Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Pim bowin’ it

91F
80F

PLENTY OF
SUNSHINE

HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.264



CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL




The Tribune

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009



Vightante mob attac
alleged! Kidnappe

Man who
reportedly
held teenage
girl for two
days taken
to hospital

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN ANGRY mob of cut-
lass wielding vigilantes sent a
man to hospital for reported-
ly kidnapping a teenage girl
and holding her against her
will in a tiny, dilapidated
home on Lewis Street for two
days.

Assistant Commissioner
Raymond Gibson confirmed
that a man had been taken to
hospital due to injuries stem-
ming from an attack on Lewis
Street yesterday, but said he
was not in police custody as a
formal complaint had not
been made against him as of
press time.

But conflicting radio
reports broadcast yesterday
evening claimed police were
searching for the man who
escaped from custody while
receiving medical attention at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal yesterday afternoon. The
media report also claimed the

a

THE TEENAGE girl was allegedly held in this ti

man had been arrested Tues-
day night for allegedly hav-
ing unlawful sex with an
underage girl.

When confronted with the
kidnapping and assault claims
yesterday, ACP Gibson
denied that the man had been
arrested but said the RBPF is
investigating the merits of the
claims.

"There is some ongoing
investigation into this matter
and if information surfaces
that he is responsible for some
crime, including molestation

SEE page 15

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ny home on Lewis Street

Minister Neko Grant ‘set for
promotion in Cabinet shuffle’

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTER
of Works and Utili-
ties Neko Grant is
set to receive a sub-
stantial promotion
when Cabinet is
shuffled sometime
next week, as
reports reaching The Tribune
suggest that the MP is set to
be given responsibility for the
entire island of Grand
Bahama.

Along with this elevation
of Mr Grant it is reported that
the former Minister of Local
Government, Sidney Collie,
who had to resign from Cabi-
net in 2007, will be brought
back into the fold possibly as



NEKO GRANT

the new minister of
Youth and Sports.

The current minis-
ter, Desmond Ban-
nister, is reportedly
being wooed by the
Prime Minister to
stay in the Cabinet
and take up the post
of either Attorney
General — that was
left vacant when
Michael Barnett was
elevated to Chief
Justice — or the post
of Minister of Education.

If Mr Bannister is promot-
ed to Education it is believed
that the current Minister, Carl
Bethel will be moved to the
Attorney General’s post.

Mr Bannister has gone on
record in recent months as
saying that he is contemplat-
ing whether or not to remain

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES, THERE WILL BE NO
USA TODAY IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE

anaees Uniform

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Was

AR U
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE



"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875









PLPs set to vote on
explosive leadership
challenge resolutions

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE National General Council of the PLP
will vote tonight on three explosive resolutions
that are designed to “stack the deck” against any
opponent who seeks to challenge party leader
Perry Christie at their October 21 National Con-

vention.
































A

ME PMMA OURS

Keod Smith

confident of

winning PLP
chairman post

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER MP Keod
Smith is confident he will
be elected as national
chairman of the PLP when
he runs for the coveted
position at the party’s con-
vention, he announced
yesterday.

The former MP for
Mount Moriah served as
vice-chairman for the PLP
in the 18 months leading
up to the 2002 general
election. He believes his
experience as an activist,
advocate and civil leader
makes him a good candi-
date for the post.

If elected, Mr Smith
vowed to stay out of the
political race and allow
another PLP hopeful to
run for the seat in Mount
Moriah in the 2012 elec-

SEE page nine



The first amendment, which seeks to block the

SEE page eight

Heated clash
in Travolta
attempted

extortion trial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HEATED exchanges
erupted between a defence
attorney and a key witness in
the attempted extortion trial
of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne yesterday.

US attorney Michael
McDermott was back on the
witness stand again yesterday
for further cross-examination.
Early into his cross-examina-
tion Mr Shurland became vis-
ibly frustrated with Mr
McDermott’s answer in
response to his question as to
whether he had told Ms
Bridgewater that their con-
versations had been private.

“When you told Ms Bridge-
water that the conversations
had been private and you
knew that police were taping,
that was a lie,” Mr Shurland
said.

“Tt was part accurate, part
inaccurate,” Mr McDermott
said.

“My lady, I am not going
to let him get out of hand if
the court is not going to reel
him in,” Mr Shurland said.
Senior Justice Allen told Mr
Shurland that he did not run
the court and asked him to sit
three times. Senior Justice
Allen again reiterated her
admonition about conduct in
the courtroom and reminded
both men not to engage in
commentary.

“My lady is he going to
keep running off at the
mouth? “So you told a lie?”
Mr Shurland asked.

“Tt’s partially true, partially
inaccurate,” Mr McDermott
said, explaining that the con-
versation he had with Bridge-
water on January 12 was pri-
vate and that the conversa-
tion on January 18 was not
private. Mr Shurland then
questioned whether Mr
McDermott had leaked the
extortion plot to the media.

SEE page 10

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Dwight, Keva
Major appeal
is adjourned

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN APPEAL lodged by
convicted drug trafficker
Dwight Major and his wife
Keva Major has been
adjourned for four weeks fol-
lowing a brief hearing in the
Court of Appeal yesterday.

Commercial Law Advocates
attorney Keod Smith, repre-
senting the Majors, both 40,
requested the adjournment as
he said he had not been able
to contact Dwight Major for
instructions on how to proceed
with the matter, as Major is cur-
rently being transferred
between prison facilities in the
United States.

Major is now in a Texas
prison and is expected to be set-
tled in another facility soon, Mr
Smith said.

The Majors’ appeal against
the Superintendent of Her
Majesty’s Prisons, the Attorney
General and the Commissioner
of Police, relates to the couple’s
complaints about inhumane
treatment at Her Majesty’s
Prison, where they were held
on allegations of drug traffick-
ing in 2003. They then fought a
five- year extradition battle

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DWIGHT and Keva Major.

before being extradited to the
United States in April last year.

Mr Smith told the court: “Mr
Major is currently between
facilities and I have not been
able to reach him so I have not
had any specific instructions as
to how to proceed with the
application.



“T was hoping it would have
been settled, but I’ve not had
any communication from him.

“T did not have any instruc-
tions to take steps in one way or
another.”

Sandra Dee Gardener of the
Attorney General’s Office did
not object to the application for

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adjournment.
Justice of Appeal Hartman
Longley adjourned the Appeal
Share your news Court hearing to Thursday,
November 5.
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

MEMORIAL TO THE LEGACY OF
SIR CLEMENT T. MAYNARD

EO UR Ew Te eae

Saturday, October 10th, 2009
4pm at Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3



GOVERNMENT EMBRYO TRANSFER PROGRAMME
O In brief

‘Parasite infestation
killed livestock from
govt embryo scheme’

Man and hoy
arraigned on
double murder
allegation

A 23-year-old man and a
16-year-old boy were
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on a double
murder charge.

Blake Rahming, 23, of
Old Cedar Street and the
juvenile were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane.

They have been charged
with the murders of
Alphaues Curtis Jr and Ben-
jamin Vues.

Gunshot

Both men were found
dead with multiple gunshot
wounds in a wooden house
off St Vincent Road on
April 16.

Curtis was reportedly 42
while Veus was said to be in
his sixties.

Rahming and the juvenile
were not required to plead
to the murder charges and
were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street and adjourned to
October 16.

Weather
experts keep
eye on Henri

LOCAL meteorologists
are still monitoring Tropical
Storm Henri although the
weather system is weaken-
ing over the Atlantic Ocean
and expected to fizzle into a
tropical wave within a day.

The National Hurricane
Centre in Miami said
Wednesday that Henri is
about 600 kilometers east of
the northern Leeward
Islands.

The Bahamas’ Chief
Meteorologist Basil Dean
said while Henri is not
expected to be a dire threat
to the Bahamas, parts of the
country can expect some
light rain from the system at
the start of next week.

"(Henri's) still moving in
a generally west direction at
45 miles per hour, we antici-
pate that it will weaken as it
moves westward and
encourage some hostile
upper level conditions. And
should that happen it could
fizzle into a tropical wave,"
said Mr Dean.

Rain

If the storm continues on
this projected track, islands
in the southeast Bahamas —
including Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island,
Acklins — and the Turks
and Caicos Islands should
experience some rain on
Sunday, Mr Dean said.

While islands in the north-
west Bahamas, including
Central Exuma, Andros,
Long Island, Cat Island, the
Berry Islands, Grand
Bahama and New Provi-
dence should expect rain on
Monday.

Mr Dean also warned
locals to be prepared for a
major hurricane even
though this storm season has
been relatively quiet.

Henri is the eighth named
tropical storm of this year's
Atlantic hurricane season,
which began June 1 and
ends November 30.

aL)

THE telephone number
for Graycliff Restaurant
printed in Wednesday’s
edition of Tribune Taste
was incorrect.

Persons wishing to
inquire about the restau-
rant’s special four-week
cooking course can con-
tact Deanne Williams at
302-9155.

Graycliff’s cooking
series promises to teach
participants some of the
five-star restaurant’s culi-
nary secrets.

The Tribune apologises
for any inconvenience this
error may have caused.



By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FAILURE to carry out rou-
tine internal parasite control
measures led to the death of
five animals from the govern-
ment's groundbreaking Embryo
Transfer Programme, the Min-
istry of Agriculture admitted
yesterday.

According to a brief state-
ment from the ministry, the
young animals, a mix of kids
and sheep, all died during the
first five days of this month
because of "heavy internal par-
asite infestation".

The ministry added that cor-
rective steps have been taken
to prevent more deaths of the
precious livestock — which are a
major part of the country’s
ambitious plan to become more
self-sufficient — including staff
reassignment and increased sur-
veillance.

"The severity of the infesta-
tion was exacerbated by recent
rains and the necessary con-
finement of animals and a fail-
ure to practice routine internal
parasite control measures,” said
the statement, which was
released after The Tribune's
inquiries into the deaths.

Agriculture Minister Larry
Cartwright said he was not
made aware of the deaths until
The Tribune contacted him
about the situation yesterday
afternoon, before the ministry
issued the statement.

He said that he had last
received an update on the ani-
mals’ condition about two
weeks ago, adding that veteri-
narians were gearing up for
another round of embryo
implantation.

Mr Cartwright promised to
look into the incident and about

HOMO TLLAY

Thousands of poker players
are expected to give the local
economy a boost come Janu-
ary when they descend on
Atlantis to take part in what
has been billed as the “largest
poker tournament to ever take
place outside of Las Vegas.”

PokerStars.com, the site that
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around 230,000 players at any
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AMBITIOUS PLAN: The TT S Embryo Transfer Sunil
is designed to make the country self-sufficient. In this file photo Dr
Leroy Santiago, project coordinator for Ovatech Genetics, is pic-

tured with a kid.

three hours later issued a state-
ment which confirmed the
reported deaths.

He explained that it was nor-
mal for livestock to become
infected with worms at this time
of year, but said several animals
dying within a short period was
reason for concern, as it could
be a sign of a contagious illness.

Government is preparing to
sell the offspring of the pro-

gramme to local farmers in the
coming weeks , said Mr
Cartwright.

He also said the project,
which began with 120 female
sheep and goats, has spawned
over 200 kids and lambs — which
are all housed at the Gladstone
Road Agricultural Centre.

The project's second round
is expected to begin next Feb-
ruary.

poker fournament in Atlantis

al

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE

www.tribune242.com —

updated daily at 2pm

Only the beginning in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — President Obama has
no plans to pull U.S. troops out of
Afghanistan. After eight years of war there,
withdrawal is not among the options the
administration is considering as it designs a
new Strategy.

Also not being considered is any explo-
ration of possible peace talks with the Tal-
iban, the indigenous Islamic group that once
controlled large swaths of Afghanistan.

When asked whether the US. could with-
draw from Afghanistan — a country known
as the “graveyard of empires” — White
House spokesman Robert Gibbs said:
“That’s not something that has ever been
entertained.”

“T don’t think we have the option to
leave,” he added. “T think that’s quite clear.”

Both Defence Secretary Robert Gates
and Gen. Stanley McChrystal — the com-
mander of U.S. and allied troops in
Afghanistan — have indicated that the Tal-
iban has the momentum and is gaining
ground.

Eight American soldiers lost their lives
in fighting at an undermanned outpost in
Afghanistan last weekend.

NATO said in a statement that the insur-
gents — that is, the Afghan fighters — lost
100 men in the same battle.

Obama is reviewing his war strategy in
Afghanistan at a time when American pub-
lic opinion is becoming sceptical about U.S.
efforts there.

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll last
month showed that 59 per cent of those
polled said they are feeling less confident
that the war will come to a successful con-
clusion, while 51 per cent said they would
oppose sending more troops to the conflict.

Obama has been conferring with Pentagon
officials, commanders on the ground and
congressional leaders as he takes his time
to make what could be the toughest decision
of his presidency.

Obama’s big dilemma now is to decide
whether to approve McChrystal’s request
for 40,000 more troops in addition to the
68,000 there now.

Another option — one pushed by Vice
President Joe Biden — is to reduce troop
numbers and instead rely on bombing and
raids by Special Forces to keep any al-Qaida
elements on the run.

Obama has been conducting a series of

Sirst Baptist Church

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“Live in such a way that

not-so-secret meetings to decide his next
move. Somehow the White House has man-
aged to change the theme — lawmakers
emerge from their White House meetings
proclaiming that Obama had ruled out a
large reduction in troops. Nice going. The
issue is whether to increase the number of
troops.

In a speech in London, McChrystal went
public with his position and was later slapped
down by Gates who reminded military lead-
ers that their advice to the president should
remain private.

“In this process, it is imperative that all of
us taking part in these deliberations — civil-
ians and military alike — provide our best
advice to the president candidly but pri-
vately,” Gates said.

I think it’s good to have the debate out in
the open and for the American people to
know what the stakes are.

The president has called the war in
Afghanistan a “necessary war” and it
behooves him to explain why we must pay
such a human cost, not to mention billions of
dollars to keep it going.

Are there any lessons from the past, espe-
cially the Vietnam War?

Is there anything to learn from the expe-
rience of the Russians, who were forced to
withdraw from Afghanistan in the 1980s,
despite their high-tech military? (Back then,
the U.S. was a big help to the Afghan fight-
ers and other anti-communists, including
Osama bin Laden, the wealthy Saudi heir
who later led al-Qaida).

Where are the Pakistanis? They know the
terrain. I thought it was interesting that the
Pakistanis decided it was their fight, too,
when Taliban forces reached striking dis-
tance of Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan,
before being pushed back.

If Obama goes with the military leaders on
the ground, there will be many more years
dedicated to defeating the Taliban and to
U.S. efforts at nation-building in
Afghanistan.

I say we should pull up stakes, let United
Nations peacekeepers try to stabilize the
Afghan government and support it with a
new, non-narcotics economy.

(This article was written by Helen Thomas

c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



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Educational
system report:
Must do better

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As we know, this year’s
national grade from students
sitting the Bahamas General
Certificate of Secondary Edu-
cation (BGCSE) has slightly
improved to a ‘D+’ average
from last year’s ‘D’ average.
The results from the Bahamas
Junior Certificate (BJC) has
risen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘C-’. Is
that good enough? No it is
not! Why? Because I know
that Bahamians know our
young children have much
more potential and capability
than what it seems.

Looking at the two most
important subjects; 56 per
cent of students from public
schools who took the English
language exam “fail”, and 82
per cent of public school stu-
dents who take the math
exam, “fail.” According to the
Coalition “this is unaccept-
able. Everyone in business,
science and engineering
agrees that an understanding
of basic math is critical to a
range of both low-tech and
high-tech jobs — from carpen-
try to computer system main-
tenance, the management of a
small business and even the
management of one’s person-
al finances.”

“The overwhelming and
critical national problems are
the extremely high failure
rates in high school English
and Mathematics,” the Coali-
tion says. The BGCSE data
support this conclusion.

Today, in order for one to
be applicable for a job or to
enter college, it is a require-
ment to have at least five
BGCSBP’s with grades of *C’

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



and above, including Mathe-
matics and English Language.
If these requirements are not
met, then one can lose the
opportunity of getting hired
and students will not be able
to enter college unless they
do ‘Prep classes’ in Mathe-
matics and English or if they
decide to sit the BGCSE
exam once more.

This can be a challenge,
because students will be
placed one step behind when
they could have been one step
forward.

With regards, to the nation-
al ‘D+’ average, in my opin-
ion, I know many students
have the potential to do better
and make improvements,
because there is always room
for improvement. In terms of
getting low grades in a Math-
ematics or English exam,
doesn’t mean the students are
not doing their best. Howev-
er, there are students today
who are excellent at carpentry
work, electrical work and
computer work and who have
the potential to be that great
artist. In schools today, these
subjects are not fully being
focused on so that students
can utilise their skills in these
areas.

From the beginning of high
school, teachers should know
which student is good in these
various areas. The education-
al system needs to be
revamped and reformed in

terms of having such students
do what they love to do in
BJC and BGCSE.

The Ministry of Education
needs to implement an initia-
tive to have students that are
really good at hands on work
to get them involved and to
also focus on the core sub-
jects, Maths and English as
well.

Furthermore initiative
needs to be taken for Mathe-
matics, English and Science
subjects.

The Ministry of Education
can look at focusing more on
Maths, English and Science
for three days out of a school
week, These are the major
core classes, and I do believe
when a focus is brought on
these three classes on a regu-
lar basis, students will be
more inclined to learn them
and will do much better when
the BJC and BGCSE come
around. I suggest that other
classes can be held during the
remaining two days of the
week. It will enhance stu-
dents’ knowledge and abili-
ties in the main classes that
will help them in the end.

If we work with the stu-
dents and the ministry of edu-
cation, it is possible that a
change will be made that will
better the educational system
and will have a major turn in
this country. We must not let
our educational system be
dysfunctional, but function for
the benefit of the children of
this nation who are the future.

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
October, 2009.

Eastern Road is ‘becoming the wild west’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

T have read this morning with great interest and
am in full agreement with the letter to the Editor
“$5.8 million on Miss Universe — but how much
on catching criminals”?

I happen to live on Eastern Road and it is
becoming the wild west, we are all afraid to walk
the dogs anytime it is not daylight. Most of us will
no longer sit on our patios, or have the doors
open, so that we can enjoy the lovely sea breeze
and beautiful views, which is the reason to live on
the water.

But until the crime is aimed at the members of
parliament and their family members, we will
continue to only get lip service, as for some rea-
son their heads are in the sand. Which by the
way we will not be needing much of, as the tourist
will not return to what used to be a beautiful
country, as the news of our crime and rundown
appearance, unkempt streets and nothing for
them to do except use the pools and beaches is
already the talk all over the world.

So our government had better pull their heads
out of the sand and be serious about the impor-
tant things which will get our country back on
track, before spending our tax dollars on trying to

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lure the tourist, because they are already going to
safer places to spend their dollars and purchase
products that are from the country they are vis-
iting and not from China and knock off designer
items.

Also, has any member of parliament tried
walking in what is called the straw market by
themselves and not with a group of bodyguards to
see how those people selling goods treat the
tourist, let them just go there on their own and
not announce their arrival. I did this year with
house guests and I will never expose myself or
anyone else to the rude behaviour displayed by
most of the people at that horrible place.

It is time now for all Bahamians who do not
want to see what is left of our country destroyed
to start making the people responsible for what
has happened to take responsibility for their non-
action and if they are unable to cope get the
right people in place that can get the job done.

This problem has been slowly brewing for
many, many years and there are many people in
high places that have much to answer for.

A CONCERNED BAHAMIAN
Nassau,
October 1, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE





PM: climate change poses
‘serious threat’ to Bahamas

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN his starkest warning yet
about the danger that climate
change poses for the Bahamas,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has told the international
community that it is a “serious
threat to our economic viabil-
ity, social development and our
territorial integrity.”

Ahead of a critical confer-
ence when countries are to get
what many are calling a “last
chance to save the world” by
creating a new pact to reverse
the negative impacts of climate
change, Mr Ingraham empha-
sised that if current trends con-
tinue some low-lying states —
of which the Bahamas is one
— “are set to become entirely
uninhabitable.”

He was speaking to world
leaders and diplomats in a pre-
recorded address to the United
Nations Summit on Climate
Change held at the organisa-
tion’s headquarters in New
York City on September 21.

Leaders

That summit drew together
more than a hundred world
leaders, from some of the
worst polluting countries to the
most vulnerable, with the aim
of galvanising political will and
focusing on Key political issues
that require resolution if nego-
tiations on a new agreement
are to conclude successfully at
the Copenhagen Climate Con-
ference in December.

The Prime Minister told the
Summit of how “the serious
challenges facing the world as
a result of climate change...are
particularly acute for small
island developing states like
The Bahamas which are
extremely vulnerable to rising
sea levels, coral bleaching and
increasingly powerful tropical
hurricanes.”

“Hundreds of millions of
dollars” that could have been
spent on “critically important
national development priori-
ties” have already had to be
diverted to “repeated restora-
tion efforts” required after the
passage of major hurricanes
“in the last decade alone,” he



added, limiting our progress
towards sustainable develop-
ment.

The Prime Minister, on
behalf of The Bahamas, called
for a global accord in Copen-
hagen with “ambitious legally
binding targets” that will
achieve the objectives of the
United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate
Change.

The UNFCC sets out an
overall framework for inter-
governmental efforts to tackle
climate change, and has been
ratified by 192 countries — but
not the United States.

Speaking to the U.N. Sum-
mit, which was also personally
attended by a Bahamian dele-
gation headed by Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, Mr
Ingraham said industrialised
countries “have a responsibili-
ty to accept the leading role
they must play in this enter-
prise, especially by committing
to a reduction in their green-
house gas emissions.”

Disagreement between rich
and poor nations over how to
share the burden of slashing
greenhouse gases, which are
primarily a product of indus-
trial and other economic activ-
ity, and who will pay for it, has
so far hampered any signifi-
cant action on climate change.

At present, another Bahami-
an delegation headed by
Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission Director Philip Weech
is in Bangkok, Thailand, where
marathon U.N. climate change
talks are underway between
180 nations towards laying the



LOCAL NEWS

fone

"h f tis 4 }



groundwork that will under-
gird the December agreement
that many hope will change
that.

Earlier this year, Mr Weech
provided an insight into the
significance of reversing cli-
mate change when he
explained how a one metre sea
level rise would see three of
The Bahamas major land
masses — Abaco, Andros and
Grand Bahama — either total-
ly or partially flooded.

Financing

Mr Ingraham urged the
international community to
make it simpler for countries
like the Bahamas to obtain the
financing they will need to
fund adaptation to the effects
of climate change, as well as
to take steps to reduce their
own carbon footprint, and
make environmental technol-
ogy “more available globally.”

Meanwhile, both he and Dr
Deveaux asked that developed
states “re-examine” initiatives
undertaken in the name of
environmental protection
which may place additional
burdens on small states, such
as a hike in taxes paid by air
passengers.

“Recognising climate
change is a threat we all face,
The Bahamas is committed to
collaborating with the family
of nations to ensure our own
survival, and the survival of
humankind in a sustainable
development model for planet
earth,” the Prime Minister
added.

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eae

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5

STRUCKUM

Ee UT es
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PHONE: 327-6464

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (inset) spoke in a pre-recorded
Ce ee

address to the UN Summit on Climate Change, pictured left. (AP)



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Cable Beach property mould stops Ministry's move’

THE MINISTRY of Edu-
cation, Youth and Sports will
not be moving into the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort as
planned after claims that a
potentially dangerous mould
infestation has been discov-
ered at the Cable Beach prop-
erty, The Tribune has been
told.

With its current offices on
Thompson Boulevard inun-



dated with mould as well, the
government has been forced
to look for new accommoda-
tion for the ministry’s employ-
ees, who have complained of
respiratory problems for some
time.

A well placed government
source told The Tribune of the
alleged mould discovery, how-
ever vice president of exter-
nal affairs at Baha Mar,

Robert Sands, said he was
unaware of the claims.

He added that government
and the resort were only at
the “exploratory stages” in
their discussions about a pos-
sible rental agreement.

President of the Bahamas
Public Service Union John
Pinder said that during his
walkabout of the property
with inspectors, he saw mould

on the sixth floor of one of
the towers, which he was
advised would be removed
from the list of possible spaces
to be rented to government.
Mr Pinder said he is wait-
ing to see a Department of
Environmental Health report
on the matter, and that if it
advises that the tower is not
safe to be occupied, the min-
istry will have to stand by this

advice and find other accom-
modations for the employees
to use.

Some kinds of mould which
develop in buildings can lead
to a variety of health prob-
lems. If present in large quan-
tities, it can be extremely haz-
ardous to humans, causing
allergic reactions and respira-
tory problems.



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ePassport applications has
resulted in the completion of
hundreds of the new passports
which are now ready for col-
lection at the Grand Bahama
passport office.

More than 1,200 ePassports
require collection, the gov-
ernment said in a statement
yesterday.

All successful ePassport
applicants are required to
bring along their old pass-
ports for cancellation when
collecting their new ePass-
ports.

Visas

Those containing non-
expired visas will be returned
to its owner for further use
once cancelled.

To address the protracted
backlog of ePassport applica-
tions for Grand Bahama resi-
dents, Foreign Affairs Minis-
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be allotted solely for the print-
ing of those passports.

A printing machine is cur-
rently dedicated to the pro-
duction of ePassports for
Grand Bahama residents. The
total number of printing
machines — all housed in New
Providence — has also been
increased to improve service
to Bahamians throughout the
country.

As part of the process of
expanding service capacity on
Grand Bahama, the number
of passport office phone lines
was increased from two to
seven, and now include an
appointment line, a hotline
and a complaints line. The
telephone number for the
passport office's appointment
system is 351-9976.

Staffing at the office has
also been increased, the state-
ment said.

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NCUA

By AVA TURNQUEST

AS part of its commitment
to improve the quality of life
of all Bahamians, the Bahamas
Association for Social Health
will host a mini-fair on Discov-
ery Day.

To be held at a 210 acre com-
pound, the mini-fair will serve
as a formal introduction to
BASH’s sister company, Edu-
cational Alternative Resources
for Total Health (EARTH)
Village and all funds will be
used to further its development.

Geared towards families and
children, EARTH Village will
continue BASH’s vision to sub-
stantially reduce crime, violence
and drug abuse by providing
positive educational outlets for
the youth. The ‘village’ features
activities such as a petting zoo,
horseback riding, Segway rides
and numerous nature trails, all
of which provide educational
benefits. Discreetly located on
Albury Street in Chippingham,
the environmental sanctuary is
often overlooked by the gen-
eral public said Wesley Fin-
layson, BASH and EARTH
Village media liaison.

“We’re having this fun day
so we can get the entire com-
munity involved. Because most
pass this place, and some peo-
ple may or may not see the sign,
no one knows the excitement
that’s inside. You can come in
and horseback ride, you can
ride a Segway, you can bring
your kids to the petting zoo or
on a field trip. We have over

E
4!
ao
ian

THE COOPERATIVE
SOCIETIES ACT, 2005

(Chapter 314)
ORDER, 2009

In Exercise of The powers conferred by Section 99
of The Cooperative Societies Act 2005, the Direc-
tor of Societies in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas makes the following ORDER:-

To transfer all immovable assets of Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union

Limited such as;

(a) Property, building and contents thereof;
(b) Ownership of all vehicles owned by the Society;
(c) All assets and liabilities prescribed in the
August 31 st, 2009 special Audited
Financial Statements; adjusted for
activities up to the date of this order.

The prescribed date of transfer of the Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union
Limited will commence pursuant to sections 98,99

and 100 of this Act.

Made this 6th day of October 2009

Nathaniel A. Adderley

DIRECTOR OF SOCIETIES

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150 medicinal plants and 34 dif-
ferent species of birds. Its very
educational. If we’re gonna stop
the grown-ups we have to nip it
at the root.”

Fun Day project co-ordinator
Tehranique Miller said: “Every-
body’s going green now. We’ve
been green for a long time now
so we’re tying to promote
awareness. Unfortunately, the
average Bahamian doesn’t real-
ly understand the concept of
going green. There are limita-
tions on just how much we can
do, but we can be aware. If we
can raise aware children, we
will have aware adults.”

The fair will open on Mon-
day, October 12, at 7am with a
forest fun walk that will begin
at the EARTH Village Wel-
come Centre and travel through
two miles of forest. The official
opening ceremony begins at
11am after which activities will
commence. Participants can dis-
cover historical aqueducts built
in 1942 which supphed drinking
water via windmills. Discontin-
ued in 1972, the infrastructure is
now an untouched ecosystem,
home to tilapia, turtles and
breath-taking water lilies.

In addition to the natural
activities available on site, fam-
ilies will be able to enjoy boun-
cy castles, rock climbing, face
painting, hoopla and bingo
while listening to live music by
various local artists.

Fairgoers will also be entered
in a raffle and each hour a win-
ner will be selected.

All funds will be used
towards the development of
EARTH Village's petting zoo
and site maintenance.

"Unfortunately every aspect
of this project takes money,"
said Ms Miller. “Everything
that we’re doing for the fun day
we have to raise the funds for it.
Its difficult but at the same time
we want to make sure that we
share what we have. A lot of
Bahamians have no idea what
we have here. There are little
subtle changes that everyone
can make. I think that if people
see what we have — I think this
is one of the last green spaces
left in Nassau, everywhere else
is concrete jungle — maybe they
will be inspired to preserve it.”

The fair will close with a fire-
works display at 11 pm.

a
WU ee

MRS Glenys Hanna Mar-
tin, daughter of Mrs Beryl
Hanna, said that her mother
has been transferred to the
private ward of the Princess
Margaret Hospital “where
she is progressing.”

Mrs Hanna had been
admitted to the hospital’s
intensive care unit several
days ago for problems asso-
ciated with her throat, said
her daughter. However, con-
trary to reports in Wednes-
day’s Tribune, Mrs Hanna
was not on a respirator.

Mrs Martin, on behalf of
the family, thanked “all of
her parents’ friends and oth-
er well-wishers for their con-
cern and prayers.”

“We are trusting that our
mother will soon be released
from the hospital,” she said.

Mrs Hanna is the wife of
Governor-general Arthur
Hanna.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 7

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Exuma marijuana case |

TUE St MRT EL
Four in court over $4m drug seizure

PST
ape



A CAR RENTAL AGENT provides
details of his company to patrons
at Bahamasair’s annual trade
show and exhibition, Friday, at
SuperClubs Breezes.

BAHAMASAIR has
improved its on-time perfor-
mance and maintained its
dispatch reliability and safe-
ty records, according manag-
ing director Henry Woods.

“We have progressed
from an airline that used to
operate in the 50 per cent on
time performance to now in
the 70s which is in line with
industry averages,” said Mr
Woods. He was speaking
during Bahamasair’s annual
trade show and exhibition at
SuperClubs Breezes.

Network

The trade show provided
an opportunity for clients to
network directly with ven-
dors in south Florida and
the Family Islands that pro-
vide services, including
hotels, motels, resorts, car
rental and travel agencies.

Mr Woods said: “Our dis-
patch reliability is almost
100 per cent. Bahamasair
very rarely cancels a flight.
Ifit happens its through an
act of God.

“We’re not like the other
carriers which if they are
two hours late they will can-
cel. We meet our commit-
ment and we value our cus-
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STEPHEN STUBBS, 34, of Ridgeland
Park.

FOUR men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of $4
million worth of marijuana in
Exuma were back in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday after-
noon.

The men were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane
on Monday and appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane
yesterday.

Stephen Stubbs, 34, of
Ridgeland Park, also known as
"Die", Dion Minnis, 35, of
Rupert Dean Lane, David
Colebrooke, 48, of Jasmine
Gardens, and Selva Hudson, 54,
of The Bluff, Eleuthera are
charged with conspiring to
import and possess a 3,935
pound shipment of marijuana
with intent to supply. It is

SELVA RUDOLPH HUSDON, 54, of
The Bluff Eleuthera.

alleged that the offences were
committed between September
5 and 30, at Scott's Creek,
Williams Town, Exuma.

Colebrooke and Hudson
are also charged with import-
ing the drugs and drug posses-
sion with intent to supply. They
are also charged with the unau-
thorised possession of a .45 pis-
tol and seven bullets for the
gun.

The four men pleaded not
guilty to the charges again yes-
terday. Stubbs, who is on bail
pending retrial in the murder
of policeman Jimmy Ambrose
10 years ago, is represented by
attorney Murrio Ducille. Attor-
ney Dion Smith is representing
the other three defendants.
They will remain on remand
and are expected back in court
on Friday for a bail hearing.

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and Gladys (Juan). He will be sadly
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Many women worry about the effect their breast cancer will have on their children. tf vou have children and receiv
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45






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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one Wiinister Grant ‘set for promotion in Cabinet shuffle’

in Cabinet, noting the finan-
cial and social commitments
he has made to his family.
Additionally, it is believed
that when the Prime Minister
appoints two additional mem-
bers to the Senate, to replace
Mr Barnett and former Sena-
tor Kay Forbes-Smith who is

now heads the Bahamas’
Consulate in Atlanta, one of
these new persons could be
appointed directly into the
Cabinet. If not, it is rumoured
that the FNM Senator Antho-
ny Musgrove, may be given
the responsibility of the Min-

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sources close to the FNM
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a

looked upon well by the oth-
er MPs who have served
“longer” than he has.
Having shuffled his cabi-
net once already in July 2008
it is understood that this sec-
ond manoeuvre would be yet
another step by Mr Ingra-
ham to ensure that ministers
who are performing will be
given greater responsibilities
while those who have yet to
meet the mark will be
relieved of their powers and

selves.”

When the Prime Minister
regained office in May of
2007, he had a relatively
inexperienced cabinet with
only a few colleagues having
served at a ministerial level.

Now, with what is seen as
the largest cabinet in the his-
tory of the Bahamas, most
of the FNM’s sitting MP’s
have either served or are
currently serving in some
ministerial portfolio with one

melt to

sidelined in favour of those
who have “proven them-

exception— Kendal Wright,
the MP for Clifton.

PLPs set to vote on explosive
leadership challenge resolutions

FROM page one

nomination of any PLP who is
not a Member of Parliament, is ff
obviously aimed at PLP new-
comer Paul Moss who was the
first candidate to announce his
bid to challenge Mr Christie.

Secondly, the NGC will also
vote on a resolution proposed to
block the nomination of any PLP
MP who does not declare his
intentions of challenging the lead-
ership before the National Con-
vention opens.

This tactic, sources say is being
used by the party hierarchy to
discourage or block the possibil-
ity of PLP MP Dr Bernard Not- +, '
tage launching a “snap challenge”
against Mr Christie from the floor ae
of the convention and avoid the
possibility of the leader being caught by “surprise.”

Additionally, it has also been suggested that if Dr Nottage
were to announce his intentions to challenge Mr Christie before
the convention, supporters of Mr Christie would have sufficient
time to run a “relentless” campaign against the challenger.
This campaign, sources say would bear the all too familiar
trademark of painting Dr Nottage as an “ingrate” who was giv-
en an opportunity to return to the party and was now turning
on the man who had given him that “second chance.”

The third measure, which is expected to be voted on tonight,
is the possibility of creating a co-deputy position that sources
explained is designed to appease the many challengers who will
ultimately one day be seeking the leadership of the party.

By appeasing these many challengers in one swoop the hope,
sources said, is to ensure that Mr Christie remains as leader, and
possibly two of his parliamentary colleagues would be named
as co-deputies of the party.

Having already warned his parliamentary group that a
“scorched earth policy” would be used against anyone who
would dare challenge him, the party leader is also expected to
ratify the additional 250 stalwart councillors appointed earlier
this year.

However, it appears that Mr Moss is undaunted by the par-
ty’s tactics and is expected to hold a press conference outside
PLP headquarters tomorrow night after the NGC has cast its
votes.



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS





je

od A i. i i Seibescee
KEOD SMITH speaks to the media yesterday.

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Keod Smith confident of
winning PLP chairman post

FROM page one

tion so that he can fully commit himself to
the chairmanship.

Mr Smith announced his ambition to run
for the post held by Englerston MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin just days after PLP deputy
chairman Kendred Dorsett said he is also vying
for the post.

Mr Dorsett released a statement yesterday,
after hearing Mr Smith’s announcement, to
highlight the PLP’s need to break away from
“business as usual” and “provide a vision for
progress.”

However, Mr Smith is confident his chances
of being chosen for the position are above
average.

The Commercial Law Advocates attorney,
who held a press conference in his Trinity
Place office yesterday, said: “Fortunately I
am not new to the party, [am not unknown to
delegates, I feel I have something that’s defi-
nitely peculiar only to me, that none of the oth-
er candidates will have, and I feel the party
knows what these attributes are.

“T suspect I will win, but if it is that I do
not, that will not change my involvement in
doing what is right for the party.

“T feel I have a more than average chance of
being successful.”

Mr Smith said his bold and aggressive nature
will drive all members of the party to face
challenging issues head-on in the run-up to
the 2012 election.

He would take seriously the chairman’s task
to minimise cheating in the next general elec-
tion by devising strategies such as a door-to-

door visitation programme to ensure all voters
are accounted for long before they cast their
ballots.

Mr Smith said the rising crime rate and mur-
der count, job losses for thousands of Bahami-
ans, and the FNM’s lack of strategy for eco-
nomic recovery places the PLP in a good posi-
tion for securing government in 2012.

He criticised the FNM for recently admitting
the government has no plans to rejuvenate
the economy in Grand Bahama, and intends to
hold a pre-convention presentation on the
island on Friday to address local delegates on
the subject, “Strategies for Immediate Eco-
nomic Rejuvenation of Grand Bahama in
2009.”

As chairman, Mr Smith maintains he will
focus on the needs of the party and not his own
political ambitions, however he would keep the
door open for his former constituents in Mount
Moriah.

He said: “In the two and a half years leading
up to the next election candidates will need to
be on the ground and starting to work, so for
me to do what I need to do I can’t be con-
cerned that I have to leave because I have
something going on in Lightbourne Street or
Yellow Elder.

“With God’s help and the support of the
convention delegates, I will not only be elect-
ed national chairman at the convention later
this month, but shall be serving in that post
when the PLP regains the government in 2012.

“At the end of the convention, whether I
win or lose, I hereby commit my efforts to
that of the party to ensure there is unity as we
move forward in this collective quest.”

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009



FROM page one

“You leaked it to the press
didn’t you, didn’t you?” Mr
Shurland demanded.

“No,” Mr McDermott
replied.
“On the 19th of January did

you give an interview to US

magazine? Did you not give
an interview to The Tribune
on the 19th’?” Mr Shurland
asked.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott
said.

“Tm suggesting that you are
lying,” Mr Shurland said.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott

OSD UKO EOD
BAHAMAS UTILITIES
COOPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION
LIMITED



























Notice is hereby given that The Director of

Cooperative Societies has been advised:

1. Pursuant to Chapter 314 Section 99 of the
Cooperative Societies Act 2005, of the transfer of
the Assets & Liabilities from Bahamas Utilities
Cooperative Credit Union Limited to National
Workers Cooperative Credit Union Limited.

2. By virtue of Section 100 of the Cooperative Societ-
ies Act creditors other than members depositors
within 90 days of the date and publication of this
notice, commencing on the 6th of October, A.D.
2009, having any claim(s) against the above-
named Cooperative are hereby duly informed to
submit particulars of claims andlor objection(s) to
the transfer of assets and liabilities of Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union
Limited, on or before January 6th, A.D.2010.

Claims and objections are to be submitted in writing
tothe Director of Societies,
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources,

Levy Building,

P. O. Box N-3028, Nassau, The Bahamas.
Dated this 6th day of October, A.D. 2009

Bahamas Utilities Cooperative Credit
Union Limited a Cooperative registered in
accordance with Chapter 314 section 187 of
the Cooperative Societies Act 2005.

DIRECTOR OF SOCIETIES

Nathaniel A. Adderley

said. Mr Shurland then sug-
gested that during the meeting
between Lightbourne and Mr
McDermott on January 19,
Lightbourne had asked Mr
McDermott if he was record-
ing him.

“You are making it up,” Mr
McDermott said.

Mr Shurland responded,
“Tm making it up; you think
you have a monopoly on the
truth?”

“T’m suggesting to you that
this tape was edited. That the
part of the tape missing is the
part where he (Lightbourne)
entered the room and took his
seat at the table, that’s the
part with all the good stuff on
it,” Mr Shurland suggested.

“No,” Mr McDermott
replied. Mr Shurland then
asked that the tape be
replayed. Officer Sean Saun-
ders took the witness stand.
The tape was played again. It
was put on pause to show a
still frame of Mr McDermott
and Lightbourne sitting at the
table in his hotel room.

“Tm suggesting that prior
to Tarino sitting down there
was some chit-chat between
you two,” Mr Shurland said.

“Yes,” McDermott said.
“That is not on the tape. ’m
suggesting that that was edit-
ed to suit your purpose,” Mr
Shurland said.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott
replied. Mr Shurland again
suggested that when Light-
bourne entered the room he
had asked if he was being
recorded.

“He never said that,”
McDermott said, “you made it
u a

“On the 20th of January
when you were talking to Mr
Lightbourne did he say ‘if
John Travolta doesn’t pay me
I’m going to the press’?” Mr
Shurland asked.

“No, sir, he didn’t say those
words,” Mr McDermott said.

“Do you know the pig prin-
ciple; pigs get fat, hogs get
slaughtered?” Mr Shurland
asked.

“Yes, sir, it’s a tax adage,”
Mr McDermott replied. Mr
McDermott told the court

THE TRIBUNE

Heated clash in Travolta

attempted extortion trial

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that he had said it as a joke,
however, Mr Shurland sug-
gested that it was not a joke.

“Tm suggesting that when
you spoke to Ms Bridgewater
and told her about the pig
principles, pigs get fat, you
intended to pay money.”

“Yes,” Mr McDermott said.

“When you said hogs get
slaughtered you wanted to kill
this young man,” Mr Shurland
said.

“Absolutely not,” Mr
McDermott replied. Mr
McDermott admitted that the
day before he spoke to Light-
bourne, news of an extortion
threat was already in the
media. Mr McDermott said
that he made a complaint of
an extortion attempt to
Bahamian police on January
18.

Mr Shurland suggested to
Mr McDermott that he had
called ambulance driver Mar-
cus Garvey looking for the
original document.

“Absolutely not,” Mr
McDermott said. Mr Shurland
went on to suggest that Mr
McDermott was able to get
Lightbourne’s telephone num-
ber from Mr Garvey. Mr
McDermott denied the sug-
gestion. He said he had never
spoken to Mr Garvey.

The jury yesterday ques-
tioned whether Mr McDer-
mott at anytime during the
meetings with Lightbourne
and Bridgewater turned off
his wire.

Mr McDermott said that he
had not.

Mr McDermott also told
the court that Bridgewater did
not personally ask him for
money. He also told jurors
that he understood “making
the deal” to mean that he was
to enter into negotiations with
Bridgewater and Lightbourne
and assent to the demand.

“That’s what I was instruct-
ed and that’s what I did,” Mr
McDermott said. Mr McDer-
mott also said that before
coming to the Bahamas he
had to refute allegations in
the media relative to Jett’s
death. The trial resumes today
at 10 am.

rn

Boone

Sato
taka

aun



of court yesterday.

ey’ McDonald Jr.

JOHN TRAVOLTA’S attorney Michael McDermott pictured outside

From the inception of his schooling bis Mathematical abilities came-alie, sn 34. Cecilia's
Primary in grade one be received S64 (G.PA) and §7% in mathematics. Special thanks to
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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

a e
he -
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

Roddick, Knowles
advance to semis

By BRENT STUBBS was really excited.”
Senior Sports Reporter After losing the
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net first set, Knowles
and Roddick
he first-year combo of Mark turned up the heat
Knowles and Andy Roddick in the second set

are playing like they have when they fell |
been together for a number behind 5-4. They |
of years. managed to hold
The Bahamian-American tandem that serve and eventu-
came together for the first time pulled off ally took the set. In
their second- round match at the China the tiebreaker,
Open to advance to the semifinal. they just simply
Knowles’ partner, Indian Mahesh Bhu- out-classed their

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When they play again in the semis,
Knowles and Roddick could either face
the team of Lukas Dlouhy and Philipp
Kohischreiber or Kubot and Oliver
Marach. Obviously, they would prefer
the latter team as Roddick seeks to
avenge his singles loss to Kubot.

“We’re pretty pumped up. We’re pret-
ty excited,” Knowles stressed. “We’re
looking to win the next match for sure
and put ourselves in a position to win
the tournament. There’s no reason why
we can’t win the tournament.

“Anytime you can put yourself in that



pathi, is nursing an injury. opponents to seal position you just have to go after it. It’s a
Yesterday in Beijing, China, the _ the deal. real pleasure for me, so I’m enjoying it.

unseeded team of Knowles and Roddick Roddick, a for- We’re just looking forward to raising the

kicked off the team of Argentina’s Jose mer No.1 player in MARK KNOWLES level and accepting the challenge ahead

Acasuso and Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez _ the world, will only of us.”

4-6, 7-5, 10-4 in 79 minutes in their quar- have the doubles If they are successful in their semis,

terfinal match. to concentrate on after Lukasz Kubot _ there’s a possibility that Knowles and

Acasuso and Gonzalez upset the up ousted him in the first round of singles. | Roddick could advance to the final to
ranked team of Daniel Nestor and Nenad = And that could play right in favour for face a familiar foe in the American iden-

Zimonjic in the opening round in three Knowles. tical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan,

straight sets while Knowles and Roddick “Andy is one of the best playersin the who are the No.2-seeded team in the

needed just two sets to dispose of the world,” Knowles reflected. “So it’s very tournament.

Taipei team of Hsain-Han Lee and _ exciting to be playing on the same court “That would be really exciting,”

Tsung-Hua Yang. with him. It’s a lot of fun because he’s Knowles projected. “Obviously we have
When contacted following their victo- one of the greatest servers of all time. our next match to worry about, but I

ry yesterday, Knowles said it was defi- “Tt’s just a lot of fun to be playing at know Andy would love to play them.

nitely a tough match against Acasuso the net when he’s serving. But he’s a ‘They obviously are great friends and they
and Gonzalez, but they played a very great doubles player. He doesn’t play are Davis Cup teammates.

good match. In fact, he noted that they doubles that often, but he’s definitely a “So ’'m sure they have their own little
were able to avenge a defeat he and Bhu- good doubles player. While we have nev- rivalry, so I think it would be a really
pathi suffered to Acasuso and Gonzalez _ er played before, we’re enjoying it. Hope- exciting match-up if we both can get



in the third round of the French Open. fully we can get another in and get into __ there.”
. . . “We knew it was going tobe atough _ the final.” Knowles and Bhupathi, who are due to
AMERICAN ANDY RODDICK teamed up with Bahamian tennis acé match, but we played very solid through- Knowles and Roddick won 66 per cent —_ return to action next week at the Shang-
Mark Knowles in the China Open yesterday. The duo won their out the match,” Knowles said. “We real- of service points and they hit a combined hai Open, lost in the final of the Aus-
second round match to advance to the semifinal... (AP Phote) ly played our best tennis at the end,soI seven aces. tralian Open in January to the Bryans.

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Bahams

tag

October 30, 2009 to November 1, 2009
Arawak Cay
Nassau, Bahamas

A National Trade Show
Promoting Bahamian-made

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

AFTER two years
excelling on the field, a
Bahamian collegiate grid-
iron star looks to make a
transition to the sideline in a
coaching role at a National
Football League Pro Bowl
Week event.

Kris Kemp, a standout
wide receiver at Taylor Uni-
versity in Fort Wayne, Indi-
ana, has been chosen as a
graduate assistant on the
coaching staff of the “Team
USA vs The World” Pro
Bowl.

Kemp will become a part
of the “World” coaching
staff headed by Jan Jenmert
of Sweden.

The team will be com-
prised of 45 of the top play-
ers from around the world
to face USA Football’s
junior national team on Jan-
uary 30, 2010 at Lockhart
Stadium in Ft Lauderdale,

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Company Name:
Contact Person
P.O, Box Settlement:
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Telephone: Cellular:
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Are you a member of an associahon: Yes{) No{ ) Name:

| certify that the products are Bahamian made and produced in the Bahamas.

et a)
behind the news,

Contact persons: Mrs. Pamela Deveaux, Ms. Sharae Collie & Mr. Le-Var Miller at
Telephowe # 242-322-3740 or Fax f 242-322-2103

SIGN

annin
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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

SPORTS

Florida, as a part of the
NFL’s Pro Bowl weekend.

The game takes place at
lpm following AFC and
NFC team practices with
fans granted free admission
to attend the international
matchup, which will feature
NCAA rules and 12-minute
quarters.

Players on the World
team must be 19 years and
under from outside the
United States across five
continents while team USA
will feature top high school
seniors in the class of 2010.

World team head coach
Jenmert has selected a
coaching staff representing
all four IFAF continental
federations and seven coun-
tries — Australia, Bahamas,
Canada, France, Japan,
Mexico and Sweden. And
they have already begun the
process of selecting the best
available players from
around the world.

Kemp, in two years at
Taylor, has been a vital part
of a rebuilding receiving
core.

In three games thus far
into the 2009 season, Kemp
has caught seven receptions
for 84 yards with an average
of 12 yards per catch.

In 2007, he was awarded a
half scholarship from Taylor
after a brief but star-studded
career with the John Bull
Jets in the Commonwealth

eee"

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Bahamian
oridiron star
to take up
coaching

American Football League.
In the CAFL, Kemp was
awarded Rookie of the Year

in 2004, and followed up
with a stellar sophomore
performance in 2005 when
he was named CAFL Offen-
sive player of the year.

Kemp was invited to the
Taylor University combine
after an impressive perfor-
mance with the Bahamian
national team against the
semi-pro Orlando Sentinels
in 2005.

The 6’0” 190 pound wide-
out returns home each annu-
ally to participate in summer
camps.

The junior, majoring in
chemistry, said he intends to
pursue coaching positions to
further the development of
organised football in the
Bahamas. A second gradu-
ate assistant will be chosen
from a developing Interna-
tional Federation of Ameri-
can Football nation in the
coming weeks.

According to its website,
the IFAF unites more than
50 countries on five conti-
nents through a burgeoning
international sport.

With national football
federations in existence for
more than 70 years, IFAF
was created in 1998 to
organise and further devel-
op the game through inter-
national cooperation and
global competition.



IN CONCERT

SATURDAY
October 10, 2009

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TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



the water store

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leu Thovtend Dollars E

SHOWN (I-r) are Paul Hutton, regatta chairman, Llewellyn Burrows, managing director of Fun Foods, Tina
Hilton, sales and marketing manager of Fun Foods and Jimmie Lowe, chairman of the NYC race committee.

Fun Foods, Nestle
donate $10,000
for sailing events

FUN Foods Wholesale &
Nestle Ice Cream have
stepped up to help make sure
the upcoming International
Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships and the 2009 Sunfish
World Championships are a
success.

The two events will be host-
ed by Nassau Yacht Club
October 15-17 and October
16-24 respectively.

More than 150 people rep-
resenting 15 countries are
expected in Nassau over the

Llewellian Borner



10-day period.

“Fun Foods Wholesale &
Nestle Ice Cream’s $10,000
donation will go a long way
towards offsetting the costs
involved with hosting such
prestigious international
sporting events,” said Paul
Hutton, regatta chairman.

Six of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing under 18s will compete for
top honours in the junior
championships and four of
them are among the 16
Bahamians who have earned

NEW ARRIVAL!
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a spot in the Sunfish World
Championships.

The Bahamas has enjoyed
much success over the years
in Sunfish sailing, winning the
World Championships five
times.

Donnie Martinborough, the
Bahamas’ top finisher in this
year’s Bahamas Nationals, is a
three-time Sunfish World
Champion, with top place fin-
ishes in 1983, 1985 and again
in 1988, the last time the event
was held in Nassau.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



A ‘fitting tribute’ to two sporting legends

THIS weekend will be ded-
icated to the memory of the
late Deacon Leviticus ‘Uncle
Low’ Adderley and Vincent
Lloyd Ferguson.

For the fifth consecutive
year, the Catholic Archdio-
cese has honoured the two for-
mer sporting legends that have

made invaluable contributions
to the growth and develop-
ment of sports in the
Bahamas.

This year, however, the
tournament will be a little spe-
cial as it comes right on the
heels of the death and burial
of Ferguson, a former profes-

sional baseball player, educa-
tor and basketball executive.

Hundreds impacted by the
life of the late Ferguson
turned out last week at St
Francis Cathedral to pay their
last respects for the man who
was best known as a discipli-
narian.






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On his return from playing
pro baseball, Ferguson served
as president of the Bahamas
Basketball Federation and he
founded the Past and Present
Association of Professional
Baseball Players.

Like Ferguson, Adderley
was also a no-nonsense prin-
cipal, who founded the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO) - the
organisation that officiates
track and field meets.

Both men have played a
vital role in the legacy of the
St Augustine’s College Big
Red Machine. In fact, it was
Ferguson who was credited
with tagging the Big Red
Machine nickname on St
Augustine’s College.

This holiday weekend, the
Catholic Archdiocese will
once again honour both men
when the tournament is staged
at Loyola Hall. It should be
another fitting tribute to two
of the former sporting icons.

May their souls rest in
peace.

SOFTBALL FUTURE

Beginning at the end of the
month, the Bahamas Softball
Federation is scheduled to
host three tournaments back-
to-back at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex starting
with the annual Austin ‘King
Snake’ Knowles National
High School Tournament.

In between that tournament
and the National Round
Robin Tournament that will
be staged over the weekend
of November 5-8, the BSF will
host the CAST Tournament
from October 29 to Novem-



OPINION

ber 1.

The tournament will bring a
number of teams from vari-
ous countries to our shores.
At the same time, the BSF
intends to showcase a number
of their talented young play-
ers.

The BSF has released the
names of two teams that will
be loaded with a lot of young
players who are making their
impact in the league right now.

That’s a good sign because
at least these players are being
afforded the opportunity to
display their skills at a high
level of play right at home in
the front of their fans.

What is also interesting to
point out is the fact that the
BSF has selected a large crop
of coaches. Is it because the
tournament is at home, or is it
that the BSF has decided to
concentrate on further devel-

oping its programme?

Whatever the reason, it’s a
step in the right direction to
making sure that the federa-
tion utilizes its full potential
to getting the best team
assembled to compete at
home.

BOXING DILEMMA

IT seems as if just when pro
boxing is getting back on track
here, it has taken a nosedive in
the wrong direction.

Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey took a gamble last
month to fight in Montreal,
Canada, on the eve of defend-
ing his British Commonwealth
super middleweight title and
now he has been stripped of
the crown.

Mackey was the biggest
draw left in town after the
departure of Meacher ‘Pain’
Major, who last year signed
up with X-Cel Worldwide to
fight out of Buffalo, New
York.

Mackey’s next bout is
scheduled for November in
New York.

This Saturday, heavyweight
Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams
will be in Germany where he
is slated to fight for a chance
to improve his world ranking.

It doesn’t appear that there
will be any major pro card
staged here until next year
because there are no big name
fighters to showcase.

Maybe, this might be a good
time for both Major and
Williams to persuade their
managers to try and negotiate
a show here. The boxing pub-
lic could sure see another dis-
play of skills very soon.

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THE TRIBUNE





Vigilante mob
attack alleged
kidnapper

FROM page one

of some girl that will be inves-
tigation. We don't have any
official complaint but we will
make an effort, as a matter of
fact every effort is being made
to determine the veracity of
this information," said Mr
Gibson.

When The Tribune visited
the scene yesterday after-
noon, several residents said
they had seen the man walk-
ing around the area, with ban-
dages around his head and
stomach. Residents of the
area also said the man was
beaten by relatives of the girl
early yesterday morning.

However, they were reluctant
to provide details of the
attack for fear of reprisal.

The girl, who is said to be
about 16 to 17-years-old, was
reportedly found bound with
tape inside the dilapidated
structure by a relative around
3 am yesterday, according to a
resident of the area. Friends
and relatives of the girl accost-
ed the man, reportedly
"chapped" him in the upper
body and chased him down
the street where he collapsed,
said another resident.

Police were later called to
the scene and, according to
eyewitnesses, took the man
to hospital.

Canadian at Guantanamo

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS

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Bay accepts two
lead civilian lawyers

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

A CANADIAN detainee
charged with war crimes fired
his military lawyer Wednes-
day and was given two new
civilian attorneys during a
court proceeding at Guan-
tanamo Bay, a U.S.
spokesman said, according to
Associated Press.

Joseph DellaVedova,
spokesman for the Pentagon’s
Office of Military Commis-
sions, said the judge in the
case at the offshore U.S. jail
for terrorism suspects agreed
to name two civilian as lead
lawyers for Omar Khadr, who
accepted the new counsel.

Appointed to lead Khadr’s
defense were criminal attor-
neys Barry Coburn and Kobie
Flowers, both of Washington-
based Coburn & Coffman
PLLC. They did not immedi-
ately respond to e-mail mes-
sages at the isolated U.S. base
in southeastern Cuba.

Hearing

During the brief hearing,
Khadr also agreed to have a
military co-counsel, Army
Maj. Jon Jackson, after being
told he needed to Keep at
least one military lawyer
under tribunal rules, DellaVe-
dova said.

The Toronto-born Khadr,
who was 15 when captured
after allegedly killing an
American soldier during a
2002 battle in Afghanistan,
had been represented by
Navy Lt. Cmdr. William Kue-
bler, whose superiors in the
Office of Military Commis-
sions sought to fire him in an
internal dispute over his han-
dling of the case.

At hearings earlier this
year, Khadr — the last West-
ern detainee held at Guan-
tanamo — tried to fire all his
military lawyers, but kept

Kuebler on when told he had
to have at least one military
attorney.

On Wednesday, Khadr,
now 22, told a military judge
he agreed to the dismissal of
Kuebler.

Kuebler, who attended the
hearing, said he was “sad to
leave Omar’s case without
seeing it through to the end.”

But he added that “given
the level of interference in
Omar’s representation by the
military chain of command,
Omar’s decision to proceed
with a new team led by inde-
pendent civilian lawyers is
completely understandable.”

An often outspoken mili-
tary lawyer, Kuebler has
argued that Khadr, who faces
up to life in prison if convict-
ed, should not be prosecut-
ed because he was a child
when his alleged crimes hap-
pened.

The military attorney also
said Khadr should be sent
back to Canada.

Canadian Prime Minister
Stephen Harper has refused
to ask for Khadr’s return,
saying the U.S. legal process
must play itself out.

Khadr is accused of killing
U.S. Army Sgt. Ist Class
Christopher Speer of Albu-
querque, New Mexico, with a
grenade during a 2002 battle
in Afghanistan.

His war crimes trial is on
hold until Nov. 16 as Presi-
dent Barack Obama conducts
a formal review of the sys-
tem for prosecuting Guan-
tanamo detainees in special
military tribunals.

The son of a slain al-Qaida
financier, Khadr faces up to
life in prison if convicted on
charges that include murder
and conspiracy.

DellaVedova said the new
defense attorneys want to
travel to Afghanistan to
examine the place where
Khadr was captured.

i
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LAYAWAY TERMS An advanced deposit of 30% of the price of the item(s) is required. The item(s) will be held for
120 days.













THE TRIBUNE



&



FF

TH URS DAY -

CRUISE SHIPS can be seen in Nassau harbour...

Value for money
hurts Bahamas on
cruise conversion

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WITH cruise arrivals to the
Bahamas and Nassau/Paradise
Island up by more than one-
third over 2008 comparative fig-
ures, the Ministry of Tourism
said this nation still has to work
out how to maximise the sec-
tor’s benefits by converting pas-
sengers to stopovers, especially

* Just 27% of stopovers
believe hotel vacation
exceeds value for money

* Cruise arrivals up for
Nassau/PI and Bahamas
by more than one-third
in July

given our ‘value for money’ weakness.

The Ministry of Tourism’s Market Report for July, released
yesterday, showed that cruise arrivals for the year-to-date to
July 2009 were “even better” than 2007 comparatives. For
July, cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were up by 36.8
per cent against 2008 figures, and ahead by 32.4 per cent for the

Bahamas as a whole.
Cruise arrivals to Grand

SEE page 10B

Bahamas ‘polarised
by a dual economy’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s foreign
direct investment (fdi) poli-
cies are “polarising society by
fostering a dual economy”, a
paper co-produced by a Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB)
professor has warned, with
the failure to create “mean-
ingful development” result-
ing in a separate ‘Bahamian
economy’ that is “subordinate
and sinking”.

Olivia Saunders, a COB
associate professor, in a paper
co-produced with Professor
Gordana Pesakovic, which
was released in a July 2009
conference at the University
of Warwick’s Business School,
concluded that despite attract-
ing billions of dollars in for-
eign investment capital, the
Bahamas had not translated
this into concrete develop-
ment or increased linkages
between these projects and
Bahamian-owned business-
es/entrepreneurs.

While the Bahamas’ vari-
ous investment incentives,
enshrined in legislation, had
helped to attract foreign
investment capital, Dr Saun-
ders and her co-author con-
cluded: “[The] effects of for-

Ph; 242.394.4397

Pe uh le ree ay
ee Ue

* Government’s investment
policies failing to provide
‘meaningful development’

* Instead, creating ‘foreign
economy’ and ‘Bahamian
economy’ where latter is
‘subordinate and sinking’

eign direct investment on the
local economy are not neces-
sarily positive.

“These policies have creat-
ed a dual economy: ‘foreign
economy’ and the ‘Bahamian
economy’, where the former
is dominant and rising, and
the latter is subordinate and
sinking.

“The ‘foreign economy’ is
operating under advantageous
conditions (none or reduced
taxes, limited obligations
towards social, environmen-
tal and national heritage pro-
tection). Its effect on employ-
ment is under the potential
level, due to the fact that for-
eign investors can always
rationalise the use of foreign
labour and the Governmen-
t’s willingness to accommo-
date them.

SEE page 5B

Cas BLATT
Taveet in, spruce ditam. treat

sel

balan Sk ngureaih.conm
PoE tea





OCTOBER 8,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Lights switched on
100k efficient bulbs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

p to 100,000 energy efficient
fluorescent CFL light bulbs
could be made available to
low and lower middle income
Bahamian households as part of a $500,000
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
initiative, a government minister confirmed
yesterday, with pilot projects on solar
water heater installation and net meter-
ing also set to be launched imminently.

Pointing out that CFL light bulbs were
sometimes seven to eight times’ more
expensive than their incandescent coun-
terparts, Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, said the IDB’s
initiative to promote energy efficient res-
idential lighting had twin objectives.

These were in line with the National
Energy Policy committee’s recommenda-
tions, aiming to lower energy usage and
costs for lower and lower middle income
Bahamian families, aiding energy effi-
ciency and conservation, and also assisting
them in meeting their BEC bills.

“Tt is important we assist lower and mid-
dle income households to purchase CFC
lightbulbs, to reduce their energy costs
and assist in meeting their obligations to
BEC,” Mr Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness. “In terms of light bulbs, we envis-
age it could possible range up to 100,000
light bulbs.

* Pilot projects for 30 solar PV/net
metering and 70 solar water heater
installations approved last week

* $580k IDB initiative aims to provide
energy efficient bulbs for low income
families, to reduce electricity
consumption

* Some 6,243 customers now
disconnected by BEC, with
Corporation’s revenues dropping
for August and September

* BEC financial position ‘getting weaker’,
with receivables still around $100m

“The programme will be to address that
cost to residential customers, those using
less than 800 kilowatt hours from BEC.
This is a very important programme. It is
important that the Government gets out
the message the energy conservation is
the low-lying fruit.”

Mr Neymour confirmed that the number
of customers disconnected by BEC for
non-payment of bills had “moved up slight-
ly”, standing at 6,243 as at September 14.

“The figure is slightly higher, and again
most of these are customers in the lower

SEE page 3B





Family Guardian targets early
2010 for agency launch

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian is
“working diligently” to launch
its general insurance agency
subsidiary by early 2010, Tri-
bune Business was told yes-
terday, and is “confident” it
will turn around the surge in
health insurance claims
responsible for dropping its
2009 first half income by 71.6
per cent.

Patricia Hermanns, the life
and health insurer’s presi-
dent/chief executive, acknowl-

Insurer ‘confident’ it can turn around health
claims experience through new initiative, having
seen claims payments ‘slow a little bit’ in Q3

edged that while its “health
claims experience has been
challenging” in 2009, the com-
pany had implemented
numerous initiatives to
address an area that largely
increased policyholder bene-
fits by 34.8 per cent during
the first six months of the
year.

Family Guardian had
focused on case management,

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clients were getting the best
available health care and
treatments, and on “assessing
our products to ensure
they’re being properly
utilised”.

Ms Hermanns added that
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By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RoyalFidelity Merchant
Bank & Trust yesterday said
its second index-linked sub-
fund had generated an 8.4 per
cent yield on an annualised
basis during its first two
months in existence, providing
further evidence of the bene-
fits from international invest-
ing as the Bahamian stock
market continues to lag its
counterparts.

Michael Anderson, Royal-
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust’s president, told Tribune
Business that its TIGRS
Series 2 sub-fund now had a
net asset value (NAV) of
$10.14 per share, up $0.14 in
two months from the $10 val-
uation it had at launch.

Elsewhere, Mr Anderson
said RoyalFidelity’s interna-
tional equities sub-fund, which
had born the brunt of the 2008
stock market crash/credit
crunch, was up 40 per cent for
the calendar year to July 2009,
or 23.32 per cent on an annu-
alised basis, while the TIGRS
Series 1 sub-fund - another
financial collapse casualty -
had risen from a $9.123 NAV
at year-end to $9.38.

SEE page 12B



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS ee eS EEE as
Bowling over the recessionary blues

AMIDST all the gloom
and doom of recession —
hotel lay-offs, sinking sales
in Palmdale, abandoned
shops on East Bay Street,
mortgage defaults — it’s
refreshing to find an oasis
of exuberant growth. Dri-
ving out to Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
(also known as Harrold
Road), one turns into Sum-
merWinds Plaza, better
known as the home of the
Robin Hood Mega Store,
where soon a massive struc-
ture will open next door
bearing the sign Mario’s
Bowling & Family Enter-
tainment Palace.

Two entrepreneurs have
taken the economic bull by
the horns and are wrestling
to stun it: Sandy Schaefer,
who learned the secrets of
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and relocated the original,
tiny Robin Hood from Sol-
dier Road in 2001, and
Leslie Miller, Bahamian
businessman, landowner
and former PLP cabinet
minister, who after the still-
unsolved slaying of his son
Mario in 2002 was inspired
to create a living memorial
with solid family values.
The target market for both
enterprises is not tourists,
wealthy expatriates or up-
scale locals, but ordinary
Bahamians who must focus
on bargain spending. After
hours of “value” purchasing
in Robin Hood, customers
will only have to cross the
spacious parking lots to
relax in Mario’s.

Each of these entrepre-
neurs has helped the other.
Mr Miller had accumulated
some 20 acres of raw land

off Harrold Road, on which
Mr Schaefer leased a site
when he needed to expand.
Mr Miller then constructed
the shell buildings for the
new retail complex, which
has grown from the original
15,000 square feet to
109,000 square feet, and is
scheduled to grow by
another 90,000, with rising
rentals to Mr Miller as land-
lord. Robin Hood now
attracts about 78,000
monthly customer visits and
Mr Schaefer is confident
about continuing profits,
which he confirms require
tight management over-
sight.

Seeing Robin Hood’s
success in drawing a huge
customer base to the previ-
ously somnolent Plaza, Mr
Miller hastened his 10-year
old plans for a bowling

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alley, but one with all the
bells and whistles. Ever
since Sidney and Ivy French
closed their Village Lanes
on Village Road, local
bowling enthusiasts have
had to travel to Miami to
roll their strikes. His market
research convinced Mr
Miller of a positive local
demand for the sport, and
he travelled widely to dis-
cover the latest in bowling
marketing and technology,
visiting prominent lanes in
Seattle, Las Vegas, Fresno
in California, and even Bel-
gium, where he found an
impressive operation in
Brussels. He brought these
ideas home, and his
Bahamian architect Leo
Ferguson pulled them all
together to create the
detailed drawings and speci-
fications. Mr Miller himself
supervised construction,
retaining Cavalier as project
manager.

The result is a rectangular
edifice of 80,000 square
feet, with a handsome
colonnaded facade of sand-
stone punctuated with tall
windows. The basic struc-
ture has been completed,
featuring 30-foot ceilings
over a central atrium hous-
ing the main dining area, to
be supervised by a chef
recruited from a local hotel.
Thirty lanes are in place in
the north wing and another
20 in the south, including a
group of four that can be
privately reserved. No
bowling centre in the US or

eo

Canada has more then 50
lanes. During my recent vis-
it, the specialised planking
for gutters and lanes was
being laid, and the pin-set-
ting machinery from Ameri-
can Bowling Company was
expected shortly. Separate
snack bars will serve
behind each set of lanes.
Pool tables will be an
additional feature, and to
attract children an arcade
for video games is placed
near the entrance with
room for 100 machines,
from which Mr Miller pro-
jects $500,000 of revenue
annually. Toscano’s, a new
name in Nassau, will oper-
ate a pizza franchise adja-
cent to the arcade. In an
upstairs mezzanine over-
looking the atrium, a pri-
vate disco-club will be open
to dues-paying members.
Two stand-by generators
will support the central air-
conditioning system — but,
of course, the BEC electri-
cal bills will be a major
expense factor. Skating will
be offered on an outdoor
flood-lit rink (asphalt, not
ice), which can be convert-
ed into basketball courts
This article is not intend-
ed as a promotional plug for
Mario’s Palace. Although
Mr Miller has done his
homework in projecting
revenues and expense, and
is confident of profitability,
it’s possible that he may be
too optimistic about fami-
lies’ discretionary spending
in these lean times, or about
the continuing appeal for
repeat customers. Can
demand from the New
Providence population of
200,000 support so large an
entertainment capacity?
Only time will tell.
Bahamians will soon be
able to decide for them-
selves whether they will
flock to the Centre to satis-
fy their urge for bowling,
good food and general con-
viviality.
A grand opening sched-
uled before the end of the

CRUISE
LINE

year will be open to the
public. For that event, the
President of the Interna-
tional Bowling Association
will be present to open the
lanes, and has assured Mr
Miller of a major interna-
tional tournament by the
end of 2010.

As with any new-venture
entrepreneur, Mr Miller
faces financial risk. Of the
total construction cost of
$10-$12 million, his own
funds have contributed
about a third, with Bank of
the Bahamas lending the
rest, secured not simply on
the new project but by Mr
Miller’s ownership of sur-
rounding land and the
stream of rental income
from Robin Hood. The risk
may increase when,
inevitably, our government
broadens its revenue base
by imposing some form of
income tax, or more likely a
sales or value-added tax.
Any such levy must be
passed on to customers, or
else reduce the owner’s
profit margin.

Mr Miller, and Mr Schae-
fer over at Robin Hood, are
doubtless planning their
financial structures to min-
imise this impact

Whatever the Palace’s
long-term future prospects,
it’s clear that the project is
providing an immediate
boost for our economy.

For the last 16 months,
Mr Miller has been employ-
ing a construction force of
about 60 persons, and pro-
jects a payroll of 104
employees once the Centre
opens, from general manag-
er to bus-boys.

And purchases of
comestibles and supplies
will be substantial.

Certainly, Mr Miller’s
willingness to stake time
and money on the risks sur-
rounding a major project
presents a challenge to oth-
er Bahamians, and injects a
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



a =~) =~
Airline concerns on NAD fee rises

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS-based airlines are count-
ing on the travelling public to help them
reverse the 24 per cent landing fee rise
and other fee increases proposed by the
Nassau Airport Development Company
(NAD) last July, which have subse-
quently been aprpoved by the Airport
Authority Board, Tribune Business con-
firmed yesterday.

NAD is proposing the fee increases at
the worst possible time, according to
managers of several inter-island airlines,
who said they will have to be passed on
to passengers in order for their compa-
nies to stay afloat.

Director of Operations at LeAir Char-
ters, David Moncur, said companies such
as his already competed with boats and
ferries on inter-island travel. He alluded
to the fee increases, which will be added
on to the price of air fares, dissuading
travellers using their service.

“T don’t know how we will manage
more of these fees,” he said. “We are

already competing with boats and the
charter sections.”

According to Mr Moncur, however,
passing the increase in operational costs
on to the passenger will mean the dif-
ference between receiving the fare and
losing it to a competitor.

He said his company understands the
need for the fee increases, but insists the
midst of a recession is the wrong time
to impose them.

Though the changes would not come
into effect until January 2010, there is
no indication of when the current eco-
nomic climate will recede, and other air-
line managers say the winter season is
often a difficult financial time following
the commercial Christmas season.

Chief Operating Officer of Sky
Bahamas, Kenneth Romer, suggested
the Government and NAD revise the
fee increase schedule and engage in a
lot more consultation with the airlines.

“The timing is not right, so the travel-
ling public will find challenges absorbing
those costs. January is a rough month
for finances,” said Mr Romer.

He said pressure from travelling pub-

lic was needed to curtail the imposition of
the new fees, and argued that the increas-
es were as much a traveller’s issue as it is
the airline’s.

Mr Romer said he could not say exact-
ly how much the fees would drive up the
costs of Sky Bahamas’s ticket prices, but
he predicted a 20 to 30 per cent increase
on the modest end. He said fuel costs
were always the volatile factor in working
out fare increases.

Managing Director of Southern Air,
Anthony Hamilton, suggested frequent
inter-island travellers protest the fee
increases, which will directly impact their
pocketbooks when they come into effect.

“Unfortunately, the public may not be
as sensitized to it,” he said.

NAD’s approved 23.6 per cent landing
fees at the Lynden Pindling Internation-
al Airport (LPIA) could translate into
an added $13 on the now $51 landing
fee for one airline.

NAD argues that the fees are neces-
sary to maintain its “financial covenants”,
but said LPIA’s rates after the increases
will remain competitive and less than the
Caribbean average.

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FROM page 1B

range of electricity consump-
tion, and in excess of 60-90
days in arrears,” the minister
added.

BEC’s financial position “is
getting worse”, with its
accounts receivables still hov-
ering in the $100 million
range, and payables around
$99 million. Those payables
include $50-$60 million owed
to BEC’s fuel suppliers at any
one time, Mr Neymour indi-
cated, the electricity suppli-
er’s fuel bill having hit $376
million for 2008 - more than
$21 million per month.

“We have had lower rev-
enues in the months of
August and September, which
is Impacting their operations,”
Mr Neymour said of BEC.

Meanwhile, in conjunction
with the Bahamas’ Global
Environmental Facility
(GEF) programme, Mr Ney-
mour said the Government
intended to initiate 30 pilot

RATES
AS

LOW
AS

demonstration projects fea-
turing the installation of solar
Photovoltaic cells and net
metering - where any excess
energy generated would be
sold back to the BEC grid,
and a credit given to the
household/business.

“Tt would be with house-
holds and some small com-
mercial installations,” Mr
Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness. “That has just been
approved by the GEF last
week. We’re looking at run-
ning approximately 30
demonstration projects
throughout Nassau and the
Family Islands.

“There will also be a pilot
programme with regard to the
supply and installation of
solar water heaters. We’re
looking at the installation of
70 solar water heaters with
households and small com-
mercial businesses, where we
will be looking at the impact
of these and Photovoltaic cells
on reducing carbon emis-
sions.”

With water heaters esti-
mated to account for 20-30
per cent of a Bahamian
household’s energy bill, Mr
Neymour said the pilot pro-
jects would enable the true
value of dollar savings derived
from solar water heaters to
be assessed. The Government
would also be able to assess
their impact on “the conser-
vation and production of
energy”, meeting another goal
of the National Energy Policy
committee’s draft report.

“We have always moved
seriously,” Mr Neymour said
on the Government’s
approach to sustainable,
renewable energies. “The
challenge was that it required
significant research to make
what we considered reliable
decisions. We recognise in the
Bahamas that we lack suffi-
cient data in certain areas to
make concrete decisions, but
we are seeing the work of the
NEP come to fruition.”

The minister added that the
13 firms who were shortlist-

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after which another shortlist
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plans sought. Seven of the
existing proposals are for
waste-to-energy.

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GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORT

Ragged Island Road Construction,
Ragged Island Project

Tender publication No.: FIR/207/15/2 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/129178/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Goverment of The Bahumas intends to award a work contnact for the rehabilitation af the
access road between Gun Pout and Duncan Town Aigpoct (via Gunean Town), The works contracts
consists in the rehabilitation ed about 3.6 miles (approx, 6.1 kim) oda two-lane single cumageway
road. Alot 36.000) square yards of the road pavement will require the replacement of the base
course layer and the placement of anew surface seal In addition, about 9,000) square yards of
concrete rond in Duncan Town will have te be demolished and reconstructed.

The works ane co-financed by the Government of The Bohamoas and the Sth European Development
Fund.

The tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at the following address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and Tramspori,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

Ist Floor East Wing

Nassau (4.P), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-522-4850

Fax.: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box bocated al:

Tender Board Ministry of Finance
Srd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Ass, The Paha

Tender submission will be received no Later than 4:00 pm, Wonday, 2nd November, 2009, Any
tender received after this deadline will mot be considered.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at M900um, Tuesday, 3nd November 20009 at
the Tenders Board,

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall be published on the Europe Asd
website: hitp:fec.curopa.eu/europeaid/ work fundingyindes, en.htm (Select Contracts link) and
will commumented in writing 10 a1] tenderers

Prospective tenderers should be aware that this tendering procedure is launched under a suspensive
Clause, Les without ihe funds from the European Commission available at this moment. The
actual award and signature of contracts following this procedure is therefore conditional to the
conclusion of the Rider to the Financing Agreement

The Contracting Authority (i.c. the Government of The Bahamas) will invariably cancel this
tendering procedure if the European Commission's decision-making procedure is not completed
and the Rider to the Financing Agreement 15 not signed by beh parties,







PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
Family Guardian targets early 2010 for agency launch

FROM page 1B

a significant “change in expe-
rience” and increase in health
claims year-over-year, Family
Guardian was also assessing
whether premium rates need-
ed to be revised upwards to
better align them with the
likely risk.

She explained that this did
not mean health insurance
premium rates would increase
across-the-board at the life
and health insurer, a 100 per
cent subsidiary of BISX-listed
FamGuard Corporation, but
assessments would be made
in instances where there were

“comparatively higher utili-
sation rates”.

“Tt certainly is larger than
what we have experienced in
previous years,” Ms Her-
manns said of the surge in
health insurance claims. “We
really started to see a signifi-
cant escalation in the second
quarter, when claims started
to be paid.

“We’re still in the process
of analysing some of the
things that may have caused
it. It takes quite a while,
because thousands of claims
are paid on a daily basis.”

While Family Guardian
would have normally expect-
ed to see an increase in health











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claims as a result of growth
in its BahamaHealth portfo-
lio, Ms Hermanns said the rise
experienced in the 2009 first
half was greater than the
client base expansion.

“Any time you have an
increase in business, you have
a corresponding increase in
claims,” Ms Hermanns told
Tribune Business. “This is still
more pronounced than what
we would expect from an
increase in new accounts.”

The Family Guardian pres-
ident denied suggestions from
some insurance market
sources that the company’s
recent unfavourable claims
experience had partly resulted
from it ‘buying’ new business,
where it reduced premium
rates below a level equivalent
to a client’s risk in order to
win the account.

Adding that such a scenario
“does not jive” with the expe-
rience of the Bahamian health
insurance market as a whole,
with all carriers experiencing
a surge in claims similar to
Family Guardian’s, Ms Her-
manns added: “All of our

accounts are priced actuarial-
ly based on the information
we receive at the time.”

“Our health claims experi-
ence has been challenging for
us this year, but we are confi-
dent we have taken the ini-
tiatives to bring it around,”
she added.

“We’re still seeing a high
claims volume in the third
quarter. The claims paid have
slowed a little bit, but we are
working diligently to make
sure we fully grasp the facts
affecting the jump in claims
paid. We’ll see how these ini-
tiatives end up.”

Ms Hermanns, though,
warned that there would be
no “quick solution” to the
health claims situation due to
“the nature of the business”,
with any initiatives likely to
take several months before
the effects came through.

Although Family Guardian
was undertaking no new
product or business line
launches, Ms Hermanns said
the company was working
towards the launch of its Fam-
ily Guardian General Insur-

ance Agency subsidiary, a
project that has been on the
drawing board for several
years now.

“We haven’t completed the
launch on that,” she told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re work-
ing diligently to have that in
place for the beginning of
2010.” the general insurance
agency will sell property and
casualty, plus auto, insurance
policies through its existing
branch network, with agents
being trained up to sell gen-
eral insurance.

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian had “not seen any
substantial increase in lapse
rates” on its life and health

insurance policies as a result
of the recession.

“We have seen growth in
new business, both life and
health, and the annuity busi-
ness is showing strong
growth,” she added.

Elsewhere, Family
Guardian had seen “good
growth in new accounts on a
monthly basis” for its FG
Financial and FG Capital
Markets subsidiaries, Ms Her-
manns said, adding that the
insurer was “happy with the
progress” even though the
recession had not been fac-
tored into the budget when
the units were launched last
year.

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P.O.Box EE-15827
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-323-1865
Email: gems-pearls@hotmail.com

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SYLVIA ROBERTS late
of Kensington Gardens, Soldier Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, De-
ceased.

Free parking at The Hilton

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named Estate are requested to send the same duly
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AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all
persons indebted to the said Estate are requested
to make full settlement on or before the date

hereinbefore mentioned.

Road Traffic Department
Road Safety Competition

CASH, FOUNTAIN
Attorneys-at-Law
P.O.Box N-476
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Personal Representatives

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5B





Oil above $71 on optimism
over economic recovery

By EILEEN NG
Associated Press Writer

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
(AP) — Oil prices rose above $71 a
barrel Wednesday in Asia as
increased optimism about a global
economic recovery boosted expec-
tations that crude demand will grow.

Benchmark crude for November
delivery was up 63 cents at $71.51
by midday Kuala Lumpur time in
electronic trading on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. The contract
rose 47 cents to settle at $70.88 Tues-
day.

Oil rose in syne with global stock

Bahamas

markets. The Dow Jones industrial
average gained a second straight day,
advancing 1.4 per cent Tuesday, its
biggest gain since August 21 as
investors bet corporate profits will
surge as the global economy recov-
ers. Most Asian indexes also
advanced in early trading Wednes-
day.

The rally in stocks came after Aus-
tralia raised interest rates Tuesday,
signaling that policymakers see the
country’s economy as strong enough
to withstand higher borrowing costs.
That touched off hopes other
economies may also be strengthen-
ing enough to unwind stimulus mea-

sures including super low interest
rates and massive government
spending.

Markets

“The optimism for economic
recovery is driving equities and oil
markets,” said Victor Shum, an ener-
gy analyst with consultancy Purvin &
Gertz in Singapore.

A report by the American Petro-
leum Institute showing a surprise
fall in US oil inventories last week
also lifted prices, he said.

Crude inventories dropped
254,000 barrels while distillate fuel

stocks fell 2.91 million barrels, he
said according to the report late
Tuesday.

The report however, contrasted
with market expectations for higher
inventories.

A survey by Platts, the energy
information arm of McGraw-Hill
Cos, said crude stock is likely to
grow by nearly two million barrels
and that supplies of gasoline and dis-
tillates used for heating oil and diesel
also climbed last week.

The official weekly supply report
will be released by the Energy Infor-
mation Administration later
Wednesday.

Shum said oil prices will rise fur-
ther if crude inventories fall.

Prices will fall if crude stocks rise
but likely to hold above $70, backed
by stronger financial markets, he
added.

In other Nymex trading, heating
oil gained 2.03 cents to $1.8345 a
gallon.

Gasoline for November delivery
jumped 1.63 cents to $1.789 a gal-
lon. Natural gas for November deliv-
ery rose 5 cents to $4.93 per 1,000
cubic feet.

In London, Brent crude rose 69
cents to $69.25 on the ICE Futures
exchange.

‘polarised by a dual economy’

s#
NASSAU -T—~ BAHAMAS

tourism and the financial sec-

FROM page 1B i 1 1 spillover benefits of these employment would be max- ° .

“The Government is not
forceful enough in demand-
ing more local content in the
sourcing of goods and ser-
vices. Further, the Govern-
ment is not convincingly pro-
viding purposeful education
and training of local people,
nor ensuring the maximum
use of local professionals.”

Dr Saunders and her co-
author based their conclusions
on an assessment of seven
unnamed Heads of Agree-
ment, signed by the former
Christie administration
between 2004-2007, for Fam-
ily Island-based mixed-use
resort projects.

Analysing the agreements,
and based on previous stud-
ies, they argued that the
‘spillover’ benefits from for-
eign direct investment in the
Bahamas, in terms of creat-
ing additional employment at,
and contracts for, Bahamian-
owned companies “have been
negligible”.

Investment capital inflows
into the tourism and hotel
industries had “not led to par-
allel growth in local business
development in manufactur-
ing, agriculture, fisheries” and
sectors directly related to
tourism.

Dr Saunders and her co-
author argued that the
Bahamas’ “persistent current
account deficits” provided
further evidence that the
Bahamas had not succeeded
in linking foreign direct
investment to the develop-
ment of other economic sec-
tors, while the numerous con-
cessions granted to developers
“severely hampers govern-
ment revenue”.

“Overall, the role and
effects of foreign direct invest-
ment on the Bahamas and its
economy are mixed,” the
authors concluded.

“Foreign direct investment
is not helping development of
the local business [communi-
ty], nor does it significantly
contribute to the Govern-
ment’s Budget. Foreign direct
investment has had a limiting
effect on local ownership in

tor. Partially, it does assist in
training.

“The role of the Bahamian
government in stimulating
foreign direct investment is
positive. However, its role in
stimulating meaningful devel-
opment is less favourable. Its
policies have fostered a dual
economy. This polarising soci-
ety, and can in the long-run
jeopardise foreign direct
investment.”

While the Heads of Agree-
ment studied by the two
authors encouraged all the
investors to use Bahamian
products and suppliers, and
apply the National Invest-
ment Policy to areas reserved
for Bahamian ownership, Dr
Saunders and her co-author
said the repeated requests by
the Government for these
projects to collaborate on
training and education pro-
grammes “suggest inadequate
local capabilities”.

“The motives for invest-
ment matter as well,” they
added. “The projects
reviewed fall under the cate-
gory of asset-exploiting, par-
ticularly resource-seeking of
the beauty and natural envi-
ronment of the Bahamas. The

types of investments are low
compared to market-seeking
foreign direct investments.”
Dr Saunders and her co-
author added that the Heads
of Agreement they scrutinised
were unlikely to “cause
increases in domestic absorp-
tive capacity and business
capacity building specifically.
The evidence lies in the very
low level of Bahamian own-
ership in the hotel and
tourism resort sector”.

Customs

Based on a 50 per cent rate
of customs and Stamp duties
on imported construction
materials and furnishings, the
paper said the Government
was giving up $700 million in
potential tax revenues
between the seven projects,
and $29 million per annum in
real property tax based on a2
per cent rate.

And while, the projects,
valued at a cumulative $1.439
billion, were projected to
directly employ 3,381 persons
at an annual wage bill of $59
million annually, based on an
average weekly $336 wage, it
was doubtful whether

The Gymnastics Federation
Of The Bahamas

invites
All Interested Gymnastics/Dance/Cheerleading
Or Similar Sporting Groups To A Meeting

Wednesday, October 21st - 6:00pm

Federation members as well as non-members are
welcome to attend this informative session

Topics of discussion will include:

* The role of the Federation in promoting and supporting

gymnastics in the Bahamas

¢ Application and requirements for GFB members

For more information email:
gymfedbah@coralwave.com



Ministry of National Security

Parliamentary Registration Department

Public Notice

Allocation of Symbols for 22nd October, Local Government Bye-Election

In accordance with Section 17(6) of the Local Government Act, 1996, the
Parliamentary Commissioner has assigned the following symbols to Candidates
in the Local Government Bye-Elections to be held on 22nd October, 2009.

Exuma Constituency Polling Divisions 11 & 14
George Town, Jolly Hall, Bahama Sound,
Cottage & Master Harbour
In the East Exuma Town Area
of the Exuma District

Candid
Morley
(Sonia Denise)

Strachan
(Clifford O’ Brian)



imised due to under-utilisa-
tion of Bahamian profession-
als and entertainers.

The two authors also noted
that many of the Heads of
Agreement contained no
penalties if the developers
failed to perform their oblig-
ations in a timely manner.

“Clearly, there is no devel-
opment plan or agenda which
the Government is following,”
they argued. “Such imprecise
‘requirements’ are likely to
lead to imprecise results. Fur-
ther, these Heads of Agree-
ments reveal a government
that is not striving to devel-
op its people for greater self-
reliance or a sustainable econ-
omy.

“It is, in fact, fostering
greater and greater depen-
dence, as local professionals
and businesses are crowded
out. As the Government signs
more of these foreign invest-
ment agreements in the
absence of attention to local
human capital development
it is, in fact, under-develop-
ing the local economy.”



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Working with

Value
Added
Tax

VAT is widely regarded as a more transparent and accurate system of taxation
which has substantial benefits. Over 150 countries worldwide have introduced
this type of taxation over the past three decades and many more are weighing
its benefits, ACCA (Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) and BICA
(Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants) present an informative seminar
on Value Added Tax (VAT).

Topics include:

@ Principles of VAT = @ VAT systems = @ Basis for VAT © @ Pros and Cons

® Examples of systems at work

Presenter: Ethlyn Norton-Coke

Ethlyn Norton-Coke is the Legal Counsel and Compliance Officer wath the University
of Technology, Jamaica, She is a qualified Attorney-at-Law, UK Solicitor and is
currently pursuing a Doctoral Programme in Taxation at the University of the

West Indies, Mona Campus. She specializes in taxation and serves on a number of
boards including (CAJ (the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica), the Public
Accountancy Board and the Advisory Board of Management of the Registrar

of Companies.

Ehurd Cunningham - Acting Financial Secretary to the Bahamas -
Comments on VAT.

Other information: 6 CPD units.
Workshop matenals, lunch and breaks included.

Value Added Tax

Date: Wechesday 14 October 2009

Time: 9.30am - 3.300m

Fee: SS 150 (members} / USS 175 (nonmembers)

Venue: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Cine Bay Street, Nassau

For further information contact Joyeelyn Butler tel: 242 326 6619
or emai’ sachica@batelnet bs

ACCA

GN-930

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Ministry Of Public
Works And Transport

Gun Point Harbour, Ragged Island Project

Tender publication No.: FID/13/1 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/128XXX/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works contract for the
construction of a new harbour including approximately 55,000 cubic yards of basin
excavation and dredging, 400 lineal feet of quay walls, shore-tied rubblemound
breakwaters, concrete armour units, navigation aids, dock furniture, utilities, concrete
wave wall, RoRo ramp and relocation of fuel tank at Gun Point on Ragged Island,
The Bahamas.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas and the 9th European
Develop Fund.

The tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at the following
address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and Transport,

John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box located at:
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm Monday, 2nd November
2009. Any tender received after this deadline will not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10:00am, Tuesday, 3rd November
2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall be published on the
EuropeAid website: http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to all tenderers.

Prospective tenderers should be aware that this tendering procedure is launched
under a suspensive clause, i.e.: without the funds from the European Commission
available at this moment. The actual award and signature of contracts following
this procedure is therefore conditional to the conclusion of the Rider to the Financing
Agreement.

Signed
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works and Transport



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asian stocks

extend gains

amid faith in
recovery

By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Asian stock markets and oil
prices extended their advance
Wednesday amid renewed
faith a recovery in the global
economy was sustainable.

Major benchmarks were
about one per cent higher or
more, while the dollar was lit-
tle changed against the yen
and euro after declining the






























The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

1805

previous session.

Investors poured money
into riskier assets like stocks
and commodities throughout
the region, as Tuesday’s news
that Australia was the first
major country to raise interest
rates since the onset of the
financial crisis continued to
bolster confidence in the
world economy. It was a sig-
nal that policymakers believe
the country’s economy is
strong enough to withstand
higher borrowing costs, and
fueled optimism that other
economies were in better than
shape than expected.

“Tt provided a psychological
boost to the market as a seal
of approval on the global
recovery story,” Dariusz
Kowalczyk, chief Investment
strategist for SJS Markets in
Hong Kong, wrote in a note.

At the same time, he said
Australia’s decision was
somewhat surprising coming
just weeks after the leaders
of the Group of 20 major
countries agreed to continue
with government spending
programmes and low interest
rates to nurture a global
rebound.

While no developed coun-
try would follow in Australia’s
footsteps anytime soon, South
Korea, where the economy
has held up relatively well and
the central bank has already
said it might raise rates in
response to rising asset prices,

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

TRUST OFFICER

-Strong supervisory and organisational skills,
-Ability to function independently but work as part ofa team.
~Ability to function in a high volume, high pressure environment.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Minimum of a Law Degree andor STEP Certification.

could be next, he said.

In Japan, the Nikkei 225
stock average gained 120.84
points, or 1.3 per cent, to
9,812.64 and Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng advanced 386.71
points, or 1.9 per cent, to
21,198.24.

Australia’s index jumped
2.4 per cent, South Korea’s
Kospi edged higher by 0.5 per
cent to 1,606.26, and Singa-
pore’s index gained 1.1 per
cent. Taiwan’s benchmark
was up 0.4 per cent. Mainland
China markets are closed for
a weeklong holiday and
reopen Friday.

In the US overnight, the
Dow rose 131.50, or 1.4 per
cent, to 9,731.25 after rising
112 points Monday.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 14.26, or 1.4 per
cent, to 1,054.72, while the
Nasdag composite index rose
35.42, or 1.7 per cent, to
2,103.57.

Oil prices were higher,
helped by the weak dollar and
optimism about that a global
economic recovery would
boost demand for crude.

Benchmark crude for
November delivery was
changing hands at $71.55 in
Asia, up 67 cents from the pri-
or session. The contract rose
47 cents overnight.

The dollar wallowed at
88.74 yen from 88.76 yen. The
euro traded at $1.4705 from
$1.4722.

“Sound knowledge of trust drattmg, reporting and accounting.

-Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents,

-Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly the Trustee Act, 1998 and

the Financial Transactions Reporting Act, 2000.
-Working knowledge of legislation in competing junsdictions.
-Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
-At least seven (7) years experience in a Private Bank or Trust Company, at least two
(2) years of which must be at the Trust Officer level.
-Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asget.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Please send
Resume and two (2) references BY OCTOBER 16, 2009 to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park
P.O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Hanamas

Offices in

Florence, Frankf, Genevs, Hong Kong, Lawsoare, Lowden, Luxembourg, Madrid, Milion, Montreal,
Nassaw, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tonyo, durin, Zurich



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9B





Burger King Corp. plans to
revamp 12,000 locations

By ASHLEY M HEHER
AP Retail Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Burg-
er King Corp. plans to swap
its generic fast-food feel and
bland tiles and tabletops for a
vibe that’s more sit-down than
drive-through.

As part of a plan to be
revealed Wednesday in Ams-
terdam, the company will
announce a massive effort to
overhaul its 12,000 locations
worldwide. The sleek interior
will include rotating red flame
chandeliers, brilliant TV-
screen menus and industrial-
inspired corrugated metal and
brick walls.

“T'd call it more contempo-
rary, edgy, futuristic,” Chair-
man and CEO John Chidsey
told The Associated Press. “It
feels so much more like an

upscale restaurant.”

But that comes with an
upscale price: The new look is
expected to cost franchisees,
who operate 90 percent of
Burger King’s locations,
between $300,000 to $600,000
per restaurant.

The company said the new
design, called “20/20” at the
Miami-based chain, is already
in place at about 60 locations
around the world. Burger
King expects about 75 more
redesigned restaurants to be
open by the end of next year.
But it will take years before
all its locations are trans-
formed.

Burger King franchise own-
ers are contractually required
to update their restaurants
after a set period of time, and
executives said the redesign
will be the primary option for

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

SKYPER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),

SKYPER

LIMITED has been Dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 3rd day of

September, 2009.

Simon John Harman
of Equity Trust House
28-30 The Parade, St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 EQ
Liquidator



future upgrades. All new
restaurants will be built using
the plan.

So far, remodeled restau-
rants have seen sales climb
about 12 to 15 per cent, while
restaurants that are torn down
and completely rebuilt at the
same location have seen sales
climb by as much as 30 per-
cent, Chidsey said.

Observers say the hip,
urban and masculine elements
in the redesign may be a hit
with Burger King’s most loy-
al customers — young men
who frequent the chain
known as much for its signa-
ture Whoppers and “steak
burgers” as its sometimes-
creepy “King” commercials.
But some experts are skepti-
cal about whether sales will
grow as much as the company
claims and how eager fran-
chise owners will be to part
with that kind of cash, partic-
ularly in a sour economy.

Chidsey said he thinks most

TNT

For the stories
WA Ug

ia aT
MEAN
Montays



franchise owners, who typi-
cally own both their restau-
rant’s building and the land,
won't have trouble obtaining
financing and will be swayed
once they see how sales can
climb.

Morningstar analyst R.J.
Hottovy said the reformulat-
ed restaurant could keep din-
ers at the table longer but
may not draw in enough extra
diners to justify the cost.

“T don’t think they’ll change
their perception,” he said.
“They’re pretty entrenched in
their reality.”

A group representing Burg-
er King franchise owners did-
n’t immediately comment.

Fast-food restaurants typi-
cally get almost two-thirds of
their business from drive-
through or carryout orders.
More appealing interiors
could help the company com-
pete with sit-down counter-
parts that many customers
think offer better food and

better ambiance.

Ron Paul, president of the
food consultant company
‘Technomic Inc., said he thinks
the redesign shows just how
determined Burger King is to
compete with “fast casual”
restaurant chains such as
Chipotle, Starbucks and Pan-
era, which customers think of
as a cut above typical fast
food.

“People in the fast-food cat-
egory are recognizing they’ve
been losing customers to the
fast-casual player,” he said.
“What this sounds like is an
attempt to get that dining-in
business back by making it an
attractive environment.”

They might also help Burg-
er King, the No. 2 burger food
chain the U.S., stand out from
larger rival McDonald’s Corp.
and other competitors, includ-
ing regional chains, who’ve
begun to add bigger and bet-
ter burgers to their menus as
they clamor for a share of the

growing burger market that’s
worth $100 billion in the U.S.

“It’s a competitive necessi-
ty to square up against the
competition,” Chidsey said.

While the most noticeable
changes will be inside restau-
rants, Burger King executives
also plan to update exteriors,
too, adding metal canopies
and more signs proclaiming
“Home of the Whopper.”

At the same time, the com-
pany is beefing up its value
menu, temporarily adding a
$1 double cheeseburger to
U.S. menus. And it’s also in
the final stages of installing
new broiler ovens that cut
energy use and will let the
company roll out new menu
items in the future.

On deck is the Steakhouse
XT burger, which has a thick
patty topped with mayon-
naise, fried onions, lettuce,
steak sauce, cheese and toma-
toes. It’s slated to join menus
in February.

GN-931

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration

Act Chapter (277) & Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands wil be held at the Port Administration Building,
Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 29" October, 2009 at 3:00pm for the purpose of

REGNO

NP 623 ATW

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT

(JET SKT} -NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICATION

“No Name”

Deal's Watersports
Nassau, Bahamas ft
Jet Ski

granting Liceaces under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) & Commercial
Recreational Watercraft Act 2006.

Any Person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least six
uy FF >, (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to the
- Board and to the applicant

NP:624ATW Deal's Watersports “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas 98

Jet Ski

UssI00

Prostate Cancer
Education & Support

&
The Cancer Society oi the Bahamas

With LO Ypank
nautilus

WATER OF THE BAHAMAS

&

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written

authorization atthe meeting, NP. 135 ATE

Dames Okinawa “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas ft

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written Tetskd

ation fos th New Providence Pot Aubry Board.
ee NP:G27ATW Dames Okinawa *No Nan’
Nassau, Bahamas 9ff

The undermentioned persons have applied for grant the licences as specified below. gg
f





NP: 656ATW Dames Okinawa “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas ft

TRANSFER OF JET SKI -NEW PROVIDENCE Jet Ski



NP:126ATE DeSquare Enterprises “No Name”
.0. Box N-13600 — 9ft

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski



REGNO PREVIOUS

OWNER

NEWOWNER CLASS PASS USE

Dames Okinawa D Rental
P.O, BoxEE-15256

Nassau, Baharnas

NP: 627 ATW Musgrove Kenneth
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 148 ATE —-D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O, Box N-13600 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT
NEW OPERATOR LICENCE- NEW PROVIDENCE

D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O, Box N-13600 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

LICENCE NO NAME CLASS

NP: 603 ATW D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O. BoxN-13600 ft

Nassau, Bahamas ‘Jet Ski

Neely Marco M. D
P.O, Box EE-17444
Nassau, Bahamas





NP: 652ATW —D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O. Box N-13600 9)

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

Pratt Devon T.
P.O, Box N-9057
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 653 ATW —-D-Square Enterprises
P.O, Box N-13600

RENEWAL OF COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT Nassau, Bahamas

OPERATOR LICENCE -NEW PROVIDENCE



‘

D-Square Enterprises “h
P.O. Box N-13600 9)
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

NP: 654 ATW



CLASS
D NP: 165 ATE

LICENCE NO NAME

K&M Watersports “No Name”
P.O, Box FH-14020 ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

104 Butler Bosfield I.
Nassau, Bahamas

Demeritte Demaro
P.O, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas

NP:622 ATW Seats Alexys “No Name”
P.O. Box SB-50016 Sit

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

= Dorsett Renaldo
P.O, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas
" Welecens Ltd.

: RENEWAL OF MASTER'S - NEW PROVIDENCE
Gibson Pat a a ae

P.O. Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas

\

LICENCE # NAME CLASS



Johnson Kevin

P.0, Box CB-13600 oo
Nassau, Bahamas Dinnick Christopher

a P.O. Box N-7149
McKenzie Dencil B Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas

| FOr their participation in our
First Snual 1,000 Man Yaa
held September 12th 2009





Roberts Farren
Nassau, Bahamas







Commander Patrick McNeil
Port Controller

Smith Cartel
P.0, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Value for money hurts the
Bahamas on cruise conversion

Ministry of Tourism said the
key question was how
Bahamian hotels could “cash
in” on the cruise business
without entering the industry
themselves, given that 80 per

FROM page 1B

Bahama and the Family
Islands were ahead of 2008

comparatives by 13 per cent
and 34.9 per cent respectively
for first port of entry, con-
trasting sharply with the 13.7
per cent drop in air or
stopover arrivals for July.

In its market analysis that
accompanied the data, the

cent of passengers who
responded to the Cruise Lines
International Association’s
(CLIA) 2008 survey said they
used voyages to assess desti-
nations where they wanted to
take a land-based vacation.
The analysis pointed to a
















2009
CLE/qui/No.00289

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels

of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a

portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate

immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5

miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,

one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper

NOTICE OF PETITION.

Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
of September, A.D. 2009.

The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill
Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:

ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be



weak point, namely that ‘sat-
isfaction’ and ‘value for mon-
ey’ ratings among cruise pas-
sengers were considerably
higher than those given by
stopover tourists in the
Bahamas.

While the CLIA’s 2008 sur-
vey had shown that 95 per
cent of cruise passengers were
satisfied with their experience,
and of those 44 per cent
‘extremely satisfied’, only 57
per cent of “the land-based
vacationers, including
boaters/yachters to the
Bahamas were satisfied with
their overall Bahamas expe-
rience”.

Out of that 57 per cent,
some 21 per cent were ‘very
satisfied’ with their Bahamian
vacation experience, but 34
per cent said only that it
matched their expectations.

“Cruise lines have learned
the importance of offering
good value for money,” the
Ministry of Tourism analysis

said. “Sixty-nine per cent of
cruisers thought that the value
for money received was very
high or somewhat high, and
only 4 per cent thought that it
was low.

“Value for money has been
a weakness of the Bahamas
for many years now. Accord-
ing to the latest Exit Statis-
tics, 27 per cent of the
stopover visitors (includes
land-based vacationers)
thought that the value for
money in the hotels was much
better or better than expect-
ed, and 23 per cent thought
that it was not as good or
worse than they had expected
it to be.

“Thirty-nine per cent
thought that the overall value
for money for the Bahamas
was much better or better
than expected, and 18 per
cent thought it was not as
good or worse than they had
expected it to be.”

The Ministry added: “It is

TEESE,
Real Estate

eee eed mle te Ro Leh alt ie

Everywhere The

a

—

‘| § - = = ) aes
Fine Fel: 502 2356 ma
for ad rates a

t

well known to Bahamians and
repeat visitors to the Bahamas
that the destination is an
expensive place. When a des-
tination is expensive, should
not the island amenities, the
hotel ‘perks’, the hotel ser-
vice, hotel rooms, hotel food,
attitude of the people in gen-
eral, food in restaurants, ser-
vice in restaurants all be
superb because, together, they
all equal good value for mon-
ey?
“Could that be a reason
why the Bahamas has seen a
large increase in cruise
tourism to the Bahamas but a
decline in the demand for
land-based accommodations?
Have land-based vacation
stays missed the ‘boat’ on val-
ue for money? Each hotel
that caters to the tourists in
the Bahamas must ponder the
point: “Are we providing
excellent value for money
through our product offerings
and service? How can we
improve our value for mon-
ey and thereby improve our

bottom line?’”

Although the Bahamas had
not matched the annualised 8
per cent growth rate the
cruise industry had experi-
enced over the last several
years, between 1989 and 2008
this nation’s cruise tourism
business has expanded by 74
per cent. And sea arrivals now
accounted for 68.3 per cent
of all tourist arrivals to the
Bahamas, with stopovers hav-
ing just a 31.7 per cent share.

For the seven months to
July 2009, air arrivals to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were
down &.8 per cent at 620,203,
compared to 679,731 in 2008.
This contrasted with a 7.3 per
cent increase for sea and air
arrivals combined.

The islands experiencing
major declines in stopover vis-
itors were Grand Bahama and
Abaco, with 27.5 per cent and
24.8 per cent falls respective-
ly, while Exuma and Cat
Island saw air arrivals falls of
38.8 per cent and 39.4 per cent
respectively.

NOTICE is hereby given that WIDSON AZOR of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1% day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ROGER JAMES
BOUCHER of MCKINNEY DRIVE, CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O.
BOX SB-52414, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

NOTICE

BAHAMAS AGRIBUSINESS

COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED
(VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED)

facts within twenty-eight days from the 1% day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

inspected during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The Administrator’s office at George Town, Exuma.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.

7 Pharmacy Technician |
TTR

Be first, only 20 American
Certification Exam
Application available.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 105 of the Cooperative Societies Act,
2005 the voluntary liquidation of Bahamas
Agribusiness Cooperative Society Limited has
commenced. All claims against the aforementioned
Cooperative must be submitted to and received by
THE LIQUIDATOR before October 31, 2009 at PO

DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009 Box SS 6462, Nassau, Bahamas.

CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House

West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

Cliff Pinder & Associates Limited
Liquidator

Register Now for October Session
Call Hepson at:
356-4860

(S. 18, O. 1, 16)

ROYAL FIDELITY

3 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYLCES
E€
Minery ot Work
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,478.40 | CHG -0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -233.96 | YTD % -13.66
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW_.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Previous Close Today's Close

SITUATION VACANT

MERCHANDISE/PARTS MANAGER

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Needed for expanding
Freeport Auto Dealership

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson : . 136

Premier Real Estate 4 d * i 64.1
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Mature applicants must have a thorough understanding of
computerized inventory systems, be able to interpret parts
usage, generate parts orders, supervise AND train parts
personnel.

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

FBB13

FBB15 i
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

id $ sk $ Last Price

7%
Prime + 1.75%

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25
RND Holdings

a EPS $ Div $

0.000
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.001

Knowledge of Japanese and Korean parts is preferred along
with proven dealership experience.

.35 0.40 oO
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540

ABDAB
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months

0.000
0.002 0.000
Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial | Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Yield %

Attractive and competitive remuneration package available
to successful applicant.

31-Aug-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
nted price for daily volume

Please apply in writing to:
Administrator
P.O, Box F-41060
Freeport

Ask $ - Selling price of Col

Last Price - Last traded

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT {,

5-Day FORECAST

ORLANDO































High: 92° F/33° C Plenty of sunshine. Clear. Plenty of sunshine. Bright sunshine and Times of clouds and Mostly sunny and The a eo ey nee Helles the
¢ lew: 76° F/24°C el comfortable. sun. humid. greater tne need tor eye and skin protection.
. @ . High: 90° High: 90° High: 87° High: 89°
' ie High: 91° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 78° see EE
TAMPA ie AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 94° F/34° C we, [___106°-82°F | High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ry r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines 7 effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:12am. 34 3:46am. 04
* @ r = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:29p.m. 26 4:42pm. 0.7
Or’ Awa a
es , Te 11:26p.m. 26 5:38pm. 0.9
4 “i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 1205pm. 33 533am. 06
{ ‘i 4 > ABACO Temperate — — 6:40 p.m. 0.9
7 ; 2 lie. High: 91° F/33° C ee ieerqigeceaiiastaieaiegaeeecdteesneeeee caenedeiaes re BEae Sunday 12:31 am. 25 6:39 a.m. 07
re - a Low:77° F/25°C Normal high Bers ye
, Normal low 74° F/23° C
jt thes @ WEST PALM BEACH is Last year's HIgh ...ccccsscssssseeesiene sor Fs2c | NTMI UCI
y _ High: 90° F/32° C b Last year's lOW oe eee 80° F/26° C
Low: 79° F/26°C ‘ Precipitation _ ace oe a.m. Lay oe
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 00.0... 0.00" unsel....... ‘49 p.m. Moonset. ... 1 l-ec a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date ......... 34) oe | ie |
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date 0... cece 40.18" a .
Low:81°F/27°C Low: 75° F/24°C oe
©: AccuWeather.com
ae @ Forecasts and graphics provided by :
th MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct.11 Oct.18 Oct. 25
P*, High: 90° F/32° C PR nao 3
Ay Low:80°F/27° C NASSAU ano Ass
Low: 80° F/27°C
a @.
KEY WEST i CATISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 83° F/28°C Low: 74° F/23°C
e =
io m2
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 90° F/32°C High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 79° F/26°C Low: 75° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ‘
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C i
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24° C
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C
Fic FIC F/C FC FC FIC F/C FC FC F/G Fic FC me Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 66/18 42/5 pe 72/22 47/8 s Indianapolis 68/20 56/13 r 6417 42/5 4 Philadelphia 70/21 5412 s 72/22 60/15 pc
Anchorage 50/10 43/6 sh 52/41 414 + Jacksonville 89/31 71/21 s 91/32 72/22 pc Phoenix 83/28 61/16 s 89/31 63/17 s$ CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 82/27 64/17 s 84/28 66/18 t Kansas City 66/18 41/5 1 58/14 38/3 s Pittsburgh 65/18 52/11 + 70/21 52/11 + RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:92°F/33"¢
Atlantic City 70/21 5140 s 75/23 59/15 pc Las Vegas 82/27 55/12 s 84/28 59/15 s Portland,OR 68/20 49/9 s 6719 457 s High: 91° F/33°C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 72/22 52/11 s 78/25 60/15 pc Little Rock 82/27 67/19 t 68/20 52/11 t Raleigh-Durham 78/25 57/13 s 84/28 63/17 pc Low: 73°F/23°C i
Boston 66/18 52/11 s 67/9 55/12 ¢ Los Angeles 72/22 56/13 pc 74/23 58/14 pc St. Louis 68/20 5140 r 5613 41/6 + .
Buffalo 6518 5110 po 66/18 46/7 F Louisville 78/25 68/20 c 74/23 49/9 + Salt Lake City 62/16 39/3 pe 63/17 38/3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 83/28 63/17 s 89/31 70/21 pc Memphis 86/30 69/20 pc 76/24 55/12 t San Antonio 87/30 70/21 pc 84/28 61/16 t High: 93° F/34°C
Chicago 542 44/6 + 5S1N0 36/2 46 Miami 90/32 80/26 pc 91/32 79/26 pc San Diego 68/20 60/15 pc 69/20 61/16 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 64417 55/12 + 65/18 46/7 1 Minneapolis 48/8 29/-1 c¢ 50/10 29/-1 s San Francisco 68/20 52/11 s 71/21 53/1 pe 7
Dallas 84/28 64/17 t 69/20 52/1 +r Nashville 83/28 69/20 s 82/27 53/11 t Seattle 60/15 44/6 pe 58/14 40/4 s
Denver 44/6 29/-1 1 52/11 27/-2 pe New Orleans 90/32 78/25 $s 92/33 74/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 s 90/32 71/21 t
Detroit 6216 48/8 r+ 59/15 43/6 4+ New York 70/21 58/14 s 71/21 60/15 pc Tampa 94/34 77/25 pc 94/34 78/25 pc
Honolulu 87/30 77/25 pc 88/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 76/24 50/10 t 60/15 47/8 © Tucson 77/25 52/1 s 83/28 55/12 $s
Houston 91/82 77/25 pe 83/28 63/17 t Orlando 92/33 76/24 pc 95/385 74/23 pc Washington, DC 72/22 55/12 s 86/30 63/17 pc

o|1|2

LOW





3|4|5|6

MODERATE





HIGH |



ov
‘|s|9l1

\. HIGH

TH a NY

oid








Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
86/30
59/15
72/22
76/24
63/17
90/32
87/30
77/25
70/21
78/25
84/28
61/16
79/26
67/19
61/16
81/27
66/18
89/31
91/32
32/0
91/32
83/28
81/27
54/12
54/12
66/18
64/17
56/13
93/33
50/10
88/31
101/38
72/22
79/26
83/28
90/32
77/25
61/16
68/20
86/30
77/25
95/35
61/16
57/13
74/23
84/28
91/32
45/7
64/17
72/22
82/27
94/34
17/25
89/31
88/31
88/31
81/27
86/30
15/23
72/22
50/10
63/17
82/27
77/25
60/15
90/32
58/14
75/23
72/22
40/4

= (il

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
42/5
37/2
65/18
54/12
76/24
78/25
63/17
43/8
70/21
61/16
39/3
71/21
42/5
39/3
61/16
43/6
69/20
82/27
9/-12
77/25
73/22
60/15
39/3
41/5
43/6
57/13
39/3
73/22
36/2
77/25
61/16
61/16
60/15
57/13
79/26
61/16
43/6
50/10
79/26
55/12
75/23
52/11
43/8
54/12
58/14
72/22
30/-1
46/7
41/5
71/21
68/20
59/15
78/25
52/11
73/22
50/10
73/22
56/13
48/8
34/1
54/12
75/23
61/16
51/10
72/22
43/6
59/15
42/5
28/-2

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 81x, 2009, PAGE 11B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

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55/12
75/23
81/27
62/16
88/31
86/30
73/22
72/22
78/25
76/24
53/11
79/26
69/20
58/14
68/20
72/22
89/31
93/33
25/-3
90/32
83/28
78/25
50/10
57/13
61/16
67/19
58/14
89/31
45/7
88/31
99/37
73/22
79/26
82/27
89/31
76/24
63/17
75/23
85/29
75/23
90/32
57/13
50/10
55/12
85/29
93/33
43/6
63/17
54/12
77/25
93/33
75/23
88/31
91/32
87/30
77/25
88/31
71/21
72/22
48/8
63/17
83/28
73/22
58/14
95/35
56/13
61/16
55/12
38/3

Friday

Low
F/C
75/23
44/6
39/3
66/18
46/7
76/24
77/25
60/15
52/11
71/21
55/12
38/3
73/22
45/7
41/5
54/12
54/12
68/20
78/25
9/-12
75/23
73/22
59/15
40/4
45/7
45/7
55/12
43/6
71/21
32/0
77/25
58/14
63/17
58/14
57/13
79/26
59/15
50/10
52/11
77/25
55/12
64/17
45/7
36/2
44/6
60/15
73/22
28/-2
50/10
35/1
66/18
69/20
63/17
79/26
55/12
71/21
48/8
74/23
60/15
52/11
34/1
54/12
77/25
59/15
44/6
70/21
37/2
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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 6-12 Knots 0-1 Feet 7 Miles 84° F
Friday: ESE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 3-6 Knots 0-1 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
Friday: SE at 4-8 Knots 0-1 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: NW at 2-4 Knots 1-3 Feet 7 Miles 83° F
Friday: ESE at 4-8 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 83° F



, Denver.
"44/29





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90/80

Showers
T-storms





Rain Fronts
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Be BI
Away u Can J Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| Shaye meee | tne tp eine



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



IT ="). | =<>\~
Act now to save small

By MARK A TURNQUEST

MY affiliated companies
and I hosted a Small Busi-
ness Economic Summit in
May/June 2009. The main
goal of the summit was to
gather information about
problems and potential
opportunities that small
business owners are experi-
encing in the Bahamas. The
main concerns of small busi-
ness owners who attended
the summit, and who com-
pleted a national survey,
were that the financial sec-
tor was not assisting them
with the necessary working
capital, and that the Gov-
ernment was not creating an
atmosphere to foster small
business development in the
Bahamas during this reces-
sion.

One of the main reasons
there is no master plan for

small business development
among the financial institu-
tions and the Government is
that there is no Small Busi-
ness Act of the Bahamas to
drive national strategies.
However, the future looks
optimistic for small busi-
nesses because a team com-
prised of both public and
private sector executives is
being assembled to craft the
initial Small Business Act
draft. This team will consist
of experts in all industries
(professional services, med-
ical services, technical ser-
vices, financial services, gen-
eral services, manufacturing,
merchandising, agriculture,
marine resources/fisheries,
tourism, hospitality, govern-
ment).

Five important reasons
why there must be a Small
Business Act of the
Bahamas:



MARK TURNQUEST

* The Small Business Act
will encourage Bahamians
to become entrepreneurs
because it will outline excel-
lent incentives/concessions
that will be awarded for:

- The development of
new, innovative products
/services,

- The hiring of a specific
number of Bahamians

- Increasing government
revenues due to significant
payments made for National
Insurance, custom duties,
property taxes, license fees
etc

* The Small Business Act
will keep many existing busi-
nesses open during a reces-
sion because it will provide
incentives/concessions to
businesses that employ a
moderate number (five and
above) of staff, are up to
date with NIB contributions
and custom duties, and are
contributing to making the
Bahamas more competitive
globally.

* The Small Business Act
will encourage Family Island
development by providing
incentives/concessions to a
Bahamian who wants to
open a small business on an

island that will decrease the
employment rate, improve
the infrastructure of the
island, encourage Bahami-
ans to reside permanently
there and entice more
tourists to visit the island.

* The Small Business Act
will increase the Bahamas’
Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) because it will even-
tually reduce the importa-
tion of foreign products and
services, increase compensa-
tion to employees, increase
business profits, increase
government income and
increase interest payments
to Bahamians.

* The Small Business Act
will reduce the national debt
because it will decrease
Government spending, par-
ticularly on hiring civil ser-
vants, and increase Govern-

businesses

ment licenses, fees and taxes
because more businesses
will be operating in the
Bahamas.

Trade Association presi-
dents (from the Hair
Braiders Association to the
Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants) are
encouraged to submit
reports indicating industry
goals, problems, opportuni-
ties and recommendations
on how to improve their
industries.

To assist with the develop-
ment of the Small Business
Act of the Bahamas please
contact Mark A. Turnquest
at 326-6748 427-3640 or

email:

markaturnquest@gmail.

com or log on to
www.markturnquestconsult-
ing.com

FIDELITY, from 1B

All three funds come under the
umbrella of RoyalFidelity’s Interna-
tional Investment Fund, and Mr
Anderson said of their performance:
“T think they’ve done reasonably
well. We’ve done the valuations for
July and August, and they’re up a
reasonable amount.

“The international markets are
seemingly continuing to move. Sep-
tember was another month in which

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ii ei

markets were up, and we hope it
continues.”

Mr Anderson said the investments
by the three RoyalFidelity sub-funds
in the European and Asian markets,
which had been less affected by the
credit crunch and recession, were
delivering good returns for Bahami-
an institutions and retail investors
who had bought into them.

“T think there’s a great opportuni-
ty for people to take advantage of
something they’re not otherwise

‘Nassau au «99

ay

Beale ci Le PAT ler

NOVEMBER 18â„¢ 2009

BRITISH Col

Rtenet Eat Te Prete

Pen eh |
St oe a

CL meh)

|
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Pane eer
Ue all et

Peer ee ll

PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT: WHAT DOES THE
BAHAMAS NEED TO D0 TO GET BETTER AND SMARTER?

246 P-3:465P

LUNCH

ONIAL HILTON

REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
OPENING REMARKS

THE BAHAMAS STATUS & STRATEGY TOWARDS TAX
INFORMATION AGREEMENTS |

COFFEE BREAK

TAS AMMESTIES (Pst

THE BENEFITS OF ECONOMIC PERMANENT RESIDENCY &
INVESTMENT VISAS

ANEL DASCUSSIGN)

ANEL OFSGUSsiLy

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COFFEE BRESK

FINANCIAL SERVICES |PWel D

get,” Mr Anderson said, implying
that investors would derive a better
return from international markets
than the Bahamian market, which
was “continuing to lag behind” and
unlikely to recover until tourism and
foreign direct investment rebound.

While the international equities
sub-fund had ended 2008 down 32
per cent, having at one point been
off 50-60 per cent, Mr Anderson told
Tribune Business yesterday: “We’ve
had our hits on this fund, but now

international markets are recover-
ing, and if I was an investor today I’d
take an international basket over a
local basket.

“Where we are today provides
great opportunities. The markets are
way off from their 2007 peak.
There’s still a fair amount of upside,
and as the world economy recovers
there’ll be opportunities to make
money in international markets.”

Mr Anderson told Tribune Busi-
ness that RoyalFidelity would now

“be marketing [its funds] a bit more
aggressively to make people aware of
it”, broadening the investment circle
beyond its immediate client base.

Many Bahamians were unaware
of the funds’ existence, he explained,
adding that RoyalFidelity had not
embarked on a mass marketing
effort yet due to the fact “there’s
been this resistance to investing in
international markets” as a result of
the September 2008 stock market
crash.

FS .

The Bahamas’ Biggest &

Mos

t Exciting Festival,

Featuring Food & Culture

From Around the World!

BOTANICAL GARDENS

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CENTERS"

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ae bs
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$10 Incl. Fashion Show &
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COCKTAIL RECEPTION

REGISTRATION FEE; $500

Far nore infonnation about The Nassau Conference, visit:

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tie i

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



The Tribun a=
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

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» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:



THURSDAY
fa) erm aw At

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS





PG 22 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

‘SO GOES THE MAL
SO GOES THE NATION’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

“SO goes the male, so goes
the nation” - this is the motto
of the Real Men Ministry
International of Bahamas Faith
Ministries International

(BFMI).

The church, led by its senior pastor Dr
Myles Munroe, is calling on all men to
attend the Real Men International
Power Conference being held at the
Diplomat Centre on Carmichael Road
starting today and ending on Sunday.

Under the theme ‘Men Raising the
Bar: Building a Kingdom Community
through Personal and National Identity’,
the conference seeks to put the onus on
men to curb what BFMI calls a “male
crisis” that is causing some of the nation’s
social ills.

Dr Kendal Major, one of the speakers
at the event, said: “Fatherlessness is the
single most destructive force in the
national development of our country and
is responsible for the vast majority of
destructive behaviours among our men.

“The future of our nation depends on
men who have accepted the challenge
and responsibility to recover, rebuild and
restore their personal lives so the culture
of our families and community can be
transformed.”

During nine sessions with speakers like
Dr Munroe, Dr Major and Dr Tony
Evans, BFMI promises participants that
they will gain new insight into topics such
as ‘the role of personal identity in nation
building’, ‘men remaining constant in

RELIGION The Tribune
























changing times’, and ‘how to be a godly
husband in a challenging mar-
riage’.

A donation of $65 gives partici-
pants full access to the two-day
workshop on Friday and Saturday
starting at 9am.

On Saturday at noon, during
what is described as a two-hour
‘power luncheon’, Dr Evans will
speak on “Kingdom keys for over-
coming personal crises.”

The admission price of this spe-
cial segment is $30 per person.

Each session promises to be “a
time of dynamic worship, teach-
ing, sharing and open discus-
sions, as we delve into the
many challenges we face as
men today,” the BFMI said.

The conference kicks off
tonight with a session at
7.30pm and continues tom-
morow with a day session
starting 9am.

On Friday evening at
7.30 pm, participants will
continue in a workshop
hosted by Dr Tony
Evans of Dallas, Texas.

Both tonight’s and
Friday’s evening sessions
are free to the general
public.

The weekend culminates
with a special closing service
on Sunday where the Her Majesty’s
Prison Men’s choir will perform. The
service will be streamed live for the
inmates to view at the prison.

You may register by calling BFMI at
461-6442/5, via the website bfmmm.com
or visit the Diplomat Centre, Carmichael
Road.

PMU gos



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8

7.30pm - Session 1, general session “The Role of
Personal Identity in Nation Building’ - Dr Myles
Munroe

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9

gam - Session 2 “The Price and Process of
Becoming a Real Man” - Dr Kendal Major

10am - Session 3, workshop “Men Remaining
Constant in Changing Times” - Dr Richard Pinder

11am - Session 4, workshop “The Responsibility for
Mentorship in God’s Kingdom Agenda” - Deacon
Jeffrey Lloyd

12noon - Session 5, workshop “Fulfilling Your
Destiny Through Community” - special real men
presentation

7.30pm - Session 6, general session “The Role of
Men in God’s Kingdom Agenda” - Dr Tony Evans

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10

9am - Session 7, workshop “How to be a Godly
Husband in a Challenging Marriage” - Dr Wayne
Thompson

10am - Session 8, workshop “Practical Power
Principles For Financial Stewardship” - Minister
Gregory Bethel

11am - Session 9, workshop “Practical Keys for
Developing Healthy Relationships” - Pastor Cedric
Beckles.



The Tribune

The Christian journey

AS Christians, we all agree that the
sacrament of baptism is the time when
we die with Christ, are raised to new
life, and become a member of the Body
of Christ, the Church. We differ on
matters such as the age of the candi-
date, the amount of water and where
the water is located.

Once the journey has begun, the
Holy Spirit works to reveals God’s love
to us more and more each day, and to
guide us in the path of holiness. Those
who are baptised as infants have desig-
nated adults whose responsibility it is
to create a home environment that is
Christian. Parents, godparents and
other relatives are expected to teach by
example and instruction.

In denominations where there is the

RELIGION

sacrament of Confirmation, the oppor-
tunity is arranged for a public declara-
tion of faith by children who have been
properly prepared to be able to make
their own promises to God. This is a
time when the laying on of hands by the
Bishop reminds the candidates that
prayers are being offered for the stir-
ring up of their gifts of ministry by the
Holy Spirit who has been present from
baptism.

As a Christian matures, there should
be a deepening of faith by means of
spiritual exposure to the will of God
through prayer and the study of
Scripture. Fellowship in a Christian
community is intended to provide nur-
ture and support throughout the per-
son’s lifetime. The matching of spiritual

Are we ready?

THE time is not coming, but rather is
at hand for us as a people to stand up
and take control of our own destiny.
Gone are the days when we have
looked to the politicians and political
parties or the foreign investors to
determine whether we live a good pros-
perous life or not.

As Bahamians, don’t you think that
we have sang the “who did me wrong”
song long enough?

We’re very proficient at blaming oth-
ers for our refusal to be proactive. It’s
like as a people our get up and go has
gotten up and left us a long time ago.

Therefore, we’ve resorted to looking
to, and solely depending upon others to
carry our load. This is one of the rea-
sons why when a foreign investor clos-
es his/her business and pulls out of the
country cries can be heard throughout
the length and breadth of the Bahamas
of “how am I supposed to feed my fam-
ily or pay my bills?” or “ve worked
for this company for 22 years and this is
all that they’ve given me.”

Where did we go wrong as a nation?
How is it that in this day and time
Bahamians are still being trained to
first, go to school, get a good education;
second, get a good job and third, buy a
piece of property, build a house, and...?
What’s next? After number three,
comes four, five, six etc, etc; what’s
next? Who has taken the time to teach
us how to make money work for us;





PASTOR _
ALLEN

rather than working all of our lives for
money?

Maybe it’s just me, but has anybody
else noticed that we do have some
smart kids coming out of our schools
with degrees, yet they have to settle for
the insulting low paying jobs - that’s if
they’re lucky to find one.

What is this saying to the hun-
dreds/thousands of other students that
are following these graduates and oth-
ers?

Make no mistake! Bahamians are
very smart people, a seriously minded
Bahamian needs only an opportunity/a
hand up, and not a hand-out. If given
an opportunity and a little time this
person would be someone to be reck-
oned with nationally or internationally.

Unfortunately, as a people we’ve
spent so much time complaining and
crying that we have overlooked and
failed to embrace and see the opportu-
nities ahead of us which are often hid-
den in the situations / challenges we’re
faced with.

In spite of what you might have

gifts to appropriate occasions for min-
istry and service gives everyone the
chance to build up the Body of Christ.

Sometimes there are detours and
delays which cause the individual to
become lost for a while or to tread
water spiritually. An intentional desire
to grow in the love and knowledge of
God needs to be a hungering and thirst-
ing that is not quenched by anyone or
anything else.

How do we make this a priority in
such a time as this? How do we com-
pete with the distractions that tantalise
the senses? Who are the persons who
are living in a way as to be a mentor
and role model in spiritual matters?

Deuteronomy 6: 4-9 says: 4 Hear, O

heard, the original acronym for the
word POOR is P_ for People; O for
Overlooking, O for Opportunity and R
for Repeatedly.

In many ways the acronym for the
word poor describes a vast majority of
us Bahamians; we’ve been constantly
overlooking opportunities and staying
focused on tourism as if without
tourism we’re dead as a nation.

This mindset, this stinking thinking
is so diabolically contaminating in that
I’ve heard prominent leaders (political
and religious), make their silly state-
ments and remarks of “if America
closes its door of tourism to us; we’re
through.”

Listen, you dumb/blind politicians
and religious leaders who ascribe to
this kind of foolish thinking and can’t
see beyond your big toes. It’s obvious
that America and tourism is your god;
so rather than speaking from your rear
ends, why don’t you shut the hell up
and get out of the way so that some
critical thinkers can come forth and
help lead this nation down the path of
God’s (Yahweh) Kingdom business
and righteousness.

From an educational standpoint, I
won't condemn or blame the Minister
of Education and the Minister of
Agriculture for that which they don’t
know as it relates to educating the gen-
erations to come from a ‘feeding our-
selves perspective.’

It’s obvious that they’re not aware of
the unlimited wealth that can be gen-
erated in agriculture; for had they
known this, then I can assure you that
their ancient approach to agricultural
education would be far, far different.

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 23



© REV, ANGELA
+ PALACIOUS:

Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is
one. [a] 5 Love the Lord your God with
all your heart and with all your soul and
with all your strength. 6 These com-
mandments that I give you today are to
be upon your hearts. 7 Impress them on
your children. Talk about them when
you sit at home and when you walk
along the road, when you lie down and
when you get up. 8 Tie them as symbols
on your hands and bind them on your
foreheads. 9 Write them on the door-
frames of your houses and on your
gates.

Parents, you have to live and breathe
your faith if you want your children to
consider it a natural phenomenon to be
Christian. Every day the journey is to
be taken with you as the guide.

Okay, Ministers of Education and
Agriculture, we’re talking about think-
ing out of the box and preparing our
children to feed the nation and becom-
ing wealthy in the course of doing so.
Rather than this small minded, waste
of time backyard farming stuff you are
talking about.

Why not develop a national pro-
gramme whereby interested students
would be given an opportunity to
spend five to six months on a large
scale farming operation throughout
the United States? Thereby giving
them a much better perspective and
appreciation for agriculture and farm-
ing than that of what you’re offering
right now.

Watch this!

Here’s what the lack of vision and
ignorance would make a leader or min-
ister say: “We can’t afford that kind of
investment right now. Do you know
how expensive such a programme
would be?”

And here’s what (someone with)
vision would say: “How in the hell did
you get to become leader or minister
over anything?”

For this is where we’ve gone and are
going wrong in this country by putting
one dimensional, visionless people in
leadership. Are we ready for the next
level?

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via email at pastormallen@yahoo.com or
telephone at 1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew and Brendalee Allen

Kingdom Minded Fellowship Centre
International



PG 24 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

RELIGION
@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

The Tribune



Ys

Roman Catholic Bishop Paul Leonard Hagarty

PAUL Hagarty was born during a
blizzard on March 20, 1909 to Bert and
Lucy Belle (née O'Connell) Hagarty,
an Irish-American Catholic farming
family in Jowa. With encouragement
from his widowed mother, he did well
at public grade school up to grade
eight, then at Greene Catholic High
School taught by Fransiscan Sisters. An
avid reader, he was influenced by the
many vocational stories in the Sacred
Heart Messenger to become a Jesuit
priest. A railroad accident in which he
suffered a broken leg gave him com-
pensation of $300 that paid for his first
year at Loras (Columbia) College and a
Saturday job at JC Penney helped him
work his way through college. He stud-
ied economics, science, geology and
meteorology and ended up working for
the Union Pacific Railway as a geolo-
gist. But deep inside he knew he want-
ed to become a priest, and after hitch-
hiking to St John's Abbey, Abbot
Alcuin accepted him into the novitiate
programme and he took the name
Leonard. While serving with Father
Hogan in Minnesota, Father Leonard
received a call from Abbot Alcuin
informing him he was being sent to the
Bahamas.

Father Leonard arrived in Nassau in
1937 and was stationed at the
Cathedral for three years and simulta-
neously chaplain to the leper colony,
Goodwill Orphanage and the general
hospital. During the war years he also
worked with the Royal Air Force and
other troops. Father Leonard had a
very close relationship with Bishop
Bernard and was a major help to him

Fatigue

By BISHOP V G CLARKE
Calvary Deliverance Church

SOMEONE once said that the
world is run by tired men.

There is probably real substance
in the statement, for genuine lead-
ers must be willing to rise early and
study longer than their contempo-
raries. Some men have tremendous
stamina, but fatigue will frequently
set in if they want to go somewhere
with their organisation and in their
responsibilities.

A wise leader will try to find a

a JIM
_ LAWLOR
eo ——

on collecting tours in the United
States. Bishop Bernard quickly recog-
nised the potential of Father Leonard
and sent him to Oxford University,
England, for post-graduate studies
ostensibly to become Director of
Education to correct the Catholic
School system which was using
American methods which didn't pre-
pare the children for English exams.
But it was obvious to the other priests
that the Bishop had his eye on Father
Leonard as his successor.

Bishop Bernard wished to appoint a
successor to move the Bahamas
beyond a Benedictine enclave to a full
diocese. Abbot Alcuin disagreed,
doubting that a permanent abbey with
indigenous personnel could supply
spiritually a widespread group of
islands. The impasse was resolved
when on June 25, 1950, Rome chose
Father Paul Leonard Hagarty as sec-
ond Bishop of the Bahamas. It was a
popular choice to Bahamians, who
loved the sight of young 'No-Hands
Hagarty’ riding without steering his lit-
tle English motorcycle from Montagu
Hotel to the Priory.

On the morning of October 19, 1950,
Our Lady's Church was filled to over-
flowing and ZNS broadcast the solemn
ceremonies of the consecration of Father

balance and seek an avocation, a
change of pace to reduce stress. He
must seek some pleasurable recre-
ation or he will eventually lose his
usefulness. You have no doubt
heard the cliché “I'd rather burn
out for God than rust out for the
devil.”

The spirit of that is noble and
pious-sounding and a person's dedi-
cation must come close to the tenor
of the thought. But on the other
hand, if a person can learn how to
relax and not spread himself too thin,
his effectiveness will be magnified.

Leonard to His Lordship, the Most
Reverend Paul Leonard Hagarty, OSB,
DD, Titular Bishop of Arba and Vicar
Apostolic of the Bahamas by His Grace
the Most Reverend Apostolic Delegate
Ameleto Cicognani DD Apostolic
Delegate to the United States.

Also attending were two archbish-
ops, three bishops, four abbots and a
host of monsignori and priests. The
new Bishop was to preside over 50
churches and chapels, numerous
schools with 2,400 pupils and over
11,000 Catholic parishioners.

On the day of his consecration,
Bishop Leonard appointed Father
Bonaventure as his pro-vicar aposto-
late, who took charge on the times
when the Bishop travelled on collec-
tion trips. He also relied heavily on
Fathers Cornelius and Brendan. This
type of backup assistance was neces-
sary to cover the Catholic presence on
Andros, Bimini, Long Island,
Eleuthera and Harbour Island, Grand
Bahama, San Salvador and Cat Island
plus three visits a year to Inagua. Then
a church was established on Abaco and
a mission started to Turks and Caicos.

During the reign of Bishop Hagarty
many significant events took place, as
he was keen to expand Catholic partic-
ipation in education and social devel-
opment. The rapid expansion was due
to several factors. The trust fund set up
by Bernard Melhardo of Belize and
benefactors Bacardi Company and
others provided capital. The Sisters of
Charity played a leading role in the
development of education, especially
at St Thomas More and St Cecilia's

If a person “burns out” complete-
ly, his influence and contribution
ends. Proper health, rest and bal-
ance will help a leader maintain his
ability to persist. But a leader must
be prepared to recognise the toll
upon him, both emotionally and
physically.

Despite our busy schedules, lead-
ers must practice what we preach in
order not to suffer fatigue or burn-
out.

Remember the wise leader finds
time for relaxation and creative
thinking.

schools. The Order of St Martin's also
assisted by providing Sisters in the
education system and more diocesan
priests arrived from all over America.
The Scarboro Foreign Mission Society
of Canada sent a dozen missionaries
who had previously served in China.
They set up a two-storey headquarters
on the grounds of St Thomas More.

Under Bishop Leonard, Bahamian
men began to enter religious life, the
first being Fr Charles Coakley in 1957.
In 1960, Fr Boswell Davis was
ordained and he was followed by Frs
Leander Thompson, Bonaventure
Dean, Cletus Adderley, Prosper
Burrows and Preston Moss - all trained
at St John's Abbey, Minnesota.

During the early 1960s, Brothers
George Taylor, Ignatius Dean, Joseph
Darville, and Henry Neeley were the
first of 12 Bahamian Benedictine
monks who took perpetual vows - sev-
eral of them taught at St Augustine's
College. Unfortunately, all but two
Bahamian priests reverted to laymen
in 1972, but in the mid-1970s a new
crop of diocesan priests including Fr
Alfred Culmer and Leviticus Adderley
were ordained.

On February 1, 1979, His Holiness
Pope John Paul II visited Nassau and
was welcomed by thousands of people
at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.

The health of Bishop Leonard began
to fail and he resigned on July 17, 1981.
On September 22, he died at St John's
Abbey and was brought back to be
buried alongside Bishop Bernard in
the crypt of St Francis Xavier
Cathedral.



Bishop VG Clarke



The Tribune




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‘BIRTHDAY Girl’ Mary Seymour

RELIGION

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 25

Oldest Anglican in Cat Island celebrates
her 99th birthday in grand style

the settlement of Knowles last Friday at
the homestead of Mary Seymour to cel-
ebrate her 99th birthday.

Mary, or “Little” as she is affectionately
called, is a sick and shut-in communicant of St
Saviour’s Parish, Cat Island, and in her all years
has never left the island of her birth.

Her ‘navel string’ is buried under the coconut
tree which stands tall in the front yard of her
residence. Mary is the widow of Ernest ‘Old
Dad’ Seymour who predeceased her in 1980.

Ernest Seymour was the bread-winner of the
family, and after his demise Mary became the
sole provider. ‘Old Dad’, as he was known to
Cat Islanders, was blind but could still deter-
mine the denomination of paper currency
placed in his hand.

[ite people of Cat Island converged on

In a birthday Eucharistic celebration fit for a
head of state, Mrs Seymour received her acco-
lades as Father Edward “Rex” Seymour, assis-
tant priest of St Saviour’s, celebrated the Mass
and Father Chester Burton, priest in-charge of
St Saviour’s, preached the sermon.

The readings were from the feast day of St
Michael’s and All Angels. Father Burton took
his text from Genesis, chapter 28, verse 13, “I
am the Lord the God of Abraham and Isaac the
land on which you lie, I will give to you and your
offspring. Your offspring shall be like the dust of
the earth.”

Father Burton posited that the Seymours are
somewhat like the passage of scripture applica-
ble for the feast day of St Michaels and All
Angels.

The Seymour clan and descendants of Mary
Seymour are here, there and everywhere - all
throughout the archipelagic chain of the
Bahamas, he said.

Father Burton further admonished and
reminded the well-wishers that if it weren’t for
Mary’s yeoman service to her family, church,
community and God, many would have strayed
from the narrow way. But thanks to God all her
children have made an indelible mark in the
fabric and tapestry of our Bahamaland, he said.

Also bringing birthday wishes to Mrs
Seymour on this auspicious occasion was Cat
Island’s senior administrator Charles King and
chief councillor Valderine Seymour. In atten-
dance were senior civil servants and govern-
ment officials from the length and breadth of
Cat Island. Veteran Pastors Vernis Storr and
Pandora Ingraham also brought greetings from
their respective churches.

Finally, Father Burton thanked the Almighty
God for Mrs Seymour’s many years of service
and presence in the settlement of Knowles.

He said that the number of persons in atten-
dance at her birthday celebration was indicative
of how many lives she has touched in a special
way.

The gathering afterwards feasted sumptuous-
ly at Bachelor’s Rest Restaurant and Bar owned
by one of Mrs Seymour’s sons.

MARY Seymour celebrates her 99th birthday at her
home with well-wishers from the Cat Island community.



PG 26 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

r

ST GEORGE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH ENDS
GOTH ANNIVERSARY WITH GALA BANQUET

ST George's Anglican Church
has been a pillar in the historical
community known as the ‘Valley’
for more than 60 years.

Last year, St George’s began its
‘Diamond in the Valley’ celebra-
tions with a special service and var-
ious activities to commemorate the
contributions that the parish
church has made over more than
half a century. Former Prime
Minister Perry Christie during the
60th anniversary thanksgiving
service spoke about how members
of the parish helped mold his life.

Many in the community also said
they see the church as the home

a, |
5



base of the famed junkanoo group
‘The Valley Boys’ led by Gus
Cooper.

This year on October 31, the
church will hold a special 60th
anniversary gala banquet to cele-
brate the growth and development
that the parish has experienced
within the community and the
Bahamas at large. Tickets are
available at St George’s and the
church committee is inviting all
sons and daughters of the Valley to
join in as thanks is given to
almighty God for 60 years of dedi-
cated service to mission and min-
istry in the community.

| Pee,

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RELIGION

aS i =

The Tribune






















The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 27

When you know who you are

IT is my firm belief that we only
ever find out who we really are when
God establishes us.

I remember ten years ago at the
beginning of my last job, within the
first two weeks I had made a friend.
We had gotten into a conversation
that took him down memory lane
recalling his college days. As he
remembered the events from then, he
mentioned that in those days he was
part of a fraternity.

Me, being curious, I asked him why,
and his response was, "they gave me
an identity because I didn't have
one."

My mind was blown because at that
time I didn't think that was possible
for anyone to not know who they
were, let alone a Bahamian. (I guess
too much faith, huh?) I really didn't
know what to do with that because I
had never heard anyone come out and
say, "I don't know who I am." He was

RELIGION
TODAY

A Sept.17, 2009
photo shows artist
Sandow Birk pos-
ing next to his
sculpture titled:
"American
Mihrab." Birk has
created an illus-
trated, English-
language Quiran
that he's calling the
"American Koran,"
at the Koplin Del
Rio Gallery in
Culver City, Calif.

Damian Dovarganes
AP Photo



ALLISON
)MILLER



a first for me.

When we don't know who we are it
is an opportunity for all kinds of iden-
tities to attach themselves to us.

Anyone or anything can come to
you and tell you who you are if you
don't know that yourself. You cannot
tell John he is Paul when he in fact
knows that he is John. You won't hear
him say ‘ok I'm Paul’ when he knows
that he is John. That is also the reason
why so many of us are confused. We
don't know who we are, nor do we
understand our self-worth. No young
lady should allow any man whether



young or old to make her feel privi-
leged for knowing him. When that
happens I believe that your self-worth
is diminished. When in fact only God
can put value to a life.

What is the value that God puts on
our lives? Well, when you accept
Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour you
become the "righteousness of God in
Christ Jesus”.

I think that is the best identity that
any human being could ever have.
Once you have that identity, you will
begin to live. What is life without pur-
pose? Then what is purpose without
fulfilling it? I believe we can only
move forward when God is the centre
of our purpose. Keeping in mind that
the Bible tells us, "only what is done
for Christ will last." There is nothing
wrong with getting an education or
having wealth, the problem comes
when we make those things the fibre
of our existence.



Then our lives are built on the
wrong things. Shortly after that we
find ourselves unsatisfied and lost. I
believe that is one of the worst posi-
tions that we can find ourselves in.

The good thing is some of us actual-
ly have the good sense to find out
what our purpose is, and we pursue it.
The rest of us just float around
because we won't make a decision on
what to do with our lives. When you
know who you are you won't accept
just anything and you will not allow
anyone to do anything to you. No one
could deter a man or a woman who is
purpose driven. He or she knows who
they are and go after their purpose.
That, my dear readers is a good posi-
tion to be in and that will ultimately
result in a good life. Instead of allow-
ing anything and anybody to tell you
who and what you are. Let us start the
search, but we start knowing that the
search begins with God.

Sensis

* THE CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE will

i officially open the new Aquinas

? College campus on Gladstone Road

? tomorrow at 10am. Catholic

? Archbishop Patrick Pinder will speak
: at the opening. The general public is
i invited to attend.

¢ ST JOSEPH’S CHURCH on Nassau

i Street will have an Golden Oldies
i dance on October 30. The general
i public is invited to come out for what
: promises to be a fun filled night.

¢ ST AGNES PARISH will for the first

i time ever be hosting a family day this
? Sunday. People are invited to bring

i their families to the 7am and 10am

: services. Under the theme “Sing

? Praises unto the Lord”, the senior

i choir at St Agnes will give a concert

i at 4pm.

ANNOUNCEMENT:
THE House of and Prayer and

i Deliverance Ministry is celebrating

: its 9th Anniversary this Sunday at

? 3pm at its location on Prince Charles
i Drive, opposite Pepsi Cola. Members
i of the public are invited to attend.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays





PG 28 © Thursday, October 8, 2009

r





The view from

the Hill

TRIBUNE Religion’s ‘Church of the
Week’ is the Hillview Seventh-day
Adventist Church on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway.

The church was officially dedicated
in 1989, but its history goes much fur-
ther back.

In 1942, Haddassah Poitier, then a
member of the Grant's Town Seventh-
day Adventist Church, invited the
neighbourhood children to Friday
evening vespers and Branch Sabbath
School classes on the following day.

Ms Poitier, affectionately called

"Sister P", was then joined by Brother
Jack Dean and met for worship in the
old building just south of the present St
Luke's Baptist Church. When this
building became unsuitable, the com-
pany moved across the street into a
two-storey building owned by Daniel
Varence. This old lodge hall situated
on the corner of East Street and
Palmetto Avenue served as a sanctuary
for these believers for many years.

In 1952, under the leadership of mis-
sion president Elder Mote, the compa-
ny was organised into a church.

RELIGION



One of the very first evangelistic cru-
sades launched by the church was con-
ducted by Pastor Melvin Nembhard in
the Old Sponge Shed on Bay Street out
of which a number of new believers
were added to this fledging church
community. By this time, the brethren
recognised the need for a more perma-
nent building so they negotiated with
Sir Roland Symonette to purchase a
small plot on East Street south, oppo-
site Cordeaux Avenue. On this site,
Daniel Varence assisted by others built
the old section of the present
Englerston Church and dedicated it in
1955. However, the congregation con-
tinued to grow and the church soon
became too small, expansion was nec-
essary, and in the mid-sixties this was
completed.

In the late 1960s and early 70s the
church witnessed an explosion of evan-

The Tribune





gelism in the Bahamas Conference
which resulted in a dramatic increase
in membership. The Englerston
Church again was bursting at its seams,
leading to Pastor Roy Fernander start-
ing a special fund to acquire a suitable
and affordable site for a new church.
However, it was not until the tenure of
Pastor Royden I Hanna that the 3.8
acreage on what is now Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway was pur-
chased through the assistance of
President Silas McKinney from the
late Sir Roland Symonette.

Pastor Keith Albury was called to
assume leadership of the Englerston
Church on February 16, 1985, and it
was dedicated on April 16, 1989 by the
then-president of the West Indies
Union Dr Silburn Reid.

The church’s present pastor is Peter
Joseph.





Full Text

PAGE 1

By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net THE MINISTER of Works and Utilities Neko Grant is set to receive a substantial promotion when Cabinet is shuffled sometime next week, as reports reaching The Tribune suggest that the MP is set to be given responsibility for the entire island of Grand Bahama. Along with this elevation of Mr Grant it is reported that the former Minister of Local Government, Sidney Collie, who had to resign from Cabi net in 2007, will be brought back into the fold possibly as the new minister of Youth and Sports. The current minister, Desmond Ban nister, is reportedly being wooed by the Prime Minister to stay in the Cabinet and take up the post of either Attorney General that was left vacant when Michael Barnett was elevated to Chief Justice or the post of Minister of Education. If Mr Bannister is promoted to Education it is believed that the current Minister, Carl Bethel will be moved to the Attorney General’s post. Mr Bannister has gone on record in recent months as saying that he is contemplating whether or not to remain N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.264THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PLENTYOF SUNSHINE HIGH 91F LOW 80F By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net AN ANGRYmob of cutlass wielding vigilantes sent a man to hospital for reported ly kidnapping a teenage girl and holding her against her will in a tiny, dilapidated home on Lewis Street for twodays. Assistant Commissioner Raymond Gibson confirmed that a man had been taken to hospital due to injuries stemming from an attack on Lewis Street yesterday, but said he was not in police custody as a formal complaint had not been made against him as of press time. But conflicting radio reports broadcast yesterday evening claimed police were searching for the man who escaped from custody while receiving medical attention at the Princess Margaret Hospital yesterday afternoon. The media report also claimed the man had been arrested Tues day night for allegedly hav ing unlawful sex with an underage girl. When confronted with the kidnapping and assault claims yesterday, ACP Gibson denied that the man had been arrested but said the RBPF is investigating the merits of the claims. "There is some ongoing investigation into this matter and if information surfaces that he is responsible for some crime, including molestation The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TINGS TOUGH McDOUBLE FOR $3.79 www.tribune242.com E N T E R T O W I N T O D A Y ! B U Y A N Y P C M E A L O R M O R E T O R E C E I V E Y O U R S C R A T C H & W I N G A M E C A R D WE ACCEPT: I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE JOBSAND HELPWANTED L L O O A A D D S S O O F F CARS! CARS! CARS! Vigilante mob attack alleged kidnapper SEE page 15 PLEASENOTE THAT, DUETOTECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES, THEREWILLBENO USA TODAYINTODAYTRIBUNE Man who reportedly held teenage girl for two days taken to hospital THETEENAGE girl was allegedly held in this tiny home on Lewis Street Felip Major /Tribune staff By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net THE National General Council of the PLP will vote tonight on three explosive resolutions that are designed to “stack the deck” against any opponent who seeks to challenge party leader Perry Christie at their October 21 National Convention. The first amendment, which seeks to block the PLPs set to vote on explosive leadership challenge resolutions SEE page eight By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net H EATED exchanges erupted between a defence attorney and a key witness in the attempted extortion trial of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne yesterday. US attorney Michael McDermott was back on the witness stand again yesterday for further cross-examination. Early into his cross-examina tion Mr Shurland became vis ibly frustrated with Mr McDermott’s answer in response to his question as to whether he had told Ms Bridgewater that their con versations had been private. “When you told Ms Bridgewater that the conversations had been private and you knew that police were taping, that was a lie,” Mr Shurland said. “It was part accurate, part inaccurate,” Mr McDermott said. “My lady, I am not going to let him get out of hand if the court is not going to reel him in,” Mr Shurland said. Senior Justice Allen told Mr Shurland that he did not run the court and asked him to sit three times. Senior Justice Allen again reiterated her admonition about conduct in the courtroom and reminded both men not to engage in commentary. “My lady is he going to keep running off at the mouth? “So you told a lie?” Mr Shurland asked. “It’s partially true, partially inaccurate,” Mr McDermott said, explaining that the conversation he had with Bridgewater on January 12 was private and that the conversation on January 18 was not private. Mr Shurland then questioned whether Mr McDermott had leaked the extortion plot to the media. Heated clash in Travolta attempted extortion trial By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FORMER MP Keod Smith is confident he will be elected as national chairman of the PLP when he runs for the coveted position at the party’s con vention, he announced yesterday. The former MP for Mount Moriah served as vice-chairman for the PLP in the 18 months leading up to the 2002 general election. He believes his experience as an activist, advocate and civil leader makes him a good candidate for the post. If elected, Mr Smith vowed to stay out of the political race and allow another PLP hopeful to run for the seat in Mount Moriah in the 2012 elec Keod Smith confident of winning PLP chairman post SEE page 10 SEE page eight SEE page nine Minister Neko Grant ‘set for promotion in Cabinet shuffle’ NEKOGRANT

PAGE 2

B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A N APPEAL lodged by convicted drug trafficker Dwight Major and his wife Keva Major has been adjourned for four weeks fol-l owing a brief hearing in the Court of Appeal yesterday. Commercial Law Advocates attorney Keod Smith, repres enting the Majors, both 40, requested the adjournment as he said he had not been able to contact Dwight Major for instructions on how to proceedw ith the matter, as Major is currently being transferred between prison facilities in theU nited States. Major is now in a Texas p rison and is expected to be settled in another facility soon, Mr S mith said. The Majors’ appeal against the Superintendent of Her Majesty’s Prisons, the Attorney General and the Commissionero f Police, relates to the couple’s complaints about inhumanet reatment at Her Majesty’s Prison, where they were held o n allegations of drug trafficking in 2003. They then fought a fiveyear extradition battle before being extradited to the United States in April last year. M r Smith told the court: “Mr Major is currently betweenf acilities and I have not been able to reach him so I have not h ad any specific instructions as to how to proceed with the application. “I was hoping it would have been settled, but I’ve not hada ny communication from him. “I did not have any instruct ions to take steps in one way or another.” S andra Dee Gardener of the Attorney General’s Office did not object to the application for adjournment. Justice of Appeal Hartman L ongley adjourned the Appeal Court hearing to Thursday,N ovember 5. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM NewExtendedBanking Hours Money Centre @ Robin HoodPersonal Loans Savings Accounts Mortgages Visa Cash Card Western Union Asue TM [ Accepts all banks Visa Cards ]Phone CardsProducts & Services Meet Our Team MonFri9:30am7:00pm Saturdays9:00am5:00pm Pictured form (Left to RightJason Ferguson, Operations Manager Shameca Knowles, Personal Banking Ofcer Michelle Bethel, Branch Manager Clarice Gibson, Operations Representative Julie Nixon, Ambassador & Customer Service Representative Dwight, Keva Major appeal is adjourned DWIGHT and Keva Major. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning f or improvements in the a rea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986a nd share your story.

PAGE 3

Thousands of poker players are expected to give the local economy a boost come January when they descend on Atlantis to take part in what h as been billed as the “largest poker tournament to ever take p lace outside of Las Vegas.” PokerStars.com, the site that hosts the biggest online poker room in the world, boasting around 230,000 players at any one time, will bring their 10day PokerStars CaribbeanA dventure to the Bahamas, starting January 4, 2010. More than 1,300 players are already signed up to play at the event, 845 of whom won theirs eats at the tournament by play ing on the pokerstars.com site, and this year’s prize pool is expected to be around $14.5 million. The tournament is to be aired on television in North and Latin America, Europe and Russia, as well as online, bringing major publicity to the r esort. Players of all levels will be eligible to participate in the 50 or more events which will be held during the festivities, with buy-ins ranging from $200t o a hefty $25,000. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net FAILURE to carry out rout ine internal parasite control m easures led to the death of five animals from the government's groundbreaking Embryo Transfer Programme, the Mini stry of Agriculture admitted yesterday. According to a brief statement from the ministry, the y oung animals, a mix of kids a nd sheep, all died during the first five days of this month because of "heavy internal parasite infestation". T he ministry added that corr ective steps have been taken to prevent more deaths of the p recious livestock – which are a major part of the country’s ambitious plan to become more self-sufficient – including staff reassignment and increased sur v eillance. "The severity of the infestat ion was exacerbated by recent rains and the necessary conf inement of animals and a failure to practice routine internal parasite control measures," said the statement, which was released after The Tribune's i nquiries into the deaths. Agriculture Minister Larry C artwright said he was not made aware of the deaths until T he Tribune c ontacted him about the situation yesterday afternoon, before the ministry issued the statement. He said that he had last r eceived an update on the animals' condition about two w eeks ago, adding that veterinarians were gearing up for a nother round of embryo implantation. Mr Cartwright promised to look into the incident and about t hree hours later issued a statement which confirmed the reported deaths. He explained that it was nor mal for livestock to become i nfected with worms at this time of year, but said several animalsd ying within a short period was reason for concern, as it could b e a sign of a contagious illness. Government is preparing to sell the offspring of the prog ramme to local farmers in the coming weeks , said Mr Cartwright. He also said the project, which began with 120 female s heep and goats, has spawned over 200 kids and lambs – whicha re all housed at the Gladstone Road Agricultural Centre. T he project's second round is expected to begin next February. ‘Parasite infestation killed livestock from govt embryo scheme’ A 23-year-old man and a 16-year-old boy were arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on a double murder charge. Blake Rahming, 23, of Old Cedar Street and the juvenile were arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane. They have been charged with the murders of Alphaues Curtis Jr and Benjamin Vues. Gunshot Both men were found d ead with multiple gunshot w ounds in a wooden house off St Vincent Road on April 16. Curtis was reportedly 42 while Veus was said to be in his sixties. Rahming and the juvenile were not required to plead to the murder charges and were remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case has been transferred to Court 10, Nassau S treet and adjourned to O ctober 16. Man and boy arraigned on double murder allegation LOCAL meteorologists are still monitoring Tropical Storm Henri although the weather system is weakening over the Atlantic Ocean and expected to fizzle into a tropical wave within a day. The National Hurricane Centre in Miami said Wednesday that Henri is about 600 kilometers east of the northern Leeward Islands. The Bahamas' Chief Meteorologist Basil Dean said while Henri is not expected to be a dire threat to the Bahamas, parts of thec ountry can expect some light rain from the system at the start of next week. "(Henri's a generally west direction at 45 miles per hour, we antici pate that it will weaken as it moves westward and encourage some hostile u pper level conditions. And should that happen it could fizzle into a tropical wave," said Mr Dean. Rain If the storm continues on this projected track, islands in the southeast Bahamas including Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked Island, Acklins and the Turks and Caicos Islands should experience some rain on Sunday, Mr Dean said. While islands in the north west Bahamas, including Central Exuma, Andros, Long Island, Cat Island, the Berry Islands, Grand Bahama and New Providence should expect rain on Monday. Mr Dean also warned locals to be prepared for a major hurricane even though this storm season has been relatively quiet. Henri is the eighth named tropical storm of this year's Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1 and ends November 30. Weather experts keep eye on Henri Huge January poker tournament in Atlantis THE telephone number for Graycliff Restaurant printed in Wednesday’s edition of Tribune Taste was incorrect. Persons wishing to inquire about the restaurant’s special four-week cooking course can con tact Deanne Williams at 302-9155. Graycliff’s cooking series promises to teach participants some of the five-star restaurant’s culinary secrets. The Tribune apologises for any inconvenience this error may have caused. CORRECTION GOVERNMENT EMBRYOTRANSFER PROGRAMME In brief AMBITIOUSPLAN: The government’s Embryo Transfer Programme is designed to make the country self-sufficient. In this file photo Dr Leroy Santiago, project coordinator for Ovatech Genetics, is pic tured with a kid.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. As we know, this year’s national grade from students sitting the Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education (BGCSE improved to a ‘D+’ average from last year’s ‘D’ average. The results from the Bahamas Junior Certificate (BJC risen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘C-’. Is that good enough? No it is not! Why? Because I know that Bahamians know our young children have much more potential and capability than what it seems. Looking at the two most important subjects; 56 per cent of students from public schools who took the English language exam “fail”, and 82 per cent of public school students who take the math exam, “fail.” According to the Coalition “this is unacceptable. Everyone in business,s cience and engineering agrees that an understanding of basic math is critical to a range of both low-tech and high-tech jobs – from carpentry to computer system main tenance, the management of a s mall business and even the management of one’s person a l finances.” “The overwhelming and critical national problems are the extremely high failure rates in high school English a nd Mathematics,” the Coalition says. The BGCSE data support this conclusion. Today, in order for one to be applicable for a job or to enter college, it is a requirement to have at least five BGCSE’s with grades of ‘C’ and above, including Mathematics and English Language. If these requirements are not met, then one can lose the opportunity of getting hired and students will not be able to enter college unless they do ‘Prep classes’ in Mathematics and English or if they decide to sit the BGCSE exam once more. This can be a challenge, because students will be placed one step behind when they could have been one step forward. With regards, to the national ‘D+’ average, in my opinion, I know many students have the potential to do better a nd make improvements, because there is always room for improvement. In terms of getting low grades in a Mathematics or English exam, doesn’t mean the students are not doing their best. However, there are students today who are excellent at carpentry work, electrical work and computer work and who have the potential to be that great artist. In schools today, theses ubjects are not fully being focused on so that students can utilise their skills in these areas. From the beginning of high school, teachers should know which student is good in these various areas. The educational system needs to be revamped and reformed in terms of having such students do what they love to do in BJC and BGCSE. The Ministry of Education n eeds to implement an initiative to have students that are really good at hands on work to get them involved and to also focus on the core subjects, Maths and English as well. Furthermore initiative needs to be taken for Mathem atics, English and Science subjects. T he Ministry of Education can look at focusing more on Maths, English and Science for three days out of a school week, These are the major c ore classes, and I do believe when a focus is brought on these three classes on a regular basis, students will be more inclined to learn them and will do much better when the BJC and BGCSE come around. I suggest that other classes can be held during the remaining two days of the week. It will enhance students’ knowledge and abili ties in the main classes that will help them in the end. If we work with the stu dents and the ministry of edu cation, it is possible that a change will be made that will better the educational system and will have a major turn in t his country. We must not let our educational system be dysfunctional, but function for t he benefit of the children of this nation who are the future. SHAVADO GIBSON Nassau, October, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm W ASHINGTON President Obama has no plans to pull U.S. troops out of A fghanistan. After eight years of war there, withdrawal is not among the options thea dministration is considering as it designs a new strategy. A lso not being considered is any exploration of possible peace talks with the Taliban, the indigenous Islamic group that once controlled large swaths of Afghanistan. When asked whether the U.S. could with d raw from Afghanistan a country known as the “graveyard of empires” White H ouse spokesman Robert Gibbs said: “That’s not something that has ever been entertained.” “I don’t think we have the option to leave,” he added. “I think that’s quite clear.” B oth Defence Secretary Robert Gates and Gen. Stanley McChrystal the com m ander of U.S. and allied troops in Afghanistan have indicated that the Tal i ban has the momentum and is gaining ground. Eight American soldiers lost their lives in fighting at an undermanned outpost in Afghanistan last weekend. N ATO said in a statement that the insurgents that is, the Afghan fighters lost 1 00 men in the same battle. Obama is reviewing his war strategy in A fghanistan at a time when American public opinion is becoming sceptical about U.S. efforts there. An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll last month showed that 59 per cent of those p olled said they are feeling less confident that the war will come to a successful con c lusion, while 51 per cent said they would oppose sending more troops to the conflict. O bama has been conferring with Pentagon officials, commanders on the ground and congressional leaders as he takes his time to make what could be the toughest decision of his presidency. Obama’s big dilemma now is to decide whether to approve McChrystal’s requestf or 40,000 more troops in addition to the 68,000 there now. Another option one pushed by Vice President Joe Biden is to reduce troopn umbers and instead rely on bombing and raids by Special Forces to keep any al-Qaida elements on the run. Obama has been conducting a series of n ot-so-secret meetings to decide his next move. Somehow the White House has man a ged to change the theme lawmakers emerge from their White House meetingsp roclaiming that Obama had ruled out a large reduction in troops. Nice going. The i ssue is whether to increase the number of troops. In a speech in London, McChrystal went public with his position and was later slapped down by Gates who reminded military lead e rs that their advice to the president should remain private. In this process, it is imperative that all of us taking part in these deliberations civilians and military alike provide our best advice to the president candidly but privately,” Gates said. I think it’s good to have the debate out in the open and for the American people tok now what the stakes are. The president has called the war in A fghanistan a “necessary war” and it behooves him to explain why we must pay such a human cost, not to mention billions of dollars to keep it going. Are there any lessons from the past, espec ially the Vietnam War? Is there anything to learn from the expe r ience of the Russians, who were forced to withdraw from Afghanistan in the 1980s, d espite their high-tech military? (Back then, the U.S. was a big help to the Afghan fight ers and other anti-communists, including Osama bin Laden, the wealthy Saudi heir who later led al-Qaida). W here are the Pakistanis? They know the terrain. I thought it was interesting that the P akistanis decided it was their fight, too, when Taliban forces reached striking dist ance of Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan, before being pushed back. If Obama goes with the military leaders on the ground, there will be many more years dedicated to defeating the Taliban and to U.S. efforts at nation-building in Afghanistan. I say we should pull up stakes, let United Nations peacekeepers try to stabilize the Afghan government and support it with a new, non-narcotics economy. (This article was written by Helen Thomas c.2009 Hearst Newspapers). Educational system report: Must do better LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Only the beginning in Afghanistan E DITOR, The Tribune. I have read this morning with great interest and am in full agreement with the letter to the Editor $5.8 million on Miss Universe but how much on catching criminals”? I happen to live on Eastern Road and it is becoming the wild west, we are all afraid to walk the dogs anytime it is not daylight. Most of us will n o longer sit on our patios, or have the doors open, so that we can enjoy the lovely sea breeze a nd beautiful views, which is the reason to live on the water. B ut until the crime is aimed at the members of parliament and their family members, we will c ontinue to only get lip service, as for some rea son their heads are in the sand. Which by the way we will not be needing much of, as the tourist will not return to what used to be a beautifulc ountry, as the news of our crime and rundown appearance, unkempt streets and nothing for them to do except use the pools and beaches is already the talk all over the world. So our government had better pull their heads out of the sand and be serious about the important things which will get our country back on track, before spending our tax dollars on trying to l ure the tourist, because they are already going to safer places to spend their dollars and purchase p roducts that are from the country they are vis iting and not from China and knock off designer i tems. Also, has any member of parliament tried walking in what is called the straw market by themselves and not with a group of bodyguards to see how those people selling goods treat the t ourist, let them just go there on their own and not announce their arrival. I did this year with h ouse guests and I will never expose myself or anyone else to the rude behaviour displayed by m ost of the people at that horrible place. It is time now for all Bahamians who do not w ant to see what is left of our country destroyed to start making the people responsible for what has happened to take responsibility for their nonaction and if they are unable to cope get ther ight people in place that can get the job done. This problem has been slowly brewing for many, many years and there are many people in high places that have much to answer for. A CONCERNED BAHAMIAN Nassau, October 1, 2009. Easter n Road is ‘becoming the wild west’

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By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net IN his starkest warning yet about the danger that climate c hange poses for the Bahamas, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham has told the international community that it is a “serious t hreat to our economic viabili ty, social development and our territorial integrity.” Ahead of a critical conference when countries are to get w hat many are calling a “last chance to save the world” by creating a new pact to reverse the negative impacts of climate c hange, Mr Ingraham emphasised that if current trends continue some low-lying states of which the Bahamas is one “are set to become entirely u ninhabitable.” He was speaking to world leaders and diplomats in a prerecorded address to the United N ations Summit on Climate Change held at the organisation’s headquarters in New York City on September 21. Leaders T hat summit drew together more than a hundred world l eaders, from some of the worst polluting countries to the most vulnerable, with the aim of galvanising political will and focusing on key political issuest hat require resolution if negotiations on a new agreementa re to conclude successfully at the Copenhagen Climate Conf erence in December. The Prime Minister told the Summit of how “the serious challenges facing the world as a result of climate change...are p articularly acute for small island developing states likeT he Bahamas which are extremely vulnerable to rising s ea levels, coral bleaching and increasingly powerful tropical hurricanes.” “Hundreds of millions of dollars” that could have been s pent on “critically important national development priori-t ies” have already had to be diverted to “repeated restorat ion efforts” required after the passage of major hurricanes “in the last decade alone,” he added, limiting our progress towards sustainable developm ent. The Prime Minister, on behalf of The Bahamas, called for a global accord in Copenh agen with “ambitious legally b inding targets” that will achieve the objectives of the United Nations FrameworkC onvention on Climate Change. The UNFCC sets out an overall framework for inter-g overnmental efforts to tackle c limate change, and has been ratified by 192 countries but not the United States. Speaking to the U.N. Summ it, which was also personally attended by a Bahamian delegation headed by Environment Minister Earl Deveaux, MrI ngraham said industrialised c ountries “have a responsibility to accept the leading role they must play in this enterprise, especially by committing t o a reduction in their green house gas emissions.” D isagreement between rich and poor nations over how to s hare the burden of slashing greenhouse gases, which are primarily a product of industrial and other economic activ ity, and who will pay for it, has s o far hampered any signifi cant action on climate change. A t present, another Bahami an delegation headed byB ahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST mission Director Philip Weech is in Bangkok, Thailand, where marathon U.N. climate change t alks are underway between 180 nations towards laying the groundwork that will undergird the December agreement t hat many hope will change that. Earlier this year, Mr Weech provided an insight into the s ignificance of reversing clim ate change when he explained how a one metre sea level rise would see three ofT he Bahamas major land masses Abaco, Andros and Grand Bahama either totally or partially flooded. Financing Mr Ingraham urged the i nternational community to make it simpler for countries l ike the Bahamas to obtain the financing they will need tof und adaptation to the effects of climate change, as well as t o take steps to reduce their own carbon footprint, and make environmental technolo gy “more available globally.” Meanwhile, both he and Dr D eveaux asked that developed states “re-examine” initiatives u ndertaken in the name of environmental protection which may place additional burdens on small states, such as a hike in taxes paid by air p assengers. “Recognising climate c hange is a threat we all face, The Bahamas is committed to c ollaborating with the family of nations to ensure our own survival, and the survival of humankind in a sustainable development model for planet e arth,” the Prime Minister added. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PM:climate change poses ‘serious threat’ to Bahamas P RIMEMINISTER H ubert Ingraham (inset a ddress to the UN Summit on Climate Change, pictured left. (AP

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FREEPORT, Grand Bahama – The dedication of additional printing time for ePassport applications has resulted in the completion of hundreds of the new passports which are now ready for collection at the Grand Bahama passport office. More than 1,200 ePassports require collection, the government said in a statement yesterday. All successful ePassport applicants are required to bring along theiroldpassportsfor cancellation when collecting their new ePassports. Visas Those containingnonexpired visaswill be returned to its owner for further use once cancelled. To address the protracted backlog of ePassport applications for Grand Bahama residents, Foreign Affairs Minister Brent Symonette directed that an entire day in the week be allotted solely for the printing of those passports. A printing machine is currently dedicated to the pro duction of ePassports for Grand Bahama residents. The total number of printing machines – all housed in New Providence – has also been increased to improve service to Bahamians throughout the c ountry. A s part of the process of e xpanding service capacity on Grand Bahama, the number of passport office phone lines was increased from two to seven, and now include an appointment line, a hotlinea nd a complaints line. The telephone number for the passport office's appointment system is 351-9976. Staffing at the office has also been increased, the state ment said. B y AVA TURNQUEST AS part of its commitment to improve the quality of lifeo f all Bahamians, the Bahamas Association for Social Health will host a mini-fair on Discovery Day. T o be held at a 210 acre compound, the mini-fair will serve as a formal introduction to BASH’s sister company, Educational Alternative Resourcesf or Total Health (EARTH Village and all funds will be used to further its development. Geared towards families and children, EARTH Village will continue BASH’s vision to sub s tantially reduce crime, violence and drug abuse by providingp ositive educational outlets for the youth. The ‘village’ features a ctivities such as a petting zoo, horseback riding, Segway rides and numerous nature trails, all of which provide educational benefits. Discreetly located onA lbury Street in Chippingham, the environmental sanctuary iso ften overlooked by the gen eral public said Wesley Finl ayson, BASH and EARTH Village media liaison. “We’re having this fun day so we can get the entire community involved. Because most p ass this place, and some people may or may not see the sign, n o one knows the excitement that’s inside. You can come in a nd horseback ride, you can ride a Segway, you can bring your kids to the petting zoo or on a field trip. We have over 150 medicinal plants and 34 different species of birds. Its verye ducational. If we’re gonna stop the grown-ups we have to nip it at the root." Fun Day project co-ordinator T ehranique Miller said: “Everybody’s going green now. We’ve been green for a long time now so we’re tying to promote awareness. Unfortunately, thea verage Bahamian doesn’t really understand the concept of going green. There are limitations on just how much we can d o, but we can be aware. If we can raise aware children, we will have aware adults.” T he fair will open on Mond ay, October 12, at 7am with a forest fun walk that will begin at the EARTH Village Welcome Centre and travel through t wo miles of forest. The official opening ceremony begins at 11am after which activities will commence. Participants can dis-c over historical aqueducts built i n 1942 which supplied drinking water via windmills. Discontinued in 1972, the infrastructure is now an untouched ecosystem, h ome to tilapia, turtles and breath-taking water lilies. In addition to the natural activities available on site, fam ilies will be able to enjoy boun c y castles, rock climbing, face painting, hoopla and bingo w hile listening to live music by various local artists. F airgoers will also be entered in a raffle and each hour a win ner will be selected. All funds will be used towards the development of E ARTH Village's petting zoo and site maintenance. " Unfortunately every aspect of this project takes money," s aid Ms Miller. “Everything that we’re doing for the fun day we have to raise the funds for it. Its difficult but at the same time we want to make sure that we share what we have. A lot of Bahamians have no idea what we have here. There are little subtle changes that everyone c an make. I think that if people see what we have – I think this is one of the last green spaces left in Nassau, everywhere else is concrete jungle – maybe they will be inspired to preserve it.” The fair will close with a fireworks display at 11 pm. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Hundreds of ePassports are ready for collection on Grand Bahama M RS Glenys Hanna Martin, daughter of Mrs Beryl H anna, said that her mother has been transferred to the private ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital “where she is progressing.” Mrs Hanna had been admitted to the hospital’s intensive care unit several days ago for problems associated with her throat, said her daughter. However, contrary to reports in Wednesday’s Tribune, Mrs Hanna was not on a respirator. Mrs Martin, on behalf of the family, thanked “all of her parents’ friends and other well-wishers for their concern and prayers.” “We are trusting that our mother will soon be released from the hospital,” she said. Mrs Hanna is the wife of Governor-general Arthur Hanna. Beryl Hanna ‘progressing’ THE MINISTRY of Education, Youth and Sports will not be moving into the Wyndham Nassau Resort as planned after claims that a potentially dangerous mould infestation has been discovered at the Cable Beach property, The Tribune has been told. W ith its current offices on T hompson Boulevard inundated with mould as well, the government has been forced to look for new accommodation for the ministry’s employees, who have complained of respiratory problems for some time. A well placed government source told The Tribune of the alleged mould discovery, howe ver vice president of extern al affairs at Baha Mar, Robert Sands, said he was unaware of the claims. He added that government and the resort were only at the “exploratory stages” in their discussions about a possible rental agreement. President of the Bahamas Public Service Union John Pinder said that during his w alkabout of the property w ith inspectors, he saw mould on the sixth floor of one of the towers, which he was advised would be removed from the list of possible spaces to be rented to government. Mr Pinder said he is waiting to see a Department of Environmental Health report on the matter, and that if it advises that the tower is not s afe to be occupied, the mini stry will have to stand by this advice and find other accommodations for the employees to use. S ome kinds of mould which develop in buildings can lead to a variety of health probl ems. If present in large quantities, it can be extremely hazardous to humans, causing allergic reactions and respirat ory problems. ‘Cable Beach property mould stops Ministry’s move’ BAHAMAS EPASSPORT ROBERTSANDS DISCOVER EARTH VILLAGE JOHN PINDER n B IS Photo

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FOUR men charged in connection with the seizure of $4 million worth of marijuana in E xuma were back in Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon. The men were arraigned before Chief Magistrate RogerG omez in Court 1, Bank Lane on Monday and appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane y esterday. Stephen Stubbs, 34, of Ridgeland Park, also known as " Die", Dion Minnis, 35, of R upert Dean Lane, David Colebrooke, 48, of Jasmine G ardens, and Selva Hudson, 54, of The Bluff, Eleuthera are c harged with conspiring to import and possess a 3,935p ound shipment of marijuana with intent to supply. It is alleged that the offences were committed between September5 and 30, at Scott's Creek, W illiams Town, Exuma. Colebrooke and Hudson are also charged with importing the drugs and drug possession with intent to supply. Theya re also charged with the unauthorised possession of a .45 pistol and seven bullets for the gun. T he four men pleaded not guilty to the charges again yes terday. Stubbs, who is on bail p ending retrial in the murder o f policeman Jimmy Ambrose 10 years ago, is represented by a ttorney Murrio Ducille. Attorney Dion Smith is representing t he other three defendants. They will remain on remanda nd are expected back in court on Friday for a bail hearing. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM COMPACTCARINFLORIDA ASLOWAS D aily/US$199WeeklyUS$46M IDSIZECARINFLORIDA A SLOWAS D aily/US$229WeeklyUS$49 GREAT FLORIDA SPECIALS!CDW, TAXES & FEESForreservations,aswellasterms&conditions pleasecontactDestinationsat(786245-0520 orat1-800-468-3334.Besuretouseratecode RC1 whenmakingthereservation.Rates includeunlimitedmileageCDW, local/state/airporttaxesandfees.Rates,terms &conditionsaresubjecttochangewithout notice.Ratesincrease$20daily/$100weekly from12/15/09to12/31/09.alamo.com NEW CONDOFOR SALESt. Albans Dr. New 3 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bath, 3 Storey Townhouse. Well Appointed Interior Gated Property With Pool.$239,000Bank Financing Available 325-1325 454-2098 or 422-4489 Four in court over $4m drug seizure BAHAMASAIR has improved its on-time performance and maintained its dispatch reliability and safety records, according managing director Henry Woods. “We have progressed from an airline that used to operate in the 50 per cent ont ime performance to now in the 70s which is in line with industry averages,” said Mr Woods. He was speaking during Bahamasair’s annual trade show and exhibition at SuperClubs Breezes. Network The trade show provided a n opportunity for clients to network directly with vendors in south Florida and the Family Islands that provide services, including hotels, motels, resorts, car rental and travel agencies. Mr Woods said: “Our dispatch reliability is almost 100 per cent. Bahamasair very rarely cancels a flight. If it happens its through an act of God. “We’re not like the other carriers which if they are two hours late they will cancel. We meet our commitment and we value our cus tomers. It may be late, but you’re safe. “ Bahamasair says it has improved ontime performance S TEPHEN STUBBS , 34, of Ridgeland Park. SELVA RUDOLPH HUSDON , 54, of The Bluff Eleuthera. DION MINNIS , 35, of Rupert Dean Lane. DAVID COLEBROOKE , 48, of Jasmine Gardens. MAGISTRATE’SCOURT: Exuma marijuana case A CAR RENTAL AGENT provides details of his company to patrons at Bahamasair’s annual trade show and exhibition, Friday, at SuperClubs Breezes.

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in Cabinet, noting the financial and social commitments he has made to his family. Additionally, it is believed that when the Prime Minister appoints two additional members to the Senate, to replaceMr Barnett and former Senator Kay Forbes-Smith who is now heads the Bahamas’ Consulate in Atlanta, one of these new persons could be appointed directly into the Cabinet. If not, it is rumoured that the FNM Senator Anthony Musgrove, may be given the responsibility of the Ministry of Works when Mr Grant leaves for his post in Grand Bahama. With speculation circulating that the current Minister of Immigration Branville McCartney may replace Tommy Turnquest as the Minister of National Security, sources close to the FNM assure this daily that such a move could not take place as the jump for Mr McCartney, from number 17 on the list of importance in the Cabinet to number four, would not be looked upon well by the other MPs who have served “longer” than he has. Having shuffled his cabinet once already in July 2008 it is understood that this second manoeuvre would be yet another step by Mr Ingraham to ensure that ministers who are performing will be given greater responsibilities while those who have yet to meet the mark will be relieved of their powers and sidelined in favour of those who have “proven themselves.” When the Prime Minister regained office in May of 2007, he had a relatively inexperienced cabinet with only a few colleagues having served at a ministerial level. Now, with what is seen as the largest cabinet in the history of the Bahamas, most of the FNM’s sitting MP’s have either served or are currently serving in some ministerial portfolio with one exception Kendal Wright, the MP for Clifton. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM nomination of any PLP who is not a Member of Parliament, is obviously aimed at PLP newcomer Paul Moss who was the first candidate to announce his bid to challenge Mr Christie. Secondly, the NGC will also vote on a resolution proposed to block the nomination of any PLP MP who does not declare his intentions of challenging the leadership before the National Convention opens. T his tactic, sources say is being used by the party hierarchy to discourage or block the possibility of PLP MP Dr Bernard Nottage launching a “snap challenge” against Mr Christie from the floor of the convention and avoid the possibility of the leader being caught by “surprise.” Additionally, it has also been suggested that if Dr Nottage were to announce his intentions to challenge Mr Christie before the convention, supporters of Mr Christie would have sufficient time to run a “relentless” campaign against the challenger. This campaign, sources say would bear the all too familiar trademark of painting Dr Nottage as an “ingrate” who was given an opportunity to return to the party and was now turning on the man who had given him that “second chance.” The third measure, which is expected to be voted on tonight, is the possibility of creating a co-deputy position that sources explained is designed to appease the many challengers who will ultimately one day be seeking the leadership of the party. By appeasing these many challengers in one swoop the hope, sources said, is to ensure that Mr Christie remains as leader, and possibly two of his parliamentary colleagues would be named as co-deputies of the party. Having already warned his parliamentary group that a “scorched earth policy” would be used against anyone who would dare challenge him, the party leader is also expected to ratify the additional 250 stalwart councillors appointed earlier this year. However, it appears that Mr Moss is undaunted by the par ty’s tactics and is expected to hold a press conference outside PLP headquarters tomorrow night after the NGC has cast its votes. F ROM page one Minister Grant ‘set for promotion in Cabinet shuffle’ P LPs set to vote on explosive leadership challenge resolutions FROM page one PERRY CHRISTIE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Sporty meets sophistication.It all starts the moment you set eyes on the new Mercedes-Benz CLC Sports Coup. Expressive styling and visible dynamism appeal to the heart, the mind and the eye in e qual measure. Its distinctive wedge shaped design exudes energy and the desire to be on the move at all times. Its agile sportiness coupled with a high standard of comfort m akes this Sports Coup heads and shoulders above the rest. Anyone o pting for a CLC buys far more than just a car. You own engineering excellence. Come into Tyreflex Star Motors and test drive a MercedesBenz CLC-Class today.OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.TYREFLEX STAR MOTORSCall us today for your new Mercedes-Benz CLC-Class at 325.4961Wulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas Fax: 323.4667 tion so that he can fully commit himself to the chairmanship. Mr Smith announced his ambition to run for the post held by Englerston MP Glenys Hanna-Martin just days after PLP deputyc hairman Kendred Dorsett said he is also vying for the post. Mr Dorsett released a statement yesterday, after hearing Mr Smith’s announcement, to highlight the PLP’s need to break away from “business as usual” and “provide a vision for progress.” However, Mr Smith is confident his chances of being chosen for the position are above average. The Commercial Law Advocates attorney, who held a press conference in his Trinity Place office yesterday, said: “Fortunately I a m not new to the party, I am not unknown to d elegates, I feel I have something that’s defin itely peculiar only to me, that none of the other candidates will have, and I feel the party knows what these attributes are. “I suspect I will win, but if it is that I do not, that will not change my involvement in doing what is right for the party. “I feel I have a more than average chance of being successful.” Mr Smith said his bold and aggressive nature will drive all members of the party to face challenging issues head-on in the run-up to the 2012 election. He would take seriously the chairman’s task to minimise cheating in the next general election by devising strategies such as a door-todoor visitation programme to ensure all voters are accounted for long before they cast their ballots. Mr Smith said the rising crime rate and murder count, job losses for thousands of Bahamians, and the FNM’s lack of strategy for economic recovery places the PLP in a good position for securing government in 2012. He criticised the FNM for recently admitting the government has no plans to rejuvenate the economy in Grand Bahama, and intends to hold a pre-convention presentation on the island on Friday to address local delegates on the subject, “Strategies for Immediate Economic Rejuvenation of Grand Bahama in 2009.” As chairman, Mr Smith maintains he will focus on the needs of the party and not his own political ambitions, however he would keep the door open for his former constituents in Mount Moriah. He said: “In the two and a half years leading up to the next election candidates will need to be on the ground and starting to work, so for me to do what I need to do I can’t be concerned that I have to leave because I have something going on in Lightbourne Street or Yellow Elder. “With God’s help and the support of the convention delegates, I will not only be elected national chairman at the convention later this month, but shall be serving in that post when the PLP regains the government in 2012. “At the end of the convention, whether I win or lose, I hereby commit my efforts to that of the party to ensure there is unity as we move forward in this collective quest.” F ROM page one KEODSMITH speaks to the media yesterday. Keod Smith confident of winning PLP chairman post T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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“You leaked it to the press didn’t you, didn’t you?” Mr Shurland demanded. No,” Mr McDermott replied. “On the 19th of January did you give an interview to US magazine? Did you not give a n interview to The Tribune on the 19th’?” Mr Shurland asked. “No, sir,” Mr McDermott s aid. I’m suggesting that you are lying,” Mr Shurland said. “No, sir,” Mr McDermott said. Mr Shurland then sugg ested that during the meeting between Lightbourne and Mr McDermott on January 19, Lightbourne had asked Mr M cDermott if he was recordi ng him. “You are making it up,” Mr McDermott said. Mr Shurland responded, I’m making it up; you think you have a monopoly on the truth?” “I’m suggesting to you that t his tape was edited. That the p art of the tape missing is the part where he (Lightbourne entered the room and took his seat at the table, that’s thep art with all the good stuff on it,” Mr Shurland suggested. “No,” Mr McDermott replied. Mr Shurland then a sked that the tape be r eplayed. Officer Sean Saunders took the witness stand. The tape was played again. It was put on pause to show as till frame of Mr McDermott and Lightbourne sitting at the table in his hotel room. “I’m suggesting that prior to Tarino sitting down there was some chit-chat betweeny ou two,” Mr Shurland said. “Yes,” McDermott said. That is not on the tape. I’m suggesting that that was edite d to suit your purpose,” Mr Shurland said. “No, sir,” Mr McDermott replied. Mr Shurland again suggested that when Light-b ourne entered the room he had asked if he was beingr ecorded. “He never said that,” M cDermott said, “you made it up.” “On the 20th of January when you were talking to Mr Lightbourne did he say ‘if J ohn Travolta doesn’t pay me I’m going to the press’?” Mr S hurland asked. “No, sir, he didn’t say those w ords,” Mr McDermott said. “Do you know the pig prin c iple; pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered?” Mr Shurland asked. “Yes, sir, it’s a tax adage,” Mr McDermott replied. Mr M cDermott told the court that he had said it as a joke, h owever, Mr Shurland suggested that it was not a joke. “I’m suggesting that when you spoke to Ms Bridgewater a nd told her about the pig p rinciples, pigs get fat, you intended to pay money.” “Yes,” Mr McDermott said. “When you said hogs get s laughtered you wanted to kill this young man,” Mr Shurland said. “Absolutely not,” Mr M cDermott replied. Mr M cDermott admitted that the day before he spoke to Lightbourne, news of an extortion threat was already in them edia. Mr McDermott said that he made a complaint of an extortion attempt to Bahamian police on January 1 8. M r Shurland suggested to Mr McDermott that he had called ambulance driver Marcus Garvey looking for theo riginal document. “Absolutely not,” Mr McDermott said. Mr Shurland went on to suggest that Mr McDermott was able to get Lightbourne’s telephone num-b er from Mr Garvey. Mr McDermott denied the sug-g estion. He said he had never spoken to Mr Garvey. T he jury yesterday questioned whether Mr McDer mott at anytime during the meetings with Lightbourne and Bridgewater turned offh is wire. Mr McDermott said that he h ad not. Mr McDermott also told t he court that Bridgewater did not personally ask him for money. He also told jurors that he understood “making the deal” to mean that he was t o enter into negotiations with Bridgewater and Lightbourne a nd assent to the demand. “That’s what I was instructe d and that’s what I did,” Mr McDermott said. Mr McDer m ott also said that before coming to the Bahamas he had to refute allegations in the media relative to Jett’s death. The trial resumes today a t 10 am. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM JOHN TRAVOLTA’S attorney Michael McDermott pictured outside of court yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Heated clash in Travolta attempted extortion trial F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 12 Bahamian gridiron star to take up coaching... TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Fun Foods, Nestle donate$ 10,000 for sailing events... See page 13 Roddick, Knowles advance to semis By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T h e first-year combo of Mark K nowles and Andy Roddick are playing like they have been together for a number of years. The Bahamian-American tandem that came together for the first time pulled off their secondround match at the China Open to advance to the semifinal. Knowles’ partner, Indian Mahesh Bhupathi, is nursing an injury. Yesterday in Beijing, China, the unseeded team of Knowles and Roddick kicked off the team of Argentina’s Jose A casuso and Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez 4-6, 7-5, 10-4 in 79 minutes in their quarterfinal match. Acasuso and Gonzalez upset the up ranked team of Daniel Nestor and Nenad Zimonjic in the opening round in three straight sets while Knowles and Roddick needed just two sets to dispose of the Taipei team of Hsain-Han Lee and Tsung-Hua Yang. When contacted following their victory yesterday, Knowles said it was definitely a tough match against Acasuso and Gonzalez, but they played a very good match. In fact, he noted that they were able to avenge a defeat he and Bhu pathi suffered to Acasuso and Gonzalez in the third round of the French Open. “We knew it was going to be a tough match, but we played very solid through out the match,” Knowles said. “We really played our best tennis at the end, so I was really excited.” After losing the first set, Knowles and Roddick turned up the heat in the second set when they fell behind 5-4. They managed to hold serve and eventually took the set. In the tiebreaker, they just simply out-classed their opponents to seal the deal. Roddick, a former No.1 player in the world, will only have the doubles to concentrate on after Lukasz Kubot ousted him in the first round of singles. And that could play right in favour for Knowles. “Andy is one of the best players in the world,” Knowles reflected. “So it’s very exciting to be playing on the same court with him. It’s a lot of fun because he’s one of the greatest servers of all time. “It’s just a lot of fun to be playing at t he net when he’s serving. But he’s a g reat doubles player. He doesn’t play doubles that often, but he’s definitely a good doubles player. While we have never played before, we’re enjoying it. Hope fully we can get another in and get into the final.” Knowles and Roddick won 66 per cent o f service points and they hit a combined seven aces. When they play again in the semis, Knowles and Roddick could either face the team of Lukas Dlouhy and Philipp Kohischreiber or Kubot and Oliver Marach. Obviously, they would prefer the latter team as Roddick seeks to avenge his singles loss to Kubot. “We’re pretty pumped up. We’re pretty excited,” Knowles stressed. “We’re looking to win the next match for sure and put ourselves in a position to win the tournament. There’s no reason why we can’t win the tournament. “Anytime you can put yourself in that position you just have to go after it. It’s a real pleasure for me, so I’m enjoying it. We’re just looking forward to raising the level and accepting the challenge ahead of us.” If they are successful in their semis, there’s a possibility that Knowles and Roddick could advance to the final to face a familiar foe in the American identical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan, who are the No.2-seeded team in the tournament. “That would be really exciting,” Knowles projected. “Obviously we have our next match to worry about, but I know Andy would love to play them.T hey obviously are great friends and they a re Davis Cup teammates. “So I’m sure they have their own little rivalry, so I think it would be a really exciting match-up if we both can get there.” Knowles and Bhupathi, who are due to return to action next week at the Shang-h ai Open, lost in the final of the Australian Open in January to the Bryans. MARK KNOWLES AMERICAN ANDY RODDICK teamed up with Bahamian tennis ace Mark Knowles in the China Open yesterday. The duo won their second round match to advance to the semifinal... (AP Photo

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net AFTER two years excelling on the field, a Bahamian collegiate gridiron star looks to make a transition to the sideline in a coaching role at a National Football League Pro Bowl Week event. Kris Kemp, a standout wide receiver at Taylor University in Fort Wayne, Indiana, has been chosen as a graduate assistant on the coaching staff of the “Team USA vs The World” Pro B owl. K emp will become a part o f the “World” coaching staff headed by Jan Jenmert of Sweden. The team will be comprised of 45 of the top players from around the world to face USA Football’s junior national team on January 30, 2010 at Lockhart Stadium in Ft Lauderdale, Florida, as a part of the NFL’s Pro Bowl weekend. The game takes place at 1pm following AFC and NFC team practices with fans granted free admission to attend the international matchup, which will feature NCAA rules and 12-minute quarters. Players on the World team must be 19 years and under from outside the United States across five continents while team USA will feature top high school seniors in the class of 2010. World team head coach Jenmert has selected a coaching staff representing all four IFAF continental federations and seven countries – Australia, Bahamas, Canada, France, Japan, Mexico and Sweden. And they have already begun the process of selecting the best available players from around the world. Kemp, in two years at Taylor, has been a vital part of a rebuilding receiving core. In three games thus far into the 2009 season, Kemp has caught seven receptions for 84 yards with an average of 12 yards per catch. In 2007, he was awarded a half scholarship from Taylor after a brief but star-studded career with the John Bull Jets in the Commonwealth American Football League. In the CAFL, Kemp was awarded Rookie of the Year in 2004, and followed up with a stellar sophomore performance in 2005 when he was named CAFL Offensive player of the year. Kemp was invited to the Taylor University combine after an impressive performance with the Bahamian national team against the semi-pro Orlando Sentinels in 2005. The 6” 190 pound wideout returns home each annually to participate in summer camps. The junior, majoring in chemistry, said he intends to pursue coaching positions to further the development of organised football in the Bahamas. A second graduate assistant will be chosen from a developing International Federation of American Football nation in the coming weeks. According to its website, the IFAF unites more than 50 countries on five conti nents through a burgeoning international sport. With national football federations in existence for more than 70 years, IFAF was created in 1998 to organise and further devel-op the game through international cooperation and global competition. Bahamian gridiron star to take up coaching F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 13 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM FUN Foods Wholesale & Nestle Ice Cream have stepped up to help make sure the upcoming International Junior Sunfish Championships and the 2009 Sunfish World Championships are a success. The two events will be hosted by Nassau Yacht Club October 15-17 and October 16-24 respectively. More than 150 people representing 15 countries are expected in Nassau over the 10-day period. “Fun Foods Wholesale & Nestle Ice Cream’s $10,000 donation will go a long way towards offsetting the costs involved with hosting such prestigious international sporting events,” said Paul Hutton, regatta chairman. Six of the Bahamas’ lead ing under 18s will compete for top honours in the junior championships and four of them are among the 16 Bahamians who have earned a spot in the Sunfish World Championships. The Bahamas has enjoyed much success over the yearsin Sunfish sailing, winning the World Championships five times. Donnie Martinborough, the Bahamas’ top finisher in this year’s Bahamas Nationals, is a three-time Sunfish World Champion, with top place finishes in 1983, 1985 and again in 1988, the last time the event was held in Nassau. Fun Foods, Nestle donate $10,000 for sailing events SHOWN (l-r Hilton, sales and marketing manager of Fun Foods and Jimmie Lowe, chairman of the NYC race committee.

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THIS weekend will be dedicated to the memory of the late Deacon Leviticus ‘Uncle Lou’ Adderley and Vincent Lloyd Ferguson. For the fifth consecutive year, the Catholic Archdiocese has honoured the two for-mer sporting legends that have made invaluable contributions to the growth and development of sports in the Bahamas. This year, however, the tournament will be a little special as it comes right on the heels of the death and burial of Ferguson, a former professional baseball player, educator and basketball executive. Hundreds impacted by the life of the late Ferguson turned out last week at St Francis Cathedral to pay their last respects for the man who was best known as a disciplinarian. On his return from playing pro baseball, Ferguson served as president of the Bahamas Basketball Federation and he founded the Past and Present Association of Professional Baseball Players. Like Ferguson, Adderley was also a no-nonsense principal, who founded the Bahamas Association of Certified Officials (BACO organisation that officiates track and field meets. Both men have played a vital role in the legacy of the St Augustine’s College Big Red Machine. In fact, it was Ferguson who was credited with tagging the Big Red Machine nickname on St Augustine’s College. This holiday weekend, the Catholic Archdiocese will once again honour both men when the tournament is staged at Loyola Hall. It should be another fitting tribute to two of the former sporting icons. M ay their souls rest in peace. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L F F U U T T U U R R E E Beginning at the end of the month, the Bahamas Softball Federation is scheduled to host three tournaments backto-back at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex starting with the annual Austin ‘KingS nake’ Knowles National High School Tournament. In between that tournament and the National RoundR obin Tournament that will be staged over the weekend of November 5-8, the BSF will host the CAST Tournament from October 29 to November 1. The tournament will bring a number of teams from various countries to our shores. At the same time, the BSF intends to showcase a number of their talented young players. The BSF has released the names of two teams that will be loaded with a lot of young players who are making their impact in the league right now. That’s a good sign because at least these players are being afforded the opportunity tod isplay their skills at a high level of play right at home in t he front of their fans. What is also interesting to point out is the fact that the BSF has selected a large crop of coaches. Is it because the tournament is at home, or is it that the BSF has decided to concentrate on further developing its programme? Whatever the reason, it’s a step in the right direction to making sure that the federation utilizes its full potential to getting the best team assembled to compete at home. B B O O X X I I N N G G D D I I L L E E M M M M A A IT seems as if just when pro boxing is getting back on track here, it has taken a nosedive in the wrong direction. Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey took a gamble last month to fight in Montreal, Canada, on the eve of defending his British Commonwealth super middleweight title and now he has been stripped of the crown. Mackey was the biggest draw left in town after the departure of Meacher ‘Pain’ Major, who last year signed up with X-Cel Worldwide to fight out of Buffalo, New York. M ackey’s next bout is scheduled for November in New York. This Saturday, heavyweight Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams will be in Germany where he is slated to fight for a chance to improve his world ranking. It doesn’t appear that there will be any major pro card staged here until next yearb ecause there are no big name fighters to showcase. Maybe, this might be a good time for both Major andW illiams to persuade their managers to try and negotiate a show here. The boxing public could sure see another display of skills very soon. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM OPINION STUBBS A ‘fitting tribute’ to two sporting legends

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 15 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM $4.25* Bigger Beer Ham or Bacon, Egg & Cheese Breakfast Sandwich w/ Medium CoeeG et a customer loyalty Card... Earn Free Dunkin’ V isit www.Dunkinbahamas.com to learn more.Add Hash Browns for $1.25. See stores for details. ENGLISHMUFFIN* Substitute Ham or Bacon with Sausage for 50.CROISSANT BAGEL of some girl that will be investigation. We don't have any official complaint but we will make an effort, as a matter of fact every effort is being made to determine the veracity of this information," said Mr Gibson. When The Tribune visited the scene yesterday afternoon, several residents said they had seen the man walking around the area, with bandages around his head and stomach. Residents of the area also said the man was beaten by relatives of the girl early yesterday morning. However, they were reluctant t o provide details of the a ttack for fear of reprisal. T he girl, who is said to be about 16 to 17-years-old, was reportedly found bound with tape inside the dilapidated structure by a relative around 3 am yesterday, according to a resident of the area. Friends and relatives of the girl accosted the man, reportedly "chapped" him in the upper body and chased him down the street where he collapsed, said another resident. Police were later called to the scene and, according to eyewitnesses, took the man t o hospital. Vigilante mob attack alleged kidnapper FROM page one THEINTERIOR of the tiny home on Lewis Street. S AN JUAN, Puerto Rico A CANADIANdetainee charged with war crimes fired his military lawyer Wednesd ay and was given two new c ivilian attorneys during a c ourt proceeding at Guantanamo Bay, a U.S. spokesman said, according to Associated Press. J oseph DellaVedova, s pokesman for the Pentagon’s Office of Military Commis sions, said the judge in the case at the offshore U.S. jail f or terrorism suspects agreed t o name two civilian as lead l awyers for Omar Khadr, who a ccepted the new counsel. Appointed to lead Khadr’s defense were criminal attor neys Barry Coburn and Kobie F lowers, both of Washingtonb ased Coburn & Coffman PLLC. They did not immedi ately respond to e-mail mes sages at the isolated U.S. base in southeastern Cuba. Hear ing D uring the brief hearing, K hadr also agreed to have a military co-counsel, Army Maj. Jon Jackson, after being told he needed to keep at least one military lawyeru nder tribunal rules, DellaVedova said. The Toronto-born Khadr, who was 15 when captured after allegedly killing an A merican soldier during a 2 002 battle in Afghanistan, had been represented by Navy Lt. Cmdr. William Kuebler, whose superiors in the Office of Military Commissions sought to fire him in an internal dispute over his handling of the case. At hearings earlier this year, Khadr the last West ern detainee held at Guantanamo tried to fire all his military lawyers, but kept K uebler on when told he had t o have at least one military attorney. On Wednesday, Khadr, now 22, told a military judge h e agreed to the dismissal of K uebler. K uebler, who attended the hearing, said he was “sad to leave Omar’s case without seeing it through to the end.” B ut he added that “given t he level of interference in Omar’s representation by the military chain of command, Omar’s decision to proceed w ith a new team led by indep endent civilian lawyers is c ompletely understandable.” A n often outspoken military lawyer, Kuebler has argued that Khadr, who faces up to life in prison if convict-e d, should not be prosecute d because he was a child when his alleged crimes hap pened. The military attorney also said Khadr should be sentb ack to Canada. Canadian Prime Minister S tephen Harper has refused to ask for Khadr’s return, saying the U.S. legal process must play itself out. K hadr is accused of killing U .S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer of Albuquerque, New Mexico, with a grenade during a 2002 battlei n Afghanistan. H is war crimes trial is on hold until Nov. 16 as President Barack Obama conducts a formal review of the system for prosecuting Guan tanamo detainees in special military tribunals. The son of a slain al-Qaida financier, Khadr faces up to life in prison if convicted on charges that include murder and conspiracy. DellaVedova said the new defense attorneys want to travel to Afghanistan to examine the place where Khadr was captured. Canadian at Guantanamo Bay accepts two lead civilian lawyers

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor W ITH cruise arrivals to the B ahamas and Nassau/Paradise Island up by more than onethird over 2008 comparative figures, the Ministry of Tourism said this nation still has to work out how to maximise the sector’s benefits by converting pas-s engers to stopovers, especially given our ‘value for money’ weakness. The Ministry of Tourism’s Market Report for July, released yesterday, showed that cruise arrivals for the year-to-date to July 2009 were “even better” than 2007 comparatives. For July, cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were up by 36.8per cent against 2008 figures, and ahead by 32.4 per cent for the Bahamas as a whole. Cruise arrivals to Grand C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.16 $4.09 $4.17 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor FAMILY Guardian is “working diligently” to launch its general insurance agency subsidiary by early 2010, Tribune Business was told yesterday, and is “confident” it will turn around the surge in health insurance claims responsible for dropping its 2009 first half income by 71.6 per cent. Patricia Hermanns, the life and health insurer’s presi dent/chief executive, acknowledged that while its “health claims experience has been challenging” in 2009, the company had implemented numerous initiatives to address an area that largely increased policyholder benefits by 34.8 per cent during the first six months of the year. Family Guardian had focused on case management, partnering with physicians and pharmacies to ensure its clients were getting the best available health care and treatments, and on “assessing our products to ensure they’re being properly utilised”. Ms Hermanns added that in cases where there had been Family Guardian targets early 2010 for agency launch Insur er ‘confident’ it can turn around health claims experience through new initiative, having seen claims payments ‘slow a little bit’ in Q3 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE Government’s foreign direct investment (fdi cies are “polarising society by fostering a dual economy”, a paper co-produced by a Col lege of the Bahamas (COB professor has warned, with the failure to create “mean ingful development” result ing in a separate ‘Bahamian economy’ that is “subordinate and sinking”. Olivia Saunders, a COB associate professor, in a paper co-produced with Professor Gordana Pesakovic, which was released in a July 2009 conference at the University of Warwick’s Business School, concluded that despite attract ing billions of dollars in for eign investment capital, the Bahamas had not translated this into concrete development or increased linkages between these projects and Bahamian-owned business es/entrepreneurs. While the Bahamas’ vari ous investment incentives, enshrined in legislation, had helped to attract foreign investment capital, Dr Saunders and her co-author concluded: “[The] effects of foreign direct investment on the local economy are not necessarily positive. “These policies have created a dual economy: ‘foreign economy’ and the ‘Bahamian economy’, where the former is dominant and rising, and the latter is subordinate and sinking. “The ‘foreign economy’ is operating under advantageous conditions (none or reduced taxes, limited obligations towards social, environmental and national heritage protection). Its effect on employment is under the potential level, due to the fact that for eign investors can always rationalise the use of foreign labour and the Government’s willingness to accommodate them. Bahamas ‘polarised by a dual economy’ * Government’s investment policies failing to provide ‘meaningful development’ * Instead, creating ‘foreign economy’ and ‘Bahamian economy’ where latter is ‘subordinate and sinking’ S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 5 5 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 B B CRUISE SHIPS can be seen in Nassau harbour... Value for money hurts Bahamas on cruise conversion * Just 27% of stopovers b elieve hotel vacation e xceeds value for money * Cruise arrivals up for N assau/PI and Bahamas b y more than one-third i n July B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor R oyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust yesterday saidi ts second index-linked subfund had generated an 8.4 per cent yield on an annualised basis during its first two m onths in existence, providing f urther evidence of the benef its from international investing as the Bahamian stock m arket continues to lag its c ounterparts. Michael Anderson, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust’s president, told Tribune B usiness that its TIGRS Series 2 sub-fund now had a net asset value (NAV $ 10.14 per share, up $0.14 in two months from the $10 valuation it had at launch. Elsewhere, Mr Anderson s aid RoyalFidelity’s internat ional equities sub-fund, which had born the brunt of the 2008 s tock market crash/credit c runch, was up 40 per cent for t he calendar year to July 2009, or 23.32 per cent on an annualised basis, while the TIGRSS eries 1 sub-fund another f inancial collapse casualty had risen from a $9.123 NAV at year-end to $9.38. RoyalFidelity funds back to positive yields S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 2 2 B B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor U p to 100,000 energy efficient fluorescent CFL light bulbs could be made available to low and lower middle income Bahamian households as part of a $500,000 Inter-American Development Bank (IDB initiative, a government minister confirmed yesterday, with pilot projects on solar water heater installation and net meter ing also set to be launched imminently. Pointing out that CFL light bulbs were sometimes seven to eight times’ more expensive than their incandescent counterparts, Phenton Neymour, minister of state for the environment, said the IDB’s initiative to promote energy efficient resi dential lighting had twin objectives. T hese were in line with the National E nergy Policy committee’s recommendations, aiming to lower energy usage and costs for lower and lower middle income Bahamian families, aiding energy efficiency and conservation, and also assisting them in meeting their BEC bills. It is important we assist lower and midd le income households to purchase CFC lightbulbs, to reduce their energy costs and assist in meeting their obligations to BEC,” Mr Neymour told Tribune Business. “In terms of light bulbs, we envisage it could possible range up to 100,000 light bulbs. “The programme will be to address that cost to residential customers, those using less than 800 kilowatt hours from BEC. This is a very important programme. It is important that the Government gets out the message the energy conservation is the low-lying fruit.” Mr Neymour confirmed that the number of customers disconnected by BEC for non-payment of bills had “moved up slightly”, standing at 6,243 as at September 14. “The figure is slightly higher, and again most of these are customers in the lower Lights switched on 100k efficient bulbs * Pilot projects for 30 solar PV/net metering and 70 solar water heater installations approved last week * $580k IDB initiative aims to provide energy efficient bulbs for low income families, to reduce electricity consumption * Some 6,243 customers now disconnected by BEC, with Corporation’s revenues dropping for August and September * BEC financial position ‘getting weaker’, with receivables still around $100m S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B

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AMIDST all the gloom and doom of recession – hotel lay-offs, sinking salesin Palmdale, abandoned shops on East Bay Street, mortgage defaults – it’s refreshing to find an oasiso f exuberant growth. Driving out to Tonique Williams-Darling Highway (also known as Harrold Road), one turns into SummerWinds Plaza, betterknown as the home of the R obin Hood Mega Store, where soon a massive structure will open next door bearing the sign Mario’s Bowling & Family Entertainment Palace . Two entrepreneurs have taken the economic bull by the horns and are wrestling to stun it: Sandy Schaefer, who learned the secrets of discount selling in America and relocated the original, tiny Robin Hood from Soldier Road in 2001, and Leslie Miller, Bahamian businessman, landowner and former PLP cabinet minister, who after the still-u nsolved slaying of his son Mario in 2002 was inspired to create a living memorial with solid family values. The target market for both enterprises is not tourists, wealthy expatriates or up-s cale locals, but ordinary Bahamians who must focus on bargain spending. After hours of “value” purchasing in Robin Hood, customers will only have to cross the spacious parking lots to relax in Mario’s. Each of these entrepreneurs has helped the other. Mr Miller had accumulated some 20 acres of raw land off Harrold Road, on which Mr Schaefer leased a site when he needed to expand. Mr Miller then constructed the shell buildings for the new retail complex, which has grown from the original1 5,000 square feet to 109,000 square feet, and is scheduled to grow by another 90,000, with rising rentals to Mr Miller as landlord. Robin Hood now attracts about 78,000m onthly customer visits and Mr Schaefer is confident about continuing profits, which he confirms require tight management oversight. Seeing Robin Hood’s success in drawing a huge customer base to the previously somnolent Plaza, Mr Miller hastened his 10-year old plans for a bowling alley, but one with all the bells and whistles. Ever since Sidney and Ivy French closed their Village Laneso n Village Road, local bowling enthusiasts have had to travel to Miami to roll their strikes. His market research convinced MrM iller of a positive local demand for the sport, and he travelled widely to dis-c over the latest in bowling marketing and technology, visiting prominent lanes in Seattle, Las Vegas, Fresno in California, and even Belgium, where he found an impressive operation in B russels. He brought these ideas home, and his Bahamian architect Leo Ferguson pulled them all together to create the detailed drawings and specifications. Mr Miller himself supervised construction, retaining Cavalier as project manager. T he result is a rectangular edifice of 80,000 squaref eet, with a handsome colonnaded facade of sandstone punctuated with tall windows. The basic structure has been completed, featuring 30-foot ceilings over a central atrium housing the main dining area, to be supervised by a chef recruited from a local hotel.T hirty lanes are in place in the north wing and another 20 in the south, including a group of four that can be privately reserved. No bowling centre in the US or Canada has more then 50 lanes. During my recent visit, the specialised planking for gutters and lanes was being laid, and the pin-setting machinery from American Bowling Company wase xpected shortly. Separate snack bars will serve behind each set of lanes. Pool tables will be an additional feature, and to attract children an arcade for video games is placedn ear the entrance with room for 100 machines, from which Mr Miller projects $500,000 of revenue annually. Toscano’s, a new name in Nassau, will operate a pizza franchise adjacent to the arcade. In an upstairs mezzanine overlooking the atrium, a private disco-club will be open to dues-paying members. Two stand-by generators will support the central airconditioning system – but,o f course, the BEC electrical bills will be a major expense factor. Skating will be offered on an outdoor flood-lit rink (asphalt, noti ce), which can be converted into basketball courts This article is not intended as a promotional plug for Mario’s Palace. Although Mr Miller has done his homework in projectingr evenues and expense, and is confident of profitability, it’s possible that he may be too optimistic about families’ discretionary spending in these lean times, or about the continuing appeal for repeat customers. Can demand from the New Providence population of 200,000 support so large an entertainment capacity? Only time will tell. Bahamians will soon be able to decide for them selves whether they will flock to the Centre to satisf y their urge for bowling, good food and general con viviality. A grand opening scheduled before the end of the year will be open to the public. For that event, the President of the International Bowling Association will be present to open the lanes, and has assured Mr Miller of a major interna-t ional tournament by the end of 2010. As with any new-venture entrepreneur, Mr Miller faces financial risk. Of the total construction cost of $10-$12 million, his ownf unds have contributed about a third, with Bank of the Bahamas lending the rest, secured not simply on the new project but by Mr Miller’s ownership of surrounding land and the stream of rental income from Robin Hood. The risk may increase when, inevitably, our government broadens its revenue base by imposing some form of income tax, or more likely a sales or value-added tax.A ny such levy must be passed on to customers, or else reduce the owner’s profit margin. Mr Miller, and Mr Schaef er over at Robin Hood, are doubtless planning their financial structures to minimise this impact Whatever the Palace’s long-term future prospects, it’s clear that the project isp roviding an immediate boost for our economy. For the last 16 months, Mr Miller has been employing a construction force of about 60 persons, and projects a payroll of 104 employees once the Centre opens, from general manager to bus-boys. And purchases of comestibles and supplies will be substantial. Certainly, Mr Miller’s willingness to stake time and money on the risks surrounding a major project p resents a challenge to other Bahamians, and injects a spirit of vitality much needed to lift the prevailing blues. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bowling over the recessionary blues By Richard Coulson

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By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net BAHAMAS-based airlines are counting on the travelling public to help them reverse the 24 per cent landing fee rise and other fee increases proposed by the Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD quently been aprpoved by the Airport Authority Board, Tribune Business confirmed yesterday. NAD is proposing the fee increases at the worst possible time, according to managers of several inter-island airlines, who said they will have to be passed on to passengers in order for their companies to stay afloat. Director of Operations at LeAir Charters, David Moncur, said companies such as his already competed with boats and ferries on inter-island travel. He alluded to the fee increases, which will be added on to the price of air fares, dissuading travellers using their service. don’t know how we will manage more of these fees,” he said. “We are already competing with boats and the charter sections.” According to Mr Moncur, however, passing the increase in operational costs on to the passenger will mean the difference between receiving the fare and losing it to a competitor. H e said his company understands the n eed for the fee increases, but insists the m idst of a recession is the wrong time to impose them. Though the changes would not come into effect until January 2010, there is no indication of when the current economic climate will recede, and other airline managers say the winter season is often a difficult financial time following the commercial Christmas season. Chief Operating Officer of Sky Bahamas, Kenneth Romer, suggested the Government and NAD revise the fee increase schedule and engage in a l ot more consultation with the airlines. “The timing is not right, so the travelling public will find challenges absorbing those costs. January is a rough month for finances,” said Mr Romer. He said pressure from travelling public was needed to curtail the imposition of the new fees, and argued that the increases were as much a traveller’s issue as it is the airline’s. Mr Romer said he could not say exactly how much the fees would drive up the costs of Sky Bahamas’s ticket prices, but h e predicted a 20 to 30 per cent increase o n the modest end. He said fuel costs w ere always the volatile factor in working out fare increases. Managing Director of Southern Air, Anthony Hamilton, suggested frequent inter-island travellers protest the fee increases, which will directly impact their pocketbooks when they come into effect. “Unfortunately, the public may not be as sensitized to it,” he said. NAD’s approved 23.6 per cent landing fees at the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA an added $13 on the now $51 landing f ee for one airline. NAD argues that the fees are necessary to maintain its “financial covenants”, but said LPIA’s rates after the increases will remain competitive and less than the Caribbean average. range of electricity consumption, and in excess of 60-90 days in arrears,” the minister added. BEC’s financial position “is getting worse”, with its accounts receivables still hovering in the $100 million range, and payables around $99 million. Those payables include $50-$60 million owed to BEC’s fuel suppliers at any one time, Mr Neymour indicated, the electricity supplier’s fuel bill having hit $376 million for 2008 more than $21 million per month. “We have had lower revenues in the months of August and September, whichis impacting their operations,” Mr Neymour said of BEC. Meanwhile, in conjunction with the Bahamas’ Global Environmental Facility (GEF mour said the Government intended to initiate 30 pilot demonstration projects featuring the installation of solar Photovoltaic cells and net metering where any excess energy generated would be sold back to the BEC grid, and a credit given to the household/business. It would be with households and some small commercial installations,” Mr Neymour told Tribune Business. “That has just been approved by the GEF last week. We’re looking at running approximately 30 demonstration projects throughout Nassau and the Family Islands. “There will also be a pilot programme with regard to the supply and installation of solar water heaters. We’re looking at the installation of 70 solar water heaters with households and small com mercial businesses, where we will be looking at the impactof these and Photovoltaic cells on reducing carbon emis sions.” With water heaters estimated to account for 20-30 per cent of a Bahamian household’s energy bill, Mr Neymour said the pilot projects would enable the true value of dollar savings derived from solar water heaters to b e assessed. The Government would also be able to assess their impact on “the conservation and production of energy”, meeting another goal of the National Energy Policy committee’s draft report. “We have always moved seriously,” Mr Neymour said on the Government’s approach to sustainable, renewable energies. “The challenge was that it required significant research to make what we considered reliable decisions. We recognise in the Bahamas that we lack sufficient data in certain areas to make concrete decisions, but we are seeing the work of the NEP come to fruition.” The minister added that the 13 firms who were shortlisted by BEC are supposed to submit their renewable energy proposals by end-October, after which another shortlist will be drawn up and final plans sought. Seven of the existing proposals are for waste-to-energy. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrfrbt t t b b n n r r t tr rn "& + ("%) #tffnn ##tbnff " %!&" +' +$***" +' +$ tb 1$5'(1+2/',1*/7' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6 HFWLRQRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV &RPSDQLHV$FWRI 1$5'(1 + 2/',1*/7' K DVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFN R IWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKH WKGD\RIHSWHPEHU ( SVLORQDQDJHPHQW/WG 6 XLWH)LUVW)ORRUOLDMLUDGH&HQWUH )UDQFLVDFKHOWUHHWLFWRULDDKH 5 HSXEOLFRIH\FKHOOHV /LTXLGDWRU Lights switched on 100k efficient bulbs Airline concerns on NAD fee rises F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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a significant “change in experience” and increase in health claims year-over-year, Family Guardian was also assessing whether premium rates needed to be revised upwards to better align them with the likely risk. She explained that this did not mean health insurance premium rates would increase across-the-board at the life and health insurer, a 100 per cent subsidiary of BISX-listed FamGuard Corporation, but assessments would be madein instances where there were “comparatively higher utilisation rates”. “It certainly is larger than what we have experienced in previous years,” Ms Hermanns said of the surge in health insurance claims. “We really started to see a significant escalation in the second quarter, when claims started to be paid. “We’re still in the process of analysing some of the things that may have caused it. It takes quite a while, because thousands of claims are paid on a daily basis.” While Family Guardian would have normally expected to see an increase in health claims as a result of growth in its BahamaHealth portfolio, Ms Hermanns said the rise experienced in the 2009 first half was greater than the client base expansion. “Any time you have an increase in business, you have a corresponding increase in claims,” Ms Hermanns told Tribune Business. “This is still more pronounced than what we would expect from an increase in new accounts.” The Family Guardian president denied suggestions from some insurance market sources that the company’s recent unfavourable claims experience had partly resulted from it ‘buying’ new business, where it reduced premium rates below a level equivalent to a client’s risk in order to win the account. Adding that such a scenario “does not jive” with the experience of the Bahamian health insurance market as a whole, with all carriers experiencing a surge in claims similar to Family Guardian’s, Ms Hermanns added: “All of our accounts are priced actuarially based on the information we receive at the time.” “Our health claims experience has been challenging for us this year, but we are confident we have taken the initiatives to bring it around,” she added. “We’re still seeing a high claims volume in the third quarter. The claims paid have slowed a little bit, but we are working diligently to make sure we fully grasp the facts affecting the jump in claims paid. We’ll see how these initiatives end up.” Ms Hermanns, though, warned that there would be no “quick solution” to the health claims situation due to “the nature of the business”, with any initiatives likely to take several months before the effects came through. Although Family Guardian was undertaking no new product or business line launches, Ms Hermanns said the company was working towards the launch of its Family Guardian General Insurance Agency subsidiary, a project that has been on the drawing board for several years now. “We haven’t completed the launch on that,” she told Tribune Business. “We’re working diligently to have that in place for the beginning of 2010.” the general insurance agency will sell property and casualty, plus auto, insurance policies through its existing branch network, with agents being trained up to sell general insurance. Ms Hermanns said Family Guardian had “not seen any substantial increase in lapse rates” on its life and health insurance policies as a result of the recession. “We have seen growth in new business, both life and health, and the annuity business is showing strong growth,” she added. Elsewhere, Family Guardian had seen “good growth in new accounts on a monthly basis” for its FG Financial and FG Capital Markets subsidiaries, Ms Hermanns said, adding that the insurer was “happy with the progress” even though the recession had not been factored into the budget when the units were launched last year. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 6DOHV&OHUN 1HHGHGIRU5HWDLOKRHWRUH Family Guardian targets early 2010 for agency launch To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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“The Government is not forceful enough in demanding more local content in the sourcing of goods and services. Further, the Government is not convincingly providing purposeful education and training of local people, nor ensuring the maximumuse of local professionals.” Dr Saunders and her coauthor based their conclusions on an assessment of seven unnamed Heads of Agreement, signed by the former Christie administration between 2004-2007, for Fam ily Island-based mixed-use resort projects. Analysing the agreements, and based on previous stud ies, they argued that the ‘spillover’ benefits from foreign direct investment in the Bahamas, in terms of creating additional employment at, and contracts for, Bahamianowned companies “have been negligible”. Investment capital inflows into the tourism and hotel industries had “not led to par allel growth in local business development in manufacturing, agriculture, fisheries” and sectors directly related to tourism. Dr Saunders and her coauthor argued that the Bahamas’ “persistent current account deficits” provided further evidence that the Bahamas had not succeededin linking foreign direct investment to the development of other economic sec tors, while the numerous concessions granted to developers “severely hampers government revenue”. “Overall, the role and effects of foreign direct invest-ment on the Bahamas and its economy are mixed,” the authors concluded. “Foreign direct investment is not helping development of the local business [community], nor does it significantly contribute to the Govern ment’s Budget. Foreign direct investment has had a limiting effect on local ownership in tourism and the financial sector. Partially, it does assist in training. “The role of the Bahamian government in stimulating foreign direct investment is positive. However, its role in stimulating meaningful development is less favourable. Its policies have fostered a dual economy. This polarising society, and can in the long-run jeopardise foreign direct investment.” While the Heads of Agreement studied by the two authors encouraged all the investors to use Bahamian products and suppliers, and apply the National Investment Policy to areas reserved for Bahamian ownership, Dr Saunders and her co-author said the repeated requests by the Government for these projects to collaborate on training and education pro grammes “suggest inadequate local capabilities”. “The motives for investment matter as well,” they added. “The projects reviewed fall under the cate gory of asset-exploiting, particularly resource-seeking of the beauty and natural envi ronment of the Bahamas. The spillover benefits of these types of investments are low compared to market-seeking foreign direct investments.” Dr Saunders and her coauthor added that the Heads of Agreement they scrutinised were unlikely to “cause increases in domestic absorptive capacity and business capacity building specifically. The evidence lies in the very low level of Bahamian ownership in the hotel and tourism resort sector”. Customs Based on a 50 per cent rate of customs and Stamp duties on imported construction materials and furnishings, the paper said the Government was giving up $700 million in potential tax revenues between the seven projects, and $29 million per annum in real property tax based on a 2 per cent rate. And while, the projects, valued at a cumulative $1.439 billion, were projected to directly employ 3,381 persons at an annual wage bill of $59 million annually, based on an average weekly $336 wage, it was doubtful whether employment would be maximised due to under-utilisation of Bahamian professionals and entertainers. The two authors also noted that many of the Heads of Agreement contained no penalties if the developers failed to perform their obligations in a timely manner. “Clearly, there is no development plan or agenda which the Government is following,” they argued. “Such imprecise ‘requirements’ are likely to lead to imprecise results. Further, these Heads of Agreements reveal a government that is not striving to devel op its people for greater selfreliance or a sustainable economy. “It is, in fact, fostering greater and greater depen dence, as local professionals and businesses are crowded out. As the Government signs more of these foreign invest ment agreements in the absence of attention to local human capital development it is, in fact, under-developing the local economy.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Bahamas ‘polarised by a dual economy’ F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B By EILEEN NG Associated Press Writer KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP barrel Wednesday in Asia as i ncreased optimism about a global e conomic recovery boosted expect ations that crude demand will grow. Benchmark crude for November delivery was up 63 cents at $71.51 by midday Kuala Lumpur time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The contract rose 47 cents to settle at $70.88 Tuesday. Oil rose in sync with global stock markets. The Dow Jones industrial average gained a second straight day, advancing 1.4 per cent Tuesday, its biggest gain since August 21 as investors bet corporate profits will surge as the global economy recovers. Most Asian indexes also advanced in early trading Wednesday. The rally in stocks came after Australia raised interest rates Tuesday, signaling that policymakers see the country’s economy as strong enough to withstand higher borrowing costs. That touched off hopes other economies may also be strengthening enough to unwind stimulus measures including super low interest rates and massive government spending. M arkets “The optimism for economic recovery is driving equities and oil markets,” said Victor Shum, an energy analyst with consultancy Purvin & Gertz in Singapore. A report by the American Petroleum Institute showing a surprise fall in US oil inventories last week also lifted prices, he said. Crude inventories dropped 254,000 barrels while distillate fuel stocks fell 2.91 million barrels, he said according to the report late Tuesday. The report however, contrasted with market expectations for higher inventories. A survey by Platts, the energy information arm of McGraw-Hill Cos, said crude stock is likely to grow by nearly two million barrels and that supplies of gasoline and distillates used for heating oil and diesel also climbed last week. The official weekly supply report will be released by the Energy Information Administration later Wednesday. Shum said oil prices will rise further if crude inventories fall. Prices will fall if crude stocks rise but likely to hold above $70, backed by stronger financial markets, he added. In other Nymex trading, heating oil gained 2.03 cents to $1.8345 a gallon. Gasoline for November delivery jumped 1.63 cents to $1.789 a gallon. Natural gas for November delivery rose 5 cents to $4.93 per 1,000 cubic feet. In London, Brent crude rose 69 cents to $69.25 on the ICE Futures exchange. Oil above $71 on optimism over economic recovery

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ AP Business Writer HONG KONG (AP Asian stock markets and oil prices extended their advance Wednesday amid renewed faith a recovery in the global economy was sustainable. Major benchmarks were about one per cent higher or more, while the dollar was little changed against the yen and euro after declining the previous session. Investors poured money into riskier assets like stocks and commodities throughout the region, as Tuesday’s news that Australia was the first major country to raise interest rates since the onset of the financial crisis continued to bolster confidence in the world economy. It was a signal that policymakers believe the country’s economy is strong enough to withstand higher borrowing costs, and fueled optimism that other economies were in better than shape than expected. “It provided a psychological boost to the market as a seal of approval on the global recovery story,” Dariusz Kowalczyk, chief Investment strategist for SJS Markets in Hong Kong, wrote in a note. At the same time, he said Australia’s decision was somewhat surprising coming just weeks after the leaders of the Group of 20 major countries agreed to continue with government spending programmes and low interest rates to nurture a global rebound. While no developed coun try would follow in Australia’s footsteps anytime soon, South Korea, where the economy has held up relatively well and the central bank has already said it might raise rates in response to rising asset prices, could be next, he said. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 stock average gained 120.84 points, or 1.3 per cent, to 9,812.64 and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng advanced 386.71 points, or 1.9 per cent, to 21,198.24. Australia’s index jumped 2.4 per cent, South Korea’s Kospi edged higher by 0.5 per cent to 1,606.26, and Singapore’s index gained 1.1 per cent. Taiwan’s benchmark was up 0.4 per cent. Mainland China markets are closed for a weeklong holiday and reopen Friday. In the US overnight, the Dow rose 131.50, or 1.4 per cent, to 9,731.25 after rising 112 points Monday. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 14.26, or 1.4 per cent, to 1,054.72, while the Nasdaq composite index rose 35.42, or 1.7 per cent, to 2,103.57. Oil prices were higher, helped by the weak dollar and optimism about that a global economic recovery would boost demand for crude. Benchmark crude for November delivery was changing hands at $71.55 in Asia, up 67 cents from the pri or session. The contract rose 47 cents overnight. The dollar wallowed at 88.74 yen from 88.76 yen. The euro traded at $1.4705 from $1.4722. Asian stocks extend gains amid faith in recovery Share your news The T r ibune wants to hear from people who are m aking news in their neighbour h oods. Per haps y ou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the a rea or have won an award. I f so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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By ASHLEY M HEHER AP Retail Writer CHICAGO (AP er King Corp. plans to swap its generic fast-food feel and bland tiles and tabletops for a vibe that’s more sit-down than drive-through. As part of a plan to be revealed Wednesday in Amsterdam, the company will announce a massive effort to overhaul its 12,000 locations worldwide. The sleek interior will include rotating red flame chandeliers, brilliant TVscreen menus and industrialinspired corrugated metal and brick walls. “I’d call it more contemporary, edgy, futuristic,” Chairman and CEO John Chidsey told The Associated Press. “It feels so much more like an upscale restaurant.” But that comes with an upscale price: The new look is expected to cost franchisees, who operate 90 percent of Burger King’s locations, between $300,000 to $600,000 per restaurant. The company said the new design, called /20” at the Miami-based chain, is already in place at about 60 locations around the world. Burger King expects about 75 more redesigned restaurants to be open by the end of next year. But it will take years before all its locations are transformed. Burger King franchise owners are contractually required to update their restaurants after a set period of time, and executives said the redesign will be the primary option for future upgrades. All new restaurants will be built using the plan. So far, remodeled restaurants have seen sales climb about 12 to 15 per cent, while restaurants that are torn down and completely rebuilt at the same location have seen sales climb by as much as 30 percent, Chidsey said. Observers say the hip, urban and masculine elements in the redesign may be a hit with Burger King’s most loyal customers young men who frequent the chain known as much for its signature Whoppers and “steak burgers” as its sometimescreepy “King” commercials. But some experts are skeptical about whether sales will grow as much as the company claims and how eager franchise owners will be to part with that kind of cash, particularly in a sour economy. Chidsey said he thinks most franchise owners, who typically own both their restaurant’s building and the land, won’t have trouble obtaining financing and will be swayed once they see how sales can climb. Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy said the reformulated restaurant could keep diners at the table longer but may not draw in enough extra diners to justify the cost. “I don’t think they’ll change their perception,” he said. “They’re pretty entrenched in their reality.” A group representing Burger King franchise owners didn’t immediately comment. Fast-food restaurants typically get almost two-thirds of their business from drivethrough or carryout orders. More appealing interiors could help the company compete with sit-down counterparts that many customers think offer better food and better ambiance. Ron Paul, president of the food consultant company Technomic Inc., said he thinks the redesign shows just how determined Burger King is to compete with “fast casual” restaurant chains such as Chipotle, Starbucks and Panera, which customers think of as a cut above typical fast food. “People in the fast-food category are recognizing they’ve been losing customers to the fast-casual player,” he said. “What this sounds like is an attempt to get that dining-in business back by making it an attractive environment.” They might also help Burger King, the No. 2 burger food chain the U.S., stand out from larger rival McDonald’s Corp. and other competitors, including regional chains, who’ve begun to add bigger and better burgers to their menus as they clamor for a share of the growing burger market that’s worth $100 billion in the U.S. “It’s a competitive necessity to square up against the competition,” Chidsey said. While the most noticeable changes will be inside restaurants, Burger King executives also plan to update exteriors, too, adding metal canopies and more signs proclaiming “Home of the Whopper.” At the same time, the company is beefing up its value menu, temporarily adding a $1 double cheeseburger to U.S. menus. And it’s also in the final stages of installing new broiler ovens that cut energy use and will let the company roll out new menu items in the future. On deck is the Steakhouse XT burger, which has a thick patty topped with mayonnaise, fried onions, lettuce, steak sauce, cheese and tomatoes. It’s slated to join menus in February. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM G N-931MINISTRYOFTHE ENVIRONMENT PORTDEPARTMENT GOVERNMENT NOTICE Burger King Corp. plans to revamp 12,000 locations 6.<3(5/,0,7(' 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK 6HFWLRQRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV & RPSDQLHV$FWRI 6 .<3(5 / ,0,7(' K DVEHHQ'LVVROYHGDQGVWUXFNRIWKH 5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLFDWHRI'LVVROXWLRQ L VVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU*HQHUDORQWKHGD\RI 6HSWHPEHU 6 LPRQ-RKQ+DUPDQ RI(TXLW\UXVW+RXVH -HUVH\ /LTXLGDWRU INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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Bahama and the Family Islands were ahead of 2008 comparatives by 13 per cent and 34.9 per cent respectively for first port of entry, contrasting sharply with the 13.7 per cent drop in air or stopover arrivals for July. In its market analysis that accompanied the data, the Ministry of Tourism said the key question was how Bahamian hotels could “cash in” on the cruise business without entering the industry themselves, given that 80 per cent of passengers who responded to the Cruise Lines International Association’s (CLIA used voyages to assess destinations where they wanted to take a land-based vacation. The analysis pointed to a weak point, namely that ‘satisfaction’ and ‘value for money’ ratings among cruise passengers were considerably higher than those given by stopover tourists in the Bahamas. While the CLIA’s 2008 survey had shown that 95 per cent of cruise passengers were satisfied with their experience, and of those 44 per cent ‘extremely satisfied’, only 57 per cent of “the land-based vacationers, including boaters/yachters to the Bahamas were satisfied with their overall Bahamas experience”. Out of that 57 per cent, some 21 per cent were ‘very satisfied’ with their Bahamian vacation experience, but 34 per cent said only that it matched their expectations. “Cruise lines have learned the importance of offering good value for money,” the Ministry of Tourism analysis said. “Sixty-nine per cent of cruisers thought that the value for money received was very high or somewhat high, and only 4 per cent thought that it was low. “Value for money has been a weakness of the Bahamas for many years now. According to the latest Exit Statistics, 27 per cent of the stopover visitors (includes land-based vacationers) thought that the value for money in the hotels was much better or better than expected, and 23 per cent thought that it was not as good or worse than they had expected it to be. “Thirty-nine per cent thought that the overall value for money for the Bahamas was much better or better than expected, and 18 per cent thought it was not as good or worse than they had expected it to be.” The Ministry added: “It is well known to Bahamians and repeat visitors to the Bahamas that the destination is an expensive place. When a destination is expensive, should not the island amenities, the hotel ‘perks’, the hotel service, hotel rooms, hotel food, attitude of the people in general, food in restaurants, service in restaurants all be superb because, together, they all equal good value for money? “Could that be a reason why the Bahamas has seen a large increase in cruise tourism to the Bahamas but a decline in the demand for land-based accommodations? Have land-based vacation stays missed the ‘boat’ on value for money? Each hotel that caters to the tourists in the Bahamas must ponder the point: “Are we providing excellent value for money through our product offerings and service? How can we improve our value for money and thereby improve our bottom line?’” Although the Bahamas had not matched the annualised 8 per cent growth rate the cruise industry had experienced over the last several years, between 1989 and 2008 this nation’s cruise tourism business has expanded by 74 per cent. And sea arrivals now accounted for 68.3 per cent of all tourist arrivals to the Bahamas, with stopovers having just a 31.7 per cent share. For the seven months to July 2009, air arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were down 8.8 per cent at 620,203, compared to 679,731 in 2008. This contrasted with a 7.3 per cent increase for sea and air arrivals combined. The islands experiencing major declines in stopover visitors were Grand Bahama and Abaco, with 27.5 per cent and 24.8 per cent falls respectively, while Exuma and Cat Island saw air arrivals falls of 38.8 per cent and 39.4 per cent respectively. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2009IN THE SUPREME COURTCLE/qui/No.00289Common Law and Equity Division I N THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959 AND I N THE MATTER OF ALLTHOSE Three (3 of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas. AND IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper N OTICE OF PETITION Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day of September, A.D. 2009. The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of: ALLTHOSE Three (3 acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of F orbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The C ommonwealth Of The Bahamas T he Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to b e the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certicate Of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act. Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be inspected during normal ofce hours at the following places: ( a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North, Nassau, Bahamas. (bThe Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House, West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas. (cThe Administrators ofce at George Town, Exuma. Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 after the nal publication of these presents le at the Registry of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and s erve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in the prescribed form veried by an Afdavit to be led therewith. Failure of any such person to le and serve an Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30 after the nal publication of these presents shall operate as a bar to such claim. DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009 CHARLES MACKEY & CO. Chambers BSB House West Bay Street Nassau, Bahamas Attorney for the Petitioner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harmacy Technician CourseBe rst, only 20 American Certication Exam Application available.Register Now for October SessionCall Hepson at: 356-4860 Value for money hurts the Bahamas on cruise conversion F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.711.03AML Foods Limited1.151.150.000.1270.0009.10.00% 11.809.90Bahamas Property Fund10.7510.750.000.9920.20010.81.86% 9.305.90Bank of Bahamas5.905.900.000.2440.26024.24.41% 0.890.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.493.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1250.09025.22.86% 2.372.14Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 14.209.93Cable Bahamas9.939.930.001.4060.2507.12.52% 2.882.72Colina Holdings2.722.720.000.2490.04010.91.47% 7.505.26Commonwealth Bank (S1)5.545.540.000.4190.30013.25.42% 3.851.27Consolidated Water BDRs3.193.17-0.020.1110.05228.61.64% 2.851.32Doctor's Hospital2.052.050.000.6250.0803.33.90% 8.206.60Famguard6.606.600.000.4200.24015.73.64% 12.508.80Finco9.309.300.000.3220.52028.95.59% 11.7110.00FirstCaribbean Bank10.0010.000.000.6310.35015.83.50% 5.534.11Focol (S)4.114.110.000.3320.15012.43.65% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 0.450.27Freeport Concrete0.270.270.000.0350.0007.70.00% 9.025.49ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.009.95J. S. Johnson9.959.950.001360.9520.64010.56.43% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1560.00064.10.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100000 100000 FidelitBkNote13(SeriC)+ FBB13 10000 000 WEDNESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,478.40 | CHG -0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -233.96 | YTD % -13.66BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)Maturity 19 October 2017 7 % Prime + 1.75% 7% BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: 30May2013 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-232019 October 2022 InterestFINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31% 1000 . 00 1000 . 00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100 . 00 0 . 00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.607.92Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.00-2.2460.000N/M0.00% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref2.006.254.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.900.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.40381.3344CFAL Bond Fund1.40383.725.20 3.03502.8952CFAL MSI Preferred Fund2.8990-1.39-4.16 1.49321.4146CFAL Money Market Fund1.49324.155.56 3.60903.0941Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.0941-8.61-13.59 13.048412.3870Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.11363.935.87 101.6693100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund101.66931.101.67 100.960093.1992CFAL Global Equity Fund96.73980.35-4.18 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 9.40759.0775Fidelity International Investment Fund9.33992.69-1.41 1.07071.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.07073.385.14 1.03641.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.0319-0.112.05 1.06731.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.06732.894.93 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/MNot Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Aug-09 Prime + 1.75% 7% 31-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Aug-09 NAV Date 31-Aug-09Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds 30 May 2013 29 May 2015TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Aug-09 30-Jun-09 31-Dec-07 31-Jul-09 31-Aug-09 2-Oct-09 31-Aug-09MARKET TERMS

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 79F/26C Low: 81F/27C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 83F/28C Low: 80 F/27 C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 92F/33C High: 94F/34C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90 F/32 C High: 90F/32C High: 91 F/33C High: 91F/33C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C Low: 78 F/26 C High: 91F/33C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 73F/23C High: 91 F/33 C Low: 79F/26C High: 90 F/32 Low: 74F/23C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24C High: 90F/32C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 92F/33C Low: 76 F/24 C High: 90F/32C Low: 74 F/23 C High: 90F/32C Low: 76F/24C High: 93 F/34 C Low: 77F/25C High: 91F/33C High: 90 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8 TH , 2009, PAGE 11B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Plenty of sunshine. Clear.Plenty of sunshine.Bright sunshine and comfortable. Times of clouds and sun. High: 91 Low: 80 High: 90 High: 90 High: 87 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny and humid. High: 89 Low: 79 Low: 78 Low: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel 111F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 88F 108-87F 106-82F 95-85F 107-86F Low: 78 TODAYTONIGHTFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................91F/33C Low ....................................................77F/25C Normal high ......................................86F/30C Normal low ........................................74F/23C Last year's high .................................. 89 F/32C Last year's low .................................. 80 F/26C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ................................................31.66" Normal year to date ....................................40.18" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU Last New First Full Oct. 11 Oct. 18Oct. 25Nov . 2 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:05 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:49 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:05 p.m. Moonset . . . . 11:22 a.m. Today Friday Saturday Sunday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:12 a.m.3.43:46 a.m.0.4 10:29 p.m.2.64:42 p.m.0.7 11:05 a.m.3.34:35 a.m.0.4 11:26 p.m.2.65:38 p.m.0.9 12:05 p.m.3.35:33 a.m.0.6 -----6:40 p.m.0.9 12:31 a.m.2.56:39 a.m.0.7 1:10 p.m.3.27:46 p.m.0.9 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco86/3073/22t88/3175/23t Amsterdam59/1542/5pc55/1244/6s Ankara, Turkey72/2237/2s75/2339/3s Athens76/2465/18s81/2766/18s Auckland63/1754/12c62/1646/7r Bangkok90/3276/24sh88/3176/24r Barbados87/3078/25s86/3077/25r Barcelona77/2563/17sh73/2260/15s Beijing70/2148/8pc72/2252/11s Beirut78/2570/21s78/2571/21s Belgrade84/2861/16s76/2455/12pc Berlin61/1639/3sh53/1138/3pc Bermuda79/2671/21sh79/2673/22s Bogota67/1942/5sh69/2045/7pc Brussels61/1639/3pc58/1441/5s Budapest81/2761/16s68/2054/12c Buenos Aires66/1843/6s72/2254/12s Cairo89/3169/20c89/3168/20s Calcutta91/3282/27t93/3378/25pc Calgary32/09/-12sn25/-39/-12pc Cancun91/3277/25pc90/3275/23s Caracas83/2873/22pc83/2873/22s Casablanca81/2760/15s78/2559/15s Copenhagen54/1239/3sh50/1040/4r Dublin54/1241/5pc57/1345/7r Frankfurt66/1843/6sh61/1645/7pc Geneva 64/17 57/13 t 67/1955/12t Halifax 56/13 39/3 r 58/14 43/6 pc Havana 93/33 73/22 s 89/31 71/21 s Helsinki 50/10 36/2pc45/732/0pc Hong Kong 88/31 77/25 pc 88/31 77/25s Islamabad 101/38 61/16 s 99/37 58/14 s Istanbul72/2261/16s73/2263/17s Jerusalem 79/26 60/15s79/2658/14s Johannesburg 83/2857/13s82/2757/13s Kingston 90/3279/26r89/3179/26r Lima77/2561/16s76/2459/15s London61/1643/6pc63/1750/10r Madrid68/2050/10sh75/2352/11pc Manila86/3079/26r85/2977/25r Mexico City77/2555/12t75/2355/12t Monterrey95/3575/23s90/3264/17t Montreal61/1652/11pc57/1345/7r Moscow57/1348/8sh50/1036/2r Munich74/2354/12r55/1244/6c Nairobi84/2858/14r85/2960/15sh New Delhi 91/3272/22s93/3373/22s Oslo45/730/-1pc43/628/-2pc Paris64/1746/7c63/1750/10s Prague 72/22 41/5 sh 54/12 35/1 pc Rio de Janeiro82/2771/21r77/2566/18r Riyadh94/3468/20s93/3369/20s Rome 77/25 59/15 s 75/23 63/17 sh St. Thomas89/3178/25pc88/3179/26s San Juan88/3152/11s91/3255/12s San Salvador 88/31 73/22 t 87/30 71/21 t Santiago 81/2750/10s77/2548/8pc Santo Domingo86/3073/22s88/3174/23s Sao Paulo 75/23 56/13 r 71/21 60/15r Seoul72/2248/8s72/2252/11s Stockholm 50/10 34/1 pc 48/8 34/1 pc Sydney 63/17 54/12 c63/1754/12sh Taipei82/2775/23pc83/2877/25c T okyo 77/25 61/16 r 73/22 59/15 pc T oronto 60/1551/10pc58/1444/6r Trinidad90/3272/22pc95/3570/21s V ancouver 58/14 43/6 pc 56/1337/2pc Vienna 75/2359/15pc61/1649/9c W arsaw 72/22 42/5 r 55/12 36/2 c Winnipeg 40/4 28/-2 c 38/327/-2sf H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 6-12 Knots0-1 Feet7 Miles84F Friday:ESE at 7-14 Knots1-2 Feet10 Miles84F Today:E at 3-6 Knots0-1 Feet7 Miles85F Friday:SE at 4-8 Knots0-1 Feet10 Miles85F Today:NW at 2-4 Knots1-3 Feet7 Miles83F Friday:ESE at 4-8 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles83F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque66/1842/5pc72/2247/8s Anchorage50/1043/6sh52/1141/5r Atlanta82/2764/17s84/2866/18t Atlantic City70/2151/10s75/2359/15pc Baltimore72/2252/11s78/2560/15pc Boston66/1852/11s67/1955/12c Buffalo65/1851/10pc66/1846/7r Charleston, SC83/2863/17s89/3170/21pc Chicago54/1244/6r51/1036/2r Cleveland64/1755/12r65/1846/7r Dallas84/2864/17t69/2052/11r Denver44/629/-1r52/1127/-2pc Detroit62/1648/8r59/1543/6r Honolulu87/3077/25pc88/3176/24s Houston91/3277/25pc83/2863/17t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayFriday TodayFridayTodayFriday Indianapolis68/2056/13r64/1742/5r Jacksonville89/3171/21s91/3272/22pc Kansas City66/1841/5r58/1438/3s Las Vegas82/2755/12s84/2859/15s Little Rock82/2767/19t68/2052/11t Los Angeles72/2256/13pc74/2358/14pc Louisville78/2568/20c74/2349/9r Memphis86/3069/20pc76/2455/12t Miami90/3280/26pc91/3279/26pc Minneapolis48/829/-1c50/1029/-1s Nashville83/2869/20s82/2753/11t New Orleans90/3278/25s92/3374/23t New York70/2158/14s71/2160/15pc Oklahoma City76/2450/10t60/1547/8r Orlando92/3376/24pc95/3574/23pc Philadelphia70/2154/12s72/2260/15pc Phoenix 83/28 61/16 s 89/3163/17s Pittsburgh65/1852/11r70/2152/11r Portland, OR 68/2049/9s67/1945/7s Raleigh-Durham 78/25 57/13 s 84/28 63/17 pc St. Louis68/2051/10r56/1341/5r Salt Lake City 62/16 39/3 pc 63/1738/3pc San Antonio 87/30 70/21 pc 84/28 61/16 t San Diego68/2060/15pc69/2061/16pc San Francisco 68/20 52/11 s 71/2153/11pc Seattle60/1544/6pc58/1440/4s T allahassee 91/3271/21s90/3271/21t T ampa 94/34 77/25 pc 94/34 78/25pc Tucson77/2552/11s83/2855/12s W ashington, DC 72/22 55/12s86/3063/17pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold W arm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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A ll three funds come under the u mbrella of RoyalFidelity’s International Investment Fund, and Mr A nderson said of their performance: I think they’ve done reasonably w ell. We’ve done the valuations for July and August, and they’re up a reasonable amount. The international markets are seemingly continuing to move. September was another month in which markets were up, and we hope it c ontinues.” M r Anderson said the investments b y the three RoyalFidelity sub-funds i n the European and Asian markets, w hich had been less affected by the c redit crunch and recession, were d elivering good returns for Bahamia n institutions and retail investors w ho had bought into them. I think there’s a great opportunity for people to take advantage of something they’re not otherwise get,” Mr Anderson said, implying t hat investors would derive a better r eturn from international markets t han the Bahamian market, which w as “continuing to lag behind” and u nlikely to recover until tourism and f oreign direct investment rebound. W hile the international equities s ub-fund had ended 2008 down 32 p er cent, having at one point been o ff 50-60 per cent, Mr Anderson told Tribune Business yesterday: “We’ve had our hits on this fund, but now international markets are recoveri ng, and if I was an investor today I’d t ake an international basket over a l ocal basket. Where we are today provides g reat opportunities. The markets are w ay off from their 2007 peak. T here’s still a fair amount of upside, a nd as the world economy recovers t here’ll be opportunities to make m oney in international markets.” Mr Anderson told Tribune Business that RoyalFidelity would now “be marketing [its funds] a bit more a ggressively to make people aware of i t”, broadening the investment circle b eyond its immediate client base. M any Bahamians were unaware o f the funds’ existence, he explained, a dding that RoyalFidelity had not e mbarked on a mass marketing e ffort yet due to the fact “there’s b een this resistance to investing in i nternational markets” as a result of the September 2008 stock market crash. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM The Bahamas’ Biggest & Most Exciting Festival, Featuring Food & Culture From Around the World! Sat 17 & Sun 18 October, 2009 10am 6pmBOTANICAL GARDENS Booths Native Brews Displays & Food Tasting ...and more$2 Kids / $5 Adults $10 Incl. Fashion Show & Wine & Food TastingADMISSION 2 0 0 9 C R E A T I V E E D G E By MARK A TURNQUEST M Y affiliated companies a nd I hosted a Small Busin ess Economic Summit in May/June 2009. The main goal of the summit was to gather information about problems and potential opportunities that small business owners are experiencing in the Bahamas. The main concerns of small business owners who attended the summit, and who completed a national survey, were that the financial sector was not assisting them with the necessary working capital, and that the Government was not creating an atmosphere to foster small business development in the Bahamas during this recession. One of the main reasons there is no master plan for small business development among the financial institutions and the Government is that there is no Small Business Act of the Bahamas to drive national strategies. However, the future looks optimistic for small businesses because a team comprised of both public and private sector executives is being assembled to craft the initial Small Business Act draft. This team will consist of experts in all industries (professional services, medical services, technical services, financial services, general services, manufacturing, merchandising, agriculture, marine resources/fisheries, tourism, hospitality, government). Five important reasons why there must be a Small Business Act of the Bahamas: * The Small Business Act will encourage Bahamians to become entrepreneurs because it will outline excellent incentives/concessions that will be awarded for: The development of new, innovative products /services, The hiring of a specific number of Bahamians Increasing government revenues due to significant payments made for National Insurance, custom duties, property taxes, license fees etc * The Small Business Act will keep many existing businesses open during a recession because it will provide incentives/concessions to businesses that employ a moderate number (five and above) of staff, are up to date with NIB contributions and custom duties, and are contributing to making the Bahamas more competitive globally. * The Small Business Act will encourage Family Island development by providing incentives/concessions to a Bahamian who wants to open a small business on an island that will decrease the employment rate, improve the infrastructure of the island, encourage Bahamians to reside permanently there and entice more tourists to visit the island. * The Small Business Act will increase the Bahamas’ Gross Domestic Product (GDP tually reduce the importation of foreign products and services, increase compensation to employees, increase business profits, increase government income and increase interest payments to Bahamians. * The Small Business Act will reduce the national debt because it will decrease Government spending, particularly on hiring civil servants, and increase Government licenses, fees and taxes because more businesses will be operating in the Bahamas. Trade Association presidents (from the Hair Braiders Association to the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants) are encouraged to submit reports indicating industry goals, problems, opportunities and recommendations on how to improve their industries. T T o o a a s s s s i i s s t t w w i i t t h h t t h h e e d d e e v v e e l l o o p p m m e e n n t t o o f f t t h h e e S S m m a a l l l l B B u u s s i i n n e e s s s s A A c c t t o o f f t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s p p l l e e a a s s e e c c o o n n t t a a c c t t M M a a r r k k A A . . T T u u r r n n q q u u e e s s t t a a t t 3 3 2 2 6 6 6 6 7 7 4 4 8 8 4 4 2 2 7 7 3 3 6 6 4 4 0 0 o o r r e e m m a a i i l l : : m m a a r r k k a a t t u u r r n n q q u u e e s s t t @ @ g g m m a a i i l l . . c c o o m m o o r r l l o o g g o o n n t t o o w w w w w w . . m m a a r r k k t t u u r r n n q q u u e e s s t t c c o o n n s s u u l l t t i i n n g g . . c c o o m m Act now to save small businesses MARK TURNQUEST F F I I D D E E L L I I T T Y Y , , f f r r o o m m 1 1 B B

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The Tribune The T ribune M y V o i c e , M y N e w s p a p e r ! Thursday, October 8th, 2009

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RELIGIOUS NEWS, STORIES AND CHURCH EVENTS The TribunePAGE21 THURSDAY October 8, 2009

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The Tribune PG 22 Thursday, October 8, 2009 RELIGION By REUBEN SHEARER Tribune Features Reporter “SO goes the male, so goes the nation” this is the motto of the Real Men Ministry International of Bahamas Faith Ministries International (BFMI The church, led by its senior pastor Dr Myles Munroe, is calling on all men to attend the Real Men International Power Confer ence being held at the Diplomat Centr e on Car michael Road starting today and ending on Sunday. Under the theme ‘Men Raising the Bar: Building a Kingdom Community through Personal and National Identity’, the conference seeks to put the onus on men to curb what BFMI calls a “male crisis” that is causing some of the nation’ s social ills. Dr Kendal Major, one of the speakers at the event, said: “Fatherlessness is the single most destructive force in the national development of our country and is responsible for the vast majority of destructive behaviours among our men. “The future of our nation depends on men who have accepted the challenge and r esponsibility to r ecover , r ebuild and r estor e their personal lives so the cultur e of our families and community can be transformed.” During nine sessions with speakers like Dr Munroe, Dr Major and Dr Tony Evans, BFMI pr omises par ticipants that they will gain new insight into topics such as ‘the role of personal identity in nation building’, ‘men remaining constant in changing times’, and ‘how to be a godly husband in a challenging marriage’. A donation of $65 gives participants full access to the two-day workshop on Friday and Saturday starting at 9am. On Saturday at noon, during what is described as a two-hour ‘power luncheon’, Dr Evans will speak on “Kingdom keys for overcoming personal crises.” The admission price of this special segment is $30 per person. Each session pr omises to be “a time of dynamic worship, teaching, sharing and open discussions, as we delve into the many challenges we face as men today ,” the BFMI said. The conference kicks off tonight with a session at 7.30pm and continues tommor ow with a day session starting 9am. On Friday evening at 7.30 pm, participants will continue in a workshop hosted by Dr Tony Evans of Dallas, Texas. Both tonight’ s and Friday’ s evening sessions ar e free to the general public. The weekend culminates with a special closing service on Sunday where the Her Majesty’s Prison Men’s choir will perform. The service will be streamed live for the inmates to view at the prison. Y ou may register by calling BFMI at 461-6442/5, via the website bfmmm.com or visit the Diplomat Centre, Carmichael Road. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8 7.30pm Session 1, general session “The Role of Personal Identity in Nation Building” Dr Myles Munroe FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 9am Session 2 “The Price and Process of Becoming a Real Man” Dr Kendal Major 10am Session 3, workshop “Men Remaining Constant in Changing Times” Dr Richard Pinder 11am Session 4, workshop “The Responsibility for Mentorship in God’ s Kingdom Agenda” Deacon Jef frey Lloyd 12noon Session 5, workshop “Fulfilling Your Destiny Through Community” special real men presentation 7.30pm Session 6, general session “The Role of Men in God’s Kingdom Agenda” Dr Tony Evans SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10 9am Session 7, workshop “How to be a Godly Husband in a Challenging Marriage” Dr W ayne Thompson 10am Session 8, workshop “Practical Power Principles For Financial Stewardship” Minister Gregory Bethel 11am Session 9, workshop “Practical Keys for Developing Healthy Relationships” Pastor Cedric Beckles. ‘SO GOES THE MALE, SO GOES THE NATION’ REAL MEN WEEKEND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Dr Myles Munroe

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REV.ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS MEDITATION The Tribune Thursday, October 8, 2009 PG 23 RELIGION THE time is not coming, but rather is at hand for us as a people to stand up and take contr ol of our own destiny. Gone are the days when we have looked to the politicians and political parties or the foreign investors to deter mine whether we live a good pr os per ous life or not. As Bahamians, don’t you think that we have sang the “who did me wr ong” song long enough? We’re very proficient at blaming others for our refusal to be proactive. It’s like as a people our get up and go has gotten up and left us a long time ago. Ther efor e, we’ve r esorted to looking to, and solely depending upon others to carry our load. This is one of the reasons why when a for eign investor clos es his/her business and pulls out of the country cries can be heard throughout the length and breadth of the Bahamas of “how am I supposed to feed my family or pay my bills?” or “I’ve worked for this company for 22 years and this is all that they’ve given me.” Where did we go wrong as a nation? How is it that in this day and time Bahamians ar e still being trained to first, go to school, get a good education; second, get a good job and third, buy a piece of property, build a house, and...? What’s next? After number three, comes four , five, six etc, etc; what’s next? Who has taken the time to teach us how to make money work for us; rather than working all of our lives for money? Maybe it’s just me, but has anybody else noticed that we do have some smart kids coming out of our schools with degr ees, yet they have to settle for the insulting low paying jobs that’ s if they’re lucky to find one. What is this saying to the hun dr eds/thousands of other students that are following these graduates and others? Make no mistake! Bahamians are very smart people, a seriously minded Bahamian needs only an oppor tunity/a hand up, and not a hand-out. If given an opportunity and a little time this person would be someone to be r eck oned with nationally or inter nationally . Unfor tunately, as a people we’ve spent so much time complaining and crying that we have overlooked and failed to embrace and see the opportunities ahead of us which ar e often hidden in the situations / challenges we’re faced with. In spite of what you might have heard, the original acronym for the word POOR is P for People; O for Overlooking, O for Opportunity and R for Repeatedly . In many ways the acronym for the word poor describes a vast majority of us Bahamians; we’ve been constantly overlooking oppor tunities and staying focused on tourism as if without tourism we’re dead as a nation. This mindset, this stinking thinking is so diabolically contaminating in that I’ve hear d pr ominent leaders (political and r eligious), make their silly statements and remarks of “if America closes its door of tourism to us; we’r e thr ough.” Listen, you dumb/blind politicians and religious leaders who ascribe to this kind of foolish thinking and can’t see beyond your big toes. It’s obvious that America and tourism is your god; so rather than speaking from your rear ends, why don’t you shut the hell up and get out of the way so that some critical thinkers can come for th and help lead this nation down the path of God’s (Yahweh) Kingdom business and righteousness. From an educational standpoint, I won’ t condemn or blame the Minister of Education and the Minister of Agriculture for that which they don’t know as it r elates to educating the gen erations to come fr om a ‘feeding our selves perspective.’ It’s obvious that they’re not aware of the unlimited wealth that can be generated in agriculture; for had they known this, then I can assur e you that their ancient approach to agricultural education would be far, far different. Okay, Ministers of Education and Agriculture, we’re talking about thinking out of the box and preparing our childr en to feed the nation and becom ing wealthy in the course of doing so. Rather than this small minded, waste of time backyard farming stuff you are talking about. Why not develop a national pr ogramme whereby interested students would be given an opportunity to spend five to six months on a large scale far ming operation thr oughout the United States? Ther eby giving them a much better perspective and appr eciation for agricultur e and far m ing than that of what you’r e of fering right now. Watch this! Here’s what the lack of vision and ignorance would make a leader or minister say: “W e can’ t af ford that kind of investment right now. Do you know how expensive such a programme would be?” And her s what (someone with vision would say: “How in the hell did you get to become leader or minister over anything?” For this is where we’ve gone and are going wr ong in this countr y by putting one dimensional, visionless people in leadership. Are we ready for the next level? For questions or comments contact us via email at pastormallen@yahoo.com or telephone at 1-242-441-2021 Pastors Matthew and Brendalee Allen Kingdom Minded Fellowship Centre International Are we ready? PASTOR MA TTHEW ALLEN The Christian journey AS Christians, we all agree that the sacrament of baptism is the time when we die with Christ, are raised to new life, and become a member of the Body of Christ, the Church. We differ on matters such as the age of the candidate, the amount of water and wher e the water is located. Once the journey has begun, the Holy Spirit works to reveals God’s love to us more and more each day, and to guide us in the path of holiness. Those who ar e baptised as infants have designated adults whose responsibility it is to create a home environment that is Christian. Par ents, godparents and other relatives are expected to teach by example and instruction. In denominations where there is the sacrament of Confirmation, the opportunity is arranged for a public declaration of faith by children who have been properly prepared to be able to make their own promises to God. This is a time when the laying on of hands by the Bishop r eminds the candidates that prayers are being offered for the stirring up of their gifts of ministry by the Holy Spirit who has been present from baptism. As a Christian matures, there should be a deepening of faith by means of spiritual exposure to the will of God through prayer and the study of Scriptur e. Fellowship in a Christian community is intended to provide nurture and support throughout the person’s lifetime. The matching of spiritual gifts to appropriate occasions for ministry and service gives everyone the chance to build up the Body of Christ. Sometimes there are detours and delays which cause the individual to become lost for a while or to tread water spiritually . An intentional desire to grow in the love and knowledge of God needs to be a hungering and thirsting that is not quenched by anyone or anything else. How do we make this a priority in such a time as this? How do we com pete with the distractions that tantalise the senses? Who are the persons who ar e living in a way as to be a mentor and role model in spiritual matters? Deuteronomy 6: 4-9 says: 4 Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. [ a ] 5 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. 6 These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. 7 Impress them on your childr en. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. 8 Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. 9 Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates. Parents, you have to live and breathe your faith if you want your childr en to consider it a natural phenomenon to be Christian. Every day the journey is to be taken with you as the guide.

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THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS PAUL Hagarty was born during a blizzard on March 20, 1909 to Bert and Lucy Belle (ne O'Connell, an Irish-American Catholic farming family in Iowa. With encouragement from his widowed mother, he did well at public grade school up to grade eight, then at Greene Catholic High School taught by Fransiscan Sisters. An avid r eader, he was influenced by the many vocational stories in the Sacred Heart Messenger to become a Jesuit priest. A railroad accident in which he suffered a broken leg gave him compensation of $300 that paid for his first year at Loras (Columbia Saturday job at JC Penney helped him work his way through college. He studied economics, science, geology and meteorology and ended up working for the Union Pacific Railway as a geologist. But deep inside he knew he wanted to become a priest, and after hitchhiking to St John's Abbey, Abbot Alcuin accepted him into the novitiate programme and he took the name Leonard. While serving with Father Hogan in Minnesota, Father Leonar d r eceived a call fr om Abbot Alcuin infor ming him he was being sent to the Bahamas. Father Leonar d ar rived in Nassau in 1937 and was stationed at the Cathedral for three years and simultaneously chaplain to the leper colony , Goodwill Orphanage and the general hospital. During the war years he also worked with the Royal Air Force and other troops. Father Leonard had a very close relationship with Bishop Bernard and was a major help to him on collecting tours in the United States. Bishop Bernard quickly recognised the potential of Father Leonard and sent him to Oxford University, England, for post-graduate studies ostensibly to become Dir ector of Education to correct the Catholic School system which was using American methods which didn't pr epare the children for English exams. But it was obvious to the other priests that the Bishop had his eye on Father Leonard as his successor. Bishop Bernard wished to appoint a successor to move the Bahamas beyond a Benedictine enclave to a full diocese. Abbot Alcuin disagreed, doubting that a per manent abbey with indigenous personnel could supply spiritually a widespr ead gr oup of islands. The impasse was resolved when on June 25, 1950, Rome chose Father Paul Leonar d Hagarty as second Bishop of the Bahamas. It was a popular choice to Bahamians, who loved the sight of young 'No-Hands Hagar ty' riding without steering his lit tle English motorcycle from Montagu Hotel to the Priory. On the morning of October 19, 1950, Our Lady's Church was filled to overflowing and ZNS broadcast the solemn cer emonies of the consecration of Father Leonard to His Lordship, the Most Reverend Paul Leonard Hagarty, OSB, DD, Titular Bishop of Arba and Vicar Apostolic of the Bahamas by His Grace the Most Reverend Apostolic Delegate Ameleto Cicognani DD Apostolic Delegate to the United States. Also attending were two archbishops, three bishops, four abbots and a host of monsignori and priests. The new Bishop was to preside over 50 churches and chapels, numerous schools with 2,400 pupils and over 11,000 Catholic parishioners. On the day of his consecration, Bishop Leonar d appointed Father Bonaventure as his pro-vicar apostolate, who took charge on the times when the Bishop travelled on collec tion trips. He also relied heavily on Fathers Cornelius and Brendan. This type of backup assistance was necessary to cover the Catholic presence on Andros, Bimini, Long Island, Eleuthera and Harbour Island, Grand Bahama, San Salvador and Cat Island plus three visits a year to Inagua. Thena chur ch was established on Abaco and a mission star ted to T urks and Caicos. During the r eign of Bishop Hagar ty many significant events took place, as he was keen to expand Catholic par tic ipation in education and social development. The rapid expansion was due to several factors. The tr ust fund set up by Bernard Melhardo of Belize and benefactors Bacar di Company and others provided capital. The Sisters of Charity played a leading role in the development of education, especially at St Thomas More and St Cecilia's schools. The Order of St Martin's also assisted by providing Sisters in the education system and more diocesan priests arrived from all over America. The Scarboro Foreign Mission Society of Canada sent a dozen missionaries who had previously served in China. They set up a two-storey headquarters on the grounds of St Thomas More. Under Bishop Leonar d, Bahamian men began to enter religious life, the first being Fr Charles Coakley in 1957. In 1960, Fr Boswell Davis was ordained and he was followed by Frs Leander Thompson, Bonaventure Dean, Cletus Adderley , Prosper Burrows and Preston Moss all trained at St John's Abbey, Minnesota. During the early 1960s, Br others George Taylor, Ignatius Dean, Joseph Darville, and Henry Neeley were the first of 12 Bahamian Benedictine monks who took perpetual vows several of them taught at St Augustine's College. Unfor tunately , all but two Bahamian priests reverted to laymen in 1972, but in the mid-1970s a new cr op of diocesan priests including Fr Alfr ed Culmer and Leviticus Adderley wer e or dained. On February 1, 1979, His Holiness Pope John Paul II visited Nassau and was welcomed by thousands of people at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre. The health of Bishop Leonar d began to fail and he resigned on July 17, 1981. On September 22, he died at St John's Abbey and was brought back to be buried alongside Bishop Bernard in the crypt of St Francis Xavier Cathedral. The Tribune PG 24 Thursday, October 8, 2009 RELIGION Roman Catholic Bishop Paul Leonard Hagarty JIM LAWLOR PART 47 By BISHOP V G CLARKE Calvary Deliverance Church SOMEONE once said that the world is r un by tir ed men. Ther e is pr obably r eal substance in the statement, for genuine leaders must be willing to rise early and study longer than their contempo raries. Some men have tremendous stamina, but fatigue will fr equently set in if they want to go somewher e with their organisation and in their r esponsibilities. A wise leader will tr y to find a balance and seek an avocation, a change of pace to reduce stress. He must seek some pleasurable recreation or he will eventually lose his usefulness. You have no doubt heard the clich “I'd rather burn out for God than rust out for the devil.” The spirit of that is noble and pious-sounding and a person's dedication must come close to the tenor of the thought. But on the other hand, if a person can learn how to relax and not spread himself too thin, his effectiveness will be magnified. If a person “bur ns out” completely, his influence and contribution ends. Proper health, rest and balance will help a leader maintain his ability to persist. But a leader must be prepared to recognise the toll upon him, both emotionally and physically. Despite our busy schedules, leaders must practice what we preach in order not to suffer fatigue or burnout. Remember the wise leader finds time for relaxation and creative thinking. Fatigue Bishop VG Clarke

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The Tribune Thursday, October 8, 2009 PG 25 RELIGION T HE people of Cat Island converged on the settlement of Knowles last Friday at the homestead of Mary Seymour to celebrate her 99th birthday. Mary, or “Little” as she is affectionately called, is a sick and shut-in communicant of St Saviour s Parish, Cat Island, and in her all years has never left the island of her bir th. Her ‘navel string’ is buried under the coconut tr ee which stands tall in the fr ont yard of her residence. Mary is the widow of Ernest ‘Old Dad’ Seymour who pr edeceased her in 1980. Er nest Seymour was the br ead-winner of the family, and after his demise Mary became the sole provider. ‘Old Dad’, as he was known to Cat Islanders, was blind but could still deter mine the denomination of paper currency placed in his hand. In a bir thday Eucharistic celebration fit for a head of state, Mrs Seymour received her accolades as Father Edward “Rex” Seymour, assistant priest of St Saviour s, celebrated the Mass and Father Chester Burton, priest in-charge of St Saviour’s, preached the sermon. The readings were from the feast day of St Michael’s and All Angels. Father Burton took his text from Genesis, chapter 28, verse 13, “I am the Lor d the God of Abraham and Isaac the land on which you lie, I will give to you and your offspring. Your offspring shall be like the dust of the ear th.” Father Bur ton posited that the Seymours ar e somewhat like the passage of scriptur e applicable for the feast day of St Michaels and All Angels. The Seymour clan and descendants of Mar y Seymour ar e her e, there and everywhere all throughout the archipelagic chain of the Bahamas, he said. Father Bur ton fur ther admonished and reminded the well-wishers that if it weren’t for Mary’s yeoman service to her family, church, community and God, many would have strayed from the narrow way. But thanks to God all her childr en have made an indelible mark in the fabric and tapestry of our Bahamaland, he said. Also bringing birthday wishes to Mrs Seymour on this auspicious occasion was Cat Island’ s senior administrator Charles King and chief councillor Valderine Seymour. In attendance were senior civil servants and government officials from the length and breadth of Cat Island. Veteran Pastors Vernis Storr and Pandora Ingraham also brought greetings from their respective churches. Finally, Father Burton thanked the Almighty God for Mrs Seymour s many years of ser vice and pr esence in the settlement of Knowles. He said that the number of persons in attendance at her birthday celebration was indicative of how many lives she has touched in a special way. The gathering afterwards feasted sumptuously at Bachelor’s Rest Restaurant and Bar owned by one of Mrs Seymour s sons. Oldest Anglican in Cat Island celebrates her 99th birthday in grand style ‘Little’ long way a goes a ‘BIRTHDAY Girl’ Mary Seymour MAR Y Seymour celebrates her 99th birthday at her home with well-wishers from the Cat Island community.

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The Tribune PG 26 Thursday, October 8, 2009 RELIGION ST George's Anglican Church has been a pillar in the historical community known as the ‘V alley’ for mor e than 60 years. Last year , St Geor ge’s began its ‘Diamond in the Valley’ celebrations with a special service and various activities to commemorate the contributions that the parish church has made over more than half a centur y . For mer Prime Minister Perry Christie during the 60th anniversary thanksgiving ser vice spoke about how members of the parish helped mold his life. Many in the community also said they see the chur ch as the home base of the famed junkanoo group ‘The V alley Boys’ led by Gus Cooper . This year on October 31, the chur ch will hold a special 60th anniversary gala banquet to celebrate the growth and development that the parish has experienced within the community and the Bahamas at large. Tickets are available at St Geor ge’ s and the church committee is inviting all sons and daughters of the Valley to join in as thanks is given to almighty God for 60 years of dedicated service to mission and ministr y in the community . ST GEORGE’S ANGLICAN CHURCH ENDS 60TH ANNIVERSARY WITH GALA BANQUET

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The Tribune Thursday, October 8, 2009 PG 27 RELIGION When you know who you are IT is my firm belief that we only ever find out who we really are when God establishes us. I remember ten years ago at the beginning of my last job, within the first two weeks I had made a friend. We had gotten into a conversation that took him down memory lane recalling his college days. As he remembered the events from then, he mentioned that in those days he was part of a fraternity. Me, being curious, I asked him why, and his response was, "they gave me an identity because I didn't have one." My mind was blown because at that time I didn't think that was possible for anyone to not know who they were, let alone a Bahamian. (I guess too much faith, huh?) I really didn't know what to do with that because I had never heard anyone come out and say, "I don't know who I am." He was a first for me. When we don't know who we are it is an opportunity for all kinds of identities to attach themselves to us. Anyone or anything can come to you and tell you who you are if you don't know that yourself. You cannot tell John he is Paul when he in fact knows that he is John. Y ou won't hear him say ‘ok I'm Paul’ when he knows that he is John. That is also the reason why so many of us are confused. We don't know who we are, nor do we understand our self-worth. No young lady should allow any man whether young or old to make her feel privileged for knowing him. When that happens I believe that your self-worth is diminished. When in fact only God can put value to a life. What is the value that God puts on our lives? Well, when you accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour you become the "righteousness of God in Christ Jesus". I think that is the best identity that any human being could ever have. Once you have that identity, you will begin to live. What is life without purpose? Then what is purpose without fulfilling it? I believe we can only move forward when God is the centre of our purpose. Keeping in mind that the Bible tells us, "only what is done for Christ will last." There is nothing wrong with getting an education or having wealth, the problem comes when we make those things the fibre of our existence. Then our lives are built on the wrong things. Shortly after that we find ourselves unsatisfied and lost. I believe that is one of the worst positions that we can find ourselves in. The good thing is some of us actually have the good sense to find out what our purpose is, and we pursue it. The rest of us just float around because we won't make a decision on what to do with our lives. When you know who you are you won't accept just anything and you will not allow anyone to do anything to you. No one could deter a man or a woman who is purpose driven. He or she knows who they are and go after their purpose. That, my dear readers is a good position to be in and that will ultimately result in a good life. Instead of allowing anything and anybody to tell you who and what you are. Let us start the search, but we start knowing that the search begins with God. ALLISON MILLER THE CA THOLIC ARCHDIOCESE will officially open the new Aquinas College campus on Gladstone Road tomorrow at 10am. Catholic Archbishop Patrick Pinder will speak at the opening. The general public is invited to attend. ST JOSEPH’S CHURCH on Nassau Street will have an Golden Oldies dance on October 30. The general public is invited to come out for what promises to be a fun filled night. ST AGNES PARISH will for the first time ever be hosting a family day this Sunday. People are invited to bring their families to the 7am and 10am services. Under the theme “Sing Praises unto the Lord”, the senior choir at St Agnes will give a concert at 4pm. ANNOUNCEMENT: THE House of and Prayer and Deliverance Ministry is celebrating its 9th Anniversary this Sunday at 3pm at its location on Prince Charles Drive, opposite Pepsi Cola. Members of the public are invited to attend. ] RELIGIOUS NOTES INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays RELIGION TODAY A Sept.17, 2009 photo shows artist Sandow Birk pos ing next to his sculpture titled: "American Mihrab." Birk has created an illus trated, Englishlanguage Qu’ran that he's calling the "American Koran," at the Koplin Del Rio Gallery in Culver City, Calif. Damian Dovarganes AP Photo

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The Tribune PG28 Thursday, October 8 , 2009 RELIGION TRIBUNE Religion’ s ‘Chur ch of the Week’ is the Hillview Seventh-day Adventist Church on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway. The church was officially dedicated in 1989, but its history goes much further back. In 1942, Haddassah Poitier, then a member of the Grant's Town Seventhday Adventist Chur ch, invited the neighbour hood childr en to Friday evening vespers and Branch Sabbath School classes on the following day. Ms Poitier, affectionately called "Sister P", was then joined by Br other Jack Dean and met for worship in the old building just south of the present St Luke's Baptist Church. When this building became unsuitable, the company moved across the street into a two-stor ey building owned by Daniel Varence. This old lodge hall situated on the corner of East Street and Palmetto A venue ser ved as a sanctuar y for these believers for many years. In 1952, under the leadership of mission president Elder Mote, the company was organised into a church. One of the ver y first evangelistic cr u sades launched by the church was conducted by Pastor Melvin Nembhard in the Old Sponge Shed on Bay Str eet out of which a number of new believers wer e added to this fledging chur ch community. By this time, the brethren r ecognised the need for a mor e permanent building so they negotiated with Sir Roland Symonette to purchase a small plot on East Str eet south, opposite Cordeaux Avenue. On this site, Daniel V ar ence assisted by others built the old section of the present Englerston Church and dedicated it in 1955. However, the congregation continued to grow and the church soon became too small, expansion was necessar y , and in the mid-sixties this was completed. In the late 1960s and early 70s the chur ch witnessed an explosion of evan gelism in the Bahamas Confer ence which resulted in a dramatic increase in membership. The Englerston Chur ch again was bursting at its seams, leading to Pastor Roy Fer nander star t ing a special fund to acquir e a suitable and affordable site for a new church. However , it was not until the tenur e of Pastor Royden I Hanna that the 3.8 acreage on what is now ToniqueW illiams-Darling Highway was purchased through the assistance of Pr esident Silas McKinney fr om the late Sir Roland Symonette. Pastor Keith Albury was called to assume leadership of the Englerston Church on February 16, 1985, and it was dedicated on April 16, 1989 by the then-pr esident of the W est Indies Union Dr Silbur n Reid. The church’s present pastor is Peter Joseph. The view from the Hill


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Pim bowin’ it

91F
80F

PLENTY OF
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HIGH
LOW

Volume: 105 No.264



CLASSIFIEDS TRADER CL




The Tribune

USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009



Vightante mob attac
alleged! Kidnappe

Man who
reportedly
held teenage
girl for two
days taken
to hospital

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN ANGRY mob of cut-
lass wielding vigilantes sent a
man to hospital for reported-
ly kidnapping a teenage girl
and holding her against her
will in a tiny, dilapidated
home on Lewis Street for two
days.

Assistant Commissioner
Raymond Gibson confirmed
that a man had been taken to
hospital due to injuries stem-
ming from an attack on Lewis
Street yesterday, but said he
was not in police custody as a
formal complaint had not
been made against him as of
press time.

But conflicting radio
reports broadcast yesterday
evening claimed police were
searching for the man who
escaped from custody while
receiving medical attention at
the Princess Margaret Hospi-
tal yesterday afternoon. The
media report also claimed the

a

THE TEENAGE girl was allegedly held in this ti

man had been arrested Tues-
day night for allegedly hav-
ing unlawful sex with an
underage girl.

When confronted with the
kidnapping and assault claims
yesterday, ACP Gibson
denied that the man had been
arrested but said the RBPF is
investigating the merits of the
claims.

"There is some ongoing
investigation into this matter
and if information surfaces
that he is responsible for some
crime, including molestation

SEE page 15

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Minister Neko Grant ‘set for
promotion in Cabinet shuffle’

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff
Reporter
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net

THE MINISTER
of Works and Utili-
ties Neko Grant is
set to receive a sub-
stantial promotion
when Cabinet is
shuffled sometime
next week, as
reports reaching The Tribune
suggest that the MP is set to
be given responsibility for the
entire island of Grand
Bahama.

Along with this elevation
of Mr Grant it is reported that
the former Minister of Local
Government, Sidney Collie,
who had to resign from Cabi-
net in 2007, will be brought
back into the fold possibly as



NEKO GRANT

the new minister of
Youth and Sports.

The current minis-
ter, Desmond Ban-
nister, is reportedly
being wooed by the
Prime Minister to
stay in the Cabinet
and take up the post
of either Attorney
General — that was
left vacant when
Michael Barnett was
elevated to Chief
Justice — or the post
of Minister of Education.

If Mr Bannister is promot-
ed to Education it is believed
that the current Minister, Carl
Bethel will be moved to the
Attorney General’s post.

Mr Bannister has gone on
record in recent months as
saying that he is contemplat-
ing whether or not to remain

SEE page eight

PLEASE NOTE THAT, DUE TO TECHNICAL
DIFFICULTIES, THERE WILL BE NO
USA TODAY IN TODAY'S TRIBUNE

anaees Uniform

PRICE —75¢ (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25)

Was

AR U
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE



"Available at

Mt. Royal Ave.
Tel:326-1875









PLPs set to vote on
explosive leadership
challenge resolutions

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE National General Council of the PLP
will vote tonight on three explosive resolutions
that are designed to “stack the deck” against any
opponent who seeks to challenge party leader
Perry Christie at their October 21 National Con-

vention.
































A

ME PMMA OURS

Keod Smith

confident of

winning PLP
chairman post

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FORMER MP Keod
Smith is confident he will
be elected as national
chairman of the PLP when
he runs for the coveted
position at the party’s con-
vention, he announced
yesterday.

The former MP for
Mount Moriah served as
vice-chairman for the PLP
in the 18 months leading
up to the 2002 general
election. He believes his
experience as an activist,
advocate and civil leader
makes him a good candi-
date for the post.

If elected, Mr Smith
vowed to stay out of the
political race and allow
another PLP hopeful to
run for the seat in Mount
Moriah in the 2012 elec-

SEE page nine



The first amendment, which seeks to block the

SEE page eight

Heated clash
in Travolta
attempted

extortion trial

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter
nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net

HEATED exchanges
erupted between a defence
attorney and a key witness in
the attempted extortion trial
of ex-PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater and former
ambulance driver Tarino
Lightbourne yesterday.

US attorney Michael
McDermott was back on the
witness stand again yesterday
for further cross-examination.
Early into his cross-examina-
tion Mr Shurland became vis-
ibly frustrated with Mr
McDermott’s answer in
response to his question as to
whether he had told Ms
Bridgewater that their con-
versations had been private.

“When you told Ms Bridge-
water that the conversations
had been private and you
knew that police were taping,
that was a lie,” Mr Shurland
said.

“Tt was part accurate, part
inaccurate,” Mr McDermott
said.

“My lady, I am not going
to let him get out of hand if
the court is not going to reel
him in,” Mr Shurland said.
Senior Justice Allen told Mr
Shurland that he did not run
the court and asked him to sit
three times. Senior Justice
Allen again reiterated her
admonition about conduct in
the courtroom and reminded
both men not to engage in
commentary.

“My lady is he going to
keep running off at the
mouth? “So you told a lie?”
Mr Shurland asked.

“Tt’s partially true, partially
inaccurate,” Mr McDermott
said, explaining that the con-
versation he had with Bridge-
water on January 12 was pri-
vate and that the conversa-
tion on January 18 was not
private. Mr Shurland then
questioned whether Mr
McDermott had leaked the
extortion plot to the media.

SEE page 10

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Dwight, Keva
Major appeal
is adjourned

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

AN APPEAL lodged by
convicted drug trafficker
Dwight Major and his wife
Keva Major has been
adjourned for four weeks fol-
lowing a brief hearing in the
Court of Appeal yesterday.

Commercial Law Advocates
attorney Keod Smith, repre-
senting the Majors, both 40,
requested the adjournment as
he said he had not been able
to contact Dwight Major for
instructions on how to proceed
with the matter, as Major is cur-
rently being transferred
between prison facilities in the
United States.

Major is now in a Texas
prison and is expected to be set-
tled in another facility soon, Mr
Smith said.

The Majors’ appeal against
the Superintendent of Her
Majesty’s Prisons, the Attorney
General and the Commissioner
of Police, relates to the couple’s
complaints about inhumane
treatment at Her Majesty’s
Prison, where they were held
on allegations of drug traffick-
ing in 2003. They then fought a
five- year extradition battle

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Bebe
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DWIGHT and Keva Major.

before being extradited to the
United States in April last year.

Mr Smith told the court: “Mr
Major is currently between
facilities and I have not been
able to reach him so I have not
had any specific instructions as
to how to proceed with the
application.



“T was hoping it would have
been settled, but I’ve not had
any communication from him.

“T did not have any instruc-
tions to take steps in one way or
another.”

Sandra Dee Gardener of the
Attorney General’s Office did
not object to the application for

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adjournment.
Justice of Appeal Hartman
Longley adjourned the Appeal
Share your news Court hearing to Thursday,
November 5.
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

MEMORIAL TO THE LEGACY OF
SIR CLEMENT T. MAYNARD

EO UR Ew Te eae

Saturday, October 10th, 2009
4pm at Bahamas Faith Ministries (BFM)

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3



GOVERNMENT EMBRYO TRANSFER PROGRAMME
O In brief

‘Parasite infestation
killed livestock from
govt embryo scheme’

Man and hoy
arraigned on
double murder
allegation

A 23-year-old man and a
16-year-old boy were
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday on a double
murder charge.

Blake Rahming, 23, of
Old Cedar Street and the
juvenile were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court One,
Bank Lane.

They have been charged
with the murders of
Alphaues Curtis Jr and Ben-
jamin Vues.

Gunshot

Both men were found
dead with multiple gunshot
wounds in a wooden house
off St Vincent Road on
April 16.

Curtis was reportedly 42
while Veus was said to be in
his sixties.

Rahming and the juvenile
were not required to plead
to the murder charges and
were remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been trans-
ferred to Court 10, Nassau
Street and adjourned to
October 16.

Weather
experts keep
eye on Henri

LOCAL meteorologists
are still monitoring Tropical
Storm Henri although the
weather system is weaken-
ing over the Atlantic Ocean
and expected to fizzle into a
tropical wave within a day.

The National Hurricane
Centre in Miami said
Wednesday that Henri is
about 600 kilometers east of
the northern Leeward
Islands.

The Bahamas’ Chief
Meteorologist Basil Dean
said while Henri is not
expected to be a dire threat
to the Bahamas, parts of the
country can expect some
light rain from the system at
the start of next week.

"(Henri's) still moving in
a generally west direction at
45 miles per hour, we antici-
pate that it will weaken as it
moves westward and
encourage some hostile
upper level conditions. And
should that happen it could
fizzle into a tropical wave,"
said Mr Dean.

Rain

If the storm continues on
this projected track, islands
in the southeast Bahamas —
including Mayaguana,
Inagua, Crooked Island,
Acklins — and the Turks
and Caicos Islands should
experience some rain on
Sunday, Mr Dean said.

While islands in the north-
west Bahamas, including
Central Exuma, Andros,
Long Island, Cat Island, the
Berry Islands, Grand
Bahama and New Provi-
dence should expect rain on
Monday.

Mr Dean also warned
locals to be prepared for a
major hurricane even
though this storm season has
been relatively quiet.

Henri is the eighth named
tropical storm of this year's
Atlantic hurricane season,
which began June 1 and
ends November 30.

aL)

THE telephone number
for Graycliff Restaurant
printed in Wednesday’s
edition of Tribune Taste
was incorrect.

Persons wishing to
inquire about the restau-
rant’s special four-week
cooking course can con-
tact Deanne Williams at
302-9155.

Graycliff’s cooking
series promises to teach
participants some of the
five-star restaurant’s culi-
nary secrets.

The Tribune apologises
for any inconvenience this
error may have caused.



By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

FAILURE to carry out rou-
tine internal parasite control
measures led to the death of
five animals from the govern-
ment's groundbreaking Embryo
Transfer Programme, the Min-
istry of Agriculture admitted
yesterday.

According to a brief state-
ment from the ministry, the
young animals, a mix of kids
and sheep, all died during the
first five days of this month
because of "heavy internal par-
asite infestation".

The ministry added that cor-
rective steps have been taken
to prevent more deaths of the
precious livestock — which are a
major part of the country’s
ambitious plan to become more
self-sufficient — including staff
reassignment and increased sur-
veillance.

"The severity of the infesta-
tion was exacerbated by recent
rains and the necessary con-
finement of animals and a fail-
ure to practice routine internal
parasite control measures,” said
the statement, which was
released after The Tribune's
inquiries into the deaths.

Agriculture Minister Larry
Cartwright said he was not
made aware of the deaths until
The Tribune contacted him
about the situation yesterday
afternoon, before the ministry
issued the statement.

He said that he had last
received an update on the ani-
mals’ condition about two
weeks ago, adding that veteri-
narians were gearing up for
another round of embryo
implantation.

Mr Cartwright promised to
look into the incident and about

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Atlantis to take part in what
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PokerStars.com, the site that
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AMBITIOUS PLAN: The TT S Embryo Transfer Sunil
is designed to make the country self-sufficient. In this file photo Dr
Leroy Santiago, project coordinator for Ovatech Genetics, is pic-

tured with a kid.

three hours later issued a state-
ment which confirmed the
reported deaths.

He explained that it was nor-
mal for livestock to become
infected with worms at this time
of year, but said several animals
dying within a short period was
reason for concern, as it could
be a sign of a contagious illness.

Government is preparing to
sell the offspring of the pro-

gramme to local farmers in the
coming weeks , said Mr
Cartwright.

He also said the project,
which began with 120 female
sheep and goats, has spawned
over 200 kids and lambs — which
are all housed at the Gladstone
Road Agricultural Centre.

The project's second round
is expected to begin next Feb-
ruary.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
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www.tribune242.com —

updated daily at 2pm

Only the beginning in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — President Obama has
no plans to pull U.S. troops out of
Afghanistan. After eight years of war there,
withdrawal is not among the options the
administration is considering as it designs a
new Strategy.

Also not being considered is any explo-
ration of possible peace talks with the Tal-
iban, the indigenous Islamic group that once
controlled large swaths of Afghanistan.

When asked whether the US. could with-
draw from Afghanistan — a country known
as the “graveyard of empires” — White
House spokesman Robert Gibbs said:
“That’s not something that has ever been
entertained.”

“T don’t think we have the option to
leave,” he added. “T think that’s quite clear.”

Both Defence Secretary Robert Gates
and Gen. Stanley McChrystal — the com-
mander of U.S. and allied troops in
Afghanistan — have indicated that the Tal-
iban has the momentum and is gaining
ground.

Eight American soldiers lost their lives
in fighting at an undermanned outpost in
Afghanistan last weekend.

NATO said in a statement that the insur-
gents — that is, the Afghan fighters — lost
100 men in the same battle.

Obama is reviewing his war strategy in
Afghanistan at a time when American pub-
lic opinion is becoming sceptical about U.S.
efforts there.

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll last
month showed that 59 per cent of those
polled said they are feeling less confident
that the war will come to a successful con-
clusion, while 51 per cent said they would
oppose sending more troops to the conflict.

Obama has been conferring with Pentagon
officials, commanders on the ground and
congressional leaders as he takes his time
to make what could be the toughest decision
of his presidency.

Obama’s big dilemma now is to decide
whether to approve McChrystal’s request
for 40,000 more troops in addition to the
68,000 there now.

Another option — one pushed by Vice
President Joe Biden — is to reduce troop
numbers and instead rely on bombing and
raids by Special Forces to keep any al-Qaida
elements on the run.

Obama has been conducting a series of

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“Live in such a way that

not-so-secret meetings to decide his next
move. Somehow the White House has man-
aged to change the theme — lawmakers
emerge from their White House meetings
proclaiming that Obama had ruled out a
large reduction in troops. Nice going. The
issue is whether to increase the number of
troops.

In a speech in London, McChrystal went
public with his position and was later slapped
down by Gates who reminded military lead-
ers that their advice to the president should
remain private.

“In this process, it is imperative that all of
us taking part in these deliberations — civil-
ians and military alike — provide our best
advice to the president candidly but pri-
vately,” Gates said.

I think it’s good to have the debate out in
the open and for the American people to
know what the stakes are.

The president has called the war in
Afghanistan a “necessary war” and it
behooves him to explain why we must pay
such a human cost, not to mention billions of
dollars to keep it going.

Are there any lessons from the past, espe-
cially the Vietnam War?

Is there anything to learn from the expe-
rience of the Russians, who were forced to
withdraw from Afghanistan in the 1980s,
despite their high-tech military? (Back then,
the U.S. was a big help to the Afghan fight-
ers and other anti-communists, including
Osama bin Laden, the wealthy Saudi heir
who later led al-Qaida).

Where are the Pakistanis? They know the
terrain. I thought it was interesting that the
Pakistanis decided it was their fight, too,
when Taliban forces reached striking dis-
tance of Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan,
before being pushed back.

If Obama goes with the military leaders on
the ground, there will be many more years
dedicated to defeating the Taliban and to
U.S. efforts at nation-building in
Afghanistan.

I say we should pull up stakes, let United
Nations peacekeepers try to stabilize the
Afghan government and support it with a
new, non-narcotics economy.

(This article was written by Helen Thomas

c.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



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Educational
system report:
Must do better

EDITOR, The Tribune.

As we know, this year’s
national grade from students
sitting the Bahamas General
Certificate of Secondary Edu-
cation (BGCSE) has slightly
improved to a ‘D+’ average
from last year’s ‘D’ average.
The results from the Bahamas
Junior Certificate (BJC) has
risen from a ‘D+’ to a ‘C-’. Is
that good enough? No it is
not! Why? Because I know
that Bahamians know our
young children have much
more potential and capability
than what it seems.

Looking at the two most
important subjects; 56 per
cent of students from public
schools who took the English
language exam “fail”, and 82
per cent of public school stu-
dents who take the math
exam, “fail.” According to the
Coalition “this is unaccept-
able. Everyone in business,
science and engineering
agrees that an understanding
of basic math is critical to a
range of both low-tech and
high-tech jobs — from carpen-
try to computer system main-
tenance, the management of a
small business and even the
management of one’s person-
al finances.”

“The overwhelming and
critical national problems are
the extremely high failure
rates in high school English
and Mathematics,” the Coali-
tion says. The BGCSE data
support this conclusion.

Today, in order for one to
be applicable for a job or to
enter college, it is a require-
ment to have at least five
BGCSBP’s with grades of *C’

LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



and above, including Mathe-
matics and English Language.
If these requirements are not
met, then one can lose the
opportunity of getting hired
and students will not be able
to enter college unless they
do ‘Prep classes’ in Mathe-
matics and English or if they
decide to sit the BGCSE
exam once more.

This can be a challenge,
because students will be
placed one step behind when
they could have been one step
forward.

With regards, to the nation-
al ‘D+’ average, in my opin-
ion, I know many students
have the potential to do better
and make improvements,
because there is always room
for improvement. In terms of
getting low grades in a Math-
ematics or English exam,
doesn’t mean the students are
not doing their best. Howev-
er, there are students today
who are excellent at carpentry
work, electrical work and
computer work and who have
the potential to be that great
artist. In schools today, these
subjects are not fully being
focused on so that students
can utilise their skills in these
areas.

From the beginning of high
school, teachers should know
which student is good in these
various areas. The education-
al system needs to be
revamped and reformed in

terms of having such students
do what they love to do in
BJC and BGCSE.

The Ministry of Education
needs to implement an initia-
tive to have students that are
really good at hands on work
to get them involved and to
also focus on the core sub-
jects, Maths and English as
well.

Furthermore initiative
needs to be taken for Mathe-
matics, English and Science
subjects.

The Ministry of Education
can look at focusing more on
Maths, English and Science
for three days out of a school
week, These are the major
core classes, and I do believe
when a focus is brought on
these three classes on a regu-
lar basis, students will be
more inclined to learn them
and will do much better when
the BJC and BGCSE come
around. I suggest that other
classes can be held during the
remaining two days of the
week. It will enhance stu-
dents’ knowledge and abili-
ties in the main classes that
will help them in the end.

If we work with the stu-
dents and the ministry of edu-
cation, it is possible that a
change will be made that will
better the educational system
and will have a major turn in
this country. We must not let
our educational system be
dysfunctional, but function for
the benefit of the children of
this nation who are the future.

SHAVADO GIBSON
Nassau,
October, 2009.

Eastern Road is ‘becoming the wild west’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

T have read this morning with great interest and
am in full agreement with the letter to the Editor
“$5.8 million on Miss Universe — but how much
on catching criminals”?

I happen to live on Eastern Road and it is
becoming the wild west, we are all afraid to walk
the dogs anytime it is not daylight. Most of us will
no longer sit on our patios, or have the doors
open, so that we can enjoy the lovely sea breeze
and beautiful views, which is the reason to live on
the water.

But until the crime is aimed at the members of
parliament and their family members, we will
continue to only get lip service, as for some rea-
son their heads are in the sand. Which by the
way we will not be needing much of, as the tourist
will not return to what used to be a beautiful
country, as the news of our crime and rundown
appearance, unkempt streets and nothing for
them to do except use the pools and beaches is
already the talk all over the world.

So our government had better pull their heads
out of the sand and be serious about the impor-
tant things which will get our country back on
track, before spending our tax dollars on trying to

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lure the tourist, because they are already going to
safer places to spend their dollars and purchase
products that are from the country they are vis-
iting and not from China and knock off designer
items.

Also, has any member of parliament tried
walking in what is called the straw market by
themselves and not with a group of bodyguards to
see how those people selling goods treat the
tourist, let them just go there on their own and
not announce their arrival. I did this year with
house guests and I will never expose myself or
anyone else to the rude behaviour displayed by
most of the people at that horrible place.

It is time now for all Bahamians who do not
want to see what is left of our country destroyed
to start making the people responsible for what
has happened to take responsibility for their non-
action and if they are unable to cope get the
right people in place that can get the job done.

This problem has been slowly brewing for
many, many years and there are many people in
high places that have much to answer for.

A CONCERNED BAHAMIAN
Nassau,
October 1, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE





PM: climate change poses
‘serious threat’ to Bahamas

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN his starkest warning yet
about the danger that climate
change poses for the Bahamas,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham has told the international
community that it is a “serious
threat to our economic viabil-
ity, social development and our
territorial integrity.”

Ahead of a critical confer-
ence when countries are to get
what many are calling a “last
chance to save the world” by
creating a new pact to reverse
the negative impacts of climate
change, Mr Ingraham empha-
sised that if current trends con-
tinue some low-lying states —
of which the Bahamas is one
— “are set to become entirely
uninhabitable.”

He was speaking to world
leaders and diplomats in a pre-
recorded address to the United
Nations Summit on Climate
Change held at the organisa-
tion’s headquarters in New
York City on September 21.

Leaders

That summit drew together
more than a hundred world
leaders, from some of the
worst polluting countries to the
most vulnerable, with the aim
of galvanising political will and
focusing on Key political issues
that require resolution if nego-
tiations on a new agreement
are to conclude successfully at
the Copenhagen Climate Con-
ference in December.

The Prime Minister told the
Summit of how “the serious
challenges facing the world as
a result of climate change...are
particularly acute for small
island developing states like
The Bahamas which are
extremely vulnerable to rising
sea levels, coral bleaching and
increasingly powerful tropical
hurricanes.”

“Hundreds of millions of
dollars” that could have been
spent on “critically important
national development priori-
ties” have already had to be
diverted to “repeated restora-
tion efforts” required after the
passage of major hurricanes
“in the last decade alone,” he



added, limiting our progress
towards sustainable develop-
ment.

The Prime Minister, on
behalf of The Bahamas, called
for a global accord in Copen-
hagen with “ambitious legally
binding targets” that will
achieve the objectives of the
United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate
Change.

The UNFCC sets out an
overall framework for inter-
governmental efforts to tackle
climate change, and has been
ratified by 192 countries — but
not the United States.

Speaking to the U.N. Sum-
mit, which was also personally
attended by a Bahamian dele-
gation headed by Environment
Minister Earl Deveaux, Mr
Ingraham said industrialised
countries “have a responsibili-
ty to accept the leading role
they must play in this enter-
prise, especially by committing
to a reduction in their green-
house gas emissions.”

Disagreement between rich
and poor nations over how to
share the burden of slashing
greenhouse gases, which are
primarily a product of indus-
trial and other economic activ-
ity, and who will pay for it, has
so far hampered any signifi-
cant action on climate change.

At present, another Bahami-
an delegation headed by
Bahamas Environment Science
and Technology (BEST) Com-
mission Director Philip Weech
is in Bangkok, Thailand, where
marathon U.N. climate change
talks are underway between
180 nations towards laying the



LOCAL NEWS

fone

"h f tis 4 }



groundwork that will under-
gird the December agreement
that many hope will change
that.

Earlier this year, Mr Weech
provided an insight into the
significance of reversing cli-
mate change when he
explained how a one metre sea
level rise would see three of
The Bahamas major land
masses — Abaco, Andros and
Grand Bahama — either total-
ly or partially flooded.

Financing

Mr Ingraham urged the
international community to
make it simpler for countries
like the Bahamas to obtain the
financing they will need to
fund adaptation to the effects
of climate change, as well as
to take steps to reduce their
own carbon footprint, and
make environmental technol-
ogy “more available globally.”

Meanwhile, both he and Dr
Deveaux asked that developed
states “re-examine” initiatives
undertaken in the name of
environmental protection
which may place additional
burdens on small states, such
as a hike in taxes paid by air
passengers.

“Recognising climate
change is a threat we all face,
The Bahamas is committed to
collaborating with the family
of nations to ensure our own
survival, and the survival of
humankind in a sustainable
development model for planet
earth,” the Prime Minister
added.

ARAL

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ak Pee ie Ll pall. to Pay. ie

eae

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5

STRUCKUM

Ee UT es
ER ea ee ae
PHONE: 327-6464

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (inset) spoke in a pre-recorded
Ce ee

address to the UN Summit on Climate Change, pictured left. (AP)



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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Cable Beach property mould stops Ministry's move’

THE MINISTRY of Edu-
cation, Youth and Sports will
not be moving into the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort as
planned after claims that a
potentially dangerous mould
infestation has been discov-
ered at the Cable Beach prop-
erty, The Tribune has been
told.

With its current offices on
Thompson Boulevard inun-



dated with mould as well, the
government has been forced
to look for new accommoda-
tion for the ministry’s employ-
ees, who have complained of
respiratory problems for some
time.

A well placed government
source told The Tribune of the
alleged mould discovery, how-
ever vice president of exter-
nal affairs at Baha Mar,

Robert Sands, said he was
unaware of the claims.

He added that government
and the resort were only at
the “exploratory stages” in
their discussions about a pos-
sible rental agreement.

President of the Bahamas
Public Service Union John
Pinder said that during his
walkabout of the property
with inspectors, he saw mould

on the sixth floor of one of
the towers, which he was
advised would be removed
from the list of possible spaces
to be rented to government.
Mr Pinder said he is wait-
ing to see a Department of
Environmental Health report
on the matter, and that if it
advises that the tower is not
safe to be occupied, the min-
istry will have to stand by this

advice and find other accom-
modations for the employees
to use.

Some kinds of mould which
develop in buildings can lead
to a variety of health prob-
lems. If present in large quan-
tities, it can be extremely haz-
ardous to humans, causing
allergic reactions and respira-
tory problems.



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Hundreds of
ePassports
are ready for
collection on
Grand Bahama

FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama — The dedication of

additional printing time for |

ePassport applications has
resulted in the completion of
hundreds of the new passports
which are now ready for col-
lection at the Grand Bahama
passport office.

More than 1,200 ePassports
require collection, the gov-
ernment said in a statement
yesterday.

All successful ePassport
applicants are required to
bring along their old pass-
ports for cancellation when
collecting their new ePass-
ports.

Visas

Those containing non-
expired visas will be returned
to its owner for further use
once cancelled.

To address the protracted
backlog of ePassport applica-
tions for Grand Bahama resi-
dents, Foreign Affairs Minis-
ter Brent Symonette directed
that an entire day in the week

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be allotted solely for the print-
ing of those passports.

A printing machine is cur-
rently dedicated to the pro-
duction of ePassports for
Grand Bahama residents. The
total number of printing
machines — all housed in New
Providence — has also been
increased to improve service
to Bahamians throughout the
country.

As part of the process of
expanding service capacity on
Grand Bahama, the number
of passport office phone lines
was increased from two to
seven, and now include an
appointment line, a hotline
and a complaints line. The
telephone number for the
passport office's appointment
system is 351-9976.

Staffing at the office has
also been increased, the state-
ment said.

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NCUA

By AVA TURNQUEST

AS part of its commitment
to improve the quality of life
of all Bahamians, the Bahamas
Association for Social Health
will host a mini-fair on Discov-
ery Day.

To be held at a 210 acre com-
pound, the mini-fair will serve
as a formal introduction to
BASH’s sister company, Edu-
cational Alternative Resources
for Total Health (EARTH)
Village and all funds will be
used to further its development.

Geared towards families and
children, EARTH Village will
continue BASH’s vision to sub-
stantially reduce crime, violence
and drug abuse by providing
positive educational outlets for
the youth. The ‘village’ features
activities such as a petting zoo,
horseback riding, Segway rides
and numerous nature trails, all
of which provide educational
benefits. Discreetly located on
Albury Street in Chippingham,
the environmental sanctuary is
often overlooked by the gen-
eral public said Wesley Fin-
layson, BASH and EARTH
Village media liaison.

“We’re having this fun day
so we can get the entire com-
munity involved. Because most
pass this place, and some peo-
ple may or may not see the sign,
no one knows the excitement
that’s inside. You can come in
and horseback ride, you can
ride a Segway, you can bring
your kids to the petting zoo or
on a field trip. We have over

E
4!
ao
ian

THE COOPERATIVE
SOCIETIES ACT, 2005

(Chapter 314)
ORDER, 2009

In Exercise of The powers conferred by Section 99
of The Cooperative Societies Act 2005, the Direc-
tor of Societies in the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas makes the following ORDER:-

To transfer all immovable assets of Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union

Limited such as;

(a) Property, building and contents thereof;
(b) Ownership of all vehicles owned by the Society;
(c) All assets and liabilities prescribed in the
August 31 st, 2009 special Audited
Financial Statements; adjusted for
activities up to the date of this order.

The prescribed date of transfer of the Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union
Limited will commence pursuant to sections 98,99

and 100 of this Act.

Made this 6th day of October 2009

Nathaniel A. Adderley

DIRECTOR OF SOCIETIES

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150 medicinal plants and 34 dif-
ferent species of birds. Its very
educational. If we’re gonna stop
the grown-ups we have to nip it
at the root.”

Fun Day project co-ordinator
Tehranique Miller said: “Every-
body’s going green now. We’ve
been green for a long time now
so we’re tying to promote
awareness. Unfortunately, the
average Bahamian doesn’t real-
ly understand the concept of
going green. There are limita-
tions on just how much we can
do, but we can be aware. If we
can raise aware children, we
will have aware adults.”

The fair will open on Mon-
day, October 12, at 7am with a
forest fun walk that will begin
at the EARTH Village Wel-
come Centre and travel through
two miles of forest. The official
opening ceremony begins at
11am after which activities will
commence. Participants can dis-
cover historical aqueducts built
in 1942 which supphed drinking
water via windmills. Discontin-
ued in 1972, the infrastructure is
now an untouched ecosystem,
home to tilapia, turtles and
breath-taking water lilies.

In addition to the natural
activities available on site, fam-
ilies will be able to enjoy boun-
cy castles, rock climbing, face
painting, hoopla and bingo
while listening to live music by
various local artists.

Fairgoers will also be entered
in a raffle and each hour a win-
ner will be selected.

All funds will be used
towards the development of
EARTH Village's petting zoo
and site maintenance.

"Unfortunately every aspect
of this project takes money,"
said Ms Miller. “Everything
that we’re doing for the fun day
we have to raise the funds for it.
Its difficult but at the same time
we want to make sure that we
share what we have. A lot of
Bahamians have no idea what
we have here. There are little
subtle changes that everyone
can make. I think that if people
see what we have — I think this
is one of the last green spaces
left in Nassau, everywhere else
is concrete jungle — maybe they
will be inspired to preserve it.”

The fair will close with a fire-
works display at 11 pm.

a
WU ee

MRS Glenys Hanna Mar-
tin, daughter of Mrs Beryl
Hanna, said that her mother
has been transferred to the
private ward of the Princess
Margaret Hospital “where
she is progressing.”

Mrs Hanna had been
admitted to the hospital’s
intensive care unit several
days ago for problems asso-
ciated with her throat, said
her daughter. However, con-
trary to reports in Wednes-
day’s Tribune, Mrs Hanna
was not on a respirator.

Mrs Martin, on behalf of
the family, thanked “all of
her parents’ friends and oth-
er well-wishers for their con-
cern and prayers.”

“We are trusting that our
mother will soon be released
from the hospital,” she said.

Mrs Hanna is the wife of
Governor-general Arthur
Hanna.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 7

MAGISTRATE’S COURT: Exuma marijuana case |

TUE St MRT EL
Four in court over $4m drug seizure

PST
ape



A CAR RENTAL AGENT provides
details of his company to patrons
at Bahamasair’s annual trade
show and exhibition, Friday, at
SuperClubs Breezes.

BAHAMASAIR has
improved its on-time perfor-
mance and maintained its
dispatch reliability and safe-
ty records, according manag-
ing director Henry Woods.

“We have progressed
from an airline that used to
operate in the 50 per cent on
time performance to now in
the 70s which is in line with
industry averages,” said Mr
Woods. He was speaking
during Bahamasair’s annual
trade show and exhibition at
SuperClubs Breezes.

Network

The trade show provided
an opportunity for clients to
network directly with ven-
dors in south Florida and
the Family Islands that pro-
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hotels, motels, resorts, car
rental and travel agencies.

Mr Woods said: “Our dis-
patch reliability is almost
100 per cent. Bahamasair
very rarely cancels a flight.
Ifit happens its through an
act of God.

“We’re not like the other
carriers which if they are
two hours late they will can-
cel. We meet our commit-
ment and we value our cus-
tomers. It may be late, but
you're safe. “

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STEPHEN STUBBS, 34, of Ridgeland
Park.

FOUR men charged in con-
nection with the seizure of $4
million worth of marijuana in
Exuma were back in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday after-
noon.

The men were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane
on Monday and appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane
yesterday.

Stephen Stubbs, 34, of
Ridgeland Park, also known as
"Die", Dion Minnis, 35, of
Rupert Dean Lane, David
Colebrooke, 48, of Jasmine
Gardens, and Selva Hudson, 54,
of The Bluff, Eleuthera are
charged with conspiring to
import and possess a 3,935
pound shipment of marijuana
with intent to supply. It is

SELVA RUDOLPH HUSDON, 54, of
The Bluff Eleuthera.

alleged that the offences were
committed between September
5 and 30, at Scott's Creek,
Williams Town, Exuma.

Colebrooke and Hudson
are also charged with import-
ing the drugs and drug posses-
sion with intent to supply. They
are also charged with the unau-
thorised possession of a .45 pis-
tol and seven bullets for the
gun.

The four men pleaded not
guilty to the charges again yes-
terday. Stubbs, who is on bail
pending retrial in the murder
of policeman Jimmy Ambrose
10 years ago, is represented by
attorney Murrio Ducille. Attor-
ney Dion Smith is representing
the other three defendants.
They will remain on remand
and are expected back in court
on Friday for a bail hearing.

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Many women worry about the effect their breast cancer will have on their children. tf vou have children and receiv
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Date of Diagnosis: January 28, 2009

45






TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one Wiinister Grant ‘set for promotion in Cabinet shuffle’

in Cabinet, noting the finan-
cial and social commitments
he has made to his family.
Additionally, it is believed
that when the Prime Minister
appoints two additional mem-
bers to the Senate, to replace
Mr Barnett and former Sena-
tor Kay Forbes-Smith who is

now heads the Bahamas’
Consulate in Atlanta, one of
these new persons could be
appointed directly into the
Cabinet. If not, it is rumoured
that the FNM Senator Antho-
ny Musgrove, may be given
the responsibility of the Min-

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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



a

looked upon well by the oth-
er MPs who have served
“longer” than he has.
Having shuffled his cabi-
net once already in July 2008
it is understood that this sec-
ond manoeuvre would be yet
another step by Mr Ingra-
ham to ensure that ministers
who are performing will be
given greater responsibilities
while those who have yet to
meet the mark will be
relieved of their powers and

selves.”

When the Prime Minister
regained office in May of
2007, he had a relatively
inexperienced cabinet with
only a few colleagues having
served at a ministerial level.

Now, with what is seen as
the largest cabinet in the his-
tory of the Bahamas, most
of the FNM’s sitting MP’s
have either served or are
currently serving in some
ministerial portfolio with one

melt to

sidelined in favour of those
who have “proven them-

exception— Kendal Wright,
the MP for Clifton.

PLPs set to vote on explosive
leadership challenge resolutions

FROM page one

nomination of any PLP who is
not a Member of Parliament, is ff
obviously aimed at PLP new-
comer Paul Moss who was the
first candidate to announce his
bid to challenge Mr Christie.

Secondly, the NGC will also
vote on a resolution proposed to
block the nomination of any PLP
MP who does not declare his
intentions of challenging the lead-
ership before the National Con-
vention opens.

This tactic, sources say is being
used by the party hierarchy to
discourage or block the possibil-
ity of PLP MP Dr Bernard Not- +, '
tage launching a “snap challenge”
against Mr Christie from the floor ae
of the convention and avoid the
possibility of the leader being caught by “surprise.”

Additionally, it has also been suggested that if Dr Nottage
were to announce his intentions to challenge Mr Christie before
the convention, supporters of Mr Christie would have sufficient
time to run a “relentless” campaign against the challenger.
This campaign, sources say would bear the all too familiar
trademark of painting Dr Nottage as an “ingrate” who was giv-
en an opportunity to return to the party and was now turning
on the man who had given him that “second chance.”

The third measure, which is expected to be voted on tonight,
is the possibility of creating a co-deputy position that sources
explained is designed to appease the many challengers who will
ultimately one day be seeking the leadership of the party.

By appeasing these many challengers in one swoop the hope,
sources said, is to ensure that Mr Christie remains as leader, and
possibly two of his parliamentary colleagues would be named
as co-deputies of the party.

Having already warned his parliamentary group that a
“scorched earth policy” would be used against anyone who
would dare challenge him, the party leader is also expected to
ratify the additional 250 stalwart councillors appointed earlier
this year.

However, it appears that Mr Moss is undaunted by the par-
ty’s tactics and is expected to hold a press conference outside
PLP headquarters tomorrow night after the NGC has cast its
votes.



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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9

LOCAL NEWS





je

od A i. i i Seibescee
KEOD SMITH speaks to the media yesterday.

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Keod Smith confident of
winning PLP chairman post

FROM page one

tion so that he can fully commit himself to
the chairmanship.

Mr Smith announced his ambition to run
for the post held by Englerston MP Glenys
Hanna-Martin just days after PLP deputy
chairman Kendred Dorsett said he is also vying
for the post.

Mr Dorsett released a statement yesterday,
after hearing Mr Smith’s announcement, to
highlight the PLP’s need to break away from
“business as usual” and “provide a vision for
progress.”

However, Mr Smith is confident his chances
of being chosen for the position are above
average.

The Commercial Law Advocates attorney,
who held a press conference in his Trinity
Place office yesterday, said: “Fortunately I
am not new to the party, [am not unknown to
delegates, I feel I have something that’s defi-
nitely peculiar only to me, that none of the oth-
er candidates will have, and I feel the party
knows what these attributes are.

“T suspect I will win, but if it is that I do
not, that will not change my involvement in
doing what is right for the party.

“T feel I have a more than average chance of
being successful.”

Mr Smith said his bold and aggressive nature
will drive all members of the party to face
challenging issues head-on in the run-up to
the 2012 election.

He would take seriously the chairman’s task
to minimise cheating in the next general elec-
tion by devising strategies such as a door-to-

door visitation programme to ensure all voters
are accounted for long before they cast their
ballots.

Mr Smith said the rising crime rate and mur-
der count, job losses for thousands of Bahami-
ans, and the FNM’s lack of strategy for eco-
nomic recovery places the PLP in a good posi-
tion for securing government in 2012.

He criticised the FNM for recently admitting
the government has no plans to rejuvenate
the economy in Grand Bahama, and intends to
hold a pre-convention presentation on the
island on Friday to address local delegates on
the subject, “Strategies for Immediate Eco-
nomic Rejuvenation of Grand Bahama in
2009.”

As chairman, Mr Smith maintains he will
focus on the needs of the party and not his own
political ambitions, however he would keep the
door open for his former constituents in Mount
Moriah.

He said: “In the two and a half years leading
up to the next election candidates will need to
be on the ground and starting to work, so for
me to do what I need to do I can’t be con-
cerned that I have to leave because I have
something going on in Lightbourne Street or
Yellow Elder.

“With God’s help and the support of the
convention delegates, I will not only be elect-
ed national chairman at the convention later
this month, but shall be serving in that post
when the PLP regains the government in 2012.

“At the end of the convention, whether I
win or lose, I hereby commit my efforts to
that of the party to ensure there is unity as we
move forward in this collective quest.”

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009



FROM page one

“You leaked it to the press
didn’t you, didn’t you?” Mr
Shurland demanded.

“No,” Mr McDermott
replied.
“On the 19th of January did

you give an interview to US

magazine? Did you not give
an interview to The Tribune
on the 19th’?” Mr Shurland
asked.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott
said.

“Tm suggesting that you are
lying,” Mr Shurland said.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott

OSD UKO EOD
BAHAMAS UTILITIES
COOPERATIVE

CREDIT UNION
LIMITED



























Notice is hereby given that The Director of

Cooperative Societies has been advised:

1. Pursuant to Chapter 314 Section 99 of the
Cooperative Societies Act 2005, of the transfer of
the Assets & Liabilities from Bahamas Utilities
Cooperative Credit Union Limited to National
Workers Cooperative Credit Union Limited.

2. By virtue of Section 100 of the Cooperative Societ-
ies Act creditors other than members depositors
within 90 days of the date and publication of this
notice, commencing on the 6th of October, A.D.
2009, having any claim(s) against the above-
named Cooperative are hereby duly informed to
submit particulars of claims andlor objection(s) to
the transfer of assets and liabilities of Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited to
National Workers Cooperative Credit Union
Limited, on or before January 6th, A.D.2010.

Claims and objections are to be submitted in writing
tothe Director of Societies,
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources,

Levy Building,

P. O. Box N-3028, Nassau, The Bahamas.
Dated this 6th day of October, A.D. 2009

Bahamas Utilities Cooperative Credit
Union Limited a Cooperative registered in
accordance with Chapter 314 section 187 of
the Cooperative Societies Act 2005.

DIRECTOR OF SOCIETIES

Nathaniel A. Adderley

said. Mr Shurland then sug-
gested that during the meeting
between Lightbourne and Mr
McDermott on January 19,
Lightbourne had asked Mr
McDermott if he was record-
ing him.

“You are making it up,” Mr
McDermott said.

Mr Shurland responded,
“Tm making it up; you think
you have a monopoly on the
truth?”

“T’m suggesting to you that
this tape was edited. That the
part of the tape missing is the
part where he (Lightbourne)
entered the room and took his
seat at the table, that’s the
part with all the good stuff on
it,” Mr Shurland suggested.

“No,” Mr McDermott
replied. Mr Shurland then
asked that the tape be
replayed. Officer Sean Saun-
ders took the witness stand.
The tape was played again. It
was put on pause to show a
still frame of Mr McDermott
and Lightbourne sitting at the
table in his hotel room.

“Tm suggesting that prior
to Tarino sitting down there
was some chit-chat between
you two,” Mr Shurland said.

“Yes,” McDermott said.
“That is not on the tape. ’m
suggesting that that was edit-
ed to suit your purpose,” Mr
Shurland said.

“No, sir,” Mr McDermott
replied. Mr Shurland again
suggested that when Light-
bourne entered the room he
had asked if he was being
recorded.

“He never said that,”
McDermott said, “you made it
u a

“On the 20th of January
when you were talking to Mr
Lightbourne did he say ‘if
John Travolta doesn’t pay me
I’m going to the press’?” Mr
Shurland asked.

“No, sir, he didn’t say those
words,” Mr McDermott said.

“Do you know the pig prin-
ciple; pigs get fat, hogs get
slaughtered?” Mr Shurland
asked.

“Yes, sir, it’s a tax adage,”
Mr McDermott replied. Mr
McDermott told the court

THE TRIBUNE

Heated clash in Travolta

attempted extortion trial

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that he had said it as a joke,
however, Mr Shurland sug-
gested that it was not a joke.

“Tm suggesting that when
you spoke to Ms Bridgewater
and told her about the pig
principles, pigs get fat, you
intended to pay money.”

“Yes,” Mr McDermott said.

“When you said hogs get
slaughtered you wanted to kill
this young man,” Mr Shurland
said.

“Absolutely not,” Mr
McDermott replied. Mr
McDermott admitted that the
day before he spoke to Light-
bourne, news of an extortion
threat was already in the
media. Mr McDermott said
that he made a complaint of
an extortion attempt to
Bahamian police on January
18.

Mr Shurland suggested to
Mr McDermott that he had
called ambulance driver Mar-
cus Garvey looking for the
original document.

“Absolutely not,” Mr
McDermott said. Mr Shurland
went on to suggest that Mr
McDermott was able to get
Lightbourne’s telephone num-
ber from Mr Garvey. Mr
McDermott denied the sug-
gestion. He said he had never
spoken to Mr Garvey.

The jury yesterday ques-
tioned whether Mr McDer-
mott at anytime during the
meetings with Lightbourne
and Bridgewater turned off
his wire.

Mr McDermott said that he
had not.

Mr McDermott also told
the court that Bridgewater did
not personally ask him for
money. He also told jurors
that he understood “making
the deal” to mean that he was
to enter into negotiations with
Bridgewater and Lightbourne
and assent to the demand.

“That’s what I was instruct-
ed and that’s what I did,” Mr
McDermott said. Mr McDer-
mott also said that before
coming to the Bahamas he
had to refute allegations in
the media relative to Jett’s
death. The trial resumes today
at 10 am.

rn

Boone

Sato
taka

aun



of court yesterday.

ey’ McDonald Jr.

JOHN TRAVOLTA’S attorney Michael McDermott pictured outside

From the inception of his schooling bis Mathematical abilities came-alie, sn 34. Cecilia's
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THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11

a e
he -
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

Roddick, Knowles
advance to semis

By BRENT STUBBS was really excited.”
Senior Sports Reporter After losing the
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net first set, Knowles
and Roddick
he first-year combo of Mark turned up the heat
Knowles and Andy Roddick in the second set

are playing like they have when they fell |
been together for a number behind 5-4. They |
of years. managed to hold
The Bahamian-American tandem that serve and eventu-
came together for the first time pulled off ally took the set. In
their second- round match at the China the tiebreaker,
Open to advance to the semifinal. they just simply
Knowles’ partner, Indian Mahesh Bhu- out-classed their

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When they play again in the semis,
Knowles and Roddick could either face
the team of Lukas Dlouhy and Philipp
Kohischreiber or Kubot and Oliver
Marach. Obviously, they would prefer
the latter team as Roddick seeks to
avenge his singles loss to Kubot.

“We’re pretty pumped up. We’re pret-
ty excited,” Knowles stressed. “We’re
looking to win the next match for sure
and put ourselves in a position to win
the tournament. There’s no reason why
we can’t win the tournament.

“Anytime you can put yourself in that



pathi, is nursing an injury. opponents to seal position you just have to go after it. It’s a
Yesterday in Beijing, China, the _ the deal. real pleasure for me, so I’m enjoying it.

unseeded team of Knowles and Roddick Roddick, a for- We’re just looking forward to raising the

kicked off the team of Argentina’s Jose mer No.1 player in MARK KNOWLES level and accepting the challenge ahead

Acasuso and Chile’s Fernando Gonzalez _ the world, will only of us.”

4-6, 7-5, 10-4 in 79 minutes in their quar- have the doubles If they are successful in their semis,

terfinal match. to concentrate on after Lukasz Kubot _ there’s a possibility that Knowles and

Acasuso and Gonzalez upset the up ousted him in the first round of singles. | Roddick could advance to the final to
ranked team of Daniel Nestor and Nenad = And that could play right in favour for face a familiar foe in the American iden-

Zimonjic in the opening round in three Knowles. tical twin brothers Bob and Mike Bryan,

straight sets while Knowles and Roddick “Andy is one of the best playersin the who are the No.2-seeded team in the

needed just two sets to dispose of the world,” Knowles reflected. “So it’s very tournament.

Taipei team of Hsain-Han Lee and _ exciting to be playing on the same court “That would be really exciting,”

Tsung-Hua Yang. with him. It’s a lot of fun because he’s Knowles projected. “Obviously we have
When contacted following their victo- one of the greatest servers of all time. our next match to worry about, but I

ry yesterday, Knowles said it was defi- “Tt’s just a lot of fun to be playing at know Andy would love to play them.

nitely a tough match against Acasuso the net when he’s serving. But he’s a ‘They obviously are great friends and they
and Gonzalez, but they played a very great doubles player. He doesn’t play are Davis Cup teammates.

good match. In fact, he noted that they doubles that often, but he’s definitely a “So ’'m sure they have their own little
were able to avenge a defeat he and Bhu- good doubles player. While we have nev- rivalry, so I think it would be a really
pathi suffered to Acasuso and Gonzalez _ er played before, we’re enjoying it. Hope- exciting match-up if we both can get



in the third round of the French Open. fully we can get another in and get into __ there.”
. . . “We knew it was going tobe atough _ the final.” Knowles and Bhupathi, who are due to
AMERICAN ANDY RODDICK teamed up with Bahamian tennis acé match, but we played very solid through- Knowles and Roddick won 66 per cent —_ return to action next week at the Shang-
Mark Knowles in the China Open yesterday. The duo won their out the match,” Knowles said. “We real- of service points and they hit a combined hai Open, lost in the final of the Aus-
second round match to advance to the semifinal... (AP Phote) ly played our best tennis at the end,soI seven aces. tralian Open in January to the Bryans.

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Bahams

tag

October 30, 2009 to November 1, 2009
Arawak Cay
Nassau, Bahamas

A National Trade Show
Promoting Bahamian-made

By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

AFTER two years
excelling on the field, a
Bahamian collegiate grid-
iron star looks to make a
transition to the sideline in a
coaching role at a National
Football League Pro Bowl
Week event.

Kris Kemp, a standout
wide receiver at Taylor Uni-
versity in Fort Wayne, Indi-
ana, has been chosen as a
graduate assistant on the
coaching staff of the “Team
USA vs The World” Pro
Bowl.

Kemp will become a part
of the “World” coaching
staff headed by Jan Jenmert
of Sweden.

The team will be com-
prised of 45 of the top play-
ers from around the world
to face USA Football’s
junior national team on Jan-
uary 30, 2010 at Lockhart
Stadium in Ft Lauderdale,

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

SPORTS

Florida, as a part of the
NFL’s Pro Bowl weekend.

The game takes place at
lpm following AFC and
NFC team practices with
fans granted free admission
to attend the international
matchup, which will feature
NCAA rules and 12-minute
quarters.

Players on the World
team must be 19 years and
under from outside the
United States across five
continents while team USA
will feature top high school
seniors in the class of 2010.

World team head coach
Jenmert has selected a
coaching staff representing
all four IFAF continental
federations and seven coun-
tries — Australia, Bahamas,
Canada, France, Japan,
Mexico and Sweden. And
they have already begun the
process of selecting the best
available players from
around the world.

Kemp, in two years at
Taylor, has been a vital part
of a rebuilding receiving
core.

In three games thus far
into the 2009 season, Kemp
has caught seven receptions
for 84 yards with an average
of 12 yards per catch.

In 2007, he was awarded a
half scholarship from Taylor
after a brief but star-studded
career with the John Bull
Jets in the Commonwealth

eee"

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Bahamian
oridiron star
to take up
coaching

American Football League.
In the CAFL, Kemp was
awarded Rookie of the Year

in 2004, and followed up
with a stellar sophomore
performance in 2005 when
he was named CAFL Offen-
sive player of the year.

Kemp was invited to the
Taylor University combine
after an impressive perfor-
mance with the Bahamian
national team against the
semi-pro Orlando Sentinels
in 2005.

The 6’0” 190 pound wide-
out returns home each annu-
ally to participate in summer
camps.

The junior, majoring in
chemistry, said he intends to
pursue coaching positions to
further the development of
organised football in the
Bahamas. A second gradu-
ate assistant will be chosen
from a developing Interna-
tional Federation of Ameri-
can Football nation in the
coming weeks.

According to its website,
the IFAF unites more than
50 countries on five conti-
nents through a burgeoning
international sport.

With national football
federations in existence for
more than 70 years, IFAF
was created in 1998 to
organise and further devel-
op the game through inter-
national cooperation and
global competition.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 13

SPORTS



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Fun Foods, Nestle
donate $10,000
for sailing events

FUN Foods Wholesale &
Nestle Ice Cream have
stepped up to help make sure
the upcoming International
Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships and the 2009 Sunfish
World Championships are a
success.

The two events will be host-
ed by Nassau Yacht Club
October 15-17 and October
16-24 respectively.

More than 150 people rep-
resenting 15 countries are
expected in Nassau over the

Llewellian Borner



10-day period.

“Fun Foods Wholesale &
Nestle Ice Cream’s $10,000
donation will go a long way
towards offsetting the costs
involved with hosting such
prestigious international
sporting events,” said Paul
Hutton, regatta chairman.

Six of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing under 18s will compete for
top honours in the junior
championships and four of
them are among the 16
Bahamians who have earned

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a spot in the Sunfish World
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The Bahamas has enjoyed
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times.

Donnie Martinborough, the
Bahamas’ top finisher in this
year’s Bahamas Nationals, is a
three-time Sunfish World
Champion, with top place fin-
ishes in 1983, 1985 and again
in 1988, the last time the event
was held in Nassau.

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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



A ‘fitting tribute’ to two sporting legends

THIS weekend will be ded-
icated to the memory of the
late Deacon Leviticus ‘Uncle
Low’ Adderley and Vincent
Lloyd Ferguson.

For the fifth consecutive
year, the Catholic Archdio-
cese has honoured the two for-
mer sporting legends that have

made invaluable contributions
to the growth and develop-
ment of sports in the
Bahamas.

This year, however, the
tournament will be a little spe-
cial as it comes right on the
heels of the death and burial
of Ferguson, a former profes-

sional baseball player, educa-
tor and basketball executive.

Hundreds impacted by the
life of the late Ferguson
turned out last week at St
Francis Cathedral to pay their
last respects for the man who
was best known as a discipli-
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On his return from playing
pro baseball, Ferguson served
as president of the Bahamas
Basketball Federation and he
founded the Past and Present
Association of Professional
Baseball Players.

Like Ferguson, Adderley
was also a no-nonsense prin-
cipal, who founded the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO) - the
organisation that officiates
track and field meets.

Both men have played a
vital role in the legacy of the
St Augustine’s College Big
Red Machine. In fact, it was
Ferguson who was credited
with tagging the Big Red
Machine nickname on St
Augustine’s College.

This holiday weekend, the
Catholic Archdiocese will
once again honour both men
when the tournament is staged
at Loyola Hall. It should be
another fitting tribute to two
of the former sporting icons.

May their souls rest in
peace.

SOFTBALL FUTURE

Beginning at the end of the
month, the Bahamas Softball
Federation is scheduled to
host three tournaments back-
to-back at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex starting
with the annual Austin ‘King
Snake’ Knowles National
High School Tournament.

In between that tournament
and the National Round
Robin Tournament that will
be staged over the weekend
of November 5-8, the BSF will
host the CAST Tournament
from October 29 to Novem-



OPINION

ber 1.

The tournament will bring a
number of teams from vari-
ous countries to our shores.
At the same time, the BSF
intends to showcase a number
of their talented young play-
ers.

The BSF has released the
names of two teams that will
be loaded with a lot of young
players who are making their
impact in the league right now.

That’s a good sign because
at least these players are being
afforded the opportunity to
display their skills at a high
level of play right at home in
the front of their fans.

What is also interesting to
point out is the fact that the
BSF has selected a large crop
of coaches. Is it because the
tournament is at home, or is it
that the BSF has decided to
concentrate on further devel-

oping its programme?

Whatever the reason, it’s a
step in the right direction to
making sure that the federa-
tion utilizes its full potential
to getting the best team
assembled to compete at
home.

BOXING DILEMMA

IT seems as if just when pro
boxing is getting back on track
here, it has taken a nosedive in
the wrong direction.

Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey took a gamble last
month to fight in Montreal,
Canada, on the eve of defend-
ing his British Commonwealth
super middleweight title and
now he has been stripped of
the crown.

Mackey was the biggest
draw left in town after the
departure of Meacher ‘Pain’
Major, who last year signed
up with X-Cel Worldwide to
fight out of Buffalo, New
York.

Mackey’s next bout is
scheduled for November in
New York.

This Saturday, heavyweight
Sherman ‘the Tank’ Williams
will be in Germany where he
is slated to fight for a chance
to improve his world ranking.

It doesn’t appear that there
will be any major pro card
staged here until next year
because there are no big name
fighters to showcase.

Maybe, this might be a good
time for both Major and
Williams to persuade their
managers to try and negotiate
a show here. The boxing pub-
lic could sure see another dis-
play of skills very soon.

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THE TRIBUNE





Vigilante mob
attack alleged
kidnapper

FROM page one

of some girl that will be inves-
tigation. We don't have any
official complaint but we will
make an effort, as a matter of
fact every effort is being made
to determine the veracity of
this information," said Mr
Gibson.

When The Tribune visited
the scene yesterday after-
noon, several residents said
they had seen the man walk-
ing around the area, with ban-
dages around his head and
stomach. Residents of the
area also said the man was
beaten by relatives of the girl
early yesterday morning.

However, they were reluctant
to provide details of the
attack for fear of reprisal.

The girl, who is said to be
about 16 to 17-years-old, was
reportedly found bound with
tape inside the dilapidated
structure by a relative around
3 am yesterday, according to a
resident of the area. Friends
and relatives of the girl accost-
ed the man, reportedly
"chapped" him in the upper
body and chased him down
the street where he collapsed,
said another resident.

Police were later called to
the scene and, according to
eyewitnesses, took the man
to hospital.

Canadian at Guantanamo

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 15
LOCAL NEWS

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SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

A CANADIAN detainee
charged with war crimes fired
his military lawyer Wednes-
day and was given two new
civilian attorneys during a
court proceeding at Guan-
tanamo Bay, a U.S.
spokesman said, according to
Associated Press.

Joseph DellaVedova,
spokesman for the Pentagon’s
Office of Military Commis-
sions, said the judge in the
case at the offshore U.S. jail
for terrorism suspects agreed
to name two civilian as lead
lawyers for Omar Khadr, who
accepted the new counsel.

Appointed to lead Khadr’s
defense were criminal attor-
neys Barry Coburn and Kobie
Flowers, both of Washington-
based Coburn & Coffman
PLLC. They did not immedi-
ately respond to e-mail mes-
sages at the isolated U.S. base
in southeastern Cuba.

Hearing

During the brief hearing,
Khadr also agreed to have a
military co-counsel, Army
Maj. Jon Jackson, after being
told he needed to Keep at
least one military lawyer
under tribunal rules, DellaVe-
dova said.

The Toronto-born Khadr,
who was 15 when captured
after allegedly killing an
American soldier during a
2002 battle in Afghanistan,
had been represented by
Navy Lt. Cmdr. William Kue-
bler, whose superiors in the
Office of Military Commis-
sions sought to fire him in an
internal dispute over his han-
dling of the case.

At hearings earlier this
year, Khadr — the last West-
ern detainee held at Guan-
tanamo — tried to fire all his
military lawyers, but kept

Kuebler on when told he had
to have at least one military
attorney.

On Wednesday, Khadr,
now 22, told a military judge
he agreed to the dismissal of
Kuebler.

Kuebler, who attended the
hearing, said he was “sad to
leave Omar’s case without
seeing it through to the end.”

But he added that “given
the level of interference in
Omar’s representation by the
military chain of command,
Omar’s decision to proceed
with a new team led by inde-
pendent civilian lawyers is
completely understandable.”

An often outspoken mili-
tary lawyer, Kuebler has
argued that Khadr, who faces
up to life in prison if convict-
ed, should not be prosecut-
ed because he was a child
when his alleged crimes hap-
pened.

The military attorney also
said Khadr should be sent
back to Canada.

Canadian Prime Minister
Stephen Harper has refused
to ask for Khadr’s return,
saying the U.S. legal process
must play itself out.

Khadr is accused of killing
U.S. Army Sgt. Ist Class
Christopher Speer of Albu-
querque, New Mexico, with a
grenade during a 2002 battle
in Afghanistan.

His war crimes trial is on
hold until Nov. 16 as Presi-
dent Barack Obama conducts
a formal review of the sys-
tem for prosecuting Guan-
tanamo detainees in special
military tribunals.

The son of a slain al-Qaida
financier, Khadr faces up to
life in prison if convicted on
charges that include murder
and conspiracy.

DellaVedova said the new
defense attorneys want to
travel to Afghanistan to
examine the place where
Khadr was captured.

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THE TRIBUNE



&



FF

TH URS DAY -

CRUISE SHIPS can be seen in Nassau harbour...

Value for money
hurts Bahamas on
cruise conversion

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

WITH cruise arrivals to the
Bahamas and Nassau/Paradise
Island up by more than one-
third over 2008 comparative fig-
ures, the Ministry of Tourism
said this nation still has to work
out how to maximise the sec-
tor’s benefits by converting pas-
sengers to stopovers, especially

* Just 27% of stopovers
believe hotel vacation
exceeds value for money

* Cruise arrivals up for
Nassau/PI and Bahamas
by more than one-third
in July

given our ‘value for money’ weakness.

The Ministry of Tourism’s Market Report for July, released
yesterday, showed that cruise arrivals for the year-to-date to
July 2009 were “even better” than 2007 comparatives. For
July, cruise arrivals to Nassau/Paradise Island were up by 36.8
per cent against 2008 figures, and ahead by 32.4 per cent for the

Bahamas as a whole.
Cruise arrivals to Grand

SEE page 10B

Bahamas ‘polarised
by a dual economy’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s foreign
direct investment (fdi) poli-
cies are “polarising society by
fostering a dual economy”, a
paper co-produced by a Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB)
professor has warned, with
the failure to create “mean-
ingful development” result-
ing in a separate ‘Bahamian
economy’ that is “subordinate
and sinking”.

Olivia Saunders, a COB
associate professor, in a paper
co-produced with Professor
Gordana Pesakovic, which
was released in a July 2009
conference at the University
of Warwick’s Business School,
concluded that despite attract-
ing billions of dollars in for-
eign investment capital, the
Bahamas had not translated
this into concrete develop-
ment or increased linkages
between these projects and
Bahamian-owned business-
es/entrepreneurs.

While the Bahamas’ vari-
ous investment incentives,
enshrined in legislation, had
helped to attract foreign
investment capital, Dr Saun-
ders and her co-author con-
cluded: “[The] effects of for-

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* Government’s investment
policies failing to provide
‘meaningful development’

* Instead, creating ‘foreign
economy’ and ‘Bahamian
economy’ where latter is
‘subordinate and sinking’

eign direct investment on the
local economy are not neces-
sarily positive.

“These policies have creat-
ed a dual economy: ‘foreign
economy’ and the ‘Bahamian
economy’, where the former
is dominant and rising, and
the latter is subordinate and
sinking.

“The ‘foreign economy’ is
operating under advantageous
conditions (none or reduced
taxes, limited obligations
towards social, environmen-
tal and national heritage pro-
tection). Its effect on employ-
ment is under the potential
level, due to the fact that for-
eign investors can always
rationalise the use of foreign
labour and the Governmen-
t’s willingness to accommo-
date them.

SEE page 5B

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OCTOBER 8,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Lights switched on
100k efficient bulbs

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

p to 100,000 energy efficient
fluorescent CFL light bulbs
could be made available to
low and lower middle income
Bahamian households as part of a $500,000
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
initiative, a government minister confirmed
yesterday, with pilot projects on solar
water heater installation and net meter-
ing also set to be launched imminently.

Pointing out that CFL light bulbs were
sometimes seven to eight times’ more
expensive than their incandescent coun-
terparts, Phenton Neymour, minister of
state for the environment, said the IDB’s
initiative to promote energy efficient res-
idential lighting had twin objectives.

These were in line with the National
Energy Policy committee’s recommenda-
tions, aiming to lower energy usage and
costs for lower and lower middle income
Bahamian families, aiding energy effi-
ciency and conservation, and also assisting
them in meeting their BEC bills.

“Tt is important we assist lower and mid-
dle income households to purchase CFC
lightbulbs, to reduce their energy costs
and assist in meeting their obligations to
BEC,” Mr Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness. “In terms of light bulbs, we envis-
age it could possible range up to 100,000
light bulbs.

* Pilot projects for 30 solar PV/net
metering and 70 solar water heater
installations approved last week

* $580k IDB initiative aims to provide
energy efficient bulbs for low income
families, to reduce electricity
consumption

* Some 6,243 customers now
disconnected by BEC, with
Corporation’s revenues dropping
for August and September

* BEC financial position ‘getting weaker’,
with receivables still around $100m

“The programme will be to address that
cost to residential customers, those using
less than 800 kilowatt hours from BEC.
This is a very important programme. It is
important that the Government gets out
the message the energy conservation is
the low-lying fruit.”

Mr Neymour confirmed that the number
of customers disconnected by BEC for
non-payment of bills had “moved up slight-
ly”, standing at 6,243 as at September 14.

“The figure is slightly higher, and again
most of these are customers in the lower

SEE page 3B





Family Guardian targets early
2010 for agency launch

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FAMILY Guardian is
“working diligently” to launch
its general insurance agency
subsidiary by early 2010, Tri-
bune Business was told yes-
terday, and is “confident” it
will turn around the surge in
health insurance claims
responsible for dropping its
2009 first half income by 71.6
per cent.

Patricia Hermanns, the life
and health insurer’s presi-
dent/chief executive, acknowl-

Insurer ‘confident’ it can turn around health
claims experience through new initiative, having
seen claims payments ‘slow a little bit’ in Q3

edged that while its “health
claims experience has been
challenging” in 2009, the com-
pany had implemented
numerous initiatives to
address an area that largely
increased policyholder bene-
fits by 34.8 per cent during
the first six months of the
year.

Family Guardian had
focused on case management,

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clients were getting the best
available health care and
treatments, and on “assessing
our products to ensure
they’re being properly
utilised”.

Ms Hermanns added that
in cases where there had been

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RoyalFidelity
funds back to
positive yields

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

RoyalFidelity Merchant
Bank & Trust yesterday said
its second index-linked sub-
fund had generated an 8.4 per
cent yield on an annualised
basis during its first two
months in existence, providing
further evidence of the bene-
fits from international invest-
ing as the Bahamian stock
market continues to lag its
counterparts.

Michael Anderson, Royal-
Fidelity Merchant Bank &
Trust’s president, told Tribune
Business that its TIGRS
Series 2 sub-fund now had a
net asset value (NAV) of
$10.14 per share, up $0.14 in
two months from the $10 val-
uation it had at launch.

Elsewhere, Mr Anderson
said RoyalFidelity’s interna-
tional equities sub-fund, which
had born the brunt of the 2008
stock market crash/credit
crunch, was up 40 per cent for
the calendar year to July 2009,
or 23.32 per cent on an annu-
alised basis, while the TIGRS
Series 1 sub-fund - another
financial collapse casualty -
had risen from a $9.123 NAV
at year-end to $9.38.

SEE page 12B



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



SS ee eS EEE as
Bowling over the recessionary blues

AMIDST all the gloom
and doom of recession —
hotel lay-offs, sinking sales
in Palmdale, abandoned
shops on East Bay Street,
mortgage defaults — it’s
refreshing to find an oasis
of exuberant growth. Dri-
ving out to Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway
(also known as Harrold
Road), one turns into Sum-
merWinds Plaza, better
known as the home of the
Robin Hood Mega Store,
where soon a massive struc-
ture will open next door
bearing the sign Mario’s
Bowling & Family Enter-
tainment Palace.

Two entrepreneurs have
taken the economic bull by
the horns and are wrestling
to stun it: Sandy Schaefer,
who learned the secrets of
discount selling in America




















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and relocated the original,
tiny Robin Hood from Sol-
dier Road in 2001, and
Leslie Miller, Bahamian
businessman, landowner
and former PLP cabinet
minister, who after the still-
unsolved slaying of his son
Mario in 2002 was inspired
to create a living memorial
with solid family values.
The target market for both
enterprises is not tourists,
wealthy expatriates or up-
scale locals, but ordinary
Bahamians who must focus
on bargain spending. After
hours of “value” purchasing
in Robin Hood, customers
will only have to cross the
spacious parking lots to
relax in Mario’s.

Each of these entrepre-
neurs has helped the other.
Mr Miller had accumulated
some 20 acres of raw land

off Harrold Road, on which
Mr Schaefer leased a site
when he needed to expand.
Mr Miller then constructed
the shell buildings for the
new retail complex, which
has grown from the original
15,000 square feet to
109,000 square feet, and is
scheduled to grow by
another 90,000, with rising
rentals to Mr Miller as land-
lord. Robin Hood now
attracts about 78,000
monthly customer visits and
Mr Schaefer is confident
about continuing profits,
which he confirms require
tight management over-
sight.

Seeing Robin Hood’s
success in drawing a huge
customer base to the previ-
ously somnolent Plaza, Mr
Miller hastened his 10-year
old plans for a bowling

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alley, but one with all the
bells and whistles. Ever
since Sidney and Ivy French
closed their Village Lanes
on Village Road, local
bowling enthusiasts have
had to travel to Miami to
roll their strikes. His market
research convinced Mr
Miller of a positive local
demand for the sport, and
he travelled widely to dis-
cover the latest in bowling
marketing and technology,
visiting prominent lanes in
Seattle, Las Vegas, Fresno
in California, and even Bel-
gium, where he found an
impressive operation in
Brussels. He brought these
ideas home, and his
Bahamian architect Leo
Ferguson pulled them all
together to create the
detailed drawings and speci-
fications. Mr Miller himself
supervised construction,
retaining Cavalier as project
manager.

The result is a rectangular
edifice of 80,000 square
feet, with a handsome
colonnaded facade of sand-
stone punctuated with tall
windows. The basic struc-
ture has been completed,
featuring 30-foot ceilings
over a central atrium hous-
ing the main dining area, to
be supervised by a chef
recruited from a local hotel.
Thirty lanes are in place in
the north wing and another
20 in the south, including a
group of four that can be
privately reserved. No
bowling centre in the US or

eo

Canada has more then 50
lanes. During my recent vis-
it, the specialised planking
for gutters and lanes was
being laid, and the pin-set-
ting machinery from Ameri-
can Bowling Company was
expected shortly. Separate
snack bars will serve
behind each set of lanes.
Pool tables will be an
additional feature, and to
attract children an arcade
for video games is placed
near the entrance with
room for 100 machines,
from which Mr Miller pro-
jects $500,000 of revenue
annually. Toscano’s, a new
name in Nassau, will oper-
ate a pizza franchise adja-
cent to the arcade. In an
upstairs mezzanine over-
looking the atrium, a pri-
vate disco-club will be open
to dues-paying members.
Two stand-by generators
will support the central air-
conditioning system — but,
of course, the BEC electri-
cal bills will be a major
expense factor. Skating will
be offered on an outdoor
flood-lit rink (asphalt, not
ice), which can be convert-
ed into basketball courts
This article is not intend-
ed as a promotional plug for
Mario’s Palace. Although
Mr Miller has done his
homework in projecting
revenues and expense, and
is confident of profitability,
it’s possible that he may be
too optimistic about fami-
lies’ discretionary spending
in these lean times, or about
the continuing appeal for
repeat customers. Can
demand from the New
Providence population of
200,000 support so large an
entertainment capacity?
Only time will tell.
Bahamians will soon be
able to decide for them-
selves whether they will
flock to the Centre to satis-
fy their urge for bowling,
good food and general con-
viviality.
A grand opening sched-
uled before the end of the

CRUISE
LINE

year will be open to the
public. For that event, the
President of the Interna-
tional Bowling Association
will be present to open the
lanes, and has assured Mr
Miller of a major interna-
tional tournament by the
end of 2010.

As with any new-venture
entrepreneur, Mr Miller
faces financial risk. Of the
total construction cost of
$10-$12 million, his own
funds have contributed
about a third, with Bank of
the Bahamas lending the
rest, secured not simply on
the new project but by Mr
Miller’s ownership of sur-
rounding land and the
stream of rental income
from Robin Hood. The risk
may increase when,
inevitably, our government
broadens its revenue base
by imposing some form of
income tax, or more likely a
sales or value-added tax.
Any such levy must be
passed on to customers, or
else reduce the owner’s
profit margin.

Mr Miller, and Mr Schae-
fer over at Robin Hood, are
doubtless planning their
financial structures to min-
imise this impact

Whatever the Palace’s
long-term future prospects,
it’s clear that the project is
providing an immediate
boost for our economy.

For the last 16 months,
Mr Miller has been employ-
ing a construction force of
about 60 persons, and pro-
jects a payroll of 104
employees once the Centre
opens, from general manag-
er to bus-boys.

And purchases of
comestibles and supplies
will be substantial.

Certainly, Mr Miller’s
willingness to stake time
and money on the risks sur-
rounding a major project
presents a challenge to oth-
er Bahamians, and injects a
spirit of vitality much need-
ed to lift the prevailing
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 3B



a =~) =~
Airline concerns on NAD fee rises

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

BAHAMAS-based airlines are count-
ing on the travelling public to help them
reverse the 24 per cent landing fee rise
and other fee increases proposed by the
Nassau Airport Development Company
(NAD) last July, which have subse-
quently been aprpoved by the Airport
Authority Board, Tribune Business con-
firmed yesterday.

NAD is proposing the fee increases at
the worst possible time, according to
managers of several inter-island airlines,
who said they will have to be passed on
to passengers in order for their compa-
nies to stay afloat.

Director of Operations at LeAir Char-
ters, David Moncur, said companies such
as his already competed with boats and
ferries on inter-island travel. He alluded
to the fee increases, which will be added
on to the price of air fares, dissuading
travellers using their service.

“T don’t know how we will manage
more of these fees,” he said. “We are

already competing with boats and the
charter sections.”

According to Mr Moncur, however,
passing the increase in operational costs
on to the passenger will mean the dif-
ference between receiving the fare and
losing it to a competitor.

He said his company understands the
need for the fee increases, but insists the
midst of a recession is the wrong time
to impose them.

Though the changes would not come
into effect until January 2010, there is
no indication of when the current eco-
nomic climate will recede, and other air-
line managers say the winter season is
often a difficult financial time following
the commercial Christmas season.

Chief Operating Officer of Sky
Bahamas, Kenneth Romer, suggested
the Government and NAD revise the
fee increase schedule and engage in a
lot more consultation with the airlines.

“The timing is not right, so the travel-
ling public will find challenges absorbing
those costs. January is a rough month
for finances,” said Mr Romer.

He said pressure from travelling pub-

lic was needed to curtail the imposition of
the new fees, and argued that the increas-
es were as much a traveller’s issue as it is
the airline’s.

Mr Romer said he could not say exact-
ly how much the fees would drive up the
costs of Sky Bahamas’s ticket prices, but
he predicted a 20 to 30 per cent increase
on the modest end. He said fuel costs
were always the volatile factor in working
out fare increases.

Managing Director of Southern Air,
Anthony Hamilton, suggested frequent
inter-island travellers protest the fee
increases, which will directly impact their
pocketbooks when they come into effect.

“Unfortunately, the public may not be
as sensitized to it,” he said.

NAD’s approved 23.6 per cent landing
fees at the Lynden Pindling Internation-
al Airport (LPIA) could translate into
an added $13 on the now $51 landing
fee for one airline.

NAD argues that the fees are neces-
sary to maintain its “financial covenants”,
but said LPIA’s rates after the increases
will remain competitive and less than the
Caribbean average.

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FROM page 1B

range of electricity consump-
tion, and in excess of 60-90
days in arrears,” the minister
added.

BEC’s financial position “is
getting worse”, with its
accounts receivables still hov-
ering in the $100 million
range, and payables around
$99 million. Those payables
include $50-$60 million owed
to BEC’s fuel suppliers at any
one time, Mr Neymour indi-
cated, the electricity suppli-
er’s fuel bill having hit $376
million for 2008 - more than
$21 million per month.

“We have had lower rev-
enues in the months of
August and September, which
is Impacting their operations,”
Mr Neymour said of BEC.

Meanwhile, in conjunction
with the Bahamas’ Global
Environmental Facility
(GEF) programme, Mr Ney-
mour said the Government
intended to initiate 30 pilot

RATES
AS

LOW
AS

demonstration projects fea-
turing the installation of solar
Photovoltaic cells and net
metering - where any excess
energy generated would be
sold back to the BEC grid,
and a credit given to the
household/business.

“Tt would be with house-
holds and some small com-
mercial installations,” Mr
Neymour told Tribune Busi-
ness. “That has just been
approved by the GEF last
week. We’re looking at run-
ning approximately 30
demonstration projects
throughout Nassau and the
Family Islands.

“There will also be a pilot
programme with regard to the
supply and installation of
solar water heaters. We’re
looking at the installation of
70 solar water heaters with
households and small com-
mercial businesses, where we
will be looking at the impact
of these and Photovoltaic cells
on reducing carbon emis-
sions.”

With water heaters esti-
mated to account for 20-30
per cent of a Bahamian
household’s energy bill, Mr
Neymour said the pilot pro-
jects would enable the true
value of dollar savings derived
from solar water heaters to
be assessed. The Government
would also be able to assess
their impact on “the conser-
vation and production of
energy”, meeting another goal
of the National Energy Policy
committee’s draft report.

“We have always moved
seriously,” Mr Neymour said
on the Government’s
approach to sustainable,
renewable energies. “The
challenge was that it required
significant research to make
what we considered reliable
decisions. We recognise in the
Bahamas that we lack suffi-
cient data in certain areas to
make concrete decisions, but
we are seeing the work of the
NEP come to fruition.”

The minister added that the
13 firms who were shortlist-

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GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORT

Ragged Island Road Construction,
Ragged Island Project

Tender publication No.: FIR/207/15/2 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/129178/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Goverment of The Bahumas intends to award a work contnact for the rehabilitation af the
access road between Gun Pout and Duncan Town Aigpoct (via Gunean Town), The works contracts
consists in the rehabilitation ed about 3.6 miles (approx, 6.1 kim) oda two-lane single cumageway
road. Alot 36.000) square yards of the road pavement will require the replacement of the base
course layer and the placement of anew surface seal In addition, about 9,000) square yards of
concrete rond in Duncan Town will have te be demolished and reconstructed.

The works ane co-financed by the Government of The Bohamoas and the Sth European Development
Fund.

The tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at the following address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and Tramspori,
John F. Kennedy Drive,

Ist Floor East Wing

Nassau (4.P), The Bahamas

Tel.: +242-522-4850

Fax.: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box bocated al:

Tender Board Ministry of Finance
Srd Floor

Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street

Ass, The Paha

Tender submission will be received no Later than 4:00 pm, Wonday, 2nd November, 2009, Any
tender received after this deadline will mot be considered.

Tenderers are invited to attend the Tender opening at M900um, Tuesday, 3nd November 20009 at
the Tenders Board,

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall be published on the Europe Asd
website: hitp:fec.curopa.eu/europeaid/ work fundingyindes, en.htm (Select Contracts link) and
will commumented in writing 10 a1] tenderers

Prospective tenderers should be aware that this tendering procedure is launched under a suspensive
Clause, Les without ihe funds from the European Commission available at this moment. The
actual award and signature of contracts following this procedure is therefore conditional to the
conclusion of the Rider to the Financing Agreement

The Contracting Authority (i.c. the Government of The Bahamas) will invariably cancel this
tendering procedure if the European Commission's decision-making procedure is not completed
and the Rider to the Financing Agreement 15 not signed by beh parties,




PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



BUSINESS
Family Guardian targets early 2010 for agency launch

FROM page 1B

a significant “change in expe-
rience” and increase in health
claims year-over-year, Family
Guardian was also assessing
whether premium rates need-
ed to be revised upwards to
better align them with the
likely risk.

She explained that this did
not mean health insurance
premium rates would increase
across-the-board at the life
and health insurer, a 100 per
cent subsidiary of BISX-listed
FamGuard Corporation, but
assessments would be made
in instances where there were

“comparatively higher utili-
sation rates”.

“Tt certainly is larger than
what we have experienced in
previous years,” Ms Her-
manns said of the surge in
health insurance claims. “We
really started to see a signifi-
cant escalation in the second
quarter, when claims started
to be paid.

“We’re still in the process
of analysing some of the
things that may have caused
it. It takes quite a while,
because thousands of claims
are paid on a daily basis.”

While Family Guardian
would have normally expect-
ed to see an increase in health











British Colonial Hilton Hotel



Marlborough St, Shop 1




claims as a result of growth
in its BahamaHealth portfo-
lio, Ms Hermanns said the rise
experienced in the 2009 first
half was greater than the
client base expansion.

“Any time you have an
increase in business, you have
a corresponding increase in
claims,” Ms Hermanns told
Tribune Business. “This is still
more pronounced than what
we would expect from an
increase in new accounts.”

The Family Guardian pres-
ident denied suggestions from
some insurance market
sources that the company’s
recent unfavourable claims
experience had partly resulted
from it ‘buying’ new business,
where it reduced premium
rates below a level equivalent
to a client’s risk in order to
win the account.

Adding that such a scenario
“does not jive” with the expe-
rience of the Bahamian health
insurance market as a whole,
with all carriers experiencing
a surge in claims similar to
Family Guardian’s, Ms Her-
manns added: “All of our

accounts are priced actuarial-
ly based on the information
we receive at the time.”

“Our health claims experi-
ence has been challenging for
us this year, but we are confi-
dent we have taken the ini-
tiatives to bring it around,”
she added.

“We’re still seeing a high
claims volume in the third
quarter. The claims paid have
slowed a little bit, but we are
working diligently to make
sure we fully grasp the facts
affecting the jump in claims
paid. We’ll see how these ini-
tiatives end up.”

Ms Hermanns, though,
warned that there would be
no “quick solution” to the
health claims situation due to
“the nature of the business”,
with any initiatives likely to
take several months before
the effects came through.

Although Family Guardian
was undertaking no new
product or business line
launches, Ms Hermanns said
the company was working
towards the launch of its Fam-
ily Guardian General Insur-

ance Agency subsidiary, a
project that has been on the
drawing board for several
years now.

“We haven’t completed the
launch on that,” she told Tri-
bune Business. “We’re work-
ing diligently to have that in
place for the beginning of
2010.” the general insurance
agency will sell property and
casualty, plus auto, insurance
policies through its existing
branch network, with agents
being trained up to sell gen-
eral insurance.

Ms Hermanns said Family
Guardian had “not seen any
substantial increase in lapse
rates” on its life and health

insurance policies as a result
of the recession.

“We have seen growth in
new business, both life and
health, and the annuity busi-
ness is showing strong
growth,” she added.

Elsewhere, Family
Guardian had seen “good
growth in new accounts on a
monthly basis” for its FG
Financial and FG Capital
Markets subsidiaries, Ms Her-
manns said, adding that the
insurer was “happy with the
progress” even though the
recession had not been fac-
tored into the budget when
the units were launched last
year.

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NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SYLVIA ROBERTS late
of Kensington Gardens, Soldier Road in the Eastern
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, De-
ceased.

Free parking at The Hilton

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hereinbefore mentioned.

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Attorneys-at-Law
P.O.Box N-476
Armstrong Street
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Personal Representatives

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 5B





Oil above $71 on optimism
over economic recovery

By EILEEN NG
Associated Press Writer

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia
(AP) — Oil prices rose above $71 a
barrel Wednesday in Asia as
increased optimism about a global
economic recovery boosted expec-
tations that crude demand will grow.

Benchmark crude for November
delivery was up 63 cents at $71.51
by midday Kuala Lumpur time in
electronic trading on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. The contract
rose 47 cents to settle at $70.88 Tues-
day.

Oil rose in syne with global stock

Bahamas

markets. The Dow Jones industrial
average gained a second straight day,
advancing 1.4 per cent Tuesday, its
biggest gain since August 21 as
investors bet corporate profits will
surge as the global economy recov-
ers. Most Asian indexes also
advanced in early trading Wednes-
day.

The rally in stocks came after Aus-
tralia raised interest rates Tuesday,
signaling that policymakers see the
country’s economy as strong enough
to withstand higher borrowing costs.
That touched off hopes other
economies may also be strengthen-
ing enough to unwind stimulus mea-

sures including super low interest
rates and massive government
spending.

Markets

“The optimism for economic
recovery is driving equities and oil
markets,” said Victor Shum, an ener-
gy analyst with consultancy Purvin &
Gertz in Singapore.

A report by the American Petro-
leum Institute showing a surprise
fall in US oil inventories last week
also lifted prices, he said.

Crude inventories dropped
254,000 barrels while distillate fuel

stocks fell 2.91 million barrels, he
said according to the report late
Tuesday.

The report however, contrasted
with market expectations for higher
inventories.

A survey by Platts, the energy
information arm of McGraw-Hill
Cos, said crude stock is likely to
grow by nearly two million barrels
and that supplies of gasoline and dis-
tillates used for heating oil and diesel
also climbed last week.

The official weekly supply report
will be released by the Energy Infor-
mation Administration later
Wednesday.

Shum said oil prices will rise fur-
ther if crude inventories fall.

Prices will fall if crude stocks rise
but likely to hold above $70, backed
by stronger financial markets, he
added.

In other Nymex trading, heating
oil gained 2.03 cents to $1.8345 a
gallon.

Gasoline for November delivery
jumped 1.63 cents to $1.789 a gal-
lon. Natural gas for November deliv-
ery rose 5 cents to $4.93 per 1,000
cubic feet.

In London, Brent crude rose 69
cents to $69.25 on the ICE Futures
exchange.

‘polarised by a dual economy’

s#
NASSAU -T—~ BAHAMAS

tourism and the financial sec-

FROM page 1B i 1 1 spillover benefits of these employment would be max- ° .

“The Government is not
forceful enough in demand-
ing more local content in the
sourcing of goods and ser-
vices. Further, the Govern-
ment is not convincingly pro-
viding purposeful education
and training of local people,
nor ensuring the maximum
use of local professionals.”

Dr Saunders and her co-
author based their conclusions
on an assessment of seven
unnamed Heads of Agree-
ment, signed by the former
Christie administration
between 2004-2007, for Fam-
ily Island-based mixed-use
resort projects.

Analysing the agreements,
and based on previous stud-
ies, they argued that the
‘spillover’ benefits from for-
eign direct investment in the
Bahamas, in terms of creat-
ing additional employment at,
and contracts for, Bahamian-
owned companies “have been
negligible”.

Investment capital inflows
into the tourism and hotel
industries had “not led to par-
allel growth in local business
development in manufactur-
ing, agriculture, fisheries” and
sectors directly related to
tourism.

Dr Saunders and her co-
author argued that the
Bahamas’ “persistent current
account deficits” provided
further evidence that the
Bahamas had not succeeded
in linking foreign direct
investment to the develop-
ment of other economic sec-
tors, while the numerous con-
cessions granted to developers
“severely hampers govern-
ment revenue”.

“Overall, the role and
effects of foreign direct invest-
ment on the Bahamas and its
economy are mixed,” the
authors concluded.

“Foreign direct investment
is not helping development of
the local business [communi-
ty], nor does it significantly
contribute to the Govern-
ment’s Budget. Foreign direct
investment has had a limiting
effect on local ownership in

tor. Partially, it does assist in
training.

“The role of the Bahamian
government in stimulating
foreign direct investment is
positive. However, its role in
stimulating meaningful devel-
opment is less favourable. Its
policies have fostered a dual
economy. This polarising soci-
ety, and can in the long-run
jeopardise foreign direct
investment.”

While the Heads of Agree-
ment studied by the two
authors encouraged all the
investors to use Bahamian
products and suppliers, and
apply the National Invest-
ment Policy to areas reserved
for Bahamian ownership, Dr
Saunders and her co-author
said the repeated requests by
the Government for these
projects to collaborate on
training and education pro-
grammes “suggest inadequate
local capabilities”.

“The motives for invest-
ment matter as well,” they
added. “The projects
reviewed fall under the cate-
gory of asset-exploiting, par-
ticularly resource-seeking of
the beauty and natural envi-
ronment of the Bahamas. The

types of investments are low
compared to market-seeking
foreign direct investments.”
Dr Saunders and her co-
author added that the Heads
of Agreement they scrutinised
were unlikely to “cause
increases in domestic absorp-
tive capacity and business
capacity building specifically.
The evidence lies in the very
low level of Bahamian own-
ership in the hotel and
tourism resort sector”.

Customs

Based on a 50 per cent rate
of customs and Stamp duties
on imported construction
materials and furnishings, the
paper said the Government
was giving up $700 million in
potential tax revenues
between the seven projects,
and $29 million per annum in
real property tax based on a2
per cent rate.

And while, the projects,
valued at a cumulative $1.439
billion, were projected to
directly employ 3,381 persons
at an annual wage bill of $59
million annually, based on an
average weekly $336 wage, it
was doubtful whether

The Gymnastics Federation
Of The Bahamas

invites
All Interested Gymnastics/Dance/Cheerleading
Or Similar Sporting Groups To A Meeting

Wednesday, October 21st - 6:00pm

Federation members as well as non-members are
welcome to attend this informative session

Topics of discussion will include:

* The role of the Federation in promoting and supporting

gymnastics in the Bahamas

¢ Application and requirements for GFB members

For more information email:
gymfedbah@coralwave.com



Ministry of National Security

Parliamentary Registration Department

Public Notice

Allocation of Symbols for 22nd October, Local Government Bye-Election

In accordance with Section 17(6) of the Local Government Act, 1996, the
Parliamentary Commissioner has assigned the following symbols to Candidates
in the Local Government Bye-Elections to be held on 22nd October, 2009.

Exuma Constituency Polling Divisions 11 & 14
George Town, Jolly Hall, Bahama Sound,
Cottage & Master Harbour
In the East Exuma Town Area
of the Exuma District

Candid
Morley
(Sonia Denise)

Strachan
(Clifford O’ Brian)



imised due to under-utilisa-
tion of Bahamian profession-
als and entertainers.

The two authors also noted
that many of the Heads of
Agreement contained no
penalties if the developers
failed to perform their oblig-
ations in a timely manner.

“Clearly, there is no devel-
opment plan or agenda which
the Government is following,”
they argued. “Such imprecise
‘requirements’ are likely to
lead to imprecise results. Fur-
ther, these Heads of Agree-
ments reveal a government
that is not striving to devel-
op its people for greater self-
reliance or a sustainable econ-
omy.

“It is, in fact, fostering
greater and greater depen-
dence, as local professionals
and businesses are crowded
out. As the Government signs
more of these foreign invest-
ment agreements in the
absence of attention to local
human capital development
it is, in fact, under-develop-
ing the local economy.”



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Working with

Value
Added
Tax

VAT is widely regarded as a more transparent and accurate system of taxation
which has substantial benefits. Over 150 countries worldwide have introduced
this type of taxation over the past three decades and many more are weighing
its benefits, ACCA (Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) and BICA
(Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants) present an informative seminar
on Value Added Tax (VAT).

Topics include:

@ Principles of VAT = @ VAT systems = @ Basis for VAT © @ Pros and Cons

® Examples of systems at work

Presenter: Ethlyn Norton-Coke

Ethlyn Norton-Coke is the Legal Counsel and Compliance Officer wath the University
of Technology, Jamaica, She is a qualified Attorney-at-Law, UK Solicitor and is
currently pursuing a Doctoral Programme in Taxation at the University of the

West Indies, Mona Campus. She specializes in taxation and serves on a number of
boards including (CAJ (the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Jamaica), the Public
Accountancy Board and the Advisory Board of Management of the Registrar

of Companies.

Ehurd Cunningham - Acting Financial Secretary to the Bahamas -
Comments on VAT.

Other information: 6 CPD units.
Workshop matenals, lunch and breaks included.

Value Added Tax

Date: Wechesday 14 October 2009

Time: 9.30am - 3.300m

Fee: SS 150 (members} / USS 175 (nonmembers)

Venue: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Cine Bay Street, Nassau

For further information contact Joyeelyn Butler tel: 242 326 6619
or emai’ sachica@batelnet bs

ACCA

GN-930

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Ministry Of Public
Works And Transport

Gun Point Harbour, Ragged Island Project

Tender publication No.: FID/13/1 (GOB)
EUROPEAID/128XXX/M/WKS/BS (EU)

The Government of The Bahamas intends to award a works contract for the
construction of a new harbour including approximately 55,000 cubic yards of basin
excavation and dredging, 400 lineal feet of quay walls, shore-tied rubblemound
breakwaters, concrete armour units, navigation aids, dock furniture, utilities, concrete
wave wall, RoRo ramp and relocation of fuel tank at Gun Point on Ragged Island,
The Bahamas.

The works are co-financed by the Government of The Bahamas and the 9th European
Develop Fund.

The tender dossier is available for inspection and purchase at the following
address:

Department of Public Works of the Ministry of Works and Transport,

John F. Kennedy Drive,

1st Floor East Wing

Nassau, (N.P.), The Bahamas

Tel: +242-322-4830

Fax: +242-326-7344

Sealed Tender submissions are to be deposited in the Tender Box located at:
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor
Sir Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Tender submissions will be received no later than 4:00pm Monday, 2nd November
2009. Any tender received after this deadline will not be considered.

Tenders are invited to attend the Tender opening at 10:00am, Tuesday, 3rd November
2009 at the Tenders Board.

Possible additional information or clarifications/questions shall be published on the
EuropeAid website: http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/funding/index_en.htm
(Select Contracts link) and will be communicated in writing to all tenderers.

Prospective tenderers should be aware that this tendering procedure is launched
under a suspensive clause, i.e.: without the funds from the European Commission
available at this moment. The actual award and signature of contracts following
this procedure is therefore conditional to the conclusion of the Rider to the Financing
Agreement.

Signed
Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works and Transport



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Asian stocks

extend gains

amid faith in
recovery

By JEREMIAH MARQUEZ
AP Business Writer

HONG KONG (AP) —
Asian stock markets and oil
prices extended their advance
Wednesday amid renewed
faith a recovery in the global
economy was sustainable.

Major benchmarks were
about one per cent higher or
more, while the dollar was lit-
tle changed against the yen
and euro after declining the






























The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

1805

previous session.

Investors poured money
into riskier assets like stocks
and commodities throughout
the region, as Tuesday’s news
that Australia was the first
major country to raise interest
rates since the onset of the
financial crisis continued to
bolster confidence in the
world economy. It was a sig-
nal that policymakers believe
the country’s economy is
strong enough to withstand
higher borrowing costs, and
fueled optimism that other
economies were in better than
shape than expected.

“Tt provided a psychological
boost to the market as a seal
of approval on the global
recovery story,” Dariusz
Kowalczyk, chief Investment
strategist for SJS Markets in
Hong Kong, wrote in a note.

At the same time, he said
Australia’s decision was
somewhat surprising coming
just weeks after the leaders
of the Group of 20 major
countries agreed to continue
with government spending
programmes and low interest
rates to nurture a global
rebound.

While no developed coun-
try would follow in Australia’s
footsteps anytime soon, South
Korea, where the economy
has held up relatively well and
the central bank has already
said it might raise rates in
response to rising asset prices,

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

TRUST OFFICER

-Strong supervisory and organisational skills,
-Ability to function independently but work as part ofa team.
~Ability to function in a high volume, high pressure environment.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

-Minimum of a Law Degree andor STEP Certification.

could be next, he said.

In Japan, the Nikkei 225
stock average gained 120.84
points, or 1.3 per cent, to
9,812.64 and Hong Kong’s
Hang Seng advanced 386.71
points, or 1.9 per cent, to
21,198.24.

Australia’s index jumped
2.4 per cent, South Korea’s
Kospi edged higher by 0.5 per
cent to 1,606.26, and Singa-
pore’s index gained 1.1 per
cent. Taiwan’s benchmark
was up 0.4 per cent. Mainland
China markets are closed for
a weeklong holiday and
reopen Friday.

In the US overnight, the
Dow rose 131.50, or 1.4 per
cent, to 9,731.25 after rising
112 points Monday.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 14.26, or 1.4 per
cent, to 1,054.72, while the
Nasdag composite index rose
35.42, or 1.7 per cent, to
2,103.57.

Oil prices were higher,
helped by the weak dollar and
optimism about that a global
economic recovery would
boost demand for crude.

Benchmark crude for
November delivery was
changing hands at $71.55 in
Asia, up 67 cents from the pri-
or session. The contract rose
47 cents overnight.

The dollar wallowed at
88.74 yen from 88.76 yen. The
euro traded at $1.4705 from
$1.4722.

“Sound knowledge of trust drattmg, reporting and accounting.

-Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents,

-Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly the Trustee Act, 1998 and

the Financial Transactions Reporting Act, 2000.
-Working knowledge of legislation in competing junsdictions.
-Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
-At least seven (7) years experience in a Private Bank or Trust Company, at least two
(2) years of which must be at the Trust Officer level.
-Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asget.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Please send
Resume and two (2) references BY OCTOBER 16, 2009 to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park
P.O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Hanamas

Offices in

Florence, Frankf, Genevs, Hong Kong, Lawsoare, Lowden, Luxembourg, Madrid, Milion, Montreal,
Nassaw, Paris, Rome, Singapore, Tonyo, durin, Zurich



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009, PAGE 9B





Burger King Corp. plans to
revamp 12,000 locations

By ASHLEY M HEHER
AP Retail Writer

CHICAGO (AP) — Burg-
er King Corp. plans to swap
its generic fast-food feel and
bland tiles and tabletops for a
vibe that’s more sit-down than
drive-through.

As part of a plan to be
revealed Wednesday in Ams-
terdam, the company will
announce a massive effort to
overhaul its 12,000 locations
worldwide. The sleek interior
will include rotating red flame
chandeliers, brilliant TV-
screen menus and industrial-
inspired corrugated metal and
brick walls.

“T'd call it more contempo-
rary, edgy, futuristic,” Chair-
man and CEO John Chidsey
told The Associated Press. “It
feels so much more like an

upscale restaurant.”

But that comes with an
upscale price: The new look is
expected to cost franchisees,
who operate 90 percent of
Burger King’s locations,
between $300,000 to $600,000
per restaurant.

The company said the new
design, called “20/20” at the
Miami-based chain, is already
in place at about 60 locations
around the world. Burger
King expects about 75 more
redesigned restaurants to be
open by the end of next year.
But it will take years before
all its locations are trans-
formed.

Burger King franchise own-
ers are contractually required
to update their restaurants
after a set period of time, and
executives said the redesign
will be the primary option for

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

SKYPER LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),

SKYPER

LIMITED has been Dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 3rd day of

September, 2009.

Simon John Harman
of Equity Trust House
28-30 The Parade, St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 EQ
Liquidator



future upgrades. All new
restaurants will be built using
the plan.

So far, remodeled restau-
rants have seen sales climb
about 12 to 15 per cent, while
restaurants that are torn down
and completely rebuilt at the
same location have seen sales
climb by as much as 30 per-
cent, Chidsey said.

Observers say the hip,
urban and masculine elements
in the redesign may be a hit
with Burger King’s most loy-
al customers — young men
who frequent the chain
known as much for its signa-
ture Whoppers and “steak
burgers” as its sometimes-
creepy “King” commercials.
But some experts are skepti-
cal about whether sales will
grow as much as the company
claims and how eager fran-
chise owners will be to part
with that kind of cash, partic-
ularly in a sour economy.

Chidsey said he thinks most

TNT

For the stories
WA Ug

ia aT
MEAN
Montays



franchise owners, who typi-
cally own both their restau-
rant’s building and the land,
won't have trouble obtaining
financing and will be swayed
once they see how sales can
climb.

Morningstar analyst R.J.
Hottovy said the reformulat-
ed restaurant could keep din-
ers at the table longer but
may not draw in enough extra
diners to justify the cost.

“T don’t think they’ll change
their perception,” he said.
“They’re pretty entrenched in
their reality.”

A group representing Burg-
er King franchise owners did-
n’t immediately comment.

Fast-food restaurants typi-
cally get almost two-thirds of
their business from drive-
through or carryout orders.
More appealing interiors
could help the company com-
pete with sit-down counter-
parts that many customers
think offer better food and

better ambiance.

Ron Paul, president of the
food consultant company
‘Technomic Inc., said he thinks
the redesign shows just how
determined Burger King is to
compete with “fast casual”
restaurant chains such as
Chipotle, Starbucks and Pan-
era, which customers think of
as a cut above typical fast
food.

“People in the fast-food cat-
egory are recognizing they’ve
been losing customers to the
fast-casual player,” he said.
“What this sounds like is an
attempt to get that dining-in
business back by making it an
attractive environment.”

They might also help Burg-
er King, the No. 2 burger food
chain the U.S., stand out from
larger rival McDonald’s Corp.
and other competitors, includ-
ing regional chains, who’ve
begun to add bigger and bet-
ter burgers to their menus as
they clamor for a share of the

growing burger market that’s
worth $100 billion in the U.S.

“It’s a competitive necessi-
ty to square up against the
competition,” Chidsey said.

While the most noticeable
changes will be inside restau-
rants, Burger King executives
also plan to update exteriors,
too, adding metal canopies
and more signs proclaiming
“Home of the Whopper.”

At the same time, the com-
pany is beefing up its value
menu, temporarily adding a
$1 double cheeseburger to
U.S. menus. And it’s also in
the final stages of installing
new broiler ovens that cut
energy use and will let the
company roll out new menu
items in the future.

On deck is the Steakhouse
XT burger, which has a thick
patty topped with mayon-
naise, fried onions, lettuce,
steak sauce, cheese and toma-
toes. It’s slated to join menus
in February.

GN-931

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
PORT DEPARTMENT

Notice of Sitting for New Providence Port Authority
To consider Application For Licence Under The Boat Registration

Act Chapter (277) & Commercial Recreational Watercraft Act 2006

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the New Providence Port Authority Board for
New Providence and the Family Islands wil be held at the Port Administration Building,
Prince George Wharf on Thursday the 29" October, 2009 at 3:00pm for the purpose of

REGNO

NP 623 ATW

RENEWAL OF COMMERICAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT

(JET SKT} -NEW PROVIDENCE

APPLICATION

“No Name”

Deal's Watersports
Nassau, Bahamas ft
Jet Ski

granting Liceaces under The Boat Registration Act Chapter (277) & Commercial
Recreational Watercraft Act 2006.

Any Person entitled to and wishing to object to any application should do so at least six
uy FF >, (6) days before the date of the hearing by submitting his/her objections in writing to the
- Board and to the applicant

NP:624ATW Deal's Watersports “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas 98

Jet Ski

UssI00

Prostate Cancer
Education & Support

&
The Cancer Society oi the Bahamas

With LO Ypank
nautilus

WATER OF THE BAHAMAS

&

Persons attending the meeting on behalf of an applicant must produce written

authorization atthe meeting, NP. 135 ATE

Dames Okinawa “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas ft

Applicants for renewals are not required to attend, unless they have received written Tetskd

ation fos th New Providence Pot Aubry Board.
ee NP:G27ATW Dames Okinawa *No Nan’
Nassau, Bahamas 9ff

The undermentioned persons have applied for grant the licences as specified below. gg
f





NP: 656ATW Dames Okinawa “No Name”
Nassau, Bahamas ft

TRANSFER OF JET SKI -NEW PROVIDENCE Jet Ski



NP:126ATE DeSquare Enterprises “No Name”
.0. Box N-13600 — 9ft

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski



REGNO PREVIOUS

OWNER

NEWOWNER CLASS PASS USE

Dames Okinawa D Rental
P.O, BoxEE-15256

Nassau, Baharnas

NP: 627 ATW Musgrove Kenneth
Nassau, Bahamas
NP: 148 ATE —-D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O, Box N-13600 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT
NEW OPERATOR LICENCE- NEW PROVIDENCE

D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O, Box N-13600 9ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

LICENCE NO NAME CLASS

NP: 603 ATW D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O. BoxN-13600 ft

Nassau, Bahamas ‘Jet Ski

Neely Marco M. D
P.O, Box EE-17444
Nassau, Bahamas





NP: 652ATW —D-Square Enterprises “No Name”
P.O. Box N-13600 9)

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

Pratt Devon T.
P.O, Box N-9057
Nassau, Bahamas

NP: 653 ATW —-D-Square Enterprises
P.O, Box N-13600

RENEWAL OF COMMERCIAL RECREATIONAL WATERCRAFT Nassau, Bahamas

OPERATOR LICENCE -NEW PROVIDENCE



‘

D-Square Enterprises “h
P.O. Box N-13600 9)
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

NP: 654 ATW



CLASS
D NP: 165 ATE

LICENCE NO NAME

K&M Watersports “No Name”
P.O, Box FH-14020 ft
Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

104 Butler Bosfield I.
Nassau, Bahamas

Demeritte Demaro
P.O, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas

NP:622 ATW Seats Alexys “No Name”
P.O. Box SB-50016 Sit

Nassau, Bahamas Jet Ski

= Dorsett Renaldo
P.O, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas
" Welecens Ltd.

: RENEWAL OF MASTER'S - NEW PROVIDENCE
Gibson Pat a a ae

P.O. Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas

\

LICENCE # NAME CLASS



Johnson Kevin

P.0, Box CB-13600 oo
Nassau, Bahamas Dinnick Christopher

a P.O. Box N-7149
McKenzie Dencil B Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Bahamas

| FOr their participation in our
First Snual 1,000 Man Yaa
held September 12th 2009





Roberts Farren
Nassau, Bahamas







Commander Patrick McNeil
Port Controller

Smith Cartel
P.0, Box CB-13600
Nassau, Bahamas



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Value for money hurts the
Bahamas on cruise conversion

Ministry of Tourism said the
key question was how
Bahamian hotels could “cash
in” on the cruise business
without entering the industry
themselves, given that 80 per

FROM page 1B

Bahama and the Family
Islands were ahead of 2008

comparatives by 13 per cent
and 34.9 per cent respectively
for first port of entry, con-
trasting sharply with the 13.7
per cent drop in air or
stopover arrivals for July.

In its market analysis that
accompanied the data, the

cent of passengers who
responded to the Cruise Lines
International Association’s
(CLIA) 2008 survey said they
used voyages to assess desti-
nations where they wanted to
take a land-based vacation.
The analysis pointed to a
















2009
CLE/qui/No.00289

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act of 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels

of land totalling 162.177 acres being Grant C-39 and a

portion of Grant C-3 in an area known as Fort Pasture situate

immediately Eastward of Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5

miles West of Williams Town on the island of Little Exuma,

one of the Islands of The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas.
AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper

NOTICE OF PETITION.

Pursuant to an Order of The Supreme Court dated the 2nd day
of September, A.D. 2009.

The Petition of Trevor Andrew Cooper, of Forbes Hill
Settlement on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas, showeth in respect of:

ALL THOSE Three (3) parcels of land totalling 162.177
acres being Grant C-39 and a portion of Grant C-3 in an
area known as Fort Pasture situate immediately Eastward of
Forbes Hill Settlement and about 5 miles West of Williams
Town on the Island of Little Exuma, one of the Islands of The
Commonwealth Of The Bahamas

The Petitioner, Trevor Andrew Cooper, herein claims to
be the owner in fee simple in possession of the said tracts
of land and has made application to The Supreme Court Of
The Commonwealth Of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
the Quieting Titles Act 1959 to have his title to the said
tracts of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate Of Title to be granted
by the Court in accordance with the provisions of that Act.

Copies of the Plan showing the position boundaries shape
marks and dimensions of the said tracts of land may be



weak point, namely that ‘sat-
isfaction’ and ‘value for mon-
ey’ ratings among cruise pas-
sengers were considerably
higher than those given by
stopover tourists in the
Bahamas.

While the CLIA’s 2008 sur-
vey had shown that 95 per
cent of cruise passengers were
satisfied with their experience,
and of those 44 per cent
‘extremely satisfied’, only 57
per cent of “the land-based
vacationers, including
boaters/yachters to the
Bahamas were satisfied with
their overall Bahamas expe-
rience”.

Out of that 57 per cent,
some 21 per cent were ‘very
satisfied’ with their Bahamian
vacation experience, but 34
per cent said only that it
matched their expectations.

“Cruise lines have learned
the importance of offering
good value for money,” the
Ministry of Tourism analysis

said. “Sixty-nine per cent of
cruisers thought that the value
for money received was very
high or somewhat high, and
only 4 per cent thought that it
was low.

“Value for money has been
a weakness of the Bahamas
for many years now. Accord-
ing to the latest Exit Statis-
tics, 27 per cent of the
stopover visitors (includes
land-based vacationers)
thought that the value for
money in the hotels was much
better or better than expect-
ed, and 23 per cent thought
that it was not as good or
worse than they had expected
it to be.

“Thirty-nine per cent
thought that the overall value
for money for the Bahamas
was much better or better
than expected, and 18 per
cent thought it was not as
good or worse than they had
expected it to be.”

The Ministry added: “It is

TEESE,
Real Estate

eee eed mle te Ro Leh alt ie

Everywhere The

a

—

‘| § - = = ) aes
Fine Fel: 502 2356 ma
for ad rates a

t

well known to Bahamians and
repeat visitors to the Bahamas
that the destination is an
expensive place. When a des-
tination is expensive, should
not the island amenities, the
hotel ‘perks’, the hotel ser-
vice, hotel rooms, hotel food,
attitude of the people in gen-
eral, food in restaurants, ser-
vice in restaurants all be
superb because, together, they
all equal good value for mon-
ey?
“Could that be a reason
why the Bahamas has seen a
large increase in cruise
tourism to the Bahamas but a
decline in the demand for
land-based accommodations?
Have land-based vacation
stays missed the ‘boat’ on val-
ue for money? Each hotel
that caters to the tourists in
the Bahamas must ponder the
point: “Are we providing
excellent value for money
through our product offerings
and service? How can we
improve our value for mon-
ey and thereby improve our

bottom line?’”

Although the Bahamas had
not matched the annualised 8
per cent growth rate the
cruise industry had experi-
enced over the last several
years, between 1989 and 2008
this nation’s cruise tourism
business has expanded by 74
per cent. And sea arrivals now
accounted for 68.3 per cent
of all tourist arrivals to the
Bahamas, with stopovers hav-
ing just a 31.7 per cent share.

For the seven months to
July 2009, air arrivals to Nas-
sau/Paradise Island were
down &.8 per cent at 620,203,
compared to 679,731 in 2008.
This contrasted with a 7.3 per
cent increase for sea and air
arrivals combined.

The islands experiencing
major declines in stopover vis-
itors were Grand Bahama and
Abaco, with 27.5 per cent and
24.8 per cent falls respective-
ly, while Exuma and Cat
Island saw air arrivals falls of
38.8 per cent and 39.4 per cent
respectively.

NOTICE is hereby given that WIDSON AZOR of BURIAL
GROUND CORNER OFF EAST STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should send a
written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 1% day of October, 2009 to the Minister responsible
for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ROGER JAMES
BOUCHER of MCKINNEY DRIVE, CARMICHAEL ROAD, P.O.
BOX SB-52414, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization should not
be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the

NOTICE

BAHAMAS AGRIBUSINESS

COOPERATIVE SOCIETY LIMITED
(VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED)

facts within twenty-eight days from the 1% day of October, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O.
Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

inspected during normal office hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of The Supreme Court, East Street North,
Nassau, Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Charles Mackey & Co., BSB House,
West Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

(c) The Administrator’s office at George Town, Exuma.

Notice is hereby given that any person having Dower
or right to Dower or an Adverse Claim not recognized in the
Petition shall on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents file at the Registry
of The Supreme Court in the City of Nassau, Bahamas, and
serve on the Petitioner or on his Attorney an Adverse Claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve an
Adverse Claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the final publication of these presents shall operate as a
bar to such claim.

7 Pharmacy Technician |
TTR

Be first, only 20 American
Certification Exam
Application available.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 105 of the Cooperative Societies Act,
2005 the voluntary liquidation of Bahamas
Agribusiness Cooperative Society Limited has
commenced. All claims against the aforementioned
Cooperative must be submitted to and received by
THE LIQUIDATOR before October 31, 2009 at PO

DATED THIS 9th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. 2009 Box SS 6462, Nassau, Bahamas.

CHARLES MACKEY & CO.
Chambers BSB House

West Bay Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Attorney for the Petitioner

Cliff Pinder & Associates Limited
Liquidator

Register Now for October Session
Call Hepson at:
356-4860

(S. 18, O. 1, 16)

ROYAL FIDELITY

3 FG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERYLCES
E€
Minery ot Work
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
WEDNESDAY, 7 OCTOBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,478.40 | CHG -0.02 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -233.96 | YTD % -13.66
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW_.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320
52wk-Low Securit y Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $
AML Foods Limited
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste

Previous Close Today's Close

SITUATION VACANT

MERCHANDISE/PARTS MANAGER

Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Needed for expanding
Freeport Auto Dealership

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol ($)

Focol Class B Preference

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson : . 136

Premier Real Estate 4 d * i 64.1
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing b

Security Symbol Last Sale Daily Vol.

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +

Mature applicants must have a thorough understanding of
computerized inventory systems, be able to interpret parts
usage, generate parts orders, supervise AND train parts
personnel.

Interest Maturity

19 October 2017

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

FBB22

FBB13

FBB15 i
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities

id $ sk $ Last Price

7%
Prime + 1.75%

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets 7.92
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25
RND Holdings

a EPS $ Div $

0.000
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.001

Knowledge of Japanese and Korean parts is preferred along
with proven dealership experience.

.35 0.40 oO
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540

ABDAB
RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds

Last 12 Months

0.000
0.002 0.000
Fund Name

CFAL Bond Fund

CFAL MSI Preferred Fund

CFAL Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial | Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

FG Financial Diversified Fund

Yield %

Attractive and competitive remuneration package available
to successful applicant.

31-Aug-09

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
last 52 weeks
ighted price for daily volume
nted price for daily volume

Please apply in writing to:
Administrator
P.O, Box F-41060
Freeport

Ask $ - Selling price of Col

Last Price - Last traded

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER REPORT {,

5-Day FORECAST

ORLANDO































High: 92° F/33° C Plenty of sunshine. Clear. Plenty of sunshine. Bright sunshine and Times of clouds and Mostly sunny and The a eo ey nee Helles the
¢ lew: 76° F/24°C el comfortable. sun. humid. greater tne need tor eye and skin protection.
. @ . High: 90° High: 90° High: 87° High: 89°
' ie High: 91° Low: 80° Low: 79° Low: 78° Low: 79° Low: 78° see EE
TAMPA ie AccuWeather RealFeel
High: 94° F/34° C we, [___106°-82°F | High _Ht.(ft.)_ Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 77° F/25°C ry r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines 7 effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:12am. 34 3:46am. 04
* @ r = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:29p.m. 26 4:42pm. 0.7
Or’ Awa a
es , Te 11:26p.m. 26 5:38pm. 0.9
4 “i Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Saturday 1205pm. 33 533am. 06
{ ‘i 4 > ABACO Temperate — — 6:40 p.m. 0.9
7 ; 2 lie. High: 91° F/33° C ee ieerqigeceaiiastaieaiegaeeecdteesneeeee caenedeiaes re BEae Sunday 12:31 am. 25 6:39 a.m. 07
re - a Low:77° F/25°C Normal high Bers ye
, Normal low 74° F/23° C
jt thes @ WEST PALM BEACH is Last year's HIgh ...ccccsscssssseeesiene sor Fs2c | NTMI UCI
y _ High: 90° F/32° C b Last year's lOW oe eee 80° F/26° C
Low: 79° F/26°C ‘ Precipitation _ ace oe a.m. Lay oe
As of 2 p.m. yesterday 00.0... 0.00" unsel....... ‘49 p.m. Moonset. ... 1 l-ec a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date ......... 34) oe | ie |
High: 90° F/32° C @ High: 90° F/32° C Normal year to date 0... cece 40.18" a .
Low:81°F/27°C Low: 75° F/24°C oe
©: AccuWeather.com
ae @ Forecasts and graphics provided by :
th MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Oct.11 Oct.18 Oct. 25
P*, High: 90° F/32° C PR nao 3
Ay Low:80°F/27° C NASSAU ano Ass
Low: 80° F/27°C
a @.
KEY WEST i CATISLAND
High: 91° F/33°C High: 89° F/32° C
Low: 83° F/28°C Low: 74° F/23°C
e =
io m2
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR
High: 90° F/32°C High: 90° F/32°C
Low: 79° F/26°C Low: 75° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | ‘
highs and tonights's lows. High: 91° F/33° C
Low: 77° F/25°C i
LONG ISLAND
Low: 76° F/24° C
Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday i MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 90° F/32° C
Fic FIC F/C FC FC FIC F/C FC FC F/G Fic FC me Low: 74° F/23°C
Albuquerque 66/18 42/5 pe 72/22 47/8 s Indianapolis 68/20 56/13 r 6417 42/5 4 Philadelphia 70/21 5412 s 72/22 60/15 pc
Anchorage 50/10 43/6 sh 52/41 414 + Jacksonville 89/31 71/21 s 91/32 72/22 pc Phoenix 83/28 61/16 s 89/31 63/17 s$ CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 82/27 64/17 s 84/28 66/18 t Kansas City 66/18 41/5 1 58/14 38/3 s Pittsburgh 65/18 52/11 + 70/21 52/11 + RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:92°F/33"¢
Atlantic City 70/21 5140 s 75/23 59/15 pc Las Vegas 82/27 55/12 s 84/28 59/15 s Portland,OR 68/20 49/9 s 6719 457 s High: 91° F/33°C Low:77°F/25°C
Baltimore 72/22 52/11 s 78/25 60/15 pc Little Rock 82/27 67/19 t 68/20 52/11 t Raleigh-Durham 78/25 57/13 s 84/28 63/17 pc Low: 73°F/23°C i
Boston 66/18 52/11 s 67/9 55/12 ¢ Los Angeles 72/22 56/13 pc 74/23 58/14 pc St. Louis 68/20 5140 r 5613 41/6 + .
Buffalo 6518 5110 po 66/18 46/7 F Louisville 78/25 68/20 c 74/23 49/9 + Salt Lake City 62/16 39/3 pe 63/17 38/3 pc GREATINAGUA
Charleston,SC 83/28 63/17 s 89/31 70/21 pc Memphis 86/30 69/20 pc 76/24 55/12 t San Antonio 87/30 70/21 pc 84/28 61/16 t High: 93° F/34°C
Chicago 542 44/6 + 5S1N0 36/2 46 Miami 90/32 80/26 pc 91/32 79/26 pc San Diego 68/20 60/15 pc 69/20 61/16 pc Low. 76°F/24°C
Cleveland 64417 55/12 + 65/18 46/7 1 Minneapolis 48/8 29/-1 c¢ 50/10 29/-1 s San Francisco 68/20 52/11 s 71/21 53/1 pe 7
Dallas 84/28 64/17 t 69/20 52/1 +r Nashville 83/28 69/20 s 82/27 53/11 t Seattle 60/15 44/6 pe 58/14 40/4 s
Denver 44/6 29/-1 1 52/11 27/-2 pe New Orleans 90/32 78/25 $s 92/33 74/23 t Tallahassee 91/32 71/21 s 90/32 71/21 t
Detroit 6216 48/8 r+ 59/15 43/6 4+ New York 70/21 58/14 s 71/21 60/15 pc Tampa 94/34 77/25 pc 94/34 78/25 pc
Honolulu 87/30 77/25 pc 88/31 76/24 s Oklahoma City 76/24 50/10 t 60/15 47/8 © Tucson 77/25 52/1 s 83/28 55/12 $s
Houston 91/82 77/25 pe 83/28 63/17 t Orlando 92/33 76/24 pc 95/385 74/23 pc Washington, DC 72/22 55/12 s 86/30 63/17 pc

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Acapulco
Amsterdam
Ankara, Turkey
Athens
Auckland
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Belgrade
Berlin
Bermuda
Bogota
Brussels
Budapest
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calcutta
Calgary
Cancun
Caracas
Casablanca
Copenhagen
Dublin
Frankfurt
Geneva
Halifax
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kingston
Lima
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Monterrey
Montreal
Moscow
Munich
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo

Paris
Prague

Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome

St. Thomas
San Juan
San Salvador
Santiago
Santo Domingo
Sao Paulo
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei

Tokyo
Toronto
Trinidad
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Winnipeg

High
F/C
86/30
59/15
72/22
76/24
63/17
90/32
87/30
77/25
70/21
78/25
84/28
61/16
79/26
67/19
61/16
81/27
66/18
89/31
91/32
32/0
91/32
83/28
81/27
54/12
54/12
66/18
64/17
56/13
93/33
50/10
88/31
101/38
72/22
79/26
83/28
90/32
77/25
61/16
68/20
86/30
77/25
95/35
61/16
57/13
74/23
84/28
91/32
45/7
64/17
72/22
82/27
94/34
17/25
89/31
88/31
88/31
81/27
86/30
15/23
72/22
50/10
63/17
82/27
77/25
60/15
90/32
58/14
75/23
72/22
40/4

= (il

Today

Low
F/C
73/22
42/5
37/2
65/18
54/12
76/24
78/25
63/17
43/8
70/21
61/16
39/3
71/21
42/5
39/3
61/16
43/6
69/20
82/27
9/-12
77/25
73/22
60/15
39/3
41/5
43/6
57/13
39/3
73/22
36/2
77/25
61/16
61/16
60/15
57/13
79/26
61/16
43/6
50/10
79/26
55/12
75/23
52/11
43/8
54/12
58/14
72/22
30/-1
46/7
41/5
71/21
68/20
59/15
78/25
52/11
73/22
50/10
73/22
56/13
48/8
34/1
54/12
75/23
61/16
51/10
72/22
43/6
59/15
42/5
28/-2

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 81x, 2009, PAGE 11B



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MarINE FORECAST

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High
F/C
88/31
55/12
75/23
81/27
62/16
88/31
86/30
73/22
72/22
78/25
76/24
53/11
79/26
69/20
58/14
68/20
72/22
89/31
93/33
25/-3
90/32
83/28
78/25
50/10
57/13
61/16
67/19
58/14
89/31
45/7
88/31
99/37
73/22
79/26
82/27
89/31
76/24
63/17
75/23
85/29
75/23
90/32
57/13
50/10
55/12
85/29
93/33
43/6
63/17
54/12
77/25
93/33
75/23
88/31
91/32
87/30
77/25
88/31
71/21
72/22
48/8
63/17
83/28
73/22
58/14
95/35
56/13
61/16
55/12
38/3

Friday

Low
F/C
75/23
44/6
39/3
66/18
46/7
76/24
77/25
60/15
52/11
71/21
55/12
38/3
73/22
45/7
41/5
54/12
54/12
68/20
78/25
9/-12
75/23
73/22
59/15
40/4
45/7
45/7
55/12
43/6
71/21
32/0
77/25
58/14
63/17
58/14
57/13
79/26
59/15
50/10
52/11
77/25
55/12
64/17
45/7
36/2
44/6
60/15
73/22
28/-2
50/10
35/1
66/18
69/20
63/17
79/26
55/12
71/21
48/8
74/23
60/15
52/11
34/1
54/12
77/25
59/15
44/6
70/21
37/2
49/9
36/2
27/-2

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storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp- precipitation, Tr-trace





WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 6-12 Knots 0-1 Feet 7 Miles 84° F
Friday: ESE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 10 Miles 84° F
FREEPORT Today: E at 3-6 Knots 0-1 Feet 7 Miles 85° F
Friday: SE at 4-8 Knots 0-1 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
ABACO Today: NW at 2-4 Knots 1-3 Feet 7 Miles 83° F
Friday: ESE at 4-8 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 83° F



, Denver.
"44/29





Miami
90/80

Showers
T-storms





Rain Fronts
<7) Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and ee

Be Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm infinite

[ve] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mega
-10s| -0s 0s | 10s 20s (B05) 40s 50s 60s 70s (80s /S0s//iUietiiis]





abies

Be BI
Away u Can J Hurricane

Or you_can rest easy knowing
that you have excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

Nobody does it better.

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

| Shaye meee | tne tp eine
PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



IT ="). | =<>\~
Act now to save small

By MARK A TURNQUEST

MY affiliated companies
and I hosted a Small Busi-
ness Economic Summit in
May/June 2009. The main
goal of the summit was to
gather information about
problems and potential
opportunities that small
business owners are experi-
encing in the Bahamas. The
main concerns of small busi-
ness owners who attended
the summit, and who com-
pleted a national survey,
were that the financial sec-
tor was not assisting them
with the necessary working
capital, and that the Gov-
ernment was not creating an
atmosphere to foster small
business development in the
Bahamas during this reces-
sion.

One of the main reasons
there is no master plan for

small business development
among the financial institu-
tions and the Government is
that there is no Small Busi-
ness Act of the Bahamas to
drive national strategies.
However, the future looks
optimistic for small busi-
nesses because a team com-
prised of both public and
private sector executives is
being assembled to craft the
initial Small Business Act
draft. This team will consist
of experts in all industries
(professional services, med-
ical services, technical ser-
vices, financial services, gen-
eral services, manufacturing,
merchandising, agriculture,
marine resources/fisheries,
tourism, hospitality, govern-
ment).

Five important reasons
why there must be a Small
Business Act of the
Bahamas:



MARK TURNQUEST

* The Small Business Act
will encourage Bahamians
to become entrepreneurs
because it will outline excel-
lent incentives/concessions
that will be awarded for:

- The development of
new, innovative products
/services,

- The hiring of a specific
number of Bahamians

- Increasing government
revenues due to significant
payments made for National
Insurance, custom duties,
property taxes, license fees
etc

* The Small Business Act
will keep many existing busi-
nesses open during a reces-
sion because it will provide
incentives/concessions to
businesses that employ a
moderate number (five and
above) of staff, are up to
date with NIB contributions
and custom duties, and are
contributing to making the
Bahamas more competitive
globally.

* The Small Business Act
will encourage Family Island
development by providing
incentives/concessions to a
Bahamian who wants to
open a small business on an

island that will decrease the
employment rate, improve
the infrastructure of the
island, encourage Bahami-
ans to reside permanently
there and entice more
tourists to visit the island.

* The Small Business Act
will increase the Bahamas’
Gross Domestic Product
(GDP) because it will even-
tually reduce the importa-
tion of foreign products and
services, increase compensa-
tion to employees, increase
business profits, increase
government income and
increase interest payments
to Bahamians.

* The Small Business Act
will reduce the national debt
because it will decrease
Government spending, par-
ticularly on hiring civil ser-
vants, and increase Govern-

businesses

ment licenses, fees and taxes
because more businesses
will be operating in the
Bahamas.

Trade Association presi-
dents (from the Hair
Braiders Association to the
Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants) are
encouraged to submit
reports indicating industry
goals, problems, opportuni-
ties and recommendations
on how to improve their
industries.

To assist with the develop-
ment of the Small Business
Act of the Bahamas please
contact Mark A. Turnquest
at 326-6748 427-3640 or

email:

markaturnquest@gmail.

com or log on to
www.markturnquestconsult-
ing.com

FIDELITY, from 1B

All three funds come under the
umbrella of RoyalFidelity’s Interna-
tional Investment Fund, and Mr
Anderson said of their performance:
“T think they’ve done reasonably
well. We’ve done the valuations for
July and August, and they’re up a
reasonable amount.

“The international markets are
seemingly continuing to move. Sep-
tember was another month in which

‘Cm FF

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ii ei

markets were up, and we hope it
continues.”

Mr Anderson said the investments
by the three RoyalFidelity sub-funds
in the European and Asian markets,
which had been less affected by the
credit crunch and recession, were
delivering good returns for Bahami-
an institutions and retail investors
who had bought into them.

“T think there’s a great opportuni-
ty for people to take advantage of
something they’re not otherwise

‘Nassau au «99

ay

Beale ci Le PAT ler

NOVEMBER 18â„¢ 2009

BRITISH Col

Rtenet Eat Te Prete

Pen eh |
St oe a

CL meh)

|
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Pane eer
Ue all et

Peer ee ll

PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT: WHAT DOES THE
BAHAMAS NEED TO D0 TO GET BETTER AND SMARTER?

246 P-3:465P

LUNCH

ONIAL HILTON

REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
OPENING REMARKS

THE BAHAMAS STATUS & STRATEGY TOWARDS TAX
INFORMATION AGREEMENTS |

COFFEE BREAK

TAS AMMESTIES (Pst

THE BENEFITS OF ECONOMIC PERMANENT RESIDENCY &
INVESTMENT VISAS

ANEL DASCUSSIGN)

ANEL OFSGUSsiLy

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COFFEE BRESK

FINANCIAL SERVICES |PWel D

get,” Mr Anderson said, implying
that investors would derive a better
return from international markets
than the Bahamian market, which
was “continuing to lag behind” and
unlikely to recover until tourism and
foreign direct investment rebound.

While the international equities
sub-fund had ended 2008 down 32
per cent, having at one point been
off 50-60 per cent, Mr Anderson told
Tribune Business yesterday: “We’ve
had our hits on this fund, but now

international markets are recover-
ing, and if I was an investor today I’d
take an international basket over a
local basket.

“Where we are today provides
great opportunities. The markets are
way off from their 2007 peak.
There’s still a fair amount of upside,
and as the world economy recovers
there’ll be opportunities to make
money in international markets.”

Mr Anderson told Tribune Busi-
ness that RoyalFidelity would now

“be marketing [its funds] a bit more
aggressively to make people aware of
it”, broadening the investment circle
beyond its immediate client base.

Many Bahamians were unaware
of the funds’ existence, he explained,
adding that RoyalFidelity had not
embarked on a mass marketing
effort yet due to the fact “there’s
been this resistance to investing in
international markets” as a result of
the September 2008 stock market
crash.

FS .

The Bahamas’ Biggest &

Mos

t Exciting Festival,

Featuring Food & Culture

From Around the World!

BOTANICAL GARDENS

THE RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD OF "OFF-SHORE
CENTERS"

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¢ Music

THE NEXT GENERATION OF gpl ENT REP NEUNG IH

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« Native Plants
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Playground

..and more

ADMISSION

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Fashion Show

& Food Tasting

ae bs
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CLOSING REMARKS

$2 Kids / $5 Adults
$10 Incl. Fashion Show &
Wine & Food Tasting

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COCKTAIL RECEPTION

REGISTRATION FEE; $500

Far nore infonnation about The Nassau Conference, visit:

WWW.nassauconference.com

tie i

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Trt.)
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FOUNDING PARTNER & SPONSOR: COFFEE BREAK SPONSOR: WASTES Be © cm z

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ATER AT ORAL
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© 2009 CREATIVE EDGE



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
The Tribun a=
OBIMUARIES
RELIGION



| -< The Tribune
a OLT | tty Arcee, My Newspaper!

—‘\ en
» \0
707.9

SS hour chaice for ine family:
THURSDAY
fa) erm aw At

RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
STORIES
AND
CHURCH
EVENTS


PG 22 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

‘SO GOES THE MAL
SO GOES THE NATION’

By REUBEN SHEARER
Tribune Features Reporter

“SO goes the male, so goes
the nation” - this is the motto
of the Real Men Ministry
International of Bahamas Faith
Ministries International

(BFMI).

The church, led by its senior pastor Dr
Myles Munroe, is calling on all men to
attend the Real Men International
Power Conference being held at the
Diplomat Centre on Carmichael Road
starting today and ending on Sunday.

Under the theme ‘Men Raising the
Bar: Building a Kingdom Community
through Personal and National Identity’,
the conference seeks to put the onus on
men to curb what BFMI calls a “male
crisis” that is causing some of the nation’s
social ills.

Dr Kendal Major, one of the speakers
at the event, said: “Fatherlessness is the
single most destructive force in the
national development of our country and
is responsible for the vast majority of
destructive behaviours among our men.

“The future of our nation depends on
men who have accepted the challenge
and responsibility to recover, rebuild and
restore their personal lives so the culture
of our families and community can be
transformed.”

During nine sessions with speakers like
Dr Munroe, Dr Major and Dr Tony
Evans, BFMI promises participants that
they will gain new insight into topics such
as ‘the role of personal identity in nation
building’, ‘men remaining constant in

RELIGION The Tribune
























changing times’, and ‘how to be a godly
husband in a challenging mar-
riage’.

A donation of $65 gives partici-
pants full access to the two-day
workshop on Friday and Saturday
starting at 9am.

On Saturday at noon, during
what is described as a two-hour
‘power luncheon’, Dr Evans will
speak on “Kingdom keys for over-
coming personal crises.”

The admission price of this spe-
cial segment is $30 per person.

Each session promises to be “a
time of dynamic worship, teach-
ing, sharing and open discus-
sions, as we delve into the
many challenges we face as
men today,” the BFMI said.

The conference kicks off
tonight with a session at
7.30pm and continues tom-
morow with a day session
starting 9am.

On Friday evening at
7.30 pm, participants will
continue in a workshop
hosted by Dr Tony
Evans of Dallas, Texas.

Both tonight’s and
Friday’s evening sessions
are free to the general
public.

The weekend culminates
with a special closing service
on Sunday where the Her Majesty’s
Prison Men’s choir will perform. The
service will be streamed live for the
inmates to view at the prison.

You may register by calling BFMI at
461-6442/5, via the website bfmmm.com
or visit the Diplomat Centre, Carmichael
Road.

PMU gos



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8

7.30pm - Session 1, general session “The Role of
Personal Identity in Nation Building’ - Dr Myles
Munroe

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9

gam - Session 2 “The Price and Process of
Becoming a Real Man” - Dr Kendal Major

10am - Session 3, workshop “Men Remaining
Constant in Changing Times” - Dr Richard Pinder

11am - Session 4, workshop “The Responsibility for
Mentorship in God’s Kingdom Agenda” - Deacon
Jeffrey Lloyd

12noon - Session 5, workshop “Fulfilling Your
Destiny Through Community” - special real men
presentation

7.30pm - Session 6, general session “The Role of
Men in God’s Kingdom Agenda” - Dr Tony Evans

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10

9am - Session 7, workshop “How to be a Godly
Husband in a Challenging Marriage” - Dr Wayne
Thompson

10am - Session 8, workshop “Practical Power
Principles For Financial Stewardship” - Minister
Gregory Bethel

11am - Session 9, workshop “Practical Keys for
Developing Healthy Relationships” - Pastor Cedric
Beckles.
The Tribune

The Christian journey

AS Christians, we all agree that the
sacrament of baptism is the time when
we die with Christ, are raised to new
life, and become a member of the Body
of Christ, the Church. We differ on
matters such as the age of the candi-
date, the amount of water and where
the water is located.

Once the journey has begun, the
Holy Spirit works to reveals God’s love
to us more and more each day, and to
guide us in the path of holiness. Those
who are baptised as infants have desig-
nated adults whose responsibility it is
to create a home environment that is
Christian. Parents, godparents and
other relatives are expected to teach by
example and instruction.

In denominations where there is the

RELIGION

sacrament of Confirmation, the oppor-
tunity is arranged for a public declara-
tion of faith by children who have been
properly prepared to be able to make
their own promises to God. This is a
time when the laying on of hands by the
Bishop reminds the candidates that
prayers are being offered for the stir-
ring up of their gifts of ministry by the
Holy Spirit who has been present from
baptism.

As a Christian matures, there should
be a deepening of faith by means of
spiritual exposure to the will of God
through prayer and the study of
Scripture. Fellowship in a Christian
community is intended to provide nur-
ture and support throughout the per-
son’s lifetime. The matching of spiritual

Are we ready?

THE time is not coming, but rather is
at hand for us as a people to stand up
and take control of our own destiny.
Gone are the days when we have
looked to the politicians and political
parties or the foreign investors to
determine whether we live a good pros-
perous life or not.

As Bahamians, don’t you think that
we have sang the “who did me wrong”
song long enough?

We’re very proficient at blaming oth-
ers for our refusal to be proactive. It’s
like as a people our get up and go has
gotten up and left us a long time ago.

Therefore, we’ve resorted to looking
to, and solely depending upon others to
carry our load. This is one of the rea-
sons why when a foreign investor clos-
es his/her business and pulls out of the
country cries can be heard throughout
the length and breadth of the Bahamas
of “how am I supposed to feed my fam-
ily or pay my bills?” or “ve worked
for this company for 22 years and this is
all that they’ve given me.”

Where did we go wrong as a nation?
How is it that in this day and time
Bahamians are still being trained to
first, go to school, get a good education;
second, get a good job and third, buy a
piece of property, build a house, and...?
What’s next? After number three,
comes four, five, six etc, etc; what’s
next? Who has taken the time to teach
us how to make money work for us;





PASTOR _
ALLEN

rather than working all of our lives for
money?

Maybe it’s just me, but has anybody
else noticed that we do have some
smart kids coming out of our schools
with degrees, yet they have to settle for
the insulting low paying jobs - that’s if
they’re lucky to find one.

What is this saying to the hun-
dreds/thousands of other students that
are following these graduates and oth-
ers?

Make no mistake! Bahamians are
very smart people, a seriously minded
Bahamian needs only an opportunity/a
hand up, and not a hand-out. If given
an opportunity and a little time this
person would be someone to be reck-
oned with nationally or internationally.

Unfortunately, as a people we’ve
spent so much time complaining and
crying that we have overlooked and
failed to embrace and see the opportu-
nities ahead of us which are often hid-
den in the situations / challenges we’re
faced with.

In spite of what you might have

gifts to appropriate occasions for min-
istry and service gives everyone the
chance to build up the Body of Christ.

Sometimes there are detours and
delays which cause the individual to
become lost for a while or to tread
water spiritually. An intentional desire
to grow in the love and knowledge of
God needs to be a hungering and thirst-
ing that is not quenched by anyone or
anything else.

How do we make this a priority in
such a time as this? How do we com-
pete with the distractions that tantalise
the senses? Who are the persons who
are living in a way as to be a mentor
and role model in spiritual matters?

Deuteronomy 6: 4-9 says: 4 Hear, O

heard, the original acronym for the
word POOR is P_ for People; O for
Overlooking, O for Opportunity and R
for Repeatedly.

In many ways the acronym for the
word poor describes a vast majority of
us Bahamians; we’ve been constantly
overlooking opportunities and staying
focused on tourism as if without
tourism we’re dead as a nation.

This mindset, this stinking thinking
is so diabolically contaminating in that
I’ve heard prominent leaders (political
and religious), make their silly state-
ments and remarks of “if America
closes its door of tourism to us; we’re
through.”

Listen, you dumb/blind politicians
and religious leaders who ascribe to
this kind of foolish thinking and can’t
see beyond your big toes. It’s obvious
that America and tourism is your god;
so rather than speaking from your rear
ends, why don’t you shut the hell up
and get out of the way so that some
critical thinkers can come forth and
help lead this nation down the path of
God’s (Yahweh) Kingdom business
and righteousness.

From an educational standpoint, I
won't condemn or blame the Minister
of Education and the Minister of
Agriculture for that which they don’t
know as it relates to educating the gen-
erations to come from a ‘feeding our-
selves perspective.’

It’s obvious that they’re not aware of
the unlimited wealth that can be gen-
erated in agriculture; for had they
known this, then I can assure you that
their ancient approach to agricultural
education would be far, far different.

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 23



© REV, ANGELA
+ PALACIOUS:

Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is
one. [a] 5 Love the Lord your God with
all your heart and with all your soul and
with all your strength. 6 These com-
mandments that I give you today are to
be upon your hearts. 7 Impress them on
your children. Talk about them when
you sit at home and when you walk
along the road, when you lie down and
when you get up. 8 Tie them as symbols
on your hands and bind them on your
foreheads. 9 Write them on the door-
frames of your houses and on your
gates.

Parents, you have to live and breathe
your faith if you want your children to
consider it a natural phenomenon to be
Christian. Every day the journey is to
be taken with you as the guide.

Okay, Ministers of Education and
Agriculture, we’re talking about think-
ing out of the box and preparing our
children to feed the nation and becom-
ing wealthy in the course of doing so.
Rather than this small minded, waste
of time backyard farming stuff you are
talking about.

Why not develop a national pro-
gramme whereby interested students
would be given an opportunity to
spend five to six months on a large
scale farming operation throughout
the United States? Thereby giving
them a much better perspective and
appreciation for agriculture and farm-
ing than that of what you’re offering
right now.

Watch this!

Here’s what the lack of vision and
ignorance would make a leader or min-
ister say: “We can’t afford that kind of
investment right now. Do you know
how expensive such a programme
would be?”

And here’s what (someone with)
vision would say: “How in the hell did
you get to become leader or minister
over anything?”

For this is where we’ve gone and are
going wrong in this country by putting
one dimensional, visionless people in
leadership. Are we ready for the next
level?

¢ For questions or comments contact us
via email at pastormallen@yahoo.com or
telephone at 1-242-441-2021

Pastors Matthew and Brendalee Allen

Kingdom Minded Fellowship Centre
International
PG 24 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

RELIGION
@r THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN THE BAHAMAS

The Tribune



Ys

Roman Catholic Bishop Paul Leonard Hagarty

PAUL Hagarty was born during a
blizzard on March 20, 1909 to Bert and
Lucy Belle (née O'Connell) Hagarty,
an Irish-American Catholic farming
family in Jowa. With encouragement
from his widowed mother, he did well
at public grade school up to grade
eight, then at Greene Catholic High
School taught by Fransiscan Sisters. An
avid reader, he was influenced by the
many vocational stories in the Sacred
Heart Messenger to become a Jesuit
priest. A railroad accident in which he
suffered a broken leg gave him com-
pensation of $300 that paid for his first
year at Loras (Columbia) College and a
Saturday job at JC Penney helped him
work his way through college. He stud-
ied economics, science, geology and
meteorology and ended up working for
the Union Pacific Railway as a geolo-
gist. But deep inside he knew he want-
ed to become a priest, and after hitch-
hiking to St John's Abbey, Abbot
Alcuin accepted him into the novitiate
programme and he took the name
Leonard. While serving with Father
Hogan in Minnesota, Father Leonard
received a call from Abbot Alcuin
informing him he was being sent to the
Bahamas.

Father Leonard arrived in Nassau in
1937 and was stationed at the
Cathedral for three years and simulta-
neously chaplain to the leper colony,
Goodwill Orphanage and the general
hospital. During the war years he also
worked with the Royal Air Force and
other troops. Father Leonard had a
very close relationship with Bishop
Bernard and was a major help to him

Fatigue

By BISHOP V G CLARKE
Calvary Deliverance Church

SOMEONE once said that the
world is run by tired men.

There is probably real substance
in the statement, for genuine lead-
ers must be willing to rise early and
study longer than their contempo-
raries. Some men have tremendous
stamina, but fatigue will frequently
set in if they want to go somewhere
with their organisation and in their
responsibilities.

A wise leader will try to find a

a JIM
_ LAWLOR
eo ——

on collecting tours in the United
States. Bishop Bernard quickly recog-
nised the potential of Father Leonard
and sent him to Oxford University,
England, for post-graduate studies
ostensibly to become Director of
Education to correct the Catholic
School system which was using
American methods which didn't pre-
pare the children for English exams.
But it was obvious to the other priests
that the Bishop had his eye on Father
Leonard as his successor.

Bishop Bernard wished to appoint a
successor to move the Bahamas
beyond a Benedictine enclave to a full
diocese. Abbot Alcuin disagreed,
doubting that a permanent abbey with
indigenous personnel could supply
spiritually a widespread group of
islands. The impasse was resolved
when on June 25, 1950, Rome chose
Father Paul Leonard Hagarty as sec-
ond Bishop of the Bahamas. It was a
popular choice to Bahamians, who
loved the sight of young 'No-Hands
Hagarty’ riding without steering his lit-
tle English motorcycle from Montagu
Hotel to the Priory.

On the morning of October 19, 1950,
Our Lady's Church was filled to over-
flowing and ZNS broadcast the solemn
ceremonies of the consecration of Father

balance and seek an avocation, a
change of pace to reduce stress. He
must seek some pleasurable recre-
ation or he will eventually lose his
usefulness. You have no doubt
heard the cliché “I'd rather burn
out for God than rust out for the
devil.”

The spirit of that is noble and
pious-sounding and a person's dedi-
cation must come close to the tenor
of the thought. But on the other
hand, if a person can learn how to
relax and not spread himself too thin,
his effectiveness will be magnified.

Leonard to His Lordship, the Most
Reverend Paul Leonard Hagarty, OSB,
DD, Titular Bishop of Arba and Vicar
Apostolic of the Bahamas by His Grace
the Most Reverend Apostolic Delegate
Ameleto Cicognani DD Apostolic
Delegate to the United States.

Also attending were two archbish-
ops, three bishops, four abbots and a
host of monsignori and priests. The
new Bishop was to preside over 50
churches and chapels, numerous
schools with 2,400 pupils and over
11,000 Catholic parishioners.

On the day of his consecration,
Bishop Leonard appointed Father
Bonaventure as his pro-vicar aposto-
late, who took charge on the times
when the Bishop travelled on collec-
tion trips. He also relied heavily on
Fathers Cornelius and Brendan. This
type of backup assistance was neces-
sary to cover the Catholic presence on
Andros, Bimini, Long Island,
Eleuthera and Harbour Island, Grand
Bahama, San Salvador and Cat Island
plus three visits a year to Inagua. Then
a church was established on Abaco and
a mission started to Turks and Caicos.

During the reign of Bishop Hagarty
many significant events took place, as
he was keen to expand Catholic partic-
ipation in education and social devel-
opment. The rapid expansion was due
to several factors. The trust fund set up
by Bernard Melhardo of Belize and
benefactors Bacardi Company and
others provided capital. The Sisters of
Charity played a leading role in the
development of education, especially
at St Thomas More and St Cecilia's

If a person “burns out” complete-
ly, his influence and contribution
ends. Proper health, rest and bal-
ance will help a leader maintain his
ability to persist. But a leader must
be prepared to recognise the toll
upon him, both emotionally and
physically.

Despite our busy schedules, lead-
ers must practice what we preach in
order not to suffer fatigue or burn-
out.

Remember the wise leader finds
time for relaxation and creative
thinking.

schools. The Order of St Martin's also
assisted by providing Sisters in the
education system and more diocesan
priests arrived from all over America.
The Scarboro Foreign Mission Society
of Canada sent a dozen missionaries
who had previously served in China.
They set up a two-storey headquarters
on the grounds of St Thomas More.

Under Bishop Leonard, Bahamian
men began to enter religious life, the
first being Fr Charles Coakley in 1957.
In 1960, Fr Boswell Davis was
ordained and he was followed by Frs
Leander Thompson, Bonaventure
Dean, Cletus Adderley, Prosper
Burrows and Preston Moss - all trained
at St John's Abbey, Minnesota.

During the early 1960s, Brothers
George Taylor, Ignatius Dean, Joseph
Darville, and Henry Neeley were the
first of 12 Bahamian Benedictine
monks who took perpetual vows - sev-
eral of them taught at St Augustine's
College. Unfortunately, all but two
Bahamian priests reverted to laymen
in 1972, but in the mid-1970s a new
crop of diocesan priests including Fr
Alfred Culmer and Leviticus Adderley
were ordained.

On February 1, 1979, His Holiness
Pope John Paul II visited Nassau and
was welcomed by thousands of people
at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre.

The health of Bishop Leonard began
to fail and he resigned on July 17, 1981.
On September 22, he died at St John's
Abbey and was brought back to be
buried alongside Bishop Bernard in
the crypt of St Francis Xavier
Cathedral.



Bishop VG Clarke
The Tribune




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‘BIRTHDAY Girl’ Mary Seymour

RELIGION

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 25

Oldest Anglican in Cat Island celebrates
her 99th birthday in grand style

the settlement of Knowles last Friday at
the homestead of Mary Seymour to cel-
ebrate her 99th birthday.

Mary, or “Little” as she is affectionately
called, is a sick and shut-in communicant of St
Saviour’s Parish, Cat Island, and in her all years
has never left the island of her birth.

Her ‘navel string’ is buried under the coconut
tree which stands tall in the front yard of her
residence. Mary is the widow of Ernest ‘Old
Dad’ Seymour who predeceased her in 1980.

Ernest Seymour was the bread-winner of the
family, and after his demise Mary became the
sole provider. ‘Old Dad’, as he was known to
Cat Islanders, was blind but could still deter-
mine the denomination of paper currency
placed in his hand.

[ite people of Cat Island converged on

In a birthday Eucharistic celebration fit for a
head of state, Mrs Seymour received her acco-
lades as Father Edward “Rex” Seymour, assis-
tant priest of St Saviour’s, celebrated the Mass
and Father Chester Burton, priest in-charge of
St Saviour’s, preached the sermon.

The readings were from the feast day of St
Michael’s and All Angels. Father Burton took
his text from Genesis, chapter 28, verse 13, “I
am the Lord the God of Abraham and Isaac the
land on which you lie, I will give to you and your
offspring. Your offspring shall be like the dust of
the earth.”

Father Burton posited that the Seymours are
somewhat like the passage of scripture applica-
ble for the feast day of St Michaels and All
Angels.

The Seymour clan and descendants of Mary
Seymour are here, there and everywhere - all
throughout the archipelagic chain of the
Bahamas, he said.

Father Burton further admonished and
reminded the well-wishers that if it weren’t for
Mary’s yeoman service to her family, church,
community and God, many would have strayed
from the narrow way. But thanks to God all her
children have made an indelible mark in the
fabric and tapestry of our Bahamaland, he said.

Also bringing birthday wishes to Mrs
Seymour on this auspicious occasion was Cat
Island’s senior administrator Charles King and
chief councillor Valderine Seymour. In atten-
dance were senior civil servants and govern-
ment officials from the length and breadth of
Cat Island. Veteran Pastors Vernis Storr and
Pandora Ingraham also brought greetings from
their respective churches.

Finally, Father Burton thanked the Almighty
God for Mrs Seymour’s many years of service
and presence in the settlement of Knowles.

He said that the number of persons in atten-
dance at her birthday celebration was indicative
of how many lives she has touched in a special
way.

The gathering afterwards feasted sumptuous-
ly at Bachelor’s Rest Restaurant and Bar owned
by one of Mrs Seymour’s sons.

MARY Seymour celebrates her 99th birthday at her
home with well-wishers from the Cat Island community.
PG 26 ® Thursday, October 8, 2009

r

ST GEORGE'S ANGLICAN CHURCH ENDS
GOTH ANNIVERSARY WITH GALA BANQUET

ST George's Anglican Church
has been a pillar in the historical
community known as the ‘Valley’
for more than 60 years.

Last year, St George’s began its
‘Diamond in the Valley’ celebra-
tions with a special service and var-
ious activities to commemorate the
contributions that the parish
church has made over more than
half a century. Former Prime
Minister Perry Christie during the
60th anniversary thanksgiving
service spoke about how members
of the parish helped mold his life.

Many in the community also said
they see the church as the home

a, |
5



base of the famed junkanoo group
‘The Valley Boys’ led by Gus
Cooper.

This year on October 31, the
church will hold a special 60th
anniversary gala banquet to cele-
brate the growth and development
that the parish has experienced
within the community and the
Bahamas at large. Tickets are
available at St George’s and the
church committee is inviting all
sons and daughters of the Valley to
join in as thanks is given to
almighty God for 60 years of dedi-
cated service to mission and min-
istry in the community.

| Pee,

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RELIGION

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The Tribune



















The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, October 8, 2009 ® PG 27

When you know who you are

IT is my firm belief that we only
ever find out who we really are when
God establishes us.

I remember ten years ago at the
beginning of my last job, within the
first two weeks I had made a friend.
We had gotten into a conversation
that took him down memory lane
recalling his college days. As he
remembered the events from then, he
mentioned that in those days he was
part of a fraternity.

Me, being curious, I asked him why,
and his response was, "they gave me
an identity because I didn't have
one."

My mind was blown because at that
time I didn't think that was possible
for anyone to not know who they
were, let alone a Bahamian. (I guess
too much faith, huh?) I really didn't
know what to do with that because I
had never heard anyone come out and
say, "I don't know who I am." He was

RELIGION
TODAY

A Sept.17, 2009
photo shows artist
Sandow Birk pos-
ing next to his
sculpture titled:
"American
Mihrab." Birk has
created an illus-
trated, English-
language Quiran
that he's calling the
"American Koran,"
at the Koplin Del
Rio Gallery in
Culver City, Calif.

Damian Dovarganes
AP Photo



ALLISON
)MILLER



a first for me.

When we don't know who we are it
is an opportunity for all kinds of iden-
tities to attach themselves to us.

Anyone or anything can come to
you and tell you who you are if you
don't know that yourself. You cannot
tell John he is Paul when he in fact
knows that he is John. You won't hear
him say ‘ok I'm Paul’ when he knows
that he is John. That is also the reason
why so many of us are confused. We
don't know who we are, nor do we
understand our self-worth. No young
lady should allow any man whether



young or old to make her feel privi-
leged for knowing him. When that
happens I believe that your self-worth
is diminished. When in fact only God
can put value to a life.

What is the value that God puts on
our lives? Well, when you accept
Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour you
become the "righteousness of God in
Christ Jesus”.

I think that is the best identity that
any human being could ever have.
Once you have that identity, you will
begin to live. What is life without pur-
pose? Then what is purpose without
fulfilling it? I believe we can only
move forward when God is the centre
of our purpose. Keeping in mind that
the Bible tells us, "only what is done
for Christ will last." There is nothing
wrong with getting an education or
having wealth, the problem comes
when we make those things the fibre
of our existence.



Then our lives are built on the
wrong things. Shortly after that we
find ourselves unsatisfied and lost. I
believe that is one of the worst posi-
tions that we can find ourselves in.

The good thing is some of us actual-
ly have the good sense to find out
what our purpose is, and we pursue it.
The rest of us just float around
because we won't make a decision on
what to do with our lives. When you
know who you are you won't accept
just anything and you will not allow
anyone to do anything to you. No one
could deter a man or a woman who is
purpose driven. He or she knows who
they are and go after their purpose.
That, my dear readers is a good posi-
tion to be in and that will ultimately
result in a good life. Instead of allow-
ing anything and anybody to tell you
who and what you are. Let us start the
search, but we start knowing that the
search begins with God.

Sensis

* THE CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE will

i officially open the new Aquinas

? College campus on Gladstone Road

? tomorrow at 10am. Catholic

? Archbishop Patrick Pinder will speak
: at the opening. The general public is
i invited to attend.

¢ ST JOSEPH’S CHURCH on Nassau

i Street will have an Golden Oldies
i dance on October 30. The general
i public is invited to come out for what
: promises to be a fun filled night.

¢ ST AGNES PARISH will for the first

i time ever be hosting a family day this
? Sunday. People are invited to bring

i their families to the 7am and 10am

: services. Under the theme “Sing

? Praises unto the Lord”, the senior

i choir at St Agnes will give a concert

i at 4pm.

ANNOUNCEMENT:
THE House of and Prayer and

i Deliverance Ministry is celebrating

: its 9th Anniversary this Sunday at

? 3pm at its location on Prince Charles
i Drive, opposite Pepsi Cola. Members
i of the public are invited to attend.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays


PG 28 © Thursday, October 8, 2009

r





The view from

the Hill

TRIBUNE Religion’s ‘Church of the
Week’ is the Hillview Seventh-day
Adventist Church on Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway.

The church was officially dedicated
in 1989, but its history goes much fur-
ther back.

In 1942, Haddassah Poitier, then a
member of the Grant's Town Seventh-
day Adventist Church, invited the
neighbourhood children to Friday
evening vespers and Branch Sabbath
School classes on the following day.

Ms Poitier, affectionately called

"Sister P", was then joined by Brother
Jack Dean and met for worship in the
old building just south of the present St
Luke's Baptist Church. When this
building became unsuitable, the com-
pany moved across the street into a
two-storey building owned by Daniel
Varence. This old lodge hall situated
on the corner of East Street and
Palmetto Avenue served as a sanctuary
for these believers for many years.

In 1952, under the leadership of mis-
sion president Elder Mote, the compa-
ny was organised into a church.

RELIGION



One of the very first evangelistic cru-
sades launched by the church was con-
ducted by Pastor Melvin Nembhard in
the Old Sponge Shed on Bay Street out
of which a number of new believers
were added to this fledging church
community. By this time, the brethren
recognised the need for a more perma-
nent building so they negotiated with
Sir Roland Symonette to purchase a
small plot on East Street south, oppo-
site Cordeaux Avenue. On this site,
Daniel Varence assisted by others built
the old section of the present
Englerston Church and dedicated it in
1955. However, the congregation con-
tinued to grow and the church soon
became too small, expansion was nec-
essary, and in the mid-sixties this was
completed.

In the late 1960s and early 70s the
church witnessed an explosion of evan-

The Tribune





gelism in the Bahamas Conference
which resulted in a dramatic increase
in membership. The Englerston
Church again was bursting at its seams,
leading to Pastor Roy Fernander start-
ing a special fund to acquire a suitable
and affordable site for a new church.
However, it was not until the tenure of
Pastor Royden I Hanna that the 3.8
acreage on what is now Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway was pur-
chased through the assistance of
President Silas McKinney from the
late Sir Roland Symonette.

Pastor Keith Albury was called to
assume leadership of the Englerston
Church on February 16, 1985, and it
was dedicated on April 16, 1989 by the
then-president of the West Indies
Union Dr Silburn Reid.

The church’s present pastor is Peter
Joseph.