regurgitating the
same old broken record”, and
charged that the Urban Renew-
al Programme is alive and well.

She said she “doesn’t know
what planet the PLP is living
on”, adding that the govern-
ment recently tabled in parlia-
ment two annual reports on the
programme.

Aggressive

Addressing delegates at the
convention, Ms Griffin claimed
that when the PLP came to
power in 2002, it “promptly
embarked on a very aggressive
social and economic pro-
gramme designed to alleviate
pain and suffering and to break
the cycle of poverty.”

The MP said that the PLP
implemented immediate and
longer term responses as part of
this programme.

She suggested the present
government has allowed suc-
cessful efforts made under the
former PLP administration to
alleviate poverty, crime and
violence to fall by the wayside
with troubling consequences.

Mrs Griffin claims the gov-
ernment does not have the best
interests of the poor at heart
and is reacting to their needs
in an “ad hoc, knee jerk” way.

Sue

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Ms Butler Turner, however,
pointed out that “most people
realise” many of the social woes
facing this country are symp-
toms of a global economic
downturn.

She said the Department of
Social Services, the Ministry of
Education and other branches
of government have imple-
mented numerous programmes
to ease the hardship being felt
by many, adding that if the PLP
would simply “stop regurgitat-
ing a broken record and look
at what we are doing” they



Meigen? review and cancel’ polic
UU

would see that the government
is in fact “trailblazing” when it
comes to initiatives to improve
social conditions.

idle le
ase

EERE
aca

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Construction of New Passanger Screening Facility
Prince George Wharf, Down Town, Nassau
Pre-Quaufication of Contractors

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
through the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is
inviting qualified General Contractors to participate in a
Pre-qualification for the Tender for the construction of a
Passenger Screening Facility at Prince George Wharf,

Down Town, Nassau.

The structure will be of conventional construction,
approximately 2,200 sq. ft., and with associated external

works and services.

The General Contractor will be required to provide a
detailed indication of their competence, both technically
and financially, to carry out the intended scope of works

within a short time frame.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Thursday, 22nd October, 2009, between

the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax: (242) 326-7907

The completed pre-qualification document should be
deposited in the Tender Box at Office of the Director of
Public Works, Ministry of Works & Transport, 3rd Floor,
John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas not
later than 12:00 noon on Thursday, 29th October, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all

pre-qualification contractors.

Signed

Nicole Campbell (Mrs.)
Acting Permanent Secretary



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PAGE 8, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Picewell Forbes
FROM page one

she did not think that the com-
plaint required an investigation
into whether the discharge of
the jury was proper but
whether Forbes’ announcement
posed a real risk of prejudice
to the administration of justice.
Mr Munroe then said he, Mr
McKinney and Mr Sears would
require more time to consider
the complaint.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner did not
object to the application for
more time. The hearing was
adjourned to next Thursday at
10am.

While Forbes declined to
speak to reporters outside the
courtroom yesterday, Mr McK-
inney said: “We will take what-
ever steps are necessary to con-
vince the judge that there was
no interference by our client
with the trial or in any way with
the procedures that were
required to be followed by any-
body, including Mr Forbes.”

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner told
reporters: “The judge has sent
for Mr Forbes. The Crown
doesn’t have a position in this
matter. We are present but we
will see what the judges’ posi-
tion is.”

He said the Crown has not yet
considered when a retrial in the
attempted extortion case will
be held. The nine-member
jury in the attempted extortion
trial of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer Grand Bahama ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne was
discharged at 10.54pm Wednes-
day although they had not
reached a verdict.

Senior Justice Allen told
jurors there had been
announcement at a political
convention by a senior official,
indicating that one of the
accused persons had been
acquitted. Earlier, around
9.30pm, Mr Forbes took to the
convention stage, while the jury
was still deliberating, and told
delegates that Bridgewater had
been acquitted. He exclaimed:
“Pleasant is a free woman,
PLPs! God is good, PLPs!
Pleasant is a free woman! God
still reigns, PLPs!”

No verdict had been reached
yet convention members cele-
brated Bridgewater's supposed
vindication by singing and
dancing to "Oh Happy Day.”
The session chairman later had
to apologise for whatever con-
fusion the MP's pronounce-
ment caused. Bridgewater
and Lightbourne are accused
of attempting to extort, and
conspiring to extort $25 million
from American actor John Tra-
volta between January 2 and
20 by means of a threat. They
deny the charges.











Aus

FROM page one

that he and the Travoltas are
committed to seeing a retrial
through.

Yesterday, Mr Ossi said:
“Jeopardy has not been
attached, so you can try the
case again.

“We want the evidence pre-
served for the next trial,
whether it be in The Bahamas
or U.S.”

Mr Ossi suggested that
because one of the alleged
extortion phone calls was made
from The Bahamas to the US
that Florida could have juris-
diction over the matter. He said
he has also run the evidence
past “an expert” who has
informed him that there is a

FROM page one

to the attention of the commit-
tee in a meeting held the day
before.

The union president claims
she had to hurriedly pay utility
bills and withdraw funds to pay
for seven committee members
to attend a Caribbean Union
of Teachers conference in
Grenada before leaving on the
trip, but Mr McPhee said there
can be no justification for with-
drawing funds from the account
for any reason other than mak-
ing pension payments.

He said the committee was
shocked to discover last week
that the money had been taken
wrongfully and without author-
ity.

The majority of members
voted to suspend her for two
weeks without pay for the
unauthorised use of money
from the Pension Fund
Account from November 1, in a
meeting chaired by Mrs Wilson
on October 16.

Mr McPhee said Mrs
Wilson’s behaviour was “the
last straw” as the president
elected in June 2008 had been
issued a letter of reprimand in
October last year.

He said: “It should be crystal
clear that generally only the
executive committee can autho-
rise an extraordinary expendi-
ture of $65,832.13, but it has
not authority to use pension
funds for any other purpose
than to pay pension benefits.

“The president has demon-
strated a terrible habit of show-
ing contempt for the constitu-
tional authority of the execu-
tive committee and has demon-
strated an appetite for operat-
ing above the rules and regu-
lations of this august body since
she was elected to office.

“The executive committee
warned her about this on a
number of occasions. This latest
breach of established BUT pro-
tocols was the last straw.”

Mr McPhee said the com-
mittee will meet this morning to

too hard
‘wll

for God














NO ILLNESS IS
TOO DIFFICULT

BEHOLD, | AM THE LORD, THE GOO.0F ALL FLESH:




i IS THERE AL

TOO HARD FOR Mes Jeremiah 32:27

Comel Join us this sunday as we come together
—— |
and explore & meet the God who heals




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* Youth Ministry Meeting
(Grades 7-12)

RADIO MINISTRY on Sundays of 8:30 a.m. -ZNS 4 - TEMPLE TIME
Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

VE Um eed mea
Oe Rs RPC ra gE
SM ae geben

Travolta retrial

good basis for the trial to take
place in the U.S. Nonetheless,
he emphasised that ultimately
he and his client have no pref-
erence over where the a retrial
is held, so long as it is a “fair tri-
al with an impartial jury.”

“T am just trying to protect
the interests of Mr Travolta,”
said the attorney. “We want to
preserve our options.”

If the trial were to take place
in Florida, defendants, Ms
Bridgewater and Mr Light-
bourne, would have to be extra-
dited to the US if they did not
go voluntarily.

Yesterday, lawyer for Ms
Bridgewater, Murio Ducille,
called the suggestion that the
US. could host the trial “non-
sense and stupidness.”

Revealing that he had “heard
as a rumour” that steps had
been taken by Mr Ossi to see
whether the trial could take
place abroad, Mr Ducille
denied that there would be any
basis for this to happen.

“Certainly my client didn’t
make any calls (to the U.S.).
This is the point i’ve made
throughout — no calls emanat-
ed from them,” he said.

BUT president

discuss how to replace the miss-
ing pension funds.

He said there was never any
allegation of the misappropria-
tion of funds, and specifically
of $90,000, as reported in
national media on Monday, and
that the committee sought to
inform union members of the
suspension before calling a
press conference yesterday.

However Mrs Wilson had
called a press conference on
Monday to publicly defend her
name by admitting she had fol-
lowed wrong process but not
misappropriated funds.

Teachers and union mem-
bers supporting Mrs Wilson
attended Monday’s meeting
spoke out about how this is the
wrong time to suspend the pres-
ident as hundreds of teachers
recently took part in industrial
action over teaching conditions
in government schools.

But Mr McPhee told teach-
ers the committee had no
choice.

He said: “I would like to
know what is a good time to
suspend the president? There’s
never a good time to suspend
the president.

“This executive committee
of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers does not take lightly
the consequences of suspend-
ing the president, however the
executive committee does not
have the authority to disregard
the rules of the handbook.”

He further alluded to Mrs

Wilson’s disregard for the BUT
rulebook by drawing attention
to the fact she had threatened
to file complaints with national
and international bodies includ-
ing Education International and
the ILO over outstanding griev-
ances with the employer.

Mr McPhee said: “The mat-
ter has never been on the agen-
da of any executive committee
meetings.

“This is just another exam-
ple of the level of contempt this
president continues to show for
the rules and legitimate author-
ity of the executive committee.”

The union’s supreme author-
ity is vested in the Annual Gen-
eral Meeting (AGM) of mem-
bers and is then governed by
the executive committee.

Mr McPhee encouraged
members to uphold the union’s
constitution yesterday.

He said: “We caution BUT
members to consult the consti-
tution and governance manual
and become seized in the rules
and regulations of our union
before allowing themselves to
be used by special interest in a
dangerous game of politics.

“We also ask members to
discern and understand the dif-
ference between the politics of
individuals and the require-
ments of our great union as out-
lined in its constitution and gov-
ernance manual. Unite and
build.”

Teacher charged

FROM page one

school.

Buchanan, a teacher employed at the Eight Mile Rock High
School, was removed in March following complaints of alleged

sexual molestation.

Attorney Calvin Seymour represented Buchanan at his
arraignment. He was not required to enter a plea to a charge of
indecent assault and was granted $5,000 bail with one surety.

The matter was adjourned to February 25, 2010, for contin-
uation in the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Sunday Schock iam
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:
sunday Spm =
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
Nlam & foUpm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 * Box Wedae |

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS © Tal: d25-2021

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25TH, 2009

LS Speaker

Elder Brentford Isaacs
October [s Missions Month At Central

Bitte Clase: 44 a.m. * Hires

of Bread Service: 10-15 zm.

+ Gommunity Gutreaoh: 17:30 rh + Evening Sarioe: 7:00 pum
* Meiweest Service To pom, [Wednegieye)
* Saotors’ Proyee Mooting: 10000 om. Gnd Thursday of each mowth)

Grace and eri Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth America

ERE Od tS ALGAE DAA DOB ER

Worship Time: f] am.

Prayer Tune: 10:1 5a.m

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twrnam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS8.4641
Telephone number: 324-2558
Telefax number: 324-2587

J1FO)



Christie: I
will return
PLP to power

IMPASSIONED: Perry Christie last night.



FROM page one

mitted to helping those in need. Dubbing the PLP the “party of
heart”, Mr Christie inspired applause and cheers as he said: “What-
ever my faults may be, there’s one thing you know about me; I feel
for people.

"I feel for people deep in my heart and in my soul and it is
that feeling, that compassion, that provides the fuel, the energy, the
vigour and the drive for my life in politics.”

He attacked the FNM government for failing to take bold and
imaginative action to address the needs of the people in a fallen
economy, which had been left in tact by the PLP in 2007.

He said: “We are the party of heart, not the party of market
forces. We don’t shrug our shoulders when market forces bring
about the loss of thousands of jobs.

“While people lose their jobs and can’t afford to put food on the
table, this government just shrugs its shoulders and leaves them on
their own. How can any government be so blind, so deaf, so uncar-
ing, so lacking in compassion, so clueless as the FNM govern-
ment we have today?”

He criticised the government for not proactively putting infra-
structure in place to reduce rising crime.

Mr Christie called on FNM to bring back the Urban Renewal
Programme, introduce 24-hour mobile police patrol, and bring
surveillance and crime detection technology up to date.

Government should also address the backlog of criminal cases
by holding night court, he said, adding that a witness protection pro-
gramme that complies with world standards is necessary for the
Bahamas. Mr Christie re-iterated his firm belief in the death
penalty for convicted murderers, a statement met with applause
from his supporters, and demanded the government restrict the
granting of bail in capital cases.

As he drew a close to the three-day convention, Mr Christie
encouraged unity within the party to strengthen the PLP for a
rise to power. He said: “There is so much unfinished work that
awaits us. Let us therefore bind ourselves in unity so when the day
of our return to power dawns before us, we will find ourselves
ready; ready to resume the march of the Bahamian nation to a bet-
ter and brighter tomorrow for all its people.”

Moments after Mr Christie finished speaking, the FNM issued a
response, saying the opposition leader had merely reiterated
promises he failed to keep when in office.

“Now he is promising more of the same: more speechmaking,
more indecision and more of the same old guard,” the FNM said.
“Mr Christie led the efforts by the PLP old guard, which failed the
country so miserably in the past, to entrench their position in the
party, sweeping aside any reformers in his party and cancelling the
involvement of a younger generation to participate in its senior
ranks. He is now in lock step with Bradley Roberts, whom he
called back to duty as his personal attack machine. As usual, Mr
Christie’s speech was long on flowery rhetoric and short on detailed
solutions to pressing issues.

“While Mr Christie talked endlessly about his heart, the Bahami-
an people doubt and rendered a verdict in the last election on Mr
Christie’s ability to get anything done, to effectively lead and dis-
cipline his colleagues, and to replace a late-again culture with
timely decision-making.”

The FNM went on to criticse Mr Christie’s suggestion that
Urban Renewal was scrapped, saying the programme is alive and
flourishing. The party also denied the PLP leader’s claim that
Prime Minister Ingraham has not gone before the Bahamian peo-
ple to speak on the challenges of the day, saying he has done so “on
countless occasions”.

“But unlike Mr Christie, who is thrilled by the sound of his
own rhetoric, the prime minister has also acted decisively, includ-
ing the initiation of landmark social programmes the PLP failed to
put in place in better economic times. Mr Christie and others in the
party are talking as if there is a global economic crisis in every coun-
try in the world, except in the Bahamas. Because they can’t talk
economic reality and sense now, they cannot be allowed to once
again be charged with the country’s economic stewardship,” he said.

Grant's Town Wesler Methodist Church
[Hatiou bil Ric & Ltapeel Satreet) FPL ieee (1-1 ati
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(ww w.giwesle yor)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25TH, 2009

7:00 a.m, Bro. Jamicko Forda/Rey. Carla Culmer
11:00 a.m. Women's Fellowship Anniversary
7:00 pm. Women's Fellowship

ee Ge em eee










LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



The Bahamas welcomes
13th US Ambassador





GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna, right, accepts Letters of Credence from Nicole Avant, the new!

Ambassador of the United States to the Bahamas.

THE Bahamas has wel-
comed the 13th Ambassador of
the United States of America.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from Nicole Avant, 41,
during a ceremony at Govern-
ment House on Thursday. He
also accepted Letters of Recall
of former ambassador Ned
Seigel.

Ambassador Avant also paid
courtesy calls on Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham and
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette.

The Bahamas and United
States established relations on
September 17, 1973 and both
countries share historical expe-
riences as former British
colonies.

“The success of Bahamas/
United States bi-lateral rela-
tions is augmented by our co-
operation and shared interest
in a number of key issues of
significance for the hemispher-
ic and international agenda as a
whole,” the Governor General
said.

“Tt is because of these shared
and common concerns that our
countries have been on one
accord when such issues are
addressed in regional and inter-
national fora such as the Organ-
isation of American States and
the United Nations. These
include, among others, drug
trafficking, terrorism, human
rights, the environment and dis-
armament.”

The Governor General said
he welcomed Ambassador
Avant’s commitment to con-
tinue work on key priority
issues of benefit to both coun-
tries, including: the protection
of borders through programmes
designed to combat the trans-
shipment of illicit drugs and the
smuggling of illegal migrants
and illicit light weapons;
enhanced joint efforts against
terrorism; the building of pros-
perity and economic security;
and the defence and promotion
of human rights and democrat-
ic ideals.

The government also fully





Fa oa

Derek Smith?BIS Photo

=)

Derek Smith?BIS Photo



US AMBASSADOR Nicole Avant, left, accepts a gift from Governor

General Arthur Hanna. Pictured far right is Ted Sarandos, chief con-
tent officer for Netflix Corporation, husband of Ambassador Avant.

appreciates the ambassador’s
commitment to ensuring that
OPBAT continues to receive
the full support and resources
needed to carry out its man-
date, he said.

“This partnership is in its 21st
year and is considered the hall-
mark of Bahamas/United States
efforts in counter-drug opera-
tions, and a model for such
third state co-operation,” the
Governor General said.

Nuclear

The threat posed by nuclear
weapons proliferation and oth-
er weapons of mass destruction
is also a major concern, he said,
adding that the Bahamas looks
forward to the continued col-
laboration to oppose the
increase of such weapons in the
hemisphere.

He also mentioned the
impact the global recession is
having on small island devel-
oping nations, particularly in
the area of tourism.

As 70 per cent of tourists
come from North America, he
said, it is important that the
partnership between the US
and the Bahamas be further
strengthened and deepened.

The Bahamas looks forward
to enhanced assistance by the
US Embassy’s consular section

facilitating first-rate visa ser-
vices for Bahamians, and the
pursuit of civic and cultural
interaction between both coun-
tries, the Governor General
said.

Ambassador Avant said she
was honoured to have been
appointed ambassador to the
Bahamas.

She mentioned that her fam-
ily has a long-standing connec-
tion to the Bahamas, and that
she brings to service a lifetime
of experience in philanthropy,
politics and culture.

Ambassador Avant also
pledged to work closely with
the government on such issues
as protection of borders against
drug trafficking and illegal
migrants, terrorism, building
prosperity and economic secu-
rity, defending and promoting
human rights and democratic
ideals, and supporting sustain-
able energy.

Nicole Avant was born on
March 6, 1968 to music execu-
tive Clarence Avant, a former
chairman of Motown Records,
and Jacqueline Avant. She
spearheads several multi-
national, multi-agency opera-
tions to combat international
drug trafficking and illicit
weapons shipments.

Ambassador Avant is mar-
ried to Ted Sarandos, chief con-
tent officer for Netflix Corpo-
ration, and they have two chil-
dren, Sarah and Tony.

Bahamas hosts Nobel Prize
winner Derek Walcott

The College of the Bahamas, in conjunction
with the Construction Seminar Group, will host
the Caribbean’s first Nobel Prize winner for
literature Derek Walcott for two exciting events
in November. This will be the first time that
the Bahamas has ever hosted a Nobel Laureate.

Honoured by the MacArthur Foundation,
the Royal Society of Literature and Her Majesty
the Queen, Mr Walcott is an outspoken poet,
playwright, writer and visual artist.

He will present on the topic “Art, Politics
and Caribbean Culture” at the college’s signa-
ture Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lecture Series
on Thursday, November 12.

Mr Walcott will also address the 2009 Con-
struction Seminar on the impact of foreign
direct investment on the development of the

DEREK WALCOTT

Caribbean on Friday, November 13. “Hosting a
Nobel Laureate in the Bahamas is a highly cel-
ebrated achievement and comes on the heels of
President Barack Obama being awarded the
Nobel Prize for extraordinary efforts to
strengthen international diplomacy and his sup-
port for nuclear arms reduction,” the college
noted in a statement.

Julius Bar

Julius Baer Group, the leading dedicated Wealth Management is seeking

candidates for the position of:

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES:

Acquire new clients through personal network (within defined objectives
Acquire new client finders or EAM

Provide financial information to clients as requested

Create / Maintain a privileged relationship with new or existing clients

providing a service of excellence

Develop Julius Baer Bank & Trust as booking centre through Julius

Baer worldwide network

REQUIRED SKILLS:

Excellent French verbal and written communication skill
PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint (ability to learn new

applications quickly)

Strong understanding of Swiss Private Banking industry creed and

regulatory framework

A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:

Minimum 10 years experience in Private Banking, Asset Management

or related field

EDUCATION:

A Bachelor’s degree with concentration in Economic, Business

Administration or equivalent.

The Securities Course Series 7 or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:

The ability to speak a third language (Italian, German, Spanish or
Portuguese) would be a strong asset.

We offer a very competitive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating
work environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our

business while expanding your career.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume by October 31“,

2009 to the attention of:

BY HAND:

Personal & Confidential

Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
P.O. Box N - 4890

Nassau, Bahamas

BY MAIL:

Personal & Confidential
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas



Neues

NOTICE is hereby given that EDITH MEDELUS of
CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH NESTOR of DAVIS
STREETS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person


ROYAL SFIDELITY a, zs

rE
Fone at Wowk ues

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 22 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,489.00 | CHG -3.49 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD -223.36 | YTD % -13.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.03 0.00 0.127
9.90 0.00 0.992
5.90 0.00 0.244
0.63 -0.877
3.15 0.125
2.14 0.055
9.93 1.406
2.72
5.26
1.27
1.32
6.28
8.80
10.00
4.11

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)}
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Previous Close Today's Close
1.17 1.17
10.75 10.75
5.90 5.90
0.63
3.15
2.37
9.93
2.72
5.83
3.01
2.05

0.63
3.15
2.37
9.93
2.72
5.74
3.04
2.25
6.50
9.30
10.00
4.11

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.09
0.03
0.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.249
0.419
0.111
0.625
6.50
9.30
10.00
4.11

0.420
0.322
0.631
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)
Interest

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)}
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
f.92 8.42 14.00

1.00
0.27
5.49
9.95
10.00

1.00
0.27
5.59

1.00
0.27
5.59

who knows any reason why registratior/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

52wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low

EPS $ Yield

-2.246

Div $ P/E
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Weekly Vol.

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

2.00
0.35

6.25
0.40

4.00
0.55

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

0.000
0.001

0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8300 “3.75 -6.75
1.4954 4.30 5.18
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1751 4.42 5.86
103.0956 3.10 2.52
99.4177
1.0000
10.5884
1.0757

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-69
30-Sep-09
16-Oct-09
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

1.3344
2.8952
1.4217
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
99.4177
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

Me}IG=

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN APPOLON of
DUMPING GROUND CR, Apt#1, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

3.12

0.00

5.88

3.86

1.0305 -0.24

1.0709 3.24
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.76
0.00
5.88
5.30
0.22
4.54

1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

r : r
|
|
k
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24,

2009





INSIDE ¢ MIAMI DOLPHINS PREVIEW



Senior Tennis

PE TST



TENNIS

THE Gatorade Senior Ten- :
nis Nationals near its comple- :
tion this weekend with aseries }
of thrilling final matches set }
to square off at the Gym Ten- }

nis Club.

In Thurday’s play two divi- }
sion winners were crownedin

doubles.

Robert Dunn and Neil }
McTaggert won the 35’s Men’s_ }
Doubles with a 6-3, 6-0 win }
over George Baxteer and Har-

rington Saunders.

John Antonas and Kit

Americans dominate
Sunfish leaderboard

Spencer lived up to their top
seed billing with a 6-1, 6-0 win
over Vince Andrews and Bud
Cambridge in the 55’s Men’s
Doubles final.

Brent Johnson advanced to
the final of the 35’s Men’s Sin-
gles with a 6-1,6-2 win over
Dwayne Gibson.

In last night’s action,
Antonas, the top seed in the
55’s Mens Singles, took on his
doubles teammate, Spencer in
the division final, while John-
son took on Stefano Donati.

Results were unavailable at
press time.

In today’s 35’s Women’s
final, Alicia Butler will face
second ranked Dionne Butler.

Jankovic upset,
Schiavone
advances at
Kremlin Cup

TENNIS
MOSCOW
Associated Press

ALISA KLEYBANOVA }
upset defending champion }
Jelena Jankovic 6-4, 6-3 Friday }
to advance to the semifinals of }

the Kremlin Cup.

The upset came a day after }
the second-seeded Jankovic }
took the last spot for the sea- }
son-ending WTA Champi- }

onships in Doha, Qatar.

Jankovic dropped serve in }
the fifth game of each set. }
Down 5-3 in the second set, }
Jankovic double-faulted twice }

to lose the match.

Kleybanova will play Olga
Govortsova of Belarus, who }
crusied past Vera Dushevina :

6-3, 6-0.

Eighth-seeded Francesca
Schiavone of Italy advanced }
with a 6-3, 6-2 win over Maria }

Kirilenko.

Schiavone, the 2005 runner-
up, will play Alona Bon- }
darenko in the other semifinal.
Bondarenko ousted qualifier }

Tsvetana Pironkova 6-3, 6-3.

In the men’s tournament, }
sixth-seeded Janko Tipsarevic }
advanced to his first semifinal }
this season by defeating Robby :
Ginepri of the United States, 6- }

3, 6-3.

Korolev 0-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Qualifier

Sergiy Stakhovsky 6-3, 6-3.

Tipsarevic will face Ukran-
ian qualifier Illya Marchenko, }
who rallied to beat Evgeny ;

Mikhail }
Kukushkin of Kazakhstan also :
rallied for a 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 win }
over fifth-seeded Pablo }
Cuevas. Kukushkin will play ;
third-seeded Mikhail Youzh- }
ny of Russia, who downed }



*

SAILING

THE final day of sailing
in 2009 Sunfish World
Championships was domi-
nated by a trio of Ameri-
cans who swept the leader-
board to culminate the
week long event.

David Loring main-
tained a lead he held since
Wednesday afternoon to
win the competition with
a net total of 28.6 points.

His highlights included
a first place finish in race
five, second place finishes
in races four, and seven,
and third place finishes in
races one and 10.

Loring’s American
counterparts ended the
competition with a flurry
to move into the second
and third spots respective-
ly.
Paul-Jon Patin finished
in second place witha
total of 30 net points,
while David Mendelblatt
finished third with 32
points.

Rankings

Patin entered the day in
third position but finished
third in race nine and won
race 10 to ascend the rank-
ings.

He won the opening
race of the event and end-
ed competition with his
second win which book-
ends a second place finish
in race two and third place
finishes in races five and
eight.

Mendelblatt continued
a wave of momentum he
was able to establish
Wednesday, delivering a

Brought to you by:

an a

A SCENE from the 2009 Sunfish World Championship this week.





World Championships

come to a close

dominating performance
over the final stretch.

Mendelblatt ended day
four with wins in races sev-
en and eight, and returned
yesterday to take race nine
and finish second in race
two.

His three wins led the
field while he also finished
second twice (races three
and 10) and third in race
four.

Peter Stanton of the U.S
Virgin Islands finished
fourth with 41 net points.

Stanton’s best finishes
included second in races

eight and nine and third in
race Six.

Max Chirnos of
Venezuela fell three spots
on the final but was still
able to round out the top
five with 43 net points.

Chirnos finished a disap-
pointing 19th in race nine
and fourth in the finale.

Donald Martinbourough
improved his standing by
three positions on the final
day to finish 13th, the best
overall finish of any
Bahamians in the field.

Martinbourough had
arguably his best day yes-

terday with a Champi-
onship-high ninth place fin-
ish in race nine and 19th
place in race 10.

He finished with 156 net
points.

Charles Kelly was the
second best finisher among
Bahamian boats, 23 over-
all with 224 net points.

Christopher Sands
improved eight positions in
the final rankings when he
turned in his best perfor-
mance on the final day.

Sands had the top two
finishes amongst Bahami-
an sailors with an eighth






place finish in race nine
and sixth place in race ten
to finish with 234 net
points.

Sands effort gave him the
biggest single day improve-
ment of any sailor in the
field.

Fernando De Cardenas
finished 30th with 262 net
points, Gavin Mckinney
was 32nd with 275 net
points, and Andrew Wil-
hoyte was 36th with 292
net points.

Other Bahamians in the
field included James Lowe
- 40th (310), Jeffrey Gale -
41st (319), Peter-Bruce
Wassitsch - 42nd (322),
Donico Brown - 46th (382),
George Damianos - 47th
(389), Ted O’Brien - 49th
(413), Michael Holowesko
- 50th (416), Dwayne Wal-
las - 53rd (436), Lori Lowe
- 64th (547) and BJ Bur-
rows - 65th (555).

BAHAMIANS FARE WELL IN RESPECTIVE CATEGORIES

ALTHOUGH they struggled in
the overall standings, Bahamian
sailors fared well amongst their
respective categories in the 2009 Sun-
fish World Championships.

James Lowe was second amongst
Grand Masters, a category which fea-
tures sailors 70-79 years-of-age.

Greg Gust of the United States
won the division while fellow coun-
tryman Charles Clifton finished
third.

Donald Martinborough finished
third in the Master category, for
sailors 50-59 years-of-age.

Gavin McKinney was fifth, while
George Damianoes finished sixth.

Malcolm Smith of Bermuda took

top honours in the category while
Cor Van Aanholt finished second.

Christopher Sands finished fifth to
lead a strong Bahamian field in the
Junior category, won by Ard Van
Aanholt of Curacao.

Matthew De By of Holland was
second while Jose Gutierrez finished
third.

Donico Brown finished seventh,
Michael Holowesko - eighth and BJ
Burrows - 11th.

The top three finisher overall,
David Loring of the United States




won the Senior division, while David
Mendalblatt (US) was second and
Peter Stanton (USVD, third.

Charles Kelly finished ninth in the
category, Fernando de Cardenas was
11th, Andrew Wilhoyte was 12th,
Ted O’Brien finished 14th, while
Dwayne Wallas was 16th.

DJ Lorsbaugh (USVI) won the
Midget division, Pedro Wassitsch
(Austria) took the Great Grand Mas-
ter division, while second place over-
all finisher, Paul-Jon Patin (US) took
the Apprentice division.



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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Liverpool
fans set

to march
against
American
CO-OWnErs

SOCCER
LIVERPOOL, England
Associated Press

A LIVERPOOL support-
ers’ group is planning a
march ahead of Sunday's
Premier League match
against Manchester United
to protest against the way
American businessmen
George Gillett Jr. and Tom
Hicks are running the club.

Local police said Friday
there will be an "appropri-
ate level of security” ahead
of the match, suggesting
there will be an increase in
the number of officers pre-
sent.

The march to Anfield is
being organized by the Spir-
it of Shankly group, which
has published an e-mail
address on its Web site ask-
ing for information on
where Gillet and Hicks are
staying.

Merseyside police said
they could not discuss the
security of individuals or
confirm the number of offi-
cers set to be on duty ata
match that Liverpool has to
win to rekindle its fading
hopes of winning a first
league title for 20 years.

Gillett and Hicks have
attracted the ire of fans by
loading it with debt in their
2007 buyout.

In an open letter to
Gillett and Hicks, Spirit of
Shankly said the American
pair was not welcome at the
club.

"All we care about is our
football club, our history
and traditions, and our
future," the letter read. "To
us, you play no part in that

future — especially not if we

want to be successful and
keep moving forward.

"You will leave a black
mark on the history of our
football club. You have
dragged us back, and this
season, you have made us
stand still, whilst other clubs
move forward.”

Liverpool finished run-
ner-up to United last season
with just two losses in 38
games but, having sold Xabi
Alonso to Real Madrid, is
currently eighth and on its
worst losing streak in 22
years.

Liverpool has lost four
straight games in all compe-
titions and has been beaten
in four of nine Premier
League matches.

Fans blame the club's 245
million-pound ($390 mil-
lion) debt for manager Rafa
Benitez's inability to buy
top-class players and fund a
new 60,000-seat stadium.

Construction on the new
ground was halted in
August 2008 because of the
global economic downturn.

Hicks, who owns basebal-
I's Texas Rangers and the
NHL's Dallas Stars, and
Gillett bought Liverpool in
2007 for nearly $290 million,
taking on about $73.8 mil-
lion in liabilities.

Gillett recently sold the
NHL's Montreal Canadiens,
the Gillett Entertainment
Centre and the Bell Centre
back to the Molson family
for a reported $580 million.

/AP

Lynne Slad



MIAMI DOLPHINS quarterback Chad Henne (7) hands off to running back Ronnie Brown during the third quarter of an NFL football game against the New York Jets Monday, Oct.

12, 2009 in Miami.

‘Miami Dolphins look
for way to slow Saints

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

THIS would be a good time
for the Miami Dolphins to
unveil the defensive equivalent
of the wildcat, whatever that
might be.

Nothing tried so far has
slowed the New Orleans Saints.
The Dolphins face the NFL’s
highest-scoring team Sunday
and could use a wildcat-style
surprise.

“Put 11 linebackers in the
game,” Miami linebacker
Channing Crowder suggested.
“Blitz Crowder every play.”

Something that radical might
be worth a shot against the
Saints, 5-0 for the first time
since 1993 and averaging 38.4
points per game.

“T don’t think you want to
try to get into a scoring contest
with these people,” Miami
coach Tony Sparano said.
“We've got to do something to
not let the candy store be
open.”

Sparano hopes his defense
learned lots from early-season
matchups against Peyton Man-
ning, Matt Ryan and Philip
Rivers. One lesson: The Dol-
phins weren’t good enough, los-
ing all three games.

Ryan threw for 229 yards and
two scores in the opener, while
Manning and Rivers threw for
303 yards each.

The defense fared better fac-
ing less potent offenses against
the Bills and Jets. Miami won
both games to improve to 2-3
and climb back into the AFC
East race.

But the Dolphins will be
tough to take seriously as a
playoff contender until they
make a stand against a top
quarterback. Still to come for
Miami are two games against
Tom Brady and one against
Ben Roethlisberger.

Brees may be the best of the

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Beginners and Advanced
Children and Adults

Oct. 26th-29th
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bunch. He has thrown 101
touchdown passes since choos-
ing the Saints over the Dolphins
as a free agent in 2006, and this
season he’s better than ever,
leading the NFL in passing.

New Orleans has yet to trail
while winning each game by at
least 14 points. Coach Sean
Payton views his team’s start
as a good omen.

“When you end up on a team
that gets into the postseason,
generally there’s a stretch
where you play good football
and you stack together wins,”
Payton said.

New Orleans is doing that,
and the latest victory was the
most impressive yet. Against
the New York Giants’ stout
defense, the Saints totaled 493
yards with no turnovers or
sacks and won 48-27.

Seven Saints scored one TD
each against the Giants, reflect-
ing the multitude of weapons
at Brees’ disposal.

“We've all been in this sys-
tem now for four years and tak-
en a lot of snaps together,”
Brees said. “There’s a huge
confidence level that we play
with now, and our comfort lev-
el with each other makes a big
difference.”

Brees’ ability to use the
entire field is one thing that
makes him special, Sparano
said. If the Saints send out four
receivers on a play, Brees
quickly determines which target
is the best option.

“He can get through the pro-
gression really quick to get to
where he is going with the foot-
ball,” Sparano said. “He gets
one to four really fast.”

As a result, Brees has been
sacked only four times in 163
plays.

That means a big challenge
for the Dolphins’ pass rush,
which has been inconsistent, in
part because linebacker Joey
Porter has been slowed by a
hamstring injury that he said is
now healed. Porter has only
two sacks after leading the
AFC last year with 17 1/2.

When the Dolphins give
opposing quarterbacks time to
throw, the result is often costly.
They’re allowing 15 yards per
completion, worst in the NFL.

Rookie cornerback Sean
Smith has played well, but vet-
erans Will Allen and Gibril
Wilson get burned often. And
the Saints thrive on big plays,
leading the league with seven
touchdown drives of less than
four plays.

“You've got to make them
matriculate down the field,”
Crowder said.

Matriculate?

“Google it,” he said. “If
they’re going to go 80 yards on
you, you’ve got to make them
have those 10-, 11-, 12-play dri-
ves. They want to get those big
chunks, and they are an explo-
sive offense. We’ve got to limit
Brees and make them work.”

An occasional turnover
would help, but the Dolphins



AS NEW ORLEANS SAINTS offensive tackle Jermon Bushrod (74) watches, Saints fullback Heath
Evans (44) celebrates scoring a touchdown late in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game between
the New York Giants and New Orleans Saints in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Sunday,
Oct. 18, 2009. Saints won 48-27.

are tied for last in the NFL with
four takeaways. Three-quarters
of the starting secondary has
yet to make an interception,
and Brees has been picked off
only twice.

Miami will counter at quar-
terback with second-year pro
Chad Henne, 2-0 as a starter
and coming off his best game
in a 31-27 win over the Jets.
Nearly 10 years after Dan Mari-
no retired, the Dolphins believe
they’ve finally found a franchise
quarterback.

Henne likes the idea of filling
that role.

“Really being the leader in
the offense is showing,” he said.
“The guys are looking up to me
in the huddle. It feels comfort-
able, and I’m getting used to
it.”

Henne will hope for help
from the wildcat, which the
Dolphins are using more than
ever. The package generated
110 yards and the winning
touchdown against the Jets.

Miami nose tackle Jason Fer-

guson smiled when asked what
type of wildcat-style surprise
might slow the Saints’ offense.

“The wildcat of a defense?”
the 310-pound Ferguson said.
“T would think maybe me rush-
ing, seven DBs, one linebacker.
Ineed somebody to get the out-
side because I don’t want to be
running Brees down, so give us
two ends.

“Hey, we’re coming — the
wild Ferg.”

Why not try it? Nothing else
has worked against the Saints.





THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13

OFFICIAL OPENING OF GRAND BAHAMA SCHOOL

1. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM is escorted by Sister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High
School principal Yvonne Ward upon his arrival at the official opening and naming of the new government
school on Grand Bahama on Thursday.
















2. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM, Education Minister Carl Bethel and Works and Transport Min-
ister Neko Grant participate in the ribbon cutting ceremony

3. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM and Education Minister Carl Bethel tour the library.

4, A STUDENT of the Sister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High School sings a solo section of the school
song

UNUM Ga AU ae eT ae

BISHOP LAWRENCE ALOYISUS BURKE receives the Order of Jamaica from Governor General of
Jamaica Sir Patrick Allen at the Ceremony of Investiture and Presentation of National Honours at
Kings House, Jamaica on National Heroes Day.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Hl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TODAY TONIGHT Sd MONDAY SS SSE Seay

pares
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ORLANDO > Clouds and sun, a Partly cloudy; a Sunny intervals, a Partly sunny and mild Mainly cloudy, Partly sunny with The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
High: 88° F/31 SGee t-storm; breezy thunderstorm t-storm in spots t-storms possible t-storms possible greater the need for eye and skin protection

Pa eC a
Bow 67 Faas ee ; High: 87° High: 87° High: 90° High: 89°
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TAMPA ia Ve WY PM ecaacelnc PMc cele LMG mace ec ey incite .
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-AQ° ° lt d Lp The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, . ‘
Low: 69 Fat c = and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cald a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. Today 14:54am. 2.8 Pa a.m.
:30 p.m.

6:22 a.m.
7:25 p.m.

7:22 a.m.
8:18 p.m.

8:24 a.m.
9:08 p.m.

9:23 a.m.
9:53 p.m.

10:16 a.m.
10:34 p.m.

11:05 a.m.
11:13 p.m.





~ A ¢ Sunday = 12:21 a.m.

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ay wr Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 4:20 a.m.
- .

ABACO A Temperature 1:44 p.m.
High: 87° F/31°C Vaud ve 86° F/30° C

° 2 ° ° Tuesda 2:19 a.m.
: Low:77°F/25°C Sle wiels _ Normal high 84° F/29° C 2:39 p.m.



3:30 p.m.



7% & ° Normal low 72° F/22° C
= Wednesday 3:14 a.m.
@ WEST PALM BEACH Wit Ey es V Last year's high 81° F/27° GC y ou

High: 86° F/30° C 45-25 knots Last ‘ °
° ° ‘ - year's low 74° F/23° G
Low: 72° F/22°C = Precipitation Thursday 4:03 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Md - Le coe YOStErday oo... cccccccececeeneccees oo 4:16 p.m.
High: 86° F/30°C High: 85° F/29°C P eal 1OCale Oey Friday 4:47 a.m.
Low:74°F/23° — Low: 76° F/24°C Normal year to date 5:01 p.m.
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@ bay AccuWeather.com
= MIAMI - ELEUTHERA Forecasts and graphics provided by Sun AND ey
6-12 knots High: 88° F/31° C High: 87° F/31°C AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

= 76° ?. NASSAU - ae 3 Sunrise...... 7:13am. Moonrise ... 12:57 p.m.
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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 14, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





OUT AND ABOUT

OUTS ABOUT

IN THE 242

DR XCITEMENT’S BIRTHDAY BASH: DISC JOCKEY with 100JAMZ, DJ Xcitement cele-
brated his birthday in style at a bash that went down at Charlie’s in Nassau last Saturday. Patrons,
and especially the ladies, came out in abundance for the event, and of course the best DJs were
there to entertain the crowd with good music and vibes. Supa Mario, DJ Ignite, DJ Fatal, DJ Fines,
TG Movements, Big Doobs and Reality were all present to party with Xcitement and all the club-
bers inside Charlie's. Champagne and Grey Goose were flowing upstairs in the VIP Lounge while
the crowd downstairs took over the dancefloor. A performance by popular Bahamian hip hop
artist Porter the Poet kept the patrons going as he showed off his lyrical skills and performed
some of his hit songs such as “Get This Paper” and “Leave That Girl Alone”. The party continued
with the best in hip hop, reggae and dancehall music through the night. In case you missed the
event, don’t worry, the Christmas 2009 party season for is just getting started!



I CULTURAL
FESTIVAL

AFTER a year of absence, the International Cultural Festival was

} held again last weekend at the Botanical Gardens in Nassau. The

focus of the festival is to showcase international cuisine and art
forms such as song and dance.

The beautiful Botanical Gardens were transformed as families
flocked to the venue to enjoy the experience and taste international
delights. The Gardens were dotted with booths representing
countries from the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and South
America.

Countries such as Greece, Peru, Cuba, Haiti, India, Jamaica,
Myanmar, China and France created a melting pot of people,
cultures and flavours alongside the Bahamian village. Young and
old were out and about mingling with friends and acquaintances,
enjoying cultural performances on stage and trying various inter-
national beers, mojitos, sweet treats such as ice cream and bakla-
va, and tasty dishes like jerk chicken, grilled shrimp, gyro, low
mein, conch fritters and Canadian bacon, to name but a few of the
culinary options on display.

The Cultural Festival was truly an interesting event and it starts
a Christmas season of family events, festivals and togetherness.

i

To advertise in

The Tribune or on our

exciting new website
» tribune242.-com call

Too Arthuron 242 322 19864

or email webads@tribunemedia.net

Heike Wollenweber

Intemational Publicist heike.axes@gmail.com
Intemational media and airplay, WWW. MySpace. comaxesmagazine
representing artists, producers, Bahamas 242 428 8412

labels, promoters and selectas/djs Jamaica 876 377 5029



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Christie: I will return PLPto power N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.277SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY, T-STORMS HIGH 89F LOW 76F I N S I D E SEE PAGE 13 Opening of GB school Attorney asks for evidence to be forwarded to prosecutors in America The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELP WANTED AND REALESTATE I N S I D E S P O R T S S EEPAGEELEVEN Americans dominate at Sunfish B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net John Travolta’s attorney has asked Bahamian authorities to forward all of the evidence from the attempted extortion trial of Pleasant Bridgewater and Tarino Lightbourne to prosecutors in the United States who will see if the case could be retried there. Michael Ossi, who also testified as a witness in the trial, for which a mistrial verdict was delivered on Wednesday evening, told The Tribune that Bahamian authorities have agreed to preserve all of the relevant evidence and the ques tion of where the re-trial will occur is “in the hands of Bahamian and US prosecutors.” A decision could be made within weeks, he suggested. A mistrial verdict was delivered and a retrial ordered by Senior Justice Anita Allen in the trial of Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightboure on Wednesday after she announced that she was “very concerned in the interests of justice” following an announcement at the PLP convention by MP Picewell Forbes that Ms Bridgewater had been acquitted. The exclamation by South Andros representative, Mr Forbes, came before the jury had returned its verdict on the five-week long trial. Justice Allen said the turn of events gave the impression that there had been a communication from the jury room. The PLP issued an “unqualified apology” for the statement made by Mr Forbes, noting that it was “incorrect” and “not intended to interfere with the administration of justice.” That evening Mr Ossi welcomed the mistrial verdict given the circumstances and noted T ravolta retrial may move to US By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net SOUTH Andros MP Picewell Forbes is expected back before a judge next week to explain why he should not be held in contempt of court for an outburst at the PLP’s national convention which led to a mistrial in the John Tra volta attempted extortion case. Forbes appeared calm and composed as he sat behind his team of attorneys in a courtroom packed with PLP supporters and officials during a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita Allen yesterday. Attorney Wayne Munroe, who along with Anthony McKinney and Alfred Sears represents Forbes, told the judge that the MP had been unable to instruct them on what the precise allegations were to which he had to answer. Senior Justice Allen explained that the hearing had come about as a result of an announcement made at the political convention while the jury was still deliberating. On Wednesday night, Forbes took to the convention stage and told delegates that former PLP senator Pleasant Bridgewater had been acquitted of all charges in the attempted extortion case. The judge said TRA VOLTA TRIAL AFTERMATH PICEWELL F ORBES EXPECTED B A CK BEFORE JUDGE BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A Grand Bahama teacher was charged at Freeport Magistrate Court on Thursday with indecently assaulting a female student. Edward Buchanan, 56, appeared in Court Three before Deputy Chief Magistrate Helen Jones. It is alleged that in Septem ber, 2008, Buchanan indecent ly assaulted a student while at GB teacher char ged with indecently assaulting student EDWARD BUCHANAN By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Union of Teachers president Belinda Wilson, who is accused of misappropriating $90,000 of union funds, withdrew more than $65,000 from the union’s pen sion fund account to make extraneous payments, the executive committee announced yesterday. Secretary general Stephen McPhee explained in a press conference at the union headquarters in Bethel Avenue, New Providence, how the Pension Fund Account is exclu sively for the payment of members’ pension benefits. The president is not authorised to remove funds from the account for any other reason, and is also prohibited from spending more than $2,500 without approval from the committee according to the union’s constitution. But Mrs Wilson transferred $43,284 from the pension fund and wrote cheques amounting to $22,548.13 on July 21, taking a total of $65,832.13 from the account without bringing it BUT president withdrew ‘more than $65,000 from pension fund account’ SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight PICEWELL FORBES , who appeared at a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita Aleen, is pictured with his attorney Wayne Munroe. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f BAHAMASUNIONOFTEACHERS By MEGAN REYNOLDS a nd AVA TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporters mreynolds@tribunemedia.net REELECTED Progressive Liberal Party leader Perry Christie instilled new hope in fervent party supporters as he closed the 51st national party convention last night and vowed to return the PLP to power. Mr Christie said he was humbled by his overwhelming win on Thursday and called for the party to remain unified at the end of a dramatic race for leadership positions. To those who did not support Mr Christie, he said he would prove himself worthy through a number of efforts addressing social issues, economic strife and rising crime in the country, promising not to make “the same mistakes again”. In an emotional address provoking response from the crowd at every turn, Mr Christie said as leader he is comPLPCONVENTION PHOTO: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff PLP LEADER Perry Christie rallies his troops last night. MORECONVENTIONCOVERAGE ONPAGES 2, 3 and 5 SEE page eight

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THE new chairman of the PLP has hit the ground running in typical style, launchinga scathing attack on the governing FNM party. Former cabinet minister a nd notorious political firebrand Bradley Roberts blasted the government for refusing to accept any responsibility for “the worst recession in the Bahamas since the Great Depression”. He said the FNM’s reluctance to admit its policies have contributed to the country’s economic woes is evidence that the party is unfit for governance. Mr Roberts said the Bahamas enjoyed its greatest level of capital inflow – in excess of $2.5 billion – during the PLP administration of Perry Christie, during which $5 billion worth of wealth was created, annual household income was substantially increased, inflation was reduced, unemployment shrank, and economic growth stood at 4.5 per cent. “The record will show that the financial crisis occurred in August 2008, a full 15 months after the FNM came to power. During that time, Hubert Ingraham has managed to drive away important foreign investments with his poor attitude and poor quality of governance, underpinned by his disastrous stop, review, and cancel policy. “The record clearly shows that the policies of the FNMb rought a halt to the economic momentum of the country and the increased prosperity of the Bahamian people, resulting in an increase in unemployment, unsustainable borrowing, and the misery index, while househ old income, government reve nue, and tourist arrivals p lummeted,” Mr Roberts said. “The Bahamian Dollar Government Bond is now under threat, as it was recently downgraded, and faces a further downgrade if current economic conditions do not improve. We note that this sorry state of affairs continues after the government has added more than $1 billion to the national debt and has to b orrow monthly to pay its b ills. The amount of this monthly borrowing has not been disclosed to the Bahamian people. Clearly the return of Hubert Ingraham has been disastrous for the well-being of the Bahamian people,” Mr Roberts said. He added: “The collateral damage to the social infra structure of our beloved country is incalculable as crime has gone amuck; totally out of control and the hapless FNM government is paralysed to do anything about it.” C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 2, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION VACANCY NOTICE MANAGER REVENUE ACCOUNTING CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION Avacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue Accounting. The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than miscellaneous receivables. Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following: New Providence and the Family Islands software the Family Islands Job requirements include: Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation Tuesday, November 3, 2009. PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE PLP’S new firebrand chairman blasts Govt over economic woes RESPONDING to the FNM’s criticism of the reelection of Perry Christie as PLP leader, new chairman Bradley Roberts told the governing party tot ake a look in the mirror. T he FNM issued a state ment yesterday calling Mr Christie’s victory a victory for the PLP old guard and a blow to any serious reform by those who represent “the worst days oft he Pindling era and the more recent scandalous past of the party.” Reform Hitting back, Mr Roberts reminded the FNM of their own failure to implement reform “when they brought back a retired leader who claimed he had no interest in the job.” He said Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham’s apathy towards governance is evident in “the sorry performance of the government and the hopelessness, despair and misery being visited upon the people of the Bahamas.” “The PLP further reminds the FNM of their undemocratic practices when Sir Arlington Butler, Maurice Moore, Algernon Allen, Pierre Dupuch, and Tennyson Wells were unceremoniously driven from the FNM government because they demonstrated their democratic rights,” he added. Mr Roberts said the PLP will not be distract ed “in its fight for the soul and future security and prosperity of the Bahamian people.” Roberts hits back at FNM’s criticism of PLP internal elections BRADLEY ROBERTS LETSHAKEONIT! PHOTOS: Felip Major /T ribune staff “The record will show that the financial crisis occurred in August 2008, a full 15 months after the FNM came to power.” CYNTHIA ‘Mother’ Pratt embraces Mrs Christie. PLP LEADER Perry Christie shakes Bradley Roberts’ hand. BY AVA TURNQUEST PLP chairman-elect Bradley Roberts spoke to a packed ballroom last night with supporters giving him immense energy as he rallied them in his inaugural speech. True to form, Mr Roberts opened by quipping that he had been reliably informed Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his colleagues are extremely troubled over his return and have already “begun to pack”. Mr Roberts thanked his supporters profusely and pledged his steadfast commitment. He reserved special mention for Cynthia “Mother” Pratt, whom he commended on her contributions to the party. Commended He also commended former chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin, who he defeated for the post, acknowledging her achievements. Mr Roberts said he wanted to see more “young blood” in parliament and he assured supporters that his team will ensure that “there will be a wonderful mix of personalities, of varying ages, gender and convictions.” The outspoken former cabinet minister made it clear he intends to “dismantle” the FNM, which he described as uncaring, unresponsive and incapable of tackling the issues that plague the Bahamian people. “I have come to bite, and bite hard,” he said. Mr Roberts hit out at many FNM “failings” – including crime, national debt and the management of utilities. H e charged that the government is waiting f or the resuscitation of the US economy and that in 2007 the FNM “inherited an economy that was booming and robust”. “The state of the Bahamian economy is in a greater state of decay than in 2002 and continues to worsen day by day,” he said. The chairman elect advised party members that their task will not be easy – largely because of a biased press, which he feels manipulates the minds of the Bahamian people against the PLP. “Fear not my fellow PLPs,” said Mr Roberts, “with a renewed commitment to our purpose, marching forward in unity, on one accord, we will rescue our country yet again from an FNM party which is all images and no substances.” Mr Roberts speech ended with a tremendous roar, with the entire room energised and shouting: “We ready now, PLP, we ready now!” ‘I intend to dismantle FNM’ HIGH EMOTION: A delegate lets his hands do his talking.

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WITH the election of Bradley “Big Bad B rad” Roberts to the chairmanship of the P LP, the party is clearly gearing up for a fight. The FNM have not lost a second in hitting back however – demonstrating that the governing party is eager and willing to t rade blows. Following Mr Roberts’ inaugural speech (see page 2 launched a scathing rebuttal – the third r apid response in three nights of PLP conv ention speeches. The FNM’s statement said: “PLP chairman Bradley Roberts’ rabid, belligerent and arrogant convention speech is a return t o the politics the Bahamian people have moved past. With his typical arrogance, he likened himself to John the Baptist. “Rather than preparing the way for genu ine deliverance from the problems of the day, he is preparing the way for the old guard of his party to return to office with empty promises, greedy hands, personal agendas and self-interest.” The FNM said the country is now unsure of who the real leader of the PLP is – since M r Roberts said that he was brought back to deal with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham. “Apparently, Mr Christie is not up to the job,” the FNM observed. Mr Roberts has a long record of character assassination, but was an ineffective minister in a government that made delay, indecision and laziness into an art form. P atronising “Mr Roberts’ speech was patronising and condescending to young Bahamians. After overthrowing as chairman a second gener-a tion younger PLP woman, Mrs Glenys Hanna-Martin, in order to re-establish the control of the old guard, Mr Roberts then went on to say that he was preparing a way f or young people in the PLP. “Even as Mr Roberts said that ‘there is a call these days for younger, fresher faces,’ h is return represents stale ideas, old tricks and a backwards mentality as regards the new type of politics for which a younger generation of Bahamians are asking,” the FNM said. T he party also noted Mr Roberts’ statement that he doesn’t simply want to win an election, but also destroy and dismantle the FNM. This is not the language that someone committed to democracy and a healthy twoparty system would be using,” the FNM said. “It seems that Mr Roberts is proposing a one-party state in which the PLP has a bsolute control. The Bahamian people have rejected such a political culture before, and will do so once again. The FNM said it will welcome “those P LPs and others who seek a party and a government committed to a more open democratic culture”. By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A N EXUBERANT crowd cheered on newly elected PLP d eputy leader Philip “Brave” Davis as he stepped up to the convention stage last night, buoyant in his victory and filled with enthusiasm for his new p ost. The MP for Cat Island, Rum C ay and San Salvador exclaimed that he will do everyt hing in his power to move the party into government and work in a government of action. The new deputy leader led an ardent campaign driven by a t eam of tenacious young Bahamians and seasoned politic ians to ensure he would secure the position above contenders S enator Jerome Fitzgerald and West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe. Mr Davis won around 760 votes, while Mr Wilchcombe w on 400 and Senator Fitzgerald won 200, and in the same way M r Davis intends to ensure the PLP wins the government in t he 2012 general election. Bowing to former deputy leader Cynthia “Mother” Pratt, who held the position for 12 years and was the country's firstf emale deputy prime minister, Mr Davis paid credit to the part y's rich history before he expounding his vision for the w ay forward. Mr Davis exclaimed: “The B ahamas is moving in the wrong direction! Education is in crisis! There is a serious lack of economic activity and the fear of crime is paralysing our nation! “The problems of this coun try loom large on the horizon and so while the celebration t hat will invariably and deservedly follow in the next d ay or two have their place, we must remember that our miss ion is to change the Bahamas. “There is much work to do, but together we can do it, because we have done it before.” M r Davis vowed to change the Bahamas for the better by t ackling crime through revision of the penal code to ensure t here are stiff penalties to deter offenders. Social He also committed to expanding social programmes such as Urban Renewal to help y oung people in inner city com munities, and to raise fundingf or causes such as the National Youth Programme, and estab l ish more rehabilitation programmes for juvenile offend ers. Mr Davis said there needs to be a scientific approach tof ighting crime with new technologies and innovative strate g ies. He said: “We cannot afford t o lose another soul to senseless violence. “The youth of our nation are calling on the PLP to rescue them from the hands of this uncaring FNM government.” The new deputy leader crit icised the FNM for spending $6 million to host the Miss Universe Pageant, and borrowing $160 million to pave roads using only two companies, one of w hich is from Argentina. And he attacked the gove rnment for taking police offi cers out of violent schools, and f ailing to raise the standards of education from a national “D” average. The next PLP government will implement an aggressive programme to r ecruit quality teachers and develop an education system r elevant to the needs of the economy and the workplace, M r Davis said. As he closed his speech at the 51st PLP convention in the Wyndham Nassau Resort last night, the new PLP deputy l eader said: “Even a blind man can see the FNM is clueless, but I am concerned about providing a blueprint for the future. “I a m prepared to make the tough decisions to do what is neces s ary to rescue the Bahamian people from the hell they are catching every day under this government. Bahamas, join us as we take the fight to thes treets in every community! This is time for work! If we can come together as one body, one voice, no one c an stop us!” C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE FNM fires back at ‘Big Bad Brad’ Cheers for Philip ‘Brave’ Davis FIERY: Bradley Robertss R uling party in scathing rebuttal of Bradley Roberts T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f PHILIP ‘Brave’ Davis speaking out last night.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Manners, respect and com mon courtesy are as scarce, in The Bahamas, as oil! This is a shameful testament to the changes in our society, but it is also not surprising. Traditions such as greeting fellow passers-by or giving a general greeting when entering a public area, such as a waiting room, are witnessed less and less frequently. Small children of the nursery and primary school age still seem to be trained to do such things, but as they grow older and into adulthood, these courtesies seem to be left by the wayside. Giving up your seats in the bus to elderly or handicapped persons; helping someone across the street; basic tele phone etiquette; there are many other instances where behaviours that were once the norm in our society have gone the route of the dinosaur. It is said to “train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old he will not depart from it”, but either we are not training our children correctly, or we stop training them too soon. Another saying that comes to mind is “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” and perhaps that is the dilemma that we are currently facing. While one might be able to change an attitude, there must be an existing foundation to build on. Courtesy is so much a part of an individual’s per sonality that it really is quite difficult to effect any real change if the basic manners just aren’t there. Employers have a hard task then if they are expected to take an adult whose personality is essentially fully developed and through the occasional seminar or training workshop, mould them into a polite employee. If someone doesn’t see the need to even say “good morning” to members of their own household, how then can they be expected to provide cour teous service to a complete stranger? If we want to successfully tackle the growing lack of courtesy in our society, I will like to suggest that a new subject be introduced in the school curriculum entitled “Manners and Behaviour” to be taught at the elementary level. This can take the form of printed booklets for distribution to the primary schools. This I believe will go a long way in encouraging better behaviour, good values, and improved self-esteem in our children. Many will disagree with me, thinking that it is the parents who should teach manners and values at home. Sadly, many of these parents themselves are lacking in these traits and they cannot teach what they do not know. Many parents, however, will benefit if this subject is taught to their children at school. Things like road rage, swearing, disrespectful behaviour, improper use of cell phones and violence are all as a result of ignorance. Many educated persons do not know the value of an apology, “please” and “thank you” simply because they were not taught this. This initiative will certainly bring about better student/teacher relationships and will ease the stress of teaching and parenting. Also, the children will feel encouraged each time they are praised for good behaviour and good manners and this will benefit every area of their lives right through to adulthood. JERRY ROKER Nassau, October 18, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. Thomas Carlyle, a great t hinker and writer, employs the physician’s aphorism “the healthy knows not of their health, but only thes ick” in his work ‘Characteristics’. Without ponder, t his application of such a wide embrace penetrates to the heart of our nation’sd ilemma. We in the Bahamas know w e are not well, we know we are in serious trouble a crime epidemic, moral d ilapidation, family disinte gration, religious divisiven ess, a disheveled judiciary, education and healthcare meltdowns yet seem tob e trifling in the face of great lament. Culture, on the other h and, enshrines the pream ble to life; it inhabits the b reath of creation; it gleams in the first words spoken into light. T hough some may devalue our ancestry while oth e rs disclaim it, culture remains the gallant defender of “the true art of living”;f inding its character and voice with or without snobb ish elitists and misguided grassroots. Upon what model of p rogress have our social instinct been developed; to what extent have the scope of national advancement aimed to target untappedn atural treasure within the individual; from what do we d erive drive and momentum? This sixth letter appeals t o the sixth sense of a people seeming to flirt with disaster, to grasp the last glim-m er of hope and reason, before the sun sets on a n ation ignominiously bankrupted by its arrogance. As with ‘Les Fleurs du M al’ by Charles Baudelaire, God forbid, the repugnant i llnesses of society take root in the garden of our hearts. This country grieves for i ts younger minds that, predominantly, are being a ddled by a crude form of atrophy, in the 242; enticed into the recesses of an illu-s ive domain where their souls languish in a stupor of illiteracy. The ethos of the Bahamian has been seductively infil-t rated, its strain diluted by subversive ideologies and trends, now it is quite unclear who or what bears the original seal. T ourism, our sterling protg, speaks and augurs well but departure polls reflect an opposite view, when perceived expectation ism atched versus product affirmation. A cultural revival will bring redemption and salvation to a beau-t iful, but besieged people. Sadly, at the core of this t urmoil is a malignant tumour within an apathetic, unproductive civil and pub-l ic service that needs a transfusion to purge rampant corr uption; but who dares to reprimand a few for the sake of many. T his country desperately needs vindication, but is c onstrained by its dire nar row-minded complex and continues to see life throughs trabismic lens. Are we as a nation likened to a man in a smallb oat with side-oars, while sitting therein he rows in o ne direction but is facing, looking the opposite way. Culture is remedy to the i ntricate problems within the problem; it is with this bless i ng that all peoples heal wounded spirits and mend broken dreams. The uni v erse cannot contain oceans of words destined to flow. U ntil next time, GREGORY NEELY N assau, October 24, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON President Obama’s leadership is being tested on two historic fronts: health care reform and U.S. involvement in Afghanistan. By the time he has made decisions on these two titanic issues, we will know whether he has the courage to make tough calls and we will know more about his bottom-line principles. On health care, Obama thought he had learned lessons from 1993 when Hillary Clinton, then the first lady, was put in charge of developing a universal health plan when her husband was president. She flunked partly because she did not t ouch base with Congress. She didn’t let the lawmakers in on the takeoff as well as the landing, as President Lyndon B. John s on would put it. The result: Congress wasn’t there for the landing. This time around, Obama has gone overboard to win congressional approval of legislation that has little meaning without a government-sponsored health-insur ance program. But his efforts raise questions of whether he is trying to appease the opposition at any price and whether he is willing to fight for a government-run health insurance program. Obama should listen to the people who have voiced their opinions about health reform. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll shows a majority favors a government health insurance plan. The pres ident and wavering congressional Democ rats should heed that view. The Republicans in the Senate are solidly against the reform plan, except for Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, who played hard to get and seemed to love the attention and tension she created over her Sen ate Finance Committee vote which ended up being a “yes.” Now she’s back playing games again and says she is unsure how she will vote when the Senate takes up its final bill. Obama has tried too hard to woo the socalled “blue dog” conservative Democrats who seem to be Republicans at heart. They are obstructionists when it comes to health reform and appear eager to follow the bidding of the health insurance industry. It’s hard to think that other presidents Harry S Truman and the two Roosevelts come to mind would not have loudly rebuked the Republican “plutocrats” for blocking the vital health plans being debated. The president’s other test of leadership is Afghanistan where he is considering a request for 40,000 more troops. Any esca lation in that rugged primitive land would be reminiscent of the Vietnam War and Gen. William Westmoreland’s bids for more and more men. We know how that turned out. Obama has made it clear that he is not going to be rushed. Perhaps the presidential caution has been inspired by the U.S. experience in Iraq, a war that should never have happened in the first place. It’s pretty amazing that we still don’t know the motives of the Bush administrationf or pushing, pushing, pushing for an invasion that turned out to be tragically wrong. The folly of that war and the sacrifices by A mericans and Iraqis are beyond painful to contemplate. War is too important to be left to the generals much as presidents would like to pass the buck and rely on decisions by the “commanders on the ground,” as the civilians like to put it. But that’s not the way it works in a democracy. The buck stops with the president who has been bombarded with advice in the last several weeks. For all that, he would do better if he reads up on White House decision-making involving the last few wars, especially Vietnam. Bob Woodward, the Washington Post reporter, recently described a 2007 interview with Robert S. McNamara, secretary of defense during the 1960s Vietnam troop surge. McNamara told Woodward that LBJ had ordered U.S. escalation in Vietnam because the president was very nervous about political criticism from conserva tives eager to accuse him of being soft on North Vietnam. So Johnson went along with requests from “commanders on the ground” in this case, Westmoreland for more American troops. The result was deeper U.S. commitment in a war we could never win. There’s a lesson there for President Obama: He should map the way forward in Afghanistan without worrying about his conservative critics. This article is by Helen Thomas (New York Times News Service clients.) c.2009 Hearst Newspapers Our social health depends on culture LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net The buck stops in the Oval Office 'HURQ$OH[DQGHU 0F,QWRVK 'HURQ$OH[DQGHU %HOO E DITOR, The Tribune . It saddened me no end to learn of the death of Mr Roger Carron, a perfect gen tleman. Although as a student of journalism I sat at the feet of his wife, Mrs Eileen DupuchCarron, Publisher/Editor of The Tribune, i t was Mr Carron who, during my forma tive years as a sports reporter ensured that I was well grounded in what it takes to survive i n this very challenging profession. W ith much patience, and gentleness, and kindness, and goodness, and faithfulness, a nd joy, and yet brooking no nonsense, he taught me much of what I know so that today I am the Bahamas’ best, well-rounded journalist since Independence. Mr Carron may have left this plane of existence but, bloody hell, he will forever be remembered in our hearts because what he t aught me, I taught others. Whenever new staff joined the newsroom at The Tribune, Mrs Carron sent them to me to take through the ropes. As Mr Carron was to me, I was to them. And in that way, many young Bahamians who passed through The Tribune have benefited. N o longer than the other day a young man stopped to say how appreciative he was of those days at The Tribune. E ven today I continue to share with others i n the Roger Carron tradition. To Mrs Carron, on behalf of my family, I s ay thank you, we love you, we appreciate everything, and we too grieve with you and Robert. GLADSTONE THURSTON Nassau, October, 2009 Saddened no end to learn of passing of Mr Roger Carron Shameful testament to changes in our society

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T HE “stop, review and cancel” policy of the current government has led to rising crime,s chool violence and an overdependence on social services, the shadow minister of social s ervices claimed. Melanie Griffin, MP for Yamacraw, said the policy ofs topping projects initiated u nder the former PLP government for review has led to work b eing halted on the Urban Renewal programme, school policing, the National YouthS ervice and social safety net reform programmes. Speaking at the party’s 51st PLP National Convention on Thursday night, she said alls ocial and youth help services created under the PLP must be re-established if the country ist o work towards a secure future. Mrs Griffin further charged t hat “we need to establish a social policy plan which would include the re-introduction oft he Urban Renewal Programme in its former structure, making any adjustmentsr equired for better operation.” “The political manager must also be replaced with a person who has not been in front-line politics for any party,” said the MP. T he Bahamas has seen “a staggering rise in the level of crime among our young men and violent crime in general, persistent poverty among children, the aged and the disabled, low academic achievement, m igration and statelessness, HIV prevalence and domestic violence and child abuse,” she said. I n response, Minister of State for Social Development Loretta Butler Turner accused Ms Griffin of “regurgitating the same old broken record”, andc harged that the Urban Renewal Programme is alive and well. She said she “doesn’t know what planet the PLP is living o n”, adding that the governm ent recently tabled in parliament two annual reports on the programme. Agg r essiv e A ddressing delegates at the convention, Ms Griffin claimed that when the PLP came to power in 2002, it “promptlye mbarked on a very aggressive s ocial and economic programme designed to alleviate pain and suffering and to break the cycle of poverty.” T he MP said that the PLP implemented immediate and longer term responses as part of this programme. S he suggested the present government has allowed successful efforts made under the former PLP administration to alleviate poverty, crime andv iolence to fall by the wayside with troubling consequences. Mrs Griffin claims the gov ernment does not have the best i nterests of the poor at heart a nd is reacting to their needs in an “ad hoc, knee jerk” way. M s Butler Turner, however, p ointed out that “most people realise” many of the social woes facing this country are symptoms of a global economic downturn. She said the Department of Social Services, the Ministry of Education and other branches o f government have implemented numerous programmes to ease the hardship being felt by many, adding that if the PLP would simply “stop regurgitating a broken record and look at what we are doing” they w ould see that the government is in fact “trailblazing” when it c omes to initiatives to improve social conditions. C M Y K C M Y K THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SPACES FOR RENTOffices:1. 1, 200sq.ft @ $2,500.00 per month 2. 1,100sq.ft @ $2,250.00 per month 3. 400sq.ft. @ $750.00 per month 4. 350 sq.ft @ $700.00 per monthStores:1. 3,000 sq.ft @ $5,000.00 per month 2. 1,000 sq.ft. @ $1,700.00 per month ALL SPACES LOCATED ON THE NORTH EASTERN CORNER OF BAY STREET & ELIZABETH AVENUE. All Spaces are exclusive of utilitiesAll Inquires Call 326-4222 Ministry of Public Works & Transport C onstruction of New Passanger Screening Facility Prince George Wharf, Down Town, Nassau P re-Quaufication of Contractors The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas t hrough the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is inviting qualified General Contractors to participate in a Pre-qualification for the Tender for the construction of a P assenger Screening Facility at Prince George Wharf, Down Town, Nassau. The structure will be of conventional construction, approximately 2,200 sq. ft., and with associated external works and services. The General Contractor willbe required to provide a detailed indication of their competence, both technically and financially, to carry out the intended scope of works within a short time frame. Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification documents as of Thursday, 22nd October, 2009, between t he hours of 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. from: The Office of the Director of Public Works Ministry of Public Works & Transport John F. Kennedy Drive Nassau, The Bahamas Telephone: (242 Fax: (242The completed pre-qualification document should be deposited in the Tender Box at Office of the Director of Public Works, Ministry of Works & Transport, 3rd Floor, John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas not later than 12:00 noon on Thursday, 29th October, 2009. The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all pre-qualification contractors. Signed Nicole Campbell (Mrs. Acting Permanent Secretary GN-939 PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE Govt under fire for ‘stop, review and cancel’ policy T HE youth arm of the FNM has criticised the PLP for failing to promote younger members. According to a statement released by the FNM Torchbearers, the PLP’s Progressive Young Liberals are justified in pleading for more of a say in the affairs of their party. In its history not one Young Liberal has been a candidate for that party,” the youth branch noted. “To date, the Free Nation-a l Movement has had at least seven torchbearers serve in par liament and in the Cabinet of the Bahamas, including Carl B ethel, Tommy Turnquest, Dion Foulkes, Kwasi Thompson, Kendal Wright, and David Thompson.” During the PLP convention this week, the Young Liberals complained about the “D” national grade average, but the Torchbearers noted that during its time in office, the PLP did n ot build a single new school. “They sent the education administration into disarray by p oliticising the Department of Education, by sidelining the director of education and by having a minister of education who c ould not focus on education because he was a part-time min ister of education,” the statement said. I t continued: “The president of the Young Liberals was also misinformed on a number of other issues. He said Urban Renewal was abandoned and that the Youth Service Programme was abandoned. This is untrue. Urban Renewal con tinues with a more refined focus, more targeted programmes a nd better use of government resources. The National Youth Service Pilot programme is being better structured for greaterr esults for the young people of the Bahamas. “The president of the Young Liberals might wish to know t hat while his party talks about young people, the FNM acts for young people. The FNM increased scholarships from $400,000 under the PLP to $6 million; substantially increased the Ministry of Youth’s budget; and established the only new programmes established in the last 20 years, including the Fresh Start Youth E mployment Programme, the Self Starter Programme and the Youth Enterprise Project. In 2006 the PLP granted 21 scholarships. In 2007 the FNM gave 157 scholarships and national scholarship grants of up to $ 10,000 each. In 2008 that number was 153 and in 2009 it is 229.” The Torchbearers went on to crtitcise the statements of former deputy leader of the PLP Cynthia “Mother” Pratt. Noting that Mrs Pratt said far too many Bahamians misunderstood and did not appreciate the PLP, the statement said: Unfortunately Mother Pratt refuses to accept that the Bahamian people became disillusioned with the ineffectual leader s hip and the personal and public failings of various PLP members of parliament and ministers. “It was the PLP who misunderstood the high expectations of the Bahamian people. It was the PLP who did not appreciate the faith that the Bahamian people placed in them in 2002 – at rust they squandered,” it said. PLP accused of failing to promote younger members PLP DELEGATES show different ways of expressing their support for the PLP at the convention. POLITICS wasn’t the only thing on display ... these bags provoked plenty of interest. FNM youth arm lashes out Shadow Minister points finger over rising crime, school violence P HOTOS: Felip Major / Tribune staff SHOEOFSUPPORT HAVING BAGSOFFUN

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t hat he and the Travoltas are committed to seeing a retrial through. Yesterday, Mr Ossi said: Jeopardy has not been attached, so you can try the case again. “We want the evidence pres erved for the next trial, w hether it be in The Bahamas or U.S.” Mr Ossi suggested that because one of the alleged e xtortion phone calls was made from The Bahamas to the US that Florida could have jurisdiction over the matter. He said h e has also run the evidence p ast “an expert” who has informed him that there is a good basis for the trial to take place in the U.S. Nonetheless, he emphasised that ultimately he and his client have no preference over where the a retrial is held, so long as it is a “fair trial with an impartial jury.” I am just trying to protect the interests of Mr Travolta,” said the attorney. “We want to preserve our options.” If the trial were to take place in Florida, defendants, Ms Bridgewater and Mr Lightbourne, would have to be extradited to the US if they did not g o voluntarily. Yesterday, lawyer for Ms Bridgewater, Murio Ducille, called the suggestion that the U.S. could host the trial “nonsense and stupidness.” Revealing that he had “heard as a rumour” that steps had b een taken by Mr Ossi to see whether the trial could take place abroad, Mr Ducille denied that there would be any basis for this to happen. “Certainly my client didn’t make any calls (to the U.S. This is the point i’ve made throughout no calls emanate d from them,” he said. to the attention of the committ ee in a meeting held the day before. The union president claims she had to hurriedly pay utility bills and withdraw funds to pay for seven committee members to attend a Caribbean Union of Teachers conference in Grenada before leaving on the trip, but Mr McPhee said there can be no justification for with-d rawing funds from the account for any reason other than maki ng pension payments. H e said the committee was s hocked to discover last week that the money had been taken w rongfully and without authority. T he majority of members v oted to suspend her for two weeks without pay for the u nauthorised use of money from the Pension Fund Account from November 1, in a meeting chaired by Mrs Wilson on October 16. M r McPhee said Mrs Wilson’s behaviour was “the last straw” as the president elected in June 2008 had been issued a letter of reprimand inO ctober last year. He said: “It should be crystal c lear that generally only the executive committee can authorise an extraordinary expendit ure of $65,832.13, but it has not authority to use pension funds for any other purpose t han to pay pension benefits. “The president has demons trated a terrible habit of showing contempt for the constitutional authority of the execu tive committee and has demonstrated an appetite for operati ng above the rules and regu lations of this august body since s he was elected to office. The executive committee warned her about this on a n umber of occasions. This latest breach of established BUT pro tocols was the last straw.” M r McPhee said the com mittee will meet this morning to d iscuss how to replace the missing pension funds. He said there was never any allegation of the misappropriation of funds, and specifically of $90,000, as reported in national media on Monday, and that the committee sought to inform union members of the s uspension before calling a press conference yesterday. However Mrs Wilson had c alled a press conference on Monday to publicly defend her n ame by admitting she had followed wrong process but not misappropriated funds. Teachers and union members supporting Mrs Wilsona ttended Monday’s meeting spoke out about how this is thew rong time to suspend the president as hundreds of teachers r ecently took part in industrial action over teaching conditions in government schools. But Mr McPhee told teachers the committee had noc hoice. He said: “I would like to k now what is a good time to suspend the president? There’s n ever a good time to suspend the president. “This executive committee of the Bahamas Union of Teachers does not take lightly t he consequences of suspending the president, however thee xecutive committee does not have the authority to disregard t he rules of the handbook.” He further alluded to Mrs W ilson’s disregard for the BUT rulebook by drawing attention to the fact she had threatened to file complaints with national and international bodies including Education International and the ILO over outstanding grievances with the employer. Mr McPhee said: “The matt er has never been on the agenda of any executive committee meetings. This is just another exam ple of the level of contempt this p resident continues to show for the rules and legitimate authority of the executive committee.” The union’s supreme authority is vested in the Annual Gen-e ral Meeting (AGM bers and is then governed byt he executive committee. Mr McPhee encouraged m embers to uphold the union’s constitution yesterday. He said: “We caution BUT members to consult the constitution and governance manuala nd become seized in the rules and regulations of our unionb efore allowing themselves to be used by special interest in a d angerous game of politics. “We also ask members to discern and understand the dif ference between the politics of individuals and the requirem ents of our great union as outlined in its constitution and gov-e rnance manual. Unite and build.” she did not think that the complaint required an investigationi nto whether the discharge of the jury was proper but whether Forbes’ announcement posed a real risk of prejudice t o the administration of justice. M r Munroe then said he, Mr McKinney and Mr Sears would require more time to consider the complaint. D irector of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turner did not object to the application for more time. The hearing was a djourned to next Thursday at 1 0am. While Forbes declined to speak to reporters outside the courtroom yesterday, Mr McK-i nney said: “We will take whatever steps are necessary to convince the judge that there was no interference by our client w ith the trial or in any way with the procedures that were required to be followed by anybody, including Mr Forbes.” Director of Public Prosecut ions Bernard Turner told reporters: “The judge has sent for Mr Forbes. The Crown doesn’t have a position in this m atter. We are present but we will see what the judges’ posit ion is.” He said the Crown has not yet considered when a retrial in the attempted extortion case willb e held. The nine-member jury in the attempted extortiont rial of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and form er Grand Bahama ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne was discharged at 10.54pm Wednesday although they had not reached a verdict. S enior Justice Allen told jurors there had beena nnouncement at a political convention by a senior official, i ndicating that one of the accused persons had been acquitted. Earlier, around 9.30pm, Mr Forbes took to the convention stage, while the jury w as still deliberating, and told delegates that Bridgewater had b een acquitted. He exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free woman, P LPs! God is good, PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God still reigns, PLPs!” No verdict had been reached yet convention members celeb rated Bridgewater's supposed vindication by singing and d ancing to "Oh Happy Day." The session chairman later had t o apologise for whatever con fusion the MP's pronounce ment caused. Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accusedof attempting to extort, and conspiring to extort $25 million from American actor John Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They d eny the charges. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Travolta retrial F ROM page one BUT president Teacher charged school. Buchanan, a teacher employed at the Eight Mile Rock High School, was removed in March following complaints of alleged sexual molestation. Attorney Calvin Seymour represented Buchanan at his arraignment. He was not required to enter a plea to a charge of indecent assault and was granted $5,000 bail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to February 25, 2010, for continuation in the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court. FROM page one F ROM page one F ROM page one P icewell Forbes mitted to helping those in need. Dubbing the PLP the “party of h eart”, Mr Christie inspired applause and cheers as he said: “Whatever my faults may be, there’s one thing you know about me; I feel f or people. " I feel for people deep in my heart and in my soul and it is t hat feeling, that compassion, that provides the fuel, the energy, the vigour and the drive for my life in politics.” H e attacked the FNM government for failing to take bold and imaginative action to address the needs of the people in a fallen e conomy, which had been left in tact by the PLP in 2007. He said: “We are the party of heart, not the party of market f orces. We don’t shrug our shoulders when market forces bring about the loss of thousands of jobs. While people lose their jobs and can’t afford to put food on the table, this government just shrugs its shoulders and leaves them on their own. How can any government be so blind, so deaf, so uncaring, so lacking in compassion, so clueless as the FNM government we have today?” H e criticised the government for not proactively putting infrastructure in place to reduce rising crime. M r Christie called on FNM to bring back the Urban Renewal Programme, introduce 24-hour mobile police patrol, and bring surveillance and crime detection technology up to date. Government should also address the backlog of criminal cases by holding night court, he said, adding that a witness protection prog ramme that complies with world standards is necessary for the Bahamas. Mr Christie re-iterated his firm belief in the deathp enalty for convicted murderers, a statement met with applause from his supporters, and demanded the government restrict the g ranting of bail in capital cases. As he drew a close to the three-day convention, Mr Christie encouraged unity within the party to strengthen the PLP for a rise to power. He said: “There is so much unfinished work that awaits us. Let us therefore bind ourselves in unity so when the day o f our return to power dawns before us, we will find ourselves ready; ready to resume the march of the Bahamian nation to a bet t er and brighter tomorrow for all its people.” Moments after Mr Christie finished speaking, the FNM issued a r esponse, saying the opposition leader had merely reiterated promises he failed to keep when in office. “Now he is promising more of the same: more speechmaking, more indecision and more of the same old guard,” the FNM said. “Mr Christie led the efforts by the PLP old guard, which failed the c ountry so miserably in the past, to entrench their position in the party, sweeping aside any reformers in his party and cancelling the i nvolvement of a younger generation to participate in its senior ranks. He is now in lock step with Bradley Roberts, whom he c alled back to duty as his personal attack machine. As usual, Mr Christie’s speech was long on flowery rhetoric and short on detailed solutions to pressing issues. “While Mr Christie talked endlessly about his heart, the Bahami an people doubt and rendered a verdict in the last election on MrC hristie’s ability to get anything done, to effectively lead and dis cipline his colleagues, and to replace a late-again culture witht imely decision-making.” The FNM went on to criticse Mr Christie’s suggestion that U rban Renewal was scrapped, saying the programme is alive and flourishing. The party also denied the PLP leader’s claim that P rime Minister Ingraham has not gone before the Bahamian people to speak on the challenges of the day, saying he has done so “on c ountless occasions”. “But unlike Mr Christie, who is thrilled by the sound of his o wn rhetoric, the prime minister has also acted decisively, including the initiation of landmark social programmes the PLP failed to put in place in better economic times. Mr Christie and others in the party are talking as if there is a global economic crisis in every coun try in the world, except in the Bahamas. Because they can’t talk economic reality and sense now, they cannot be allowed to once again be charged with the country’s economic stewardship,” he said. Christie: I will return PLPto power IMPASSIONED: Perry Christie last night. F ROM page one

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THE Bahamas has welc omed the 13th Ambassador of the United States of America. G overnor General Arthur Hanna accepted Letters of Credence from Nicole Avant, 41, during a ceremony at Government House on Thursday. Hea lso accepted Letters of Recall of former ambassador NedS eigel. Ambassador Avant also paid c ourtesy calls on Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette. T he Bahamas and United States established relations onS eptember 17, 1973 and both countries share historical exper iences as former British colonies. “The success of Bahamas/ United States bi-lateral relations is augmented by our coo peration and shared interest in a number of key issues of s ignificance for the hemispheric and international agenda as a w hole,” the Governor General said. “It is because of these shared and common concerns that our countries have been on one a ccord when such issues are addressed in regional and inter n ational fora such as the Organ isation of American States and t he United Nations. These include, among others, drug trafficking, terrorism, human rights, the environment and disarmament.” T he Governor General said he welcomed Ambassador A vant’s commitment to con tinue work on key priority i ssues of benefit to both coun tries, including: the protection o f borders through programmes designed to combat the transshipment of illicit drugs and thes muggling of illegal migrants and illicit light weapons; e nhanced joint efforts against terrorism; the building of prosperity and economic security; and the defence and promotion of human rights and democratic ideals. The government also fully appreciates the ambassador’s c ommitment to ensuring that OPBAT continues to receive t he full support and resources needed to carry out its mandate, he said. “This partnership is in its 21st year and is considered the hallm ark of Bahamas/United States efforts in counter-drug opera t ions, and a model for such third state co-operation,” the G overnor General said. Nuc lear The threat posed by nuclear weapons proliferation and oth e r weapons of mass destruction is also a major concern, he said, a dding that the Bahamas looks forward to the continued coll aboration to oppose the increase of such weapons in the hemisphere. He also mentioned the impact the global recession is having on small island developing nations, particularly in the area of tourism. As 70 per cent of tourists come from North America, he said, it is important that thep artnership between the US and the Bahamas be further strengthened and deepened. The Bahamas looks forward to enhanced assistance by the US Embassy’s consular section in facilitating first-rate visa ser vices for Bahamians, and the pursuit of civic and cultural interaction between both coun t ries, the Governor General said. A mbassador Avant said she was honoured to have been a ppointed ambassador to the Bahamas. She mentioned that her family has a long-standing connection to the Bahamas, and that s he brings to service a lifetime of experience in philanthropy, p olitics and culture. Ambassador Avant also p ledged to work closely with the government on such issues as protection of borders against drug trafficking and illegal migrants, terrorism, building p rosperity and economic security, defending and promoting h uman rights and democratic ideals, and supporting sustain-a ble energy. Nicole Avant was born on March 6, 1968 to music executive Clarence Avant, a former chairman of Motown Records,a nd Jacqueline Avant. She spearheads several multin ational, multi-agency operations to combat international drug trafficking and illicit weapons shipments. Ambassador Avant is married to Ted Sarandos, chief con tent officer for Netflix Corporation, and they have two children, Sarah and Tony. T he College of the Bahamas, in conjunction with the Construction Seminar Group, will host the Caribbean’s first Nobel Prize winner for literature Derek Walcott for two exciting events i n November. This will be the first time that the Bahamas has ever hosted a Nobel Laureate. Honoured by the MacArthur Foundation, the Royal Society of Literature and Her Majesty the Queen, Mr Walcott is an outspoken poet,p laywright, writer and visual artist. He will present on the topic “Art, Politics and Caribbean Culture” at the college’s signature Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lecture Series o n Thursday, November 12. Mr Walcott will also address the 2009 Construction Seminar on the impact of foreign direct investment on the development of the Caribbean on Friday, November 13. “Hosting a Nobel Laureate in the Bahamas is a highly celebrated achievement and comes on the heels of P resident Barack Obama being awarded the Nobel Prize for extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and his support for nuclear arms reduction,” the collegen oted in a statement. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.711.03AML Foods Limited1.171.170.000.1270.0009.20.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9.305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1250.09025.22.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.209.93Cable Bahamas9.939.930.001.4060.2507.12.52% 2.882.72Colina Holdings2.722.720.002390.2490.04010.91.47% 7 .505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.835.74-0.092,5000.4190.30013.75.23% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.013.040.030.1110.05227.41.71% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.250.2012,0000.6250.0803.63.56% 8.206.28Famguard6.506.500.000.4200.24015.53.69% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.6310.35015.83.50% 5.534.11Focol (S)4.114.110.000.3320.15012.43.65% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.009.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 792 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1400 2246 0000 N/M 000% T HURSDAY, 22 OCTOBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,489.00 | CHG -3.49 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD -223.36 | YTD % -13.04BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%B ISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W W W.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 14 . 60 7 . 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 00 2 . 246 0 . 000 N/M 0 . 00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8300-3.75-6.75 1.49541.4217CFAL Money Market Fund1.49544.305.18 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.175112.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.17514.425.86 103.0956100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund103.09563.102.52 100.000099.4177CFAL Global Equity Fund99.41773.122.76 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.58849.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund10.58845.885.88 1.07571.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07573.865.30 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0305-0.240.22 1.07091.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.07093.244.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200730-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 NAV Date 30-Sep-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual FundsTO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Sep-09 31-Dec-07 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 16-Oct-09 31-Aug-09MARKET TERMS NOTICEis hereby given that CHRISTIAN APPOLON of DUMPING GROUNDCR, Apt#1,NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE NOTICEis hereby given that EDITH MEDELUS of CARMICHAEL , NASSAU, BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twentyeight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE The Bahamas welcomes 13th US Ambassador Bahamas hosts Nobel Prize winner Derek Wal cott DEREKWALCOTT GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna, right, accepts Letters of Credence from Nicole Avant, the new Ambassador of the United States to the Bahamas. D e r e k S m i t h ? B I S P h o t o D e r e k S m i t h ? B I S P h o t o US AMBASSADOR Nicole Avant, left, accepts a gift from Governor General Arthur Hanna. Pictured far right is Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix Corporation, husband of Ambassador Avant.

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 INSIDE MIAMIDOLPHINSPREVIEW TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM SAILING T HE final day of sailing i n 2009 Sunfish World Championships was domi-n ated by a trio of Americ ans who swept the leader board to culminate the week long event. David Loring main t ained a lead he held since Wednesday afternoon to win the competition witha net total of 28.6 points. His highlights included a first place finish in race five, second place finishesi n races four, and seven, a nd third place finishes in r aces one and 10. Loring’s American counterparts ended thec ompetition with a flurry to move into the second and third spots respectively. Paul-Jon Patin finished in second place with a total of 30 net points, while David Mendelblatt finished third with 32 points. Rankings Patin entered the day in third position but finished third in race nine and won race 10 to ascend the rankings. He won the opening race of the event and ended competition with his second win which book ends a second place finish in race two and third place finishes in races five and eight. Mendelblatt continued a wave of momentum he was able to establish Wednesday, delivering a dominating performance over the final stretch. M endelblatt ended day four with wins in races seven and eight, and returnedy esterday to take race nine a nd finish second in race two. His three wins led the field while he also finished second twice (races three and 10) and third in race four. Peter Stanton of the U.S Virgin Islands finished fourth with 41 net points. Stanton’s best finishes included second in races eight and nine and third in race six. M ax Chirnos of Venezuela fell three spots on the final but was stilla ble to round out the top f ive with 43 net points. Chirnos finished a disap pointing 19th in race nine and fourth in the finale. Donald Martinbourough improved his standing by three positions on the final day to finish 13th, the best overall finish of any Bahamians in the field. Martinbourough had arguably his best day yes terday with a Champi onship-high ninth place fin i sh in race nine and 19th place in race 10. He finished with 156 net p oints. C harles Kelly was the second best finisher among Bahamian boats, 23 overall with 224 net points. Christopher Sands improved eight positions in the final rankings when he turned in his best performance on the final day. Sands had the top two finishes amongst Bahamian sailors with an eighth place finish in race nine and sixth place in race tent o finish with 234 net p oints. Sands effort gave him the b iggest single day improvem ent of any sailor in the field. Fernando De Cardenas finished 30th with 262 netp oints, Gavin Mckinney was 32nd with 275 net points, and Andrew Wil-h oyte was 36th with 292 net points. Other Bahamians in the field included James Lowe40th (310 4 1st (319 W assitsch 42nd (322 Donico Brown 46th (382 George Damianos 47th( 389), Ted O’Brien 49th (41350th (416 las 53rd (436 64th (547 rows 65th (555 Americans dominate Sunfish leaderboard ALTHOUGHthey struggled in the overall standings, Bahamian sailors fared well amongst their respective categories in the 2009 Sunfish World Championships. James Lowe was second amongst Grand Masters, a category which features sailors 70-79 years-of-age. Greg Gust of the United States won the division while fellow countryman Charles Clifton finished third. Donald Martinborough finished third in the Master category, for sailors 50-59 years-of-age. Gavin McKinney was fifth, while George Damianoes finished sixth. Malcolm Smith of Bermuda took top honours in the category while Cor Van Aanholt finished second. Christopher Sands finished fifth to lead a strong Bahamian field in the Junior category, won by Ard Van Aanholt of Curacao. Matthew De By of Holland was second while Jose Gutierrez finished third. Donico Brown finished seventh, Michael Holowesko eighth and BJ Burrows 11th. The top three finisher overall, David Loring of the United States won the Senior division, while David Mendalblatt (US Peter Stanton (USVI Charles Kelly finished ninth in the category, Fernando de Cardenas was 11th, Andrew Wilhoyte was 12th, Ted O’Brien finished 14th, while Dwayne Wallas was 16th. DJ Lorsbaugh (USVI Midget division, Pedro Wassitsch (Austria ter division, while second place overall finisher, Paul-Jon Patin (US the Apprentice division. BAHAMIANSFARE WELLINRESPECTIVECATEGORIES W orld Championships come to a close TENNIS THEGatorade Senior Tennis Nationals near its completion this weekend with a series of thrilling final matches set to square off at the Gym Tennis Club. In Thurday’s play two division winners were crowned in doubles. Robert Dunn and Neil McTaggert won the 35’s Men’s Doubles with a 6-3, 6-0 win over George Baxteer and Harrington Saunders. John Antonas and Kit Spencer lived up to their top seed billing with a 6-1, 6-0 win over Vince Andrews and Bud Cambridge in the 55’s Men’s Doubles final. Brent Johnson advanced to the final of the 35’s Men’s Singles with a 6-1,6-2 win over Dwayne Gibson. In last night’s action, Antonas, the top seed in the 55’s Mens Singles, took on his doubles teammate, Spencer in the division final, while Johnson took on Stefano Donati. Results were unavailable at press time. In today’s 35’s Women’s final, Alicia Butler will face second ranked Dionne Butler. Senior Tennis Nationals near completion TENNIS MOSCOW Associated Press ALISA KLEYBANOVA upset defending champion Jelena Jankovic 6-4, 6-3 Friday to advance to the semifinals of the Kremlin Cup. The upset came a day after the second-seeded Jankovic took the last spot for the sea son-ending WTA Championships in Doha, Qatar. Jankovic dropped serve in the fifth game of each set. Down 5-3 in the second set, Jankovic double-faulted twice to lose the match. Kleybanova will play Olga Govortsova of Belarus, who crusied past Vera Dushevina 6-3, 6-0. Eighth-seeded Francesca Schiavone of Italy advanced with a 6-3, 6-2 win over Maria Kirilenko. Schiavone, the 2005 runnerup, will play Alona Bondarenko in the other semifinal. Bondarenko ousted qualifier Tsvetana Pironkova 6-3, 6-3. In the men’s tournament, sixth-seeded Janko Tipsarevic advanced to his first semifinal this season by defeating Robby Ginepri of the United States, 63, 6-3. Tipsarevic will face Ukranian qualifier Illya Marchenko, who rallied to beat Evgeny Korolev 0-6, 6-2, 6-3. Qualifier Mikhail Kukushkin of Kazakhstan also rallied for a 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 win over fifth-seeded Pablo Cuevas. Kukushkin will play third-seeded Mikhail Youzh ny of Russia, who downed Sergiy Stakhovsky 6-3, 6-3. Jankovic upset, Schiavone advances at Kremlin Cup ASCENE from the 2009 Sunfish World Championship this week.

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By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer THISwould be a good time for the Miami Dolphins to unveil the defensive equivalent of the wildcat, whatever that might be. Nothing tried so far has slowed the New Orleans Saints. The Dolphins face the NFL’s highest-scoring team Sunday and could use a wildcat-style surprise. “Put 11 linebackers in the game,” Miami linebacker Channing Crowder suggested. “Blitz Crowder every play.” Something that radical might be worth a shot against the Saints, 5-0 for the first time since 1993 and averaging 38.4 points per game. “I don’t think you want to try to get into a scoring contest with these people,” Miamic oach Tony Sparano said. “We’ve got to do something to not let the candy store be open.” Sparano hopes his defense learned lots from early-season matchups against Peyton Manning, Matt Ryan and Philip Rivers. One lesson: The Dolphins weren’t good enough, los ing all three games. Ryan threw for 229 yards and two scores in the opener, while Manning and Rivers threw for 303 yards each. The defense fared better facing less potent offenses against the Bills and Jets. Miami won both games to improve to 2-3 and climb back into the AFC East race. But the Dolphins will be tough to take seriously as a playoff contender until they make a stand against a top quarterback. Still to come for Miami are two games against Tom Brady and one against Ben Roethlisberger. Brees may be the best of the bunch. He has thrown 101 touchdown passes since choosing the Saints over the Dolphinsa s a free agent in 2006, and this season he’s better than ever, leading the NFL in passing. New Orleans has yet to trail while winning each game by at least 14 points. Coach Sean Payton views his team’s start as a good omen. “When you end up on a team t hat gets into the postseason, generally there’s a stretch where you play good football and you stack together wins,” Payton said. New Orleans is doing that, and the latest victory was the most impressive yet. Against the New York Giants’ stout d efense, the Saints totaled 493 yards with no turnovers or sacks and won 48-27. Seven Saints scored one TD each against the Giants, reflecting the multitude of weapons at Brees’ disposal. “We’ve all been in this sys tem now for four years and take n a lot of snaps together,” Brees said. “There’s a huge confidence level that we play with now, and our comfort level with each other makes a big difference.” Brees’ ability to use the entire field is one thing that makes him special, Sparano said. If the Saints send out four receivers on a play, Brees quickly determines which target is the best option. “He can get through the progression really quick to get to where he is going with the football,” Sparano said. “He gets one to four really fast.” As a result, Brees has been sacked only four times in 163 plays. That means a big challenge for the Dolphins’ pass rush, which has been inconsistent, in part because linebacker Joey Porter has been slowed by a hamstring injury that he said is now healed. Porter has only two sacks after leading the AFC last year with 17 1/2. When the Dolphins give opposing quarterbacks time to throw, the result is often costly. They’re allowing 15 yards per completion, worst in the NFL. Rookie cornerback Sean Smith has played well, but veterans Will Allen and Gibril Wilson get burned often. And the Saints thrive on big plays, leading the league with seven touchdown drives of less than four plays. “You’ve got to make them matriculate down the field,” Crowder said. Matriculate? “Google it,” he said. “If they’re going to go 80 yards on you, you’ve got to make them have those 10-, 11-, 12-play dri ves. They want to get those big chunks, and they are an explo sive offense. We’ve got to limit Brees and make them work.” An occasional turnover would help, but the Dolphins are tied for last in the NFL with four takeaways. Three-quarters of the starting secondary has yet to make an interception, and Brees has been picked off only twice. Miami will counter at quarterback with second-year pro Chad Henne, 2-0 as a starter and coming off his best game in a 31-27 win over the Jets. Nearly 10 years after Dan Mari no retired, the Dolphins believe they’ve finally found a franchise quarterback. Henne likes the idea of filling that role. “Really being the leader in the offense is showing,” he said. “The guys are looking up to me in the huddle. It feels comfortable, and I’m getting used to it.” Henne will hope for help from the wildcat, which the Dolphins are using more than ever. The package generated 110 yards and the winning touchdown against the Jets. Miami nose tackle Jason Ferguson smiled when asked what type of wildcat-style surprise might slow the Saints’ offense. “The wildcat of a defense?” the 310-pound Ferguson said. “I would think maybe me rushing, seven DBs, one linebacker. I need somebody to get the outside because I don’t want to be running Brees down, so give us two ends. “Hey, we’re coming the wild Ferg.” Why not try it? Nothing else has worked against the Saints. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 12, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Miami Dolphins look for way to slow Saints M IAMI DOLPHINS q uarterback Chad Henne (7 12, 2009 in Miami. L y n n e S l a d k y / A P AS NEW ORLEANS SAINTS offensive tackle Jermon Bushrod (74 Evans (44 the New York Giants and New Orleans Saints in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Sunday, Oct. 18, 2009. Saints won 48-27. B i l l F e i g / A P S OCCER L IVERPOOL, England A ssociated Press A LIVERPOOLsupporters' group is planning a march ahead of Sunday'sP remier League match a gainst Manchester United to protest against the way American businessmen George Gillett Jr. and Tom Hicks are running the club. L ocal police said Friday there will be an "appropri ate level of security" ahead o f the match, suggesting there will be an increase int he number of officers pres ent. T he march to Anfield is being organized by the Spirit of Shankly group, which has published an e-mail address on its Web site asking for information onw here Gillet and Hicks are staying. Merseyside police said they could not discuss the security of individuals or confirm the number of offic ers set to be on duty at a m atch that Liverpool has to win to rekindle its fading hopes of winning a firstl eague title for 20 years. Gillett and Hicks have attracted the ire of fans by l oading it with debt in their 2 007 buyout. In an open letter to Gillett and Hicks, Spirit of S hankly said the American pair was not welcome at the club. " All we care about is our f ootball club, our history and traditions, and our future," the letter read. "Tou s, you play no part in that future especially not if we want to be successful andk eep moving forward. "You will leave a black mark on the history of our football club. You haved ragged us back, and this season, you have made us stand still, whilst other clubs m ove forward." Liverpool finished runner-up to United last seasonw ith just two losses in 38 games but, having sold Xabi Alonso to Real Madrid, is currently eighth and on its worst losing streak in 22 years. Liverpool has lost four straight games in all compe titions and has been beaten in four of nine Premier League matches. Fans blame the club's 245 million-pound ($390 million) debt for manager Rafa Benitez's inability to buy top-class players and fund a new 60,000-seat stadium. Construction on the new ground was halted in August 2008 because of the global economic downturn. Hicks, who owns basebal l's Texas Rangers and the NHL's Dallas Stars, and Gillett bought Liverpool in 2007 for nearly $290 million, taking on about $73.8 mil lion in liabilities. Gillett recently sold the NHL's Montreal Canadiens, the Gillett Entertainment Centre and the Bell Centre back to the Molson family for a reported $580 million. Liverpool fans set to march against American co-owners

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE T AMPA ORLANDOLow: 67F/19C L ow: 69F/21C Low: 72F/22C L ow: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 77F/25C Low: 76F/24C H igh: 88F/31C H igh: 85F/29C H igh: 86F/30C H igh: 86F/30C High: 88F/31C High: 86F/30C H igh: 87F/31C Low: 77F/25C H igh: 87F/31C L ow: 79F/26C H igh: 87F/31CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 77F/25C High: 86F/30C L ow: 77F/25C High: 86F/30C Low: 76F/24C H igh: 84F/29C Low: 77F/25C H igh: 86F/30C L ow: 77F/25C H igh: 88F/31C Low: 78F/26C High: 87F/31C L ow: 74F/23C H igh: 88F/31C Low: 78F/26C High: 89F/32C Low: 78F/26C H igh: 87F/31C High: 85F/29CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECASTClouds and sun, a t -storm; breezy Partly cloudy; a thunderstorm Sunny intervals, a t-storm in spots Partly sunny and mild M ainly cloudy, t-storms possible H igh:87Low:77High:8 High:8 High:9 A ccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeelPartly sunny with t-storms possible H igh:89Low:79Low:78Low:78 AccuWeather RealFeel 8 F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperaturei s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 84F 90-87F 100-81F 98-88F 1 04-84F Low:78TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY ALMANACHigh ..................................................86F/30C Low ....................................................75F/24C Normal high ......................................84F/29C Normal low ........................................72F/22CL ast year's high ..................................81F/27C L ast year's low ..................................74F/23C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.08" Y ear to date ................................................31.97" N ormal year to date ....................................44.28" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU F irst F ullLast N ew Oct. 25Nov. 2Nov. 9Nov. 16Sunrise . . . . . . 7:13 a.m. S unset . . . . . . . 6:35 p.m. Moonrise . . . 12:57 p.m. M oonset . . . . 11:48 p.m. Today Sunday Monday Tuesday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 11:54 a.m.2.85:27 a.m.0.9 ----6:30 p.m.1.0 12:21 a.m.2.36:22 a.m.1.2 12:48 p.m.2.77:25 p.m.1.2 1:20 a.m.2.37:22 a.m.1.3 1 :44 p.m.2.68:18 p.m.1.2 2 :19 a.m.2.48:24 a.m.1.3 2 :39 p.m.2.69:08 p.m.1.0 Wednesday T hursday Friday 3:14 a.m.2.59:23 a.m.1.2 3 :30 p.m.2.69:53 p.m.0.9 4:03 a.m.2.610:16 a.m.1.0 4:16 p.m.2.610:34 p.m.0.7 4:47 a.m.2.811:05 a.m.0.7 5:01 p.m.2.711:13 p.m.0.4 MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. ABACO ANDROS CAT ISLAND CROOKED ISLAND ELEUTHERA FREEPORT GREAT EXUMA GREAT INAGUA LONG ISLAND MAYAGUANA NASSAU SAN SALVADOR RAGGED ISLAND Today:SE at 15-25 Knots5-9 Feet5 Miles80F Sunday:S at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles80F Today:SW at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet5 Miles81F Sunday:ESE at 7-14 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles81F Today:SSE at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet5 Miles83F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles83F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles83F Sunday:SE at 12-25 Knots3-6 Feet10 Miles83F Today:SSE at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet10 Miles82F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles82F Today:S at 6-12 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles82F Sunday:SSW at 3-6 Knots1-2 Feet5 Miles81F Today:S at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles82F Sunday:SE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles82F Today:SE at 7-14 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles84F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet7 Miles84F Today:SE at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles83F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles83F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet7 Miles84F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots4-7 Feet6 Miles84F Today:S at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet5 Miles82F Sunday:SSE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet4 Miles82F Today:SE at 6-12 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles83F Sunday:SE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles83F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles82F Sunday:SE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles82F UV INDEXTODAYThe higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTMnumber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. AccuWeather.com L H Atlanta A t l a n t a Highs: 66F/19C H i g h s : 6 6 F / 1 9 C Kingston K i n g s t o n Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Caracas C a r a c a s Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Panama City P a n a m a C i t y Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Limon L i m o n Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Managua Ma n a g u a Highs: 92F/33C H i g h s : 9 2 F / 3 3 C Cozumel C o z u m e l Highs: 90F/32C H i g h s : 9 0 F / 3 2 C Belize B e l i z e Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Charlotte C h a r l o t t e Highs: 73F/23C H i g h s : 7 3 F / 2 3 C Charleston C h a r l e s t o n Highs: 80F/27C H i g h s : 8 0 F / 2 7 C Savannah S a v a n n a h Highs: 80F/27C H i g h s : 8 0 F / 2 7 C Pensacola P e n s a c o l a Highs: 72F/22C H i g h s : 7 2 F / 2 2 C Daytona Beach D a y t o n a B e a c h Highs: 82F/28C H i g h s : 8 2 F / 2 8 C Tampa T a m p a Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Freeport F r e e p o r t Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Miami Mi a m i Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Nassau N a s s a u Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Havana H a v a n a Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Santiago de Cuba S a n t i a g o d e C u b a Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C San Juan S a n J u a n Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Santa S a n t a Domingo D o m i n g o Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Trinidad T r i n i d a d Tobago T o b a g o Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Port-au-Prince P o r t a u P r i n c e Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Cape Hatteras C a p e H a t t e r a s Highs: 80F/27C H i g h s : 8 0 F / 2 7 C Aruba Curacao A r u b a C u r a c a o Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Antigua A n t i g u a Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Barbados B a r b a d o s Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Bermuda B e r m u d a Highs: 77F/25C H i g h s : 7 7 F / 2 5 C Atlanta Highs: 66F/19C Kingston Highs: 86F/30C Caracas Highs: 88F/31C Panama City Highs: 86F/30C Limon Highs: 83F/28C Managua Highs: 92F/33C Cozumel Highs: 90F/32C Belize Highs: 86F/30C Charlotte Highs: 73F/23C Charleston Highs: 80F/27C Savannah Highs: 80F/27C Pensacola Highs: 72F/22C Daytona Beach Highs: 82F/28C Tampa Highs: 85F/29C Freeport Highs: 85F/29C Miami Highs: 88F/31C Nassau Highs: 87F/31C Havana Highs: 86F/30C Santiago de Cuba Highs: 83F/28C San Juan Highs: 89F/32C Santa Domingo Highs: 84F/29C Trinidad Tobago Highs: 89F/32C Port-au-Prince Highs: 87F/31C Cape Hatteras Highs: 80F/27C Aruba Curacao Highs: 89F/32C Antigua Highs: 87F/31C Barbados Highs: 86F/30C Bermuda Highs: 77F/25C INSURANCEMANAGMENTTRACKINGMAP Showers Warm Cold Stationary Rain T-storms Flurries Snow IceShown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows. N S EW S E 6 -12 knots N S EW S E 1 5-25 knots N S EW S E 8-16 knots N S EW S E 10-20 knots N S EW N S S S 8-16 knots N S EW S E 8-16 knots N S EW S E 6-12 knots N S EW S E 6 -12 knots BISHOP LAWRENCE ALOYISUS BURKE receives the Order of Jamaica from Governor General of Jamaica Sir Patrick Allen at the Ceremony of Investiture and Presentation of National Honours at Kings House, Jamaica on National Heroes Day. BISHOP RECEIVES ORDER OF JAMAICA 1. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM is escorted by Sister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High School principal Yvonne Ward upon his arrival at the official opening and naming of the new government school on Grand Bahama on Thursday. OFFICIALOPENINGOFGRANDBAHAMASCHOOL 1 3. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM and Education Minister Carl Bethel tour the library. 3 4. A STUDENT of theSister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High School sings a solo section of the school song 4 2. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM , Education Minister Carl Bethel and Works and Transport Minister Neko Grant participate in the ribbon cutting ceremo ny 2

PAGE 11

CULTURAL FESTIVAL AFTER a year of absence, the International Cultural Festival was held again last weekend at the Botanical Gardens in Nassau. The focus of the festival is to showcase international cuisine and art forms such as song and dance. The beautiful Botanical Gardens were transformed as families f locked to the venue to enjoy the experience and taste international delights. The Gardens were dotted with booths representing countries from the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and South America. Countries such as Greece, Peru, Cuba, Haiti, India, Jamaica, Myanmar, China and France created a melting pot of people, cultures and flavours alongside the Bahamian village. Young ando ld were out and about mingling with friends and acquaintances, e njoying cultural performances on stage and trying various international beers, mojitos, sweet treats such as ice cream and baklava, and tasty dishes like jerk chicken, grilled shrimp, gyro, low mein, conch fritters and Canadian bacon, to name but a few of the culinary options on display. The Cultural Festival was truly an interesting event and it starts a Christmas season of family events, festivals and togetherness. C M Y K C M Y K OUTANDABOUT PAGE 14, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM OUT & ABOUT IN THE 242 M R CHIN’S PROMO GIRLS PATRONS OFDJ XCITEMENT’S PARTY XCITEMENT, DJFINES AND BIGDOOBS HAITI BOOTH HEIKE ATTHE CUBANBOOTH DRXCITEMENT’SBIRTHDAYBASH: DISC JOCKEY with 100JAMZ, DJ Xcitement celebrated his birthday in style at a bash that went down at Charlie’s in Nassau last Saturday. Patrons, and especially the ladies, came out in abundance for the event, and of course the best DJs were there to entertain the crowd with good music and vibes. Supa Mario, DJ Ignite, DJ Fatal, DJ Fines,T G Movements, Big Doobs and Reality were all present to party with Xcitement and all the clubbers inside Charlie’s. Champagne and Grey Goose were flowing upstairs in the VIP Lounge while the crowd downstairs took over the dancefloor. A performance by popular Bahamian hip hop artist Porter the Poet kept the patrons going as he showed off his lyrical skills and performed some of his hit songs such as “Get This Paper” and “Leave That Girl Alone”. The party continuedw ith the best in hip hop, reggae and dancehall music through the night. In case you missed the event, don’t worry, the Christmas 2009 party season for is just getting started!


WEATHER

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Volume: 105 No.277



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ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE

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www.tribune242.com

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

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SUES Sy ti Fa : 5

Travolta retrial
may move to US

Attorney asks
for evidence to
be forwarded
to prosecutors
in America

EN UN

AFTERMATH



By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

John Travolta’s attorney has
asked Bahamian authorities to
forward all of the evidence
from the attempted extortion
trial of Pleasant Bridgewater
and Tarino Lightbourne to
prosecutors in the United
States who will see if the case
could be retried there.

Michael Ossi, who also testi-
fied as a witness in the trial, for
which a mistrial verdict was
delivered on Wednesday
evening, told The Tribune that
Bahamian authorities have
agreed to preserve all of the
relevant evidence and the ques-
tion of where the re-trial will
occur is “in the hands of
Bahamian and US prosecu-
tors.”

A decision could be made
within weeks, he suggested.

A mistrial verdict was deliv-
ered and a retrial ordered by
Senior Justice Anita Allen in
the trial of Ms Bridgewater and
Mr Lightboure on Wednesday
after she announced that she
was “very concerned in the
interests of justice” following
an announcement at the PLP
convention by MP Picewell
Forbes that Ms Bridgewater
had been acquitted.

The exclamation by South
Andros representative, Mr
Forbes, came before the jury
had returned its verdict on the
five-week long trial. Justice
Allen said the turn of events
gave the impression that there
had been a communication
from the jury room.

The PLP issued an “unqual-
ified apology” for the statement
made by Mr Forbes, noting that
it was “incorrect” and “not
intended to interfere with the
administration of justice.”

That evening Mr Ossi wel-
comed the mistrial verdict given
the circumstances and noted

SEE page eight

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PICEWELL FORBES, who appeared at a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita Aleen, is pictured with

his attorney Wayne Munroe.
By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

SOUTH Andros MP Picewell Forbes is
expected back before a judge next week to
explain why he should not be held in contempt of
court for an outburst at the PLP’s national con-
vention which led to a mistrial in the John Tra-
volta attempted extortion case.

Forbes appeared calm and composed as he
sat behind his team of attorneys in a courtroom
packed with PLP supporters and officials dur-
ing a brief hearing before Senior Justice Anita
Allen yesterday. Attorney Wayne Munroe, who

along with Anthony McKinney and Alfred Sears
represents Forbes, told the judge that the MP
had been unable to instruct them on what the
precise allegations were to which he had to

answer.

Senior Justice Allen explained that the hear-
ing had come about as a result of an announce-
ment made at the political convention while the
jury was still deliberating. On Wednesday night,

Forbes took to the convention stage and told

BAHAMAS UNION OF TEACHERS
BUT president withdrew ‘more than
$65,000 from pension fund account’

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Union of
Teachers president Belinda
Wilson, who is accused of mis-
appropriating $90,000 of union
funds, withdrew more than
$65,000 from the union’s pen-
sion fund account to make
extraneous payments, the exec-
utive committee announced

yesterday.

Secretary general Stephen
McPhee explained in a press
conference at the union head-
quarters in Bethel Avenue,
New Providence, how the Pen-
sion Fund Account is exclu-
sively for the payment of mem-
bers’ pension benefits.

The president is not autho-
rised to remove funds from the
account for any other reason,
and is also prohibited from

delegates that former PLP senator Pleasant
Bridgewater had been acquitted of all charges in
the attempted extortion case. The judge said

SEE page eight

spending more than $2,500
without approval from the com-
mittee according to the union’s
constitution.

But Mrs Wilson transferred
$43,284 from the pension fund
and wrote cheques amounting
to $22,548.13 on July 21, tak-
ing a total of $65,832.13 from
the account without bringing it

SEE page eight



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Christie: I
will return
PLP to power



PHOTO: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff
PLP LEADER Perry Christie rallies his troops last night.

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
and AVA TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporters
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REELECTED Progressive Liberal Party leader Perry
Christie instilled new hope in fervent party supporters as
he closed the 51st national party convention last night and
vowed to return the PLP to power.

Mr Christie said he was humbled by his overwhelming
win on Thursday and called for the party to remain uni-
fied at the end of a dramatic race for leadership positions.

To those who did not support Mr Christie, he said he
would prove himself worthy through a number of efforts
addressing social issues, economic strife and rising crime
in the country, promising not to make “the same mistakes

again”.

In an emotional address provoking response from the
crowd at every turn, Mr Christie said as leader he is com-

SEE page eight

NU CRC A A

GB teacher charged with
indecently assaulting student

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Grand
Bahama teacher was charged
at Freeport Magistrate Court
on Thursday with indecently
assaulting a female student.

Edward Buchanan, 56,
appeared in Court Three
before Deputy Chief Magis-
trate Helen Jones.

It is alleged that in Septem-
ber, 2008, Buchanan indecent-
ly assaulted a student while at

SEE page eight



NASSAU AND BAHAM

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

EDWARD BUCHANAN


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

—— —_—_—a PLP CONVENTION COVERAGE

THE TRIBUNE



RRS CUE



PLP LEADER Perry Christie shakes Bradley Roberts’ hand.

‘I intend to dismantle FNM’

BY AVA TURNQUEST

PLP chairman-elect Bradley Roberts spoke
to a packed ballroom last night with support-
ers giving him immense energy as he rallied
them in his inaugural speech.

True to form, Mr Roberts opened by quip-
ping that he had been reliably informed Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham and his colleagues
are extremely troubled over his return and
have already “begun to pack”.

Mr Roberts thanked his supporters pro-
fusely and pledged his steadfast commitment.
He reserved special mention for Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt, whom he commended on her
contributions to the party.

Commended

He also commended former chairman
Glenys Hanna-Martin, who he defeated for
the post, acknowledging her achievements.

Mr Roberts said he wanted to see more
“young blood” in parliament and he assured
supporters that his team will ensure that “there
will be a wonderful mix of personalities, of
varying ages, gender and convictions.”

The outspoken former cabinet minister



made it clear he intends to “dismantle” the
FNM, which he described as uncaring, unre-
sponsive and incapable of tackling the issues
that plague the Bahamian people.

“T have come to bite, and bite hard,” he
said. Mr Roberts hit out at many FNM “fail-
ings” — including crime, national debt and the
management of utilities.

He charged that the government is waiting
for the resuscitation of the US economy and
that in 2007 the FNM “inherited an economy
that was booming and robust”.

“The state of the Bahamian economy is in a
greater state of decay than in 2002 and con-
tinues to worsen day by day,” he said.

The chairman elect advised party members
that their task will not be easy — largely
because of a biased press, which he feels
manipulates the minds of the Bahamian peo-
ple against the PLP.

“Fear not my fellow PLPs,” said Mr Roberts,
“with a renewed commitment to our purpose,
marching forward in unity, on one accord, we
will rescue our country yet again from an FNM
party which is all images and no substances.”

Mr Roberts speech ended with a tremen-
dous roar, with the entire room energised and
shouting: “We ready now, PLP, we ready
now!”




BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

MANAGER - REVENUE ACCOUNTING
CUSTOMER SERVICES DIVISION

A vacancy exists in the Corporation for the position of Manager, Revenue

Accounting.

The job manages the billing of all customer accounts in New Providence and
the Family Islands and the reconciliation of all revenue accounts other than

miscellaneous receivables.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, the following:

Manages the meter reading and billing processes both in
New Providence and the Family Islands
Assists with the disconnection process through the use of meter readers

Prepares the Sales Budget

Prepares the Revenue Accounting Department Budget
Oversees the preparation of the Accounts Receivable Reconciliation
Oversees the training of all Customer Services staff in the new billing

software

Prepares monthly Board Reports

Prepares monthly sales analysis and unbilled revenue reports
Prepares quarterly reports for the Central Bank & Department of

Statistics

Provides statistical billing information for Family Island Managers
Oversees the disconnection of services for non-payment of electricity in

the Family Islands

Attends yearly community meetings as well as ad hoc meetings required
during acquisition of new locations

Develops and implements rules, guidelines and procedures for the
efficient operation of the department

Job requirements include:

A minimum of a Bachelors Degree in Accounts or equivalent

A minimum of 8+ years of experience in accounting practice and theory
Certified Accountant (CPA) or equivalent qualifications

Knowledge of the Electricity Act of the Bahamas

Ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing

Sound reasoning and good judgment skills

Ability to interpret financial reports

Good time management skills
Project Management skills

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application
Form to: The Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Baha-

mas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

N-7509 Nassau

Bahamas on or before: Tuesday, November 3, 2009.

PLP’S new firebrand
chairman blasts Govt
over eCOnomic woes

THE new chairman of the
PLP has hit the ground run-
ning in typical style, launching
a scathing attack on the gov-
erning FNM party.

Former cabinet minister
and notorious political fire-
brand Bradley Roberts blast-
ed the government for refus-
ing to accept any responsibil-
ity for “the worst recession in
the Bahamas since the Great
Depression”.

He said the FNM’s reluc-
tance to admit its policies
have contributed to the coun-
try’s economic Woes is evi-
dence that the party is unfit
for governance.

Mr Roberts said the
Bahamas enjoyed its greatest
level of capital inflow — in
excess of $2.5 billion — during
the PLP administration of
Perry Christie, during which
$5 billion worth of wealth was
created, annual household
income was substantially
increased, inflation was
reduced, unemployment
shrank, and economic growth
stood at 4.5 per cent.

“The record will show that
the financial crisis occurred
in August 2008, a full 15
months after the FNM came
to power. During that time,
Hubert Ingraham has man-
aged to drive away important
foreign investments with his
poor attitude and poor quali-
ty of governance, under-
pinned by his disastrous stop,
review, and cancel policy.

“The record clearly shows
that the policies of the FNM
brought a halt to the eco-
nomic momentum of the
country and the increased
prosperity of the Bahamian
people, resulting in an

Z



“The record
will show that
the financial cri-
sis occurred in
August 2008, a
full 15 months
after the FNM
came to power.”



increase in unemployment,
unsustainable borrowing, and
the misery index, while house-
hold income, government rev-
enue, and tourist arrivals
plummeted,” Mr Roberts
said.

“The Bahamian Dollar
Government Bond is now
under threat, as it was recent-
ly downgraded, and faces a
further downgrade if current
economic conditions do not
improve. We note that this
sorry state of affairs contin-
ues after the government has
added more than $1 billion to
the national debt and has to
borrow monthly to pay its
bills. The amount of this
monthly borrowing has not
been disclosed to the Bahami-
an people. Clearly the return
of Hubert Ingraham has been
disastrous for the well-being
of the Bahamian people,” Mr
Roberts said.

He added: “The collateral
damage to the social infra-
structure of our beloved coun-
try is incalculable as crime has
gone amuck; totally out of
control and the hapless FNM
government is paralysed to do
anything about it.”

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Tae OTS
IPT i bs
UES A he
internal elections

PR Maas)

RESPONDING to the
FNWM’s criticism of the re-
election of Perry Christie
as PLP leader, new chair-
man Bradley Roberts told
the governing party to
take a look in the mirror.

The FNM issued a state-
ment yesterday calling Mr
Christie’s victory a victory
for the PLP old guard and
a blow to any serious
reform by those who rep-
resent “the worst days of
the Pindling era and the
more recent scandalous
past of the party.”




Reform

Hitting back, Mr
Roberts reminded the
FNM of their own failure
to implement reform
“when they brought back
a retired leader who
claimed he had no inter-
est in the job.”

He said Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s apathy
towards governance is evi-
dent in “the sorry perfor-
mance of the government
and the hopelessness,
despair and misery being
visited upon the people of
the Bahamas.”

“The PLP further
reminds the FNM of their
undemocratic practices
when Sir Arlington But-
ler, Maurice Moore,
Algernon Allen, Pierre
Dupuch, and Tennyson
Wells were unceremoni-
ously driven from the
FNM government because
they demonstrated their
democratic rights,” he
added.

Mr Roberts said the
PLP will not be distract-
ed “‘in its fight for the soul
and future security and
prosperity of the Bahami-
an people.”

CYNTHIA ‘Mother’ Pratt
HNO Ces SMS OLN AST IISR

PHOTOS:
Felipé Major
/Tribune staff
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 3

ee PLP CONVENTION COVERAGE



FNM fires back at ‘Big Bad Brad’

Ruling party in scathing rebuttal of Bradley Roberts

WITH the election of Bradley “Big Bad
Brad” Roberts to the chairmanship of the
PLP, the party is clearly gearing up for a
fight. The FNM have not lost a second in
hitting back however — demonstrating that
the governing party is eager and willing to
trade blows.

Following Mr Roberts’ inaugural speech
(see page 2), the FNM immediately
launched a scathing rebuttal — the third
rapid response in three nights of PLP con-
vention speeches.

The FNM’s statement said: “PLP chair-
man Bradley Roberts’ rabid, belligerent
and arrogant convention speech is a return
to the politics the Bahamian people have
moved past. With his typical arrogance, he
likened himself to John the Baptist.

“Rather than preparing the way for gen-
uine deliverance from the problems of the
day, he is preparing the way for the old
guard of his party to return to office with
empty promises, greedy hands, personal
agendas and self-interest.”

The FNM said the country is now unsure

Cheers
waitin
‘Brave’
AAT

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net i

of who the real leader of the PLP is — since
Mr Roberts said that he was brought back
to deal with Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.

“Apparently, Mr Christie is not up to the
job,” the FNM observed.

“Mr Roberts has a long record of char-
acter assassination, but was an ineffective
minister in a government that made delay,
indecision and laziness into an art form.

Patronising

“Mr Roberts’ speech was patronising and
condescending to young Bahamians. After
overthrowing as chairman a second gener-
ation younger PLP woman, Mrs Glenys
Hanna-Martin, in order to re-establish the
control of the old guard, Mr Roberts then
went on to say that he was preparing a way
for young people in the PLP.

“Even as Mr Roberts said that ‘there is a



call these days for younger, fresher faces,’
his return represents stale ideas, old tricks
and a backwards mentality as regards the
new type of politics for which a younger
generation of Bahamians are asking,” the
FNM said.

The party also noted Mr Roberts’ state-
ment that he doesn’t simply want to win
an election, but also destroy and dismantle
the FNM.

“This is not the language that someone
committed to democracy and a healthy two-
party system would be using,” the FNM
said. “It seems that Mr Roberts is proposing
a one-party state in which the PLP has
absolute control. The Bahamian people
have rejected such a political culture before,
and will do so once again.

The FNM said it will welcome “those
PLPs and others who seek a party and a
government committed to a more open
democratic culture”.

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



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AN EXUBERANT crowd
cheered on newly elected PLP
deputy leader Philip “Brave”
Davis as he stepped up to the
convention stage last night,
buoyant in his victory and filled
with enthusiasm for his new
post.

The MP for Cat Island, Rum
Cay and San Salvador
exclaimed that he will do every-
thing in his power to move the
party into government and
work in a government of action.

The new deputy leader led
an ardent campaign driven by a
team of tenacious young
Bahamians and seasoned politi-
cians to ensure he would secure
the position above contenders
Senator Jerome Fitzgerald and
West End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe.

Mr Davis won around 760
votes, while Mr Wilchcombe
won 400 and Senator Fitzgerald
won 200, and in the same way
Mr Davis intends to ensure the
PLP wins the government in
the 2012 general election. Bow-
ing to former deputy leader
Cynthia “Mother” Pratt, who
held the position for 12 years
and was the country's first
female deputy prime minister,
Mr Davis paid credit to the par-
ty's rich history before he
expounding his vision for the
way forward.

Mr Davis exclaimed: “The
Bahamas is moving in the
wrong direction! Education is
in crisis! There is a serious lack
of economic activity and the
fear of crime is paralysing our
nation!

“The problems of this coun-

‘Halloween’ Craft Cue

try loom large on the horizon
and so while the celebration
that will invariably and
deservedly follow in the next
day or two have their place, we
must remember that our mis-
sion is to change the Bahamas.

“There is much work to do,
but together we can do it,
because we have done it
before.”

Mr Davis vowed to change
the Bahamas for the better by
tackling crime through revision
of the penal code to ensure
there are stiff penalties to deter
offenders.

Social

He also committed to
expanding social programmes
such as Urban Renewal to help
young people in inner city com-
munities, and to raise funding
for causes such as the National
Youth Programme, and estab-
lish more rehabilitation pro-
grammes for juvenile offend-
ers.

Mr Davis said there needs
to be a scientific approach to
fighting crime with new tech-
nologies and innovative strate-
gies.

He said: “We cannot afford
to lose another soul to sense-
less violence.

“The youth of our nation are
calling on the PLP to rescue
them from the hands of this
uncaring FNM government.”

The new deputy leader crit-
icised the FNM for spending $6
million to host the Miss Uni-
verse Pageant, and borrowing

$160 million to pave roads using
only two companies, one of
which is from Argentina.

And he attacked the gov-
ernment for taking police offi-
cers out of violent schools, and
failing to raise the standards of
education from a national “D”
average. The next PLP gov-
ernment will implement an
aggressive programme to
recruit quality teachers and
develop an education system
relevant to the needs of the
economy and the workplace,
Mr Davis said.

As he closed his speech at

Name:

Wyndham Nassau Resort last
night, the new PLP deputy Age:
leader said: “Even a blind man Tel:

can see the FNM is clueless, but -
I am concerned about providing Mobite:
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am prepared to make the tough

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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

The buck stops in the Oval Office

WASHINGTON —President Obama’s
leadership is being tested on two historic
fronts: health care reform and U.S.
involvement in Afghanistan.

By the time he has made decisions on
these two titanic issues, we will know
whether he has the courage to make tough
calls and we will know more about his
bottom-line principles.

On health care, Obama thought he had
learned lessons from 1993 when Hillary
Clinton, then the first lady, was put in
charge of developing a universal health
plan when her husband was president.

She flunked partly because she did not
touch base with Congress. She didn’t let
the lawmakers in on the takeoff as well as
the landing, as President Lyndon B. John-
son would put it. The result: Congress
wasn’t there for the landing.

This time around, Obama has gone
overboard to win congressional approval
of legislation that has little meaning with-
out a government-sponsored health-insur-
ance program. But his efforts raise ques-
tions of whether he is trying to appease the
opposition at any price and whether he
is willing to fight for a government-run
health insurance program.

Obama should listen to the people who
have voiced their opinions about health
reform. A new Washington Post-ABC
News poll shows a majority favors a gov-
ernment health insurance plan. The pres-
ident and wavering congressional Democ-
rats should heed that view.

The Republicans in the Senate are solid-
ly against the reform plan, except for Sen.
Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, who played
hard to get and seemed to love the atten-
tion and tension she created over her Sen-
ate Finance Committee vote — which
ended up being a “yes.” Now she’s back
playing games again and says she is unsure
how she will vote when the Senate takes
up its final bill.

Obama has tried too hard to woo the so-
called “blue dog” conservative Democ-
rats — who seem to be Republicans at
heart. They are obstructionists when it
comes to health reform and appear eager
to follow the bidding of the health insur-
ance industry.

It’s hard to think that other presidents
— Harry S Truman and the two Roo-
sevelts come to mind — would not have
loudly rebuked the Republican “pluto-
crats” for blocking the vital health plans
being debated.

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The president’s other test of leadership
is Afghanistan where he is considering a
request for 40,000 more troops. Any esca-
lation in that rugged primitive land would
be reminiscent of the Vietnam War and
Gen. William Westmoreland’s bids for
more and more men. We know how that
turned out.

Obama has made it clear that he is not
going to be rushed. Perhaps the presiden-
tial caution has been inspired by the U.S.
experience in Iraq, a war that should nev-
er have happened in the first place. It’s
pretty amazing that we still don’t know
the motives of the Bush administration
for pushing, pushing, pushing for an inva-
sion that turned out to be tragically wrong.
The folly of that war and the sacrifices by
Americans and Iragis are beyond painful
to contemplate.

War is too important to be left to the
generals — much as presidents would like
to pass the buck and rely on decisions by
the “commanders on the ground,” as the
civilians like to put it.

But that’s not the way it works in a
democracy.

The buck stops with the president who
has been bombarded with advice in the
last several weeks.

For all that, he would do better if he
reads up on White House decision-making
involving the last few wars, especially Viet-
nam.

Bob Woodward, the Washington Post
reporter, recently described a 2007 inter-
view with Robert S$. McNamara, secre-
tary of defense during the 1960s Vietnam
troop surge.

McNamara told Woodward that LBJ
had ordered U.S. escalation in Vietnam
because the president was very nervous
about political criticism from conserva-
tives eager to accuse him of being soft on
North Vietnam.

So Johnson went along with requests
from “commanders on the ground” — in
this case, Westmoreland — for more
American troops. The result was deeper
U.S. commitment in a war we could never
win.

There’s a lesson there for President
Obama: He should map the way forward
in Afghanistan without worrying about
his conservative critics.

This article is by Helen Thomas (New
York Times News Service clients.)
c.2009 Hearst Newspapers



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Our social
health depends
on culture

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Thomas Carlyle, a great
thinker and writer, employs
the physician’s aphorism
“the healthy knows not of
their health, but only the
sick” in his work ‘Charac-
teristics’. Without ponder,
this application of such a
wide embrace penetrates to
the heart of our nation’s
dilemma.

We in the Bahamas know
we are not well, we know
we are in serious trouble —
a crime epidemic, moral
dilapidation, family disinte-
gration, religious divisive-
ness, a disheveled judiciary,
education and healthcare
meltdowns — yet seem to
be trifling in the face of
great lament.

Culture, on the other
hand, enshrines the pream-
ble to life; it inhabits the
breath of creation; it gleams
in the first words spoken
into light.

Though some may deval-
ue our ancestry while oth-
ers disclaim it, culture
remains the gallant defend-
er of “the true art of living”;
finding its character and
voice with or without snob-
bish elitists and misguided
grassroots.

Upon what model of
progress have our social
instinct been developed; to
what extent have the scope

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



of national advancement
aimed to target untapped
natural treasure within the
individual; from what do we
derive drive and momen-
tum?

This sixth letter appeals
to the sixth sense of a people
seeming to flirt with disas-
ter, to grasp the last glim-
mer of hope and reason,
before the sun sets ona
nation ignominiously bank-
rupted by its arrogance.

As with ‘Les Fleurs du
Mal’ by Charles Baudelaire,
God forbid, the repugnant
illnesses of society take root
in the garden of our hearts.

This country grieves for
its younger minds that, pre-
dominantly, are being
addled by a crude form of
atrophy, in the 242; enticed
into the recesses of an illu-
sive domain where their
souls languish in a stupor of
illiteracy.

The ethos of the Bahami-
an has been seductively infil-
trated, its strain diluted by
subversive ideologies and
trends, now it is quite
unclear who or what bears
the original seal.

Tourism, our sterling pro-
tégé, speaks and augurs well

but departure polls reflect
an opposite view, when per-
ceived expectation is
matched versus product
affirmation. A cultural
revival will bring redemp-
tion and salvation to a beau-
tiful, but besieged people.

Sadly, at the core of this
turmoil is a malignant
tumour within an apathetic,
unproductive civil and pub-
lic service that needs a trans-
fusion to purge rampant cor-
ruption; but who dares to
reprimand a few for the sake
of many.

This country desperately
needs vindication, but is
constrained by its dire nar-
row-minded complex and
continues to see life through
strabismic lens.

Are we as a nation
likened to a man in a small
boat with side-oars, while
sitting therein he rows in
one direction but is facing,
looking the opposite way.

Culture is remedy to the
intricate problems within the
problem; it is with this bless-
ing that all peoples heal
wounded spirits and mend
broken dreams. The uni-
verse cannot contain oceans
of words destined to flow.
Until next time,

GREGORY NEELY
Nassau,
October 24, 2009.

Saddened no end to learn of
passing of Mr Roger Carron

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It saddened me no end to learn of the
death of Mr Roger Carron, a perfect gen-
tleman.

Although as a student of journalism I sat
at the feet of his wife, Mrs Eileen Dupuch-
Carron, Publisher/Editor of The Tribune,
it was Mr Carron who, during my forma-
tive years as a sports reporter ensured that I
was well grounded in what it takes to survive
in this very challenging profession.

With much patience, and gentleness, and
kindness, and goodness, and faithfulness,

taught me, I taught others.

Whenever new staff joined the newsroom
at The Tribune, Mrs Carron sent them to me
to take through the ropes.

As Mr Carron was to me, I was to them.
And in that way, many young Bahamians
who passed through The Tribune have ben-
efited.

No longer than the other day a young
man stopped to say how appreciative he
was of those days at The Tribune.

Even today I continue to share with others
in the Roger Carron tradition.

To Mrs Carron, on behalf of my family, I

and joy, and yet brooking no nonsense, he
taught me much of what I know so that
today I am the Bahamas’ best, well-rounded
journalist since Independence.

Mr Carron may have left this plane of
existence but, bloody hell, he will forever be
remembered in our hearts because what he

Robert.

Nassau,

October, 2009

say thank you, we love you, we appreciate
everything, and we too grieve with you and

GLADSTONE THURSTON

Shameful testament to changes in our society

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Manners, respect and com-
mon courtesy are as scarce,
in The Bahamas, as oil!

This is a shameful testa-
ment to the changes in our
society, but it is also not sur-
prising. Traditions such as
greeting fellow passers-by or
giving a general greeting
when entering a public area,
such as a waiting room, are
witnessed less and less fre-
quently. Small children of the
nursery and primary school
age still seem to be trained to
do such things, but as they
grow older and into adult-
hood, these courtesies seem
to be left by the wayside.

Giving up your seats in the
bus to elderly or handicapped
persons; helping someone
across the street; basic tele-
phone etiquette; there are
many other instances where
behaviours that were once the
norm in our society have gone
the route of the dinosaur. It is
said to “train up a child in the
way he should go and when
he is old he will not depart
from it”, but either we are not
training our children correct-

ly, or we stop training them
too soon.

Another saying that comes
to mind is “you can’t teach an
old dog new tricks” and per-
haps that is the dilemma that
we are currently facing.

While one might be able to
change an attitude, there must
be an existing foundation to
build on. Courtesy is so much
a part of an individual’s per-
sonality that it really is quite
difficult to effect any real
change if the basic manners
just aren’t there.

Employers have a hard task
then if they are expected to
take an adult — whose per-
sonality is essentially fully
developed — and through the
occasional seminar or train-
ing workshop, mould them
into a polite employee.

If someone doesn’t see the
need to even say “good morn-
ing” to members of their own
household, how then can they
be expected to provide cour-
teous service to a complete
stranger?

If we want to successfully
tackle the growing lack of
courtesy in our society, I will
like to suggest that a new sub-

aU) Ree lenalas

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, Deron Alexander
Mcintosh intend to change my name to Deron Alexander
Bell. If there are any objections to this change of name
by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of

this notice.



ject be introduced in the
school curriculum entitled
“Manners and Behaviour” to
be taught at the elementary
level.

This can take the form of
printed booklets for distribu-
tion to the primary schools.
This I believe will go a long
way in encouraging better
behaviour, good values, and
improved self-esteem in our
children.

Many will disagree with me,
thinking that it is the parents
who should teach manners
and values at home.

Sadly, many of these par-
ents themselves are lacking in
these traits and they cannot
teach what they do not know.
Many parents, however, will
benefit if this subject is taught
to their children at school.

Things like road rage,
swearing, disrespectful behav-
iour, improper use of cell
phones and violence are all
as a result of ignorance.

Many educated persons do
not know the value of an
apology, “please” and “thank
you” simply because they
were not taught this.

This initiative will certainly
bring about better
student/teacher relationships
and will ease the stress of
teaching and parenting.

Also, the children will feel
encouraged each time they
are praised for good behav-
iour and good manners and
this will benefit every area of
their lives right through to
adulthood.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
October 18, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

har RATT)




TT OTC

FNM youth arm lashes out

THE youth arm of the FNM has criticised the PLP for fail-
ing to promote younger members.

According to a statement released by the FNM Torchbear-
ers, the PLP’s Progressive Young Liberals are justified in
pleading for more of a say in the affairs of their party.

“Tn its history not one Young Liberal has been a candidate for
that party,” the youth branch noted. “To date, the Free Nation-
al Movement has had at least seven torchbearers serve in par-
liament and in the Cabinet of the Bahamas, including Carl
Bethel, Tommy Turnquest, Dion Foulkes, Kwasi Thompson,
Kendal Wright, and David Thompson.”

During the PLP convention this week, the Young Liberals
complained about the “D” national grade average, but the
Torchbearers noted that during its time in office, the PLP did
not build a single new school.

“They sent the education administration into disarray by
politicising the Department of Education, by sidelining the
director of education and by having a minister of education who
could not focus on education because he was a part-time min-
ister of education,” the statement said.

It continued: “The president of the Young Liberals was also
misinformed on a number of other issues. He said Urban
Renewal was abandoned and that the Youth Service Pro-
gramme was abandoned. This is untrue. Urban Renewal con-
tinues with a more refined focus, more targeted programmes
and better use of government resources. The National Youth
Service Pilot programme is being better structured for greater
results for the young people of the Bahamas.

“The president of the Young Liberals might wish to know
that while his party talks about young people, the FNM acts for
young people. The FNM increased scholarships from $400,000
under the PLP to $6 million; substantially increased the Ministry
of Youth’s budget; and established the only new programmes
established in the last 20 years, including the Fresh Start Youth
Employment Programme, the Self Starter Programme and the
Youth Enterprise Project.

“In 2006 the PLP granted 21 scholarships. In 2007 the FNM
gave 157 scholarships and national scholarship grants of up to
$10,000 each. In 2008 that number was 153 and in 2009 it is 229.”

The Torchbearers went on to crtitcise the statements of for-
mer deputy leader of the PLP Cynthia “Mother” Pratt.

Noting that Mrs Pratt said far too many Bahamians misun-
derstood and did not appreciate the PLP, the statement said:
“Unfortunately Mother Pratt refuses to accept that the Bahami-
an people became disillusioned with the ineffectual leader-
ship and the personal and public failings of various PLP mem-
bers of parliament and ministers.

“Tt was the PLP who misunderstood the high expectations of
the Bahamian people. It was the PLP who did not appreciate
the faith that the Bahamian people placed in them in 2002 -a
trust they squandered,” it said.

HAVING BAGS OF FUN

e

POLITICS wasn't the only thing on display ..
plenty of interest.





. these bags provoked

=

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 5

TUR ADO

PLP DELEGA
the PLP at the convention.



PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Shadow Minister points finger over rising crime, school violence

Govt under fire for ‘stop,

THE “stop, review and can-
cel” policy of the current gov-
ernment has led to rising crime,
school violence and an over-
dependence on social services,
the shadow minister of social
services claimed.

Melanie Griffin, MP for
Yamacraw, said the policy of
stopping projects initiated
under the former PLP govern-
ment for review has led to work
being halted on the Urban
Renewal programme, school
policing, the National Youth
Service and social safety net
reform programmes.

Speaking at the party’s 51st
PLP National Convention on
Thursday night, she said all
social and youth help services
created under the PLP must be
re-established if the country is
to work towards a secure
future.

Mrs Griffin further charged
that “we need to establish a
social policy plan which would
include the re-introduction of
the Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme in its former structure,
making any adjustments
required for better operation.”

“The political manager must
also be replaced with a person
who has not been in front-line
politics for any party,” said the
MP.

The Bahamas has seen “a
staggering rise in the level of
crime among our young men
and violent crime in general,
persistent poverty among chil-
dren, the aged and the disabled,
low academic achievement,

migration and statelessness,
HIV prevalence and domestic
violence and child abuse,” she
said.

In response, Minister of State
for Social Development Loret-
ta Butler Turner accused Ms
Griffin of “regurgitating the
same old broken record”, and
charged that the Urban Renew-
al Programme is alive and well.

She said she “doesn’t know
what planet the PLP is living
on”, adding that the govern-
ment recently tabled in parlia-
ment two annual reports on the
programme.

Aggressive

Addressing delegates at the
convention, Ms Griffin claimed
that when the PLP came to
power in 2002, it “promptly
embarked on a very aggressive
social and economic pro-
gramme designed to alleviate
pain and suffering and to break
the cycle of poverty.”

The MP said that the PLP
implemented immediate and
longer term responses as part of
this programme.

She suggested the present
government has allowed suc-
cessful efforts made under the
former PLP administration to
alleviate poverty, crime and
violence to fall by the wayside
with troubling consequences.

Mrs Griffin claims the gov-
ernment does not have the best
interests of the poor at heart
and is reacting to their needs
in an “ad hoc, knee jerk” way.

Sue

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Ms Butler Turner, however,
pointed out that “most people
realise” many of the social woes
facing this country are symp-
toms of a global economic
downturn.

She said the Department of
Social Services, the Ministry of
Education and other branches
of government have imple-
mented numerous programmes
to ease the hardship being felt
by many, adding that if the PLP
would simply “stop regurgitat-
ing a broken record and look
at what we are doing” they



Meigen? review and cancel’ polic
UU

would see that the government
is in fact “trailblazing” when it
comes to initiatives to improve
social conditions.

idle le
ase

EERE
aca

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Construction of New Passanger Screening Facility
Prince George Wharf, Down Town, Nassau
Pre-Quaufication of Contractors

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas
through the Ministry of Public Works and Transport is
inviting qualified General Contractors to participate in a
Pre-qualification for the Tender for the construction of a
Passenger Screening Facility at Prince George Wharf,

Down Town, Nassau.

The structure will be of conventional construction,
approximately 2,200 sq. ft., and with associated external

works and services.

The General Contractor will be required to provide a
detailed indication of their competence, both technically
and financially, to carry out the intended scope of works

within a short time frame.

Interested parties may collect the pre-qualification
documents as of Thursday, 22nd October, 2009, between

the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. from:

The Office of the Director of Public Works
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

Nassau, The Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 322-4830

Fax: (242) 326-7907

The completed pre-qualification document should be
deposited in the Tender Box at Office of the Director of
Public Works, Ministry of Works & Transport, 3rd Floor,
John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas not
later than 12:00 noon on Thursday, 29th October, 2009.

The Government of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all

pre-qualification contractors.

Signed

Nicole Campbell (Mrs.)
Acting Permanent Secretary



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PAGE 8, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Picewell Forbes
FROM page one

she did not think that the com-
plaint required an investigation
into whether the discharge of
the jury was proper but
whether Forbes’ announcement
posed a real risk of prejudice
to the administration of justice.
Mr Munroe then said he, Mr
McKinney and Mr Sears would
require more time to consider
the complaint.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner did not
object to the application for
more time. The hearing was
adjourned to next Thursday at
10am.

While Forbes declined to
speak to reporters outside the
courtroom yesterday, Mr McK-
inney said: “We will take what-
ever steps are necessary to con-
vince the judge that there was
no interference by our client
with the trial or in any way with
the procedures that were
required to be followed by any-
body, including Mr Forbes.”

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner told
reporters: “The judge has sent
for Mr Forbes. The Crown
doesn’t have a position in this
matter. We are present but we
will see what the judges’ posi-
tion is.”

He said the Crown has not yet
considered when a retrial in the
attempted extortion case will
be held. The nine-member
jury in the attempted extortion
trial of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer Grand Bahama ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne was
discharged at 10.54pm Wednes-
day although they had not
reached a verdict.

Senior Justice Allen told
jurors there had been
announcement at a political
convention by a senior official,
indicating that one of the
accused persons had been
acquitted. Earlier, around
9.30pm, Mr Forbes took to the
convention stage, while the jury
was still deliberating, and told
delegates that Bridgewater had
been acquitted. He exclaimed:
“Pleasant is a free woman,
PLPs! God is good, PLPs!
Pleasant is a free woman! God
still reigns, PLPs!”

No verdict had been reached
yet convention members cele-
brated Bridgewater's supposed
vindication by singing and
dancing to "Oh Happy Day.”
The session chairman later had
to apologise for whatever con-
fusion the MP's pronounce-
ment caused. Bridgewater
and Lightbourne are accused
of attempting to extort, and
conspiring to extort $25 million
from American actor John Tra-
volta between January 2 and
20 by means of a threat. They
deny the charges.











Aus

FROM page one

that he and the Travoltas are
committed to seeing a retrial
through.

Yesterday, Mr Ossi said:
“Jeopardy has not been
attached, so you can try the
case again.

“We want the evidence pre-
served for the next trial,
whether it be in The Bahamas
or U.S.”

Mr Ossi suggested that
because one of the alleged
extortion phone calls was made
from The Bahamas to the US
that Florida could have juris-
diction over the matter. He said
he has also run the evidence
past “an expert” who has
informed him that there is a

FROM page one

to the attention of the commit-
tee in a meeting held the day
before.

The union president claims
she had to hurriedly pay utility
bills and withdraw funds to pay
for seven committee members
to attend a Caribbean Union
of Teachers conference in
Grenada before leaving on the
trip, but Mr McPhee said there
can be no justification for with-
drawing funds from the account
for any reason other than mak-
ing pension payments.

He said the committee was
shocked to discover last week
that the money had been taken
wrongfully and without author-
ity.

The majority of members
voted to suspend her for two
weeks without pay for the
unauthorised use of money
from the Pension Fund
Account from November 1, in a
meeting chaired by Mrs Wilson
on October 16.

Mr McPhee said Mrs
Wilson’s behaviour was “the
last straw” as the president
elected in June 2008 had been
issued a letter of reprimand in
October last year.

He said: “It should be crystal
clear that generally only the
executive committee can autho-
rise an extraordinary expendi-
ture of $65,832.13, but it has
not authority to use pension
funds for any other purpose
than to pay pension benefits.

“The president has demon-
strated a terrible habit of show-
ing contempt for the constitu-
tional authority of the execu-
tive committee and has demon-
strated an appetite for operat-
ing above the rules and regu-
lations of this august body since
she was elected to office.

“The executive committee
warned her about this on a
number of occasions. This latest
breach of established BUT pro-
tocols was the last straw.”

Mr McPhee said the com-
mittee will meet this morning to

too hard
‘wll

for God














NO ILLNESS IS
TOO DIFFICULT

BEHOLD, | AM THE LORD, THE GOO.0F ALL FLESH:




i IS THERE AL

TOO HARD FOR Mes Jeremiah 32:27

Comel Join us this sunday as we come together
—— |
and explore & meet the God who heals




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Travolta retrial

good basis for the trial to take
place in the U.S. Nonetheless,
he emphasised that ultimately
he and his client have no pref-
erence over where the a retrial
is held, so long as it is a “fair tri-
al with an impartial jury.”

“T am just trying to protect
the interests of Mr Travolta,”
said the attorney. “We want to
preserve our options.”

If the trial were to take place
in Florida, defendants, Ms
Bridgewater and Mr Light-
bourne, would have to be extra-
dited to the US if they did not
go voluntarily.

Yesterday, lawyer for Ms
Bridgewater, Murio Ducille,
called the suggestion that the
US. could host the trial “non-
sense and stupidness.”

Revealing that he had “heard
as a rumour” that steps had
been taken by Mr Ossi to see
whether the trial could take
place abroad, Mr Ducille
denied that there would be any
basis for this to happen.

“Certainly my client didn’t
make any calls (to the U.S.).
This is the point i’ve made
throughout — no calls emanat-
ed from them,” he said.

BUT president

discuss how to replace the miss-
ing pension funds.

He said there was never any
allegation of the misappropria-
tion of funds, and specifically
of $90,000, as reported in
national media on Monday, and
that the committee sought to
inform union members of the
suspension before calling a
press conference yesterday.

However Mrs Wilson had
called a press conference on
Monday to publicly defend her
name by admitting she had fol-
lowed wrong process but not
misappropriated funds.

Teachers and union mem-
bers supporting Mrs Wilson
attended Monday’s meeting
spoke out about how this is the
wrong time to suspend the pres-
ident as hundreds of teachers
recently took part in industrial
action over teaching conditions
in government schools.

But Mr McPhee told teach-
ers the committee had no
choice.

He said: “I would like to
know what is a good time to
suspend the president? There’s
never a good time to suspend
the president.

“This executive committee
of the Bahamas Union of
Teachers does not take lightly
the consequences of suspend-
ing the president, however the
executive committee does not
have the authority to disregard
the rules of the handbook.”

He further alluded to Mrs

Wilson’s disregard for the BUT
rulebook by drawing attention
to the fact she had threatened
to file complaints with national
and international bodies includ-
ing Education International and
the ILO over outstanding griev-
ances with the employer.

Mr McPhee said: “The mat-
ter has never been on the agen-
da of any executive committee
meetings.

“This is just another exam-
ple of the level of contempt this
president continues to show for
the rules and legitimate author-
ity of the executive committee.”

The union’s supreme author-
ity is vested in the Annual Gen-
eral Meeting (AGM) of mem-
bers and is then governed by
the executive committee.

Mr McPhee encouraged
members to uphold the union’s
constitution yesterday.

He said: “We caution BUT
members to consult the consti-
tution and governance manual
and become seized in the rules
and regulations of our union
before allowing themselves to
be used by special interest in a
dangerous game of politics.

“We also ask members to
discern and understand the dif-
ference between the politics of
individuals and the require-
ments of our great union as out-
lined in its constitution and gov-
ernance manual. Unite and
build.”

Teacher charged

FROM page one

school.

Buchanan, a teacher employed at the Eight Mile Rock High
School, was removed in March following complaints of alleged

sexual molestation.

Attorney Calvin Seymour represented Buchanan at his
arraignment. He was not required to enter a plea to a charge of
indecent assault and was granted $5,000 bail with one surety.

The matter was adjourned to February 25, 2010, for contin-
uation in the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

(Sunday Schock iam
Preaching
Radio Bible Hour:
sunday Spm =
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

FUNDAMENTAL |
Nlam & foUpm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mile

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
| Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0663 * Box Wedae |

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS © Tal: d25-2021

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25TH, 2009

LS Speaker

Elder Brentford Isaacs
October [s Missions Month At Central

Bitte Clase: 44 a.m. * Hires

of Bread Service: 10-15 zm.

+ Gommunity Gutreaoh: 17:30 rh + Evening Sarioe: 7:00 pum
* Meiweest Service To pom, [Wednegieye)
* Saotors’ Proyee Mooting: 10000 om. Gnd Thursday of each mowth)

Grace and eri Wesleyan Church
A Society of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth America

ERE Od tS ALGAE DAA DOB ER

Worship Time: f] am.

Prayer Tune: 10:1 5a.m

Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twrnam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O. Box SS8.4641
Telephone number: 324-2558
Telefax number: 324-2587

J1FO)



Christie: I
will return
PLP to power

IMPASSIONED: Perry Christie last night.



FROM page one

mitted to helping those in need. Dubbing the PLP the “party of
heart”, Mr Christie inspired applause and cheers as he said: “What-
ever my faults may be, there’s one thing you know about me; I feel
for people.

"I feel for people deep in my heart and in my soul and it is
that feeling, that compassion, that provides the fuel, the energy, the
vigour and the drive for my life in politics.”

He attacked the FNM government for failing to take bold and
imaginative action to address the needs of the people in a fallen
economy, which had been left in tact by the PLP in 2007.

He said: “We are the party of heart, not the party of market
forces. We don’t shrug our shoulders when market forces bring
about the loss of thousands of jobs.

“While people lose their jobs and can’t afford to put food on the
table, this government just shrugs its shoulders and leaves them on
their own. How can any government be so blind, so deaf, so uncar-
ing, so lacking in compassion, so clueless as the FNM govern-
ment we have today?”

He criticised the government for not proactively putting infra-
structure in place to reduce rising crime.

Mr Christie called on FNM to bring back the Urban Renewal
Programme, introduce 24-hour mobile police patrol, and bring
surveillance and crime detection technology up to date.

Government should also address the backlog of criminal cases
by holding night court, he said, adding that a witness protection pro-
gramme that complies with world standards is necessary for the
Bahamas. Mr Christie re-iterated his firm belief in the death
penalty for convicted murderers, a statement met with applause
from his supporters, and demanded the government restrict the
granting of bail in capital cases.

As he drew a close to the three-day convention, Mr Christie
encouraged unity within the party to strengthen the PLP for a
rise to power. He said: “There is so much unfinished work that
awaits us. Let us therefore bind ourselves in unity so when the day
of our return to power dawns before us, we will find ourselves
ready; ready to resume the march of the Bahamian nation to a bet-
ter and brighter tomorrow for all its people.”

Moments after Mr Christie finished speaking, the FNM issued a
response, saying the opposition leader had merely reiterated
promises he failed to keep when in office.

“Now he is promising more of the same: more speechmaking,
more indecision and more of the same old guard,” the FNM said.
“Mr Christie led the efforts by the PLP old guard, which failed the
country so miserably in the past, to entrench their position in the
party, sweeping aside any reformers in his party and cancelling the
involvement of a younger generation to participate in its senior
ranks. He is now in lock step with Bradley Roberts, whom he
called back to duty as his personal attack machine. As usual, Mr
Christie’s speech was long on flowery rhetoric and short on detailed
solutions to pressing issues.

“While Mr Christie talked endlessly about his heart, the Bahami-
an people doubt and rendered a verdict in the last election on Mr
Christie’s ability to get anything done, to effectively lead and dis-
cipline his colleagues, and to replace a late-again culture with
timely decision-making.”

The FNM went on to criticse Mr Christie’s suggestion that
Urban Renewal was scrapped, saying the programme is alive and
flourishing. The party also denied the PLP leader’s claim that
Prime Minister Ingraham has not gone before the Bahamian peo-
ple to speak on the challenges of the day, saying he has done so “on
countless occasions”.

“But unlike Mr Christie, who is thrilled by the sound of his
own rhetoric, the prime minister has also acted decisively, includ-
ing the initiation of landmark social programmes the PLP failed to
put in place in better economic times. Mr Christie and others in the
party are talking as if there is a global economic crisis in every coun-
try in the world, except in the Bahamas. Because they can’t talk
economic reality and sense now, they cannot be allowed to once
again be charged with the country’s economic stewardship,” he said.

Grant's Town Wesler Methodist Church
[Hatiou bil Ric & Ltapeel Satreet) FPL ieee (1-1 ati
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(ww w.giwesle yor)

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25TH, 2009

7:00 a.m, Bro. Jamicko Forda/Rey. Carla Culmer
11:00 a.m. Women's Fellowship Anniversary
7:00 pm. Women's Fellowship

ee Ge em eee










LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



The Bahamas welcomes
13th US Ambassador





GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur Hanna, right, accepts Letters of Credence from Nicole Avant, the new!

Ambassador of the United States to the Bahamas.

THE Bahamas has wel-
comed the 13th Ambassador of
the United States of America.

Governor General Arthur
Hanna accepted Letters of Cre-
dence from Nicole Avant, 41,
during a ceremony at Govern-
ment House on Thursday. He
also accepted Letters of Recall
of former ambassador Ned
Seigel.

Ambassador Avant also paid
courtesy calls on Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham and
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette.

The Bahamas and United
States established relations on
September 17, 1973 and both
countries share historical expe-
riences as former British
colonies.

“The success of Bahamas/
United States bi-lateral rela-
tions is augmented by our co-
operation and shared interest
in a number of key issues of
significance for the hemispher-
ic and international agenda as a
whole,” the Governor General
said.

“Tt is because of these shared
and common concerns that our
countries have been on one
accord when such issues are
addressed in regional and inter-
national fora such as the Organ-
isation of American States and
the United Nations. These
include, among others, drug
trafficking, terrorism, human
rights, the environment and dis-
armament.”

The Governor General said
he welcomed Ambassador
Avant’s commitment to con-
tinue work on key priority
issues of benefit to both coun-
tries, including: the protection
of borders through programmes
designed to combat the trans-
shipment of illicit drugs and the
smuggling of illegal migrants
and illicit light weapons;
enhanced joint efforts against
terrorism; the building of pros-
perity and economic security;
and the defence and promotion
of human rights and democrat-
ic ideals.

The government also fully





Fa oa

Derek Smith?BIS Photo

=)

Derek Smith?BIS Photo



US AMBASSADOR Nicole Avant, left, accepts a gift from Governor

General Arthur Hanna. Pictured far right is Ted Sarandos, chief con-
tent officer for Netflix Corporation, husband of Ambassador Avant.

appreciates the ambassador’s
commitment to ensuring that
OPBAT continues to receive
the full support and resources
needed to carry out its man-
date, he said.

“This partnership is in its 21st
year and is considered the hall-
mark of Bahamas/United States
efforts in counter-drug opera-
tions, and a model for such
third state co-operation,” the
Governor General said.

Nuclear

The threat posed by nuclear
weapons proliferation and oth-
er weapons of mass destruction
is also a major concern, he said,
adding that the Bahamas looks
forward to the continued col-
laboration to oppose the
increase of such weapons in the
hemisphere.

He also mentioned the
impact the global recession is
having on small island devel-
oping nations, particularly in
the area of tourism.

As 70 per cent of tourists
come from North America, he
said, it is important that the
partnership between the US
and the Bahamas be further
strengthened and deepened.

The Bahamas looks forward
to enhanced assistance by the
US Embassy’s consular section

facilitating first-rate visa ser-
vices for Bahamians, and the
pursuit of civic and cultural
interaction between both coun-
tries, the Governor General
said.

Ambassador Avant said she
was honoured to have been
appointed ambassador to the
Bahamas.

She mentioned that her fam-
ily has a long-standing connec-
tion to the Bahamas, and that
she brings to service a lifetime
of experience in philanthropy,
politics and culture.

Ambassador Avant also
pledged to work closely with
the government on such issues
as protection of borders against
drug trafficking and illegal
migrants, terrorism, building
prosperity and economic secu-
rity, defending and promoting
human rights and democratic
ideals, and supporting sustain-
able energy.

Nicole Avant was born on
March 6, 1968 to music execu-
tive Clarence Avant, a former
chairman of Motown Records,
and Jacqueline Avant. She
spearheads several multi-
national, multi-agency opera-
tions to combat international
drug trafficking and illicit
weapons shipments.

Ambassador Avant is mar-
ried to Ted Sarandos, chief con-
tent officer for Netflix Corpo-
ration, and they have two chil-
dren, Sarah and Tony.

Bahamas hosts Nobel Prize
winner Derek Walcott

The College of the Bahamas, in conjunction
with the Construction Seminar Group, will host
the Caribbean’s first Nobel Prize winner for
literature Derek Walcott for two exciting events
in November. This will be the first time that
the Bahamas has ever hosted a Nobel Laureate.

Honoured by the MacArthur Foundation,
the Royal Society of Literature and Her Majesty
the Queen, Mr Walcott is an outspoken poet,
playwright, writer and visual artist.

He will present on the topic “Art, Politics
and Caribbean Culture” at the college’s signa-
ture Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lecture Series
on Thursday, November 12.

Mr Walcott will also address the 2009 Con-
struction Seminar on the impact of foreign
direct investment on the development of the

DEREK WALCOTT

Caribbean on Friday, November 13. “Hosting a
Nobel Laureate in the Bahamas is a highly cel-
ebrated achievement and comes on the heels of
President Barack Obama being awarded the
Nobel Prize for extraordinary efforts to
strengthen international diplomacy and his sup-
port for nuclear arms reduction,” the college
noted in a statement.

Julius Bar

Julius Baer Group, the leading dedicated Wealth Management is seeking

candidates for the position of:

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES:

Acquire new clients through personal network (within defined objectives
Acquire new client finders or EAM

Provide financial information to clients as requested

Create / Maintain a privileged relationship with new or existing clients

providing a service of excellence

Develop Julius Baer Bank & Trust as booking centre through Julius

Baer worldwide network

REQUIRED SKILLS:

Excellent French verbal and written communication skill
PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint (ability to learn new

applications quickly)

Strong understanding of Swiss Private Banking industry creed and

regulatory framework

A commitment to service excellence

EXPERIENCE:

Minimum 10 years experience in Private Banking, Asset Management

or related field

EDUCATION:

A Bachelor’s degree with concentration in Economic, Business

Administration or equivalent.

The Securities Course Series 7 or equivalent.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:

The ability to speak a third language (Italian, German, Spanish or
Portuguese) would be a strong asset.

We offer a very competitive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating
work environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our

business while expanding your career.

Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume by October 31“,

2009 to the attention of:

BY HAND:

Personal & Confidential

Human Resources

Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
P.O. Box N - 4890

Nassau, Bahamas

BY MAIL:

Personal & Confidential
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas



Neues

NOTICE is hereby given that EDITH MEDELUS of
CARMICHAEL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH NESTOR of DAVIS
STREETS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person


ROYAL SFIDELITY a, zs

rE
Fone at Wowk ues

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 22 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,489.00 | CHG -3.49 | %CHG -0.23 | YTD -223.36 | YTD % -13.04
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.03 0.00 0.127
9.90 0.00 0.992
5.90 0.00 0.244
0.63 -0.877
3.15 0.125
2.14 0.055
9.93 1.406
2.72
5.26
1.27
1.32
6.28
8.80
10.00
4.11

Securit y
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)}
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Previous Close Today's Close
1.17 1.17
10.75 10.75
5.90 5.90
0.63
3.15
2.37
9.93
2.72
5.83
3.01
2.05

0.63
3.15
2.37
9.93
2.72
5.74
3.04
2.25
6.50
9.30
10.00
4.11

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.09
0.03
0.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.249
0.419
0.111
0.625
6.50
9.30
10.00
4.11

0.420
0.322
0.631
0.332
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.156
ases)
Interest

Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)}
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00
Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b
Securit Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol.
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 T%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
f.92 8.42 14.00

1.00
0.27
5.49
9.95
10.00

1.00
0.27
5.59

1.00
0.27
5.59

who knows any reason why registratior/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

52wk-Hi_ 52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

1000.00

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
52wk-Low

EPS $ Yield

-2.246

Div $ P/E
0.000

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets

Weekly Vol.

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

RND Holdings

ABDAB
RND Holdings

2.00
0.35

6.25
0.40

4.00
0.55

Colina Over-The-Counter Securities

30.13
0.45

31.59
0.55

29.00
0.55

0.000
0.001

0.480
0.000

N/M
256.6

4.540
0.002

0.000
0.000

9.03
261.90

BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NAV YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8300 “3.75 -6.75
1.4954 4.30 5.18
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1751 4.42 5.86
103.0956 3.10 2.52
99.4177
1.0000
10.5884
1.0757

Fund Name
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-69
30-Sep-09
16-Oct-09
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

1.3344
2.8952
1.4217
3.0941
12.3870
100.0000
99.4177
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000

Me}IG=

NOTICE is hereby given that CHRISTIAN APPOLON of
DUMPING GROUND CR, Apt#1, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th of October, 2009 to the
Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

3.12

0.00

5.88

3.86

1.0305 -0.24

1.0709 3.24
MARKET TERMS

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

2.76
0.00
5.88
5.30
0.22
4.54

1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

r : r
|
|
k
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24,

2009





INSIDE ¢ MIAMI DOLPHINS PREVIEW



Senior Tennis

PE TST



TENNIS

THE Gatorade Senior Ten- :
nis Nationals near its comple- :
tion this weekend with aseries }
of thrilling final matches set }
to square off at the Gym Ten- }

nis Club.

In Thurday’s play two divi- }
sion winners were crownedin

doubles.

Robert Dunn and Neil }
McTaggert won the 35’s Men’s_ }
Doubles with a 6-3, 6-0 win }
over George Baxteer and Har-

rington Saunders.

John Antonas and Kit

Americans dominate
Sunfish leaderboard

Spencer lived up to their top
seed billing with a 6-1, 6-0 win
over Vince Andrews and Bud
Cambridge in the 55’s Men’s
Doubles final.

Brent Johnson advanced to
the final of the 35’s Men’s Sin-
gles with a 6-1,6-2 win over
Dwayne Gibson.

In last night’s action,
Antonas, the top seed in the
55’s Mens Singles, took on his
doubles teammate, Spencer in
the division final, while John-
son took on Stefano Donati.

Results were unavailable at
press time.

In today’s 35’s Women’s
final, Alicia Butler will face
second ranked Dionne Butler.

Jankovic upset,
Schiavone
advances at
Kremlin Cup

TENNIS
MOSCOW
Associated Press

ALISA KLEYBANOVA }
upset defending champion }
Jelena Jankovic 6-4, 6-3 Friday }
to advance to the semifinals of }

the Kremlin Cup.

The upset came a day after }
the second-seeded Jankovic }
took the last spot for the sea- }
son-ending WTA Champi- }

onships in Doha, Qatar.

Jankovic dropped serve in }
the fifth game of each set. }
Down 5-3 in the second set, }
Jankovic double-faulted twice }

to lose the match.

Kleybanova will play Olga
Govortsova of Belarus, who }
crusied past Vera Dushevina :

6-3, 6-0.

Eighth-seeded Francesca
Schiavone of Italy advanced }
with a 6-3, 6-2 win over Maria }

Kirilenko.

Schiavone, the 2005 runner-
up, will play Alona Bon- }
darenko in the other semifinal.
Bondarenko ousted qualifier }

Tsvetana Pironkova 6-3, 6-3.

In the men’s tournament, }
sixth-seeded Janko Tipsarevic }
advanced to his first semifinal }
this season by defeating Robby :
Ginepri of the United States, 6- }

3, 6-3.

Korolev 0-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Qualifier

Sergiy Stakhovsky 6-3, 6-3.

Tipsarevic will face Ukran-
ian qualifier Illya Marchenko, }
who rallied to beat Evgeny ;

Mikhail }
Kukushkin of Kazakhstan also :
rallied for a 4-6, 6-1, 6-4 win }
over fifth-seeded Pablo }
Cuevas. Kukushkin will play ;
third-seeded Mikhail Youzh- }
ny of Russia, who downed }



*

SAILING

THE final day of sailing
in 2009 Sunfish World
Championships was domi-
nated by a trio of Ameri-
cans who swept the leader-
board to culminate the
week long event.

David Loring main-
tained a lead he held since
Wednesday afternoon to
win the competition with
a net total of 28.6 points.

His highlights included
a first place finish in race
five, second place finishes
in races four, and seven,
and third place finishes in
races one and 10.

Loring’s American
counterparts ended the
competition with a flurry
to move into the second
and third spots respective-
ly.
Paul-Jon Patin finished
in second place witha
total of 30 net points,
while David Mendelblatt
finished third with 32
points.

Rankings

Patin entered the day in
third position but finished
third in race nine and won
race 10 to ascend the rank-
ings.

He won the opening
race of the event and end-
ed competition with his
second win which book-
ends a second place finish
in race two and third place
finishes in races five and
eight.

Mendelblatt continued
a wave of momentum he
was able to establish
Wednesday, delivering a

Brought to you by:

an a

A SCENE from the 2009 Sunfish World Championship this week.





World Championships

come to a close

dominating performance
over the final stretch.

Mendelblatt ended day
four with wins in races sev-
en and eight, and returned
yesterday to take race nine
and finish second in race
two.

His three wins led the
field while he also finished
second twice (races three
and 10) and third in race
four.

Peter Stanton of the U.S
Virgin Islands finished
fourth with 41 net points.

Stanton’s best finishes
included second in races

eight and nine and third in
race Six.

Max Chirnos of
Venezuela fell three spots
on the final but was still
able to round out the top
five with 43 net points.

Chirnos finished a disap-
pointing 19th in race nine
and fourth in the finale.

Donald Martinbourough
improved his standing by
three positions on the final
day to finish 13th, the best
overall finish of any
Bahamians in the field.

Martinbourough had
arguably his best day yes-

terday with a Champi-
onship-high ninth place fin-
ish in race nine and 19th
place in race 10.

He finished with 156 net
points.

Charles Kelly was the
second best finisher among
Bahamian boats, 23 over-
all with 224 net points.

Christopher Sands
improved eight positions in
the final rankings when he
turned in his best perfor-
mance on the final day.

Sands had the top two
finishes amongst Bahami-
an sailors with an eighth






place finish in race nine
and sixth place in race ten
to finish with 234 net
points.

Sands effort gave him the
biggest single day improve-
ment of any sailor in the
field.

Fernando De Cardenas
finished 30th with 262 net
points, Gavin Mckinney
was 32nd with 275 net
points, and Andrew Wil-
hoyte was 36th with 292
net points.

Other Bahamians in the
field included James Lowe
- 40th (310), Jeffrey Gale -
41st (319), Peter-Bruce
Wassitsch - 42nd (322),
Donico Brown - 46th (382),
George Damianos - 47th
(389), Ted O’Brien - 49th
(413), Michael Holowesko
- 50th (416), Dwayne Wal-
las - 53rd (436), Lori Lowe
- 64th (547) and BJ Bur-
rows - 65th (555).

BAHAMIANS FARE WELL IN RESPECTIVE CATEGORIES

ALTHOUGH they struggled in
the overall standings, Bahamian
sailors fared well amongst their
respective categories in the 2009 Sun-
fish World Championships.

James Lowe was second amongst
Grand Masters, a category which fea-
tures sailors 70-79 years-of-age.

Greg Gust of the United States
won the division while fellow coun-
tryman Charles Clifton finished
third.

Donald Martinborough finished
third in the Master category, for
sailors 50-59 years-of-age.

Gavin McKinney was fifth, while
George Damianoes finished sixth.

Malcolm Smith of Bermuda took

top honours in the category while
Cor Van Aanholt finished second.

Christopher Sands finished fifth to
lead a strong Bahamian field in the
Junior category, won by Ard Van
Aanholt of Curacao.

Matthew De By of Holland was
second while Jose Gutierrez finished
third.

Donico Brown finished seventh,
Michael Holowesko - eighth and BJ
Burrows - 11th.

The top three finisher overall,
David Loring of the United States




won the Senior division, while David
Mendalblatt (US) was second and
Peter Stanton (USVD, third.

Charles Kelly finished ninth in the
category, Fernando de Cardenas was
11th, Andrew Wilhoyte was 12th,
Ted O’Brien finished 14th, while
Dwayne Wallas was 16th.

DJ Lorsbaugh (USVI) won the
Midget division, Pedro Wassitsch
(Austria) took the Great Grand Mas-
ter division, while second place over-
all finisher, Paul-Jon Patin (US) took
the Apprentice division.



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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Liverpool
fans set

to march
against
American
CO-OWnErs

SOCCER
LIVERPOOL, England
Associated Press

A LIVERPOOL support-
ers’ group is planning a
march ahead of Sunday's
Premier League match
against Manchester United
to protest against the way
American businessmen
George Gillett Jr. and Tom
Hicks are running the club.

Local police said Friday
there will be an "appropri-
ate level of security” ahead
of the match, suggesting
there will be an increase in
the number of officers pre-
sent.

The march to Anfield is
being organized by the Spir-
it of Shankly group, which
has published an e-mail
address on its Web site ask-
ing for information on
where Gillet and Hicks are
staying.

Merseyside police said
they could not discuss the
security of individuals or
confirm the number of offi-
cers set to be on duty ata
match that Liverpool has to
win to rekindle its fading
hopes of winning a first
league title for 20 years.

Gillett and Hicks have
attracted the ire of fans by
loading it with debt in their
2007 buyout.

In an open letter to
Gillett and Hicks, Spirit of
Shankly said the American
pair was not welcome at the
club.

"All we care about is our
football club, our history
and traditions, and our
future," the letter read. "To
us, you play no part in that

future — especially not if we

want to be successful and
keep moving forward.

"You will leave a black
mark on the history of our
football club. You have
dragged us back, and this
season, you have made us
stand still, whilst other clubs
move forward.”

Liverpool finished run-
ner-up to United last season
with just two losses in 38
games but, having sold Xabi
Alonso to Real Madrid, is
currently eighth and on its
worst losing streak in 22
years.

Liverpool has lost four
straight games in all compe-
titions and has been beaten
in four of nine Premier
League matches.

Fans blame the club's 245
million-pound ($390 mil-
lion) debt for manager Rafa
Benitez's inability to buy
top-class players and fund a
new 60,000-seat stadium.

Construction on the new
ground was halted in
August 2008 because of the
global economic downturn.

Hicks, who owns basebal-
I's Texas Rangers and the
NHL's Dallas Stars, and
Gillett bought Liverpool in
2007 for nearly $290 million,
taking on about $73.8 mil-
lion in liabilities.

Gillett recently sold the
NHL's Montreal Canadiens,
the Gillett Entertainment
Centre and the Bell Centre
back to the Molson family
for a reported $580 million.

/AP

Lynne Slad



MIAMI DOLPHINS quarterback Chad Henne (7) hands off to running back Ronnie Brown during the third quarter of an NFL football game against the New York Jets Monday, Oct.

12, 2009 in Miami.

‘Miami Dolphins look
for way to slow Saints

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer

THIS would be a good time
for the Miami Dolphins to
unveil the defensive equivalent
of the wildcat, whatever that
might be.

Nothing tried so far has
slowed the New Orleans Saints.
The Dolphins face the NFL’s
highest-scoring team Sunday
and could use a wildcat-style
surprise.

“Put 11 linebackers in the
game,” Miami linebacker
Channing Crowder suggested.
“Blitz Crowder every play.”

Something that radical might
be worth a shot against the
Saints, 5-0 for the first time
since 1993 and averaging 38.4
points per game.

“T don’t think you want to
try to get into a scoring contest
with these people,” Miami
coach Tony Sparano said.
“We've got to do something to
not let the candy store be
open.”

Sparano hopes his defense
learned lots from early-season
matchups against Peyton Man-
ning, Matt Ryan and Philip
Rivers. One lesson: The Dol-
phins weren’t good enough, los-
ing all three games.

Ryan threw for 229 yards and
two scores in the opener, while
Manning and Rivers threw for
303 yards each.

The defense fared better fac-
ing less potent offenses against
the Bills and Jets. Miami won
both games to improve to 2-3
and climb back into the AFC
East race.

But the Dolphins will be
tough to take seriously as a
playoff contender until they
make a stand against a top
quarterback. Still to come for
Miami are two games against
Tom Brady and one against
Ben Roethlisberger.

Brees may be the best of the

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bunch. He has thrown 101
touchdown passes since choos-
ing the Saints over the Dolphins
as a free agent in 2006, and this
season he’s better than ever,
leading the NFL in passing.

New Orleans has yet to trail
while winning each game by at
least 14 points. Coach Sean
Payton views his team’s start
as a good omen.

“When you end up on a team
that gets into the postseason,
generally there’s a stretch
where you play good football
and you stack together wins,”
Payton said.

New Orleans is doing that,
and the latest victory was the
most impressive yet. Against
the New York Giants’ stout
defense, the Saints totaled 493
yards with no turnovers or
sacks and won 48-27.

Seven Saints scored one TD
each against the Giants, reflect-
ing the multitude of weapons
at Brees’ disposal.

“We've all been in this sys-
tem now for four years and tak-
en a lot of snaps together,”
Brees said. “There’s a huge
confidence level that we play
with now, and our comfort lev-
el with each other makes a big
difference.”

Brees’ ability to use the
entire field is one thing that
makes him special, Sparano
said. If the Saints send out four
receivers on a play, Brees
quickly determines which target
is the best option.

“He can get through the pro-
gression really quick to get to
where he is going with the foot-
ball,” Sparano said. “He gets
one to four really fast.”

As a result, Brees has been
sacked only four times in 163
plays.

That means a big challenge
for the Dolphins’ pass rush,
which has been inconsistent, in
part because linebacker Joey
Porter has been slowed by a
hamstring injury that he said is
now healed. Porter has only
two sacks after leading the
AFC last year with 17 1/2.

When the Dolphins give
opposing quarterbacks time to
throw, the result is often costly.
They’re allowing 15 yards per
completion, worst in the NFL.

Rookie cornerback Sean
Smith has played well, but vet-
erans Will Allen and Gibril
Wilson get burned often. And
the Saints thrive on big plays,
leading the league with seven
touchdown drives of less than
four plays.

“You've got to make them
matriculate down the field,”
Crowder said.

Matriculate?

“Google it,” he said. “If
they’re going to go 80 yards on
you, you’ve got to make them
have those 10-, 11-, 12-play dri-
ves. They want to get those big
chunks, and they are an explo-
sive offense. We’ve got to limit
Brees and make them work.”

An occasional turnover
would help, but the Dolphins



AS NEW ORLEANS SAINTS offensive tackle Jermon Bushrod (74) watches, Saints fullback Heath
Evans (44) celebrates scoring a touchdown late in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game between
the New York Giants and New Orleans Saints in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Sunday,
Oct. 18, 2009. Saints won 48-27.

are tied for last in the NFL with
four takeaways. Three-quarters
of the starting secondary has
yet to make an interception,
and Brees has been picked off
only twice.

Miami will counter at quar-
terback with second-year pro
Chad Henne, 2-0 as a starter
and coming off his best game
in a 31-27 win over the Jets.
Nearly 10 years after Dan Mari-
no retired, the Dolphins believe
they’ve finally found a franchise
quarterback.

Henne likes the idea of filling
that role.

“Really being the leader in
the offense is showing,” he said.
“The guys are looking up to me
in the huddle. It feels comfort-
able, and I’m getting used to
it.”

Henne will hope for help
from the wildcat, which the
Dolphins are using more than
ever. The package generated
110 yards and the winning
touchdown against the Jets.

Miami nose tackle Jason Fer-

guson smiled when asked what
type of wildcat-style surprise
might slow the Saints’ offense.

“The wildcat of a defense?”
the 310-pound Ferguson said.
“T would think maybe me rush-
ing, seven DBs, one linebacker.
Ineed somebody to get the out-
side because I don’t want to be
running Brees down, so give us
two ends.

“Hey, we’re coming — the
wild Ferg.”

Why not try it? Nothing else
has worked against the Saints.


THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009, PAGE 13

OFFICIAL OPENING OF GRAND BAHAMA SCHOOL

1. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM is escorted by Sister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High
School principal Yvonne Ward upon his arrival at the official opening and naming of the new government
school on Grand Bahama on Thursday.
















2. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM, Education Minister Carl Bethel and Works and Transport Min-
ister Neko Grant participate in the ribbon cutting ceremony

3. PRIME MINISTER HUBERT INGRAHAM and Education Minister Carl Bethel tour the library.

4, A STUDENT of the Sister Mary Patricia Russell Junior High School sings a solo section of the school
song

UNUM Ga AU ae eT ae

BISHOP LAWRENCE ALOYISUS BURKE receives the Order of Jamaica from Governor General of
Jamaica Sir Patrick Allen at the Ceremony of Investiture and Presentation of National Honours at
Kings House, Jamaica on National Heroes Day.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Hl (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

TODAY TONIGHT Sd MONDAY SS SSE Seay

pares
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‘ Low MODERATE | HIGH V. HIGH EXT.

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High: 88° F/31 SGee t-storm; breezy thunderstorm t-storm in spots t-storms possible t-storms possible greater the need for eye and skin protection

Pa eC a
Bow 67 Faas ee ; High: 87° High: 87° High: 90° High: 89°
us _@ . High: 87° Low: 77° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 78° Low: 78° TIDES For Nassau
TAMPA ia Ve WY PM ecaacelnc PMc cele LMG mace ec ey incite .
High: 85° F/29°C. is ce 89° F 84°F 90°-87° F 100°-81° F 98°-88° F 104°-84° F High Hi(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.

-AQ° ° lt d Lp The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, . ‘
Low: 69 Fat c = and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cald a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. Today 14:54am. 2.8 Pa a.m.
:30 p.m.

6:22 a.m.
7:25 p.m.

7:22 a.m.
8:18 p.m.

8:24 a.m.
9:08 p.m.

9:23 a.m.
9:53 p.m.

10:16 a.m.
10:34 p.m.

11:05 a.m.
11:13 p.m.





~ A ¢ Sunday = 12:21 a.m.

y 12:48 p.m.
ay wr Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Monday 4:20 a.m.
- .

ABACO A Temperature 1:44 p.m.
High: 87° F/31°C Vaud ve 86° F/30° C

° 2 ° ° Tuesda 2:19 a.m.
: Low:77°F/25°C Sle wiels _ Normal high 84° F/29° C 2:39 p.m.



3:30 p.m.



7% & ° Normal low 72° F/22° C
= Wednesday 3:14 a.m.
@ WEST PALM BEACH Wit Ey es V Last year's high 81° F/27° GC y ou

High: 86° F/30° C 45-25 knots Last ‘ °
° ° ‘ - year's low 74° F/23° G
Low: 72° F/22°C = Precipitation Thursday 4:03 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT — Md - Le coe YOStErday oo... cccccccececeeneccees oo 4:16 p.m.
High: 86° F/30°C High: 85° F/29°C P eal 1OCale Oey Friday 4:47 a.m.
Low:74°F/23° — Low: 76° F/24°C Normal year to date 5:01 p.m.
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@ bay AccuWeather.com
= MIAMI - ELEUTHERA Forecasts and graphics provided by Sun AND ey
6-12 knots High: 88° F/31° C High: 87° F/31°C AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

= 76° ?. NASSAU - ae 3 Sunrise...... 7:13am. Moonrise ... 12:57 p.m.
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(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

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PAGE 14, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





OUT AND ABOUT

OUTS ABOUT

IN THE 242

DR XCITEMENT’S BIRTHDAY BASH: DISC JOCKEY with 100JAMZ, DJ Xcitement cele-
brated his birthday in style at a bash that went down at Charlie’s in Nassau last Saturday. Patrons,
and especially the ladies, came out in abundance for the event, and of course the best DJs were
there to entertain the crowd with good music and vibes. Supa Mario, DJ Ignite, DJ Fatal, DJ Fines,
TG Movements, Big Doobs and Reality were all present to party with Xcitement and all the club-
bers inside Charlie's. Champagne and Grey Goose were flowing upstairs in the VIP Lounge while
the crowd downstairs took over the dancefloor. A performance by popular Bahamian hip hop
artist Porter the Poet kept the patrons going as he showed off his lyrical skills and performed
some of his hit songs such as “Get This Paper” and “Leave That Girl Alone”. The party continued
with the best in hip hop, reggae and dancehall music through the night. In case you missed the
event, don’t worry, the Christmas 2009 party season for is just getting started!



I CULTURAL
FESTIVAL

AFTER a year of absence, the International Cultural Festival was

} held again last weekend at the Botanical Gardens in Nassau. The

focus of the festival is to showcase international cuisine and art
forms such as song and dance.

The beautiful Botanical Gardens were transformed as families
flocked to the venue to enjoy the experience and taste international
delights. The Gardens were dotted with booths representing
countries from the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and South
America.

Countries such as Greece, Peru, Cuba, Haiti, India, Jamaica,
Myanmar, China and France created a melting pot of people,
cultures and flavours alongside the Bahamian village. Young and
old were out and about mingling with friends and acquaintances,
enjoying cultural performances on stage and trying various inter-
national beers, mojitos, sweet treats such as ice cream and bakla-
va, and tasty dishes like jerk chicken, grilled shrimp, gyro, low
mein, conch fritters and Canadian bacon, to name but a few of the
culinary options on display.

The Cultural Festival was truly an interesting event and it starts
a Christmas season of family events, festivals and togetherness.

i

To advertise in

The Tribune or on our

exciting new website
» tribune242.-com call

Too Arthuron 242 322 19864

or email webads@tribunemedia.net

Heike Wollenweber

Intemational Publicist heike.axes@gmail.com
Intemational media and airplay, WWW. MySpace. comaxesmagazine
representing artists, producers, Bahamas 242 428 8412

labels, promoters and selectas/djs Jamaica 876 377 5029



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