Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.275

The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

PITTSBURGH

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875

Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman PLPs!
God is good PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God siill reigns PLPs!

hae mR ne

PLP outburst forces

Iravoita case retrial

Convention
speech by MP
prompts judge to
discharge jurors

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE John Travolta
attempted extortion trial end-
ed in chaos last night after
an outburst at the PLP con-
vention forced Senior Justice
Anita Allen to order a retri-
al.

Proceedings were sensa-
tionally halted after South
Andros MP Picewell Forbes
took to the convention stage
and told delegates that one
of the accused, former PLP
senator Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter, had been acquitted.

He exclaimed: “Pleasant is
a free woman PLPs! Pleas-
ant is a free woman PLPs!
God is good PLPs! Pleasant
is a free woman! God still
reigns PLPs!”

But trial jury members
were still deliberating, and
had been for more than eight
hours. No verdict had been
reached although convention
members celebrated Bridge-
water’s supposed vindication
by singing and dancing to
“Oh Happy Day”.

An angry Senior Justice
Allen discharged jurors from
returning with a verdict at
10.54pm last night, inform-

“=” BK BBQ
DOUBLE
STACKER

ICEWELL FORBES speaks to delegates at the Roce emt] aim

ing them that some two hours
earlier there was an
announcement at a political
convention by a senior offi-
cial, indicating that one of the
accused persons had been
acquitted.

Some 20 minutes earlier,
the jury had been brought
into court and the foreman
indicated they needed more

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a

rs

FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater leaves court.

PLP leadership is a three horse race

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP delegates vote for their next party leader today
with three candidates vying for the top job.

Former Prime Minister Perry Christie, Dr Bernard
Nottage and Paul Moss are all jockeying for the top job
after being nominated and seconded as leadership
candidates at the start of the PLP’s 51st national con-
vention.

Of the four original candidates, only Fred Mitchell
declined the nomination (see page 7) leaving Dr Not-
tage, Mr Moss, and Mr Christie to vie for the post in
what is expected to be a hotly contested three-way-
race.

Nominating Mr Christie was former PLP Senator
Trevor Whylly who was seconded by Omar Armbris-
ter. Mr Moss was nominated by Tonya Charlton and
seconded by Elaine Adderley. Nominating Dr Nottage
was the former PLP MP Rubianne Darling who was
seconded by Valerie Percentie; and finally Mr Mitchell
was nominated by Atavese Issacs and seconded by
Irene Rolle.

With each candidate’s supporters sporting t-shirts,
caps, and pins, the convention floor was strewn with
paraphernalia of every kind as the prospective leaders
entered the Wyndham’s ballroom.

While there has been no official formation of
“teams” or tickets on which persons will be running to

SEE page 14

POM Mt



PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

=





THE family of Tribune
managing director Mr Roger
Carron has asked that instead
of flowers, well-wishers may
make donations in his mem-
ory to either the Breathe
Easy Campaign, an effort to

Funeral arrangements for Roger Carron

raise funds for the purchase
of urgently needed ventila-
tors and incubators for the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
or St Martin’s Convent, which
does important work with
students and the poor.

Mr Carron was a fervent
supporter of both efforts.

Funeral services will be
held at St Francis Cathe-
dral on West Hill Street at
3pm on Saturday, October
31.

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



women Move to restrict candidate

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nomination is shot down

Several political heavyweights attack resolution

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A RESOLUTION seek-
ing to block the nomination
of any candidate for office
within the PLP who had not
been a card-carrying mem-
ber for at least seven years
was shot down at the begin-
ning of the party’s national
convention yesterday.

With five amendments in
total to the party’s constitu-
tion being debated during
yesterday’s morning session,
the party also sought to cre-
ate and enforce a co-deputy
leader position, restrict any
nomination for posts being
made within a month from
any convention, and it also
ratified the Progressive
Young Liberals (PYL) to
now be named the official
National Youth Arm of the
party with more voting pow-
ers than ever before.

Criticism

While some amendments
such as the one relating to
the PYL was passed out-
right, the amendment
requiring an individual to
have served or be with the
party for seven years faced
substantial criticism from
political heavyweights such
as former leader candidate
Philip Galanis, and long
time party supporter Valen-
tine Grimes.

When it became obvious
that this amendment was
not going to see the light of
day, some supporters of it
sought to change the terms
and make the timeline five
years instead of seven.

This again caused an out-
cry with it finally being
decided that the matter
would go before a special
committee before any fur-
ther discussions can be had.

One PLP insider told The
Tribune that such a “fool-
ish” move by the party will
not be allowed to be pushed
through by “certain” indi-
viduals who would wish to
block the nominations of
any potential challengers at
this or any other convention.

While it is well known
that any changes to the pre-



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

SOME OF THE ATTENDEES at the PLP convention get in a festive

mood.

sent constitution would not
take effect until the party’s
next convention, technically
speaking it would mean that
if the party decided to
change its leader today for
either attorney Paul Moss,
or Dr Bernard Nottage,
these individuals would not
be eligible to contest for re-
election in their own party
as they would not have been
card-carrying members for
the requisite number of






















years. “We won’t allow this
to happen.

“We cannot be so short-
sighted to allow these
changes today to destroy the
party in the future,” said
another source.

The PLP’s convention
continues today where dele-
gates are expected to vote
for their prospective candi-
dates for leader, deputy
leader, and chairman of the
party.

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3



cintinataatie areiertes for









Davis during nominations

PHILLIP “Brave” Davis
received the most enthusiastic
welcome from voting delegates
and stalwart councillors when
he was nominated at the PLP
convention yesterday.

The Cat Island, Rum Cay
and San Salvador MP and
prominent attorney is widely
noted as having outspent his
contenders for the PLP deputy
leadership and when combined
with his familiarity within the
party and a well-oiled cam-
paign, his efforts appeared to
have paid off yesterday during
nominations at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Numerous delegates and stalwart coun-
cillors who were inside the hall — the
media was excluded - said Mr Davis, who
is running under the slogan “Be Brave
...Change the Bahamas”, was the most
well received contender for the deputy
leadership.

While some suggested it was “by a
whisker” that the MP won the favour of

the crowd, others claimed Mr
Davis got a louder reception
that incumbent party leader
Perry Christie himself.

Mr Davis has flown in and
accommodated a large number
of voting delegates from the
family islands, and his con-
stituency in particular, to attend
the convention. While Mr
Fitzgerald’s supporters were
numerous, emblazoned with the
campaign slogan “Forward ...
the Future is now”, Mr Davis’

ieee URS were most visible.

Mr Wilchcombe, who ran
under the slogan “Now is the time!”
appeared to have been outgunned by Mr
Davis and Mr Fitzgerald in terms of the
amont of money he has spent on his cam-
paign, apparently relying to a greater
extent on his established credentials as
a former minister and long time MP in the
party than on t-shirts and badges.

Mr Davis was nominated by PLP sen-
ator Michael Darville, and seconded by St
Thomas More MP Frank Smith. MP for

West End and Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe,
was nominated by PLP Vice Chairman
Melissa Sears and seconded by Staford
“Scorpio” Evans, and Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald was nominated by his father
Edward Fitzgerald and seconded by Dan-
ny Johnson.

Mr Davis has publicly announced his
support for incumbent PLP leader Perry
Christie - who is being challenged at the
convention by his friend and parliamen-
tary colleague, Bernard Nottage, as well
as by newcomer Paul Moss - and while
Mr Christie has not formally revealed
who he supports for deputy leadership, it
is reported that he supports Mr Davis - his
former law partner - in return.

Mr Davis previously received the back-
ing of departing Deputy Leader, Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt.

With three strong candidates vying for
the deputy leadership of the party, the
PLP convention was yesterday swamped
with supporters bearing the hats, shirts
and badges of Phillip “Brave” Davis,
Obie Wilchcombe and Jerome Fitzger-
ald.

Roberts gets loud reception
from PLP convention floor

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PLP heavyweight and former
political retiree Bradley Roberts
looks in a strong position to steal
the chairmanship of the PLP
from incumbent Glenys Hanna
Martin.

To the disappointment of
those who had hoped to see the
party express support for a tran-
sition to a younger generation of
PLPs, and those who had been
happy to see a woman given a
prominent voice in the party,
the 65-year-old received the
loudest reaction from the con-
vention floor yesterday when he
was nominated to contest the
Chairmanship, according to del-
egates and stalwart councillors
who were in the convention hall

Mrs Hanna Martin also
received popular support, how-
ever many whom The Tribune
spoke with following the nomi-
nation process expressed their
belief that Mr Roberts, as a for-
mer chairman who spoke for
the party in the run up to its vic-
tory in the 2002 election, has the
capabilities to do so again.

Yesterday saw incumbent Ms
Hanna Martin nominated by her
parliamentary colleague,
‘Yamacraw MP Melanie Griffin,
and seconded by Miles Laroda.

Mr Roberts was nominated
by former PLP MP Neville Wis-
dom and seconded by avid PLP
supporter Laura Williams.

Joining them in the race is
former MP Keod Smith, who
was nominated by Laurette
Miller and seconded by C.L.
Johnson.

Ricardo Smith, who had pre-
viously expressed an intention
to seek a nomination, did not
do so.

While The Tribune spoke
with several keen supporters of

Correction

IN TWO stories appearing
in Tuesday’s Tribune, the
Right Reverend Laish Boyd
was incorrectly referred to as
the Anglican archbishop.

He is not an archbishop,
but rather a bishop of the
Anglican Diocese of the
Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos Islands.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.

TROPICAL
Us ed)
REE
PHONE: 322-2157

COMPLETE

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Ms Hanna Martin,
who felt she has been
a successful chairman
and organiser for the
party and should be
returned, just as many
PLP supporters said
now is the time for
Mr Roberts, who
retired from frontline
politics in 2007, to
return to the Chair-
manship.

Mr Roberts was
the last of the candi-
dates for Chairman to
announce his intentions, doing
so last Sunday on Island FM.

He described how he was
“admonished and encouraged”
to join the race and felt com-
pelled to do so by the “decay-
ing” condition the country is in
after just over two years of FNM
leadership. He said he would

|. © %



organise the party to
return to government
in the 2012 election,
but would not seek a
seat as an MP again.

Yesterday a sup-
porter, echoing the
sentiments of sever-
al others interviewed
by The Tribune, said:
“Past is profile.
(Roberts) did a great
job and he’ll do an
even greater job this

ayia ROBERTS time round.”

A younger PLP,
however, said: “I understand
that Bradley’s a proven leader,
and he’s got more time to con-
centrate on it, but I don’t think it
would be good for the party if
Bradley won. I think this is the
ideal time for the party to
demonstrate its commitment to
young people, to change and

aed eh Tate

EMOTE toLeT TeSys at ee ee ele eT
Glenys Hanna-Martin had opened the 51st PLP convention as the
first speaker of the evening at the Wyndham last night.

She talked of the honour and privilege of being elected for her
coveted position now sought after by Ken Dorsett, Keod Smith

and Bradley Roberts.

She paid tribute to former leaders and encouraged the
involvement of young people in the future of the PLP.

trying to move the country for-
ward.

“T support the youth and he’s
a young man, and I think he
should be given an opportunity
to show the country and the
PLP that young people have
something to offer. He’s one
who’s come up through the
ranks in the party...and so I
believe that I would like to see
the PLP present the youth to
the nation and move ahead with
that bridge that they keep talk-
ing about.”

Delegates and Stalwart coun-
cillors of the party will vote for
who they wish to see take the
top party posts today at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort,
where the convention will enter
its second of three days.

The winner of the race must
receive a simple majority of the
votes,

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Young people grudgingly flock to Twitter

CHICAGO (AP) — They think it’s point-
less, narcissistic. Some don’t even know what
it is.

Even so, more young adults and teens —
normally at the cutting edge of technology —
are finally coming around to Twitter, using it
for class or work, monitoring the minutiae of
celebrities’ lives. It’s not always love at first
tweet, though. Many of them are doing it
grudgingly, perhaps because a friend pres-
sures them or a teacher or boss makes them
try the 140-character microblogging site.

“T still find no point to using it. I’m the type
of person who likes to talk to someone,” says
Austyn Gabig, a sophomore at the University
of California, San Diego, who only joined
Twitter this month because she heard Ellen
DeGeneres was going to use tweets as a way to
win tickets to her talk show.

DeGeneres set off a frenzy on the UCSD
campus when she promised the tickets to those
who, within 15 minutes of the tweet, e-mailed
her cell phone photos of themselves wearing a
red towel and standing with someone in a uni-
form. Gabig got the tweet, found a towel —
and won tickets.

She might think she won’t tweet again, but
social networking expert David Silver pre-
dicts she’ll change her mind.

“Every semester, Twitter is the one tech-
nology that students are most resistant to,”
says Silver, a media studies professor at the
University of San Francisco, where he regu-
larly teaches a class on how to use various
Internet applications. “But it’s also the one
they end up using the most.”

It is a rare instance, he and others say, of
young people adopting an Internet applica-
tion after many of their older counterparts
have already done so.

Their slowness to warm to Twitter comes in
part from a fondness for the ease and direct-
ness of text messaging and other social net-
working services that most of their friends
already use. Many also are under the false
impression that their Twitter pages have to
be public, which is unappealing to a generation
that’s had privacy drilled into them.

Then there’s the fact that their elders like it,
and that’s very uncool. But that’s bound to
change as tech-savvy Gen Xers reach middle
age and baby boomers and even some senior
citizens become more comfortable with social
networking.

“In some ways, what we’re seeing here is a
kind of closing of that generational gap as it
relates to technology,” says Craig Watkins, a
University of Texas professor and author of
the book “The Young and the Digital.”

Consider, for instance, that the median age
of a Facebook user is now 33, despite the
social-networking site’s roots as a college hang-
out, according to the Pew Internet & Ameri-
can Life Project. The median age for Twitter
is 31. And while Facebook’s audience is aging,
Twitterers are getting younger. Internet track-

Worried About Being Left in the Dark?

hie
Hurricane Season

er comScore Inc. found that 18- to 24-year-olds
made up 18 percent of unique visitors to Twit-
ter in September, compared with 11 percent a
year earlier.

Meanwhile, kids ages 12 to 17 accounted
for 12 percent of Twitter visitors last month,
about double the proportion of a year earlier.

Pew researchers also found in a report
released Wednesday that the number of peo-
ple ages 18 to 24 who use some type of status-
update service is growing quickly, too. They
attribute much of the growth to Twitter.

“So much of this is driven by community. I'd
even call it a tribe,” says Susannah Fox, a Pew
researcher who was the new report’s lead
author. She said the survey also found that
wireless devices are increasingly a factor in
Twitter involvement, as in the more you have
— laptop, mobile phone and so on — the
more likely you are to tweet.

Alex Lifschitz, in his third year at the
Rochester Institute of Technology in New
York, uses Twitter as a tight-knit circle, keep-
ing his contacts more limited than on Face-
book. Using his cell phone or laptop, he tweets
to let professors know he can’t make it to
class or to ask questions about assignments. He
also uses it for something as basic as organiz-
ing a food run with friends on campus.

“T can simply tweet and ask who wants to go
somewhere with me, and I'll have a few takers
at any given time,” he says.

Mallory Wood, a recent graduate of Saint
Michael’s College in Vermont, is another Twit-
ter convert — primarily for work. She’s now
an admissions counselor there, in charge of
getting more people to follow her department
on Twitter. She uses the service to offer appli-
cation fee waivers to prospective students and
points them to links to student blogs, even
some with complaints about campus life. “You
have to be real with them,” Wood says.

That’s still not enough to persuade some
young people to get on board.

“Quite frankly, I don’t need to hear if some-
one stepped in dog poo on the way to class or
how annoyed they are that they lost their
favorite pen,” says Carolyn Wald, a Universi-
ty of Chicago junior who has not joined Twit-
ter and rarely posts status updates on Face-
book because “TI don’t want to assume that
people want to hear those things about me,
either.”

Even teen pop star Miley Cyrus stopped
tweeting, griping in a rap song she posted on
YouTube that, among other things, she’d
grown weary of making constant, meaning-
less updates about what she was doing.

The key, USF professor Silver says, is show-
ing his students how a simple status update can
become a more sophisticated way to show
their creative sides and, who knows, maybe
land a job.

(This article is by Martha Irvine of the
Associated Press)



Students should.
learn ‘where
words fail
blows ensue’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LOCKED in the dreaded
cycle of violence, our society
struggles with the search for
solutions to this multifaceted
problem including the ques-
tion of corporal punishment
in schools.

Those against corporal
punishment in schools argue
that it is cruel, humiliating
and violent.

Furthermore, they believe
that its administration may
be injurious to students, is
prone to abuse by teachers,
and may result in litigation
against teachers and the
Ministry of Education.

Additionally, they believe
it may be even counterpro-
ductive because its long-
term effect could make stu-
dents more prone to vio-
lence in adult life.

On the other hand, those
for corporal punishment in
schools say it worked well
in the past, and is well tried
and proven as demonstrated
by the production of man-
nerly, polished, and disci-
plined students of the 50s

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



and 60s.

We have created a vacu-
um while we experiment
with new alternatives.

What we are witnessing is
a disconnect between the
school environment and the
harsh realities of our real
society.

It seems as if the large
number of graduates from
the current school system
only contribute to an
increasingly violent society.

While the education
administrators have dis-
armed teachers of their
straps, and canes and
require that they use only
persuasive techniques for
dealing with disciplinary
problems, in the wider soci-
ety, it seems as though more
and more police officers are
appearing in public armed
with guns.

In years gone by, corpo-
ral punishment, as part of a

school’s disciplinary system,
could be compared to vacci-
nation; that minor discom-
fort experienced by the
unruly student from the
benign sting of the strap or
cane served to immunise
him or her in the future.

Unfortunately, legitimate
violence, and not just per-
suasion, is the reality of all
civil societies.

There is a time to drop
bombs on aggressors, a time
to shoot attacking enemies,
a time to use lethal force on
violent criminals or intrud-
ers, a time to subdue force-
fully and restrain various
wrongdoers.

Therefore, under con-
trolled conditions, by
humane administrators, stu-
dents should be made
aware, from a tender age, of
the realities of the real
world.

“Where words fail, blows
ensue.”

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
September, 2009

Whom shall Haitians call on?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Mr. Lovence Louima has
written what he stands by as
the truth when all others have
refused to even give a state-
ment. The reporters have
been denied access to the
detention centre, possibly
because the Minister of State
Mr. Branville McCartney dis-
agrees with The Tribune’s
series of articles into allega-
tions of abuse and mistreat-
ment at the facility.

The Haitian ambassador
has read the newspapers and
has been told of the number
of abuses which take place at
this centre. Yet for what he
does about it suggests to me
that he sits in the office as if
he’s on a vacation in the
Bahamas, allowing everything
to take place right before his
eyes. What is wrong with this
picture? Why can’t we see
what is going on, has the
ambassador been threatened
by the Government of the
Bahamas? Has he been told if
you get in too deep we will
deport you from this country?

Sirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South » P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas
ee ea es

“GIVE AND IT SHALL BE

GIVEN UNTO YOU."

Should I go further in thinking
that he is enjoying such a great
life and doesn't want to be
bothered or get his hands
dirty? What conclusions can
be drawn when there are
reports that hundreds and
thousand of persons go miss-
ing in the Bahamas in the
wake of what would be the
Immigration Haitian Opera-
tion Flood? Who shall they
call on when the ambassador,
the representative for Haiti,
appears to do little? While 39
persons lose their homes in
Abaco and no questions
asked! Persons being sent
home without proper investi-
gation on the process or the
grounds they are being sent
on! Persons have to sit out-
side and are spoken to like
dirt at the passport office
when applying or renewing
their kids’ travel documents!

Is there a government in
Haiti that really sees what is
going on in the Bahamas, will-
ing to step in and encourage
the men and women to stop
taking this dangerous journey
for a better life just to find
temselves being shot down by
RBDF who are given the
order to do so? Is there a
Government in Haiti that will
stand and say enough is
enough they have to amend
the constitution? They should
examine who they send to
represent their country and its
citizens. There needs to be a

SUNDAY SEAVICES

stand to defend the cause of

the illegal ones when in actu-
ality we mean every one of
them, even the one who sits
next to me and helps pass my
exams in school. The one who
fought for me when no one
else wanted to stand and
defend me, yes! The one who
weeds my yard, works in the
construction field with us and
for a little or nothing and
sometimes went months with-
out being paid. If any ques-
tions asked, we call the police
or immigration and get them
deported. Yes! I mean all of
them who begin to integrate
themselves in this society
thinking they can live the way
we live; have far better jobs;
vehicles and homes than some
of us, they must go!

In conclusion, this matter is
far beyond Minister McCart-
ney, we are in a mess. While
many have called Haitians
havoc to this society and
blame them for everything
from crime to AIDS, they’ve
remained passive in the case
of allowing all of the above to
take place; without uttering a
word to discontinue this
because they are of Haitian
descendants and illegal;
should this be the cause of one
being mistreated and nobody
to call on? Where do they go
or who can they turn to for
assistance? At this present
time I am calling on everyone
who has a listening ear, young
and old to join together in
calling on the Almighty God!

the innocents.

Indeed! There are too
many Haitians in the
Bahamas. We play with the
words and say we only mean

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October, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5



Cynthia Pratt calls for new PLP
leadership to maintain integrity

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POPULAR PLP Deputy Leader Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt urged the new lead-
ership to maintain integrity in service as
she bid her final farewell to supporters
last night.

As the Member of Parliament for St
Cecilia stepped down from the post she
held for 12 years, Mrs Pratt explained
how her political ambitions were driven
by the needs of the people she served as
MP, Minister and Deputy Prime Minister.
And she encouraged future party leaders
to do the same.

Mrs Pratt said: “Some of us have lost
sight of the fact that politics is all about
the people.

“Tt is about crafting new and innovative
programmes to ensure that they recognise
the bountiful opportunities that exist in
the Bahamas.

“Public service, is just that, service to
the Bahamian people, not for reward,
but to guarantee a level of decency in
their daily lives.”

The people who rely on the State are
the people the party needs to work for,
Mrs Pratt said.

As she worked her way from “rags” to
the “middle class” and through the polit-
ical ranks, Mrs Pratt said she retained
her values and characteristics as a fiery
community builder and defender of the
poor, qualities Sir Lynden Pindling recog-
nised as fundamental to the party.

Steadfast

As long as the party remains steadfast
in its resolve to alleviate people’s suffer-
ing and continue to prioritise economic
empowerment, Mrs Pratt sees a bright
future for the PLP.

She praised the deep and wide PLP
bench and commended those vying for
her former position and other leadership
positions for the maturity they have dis-
played in their campaigns.

And Mrs Pratt reminded them of their
responsibility to create an environment
where young Bahamians are guaranteed
a bright future.

She called for the future leadership to

focus on the key issues affecting commu-
nities, such as education, immigration,
healthcare and public safety.

Mrs Pratt lamented the dismantling of
the Urban Renewal Programme — which,
she said, was helping young men in inner
cities — as a bad political decision, as was
the discontinuation of the National Youth
Service, which may have prevented the
criminality among young men today.

There should be a strict protectionist
policy for illegal immigrants and the pre-
sent policy allowing stateless children
must be addressed, Mrs Pratt said.

True reform of the educational system
is required, and affordable healthcare
should be available to all.

Mrs Pratt thanked the hundreds of del-
egates gathered for the first night of the
51st convention at the Wyndham resort in
Cable Beach for their support, and
thanked them on behalf of her late hus-
band.

As she bowed out to an adoring crowd,
Mrs Pratt advised the party to continue to
reach out to young people, and said:
“Remember, service is all about the peo-
ple.”

Parliamentarians tight-lipped on contenders

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

DESPITE allegiances and
alliances behind the scenes, par-
liamentarians yesterday
remained largely tight-lipped
about who of the leadership,
deputy leadership and chair-
manship contenders they would
wish to see elected.

With races for the three top
posts being hotly contested at
the party’s three day convention,
which began yesterday at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on
Cable Beach, it appeared that

PLP LEADER Perry Christie is welcomed to the convention



come out of this convention unit-
ed and fighting ready for the
next election,” she added.

Mr Christie received the loud-
est shouts of support of all con-
tenders for party offices yester-
day as he marched towards the
entrance of the convention hall
to be nominated.

The leader must win at least
51 per cent of the votes in order
to win or retain the post, while
the victors in all other races must
attain a simple majority.

STRUCKUM

many of PLP MPs and senators
did not want to get caught in any
post-convention controversy by
making public statements about
their personal preferences.

Incumbent party leader Perry
Christie, leadership contender
Bernard Nottage and deputy
leadership contender Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald would not be
drawn on who they would wish
to join them in leading the party,
keeping their cards close to their
chests when approached by The
Tribune.

Other parliamentarians, such
as incumbent chairman and MP
Glenys Hanna-Martin, former
House speaker Oswald Ingra-
ham and Senator Hope Stra-
chan, joined them in declining
to state their preferences.

MP Picewell Forbes told The
Tribune he is for Obie Wilch-
combe taking the deputy lead-
ership of the party but stopped
short of naming his favoured
leadership candidate.

For his part, Mr Christie said

diplomatically that “whoever the
party chooses” would be the best
person for the chairman or
deputy leadership posts, while
Dr Nottage claimed he is sim-
ply focusing on his own cam-
paign and Mr Fizgerald said he
did not wish to comment as he
wanted his personal supporters,
who he noted are “very divid-
ed” over who they would like to
see become leader, to vote
according to their individual con-
sciences.

Chairman of Mr Christie’s re-
election campaign, Vincent Peet
claimed Mr Christie has the sup-
port of 80 per cent of the parlia-
mentary group of MPs and sen-
ators and the “overwhelming”
support of stalwart councillors
and delegates, giving him the
strongest chance of emerging the
victor in the leadership race.

However, another senior MP
in the party claimed that, in
truth, the parliamentary group
is “split” over who they would
like to see as leader of the PLP

S HHH! HURRY

our

Of Pre-Owned Cars

coming out of the convention.

Nonetheless, Mr Christie is
favoured by all parliamentari-
ans who were willing to voice
their opinion — including Mr
Peet, Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson and deputy leadership
nominee Philip “Brave” Davis.

Mr Peet said he travelled with
Mr Christie last week to Andros,
Eleuthera, Exuma and Grand
Bahama and is certain he also
has strong support “on the
ground” among grassroots party
supporters.

Meanwhile, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said: “I’ve always been a
supporter of Mr Christie, I’ve
not changed in that regard. I
think the style of leadership and
the quality of leadership that he
displays are vital for the devel-
opment of our country. That’s
why I support him 100 per cent.”

She added that she feels the
convention turnout has “shown
most importantly that people see
the PLP as a very viable party.”

“T am sure we are going to

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Tourist joins the
Paul Moss camp

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs

Development Officer, Alumni Relations and Development, responsible
for selected College fundraising activities. The Development Officer is
a position for a candidate with experience in the non-profit industry and
who wishes to continue to build a career in fundraising and/or higher
education advancement. The suceesstul candidate will be someone
with strong organisational skills, who is a good communicator both
verbally and in writing and who enjoys team work,

Specific duties and responsibilities include identifying, cultivating and
soliciting major donors and prospects including individuals, corpora-
tions, and foundations; providing support for the maintenance of the
major gifts prospect pipeline: assisting in the implementation of pro-
grammes and activities designed to increase the visibility of the ARAD
Office and The College to internal and external constituencies and con-
ducting internal and external research/fact gathering in support of fund-
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A Bachelor's degree, minimum of five years professional experience
and prior fundraising, sales or markeling experience are a must along
with demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills. For
a detailed job description, visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested
candidates should submit a letter of interest, Resume, a completed
Employment Application Form along with all the required documenta-
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Human Resources Department OR hrapply@cob.edu.bs
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By AVA TURNQUEST

THOUGH the general
attention level of guests at the
Wyndham was one of casual
interest bordering on apathy,
some visitors were intrigued
by the publicly accessible
political process with one
tourist going so far as to actu-
ally join a camp.

Attracted by the intensity
projected from PLP sup-
porters at this year's con-
vention, Geminy Maw, a 21-
year-old from England,
explored the convention
floor intending only to dis-
cover just what all the excite-
ment was about.

Ms Maw said that out of all
the booths she visited, it was
the Paul Moss camp that not
only explained the event and
its national importance the

A
GEMINY MAW with Paul Moss



best, but was also the most
sociable and genuine in shar-
ing their campaign.

Since joining their campaign
as an honorary member and
donning the iconic purple t-
shirt, Ms Maw said that she is
definitely enjoying this unique
experience and plans to attend
the convention for the remain-
ing two days.

Party hopeful Mr Moss
joked: "See even the interna-

A SHOW OF SUPPORT FOR DAVIS

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tional community is for Paul
Moss.”

Meanwhile, Joe Hughes
from Kentucky and Missy
Wallace from Indiana both
commented that what sur-
prised them the most was how
accessible such a crucial elec-
tion was to the public and
both agreed that this is instru-
mental in keeping elected offi-
cials grounded in the needs
and concerns of the people.

jajor/Tribune staff

A PLP delegate waves her sup-
port for one of the party’s
Deputy Leadership challengers,
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort last
night.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

share
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news

The Tribune wants to hear
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7



Wyndham transformed into a political bunker

By AVA TURNQUEST

PLP supporters swarmed
the Wyndham resort yes-
terday morning turning the
typically serene lobby into a
bustling hive.

Overnight bags littered
the walls and seats as dele-
gates and stalwart council-
lors from across the archi-
pelago stepped into their
arena.

Booths lined the halls of
the ground and second floor
of the Marlin tower, trans-
forming the island hotel
into a political bunker.

Candidate booths ranged
from the modest to the
elaborate, seasoned candi-
dates opting for reserved
traditional methods such as
pins, flyers or booklets
while some newcomers
spared no expense, includ-
ing flat screen TVs, massive
posters and even person-
alised bottled water.

Supporters

No candidate was with-
out an extensive team of
supporters, however
Christie paraphernalia
reigned supreme yesterday,
with the campaign going so
far as to hire attractive
young women to sport cam-
paign shirts and distribute
materials — the majority of
them having no political
interests whatsoever.

The superficial aside, sup-
porters are unanimous in
their understanding that for
the party to move forward
there must be total cohe-
sion. The verdict on
whether or not this can be
achieved is mixed.

National general council
member for Carmichael
Judson Wilmott is confident

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that the party is mature
enough to move past elec-
tions and support new offi-
cials without backbiting or
discord.

“Leader has stated that
the party is in transition,”
said Mr Wilmott, “which
means that the leader is
moving on the way out and
passing the party on to
those persons that have
been groomed and who
have the experience to take
the party forward and
become the type of leaders
that will better the party
and ultimately the country.”

College of the Bahamas
student and BJ Nottage
supporter Matysha Maura
said: “Some people may be
intimidated by some of the
more outspoken support-
ers, those shouting
‘Christie, Christie’ at any-
one who walks past. From
what I can see I’m not real-
ly sure what will happen
after the leader of the party
election — whether every-
one will really be able to
come together.

“There is a huge rift

Pe
ca
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PERRY CHRISTIE paraphernalia mie STC EM IKON A

between BJ Nottage sup-
porters and Christie sup-
porters and I don’t know
whether or not they will be
able to overcome that.

“With the young PLPs I
don’t feel that there is much
division — with us it feels
like yes we’re voting for dif-
ferent people but at the end
of the day we’re supporting
whoever is elected 100 per
cent. With the older PLPs I
find that at times they can
be a bit over zealous.”

It can be deduced, how-
ever, that these “older
PLPs” are the life and spir-
it of this year’s convention.

The ratio of 50+ support-

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ers versus those under 45
was a Staggering 5 to 1, with
more than a few stalwarts
who made the pilgrimage
confined to wheelchairs.

At the epicentre of con-
vention spectacle was PLP
celebrity Laura Williams.
Never failing to entertain
and inspire, this year she
demonstrated complete
support for her candidates
by affixing a fan to her head
beset with rhinestones and
pictures of the candidates
on each side.

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her attention-grabbing out-
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acted on more than one
occasion as a peacemaker
between over zealous sup-
porters, insisting that it was
each person’s right to vote
for whoever they wanted.
Though it is uncertain
what the next two days will
bring for the party, the
excitement and adrenaline
rush so indicative of
Bahamian conventions can-
not be ignored and it is this

















electrifying current that
lends hope for a unified
party.

“We coming here strong
and we going out stronger,”
said Ms Williams.

“This ain’t no FNM and
PLP in here, this is strictly
PLP - our convention.

“And when we finish with
this Friday night, we form-
ing the next government
2010.”

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British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

Eating properly is important when pated igen breast cancer therapy. Treatments can cause fatigue, reduce physical
er from a reduced appetite as aside effect of the treatment . Eating fruits

strength, and damage tissue. Patients usual
and vegetables rich in vitamin C, high-protein foods like meat, beans, and dairy products, and carbohvdrate-laden whole

y Sul

frains for energy can help tremendously.

You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of

mammogram and physical exams are crucial steps that every woman should employ

BN American

The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2009 4 A]

Sabrina Deleveaux

Breast Cancer Survivor for 1" years

4"



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FRED Mitchell has turned
down the opportunity to run
for the leadership of the PLP
at the party’s national con-
vention.

Yesterday afternoon, it was
announced that the Fox Hill
MP will not join current
leader Perry Christie, veter-
an MP Bernard Nottage and
newcomer Paul Moss in vying
for the post.

A statement issued by Mr
Mitchell’s camp said he was
nominated to run “as a Fox
Hill favourite son”, but
declined.

“Mr Mitchell expects that
there may be further oppor-
tunities for leadership,” it
said.

According to someone
inside the convention hall at
the time, the delegates issued
a “collective gasp” when Mr
Mitchell refused the nomina-
tion. A group of attendees
then ran over to hug the MP.

Mr Mitchell told the con-
vention he felt that in raising
the possibility of running, he
had successfully championed
the democratic rights of all
PLPs who choose to stand for
any office in the party.

The MP said he will con-
tinue to work throughout the
convention and beyond for an
effective, fair and transparent
electoral process, conducted
with courtesy and respect.

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The statement said: “I want
to win the leadership of the
PLP. I want to win the lead-
ership of the country, and this
continues to be the fact, but
my supporters and I have
determined that such a move
at this time will not now serve
the long-term interests of the
party.

“By openly declaring my
interest in the leadership of
the party and by demonstrat-
ing the support for my Agen-
da For Change, I am pleased
with the galvanising effect
that has become evident to
everyone in the electoral
process and the conduct of














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Mitchell decides
against running
§ for PLP leadership

the party’s leadership.

“My work with the Mission
Fund to support candidates
for the general election will
continue and I will continue
with my work on the agenda
for change, both of which are
critical for the future success
of the PLP.

“T remind those in the
FNM who would make mis-
chief to mind their own busi-
ness and council them,
instead, to prepare to deal
with a re-energised, rededi-
cated and powerfully invigo-
rated PLP.

“T again thank my col-
leagues in the Parliamentary
Caucus for our shared hard
work and dedication and
pledge my continued support.

“T remind young Bahami-
ans that the campaign for
change was launched to
demonstrate that there is
space in the PLP for young
people as the party works to
engage the next generation of
PLPs.

“Finally, the party deserves
at this convention an open,
fair, transparent and unclut-
tered process as we organise
ourselves to respond to the
lessons of 2007. I will continue
to be an integral part of that
process, now and in the par-
ty’s coming conventions, lead-
ing to the next general elec-
tion.”

EDITIONS of ‘The Brave Voice’,
a publication for PLP Deputy
Leadership candidate Philip
‘Brave’ Davis on display at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort
ahead of the PLP Convention.
Davis will contest the post with
Obie Wilchcombe and Jerome
Fitzgerald.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

The Tribune



THE POLL appeared on the tribune242.com website.

Tribune poll
suggests readers
want registry of

sex offenders

TRIBUNE readers say
they believe the government
should create a registry of
sex offenders.

Those who took part in
the latest tribune242.com
poll said the creation of a
list of persons convicted of
sexual crimes would help
the government protect
families from child moles-
ters.

Sex offender registration
is a system in place ina
number of countries
designed to allow officials
to keep track of the loca-
tion and activities of sex
offenders, including those
who have completed crimi-
nal sentences.

In some countries like the
US, the contents of the reg-
istry are available to the
public.

Of those who voted on
the issue, 64 said a sex
offenders registry would
help keep children safe,
while 16 argued that it
would not.

A number of readers also
commented on the matter.
“Manifesto Victim” said:
“A register can only be
meaningful if these crimes
are reported, tried and con-
victions are made. In other
words, the register is the
last part of the puzzle. A
register will only let us
know who we are dealing

Moving

with, it won't stop
stop pedophiles would be
proper sex education in the
high schools which includes
pedophile awareness. We
need to empower the vic-
tims in cases like this . This
would ensure more convic-
tions. Crime prevention
begins with awareness!”

Another reader thought a
registry would be a very }

good idea, “however fami-

lies who have this or any
type of criminal in their |

family should also do the

right thing and turn them in

to the proper authorities.

Protecting/ covering up for
these people is what causes }

the crime rate in our coun-

try to continuously rise.”
“Sandra” said she does

not agree that such a reg-

istry would be useful. “I
don't think the registry }

would work at this time
because most of the offend-

ers are known to the victims |

— eg mother's boyfriend,

neighbours and relatives. In
most cases the crime is only }

reported to exact some sort
of revenge for a relation-

ship gone wrong for other
reasons besides the act itself

— which is such a shame.

The social decay in this

country is so deep that it’s
difficult to know where to
start to correct it.”

ey

Colinalmperial's

Group & Health Benefits Division

is moving.

As of November 2, 2009, our address will be:

- Police concerned about high
number of GB traffic accidents

Senior officer issues warning about the dangers of ‘texting’ while driving

: By DENISE MAYCOCK
i Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Although road

i deaths on Grand Bahama are down
: this year, Road Traffic and police
i officials are very concerned about
i the high number of accidents.

A senior police officer reported

: that more than 900 road accidents
i were recorded here between Janu-
i ary 1 and October 20, as a result
i of which seven people died and 266
: sustained minor injuries.
pedophiles. A better toolto :
i Wednesday, Deputy Controller of
? Road Traffic Basil Rahming said
i he is particularly concerned about
? the use of cell phones by drivers.

During a press conference on

“It is impossible to be texting and

paying a degree of attention that is
; expected of a reasonable and pru-
: dent driver — it creates a very dan-

BAHAMAS, SPAIN REPRESENTATIVES MEET ON TOURISM

hk lle

-
MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace met with Jesus Sil-
i va Fernandez, the Ambassador of Spain to the Bahamas to discuss tourism and emerging
i opportunities for co-operation. The men are pictured after the meeting, when Mr Van-
: derpool-Wallace presented Mr Silva Fernandez with a souvenir coin collection and authen-
? tic Bahamian jewel case.



BASIL RAHMING said he is particularly
concerned about the use of cell phones by
drivers.

gerous situation when driving,” he
said.

While the law against driving
without due care and attention
technically bans texting while dri-
ving, Mr Rahming said the law does
not specifically prohibit drivers



from using cell phones.

“It is up to the driver not to be
distracted. We have had instances
in the past where persons were
killed in accidents because they
allowed themselves to be distracted
on the cell phone,” he said.

“We are experiencing an unac-
ceptably high rate of road accidents
and we are very concerned, and
give thanks to God that the fatality
rate is not higher at this time,” Mr
Rahming said.

The police also said they are con-
cerned about persons driving under
the influence of alcohol and drugs.

It was noted that an amendment
to the Road Traffic Act has been
passed enabling officers to use
breathalysers to test suspected
drunk drivers, and senior officers
said they expect practice to begin
soon — perhaps as early as next

The Anglican
community plans
Celebration for
Father Norman
Lighthourne

AS FATHER NOR-
MAN LIGHT-
BOURNE’S 25th anniver-
sary of service approach-
es, the Anglican commu-
nity has announced that
“aman of worth must be
celebrated”.

Plans are underway to
celebrate his leadership
and legacy in a ‘Service of
Celebration’ at Holy
Cross Anglican Church
tonight at 7pm and a gala
dinner scheduled for 7pm
on Friday at Sandals
Resort.

Sporty meets sophistication.



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New telephone contact:
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Verification numbers:
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Senior Justice Allen told

sce. PLP outturst forces Travolta case retrial)

time to reach a decision.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury: “We are very con-
cerned, in the interest of jus-
tice, that it does not appear
that there has been a com-
munication from the jury
room. Justice must not only
be done, but seen to be
done.”

Noting that the trial has
lasted some five weeks, the
judge said: “I am very very

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reluctant to discharge you but
in the interest of justice, hav-
ing heard the views of coun-
sel, we are concerned. It
leaves the impression that
there may have been a com-
munication from the jury
room.

“Tam not going to ask if
there was or not.”

The judge then ordered a
retrial for the accused.

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Outside the courtroom,
Bridgewater was swarmed by
family members and support-
ers who subsequently went
into chants of “Pleasant,
Pleasant” as they moved on
to Bank Lane.

Bridgewater’s attorney
Murrio Ducille told reporters:
“We were ready for the ver-
dict. I know that we would
have won. Everything is pos-
itive. There has been
absolutely no evidence to
implicate this lady or Light-
bourne for that matter.”

Mr Ducille said he is pre-
pared for a retrial but has no
idea when that would be. He
said he would not comment
on how the possible leak of
the verdict came about.

“There is no evidence as to
where that came from,” he
said.

Mr Travolta’s attorney
Michael Ossi told reporters
he was happy with Senior Jus-
tice Allen’s decision to dis-
charge the jury.

When asked whether Mr
Travolta would be prepared
to return to testify at the retri-
al Mr Ossi said: “We are fully
cooperating with the prose-
cution.

“We are committed to see-
ing this through, and we are
committed to seeing justice
served. Whatever the prose-
cution asks us to do is exactly
what we will do.

“We would have liked to
have seen a verdict rendered
today but we would like to
see justice served.”

Attorney Carlson Shurland
said: “Unfortunately the
announcement at the con-
vention compromised the
integrity of the jury room and
after five weeks of serious
advocacy it’s very disappoint-
ing. We are very confident
that at the end of the day our
client will be vindicated.”

Mr Shurland said he will
seek to have the retrial held in
Freeport.

Around 9.30pm last night,
hundreds at the PLP conven-
tion were whipped into a fren-
zy by an overly enthusiastic
Mr Forbes who prematurely
exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free
woman PLPs! Pleasant is a
free woman PLPs! God is

good PLPs! Pleasant is a free
woman! God still reigns
PLPs!”

The convention exploded
in an impromptu dance to the
song “Oh Happy Day” while
the jury was still deliberating.

The session chairman
mounting the podium after
Mr Forbes’ speech had to
apologise for whatever con-
fusion the MP’s pronounce-
ment caused.

And late last night the PLP
issued an official apology. A
statement read: “Last evening
in the course of an address at
our annual national general
convention, it was announced
that former Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater had been acquit-
ted. The announcement was
incorrect. We give an unqual-
ified apology. This was not
intended to interfere with the
administration of justice.”

Before being sent to delib-
erate yesterday, the jury in
the John Travolta trial were
told yesterday they had to be
certain that ex-PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer ambulance driver Tari-
no Lightbourne agreed
together to extort money
from the star.

In her summing up, Senior
Justice Anita Allen told the
nine-member jury a “threat”
is simply an expression of an
intention to do something,
and if they believed there was
no threat, then the accused
could not be found guilty of
attempted extortion.

Bridgewater and Light-
bourne are accused of
attempting to extort, and con-
spiring to extort $25 million
from American actor John
Travolta between January 2
and 20 by means of a threat.
They deny the charges.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury they had to be cer-
tain the pair agreed together
to extort money from Mr Tra-
volta, 55, stating they could
not convict one on the con-
spiracy charge and acquit the
other.

On the abetment to extor-
tion charge against Ms
Bridgewater alone, Senior
Justice Allen told the jury
they could not find Bridge-
water guilty of both attempt-

TARINO LIGHTBOURNE



ed extortion as well as abet-
ment to extortion.

She told them to consider
the abetment charge against
her only after considering the
attempted extortion charge.
She told the jury that only if
they found her not guilty on
the attempted extortion
charge, could they consider
the charge of abetment to
extortion.

The prosecution had
alleged that after Jett Travol-
ta, 16, had died of a seizure on
January 2, contact was made
with certain individuals to
convey a threat to Mr Tra-
volta, regarding the release to
the media of a refusal of treat-
ment form bearing his signa-
ture.

The form releases medical
personnel who attend to
patients in their care of any
liability if they are not taken
to the hospital.

When Mr Travolta took the
witness stand, he testified he
had been informed that the
release document he signed,
and stories connected to the
document, which would imply
that he was in some way cul-
pable in the death of his son,
would be released to the
media if money was not paid.

The defence contended
however that there had been
no threat or demand but
rather a “negotiation” for the
purchase of a document
which Mr Lightbourne had in
his possession.

Bridgewater contended that
she had been acting on behalf
of Lightbourne in her capaci-
ty as an attorney.

the jury that lawyers are not
immune to the law if they do
any act which amounts to a
criminal offence, whether on
their own or in representing a
client. Lightbourne’s defence
said he had made no threat
or demand and described him
as an opportunist and not an
extortionist.

Both accused made
unsworn statements to the
jury proclaiming their inno-
cence and the judge said it
was for the jury to determine
whether they were of any evi-
dential value and what weight
to be given to them. She also
told them that even if they
did not believe a word the
accused had said, they still
had to be satisfied on the evi-
dence of the prosecution that
they had committed the
offences.

She reminded the jury
they had to accept her direc-
tions on the law, and that
their role was to decide on
the facts. She noted that the
case is perhaps one of the
most high profile ever in the
Bahamas but told the jury
they were not to have any
regard to the media publicity.
She ordered them not to have
any sympathy for the victim
(Mr Travolta) nor the
accused, and also told them
they should not have any prej-
udice towards them.

“This case is not about pol-
itics. This is not about them
against us,” Senior Justice
Allen said.

She told the jury they
should not reject the evidence
of PLP senator Allyson May-
nard Gibson and Mr Tra-
volta’s attorney Michael
McDermott on the basis that
they had assisted the police.
She told the jury that there
was nothing in the law that
prohibited such actions.

The prosecution had
brought video and audio
taped conversations between
McDermott and the accused
in a covert operation as evi-
dence in the trial.

The defence claimed that
Mr Travolta had given birth
to extortion and was an
untruthful witness.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury that the accused
could be found guilty by a two
thirds majority of 6-3 or 9-0.

B. E.C. (Bahamas Electricity Corporation) plan to construct and
operate Abaco’s new power plant in the Wilsons City/Buzzard Hill
area. We would like to send a strong message to our Government.
You are urged to attend and participate in a peaceful, lawful public
demonstration to be held in downtown Marsh Harbour, Abaco, on
Friday, October 23rd, between 10:00 am and Noon.

htto:/ Wwww.youtube.com/watch?v=PKk2DYYcSpu

For further information please contact Stafford Patterson at

242-366-0023 office
242-577-0273 cell
242-366-0554 home

info@splug@abacoinet.com

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 11





The Bahamas and the death penalty

By LARRY SMITH

Let the punishment be equal
with the offence.
-- Cicero

"In the end, it is the poor who
are selected to die.”
-- Sister Helen Prejean

A A College of the
Bahamas seminar

recently, I sat next to a first-
year law student who had a
degree in criminal justice from
an American college. When
asked what should be done to
address crime, the first word
out of her mouth was "hang-
ing”.

And it appears that most
preachers are also firmly in
favour of the death penalty,
although it flies in the face of
everything written in the New
Testament. Indeed, some would
have no objection to turning
the clock back centuries and
making executions into a public
spectacle.

"Criminals now have no fear
of the law and no regard for
human life, and we can no
longer remain philosophical
about sending the strongest
message to the criminal ele-
ment in our society,” said the
chairman of the National Advi-
sory Council on Crime, Bish-
op Simeon Hall, recently. "We
need to hang a few."

But there are strong argu-
ments that the death penalty in
and of itself does not deter
crime. Many experts believe
such a punishment is only effec-
tive if it is applied with certain-
ty and without delay. And the
gross inefficiency of our judi-
cial system blunts any perceived
connection between the crime
and the penalty.

According to one report that
examined capital punishment
in Trinidad and Tobago: "The
evidence suggests that the prob-
lem faced by law enforcement is
to increase the certainty of pun-
ishment. The occasional and
long delayed mandatory sen-
tence to death is very unlikely
to add weight to the deterrent
effectiveness of a poorly-
enforced criminal law."

This report concluded that
"the problem of high and esca-
lating lethal violence in
Trinidad and Tobago cannot
be ‘fixed’ by executing occa-
sionally a tiny fraction of those
who commit murder. The solu-
tion must lie in tackling the eco-
nomic and social conditions that
have given rise to the problem,
and the cultural factors that
support the use of deadly force
as a means of resolving dis-
putes".

Much the same could be said
here, where the political class is
probably more sophisticated
than the wider public on the
hanging issue. For example,
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie have found it politic to
support hanging during periods
of public outcry against crime,
but many suspect they are not
expressing their true feelings.

The official position is that
capital punishment is the law
of the land, and the law will be
allowed to take its course. But
the argument is made by some
that this is double-speak.
According to defence lawyer
Wayne Munroe: "If the gov-
ernment was serious it would
know what is open to litigation
on the death penalty and move
to engage these points.

"If you want to hang, you
have to take positive steps to
limit appeals. You need legis-
lation prescribing uniform sen-
tencing, as was recommended
by the 1999 criminal justice task
force, but the politicians don't
have the will to do it. They are
just stringing the public along.”

In 2006, FNM cabinet minis-
ter Carl Bethel said much the
same thing when he was in
opposition, noting that if then
Prime Minister Perry Christie
wanted capital punishment (as
Mr Christie claimed he did) "he
would have to bring some laws
to parliament". Presumably
that is still the case, but we
don't see any such laws ema-
nating from the Ingraham gov-
ernment either.

There were 17 murderers on
death row in 2006, when the
Privy Council abolished the
mandatory death sentence in
the Bahamas. This meant that
every prisoner had to be re-sen-
tenced. But since then only four
cases have been reviewed,
according to National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest,
and they have all been
appealed, so there will be no
hangings anytime soon.

"We will follow (the Privy
Council rulings) that the death
sentence is not mandatory and
that there has to be a sentenc-
ing hearing for all those who

were sentenced to death with-
out such a hearing,” Tunquest
told me. "During the re-sen-
tencing, the judges wil be look-
ing at the cases again, as well as
the length of time already
served, and they are passing a
variety of different sentences.
There is no need to change the
laws in my view.”

According to Turnquest:
"The four cases that have had
hearings where the death penal-
ty has been handed down again
are all now under appeal and
therefore the government can-
not carry out the death sen-
tence. Every citizen is entitled
to exhaust all avenues of
appeal. Once the appeal at any
level is dismissed the govern-
ment can proceed. In some
instances, if the government
doesn't proceed, the convict
would not move forward with
appeals to the next level.”

Fifty men have been hanged
here since 1929. Five under the
previous Ingraham administra-
tion; 13 under the Pindling gov-
ernment; and the remainder
between 1929 and 1967. The
last man to be hanged was
David Mitchell, in January
2000. Another man was sched-
uled for execution at the same
time, but he committed suicide
first.

Our annual murder rate last
year was 21 per 100,000 - in the
same league as Russia. And
there have been about a thou-
sand murders in the Bahamas
since 1990, not including
attempted killings or causing
grievous harm. A year ago, for-
mer police prosecutor Keith
Bell said the justice system itself
was the biggest obstacle to
crime reduction, and the only
way to address it was for politi-
cians of all parties to agree on a
priority agenda for legal reform.

"One third of accused mur-
derers are out on bail, including
those accused of up to 10 mur-
ders," Bell said. "The statistics
and reports are all there. We
know what is happening. The
only question is who is going
to be next. Why are we still
charging people with murder
when we know that capital pun-
ishment cannot be applied? We
should amend the law to pro-
vide for degrees of killing to
make it easier to convict, and
implement a system of plea bar-
gaining.”

Many people argue that
there needs to be clarity as far
as the death penalty is con-
cerned, and few would deny
that comprehensive legal
reforms to address our sky-
rocketing crime rate are long
overdue. In fact, they have been
prescribed by any number of
experts and consultative bod-
ies since at least the 1990s.

But in my view, we should
be sceptical about the death
penalty for two main reasons -
the certainty of miscarriages of
justice, and the historical use of
executions by those in power
for the suppression of dissent.
Leaders of slave and peasant
revolts present important exam-
ples in this regard. And as
Amnesty International notes,
capital punishment is “the ulti-
mate, irreversible denial of
human rights”.

Ever since the 7th century
BC, when Greece’s Draconian
legal code made death the only
penalty for every crime, the
world has been moving away
from capital punishment. More
than a hundred countries have
abolished the death penalty in
law or in practice - the United
States and Japan being the only
developed democracies that still
carry out judicial killings.

Until the late 19th century,
the “long drop” (as hanging
was known) was the penalty for
hundreds of crimes - including
shoplifting, poaching and
“being in the company of gyp-
sies”. But these days, the death
penalty is reserved for the most
serious offences — like aggra-
vated murder or treason - and
capital punishment is viewed
by most countries as an excep-
tion to be accompanied by
stringent safeguards.

Perhaps the best (or worst)
argument against the death
penalty is the certainty that
imnocent people will be execut-
ed, and there is no possible way
of compensating them for this
miscarriage of justice. In fact,
one of the last people hanged in
Britain was a mentally-handi-
capped teenager who was later
awarded a posthumous pardon.

In America, most of those
executed could not afford a tri-
al lawyer. And studies have also



shown the death penalty to be
racially biased. For example, in
Florida, experts say a black man
convicted of killing a white man
is five times more likely to
receive a death sentence than a
white man convicted of killing
another white man.

A study of hundreds of crim-
inal cases in which the convict-
ed person was exonerated sug-
gests there are thousands of
innocent people in American
prisons today. And the leading
causes of wrongful convictions
for murder were false confes-
sions and perjury by co-defen-
dants, informants, police offi-
cers or forensic scientists.

Despite the clear risk that
this could happen to any of us
at any time, most Bahamians
and other CARICOM nation-
als share a biblical attachment
to execution as a response to
violent crime. But judges have
been chipping away at the prac-
tice for years.

By most accounts it is highly
unlikely that a handful of exe-
cutions following years of delay
will have any real effect, par-

ticularly on the people whom
we would most like to be
deterred - like serial killers,
sadistic rapists and drugs
barons. And these particular
criminals are the least likely to
be executed anyway. The serial
killers will be found insane and
the drug barons will use any
means to avoid conviction,
including witness intimidation.

So, if we are really serious in
our desire to reduce crime
through harsher punishments
alone, we must be prepared to
execute every criminal who
commits a capital crime irre-
spective of their sex, age (above
the legal minimum) alleged
mental state or background.
Defences and appeals must be
limited by statute, and there
can be no reprieves.

Executions must be carried
out without delay and with suf-
ficient publicity to get the mes-
sage across to other similarly
minded people. For capital pun-
ishment to really reduce crime,
everyone of us must realise that
we will personally and without
doubt be put to death if we
commit particular crimes, and
that there can be absolutely no
hope of reprieve.

There is also the argument
that if we continue to do little or
nothing about persistent juve-
nile offenders, and then apply
the death penalty consistently,
we may be consigning many to

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their death at the age of 18, hav-
ing never previously given them
any discipline whatsoever. In
this scenario, execution will be
the first and last taste of disci-
pline a person gets in our soci-

ety.

The 2006 Privy Council rul-
ing that abolished the manda-
tory death sentence brought the
Bahamas in line with evolving
world standards. The United
Nations says that a mandatory

death penalty, which precludes
the possibility of a lesser sen-
tence regardless of the circum-
stances, is inconsistent with the
prohibition of cruel, inhuman
or degrading treatment or pun-
ishment.

But many still believe there is
no substitute for the best
defence. Capital punishment
not only forever bars murderers
from killing again, it offers
some retribution for their terri-
ble crimes. It would also save
money that could, perhaps, be
spent on better things than
Keeping killers in prison.

According to Lord Denning,
one of the most celebrated
British judges of the 20th cen-
tury: “It is a mistake to consid-
er the objects of punishments as
being a deterrent or reforma-
tive or preventive and nothing
else. The truth is that some
crimes are so outrageous that
society insists on adequate pun-
ishment, because the wrongdo-
er deserves it, irrespective of
whether it is a deterrent or
not."

If that is the case, it is incum-
bent upon our leaders to speak
clearly on this issue and then
do what is necessary to achieve
the desired outcome.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

Holidays

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS



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AP BRIEFS FROM CARIBBEAN AND BERMUDA

Island ready to export 1 million
cases of rum to post-embargo US

HAVANA

Cuba is ready to ship 1 million cases of rum to
America if Washington eases its 47-year-old
embargo, but would hold off exporting its flagship
Havana Club brand because of U.S. trademark
battles, one of the island's top rum executives
said Wednesday. U.S. trade sanctions have cost
Cuba's rum industry $95 million annually in lost
sales and additional spending to import produc-
tion materials including glass bottles and machin-
ery from Europe instead of from its neighbor to
the north, said Juan Gonzalez, vice president of
Cuba Ron SA, the communist state's rum pro-
duction monopoly.

Cuban rums can't be sold in the United States,
but they are available in more than 120 countries,
Gonzalez said, noting that the company sold 4
million cases in 2008. Of that, Havana Club
counts for all but about half a million cases.

The global financial crisis should cut into sales
this year, but Cuba still hopes sell 5 million cas-
es a year by 2013, Gonzalez said. The government
does not release figures on revenue. Cuba's
domestic rum market is its top customer, fol-
lowed by Spain, France, Greece, Chile and Rus-
sia. Gonzalez said the United States accounts
for 40 percent of the global rum market.

US man accused of killing wife on
scuba trip describes rescue efforts

TORTOLA, British Virgin Islands

A Rhode Island man accused of drowning his
wife during a 1999 scuba-diving trip choked back
emotions as he described the deadly dive in court
Wednesday, saying he cried over her lifeless body
after his efforts to save her failed.

David Swain, 53, who faces a maximum penal-
ty of life in prison if convicted, testified that he
had "no idea" how Shelly Tyre drowned during
the dive in British Virgin Islands waters. He said
they descended together and then parted ways at
a shipwreck. After he surfaced, he heard anoth-
er diver shouting for help and clutching his wife's
body. Swain, who had worked as an emergency



medical technician for years before opening a
dive shop in Rhode Island, helped lift Tyre onto
a dinghy, where he led rescue efforts including
CPR. The 1999 drowning was initially ruled an
accident. But authorities in the British Virgin
Islands later charged Swain with murder after a
2006 civil trial in his home state found him
responsible. He was extradited to Tortola the
following year and has been in jail here since.

Prosecutors allege Swain killed his 46-year-
old wife so he could pursue a romance with
another woman, and because the couple's
prenuptial agreement denied him money if they
divorced. Experts have testified that they believe
Swain wrestled Tyre from behind, tore off her
mask and shut off her air supply.

Swain has always maintained his innocence
and his defense lawyers have said they will show
the drowning was a "tragic accident."

Bermuda resort voted ‘world top 500'
hotel to partially close amid crisis

BERMUDA

A posh Bermuda resort named one of the
world's top 500 hotels this year will close its cen-
tury-old main building because the economic cri-
sis has sapped tourism to the island. Elbow Beach
Hotel will lay off about 160 employees by the end
of November as it shutters 131 rooms and out-
sources food and beverage services, Mandarin
Oriental Hotel Group spokeswoman Danielle
DeVoe said Wednesday.

"It's fair to say that current business levels are
challenging globally,” she said.

The hotel's 1908 pastel-yellow building will
remain closed for several years. Hotel officials
hope to renovate it during that time, although no
details have been specified, DeVoe said.

Elbow Beach will still operate 98 luxury suites
and cottages, said Frank Stocek, the hotel's gen-
eral manager. The resort made its debut on Trav-
el + Leisure magazine's list of the world's top
500 hotels this year. Mandarin Oriental has man-
aged it since 2000. Rates range from $300 to
more than $800 a night. Bermuda, a British ter-
ritory several hundred miles northeast of Florida,
has seen a nearly 20 percent drop in tourists
through June, compared to the same period last
year, according to the Caribbean Tourism Orga-
nization.

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 13





LOCAL NEWS

ae i
DIAMONDS INTERNATIONAL DONATION: Pictured from left to right: Adi Kaniel, DI representative; Kevin
Hanna, DI representative; Dr F Montero, Neonatal Department, PMH; Renee Knowles, DI representative;
Dr Steve Lochan, Neonatal Department, PMH; Patsy Morris, PMH; Jennifer Sands, PMH; Thelma Rolle,
PMH Foundation; Michele Rassin, Doctors Hospital

Corporate donations made
to ‘Breathe Easy’ Campaign

CORPORATE partners con-
tinue to support the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” benefitting the
Princess Margaret Hospital’s
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Earmarked for high risk, pre-
mature, low birth-weight, or crit-
ically ill newborns, the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” is a nationwide
fund-raiser that will provide ven-
tilators designed to breathe for a
newborn who is physically
unable to do so. The donated
ventilators will support breathing
until the infant's respiratory
efforts are sufficient.

The latest community citi-
zens to support the cause, Dia-
monds International employees,
made a collection in support of
the Breathe Easy Campaign and
Diamonds International
Bahamas matched the funds for
a total cheque presentation in
the amount of $2,000.

Diamonds International mar-
keting manager Renea Knowles
said: "The entire team at Dia-
monds International felt that it
was important to lend support
to such a worthy cause. We are
encouraging other organisations
to become involved and do their
part in helping the programme
to reach their goal.”

Long-standing Bahamian
bank and community partner
Royal Bank of Canada was also
presented a cheque to the
Breathe Easy Campaign in the
amount of $2,000.

Hope Sealy of the RBC
Financial Group said: "We are
delighted to continue our tradi-



MANDY'S FRENCH BAKERY DONATION: Pictured from left to right:
Mandy Yuen, Mandy's French Bakery and Michele Rassin, president

of Rotary Club of East Nassau

tion of contributing to the
Bahamas; the donation to the
Breathe Easy Campaign is
another way for RBC to give
back to the community in a tan-
gible way that will have a life-
saving impact for the premature
babies at the Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital."

In addition to the larger cor-
porate sponsors, the first French
Bakery in the Bahamas,
Mandy's French Bakery, donat-
ed $500 to the campaign.

Owner Mandy Yuen said:
"We are proud to be supporters
of the effort to improve health-
care in the Bahamas and the
Bahamian community."

Organised by the Tribune

Media Group, the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, Tile King, Doc-
tors Hospital, Bahamas Realty,
and the Rotary Club of East
Nassau, to date the campaign
has topped the halfway mark
with approximately $166,935
being raised, the goal being
$300,000.

The first two ventilators have
already arrived at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Persons interested in making a
donation towards the campaign
should contact the Tribune
Media Group, Doctors Hospi-
tal or the Tile King, or drop off a
check made payable to the
“Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation", Breathe Easy
Campaign.



RBC DONATION: Pictured from left to right: Neonatal Nurses from PMH; Hope Sealy, RBC; Michele
Rassin and Joanne Lowe from the Rotary Club of East Nassau

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recognition of their exceptional achievement on the AP Exams.

The College Board's Advanced Placement Program (AP) provides motivated and academically
prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous college-level courses while still in high
school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on
the AP Exams. About 18 percent of the nearly 1.7 million students worldwide who took AP Exams
performed at a sufficiently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award.

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on AP Exams. At Kingsway Academy four (4) students qualified for the AP Scholar Award by
completing three or more AP Exams with grades of 3 or higher. The AP Scholars are Raymond
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Through more than 30 different college-level courses and exams, AP provides motivated and
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on AP Exams (based on a scale from 1 to 5), with 5 being the highest) typically experience greater
academic success in college and higher graduation rates than students who do not

participate in AP.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A eae

"I THINK the nominating process was exciting. I think it
was good for the democracy of the party seeing that there
were so many people nominating for so many positions.
This suggests that the party is alive and well and that people
are enthused by the prospects of serving the people through
the PLP and hopefully one day serving the nation again."

"T think my chances are as good anybody else who is in
the race. I think there is an undercurrent in the convention
for change. I think people want things done differently
even those who have had an opportunity to serve currently
are promising that they will change so obviously they have
gotten the message from the electorate so we just have to
wait and see."

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PLP LEADER Perry Christie at the convention last night.

PLP leadership is
a three horse race

FROM page one

secure a better chance of
victory, there are reports
from the convention floor
that the respective candi-
dates have formed alliances
with deputy leadership can-
didates and even those in

the race for chairman.
Some stalwarts suggest
Mr Christie had teamed up
with PLP MP Philip ‘Brave’
Davis and former MP
Bradley Roberts, while oth-
ers say the former prime
minister has thrown his sup-
port behind West End and

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe and Glenys Hanna-
Martin.

Dr Nottage is receiving
significant support from the
party’s delegates who spec-
ulate that he might be
inclined to support Mr
Davis or even Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald for
deputy.

Whoever wins must be
prepared to fight for the
hearts and minds of unde-
cided voters, senior party
members say.

“We need to fight for
change in this party,” said
one stalwart last night. “The
PLP as a whole needs to
realise that we have to fight
for those undecided / swing
voters out there who are
looking to us to mature as
an organisation and use this

OTe ST
ava aA)

THE convention
floor was reportedly a
scene of raw emotions
and frayed nerves yes-
terday.

TRIBUNE sources
said that among the
many anxious politi-
cians was party leader
Perry Christie, who
was spied off to one
side whispering ani-
matedly with party
chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin.

Mrs Hanna-Martin
had reportedly pulled
Mr Christie aside to
ask why he brought
back former chairman
Bradley Roberts to run
against her.

It is not known what
Mr Christie said, but
he reportedly seemed
flustered and extreme-
ly agitated, using vigor-
ous body language and
gestures.

Whatever the party
leader communicated
reportedly upset the
chairman, who some
said had tears in her
eyes after the conver-
sation.



opportunity to make some
concrete developments
within our organisation.

“We don’t need to appeal
or appease our base. They
will be voting PLP anyhow.
It is the young voter — the
young educated voter who
will decide the way this next
election will swing.”

PLP delegate Laurence
Harrison said that Mr
Christie and Mr Wilch-
combe are the right men for
the job.

“Mr Christie is a good
man. He has done well and
I feel that he deserves a
chance. He said he is in
transition with the party
which means that Mr Wilch-
combe will be that man who
Sir Lynden said he was
training to one day lead this
party into the next genera-
tion.”

Unner Ine Distineunsneo Parnosace Or His Excecency,

—

Archbishop of Nassau

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

sports



a OCTOBER 22,



2009

LEADING BAHAMIAN: saci Martinborough is now io me oT) meen boat:

DUE to the heavy winds, there was
no sailing competition yesterday in Mon-
tagu Bay as the 2009 Sunfish World

Championship took a break.

However, the competition will pick

back up today with a full slate of action.

Going into day three of the champi-
onships, American David M. Loring
leads the way with s total of 13.8 points.
Loring won the fifth and last race con-

tested on Tuesday.

Not too far behind in second place is

Bahamas Fall Judo Classic
set for Saturday October 24

Chrisnell and Myriel

THE Bahamas Judo Federation will be





Heavy winds force suspension
of Sunfish World Championship

Marx Chirinos of Venezuela with 14.0.
American Paul-Jon Patin rounds out the
top three with 17.0.

Three-time champion Donnie Mart-
inborough tops the list of Bahamians as
he sit in 14th place with 96.0. Charles

Kelly is the next Bahamian in 20th place
with 112.0.

@ SEE PAGE 16 FOR PHOTOS AND
PRELIMINARY RESULTS

PHOTOS: Woodley Carroll



hosting the Bahamas Judo Fall Classic on
Saturday October 24 at Xaviers Lower
School from 5pm to 8 pm. This tournament
promises to be very exciting as the overall
level of Judo in the country has grown expo-
nentially since the beginning of the year.
Persons from Judo in Abaco will also be in
attendance. Also present will be the Spe-
cial Olympics athletes who will compete in
regular divisions. "We are looking forward to
an excellent event," Says David Rahming,
Chief Instructor of the Fox Hill Club and
Special Olympians.

Competing in the tournament will be a
number of students from the College of the
Bahamas as well as the regular Judo clubs.

Judo is an Olympic combat sport where the
match is determined by throwing an indi-
vidual with force and control to his or her
back and pinning them for 25 seconds.
Attending will also be Cynthia Rahming
and Taryn Butler, two top female athletes
with international credentials.

"There will be some really tough match-
es,” says Phil Kemp, BJF Treasurer. " We
want to use this event to get things back
into full swing for the academic year. We
have seen that the Bahamian athletes need
more match time."

Spectator Tickets will be on sale at the
door for $10 per person. Anyone interested
in Judo may contact the Bahamas Judo Fed-
eration at 364-6773.



Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools basketball league

Blue Flames
oo hot for
the Sparks

Defensive battle turns
into 39-19 hammering

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribune-
media.net

HAT started out as a defensive battle turned
into a massacre as Our Lady’s Blue Flames
outlasted the visiting St. Thomas More
Sparks 39-19.

The Blue Flames, the league’s dormant team last year with
just one victory on their ledger, stunned the Sparks, last year’s
runners-up, as the Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools basket-
ball league continued.

“T think it’s going to be a very competive season,” said
Rohan Parkes, coach of Our Lady’s. “I watched a couple of
teams played and I think they’re all going to be very tough.”

Parkes, however, could put in an agument for his Blue
Flames after they pulled away from a close 15-13 deficit at
the end of the third and turned it into a blowout as they went
on a couple of scoring sprees, starting with a 6-0 run for a 23-17
lead in the fourth.

Our Lady’s would go on another 8-1 spurt that extended
their lead to 31-18 and they controlled all facet of the game as
they cruised to an easy victory.

D’Angelo Mackey, who was unstoppable as he went on his
rampage, finished with a game high 24 points as he took over
in the fourth quarter, scoring two and three baskets at will.

Mackey said he was pleased with their team effort.

“We passed the ball and we laid up good,” said Mackey,
not trying to take all of the spotlight. “I felt good about the way
we played. We did very good.”

The 10-year-old fifth grader said this was just an indication of
what to expect this year from the Blue Flames, who worked
very hard to get ready for this year’s season.

Charles Cooper also had a big game defensively for Our
Lady’s, who eventually fouled out late in the fourth quarter
after he contributed seven points. Tereek Munroe added six
points.

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THE NEW PROVIDENCE PUBLIC PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Soccer competition held at
College of Bahamas field

THE New Providence
Public Primary Schools
kicked off its calender year
by hosting its soccer compe-
tition at the College of the
Bahamas playing field.

The tournament was com-
pleted yesterday with Yel-
low Elder and Adalaide
being crowned as the girls
and boys champions respec-
tively.

In the girls championship,
Yellow Elder, coached by
Cardinal Moncur, defeated
Garvin Tynes to complete
the season with a perfect 6-0
win-loss.

Robyn Port was named
the most valuable player.

Garvin Tynes fnished with
a 5-1 record. Adalaide was
third at 4-2, while Sadie Cur-
tis was fourth at 3-3.

A total of 17 schools par-
ticipated in the division.

On the boys side,
Adalaide blanked Centre-
ville 2-0 to win the title.
They finished with a 6-0
record and surprisingly did-
n’t allow any team to score
goal.

Centreville ended up in
second at 5-1, while Garvin
Tynes was third at 4-2.

A total of 24 teams par-
ticipated in the division.

League public relations
officer Frank Johnson said
the league was a very com-
petitive one and they were
very pleased with the help
they got from some of the
coaches and officials in the
Bahamas Football Associa-
tion. Johnson said they are
also looking forward to the
rest of the calender year.
During the third week of
November, Johnson said
they intend to start basket-
ball at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

—_ 2009 SUNFISH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP






@ PRELIMINARY TTT TGA PU

ayy a
Sailed:5, Discards:0, To count:5, Entries:72, Scoring system:Appendix A

Rank Nat SailINo Helm R2 Total
Ist USA 3963 David M. Loring ; 2.8 rdga : : ‘ 13.8

2nd Venezuela 3910 Marx Chirinos : 3.0 ; ; ; 14.0

3rd_ USA 3950 Paul-Jon Patin : 2.0 : ; : 17.0

4th Curacao 3920 Ard Van Aanholt ; 1.0 : : : 22.0

Sth USA 3948 David Mendelblatt ; 5.0 : : ; 27.0

6th Guatemala 3965 = Juan Jose Delgdo Hurtado : 8.0 : ! : 29.0

7th US VirginIsls 3917 — Peter Stanton ; 6.0 . ‘ : 32.0

8th Bermuda 3957 Malcolm Smith : 4.0 : : ; 33.0

9th Holland 3922 Mathieu De By 7.0 : 10.0 : 53.0

10th Curacao 3925 Cor Van Aanholt 13, 0 9.0 ; 26.0 : 63.0

11th Venezuela 3906 Jose Gutierrez 12.0 13.0 . 13.0 12.0 70.0

12th USA 3967 H.N. "Hank" Saurage IV 11.0 10.0 ; 32.0 15.0 85.0

13th USA 3952 Greg Gust 15.0 16.0 : 31.0 14.0 88.0

14th Bahamas 3955. Donald Martinborough 19.0 21.0 : 12.0 21.0 96.0

15th USA 3970 Chip Clifton 20.0 22.0 . 11.0 16.0 101.0
16th USA 3951 Rich Chapman 14.0 17.0 : 16.0 28.0 102.0
17th USA 3972 Seth Siegler 20.7rdga20.7 rdga : 30.0 18.0 103.4
18th Peru 3903 Guillermo Cappelleti 22.0 12.0 : 40.0 20.0 109.0
19th Curacao 3942 ~— Jurgen Schneider 10.0 18.0 . 19.0 46.0 zfp 111.0
20th Bahamas 3935 Charles Kelly 18.0 20.0 : 23.0 27.0 112.0
21st USA 3936 Josh Kerst 16.0 30.0 : 14.0 35.0 114.0
22nd Curacao 3923 Philipine Van Aanholt 33.0 36.0 i 20.0 17.0 116.0
23rd USA 3912 Eric Woodman 32.0 26.0 ; 9.0 26.0 119.0
24th Curacao 3943 Mark Simmeren 39.0 15.0 . 37.0 22.0 124.0
25th Guatemala 3966 Andrea Denisse Aldana Bennett 35.0 19.0 : 18.0 13.0 129.0
26th Bahamas 3901 William (Christopher) Sands 34.0 38.0 : 21.0 32.0 141.0
27th Venezuela 3939 Luis T. Nunez 29.3rdga29.3 rdga ; 33.0 42.0 146.6
28th Curacao 3941 Niek Kort 17.0 14.0 : 48.0 39.0 148.0
29th Holland 3929 Paul Van Alphen 21.0 11.0 : 60.0 34.0 155.0
30th Bonaire 3902 Sipke Stapert 26.0 73.0 dnt : 17.0 10.0 160.0
31st USA 3947 Chad Coberly 31.0 25.0 : 28.0 44.0 zfp 161.0
32nd USA 3971 William Betts IIT 23.0 32.0 : 54.0 30.5 161.5
33rd Bahamas 3934 Fernando De Cardenas 28.0 23.0 , 29.0 43.0 162.0
34th Bahamas 3931 Gavin McKinney 38.0 39.0 : 15.0 41.0 164.0
35th Bahamas 3954 Jeffrey Gale 37.0 28.0 . 39.0 25.0 165.0
36th Holland 3930 Piet Bankersen 25.0 34.0 ; 22.0 44.0 167.0
37th USA 3962 Steven W. Evans 36.0 33.0 : 25.0 29.0 168.0
38th Bahamas 3964 Andrew Wilhoyte 30.0 27.0 : 50.0 51.0 179.0
39th USA 3927 Ravi Subramanian 24.0 41.0 : 49.0 24.0 179.0
40th USA 3946 Daniel Norton 49.0 37.0 : 41.0 19.0 183.0
41st USA 3911 Bill F. Brainiforte 29.0 73.0 dns ; 35.0 23.0 188.0
42nd Bahamas 3932 James Lowe 48.0 43.0 . 24.0 40.0 195.0
43rd Bahamas 3968 George Damianos 27.0 29.0 : 52.0 54.0 205.0
44th Bahamas 3940 Peter-Bruce Wassitsch 41.0 35.0 : 38.0 57.0 209.0
45th Venezuela 3907 Francisco Almon 42.0 51.0 : 27.0 58.0 213.0
46th USA 3956 John A. Butine 44.0 42.0 : 34.0 47.0 216.0
47th USA 3961 Tony Collins 53.0 24.0 . 36.0 56.0 229.0
48th Bahamas 3944 Ted O'Brien 47.0 45.0 ; 45.0 45.0 236.0
49th Curacao 3918 Alex Roose 40.0 54.0 ; 51.0 46.0 250.0
50th USA 3969 Charles Clifton 54.0 48.0 : 56.0 48.0 253.0
Sist Venezuela 3909 Roberto Kazibutowski 58.0 40.0 : 47.0 64.0 255.0
52nd USA 3914 Brent Evans 59.0 50.0 : 46.0 51.0 zfp 256.0
53rd ahamas 3904 Donico Brown 52.0 73.0 dnt : 42.0 37.0 257.0
54th ahamas 3919 Michael Holowesko 51.0 58.0 : 44.0 49.0 257.0
55th 3908 Lee Montes 50.0 53.0 : 55.0 52.0 258.0
56th 3913 Matthew McCoy 45.0 57.0 ; 64.0 36.0 260.0
57th 3921 Lee McCoy 52.3rdga46.0 : 57.0 55.0 261.3
58th 3915 David (DJ) Lorshbaugh Jr. 43.0 56.0 : 61.0 50.0 266.0
59th 3926 Ed Hill 55.0 31.0 : 63.0 67.0 268.0
60th Peurto Rico 3958 Fernando I Monllor 56.0 47.0 ; 53.0 63.0 280.0
6lst SA 3953 Marshall Woodson 60.0 49.0 . 59.0 59.0 284.0
62nd Bahamas 3937. Dwayne Wallas 57.0 55.0 : 58.0 61.0 293.0
63rd SA 3938 Lee Creekmore 73.0dnf 73.0 dne . 43.0 53.0 306.0
64th Bahamas 3900 — Brent (BJ) Burrows 63.0 60.0 : 62.0 62.0 312.0
65th 3933 Lori Lowe 65.0 52.0 : 65.0 65.0 316.0
66th 3949 Anne Cottrell Patin 62.0 59.0 ; 67.0 68.0 319.0
67th 3960 Nicky Einthoven 66.0 61.0 . 68.0 60.0 326.0
68th Venezuela 3924 Nieves Barreda 64.0 62.0 ; 66.0 66.0 328.0
69th Austria 3916 Pedro Wassitsch 61.0 73.0 dnt ; 73.0 dns 73.0 dns 346.0
70th Holland 3928 Marie-Christine Breeveld 73.0 dnf 73.0 dne : 69.0 69.0 352.0
71st Canada 3959 Alyson Myers 73.0 dnf 73.0 dne : 70.0 70.0 358.0
72nd USA 3905 David McCary 73.0 dnc 73.0 dne ; 73.0 dnf 73.0 dns 359.0

SCORING CODES USED

Code Description Points
DNC Did not come to the starting area

DNF = Started but did not finish

DNS Came to the start area but did not start

RDGaRedress - average points for all races except the race in question

ZFP 20% penalty under rule 30.2 Varies



aGauprcrcrcd

— a

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 17



November 21 election
will be critical for BAAA

y OU would think
that you're getting

ready for a political cam-
paign the way Michael
‘Mike’ Sands and his slate
of officers have officially
launched their quest to con-
test the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associa-
tions’ election of officers.

On Wednesday as they
gathered in front of the con-
struction site for the new
national stadium, Sands and
his Visionary team as they
call themselves presented
their platform slogan
dubbed: "Share the Vision."

The vision, as they've out-
lined it, states:

"To improve our standing
in the World by providing
visionary leadership through
experience, with integrity,
courage, commitment,
empathy, humility and con-
fidence, while serving ath-
letes, coaches, officials and
all stakeholders throughout
the length and breadth of
the Bahamas."

Track and field, by far, is
the most highly recognized
sport for the Bahamas on
the international scene,
based on the tremendous
performance of our athletes
and even administrators, led
by Pauline
Davis-
Thomp-
son, who
sits on the
board of
the IAAF
Council.

As such,
the leader-
ship of the
sport has
to be one
that is very visible and
respected.

So the elections coming
up on November 21 will be a
very critical one for the
BAAA.

Right now there are two
persons vying for leader.
Sands will take on Curt 'Mr.
H' Hollingsworth, who
served as vice president dur-
ing Sands’ last tenure in
office before he was ousted
out by a ‘vote of no confi-
dence.’

The two have been insep-
arable before the turmoil
that the association experi-
enced about two years ago
and whatever the outcome
of the elections, I think it
will be incumbent on both
men to get back to that lev-
el because I think they both
have a contribution to make

10 NIK a C

y,
1 |
\ |

BASKETBALL
BBF CLINIC

~ MIKE SANDS




The Bahamas Basketball
Federation in conjunction
with FIBA, the world gov-
erning body for basketball,
will be conducting a Mini
Basketball Clinic, for all
coaches in the Bahamas
Friday October 23rd from
5:30 pm to 8 p.m. and Sat-
urday 24th from 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Sir Kendal
Isaac’s Gymnasium.

The cost of the clinic is
$35.00 which includes a
mini basketball book and
clinic materials.

The instructor for the
Clinic is Professor Edwin
Pefia, FIBA Certified
Instructor. The Federation
will provide participants
with “Certificates of Par-
ticipation”.

Individuals who are
interested in participating
in the Clinic are asked to
contact Mr. Sean Bastian
302-4591 or email:
HYPERLINK
"mailto:snsenterpris-
es_502@hotmail.com"
snsenterprises_502@hot-
mail.com as soon as possi-
ble.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
rete Merde] 414
on Mondays



STUBBS



OPINION

in the way forward for the
association.

The new executive board
should be in office by the
time the new stadium is
completed by the Chinese
Government and by the
time the next Olympic
Games roll around in 2012
in London, England.

While Hollingsworth has
indicated that he prefer not
to get into a political foray in
the media, Sands knows
quite well that any and all
publicity generated will go
a long way in getting his
message across.

In their platform, Sands
and his executive team have
also made some promises
that they hope that they
should be accountable for,
if elected to office.

Among the list are:

¢ Establishment of a
National Training Center
with proper weights, equip-
ment and implements.

¢ Obtain increased fund-
ing from government, part-
ners and other sources based
on track and field's perfor-
mance.

¢ Provide cash incentives
to clubs and coaches for
home based student-ath-
letes.

¢ Provide training and cer-
tification opportunities for
all coaches, especially at the
primary and high school lev-
els.

¢ Reestablish the
Bahamas’ preeminence in
the region at the Youth and

Junior competitions.

¢ Change meeting dates
for the BAAA to a Friday
to include Family Island
coaches and members in the
decision making process.

Those are just some of the
promises made and I'm sure
that all voting delegates will
be looking at them seriously
before they make their final
decision and if elected, they
will be holding them to each
and every one of them.

So the campaign swords
have been drawn and with
less than a month left before
the electorate go to the
polls, you can bet that there
will be a whole lot of discus-
sion on who will be the next
leader of the BAAA.

GOOD BYE MR. C

Thanks to all who took
the time out with me to offer
prayers for the late Roger
Carron.

When I got the news on
Sunday
morning that
he had passed
away, I felt a |)
big void in
my life went
away because
of the role
that Mr. C, as
he was affec-
tionately
called, went
away as well.

Mr. C, as I mentioned in
this column last week, was
the first boss that I came
into contact with here at The
Tribune when I joined the
staff as a budding young
reporter.

And throughout my
tenure, Mr. C was probably
the most caring and sympa-
thetic boss that I ever came
in contact with. He had a
passion for sports, but he
also had a knack for perfec-
tion and always wanted to
see the staff produce it's
best. Although he no loner
occupied the desk as the
Sports Editor, in a lot of
ways, I still considered him
to be my boss because he
always knew what was going
on and he never let a day go
back if something wasn't
covered or covered proper-
ly. Twill certainly miss him.

To Mrs. Elaine Carron,
Robert and the rest of the
family, I know you've loved
a gem, but I will also cherish
the relationship and the
bond that we were able to
develop over the years.

May his soul rest in peace.

ROGER
TO

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Junior Squash finals show improvements in skill

On Saturday, October 17th the finals for
the first Junior team league squash were held
with trophies and awards presented by the
President of the Bahamas Squash Associa-
tion, Mr. Pembroke Williams and Vice-Presi-
dent, Ms. Michele Thompson.

After six weeks of league competition twen-
ty junior squash players demonstrated tremen-
dous improvements in their fitness, squash
skills and racquet control for winning shots
as well as sportsmanship on and off the court
and responsibility for scoring and refereeing
matches.

The Berry Rain Bashers led by Christina
Fields were the winners with a total of 73
points. In second place the Lemon Standers,
captained by Dylan Davies, earned 67 points.
In third place the Green Goblins with Oliver
Euteneuer leading his team scored a total of 62
points. The most improved player award went
to Aidan Adams and the best sportsperson
award was presented to Ashley Fox.

eoneA Meee Med ctrle atm aT Lebets ano Luke, Aen Scott and Au.



2009 softball season
closes on a high note

The Bahamas Government Departmen-
tal Softball Association closed its 2009 soft-
ball season on a very high note.

The players, spectators and fans wit-
nessed the most spectacular, keen contest-
ed, championship playoff series ever.

This year's softball season were well
attended by the fans and spectators alike.
The championship games brought people
by the groves to watch softball at its best.

There were persons standing around the
fences to ensure that they don't miss a stu-
pendous play and during all of the games
the bleachers were jammed pack.

It was predicted by many persons that
since the two best top Men Teams in the
League will square-off in the championship
series, and knowing that both ball clubs
have dynamism their playoff series defi-
nitely will go down to the wires. So said, so
done! Police Chiefs went into the champi-
onship playoff with the Men's best overall
record, but they were still considerate as the
under dogs. On the other hand, Defence
Force Floaters placed second in the Men's
overall standing but because of them cap-
turing the Men's title for seventeen con-
secutive years and with the wealth of expe-
riences under their belts, some persons
were still expecting them to capture their
eighteen (18) consecutive titles.

However, when the dust was cleared in
game number seven, the Police Chiefs came
out as the victors while it was a doomed day
for Defence Force Floaters.

The Floaters prestigious crown which
they held for so many years suddenly swept
from them just by a wink of an eye.

At the conclusion of the seventh game
everyone was stunned to see that Defence
Force Floaters winning streak came to a
halt so quickly. The championship series
left everyone saying that this was the most
unbelievable playoff series that they have
ever seen.

¢ Here’s a summary of the games played:

Game One

The Defence Force Floaters came from
behind and nipped Police Chiefs 30-29 in a
hair- raising and a nail- biting encounter.

Reynaldo Russell was the hero for
Defence Force Floaters, he had a perfect 5-
for-5 day at the plate, scored four runs and
picked up five RBI and he had four home
runs.

Dwayne Dean did the damage for Police
Chiefs, he had a perfect plate appearances,



as he went 5-for-5, scored four runs, picked
up two RBI and had one home-run.

Game Two

The Police Chiefs routed Defence Force
Floaters 19-9 to tie their series 1-1 in a lop-
sided affair.

The Police Chiefs came out with fire in
their eyes and bats, as they smoked-out
Defence Force Floaters 19-9.

Alcott Forbes swung the hot bat for the
Police Chiefs with a perfect 4-for-4 day
appearances. He scored four runs and
picked up five RBI. Remone Storr was the
potent batter for his team, he had a 4-for-3
day at the plate, scored two runs and picked
up one RBI.

Game three

The Police Chiefs clobbered Defence
Force Floaters 25-12 to take a commanding
2-1 lead.

Van Johnson, Godfrey Willie and Marvin
Wood had four hits a piece. Willie scored
two runs and picked up six RBI, he also had
two home runs.

Dwayne Mackey, Philip Culmer and
Thomas Williams had three hits each.
Mackey scored three runs and picked up
four RBI.

Game four

Defence Force Floaters gave Police
Chiefs a taste of their own medicine by
defeating them with identical 19-9 record as
in game two of their series, they also tied
the series 2-2.

Philip Culmer swung the hot bat for the
Floaters, he went 5-for4 plate appearances,
scored four runs and picked up three RBI.
Van Johnson assisted his team by having a
perfect 3-for-3 day at the plate, scored one
ran and picked up two RBI.

Game five

Police Chiefs out-hit Defence Force
Floaters 20-12 to take a commanding 3-2
lead in the playoff series. Police Chiefs
came out with their bats fully loaded and
they went to work from the onset of the
game.

Alcott Forbes, Derek Sands and Mar-
vin Wood were the sluggers of the game,
they all had three hits each. Wood scored
two runs and picked up two RBI.

Dencil Clarke was the striker for
Defence Force Floaters, he had a 3-for-4
day plate appearances, scored three runs
and picked one RBI.

Game six

The Defence Force Floaters refused to

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lie down and play dead, the Floaters
secured the victory by edging-out Police
Chiefs 10-9 in a squeezer to tie the series
once again 3-3 for a dead lock for the third
time in their series.

Keith Moss, Terrance Culmer and Brad
Smith had three hits each for the Floaters.
Darren Mortimer did the damage for Police
Chiefs with his perfect three-for-three day
and he scored one run.

Game seven

The Police Chiefs came out stroking
from the top of the first inning by scoring
four runs, in the bottom half, Defence
Force Floaters knowing that it was show-
time, had to come tougher than the Law
Enforcement Officers; therefore, they came
out blasting with six tallies to take an early
6-5 lead. In the Top of the second inning,
Police Chiefs refused to give up, they
smashed three runs and in the bottom half,
they were able to quiet Defence Force
Floaters bats to one run.

In the top of the third inning Police
Chiefs was allowed to score one run and
they kept the Defence Force Floaters to
one run in the bottom half. In the top of the
fourth inning, Police Chiefs scored one and
Defence Force Floaters tried to make their
move by scoring four runs to take a 11-10
lead in the bottom half of the fourth inning.

In the top of the fifth inning, Police
Chiefs came up with four biggers while
Defence Force Floaters was able to sneak
one run in the bottom half.

In the top of the sixth inning, Police
Chiefs went on a hit-parade by scoring
eight more runs while keeping Defence
Force Floaters to only one run in the bot-
tom half. In the top of the seventh inning,
Police Chiefs ended Defence Force Floaters
streak of seventeen consecutive victories
and dethroning them with a 27-15 score,
damaging the Defence Force Floaters.

The Police Chiefs gave the Floaters a
taste of their own medicine by cracking
seventeen (17) home runs which helped
them to subjugate the Mariners.

The Most Valuable Players (MVPs) of
the championship games are Godfrey
Willie and Darren Mortimer.

The Executives extend congratulation
to the 2009 champions, Police Chiefs. Also
congratulation to the 2009 Runners-up,
Defence Force Floaters for a job well done
and we wish you all success for the 2010
softball season.

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Blue Flames too hot for Sparks
FROM page 15

For the St. Thomas More, after trailing 6-4 at the end of
the first and 9-8 at the half, just simply fell apart in the second
half as they only managed to score an extra 11 points. After the
game, Sparks’ coach N’Komo Ferguson was dumbfounded
about his team’s performance. “When you find out, you let me
know,” said Ferguson when asked what happened to his team.
“Tjust don’t know. My boys just didn’t come to play.”

D’Chaz Butler had five points, Rohan Kerr four and Davon
Martin, Cairo Curry, Jefferson Thomas and Carl Cooper all
chipped in with two points in the loss.

After the mid-term break this weekend, St. Thomas More will
have very little time to heal their wombs as they have to face
defending champions St. Bede’s Crushers on Tuesday.

“Tt’s really back to the drawing board,” said Ferguson about
last year’s championship rematch. “This is a brand new team
with just two grade six players. But if my four starters don’t
come out and play like I expect them to do, then I will have no
other choice but to go with the bench. They will have to carry
us through.”

Against St. Bede’s, Ferguson know that they will have to
come prepared. In the league’s opening game on Monday, the
Crushers crushed the Xavier’s Green giants 39-5.

RMT UD
Capture ladies crown

THE Finance Health Invaders captured the ladies
crown in Government Departmental Softball in grand
style. They waited patiently for two years to reclaim the
distinguished crown.

The Invaders did not waste any time in the postseason.

They knocked off the BTC Connectors in three shakes
to advance to the championship round, then they came
back and swept the Defence Force Waves in four straight
games.

Finance Health held the best record of 20-1 in the
ladies overall standing. This year they played every team
hard and by the scores in the scorebooks, in some
instances they showed no mercy for their opponents.

Finance Health Invaders' manager Della Davis said
that they had set their goal from the onset of the season
and if they had to scratch and crawl their way to the
number one position and to stay there then so be it.

She said that she informed her ladies, that this was
their year and in order for them to recapture the ladies’
title, they must jell together as a team, play good defense
and have a solid offence.

While Davis spoke with a big smile on her face, she stat-
ed that she was very pleased with the team's accom-
plishment this season and hoping to have a spotless record
for the 2010 softball season.

¢ Here’s asummary of their games played:

Game one

Finance Health Invaders arrested the Defence Force
Waves 8-6 to take a 1-0 lead in their championship play-
off.

Lily Hernandez swung the hot bat with a prefect three-
for three plate appearances and she scored one run. Mary
Sweeting assisted Defence with her feverous bat, she
went 3-for-4 and scored one run in a losing effort.

Game two

In a low scoring game, Finance Health Invaders nabbed
Defence Force Waves 6-1. Keisha Pratt did the honors for
Finance with a perfect three-for -three plate appearances
and she scored two runs. Rhonda Kelly, Maryann Fowler
‘and Laurel Farrington had three hits apiece in a losing
effort.

Game three

Finance Health Invaders bombarded the Defence Force
Waves 11-6 to take a 3-0 commanding lead. Renee Davis
had two hits, scored three runs and picked up one RBI.
Rhonda Kelly went 3-for-4, scored one run and picked up
one RBI in losing effort.

Game four

In a high scoring game, 15-12; Finance Health Invaders
assaulted the Defence Force Waves and swept them in
four straight games to clinch the 2009 Ladies’ title.

Renee Davis and May Miller had three hits a piece.
Davis also scored three runs and two RBIs. Maryann
Fowler and Karen Darville were the offences batters for
Defence.

The Most Valuable Player (MVP) in the championship
games was Renee Davis.

The Executives extend best wishes to the reigning
champions, Finance Health Invaders and a successful
2010 season.



Police Chiefs to hold motorcade

ON Saturday, the Police Chiefs will hold a motorcade
starting from Royal Bahamas Police Force on East Street at
IO a.m. to celebrate their triumph as the new men’s champi-
ons of the Bahamas Government Departmental Softball
Association.

The league is requesting all teams to come out and partici-
pate in the motorcade, which will be followed by an all-day
victory party at the Baillou Hill Sporting Complex.

The Chefs snapped the Royal Bahamas Defense Force’s
17-year stranglehold of the title with a 4-3 decision in their
best-of-seven series that was concluded recently.

There will be a live concert with local entertainers per-

forming.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 19



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Rio police expand anti-gang raids, 32 now dead

BRADLEY BROOKS,
Associated Press Writer
RIO DE JANEIRO

Police in Rio expanded a
crackdown on gangs beyond
the area hit by a wave of
killings that has claimed at
least 32 lives since the week-
end, officials said Wednesday.

The clashes came less than
three weeks after the city was
awarded the 2016 Olympic
Games. They began when a
drug gang tried to invade a
rival's territory and three
policemen were killed when
a helicopter was shot down
by gunfire over the weekend.

Subsequent firefights
between police and heavily
armed gang members have
left the affected slums in
chaos. Hundreds of residents
fled their homes overnight,
choosing to sleep in streets
away from their own neigh-
borhoods after rumors spread
that drug gangs were set to
battle again.

While the violence began

ei

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A tothe cdreaurf

Eduardo Naddar/AP Photo



POLICE TAKE POSITIONS during an ane in search of drugs, traf-
fickers and weapons in the Vila Cruzeiro slum in Rio de Janeiro,

Brazil, Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009.

in a northern area near the
Maracana stadium, which will
host the Olympics’ opening
and closing ceremonies, police
searching for suspects behind
the downing of the helicopter
launched operations in slums
in Rio's south and center on
Wednesday.

A police spokesman said
officers killed three suspected

drug traffickers during the
afternoon raids, raising the
death toll to 32. The official
spoke on condition of
anonymity, citing department
rules. In the early morning,
officers shot dead three other
suspects in northern areas of
the city. "We can't allow four
or five criminals to cause this
madness," Rio state Public

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officers were hunting down.
"Many people are suffering
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THE TRIBUNE





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Foxwoods’ Our Lucaya
deal ‘comes alive again’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Government will

know “in the next 24-

48 hours” whether its

preferred choice for

Foxwoods Develop-
ment Company to take over the Our
Lucaya Resort’s management/oper-
ations, as well as its casino, is back
on track, Tribune Business was told
yesterday.

This newspaper can reveal that
the deal, which has involved three-
way negotiations between the Gov-
ernment, Foxwoods and Our
Lucaya’s owner, Hong Kong-based
Hutchison Whampoa, has “come
alive again” after previously hitting
the proverbial ‘brick wall’ over the
issue of who would manage/operate
the hotel component.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
minister of tourism and aviation,
confirmed to Tribune Business that
the Government had been in con-
tact with both Hutchison Whampoa
and Foxwoods within the last 24
hours as it moves rapidly to revive a
deal it sees as key to placing Grand
Bahama back on the resort/casi-

* Government hoping to know ‘in the next 24-48 hours’ whether deal involving
renowned casino/resort operator and Hutchison can be reached, and its shape

* Key issue is hotel management/operational control if Foxwoods brands resort and casino

* Treasure Bay firmly reserve choice, with Foxwoods seen as
having global brand clout to revive Grand Bahama tourism

no/tourism map.

Tribune Business had contacted
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace after being
told by numerous sources familiar
with the situation that the Govern-
ment’s preferred solution for Our
Lucaya, namely for Foxwoods to
take over management and opera-
tions at the hotel as well as the casi-
no, had died a death.

“No, it’s not dead,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace replied. “We have
been in contact with them [Fox-
woods] this morning, and Hutchi-
son last night in Hong Kong. The
answer is that it’s not dead.”

The minister added that the Gov-
ernment did “not yet” know the pre-
cise nature of any agreement that
might be worked out between itself,
Foxwoods and Hutchison Wham-
poa, “but we’ll get a good sense of

that in the
next 24-48
hours”.
Confirming
that any deal
would not
involve “a
purchase
agreement”,
where Fox-
woods would
acquire Our
Lucaya from
Hutchison
Whampoa
outright, Mr
Vanderpool-
Wallace told Tribune Business:
“These things are complex. You nev-
er know what form it will take.”
However, other sources familiar
with the situation told Tribune Busi-

V-WALLACE



ness that the main sticking point to
any successful agreement involving
Foxwoods was who would run/man-
age the hotel component at Our
Lucaya.

“The Government’s preferred
choice is Foxwoods, because not
only will they take over the casino
but brand the hotel,” one source
confirmed. “But they [Hutchison]
would prefer to lease the casino and
keep their staff in place. Foxwoods
would come in and brand it with
their own management.

“The sticking point is the way in
which the relationship would move
forward with the running of the
hotel.”

In other words, Hutchison Wham-
poa would be happy with a situation
somewhat resembling the status quo,
where the casino was leased to a

third-party operator and it was able
to run and manage the hotel itself.

The Government, though, wants
Foxwoods to take over the manage-
ment of the entire complex, and use
its brand and gaming marketing
database to put Grand Bahama back
on the tourism/casino map. It would
thus seem that the key to any deal
would be for Hutchison Whampoa
to shift its position to one more in
line with the Government’s think-
ing.

One source emphasised to Tri-
bune Business that Treasure Bay
Casino and Resorts Inc, the previ-
ously announced replacement for
Isle of Capri as the Our Lucaya casi-
no’s operator, was strictly a second

SEE page 8B

Construction bracing
for ‘slow winter’

Government, private sector ‘absolutely
not’ maximising its grant funding ability

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

tractors were currently endur-
ing a “significantly reduced”
level of work compared to
one year ago, when the
Bahamas was first experienc-
ing the chill winds of the glob-
al recession and construction
contracts from Spring 2008
were still carrying firms
through.

“The industry is very slow
at the moment,” Mr Wrinkle
told Tribune Business.

the EU’s Direct Assistance Grant Scheme.

Grant funding is possibly the cheapest form
of financing available to Bahamian businesses,
especially during a period when traditional
forms of financing - especially debt financing
from commercial banks - has seemingly all
but dried up. Yet Bahamian companies and
entrepreneurs have frequently failed to access
and exploit this financing when it has been
available.

“Absolutely not,” replied Mr Ferguson,
when asked whether Bahamian companies
had exploited grant funding opportunities to

THE Bahamian construc-
tion industry is bracing itself
for “a very slow winter”, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president said
yesterday, adding that the fail-
ure to-date to bring legisla-
tion that would regulate the
industry to Parliament was in
danger of “stifling growth and

THE Bahamian private sector and the Goy-
ernment have “absolutely not” maximised
their use of available grant funding sources, a
Chamber of Commerce executive told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, although he was
“pretty confident the best of the Bahamas will
be funded” in the latest European Union (EU)
sponsored round.

Hank Ferguson, who heads the Chamber’s
small and medium-sized enterprises trade unit,



development”. “There’s a few people who said the organisation’s two-day grant scheme _ the full.

Stephen Wrinkle, of Wrin- have work. Banks are reluc- workshop had provided the 32 firms/entre- “The biggest challenge is that most Bahami-
kle Development, explained saat sion| | preneurs who attended with the information
that many Bahamian con- SEE page 4B re as a | and skills necessary to apply for financing from SEE page 10B

Realtors ‘compiling’
Bill reform options

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BREA chief meets
with Port over realtor

THE Bahamas Real Estate licensing in Freeport
Association (BREA) is “com-
piling a list of suggestions” that it
plans to submit to the Government over its proposed Planning ' Ls |
and Subdivisions Bill, its president said yesterday, adding that his . j
members main concern was that the suggested approval process ; = .
could frustrate “good developers”. i h
William Wong told Tribune Business: “We are now compiling oe /fta ane or , Hog f,
it

a list of suggestions to have some
stuff included or deleted in the SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Airlines still looking for business travelers

By DAVID KOENIG
AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines value
premium travelers above other cus-
tomers, letting them board first, eat
a meal, and order a cocktail with-
out whipping out a credit card.

Many of them are business travel-
ers who fly frequently and often pay
higher last-minute fares than the
jeans-and-T-shirt crowd on the way
to see grandma. Anyone who ques-
tions why airlines treat business trav-
elers nicely only needs to look at the
carriers’ third-quarter financial
reports.

On Wednesday, American Air-
lines parent AMR Corp. reported
that it lost $359 million in the third
quarter, and Continental Airlines
Inc. posted an $18 million loss. Those
results followed losses in the last few
days reported by Southwest Airlines
Co. and United parent UAL Corp.

That news, and oil prices above
$81 a barrel, dragged down airline
stocks. Continental and AMR shares
fell more than 11 per cent in after-
noon trading.

Overall traffic is picking up. Planes
were mostly full over the summer
vacation period and through Sep-
tember.

But revenue at the biggest airlines
plunged about one-fifth from the
levels of summer 2008, largely
because business travelers stayed
home, grounded by cutbacks in cor-
porate travel during the recession.



AN AMERICAN AIRLINES jet plane takes off at the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California. American’s parent, AMR Corp., on
Wednesday said it lost about $300 million in the third quarter.

Airline executives refused to pre-
dict when demand for travel — and
higher prices — might come back.

“We are bumping along the bot-
tom,” Continental President Jeff
Smisek said Wednesday. “I can’t tell
you when the recovery will come or
how quickly or at what rate business
travel will return ... the recovery
seems to be quite slow.”

The day before, United President
John Tague said there was no chance
airlines could return to earlier rev-
enue levels until they can recapture
high-paying customers.

Basili Alukos, an airline analyst
at Morningstar, said United is the
most heavily dependent on premium
passengers — business travelers and
international customers — but that
many airlines are feeling the effect.
He said there has been a permanent
change in travel habits, including
more business travelers buying
cheaper tickets in coach.

Alukos said some premium pas-
sengers will return as the economy
improves and companies employ
more people who need to travel,
“but everyone is going to try to hold

TOPICS:

m& The Response of Regulators Workdwide: the U.S

November 4th -

(AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes)

down their costs.”

It’s hard to know how many pas-
sengers are flying for business versus
pleasure. Southwest has said that in
good times, at least 40 per cent of its
customers are business travelers. It
may be higher at other airlines.
Alukos estimates that a little more
than half of US passengers are trav-
eling on business.

At AMR, traffic in the third quar-
ter fell about six per cent, but rev-
enue plummeted 20 per cent. The
company blamed a drop-off in busi-
ness travel and low fares to entice

leisure customers to American, the
nation’s second-largest carrier.

AMR’s $359 million loss com-
pared with profit of $31 million in
the third quarter of 2008, when the
Fort Worth-based company sold its
investment business.

Houston-based Continental, the
No. 4 US airline, lost $18 million,
which was a big improvement over
the $230 million loss a year earlier,
when jet fuel prices were roughly 50
per cent higher.

Revenue plunged 20.2 per cent,
to $3.32 billion, despite a traffic
downturn of less than one per cent.
Weak sales cut across all of Conti-
nental’s markets, with trans-Atlantic
business particularly sluggish.

However, Continental is betting
on improvement next year. After
two years of cutting capacity by elim-
inating flights or using smaller air-
craft, the airline expects to increase
capacity next year by between 1.5
per cent and 2.5 per cent, with all
the extra flying on international
routes.

While larger carriers posted losses
for the quarter, low-fare AirTran
Airways said Wednesday it earned
$10.4 million, although revenue fell
11 per cent, to $597.4 million. A year
ago, the company lost $94.6 million.

AirTran has been dropping
unprofitable routes and executives of
the carrier, based in Orlando, Fla.,
said they expect to increase capacity
between two per cent and four per
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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B



Moody’s: Bahamas
economy to shrink
again during 2010

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
is likely to further contract in
2010, a Wall Street credit rat-

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the first month of the 2009-
2010 financial year - had fall-
en to $3.3 million from $29
million in the same period last
year, this position would be
“hard to sustain”.

“On a yearly basis, govern-
ment revenues remained flat,
while expenditures contracted
by around 20 per cent,” the
Wall Street credit rating
agency said. “But this
improvement will be hard to
sustain for the year as a
whole, given the Govern-
ment’s plans to carry out
infrastructure projects, which
will result in higher expendi-
tures, and the impact of the
recession on government rev-
enues.”

The latter was running $40
million behind forecast as at
end-September 2009, the
close of the first quarter in the
Government’s fiscal year, with
air arrivals down by 14.7 per
cent for the first seven
months.

Overall, Moody’s forecast
that the Bahamian economy
would continue to contract -
albeit at a much slower 0.5
per cent rate - in 2010, with
the central government debt-
to-GDP ratio reaching 46.6
per cent next year - well
above the 40 per cent ratio
regarded as a ‘danger thresh-
old’ by the likes of the Inter-
national Monetary Fund
(IMF). The government debt
to government revenue ratio
is projected by Moody’s to
peak at 237.4 per cent this
year, before declining to 234.6
per cent in 2010.

The Wall Street rating
agency added that the Gov-
ernment’s success in manag-
ing the Bahamas through the
current worldwide recession
and economic crisis “without
incurring a deep and sus-
tained deterioration in rela-
tive credit metrics” was criti-
cal to maintaining a stable
outlook on its sovereign rat-
ing.

Explaining its decision to
downgrade the Bahamas’
local currency bond rating,
Moody’s said it partly reflect-
ed the fact this nation’s debt-
to-GDP ratio was anticipat-
ed to increase by 15 percent-
age points in the three years
to 2010.

“The erosion of the coun-
try’s main debt metrics, with
debt-to-GDP projected to
reach close to 50 per cent by
2010, from 35 per cent in 2007,
further justify the A3 as the
appropriate level for both
bond ratings,” Moody’s said.

“Long-term growth lower
than that of its rating peers
also weighed on the decision
to align the bond ratings at
A3. The Bahamas’ two main
industries, tourism and finan-
cial services, have been

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impacted by the world crisis
and will find it difficult to
recover strongly in the near
future.”

Moody’s kept the outlook
on all the Bahamas’ sovereign
credit ratings as ‘stable’, and
reaffirmed the Aal country
ceiling for foreign currency
bonds and A3 country ceiling
for bank deposits.



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

EASTBOURNE TRADING COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), EAST-
BOURNE TRADING COMPANY LIMITED is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the EASTBOURNE TRAD-
ING COMPANY LIMITED is required on or before November
30, 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such claim is approved.

I, Vassilios Hadjivassiliou, of Seventh Floor, City Forum, 11 Florinis
Street, 1065 Nicosia Cyprus, is the Liquidator of EASTBOURNE
TRADING COMPANY LIMITED.



Dr. Francis Williams is pleased to announce the opening of his medical practice

st. Jude’s Medical Centre
located at 78 Market Street (2 doors north of Hay Street)

St. Jude's offers primary health care services to any family member, at any age. Each
family, and each family member, is unique and has different healthcare needs, At St,
Jude's, we take the time to get to know you, your family and your medical history. This
means we're able to serve you better because we know you better. We want to do
everything we can to keep you healthy and help you play an active and informed role in

your medical care.

Our Services Include:

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* Geriatrics

Preventive Medicine
Immunizations

+ Laceration repair

+ Health certificates

Dr. Williams holds a Doctorate in Family Medicine from the University of the West Indies

and is a member of the Caribbean College of Family Physicians.

Office Hours Monday to Friday 10am to 6 p.m,

Saturdays by appointment only
Phone Numbers 242-322-4023

Fax Numbers 242-322-d076

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



REALTORS, from 1B

Bill. We’re compiling some stuff for
the minister, and hopefully he will
look at it and make some changes.”

The move follows on from last
week’s meeting at which Dr Earl
Deveaux, minister of the environ-
ment, addressed BREA members on
the likely impact of the new Bill.

Mr Wong told Tribune Business
his members’ main concern was the
requirement for all stakeholders,
including neighbouring landowners,
to be consulted on any proposed sub-
divisions earmarked for their areas,
so they had an opportunity to voice
their concerns.

While welcoming the consultative
approach, Mr Wong said: “I think a
lot of nutcases will come out, and a

lot of good subdivisions and good
developers will be delayed and frus-
trated. That’s the concern of a lot of
members.

“How’s that going to affect the pro-
ject moving along - there are so many
weeks for this, so many weeks for
that. That has to be looked at again.
Before a developer buys and devel-
ops the land, it’s conditional on get-
ting the approval of the neighbours.”

Mr Wong suggested the Bill need-
ed to contain some “checks and bal-
ances” to ensure bona fide developers
were not unduly delayed by frivolous
and vexatious complaints, or vested
interests.

Time is often money, especially
where real estate developments are
concerned, and any undue delays in
the approvals process will likely deter

future developers from proceeding
with their projects - especially if they
have vast sums of money tied up in
large tracts of land they cannot devel-
op.

However, Mr Wong acknowledged
that the Bill was “going to rein in
those cowboys, those unscrupulous
developers” who sold lots, took client
money and then failed to deliver on
what they had promised, namely fail-
ing to put in proper roads and utili-
ties.

“Some parts of it are very good,
but there are concerns that Dr
Deveaux will listen to. I think he’ll lis-
ten to us and we’ll get this stuff sort-
ed out,” Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Meanwhile, the BREA president
disclosed that he met Ian Rolle, the

Grand Bahama Port Authority’s
(GBPA) president, on Wednesday
in a bid to resolve the situation where
the Port was issuing real estate
licences to persons operating in
Freeport.

BREA’s own position is that it
should be the sole licensing authority
for realtors operating throughout the
Bahamas, including in Freeport, and
the GBPA licensing of realtors was
creating unfair competition and leav-
ing consumers exposed.

“We'll have some more conversa-
tions, so hopefully we can resolve this
situation with the Port,” Mr Wong
told Tribune Business. “We had a
good conversation and I’m very
encouraged.”

Mr Wong had previously said the
issue was causing BREA's 70-plus

members in Freeport and Grand
Bahama “a lot of frustration and a
lot of stress, and it's been going on for
at least the last 10 years.”

The BREA president said that for
the last four to five years, the organ-
isation had been trying to get the Port
Authority to recognise it as the only
licensing body for realtors in Grand
Bahama and Freeport, but without
success.

Mr Wong said BREA's position
was that the 1995 Real Estate Act
empowered it as the sole boy to
licence practising realtors through-
out the Bahamas - including Freeport
and Grand Bahama. The profession,
he added, had been placed on par
with the likes of architects, doctors
and attorneys in terms of being able
to self-regulate.

WINTER, from 1B

tant to lend money right now,
and business people are reluc-
tant to invest right now.
“Everyone is in a wait and
see mode, and the work is not
there. What we’re seeing is
renovations and add-ons, as
opposed to new builds. It’s





slow; it’s real slow.

“This time last year, we
were just starting to feel it.
The level of work has reduced
significantly from a year ago,
because a lot of that work
started that Spring.”

With no indications emerg-
ing yet that the US economy
was beginning to recover from

the depths of the current
recession, Mr Wrinkle added:
“All indications are that we
will have a very slow Winter.

“Hopefully, Baha Mar will
go ahead in the New Year
and hire more people. The
airport is moving nicely, and
Albany has been able to sell
some lots, but generally

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at the

Family Medical Centre

Village Road Shopping Centre
SKIN CLINIC SERVICES INCLUDE:





















Skin Allergies

Skin Infections

Psoriasis

Razor Bumps

Eczema and Rashes

Routine Skin Exam, (Moles, Skin Cancer)
Scalp Disorders (Dandruff, Itching, Hair Loss)
Infants/Children Skin Problems

General Skin, Hair and Nail Problems

Teens to Adults with Acne (Face, Chest, Back)
Itching Skin (Pruritus)

Skins Problems in Pregnancy

Monday - Friday and every other Sunday by appointment.
Most major medical insurances accepted.

PHONE: 394-3433 / 394-1815









The Nature Gy
Conservancy. :

Protecting nature. Preserving Ife.

Applications are invited to conduct
An Economic Valuation of the Natural Resources of Andros

Island, The Bahamas

Under the Integrated Watershed and Coastal Area Management
(IWCAM) Project Andros, The Bahamas

The overall objective of the contract is to document the economic
contribution of renewable and finite natural resources on the island of
Andros and the associated environmental goods and services that
they provide to the Bahamian economy and to the social development

of its population.

The Contractor(s) is expected to:

speaking across the industry
it’s pretty tough.”

The BCA president said
Baha Mar had been asking
Bahamian contractors to
again pre-qualify for con-
struction contracts on its pro-
posed Commercial Village,
the site where it hopes to relo-
cate all the banks, govern-
ment buildings and the Straw
Market currently lining West
Bay Street.

Mr Wrinkle said that,
assuming Baha Mar was able
to close its agreements with

the two Chinese state-owned
entities and proceed with the
$2.6 billion project, the BCA’s
understanding was that all
work outside the scope of the
main resort/casino/convention
campus would go out to bid
by Bahamian companies.
Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle
said the BCA had been work-
ing with the relevant govern-
ment ministries and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
to put together a curriculum
for the latter’s planned con-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARLENE GUERRIER of 407 N.E.
17 AVE. APT. 103, BOYNTON BEACH, FL. 33485, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












twenty-eight

Citizenship,



NOTICEisherebygiventhat VENASEYMOUR of MARI
STREET, P.O. BOX N-720, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality

Citizenship, for registration/aturalization as a citizen of
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason '
registration/naturalization should not be granted, sh«
send a written and signed statement of the facts wi
the 15th day of Octol
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality

P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

days from



Bahar



[er
py

struction management pro-
gramme, plus the ‘grandfa-
thering seminars’ to educate
contractors on the licensing
requirements of the Contrac-
tors Bill.

“We were trying to do
something before Christmas,
but it’s not looking likely it’s
going to happen,” Mr Wrinkle
said of the seminars. “What
we’re trying to do is establish
the level of the bar for the
contractors’ licensing require-
ments. Up until now, there
have been no requirements in
place, so we’re trying to take a
broad approach to it, particu-
larly at level one.”

The focus, Mr Wrinkle
explained, would be on adher-
ence to the Building Code
and compliance in a bid to
crack down on defective and
shoddy workmanship of the
kind that had impacted the
Ministry of Housing’s hous-
ing programme in the past.

“We have to have measures
in place to prevent this,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “Clearly, the
best approach is to get it out
at the education and licens-
ing level.”

The BCA president urged
the Government to “push in a
timely fashion” on getting the
Contractors Bill to Parlia-
ment, and added that the
organisation was expecting to
“imminently” receive
approval from the Inter-
American Development
Bank’s (IDB) head office for
a project designed to strength-
en the Bahamian construction
industry.

LIGNUM INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY

PRESENTS

The PMI, AAPM s
Autodesk Seminar

DATE:

1. Conduct consultations, inclusive of interviews, working
meetings and workshops, with key stakeholders and policy
makers identified in consultation with TNC about data and
messages to be presented
Conduct analysis of actual and potential environmental goods
and services being delivered to local populations and social
sectors by the natural resources and ecosystems of Andros,
identifying the most strategic goods and services that can be
economically valued.

Complete economic assessment of the selected environmental
inputs and services identified, for BAU and SEM, within Andros
in line with the objectives and approach set out in the detailed
TORs.

Identify the means to integrate the economic valuation tools into
agency and national budgetary processes in order to increase
their likelihood of implementation. This will involve
identification of policy reforms necessary to facilitate this.

The term of the contract is three (3) months, starting in October 2009,

All interested persons should forward curriculum vitae with a cover

letter via email to bahamas@tnc.org to the attention of IWCAM

Project Manager, The Nature Conservancy. Deadline for applications

is Thursday, October 15", 2009. Requests for more detailed TORs

can also be sent to bahamas @tnc.org

October 30" 2009 (9.00AM — 2.00PM)

PLACE:
British Colonial Hilton (The Victoria Room)

ST:
$35 Regular $25 Student
($5 Discount for early registration)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
RISK MANAGEMENT
AUTODESK REVIT 2010

Also Product Demos on:
Bluebeam — Powerful PDF software for the AEC Industry.
NComputing — Exciting new product for School Labs,

Small Business and Web Cafes.
Register now at www.lignumtech.com/LIT or

call 393-2164 for more information

Special $100 discount for Project Management & AutoCad
courses if you register at the Seminar.
All PMP’s, CIPM’s, will receive 25 PDU’s to maintain
their membership.

mM

AP.
cane 4 fd Bs

Frac: Wmopresr i'r

Autodesk
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



Twenty three states report
higher unemployment

By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Unemployment rose in 23
states last month as the econ-
omy struggled to create jobs
in the early stages of the
recovery.




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While layoffs have slowed,
companies remain reluctant
to hire. Forty-three states
reported job losses in Sep-
tember, while only seven
gained jobs, the Labour
Department said Wednesday.

Some of the states that lost
jobs still saw their unemploy-
ment rates decline, as dis-





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couraged workers gave up
looking for work.

People who are out of work
but no longer looking for jobs
aren’t counted as officially
unemployed.

That trend was evident
nationwide in September, as
nearly 600,000 people
dropped out of the work
force, the department report-
ed earlier this month.

The US jobless rate rose to
9.8 per cent in September, a
26-year high, from 9.7 per
cent. Some economists esti-
mate it would have topped 10
per cent if there had been no
change in the labour force.

There were some bright
spots in Wednesday’s report.
The Midwest region, hit hard
during the recession by job
losses in manufacturing, saw
its unemployment rate drop
for the second straight month,
to 9.8 per cent from 10 per
cent in August. It was the
only region where the unem-
ployment rate declined.

The Midwest benefited
from sharp drops in unem-
ployment in Indiana and
Ohio. Indiana’s jobless rate
fell to 9.6 per cent, from 9.9
per cent in August and 10.7
per cent in June.

Indiana added 4,400 jobs,
the most of any state, due to
gains in the manufacturing
and service sectors.

Ohio, meanwhile, saw its
jobless rate drop to 10.1 per
cent, from 10.8 per cent in
August and 11.2 per cent in
July.

Still, Ohio lost about 6,000
jobs in September, and much
of the improvement in its
unemployment rate came
from discouraged workers
leaving the work force.

Nevada, Rhode Island and
Florida last month posted
their highest jobless rates on

Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Support Officer

EFG International

EFG International is a global private banking group headquartered in Switzerland,
offering private banking and asset management services. EFG International's private
banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations in aver 30 countries, with circa

2,400 employees.

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd continues to expand as evidenced by its new
premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 expernenced professionals and

offers a full range of solutions for wealthy clients around the globe. EFG's unique
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professionals in the industry. To eam more, please visit www_elgintemational.com

We are looking for a professional with business experiance dealing with high net
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deal with telaphone enquiries, prapare client visits, organize business travel, the
ability to monitor profit centre costs and retrocession payments. The interview will be
conducted in Franch.

Preference will ba given to a candidate with a university or collage degree. Computer
literacy is required with proficiency in Microsoft Office suite of products.

EFG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, bonus and benefits.

Salary will be determined by experience, and qualifications.

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 6th November 2009 to:

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Human Resources

Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor

1 Bay Street

P.O. Box $$ 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 502-5487



records dating to 1976, the
department said.

Rates

Fifteen states and Wash-
ington, D.C., reported unem-
ployment rates of 10 per cent
or more.

Michigan reported the

nation’s highest unemploy-
ment rate at 15.3 per cent. It
was followed by Nevada at
13.3 per cent, Rhode Island
at 13 per cent, California at
12.2 per cent and South Car-
olina at 11.6 per cent.

Real estate continues to
bedevil states that enjoyed a
housing boom. Florida’s job-

less rate rose to 11 per cent
from 10.8 per cent in August,
as the state lost nearly 13,000
construction jobs. California
lost 39,300 jobs, including
more than 14,000 in construc-
tion. Nevada lost 3,500 con-
struction jobs, though it
boosted employment in ser-
vices.

MUST SELL

COMMERCIAL BUILDING

Lot #1, Block ‘BB’ Civic Industrial Area
Keats Street & Queens Highway
Freeport, Grand Bahama

DESCRIPTION:

The building comprises a Retail Store with a large Meat Section at the rear of the store.
Other accommodation includes Male and Female Rest Rooms, a Trash Room,
a Manager’s Office and a Kitchenette.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before November 9, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

By HARRY R WEBER
AP Airlines Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — Air-
Tran Airways’ financial
results are benefiting from the
discount carrier’s low costs
and laser focus on domestic
routes where it believes it can
make money, and it actually
wants to grow in 2010 when
other major carriers have
more conservative plans.

Its Orlando, Florida-based
parent company reported
Wednesday a $10.4 million
third-quarter profit, or eight
cents a share, even though
sales declined more than 11
per cent. A year ago it report-
ed a restated $94.6 million
loss, or 81 cents a share.

The July-September results
mark AirTran’s third quarter
in a row of profit as most
major US carriers struggle
amid weak overall demand
for business and international
travel.

Revenue fell to $597.4 mil-
lion from $673.3 million a
year ago.

Excluding one-time items,
its adjusted net income for the
three months ended Septem-
ber 30 was eight cents a share,
in line with analysts’ slightly

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7B

AirTran posts

Q3 profit
of $10.4m

reduced expectations. The
revenue figure was a little
below the analysts’ estimate
of $600.5 million.

Executives said during a
conference call with analysts
that AirTran expects to
increase capacity two per cent
to four per cent next year. In
March and again in July the
airline said capacity, as mea-
sured by available seat miles,
would be flat in 2010.

Delivery

CEO Bob Fornaro said in
an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press after the call that
AirTran took delivery of two
more planes in late Septem-
ber that it hadn’t planned to
previously.

“T think consistent with
what we’re seeing in the mar-
ket, we’re feeling pretty good
about our profitability,”
Fornaro said. He also noted
that 34 per cent of AirTran’s
2010 fuel needs are hedged,
protecting the airline from ris-
ing fuel prices.

Several other major carri-
ers continue to post losses,
albeit smaller ones in some
cases, and they are being con-
servative with their capacity

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plans next year as the econo-
my has only recently shown
signs of improvement.

“T wouldn’t say we are in a
special place, but we’ve had a
much better year than the rest
of our competitors,” Fornaro
said. “We’re solidly prof-
itable.”

AirTran has been trying to
shift its focus from unprof-
itable routes to profitable
ones, and it also has been
working to make sure it has
enough cash to continue to
weather the downturn in trav-
el demand.

In August, AirTran said it
planned to stop flying to and
from Newark, N.J., effective
Sunday, and give its takeoff
and landing slots there to
Houston-based Continental
Airlines Inc. in exchange for
Continental slots at
LaGuardia Airport in New
York and Reagan National
Airport in Washington. Con-
tinental has a hub at Newark
Liberty International Airport,
which is used by many travel-
ers heading to or from New
York City.

A slot is an interval of time
during which an airline can
takeoff or land its aircraft at
an airport. Slots, especially at
peak times of day and in busy
corridors like the Northeast,
are valuable to airlines.

AirTran, which has its hub
in Atlanta, has over 700 daily
flights to 67 destinations.

AirTran shares fell 24 cents,
or 4.4 per cent, to $5.16 in
morning trading.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

FREE SEMINAR

You are

invited to attend a Free Financial

Seminar, organized by the Education Committee. of
the Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union
Limited, to be held on Friday, October 23rd, 2009 at
the Office of the Bahamas Co-operative League
Limited (justwestof Wendy’s, Oakes Field), beginning
at 6:30 p.m.

Come
and
See how you can stretch your

DOLLARS SS$

Featured Speakers:

Mrs. Stephanie Missick-Jones
(Credit Specialist-Bahamas Co-operative League Ltd.)

and Mr. Philip Greenslade

(Treasurer-Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.)

Bring a friend and get a prize for bringing the most guests.
Refreshments will be served





Full Text



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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.275THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDY, T-STORMS HIGH 85F LOW 74F The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com THE family of Tribune managing director Mr Roger Carron has asked that instead of flowers, well-wishers may make donations in his mem ory to either the Breathe Easy Campaign, an effort to raise funds for the purchase of urgently needed ventilators and incubators for the Princess Margaret Hospital, or St Martin’s Convent, which does important work with students and the poor. Mr Carron was a fervent supporter of both efforts. Funeral services will be held at St Francis Cathe dral on West Hill Street at 3pm on Saturday, October 31. Funer al ar rangements for Roger Carron By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net PLP delegates vote for their next party leader today with three candidates vying for the top job. Former Prime Minister Perry Christie, Dr Bernard Nottage and Paul Moss are all jockeying for the top job after being nominated and seconded as leadership candidates at the start of the PLP’s 51st national convention. Of the four original candidates, only Fred Mitchell declined the nomination (see page 7 tage, Mr Moss, and Mr Christie to vie for the post in what is expected to be a hotly contested three-wayrace. Nominating Mr Christie was former PLP Senator Trevor Whylly who was seconded by Omar Armbrister. Mr Moss was nominated by Tonya Charlton and seconded by Elaine Adderley. Nominating Dr Nottage was the former PLP MP Rubianne Darling who was seconded by Valerie Percentie; and finally Mr Mitchell was nominated by Atavese Issacs and seconded by Irene Rolle. With each candidate’s supporters sporting t-shirts, caps, and pins, the convention floor was strewn with paraphernalia of every kind as the prospective leaders entered the Wyndham’s ballroom. While there has been no official formation of “teams” or tickets on which persons will be running to Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! God is good PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God still reigns PLPs! PICEWELL FORBES, TO CONVENTION DELEGATES PLP outburst forces Travolta case retrial PLP leadership is a thr ee horse race SEE page 14 By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net T HE John Travolta attempted extortion trial end ed in chaos last night after an outburst at the PLP conv ention forced Senior Justice Anita Allen to order a retri al. Proceedings were sensa tionally halted after South A ndros MP Picewell Forbes took to the convention stage a nd told delegates that one of the accused, former PLP senator Pleasant Bridgewa ter, had been acquitted. He exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! G od is good PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God still reigns PLPs!” But trial jury members were still deliberating, and had been for more than eight hours. No verdict had been reached although convention members celebrated Bridgewater’s supposed vindication by singing and dancing to “Oh Happy Day”. An angry Senior Justice Allen discharged jurors from returning with a verdict at 10.54pm last night, informing them that some two hours earlier there was an announcement at a political convention by a senior official, indicating that one of the accused persons had been acquitted. Some 20 minutes earlier, the jury had been brought into court and the foreman indicated they needed more Convention speech by MP prompts judge to discharge jurors SEE page 10 FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater leaves court. PICEWELL FORBES speaks to delegates at the convention last night. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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B y PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A RESOLUTION seeking to block the nominationo f any candidate for office within the PLP who had not been a card-carrying member for at least seven years was shot down at the beginning of the party’s nationalc onvention yesterday. With five amendments in total to the party’s constitu-t ion being debated during yesterday’s morning session, t he party also sought to create and enforce a co-deputy leader position, restrict anyn omination for posts being made within a month from a ny convention, and it also ratified the Progressive Young Liberals (PYLn ow be named the official National Youth Arm of the p arty with more voting powers than ever before. Criticism While some amendments such as the one relating tot he PYL was passed outright, the amendment r equiring an individual to h ave served or be with the party for seven years faced substantial criticism from political heavyweights such as former leader candidateP hilip Galanis, and long time party supporter Valentine Grimes. W hen it became obvious that this amendment was n ot going to see the light of day, some supporters of it sought to change the termsa nd make the timeline five years instead of seven. This again caused an outcry with it finally being decided that the matterw ould go before a special committee before any further discussions can be had. One PLP insider told The Tribune that such a “fooli sh” move by the party will not be allowed to be pushed through by “certain” individuals who would wish to block the nominations ofa ny potential challengers at this or any other convention. While it is well known that any changes to the pre s ent constitution would not take effect until the party’s n ext convention, technically speaking it would mean that if the party decided toc hange its leader today for either attorney Paul Moss, or Dr Bernard Nottage,t hese individuals would not be eligible to contest for ree lection in their own party as they would not have been card-carrying members fort he requisite number of y ears. “We won’t allow this to happen. We cannot be so shortsighted to allow these changes today to destroy thep arty in the future,” said another source. The PLP’s convention c ontinues today where delegates are expected to vote f or their prospective candidates for leader, deputy leader, and chairman of thep arty. C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE Move to restrict candidate nomination is shot down SOMEOFTHE ATTENDEES at the PLP convention get in a festive mood. Several political heavyweights attack resolution F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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PHILLIP “Brave” Davis received the most enthusiastic welcome from voting delegates and stalwart councillors whenh e was nominated at the PLP c onvention yesterday. The Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador MP and prominent attorney is widely noted as having outspent his contenders for the PLP deputyl eadership and when combined w ith his familiarity within the party and a well-oiled campaign, his efforts appeared to have paid off yesterday during nominations at the Wyndham Nassau Resort. N umerous delegates and stalwart counc illors who were inside the hall – the media was excluded said Mr Davis, who is running under the slogan “Be Brave Change the Bahamas”, was the most well received contender for the deputy leadership. W hile some suggested it was “by a w hisker” that the MP won the favour of the crowd, others claimed Mr Davis got a louder reception that incumbent party leader Perry Christie himself. M r Davis has flown in and a ccommodated a large number of voting delegates from the family islands, and his constituency in particular, to attend the convention. While Mr Fitzgerald’s supporters weren umerous, emblazoned with the c ampaign slogan “Forward the Future is now”, Mr Davis’ were most visible. Mr Wilchcombe, who ran under the slogan “Now is the time!” appeared to have been outgunned by MrD avis and Mr Fitzgerald in terms of the a mont of money he has spent on his campaign, apparently relying to a greater extent on his established credentials asa former minister and long time MP in the party than on t-shirts and badges. Mr Davis was nominated by PLP sena tor Michael Darville, and seconded by St T homas More MP Frank Smith. MP for West End and Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe, was nominated by PLP Vice Chairman Melissa Sears and seconded by Staford “Scorpio” Evans, and Senator JeromeF itzgerald was nominated by his father E dward Fitzgerald and seconded by Danny Johnson. Mr Davis has publicly announced his support for incumbent PLP leader Perry Christie who is being challenged at the convention by his friend and parliamen-t ary colleague, Bernard Nottage, as well a s by newcomer Paul Moss and while Mr Christie has not formally revealed who he supports for deputy leadership, it is reported that he supports Mr Davis his former law partner in return. Mr Davis previously received the backi ng of departing Deputy Leader, Cynthia Mother” Pratt. With three strong candidates vying for the deputy leadership of the party, the PLP convention was yesterday swamped with supporters bearing the hats, shirts and badges of Phillip “Brave” Davis, O bie Wilchcombe and Jerome Fitzgera ld. By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net P LP heavyweight and former political retiree Bradley Roberts looks in a strong position to steal the chairmanship of the PLP from incumbent Glenys Hanna Martin. T o the disappointment of t hose who had hoped to see the party express support for a tran sition to a younger generation of P LPs, and those who had been h appy to see a woman given a prominent voice in the party, the 65-year-old received thel oudest reaction from the convention floor yesterday when he was nominated to contest theC hairmanship, according to del egates and stalwart councillors who were in the convention hall Mrs Hanna Martin also r eceived popular support, however many whom The Tribune spoke with following the nomi n ation process expressed their belief that Mr Roberts, as a former chairman who spoke fort he party in the run up to its vic tory in the 2002 election, has the capabilities to do so again. Y esterday saw incumbent Ms Hanna Martin nominated by her parliamentary colleague, Yamacraw MP Melanie Griffin,a nd seconded by Miles Laroda. Mr Roberts was nominated b y former PLP MP Neville Wisdom and seconded by avid PLP supporter Laura Williams. Joining them in the race is former MP Keod Smith, who was nominated by Laurette Miller and seconded by C.L. Johnson. Ricardo Smith, who had pre viously expressed an intention to seek a nomination, did not do so. While The Tribune spoke with several keen supporters of Ms Hanna Martin, who felt she has been a successful chairman a nd organiser for the party and should be returned, just as manyP LP supporters said now is the time for Mr Roberts, who r etired from frontline p olitics in 2007, to return to the Chairmanship. M r Roberts was the last of the candidates for Chairman to announce his intentions, doing s o last Sunday on Island FM. He described how he was “admonished and encouraged” t o join the race and felt com pelled to do so by the “decay ing” condition the country is in a fter just over two years of FNM leadership. He said he would organise the party to return to government i n the 2012 election, b ut would not seek a seat as an MP again. Yesterday a supp orter, echoing the sentiments of several others interviewed b y T he Tribune , said: Past is profile. (Roberts job and he’ll do an e ven greater job this time round.” A younger PLP, however, said: “I understand t hat Bradley’s a proven leader, and he’s got more time to concentrate on it, but I don’t think it w ould be good for the party if Bradley won. I think this is the ideal time for the party tod emonstrate its commitment to young people, to change and trying to move the country forward. I support the youth and he’s a young man, and I think he should be given an opportunity to show the country and theP LP that young people have something to offer. He’s one who’s come up through the r anks in the partyand so I b elieve that I would like to see the PLP present the youth to the nation and move ahead with t hat bridge that they keep talking about.” Delegates and Stalwart coun cillors of the party will vote forw ho they wish to see take the top party posts today at the Wyndham Nassau Resort, w here the convention will enter its second of three days. The winner of the race must r eceive a simple majority of the votes. PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Roberts gets loud reception from PLP convention floor IN TWOstories appearing in Tuesday’s Tribune , the Right Reverend Laish Boyd was incorrectly referred to as the Anglican archbishop. He is not an archbishop, but rather a bishop of the Anglican Diocese of the Bahamas and Turks andCaicos Islands. The Tribune apologises for any inconvenience this error may have caused. Correction NATIONAL PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY (PLP Glenys Hanna-Martin had opened the 51st PLP convention as the first speaker of the evening at the Wyndham last night. She talked of the honour and privilege of being elected for her coveted position now sought after by Ken Dorsett, Keod Smith and Bradley Roberts. She paid tribute to former leaders and encouraged the involvement of young people in the future of the PLP. PLP CHAIRMAN OPENSCONVENTION BRADLEYROBERTS PHILIP‘BRAVE’ DAVIS F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Enthusiastic welcome for Davis during nominations

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E DITOR, The Tribune . Mr. Lovence Louima has written what he stands by as the truth when all others have refused to even give a state ment. The reporters have been denied access to the detention centre, possibly because the Minister of State Mr. Branville McCartney disagrees with The Tribune’s series of articles into allegations of abuse and mistreat ment at the facility. The Haitian ambassador has read the newspapers and has been told of the number of abuses which take place at this centre. Yet for what he does about it suggests to me that he sits in the office as if he’s on a vacation in the Bahamas, allowing everything to take place right before his eyes. What is wrong with this picture? Why can’t we see what is going on, has the ambassador been threatened by the Government of the Bahamas? Has he been told if you get in too deep we will deport you from this country? S hould I go further in thinking that he is enjoying such a great life and doesn't want to be bothered or get his hands dirty? What conclusions can be drawn when there are reports that hundreds and thousand of persons go miss ing in the Bahamas in the wake of what would be the Immigration Haitian Operation Flood? Who shall they call on when the ambassador, the representative for Haiti, appears to do little? While 39 persons lose their homes in Abaco and no questions asked! Persons being sent home without proper investi gation on the process or the grounds they are being sent on! Persons have to sit outside and are spoken to like dirt at the passport office when applying or renewing their kids’ travel documents! Is there a government in Haiti that really sees what is going on in the Bahamas, willing to step in and encourage the men and women to stop taking this dangerous journey for a better life just to find temselves being shot down by RBDF who are given the order to do so? Is there a Government in Haiti that will stand and say enough is enough they have to amend the constitution? They should examine who they send to represent their country and its citizens. There needs to be a stand to defend the cause of the innocents. Indeed! There are too many Haitians in the Bahamas. We play with the words and say we only mean t he illegal ones when in actuality we mean every one of them, even the one who sits next to me and helps pass my exams in school. The one who fought for me when no one else wanted to stand and defend me, yes! The one who weeds my yard, works in the construction field with us and for a little or nothing and sometimes went months without being paid. If any questions asked, we call the police or immigration and get them deported.Yes! I mean all of them who begin to integrate themselves in this society thinking they can live the way we live; have far better jobs; vehicles and homes than some of us, they must go! In conclusion, this matter is far beyond Minister McCartney, we are in a mess. While many have called Haitians havoc to this society and blame them for everything from crime to AIDS, they’ve remainedpassive in the case of allowing all of the above to take place; without uttering a word to discontinue this because they are of Haitian descendants and illegal; should this be the cause of one being mistreated and nobody to call on? Where do they go or who can they turn to for assistance? At this present time I am calling on everyone who has a listening ear, young and old to join together in calling on the Almighty God! Concern Citizen of the Bahamas Nassau, October, 2009 EDITOR, The Tribune. LOCKED in the dreaded c ycle of violence, our society struggles with the search for solutions to this multifaceted p roblem including the question of corporal punishment in schools. T hose against corporal punishment in schools argue that it is cruel, humiliating a nd violent. Furthermore, they believe that its administration may b e injurious to students, is prone to abuse by teachers, and may result in litigation a gainst teachers and the Ministry of Education. Additionally, they believe i t may be even counterproductive because its longterm effect could make stud ents more prone to violence in adult life. On the other hand, those f or corporal punishment in schools say it worked well i n the past, and is well tried a nd proven as demonstrated b y the production of mannerly, polished, and disci plined students of the 50s and 60s. W e have created a vacuum while we experiment with new alternatives. W hat we are witnessing is a disconnect between the s chool environment and the harsh realities of our real society. I t seems as if the large number of graduates from t he current school system only contribute to an increasingly violent society. W hile the education administrators have disa rmed teachers of their straps, and canes and require that they use onlyp ersuasive techniques for dealing with disciplinary problems, in the wider society, it seems as though more and more police officers area ppearing in public armed with guns. In years gone by, corpor al punishment, as part of a school’s disciplinary system, could be compared to vaccination; that minor discomfort experienced by the unruly student from theb enign sting of the strap or cane served to immunise him or her in the future. U nfortunately, legitimate v iolence, and not just persuasion, is the reality of allc ivil societies. T here is a time to drop b ombs on aggressors, a time to shoot attacking enemies,a time to use lethal force on v iolent criminals or intrude rs, a time to subdue force fully and restrain various wrongdoers. Therefore, under con trolled conditions, by humane administrators, stu-d ents should be made a ware, from a tender age, of the realities of the real world. “Where words fail, blows ensue.” JERRY ROKER Nassau, September, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm CHICAGO (AP less, narcissistic. Some don’t even know what it is. E ven so, more young adults and teens normally at the cutting edge of technology are finally coming around to Twitter, using it for class or work, monitoring the minutiae ofc elebrities’ lives. It’s not always love at first tweet, though. Many of them are doing itg rudgingly, perhaps because a friend pressures them or a teacher or boss makes them t ry the 140-character microblogging site. still find no point to using it. I’m the type of person who likes to talk to someone,” says Austyn Gabig, a sophomore at the University of California, San Diego, who only joinedT witter this month because she heard Ellen DeGeneres was going to use tweets as a way tow in tickets to her talk show. DeGeneres set off a frenzy on the UCSD c ampus when she promised the tickets to those who, within 15 minutes of the tweet, e-mailed h er cell phone photos of themselves wearing a red towel and standing with someone in a uniform. Gabig got the tweet, found a towel and won tickets. She might think she won’t tweet again, but s ocial networking expert David Silver predicts she’ll change her mind. Every semester, Twitter is the one tech nology that students are most resistant to,” s ays Silver, a media studies professor at the University of San Francisco, where he regul arly teaches a class on how to use various Internet applications. “But it’s also the one they end up using the most.” It is a rare instance, he and others say, of young people adopting an Internet applica t ion after many of their older counterparts have already done so. T heir slowness to warm to Twitter comes in part from a fondness for the ease and directn ess of text messaging and other social net working services that most of their friends already use. Many also are under the false impression that their Twitter pages have to be public, which is unappealing to a generation t hat’s had privacy drilled into them. Then there’s the fact that their elders like it, a nd that’s very uncool. But that’s bound to change as tech-savvy Gen Xers reach middle a ge and baby boomers and even some senior citizens become more comfortable with social networking. “In some ways, what we’re seeing here is a kind of closing of that generational gap as it r elates to technology,” says Craig Watkins, a University of Texas professor and author of t he book “The Young and the Digital.” Consider, for instance, that the median age of a Facebook user is now 33, despite the social-networking site’s roots as a college hangout, according to the Pew Internet & Ameri-c an Life Project. The median age for Twitter is 31. And while Facebook’s audience is aging, Twitterers are getting younger. Internet tracker comScore Inc. found that 18to 24-year-olds made up 18 percent of unique visitors to Twitter in September, compared with 11 percent a y ear earlier. Meanwhile, kids ages 12 to 17 accounted for 12 percent of Twitter visitors last month, about double the proportion of a year earlier. P ew researchers also found in a report released Wednesday that the number of peo-p le ages 18 to 24 who use some type of statusupdate service is growing quickly, too. They a ttribute much of the growth to Twitter. “So much of this is driven by community. I’d even call it a tribe,” says Susannah Fox, a Pew researcher who was the new report’s lead author. She said the survey also found thatw ireless devices are increasingly a factor in Twitter involvement, as in the more you have laptop, mobile phone and so on the more likely you are to tweet. A lex Lifschitz, in his third year at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New Y ork, uses Twitter as a tight-knit circle, keeping his contacts more limited than on Facebook. Using his cell phone or laptop, he tweets to let professors know he can’t make it to class or to ask questions about assignments. He a lso uses it for something as basic as organizing a food run with friends on campus. I can simply tweet and ask who wants to go somewhere with me, and I’ll have a few takers a t any given time,” he says. Mallory Wood, a recent graduate of Saint M ichael’s College in Vermont, is another Twit ter convert primarily for work. She’s now an admissions counselor there, in charge of getting more people to follow her department on Twitter. She uses the service to offer appli c ation fee waivers to prospective students and points them to links to student blogs, evens ome with complaints about campus life. “You have to be real with them,” Wood says. T hat’s still not enough to persuade some young people to get on board. “Quite frankly, I don’t need to hear if some one stepped in dog poo on the way to class or how annoyed they are that they lost their f avorite pen,” says Carolyn Wald, a University of Chicago junior who has not joined Twit t er and rarely posts status updates on Facebook because “I don’t want to assume that p eople want to hear those things about me, either.” Even teen pop star Miley Cyrus stopped tweeting, griping in a rap song she posted on YouTube that, among other things, she’d g rown weary of making constant, meaningless updates about what she was doing. T he key, USF professor Silver says, is show ing his students how a simple status update can become a more sophisticated way to show their creative sides and, who knows, maybe land a job. (This article is by Martha Irvine of the Associated Press) Students should learn ‘where words fail blows ensue’ LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Young people grudgingly flock to Twitter Whom shall Haitians call on?

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By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net DESPITE allegiances and alliances behind the scenes, parliamentarians yesterday remained largely tight-lipped about who of the leadership, deputy leadership and chairmanship contenders they would wish to see elected. With races for the three top posts being hotly contested at the party’s three day convention, which began yesterday at the Wyndham Nassau Resort on Cable Beach, it appeared that many of PLP MPs and senators did not want to get caught in any post-convention controversy bym aking public statements about their personal preferences. Incumbent party leader Perry Christie, leadership contender Bernard Nottage and deputy leadership contender Senator Jerome Fitzgerald would not be drawn on who they would wishto join them in leading the party, k eeping their cards close to their chests when approached by The Tribune. Other parliamentarians, such as incumbent chairman and MP Glenys Hanna-Martin, former House speaker Oswald Ingraham and Senator Hope Stra chan, joined them in declining to state their preferences. MP Picewell Forbes told The Tribune he is for Obie Wilchcombe taking the deputy leadership of the party but stopped short of naming his favoured leadership candidate. For his part, Mr Christie said diplomatically that “whoever the party chooses” would be the best person for the chairman or deputy leadership posts, while Dr Nottage claimed he is sim ply focusing on his own cam paign and Mr Fizgerald said he did not wish to comment as he wanted his personal supporters, who he noted are “very divided” over who they would like to see become leader, to vote according to their individual con sciences. Chairman of Mr Christie’s reelection campaign, Vincent Peet claimed Mr Christie has the support of 80 per cent of the parliamentary group of MPs and sen ators and the “overwhelming” support of stalwart councillors and delegates, giving him the strongest chance of emerging the victor in the leadership race. However, another senior MP in the party claimed that, in truth, the parliamentary group is “split” over who they would like to see as leader of the PLP coming out of the convention. Nonetheless, Mr Christie is favoured by all parliamentari ans who were willing to voice their opinion – including Mr Peet, Senator Allyson MaynardGibson and deputy leadership nominee Philip “Brave” Davis. Mr Peet said he travelled with Mr Christie last week to Andros, Eleuthera, Exuma and Grand Bahama and is certain he also has strong support “on the ground” among grassroots party supporters. Meanwhile, Mrs MaynardGibson said: “I’ve always been a supporter of Mr Christie, I’ve not changed in that regard. I think the style of leadership and the quality of leadership that he displays are vital for the development of our country. That’s why I support him 100 per cent.” She added that she feels the convention turnout has “shown most importantly that people see the PLP as a very viable party.” “I am sure we are going to come out of this convention united and fighting ready for the next election,” she added. Mr Christie received the loudest shouts of support of all contenders for party offices yesterday as he marched towards the entrance of the convention hall to be nominated. The leader must win at least 51 per cent of the votes in order to win or retain the post, while the victors in all other races must attain a simple majority. C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $112 81& (0(17 PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE Parliamentarians tight-lipped on contenders B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net POPULAR PLP Deputy Leader Cynthia “Mother” Pratt urged the new leadership to maintain integrity in service as she bid her final farewell to supporters last night. As the Member of Parliament for St Cecilia stepped down from the post she held for 12 years, Mrs Pratt explained how her political ambitions were driven by the needs of the people she served as M P, Minister and Deputy Prime Minister. And she encouraged future party leaders to do the same. M rs Pratt said: “Some of us have lost sight of the fact that politics is all about the people. “It is about crafting new and innovative p rogrammes to ensure that they recognise the bountiful opportunities that exist in the Bahamas. Public service, is just that, service to t he Bahamian people, not for reward, b ut to guarantee a level of decency in their daily lives.” The people who rely on the State are the people the party needs to work for, Mrs Pratt said. As she worked her way from “rags” to the “middle class” and through the political ranks, Mrs Pratt said she retained h er values and characteristics as a fiery c ommunity builder and defender of the poor, qualities Sir Lynden Pindling recogn ised as fundamental to the party. Steadfast As long as the party remains steadfast i n its resolve to alleviate people’s sufferi ng and continue to prioritise economic e mpowerment, Mrs Pratt sees a bright future for the PLP. S he praised the deep and wide PLP bench and commended those vying for h er former position and other leadership positions for the maturity they have dis-p layed in their campaigns. A nd Mrs Pratt reminded them of their responsibility to create an environment where young Bahamians are guaranteeda bright future. She called for the future leadership to focus on the key issues affecting communities, such as education, immigration, healthcare and public safety. Mrs Pratt lamented the dismantling of the Urban Renewal Programme – which, she said, was helping young men in inner cities – as a bad political decision, as was the discontinuation of the National YouthS ervice, which may have prevented the c riminality among young men today. T here should be a strict protectionist p olicy for illegal immigrants and the pres ent policy allowing stateless children must be addressed, Mrs Pratt said. T rue reform of the educational system is required, and affordable healthcare s hould be available to all. Mrs Pratt thanked the hundreds of delegates gathered for the first night of the 51st convention at the Wyndham resort in C able Beach for their support, and t hanked them on behalf of her late husband. A s she bowed out to an adoring crowd, Mrs Pratt advised the party to continue to reach out to young people, and said: “Remember, service is all about the peop le.” Cynthia Pratt calls for new PLP leadership to maintain integrity PLPLEADER Perry Christie is welcomed to the convention

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 N A S S A U G L A S S C O M P A N Y SA RT G A L L E RY& L I G H T I N G C E N T R EP re ~ C h r i s t m a s S a l eO F F S T O R E W I D E ** e x c l u d i n g t h e g l a s s d e p a r t m e n t a n d i t e m s o n c o n s i g n m e n tTue s d a y O c t o b e r 1 3 t h ro u g h S a t u rd a y O c t o b e r 3 1CUSTOM &READY-MADE FRAMES15%OFFMackey St 393-8165 393-3723HOURS Monday Friday 8:30am 4:30pm Saturday 8:30am 1:00pmAll major credit cards accepted as cash!www.nassauglass.com P LPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE By AVA TURNQUEST T HOUGHthe general attention level of guests at the Wyndham was one of casual interest bordering on apathy, some visitors were intrigued by the publicly accessible p olitical process with one t ourist going so far as to actually join a camp. Attracted by the intensity projected from PLP supporters at this year's convention, Geminy Maw, a 21y ear-old from England, e xplored the convention floor intending only to discover just what all the excitement was about. M s Maw said that out of all t he booths she visited, it was the Paul Moss camp that not only explained the event and its national importance the best, but was also the most sociable and genuine in shar-i ng their campaign. Since joining their campaign as an honorary member and donning the iconic purple t-s hirt, Ms Maw said that she is d efinitely enjoying this unique experience and plans to attend the convention for the remaining two days. P arty hopeful Mr Moss joked: "See even the international community is for Paul Moss." M eanwhile, Joe Hughes from Kentucky and Missy Wallace from Indiana both commented that what sur-p rised them the most was how a ccessible such a crucial election was to the public and both agreed that this is instrumental in keeping elected offic ials grounded in the needs and concerns of the people. Tourist joins the Paul Moss camp GEMINY MAWwith Paul Moss A SHOWOFSUPPORT FORDAVIS A P LP delegate waves her sup port for one of the party’s D eputy Leadership challengers, Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, at the Wyndham Nassau Resort last night. F elip Major / Tribune staff F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Shar e your news T he Tribune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By AVA TURNQUEST PLP supporters swarmed t he Wyndham resort yest erday morning turning the t ypically serene lobby into a bustling hive. Overnight bags littered the walls and seats as delegates and stalwart councillors from across the archipelago stepped into their a rena. B ooths lined the halls of t he ground and second floor of the Marlin tower, transforming the island hotel into a political bunker. C andidate booths ranged f rom the modest to the elaborate, seasoned candid ates opting for reserved t raditional methods such as p ins, flyers or booklets while some newcomers spared no expense, includ-i ng flat screen TVs, massive posters and even personalised bottled water. Suppor ters N o candidate was witho ut an extensive team of supporters, however C hristie paraphernalia r eigned supreme yesterday, w ith the campaign going so far as to hire attractive young women to sport cam-p aign shirts and distribute materials – the majority of them having no political interests whatsoever. The superficial aside, supporters are unanimous in their understanding that for t he party to move forward t here must be total cohes ion. The verdict on whether or not this can bea chieved is mixed. National general council member for Carmichael Judson Wilmott is confident that the party is mature e nough to move past elect ions and support new officials without backbiting or discord. “Leader has stated that the party is in transition,” said Mr Wilmott, “which means that the leader is m oving on the way out and p assing the party on to those persons that have been groomed and who have the experience to take the party forward and b ecome the type of leaders t hat will better the party a nd ultimately the country.” C ollege of the Bahamas s tudent and BJ Nottage s upporter Matysha Maura said: “Some people may be intimidated by some of them ore outspoken supporters, those shouting ‘Christie, Christie’ at any one who walks past. Fromw hat I can see I’m not really sure what will happen after the leader of the party e lection – whether everyo ne will really be able to c ome together. “There is a huge rift between BJ Nottage supporters and Christie sup-p orters and I don’t know whether or not they will be able to overcome that. “With the young PLPs I d on’t feel that there is much division – with us it feels like yes we’re voting for diff erent people but at the end o f the day we’re supporting w hoever is elected 100 per c ent. With the older PLPs I find that at times they can b e a bit over zealous.” It can be deduced, howe ver, that these “older PLPs” are the life and spirit of this year’s convention. T he ratio of 50+ supporters versus those under 45 was a staggering 5 to 1, withm ore than a few stalwarts who made the pilgrimage confined to wheelchairs. At the epicentre of conv ention spectacle was PLP celebrity Laura Williams. Never failing to entertain a nd inspire, this year she d emonstrated complete s upport for her candidates b y affixing a fan to her head beset with rhinestones and p ictures of the candidates on each side. T hough well-known for her attention-grabbing outfits and fearless personality, t his year Laura Williams acted on more than one occasion as a peacemaker between over zealous supp orters, insisting that it was e ach person’s right to vote f or whoever they wanted. Though it is uncertain what the next two days will bring for the party, the excitement and adrenaline rush so indicative of Bahamian conventions cann ot be ignored and it is this electrifying current that lends hope for a unified party. We coming here strong a nd we going out stronger,” s aid Ms Williams. “This ain’t no FNM and PLP in here, this is strictly PLP – our convention. “And when we finish with this Friday night, we forming the next government 2 010.” C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM (QWH :, )UH 0DPPR JUDP I RU /LIH SO HWLQJ W K LV HQWU\ RUP EHI RUHRY HPE HU Q GPD LOWR 'RF WRUV +RVS LWD 0DUNH WLQJ H SDUWP HQ % R[1 1 DVVDX %DKDPDV 1DP $GGU HVV 2 $ JH 7HO 0RELOH ( P DLO (PDLO WK FRVWRI D PPRJU DPV :RPH Z KR KDYH RW DG DPPRJU DPDW RFW RUV RV SLW DO r 0XVW SUHV HQW K LV FRXSRQ 9DO LG WKU RXJK H FHPEH &DO WR D NH \RXU S SRLQW PHQW WRG D\ The Bahamas Electricity CorporationTenderTheBahamasElectricityCorporation invites Tenders for the services described below: Bidders are required to collect packages from the &RUSRUDWLRQ$GPLQLVWUDWLRQIFH%OXH+LOOt7XFNHURDG Contact: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at telephone 302-1158 Tenders are to be addressed to: Mr. Kevin Basden General Manager Bahamas Electricity Corporation ([HFXWLYXFNHURDGV Nassau, Bahamas Deadline for delivery to BEC: on or before 30thOctober,2009 no later than 4:00 p.m. Submissions should be marked as follows: Tender No. 685/09 Fire Alarm and Detection System Installation Big Pond Complex, Nassau, Bahamas Tender No. 686/09 ),5($/$50$1''(7(&7,21<67(0,167$//$7,21 7+(2&.':(5$7,21 (/(87+(5$%$+$0$6 TheCorporationreservestherighttoacceptor reject any or all proposals. )RUDOOHQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWHQGHUVDQGVLWHYLVLWVFRQWDFW 0UKDHO:LOVRQD PLPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE THE BUZZ PLPCONVENTION PERRY CHRISTIE paraphernalia reigned supreme yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Wyndham transformed into a political bunker

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C M Y K C M Y K PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Mitchell decides against running for PLPleadership FRED Mitchell has turned down the opportunity to runf or the leadership of the PLP at the party’s national convention. Yesterday afternoon, it was announced that the Fox Hill MP will not join current l eader Perry Christie, vetera n MP Bernard Nottage and newcomer Paul Moss in vying for the post. A statement issued by Mr M itchell’s camp said he was n ominated to run “as a Fox Hill favourite son”, but declined. Mr Mitchell expects that t here may be further opport unities for leadership,” it s aid. According to someone inside the convention hall at t he time, the delegates issued a “collective gasp” when Mr Mitchell refused the nominat ion. A group of attendees then ran over to hug the MP. Mr Mitchell told the convention he felt that in raising the possibility of running, he h ad successfully championed the democratic rights of all P LPs who choose to stand for a ny office in the party. The MP said he will continue to work throughout the convention and beyond for an e ffective, fair and transparent e lectoral process, conducted with courtesy and respect. The statement said: “I want t o win the leadership of the PLP. I want to win the leadership of the country, and this continues to be the fact, but m y supporters and I have d etermined that such a move at this time will not now serve the long-term interests of thep arty. “By openly declaring my interest in the leadership of t he party and by demonstrati ng the support for my Agend a For Change, I am pleased with the galvanising effect t hat has become evident to everyone in the electoral process and the conduct of the party’s leadership. “My work with the Mission F und to support candidates for the general election will continue and I will continue with my work on the agenda for change, both of which are critical for the future success o f the PLP. I remind those in the FNM who would make mischief to mind their own business and council them,i nstead, to prepare to deal w ith a re-energised, rededicated and powerfully invigorated PLP. I again thank my coll eagues in the Parliamentary C aucus for our shared hard w ork and dedication and pledge my continued support. “I remind young Bahamia ns that the campaign for c hange was launched to demonstrate that there is s pace in the PLP for young people as the party works to engage the next generation of PLPs. “Finally, the party deserves a t this convention an open, fair, transparent and unclut t ered process as we organise o urselves to respond to the lessons of 2007. I will continue to be an integral part of that process, now and in the part y’s coming conventions, leadi ng to the next general election.” FREDMITCHELL D A VIS MAKESHIS‘BRAVEVOICE’ HEARD EDITIONS of ‘The Brave Voice’, a publication for PLP Deputy Leadership candidate Philip ‘Brave’ Davis on display at the Wyndham Nassau Resort ahead of the PLPConvention. Davis will contest the post with Obie Wilchcombe and Jerome Fitzgerald. Felip Major /Tribune staff P LPCONVENTIONCOVERAGE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in equal measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort makes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone opting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 TRIBUNE readers say they believe the governments hould create a registry of sex offenders. Those who took part in the latest tribune242.com poll said the creation of a l ist of persons convicted of sexual crimes would help t he government protect families from child molest ers. Sex offender registration is a system in place in a n umber of countries designed to allow officials t o keep track of the location and activities of sex offenders, including those w ho have completed criminal sentences. I n some countries like the US, the contents of the regi stry are available to the p ublic. Of those who voted on t he issue, 64 said a sex offenders registry would h elp keep children safe, while 16 argued that it would not. A number of readers also commented on the matter. Manifesto Victim” said: A register can only be meaningful if these crimes are reported, tried and convictions are made. In otherw ords, the register is the last part of the puzzle. A register will only let usk now who we are dealing with, it won’t stop pedophiles. A better tool tos top pedophiles would be proper sex education in the high schools which includes pedophile awareness. We need to empower the vict ims in cases like this . This would ensure more convict ions. Crime prevention begins with awareness!” A nother reader thought a registry would be a very good idea, “however famil ies who have this or any type of criminal in their f amily should also do the right thing and turn them in to the proper authorities. P rotecting/ covering up for these people is what causes t he crime rate in our country to continuously rise.” Sandra” said she does n ot agree that such a registry would be useful. “I d on't think the registry would work at this time b ecause most of the offenders are known to the victims eg mother's boyfriend, n eighbours and relatives. In most cases the crime is onlyr eported to exact some sort o f revenge for a relation ship gone wrong for other reasons besides the act itself which is such a shame. T he social decay in this country is so deep that it's difficult to know where tos tart to correct it.” B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Although road deaths on Grand Bahama are down t his year, Road Traffic and police o fficials are very concerned about t he high number of accidents. A senior police officer reported that more than 900 road accidents were recorded here between January 1 and October 20, as a result of which seven people died and 266s ustained minor injuries. During a press conference on Wednesday, Deputy Controller ofR oad Traffic Basil Rahming said he is particularly concerned about the use of cell phones by drivers. “It is impossible to be texting and p aying a degree of attention that is expected of a reasonable and prudent driver – it creates a very dangerous situation when driving,” he s aid. W hile the law against driving w ithout due care and attention technically bans texting while driving, Mr Rahming said the law doesn ot specifically prohibit drivers from using cell phones. It is up to the driver not to be d istracted. We have had instances i n the past where persons were killed in accidents because they allowed themselves to be distracted on the cell phone,” he said. “We are experiencing an unacceptably high rate of road accidents and we are very concerned, and g ive thanks to God that the fatality r ate is not higher at this time,” Mr R ahming said. The police also said they are concerned about persons driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs. I t was noted that an amendment t o the Road Traffic Act has been passed enabling officers to use b reathalysers to test suspected d runk drivers, and senior officers s aid they expect practice to begin soon – perhaps as early as next year. Police concerned about high number of GB traffic accidents S enior officer issues warning about the dangers of ‘texting’ while driving BASIL RAHMING said he is particularly concerned about the use of cell phones by drivers. Tribune poll suggests readers want registry of sex offenders T HEPOLL a ppeared on the tribune242.com website. MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace met with Jesus Silv a Fernandez, the Ambassador of Spain to the Bahamas to discuss tourism and emerging opportunities for co-operation. The men are pictured after the meeting, when Mr Van derpool-Wallace presented Mr Silva Fernandez with a souvenir coin collection and authentic Bahamian jewel case. B AHAMAS, SPAIN REPRESENTATIVES MEET ON TOURISM AS FATHER NORM AN LIGHTB OURNE’S 25th annivers ary of service approaches, the Anglican community has announced that a man of worth must be celebrated”. Plans are underway to celebrate his leadershipa nd legacy in a ‘Service of Celebration’ at Holy Cross Anglican Church tonight at 7pm and a galad inner scheduled for 7pm o n Friday at Sandals Resort. The Anglican community plans celebration for Father Nor man Lightbourne

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time to reach a decision. Senior Justice Allen told the jury: “We are very concerned, in the interest of justice, that it does not appear that there has been a com-m unication from the jury r oom. Justice must not only be done, but seen to be done.” Noting that the trial has lasted some five weeks, the judge said: “I am very very reluctant to discharge you but in the interest of justice, having heard the views of counsel, we are concerned. Itl eaves the impression that t here may have been a comm unication from the jury room. “I am not going to ask if there was or not.” The judge then ordered a r etrial for the accused. Outside the courtroom, Bridgewater was swarmed by family members and supporters who subsequently wenti nto chants of “Pleasant, P leasant” as they moved on t o Bank Lane. Bridgewater’s attorney Murrio Ducille told reporters: “We were ready for the verdict. I know that we wouldh ave won. Everything is posi tive. There has been absolutely no evidence to implicate this lady or Lightbourne for that matter.” Mr Ducille said he is prepared for a retrial but has noi dea when that would be. He said he would not comment on how the possible leak of the verdict came about. “There is no evidence as to where that came from,” he said. M r Travolta’s attorney M ichael Ossi told reporters he was happy with Senior Justice Allen’s decision to discharge the jury. When asked whether Mr Travolta would be prepared to return to testify at the retrial Mr Ossi said: “We are fullyc ooperating with the prosecution. “We are committed to seei ng this through, and we are committed to seeing justice served. Whatever the prose-c ution asks us to do is exactly w hat we will do. We would have liked to have seen a verdict rendered t oday but we would like to see justice served.” Attorney Carlson Shurland s aid: “Unfortunately the a nnouncement at the convention compromised the integrity of the jury room and after five weeks of serious advocacy it’s very disappointing. We are very confidentt hat at the end of the day our client will be vindicated.” Mr Shurland said he will s eek to have the retrial held in F reeport. Around 9.30pm last night, h undreds at the PLP conven tion were whipped into a frenzy by an overly enthusiastic Mr Forbes who prematurelye xclaimed: “Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! God is good PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God still reigns PLPs!” The convention exploded i n an impromptu dance to the s ong “Oh Happy Day” while t he jury was still deliberating. The session chairman mounting the podium after Mr Forbes’ speech had to apologise for whatever con-f usion the MP’s pronouncem ent caused. And late last night the PLP issued an official apology. A statement read: “Last evening in the course of an address at our annual national generalc onvention, it was announced that former Senator Pleasant Bridgewater had been acquitted. The announcement was incorrect. We give an unqualified apology. This was not intended to interfere with thea dministration of justice.” B efore being sent to deliberate yesterday, the jury in the John Travolta trial were told yesterday they had to be certain that ex-PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne agreedt ogether to extort money from the star. In her summing up, Senior J ustice Anita Allen told the nine-member jury a “threat” is simply an expression of ani ntention to do something, a nd if they believed there was n o threat, then the accused could not be found guilty of a ttempted extortion. Bridgewater and Lightbourne are accused ofa ttempting to extort, and cons piring to extort $25 million from American actor John Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of a threat. They deny the charges. Senior Justice Allen told t he jury they had to be certain the pair agreed together to extort money from Mr Trav olta, 55, stating they could n ot convict one on the con spiracy charge and acquit the o ther. On the abetment to extortion charge against Ms Bridgewater alone, SeniorJ ustice Allen told the jury they could not find Bridgewater guilty of both attempt e d extortion as well as abetm ent to extortion. She told them to consider the abetment charge against her only after considering the attempted extortion charge.S he told the jury that only if t hey found her not guilty on t he attempted extortion charge, could they consider t he charge of abetment to extortion. T he prosecution had alleged that after Jett Travol ta, 16, had died of a seizure on January 2, contact was made with certain individuals to convey a threat to Mr Tra-v olta, regarding the release to t he media of a refusal of treatment form bearing his signature. T he form releases medical personnel who attend to patients in their care of anyl iability if they are not taken t o the hospital. When Mr Travolta took the witness stand, he testified he had been informed that the release document he signed, and stories connected to thed ocument, which would imply that he was in some way culpable in the death of his son, would be released to the media if money was not paid. T he defence contended however that there had been n o threat or demand but rather a “negotiation” for the purchase of a documentw hich Mr Lightbourne had in his possession. Bridgewater contended that she had been acting on behalfo f Lightbourne in her capaci ty as an attorney. Senior Justice Allen told the jury that lawyers are not immune to the law if they doa ny act which amounts to a c riminal offence, whether on t heir own or in representing a client. Lightbourne’s defence said he had made no threat or demand and described him as an opportunist and not ane xtortionist. B oth accused made unsworn statements to the jury proclaiming their innocence and the judge said it was for the jury to determine whether they were of any evidential value and what weightt o be given to them. She also told them that even if they did not believe a word the accused had said, they still had to be satisfied on the evidence of the prosecution that they had committed theo ffences. She reminded the jury they had to accept her directions on the law, and that their role was to decide on the facts. She noted that the c ase is perhaps one of the most high profile ever in the B ahamas but told the jury t hey were not to have any regard to the media publicity. S he ordered them not to have any sympathy for the victim (Mr Travolta a ccused, and also told them they should not have any prej-u dice towards them. This case is not about poli tics. This is not about them a gainst us,” Senior Justice Allen said. S he told the jury they s hould not reject the evidence o f PLP senator Allyson Mayn ard Gibson and Mr Travolta’s attorney Michael McDermott on the basis that they had assisted the police. S he told the jury that there w as nothing in the law that prohibited such actions. T he prosecution had brought video and audio taped conversations between McDermott and the accused in a covert operation as evidence in the trial. The defence claimed that Mr Travolta had given birtht o extortion and was an untruthful witness. Senior Justice Allen told t he jury that the accused could be found guilty by a two thirds majority of 6-3 or 9-0. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NOTICEB.E.C.(Bahamas Electricity Corporation) plan to construct and operate Abaco’s new power plant in the Wilsons City/Buzzard Hill area. We would like to send a strong message to our Government. You are urged to attend and participate in a peaceful, lawful public demonstration to be held in downtown Marsh Harbour, Abaco, on Friday, October 23rd, between 10:00 am and Noon.http:/ /www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKk2DYYcSpu For further information please contact Stafford Patterson at 242-366-0023 office 242-577-0273 cell 242-366-0554 home info@splug@abacoinet.comPaid Advertisement FROM page one PLP outburst forces Travolta case retrial TARINOLIGHTBOURNE

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B y LARRYSMITH L et the punishment be equal with the offence. -Cicero "In the end, it is the poor who a re selected to die." Sister Helen Prejean A T ACollege of the Bahamas seminar recently, I sat next to a firstyear law student who had a d egree in criminal justice from an American college. When asked what should be done to address crime, the first wordout of her mouth was "hanging". A nd it appears that most p reachers are also firmly in favour of the death penalty, although it flies in the face of everything written in the New Testament. Indeed, some would have no objection to turning the clock back centuries and making executions into a public spectacle. " Criminals now have no fear of the law and no regard for h uman life, and we can no l onger remain philosophical about sending the strongest message to the criminal element in our society," said the c hairman of the National Advisory Council on Crime, Bisho p Simeon Hall, recently. "We n eed to hang a few." But there are strong arguments that the death penalty in and of itself does not deter c rime. Many experts believe s uch a punishment is only effective if it is applied with certaint y and without delay. And the gross inefficiency of our judic ial system blunts any perceived c onnection between the crime a nd the penalty. A ccording to one report that examined capital punishment in Trinidad and Tobago: "The evidence suggests that the prob lem faced by law enforcement is t o increase the certainty of pun ishment. The occasional and long delayed mandatory sent ence to death is very unlikely to add weight to the deterrent effectiveness of a poorly-e nforced criminal law." T his report concluded that "the problem of high and esca lating lethal violence in T rinidad and Tobago cannot be ‘fixed’ by executing occasionally a tiny fraction of those w ho commit murder. The solu tion must lie in tackling the eco nomic and social conditions that have given rise to the problem, a nd the cultural factors that support the use of deadly force as a means of resolving dis-p utes". Much the same could be said here, where the political class is probably more sophisticated t han the wider public on the hanging issue. For example, Hubert Ingraham and PerryC hristie have found it politic to support hanging during periods of public outcry against crime, but many suspect they are not expressing their true feelings. The official position is that capital punishment is the law of the land, and the law will be allowed to take its course. But the argument is made by some that this is double-speak. According to defence lawyer Wayne Munroe: "If the government was serious it would know what is open to litigation on the death penalty and move to engage these points. "If you want to hang, you have to take positive steps to limit appeals. You need legislation prescribing uniform sen tencing, as was recommended by the 1999 criminal justice task force, but the politicians don't have the will to do it. They are just stringing the public along." In 2006, FNM cabinet minister Carl Bethel said much the same thing when he was in opposition, noting that if then Prime Minister Perry Christie wanted capital punishment (as Mr Christie claimed he did) "he would have to bring some lawsto parliament". Presumably that is still the case, but we don't see any such laws emanating from the Ingraham government either. There were 17 murderers on death row in 2006, when the Privy Council abolished the mandatory death sentence inthe Bahamas. This meant that every prisoner had to be re-sentenced. But since then only fourcases have been reviewed, according to National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest, and they have all been appealed, so there will be no hangings anytime soon. "We will follow (the Privy Council rulings) that the death sentence is not mandatory and that there has to be a sentencing hearing for all those who were sentenced to death witho ut such a hearing," Tunquest t old me. "During the re-sentencing, the judges wil be looking at the cases again, as well as the length of time already served, and they are passing a variety of different sentences. T here is no need to change the l aws in my view." According to Turnquest: "The four cases that have had hearings where the death penalty has been handed down againa re all now under appeal and therefore the government can-n ot carry out the death sentence. Every citizen is entitled to exhaust all avenues of appeal. Once the appeal at anyl evel is dismissed the government can proceed. In some instances, if the government doesn't proceed, the convict would not move forward with appeals to the next level." F ifty men have been hanged h ere since 1929. Five under the previous Ingraham administration; 13 under the Pindling gov-e rnment; and the remainder between 1929 and 1967. The last man to be hanged was D avid Mitchell, in January 2 000. Another man was scheduled for execution at the same time, but he committed suicidef irst. Our annual murder rate last year was 21 per 100,000 in thes ame league as Russia. And t here have been about a thousand murders in the Bahamas since 1990, not including a ttempted killings or causing grievous harm. A year ago, former police prosecutor KeithB ell said the justice system itself was the biggest obstacle to crime reduction, and the only way to address it was for politi-c ians of all parties to agree on a priority agenda for legal reform. "One third of accused mur d erers are out on bail, including those accused of up to 10 mur ders," Bell said. "The statistics a nd reports are all there. We k now what is happening. The only question is who is going to be next. Why are we still charging people with murder when we know that capital pun ishment cannot be applied? We s hould amend the law to provide for degrees of killing to make it easier to convict, and implement a system of plea bar gaining." Many people argue that there needs to be clarity as fara s the death penalty is concerned, and few would deny that comprehensive legalr eforms to address our sky rocketing crime rate are long overdue. In fact, they have been prescribed by any number of e xperts and consultative bod ies since at least the 1990s. But in my view, we should be sceptical about the death penalty for two main reasons the certainty of miscarriages of justice, and the historical use of executions by those in power for the suppression of dissent. Leaders of slave and peasant revolts present important examples in this regard. And as Amnesty International notes, capital punishment is “the ultimate, irreversible denial of human rights”. Ever since the 7th century BC, when Greece’s Draconian legal code made death the only penalty for every crime, the world has been moving away from capital punishment. More than a hundred countries have abolished the death penalty in law or in practice the United States and Japan being the only developed democracies that still carry out judicial killings. Until the late 19th century, the “long drop” (as hanging was known) was the penalty for hundreds of crimes including shoplifting, poaching and “being in the company of gypsies”. But these days, the death penalty is reserved for the most serious offences – like aggravated murder or treason and capital punishment is viewed by most countries as an exception to be accompanied by stringent safeguards. Perhaps the best (or worst argument against the death penalty is the certainty that innocent people will be execut ed, and there is no possible way of compensating them for this miscarriage of justice. In fact, one of the last people hanged in Britain was a mentally-handicapped teenager who was later awarded a posthumous pardon. In America, most of those executed could not afford a tri al lawyer. And studies have also shown the death penalty to be r acially biased. For example, in F lorida, experts say a black man convicted of killing a white man is five times more likely to receive a death sentence than a white man convicted of killing another white man. A study of hundreds of crimi nal cases in which the convicted person was exonerated suggests there are thousands of innocent people in American prisons today. And the leadingc auses of wrongful convictions for murder were false confes-s ions and perjury by co-defendants, informants, police officers or forensic scientists. Despite the clear risk that t his could happen to any of us at any time, most Bahamians and other CARICOM nationals share a biblical attachment to execution as a response to violent crime. But judges have b een chipping away at the pract ice for years. By most accounts it is highly unlikely that a handful of exe-c utions following years of delay will have any real effect, part icularly on the people whom w e would most like to be d eterred like serial killers, sadistic rapists and drugs barons. And these particular criminals are the least likely to be executed anyway. The serialk illers will be found insane and t he drug barons will use any means to avoid conviction, including witness intimidation. So, if we are really serious in our desire to reduce crime through harsher punishments alone, we must be prepared toe xecute every criminal who commits a capital crime irrespective of their sex, age (above the legal minimum) alleged mental state or background. Defences and appeals must be l imited by statute, and there c an be no reprieves. Executions must be carried out without delay and with sufficient publicity to get the message across to other similarly minded people. For capital punishment to really reduce crime, everyone of us must realise that we will personally and without d oubt be put to death if we commit particular crimes, and t hat there can be absolutely no h ope of reprieve. There is also the argument that if we continue to do little or nothing about persistent juven ile offenders, and then apply the death penalty consistently, w e may be consigning many to t heir death at the age of 18, havi ng never previously given them any discipline whatsoever. In this scenario, execution will be the first and last taste of discip line a person gets in our socie ty. T he 2006 Privy Council ruli ng that abolished the mandatory death sentence brought the B ahamas in line with evolving w orld standards. The United N ations says that a mandatory d eath penalty, which precludes t he possibility of a lesser sent ence regardless of the circumstances, is inconsistent with the prohibition of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. B ut many still believe there is n o substitute for the best defence. Capital punishment not only forever bars murderers from killing again, it offers some retribution for their terrible crimes. It would also save money that could, perhaps, bes pent on better things than keeping killers in prison. According to Lord Denning, one of the most celebrated British judges of the 20th century: “It is a mistake to conside r the objects of punishments as b eing a deterrent or reformative or preventive and nothing else. The truth is that some crimes are so outrageous that society insists on adequate punishment, because the wrongdoer deserves it, irrespective of whether it is a deterrent or not." I f that is the case, it is incumbent upon our leaders to speak c learly on this issue and then d o what is necessary to achieve the desired outcome. What do you think? S end comments to larry@tribunemedia.net O r visit www.bahamapundit.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Bahamas and the death penalty

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Island ready to export 1 million cases of rum to post-embargo US HAVANA Cuba is ready to ship 1 million cases of rum to America if Washington eases its 47-year-old embargo, but would hold off exporting its flagship Havana Club brand because of U.S. trademark battles, one of the island's top rum executives said Wednesday. U.S. trade sanctions have costC uba's rum industry $95 million annually in lost sales and additional spending to import production materials including glass bottles and machinery from Europe instead of from its neighbor to the north, said Juan Gonzalez, vice president ofC uba Ron SA, the communist state's rum production monopoly. Cuban rums can't be sold in the United States, but they are available in more than 120 countries, Gonzalez said, noting that the company sold 4m illion cases in 2008. Of that, Havana Club counts for all but about half a million cases. The global financial crisis should cut into sales this year, but Cuba still hopes sell 5 million cases a year by 2013, Gonzalez said. The government does not release figures on revenue. Cuba's domestic rum market is its top customer, fol-l owed by Spain, France, Greece, Chile and Russia. Gonzalez said the United States accounts for 40 percent of the global rum market. US man accused of killing wife on scuba trip describes rescue efforts TORTOLA, British Virgin Islands A Rhode Island man accused of drowning his wife during a 1999 scuba-diving trip choked back emotions as he described the deadly dive in court Wednesday, saying he cried over her lifeless body after his efforts to save her failed. D avid Swain, 53, who faces a maximum penalt y of life in prison if convicted, testified that he had "no idea" how Shelly Tyre drowned during the dive in British Virgin Islands waters. He said they descended together and then parted ways ata shipwreck. After he surfaced, he heard another diver shouting for help and clutching his wife's body. Swain, who had worked as an emergency medical technician for years before opening a dive shop in Rhode Island, helped lift Tyre onto a dinghy, where he led rescue efforts including CPR. The 1999 drowning was initially ruled an accident. But authorities in the British Virgin Islands later charged Swain with murder after a 2006 civil trial in his home state found him responsible. He was extradited to Tortola the following year and has been in jail here since. P rosecutors allege Swain killed his 46-yearold wife so he could pursue a romance with a nother woman, and because the couple's prenuptial agreement denied him money if they divorced. Experts have testified that they believe Swain wrestled Tyre from behind, tore off her mask and shut off her air supply. Swain has always maintained his innocence a nd his defense lawyers have said they will show the drowning was a "tragic accident." Bermuda resort voted 'world top 500' hotel to partially close amid crisis BERMUDA A posh Bermuda resort named one of the world's top 500 hotels this year will close its century-old main building because the economic crisis has sapped tourism to the island. Elbow Beach Hotel will lay off about 160 employees by the end of November as it shutters 131 rooms and outsources food and beverage services, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group spokeswoman Danielle DeVoe said Wednesday. " It's fair to say that current business levels are challenging globally," she said. The hotel's 1908 pastel-yellow building will r emain closed for several years. Hotel officials h ope to renovate it during that time, although no d etails have been specified, DeVoe said. Elbow Beach will still operate 98 luxury suites and cottages, said Frank Stocek, the hotel's gen eral manager. The resort made its debut on Travel + Leisure magazine's list of the world's top 5 00 hotels this year. Mandarin Oriental has managed it since 2000. Rates range from $300 to more than $800 a night. Bermuda, a British territory several hundred miles northeast of Florida, has seen a nearly 20 percent drop in tourists through June, compared to the same period last year, according to the Caribbean Tourism Organization. AP B RIEFSFROM C A RIBBEANAND B E RMUDA

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CORPORATE partners continue to support the “Breathe Easy Campaign” benefitting the Princess Margaret Hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Earmarked for high risk, premature, low birth-weight, or critically ill newborns, the “Breathe Easy Campaign” is a nationwide fund-raiser that will provide ventilators designed to breathe for a newborn who is physically unable to do so. The donated v entilators will support breathing until the infant's respiratory efforts are sufficient. The latest community citi zens to support the cause, Diamonds International employees, made a collection in support of the Breathe Easy Campaign and Diamonds International B ahamas matched the funds for a total cheque presentation in the amount of $2,000. Diamonds International mar keting manager Renea Knowles said: "The entire team at Diamonds International felt that it was important to lend supportto such a worthy cause. We are e ncouraging other organisations to become involved and do their part in helping the programme to reach their goal.” Long-standing Bahamian bank and community partner Royal Bank of Canada was also presented a cheque to the Breathe Easy Campaign in thea mount of $2,000. Hope Sealy of the RBC Financial Group said: "We are delighted to continue our tradi tion of contributing to the Bahamas; the donation to the Breathe Easy Campaign is another way for RBC to give back to the community in a tangible way that will have a lifesaving impact for the premature babies at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Princess Margaret Hospital." In addition to the larger corporate sponsors, the first French Bakery in the Bahamas, Mandy's French Bakery, donated $500 to the campaign. Owner Mandy Yuen said: "We are proud to be supporters of the effort to improve health care in the Bahamas and the Bahamian community." Organised by the Tribune Media Group, the Princess Margaret Hospital, Tile King, Doctors Hospital, Bahamas Realty, and the Rotary Club of East Nassau, to date the campaign has topped the halfway mark with approximately $166,935 being raised, the goal being $300,000. The first two ventilators have already arrived at the Princess Margaret Hospital. Persons interested in making a donation towards the campaign should contact the Tribune Media Group, Doctors Hospi tal or the Tile King, or drop off a check made payable to the “Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation", Breathe Easy Campaign. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Corporate donations made to ‘Breathe Easy’ Campaign DIAMONDS INTERNATIONAL DONATION :Pictured from left to right: Adi Kaniel, DI representative; Kevin Hanna, DI representative; Dr F Montero, Neonatal Department, PMH; Renee Knowles, DI representative;Dr Steve Lochan, Neonatal Department, PMH; Patsy Morris, PMH; Jennifer Sands, PMH; Thelma Rolle, P MH Foundation; Michele Rassin, Doctors Hospital RBCDONATION: Pictured from left to right: Neonatal Nurses from PMH; Hope Sealy, RBC; Michele Rassin and Joanne Lowe from the Rotary Club of East Nassau MANDY'S FRENCH BAKERY DONATION: Pictured from left to right: Mandy Yuen, Mandy's French Bakery and Michele Rassin, president of Rotary Club of East Nassau

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secure a better chance of victory, there are reports from the convention floor that the respective candidates have formed alliances with deputy leadership cand idates and even those in t he race for chairman. Some stalwarts suggest M r Christie had teamed up w ith PLP MP Philip ‘Brave’ D avis and former MP Bradley Roberts, while others say the former primem inister has thrown his support behind West End and B imini MP Obie Wilchcombe and Glenys HannaM artin. D r Nottage is receiving s ignificant support from the party’s delegates who speculate that he might bei nclined to support Mr Davis or even Senator Jerome Fitzgerald for deputy. Whoever wins must be prepared to fight for the hearts and minds of undec ided voters, senior party m embers say. We need to fight for change in this party,” said o ne stalwart last night. “The P LP as a whole needs to realise that we have to fight for those undecided / swing voters out there who arel ooking to us to mature as an organisation and use this o pportunity to make some concrete developments w ithin our organisation. “We don’t need to appeal o r appease our base. They will be voting PLP anyhow. It is the young voter – the y oung educated voter who will decide the way this next e lection will swing.” PLP delegate Laurence Harrison said that MrC hristie and Mr Wilchcombe are the right men for t he job. “Mr Christie is a good man. He has done well and I feel that he deserves a chance. He said he is in transition with the party which means that Mr Wilch c ombe will be that man who S ir Lynden said he was training to one day lead this party into the next genera t ion.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM QFSOJHIU QMVTUBYBOE HSBUVJUJFT"TLBCPVUPVS TQFDJBM#BIBNJBO SPPNSBUFTGSPN5SFBUUIFGBNJMZUPVOEBZ#SVODI BUIFSBUPO/BTTBV#FBDIFTPSU &WFSZVOEBZr/PPOUPQN #JNJOJ.BSLFU'SFFBEVMUTDIJMESFODIJMESFO %PXO)PNFFE#FBOTBOEJDF #BIBNJBOUZMF$IFFTZ .BDBSPOJBOE$IFFTF 4QBOJTIFMMT'SJFE'JTI'JMMFU XJUIQJDZBSUBSBVDF $PODI$IPXEFS 1FBSMTPGUIF#BIBNJBO 4FB(SJMMFE.BIJ.BIJ #BIBNJBO'SJFE$IJDLFO $PODI'SJFEJDF 1JOFBQQMFQTJEF%PXO$BLF (VBWB%VGG #SVODIJODMVEFTPOFHMBTTPGXJOFPSDJEFS 'PSIPUFMSFTFSWBUPODPNOBTTBVXPPE)PUFMTFTPSUTPSMEXJEFr*OD"MMJHIUTFTFS4IFSBUPOBOEJUTMPHPBSFUIFUSBEFNBSLTPG4UBSXPPE)PUFMT 3FTPSUT8PSMEXJEFr*ODrPSJUTBGGJMJBUFT F ROM page one RAWEMOTIONSAND F RAYEDNERVES T HE convention floor was reportedly a scene of raw emotions and frayed nerves yesterday. T RIBUNE s ources s aid that among the m any anxious politicians was party leader Perry Christie, who was spied off to one side whispering ani-m atedly with party c hairman Glenys Hanna-Martin. Mrs Hanna-Martin had reportedly pulled Mr Christie aside to ask why he broughtb ack former chairman B radley Roberts to run against her. It is not known what Mr Christie said, but he reportedly seemed flustered and extreme-l y agitated, using vigorous body language and g estures. Whatever the party leader communicated reportedly upset the chairman, who some said had tears in her eyes after the conver s ation. LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE BERNARD NOTTAGE "I THINKthe nominating process was exciting. I think it was good for the democracy of the party seeing that there were so many people nominating for so many positions. This suggests that the party is alive and well and that peoplea re enthused by the prospects of serving the people through t he PLP and hopefully one day serving the nation again." "I think my chances are as good anybody else who is in the race. I think there is an undercurrent in the convention for change. I think people want things done differently even those who have had an opportunity to serve currentlya re promising that they will change so obviously they have g otten the message from the electorate so we just have to w ait and see." PLP leadership is a three horse race P LPLEADER P erry Christie at the convention last night. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the ar ea or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 P AGE18 Improvement in squash skills TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM DUE to the heavy winds, there was no sailing competition yesterday in Montagu Bay as the 2009 Sunfish World Championship took a break. However, the competition will pick back up today with a full slate of action. Going into day three of the champi onships, American David M. Loring leads the way with s total of 13.8 points. Loring won the fifth and last race contested on Tuesday. Not too far behind in second place is M arx Chirinos of Venezuela with 14.0. American Paul-Jon Patin rounds out the top three with 17.0. Three-time champion Donnie Mart inborough tops the list of Bahamians as he sit in 14th place with 96.0. Charles K elly is the next Bahamian in 20th place with 112.0. n SEE PAGE 16 FOR PHOTOS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS Heavy winds force suspension of Sunfish World Championship THE Bahamas Judo Federation will be hosting the Bahamas Judo Fall Classic on Saturday October 24 at Xaviers Lower School from 5pm to 8 pm. This tournament promises to be very exciting as the overall level of Judo in the country has grown exponentially since the beginning of the year. Persons from Judo in Abaco will also be in attendance. Also present will be the Special Olympics athletes who will compete in regular divisions. "We are looking forward toan excellent event," Says David Rahming, Chief Instructor of the Fox Hill Club and Special Olympians. Competing in the tournament will be a number of students from the College of the Bahamas as well as the regular Judo clubs. Judo is an Olympic combat sport where the match is determined by throwing an individual with force and control to his or her back and pinning them for 25 seconds. Attending will also be Cynthia Rahming and Taryn Butler, two top female athletes with international credentials. "There will be some really tough matches," says Phil Kemp, BJF Treasurer. " We want to use this event to get things back into full swing for the academic year. We have seen that the Bahamian athletes need more match time." Spectator Tickets will be on sale at the door for $10 per person. Anyone interested in Judo may contact the Bahamas Judo Federation at 364-6773. Bahamas Fall Judo Classic set for Saturday October 24 MARTINBOROUGHLEADS BAHAMIANCHARGE LEADINGBAHAMIAN: Donny Martinborough is now the number one Bahamian boat. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net W HAT started out as a defensive battle turned i nto a massacre as Our Lady’s Blue Flames o utlasted the visiting St. Thomas More Sparks 39-19. The Blue Flames, the league’s dormant team last year with just one victory on their ledger, stunned the Sparks, last year’s runners-up, as the Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools basketball league continued. “I think it’s going to be a very competive season,” said R ohan Parkes, coach of Our Lady’s. “I watched a couple of teams played and I think they’re all going to be very tough.” Parkes, however, could put in an agument for his Blue Flames after they pulled away from a close 15-13 deficit at the end of the third and turned it into a blowout as they went on a couple of scoring sprees, starting with a 6-0 run for a 23-17 lead in the fourth. O ur Lady’s would go on another 8-1 spurt that extended their lead to 31-18 and they controlled all facet of the game as they cruised to an easy victory. D’Angelo Mackey, who was unstoppable as he went on his rampage, finished with a game high 24 points as he took over in the fourth quarter, scoring two and three baskets at will. Mackey said he was pleased with their team effort. “We passed the ball and we laid up good,” said Mackey, not trying to take all of the spotlight. “I felt good about the way we played. We did very good.” The 10-year-old fifth grader said this was just an indication of what to expect this year from the Blue Flames, who worked very hard to get ready for this year’s season. Charles Cooper also had a big game defensively for Our Lady’s, who eventually fouled out late in the fourth quarter after he contributed seven points. Tereek Munroe added six points. Blue Flames too hot for the Sparks Chrisnell and Myriel Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools basketball league Defensive battle turns into 39-19 hammering NATIONALCHAMPION Cynthia Rahming SEE page 18 P H O T O S : W o o d l e y C a r r o l l R o b e r t D u n k l e y THE New Providence Public Primary Schools kicked off its calender year by hosting its soccer competition at the College of the Bahamas playing field. The tournament was completed yesterday with Yellow Elder and Adalaide being crowned as the girls and boys champions respectively. In the girls championship, Yellow Elder, coached by Cardinal Moncur, defeated Garvin Tynes to complete the season with a perfect 6-0 win-loss. Robyn Port was named the most valuable player. Garvin Tynes fnished with a 5-1 record. Adalaide was third at 4-2, while Sadie Curtis was fourth at 3-3. A total of 17 schools participated in the division. On the boys side, Adalaide blanked Centreville 2-0 to win the title. They finished with a 6-0 record and surprisingly didn’t allow any team to score goal. Centreville ended up in second at 5-1, while Garvin Tynes was third at 4-2. A total of 24 teams participated in the division. League public relations officer Frank Johnson said the league was a very competitive one and they were very pleased with the help they got from some of the coaches and officials in the Bahamas Football Association. Johnson said they are also looking forward to the rest of the calender year. During the third week of November, Johnson said they intend to start basketball at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Soccer competition held at College of Bahamas field THENEWPROVIDENCEPUBLICPRIMARYSCHOOLS

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PRELIMINARY 2009 SUNFISHWORLDSRESULTS OVERALL Sailed:5, Discards:0, To count:5, Entries:72, Scoring system:Appendix A Rank Nat SailNo Helm R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 Total Nett 1st USA 3963 David M. Loring 3.0 2.8 rdga5.0 2.0 1.0 13.8 13.8 2nd Venezuela 3910 Marx Chirinos 2.0 3.0 1.0 6.0 2.0 14.0 14.0 3rd USA 3950 Paul-Jon Patin 1.0 2.0 6.0 5.0 3.0 17.0 17.0 4th Curacao 3920 Ard Van Aanholt 5.0 1.0 7.0 4.0 5.0 22.0 22.0 5th USA 3948 David Mendelblatt 8.0 5.0 2.0 3.0 9.0 27.0 27.0 6th Guatemala 3965 Juan Jose Delgdo Hurtado 6.0 8.0 3.0 1.0 11.0 29.0 29.0 7th US Virgin Isls 3917 Peter Stanton 4.0 6.0 8.0 7.0 7.0 32.0 32.0 8th Bermuda 3957 Malcolm Smith 9.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 8.0 33.0 33.0 9th Holland 3922 Mathieu De By 7.0 7.0 25.0 10.0 4.0 53.0 53.0 10th Curacao 3925 Cor Van Aanholt 13.0 9.0 9.0 26.0 6.0 63.0 63.0 11th Venezuela 3906 Jose Gutierrez 12.0 13.0 20.0 13.0 12.0 70.0 70.0 12th USA 3967 H.N. "Hank" Saurage IV 11.0 10.0 17.0 32.0 15.0 85.0 85.0 13th USA 3952 Greg Gust 15.0 16.0 12.0 31.0 14.0 88.0 88.0 14th Bahamas 3955 Donald Martinborough 19.0 21.0 23.0 12.0 21.0 96.0 96.0 15th USA 3970 Chip Clifton 20.0 22.0 32.0 11.0 16.0 101.0 101.0 16th USA 3951 Rich Chapman 14.0 17.0 27.0 16.0 28.0 102.0 102.0 17th USA 3972 Seth Siegler 20.7rdga20.7 rdga 14.0 30.0 18.0 103.4 103.4 18th Peru 3903 Guillermo Cappelleti 22.0 12.0 15.0 40.0 20.0 109.0 109.0 19th Curacao 3942 Jurgen Schneider 10.0 18.0 18.0 19.0 46.0 zfp 111.0 111.0 20th Bahamas 3935 Charles Kelly 18.0 20.0 24.0 23.0 27.0 112.0 112.0 21st USA 3936 Josh Kerst 16.0 30.0 19.0 14.0 35.0 114.0 114.0 22nd Curacao 3923 Philipine Van Aanholt 33.0 36.0 10.0 20.0 17.0 116.0 116.0 23rd USA 3912 Eric Woodman 32.0 26.0 26.0 9.0 26.0 119.0 119.0 24th Curacao 3943 Mark Simmeren 39.0 15.0 11.0 37.0 22.0 124.0 124.0 25th Guatemala 3966 Andrea Denisse Aldana Bennett 35.0 19.0 44.0 18.0 13.0 129.0 129.0 26th Bahamas 3901 William (Christopher34.0 38.0 16.0 21.0 32.0 141.0 141.0 27th Venezuela 3939 Luis T. Nunez 29.3rdga29.3 rdga 13.0 33.0 42.0 146.6 146.6 28th Curacao 3941 Niek Kort 17.0 14.0 30.0 48.0 39.0 148.0 148.0 29th Holland 3929 Paul Van Alphen 21.0 11.0 29.0 60.0 34.0 155.0 155.0 30th Bonaire 3902 Sipke Stapert 26.0 73.0 dnf34.0 17.0 10.0 160.0 160.0 31st USA 3947 Chad Coberly 31.0 25.0 33.0 28.0 44.0 zfp 161.0 161.0 32nd USA 3971 William Betts III 23.0 32.0 22.0 54.0 30.5 161.5 161.5 33rd Bahamas 3934 Fernando De Cardenas 2 8.0 23.0 39.0 29.0 43.0 162.0 162.0 34th Bahamas 3931 Gavin McKinney 38.0 39.0 31.0 15.0 41.0 164.0 164.0 35th Bahamas 3954 Jeffrey Gale 37.0 28.0 36.0 39.0 25.0 165.0 165.0 36th Holland 3930 Piet Bankersen 25.0 34.0 4 2.0 22.0 44.0 167.0 167.0 37th USA 3962 Steven W. Evans 36.0 33.0 45.0 25.0 29.0 168.0 168.0 38th Bahamas 3964 Andrew Wilhoyte 30.0 27.0 21.0 50.0 51.0 179.0 179.0 39th USA 3927 Ravi Subramanian 24.0 41.0 41.0 49.0 24.0 179.0 179.0 40th USA 3946 Daniel Norton 49.0 37.0 37.0 41.0 19.0 183.0 183.0 41st USA 3911 Bill F. Brainiforte 29.0 73.0 dns28.0 35.0 23.0 188.0 188.0 4 2nd Bahamas 3932 James Lowe 48.0 43.0 40.0 24.0 40.0 195.0 195.0 43rd B ahamas 3968 George Damianos 27.0 29.0 43.0 52.0 54.0 205.0 205.0 44th Bahamas 3940 Peter-Bruce Wassitsch 41.0 35.0 38.0 38.0 57.0 209.0 209.0 45th Venezuela 3 907 Francisco Almon 42.0 51.0 35.0 27.0 58.0 213.0 213.0 46th USA 3956 John A. Butine 44.0 42.0 49.0 34.0 47.0 216.0 216.0 47th USA 3961 Tony Collins 53.0 24.0 60.0 36.0 56.0 229.0 229.0 48th Bahamas 3944 Ted O'Brien 47.0 45.0 54.0 45.0 45.0 236.0 236.0 4 9th Curacao 3918 Alex Roose 40.0 54.0 59.0 51.0 46.0 250.0 250.0 50th USA 3969 Charles Clifton 54.0 48.0 47.0 56.0 48.0 253.0 253.0 51st Venezuela 3909 Roberto Kazibutowski 58.0 40.0 46.0 47.0 64.0 255.0 255.0 52nd USA 3914 Brent Evans 59.0 50.0 50.0 46.0 51.0 zfp 256.0 256.0 53rd Bahamas 3904 Donico Brown 52.0 73.0 dnf53.0 42.0 37.0 257.0 257.0 54th Bahamas 3919 Michael Holowesko 51.0 58.0 55.0 44.0 49.0 257.0 257.0 55th USA 3908 Lee Montes 50.0 53.0 48.0 55.0 52.0 258.0 258.0 56th Ireland 3913 Matthew McCoy45.0 57.0 58.0 64.0 36.0 260.0 260.0 57th Ireland 3921 Lee McCoy 52.3rdga46.0 51.0 57.0 55.0 261.3 261.3 58th USA 3915 David (DJ43.0 56.0 56.0 61.0 50.0 266.0 266.0 59th USA 3926 Ed Hill 55.0 31.0 52.0 63.0 67.0 268.0 268.0 60th Peurto Rico 3958 Fernando I Monllor 56.0 47.0 61.0 53.0 63.0 280.0 280.0 61st USA 3953 Marshall Woodson 60.0 49.0 57.0 59.0 59.0 284.0 284.0 62nd Bahamas 3937 Dwayne Wallas 57.0 55.0 62.0 58.0 61.0 293.0 293.0 63rd USA 3938 Lee Creekmore 73.0dnf73.0 dnc 64.0 43.0 53.0 306.0 306.0 64th Bahamas 3900 Brent (BJ 63.0 60.0 65.0 62.0 62.0 312.0 312.0 65th Bahamas 3933 Lori Lowe 65.0 52.0 69.0 65.0 65.0 316.0 316.0 66th USA 3949 Anne Cottrell Patin 62.0 59.0 63.0 67.0 68.0 319.0 319.0 67th USA 3960 Nicky Einthoven 66.0 61.0 71.0 68.0 60.0 326.0 326.0 68th Venezuela 3924 Nieves Barreda 64.0 62.0 70.0 66.0 66.0 328.0 328.0 69th Austria 3916 Pedro Wassitsch61.0 73.0 dnf66.0 73.0 dns 73.0 dns 346.0 346.0 70th Holland 3928 Marie-Christine Breeveld 73.0 dnf 73.0 dnc 68.0 69.0 69.0 352.0 352.0 71st Canada 3959 Alyson Myers 73.0 dnf 73.0 dnc 72.0 70.0 70.0 358.0 358.0 72nd USA 3905 David McCary 73.0 dnc73.0 dnc 67.0 73.0 dnf 73.0 dns 359.0 359.0 SCORING CODES USED Code Description Points DNC Did not come to the starting area 73 DNF Started but did not finish 73 DNS Came to the start area but did not start 73 RDGaRedress average points for all races except the race in question Varies ZFP 20% penalty under rule 30.2 Varies 2009SUNFISHWORLDCHAMPIONSHIP R o b e r t D u n k l e y

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 17 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Y O U would think that you're getting ready for a political campaign the way Michael 'Mike' Sands and his slateo f officers have officially launched their quest to contest the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations' election of officers. O n Wednesday as they g athered in front of the construction site for the new national stadium, Sands and his Visionary team as they call themselves presented their platform slogand ubbed: "Share the Vision." The vision, as they've outl ined it, states: " To improve our standing in the World by providing v isionary leadership through experience, with integrity, courage, commitment,e mpathy, humility and conf idence, while serving athletes, coaches, officials and a ll stakeholders throughout the length and breadth of the Bahamas." T rack and field, by far, is the most highly recognized sport for the Bahamas on the international scene, based on the tremendousp erformance of our athletes and even administrators, led by PaulineD avisThomps on, who sits on theb oard of the IAAF Council. A s such, the leaders hip of the sport has to be one t hat is very visible and respected. So the elections coming up on November 21 will be a very critical one for theB AAA. Right now there are two persons vying for leader. Sands will take on Curt 'Mr. H' Hollingsworth, whos erved as vice president during Sands' last tenure in office before he was oustedo ut by a 'vote of no confidence.' T he two have been inseparable before the turmoil that the association experi-e nced about two years ago and whatever the outcome of the elections, I think it will be incumbent on both men to get back to that lev el because I think they both have a contribution to make i n the way forward for the association. The new executive board s hould be in office by the time the new stadium is completed by the Chinese Government and by the time the next OlympicG ames roll around in 2012 in London, England. While Hollingsworth has i ndicated that he prefer not to get into a political foray in t he media, Sands knows quite well that any and all p ublicity generated will go a long way in getting his message across. I n their platform, Sands and his executive team have a lso made some promises that they hope that they should be accountable for,i f elected to office. Among the list are: Establishment of a National Training Center with proper weights, equip-m ent and implements. Obtain increased funding from government, partners and other sources based on track and field's perfor-m ance. Provide cash incentives to clubs and coaches forh ome based student-athletes. Provide training and certification opportunities for all coaches, especially at thep rimary and high school levels. Reestablish the B ahamas' preeminence in the region at the Youth and J unior competitions. Change meeting dates for the BAAA to a Friday to include Family Islandc oaches and members in the d ecision making process. Those are just some of the promises made and I'm sure that all voting delegates will be looking at them seriouslyb efore they make their final decision and if elected, they will be holding them to each and every one of them. So the campaign swords h ave been drawn and with l ess than a month left before the electorate go to the polls, you can bet that therew ill be a whole lot of discussion on who will be the next l eader of the BAAA. GOOD BYE MR. C Thanks to all who took t he time out with me to offer prayers for the late Roger Carron. W hen I got the news on Sunday morning that he had passed away, I felt ab ig void in my life went away becauseo f the role that Mr. C, as h e was affectionately called, wenta way as well. Mr. C, as I mentioned in this column last week, was t he first boss that I came into contact with here at The Tribune when I joined the staff as a budding young reporter. A nd throughout my tenure, Mr. C was probably the most caring and sympathetic boss that I ever came in contact with. He had ap assion for sports, but he also had a knack for perfection and always wanted tos ee the staff produce it's best. Although he no loner o ccupied the desk as the Sports Editor, in a lot of ways, I still considered himt o be my boss because he always knew what was going on and he never let a day go back if something wasn't covered or covered proper-l y. I will certainly miss him. To Mrs. Elaine Carron, Robert and the rest of the family, I know you've loved a gem, but I will also cherisht he relationship and the b ond that we were able to develop over the years. May his soul rest in peace. November 21 election will be critical for BAAA OPINION STUBBS BASKETBALL BBF CLINIC The Bahamas Basketball Federation in conjunction with FIBA, the world governing body for basketball, will be conducting a Mini Basketball Clinic, for all coaches in the Bahamas Friday October 23rd from 5:30 pm to 8 p.m. and Saturday 24th from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sir Kendal Isaac’s Gymnasium. The cost of the clinic is $35.00 which includes a mini basketball book and clinic materials. The instructor for the Clinic is Professor Edwin Pe–a, FIBA Certified Instructor. The Federation will provide participants with “Certificates of Par ticipation”. Individuals who are interested in participating in the Clinic are asked to contact Mr. Sean Bastian 302-4591 or email: HYPERLINK "mailto:snsenterprises_502@hotmail.com" snsenterprises_502@hot mail.com as soon as possible. MIKE SANDS ROGER C ARRON spor ts NOTES I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T he Bahamas Government Departmental Softball Association closed its 2009 soft b all season on a very high note. The players, spectators and fans witnessed the most spectacular, keen contested, championship playoff series ever. T his year's softball season were well attended by the fans and spectators alike. The championship games brought people by the groves to watch softball at its best. T here were persons standing around the f ences to ensure that they don't miss a stupendous play and during all of the games the bleachers were jammed pack. It was predicted by many persons that s ince the two best top Men Teams in the League will square-off in the championship series, and knowing that both ball clubs have dynamism their playoff series defi-n itely will go down to the wires. So said, so done! Police Chiefs went into the championship playoff with the Men's best overall record, but they were still considerate as the under dogs. On the other hand, Defence F orce Floaters placed second in the Men's overall standing but because of them cap t uring the Men's title for seventeen con secutive years and with the wealth of exper iences under their belts, some persons were still expecting them to capture their eighteen (18 However, when the dust was cleared in game number seven, the Police Chiefs came o ut as the victors while it was a doomed day for Defence Force Floaters. T he Floaters prestigious crown which they held for so many years suddenly swept f rom them just by a wink of an eye. At the conclusion of the seventh game everyone was stunned to see that Defence Force Floaters winning streak came to a halt so quickly. The championship series l eft everyone saying that this was the most unbelievable playoff series that they have e ver seen. Here’s a summary of the games played: G ame One The Defence Force Floaters came from behind and nipped Police Chiefs 30-29 in a hairraising and a nailbiting encounter. Reynaldo Russell was the hero for D efence Force Floaters, he had a perfect 5for-5 day at the plate, scored four runs and p icked up five RBI and he had four home runs. D wayne Dean did the damage for Police C hiefs, he had a perfect plate appearances, a s he went 5-for-5, scored four runs, picked up two RBI and had one home-run. G ame Two The Police Chiefs routed Defence Force Floaters 19-9 to tie their series 1-1 in a lopsided affair. T he Police Chiefs came out with fire in their eyes and bats, as they smoked-out Defence Force Floaters 19-9. Alcott Forbes swung the hot bat for the P olice Chiefs with a perfect 4-for-4 day a ppearances. He scored four runs and picked up five RBI. Remone Storr was the potent batter for his team, he had a 4-for-3 day at the plate, scored two runs and picked u p one RBI. Game three The Police Chiefs clobbered Defence Force Floaters 25-12 to take a commanding2 -1 lead. Van Johnson, Godfrey Willie and Marvin Wood had four hits a piece. Willie scored two runs and picked up six RBI, he also had two home runs. D wayne Mackey, Philip Culmer and Thomas Williams had three hits each. M ackey scored three runs and picked up four RBI. G ame four Defence Force Floaters gave Police Chiefs a taste of their own medicine by defeating them with identical 19-9 record as in game two of their series, they also tied t he series 2-2. Philip Culmer swung the hot bat for the F loaters, he went 5-for-4 plate appearances, scored four runs and picked up three RBI. V an Johnson assisted his team by having a perfect 3-for-3 day at the plate, scored one ran and picked up two RBI. Game five Police Chiefs out-hit Defence Force F loaters 20-12 to take a commanding 3-2 lead in the playoff series. Police Chiefs c ame out with their bats fully loaded and they went to work from the onset of the g ame. Alcott Forbes, Derek Sands and Marvin Wood were the sluggers of the game, they all had three hits each. Wood scored two runs and picked up two RBI. D encil Clarke was the striker for Defence Force Floaters, he had a 3-for-4 d ay plate appearances, scored three runs and picked one RBI. G ame six T he Defence Force Floaters refused to l ie down and play dead, the Floaters secured the victory by edging-out Police C hiefs 10-9 in a squeezer to tie the series once again 3-3 for a dead lock for the third time in their series. Keith Moss, Terrance Culmer and Brad S mith had three hits each for the Floaters. Darren Mortimer did the damage for Police Chiefs with his perfect three-for-three day and he scored one run. G ame seven T he Police Chiefs came out stroking from the top of the first inning by scoring four runs, in the bottom half, Defence Force Floaters knowing that it was showt ime, had to come tougher than the Law Enforcement Officers; therefore, they came out blasting with six tallies to take an early 6-5 lead. In the Top of the second inning,P olice Chiefs refused to give up, they smashed three runs and in the bottom half, they were able to quiet Defence Force Floaters bats to one run. In the top of the third inning Police C hiefs was allowed to score one run and they kept the Defence Force Floaters to o ne run in the bottom half. In the top of the fourth inning, Police Chiefs scored one and D efence Force Floaters tried to make their move by scoring four runs to take a 11-10 lead in the bottom half of the fourth inning. In the top of the fifth inning, Police Chiefs came up with four biggers while D efence Force Floaters was able to sneak one run in the bottom half. I n the top of the sixth inning, Police Chiefs went on a hit-parade by scoring e ight more runs while keeping Defence Force Floaters to only one run in the bottom half. In the top of the seventh inning, Police Chiefs ended Defence Force Floaters streak of seventeen consecutive victories a nd dethroning them with a 27-15 score, damaging the Defence Force Floaters. T he Police Chiefs gave the Floaters a taste of their own medicine by cracking s eventeen (17 them to subjugate the Mariners. The Most Valuable Players (MVPs the championship games are Godfrey Willie and Darren Mortimer. T he Executives extend congratulation to the 2009 champions, Police Chiefs. Also c ongratulation to the 2009 Runners-up, Defence Force Floaters for a job well done a nd we wish you all success for the 2010 s oftball season. 2009 softball season closes on a high note On Saturday, October 17th the finals for the first Junior team league squash were held with trophies and awards presented by theP resident of the Bahamas Squash Association, Mr. Pembroke Williams and Vice-President, Ms. Michele Thompson. After six weeks of league competition twent y junior squash players demonstrated tremendous improvements in their fitness, squash skills and racquet control for winning shots as well as sportsmanship on and off the court and responsibility for scoring and refereeingm atches. The Berry Rain Bashers led by Christina Fields were the winners with a total of 73 points. In second place the Lemon Standers, c aptained by Dylan Davies, earned 67 points. In third place the Green Goblins with Oliver Euteneuer leading his team scored a total of 62 points. The most improved player award went to Aidan Adams and the best sportspersona ward was presented to Ashley Fox. Junior Squash finals show improvements in skill ON Saturday, the Police Chiefs will hold a motorcade starting from Royal Bahamas Police Force on East Street at IO a.m. to celebrate their triumph as the new men’s champi ons of the Bahamas Government Departmental Softball Association. The league is requesting all teams to come out and participate in the motorcade, which will be followed by an all-day victory party at the Baillou Hill Sporting Complex. The Chefs snapped the Royal Bahamas Defense Force’s 17-year stranglehold of the title with a 4-3 decision in their best-of-seven series that was concluded recently. There will be a live concert with local entertainers per forming. Police Chiefs to hold motorcade THE Finance Health Invaders captured the ladies c rown in Government Departmental Softball in grand style. They waited patiently for two years to reclaim the distinguished crown. T he Invaders did not waste any time in the postseason. They knocked off the BTC Connectors in three shakes t o advance to the championship round, then they came back and swept the Defence Force Waves in four straight games. F inance Health held the best record of 20-1 in the ladies overall standing. This year they played every team h ard and by the scores in the scorebooks, in some instances they showed no mercy for their opponents. Finance Health Invaders' manager Della Davis said t hat they had set their goal from the onset of the season and if they had to scratch and crawl their way to the n umber one position and to stay there then so be it. She said that she informed her ladies, that this was their year and in order for them to recapture the ladies't itle, they must jell together as a team, play good defense and have a solid offence. While Davis spoke with a big smile on her face, she stat ed that she was very pleased with the team's accom plishment this season and hoping to have a spotless record f or the 2010 softball season. Here’s a summary of their games played: Game one F inance Health Invaders arrested the Defence Force Waves 8-6 to take a 1-0 lead in their championship play o ff. Lily Hernandez swung the hot bat with a prefect threefor three plate appearances and she scored one run. MaryS weeting assisted Defence with her feverous bat, she went 3-for-4 and scored one run in a losing effort. G ame two In a low scoring game, Finance Health Invaders nabbed Defence Force Waves 6-1. Keisha Pratt did the honors forF inance with a perfect three-for -three plate appearances and she scored two runs. Rhonda Kelly, Maryann Fowler 'and Laurel Farrington had three hits apiece in a losing effort. Game three F inance Health Invaders bombarded the Defence Force Waves 11-6 to take a 3-0 commanding lead. Renee Davis had two hits, scored three runs and picked up one RBI. Rhonda Kelly went 3-for-4, scored one run and picked up one RBI in losing effort. G ame four In a high scoring game, 15-12; Finance Health Invaders assaulted the Defence Force Waves and swept them inf our straight games to clinch the 2009 Ladies' title. Renee Davis and May Miller had three hits a piece. Davis also scored three runs and two RBIs. Maryann Fowler and Karen Darville were the offences batters for Defence. The Most Valuable Player (MVP games was Renee Davis. The Executives extend best wishes to the reigning champions, Finance Health Invaders and a successful 2010 season. Finance Health Invaders capture ladies crown For the St. Thomas More, after trailing 6-4 at the end of the first and 9-8 at the half, just simply fell apart in the second half as they only managed to score an extra 11 points. After the game, Sparks’ coach N’Komo Ferguson was dumbfounded about his team’s performance. “When you find out, you let me know,” said Ferguson when asked what happened to his team. “I just don’t know. My boys just didn’t come to play.” D’Chaz Butler had five points, Rohan Kerr four and Davon Martin, Cairo Curry, Jefferson Thomas and Carl Cooper all chipped in with two points in the loss. After the mid-term break this weekend, St. Thomas More will have very little time to heal their wombs as they have to face defending champions St. Bede’s Crushers on Tuesday. “It’s really back to the drawing board,” said Ferguson about last year’s championship rematch. “This is a brand new team with just two grade six players. But if my four starters don’t come out and play like I expect them to do, then I will have no other choice but to go with the bench. They will have to carry us through.” Against St. Bede’s, Ferguson know that they will have to come prepared. In the league’s opening game on Monday, the Crushers crushed the Xavier’s Green giants 39-5. F ROM page 15 Blue Flames too hot for Sparks BERRY RAIN BASHERS WINNERS Donovan, Luke, Christina, Scott and AJ.

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BRADLEY BROOKS, Associated Press WriterRIO DE JANEIRO Police in Rio expanded a c rackdown on gangs beyond the area hit by a wave of killings that has claimed atl east 32 lives since the weekend, officials said Wednesday. The clashes came less than three weeks after the city was awarded the 2016 Olympic Games. They began when a drug gang tried to invade a r ival's territory and three policemen were killed when a helicopter was shot down by gunfire over the weekend. Subsequent firefights between police and heavily armed gang members have left the affected slums in chaos. Hundreds of residentsfled their homes overnight, choosing to sleep in streets away from their own neighborhoods after rumors spread that drug gangs were set to battle again. While the violence began in a northern area near the Maracana stadium, which will host the Olympics' opening and closing ceremonies, police searching for suspects behind the downing of the helicopter launched operations in slums in Rio's south and center on Wednesday. A police spokesman said officers killed three suspected drug traffickers during the afternoon raids, raising the death toll to 32. The official spoke on condition of anonymity, citing department rules. In the early morning, officers shot dead three other suspects in northern areas of the city. "We can't allow four or five criminals to cause this madness," Rio state Public Safety Director Jose Beltrame said about the drug chiefs his officers were hunting down. "Many people are suffering and feeling the pressure of this violence." By evening, most of the areas were calm, but more police operations were expected during the night. The International Olympic Committee awarded Rio the 2016 games on Oct. 2. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 19 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Rio police expand anti-gang raids, 32 now dead P OLICE TAKE POSITIONS d uring an operation in search of drugs, traff ickers and weapons in the Vila Cruzeiro slum in Rio de Janeiro, B razil, Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009. E d u a r d o N a d d a r / A P P h o t o

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.09 $3.88 $4.00 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Government will know “in the next 2448 hours” whether its preferred choice for Foxwoods Develop m ent Company to take over the Our Lucaya Resort’s management/operations, as well as its casino, is back on track, Tribune Business was told yesterday. This newspaper can reveal that the deal, which has involved threeway negotiations between the Government, Foxwoods and Our Lucaya’s owner, Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa, has “come alive again” after previously hitting the proverbial ‘brick wall’ over the i ssue of who would manage/operate t he hotel component. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, confirmed to Tribune Business that the Government had been in contact with both Hutchison Whampoa and Foxwoods within the last 24 hours as it moves rapidly to revive a deal it sees as key to placing Grand Bahama back on the resort/casino/tourism map. Tribune Business had contacted Mr Vanderpool-Wallace after being told by numerous sources familiar with the situation that the Government’s preferred solution for Our Lucaya, namely for Foxwoods to take over management and operations at the hotel as well as the casino, had died a death. “No, it’s not dead,” Mr Vanderpool-Wallace replied. “We have been in contact with them [Foxwoods] this morning, and Hutchison last night in Hong Kong. The answer is that it’s not dead.” The minister added that the Gov ernment did “not yet” know the precise nature of any agreement that might be worked out between itself, Foxwoods and Hutchison Wham poa, “but we’ll get a good sense of that in the next 24-48 hours”. Confirming that any deal would not involve “a purchase agreement”, where Foxwoods would acquire Our Lucaya from Hutchison Whampoa outright, Mr VanderpoolWallace told Tribune Business: “These things are complex. You never know what form it will take.” However, other sources familiar with the situation told Tribune Business that the main sticking point to any successful agreement involving Foxwoods was who would run/manage the hotel component at Our Lucaya. “The Government’s preferred choice is Foxwoods, because not only will they take over the casino but brand the hotel,” one source confirmed. “But they [Hutchison] would prefer to lease the casino and keep their staff in place. Foxwoods would come in and brand it with their own management. “The sticking point is the way in which the relationship would move forward with the running of the hotel.” In other words, Hutchison Whampoa would be happy with a situation somewhat resembling the status quo, where the casino was leased to a third-party operator and it was able to run and manage the hotel itself. The Government, though, wants Foxwoods to take over the management of the entire complex, and use its brand and gaming marketing database to put Grand Bahama back on the tourism/casino map. It would thus seem that the key to any deal would be for Hutchison Whampoa to shift its position to one more in line with the Government’s thinking. One source emphasised to Tribune Business that Treasure Bay Casino and Resorts Inc, the previously announced replacement for Isle of Capri as the Our Lucaya casino’s operator, was strictly a second Foxwoods’ Our Lucaya deal ‘comes alive again’ * Government hoping to know ‘in the next 24-48 hours’ whether deal involving renowned casino/resort operator and Hutchison can be reached, and its shape * Key issue is hotel management/operational control if Foxwoods brands resort and casino * Treasure Bay firmly reserve choice, with Foxwoods seen as having global brand clout to revive Grand Bahama tourism V-WALLACE S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 8 8 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian private sector and the Government have “absolutely not” maximised their use of available grant funding sources, a Chamber of Commerce executive told Tribune Business yesterday, although he was “pretty confident the best of the Bahamas will be funded” in the latest European Union (EU sponsored round. Hank Ferguson, who heads the Chamber’s small and medium-sized enterprises trade unit, said the organisation’s two-day grant scheme workshop had provided the 32 firms/entre preneurs who attended with the information and skills necessary to apply for financing from the EU’s Direct Assistance Grant Scheme. Grant funding is possibly the cheapest form of financing available to Bahamian businesses, especially during a period when traditional forms of financing especially debt financing from commercial banks has seemingly all but dried up. Yet Bahamian companies and entrepreneurs have frequently failed to access and exploit this financing when it has been available. “Absolutely not,” replied Mr Ferguson, when asked whether Bahamian companies had exploited grant funding opportunities to the full. “The biggest challenge is that most BahamiGovernment, private sector ‘absolutely not’ maximising its grant funding ability By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE Bahamian construction industry is bracing itself for “a very slow winter”, the Bahamian Contractors Asso ciation’s (BCA yesterday, adding that the fail u re to-date to bring legislation that would regulate the industry to Parliament was in danger of “stifling growth and development”. Stephen Wrinkle, of Wrin kle Development, explained that many Bahamian contractors were currently enduring a “significantly reduced” level of work compared to one year ago, when the Bahamas was first experiencing the chill winds of the global recession and construction contracts from Spring 2008 were still carrying firms through. “The industry is very slow at the moment,” Mr Wrinkle told Tribune Business. “There’s a few people who have work. Banks are reluc Constr uction br acing for ‘slow winter’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA piling a list of suggestions” that it plans to submit to the Government over its proposed Planning and Subdivisions Bill, its president said yesterday, adding that his members main concern was that the suggested approval process could frustrate “good developers”. William Wong told Tribune Business: “We are now compiling a list of suggestions to have some stuff included or deleted in the Realtors ‘compiling’ Bill r efor m options BREA c hief meets with Port over realtor licensing in Freeport S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By DAVID KOENIG AP Airlines Writer DALLAS (AP premium travelers above other customers, letting them board first, eat a meal, and order a cocktail without whipping out a credit card. Many of them are business travelers who fly frequently and often pay higher last-minute fares than the jeans-and-T-shirt crowd on the way to see grandma. Anyone who questions why airlines treat business travelers nicely only needs to look at the carriers’ third-quarter financial reports. On Wednesday, American Airlines parent AMR Corp. reported that it lost $359 million in the third quarter, and Continental Airlines Inc. posted an $18 million loss. Those results followed losses in the last few days reported by Southwest Airlines Co. and United parent UAL Corp. That news, and oil prices above $81 a barrel, dragged down airline stocks. Continental and AMR shares fell more than 11 per cent in afternoon trading. Overall traffic is picking up. Planes were mostly full over the summer vacation period and through September. But revenue at the biggest airlines plunged about one-fifth from the levels of summer 2008, largely because business travelers stayed home, grounded by cutbacks in corporate travel during the recession. Airline executives refused to predict when demand for travel and higher prices might come back. “We are bumping along the bottom,” Continental President Jeff Smisek said Wednesday. “I can’t tell you when the recovery will come or how quickly or at what rate business travel will return ... the recovery seems to be quite slow.” The day before, United President J ohn Tague said there was no chance a irlines could return to earlier revenue levels until they can recapture high-paying customers. Basili Alukos, an airline analyst at Morningstar, said United is the most heavily dependent on premium passengers business travelers and international customers but that many airlines are feeling the effect. He said there has been a permanent change in travel habits, including more business travelers buying cheaper tickets in coach. Alukos said some premium pass engers will return as the economy i mproves and companies employ more people who need to travel, “but everyone is going to try to hold down their costs.” It’s hard to know how many passengers are flying for business versus pleasure. Southwest has said that in good times, at least 40 per cent of its customers are business travelers. It may be higher at other airlines. Alukos estimates that a little more than half of US passengers are traveling on business. At AMR, traffic in the third quart er fell about six per cent, but rev e nue plummeted 20 per cent. The company blamed a drop-off in business travel and low fares to entice leisure customers to American, the nation’s second-largest carrier. AMR’s $359 million loss compared with profit of $31 million in the third quarter of 2008, when the Fort Worth-based company sold its investment business. Houston-based Continental, the No. 4 US airline, lost $18 million, which was a big improvement over the $230 million loss a year earlier, when jet fuel prices were roughly 50 per cent higher. Revenue plunged 20.2 per cent, to $3.32 billion, despite a traffic downturn of less than one per cent. Weak sales cut across all of Continental’s markets, with trans-Atlantic business particularly sluggish. However, Continental is betting on improvement next year. After two years of cutting capacity by eliminating flights or using smaller aircraft, the airline expects to increase capacity next year by between 1.5 per cent and 2.5 per cent, with all the extra flying on international routes. While larger carriers posted losses for the quarter, low-fare AirTran Airways said Wednesday it earned $10.4 million, although revenue fell 11 per cent, to $597.4 million. A year ago, the company lost $94.6 million. AirTran has been dropping unprofitable routes and executives of the carrier, based in Orlando, Fla., said they expect to increase capacity between two per cent and four per cent next year. Airlines still looking for business travelers AN AMERICAN AIRLINES jet plane takes off at the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California. American’s parent, AMR Corp., on Wednesday said it lost about $300 million in the third quarter. (AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes

PAGE 22

By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamian economy is likely to further contract in 2010, a Wall Street credit rating agency has forecast, warning that a “continued and permanent deterioration” in the Government’s debt position something that already sparked a downgrade of this nation’s BS bond ratings from A1 to A3. In its latest credit opinion on the Bahamas, Moody’s said that while the fiscal deficit incurred during July the first month of the 20092010 financial year had fallen to $3.3 million from $29 million in the same period last year, this position would be “hard to sustain”. On a yearly basis, government revenues remained flat, while expenditures contracted by around 20 per cent,” the Wall Street credit rating agency said. “But this improvement will be hard to sustain for the year as a whole, given the Govern ment’s plans to carry out infrastructure projects, which will result in higher expenditures, and the impact of the recession on government revenues.” The latter was running $40 million behind forecast as at end-September 2009, the close of the first quarter in the Government’s fiscal year, with air arrivals down by 14.7 per cent for the first seven months. Overall, Moody’s forecast that the Bahamian economy would continue to contract albeit at a much slower 0.5 per cent rate in 2010, with the central government debtto-GDP ratio reaching 46.6 per cent next year well above the 40 per cent ratio regarded as a ‘danger thresh old’ by the likes of the International Monetary Fund (IMF to government revenue ratio is projected by Moody’s to peak at 237.4 per cent this year, before declining to 234.6 per cent in 2010. The Wall Street rating agency added that the Government’s success in managing the Bahamas through the current worldwide recession and economic crisis “without incurring a deep and sus tained deterioration in rela tive credit metrics” was critical to maintaining a stable outlook on its sovereign rating. Explaining its decision to downgrade the Bahamas’ local currency bond rating, Moody’s said it partly reflected the fact this nation’s debtto-GDP ratio was anticipated to increase by 15 percentage points in the three years to 2010. “The erosion of the coun try’s main debt metrics, with debt-to-GDP projected to reach close to 50 per cent by 2010, from 35 per cent in 2007, further justify the A3 as the appropriate level for both bond ratings,” Moody’s said. “Long-term growth lower than that of its rating peers also weighed on the decision to align the bond ratings at A3. The Bahamas’ two main industries, tourism and financial services, have been impacted by the world crisis and will find it difficult to recover strongly in the near future.” Moody’s kept the outlook on all the Bahamas’ sovereign credit ratings as ‘stable’, and reaffirmed the Aa1 country ceiling for foreign currency bonds and A3 country ceiling for bank deposits. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ST. AUGUSTINE SOD(Grass Squares) Sold by the Pallet 500 Square Feet Roots Landscape & Maintenance Gladstone Road Tel. 361-7589 / 357-3308 Moody’s: Bahamas economy to shrink again during 2010

PAGE 23

Bill. We’re compiling some stuff for the minister, and hopefully he will look at it and make some changes.” The move follows on from last week’s meeting at which Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, addressed BREA members on the likely impact of the new Bill. Mr Wong told Tribune Business his members’ main concern was the requirement for all stakeholders, including neighbouring landowners,to be consulted on any proposed subdivisions earmarked for their areas, so they had an opportunity to voice their concerns. W hile welcoming the consultative approach, Mr Wong said: “I think a lot of nutcases will come out, and a lot of good subdivisions and good developers will be delayed and frustrated. That’s the concern of a lot of members. “How’s that going to affect the proj ect moving along there are so many weeks for this, so many weeks for that. That has to be looked at again. Before a developer buys and develops the land, it’s conditional on getting the approval of the neighbours.” Mr Wong suggested the Bill needed to contain some “checks and balances” to ensure bona fide developers w ere not unduly delayed by frivolous and vexatious complaints, or vested interests. Time is often money, especially where real estate developments are concerned, and any undue delays in the approvals process will likely deter future developers from proceeding with their projects especially if they have vast sums of money tied up in large tracts of land they cannot develop. H owever, Mr Wong acknowledged that the Bill was “going to rein in those cowboys, those unscrupulous developers” who sold lots, took client money and then failed to deliver on what they had promised, namely failing to put in proper roads and utilities. “Some parts of it are very good, b ut there are concerns that Dr Deveaux will listen to. I think he’ll listen to us and we’ll get this stuff sorted out,” Mr Wong told Tribune Business. Meanwhile, the BREA president disclosed that he met Ian Rolle, the Grand Bahama Port Authority’s (GBPA in a bid to resolve the situation where the Port was issuing real estate licences to persons operating in F reeport. BREA’s own position is that it should be the sole licensing authority for realtors operating throughout the Bahamas, including in Freeport, and the GBPA licensing of realtors was creating unfair competition and leaving consumers exposed. “We’ll have some more conversat ions, so hopefully we can resolve this situation with the Port,” Mr Wong told Tribune Business. “We had a good conversation and I’m very encouraged.” Mr Wong had previously said the issue was causing BREA's 70-plus members in Freeport and Grand Bahama "a lot of frustration and a lot of stress, and it's been going on for at least the last 10 years." The BREA president said that for t he last four to five years, the organisation had been trying to get the Port Authority to recognise it as the only licensing body for realtors in Grand Bahama and Freeport, but without success. Mr Wong said BREA's position was that the 1995 Real Estate Act empowered it as the sole boy to l icence practising realtors throughout the Bahamas including Freeport and Grand Bahama. The profession, he added, had been placed on par with the likes of architects, doctors and attorneys in terms of being able to self-regulate. tant to lend money right now, and business people are reluctant to invest right now. “Everyone is in a wait and see mode, and the work is not there. What we’re seeing is renovations and add-ons, as opposed to new builds. It’s slow; it’s real slow. “This time last year, we were just starting to feel it. The level of work has reduced significantly from a year ago, because a lot of that work started that Spring.” With no indications emerging yet that the US economy was beginning to recover from the depths of the current recession, Mr Wrinkle added: “All indications are that we will have a very slow Winter. “Hopefully, Baha Mar will go ahead in the New Year and hire more people. The airport is moving nicely, and Albany has been able to sell some lots, but generally speaking across the industry it’s pretty tough.” The BCA president said Baha Mar had been asking Bahamian contractors to again pre-qualify for construction contracts on its proposed Commercial Village, the site where it hopes to relocate all the banks, government buildings and the Straw Market currently lining West Bay Street. Mr Wrinkle said that, assuming Baha Mar was able to close its agreements with the two Chinese state-owned entities and proceed with the $2.6 billion project, the BCA’s understanding was that all work outside the scope of the main resort/casino/convention campus would go out to bid by Bahamian companies. Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle said the BCA had been working with the relevant government ministries and the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute (BTVI to put together a curriculum for the latter’s planned construction management programme, plus the ‘grandfathering seminars’ to educate contractors on the licensing requirements of the Contractors Bill. “We were trying to do something before Christmas, but it’s not looking likely it’s going to happen,” Mr Wrinkle said of the seminars. “What we’re trying to do is establish the level of the bar for the contractors’ licensing requirements. Up until now, there have been no requirements in place, so we’re trying to take a broad approach to it, particularly at level one.” The focus, Mr Wrinkle explained, would be on adherence to the Building Code and compliance in a bid to crack down on defective and shoddy workmanship of the kind that had impacted the Ministry of Housing’s housing programme in the past. “We have to have measures in place to prevent this,” Mr Wrinkle said. “Clearly, the best approach is to get it out at the education and licensing level.” The BCA president urged the Government to “push in a timely fashion” on getting the Contractors Bill to Parliament, and added that the organisation was expecting to “imminently” receivea pproval from the InterAmerican Development Bank’s (IDBa project designed to strength en the Bahamian construction industry. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE SKIN CLINIC at theFamily Medical Centre Village Road Shopping Centre W W I I N N T T E E R R , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B R R E E A A L L T T O O R R S S , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

PAGE 24

By CHRISTOPHER S RUGABER AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Unemployment rose in 23 states last month as the economy struggled to create jobsin the early stages of the recovery. While layoffs have slowed, companies remain reluctant to hire. Forty-three states reported job losses in September, while only seven gained jobs, the Labour Department said Wednesday. Some of the states that lost jobs still saw their unemployment rates decline, as discouraged workers gave up looking for work. People who are out of work but no longer looking for jobs aren’t counted as officially unemployed. That trend was evident nationwide in September, as nearly 600,000 people dropped out of the work force, the department reported earlier this month. The US jobless rate rose to 9.8 per cent in September, a 26-year high, from 9.7 per cent. Some economists estimate it would have topped 10 per cent if there had been no change in the labour force. There were some bright spots in Wednesday’s report. The Midwest region, hit hard during the recession by job losses in manufacturing, saw its unemployment rate drop for the second straight month, to 9.8 per cent from 10 per cent in August. It was the only region where the unemployment rate declined. The Midwest benefited from sharp drops in unemployment in Indiana and Ohio. Indiana’s jobless rate fell to 9.6 per cent, from 9.9 per cent in August and 10.7 per cent in June. Indiana added 4,400 jobs, the most of any state, due to gains in the manufacturing and service sectors. Ohio, meanwhile, saw its jobless rate drop to 10.1 per cent, from 10.8 per cent in August and 11.2 per cent in July. Still, Ohio lost about 6,000 jobs in September, and much of the improvement in its unemployment rate came from discouraged workers leaving the work force. Nevada, Rhode Island and Florida last month posted their highest jobless rates on records dating to 1976, the department said. Rates Fifteen states and Washington, D.C., reported unemployment rates of 10 per centor more. Michigan reported the nation’s highest unemployment rate at 15.3 per cent. It was followed by Nevada at 13.3 per cent, Rhode Island at 13 per cent, California at 12.2 per cent and South Carolina at 11.6 per cent. Real estate continues to bedevil states that enjoyed a housing boom. Florida’s jobless rate rose to 11 per cent from 10.8 per cent in August, as the state lost nearly 13,000 construction jobs. California lost 39,300 jobs, including more than 14,000 in construction. Nevada lost 3,500 construction jobs, though it boosted employment in services. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Twenty three states report higher unemployment

PAGE 25

By HARRY R WEBER AP Airlines Writer ATLANTA (AP Tran Airways’ financial results are benefiting from the discount carrier’s low costs and laser focus on domestic routes where it believes it can make money, and it actually wants to grow in 2010 when other major carriers have more conservative plans. Its Orlando, Florida-based parent company reported Wednesday a $10.4 million third-quarter profit, or eight cents a share, even though sales declined more than 11 per cent. A year ago it reported a restated $94.6 million loss, or 81 cents a share. The July-September results mark AirTran’s third quarter in a row of profit as most major US carriers struggle amid weak overall demand for business and international travel. Revenue fell to $597.4 million from $673.3 million a year ago. Excluding one-time items, its adjusted net income for the three months ended September 30 was eight cents a share, in line with analysts’ slightly reduced expectations. The revenue figure was a little below the analysts’ estimate of $600.5 million. Executives said during a conference call with analysts that AirTran expects to increase capacity two per cent to four per cent next year. In M arch and again in July the a irline said capacity, as meas ured by available seat miles, would be flat in 2010. Delivery CEO Bob Fornaro said in an interview with The Associated Press after the call that AirTran took delivery of two more planes in late September that it hadn’t planned to previously. “I think consistent with w hat we’re seeing in the market, we’re feeling pretty good about our profitability,” Fornaro said. He also noted that 34 per cent of AirTran’s 2010 fuel needs are hedged, protecting the airline from rising fuel prices. Several other major carri ers continue to post losses, albeit smaller ones in some cases, and they are being con servative with their capacity plans next year as the economy has only recently shown signs of improvement. “I wouldn’t say we are in a special place, but we’ve had a much better year than the rest of our competitors,” Fornaro said. “We’re solidly profitable.” A irTran has been trying to s hift its focus from unprofi table routes to profitable ones, and it also has been working to make sure it has enough cash to continue to weather the downturn in travel demand. In August, AirTran said it planned to stop flying to and from Newark, N.J., effective Sunday, and give its takeoff and landing slots there to Houston-based Continental Airlines Inc. in exchange for C ontinental slots at LaGuardia Airport in New York and Reagan National Airport in Washington. Continental has a hub at Newark Liberty International Airport, which is used by many travelers heading to or from New York City. A slot is an interval of time during which an airline can takeoff or land its aircraft at an airport. Slots, especially at peak times of day and in busy corridors like the Northeast, are valuable to airlines. AirTran, which has its hub in Atlanta, has over 700 daily flights to 67 destinations. AirTran shares fell 24 cents, or 4.4 per cent, to $5.16 in morning trading. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7B FREE SEMINARYou are invited to attend a Free Financial Seminar, organized by the Education Committee of the Public Workers’Co-operative Credit Union Limited, to be held on Friday, October 23rd, 2009 at the Ofce of the Bahamas Co-operative League Limited (just west of Wendy’s, Oakes Field), beginning at 6:30 p.m.Come and See how you can stretch yourDOLLARS $$$Featured Speakers:Mrs. Stephanie Missick-Jones(Credit Specialist-Bahamas Co-operative League Ltd.and Mr. Philip Greenslade(Treasurer-Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.)Bring a friend and get a prize for bringing the most guests.Refreshments will be served AirTran posts Q3 profit of $10.4m I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s


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Volume: 105 No.275

The Tribune

USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

PITTSBURGH

Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875

Pleasant is a free woman PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman PLPs!
God is good PLPs! Pleasant is a free woman! God siill reigns PLPs!

hae mR ne

PLP outburst forces

Iravoita case retrial

Convention
speech by MP
prompts judge to
discharge jurors

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

THE John Travolta
attempted extortion trial end-
ed in chaos last night after
an outburst at the PLP con-
vention forced Senior Justice
Anita Allen to order a retri-
al.

Proceedings were sensa-
tionally halted after South
Andros MP Picewell Forbes
took to the convention stage
and told delegates that one
of the accused, former PLP
senator Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter, had been acquitted.

He exclaimed: “Pleasant is
a free woman PLPs! Pleas-
ant is a free woman PLPs!
God is good PLPs! Pleasant
is a free woman! God still
reigns PLPs!”

But trial jury members
were still deliberating, and
had been for more than eight
hours. No verdict had been
reached although convention
members celebrated Bridge-
water’s supposed vindication
by singing and dancing to
“Oh Happy Day”.

An angry Senior Justice
Allen discharged jurors from
returning with a verdict at
10.54pm last night, inform-

“=” BK BBQ
DOUBLE
STACKER

ICEWELL FORBES speaks to delegates at the Roce emt] aim

ing them that some two hours
earlier there was an
announcement at a political
convention by a senior offi-
cial, indicating that one of the
accused persons had been
acquitted.

Some 20 minutes earlier,
the jury had been brought
into court and the foreman
indicated they needed more

SEE page 10

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

a

rs

FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater leaves court.

PLP leadership is a three horse race

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

PLP delegates vote for their next party leader today
with three candidates vying for the top job.

Former Prime Minister Perry Christie, Dr Bernard
Nottage and Paul Moss are all jockeying for the top job
after being nominated and seconded as leadership
candidates at the start of the PLP’s 51st national con-
vention.

Of the four original candidates, only Fred Mitchell
declined the nomination (see page 7) leaving Dr Not-
tage, Mr Moss, and Mr Christie to vie for the post in
what is expected to be a hotly contested three-way-
race.

Nominating Mr Christie was former PLP Senator
Trevor Whylly who was seconded by Omar Armbris-
ter. Mr Moss was nominated by Tonya Charlton and
seconded by Elaine Adderley. Nominating Dr Nottage
was the former PLP MP Rubianne Darling who was
seconded by Valerie Percentie; and finally Mr Mitchell
was nominated by Atavese Issacs and seconded by
Irene Rolle.

With each candidate’s supporters sporting t-shirts,
caps, and pins, the convention floor was strewn with
paraphernalia of every kind as the prospective leaders
entered the Wyndham’s ballroom.

While there has been no official formation of
“teams” or tickets on which persons will be running to

SEE page 14

POM Mt



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THE family of Tribune
managing director Mr Roger
Carron has asked that instead
of flowers, well-wishers may
make donations in his mem-
ory to either the Breathe
Easy Campaign, an effort to

Funeral arrangements for Roger Carron

raise funds for the purchase
of urgently needed ventila-
tors and incubators for the
Princess Margaret Hospital,
or St Martin’s Convent, which
does important work with
students and the poor.

Mr Carron was a fervent
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Funeral services will be
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THE TRIBUNE



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nomination is shot down

Several political heavyweights attack resolution

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

A RESOLUTION seek-
ing to block the nomination
of any candidate for office
within the PLP who had not
been a card-carrying mem-
ber for at least seven years
was shot down at the begin-
ning of the party’s national
convention yesterday.

With five amendments in
total to the party’s constitu-
tion being debated during
yesterday’s morning session,
the party also sought to cre-
ate and enforce a co-deputy
leader position, restrict any
nomination for posts being
made within a month from
any convention, and it also
ratified the Progressive
Young Liberals (PYL) to
now be named the official
National Youth Arm of the
party with more voting pow-
ers than ever before.

Criticism

While some amendments
such as the one relating to
the PYL was passed out-
right, the amendment
requiring an individual to
have served or be with the
party for seven years faced
substantial criticism from
political heavyweights such
as former leader candidate
Philip Galanis, and long
time party supporter Valen-
tine Grimes.

When it became obvious
that this amendment was
not going to see the light of
day, some supporters of it
sought to change the terms
and make the timeline five
years instead of seven.

This again caused an out-
cry with it finally being
decided that the matter
would go before a special
committee before any fur-
ther discussions can be had.

One PLP insider told The
Tribune that such a “fool-
ish” move by the party will
not be allowed to be pushed
through by “certain” indi-
viduals who would wish to
block the nominations of
any potential challengers at
this or any other convention.

While it is well known
that any changes to the pre-



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

SOME OF THE ATTENDEES at the PLP convention get in a festive

mood.

sent constitution would not
take effect until the party’s
next convention, technically
speaking it would mean that
if the party decided to
change its leader today for
either attorney Paul Moss,
or Dr Bernard Nottage,
these individuals would not
be eligible to contest for re-
election in their own party
as they would not have been
card-carrying members for
the requisite number of






















years. “We won’t allow this
to happen.

“We cannot be so short-
sighted to allow these
changes today to destroy the
party in the future,” said
another source.

The PLP’s convention
continues today where dele-
gates are expected to vote
for their prospective candi-
dates for leader, deputy
leader, and chairman of the
party.

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3



cintinataatie areiertes for









Davis during nominations

PHILLIP “Brave” Davis
received the most enthusiastic
welcome from voting delegates
and stalwart councillors when
he was nominated at the PLP
convention yesterday.

The Cat Island, Rum Cay
and San Salvador MP and
prominent attorney is widely
noted as having outspent his
contenders for the PLP deputy
leadership and when combined
with his familiarity within the
party and a well-oiled cam-
paign, his efforts appeared to
have paid off yesterday during
nominations at the Wyndham Nassau
Resort.

Numerous delegates and stalwart coun-
cillors who were inside the hall — the
media was excluded - said Mr Davis, who
is running under the slogan “Be Brave
...Change the Bahamas”, was the most
well received contender for the deputy
leadership.

While some suggested it was “by a
whisker” that the MP won the favour of

the crowd, others claimed Mr
Davis got a louder reception
that incumbent party leader
Perry Christie himself.

Mr Davis has flown in and
accommodated a large number
of voting delegates from the
family islands, and his con-
stituency in particular, to attend
the convention. While Mr
Fitzgerald’s supporters were
numerous, emblazoned with the
campaign slogan “Forward ...
the Future is now”, Mr Davis’

ieee URS were most visible.

Mr Wilchcombe, who ran
under the slogan “Now is the time!”
appeared to have been outgunned by Mr
Davis and Mr Fitzgerald in terms of the
amont of money he has spent on his cam-
paign, apparently relying to a greater
extent on his established credentials as
a former minister and long time MP in the
party than on t-shirts and badges.

Mr Davis was nominated by PLP sen-
ator Michael Darville, and seconded by St
Thomas More MP Frank Smith. MP for

West End and Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe,
was nominated by PLP Vice Chairman
Melissa Sears and seconded by Staford
“Scorpio” Evans, and Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald was nominated by his father
Edward Fitzgerald and seconded by Dan-
ny Johnson.

Mr Davis has publicly announced his
support for incumbent PLP leader Perry
Christie - who is being challenged at the
convention by his friend and parliamen-
tary colleague, Bernard Nottage, as well
as by newcomer Paul Moss - and while
Mr Christie has not formally revealed
who he supports for deputy leadership, it
is reported that he supports Mr Davis - his
former law partner - in return.

Mr Davis previously received the back-
ing of departing Deputy Leader, Cynthia
“Mother” Pratt.

With three strong candidates vying for
the deputy leadership of the party, the
PLP convention was yesterday swamped
with supporters bearing the hats, shirts
and badges of Phillip “Brave” Davis,
Obie Wilchcombe and Jerome Fitzger-
ald.

Roberts gets loud reception
from PLP convention floor

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PLP heavyweight and former
political retiree Bradley Roberts
looks in a strong position to steal
the chairmanship of the PLP
from incumbent Glenys Hanna
Martin.

To the disappointment of
those who had hoped to see the
party express support for a tran-
sition to a younger generation of
PLPs, and those who had been
happy to see a woman given a
prominent voice in the party,
the 65-year-old received the
loudest reaction from the con-
vention floor yesterday when he
was nominated to contest the
Chairmanship, according to del-
egates and stalwart councillors
who were in the convention hall

Mrs Hanna Martin also
received popular support, how-
ever many whom The Tribune
spoke with following the nomi-
nation process expressed their
belief that Mr Roberts, as a for-
mer chairman who spoke for
the party in the run up to its vic-
tory in the 2002 election, has the
capabilities to do so again.

Yesterday saw incumbent Ms
Hanna Martin nominated by her
parliamentary colleague,
‘Yamacraw MP Melanie Griffin,
and seconded by Miles Laroda.

Mr Roberts was nominated
by former PLP MP Neville Wis-
dom and seconded by avid PLP
supporter Laura Williams.

Joining them in the race is
former MP Keod Smith, who
was nominated by Laurette
Miller and seconded by C.L.
Johnson.

Ricardo Smith, who had pre-
viously expressed an intention
to seek a nomination, did not
do so.

While The Tribune spoke
with several keen supporters of

Correction

IN TWO stories appearing
in Tuesday’s Tribune, the
Right Reverend Laish Boyd
was incorrectly referred to as
the Anglican archbishop.

He is not an archbishop,
but rather a bishop of the
Anglican Diocese of the
Bahamas and Turks and
Caicos Islands.

The Tribune apologises for
any inconvenience this error
may have caused.

TROPICAL
Us ed)
REE
PHONE: 322-2157

COMPLETE

tee eed lal
Se eae

rYst aee |e 00 me) be
quarantee
TO AOE (ei il mc



Ms Hanna Martin,
who felt she has been
a successful chairman
and organiser for the
party and should be
returned, just as many
PLP supporters said
now is the time for
Mr Roberts, who
retired from frontline
politics in 2007, to
return to the Chair-
manship.

Mr Roberts was
the last of the candi-
dates for Chairman to
announce his intentions, doing
so last Sunday on Island FM.

He described how he was
“admonished and encouraged”
to join the race and felt com-
pelled to do so by the “decay-
ing” condition the country is in
after just over two years of FNM
leadership. He said he would

|. © %



organise the party to
return to government
in the 2012 election,
but would not seek a
seat as an MP again.

Yesterday a sup-
porter, echoing the
sentiments of sever-
al others interviewed
by The Tribune, said:
“Past is profile.
(Roberts) did a great
job and he’ll do an
even greater job this

ayia ROBERTS time round.”

A younger PLP,
however, said: “I understand
that Bradley’s a proven leader,
and he’s got more time to con-
centrate on it, but I don’t think it
would be good for the party if
Bradley won. I think this is the
ideal time for the party to
demonstrate its commitment to
young people, to change and

aed eh Tate

EMOTE toLeT TeSys at ee ee ele eT
Glenys Hanna-Martin had opened the 51st PLP convention as the
first speaker of the evening at the Wyndham last night.

She talked of the honour and privilege of being elected for her
coveted position now sought after by Ken Dorsett, Keod Smith

and Bradley Roberts.

She paid tribute to former leaders and encouraged the
involvement of young people in the future of the PLP.

trying to move the country for-
ward.

“T support the youth and he’s
a young man, and I think he
should be given an opportunity
to show the country and the
PLP that young people have
something to offer. He’s one
who’s come up through the
ranks in the party...and so I
believe that I would like to see
the PLP present the youth to
the nation and move ahead with
that bridge that they keep talk-
ing about.”

Delegates and Stalwart coun-
cillors of the party will vote for
who they wish to see take the
top party posts today at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort,
where the convention will enter
its second of three days.

The winner of the race must
receive a simple majority of the
votes,

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Young people grudgingly flock to Twitter

CHICAGO (AP) — They think it’s point-
less, narcissistic. Some don’t even know what
it is.

Even so, more young adults and teens —
normally at the cutting edge of technology —
are finally coming around to Twitter, using it
for class or work, monitoring the minutiae of
celebrities’ lives. It’s not always love at first
tweet, though. Many of them are doing it
grudgingly, perhaps because a friend pres-
sures them or a teacher or boss makes them
try the 140-character microblogging site.

“T still find no point to using it. I’m the type
of person who likes to talk to someone,” says
Austyn Gabig, a sophomore at the University
of California, San Diego, who only joined
Twitter this month because she heard Ellen
DeGeneres was going to use tweets as a way to
win tickets to her talk show.

DeGeneres set off a frenzy on the UCSD
campus when she promised the tickets to those
who, within 15 minutes of the tweet, e-mailed
her cell phone photos of themselves wearing a
red towel and standing with someone in a uni-
form. Gabig got the tweet, found a towel —
and won tickets.

She might think she won’t tweet again, but
social networking expert David Silver pre-
dicts she’ll change her mind.

“Every semester, Twitter is the one tech-
nology that students are most resistant to,”
says Silver, a media studies professor at the
University of San Francisco, where he regu-
larly teaches a class on how to use various
Internet applications. “But it’s also the one
they end up using the most.”

It is a rare instance, he and others say, of
young people adopting an Internet applica-
tion after many of their older counterparts
have already done so.

Their slowness to warm to Twitter comes in
part from a fondness for the ease and direct-
ness of text messaging and other social net-
working services that most of their friends
already use. Many also are under the false
impression that their Twitter pages have to
be public, which is unappealing to a generation
that’s had privacy drilled into them.

Then there’s the fact that their elders like it,
and that’s very uncool. But that’s bound to
change as tech-savvy Gen Xers reach middle
age and baby boomers and even some senior
citizens become more comfortable with social
networking.

“In some ways, what we’re seeing here is a
kind of closing of that generational gap as it
relates to technology,” says Craig Watkins, a
University of Texas professor and author of
the book “The Young and the Digital.”

Consider, for instance, that the median age
of a Facebook user is now 33, despite the
social-networking site’s roots as a college hang-
out, according to the Pew Internet & Ameri-
can Life Project. The median age for Twitter
is 31. And while Facebook’s audience is aging,
Twitterers are getting younger. Internet track-

Worried About Being Left in the Dark?

hie
Hurricane Season

er comScore Inc. found that 18- to 24-year-olds
made up 18 percent of unique visitors to Twit-
ter in September, compared with 11 percent a
year earlier.

Meanwhile, kids ages 12 to 17 accounted
for 12 percent of Twitter visitors last month,
about double the proportion of a year earlier.

Pew researchers also found in a report
released Wednesday that the number of peo-
ple ages 18 to 24 who use some type of status-
update service is growing quickly, too. They
attribute much of the growth to Twitter.

“So much of this is driven by community. I'd
even call it a tribe,” says Susannah Fox, a Pew
researcher who was the new report’s lead
author. She said the survey also found that
wireless devices are increasingly a factor in
Twitter involvement, as in the more you have
— laptop, mobile phone and so on — the
more likely you are to tweet.

Alex Lifschitz, in his third year at the
Rochester Institute of Technology in New
York, uses Twitter as a tight-knit circle, keep-
ing his contacts more limited than on Face-
book. Using his cell phone or laptop, he tweets
to let professors know he can’t make it to
class or to ask questions about assignments. He
also uses it for something as basic as organiz-
ing a food run with friends on campus.

“T can simply tweet and ask who wants to go
somewhere with me, and I'll have a few takers
at any given time,” he says.

Mallory Wood, a recent graduate of Saint
Michael’s College in Vermont, is another Twit-
ter convert — primarily for work. She’s now
an admissions counselor there, in charge of
getting more people to follow her department
on Twitter. She uses the service to offer appli-
cation fee waivers to prospective students and
points them to links to student blogs, even
some with complaints about campus life. “You
have to be real with them,” Wood says.

That’s still not enough to persuade some
young people to get on board.

“Quite frankly, I don’t need to hear if some-
one stepped in dog poo on the way to class or
how annoyed they are that they lost their
favorite pen,” says Carolyn Wald, a Universi-
ty of Chicago junior who has not joined Twit-
ter and rarely posts status updates on Face-
book because “TI don’t want to assume that
people want to hear those things about me,
either.”

Even teen pop star Miley Cyrus stopped
tweeting, griping in a rap song she posted on
YouTube that, among other things, she’d
grown weary of making constant, meaning-
less updates about what she was doing.

The key, USF professor Silver says, is show-
ing his students how a simple status update can
become a more sophisticated way to show
their creative sides and, who knows, maybe
land a job.

(This article is by Martha Irvine of the
Associated Press)



Students should.
learn ‘where
words fail
blows ensue’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

LOCKED in the dreaded
cycle of violence, our society
struggles with the search for
solutions to this multifaceted
problem including the ques-
tion of corporal punishment
in schools.

Those against corporal
punishment in schools argue
that it is cruel, humiliating
and violent.

Furthermore, they believe
that its administration may
be injurious to students, is
prone to abuse by teachers,
and may result in litigation
against teachers and the
Ministry of Education.

Additionally, they believe
it may be even counterpro-
ductive because its long-
term effect could make stu-
dents more prone to vio-
lence in adult life.

On the other hand, those
for corporal punishment in
schools say it worked well
in the past, and is well tried
and proven as demonstrated
by the production of man-
nerly, polished, and disci-
plined students of the 50s

LETTERS

letters@triobunemedia.net



and 60s.

We have created a vacu-
um while we experiment
with new alternatives.

What we are witnessing is
a disconnect between the
school environment and the
harsh realities of our real
society.

It seems as if the large
number of graduates from
the current school system
only contribute to an
increasingly violent society.

While the education
administrators have dis-
armed teachers of their
straps, and canes and
require that they use only
persuasive techniques for
dealing with disciplinary
problems, in the wider soci-
ety, it seems as though more
and more police officers are
appearing in public armed
with guns.

In years gone by, corpo-
ral punishment, as part of a

school’s disciplinary system,
could be compared to vacci-
nation; that minor discom-
fort experienced by the
unruly student from the
benign sting of the strap or
cane served to immunise
him or her in the future.

Unfortunately, legitimate
violence, and not just per-
suasion, is the reality of all
civil societies.

There is a time to drop
bombs on aggressors, a time
to shoot attacking enemies,
a time to use lethal force on
violent criminals or intrud-
ers, a time to subdue force-
fully and restrain various
wrongdoers.

Therefore, under con-
trolled conditions, by
humane administrators, stu-
dents should be made
aware, from a tender age, of
the realities of the real
world.

“Where words fail, blows
ensue.”

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
September, 2009

Whom shall Haitians call on?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Mr. Lovence Louima has
written what he stands by as
the truth when all others have
refused to even give a state-
ment. The reporters have
been denied access to the
detention centre, possibly
because the Minister of State
Mr. Branville McCartney dis-
agrees with The Tribune’s
series of articles into allega-
tions of abuse and mistreat-
ment at the facility.

The Haitian ambassador
has read the newspapers and
has been told of the number
of abuses which take place at
this centre. Yet for what he
does about it suggests to me
that he sits in the office as if
he’s on a vacation in the
Bahamas, allowing everything
to take place right before his
eyes. What is wrong with this
picture? Why can’t we see
what is going on, has the
ambassador been threatened
by the Government of the
Bahamas? Has he been told if
you get in too deep we will
deport you from this country?

Sirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South » P.O. Box N-7984 « Nassau, Bahamas
ee ea es

“GIVE AND IT SHALL BE

GIVEN UNTO YOU."

Should I go further in thinking
that he is enjoying such a great
life and doesn't want to be
bothered or get his hands
dirty? What conclusions can
be drawn when there are
reports that hundreds and
thousand of persons go miss-
ing in the Bahamas in the
wake of what would be the
Immigration Haitian Opera-
tion Flood? Who shall they
call on when the ambassador,
the representative for Haiti,
appears to do little? While 39
persons lose their homes in
Abaco and no questions
asked! Persons being sent
home without proper investi-
gation on the process or the
grounds they are being sent
on! Persons have to sit out-
side and are spoken to like
dirt at the passport office
when applying or renewing
their kids’ travel documents!

Is there a government in
Haiti that really sees what is
going on in the Bahamas, will-
ing to step in and encourage
the men and women to stop
taking this dangerous journey
for a better life just to find
temselves being shot down by
RBDF who are given the
order to do so? Is there a
Government in Haiti that will
stand and say enough is
enough they have to amend
the constitution? They should
examine who they send to
represent their country and its
citizens. There needs to be a

SUNDAY SEAVICES

stand to defend the cause of

the illegal ones when in actu-
ality we mean every one of
them, even the one who sits
next to me and helps pass my
exams in school. The one who
fought for me when no one
else wanted to stand and
defend me, yes! The one who
weeds my yard, works in the
construction field with us and
for a little or nothing and
sometimes went months with-
out being paid. If any ques-
tions asked, we call the police
or immigration and get them
deported. Yes! I mean all of
them who begin to integrate
themselves in this society
thinking they can live the way
we live; have far better jobs;
vehicles and homes than some
of us, they must go!

In conclusion, this matter is
far beyond Minister McCart-
ney, we are in a mess. While
many have called Haitians
havoc to this society and
blame them for everything
from crime to AIDS, they’ve
remained passive in the case
of allowing all of the above to
take place; without uttering a
word to discontinue this
because they are of Haitian
descendants and illegal;
should this be the cause of one
being mistreated and nobody
to call on? Where do they go
or who can they turn to for
assistance? At this present
time I am calling on everyone
who has a listening ear, young
and old to join together in
calling on the Almighty God!

the innocents.

Indeed! There are too
many Haitians in the
Bahamas. We play with the
words and say we only mean

fQem, 8:00am, 11:17am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P0.0.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Iniercessor
oc SE-B * 09-5798
Fax: Sof-ddiiohd-dii

Concern Citizen
of the Bahamas
Nassau,
October, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5



Cynthia Pratt calls for new PLP
leadership to maintain integrity

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

POPULAR PLP Deputy Leader Cyn-
thia “Mother” Pratt urged the new lead-
ership to maintain integrity in service as
she bid her final farewell to supporters
last night.

As the Member of Parliament for St
Cecilia stepped down from the post she
held for 12 years, Mrs Pratt explained
how her political ambitions were driven
by the needs of the people she served as
MP, Minister and Deputy Prime Minister.
And she encouraged future party leaders
to do the same.

Mrs Pratt said: “Some of us have lost
sight of the fact that politics is all about
the people.

“Tt is about crafting new and innovative
programmes to ensure that they recognise
the bountiful opportunities that exist in
the Bahamas.

“Public service, is just that, service to
the Bahamian people, not for reward,
but to guarantee a level of decency in
their daily lives.”

The people who rely on the State are
the people the party needs to work for,
Mrs Pratt said.

As she worked her way from “rags” to
the “middle class” and through the polit-
ical ranks, Mrs Pratt said she retained
her values and characteristics as a fiery
community builder and defender of the
poor, qualities Sir Lynden Pindling recog-
nised as fundamental to the party.

Steadfast

As long as the party remains steadfast
in its resolve to alleviate people’s suffer-
ing and continue to prioritise economic
empowerment, Mrs Pratt sees a bright
future for the PLP.

She praised the deep and wide PLP
bench and commended those vying for
her former position and other leadership
positions for the maturity they have dis-
played in their campaigns.

And Mrs Pratt reminded them of their
responsibility to create an environment
where young Bahamians are guaranteed
a bright future.

She called for the future leadership to

focus on the key issues affecting commu-
nities, such as education, immigration,
healthcare and public safety.

Mrs Pratt lamented the dismantling of
the Urban Renewal Programme — which,
she said, was helping young men in inner
cities — as a bad political decision, as was
the discontinuation of the National Youth
Service, which may have prevented the
criminality among young men today.

There should be a strict protectionist
policy for illegal immigrants and the pre-
sent policy allowing stateless children
must be addressed, Mrs Pratt said.

True reform of the educational system
is required, and affordable healthcare
should be available to all.

Mrs Pratt thanked the hundreds of del-
egates gathered for the first night of the
51st convention at the Wyndham resort in
Cable Beach for their support, and
thanked them on behalf of her late hus-
band.

As she bowed out to an adoring crowd,
Mrs Pratt advised the party to continue to
reach out to young people, and said:
“Remember, service is all about the peo-
ple.”

Parliamentarians tight-lipped on contenders

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe @tribunemedia.net

DESPITE allegiances and
alliances behind the scenes, par-
liamentarians yesterday
remained largely tight-lipped
about who of the leadership,
deputy leadership and chair-
manship contenders they would
wish to see elected.

With races for the three top
posts being hotly contested at
the party’s three day convention,
which began yesterday at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort on
Cable Beach, it appeared that

PLP LEADER Perry Christie is welcomed to the convention



come out of this convention unit-
ed and fighting ready for the
next election,” she added.

Mr Christie received the loud-
est shouts of support of all con-
tenders for party offices yester-
day as he marched towards the
entrance of the convention hall
to be nominated.

The leader must win at least
51 per cent of the votes in order
to win or retain the post, while
the victors in all other races must
attain a simple majority.

STRUCKUM

many of PLP MPs and senators
did not want to get caught in any
post-convention controversy by
making public statements about
their personal preferences.

Incumbent party leader Perry
Christie, leadership contender
Bernard Nottage and deputy
leadership contender Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald would not be
drawn on who they would wish
to join them in leading the party,
keeping their cards close to their
chests when approached by The
Tribune.

Other parliamentarians, such
as incumbent chairman and MP
Glenys Hanna-Martin, former
House speaker Oswald Ingra-
ham and Senator Hope Stra-
chan, joined them in declining
to state their preferences.

MP Picewell Forbes told The
Tribune he is for Obie Wilch-
combe taking the deputy lead-
ership of the party but stopped
short of naming his favoured
leadership candidate.

For his part, Mr Christie said

diplomatically that “whoever the
party chooses” would be the best
person for the chairman or
deputy leadership posts, while
Dr Nottage claimed he is sim-
ply focusing on his own cam-
paign and Mr Fizgerald said he
did not wish to comment as he
wanted his personal supporters,
who he noted are “very divid-
ed” over who they would like to
see become leader, to vote
according to their individual con-
sciences.

Chairman of Mr Christie’s re-
election campaign, Vincent Peet
claimed Mr Christie has the sup-
port of 80 per cent of the parlia-
mentary group of MPs and sen-
ators and the “overwhelming”
support of stalwart councillors
and delegates, giving him the
strongest chance of emerging the
victor in the leadership race.

However, another senior MP
in the party claimed that, in
truth, the parliamentary group
is “split” over who they would
like to see as leader of the PLP

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coming out of the convention.

Nonetheless, Mr Christie is
favoured by all parliamentari-
ans who were willing to voice
their opinion — including Mr
Peet, Senator Allyson Maynard-
Gibson and deputy leadership
nominee Philip “Brave” Davis.

Mr Peet said he travelled with
Mr Christie last week to Andros,
Eleuthera, Exuma and Grand
Bahama and is certain he also
has strong support “on the
ground” among grassroots party
supporters.

Meanwhile, Mrs Maynard-
Gibson said: “I’ve always been a
supporter of Mr Christie, I’ve
not changed in that regard. I
think the style of leadership and
the quality of leadership that he
displays are vital for the devel-
opment of our country. That’s
why I support him 100 per cent.”

She added that she feels the
convention turnout has “shown
most importantly that people see
the PLP as a very viable party.”

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Tourist joins the
Paul Moss camp

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edubs

Development Officer, Alumni Relations and Development, responsible
for selected College fundraising activities. The Development Officer is
a position for a candidate with experience in the non-profit industry and
who wishes to continue to build a career in fundraising and/or higher
education advancement. The suceesstul candidate will be someone
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Specific duties and responsibilities include identifying, cultivating and
soliciting major donors and prospects including individuals, corpora-
tions, and foundations; providing support for the maintenance of the
major gifts prospect pipeline: assisting in the implementation of pro-
grammes and activities designed to increase the visibility of the ARAD
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ducting internal and external research/fact gathering in support of fund-
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A Bachelor's degree, minimum of five years professional experience
and prior fundraising, sales or markeling experience are a must along
with demonstrated ability to plan and strong communication skills. For
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candidates should submit a letter of interest, Resume, a completed
Employment Application Form along with all the required documenta-
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The Associate Vice President, H.R.
Human Resources Department OR hrapply@cob.edu.bs
The College of The Bahamas



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By AVA TURNQUEST

THOUGH the general
attention level of guests at the
Wyndham was one of casual
interest bordering on apathy,
some visitors were intrigued
by the publicly accessible
political process with one
tourist going so far as to actu-
ally join a camp.

Attracted by the intensity
projected from PLP sup-
porters at this year's con-
vention, Geminy Maw, a 21-
year-old from England,
explored the convention
floor intending only to dis-
cover just what all the excite-
ment was about.

Ms Maw said that out of all
the booths she visited, it was
the Paul Moss camp that not
only explained the event and
its national importance the

A
GEMINY MAW with Paul Moss



best, but was also the most
sociable and genuine in shar-
ing their campaign.

Since joining their campaign
as an honorary member and
donning the iconic purple t-
shirt, Ms Maw said that she is
definitely enjoying this unique
experience and plans to attend
the convention for the remain-
ing two days.

Party hopeful Mr Moss
joked: "See even the interna-

A SHOW OF SUPPORT FOR DAVIS

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tional community is for Paul
Moss.”

Meanwhile, Joe Hughes
from Kentucky and Missy
Wallace from Indiana both
commented that what sur-
prised them the most was how
accessible such a crucial elec-
tion was to the public and
both agreed that this is instru-
mental in keeping elected offi-
cials grounded in the needs
and concerns of the people.

jajor/Tribune staff

A PLP delegate waves her sup-
port for one of the party’s
Deputy Leadership challengers,
Philip ‘Brave’ Davis, at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort last
night.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7



Wyndham transformed into a political bunker

By AVA TURNQUEST

PLP supporters swarmed
the Wyndham resort yes-
terday morning turning the
typically serene lobby into a
bustling hive.

Overnight bags littered
the walls and seats as dele-
gates and stalwart council-
lors from across the archi-
pelago stepped into their
arena.

Booths lined the halls of
the ground and second floor
of the Marlin tower, trans-
forming the island hotel
into a political bunker.

Candidate booths ranged
from the modest to the
elaborate, seasoned candi-
dates opting for reserved
traditional methods such as
pins, flyers or booklets
while some newcomers
spared no expense, includ-
ing flat screen TVs, massive
posters and even person-
alised bottled water.

Supporters

No candidate was with-
out an extensive team of
supporters, however
Christie paraphernalia
reigned supreme yesterday,
with the campaign going so
far as to hire attractive
young women to sport cam-
paign shirts and distribute
materials — the majority of
them having no political
interests whatsoever.

The superficial aside, sup-
porters are unanimous in
their understanding that for
the party to move forward
there must be total cohe-
sion. The verdict on
whether or not this can be
achieved is mixed.

National general council
member for Carmichael
Judson Wilmott is confident

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that the party is mature
enough to move past elec-
tions and support new offi-
cials without backbiting or
discord.

“Leader has stated that
the party is in transition,”
said Mr Wilmott, “which
means that the leader is
moving on the way out and
passing the party on to
those persons that have
been groomed and who
have the experience to take
the party forward and
become the type of leaders
that will better the party
and ultimately the country.”

College of the Bahamas
student and BJ Nottage
supporter Matysha Maura
said: “Some people may be
intimidated by some of the
more outspoken support-
ers, those shouting
‘Christie, Christie’ at any-
one who walks past. From
what I can see I’m not real-
ly sure what will happen
after the leader of the party
election — whether every-
one will really be able to
come together.

“There is a huge rift

Pe
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PERRY CHRISTIE paraphernalia mie STC EM IKON A

between BJ Nottage sup-
porters and Christie sup-
porters and I don’t know
whether or not they will be
able to overcome that.

“With the young PLPs I
don’t feel that there is much
division — with us it feels
like yes we’re voting for dif-
ferent people but at the end
of the day we’re supporting
whoever is elected 100 per
cent. With the older PLPs I
find that at times they can
be a bit over zealous.”

It can be deduced, how-
ever, that these “older
PLPs” are the life and spir-
it of this year’s convention.

The ratio of 50+ support-

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ers versus those under 45
was a Staggering 5 to 1, with
more than a few stalwarts
who made the pilgrimage
confined to wheelchairs.

At the epicentre of con-
vention spectacle was PLP
celebrity Laura Williams.
Never failing to entertain
and inspire, this year she
demonstrated complete
support for her candidates
by affixing a fan to her head
beset with rhinestones and
pictures of the candidates
on each side.

Though well-known for
her attention-grabbing out-
fits and fearless personality,
this year Laura Williams

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acted on more than one
occasion as a peacemaker
between over zealous sup-
porters, insisting that it was
each person’s right to vote
for whoever they wanted.
Though it is uncertain
what the next two days will
bring for the party, the
excitement and adrenaline
rush so indicative of
Bahamian conventions can-
not be ignored and it is this

















electrifying current that
lends hope for a unified
party.

“We coming here strong
and we going out stronger,”
said Ms Williams.

“This ain’t no FNM and
PLP in here, this is strictly
PLP - our convention.

“And when we finish with
this Friday night, we form-
ing the next government
2010.”

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



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FRED Mitchell has turned
down the opportunity to run
for the leadership of the PLP
at the party’s national con-
vention.

Yesterday afternoon, it was
announced that the Fox Hill
MP will not join current
leader Perry Christie, veter-
an MP Bernard Nottage and
newcomer Paul Moss in vying
for the post.

A statement issued by Mr
Mitchell’s camp said he was
nominated to run “as a Fox
Hill favourite son”, but
declined.

“Mr Mitchell expects that
there may be further oppor-
tunities for leadership,” it
said.

According to someone
inside the convention hall at
the time, the delegates issued
a “collective gasp” when Mr
Mitchell refused the nomina-
tion. A group of attendees
then ran over to hug the MP.

Mr Mitchell told the con-
vention he felt that in raising
the possibility of running, he
had successfully championed
the democratic rights of all
PLPs who choose to stand for
any office in the party.

The MP said he will con-
tinue to work throughout the
convention and beyond for an
effective, fair and transparent
electoral process, conducted
with courtesy and respect.

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The statement said: “I want
to win the leadership of the
PLP. I want to win the lead-
ership of the country, and this
continues to be the fact, but
my supporters and I have
determined that such a move
at this time will not now serve
the long-term interests of the
party.

“By openly declaring my
interest in the leadership of
the party and by demonstrat-
ing the support for my Agen-
da For Change, I am pleased
with the galvanising effect
that has become evident to
everyone in the electoral
process and the conduct of














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Mitchell decides
against running
§ for PLP leadership

the party’s leadership.

“My work with the Mission
Fund to support candidates
for the general election will
continue and I will continue
with my work on the agenda
for change, both of which are
critical for the future success
of the PLP.

“T remind those in the
FNM who would make mis-
chief to mind their own busi-
ness and council them,
instead, to prepare to deal
with a re-energised, rededi-
cated and powerfully invigo-
rated PLP.

“T again thank my col-
leagues in the Parliamentary
Caucus for our shared hard
work and dedication and
pledge my continued support.

“T remind young Bahami-
ans that the campaign for
change was launched to
demonstrate that there is
space in the PLP for young
people as the party works to
engage the next generation of
PLPs.

“Finally, the party deserves
at this convention an open,
fair, transparent and unclut-
tered process as we organise
ourselves to respond to the
lessons of 2007. I will continue
to be an integral part of that
process, now and in the par-
ty’s coming conventions, lead-
ing to the next general elec-
tion.”

EDITIONS of ‘The Brave Voice’,
a publication for PLP Deputy
Leadership candidate Philip
‘Brave’ Davis on display at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort
ahead of the PLP Convention.
Davis will contest the post with
Obie Wilchcombe and Jerome
Fitzgerald.



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS

The Tribune



THE POLL appeared on the tribune242.com website.

Tribune poll
suggests readers
want registry of

sex offenders

TRIBUNE readers say
they believe the government
should create a registry of
sex offenders.

Those who took part in
the latest tribune242.com
poll said the creation of a
list of persons convicted of
sexual crimes would help
the government protect
families from child moles-
ters.

Sex offender registration
is a system in place ina
number of countries
designed to allow officials
to keep track of the loca-
tion and activities of sex
offenders, including those
who have completed crimi-
nal sentences.

In some countries like the
US, the contents of the reg-
istry are available to the
public.

Of those who voted on
the issue, 64 said a sex
offenders registry would
help keep children safe,
while 16 argued that it
would not.

A number of readers also
commented on the matter.
“Manifesto Victim” said:
“A register can only be
meaningful if these crimes
are reported, tried and con-
victions are made. In other
words, the register is the
last part of the puzzle. A
register will only let us
know who we are dealing

Moving

with, it won't stop
stop pedophiles would be
proper sex education in the
high schools which includes
pedophile awareness. We
need to empower the vic-
tims in cases like this . This
would ensure more convic-
tions. Crime prevention
begins with awareness!”

Another reader thought a
registry would be a very }

good idea, “however fami-

lies who have this or any
type of criminal in their |

family should also do the

right thing and turn them in

to the proper authorities.

Protecting/ covering up for
these people is what causes }

the crime rate in our coun-

try to continuously rise.”
“Sandra” said she does

not agree that such a reg-

istry would be useful. “I
don't think the registry }

would work at this time
because most of the offend-

ers are known to the victims |

— eg mother's boyfriend,

neighbours and relatives. In
most cases the crime is only }

reported to exact some sort
of revenge for a relation-

ship gone wrong for other
reasons besides the act itself

— which is such a shame.

The social decay in this

country is so deep that it’s
difficult to know where to
start to correct it.”

ey

Colinalmperial's

Group & Health Benefits Division

is moving.

As of November 2, 2009, our address will be:

- Police concerned about high
number of GB traffic accidents

Senior officer issues warning about the dangers of ‘texting’ while driving

: By DENISE MAYCOCK
i Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Although road

i deaths on Grand Bahama are down
: this year, Road Traffic and police
i officials are very concerned about
i the high number of accidents.

A senior police officer reported

: that more than 900 road accidents
i were recorded here between Janu-
i ary 1 and October 20, as a result
i of which seven people died and 266
: sustained minor injuries.
pedophiles. A better toolto :
i Wednesday, Deputy Controller of
? Road Traffic Basil Rahming said
i he is particularly concerned about
? the use of cell phones by drivers.

During a press conference on

“It is impossible to be texting and

paying a degree of attention that is
; expected of a reasonable and pru-
: dent driver — it creates a very dan-

BAHAMAS, SPAIN REPRESENTATIVES MEET ON TOURISM

hk lle

-
MINISTER of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace met with Jesus Sil-
i va Fernandez, the Ambassador of Spain to the Bahamas to discuss tourism and emerging
i opportunities for co-operation. The men are pictured after the meeting, when Mr Van-
: derpool-Wallace presented Mr Silva Fernandez with a souvenir coin collection and authen-
? tic Bahamian jewel case.



BASIL RAHMING said he is particularly
concerned about the use of cell phones by
drivers.

gerous situation when driving,” he
said.

While the law against driving
without due care and attention
technically bans texting while dri-
ving, Mr Rahming said the law does
not specifically prohibit drivers



from using cell phones.

“It is up to the driver not to be
distracted. We have had instances
in the past where persons were
killed in accidents because they
allowed themselves to be distracted
on the cell phone,” he said.

“We are experiencing an unac-
ceptably high rate of road accidents
and we are very concerned, and
give thanks to God that the fatality
rate is not higher at this time,” Mr
Rahming said.

The police also said they are con-
cerned about persons driving under
the influence of alcohol and drugs.

It was noted that an amendment
to the Road Traffic Act has been
passed enabling officers to use
breathalysers to test suspected
drunk drivers, and senior officers
said they expect practice to begin
soon — perhaps as early as next

The Anglican
community plans
Celebration for
Father Norman
Lighthourne

AS FATHER NOR-
MAN LIGHT-
BOURNE’S 25th anniver-
sary of service approach-
es, the Anglican commu-
nity has announced that
“aman of worth must be
celebrated”.

Plans are underway to
celebrate his leadership
and legacy in a ‘Service of
Celebration’ at Holy
Cross Anglican Church
tonight at 7pm and a gala
dinner scheduled for 7pm
on Friday at Sandals
Resort.

Sporty meets sophistication.



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PO. Box N-4728

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New telephone contact:
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Verification numbers:
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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Senior Justice Allen told

sce. PLP outturst forces Travolta case retrial)

time to reach a decision.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury: “We are very con-
cerned, in the interest of jus-
tice, that it does not appear
that there has been a com-
munication from the jury
room. Justice must not only
be done, but seen to be
done.”

Noting that the trial has
lasted some five weeks, the
judge said: “I am very very

Road Traffic Department
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reluctant to discharge you but
in the interest of justice, hav-
ing heard the views of coun-
sel, we are concerned. It
leaves the impression that
there may have been a com-
munication from the jury
room.

“Tam not going to ask if
there was or not.”

The judge then ordered a
retrial for the accused.

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i'm lovin it

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Outside the courtroom,
Bridgewater was swarmed by
family members and support-
ers who subsequently went
into chants of “Pleasant,
Pleasant” as they moved on
to Bank Lane.

Bridgewater’s attorney
Murrio Ducille told reporters:
“We were ready for the ver-
dict. I know that we would
have won. Everything is pos-
itive. There has been
absolutely no evidence to
implicate this lady or Light-
bourne for that matter.”

Mr Ducille said he is pre-
pared for a retrial but has no
idea when that would be. He
said he would not comment
on how the possible leak of
the verdict came about.

“There is no evidence as to
where that came from,” he
said.

Mr Travolta’s attorney
Michael Ossi told reporters
he was happy with Senior Jus-
tice Allen’s decision to dis-
charge the jury.

When asked whether Mr
Travolta would be prepared
to return to testify at the retri-
al Mr Ossi said: “We are fully
cooperating with the prose-
cution.

“We are committed to see-
ing this through, and we are
committed to seeing justice
served. Whatever the prose-
cution asks us to do is exactly
what we will do.

“We would have liked to
have seen a verdict rendered
today but we would like to
see justice served.”

Attorney Carlson Shurland
said: “Unfortunately the
announcement at the con-
vention compromised the
integrity of the jury room and
after five weeks of serious
advocacy it’s very disappoint-
ing. We are very confident
that at the end of the day our
client will be vindicated.”

Mr Shurland said he will
seek to have the retrial held in
Freeport.

Around 9.30pm last night,
hundreds at the PLP conven-
tion were whipped into a fren-
zy by an overly enthusiastic
Mr Forbes who prematurely
exclaimed: “Pleasant is a free
woman PLPs! Pleasant is a
free woman PLPs! God is

good PLPs! Pleasant is a free
woman! God still reigns
PLPs!”

The convention exploded
in an impromptu dance to the
song “Oh Happy Day” while
the jury was still deliberating.

The session chairman
mounting the podium after
Mr Forbes’ speech had to
apologise for whatever con-
fusion the MP’s pronounce-
ment caused.

And late last night the PLP
issued an official apology. A
statement read: “Last evening
in the course of an address at
our annual national general
convention, it was announced
that former Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater had been acquit-
ted. The announcement was
incorrect. We give an unqual-
ified apology. This was not
intended to interfere with the
administration of justice.”

Before being sent to delib-
erate yesterday, the jury in
the John Travolta trial were
told yesterday they had to be
certain that ex-PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and for-
mer ambulance driver Tari-
no Lightbourne agreed
together to extort money
from the star.

In her summing up, Senior
Justice Anita Allen told the
nine-member jury a “threat”
is simply an expression of an
intention to do something,
and if they believed there was
no threat, then the accused
could not be found guilty of
attempted extortion.

Bridgewater and Light-
bourne are accused of
attempting to extort, and con-
spiring to extort $25 million
from American actor John
Travolta between January 2
and 20 by means of a threat.
They deny the charges.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury they had to be cer-
tain the pair agreed together
to extort money from Mr Tra-
volta, 55, stating they could
not convict one on the con-
spiracy charge and acquit the
other.

On the abetment to extor-
tion charge against Ms
Bridgewater alone, Senior
Justice Allen told the jury
they could not find Bridge-
water guilty of both attempt-

TARINO LIGHTBOURNE



ed extortion as well as abet-
ment to extortion.

She told them to consider
the abetment charge against
her only after considering the
attempted extortion charge.
She told the jury that only if
they found her not guilty on
the attempted extortion
charge, could they consider
the charge of abetment to
extortion.

The prosecution had
alleged that after Jett Travol-
ta, 16, had died of a seizure on
January 2, contact was made
with certain individuals to
convey a threat to Mr Tra-
volta, regarding the release to
the media of a refusal of treat-
ment form bearing his signa-
ture.

The form releases medical
personnel who attend to
patients in their care of any
liability if they are not taken
to the hospital.

When Mr Travolta took the
witness stand, he testified he
had been informed that the
release document he signed,
and stories connected to the
document, which would imply
that he was in some way cul-
pable in the death of his son,
would be released to the
media if money was not paid.

The defence contended
however that there had been
no threat or demand but
rather a “negotiation” for the
purchase of a document
which Mr Lightbourne had in
his possession.

Bridgewater contended that
she had been acting on behalf
of Lightbourne in her capaci-
ty as an attorney.

the jury that lawyers are not
immune to the law if they do
any act which amounts to a
criminal offence, whether on
their own or in representing a
client. Lightbourne’s defence
said he had made no threat
or demand and described him
as an opportunist and not an
extortionist.

Both accused made
unsworn statements to the
jury proclaiming their inno-
cence and the judge said it
was for the jury to determine
whether they were of any evi-
dential value and what weight
to be given to them. She also
told them that even if they
did not believe a word the
accused had said, they still
had to be satisfied on the evi-
dence of the prosecution that
they had committed the
offences.

She reminded the jury
they had to accept her direc-
tions on the law, and that
their role was to decide on
the facts. She noted that the
case is perhaps one of the
most high profile ever in the
Bahamas but told the jury
they were not to have any
regard to the media publicity.
She ordered them not to have
any sympathy for the victim
(Mr Travolta) nor the
accused, and also told them
they should not have any prej-
udice towards them.

“This case is not about pol-
itics. This is not about them
against us,” Senior Justice
Allen said.

She told the jury they
should not reject the evidence
of PLP senator Allyson May-
nard Gibson and Mr Tra-
volta’s attorney Michael
McDermott on the basis that
they had assisted the police.
She told the jury that there
was nothing in the law that
prohibited such actions.

The prosecution had
brought video and audio
taped conversations between
McDermott and the accused
in a covert operation as evi-
dence in the trial.

The defence claimed that
Mr Travolta had given birth
to extortion and was an
untruthful witness.

Senior Justice Allen told
the jury that the accused
could be found guilty by a two
thirds majority of 6-3 or 9-0.

B. E.C. (Bahamas Electricity Corporation) plan to construct and
operate Abaco’s new power plant in the Wilsons City/Buzzard Hill
area. We would like to send a strong message to our Government.
You are urged to attend and participate in a peaceful, lawful public
demonstration to be held in downtown Marsh Harbour, Abaco, on
Friday, October 23rd, between 10:00 am and Noon.

htto:/ Wwww.youtube.com/watch?v=PKk2DYYcSpu

For further information please contact Stafford Patterson at

242-366-0023 office
242-577-0273 cell
242-366-0554 home

info@splug@abacoinet.com

Paid Advertisement



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 11





The Bahamas and the death penalty

By LARRY SMITH

Let the punishment be equal
with the offence.
-- Cicero

"In the end, it is the poor who
are selected to die.”
-- Sister Helen Prejean

A A College of the
Bahamas seminar

recently, I sat next to a first-
year law student who had a
degree in criminal justice from
an American college. When
asked what should be done to
address crime, the first word
out of her mouth was "hang-
ing”.

And it appears that most
preachers are also firmly in
favour of the death penalty,
although it flies in the face of
everything written in the New
Testament. Indeed, some would
have no objection to turning
the clock back centuries and
making executions into a public
spectacle.

"Criminals now have no fear
of the law and no regard for
human life, and we can no
longer remain philosophical
about sending the strongest
message to the criminal ele-
ment in our society,” said the
chairman of the National Advi-
sory Council on Crime, Bish-
op Simeon Hall, recently. "We
need to hang a few."

But there are strong argu-
ments that the death penalty in
and of itself does not deter
crime. Many experts believe
such a punishment is only effec-
tive if it is applied with certain-
ty and without delay. And the
gross inefficiency of our judi-
cial system blunts any perceived
connection between the crime
and the penalty.

According to one report that
examined capital punishment
in Trinidad and Tobago: "The
evidence suggests that the prob-
lem faced by law enforcement is
to increase the certainty of pun-
ishment. The occasional and
long delayed mandatory sen-
tence to death is very unlikely
to add weight to the deterrent
effectiveness of a poorly-
enforced criminal law."

This report concluded that
"the problem of high and esca-
lating lethal violence in
Trinidad and Tobago cannot
be ‘fixed’ by executing occa-
sionally a tiny fraction of those
who commit murder. The solu-
tion must lie in tackling the eco-
nomic and social conditions that
have given rise to the problem,
and the cultural factors that
support the use of deadly force
as a means of resolving dis-
putes".

Much the same could be said
here, where the political class is
probably more sophisticated
than the wider public on the
hanging issue. For example,
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie have found it politic to
support hanging during periods
of public outcry against crime,
but many suspect they are not
expressing their true feelings.

The official position is that
capital punishment is the law
of the land, and the law will be
allowed to take its course. But
the argument is made by some
that this is double-speak.
According to defence lawyer
Wayne Munroe: "If the gov-
ernment was serious it would
know what is open to litigation
on the death penalty and move
to engage these points.

"If you want to hang, you
have to take positive steps to
limit appeals. You need legis-
lation prescribing uniform sen-
tencing, as was recommended
by the 1999 criminal justice task
force, but the politicians don't
have the will to do it. They are
just stringing the public along.”

In 2006, FNM cabinet minis-
ter Carl Bethel said much the
same thing when he was in
opposition, noting that if then
Prime Minister Perry Christie
wanted capital punishment (as
Mr Christie claimed he did) "he
would have to bring some laws
to parliament". Presumably
that is still the case, but we
don't see any such laws ema-
nating from the Ingraham gov-
ernment either.

There were 17 murderers on
death row in 2006, when the
Privy Council abolished the
mandatory death sentence in
the Bahamas. This meant that
every prisoner had to be re-sen-
tenced. But since then only four
cases have been reviewed,
according to National Security
Minister Tommy Turnquest,
and they have all been
appealed, so there will be no
hangings anytime soon.

"We will follow (the Privy
Council rulings) that the death
sentence is not mandatory and
that there has to be a sentenc-
ing hearing for all those who

were sentenced to death with-
out such a hearing,” Tunquest
told me. "During the re-sen-
tencing, the judges wil be look-
ing at the cases again, as well as
the length of time already
served, and they are passing a
variety of different sentences.
There is no need to change the
laws in my view.”

According to Turnquest:
"The four cases that have had
hearings where the death penal-
ty has been handed down again
are all now under appeal and
therefore the government can-
not carry out the death sen-
tence. Every citizen is entitled
to exhaust all avenues of
appeal. Once the appeal at any
level is dismissed the govern-
ment can proceed. In some
instances, if the government
doesn't proceed, the convict
would not move forward with
appeals to the next level.”

Fifty men have been hanged
here since 1929. Five under the
previous Ingraham administra-
tion; 13 under the Pindling gov-
ernment; and the remainder
between 1929 and 1967. The
last man to be hanged was
David Mitchell, in January
2000. Another man was sched-
uled for execution at the same
time, but he committed suicide
first.

Our annual murder rate last
year was 21 per 100,000 - in the
same league as Russia. And
there have been about a thou-
sand murders in the Bahamas
since 1990, not including
attempted killings or causing
grievous harm. A year ago, for-
mer police prosecutor Keith
Bell said the justice system itself
was the biggest obstacle to
crime reduction, and the only
way to address it was for politi-
cians of all parties to agree on a
priority agenda for legal reform.

"One third of accused mur-
derers are out on bail, including
those accused of up to 10 mur-
ders," Bell said. "The statistics
and reports are all there. We
know what is happening. The
only question is who is going
to be next. Why are we still
charging people with murder
when we know that capital pun-
ishment cannot be applied? We
should amend the law to pro-
vide for degrees of killing to
make it easier to convict, and
implement a system of plea bar-
gaining.”

Many people argue that
there needs to be clarity as far
as the death penalty is con-
cerned, and few would deny
that comprehensive legal
reforms to address our sky-
rocketing crime rate are long
overdue. In fact, they have been
prescribed by any number of
experts and consultative bod-
ies since at least the 1990s.

But in my view, we should
be sceptical about the death
penalty for two main reasons -
the certainty of miscarriages of
justice, and the historical use of
executions by those in power
for the suppression of dissent.
Leaders of slave and peasant
revolts present important exam-
ples in this regard. And as
Amnesty International notes,
capital punishment is “the ulti-
mate, irreversible denial of
human rights”.

Ever since the 7th century
BC, when Greece’s Draconian
legal code made death the only
penalty for every crime, the
world has been moving away
from capital punishment. More
than a hundred countries have
abolished the death penalty in
law or in practice - the United
States and Japan being the only
developed democracies that still
carry out judicial killings.

Until the late 19th century,
the “long drop” (as hanging
was known) was the penalty for
hundreds of crimes - including
shoplifting, poaching and
“being in the company of gyp-
sies”. But these days, the death
penalty is reserved for the most
serious offences — like aggra-
vated murder or treason - and
capital punishment is viewed
by most countries as an excep-
tion to be accompanied by
stringent safeguards.

Perhaps the best (or worst)
argument against the death
penalty is the certainty that
imnocent people will be execut-
ed, and there is no possible way
of compensating them for this
miscarriage of justice. In fact,
one of the last people hanged in
Britain was a mentally-handi-
capped teenager who was later
awarded a posthumous pardon.

In America, most of those
executed could not afford a tri-
al lawyer. And studies have also



shown the death penalty to be
racially biased. For example, in
Florida, experts say a black man
convicted of killing a white man
is five times more likely to
receive a death sentence than a
white man convicted of killing
another white man.

A study of hundreds of crim-
inal cases in which the convict-
ed person was exonerated sug-
gests there are thousands of
innocent people in American
prisons today. And the leading
causes of wrongful convictions
for murder were false confes-
sions and perjury by co-defen-
dants, informants, police offi-
cers or forensic scientists.

Despite the clear risk that
this could happen to any of us
at any time, most Bahamians
and other CARICOM nation-
als share a biblical attachment
to execution as a response to
violent crime. But judges have
been chipping away at the prac-
tice for years.

By most accounts it is highly
unlikely that a handful of exe-
cutions following years of delay
will have any real effect, par-

ticularly on the people whom
we would most like to be
deterred - like serial killers,
sadistic rapists and drugs
barons. And these particular
criminals are the least likely to
be executed anyway. The serial
killers will be found insane and
the drug barons will use any
means to avoid conviction,
including witness intimidation.

So, if we are really serious in
our desire to reduce crime
through harsher punishments
alone, we must be prepared to
execute every criminal who
commits a capital crime irre-
spective of their sex, age (above
the legal minimum) alleged
mental state or background.
Defences and appeals must be
limited by statute, and there
can be no reprieves.

Executions must be carried
out without delay and with suf-
ficient publicity to get the mes-
sage across to other similarly
minded people. For capital pun-
ishment to really reduce crime,
everyone of us must realise that
we will personally and without
doubt be put to death if we
commit particular crimes, and
that there can be absolutely no
hope of reprieve.

There is also the argument
that if we continue to do little or
nothing about persistent juve-
nile offenders, and then apply
the death penalty consistently,
we may be consigning many to

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their death at the age of 18, hav-
ing never previously given them
any discipline whatsoever. In
this scenario, execution will be
the first and last taste of disci-
pline a person gets in our soci-

ety.

The 2006 Privy Council rul-
ing that abolished the manda-
tory death sentence brought the
Bahamas in line with evolving
world standards. The United
Nations says that a mandatory

death penalty, which precludes
the possibility of a lesser sen-
tence regardless of the circum-
stances, is inconsistent with the
prohibition of cruel, inhuman
or degrading treatment or pun-
ishment.

But many still believe there is
no substitute for the best
defence. Capital punishment
not only forever bars murderers
from killing again, it offers
some retribution for their terri-
ble crimes. It would also save
money that could, perhaps, be
spent on better things than
Keeping killers in prison.

According to Lord Denning,
one of the most celebrated
British judges of the 20th cen-
tury: “It is a mistake to consid-
er the objects of punishments as
being a deterrent or reforma-
tive or preventive and nothing
else. The truth is that some
crimes are so outrageous that
society insists on adequate pun-
ishment, because the wrongdo-
er deserves it, irrespective of
whether it is a deterrent or
not."

If that is the case, it is incum-
bent upon our leaders to speak
clearly on this issue and then
do what is necessary to achieve
the desired outcome.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS



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THE TRIBUNE





AP BRIEFS FROM CARIBBEAN AND BERMUDA

Island ready to export 1 million
cases of rum to post-embargo US

HAVANA

Cuba is ready to ship 1 million cases of rum to
America if Washington eases its 47-year-old
embargo, but would hold off exporting its flagship
Havana Club brand because of U.S. trademark
battles, one of the island's top rum executives
said Wednesday. U.S. trade sanctions have cost
Cuba's rum industry $95 million annually in lost
sales and additional spending to import produc-
tion materials including glass bottles and machin-
ery from Europe instead of from its neighbor to
the north, said Juan Gonzalez, vice president of
Cuba Ron SA, the communist state's rum pro-
duction monopoly.

Cuban rums can't be sold in the United States,
but they are available in more than 120 countries,
Gonzalez said, noting that the company sold 4
million cases in 2008. Of that, Havana Club
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The global financial crisis should cut into sales
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does not release figures on revenue. Cuba's
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lowed by Spain, France, Greece, Chile and Rus-
sia. Gonzalez said the United States accounts
for 40 percent of the global rum market.

US man accused of killing wife on
scuba trip describes rescue efforts

TORTOLA, British Virgin Islands

A Rhode Island man accused of drowning his
wife during a 1999 scuba-diving trip choked back
emotions as he described the deadly dive in court
Wednesday, saying he cried over her lifeless body
after his efforts to save her failed.

David Swain, 53, who faces a maximum penal-
ty of life in prison if convicted, testified that he
had "no idea" how Shelly Tyre drowned during
the dive in British Virgin Islands waters. He said
they descended together and then parted ways at
a shipwreck. After he surfaced, he heard anoth-
er diver shouting for help and clutching his wife's
body. Swain, who had worked as an emergency



medical technician for years before opening a
dive shop in Rhode Island, helped lift Tyre onto
a dinghy, where he led rescue efforts including
CPR. The 1999 drowning was initially ruled an
accident. But authorities in the British Virgin
Islands later charged Swain with murder after a
2006 civil trial in his home state found him
responsible. He was extradited to Tortola the
following year and has been in jail here since.

Prosecutors allege Swain killed his 46-year-
old wife so he could pursue a romance with
another woman, and because the couple's
prenuptial agreement denied him money if they
divorced. Experts have testified that they believe
Swain wrestled Tyre from behind, tore off her
mask and shut off her air supply.

Swain has always maintained his innocence
and his defense lawyers have said they will show
the drowning was a "tragic accident."

Bermuda resort voted ‘world top 500'
hotel to partially close amid crisis

BERMUDA

A posh Bermuda resort named one of the
world's top 500 hotels this year will close its cen-
tury-old main building because the economic cri-
sis has sapped tourism to the island. Elbow Beach
Hotel will lay off about 160 employees by the end
of November as it shutters 131 rooms and out-
sources food and beverage services, Mandarin
Oriental Hotel Group spokeswoman Danielle
DeVoe said Wednesday.

"It's fair to say that current business levels are
challenging globally,” she said.

The hotel's 1908 pastel-yellow building will
remain closed for several years. Hotel officials
hope to renovate it during that time, although no
details have been specified, DeVoe said.

Elbow Beach will still operate 98 luxury suites
and cottages, said Frank Stocek, the hotel's gen-
eral manager. The resort made its debut on Trav-
el + Leisure magazine's list of the world's top
500 hotels this year. Mandarin Oriental has man-
aged it since 2000. Rates range from $300 to
more than $800 a night. Bermuda, a British ter-
ritory several hundred miles northeast of Florida,
has seen a nearly 20 percent drop in tourists
through June, compared to the same period last
year, according to the Caribbean Tourism Orga-
nization.

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For detail please contact Sale Rep. Teresa Symonette at teresa_symonette@hotmail.com or epbahamas@yahoo.com or Ph: 393-5011



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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 13





LOCAL NEWS

ae i
DIAMONDS INTERNATIONAL DONATION: Pictured from left to right: Adi Kaniel, DI representative; Kevin
Hanna, DI representative; Dr F Montero, Neonatal Department, PMH; Renee Knowles, DI representative;
Dr Steve Lochan, Neonatal Department, PMH; Patsy Morris, PMH; Jennifer Sands, PMH; Thelma Rolle,
PMH Foundation; Michele Rassin, Doctors Hospital

Corporate donations made
to ‘Breathe Easy’ Campaign

CORPORATE partners con-
tinue to support the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” benefitting the
Princess Margaret Hospital’s
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Earmarked for high risk, pre-
mature, low birth-weight, or crit-
ically ill newborns, the “Breathe
Easy Campaign” is a nationwide
fund-raiser that will provide ven-
tilators designed to breathe for a
newborn who is physically
unable to do so. The donated
ventilators will support breathing
until the infant's respiratory
efforts are sufficient.

The latest community citi-
zens to support the cause, Dia-
monds International employees,
made a collection in support of
the Breathe Easy Campaign and
Diamonds International
Bahamas matched the funds for
a total cheque presentation in
the amount of $2,000.

Diamonds International mar-
keting manager Renea Knowles
said: "The entire team at Dia-
monds International felt that it
was important to lend support
to such a worthy cause. We are
encouraging other organisations
to become involved and do their
part in helping the programme
to reach their goal.”

Long-standing Bahamian
bank and community partner
Royal Bank of Canada was also
presented a cheque to the
Breathe Easy Campaign in the
amount of $2,000.

Hope Sealy of the RBC
Financial Group said: "We are
delighted to continue our tradi-



MANDY'S FRENCH BAKERY DONATION: Pictured from left to right:
Mandy Yuen, Mandy's French Bakery and Michele Rassin, president

of Rotary Club of East Nassau

tion of contributing to the
Bahamas; the donation to the
Breathe Easy Campaign is
another way for RBC to give
back to the community in a tan-
gible way that will have a life-
saving impact for the premature
babies at the Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital."

In addition to the larger cor-
porate sponsors, the first French
Bakery in the Bahamas,
Mandy's French Bakery, donat-
ed $500 to the campaign.

Owner Mandy Yuen said:
"We are proud to be supporters
of the effort to improve health-
care in the Bahamas and the
Bahamian community."

Organised by the Tribune

Media Group, the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, Tile King, Doc-
tors Hospital, Bahamas Realty,
and the Rotary Club of East
Nassau, to date the campaign
has topped the halfway mark
with approximately $166,935
being raised, the goal being
$300,000.

The first two ventilators have
already arrived at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Persons interested in making a
donation towards the campaign
should contact the Tribune
Media Group, Doctors Hospi-
tal or the Tile King, or drop off a
check made payable to the
“Princess Margaret Hospital
Foundation", Breathe Easy
Campaign.



RBC DONATION: Pictured from left to right: Neonatal Nurses from PMH; Hope Sealy, RBC; Michele
Rassin and Joanne Lowe from the Rotary Club of East Nassau

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The College Board's Advanced Placement Program (AP) provides motivated and academically
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school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on
the AP Exams. About 18 percent of the nearly 1.7 million students worldwide who took AP Exams
performed at a sufficiently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award.

The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students’ performance
on AP Exams. At Kingsway Academy four (4) students qualified for the AP Scholar Award by
completing three or more AP Exams with grades of 3 or higher. The AP Scholars are Raymond
Bingham, Joshua Key, Elizabeth Newchurch, and Amy Pinder.

Through more than 30 different college-level courses and exams, AP provides motivated and
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research institutions. More than 3,600 colleges and universities annually receive AP grades.
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academic success in college and higher graduation rates than students who do not

participate in AP.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



A eae

"I THINK the nominating process was exciting. I think it
was good for the democracy of the party seeing that there
were so many people nominating for so many positions.
This suggests that the party is alive and well and that people
are enthused by the prospects of serving the people through
the PLP and hopefully one day serving the nation again."

"T think my chances are as good anybody else who is in
the race. I think there is an undercurrent in the convention
for change. I think people want things done differently
even those who have had an opportunity to serve currently
are promising that they will change so obviously they have
gotten the message from the electorate so we just have to
wait and see."

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PLP LEADER Perry Christie at the convention last night.

PLP leadership is
a three horse race

FROM page one

secure a better chance of
victory, there are reports
from the convention floor
that the respective candi-
dates have formed alliances
with deputy leadership can-
didates and even those in

the race for chairman.
Some stalwarts suggest
Mr Christie had teamed up
with PLP MP Philip ‘Brave’
Davis and former MP
Bradley Roberts, while oth-
ers say the former prime
minister has thrown his sup-
port behind West End and

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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Bimini MP Obie Wilch-
combe and Glenys Hanna-
Martin.

Dr Nottage is receiving
significant support from the
party’s delegates who spec-
ulate that he might be
inclined to support Mr
Davis or even Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald for
deputy.

Whoever wins must be
prepared to fight for the
hearts and minds of unde-
cided voters, senior party
members say.

“We need to fight for
change in this party,” said
one stalwart last night. “The
PLP as a whole needs to
realise that we have to fight
for those undecided / swing
voters out there who are
looking to us to mature as
an organisation and use this

OTe ST
ava aA)

THE convention
floor was reportedly a
scene of raw emotions
and frayed nerves yes-
terday.

TRIBUNE sources
said that among the
many anxious politi-
cians was party leader
Perry Christie, who
was spied off to one
side whispering ani-
matedly with party
chairman Glenys Han-
na-Martin.

Mrs Hanna-Martin
had reportedly pulled
Mr Christie aside to
ask why he brought
back former chairman
Bradley Roberts to run
against her.

It is not known what
Mr Christie said, but
he reportedly seemed
flustered and extreme-
ly agitated, using vigor-
ous body language and
gestures.

Whatever the party
leader communicated
reportedly upset the
chairman, who some
said had tears in her
eyes after the conver-
sation.



opportunity to make some
concrete developments
within our organisation.

“We don’t need to appeal
or appease our base. They
will be voting PLP anyhow.
It is the young voter — the
young educated voter who
will decide the way this next
election will swing.”

PLP delegate Laurence
Harrison said that Mr
Christie and Mr Wilch-
combe are the right men for
the job.

“Mr Christie is a good
man. He has done well and
I feel that he deserves a
chance. He said he is in
transition with the party
which means that Mr Wilch-
combe will be that man who
Sir Lynden said he was
training to one day lead this
party into the next genera-
tion.”

Unner Ine Distineunsneo Parnosace Or His Excecency,

—

Archbishop of Nassau

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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 15

sports



a OCTOBER 22,



2009

LEADING BAHAMIAN: saci Martinborough is now io me oT) meen boat:

DUE to the heavy winds, there was
no sailing competition yesterday in Mon-
tagu Bay as the 2009 Sunfish World

Championship took a break.

However, the competition will pick

back up today with a full slate of action.

Going into day three of the champi-
onships, American David M. Loring
leads the way with s total of 13.8 points.
Loring won the fifth and last race con-

tested on Tuesday.

Not too far behind in second place is

Bahamas Fall Judo Classic
set for Saturday October 24

Chrisnell and Myriel

THE Bahamas Judo Federation will be





Heavy winds force suspension
of Sunfish World Championship

Marx Chirinos of Venezuela with 14.0.
American Paul-Jon Patin rounds out the
top three with 17.0.

Three-time champion Donnie Mart-
inborough tops the list of Bahamians as
he sit in 14th place with 96.0. Charles

Kelly is the next Bahamian in 20th place
with 112.0.

@ SEE PAGE 16 FOR PHOTOS AND
PRELIMINARY RESULTS

PHOTOS: Woodley Carroll



hosting the Bahamas Judo Fall Classic on
Saturday October 24 at Xaviers Lower
School from 5pm to 8 pm. This tournament
promises to be very exciting as the overall
level of Judo in the country has grown expo-
nentially since the beginning of the year.
Persons from Judo in Abaco will also be in
attendance. Also present will be the Spe-
cial Olympics athletes who will compete in
regular divisions. "We are looking forward to
an excellent event," Says David Rahming,
Chief Instructor of the Fox Hill Club and
Special Olympians.

Competing in the tournament will be a
number of students from the College of the
Bahamas as well as the regular Judo clubs.

Judo is an Olympic combat sport where the
match is determined by throwing an indi-
vidual with force and control to his or her
back and pinning them for 25 seconds.
Attending will also be Cynthia Rahming
and Taryn Butler, two top female athletes
with international credentials.

"There will be some really tough match-
es,” says Phil Kemp, BJF Treasurer. " We
want to use this event to get things back
into full swing for the academic year. We
have seen that the Bahamian athletes need
more match time."

Spectator Tickets will be on sale at the
door for $10 per person. Anyone interested
in Judo may contact the Bahamas Judo Fed-
eration at 364-6773.



Catholic Diocesan Primary
Schools basketball league

Blue Flames
oo hot for
the Sparks

Defensive battle turns
into 39-19 hammering

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribune-
media.net

HAT started out as a defensive battle turned
into a massacre as Our Lady’s Blue Flames
outlasted the visiting St. Thomas More
Sparks 39-19.

The Blue Flames, the league’s dormant team last year with
just one victory on their ledger, stunned the Sparks, last year’s
runners-up, as the Catholic Diocesan Primary Schools basket-
ball league continued.

“T think it’s going to be a very competive season,” said
Rohan Parkes, coach of Our Lady’s. “I watched a couple of
teams played and I think they’re all going to be very tough.”

Parkes, however, could put in an agument for his Blue
Flames after they pulled away from a close 15-13 deficit at
the end of the third and turned it into a blowout as they went
on a couple of scoring sprees, starting with a 6-0 run for a 23-17
lead in the fourth.

Our Lady’s would go on another 8-1 spurt that extended
their lead to 31-18 and they controlled all facet of the game as
they cruised to an easy victory.

D’Angelo Mackey, who was unstoppable as he went on his
rampage, finished with a game high 24 points as he took over
in the fourth quarter, scoring two and three baskets at will.

Mackey said he was pleased with their team effort.

“We passed the ball and we laid up good,” said Mackey,
not trying to take all of the spotlight. “I felt good about the way
we played. We did very good.”

The 10-year-old fifth grader said this was just an indication of
what to expect this year from the Blue Flames, who worked
very hard to get ready for this year’s season.

Charles Cooper also had a big game defensively for Our
Lady’s, who eventually fouled out late in the fourth quarter
after he contributed seven points. Tereek Munroe added six
points.

SEE page 18

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THE NEW PROVIDENCE PUBLIC PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Soccer competition held at
College of Bahamas field

THE New Providence
Public Primary Schools
kicked off its calender year
by hosting its soccer compe-
tition at the College of the
Bahamas playing field.

The tournament was com-
pleted yesterday with Yel-
low Elder and Adalaide
being crowned as the girls
and boys champions respec-
tively.

In the girls championship,
Yellow Elder, coached by
Cardinal Moncur, defeated
Garvin Tynes to complete
the season with a perfect 6-0
win-loss.

Robyn Port was named
the most valuable player.

Garvin Tynes fnished with
a 5-1 record. Adalaide was
third at 4-2, while Sadie Cur-
tis was fourth at 3-3.

A total of 17 schools par-
ticipated in the division.

On the boys side,
Adalaide blanked Centre-
ville 2-0 to win the title.
They finished with a 6-0
record and surprisingly did-
n’t allow any team to score
goal.

Centreville ended up in
second at 5-1, while Garvin
Tynes was third at 4-2.

A total of 24 teams par-
ticipated in the division.

League public relations
officer Frank Johnson said
the league was a very com-
petitive one and they were
very pleased with the help
they got from some of the
coaches and officials in the
Bahamas Football Associa-
tion. Johnson said they are
also looking forward to the
rest of the calender year.
During the third week of
November, Johnson said
they intend to start basket-
ball at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

—_ 2009 SUNFISH WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP






@ PRELIMINARY TTT TGA PU

ayy a
Sailed:5, Discards:0, To count:5, Entries:72, Scoring system:Appendix A

Rank Nat SailINo Helm R2 Total
Ist USA 3963 David M. Loring ; 2.8 rdga : : ‘ 13.8

2nd Venezuela 3910 Marx Chirinos : 3.0 ; ; ; 14.0

3rd_ USA 3950 Paul-Jon Patin : 2.0 : ; : 17.0

4th Curacao 3920 Ard Van Aanholt ; 1.0 : : : 22.0

Sth USA 3948 David Mendelblatt ; 5.0 : : ; 27.0

6th Guatemala 3965 = Juan Jose Delgdo Hurtado : 8.0 : ! : 29.0

7th US VirginIsls 3917 — Peter Stanton ; 6.0 . ‘ : 32.0

8th Bermuda 3957 Malcolm Smith : 4.0 : : ; 33.0

9th Holland 3922 Mathieu De By 7.0 : 10.0 : 53.0

10th Curacao 3925 Cor Van Aanholt 13, 0 9.0 ; 26.0 : 63.0

11th Venezuela 3906 Jose Gutierrez 12.0 13.0 . 13.0 12.0 70.0

12th USA 3967 H.N. "Hank" Saurage IV 11.0 10.0 ; 32.0 15.0 85.0

13th USA 3952 Greg Gust 15.0 16.0 : 31.0 14.0 88.0

14th Bahamas 3955. Donald Martinborough 19.0 21.0 : 12.0 21.0 96.0

15th USA 3970 Chip Clifton 20.0 22.0 . 11.0 16.0 101.0
16th USA 3951 Rich Chapman 14.0 17.0 : 16.0 28.0 102.0
17th USA 3972 Seth Siegler 20.7rdga20.7 rdga : 30.0 18.0 103.4
18th Peru 3903 Guillermo Cappelleti 22.0 12.0 : 40.0 20.0 109.0
19th Curacao 3942 ~— Jurgen Schneider 10.0 18.0 . 19.0 46.0 zfp 111.0
20th Bahamas 3935 Charles Kelly 18.0 20.0 : 23.0 27.0 112.0
21st USA 3936 Josh Kerst 16.0 30.0 : 14.0 35.0 114.0
22nd Curacao 3923 Philipine Van Aanholt 33.0 36.0 i 20.0 17.0 116.0
23rd USA 3912 Eric Woodman 32.0 26.0 ; 9.0 26.0 119.0
24th Curacao 3943 Mark Simmeren 39.0 15.0 . 37.0 22.0 124.0
25th Guatemala 3966 Andrea Denisse Aldana Bennett 35.0 19.0 : 18.0 13.0 129.0
26th Bahamas 3901 William (Christopher) Sands 34.0 38.0 : 21.0 32.0 141.0
27th Venezuela 3939 Luis T. Nunez 29.3rdga29.3 rdga ; 33.0 42.0 146.6
28th Curacao 3941 Niek Kort 17.0 14.0 : 48.0 39.0 148.0
29th Holland 3929 Paul Van Alphen 21.0 11.0 : 60.0 34.0 155.0
30th Bonaire 3902 Sipke Stapert 26.0 73.0 dnt : 17.0 10.0 160.0
31st USA 3947 Chad Coberly 31.0 25.0 : 28.0 44.0 zfp 161.0
32nd USA 3971 William Betts IIT 23.0 32.0 : 54.0 30.5 161.5
33rd Bahamas 3934 Fernando De Cardenas 28.0 23.0 , 29.0 43.0 162.0
34th Bahamas 3931 Gavin McKinney 38.0 39.0 : 15.0 41.0 164.0
35th Bahamas 3954 Jeffrey Gale 37.0 28.0 . 39.0 25.0 165.0
36th Holland 3930 Piet Bankersen 25.0 34.0 ; 22.0 44.0 167.0
37th USA 3962 Steven W. Evans 36.0 33.0 : 25.0 29.0 168.0
38th Bahamas 3964 Andrew Wilhoyte 30.0 27.0 : 50.0 51.0 179.0
39th USA 3927 Ravi Subramanian 24.0 41.0 : 49.0 24.0 179.0
40th USA 3946 Daniel Norton 49.0 37.0 : 41.0 19.0 183.0
41st USA 3911 Bill F. Brainiforte 29.0 73.0 dns ; 35.0 23.0 188.0
42nd Bahamas 3932 James Lowe 48.0 43.0 . 24.0 40.0 195.0
43rd Bahamas 3968 George Damianos 27.0 29.0 : 52.0 54.0 205.0
44th Bahamas 3940 Peter-Bruce Wassitsch 41.0 35.0 : 38.0 57.0 209.0
45th Venezuela 3907 Francisco Almon 42.0 51.0 : 27.0 58.0 213.0
46th USA 3956 John A. Butine 44.0 42.0 : 34.0 47.0 216.0
47th USA 3961 Tony Collins 53.0 24.0 . 36.0 56.0 229.0
48th Bahamas 3944 Ted O'Brien 47.0 45.0 ; 45.0 45.0 236.0
49th Curacao 3918 Alex Roose 40.0 54.0 ; 51.0 46.0 250.0
50th USA 3969 Charles Clifton 54.0 48.0 : 56.0 48.0 253.0
Sist Venezuela 3909 Roberto Kazibutowski 58.0 40.0 : 47.0 64.0 255.0
52nd USA 3914 Brent Evans 59.0 50.0 : 46.0 51.0 zfp 256.0
53rd ahamas 3904 Donico Brown 52.0 73.0 dnt : 42.0 37.0 257.0
54th ahamas 3919 Michael Holowesko 51.0 58.0 : 44.0 49.0 257.0
55th 3908 Lee Montes 50.0 53.0 : 55.0 52.0 258.0
56th 3913 Matthew McCoy 45.0 57.0 ; 64.0 36.0 260.0
57th 3921 Lee McCoy 52.3rdga46.0 : 57.0 55.0 261.3
58th 3915 David (DJ) Lorshbaugh Jr. 43.0 56.0 : 61.0 50.0 266.0
59th 3926 Ed Hill 55.0 31.0 : 63.0 67.0 268.0
60th Peurto Rico 3958 Fernando I Monllor 56.0 47.0 ; 53.0 63.0 280.0
6lst SA 3953 Marshall Woodson 60.0 49.0 . 59.0 59.0 284.0
62nd Bahamas 3937. Dwayne Wallas 57.0 55.0 : 58.0 61.0 293.0
63rd SA 3938 Lee Creekmore 73.0dnf 73.0 dne . 43.0 53.0 306.0
64th Bahamas 3900 — Brent (BJ) Burrows 63.0 60.0 : 62.0 62.0 312.0
65th 3933 Lori Lowe 65.0 52.0 : 65.0 65.0 316.0
66th 3949 Anne Cottrell Patin 62.0 59.0 ; 67.0 68.0 319.0
67th 3960 Nicky Einthoven 66.0 61.0 . 68.0 60.0 326.0
68th Venezuela 3924 Nieves Barreda 64.0 62.0 ; 66.0 66.0 328.0
69th Austria 3916 Pedro Wassitsch 61.0 73.0 dnt ; 73.0 dns 73.0 dns 346.0
70th Holland 3928 Marie-Christine Breeveld 73.0 dnf 73.0 dne : 69.0 69.0 352.0
71st Canada 3959 Alyson Myers 73.0 dnf 73.0 dne : 70.0 70.0 358.0
72nd USA 3905 David McCary 73.0 dnc 73.0 dne ; 73.0 dnf 73.0 dns 359.0

SCORING CODES USED

Code Description Points
DNC Did not come to the starting area

DNF = Started but did not finish

DNS Came to the start area but did not start

RDGaRedress - average points for all races except the race in question

ZFP 20% penalty under rule 30.2 Varies



aGauprcrcrcd

— a

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

SPORTS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 17



November 21 election
will be critical for BAAA

y OU would think
that you're getting

ready for a political cam-
paign the way Michael
‘Mike’ Sands and his slate
of officers have officially
launched their quest to con-
test the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Athletic Associa-
tions’ election of officers.

On Wednesday as they
gathered in front of the con-
struction site for the new
national stadium, Sands and
his Visionary team as they
call themselves presented
their platform slogan
dubbed: "Share the Vision."

The vision, as they've out-
lined it, states:

"To improve our standing
in the World by providing
visionary leadership through
experience, with integrity,
courage, commitment,
empathy, humility and con-
fidence, while serving ath-
letes, coaches, officials and
all stakeholders throughout
the length and breadth of
the Bahamas."

Track and field, by far, is
the most highly recognized
sport for the Bahamas on
the international scene,
based on the tremendous
performance of our athletes
and even administrators, led
by Pauline
Davis-
Thomp-
son, who
sits on the
board of
the IAAF
Council.

As such,
the leader-
ship of the
sport has
to be one
that is very visible and
respected.

So the elections coming
up on November 21 will be a
very critical one for the
BAAA.

Right now there are two
persons vying for leader.
Sands will take on Curt 'Mr.
H' Hollingsworth, who
served as vice president dur-
ing Sands’ last tenure in
office before he was ousted
out by a ‘vote of no confi-
dence.’

The two have been insep-
arable before the turmoil
that the association experi-
enced about two years ago
and whatever the outcome
of the elections, I think it
will be incumbent on both
men to get back to that lev-
el because I think they both
have a contribution to make

10 NIK a C

y,
1 |
\ |

BASKETBALL
BBF CLINIC

~ MIKE SANDS




The Bahamas Basketball
Federation in conjunction
with FIBA, the world gov-
erning body for basketball,
will be conducting a Mini
Basketball Clinic, for all
coaches in the Bahamas
Friday October 23rd from
5:30 pm to 8 p.m. and Sat-
urday 24th from 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Sir Kendal
Isaac’s Gymnasium.

The cost of the clinic is
$35.00 which includes a
mini basketball book and
clinic materials.

The instructor for the
Clinic is Professor Edwin
Pefia, FIBA Certified
Instructor. The Federation
will provide participants
with “Certificates of Par-
ticipation”.

Individuals who are
interested in participating
in the Clinic are asked to
contact Mr. Sean Bastian
302-4591 or email:
HYPERLINK
"mailto:snsenterpris-
es_502@hotmail.com"
snsenterprises_502@hot-
mail.com as soon as possi-
ble.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
rete Merde] 414
on Mondays



STUBBS



OPINION

in the way forward for the
association.

The new executive board
should be in office by the
time the new stadium is
completed by the Chinese
Government and by the
time the next Olympic
Games roll around in 2012
in London, England.

While Hollingsworth has
indicated that he prefer not
to get into a political foray in
the media, Sands knows
quite well that any and all
publicity generated will go
a long way in getting his
message across.

In their platform, Sands
and his executive team have
also made some promises
that they hope that they
should be accountable for,
if elected to office.

Among the list are:

¢ Establishment of a
National Training Center
with proper weights, equip-
ment and implements.

¢ Obtain increased fund-
ing from government, part-
ners and other sources based
on track and field's perfor-
mance.

¢ Provide cash incentives
to clubs and coaches for
home based student-ath-
letes.

¢ Provide training and cer-
tification opportunities for
all coaches, especially at the
primary and high school lev-
els.

¢ Reestablish the
Bahamas’ preeminence in
the region at the Youth and

Junior competitions.

¢ Change meeting dates
for the BAAA to a Friday
to include Family Island
coaches and members in the
decision making process.

Those are just some of the
promises made and I'm sure
that all voting delegates will
be looking at them seriously
before they make their final
decision and if elected, they
will be holding them to each
and every one of them.

So the campaign swords
have been drawn and with
less than a month left before
the electorate go to the
polls, you can bet that there
will be a whole lot of discus-
sion on who will be the next
leader of the BAAA.

GOOD BYE MR. C

Thanks to all who took
the time out with me to offer
prayers for the late Roger
Carron.

When I got the news on
Sunday
morning that
he had passed
away, I felt a |)
big void in
my life went
away because
of the role
that Mr. C, as
he was affec-
tionately
called, went
away as well.

Mr. C, as I mentioned in
this column last week, was
the first boss that I came
into contact with here at The
Tribune when I joined the
staff as a budding young
reporter.

And throughout my
tenure, Mr. C was probably
the most caring and sympa-
thetic boss that I ever came
in contact with. He had a
passion for sports, but he
also had a knack for perfec-
tion and always wanted to
see the staff produce it's
best. Although he no loner
occupied the desk as the
Sports Editor, in a lot of
ways, I still considered him
to be my boss because he
always knew what was going
on and he never let a day go
back if something wasn't
covered or covered proper-
ly. Twill certainly miss him.

To Mrs. Elaine Carron,
Robert and the rest of the
family, I know you've loved
a gem, but I will also cherish
the relationship and the
bond that we were able to
develop over the years.

May his soul rest in peace.

ROGER
TO

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Junior Squash finals show improvements in skill

On Saturday, October 17th the finals for
the first Junior team league squash were held
with trophies and awards presented by the
President of the Bahamas Squash Associa-
tion, Mr. Pembroke Williams and Vice-Presi-
dent, Ms. Michele Thompson.

After six weeks of league competition twen-
ty junior squash players demonstrated tremen-
dous improvements in their fitness, squash
skills and racquet control for winning shots
as well as sportsmanship on and off the court
and responsibility for scoring and refereeing
matches.

The Berry Rain Bashers led by Christina
Fields were the winners with a total of 73
points. In second place the Lemon Standers,
captained by Dylan Davies, earned 67 points.
In third place the Green Goblins with Oliver
Euteneuer leading his team scored a total of 62
points. The most improved player award went
to Aidan Adams and the best sportsperson
award was presented to Ashley Fox.

eoneA Meee Med ctrle atm aT Lebets ano Luke, Aen Scott and Au.



2009 softball season
closes on a high note

The Bahamas Government Departmen-
tal Softball Association closed its 2009 soft-
ball season on a very high note.

The players, spectators and fans wit-
nessed the most spectacular, keen contest-
ed, championship playoff series ever.

This year's softball season were well
attended by the fans and spectators alike.
The championship games brought people
by the groves to watch softball at its best.

There were persons standing around the
fences to ensure that they don't miss a stu-
pendous play and during all of the games
the bleachers were jammed pack.

It was predicted by many persons that
since the two best top Men Teams in the
League will square-off in the championship
series, and knowing that both ball clubs
have dynamism their playoff series defi-
nitely will go down to the wires. So said, so
done! Police Chiefs went into the champi-
onship playoff with the Men's best overall
record, but they were still considerate as the
under dogs. On the other hand, Defence
Force Floaters placed second in the Men's
overall standing but because of them cap-
turing the Men's title for seventeen con-
secutive years and with the wealth of expe-
riences under their belts, some persons
were still expecting them to capture their
eighteen (18) consecutive titles.

However, when the dust was cleared in
game number seven, the Police Chiefs came
out as the victors while it was a doomed day
for Defence Force Floaters.

The Floaters prestigious crown which
they held for so many years suddenly swept
from them just by a wink of an eye.

At the conclusion of the seventh game
everyone was stunned to see that Defence
Force Floaters winning streak came to a
halt so quickly. The championship series
left everyone saying that this was the most
unbelievable playoff series that they have
ever seen.

¢ Here’s a summary of the games played:

Game One

The Defence Force Floaters came from
behind and nipped Police Chiefs 30-29 in a
hair- raising and a nail- biting encounter.

Reynaldo Russell was the hero for
Defence Force Floaters, he had a perfect 5-
for-5 day at the plate, scored four runs and
picked up five RBI and he had four home
runs.

Dwayne Dean did the damage for Police
Chiefs, he had a perfect plate appearances,



as he went 5-for-5, scored four runs, picked
up two RBI and had one home-run.

Game Two

The Police Chiefs routed Defence Force
Floaters 19-9 to tie their series 1-1 in a lop-
sided affair.

The Police Chiefs came out with fire in
their eyes and bats, as they smoked-out
Defence Force Floaters 19-9.

Alcott Forbes swung the hot bat for the
Police Chiefs with a perfect 4-for-4 day
appearances. He scored four runs and
picked up five RBI. Remone Storr was the
potent batter for his team, he had a 4-for-3
day at the plate, scored two runs and picked
up one RBI.

Game three

The Police Chiefs clobbered Defence
Force Floaters 25-12 to take a commanding
2-1 lead.

Van Johnson, Godfrey Willie and Marvin
Wood had four hits a piece. Willie scored
two runs and picked up six RBI, he also had
two home runs.

Dwayne Mackey, Philip Culmer and
Thomas Williams had three hits each.
Mackey scored three runs and picked up
four RBI.

Game four

Defence Force Floaters gave Police
Chiefs a taste of their own medicine by
defeating them with identical 19-9 record as
in game two of their series, they also tied
the series 2-2.

Philip Culmer swung the hot bat for the
Floaters, he went 5-for4 plate appearances,
scored four runs and picked up three RBI.
Van Johnson assisted his team by having a
perfect 3-for-3 day at the plate, scored one
ran and picked up two RBI.

Game five

Police Chiefs out-hit Defence Force
Floaters 20-12 to take a commanding 3-2
lead in the playoff series. Police Chiefs
came out with their bats fully loaded and
they went to work from the onset of the
game.

Alcott Forbes, Derek Sands and Mar-
vin Wood were the sluggers of the game,
they all had three hits each. Wood scored
two runs and picked up two RBI.

Dencil Clarke was the striker for
Defence Force Floaters, he had a 3-for-4
day plate appearances, scored three runs
and picked one RBI.

Game six

The Defence Force Floaters refused to

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lie down and play dead, the Floaters
secured the victory by edging-out Police
Chiefs 10-9 in a squeezer to tie the series
once again 3-3 for a dead lock for the third
time in their series.

Keith Moss, Terrance Culmer and Brad
Smith had three hits each for the Floaters.
Darren Mortimer did the damage for Police
Chiefs with his perfect three-for-three day
and he scored one run.

Game seven

The Police Chiefs came out stroking
from the top of the first inning by scoring
four runs, in the bottom half, Defence
Force Floaters knowing that it was show-
time, had to come tougher than the Law
Enforcement Officers; therefore, they came
out blasting with six tallies to take an early
6-5 lead. In the Top of the second inning,
Police Chiefs refused to give up, they
smashed three runs and in the bottom half,
they were able to quiet Defence Force
Floaters bats to one run.

In the top of the third inning Police
Chiefs was allowed to score one run and
they kept the Defence Force Floaters to
one run in the bottom half. In the top of the
fourth inning, Police Chiefs scored one and
Defence Force Floaters tried to make their
move by scoring four runs to take a 11-10
lead in the bottom half of the fourth inning.

In the top of the fifth inning, Police
Chiefs came up with four biggers while
Defence Force Floaters was able to sneak
one run in the bottom half.

In the top of the sixth inning, Police
Chiefs went on a hit-parade by scoring
eight more runs while keeping Defence
Force Floaters to only one run in the bot-
tom half. In the top of the seventh inning,
Police Chiefs ended Defence Force Floaters
streak of seventeen consecutive victories
and dethroning them with a 27-15 score,
damaging the Defence Force Floaters.

The Police Chiefs gave the Floaters a
taste of their own medicine by cracking
seventeen (17) home runs which helped
them to subjugate the Mariners.

The Most Valuable Players (MVPs) of
the championship games are Godfrey
Willie and Darren Mortimer.

The Executives extend congratulation
to the 2009 champions, Police Chiefs. Also
congratulation to the 2009 Runners-up,
Defence Force Floaters for a job well done
and we wish you all success for the 2010
softball season.

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Blue Flames too hot for Sparks
FROM page 15

For the St. Thomas More, after trailing 6-4 at the end of
the first and 9-8 at the half, just simply fell apart in the second
half as they only managed to score an extra 11 points. After the
game, Sparks’ coach N’Komo Ferguson was dumbfounded
about his team’s performance. “When you find out, you let me
know,” said Ferguson when asked what happened to his team.
“Tjust don’t know. My boys just didn’t come to play.”

D’Chaz Butler had five points, Rohan Kerr four and Davon
Martin, Cairo Curry, Jefferson Thomas and Carl Cooper all
chipped in with two points in the loss.

After the mid-term break this weekend, St. Thomas More will
have very little time to heal their wombs as they have to face
defending champions St. Bede’s Crushers on Tuesday.

“Tt’s really back to the drawing board,” said Ferguson about
last year’s championship rematch. “This is a brand new team
with just two grade six players. But if my four starters don’t
come out and play like I expect them to do, then I will have no
other choice but to go with the bench. They will have to carry
us through.”

Against St. Bede’s, Ferguson know that they will have to
come prepared. In the league’s opening game on Monday, the
Crushers crushed the Xavier’s Green giants 39-5.

RMT UD
Capture ladies crown

THE Finance Health Invaders captured the ladies
crown in Government Departmental Softball in grand
style. They waited patiently for two years to reclaim the
distinguished crown.

The Invaders did not waste any time in the postseason.

They knocked off the BTC Connectors in three shakes
to advance to the championship round, then they came
back and swept the Defence Force Waves in four straight
games.

Finance Health held the best record of 20-1 in the
ladies overall standing. This year they played every team
hard and by the scores in the scorebooks, in some
instances they showed no mercy for their opponents.

Finance Health Invaders' manager Della Davis said
that they had set their goal from the onset of the season
and if they had to scratch and crawl their way to the
number one position and to stay there then so be it.

She said that she informed her ladies, that this was
their year and in order for them to recapture the ladies’
title, they must jell together as a team, play good defense
and have a solid offence.

While Davis spoke with a big smile on her face, she stat-
ed that she was very pleased with the team's accom-
plishment this season and hoping to have a spotless record
for the 2010 softball season.

¢ Here’s asummary of their games played:

Game one

Finance Health Invaders arrested the Defence Force
Waves 8-6 to take a 1-0 lead in their championship play-
off.

Lily Hernandez swung the hot bat with a prefect three-
for three plate appearances and she scored one run. Mary
Sweeting assisted Defence with her feverous bat, she
went 3-for-4 and scored one run in a losing effort.

Game two

In a low scoring game, Finance Health Invaders nabbed
Defence Force Waves 6-1. Keisha Pratt did the honors for
Finance with a perfect three-for -three plate appearances
and she scored two runs. Rhonda Kelly, Maryann Fowler
‘and Laurel Farrington had three hits apiece in a losing
effort.

Game three

Finance Health Invaders bombarded the Defence Force
Waves 11-6 to take a 3-0 commanding lead. Renee Davis
had two hits, scored three runs and picked up one RBI.
Rhonda Kelly went 3-for-4, scored one run and picked up
one RBI in losing effort.

Game four

In a high scoring game, 15-12; Finance Health Invaders
assaulted the Defence Force Waves and swept them in
four straight games to clinch the 2009 Ladies’ title.

Renee Davis and May Miller had three hits a piece.
Davis also scored three runs and two RBIs. Maryann
Fowler and Karen Darville were the offences batters for
Defence.

The Most Valuable Player (MVP) in the championship
games was Renee Davis.

The Executives extend best wishes to the reigning
champions, Finance Health Invaders and a successful
2010 season.



Police Chiefs to hold motorcade

ON Saturday, the Police Chiefs will hold a motorcade
starting from Royal Bahamas Police Force on East Street at
IO a.m. to celebrate their triumph as the new men’s champi-
ons of the Bahamas Government Departmental Softball
Association.

The league is requesting all teams to come out and partici-
pate in the motorcade, which will be followed by an all-day
victory party at the Baillou Hill Sporting Complex.

The Chefs snapped the Royal Bahamas Defense Force’s
17-year stranglehold of the title with a 4-3 decision in their
best-of-seven series that was concluded recently.

There will be a live concert with local entertainers per-

forming.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 19



INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Rio police expand anti-gang raids, 32 now dead

BRADLEY BROOKS,
Associated Press Writer
RIO DE JANEIRO

Police in Rio expanded a
crackdown on gangs beyond
the area hit by a wave of
killings that has claimed at
least 32 lives since the week-
end, officials said Wednesday.

The clashes came less than
three weeks after the city was
awarded the 2016 Olympic
Games. They began when a
drug gang tried to invade a
rival's territory and three
policemen were killed when
a helicopter was shot down
by gunfire over the weekend.

Subsequent firefights
between police and heavily
armed gang members have
left the affected slums in
chaos. Hundreds of residents
fled their homes overnight,
choosing to sleep in streets
away from their own neigh-
borhoods after rumors spread
that drug gangs were set to
battle again.

While the violence began

ei

iy jn nas
A tothe cdreaurf

Eduardo Naddar/AP Photo



POLICE TAKE POSITIONS during an ane in search of drugs, traf-
fickers and weapons in the Vila Cruzeiro slum in Rio de Janeiro,

Brazil, Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2009.

in a northern area near the
Maracana stadium, which will
host the Olympics’ opening
and closing ceremonies, police
searching for suspects behind
the downing of the helicopter
launched operations in slums
in Rio's south and center on
Wednesday.

A police spokesman said
officers killed three suspected

drug traffickers during the
afternoon raids, raising the
death toll to 32. The official
spoke on condition of
anonymity, citing department
rules. In the early morning,
officers shot dead three other
suspects in northern areas of
the city. "We can't allow four
or five criminals to cause this
madness," Rio state Public

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Safety Director Jose Beltrame
said about the drug chiefs his
officers were hunting down.
"Many people are suffering
and feeling the pressure of
this violence."

By evening, most of the
areas were calm, but more
police operations were
expected during the night.

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By NEIL HARTNELL
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he Government will

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preferred choice for

Foxwoods Develop-
ment Company to take over the Our
Lucaya Resort’s management/oper-
ations, as well as its casino, is back
on track, Tribune Business was told
yesterday.

This newspaper can reveal that
the deal, which has involved three-
way negotiations between the Gov-
ernment, Foxwoods and Our
Lucaya’s owner, Hong Kong-based
Hutchison Whampoa, has “come
alive again” after previously hitting
the proverbial ‘brick wall’ over the
issue of who would manage/operate
the hotel component.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
minister of tourism and aviation,
confirmed to Tribune Business that
the Government had been in con-
tact with both Hutchison Whampoa
and Foxwoods within the last 24
hours as it moves rapidly to revive a
deal it sees as key to placing Grand
Bahama back on the resort/casi-

* Government hoping to know ‘in the next 24-48 hours’ whether deal involving
renowned casino/resort operator and Hutchison can be reached, and its shape

* Key issue is hotel management/operational control if Foxwoods brands resort and casino

* Treasure Bay firmly reserve choice, with Foxwoods seen as
having global brand clout to revive Grand Bahama tourism

no/tourism map.

Tribune Business had contacted
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace after being
told by numerous sources familiar
with the situation that the Govern-
ment’s preferred solution for Our
Lucaya, namely for Foxwoods to
take over management and opera-
tions at the hotel as well as the casi-
no, had died a death.

“No, it’s not dead,” Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace replied. “We have
been in contact with them [Fox-
woods] this morning, and Hutchi-
son last night in Hong Kong. The
answer is that it’s not dead.”

The minister added that the Gov-
ernment did “not yet” know the pre-
cise nature of any agreement that
might be worked out between itself,
Foxwoods and Hutchison Wham-
poa, “but we’ll get a good sense of

that in the
next 24-48
hours”.
Confirming
that any deal
would not
involve “a
purchase
agreement”,
where Fox-
woods would
acquire Our
Lucaya from
Hutchison
Whampoa
outright, Mr
Vanderpool-
Wallace told Tribune Business:
“These things are complex. You nev-
er know what form it will take.”
However, other sources familiar
with the situation told Tribune Busi-

V-WALLACE



ness that the main sticking point to
any successful agreement involving
Foxwoods was who would run/man-
age the hotel component at Our
Lucaya.

“The Government’s preferred
choice is Foxwoods, because not
only will they take over the casino
but brand the hotel,” one source
confirmed. “But they [Hutchison]
would prefer to lease the casino and
keep their staff in place. Foxwoods
would come in and brand it with
their own management.

“The sticking point is the way in
which the relationship would move
forward with the running of the
hotel.”

In other words, Hutchison Wham-
poa would be happy with a situation
somewhat resembling the status quo,
where the casino was leased to a

third-party operator and it was able
to run and manage the hotel itself.

The Government, though, wants
Foxwoods to take over the manage-
ment of the entire complex, and use
its brand and gaming marketing
database to put Grand Bahama back
on the tourism/casino map. It would
thus seem that the key to any deal
would be for Hutchison Whampoa
to shift its position to one more in
line with the Government’s think-
ing.

One source emphasised to Tri-
bune Business that Treasure Bay
Casino and Resorts Inc, the previ-
ously announced replacement for
Isle of Capri as the Our Lucaya casi-
no’s operator, was strictly a second

SEE page 8B

Construction bracing
for ‘slow winter’

Government, private sector ‘absolutely
not’ maximising its grant funding ability

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

tractors were currently endur-
ing a “significantly reduced”
level of work compared to
one year ago, when the
Bahamas was first experienc-
ing the chill winds of the glob-
al recession and construction
contracts from Spring 2008
were still carrying firms
through.

“The industry is very slow
at the moment,” Mr Wrinkle
told Tribune Business.

the EU’s Direct Assistance Grant Scheme.

Grant funding is possibly the cheapest form
of financing available to Bahamian businesses,
especially during a period when traditional
forms of financing - especially debt financing
from commercial banks - has seemingly all
but dried up. Yet Bahamian companies and
entrepreneurs have frequently failed to access
and exploit this financing when it has been
available.

“Absolutely not,” replied Mr Ferguson,
when asked whether Bahamian companies
had exploited grant funding opportunities to

THE Bahamian construc-
tion industry is bracing itself
for “a very slow winter”, the
Bahamian Contractors Asso-
ciation’s (BCA) president said
yesterday, adding that the fail-
ure to-date to bring legisla-
tion that would regulate the
industry to Parliament was in
danger of “stifling growth and

THE Bahamian private sector and the Goy-
ernment have “absolutely not” maximised
their use of available grant funding sources, a
Chamber of Commerce executive told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, although he was
“pretty confident the best of the Bahamas will
be funded” in the latest European Union (EU)
sponsored round.

Hank Ferguson, who heads the Chamber’s
small and medium-sized enterprises trade unit,



development”. “There’s a few people who said the organisation’s two-day grant scheme _ the full.

Stephen Wrinkle, of Wrin- have work. Banks are reluc- workshop had provided the 32 firms/entre- “The biggest challenge is that most Bahami-
kle Development, explained saat sion| | preneurs who attended with the information
that many Bahamian con- SEE page 4B re as a | and skills necessary to apply for financing from SEE page 10B

Realtors ‘compiling’
Bill reform options

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BREA chief meets
with Port over realtor

THE Bahamas Real Estate licensing in Freeport
Association (BREA) is “com-
piling a list of suggestions” that it
plans to submit to the Government over its proposed Planning ' Ls |
and Subdivisions Bill, its president said yesterday, adding that his . j
members main concern was that the suggested approval process ; = .
could frustrate “good developers”. i h
William Wong told Tribune Business: “We are now compiling oe /fta ane or , Hog f,
it

a list of suggestions to have some
stuff included or deleted in the SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Airlines still looking for business travelers

By DAVID KOENIG
AP Airlines Writer

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines value
premium travelers above other cus-
tomers, letting them board first, eat
a meal, and order a cocktail with-
out whipping out a credit card.

Many of them are business travel-
ers who fly frequently and often pay
higher last-minute fares than the
jeans-and-T-shirt crowd on the way
to see grandma. Anyone who ques-
tions why airlines treat business trav-
elers nicely only needs to look at the
carriers’ third-quarter financial
reports.

On Wednesday, American Air-
lines parent AMR Corp. reported
that it lost $359 million in the third
quarter, and Continental Airlines
Inc. posted an $18 million loss. Those
results followed losses in the last few
days reported by Southwest Airlines
Co. and United parent UAL Corp.

That news, and oil prices above
$81 a barrel, dragged down airline
stocks. Continental and AMR shares
fell more than 11 per cent in after-
noon trading.

Overall traffic is picking up. Planes
were mostly full over the summer
vacation period and through Sep-
tember.

But revenue at the biggest airlines
plunged about one-fifth from the
levels of summer 2008, largely
because business travelers stayed
home, grounded by cutbacks in cor-
porate travel during the recession.



AN AMERICAN AIRLINES jet plane takes off at the Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, California. American’s parent, AMR Corp., on
Wednesday said it lost about $300 million in the third quarter.

Airline executives refused to pre-
dict when demand for travel — and
higher prices — might come back.

“We are bumping along the bot-
tom,” Continental President Jeff
Smisek said Wednesday. “I can’t tell
you when the recovery will come or
how quickly or at what rate business
travel will return ... the recovery
seems to be quite slow.”

The day before, United President
John Tague said there was no chance
airlines could return to earlier rev-
enue levels until they can recapture
high-paying customers.

Basili Alukos, an airline analyst
at Morningstar, said United is the
most heavily dependent on premium
passengers — business travelers and
international customers — but that
many airlines are feeling the effect.
He said there has been a permanent
change in travel habits, including
more business travelers buying
cheaper tickets in coach.

Alukos said some premium pas-
sengers will return as the economy
improves and companies employ
more people who need to travel,
“but everyone is going to try to hold

TOPICS:

m& The Response of Regulators Workdwide: the U.S

November 4th -

(AP Photo: Damian Dovarganes)

down their costs.”

It’s hard to know how many pas-
sengers are flying for business versus
pleasure. Southwest has said that in
good times, at least 40 per cent of its
customers are business travelers. It
may be higher at other airlines.
Alukos estimates that a little more
than half of US passengers are trav-
eling on business.

At AMR, traffic in the third quar-
ter fell about six per cent, but rev-
enue plummeted 20 per cent. The
company blamed a drop-off in busi-
ness travel and low fares to entice

leisure customers to American, the
nation’s second-largest carrier.

AMR’s $359 million loss com-
pared with profit of $31 million in
the third quarter of 2008, when the
Fort Worth-based company sold its
investment business.

Houston-based Continental, the
No. 4 US airline, lost $18 million,
which was a big improvement over
the $230 million loss a year earlier,
when jet fuel prices were roughly 50
per cent higher.

Revenue plunged 20.2 per cent,
to $3.32 billion, despite a traffic
downturn of less than one per cent.
Weak sales cut across all of Conti-
nental’s markets, with trans-Atlantic
business particularly sluggish.

However, Continental is betting
on improvement next year. After
two years of cutting capacity by elim-
inating flights or using smaller air-
craft, the airline expects to increase
capacity next year by between 1.5
per cent and 2.5 per cent, with all
the extra flying on international
routes.

While larger carriers posted losses
for the quarter, low-fare AirTran
Airways said Wednesday it earned
$10.4 million, although revenue fell
11 per cent, to $597.4 million. A year
ago, the company lost $94.6 million.

AirTran has been dropping
unprofitable routes and executives of
the carrier, based in Orlando, Fla.,
said they expect to increase capacity
between two per cent and four per
cent next year.

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 3B



Moody’s: Bahamas
economy to shrink
again during 2010

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy
is likely to further contract in
2010, a Wall Street credit rat-

ing agency has forecast, warn-
ing that a “continued and per-
manent deterioration” in the
Government’s debt position
- something that already
sparked a downgrade of this

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nation’s BS bond ratings from
Al to A3.

In its latest credit opinion
on the Bahamas, Moody’s
said that while the fiscal
deficit incurred during July -
the first month of the 2009-
2010 financial year - had fall-
en to $3.3 million from $29
million in the same period last
year, this position would be
“hard to sustain”.

“On a yearly basis, govern-
ment revenues remained flat,
while expenditures contracted
by around 20 per cent,” the
Wall Street credit rating
agency said. “But this
improvement will be hard to
sustain for the year as a
whole, given the Govern-
ment’s plans to carry out
infrastructure projects, which
will result in higher expendi-
tures, and the impact of the
recession on government rev-
enues.”

The latter was running $40
million behind forecast as at
end-September 2009, the
close of the first quarter in the
Government’s fiscal year, with
air arrivals down by 14.7 per
cent for the first seven
months.

Overall, Moody’s forecast
that the Bahamian economy
would continue to contract -
albeit at a much slower 0.5
per cent rate - in 2010, with
the central government debt-
to-GDP ratio reaching 46.6
per cent next year - well
above the 40 per cent ratio
regarded as a ‘danger thresh-
old’ by the likes of the Inter-
national Monetary Fund
(IMF). The government debt
to government revenue ratio
is projected by Moody’s to
peak at 237.4 per cent this
year, before declining to 234.6
per cent in 2010.

The Wall Street rating
agency added that the Gov-
ernment’s success in manag-
ing the Bahamas through the
current worldwide recession
and economic crisis “without
incurring a deep and sus-
tained deterioration in rela-
tive credit metrics” was criti-
cal to maintaining a stable
outlook on its sovereign rat-
ing.

Explaining its decision to
downgrade the Bahamas’
local currency bond rating,
Moody’s said it partly reflect-
ed the fact this nation’s debt-
to-GDP ratio was anticipat-
ed to increase by 15 percent-
age points in the three years
to 2010.

“The erosion of the coun-
try’s main debt metrics, with
debt-to-GDP projected to
reach close to 50 per cent by
2010, from 35 per cent in 2007,
further justify the A3 as the
appropriate level for both
bond ratings,” Moody’s said.

“Long-term growth lower
than that of its rating peers
also weighed on the decision
to align the bond ratings at
A3. The Bahamas’ two main
industries, tourism and finan-
cial services, have been

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impacted by the world crisis
and will find it difficult to
recover strongly in the near
future.”

Moody’s kept the outlook
on all the Bahamas’ sovereign
credit ratings as ‘stable’, and
reaffirmed the Aal country
ceiling for foreign currency
bonds and A3 country ceiling
for bank deposits.



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

EASTBOURNE TRADING COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), EAST-
BOURNE TRADING COMPANY LIMITED is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the EASTBOURNE TRAD-
ING COMPANY LIMITED is required on or before November
30, 2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they
may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before
such claim is approved.

I, Vassilios Hadjivassiliou, of Seventh Floor, City Forum, 11 Florinis
Street, 1065 Nicosia Cyprus, is the Liquidator of EASTBOURNE
TRADING COMPANY LIMITED.



Dr. Francis Williams is pleased to announce the opening of his medical practice

st. Jude’s Medical Centre
located at 78 Market Street (2 doors north of Hay Street)

St. Jude's offers primary health care services to any family member, at any age. Each
family, and each family member, is unique and has different healthcare needs, At St,
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



REALTORS, from 1B

Bill. We’re compiling some stuff for
the minister, and hopefully he will
look at it and make some changes.”

The move follows on from last
week’s meeting at which Dr Earl
Deveaux, minister of the environ-
ment, addressed BREA members on
the likely impact of the new Bill.

Mr Wong told Tribune Business
his members’ main concern was the
requirement for all stakeholders,
including neighbouring landowners,
to be consulted on any proposed sub-
divisions earmarked for their areas,
so they had an opportunity to voice
their concerns.

While welcoming the consultative
approach, Mr Wong said: “I think a
lot of nutcases will come out, and a

lot of good subdivisions and good
developers will be delayed and frus-
trated. That’s the concern of a lot of
members.

“How’s that going to affect the pro-
ject moving along - there are so many
weeks for this, so many weeks for
that. That has to be looked at again.
Before a developer buys and devel-
ops the land, it’s conditional on get-
ting the approval of the neighbours.”

Mr Wong suggested the Bill need-
ed to contain some “checks and bal-
ances” to ensure bona fide developers
were not unduly delayed by frivolous
and vexatious complaints, or vested
interests.

Time is often money, especially
where real estate developments are
concerned, and any undue delays in
the approvals process will likely deter

future developers from proceeding
with their projects - especially if they
have vast sums of money tied up in
large tracts of land they cannot devel-
op.

However, Mr Wong acknowledged
that the Bill was “going to rein in
those cowboys, those unscrupulous
developers” who sold lots, took client
money and then failed to deliver on
what they had promised, namely fail-
ing to put in proper roads and utili-
ties.

“Some parts of it are very good,
but there are concerns that Dr
Deveaux will listen to. I think he’ll lis-
ten to us and we’ll get this stuff sort-
ed out,” Mr Wong told Tribune Busi-
ness.

Meanwhile, the BREA president
disclosed that he met Ian Rolle, the

Grand Bahama Port Authority’s
(GBPA) president, on Wednesday
in a bid to resolve the situation where
the Port was issuing real estate
licences to persons operating in
Freeport.

BREA’s own position is that it
should be the sole licensing authority
for realtors operating throughout the
Bahamas, including in Freeport, and
the GBPA licensing of realtors was
creating unfair competition and leav-
ing consumers exposed.

“We'll have some more conversa-
tions, so hopefully we can resolve this
situation with the Port,” Mr Wong
told Tribune Business. “We had a
good conversation and I’m very
encouraged.”

Mr Wong had previously said the
issue was causing BREA's 70-plus

members in Freeport and Grand
Bahama “a lot of frustration and a
lot of stress, and it's been going on for
at least the last 10 years.”

The BREA president said that for
the last four to five years, the organ-
isation had been trying to get the Port
Authority to recognise it as the only
licensing body for realtors in Grand
Bahama and Freeport, but without
success.

Mr Wong said BREA's position
was that the 1995 Real Estate Act
empowered it as the sole boy to
licence practising realtors through-
out the Bahamas - including Freeport
and Grand Bahama. The profession,
he added, had been placed on par
with the likes of architects, doctors
and attorneys in terms of being able
to self-regulate.

WINTER, from 1B

tant to lend money right now,
and business people are reluc-
tant to invest right now.
“Everyone is in a wait and
see mode, and the work is not
there. What we’re seeing is
renovations and add-ons, as
opposed to new builds. It’s





slow; it’s real slow.

“This time last year, we
were just starting to feel it.
The level of work has reduced
significantly from a year ago,
because a lot of that work
started that Spring.”

With no indications emerg-
ing yet that the US economy
was beginning to recover from

the depths of the current
recession, Mr Wrinkle added:
“All indications are that we
will have a very slow Winter.

“Hopefully, Baha Mar will
go ahead in the New Year
and hire more people. The
airport is moving nicely, and
Albany has been able to sell
some lots, but generally

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The Nature Gy
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Applications are invited to conduct
An Economic Valuation of the Natural Resources of Andros

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Under the Integrated Watershed and Coastal Area Management
(IWCAM) Project Andros, The Bahamas

The overall objective of the contract is to document the economic
contribution of renewable and finite natural resources on the island of
Andros and the associated environmental goods and services that
they provide to the Bahamian economy and to the social development

of its population.

The Contractor(s) is expected to:

speaking across the industry
it’s pretty tough.”

The BCA president said
Baha Mar had been asking
Bahamian contractors to
again pre-qualify for con-
struction contracts on its pro-
posed Commercial Village,
the site where it hopes to relo-
cate all the banks, govern-
ment buildings and the Straw
Market currently lining West
Bay Street.

Mr Wrinkle said that,
assuming Baha Mar was able
to close its agreements with

the two Chinese state-owned
entities and proceed with the
$2.6 billion project, the BCA’s
understanding was that all
work outside the scope of the
main resort/casino/convention
campus would go out to bid
by Bahamian companies.
Meanwhile, Mr Wrinkle
said the BCA had been work-
ing with the relevant govern-
ment ministries and the
Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
to put together a curriculum
for the latter’s planned con-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARLENE GUERRIER of 407 N.E.
17 AVE. APT. 103, BOYNTON BEACH, FL. 33485, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of October,
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.












twenty-eight

Citizenship,



NOTICEisherebygiventhat VENASEYMOUR of MARI
STREET, P.O. BOX N-720, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality

Citizenship, for registration/aturalization as a citizen of
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason '
registration/naturalization should not be granted, sh«
send a written and signed statement of the facts wi
the 15th day of Octol
2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality

P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

days from



Bahar



[er
py

struction management pro-
gramme, plus the ‘grandfa-
thering seminars’ to educate
contractors on the licensing
requirements of the Contrac-
tors Bill.

“We were trying to do
something before Christmas,
but it’s not looking likely it’s
going to happen,” Mr Wrinkle
said of the seminars. “What
we’re trying to do is establish
the level of the bar for the
contractors’ licensing require-
ments. Up until now, there
have been no requirements in
place, so we’re trying to take a
broad approach to it, particu-
larly at level one.”

The focus, Mr Wrinkle
explained, would be on adher-
ence to the Building Code
and compliance in a bid to
crack down on defective and
shoddy workmanship of the
kind that had impacted the
Ministry of Housing’s hous-
ing programme in the past.

“We have to have measures
in place to prevent this,” Mr
Wrinkle said. “Clearly, the
best approach is to get it out
at the education and licens-
ing level.”

The BCA president urged
the Government to “push in a
timely fashion” on getting the
Contractors Bill to Parlia-
ment, and added that the
organisation was expecting to
“imminently” receive
approval from the Inter-
American Development
Bank’s (IDB) head office for
a project designed to strength-
en the Bahamian construction
industry.

LIGNUM INSTITUTE OF
TECHNOLOGY

PRESENTS

The PMI, AAPM s
Autodesk Seminar

DATE:

1. Conduct consultations, inclusive of interviews, working
meetings and workshops, with key stakeholders and policy
makers identified in consultation with TNC about data and
messages to be presented
Conduct analysis of actual and potential environmental goods
and services being delivered to local populations and social
sectors by the natural resources and ecosystems of Andros,
identifying the most strategic goods and services that can be
economically valued.

Complete economic assessment of the selected environmental
inputs and services identified, for BAU and SEM, within Andros
in line with the objectives and approach set out in the detailed
TORs.

Identify the means to integrate the economic valuation tools into
agency and national budgetary processes in order to increase
their likelihood of implementation. This will involve
identification of policy reforms necessary to facilitate this.

The term of the contract is three (3) months, starting in October 2009,

All interested persons should forward curriculum vitae with a cover

letter via email to bahamas@tnc.org to the attention of IWCAM

Project Manager, The Nature Conservancy. Deadline for applications

is Thursday, October 15", 2009. Requests for more detailed TORs

can also be sent to bahamas @tnc.org

October 30" 2009 (9.00AM — 2.00PM)

PLACE:
British Colonial Hilton (The Victoria Room)

ST:
$35 Regular $25 Student
($5 Discount for early registration)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
RISK MANAGEMENT
AUTODESK REVIT 2010

Also Product Demos on:
Bluebeam — Powerful PDF software for the AEC Industry.
NComputing — Exciting new product for School Labs,

Small Business and Web Cafes.
Register now at www.lignumtech.com/LIT or

call 393-2164 for more information

Special $100 discount for Project Management & AutoCad
courses if you register at the Seminar.
All PMP’s, CIPM’s, will receive 25 PDU’s to maintain
their membership.

mM

AP.
cane 4 fd Bs

Frac: Wmopresr i'r

Autodesk
TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 5B



Twenty three states report
higher unemployment

By CHRISTOPHER S
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Unemployment rose in 23
states last month as the econ-
omy struggled to create jobs
in the early stages of the
recovery.




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While layoffs have slowed,
companies remain reluctant
to hire. Forty-three states
reported job losses in Sep-
tember, while only seven
gained jobs, the Labour
Department said Wednesday.

Some of the states that lost
jobs still saw their unemploy-
ment rates decline, as dis-





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couraged workers gave up
looking for work.

People who are out of work
but no longer looking for jobs
aren’t counted as officially
unemployed.

That trend was evident
nationwide in September, as
nearly 600,000 people
dropped out of the work
force, the department report-
ed earlier this month.

The US jobless rate rose to
9.8 per cent in September, a
26-year high, from 9.7 per
cent. Some economists esti-
mate it would have topped 10
per cent if there had been no
change in the labour force.

There were some bright
spots in Wednesday’s report.
The Midwest region, hit hard
during the recession by job
losses in manufacturing, saw
its unemployment rate drop
for the second straight month,
to 9.8 per cent from 10 per
cent in August. It was the
only region where the unem-
ployment rate declined.

The Midwest benefited
from sharp drops in unem-
ployment in Indiana and
Ohio. Indiana’s jobless rate
fell to 9.6 per cent, from 9.9
per cent in August and 10.7
per cent in June.

Indiana added 4,400 jobs,
the most of any state, due to
gains in the manufacturing
and service sectors.

Ohio, meanwhile, saw its
jobless rate drop to 10.1 per
cent, from 10.8 per cent in
August and 11.2 per cent in
July.

Still, Ohio lost about 6,000
jobs in September, and much
of the improvement in its
unemployment rate came
from discouraged workers
leaving the work force.

Nevada, Rhode Island and
Florida last month posted
their highest jobless rates on

Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Client Support Officer

EFG International

EFG International is a global private banking group headquartered in Switzerland,
offering private banking and asset management services. EFG International's private
banking businesses currently operate in 55 locations in aver 30 countries, with circa

2,400 employees.

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd continues to expand as evidenced by its new
premises at Lyford Cay. EFG Bahamas has over 40 expernenced professionals and

offers a full range of solutions for wealthy clients around the globe. EFG's unique
corporate culture attracts the mos! entrepreneurial and most experienced

professionals in the industry. To eam more, please visit www_elgintemational.com

We are looking for a professional with business experiance dealing with high net
worth clients and companies. Specifically, we require a professional fluent in French,
English and Spanish to deal with the existing client base. The candidate must
possess knowledge of administrative frontline duties, follow up on trade executions,
deal with telaphone enquiries, prapare client visits, organize business travel, the
ability to monitor profit centre costs and retrocession payments. The interview will be
conducted in Franch.

Preference will ba given to a candidate with a university or collage degree. Computer
literacy is required with proficiency in Microsoft Office suite of products.

EFG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary, bonus and benefits.

Salary will be determined by experience, and qualifications.

Only qualified professionals should submit applications by 6th November 2009 to:

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd

Human Resources

Centre of Commerce, 2â„¢ Floor

1 Bay Street

P.O. Box $$ 6289
Nassau, The Bahamas
Fax (242) 502-5487



records dating to 1976, the
department said.

Rates

Fifteen states and Wash-
ington, D.C., reported unem-
ployment rates of 10 per cent
or more.

Michigan reported the

nation’s highest unemploy-
ment rate at 15.3 per cent. It
was followed by Nevada at
13.3 per cent, Rhode Island
at 13 per cent, California at
12.2 per cent and South Car-
olina at 11.6 per cent.

Real estate continues to
bedevil states that enjoyed a
housing boom. Florida’s job-

less rate rose to 11 per cent
from 10.8 per cent in August,
as the state lost nearly 13,000
construction jobs. California
lost 39,300 jobs, including
more than 14,000 in construc-
tion. Nevada lost 3,500 con-
struction jobs, though it
boosted employment in ser-
vices.

MUST SELL

COMMERCIAL BUILDING

Lot #1, Block ‘BB’ Civic Industrial Area
Keats Street & Queens Highway
Freeport, Grand Bahama

DESCRIPTION:

The building comprises a Retail Store with a large Meat Section at the rear of the store.
Other accommodation includes Male and Female Rest Rooms, a Trash Room,
a Manager’s Office and a Kitchenette.

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
To reach us on or before November 9, 2009.

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

By HARRY R WEBER
AP Airlines Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — Air-
Tran Airways’ financial
results are benefiting from the
discount carrier’s low costs
and laser focus on domestic
routes where it believes it can
make money, and it actually
wants to grow in 2010 when
other major carriers have
more conservative plans.

Its Orlando, Florida-based
parent company reported
Wednesday a $10.4 million
third-quarter profit, or eight
cents a share, even though
sales declined more than 11
per cent. A year ago it report-
ed a restated $94.6 million
loss, or 81 cents a share.

The July-September results
mark AirTran’s third quarter
in a row of profit as most
major US carriers struggle
amid weak overall demand
for business and international
travel.

Revenue fell to $597.4 mil-
lion from $673.3 million a
year ago.

Excluding one-time items,
its adjusted net income for the
three months ended Septem-
ber 30 was eight cents a share,
in line with analysts’ slightly

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2009, PAGE 7B

AirTran posts

Q3 profit
of $10.4m

reduced expectations. The
revenue figure was a little
below the analysts’ estimate
of $600.5 million.

Executives said during a
conference call with analysts
that AirTran expects to
increase capacity two per cent
to four per cent next year. In
March and again in July the
airline said capacity, as mea-
sured by available seat miles,
would be flat in 2010.

Delivery

CEO Bob Fornaro said in
an interview with The Asso-
ciated Press after the call that
AirTran took delivery of two
more planes in late Septem-
ber that it hadn’t planned to
previously.

“T think consistent with
what we’re seeing in the mar-
ket, we’re feeling pretty good
about our profitability,”
Fornaro said. He also noted
that 34 per cent of AirTran’s
2010 fuel needs are hedged,
protecting the airline from ris-
ing fuel prices.

Several other major carri-
ers continue to post losses,
albeit smaller ones in some
cases, and they are being con-
servative with their capacity

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plans next year as the econo-
my has only recently shown
signs of improvement.

“T wouldn’t say we are in a
special place, but we’ve had a
much better year than the rest
of our competitors,” Fornaro
said. “We’re solidly prof-
itable.”

AirTran has been trying to
shift its focus from unprof-
itable routes to profitable
ones, and it also has been
working to make sure it has
enough cash to continue to
weather the downturn in trav-
el demand.

In August, AirTran said it
planned to stop flying to and
from Newark, N.J., effective
Sunday, and give its takeoff
and landing slots there to
Houston-based Continental
Airlines Inc. in exchange for
Continental slots at
LaGuardia Airport in New
York and Reagan National
Airport in Washington. Con-
tinental has a hub at Newark
Liberty International Airport,
which is used by many travel-
ers heading to or from New
York City.

A slot is an interval of time
during which an airline can
takeoff or land its aircraft at
an airport. Slots, especially at
peak times of day and in busy
corridors like the Northeast,
are valuable to airlines.

AirTran, which has its hub
in Atlanta, has over 700 daily
flights to 67 destinations.

AirTran shares fell 24 cents,
or 4.4 per cent, to $5.16 in
morning trading.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

FREE SEMINAR

You are

invited to attend a Free Financial

Seminar, organized by the Education Committee. of
the Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union
Limited, to be held on Friday, October 23rd, 2009 at
the Office of the Bahamas Co-operative League
Limited (justwestof Wendy’s, Oakes Field), beginning
at 6:30 p.m.

Come
and
See how you can stretch your

DOLLARS SS$

Featured Speakers:

Mrs. Stephanie Missick-Jones
(Credit Specialist-Bahamas Co-operative League Ltd.)

and Mr. Philip Greenslade

(Treasurer-Public Workers’ Co-operative Credit Union Ltd.)

Bring a friend and get a prize for bringing the most guests.
Refreshments will be served