Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim blowin’ it

83F
72F

SUNNY WITH

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.273

FEATURES

Teachers’ ion Hoss
in $90,000 cash row

RS at

Belinda Wilson
to be suspended
for two weeks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Union of
Teachers president Belinda
Wilson is to be suspended
without pay following alle-
gations of the misappropri-
ation of $90,000 in union
funds.

Ms Wilson flatly denied
the allegations in a press
conference yesterday, claim-
ing only $65,000 of union
money was not accounted
for as she had to pay a num-
ber of bills before leaving
for a Caribbean Union of
Teachers conference in
Grenada in July.

In the absence of treasur-
er Janice Armbrister, who
was away on a six-week
vacation at the time, Ms
Wilson said she had docu-
ments, which were pre-
signed by the treasurer,
countersigned by executive
board member Sebastian
Campbell and herself before
taking the money to pay
insurance and utility bills,
and for seven council mem-

bers to travel to Grenada.

Ms Wilson admitted she
did not follow proper pro-
cedure as she did not con-
sult the executive board
before making the pay-
ments, but said she did so
because she was in an emer-
gency situation as the bills
had to be paid before she
left the country.

At least seven of the 15
executive board members
voted on Friday for the pres-
ident to be suspended with-
out pay for two weeks from
November 1 for the misap-
propriation of funds. The
media was told Ms Wilson
would be suspended because
she misappropriated
$90,000

However Ms Wilson’s
supporters, including Ms
Armbrister, BUT Associate
Vice President Quintin Lar-
oda, and around 30 teach-
ers at the press conference
held at the BUT offices in
Bethel Avenue yesterday,
maintain the president is not
guilty of misappropriation

SEE page six

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Pala i x Gjai Gimedium,

ietc

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

CARS FOR se
aH
a aa

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

THE Anglican Church has
joined several other religous
denominations in throwing its
full support behind the Gov-
ernment’s efforts to make it
illegal for a man to rape his
wife.

Delivering his Charge to the
109th session of the Anglican
diocesan Synod, Archbishop
Laish Boyd expressed his sup-
port for the Ingraham admin-
istration’s proposed amend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
Act banning marital rape — but
cautioned that we must work
toward “the appropriate
amendment that addresses the
right concerns”.

ial eS

mash

Ne
RO - EN i

Anglican Church backs
govt’s marital rape law

He also came out against
the decision to resume capital
punishment (see story, page
2).

Archbishop Boyd said the
constitution, laws and govern-
ment of any jurisdiction “must
see after the well-being of all
who dwell in or find them-
selves in that jurisdiction. Laws
must protect all and address
the needs and security of those
who are vulnerable”.

He said the current Sexual
Offences Act suggests that
spouses cannot be raped — a
point of view espoused by

SEE page two

The Tribune

USA TODAY.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

CLINTON FORBES is taken
from court yesterday.

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

A TEENAGER was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday
on two murder charges.

Clinton Forbes, 19, is
charged with the mur-
der of Jeffrey Johnson-
Rolle.

Mr Rolle was gunned
down in front of his
brother while they were
walking along Derby
Road around 10pm on
June 15.

Initial reports stated
that the brothers were
approached by a group
of men while walking
and attempted to run
away. The group



SEE page six






PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Almost 80%
of Detention
Centre detainees
were smuggled
into Bahamas

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

NEARLY 80 per cent
of the 89 detainees being
held at the Detention
Centre were smuggled
into the Bahamas, with
some destined for manual
labour in the construction
field, while others were set
to be forced into prostitu-
tion, Immigration officials
revealed yesterday.

Senior deputy director
Roderick Bowe informed
the press yesterday that
the majority of persons
who enter the Bahamas

SEE page 13



Court hears
the closing
addresses in
Travolta case

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

CLOSING addresses began
in the attempted extortion trial
of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne yesterday.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions and lead prosecutor
Bernard Turner told the nine
member jury that the prosecu-
tion has discharged its burden
in proving that Bridgewater and
Lightbourne are guilty of the
offences for which they are
charged.

SEE page 13

Legendary
artist Amos
Ferguson dies

By AVA TURNQUEST

THE global art community is
greatly saddened by the loss of a
legendary prolific ‘outsider’
artist, an internationally-cele-
brated Bahamian who “was so
close and yet so far” to his own
people.

Amos Ferguson contributed
more than four decades to visu-
al art and the documentation of
Bahamian culture, and can best
be described as a “prophet not
without honour, save in his own
country, and in his own house
(Matthew 13:57).” The biblical
reference fitting to a man who
was greatly respected by so

SEE page 13

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Anglican Archbishop speaks |
out against the death penalty

ANGLICAN Archbishop
Laish Boyd said one of the
most “alarming and perplex-
ing” issues facing the Bahamas
today is the government’s pro-
posal to resume hanging con-
victed murderers.

Expressing his disagree-
ment with this proposal, the



archbishop admitted there has
been a substantial increase in
violent crime and that people
are calling for action.
Speaking at the 109th
Diocesan Synod yesterday, he
said: “Crime is one of our
most serious social problems.
The number of homicides this

year shows a complete disre-
gard for the sacredness of
human life. It is easy to see
how in this environment there
would be a clarion call for the
carrying out of the death
penalty.

“However, it has long been
acknowledged in many circles

around the world, and proven
by statistical data, that capi-
tal punishment is not a deter-
rent to crime. And you do not
quell violence with more vio-
lence.”

The archbishop noted that
of the 59 homicides this year
up to September 18, govern-
ment statistics say 66 per cent
were related to drugs, retalia-
tion, conflict or domestic vio-
lence.

He said that Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest “rightly stated that
the police would have little
control over or intervention
power in such circumstances
to prevent them. There is only
so much that they can do.

“The disregard for human
life and a perverted value sys-
tem which allows a person to
maim or to kill another in a
dispute, are realities that cap-
ital punishment cannot ever
address, even though a hang-
ing may satisfy the desire for
retribution.

“Tn fact, the last hanging in
the Bahamas was in January,
2000, at the beginning of the

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ANGLICAN ARCHBISHOP
Laish Boyd

year. That year had an all time
record number of murders, so
obviously that hanging did not
deter much.”

According to the archbish-
op, the real issue facing society
is the fragmentation of rela-
tionships and family life. He
said too many children are
being born to parents who are
unable to socialise and care
for them properly.

“What we need is for par-
ents to be parents and to raise
children to honour and respect
God and humanity. We have
strayed far from this in some
quarters and we need to get
back to it. The real issue is
creating justice and fairness
and a sense of hope and worth
in our society so that every-
one can feel — and also know —
that they have a chance to
make it.

“These kinds of things are
tougher to address, but they
are the issues. And all the
hanging in the world will not
address or even begin to
reverse them. This is where
the court system needs to
work more effectively and
efficiently.”

Marital rape
FROM page one

many opponents to the
amendment, including the
Bahamas Christian Council.
However, according to
Archbishop Boyd, marital
rape does indeed occur, and

? the law needs to reflect and

i address this reality.

He said: “Many persons

? have disagreed with the

: proposed amendment

? because they say it weakens
? or disrespects the bond of

: marriage and creates disad-
? vantage or unfairness for

i one spouse.

“The reality is that all

? marriages do not work with
? the harmony and equality

? that God ordained. Some

? marriages are at the point

? where certain elements of

? the sharing may not happen
? for various reasons, or some
: may be at the point where

? certain elements of the

: sharing no longer occur at

: all. These circumstances call
? for communication, coun-

: selling or even reconcilia-

? tion, or some other inter-

i vention.

“The law did not cause

? these circumstances nor can
: the law heal them. They

: need to be addressed by

? another means outside of

i the law.

“To say that an amend-

? ment to the law would cre-

: ate injustice or inequity ina
? marriage because it will give
? one spouse a Weapon

: against the other is not

: quite the full picture: such a
? marriage already has prob-

? lems of its own which the

? law did not create nor can

? the law solve. Those reali-

? ties in that marriage need to
i be addressed. People who

? will misuse or abuse any

? amendment must be dealt

? with. But if we are going to

i create an environment

? where real and possible vic-
? tims can be protected, then

? some reasonable amend-

; ment must be made.

“Tt is my belief that this is

: the intent of the govern-

i ment. I applaud the efforts

: that have been made Let us
: press on in dialogue without
? rushing to the end result.”

Teens set to appear in court in
Connection with drug, gun busts

TWO 19-year-olds are set to be arraigned in court
this week in connection with two drug and gun busts
made by police this weekend.

One young man is set to go to court tomorrow in
connection with the discovery of a .223 assault rifle
and ten rounds of ammunition at around 9pm on Fri-

day.

According to police, the seizure came after a search
warrant was executed by officers from the southern
division on a home on Wood’s Alley, off Market

Street.

A second 19 year old will be charged later in the
week in connection with the seizure of 21 foil wrap-
pings of suspected marijuana, a .357 revolver and six

rounds of ammunition.

The Peter Street resident was arrested in the Quack-
oo Street area yesterday at around 1.10pm.

NASA delays shuttle launch for test flight

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is delaying its
November space shuttle
launch by four days to pro-
vide more breathing room for
a test flight of its new rocket,
according to Associated Press.

Atlantis was supposed to
lift off Nov. 12. Now launch is
targeted for Nov. 16. NASA
said Monday the delay will
make it easier to get the
experimental Ares rocket fly-
ing next week. The Ares I-X

is supposed to blast off Oct.
27 on a brief suborbital flight.
NASA will move the rocket
to the pad Tuesday morning.

The Ares test vehicle will
carry neither people nor pay-
loads when it takes off. Much
of the rocket consists of
mock-up hardware. NASA
wants to see how well the par-
tial first stage performs.

The same Kennedy Space
Center team is supporting
both the Ares and Atlantis
launches.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Sports

P8,9,14
Fa ah

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

2009 CONVENTION EDITION 12 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3



Immigration chief denies withholding

information on the Detention Centre

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney yesterday denied the alle-
gation that he is personally with-
holding information from the
press regarding conditions at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre.

Noting that the ministry has
conducted a number of visits to
the facility and has even com-

missioned a committee to inves-
tigate the numerous reports of
abuse and unsanitary condi-
tions, Mr McCartney said the
media will be given the depart-
ment’s final report as soon as it
is completed and presented to
Cabinet.

“The committee’s terms of
reference were to investigate
and determine the validity of
these accusations. The commit-
tee members include, Dr David
Allen, Father James Palacious,
Jack Thompson, representatives

WEG UAL ia

34-YEAR-OLD Shawn Moxey at court.

A 34-YEAR-OLD man charged with the murder of a
former Tribune employee and the attempted murder
of his brother was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yes-

terday.

Police have charged Shawn Edgar Moxey alias Shawn
Isaacs with the murder of Matthew Ambrister and the
attempted murder of his brother Marvin Ambrister.

Matthew 23, and Marvin, 24, of Farrington Road,
were shot in the stomach when an altercation erupted
between two groups of men outside Dominique's
Restaurant and Bar on Boyd Road, on Saturday, June

13.

Matthew who worked in the Tribune press room,

died at the scene.

Moxey, who was represented by attorney Krysta
Smith, was not required to enter a plea to the charges
during his arraignment before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. Twenty witnesses
are listed on court dockets. Moxey, of Church Hill
Avenue, was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. His
case has been adjourned to November 30 in Court 10,

Nassau Street.



Man airlifted to New
Providence after crash

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A 23-year-
old Eight Mile Rock man whose
vehicle crashed into a service
station on Friday has been air-
lifted to New Providence for
further medical treatment.

The accident occurred
around 9.30pm at Chappy’s Gas
Station in Bartlette Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, when the driver of a
Toyota Aristo car lost control
and crashed into the gas pumps
and a parked vehicle.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said that prior to the crash offi-
cers of the Eight Mile Rock
Police Station were conducting
road checks in the Hanna Hill
area when they observed a vehi-
cle being driven in a reckless
manner.

She said officers pursued a
white and gray Aristo vehicle,
which later crashed. The victim,
who has not been identified by
police, was taken to the Rand
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment.

Police reported that the
male victim was airlifted over
the weekend to the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Investigations are contin-
uing into that matter.

SUSPECT ARRESTED

Grand Bahama Police
arrested a 24-year-old man
in Freeport for possession of
an unlicensed firearm and
ammunition.

ASP Mackey reported that
police were called around
1.30am on Saturday to assist
security at the Bowling Alley
on Britannia Lane.

According to reports, a
young man who was attempt-
ing to enter the establish-
ment was searched. Officers
discovered a black Glock
9mm pistol with seven rounds
of 9mm ammunition in his
trousers.

The suspect was arrested
and taken into police cus-
tody.

Officers of the Central
Detective Unit are investi-
gating the matter.

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from the Department of Social
Services and the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

“The first tour was conducted
March 3, 2009. Following the
second tour on April 7, 2009,
committee members expressed
how pleased they were during
their initial visit with the
improvements made to the facil-
ity. Shortly after, I would have
spoken to the improvements
made during my budget debate
in June.

“A third and final visit is
planned at the end of this
month before a final report is
submitted to Cabinet for

Newly appointed
Justice of the
Court of Appeal

SIR GEORGE NEW-
MAN, newly appointed Jus-
tice of the Court of Appeal,
presented his credentials to
Governor General Arthur
Hanna at Government
House yesterday.

Sir George was appointed
as a Judge of the High
Court of England and
Wales in May 1995 and
retired from that Court on
October 1, 2007 after serv-
ing more than 12 years.

Prior to becoming a judge
of the High Court, Sir
George practiced as a bar-
rister.

He was called to the bar
in 1965 and was appointed
Queen’s Counsel in 1981.
Sir George’s practice as a
barrister included many
appearances before the
Privy Council in a wide vari-
ety of cases.

Sir George was one of the
judges nominated to sit in
the Administrative Court
and in the Special Immigra-
tion Appeals Commission
(SIAC).

He is presently the trea-
surer of the Honorable Soci-
ety of the Middle Temple.
In February 2009, UK
Prime Minister Gordon
Brown appointed him chair
of the Security Vetting
Appeals Panel of the Unit-
ed Kingdom.



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review,” Mr McCartney said.

The minister added that
although he is not at liberty to
disclose any particulars about
the unfinished report, he has
had an opportunity to review
the document and is satisfied
that the Detention Centre is a
picture of “extremely humane”
conditions that will “satisfy the
highest of standards”.

“These conditions resulted
from allegations that I had
heard prior to this governmen-
t’s election, conditions that were
indeed alarming. When reports
of those conditions resurfaced,
we wasted no time in investi-
gating, making certain improve-
ments where warranted and in
commissioning an independent
study as aforementioned.

“Today’s Detention Centre
is not yesterday’s Detention
Centre. Today’s Detention Cen-
tre is a holding facility where
international persons without
status, who have entered the
country illegally, benefit from
excellent meals, cable TV, plen-
ty of recreation, hot water, clean
beds, laundry facilities, access
to medical treatment on site and
available telephones,” he said.

Mr McCartney said he antic-
ipates that the report could be
released before the end of the
year after being presented to
Cabinet; noting that it will show
the Bahamas has accepted its
“overwhelming immigration
burden” and is treating these
persons with as much grace,
“diplomacy, and humanity” as
anywhere else in the world.







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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Military brass grow restive

WASHINGTON — Only nine months
ago, the Pentagon pronounced itself reas-
sured by the early steps of a new com-
mander in chief.

President Barack Obama was moving
slowly on U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, had
retained former President George W.
Bush’s defense secretary and, in a gesture
much noticed, had executed his first mili-
tary salute with crisp precision.

But now, after nearly a month of delib-
erations by Obama over whether to send
more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, frustra-
tions and anxiety are on the rise within the
military.

A number of active duty and retired
senior officers say there is concern that
the president is moving too slowly, is revis-
iting a war strategy he announced in
March and is unduly influenced by politi-
cal advisers in the Situation Room.

“The thunderstorm is there and it’s kind
of brewing and it’s unstable and the light-
ning hasn’t struck, and hopefully it won’t,”
said Nathaniel C. Fick, a former Marine
Corps officer who briefed Obama during
the 2008 presidential campaign and is chief
executive of the Center fora New Amer-
ican Security, a military research institu-
tion in Washington.

“T think it can probably be contained
and avoided, but people are aware of the
volatile brew.”

Last week, the national commander of
the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Thomas J.
Tradewell Sr., issued a terse statement
criticizing Obama’s review of Afghan war
strategy.

“The extremists are sensing weakness
and indecision within the U.S. govern-
ment, which plays into their hands,” said
Tradewell’s statement on behalf of his
group, which represents 1.5 million for-
mer service members.

In August, in a speech to the VFW,
Obama defended his strategy, saying,
“This is not only a war worth fighting; this
is fundamental to the defense of our peo-
ple.”

Obama’s civilian advisers on national
security say the president is appropriately

MU

NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEY SIFFORD of Toote
Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326

reviewing his policy options from all sides.
They said it would be reckless to rush a
decision on whether to send as many as
40,000 more American men and women to
war, particularly when the unresolved
Afghan election had left the United States
without a clear partner in Kabul.

Although the tensions do not break
entirely on classic civilian-military lines
— some senior military officers have
doubts about sending more troops to
Afghanistan and some of Obama’s top
civilian advisers do not — the strains
reflect the military’s awareness in recent
months that life has changed under the
new White House.

After years of rising military budgets
under the Bush administration, the new
administration has tried to rein in Penta-
gon spending, and has signaled other
changes as well, including reopening
debate on the “don’t ask, don’t tell” poli-
cy governing military service by gay men
and lesbians. The administration has made
clear that Obama will not necessarily fol-
low the advice of his generals in the same
way Bush did, notably in the former pres-
ident’s deference to Gen. David H.
Petraeus, now the head of the Central
Command, and that it does not want mil-
itary leaders publicly pressing the com-
mander in chief as they give their advice.

Two weeks ago, after Gen. Stanley A.
McChrystal, the top NATO commander in
Afghanistan, rejected calls for the Afghan
war to be scaled back during a question-
and-answer session in a speech in Lon-
don, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates
warned not only McChrystal, but also the
military as a whole, to keep quiet in pub-
lic as the debate progressed.

“Tt is imperative that all of us taking
part in these deliberations — civilian and
military alike — provide our best advice to
the president candidly but privately,”
Gates told the annual meeting of the
Association of the United States Army, a
private support group, in Washington.

This article is by Elisabeth Bumiller
c.2009 New York Times News Service



NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 20th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

WEST WINDS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION LIMITED

Notice of Extraordinary
General Meeting
of

Six tourism
pioneers who
deserve our

recognition

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I stumbled upon the tale
of six unsung tourism pio-
neers which has remained
under the radar for some
forty years.

The recognition of Sen
Hon Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace by the Queen for
his exceptional works in the
Hospitality Industry has
caused me to focus on the
untold story.

The Ministry of Tourism
has failed to Inspire the
nation with the challenges
and achievements of six
young Bahamians, who in
1970, were selected by the
Ministry of Tourism to be
shipped abroad to be trained
and developed to replace
the existing foreign tourism
professionals. Sir Clement
T Maynard was convinced
that this untapped area
could become the proving
ground for Bahamians.

I began looking into this
matter after reading Sir
Clement T Maynard’s book,
“Picking up Speed.”

I noted that Sir Clement
put Bahamahost, People to
People, professional train-
ing and education policies,
the utilisation of denomina-
tion leaders to promote the
Bahamas, cultural develop-
ment and standards of per-
formance in the workplace;

letters@triounemedia.net



regrettably, the full story of
the Bahamianisation of the
tourism overseas network
has not been told or cele-
brated. We are proud of Sir
Stafford Sands, George
Myers, Sir Baltron Bethell,
Sen Hon Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, but what of
these six. Philip Mortimer,
David Johnson, Joseph
Delaney, Athama Bowe,
Van Isaacs and the late
Arlene Wisdom-Albury,
gave their best and are
excellent examples of what
Bahamians have and can
become.

The group had pressure
from every quarter; they
were made to understand
that failure was not an
option.

As Jackie Robinson had,
they were instructed to suck
it up, remain focused amidst
the internal challenges to
Include professional and
racial bias.

Sir Baltron speaks well of
the group and views them
as tourism trailblazers and
exceptional professionals,
“We could not Intervene,
we had to have faith in them
—if they had not succeeded,

we could not have placed
Bahamians overseas.

“They went off almost in
the dead of winter.”

“This group was put in
place by PS Elison A
Thompson and Director
General of Tourism, Som
Nath Chib; E John Dele-
veaux was responsible for
the project.”

This story confirm that
young men and women out-
side of politics were shaping
the Bahamas; what a posi-
tive story.

How can a grateful nation
who recognises athletes, cul-
turalists, academics, politi-
cians, the clergy, neglect
these early nation builders;
they were diligent, unselfish,
skilled, qualified, well edu-
cated and passionate for
their Bahamas. We must
correct this oversight.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, the
Bahamas Christian Council
and the Ministry of Youth,
should be inspired by this
opportunity to celebrate this
group.

The Ministry of Tourism
and the Hon Minister
should initiate the recogni-
tion effort.

WENDELL F ALBURY
Nassau,
October, 2009.

Sad to see criminals
having ‘a field trip’
e Bahamas

in th

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write this letter to bring
awareness to the Bahamas

Skin Disease (Dermatology) Clinic
At The
Family Medical Clinic
Village Road Shopping Center
Village Road

Monday - Friday, and every other Sunday

By Appointment
Phone: 394-3433 / 394-1815

SPECIAL RETURN ENGAGEMENT
CATALYN & CURRY’S

“GUANAHANI”
FEATURING
James Catalyn & Friends
The Allagro Singers

and good Bahamian people.

Robbing, raping, murder-
ing, etc the crime list goes
on each day.

It makes one sad to see
these criminals continue to
have a field trip, or merry-
go-round.

There is a Bahamian slang
that goes on to say “ain’t
nothing happening”.

So if that’s the case for
these bold criminals to
enjoy, you see just how
things are going for us, there
is no fear, especially for
murderers in the land.

They are well aware that
there is nothing happening
to them, only a jail term.

So the bold killers devel-
oped a mind that does not
care. Apart from that these
killers are given bail even-
tually. Giving them the
opportunity to go and kill
again.

Because sentence against
an evil work is not executed
speedily, therefore the heart
of the sons of men is fully
set in them to do evil (Eccle-
siastics 8:11) what a sad pic-
ture as far as the law of the
land is concerned.

avery good job every day.

But sad to say locking
them up, is not all to be
done.

What has happened to the
promise that was given to
the Bahamian people?

In reference to the elec-
tronic ankle bands that was
spoken by the Minister
Tommy Turnquest?

It’s almost five years and I
have not seen anything yet.

If the Bahamian people
place anyone to serve in par-
liament you have to please
your people by truly serv-
ing.

Keeping promises is a
very important thing. By giv-
ing these criminals, some-
thing to think about.

Please get these devices,
and use these to fast track
them all on bail.

This is one of the things
to be done, before it’s too
late.

I’m sure a word to the
wise is enough we do not
know, who is to be mur-
dered next.

DOH
Nassau,

West Winds Property Owners the — Charale

Association Limited

Our police force are doing September, 2009.

Tha National Dance School
The Oundas Centre for the Performing Arts
Uclobar 29th - 31st 2009 at 800 p.m. nightly

Tickets $20.00
Box Office at the Dundas (telephones 393-3728/394-7179) opens

Saturday 24th October $200 am. 9 S00 pom. daily
Advanced fiche! bookings 4-mal address
judcabS 1 Gthobm ail.com

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

Please be advised an Extraordinary General
Meeting of West Winds Property Owners
Association Limited (WWPOA) will be held
on Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.
in the evening at the Pavilion, West Winds.

you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

(Reversed tiobets: not callected bp 3200 pom. on day of

pectoraanes will he seal, |

A Tribute To Two of The Bahamas’ Cultural Icons,
Andrew A. Curry | James J. Catalin





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Tributes paid to the
late Roger Carron

TRIBUTES have been pour-
ing in for the late Roger Car-
ron, The Tribune’s Managing
Director and husband of Tri-
bune Publisher Eileen Carron,
who passed way Sunday morn-
ing.

Mr Carron, 77, was born in
Eastbourne, Sussex, England
on June 13, 1932. He met his
future wife while studying for
his bar finals in London in 1960
and overcame a number of hur-
dles to join her when she
returned to the Bahamas to
help her father Sir Etienne
Dupuch with The Tribune.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said he and his col-
leagues were saddened to learn
of his death.

“Mr Carron lived a full and
productive life and made a sig-
nificant contribution to
Bahamian national life since his
arrival here almost 50 years
ago. Despite the difficulties he
encountered, Mr Carron grew
to love his adopted home and
retained his good humour
throughout. He was fond of
chatting with Bahamians from
all walks of life and made many
friends among them.

“In his many years at The
Tribune Mr Carron garnered
the respect and admiration of
many, including the young jour-
nalists with whom he came into
contact and he contributed sig-
nificantly to their development
as a wise mentor and profes-
sional journalist.

“Roger Carron contributed
much to The Tribune, an
important Bahamian institu-
tion, and to the country in gen-
eral. My colleagues and I
extend our sincere condolences
to Mrs Carron and their son
Robert on his passing.”

Glenys Hanna-Martin,
national chairman of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, also
extended her condolences to
The Tribune's publisher.

“Mr Carron was always an
amiable gentleman who always
appeared to fully enjoy his walk
through life. He was over the
years a vital component in the
publication of The Tribune and
we therefore know his extend-
ed family will include the staff
of that newspaper.

Pl
ri
BI

nOlclsiemeye\e 1s @))|



“It is our prayer that God
will give strength to both Mrs
Carron and their son Robert
during this difficult time of
loss.”

Former Tribune Managing
Editor John Marquis described
Mr Carron as a “true English
gent with a very human touch”.

He added: “My wife Joan
and I were deeply shocked to
hear of Roger's passing. We
always regarded him as the very
nicest kind of English gentle-
man, a person with a real con-
cern for his fellow humans who
never lost his twinkling sense
of humour and engaging smile.

“During my 10 years as The
Tribune's managing editor, he
and Mrs Carron were extreme-
ly supportive. It was their inde-
pendent and robust approach
to journalism that lured me
back to the Bahamas in the late
1990s, and it was their commit-
ment to freedom of the press
that kept me there for so long.

“The Bahamas owes Roger a
great debt because the won-

derful relationship he shared
with Mrs Carron was undoubt-
edly a major factor in keeping
The Tribune on track during
the very difficult times they had
to face during the 1970s and
1980s.”

Dr Keva Bethel, president
Emeritus of the College of the
Bahamas, said: “He was such a
fine, upright, congenial man,
one whose friendship I trea-
sured. He will be a sore loss not
only to The Tribune and the
Bahamian media in general, but
to our whole community. I
extend best wishes and special
condolences to all The Tribune
family whose pain must be par-
ticularly acute at this sad time.”

Minister of State for Social
Services Loretta Butler-Turn-
er said: “On behalf of my fam-
ily and I, and the residents of
the Montagu Constituency, I
wish to extend our heart-felt
sympathy to the family of
Rodger Carron. At this most
difficult time we prayerfully
remember and support his
devoted wife and partner, Mrs
Eileen Carron and beloved son
Robert Carron.

“We also remember his
extended family members and
professional family at The Tri-
bune group of companies. May
God's Blessings lovingly sus-
tain and uplift you at this time.
May his soul and the souls of
the faithfully departed rest in
peace.”

Jack Thompson, Director of
Immigration, said: “I would like
to extend sincerest sympathy
to Mrs Carron and to the fami-
ly at The Tribune on the passing
of Mr Carron. Please be
assured of our prayers.”

Branville McCartney, Minis-
ter of State for Immigration,
said: “I would like to wish sin-
cere condolences to Mrs Carron
and her family on the passing of
Mr Roger Carron. Our prayers
are with her and the family.”

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PHONE: 322-2157



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Public praise for Tribune over Preston Ferguson coverage

MEMBERS of the public
have been effusive in their
praise of The Tribune and the
family of Preston Ferguson
following the announcement
that the police investigation
into his death has been
reopened.

Mr Ferguson’s body was
found in his work vehicle on a
lonely stretch of road on
Great Exuma about two



months ago. The police ini-
tially deemed the death an
accident, however the family
and The Tribune have cam-
paigned strongly for the mat-
ter to be revisited, as the evi-
dence could point to foul play.

Following the announce-
ment last week that a team of
homicide investigators had
been dispatched to the island,
readers of tribune242.com

hailed the persistence of Pre-
ston’s relatives and the efforts
of this newspaper.

D Collie said: “Has there
EVER been this level of
investigative journalism in this
country? Iam proud of what
has been done in this matter
and hope that the elected offi-
cials take note. This family
was just one of many and they
stuck to their guns and didn’t

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O THE WORLD

RE-ISSUE OF BTC TENDER

just roll over to the usual
empty double talk of minis-
ters and police spokespersons.

Good Job Tribune
reporters and Ferguson Fam-
ily. Next up, the family of
Brenton Smith need closure!”

Gail H said: “This is living
proof that the fourth estate
still holds some kind of weight
in the country. Thank you 77i-
bune and continue to use your
powers for good.”

Gretchen added: “Con-
grats to the investigative
reporters at The Tribune; I
know the family must be very
relieved to have their quest
for justice documented in the
print media. A job well done.
Thank God for the Tribune
staff.

“Jetta” said: “The Tribune
staff needs to be commend-
ed for bringing this and other
important issues to the fore-
front so that people can get
justice in this country.”

“Bush Lawyer added: “Yes,
I too would like to thank The
Tribune for good coverage of
local events. So many articles
are reported once, are incon-
clusive, and you never hear
about it again. We need to
stop hiding behind this small
town syndrome, and getting
in bed with wrongdoers.”

According to “Joe Blow”,
“Tt's about time. At least now
Preston's family knows they

FOR USED & SALVAGED VEHICLES

This is to advise that BIC is re-issuing the

“Tender For Used and Salvaged Vehicles”
that originally appeared in the press for the month of September, 2009, with a

deadline of submission of September 30, 2009.

Please note that ALL tender offers submitted at that time are null and void.
None of the submitted tenders were opened and viewed by BIC

All interested parties remain eligible fo participate in the re-issued tender
exercise for scrap vehicles. If you participated before, you must submit a brand

new tender.

Bids should be clearly marked “Tender For Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

and submitted to the Acting President & CEO

not later than 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 23, 2009,

Vehicle Type

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1994 E-150 Van 1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck

999 Ford Ranger P/U Truck
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have real police on the case,
so they should be able to feel
comfortable with whatever
the outcome.

FROM page one

“Good for them for forcing
the issue and good for The
Tribune for taking up the sto-
ry and not letting go.”



reportedly gave chase and shots were heard in the area of the
Tom “The Bird” Grant recreational Complex. Johnson
received gunshot wounds about the body and was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

Forbes of Graham Drive, Yellow Elder Gardens, was
represented by attorney Tai Pinder during his arraignment

before Chief Magistrate
Ce Gea)

Roger Gomez in Court

One, Bank Lane, yester-

day. He was not required j
to enter a plea tand the

case was adjourned to

November 2 in Court 5,

Bank Lane. .

Forbes along with Ricar-
do L Knowles, 21, of Butler ~~
Street, Nassau Village, is a.
charged with the August ees
14 murder of Shawn Potae R
Kareem Stubbs. Stubbs, 23 ee cao ke.
was found dead through ae
Sea Breeze Lane around ;
3am on August 14 with a J
gunshot wound to the }
head. Forbes and Knowles }§ .
were not required to enter |RRAE TT Eten eroneattr
a plea to the murder charge
and the case was adjourned
to November 2 in Court 5, Bank Lane.

Knowles is also charged with armed robbery, stealing,
receiving and burglary. It is alleged that Knowles between
August 2 and 3, broke into the home of Dwayne Curtis. It is
alleged that he stole a $670, stainless steel Rolex watch, a
$200 silver hand chain, a $1,300 flat screen television, a
$1000 HP computer, $300 cash, a $50 Samsung digital cam-
era and a set of keys for a 1994 vehicle.

It is also alleged that Knowles robbed Curtis of a set of
keys for a Ford Fiesta, registered to the Department of
Environmental Health. Knowles is also accused of stealing
the vehicle, as well as a 2000 Nissan Sentra and a 1994
Audi. Knowles pleaded not guilty to the charges and those
cases were also adjourned to November 2, in Court Number
5 Bank Lane.

Attorney Pinder told the court she had been informed by
her client that while in custody at the Central Detective
Unit, he was beaten in the back and told he would be “dealt
with” once remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison as murder vic-
tim Jeffrey Johnson-Rolle is the nephew of the prison’s
Deputy Superintendent Charles Rolle.

Knowles also told the court he needed medical atten-
tion, claiming he to had been beaten by police and had lost
hearing in one of his ears. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered
that he receive medical treatment. Both men were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

A rowdy crowd assembled on Bank Lane yesterday,
shouting at the police officers as they jostled with the
accused while escorting them back to the Central Police
Station.



Teachers’
union boss in
SOOK cash row

tions Corporation (BTC),
FROM Page One $3,632 to the Water and

Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) and $2,451 to the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-

but carrying out the wrong
process.
And Mr Laroda said the

1 : ration (BEC).
punishment does not fit the Another $1,000 was tak-
crime. en out by Ms Wilson to put

He told the press: “The
allegations are misleading
and disingenuous because
every executive officer
knows the suspension wasn’t
because of misappropriation
of funds.

“Ms Wilson was travelling
the next day, the bills had
to be paid and she wanted to
pay them before she left.

“Also the trip to Grenada
had to be funded and she

on the Impress account for
petty cash, adding to a total
of $64,232.

Ms Wilson said: “I wish to
state unequivically there is
no truth in the misappropri-
ation of funds on my part.

“Our Union’s Constitu-
tion has a mechanism that
allows us to resolve matters
internally.

“It is sad that persons
found it necessary to bring

needed cash to pay for the
rooms and other expenses.

“There are times when
you have to make decisions
on your feet. I give her the
benefit of the doubt.”

The union treasurer
explained how two $30,000
payments which should have
been transferred from the
consolidated account to the
pension fund were not, and
payments were made with-
out consultation with the
board.

She said $43,284 was used
to make up for a shortfall in
insurance payments and has
evidence in a letter from Ms
Wilson to the credit union.

A $10,000 cheque was
made payable to secretary
general Stephen McPhee to
cover expenses on the trip
to Grenada on July 23, and
another $1,500 cheque was
written to Fr Campbell to
cover the cost of office oper-
ations in Ms Wilson’s
absence.

Ms Armbrister said a fur-
ther $2,395 was paid to the
Bahamas Telecommunica-

this matter to the media. I
do not intend to resolve the
matter via the media but I
do intend to exhaust all
avenues available to me to
defend my good name and
restore the confidence in this
great union.”

Government High School
teacher Pearl Baker said it
was a bad time to lose the
president of the 4,000 mem-
ber union as hundreds could
be facing pay cuts next week
after taking industrial action
over inadequate teaching
conditions in government
schools.

She said: “I am very dis-
appointed because teachers
should have been informed
before the press was
informed of any allegations
involving the elected presi-
dent.

“Her suspension comes in
as some of my colleagues
will be cut so who will be
standing up for them? This
makes the union look bad
with a lot of false allega-
tions. I smell conspiracy
written all over this.”

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THE TRIBUNE



PM wants better
revenue collection
from Family Island

administrators

FAMILY ISLAND ADMINISTRA-
TORS must do a better job at collecting
government revenue, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said.

“Administrators are just not expected
to sit in the office all day dressed in suit
and tie and wait for somebody to come
and see ‘the chief’,” he said. “They are to
be very knowledgeable about what is hap-
pening in their communities.”

During the annual conference for Fam-

lect a royalty for every load of sand taken
from the Bahamian seabed, “but that is
not happening. It is all stipulated in the
law. We can go down a list across the
board, agency after agency, to discover
how we are falling down in the adminis-
tration of the revenue collection in the
Family Islands.”

The government requires “greater
accountability” from administrators with
respect to the expenditure of public funds,

ily Island Administrators at the British a Mr Ingraham said.

Colonial Hilton, which ended on Friday,

Mr Ingraham told administrators to investigate any
suggestion that the government may not be receiv-
ing revenue due to it.

Second home owners on certain islands rent out
their homes but are not paying taxes from the
income generated, Mr Ingraham said.

“We are willing to treat their property as a private
dwelling home for the purposes of real property
tax, which means they will be able to benefit from the
exemption of the first $250,000 of value, like every-
body else,” he said.

“They will pay the real property tax on the
remainder and they will charge their guests who are
paying them, the percentum for the daily rate that
they are occupying the places, and remit that to the
Treasury or to the Administrator’s Office on a
monthly basis.”

Mr Ingraham insisted that there must be ways to
improve the delivery of services while increasing
the intake of revenue.

He noted that the government is supposed to col-



“Our aim and our goal has always been
that we will seek to benchmark the expenditure by
Local Government in districts against the revenue
collected from that district and top off those dis-
tricts that for their own economic circumstance are
unable to produce an adequate sum of money to
fund adequately a Local Government. We expect
that soon we will be able to benchmark the amount
of remittance to a district based upon the amount
that is collected from certain taxes in the district.”

Elected local authorities would then “have to be
more vigilant in helping to identify and collect the
$100 a year for every dock that is in the district, to
collect from the marinas for all of the boats they have
tied up, collect business licence fees and other fees,”
he said. Administrators should also publically explain
why they cannot approve certain requests and should
not try to evade meeting with members of the pub-
lic, Mr Ingraham added. “You ought not to turn
people around by telling them come back tomorrow.
Determine it now. If you cannot do it, find out who
can do it and get them the answer.”

Deter NOLL DAV sy lee to an Te amare Bahama.



PLP leadership candidates
campaign in Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Five of the can-
didates vying for leadership posi-
tions within the Progressive Lib-
eral Party have taken their cam-
paigns to Grand Bahama.

Dr Bernard Nottage, Kendrick
Dorsett, and attorneys Paul Moss,
Philip “Brave” Davis and Jerome
Fitzgerald addressed PLP sup-
porters in Freeport at an open
forum at Mary Star of the Sea
auditorium on Friday.

West End MP Obie Wilch-
combe, who is vying for deputy
leader of the PLP, did not attend.

The candidates shared their
ideas and vision of moving the
party forward into the next gen-
eral elections.

The crowd favourite of the
evening was Dr Nottage. The
auditorium erupted with applause
as the candidate for leader of the
PLP was introduced to the stage.

Dr Nottage urged PLPs not to
be afraid of change. He noted that
the party has an “image problem”
that prevents people from sup-
porting it.

“The party is in crisis of confi-
dence in Grand Bahama, and
when I went to South Eleuthera
the people there said they have
not seen any of the party officers
in a year or two, and that was the
same story I heard in Andros.

“We have a wonderful par-
ty...but to date...people don’t see
the party making enough inter-
vention on their behalf,” he said.

He claims that Bahamians are
being victimized and sent home
under the FNM government. He
also noted that the economy of
Grand Bahama is in crisis.

Dr Nottage stressed that it is
important that the party is able
to win the support of those young
people who do not belong to any
party.

“The time has come for a
change in our party and in our
country. Our party does not
belong to any one person. It
belongs to all of us. You must not
worry about personalities when
you go to vote, you must remem-
ber to think about your children
and what is in the best interest of
the party.”

Dr Nottage believes that his
brief departure from the party is
not an issue for PLPs.

He explained that many before
him had left, including party
leader Perry Christie who also
returned to the party.

Attorney Paul Moss, who is
also vying for leader of the PLP,
believes that he is capable of lead-
ing the party. During his address,
he expressed concerns about the
state of Grand Bahama, and
blamed the Grand Bahama Port
Authority for the current eco-
nomic woes in Freeport.

Mr Moss was also concerned
that foreigners were being
favoured over Bahamians, partic-
ularly as it relates to the granting
of crown land.

“There are 2.7 million acres of
crown land in the country and
each of the 300,000 Bahamians

should be given some crown
land,” he said.

As Mr Moss was speaking, a
small group of unruly Perry
Christie supporters left the audi-
torium chanting “Perry, Perry”
on the outside.

Senator Fitzgerald told sup-
porters that he is ready for lead-
ership within the party.

Mr Philip “Brave” Davis, the
candidate for deputy leader, said
that there is a need for moderniz-
ing the party’s internal structure.

He intends to formulate and
standardize general election pro-
cedures and make the national
headquarters a fully operational
command centre.

A small booklet entitled, ‘Be
Brave Change the Bahamas,’ fur-
ther outlining his vision for the
party, was distributed among the
audience. Mr Davis, who is
endorsed by deputy leader Cyn-
thia Pratt, said he will support the
participation of more women and
young people in the party.

Kendred Dorsett, the candi-
date vying for national chairman
of the PLP, believes that the
Council needs a full-time chair-
man in New Providence.

If elected, he intends to
become a full time chairman at
the Sir Lynden 8 Centre.

Mr Dorsett also intends to trav-
el to Grand Bahama once a
month to ensure the effectiveness
of the council on the island.

“We must revitalize the coun-
cil in Grand Bahama, we must
restore the people’s confidence in
the PLP,” he said

British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

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Jennifer Francis

Breast Cancer Survivor for 9 years

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

THE SKIN CLINIC

at the

Family Medical Centre
Village Road Shopping Centre

SKIN CLINIC SERVICES INCLUDE:

Routine Skin Exam, (Moles, Skin Cancer)

Skin Allergies

Scalp Disorders (Dandruff, Itching, Hair Loss)

Skin Infections
Infants/Children Skin Problems

General Skin, Hair and Nail Problems
Teens to Adults with Acne (Face, Chest, Back)

Itching Skin (Pruritus)
Psoriasis

Eczema and Rashes

Razor Bumps

Skins Problems in Pregnancy

Monday - Friday and every other Sunday by appointment.
Most major medical insurances accepted.

PHONE: 394-3433 / 394-1815

IN MEMORIAM

Forever in our hearts!

. me et i z
MRS. JESTINA M. ALLEN
Born: Sth April, 1918
Ned: 20th October, 2006

MR. MARTIN A. ALLEN

Born: 19th August, 1935
Died: 21st December, 1998

O light forever dawning beyond the
darkest night;

O comfort of the mourning, our
strength and our delight; receive
our humble pleading for those
whose course is run, lest pardon

they be needing for any evil done.

MR. HARRY HR ALLEN

Born: 2nd August, 1912
Died: 8th November, 1985

MR. PITTMAN R. ALLEN

Born: 42nd Februar ¥ 1944
Died: 2nd December, 2007

To him who like the eagle arose
on congu‘ring wing, the cross
his banner regal, O death,
where is your sting?

There's surely no rejection for
those who share His strife,
but hope and resurrection
and everlasting life.

@ THE ALLEN FAMILY @



this disease is to detect breast cancer in its
rly perform breast exams on yourself. Every
woman should start self breast exams when they reach twenty years of age. Self exams should be performed every
month. Mark your calendar in red ink to remind you; this is a reminder to help yourself and possibly save your ow

49










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THE TRIBUNE

S
\

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20,

2009 WORLD SUNFISH
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Bahamian
sailors find
the going
tough

RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

After the opening day of
competition in the 2009
World Sunfish Champi-
onships, Bahamian com-
petitors find themselves with
much ground to make up to
claim pole positions near the
leader board by the end of
the week.

With the release of the
preliminary results yester-
day afternoon, Bahamians
found themselves in less
than favorable positions ear-
ly on.

Charles Kelly recorded
the best finish of any of the
15 Bahamian sailors in the
field in 18th position with a
net score of 38, a result of
an 18th place finish in race
one and 20th in race two.

Former three time Sun-
fish World Champion, Don-
ald Martinbourough closely
trailed Kelly in both races
as he finished 19th overall,
with a 19th place finish in
race one and 21st place fin-
ish in race two, a net score of

Paul-Jon Patin of the
United States leads the field
with a net score of three, a
first place in race one fol-
lowed by second in race two.

Marx Chirinos of
Venezuela is in second with
five points, while the win-
ner of race two, Art Van
Aanholt of Curacao is third
with six.

Other Bahaminas in the
field included George Dami-
anos in 27th place, Andrew
Wilhoyte in 28th place, Jef-
ferey Gale in 32nd place,
Christopher Sands in 35th
place, Peter Bruce Wassitsch
in 37th place, Gavin McK-
inney in 39th place, Jimmy

SEE page 12



PAGE 10



2009





Crushers demolish
Giants Ht og points

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Defending champions
st Bede’s win Catholic

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

defence of Xavier's Giants.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribbunemedia.net

T was a like a David

vs Goliath match-up

as the defending

champions St. Bede’s
Crushers crushed the Xavier’s
Giants 44-5 to start the 21st
annual Catholic Diocesan Pri-
mary School Basketball
League.

No, it wasn’t a typographic
error. The Crushers just sim-
ply took advantage of their
home court yesterday to
demolish the Giants by 39
points.

In fact, St. Bede’s had post-
ed an impressive 39-0 lead
through the first three and a
half quarters of the game
before Xavier’s finally got on
the scoreboard.

Donnie Culmer, one of the
Crushers’ coach, said they
wanted to make a strong
statement with all of the
teams in the league on hand
for the opening ceremonies
that was held prior to the start
of the game.

“We didn’t look like how
we practiced, but all in all, it
was the first game,” Culmer
stressed. “But the fifth game,
we will get it together and
play like the true champions
that we are.”

Despite the score, the
Crushers got off to a slow
start, but by the time Kyle
‘Flash’ Turnquest, considered
to be the best player in the
league, got into the game, it
was all over.

Although he didn’t play in
the first quarter, Turnquest
was still able to rack up a
game high 20 points, leaving
Giants’ coach Nelson ‘Man-

ST. BEDE’S CRUSHERS centre Gregory Cooper muscles his way up over the



della’ Joseph in awe. “They
look good. They impress me,”
said Joseph, who himself is
listed as one of the top nation-
al team players in the country.
“To see one of their players at
the primary school level, vow.
It gives you chills.”

Joseph, however, admitted
that his young Giants ran up
against a seasoned Crushers
team and it showed in the
result.

“That’s no excuse, but
some of them had some first
game jitters,” he pointed out.
“Hopefully by the next game,
they will be able to do bet-
ter.”

Work

Judging from the blowout,
Joseph said there’s a lot of
work in just about every facet
of the game that his Giants
will have to work on before
they play their next game on
Wednesday, October 28 at
home against the St. Thomas
More Shockers.

“We have a lot of things to
work on,” he said. “Lay ups,
free throws, defense. We have
a lot of things to work on.”

Even though they were
blown out from start to fin-
ish, Joseph said they did get
some confidence late in the
fourth quarter when they
avoided being totally shut out.

“T was telling them at in the
fourth quarter, we needed to
score, get at least two points
on the scoreboard,” he said.
“Tt was good for their confi-
dence.

“So it was good for some
of the guys who played for
the first time. Hopefully the

SEE page 11



TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11
SPORTS

Crushers cut Giants down to size

FROM page ten

next gome they will be able ACTION FROM CATHOLIC DIOCESAN PRIMARY SCHOOL BASKETBALL LEAGUE

to rebound from this loss.”

While coaches Culmer and
Ricardo Freemantle sat out
both Turnquest and their
rebounding intimidator Gre-
gory Cooper in the first quar-
ter, St. Bede’s still managed to
open a slim 5-0 lead.

It was Donald Cash who
scored the first point for the
season on a free throw and
Christopher Oliver and Malik
Jones got back-to-back bas-
kets. Once Turnquest got into
the game, he went right on
the scoring rampage, putting
up all seven points for St.
Bede’s in the quarter as they
extended their lead to 12-0 at
the half.

Having established his pres-
ence, Turnquest and the rest
of his team-mates came out
of the break and turned up
the heat in the third quarter.

When it wasn’t Turnquest,
who converted six of his 10
shots from the free throw line,
St. Bede’s got another six in
total from Adrian Mackey,
five from Christopher Oliver
and four apiece from Malik
Jones and Gregory Cooper.

That was when the Crush-
ers’ coaching staff went fur-
ther into their bench and
brought in the first set of
reserves, which enabled the
Giants to finally score.

Tahj Moss was the first to
score, cutting the deficit to 39-
2 and Rashad Gibson added
another basket, while Eugene
Higgs chipped in with a free
throw.

“The team started out a bit
nervous at first, but once they
got into the groove, they start-
ed playing as a team,” coach
Freemantle stated.

“But this team has been
training hard, so it was good
for us as we totally dominated
the game. We’re champions
and we want to play as cham-
pions and repeat as champi-
ons this year.”

Coach Culmer said this was
just an indication of what the
rest of the teams in the league
can expect. “We’re looking to
beat everybody,” he project-
ed. “We don’t plan to lose any
game this year. This is my
final year, so I want to go out
with a bang.”

The league opened with a
bang as Bahamas Basketball
Federation president
Lawrence Hepburn brought
the official remarks, praising
the Catholic schools for hav-
ing the sporting curriculum in
all schools.

As for the players, Hep-
burn advised them not to be
selfish when they score and
they don’t score. He encour-
aged them to get back and
play defense.

And he also informed them
not to allow basketball to be
the focal point of their lives,
but rather make sure that
they do their necessary school
work to better prepare them
for the future.

Minister expresses condolences

over death of Mr Roger Carron

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Desmond Bannis-
ter, expresses heartfelt condo-
lences to the wife and family of
Mr. Roger Carron who passed
away in Florida.
Mr. Carron was keenly inter-
ested in sports — particularly
golf and tennis and, even
though he may not have played
competitively he ensured that
there was fair and balanced
reporting particularly in his
role as News Editor at The Tri-
bune.
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM











PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



2009 INTERNATIONAL JUNIOR SUNFISH CHAMPIONSHIPS

Top Bahamian eighth as Ecuador's
Martinetti continues his domination

Ecuador's Johnathan Martinetti con-
tinued his domination of the Sunfish sail-
ing world Saturday, winning the 2009
International Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships in Nassau.

The 17 year old has had an impressive
streak this year, already winning the 2009
Sunfish North American Championship
and the Laser 4.7 Worlds held in ByJzios,
Brazil. Martinetti beat out 24 other top
junior sailors representing 10 countries,
placing first in four of the six regattas.

"Sailing here was kind of different
because the wind was shifting, but the
regattas were very, very competitive,"
he said. Puerto Rico's Fernando Monllor
placed second and Phillipine Van Aan-
holt finished with third place honours
and was also the top placing female com-
petitor.

Competition

Regatta Chairman Paul Hutton is
pleased with the level of competition and
the way the event played out.

"These are very talented young men
and women that we've had competing
here over the last few days,” he said,
"We had two days of good racing with
enough wind on the course, especially
considering these were juniors and not
seniors."

Six Bahamian juniors competed in the
championships. Christopher Sands, who
won Junior Nationals this summer, was
the top Bahamian with an 8th place fin-
ish.

"Tt was a lot of work, but it felt really
good. The foreign guys are really good
sailors with a lot of experience, so this
was a different level of competition,”
said Sands. Sunday night was the opening
ceremony for the 2009 Sunfish World
Championships and 72 of the world's top
sailors will line up Monday morning at
10am for the start of a week of what's
expected to be intense top level sailing.

e 2 i 3
THE TOP JUNIOR SAILORS of 2009 with thei

a
= |
a
=

‘t

PHOTO: Robe



=) 9
r uniquely designed trophies. From left: Paul

Hutton, Regatta Chairman; 1st place, Jonathan Martinetti, Ecuador; 4th place, Jose Gutier-
rez, Venezuela; Youngest competitor, Olivia Gugliemini, USA; 2nd place, Fernando Monllor,
Puerto Rico; 5th place, Mathieu de By, Holland; 3rd place and top female, Phillipine Van

Aanholt, Curacao; Brent Burrows, Nassau Yacht Club Commodore; Andres Santana, Inter-

national Sunfish Class Association President.

ECUADOR'S JONATHAN MARTINETTI waves

, yl

PHOTO: Robert Dunkley





his country's flag he receives his trophies



for winning the 2009 International Junior Sunfish Championships. Pictured from left: Mar-

tinetti; Llewellyn Burrows, Managing Director
Ice Cream; Paul Hutton, Regatta Chairman.

THE START of the first race in the 2009 World Sunfish Championships.

FROM page ten

Lowe in 44th place, Ted O’ Brien,
45th, Michael Holowesko, 58th,
Dwayne Wallas, 59th, Lori Lowe,
60th, BJ Burrows, 63rd, and Donico
Brown rounds out the contingent in
64th place. The Bahamas loos to con-

sports

tinue a rich tradition in the Sunfish
Class which has netted five World
Championships since the event’s
enception.

Pierre Siegenthalter took the title in
1973 and and 1977, while Martin-
borogh won the event in 1983, 1985,

Fun Foods Wholesale, distributors of Nestle

PHOTO: Robert Dunkley

and 1988. The Sunfish World Cham-
pionships were last held in the
Bahamas in 1995 in Abaco, when
David Loring of the United States
took top honors.

The First Warning Signal to begin
today’s action will sound at 10am.



New Providence Volleyball Association: teams
try to close out first half in playoff contention

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association continued its regular sea-
son on Sunday at the DW Davis Gym-
nasium with teams trying to close out
the first half in playoff contention.

On Friday, Anastasia Sands-Moultrie
and Kelsie Johnson led the Johnson's
Lady Truckers in three sets over the
Lady Hornets.

In men's action, the Technicians also
defeated the Champions Club in three
sets. Jamaal Knowles and Adalbert
Ingraham led the Technicians in the
win whilst Muller Petit led the Cham-
pionship Club.

Sunday night action saw the Lady
Hornets come from behind to defeat
the Lady Techs in five sets 21-25, 18-25,
25-19, 25-21 and 15-10. Simona Kerr
let the Hornets with nine points and
Sharon Whylly was the leading scorer
for the Lady Techs with 13 points.

In the men's action, DaBasement
defeated the Saints 25-15, 25-15 and
25-15. Cashmir Wood led all scorers
with 17 points in the win.

Matthew Wert led the Saints with
five points.

The last game was a battle of the
two undefeated teams and what an
intense game it was.

However, in the end, the defending
champions, Scotiabank Defenders
would improve their record to 4-0 by
defeating the youthful National Fence
Intruders 23-25, 25-23, 25-21, 15-25 and
17-15.

Shedrick Forbes led the Defenders
with 18 kills and two blocks, Prince
Wilson led the Intruders in a losing
effort with 19 kills and four aces.

THE College of the Bahamas wom-
en’s volleyball wrapped up its inter-
collegiate play this weekend in Florida.

In their frst game on Friday night,
the Lady Caribs lost in three straight
sets to St. Thomas University.

They played a much better game on
Saturday winning the first set. How-
ever, they came up short in four sets to
Florida Memorial University.

The Lady Caribs will now shift their
attention to play in the New Provi-
dence Volleyball Association with its
next game scheduled for Wednesday at

7:30 pm at the D W Davis Gymnasium
against the Lady Truckers and then
again on Sunday at 3:30 pm against
Scottsdale Vixens.

Meanwhile, the Caribs men’s vol-
leyball team will also play on Sunday at
5:30 p.m. against the Crimestoppers.

THE Gymnastics Federation of the
Bahamas is inviting all interested gym-
nastics, dancers and cheerleaders to
attend a meeting on Wednesday at 6
pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Federation members as well as non-
members are welcome to attend this
informative session.

Topics of discussion will include:

- The role of the Federation in pro-
moting and supporting gymnastics in
the Bahamas.

- Past accomplishments and future
goals.

- Information from the Bahamas
Olympic Committee and the FIG per-
taining to developing the sport and
assistance available.

- Application and requirements for
GFB members.





exird

Owen braced for
facing |S

Reds fans
in United
shirt

ROBERT MILLWARD,
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

Mie Owen knows how tough it is trying to
convince England coach Fabio Capello he's
good enough for the World Cup, especially as it might
well be in vain.

The former Liverpool, Real Madrid and Newcastle
striker has fought back from persistent hamstring injuries,
a knee operation and a foot fracture and emerged still try-
ing to sound positive.

Now comes possibly the most difficult task of all.

Once the favourite of the Liverpool fans, Owen now
has to face them at Anfield wearing a Manchester Unit-
ed shirt.

When it comes to soccer, the followers of the two most
successful clubs in English league history hate each oth-
er. Few players wind up playing for both clubs and,
although Owen has taken a round trip via Madrid and
Newcastle, the Liverpool fans are likely to forget all the
great goals he scored for their team when they see him
wearing United's colours.

"IT would prefer people to sit down and recognize what
you did for them and for the team in years gone past,"
Owen said. "But I am pretty realistic as well and now that
I am playing for their arch rivals... Iam not holding my
breath, put it that way."

Owen hopes the Liverpool fans will acknowledge he is
a professional player carning a living.

After disappointing spells at Madrid and Newcastle, he
badly needs a break to get back to the top of English soc-
cer and recapture his England place. With Liverpool
seemingly not interested in taking him back, he had to go
to a club capable of winning titles.

Manchester United appeared to be the ideal choice
although not in the eyes of the Liverpool fans.

"People talk about loyalty in football. It is easy for a
football supporter to preach about that," Owen said.
"As a father, brother and son, there is no one more loy-
al than me. But when you are a player, you are not a fan.
I have got to earn a living, provide for my family. It is a
job opportunity, just like anyone else's work."

Owen has faced Liverpool before. As a Newcastle
player last season, he played in both Premier League
games that his former club won, 5-1 and 3-0.

But this is different. And if Wayne Rooney fails to
recover from injury, there is a good chance Owen will
start or at least be on the bench at Anfield.



eee eh Ts

Worry

The thought doesn't appear to worry him. Neither, it
seems, do his so far fruitless efforts to get Capello to
select him for England.

The Italian coach has guided England impressively to
the 2010 World Cup with nine wins in 10 qualifying
matches without any help from Owen, a veteran of three
such championships and with 40 goals in 89 games for his
country. Capello persistently says "the door is still open"
when the subject is raised of Owen's inclusion in the
England squad although that doesn't sound like much
encouragement for the 29-year-old striker.

The player's argument is that he won't let Capello
down and he has plenty of experience of World Cups,
whereas younger players might freeze on the big occasion.

"Everyone knows if I play then I am likely to score
every other game," he said. "Playing in a World Cup
wouldn't bother me. In fact, I would raise my game, as
happened before in big games. Naturally I would like to
be in the squad, but the last thing I want to be is cam-
paigning."

With Sunday's game looming, Owen has plenty to
think about as the Man United stars make the long jour-
ney to and from their Champions League group game
against CSKA Moscow in Russia.

Owen, who is in the horse business as a stable owner,
can check the racing papers for the odds on his thor-
oughbreds. He might also note that that the bookmakers
rate him a 9-4 shot to play at the World Cup but 1-3
that he won't. If that doesn't worry him, there's always the
thought of facing those Liverpool fans.

Dempsey returns as
Fulham beat Hull 2-0

LONDON

American midfielder Clint Dempsey returned from a
sprained right shoulder as Fulham beat Hull 2-0 Monday
night to climb four places to 12th in the Premier League,
according to Associated Press.

Dempsey was hurt Oct. 4 while playing against West
Ham and missed the United States’ World Cup qualifiers
against Honduras and Costa Rica. He shot wide and head-
ed off target against Hull.

US. forward Jozy Altidore entered as a 69th-minute sub-
stitute, his first appearance for Hull since Sept. 26.

Bobby Zamora scored the first goal in the 43rd minute on
a header after goalkeeper Boaz Myhill’s blocked Damien
Duff's shot. Diomansy Kamara added the second goal in the
64th minute when he turned home Zamora’s cross after a
Fulham breakaway. Fulham improved to 3-4-1. Hull is 18th
in the 20-team league at 2-6-1.

Hull midfielder Jimmy Bullard, a former Fulham star,
returned to action after being sidelined for nine months
following knee surgery.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one John Travolta case

The two are accused of con-
spiring to extort and attempting
to extort $25 million from
American actor John Travolta.
Bridgewater is also charged
with abetment to extortion.

Mr Turner told the jury there
was a threat made regarding
the refusal of treatment form
and that demands were also
made and communicated to Mr
Travolta, although indirectly.

“A threat is a threat, he
(Lightbourne) wanted to give
Mr Travolta the first option to
buy the document,” Mr Turner
said.

“We say that from the evi-
dence there was an agreement
between the two defendants to
extort money from Mr Travol-
ta,” he told the jury, and added
that the agreement in itself was
an offence.

“The threat was not suc-
cessful because no money
changed hands but it was not
for a lack of trying,” he said.

Mr Turner challenged Ms
Bridgewater’s assertion that she
had been acting in her profes-
sional capacity as an attorney.
Mr Turner highlighted rule
three of the Bahamas Bar
Association’s professional code
of conduct, which stated that
an attorney must be candid and
honest in advising his or her
client and must never assist in
any dishonesty, fraud or crime.

Mr Turner told the jury
that Bridgewater knew that
what she was doing was wrong.

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FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater leaves court yesterday.

defence’s claim that Bridgewa-
ter and Lightbourne had been
set up. Mr Tuner told the jury
that what Bridgewater and
Lightbourne said during the
recorded meetings in attorney
Michael McDermott’s hotel
room, had been stated by them
previously.

“Nobody is being set up.
They weren’t being encouraged
to do something they hadn’t
already done,” he said.

Mr Turner also noted that
Lightbourne claimed there had
been an attempt to cover-up
the circumstances surrounding
Jett Travolta’s death but point-
ed out that there was no evi-

dence to suggest that there was
any cover-up and that the issue
was never raised during the
cross-examination of any of the
witnesses. Mr Turner told the
jury that in his unsworn state-
ment, Lightbourne had
besmirched the names of sev-
eral individuals. He also noted
that PLP Senator and attorney
Allyson Maynard-Gibson had
done the right thing by assisting
police but had been vilified in
the trial.

“She did the right thing,
only to be vilified, for what” he
asked.

“AILT ask you to do , hav-
ing considered the evidence in
this case and the law with
respect to it, to return with a
verdict and be able to say I
have done justice between man
and man,” Mr Turner said.

“We are not doing this
because of who the victim is,
we enforce our laws for our-
selves,” Mr Turner told the
jury.

Attorney Murrio Ducille
who represents Bridgewater,
began his closing address yes-
terday afternoon, telling the
jury that they needed to be
refocused.

“This case is not dealing
with politics, FNM and PLP,
we are dealing with two
Bahamians on trial for serious
offences,” he said.

“This case is all about dis-
traction. An incident took place
in Grand Bahama on January 2

Mr Tuner also attacked the

FROM page one

illegally “normally” are employed in the con-
struction field, or working in areas where Bahami-
ans wouldn’t want to work.

“So we find them gravitating towards those
types of jobs. There are others who we have found
who have been arrested and deported for ‘other
reasons’. Some of them have returned and have
been refused entry into the Bahamas,” he said.

Human trafficking has often been referred to as
the modern day form of slavery and is currently
the fastest growing area of international criminal
activity. It involves the exploitation of people
through force, deception, debt bondage, and the
deprivation of a person’s liberty or freedom.

According to Mr Bowe, of the 89 persons at
the Detention Centre, there are 37 Haitians, 11
Jamaicans, 31 Chinese, three Cubans, five Turkish
residents, one Guyanian, and one Nigerian. Of
this total, there were 61 males, 21 females, and sev-
en children.

When speaking to the press yesterday on this
issue of trafficking, Mr Bowe said these individu-
als are often smuggled over great distances to the
Bahamas or on to some other destination where
they will be put to use in some form or fashion.

With many of these persons being caught or
intercepted in the Bahamas, Mr Bowe said they
are unable to put a financial figure on the price
paid for each migrant who is being smuggled from

from which people from the

Detention Centre

“T really can’t say that they are being bought and
sold. I can tell you that persons we have come
across have paid monies to be transported - what
the sums are we really can’t say because right
now our investigations are continuing so it is hard
to come up with a figure.

“During the investigations normally people
would say where they would have originally come
from and that they would have paid persons. Many
times there are persons who are involved in the
scheme of things, they are unable to identify them
because a lot of it is done in the dark. They don’t
get names, or nationalities, and sometimes it is
very difficult when they move at night to say where
they were and how long they have been there.”

Most of these persons who have been smug-
gled, Mr Bowe said have been captured in Grand
Bahama, Abaco, New Providence, and even in
the Biminies.

“Some are found in bushes, some are found in
homes, some are found in vehicles moving along,
and others are found at sea,” he said.

The Department of Immigration is working in
concert with US officials as well as the Royal
Bahamas Police and Defence Forces to combat
this global problem. In 2005, a US report revealed
that nearly one million persons are estimated to be
trafficked globally per year, with nearly 20,000 of

one country to the next.

them destined for the United States.

FROM pageone Amos Ferguson

many cultural strangers.

Described earlier this year by
the New York Times as “the
Picasso of Nassau”, Mr Fergu-
son’s life was littered with inter-
national acclaim contrasted by
seemingly resolute local obscu-
rity.

Mr Ferguson, though drawn
to painting all his life, worked
first as a house painter and said
he didn’t take his talent serious-
ly until his nephew told him
about a dream he had.

“Uncle Amos, I dreamed that
the Lord came out of the sea
with a painting in his hands and
He say He give you a talent but
you don’t use it.”

Mr Ferguson was a devout
christian and many believe that it
was his infallible faith that lent
him the courage and vision to
fully explore and develop his
unique and distinctive style.

Jackson Burnside reflected on
his personal involvement with
the artist, having witnessed his
evolution from cardboard paint-
ings to international exhibitions.

“T first new him as a person
who painted houses, he painted
our mother’s kitchen,” said Mr
Burnside.

“Eventually we got to see his
work as he painted on whatever
materials he could paint on.
When his wife Bea began to take
his work to the market he rec-
ognized that he had a product
that was marketable and would
sell. He was trained by God as
he would say, he was fearless
and couragous and had a
tremendous sense of self esteem.
Without a doubt Amos was the
most prolific Bahamian artist of
the 20th century. What he
accomplished was tremendous.”

Broadly categorised as ‘“‘out-
sider art” or “art brut” (raw art),
Mr Ferguson’s work embodied a
sense of cultural freedom, devoid
of competition or social promo-
tion. Working from his home on
Exuma Street, renamed Amos
Ferguson Street in his honour in
2005, Mr Ferguson was a reno-
knowned intuitive artist and sto-
ryteller that painted “by faith
and not by sight”, often turning
to the bible for inspiration — as
he would tell those curious to
his methodology.

Antonius Roberts said: “I
knew Amos Ferguson to be one
of the most significant artists the
bahamas has ever seen we have
certiantly lost a national trea-

sure but the art world at large,
globally, has lost one of the most
significant outsider or primitive
artist, ever.

“He has been celebrated
appreciated for quite some time
well over a decade by the
ousider world wider art commu-
nity he has yet to receive the to
be embraced by his own people.
Perhaps this will be an opportu-
nity for us as a people to under-
stand and recognise that we have
lost a national treasure and per-
haps find a way to celebrate his
work and his life.”

Amos Ferguson’s first solo
exhibition was held at Toogood’s
studio in 1972, since then his
international recognition by
esteeemed collectors such as
Wadsworth Atheneum Muse-
um.

“People would call him crazy
and vandalise his work, thus he
bacame a recluse,” Mr Roberts
added.

“He only wanted to be
embraced and celebrated and
appreciated by his people. Even
today, a lot of people would look
at his work and rather than
doing the research they would
simply say ‘man the guy paints
like a child, what’s the big deal’.
Unfortunately lack of exposure
has done alot of us in the
Bahamas a great disservice and
as a result we miss so many
opportunities to celebrate the
genius among us.

“His work embodies and sym-
bolizes determination, hardwork
and focus. He had a desire and a
dream to be an artist and he
became one of the best story-
tellers that ever lived.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “My colleagues and I
were saddened to learn of the
death this morning of foremost
Bahamian naive artist, Amos
Ferguson. He is perhaps our
country’s most successful artist
with works in private collections
and galleries around the world.

“The Bahamas has lost a cul-
tural icon. Mr Ferguson, a tal-
ented house painter, unschooled
in the fine arts, reportedly began
painting pictures following the
encouragement of a nephew
who dreamt of his uncle’s hidden
talent.

“Religion and a strong faith
heavily influenced Mr Fergu-
son’s artwork which all bear his
inimitable signature “Paint by
Mr Amos Ferguson”.

A

before Senior Justice Anita
Allen. Mr Ducille is expecting
to continue is closing address
followed by Lightbourne’s
attorney Carlson Shurland.

media were pounding on Mr
Lightbourne and Mr McDer-
mott came here to shift focus,”
he said.

Mr Ducille said there had

been no threat, nor conspiracy
and called the abettment charge
against Bridgewater “non-
sense”.

The case resumes today

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

64% rise on
debt service
payments in
seven years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Answer on whether
taxpayer getting value for
money ‘a resounding no’,

THE Government’s spend- : ;
P says economic think-tank

ing on its own debt interest
payments increased by almost
64 per cent in the seven Budget years leading up to the
2008-2009 fiscal period, a Bahamian economic think-tank
said yesterday, adding that the answer as to whether the tax-
payer was getting value for money was “a resounding no”.

The Nassau Institute, in its analysis of the Government’s
Budget spending for the years between 2002-2003 and 2008-
2009, said that apart from interest payments in its debt (dis-
regarding principal), spending on health and education had
risen by 73.33 per cent and 64.47 per cent respectively.

Pointing out that this increased spending had not pro-
duced any improvement in the nation’s national ‘D’ BGCSE
grade average, Rick Lowe, a Nassau Institute executive,
told Tribune Business: “All the indicators are heading in the
wrong direction.

“When you look at what has been done on education
alone, $1.8 billion or 19 per cent of government spending in
seven years, nothing has improved.

“Some analysis has to be done by government to say are
we getting value for money
and, regrettably, the answer
has got to be a resounding ‘no’

SEE page 4B



BEC’s Abaco peak load

usine

OCTOBER 20,



2009

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

major

Wall

Street

credit rat-
ing agency’s decision
to downgrade the
Bahamas’ B$ bonds
does not “reflect any
fundamental concern
at all about our eco-
nomic situation” and
the Government’s abil-
ity to meet its obliga-
tions, a Cabinet minister said last night.

In addition, Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, told Tribune Business
that the Ingraham administration was
“expecting an extraordinary gain” from
several transactions that it believed
would either eliminate or reduce the $40
million gap between its revenue fore-
casts and current performance.

While not disclosing any of these trans-
actions, Mr Laing said they did not
include the impending privatisation of
the Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC).

The minister was replying to Tribune
Business after it contacted him about
Moody’s decision to downgrade the
Bahamas’ local currency (Bahamian dol-
lar denominated) bonds from the pre-
mium A1 rating to A3, aligning this with

LAING

Police probed 29% of suspect financial reports



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* Government expecting to receive ‘extraordinary gain’ from several

transactions designed to eliminate or reduce $40m revenue forecast gap
* Top Wall Street rating agency lowers Bahamas’ local currency bonds from A1 to A3
* Warns Bahamas has suffered ‘erosion of main debt metrics’, and

it has ‘lower’ long-term growth projections than peers

the A3 rating the Wall Street agency had
assigned to this nation’s foreign currency
bonds.

The move is partly a result of a change
in Moody’s own internal policies, but
also reflects what it termed “the erosion
of the [Bahamas] main debt metrics”,
with this nation’s debt-to-GDP ratio
anticipated to increase by 15 percentage
points in the three years to 2010.

The Wall Street rating agency added
that the Bahamas’ long-term growth pro-
jections were “lower” than that of many
countries it was compared to for rating
purposes.

Gabriel Torres, a Moody’s vice-presi-
dent and sovereign analyst for the
Bahamas, said the rating agency had
eliminated the gap between local and
foreign currency bond ratings for many
countries because “historical evidence
indicates that governments are almost
equally likely to default on either type of
debt”.

Typically, a country’s local currency-
denominated bonds had been rated high-
er than their domestic counterparts, but
Moody’s was now assessing whether to

maintain such a gap on a case-by-case
basis.

“For the Bahamas, Moody’s has con-
cluded that these factors do not warrant
a ratings gap, and therefore we have
aligned the two ratings at A3,” Mr Torres
said.

However, the Wall Street agency’s
statement then added: “The erosion of
the country’s main debt metrics, with
debt-to-GDP projected to reach close to
50 per cent by 2010, from 35 per cent in
2007, further justify the A3 as the appro-
priate level for both bond ratings.

“Long-term growth lower than that of
its rating peers also weighed on the deci-
sion to align the bond ratings at A3. The
Bahamas’ two main industries, tourism
and financial services, have been impact-
ed by the world crisis and will find it dif-
ficult to recover strongly in the near
future.”

Moody’s kept the outlook on all the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit ratings as ‘sta-
ble’, and reaffirmed the Aal country ceil-
ing for foreign currency bonds and A3

SEE page 6B

up 64% in 5 years

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) pro-
posed Wilson City power
plant “will almost double the
nominal generating capacity”
that it currently has on Aba-
co, the project’s Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) has disclosed, its peak
load on the island having risen
by 64 per cent in five years.

The EIA by Kalimantan
Environmental Services
(KES), which has been
obtained by Tribune Business,
said that based on current and
future demand trends, BEC
had determined that “expan-
sion of the existing power
generating facilities is consid-
ered necessary to meet the
needs of all consumers in
Abaco”, not least the various
development projects ongo-
ing on the island.

Delving briefly into BEC’s
history in power generation
on the island, the KES report
said the 2001 extension of its
existing Marsh Harbour pow-
er station and the addition of
two 4.4 megawatt generators
“met the forecasted load
demand” then.

“The expansion of the gen-
erating system was intended
to meet the increased

demand, thereby benefiting
the continuing development
of the island by continued
encouragement of economic
development for projects in
tourism, agriculture and small
industry,” the EJA said.

The existing Marsh Har-
bour Power Station now had
an installed capacity of some
25.6 mega watts (MW), the
EIA said, with smaller gen-
erator sets having purchased
to meet peak summer
demand.

“The growth in consumer
demand for power in Abaco
over the past few years has
increased,” the report added.
“Over the past five years,
BEC’s peak load has
increased by some 64 per
cent. This has presented BEC
with challenges, in some
instances requiring additional
generating capacity, as well
as initiating a programme to
replace the older generators
with new ones.”

The Wilson City power
plant has been a subject of
much controversy recently,
with BEC and the Govern-
ment coming under fire amid
accusations of lack of trans-
parency and a failure to dis-
close details of the project to
impacted Abaco residents.

SEE page 2B

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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME 29 per cent of the
Suspicious Transactions
Reports (STRs) it received
during 2008 were passed on
to the Royal Bahamas Police
Force for further investiga-
tion, the Financial Intelligence
Unit’s (FIU) 2008 report dis-
closed, involving $6.756 mil-
lion worth of assets.

The FIU, whose report was
recently tabled in Parliament,
said it saw a 3 per cent year-
over-year increase in STR
reports to 129 in 2008, com-
pared to 125 the previous
year. The 2008 reports

involved a total $4.113 billion
in assets.

Out of the 129 STR reports
received in 2008, the FIU said
37 were passed on to the
police, with 38 cases closed
and 54 matters still pending
at year-end.

The pending matters, some
41.86 per cent of STRs sub-
mitted, accounted for some
$4.014 billion or 97.6 per cent
of all assets covered in these
reports. The closed STR
investigations involved some
$91.962 million in assets.

The vast majority of STRs -
some 92.25 per cent - were
received from the Bahamian
banking community, the FIU

said, with 52 coming from the
‘domestic/offshore’ banking
sector and another 531 from
‘offshore banks’. A further 16
came from so-called ‘domestic
banks’.

While the average STR
covered assets with a value of
$31.883 million, the value of
those passed on to the police
for investigation was much
smaller, standing at $182,593.
The average value of closed
reports was $2.42 million, and
that of pending reports was
$74.335 million.

“The Financial Intelligence
Unit did not detect any crim-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report,



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EE eee
Sandals starts Emerald Bay staffing drive

SANDALS will today hold the
first job fair for its newly-acquired
Emerald Bay Resort, having
unveiled plans to open the property’s
marina on November 10.

The job fairs will be held at the
Sandals Emerald Bay’s conferenc-
ing facilities between 9am-S5pm on
the following days:

Tuesday, October 20: All man-
agerial and supervisory positions

Wednesday, October 21: Former
Four Seasons employees only

Thursday, October 22: Line staff
and other positions

All attending candidates will be
interviewed by Sandals group direc-
tors, and those hired will be required
to start work at the end of December
in order to undergo the Sandals
training programme ahead of Janu-

ary’s opening.

Sandals Resorts International’s
director of operations, Shawn
DaCosta, said: “We’re delighted to
announce that we are now in a posi-
tion to invite people to be part of
this exciting project and join our
team. We’ll be looking for the very
best candidates that share our phi-
losophy for giving guests more than
they expect, and helping take the
travel industry by storm.”

Sandals Emerald Bay is set to
open The Marina at Emerald Bay
on November 10, 2009.

Sandals asked interviewees to
dress appropriately, and bring up-
to-date resumes and any relevant
original documents. Former Four
Seasons employees are asked to
bring identification.

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BEC’s Abaco peak load up 64 per cent in five years

FROM page 1B

Fred Smith, the Callenders
& Co partner and attorney,
who represents several Abaco
residents, has already issued
several warnings about insti-
gating Judicial Review pro-
ceedings if his clients are not
properly involved in the plan-
ning and permitting process.

The KES report said that

selection of Wilson City were
assessed, namely an expan-
sion of the existing Marsh
Harbour power plant facility,
plus the site at Snake Cay.
“Based upon limited space
and the close proximity of a
residential community, the
Marsh Harbour site was sub-
sequently eliminated from
further consideration,” the
EIA said. “The selection of

tional value based upon its
remote location, and the
availability of water borne
access for fuel and materials.
However, based upon eco-
sensitivity and land use con-
cerns, Snake Cay was deemed
unsuitable for BEC.”

And, spelling out the con-
sequences for Abaco, its resi-
dents and economy if the Wil-
son City project did not go
ahead, the KES EIA said

several locations prior to the the Snake Cay site had addi-

1, SummitAcademy 2. Higgs & Johnson Accounting 3. Super Value Executive Offices

4, British American independence Drive 5, British American Financial, Freeport Branch

6. Kelso Medical Laboratory 7. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited, Stella Maris, Long island Branch
8, Bahamas National Trust 9. Bahamas First 10. Abaco Insurance Agency 11. Xavier's Lower
School 12, Bahamas First 13. Higgs & Johnson 14 Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, Exuma

In support of the Cancer Society and the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group’s
effort to raise and promote awareness of the disease, British American Financial
hosted the 13th Annual Lee National Denim Day during the month of October. The
intemational event takes place on the first Friday of October, during the month long
awareness campaign. We say THANK YOU to our spokesperson Zarina Fitzgerald,
participating companies, schools and and organizations who made donations and
wore pink shirts with pink ribbons in solidarity with cancer survivors.

non-implementation was “not
considered to be a viable
option” when it came to the
island’s sustainable develop-
ment.

Capacity

“The installed capacity at
Marsh Harbour is insufficient
to meet current and near
future demand for power in
Abaco,” the EJA said.

Get a FREE
Hunt's “The
Tomato
Experts”
Shopping bag
when you bring
your entry form
to The d’Albenas
Agency in
\% ale

o~

Name:

“Without additional capac-
ity, the need for load shed-
ding becomes likely in order
to maintain a_ balance
between demand and genera-
tion capacity. Therefore, the
proposed project is designed
to meet the current and future
needs, providing reliable addi-
tional electricity generation
capacity.”

The KES report warned
that without the Wilson City

power plant, “greater reliance
would be placed upon the use
of small diesel generator sets
for residential, commercial
and industrial purposes.
“Those typically burn pre-
mium fuels such as high-speed
diesel, whilst their energy effi-
ciency and inherent emissions
means that their environ-
mental performance may
compare unfavourably with
larger scale generation.”

Buy any 3 of these
products—Hunt's Whole,
Stewed or Diced Tomatoes 14.502,

Tomato Paste 120z, Tomato Sauce 140z,

Spaghetti Sauce 260z, Ketchup 360z
and BBQ Sauce 21.6 oz. Circle them on your store
receipt dated after October 5, fill out an
entry form and drop in boxes provided. i

Fill in the blanks: Hunt’s are the Tomato

MORTGAGES * MUTUAL FUNDS + LIFE INSURANCE

E& a a
el : British HEALTH INSURANCE * ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS Address:
—_ ‘4 American FINANGIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS

FINANCIAL Phone:

EX_E_TS
Circle the three items on your store receipt(s) dated after
October 5, 2009. Fill out entry form and attach store receipt and
drop into entry boxes in participating stores or at The d'Albenas
Agency in Palmdale. Contest ends November 13, 2009

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

A GOVERNMENT min-

ister has moved to address
concerns from Bahamian real-
tors about the impact pro-
posed legislation will have on
the timescale for approving
subdivisions, arguing that the
process “should be speeded
up”.
At arecent luncheon meet-
ing, several Bahamas Real
Estate Association (BREA)
members voiced concerns to
Earl] Deveaux, minister of the
environment, that the pro-
posed Planning and Subdivi-
sion Act would lengthen an
already protracted and unpre-
dictable timeframe from pro-
posal to final approval - a
deterrent to most potential
developers.

However, Dr Deveaux
replied: “Each stage should
be completed in a specified
four-month timeframe so that,
in fact, the whole process
should be speeded up”.

BREA’s president, William
Wong, urged realtors who had
concerns about the proposed
Planning and Subdivision Act
to “promptly put pen to paper
and make submissions to the
Minister”.

Earlier, Dr Deveaux said
of the proposed legislation:
“This act will replace three
acts which have been in place
for over 40 years — The Pri-
vate Roads and Subdivision
Act, The Town Planning Act
and the Town Planning (Out
Island) Act. Copies of the
proposed act have been wide-
ly circulated and itis still not
too late for changes to be
made.”

Dr Deveaux also reiterat-
ed the Prime Minister’s com-
ments that of the 3.45 million
acres of land in the Bahamas,
approximately 2.5 million
acres are Crown Land,
900,000 acres of which are
wetlands. That left roughly
1.6 million acres of dry Crown
Land

The minister added: “It is
this land which creates our
economic basis and allows the

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3B
Minister addresses
realtors’ concerns



EARL DEVEAUX with the BREA
president William Wong (right)
Photo: Keith Parker

Government to economical-
ly empower Bahamians. The
Planning and Subdivision Act
deals with a number of the
issues faced by developers
and prospective home own-

Far itteh Coliog

ers.”

Referring to various “mis-
chiefs” which have plagued
the orderly development of
Bahamian land in the past, Dr
Deveaux listed the “unautho-
rised sale of lots; requests to
sell lots to pay for infrastruc-
ture; building permits issued
in unapproved subdivisions;
lack of utility services; subdi-
vision fees; uncompleted sub-
divisions; lack of utilities in
approved subdivisions and
family subdivisions”.

The minister emphasised
that the new Act’s aim will be
to modify and simplify the
various steps required to
establish subdivisions
throughout the Bahamas.

Given the need for trans-
parency and the desire of
Bahamians to be aware and
have a voice in proposed
developments in their dis-
tricts, a regular path will be
established for applications,
preliminary approval, public
and committee hearings,
appeals to final approval.

tin] Hiltem Hotel

Marlborough St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE

Eve

rything

is $20

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knoatting,
Wiring. ileal oy The Snack Fix System and
he Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale

arid

Retail

P.O.Box EE-15827

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com

Free parking at The Hilton

rank

cans

N

Nassau Airport
Development Company



Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking Proponents (individuals,
consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced retail operator] to finance,
design, develop, operate and manage Bahamian Specialty Retail stores in the new US.
Departures Terminal currently under construction at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport. These stores will be world class in design and appearance with a distinctive ‘sense of
place’ and will offer uniquely 100% Bahamian manufactured/produced products at

competitive prices,

® Bank of The Bahamas

IN TERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the

provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the
position of:

TNC Oa Ree

Core Responsibilities:

¢ Provides user support for the company's networked systems, by investigating
and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.

¢ Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.

¢ Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including server
issues.

¢ Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and
operations.

* Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.

¢ Assist with the administration of the company's networked anti-virus, data
back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these systems are
current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

¢ Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP operating
systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support and to
troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.
Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and
upgrades.
Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network issues.
Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned
recommendations.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.
Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.
Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 21, 2009 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

BAHAMIAN SPECIALTY RETAIL SHOPS
NEW U.S, DEPARTURES TERMINAL AT LPIA



Four inline stores have been identified in the new terminal for these uniquely Bahamian
products; the categories are as follows:

1, Jewelry, Arts and Crafts

2. Soaps, Candles, Oils, Etc.

3, Straw and related articles

4, Other Bahamian made products

There will be additional Requests for Proposals issued over the next few months covering
additional inline stores for general retail plus kiosks and carts,

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii, Proponents must have operated a retail facility within the last three (3] years,

NAD'S GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ARE TO:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of the Nassau Airport as a
world class airport;

(c) offer retail choices to passengers at reasonable prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international brands

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new terminal
while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of The Bahamas; and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD.

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD's

offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden
Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from October
13th to October 26th, 2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for those who have picked
up packages will be held at the New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road on
Wednesday, October 28th at 10:00am,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





4% rise on debt service
payments in seven years

at this stage.
“Sure, even with health,
there’s a hell of a lot of mon-

ey going in, and the Govern-
ment is talking about a
National Prescription Drug

FROM page 1B

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

P.O. BOX N-1132

To our valued tenants,

Please note that effective, Monday,
November, 2nd 2009 our new office hours will
be:

Monday - Friday 8:00am - 4:00pm
saturdays - 9:00am - 12:00pm

Gate access hours will remain:
7:00am - 7:00pm (7 days a week)

Management

We apologize for any inconvenience, and thank you for your
continued patronage.

ie) eel
Soldier Road
(by Lowe's Wholesale},
ACeteli eu eee Lan |

ba Bank of The Bahamas

TERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the provision
of financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

RAV Tei

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the organizational
or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business decisions through
the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:
Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program in
a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the organization
while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best practices;
Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing and
estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the business;
Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in carrying
out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;
Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;
Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;
Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and implementing
systems, policies, and procedures for the identification, collection and
analysis of risk related information, that is comparing estimated risks with
risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk management;
Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some regulatory
bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bacheloris degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KYC, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
Bank of The Bahamas
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later
than October 21, 2009 to:
Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



Plan and socialised medicine.
Are they better off looking at
other alternatives? They'd be
better off giving poor people
vouchers to buy health insur-
ance, rather than doing it all
themselves. The money being
spent, it could be targeted dif-
ferently.”

In its study, the Nassau
Institute said the Government
had spent $9.1 billion in nine
key categories over the period
assessed. There had been, for
instance, a 51.38 per cent
increase over the period in
sums spent on the general
public service, Mr Lowe sug-
gesting most of this was for
civil service wage increases.

The general public service

accounted for $2.6 billion or
28 per cent of spending over
the period assessed, with
health also taking up $1.5 bil-
lion or 16 per cent of spend-
ing. Interest on debt account-
ed for $883 million or 10 per
cent of government spending.

Annual

With the Government hav-
ing run annual fiscal deficits to
finance this spending, Mr
Lowe told Tribune Business:
“Particularly with a struggling
economy, with GDP reduc-
ing, it throws the debt-to-
GDP ratio out of whack.
Where will it end up?

“Tt’s been a long time com-

BAHAMAS Forni,

) per

MARKETING MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for a Marketing Manager in New Provi-
dence to join this market leader has arisen.

Reporting to the CEO, the successful applicant will have
previous experience in implementing strategies, growing
market share and analyzing the market and competition
to implement marketing strategies.



Key responsibilities and selection criteria include:

« Ability to analyze information to support consumer
initiatives and business planning
Developing and implementing strategic marketing and

commercial plans

Ensure the achievement of agreed sales and gross profit

targets

Lead advertising and communication agencies on all
aspects of brand communication

Controlling advertising and promotional expenses
Highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings and weekends as required

Motivate, train and ensure that associates and outside
Contractors are able to implement marketing strategies
Ability to develop and execute Marketing plans
University degree in Marketing or Business Adminis-

tration

Work independently, making quick decisions while

working under pressure

Have good communication (verbal and written) and

interpersonal skills

Highly functional computer skills with extensive
knowledge of Microsoft applications

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 * Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com

Only qualified applicants will be contacted
No telephone inquiries please

City

/¥| laréet

ra

we



AIN OCT 19-21, 09

ing. They’ve dismissed all calls
to be more cautious, but year
after year they’ve been look-
ing at rising revenues to justi-
fy projections that govern-
ment is going to grow and
grow.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas’ did not have a large
and diverse enough economic
base to sustain the sort of gov-
ernment spending it was now
incurring, Mr Lowe acknowl-
edged that cutting public
spending during the midst of a
recession was not the ideal
time.

However, he argued: “Gov-
ernment spending and the size
of government are detriments
to economic growth. If you
continue to grow government,
you take resources away from
the private sector and the
incentive for people in the pri-
vate sector to do things.

“The Government has
somehow got to rein that in
and shrink the size of govern-
ment. It’s a tough time, but
they can’t continue to keep
growing it.”

When it was pointed out
that much of the Bahamas’
national debt was held by
domestic institutions, Mr
Lowe responded that a large
portion was held by the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), representing Bahami-
ans’ long-term retirement
funds and social security.
There was nothing to suggest
Bahamian banks would con-
tinue indefinitely backing the
Government on its debt
issues.

And while Mr Lowe con-
ceded that the Bahamas “may
have been less crazy than oth-
er countries” when it came to
its debt-to-GDP ratio and
management of its fiscal
affairs, this did not mean suc-
cessive governments had been
fiscally prudent.

In its report, the Nassau
Institute said that since 1991
the Bahamian national debt
had increased from $870 mil-
lion to $3 billion, a 244.8 per
cent increase over 18 years or
an increase of $118 million
per year.

The projected increase for
2009-2010 indicated the
national debt was approach-
ing the $4 billion mark, close
to 50 per cent of GDP.

“Tf it hasn’t already done
so, Government must take
immediate steps to reduce
spending. The pain will be felt
by government employees,
and those depending on gov-
ernment contracts for new
spending. Their pain will be
no different from the many
Bahamians working part time
or have lost jobs and whose
mortgage payments are falling
behind,” the Nassau Institute
said.

“Reducing the fiscal load
of a government too big is
imperative. It’s a load the
country simply cannot con-
tinue to bear.”

‘People’, Processes and Technology

Driving Business Value”

Our client has requested BHC Consulting to seek applicants for the position of:

IT ADMINISTRATOR

You will be responsible for the health and development of the Corporate Information Systems
and Network. Only candidates with the following qualifications should apply:

Degree in Computer Science or Engineering
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer

Minimum of | year of experience in a similar position
Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Reporting to the Financial Controller, this is the ideal position for an individual who can work
independently with minimal supervision. You will be responsible for:

Supervision of the existing corporate information network

Ensuring that IT utilizes best practices and standards
Development of new IT initiatives that add value to the business

Remuneration package includes generous employee benefits.

Only candidates that meet the above criteria should respond via email (subject: IT Administrator)
and attach a “one page resume” and salary requirements to:

Brian Hassan, Principal Consultant

bhec@coralwave.com

Deadline: 21st October, 2009



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



a ee
Police probed 29% of
suspect financial reports

FROM page 1B

inal activity in 46.51 per cent
of the Suspicious Transactions
Reports received,” it said in
its 2008 annual report. “Fraud
and drugs were detected in
27.91 per cent and 15,5 per
cent respectively of the

reports received.

“In approximately 44.19 per
cent of cases, the financial
institution at the time it sub-
mitted the Suspicious Trans-
actions Report did not know
the nature of the offence.
Thus other suspicious cir-
cumstances led to the filing

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & BOUITY DIVISION

CLE/QUTL-9R4

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL. THAT all that parcel of lot of land being
kncva'n as Jot Number Sixteen (16) Block Number Nineteen (19)
Centreville District, as shown on the Master Plan in the Department
of Lands And Surveys in the Island of New Providence

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of JULIETTE L. RAMSEY

NOTICE

JULIETTE L. RAMSEY the Petitioner claim to be the owner in
fee simple in possession of the parcel of land and free from
encumbrances, The Petitioner has mate application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas section 3 of the
Quicting Act, 1939 to have their Title to the said land investigated
and declared in a certifpcute of Tithes to be grinted by the Court in
the accordance with che provisions of the act.

Copies of the file plan may be inspected t r mearmmall beurre. at:-
Copies of the fle plan may be inspecbed during normal bers al

1. The Registry of the Supreme Coun; and
2. The Chambers of Rumsey Aund Associates, Rames Building,
33 Plantol, Nassau, Bahamas

Newice 1s hereby piven thal any persen or persons having a right
of dower or any advise claim net recognized in the Petition shall
within thirty (30) days after the publication of the notice herein
Nile in the registry of the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau
aforesaid and service on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
of such claim in the prescribed Form, verified by an affidavit to
be fled therewith. Farlure of any such person to tile and serve a
statement of such claim within thimy days (30) herein will operate
as. bar to such claim.

Dated this 17 day of September, AD., 2009

RAMSEY AND ASSOCIATES
CHAMBER
Rames Building
23 Alani Street
Nassau, Bahamas



of the reports. Fraud and
drugs were suspected in 30.23
per cent and 14.73 per cent
respectively of the reports
received........

“Longstanding customers
of the disclosing institutions
accounted for 52.71 per cent
of the reports received,
whereas new customers
accounted for 34.88 per cent
of the reports.”

During 2008, the FIU
issued one five-day freeze and
two 72-hour restraint notices
to Bahamian financial insti-
tutions, involving assets
totalling $24.196 million. This
activity ultimately resulted in
one restraint order being
issued by the Supreme Court,
concerning assets worth
$19.993 million.

Internet searches proved to
be the main factor that
prompted the filing of STRs,
the FIU report said, account-
ing for 32 of the investigations
sparked during 2008. Cash
transactions and account
activity not in keeping with
Know Your Customer (K YC)
policies accounted for 26 and
24 STRs, respectively.

Bahamian citizens account-
ed for 71 or 55 per cent of
those who were the subject of
STRs in 2008, some 20.93 per
cent of the remainder being
Canadians or Americans.
When it came to domicile, 76
STRs or 58.91 per cent con-
cerned persons living in the
Bahamas, and Bahamians
represented 41.86 per cent of
the beneficial owners of assets
subject to STRs.

During 2008, the FIU said it
received some 108 requests
for information and assistance
from overseas FIUs. It added
that it provided assistance in
87.96 per cent of the cases,
denied 9.26 per cent or 10
requests, while a further 2.78
per cent were withdrawn.

Of the 15 requests for assis-
tance that the Bahamian FIU
itself made, only one was
denied.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Suitably qualified and experienced individuals are invited to apply for

the position of:

PROJECT ENGINEER

The minimum required qualifications are as follows:

- a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering, or similar
discipline or extensive knowledge and experience with the

execution of construction projects.

- A strong and working knowledge of time management
and project scheduling would be a plus.

- Successful applicant would have a minimum of 10 years
construction experience with technical and administrative
competences in all phases of project development from
conceptualization to construction and maintenance.

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the provision of
financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

TCA ee ee

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database
infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company
as required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server related
issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.

Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.
Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.

Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new
technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Knowledge of the AS400 and Windows Operating systems required.
Experience with ATM and POS hardware.

Knowledge of credit card processing and experience working with
branded networks (VISA, Mastercard, AMEX etc) a plus.

Ability to consult Management and developers regarding application
software performance and use.

Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned
recommendations.

Must be a Team player and possess the ability to work in a demanding
environment.

Ability to communicate and document clearly and effectively required.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 21, 2009 to:

Email:hr.apply @bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



vwANSBACHER

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, a specialist in private banking, fiduciary services
and wealth management has an opening for the position of

Risk and Compliance Officer

The successful candidate will:

* Have responsibility for promating, monitoring and maintaining the bank's strategic

risk management framework and compliance policies to eniure compliance with
regulatory requirements

Monitor and investigate departmental risk reviews

Act asa source of information and enforcement on risk and compliance matters,
policies and procedures

Assist in monitoring credit, market and operational risk positions and the bank's
key risk indicators in accordance with approved risk policies

Identify potential areas of compliance vulnerability and risk throughout the bank,
and develop and implement corrective action plans for resolution of problematic
issues

Safeguard the bank from any possible reputation damage and protect and enhance
the reputation of the bank

Assist in report preparation and data compilation as required

Carry out such other risk management and compliance related duties as may be
required

The position requires professional skills in fast tracking projects
with the appropriate level of contract management and supervising
and coordinating personnel activities.

Excellent written and verbal communication skills are required
for preparing regular reports, acting as a liaison with government
agencies and delivering presentations to management

High integrity, goal oriented and a strong work ethics are
essential in addition to the proven ability to learn, develop and
comply with international industry best practices.

Qualifications:
Minimum of three (3) years of compliance and/or financial risk experience
Four (4) year college degree required
BACO Certification or other relevant professional qualification would be an asset
Strona analytical, communication and interpersonal skills
Strang computer and database management skills

Organizational and project management skills with the ability to multi-task

a lary rate with experie lifications.
We offer a very competitive salary and benefits package (commensurate ——————————————

with work experience and qualifications). Please send all resumes to the attention of:
Hurnan Resource Manager
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Baharnas
Fax: 325-0524

E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

For prompt consideration, please submit a detailed resume no later
than October 30, 2009 to:

apply4jobs2009@yahoo.com

Deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail is Friday October 23, 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

KINCADE VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


























Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORIENTAL EXPRESS HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TURNIP INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

‘No concerns’ over
B$ bond downgrade

FROM page 1B

country ceiling for bank
deposits.

In response, Mr Laing said
the downgrade decision was
no cause for panic, as it had
partly resulted from Moody’s
own internal policies.

“Tt’s not a reflection of any
fundamental concerns at all
about our economic situa-
tion,” the minister added.

When = asked about
Moody’s comments on “the
erosion of the country’s main
debt metrics”, the minister
replied: “They’re reflecting a
set of realities for our eco-
nomic circumstances and they
are assessing it. We have no
difficulty with that.”

Mr Laing said the
Bahamas’ “credit rating
remains pretty strong in the
circumstances”, adding that

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EAGLE STARS INVESTMENTS LIMITED.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REAL INTERNATIONAL GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

the Government would move
to bring the debt-to-GDP
ratio back in line with histor-
ical trends once the economic
crisis abated.

He added that Moody’s had
also spoken to the Bahamas’
“fiscal prudence and
strength”.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
persons had to keep the
Bahamas’ current fiscal per-
formance in context, pointing
out that while revenues were
$40 million behind forecast as
at end-September 2009, the
Government had been look-
ing at a shortfall more than
two times as great some 12
months previously.

“We have continued to
show a shortfall in terms of
forecast of the order of $40
million through September,
but that has to be looked at in

the context of this,” Mr Laing
said.

“Last year, we were looking
at more than two times that
kind of shortfall. In addition
to that, we are expecting an
extraordinary gain in some
revenues based on a number
of transactions in the pipeline.

“For obvious reasons, I
don’t want to say what they
are, but we expect that when
those transactions are con-
cluded they will bring us on
par in terms of forecast or
reduce that gap significantly.

“Tt’s still a very strange sit-
uation. We are looking at it
with significant caution, and
exercising great prudence and
vigilance in the circumstances.
We have to keep in context
where we are, where we were
and where we might have
been.”

NOTICE
VOLUNTARY DISSOLUTION

Pursuant to Section 138 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is given

that:-

(a) SPONGE INVESTMENTS INC. has been
voluntarily dissolved and struck off the

Register.

The Company was dissolved on the 3rd day
of September, A.D. 2009.

The Liquidator was Mr. Anthony W. Moree
of Dupuch & Turnquest & Co., 308 East Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-8181, Nassau, Bahamas.

eee
Employment Opportunity

A well established business within New
Providence is in search of an Inventory
Control Manager. Inquires must be
able to organize and set up an easy
manageable inventory control system
that includes monitoring and organizing
Building & Hardware and Plumbing
& Electrical Supplies. The successful
candidate must posses the following
skills

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“W FG CAPITAL MARKETS

Sc: BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CO LON TAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Morey a4 Wark

Be able to:

¢ Track and follow-up on all shipment
from Suppliers.

« Receive and validate all shipped
items.

* Organize a comprehensive store
delivery system.

* Organize and/or Improve items
location on the sales floor area.

« Maintain a proper data base so
that management and staff have an
accurate record of all In-stock items

« Manage inventory control staff.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 19 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,491.37 | CHG 0.09 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -220.99 | YTD % -12.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17 1.17 0.00 0.127
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.992
5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00 0.244
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.125
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
9.93 Cable Bahamas 9.93 9.93 0.00 1.406
2.72 Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00 0.249
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.83 5.83 0.00 0.419
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.94 3.03 0.09 0.111
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.625
6.28 Famguard 6.28 6.28 0.00 0.420
8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322
10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.631
4.11 Focol (S) 4.11 4.11 0.00 0.332
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 64.1
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b ases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8300 -3.75 -6.75
1.4946 4.25 5.18
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1751 442 5.86
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
10.5884 5.88 5.88
1.0757 3.86 5.30
1.0305 -0.24 0.22
1.0709 3.24 4.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

1,000

The successful applicant must have
a minimum of 3-5 years inventory
and stock taking experience. He/she
must be familiar with the Microsoft

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
Symbol Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield

word & excel software. Warehouse
management and Stock taking training
with certificates would be desired.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

Fund Name NAV
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
9-Oct-09
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

Salary would be based on qualifications
and experience.

Interested applicants are asked to
apply through the following address:

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

The President
Re: Inventory Control Manager
P.0.Box N-7143

Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

B O

ealth



HEALTH

oer N D

Overcoming side effects, aftermath
of breast cancer treatment

¢ Tribune Health is observing Breast
Cancer Awareness Month in October
with a series of articles...

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

vercoming the side effects

and the aftermath of

breast cancer treatment

can be extremely chal-
lenging for many women.

Some women are devastated when
they suffer hair loss due to chemother-
apy, and in even more drastic cases,
when they have one or both breasts
surgically removed in a mastectomy.

For Kelda McDonald, a Bahamian
breast cancer survivor, feeling com-
fortable with her body and the way
she looked after undergoing a double
mastectomy and chemotherapy took
some time and a lot of emotional
strength.

She told Tribune Health the story of
how she overcame her frustrations
about her appearance.

“Twas diagnosed with breast cancer
in July 2006. I had discovered a lump
in my breast while I was in the show-
er. It felt a little hard and it was visible,
so the following day I went to see a
doctor,” she said.

The doctor removed the lump, and
after a series of examinations Ms
McDonald was diagnosed with Stage
II breast cancer.

After finding out she had breast
cancer Ms McDonald immediately
sought consultations from doctors
both local and abroad.

“T spoke to one of my friends who
had went through a similar situation,

then I went to Florida
where the doctor rec-
ommended that I have
(both breasts removed
and) reconstructive
surgery,” she said.

Ms McDonald said
thoughts about the
mastectomy and the
consequent reconstruc-
tive surgery consumed
her.

After thinking long
and hard about it she
said she came to the
conclusion that her life
was more valuable than
her size ‘D’ breasts.

“T was very skeptical
about the idea of my
breasts being removed
and I couldn’t imagine seeing myself
without (them).

“T was hesitant, but I finally realised
that my life was more important that
my breasts,” she said.

Ms McDonald agreed to the
surgery, and while her main concern
was for her overall health, the first
thing she did after waking up following
the surgery was to check her chest.

"I knew that the doctors were going
to remove both breasts, but it was so
shocking when I woke up and felt that
nothing was there. I was in complete
disbelief," she said.

Like most women in Bahamian soci-
ety, she saw her breasts as valuable
assets, as important aspects of her fem-
ininity.

Following the double mastectomy,
Ms McDonald said she experienced

feelings of insecurity
and unhappiness, and
she feared that she had
lost her sex appeal
which had turned the
head of many a man in
the past.

“Even though I got
implants immediately
after reconstructive
surgery, it did not feel
the same. My chest was
still flat and I would
have to go every so
often to get injections
that made the implants
expand. I was unhappy
and concerned about
how I would feel with
someone (a man) look-
ing at my body and not

being happy about it,” she said.
“After a while I came to terms with
my situation and I thought the
implants aren’t so bad though I can’t
feel any sensation in the breasts. I
started to wear clothing that accentu-
ated my new bust, and that helped me
feel better about my appearance.”
Despite her concerns about her new
appearance, Ms McDonald said she
found someone who loved her and
accepted her as she was, ‘flaws’ and all.
But the struggle to come to terms
with her breasts being removed was
not the only difficulty she had to face.
Undergoing chemotherapy treat-
ment following the mastectomy, she
noticed in the second week that her
hair was thinning.
“One day I went to brush my hair
and (it) started to fall out. I showed

Steps to finding breast lumps early

By Dr Chinyere Bullard
Family medicine specialist

I ALMOST cried when I
was ordered to get my first
mammogram. To think that I
was at risk for this life threat-
ening, painful disease! One of
our best ways to fight any can-
cer is early detection, and this
is especially true for breast
cancer. This makes treatment
much easier and more effec-
tive. Not to mention cheap-
er.

How can you find breast
cancer early?

The best way, so far, to find
breast lumps that may be can-
cerous is to do two things:

1. Have regular mammo-
grams. (Every one to two
years)

2. Have your family medi-
cine specialist check your
breasts every year at your
annual physical.

BRCA-genes (so-called
‘cancer genes’)?

Women with risk factors
such as a history of two or
more first-degree family
members having breast or
ovarian cancer under the age
of 40 may need to be tested
for the BRCA.

Your family medical doc-
tor can determine if you need
a test for the BRCA gene.
Currently studies are being
done in our country by Dr
Theodore Turnquest and Dr
DeVaughn Curling, both can-
cer specialists, to determine
when women in the Bahamas
should have BRCA gene tests
done, and how to treat the
results.

What is a mammogram?

A mammogram is the most
effective way to find breast
cancer early, up to two years
before the lump is even large
enough to feel. It is a special
kind of x-ray of your breasts.
A radiologist will look at the
x-rays for signs of cancer or
other breast problems.
Because the amount of radia-
tion used in the x-ray is very
small, mammograms are safe.

Do mammograms hurt?

Mammograms can be
uncomfortable. The breast
has to be squeezed, but the
procedure doesn't take very
long.

How often should I get a
mammogram?

According to the American
Academy of Family Physi-



DR CHINYERE BULLARD

cians, American women
should start routine mammo-
grams at 45. According to the
Canadian Academy of Fami-
ly Physicians, Canadian
women should start their rou-
tine mammograms at 50, and
in general you should undergo
one every two years.

But all this depends on
your risk.

According to Dr Curling,
the average Bahamian
woman should start screening
for breast cancer at the age
of 40.

If you have a positive fam-
ily history of breast cancer
you should be screened 10
years before the age your rel-
ative was when they were
diagnosed.

If you are under 25 your
best test may be a MRI or
ultrasound.

How often should my

family medical

specialist check my breasts?

You should have a breast
exam in addition to a mam-
mogram every year, depend-
ing on your risk.

What is the doctor

checking for?

The main thing to look for
is any change in your breasts.
It's normal for your breasts
to be different sizes. A firm
ridge in the lower curve of
your breast is also normal.

Changes to look for

in your breasts

e Any new lump which may
not be painful or tender

e Unusual thickening of
your breasts

e Sticky or bloody dis-
charge from your nipples

e Any changes in the skin
of your nipples or breasts,
such as puckering or dimpling

. © An unusual increase in the
size of one breast

e One breast unusually low-
er than the other

If you want to check your
breasts, do the exam a few
days after your period. Your
breasts aren't so sore or as
lumpy at this time.

What are some risk factors
for breast cancer?

e Having had breast cancer
increases your risk of devel-
oping it again.

e A family history of cer-
tain types of breast cancer,
particularly in your mother,
daughter, or sister.

e Having a genetic defect
in the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene.

¢ Heavy alcohol use - hav-
ing more than three drinks a
day raises your risk for breast
cancer as does as smoking a
pack of cigarettes.

e Eating lots of red meat -
women who eat more than
one serving of red meat a day,
especially post-menopausal
women, have a more than 50
per cent risk increase. Women
who eat processed meat
(bacon, sausage, baloney, and
ham, ect) daily, increase their
risk for breast cancer to more
than 60 per cent. Studies show
that eating more fibre can
help to decrease the risks
associated with red meat con-
sumption.

e Obesity increases your
risk for breast cancer, also
cancer of the uterus, colon,
kidney, and the esophagus,
not to mention the fact that it
increases your risk for hyper-
tension, diabetes, high cho-
lesterol, heart disease and
stroke.

Avoiding weight gain is an
effective way to decrease
these risks.

e Race - I want to say the
human race. White women
are seeing a over-all increase
in the breast cancer rate, but
among women aged 40 to 50
black women have a higher
incidence rate and death rate.

I would like to encourage
you to get your physical done
yearly, and adapt some
healthy lifestyle changes for
yourself and also as an exam-
ple to our children.

I would also like to dedi-
cate this article to my Auntie
Beverly Lockheart who
fought breast cancer tooth
and nail.

my sons how the hair was falling out
and I asked my brother for some assis-
tance in shaving the entire thing off,
but he told me no,” she said.

Ms McDonald said for her person-
ally, she felt better shaving all of her
hair off rather than watching patches
of it fall out every day.

“T couldn’t take seeing my hair on
my pillow or in the palm of my hands,
so I said I am going to cut the entire
thing off. My brother saw that I had
begun to shave my hair and so he
finally gave me some assistance,” she
said.

When asked how she felt about her
hair loss, Ms McDonald said she was
more prepared for it than she for the
loss of her breasts.

She found a wig that she said looked
great, but added that wearing it was so
hot during the day she would some-
times “ditch” it and go out without
anything on her head, no caps, no
scarfs.

“One day I decided to go out to the
dry cleaners. I was confident about it
and not so self-conscious. The minute
I step into the wash house it felt as if
everyone was looking at me and judg-
ing me at the same time. When I saw
the first person looking at me I felt it
was a bad idea to come out of the
house without my wig.”

She had to battle many physical and
emotional challenges, but in time, and
with the love and support from family
and friends, Ms McDonald, like other
breast cancer survivors, was able to
overcome the hurdles on her path to
recovery and live a happy, healthy and
fulfilling life.



Sun exposure
and skin aging

t

SKIN is an excellent record
keeper. Every moment of
exposure to daylight adds up
like money in the bank - the
problem is the payoff known
as sun damage (also known
as photodamage).

As the top cause of prema-
ture signs of skin aging, sun
damage shows on skin in the
form of wrinkles and hyper-
pigmentation, and can led to a
repressed immune system and
the potential for skin cancer.

Even if exposure is limited
to brief outdoor lunches or a
20-minute walk, cumulative
exposure is enough to cause
the signs of skin aging. The
first line of daily defense
against sun damage is daily
use of SPF. Even on cloudy
or overcast days, UV light can
strike skin and cause damage,
so simply wearing sunscreen
on sunny days isn't enough.

Fortunately, more sophis-
ticated sunscreen formula-
tions with skin health bene-
fits (think less chalky, less
greasy) have made SPF a con-
venient addition to our morn-
ing routine. Speak with your
professional skin therapist
about SPF moisturisers that
can be worn comfortably
under make-up, or alone to
deliver defence against skin
aging UV light.

DON'T MISS ITM

12" Annual

Yhemes
ADITION made

Crafts/GiftsSouvenirs
October 40" — November 1° 2009
1:00 am — 11:1) pm daily
Arawak Cay,
Nassau, Rahamas

LOTS OF DRINKS

Lots of Food

GOSPEL GROUPS

Falcon Band
Royal

Battle of the school Bands
Pathfinders Marching Band

Exuma Marching Band

For Further inforrcation pleaa: contact: Mp, Le-Var Miller, Ms, Sharer Collie
& rw Paonela Deveson ot Tel 2 322-579 ap Fax 2 2-1

B.A...
BahamArts Festival 2009

MW ODBRO

National Trade show promoting Bahamian made Arts &

Habermas National Crafi Week. 200%
Highliehts

Sunikry, Cheteber 12" Me
Peal Cratl bck | hore’ serving
Zion Baptist Charch
Exel & Stree Siete
Hommes: Sirs. Lars Sacha.

Sr Voki
Monsday!Tucsdlay = (het. 26" 27"

Vasil to High Schools

Tienda Teening Prograin - [eeoratre:
Pamng:

Werkvesday & Thurstley Oi, 287g 10"
2 Annual Lene! neebng = EA
SuperCab Boeeze- West Bary 5
. LY" BabamArts Festival Events

Friday, October hia SiR
fella Bahares Al Saar - Live

1heP aum, Oi Tictal Ui pening al tie Festival
Kerante Speaker ; The As Hom Hubert A,
lograhani, Prime Miniter of the
Commanerealih af The Hobamas | THC)
Live fom Arserak Cay
Mb pum. Live Extertainmest - Falceas Hand

Saturday, Chet, Bi" Wa

[ein Mini Regatta Heat Race
|: pun. Reval Boh Defense Force Band
Tb put. Raleof the Haads - High Sebel
Compeition
EM pm. - until Falcons Band - Live

Sends, Morveilgr " ln

|: pun. PachFinders Marching Hand

EM pn. Vicor ol ke Chock Cheers
Competition

EM pon Gab Tea Pats

Delicacies

4: pum Geanel Exphosion

OM por Jeckanes Buh Oy

All Hakarniaa

60 Booths, Delicious food, Drinks & Lots of Music
EVERYONE IS WELCOME!!!



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009





Is it really
possible to

trust again? of excellence

A FEW weeks
ago we talked about
love’s greatest chal-
lenge being forgive-
ness. It is important
to understand that
to trust someone
again we first need
to open our hearts ¢
and forgive them.

If forgiveness does
not take place then a
barrier will always be present.
No matter what the wrong-
doer does to regain your trust
it will be pointless. True heal-
ing will not be able to take
place and the relationship will
not develop.

When we make the deci-
sion to tackle the obstacle
course of forgiveness we soon
come to realise that it is not
an easy road. The process is
often slow, excruciatingly
painful, and unexpected road
blocks may still present them-
selves along the way.

As the years go by, we
come to realise that the suf-
ferings we are experiencing
are in fact brought about by
ourselves, because we hold
on to the pain. We come to
appreciate that we can not
change the past, but we can
choose our future. We have
to decide if we want to
remain implanted right where
we are, crying and suffering,
or move ahead to possibili-
ties of happiness. We are the
only ones who really under-
stand our pain and so ulti-
mately we are the only ones
who can heal ourselves.

Being told, “Why haven’t
you let that go?” or “I would-
n’t let that bother me”, does
little to ease the situation.

Hurtful relationships that
involve work, friendship or
even family are sometimes
easier to deal with because
we can have ‘time out’ and
distance ourselves.

We are allowed time to
step back and regroup. But
what happens when we are
living under the same roof
with the person who has
caused us so much heartache?
The anger, hurt and disbelief
pushes us to believe that this
1s as much as we can possibly
take. Our natural instinct may
be to throw in the towel and
run. It is only when we are
faced with enormous hurts or
betrayals that our limits are
really tested. Aren’t we
brought up to believe we are
not given any more than we
can bear?

Trusting and believing in
someone comes all tied up in
a neat parcel when we first
commit to loving someone.
Newlyweds often begin life
together believing that the
trust they start off with will
only grow and get stronger.
As we get older we learn that
life has a way of surprising
us. Even when we think we
have it all planned out we dis-
cover that none of us are
infallible.



Love relationships are
often imperfect and the first
blow can be devastating. But
it is how we deal with these
knocks that ultimately deter-
mine the strength of the rela-
tionship and the test of love.

Before trust can be rebuilt
the ground has to be cleared
for honesty to be introduced.
All the anger, accusations and
judgments have to be aired.

If the wrong-doer is truly
remorseful then they need to
understand that the outbursts
are essential before forgive-
ness takes place.

Set aside time for daily
talks which will add structure
to what would otherwise be
chaotic arguing. Writing
down points throughout the
day means that talking and
discussing should be more
organised and focused.

Do not be surprised that
the door way to honesty may
open and close at tues and
the process may be slow. It
is not unusual for the whole
truth to come out over a peri-
od of time. Only when every
thing is out in the open and
the deceiver is believed will
true intimacy begin. Honesty
has to be present for trust and
trust has to be present for
intimacy.

For all of us who have
experienced trauma in our
lives, we start to question
whether anything makes
sense anymore.

We may have reached a
certain age and stage in our
lives where we think we have
it all worked out. We may
feel confidant about our rela-
tionships. It is not surprising
then that we feel as if we are
hit by a sledge hammer when
faced with a betrayal. But if
we take a deep breath, step
back and remember that all
life experiences hold mean-
ing, if we can see a future
with the person, and we have
committed our love to them,
then we need to reassess the
relationship. Interestingly,
many people discover a new
depth to their relationship
and move on to a more satis-
fying love.

e Margaret Bain is an
individual and couples rela-
tionship therapist. She is a
registered nurse and a certi-
fied clinical sex therapist.
For appointments call 535-
7456 or e-mail her at relate-
bahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas. blogspot
.com. She is also available

for speaking engagements.

THE TRIBUNE



A woman



and elegance

A LOCAL business-
woman who has
established herself

as somewhat of a
pioneer in the field

of etiquette training
in the Bahamas has
now set her sights on
the corporate world...

atrice Ellis, founder and

CEO of the Etiquette

Image Institute, has

already carved out her
niche in the children’s etiquette
market after having completed a
certification in children’s etiquette
at the Etiquette and Leadership
Institute and the American School
of Protocol.

She facilitates workshops and
seminars throughout the country
and abroad, and now she is expand-
ing her field of expertise by teaching
social and communication skills to
business employees.

Ms Ellis was recently approached
by local corporate entities to con-
duct workshops to sharpen their
employees’ social skills.

With more than ten years of expe-
rience in the field, Ms Ellis complet-
ed a certification course as a corpo-
rate etiquette consultant at the
American School of Protocol in
Atlanta, Georgia. She, along with
her peers including diplomats from
Europe, Africa and India, partici-
pated in courses including self-pre-
sentation; correspondence; effective
networking; professional attire for
men and women; dining skills, and
mastering business etiquette.

According to the etiquette guru,
her institute takes companies “from
being unnoticed to being unforget-
table by increasing employees’ self-
confidence and polishing their
image, while equipping them with

PATRICE ELLIS, founder and CEO of the Etiquette Image Institute

the tools and skills that will enhance
their professional presence, and
position their company for ultimate
success.”

“The life skills that we teach at
the Etiquette and Image Institute
can be applied no matter where our
participants may go,” she said.

Before fully delving into the busi-
ness world, Ms Ellis recently con-
ducted the ‘Manners Matter’ pro-
gramme.

“The life skills that we
teach at the Etiquette and
Image Institute can be
applied no matter where
our participants may go.”

— Patrice Ellis

Some 30 students participated
and graduated from the first ever
‘Manners Matter’ training course.

The programme caters to children
and young people aged four
through 18 and helps them build
self-awareness and enhances self-
respect and self-confidence. The
three-semester long programme
consists of several fun-filled sessions
including first impressions; types of
handshakes; telephone manners;
poise, dining etiquette, and eti-
quette for public places.

Ms Ellis spent her early years
working with women’s groups
throughout the country and interna-
tionally under the banner ‘Women
of Excellence and Elegance’.

Over the years, her name has
become synonymous with the term
‘etiquette’.

Founded earlier this year, the Eti-
quette Image Institute specialises in
helping companies to polish their
corporate image and gain a compet-
itive edge over the competition.

Ms Ellis said she is looking for-
ward to helping business employees
improve their corporate image and
communication skills.



Coach Approach: Whose goals are you working towards?

“Most people are working in
places they don’t like in order to
buy stuff they don’t need.”

— Thomas Herold

AMERICAN existential psy-
chologist Rollo May said, “the
opposite of courage in our society
is not cowardice, it is conformity;
everybody trying to be like every-
body else.”

Living to please people along
with being saddled with worries
about what people will think caus-
es many to become prisoners of
the status quo; driven by outer
directed ideals that keep them
working towards other people’s
goals.

The path that you choose in life
will either take you towards your
own dreams and desires or towards
someone else’s, leading you to a
life of personal dissatisfaction.
Unless you set clear intentions
about what you want and where
you desire to go you will succeed at
achieving very little.

Think of a ship leaving port; in
order for it to have a successful
voyage it must set a destination
and outline an appropriate naviga-
tion course. Here in the Bahamas,
where we boast about it being bet-

ter, how many of us really set goals
or pursue our dreams?

How many of us are working
towards our own ideals?

What Do You Really Want?

If you don’t know where you are
going, you are certain not to get
there. Life is not a state of perma-
nency and change is constant;
learning to embrace the winds of
change is an empowering skill.

Nothing could be more unfulfill-
ing than the burden of living some-
one else’s life - a sad life sentence
that so many have declared for
themselves.

The question is what is it that
you really want from life? Don’t
create your life based on what oth-
ers want or think you should be, do
or have; successful living is not
about following fashion, it’s about
authenticity.

Asking yourself some

tough questions:

Why do you go to work?

What if you had all the money
you need?

What are your dreams/goals?

Where would you like to be in
five years?

Fifty years from now, will any-
one know that you were here?



What does success really mean
to you?

What are your strengths?

What are you getting better at?

These questions are a great start-
ing point. But you owe it to your-
self to set out on a journey of self-
discovery, nothing is discovered
until it is explored. Notice that all

of the precious gems are buried
within the mountains.

The point here is whether or not
you know whose goals you are
working towards - you are working
towards some kind of objective
and there are only two options,
you either get what you want or
what you don’t want.

Unless you know what you are
working toward, you live adrift
with no sense of direction or pur-
pose, becoming a rickety vessel
tossed around by the gales of life.

Yet you have intrinsic power to
rise above the chaos and pursue
your own goals; within you is a
gigantic spirit of greatness waiting
only for you to plug in.

Too many of us are content
members of the choir of complain-
ers, holding steadfast to the role as
victims of circumstances. Instead
we need only define our goals and
create a personal action plan,
knowing that all is possible.

Final Thoughts

Your life is waiting for you to
pursue your own dreams. Com-
plaining about what you don’t have
keeps you in a state of powerless-
ness. Instead strengthen your
strengths and build yourself from

the inside out.

Regardless of your situation, you
have direct authority to release
yourself from the popular carbon
copy living.

Whether it is job loss, sickness,
financial bondage or whatever; you
can change your life by learning to
live by your own ideals.

Why not make today the day
that you shake off the shackles of
what people will think (they are
thinking it anyway) and stand up
for your own goals and pursue
your own personal growth. Now is
the time to make something better
happen.

For more information about per-
sonal growth programmes contact
the Coaching Studio at 326-3332 or
429-6770; or send an e-mail to
coach4ward@yahoo.com.

Michelle M Miller is a certified
life coach and stress management
consultant. She is the principal
coach of the Coaching Studio,
which is located in the Jovan
Plaza, Madeira Street.

Questions or comments can be
sent to PO Box CB-13060; e-mail
to coach4ward@yahoo.com or
telephone 429-6770.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11B



GARDENING ee
Cukes and Zukes and company

FOR today’s purposes we
can divide the cucurbits into
four categories: Cucumbers,
summer squash, winter
squash, and pumpkins.

We will deal with melons
and watermelons at a later
date.

All cucumbers, squash and
pumpkins need a rich soil and
good drainage. This is
achieved by growing them in
‘hills’ that are small areas of
well composted and well fer-
tilised soil that need not be
raised, but often are.

A hill is usually about 18
inches in diameter and can
accommodate three or four
seeds. When the seedlings
appear the weakest is
removed.

Cucumber

The most common type of
cucumber grown in the
Bahamas is the Ridge, or
American, which is six inches
to a foot long, bears short
spines on its surface, is very
seedy and has a strong taste.

The English cucumber is
much longer and has to be
grown on trellises to maintain
a straight shape. It is often
grown in glasshouses and, not
being fertilised by insects, is
seedless.

English cucumber is far
milder than Ridge.

There are also oriental vari-
eties of cucumber that I have
not had the opportunity to try
but seem to resemble the
English cucumber rather than
the Ridge. Armenian cucum-
ber is a squash, not a true
cucumber.

When the cucumber vines
reach maturity they put out
both male and female flow-
ers, the female flowers being
identified as growing from
miniature fruits. These fruits
swell when the female flowers

THE WEATHER REPORT ii



ZUCCHINIS (shown) may start
out slow but are normally very
productive.

are pollinated by insects, usu-
ally bees. A Ridge cucumber
is ripe when the spines can be
rubbed off with the fingertips.

Summer Squash

Summer squash includes
straightneck, crookneck, zuc-
chini, scallopini and Patty
Pan. The plants do not vine
but produce their fruits from
the base of upright broadleaf
stems. All varieties of sum-
mer squash should be picked
just short of maturity before
the seeds grow too large.

Crookneck and straight-
neck squash are very produc-
tive and usually give high
yields. Zucchini can be yel-
low, green, and so dark a
green as to be almost black.
Zucchini has a uniform shape
and is easier to slice and cook
than other summer squash
varieties.

Winter Squash

Winter squash are slower
growing and are vinous. Their
name refers to the keeping
qualities of the fruits and the
fact they can be stored for a
long time.

The most successful variety
for use in the Bahamas is But-
ternut, though I have also had
success with spaghetti squash.
Acorn squash has never pro-
duced well for me.

+>

HARDY

Pumpkin

Calabaza pumpkin pro-
duces enormous vines that set
down roots along their length
and can eventually wander
away from their original
growing position. They need a
large area in which to grow
but are otherwise quite trou-
ble free.

Ihave made the growing of
cucurbits seem rather simple
but there are drawbacks I

should mention. Sometimes
both male and female flow-
ers form but pollination does
not occur. If you notice any
female flowers being neglect-
ed then you can pollinate the
next set yourself by picking a
male flower and stripping it
of its petals, inserting it into
the receptacle of the female
flower and tying the female
petals around to secure. You
could also use a small paint-
brush or ear swab to transfer
pollen from a male flower to
the female flower, but the old

fashioned way seems more
romantic.

Cucumbers, squash and
pumpkins bear lovely green
foliage when they are young
but by the time they produce
fruit tend to be rather ragged
or even drastically dissipated.
Part of this is caused by our
autumn weather producing
early morning mists or
draughts that wet the leaves.
These wet leaves allow fun-
gus spores, powdery mildew
and other airborne diseases
to attach themselves.

Ireland's premium butter,
\ famous the world over.

There's nothing better than pure

Kerrygold creamery butter...from the rich,
green pastures of Ireland. Use Kerrygold
salted or unsalted butter for rich,
mouthwatering cakes, breads,
vegetables and desserts. Or try our
Garlic & Herb butter on baked
potatoes or seasoning for a juicier
| steak. Ask for them at
your favourite foodstore.

Nobody does
butter better.

When the sun rises and
warms the leaves these dis-
eases develop and begin the
process of skeletonising the
structure of the plant.

You can apply fungicide in
either powder or liquid form
but I have found that this is
no more than a delaying tac-
tic. The good news is that
most plants give a healthy
harvest before succumbing to
disease. Consecutive sowing
of new hills should keep you
in more squash and pumpkins
than you can handle.

Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies | East West Highway | Tel: 242-394-1 759°

a=



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UV INDEX Topay

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Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible
High: 83°
Low: 77°

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Partly sunny and
breezy with a shower
around

Low MODERATE | HIGH

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Mostly cloudy and
breezy; a shower

5-Day Forecast
ORLANDO
High: 79° F/26°C.

Low: 67° F/19°C
Low: 72°
PCE melee AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Pe CC mr Liat)

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TAMPA fey a AccuWeather RealFeel Pee ruc marcel
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Low: 65° F/18°C The exclusive Accu Weather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

Mostly cloudy, a
greater the need for eye and skin protection

shower; breezy
High: 83°
Low: 75°

Clouds and sun, a
shower possible

High: 84°
Low: 76°

A couple of afternoon
thunderstorms

High: 86°
Low: 77° TIDES For Nassau
High Ht.(it.)

8:48 a.m.
9:05 p.m.

Wednesday 9:32 a.m.
9:50 p.m.

Thursday 10:17 a.m.
10:36 p.m.

11:04 a.m.
11:26 p.m.

11:54 a.m.

Low Ht.(ft.)



Today

Gal
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and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Uh

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High .
Low ...
Norma
Normal low





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12-25 knots

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High: 83° F/28°C

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High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 68° F/20°C



. 81° F/27° C
. 73° F/23° C
. 84° F/29° C
. 73° F/23° C
Last year's high . . 91° F/33° C
Last year's low 70° F/21° C
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday

4 Year to date

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Friday



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High: 81° F/27°C
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Saturday



Sunday 12:21 a.m.

12:48 p.m.

1:20 a.m.
1:44 p.m.

FT. LAUDERDALE
High:83°F/28°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

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Monday

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
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Sunrise... ... 7:11 a.m.
Sunset....... 6:38 p.m.

First Full Last

CATISLAND q: C* = »>

ELEUTHERA
High: 85° F/29° C

_ Low: 74° F/23°C 9:30 a.m.

8:17 p.m.

Moonrise. ....
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NASSAU
High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 72° F/22°C '

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High: 82° F/28°C
Low:76°F/24°C

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High: 82° F/28°C =
Low: 73° F/23°C ' ‘
Oct. 25 Nov. 2 Nov. 9
SAN SALVADOR
High: 82° F/28°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

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MAYAGUANA
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

Nov. 16

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LONG ISLAND

High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

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highs and tonights's lows.

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CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS

High: 84° F/29° C
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CAT ISLAND oday: NE at 12-25 Kno’
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
CROOKED ISLAND Today: E at 8-16 Knots
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
ELEUTHERA oday: NE at 15-25 Kno’
Barbados Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Kn
Highs: 86°F/30° FREEPORT oday: ENE at 12-25 Kn
Wednesday: ENE at 15-25 Kn

GREAT EXUMA oday: NE at 15-25 Kno
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
GREAT INAGUA oday: E at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Kno
LONG ISLAND lay: ENE at 8-16 Kno
Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Kno
MAYAGUANA lay: E at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
NASSAU lay: NE at 12-25 Knots
Wednesday: ENE at 12-25 Knots
SAN SALVADOR ay: NE at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: SE at 6-12 Knots
RAGGED ISLAND lay: NE at 15-25 Knots

Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
6-10 Feet 10 Miles 83° F
8-12 Feet 10 Miles 83°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 4 Miles 85°
Fee’ 5 Miles 85°
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Fee’ 7 Miles 85°
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Fee’ 4 Miles 85°
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON

air! Black, blonde, red, curly, straight,

natural, relaxed, long or short - no |

matter the colour, the length or the

texture, most Bahamian women will

probably say ‘forget clothes, my hair
is more important’.

Of course hair is not only a big deal for Bahamian
women, but for women all over the globe.

Throughout the countries of the world there are
| constant debates and discussions about the appear- |
ance of women’s hair.

Fashion and women’s magazines are full with nev-
er-ending styling tips and ever-changing ‘dos and |
don’ts’ when it comes to hair.

But in recent times it has been the issue of natural
hair versus relaxed hair or weaves and wigs that has
gotten a lot of media attention, especially in the
United States.

A few weeks ago, world renowned super model
and television personality Tyra Banks decided to
end all speculation and rumours surrounding the
state of her natural hair and came out on national
television without her usual weave or wig.
|} Popular comedian Chris Rock also sparked more
| debate about the issue with his new documentary
“Good Hair”, in which he takes a look at the black
hair industry in the US.

With all the noise in the market, Tribune Woman
wanted to know what local stylists had to say about

the topic.
| Stylist Yashicka Carey of the All Natural and Ther-
| mal Salon said that a new trend is also emerging in |
the Bahamas where women are either wearing their
hair natural or wearing weaves in natural hairstyles.

“About 60 per cent of the women that come into
our salons are wearing their hair natural and about 40
per cent are wearing natural hairstyles with weaves,”
she said.

Wearing hair natural, she said, has several advan-
tages.

“When you wear your hair relaxed you are limited |
to straight looks, but if you wear your hair natural, |
depending on the texture, you can wear your hair in
straight styles and in afro styles,” Ms Carey said.

Despite what some people might believe about
natural hair always being healthier than relaxed hair,
she said that this is a misconception.

“Regardless of the texture of hair, whether it’s
natural or straight, if it is not maintained and taken
good care of then it is no better than relaxed hair.
That is also the same for relaxed hair, if it’s not main-
tained it will become damaged,” she said.

“T have seen many women whose hair is natural
and damaged very badly come into the salons for
treatment,” the stylist said.

Weave is the ‘in’ thing for most Bahamian women.
The majority probably wear the so-called lace-front
caps or sewn in wraps.

While there is nothing wrong with wearing hair
weaves, doing it excessively can damage the hair
greatly.

“There are a lot of women who wear extensions
and weaves. It is, however, not good to always put
| weaves in the hair because it thins the hair and stunts
| the growth,” she said.

Ms Carey said that many women who come to her
salon and have hair that is badly damaged from wear-
ing weaves are not willing to go through the long
process of hair repair.

“Repairing the hair after it is damaged is a very
long process and it is very costly, too. It requires a lot
of dedication and people are not willing to stick it out
so that their hair can be fully repaired,” she said.

And even though women are aware of the damages |
of wearing weaves excessively, they continue to do it. |

Because so many women in the country wear
weaves instead of their natural hair, it raises the |
question if Bahamian women are insecure about | —
their own hair. |

Ms Carey said in her opinion there are a number of
reasons why Bahamian women prefer wearing weaves
as opposed to wearing their own hair.

“One of the reasons could be that Bahamian
women are not aware of the damage it can do to the |
hair. Then again it could be a possibility that they are |
not confident and secure with their own, and it could
also be because weaves allow variety,” she said.

Overall, Bahamian women are probably not ready |
to make that leap to all-natural, all the time just |
yet, but attitudes and hairstyles are changing.

+ F 4
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Volume: 105 No.273

FEATURES

Teachers’ ion Hoss
in $90,000 cash row

RS at

Belinda Wilson
to be suspended
for two weeks

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS Union of
Teachers president Belinda
Wilson is to be suspended
without pay following alle-
gations of the misappropri-
ation of $90,000 in union
funds.

Ms Wilson flatly denied
the allegations in a press
conference yesterday, claim-
ing only $65,000 of union
money was not accounted
for as she had to pay a num-
ber of bills before leaving
for a Caribbean Union of
Teachers conference in
Grenada in July.

In the absence of treasur-
er Janice Armbrister, who
was away on a six-week
vacation at the time, Ms
Wilson said she had docu-
ments, which were pre-
signed by the treasurer,
countersigned by executive
board member Sebastian
Campbell and herself before
taking the money to pay
insurance and utility bills,
and for seven council mem-

bers to travel to Grenada.

Ms Wilson admitted she
did not follow proper pro-
cedure as she did not con-
sult the executive board
before making the pay-
ments, but said she did so
because she was in an emer-
gency situation as the bills
had to be paid before she
left the country.

At least seven of the 15
executive board members
voted on Friday for the pres-
ident to be suspended with-
out pay for two weeks from
November 1 for the misap-
propriation of funds. The
media was told Ms Wilson
would be suspended because
she misappropriated
$90,000

However Ms Wilson’s
supporters, including Ms
Armbrister, BUT Associate
Vice President Quintin Lar-
oda, and around 30 teach-
ers at the press conference
held at the BUT offices in
Bethel Avenue yesterday,
maintain the president is not
guilty of misappropriation

SEE page six

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

Pala i x Gjai Gimedium,

ietc

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BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

CARS FOR se
aH
a aa

BAHAMAS BIGGEST

THE Anglican Church has
joined several other religous
denominations in throwing its
full support behind the Gov-
ernment’s efforts to make it
illegal for a man to rape his
wife.

Delivering his Charge to the
109th session of the Anglican
diocesan Synod, Archbishop
Laish Boyd expressed his sup-
port for the Ingraham admin-
istration’s proposed amend-
ment to the Sexual Offences
Act banning marital rape — but
cautioned that we must work
toward “the appropriate
amendment that addresses the
right concerns”.

ial eS

mash

Ne
RO - EN i

Anglican Church backs
govt’s marital rape law

He also came out against
the decision to resume capital
punishment (see story, page
2).

Archbishop Boyd said the
constitution, laws and govern-
ment of any jurisdiction “must
see after the well-being of all
who dwell in or find them-
selves in that jurisdiction. Laws
must protect all and address
the needs and security of those
who are vulnerable”.

He said the current Sexual
Offences Act suggests that
spouses cannot be raped — a
point of view espoused by

SEE page two

The Tribune

USA TODAY.



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

CLINTON FORBES is taken
from court yesterday.

By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

A TEENAGER was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday
on two murder charges.

Clinton Forbes, 19, is
charged with the mur-
der of Jeffrey Johnson-
Rolle.

Mr Rolle was gunned
down in front of his
brother while they were
walking along Derby
Road around 10pm on
June 15.

Initial reports stated
that the brothers were
approached by a group
of men while walking
and attempted to run
away. The group



SEE page six






PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)



Almost 80%
of Detention
Centre detainees
were smuggled
into Bahamas

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

NEARLY 80 per cent
of the 89 detainees being
held at the Detention
Centre were smuggled
into the Bahamas, with
some destined for manual
labour in the construction
field, while others were set
to be forced into prostitu-
tion, Immigration officials
revealed yesterday.

Senior deputy director
Roderick Bowe informed
the press yesterday that
the majority of persons
who enter the Bahamas

SEE page 13



Court hears
the closing
addresses in
Travolta case

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@
tribunemedia.net

CLOSING addresses began
in the attempted extortion trial
of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former ambu-
lance driver Tarino Light-
bourne yesterday.

Director of Public Prosecu-
tions and lead prosecutor
Bernard Turner told the nine
member jury that the prosecu-
tion has discharged its burden
in proving that Bridgewater and
Lightbourne are guilty of the
offences for which they are
charged.

SEE page 13

Legendary
artist Amos
Ferguson dies

By AVA TURNQUEST

THE global art community is
greatly saddened by the loss of a
legendary prolific ‘outsider’
artist, an internationally-cele-
brated Bahamian who “was so
close and yet so far” to his own
people.

Amos Ferguson contributed
more than four decades to visu-
al art and the documentation of
Bahamian culture, and can best
be described as a “prophet not
without honour, save in his own
country, and in his own house
(Matthew 13:57).” The biblical
reference fitting to a man who
was greatly respected by so

SEE page 13

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Anglican Archbishop speaks |
out against the death penalty

ANGLICAN Archbishop
Laish Boyd said one of the
most “alarming and perplex-
ing” issues facing the Bahamas
today is the government’s pro-
posal to resume hanging con-
victed murderers.

Expressing his disagree-
ment with this proposal, the



archbishop admitted there has
been a substantial increase in
violent crime and that people
are calling for action.
Speaking at the 109th
Diocesan Synod yesterday, he
said: “Crime is one of our
most serious social problems.
The number of homicides this

year shows a complete disre-
gard for the sacredness of
human life. It is easy to see
how in this environment there
would be a clarion call for the
carrying out of the death
penalty.

“However, it has long been
acknowledged in many circles

around the world, and proven
by statistical data, that capi-
tal punishment is not a deter-
rent to crime. And you do not
quell violence with more vio-
lence.”

The archbishop noted that
of the 59 homicides this year
up to September 18, govern-
ment statistics say 66 per cent
were related to drugs, retalia-
tion, conflict or domestic vio-
lence.

He said that Minister of
National Security Tommy
Turnquest “rightly stated that
the police would have little
control over or intervention
power in such circumstances
to prevent them. There is only
so much that they can do.

“The disregard for human
life and a perverted value sys-
tem which allows a person to
maim or to kill another in a
dispute, are realities that cap-
ital punishment cannot ever
address, even though a hang-
ing may satisfy the desire for
retribution.

“Tn fact, the last hanging in
the Bahamas was in January,
2000, at the beginning of the

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ANGLICAN ARCHBISHOP
Laish Boyd

year. That year had an all time
record number of murders, so
obviously that hanging did not
deter much.”

According to the archbish-
op, the real issue facing society
is the fragmentation of rela-
tionships and family life. He
said too many children are
being born to parents who are
unable to socialise and care
for them properly.

“What we need is for par-
ents to be parents and to raise
children to honour and respect
God and humanity. We have
strayed far from this in some
quarters and we need to get
back to it. The real issue is
creating justice and fairness
and a sense of hope and worth
in our society so that every-
one can feel — and also know —
that they have a chance to
make it.

“These kinds of things are
tougher to address, but they
are the issues. And all the
hanging in the world will not
address or even begin to
reverse them. This is where
the court system needs to
work more effectively and
efficiently.”

Marital rape
FROM page one

many opponents to the
amendment, including the
Bahamas Christian Council.
However, according to
Archbishop Boyd, marital
rape does indeed occur, and

? the law needs to reflect and

i address this reality.

He said: “Many persons

? have disagreed with the

: proposed amendment

? because they say it weakens
? or disrespects the bond of

: marriage and creates disad-
? vantage or unfairness for

i one spouse.

“The reality is that all

? marriages do not work with
? the harmony and equality

? that God ordained. Some

? marriages are at the point

? where certain elements of

? the sharing may not happen
? for various reasons, or some
: may be at the point where

? certain elements of the

: sharing no longer occur at

: all. These circumstances call
? for communication, coun-

: selling or even reconcilia-

? tion, or some other inter-

i vention.

“The law did not cause

? these circumstances nor can
: the law heal them. They

: need to be addressed by

? another means outside of

i the law.

“To say that an amend-

? ment to the law would cre-

: ate injustice or inequity ina
? marriage because it will give
? one spouse a Weapon

: against the other is not

: quite the full picture: such a
? marriage already has prob-

? lems of its own which the

? law did not create nor can

? the law solve. Those reali-

? ties in that marriage need to
i be addressed. People who

? will misuse or abuse any

? amendment must be dealt

? with. But if we are going to

i create an environment

? where real and possible vic-
? tims can be protected, then

? some reasonable amend-

; ment must be made.

“Tt is my belief that this is

: the intent of the govern-

i ment. I applaud the efforts

: that have been made Let us
: press on in dialogue without
? rushing to the end result.”

Teens set to appear in court in
Connection with drug, gun busts

TWO 19-year-olds are set to be arraigned in court
this week in connection with two drug and gun busts
made by police this weekend.

One young man is set to go to court tomorrow in
connection with the discovery of a .223 assault rifle
and ten rounds of ammunition at around 9pm on Fri-

day.

According to police, the seizure came after a search
warrant was executed by officers from the southern
division on a home on Wood’s Alley, off Market

Street.

A second 19 year old will be charged later in the
week in connection with the seizure of 21 foil wrap-
pings of suspected marijuana, a .357 revolver and six

rounds of ammunition.

The Peter Street resident was arrested in the Quack-
oo Street area yesterday at around 1.10pm.

NASA delays shuttle launch for test flight

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.

NASA is delaying its
November space shuttle
launch by four days to pro-
vide more breathing room for
a test flight of its new rocket,
according to Associated Press.

Atlantis was supposed to
lift off Nov. 12. Now launch is
targeted for Nov. 16. NASA
said Monday the delay will
make it easier to get the
experimental Ares rocket fly-
ing next week. The Ares I-X

is supposed to blast off Oct.
27 on a brief suborbital flight.
NASA will move the rocket
to the pad Tuesday morning.

The Ares test vehicle will
carry neither people nor pay-
loads when it takes off. Much
of the rocket consists of
mock-up hardware. NASA
wants to see how well the par-
tial first stage performs.

The same Kennedy Space
Center team is supporting
both the Ares and Atlantis
launches.

INDEX

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Sports

P8,9,14
Fa ah

BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

2009 CONVENTION EDITION 12 PAGES

USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3



Immigration chief denies withholding

information on the Detention Centre

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net

MINISTER of State for
Immigration Branville McCart-
ney yesterday denied the alle-
gation that he is personally with-
holding information from the
press regarding conditions at
the Carmichael Road Deten-
tion Centre.

Noting that the ministry has
conducted a number of visits to
the facility and has even com-

missioned a committee to inves-
tigate the numerous reports of
abuse and unsanitary condi-
tions, Mr McCartney said the
media will be given the depart-
ment’s final report as soon as it
is completed and presented to
Cabinet.

“The committee’s terms of
reference were to investigate
and determine the validity of
these accusations. The commit-
tee members include, Dr David
Allen, Father James Palacious,
Jack Thompson, representatives

WEG UAL ia

34-YEAR-OLD Shawn Moxey at court.

A 34-YEAR-OLD man charged with the murder of a
former Tribune employee and the attempted murder
of his brother was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yes-

terday.

Police have charged Shawn Edgar Moxey alias Shawn
Isaacs with the murder of Matthew Ambrister and the
attempted murder of his brother Marvin Ambrister.

Matthew 23, and Marvin, 24, of Farrington Road,
were shot in the stomach when an altercation erupted
between two groups of men outside Dominique's
Restaurant and Bar on Boyd Road, on Saturday, June

13.

Matthew who worked in the Tribune press room,

died at the scene.

Moxey, who was represented by attorney Krysta
Smith, was not required to enter a plea to the charges
during his arraignment before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. Twenty witnesses
are listed on court dockets. Moxey, of Church Hill
Avenue, was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. His
case has been adjourned to November 30 in Court 10,

Nassau Street.



Man airlifted to New
Providence after crash

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — A 23-year-
old Eight Mile Rock man whose
vehicle crashed into a service
station on Friday has been air-
lifted to New Providence for
further medical treatment.

The accident occurred
around 9.30pm at Chappy’s Gas
Station in Bartlette Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, when the driver of a
Toyota Aristo car lost control
and crashed into the gas pumps
and a parked vehicle.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey
said that prior to the crash offi-
cers of the Eight Mile Rock
Police Station were conducting
road checks in the Hanna Hill
area when they observed a vehi-
cle being driven in a reckless
manner.

She said officers pursued a
white and gray Aristo vehicle,
which later crashed. The victim,
who has not been identified by
police, was taken to the Rand
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment.

Police reported that the
male victim was airlifted over
the weekend to the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Investigations are contin-
uing into that matter.

SUSPECT ARRESTED

Grand Bahama Police
arrested a 24-year-old man
in Freeport for possession of
an unlicensed firearm and
ammunition.

ASP Mackey reported that
police were called around
1.30am on Saturday to assist
security at the Bowling Alley
on Britannia Lane.

According to reports, a
young man who was attempt-
ing to enter the establish-
ment was searched. Officers
discovered a black Glock
9mm pistol with seven rounds
of 9mm ammunition in his
trousers.

The suspect was arrested
and taken into police cus-
tody.

Officers of the Central
Detective Unit are investi-
gating the matter.

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from the Department of Social
Services and the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force.

“The first tour was conducted
March 3, 2009. Following the
second tour on April 7, 2009,
committee members expressed
how pleased they were during
their initial visit with the
improvements made to the facil-
ity. Shortly after, I would have
spoken to the improvements
made during my budget debate
in June.

“A third and final visit is
planned at the end of this
month before a final report is
submitted to Cabinet for

Newly appointed
Justice of the
Court of Appeal

SIR GEORGE NEW-
MAN, newly appointed Jus-
tice of the Court of Appeal,
presented his credentials to
Governor General Arthur
Hanna at Government
House yesterday.

Sir George was appointed
as a Judge of the High
Court of England and
Wales in May 1995 and
retired from that Court on
October 1, 2007 after serv-
ing more than 12 years.

Prior to becoming a judge
of the High Court, Sir
George practiced as a bar-
rister.

He was called to the bar
in 1965 and was appointed
Queen’s Counsel in 1981.
Sir George’s practice as a
barrister included many
appearances before the
Privy Council in a wide vari-
ety of cases.

Sir George was one of the
judges nominated to sit in
the Administrative Court
and in the Special Immigra-
tion Appeals Commission
(SIAC).

He is presently the trea-
surer of the Honorable Soci-
ety of the Middle Temple.
In February 2009, UK
Prime Minister Gordon
Brown appointed him chair
of the Security Vetting
Appeals Panel of the Unit-
ed Kingdom.



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review,” Mr McCartney said.

The minister added that
although he is not at liberty to
disclose any particulars about
the unfinished report, he has
had an opportunity to review
the document and is satisfied
that the Detention Centre is a
picture of “extremely humane”
conditions that will “satisfy the
highest of standards”.

“These conditions resulted
from allegations that I had
heard prior to this governmen-
t’s election, conditions that were
indeed alarming. When reports
of those conditions resurfaced,
we wasted no time in investi-
gating, making certain improve-
ments where warranted and in
commissioning an independent
study as aforementioned.

“Today’s Detention Centre
is not yesterday’s Detention
Centre. Today’s Detention Cen-
tre is a holding facility where
international persons without
status, who have entered the
country illegally, benefit from
excellent meals, cable TV, plen-
ty of recreation, hot water, clean
beds, laundry facilities, access
to medical treatment on site and
available telephones,” he said.

Mr McCartney said he antic-
ipates that the report could be
released before the end of the
year after being presented to
Cabinet; noting that it will show
the Bahamas has accepted its
“overwhelming immigration
burden” and is treating these
persons with as much grace,
“diplomacy, and humanity” as
anywhere else in the world.







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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Military brass grow restive

WASHINGTON — Only nine months
ago, the Pentagon pronounced itself reas-
sured by the early steps of a new com-
mander in chief.

President Barack Obama was moving
slowly on U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, had
retained former President George W.
Bush’s defense secretary and, in a gesture
much noticed, had executed his first mili-
tary salute with crisp precision.

But now, after nearly a month of delib-
erations by Obama over whether to send
more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, frustra-
tions and anxiety are on the rise within the
military.

A number of active duty and retired
senior officers say there is concern that
the president is moving too slowly, is revis-
iting a war strategy he announced in
March and is unduly influenced by politi-
cal advisers in the Situation Room.

“The thunderstorm is there and it’s kind
of brewing and it’s unstable and the light-
ning hasn’t struck, and hopefully it won’t,”
said Nathaniel C. Fick, a former Marine
Corps officer who briefed Obama during
the 2008 presidential campaign and is chief
executive of the Center fora New Amer-
ican Security, a military research institu-
tion in Washington.

“T think it can probably be contained
and avoided, but people are aware of the
volatile brew.”

Last week, the national commander of
the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Thomas J.
Tradewell Sr., issued a terse statement
criticizing Obama’s review of Afghan war
strategy.

“The extremists are sensing weakness
and indecision within the U.S. govern-
ment, which plays into their hands,” said
Tradewell’s statement on behalf of his
group, which represents 1.5 million for-
mer service members.

In August, in a speech to the VFW,
Obama defended his strategy, saying,
“This is not only a war worth fighting; this
is fundamental to the defense of our peo-
ple.”

Obama’s civilian advisers on national
security say the president is appropriately

MU

NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEY SIFFORD of Toote
Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326

reviewing his policy options from all sides.
They said it would be reckless to rush a
decision on whether to send as many as
40,000 more American men and women to
war, particularly when the unresolved
Afghan election had left the United States
without a clear partner in Kabul.

Although the tensions do not break
entirely on classic civilian-military lines
— some senior military officers have
doubts about sending more troops to
Afghanistan and some of Obama’s top
civilian advisers do not — the strains
reflect the military’s awareness in recent
months that life has changed under the
new White House.

After years of rising military budgets
under the Bush administration, the new
administration has tried to rein in Penta-
gon spending, and has signaled other
changes as well, including reopening
debate on the “don’t ask, don’t tell” poli-
cy governing military service by gay men
and lesbians. The administration has made
clear that Obama will not necessarily fol-
low the advice of his generals in the same
way Bush did, notably in the former pres-
ident’s deference to Gen. David H.
Petraeus, now the head of the Central
Command, and that it does not want mil-
itary leaders publicly pressing the com-
mander in chief as they give their advice.

Two weeks ago, after Gen. Stanley A.
McChrystal, the top NATO commander in
Afghanistan, rejected calls for the Afghan
war to be scaled back during a question-
and-answer session in a speech in Lon-
don, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates
warned not only McChrystal, but also the
military as a whole, to keep quiet in pub-
lic as the debate progressed.

“Tt is imperative that all of us taking
part in these deliberations — civilian and
military alike — provide our best advice to
the president candidly but privately,”
Gates told the annual meeting of the
Association of the United States Army, a
private support group, in Washington.

This article is by Elisabeth Bumiller
c.2009 New York Times News Service



NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a

citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 20th day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

WEST WINDS PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION LIMITED

Notice of Extraordinary
General Meeting
of

Six tourism
pioneers who
deserve our

recognition

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I stumbled upon the tale
of six unsung tourism pio-
neers which has remained
under the radar for some
forty years.

The recognition of Sen
Hon Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace by the Queen for
his exceptional works in the
Hospitality Industry has
caused me to focus on the
untold story.

The Ministry of Tourism
has failed to Inspire the
nation with the challenges
and achievements of six
young Bahamians, who in
1970, were selected by the
Ministry of Tourism to be
shipped abroad to be trained
and developed to replace
the existing foreign tourism
professionals. Sir Clement
T Maynard was convinced
that this untapped area
could become the proving
ground for Bahamians.

I began looking into this
matter after reading Sir
Clement T Maynard’s book,
“Picking up Speed.”

I noted that Sir Clement
put Bahamahost, People to
People, professional train-
ing and education policies,
the utilisation of denomina-
tion leaders to promote the
Bahamas, cultural develop-
ment and standards of per-
formance in the workplace;

letters@triounemedia.net



regrettably, the full story of
the Bahamianisation of the
tourism overseas network
has not been told or cele-
brated. We are proud of Sir
Stafford Sands, George
Myers, Sir Baltron Bethell,
Sen Hon Vincent Vander-
pool-Wallace, but what of
these six. Philip Mortimer,
David Johnson, Joseph
Delaney, Athama Bowe,
Van Isaacs and the late
Arlene Wisdom-Albury,
gave their best and are
excellent examples of what
Bahamians have and can
become.

The group had pressure
from every quarter; they
were made to understand
that failure was not an
option.

As Jackie Robinson had,
they were instructed to suck
it up, remain focused amidst
the internal challenges to
Include professional and
racial bias.

Sir Baltron speaks well of
the group and views them
as tourism trailblazers and
exceptional professionals,
“We could not Intervene,
we had to have faith in them
—if they had not succeeded,

we could not have placed
Bahamians overseas.

“They went off almost in
the dead of winter.”

“This group was put in
place by PS Elison A
Thompson and Director
General of Tourism, Som
Nath Chib; E John Dele-
veaux was responsible for
the project.”

This story confirm that
young men and women out-
side of politics were shaping
the Bahamas; what a posi-
tive story.

How can a grateful nation
who recognises athletes, cul-
turalists, academics, politi-
cians, the clergy, neglect
these early nation builders;
they were diligent, unselfish,
skilled, qualified, well edu-
cated and passionate for
their Bahamas. We must
correct this oversight.

The Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce, the
Bahamas Christian Council
and the Ministry of Youth,
should be inspired by this
opportunity to celebrate this
group.

The Ministry of Tourism
and the Hon Minister
should initiate the recogni-
tion effort.

WENDELL F ALBURY
Nassau,
October, 2009.

Sad to see criminals
having ‘a field trip’
e Bahamas

in th

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I write this letter to bring
awareness to the Bahamas

Skin Disease (Dermatology) Clinic
At The
Family Medical Clinic
Village Road Shopping Center
Village Road

Monday - Friday, and every other Sunday

By Appointment
Phone: 394-3433 / 394-1815

SPECIAL RETURN ENGAGEMENT
CATALYN & CURRY’S

“GUANAHANI”
FEATURING
James Catalyn & Friends
The Allagro Singers

and good Bahamian people.

Robbing, raping, murder-
ing, etc the crime list goes
on each day.

It makes one sad to see
these criminals continue to
have a field trip, or merry-
go-round.

There is a Bahamian slang
that goes on to say “ain’t
nothing happening”.

So if that’s the case for
these bold criminals to
enjoy, you see just how
things are going for us, there
is no fear, especially for
murderers in the land.

They are well aware that
there is nothing happening
to them, only a jail term.

So the bold killers devel-
oped a mind that does not
care. Apart from that these
killers are given bail even-
tually. Giving them the
opportunity to go and kill
again.

Because sentence against
an evil work is not executed
speedily, therefore the heart
of the sons of men is fully
set in them to do evil (Eccle-
siastics 8:11) what a sad pic-
ture as far as the law of the
land is concerned.

avery good job every day.

But sad to say locking
them up, is not all to be
done.

What has happened to the
promise that was given to
the Bahamian people?

In reference to the elec-
tronic ankle bands that was
spoken by the Minister
Tommy Turnquest?

It’s almost five years and I
have not seen anything yet.

If the Bahamian people
place anyone to serve in par-
liament you have to please
your people by truly serv-
ing.

Keeping promises is a
very important thing. By giv-
ing these criminals, some-
thing to think about.

Please get these devices,
and use these to fast track
them all on bail.

This is one of the things
to be done, before it’s too
late.

I’m sure a word to the
wise is enough we do not
know, who is to be mur-
dered next.

DOH
Nassau,

West Winds Property Owners the — Charale

Association Limited

Our police force are doing September, 2009.

Tha National Dance School
The Oundas Centre for the Performing Arts
Uclobar 29th - 31st 2009 at 800 p.m. nightly

Tickets $20.00
Box Office at the Dundas (telephones 393-3728/394-7179) opens

Saturday 24th October $200 am. 9 S00 pom. daily
Advanced fiche! bookings 4-mal address
judcabS 1 Gthobm ail.com

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

Please be advised an Extraordinary General
Meeting of West Winds Property Owners
Association Limited (WWPOA) will be held
on Tuesday, October 20th, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.
in the evening at the Pavilion, West Winds.

you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

(Reversed tiobets: not callected bp 3200 pom. on day of

pectoraanes will he seal, |

A Tribute To Two of The Bahamas’ Cultural Icons,
Andrew A. Curry | James J. Catalin


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5

LOCAL NEWS



Tributes paid to the
late Roger Carron

TRIBUTES have been pour-
ing in for the late Roger Car-
ron, The Tribune’s Managing
Director and husband of Tri-
bune Publisher Eileen Carron,
who passed way Sunday morn-
ing.

Mr Carron, 77, was born in
Eastbourne, Sussex, England
on June 13, 1932. He met his
future wife while studying for
his bar finals in London in 1960
and overcame a number of hur-
dles to join her when she
returned to the Bahamas to
help her father Sir Etienne
Dupuch with The Tribune.

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said he and his col-
leagues were saddened to learn
of his death.

“Mr Carron lived a full and
productive life and made a sig-
nificant contribution to
Bahamian national life since his
arrival here almost 50 years
ago. Despite the difficulties he
encountered, Mr Carron grew
to love his adopted home and
retained his good humour
throughout. He was fond of
chatting with Bahamians from
all walks of life and made many
friends among them.

“In his many years at The
Tribune Mr Carron garnered
the respect and admiration of
many, including the young jour-
nalists with whom he came into
contact and he contributed sig-
nificantly to their development
as a wise mentor and profes-
sional journalist.

“Roger Carron contributed
much to The Tribune, an
important Bahamian institu-
tion, and to the country in gen-
eral. My colleagues and I
extend our sincere condolences
to Mrs Carron and their son
Robert on his passing.”

Glenys Hanna-Martin,
national chairman of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, also
extended her condolences to
The Tribune's publisher.

“Mr Carron was always an
amiable gentleman who always
appeared to fully enjoy his walk
through life. He was over the
years a vital component in the
publication of The Tribune and
we therefore know his extend-
ed family will include the staff
of that newspaper.

Pl
ri
BI

nOlclsiemeye\e 1s @))|



“It is our prayer that God
will give strength to both Mrs
Carron and their son Robert
during this difficult time of
loss.”

Former Tribune Managing
Editor John Marquis described
Mr Carron as a “true English
gent with a very human touch”.

He added: “My wife Joan
and I were deeply shocked to
hear of Roger's passing. We
always regarded him as the very
nicest kind of English gentle-
man, a person with a real con-
cern for his fellow humans who
never lost his twinkling sense
of humour and engaging smile.

“During my 10 years as The
Tribune's managing editor, he
and Mrs Carron were extreme-
ly supportive. It was their inde-
pendent and robust approach
to journalism that lured me
back to the Bahamas in the late
1990s, and it was their commit-
ment to freedom of the press
that kept me there for so long.

“The Bahamas owes Roger a
great debt because the won-

derful relationship he shared
with Mrs Carron was undoubt-
edly a major factor in keeping
The Tribune on track during
the very difficult times they had
to face during the 1970s and
1980s.”

Dr Keva Bethel, president
Emeritus of the College of the
Bahamas, said: “He was such a
fine, upright, congenial man,
one whose friendship I trea-
sured. He will be a sore loss not
only to The Tribune and the
Bahamian media in general, but
to our whole community. I
extend best wishes and special
condolences to all The Tribune
family whose pain must be par-
ticularly acute at this sad time.”

Minister of State for Social
Services Loretta Butler-Turn-
er said: “On behalf of my fam-
ily and I, and the residents of
the Montagu Constituency, I
wish to extend our heart-felt
sympathy to the family of
Rodger Carron. At this most
difficult time we prayerfully
remember and support his
devoted wife and partner, Mrs
Eileen Carron and beloved son
Robert Carron.

“We also remember his
extended family members and
professional family at The Tri-
bune group of companies. May
God's Blessings lovingly sus-
tain and uplift you at this time.
May his soul and the souls of
the faithfully departed rest in
peace.”

Jack Thompson, Director of
Immigration, said: “I would like
to extend sincerest sympathy
to Mrs Carron and to the fami-
ly at The Tribune on the passing
of Mr Carron. Please be
assured of our prayers.”

Branville McCartney, Minis-
ter of State for Immigration,
said: “I would like to wish sin-
cere condolences to Mrs Carron
and her family on the passing of
Mr Roger Carron. Our prayers
are with her and the family.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Public praise for Tribune over Preston Ferguson coverage

MEMBERS of the public
have been effusive in their
praise of The Tribune and the
family of Preston Ferguson
following the announcement
that the police investigation
into his death has been
reopened.

Mr Ferguson’s body was
found in his work vehicle on a
lonely stretch of road on
Great Exuma about two



months ago. The police ini-
tially deemed the death an
accident, however the family
and The Tribune have cam-
paigned strongly for the mat-
ter to be revisited, as the evi-
dence could point to foul play.

Following the announce-
ment last week that a team of
homicide investigators had
been dispatched to the island,
readers of tribune242.com

hailed the persistence of Pre-
ston’s relatives and the efforts
of this newspaper.

D Collie said: “Has there
EVER been this level of
investigative journalism in this
country? Iam proud of what
has been done in this matter
and hope that the elected offi-
cials take note. This family
was just one of many and they
stuck to their guns and didn’t

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O THE WORLD

RE-ISSUE OF BTC TENDER

just roll over to the usual
empty double talk of minis-
ters and police spokespersons.

Good Job Tribune
reporters and Ferguson Fam-
ily. Next up, the family of
Brenton Smith need closure!”

Gail H said: “This is living
proof that the fourth estate
still holds some kind of weight
in the country. Thank you 77i-
bune and continue to use your
powers for good.”

Gretchen added: “Con-
grats to the investigative
reporters at The Tribune; I
know the family must be very
relieved to have their quest
for justice documented in the
print media. A job well done.
Thank God for the Tribune
staff.

“Jetta” said: “The Tribune
staff needs to be commend-
ed for bringing this and other
important issues to the fore-
front so that people can get
justice in this country.”

“Bush Lawyer added: “Yes,
I too would like to thank The
Tribune for good coverage of
local events. So many articles
are reported once, are incon-
clusive, and you never hear
about it again. We need to
stop hiding behind this small
town syndrome, and getting
in bed with wrongdoers.”

According to “Joe Blow”,
“Tt's about time. At least now
Preston's family knows they

FOR USED & SALVAGED VEHICLES

This is to advise that BIC is re-issuing the

“Tender For Used and Salvaged Vehicles”
that originally appeared in the press for the month of September, 2009, with a

deadline of submission of September 30, 2009.

Please note that ALL tender offers submitted at that time are null and void.
None of the submitted tenders were opened and viewed by BIC

All interested parties remain eligible fo participate in the re-issued tender
exercise for scrap vehicles. If you participated before, you must submit a brand

new tender.

Bids should be clearly marked “Tender For Used & Salvaged Vehicles”

and submitted to the Acting President & CEO

not later than 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 23, 2009,

Vehicle Type

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1996 Ford E-150 Van 1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck

1998 E-150 Van

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1996 Ford Ranger P/U T 20

96 Ford E-150 Van
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01 Dodge Caravan



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1994 E-150 Van 1998 Ford F-250 P/U Truck

999 Ford Ranger P/U Truck
96 Ford F-450 Lift Truck
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90 Nissan Civillian
91 Nissan Civillian
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have real police on the case,
so they should be able to feel
comfortable with whatever
the outcome.

FROM page one

“Good for them for forcing
the issue and good for The
Tribune for taking up the sto-
ry and not letting go.”



reportedly gave chase and shots were heard in the area of the
Tom “The Bird” Grant recreational Complex. Johnson
received gunshot wounds about the body and was pro-
nounced dead at the scene.

Forbes of Graham Drive, Yellow Elder Gardens, was
represented by attorney Tai Pinder during his arraignment

before Chief Magistrate
Ce Gea)

Roger Gomez in Court

One, Bank Lane, yester-

day. He was not required j
to enter a plea tand the

case was adjourned to

November 2 in Court 5,

Bank Lane. .

Forbes along with Ricar-
do L Knowles, 21, of Butler ~~
Street, Nassau Village, is a.
charged with the August ees
14 murder of Shawn Potae R
Kareem Stubbs. Stubbs, 23 ee cao ke.
was found dead through ae
Sea Breeze Lane around ;
3am on August 14 with a J
gunshot wound to the }
head. Forbes and Knowles }§ .
were not required to enter |RRAE TT Eten eroneattr
a plea to the murder charge
and the case was adjourned
to November 2 in Court 5, Bank Lane.

Knowles is also charged with armed robbery, stealing,
receiving and burglary. It is alleged that Knowles between
August 2 and 3, broke into the home of Dwayne Curtis. It is
alleged that he stole a $670, stainless steel Rolex watch, a
$200 silver hand chain, a $1,300 flat screen television, a
$1000 HP computer, $300 cash, a $50 Samsung digital cam-
era and a set of keys for a 1994 vehicle.

It is also alleged that Knowles robbed Curtis of a set of
keys for a Ford Fiesta, registered to the Department of
Environmental Health. Knowles is also accused of stealing
the vehicle, as well as a 2000 Nissan Sentra and a 1994
Audi. Knowles pleaded not guilty to the charges and those
cases were also adjourned to November 2, in Court Number
5 Bank Lane.

Attorney Pinder told the court she had been informed by
her client that while in custody at the Central Detective
Unit, he was beaten in the back and told he would be “dealt
with” once remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison as murder vic-
tim Jeffrey Johnson-Rolle is the nephew of the prison’s
Deputy Superintendent Charles Rolle.

Knowles also told the court he needed medical atten-
tion, claiming he to had been beaten by police and had lost
hearing in one of his ears. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered
that he receive medical treatment. Both men were remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison.

A rowdy crowd assembled on Bank Lane yesterday,
shouting at the police officers as they jostled with the
accused while escorting them back to the Central Police
Station.



Teachers’
union boss in
SOOK cash row

tions Corporation (BTC),
FROM Page One $3,632 to the Water and

Sewerage Corporation
(WSC) and $2,451 to the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-

but carrying out the wrong
process.
And Mr Laroda said the

1 : ration (BEC).
punishment does not fit the Another $1,000 was tak-
crime. en out by Ms Wilson to put

He told the press: “The
allegations are misleading
and disingenuous because
every executive officer
knows the suspension wasn’t
because of misappropriation
of funds.

“Ms Wilson was travelling
the next day, the bills had
to be paid and she wanted to
pay them before she left.

“Also the trip to Grenada
had to be funded and she

on the Impress account for
petty cash, adding to a total
of $64,232.

Ms Wilson said: “I wish to
state unequivically there is
no truth in the misappropri-
ation of funds on my part.

“Our Union’s Constitu-
tion has a mechanism that
allows us to resolve matters
internally.

“It is sad that persons
found it necessary to bring

needed cash to pay for the
rooms and other expenses.

“There are times when
you have to make decisions
on your feet. I give her the
benefit of the doubt.”

The union treasurer
explained how two $30,000
payments which should have
been transferred from the
consolidated account to the
pension fund were not, and
payments were made with-
out consultation with the
board.

She said $43,284 was used
to make up for a shortfall in
insurance payments and has
evidence in a letter from Ms
Wilson to the credit union.

A $10,000 cheque was
made payable to secretary
general Stephen McPhee to
cover expenses on the trip
to Grenada on July 23, and
another $1,500 cheque was
written to Fr Campbell to
cover the cost of office oper-
ations in Ms Wilson’s
absence.

Ms Armbrister said a fur-
ther $2,395 was paid to the
Bahamas Telecommunica-

this matter to the media. I
do not intend to resolve the
matter via the media but I
do intend to exhaust all
avenues available to me to
defend my good name and
restore the confidence in this
great union.”

Government High School
teacher Pearl Baker said it
was a bad time to lose the
president of the 4,000 mem-
ber union as hundreds could
be facing pay cuts next week
after taking industrial action
over inadequate teaching
conditions in government
schools.

She said: “I am very dis-
appointed because teachers
should have been informed
before the press was
informed of any allegations
involving the elected presi-
dent.

“Her suspension comes in
as some of my colleagues
will be cut so who will be
standing up for them? This
makes the union look bad
with a lot of false allega-
tions. I smell conspiracy
written all over this.”

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THE TRIBUNE



PM wants better
revenue collection
from Family Island

administrators

FAMILY ISLAND ADMINISTRA-
TORS must do a better job at collecting
government revenue, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said.

“Administrators are just not expected
to sit in the office all day dressed in suit
and tie and wait for somebody to come
and see ‘the chief’,” he said. “They are to
be very knowledgeable about what is hap-
pening in their communities.”

During the annual conference for Fam-

lect a royalty for every load of sand taken
from the Bahamian seabed, “but that is
not happening. It is all stipulated in the
law. We can go down a list across the
board, agency after agency, to discover
how we are falling down in the adminis-
tration of the revenue collection in the
Family Islands.”

The government requires “greater
accountability” from administrators with
respect to the expenditure of public funds,

ily Island Administrators at the British a Mr Ingraham said.

Colonial Hilton, which ended on Friday,

Mr Ingraham told administrators to investigate any
suggestion that the government may not be receiv-
ing revenue due to it.

Second home owners on certain islands rent out
their homes but are not paying taxes from the
income generated, Mr Ingraham said.

“We are willing to treat their property as a private
dwelling home for the purposes of real property
tax, which means they will be able to benefit from the
exemption of the first $250,000 of value, like every-
body else,” he said.

“They will pay the real property tax on the
remainder and they will charge their guests who are
paying them, the percentum for the daily rate that
they are occupying the places, and remit that to the
Treasury or to the Administrator’s Office on a
monthly basis.”

Mr Ingraham insisted that there must be ways to
improve the delivery of services while increasing
the intake of revenue.

He noted that the government is supposed to col-



“Our aim and our goal has always been
that we will seek to benchmark the expenditure by
Local Government in districts against the revenue
collected from that district and top off those dis-
tricts that for their own economic circumstance are
unable to produce an adequate sum of money to
fund adequately a Local Government. We expect
that soon we will be able to benchmark the amount
of remittance to a district based upon the amount
that is collected from certain taxes in the district.”

Elected local authorities would then “have to be
more vigilant in helping to identify and collect the
$100 a year for every dock that is in the district, to
collect from the marinas for all of the boats they have
tied up, collect business licence fees and other fees,”
he said. Administrators should also publically explain
why they cannot approve certain requests and should
not try to evade meeting with members of the pub-
lic, Mr Ingraham added. “You ought not to turn
people around by telling them come back tomorrow.
Determine it now. If you cannot do it, find out who
can do it and get them the answer.”

Deter NOLL DAV sy lee to an Te amare Bahama.



PLP leadership candidates
campaign in Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Five of the can-
didates vying for leadership posi-
tions within the Progressive Lib-
eral Party have taken their cam-
paigns to Grand Bahama.

Dr Bernard Nottage, Kendrick
Dorsett, and attorneys Paul Moss,
Philip “Brave” Davis and Jerome
Fitzgerald addressed PLP sup-
porters in Freeport at an open
forum at Mary Star of the Sea
auditorium on Friday.

West End MP Obie Wilch-
combe, who is vying for deputy
leader of the PLP, did not attend.

The candidates shared their
ideas and vision of moving the
party forward into the next gen-
eral elections.

The crowd favourite of the
evening was Dr Nottage. The
auditorium erupted with applause
as the candidate for leader of the
PLP was introduced to the stage.

Dr Nottage urged PLPs not to
be afraid of change. He noted that
the party has an “image problem”
that prevents people from sup-
porting it.

“The party is in crisis of confi-
dence in Grand Bahama, and
when I went to South Eleuthera
the people there said they have
not seen any of the party officers
in a year or two, and that was the
same story I heard in Andros.

“We have a wonderful par-
ty...but to date...people don’t see
the party making enough inter-
vention on their behalf,” he said.

He claims that Bahamians are
being victimized and sent home
under the FNM government. He
also noted that the economy of
Grand Bahama is in crisis.

Dr Nottage stressed that it is
important that the party is able
to win the support of those young
people who do not belong to any
party.

“The time has come for a
change in our party and in our
country. Our party does not
belong to any one person. It
belongs to all of us. You must not
worry about personalities when
you go to vote, you must remem-
ber to think about your children
and what is in the best interest of
the party.”

Dr Nottage believes that his
brief departure from the party is
not an issue for PLPs.

He explained that many before
him had left, including party
leader Perry Christie who also
returned to the party.

Attorney Paul Moss, who is
also vying for leader of the PLP,
believes that he is capable of lead-
ing the party. During his address,
he expressed concerns about the
state of Grand Bahama, and
blamed the Grand Bahama Port
Authority for the current eco-
nomic woes in Freeport.

Mr Moss was also concerned
that foreigners were being
favoured over Bahamians, partic-
ularly as it relates to the granting
of crown land.

“There are 2.7 million acres of
crown land in the country and
each of the 300,000 Bahamians

should be given some crown
land,” he said.

As Mr Moss was speaking, a
small group of unruly Perry
Christie supporters left the audi-
torium chanting “Perry, Perry”
on the outside.

Senator Fitzgerald told sup-
porters that he is ready for lead-
ership within the party.

Mr Philip “Brave” Davis, the
candidate for deputy leader, said
that there is a need for moderniz-
ing the party’s internal structure.

He intends to formulate and
standardize general election pro-
cedures and make the national
headquarters a fully operational
command centre.

A small booklet entitled, ‘Be
Brave Change the Bahamas,’ fur-
ther outlining his vision for the
party, was distributed among the
audience. Mr Davis, who is
endorsed by deputy leader Cyn-
thia Pratt, said he will support the
participation of more women and
young people in the party.

Kendred Dorsett, the candi-
date vying for national chairman
of the PLP, believes that the
Council needs a full-time chair-
man in New Providence.

If elected, he intends to
become a full time chairman at
the Sir Lynden 8 Centre.

Mr Dorsett also intends to trav-
el to Grand Bahama once a
month to ensure the effectiveness
of the council on the island.

“We must revitalize the coun-
cil in Grand Bahama, we must
restore the people’s confidence in
the PLP,” he said

British American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

Breast cancer is the fear of every woman, One of the keys to beat

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life!

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The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2009

Jennifer Francis

Breast Cancer Survivor for 9 years

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

THE SKIN CLINIC

at the

Family Medical Centre
Village Road Shopping Centre

SKIN CLINIC SERVICES INCLUDE:

Routine Skin Exam, (Moles, Skin Cancer)

Skin Allergies

Scalp Disorders (Dandruff, Itching, Hair Loss)

Skin Infections
Infants/Children Skin Problems

General Skin, Hair and Nail Problems
Teens to Adults with Acne (Face, Chest, Back)

Itching Skin (Pruritus)
Psoriasis

Eczema and Rashes

Razor Bumps

Skins Problems in Pregnancy

Monday - Friday and every other Sunday by appointment.
Most major medical insurances accepted.

PHONE: 394-3433 / 394-1815

IN MEMORIAM

Forever in our hearts!

. me et i z
MRS. JESTINA M. ALLEN
Born: Sth April, 1918
Ned: 20th October, 2006

MR. MARTIN A. ALLEN

Born: 19th August, 1935
Died: 21st December, 1998

O light forever dawning beyond the
darkest night;

O comfort of the mourning, our
strength and our delight; receive
our humble pleading for those
whose course is run, lest pardon

they be needing for any evil done.

MR. HARRY HR ALLEN

Born: 2nd August, 1912
Died: 8th November, 1985

MR. PITTMAN R. ALLEN

Born: 42nd Februar ¥ 1944
Died: 2nd December, 2007

To him who like the eagle arose
on congu‘ring wing, the cross
his banner regal, O death,
where is your sting?

There's surely no rejection for
those who share His strife,
but hope and resurrection
and everlasting life.

@ THE ALLEN FAMILY @



this disease is to detect breast cancer in its
rly perform breast exams on yourself. Every
woman should start self breast exams when they reach twenty years of age. Self exams should be performed every
month. Mark your calendar in red ink to remind you; this is a reminder to help yourself and possibly save your ow

49










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THE TRIBUNE

S
\

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20,

2009 WORLD SUNFISH
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Bahamian
sailors find
the going
tough

RENALDO DORSETT
Tribune Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

After the opening day of
competition in the 2009
World Sunfish Champi-
onships, Bahamian com-
petitors find themselves with
much ground to make up to
claim pole positions near the
leader board by the end of
the week.

With the release of the
preliminary results yester-
day afternoon, Bahamians
found themselves in less
than favorable positions ear-
ly on.

Charles Kelly recorded
the best finish of any of the
15 Bahamian sailors in the
field in 18th position with a
net score of 38, a result of
an 18th place finish in race
one and 20th in race two.

Former three time Sun-
fish World Champion, Don-
ald Martinbourough closely
trailed Kelly in both races
as he finished 19th overall,
with a 19th place finish in
race one and 21st place fin-
ish in race two, a net score of

Paul-Jon Patin of the
United States leads the field
with a net score of three, a
first place in race one fol-
lowed by second in race two.

Marx Chirinos of
Venezuela is in second with
five points, while the win-
ner of race two, Art Van
Aanholt of Curacao is third
with six.

Other Bahaminas in the
field included George Dami-
anos in 27th place, Andrew
Wilhoyte in 28th place, Jef-
ferey Gale in 32nd place,
Christopher Sands in 35th
place, Peter Bruce Wassitsch
in 37th place, Gavin McK-
inney in 39th place, Jimmy

SEE page 12



PAGE 10



2009





Crushers demolish
Giants Ht og points

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Defending champions
st Bede’s win Catholic

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

defence of Xavier's Giants.

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribbunemedia.net

T was a like a David

vs Goliath match-up

as the defending

champions St. Bede’s
Crushers crushed the Xavier’s
Giants 44-5 to start the 21st
annual Catholic Diocesan Pri-
mary School Basketball
League.

No, it wasn’t a typographic
error. The Crushers just sim-
ply took advantage of their
home court yesterday to
demolish the Giants by 39
points.

In fact, St. Bede’s had post-
ed an impressive 39-0 lead
through the first three and a
half quarters of the game
before Xavier’s finally got on
the scoreboard.

Donnie Culmer, one of the
Crushers’ coach, said they
wanted to make a strong
statement with all of the
teams in the league on hand
for the opening ceremonies
that was held prior to the start
of the game.

“We didn’t look like how
we practiced, but all in all, it
was the first game,” Culmer
stressed. “But the fifth game,
we will get it together and
play like the true champions
that we are.”

Despite the score, the
Crushers got off to a slow
start, but by the time Kyle
‘Flash’ Turnquest, considered
to be the best player in the
league, got into the game, it
was all over.

Although he didn’t play in
the first quarter, Turnquest
was still able to rack up a
game high 20 points, leaving
Giants’ coach Nelson ‘Man-

ST. BEDE’S CRUSHERS centre Gregory Cooper muscles his way up over the



della’ Joseph in awe. “They
look good. They impress me,”
said Joseph, who himself is
listed as one of the top nation-
al team players in the country.
“To see one of their players at
the primary school level, vow.
It gives you chills.”

Joseph, however, admitted
that his young Giants ran up
against a seasoned Crushers
team and it showed in the
result.

“That’s no excuse, but
some of them had some first
game jitters,” he pointed out.
“Hopefully by the next game,
they will be able to do bet-
ter.”

Work

Judging from the blowout,
Joseph said there’s a lot of
work in just about every facet
of the game that his Giants
will have to work on before
they play their next game on
Wednesday, October 28 at
home against the St. Thomas
More Shockers.

“We have a lot of things to
work on,” he said. “Lay ups,
free throws, defense. We have
a lot of things to work on.”

Even though they were
blown out from start to fin-
ish, Joseph said they did get
some confidence late in the
fourth quarter when they
avoided being totally shut out.

“T was telling them at in the
fourth quarter, we needed to
score, get at least two points
on the scoreboard,” he said.
“Tt was good for their confi-
dence.

“So it was good for some
of the guys who played for
the first time. Hopefully the

SEE page 11
TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11
SPORTS

Crushers cut Giants down to size

FROM page ten

next gome they will be able ACTION FROM CATHOLIC DIOCESAN PRIMARY SCHOOL BASKETBALL LEAGUE

to rebound from this loss.”

While coaches Culmer and
Ricardo Freemantle sat out
both Turnquest and their
rebounding intimidator Gre-
gory Cooper in the first quar-
ter, St. Bede’s still managed to
open a slim 5-0 lead.

It was Donald Cash who
scored the first point for the
season on a free throw and
Christopher Oliver and Malik
Jones got back-to-back bas-
kets. Once Turnquest got into
the game, he went right on
the scoring rampage, putting
up all seven points for St.
Bede’s in the quarter as they
extended their lead to 12-0 at
the half.

Having established his pres-
ence, Turnquest and the rest
of his team-mates came out
of the break and turned up
the heat in the third quarter.

When it wasn’t Turnquest,
who converted six of his 10
shots from the free throw line,
St. Bede’s got another six in
total from Adrian Mackey,
five from Christopher Oliver
and four apiece from Malik
Jones and Gregory Cooper.

That was when the Crush-
ers’ coaching staff went fur-
ther into their bench and
brought in the first set of
reserves, which enabled the
Giants to finally score.

Tahj Moss was the first to
score, cutting the deficit to 39-
2 and Rashad Gibson added
another basket, while Eugene
Higgs chipped in with a free
throw.

“The team started out a bit
nervous at first, but once they
got into the groove, they start-
ed playing as a team,” coach
Freemantle stated.

“But this team has been
training hard, so it was good
for us as we totally dominated
the game. We’re champions
and we want to play as cham-
pions and repeat as champi-
ons this year.”

Coach Culmer said this was
just an indication of what the
rest of the teams in the league
can expect. “We’re looking to
beat everybody,” he project-
ed. “We don’t plan to lose any
game this year. This is my
final year, so I want to go out
with a bang.”

The league opened with a
bang as Bahamas Basketball
Federation president
Lawrence Hepburn brought
the official remarks, praising
the Catholic schools for hav-
ing the sporting curriculum in
all schools.

As for the players, Hep-
burn advised them not to be
selfish when they score and
they don’t score. He encour-
aged them to get back and
play defense.

And he also informed them
not to allow basketball to be
the focal point of their lives,
but rather make sure that
they do their necessary school
work to better prepare them
for the future.

Minister expresses condolences

over death of Mr Roger Carron

Minister of Youth, Sports
and Culture, Desmond Bannis-
ter, expresses heartfelt condo-
lences to the wife and family of
Mr. Roger Carron who passed
away in Florida.
Mr. Carron was keenly inter-
ested in sports — particularly
golf and tennis and, even
though he may not have played
competitively he ensured that
there was fair and balanced
reporting particularly in his
role as News Editor at The Tri-
bune.
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



2009 INTERNATIONAL JUNIOR SUNFISH CHAMPIONSHIPS

Top Bahamian eighth as Ecuador's
Martinetti continues his domination

Ecuador's Johnathan Martinetti con-
tinued his domination of the Sunfish sail-
ing world Saturday, winning the 2009
International Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships in Nassau.

The 17 year old has had an impressive
streak this year, already winning the 2009
Sunfish North American Championship
and the Laser 4.7 Worlds held in ByJzios,
Brazil. Martinetti beat out 24 other top
junior sailors representing 10 countries,
placing first in four of the six regattas.

"Sailing here was kind of different
because the wind was shifting, but the
regattas were very, very competitive,"
he said. Puerto Rico's Fernando Monllor
placed second and Phillipine Van Aan-
holt finished with third place honours
and was also the top placing female com-
petitor.

Competition

Regatta Chairman Paul Hutton is
pleased with the level of competition and
the way the event played out.

"These are very talented young men
and women that we've had competing
here over the last few days,” he said,
"We had two days of good racing with
enough wind on the course, especially
considering these were juniors and not
seniors."

Six Bahamian juniors competed in the
championships. Christopher Sands, who
won Junior Nationals this summer, was
the top Bahamian with an 8th place fin-
ish.

"Tt was a lot of work, but it felt really
good. The foreign guys are really good
sailors with a lot of experience, so this
was a different level of competition,”
said Sands. Sunday night was the opening
ceremony for the 2009 Sunfish World
Championships and 72 of the world's top
sailors will line up Monday morning at
10am for the start of a week of what's
expected to be intense top level sailing.

e 2 i 3
THE TOP JUNIOR SAILORS of 2009 with thei

a
= |
a
=

‘t

PHOTO: Robe



=) 9
r uniquely designed trophies. From left: Paul

Hutton, Regatta Chairman; 1st place, Jonathan Martinetti, Ecuador; 4th place, Jose Gutier-
rez, Venezuela; Youngest competitor, Olivia Gugliemini, USA; 2nd place, Fernando Monllor,
Puerto Rico; 5th place, Mathieu de By, Holland; 3rd place and top female, Phillipine Van

Aanholt, Curacao; Brent Burrows, Nassau Yacht Club Commodore; Andres Santana, Inter-

national Sunfish Class Association President.

ECUADOR'S JONATHAN MARTINETTI waves

, yl

PHOTO: Robert Dunkley





his country's flag he receives his trophies



for winning the 2009 International Junior Sunfish Championships. Pictured from left: Mar-

tinetti; Llewellyn Burrows, Managing Director
Ice Cream; Paul Hutton, Regatta Chairman.

THE START of the first race in the 2009 World Sunfish Championships.

FROM page ten

Lowe in 44th place, Ted O’ Brien,
45th, Michael Holowesko, 58th,
Dwayne Wallas, 59th, Lori Lowe,
60th, BJ Burrows, 63rd, and Donico
Brown rounds out the contingent in
64th place. The Bahamas loos to con-

sports

tinue a rich tradition in the Sunfish
Class which has netted five World
Championships since the event’s
enception.

Pierre Siegenthalter took the title in
1973 and and 1977, while Martin-
borogh won the event in 1983, 1985,

Fun Foods Wholesale, distributors of Nestle

PHOTO: Robert Dunkley

and 1988. The Sunfish World Cham-
pionships were last held in the
Bahamas in 1995 in Abaco, when
David Loring of the United States
took top honors.

The First Warning Signal to begin
today’s action will sound at 10am.



New Providence Volleyball Association: teams
try to close out first half in playoff contention

THE New Providence Volleyball
Association continued its regular sea-
son on Sunday at the DW Davis Gym-
nasium with teams trying to close out
the first half in playoff contention.

On Friday, Anastasia Sands-Moultrie
and Kelsie Johnson led the Johnson's
Lady Truckers in three sets over the
Lady Hornets.

In men's action, the Technicians also
defeated the Champions Club in three
sets. Jamaal Knowles and Adalbert
Ingraham led the Technicians in the
win whilst Muller Petit led the Cham-
pionship Club.

Sunday night action saw the Lady
Hornets come from behind to defeat
the Lady Techs in five sets 21-25, 18-25,
25-19, 25-21 and 15-10. Simona Kerr
let the Hornets with nine points and
Sharon Whylly was the leading scorer
for the Lady Techs with 13 points.

In the men's action, DaBasement
defeated the Saints 25-15, 25-15 and
25-15. Cashmir Wood led all scorers
with 17 points in the win.

Matthew Wert led the Saints with
five points.

The last game was a battle of the
two undefeated teams and what an
intense game it was.

However, in the end, the defending
champions, Scotiabank Defenders
would improve their record to 4-0 by
defeating the youthful National Fence
Intruders 23-25, 25-23, 25-21, 15-25 and
17-15.

Shedrick Forbes led the Defenders
with 18 kills and two blocks, Prince
Wilson led the Intruders in a losing
effort with 19 kills and four aces.

THE College of the Bahamas wom-
en’s volleyball wrapped up its inter-
collegiate play this weekend in Florida.

In their frst game on Friday night,
the Lady Caribs lost in three straight
sets to St. Thomas University.

They played a much better game on
Saturday winning the first set. How-
ever, they came up short in four sets to
Florida Memorial University.

The Lady Caribs will now shift their
attention to play in the New Provi-
dence Volleyball Association with its
next game scheduled for Wednesday at

7:30 pm at the D W Davis Gymnasium
against the Lady Truckers and then
again on Sunday at 3:30 pm against
Scottsdale Vixens.

Meanwhile, the Caribs men’s vol-
leyball team will also play on Sunday at
5:30 p.m. against the Crimestoppers.

THE Gymnastics Federation of the
Bahamas is inviting all interested gym-
nastics, dancers and cheerleaders to
attend a meeting on Wednesday at 6
pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Federation members as well as non-
members are welcome to attend this
informative session.

Topics of discussion will include:

- The role of the Federation in pro-
moting and supporting gymnastics in
the Bahamas.

- Past accomplishments and future
goals.

- Information from the Bahamas
Olympic Committee and the FIG per-
taining to developing the sport and
assistance available.

- Application and requirements for
GFB members.





exird

Owen braced for
facing |S

Reds fans
in United
shirt

ROBERT MILLWARD,
AP Soccer Writer
LONDON

Mie Owen knows how tough it is trying to
convince England coach Fabio Capello he's
good enough for the World Cup, especially as it might
well be in vain.

The former Liverpool, Real Madrid and Newcastle
striker has fought back from persistent hamstring injuries,
a knee operation and a foot fracture and emerged still try-
ing to sound positive.

Now comes possibly the most difficult task of all.

Once the favourite of the Liverpool fans, Owen now
has to face them at Anfield wearing a Manchester Unit-
ed shirt.

When it comes to soccer, the followers of the two most
successful clubs in English league history hate each oth-
er. Few players wind up playing for both clubs and,
although Owen has taken a round trip via Madrid and
Newcastle, the Liverpool fans are likely to forget all the
great goals he scored for their team when they see him
wearing United's colours.

"IT would prefer people to sit down and recognize what
you did for them and for the team in years gone past,"
Owen said. "But I am pretty realistic as well and now that
I am playing for their arch rivals... Iam not holding my
breath, put it that way."

Owen hopes the Liverpool fans will acknowledge he is
a professional player carning a living.

After disappointing spells at Madrid and Newcastle, he
badly needs a break to get back to the top of English soc-
cer and recapture his England place. With Liverpool
seemingly not interested in taking him back, he had to go
to a club capable of winning titles.

Manchester United appeared to be the ideal choice
although not in the eyes of the Liverpool fans.

"People talk about loyalty in football. It is easy for a
football supporter to preach about that," Owen said.
"As a father, brother and son, there is no one more loy-
al than me. But when you are a player, you are not a fan.
I have got to earn a living, provide for my family. It is a
job opportunity, just like anyone else's work."

Owen has faced Liverpool before. As a Newcastle
player last season, he played in both Premier League
games that his former club won, 5-1 and 3-0.

But this is different. And if Wayne Rooney fails to
recover from injury, there is a good chance Owen will
start or at least be on the bench at Anfield.



eee eh Ts

Worry

The thought doesn't appear to worry him. Neither, it
seems, do his so far fruitless efforts to get Capello to
select him for England.

The Italian coach has guided England impressively to
the 2010 World Cup with nine wins in 10 qualifying
matches without any help from Owen, a veteran of three
such championships and with 40 goals in 89 games for his
country. Capello persistently says "the door is still open"
when the subject is raised of Owen's inclusion in the
England squad although that doesn't sound like much
encouragement for the 29-year-old striker.

The player's argument is that he won't let Capello
down and he has plenty of experience of World Cups,
whereas younger players might freeze on the big occasion.

"Everyone knows if I play then I am likely to score
every other game," he said. "Playing in a World Cup
wouldn't bother me. In fact, I would raise my game, as
happened before in big games. Naturally I would like to
be in the squad, but the last thing I want to be is cam-
paigning."

With Sunday's game looming, Owen has plenty to
think about as the Man United stars make the long jour-
ney to and from their Champions League group game
against CSKA Moscow in Russia.

Owen, who is in the horse business as a stable owner,
can check the racing papers for the odds on his thor-
oughbreds. He might also note that that the bookmakers
rate him a 9-4 shot to play at the World Cup but 1-3
that he won't. If that doesn't worry him, there's always the
thought of facing those Liverpool fans.

Dempsey returns as
Fulham beat Hull 2-0

LONDON

American midfielder Clint Dempsey returned from a
sprained right shoulder as Fulham beat Hull 2-0 Monday
night to climb four places to 12th in the Premier League,
according to Associated Press.

Dempsey was hurt Oct. 4 while playing against West
Ham and missed the United States’ World Cup qualifiers
against Honduras and Costa Rica. He shot wide and head-
ed off target against Hull.

US. forward Jozy Altidore entered as a 69th-minute sub-
stitute, his first appearance for Hull since Sept. 26.

Bobby Zamora scored the first goal in the 43rd minute on
a header after goalkeeper Boaz Myhill’s blocked Damien
Duff's shot. Diomansy Kamara added the second goal in the
64th minute when he turned home Zamora’s cross after a
Fulham breakaway. Fulham improved to 3-4-1. Hull is 18th
in the 20-team league at 2-6-1.

Hull midfielder Jimmy Bullard, a former Fulham star,
returned to action after being sidelined for nine months
following knee surgery.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



FROM page one John Travolta case

The two are accused of con-
spiring to extort and attempting
to extort $25 million from
American actor John Travolta.
Bridgewater is also charged
with abetment to extortion.

Mr Turner told the jury there
was a threat made regarding
the refusal of treatment form
and that demands were also
made and communicated to Mr
Travolta, although indirectly.

“A threat is a threat, he
(Lightbourne) wanted to give
Mr Travolta the first option to
buy the document,” Mr Turner
said.

“We say that from the evi-
dence there was an agreement
between the two defendants to
extort money from Mr Travol-
ta,” he told the jury, and added
that the agreement in itself was
an offence.

“The threat was not suc-
cessful because no money
changed hands but it was not
for a lack of trying,” he said.

Mr Turner challenged Ms
Bridgewater’s assertion that she
had been acting in her profes-
sional capacity as an attorney.
Mr Turner highlighted rule
three of the Bahamas Bar
Association’s professional code
of conduct, which stated that
an attorney must be candid and
honest in advising his or her
client and must never assist in
any dishonesty, fraud or crime.

Mr Turner told the jury
that Bridgewater knew that
what she was doing was wrong.

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FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater leaves court yesterday.

defence’s claim that Bridgewa-
ter and Lightbourne had been
set up. Mr Tuner told the jury
that what Bridgewater and
Lightbourne said during the
recorded meetings in attorney
Michael McDermott’s hotel
room, had been stated by them
previously.

“Nobody is being set up.
They weren’t being encouraged
to do something they hadn’t
already done,” he said.

Mr Turner also noted that
Lightbourne claimed there had
been an attempt to cover-up
the circumstances surrounding
Jett Travolta’s death but point-
ed out that there was no evi-

dence to suggest that there was
any cover-up and that the issue
was never raised during the
cross-examination of any of the
witnesses. Mr Turner told the
jury that in his unsworn state-
ment, Lightbourne had
besmirched the names of sev-
eral individuals. He also noted
that PLP Senator and attorney
Allyson Maynard-Gibson had
done the right thing by assisting
police but had been vilified in
the trial.

“She did the right thing,
only to be vilified, for what” he
asked.

“AILT ask you to do , hav-
ing considered the evidence in
this case and the law with
respect to it, to return with a
verdict and be able to say I
have done justice between man
and man,” Mr Turner said.

“We are not doing this
because of who the victim is,
we enforce our laws for our-
selves,” Mr Turner told the
jury.

Attorney Murrio Ducille
who represents Bridgewater,
began his closing address yes-
terday afternoon, telling the
jury that they needed to be
refocused.

“This case is not dealing
with politics, FNM and PLP,
we are dealing with two
Bahamians on trial for serious
offences,” he said.

“This case is all about dis-
traction. An incident took place
in Grand Bahama on January 2

Mr Tuner also attacked the

FROM page one

illegally “normally” are employed in the con-
struction field, or working in areas where Bahami-
ans wouldn’t want to work.

“So we find them gravitating towards those
types of jobs. There are others who we have found
who have been arrested and deported for ‘other
reasons’. Some of them have returned and have
been refused entry into the Bahamas,” he said.

Human trafficking has often been referred to as
the modern day form of slavery and is currently
the fastest growing area of international criminal
activity. It involves the exploitation of people
through force, deception, debt bondage, and the
deprivation of a person’s liberty or freedom.

According to Mr Bowe, of the 89 persons at
the Detention Centre, there are 37 Haitians, 11
Jamaicans, 31 Chinese, three Cubans, five Turkish
residents, one Guyanian, and one Nigerian. Of
this total, there were 61 males, 21 females, and sev-
en children.

When speaking to the press yesterday on this
issue of trafficking, Mr Bowe said these individu-
als are often smuggled over great distances to the
Bahamas or on to some other destination where
they will be put to use in some form or fashion.

With many of these persons being caught or
intercepted in the Bahamas, Mr Bowe said they
are unable to put a financial figure on the price
paid for each migrant who is being smuggled from

from which people from the

Detention Centre

“T really can’t say that they are being bought and
sold. I can tell you that persons we have come
across have paid monies to be transported - what
the sums are we really can’t say because right
now our investigations are continuing so it is hard
to come up with a figure.

“During the investigations normally people
would say where they would have originally come
from and that they would have paid persons. Many
times there are persons who are involved in the
scheme of things, they are unable to identify them
because a lot of it is done in the dark. They don’t
get names, or nationalities, and sometimes it is
very difficult when they move at night to say where
they were and how long they have been there.”

Most of these persons who have been smug-
gled, Mr Bowe said have been captured in Grand
Bahama, Abaco, New Providence, and even in
the Biminies.

“Some are found in bushes, some are found in
homes, some are found in vehicles moving along,
and others are found at sea,” he said.

The Department of Immigration is working in
concert with US officials as well as the Royal
Bahamas Police and Defence Forces to combat
this global problem. In 2005, a US report revealed
that nearly one million persons are estimated to be
trafficked globally per year, with nearly 20,000 of

one country to the next.

them destined for the United States.

FROM pageone Amos Ferguson

many cultural strangers.

Described earlier this year by
the New York Times as “the
Picasso of Nassau”, Mr Fergu-
son’s life was littered with inter-
national acclaim contrasted by
seemingly resolute local obscu-
rity.

Mr Ferguson, though drawn
to painting all his life, worked
first as a house painter and said
he didn’t take his talent serious-
ly until his nephew told him
about a dream he had.

“Uncle Amos, I dreamed that
the Lord came out of the sea
with a painting in his hands and
He say He give you a talent but
you don’t use it.”

Mr Ferguson was a devout
christian and many believe that it
was his infallible faith that lent
him the courage and vision to
fully explore and develop his
unique and distinctive style.

Jackson Burnside reflected on
his personal involvement with
the artist, having witnessed his
evolution from cardboard paint-
ings to international exhibitions.

“T first new him as a person
who painted houses, he painted
our mother’s kitchen,” said Mr
Burnside.

“Eventually we got to see his
work as he painted on whatever
materials he could paint on.
When his wife Bea began to take
his work to the market he rec-
ognized that he had a product
that was marketable and would
sell. He was trained by God as
he would say, he was fearless
and couragous and had a
tremendous sense of self esteem.
Without a doubt Amos was the
most prolific Bahamian artist of
the 20th century. What he
accomplished was tremendous.”

Broadly categorised as ‘“‘out-
sider art” or “art brut” (raw art),
Mr Ferguson’s work embodied a
sense of cultural freedom, devoid
of competition or social promo-
tion. Working from his home on
Exuma Street, renamed Amos
Ferguson Street in his honour in
2005, Mr Ferguson was a reno-
knowned intuitive artist and sto-
ryteller that painted “by faith
and not by sight”, often turning
to the bible for inspiration — as
he would tell those curious to
his methodology.

Antonius Roberts said: “I
knew Amos Ferguson to be one
of the most significant artists the
bahamas has ever seen we have
certiantly lost a national trea-

sure but the art world at large,
globally, has lost one of the most
significant outsider or primitive
artist, ever.

“He has been celebrated
appreciated for quite some time
well over a decade by the
ousider world wider art commu-
nity he has yet to receive the to
be embraced by his own people.
Perhaps this will be an opportu-
nity for us as a people to under-
stand and recognise that we have
lost a national treasure and per-
haps find a way to celebrate his
work and his life.”

Amos Ferguson’s first solo
exhibition was held at Toogood’s
studio in 1972, since then his
international recognition by
esteeemed collectors such as
Wadsworth Atheneum Muse-
um.

“People would call him crazy
and vandalise his work, thus he
bacame a recluse,” Mr Roberts
added.

“He only wanted to be
embraced and celebrated and
appreciated by his people. Even
today, a lot of people would look
at his work and rather than
doing the research they would
simply say ‘man the guy paints
like a child, what’s the big deal’.
Unfortunately lack of exposure
has done alot of us in the
Bahamas a great disservice and
as a result we miss so many
opportunities to celebrate the
genius among us.

“His work embodies and sym-
bolizes determination, hardwork
and focus. He had a desire and a
dream to be an artist and he
became one of the best story-
tellers that ever lived.”

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said: “My colleagues and I
were saddened to learn of the
death this morning of foremost
Bahamian naive artist, Amos
Ferguson. He is perhaps our
country’s most successful artist
with works in private collections
and galleries around the world.

“The Bahamas has lost a cul-
tural icon. Mr Ferguson, a tal-
ented house painter, unschooled
in the fine arts, reportedly began
painting pictures following the
encouragement of a nephew
who dreamt of his uncle’s hidden
talent.

“Religion and a strong faith
heavily influenced Mr Fergu-
son’s artwork which all bear his
inimitable signature “Paint by
Mr Amos Ferguson”.

A

before Senior Justice Anita
Allen. Mr Ducille is expecting
to continue is closing address
followed by Lightbourne’s
attorney Carlson Shurland.

media were pounding on Mr
Lightbourne and Mr McDer-
mott came here to shift focus,”
he said.

Mr Ducille said there had

been no threat, nor conspiracy
and called the abettment charge
against Bridgewater “non-
sense”.

The case resumes today

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

64% rise on
debt service
payments in
seven years

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Answer on whether
taxpayer getting value for
money ‘a resounding no’,

THE Government’s spend- : ;
P says economic think-tank

ing on its own debt interest
payments increased by almost
64 per cent in the seven Budget years leading up to the
2008-2009 fiscal period, a Bahamian economic think-tank
said yesterday, adding that the answer as to whether the tax-
payer was getting value for money was “a resounding no”.

The Nassau Institute, in its analysis of the Government’s
Budget spending for the years between 2002-2003 and 2008-
2009, said that apart from interest payments in its debt (dis-
regarding principal), spending on health and education had
risen by 73.33 per cent and 64.47 per cent respectively.

Pointing out that this increased spending had not pro-
duced any improvement in the nation’s national ‘D’ BGCSE
grade average, Rick Lowe, a Nassau Institute executive,
told Tribune Business: “All the indicators are heading in the
wrong direction.

“When you look at what has been done on education
alone, $1.8 billion or 19 per cent of government spending in
seven years, nothing has improved.

“Some analysis has to be done by government to say are
we getting value for money
and, regrettably, the answer
has got to be a resounding ‘no’

SEE page 4B



BEC’s Abaco peak load

usine

OCTOBER 20,



2009

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

major

Wall

Street

credit rat-
ing agency’s decision
to downgrade the
Bahamas’ B$ bonds
does not “reflect any
fundamental concern
at all about our eco-
nomic situation” and
the Government’s abil-
ity to meet its obliga-
tions, a Cabinet minister said last night.

In addition, Zhivargo Laing, minister
of state for finance, told Tribune Business
that the Ingraham administration was
“expecting an extraordinary gain” from
several transactions that it believed
would either eliminate or reduce the $40
million gap between its revenue fore-
casts and current performance.

While not disclosing any of these trans-
actions, Mr Laing said they did not
include the impending privatisation of
the Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC).

The minister was replying to Tribune
Business after it contacted him about
Moody’s decision to downgrade the
Bahamas’ local currency (Bahamian dol-
lar denominated) bonds from the pre-
mium A1 rating to A3, aligning this with

LAING

Police probed 29% of suspect financial reports



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* Government expecting to receive ‘extraordinary gain’ from several

transactions designed to eliminate or reduce $40m revenue forecast gap
* Top Wall Street rating agency lowers Bahamas’ local currency bonds from A1 to A3
* Warns Bahamas has suffered ‘erosion of main debt metrics’, and

it has ‘lower’ long-term growth projections than peers

the A3 rating the Wall Street agency had
assigned to this nation’s foreign currency
bonds.

The move is partly a result of a change
in Moody’s own internal policies, but
also reflects what it termed “the erosion
of the [Bahamas] main debt metrics”,
with this nation’s debt-to-GDP ratio
anticipated to increase by 15 percentage
points in the three years to 2010.

The Wall Street rating agency added
that the Bahamas’ long-term growth pro-
jections were “lower” than that of many
countries it was compared to for rating
purposes.

Gabriel Torres, a Moody’s vice-presi-
dent and sovereign analyst for the
Bahamas, said the rating agency had
eliminated the gap between local and
foreign currency bond ratings for many
countries because “historical evidence
indicates that governments are almost
equally likely to default on either type of
debt”.

Typically, a country’s local currency-
denominated bonds had been rated high-
er than their domestic counterparts, but
Moody’s was now assessing whether to

maintain such a gap on a case-by-case
basis.

“For the Bahamas, Moody’s has con-
cluded that these factors do not warrant
a ratings gap, and therefore we have
aligned the two ratings at A3,” Mr Torres
said.

However, the Wall Street agency’s
statement then added: “The erosion of
the country’s main debt metrics, with
debt-to-GDP projected to reach close to
50 per cent by 2010, from 35 per cent in
2007, further justify the A3 as the appro-
priate level for both bond ratings.

“Long-term growth lower than that of
its rating peers also weighed on the deci-
sion to align the bond ratings at A3. The
Bahamas’ two main industries, tourism
and financial services, have been impact-
ed by the world crisis and will find it dif-
ficult to recover strongly in the near
future.”

Moody’s kept the outlook on all the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit ratings as ‘sta-
ble’, and reaffirmed the Aal country ceil-
ing for foreign currency bonds and A3

SEE page 6B

up 64% in 5 years

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) pro-
posed Wilson City power
plant “will almost double the
nominal generating capacity”
that it currently has on Aba-
co, the project’s Environ-
mental Impact Assessment
(EIA) has disclosed, its peak
load on the island having risen
by 64 per cent in five years.

The EIA by Kalimantan
Environmental Services
(KES), which has been
obtained by Tribune Business,
said that based on current and
future demand trends, BEC
had determined that “expan-
sion of the existing power
generating facilities is consid-
ered necessary to meet the
needs of all consumers in
Abaco”, not least the various
development projects ongo-
ing on the island.

Delving briefly into BEC’s
history in power generation
on the island, the KES report
said the 2001 extension of its
existing Marsh Harbour pow-
er station and the addition of
two 4.4 megawatt generators
“met the forecasted load
demand” then.

“The expansion of the gen-
erating system was intended
to meet the increased

demand, thereby benefiting
the continuing development
of the island by continued
encouragement of economic
development for projects in
tourism, agriculture and small
industry,” the EJA said.

The existing Marsh Har-
bour Power Station now had
an installed capacity of some
25.6 mega watts (MW), the
EIA said, with smaller gen-
erator sets having purchased
to meet peak summer
demand.

“The growth in consumer
demand for power in Abaco
over the past few years has
increased,” the report added.
“Over the past five years,
BEC’s peak load has
increased by some 64 per
cent. This has presented BEC
with challenges, in some
instances requiring additional
generating capacity, as well
as initiating a programme to
replace the older generators
with new ones.”

The Wilson City power
plant has been a subject of
much controversy recently,
with BEC and the Govern-
ment coming under fire amid
accusations of lack of trans-
parency and a failure to dis-
close details of the project to
impacted Abaco residents.

SEE page 2B

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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

SOME 29 per cent of the
Suspicious Transactions
Reports (STRs) it received
during 2008 were passed on
to the Royal Bahamas Police
Force for further investiga-
tion, the Financial Intelligence
Unit’s (FIU) 2008 report dis-
closed, involving $6.756 mil-
lion worth of assets.

The FIU, whose report was
recently tabled in Parliament,
said it saw a 3 per cent year-
over-year increase in STR
reports to 129 in 2008, com-
pared to 125 the previous
year. The 2008 reports

involved a total $4.113 billion
in assets.

Out of the 129 STR reports
received in 2008, the FIU said
37 were passed on to the
police, with 38 cases closed
and 54 matters still pending
at year-end.

The pending matters, some
41.86 per cent of STRs sub-
mitted, accounted for some
$4.014 billion or 97.6 per cent
of all assets covered in these
reports. The closed STR
investigations involved some
$91.962 million in assets.

The vast majority of STRs -
some 92.25 per cent - were
received from the Bahamian
banking community, the FIU

said, with 52 coming from the
‘domestic/offshore’ banking
sector and another 531 from
‘offshore banks’. A further 16
came from so-called ‘domestic
banks’.

While the average STR
covered assets with a value of
$31.883 million, the value of
those passed on to the police
for investigation was much
smaller, standing at $182,593.
The average value of closed
reports was $2.42 million, and
that of pending reports was
$74.335 million.

“The Financial Intelligence
Unit did not detect any crim-

SEE page 5B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report,



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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EE eee
Sandals starts Emerald Bay staffing drive

SANDALS will today hold the
first job fair for its newly-acquired
Emerald Bay Resort, having
unveiled plans to open the property’s
marina on November 10.

The job fairs will be held at the
Sandals Emerald Bay’s conferenc-
ing facilities between 9am-S5pm on
the following days:

Tuesday, October 20: All man-
agerial and supervisory positions

Wednesday, October 21: Former
Four Seasons employees only

Thursday, October 22: Line staff
and other positions

All attending candidates will be
interviewed by Sandals group direc-
tors, and those hired will be required
to start work at the end of December
in order to undergo the Sandals
training programme ahead of Janu-

ary’s opening.

Sandals Resorts International’s
director of operations, Shawn
DaCosta, said: “We’re delighted to
announce that we are now in a posi-
tion to invite people to be part of
this exciting project and join our
team. We’ll be looking for the very
best candidates that share our phi-
losophy for giving guests more than
they expect, and helping take the
travel industry by storm.”

Sandals Emerald Bay is set to
open The Marina at Emerald Bay
on November 10, 2009.

Sandals asked interviewees to
dress appropriately, and bring up-
to-date resumes and any relevant
original documents. Former Four
Seasons employees are asked to
bring identification.

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BEC’s Abaco peak load up 64 per cent in five years

FROM page 1B

Fred Smith, the Callenders
& Co partner and attorney,
who represents several Abaco
residents, has already issued
several warnings about insti-
gating Judicial Review pro-
ceedings if his clients are not
properly involved in the plan-
ning and permitting process.

The KES report said that

selection of Wilson City were
assessed, namely an expan-
sion of the existing Marsh
Harbour power plant facility,
plus the site at Snake Cay.
“Based upon limited space
and the close proximity of a
residential community, the
Marsh Harbour site was sub-
sequently eliminated from
further consideration,” the
EIA said. “The selection of

tional value based upon its
remote location, and the
availability of water borne
access for fuel and materials.
However, based upon eco-
sensitivity and land use con-
cerns, Snake Cay was deemed
unsuitable for BEC.”

And, spelling out the con-
sequences for Abaco, its resi-
dents and economy if the Wil-
son City project did not go
ahead, the KES EIA said

several locations prior to the the Snake Cay site had addi-

1, SummitAcademy 2. Higgs & Johnson Accounting 3. Super Value Executive Offices

4, British American independence Drive 5, British American Financial, Freeport Branch

6. Kelso Medical Laboratory 7. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited, Stella Maris, Long island Branch
8, Bahamas National Trust 9. Bahamas First 10. Abaco Insurance Agency 11. Xavier's Lower
School 12, Bahamas First 13. Higgs & Johnson 14 Bahamas Ministry of Tourism, Exuma

In support of the Cancer Society and the Sister Sister Breast Cancer Support Group’s
effort to raise and promote awareness of the disease, British American Financial
hosted the 13th Annual Lee National Denim Day during the month of October. The
intemational event takes place on the first Friday of October, during the month long
awareness campaign. We say THANK YOU to our spokesperson Zarina Fitzgerald,
participating companies, schools and and organizations who made donations and
wore pink shirts with pink ribbons in solidarity with cancer survivors.

non-implementation was “not
considered to be a viable
option” when it came to the
island’s sustainable develop-
ment.

Capacity

“The installed capacity at
Marsh Harbour is insufficient
to meet current and near
future demand for power in
Abaco,” the EJA said.

Get a FREE
Hunt's “The
Tomato
Experts”
Shopping bag
when you bring
your entry form
to The d’Albenas
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o~

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“Without additional capac-
ity, the need for load shed-
ding becomes likely in order
to maintain a_ balance
between demand and genera-
tion capacity. Therefore, the
proposed project is designed
to meet the current and future
needs, providing reliable addi-
tional electricity generation
capacity.”

The KES report warned
that without the Wilson City

power plant, “greater reliance
would be placed upon the use
of small diesel generator sets
for residential, commercial
and industrial purposes.
“Those typically burn pre-
mium fuels such as high-speed
diesel, whilst their energy effi-
ciency and inherent emissions
means that their environ-
mental performance may
compare unfavourably with
larger scale generation.”

Buy any 3 of these
products—Hunt's Whole,
Stewed or Diced Tomatoes 14.502,

Tomato Paste 120z, Tomato Sauce 140z,

Spaghetti Sauce 260z, Ketchup 360z
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receipt dated after October 5, fill out an
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Fill in the blanks: Hunt’s are the Tomato

MORTGAGES * MUTUAL FUNDS + LIFE INSURANCE

E& a a
el : British HEALTH INSURANCE * ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS Address:
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FINANCIAL Phone:

EX_E_TS
Circle the three items on your store receipt(s) dated after
October 5, 2009. Fill out entry form and attach store receipt and
drop into entry boxes in participating stores or at The d'Albenas
Agency in Palmdale. Contest ends November 13, 2009

242-461-1000 | www.babfinancial.com

Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035 Abaco 242-367-6501



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

A GOVERNMENT min-

ister has moved to address
concerns from Bahamian real-
tors about the impact pro-
posed legislation will have on
the timescale for approving
subdivisions, arguing that the
process “should be speeded
up”.
At arecent luncheon meet-
ing, several Bahamas Real
Estate Association (BREA)
members voiced concerns to
Earl] Deveaux, minister of the
environment, that the pro-
posed Planning and Subdivi-
sion Act would lengthen an
already protracted and unpre-
dictable timeframe from pro-
posal to final approval - a
deterrent to most potential
developers.

However, Dr Deveaux
replied: “Each stage should
be completed in a specified
four-month timeframe so that,
in fact, the whole process
should be speeded up”.

BREA’s president, William
Wong, urged realtors who had
concerns about the proposed
Planning and Subdivision Act
to “promptly put pen to paper
and make submissions to the
Minister”.

Earlier, Dr Deveaux said
of the proposed legislation:
“This act will replace three
acts which have been in place
for over 40 years — The Pri-
vate Roads and Subdivision
Act, The Town Planning Act
and the Town Planning (Out
Island) Act. Copies of the
proposed act have been wide-
ly circulated and itis still not
too late for changes to be
made.”

Dr Deveaux also reiterat-
ed the Prime Minister’s com-
ments that of the 3.45 million
acres of land in the Bahamas,
approximately 2.5 million
acres are Crown Land,
900,000 acres of which are
wetlands. That left roughly
1.6 million acres of dry Crown
Land

The minister added: “It is
this land which creates our
economic basis and allows the

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3B
Minister addresses
realtors’ concerns



EARL DEVEAUX with the BREA
president William Wong (right)
Photo: Keith Parker

Government to economical-
ly empower Bahamians. The
Planning and Subdivision Act
deals with a number of the
issues faced by developers
and prospective home own-

Far itteh Coliog

ers.”

Referring to various “mis-
chiefs” which have plagued
the orderly development of
Bahamian land in the past, Dr
Deveaux listed the “unautho-
rised sale of lots; requests to
sell lots to pay for infrastruc-
ture; building permits issued
in unapproved subdivisions;
lack of utility services; subdi-
vision fees; uncompleted sub-
divisions; lack of utilities in
approved subdivisions and
family subdivisions”.

The minister emphasised
that the new Act’s aim will be
to modify and simplify the
various steps required to
establish subdivisions
throughout the Bahamas.

Given the need for trans-
parency and the desire of
Bahamians to be aware and
have a voice in proposed
developments in their dis-
tricts, a regular path will be
established for applications,
preliminary approval, public
and committee hearings,
appeals to final approval.

tin] Hiltem Hotel

Marlborough St., Shop #1

Clearance SALE

Eve

rything

is $20

We offer Stringing Services, Repairs, Knoatting,
Wiring. ileal oy The Snack Fix System and
he Mystery Clasps

Pearls and Beads Strands Wholesale

arid

Retail

P.O.Box EE-15827

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com

Free parking at The Hilton

rank

cans

N

Nassau Airport
Development Company



Nassau Airport Development Company Limited (NAD) is seeking Proponents (individuals,
consortium or joint venture that must include an experienced retail operator] to finance,
design, develop, operate and manage Bahamian Specialty Retail stores in the new US.
Departures Terminal currently under construction at the Lynden Pindling International
Airport. These stores will be world class in design and appearance with a distinctive ‘sense of
place’ and will offer uniquely 100% Bahamian manufactured/produced products at

competitive prices,

® Bank of The Bahamas

IN TERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the

provision of financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the
position of:

TNC Oa Ree

Core Responsibilities:

¢ Provides user support for the company's networked systems, by investigating
and performing resolutions to problems that are reported.

¢ Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and repairs to
hardware, operating systems and application installations.

¢ Troubleshoots system hardware and application problems, including server
issues.

¢ Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards and
operations.

* Assists with the implementation of new technologies and information
systems and the decommissioning and disposal of old technologies.

¢ Assist with the administration of the company's networked anti-virus, data
back-up systems, firewalls and routers by checking that these systems are
current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

¢ Advanced knowledge of Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP operating
systems (AIX Unix 5.0 a plus) to provide help desk support and to
troubleshoot end-user and back office systems.
Ability to communicate clearly and effectively in providing help desk
support and troubleshooting end-user and back office systems.
Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware repairs and
upgrades.
Advanced knowledge of networking, especially protocols and systems in
use by the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network issues.
Sharp analytical and problem solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned
recommendations.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.
Must be able to work independently and as a team player when required.
Microsoft MSCE and/or MCP Certifications a plus.
Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 21, 2009 to:

Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637

REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL

BAHAMIAN SPECIALTY RETAIL SHOPS
NEW U.S, DEPARTURES TERMINAL AT LPIA



Four inline stores have been identified in the new terminal for these uniquely Bahamian
products; the categories are as follows:

1, Jewelry, Arts and Crafts

2. Soaps, Candles, Oils, Etc.

3, Straw and related articles

4, Other Bahamian made products

There will be additional Requests for Proposals issued over the next few months covering
additional inline stores for general retail plus kiosks and carts,

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
i. Proponents must be Bahamian and incorporated in The Bahamas.
ii, Proponents must have operated a retail facility within the last three (3] years,

NAD'S GOALS AND OBJECTIVES ARE TO:

(a) achieve a high standard of excellence and customer service;

(b) offer a mix of concepts that will help to enhance the image of the Nassau Airport as a
world class airport;

(c) offer retail choices to passengers at reasonable prices;

(d) offer a mix of local, regional and national and international brands

(e) develop and design retail facilities that complement the qualities of the new terminal
while recognizing the distinctive spirit, character and ‘sense of place’ of The Bahamas; and

(f) optimize revenue to NAD.

Qualified and interested parties may pick-up the Request for Proposal package at NAD's

offices at the reception desk on the second floor Domestic/International Terminal at Lynden
Pindling International Airport between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, from October
13th to October 26th, 2009. A mandatory pre-proposal briefing for those who have picked
up packages will be held at the New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road on
Wednesday, October 28th at 10:00am,



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





4% rise on debt service
payments in seven years

at this stage.
“Sure, even with health,
there’s a hell of a lot of mon-

ey going in, and the Govern-
ment is talking about a
National Prescription Drug

FROM page 1B

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

P.O. BOX N-1132

To our valued tenants,

Please note that effective, Monday,
November, 2nd 2009 our new office hours will
be:

Monday - Friday 8:00am - 4:00pm
saturdays - 9:00am - 12:00pm

Gate access hours will remain:
7:00am - 7:00pm (7 days a week)

Management

We apologize for any inconvenience, and thank you for your
continued patronage.

ie) eel
Soldier Road
(by Lowe's Wholesale},
ACeteli eu eee Lan |

ba Bank of The Bahamas

TERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the provision
of financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

RAV Tei

The Risk Manager is responsible for administering and managing the Bank’s
risk management program. This encompasses designing processes, policies and
procedures to identify and manage threats to the achievement of the organizational
or business objectives. Risk Manager contributes to business decisions through
the measurement and comparison of risks.

Core Responsibilities:
Develops and implements the organization’s risk management program in
a manner that fulfills the mission and strategic goals of the organization
while complying with regulatory bodies standards and best practices;
Performing risk assessments which involves managing the process of
analyzing upside and downside risks as well as identifying, describing and
estimating the quantitative and qualitative risks affecting the business;
Educates and trains the leadership, staff and business associates as to the
risk management program, and their respective responsibilities in carrying
out execution of such;
Leads, facilitates and advises units and departments in designing risk
management programs;
Collects, evaluates, and maintain data relative to fraud, irregularities and
operational errors;
Investigates and analyzes root causes, patterns or trends that could result
in operational losses;
Performing risk evaluations which involves developing and implementing
systems, policies, and procedures for the identification, collection and
analysis of risk related information, that is comparing estimated risks with
risk criteria established by the organization;
Actively participates in or facilitates committees related to risk management;
Serves as organization liaison with insurance companies and some regulatory
bodies.

Job Requirements:
Bacheloris degree, plus five (5) years commercial or private banking
experience.
Intimate knowledge of AML/KYC, as well as other regulatory guidelines
Knowledge of local banking laws, including requirements of The Central
Bank of The Bahamas
Substantive experience providing team leadership in a fast-paced environment
Strong supervisory and analytical skills are essential.
Excellent verbal and written communication skills.
Must possess strong time management and organizational skills.

Benefits include: Competitive salary and benefits package, commensurate with
work experience and qualifications. Interested persons should apply no later
than October 21, 2009 to:
Email: hr.apply@bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



Plan and socialised medicine.
Are they better off looking at
other alternatives? They'd be
better off giving poor people
vouchers to buy health insur-
ance, rather than doing it all
themselves. The money being
spent, it could be targeted dif-
ferently.”

In its study, the Nassau
Institute said the Government
had spent $9.1 billion in nine
key categories over the period
assessed. There had been, for
instance, a 51.38 per cent
increase over the period in
sums spent on the general
public service, Mr Lowe sug-
gesting most of this was for
civil service wage increases.

The general public service

accounted for $2.6 billion or
28 per cent of spending over
the period assessed, with
health also taking up $1.5 bil-
lion or 16 per cent of spend-
ing. Interest on debt account-
ed for $883 million or 10 per
cent of government spending.

Annual

With the Government hav-
ing run annual fiscal deficits to
finance this spending, Mr
Lowe told Tribune Business:
“Particularly with a struggling
economy, with GDP reduc-
ing, it throws the debt-to-
GDP ratio out of whack.
Where will it end up?

“Tt’s been a long time com-

BAHAMAS Forni,

) per

MARKETING MANAGER

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading
supermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader,
the Company prides itself on delivering premier service
through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong
commitment to its customers, associates and community.

An opportunity for a Marketing Manager in New Provi-
dence to join this market leader has arisen.

Reporting to the CEO, the successful applicant will have
previous experience in implementing strategies, growing
market share and analyzing the market and competition
to implement marketing strategies.



Key responsibilities and selection criteria include:

« Ability to analyze information to support consumer
initiatives and business planning
Developing and implementing strategic marketing and

commercial plans

Ensure the achievement of agreed sales and gross profit

targets

Lead advertising and communication agencies on all
aspects of brand communication

Controlling advertising and promotional expenses
Highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work
evenings and weekends as required

Motivate, train and ensure that associates and outside
Contractors are able to implement marketing strategies
Ability to develop and execute Marketing plans
University degree in Marketing or Business Adminis-

tration

Work independently, making quick decisions while

working under pressure

Have good communication (verbal and written) and

interpersonal skills

Highly functional computer skills with extensive
knowledge of Microsoft applications

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging
role, forward your resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources Director
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
East-West Highway « P. O. Box N 3738 * Nassau, Bahamas
Or e-mail to: humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com

Only qualified applicants will be contacted
No telephone inquiries please

City

/¥| laréet

ra

we



AIN OCT 19-21, 09

ing. They’ve dismissed all calls
to be more cautious, but year
after year they’ve been look-
ing at rising revenues to justi-
fy projections that govern-
ment is going to grow and
grow.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas’ did not have a large
and diverse enough economic
base to sustain the sort of gov-
ernment spending it was now
incurring, Mr Lowe acknowl-
edged that cutting public
spending during the midst of a
recession was not the ideal
time.

However, he argued: “Gov-
ernment spending and the size
of government are detriments
to economic growth. If you
continue to grow government,
you take resources away from
the private sector and the
incentive for people in the pri-
vate sector to do things.

“The Government has
somehow got to rein that in
and shrink the size of govern-
ment. It’s a tough time, but
they can’t continue to keep
growing it.”

When it was pointed out
that much of the Bahamas’
national debt was held by
domestic institutions, Mr
Lowe responded that a large
portion was held by the
National Insurance Board
(NIB), representing Bahami-
ans’ long-term retirement
funds and social security.
There was nothing to suggest
Bahamian banks would con-
tinue indefinitely backing the
Government on its debt
issues.

And while Mr Lowe con-
ceded that the Bahamas “may
have been less crazy than oth-
er countries” when it came to
its debt-to-GDP ratio and
management of its fiscal
affairs, this did not mean suc-
cessive governments had been
fiscally prudent.

In its report, the Nassau
Institute said that since 1991
the Bahamian national debt
had increased from $870 mil-
lion to $3 billion, a 244.8 per
cent increase over 18 years or
an increase of $118 million
per year.

The projected increase for
2009-2010 indicated the
national debt was approach-
ing the $4 billion mark, close
to 50 per cent of GDP.

“Tf it hasn’t already done
so, Government must take
immediate steps to reduce
spending. The pain will be felt
by government employees,
and those depending on gov-
ernment contracts for new
spending. Their pain will be
no different from the many
Bahamians working part time
or have lost jobs and whose
mortgage payments are falling
behind,” the Nassau Institute
said.

“Reducing the fiscal load
of a government too big is
imperative. It’s a load the
country simply cannot con-
tinue to bear.”

‘People’, Processes and Technology

Driving Business Value”

Our client has requested BHC Consulting to seek applicants for the position of:

IT ADMINISTRATOR

You will be responsible for the health and development of the Corporate Information Systems
and Network. Only candidates with the following qualifications should apply:

Degree in Computer Science or Engineering
Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer

Minimum of | year of experience in a similar position
Excellent verbal and written communication skills

Reporting to the Financial Controller, this is the ideal position for an individual who can work
independently with minimal supervision. You will be responsible for:

Supervision of the existing corporate information network

Ensuring that IT utilizes best practices and standards
Development of new IT initiatives that add value to the business

Remuneration package includes generous employee benefits.

Only candidates that meet the above criteria should respond via email (subject: IT Administrator)
and attach a “one page resume” and salary requirements to:

Brian Hassan, Principal Consultant

bhec@coralwave.com

Deadline: 21st October, 2009



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5B



a ee
Police probed 29% of
suspect financial reports

FROM page 1B

inal activity in 46.51 per cent
of the Suspicious Transactions
Reports received,” it said in
its 2008 annual report. “Fraud
and drugs were detected in
27.91 per cent and 15,5 per
cent respectively of the

reports received.

“In approximately 44.19 per
cent of cases, the financial
institution at the time it sub-
mitted the Suspicious Trans-
actions Report did not know
the nature of the offence.
Thus other suspicious cir-
cumstances led to the filing

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & BOUITY DIVISION

CLE/QUTL-9R4

IN THE MATTER OF THE QUIETING TITLES ACT 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of ALL. THAT all that parcel of lot of land being
kncva'n as Jot Number Sixteen (16) Block Number Nineteen (19)
Centreville District, as shown on the Master Plan in the Department
of Lands And Surveys in the Island of New Providence

AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE Petition of JULIETTE L. RAMSEY

NOTICE

JULIETTE L. RAMSEY the Petitioner claim to be the owner in
fee simple in possession of the parcel of land and free from
encumbrances, The Petitioner has mate application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas section 3 of the
Quicting Act, 1939 to have their Title to the said land investigated
and declared in a certifpcute of Tithes to be grinted by the Court in
the accordance with che provisions of the act.

Copies of the file plan may be inspected t r mearmmall beurre. at:-
Copies of the fle plan may be inspecbed during normal bers al

1. The Registry of the Supreme Coun; and
2. The Chambers of Rumsey Aund Associates, Rames Building,
33 Plantol, Nassau, Bahamas

Newice 1s hereby piven thal any persen or persons having a right
of dower or any advise claim net recognized in the Petition shall
within thirty (30) days after the publication of the notice herein
Nile in the registry of the Supreme Court in the city of Nassau
aforesaid and service on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement
of such claim in the prescribed Form, verified by an affidavit to
be fled therewith. Farlure of any such person to tile and serve a
statement of such claim within thimy days (30) herein will operate
as. bar to such claim.

Dated this 17 day of September, AD., 2009

RAMSEY AND ASSOCIATES
CHAMBER
Rames Building
23 Alani Street
Nassau, Bahamas



of the reports. Fraud and
drugs were suspected in 30.23
per cent and 14.73 per cent
respectively of the reports
received........

“Longstanding customers
of the disclosing institutions
accounted for 52.71 per cent
of the reports received,
whereas new customers
accounted for 34.88 per cent
of the reports.”

During 2008, the FIU
issued one five-day freeze and
two 72-hour restraint notices
to Bahamian financial insti-
tutions, involving assets
totalling $24.196 million. This
activity ultimately resulted in
one restraint order being
issued by the Supreme Court,
concerning assets worth
$19.993 million.

Internet searches proved to
be the main factor that
prompted the filing of STRs,
the FIU report said, account-
ing for 32 of the investigations
sparked during 2008. Cash
transactions and account
activity not in keeping with
Know Your Customer (K YC)
policies accounted for 26 and
24 STRs, respectively.

Bahamian citizens account-
ed for 71 or 55 per cent of
those who were the subject of
STRs in 2008, some 20.93 per
cent of the remainder being
Canadians or Americans.
When it came to domicile, 76
STRs or 58.91 per cent con-
cerned persons living in the
Bahamas, and Bahamians
represented 41.86 per cent of
the beneficial owners of assets
subject to STRs.

During 2008, the FIU said it
received some 108 requests
for information and assistance
from overseas FIUs. It added
that it provided assistance in
87.96 per cent of the cases,
denied 9.26 per cent or 10
requests, while a further 2.78
per cent were withdrawn.

Of the 15 requests for assis-
tance that the Bahamian FIU
itself made, only one was
denied.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

Suitably qualified and experienced individuals are invited to apply for

the position of:

PROJECT ENGINEER

The minimum required qualifications are as follows:

- a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering, or similar
discipline or extensive knowledge and experience with the

execution of construction projects.

- A strong and working knowledge of time management
and project scheduling would be a plus.

- Successful applicant would have a minimum of 10 years
construction experience with technical and administrative
competences in all phases of project development from
conceptualization to construction and maintenance.

® Bank of The Bahamas

INTERNATIONAL
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

The Bank of The Bahamas International, the institution of first choice in the provision of
financial services, seeks to identify suitable candidates for the position of:

TCA ee ee

Core Responsibilities:

Provides support and maintenance of core applications and database
infrastructure.

Assist with application and reports development within the company
as required

Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.

Troubleshoots system and application problems, including server related
issues.

Reviews and tests technologies for potential purchase by researching
computer industry information.

Interfaces with all staff and IT vendors in carrying out duties.
Performs application installations and configurations, preventative
maintenance and repairs.

Executes, coordinates and assists in the implementation of new
technologies.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

Knowledge of the AS400 and Windows Operating systems required.
Experience with ATM and POS hardware.

Knowledge of credit card processing and experience working with
branded networks (VISA, Mastercard, AMEX etc) a plus.

Ability to consult Management and developers regarding application
software performance and use.

Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide reasoned
recommendations.

Must be a Team player and possess the ability to work in a demanding
environment.

Ability to communicate and document clearly and effectively required.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in support
of the network and central database systems.

Bachelor of Science degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of proven
network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience and
qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and life insurance;
pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than October 21, 2009 to:

Email:hr.apply @bankbahamas.com
or fax to: 242-323-2637



vwANSBACHER

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, a specialist in private banking, fiduciary services
and wealth management has an opening for the position of

Risk and Compliance Officer

The successful candidate will:

* Have responsibility for promating, monitoring and maintaining the bank's strategic

risk management framework and compliance policies to eniure compliance with
regulatory requirements

Monitor and investigate departmental risk reviews

Act asa source of information and enforcement on risk and compliance matters,
policies and procedures

Assist in monitoring credit, market and operational risk positions and the bank's
key risk indicators in accordance with approved risk policies

Identify potential areas of compliance vulnerability and risk throughout the bank,
and develop and implement corrective action plans for resolution of problematic
issues

Safeguard the bank from any possible reputation damage and protect and enhance
the reputation of the bank

Assist in report preparation and data compilation as required

Carry out such other risk management and compliance related duties as may be
required

The position requires professional skills in fast tracking projects
with the appropriate level of contract management and supervising
and coordinating personnel activities.

Excellent written and verbal communication skills are required
for preparing regular reports, acting as a liaison with government
agencies and delivering presentations to management

High integrity, goal oriented and a strong work ethics are
essential in addition to the proven ability to learn, develop and
comply with international industry best practices.

Qualifications:
Minimum of three (3) years of compliance and/or financial risk experience
Four (4) year college degree required
BACO Certification or other relevant professional qualification would be an asset
Strona analytical, communication and interpersonal skills
Strang computer and database management skills

Organizational and project management skills with the ability to multi-task

a lary rate with experie lifications.
We offer a very competitive salary and benefits package (commensurate ——————————————

with work experience and qualifications). Please send all resumes to the attention of:
Hurnan Resource Manager
Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Baharnas
Fax: 325-0524

E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

For prompt consideration, please submit a detailed resume no later
than October 30, 2009 to:

apply4jobs2009@yahoo.com

Deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail is Friday October 23, 2009

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Legal Notice

NOTICE

KINCADE VENTURES LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)


























Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ORIENTAL EXPRESS HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TURNIP INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 19th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

‘No concerns’ over
B$ bond downgrade

FROM page 1B

country ceiling for bank
deposits.

In response, Mr Laing said
the downgrade decision was
no cause for panic, as it had
partly resulted from Moody’s
own internal policies.

“Tt’s not a reflection of any
fundamental concerns at all
about our economic situa-
tion,” the minister added.

When = asked about
Moody’s comments on “the
erosion of the country’s main
debt metrics”, the minister
replied: “They’re reflecting a
set of realities for our eco-
nomic circumstances and they
are assessing it. We have no
difficulty with that.”

Mr Laing said the
Bahamas’ “credit rating
remains pretty strong in the
circumstances”, adding that

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EAGLE STARS INVESTMENTS LIMITED.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REAL INTERNATIONAL GROUP LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 16th day of October 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,
Bahamas.

the Government would move
to bring the debt-to-GDP
ratio back in line with histor-
ical trends once the economic
crisis abated.

He added that Moody’s had
also spoken to the Bahamas’
“fiscal prudence and
strength”.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said
persons had to keep the
Bahamas’ current fiscal per-
formance in context, pointing
out that while revenues were
$40 million behind forecast as
at end-September 2009, the
Government had been look-
ing at a shortfall more than
two times as great some 12
months previously.

“We have continued to
show a shortfall in terms of
forecast of the order of $40
million through September,
but that has to be looked at in

the context of this,” Mr Laing
said.

“Last year, we were looking
at more than two times that
kind of shortfall. In addition
to that, we are expecting an
extraordinary gain in some
revenues based on a number
of transactions in the pipeline.

“For obvious reasons, I
don’t want to say what they
are, but we expect that when
those transactions are con-
cluded they will bring us on
par in terms of forecast or
reduce that gap significantly.

“Tt’s still a very strange sit-
uation. We are looking at it
with significant caution, and
exercising great prudence and
vigilance in the circumstances.
We have to keep in context
where we are, where we were
and where we might have
been.”

NOTICE
VOLUNTARY DISSOLUTION

Pursuant to Section 138 (8) of the International
Business Companies Act, 2000 notice is given

that:-

(a) SPONGE INVESTMENTS INC. has been
voluntarily dissolved and struck off the

Register.

The Company was dissolved on the 3rd day
of September, A.D. 2009.

The Liquidator was Mr. Anthony W. Moree
of Dupuch & Turnquest & Co., 308 East Bay
Street, P.O. Box N-8181, Nassau, Bahamas.

eee
Employment Opportunity

A well established business within New
Providence is in search of an Inventory
Control Manager. Inquires must be
able to organize and set up an easy
manageable inventory control system
that includes monitoring and organizing
Building & Hardware and Plumbing
& Electrical Supplies. The successful
candidate must posses the following
skills

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

“W FG CAPITAL MARKETS

Sc: BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

CO LON TAL

ROYAL FIDELITY

Morey a4 Wark

Be able to:

¢ Track and follow-up on all shipment
from Suppliers.

« Receive and validate all shipped
items.

* Organize a comprehensive store
delivery system.

* Organize and/or Improve items
location on the sales floor area.

« Maintain a proper data base so
that management and staff have an
accurate record of all In-stock items

« Manage inventory control staff.

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
MONDAY, 19 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,491.37 | CHG 0.09 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -220.99 | YTD % -12.91
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.17 1.17 0.00 0.127
9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.992
5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00 0.244
0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877
3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.125
2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
9.93 Cable Bahamas 9.93 9.93 0.00 1.406
2.72 Colina Holdings 2.72 2.72 0.00 0.249
5.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.83 5.83 0.00 0.419
1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.94 3.03 0.09 0.111
1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.625
6.28 Famguard 6.28 6.28 0.00 0.420
8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322
10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.631
4.11 Focol (S) 4.11 4.11 0.00 0.332
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000
0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035
5.49 ICD Utilities 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.407
9.95 J. S. Johnson 9.95 9.95 0.00 0.952
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.156 64.1
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b ases)
Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92 8.42 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00
RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4038 3.72 5.20
2.8300 -3.75 -6.75
1.4946 4.25 5.18
3.0941 -8.61 -13.59
13.1751 442 5.86
101.6693 1.10 1.67
96.7398 0.35 -4.18
1.0000 0.00 0.00
10.5884 5.88 5.88
1.0757 3.86 5.30
1.0305 -0.24 0.22
1.0709 3.24 4.54
MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

1,000

The successful applicant must have
a minimum of 3-5 years inventory
and stock taking experience. He/she
must be familiar with the Microsoft

52wk-Hi _52wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Maturity
19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015
Symbol Weekly Vol. EPS $
-2.246
0.000
0.001

Div $ P/E
0.000 N/M
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Yield

word & excel software. Warehouse
management and Stock taking training
with certificates would be desired.

4.540
0.002

0.000 9.03
0.000 261.90

Fund Name NAV
CFAL Bond Fund
CFAL MSI Preferred Fund
CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Div $ Yield % NAV Date
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
9-Oct-09
31-Aug-09
30-Sep-09
30-Jun-09
30-Jun-09
31-Dec-07
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09
30-Sep-09

Salary would be based on qualifications
and experience.

Interested applicants are asked to
apply through the following address:

Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

The President
Re: Inventory Control Manager
P.0.Box N-7143

Nassau, Bahamas

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
KS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 9B





The Tribune

B O

ealth



HEALTH

oer N D

Overcoming side effects, aftermath
of breast cancer treatment

¢ Tribune Health is observing Breast
Cancer Awareness Month in October
with a series of articles...

By JEFFARAH GIBSON

vercoming the side effects

and the aftermath of

breast cancer treatment

can be extremely chal-
lenging for many women.

Some women are devastated when
they suffer hair loss due to chemother-
apy, and in even more drastic cases,
when they have one or both breasts
surgically removed in a mastectomy.

For Kelda McDonald, a Bahamian
breast cancer survivor, feeling com-
fortable with her body and the way
she looked after undergoing a double
mastectomy and chemotherapy took
some time and a lot of emotional
strength.

She told Tribune Health the story of
how she overcame her frustrations
about her appearance.

“Twas diagnosed with breast cancer
in July 2006. I had discovered a lump
in my breast while I was in the show-
er. It felt a little hard and it was visible,
so the following day I went to see a
doctor,” she said.

The doctor removed the lump, and
after a series of examinations Ms
McDonald was diagnosed with Stage
II breast cancer.

After finding out she had breast
cancer Ms McDonald immediately
sought consultations from doctors
both local and abroad.

“T spoke to one of my friends who
had went through a similar situation,

then I went to Florida
where the doctor rec-
ommended that I have
(both breasts removed
and) reconstructive
surgery,” she said.

Ms McDonald said
thoughts about the
mastectomy and the
consequent reconstruc-
tive surgery consumed
her.

After thinking long
and hard about it she
said she came to the
conclusion that her life
was more valuable than
her size ‘D’ breasts.

“T was very skeptical
about the idea of my
breasts being removed
and I couldn’t imagine seeing myself
without (them).

“T was hesitant, but I finally realised
that my life was more important that
my breasts,” she said.

Ms McDonald agreed to the
surgery, and while her main concern
was for her overall health, the first
thing she did after waking up following
the surgery was to check her chest.

"I knew that the doctors were going
to remove both breasts, but it was so
shocking when I woke up and felt that
nothing was there. I was in complete
disbelief," she said.

Like most women in Bahamian soci-
ety, she saw her breasts as valuable
assets, as important aspects of her fem-
ininity.

Following the double mastectomy,
Ms McDonald said she experienced

feelings of insecurity
and unhappiness, and
she feared that she had
lost her sex appeal
which had turned the
head of many a man in
the past.

“Even though I got
implants immediately
after reconstructive
surgery, it did not feel
the same. My chest was
still flat and I would
have to go every so
often to get injections
that made the implants
expand. I was unhappy
and concerned about
how I would feel with
someone (a man) look-
ing at my body and not

being happy about it,” she said.
“After a while I came to terms with
my situation and I thought the
implants aren’t so bad though I can’t
feel any sensation in the breasts. I
started to wear clothing that accentu-
ated my new bust, and that helped me
feel better about my appearance.”
Despite her concerns about her new
appearance, Ms McDonald said she
found someone who loved her and
accepted her as she was, ‘flaws’ and all.
But the struggle to come to terms
with her breasts being removed was
not the only difficulty she had to face.
Undergoing chemotherapy treat-
ment following the mastectomy, she
noticed in the second week that her
hair was thinning.
“One day I went to brush my hair
and (it) started to fall out. I showed

Steps to finding breast lumps early

By Dr Chinyere Bullard
Family medicine specialist

I ALMOST cried when I
was ordered to get my first
mammogram. To think that I
was at risk for this life threat-
ening, painful disease! One of
our best ways to fight any can-
cer is early detection, and this
is especially true for breast
cancer. This makes treatment
much easier and more effec-
tive. Not to mention cheap-
er.

How can you find breast
cancer early?

The best way, so far, to find
breast lumps that may be can-
cerous is to do two things:

1. Have regular mammo-
grams. (Every one to two
years)

2. Have your family medi-
cine specialist check your
breasts every year at your
annual physical.

BRCA-genes (so-called
‘cancer genes’)?

Women with risk factors
such as a history of two or
more first-degree family
members having breast or
ovarian cancer under the age
of 40 may need to be tested
for the BRCA.

Your family medical doc-
tor can determine if you need
a test for the BRCA gene.
Currently studies are being
done in our country by Dr
Theodore Turnquest and Dr
DeVaughn Curling, both can-
cer specialists, to determine
when women in the Bahamas
should have BRCA gene tests
done, and how to treat the
results.

What is a mammogram?

A mammogram is the most
effective way to find breast
cancer early, up to two years
before the lump is even large
enough to feel. It is a special
kind of x-ray of your breasts.
A radiologist will look at the
x-rays for signs of cancer or
other breast problems.
Because the amount of radia-
tion used in the x-ray is very
small, mammograms are safe.

Do mammograms hurt?

Mammograms can be
uncomfortable. The breast
has to be squeezed, but the
procedure doesn't take very
long.

How often should I get a
mammogram?

According to the American
Academy of Family Physi-



DR CHINYERE BULLARD

cians, American women
should start routine mammo-
grams at 45. According to the
Canadian Academy of Fami-
ly Physicians, Canadian
women should start their rou-
tine mammograms at 50, and
in general you should undergo
one every two years.

But all this depends on
your risk.

According to Dr Curling,
the average Bahamian
woman should start screening
for breast cancer at the age
of 40.

If you have a positive fam-
ily history of breast cancer
you should be screened 10
years before the age your rel-
ative was when they were
diagnosed.

If you are under 25 your
best test may be a MRI or
ultrasound.

How often should my

family medical

specialist check my breasts?

You should have a breast
exam in addition to a mam-
mogram every year, depend-
ing on your risk.

What is the doctor

checking for?

The main thing to look for
is any change in your breasts.
It's normal for your breasts
to be different sizes. A firm
ridge in the lower curve of
your breast is also normal.

Changes to look for

in your breasts

e Any new lump which may
not be painful or tender

e Unusual thickening of
your breasts

e Sticky or bloody dis-
charge from your nipples

e Any changes in the skin
of your nipples or breasts,
such as puckering or dimpling

. © An unusual increase in the
size of one breast

e One breast unusually low-
er than the other

If you want to check your
breasts, do the exam a few
days after your period. Your
breasts aren't so sore or as
lumpy at this time.

What are some risk factors
for breast cancer?

e Having had breast cancer
increases your risk of devel-
oping it again.

e A family history of cer-
tain types of breast cancer,
particularly in your mother,
daughter, or sister.

e Having a genetic defect
in the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene.

¢ Heavy alcohol use - hav-
ing more than three drinks a
day raises your risk for breast
cancer as does as smoking a
pack of cigarettes.

e Eating lots of red meat -
women who eat more than
one serving of red meat a day,
especially post-menopausal
women, have a more than 50
per cent risk increase. Women
who eat processed meat
(bacon, sausage, baloney, and
ham, ect) daily, increase their
risk for breast cancer to more
than 60 per cent. Studies show
that eating more fibre can
help to decrease the risks
associated with red meat con-
sumption.

e Obesity increases your
risk for breast cancer, also
cancer of the uterus, colon,
kidney, and the esophagus,
not to mention the fact that it
increases your risk for hyper-
tension, diabetes, high cho-
lesterol, heart disease and
stroke.

Avoiding weight gain is an
effective way to decrease
these risks.

e Race - I want to say the
human race. White women
are seeing a over-all increase
in the breast cancer rate, but
among women aged 40 to 50
black women have a higher
incidence rate and death rate.

I would like to encourage
you to get your physical done
yearly, and adapt some
healthy lifestyle changes for
yourself and also as an exam-
ple to our children.

I would also like to dedi-
cate this article to my Auntie
Beverly Lockheart who
fought breast cancer tooth
and nail.

my sons how the hair was falling out
and I asked my brother for some assis-
tance in shaving the entire thing off,
but he told me no,” she said.

Ms McDonald said for her person-
ally, she felt better shaving all of her
hair off rather than watching patches
of it fall out every day.

“T couldn’t take seeing my hair on
my pillow or in the palm of my hands,
so I said I am going to cut the entire
thing off. My brother saw that I had
begun to shave my hair and so he
finally gave me some assistance,” she
said.

When asked how she felt about her
hair loss, Ms McDonald said she was
more prepared for it than she for the
loss of her breasts.

She found a wig that she said looked
great, but added that wearing it was so
hot during the day she would some-
times “ditch” it and go out without
anything on her head, no caps, no
scarfs.

“One day I decided to go out to the
dry cleaners. I was confident about it
and not so self-conscious. The minute
I step into the wash house it felt as if
everyone was looking at me and judg-
ing me at the same time. When I saw
the first person looking at me I felt it
was a bad idea to come out of the
house without my wig.”

She had to battle many physical and
emotional challenges, but in time, and
with the love and support from family
and friends, Ms McDonald, like other
breast cancer survivors, was able to
overcome the hurdles on her path to
recovery and live a happy, healthy and
fulfilling life.



Sun exposure
and skin aging

t

SKIN is an excellent record
keeper. Every moment of
exposure to daylight adds up
like money in the bank - the
problem is the payoff known
as sun damage (also known
as photodamage).

As the top cause of prema-
ture signs of skin aging, sun
damage shows on skin in the
form of wrinkles and hyper-
pigmentation, and can led to a
repressed immune system and
the potential for skin cancer.

Even if exposure is limited
to brief outdoor lunches or a
20-minute walk, cumulative
exposure is enough to cause
the signs of skin aging. The
first line of daily defense
against sun damage is daily
use of SPF. Even on cloudy
or overcast days, UV light can
strike skin and cause damage,
so simply wearing sunscreen
on sunny days isn't enough.

Fortunately, more sophis-
ticated sunscreen formula-
tions with skin health bene-
fits (think less chalky, less
greasy) have made SPF a con-
venient addition to our morn-
ing routine. Speak with your
professional skin therapist
about SPF moisturisers that
can be worn comfortably
under make-up, or alone to
deliver defence against skin
aging UV light.

DON'T MISS ITM

12" Annual

Yhemes
ADITION made

Crafts/GiftsSouvenirs
October 40" — November 1° 2009
1:00 am — 11:1) pm daily
Arawak Cay,
Nassau, Rahamas

LOTS OF DRINKS

Lots of Food

GOSPEL GROUPS

Falcon Band
Royal

Battle of the school Bands
Pathfinders Marching Band

Exuma Marching Band

For Further inforrcation pleaa: contact: Mp, Le-Var Miller, Ms, Sharer Collie
& rw Paonela Deveson ot Tel 2 322-579 ap Fax 2 2-1

B.A...
BahamArts Festival 2009

MW ODBRO

National Trade show promoting Bahamian made Arts &

Habermas National Crafi Week. 200%
Highliehts

Sunikry, Cheteber 12" Me
Peal Cratl bck | hore’ serving
Zion Baptist Charch
Exel & Stree Siete
Hommes: Sirs. Lars Sacha.

Sr Voki
Monsday!Tucsdlay = (het. 26" 27"

Vasil to High Schools

Tienda Teening Prograin - [eeoratre:
Pamng:

Werkvesday & Thurstley Oi, 287g 10"
2 Annual Lene! neebng = EA
SuperCab Boeeze- West Bary 5
. LY" BabamArts Festival Events

Friday, October hia SiR
fella Bahares Al Saar - Live

1heP aum, Oi Tictal Ui pening al tie Festival
Kerante Speaker ; The As Hom Hubert A,
lograhani, Prime Miniter of the
Commanerealih af The Hobamas | THC)
Live fom Arserak Cay
Mb pum. Live Extertainmest - Falceas Hand

Saturday, Chet, Bi" Wa

[ein Mini Regatta Heat Race
|: pun. Reval Boh Defense Force Band
Tb put. Raleof the Haads - High Sebel
Compeition
EM pm. - until Falcons Band - Live

Sends, Morveilgr " ln

|: pun. PachFinders Marching Hand

EM pn. Vicor ol ke Chock Cheers
Competition

EM pon Gab Tea Pats

Delicacies

4: pum Geanel Exphosion

OM por Jeckanes Buh Oy

All Hakarniaa

60 Booths, Delicious food, Drinks & Lots of Music
EVERYONE IS WELCOME!!!



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009





Is it really
possible to

trust again? of excellence

A FEW weeks
ago we talked about
love’s greatest chal-
lenge being forgive-
ness. It is important
to understand that
to trust someone
again we first need
to open our hearts ¢
and forgive them.

If forgiveness does
not take place then a
barrier will always be present.
No matter what the wrong-
doer does to regain your trust
it will be pointless. True heal-
ing will not be able to take
place and the relationship will
not develop.

When we make the deci-
sion to tackle the obstacle
course of forgiveness we soon
come to realise that it is not
an easy road. The process is
often slow, excruciatingly
painful, and unexpected road
blocks may still present them-
selves along the way.

As the years go by, we
come to realise that the suf-
ferings we are experiencing
are in fact brought about by
ourselves, because we hold
on to the pain. We come to
appreciate that we can not
change the past, but we can
choose our future. We have
to decide if we want to
remain implanted right where
we are, crying and suffering,
or move ahead to possibili-
ties of happiness. We are the
only ones who really under-
stand our pain and so ulti-
mately we are the only ones
who can heal ourselves.

Being told, “Why haven’t
you let that go?” or “I would-
n’t let that bother me”, does
little to ease the situation.

Hurtful relationships that
involve work, friendship or
even family are sometimes
easier to deal with because
we can have ‘time out’ and
distance ourselves.

We are allowed time to
step back and regroup. But
what happens when we are
living under the same roof
with the person who has
caused us so much heartache?
The anger, hurt and disbelief
pushes us to believe that this
1s as much as we can possibly
take. Our natural instinct may
be to throw in the towel and
run. It is only when we are
faced with enormous hurts or
betrayals that our limits are
really tested. Aren’t we
brought up to believe we are
not given any more than we
can bear?

Trusting and believing in
someone comes all tied up in
a neat parcel when we first
commit to loving someone.
Newlyweds often begin life
together believing that the
trust they start off with will
only grow and get stronger.
As we get older we learn that
life has a way of surprising
us. Even when we think we
have it all planned out we dis-
cover that none of us are
infallible.



Love relationships are
often imperfect and the first
blow can be devastating. But
it is how we deal with these
knocks that ultimately deter-
mine the strength of the rela-
tionship and the test of love.

Before trust can be rebuilt
the ground has to be cleared
for honesty to be introduced.
All the anger, accusations and
judgments have to be aired.

If the wrong-doer is truly
remorseful then they need to
understand that the outbursts
are essential before forgive-
ness takes place.

Set aside time for daily
talks which will add structure
to what would otherwise be
chaotic arguing. Writing
down points throughout the
day means that talking and
discussing should be more
organised and focused.

Do not be surprised that
the door way to honesty may
open and close at tues and
the process may be slow. It
is not unusual for the whole
truth to come out over a peri-
od of time. Only when every
thing is out in the open and
the deceiver is believed will
true intimacy begin. Honesty
has to be present for trust and
trust has to be present for
intimacy.

For all of us who have
experienced trauma in our
lives, we start to question
whether anything makes
sense anymore.

We may have reached a
certain age and stage in our
lives where we think we have
it all worked out. We may
feel confidant about our rela-
tionships. It is not surprising
then that we feel as if we are
hit by a sledge hammer when
faced with a betrayal. But if
we take a deep breath, step
back and remember that all
life experiences hold mean-
ing, if we can see a future
with the person, and we have
committed our love to them,
then we need to reassess the
relationship. Interestingly,
many people discover a new
depth to their relationship
and move on to a more satis-
fying love.

e Margaret Bain is an
individual and couples rela-
tionship therapist. She is a
registered nurse and a certi-
fied clinical sex therapist.
For appointments call 535-
7456 or e-mail her at relate-
bahamas@yahoo.com or
www.relatebahamas. blogspot
.com. She is also available

for speaking engagements.

THE TRIBUNE



A woman



and elegance

A LOCAL business-
woman who has
established herself

as somewhat of a
pioneer in the field

of etiquette training
in the Bahamas has
now set her sights on
the corporate world...

atrice Ellis, founder and

CEO of the Etiquette

Image Institute, has

already carved out her
niche in the children’s etiquette
market after having completed a
certification in children’s etiquette
at the Etiquette and Leadership
Institute and the American School
of Protocol.

She facilitates workshops and
seminars throughout the country
and abroad, and now she is expand-
ing her field of expertise by teaching
social and communication skills to
business employees.

Ms Ellis was recently approached
by local corporate entities to con-
duct workshops to sharpen their
employees’ social skills.

With more than ten years of expe-
rience in the field, Ms Ellis complet-
ed a certification course as a corpo-
rate etiquette consultant at the
American School of Protocol in
Atlanta, Georgia. She, along with
her peers including diplomats from
Europe, Africa and India, partici-
pated in courses including self-pre-
sentation; correspondence; effective
networking; professional attire for
men and women; dining skills, and
mastering business etiquette.

According to the etiquette guru,
her institute takes companies “from
being unnoticed to being unforget-
table by increasing employees’ self-
confidence and polishing their
image, while equipping them with

PATRICE ELLIS, founder and CEO of the Etiquette Image Institute

the tools and skills that will enhance
their professional presence, and
position their company for ultimate
success.”

“The life skills that we teach at
the Etiquette and Image Institute
can be applied no matter where our
participants may go,” she said.

Before fully delving into the busi-
ness world, Ms Ellis recently con-
ducted the ‘Manners Matter’ pro-
gramme.

“The life skills that we
teach at the Etiquette and
Image Institute can be
applied no matter where
our participants may go.”

— Patrice Ellis

Some 30 students participated
and graduated from the first ever
‘Manners Matter’ training course.

The programme caters to children
and young people aged four
through 18 and helps them build
self-awareness and enhances self-
respect and self-confidence. The
three-semester long programme
consists of several fun-filled sessions
including first impressions; types of
handshakes; telephone manners;
poise, dining etiquette, and eti-
quette for public places.

Ms Ellis spent her early years
working with women’s groups
throughout the country and interna-
tionally under the banner ‘Women
of Excellence and Elegance’.

Over the years, her name has
become synonymous with the term
‘etiquette’.

Founded earlier this year, the Eti-
quette Image Institute specialises in
helping companies to polish their
corporate image and gain a compet-
itive edge over the competition.

Ms Ellis said she is looking for-
ward to helping business employees
improve their corporate image and
communication skills.



Coach Approach: Whose goals are you working towards?

“Most people are working in
places they don’t like in order to
buy stuff they don’t need.”

— Thomas Herold

AMERICAN existential psy-
chologist Rollo May said, “the
opposite of courage in our society
is not cowardice, it is conformity;
everybody trying to be like every-
body else.”

Living to please people along
with being saddled with worries
about what people will think caus-
es many to become prisoners of
the status quo; driven by outer
directed ideals that keep them
working towards other people’s
goals.

The path that you choose in life
will either take you towards your
own dreams and desires or towards
someone else’s, leading you to a
life of personal dissatisfaction.
Unless you set clear intentions
about what you want and where
you desire to go you will succeed at
achieving very little.

Think of a ship leaving port; in
order for it to have a successful
voyage it must set a destination
and outline an appropriate naviga-
tion course. Here in the Bahamas,
where we boast about it being bet-

ter, how many of us really set goals
or pursue our dreams?

How many of us are working
towards our own ideals?

What Do You Really Want?

If you don’t know where you are
going, you are certain not to get
there. Life is not a state of perma-
nency and change is constant;
learning to embrace the winds of
change is an empowering skill.

Nothing could be more unfulfill-
ing than the burden of living some-
one else’s life - a sad life sentence
that so many have declared for
themselves.

The question is what is it that
you really want from life? Don’t
create your life based on what oth-
ers want or think you should be, do
or have; successful living is not
about following fashion, it’s about
authenticity.

Asking yourself some

tough questions:

Why do you go to work?

What if you had all the money
you need?

What are your dreams/goals?

Where would you like to be in
five years?

Fifty years from now, will any-
one know that you were here?



What does success really mean
to you?

What are your strengths?

What are you getting better at?

These questions are a great start-
ing point. But you owe it to your-
self to set out on a journey of self-
discovery, nothing is discovered
until it is explored. Notice that all

of the precious gems are buried
within the mountains.

The point here is whether or not
you know whose goals you are
working towards - you are working
towards some kind of objective
and there are only two options,
you either get what you want or
what you don’t want.

Unless you know what you are
working toward, you live adrift
with no sense of direction or pur-
pose, becoming a rickety vessel
tossed around by the gales of life.

Yet you have intrinsic power to
rise above the chaos and pursue
your own goals; within you is a
gigantic spirit of greatness waiting
only for you to plug in.

Too many of us are content
members of the choir of complain-
ers, holding steadfast to the role as
victims of circumstances. Instead
we need only define our goals and
create a personal action plan,
knowing that all is possible.

Final Thoughts

Your life is waiting for you to
pursue your own dreams. Com-
plaining about what you don’t have
keeps you in a state of powerless-
ness. Instead strengthen your
strengths and build yourself from

the inside out.

Regardless of your situation, you
have direct authority to release
yourself from the popular carbon
copy living.

Whether it is job loss, sickness,
financial bondage or whatever; you
can change your life by learning to
live by your own ideals.

Why not make today the day
that you shake off the shackles of
what people will think (they are
thinking it anyway) and stand up
for your own goals and pursue
your own personal growth. Now is
the time to make something better
happen.

For more information about per-
sonal growth programmes contact
the Coaching Studio at 326-3332 or
429-6770; or send an e-mail to
coach4ward@yahoo.com.

Michelle M Miller is a certified
life coach and stress management
consultant. She is the principal
coach of the Coaching Studio,
which is located in the Jovan
Plaza, Madeira Street.

Questions or comments can be
sent to PO Box CB-13060; e-mail
to coach4ward@yahoo.com or
telephone 429-6770.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11B



GARDENING ee
Cukes and Zukes and company

FOR today’s purposes we
can divide the cucurbits into
four categories: Cucumbers,
summer squash, winter
squash, and pumpkins.

We will deal with melons
and watermelons at a later
date.

All cucumbers, squash and
pumpkins need a rich soil and
good drainage. This is
achieved by growing them in
‘hills’ that are small areas of
well composted and well fer-
tilised soil that need not be
raised, but often are.

A hill is usually about 18
inches in diameter and can
accommodate three or four
seeds. When the seedlings
appear the weakest is
removed.

Cucumber

The most common type of
cucumber grown in the
Bahamas is the Ridge, or
American, which is six inches
to a foot long, bears short
spines on its surface, is very
seedy and has a strong taste.

The English cucumber is
much longer and has to be
grown on trellises to maintain
a straight shape. It is often
grown in glasshouses and, not
being fertilised by insects, is
seedless.

English cucumber is far
milder than Ridge.

There are also oriental vari-
eties of cucumber that I have
not had the opportunity to try
but seem to resemble the
English cucumber rather than
the Ridge. Armenian cucum-
ber is a squash, not a true
cucumber.

When the cucumber vines
reach maturity they put out
both male and female flow-
ers, the female flowers being
identified as growing from
miniature fruits. These fruits
swell when the female flowers

THE WEATHER REPORT ii



ZUCCHINIS (shown) may start
out slow but are normally very
productive.

are pollinated by insects, usu-
ally bees. A Ridge cucumber
is ripe when the spines can be
rubbed off with the fingertips.

Summer Squash

Summer squash includes
straightneck, crookneck, zuc-
chini, scallopini and Patty
Pan. The plants do not vine
but produce their fruits from
the base of upright broadleaf
stems. All varieties of sum-
mer squash should be picked
just short of maturity before
the seeds grow too large.

Crookneck and straight-
neck squash are very produc-
tive and usually give high
yields. Zucchini can be yel-
low, green, and so dark a
green as to be almost black.
Zucchini has a uniform shape
and is easier to slice and cook
than other summer squash
varieties.

Winter Squash

Winter squash are slower
growing and are vinous. Their
name refers to the keeping
qualities of the fruits and the
fact they can be stored for a
long time.

The most successful variety
for use in the Bahamas is But-
ternut, though I have also had
success with spaghetti squash.
Acorn squash has never pro-
duced well for me.

+>

HARDY

Pumpkin

Calabaza pumpkin pro-
duces enormous vines that set
down roots along their length
and can eventually wander
away from their original
growing position. They need a
large area in which to grow
but are otherwise quite trou-
ble free.

Ihave made the growing of
cucurbits seem rather simple
but there are drawbacks I

should mention. Sometimes
both male and female flow-
ers form but pollination does
not occur. If you notice any
female flowers being neglect-
ed then you can pollinate the
next set yourself by picking a
male flower and stripping it
of its petals, inserting it into
the receptacle of the female
flower and tying the female
petals around to secure. You
could also use a small paint-
brush or ear swab to transfer
pollen from a male flower to
the female flower, but the old

fashioned way seems more
romantic.

Cucumbers, squash and
pumpkins bear lovely green
foliage when they are young
but by the time they produce
fruit tend to be rather ragged
or even drastically dissipated.
Part of this is caused by our
autumn weather producing
early morning mists or
draughts that wet the leaves.
These wet leaves allow fun-
gus spores, powdery mildew
and other airborne diseases
to attach themselves.

Ireland's premium butter,
\ famous the world over.

There's nothing better than pure

Kerrygold creamery butter...from the rich,
green pastures of Ireland. Use Kerrygold
salted or unsalted butter for rich,
mouthwatering cakes, breads,
vegetables and desserts. Or try our
Garlic & Herb butter on baked
potatoes or seasoning for a juicier
| steak. Ask for them at
your favourite foodstore.

Nobody does
butter better.

When the sun rises and
warms the leaves these dis-
eases develop and begin the
process of skeletonising the
structure of the plant.

You can apply fungicide in
either powder or liquid form
but I have found that this is
no more than a delaying tac-
tic. The good news is that
most plants give a healthy
harvest before succumbing to
disease. Consecutive sowing
of new hills should keep you
in more squash and pumpkins
than you can handle.

Distributed by Bahamas Wholesale Agencies | East West Highway | Tel: 242-394-1 759°

a=



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT
(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

UV INDEX Topay

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Partly sunny, a
t-storm possible
High: 83°
Low: 77°

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Partly sunny and
breezy with a shower
around

Low MODERATE | HIGH

ES | RL. ht

Mostly cloudy and
breezy; a shower

5-Day Forecast
ORLANDO
High: 79° F/26°C.

Low: 67° F/19°C
Low: 72°
PCE melee AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Pe CC mr Liat)

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TAMPA fey a AccuWeather RealFeel Pee ruc marcel
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Low: 65° F/18°C The exclusive Accu Weather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure,

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

Mostly cloudy, a
greater the need for eye and skin protection

shower; breezy
High: 83°
Low: 75°

Clouds and sun, a
shower possible

High: 84°
Low: 76°

A couple of afternoon
thunderstorms

High: 86°
Low: 77° TIDES For Nassau
High Ht.(it.)

8:48 a.m.
9:05 p.m.

Wednesday 9:32 a.m.
9:50 p.m.

Thursday 10:17 a.m.
10:36 p.m.

11:04 a.m.
11:26 p.m.

11:54 a.m.

Low Ht.(ft.)



Today

Gal
oa

and elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

Uh

Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature
High .
Low ...
Norma
Normal low





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12-25 knots

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High: 83° F/28°C

Low: 75° F/24°C
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High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 68° F/20°C



. 81° F/27° C
. 73° F/23° C
. 84° F/29° C
. 73° F/23° C
Last year's high . . 91° F/33° C
Last year's low 70° F/21° C
Precipitation

As of 2 p.m. yesterday

4 Year to date

i» Normal year to date

Friday



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High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 67° F/19°C Pd

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Saturday



Sunday 12:21 a.m.

12:48 p.m.

1:20 a.m.
1:44 p.m.

FT. LAUDERDALE
High:83°F/28°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

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Monday

AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009

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Sunrise... ... 7:11 a.m.
Sunset....... 6:38 p.m.

First Full Last

CATISLAND q: C* = »>

ELEUTHERA
High: 85° F/29° C

_ Low: 74° F/23°C 9:30 a.m.

8:17 p.m.

Moonrise. ....
Moonset.....

NASSAU
High: 83° F/28°C
Low: 72° F/22°C '

2 a

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High: 82° F/28°C
Low:76°F/24°C

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High: 82° F/28°C =
Low: 73° F/23°C ' ‘
Oct. 25 Nov. 2 Nov. 9
SAN SALVADOR
High: 82° F/28°C
Low: 75° F/24°C

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MAYAGUANA
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 75° F/24°C

Nov. 16

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High: 86° F/30° C . ' -_—_—
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LONG ISLAND

High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 77° F/25°C

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highs and tonights's lows.

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CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS

High: 84° F/29° C
RAGGEDISLAND ‘ow:78°F/26°C
High: 81° F/27°C

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NE at 15-25 Kno
Wednesday: ENE at 12-25 Kn
CAT ISLAND oday: NE at 12-25 Kno’
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
CROOKED ISLAND Today: E at 8-16 Knots
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
ELEUTHERA oday: NE at 15-25 Kno’
Barbados Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Kn
Highs: 86°F/30° FREEPORT oday: ENE at 12-25 Kn
Wednesday: ENE at 15-25 Kn

GREAT EXUMA oday: NE at 15-25 Kno
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
GREAT INAGUA oday: E at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Kno
LONG ISLAND lay: ENE at 8-16 Kno
Wednesday: ESE at 8-16 Kno
MAYAGUANA lay: E at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots
NASSAU lay: NE at 12-25 Knots
Wednesday: ENE at 12-25 Knots
SAN SALVADOR ay: NE at 7-14 Knots
Wednesday: SE at 6-12 Knots
RAGGED ISLAND lay: NE at 15-25 Knots

Wednesday: E at 8-16 Knots

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
6-10 Feet 10 Miles 83° F
8-12 Feet 10 Miles 83°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 10 Miles 85°
Fee 4 Miles 85°
Fee’ 5 Miles 85°
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Fee’ 7 Miles 85°
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Fee 4 Miles 85°
Fee’ 4 Miles 85°
Fee 6 Miles 85°
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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM

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THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009

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By JEFFARAH GIBSON

air! Black, blonde, red, curly, straight,

natural, relaxed, long or short - no |

matter the colour, the length or the

texture, most Bahamian women will

probably say ‘forget clothes, my hair
is more important’.

Of course hair is not only a big deal for Bahamian
women, but for women all over the globe.

Throughout the countries of the world there are
| constant debates and discussions about the appear- |
ance of women’s hair.

Fashion and women’s magazines are full with nev-
er-ending styling tips and ever-changing ‘dos and |
don’ts’ when it comes to hair.

But in recent times it has been the issue of natural
hair versus relaxed hair or weaves and wigs that has
gotten a lot of media attention, especially in the
United States.

A few weeks ago, world renowned super model
and television personality Tyra Banks decided to
end all speculation and rumours surrounding the
state of her natural hair and came out on national
television without her usual weave or wig.
|} Popular comedian Chris Rock also sparked more
| debate about the issue with his new documentary
“Good Hair”, in which he takes a look at the black
hair industry in the US.

With all the noise in the market, Tribune Woman
wanted to know what local stylists had to say about

the topic.
| Stylist Yashicka Carey of the All Natural and Ther-
| mal Salon said that a new trend is also emerging in |
the Bahamas where women are either wearing their
hair natural or wearing weaves in natural hairstyles.

“About 60 per cent of the women that come into
our salons are wearing their hair natural and about 40
per cent are wearing natural hairstyles with weaves,”
she said.

Wearing hair natural, she said, has several advan-
tages.

“When you wear your hair relaxed you are limited |
to straight looks, but if you wear your hair natural, |
depending on the texture, you can wear your hair in
straight styles and in afro styles,” Ms Carey said.

Despite what some people might believe about
natural hair always being healthier than relaxed hair,
she said that this is a misconception.

“Regardless of the texture of hair, whether it’s
natural or straight, if it is not maintained and taken
good care of then it is no better than relaxed hair.
That is also the same for relaxed hair, if it’s not main-
tained it will become damaged,” she said.

“T have seen many women whose hair is natural
and damaged very badly come into the salons for
treatment,” the stylist said.

Weave is the ‘in’ thing for most Bahamian women.
The majority probably wear the so-called lace-front
caps or sewn in wraps.

While there is nothing wrong with wearing hair
weaves, doing it excessively can damage the hair
greatly.

“There are a lot of women who wear extensions
and weaves. It is, however, not good to always put
| weaves in the hair because it thins the hair and stunts
| the growth,” she said.

Ms Carey said that many women who come to her
salon and have hair that is badly damaged from wear-
ing weaves are not willing to go through the long
process of hair repair.

“Repairing the hair after it is damaged is a very
long process and it is very costly, too. It requires a lot
of dedication and people are not willing to stick it out
so that their hair can be fully repaired,” she said.

And even though women are aware of the damages |
of wearing weaves excessively, they continue to do it. |

Because so many women in the country wear
weaves instead of their natural hair, it raises the |
question if Bahamian women are insecure about | —
their own hair. |

Ms Carey said in her opinion there are a number of
reasons why Bahamian women prefer wearing weaves
as opposed to wearing their own hair.

“One of the reasons could be that Bahamian
women are not aware of the damage it can do to the |
hair. Then again it could be a possibility that they are |
not confident and secure with their own, and it could
also be because weaves allow variety,” she said.

Overall, Bahamian women are probably not ready |
to make that leap to all-natural, all the time just |
yet, but attitudes and hairstyles are changing.

+ F 4
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OF COURSE, hair is not only a big deal for Bahamian women, but for women all over the globe. Beyonce Knowles can be seen at the Billboard Women In Music brunch in New York. (AP Photo)







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Aloe Relief =

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N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.273TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY WITH SHOWER HIGH 83F LOW 72F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S Natural hair vs the Weave SEEPAGETEN Crushers demolish the Giants B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS Union of Teachers president Belinda Wilson is to be suspendedw ithout pay following allegations of the misappropri ation of $90,000 in union funds. M s Wilson flatly denied the allegations in a press conference yesterday, claiming only $65,000 of union money was not accounted for as she had to pay a number of bills before leaving for a Caribbean Union of Teachers conference in Grenada in July. In the absence of treasurer Janice Armbrister, who was away on a six-week vacation at the time, Ms Wilson said she had docu ments, which were presigned by the treasurer, countersigned by executive board member Sebastian Campbell and herself before taking the money to pay insurance and utility bills, and for seven council members to travel to Grenada. Ms Wilson admitted she did not follow proper pro c edure as she did not consult the executive board before making the pay ments, but said she did so b ecause she was in an emergency situation as the bills had to be paid before she left the country. A t least seven of the 15 executive board members voted on Friday for the pres-i dent to be suspended with out pay for two weeks from November 1 for the misappropriation of funds. The media was told Ms Wilson would be suspended because she misappropriated $90,000. However Ms Wilson’s supporters, including Ms Armbrister, BUT Associate Vice President Quintin Lar oda, and around 30 teachers at the press conference held at the BUT offices in Bethel Avenue yesterday, maintain the president is not guilty of misappropriation Belinda W ilson to be suspendedf or tw o weeks The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com Teachers’ union boss in $90,000 cash r ow TEEN A GER CHARGEDWITHTWOMURDERS By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net A TEENAGER was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on two murder charges. Clinton Forbes, 19, is charged with the murder of Jeffrey JohnsonRolle. Mr Rolle was gunned down in front of his brother while they were walking along Derby Road around 10pm on June 15. Initial reports stated that the brothers were approached by a group of men while walking and attempted to run away. The group CLINTONFORBES is taken from court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page six By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@ tribunemedia.net CLOSING addresses began in the attempted extortion trial of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne yesterday. Director of Public Prosecutions and lead prosecutor Bernard Turner told the nine member jury that the prosecution has discharged its burden in proving that Bridgewater and Lightbourne are guilty of the offences for which they are charged. Court hears the closing addresses in Travolta case By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net NEARLY 80 per cent of the 89 detainees being h eld at the Detention Centre were smuggled into the Bahamas, withs ome destined for manual labour in the construction field, while others were sett o be forced into prostitution, Immigration officials revealed yesterday. Senior deputy director Roderick Bowe informed the press yesterday that the majority of persons who enter the Bahamas SEE page 13 Almost 80% of Detention Centr e detainees were smuggled into Bahamas SEE page 13 By AVA TURNQUEST THE global art community is greatly saddened by the loss of a legendary prolific ‘outsider’ artist, an internationally-celebrated Bahamian who “was so close and yet so far” to his own people. Amos Ferguson contributed more than four decades to visu al art and the documentation of Bahamian culture, and can best be described as a “prophet not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house (Matthew 13:57 reference fitting to a man who was greatly respected by so Legendary artist Amos Ferguson dies SEE page 13 THE Anglican Church has joined several other religous denominations in throwing its full support behind the Gov ernment’s efforts to make it illegal for a man to rape his wife. Delivering his Charge to the 109th session of the Anglican diocesan Synod, Archbishop Laish Boyd expressed his support for the Ingraham admin istration’s proposed amendment to the Sexual Offences Act banning marital rape – but cautioned that we must work toward “the appropriate amendment that addresses the right concerns”. He also came out against the decision to resume capital punishment (see story, page 2). Archbishop Boyd said the constitution, laws and government of any jurisdiction “must see after the well-being of all who dwell in or find themselves in that jurisdiction. Laws must protect all and address the needs and security of those who are vulnerable”. He said the current Sexual Offences Act suggests that spouses cannot be raped – a point of view espoused by Anglican Church backs govt’s marital rape law SEE page two SEE page six BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E

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ANGLICANArchbishop Laish Boyd said one of the most “alarming and perplexing” issues facing the Bahamas today is the government’s proposal to resume hanging convicted murderers. Expressing his disagreement with this proposal, the archbishop admitted there has been a substantial increase in violent crime and that people are calling for action. Speaking at the 109th Diocesan Synod yesterday, he said: “Crime is one of our most serious social problems. The number of homicides this year shows a complete disregard for the sacredness of human life. It is easy to see how in this environment there would be a clarion call for the carrying out of the death penalty. “However, it has long been acknowledged in many circles around the world, and proven by statistical data, that capital punishment is not a deterrent to crime. And you do not quell violence with more violence.” The archbishop noted that of the 59 homicides this year up to September 18, government statistics say 66 per cent were related to drugs, retaliation, conflict or domestic violence. He said that Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest “rightly stated that the police would have little control over or intervention power in such circumstances to prevent them. There is only so much that they can do. “The disregard for human life and a perverted value system which allows a person to maim or to kill another in ad ispute, are realities that capital punishment cannot ever address, even though a hanging may satisfy the desire for retribution. “In fact, the last hanging in the Bahamas was in January,2 000, at the beginning of the year. That year had an all time record number of murders, so obviously that hanging did not d eter much.” According to the archbishop, the real issue facing society is the fragmentation of relationships and family life. He said too many children are being born to parents who areu nable to socialise and care for them properly. “What we need is for parents to be parents and to raise children to honour and respect God and humanity. We have strayed far from this in someq uarters and we need to get back to it. The real issue is creating justice and fairness and a sense of hope and worth in our society so that every one can feel – and also know – that they have a chance to make it. “These kinds of things are tougher to address, but theya re the issues. And all the hanging in the world will not address or even begin to reverse them. This is where the court system needs to work more effectively and efficiently.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM INDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News..........................P1,2,3,5,6,7,13 Editorial/Letters.......................................P4 Advts...............................................P8,9,14 Sports..........................................P10,11,12 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business...................................P1,2,3,4,5,6 Advt.........................................................P7 Comics......................................................P8 Woman........................................P9,10,11,12 CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 P AGES 2009 CONVENTION EDITION 12 P AGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Anglican Archbishop speaks out against the death penalty many opponents to the amendment, including the Bahamas Christian Council. However, according to Archbishop Boyd, marital rape does indeed occur, and the law needs to reflect and address this reality. He said: “Many persons have disagreed with the proposed amendment because they say it weakens or disrespects the bond of marriage and creates disadvantage or unfairness for one spouse. “The reality is that all marriages do not work with the harmony and equality that God ordained. Some marriages are at the point where certain elements of the sharing may not happen for various reasons, or some may be at the point where certain elements of the sharing no longer occur at all. These circumstances call f or communication, counselling or even reconciliation, or some other intervention. “The law did not cause these circumstances nor can the law heal them. They need to be addressed by another means outside of the law. To say that an amend ment to the law would create injustice or inequity in a marriage because it will give one spouse a weapon against the other is not quite the full picture: such am arriage already has problems of its own which the law did not create nor can the law solve. Those realities in that marriage need to be addressed. People who will misuse or abuse anya mendment must be dealt with. But if we are going to create an environment where real and possible vic tims can be protected, then some reasonable amendment must be made. “It is my belief that this is the intent of the govern ment. I applaud the efforts t hat have been made Let us press on in dialogue without rushing to the end result.” TWO 19-year-olds are set to be arraigned in court this week in connection with two drug and gun bustsm ade by police this weekend. One young man is set to go to court tomorrow in connection with the discovery of a .223 assault rifle and ten rounds of ammunition at around 9pm on Fri d ay. According to police, the seizure came after a search warrant was executed by officers from the southern division on a home on Wood’s Alley, off Market Street. A second 19 year old will be charged later in the week in connection with the seizure of 21 foil wrap pings of suspected marijuana, a .357 revolver and six rounds of ammunition. The Peter Street resident was arrested in the Quack oo Street area yesterday at around 1.10pm. Marital rape FROM page one ANGLICAN ARCHBISHOP Laish Boyd Teens set to appear in court in connection with drug, gun busts CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. NASA is delaying its November space shuttle launch by four days to pro vide more breathing room for a test flight of its new rocket, according to Associated Press. Atlantis was supposed to lift off Nov. 12. Now launch is targeted for Nov. 16. NASA said Monday the delay will make it easier to get the experimental Ares rocket fly ing next week. The Ares I-X is supposed to blast off Oct. 27 on a brief suborbital flight. NASA will move the rocket to the pad Tuesday morning. The Ares test vehicle will carry neither people nor payloads when it takes off. Much of the rocket consists of mock-up hardware. NASA wants to see how well the partial first stage performs. The same Kennedy Space Center team is supporting both the Ares and Atlantis launches. NASA delays shuttle launch for test flight

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By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 23-yearold Eight Mile Rock man whose vehicle crashed into a service station on Friday has been airlifted to New Providence for further medical treatment. The accident occurred around 9.30pm at Chappy’s Gas Station in Bartlette Hill, Eight Mile Rock, when the driver of a Toyota Aristo car lost control and crashed into the gas pumps and a parked vehicle. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said that prior to the crash offi cers of the Eight Mile Rock Police Station were conducting road checks in the Hanna Hill area when they observed a vehi cle being driven in a reckless manner. She said officers pursued a white and gray Aristo vehicle, which later crashed. The victim, who has not been identified by police, was taken to the Rand Memorial Hospital for treatment. Police reported that the male victim was airlifted over the weekend to the Princess Margaret Hospital. Investigations are continuing into that matter. SUSPECT ARRESTED Grand Bahama Police arrested a 24-year-old man in Freeport for possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. ASP Mackey reported that police were called around 1.30am on Saturday to assist security at the Bowling Alley on Britannia Lane. According to reports, a young man who was attempting to enter the establishment was searched. Officers discovered a black Glock 9mm pistol with seven rounds of 9mm ammunition in his trousers. The suspect was arrested and taken into police custody. Officers of the Central Detective Unit are investigating the matter. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net MINISTER of State for Immigration Branville McCart-n ey yesterday denied the allegation that he is personally withholding information from the p ress regarding conditions at the Carmichael Road Detention Centre. N oting that the ministry has conducted a number of visits to the facility and has even commissioned a committee to investigate the numerous reports of abuse and unsanitary conditions, Mr McCartney said the media will be given the department’s final report as soon as it is completed and presented to Cabinet. “The committee’s terms of reference were to investigate and determine the validity of these accusations. The committee members include, Dr David Allen, Father James Palacious, Jack Thompson, representatives from the Department of Social Services and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. “The first tour was conducted March 3, 2009. Following the second tour on April 7, 2009, committee members expressed how pleased they were during their initial visit with the improvements made to the facility. Shortly after, I would have spoken to the improvements made during my budget debate in June. “A third and final visit is planned at the end of this month before a final report is submitted to Cabinet for review,” Mr McCartney said. The minister added that although he is not at liberty to disclose any particulars about the unfinished report, he has had an opportunity to review the document and is satisfied that the Detention Centre is a picture of “extremely humane” conditions that will “satisfy the highest of standards”. “These conditions resulted from allegations that I had heard prior to this government’s election, conditions that were indeed alarming. When reports of those conditions resurfaced, we wasted no time in investigating, making certain improvements where warranted and in commissioning an independent study as aforementioned. “Today’s Detention Centre is not yesterday’s Detention Centre. Today’s Detention Centre is a holding facility where international persons without status, who have entered the country illegally, benefit from excellent meals, cable TV, plenty of recreation, hot water, clean beds, laundry facilities, access to medical treatment on site anda vailable telephones,” he said. Mr McCartney said he anticipates that the report could ber eleased before the end of the year after being presented to Cabinet; noting that it will show t he Bahamas has accepted its “overwhelming immigration burden” and is treating thesep ersons with as much grace, “diplomacy, and humanity” as anywhere else in the world. Immigration chief denies withholding information on the Detention Centre Man airlifted to Ne w Providence after crash SIR GEORGE NEW M AN, newly appointed Justice of the Court of Appeal, presented his credentials to Governor General Arthur Hanna at Government House yesterday. Sir George was appointed as a Judge of the High Court of England and Wales in May 1995 and retired from that Court on October 1, 2007 after serving more than 12 years. Prior to becoming a judge of the High Court, Sir George practiced as a bar rister. He was called to the bar in 1965 and was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1981. Sir George’s practice as a barrister included many appearances before the Privy Council in a wide variety of cases. Sir George was one of the judges nominated to sit in the Administrative Court and in the Special Immigra t ion Appeals Commission (SIAC He is presently the treas urer of the Honorable Soci ety of the Middle Temple. In February 2009, UKP rime Minister Gordon Brown appointed him chair of the Security Vetting Appeals Panel of the United Kingdom. Newly appointed Justice of the Court of Appeal A 34-YEAR-OLD man charged with the murder of a former Tribune employee and the attempted murder of his brother was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Police have charged Shawn Edgar Moxey alias Shawn Isaacs with the murder of Matthew Ambrister and the attempted murder of his brother Marvin Ambrister. M atthew 23, and Marvin, 24, of Farrington Road, were shot in the stomach when an altercation erupted between two groups of men outside Dominique's Restaurant and Bar on Boyd Road, on Saturday, June 13. Matthew who worked in the Tribune press room, died at the scene. M oxey, who was represented by attorney Krysta Smith, was not required to enter a plea to the charges during his arraignment before Chief Magistrate RogerGomez in Court One, Bank Lane. Twenty witnesses are listed on court dockets. Moxey, of Church Hill Avenue, was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. His case has been adjourned to November 30 in Court 10,N assau Street. MAN CHARGED WITH MURDER 34-YEAR-OLD Shawn Moxey at court. SIR GEORGE NEWMAN

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I write this letter to bring awareness to the Bahamas and good Bahamian people. Robbing, raping, murdering, etc the crime list goes on each day. It makes one sad to see these criminals continue to have a field trip, or merrygo-round. There is a Bahamian slang that goes on to say “ain’t nothing happening”. So if that’s the case for these bold criminals to enjoy, you see just how things are going for us, there is no fear, especially for murderers in the land. They are well aware that there is nothing happening to them, only a jail term. So the bold killers devel oped a mind that does not care. Apart from that these killers are given bail eventually. Giving them the opportunity to go and kill again. Because sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do evil (Eccle siastics 8:11) what a sad pic ture as far as the law of the land is concerned. Our police force are doing a very good job every day. But sad to say locking them up, is not all to be done. What has happened to the promise that was given to the Bahamian people? In reference to the electronic ankle bands that was spoken by the Minister Tommy Turnquest? It’s almost five years and I have not seen anything yet. If the Bahamian people place anyone to serve in par liament you have to please your people by truly serv ing. Keeping promises is a very important thing. By giving these criminals, some thing to think about. Please get these devices, and use these to fast track them all on bail. This is one of the things to be done, before it’s too late. I’m sure a word to the wise is enough we do not know, who is to be mur dered next. D O H Nassau, September, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I stumbled upon the tale of six unsung tourism pioneers which has remainedu nder the radar for some forty years. The recognition of Sen H on Vincent VanderpoolWallace by the Queen for h is exceptional works in the H ospitality Industry has caused me to focus on the untold story. The Ministry of Tourism h as failed to Inspire the n ation with the challenges a nd achievements of six y oung Bahamians, who in 1 970, were selected by the Ministry of Tourism to be s hipped abroad to be trained a nd developed to replace the existing foreign tourism professionals. Sir Clement T Maynard was convinced that this untapped areac ould become the proving g round for Bahamians. I began looking into this m atter after reading Sir Clement T Maynard’s book, “Picking up Speed.” I noted that Sir Clement p ut Bahamahost, People to People, professional train i ng and education policies, t he utilisation of denominat ion leaders to promote the Bahamas, cultural development and standards of per formance in the workplace; regrettably, the full story of the Bahamianisation of the t ourism overseas network h as not been told or celebrated. We are proud of Sir Stafford Sands, George Myers, Sir Baltron Bethell, Sen Hon Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, but what of these six. Philip Mortimer, D avid Johnson, Joseph D elaney, Athama Bowe, Van Isaacs and the late Arlene Wisdom-Albury, gave their best and are excellent examples of what Bahamians have and can become. T he group had pressure f rom every quarter; they were made to understand that failure was not an option. A s Jackie Robinson had, they were instructed to suck it up, remain focused amidst the internal challenges toI nclude professional and racial bias. Sir Baltron speaks well of the group and views them as tourism trailblazers and exceptional professionals, “We could not Intervene,w e had to have faith in them if they had not succeeded, we could not have placed Bahamians overseas. “They went off almost in the dead of winter.” “This group was put in p lace by PS Elison A Thompson and Director General of Tourism, Som N ath Chib; E John Deleveaux was responsible for t he project.” T his story confirm that young men and women out side of politics were shaping the Bahamas; what a posit ive story. H ow can a grateful nation w ho recognises athletes, cult uralists, academics, politic ians, the clergy, neglect these early nation builders; t hey were diligent, unselfish, s killed, qualified, well educated and passionate for their Bahamas. We must correct this oversight. The Bahamas Hotel Asso c iation, the Bahamas Chamb er of Commerce, the B ahamas Christian Council a nd the Ministry of Youth, should be inspired by this opportunity to celebrate this group. T he Ministry of Tourism and the Hon Minister s hould initiate the recognit ion effort. WENDELL F ALBURY Nassau, October, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Only nine months ago, the Pentagon pronounced itself reassured by the early steps of a new commander in chief. President Barack Obama was moving slowly on U.S. withdrawal from Iraq, had retained former President George W. Bush’s defense secretary and, in a gesture much noticed, had executed his first military salute with crisp precision. But now, after nearly a month of deliberations by Obama over whether to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, frustra tions and anxiety are on the rise within the military. A number of active duty and retired senior officers say there is concern that the president is moving too slowly, is revisiting a war strategy he announced in March and is unduly influenced by political advisers in the Situation Room. “The thunderstorm is there and it’s kind of brewing and it’s unstable and the lightning hasn’t struck, and hopefully it won’t,” said Nathaniel C. Fick, a former Marine Corps officer who briefed Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign and is chief executive of the Center for a New Amer ican Security, a military research institution in Washington. “I think it can probably be contained and avoided, but people are aware of the volatile brew.” Last week, the national commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Thomas J. Tradewell Sr., issued a terse statement criticizing Obama’s review of Afghan war strategy. “The extremists are sensing weakness and indecision within the U.S. govern ment, which plays into their hands,” said Tradewell’s statement on behalf of his group, which represents 1.5 million former service members. In August, in a speech to the VFW, Obama defended his strategy, saying, “This is not only a war worth fighting; this is fundamental to the defense of our peo ple.” Obama’s civilian advisers on national security say the president is appropriately reviewing his policy options from all sides. They said it would be reckless to rush a decision on whether to send as many as 40,000 more American men and women to war, particularly when the unresolved Afghan election had left the United States without a clear partner in Kabul. Although the tensions do not break entirely on classic civilian-military lines some senior military officers have doubts about sending more troops to Afghanistan and some of Obama’s top civilian advisers do not the strains reflect the military’s awareness in recent months that life has changed under the new White House. After years of rising military budgets under the Bush administration, the new administration has tried to rein in Pentagon spending, and has signaled other changes as well, including reopening debate on the “don’t ask, don’t tell” poli cy governing military service by gay men and lesbians. The administration has made clear that Obama will not necessarily fol low the advice of his generals in the same way Bush did, notably in the former president’s deference to Gen. David H. Petraeus, now the head of the Central Command, and that it does not want military leaders publicly pressing the commander in chief as they give their advice. Two weeks ago, after Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the top NATO commander in Afghanistan, rejected calls for the Afghan war to be scaled back during a questionand-answer session in a speech in Lon don, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates warned not only McChrystal, but also the military as a whole, to keep quiet in pub lic as the debate progressed. “It is imperative that all of us taking part in these deliberations civilian and military alike provide our best advice to the president candidly but privately,” Gates told the annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army, a private support group, in Washington. This article is by Elisabeth Bumiller c.2009 New York Times News Service Six tourism pioneers who deserve our recognition LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Military brass grow restive 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 63(&,$/(7851(1*$*(0(17 127,&( 127,&( NOTICE is hereby given that SHIRLEYSIFFORD of Toote Shop Corner, Off East Street, P.O. BOX N-10326 NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 20thdayof October, 2009to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.NOTICE Sad to see criminals having ‘a field trip’ in the Bahamas Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y .

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TRIBUTES have been pouring in for the late Roger Carron, The Tribune’s Managing Director and husband of Tribune Publisher Eileen Carron, who passed way Sunday morning. Mr Carron, 77, was born in Eastbourne, Sussex, England on June 13, 1932. He met his future wife while studying for his bar finals in London in 1960 and overcame a number of hurdles to join her when she returned to the Bahamas to help her father Sir Etienne Dupuch with The Tribune. Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said he and his colleagues were saddened to learn of his death. “Mr Carron lived a full and productive life and made a significant contribution to Bahamian national life since his arrival here almost 50 years ago. Despite the difficulties he encountered, Mr Carron grew to love his adopted home and retained his good humour throughout. He was fond of chatting with Bahamians from all walks of life and made manyf riends among them. “In his many years at The Tribune Mr Carron garnered t he respect and admiration of many, including the young jour nalists with whom he came intoc ontact and he contributed significantly to their developmentas a wise mentor and profess ional journalist. “Roger Carron contributed much to The Tribune, an important Bahamian institu tion, and to the country in general. My colleagues and I extend our sincere condolencesto Mrs Carron and their son Robert on his passing.” Glenys Hanna-Martin, national chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party, also extended her condolences to The Tribune’s publisher. “Mr Carron was always an amiable gentleman who always appeared to fully enjoy his walk through life. He was over the years a vital component in the publication of The Tribune and we therefore know his extend ed family will include the staff of that newspaper. “It is our prayer that God will give strength to both Mrs Carron and their son Robert during this difficult time of loss.” Former Tribune Managing Editor John Marquis described Mr Carron as a “true English gent with a very human touch”. He added: “My wife Joan and I were deeply shocked to hear of Roger's passing. We always regarded him as the very nicest kind of English gentle man, a person with a real con cern for his fellow humans who never lost his twinkling sense of humour and engaging smile. “During my 10 years as The Tribune's managing editor, he and Mrs Carron were extremely supportive. It was their independent and robust approach to journalism that lured me back to the Bahamas in the late 1990s, and it was their commit-m ent to freedom of the press that kept me there for so long. “The Bahamas owes Roger a g reat debt because the wonderful relationship he shared with Mrs Carron was undoubtedly a major factor in keeping The Tribune on track during the very difficult times they had to face during the 1970s and 1980s.” Dr Keva Bethel, president Emeritus of the College of the Bahamas, said: “He was such a fine, upright, congenial man, one whose friendship I treasured. He will be a sore loss not only to The Tribune and the Bahamian media in general, but to our whole community. I extend best wishes and special condolences to all The Tribune family whose pain must be particularly acute at this sad time.” Minister of State for Social Services Loretta Butler-Turner said: “On behalf of my family and I, and the residents of the Montagu Constituency, I wish to extend our heart-felt sympathy to the family of Rodger Carron. At this most difficult time we prayerfully remember and support his devoted wife and partner, Mrs Eileen Carron and beloved son Robert Carron. We also remember his extended family members and professional family at The Trib une g roup of companies. May God's Blessings lovingly sus tain and uplift you at this time.M ay his soul and the souls of the faithfully departed rest in peace.” J ack Thompson, Director of Immigration, said: “I would like to extend sincerest sympathy to Mrs Carron and to the fami ly at The Tribune on the passing of Mr Carron. Please be assured of our prayers.” Branville McCartney, Minis ter of State for Immigration, said: “I would like to wish sincere condolences to Mrs Carron and her family on the passing of Mr Roger Carron. Our prayers are with her and the family.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Tributes paid to the late Roger Carron Hubert Ingraham Dr Keva Bethel Glenys Hanna-Martin ROGER CARRON

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MEMBERS of the public have been effusive in their praise of The Tribune and the f amily of Preston Ferguson following the announcement that the police investigation into his death has been reopened. Mr Ferguson’s body was found in his work vehicle on al onely stretch of road on Great Exuma about two months ago. The police initially deemed the death an accident, however the familya nd T he Tribune h ave campaigned strongly for the matter to be revisited, as the evidence could point to foul play. Following the announcement last week that a team of homicide investigators hadb een dispatched to the island, readers of tribune242.com hailed the persistence of Preston’s relatives and the efforts of this newspaper. D Collie said: “Has there EVER been this level of investigative journalism in this country? I am proud of what has been done in this matter and hope that the elected officials take note. This familyw as just one of many and they stuck to their guns and didn’t just roll over to the usual empty double talk of ministers and police spokespersons.. . Good Job T ribune reporters and Ferguson Family. Next up, the family of Brenton Smith need closure!” Gail H said: “This is living proof that the fourth estate still holds some kind of weighti n the country. Thank you T ribune and continue to use your powers for good.” Gretchen added: “Congrats to the investigative reporters at The Tribune; I know the family must be veryr elieved to have their quest for justice documented in the print media. A job well done. Thank God for the Tribune staff. “Jetta” said: “ The Tribune staff needs to be commende d for bringing this and other important issues to the forefront so that people can get justice in this country.” “Bush Lawyer added: “Yes, I too would like to thank T he Tribune for good coverage of local events. So many articles are reported once, are inconclusive, and you never hear about it again. We need to stop hiding behind this smallt own syndrome, and getting in bed with wrongdoers.” According to “Joe Blow”, “It's about time. At least now Preston's family knows they have real police on the case, so they should be able to feel comfortable with whatevert he outcome. “Good for them for forcing the issue and good for The Tribune for taking up the stor y and not letting go.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM but carrying out the wrong process. And Mr Laroda said the punishment does not fit the crime. He told the press: “The allegations are misleading and disingenuous because every executive officer knows the suspension wasn’t because of misappropriation of funds. “Ms Wilson was travelling the next day, the bills had to be paid and she wanted to pay them before she left. “Also the trip to Grenada had to be funded and she needed cash to pay for the rooms and other expenses. “There are times when you have to make decisions on your feet. I give her the benefit of the doubt.” The union treasurer explained how two $30,000 payments which should have been transferred from the consolidated account to the pension fund were not, and payments were made without consultation with the board. She said $43,284 was used to make up for a shortfall in insurance payments and has evidence in a letter from Ms Wilson to the credit union. A $10,000 cheque was made payable to secretary general Stephen McPhee to cover expenses on the trip to Grenada on July 23, and another $1,500 cheque was written to Fr Campbell to cover the cost of office oper ations in Ms Wilson’s absence. Ms Armbrister said a further $2,395 was paid to the Bahamas Telecommunications Corporation (BTC $3,632 to the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC Another $1,000 was tak en out by Ms Wilson to put on the Impress account for petty cash, adding to a total of $64,232. Ms Wilson said: “I wish to state unequivically there is no truth in the misappropriation of funds on my part. “Our Union’s Constitu tion has a mechanism that allows us to resolve matters internally. “It is sad that persons found it necessary to bring this matter to the media. I do not intend to resolve the matter via the media but I do intend to exhaust all avenues available to me to defend my good name and restore the confidence in this great union.” Government High School teacher Pearl Baker said it was a bad time to lose the president of the 4,000 mem ber union as hundreds could be facing pay cuts next week after taking industrial action over inadequate teaching conditions in government schools. She said: “I am very dis appointed because teachers should have been informed before the press was informed of any allegations involving the elected president. “Her suspension comes in as some of my colleagues will be cut so who will be standing up for them? This makes the union look bad with a lot of false allegations. I smell conspiracy written all over this.” reportedly gave chase and shots were heard in the area of the Tom “The Bird” Grant recreational Complex. Johnson received gunshot wounds about the body and was pron ounced dead at the scene. Forbes of Graham Drive, Yellow Elder Gardens, was represented by attorney Tai Pinder during his arraignment before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane, yesterd ay. He was not required to enter a plea tand the case was adjourned to N ovember 2 in Court 5, Bank Lane. Forbes along with Ricardo L Knowles, 21, of Butler S treet, Nassau Village, is charged with the August 14 murder of Shawn K areem Stubbs. Stubbs, 23 w as found dead through Sea Breeze Lane around 3am on August 14 with ag unshot wound to the head. Forbes and Knowles were not required to entera plea to the murder charge a nd the case was adjourned to November 2 in Court 5, Bank Lane. Knowles is also charged with armed robbery, stealing, receiving and burglary. It is alleged that Knowles betweenA ugust 2 and 3, broke into the home of Dwayne Curtis. It is alleged that he stole a $670, stainless steel Rolex watch, a $200 silver hand chain, a $1,300 flat screen television, a$ 1000 HP computer, $300 cash, a $50 Samsung digital came ra and a set of keys for a 1994 vehicle. It is also alleged that Knowles robbed Curtis of a set of keys for a Ford Fiesta, registered to the Department ofE nvironmental Health. Knowles is also accused of stealing the vehicle, as well as a 2000 Nissan Sentra and a 1994 Audi. Knowles pleaded not guilty to the charges and those cases were also adjourned to November 2, in Court Number5 Bank Lane. Attorney Pinder told the court she had been informed by her client that while in custody at the Central DetectiveU nit, he was beaten in the back and told he would be “dealt with” once remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison as murder victim Jeffrey Johnson-Rolle is the nephew of the prison’s Deputy Superintendent Charles Rolle. K nowles also told the court he needed medical attention, claiming he to had been beaten by police and had lost hearing in one of his ears. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that he receive medical treatment. Both men were remand-e d to Her Majesty’s Prison. A rowdy crowd assembled on Bank Lane yesterday, shouting at the police officers as they jostled with the accused while escorting them back to the Central Police Station. Public praise for Tribune over Preston Ferguson coverage Teenager charged F ROM page one RICARDO KNOWLES outside of court SECONDMANCHARGED T eac hers’ union boss in $90K cash row FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM THE SKIN CLINIC at theFamily Medical Centre Village Road Shopping Centre FAMILY ISLAND ADMINISTRATORSmust do a better job at collecting government revenue, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said. “Administrators are just not expected to sit in the office all day dressed in suit and tie and wait for somebody to come and see ‘the chief’,” he said. “They are to be very knowledgeable about what is happening in their communities.” During the annual conference for Family Island Administrators at the British Colonial Hilton, which ended on Friday, Mr Ingraham told administrators to investigate any suggestion that the government may not be receiving revenue due to it. Second home owners on certain islands rent out their homes but are not paying taxes from the income generated, Mr Ingraham said. “We are willing to treat their property as a private dwelling home for the purposes of real property tax, which means they will be able to benefit from the exemption of the first $250,000 of value, like everybody else,” he said. They will pay the real property tax on the remainder and they will charge their guests who are paying them, the percentum for the daily rate thatt hey are occupying the places, and remit that to the Treasury or to the Administrator’s Office on a monthly basis.” Mr Ingraham insisted that there must be ways to improve the delivery of services while increasing the intake of revenue. He noted that the government is supposed to col lect a royalty for every load of sand taken from the Bahamian seabed, “but that is not happening. It is all stipulated in the law. We can go down a list across the board, agency after agency, to discover how we are falling down in the administration of the revenue collection in the Family Islands.” The government requires “greater accountability” from administrators with respect to the expenditure of public funds, Mr Ingraham said. “Our aim and our goal has always been that we will seek to benchmark the expenditure by Local Government in districts against the revenue collected from that district and top off those districts that for their own economic circumstance are unable to produce an adequate sum of money to fund adequately a Local Government. We expect that soon we will be able to benchmark the amount of remittance to a district based upon the amount that is collected from certain taxes in the district.” Elected local authorities would then “have to be more vigilant in helping to identify and collect the $ 100 a year for every dock that is in the district, to collect from the marinas for all of the boats they have tied up, collect business licence fees and other fees,”h e said. Administrators should also publically explain why they cannot approve certain requests and should not try to evade meeting with members of the public, Mr Ingraham added. “You ought not to turn people around by telling them come back tomorrow. Determine it now. If you cannot do it, find out who can do it and get them the answer.” PM wants better revenue collection from Family Island administrators By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Five of the candidates vying for leadership posi tions within the Progressive Lib eral Party have taken their cam paigns to Grand Bahama. Dr Bernard Nottage, Kendrick Dorsett, and attorneys Paul Moss, Philip “Brave” Davis and Jerome Fitzgerald addressed PLP supporters in Freeport at an open forum at Mary Star of the Sea auditorium on Friday. West End MP Obie Wilchcombe, who is vying for deputy leader of the PLP, did not attend. T he candidates shared their ideas and vision of moving the party forward into the next gen eral elections. The crowd favourite of the evening was Dr Nottage. The auditorium erupted with applause as the candidate for leader of the PLP was introduced to the stage. Dr Nottage urged PLPs not to be afraid of change. He noted that the party has an “image problem” that prevents people from supporting it. “The party is in crisis of confi dence in Grand Bahama, and when I went to South Eleuthera the people there said they have not seen any of the party officers in a year or two, and that was the same story I heard in Andros. “We have a wonderful par tybut to datepeople don’t see the party making enough intervention on their behalf,” he said. He claims that Bahamians are b eing victimized and sent home under the FNM government. He also noted that the economy of G rand Bahama is in crisis. Dr Nottage stressed that it is important that the party is able to win the support of those young people who do not belong to any party. “The time has come for a change in our party and in our country. Our party does not belong to any one person. It belongs to all of us. You must not worry about personalities when you go to vote, you must remem ber to think about your children and what is in the best interest of the party.” Dr Nottage believes that his brief departure from the party is not an issue for PLPs. He explained that many before him had left, including party leader Perry Christie who also returned to the party. Attorney Paul Moss, who is also vying for leader of the PLP, believes that he is capable of lead ing the party. During his address, he expressed concerns about the state of Grand Bahama, and blamed the Grand Bahama Port Authority for the current economic woes in Freeport. Mr Moss was also concerned that foreigners were being favoured over Bahamians, partic ularly as it relates to the granting of crown land. “There are 2.7 million acres of crown land in the country and each of the 300,000 Bahamians should be given some crown l and,” he said. As Mr Moss was speaking, a small group of unruly Perry C hristie supporters left the auditorium chanting “Perry, Perry” on the outside. Senator Fitzgerald told sup porters that he is ready for lead ership within the party. Mr Philip “Brave” Davis, the candidate for deputy leader, said that there is a need for modernizing the party’s internal structure. He intends to formulate and standardize general election pro cedures and make the national headquarters a fully operational command centre. A small booklet entitled, ‘Be Brave Change the Bahamas,’ further outlining his vision for the party, was distributed among the audience. Mr Davis, who is endorsed by deputy leader Cynthia Pratt, said he will support the participation of more women and young people in the party. Kendred Dorsett, the candidate vying for national chairman of the PLP, believes that the Council needs a full-time chairman in New Providence. If elected, he intends to become a full time chairman at the Sir Lynden Centre. Mr Dorsett also intends to trav el to Grand Bahama once a month to ensure the effectiveness of the council on the island. “We must revitalize the coun cil in Grand Bahama, we must restore the people’s confidence in the PLP,” he said PLP leadership candidates campaign in Gr and Bahama THE CANDIDATES talk to an audience in Grand Bahama. H UBERT INGRAHAM

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C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 10 I NSIDE Michael Owen prepares to face Liverpool fans TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM KYLE ‘FLASH’ TURNQUEST of St. Bede’s Crushers goes up for a jumper over Xavier’s Giants defenders. RENALDO DORSETT T ribune Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net A fter the opening day of c ompetition in the 2009 World Sunfish Champio nships, Bahamian competitors find themselves with much ground to make up toc laim pole positions near the leader board by the end of the week. W ith the release of the preliminary results yesterd ay afternoon, Bahamians found themselves in less than favorable positions ear-l y on. Charles Kelly recorded t he best finish of any of the 15 Bahamian sailors in thef ield in 18th position with a net score of 38, a result of an 18th place finish in raceo ne and 20th in race two. Former three time Sun f ish World Champion, Don ald Martinbourough closely trailed Kelly in both racesa s he finished 19th overall, with a 19th place finish in race one and 21st place fin ish in race two, a net score of 40. P aul-Jon Patin of the United States leads the field with a net score of three, a first place in race one fol lowed by second in race two. M arx Chirinos of Venezuela is in second with five points, while the win n er of race two, Art Van Aanholt of Curacao is third w ith six. Other Bahaminas in the field included George Dami a nos in 27th place, Andrew Wilhoyte in 28th place, Jef ferey Gale in 32nd place, Christopher Sands in 35th place, Peter Bruce Wassitsch in 37th place, Gavin McKinney in 39th place, Jimmy Bahamian sailors find the going tough SEE page 12 2009 WORLDSUNFISH C HAMPIONSHIPS By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribbunemedia.net I T was a like a David vs Goliath match-up as the defending champions St. Bede’s Crushers crushed the Xavier’s Giants 44-5 to start the 21st annual Catholic Diocesan Primary School Basketball League. No, it wasn’t a typographic error. The Crushers just simply took advantage of their home court yesterday to demolish the Giants by 39 points. In fact, St. Bede’s had posted an impressive 39-0 lead through the first three and a half quarters of the game before Xavier’s finally got on the scoreboard. Donnie Culmer, one of the Crushers’ coach, said they wanted to make a strong statement with all of the teams in the league on hand for the opening ceremonies that was held prior to the start of the game. “We didn’t look like how we practiced, but all in all, it was the first game,” Culmer stressed. “But the fifth game, we will get it together and play like the true champions that we are.” Despite the score, the Crushers got off to a slow start, but by the time Kyle ‘Flash’ Turnquest, considered to be the best player in the league, got into the game, it was all over. Although he didn’t play in the first quarter, Turnquest was still able to rack up a game high 20 points, leaving Giants’ coach Nelson ‘Man della’ Joseph in awe. “They look good. They impress me,” said Joseph, who himself is listed as one of the top national team players in the country. “To see one of their players at the primary school level, vow. It gives you chills.” Joseph, however, admitted that his young Giants ran up against a seasoned Crushers team and it showed in the result. “That’s no excuse, but some of them had some first game jitters,” he pointed out. “Hopefully by the next game, they will be able to do bet ter.” Work Judging from the blowout, Joseph said there’s a lot of work in just about every facet of the game that his Giants will have to work on before they play their next game on Wednesday, October 28 at home against the St. Thomas More Shockers. “We have a lot of things to work on,” he said. “Lay ups, free throws, defense. We have a lot of things to work on.” Even though they were blown out from start to finish, Joseph said they did get some confidence late in the fourth quarter when they avoided being totally shut out. “I was telling them at in the fourth quarter, we needed to score, get at least two points on the scoreboard,” he said. “It was good for their confi dence. “So it was good for some of the guys who played for the first time. Hopefully the Crushers demolish Giants by 39 points S T. BEDE’S CRUSHERS c entre Gregory Cooper muscles his way up over the defence of Xavier’s Giants. Defending champions St. Bede’s win Catholic Diocese season opener SEE page 11 T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM next game they will be able to rebound from this loss.” While coaches Culmer and Ricardo Freemantle sat outboth Turnquest and their rebounding intimidator Gregory Cooper in the first quarter, St. Bede’s still managed to open a slim 5-0 lead. It was Donald Cash who scored the first point for the season on a free throw and Christopher Oliver and Malik Jones got back-to-back baskets. Once Turnquest got into the game, he went right on the scoring rampage, putting up all seven points for St. Bede’s in the quarter as they extended their lead to 12-0 at the half. Having established his presence, Turnquest and the rest of his team-mates came out of the break and turned up the heat in the third quarter. When it wasn’t Turnquest, who converted six of his 10 shots from the free throw line, St. Bede’s got another six in total from Adrian Mackey,five from Christopher Oliver and four apiece from Malik Jones and Gregory Cooper. That was when the Crushers’ coaching staff went further into their bench and brought in the first set of reserves, which enabled the Giants to finally score. Tahj Moss was the first to score, cutting the deficit to 392 and Rashad Gibson added another basket, while Eugene Higgs chipped in with a free throw. “The team started out a bit nervous at first, but once they got into the groove, they start ed playing as a team,” coach F reemantle stated. But this team has been training hard, so it was good for us as we totally dominated the game. We’re champions and we want to play as champions and repeat as champi-ons this year.” C oach Culmer said this was just an indication of what the rest of the teams in the league can expect. “We’re looking tobeat everybody,” he projected. “We don’t plan to lose any game this year. This is my final year, so I want to go out with a bang.” The league opened with a bang as Bahamas Basketball Federation president Lawrence Hepburn brought the official remarks, praising the Catholic schools for having the sporting curriculum in all schools. As for the players, Hep burn advised them not to be selfish when they score and they don’t score. He encouraged them to get back and play defense. And he also informed them not to allow basketball to be the focal point of their lives, but rather make sure that they do their necessary school work to better prepare them for the future. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Desmond Bannis ter, expresses heartfelt condolences to the wife and family of Mr. Roger Carron who passed away in Florida. Mr. Carron was keenly inter ested in sports – particularly golf and tennis and, even though he may not have played competitively he ensured that there was fair and balanced reporting particularly in his role as News Editor at The Tri bune. In this regard the public at large, but particularly the sporting community became the beneficiary of many reports that were factual and informa tive. The Minister has taken note of the fact that Mr. Carron dis tinguished himself over the years as a gentleman and a journalist of the highest order setting a standard in journalism that reflected the true worth of the man. To all family members and friends – I pray that the love of Almighty God will protect and sustain you as you go through this very difficult period. Minister expresses condolences over death of Mr Roger Carron FROM page ten Crushers cut Giants down to size ACTION FROM CATHOLIC DIOCESAN PRIMARY SCHOOL BASKETBALLLEAGUE PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff SADLY MISSED: ROGER CARRON STATEMENTBYDESMONDBANNISTER

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ROBERT MILLWARD, AP Soccer WriterL ONDON M ichael Owen knows how tough it is trying to convince England coach Fabio Capello he's g ood enough for the World Cup, especially as it might well be in vain. T he former Liverpool, Real Madrid and Newcastle striker has fought back from persistent hamstring injuries, a knee operation and a foot fracture and emerged still try-i ng to sound positive. Now comes possibly the most difficult task of all. Once the favourite of the Liverpool fans, Owen now has to face them at Anfield wearing a Manchester United shirt. W hen it comes to soccer, the followers of the two most successful clubs in English league history hate each other. Few players wind up playing for both clubs and,a lthough Owen has taken a round trip via Madrid and Newcastle, the Liverpool fans are likely to forget all the g reat goals he scored for their team when they see him wearing United's colours. "I would prefer people to sit down and recognize what y ou did for them and for the team in years gone past," Owen said. "But I am pretty realistic as well and now that I am playing for their arch rivals... I am not holding my breath, put it that way." Owen hopes the Liverpool fans will acknowledge he is a professional player earning a living. After disappointing spells at Madrid and Newcastle, he badly needs a break to get back to the top of English soc cer and recapture his England place. With Liverpool seemingly not interested in taking him back, he had to got o a club capable of winning titles. Manchester United appeared to be the ideal choice although not in the eyes of the Liverpool fans. "People talk about loyalty in football. It is easy for a football supporter to preach about that," Owen said." As a father, brother and son, there is no one more loyal than me. But when you are a player, you are not a fan. I have got to earn a living, provide for my family. It is aj ob opportunity, just like anyone else's work." Owen has faced Liverpool before. As a Newcastle p layer last season, he played in both Premier League games that his former club won, 5-1 and 3-0. But this is different. And if Wayne Rooney fails to r ecover from injury, there is a good chance Owen will start or at least be on the bench at Anfield. Worry The thought doesn't appear to worry him. Neither, it seems, do his so far fruitless efforts to get Capello to select him for England. The Italian coach has guided England impressively to the 2010 World Cup with nine wins in 10 qualifying matches without any help from Owen, a veteran of three such championships and with 40 goals in 89 games for his country. Capello persistently says "the door is still open" when the subject is raised of Owen's inclusion in the England squad although that doesn't sound like much encouragement for the 29-year-old striker. The player's argument is that he won't let Capello down and he has plenty of experience of World Cups, whereas younger players might freeze on the big occasion. "Everyone knows if I play then I am likely to score every other game," he said. "Playing in a World Cup wouldn't bother me. In fact, I would raise my game, as happened before in big games. Naturally I would like to be in the squad, but the last thing I want to be is cam paigning." With Sunday's game looming, Owen has plenty to think about as the Man United stars make the long jour ney to and from their Champions League group game against CSKA Moscow in Russia. Owen, who is in the horse business as a stable owner, can check the racing papers for the odds on his thor oughbreds. He might also note that that the bookmakers rate him a 9-4 shot to play at the World Cup but 1-3 that he won't. If that doesn't worry him, there's always the thought of facing those Liverpool fans. C M Y K C M Y K LOCALANDINTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM extra TIME Owen braced for facing Reds fans in United shirt M ICHAEL OWEN THE TOP JUNIOR SAILORS of 2009 with their uniquely designed trophies. From left: Paul Hutton, Regatta Chairman; 1st place, Jonathan Martinetti, Ecuador; 4th place, Jose Gutierrez, Venezuela; Youngest competitor, Olivia Gugliemini, USA; 2nd place, Fernando Monllor, Puerto Rico; 5th place, Mathieu de By, Holland; 3rd place and top female, Phillipine Van Aanholt, Curacao; Brent Burrows, Nassau Yacht Club Commodore; Andres Santana, International Sunfish Class Association President. P H O T O : R o b e r t D u n k l e y E cuador's Johnathan Martinetti continued his domination of the Sunfish sailing world Saturday, winning the 2009 International Junior Sunfish Championships in Nassau. The 17 year old has had an impressive streak this year, already winning the 2009 Sunfish North American Championship and the Laser 4.7 Worlds held in B zios, Brazil. Martinetti beat out 24 other top junior sailors representing 10 countries, placing first in four of the six regattas. " Sailing here was kind of different because the wind was shifting, but the regattas were very, very competitive," he said. Puerto Rico's Fernando Monllor placed second and Phillipine Van Aanholt finished with third place honours and was also the top placing female competitor. Competition Regatta Chairman Paul Hutton is pleased with the level of competition and the way the event played out. "These are very talented young men and women that we've had competing here over the last few days," he said, "We had two days of good racing with e nough wind on the course, especially considering these were juniors and not seniors." Six Bahamian juniors competed in the championships. Christopher Sands, who won Junior Nationals this summer, wast he top Bahamian with an 8th place fin ish. "It was a lot of work, but it felt really good. The foreign guys are really good sailors with a lot of experience, so this was a different level of competition," said Sands. Sunday night was the openingc eremony for the 2009 Sunfish World Championships and 72 of the world's top sailors will line up Monday morning at 10am for the start of a week of what's expected to be intense top level sailing. Top Bahamian eighth as Ecuador’s Martinetti continues his domination 2009 INTERNATIONAL JUNIOR SUNFISH CHAMPIONSHIPS ECUADOR'S JONATHAN MARTINETTI waves his country's flag as he receives his trophies for winning the 2009 International Junior Sunfish Championships. Pictured from left: Martinetti; Llewellyn Burrows, Managing Director Fun Foods Wholesale, distributors of Nestle Ice Cream; Paul Hutton, Regatta Chairman. P H O T O : R o b e r t D u n k l e y Bahamians find the going tough L owe in 44th place, Ted O’ Brien, 45th, Michael Holowesko, 58th, Dwayne Wallas, 59th, Lori Lowe, 60th, BJ Burrows, 63rd, and Donico Brown rounds out the contingent in 64th place. The Bahamas loos to continue a rich tradition in the Sunfish C lass which has netted five World Championships since the event’s enception. Pierre Siegenthalter took the title in 1973 and and 1977, while Martinborogh won the event in 1983, 1985, and 1988. The Sunfish World Champ ionships were last held in the Bahamas in 1995 in Abaco, when David Loring of the United States took top honors. The First Warning Signal to begin today’s action will sound at 10am. FROM page ten V OLLEYBALL NPVA UPDATE THE New Providence Volleyball Association continued its regular season on Sunday at the DW Davis Gymnasium with teams trying to close out the first half in playoff contention. On Friday, Anastasia Sands-Moultrie and Kelsie Johnson led the Johnson's Lady Truckers in three sets over the Lady Hornets. In men's action, the Technicians also defeated the Champions Club in three sets. Jamaal Knowles and Adalbert Ingraham led the Technicians in the win whilst Muller Petit led the Championship Club. Sunday night action saw the Lady Hornets come from behind to defeat the Lady Techs in five sets 21-25, 18-25, 25-19, 25-21 and 15-10. Simona Kerr let the Hornets with nine points and Sharon Whylly was the leading scorer for the Lady Techs with 13 points. In the men's action, DaBasement defeated the Saints 25-15, 25-15 and 25-15. Cashmir Wood led all scorers with 17 points in the win. Matthew Wert led the Saints with five points. The last game was a battle of the two undefeated teams and what an intense game it was. However, in the end, the defending champions, Scotiabank Defenders would improve their record to 4-0 by defeating the youthful National Fence Intruders 23-25, 25-23, 25-21, 15-25 and 17-15. Shedrick Forbes led the Defenders with 18 kills and two blocks, Prince Wilson ledthe Intrudersin a losing effort with 19 kills and four aces. V OLLEYB ALL COB PL AY THE College of the Bahamas women’s volleyball wrapped up its inter collegiate play this weekend in Florida. In their frst game on Friday night, the Lady Caribs lost in three straight sets to St. Thomas University. They played a much better game on Saturday winning the first set. How ever, they came up short in four sets to Florida Memorial University. The Lady Caribs will now shift their attention to play in the New Provi dence Volleyball Association with its next game scheduled for Wednesday at 7:30 pm at the D W Davis Gymnasium against the Lady Truckers and then again on Sunday at 3:30 pm against Scottsdale Vixens. Meanwhile, the Caribs men’s volleyball team will also play on Sunday at 5:30 p.m. against the Crimestoppers. G YMN AS TICS FEDERATION MEETIN G THE Gymnastics Federation of the Bahamas is inviting all interested gym nastics, dancers and cheerleaders to attend a meeting on Wednesday at 6 pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Federation members as well as nonmembers are welcome to attend this informative session. Topics of discussion will include: The role of the Federation in promoting and supporting gymnastics in the Bahamas. Past accomplishments and future goals. Information from the Bahamas Olympic Committee and the FIG pertaining to developing the sport and assistance available. Application and requirements for GFB members. New Providence Volleyball Association: teams try to close out first half in playoff contention sports NOTES LONDON American midfielder Clint Dempsey returned from a sprained right shoulder as Fulham beat Hull 2-0 Monday night to climb four places to 12th in the Premier League, according to Associated Press . Dempsey was hurt Oct. 4 while playing against West Ham and missed the United States’ World Cup qualifiers against Honduras and Costa Rica. He shot wide and headed off target against Hull. U.S. forward Jozy Altidore entered as a 69th-minute substitute, his first appearance for Hull since Sept. 26. Bobby Zamora scored the first goal in the 43rd minute on a header after goalkeeper Boaz Myhill’s blocked Damien Duff’s shot. Diomansy Kamara added the second goal in the 64th minute when he turned home Zamora’s cross after a Fulham breakaway. Fulham improved to 3-4-1. Hull is 18th in the 20-team league at 2-6-1. Hull midfielder Jimmy Bullard, a former Fulham star, returned to action after being sidelined for nine months following knee surgery. Dempsey returns as Fulham beat Hull 2-0 PHOTO: Robert Dunkley THE START of the first race in the 2009 World Sunfish Championships.

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The two are accused of conspiring to extort and attemptingt o extort $25 million from American actor John Travolta. Bridgewater is also charged with abetment to extortion. Mr Turner told the jury there was a threat made regarding the refusal of treatment form and that demands were also made and communicated to Mr Travolta, although indirectly. threat is a threat, he (Lightbourne Mr Travolta the first option to buy the document,” Mr Turner said. “We say that from the evidence there was an agreement between the two defendants to extort money from Mr Travolta,” he told the jury, and added that the agreement in itself was an offence. “The threat was not successful because no money changed hands but it was not for a lack of trying,” he said. Mr Turner challenged Ms Bridgewater’s assertion that she had been acting in her professional capacity as an attorney. Mr Turner highlighted rule three of the Bahamas Bar Association’s professional code of conduct, which stated that an attorney must be candid and honest in advising his or her client and must never assist in any dishonesty, fraud or crime. Mr Turner told the jury that Bridgewater knew that what she was doing was wrong. Mr Tuner also attacked the defence’s claim that Bridgewater and Lightbourne had been set up. Mr Tuner told the jury that what Bridgewater and Lightbourne said during the recorded meetings in attorney Michael McDermott’s hotel room, had been stated by them previously. “Nobody is being set up. They weren’t being encouraged to do something they hadn’t already done,” he said. M r Turner also noted that Lightbourne claimed there had been an attempt to cover-up t he circumstances surrounding Jett Travolta’s death but pointed out that there was no evi dence to suggest that there was any cover-up and that the issue was never raised during the cross-examination of any of the witnesses. Mr Turner told the jury that in his unsworn statement, Lightbourne had besmirched the names of several individuals. He also noted that PLP Senator and attorney Allyson Maynard-Gibson had done the right thing by assisting police but had been vilified in the trial. “She did the right thing, only to be vilified, for what” he asked. “All I ask you to do , having considered the evidence in this case and the law with respect to it, to return with a verdict and be able to say I have done justice between man and man,” Mr Turner said. “We are not doing this b ecause of who the victim is, we enforce our laws for ourselves,” Mr Turner told the j ury. Attorney Murrio Ducille who represents Bridgewater,b egan his closing address yesterday afternoon, telling the jury that they needed to be r efocused. “This case is not dealing with politics, FNM and PLP, we are dealing with two Bahamians on trial for serious offences,” he said. “This case is all about distraction. An incident took place in Grand Bahama on January 2 from which people from the media were pounding on Mr Lightbourne and Mr McDermott came here to shift focus,” he said. Mr Ducille said there had been no threat, nor conspiracy and called the abettment charge against Bridgewater “nonsense”. The case resumes today before Senior Justice Anita Allen. Mr Ducille is expecting to continue is closing address followed by Lightbourne’s attorney Carlson Shurland. many cultural strangers. Described earlier this year by the New York Times as “theP icasso of Nassau”, Mr Fergu son’s life was littered with inter national acclaim contrasted bys eemingly resolute local obscu rity. Mr Ferguson, though drawn t o painting all his life, worked first as a house painter and saidhe didn’t take his talent serious ly until his nephew told him about a dream he had. “Uncle Amos, I dreamed that the Lord came out of the sea with a painting in his hands and He say He give you a talent but you don’t use it.” Mr Ferguson was a devout christian and many believe that it was his infallible faith that lent him the courage and vision to fully explore and develop his unique and distinctive style. Jackson Burnside reflected on his personal involvement with the artist, having witnessed his evolution from cardboard paintings to international exhibitions. “I first new him as a person who painted houses, he painted our mother’s kitchen,” said Mr Burnside. “Eventually we got to see his work as he painted on whatever materials he could paint on. When his wife Bea began to take his work to the market he recognized that he had a product that was marketable and would sell. He was trained by God as he would say, he was fearless and couragous and had a tremendous sense of self esteem. Without a doubt Amos was the most prolific Bahamian artist of the 20th century. What he accomplished was tremendous.” Broadly categorised as “out sider art” or “art brut” (raw art Mr Ferguson’s work embodied a sense of cultural freedom, devoid of competition or social promo tion. Working from his home on Exuma Street, renamed Amos Ferguson Street in his honour in 2005, Mr Ferguson was a renoknowned intuitive artist and sto ryteller that painted “by faithand not by sight”, often turning to the bible for inspiration – as he would tell those curious to his methodology. Antonius Roberts said: “I knew Amos Ferguson to be one of the most significant artists the bahamas has ever seen we have certiantly lost a national trea sure but the art world at large, globally, has lost one of the mosts ignificant outsider or primitive artist, ever. “He has been celebrated a ppreciated for quite some time well over a decade by the ousider world wider art commu nity he has yet to receive the to be embraced by his own people. Perhaps this will be an opportunity for us as a people to understand and recognise that we have lost a national treasure and per haps find a way to celebrate his work and his life.” Amos Ferguson’s first solo exhibition was held at Toogood’s studio in 1972, since then his international recognition by esteeemed collectors such as Wadsworth Atheneum Muse um. “People would call him crazy and vandalise his work, thus he bacame a recluse,” Mr Roberts added. “He only wanted to be embraced and celebrated and appreciated by his people. Even today, a lot of people would look at his work and rather than doing the research they would simply say ‘man the guy paints like a child, what’s the big deal’. Unfortunately lack of exposure has done alot of us in the Bahamas a great disservice and as a result we miss so many opportunities to celebrate the genius among us. “His work embodies and sym bolizes determination, hardwork and focus. He had a desire and a dream to be an artist and he became one of the best storytellers that ever lived.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said: “My colleagues and I were saddened to learn of the death this morning of foremost Bahamian na•ve artist, Amos Ferguson. He is perhaps our country’s most successful artist with works in private collections and galleries around the world. “The Bahamas has lost a cul tural icon. Mr Ferguson, a tal ented house painter, unschooled in the fine arts, reportedly began painting pictures following the encouragement of a nephew who dreamt of his uncle’s hidden talent. “Religion and a strong faith heavily influenced Mr Ferguson’s artwork which all bear his inimitable signature “Paint by Mr Amos Ferguson”. illegally “normally” are employed in the construction field, or working in areas where Bahami-a ns wouldn’t want to work. “So we find them gravitating towards those types of jobs. There are others who we have found w ho have been arrested and deported for ‘other reasons’. Some of them have returned and have been refused entry into the Bahamas,” he said. H uman trafficking has often been referred to as the modern day form of slavery and is currently the fastest growing area of international criminal activity. It involves the exploitation of people through force, deception, debt bondage, and the deprivation of a person’s liberty or freedom. According to Mr Bowe, of the 89 persons at the Detention Centre, there are 37 Haitians, 11 Jamaicans, 31 Chinese, three Cubans, five Turkish residents, one Guyanian, and one Nigerian. Of this total, there were 61 males, 21 females, and sev en children. When speaking to the press yesterday on this issue of trafficking, Mr Bowe said these individuals are often smuggled over great distances to the Bahamas or on to some other destination where they will be put to use in some form or fashion. With many of these persons being caught or intercepted in the Bahamas, Mr Bowe said they are unable to put a financial figure on the price paid for each migrant who is being smuggled fromone country to the next. “I really can’t say that they are being bought and sold. I can tell you that persons we have come across have paid monies to be transported what the sums are we really can’t say because right now our investigations are continuing so it is hard to come up with a figure. “During the investigations normally people would say where they would have originally come from and that they would have paid persons. Many times there are persons who are involved in the scheme of things, they are unable to identify them because a lot of it is done in the dark. They don’t get names, or nationalities, and sometimes it is very difficult when they move at night to say where they were and how long they have been there.” Most of these persons who have been smug gled, Mr Bowe said have been captured in Grand Bahama, Abaco, New Providence, and even in the Biminies. “Some are found in bushes, some are found in homes, some are found in vehicles moving along, and others are found at sea,” he said. The Department of Immigration is working in concert with US officials as well as the Royal Bahamas Police and Defence Forces to combatt his global problem. In 2005, a US report revealed that nearly one million persons are estimated to be trafficked globally per year, with nearly 20,000 of t hem destined for the United States. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FROM page one FROM page one Amos Fer guson FROM page one Detention Centre John Travolta case FORMER PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater leaves court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A major Wall Street c redit rating agency’s decision to downgrade the Bahamas’ B$ bonds does not “reflect any fundamental concern at all about our economic situation” and the Government’s ability to meet its obligations, a Cabinet minister said last night. In addition, Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business that the Ingraham administration was “expecting an extraordinary gain” from several transactions that it believed would either eliminate or reduce the $40 million gap between its revenue forecasts and current performance. While not disclosing any of these transactions, Mr Laing said they did not include the impending privatisation of the Bahamas Telecommunications Com pany (BTC The minister was replying to Tribune Business after it contacted him about Moody’s decision to downgrade the Bahamas’ local currency (Bahamian dol lar denominated) bonds from the premium A1 rating to A3, aligning this with the A3 rating the Wall Street agency had assigned to this nation’s foreign currency bonds. The move is partly a result of a change in Moody’s own internal policies, but also reflects what it termed “the erosion of the [Bahamas] main debt metrics”, with this nation’s debt-to-GDP ratio anticipated to increase by 15 percentage points in the three years to 2010. The Wall Street rating agency added that the Bahamas’ long-term growth projections were “lower” than that of many countries it was compared to for rating purposes. Gabriel Torres, a Moody’s vice-president and sovereign analyst for the Bahamas, said the rating agency had eliminated the gap between local and foreign currency bond ratings for many countries because “historical evidence indicates that governments are almost equally likely to default on either type of debt”. Typically, a country’s local currencydenominated bonds had been rated higher than their domestic counterparts, but Moody’s was now assessing whether to maintain such a gap on a case-by-case basis. “For the Bahamas, Moody’s has concluded that these factors do not warrant a ratings gap, and therefore we have aligned the two ratings at A3,” Mr Torres said. However, the Wall Street agency’s statement then added: “The erosion of the country’s main debt metrics, with debt-to-GDP projected to reach close to 50 per cent by 2010, from 35 per cent in 2007, further justify the A3 as the appropriate level for both bond ratings. “Long-term growth lower than that of its rating peers also weighed on the decision to align the bond ratings at A3. The Bahamas’ two main industries, tourism and financial services, have been impacted by the world crisis and will find it dif ficult to recover strongly in the near future.” Moody’s kept the outlook on all the Bahamas’ sovereign credit ratings as ‘stable’, and reaffirmed the Aa1 country ceil ing for foreign currency bonds and A3 C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or omission from the daily report. $4.09 $3.88 $4.00 % &$t$% #)rtf$tt % & %$! % #$b%# $ &$)'%% '! %)%#'$ $ "#!"" !$ !"$#$brtrrnf By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor SOME 29 per cent of the Suspicious Transactions Reports (STRs during 2008 were passed on to the Royal Bahamas Police Force for further investiga tion, the Financial Intelligence Unit’s (FIU closed, involving $6.756 mil lion worth of assets. The FIU, whose report was recently tabled in Parliament, said it saw a 3 per cent yearover-year increase in STR reports to 129 in 2008, compared to 125 the previous year. The 2008 reports i nvolved a total $4.113 billion in assets. Out of the 129 STR reports received in 2008, the FIU said 37 were passed on to the police, with 38 cases closed and 54 matters still pendinga t year-end. The pending matters, some 41.86 per cent of STRs sub mitted, accounted for some $4.014 billion or 97.6 per cent of all assets covered in these reports. The closed STR investigations involved some $91.962 million in assets. The vast majority of STRs some 92.25 per cent were received from the Bahamian banking community, the FIU s aid, with 52 coming from the ‘domestic/offshore’ banking sector and another 51 from ‘offshore banks’. A further 16 came from so-called ‘domestic banks’. While the average STR c overed assets with a value of $31.883 million, the value of those passed on to the police for investigation was much smaller, standing at $182,593. The average value of closed reports was $2.42 million, and that of pending reports was $74.335 million. “The Financial Intelligence Unit did not detect any crimPolice probed 29% of suspect financial reports By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC posed Wilson City power plant “will almost double the nominal generating capacity” that it currently has on Abaco, the project’s Environ mental Impact Assessment (EIA load on the island having risen by 64 per cent in five years. The EIA by Kalimantan Environmental Services (KES obtained by Tribune Business, said that based on current and future demand trends, BEC had determined that “expansion of the existing power generating facilities is considered necessary to meet the needs of all consumers in Abaco”, not least the various development projects ongoing on the island. Delving briefly into BEC’s history in power generation on the island, the KES report said the 2001 extension of its existing Marsh Harbour power station and the addition of two 4.4 megawatt generators “met the forecasted load demand” then. “The expansion of the gen erating system was intended to meet the increased demand, thereby benefiting the continuing development of the island by continued encouragement of economic development for projects in tourism, agriculture and small industry,” the EIA said. The existing Marsh Harbour Power Station now had an installed capacity of some 25.6 mega watts (MW EIA said, with smaller gen erator sets having purchased to meet peak summer demand. “The growth in consumer demand for power in Abaco over the past few years has increased,” the report added. “Over the past five years, BEC’s peak load has increased by some 64 per cent. This has presented BEC with challenges, in some instances requiring additional generating capacity, as well as initiating a programme to replace the older generators with new ones.” The Wilson City power plant has been a subject of much controversy recently, with BEC and the Govern ment coming under fire amid accusations of lack of trans parency and a failure to disclose details of the project to impacted Abaco residents. BEC’s Abaco peak load up 64% in 5 years SEE page 2B SEE page 5B SEE page 6B ‘No concerns’ over B$ bond downgrade * Government expecting to receive ‘extraordinary gain’ from several transactions designed to eliminate or reduce $40m revenue forecast gap * Top Wall Street rating agency lowers Bahamas’ local currency bonds from A1 to A3 * Warns Bahamas has suffered ‘erosion of main debt metrics’, and it has ‘lower’ long-term growth projections than peers LAING By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government’s spending on its own debt interest payments increased by almost 64 per cent in the seven Budget years leading up to the 2008-2009 fiscal period, a Bahamian economic think-tank said yesterday, adding that the answer as to whether the tax payer was getting value for money was “a resounding no”. The Nassau Institute, in its analysis of the Government’s Budget spending for the years between 2002-2003 and 20082009, said that apart from interest payments in its debt (disregarding principal), spending on health and education had risen by 73.33 per cent and 64.47 per cent respectively. Pointing out that this increased spending had not produced any improvement in the nation’s national ‘D’ BGCSE grade average, Rick Lowe, a Nassau Institute executive, told Tribune Business: “All the indicators are heading in the wrong direction. “When you look at what has been done on education alone, $1.8 billion or 19 per cent of government spending in seven years, nothing has improved. “Some analysis has to be done by government to say are we getting value for money and, regrettably, the answer has got to be a resounding ‘no’ 64% rise on debt service payments in seven years Answer on whether t axpayer getting value for money ‘a resounding no’, says economic think-tank SEE page 4B

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Fred Smith, the Callenders & Co partner and attorney, who represents several Abaco residents, has already issued several warnings about instigating Judicial Review proceedings if his clients are not properly involved in the planning and permitting process. The KES report said that several locations prior to the selection of Wilson City were assessed, namely an expansion of the existing Marsh Harbour power plant facility, plus the site at Snake Cay. “Based upon limited space and the close proximity of a residential community, the Marsh Harbour site was subsequently eliminated from further consideration,” the EIA said. “The selection of t he Snake Cay site had additional value based upon its remote location, and the availability of water borne access for fuel and materials. However, based upon ecosensitivity and land use concerns, Snake Cay was deemed unsuitable for BEC.” And, spelling out the consequences for Abaco, its residents and economy if the Wilson City project did not go a head, the KES EIA said non-implementation was “not considered to be a viable option” when it came to the island’s sustainable development. Capacity “The installed capacity at Marsh Harbour is insufficient to meet current and near future demand for power in A baco,” the EIA said. “Without additional capacity, the need for load shedding becomes likely in order to maintain a balance between demand and genera tion capacity. Therefore, the proposed project is designed to meet the current and future needs, providing reliable additional electricity generation capacity.” The KES report warned t hat without the Wilson City power plant, “greater reliance would be placed upon the use of small diesel generator sets for residential, commercial and industrial purposes. “Those typically burn premium fuels such as high-speed diesel, whilst their energy efficiency and inherent emissions means that their environmental performance may compare unfavourably with l arger scale generation.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM www.babfinancial.com 242-461-1000 Freeport242-352-7209Exuma242-336-3035Abaco242-367-6501 InsupportoftheCancerSocietyandtheSisterSisterBreastCancerSupportGroup’s efforttoraiseandpromoteawarenessofthedisease,BritishAmericanFinancial hostedthe13thAnnualLeeNationalDenimDayduringthemonthofOctober.The internationaleventtakesplaceontherstFridayofOctober,duringthemonthlong awarenesscampaign.WesayTHANKYOUtoourspokespersonZarinaFitzgerald, participatingcompanies,schoolsandandorganizationswhomadedonationsand worepinkshirtswithpinkribbonsinsolidaritywithcancersurvivors. BRITISHAMERICANLEADSBREASTCANCERAWARENESS BRITISHAMERICANLEADSBREASTCANCERAWARENESS 1 2 3 4 5 8 11 1 4 10 12 13 6 7 1.SummitAcademy2.Higgs&JohnsonAccounting3.SuperValueExecutiveOfces 4.BritishAmericanIndependenceDrive5.BritishAmericanFinancial,FreeportBranch 6.KelsoMedicalLaboratory7.Scotiabank(BahamasLimited,StellaMaris,LongIslandBranch 8 .BahamasNationalTrust9.BahamasFirst10.AbacoInsuranceAgency11.Xavier’sLower School12.BahamasFirst13.Higgs&Johnson14.BahamasMinistryofTourism,Exuma 9 SANDALS will today hold the first job fair for its newly-acquired Emerald Bay Resort, having unveiled plans to open the property’s marina on November 10. The job fairs will be held at the Sandals Emerald Bay’s conferencing facilities between 9am-5pm on the following days: Tuesday, October 20: All managerial and supervisory positions Wednesday, October 21: Former Four Seasons employees only Thursday, October 22: Line staff and other positions All attending candidates will be interviewed by Sandals group directors, and those hired will be required to start work at the end of December in order to undergo the Sandals training programme ahead of January’s opening. Sandals Resorts International’s director of operations, Shawn DaCosta, said: “We’re delighted to announce that we are now in a position to invite people to be part of this exciting project and join our team. We’ll be looking for the very best candidates that share our philosophy for giving guests more than they expect, and helping take the travel industry by storm.” Sandals Emerald Bay is set to open The Marina at Emerald Bay on November 10, 2009. Sandals asked interviewees to dress appropriately, and bring upto-date resumes and any relevant original documents. Former Four Seasons employees are asked to bring identification. Sandals starts Emerald Bay staffing drive CONSTRUCTION work moves into high gear on Sandals signature swim-up pool bar for its Sandals Emerald Bay Resort... BEC’s Abaco peak load up 64 per cent in five years FROM page 1B

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A GOVERNMENT minister has moved to addressc oncerns from Bahamian realtors about the impact proposed legislation will have on the timescale for approving subdivisions, arguing that the process “should be speeded up”. At a recent luncheon meeting, several Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA members voiced concerns to Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, that the proposed Planning and Subdivision Act would lengthen an already protracted and unpredictable timeframe from proposal to final approval a deterrent to most potential developers. However, Dr Deveaux replied: “Each stage should be completed in a specified four-month timeframe so that, in fact, the whole process should be speeded up”. BREA’s president, William Wong, urged realtors who had concerns about the proposedP lanning and Subdivision Act to “promptly put pen to paper and make submissions to the Minister”. Earlier, Dr Deveaux said of the proposed legislation: “This act will replace three a cts which have been in place for over 40 years – The Pri vate Roads and Subdivision Act, The Town Planning Act and the Town Planning (Out Island) Act. Copies of the proposed act have been wide l y circulated and it is still not too late for changes to be made.” Dr Deveaux also reiterated the Prime Minister’s com ments that of the 3.45 million acres of land in the Bahamas, approximately 2.5 million acres are Crown Land,900,000 acres of which are wetlands. That left roughly 1.6 million acres of dry Crown Land The minister added: “It is this land which creates our economic basis and allows the Government to economically empower Bahamians. The Planning and Subdivision Act deals with a number of the issues faced by developers and prospective home owners.” Referring to various “misc hiefs” which have plagued the orderly development of Bahamian land in the past, Dr Deveaux listed the “unauthorised sale of lots; requests to sell lots to pay for infrastructure; building permits issued in unapproved subdivisions; lack of utility services; subdivision fees; uncompleted subdivisions; lack of utilities in approved subdivisions and family subdivisions”. The minister emphasised that the new Act’s aim will be to modify and simplify the various steps required to establish subdivisions throughout the Bahamas. Given the need for transparency and the desire of Bahamians to be aware and have a voice in proposed developments in their districts, a regular path will be established for applications, preliminary approval, public and committee hearings, appeals to final approval. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Minister addresses realtors’ concerns EARL DEVEAUX with the BREA president William Wong (right Photo: Keith Parker

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at this stage. “Sure, even with health, there’s a hell of a lot of money going in, and the Government is talking about a National Prescription Drug Plan and socialised medicine. Are they better off looking at other alternatives? They’d be better off giving poor people vouchers to buy health insurance, rather than doing it all themselves. The money being spent, it could be targeted differently.” In its study, the Nassau Institute said the Government had spent $9.1 billion in nine key categories over the period assessed. There had been, for instance, a 51.38 per cent increase over the period in sums spent on the general public service, Mr Lowe suggesting most of this was for civil service wage increases. The general public service accounted for $2.6 billion or 28 per cent of spending over the period assessed, with health also taking up $1.5 billion or 16 per cent of spending. Interest on debt accounted for $883 million or 10 per cent of government spending. Annual With the Government having run annual fiscal deficits to finance this spending, Mr Lowe told Tribune Business: “Particularly with a struggling economy, with GDP reducing, it throws the debt-toGDP ratio out of whack. Where will it end up? “It’s been a long time coming. They’ve dismissed all calls to be more cautious, but year after year they’ve been looking at rising revenues to justify projections that government is going to grow and grow.” Pointing out that the Bahamas’ did not have a large and diverse enough economic base to sustain the sort of government spending it was now incurring, Mr Lowe acknowledged that cutting public spending during the midst of a recession was not the ideal time. However, he argued: “Government spending and the size of government are detriments to economic growth. If you continue to grow government, you take resources away from the private sector and the incentive for people in the private sector to do things. “The Government has somehow got to rein that in and shrink the size of government. It’s a tough time, but they can’t continue to keep growing it.” When it was pointed out that much of the Bahamas’ national debt was held by domestic institutions, Mr Lowe responded that a large portion was held by the National Insurance Board (NIB ans’ long-term retirement funds and social security. There was nothing to suggest Bahamian banks would continue indefinitely backing the Government on its debt issues. And while Mr Lowe con ceded that the Bahamas “may have been less crazy than other countries” when it came to its debt-to-GDP ratio and management of its fiscal affairs, this did not mean suc cessive governments had been fiscally prudent. In its report, the Nassau Institute said that since 1991t he Bahamian national debt h ad increased from $870 mil lion to $3 billion, a 244.8 per cent increase over 18 years or an increase of $118 million per year. The projected increase for 2009-2010 indicated then ational debt was approach ing the $4 billion mark, close to 50 per cent of GDP. “If it hasn’t already done so, Government must take immediate steps to reduce spending. The pain will be felt by government employees, and those depending on government contracts for new spending. Their pain will be no different from the many Bahamians working part time or have lost jobs and whose mortgage payments are falling behind,” the Nassau Institute said. “Reducing the fiscal load of a government too big is imperative. It’s a load the country simply cannot continue to bear.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Our client has requested BHC Consulting to seek applicants for the position of: ITADMINISTRATOR You will be responsible for the health and development of the Corporate Information Systems and Network. Only candidates with the following qualications should apply: Reporting to the Financial Controller, this is the ideal position for an individual who can work independently with minimal supervision. You will be responsible for: Remuneration package includes generous employee benets.and attach a “one page resume” and salary requirements to: Brian Hassan, Principal Consultant bhcc@coralwave.com Deadline: 21st October, 2009 “People”, Processes and Technology Driving Business Value” MARKETING MANAGERBahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading s upermarket chain in The Bahamas. As a market leader, t he Company prides itself on delivering premier service through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong c ommitment to its customers, associates and community. A n opportunity for a Marketing Manager in New Provid ence to join this market leader has arisen. Reporting to the CEO, the successful applicant will have p revious experience in implementing strategies, growing market share and analyzing the market and competition to implement marketing strategies. Key responsibilities and selection criteria include: Ability to analyze information to support consumer initiatives and business planning Developing and implementing strategic marketing and commercial plans Ensure the achievement of agreed sales and gross profit targets Lead advertising and communication agencies on all aspects of brand communication Controlling advertising and promotional expenses Highly flexible and mobile and prepared to work evenings and weekends as required Motivate, train and ensure that associates and outside Contractors are able to implement marketing strategies Ability to develop and execute Marketing plans University degree in Marketing or Business Administration Work independently, making quick decisions while working under pressure Have good communication (verbal and written interpersonal skills Highly functional computer skills with extensive knowledge of Microsoft applications If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your resume and cover letter to:Human Resources Director Bahamas Supermarkets Limited Only qualified applicants will be contacted No telephone inquiries pleaseAIN OCT 19-21, 09 FROM page 1B 64% rise on debt service payments in seven years

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inal activity in 46.51 per cent of the Suspicious Transactions Reports received,” it said in its 2008 annual report. “Fraud and drugs were detected in 27.91 per cent and 15,5 per cent respectively of the reports received. “In approximately 44.19 per cent of cases, the financial institution at the time it submitted the Suspicious Transactions Report did not know the nature of the offence. Thus other suspicious circumstances led to the filing of the reports. Fraud and drugs were suspected in 30.23 per cent and 14.73 per cent respectively of the reports received........ “Longstanding customers of the disclosing institutions accounted for 52.71 per cent of the reports received, whereas new customers accounted for 34.88 per cent of the reports.” During 2008, the FIU issued one five-day freeze and two 72-hour restraint notices to Bahamian financial institutions, involving assets totalling $24.196 million. This activity ultimately resulted in one restraint order being issued by the Supreme Court, concerning assets worth $19.993 million. Internet searches proved to be the main factor that prompted the filing of STRs, the FIU report said, accounting for 32 of the investigations sparked during 2008. Cash transactions and account activity not in keeping with Know Your Customer (KYC policies accounted for 26 and 24 STRs, respectively. Bahamian citizens accounted for 71 or 55 per cent of those who were the subject of STRs in 2008, some 20.93 per cent of the remainder being Canadians or Americans. When it came to domicile, 76 STRs or 58.91 per cent concerned persons living in the Bahamas, and Bahamians represented 41.86 per cent of the beneficial owners of assets subject to STRs. During 2008, the FIU said it received some 108 requests for information and assistance from overseas FIUs. It added that it provided assistance in 87.96 per cent of the cases, denied 9.26 per cent or 10 requests, while a further 2.78 per cent were withdrawn. Of the 15 requests for assistance that the Bahamian FIU itself made, only one was denied. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Police probed 29% of suspect financial reports FROM page 1B

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country ceiling for bank deposits. In response, Mr Laing said the downgrade decision was no cause for panic, as it had partly resulted from Moody’s own internal policies. “It’s not a reflection of any fundamental concerns at all about our economic situation,” the minister added. When asked about Moody’s comments on “the erosion of the country’s main debt metrics”, the minister replied: “They’re reflecting a set of realities for our economic circumstances and they are assessing it. We have no difficulty with that.” Mr Laing said the Bahamas’ “credit rating remains pretty strong in the circumstances”, adding that the Government would move to bring the debt-to-GDP ratio back in line with historical trends once the economic crisis abated. He added that Moody’s had also spoken to the Bahamas’ “fiscal prudence and strength”. Meanwhile, Mr Laing said persons had to keep the Bahamas’ current fiscal performance in context, pointing out that while revenues were $40 million behind forecast as at end-September 2009, the Government had been looking at a shortfall more than two times as great some 12 months previously. “We have continued to show a shortfall in terms of forecast of the order of $40 million through September, but that has to be looked at in the context of this,” Mr Laing said. “Last year, we were looking at more than two times that kind of shortfall. In addition to that, we are expecting an extraordinary gain in some revenues based on a number of transactions in the pipeline. “For obvious reasons, I don’t want to say what they are, but we expect that when those transactions are concluded they will bring us on par in terms of forecast or reduce that gap significantly. “It’s still a very strange situation. We are looking at it with significant caution, and exercising great prudence and vigilance in the circumstances. We have to keep in context where we are, where we were and where we might have been.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.711.03AML Foods Limited1.171.170.000.1270.0009.20.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9 .305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.007000.2440.26024.24.41% 0 .890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1250.09025.22.86% 2 .372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.209.93Cable Bahamas9.939.930.001.4060.2507.12.52% 2.882.72Colina Holdings2.722.720.000.2490.04010.91.47% 7 .505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.835.830.000.4190.30013.95.15% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs2.943.030.090.1110.05227.31.72% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.6250.0803.33.90%8 .206.28Famguard6.286.280.000.4200.24015.03.82% 1 2.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.6310.35015.83.50% 5.534.11Focol (S)4.114.110.000.3320.15012.43.65%1 .001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.595.590.001,0000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.009.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.000.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1460 792 BahamasSupermarkets 792 842 1400 2246 0000 N/M 000% FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities30 May 2013 29 May 2015 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 Interest Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 7%MONDAY, 19 OCTOBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,491.37 | CHG 0.09 | %CHG 0.01 | YTD -220.99 | YTD % -12.91BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % 14 . 60 7 . 92 Bahamas Supermarkets 7 . 92 8 . 42 14 . 00 2 . 246 0 . 000 N/M 0 . 00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8300-3.75-6.75 1.49461.4210CFAL Money Market Fund1.49464.255.18 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.175112.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.17514.425.86 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.58849.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund10.58845.885.88 1.07571.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07573.865.30 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0305-0.240.22 1.07091.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.07093.244.54 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 9-Oct-09 31-Aug-09MARKET TERMS30-Sep-09Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Sep-09 30-Sep-09 30-Jun-09 30-Sep-09 NAV Date Employment Opportunity Awell established business within New Providence is in search of an Inventory Control Manager. Inquires must be able to organize and set up an easy manageable inventory control system that includes monitoring and organizing Building & Hardware and Plumbing & Electrical Supplies. The successful candidate must posses the following skills Be able to: 7UDFNDQGIROORZXSRQDOOVKLSPHQW from Suppliers. 5HFHLYHDQGYDOLGDWHDOOVKLSSHG items. 2UJDQL]HDFRPSUHKHQVLYHVWRUH delivery system. 2UJDQL]HDQGRU,PSURYHLWHPV location on the sales floor area. 0DLQWDLQDSURSHUGDWDEDVHVR that management and staff have an DFFXUDWHUHFRUGRIDOO,QVWRFNLWHPV 0DQDJHLQYHQWRU\FRQWUROVWDI The successful applicant must have D PLQLPXPRI\HDUVLQYHQWRU\ DQGVWRFNWDNLQJH[SHULHQFH+HVKH must be familiar with the Microsoft word & excel software. Warehouse management and Stock taking training with certificates would be desired. Salary would be based on qualifications and experience.Interested applicants are asked to apply through the following address: The President Re: Inventory Control Manager P.O.Box N-7143 Nassau, Bahamas Legal NoticeN OTICETURNIP INVESTMENT GROUP LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the19th day of October 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator L egal NoticeN OTICEO RIENTAL EXPRESS HOLDINGS LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the19th day of October 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) Legal NoticeN OTICEK INCADE VENTURES LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the16th day of October 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeN OTICEREAL INTERNATIONAL GROUP LTD.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the16th day of October 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.(Liquidator Legal NoticeNOTICEE AGLE STARS INVESTMENTS LIMITED.(In Voluntary Liquidation)Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the16th day of October 2009.TheLiquidator isArgosa Corp. Inc.,P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas. ARGOSA CORP. INC.( Liquidator) ‘No concerns’ over B$ bond downgrade FROM page 1B

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C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE SECTIONC HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 OF COURSE , hair is not only a big deal for Bahamian women, but for women all over the globe. Beyonce Knowles can be seen at the Billboard Women In Music brunch in New York. (AP Photo By JEFFARAH GIBSON H a ir! Black, blonde, red, curly, straight, natural, relaxed, long or short no matter the colour, the length or the texture, most Bahamian women will probably say ‘forget clothes, my hair is more important’. Of course hair is not only a big deal for Bahamian women, but for women all over the globe. Throughout the countries of the world there are constant debates and discussions about the appearance of women’s hair. Fashion and women’s magazines are full with never-ending styling tips and ever-changing ‘dos and don’ts’ when it comes to hair. But in recent times it has been the issue of natural hair versus relaxed hair or weaves and wigs that has gotten a lot of media attention, especially in the United States. A few weeks ago, world renowned super model a nd television personality Tyra Banks decided to end all speculation and rumours surrounding the state of her natural hair and came out on national television without her usual weave or wig. Popular comedian Chris Rock also sparked more debate about the issue with his new documentary “Good Hair”, in which he takes a look at the blackh air industry in the US. With all the noise in the market, Tribune Woman wanted to know what local stylists had to say about the topic. Stylist Yashicka Carey of the All Natural and Thermal Salon said that a new trend is also emerging inthe Bahamas where women are either wearing their h air natural or wearing weaves in natural hairstyles. “About 60 per cent of the women that come into our salons are wearing their hair natural and about 40 per cent are wearing natural hairstyles with weaves,” she said. Wearing hair natural, she said, has several advantages. “When you wear your hair relaxed you are limited to straight looks, but if you wear your hair natural, depending on the texture, you can wear your hair in straight styles and in afro styles,” Ms Carey said. Despite what some people might believe about natural hair always being healthier than relaxed hair, she said that this is a misconception. “Regardless of the texture of hair, whether it’s natural or straight, if it is not maintained and taken good care of then it is no better than relaxed hair. That is also the same for relaxed hair, if it’s not main tained it will become damaged,” she said. “I have seen many women whose hair is natural and damaged very badly come into the salons for treatment,” the stylist said. Weave is the ‘in’ thing for most Bahamian women. The majority probably wear the so-called lace-front caps or sewn in wraps. While there is nothing wrong with wearing hair weaves, doing it excessively can damage the hair greatly. “There are a lot of women who wear extensions and weaves. It is, however, not good to always put weaves in the hair because it thins the hair and stunts the growth,” she said. Ms Carey said that many women who come to her salon and have hair that is badly damaged from wearing weaves are not willing to go through the long process of hair repair. “Repairing the hair after it is damaged is a very long process and it is very costly, too. It requires a lot of dedication and people are not willing to stick it out so that their hair can be fully repaired,” she said. And even though women are aware of the damages of wearing weaves excessively, they continue to do it. Because so many women in the country wear weaves instead of their natural hair, it raises the question if Bahamian women are insecure about their own hair. Ms Carey said in her opinion there are a number of reasons why Bahamian women prefer wearing weaves as opposed to wearing their own hair. “One of the reasons could be that Bahamian women are not aware of the damage it can do to the hair. Then again it could be a possibility that they are not confident and secure with their own, and it could also be because weaves allow variety,” she said. Overall, Bahamian women are probably not ready to make that leap to all-natural, all the time just yet, but attitudes and hairstyles are changing. Natural hair vs The Weave

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A woman of excellence and elegance A FEW weeks ago we talked about love’s greatest challenge being forgiveness. It is important to understand that to trust someone again we first need to open our hearts and forgive them. If forgiveness does not take place then a barrier will always be present. No matter what the wrongdoer does to regain your trust it will be pointless. True healing will not be able to take place and the relationship willnot develop. When we make the decision to tackle the obstaclecourse of forgiveness we soon come to realise that it is not an easy road. The process is often slow, excruciatingly painful, and unexpected road blocks may still present themselves along the way. As the years go by, we come to realise that the suf ferings we are experiencinga re in fact brought about by ourselves, because we hold on to the pain. We come to a ppreciate that we can not change the past, but we can choose our future. We have to decide if we want to remain implanted right where we are, crying and suffering, or move ahead to possibili ties of happiness. We are theonly ones who really understand our pain and so ultimately we are the only ones who can heal ourselves. Being told, “Why haven’t y ou let that go?” or “I wouldn’t let that bother me”, does little to ease the situation. H urtful relationships that involve work, friendship or even family are sometimes easier to deal with becausewe can have ‘time out’ and distance ourselves. We are allowed time to step back and regroup. But what happens when we are living under the same roof with the person who has caused us so much heartache? The anger, hurt and disbelief p ushes us to believe that this is as much as we can possibly take. Our natural instinct may b e to throw in the towel and run. It is only when we are faced with enormous hurts or betrayals that our limits are really tested. Aren’t we brought up to believe we are not given any more than we can bear? Trusting and believing in someone comes all tied up in a neat parcel when we first commit to loving someone. Newlyweds often begin life together believing that the trust they start off with will only grow and get stronger. As we get older we learn that life has a way of surprising us. Even when we think we have it all planned out we discover that none of us are infallible. Love relationships are often imperfect and the first blow can be devastating. But it is how we deal with these knocks that ultimately determine the strength of the relationship and the test of love. Before trust can be rebuilt the ground has to be cleared for honesty to be introduced. All the anger, accusations and judgments have to be aired. If the wrong-doer is truly remorseful then they need to understand that the outbursts are essential before forgiveness takes place. Set aside time for daily t alks which will add structure to what would otherwise be chaotic arguing. Writing d own points throughout the day means that talking and discussing should be more o rganised and focused. Do not be surprised that the door way to honesty may open and close at times and the process may be slow. It is not unusual for the whole truth to come out over a period of time. Only when every thing is out in the open and the deceiver is believed will true intimacy begin. Honesty has to be present for trust and trust has to be present for i ntimacy. For all of us who have experienced trauma in our lives, we start to question whether anything makes sense anymore. We may have reached a certain age and stage in our lives where we think we have it all worked out. We may feel confidant about our relationships. It is not surprising then that we feel as if we are hit by a sledge hammer when faced with a betrayal. But if we take a deep breath, step b ack and remember that all life experiences hold meaning, if we can see a future with the person, and we have committed our love to them, then we need to reassess the relationship. Interestingly, many people discover a new depth to their relationship and move on to a more satisfying love. M M a a r r g g a a r r e e t t B B a a i i n n i i s s a a n n i i n n d d i i v v i i d d u u a a l l a a n n d d c c o o u u p p l l e e s s r r e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p t t h h e e r r a a p p i i s s t t . . S S h h e e i i s s a a r r e e g g i i s s t t e e r r e e d d n n u u r r s s e e a a n n d d a a c c e e r r t t i i f f i i e e d d c c l l i i n n i i c c a a l l s s e e x x t t h h e e r r a a p p i i s s t t . . F F o o r r a a p p p p o o i i n n t t m m e e n n t t s s c c a a l l l l 5 5 3 3 5 5 7 7 4 4 5 5 6 6 o o r r e e m m a a i i l l h h e e r r a a t t r r e e l l a a t t e e b b a a h h a a m m a a s s @ @ y y a a h h o o o o . . c c o o m m o o r r w w w w w w . . r r e e l l a a t t e e b b a a h h a a m m a a s s . . b b l l o o g g s s p p o o t t . . c c o o m m . . S S h h e e i i s s a a l l s s o o a a v v a a i i l l a a b b l l e e f f o o r r s s p p e e a a k k i i n n g g e e n n g g a a g g e e m m e e n n t t s s . . C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A LOCAL businesswoman who has established herself as somewhat of a pioneer in the field of etiquette training in the Bahamas has now set her sights on the corporate world... P atrice Ellis, founder and CEO of the Etiquette Image Institute, has already carved out her niche in the children’s etiquette market after having completed a certification in children’s etiquette at the Etiquette and Leadership Institute and the American School of Protocol. She facilitates workshops and seminars throughout the country and abroad, and now she is expanding her field of expertise by teaching social and communication skills to business employees. Ms Ellis was recently approached by local corporate entities to con duct workshops to sharpen their employees’ social skills. With more than ten years of experience in the field, Ms Ellis completed a certification course as a corporate etiquette consultant at the American School of Protocol in Atlanta, Georgia. She, along with her peers including diplomats from Europe, Africa and India, partici pated in courses including self-presentation; correspondence; effective networking; professional attire for men and women; dining skills, and mastering business etiquette. According to the etiquette guru, her institute takes companies “from being unnoticed to being unforget table by increasing employees’ selfconfidence and polishing their image, while equipping them with the tools and skills that will enhance their professional presence, and position their company for ultimate success.” “The life skills that we teach at the Etiquette and Image Institute can be applied no matter where our participants may go,” she said. Before fully delving into the business world, Ms Ellis recently con ducted the ‘Manners Matter’ pro gramme. Some 30 students participated and graduated from the first ever ‘Manners Matter’ training course. The programme caters to children and young people aged four through 18 and helps them build self-awareness and enhances selfrespect and self-confidence. The three-semester long programme consists of several fun-filled sessions including first impressions; types of handshakes; telephone manners; poise, dining etiquette, and etiquette for public places. Ms Ellis spent her early years working with women’s groups throughout the country and internationally under the banner ‘Women of Excellence and Elegance’. Over the years, her name has become synonymous with the term ‘etiquette’. Founded earlier this year, the Etiquette Image Institute specialises in helping companies to polish their corporate image and gain a compet itive edge over the competition. Ms Ellis said she is looking forward to helping business employees improve their corporate image and communication skills. “Most people are working in places they don’t like in order to buy stuff they don’t need.” T T h h o o m m a a s s H H e e r r o o l l d d AMERICAN existential psychologist Rollo May said, “the opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity; everybody trying to be like everybody else.” Living to please people along with being saddled with worries about what people will think caus es many to become prisoners of the status quo; driven by outer directed ideals that keep them working towards other people’s goals. The path that you choose in life will either take you towards your own dreams and desires or towards someone else’s, leading you to a life of personal dissatisfaction. Unless you set clear intentions about what you want and where you desire to go you will succeed at achieving very little. Think of a ship leaving port; in order for it to have a successful voyage it must set a destination and outline an appropriate naviga tion course. Here in the Bahamas, where we boast about it being better, how many of us really set goals or pursue our dreams? How many of us are working towards our own ideals? W W h h a a t t D D o o Y Y o o u u R R e e a a l l l l y y W W a a n n t t ? ? If you don’t know where you are going, you are certain not to get there. Life is not a state of permanency and change is constant; learning to embrace the winds of change is an empowering skill. Nothing could be more unfulfilling than the burden of living some one else’s life a sad life sentence that so many have declared for themselves. The question is what is it that you really want from life? Don’t create your life based on what oth ers want or think you should be, do or have; successful living is not about following fashion, it’s about authenticity. Asking yourself some tough questions: Why do you go to work? What if you had all the money you need? What are your dreams/goals? Where would you like to be in five years? Fifty years from now, will anyone know that you were here? What does success really mean to you? What are your strengths? What are you getting better at? These questions are a great starting point. But you owe it to yourself to set out on a journey of selfdiscovery, nothing is discovered until it is explored. Notice that all of the precious gems are buried within the mountains. The point here is whether or not you know whose goals you are working towards you are working towards some kind of objective and there are only two options, you either get what you want or what you don’t want. Unless you know what you are working toward, you live adrift with no sense of direction or purpose, becoming a rickety vessel tossed around by the gales of life. Yet you have intrinsic power to rise above the chaos and pursue your own goals; within you is a gigantic spirit of greatness waiting only for you to plug in. Too many of us are content members of the choir of complainers, holding steadfast to the role as victims of circumstances. Instead we need only define our goals and create a personal action plan, knowing that all is possible. F F i i n n a a l l T T h h o o u u g g h h t t s s Your life is waiting for you to pursue your own dreams. Complaining about what you don’t have keeps you in a state of powerless ness. Instead strengthen your strengths and build yourself from the inside out. Regardless of your situation, you have direct authority to release yourself from the popular carbon copy living. Whether it is job loss, sickness, financial bondage or whatever; you can change your life by learning to live by your own ideals. Why not make today the day that you shake off the shackles of what people will think (they are thinking it anyway) and stand up for your own goals and pursue your own personal growth. Now is the time to make something better happen. For more information about personal growth programmes contact the Coaching Studio at 326-3332 or 429-6770; or send an e-mail to coach4ward@yahoo.com. M M i i c c h h e e l l l l e e M M M M i i l l l l e e r r i i s s a a c c e e r r t t i i f f i i e e d d l l i i f f e e c c o o a a c c h h a a n n d d s s t t r r e e s s s s m m a a n n a a g g e e m m e e n n t t c c o o n n s s u u l l t t a a n n t t . . S S h h e e i i s s t t h h e e p p r r i i n n c c i i p p a a l l c c o o a a c c h h o o f f t t h h e e C C o o a a c c h h i i n n g g S S t t u u d d i i o o , , w w h h i i c c h h i i s s l l o o c c a a t t e e d d i i n n t t h h e e J J o o v v a a n n P P l l a a z z a a , , M M a a d d e e i i r r a a S S t t r r e e e e t t . . Q Q u u e e s s t t i i o o n n s s o o r r c c o o m m m m e e n n t t s s c c a a n n b b e e s s e e n n t t t t o o P P O O B B o o x x C C B B 1 1 3 3 0 0 6 6 0 0 ; ; e e m m a a i i l l t t o o c c o o a a c c h h 4 4 w w a a r r d d @ @ y y a a h h o o o o . . c c o o m m o o r r t t e e l l e e p p h h o o n n e e 4 4 2 2 9 9 6 6 7 7 7 7 0 0 . . Coach Approach: Whose goals are you working towards? Is it really possible to trust again? by Michelle M Miller, CC by MAGGIE BAIN PATRICE ELLIS , founder and CEO of the Etiquette Image Institute “The life skills that we teac h at the Etiquette and Image Institute can be applied no matter wher e our participants may go. P P a a t t r r i i c c e e E E l l l l i i s s

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C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM health BODYANDMIND T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e Tribune Health is observing Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October with a series of articles... By JEFFARAH GIBSON O vercoming the side effects and the aftermath of breast cancer treatment can be extremely challenging for many women. Some women are devastated when they suffer hair loss due to chemotherapy, and in even more drastic cases, when they have one or both breasts surgically removed in a mastectomy. For Kelda McDonald, a Bahamian breast cancer survivor, feeling comf ortable with her body and the way s he looked after undergoing a double m astectomy and chemotherapy took some time and a lot of emotional strength. She told Tribune Health the story of how she overcame her frustrations about her appearance. “I was diagnosed with breast cancer in July 2006. I had discovered a lump in my breast while I was in the shower. It felt a little hard and it was visible, so the following day I went to see a doctor,” she said. The doctor removed the lump, and after a series of examinations Ms McDonald was diagnosed with Stage II breast cancer. After finding out she had breast cancer Ms McDonald immediately sought consultations from doctors both local and abroad. “I spoke to one of my friends who had went through a similar situation, t hen I went to Florida where the doctor recommended that I have (both breasts removed and) reconstructive surgery,” she said. Ms McDonald said thoughts about the mastectomy and the consequent reconstructive surgery consumed her. After thinking long and hard about it she said she came to the conclusion that her life was more valuable than her size ‘D’ breasts. I was very skeptical a bout the idea of my b reasts being removed and I couldn’t imagine seeing myself without (them “I was hesitant, but I finally realised that my life was more important that my breasts,” she said. Ms McDonald agreed to the surgery, and while her main concern was for her overall health, the first thing she did after waking up following the surgery was to check her chest. "I knew that the doctors were going to remove both breasts, but it was so shocking when I woke up and felt that nothing was there. I was in complete disbelief," she said. Like most women in Bahamian society, she saw her breasts as valuable assets, as important aspects of her fem ininity. Following the double mastectomy, Ms McDonald said she experienced f eelings of insecurity and unhappiness, and she feared that she had lost her sex appeal which had turned the head of many a man in the past. “Even though I got implants immediately after reconstructive surgery, it did not feel the same. My chest was still flat and I would have to go every so often to get injections that made the implants expand. I was unhappy and concerned about h ow I would feel with s omeone (a man i ng at my body and not being happy about it,” she said. “After a while I came to terms with my situation and I thought the implants aren’t so bad though I can’t feel any sensation in the breasts. I started to wear clothing that accentuated my new bust, and that helped me feel better about my appearance.” Despite her concerns about her new appearance, Ms McDonald said she found someone who loved her and accepted her as she was, ‘flaws’ and all. But the struggle to come to terms with her breasts being removed was not the only difficulty she had to face. Undergoing chemotherapy treatment following the mastectomy, she noticed in the second week that her hair was thinning. “One day I went to brush my hair and (it m y sons how the hair was falling out and I asked my brother for some assistance in shaving the entire thing off, but he told me no,” she said. Ms McDonald said for her personally, she felt better shaving all of her hair off rather than watching patches of it fall out every day. “I couldn’t take seeing my hair on my pillow or in the palm of my hands, so I said I am going to cut the entire thing off. My brother saw that I had begun to shave my hair and so he finally gave me some assistance,” she said. When asked how she felt about her hair loss, Ms McDonald said she was more prepared for it than she for the l oss of her breasts. S he found a wig that she said looked g reat, but added that wearing it was so hot during the day she would sometimes “ditch” it and go out without anything on her head, no caps, no scarfs. “One day I decided to go out to the dry cleaners. I was confident about it and not so self-conscious. The minute I step into the wash house it felt as if everyone was looking at me and judg ing me at the same time. When I saw the first person looking at me I felt it was a bad idea to come out of the house without my wig.” She had to battle many physical and emotional challenges, but in time, and with the love and support from family and friends, Ms McDonald, like other breast cancer survivors, was able to overcome the hurdles on her path to recovery and live a happy, healthy and fulfilling life. Overcoming side effects, aftermath of breast cancer treatment SKIN is an excellent record keeper. Every moment of exposure to daylight adds up like money in the bank the problem is the payoff known as sun damage (also known as photodamage). As the top cause of premature signs of skin aging, sun damage shows on skin in the form of wrinkles and hyperpigmentation, and can led to a r epressed immune system and t he potential for skin cancer. E ven if exposure is limited to brief outdoor lunches or a 20-minute walk, cumulative exposure is enough to cause the signs of skin aging. The first line of daily defense against sun damage is daily use of SPF. Even on cloudy or overcast days, UV light can strike skin and cause damage, so simply wearing sunscreen on sunny days isn't enough. Fortunately, more sophis ticated sunscreen formulations with skin health benefits (think less chalky, less greasy) have made SPF a con venient addition to our morn ing routine. Speak with your professional skin therapist about SPF moisturisers that can be worn comfortably under make-up, or alone to deliver defence against skin aging UV light. Sun exposure and skin aging By Dr Chinyere Bullard Family medicine specialist I ALMOST cried when I was ordered to get my first mammogram. To think that I was at risk for this life threatening, painful disease! One of our best ways to fight any can cer is early detection, and this is especially true for breast cancer. This makes treatment much easier and more effective. Not to mention cheaper. How can you find breast cancer early? The best way, so far, to find breast lumps that may be cancerous is to do two things: 1. Have regular mammo grams. (Every one to two years) 2. Have your family medicine specialist check your breasts every year at your annual physical. BRCA-genes (so-called ‘cancer genes’)? Women with risk factors such as a history of two or more first-degree family members having breast or ovarian cancer under the age of 40 may need to be tested for the BRCA. Your family medical doctor can determine if you need a test for the BRCA gene. Currently studies are being done in our country by Dr Theodore Turnquest and Dr DeVaughn Curling, both cancer specialists, to determine when women in the Bahamas should have BRCA gene tests done, and how to treat the results. What is a mammogram? A mammogram is the most effective way to find breast cancer early, up to two years before the lump is even large enough to feel. It is a special kind of x-ray of your breasts. A radiologist will look at the x-rays for signs of cancer or other breast problems. Because the amount of radiation used in the x-ray is very small, mammograms are safe. Do mammograms hurt? Mammograms can be uncomfortable. The breast has to be squeezed, but the procedure doesn't take very long. How often should I get a mammogram? According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, American women should start routine mammograms at 45. According to the Canadian Academy of Family Physicians, Canadian women should start their routine mammograms at 50, and in general you should undergo one every two years. But all this depends on your risk. According to Dr Curling, the average Bahamian woman should start screening for breast cancer at the age of 40. If you have a positive family history of breast cancer you should be screened 10 years before the age your relative was when they were diagnosed. If you are under 25 your best test may be a MRI or ultrasound. How often should my family medical specialist check my breasts? You should have a breast exam in addition to a mammogram every year, depending on your risk. What is the doctor checking for? The main thing to look for is any change in your breasts. It's normal for your breasts to be different sizes. A firm ridge in the lower curve of your breast is also normal. Changes to look for in your breasts Any new lump which may not be painful or tender Unusual thickening of your breasts Sticky or bloody discharge from your nipples Any changes in the skin of your nipples or breasts, such as puckering or dimpling . An unusual increase in the size of one breast One breast unusually low er than the other If you want to check your breasts, do the exam a few days after your period. Your breasts aren't so sore or as lumpy at this time. What are some risk factors for breast cancer? Having had breast cancer i ncreases your risk of developing it again. A family history of certain types of breast cancer, particularly in your mother, daughter, or sister. Having a genetic defect in the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene. Heavy alcohol use having more than three drinks a day raises your risk for breast cancer as does as smoking a pack of cigarettes. Eating lots of red meat women who eat more than one serving of red meat a day, especially post-menopausal women, have a more than 50 per cent risk increase. Women who eat processed meat (bacon, sausage, baloney, and ham, ect) daily, increase their risk for breast cancer to more than 60 per cent. Studies show that eating more fibre can help to decrease the risks associated with red meat consumption. Obesity increases your risk for breast cancer, also cancer of the uterus, colon, kidney, and the esophagus, not to mention the fact that it increases your risk for hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, heart disease and stroke. Avoiding weight gain is an effective way to decrease these risks. Race I want to say the human race. White women are seeing a over-all increase in the breast cancer rate, but among women aged 40 to 50 black women have a higher incidence rate and death rate. I would like to encourage you to get your physical done yearly, and adapt some healthy lifestyle changes for yourself and also as an example to our children. I would also like to dedi cate this article to my Auntie Beverly Lockheart who fought breast cancer tooth and nail. Steps to finding breast lumps early by SARAH B EEK DR CHINYERE BULLARD

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FOR today’s purposes we can divide the cucurbits into four categories: Cucumbers, summer squash, winter squash, and pumpkins. We will deal with melons and watermelons at a later d ate. A ll cucumbers, squash and p umpkins need a rich soil and good drainage. This is achieved by growing them in ‘hills’ that are small areas of well composted and well fertilised soil that need not be raised, but often are. A hill is usually about 18 inches in diameter and can accommodate three or four seeds. When the seedlings appear the weakest is removed. C C u u c c u u m m b b e e r r The most common type of cucumber grown in the Bahamas is the Ridge, or American, which is six inches to a foot long, bears short spines on its surface, is very seedy and has a strong taste. The English cucumber is much longer and has to be grown on trellises to maintain a straight shape. It is often grown in glasshouses and, not being fertilised by insects, is seedless. English cucumber is far milder than Ridge. There are also oriental varie ties of cucumber that I have n ot had the opportunity to try b ut seem to resemble the English cucumber rather than the Ridge. Armenian cucumber is a squash, not a true cucumber. When the cucumber vines reach maturity they put out both male and female flowers, the female flowers being identified as growing from miniature fruits. These fruits swell when the female flowers are pollinated by insects, usually bees. A Ridge cucumber is ripe when the spines can be rubbed off with the fingertips. S S u u m m m m e e r r S S q q u u a a s s h h Summer squash includes straightneck, crookneck, zucchini, scallopini and Patty Pan. The plants do not vine but produce their fruits from the base of upright broadleaf stems. All varieties of summer squash should be picked just short of maturity before the seeds grow too large. Crookneck and straightneck squash are very productive and usually give high yields. Zucchini can be yellow, green, and so dark a green as to be almost black. Zucchini has a uniform shapea nd is easier to slice and cook than other summer squash v arieties. W W i i n n t t e e r r S S q q u u a a s s h h W inter squash are slower growing and are vinous. Their name refers to the keeping qualities of the fruits and the fact they can be stored for a long time. The most successful variety for use in the Bahamas is Butternut, though I have also had success with spaghetti squash. Acorn squash has never produced well for me. P P u u m m p p k k i i n n Calabaza pumpkin produces enormous vines that set down roots along their length and can eventually wander away from their original growing position. They need a large area in which to grow but are otherwise quite trouble free. I have made the growing of cucurbits seem rather simple but there are drawbacks I should mention. Sometimes both male and female flowers form but pollination does not occur. If you notice any female flowers being neglected then you can pollinate the next set yourself by picking a m ale flower and stripping it o f its petals, inserting it into t he receptacle of the female flower and tying the female petals around to secure. You could also use a small paintbrush or ear swab to transfer pollen from a male flower to the female flower, but the old fashioned way seems more romantic. Cucumbers, squash and pumpkins bear lovely green foliage when they are young but by the time they produce fruit tend to be rather ragged o r even drastically dissipated. P art of this is caused by our a utumn weather producing early morning mists or draughts that wet the leaves. These wet leaves allow fungus spores, powdery mildew and other airborne diseases to attach themselves. When the sun rises and warms the leaves these diseases develop and begin the process of skeletonising the structure of the plant. You can apply fungicide in either powder or liquid form b ut I have found that this is n o more than a delaying tact ic. The good news is that most plants give a healthy harvest before succumbing to disease. Consecutive sowing of new hills should keep you in more squash and pumpkins than you can handle. C M Y K C M Y K GARDENING THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2009, PAGE 11B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM A NDROS C AT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's h ighs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH F T. LAUDERDALE T AMPA ORLANDOLow: 67F/19C L ow: 65F/18C Low: 75F/24C Low: 75F/24C L ow: 74F/23C Low: 76F/24C Low: 72F/22C Low: 67F/19C High: 79F/26C High: 83F/28C High: 83F/28C High: 83F/28C H igh: 83F/28C High: 82F/28C High: 83F/28C L ow: 68F/20C High: 81F/27C L ow: 74F/23C High: 85F/29CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 75F/24C High: 81F/27C L ow: 77F/25C H igh: 84F/29C Low: 73F/23C High: 82F/28C Low: 75F/24C High: 82F/28C L ow: 78F/26C High: 84F/29C Low: 77F/25C High: 83F/28C Low: 75F/24C High: 83F/28C Low: 77F/25C High: 86F/30C Low: 75F/24C H igh: 86F/30C High: 81F/27CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECASTPartly sunny and breezy with a shower a round Mostly cloudy and breezy; a shower Mostly cloudy, a shower; breezy Partly sunny, a t-storm possible C louds and sun, a shower possible High:83Low:72High:8 High:8 High:8 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeelA couple of afternoon thunderstorms High:8 L ow:7 L ow:7 L ow:7 AccuWeather RealFeel 78F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 75F 86-71F 85-83F 90-78F 96-80F L ow:7 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANACHigh ..................................................81F/27C Low ....................................................73F/23CN ormal high ......................................84F/29C N ormal low ........................................73F/23C Last year's high ..................................91F/33C Last year's low ..................................70F/21C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.18" Year to date ................................................31.88" Normal year to date ....................................43.26" S tatistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU First FullLast New Oct. 25Nov. 2Nov. 9Nov. 16Sunrise . . . . . . 7:11 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:38 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 9:30 a.m. Moonset . . . . . 8:17 p.m. Today Wednesday T hursday Friday H ighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 8:48 a.m.3.52:28 a.m.0.0 9:05 p.m.2.73:16 p.m.0.3 9:32 a.m.3.33:10 a.m.0.3 9:50 p.m.2.54:02 p.m.0.4 10:17 a.m.3.13:52 a.m.0.4 10:36 p.m.2.54:48 p.m.0.7 11:04 a.m.3.04:37 a.m.0.7 11:26 p.m.2.45:38 p.m.0.9 S aturday Sunday Monday 11:54 a.m.2.85:27 a.m.0.9 -----6:30 p.m.1.0 12:21 a.m.2.36:22 a.m.1.2 12:48 p.m.2.77:25 p.m.1.2 1:20 a.m.2.37:22 a.m.1.3 1:44 p.m.2.68:18 p.m.1.2 MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. ABACO ANDROS CAT ISLAND CROOKED ISLAND ELEUTHERA FREEPORT GREAT EXUMA GREAT INAGUA LONG ISLAND MAYAGUANA NASSAU SAN SALVADOR RAGGED ISLAND Today:NE at 15-25 Knots6-10 Feet10 Miles83F Wednesday:ENE at 15-25 Knots8-12 Feet10 Miles83F Today:NE at 15-25 Knots4-7 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ENE at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F Today:NE at 12-25 Knots5-9 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots5-9 Feet4 Miles85F Today:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5 Miles85F Today:NE at 15-25 Knots5-9 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ENE at 10-20 Knots6-10 Feet10 Miles85F Today:ENE at 12-25 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ENE at 15-25 Knots4-8 Feet10 Miles85F Today:NE at 15-25 Knots2-4 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet5 Miles85F Today:E at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet7 Miles85F Wednesday:ESE at 8-16 Knots2-4 Feet5 Miles85F Today:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ESE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet4 Miles85F Today:E at 7-14 Knots4-7 Feet4 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots4-8 Feet6 Miles85F Today:NE at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:ENE at 12-25 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F Today:NE at 7-14 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Wednesday:SE at 6-12 Knots1-3 Feet4 Miles86F Today:NE at 15-25 Knots4-7 Feet10 Miles85F Wednesday:E at 8-16 Knots3-6 Feet4 Miles85F UV INDEXTODAYThe higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTMnumber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. AccuWeather.com H Atlanta A t l a n t a Highs: 71F/22C H i g h s : 7 1 F / 2 2 C Kingston K i n g s t o n Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Caracas C a r a c a s Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Panama City P a n a m a C i t y Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Limon L i m o n Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Managua Ma n a g u a Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Cozumel C o z u m e l Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Belize B e l i z e Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Charlotte C h a r l o t t e Highs: 73F/23C H i g h s : 7 3 F / 2 3 C Charleston C h a r l e s t o n Highs: 74F/23C H i g h s : 7 4 F / 2 3 C Savannah S a v a n n a h Highs: 73F/23C H i g h s : 7 3 F / 2 3 C Pensacola P e n s a c o l a Highs: 74F/23C H i g h s : 7 4 F / 2 3 C Daytona Beach D a y t o n a B e a c h Highs: 78F/26C H i g h s : 7 8 F / 2 6 C Tampa T a m p a Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Freeport F r e e p o r t Highs: 81F/27C H i g h s : 8 1 F / 2 7 C Miami Mi a m i Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Nassau N a s s a u Highs: 83F/28C H i g h s : 8 3 F / 2 8 C Havana H a v a n a Highs: 84F/29C H i g h s : 8 4 F / 2 9 C Santiago de Cuba S a n t i a g o d e C u b a Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C San Juan S a n J u a n Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Santa S a n t a Domingo D o m i n g o Highs: 85F/29C H i g h s : 8 5 F / 2 9 C Trinidad T r i n i d a d Tobago T o b a g o Highs: 89F/32C H i g h s : 8 9 F / 3 2 C Port-au-Prince P o r t a u P r i n c e Highs: 91F/33C H i g h s : 9 1 F / 3 3 C Cape Hatteras C a p e H a t t e r a s Highs: 69F/21C H i g h s : 6 9 F / 2 1 C Aruba Curacao A r u b a C u r a c a o Highs: 88F/31C H i g h s : 8 8 F / 3 1 C Antigua A n t i g u a Highs: 87F/31C H i g h s : 8 7 F / 3 1 C Barbados B a r b a d o s Highs: 86F/30C H i g h s : 8 6 F / 3 0 C Bermuda B e r m u d a Highs: 77F/25C H i g h s : 7 7 F / 2 5 C Atlanta Highs: 71F/22C Kingston Highs: 87F/31C Caracas Highs: 89F/32C Panama City Highs: 86F/30C Limon Highs: 84F/29C Managua Highs: 89F/32C Cozumel Highs: 86F/30C Belize Highs: 84F/29C Charlotte Highs: 73F/23C Charleston Highs: 74F/23C Savannah Highs: 73F/23C Pensacola Highs: 74F/23C Daytona Beach Highs: 78F/26C Tampa Highs: 83F/28C Freeport Highs: 81F/27C Miami Highs: 83F/28C Nassau Highs: 83F/28C Havana Highs: 84F/29C Santiago de Cuba Highs: 86F/30C San Juan Highs: 88F/31C Santa Domingo Highs: 85F/29C Trinidad Tobago Highs: 89F/32C Port-au-Prince Highs: 91F/33C Cape Hatteras Highs: 69F/21C Aruba Curacao Highs: 88F/31C Antigua Highs: 87F/31C Barbados Highs: 86F/30C Bermuda Highs: 77F/25C INSURANCEMANAGMENTTRACKINGMAP Showers Warm Cold Stationary Rain T-storms Flurries Snow IceShown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonight's lows. N S EW S E 1 0-20 knots N S EW S E 15-25 knots N S EW S E 12-25 knots N S EW S E 15-25 knots N S EW S E 1 5-25 knots N S EW E E E E W 7-14 knots N S EW S E 7-14 knots N S EW S E 15-25 knots Cukes and Zukes and company by JACK HARDY ZUCCHINIS (shown out slow but are normally very productive.