Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.253

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aMNricge quits
as PLP treasurer

i Also steps down as senior
partner in law firm after
money laundering claims

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Embattled lawyer Sidney Cambridge
resigned as treasurer of the PLP yester-
day. On the same day he stepped down
from his position as senior partner in the
law firm of Callenders and Co.

In the wake of accusations in a criminal
complaint filed in a US District Court that
he knowingly helped launder funds from

what he was told was a European-based
investment fraud, the attorney is now said to
be “focusing all of his attention on estab-
lishing his innocence” in the face of the charges.

He is accused with Florida’s Broward County Commission-

SEE page three

George Smith backs Christie

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net



SIDNEY
CAMBRIDGE



IN the lead up to the par-
ty’s national convention next
month, the former PLP MP for
Exuma George Smith has
openly pledged his support for
Perry Christie to be returned
as leader of the PLP.

Calling Mr Christie a man
with tremendous ability and
ideas, Mr Smith said he wants
the officers in the PLP to push

SEE page eight

aA Meas







The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

Concern over

country’s failure
to escape OECD
list of tax havens

UU Sata tal la VR



FIREMEN’S
CHALLENGE was
held yesterday at
the fire training
grounds at the
Police Headquar-
ters in East
Street during Fire
Safety Week. A
fireman of the
Red Squad is
pictured pulling a
dummy to help
win the
Firemen’s
Challenge. Three
squads took part
in the challenge.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

dudge decides against stay of hotel union elections ruling

SUPREME Court Justice Neville Adderley
yesterday decided not to grant a stay of his
September 7 ruling that ordered a new nomi-
nation process for the hotel union elections,
which are scheduled for next Tuesday.

Attorney Keod Smith had sought the stay
on behalf of the majority of the union's Exec-
utive Council, pending an appeal of Justice
Adderley’s ruling in the Court of Appeal. Mr
Smith had also sought to have the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union

elections postponed sine die until after the
final determination of that appeal.
Nominations for the new Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers Union elections
were held on September 15. Tyrone Beneby,
Philippa Dixon and Raymond Wright running
for the Deliverance Team were not allowed to
nominate and Mr Smith contended that some

SEE page 12





Get Your Of) [°|

Coftee Fix

Boxers make

Bie rlinlies



Private banking
system leader to
leave Bahamas

By TANEKA
HOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LEADER in the
private banking system
has decided to with-
draw from the
Bahamas before the
end of the year because
this country has failed
to escape the powerful
OECD's “grey-list” of
so-called tax havens.

French-based bank
BNP Paribas
(Bahamas) Limited —
which operates in more
than 80 countries —
said despite "excellent"
financial performance
in the current econom-
ic crisis it had to review
its network "in the con-
text of the ongoing
changes in the world
financial system and
G20 initiatives."

SEE page 8



Ex-EMS worker
still maintains

his innocence

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Former
EMS worker Marcus Garvey
continues to maintain his
innocence following his dis-
missal by hospital officials
earlier this year.

Garvey insists that he had
no idea that a casual conver-
sation with an expatriate man
was being recorded for an
online entertainment website.

Hospital officials terminat-
ed the veteran employee in
February for breach of patient
confidentiality. Garvey was
one of two persons who had

SEE page eight

eM as
WRT La

NO witnesses took the
stand yesterday in the tri-
al of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and
former paramedic Tarino
Lightbourne who are
accused of attempting to
extort $25 million from
Hollywood celebrity John
Travolta.

SEE page 12



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NASSAU AND BAHAM/

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LTD.





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian charged over Florida store owner shooting

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN has been charged
in connection with the shooting of a
convenience store owner in Fort
Pierce, Florida.

Police arrested Anthony “Rude
Boy” Symonette, 21, as he made
attempts to board a cruise ship to Nas-
sau in Hollywood, Florida, on Friday,

September 11.

He had been wanted in connection
with the shooting death of Parag Patel,
44, on September 4.

Mr Patel, owner of the A&M Dis-
count Beverage store in Georgia
Avenue and Okeechobee Road, Fort
Pierce, was shot dead when three
armed men entered and robbed his
store.

Symonette, who was wanted in con-
nection with the murder, was trying

T Our

ur

to flee the US at the time he was
arrested, according to the Fort Pierce
police department.

A detective told The Tribune: “We
got a tip that Symonette was on the
way to the Bahamas and we got US
Customs and ICE (Immigration and
Customs Enforcement) involved in
trying to put flags on their passports.

“Then we got a call from customs to
say he had made it to the Bahamas,
but it turned out to be someone else.

“We knew Symonette was Bahami-
an and had family in Nassau and that
he was trying to get there.

“Then we got an anonymous tip that
he was trying to buy a cruise ticket in
Hollywood, Florida, because he would
have been able to get on and off the
cruise ship without a passport.”

Symonette has since been charged
with second-degree murder with a
firearm and robbery with a deadly
weapon while wearing a mask.

Donald “DJ” Isaiah, 24, and
Mahogany Alexander, 29, of Fort
Pierce, have also been charged on the
same counts.

Deondravious St Fleur, 23, of Fort
Pierce, was arrested on September 9
and charged with accessory after the
fact to murder on suspicion he drove
the gunmen to the Port St Lucie/Stuart
area, where they rented a car after the
robbery. Unconfirmed reports claim
St Fleur is Haitian-Bahamian.

PERMANENT
Secretary in the
Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Cul-
ture Archie Nairn
(left) with the
Ambassador of
the People’s
Republic of China

Hu Dingxian dur-
ing a tour of the
construction site
of the new
National Stadium
by executives of
the Bahamas Chi-
na Friendship
Association on
Tuesday.

MBASSADOR of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian

along with president of the Bahamas-China Friendship Associa-

tion Anthony McKinney and other government sports officials

toured the Thomas A Robinson National Stadium construction
site on Tuesday.

The Bahamas-China Friendship Association was established in 2004 to pro-
mote goodwill and people-to-people contact between both countries; to pro-
mote understanding of both countries through cultural exchanges and the study
of the language, culture and history of both; to promote economic and trade
opportunities and entrepreneurial development through participation in trade
fairs and investment tours; to provide mutual relief and assistance to the people
of both countries in times of emergency and for social enhancement, and to
assist in the improvement of the social, economic and spiritual welfare of the
peoples of both countries.

The most recent announcement of cooperation between the two countries was
the agreement signed with the Export-Import Bank of China for funding to
jump-start the $1.92 billion redevelopment of the Cable Beach strip.

Also, the gift of $30 million from China to build a sports stadium for the
Bahamas to contribute to the development of the country’s youth through
sports.



Ministry of
Youth,
Sports and
Culture/

Eric Rose

PROJECT man-
ager Iram Lewis
(right) shows
points of interest
ona map during
a tour of the con-

PERMANENT Secretary in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture Archie Nairn
(centre) joins Aaron Brice (left) and Mrs

Delores Ingraham, wife of the prime min-

ister and principal of C C Sweeting High
School, during a tour of the construction

struction site of
the new National
Stadium by exec-
utives of the
Bahamas China
Friendship Asso-

site of the new National Stadium by exec-
utives of the Bahamas China Friendship
Association on Tuesday.

ciation on Tues-
day.



Hope for graduates with reject
letters from Bahamian colleges

FACULTY AND
BOARD

members of Hope
College shown
here at an Open
House over the
weekend. The
Christian-based
college, spear-
headed by the
Assemblies of
Brethren in the
Bahamas, is tar-
geting those
whose aspirations
for higher educa-
tion were dashed
by unsatisfactory
BGCSE results.



By REUBEN SHEARER























WITH the national average down for BGCSE examinations
dropping from a ‘C-’ to a ‘D’, many graduates will have received
reject letters from local colleges.

With hopes of further education tarnished, there’s little option
but to try to find work in an already depressed job market.

However, there’s an institution offering an alternative solution.

Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Cen-
tre (CLC) pitched its degree programmes to the public in an open
house, and began registering new students for the 2009 academic
year.

uC es

OO Ra ua |

Dashed

The Christian-based college, spear-headed by the Assemblies of
Brethren in the Bahamas, is targeting those whose aspirations for
higher education were dashed by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr
June Wilson, Research and Education Director at the college told
The Tribune yesterday. In addition to secular training, the college
seeks to equip people interested in entering Christian ministry, pro-
viding an at-home ministry training experience however, for aspir-
ing church-workers in the Associate of Arts Divinity degree
(ATH). The College will offer BGCSE and pre-college classes in
English, Math, History, Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge,
Accounts and Economics at $350 per course.

For further information, contact the CLC on 328-5341



=

SAMA | 1

F

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS









Ses
Mal

TT



WHILE trying not to con-
demn the party’s former
treasurer Sidney Cambridge,
former PLP MP for Exuma
George Smith said that the
recent scandal surrounding
Mr Cambridge is “not a PLP
problem.”

“That’s Mr Cambridge’s
difficulty. I know Sidney
Cambridge. I am fond of
him, and I hope that this
society won’t judge him too
harshly and wait until the
matter plays itself out. But
that is not a PLP problem,”
Mr Smith told The Tribune
yesterday.

Tendering his resignation
to party leader Perry
Christie yesterday, Mr Cam-
bridge reportedly advised
the former Prime Minister
that he intends to focus his
energies on establishing his
innocence to the money
laundering charge upon
which he was indicted in
Florida on Wednesday.

“In these circumstances,
Mr Cambridge did not think
that it would be appropriate
for him to continue to serve
in any capacity within the
party at this time. I under-
stand and accept Mr Cam-
bridge’s decision and com-
mend him for dealing with
this matter so responsibly
and promptly,” Mr Christie
said.

Shocked

Expanding on the issue,
Mr Smith said he would be
shocked if any funds that
were spent by the PLP in the
last election, or the elections
before that did not come
from legitimate means.

“And the fact that I hold
an office in the party, and I
behave in a way that is
improper, unless the party
condones my behaviour the
party ought to deal with me.

“People make mistakes,
you know. I like to tell the
story that I belong toa
church, the Roman Catholic
Church that is 2,000 years
old. You have had Cardinals
that have messed up; they
messed up. The church is the
organisation and until the
church does something to
condone the wrong the
organisation isn’t tainted.

“And Iam not about to
suggest that Mr Cambridge
did anything wrong — I will
always shy away from con-
demning any Bahamian that
is seen to be getting into any
trouble beyond the borders
of the Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Colin Callender, man-
aging partner of Callender
and Co also confirmed yes-
terday that Mr Cambridge
had tendered his resignation
from the law firm where he
was a senior partner.

“He has resigned as a
member of the firm with
immediate effect as far as
I’m concerned it won’t
adversely impact on the
credibility or otherwise of
the firm,” said Mr Callen-
der.

It was unknown yesterday
whether Mr Cambridge will
also have to leave his post as
treasurer of the Bahamas
Bar Association, although
there were calls for him to
do so. Messages left for
Bahamas Bar Association,



Senior PLP MP says country would
benefit from rules on campaign financing

Call for more transparency

with political donations

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN the wake of a claim by a US
politician, caught up in a money laun-
dering scandal, that he gave money
to the PLP, a senior PLP MP says
there should be a more transparent
and accountable system for donations
to aspiring politicians and political
parties.

Dr Bernard Nottage, PLP Bain and
Grants Town MP, and former leader
of the Coalition for Democratic
Reform, said that while accused mon-
ey launderer Broward County Com-
missioner Josephus Eggelleton’s alle-
gation that he was “raising money for
(Perry Christie’s) re-election cam-
paign” in 2006 is “unsubstantiated” it
would be better for the country if rules
on campaign financing existed so that
a definitive record of who donated
what to which party could be scruti-
nised.

“T do not think that what that man
(Eggelleton) says is evidence of any-
thing. It’s a remark he made without
any substantiation whatsoever and
anyone can tell anyone else they are
raising money. Mr Christie denied any
knowledge of it or soliciting any funds
through or from him and his word is



“I do not think that what that man
(Eggelleton) says is evidence of anything. It’s a
remark he made without any substantiation
whatsoever and anyone can tell anyone else

they are raising money.



sufficient evidence for me that it’s
unlikely to be true,” said Dr Nottage.

Mr Eggelleton was quoted as mak-
ing the claim about being set to donate
to Mr Christie’s campaign in a criminal
complaint filed in Florida on Tuesday
following an extensive three-year-long
undercover operation by the Federal
Bureau of Investigations (FBI).

However, Dr Nottage, like several
other political figures over the years,
including Mr Christie, Brent Symon-
ette, Tommy Turnquest, Fred
Mitchell, Alfred Sears and Paul Moss,
said he does believe there “ought to be
very strict rules to which persons who
are seeking public office must com-
ply in case of funding.”

And he added that this should
involve records being kept of who
receives what donations from whom,
which can be “open to scrutiny by the
public and an independent election
commission” in the name of ensuring

fairness in elections and reducing
room for corruption or any percep-
tion of it.

“There should be completely trans-
parent and accountable procedures
and there should be records that can
be subject to scrutiny so we can tell
who is giving what,” he said.

His comments came after Sidney
Cambridge, PLP treasurer and partner
in the law firm of Callender and Co,
was indicted with Broward County
Commissioner Josephus Eggeleton,
as a result of an FBI “sting” opera-
tion.

It is claimed that Mr Cambridge
acted for Mr Eggelleton in a legal
capacity and both are accused, with
two others, of conspiring to commit
money laundering in the Bahamas.

The complaint against him primar-
ily focuses on the “sting,” in which it is
alleged that Mr Eggeleton advised and
cooperated with undercover agents

BERNARD NOTTAGE



who told him they wished to launder
funds in The Bahamas. The funds
were allegedly obtained through a
European-based investment fraud.

Mr Cambridge was indicted
Wednesday by US federal authorities
for allegedly helping to launder thou-
sands of dollars in proceeds from the
purported investment fraud.

The criminal complaint against Mr
Eggelleton on Tuesday stated, in part:
“On or about May 30, 2006, defen-
dant Eggelleton stated to an under-
cover agent and a cooperating wit-
ness, ‘If you wanna do some deals in
The Bahamas, let me know. Yes sir, in
fact Pm gonna be raising some money
for the prime minister of The
Bahamas that’s running for re-elec-
tion.”

In July 2006, Eggelleton was quoted
as saying that in the Bahamas he
“does not have to adhere to the same
ethical standards he has in the US.”

In astatement issued yesterday Mr
Christie said he was “able to confirm”
that “neither I nor any of the persons
who were responsible for fundraising
for the PLP in the last General Elec-
tion have any knowledge of any con-
tribution that would have been made
by, or on behalf of, or at the sugges-
tion or direction of any of the persons
who are named in the indictment.”

Cambridge quits as PLP treasurer

FROM page one

er Josephus Eggelleton and
two others following a three-
year-long “sting” operation
by the Federal Bureau of
Investigations into public cor-
ruption in Florida.

A statement from PLP
leader Perry Christie yester-
day afternoon said he had
accepted “with regret” Mr
Cambridge’s resignation as
party treasurer.

“Tn my discussion with him
this morning, Mr Cambridge
indicated that he intended to
focus all of his attention on
establishing his innocence to
the charge upon which he was
indicted in Florida yesterday.

“In these circumstances, Mr
Cambridge did not think that
it would be appropriate for
him to continue to serve in
any capacity within the Party
at this time.

“T understand and accept
Mr Cambridge’s decision and
commend him for dealing
with this matter so responsi-
bly and promptly.”

However, Mr Christie crit-
icised The Nassau Guardian
for its headline over the arti-
cle outlining the case involv-
ing Mr Cambridge on Thurs-

day, saying it was “unfortu-
nate that...the headline
referred to the indictment of
the PLP treasurer as if to
imply that that position was
somehow relevant to the
indictment.”

“In fact, the indictment
relates only to matters in
which Mr. Cambridge is
alleged to have acted as a
lawyer and not as a party offi-
cial.”

Headline

That headline read “PLP
Treasurer Charged in the
US”.

Mr Christie continued: “I
would remind all my fellow-
citizens that in common with
all accused persons, Mr Cam-
bridge is entitled to the pre-
sumption of innocence.

“In this regard, I am grati-
fied by Mr Cambridge’s per-
sonal assurances to me that
he is completely innocent of
the charges made against him
and that he intends to exert
every effort to vindicate him-
self accordingly.”

Finally, the PLP leader
asserted, with more certainty
than in his initial statement
on the matter, that he could

"UNEN » COTTON
* LAMOUR —* SILK

confirm having made further
inquiries, “that neither I nor
any of the persons who were
responsible for fundraising for
the PLP in the last General
Election have any knowledge
of any contribution that
would have been made by, or
on behalf of, or at the sugges-
tion or direction of any of the
persons who are named in the
indictment.”

“Any allegation to the con-
trary is completely false,” he
added. Colin Callender, man-
aging partner of Callender
and Co. confirmed Mr Cam-
bridge’s resignation from that
company yesterday afternoon.

“He has resigned as a mem-
ber of the firm with immedi-
ate effect as far as I’m con-
cerned won’t adversely
impact on the credibility or
other wise of the firm,” said
Mr Callender.

It was unknown yesterday
whether Mr Cambridge will

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
eA AOU
PG ELC ey

also have to leave his post as
treasurer of the Bahamas Bar
Association, although there
were calls for him to do so.
Messages left for Bahamas
Bar Association, President
Ruth Bowe Darville, were not
returned up to press time yes-
terday.

Some attorneys suggested

that the indictment of Mr
Cambridge, given his position
as a senior attorney and in the
Bar Association and the pub-
licity surrounding the matter
could have “serious” knock-
on effects on the reputation
of the legal profession in The
Bahamas.





































Thi “lol ot - ‘Winrar
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT bt AM DAILY

Basa2euus SEPTEMBER 25TH, 2000

susoones ew 8) 990] A | | was [x00

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fate aes eles

President Ruth Bowe
Darville, were not returned
up to press time yesterday.

0 In brief

RM Bailey
class of 1984
to hold meeting

RM Bailey class of 1984
will hold an important meet-
ing at the school on Robin-
son Road at 3 pm promptly.
Important matters will be
discussed, including the
upcoming 25th anniversary
banquet.

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# MLL JACOUMEDS, BROCADES

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Does Lynx Airlines

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Natural gas: It’s plentiful and it’s here

WASHINGTON — Natural gas is nifty
stuff. It burns twice as clean as other fossil
fuels, leaves no ash to be disposed of and is
critical to many industrial processes.

It is used for everything from drying grain
to distilling liquor. It is an essential feed-
stock in making fertilizers. It also can fairly
easily substitute for oil as a transportation
fuel. Buses in big American cities increas-
ingly run on it, as taxis in Australia have for
years.

Its history is a tale of how markets work,
how technology can broadside the best futur-
ists, and how planners and politicians can
get it wrong.

More important than the lessons of histo-
ry is the fact that we appear now to have
more natural gas than was ever predicted,
and we can look forward to possibly hun-
dreds of years of supply at present rates of
use. And it could slay the foreign oil dragon,
or at least maim the brute.

Trouble is, because of its tortured history,
natural gas has often been put on the back
burner.

When the first commercial oil well, the
Drake, was sunk in western Pennsylvania
in 1859, natural gas, or methane to give it its
proper classification, was not on anyone’s
mind except deep miners, for whom it was a
lethal hazard. The Oil Age began without
natural gas. When it was found in conjunc-
tion with oil, it was unceremoniously burned
off: a process known as flaring.

In the United States, natural gas faced
political problems as well as infrastructural
problems. Natural gas production was regu-
lated by a predecessor of the Federal Ener-
gy Regulatory Commission, the Federal
Power Commission. It was bound by a legal
ruling known as the Permian Basin Deci-
sion that kept the price of natural gas artifi-
cially low, discouraging new supplies and
new infrastructure, such as processing plants
and storage. This led to shortages and to a
lack of confidence in the future of natural
gas.

During the energy shortages of the 1970s,
natural gas was discounted by the govern-
ment and much of industry. Jack O’Leary,
the first deputy secretary of energy, snapped
at a reporter who asked him about natural
gas: “Forget about natural gas: It is a deplet-
ed resource.”

Congress panicked and passed a piece of
legislation called the Fuel Use Act, which

forbade the use of natural gas for many
things, including pilot lights in new kitchen
stoves. There was even concern about the
eternal flame at Arlington National Ceme-
tery. Utilities were told not to even think
of burning natural gas: It was too precious
and there was too little of it.

Gas demand declined precipitously in the
1980s. And in 1987, the Fuel Use Act was
repealed. Along with deregulation of gas, a
gas boom resulted.

But it was technology that changed every-
thing. New drilling techniques increased sup-
ply. New turbines, based on airplane engines,
started to enter the electricity market. They
were clean, easy to install, and reached high
efficiencies of fuel-to-electricity conversion.
Today, 30 per cent of our generation comes
from these “derivative” machines.

So successful was natural gas in the 1990s,
that new concerns about supply shook the
industry and the public was told that gas
would have to be imported from the Middle
East, especially from Qatar. Permission was
sought to build dozens of liquefied natural
gas terminals around the coastlines.

Now it looks as if natural gas is a fuel with
an enormous resource base — thanks to
technology.

The technology in question is horizontal
drilling. Imagine you sink a hole 2 miles into
the earth and then send out horizontal roots
in all directions from this vertical trunk.
That, in essence, is horizontal drilling and it
makes available trillions of cubic feet of nat-
ural gas trapped in close formation shale
deep in the earth.

Ironically, or fittingly, this takes the ener-
gy story back to Pennsylvania where a vast
shale field called the Marcellus is being
developed and will write the next chapter of
hydrocarbon energy.

This is good because it is plentiful, it is
here and it builds on extant pipeline infra-
structure.

Of course, it makes investments in many
“alternative” sources of energy, particularly
ethanol from corn, look like very poor
investments. Cars and trucks that run on
natural gas are an appealing alternative to
ethanol with less disruption of the food chain
and stress on the farms.

(This article was written by Llewelyn King
-C.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



care about their

Bahamian passengers?
LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is a letter to voice the
concerns that I have over Lynx
Airlines, which is operating out
of Fort Lauderdale to Bimini.
On August 12, 2009 when I had
planned to depart Fort Laud-
erdale to return to Bimini I did-
n’t know what to expect (hav-
ing never flown Lynx Airlines
before August 10, 2009 when I
travelled to Fort Lauderdale).
So I went to the airport early in
the event of an early departure
or for some unforeseen prob-
lem. The flight was scheduled
to leave at 3.30 pm. My wife
along with myself arrived at the
airport at 12.15pm.

On our arrival to the Fort
Lauderdale International Air-
port we soon realised that there
were no ticket agents at the
counter. After waiting for a
while we called the office num-
ber that was on the ticket and
the agent said that they were
going to send someone to pick
us up. Not knowing what time
the shuttle was going to arrive
we just waited. After waiting
for over an hour the shuttle
came and took us to the freight
section of the airport because
this is where they were working
from. Getting to this location I
told the agents that we were
hungry and that everyone that
was there was afraid to go
upstairs to the restaurant and
get something to eat because
we had no idea when the shut-
tle would arrive. They had one
vending machine with five chips
in it and nothing else. I asked
the agent when or if they were
going back to the airport that I
wanted to go so that I could get
some food for my wife and
myself to eat and they said “no
problem.” Twenty minutes lat-
er a few more passengers came
and I asked what had happened
because they knew I wanted to
get something to eat, but they
ignored me.

At 3.20pm they told us that
we were going into Congo
Town, Andros Island, then they
were going to drop us off in
Bimini. The question was
asked, “Why are we going into
Andros?” The response was
that there are more people to
come out of Bimini. We swal-
lowed that pill and proceeded
with the flight.

After flying for over an hour
we were over Andros, flying to
the airport which was another
20 minutes away. On lining up
for landing the pilot said that
we could not land and that we
had to go back to Fort Laud-
erdale. Everyone thought that
he was joking until the plane
climbed past 10,000 feet. The
question was asked, why are we
going back? He said that there
was a hydraulic problem.

As we were flying back to
Fort Lauderdale we were real
quiet on the plane because we
did not know what was going
on. When we got over Fort
Lauderdale we started to pray
audibly and as soon as we had
finished praying the landing
gear came out. We flew over
the tower so as the tower could

letters@triobunemedia.net



take a look at the landing gear
then we proceeded to make a
safe landing. Upon getting on
the ground everyone was glad
to be alive and the mechanical
crew came out to inspect the
plane. All the passengers went
into the warehouse as to try and
get our thoughts together.

Speaking with the agent they
said that they were going to put
us up for the night. We asked,
“What about food?” and they
said that they are not going to
do that. The question was asked
why, since it was their fault that
we were back in Fort Laud-
erdale but they continued to
say that they are not going to
do it. We asked for the manag-
er (or owner) to come and
speak with us whose name is
Albert Vitale but the agents
said that he is not coming to
see us. After an event like the
one that had just happened he
should want to speak with the
passengers to let them know
that they are concerned about
the well being of the passen-
gers, but seemed to be of no
concern to them.

We pleaded with the agent
to call for him to come out to
the warehouse. Finally, one of
the agents said that Mr. Vitale
would be over in twenty min-
utes so we said that we would
wait. After one half hour the
agent said that he would meet
us at the hotel but no one
believed him because he did
not come to the warehouse. I
asked the agent if we flew with
them in the morning would we
still have to fly into Andros and
the answer was yes.

We arrived at the Best West-
ern Hotel and one of the pas-
sengers asked what about food
and the agent said there was a
McDonalds next door. The
response to that was, “So are
we supposed to go to McDon-
alds and say that Lynx sent us?”
because they still did not give us
any money. We went and
checked into the hotel and the
agent was getting all the room
numbers of the passengers then
he told the hotel agent that he
would call her back to get the
room numbers and to give any
information that is needed to
pass on to the passengers. The
ticket agent left but before he
left he said that the manager
would be stopping by the hotel
to bring some money for us,
and then he left. At this point
the hotel employee was more
concerned about our welfare
than Lynx. Kendra (the hotel
employee) was going out of her
way to see that we were com-
fortable and at ease and I thank
her for that.

In the first place the hotel
was not responsible for the
state that we were in and if
Lynx had to up date us about
anything they should have done
it themselves and not try to pass
it on to the hotel. We stayed in

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the lobby trying to comfort one
another as best we could;
because shock comes into play
when you are alone and every-
thing starts to come down on
you. We stayed in the lobby as
a group for one and one half
hours until we felt that we felt
better. The entire time that we
were in the lobby Mr. Vitale
never showed up, nor called.

We went to bed and got up
the next morning and went
straight to the airport trying to
catch another plane because of
the way that we were treated
and our lives did not seem that
important to Lynx. At 8.30am
Lynx phoned me on my cell
phone to find out if we were
still at the hotel and I said that
we were at the airport. They
said that they were on their way
to pick us up. I asked, “For
what? Because we were not fly-
ing with them anymore.” The
response was, “Aren’t you
going to Bimini anymore?” I
said, “Yes, but not with Lynx.
Not only my wife and myself,
but everyone that was going to
Bimini would not be flying on
Lynx.”

We travelled on Continental
and had a safe flight home
going direct to Bimini. Lynx
flight that they wanted us to
come on which was supposed
to leave Fort Lauderdale at
9.00am did not get into Bimini
until after 7pm that evening
because they had more
mechanical problems. Had we
flown with them we would have
been in the warehouse for the
entire day with a company that
did not even give us the time
of day.

The problem was not the
landing gear because any plane
can have problems but the way
in which we were treated so
very poorly. They had no sym-
pathy for what we went through
and it seemed as if they did not
care.

Problems with Lynx:

No ticket agent at the air-
port; no set time for busing to
freight section; no vending
machines in the freight section;
no advance notice of going into
Andros Island. The plane went
into Andros first passing Bimi-
niin the air.

No help from the ticket agents
when we got on the ground.
They made no effort to see that
we could call our families to let
them know we were safe.

No food voucher; no contact
was made with the passengers
after being checked in to the
hotel; seemingly no concern
about the mental state of the
passengers; no call advising us
on the progress of the plane
they wanted us to fly on; no
alternative way to get home if
we did not want to fly Lynx
anymore; no compensation for
the loss of a day’s pay.

Something needs to be done
with Lynx. Chalks airlines start-
ed to do the same kinds of
things that Lynx is doing now
and you saw what happened to
them. I am asking please look
into this matter so that we do
not have another Chalk’s
tragedy on our hands. In that
crash I had a loss of four fami-
ly members.

Mr. Vitale said that he would
come into Bimini to speak to
each of the passengers and hear
our concerns, but to date he has
not shown up and does not
answer his phone anymore.

PEDRITO and HELENA
ROBERTS

Bahamas,

September 8, 2009

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Re: Drivers, please use your
indicators.

Tribune,

September 19, 2009

THE courteous use of turn
signal indicators presents an
excruciating dilemma to many
stereo-blasting, cell phone-
using, grade D drivers. The
added mental strain of choosing
left vs right on the spur of the
moment is simply too much for
them to handle. Consequently,
their solution is to employ one
of two time-honoured methods
for resolving the problem —

(a) Don’t use any signal indi-
cators at all (commonest), or

(b) Press the hazard button
and flash all the lights at once.

The latter is frequently found
to be especially thrilling by jit-
ney drivers and those who like
to celebrate Christmas all year
long.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

September 20, 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

FOUL ODOUR COMPLAINT
Ministry
staff urged
to return
to work

BAHAMAS Public Service
Union President John Pinder
advised staff at the Ministry of
Education’s office on Thomp-
son Boulevard to return to
work today and if a foul odour
remains in the building, they
must vacant the premises and
“work outside.”

Originally, staff at the min-
istry complained of mould in
the building that resulted in
talks between Mr Pinder and
Education Minister Carl
Bethel. According to Mr Pin-
der, Mr Bethel had “looked
favourably” on the staff work-
ing on “flexible hours” or a shift
system so that the work of the
ministry could be done.

However, when the minister
took this initiative to cabinet,
Mr Pinder said, cabinet report-
edly did not approve it.

“And so he (Mr Bethel) had
to call back and tell them (the
staff) that it was cancelled and
they had to go back to the nor-
mal shifts.

“Now when they got to work
this morning they met a foul
odour in the place and they
came out in protest against that.
But in addition to that we are
now learning, like I indicated,
that the flexi-hours are not
approved,” he said.

Mr Pinder said his union
members are having difficulty
with the decision taken by the
Minister, as normally such tem-
porary measures as the pro-
posed shift system does not nec-
essarily require Cabinet
approval.“‘So I don’t know why
this has to reach the cabinet
level, and that has me con-
cerned,” Mr Pinder said.

With the minister indicating
that government is working
aggressively to have these
employees at Thompson Boule-
vard relocated to another site,
Mr Pinder said he felt it was
imperative for the staff to be
placed on a shift system so that
some of them can vacate the
building when necessary
because of the mould problem
that currently exists.

“When you look at that
mould, it is playing with their
psyche. They are getting the
impression that this is really
going to make them sick and
some of them are already expe-
riencing discomfort in breathing
and the rest of it. And so I fig-
ured the fewer hours they
spend in there the better it is
for them. And we had agreed
for them to do five hours a day

Paying father's

funeral expenses Is

CGC

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved daughter of
popular radio personality Antho-
ny 'Fatback' Marshall claims she is
struggling to pay off her father's
funeral expenses despite the thou-
sands of dollars that were raised in
donations after his death.

Radio station More 94FM,
where Mr Marshall was
employed, accepted almost $8,000
in donations during a special call-
in show shortly after he died to
help with the popular disc jockey's
funeral costs.

Mr Marshall's eldest daughter
Charnell said that although the
station paid out $5,000 to the
funeral home, management has
refused to give her the remain-
der. She also claimed she is being
harassed by creditors to pay
$1,600 for her father's burial plot
and a balance of $2,700 to the
funeral home. The 23-year-old
single mother said she is now
forced to sell her only means of
transportation - her dead father's
car - to cover the outstanding bills.

"It's still hard for me because
me and him were basically living
together and I was taking care of
him up to his death, only me and
his girlfriend, and its still hurting
and I have to fight for the little
that he has," she told The Tri-
bune.

"People who donated money
are calling me, saying 'Man I hear
you still in pain, what happen to

my money?’." When The Tri-
bune contacted station manger
Galen Saunders for comment he
directed us to the station's attor-
ney Craig Butler.

Mr Butler told The Tribune that
between $7,500 and $7,700 was
raised in donations in memory of
Mr Marshall during a radio show
shortly after his death. He said
$5,000 of this was paid to the
funeral home while the balance
remains in the care of the radio
station.

Claim

He also claimed that since Mr
Marshall's death, three different
people have approached the sta-
tion saying they had rightful claim
to the money. This prompted the
station to temporarily freeze the
funds until management could
sort out who was legally entitled
to the money.

"That's friction that More
94FM does not need to be
involved in, so the station asked
me what to do and I advised them
that until I get some clarity on the
situation I will not release those
funds."

Mr Butler added that if Mr

Marshall's immediate family met
with him collectively, an agree-
ment could be reached on when
to release rest of the money.
Mr Marshall, 44, died June 25, the
day after he suffered a heart
attack. He is the founder of the
Fatback Kids Club.

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by the day week or month in

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in two different shift systems
to make sure that the place is
always covered so that they can
be away from the building for
some period of time.

“And I already told them
when they return to work today
that if the environment in the
building is unbearable then
they are not to work in the
building. I advised them to
show up to work and if the
problem has not been corrected
they are to work on the out-
side,” Mr Pinder said.

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VA eT

NOTICE OF
SPECIAL CALL
MEETING

To: All Members of National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited,
New Providence, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,
San Salvador and Exuma.

Sa

IN recognising World Ani-
mal Day on the October 4,
the Bahamas will join many
other countries around the
world in celebration of this
occasion.

The day is known to others
as St Francis of Assisi Day —
named after the patron saint
of the animals. The Bahamas
Humane Society is encourag-
ing all animal welfare groups
and owners of animals to do
something special for animals
on this day.

The Parish of St Christo-
pher’s and the Bahamas
Humane Society will be hold-
ing a St Francis of Assisi ser-
vice for all animals and pets
on Sunday, October 4, at
4.30pm at St Christopher’s
Church at Lyford Cay. Please
bring your animals and pets
and share in the service cele-
brated by Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright.

Stephen Turnquest of the
Humane Society urged peo-
ple to e-mail photos of events
to bhscruelty@gmail.com so
that they can be highlighted
on http:/Awww.worldanimal-
day.org.uk under the
Bahamas events.

ie
US



Pursuant to Section 21, 22 & 99 of the Co-operative
Societies Act 2005, notice is hereby given that all
members of National Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited (NWCCU) are urged to
attend a Special Call Meeting on Friday,
October 2nd, 2009 at the British Colonial
Hilton, Salon BC commencing at 10:00am to
discuss and vote on important matters pertaining to
your Credit Union.

National Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited (NWCCU) Merger with Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited
(BUCCUL)

The closure of the East Bay Branch, effective
October 31st, 2009.

The acquisition of property for the purpose of
constructing a building for housing NCCCU
head office.

To address the matter pertaining to the member
of the Supervisory Committee who did not meet
the requirements during the time of election.

aU eet)
PHONE: 822-2157

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD RESPONDS TO NASSAU INSTITUTE

NIB: Tax increase suggestion is wrong
a (ole

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

We

Mrs. Barbara Elaine
Kelly Albury, 89

of Village Road,
Nassau, The Bahamas
died at her residence,
on Wednesday 23rd
September, 2009.

Mrs. Albury is
| predeceased by her
| husband, Kenneth HE.
Albury, her brother,
Dudley Sands and her
daughter-in-law, Christina Albury.

She is survived by her son, Drew Albury; brother,
Everette Sands and his wife Patricia;
grandchildren, Christian and Stefan Albury;
sister-in-law, Valeria Sands; nephews, John and
Jimmy Sands; niece, Sonia Springle and many
other relatives and close friends.

A Memorial Service will be held for Mrs. Barbara
Elaine Kelly Albury, at Trinity Methodist Church,

Trinity Place and Frederick Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 3rd October, 2009 at 4:00p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family request that donations
be sent to Queen's College Foundation, P.O. Box
N. 7127, Nassau, in memory of Barbara E.K.
Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.



BY THE NATIONAL
INSURANCE BOARD
September 21, 2009

heNational Insur-

ance Board

(NIB) wishes to

address and cor-
rect “facts” advanced by the
Nassau Institute in a letter
to the Editor, published in
the Nassau Guardian of Sat-
urday, September 19, 2009,
and referenced in a Tribune
article on September 21,
2009. In that letter, the Nas-
sau Institute incorrectly sug-
gested that National Insur-
ance is proposing an 84.1 per
cent increase in taxes.

Each month the National
Insurance Board collects
contributions from employ-
ers and employees that are
invested for future benefit
payments to workers should
they lose employment
income for reasons such as
sickness, child birth,
advanced age, invalidity,
death and more recently, loss
of employment.

Contributions made to
NIB are certainly not faxes;
they are contributions, or, in
commercial insurance terms
premiums, for which con-
tributors receive returns in
the form of income-replac-
ing benefits.

There is a direct link
between contributions made
and benefits received.

For example, National
Insurance contributions pro-
vide full relief for employ-
ers from any costs and lia-
bility related to job-related
accidents or diseases.

In their letter, the Institute
gives an example of how a
proposed two per cent rate
increase and a change in the
wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per week will result in a
84.1 per cent increase in con-

ARG a Ne |

ES ._



The National Insurance Board

Press Response To a letter from the Nassau
Institute, published in the September
19, 2009 edition of the Nassau Guardian.



tributions. While their math-
ematics may be correct for
someone earning $600 or
more per week, the Institute
does not state that each of
the considered increases they
refer to would result in
increased benefits to con-
tributors.

Also, a ceiling increase will
not affect all workers and
employers.

Ceiling

In fact, when the ceiling is
increased next, only around
40 per cent of the workers
and their employers will be
affected, i.e., only those
workers who are now con-
tributing on the maximum
$400 per week contribution
ceiling will be required to
pay more.

From this perspective, the
Nassau Institute’s calcula-
tions are not correct as they
appear to assume that all
workers make in excess of
$400 per week.

In fact, the assumption
seems to be that all workers
make at least $600.

We know that this is not
true; we know that not all
workers will be affected, and
those affected will not all
have to pay on the new ceil-
ing.
It must be restated that
National Insurance contri-
butions are payable on actu-
al wages up to the ceiling. If
that ceiling is increased to
$600 today, then the person
who makes $525 per week,
will pay contributions on
that amount and not on $600
per week.

So then, contrary to the
Nassau Institute’s con-
tention, 60 per cent of work-
ers will see no change in
their weekly or monthly
deductions.

The remaining 40 per cent

of workers will be affected,
but in varying degrees.
Depending on their actual
wages, some will pay contri-
butions on wages of $10
more per week; or on $100
more; or, in the case of those
earning the ceiling or above,
on $200 more.

It cannot be overstated
that those who will pay more
in contributions as a result
of the ceiling increase will
realize larger benefits based
on their higher insurable
wages.

The National Insurance
programme needs to main-
tain its relevance as both the
economy and social patterns
change and thus various
responses are required from
time to time. In April 2009,
an unemployment benefit
was added.

Because of this new bene-
fit over 11,000 unemployed
workers have had a portion
of their lost income replaced
and over $14 million has
been returned to the econo-
my thus far, boosting local
consumption and benefiting
Bahamian businesses.

A ceiling adjustment
would be in response to
increasing wage levels over
the past 10 years and will
enhance NIB’s relevance to
higher income workers.

Regarding the specific
adjustments referred to by
the Nassau Institute, the
Government of The
Bahamas has not announced
any rate increase or ceiling
adjustments.

While new benefit initia-
tives and actuarial recom-
mendations do call for rate
and ceiling adjustments, no
changes or implementation
dates have been set.

It is likely, though, that the
additional one per cent con-
tribution for unemployment
benefit that will be shared

equally by employers and
employees, will take effect
in early 2010, and this is
required to support the con-
tinuing benefit.

Likewise, the Chronic Dis-
ease Prescription Drug Plan,
when expanded to all NIB
eligible contributors, will call
for a rate adjustment, now
suggested at one per ecnt.
The accompanying benefit
that will be delivered to all
employees, when this rate
increase is approved and
implemented, will result in
a significant benefit to con-
tributors and employers and
will likely result in decreased
health care costs for the
entire country.

Value

The National Insurance
programme has for more
than 30 years proven its val-
ue and importance to work-
ers, employers and the over-
all economy.

To maintain its value and
relevance, changes are
required from time to time.

In this case, new benefits
and a ceiling adjustment are
being considered. The Gov-
ernment and the National
Insurance Board will be
proactive in measures aimed
at ensuring that Bahamians
can depend on the National
Insurance Board to provide
meaningful benefits to cur-
rent and future generations
of Bahamians.

We know that we must
reform NIB.

Workers and the media
are calling for this reform,
particularly to ensure that
the Fund remains relevant,
vibrant, and paying a mean-
ingful benefit beyond 2032.

It would not be responsi-
ble for NIB to know that it
has to reform and to intro-
duce new benefits, provide
for income relevancy and
move to introduce the rec-
ommended Actuarial rec-
ommendations, without
reviewing the cost of the
additional benefits. Simply
put, we cannot sit by and do
nothing when we know that
we should act now.

AVG NOUS UAL ey)
SU US LUNG

ARAWAK Homes will host its first
“Build on your lot” fair at its Shirley
Street office on Saturday.

This event will cater to persons who
own their lots, or have a considerable
amount of equity built up in a lot on which
they are still paying the bank, and wish to
build a home, or a multi-family structure.

A spokesman for the company said
that they are aware that “many persons
own a lot, are paying on a lot, have inher-
ited a lot, have been given a lot or have

been promised a lot and really want to
take the next step towards becoming a

home-owner. Then this event is for

them.”

YOOR CORAICrION-TO lar WoeLe

On Saturday Arawak Homes team of
home consultants, architects, engineers,
attorneys and contractors will be avail-
able from 10 am to 5 pm, to answer ques-
tions, and to provide assistance on all
aspects of home-ownership.

The event, said the spokesman, is free.

Serenity Point

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PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER

For the Disposal of Scrap Underground
& Aerial Copper Cable

The Bohamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is currently
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Cable. All interested companies are asked to collect a Proposal
at the Security Desk at JFK Head Office.

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Tender for the Disposal S$crap Underground & Aerial Copper Cable
Attention:
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THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, NOR IS ANY OFFER OR SOLICITATION MADE WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. THE STATEMENTS SET FORTH HEREIN ARE SUMMARY IN NATURE AND
SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON. A PROSPECTIVE PURCHASER SHOULD REFER TO THE ENTIRE SET OF DOCUMENTS PROVIDED BY ANCO LANDSLTD. AND SHOULD SEEK COMPETENT LEGAL ADVICE IN CONNECTION
THEREWITH,

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

EDUCATION: ‘Sit-in’ protests

Teachers return to classrooms
as Ministry bows to demands

eed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TEACHERS who refused to work ear-
lier this week returned to their classrooms
yesterday as the Ministry of Education
committed to meeting all of their demands.

Staff have been reassigned to fill vacant
positions at C I Gibson and Anatol
Rodgers high schools, and 70,000 new
pieces of furniture arrived in Nassau on
Friday to be distributed to insufficiently
furnished public schools.

Dissatisfied teachers staged sit-ins at Uri-
ah McPhee on Friday until the broken air
conditioning was repaired over the week-
end; they refused to work at Anatol
Rodgers on Monday and Tuesday until two
teachers were put in place, and at CI Gib-
son the staff of 80 staged a three-day
protest.

Classes resumed at C I Gibson Senior
High School yesterday after the Ministry of
Education provided four teachers and four
security officers, as well as classroom fur-
nishings.

Teachers had complained classrooms did
not have enough desks and chairs to accom-



o , oo am
rSA
S
4

te
fee |



Cl GIBSON

modate large classes, and they were over-
worked as there were not enough staff.
They were also concerned about their per-
sonal safety, as 11 knives and an ice-pick
have been found on the campus this term.

President of the Bahamas Teachers
Union (BUT) Belinda Wilson criticised the
Ministry of Education for not having all
the necessary staff and furnishings in place
at public schools before the start of the
new school year on August 31.

But Director of Education Lionel Sands
said the department did not fail to hire the
correct number of staff or order the neces-
sary furnishings, but resources had to be
reassigned when registration was complet-
ed after the start of the new school year.

An estimated 3,000 students were expect-
ed to move from private to public schools
this year owing to the recession, but when
the school year started, only half that num-
ber were transferred to the public school
system.

And those students were distributed at
schools across New Providence, and did
not necessarily enroll at the school the Edu-
cation Department expected them too.

This confusion was compounded by the
fact that parents would register a child at

DEEP CREEK
Middle School
students Lionel

and Wayde at the
Boys Club of NY
summer camp.

Handbags
Ewe - Belts
Clothes



A STEAK-OUT at an Eleuthera Pri-
mary School will raise money for stu-
dents to attend challenging summer
camps in the United States next year.

Deep Creek Middle School, in Rock
Sound, hopes to raise thousands of dol-
lars this year for a scholarship fund that
will pay for students to attend camps in
New York, Vermont, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire and Maine next sum-
mer, as well as local camps in Gregory

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

several schools in the hope of getting a
place. Therefore the projections were off by
300 students in some cases, as at C I Gibson
800 students were expected to attend, and
1,100 have now enrolled.

Mr Sands said: “We weren’t concerned
with understaffing because we recognised
that around the end of September we
would find out what the real numbers are,
and we didn’t want to transfer teachers
until after we got the final numbers for stu-
dents in the schools.

“I am not ashamed because we did not
have any control over the movement of
people from one district to the next, or the
number of students that leave private
schools and go to public schools, so I don’t
feel embarrassed that we had to make
adjustments, the department makes adjust-
ments when the need arises.

“We were making adjustments last year
and every year before, but this year is not a
usual year because of the financial situation

.. and it was so bad this year because we
expected more students.

“But the bottom line is the children are
the ones who actually suffer in all of this
and it is grossly unfair to all of them and to
the parents.”

ALL BABY PHAT ITEMS MUST GO
Located in The Mall at Marathon, North Entrance by the Food Court

Tel.: 394-7019

nce lee ees os

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Town and at Camp Eleuthera. The
school has been running the programme
for three years and has so far sent 34
students on positive vacation adventures.
Last year the camp scholarship fund
raised over $39,000, and the school hopes
to be just as successful this year.
Principal Joanna Paul said: “Support-
ing travel to camp is a large part of our
budget, but the change it produces in
students is worth every penny. “When a

Police arrest
four men after
drug seizure

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police arrested four men in connection
with a drug seizure at an apartment complex in the Lunar
Boulevard area.

More than 70Ibs of a substance suspected to be mari-
juana with an estimated street value of about $56,800 was
seized on Wednesday.

At about 3.15pm police executed a search warrant at a
five-unit apartment complex at Lunar Boulevard for
dangerous drugs and firearms.

During a search of one of the units officers discov-
ered two large black plastic bags containing a number of
clear-taped packages of suspected marijuana.

Truck

Officers also searched an abandoned white dump truck
located at the rear of the complex, where they found
another black-taped package of suspected marijuana in
the glove compartment.

Two additional bags of marijuana were also found
hidden under the hood of the truck.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said four men were taken
into police custody.

Officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit are continuing
their investigation.

Ms Mackey thanked the Grand Bahama community
and the media for their continued partnership with the
police in the fight against crime.

People who want to report a crime, or those who may
have information about an incident, is asked to tele-
phone 350-3107/8 or 911.



student climbs the highest mountain in
Maine, suddenly a math test on fractions
doesn’t seem so hard.”

After returning from camp, Aleice
Goodman of Tarpum Bay said: “I have
more temerity and I am not afraid to do
things I hadn’t done before.”

The steak-out will be held at the Rock
Sound homecoming site from 1lam on
Saturday.

The event will run all day.

Qt | WYNDHAM

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to take Discovery Day Weekend off and come Discover
the Tropical Treasures at the Wyndham Nassasu Resort.

Join in the Discovery Day Weekend Activities:

Take advantage of our Forever Summer Sale with
rates starting at $114.00 per room, per night
Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing

Pirates Dinner Party on the beach

(prize for best-looking pirate)

ystery photo scavenger hunt

Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team
Golf tournament (green fees additional charge)
Dive-in movie with popcorn

Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music
Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night
Club featuring the VIP Band

Dance contests & prizes

8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property

Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables,
dance floor, rock slide & water slide



WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT.COM ° 242.327.6200
WEST BAY STREET AT CABLE BEACH

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Private banking system leader to leave Bahamas

FROM page one

"In the light of this review,
BNP Paribas has taken the
decision to withdraw before
the end of 2010 from coun-
tries grey listed by the OECD
and viewed as Tax Havens.
This includes the Bahamas,"
said a brief statement released
by the company yesterday.

The bank said it will try its
best to maintain its clients'
interests, but the fate of the 40
persons employed there is
uncertain.

According to a well-placed
source, BNP's move is "a
political one", in line with
French President Nicholas
Sarkozy's views.

"It's definitely political —
they don't want to be seen in
grey or black-listed places,”
said the source, who believes
other private banks may fol-



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“It is a regrettable decision to the
extent that you don’t want to see a
reputable bank like Paribas leaving.”



low BNP's lead.

When contacted for com-
ment yesterday, State Finance
Minister Zhirvargo Laing said
while the bank's decision was
"regrettable" the Bahamas
was working feverishly to
meet the OECD's minimum
requirements by the end of
the year.

"It's a regrettable decision
to the extent that you don't
want to see a reputable bank
like Paribas leaving. It has sig-
nificant implications for their
staff and their clients and
there's also the tendency to
have the jurisdiction lose a

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Coconut Grove Plaza-Coconut Grove

TEL: 326-2355

“
CREDIT SUISSE



Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a

Senior Globus System Developer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

© Qualifications:

At least Five (3) years experience in installation, configuration and

troubleshooting in a banking environment

Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both support

and development roles

Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 - 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL
Experience in working with Globus/T24 related migration or implementation

projects.

Personal Qualities:

Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills

- Good technical and problem solving skills and expenence

- Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as

overtime

Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining

Globus/T24 system is a plus,

Other Duties:

- Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff

- Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
; o

Ensure that “d2Business Contingency Planning’d3 requirements are

follerwrendl

Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
- Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and extemal career development/training program

IST RE IN W i: Pe

minimum requirements need not a

pe

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O, Box Weds
Nassau, Bahamas



valuable presence. But again
this is one of the reasons why
we are working as feverishly
as we have been to meet the
(OECD's) standards.

“We know there might be
those entities that will find it
difficult to remain (here), if
the Bahamas remains in the
grey list. We fully expect to
meet that standard by the end
of the year but that does not
mean we cannot meet it soon-
er," he said.

The OECD requires 12 tax
information exchange agree-
ments (TIEA) as a minimum
requirement to be “white-list-

ed.” Mr Laing said the
Bahamas has signed three —
one with the United States,
one with Monaco, and the lat-
est signed yesterday with San
Morino.

The news came the same
day the powerful G-20 leaders
met in Pittsburgh to discuss,
among other things, ways to
crack down on tax havens.
The group was expected to
assess the progress of off-
shore jurisdictions that had
not met the OECD's white
list requirements.

International reports state
that French President Nico-
las Sarkozy is urging his G20
counterparts to agree to
impose sanctions on uncoop-
erative tax havens as early as
2010. Meantime, Pascal
Dulau, CEO of BNP Paribas
(Bahamas) Ltd said there is
no firm date when the bank

Former EMS worker still
maintains his innocence

FROM page one

driven the ambulance that took 16-year-old Jett Travolta to the

hospital on January 2.

Ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne, 46, was also fired ear-
lier this year. He is on trial with former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater for attempted extortion of actor John Travolta and

his wife, Kelly Preston.

The pair is accused of trying to extort $25 million from the
Travoltas. The trial opened in Nassau on Tuesday.

Mr Garvey said he has been following the trial.

The death of Jett Travolta in Grand Bahama had attracted a

lot of media attention.

Mr Garvey said that an expatriate saw him on television
arriving at the hospital in the ambulance with Jett and his par-

ents.

“He asked if I was still at the hospital and asked me ‘how did
it feel that it was John Travolta riding in the ambulance with

you.’

“Tsaid I did not know it was him. And he asked me how he
(John Travolta) was acting to the situation. I said, in a normal
conversation, that he was like any other normal parent con-

cerned about his child.”

Television

Mr Garvey said he later received a call from the Senior Hos-
pital Administrator about his appearance on television.

“She asked me if I knew I was on the TV. I told her yes, I saw
myself on ZNS opening the ambulance. She told me that she
was not talking about that, that she was talking about an Amer-

ican station.

Mr Garvey said that the administrator directed him to go to

the Internet.

“She told me to go to Radar on the internet. When I did, to
my surprise, I was being interviewed which was something I

never did with anyone.

“What was on the video was not what I said. It was edited to
suit their purpose. I was never seated where the background was

taken,” he said.

“T would warn my fellow colleagues to be careful...because
they can put you on the computer and do whatever they feel
like on the computer when you are an innocent person.

“Just as this happened to me, it could happen to anyone
tomorrow with the new technology today.

“T continue to maintain my innocence. I was wrongfully dis-
missed without proper investigation into this matter and I am
asking for gratuity or to be reinstated,” said Mr Garvey.

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD.

Parts Department
Thompson Bivd.

WILL BE

FOR STOCK TAKING
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2009

WE WILL BE

OPEN

for Business on Monday
September 28, 2009 at 8am

Our Vehicle Sales Department
WILL BE OPEN as usual

We thank you for your patronage
and apologize to our customers for
any inconvenience caused.



will pull its services out of the
country.

"We don't close, we are
exiting meaning that we are
trying to find a solution by
trying to sell or transfer the
business depending on the
clients — but there is no offi-
cial date where we say we
turn out the lights. We will
withdraw from the Bahamas
but will take the necessary
(steps)."

When asked if the bank
would reconsider its position
if the Bahamas managed to
make it onto the OECD's
white-list before the end of
the year, Mr Dulau said:
"Once you take this decision
you can't go back."

The Bahamas was placed
on the OECD's grey list, part
of a naming and shaming of
so-called tax havens by the
G20 nations, in April.

Te SHIH

TE RST

FROM page one

Mr Christie to be the kind of
leader that he knows he can
be.

However, the former MP
also warned that if Mr
Christie were to return as
leader of the PLP and not
perform up to par — that he
would be “very disappointed”
in him, and the party would
have to make the difficult
decision of replacing him.

“Tf that is required we are
obliged to do everything
humanly possible to be the
government.

“That is the purpose of the
party. Nothing supersedes
that.

“Nothing. But I am confi-
dent that he would (meet the
mark).

“And if he disappoints me,
I would do it with some sad-
ness, but I would join in the
effort to deal with the prob-
lem,” Mr Smith said.

Mr Smith also expressed his
fondness and admiration for
PLP leadership hopeful Paul
Moss and thanked him for his
bravery in entering the race,
stating that he feels the can-
didate has a “tremendous
contribution” to make to the
party.

“T embrace Paul Moss, he is
a man of tremendous ideas
and I think he has a future
with the party.

“ think Jerome Fitzgerald
has a tremendous future and
we need more like them to
come forward because as they
put their ideas in the great
mix it becomes what is really
best for the organisation and
the country,” Mr Smith said.

Quipped

While seeking not to high-
light exactly who he favours
for the deputy leadership of
the party — noting that there
are currently three persons
who have pledged — Mr
Smith quipped that he liked
two out of the lot but his true
candidate had not entered the
race — yet.

“Tam waiting to see who
else has entered the race.
Right now my candidate is
none of the above and if he
does not enter the race I will
certainly pick the one who I
would conclude the party is
safest with,” he said.

Mr Christie has been on the
offensive in the past few
weeks defending his tenure
as prime minister and chal-
lenging his critics who contin-
ue to write him as “soft”,
“indecisive”, or “weak.”

Recently in a televised
interview with JCN CEO
Wendall Jones, Mr Christie
warned his would-be chal-
lengers to not take his “kind-
ness for weakness.”

“Tam absolutely prepared
for this moment. Everything
about me has now climaxed
at this point where I am ready
to go. One only has to look
at my career and see the
arrows and the darts and the
punishing criticism that I have
received. Clearly that pre-
pares someone — it makes
you stronger.

“And contrary to percep-
tions that people try to put
out there.

“Tam a strong and pur-
poseful person connected to
people.

“And so I am confident,
and I know at the end of the
convention I will be the leader
of the PLP,” he said.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

—'



Trinidad
hangs on
to sixth
spot

But only top three
countries qualify for
2010 World Cup

By SAMORA J ST ROSE
Layout editor

LET’S take a glance at the
2010 World Cup Soccer
Qualifying in which Trinidad
& Tobago, the only
Caribbean island competing
in the finals against five coun-
tries, is hanging on to the
sixth spot with five points m
the North and Central Amer-
ica & Caribbean region.

After eight games, Trinidad
has one win, two draws and
five losses.

But only the top three
countries qualify. And the
fourth-place team advances
to the playoffs against the
fifth-place team in the South
America region.

The United States, which
barely has the top position
with 16 points ahead of Mex-
ico (15 points), Honduras (13
points), Costa Rica (12
points) and El Salvador (8
points), boasts a record of
five wins, one draw and two
losses.

Trinidad is scheduled to hit
the field against Costa Rica
in San Jose at 10pm Satur-
day, October 10. And the
Caribbean nation is slated to
host Mexico at Macoya
8:05pm Wednesday, October
14

In Europe, the winners of
each of the nine groups qual-
ify and the top eight second-
place teams advance to the
European playoffs.

Qualifying for the World
Cup at the top of group five
with 24 points is Spain which
has won all cight games
played.

England, also holding on
to the top spot in group six,
has qualified with 24 points
and boasts a perfect 8-0-0
record.

And in group nine, the
Netherlands qualified with 24
points and a perfect 8-0-0
record.

In South America, the top
four teams qualify and the
fifth-place team advances to
the playoffs against CON-
CACAF fourth place.

After 16 games played,
Brazil and Paraguay have
qualified and are in first and
second place with 33 and 30
points respectively ahead of
Chile (27 points), Ecuador
(23 points), Argentina (22
points), Uruguay (21 points),
Venezuela (21 points),
Colombia (20 points), Bolivia
(12 points) and Peru (10
points).

In Africa, the winners of
each of the five groups quali-
fy. After four games played,
Cameroon (seven points),
Tunisia (cight points), Alge-
ria (10 points) and Ivory
Coast are all leading their
respective groups in the
World Cup qualifying race
but only Ghana has qualified
at the top of group D with 12
points and a perfect 4-0-0
record.

Under-20 World Cup:

Egypt beats Trinidad

Meanwhile, in Alexandria,
host Egypt defeated Trinidad
4-1 in the Under-20 World
Cup opener, with Hussam
Arafat scoring twice yester-
day.

Striker Afroto gave Egypt
the lead in the 30th minute
at the Egyptian Army stadi-
um, but Jean-Luc Rochford
equalized six minutes later.

Arafat and Mohamed
Talaat scored early in the sec-
ond half, with goalkeeper
Glenroy Samuel at fault on
both goals. Arafat complet-
ed the rout in injury time with
an angled shot from the edge
of the penalty area.

Paraguay plays Italy in
Group A’s other game today.
Also on Friday, Nigeria plays
Venezuela and Spain faces
Tahiti in Group B.

12

sass 1€8

‘One day a friend told me he was going
to sailing camp, so I just tagged along...’

WHEN he was a tenth grader at CI
Gibson High School, Donico Brown
used to sit on the Montagu foreshore
watching the tiny white-sailed boats
race up and down the harbour.

Three years ago he had no idea he
was about to become one of the
Bahamas’ top junior sailors, repre-
senting the country in international
competition.

“One day a friend told me he was
going to sailing camp, so I just tagged
along. I had no idea where we were
going or what was involved. I even
thought he was talking about the big
regatta sloops,” he said. “But I was
really excited when I realised it was
the little boats ’'d been watching all
that time.”

The programme Donico stumbled
upon was the Bahamas Sailing Associ-
ation youth programme, and the little
boats were Optimist dinghies - the
boats most youngsters get their feet
wet in before graduating to the bigger
and more difficult to handle Sunfish.

In addition to providing training for
young Bahamians who have grown up
around the sport, the sailing camp,
which now operates year round, reach-
es into the public school system to
introduce as many Bahamian children
to the sport as possible.



DONICO BROWN in action...

“A lot of these kids would never
have been given the opportunity to try
it or even been exposed to sailing with-
out this junior programme,” explains
race committee chairman and veteran
sailor Jimmy Lowe. “Being able to
teach them how to sail and provide the
necessary equipment for them to use is
clearly a good thing for them, but it’s
good for those of us who love the sport

because we’ve been able to create a
base of new sailing talent that we’d
essentially lost for a generation because
there was no learn to sail programme.”

To date, more than 850 children have
learned to sail or mastered their skills
on the water thanks to the programme,
which has expanded in its five years
into Grand Bahama, Abaco, Eleuthera,
Harbour Island and Long Island.

Come October 15-17, Donico,
Christopher Sands, Michael
Holowesko, Michael Gibson and Brent
Burrows Jr, all of Nassau, and Long
Island’s Torrington Cartwright, are
expected to compete against top junior
sailors from around the world in the
International Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships 2009 that will be hosted by the
Nassau Yacht Club. That competition
will take place in Montagu Bay - the
very spot Donico was first introduced
to sunfish sailing.

“Tt’s not going to be easy, but I do
think we have a bit of an advantage
because that’s where we train every
day. We know the winds and the water
better than anyone else,” he says. For
months now, he has been putting in
three to four hours a day in practice to
prepare for the big event.

In fact, Donico, Sands, Holowesko
and Burrows Jr are among the 16

Bahamians who are set to compete
against some of the world’s best and
most seasoned sailors in the 2009 Sun-
fish World Championships also being
hosted by the Yacht Club October 16-
24

“Having these two world class events
here in the Bahamas this year is a
major boost to the sport locally and
will also provide significant exposure
for the country as more than 150 peo-
ple from 14 different countries will be
here over the two week period.

“A lot of people are working hard
behind the scenes to make sure the
Bahamas shines and none of it could be
done without key corporate sponsors
like Pictet Bank & Trust, Nestle and
Atlantis or without the support of the
ministries of tourism and youth, sports
and culture,” says Paul Hutton, chair-
man of the regatta.

The Bahamas has enjoyed much suc-
cess over the years in Sunfish sailing,
winning the World Championships five
times.

Donnie Martinborough, the
Bahamas’ top finisher in this year’s
Bahamas Nationals, is a three-time
Sunfish world champion, with top place
finishes in 1983, 1985 and again in 1988,
the last time the event was held in Nas-
sau.

BOXERS, from 11

And finally, he congratulat-
ed Knowles and Hield for the
manner in which they repre-
sented the country while they
were off for the past month.

“They had the best showing
ever and they ought to be
commended for being ambas-
sadors for our country,” he
said. “Too often, we in the
Bahamas, look and say if you
didn’t come first, second or
third, you didn’t do anything.

“That’s not the case in
sports. In sports, you give your
heart, your guts, everything on
the line. And that was what
these young men did. They

SAILORS, from 11

fourth consecutive year.

Forbes, who made his
debut, said he was also pleased
with his performance.

When asked if he thinks he
can come back next year and
beat de Cardenas, Forbes
could only chuckle because he
knows it would be a difficult
task.

And Brown, who wasn’t eli-
gible to compete in the
Nationals over the weekend,
said he was thrilled to watch a
lot of the competitors whom
he had the opportunity to
coach. “This weekend was
really competitive,” he said.

Talking about his perfor-
mance in Brazil in July, Brown
said it was a good experience
competing against the top
competitors from around the
world.

“It was a completely differ-
ent venue, a completely dif-

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represented the country well,
they represented the country
with dignity and they are still
learning.”

Archie Nairn, permanent
secretary in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
said the two boxers should be
commended, as well as Miller
and the executives of the
ABAB.

“What we see happening in
this federation exemplifies
what this ministry would like
to see in other federations as
well,” Nairn stated. “When we
see the kind of success manu-
factured by the many pro-
grammes they have taken on,

ferent atmosphere,” Brown
said. “I just need to work on
my techniques.”

Brown, who came into the
programme from the incep-
tion when he attended CI
Gibson Secondary High, fin-
ished 52nd in the champi-
onships held July 9-18.

According to Lawrence,
each country got to enter at
least one competitor. This was
the second time that the
Bahamas was represented.
The first time was two years
ago.

Brown will be joined by
Christopher Sands, Michael
Holowesko, Michael Gibson
and Brent Burrows Jr, along
with Long Island's Torrington
Cartwright, as they represent
the Bahamas in the Interna-
tional Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships 2009 that will be host-
ed by the Nassau Yacht Club
October 15-17 in Montagu
Bay.

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then we have reason to be just-
ly proud.”

Hield, who thanked God for
the opportunity to travel to
Italy, said the competition was
stiffer than he expected and
he went out there and he gave
it his all in the 64 kilogram
class.

“The loss has just boosted
me more to get back into
training for the Olympic
Games to be the first Bahami-
an to bring this gold medal
home,” Hield said.

The 23-year-old noted that
Knowles’ first round victory
was just like a gold medal for
the team because it put the
Bahamas on the map.

Knowles, who also thanked
the Lord, had nothing but
praise for all those who assist-

Sept 25th - 29th, 2009

Cay a

ie a OE Rhee 1007) als

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a able Pa

ed him mentally and physical-
ly to get ready for the champi-
onships, especially his father
who was there with him
throughout the whole experi-
ence.

“Everything went good,
everything was fine at the
training camp,” he said. “As
you can see, boxing is at a
stage where it is on the rise
now and my training pro-
gramme is going very fine.

“Tt was good, but it wasn’t
easy going up there and fight-
ing against the best in the
world. I went out there and I
did my thing. I brought back
history behind it.”

Now 21-year-old Knowles
said he wants to be able to go
out and fulfill his next dream
which is to win a medal at the

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Olympics in 2012.

Also in attendance was
Johnson, who is leaning on
making his second appearance
at the Olympics in 2012 with
Hield and Knowles, his team-
mates and training partners.

“This is a team, we all know
each other and I know what it
took down there to win was
not an easy task,” Johnson
said. “These guys deserve a
standing ovation. They went
down there and did what they
had to do.”

Unable to travel due to ill-
ness, Johnson said he was right
there in spirit and he congrat-
ulated both of them for their
efforts in Italy and he’s look-
ing forward to one of them
getting a medal in London in
2012.








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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



For the best sporting action . . .
WWW. ibune?42. C

Minister helps fund squash

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex undergoing
renovations, legendary track
coach Errol Bodie has decid-
ed not to sit idly down on the
sidelines. He has ventured
into the sport of squash, a
sport he is hoping to try and
resurrect in Grand Bahama.

At present, Bodie conducts
four classes daily for students
from Sunland Lutheran, St
George’s, Tabernacle and
Walter Parker Primary
School. In all, Bodie is cater-
ing to more than 300 students
in the programme, an aver-
age of 30-35 per class.

Yesterday, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister present-
ed Bodie with a grant to assist
in the development of his pro-
gramme.

During the day, Bodie said
the squash club is not in use,
so he came up with the idea of
hosting the high school stu-
dents on the four courts.

“T wrote to the Ministry
and the first time it was sent
back. But the second time, Mr
Bannister took note of the
programme,” Bodie said.

While he said they would
like to cater to all of the
schools on Grand Bahama,
Bodie said there are five with-
in the vicinity that they have
earmarked.

“Sunland walks to the
squash club in the mornings
and St George’s and Taber-
nacle busses their kids to the
squash club,” Bodie said.
“This is the only way you
could develop a sport that is
not taught in the schools or
taught in the facilities in the
schools.”

As a retired school teacher,
Bodie said he can devote his
time to the programme and
he has a number of friends
who come along to assist him.

“We’re hoping that through
this programme, we can iden-
tify some talent, tennis talent
and squash talent,” he said.
“Now-a-days, you don’t hear
anything about squash
because it is dying.

The
OA

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ay 2 ge



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ERROL BODIE accepts a cheque from Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister. Permanent secretary Archie Nairn looks on...

“There’s no problem to
keep it going. In the

Caribbean at one time we
were the best. Now there is

hardly any squash players. I
think the end result of all this

Bannister extends deepest
condolences to Ferguson family

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister has extended his
deepest condolences to the
family of the late Vincent
Lloyd Ferguson on behalf of
the government and the
entire local sporting commu-
nity.

Ferguson, 71, died at his
home while having breakfast
on Wednesday morning.

“As this country’s pre-emi-
nent sports administrator, he
embodied all that is good
about Bahamian sports,
inspiring in athletes and spec-
tators alike, the notion that
they all shared an equal stake
in the growth and develop-
ment of the Bahamas through
whatever noble medium they
sought to pursue,” Bannister
said.

He noted that “so firmly
did Ferguson believe in such
a proposition that many were

Se

It ye ouare 106 okins

his personal sacrifices to con-
nect unattached Bahamian
youth with their true purpose
in life, whether as an athlete,
an academic, as a politician,
as an educator or as a social
scientist.

“Such sacrifices were many
and continuous, resulting in
an abiding respect for his pro-
found wisdom that readily
qualified him as a Bahamian
icon, well known throughout
local and international cir-
cles.”

Bannister said his ministry
is convinced that “Vince Fer-
guson has been a shining
example to the youth and
people of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, as much by
his contribution to national
development through the use
of his intellect as by his steady
display of honesty, integrity
and respect for wider
humankind.



VINCENT FERGUSON

“Much can be said about
his days as an outstanding
athlete at St Augustine’s Col-
lege where he functioned as
an important cog in engines
of the Big Red Machine, a
name he was responsible for
coining and assigning to SAC
during his days as coach and

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vice principal there.”

Bannister also noted that
“for all these and his other
telling attributes as profes-
sional baseball player that
Vincent Lloyd Ferguson was
inducted into this country’s
National Hall of Fame in
2003, rightfully earning this
country’s highest national
sporting award.

“T have further requested
the Sports Department of my
ministry to provide me with a
number of other recommen-
dations to perpetually com-
memorate the invaluable
national contributions made
by Mr Ferguson such that his
life will forever serve as a
beacon for the youth of the
Bahamas, especially those
who demonstrate an avoca-
tion for sports.”

To the immediate and
extended family of Ferguson,
Bannister said he asks them

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to “take exceptional pride in
his life contributions, partic-
ularly in the countless lives
he so richly blessed by his
affinity to practice and preach
honesty and fair play.

“T am confident then, that
his many good deeds will long
outlive the relatively short
period of his temporal jour-
ney among us. Eternal rest
grant to him, O Lord.”

Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration president Lawrence
Hepburn offered his condo-
lences to the family.

“T join you in the mourning
of a legend who served his
generation with all he had,
with all that he said God had
endowed him,” Hepburn
said. “Today we lost a father
to the modern game of bas-
ketball as we know it.

“Many had came before
him, but none had revolu-
tionise the game of basket-
ball like Mr Vince Ferguson.
His presence demanded
respect and he did not apolo-
gise for his strength, frank-
ness and style of leadership.”

Hepburn said “while he
knew the power he possessed
he was also able to commune
with the most humbled or
down trodden.”

He said Ferguson’s words,
“Young Man,’ would resonate
in his ear because Ferguson
always got his full and undi-
vided attention.

“Yes Mr Ferguson was a
giant the many has tried to
emulate,” Hepburn said. “But
what I realised is that Vince
Ferguson not only was appro-
priate for his generation, very
much ahead of his time and
an exemplary role model, but
he was a man who possessed
a passion driven by a vision
and a love from God that
made him hurt to see his fel-
low men progress and
advance to the pinnacle of
success.”

Hepburn further said:
“Most of all we all knew his
disciplinary approach to life.
Mr Ferguson was never too
afraid to discipline, but he
lived the example before us
and gave us a model to fol-

And he noted that basket-
ball, baseball, track and field,
the Cancer Society, the
Bahamas Association of Bas-
ketball Officials, the men’s
fellowship of his church and
all was well served by this
great Bahamian.

“The Bahamas Basketball
Federation which he formed
wishes at this time to say to
the family of this icon: ‘Our
hearts hurt with you this day
and may the God of all com-
fort give you his ever-abiding
peace in this your time of sor-
row. We have indeed lost
another great Bahamian.’”

is the scholarships and if they
are very good, they can go
professional.”

Bodie said he already has
two students who are being
groomed for athletic scholar-
ships in the US.

As for track and field, Bod-
ie said as soon as the renova-
tions to the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex are complet-
ed, he will look at making a
return to coaching track and
field again.

“Coach Bodie has been the
most successful track and field
coach we’ve had in the coun-
try, so the kids in Nassau bet-
ter watch out,” Bannister said.

Baptist Sports
Council to
take break
for funeral

THE Baptist Sports
Council will take a break
next weekend because of
the funeral service of the
late Rashad Morris, who
was killed on Sunday
morning.

Morris is a brother of
Morris-Evans, who serves
as the treasurer of the
BSC. His father, Ortnell
Peter Morris, is also a
member of the league.

Morris has also helped
out considerably in the
concession stand at the
BSC's games. The BSC
extends its condolences to
the Morris family.

The BSC also extends
condolences to the hus-
band and wife team of
Keith and Pamela Capron,
who both play in the
league.

Their father and father-
in-law David Alphonso
‘Iron Baby’ Bethel, is slat-
ed to be laid to rest 10am
Saturday St Anne's Angli-
can Church.

The BSC will pay its
respects to the Capron
family by not starting its
games until noon Satur-
day.

The BSC is scheduled
to begin its 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball
Classic Saturday on
Wholesalers Field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.

Here’s a look at the
schedule of games for Sat-
urday:

Noon — Golden Gates
vs Ebenezer (Co-ed)

lpm — Macedonia vs Mt
Carey (M).

2pm — Transfiguration
vs Golden Gates (M)

3pm — Macedonia vs
Temple Fellowship (17-
And-Under)

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays





THE TRIBUNE



b





FRIDAY,



SEPTEMBER 25,



ns

2009



Trinidad
hangs on to

sixth spot...

See page 9

Winning sailors are recognised

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ollowing the suc-

cessful hosting of

the Bahamas

Optimist Nation-

al Championships
over the weekend, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister lauded
two of the winners.

Bannister said he was par-
ticularly pleased to recognise
14-year-old Danny de Carde-
nas, the repeat overall cham-
pion, as well as 10-year-old
Alande Forbes, who was third
in the green fleet.

And Bannister also recog-
nised Donico Brown, the 18-
year-old who represented the
Bahamas at the World Cham-



ALANDE FORBES shares a special moment with Minister of Youth,

Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister...

pionships in Brazil in July.
“Sailing has really made
awesome steps in developing
young people and they have a
great vehicular route in teach-
ing young people how to swim

Photos: Felipé Major

and how to sail,” Bannister
said. “So we are very pleased
to support what they are
doing.”

Bannister, along with per-
manent secretary Archie

SHOWN sitting (I-r) are Wellington Miller, Desmond Bannister and Archie Nairn. Standing (I-r) are referee
Alvin Sergeant, boxers Taureano Johnson, Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles and coach A Seymour...

boxers make the

Bahamas proud

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Amateur Boxing Associa-
tion of the Bahamas president
Wellington Miller said he’s
pleased that the Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister had a
send off for the two boxers
who fought in the World
Championships and honoured
them when they came home.

In August, the team of
Valentino Knowles and Carl
Hield, along with coach Andre
Seymour, attended the cham-
pionships in Milan, Italy.

While Hield was eliminat-
ed in the first round in the 64
Kilogram weight class,
Knowles went on to make his-
tory by becoming the first
Bahamian to win a match. He
competed in the 60kg class.

“We in the amateur boxing
programme started the pro-
gramme 10 years ago after we
didn’t make it to the 2004
Olympics,” said Miller, who
also serves as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion.

ea

“Reno Johnson’ was
involved in that. He went
through and followed our
instructions and he made it to
the 2008 Olympics and we
made history from there.”

Knowles and Hield are fol-
lowing the same path as John-
son competing at the World
Championships. But he said
the quest now is for them to go
all the way to the Olympics in
London, England, in 2012.

“We’re proud of them and
we are hoping that by the time
the Olympics roll around in
2012, they will come back with
a medal,” Miller said.

Seymour, who made history
as the first Bahamian to com-
pete in two Olympics and win-
ning at least one bout, said it
was not an easy road being in
Italy with the boxers for five
weeks.

They started out in a train-
ing camp in Rome with over
80 boxers from more than 50
countries and the boxers per-
formed very well in the match-
es they competed in as they
prepared for the champi-
onships.

At the championships, Sey-

mour said the boxers went to
Milan and they did extremely
well, but he’s confident that
because of the experience they
gained, the Bahamas could
end up winning its first medal
at the next championships in
two years and even at the
Olympics the following year.

“Tcan guarantee you that at
the next Olympics, we will hit
the medal podium,” he said,
“as long we continue to invest
in our boxers and we continue
to get the support from the
parents.”

Bannister firstly commend-
ed the families of both boxers
for the tremendous support
that they received as they took
the long journey to Italy.

Secondly, he thanked the
ABAB and its president,
whom he said has done an
excellent job, along with Sey-
mour, in exposing a lot more
youngsters to the sport.

“So many youngsters are
looking at a way to showcase
their skills and to develop their
skills,” he said.

SEE page 9



SHOWN (I-r) are Danny de Cardenas, Donico Brown, Bannister, John
Lawrence, McPhee, Archie Nairn and Alande Forbes...

Nairn, presented a cheque to
John Lawrence, the president
of the Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation, for their continued
contribution to the growth and
development of the junior sail-

ET PSS I Pe ee ee

ing programme.

Lawrence said since the
junior programme was
launched five years ago, the
ministry has been a financial
partner and they assisted

greatly in their fourth summer
sailing camp that attracted 76
students from 28 different
schools.

Sailing camps were also held
in Harbour Island and Long
Island where another 40 stu-
dents were able to take advan-
tage of the programme.

“We just finished our
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships last weekend
where we had some 54 boats
competing,” Lawrence said.
“They’re all single handed
boats and they all performed
very well.”

de Cardenas, who success-
fully defended his title, said he
had a “great time” and he
enjoyed competing for the

SEE page 9

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Police investigate fire at

Georgies on the beach

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are
trying to determine the cause
of a fire at Georgies on the
beach in Mather Town.

According to reports, some-
time around 11.50pm on
Wednesday police received a
report of a fire at Georgies
Restaurant, Disco and Lounge
on the Beach.

When firemen arrived at the
scene, flames had engulfed the

roof and a portion of the
wood/stone deck. The fire was
extinguished. The building was
destroyed. Asst Supt Loretta
Mackey said investigations are
continuing into the matter.

SUSPECTS ARRESTED

Four persons were arrested
early Thursday morning after
police discovered and seized a
large quantity of cash, along
with a several firearms and
ammunition at a residence in
Freeport. ASP Loretta Mackey

said police, acting on informa-
tion, went to Hampton Road
around 5.35am where they
searched a residence occupied
by two men and two women.
While searching the resi-
dence and a vehicle, officers
discovered four unlicensed
firearms and ammunition with
some $67,000 cash in US cur-
rency. The suspects, who are
between 17 and 34 years of age,
were taken into custody. Offi-
cers at the Drug Enforcement
Unit are continuing their inves-
tigations into the matter.

dutge decides against stay of hotel union elections ruling

refuse to stop the elections from proceeding on
September 29, 2009,” Justice Adderley stated

FROM page one

voters might not support the other members of
the team if such key members were missing.
“Having weighed the interests of justice,
the hopelessness of the appeal and as it relates
to the new nomination date of September 15
and the circumstances of this case, I felt com-
pelled to exercise my discretion to refuse a

in his ruling.

stay of the September 7 decisions as well as to

Travolta trial jurors discharged early

FROM page one

Jurors in the case were dis-
charged early yesterday.
Lawyers in the case had met
in closed court Wednesday
evening to make legal sub-
missions in the absence of the
jury. Senior Justice Anita
Allen reserved Thursday to
consider those submissions.

Prosecutors have called
four witnesses so far, includ-
ing Mr Travolta. On Wednes-
day Mr Travolta -who was the
only witness to take the stand-
recalled the efforts he and
others made to save his 16-
year-old son Jett’s life after
the boy suffered a seizure on
the morning of January 2 at a
condo at the Old Bahama
Bay Resort where they were
vacationing. Mr Travolta
recalled that after being awak-
ened by a nanny he and his
wife- actor Kelly Preston- ran

downstairs to help their son.
Mr Travolta said that one of
Jett’s nannies was doing chest
compression’s while he per-
formed CPR.

Mr Travolta also told the
court on Wednesday that out-
side the condo, he spoke to
the ambulance driver and fol-
lowing that exchange he
received a liability release
document which he signed.
He admitted however that he
did not read the document
because “time was of the
essence.”

Mr Travolta said that he
told the ambulance driver to
take Jett to the airport at Old
Bahama Bay; the reason
being he said was so that he
could take his son on a Ginn
jet to West Palm Beach rather
than taking him to the
Freeport hospital. Mr Travol-
ta testified however that Jett
was taken to the Freeport
hospital via ambulance. Mr

In a verbal judgment Justice Adderley also
ordered that union trustee Ian Neely obey the
September 7 ruling and sign the payroll sheet
by lpm today and that no resignations are to
take effect until he does so. Justice Adderley
said that if Neely fails to comply he would
entertain a contempt of court hearing.

Travolta said that en route to
the hospital there was a
switching of ambulance dri-
vers.

The case resumes this
morning. A jury of six women
and three men was selected
on Monday in the case.
Bridgewater, 49, and Light-
bourne, 47, are accused of
conspiring to extort and
attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between
January 2 and 20 by means of
threats.

Bridgewater is also accused
of abettment to extortion. Ms
Bridgewater is being repre-
sented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille and Krysta Smith.

Mr Lightbourne is being
represented by attorney Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain
pro bono. Director of Public
Prosecutions Bernard Turn-
er, Neil Brathwaite and
Garvin Gaskin are prosecut-
ing the case.



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THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,



Lack of ‘trust!
hits pension
fund industry

* Bahamian pensions sector

‘essentially a $1.1bn unregulated §

industry’, says accountant,
urging that percentage of
workforce covered by plan
increase from 27% to 80-90%

* Absence of trust structures
creates uncertainty over plan
ownership, says actuary

* Concerns over level of loans
applied against retirement
funds, plus use of pensions to
invest in sponsor’s company
and early withdrawals by plan
members

By NEIL HARTNELL

THE “most critical issue”

ership of many funds is uncer-

ulated industry”.

Marcus Bosland, Colinalm-
perial Insurance Company’s }

resident actuary, addressing a

was “nothing that prevents”
money held for its employees’

panies.
Meanwhile,

Christie, an accountant and

partner at Grant Thornton

(Bahamas), who is a member }
of the Government-appoint- }
ed committee examining the }

sickness claims

Bahamian workforce was cov- }

creation of pension legislation,
said only 27 per cent of the

ered by a pension plan.

“We need to get that to 80-

from fraud check

then mandatory legislation. }
What we have here is essen- }
tially a $1.1 billion unregulated :
industry. We have to look at :
how we introduce regulations

90 per cent,” said Mr Christie,
“through encouragement, and

around the industry.”

Recalling his experience

else : * Average return on assets drops to 4.23% for 2009
ea ere "Mr | * Board ‘defers no prosecution’ of delinquent employers
Christie said legislation should :
also look at Bahamians who }
used their retirement funds as }
: Tribune Business Editor
He explained: “What con- 7” — cerned me was the level of :
: ance Board (NIB) has seen a
? 30 per cent reduction in sick-
i ness benefits claims since the
sible for persons with $20,000

when he helped to administer

collateral for loans.

loans persons applied against
their pension fund balances.”
Mr Christie said it was pos-

in retirement savings to walk
as a result, adding: “I would
really want to look at how to
restrict the application of loans
and withdrawals [against pen-
sion fund monies].

“T was personally troubled

pany who, in some cases, end-

plans.”

SEE page four

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Kendrick

NIB: 30% fall in

- i form requiring employers to
away with only $1,000-$2,000 ? confirm whether staff were
? actually off work ill, its direc-
i tor yesterday saying the sharp
? reduction in fraudulent claims
: had already saved $2 million.

: ing a seminar organised by
by persons who left the com- investment advisory firm

F ae i CFAL, said that for 2009
eo Up Owing Ane Sompany ? year-to-date, sickness bene-
money. We need to look at the i tite claims had dropped by
level of loan and withttawal 4 note than 3,000 to 12.580
applications against pension i compared fo the 2008 ai

: i parative figure of 15,870. NIB
oo nadine that another con- f had paid out $6.2 million in
which Bahamian pension plan ? sickness benefits claims this

participants could withdraw } :
funds prior to retirement, to } for the same period last year.

cope with events such as med- } :
ical emergencies, Mr Bosland } the Med-4 form, benefits

? claims [for being off work
i sick] have reduced by 30 per



SECTION B ° business@tribunemedia.net

300 sales for

Lr

A MULTI-MILLION dollar mixed-use

? resort project is only awaiting govern-
i ment approval of its Environmental Man-
: agement Plan (EMP) before it begins final
i master planning, having pre-sold some
: 300 real estate plots to international buy-
i ers over the past three years despite the
: recession.

The principals behind the 951.4-acre

: Port St George project on Long Island
/ : . : have signed a 25-year management agree-
Tribune Business Editor : ment with Langham Hotels International
? to operate the development’s 224-unit,
fopine the Heb anian benon i five-star resort, covering 27.2 acres. Oth-
ae a caeeeeer nee the own. | &fcomponents feature a 640-slip marina,

y : 1,217 residential units, commercial and

tain because they have not i retail space, and a Robert Trent Jones II-

been incorporated as trust }
structures, an actuary said yes- }
terday, the sector operating as }
“essentially a $1 billion unreg- ;
: Houghton, said in their newly-released

designed golf course and country club.
The project developer, RUFO Invest-

ments Ltd, whose principals are UK citi-

zens Ian Moorcroft and Jonathan

information brochure that permission for
Port St George had been granted by the

\ ; ? Government, with only EMP approval
seminar organised by the ;
insurer’s affiliate, CFAL, said : planning can begin”.
that among the concerns sur- }
eee ee er ae eae ! for approval, and the developers state
apeag rea tt Mee Tee gama eaie i that final master planning “will commence

1 f investing ; at the earliest possible opportunity”.
ee : Applications for subdivision approval will

retirement in their own com- } then be made.

“required before the final stage of master

The EMP has already been submitted

* $2m savings to social security programme from
3,000 drop in benefits claims for days off work
: * Contribution income rises 2.3% to $108.2m for

year to August

By NEIL HARTNELL

THE NATIONAL Insur-

March 2009 introduction of a

Algernon Cargill, address-

year, compared to $7 million

“Since the introduction of

cent,” Mr Cargill said. “This
30 per cent reduction has so
far resulted in savings of $2
million to NIB.

“Many employees claiming
benefits from NIB for time
off work were not off..... This
tells us there was a problem,
and we’re asking the indul-
gence of employees in sub-
mitting the Med-4 form when
employees submit a claim.”

For 2009 to date, NIB has
received a combined 16,628
medical, sickness and injury
benefits claims, down from
19,633 in the same period in
2008. The value of benefits
paid out has fallen from $12
million to $10.8 million.

Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said
NIB’s increased compliance
focus and ensuring it collected
all contributions due from

SEE page three

esort project

By NEIL HARTNELL
: Tribune Business Editor

* Multi-million
dollar development
signs 25-year
management deal
with Langham Hotels,
with 640-slip marina
and 1,217 residential
units also planned

To date, the developers said some 300
real estate sales outside the main Port St
George site had been completed, many
to leading European buyers and interna-
tional sports personalities. Right to Buy
agreements to secure lots on the main site
have been entered into with the pur-
chasers, who must pay a 10 per cent
deposit once subdivision drawings are fin-
ished, the balance being due when infra-
structure is completed.

Although no sales can be concluded in
the absence of subdivision approval, the
Port St George developers said “a high
conversion rate of right to buy agreements

SEE page five

Algernon Cargill





Renewables
‘double the
cost’ of fossil
fuel energy

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

RENEWABLE energy is too costly, takes up too much
land and is unable to supply the continuous electricity need-
ed to meet Abaco’s power needs, presentations on behalf of
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) have argued,
although attendees at the Wilson City power plant town
told Tribune Business yesterday the alternatives had not

been properly explored.

A BEC presentation on alternative energy forms, given at
the Wilson City meeting, suggested that waste-to-energy
would never be suitable for Abaco’s energy needs, since
the island produced less than 3,000 tonnes of waste per

month.

It said that to supply one megawatt of power per month,
some 280 tonnes of waste per hour, or 9,120 tonnes per day,
would be required - an amount well in excess of Abaco’s

monthly power needs.

With waste-to-energy ruled out, the BEC presentation

SEE page two

20% of jobless claimants find
hew work prior to benefit's end

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance Board (NIB) will not defer police
action and prosecution of unemployment benefit fraudsters
even if they return the funds taken, it was revealed yesterday,

with some 20 per cent of
claimants not receiving the
full 13 weeks’ benefit - indi-
cating they were subse-
quently able to find another
job.

Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, addressing a semi-
nar organised by investment
advisory firm CFAL,
recalled how a woman came
into see NIB’s fraud unit last
week, accompanied by her
attorney, offering to return
all the unemployment bene-
fit cheques she had fraudu-

* NIB director warns
fraudulent benefit claimants
that returning funds will not
prevent police action

* $15.4m paid out to 11,225
jobless Bahamians to date, with
$135 average weekly pay out

* 30% of government clinic
visits caused by chronic, non-
communicable diseases

lently received following a visit from police investigators.
While NIB “in the first instance definitely insists on the
funds being returned”, Mr Cargill said this act would not pre-

SEE page three

FG CAPITAL MARKETS

BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

call us today at 396-4076

FAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET | www.famguardbe

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A SUBSIDIARY OF

FANG





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Abaco to get own tourism brand

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Don’t miss This Special Business Information Meeting
IN THE BAHAMAS

You are cordially invited to a Special Presentation Introducing A Cutting
Edge New Technology and Business Opportunity

Special Guest Speaker
Executive Director

MARVA SCOTT

All the way from the

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Event Info: Thursday September 24, 2009 @ 7:00 p.m.
Saturday September 26, 2009 @ 6:00 p.m.
Hillside Restoration Center, Marathon Road, Upstairs Wallace Auto
BAHAMAS
R.S.V.P: Patsy Davis - 242-525-1605 / 242-394-8237
Email:_trivenadavis @ hotmail.com

DOOR PRIZE WILL BE GIVEN TO THE FIRST 25 GUESTS



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco - Abaco will be mar-
keted as its own destination
within the Bahamas just as
Nassau/Paradise Island has
been for decades, the minister
of tourism and aviation said,
with Marsh Harbour to receive
a new airport runway by next
month and 14 American Air-
lines flights per week.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace could not say when con-
struction of the new Marsh
Harbour Airport terminal will
begin, but revealed that plans
for the building are almost
complete.

Speaking at the sixth annual
Abaco Business Outlook con-
ference, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said it was time that Aba-
co, which has the fastest grow-
ing economy and largest mari-
na industry in the Bahamas,
had its own marketing identity

FROM page one

said ocean thermal energy con-
version (OTEC), wave and
tidal energy were “not suffi-
ciently advanced to provide
useful power on a utility scale
at this time”.

As for solar power, a power-
generation technology the
Bahamas seems ideally suited
to, the capacity factor for a
solar Photovoltaic plant at
Abaco’s latitude was pegged
at around 21 per cent or less.

When it came to the com-
parative costs of power pro-
duction, as a percentage of
diesel generation, the BEC
presentation showed wind was
220 per cent more expensive;
waste-to-energy some 340 per
cent more expensive; and solar
450 per cent more expensive.

And as for land require-
ments, some 360 acres would
be required to house a 48
megawatt (MW) wind farm
featuring 50-metre towers;
1,920 acres to site a solar facil-
ity; and 20 acres set aside for

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”
re a

instead of being grouped with-
in the “Islands of the
Bahamas”.

“We have to move Abaco
out of the shadow of Nassau
and Paradise Island,” he said.

The minister said the
Bahamas’ promotional neglect
of the Family Islands was com-
parable to Jamaica only sell-
ing Kingston in its promotion-
al material.

He argued that just as
Jamaica has successfully devel-
oped other areas of its island
into tourism meccas, so can the
Bahamas.

As American Airlines
arrivals are increased, the Min-
istry of Tourism is focusing on
creating a dedicated Abaco
logo for promotional purposes.

Essentially, according to Mr
Vanderpool- Wallace, Abaco
will be sold separately in the
future, much like Nassau/Par-
adise Island and Freeport,
Grand Bahama, have been.

However, the island remains
without suitable infrastructure

Energy

waste-to-energy power pro-
duction.

In short, the BEC presenta-
tion on renewable energy con-
cluded: “Renewables have a
greater land requirement.
Renewables presently are more
costly than traditional sources
of electricity production.

“Wind and solar do not pro-
vide continuous sources of
power, and will require tradi-
tional sources of power for
most of the time”.

However, while acknowl-
edging that renewable, sus-
tainable forms of energy had
the ability to contribute to the
Bahamas’ energy security, they
would only “eventually be inte-
grated into the power produc-
tion process in a limited way”.

The presentation seemed
designed to dampen expecta-
tions about how useful renew-
able, sustainable energy would
be in meeting Abaco’s power

a

4



1805

for its rapidly-growing econo-
my.
BEC is working to increase
power output on the island,
but its Wilson City project was
recently set back because of
the need to obtain construc-
tion permits.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace said
Abaco’s economy had seen a
27 per cent visitor arrivals
decline since the start of the
recession, while Freeport saw a
35 per cent decline and Nas-
sau an 8.8 per cent decline.

Administrator for Central
Abaco, Cephas Cooper, said
Abaco’s economy has seen
growth on average of 32 per
cent in tourist arrivals since the
1960s. He said that despite the
economic downturn “the
future of Abaco still looks very
bright”.

Mr Cooper said the island,
with a population of about
14,000 across several towns
along 120 miles of land, has
been experiencing rush hour
traffic recently - a testament

needs - and, indeed, those of
the wider Bahamas.

One attendee at the Abaco
Town Meeting on the Wilson
City power plant, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity, said BEC “did-
mt give any basis” for its deci-
sion and views on renewable
energy sources in the context
of the island’s energy needs.

He added that while BEC
said the average wind speed
on Abaco per year was seven
knots, historical data showed it
was really around 16 Knots. For
renewable energy derived from
wing, the latter figure was in
the Class 6 (outstanding) cate-
gory, and just below Class 7
(superb).

The source told Tribune
Business that while a wind farm
would be double the cost of the
proposed $105 million Wilson
City, Bunker C fuel-burning,
plant, that could be “made
back in a couple of years” from
the likes of carbon emission
credits.

In addition, he explained

w PICTET

to its growth.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
restated his consternation at
the price of airlift into Abaco,
but contended that the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
is working to have airlines low-
er their costs.

He asserted that a flight to
Abaco from New York was
more expensive than a New
York to London flight. And
Abaconians lament that the
once per week American Air-
lines flight to Miami is more
expensive than flying to Nas-
sau, then taking a second flight
out to Miami.

According to Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace, the Bahamas is a
high cost destination due to
high labour costs and high
energy costs. He said this coun-
try has to find out how to com-
pete in this region with those
factors in mind.

“We cannot compete with
other destinations on the basis
of cost,” he said. “We have to
find out how to compete.”

that wind farms did not auto-
matically render the land where
they were located useless for
any other application, pointing
out that they co-existed quite
well with farmland.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment’s approach to renewable
energies appeared designed to
protect BEC, and prevent peo-
ple from generating their own
power, the source said of the
proposed National Energy Pol-
icy (NEP): “It’s pretty obvious
they have no intention of con-
sidering renewable energy
sources for another 20-30 years.

“They’re doing a few pro-
jects, but are not going after it
in an aggressive sense. What
the Bahamas government
deems is the cheapest way to
generate electricity, that’s the
policy.

“They haven’t considered it
[renewable energy] at all. They
give it lip service, so people
feel all warm and fuzzy. All
this talk is to placate people
and show them they’re doing
something.”

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Offices in
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



FROM page one

vent the social security pro-
gramme from allowing police
to go through with their inves-
tigations, and eventual pros-
ecution, of benefit fraudsters.

The NIB director warned
Bahamians that the fund had
a simple way to detect fraud,
since it could compare unem-
ployment benefit claimants
with those whom employers
made contribution payments
on their behalf. If contribu-
tions were still being made on
behalf of a benefit claimant,
this indicated they were still
working.

Mr Cargill added that NIB
was receiving numerous calls
from neighbours to inform it
that persons claiming unem-
ployment benefit had either

FROM page one

employers and the self-
employed was paying off, as
contribution income had so
far defied the recession
through increasing by 2.3 per
cent year-over-year for the
first eight months of 2009.

For the year to August,
NIB’s contribution income
stood at $108.2 million, com-
pared to $105.8 million the
year before. For 2008, con-
tribution income hit $154.9
million, up from $125 million
in 2004, $135.1 million in
2005 and $149 million in
2006. It was slightly below
the $155 million generated in
2007.

Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said
NIB’s Board of Directors
“has not deferred any prose-
cutions” in court of delin-
quent employers who refused
to negotiate a settlement to
settle outstanding contribu-
tion amounts “regardless of
who is on the list”.

The NIB director revealed
that the social security pro-
gramme always sought an up-
front payment of 40 per cent
of the sum owed by employ-
ers because this represented
the employees’ share of con-
tributions, or the 3.4 per cent
deducted from their salaries
every month.

Explaining that court pros-

Jobless claims

found new jobs, were work-
ing part-time or had gone self-
employed.

As a further safeguard,
rather than deposit benefits
direct to bank accounts, Mr
Cargill said NIB required all
claimants to come to its offices
and sign an affidavit confirm-
ing they were still unemployed
and looking for work.

Out of the $20 million trans-
ferred from NIB’s medical
branch to finance the initial
stages of the unemployment
benefit scheme, Mr Cargill
said some $15.4 million had
been paid out to-date. The
average weekly benefit col-
lected by claimants, he said,
was $135.

NIB

ecutions were the “last
resort” when negotiations
failed and employers refused
to pay, Mr Cargill added:
“When we take people to
court, we are protecting the
employees, the workers of
the country, ensuring their
contributions are paid and
paid on time.”

For 2009 year-to-date, Mr
Cargill said the average rate
of return on NIB’s invested
assets had dropped a little to
around 4.23 per cent, but
pointed out that this was
“outperforming” many oth-
er leading indicators, such as
the BISX All-Share Index,
which was down 12 per cent
for the year-to-date.

For most of the five years
since 2004, NIB has generat-
ed an average return on its
assets of between 5-6 per
cent, exceeding the 6 per cent
barrier just once - in 2007.

Mr Cargill blamed the
decline in 2009 year-to-date
returns on its $1.6 billion
reserve fund on last year’s
“market correction” follow-
ing “accelerated growth” in
previous years, plus the
decline in Cable Bahamas’
share price - the BISX-listed
company in which it is poised
to become the largest

F
fet Came aie

Some 11,225 Bahamians
had so fare received unem-
ployment benefits, Mr Cargill
said, but 20 per cent of
claimants did not receive the
full 13 weeks of benefits, indi-
cating that they had found
jobs in the interim.

“There is not one Bahami-
an who has been approved
who has not received their
cheque every two weeks,” Mr
Cargill said, adding that of the
11,225 claimants, an estimated
8,000-9,000 were on New
Providence. On Abaco, he
added that the unemployment
rate was 2-2.5 per cent, as indi-
cated by the percentage of the
workforce claiming benefit.

“We believe the $20 million

investor with an almost-30
per cent stake.

Justifying NIB’s invest-
ment strategy, particularly its
dependence on government
debt instruments and build-
ing projects, Mr Cargill said
the Bahamian economy was
simply not large enough to
support all NIB’s investment
assets and generate a good
rate of return. Nor could the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing sector support them.

“NIB has no non-perform-
ing investments in the
Bahamas government, and
no non-performing govern-
ment debt,” Mr Cargill said.
“The Government pays NIB
contributions and pays them
on time.”

At year-end 2008, some 43

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read

Insight
on Mondays



















PUBLIC NOTICE

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pom., Monday faraugh Friday fram Scotembecr 18fh,

AMP

he secvine lor suena ol lenders e Thursday Oc-
fobor Jed, JO. Tenickers should be socked and rcwiccd
‘PREOPORAL FOR PUBL RELATIONS ASSISTANCE IAI-
TLATIVES FOR THE BARAMAS TELECOMMUBICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED* dnd should Get oclecrcd to fc ot
lesnlkaves! Hoo: "Mle. L Bek Gedfin Acdeng Preaiclet core

EC."

BTC RESERVES THE RMSGHT TO REJECT ANY,

OR ALL TENDERS

Yet Loa |

earmarked is sufficient to con-
tinue this unemployment ben-
efit,” Mr Cargill said. “Every
Bahamian who qualifies,
regardless of whether the $20
million is expended, will
receive a benefit.”

Currently, Bahamians
merely have to prove they are
unemployed to qualify, but Mr
Cargill warned that “the qual-
ifying criteria will be a lot
more stringent” when the
unemployment benefit enters
its permanent phase.

That will be when the NIB
contribution rate increases
from 8.8 per cent to 10.8 per
cent, to fund both the unem-
ployment programme and
proposed National Chronic
Drug Programme.

Mr Cargill said the latter
would generate “significant
savings” for Bahamian insur-

per cent of NIB’s investment
portfolio was concentrated in
Government Registered
Stock Issues, 3 per cent in
Treasury Bills and 22 per
cent in Certificates of
Deposit (CDs). Some 5 per
cent was held in property
investments, chiefly govern-
ment buildings. A further 18
per cent of assets were
invested in bonds, 5 per cent
in shares, and 1 per cent in
loans.

Pointing out that foreign
investments were currently
not generating as good a
return as NIB’s Bahamas-

ance companies and the pub-
lic, through facilitating the
purchase of drugs that com-
bat chronic diseases at lower
prices.

The NIB director said one
in three Bahamians suffered
from chronic, non-communi-
cable diseases “and most lack
timely access to prescription
drugs”.

He added that at Wednes-
day’s Business Outlook Con-
ference, Dr Pearl MacMillan,
the director of public health,
said that 30 per cent of all vis-
its to government clinics in the
Bahamas were by persons suf-
fering from chronic, non-com-
municable diseases.

While the programme
would be phased in, covering
pensioners, invalids and chil-
dren initially, all Bahamians
would eventually qualify, Mr

based portfolio, Mr Cargill
addressed recent criticism of
NIB’s decision to terminate
investment management con-
tracts with CFAL, RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank &
Trust, and Providence Advi-
sors.

“The re-positioning of
investment strategy does not
mean reduced investment
opportunities or investment
inefficiency at NIB,” he
added. “The opposite is true.
We are poised to ensure the
National Insurance Fund con-
tinues to return a positive
returns.”

Cargill saying the programme
would initially cover 11 dis-
eases, drugs and medical sup-
plies, and incorporate public
and private pharmacies.

“The goal is to reduce the
cost of drugs significantly, with
smaller co-payments and low-
er premiums for claiming pre-
scription drugs on medical
plans,” Mr Cargill said.

He added that the planned
50 per cent increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, from
$400 to $600, meant high earn-
ers would receive greater ben-
efits from NIB. For instance,
sickness benefit, paid at 60 per
cent of the insurable wage
ceiling, would rise from $240
to $360 for higher income
earners, while pension pay-
ments would rise from the
monthly $970 earned at the
$400 ceiling.

While NIB generated a $54
million surplus in 2008, this
came almost entirely from its
investment income. Mr Cargill
said: “In 2009, for the first
time, it is projected that bene-
fits paid will equal contribu-
tion income. The majority of
the surplus will have come
from investment income.”

With NIB taking in $13-
$14 million in contribution
income, the NIB director
added: “This is another rea-
son to increase the contribu-
tion rate, to ensure the bene-
fits paid out do no exceed the
contribution income.”



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PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Family Islands always a loss maker for BEC

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco - BEC’s Family Island
operations will generate at net
loss for the remainder of the
corporation’s publicly owned
life, its general manager has
indicated.

Kevin Basden told the
Abaco Business Outlook con-
ference that BEC’s New
Providence profits subsidise

the cost of electricity genera-
tion on the Family Islands due
to its uniform tariff system.
This allows Family Island res-
idents to pay the same rates
as New Providence residents
despite the higher overhead
cost of generation.
According to Mr Basden,
because the cost of operating
power plants on some Family
Islands is disproportionate to
the rates paid by consumers,
BEC is in a “loss position”.
He said Family Island resi-
dents should be paying far

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dissolu-
tion of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD. has been
completed and the Company was removed from the
Register of Companies on the 12 th Day of August,

2009.

Dated this 25 th day of September, 2009

Maria M. Férére
Liquidator

.
st
s

1

Ke \

% \
fornonss

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

more than they do for their
energy consumption. Howev-
er, the prices that the energy
company would have to
charge could put electricity
prices out of reach of the
average population.

Mr Basden said purchasing
fuel, shipping fuel and main-
taining generators puts a
strain on BEC’s finances,
which are never recouped in
the Family Islands.

According to him, the deci-
sion to supply power to the
Family Islands then becomes

FROM page one

said in a panel discussion that
his major fear centred on the
fact that “many of the pension
funds themselves are not cre-
ated by a trust”.

A trust is essentially that, a
structure that effectively holds
pension plan assets in escrow
to meet the retirement needs
of plan members, and which
is segregated from the opera-
tional assets of their employ-
er/company sponsor.

“This is the most critical
issue facing the industry here,”
Mr Bosland said. “If trusts do
not arise to own the assets,
who controls and owns them?
In the absence of a trust, does
the employer own the fund?
Do the employees own the
fund? Is it 50/50? That’s a crit-
ical matter.

“Plans that are segregated
but not in trusts do concern
me, because the question aris-
es as to who owns the plan.
We need to enhance plan
transparency.” Disclosure to
plan participants was key, Mr
Bosland said, because if they
did not know how their retire-

less BEC’s business and more
its social obligation.

BEC’s corporate overview
reveals that it holds $900 mil-
lion of assets across the
Bahamas and averages $500
million in revenues, to which
$350 million goes to the pur-
chase of fuels to run 26 power
stations across the Bahamas.

While BEC is moving
towards making its operations
more efficient, hiring a con-
sultancy firm out of Germany,
and devising studies to gauge
the feasibility of alternative

Pension

ment funds were being man-
aged, it could lead to further
problems.

The absence of an overall
regulatory framework for the
Bahamian pension fund indus-
try means there are minimal
to no safeguards preventing
plan sponsors and employers
from investing a large per-
centage of plan assets, osten-
sibly held to meet obligations
to retired employees, in their
own companies.

This, Mr Bosland said, cre-
ated potential conflicts of
interest and investment risk,
with too great a percentage of
plan assets concentrated in
one investment.

He pointed to the collapse
of energy giant Enron earlier
this decade as an example of
the dangers this created, with
the company’s employees los-
ing 80-90 per cent of their
retirement nest eggs because
they were invested so heavily
in the company’s own stock.

“It’s not clear to what

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

energy, it continues to have
to build power generating
facilities using diesel turbines.

“Many of the generators
are old and not very effi-
cient,” Mr Basen said of the
typical generator across the
wider Bahamas. “There are a
lot of breakdowns and
employees have to work very
hard.”

He said that if certain
renewable energy options are
implemented in the Bahamas,
BEC will be able to supple-
ment the existing power gen-

degree that is prevalent in the
Bahamas,” Mr Bosland said.
“But the fact there is nothing
that prevents it, limits it or
requires disclosure of it is a
concern.”

The Colinalmperial resident
actuary added that another
“grey area’ in the Bahamas was
“the ability of people to with-
draw money from a fund prior
to retirement”.

While “most plans don’t
expressly permit it or restrict
it”, Mr Bosland said that plan
members/employees with-
drawing their retirement
funds, so as to meet medical or
family emergencies, created
problems that were not obvi-
ous at first sight.

“The issue is: On what
terms should a plan allow
someone to do that, because
essentially a person is trading
off their retirement needs for
present needs,” Mr Bosland
said. “However pressing that
need, it needs to be explained
to the employee, so they
should Know the consequences
of doing it.

“T’m particularly concerned
about an employee’s ability to
make a sensible decision,
when facing a financial crisis,
on something that affects their
financial future.” Mr Bosland
suggested that counselling and
advisory services be made

eration method of burning
fossil fuels. However, it will
look into allowing private
generation of power via solar
panels, with a view to having
excess power generated rein-
serted into the grid.

Mr Basden restated yester-
day at the Bahamas Society
of Engineers luncheon meet-
ing that BEC does not want
to carry out disconnections,
and moving to find ways to
make power generation more
efficient and more affordable
for every Bahamian.

available to ensure employees
made an informed choice.

Mr Christie said Bahamas-
based companies should first
be encouraged to establish
retirement plans for their
employees, through the use of
incentives and highlighting
that such schemes often cre-
ated a happier, more loyal and
productive workforce.

Apart from pension funds,
he also urged that the
Bahamas’ national savings rate
be increased, pointing out that
75 per cent of this nation’s
bank accounts hold less than
$10,000, and most less than
$1,000.

Acknowledging that there
were concerns over the com-
position of plan Boards and
investment committees, espe-
cially if they were dominated
by plan sponsors or partici-
pants, Mr Christie said he
wanted to see statutory
requirements for the regular
auditing of pension funds,
especially those with assets
above a certain amount, “to
Keep the actuary on their
toes”.

Mr Christie added that poli-
cies governing plan investment
strategies, the concentration
of risk, and rules regarding
investments in related compa-
nies also needed to be man-
dated.

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and
addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16", 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

Bis



Money at Work

ROYAL FIDELITY

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAKASHA LETITIA SMITH
of the city of Freeport in the Islands of Grand Bahama,
intend to change my child's name from TA’KAl GRAYLON
ROKER to JAH’REN TA’KI DAVIS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

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COLONIAL





CFA L”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.88| CHG -11.01| %CHG -0.73 | YTD -209.48 | YTD % -12.23
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.81 1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.08 1.08 0.00 0.127 0.000 B35 0.00%
11.80 9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.992 0.200 10.8 1.86%)
9.30 5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00 0.244 0.260 24.2 4.41%
0.89 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 0.090 40.4 2.86%
2.37 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%]
14.20 10.00 Cable Bahamas 10.03 10.03 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1 2.49%
2.88 2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0 1.46%]
7.50 6.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.87 5.87 0.00 5,000 0.419 0.300 14.0 5.11%
3.85 1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.42 3.34 -0.08 0.111 0.052 30.1 1.56%)
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.382 0.080 6.4 3.90%
8.20 6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.7 3.64%
12.50 8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9 5.59%
11.71 10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.631 0.350 15.8 3.50%
5.53 4.50 Focol (S$) 4.50 4.50 0.00 0.332 0.150 13.6 3.33%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 #7 0.00%
9.02 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.5 9.09%
12.00 9.98 J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.41%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 t% 19 October 2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 1% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets ¢.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M 0.00%|
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 o.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55, 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%|
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%|
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
S2wk-Hi S52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.4038 1.3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4038 3.72 6.20 31-Aug-09
3.0350 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16 31-Aug-09
1.4905 1.4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4905 3.96 5.49 18-Sep-09
3.6090 3.0941 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0941 -8.61 -13.59 31-Aug-09
13.0484 12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.1136 3.83, 5.87 31-Aug-09
101.6693 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67 30-Jun-09
100.9600 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18 30-Jun-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-O07
9.4075 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41 31-Jul-09
1.0707 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0707 3.38 5.14 31-Aug-09
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0319 -0.11 2.05 31-Aug-09
1.0673 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0673 2.89 4.93 31-Aug-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 15 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing pric last 52 weeks

ted price fer daily volume













hted price for daily volume.
rom day to day

traded today

DIV $ - Dividends are paid in the last 12 months

PIE - Closing price d by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Steck Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Steck Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007




YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
f



N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Steck Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RENE TELLE of
187 EMERALD CIRCLE, TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX
CR-56766 NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA WILLIAMS of SOLDIER
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-1055, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL FANORD of
CHARLES VINCENT ST., NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason. why — registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

AS

ep
KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY
Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

¢ Outstanding personality

¢ Current BREA license

¢ Minimum 2-years experience
¢ Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5B





300 sales for resort project

into sales agreements is
expected, as the price at
which right to buy holders
are entitled to purchase is
extremely attractive. This
has led to some right to
buy agreements changing
hands for a considerable
premium.

“Whilst the pre-sales
from the right to buy

FROM page one

agreements are expected
to result in approximately
25 per cent of the plots at
Port St George being sold
at a substantial discount,
the early revenue generat-
ed is expected to more
than cover the costs of
infrastructure to the entire

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Balance Sheet

site, including construction
of the marina and golf
course.....

“Evidence suggests that
residential values in the
Bahamas have held up
well, and furthermore that
US purchasers are begin-
ning to return to the
region.” Interest, the
developers said, had been







(unaudited)
June 30 December 31
2009 2008
Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 283,956 $ 160,456
Accounts receivable, net 1,612,317 1,496,303
Inventory 351522 304,064
Prepaids and other receivables 199,371 77,835
Deposits 12,900 12,900
Total current assets 2,465,866 2,051,558
Non-current assets
Investment in associate 143,248 143,248
Property, plant and equipment, net 7,212,612 7,391,968
Total non-current assets 7,355,860 7,535,216
Total assets $ 9,821,726 $ 9,586,774
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Bank overdraft $ - $ 17,802
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 321,273 397,783
Current-portion of note payable (note 5) 84,401 98,384
Total current liabilities 405,674 513,969
Non-current liabilities
Security deposits 397,714 407,889
Note payable (note 5) 220,589 254,940
Total non-current liabilities 618,303 662,829
Total liabilities 1,023,977 1,176,798
Shareholders’ equity
Share capital 42,000 42,000
Contributed surplus 2,752,113 2,752,113
Retained earnings 6,003,636 5,615,863
Total shareholders’ equity 8,797,749 8.409.976
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 9,821,726 $ 9,586,774
Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statement of Income and Retained Earnings

(unaudited)

Sales and services rendered
Cost of sales and direct expenses
Gross profit

Expenses
Operating
Interest and bank charges
Total operating expenses

Net income

Retained earnings at beginning of year
Retained earnings at end of period

Earnings per share

Six months ended June 30



2009 2008
$ 3,795,480 $ 3,879,395
2,442,958 2,732,903
1,352,522 1,146,492
951,224 943,592
13,525 13,017
964,749 956,609
387,773 189,883
5,615,863 5,287,247

$ 6,003,636 $ 5,477,130
$ 09 05

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Six months ended June 30



2009 2008
Cash flows from operating activities
Operating activities
Net income $ 387,773 $ 189,883
Adjustments for items not involving use of cash:
Depreciation 615,247 619,386
1,003,020 809,269
Change in non-cash working capital items
Increase in accounts receivable (116,014) (159,900)
Increase in inventory (53,258) (44,167)
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (121,536) -
Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities (76,510) (50,901)
(Decrease) increase in security deposits (10,175) 21,593
Net cash flow provided by operating activities 625,527 575,894
Cash flows from investing activities
Purchase of fixed assets (435,891) (892,823)
Investment in associate - (50,000)
Net cash flow (used in) provided by investing activities (435,891) (942,823)
Cash flows from financing activities
Proceeds from note payable - 400,000
Payment of note payable (48,334) -
Net cash flow (used in) provided by financing activities (48,334) 400,000
Net change in cash 141,302 33,071
Cash position at beginning of the period 142,654 (191,960)
Cash position at end of the period $ 283,956 $ (158,889)



See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.

received from Australia,
the Middle East and India.
The developers added
that they had been able to
reduce the risks associat-
ed with Port St George by
financing the development
costs to date, including the
land acquisition, entirely
from their own equity and
financial resources.

“This debt free status
has allowed Port St
George to emerge
unscathed from the finan-
cial turmoil of 2008-2009,
and the developers are
now well-positioned to
take advantage of reduced
construction costs and the
initiatives to boost the
global economy that are

being taken by govern-
ments around the world,”
the developers said.

The development will be
undertaken in a joint ven-
ture partnership with BDO
Stoy Hayward Investment
Management, the 385
hectare project covering
“less than 1 per cent” of
Long Island.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements
June 30, 2009

1. Corporate Information

Bahamas Waste Limited (“BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987. The Company is engaged in the business of solid and medical waste
collection and disposal, including the sale, installation, rental and maintenance of waste compactors
and containers. The Company has publicly traded shares which are registered on the Bahamas
International Stock Exchange. The latest audited accounts of the BWL were prepared on December
31, 2008.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2008 were authorized
for issue by the directors on September 4, 2006.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of preparation
These condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 3007 have been
prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2008 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2008, except for the adoption of new standards and interpretations and
amendments to existing standards have been published that are mandatory for the Company’s
accounting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009 or later periods, noted below. Adoption of
the following Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the financial position or
performance of the Company.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements (Continued)

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

Basis of preparation (continued)

¢ IFRS 2 Share Based Payments (Revised)

¢ IFRS3 Business Combinations (Revised)

¢ IFRS8 Operating Segments

¢ JAS 23 Borrowing Costs (Revised)

¢ JAS 27 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (Revised)
¢ IFRIC 15 Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate

¢ IFRIC 16 Hedges of a Net Investment in Foreign Operation

¢ IFRIC 17 Distribution to Non-Cash Assets to Owners

¢ IFRIC 18 Transfers of Assets from Customers

3. Earnings per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.
2009 2008

Shares outstanding at June 30 4,200,000 4,200,000

4. Related Party Transactions

During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and significant obligations to the related parties at June 30, 2008.

5. Note Payable
On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing

location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company had paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 promissory note agreement with Davandon Holdings Limited. The term of

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements (Continued)

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM





THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH, 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST






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Buffalo 69/20 46/7 s 69/20 54/12 1 Louisville 79/26 66/18 r 78/25 59/15 t Salt Lake City 84/28 55/12 s 84/28 57/13 s GREAT INAGUA on Tava 79/26 68/20 pc 75/23 66/18 pc
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Cleveland 73/22 56/13 s 71/21 59/15 Minneapolis 68/20 54/12 r 75/23 58/14 pe San Francisco 79/26 57/13 pce 82/27 56/13 pc . Tana 67/19 54/12 pc 63/17 48/8 pc
Dallas 82/27 62/16 pc 88/31 68/20 s __ Nashville 83/28 68/20 t 79/26 59/15 t Seattle 69/20 52/11 s 67/19 488 s VicHea 66/18 51/10 pe B7/19 54/12 § _ New Providence J Grand Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 66/18 44/6 c 85/29 50/10 s NewOrleans 87/30 74/23 t 87/30 73/22 t Tallahassee 92/33 74/21 pe 90/32 70/21 t a Rie 63/17 50/10 pc 61/16 50/10 c Tek: (A) Be-a55 ff Tet Tet: (242) 367-4204 ff Tek (22) 502-2062 ff Te: (242) 236-204
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Honolulu 88/31 76/24 s 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 78/25 55/12 pce 83/28 60/15 s Tucson 95/35 67/19 s 97/36 67/19 s — ‘
Houston 85/29 70/21 + 90/32 73/22 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 po 91/32 72/22 t Washington, DC 75/23 55/12 pc 68/20 63/17 1 She Oe ee ee



Full Text

PAGE 1

Private banking system leader to leave Bahamas N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.253FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 PRICE – 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY, T-STORM IN SPOTS HIGH 89F LOW 77F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S 300 sales for SEEPAGEELEVEN RESORT PROJECT Boxers make the Bahamas PROUD Also steps down as senior partner in law firm after money laundering claims The Tribune ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION TRY OUR DOUBLE FILET-O-FISH www.tribune242.com BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREAL ESTATE I N S I D E HOTWORK: FIREMENMEETTHECHALLENGE By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net IN the lead up to the par ty’s national convention next month, the former PLP MP for Exuma George Smith has openly pledged his support for Perry Christie to be returned as leader of the PLP. Calling Mr Christie a man with tremendous ability and ideas, Mr Smith said he wants the officers in the PLP to push G G e e o o r r g g e e S S m m i i t t h h b b a a c c k k s s C C h h r r i i s s t t i i e e FIREMEN’S CHALLENGE was held yesterday at the fire training grounds at the Police Headquar ters in East Street during Fire Safety Week. A fireman of the Red Squad is pictured pulling a dummy to help win the Firemen’s Challenge. Three squads took part in the challenge. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net Embattled lawyer Sidney Cambridge resigned as treasurer of the PLP yester day. On the same day he stepped down from his position as senior partner in the law firm of Callenders and Co. In the wake of accusations in a criminal complaint filed in a US District Court that he knowingly helped launder funds from what he was told was a European-based investment fraud, the attorney is now said to be “focusing all of his attention on establishing his innocence” in the face of the charges. He is accused with Florida’s Broward County CommissionCambridge quits as PLP tr easur er Perry Christie SIDNEY CAMBRIDGE SEE page three SEE page eight B y TANEKA HOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net A LEADER in the private banking system has decided to with draw from the Bahamas before the end of the year because this country has failed to escape the powerful OECD's “grey-list” of so-called tax havens. French-based bank BNP Paribas (Bahamas which operates in more than 80 countries said despite "excellent" financial performance in the current econom ic crisis it had to review its network "in the context of the ongoing changes in the world financial system and G20 initiatives." Concern over country’s failure to escape OECD list of tax havens NO witnesses took the stand yesterday in the trial of former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater and former paramedic Tarino Lightbourne who are accused of attempting to extort $25 million from Hollywood celebrity John Travolta. Travolta trial jurors discharged early SEE page 12 SUPREME Court Justice Neville Adderley yesterday decided not to grant a stay of his September 7 ruling that ordered a new nomination process for the hotel union elections, which are scheduled for next Tuesday. Attorney Keod Smith had sought the stay on behalf of the majority of the union's Exec utive Council, pending an appeal of Justice Adderley’s ruling in the Court of Appeal. Mr Smith had also sought to have the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union elections postponed sine die until after the final determination of that appeal. Nominations for the new Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union elections were held on September 15. Tyrone Beneby, Philippa Dixon and Raymond Wright running for the Deliverance Team were not allowed to nominate and Mr Smith contended that some Judge decides against stay of hotel union elections r uling SEE page 12 SEE page 8 By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Former EMS worker Marcus Garvey continues to maintain his innocence following his dis missal by hospital officials earlier this year. Garvey insists that he had no idea that a casual conversation with an expatriate man was being recorded for an online entertainment website. Hospital officials terminated the veteran employee in February for breach of patient confidentiality. Garvey was one of two persons who had Ex-EMS worker still maintains his innocence SEE page eight By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE NATIONALInsurance Board (NIB 30 per cent reduction in sickn ess benefits claims since the March 2009 introduction of a form requiring employers to confirm whether staff were actually off work ill, its director yesterday saying the sharp r eduction in fraudulent claims had already saved $2 million. Algernon Cargill, addressing a seminar organised by investment advisory firm CFAL, said that for 2009 y ear-to-date, sickness benefits claims had dropped by more than 3,000 to 12,580 compared to the 2008 comparative figure of 15,870. NIBh ad paid out $6.2 million in s ickness benefits claims this year, compared to $7 million for the same period last year. “Since the introduction of the Med-4 form, benefitsc laims [for being off work sick] have reduced by 30 per cent,” Mr Cargill said. “This 30 per cent reduction has so far resulted in savings of $2 million to NIB. Many employees claiming benefits from NIB for time off work were not off..... This tells us there was a problem, and we’re asking the indulg ence of employees in subm itting the Med-4 form when employees submit a claim.” For 2009 to date, NIB has received a combined 16,628 medical, sickness and injury b enefits claims, down from 19,633 in the same period in 2008. The value of benefits paid out has fallen from $12 million to $10.8 million. Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said N IB’s increased compliance focus and ensuring it collected all contributions due from C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.16 $4.14 $4.26 F AMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4076 A SUBSIDIARY OF getsound investment advice benetfrom multiple fund optionse arn potentially higher returnsall of the aboveinvestmentsplan your strategy By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE “most critical issue” facing the Bahamian pension fund industry is that the owne rship of many funds is uncert ain because they have not been incorporated as trust structures, an actuary said yesterday, the sector operating as essentially a $1 billion unregulated industry”. Marcus Bosland, ColinaImperial Insurance Company’s r esident actuary, addressing a seminar organised by the insurer’s affiliate, CFAL, said that among the concerns sur-r ounding the Bahamian pension industry were that there was “nothing that prevents” plan sponsors from investing m oney held for its employees’ r etirement in their own companies. Meanwhile, Kendrick C hristie, an accountant and p artner at Grant Thornton (Bahamas of the Government-appointed committee examining the c reation of pension legislation, said only 27 per cent of the Bahamian workforce was covered by a pension plan. We need to get that to 8090 per cent,” said Mr Christie, “through encouragement, and then mandatory legislation.W hat we have here is essent ially a $1.1 billion unregulated industry. We have to look at how we introduce regulations a round the industry.” R ecalling his experience when he helped to administer a company’s Provident savings/retirement fund, MrC hristie said legislation should also look at Bahamians who used their retirement funds as collateral for loans. H e explained: “What concerned me was the level of loans persons applied against their pension fund balances.” M r Christie said it was poss ible for persons with $20,000 in retirement savings to walk away with only $1,000-$2,000a s a result, adding: “I would r eally want to look at how to restrict the application of loans and withdrawals [against pens ion fund monies]. I was personally troubled by persons who left the company who, in some cases, ended up owing the company m oney. We need to look at the level of loan and withdrawal applications against pension plans.” A dding that another concern was the “terms” under which Bahamian pension plan participants could withdrawf unds prior to retirement, to cope with events such as medical emergencies, Mr BoslandLack of ‘trust’ hits pension fund industry S EE page four S EE page three* Bahamian pensions sector ‘essentially a $1.1bn unregulated industry’, says accountant, urging that percentage of workforce covered by plan increase from 27% to 80-90% * Absence of trust structures creates uncertainty over plan ownership, says actuary * Concerns over level of loans applied against retirement funds, plus use of pensions to invest in sponsor’s company and early withdrawals by plan membersNIB: 30% fall in sickness claims from fraud check Algernon Cargill * $2m savings to social security programme from 3,000 drop in benefits claims for days off work * Contribution income rises 2.3% to $108.2m for year to August * Average return on assets drops to 4.23% for 2009 * Board ‘defers no prosecution’ of delinquent employers By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE National Insurance Board (NIB action and prosecution of unemployment benefit fraudsters e ven if they return the funds taken, it was revealed yesterday, w ith some 20 per cent of claimants not receiving the full 13 weeks’ benefit indicating they were subsequently able to find another j ob. Algernon Cargill, NIB’s director, addressing a seminar organised by investment advisory firm CFAL, recalled how a woman came i nto see NIB’s fraud unit last week, accompanied by her attorney, offering to return all the unemployment benefit cheques she had fraudulently received following a visit from police investigators. W hile NIB “in the first instance definitely insists on the funds being returned”, Mr Cargill said this act would not pre20% of jobless claimants find new work prior to benefit’s end * NIB director warns fraudulent benefit claimants t hat returning funds will not prevent police action * $15.4m paid out t o 11,225 jobless Bahamians to date, with $135 average weekly pay out * 30% of government clinic visits caused by chronic, noncommunicable diseases SEE page threeBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor RENEWABLEenergy is too costly, takes up too much land and is unable to supply the continuous electricity needed to meet Abaco’s power needs, presentations on behalf oft he Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC although attendees at the Wilson City power plant town told Tribune Business yesterday the alternatives had not been properly explored. A BEC presentation on alternative energy forms, given at t he Wilson City meeting, suggested that waste-to-energy would never be suitable for Abaco’s energy needs, since the island produced less than 3,000 tonnes of waste per m onth. I t said that to supply one megawatt of power per month, some 280 tonnes of waste per hour, or 9,120 tonnes per day, would be required an amount well in excess of Abaco’s monthly power needs. W ith waste-to-energy ruled out, the BEC presentationRenewables ‘double thec ost’ of fossil fuel energy SEE page two By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A MULTI-MILLIONdollar mixed-use resort project is only awaiting government approval of its Environmental Man-a gement Plan (EMP master planning, having pre-sold some 300 real estate plots to international buyers over the past three years despite the recession. T he principals behind the 951.4-acre Port St George project on Long Island h ave signed a 25-year management agreement with Langham Hotels International to operate the development’s 224-unit,f ive-star resort, covering 27.2 acres. Other components feature a 640-slip marina, 1,217 residential units, commercial and retail space, and a Robert Trent Jones IIdesigned golf course and country club. T he project developer, RUFO Investments Ltd, whose principals are UK citizens Ian Moorcroft and Jonathan Houghton, said in their newly-released information brochure that permission forP ort St George had been granted by the Government, with only EMP approval “required before the final stage of masterp lanning can begin”. The EMP has already been submitted f or approval, and the developers state that final master planning “will commence at the earliest possible opportunity”.A pplications for subdivision approval will then be made. To date, the developers said some 300 real estate sales outside the main Port St George site had been completed, many to leading European buyers and international sports personalities. Right to Buy agreements to secure lots on the main site have been entered into with the purchasers, who must pay a 10 per cent deposit once subdivision drawings are finished, the balance being due when infrastructure is completed. Although no sales can be concluded in the absence of subdivision approval, the Port St George developers said “a high conversion rate of right to buy agreements 300 sales for resort project * Multi-million dollar development signs 25-year management deal with Langham Hotels, with 640-slip marina and 1,217 residential units also planned SEE page five

PAGE 2

By REUBEN SHEARER WITH the national average down for BGCSE examinations d ropping from a ‘C-’ to a ‘D’, many graduates will have received reject letters from local colleges. With hopes of further education tarnished, there’s little option but to try to find work in an already depressed job market. However, there’s an institution offering an alternative solution. Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Centre (CLC house, and began registering new students for the 2009 academic year. Dashed The Christian-based college, spear-headed by the Assemblies of Brethren in the Bahamas, is targeting those whose aspirations for higher education were dashed by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr June Wilson, Research and Education Director at the college told The Tribune yesterday. In addition to secular training, the college seeks to equip people interested in entering Christian ministry, pro viding an at-home ministry training experience however, for aspiring church-workers in the Associate of Arts Divinity degree (ATH English, Math, History, Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge, Accounts and Economics at $350 per course. For further information, contact the CLC on 328-5341 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Tour Stadium A M BASSADOR of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian along with president of the Bahamas-China Friendship Association Anthony McKinney and other government sports officials toured the Thomas A Robinson National Stadium construction s ite on Tuesday. The Bahamas-China Friendship Association was established in 2004 to promote goodwill and people-to-people contact between both countries; to promote understanding of both countries through cultural exchanges and the studyo f the language, culture and history of both; to promote economic and trade opportunities and entrepreneurial development through participation in tradef airs and investment tours; to provide mutual relief and assistance to the people of both countries in times of emergency and for social enhancement, and to a ssist in the improvement of the social, economic and spiritual welfare of the peoples of both countries. The most recent announcement of cooperation between the two countries was the agreement signed with the Export-Import Bank of China for funding to jump-start the $1.92 billion redevelopment of the Cable Beach strip. A lso, the gift of $30 million from China to build a sports stadium for the Bahamas to contribute to the development of the country’s youth throughs ports. GOVERNMENT SPORTS OFFICIALS AND BAHAMAS CHINA FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION TOUR CONSTRUCTION SITE PERMANENT Secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture Archie Nairn (left Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian during a tour of the construction site of the new National Stadium by executives of the Bahamas Chi na Friendship Association on Tuesday. PERMANENT Secretary in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture Archie Nairn (centreleft Delores Ingraham, wife of the prime minister and principal of C C Sweeting High School, during a tour of the construction site of the new National Stadium by executives of the Bahamas China Friendship Association on Tuesday. P ROJECT m anager Iram Lewis (right points of interest on a map during a tour of the construction site oft he new National Stadium by executives of the Bahamas China Friendship Association on Tuesday. PHOTOS: Ministry ofY outh, Sports and Culture/E ric Rose Hope for graduates with reject letters fr om Bahamian colleges By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A BAHAMIAN has been charged i n connection with the shooting of a c onvenience store owner in Fort Pierce, Florida. Police arrested Anthony “Rude Boy” Symonette, 21, as he madea ttempts to board a cruise ship to Nassau in Hollywood, Florida, on Friday, September 11. He had been wanted in connection with the shooting death of Parag Patel, 4 4, on September 4. Mr Patel, owner of the A&M Discount Beverage store in Georgia Avenue and Okeechobee Road, Fort Pierce, was shot dead when threea rmed men entered and robbed his store. Symonette, who was wanted in connection with the murder, was trying to flee the US at the time he was arrested, according to the Fort Pierce police department. A detective told T he Tribune : “We got a tip that Symonette was on the way to the Bahamas and we got US Customs and ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) involved int rying to put flags on their passports. “Then we got a call from customs to say he had made it to the Bahamas, but it turned out to be someone else. “We knew Symonette was Bahamian and had family in Nassau and that he was trying to get there. Then we got an anonymous tip that he was trying to buy a cruise ticket in Hollywood, Florida, because he would have been able to get on and off the cruise ship without a passport.” S ymonette has since been charged with second-degree murder with a firearm and robbery with a deadly weapon while wearing a mask. Donald “DJ” Isaiah, 24, and Mahogany Alexander, 29, of Fort Pierce, have also been charged on the s ame counts. Deondravious St Fleur, 23, of Fort Pierce, was arrested on September 9 and charged with accessory after the fact to murder on suspicion he drovet he gunmen to the Port St Lucie/Stuart area, where they rented a car after the robbery. Unconfirmed reports claim St Fleur is Haitian-Bahamian. Bahamian charged over Florida store owner shooting F ACULTY AND BOARD m embers of Hope College shown here at an Open House over the weekend. The C hristian-based college, spearh eaded by the Assemblies of B rethren in the Bahamas, is targeting thosew hose aspirations for higher educat ion were dashed by unsatisfactory B GCSE results.

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er Josephus Eggelleton and two others following a threeyear-long “sting” operationb y the Federal Bureau of I nvestigations into public cor ruption in Florida. A statement from PLP leader Perry Christie yester day afternoon said he had accepted “with regret” Mr Cambridge’s resignation asp arty treasurer. “In my discussion with him this morning, Mr Cambridge indicated that he intended to focus all of his attention on establishing his innocence to the charge upon which he was indicted in Florida yesterday. “In these circumstances, Mr Cambridge did not think that it would be appropriate for him to continue to serve in any capacity within the Party at this time. “I understand and accept Mr Cambridge’s decision and commend him for dealing with this matter so responsibly and promptly.” However, Mr Christie criticised The Nassau Guardian for its headline over the arti cle outlining the case involving Mr Cambridge on Thursday, saying it was “unfortunate that...the headline referred to the indictment of the PLP treasurer as if to imply that that position was somehow relevant to the indictment.” “In fact, the indictment relates only to matters in which Mr. Cambridge is alleged to have acted as a lawyer and not as a party official.” Headline That headline read “PLP Treasurer Charged in the US”. Mr Christie continued: “I would remind all my fellowcitizens that in common with all accused persons, Mr Cambridge is entitled to the presumption of innocence. “In this regard, I am gratified by Mr Cambridge’s personal assurances to me that he is completely innocent of the charges made against him and that he intends to exert every effort to vindicate him self accordingly.” Finally, the PLP leader asserted, with more certainty than in his initial statement on the matter, that he could confirm having made further inquiries, “that neither I nor any of the persons who were responsible for fundraising for the PLP in the last General Election have any knowledge of any contribution that would have been made by, or on behalf of, or at the sugges tion or direction of any of the persons who are named in the indictment.” “Any allegation to the contrary is completely false,” he added. Colin Callender, managing partner of Callender and Co. confirmed Mr Cam bridge’s resignation from that company yesterday afternoon. “He has resigned as a mem ber of the firm with immedi ate effect as far as I’m con cerned won’t adversely impact on the credibility or other wise of the firm,” said Mr Callender. It was unknown yesterday whether Mr Cambridge will also have to leave his post as treasurer of the Bahamas Bar Association, although there were calls for him to do so. Messages left for Bahamas Bar Association, President Ruth Bowe Darville, were not returned up to press time yes terday. Some attorneys suggested that the indictment of Mr Cambridge, given his position as a senior attorney and in the Bar Association and the publicity surrounding the matter could have “serious” knockon effects on the reputation of the legal profession in The Bahamas. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM MONEYLAUNDERINGALLEGATIONS By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net IN the wake of a claim by a US politician, caught up in a money laundering scandal, that he gave money to the PLP, a senior PLP MP says there should be a more transparent and accountable system for donations to aspiring politicians and political parties. Dr Bernard Nottage, PLP Bain and Grants Town MP, and former leader of the Coalition for Democratic Reform, said that while accused money launderer Broward County Com missioner Josephus Eggelleton’s allegation that he was “raising money for (Perry Christie’s paign” in 2006 is “unsubstantiated” it would be better for the country if rules on campaign financing existed so thata definitive record of who donated what to which party could be scrutinised. “I do not think that what that man (Eggelleton thing. It’s a remark he made without any substantiation whatsoever and anyone can tell anyone else they are raising money. Mr Christie denied any knowledge of it or soliciting any funds through or from him and his word is sufficient evidence for me that it’s unlikely to be true,” said Dr Nottage. Mr Eggelleton was quoted as making the claim about being set to donate to Mr Christie’s campaign in a criminal complaint filed in Florida on Tuesday following an extensive three-year-long undercover operation by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI However, Dr Nottage, like several other political figures over the years, including Mr Christie, Brent Symonette, Tommy Turnquest, Fred Mitchell, Alfred Sears and Paul Moss, said he does believe there “ought to be very strict rules to which persons who are seeking public office must comply in case of funding.” And he added that this should involve records being kept of who receives what donations from whom, which can be “open to scrutiny by the public and an independent election commission” in the name of ensuring fairness in elections and reducing room for corruption or any perception of it. “There should be completely transparent and accountable procedures and there should be records that can be subject to scrutiny so we can tell who is giving what,” he said. His comments came after Sidney Cambridge, PLP treasurer and partner in the law firm of Callender and Co, was indicted with Broward County Commissioner Josephus Eggeleton, as a result of an FBI “sting” operation. It is claimed that Mr Cambridge acted for Mr Eggelleton in a legal capacity and both are accused, with two others, of conspiring to commit money laundering in the Bahamas. The complaint against him primarily focuses on the “sting,” in which it is alleged that Mr Eggeleton advised and cooperated with undercover agents who told him they wished to launder funds in The Bahamas. The funds were allegedly obtained through a European-based investment fraud. Mr Cambridge was indicted Wednesday by US federal authorities for allegedly helping to launder thousands of dollars in proceeds from the purported investment fraud. The criminal complaint against Mr E ggelleton on Tuesday stated, in part: On or about May 30, 2006, defend ant Eggelleton stated to an undercover agent and a cooperating witness, ‘If you wanna do some deals in The Bahamas, let me know. Yes sir, in fact I’m gonna be raising some money for the prime minister of The Bahamas that’s running for re-election.” In July 2006, Eggelleton was quoted as saying that in the Bahamas he “does not have to adhere to the same ethical standards he has in the US.” In a statement issued yesterday Mr Christie said he was “able to confirm” that “neither I nor any of the persons who were responsible for fundraising for the PLP in the last General Elec tion have any knowledge of any contribution that would have been made by, or on behalf of, or at the suggestion or direction of any of the persons who are named in the indictment.” Call for more transparency with political donations In brief RM Bailey class of 1984 will hold an important meeting at the school on Robinson Road at 3 pm promptly. Important matters will be discussed, including the upcoming 25th anniversary banquet. RMBailey class of 1984 to hold meeting WHILE trying not to condemn the party’s former treasurer Sidney Cambridge, former PLP MP for Exuma George Smith said that the recent scandal surrounding Mr Cambridge is “not a PLP problem.” “That’s Mr Cambridge’s difficulty. I know Sidney Cambridge. I am fond of him, and I hope that this society won’t judge him too harshly and wait until the matter plays itself out. But that is not a PLP problem,” Mr Smith told The Tribune yesterday. Tendering his resignation to party leader Perry Christie yesterday, Mr Cambridge reportedly advised the former Prime Minister that he intends to focus his energies on establishing his innocence to the money laundering charge upon which he was indicted in Florida on Wednesday. “In these circumstances, Mr Cambridge did not think that it would be appropriate for him to continue to serve in any capacity within the party at this time. I understand and accept Mr Cam bridge’s decision and commend him for dealing with this matter so responsiblya nd promptly,” Mr Christie s aid. Shoc k ed E xpanding on the issue, M r Smith said he would be shocked if any funds that were spent by the PLP in the last election, or the elections before that did not come from legitimate means. “And the fact that I hold an office in the party, and I behave in a way that is improper, unless the party condones my behaviour the party ought to deal with me. “People make mistakes, you know. I like to tell the story that I belong to a church, the Roman Catholic Church that is 2,000 years old. You have had Cardinals that have messed up; they messed up. The church is the organisation and until the church does something to condone the wrong the organisation isn’t tainted. “And I am not about to suggest that Mr Cambridge did anything wrong I will always shy away from condemning any Bahamian that is seen to be getting into any trouble beyond the borders of the Bahamas,” he said. Mr Colin Callender, managing partner of Callender and Co also confirmed yes terday that Mr Cambridge had tendered his resignation from the law firm where he was a senior partner. “He has resigned as a member of the firm with immediate effect as far as I’m concerned it won’t adversely impact on the credibility or otherwise of the firm,” said Mr Callender. It was unknown yesterday whether Mr Cambridge will also have to leave his post as treasurer of the Bahamas Bar Association, although there were calls for him to do so. Messages left for Bahamas Bar Association, President Ruth Bowe Darville, were not returned up to press time yesterday. This is not a ‘PLP problem’ Senior PLP MP says country would benefit from rules on campaign financing BERNARD NOTTAGE Cambridge quits as PLP treasurer FROM page one “I do not think that what that man (Eggelletonr emark he made without any substantiation w hatsoever and anyone can tell anyone else t hey are raising money.

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EDITOR, The Tribune . This is a letter to voice the c oncerns that I have over Lynx Airlines, which is operating out of Fort Lauderdale to Bimini. On August 12, 2009 when I had p lanned to depart Fort Lauderdale to return to Bimini I didn’t know what to expect (having never flown Lynx Airlines before August 10, 2009 when It ravelled to Fort Lauderdale). So I went to the airport early in the event of an early departure or for some unforeseen probl em. The flight was scheduled to leave at 3.30 pm. My wife along with myself arrived at the airport at 12.15pm. On our arrival to the Fort L auderdale International Airport we soon realised that there were no ticket agents at the counter. After waiting for a w hile we called the office number that was on the ticket and the agent said that they were g oing to send someone to pick us up. Not knowing what time the shuttle was going to arrive we just waited. After waiting for over an hour the shuttlec ame and took us to the freight section of the airport becauset his is where they were working from. Getting to this location I t old the agents that we were hungry and that everyone that was there was afraid to go upstairs to the restaurant and get something to eat becausew e had no idea when the shuttle would arrive. They had onev ending machine with five chips in it and nothing else. I asked the agent when or if they were going back to the airport that I wanted to go so that I could get s ome food for my wife and myself to eat and they said “no p roblem.” Twenty minutes lat er a few more passengers came a nd I asked what had happened because they knew I wanted toget something to eat, but they ignored me. At 3.20pm they told us that we were going into Congo Town, Andros Island, then they were going to drop us off in Bimini. The question was a sked, “Why are we going into Andros?” The response was that there are more people to come out of Bimini. We swallowed that pill and proceeded with the flight. After flying for over an hour we were over Andros, flying to the airport which was another 2 0 minutes away. On lining up for landing the pilot said that we could not land and that we had to go back to Fort Laud erdale. Everyone thought that he was joking until the plane climbed past 10,000 feet. The q uestion was asked, why are we going back? He said that there w as a hydraulic problem. As we were flying back to F ort Lauderdale we were real quiet on the plane because we did not know what was going on. When we got over Fort Lauderdale we started to pray audibly and as soon as we had finished praying the landing gear came out. We flew over the tower so as the tower could t ake a look at the landing gear then we proceeded to make a safe landing. Upon getting on the ground everyone was glad t o be alive and the mechanical crew came out to inspect the plane. All the passengers went into the warehouse as to try and g et our thoughts together. Speaking with the agent they said that they were going to put us up for the night. We asked, “What about food?” and they said that they are not going to do that. The question was asked why, since it was their fault that we were back in Fort Laude rdale but they continued to say that they are not going to do it. We asked for the manager (or owners peak with us whose name is Albert Vitale but the agents said that he is not coming to see us. After an event like the one that had just happened hes hould want to speak with the passengers to let them know that they are concerned about the well being of the passeng ers, but seemed to be of no concern to them. We pleaded with the agent to call for him to come out tot he warehouse. Finally, one of t he agents said that Mr. Vitale would be over in twenty minutes so we said that we would wait. After one half hour the a gent said that he would meet us at the hotel but no oneb elieved him because he did not come to the warehouse. I a sked the agent if we flew with them in the morning would we still have to fly into Andros and the answer was yes. We arrived at the Best Weste rn Hotel and one of the passengers asked what about fooda nd the agent said there was a McDonalds next door. The r esponse to that was, “So are we supposed to go to McDonalds and say that Lynx sent us?” because they still did not give us any money. We went and checked into the hotel and the agent was getting all the room n umbers of the passengers then he told the hotel agent that he w ould call her back to get the room numbers and to give any information that is needed to pass on to the passengers. The ticket agent left but before he left he said that the manager would be stopping by the hotel t o bring some money for us, and then he left. At this point t he hotel employee was more concerned about our welfare than Lynx. Kendra (the hotel employee) was going out of her way to see that we were comfortable and at ease and I thank her for that. In the first place the hotel was not responsible for the state that we were in and if Lynx had to up date us about anything they should have done it themselves and not try to pass it on to the hotel. We stayed in the lobby trying to comfort one another as best we could; because shock comes into playw hen you are alone and everything starts to come down on you. We stayed in the lobby asa group for one and one half h ours until we felt that we felt better. The entire time that we were in the lobby Mr. Vitale never showed up, nor called. We went to bed and got up t he next morning and went straight to the airport trying to catch another plane because of the way that we were treated a nd our lives did not seem that important to Lynx. At 8.30am Lynx phoned me on my cell phone to find out if we were still at the hotel and I said thatw e were at the airport. They said that they were on their way to pick us up. I asked, “For what? Because we were not flyi ng with them anymore.” The response was, “Aren’t you going to Bimini anymore?” I s aid, “Yes, but not with Lynx. Not only my wife and myself, but everyone that was going to Bimini would not be flying on Lynx.” W e travelled on Continental and had a safe flight homeg oing direct to Bimini. Lynx flight that they wanted us to c ome on which was supposed to leave Fort Lauderdale at 9.00am did not get into Bimini until after 7pm that evening because they had morem echanical problems. Had we flown with them we would haveb een in the warehouse for the entire day with a company that did not even give us the time of day. The problem was not the l anding gear because any plane can have problems but the way i n which we were treated so very poorly. They had no symp athy for what we went through and it seemed as if they did not care. Problems with Lynx: No ticket agent at the airport; no set time for busing to freight section; no vending machines in the freight section; no advance notice of going into A ndros Island. The plane went into Andros first passing Bimi ni in the air. No help from the ticket agents when we got on the ground. They made no effort to see that we could call our families to let them know we were safe. No food voucher; no contact w as made with the passengers after being checked in to the hotel; seemingly no concern about the mental state of the passengers; no call advising us on the progress of the plane they wanted us to fly on; no a lternative way to get home if we did not want to fly Lynx a nymore; no compensation for the loss of a day’s pay. S omething needs to be done with Lynx. Chalks airlines start ed to do the same kinds of things that Lynx is doing now and you saw what happened to them. I am asking please look into this matter so that we do not have another Chalk’s tragedy on our hands. In that crash I had a loss of four family members. Mr. Vitale said that he would come into Bimini to speak to each of the passengers and hear our concerns, but to date he has not shown up and does not answer his phone anymore. PEDRITO and HELENA ROBERTS Bahamas, September 8, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 W EBSITE www.tribune242.com – updated daily at 2pm WASHINGTON Natural gas is nifty stuff. It burns twice as clean as other fossil f uels, leaves no ash to be disposed of and is critical to many industrial processes. I t is used for everything from drying grain to distilling liquor. It is an essential feedstock in making fertilizers. It also can fairly easily substitute for oil as a transportation fuel. Buses in big American cities increasi ngly run on it, as taxis in Australia have for years. I ts history is a tale of how markets work, how technology can broadside the best futur ists, and how planners and politicians can g et it wrong. More important than the lessons of history is the fact that we appear now to have more natural gas than was ever predicted, and we can look forward to possibly hundreds of years of supply at present rates of use. And it could slay the foreign oil dragon, o r at least maim the brute. Trouble is, because of its tortured history, natural gas has often been put on the back burner. When the first commercial oil well, the D rake, was sunk in western Pennsylvania in 1859, natural gas, or methane to give it its proper classification, was not on anyone’s mind except deep miners, for whom it was a lethal hazard. The Oil Age began withoutn atural gas. When it was found in conjunc tion with oil, it was unceremoniously burnedo ff: a process known as flaring. In the United States, natural gas faced political problems as well as infrastructural p roblems. Natural gas production was regu lated by a predecessor of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Federal Power Commission. It was bound by a legal ruling known as the Permian Basin Decis ion that kept the price of natural gas artifi cially low, discouraging new supplies and new infrastructure, such as processing plants and storage. This led to shortages and to a lack of confidence in the future of natural g as. During the energy shortages of the 1970s, n atural gas was discounted by the governm ent and much of industry. Jack O’Leary, the first deputy secretary of energy, snapped at a reporter who asked him about natural gas: “Forget about natural gas: It is a depleted resource.” Congress panicked and passed a piece of legislation called the Fuel Use Act, which forbade the use of natural gas for many things, including pilot lights in new kitchen stoves. There was even concern about the eternal flame at Arlington National Cemetery. Utilities were told not to even thinko f burning natural gas: It was too precious a nd there was too little of it. G as demand declined precipitously in the 1 980s. And in 1987, the Fuel Use Act was r epealed. Along with deregulation of gas, a gas boom resulted. But it was technology that changed everyt hing. New drilling techniques increased sup ply. New turbines, based on airplane engines, started to enter the electricity market. Theyw ere clean, easy to install, and reached high efficiencies of fuel-to-electricity conversion.T oday, 30 per cent of our generation comes f rom these “derivative” machines. So successful was natural gas in the 1990s, that new concerns about supply shook thei ndustry and the public was told that gas would have to be imported from the Middle East, especially from Qatar. Permission was sought to build dozens of liquefied natural gas terminals around the coastlines. N ow it looks as if natural gas is a fuel with an enormous resource base thanks to technology. T he technology in question is horizontal drilling. Imagine you sink a hole 2 miles into t he earth and then send out horizontal roots in all directions from this vertical trunk. That, in essence, is horizontal drilling and it m akes available trillions of cubic feet of natural gas trapped in close formation shale deep in the earth. Ironically, or fittingly, this takes the energy story back to Pennsylvania where a vast shale field called the Marcellus is beingd eveloped and will write the next chapter of hydrocarbon energy. This is good because it is plentiful, it is here and it builds on extant pipeline infrastructure. Of course, it makes investments in many “alternative” sources of energy, particularly ethanol from corn, look like very poor investments. Cars and trucks that run on natural gas are an appealing alternative to ethanol with less disruption of the food chain and stress on the farms. (This article was written by Llewelyn King -C.2009 Hearst Newspapers). Does Lynx Airlines care about their Bahamian passengers? LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Natural gas: It’ s plentiful and it’s here EDITOR, The Tribune. Re: Drivers, please use your indicators. Tribune, September 19, 2009 THE courteous use of turn signal indicators presents an excruciating dilemma to many stereo-blasting, cell phoneusing, grade D drivers. The added mental strain of choosing left vs right on the spur of the moment is simply too much for them to handle. Consequently, their solution is to employ one of two time-honoured methods for resolving the problem (a cators at all (commonest (bPress the hazard button and flash all the lights at once. The latter is frequently found to be especially thrilling by jit ney drivers and those who like to celebrate Christmas all year long. KEN W KNOWLES, MD Nassau, September 20, 2009. A signal dilemma for many motorists

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM IN recognising World Ani mal Day on the October 4, the Bahamas will join many other countries around the world in celebration of this occasion. The day is known to others as St Francis of Assisi Day named after the patron saint of the animals. The Bahamas Humane Society is encouraging all animal welfare groups and owners of animals to do something special for animals on this day. The Parish of St Christopher’s and the Bahamas Humane Society will be holding a St Francis of Assisi service for all animals and pets on Sunday, October 4, at 4.30pm at St Christopher’s Church at Lyford Cay. Please bring your animals and pets and share in the service celebrated by Archdeacon Keith Cartwright. Stephen Turnquest of the Humane Society urged people to e-mail photos of events to bhscruelty@gmail.com so that they can be highlighted on http://www.worldanimalday.org.uk under the Bahamas events. OCTOBER 4: WORLD ANIMAL DAY BAHAMAS Public Service Union President John Pinder advised staff at the Ministry of E ducation’s office on Thompson Boulevard to return to work today and if a foul odour remains in the building, they must vacant the premises and work outside.” Originally, staff at the ministry complained of mould in the building that resulted in t alks between Mr Pinder and Education Minister Carl Bethel. According to Mr Pinder, Mr Bethel had “looked favourably” on the staff work-i ng on “flexible hours” or a shift system so that the work of the ministry could be done. However, when the minister t ook this initiative to cabinet, Mr Pinder said, cabinet reportedly did not approve it. “And so he (Mr Bethel to call back and tell them (the staff) that it was cancelled and t hey had to go back to the normal shifts. Now when they got to work this morning they met a foulo dour in the place and they came out in protest against that. B ut in addition to that we are now learning, like I indicated, that the flexi-hours are not a pproved,” he said. Mr Pinder said his union m embers are having difficulty with the decision taken by theM inister, as normally such tem porary measures as the prop osed shift system does not necessarily require Cabinet approval.“So I don’t know why t his has to reach the cabinet level, and that has me con c erned,” Mr Pinder said. With the minister indicating t hat government is working aggressively to have these employees at Thompson Boulevard relocated to another site, Mr Pinder said he felt it was i mperative for the staff to be placed on a shift system so thats ome of them can vacate the building when necessary b ecause of the mould problem that currently exists. “When you look at that mould, it is playing with their psyche. They are getting the i mpression that this is really going to make them sick and s ome of them are already expe riencing discomfort in breathing a nd the rest of it. And so I figured the fewer hours they spend in there the better it is for them. And we had agreed for them to do five hours a day i n two different shift systems to make sure that the place is a lways covered so that they can be away from the building for s ome period of time. “And I already told them w hen they return to work today that if the environment in the building is unbearable then they are not to work in theb uilding. I advised them to show up to work and if the problem has not been corrected they are to work on the out side,” Mr Pinder said. Ministry staff urgedto return to work ‘Paying father’s funeral expenses is a real struggle’ POPULAR RADIO PERSONALITY: Anthony ‘Fatback’ Marshall. B EREAVEDDAUGHTEROFRADIOPERSONALITY A NTHONY ATBACK ’ M ARSHALLTELLSOFMONEYWOES By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net THE bereaved daughter of p opular radio personality Anthony 'Fatback' Marshall claims she is s truggling to pay off her father's f uneral expenses despite the thousands of dollars that were raised in d onations after his death. Radio station More 94FM, where Mr Marshall wase mployed, accepted almost $8,000 in donations during a special calli n show shortly after he died to help with the popular disc jockey's funeral costs. Mr Marshall's eldest daughter Charnell said that although the station paid out $5,000 to the funeral home, management has refused to give her the remaind er. She also claimed she is being harassed by creditors to pay $ 1,600 for her father's burial plot and a balance of $2,700 to the funeral home. The 23-year-olds ingle mother said she is now forced to sell her only means of t ransportation her dead father's c ar to cover the outstanding bills. "It's still hard for me because me and him were basically living together and I was taking care of him up to his death, only me and h is girlfriend, and its still hurting and I have to fight for the little that he has," she told The Tribune . "People who donated money a re calling me, saying 'Man I hear you still in pain, what happen to m y money?’." When T he Tribune contacted station manger Galen Saunders for comment he directed us to the station's attorney Craig Butler. M r Butler told T he Tribune t hat between $7,500 and $7,700 was raised in donations in memory of Mr Marshall during a radio show shortly after his death. He said $ 5,000 of this was paid to the f uneral home while the balance remains in the care of the radio station. Claim He also claimed that since Mr Marshall's death, three differentp eople have approached the stat ion saying they had rightful claim t o the money. This prompted the station to temporarily freeze the funds until management could s ort out who was legally entitled to the money. " That's friction that More 94FM does not need to be involved in, so the station asked me what to do and I advised them that until I get some clarity on the situation I will not release those funds." Mr Butler added that if Mr Marshall's immediate family met with him collectively, an agree-m ent could be reached on when to release rest of the money. Mr Marshall, 44, died June 25, the day after he suffered a heart attack. He is the founder of theF atback Kids Club. F OULODOUR COMPLAINT

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BY THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD September 21, 2009 T heNational Insurance Board (NIB address and corr ect “facts” advanced by the Nassau Institute in a letter to the Editor, published in the Nassau Guardian of Saturday, September 19, 2009,a nd referenced in a T ribune article on September 21, 2 009. In that letter, the Nassau Institute incorrectly sugg ested that National Insurance is proposing an 84.1 per cent increase in taxes . E ach month the National Insurance Board collects c ontributions from employers and employees that are invested for future benefitp ayments to workers should they lose employment income for reasons such ass ickness, child birth, advanced age, invalidity, d eath and more recently, loss of employment. Contributions made to N IB are certainly not t axes ; they are contributions, or, inc ommercial insurance terms premiums , for which contributors receive returns int he form of income-replacing benefits. There is a direct link between contributions made and benefits received. For example, National Insurance contributions provide full relief for employ e rs from any costs and lia bility related to job-related accidents or diseases. I n their letter, the Institute gives an example of how a p roposed two per cent rate increase and a change in the wage ceiling from $400 to$ 600 per week will result in a 84.1 per cent increase in con tributions. While their mathe matics may be correct for someone earning $600 or m ore per week, the Institute does not state that each of the considered increases theyr efer to would result in increased benefits to contributors. A lso, a ceiling increase will n ot affect all workers and employers. Ceiling I n fact, when the ceiling is increased next, only around 4 0 per cent of the workers and their employers will be affected, i.e., only thosew orkers who are now contributing on the maximum $400 per week contribution ceiling will be required to pay more. F rom this perspective, the Nassau Institute’s calcula-t ions are not correct as they appear to assume that all workers make in excess of$ 400 per week. In fact, the assumption s eems to be that all workers make at least $600. We know that this is not t rue; we know that not all workers will be affected, and t hose affected will not all have to pay on the new ceiling. I t must be restated that National Insurance contributions are payable on actu al wages up to the ceiling . If that ceiling is increased to$ 600 today, then the person who makes $525 per week, will pay contributions on that amount and not on $600 per week. S o then, contrary to the Nassau Institute’s contention, 60 per cent of work-e rs will see no change in their weekly or monthly deductions. The remaining 40 per cent of workers will be affected, b ut in varying degrees. Depending on their actual w ages, some will pay contributions on wages of $10 more per week; or on $100m ore; or, in the case of those earning the ceiling or above, on $200 more. I t cannot be overstated t hat those who will pay more in contributions as a result of the ceiling increase will realize larger benefits basedo n their higher insurable wages. T he National Insurance programme needs to maintain its relevance as both thee conomy and social patterns change and thus various r esponses are required from time to time. In April 2009, an unemployment benefitw as added. Because of this new benefit over 11,000 unemployed workers have had a portion of their lost income replaceda nd over $14 million has been returned to the economy thus far, boosting localc onsumption and benefiting Bahamian businesses. A ceiling adjustment would be in response to increasing wage levels overt he past 10 years and will enhance NIB’s relevance to higher income workers. Regarding the specific adjustments referred to byt he Nassau Institute, the Government of The Bahamas has not announced any rate increase or ceiling adjustments. W hile new benefit initiatives and actuarial recom mendations do call for rate and ceiling adjustments, no changes or implementationd ates have been set. It is likely, though, that the additional one per cent con-t ribution for unemployment benefit that will be shared e qually by employers and employees, will take effect i n early 2010, and this is required to support the continuing benefit. Likewise, the Chronic Disease Prescription Drug Plan, when expanded to all NIB eligible contributors, will call for a rate adjustment, now suggested at one per ecnt.T he accompanying benefit that will be delivered to all employees, when this rate increase is approved and implemented, will result in a significant benefit to contributors and employers and w ill likely result in decreased health care costs for the entire country. Value The National Insurance p rogramme has for more than 30 years proven its value and importance to workers, employers and the overall economy. T o maintain its value and relevance, changes are required from time to time. In this case, new benefits and a ceiling adjustment are being considered. The Gove rnment and the National Insurance Board will be proactive in measures aimed at ensuring that Bahamians can depend on the National Insurance Board to provide meaningful benefits to current and future generationso f Bahamians. We know that we must reform NIB. Workers and the media a re calling for this reform, particularly to ensure that the Fund remains relevant,v ibrant, and paying a meaningful benefit beyond 2032. It would not be responsi b le for NIB to know that it h as to reform and to introduce new benefits, provide for income relevancy and move to introduce the recommended Actuarial recommendations, without reviewing the cost of the additional benefits. Simply put, we cannot sit by and do nothing when we know that we should act now. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Offering Unparalleled Beachfront ValueTHISISNOTANOFFERTOSELLORSOLICITATIONOFOFFERSTOBUY,NORISANYOFFERORSOLICITATIONMADEWHEREPROHIBITEDBYLAW.THESTATEMENTSSETFORTHHEREINARESUMMARYINNATUREAND SHOULDNOTBERELIEDUPON.APROSPECTIVEPURCHASERSHOULDREFERTOTHEENTIRESETOFDOCUMENTSPROVIDEDBYANCOLANDSLTD.ANDSHOULDSEEKCOMPETENTLEGALADVICEINCONNECTION THEREWITH.developed by exclusively offered by 24 Luxury Beachfront Homesites in a Private Community with an Authentic New Harbour Village at Your Doorstep +1.242.677.5333 www.serenitypoint.comSurrender to SerenitySchooner Bay Beach, Abaco Bahamas NIB: Tax increase suggestion is wrong NATIONALINSURANCEBOARDRESPONDSTONASSAUINSTITUTE OUR S AY T he National Insurance Board Press Response To a letter from the Nassau Institute, published in the September 1 9, 2009 edition of the Nassau Guardian. ARAWAK Homes will host its first “Build on your lot” fair at its Shirley Street office on Saturday. This event will cater to persons who own their lots, or have a considerable amount of equity built up in a lot on which they are still paying the bank, and wish to build a home, or a multi-family structure. A spokesman for the company said that they are aware that “many persons own a lot, are paying on a lot, have inherited a lot, have been given a lot or have been promised a lot and really want to take the next step towards becoming a home-owner. Then this event is for them.” On Saturday Arawak Homes team of home consultants, architects, engineers, attorneys and contractors will be available from 10 am to 5 pm, to answer questions, and to provide assistance on all aspects of home-ownership. The event, said the spokesman, is free. ARA W AK HOMES T O HOS T ITS FIRST ‘BUILD ON YOUR LOT’ FAIR ON SATURDAY

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 7 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WYNDHAMNASSAURESORT.COM 242.327.6200 WEST BAY STREET AT CABLE BEACHTHE TROPICAL TREASURESOCTOBER 8 12DISCOVERInvite your family, friends, neighbors & co-workers to take Discovery Day Weekend o and come Discover the Tropical Treasures at the Wyndham Nassasu Resort.Join in the Discovery Day Weekend Activities: Take advantage of our Forever Summer Sale with rates starting at $114.00 per room, per night Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing Pirates Dinner Party on the beach(prize for best-looking pirate) Mystery photo scavenger hunt Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team Golf t ournament (green fees additional charge) Dive-in movie with popcorn Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night Club featuring the VIP Band Dance contests & prizes 8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables, dance floor, rock slide & water slide By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net TEACHERS who refused to work earlier this week returned to their classrooms y esterday as the Ministry of Education c ommitted to meeting all of their demands. Staff have been reassigned to fill vacant positions at C I Gibson and Anatol Rodgers high schools, and 70,000 new p ieces of furniture arrived in Nassau on Friday to be distributed to insufficiently furnished public schools. D issatisfied teachers staged sit-ins at Uriah McPhee on Friday until the broken air conditioning was repaired over the weekend; they refused to work at Anatol Rodgers on Monday and Tuesday until twot eachers were put in place, and at C I Gibson the staff of 80 staged a three-dayp rotest. Classes resumed at C I Gibson Senior H igh School yesterday after the Ministry of Education provided four teachers and four security officers, as well as classroom furnishings. Teachers had complained classrooms did n ot have enough desks and chairs to accomm odate large classes, and they were overworked as there were not enough staff. They were also concerned about their personal safety, as 11 knives and an ice-pick have been found on the campus this term. President of the Bahamas Teachers Union (BUT Ministry of Education for not having all the necessary staff and furnishings in place a t public schools before the start of the new school year on August 31. But Director of Education Lionel Sands said the department did not fail to hire the correct number of staff or order the necess ary furnishings, but resources had to be reassigned when registration was completed after the start of the new school year. An estimated 3,000 students were expecte d to move from private to public schools t his year owing to the recession, but when the school year started, only half that number were transferred to the public school system. A nd those students were distributed at schools across New Providence, and did not necessarily enroll at the school the Education Department expected them too. T his confusion was compounded by the f act that parents would register a child at s everal schools in the hope of getting a place. Therefore the projections were off by 300 students in some cases, as at C I Gibson 800 students were expected to attend, and 1,100 have now enrolled. Mr Sands said: “We weren’t concerned with understaffing because we recognised that around the end of September we would find out what the real numbers are, a nd we didn’t want to transfer teachers until after we got the final numbers for students in the schools. “I am not ashamed because we did not have any control over the movement of p eople from one district to the next, or the number of students that leave private schools and go to public schools, so I don’t feel embarrassed that we had to makea djustments, the department makes adjustm ents when the need arises. “We were making adjustments last year and every year before, but this year is not a usual year because of the financial situation . .. and it was so bad this year because we expected more students. “But the bottom line is the children are the ones who actually suffer in all of thisa nd it is grossly unfair to all of them and to t he parents.” Teachers return to classrooms as Ministry bows to demands A STEAK-OUT at an Eleuthera Pri mary School will raise money for stu dents to attend challenging summer camps in the United States next year. Deep Creek Middle School, in Rock Sound, hopes to raise thousands of dollars this year for a scholarship fund that will pay for students to attend camps in New York, Vermont, Massachusetts, N ew Hampshire and Maine next sum mer, as well as local camps in Gregory T own and at Camp Eleuthera. The school has been running the programme for three years and has so far sent 34 students on positive vacation adventures. Last year the camp scholarship fund raised over $39,000, and the school hopes to be just as successful this year. Principal Joanna Paul said: “Support ing travel to camp is a large part of our b udget, but the change it produces in students is worth every penny. “When a s tudent climbs the highest mountain in Maine, suddenly a math test on fractions doesn’t seem so hard.” After returning from camp, Aleice Goodman of Tarpum Bay said: “I have more temerity and I am not afraid to do things I hadn’t done before.” The steak-out will be held at the Rock Sound homecoming site from 11am on S aturday. The event will run all day. Fund-raising steak-out to help students attend US summer camps BY DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police arrested four men in connection with a drug seizure at an apartment complex in the Lunar Boulevard area. More than 70lbs of a substance suspected to be marijuana with an estimated street value of about $56,800 was seized on Wednesday. A t about 3.15pm police executed a search warrant at a f ive-unit apartment complex at Lunar Boulevard for dangerous drugs and firearms. D uring a search of one of the units officers discovered two large black plastic bags containing a number of c lear-taped packages of suspected marijuana. Truck O fficers also searched an abandoned white dump truck located at the rear of the complex, where they founda nother black-taped package of suspected marijuana in the glove compartment. Two additional bags of marijuana were also found hidden under the hood of the truck. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said four men were taken into police custody. O fficers of the Drug Enforcement Unit are continuing their investigation. Ms Mackey thanked the Grand Bahama community and the media for their continued partnership with thep olice in the fight against crime. People who want to report a crime, or those who may h ave information about an incident, is asked to telep hone 350-3107/8 or 911. P P o o l l i i c c e e a a r r r r e e s s t t f f o o u u r r m m e e n n a a f f t t e e r r d d r r u u g g s s e e i i z z u u r r e e E DUCATION: Sit-in’ protests CIGIBSON URIAH MCPHEE DEEP CREEK Middle School students Lionel and Wayde at the Boys Club of NY summer camp. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Private banking system leader to leave Bahamas "In the light of this review, B NP Paribas has taken the d ecision to withdraw before t he end of 2010 from countries grey listed by the OECD and viewed as Tax Havens. This includes the Bahamas," said a brief statement released by the company yesterday. The bank said it will try its best to maintain its clients' interests, but the fate of the 40 persons employed there is uncertain. According to a well-placed source, BNP's move is "a p olitical one", in line with F rench President Nicholas Sarkozy's views. "It's definitely political they don't want to be seen in grey or black-listed places," said the source, who believes other private banks may follow BNP's lead. When contacted for comment yesterday, State Finance Minister Zhirvargo Laing said while the bank's decision was "regrettable" the Bahamas was working feverishly to meet the OECD's minimum requirements by the end of the year. " It's a regrettable decision to the extent that you don't want to see a reputable bank like Paribas leaving. It has significant implications for their staff and their clients and there's also the tendency to have the jurisdiction lose a valuable presence. But again this is one of the reasons why we are working as feverishly as we have been to meet the (OECD's “We know there might be those entities that will find it difficult to remain (here the Bahamas remains in the grey list. We fully expect tom eet that standard by the end of the year but that does not mean we cannot meet it sooner," he said. The OECD requires 12 tax information exchange agreements (TIEA requirement to be “white-listed.” Mr Laing said the Bahamas has signed three one with the United States, one with Monaco, and the latest signed yesterday with San Morino. The news came the same day the powerful G-20 leaders met in Pittsburgh to discuss, among other things, ways to crack down on tax havens. The group was expected to assess the progress of offshore jurisdictions that had not met the OECD's white list requirements. International reports state that French President Nicolas Sarkozy is urging his G20 counterparts to agree to impose sanctions on uncooperative tax havens as early as 2010. Meantime, Pascal Dulau, CEO of BNP Paribas (Bahamas no firm date when the bank will pull its services out of the country. "We don't close, we are exiting meaning that we are trying to find a solution by trying to sell or transfer the business depending on the clients but there is no official date where we say we turn out the lights. We will withdraw from the Bahamas but will take the necessary (steps When asked if the bank would reconsider its position if the Bahamas managed to make it onto the OECD's white-list before the end of the year, Mr Dulau said: "Once you take this decision you can't go back." The Bahamas was placed on the OECD's grey list, part of a naming and shaming of so-called tax havens by the G20 nations, in April. F ROM page one Mr Christie to be the kind of leader that he knows he can be. However, the former MP also warned that if Mr Christie were to return as leader of the PLP and not perform up to par that he w ould be “very disappointed” i n him, and the party would h ave to make the difficult decision of replacing him. “If that is required we are obliged to do everything humanly possible to be the government. “That is the purpose of the p arty. Nothing supersedes that. “Nothing. But I am confident that he would (meet the mark). “And if he disappoints me, I would do it with some sadness, but I would join in the effort to deal with the prob lem,” Mr Smith said. Mr Smith also expressed his fondness and admiration for PLP leadership hopeful Paul Moss and thanked him for his bravery in entering the race, stating that he feels the candidate has a “tremendous contribution” to make to the party. “I embrace Paul Moss, he is a man of tremendous ideas and I think he has a future with the party. “ think Jerome Fitzgerald has a tremendous future and we need more like them to come forward because as they put their ideas in the great mix it becomes what is really best for the organisation and the country,” Mr Smith said. Quipped While seeking not to highlight exactly who he favours for the deputy leadership of the party noting that there are currently three persons who have pledged Mr Smith quipped that he liked two out of the lot but his true candidate had not entered the race yet. “I am waiting to see who else has entered the race. Right now my candidate is none of the above and if he does not enter the race I will certainly pick the one who I would conclude the party is safest with,” he said. Mr Christie has been on the offensive in the past few weeks defending his tenure as prime minister and chal lenging his critics who contin ue to write him as “soft”, “indecisive”, or “weak.” Recently in a televised interview with JCN CEO Wendall Jones, Mr Christie warned his would-be chal lengers to not take his “kindness for weakness.” “I am absolutely prepared for this moment. Everything about me has now climaxed at this point where I am ready to go. One only has to look at my career and see the arrows and the darts and the punishing criticism that I have received. Clearly that pre pares someone it makes you stronger. “And contrary to perceptions that people try to put out there. “I am a strong and purposeful person connected to people. “And so I am confident, and I know at the end of the convention I will be the leader of the PLP,” he said. George Smith backs Christie F ROM page one d riven the ambulance that took 16-year-old Jett Travolta to the h ospital on January 2. Ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne, 46, was also fired earlier this year. He is on trial with former PLP Senator Pleasant Bridgewater for attempted extortion of actor John Travolta and his wife, Kelly Preston. The pair is accused of trying to extort $25 million from the Travoltas. The trial opened in Nassau on Tuesday. Mr Garvey said he has been following the trial. The death of Jett Travolta in Grand Bahama had attracted a lot of media attention. Mr Garvey said that an expatriate saw him on television arriving at the hospital in the ambulance with Jett and his parents. “He asked if I was still at the hospital and asked me ‘how did it feel that it was John Travolta riding in the ambulance with you.’ “I said I did not know it was him. And he asked me how he (John Travolta conversation, that he was like any other normal parent concerned about his child.” Television Mr Garvey said he later received a call from the Senior Hospital Administrator about his appearance on television. “She asked me if I knew I was on the TV. I told her yes, I saw myself on ZNS opening the ambulance. She told me that she was not talking about that, that she was talking about an Amer ican station. Mr Garvey said that the administrator directed him to go to the Internet. “She told me to go to Radar on the internet. When I did, to my surprise, I was being interviewed which was something I never did with anyone. “What was on the video was not what I said. It was edited to suit their purpose. I was never seated where the background was taken,” he said. “I would warn my fellow colleagues to be carefulbecause they can put you on the computer and do whatever they feel like on the computer when you are an innocent person. “Just as this happened to me, it could happen to anyone tomorrow with the new technology today. “I continue to maintain my innocence. I was wrongfully dis missed without proper investigation into this matter and I am asking for gratuity or to be reinstated,” said Mr Garvey. Former EMS worker still maintains his innocence F ROM page one n ZHIVARGO LAING “It is a regrettable decision to the e xtent that you don’t want to see a r eputable bank like Paribas leaving.”

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And finally, he congratulated Knowles and Hield for the manner in which they repre sented the country while they were off for the past month. “They had the best showing ever and they ought to be commended for being ambassadors for our country,” he said. “Too often, we in the Bahamas, look and say if you didn’t come first, second or third, you didn’t do anything. “That’s not the case in sports. In sports, you give your heart, your guts, everything on the line. And that was what these young men did. They represented the country well, they represented the country with dignity and they are still learning.” Archie Nairn, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Y outh, Sports and Culture, s aid the two boxers should be commended, as well as Miller and the executives of the ABAB. “What we see happening in this federation exemplifies what this ministry would like to see in other federations as well,” Nairn stated. “When we see the kind of success manu factured by the many pro grammes they have taken on, then we have reason to be just ly proud.” Hield, who thanked God for the opportunity to travel to Italy, said the competition was stiffer than he expected and h e went out there and he gave i t his all in the 64 kilogram class. “The loss has just boosted me more to get back into training for the Olympic Games to be the first Bahamian to bring this gold medal home,” Hield said. The 23-year-old noted that Knowles’ first round victory was just like a gold medal for the team because it put the Bahamas on the map. Knowles, who also thanked the Lord, had nothing but p raise for all those who assisted him mentally and physical ly to get ready for the championships, especially his father who was there with him throughout the whole experi ence. Everything went good, e verything was fine at the training camp,” he said. “As you can see, boxing is at a stage where it is on the rise now and my training programme is going very fine. “It was good, but it wasn’t easy going up there and fight ing against the best in the world. I went out there and I did my thing. I brought back history behind it.” Now 21-year-old Knowles said he wants to be able to go out and fulfill his next dream w hich is to win a medal at the Olympics in 2012. Also in attendance was Johnson, who is leaning on making his second appearance at the Olympics in 2012 with Hield and Knowles, his teamm ates and training partners. This is a team, we all know each other and I know what it took down there to win was not an easy task,” Johnson said. “These guys deserve a standing ovation. They went down there and did what they had to do.” Unable to travel due to ill ness, Johnson said he was right there in spirit and he congrat ulated both of them for their efforts in Italy and he’s look ing forward to one of them getting a medal in London in 2 012. Trinidad hangs on to sixth spot C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 9 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM WHEN he was a tenth grader at C I Gibson High School, Donico Brown used to sit on the Montagu foreshore watching the tiny white-sailed boats race up and down the harbour. Three years ago he had no idea he was about to become one of the Bahamas’ top junior sailors, representing the country in international competition. “One day a friend told me he was going to sailing camp, so I just tagged along. I had no idea where we were going or what was involved. I even thought he was talking about the big regatta sloops,” he said. “But I was really excited when I realised it was the little boats I’d been watching all that time.” The programme Donico stumbled upon was the Bahamas Sailing Association youth programme, and the little boats were Optimist dinghies the b oats most youngsters get their feet wet in before graduating to the bigger and more difficult to handle Sunfish. In addition to providing training for young Bahamians who have grown up around the sport, the sailing camp, which now operates year round, reaches into the public school system to introduce as many Bahamian children to the sport as possible. “A lot of these kids would never have been given the opportunity to try it or even been exposed to sailing without this junior programme,” explains race committee chairman and veteran sailor Jimmy Lowe. “Being able to teach them how to sail and provide the necessary equipment for them to use is clearly a good thing for them, but it’s good for those of us who love the sport because we’ve been able to create a base of new sailing talent that we’d essentially lost for a generation because there was no learn to sail programme.” To date, more than 850 children have learned to sail or mastered their skills on the water thanks to the programme, which has expanded in its five years into Grand Bahama, Abaco, Eleuthera, Harbour Island and Long Island. Come October 15-17, Donico, Christopher Sands, Michael Holowesko, Michael Gibson and Brent Burrows Jr, all of Nassau, and Long Island’s Torrington Cartwright, are expected to compete against top junior sailors from around the world in the International Junior Sunfish Championships 2009 that will be hosted by the Nassau Yacht Club. That competition will take place in Montagu Bay the very spot Donico was first introduced to sunfish sailing. It’s not going to be easy, but I do think we have a bit of an advantage because that’s where we train every day. We know the winds and the water better than anyone else,” he says. For months now, he has been putting in three to four hours a day in practice to prepare for the big event. In fact, Donico, Sands, Holowesko and Burrows Jr are among the 16 Bahamians who are set to compete against some of the world’s best and most seasoned sailors in the 2009 Sunfish World Championships also being hosted by the Yacht Club October 1624. “Having these two world class events here in the Bahamas this year is a major boost to the sport locally and will also provide significant exposure for the country as more than 150 people from 14 different countries will be here over the two week period. “A lot of people are working hard behind the scenes to make sure the Bahamas shines and none of it could be done without key corporate sponsors like Pictet Bank & Trust, Nestle and Atlantis or without the support of the ministries of tourism and youth, sports and culture," says Paul Hutton, chairman of the regatta. The Bahamas has enjoyed much succ ess over the years in Sunfish sailing, winning the World Championships five times. Donnie Martinborough, the Bahamas’ top finisher in this year’s Bahamas Nationals, is a three-time Sunfish world champion, with top place finishes in 1983, 1985 and again in 1988, the last time the event was held in Nassau. ‘One day a friend told me he was going to sailing camp, so I just tagged along...’ By SAMORA J ST ROSE Layout editor LET’S take a glance at the 2 010 World Cup Soccer Q ualifying in which Trinidad & Tobago, the only C aribbean island competing i n the finals against five count ries, is hanging on to the s ixth spot with five points in t he North and Central America & Caribbean region. A fter eight games, Trinidad h as one win, two draws and f ive losses. But only the top three countries qualify. And the fourth-place team advancest o the playoffs against the fifth-place team in the South America region. T he United States, which barely has the top position w ith 16 points ahead of Mex i co (15 points), Honduras (13 points), Costa Rica (12 points) and El Salvador (8 points), boasts a record of five wins, one draw and twol osses. T rinidad is scheduled to hit the field against Costa Rica in San Jose at 10pm Saturd ay, October 10. And the Caribbean nation is slated to host Mexico at Macoya 8:05pm Wednesday, October 14. I n Europe, the winners of each of the nine groups qualify and the top eight secondplace teams advance to the European playoffs. Qualifying for the World C up at the top of group five with 24 points is Spain which has won all eight games played. England, also holding on to the top spot in group six, h as qualified with 24 points and boasts a perfect 8-0-0 record. And in group nine, the N etherlands qualified with 24 points and a perfect 8-0-0 record. I n South America, the top four teams qualify and the fifth-place team advances to the playoffs against CONCACAF fourth place. After 16 games played, Brazil and Paraguay have qualified and are in first and second place with 33 and 30 points respectively ahead of Chile (27 points (23 points), Argentina (22 points), Uruguay (21 points), Venezuela (21 points Colombia (20 points (12 points) and Peru (10 points). In Africa, the winners of each of the five groups qualify. After four games played, Cameroon (seven points Tunisia (eight points ria (10 points Coast are all leading their respective groups in the World Cup qualifying race but only Ghana has qualified at the top of group D with 12 points and a perfect 4-0-0 record. Under-20 World Cup: Egypt beats Trinidad Meanwhile, in Alexandria, host Egypt defeated Trinidad 4-1 in the Under-20 World Cup opener, with Hussam Arafat scoring twice yesterday. Striker Afroto gave Egypt the lead in the 30th minute at the Egyptian Army stadi um, but Jean-Luc Rochford equalized six minutes later. Arafat and Mohamed Talaat scored early in the sec ond half, with goalkeeper Glenroy Samuel at fault on both goals. Arafat complet ed the rout in injury time with an angled shot from the edge of the penalty area. Paraguay plays Italy in Group A’s other game today. Also on Friday, Nigeria plays Venezuela and Spain faces Tahiti in Group B. But only top three countries qualify for 2010 World Cup fourth consecutive year. Forbes, who made his debut, said he was also pleased with his performance. When asked if he thinks he can come back next year and beat de Cardenas, Forbes could only chuckle because he knows it would be a difficult task. And Brown, who wasn’t eligible to compete in the Nationals over the weekend, said he was thrilled to watch a lot of the competitors whom he had the opportunity to coach. “This weekend was really competitive,” he said. Talking about his performance in Brazil in July, Brown said it was a good experience competing against the top competitors from around the world. “It was a completely differ ent venue, a completely different atmosphere,” Brown said. “I just need to work on my techniques.” Brown, who came into the programme from the incep tion when he attended C I Gibson Secondary High, fin-i shed 52nd in the champi o nships held July 9-18. According to Lawrence, each country got to enter at least one competitor. This was the second time that the Bahamas was represented. The first time was two years ago. Brown will be joined by Christopher Sands, Michael Holowesko, Michael Gibson and Brent Burrows Jr, along with Long Island's Torrington Cartwright, as they represent the Bahamas in the Interna tional Junior Sunfish Championships 2009 that will be host ed by the Nassau Yacht Club October 15-17 in Montagu Bay. D ONICO BROWN i n action... SAILORS, from 11 B OXERS, from 11

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B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH the Grand Bahama Sports Complex undergoing renovations, legendary trackc oach Errol Bodie has decided not to sit idly down on the sidelines. He has ventured into the sport of squash, a sport he is hoping to try and r esurrect in Grand Bahama. At present, Bodie conducts four classes daily for studentsf rom Sunland Lutheran, St G eorge’s, Tabernacle and Walter Parker Primary School. In all, Bodie is catering to more than 300 students i n the programme, an average of 30-35 per class. Y esterday, Minister of Y outh, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister present-ed Bodie with a grant to assist i n the development of his prog ramme. D uring the day, Bodie said the squash club is not in use, s o he came up with the idea of hosting the high school students on the four courts. “I wrote to the Ministry and the first time it was sent back. But the second time, Mr B annister took note of the p rogramme,” Bodie said. W hile he said they would like to cater to all of the schools on Grand Bahama, Bodie said there are five within the vicinity that they havee armarked. Sunland walks to the squash club in the mornings and St George’s and Tabernacle busses their kids to the squash club,” Bodie said. This is the only way you could develop a sport that is not taught in the schools or t aught in the facilities in the s chools.” As a retired school teacher, Bodie said he can devote his time to the programme and he has a number of friends who come along to assist him. We’re hoping that through this programme, we can iden tify some talent, tennis talent and squash talent,” he said. “Now-a-days, you don’t hear anything about squash b ecause it is dying. There’s no problem to k eep it going. In the C aribbean at one time we w ere the best. Now there is h ardly any squash players. I t hink the end result of all this i s the scholarships and if they a re very good, they can go professional.” Bodie said he already has t wo students who are being groomed for athletic scholarships in the US. A s for track and field, Bodi e said as soon as the renovat ions to the Grand Bahama Sports Complex are complete d, he will look at making a return to coaching track and field again. Coach Bodie has been the most successful track and field coach we’ve had in the coun t ry, so the kids in Nassau bett er watch out,” Bannister said. ERROL BODIE accepts a cheque from Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister. Permanent secretary Archie Nairn looks on... M INISTER of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister has extended his d eepest condolences to the f amily of the late Vincent L loyd Ferguson on behalf of t he government and the entire local sporting commu nity. Ferguson, 71, died at his h ome while having breakfast o n Wednesday morning. “As this country’s pre-eminent sports administrator, he e mbodied all that is good about Bahamian sports, inspiring in athletes and spec tators alike, the notion that they all shared an equal stakei n the growth and develop m ent of the Bahamas through whatever noble medium they s ought to pursue,” Bannister said. He noted that “so firmly d id Ferguson believe in such a proposition that many were h is personal sacrifices to connect unattached Bahamian youth with their true purpose i n life, whether as an athlete, a n academic, as a politician, a s an educator or as a social s cientist. “Such sacrifices were many and continuous, resulting in an abiding respect for his pro-f ound wisdom that readily q ualified him as a Bahamian icon, well known throughout local and international cir c les.” Bannister said his ministry is convinced that “Vince Fer guson has been a shining example to the youth andp eople of the Commonwealth o f the Bahamas, as much by his contribution to national d evelopment through the use of his intellect as by his steady display of honesty, integritya nd respect for wider humankind. “Much can be said about his days as an outstandinga thlete at St Augustine’s College where he functioned as an important cog in engines of the Big Red Machine, an ame he was responsible for coining and assigning to SAC during his days as coach and v ice principal there.” Bannister also noted that “for all these and his other t elling attributes as profess ional baseball player that V incent Lloyd Ferguson was i nducted into this country’s National Hall of Fame in 2003, rightfully earning this country’s highest nationals porting award. I have further requested the Sports Department of my ministry to provide me with a n umber of other recommen dations to perpetually com memorate the invaluable national contributions made by Mr Ferguson such that hisl ife will forever serve as a b eacon for the youth of the Bahamas, especially those w ho demonstrate an avocation for sports.” To the immediate and e xtended family of Ferguson, Bannister said he asks them t o “take exceptional pride in his life contributions, partic ularly in the countless livesh e so richly blessed by his a ffinity to practice and preach h onesty and fair play. I am confident then, that his many good deeds will long outlive the relatively short period of his temporal jour-n ey among us. Eternal rest g rant to him, O Lord.” Bahamas Basketball Federation president Lawrence H epburn offered his condo lences to the family. “I join you in the mourning of a legend who served his generation with all he had,w ith all that he said God had e ndowed him,” Hepburn said. “Today we lost a father t o the modern game of basketball as we know it. “Many had came before h im, but none had revolutionise the game of basket ball like Mr Vince Ferguson. His presence demanded respect and he did not apolo gise for his strength, frankness and style of leadership.” Hepburn said “while he knew the power he possessed he was also able to commune with the most humbled or down trodden.” He said Ferguson’s words, ‘Young Man,’ would resonate in his ear because Ferguson always got his full and undivided attention. “Yes Mr Ferguson was a giant the many has tried to emulate,” Hepburn said. “But what I realised is that Vince Ferguson not only was appropriate for his generation, very much ahead of his time and an exemplary role model, but he was a man who possessed a passion driven by a vision and a love from God that made him hurt to see his fel low men progress and advance to the pinnacle of success.” Hepburn further said: “Most of all we all knew his disciplinary approach to life. Mr Ferguson was never too afraid to discipline, but he lived the example before us and gave us a model to follow.” And he noted that basket ball, baseball, track and field, the Cancer Society, the Bahamas Association of Basketball Officials, the men’s fellowship of his church and all was well served by this great Bahamian. “The Bahamas Basketball Federation which he formed wishes at this time to say to the family of this icon: ‘Our hearts hurt with you this day and may the God of all comfort give you his ever-abiding peace in this your time of sorrow. We have indeed lost another great Bahamian.’” Bannister extends deepest condolences to Ferguson family VINCENT FERGUSON Baptist Sports Council to take break for funeral C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM T HE Baptist Sports C ouncil will take a break next weekend because of the funeral service of thel ate Rashad Morris, who was killed on Sunday m orning. Morris is a brother of Morris-Evans, who servesa s the treasurer of the BSC. His father, Ortnell Peter Morris, is also a member of the league. Morris has also helped out considerably in the concession stand at the BSC's games. The BSC extends its condolences to the Morris family. The BSC also extends condolences to the hus band and wife team of Keith and Pamela Capron, who both play in the league. Their father and fatherin-law David Alphonso 'Iron Baby' Bethel, is slat ed to be laid to rest 10am Saturday St Anne's Anglican Church. The BSC will pay its respects to the Capron family by not starting its games until noon Saturday. The BSC is scheduled to begin its 2009 Olympia Morris-Evans Softball Classic Saturday on Wholesalers Field at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. Here’s a look at the schedule of games for Sat urday: Noon – Golden Gates vs Ebenezer (Co-ed 1pm – Macedonia vs Mt Carey (M 2pm – Transfiguration vs Golden Gates (M 3pm – Macedonia vs Temple Fellowship (17And-Under) Minister helps fund squash F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net F ollowing the successful hosting of the Bahamas O ptimist National Championships over the weekend, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister laudedtwo of the winners. Bannister said he was particularly pleased to recognise 14-year-old Danny de Cardenas, the repeat overall champion, as well as 10-year-old Alande Forbes, who was third i n the green fleet. And Bannister also recognised Donico Brown, the 18year-old who represented the Bahamas at the World Championships in Brazil in July. “Sailing has really made awesome steps in developing young people and they have a great vehicular route in teaching young people how to swim and how to sail,” Bannister said. “So we are very pleased to support what they are doing.” Bannister, along with permanent secretary Archie Nairn, presented a cheque to J ohn Lawrence, the president of the Bahamas Sailing Association, for their continued contribution to the growth and development of the junior sailing programme. L awrence said since the junior programme was launched five years ago, the ministry has been a financial partner and they assisted greatly in their fourth summer sailing camp that attracted 76 students from 28 different schools. Sailing camps were also held in Harbour Island and Long Island where another 40 students were able to take advant age of the programme. “We just finished our Bahamas Optimist National Championships last weekend where we had some 54 boats competing,” Lawrence said. “They’re all single handed boats and they all performed very well.” d e Cardenas, who successf ully defended his title, said he had a “great time” and he enjoyed competing for the C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM ALANDE FORBES shares a special moment with Minister of Youth, S ports and Culture Desmond Bannister... P hotos: Felip Major Winning sailors are recognised S HOWN s itting (l-rl-r Alvin Sergeant, boxers Taureano Johnson, Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles and coach A Seymour... By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net Amateur Boxing Association of the Bahamas president Wellington Miller said he’s pleased that the Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister had a send off for the two boxers who fought in the World Championships and honoured them when they came home. In August, the team of Valentino Knowles and Carl Hield, along with coach Andre Seymour, attended the championships in Milan, Italy. While Hield was eliminat ed in the first round in the 64 kilogram weight class, Knowles went on to make his tory by becoming the first Bahamian to win a match. He competed in the 60kg class. “We in the amateur boxing programme started the programme 10 years ago after we didn’t make it to the 2004 Olympics,” said Miller, who also serves as president of the Bahamas Olympic Associa tion. “Reno Johnson was involved in that. He went through and followed our instructions and he made it to the 2008 Olympics and we made history from there.” Knowles and Hield are following the same path as Johnson competing at the World Championships. But he said the quest now is for them to go all the way to the Olympics in London, England, in 2012. “We’re proud of them and we are hoping that by the time the Olympics roll around in 2012, they will come back with a medal,” Miller said. Seymour, who made history as the first Bahamian to compete in two Olympics and win ning at least one bout, said it was not an easy road being in Italy with the boxers for five weeks. They started out in a training camp in Rome with over 80 boxers from more than 50 countries and the boxers performed very well in the matches they competed in as they prepared for the champi onships. At the championships, Seymour said the boxers went to Milan and they did extremely well, but he’s confident that because of the experience they gained, the Bahamas could end up winning its first medal at the next championships in two years and even at the Olympics the following year. “I can guarantee you that at the next Olympics, we will hit the medal podium,” he said, “as long we continue to invest in our boxers and we continue to get the support from the parents.” Bannister firstly commended the families of both boxers for the tremendous support that they received as they took the long journey to Italy. Secondly, he thanked the ABAB and its president, whom he said has done an excellent job, along with Sey mour, in exposing a lot more youngsters to the sport. “So many youngsters are looking at a way to showcase their skills and to develop their skills,” he said. Boxers make the Bahamas proud SHOWN (l-r L awrence, McPhee, Archie Nairn and Alande Forbes... SEE page 9 SEE page 9 T T r r i i n n i i d d a a d d h h a a n n g g s s o o n n t t o o s s i i x x t t h h s s p p o o t t . . . . . . S ee page 9

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM voters might not support the other members of the team if such key members were missing. “Having weighed the interests of justice, the hopelessness of the appeal and as it relates to the new nomination date of September 15 and the circumstances of this case, I felt compelled to exercise my discretion to refuse a stay of the September 7 decisions as well as to r efuse to stop the elections from proceeding on S eptember 29, 2009,” Justice Adderley stated in his ruling. In a verbal judgment Justice Adderley also ordered that union trustee Ian Neely obey the September 7 ruling and sign the payroll sheet by 1pm today and that no resignations are to take effect until he does so. Justice Adderley said that if Neely fails to comply he would entertain a contempt of court hearing. Judge decides against stay of hotel union elections ruling F ROM page one Jurors in the case were discharged early yesterday. Lawyers in the case had met in closed court Wednesday evening to make legal sub missions in the absence of thej ury. Senior Justice Anita A llen reserved Thursday to c onsider those submissions. Prosecutors have called four witnesses so far, including Mr Travolta. On Wednesday Mr Travolta -who was the only witness to take the stand-r ecalled the efforts he and others made to save his 16year-old son Jett’s life after the boy suffered a seizure on the morning of January 2 at a condo at the Old Bahama Bay Resort where they were vacationing. Mr Travolta recalled that after being awakened by a nanny he and his wifeactor Kelly Prestonran downstairs to help their son. Mr Travolta said that one of Jett’s nannies was doing chest compression’s while he performed CPR. Mr Travolta also told the court on Wednesday that outside the condo, he spoke to the ambulance driver and following that exchange he received a liability release document which he signed. He admitted however that he did not read the document because “time was of the essence.” Mr Travolta said that he told the ambulance driver to take Jett to the airport at Old Bahama Bay; the reason being he said was so that he could take his son on a Ginn jet to West Palm Beach rather than taking him to the Freeport hospital. Mr Travol ta testified however that Jett was taken to the Freeport hospital via ambulance. Mr Travolta said that en route to the hospital there was a switching of ambulance drivers. The case resumes this morning. A jury of six women and three men was selected on Monday in the case. Bridgewater, 49, and Lightbourne, 47, are accused of conspiring to extort and attempting to extort money from Mr Travolta between January 2 and 20 by means of threats. Bridgewater is also accused of abettment to extortion. Ms Bridgewater is being represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krysta Smith. Mr Lightbourne is being represented by attorney Carl son Shurland and Mary Bain pro bono. Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard Turn er, Neil Brathwaite and Garvin Gaskin are prosecuting the case. Travolta trial jurors discharged early F ROM page one By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police are trying to determine the cause of a fire at Georgies on the beach in Mather Town. A ccording to reports, sometime around 11.50pm on Wednesday police received a report of a fire at Georgies R estaurant, Disco and Lounge on the Beach. When firemen arrived at the scene, flames had engulfed the roof and a portion of the w ood/stone deck. The fire was extinguished. The building was destroyed. Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said investigations are c ontinuing into the matter. SUSPECTS ARRESTED Four persons were arrested e arly Thursday morning after police discovered and seized a large quantity of cash, along with a several firearms and a mmunition at a residence in F reeport. ASP Loretta Mackey said police, acting on informat ion, went to Hampton Road around 5.35am where they searched a residence occupied by two men and two women. W hile searching the resid ence and a vehicle, officers discovered four unlicensed firearms and ammunition with some $67,000 cash in US curr ency. The suspects, who are between 17 and 34 years of age, were taken into custody. Officers at the Drug Enforcement U nit are continuing their invest igations into the matter. Police investigate fire at Georgies on the beach

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE NATIONALInsurance Board (NIB 30 per cent reduction in sickness benefits claims since the March 2009 introduction of a form requiring employers to confirm whether staff were actually off work ill, its direc tor yesterday saying the sharp reduction in fraudulent claims had already saved $2 million. Algernon Cargill, addressing a seminar organised by investment advisory firm CFAL, said that for 2009 year-to-date, sickness benefits claims had dropped by more than 3,000 to 12,580 compared to the 2008 comparative figure of 15,870. NIB had paid out $6.2 million in sickness benefits claims this year, compared to $7 million for the same period last year. “Since the introduction of the Med-4 form, benefits claims [for being off work sick] have reduced by 30 per cent,” Mr Cargill said. “This 30 per cent reduction has so far resulted in savings of $2 million to NIB. “Many employees claiming benefits from NIB for time off work were not off..... This tells us there was a problem, and we’re asking the indul gence of employees in sub mitting the Med-4 form when employees submit a claim.” For 2009 to date, NIB has received a combined 16,628 medical, sickness and injury benefits claims, down from 19,633 in the same period in 2008. The value of benefits paid out has fallen from $12 million to $10.8 million. Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said NIB’s increased compliance focus and ensuring it collected all contributions due from C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4.68$4.51$4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $4.16 $4.14 $4.26 FAMILY GUARDIAN CORPORATE CENTRE: AT THE JUNCTION OF VILLAGE ROAD, SHIRLEY STREET & EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.comcall us today at 396-4076 A SUBSIDIARY OF get sound investment advice benet from multiple fund options earn potentially higher returnsall of the aboveinvestmentsplan your strategy By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor THE “most critical issue” facing the Bahamian pensionf und industry is that the ownership of many funds is uncer tain because they have not been incorporated as trust structures, an actuary said yesterday, the sector operating as “essentially a $1 billion unregulated industry”. Marcus Bosland, ColinaImperial Insurance Company’s resident actuary, addressing a seminar organised by the insurer’s affiliate, CFAL, said that among the concerns sur rounding the Bahamian pen sion industry were that there was “nothing that prevents” plan sponsors from investing money held for its employees’ retirement in their own com panies. Meanwhile, Kendrick Christie, an accountant and partner at Grant Thornton (Bahamas of the Government-appointed committee examining the creation of pension legislation, said only 27 per cent of the Bahamian workforce was cov e red by a pension plan. “We need to get that to 809 0 per cent,” said Mr Christie, “through encouragement, and t hen mandatory legislation. What we have here is essentially a $1.1 billion unregulated industry. We have to look at how we introduce regulations around the industry.” Recalling his experience when he helped to administer a company’s Provident savi ngs/retirement fund, Mr Christie said legislation should also look at Bahamians who used their retirement funds as collateral for loans. He explained: “What concerned me was the level of loans persons applied against their pension fund balances.” Mr Christie said it was possible for persons with $20,000 in retirement savings to walk away with only $1,000-$2,000 as a result, adding: “I would really want to look at how to restrict the application of loans and withdrawals [against pen sion fund monies]. “I was personally troubled by persons who left the company who, in some cases, end ed up owing the company money. We need to look at the level of loan and withdrawal applications against pension plans.” Adding that another concern was the “terms” under which Bahamian pension plan participants could withdraw funds prior to retirement, to cope with events such as medical emergencies, Mr Bosland Lack of ‘trust’ hits pension fund industry SEE page four SEE page three * Bahamian pensions sector essentially a $1.1bn unregulated industry’, says accountant, urging that percentage of w orkforce covered by plan increase from 27% to 80-90% * Absence of trust s tructures c reates uncertainty over plan ownership, says actuary * Concerns o ver level of loans applied against retirement funds, plus use of pensions to i nvest in sponsor’s company and early withdrawals by plan m embers NIB: 30% fall in sickness claims from fraud check Algernon Cargill * $2m savings to social security programme from 3,000 drop in benefits claims for days off work * Contribution income rises 2.3% to $108.2m for year to August * Average return on assets drops to 4.23% for 2009 * Board ‘defers no prosecution’ of delinquent employers By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE National Insurance Board (NIB action and prosecution of unemployment benefit fraudsters even if they return the funds taken, it was revealed yesterday, with some 20 per cent of claimants not receiving the full 13 weeks’ benefit indi cating they were subse quently able to find another job. Algernon Cargill, NIB’s director, addressing a seminar organised by investment advisory firm CFAL, recalled how a woman came into see NIB’s fraud unit last week, accompanied by her attorney, offering to return all the unemployment benefit cheques she had fraudulently received following a visit from police investigators. While NIB “in the first instance definitely insists on the funds being returned”, Mr Cargill said this act would not pre 20% of jobless claimants find new work prior to benefit’s end * NIB director warns fraudulent benefit claimants t hat returning funds will not prevent police action * $15.4m paid out t o 11,225 jobless Bahamians to date, with $135 average weekly pay out * 30% of government clinic visits caused by chronic, noncommunicable diseases SEE page thr ee By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor RENEWABLEenergy is too costly, takes up too much land and is unable to supply the continuous electricity need-e d to meet Abaco’s power needs, presentations on behalf of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC although attendees at the Wilson City power plant town told Tribune Business yesterday the alternatives had not b een properly explored. A BEC presentation on alternative energy forms, given at the Wilson City meeting, suggested that waste-to-energy would never be suitable for Abaco’s energy needs, since the island produced less than 3,000 tonnes of waste per month. It said that to supply one megawatt of power per month, some 280 tonnes of waste per hour, or 9,120 tonnes per day, would be required an amount well in excess of Abaco’s monthly power needs. With waste-to-energy ruled out, the BEC presentation Renewables ‘double the cost’ of fossil fuel energy SEE page two By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A MULTI-MILLIONdollar mixed-use resort project is only awaiting government approval of its Environmental Man-a gement Plan (EMP m aster planning, having pre-sold some 300 real estate plots to international buyers over the past three years despite the recession. T he principals behind the 951.4-acre Port St George project on Long Island h ave signed a 25-year management agreement with Langham Hotels International to operate the development’s 224-unit,f ive-star resort, covering 27.2 acres. Other components feature a 640-slip marina, 1,217 residential units, commercial and retail space, and a Robert Trent Jones IIdesigned golf course and country club. T he project developer, RUFO Investments Ltd, whose principals are UK citizens Ian Moorcroft and Jonathan Houghton, said in their newly-released information brochure that permission forP ort St George had been granted by the Government, with only EMP approval “required before the final stage of masterp lanning can begin”. The EMP has already been submitted f or approval, and the developers state that final master planning “will commence at the earliest possible opportunity”.A pplications for subdivision approval will then be made. To date, the developers said some 300 real estate sales outside the main Port St George site had been completed, many t o leading European buyers and international sports personalities. Right to Buya greements to secure lots on the main site have been entered into with the pur chasers, who must pay a 10 per cent deposit once subdivision drawings are fin ished, the balance being due when infra s tructure is completed. Although no sales can be concluded in the absence of subdivision approval, theP ort St George developers said “a high conversion rate of right to buy agreements 300 sales for resort project * Multi-million dollar development signs 25-year management deal with Langham Hotels, with 640-slip marina and 1,217 residential units also planned SEE page five

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE said ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC tidal energy were “not sufficiently advanced to provide useful power on a utility scalea t this time”. As for solar power, a powergeneration technology the Bahamas seems ideally suited to, the capacity factor for a solar Photovoltaic plant at Abaco’s latitude was pegged a t around 21 per cent or less. When it came to the com p arative costs of power pro duction, as a percentage of diesel generation, the BEC presentation showed wind was 2 20 per cent more expensive; waste-to-energy some 340 per cent more expensive; and solar 450 per cent more expensive. And as for land require ments, some 360 acres would be required to house a 48 megawatt (MW featuring 50-metre towers; 1,920 acres to site a solar facility; and 20 acres set aside for waste-to-energy power prod uction. In short, the BEC presentation on renewable energy con-c luded: “Renewables have a g reater land requirement. Renewables presently are more costly than traditional sources of electricity production. “Wind and solar do not provide continuous sources of power, and will require traditional sources of power for most of the time”. H owever, while acknowledging that renewable, sust ainable forms of energy had the ability to contribute to the Bahamas’ energy security, they would only “eventually be inte g rated into the power production process in a limited way”. The presentation seemed designed to dampen expecta-t ions about how useful renewable, sustainable energy would be in meeting Abaco’s power needs and, indeed, those of the wider Bahamas. One attendee at the Abaco T own Meeting on the Wilson City power plant, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of anonymity, said BEC “didn’t give any basis” for its decision and views on renewable energy sources in the context o f the island’s energy needs. He added that while BEC said the average wind speed on Abaco per year was seven knots, historical data showed it was really around 16 knots. For renewable energy derived from wing, the latter figure was in the Class 6 (outstanding gory, and just below Class 7( superb). The source told Tribune Business that while a wind farm would be double the cost of thep roposed $105 million Wilson City, Bunker C fuel-burning, plant, that could be “made back in a couple of years” from the likes of carbon emission credits. In addition, he explained that wind farms did not automatically render the land where they were located useless fora ny other application, pointing out that they co-existed quite well with farmland. Arguing that the Government’s approach to renewable energies appeared designed to protect BEC, and prevent peop le from generating their own power, the source said of the proposed National Energy Policy (NEP they have no intention of considering renewable energy sources for another 20-30 years. “They’re doing a few projects, but are not going after it in an aggressive sense. Whatt he Bahamas government deems is the cheapest way to generate electricity, that’s the policy. They haven’t considered it [renewable energy] at all. They give it lip service, so people feel all warm and fuzzy. All this talk is to placate people and show them they’re doing something.” FROM page one Energy B y CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter crobards@tribunemedia.net MARSH HARBOUR, Abaco Abaco will be marketed as its own destination within the Bahamas just as Nassau/Paradise Island has been for decades, the minister of tourism and aviation said, with Marsh Harbour to receive a new airport runway by next month and 14 American Airlines flights per week. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace could not say when construction of the new Marsh Harbour Airport terminal will begin, but revealed that plans for the building are almost complete. Speaking at the sixth annual Abaco Business Outlook conference, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said it was time that Abaco, which has the fastest growing economy and largest marina industry in the Bahamas, had its own marketing identity instead of being grouped within the “Islands of the Bahamas”. “We have to move Abaco out of the shadow of Nassau and Paradise Island,” he said. The minister said the Bahamas’ promotional neglect of the Family Islands was comparable to Jamaica only selling Kingston in its promotional material. He argued that just as Jamaica has successfully developed other areas of its island into tourism meccas, so can the Bahamas. As American Airlines arrivals are increased, the Ministry of Tourism is focusing on creating a dedicated Abaco logo for promotional purposes. Essentially, according to Mr VanderpoolWallace, Abaco will be sold separately in the future, much like Nassau/Paradise Island and Freeport, Grand Bahama, have been. However, the island remains without suitable infrastructure for its rapidly-growing economy. BEC is working to increase power output on the island, but its Wilson City project was recently set back because of the need to obtain construction permits. Mr Vanderpool Wallace said Abaco’s economy had seen a 27 per cent visitor arrivals decline since the start of the recession, while Freeport saw a 35 per cent decline and Nassau an 8.8 per cent decline. Administrator for Central Abaco, Cephas Cooper, said Abaco’s economy has seen growth on average of 32 per cent in tourist arrivals since the 1960s. He said that despite the economic downturn “the future of Abaco still looks very bright". Mr Cooper said the island, with a population of about 14,000 across several towns along 120 miles of land, has been experiencing rush hour traffic recently a testament to its growth. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace restated his consternation at the price of airlift into Abaco, but contended that the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation is working to have airlines lower their costs. He asserted that a flight to Abaco from New York was more expensive than a New York to London flight. And Abaconians lament that the once per week American Airlines flight to Miami is more expensive than flying to Nassau, then taking a second flight out to Miami. According to Mr Vanderpool-Wallace, the Bahamas is a high cost destination due to high labour costs and high energy costs. He said this country has to find out how to compete in this region with those factors in mind. “We cannot compete with other destinations on the basis of cost,” he said. “We have to find out how to compete.” Abaco to get own tourism brand V incent Vanderpool-Wallace

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employers and the selfemployed was paying off, as contribution income had so far defied the recession through increasing by 2.3 per cent year-over-year for the first eight months of 2009. For the year to August, NIB’s contribution income stood at $108.2 million, compared to $105.8 million the year before. For 2008, contribution income hit $154.9 million, up from $125 million in 2004, $135.1 million in 2005 and $149 million in 2006. It was slightly below the $155 million generated in 2007. Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said NIB’s Board of Directors “has not deferred any prosec utions” in court of delinq uent employers who refused t o negotiate a settlement to settle outstanding contribu-tion amounts “regardless of who is on the list”. The NIB director revealed that the social security programme always sought an up-f ront payment of 40 per cent of the sum owed by employ ers because this represented the employees’ share of contributions, or the 3.4 per cent deducted from their salaries every month. Explaining that court prosecutions were the “last resort” when negotiations failed and employers refused to pay, Mr Cargill added: “When we take people to court, we are protecting the employees, the workers of the country, ensuring their contributions are paid and paid on time.” For 2009 year-to-date, Mr Cargill said the average rate of return on NIB’s invested a ssets had dropped a little to a round 4.23 per cent, but p ointed out that this was “outperforming” many oth-er leading indicators, such as the BISX All-Share Index, which was down 12 per cent for the year-to-date. For most of the five years since 2004, NIB has generated an average return on its assets of between 5-6 per cent, exceeding the 6 per cent barrier just once in 2007. Mr Cargill blamed the decline in 2009 year-to-date returns on its $1.6 billion reserve fund on last year’s “market correction” following “accelerated growth” in previous years, plus the decline in Cable Bahamas’ share price the BISX-listed company in which it is poised to become the largest investor with an almost-30 per cent stake. Justifying NIB’s investment strategy, particularly its dependence on government debt instruments and building projects, Mr Cargill said the Bahamian economy was simply not large enough to support all NIB’s investment assets and generate a good rate of return. Nor could the Bahamian commercial banking sector support them. “NIB has no non-performing investments in the Bahamas government, and no non-performing government debt,” Mr Cargill said. “The Government pays NIB contributions and pays them on time.” At year-end 2008, some 43 per cent of NIB’s investment portfolio was concentrated in Government Registered Stock Issues, 3 per cent in Treasury Bills and 22 per cent in Certificates of Deposit (CDs cent was held in property investments, chiefly government buildings. A further 18 per cent of assets were invested in bonds, 5 per cent in shares, and 1 per cent in loans. Pointing out that foreign investments were currently not generating as good a return as NIB’s Bahamasbased portfolio, Mr Cargill addressed recent criticism of NIB’s decision to terminate investment management contracts with CFAL, RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust, and Providence Advisors. “The re-positioning of investment strategy does not mean reduced investment opportunities or investment inefficiency at NIB,” he added. “The opposite is true. We are poised to ensure the National Insurance Fund continues to return a positive returns.” While NIB generated a $54 million surplus in 2008, this came almost entirely from its investment income. Mr Cargill said: “In 2009, for the first time, it is projected that benefits paid will equal contribution income. The majority of the surplus will have come from investment income.” With NIB taking in $13$14 million in contribution income, the NIB director added: “This is another reason to increase the contribution rate, to ensure the benefits paid out do no exceed the contribution income.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM btrt tfb r f r!%* &'!$()))!*&*#tffn""bnff ! $ %#&!*&*# !%** NIB F ROM page one vent the social security programme from allowing police to go through with their investigations, and eventual prosecution, of benefit fraudsters. The NIB director warned Bahamians that the fund had a simple way to detect fraud, since it could compare unemployment benefit claimants with those whom employers made contribution paymentson their behalf. If contributions were still being made on behalf of a benefit claimant, this indicated they were still working. Mr Cargill added that NIB was receiving numerous calls from neighbours to inform it that persons claiming unemployment benefit had either f ound new jobs, were worki ng part-time or had gone selfemployed. As a further safeguard, rather than deposit benefits direct to bank accounts, Mr Cargill said NIB required all claimants to come to its offices and sign an affidavit confirming they were still unemployed and looking for work. Out of the $20 million transferred from NIB’s medical branch to finance the initial stages of the unemployment benefit scheme, Mr Cargill said some $15.4 million had been paid out to-date. The average weekly benefit collected by claimants, he said, was $135. S ome 11,225 Bahamians h ad so fare received unemployment benefits, Mr Cargill said, but 20 per cent of claimants did not receive the full 13 weeks of benefits, indicating that they had found jobs in the interim. “There is not one Bahamian who has been approved who has not received their cheque every two weeks,” Mr Cargill said, adding that of the 11,225 claimants, an estimated 8,000-9,000 were on New Providence. On Abaco, he added that the unemployment rate was 2-2.5 per cent, as indicated by the percentage of the workforce claiming benefit. “We believe the $20 million earmarked is sufficient to continue this unemployment benefit,” Mr Cargill said. “Every Bahamian who qualifies, regardless of whether the $20 million is expended, will receive a benefit.” Currently, Bahamians merely have to prove they are unemployed to qualify, but Mr Cargill warned that “the qualifying criteria will be a lot more stringent” when the unemployment benefit enters its permanent phase. That will be when the NIB contribution rate increases from 8.8 per cent to 10.8 per cent, to fund both the unemployment programme and proposed National Chronic Drug Programme. Mr Cargill said the latter would generate “significant savings” for Bahamian insurance companies and the public, through facilitating the purchase of drugs that combat chronic diseases at lower prices. The NIB director said one in three Bahamians suffered from chronic, non-communicable diseases “and most lack timely access to prescription drugs”. He added that at Wednesday’s Business Outlook Conference, Dr Pearl MacMillan, the director of public health, said that 30 per cent of all visits to government clinics in the Bahamas were by persons suffering from chronic, non-communicable diseases. While the programme would be phased in, covering pensioners, invalids and children initially, all Bahamians would eventually qualify, Mr Cargill saying the programme would initially cover 11 diseases, drugs and medical supplies, and incorporate public and private pharmacies. “The goal is to reduce the cost of drugs significantly, with smaller co-payments and lower premiums for claiming prescription drugs on medical plans,” Mr Cargill said. He added that the planned 50 per cent increase in the insurable wage ceiling, from $400 to $600, meant high earners would receive greater benefits from NIB. For instance, sickness benefit, paid at 60 per cent of the insurable wage ceiling, would rise from $240 to $360 for higher income earners, while pension payments would rise from the monthly $970 earned at the $400 ceiling. F ROM page one Jobless claims I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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said in a panel discussion that his major fear centred on the fact that “many of the pension funds themselves are not created by a trust”. A trust is essentially that, a structure that effectively holds pension plan assets in escrow to meet the retirement needs of plan members, and which is segregated from the operational assets of their employer/company sponsor. “This is the most critical issue facing the industry here,” Mr Bosland said. “If trusts do not arise to own the assets, who controls and owns them? In the absence of a trust, does the employer own the fund? Do the employees own the fund? Is it 50/50? That’s a critical matter. “Plans that are segregated but not in trusts do concern me, because the question aris-es as to who owns the plan. We need to enhance plan transparency.” Disclosure to plan participants was key, Mr Bosland said, because if theyd id not know how their retire ment funds were being managed, it could lead to further problems. The absence of an overall regulatory framework for the B ahamian pension fund industry means there are minimal to no safeguards preventing plan sponsors and employers from investing a large per-c entage of plan assets, ostensibly held to meet obligations to retired employees, in their own companies. This, Mr Bosland said, created potential conflicts of interest and investment risk, w ith too great a percentage of plan assets concentrated in one investment. He pointed to the collapse of energy giant Enron earlier this decade as an example of the dangers this created, with the company’s employees losi ng 80-90 per cent of their retirement nest eggs because they were invested so heavily in the company’s own stock. It’s not clear to what degree that is prevalent in the Bahamas,” Mr Bosland said. But the fact there is nothing that prevents it, limits it or requires disclosure of it is a concern.” T he ColinaImperial resident actuary added that another ‘grey area’ in the Bahamas was “the ability of people to with-d raw money from a fund prior to retirement”. While “most plans don’t expressly permit it or restrict i t”, Mr Bosland said that plan m embers/employees withdrawing their retirement funds, so as to meet medical or family emergencies, created problems that were not obvious at first sight. “The issue is: On what t erms should a plan allow someone to do that, because essentially a person is trading off their retirement needs for p resent needs,” Mr Bosland said. “However pressing that need, it needs to be explained to the employee, so theys hould know the consequences of doing it. “I’m particularly concerned about an employee’s ability to make a sensible decision, when facing a financial crisis, on something that affects their financial future.” Mr Bosland suggested that counselling anda dvisory services be made available to ensure employees made an informed choice. M r Christie said Bahamasbased companies should first be encouraged to establish retirement plans for their e mployees, through the use of incentives and highlighting that such schemes often created a happier, more loyal andp roductive workforce. Apart from pension funds, he also urged that the Bahamas’ national savings rate b e increased, pointing out that 7 5 per cent of this nation’s bank accounts hold less than $10,000, and most less than $1,000. Acknowledging that there were concerns over the composition of plan Boards and i nvestment committees, especially if they were dominated by plan sponsors or participants, Mr Christie said he w anted to see statutory requirements for the regular auditing of pension funds, especially those with assetsa bove a certain amount, “to keep the actuary on their toes”. Mr Christie added that policies governing plan investment strategies, the concentration of risk, and rules regarding investments in related companies also needed to be man-d ated. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM 1 27,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW * /25,$:,//,$06RI62/',(5 5 3%2;1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJ W R WKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRU UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHG VWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH W K GD\ RI 6HSWHPEHU WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG &LWL]HQVKLS 1DVVDX%DKDPDV NOTICE is hereby given that RENE TELLE of 187 EMERALD CIRCLE, TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX CR-56766 NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS , is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why registration/n aturalization should not be granted, should send a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 18th day of September, 2009 to the Minister r esponsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas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f 'LUHFWRU 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW 0,&+$(/)$125' RI &+$5/(69,1&(17671$66$87+(%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\ DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQDV FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ VKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQG VLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\V IURPWKH W KGD\RI6HSWHPEHU WR WKH 0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( Pension F ROM page one By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter c robards@tribunemedia.net MARSH HARBOUR, Abaco BEC’s Family Island operations will generate at net loss for the remainder of thec orporation’s publicly owned l ife, its general manager has indicated. Kevin Basden told the Abaco Business Outlook conference that BEC’s New Providence profits subsidise the cost of electricity generation on the Family Islands due to its uniform tariff system. This allows Family Island residents to pay the same rates as New Providence residents d espite the higher overhead cost of generation. According to Mr Basden, because the cost of operating power plants on some Family Islands is disproportionate to the rates paid by consumers, BEC is in a “loss position”. H e said Family Island residents should be paying far more than they do for their energy consumption. However, the prices that the energy company would have to charge could put electricity prices out of reach of the a verage population. Mr Basden said purchasing fuel, shipping fuel and maintaining generators puts a strain on BEC’s finances, which are never recouped in the Family Islands. According to him, the decis ion to supply power to the Family Islands then becomes less BEC’s business and more its social obligation. BEC’s corporate overview reveals that it holds $900 million of assets across the Bahamas and averages $500 m illion in revenues, to which $350 million goes to the purchase of fuels to run 26 power stations across the Bahamas. While BEC is moving towards making its operations more efficient, hiring a consultancy firm out of Germany,a nd devising studies to gauge the feasibility of alternative energy, it continues to have to build power generating facilities using diesel turbines. “Many of the generators are old and not very efficient,” Mr Basen said of the t ypical generator across the wider Bahamas. “There are a lot of breakdowns and employees have to work very hard.” He said that if certain renewable energy options are implemented in the Bahamas,B EC will be able to supplement the existing power generation method of burning fossil fuels. However, it will look into allowing private generation of power via solar panels, with a view to having excess power generated reins erted into the grid. Mr Basden restated yesterday at the Bahamas Society of Engineers luncheon meeting that BEC does not want to carry out disconnections, and moving to find ways to make power generation moree fficient and more affordable for every Bahamian. Family Islands always a loss maker for BEC

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5B TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM into sales agreements is e xpected, as the price at which right to buy holders are entitled to purchase is extremely attractive. This has led to some right tob uy agreements changing hands for a considerable premium. “Whilst the pre-sales from the right to buy agreements are expected to result in approximately 25 per cent of the plots at Port St George being solda t a substantial discount, the early revenue generated is expected to more than cover the costs of infrastructure to the entire site, including construction o f the marina and golf course..... “Evidence suggests that residential values in the Bahamas have held upw ell, and furthermore that US purchasers are beginning to return to the region.” Interest, the developers said, had been received from Australia, t he Middle East and India. The developers added that they had been able to reduce the risks associated with Port St George byf inancing the development costs to date, including the land acquisition, entirely from their own equity and financial resources. “This debt free status h as allowed Port St George to emerge unscathed from the financial turmoil of 2008-2009, and the developers aren ow well-positioned to take advantage of reduced construction costs and the initiatives to boost the global economy that are being taken by governm ents around the world,” the developers said. The development will be undertaken in a joint venture partnership with BDOS toy Hayward Investment Management, the 385 hectare project covering “less than 1 per cent” of Long Island. 300 sales for resort project F ROM page one

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 75F/24C Low: 76F/24C Low: 77F/25C Low: 78F/26C Low: 79 F/26 C Low: 80F/27C Low: 73 F/23 C Low: 73 F/23 C High: 92F/33C High: 91F/33C High: 91 F/33 C High: 89 F/32 C High: 89F/32C High: 88 F/31C High: 89F/32C Low: 75F/24C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 89F/32C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 74F/23C High: 87 F/31 C Low: 76F/24C High: 90 F/32 Low: 73F/23C High: 87F/31C Low: 74 F/23C High: 88F/31C Low: 77 F/25 C High: 89F/32C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 88F/31C Low: 75 F/24 C High: 86F/30C Low: 77F/25C High: 90 F/32 C Low: 74F/23C High: 90F/32C High: 89 F/32 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH, 2009, PAGE 7B THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Mostly sunny, a t-storm in spots. Partly cloudy; a shower or t-storm. Breezy with partial sunshine. Clouds and sunshine. Partly sunny. High: 89 Low: 73 High: 88 High: 88 High: 88 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel An afternoon thunderstorm possible. High: 88 Low: 74 Low: 75 Low: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel 100F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 74F 89-78F 92-81F 95-84F 102-78F Low: 75 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................90F/32C Low ....................................................81F/27C Normal high ......................................87F/31C Normal low ........................................74F/24C Last year's high .................................. 88 F/31C Last year's low .................................. 77 F/25C As of 2 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.05" Year to date ................................................30.56" Normal year to date ....................................36.98" Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU First Full Last New Sep. 26 Oct. 4Oct. 11Oct. 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 7:00 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 7:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . . 1:33 p.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . none Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 12:36 p.m.2.96:05 a.m.1.0 -----7:10 p.m.1.3 12:57 a.m.2.47:03 a.m.1.2 1:35 p.m.2.88:11 p.m.1.4 2:00 a.m.2.48:05 a.m.1.3 2:35 p.m.2.89:09 p.m.1.4 3:01 a.m.2.49:06 a.m.1.3 3:31 p.m.2.810:01 p.m.1.3 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3277/25pc92/3379/26t Amsterdam63/1752/11pc63/1750/10s Ankara, Turkey75/2347/8s76/2445/7c Athens76/2463/17s81/2766/18pc Auckland63/1753/11r64/1751/10pc Bangkok89/3178/25t89/3177/25r Barbados87/3077/25sh86/3077/25sh Barcelona77/2563/17s75/2361/16s Beijing82/2761/16pc81/2761/16t Beirut78/2572/22s78/2571/21s Belgrade76/2452/11pc74/2350/10s Berlin63/1748/8pc68/2052/11s Bermuda83/2875/23sh82/2772/22pc Bogota70/2141/5pc68/2045/7pc Brussels66/1849/9s70/2151/10s Budapest73/2250/10s72/2250/10s Buenos Aires66/1848/8pc70/2150/10s Cairo91/3268/20s92/3372/22s Calcutta93/3383/28r93/3384/28r Calgary74/2341/5s66/1834/1pc Cancun90/3273/22t90/3273/22sh Caracas82/2772/22t83/2873/22t Casablanca79/2661/16t78/2560/15pc Copenhagen65/1850/10c64/1751/10pc Dublin63/1750/10pc63/1752/11pc Frankfurt68/2050/10pc70/2148/8s Geneva 71/21 53/11 pc 69/2054/12pc Halifax 59/15 43/6 c 61/16 46/7 s Havana 88/31 71/21 t 88/31 71/21 s Helsinki 55/12 48/8sh63/1752/11c Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 s 91/32 82/27s Islamabad 110/43 72/22 s 106/41 72/22 s Istanbul76/2463/17pc77/2560/15s Jerusalem 81/27 59/15s77/2561/16s Johannesburg 63/1752/11t74/2355/12s Kingston 89/3179/26sh88/3179/26sh Lima73/2258/14s73/2257/13pc London68/2050/10pc72/2250/10pc Madrid84/2854/12s82/2757/13pc Manila85/2976/24r84/2876/24r Mexico City72/2255/12t72/2252/11t Monterrey79/2663/17c86/3070/21s Montreal64/1745/7s66/1854/12s Moscow54/1245/7sh55/1246/7pc Munich66/1848/8pc71/2148/8s Nairobi88/3155/12pc88/3156/13pc New Delhi 99/3779/26s99/3777/25s Oslo63/1749/9pc68/2045/7s Paris72/2249/9pc72/2250/10s Prague 64/17 45/7 s 67/19 47/8 s Rio de Janeiro75/2367/19pc77/2571/21c Riyadh100/3771/21s100/3771/21s Rome 75/23 63/17 pc 79/26 61/16 s St. Thomas88/3180/26pc88/3179/26s San Juan84/2849/9s81/2742/5s San Salvador 87/30 73/22 t 87/30 73/22 t Santiago 63/1741/5c55/1237/2c Santo Domingo86/3073/22r86/3073/22sh Sao Paulo 67/19 60/15 pc 73/22 65/18t Seoul72/2255/12c77/2559/15c Stockholm 63/17 50/10 pc 68/20 52/11 pc Sydney 77/25 66/18 s72/2254/12pc Taipei91/3281/27s92/3383/28s T okyo 79/26 68/20 pc 75/23 66/18 pc T oronto 64/1750/10s66/1855/12r Trinidad90/3270/21pc96/3569/20s V ancouver 67/19 54/12 pc 63/1748/8pc Vienna 66/1851/10pc67/1954/12s W arsaw 63/17 50/10 pc 61/16 50/10 c Winnipeg 77/25 57/13 s 73/2250/10pc H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace T ODAY ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet6 Miles86F Saturday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:ENE at 8-16 Knots1-2 Feet6 Miles86F Saturday:E at 8-16 Knots1-3 Feet10 Miles86F Today:E at 7-14 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F Saturday:E at 8-16 Knots3-5 Feet10 Miles85F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque78/2555/12s81/2755/12s Anchorage49/941/5r50/1039/3c Atlanta87/3067/19c81/2765/18t Atlantic City74/2350/10pc66/1860/15pc Baltimore75/2351/10pc71/2156/13pc Boston66/1845/7s63/1755/12s Buffalo69/2046/7s69/2054/12r Charleston, SC89/3170/21c87/3071/21pc Chicago74/2356/13r76/2458/14sh Cleveland73/2256/13s71/2159/15r Dallas82/2762/16pc88/3168/20s Denver66/1844/6c85/2950/10s Detroit72/2256/13s70/2158/14r Honolulu88/3176/24s88/3175/23pc Houston85/2970/21r90/3273/22t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odaySaturday TodaySaturdayTodaySaturday Indianapolis73/2261/16r74/2356/13sh Jacksonville90/3271/21pc88/3171/21t Kansas City76/2455/12c74/2360/15pc Las Vegas99/3769/20s101/3871/21s Little Rock81/2763/17c83/2861/16pc Los Angeles94/3464/17s96/3564/17s Louisville79/2666/18r78/2559/15t Memphis80/2668/20r82/2764/17t Miami89/3179/26pc89/3179/26t Minneapolis68/2054/12r75/2358/14pc Nashville83/2868/20t79/2659/15t New Orleans87/3074/23t87/3073/22t New York71/2152/11s67/1961/16pc Oklahoma City78/2555/12pc83/2860/15s Orlando92/3375/23pc91/3272/22t Philadelphia73/2253/11pc68/2058/14pc Phoenix 102/38 73/22 s 103/3976/24s Pittsburgh73/2249/9pc66/1854/12r Portland, OR 81/2753/11s74/2350/10s Raleigh-Durham 80/26 61/16 pc 73/22 64/17 c St. Louis78/2559/15r78/2561/16sh Salt Lake City 84/28 55/12 s 84/2857/13s San Antonio 82/27 67/19 pc 89/31 71/21 s San Diego80/2664/17pc82/2764/17pc San Francisco 79/26 57/13 pc 82/2756/13pc Seattle69/2052/11s67/1948/8s T allahassee 92/3371/21pc90/3270/21t T ampa 91/32 76/24 t 90/32 76/24t Tucson95/3567/19s97/3667/19s W ashington, DC 75/23 55/12pc68/2063/17r UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. T emperature bands are highs for the day . Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com


TRY OUR
DOUBLE :
FILET-0-FISH "oven

ANY
HIGH
LOW

SOF
TIF

zy PARTLY SUNNY,



Volume: 105 No.253

300 sales for

De as)

aMNricge quits
as PLP treasurer

i Also steps down as senior
partner in law firm after
money laundering claims

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Embattled lawyer Sidney Cambridge
resigned as treasurer of the PLP yester-
day. On the same day he stepped down
from his position as senior partner in the
law firm of Callenders and Co.

In the wake of accusations in a criminal
complaint filed in a US District Court that
he knowingly helped launder funds from

what he was told was a European-based
investment fraud, the attorney is now said to
be “focusing all of his attention on estab-
lishing his innocence” in the face of the charges.

He is accused with Florida’s Broward County Commission-

SEE page three

George Smith backs Christie

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia. net



SIDNEY
CAMBRIDGE



IN the lead up to the par-
ty’s national convention next
month, the former PLP MP for
Exuma George Smith has
openly pledged his support for
Perry Christie to be returned
as leader of the PLP.

Calling Mr Christie a man
with tremendous ability and
ideas, Mr Smith said he wants
the officers in the PLP to push

SEE page eight

aA Meas







The Tribune

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE



BAHAMAS EDITION

www.tribune242.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

Concern over

country’s failure
to escape OECD
list of tax havens

UU Sata tal la VR



FIREMEN’S
CHALLENGE was
held yesterday at
the fire training
grounds at the
Police Headquar-
ters in East
Street during Fire
Safety Week. A
fireman of the
Red Squad is
pictured pulling a
dummy to help
win the
Firemen’s
Challenge. Three
squads took part
in the challenge.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

dudge decides against stay of hotel union elections ruling

SUPREME Court Justice Neville Adderley
yesterday decided not to grant a stay of his
September 7 ruling that ordered a new nomi-
nation process for the hotel union elections,
which are scheduled for next Tuesday.

Attorney Keod Smith had sought the stay
on behalf of the majority of the union's Exec-
utive Council, pending an appeal of Justice
Adderley’s ruling in the Court of Appeal. Mr
Smith had also sought to have the Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union

elections postponed sine die until after the
final determination of that appeal.
Nominations for the new Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers Union elections
were held on September 15. Tyrone Beneby,
Philippa Dixon and Raymond Wright running
for the Deliverance Team were not allowed to
nominate and Mr Smith contended that some

SEE page 12





Get Your Of) [°|

Coftee Fix

Boxers make

Bie rlinlies



Private banking
system leader to
leave Bahamas

By TANEKA
HOMPSON

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A LEADER in the
private banking system
has decided to with-
draw from the
Bahamas before the
end of the year because
this country has failed
to escape the powerful
OECD's “grey-list” of
so-called tax havens.

French-based bank
BNP Paribas
(Bahamas) Limited —
which operates in more
than 80 countries —
said despite "excellent"
financial performance
in the current econom-
ic crisis it had to review
its network "in the con-
text of the ongoing
changes in the world
financial system and
G20 initiatives."

SEE page 8



Ex-EMS worker
still maintains

his innocence

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Former
EMS worker Marcus Garvey
continues to maintain his
innocence following his dis-
missal by hospital officials
earlier this year.

Garvey insists that he had
no idea that a casual conver-
sation with an expatriate man
was being recorded for an
online entertainment website.

Hospital officials terminat-
ed the veteran employee in
February for breach of patient
confidentiality. Garvey was
one of two persons who had

SEE page eight

eM as
WRT La

NO witnesses took the
stand yesterday in the tri-
al of former PLP Senator
Pleasant Bridgewater and
former paramedic Tarino
Lightbourne who are
accused of attempting to
extort $25 million from
Hollywood celebrity John
Travolta.

SEE page 12



eee fe

MOTORS



NASSAU AND BAHAM/

Oo) CIN) De JG) BY DY Do (COs IY) BA, CSI BY 22) 8) 8

LTD.


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Bahamian charged over Florida store owner shooting

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A BAHAMIAN has been charged
in connection with the shooting of a
convenience store owner in Fort
Pierce, Florida.

Police arrested Anthony “Rude
Boy” Symonette, 21, as he made
attempts to board a cruise ship to Nas-
sau in Hollywood, Florida, on Friday,

September 11.

He had been wanted in connection
with the shooting death of Parag Patel,
44, on September 4.

Mr Patel, owner of the A&M Dis-
count Beverage store in Georgia
Avenue and Okeechobee Road, Fort
Pierce, was shot dead when three
armed men entered and robbed his
store.

Symonette, who was wanted in con-
nection with the murder, was trying

T Our

ur

to flee the US at the time he was
arrested, according to the Fort Pierce
police department.

A detective told The Tribune: “We
got a tip that Symonette was on the
way to the Bahamas and we got US
Customs and ICE (Immigration and
Customs Enforcement) involved in
trying to put flags on their passports.

“Then we got a call from customs to
say he had made it to the Bahamas,
but it turned out to be someone else.

“We knew Symonette was Bahami-
an and had family in Nassau and that
he was trying to get there.

“Then we got an anonymous tip that
he was trying to buy a cruise ticket in
Hollywood, Florida, because he would
have been able to get on and off the
cruise ship without a passport.”

Symonette has since been charged
with second-degree murder with a
firearm and robbery with a deadly
weapon while wearing a mask.

Donald “DJ” Isaiah, 24, and
Mahogany Alexander, 29, of Fort
Pierce, have also been charged on the
same counts.

Deondravious St Fleur, 23, of Fort
Pierce, was arrested on September 9
and charged with accessory after the
fact to murder on suspicion he drove
the gunmen to the Port St Lucie/Stuart
area, where they rented a car after the
robbery. Unconfirmed reports claim
St Fleur is Haitian-Bahamian.

PERMANENT
Secretary in the
Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Cul-
ture Archie Nairn
(left) with the
Ambassador of
the People’s
Republic of China

Hu Dingxian dur-
ing a tour of the
construction site
of the new
National Stadium
by executives of
the Bahamas Chi-
na Friendship
Association on
Tuesday.

MBASSADOR of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian

along with president of the Bahamas-China Friendship Associa-

tion Anthony McKinney and other government sports officials

toured the Thomas A Robinson National Stadium construction
site on Tuesday.

The Bahamas-China Friendship Association was established in 2004 to pro-
mote goodwill and people-to-people contact between both countries; to pro-
mote understanding of both countries through cultural exchanges and the study
of the language, culture and history of both; to promote economic and trade
opportunities and entrepreneurial development through participation in trade
fairs and investment tours; to provide mutual relief and assistance to the people
of both countries in times of emergency and for social enhancement, and to
assist in the improvement of the social, economic and spiritual welfare of the
peoples of both countries.

The most recent announcement of cooperation between the two countries was
the agreement signed with the Export-Import Bank of China for funding to
jump-start the $1.92 billion redevelopment of the Cable Beach strip.

Also, the gift of $30 million from China to build a sports stadium for the
Bahamas to contribute to the development of the country’s youth through
sports.



Ministry of
Youth,
Sports and
Culture/

Eric Rose

PROJECT man-
ager Iram Lewis
(right) shows
points of interest
ona map during
a tour of the con-

PERMANENT Secretary in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture Archie Nairn
(centre) joins Aaron Brice (left) and Mrs

Delores Ingraham, wife of the prime min-

ister and principal of C C Sweeting High
School, during a tour of the construction

struction site of
the new National
Stadium by exec-
utives of the
Bahamas China
Friendship Asso-

site of the new National Stadium by exec-
utives of the Bahamas China Friendship
Association on Tuesday.

ciation on Tues-
day.



Hope for graduates with reject
letters from Bahamian colleges

FACULTY AND
BOARD

members of Hope
College shown
here at an Open
House over the
weekend. The
Christian-based
college, spear-
headed by the
Assemblies of
Brethren in the
Bahamas, is tar-
geting those
whose aspirations
for higher educa-
tion were dashed
by unsatisfactory
BGCSE results.



By REUBEN SHEARER























WITH the national average down for BGCSE examinations
dropping from a ‘C-’ to a ‘D’, many graduates will have received
reject letters from local colleges.

With hopes of further education tarnished, there’s little option
but to try to find work in an already depressed job market.

However, there’s an institution offering an alternative solution.

Hope College, located on JFK Drive in the Christian Life Cen-
tre (CLC) pitched its degree programmes to the public in an open
house, and began registering new students for the 2009 academic
year.

uC es

OO Ra ua |

Dashed

The Christian-based college, spear-headed by the Assemblies of
Brethren in the Bahamas, is targeting those whose aspirations for
higher education were dashed by unsatisfactory BGCSE results, Dr
June Wilson, Research and Education Director at the college told
The Tribune yesterday. In addition to secular training, the college
seeks to equip people interested in entering Christian ministry, pro-
viding an at-home ministry training experience however, for aspir-
ing church-workers in the Associate of Arts Divinity degree
(ATH). The College will offer BGCSE and pre-college classes in
English, Math, History, Geography, Biology, Religious Knowledge,
Accounts and Economics at $350 per course.

For further information, contact the CLC on 328-5341



=

SAMA | 1

F

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS









Ses
Mal

TT



WHILE trying not to con-
demn the party’s former
treasurer Sidney Cambridge,
former PLP MP for Exuma
George Smith said that the
recent scandal surrounding
Mr Cambridge is “not a PLP
problem.”

“That’s Mr Cambridge’s
difficulty. I know Sidney
Cambridge. I am fond of
him, and I hope that this
society won’t judge him too
harshly and wait until the
matter plays itself out. But
that is not a PLP problem,”
Mr Smith told The Tribune
yesterday.

Tendering his resignation
to party leader Perry
Christie yesterday, Mr Cam-
bridge reportedly advised
the former Prime Minister
that he intends to focus his
energies on establishing his
innocence to the money
laundering charge upon
which he was indicted in
Florida on Wednesday.

“In these circumstances,
Mr Cambridge did not think
that it would be appropriate
for him to continue to serve
in any capacity within the
party at this time. I under-
stand and accept Mr Cam-
bridge’s decision and com-
mend him for dealing with
this matter so responsibly
and promptly,” Mr Christie
said.

Shocked

Expanding on the issue,
Mr Smith said he would be
shocked if any funds that
were spent by the PLP in the
last election, or the elections
before that did not come
from legitimate means.

“And the fact that I hold
an office in the party, and I
behave in a way that is
improper, unless the party
condones my behaviour the
party ought to deal with me.

“People make mistakes,
you know. I like to tell the
story that I belong toa
church, the Roman Catholic
Church that is 2,000 years
old. You have had Cardinals
that have messed up; they
messed up. The church is the
organisation and until the
church does something to
condone the wrong the
organisation isn’t tainted.

“And Iam not about to
suggest that Mr Cambridge
did anything wrong — I will
always shy away from con-
demning any Bahamian that
is seen to be getting into any
trouble beyond the borders
of the Bahamas,” he said.

Mr Colin Callender, man-
aging partner of Callender
and Co also confirmed yes-
terday that Mr Cambridge
had tendered his resignation
from the law firm where he
was a senior partner.

“He has resigned as a
member of the firm with
immediate effect as far as
I’m concerned it won’t
adversely impact on the
credibility or otherwise of
the firm,” said Mr Callen-
der.

It was unknown yesterday
whether Mr Cambridge will
also have to leave his post as
treasurer of the Bahamas
Bar Association, although
there were calls for him to
do so. Messages left for
Bahamas Bar Association,



Senior PLP MP says country would
benefit from rules on campaign financing

Call for more transparency

with political donations

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN the wake of a claim by a US
politician, caught up in a money laun-
dering scandal, that he gave money
to the PLP, a senior PLP MP says
there should be a more transparent
and accountable system for donations
to aspiring politicians and political
parties.

Dr Bernard Nottage, PLP Bain and
Grants Town MP, and former leader
of the Coalition for Democratic
Reform, said that while accused mon-
ey launderer Broward County Com-
missioner Josephus Eggelleton’s alle-
gation that he was “raising money for
(Perry Christie’s) re-election cam-
paign” in 2006 is “unsubstantiated” it
would be better for the country if rules
on campaign financing existed so that
a definitive record of who donated
what to which party could be scruti-
nised.

“T do not think that what that man
(Eggelleton) says is evidence of any-
thing. It’s a remark he made without
any substantiation whatsoever and
anyone can tell anyone else they are
raising money. Mr Christie denied any
knowledge of it or soliciting any funds
through or from him and his word is



“I do not think that what that man
(Eggelleton) says is evidence of anything. It’s a
remark he made without any substantiation
whatsoever and anyone can tell anyone else

they are raising money.



sufficient evidence for me that it’s
unlikely to be true,” said Dr Nottage.

Mr Eggelleton was quoted as mak-
ing the claim about being set to donate
to Mr Christie’s campaign in a criminal
complaint filed in Florida on Tuesday
following an extensive three-year-long
undercover operation by the Federal
Bureau of Investigations (FBI).

However, Dr Nottage, like several
other political figures over the years,
including Mr Christie, Brent Symon-
ette, Tommy Turnquest, Fred
Mitchell, Alfred Sears and Paul Moss,
said he does believe there “ought to be
very strict rules to which persons who
are seeking public office must com-
ply in case of funding.”

And he added that this should
involve records being kept of who
receives what donations from whom,
which can be “open to scrutiny by the
public and an independent election
commission” in the name of ensuring

fairness in elections and reducing
room for corruption or any percep-
tion of it.

“There should be completely trans-
parent and accountable procedures
and there should be records that can
be subject to scrutiny so we can tell
who is giving what,” he said.

His comments came after Sidney
Cambridge, PLP treasurer and partner
in the law firm of Callender and Co,
was indicted with Broward County
Commissioner Josephus Eggeleton,
as a result of an FBI “sting” opera-
tion.

It is claimed that Mr Cambridge
acted for Mr Eggelleton in a legal
capacity and both are accused, with
two others, of conspiring to commit
money laundering in the Bahamas.

The complaint against him primar-
ily focuses on the “sting,” in which it is
alleged that Mr Eggeleton advised and
cooperated with undercover agents

BERNARD NOTTAGE



who told him they wished to launder
funds in The Bahamas. The funds
were allegedly obtained through a
European-based investment fraud.

Mr Cambridge was indicted
Wednesday by US federal authorities
for allegedly helping to launder thou-
sands of dollars in proceeds from the
purported investment fraud.

The criminal complaint against Mr
Eggelleton on Tuesday stated, in part:
“On or about May 30, 2006, defen-
dant Eggelleton stated to an under-
cover agent and a cooperating wit-
ness, ‘If you wanna do some deals in
The Bahamas, let me know. Yes sir, in
fact Pm gonna be raising some money
for the prime minister of The
Bahamas that’s running for re-elec-
tion.”

In July 2006, Eggelleton was quoted
as saying that in the Bahamas he
“does not have to adhere to the same
ethical standards he has in the US.”

In astatement issued yesterday Mr
Christie said he was “able to confirm”
that “neither I nor any of the persons
who were responsible for fundraising
for the PLP in the last General Elec-
tion have any knowledge of any con-
tribution that would have been made
by, or on behalf of, or at the sugges-
tion or direction of any of the persons
who are named in the indictment.”

Cambridge quits as PLP treasurer

FROM page one

er Josephus Eggelleton and
two others following a three-
year-long “sting” operation
by the Federal Bureau of
Investigations into public cor-
ruption in Florida.

A statement from PLP
leader Perry Christie yester-
day afternoon said he had
accepted “with regret” Mr
Cambridge’s resignation as
party treasurer.

“Tn my discussion with him
this morning, Mr Cambridge
indicated that he intended to
focus all of his attention on
establishing his innocence to
the charge upon which he was
indicted in Florida yesterday.

“In these circumstances, Mr
Cambridge did not think that
it would be appropriate for
him to continue to serve in
any capacity within the Party
at this time.

“T understand and accept
Mr Cambridge’s decision and
commend him for dealing
with this matter so responsi-
bly and promptly.”

However, Mr Christie crit-
icised The Nassau Guardian
for its headline over the arti-
cle outlining the case involv-
ing Mr Cambridge on Thurs-

day, saying it was “unfortu-
nate that...the headline
referred to the indictment of
the PLP treasurer as if to
imply that that position was
somehow relevant to the
indictment.”

“In fact, the indictment
relates only to matters in
which Mr. Cambridge is
alleged to have acted as a
lawyer and not as a party offi-
cial.”

Headline

That headline read “PLP
Treasurer Charged in the
US”.

Mr Christie continued: “I
would remind all my fellow-
citizens that in common with
all accused persons, Mr Cam-
bridge is entitled to the pre-
sumption of innocence.

“In this regard, I am grati-
fied by Mr Cambridge’s per-
sonal assurances to me that
he is completely innocent of
the charges made against him
and that he intends to exert
every effort to vindicate him-
self accordingly.”

Finally, the PLP leader
asserted, with more certainty
than in his initial statement
on the matter, that he could

"UNEN » COTTON
* LAMOUR —* SILK

confirm having made further
inquiries, “that neither I nor
any of the persons who were
responsible for fundraising for
the PLP in the last General
Election have any knowledge
of any contribution that
would have been made by, or
on behalf of, or at the sugges-
tion or direction of any of the
persons who are named in the
indictment.”

“Any allegation to the con-
trary is completely false,” he
added. Colin Callender, man-
aging partner of Callender
and Co. confirmed Mr Cam-
bridge’s resignation from that
company yesterday afternoon.

“He has resigned as a mem-
ber of the firm with immedi-
ate effect as far as I’m con-
cerned won’t adversely
impact on the credibility or
other wise of the firm,” said
Mr Callender.

It was unknown yesterday
whether Mr Cambridge will

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also have to leave his post as
treasurer of the Bahamas Bar
Association, although there
were calls for him to do so.
Messages left for Bahamas
Bar Association, President
Ruth Bowe Darville, were not
returned up to press time yes-
terday.

Some attorneys suggested

that the indictment of Mr
Cambridge, given his position
as a senior attorney and in the
Bar Association and the pub-
licity surrounding the matter
could have “serious” knock-
on effects on the reputation
of the legal profession in The
Bahamas.





































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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Does Lynx Airlines

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

WEBSITE
www.tribune242.com — updated daily at 2pm

Natural gas: It’s plentiful and it’s here

WASHINGTON — Natural gas is nifty
stuff. It burns twice as clean as other fossil
fuels, leaves no ash to be disposed of and is
critical to many industrial processes.

It is used for everything from drying grain
to distilling liquor. It is an essential feed-
stock in making fertilizers. It also can fairly
easily substitute for oil as a transportation
fuel. Buses in big American cities increas-
ingly run on it, as taxis in Australia have for
years.

Its history is a tale of how markets work,
how technology can broadside the best futur-
ists, and how planners and politicians can
get it wrong.

More important than the lessons of histo-
ry is the fact that we appear now to have
more natural gas than was ever predicted,
and we can look forward to possibly hun-
dreds of years of supply at present rates of
use. And it could slay the foreign oil dragon,
or at least maim the brute.

Trouble is, because of its tortured history,
natural gas has often been put on the back
burner.

When the first commercial oil well, the
Drake, was sunk in western Pennsylvania
in 1859, natural gas, or methane to give it its
proper classification, was not on anyone’s
mind except deep miners, for whom it was a
lethal hazard. The Oil Age began without
natural gas. When it was found in conjunc-
tion with oil, it was unceremoniously burned
off: a process known as flaring.

In the United States, natural gas faced
political problems as well as infrastructural
problems. Natural gas production was regu-
lated by a predecessor of the Federal Ener-
gy Regulatory Commission, the Federal
Power Commission. It was bound by a legal
ruling known as the Permian Basin Deci-
sion that kept the price of natural gas artifi-
cially low, discouraging new supplies and
new infrastructure, such as processing plants
and storage. This led to shortages and to a
lack of confidence in the future of natural
gas.

During the energy shortages of the 1970s,
natural gas was discounted by the govern-
ment and much of industry. Jack O’Leary,
the first deputy secretary of energy, snapped
at a reporter who asked him about natural
gas: “Forget about natural gas: It is a deplet-
ed resource.”

Congress panicked and passed a piece of
legislation called the Fuel Use Act, which

forbade the use of natural gas for many
things, including pilot lights in new kitchen
stoves. There was even concern about the
eternal flame at Arlington National Ceme-
tery. Utilities were told not to even think
of burning natural gas: It was too precious
and there was too little of it.

Gas demand declined precipitously in the
1980s. And in 1987, the Fuel Use Act was
repealed. Along with deregulation of gas, a
gas boom resulted.

But it was technology that changed every-
thing. New drilling techniques increased sup-
ply. New turbines, based on airplane engines,
started to enter the electricity market. They
were clean, easy to install, and reached high
efficiencies of fuel-to-electricity conversion.
Today, 30 per cent of our generation comes
from these “derivative” machines.

So successful was natural gas in the 1990s,
that new concerns about supply shook the
industry and the public was told that gas
would have to be imported from the Middle
East, especially from Qatar. Permission was
sought to build dozens of liquefied natural
gas terminals around the coastlines.

Now it looks as if natural gas is a fuel with
an enormous resource base — thanks to
technology.

The technology in question is horizontal
drilling. Imagine you sink a hole 2 miles into
the earth and then send out horizontal roots
in all directions from this vertical trunk.
That, in essence, is horizontal drilling and it
makes available trillions of cubic feet of nat-
ural gas trapped in close formation shale
deep in the earth.

Ironically, or fittingly, this takes the ener-
gy story back to Pennsylvania where a vast
shale field called the Marcellus is being
developed and will write the next chapter of
hydrocarbon energy.

This is good because it is plentiful, it is
here and it builds on extant pipeline infra-
structure.

Of course, it makes investments in many
“alternative” sources of energy, particularly
ethanol from corn, look like very poor
investments. Cars and trucks that run on
natural gas are an appealing alternative to
ethanol with less disruption of the food chain
and stress on the farms.

(This article was written by Llewelyn King
-C.2009 Hearst Newspapers).



care about their

Bahamian passengers?
LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is a letter to voice the
concerns that I have over Lynx
Airlines, which is operating out
of Fort Lauderdale to Bimini.
On August 12, 2009 when I had
planned to depart Fort Laud-
erdale to return to Bimini I did-
n’t know what to expect (hav-
ing never flown Lynx Airlines
before August 10, 2009 when I
travelled to Fort Lauderdale).
So I went to the airport early in
the event of an early departure
or for some unforeseen prob-
lem. The flight was scheduled
to leave at 3.30 pm. My wife
along with myself arrived at the
airport at 12.15pm.

On our arrival to the Fort
Lauderdale International Air-
port we soon realised that there
were no ticket agents at the
counter. After waiting for a
while we called the office num-
ber that was on the ticket and
the agent said that they were
going to send someone to pick
us up. Not knowing what time
the shuttle was going to arrive
we just waited. After waiting
for over an hour the shuttle
came and took us to the freight
section of the airport because
this is where they were working
from. Getting to this location I
told the agents that we were
hungry and that everyone that
was there was afraid to go
upstairs to the restaurant and
get something to eat because
we had no idea when the shut-
tle would arrive. They had one
vending machine with five chips
in it and nothing else. I asked
the agent when or if they were
going back to the airport that I
wanted to go so that I could get
some food for my wife and
myself to eat and they said “no
problem.” Twenty minutes lat-
er a few more passengers came
and I asked what had happened
because they knew I wanted to
get something to eat, but they
ignored me.

At 3.20pm they told us that
we were going into Congo
Town, Andros Island, then they
were going to drop us off in
Bimini. The question was
asked, “Why are we going into
Andros?” The response was
that there are more people to
come out of Bimini. We swal-
lowed that pill and proceeded
with the flight.

After flying for over an hour
we were over Andros, flying to
the airport which was another
20 minutes away. On lining up
for landing the pilot said that
we could not land and that we
had to go back to Fort Laud-
erdale. Everyone thought that
he was joking until the plane
climbed past 10,000 feet. The
question was asked, why are we
going back? He said that there
was a hydraulic problem.

As we were flying back to
Fort Lauderdale we were real
quiet on the plane because we
did not know what was going
on. When we got over Fort
Lauderdale we started to pray
audibly and as soon as we had
finished praying the landing
gear came out. We flew over
the tower so as the tower could

letters@triobunemedia.net



take a look at the landing gear
then we proceeded to make a
safe landing. Upon getting on
the ground everyone was glad
to be alive and the mechanical
crew came out to inspect the
plane. All the passengers went
into the warehouse as to try and
get our thoughts together.

Speaking with the agent they
said that they were going to put
us up for the night. We asked,
“What about food?” and they
said that they are not going to
do that. The question was asked
why, since it was their fault that
we were back in Fort Laud-
erdale but they continued to
say that they are not going to
do it. We asked for the manag-
er (or owner) to come and
speak with us whose name is
Albert Vitale but the agents
said that he is not coming to
see us. After an event like the
one that had just happened he
should want to speak with the
passengers to let them know
that they are concerned about
the well being of the passen-
gers, but seemed to be of no
concern to them.

We pleaded with the agent
to call for him to come out to
the warehouse. Finally, one of
the agents said that Mr. Vitale
would be over in twenty min-
utes so we said that we would
wait. After one half hour the
agent said that he would meet
us at the hotel but no one
believed him because he did
not come to the warehouse. I
asked the agent if we flew with
them in the morning would we
still have to fly into Andros and
the answer was yes.

We arrived at the Best West-
ern Hotel and one of the pas-
sengers asked what about food
and the agent said there was a
McDonalds next door. The
response to that was, “So are
we supposed to go to McDon-
alds and say that Lynx sent us?”
because they still did not give us
any money. We went and
checked into the hotel and the
agent was getting all the room
numbers of the passengers then
he told the hotel agent that he
would call her back to get the
room numbers and to give any
information that is needed to
pass on to the passengers. The
ticket agent left but before he
left he said that the manager
would be stopping by the hotel
to bring some money for us,
and then he left. At this point
the hotel employee was more
concerned about our welfare
than Lynx. Kendra (the hotel
employee) was going out of her
way to see that we were com-
fortable and at ease and I thank
her for that.

In the first place the hotel
was not responsible for the
state that we were in and if
Lynx had to up date us about
anything they should have done
it themselves and not try to pass
it on to the hotel. We stayed in

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the lobby trying to comfort one
another as best we could;
because shock comes into play
when you are alone and every-
thing starts to come down on
you. We stayed in the lobby as
a group for one and one half
hours until we felt that we felt
better. The entire time that we
were in the lobby Mr. Vitale
never showed up, nor called.

We went to bed and got up
the next morning and went
straight to the airport trying to
catch another plane because of
the way that we were treated
and our lives did not seem that
important to Lynx. At 8.30am
Lynx phoned me on my cell
phone to find out if we were
still at the hotel and I said that
we were at the airport. They
said that they were on their way
to pick us up. I asked, “For
what? Because we were not fly-
ing with them anymore.” The
response was, “Aren’t you
going to Bimini anymore?” I
said, “Yes, but not with Lynx.
Not only my wife and myself,
but everyone that was going to
Bimini would not be flying on
Lynx.”

We travelled on Continental
and had a safe flight home
going direct to Bimini. Lynx
flight that they wanted us to
come on which was supposed
to leave Fort Lauderdale at
9.00am did not get into Bimini
until after 7pm that evening
because they had more
mechanical problems. Had we
flown with them we would have
been in the warehouse for the
entire day with a company that
did not even give us the time
of day.

The problem was not the
landing gear because any plane
can have problems but the way
in which we were treated so
very poorly. They had no sym-
pathy for what we went through
and it seemed as if they did not
care.

Problems with Lynx:

No ticket agent at the air-
port; no set time for busing to
freight section; no vending
machines in the freight section;
no advance notice of going into
Andros Island. The plane went
into Andros first passing Bimi-
niin the air.

No help from the ticket agents
when we got on the ground.
They made no effort to see that
we could call our families to let
them know we were safe.

No food voucher; no contact
was made with the passengers
after being checked in to the
hotel; seemingly no concern
about the mental state of the
passengers; no call advising us
on the progress of the plane
they wanted us to fly on; no
alternative way to get home if
we did not want to fly Lynx
anymore; no compensation for
the loss of a day’s pay.

Something needs to be done
with Lynx. Chalks airlines start-
ed to do the same kinds of
things that Lynx is doing now
and you saw what happened to
them. I am asking please look
into this matter so that we do
not have another Chalk’s
tragedy on our hands. In that
crash I had a loss of four fami-
ly members.

Mr. Vitale said that he would
come into Bimini to speak to
each of the passengers and hear
our concerns, but to date he has
not shown up and does not
answer his phone anymore.

PEDRITO and HELENA
ROBERTS

Bahamas,

September 8, 2009

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TU 8

EDITOR, The Tribune.



Re: Drivers, please use your
indicators.

Tribune,

September 19, 2009

THE courteous use of turn
signal indicators presents an
excruciating dilemma to many
stereo-blasting, cell phone-
using, grade D drivers. The
added mental strain of choosing
left vs right on the spur of the
moment is simply too much for
them to handle. Consequently,
their solution is to employ one
of two time-honoured methods
for resolving the problem —

(a) Don’t use any signal indi-
cators at all (commonest), or

(b) Press the hazard button
and flash all the lights at once.

The latter is frequently found
to be especially thrilling by jit-
ney drivers and those who like
to celebrate Christmas all year
long.

KEN W
KNOWLES, MD
Nassau,

September 20, 2009.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

FOUL ODOUR COMPLAINT
Ministry
staff urged
to return
to work

BAHAMAS Public Service
Union President John Pinder
advised staff at the Ministry of
Education’s office on Thomp-
son Boulevard to return to
work today and if a foul odour
remains in the building, they
must vacant the premises and
“work outside.”

Originally, staff at the min-
istry complained of mould in
the building that resulted in
talks between Mr Pinder and
Education Minister Carl
Bethel. According to Mr Pin-
der, Mr Bethel had “looked
favourably” on the staff work-
ing on “flexible hours” or a shift
system so that the work of the
ministry could be done.

However, when the minister
took this initiative to cabinet,
Mr Pinder said, cabinet report-
edly did not approve it.

“And so he (Mr Bethel) had
to call back and tell them (the
staff) that it was cancelled and
they had to go back to the nor-
mal shifts.

“Now when they got to work
this morning they met a foul
odour in the place and they
came out in protest against that.
But in addition to that we are
now learning, like I indicated,
that the flexi-hours are not
approved,” he said.

Mr Pinder said his union
members are having difficulty
with the decision taken by the
Minister, as normally such tem-
porary measures as the pro-
posed shift system does not nec-
essarily require Cabinet
approval.“‘So I don’t know why
this has to reach the cabinet
level, and that has me con-
cerned,” Mr Pinder said.

With the minister indicating
that government is working
aggressively to have these
employees at Thompson Boule-
vard relocated to another site,
Mr Pinder said he felt it was
imperative for the staff to be
placed on a shift system so that
some of them can vacate the
building when necessary
because of the mould problem
that currently exists.

“When you look at that
mould, it is playing with their
psyche. They are getting the
impression that this is really
going to make them sick and
some of them are already expe-
riencing discomfort in breathing
and the rest of it. And so I fig-
ured the fewer hours they
spend in there the better it is
for them. And we had agreed
for them to do five hours a day

Paying father's

funeral expenses Is

CGC

By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE bereaved daughter of
popular radio personality Antho-
ny 'Fatback' Marshall claims she is
struggling to pay off her father's
funeral expenses despite the thou-
sands of dollars that were raised in
donations after his death.

Radio station More 94FM,
where Mr Marshall was
employed, accepted almost $8,000
in donations during a special call-
in show shortly after he died to
help with the popular disc jockey's
funeral costs.

Mr Marshall's eldest daughter
Charnell said that although the
station paid out $5,000 to the
funeral home, management has
refused to give her the remain-
der. She also claimed she is being
harassed by creditors to pay
$1,600 for her father's burial plot
and a balance of $2,700 to the
funeral home. The 23-year-old
single mother said she is now
forced to sell her only means of
transportation - her dead father's
car - to cover the outstanding bills.

"It's still hard for me because
me and him were basically living
together and I was taking care of
him up to his death, only me and
his girlfriend, and its still hurting
and I have to fight for the little
that he has," she told The Tri-
bune.

"People who donated money
are calling me, saying 'Man I hear
you still in pain, what happen to

my money?’." When The Tri-
bune contacted station manger
Galen Saunders for comment he
directed us to the station's attor-
ney Craig Butler.

Mr Butler told The Tribune that
between $7,500 and $7,700 was
raised in donations in memory of
Mr Marshall during a radio show
shortly after his death. He said
$5,000 of this was paid to the
funeral home while the balance
remains in the care of the radio
station.

Claim

He also claimed that since Mr
Marshall's death, three different
people have approached the sta-
tion saying they had rightful claim
to the money. This prompted the
station to temporarily freeze the
funds until management could
sort out who was legally entitled
to the money.

"That's friction that More
94FM does not need to be
involved in, so the station asked
me what to do and I advised them
that until I get some clarity on the
situation I will not release those
funds."

Mr Butler added that if Mr

Marshall's immediate family met
with him collectively, an agree-
ment could be reached on when
to release rest of the money.
Mr Marshall, 44, died June 25, the
day after he suffered a heart
attack. He is the founder of the
Fatback Kids Club.

Fully furnished and ¢ -quippe id apartments
by the day week or month in

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BEREAVED DAUGHTER OF RADIO PERSONALITY ANTHONY ‘FATBACK’ MARSHALL TELLS OF MONEY WOES

POPULAR RADIO PERSONALITY: Anthony ‘Fatback’ Marshall.

Fall Specials: $75 per nig
One Bedroom al

in two different shift systems
to make sure that the place is
always covered so that they can
be away from the building for
some period of time.

“And I already told them
when they return to work today
that if the environment in the
building is unbearable then
they are not to work in the
building. I advised them to
show up to work and if the
problem has not been corrected
they are to work on the out-
side,” Mr Pinder said.

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VA eT

NOTICE OF
SPECIAL CALL
MEETING

To: All Members of National Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited,
New Providence, Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,
San Salvador and Exuma.

Sa

IN recognising World Ani-
mal Day on the October 4,
the Bahamas will join many
other countries around the
world in celebration of this
occasion.

The day is known to others
as St Francis of Assisi Day —
named after the patron saint
of the animals. The Bahamas
Humane Society is encourag-
ing all animal welfare groups
and owners of animals to do
something special for animals
on this day.

The Parish of St Christo-
pher’s and the Bahamas
Humane Society will be hold-
ing a St Francis of Assisi ser-
vice for all animals and pets
on Sunday, October 4, at
4.30pm at St Christopher’s
Church at Lyford Cay. Please
bring your animals and pets
and share in the service cele-
brated by Archdeacon Keith
Cartwright.

Stephen Turnquest of the
Humane Society urged peo-
ple to e-mail photos of events
to bhscruelty@gmail.com so
that they can be highlighted
on http:/Awww.worldanimal-
day.org.uk under the
Bahamas events.

ie
US



Pursuant to Section 21, 22 & 99 of the Co-operative
Societies Act 2005, notice is hereby given that all
members of National Workers Co-operative
Credit Union Limited (NWCCU) are urged to
attend a Special Call Meeting on Friday,
October 2nd, 2009 at the British Colonial
Hilton, Salon BC commencing at 10:00am to
discuss and vote on important matters pertaining to
your Credit Union.

National Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited (NWCCU) Merger with Bahamas
Utilities Cooperative Credit Union Limited
(BUCCUL)

The closure of the East Bay Branch, effective
October 31st, 2009.

The acquisition of property for the purpose of
constructing a building for housing NCCCU
head office.

To address the matter pertaining to the member
of the Supervisory Committee who did not meet
the requirements during the time of election.

aU eet)
PHONE: 822-2157

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD RESPONDS TO NASSAU INSTITUTE

NIB: Tax increase suggestion is wrong
a (ole

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

We

Mrs. Barbara Elaine
Kelly Albury, 89

of Village Road,
Nassau, The Bahamas
died at her residence,
on Wednesday 23rd
September, 2009.

Mrs. Albury is
| predeceased by her
| husband, Kenneth HE.
Albury, her brother,
Dudley Sands and her
daughter-in-law, Christina Albury.

She is survived by her son, Drew Albury; brother,
Everette Sands and his wife Patricia;
grandchildren, Christian and Stefan Albury;
sister-in-law, Valeria Sands; nephews, John and
Jimmy Sands; niece, Sonia Springle and many
other relatives and close friends.

A Memorial Service will be held for Mrs. Barbara
Elaine Kelly Albury, at Trinity Methodist Church,

Trinity Place and Frederick Street, Nassau, on
Saturday, 3rd October, 2009 at 4:00p.m.

In lieu of flowers the family request that donations
be sent to Queen's College Foundation, P.O. Box
N. 7127, Nassau, in memory of Barbara E.K.
Albury.

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited.



BY THE NATIONAL
INSURANCE BOARD
September 21, 2009

heNational Insur-

ance Board

(NIB) wishes to

address and cor-
rect “facts” advanced by the
Nassau Institute in a letter
to the Editor, published in
the Nassau Guardian of Sat-
urday, September 19, 2009,
and referenced in a Tribune
article on September 21,
2009. In that letter, the Nas-
sau Institute incorrectly sug-
gested that National Insur-
ance is proposing an 84.1 per
cent increase in taxes.

Each month the National
Insurance Board collects
contributions from employ-
ers and employees that are
invested for future benefit
payments to workers should
they lose employment
income for reasons such as
sickness, child birth,
advanced age, invalidity,
death and more recently, loss
of employment.

Contributions made to
NIB are certainly not faxes;
they are contributions, or, in
commercial insurance terms
premiums, for which con-
tributors receive returns in
the form of income-replac-
ing benefits.

There is a direct link
between contributions made
and benefits received.

For example, National
Insurance contributions pro-
vide full relief for employ-
ers from any costs and lia-
bility related to job-related
accidents or diseases.

In their letter, the Institute
gives an example of how a
proposed two per cent rate
increase and a change in the
wage ceiling from $400 to
$600 per week will result in a
84.1 per cent increase in con-

ARG a Ne |

ES ._



The National Insurance Board

Press Response To a letter from the Nassau
Institute, published in the September
19, 2009 edition of the Nassau Guardian.



tributions. While their math-
ematics may be correct for
someone earning $600 or
more per week, the Institute
does not state that each of
the considered increases they
refer to would result in
increased benefits to con-
tributors.

Also, a ceiling increase will
not affect all workers and
employers.

Ceiling

In fact, when the ceiling is
increased next, only around
40 per cent of the workers
and their employers will be
affected, i.e., only those
workers who are now con-
tributing on the maximum
$400 per week contribution
ceiling will be required to
pay more.

From this perspective, the
Nassau Institute’s calcula-
tions are not correct as they
appear to assume that all
workers make in excess of
$400 per week.

In fact, the assumption
seems to be that all workers
make at least $600.

We know that this is not
true; we know that not all
workers will be affected, and
those affected will not all
have to pay on the new ceil-
ing.
It must be restated that
National Insurance contri-
butions are payable on actu-
al wages up to the ceiling. If
that ceiling is increased to
$600 today, then the person
who makes $525 per week,
will pay contributions on
that amount and not on $600
per week.

So then, contrary to the
Nassau Institute’s con-
tention, 60 per cent of work-
ers will see no change in
their weekly or monthly
deductions.

The remaining 40 per cent

of workers will be affected,
but in varying degrees.
Depending on their actual
wages, some will pay contri-
butions on wages of $10
more per week; or on $100
more; or, in the case of those
earning the ceiling or above,
on $200 more.

It cannot be overstated
that those who will pay more
in contributions as a result
of the ceiling increase will
realize larger benefits based
on their higher insurable
wages.

The National Insurance
programme needs to main-
tain its relevance as both the
economy and social patterns
change and thus various
responses are required from
time to time. In April 2009,
an unemployment benefit
was added.

Because of this new bene-
fit over 11,000 unemployed
workers have had a portion
of their lost income replaced
and over $14 million has
been returned to the econo-
my thus far, boosting local
consumption and benefiting
Bahamian businesses.

A ceiling adjustment
would be in response to
increasing wage levels over
the past 10 years and will
enhance NIB’s relevance to
higher income workers.

Regarding the specific
adjustments referred to by
the Nassau Institute, the
Government of The
Bahamas has not announced
any rate increase or ceiling
adjustments.

While new benefit initia-
tives and actuarial recom-
mendations do call for rate
and ceiling adjustments, no
changes or implementation
dates have been set.

It is likely, though, that the
additional one per cent con-
tribution for unemployment
benefit that will be shared

equally by employers and
employees, will take effect
in early 2010, and this is
required to support the con-
tinuing benefit.

Likewise, the Chronic Dis-
ease Prescription Drug Plan,
when expanded to all NIB
eligible contributors, will call
for a rate adjustment, now
suggested at one per ecnt.
The accompanying benefit
that will be delivered to all
employees, when this rate
increase is approved and
implemented, will result in
a significant benefit to con-
tributors and employers and
will likely result in decreased
health care costs for the
entire country.

Value

The National Insurance
programme has for more
than 30 years proven its val-
ue and importance to work-
ers, employers and the over-
all economy.

To maintain its value and
relevance, changes are
required from time to time.

In this case, new benefits
and a ceiling adjustment are
being considered. The Gov-
ernment and the National
Insurance Board will be
proactive in measures aimed
at ensuring that Bahamians
can depend on the National
Insurance Board to provide
meaningful benefits to cur-
rent and future generations
of Bahamians.

We know that we must
reform NIB.

Workers and the media
are calling for this reform,
particularly to ensure that
the Fund remains relevant,
vibrant, and paying a mean-
ingful benefit beyond 2032.

It would not be responsi-
ble for NIB to know that it
has to reform and to intro-
duce new benefits, provide
for income relevancy and
move to introduce the rec-
ommended Actuarial rec-
ommendations, without
reviewing the cost of the
additional benefits. Simply
put, we cannot sit by and do
nothing when we know that
we should act now.

AVG NOUS UAL ey)
SU US LUNG

ARAWAK Homes will host its first
“Build on your lot” fair at its Shirley
Street office on Saturday.

This event will cater to persons who
own their lots, or have a considerable
amount of equity built up in a lot on which
they are still paying the bank, and wish to
build a home, or a multi-family structure.

A spokesman for the company said
that they are aware that “many persons
own a lot, are paying on a lot, have inher-
ited a lot, have been given a lot or have

been promised a lot and really want to
take the next step towards becoming a

home-owner. Then this event is for

them.”

YOOR CORAICrION-TO lar WoeLe

On Saturday Arawak Homes team of
home consultants, architects, engineers,
attorneys and contractors will be avail-
able from 10 am to 5 pm, to answer ques-
tions, and to provide assistance on all
aspects of home-ownership.

The event, said the spokesman, is free.

Serenity Point

ABACO: BAHAMAS

PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER

For the Disposal of Scrap Underground
& Aerial Copper Cable

The Bohamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. is currently
tendering the Disposal of Scrap Underground & Ariel Copper
Cable. All interested companies are asked to collect a Proposal
at the Security Desk at JFK Head Office.

www.serenitypoint.com

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Bids must be submitted no later than Friday, September 25, 2007
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Tender for the Disposal S$crap Underground & Aerial Copper Cable
Attention:
Mr. |. Kirk Griffin
Acting President &£ CEO
The Bohamas Telecommunications Company Lid
P.O. Box N-2048, Nassau, Baharnas

EXCLUSIVELY OFFERED BY

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INTERNATIONAL REALTY

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Damianos |

THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, NOR IS ANY OFFER OR SOLICITATION MADE WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. THE STATEMENTS SET FORTH HEREIN ARE SUMMARY IN NATURE AND
SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON. A PROSPECTIVE PURCHASER SHOULD REFER TO THE ENTIRE SET OF DOCUMENTS PROVIDED BY ANCO LANDSLTD. AND SHOULD SEEK COMPETENT LEGAL ADVICE IN CONNECTION
THEREWITH,

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS

EDUCATION: ‘Sit-in’ protests

Teachers return to classrooms
as Ministry bows to demands

eed

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TEACHERS who refused to work ear-
lier this week returned to their classrooms
yesterday as the Ministry of Education
committed to meeting all of their demands.

Staff have been reassigned to fill vacant
positions at C I Gibson and Anatol
Rodgers high schools, and 70,000 new
pieces of furniture arrived in Nassau on
Friday to be distributed to insufficiently
furnished public schools.

Dissatisfied teachers staged sit-ins at Uri-
ah McPhee on Friday until the broken air
conditioning was repaired over the week-
end; they refused to work at Anatol
Rodgers on Monday and Tuesday until two
teachers were put in place, and at CI Gib-
son the staff of 80 staged a three-day
protest.

Classes resumed at C I Gibson Senior
High School yesterday after the Ministry of
Education provided four teachers and four
security officers, as well as classroom fur-
nishings.

Teachers had complained classrooms did
not have enough desks and chairs to accom-



o , oo am
rSA
S
4

te
fee |



Cl GIBSON

modate large classes, and they were over-
worked as there were not enough staff.
They were also concerned about their per-
sonal safety, as 11 knives and an ice-pick
have been found on the campus this term.

President of the Bahamas Teachers
Union (BUT) Belinda Wilson criticised the
Ministry of Education for not having all
the necessary staff and furnishings in place
at public schools before the start of the
new school year on August 31.

But Director of Education Lionel Sands
said the department did not fail to hire the
correct number of staff or order the neces-
sary furnishings, but resources had to be
reassigned when registration was complet-
ed after the start of the new school year.

An estimated 3,000 students were expect-
ed to move from private to public schools
this year owing to the recession, but when
the school year started, only half that num-
ber were transferred to the public school
system.

And those students were distributed at
schools across New Providence, and did
not necessarily enroll at the school the Edu-
cation Department expected them too.

This confusion was compounded by the
fact that parents would register a child at

DEEP CREEK
Middle School
students Lionel

and Wayde at the
Boys Club of NY
summer camp.

Handbags
Ewe - Belts
Clothes



A STEAK-OUT at an Eleuthera Pri-
mary School will raise money for stu-
dents to attend challenging summer
camps in the United States next year.

Deep Creek Middle School, in Rock
Sound, hopes to raise thousands of dol-
lars this year for a scholarship fund that
will pay for students to attend camps in
New York, Vermont, Massachusetts,
New Hampshire and Maine next sum-
mer, as well as local camps in Gregory

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

several schools in the hope of getting a
place. Therefore the projections were off by
300 students in some cases, as at C I Gibson
800 students were expected to attend, and
1,100 have now enrolled.

Mr Sands said: “We weren’t concerned
with understaffing because we recognised
that around the end of September we
would find out what the real numbers are,
and we didn’t want to transfer teachers
until after we got the final numbers for stu-
dents in the schools.

“I am not ashamed because we did not
have any control over the movement of
people from one district to the next, or the
number of students that leave private
schools and go to public schools, so I don’t
feel embarrassed that we had to make
adjustments, the department makes adjust-
ments when the need arises.

“We were making adjustments last year
and every year before, but this year is not a
usual year because of the financial situation

.. and it was so bad this year because we
expected more students.

“But the bottom line is the children are
the ones who actually suffer in all of this
and it is grossly unfair to all of them and to
the parents.”

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Town and at Camp Eleuthera. The
school has been running the programme
for three years and has so far sent 34
students on positive vacation adventures.
Last year the camp scholarship fund
raised over $39,000, and the school hopes
to be just as successful this year.
Principal Joanna Paul said: “Support-
ing travel to camp is a large part of our
budget, but the change it produces in
students is worth every penny. “When a

Police arrest
four men after
drug seizure

BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police arrested four men in connection
with a drug seizure at an apartment complex in the Lunar
Boulevard area.

More than 70Ibs of a substance suspected to be mari-
juana with an estimated street value of about $56,800 was
seized on Wednesday.

At about 3.15pm police executed a search warrant at a
five-unit apartment complex at Lunar Boulevard for
dangerous drugs and firearms.

During a search of one of the units officers discov-
ered two large black plastic bags containing a number of
clear-taped packages of suspected marijuana.

Truck

Officers also searched an abandoned white dump truck
located at the rear of the complex, where they found
another black-taped package of suspected marijuana in
the glove compartment.

Two additional bags of marijuana were also found
hidden under the hood of the truck.

Asst Supt Loretta Mackey said four men were taken
into police custody.

Officers of the Drug Enforcement Unit are continuing
their investigation.

Ms Mackey thanked the Grand Bahama community
and the media for their continued partnership with the
police in the fight against crime.

People who want to report a crime, or those who may
have information about an incident, is asked to tele-
phone 350-3107/8 or 911.



student climbs the highest mountain in
Maine, suddenly a math test on fractions
doesn’t seem so hard.”

After returning from camp, Aleice
Goodman of Tarpum Bay said: “I have
more temerity and I am not afraid to do
things I hadn’t done before.”

The steak-out will be held at the Rock
Sound homecoming site from 1lam on
Saturday.

The event will run all day.

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Beach BBQ with fire pits & dancing

Pirates Dinner Party on the beach

(prize for best-looking pirate)

ystery photo scavenger hunt

Volleyball tournaments with prizes for winning team
Golf tournament (green fees additional charge)
Dive-in movie with popcorn

Daily happy hours on the beach with LIVE music
Nightly LIVE entertainment in our 22 Above Night
Club featuring the VIP Band

Dance contests & prizes

8 restaurants, 6 bars & lounges on property

Pool with entertainment, swim-up bar & tables,
dance floor, rock slide & water slide



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


PAGE 8, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Private banking system leader to leave Bahamas

FROM page one

"In the light of this review,
BNP Paribas has taken the
decision to withdraw before
the end of 2010 from coun-
tries grey listed by the OECD
and viewed as Tax Havens.
This includes the Bahamas,"
said a brief statement released
by the company yesterday.

The bank said it will try its
best to maintain its clients'
interests, but the fate of the 40
persons employed there is
uncertain.

According to a well-placed
source, BNP's move is "a
political one", in line with
French President Nicholas
Sarkozy's views.

"It's definitely political —
they don't want to be seen in
grey or black-listed places,”
said the source, who believes
other private banks may fol-



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“It is a regrettable decision to the
extent that you don’t want to see a
reputable bank like Paribas leaving.”



low BNP's lead.

When contacted for com-
ment yesterday, State Finance
Minister Zhirvargo Laing said
while the bank's decision was
"regrettable" the Bahamas
was working feverishly to
meet the OECD's minimum
requirements by the end of
the year.

"It's a regrettable decision
to the extent that you don't
want to see a reputable bank
like Paribas leaving. It has sig-
nificant implications for their
staff and their clients and
there's also the tendency to
have the jurisdiction lose a

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TEL: 326-2355

“
CREDIT SUISSE



Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for a

Senior Globus System Developer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

© Qualifications:

At least Five (3) years experience in installation, configuration and

troubleshooting in a banking environment

Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both support

and development roles

Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 - 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL
Experience in working with Globus/T24 related migration or implementation

projects.

Personal Qualities:

Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills

- Good technical and problem solving skills and expenence

- Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as

overtime

Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining

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Other Duties:

- Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff

- Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
; o

Ensure that “d2Business Contingency Planning’d3 requirements are

follerwrendl

Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
- Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and extemal career development/training program

IST RE IN W i: Pe

minimum requirements need not a

pe

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O, Box Weds
Nassau, Bahamas



valuable presence. But again
this is one of the reasons why
we are working as feverishly
as we have been to meet the
(OECD's) standards.

“We know there might be
those entities that will find it
difficult to remain (here), if
the Bahamas remains in the
grey list. We fully expect to
meet that standard by the end
of the year but that does not
mean we cannot meet it soon-
er," he said.

The OECD requires 12 tax
information exchange agree-
ments (TIEA) as a minimum
requirement to be “white-list-

ed.” Mr Laing said the
Bahamas has signed three —
one with the United States,
one with Monaco, and the lat-
est signed yesterday with San
Morino.

The news came the same
day the powerful G-20 leaders
met in Pittsburgh to discuss,
among other things, ways to
crack down on tax havens.
The group was expected to
assess the progress of off-
shore jurisdictions that had
not met the OECD's white
list requirements.

International reports state
that French President Nico-
las Sarkozy is urging his G20
counterparts to agree to
impose sanctions on uncoop-
erative tax havens as early as
2010. Meantime, Pascal
Dulau, CEO of BNP Paribas
(Bahamas) Ltd said there is
no firm date when the bank

Former EMS worker still
maintains his innocence

FROM page one

driven the ambulance that took 16-year-old Jett Travolta to the

hospital on January 2.

Ambulance driver Tarino Lightbourne, 46, was also fired ear-
lier this year. He is on trial with former PLP Senator Pleasant
Bridgewater for attempted extortion of actor John Travolta and

his wife, Kelly Preston.

The pair is accused of trying to extort $25 million from the
Travoltas. The trial opened in Nassau on Tuesday.

Mr Garvey said he has been following the trial.

The death of Jett Travolta in Grand Bahama had attracted a

lot of media attention.

Mr Garvey said that an expatriate saw him on television
arriving at the hospital in the ambulance with Jett and his par-

ents.

“He asked if I was still at the hospital and asked me ‘how did
it feel that it was John Travolta riding in the ambulance with

you.’

“Tsaid I did not know it was him. And he asked me how he
(John Travolta) was acting to the situation. I said, in a normal
conversation, that he was like any other normal parent con-

cerned about his child.”

Television

Mr Garvey said he later received a call from the Senior Hos-
pital Administrator about his appearance on television.

“She asked me if I knew I was on the TV. I told her yes, I saw
myself on ZNS opening the ambulance. She told me that she
was not talking about that, that she was talking about an Amer-

ican station.

Mr Garvey said that the administrator directed him to go to

the Internet.

“She told me to go to Radar on the internet. When I did, to
my surprise, I was being interviewed which was something I

never did with anyone.

“What was on the video was not what I said. It was edited to
suit their purpose. I was never seated where the background was

taken,” he said.

“T would warn my fellow colleagues to be careful...because
they can put you on the computer and do whatever they feel
like on the computer when you are an innocent person.

“Just as this happened to me, it could happen to anyone
tomorrow with the new technology today.

“T continue to maintain my innocence. I was wrongfully dis-
missed without proper investigation into this matter and I am
asking for gratuity or to be reinstated,” said Mr Garvey.

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will pull its services out of the
country.

"We don't close, we are
exiting meaning that we are
trying to find a solution by
trying to sell or transfer the
business depending on the
clients — but there is no offi-
cial date where we say we
turn out the lights. We will
withdraw from the Bahamas
but will take the necessary
(steps)."

When asked if the bank
would reconsider its position
if the Bahamas managed to
make it onto the OECD's
white-list before the end of
the year, Mr Dulau said:
"Once you take this decision
you can't go back."

The Bahamas was placed
on the OECD's grey list, part
of a naming and shaming of
so-called tax havens by the
G20 nations, in April.

Te SHIH

TE RST

FROM page one

Mr Christie to be the kind of
leader that he knows he can
be.

However, the former MP
also warned that if Mr
Christie were to return as
leader of the PLP and not
perform up to par — that he
would be “very disappointed”
in him, and the party would
have to make the difficult
decision of replacing him.

“Tf that is required we are
obliged to do everything
humanly possible to be the
government.

“That is the purpose of the
party. Nothing supersedes
that.

“Nothing. But I am confi-
dent that he would (meet the
mark).

“And if he disappoints me,
I would do it with some sad-
ness, but I would join in the
effort to deal with the prob-
lem,” Mr Smith said.

Mr Smith also expressed his
fondness and admiration for
PLP leadership hopeful Paul
Moss and thanked him for his
bravery in entering the race,
stating that he feels the can-
didate has a “tremendous
contribution” to make to the
party.

“T embrace Paul Moss, he is
a man of tremendous ideas
and I think he has a future
with the party.

“ think Jerome Fitzgerald
has a tremendous future and
we need more like them to
come forward because as they
put their ideas in the great
mix it becomes what is really
best for the organisation and
the country,” Mr Smith said.

Quipped

While seeking not to high-
light exactly who he favours
for the deputy leadership of
the party — noting that there
are currently three persons
who have pledged — Mr
Smith quipped that he liked
two out of the lot but his true
candidate had not entered the
race — yet.

“Tam waiting to see who
else has entered the race.
Right now my candidate is
none of the above and if he
does not enter the race I will
certainly pick the one who I
would conclude the party is
safest with,” he said.

Mr Christie has been on the
offensive in the past few
weeks defending his tenure
as prime minister and chal-
lenging his critics who contin-
ue to write him as “soft”,
“indecisive”, or “weak.”

Recently in a televised
interview with JCN CEO
Wendall Jones, Mr Christie
warned his would-be chal-
lengers to not take his “kind-
ness for weakness.”

“Tam absolutely prepared
for this moment. Everything
about me has now climaxed
at this point where I am ready
to go. One only has to look
at my career and see the
arrows and the darts and the
punishing criticism that I have
received. Clearly that pre-
pares someone — it makes
you stronger.

“And contrary to percep-
tions that people try to put
out there.

“Tam a strong and pur-
poseful person connected to
people.

“And so I am confident,
and I know at the end of the
convention I will be the leader
of the PLP,” he said.



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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 9



SPORTS

—'



Trinidad
hangs on
to sixth
spot

But only top three
countries qualify for
2010 World Cup

By SAMORA J ST ROSE
Layout editor

LET’S take a glance at the
2010 World Cup Soccer
Qualifying in which Trinidad
& Tobago, the only
Caribbean island competing
in the finals against five coun-
tries, is hanging on to the
sixth spot with five points m
the North and Central Amer-
ica & Caribbean region.

After eight games, Trinidad
has one win, two draws and
five losses.

But only the top three
countries qualify. And the
fourth-place team advances
to the playoffs against the
fifth-place team in the South
America region.

The United States, which
barely has the top position
with 16 points ahead of Mex-
ico (15 points), Honduras (13
points), Costa Rica (12
points) and El Salvador (8
points), boasts a record of
five wins, one draw and two
losses.

Trinidad is scheduled to hit
the field against Costa Rica
in San Jose at 10pm Satur-
day, October 10. And the
Caribbean nation is slated to
host Mexico at Macoya
8:05pm Wednesday, October
14

In Europe, the winners of
each of the nine groups qual-
ify and the top eight second-
place teams advance to the
European playoffs.

Qualifying for the World
Cup at the top of group five
with 24 points is Spain which
has won all cight games
played.

England, also holding on
to the top spot in group six,
has qualified with 24 points
and boasts a perfect 8-0-0
record.

And in group nine, the
Netherlands qualified with 24
points and a perfect 8-0-0
record.

In South America, the top
four teams qualify and the
fifth-place team advances to
the playoffs against CON-
CACAF fourth place.

After 16 games played,
Brazil and Paraguay have
qualified and are in first and
second place with 33 and 30
points respectively ahead of
Chile (27 points), Ecuador
(23 points), Argentina (22
points), Uruguay (21 points),
Venezuela (21 points),
Colombia (20 points), Bolivia
(12 points) and Peru (10
points).

In Africa, the winners of
each of the five groups quali-
fy. After four games played,
Cameroon (seven points),
Tunisia (cight points), Alge-
ria (10 points) and Ivory
Coast are all leading their
respective groups in the
World Cup qualifying race
but only Ghana has qualified
at the top of group D with 12
points and a perfect 4-0-0
record.

Under-20 World Cup:

Egypt beats Trinidad

Meanwhile, in Alexandria,
host Egypt defeated Trinidad
4-1 in the Under-20 World
Cup opener, with Hussam
Arafat scoring twice yester-
day.

Striker Afroto gave Egypt
the lead in the 30th minute
at the Egyptian Army stadi-
um, but Jean-Luc Rochford
equalized six minutes later.

Arafat and Mohamed
Talaat scored early in the sec-
ond half, with goalkeeper
Glenroy Samuel at fault on
both goals. Arafat complet-
ed the rout in injury time with
an angled shot from the edge
of the penalty area.

Paraguay plays Italy in
Group A’s other game today.
Also on Friday, Nigeria plays
Venezuela and Spain faces
Tahiti in Group B.

12

sass 1€8

‘One day a friend told me he was going
to sailing camp, so I just tagged along...’

WHEN he was a tenth grader at CI
Gibson High School, Donico Brown
used to sit on the Montagu foreshore
watching the tiny white-sailed boats
race up and down the harbour.

Three years ago he had no idea he
was about to become one of the
Bahamas’ top junior sailors, repre-
senting the country in international
competition.

“One day a friend told me he was
going to sailing camp, so I just tagged
along. I had no idea where we were
going or what was involved. I even
thought he was talking about the big
regatta sloops,” he said. “But I was
really excited when I realised it was
the little boats ’'d been watching all
that time.”

The programme Donico stumbled
upon was the Bahamas Sailing Associ-
ation youth programme, and the little
boats were Optimist dinghies - the
boats most youngsters get their feet
wet in before graduating to the bigger
and more difficult to handle Sunfish.

In addition to providing training for
young Bahamians who have grown up
around the sport, the sailing camp,
which now operates year round, reach-
es into the public school system to
introduce as many Bahamian children
to the sport as possible.



DONICO BROWN in action...

“A lot of these kids would never
have been given the opportunity to try
it or even been exposed to sailing with-
out this junior programme,” explains
race committee chairman and veteran
sailor Jimmy Lowe. “Being able to
teach them how to sail and provide the
necessary equipment for them to use is
clearly a good thing for them, but it’s
good for those of us who love the sport

because we’ve been able to create a
base of new sailing talent that we’d
essentially lost for a generation because
there was no learn to sail programme.”

To date, more than 850 children have
learned to sail or mastered their skills
on the water thanks to the programme,
which has expanded in its five years
into Grand Bahama, Abaco, Eleuthera,
Harbour Island and Long Island.

Come October 15-17, Donico,
Christopher Sands, Michael
Holowesko, Michael Gibson and Brent
Burrows Jr, all of Nassau, and Long
Island’s Torrington Cartwright, are
expected to compete against top junior
sailors from around the world in the
International Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships 2009 that will be hosted by the
Nassau Yacht Club. That competition
will take place in Montagu Bay - the
very spot Donico was first introduced
to sunfish sailing.

“Tt’s not going to be easy, but I do
think we have a bit of an advantage
because that’s where we train every
day. We know the winds and the water
better than anyone else,” he says. For
months now, he has been putting in
three to four hours a day in practice to
prepare for the big event.

In fact, Donico, Sands, Holowesko
and Burrows Jr are among the 16

Bahamians who are set to compete
against some of the world’s best and
most seasoned sailors in the 2009 Sun-
fish World Championships also being
hosted by the Yacht Club October 16-
24

“Having these two world class events
here in the Bahamas this year is a
major boost to the sport locally and
will also provide significant exposure
for the country as more than 150 peo-
ple from 14 different countries will be
here over the two week period.

“A lot of people are working hard
behind the scenes to make sure the
Bahamas shines and none of it could be
done without key corporate sponsors
like Pictet Bank & Trust, Nestle and
Atlantis or without the support of the
ministries of tourism and youth, sports
and culture,” says Paul Hutton, chair-
man of the regatta.

The Bahamas has enjoyed much suc-
cess over the years in Sunfish sailing,
winning the World Championships five
times.

Donnie Martinborough, the
Bahamas’ top finisher in this year’s
Bahamas Nationals, is a three-time
Sunfish world champion, with top place
finishes in 1983, 1985 and again in 1988,
the last time the event was held in Nas-
sau.

BOXERS, from 11

And finally, he congratulat-
ed Knowles and Hield for the
manner in which they repre-
sented the country while they
were off for the past month.

“They had the best showing
ever and they ought to be
commended for being ambas-
sadors for our country,” he
said. “Too often, we in the
Bahamas, look and say if you
didn’t come first, second or
third, you didn’t do anything.

“That’s not the case in
sports. In sports, you give your
heart, your guts, everything on
the line. And that was what
these young men did. They

SAILORS, from 11

fourth consecutive year.

Forbes, who made his
debut, said he was also pleased
with his performance.

When asked if he thinks he
can come back next year and
beat de Cardenas, Forbes
could only chuckle because he
knows it would be a difficult
task.

And Brown, who wasn’t eli-
gible to compete in the
Nationals over the weekend,
said he was thrilled to watch a
lot of the competitors whom
he had the opportunity to
coach. “This weekend was
really competitive,” he said.

Talking about his perfor-
mance in Brazil in July, Brown
said it was a good experience
competing against the top
competitors from around the
world.

“It was a completely differ-
ent venue, a completely dif-

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represented the country well,
they represented the country
with dignity and they are still
learning.”

Archie Nairn, permanent
secretary in the Ministry of
Youth, Sports and Culture,
said the two boxers should be
commended, as well as Miller
and the executives of the
ABAB.

“What we see happening in
this federation exemplifies
what this ministry would like
to see in other federations as
well,” Nairn stated. “When we
see the kind of success manu-
factured by the many pro-
grammes they have taken on,

ferent atmosphere,” Brown
said. “I just need to work on
my techniques.”

Brown, who came into the
programme from the incep-
tion when he attended CI
Gibson Secondary High, fin-
ished 52nd in the champi-
onships held July 9-18.

According to Lawrence,
each country got to enter at
least one competitor. This was
the second time that the
Bahamas was represented.
The first time was two years
ago.

Brown will be joined by
Christopher Sands, Michael
Holowesko, Michael Gibson
and Brent Burrows Jr, along
with Long Island's Torrington
Cartwright, as they represent
the Bahamas in the Interna-
tional Junior Sunfish Champi-
onships 2009 that will be host-
ed by the Nassau Yacht Club
October 15-17 in Montagu
Bay.

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then we have reason to be just-
ly proud.”

Hield, who thanked God for
the opportunity to travel to
Italy, said the competition was
stiffer than he expected and
he went out there and he gave
it his all in the 64 kilogram
class.

“The loss has just boosted
me more to get back into
training for the Olympic
Games to be the first Bahami-
an to bring this gold medal
home,” Hield said.

The 23-year-old noted that
Knowles’ first round victory
was just like a gold medal for
the team because it put the
Bahamas on the map.

Knowles, who also thanked
the Lord, had nothing but
praise for all those who assist-

Sept 25th - 29th, 2009

Cay a

ie a OE Rhee 1007) als

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(ee

a able Pa

ed him mentally and physical-
ly to get ready for the champi-
onships, especially his father
who was there with him
throughout the whole experi-
ence.

“Everything went good,
everything was fine at the
training camp,” he said. “As
you can see, boxing is at a
stage where it is on the rise
now and my training pro-
gramme is going very fine.

“Tt was good, but it wasn’t
easy going up there and fight-
ing against the best in the
world. I went out there and I
did my thing. I brought back
history behind it.”

Now 21-year-old Knowles
said he wants to be able to go
out and fulfill his next dream
which is to win a medal at the

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Olympics in 2012.

Also in attendance was
Johnson, who is leaning on
making his second appearance
at the Olympics in 2012 with
Hield and Knowles, his team-
mates and training partners.

“This is a team, we all know
each other and I know what it
took down there to win was
not an easy task,” Johnson
said. “These guys deserve a
standing ovation. They went
down there and did what they
had to do.”

Unable to travel due to ill-
ness, Johnson said he was right
there in spirit and he congrat-
ulated both of them for their
efforts in Italy and he’s look-
ing forward to one of them
getting a medal in London in
2012.








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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

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For the best sporting action . . .
WWW. ibune?42. C

Minister helps fund squash

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex undergoing
renovations, legendary track
coach Errol Bodie has decid-
ed not to sit idly down on the
sidelines. He has ventured
into the sport of squash, a
sport he is hoping to try and
resurrect in Grand Bahama.

At present, Bodie conducts
four classes daily for students
from Sunland Lutheran, St
George’s, Tabernacle and
Walter Parker Primary
School. In all, Bodie is cater-
ing to more than 300 students
in the programme, an aver-
age of 30-35 per class.

Yesterday, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister present-
ed Bodie with a grant to assist
in the development of his pro-
gramme.

During the day, Bodie said
the squash club is not in use,
so he came up with the idea of
hosting the high school stu-
dents on the four courts.

“T wrote to the Ministry
and the first time it was sent
back. But the second time, Mr
Bannister took note of the
programme,” Bodie said.

While he said they would
like to cater to all of the
schools on Grand Bahama,
Bodie said there are five with-
in the vicinity that they have
earmarked.

“Sunland walks to the
squash club in the mornings
and St George’s and Taber-
nacle busses their kids to the
squash club,” Bodie said.
“This is the only way you
could develop a sport that is
not taught in the schools or
taught in the facilities in the
schools.”

As a retired school teacher,
Bodie said he can devote his
time to the programme and
he has a number of friends
who come along to assist him.

“We’re hoping that through
this programme, we can iden-
tify some talent, tennis talent
and squash talent,” he said.
“Now-a-days, you don’t hear
anything about squash
because it is dying.

The
OA

Ta

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ay 2 ge



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ERROL BODIE accepts a cheque from Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister. Permanent secretary Archie Nairn looks on...

“There’s no problem to
keep it going. In the

Caribbean at one time we
were the best. Now there is

hardly any squash players. I
think the end result of all this

Bannister extends deepest
condolences to Ferguson family

MINISTER of Youth,
Sports and Culture Desmond
Bannister has extended his
deepest condolences to the
family of the late Vincent
Lloyd Ferguson on behalf of
the government and the
entire local sporting commu-
nity.

Ferguson, 71, died at his
home while having breakfast
on Wednesday morning.

“As this country’s pre-emi-
nent sports administrator, he
embodied all that is good
about Bahamian sports,
inspiring in athletes and spec-
tators alike, the notion that
they all shared an equal stake
in the growth and develop-
ment of the Bahamas through
whatever noble medium they
sought to pursue,” Bannister
said.

He noted that “so firmly
did Ferguson believe in such
a proposition that many were

Se

It ye ouare 106 okins

his personal sacrifices to con-
nect unattached Bahamian
youth with their true purpose
in life, whether as an athlete,
an academic, as a politician,
as an educator or as a social
scientist.

“Such sacrifices were many
and continuous, resulting in
an abiding respect for his pro-
found wisdom that readily
qualified him as a Bahamian
icon, well known throughout
local and international cir-
cles.”

Bannister said his ministry
is convinced that “Vince Fer-
guson has been a shining
example to the youth and
people of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, as much by
his contribution to national
development through the use
of his intellect as by his steady
display of honesty, integrity
and respect for wider
humankind.



VINCENT FERGUSON

“Much can be said about
his days as an outstanding
athlete at St Augustine’s Col-
lege where he functioned as
an important cog in engines
of the Big Red Machine, a
name he was responsible for
coining and assigning to SAC
during his days as coach and

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vice principal there.”

Bannister also noted that
“for all these and his other
telling attributes as profes-
sional baseball player that
Vincent Lloyd Ferguson was
inducted into this country’s
National Hall of Fame in
2003, rightfully earning this
country’s highest national
sporting award.

“T have further requested
the Sports Department of my
ministry to provide me with a
number of other recommen-
dations to perpetually com-
memorate the invaluable
national contributions made
by Mr Ferguson such that his
life will forever serve as a
beacon for the youth of the
Bahamas, especially those
who demonstrate an avoca-
tion for sports.”

To the immediate and
extended family of Ferguson,
Bannister said he asks them

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to “take exceptional pride in
his life contributions, partic-
ularly in the countless lives
he so richly blessed by his
affinity to practice and preach
honesty and fair play.

“T am confident then, that
his many good deeds will long
outlive the relatively short
period of his temporal jour-
ney among us. Eternal rest
grant to him, O Lord.”

Bahamas Basketball Fed-
eration president Lawrence
Hepburn offered his condo-
lences to the family.

“T join you in the mourning
of a legend who served his
generation with all he had,
with all that he said God had
endowed him,” Hepburn
said. “Today we lost a father
to the modern game of bas-
ketball as we know it.

“Many had came before
him, but none had revolu-
tionise the game of basket-
ball like Mr Vince Ferguson.
His presence demanded
respect and he did not apolo-
gise for his strength, frank-
ness and style of leadership.”

Hepburn said “while he
knew the power he possessed
he was also able to commune
with the most humbled or
down trodden.”

He said Ferguson’s words,
“Young Man,’ would resonate
in his ear because Ferguson
always got his full and undi-
vided attention.

“Yes Mr Ferguson was a
giant the many has tried to
emulate,” Hepburn said. “But
what I realised is that Vince
Ferguson not only was appro-
priate for his generation, very
much ahead of his time and
an exemplary role model, but
he was a man who possessed
a passion driven by a vision
and a love from God that
made him hurt to see his fel-
low men progress and
advance to the pinnacle of
success.”

Hepburn further said:
“Most of all we all knew his
disciplinary approach to life.
Mr Ferguson was never too
afraid to discipline, but he
lived the example before us
and gave us a model to fol-

And he noted that basket-
ball, baseball, track and field,
the Cancer Society, the
Bahamas Association of Bas-
ketball Officials, the men’s
fellowship of his church and
all was well served by this
great Bahamian.

“The Bahamas Basketball
Federation which he formed
wishes at this time to say to
the family of this icon: ‘Our
hearts hurt with you this day
and may the God of all com-
fort give you his ever-abiding
peace in this your time of sor-
row. We have indeed lost
another great Bahamian.’”

is the scholarships and if they
are very good, they can go
professional.”

Bodie said he already has
two students who are being
groomed for athletic scholar-
ships in the US.

As for track and field, Bod-
ie said as soon as the renova-
tions to the Grand Bahama
Sports Complex are complet-
ed, he will look at making a
return to coaching track and
field again.

“Coach Bodie has been the
most successful track and field
coach we’ve had in the coun-
try, so the kids in Nassau bet-
ter watch out,” Bannister said.

Baptist Sports
Council to
take break
for funeral

THE Baptist Sports
Council will take a break
next weekend because of
the funeral service of the
late Rashad Morris, who
was killed on Sunday
morning.

Morris is a brother of
Morris-Evans, who serves
as the treasurer of the
BSC. His father, Ortnell
Peter Morris, is also a
member of the league.

Morris has also helped
out considerably in the
concession stand at the
BSC's games. The BSC
extends its condolences to
the Morris family.

The BSC also extends
condolences to the hus-
band and wife team of
Keith and Pamela Capron,
who both play in the
league.

Their father and father-
in-law David Alphonso
‘Iron Baby’ Bethel, is slat-
ed to be laid to rest 10am
Saturday St Anne's Angli-
can Church.

The BSC will pay its
respects to the Capron
family by not starting its
games until noon Satur-
day.

The BSC is scheduled
to begin its 2009 Olympia
Morris-Evans Softball
Classic Saturday on
Wholesalers Field at the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.

Here’s a look at the
schedule of games for Sat-
urday:

Noon — Golden Gates
vs Ebenezer (Co-ed)

lpm — Macedonia vs Mt
Carey (M).

2pm — Transfiguration
vs Golden Gates (M)

3pm — Macedonia vs
Temple Fellowship (17-
And-Under)

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays


THE TRIBUNE



b





FRIDAY,



SEPTEMBER 25,



ns

2009



Trinidad
hangs on to

sixth spot...

See page 9

Winning sailors are recognised

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ollowing the suc-

cessful hosting of

the Bahamas

Optimist Nation-

al Championships
over the weekend, Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister lauded
two of the winners.

Bannister said he was par-
ticularly pleased to recognise
14-year-old Danny de Carde-
nas, the repeat overall cham-
pion, as well as 10-year-old
Alande Forbes, who was third
in the green fleet.

And Bannister also recog-
nised Donico Brown, the 18-
year-old who represented the
Bahamas at the World Cham-



ALANDE FORBES shares a special moment with Minister of Youth,

Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister...

pionships in Brazil in July.
“Sailing has really made
awesome steps in developing
young people and they have a
great vehicular route in teach-
ing young people how to swim

Photos: Felipé Major

and how to sail,” Bannister
said. “So we are very pleased
to support what they are
doing.”

Bannister, along with per-
manent secretary Archie

SHOWN sitting (I-r) are Wellington Miller, Desmond Bannister and Archie Nairn. Standing (I-r) are referee
Alvin Sergeant, boxers Taureano Johnson, Carl Hield and Valentino Knowles and coach A Seymour...

boxers make the

Bahamas proud

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

Amateur Boxing Associa-
tion of the Bahamas president
Wellington Miller said he’s
pleased that the Minister of
Youth, Sports and Culture
Desmond Bannister had a
send off for the two boxers
who fought in the World
Championships and honoured
them when they came home.

In August, the team of
Valentino Knowles and Carl
Hield, along with coach Andre
Seymour, attended the cham-
pionships in Milan, Italy.

While Hield was eliminat-
ed in the first round in the 64
Kilogram weight class,
Knowles went on to make his-
tory by becoming the first
Bahamian to win a match. He
competed in the 60kg class.

“We in the amateur boxing
programme started the pro-
gramme 10 years ago after we
didn’t make it to the 2004
Olympics,” said Miller, who
also serves as president of the
Bahamas Olympic Associa-
tion.

ea

“Reno Johnson’ was
involved in that. He went
through and followed our
instructions and he made it to
the 2008 Olympics and we
made history from there.”

Knowles and Hield are fol-
lowing the same path as John-
son competing at the World
Championships. But he said
the quest now is for them to go
all the way to the Olympics in
London, England, in 2012.

“We’re proud of them and
we are hoping that by the time
the Olympics roll around in
2012, they will come back with
a medal,” Miller said.

Seymour, who made history
as the first Bahamian to com-
pete in two Olympics and win-
ning at least one bout, said it
was not an easy road being in
Italy with the boxers for five
weeks.

They started out in a train-
ing camp in Rome with over
80 boxers from more than 50
countries and the boxers per-
formed very well in the match-
es they competed in as they
prepared for the champi-
onships.

At the championships, Sey-

mour said the boxers went to
Milan and they did extremely
well, but he’s confident that
because of the experience they
gained, the Bahamas could
end up winning its first medal
at the next championships in
two years and even at the
Olympics the following year.

“Tcan guarantee you that at
the next Olympics, we will hit
the medal podium,” he said,
“as long we continue to invest
in our boxers and we continue
to get the support from the
parents.”

Bannister firstly commend-
ed the families of both boxers
for the tremendous support
that they received as they took
the long journey to Italy.

Secondly, he thanked the
ABAB and its president,
whom he said has done an
excellent job, along with Sey-
mour, in exposing a lot more
youngsters to the sport.

“So many youngsters are
looking at a way to showcase
their skills and to develop their
skills,” he said.

SEE page 9



SHOWN (I-r) are Danny de Cardenas, Donico Brown, Bannister, John
Lawrence, McPhee, Archie Nairn and Alande Forbes...

Nairn, presented a cheque to
John Lawrence, the president
of the Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation, for their continued
contribution to the growth and
development of the junior sail-

ET PSS I Pe ee ee

ing programme.

Lawrence said since the
junior programme was
launched five years ago, the
ministry has been a financial
partner and they assisted

greatly in their fourth summer
sailing camp that attracted 76
students from 28 different
schools.

Sailing camps were also held
in Harbour Island and Long
Island where another 40 stu-
dents were able to take advan-
tage of the programme.

“We just finished our
Bahamas Optimist National
Championships last weekend
where we had some 54 boats
competing,” Lawrence said.
“They’re all single handed
boats and they all performed
very well.”

de Cardenas, who success-
fully defended his title, said he
had a “great time” and he
enjoyed competing for the

SEE page 9

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Police investigate fire at

Georgies on the beach

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police are
trying to determine the cause
of a fire at Georgies on the
beach in Mather Town.

According to reports, some-
time around 11.50pm on
Wednesday police received a
report of a fire at Georgies
Restaurant, Disco and Lounge
on the Beach.

When firemen arrived at the
scene, flames had engulfed the

roof and a portion of the
wood/stone deck. The fire was
extinguished. The building was
destroyed. Asst Supt Loretta
Mackey said investigations are
continuing into the matter.

SUSPECTS ARRESTED

Four persons were arrested
early Thursday morning after
police discovered and seized a
large quantity of cash, along
with a several firearms and
ammunition at a residence in
Freeport. ASP Loretta Mackey

said police, acting on informa-
tion, went to Hampton Road
around 5.35am where they
searched a residence occupied
by two men and two women.
While searching the resi-
dence and a vehicle, officers
discovered four unlicensed
firearms and ammunition with
some $67,000 cash in US cur-
rency. The suspects, who are
between 17 and 34 years of age,
were taken into custody. Offi-
cers at the Drug Enforcement
Unit are continuing their inves-
tigations into the matter.

dutge decides against stay of hotel union elections ruling

refuse to stop the elections from proceeding on
September 29, 2009,” Justice Adderley stated

FROM page one

voters might not support the other members of
the team if such key members were missing.
“Having weighed the interests of justice,
the hopelessness of the appeal and as it relates
to the new nomination date of September 15
and the circumstances of this case, I felt com-
pelled to exercise my discretion to refuse a

in his ruling.

stay of the September 7 decisions as well as to

Travolta trial jurors discharged early

FROM page one

Jurors in the case were dis-
charged early yesterday.
Lawyers in the case had met
in closed court Wednesday
evening to make legal sub-
missions in the absence of the
jury. Senior Justice Anita
Allen reserved Thursday to
consider those submissions.

Prosecutors have called
four witnesses so far, includ-
ing Mr Travolta. On Wednes-
day Mr Travolta -who was the
only witness to take the stand-
recalled the efforts he and
others made to save his 16-
year-old son Jett’s life after
the boy suffered a seizure on
the morning of January 2 at a
condo at the Old Bahama
Bay Resort where they were
vacationing. Mr Travolta
recalled that after being awak-
ened by a nanny he and his
wife- actor Kelly Preston- ran

downstairs to help their son.
Mr Travolta said that one of
Jett’s nannies was doing chest
compression’s while he per-
formed CPR.

Mr Travolta also told the
court on Wednesday that out-
side the condo, he spoke to
the ambulance driver and fol-
lowing that exchange he
received a liability release
document which he signed.
He admitted however that he
did not read the document
because “time was of the
essence.”

Mr Travolta said that he
told the ambulance driver to
take Jett to the airport at Old
Bahama Bay; the reason
being he said was so that he
could take his son on a Ginn
jet to West Palm Beach rather
than taking him to the
Freeport hospital. Mr Travol-
ta testified however that Jett
was taken to the Freeport
hospital via ambulance. Mr

In a verbal judgment Justice Adderley also
ordered that union trustee Ian Neely obey the
September 7 ruling and sign the payroll sheet
by lpm today and that no resignations are to
take effect until he does so. Justice Adderley
said that if Neely fails to comply he would
entertain a contempt of court hearing.

Travolta said that en route to
the hospital there was a
switching of ambulance dri-
vers.

The case resumes this
morning. A jury of six women
and three men was selected
on Monday in the case.
Bridgewater, 49, and Light-
bourne, 47, are accused of
conspiring to extort and
attempting to extort money
from Mr Travolta between
January 2 and 20 by means of
threats.

Bridgewater is also accused
of abettment to extortion. Ms
Bridgewater is being repre-
sented by attorneys Murrio
Ducille and Krysta Smith.

Mr Lightbourne is being
represented by attorney Carl-
son Shurland and Mary Bain
pro bono. Director of Public
Prosecutions Bernard Turn-
er, Neil Brathwaite and
Garvin Gaskin are prosecut-
ing the case.



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

usiness

2009

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,



Lack of ‘trust!
hits pension
fund industry

* Bahamian pensions sector

‘essentially a $1.1bn unregulated §

industry’, says accountant,
urging that percentage of
workforce covered by plan
increase from 27% to 80-90%

* Absence of trust structures
creates uncertainty over plan
ownership, says actuary

* Concerns over level of loans
applied against retirement
funds, plus use of pensions to
invest in sponsor’s company
and early withdrawals by plan
members

By NEIL HARTNELL

THE “most critical issue”

ership of many funds is uncer-

ulated industry”.

Marcus Bosland, Colinalm-
perial Insurance Company’s }

resident actuary, addressing a

was “nothing that prevents”
money held for its employees’

panies.
Meanwhile,

Christie, an accountant and

partner at Grant Thornton

(Bahamas), who is a member }
of the Government-appoint- }
ed committee examining the }

sickness claims

Bahamian workforce was cov- }

creation of pension legislation,
said only 27 per cent of the

ered by a pension plan.

“We need to get that to 80-

from fraud check

then mandatory legislation. }
What we have here is essen- }
tially a $1.1 billion unregulated :
industry. We have to look at :
how we introduce regulations

90 per cent,” said Mr Christie,
“through encouragement, and

around the industry.”

Recalling his experience

else : * Average return on assets drops to 4.23% for 2009
ea ere "Mr | * Board ‘defers no prosecution’ of delinquent employers
Christie said legislation should :
also look at Bahamians who }
used their retirement funds as }
: Tribune Business Editor
He explained: “What con- 7” — cerned me was the level of :
: ance Board (NIB) has seen a
? 30 per cent reduction in sick-
i ness benefits claims since the
sible for persons with $20,000

when he helped to administer

collateral for loans.

loans persons applied against
their pension fund balances.”
Mr Christie said it was pos-

in retirement savings to walk
as a result, adding: “I would
really want to look at how to
restrict the application of loans
and withdrawals [against pen-
sion fund monies].

“T was personally troubled

pany who, in some cases, end-

plans.”

SEE page four

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

Kendrick

NIB: 30% fall in

- i form requiring employers to
away with only $1,000-$2,000 ? confirm whether staff were
? actually off work ill, its direc-
i tor yesterday saying the sharp
? reduction in fraudulent claims
: had already saved $2 million.

: ing a seminar organised by
by persons who left the com- investment advisory firm

F ae i CFAL, said that for 2009
eo Up Owing Ane Sompany ? year-to-date, sickness bene-
money. We need to look at the i tite claims had dropped by
level of loan and withttawal 4 note than 3,000 to 12.580
applications against pension i compared fo the 2008 ai

: i parative figure of 15,870. NIB
oo nadine that another con- f had paid out $6.2 million in
which Bahamian pension plan ? sickness benefits claims this

participants could withdraw } :
funds prior to retirement, to } for the same period last year.

cope with events such as med- } :
ical emergencies, Mr Bosland } the Med-4 form, benefits

? claims [for being off work
i sick] have reduced by 30 per



SECTION B ° business@tribunemedia.net

300 sales for

Lr

A MULTI-MILLION dollar mixed-use

? resort project is only awaiting govern-
i ment approval of its Environmental Man-
: agement Plan (EMP) before it begins final
i master planning, having pre-sold some
: 300 real estate plots to international buy-
i ers over the past three years despite the
: recession.

The principals behind the 951.4-acre

: Port St George project on Long Island
/ : . : have signed a 25-year management agree-
Tribune Business Editor : ment with Langham Hotels International
? to operate the development’s 224-unit,
fopine the Heb anian benon i five-star resort, covering 27.2 acres. Oth-
ae a caeeeeer nee the own. | &fcomponents feature a 640-slip marina,

y : 1,217 residential units, commercial and

tain because they have not i retail space, and a Robert Trent Jones II-

been incorporated as trust }
structures, an actuary said yes- }
terday, the sector operating as }
“essentially a $1 billion unreg- ;
: Houghton, said in their newly-released

designed golf course and country club.
The project developer, RUFO Invest-

ments Ltd, whose principals are UK citi-

zens Ian Moorcroft and Jonathan

information brochure that permission for
Port St George had been granted by the

\ ; ? Government, with only EMP approval
seminar organised by the ;
insurer’s affiliate, CFAL, said : planning can begin”.
that among the concerns sur- }
eee ee er ae eae ! for approval, and the developers state
apeag rea tt Mee Tee gama eaie i that final master planning “will commence

1 f investing ; at the earliest possible opportunity”.
ee : Applications for subdivision approval will

retirement in their own com- } then be made.

“required before the final stage of master

The EMP has already been submitted

* $2m savings to social security programme from
3,000 drop in benefits claims for days off work
: * Contribution income rises 2.3% to $108.2m for

year to August

By NEIL HARTNELL

THE NATIONAL Insur-

March 2009 introduction of a

Algernon Cargill, address-

year, compared to $7 million

“Since the introduction of

cent,” Mr Cargill said. “This
30 per cent reduction has so
far resulted in savings of $2
million to NIB.

“Many employees claiming
benefits from NIB for time
off work were not off..... This
tells us there was a problem,
and we’re asking the indul-
gence of employees in sub-
mitting the Med-4 form when
employees submit a claim.”

For 2009 to date, NIB has
received a combined 16,628
medical, sickness and injury
benefits claims, down from
19,633 in the same period in
2008. The value of benefits
paid out has fallen from $12
million to $10.8 million.

Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said
NIB’s increased compliance
focus and ensuring it collected
all contributions due from

SEE page three

esort project

By NEIL HARTNELL
: Tribune Business Editor

* Multi-million
dollar development
signs 25-year
management deal
with Langham Hotels,
with 640-slip marina
and 1,217 residential
units also planned

To date, the developers said some 300
real estate sales outside the main Port St
George site had been completed, many
to leading European buyers and interna-
tional sports personalities. Right to Buy
agreements to secure lots on the main site
have been entered into with the pur-
chasers, who must pay a 10 per cent
deposit once subdivision drawings are fin-
ished, the balance being due when infra-
structure is completed.

Although no sales can be concluded in
the absence of subdivision approval, the
Port St George developers said “a high
conversion rate of right to buy agreements

SEE page five

Algernon Cargill





Renewables
‘double the
cost’ of fossil
fuel energy

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

RENEWABLE energy is too costly, takes up too much
land and is unable to supply the continuous electricity need-
ed to meet Abaco’s power needs, presentations on behalf of
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) have argued,
although attendees at the Wilson City power plant town
told Tribune Business yesterday the alternatives had not

been properly explored.

A BEC presentation on alternative energy forms, given at
the Wilson City meeting, suggested that waste-to-energy
would never be suitable for Abaco’s energy needs, since
the island produced less than 3,000 tonnes of waste per

month.

It said that to supply one megawatt of power per month,
some 280 tonnes of waste per hour, or 9,120 tonnes per day,
would be required - an amount well in excess of Abaco’s

monthly power needs.

With waste-to-energy ruled out, the BEC presentation

SEE page two

20% of jobless claimants find
hew work prior to benefit's end

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE National Insurance Board (NIB) will not defer police
action and prosecution of unemployment benefit fraudsters
even if they return the funds taken, it was revealed yesterday,

with some 20 per cent of
claimants not receiving the
full 13 weeks’ benefit - indi-
cating they were subse-
quently able to find another
job.

Algernon Cargill, NIB’s
director, addressing a semi-
nar organised by investment
advisory firm CFAL,
recalled how a woman came
into see NIB’s fraud unit last
week, accompanied by her
attorney, offering to return
all the unemployment bene-
fit cheques she had fraudu-

* NIB director warns
fraudulent benefit claimants
that returning funds will not
prevent police action

* $15.4m paid out to 11,225
jobless Bahamians to date, with
$135 average weekly pay out

* 30% of government clinic
visits caused by chronic, non-
communicable diseases

lently received following a visit from police investigators.
While NIB “in the first instance definitely insists on the
funds being returned”, Mr Cargill said this act would not pre-

SEE page three

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PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Abaco to get own tourism brand

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Don’t miss This Special Business Information Meeting
IN THE BAHAMAS

You are cordially invited to a Special Presentation Introducing A Cutting
Edge New Technology and Business Opportunity

Special Guest Speaker
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DOOR PRIZE WILL BE GIVEN TO THE FIRST 25 GUESTS



By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco - Abaco will be mar-
keted as its own destination
within the Bahamas just as
Nassau/Paradise Island has
been for decades, the minister
of tourism and aviation said,
with Marsh Harbour to receive
a new airport runway by next
month and 14 American Air-
lines flights per week.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wal-
lace could not say when con-
struction of the new Marsh
Harbour Airport terminal will
begin, but revealed that plans
for the building are almost
complete.

Speaking at the sixth annual
Abaco Business Outlook con-
ference, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said it was time that Aba-
co, which has the fastest grow-
ing economy and largest mari-
na industry in the Bahamas,
had its own marketing identity

FROM page one

said ocean thermal energy con-
version (OTEC), wave and
tidal energy were “not suffi-
ciently advanced to provide
useful power on a utility scale
at this time”.

As for solar power, a power-
generation technology the
Bahamas seems ideally suited
to, the capacity factor for a
solar Photovoltaic plant at
Abaco’s latitude was pegged
at around 21 per cent or less.

When it came to the com-
parative costs of power pro-
duction, as a percentage of
diesel generation, the BEC
presentation showed wind was
220 per cent more expensive;
waste-to-energy some 340 per
cent more expensive; and solar
450 per cent more expensive.

And as for land require-
ments, some 360 acres would
be required to house a 48
megawatt (MW) wind farm
featuring 50-metre towers;
1,920 acres to site a solar facil-
ity; and 20 acres set aside for

PUBLIC NOTICE

Tender for “Used & Salvaged Vehicles”
re a

instead of being grouped with-
in the “Islands of the
Bahamas”.

“We have to move Abaco
out of the shadow of Nassau
and Paradise Island,” he said.

The minister said the
Bahamas’ promotional neglect
of the Family Islands was com-
parable to Jamaica only sell-
ing Kingston in its promotion-
al material.

He argued that just as
Jamaica has successfully devel-
oped other areas of its island
into tourism meccas, so can the
Bahamas.

As American Airlines
arrivals are increased, the Min-
istry of Tourism is focusing on
creating a dedicated Abaco
logo for promotional purposes.

Essentially, according to Mr
Vanderpool- Wallace, Abaco
will be sold separately in the
future, much like Nassau/Par-
adise Island and Freeport,
Grand Bahama, have been.

However, the island remains
without suitable infrastructure

Energy

waste-to-energy power pro-
duction.

In short, the BEC presenta-
tion on renewable energy con-
cluded: “Renewables have a
greater land requirement.
Renewables presently are more
costly than traditional sources
of electricity production.

“Wind and solar do not pro-
vide continuous sources of
power, and will require tradi-
tional sources of power for
most of the time”.

However, while acknowl-
edging that renewable, sus-
tainable forms of energy had
the ability to contribute to the
Bahamas’ energy security, they
would only “eventually be inte-
grated into the power produc-
tion process in a limited way”.

The presentation seemed
designed to dampen expecta-
tions about how useful renew-
able, sustainable energy would
be in meeting Abaco’s power

a

4



1805

for its rapidly-growing econo-
my.
BEC is working to increase
power output on the island,
but its Wilson City project was
recently set back because of
the need to obtain construc-
tion permits.

Mr Vanderpool Wallace said
Abaco’s economy had seen a
27 per cent visitor arrivals
decline since the start of the
recession, while Freeport saw a
35 per cent decline and Nas-
sau an 8.8 per cent decline.

Administrator for Central
Abaco, Cephas Cooper, said
Abaco’s economy has seen
growth on average of 32 per
cent in tourist arrivals since the
1960s. He said that despite the
economic downturn “the
future of Abaco still looks very
bright”.

Mr Cooper said the island,
with a population of about
14,000 across several towns
along 120 miles of land, has
been experiencing rush hour
traffic recently - a testament

needs - and, indeed, those of
the wider Bahamas.

One attendee at the Abaco
Town Meeting on the Wilson
City power plant, speaking to
Tribune Business on condition
of anonymity, said BEC “did-
mt give any basis” for its deci-
sion and views on renewable
energy sources in the context
of the island’s energy needs.

He added that while BEC
said the average wind speed
on Abaco per year was seven
knots, historical data showed it
was really around 16 Knots. For
renewable energy derived from
wing, the latter figure was in
the Class 6 (outstanding) cate-
gory, and just below Class 7
(superb).

The source told Tribune
Business that while a wind farm
would be double the cost of the
proposed $105 million Wilson
City, Bunker C fuel-burning,
plant, that could be “made
back in a couple of years” from
the likes of carbon emission
credits.

In addition, he explained

w PICTET

to its growth.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
restated his consternation at
the price of airlift into Abaco,
but contended that the Min-
istry of Tourism and Aviation
is working to have airlines low-
er their costs.

He asserted that a flight to
Abaco from New York was
more expensive than a New
York to London flight. And
Abaconians lament that the
once per week American Air-
lines flight to Miami is more
expensive than flying to Nas-
sau, then taking a second flight
out to Miami.

According to Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace, the Bahamas is a
high cost destination due to
high labour costs and high
energy costs. He said this coun-
try has to find out how to com-
pete in this region with those
factors in mind.

“We cannot compete with
other destinations on the basis
of cost,” he said. “We have to
find out how to compete.”

that wind farms did not auto-
matically render the land where
they were located useless for
any other application, pointing
out that they co-existed quite
well with farmland.

Arguing that the Govern-
ment’s approach to renewable
energies appeared designed to
protect BEC, and prevent peo-
ple from generating their own
power, the source said of the
proposed National Energy Pol-
icy (NEP): “It’s pretty obvious
they have no intention of con-
sidering renewable energy
sources for another 20-30 years.

“They’re doing a few pro-
jects, but are not going after it
in an aggressive sense. What
the Bahamas government
deems is the cheapest way to
generate electricity, that’s the
policy.

“They haven’t considered it
[renewable energy] at all. They
give it lip service, so people
feel all warm and fuzzy. All
this talk is to placate people
and show them they’re doing
something.”

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

| Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

GLOBAL CUSTODY ADMINISTRATOR

The qualified candidate will...
- Assist the Senior Relationship Manager in all administrative aspects of his activities,
- Provide support and service to existing client relationships.
- Actas the main contact person for clients for the daily administration of their
accounts,
~ Co-ordinate the paperwork involved in opening accounts/account restructuring.
- Interact with Compliance and Legal departments to ensure due diligence
requirements are met.
- Coordinate implementation of new service requirements.
- Update the client relationship database,
Visit clients with the relationship manager when required.
- Keep the relationship manager updated on all issues regarding client accounts.
- Maintain positive working relations with clients and all Pictet departments, including
close collaboration with Operations divisions.

QUALIFICATIONS/SKILLS:

- CPAICFA

- Bachelors degree in Business/Finance

- Series 7 (international) or equivalent qualification.

~ Knowledge of another language (French, Spanish) would be an asset.
-Working knowledge of investment instruments.

~ 5 years’ banking experience, preferably in Global Custody/Family Office.

- Ability to manage money market, forex and trading desks.

~ Good PC skills (Word, Excel, Power Point),

- Excellent communicator

~ Enthusiastic personality.

- Ability to work under pressure,

~ Independent and self motivated.

- Ability to accomplish assigned tasks in an organised and disciplined manner.
~ Ability to work with a dynamic team in a professional environment that continually
offers new challenges,

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cofhed of #27 John f. benno Cries. Massau Boban: Bids
fhowd be received by Sa) po Weneccdop, Septem oH,
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Hand deliver Resume, cover letter and two (2) references BY SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 to:-

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER
Pictet Bank & Trust Limited
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay St. & Blake Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Mr. | Kirk Griffin
ACTING PRENDENT & CEO

Thea Looms: Talecmeniae Cmgcirys lirrethard

$21 John F Koenodly Devo. Pid. Boo M SL Nassau MP, Bahan:
BIC Biservirs (HE ReAy 10 RESO! ANT, | i : a

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Offices in
Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, London, Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 3B



FROM page one

vent the social security pro-
gramme from allowing police
to go through with their inves-
tigations, and eventual pros-
ecution, of benefit fraudsters.

The NIB director warned
Bahamians that the fund had
a simple way to detect fraud,
since it could compare unem-
ployment benefit claimants
with those whom employers
made contribution payments
on their behalf. If contribu-
tions were still being made on
behalf of a benefit claimant,
this indicated they were still
working.

Mr Cargill added that NIB
was receiving numerous calls
from neighbours to inform it
that persons claiming unem-
ployment benefit had either

FROM page one

employers and the self-
employed was paying off, as
contribution income had so
far defied the recession
through increasing by 2.3 per
cent year-over-year for the
first eight months of 2009.

For the year to August,
NIB’s contribution income
stood at $108.2 million, com-
pared to $105.8 million the
year before. For 2008, con-
tribution income hit $154.9
million, up from $125 million
in 2004, $135.1 million in
2005 and $149 million in
2006. It was slightly below
the $155 million generated in
2007.

Meanwhile, Mr Cargill said
NIB’s Board of Directors
“has not deferred any prose-
cutions” in court of delin-
quent employers who refused
to negotiate a settlement to
settle outstanding contribu-
tion amounts “regardless of
who is on the list”.

The NIB director revealed
that the social security pro-
gramme always sought an up-
front payment of 40 per cent
of the sum owed by employ-
ers because this represented
the employees’ share of con-
tributions, or the 3.4 per cent
deducted from their salaries
every month.

Explaining that court pros-

Jobless claims

found new jobs, were work-
ing part-time or had gone self-
employed.

As a further safeguard,
rather than deposit benefits
direct to bank accounts, Mr
Cargill said NIB required all
claimants to come to its offices
and sign an affidavit confirm-
ing they were still unemployed
and looking for work.

Out of the $20 million trans-
ferred from NIB’s medical
branch to finance the initial
stages of the unemployment
benefit scheme, Mr Cargill
said some $15.4 million had
been paid out to-date. The
average weekly benefit col-
lected by claimants, he said,
was $135.

NIB

ecutions were the “last
resort” when negotiations
failed and employers refused
to pay, Mr Cargill added:
“When we take people to
court, we are protecting the
employees, the workers of
the country, ensuring their
contributions are paid and
paid on time.”

For 2009 year-to-date, Mr
Cargill said the average rate
of return on NIB’s invested
assets had dropped a little to
around 4.23 per cent, but
pointed out that this was
“outperforming” many oth-
er leading indicators, such as
the BISX All-Share Index,
which was down 12 per cent
for the year-to-date.

For most of the five years
since 2004, NIB has generat-
ed an average return on its
assets of between 5-6 per
cent, exceeding the 6 per cent
barrier just once - in 2007.

Mr Cargill blamed the
decline in 2009 year-to-date
returns on its $1.6 billion
reserve fund on last year’s
“market correction” follow-
ing “accelerated growth” in
previous years, plus the
decline in Cable Bahamas’
share price - the BISX-listed
company in which it is poised
to become the largest

F
fet Came aie

Some 11,225 Bahamians
had so fare received unem-
ployment benefits, Mr Cargill
said, but 20 per cent of
claimants did not receive the
full 13 weeks of benefits, indi-
cating that they had found
jobs in the interim.

“There is not one Bahami-
an who has been approved
who has not received their
cheque every two weeks,” Mr
Cargill said, adding that of the
11,225 claimants, an estimated
8,000-9,000 were on New
Providence. On Abaco, he
added that the unemployment
rate was 2-2.5 per cent, as indi-
cated by the percentage of the
workforce claiming benefit.

“We believe the $20 million

investor with an almost-30
per cent stake.

Justifying NIB’s invest-
ment strategy, particularly its
dependence on government
debt instruments and build-
ing projects, Mr Cargill said
the Bahamian economy was
simply not large enough to
support all NIB’s investment
assets and generate a good
rate of return. Nor could the
Bahamian commercial bank-
ing sector support them.

“NIB has no non-perform-
ing investments in the
Bahamas government, and
no non-performing govern-
ment debt,” Mr Cargill said.
“The Government pays NIB
contributions and pays them
on time.”

At year-end 2008, some 43

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read

Insight
on Mondays



















PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER

Public Relations Assistance for
The Bahamas Teleacommunications

Company Limited

Tre: Rohewids Teksconmunkuaiene Campaany | n-
hed is pleased bo invite benders bo ossist with I'vtdic
Relotiens Inttatves far the: cornprarny.

lieleortes deed Mere cor tclivecdenaks imag accelese:| aa Teecdes
Semchicaton tram the PC's securthy desk at Jatin F.
Rietriede, Lalani Thee bec cl SoM ean. one! a

pom., Monday faraugh Friday fram Scotembecr 18fh,

AMP

he secvine lor suena ol lenders e Thursday Oc-
fobor Jed, JO. Tenickers should be socked and rcwiccd
‘PREOPORAL FOR PUBL RELATIONS ASSISTANCE IAI-
TLATIVES FOR THE BARAMAS TELECOMMUBICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED* dnd should Get oclecrcd to fc ot
lesnlkaves! Hoo: "Mle. L Bek Gedfin Acdeng Preaiclet core

EC."

BTC RESERVES THE RMSGHT TO REJECT ANY,

OR ALL TENDERS

Yet Loa |

earmarked is sufficient to con-
tinue this unemployment ben-
efit,” Mr Cargill said. “Every
Bahamian who qualifies,
regardless of whether the $20
million is expended, will
receive a benefit.”

Currently, Bahamians
merely have to prove they are
unemployed to qualify, but Mr
Cargill warned that “the qual-
ifying criteria will be a lot
more stringent” when the
unemployment benefit enters
its permanent phase.

That will be when the NIB
contribution rate increases
from 8.8 per cent to 10.8 per
cent, to fund both the unem-
ployment programme and
proposed National Chronic
Drug Programme.

Mr Cargill said the latter
would generate “significant
savings” for Bahamian insur-

per cent of NIB’s investment
portfolio was concentrated in
Government Registered
Stock Issues, 3 per cent in
Treasury Bills and 22 per
cent in Certificates of
Deposit (CDs). Some 5 per
cent was held in property
investments, chiefly govern-
ment buildings. A further 18
per cent of assets were
invested in bonds, 5 per cent
in shares, and 1 per cent in
loans.

Pointing out that foreign
investments were currently
not generating as good a
return as NIB’s Bahamas-

ance companies and the pub-
lic, through facilitating the
purchase of drugs that com-
bat chronic diseases at lower
prices.

The NIB director said one
in three Bahamians suffered
from chronic, non-communi-
cable diseases “and most lack
timely access to prescription
drugs”.

He added that at Wednes-
day’s Business Outlook Con-
ference, Dr Pearl MacMillan,
the director of public health,
said that 30 per cent of all vis-
its to government clinics in the
Bahamas were by persons suf-
fering from chronic, non-com-
municable diseases.

While the programme
would be phased in, covering
pensioners, invalids and chil-
dren initially, all Bahamians
would eventually qualify, Mr

based portfolio, Mr Cargill
addressed recent criticism of
NIB’s decision to terminate
investment management con-
tracts with CFAL, RoyalFi-
delity Merchant Bank &
Trust, and Providence Advi-
sors.

“The re-positioning of
investment strategy does not
mean reduced investment
opportunities or investment
inefficiency at NIB,” he
added. “The opposite is true.
We are poised to ensure the
National Insurance Fund con-
tinues to return a positive
returns.”

Cargill saying the programme
would initially cover 11 dis-
eases, drugs and medical sup-
plies, and incorporate public
and private pharmacies.

“The goal is to reduce the
cost of drugs significantly, with
smaller co-payments and low-
er premiums for claiming pre-
scription drugs on medical
plans,” Mr Cargill said.

He added that the planned
50 per cent increase in the
insurable wage ceiling, from
$400 to $600, meant high earn-
ers would receive greater ben-
efits from NIB. For instance,
sickness benefit, paid at 60 per
cent of the insurable wage
ceiling, would rise from $240
to $360 for higher income
earners, while pension pay-
ments would rise from the
monthly $970 earned at the
$400 ceiling.

While NIB generated a $54
million surplus in 2008, this
came almost entirely from its
investment income. Mr Cargill
said: “In 2009, for the first
time, it is projected that bene-
fits paid will equal contribu-
tion income. The majority of
the surplus will have come
from investment income.”

With NIB taking in $13-
$14 million in contribution
income, the NIB director
added: “This is another rea-
son to increase the contribu-
tion rate, to ensure the bene-
fits paid out do no exceed the
contribution income.”



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TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM
PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Family Islands always a loss maker for BEC

By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter
crobards@tribunemedia.net

MARSH HARBOUR,
Abaco - BEC’s Family Island
operations will generate at net
loss for the remainder of the
corporation’s publicly owned
life, its general manager has
indicated.

Kevin Basden told the
Abaco Business Outlook con-
ference that BEC’s New
Providence profits subsidise

the cost of electricity genera-
tion on the Family Islands due
to its uniform tariff system.
This allows Family Island res-
idents to pay the same rates
as New Providence residents
despite the higher overhead
cost of generation.
According to Mr Basden,
because the cost of operating
power plants on some Family
Islands is disproportionate to
the rates paid by consumers,
BEC is in a “loss position”.
He said Family Island resi-
dents should be paying far

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the winding up and dissolu-
tion of CABEX INTERNACIONAL LTD. has been
completed and the Company was removed from the
Register of Companies on the 12 th Day of August,

2009.

Dated this 25 th day of September, 2009

Maria M. Férére
Liquidator

.
st
s

1

Ke \

% \
fornonss

THE PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
BAHAMAS NATIONAL DRUG AGENCY

more than they do for their
energy consumption. Howev-
er, the prices that the energy
company would have to
charge could put electricity
prices out of reach of the
average population.

Mr Basden said purchasing
fuel, shipping fuel and main-
taining generators puts a
strain on BEC’s finances,
which are never recouped in
the Family Islands.

According to him, the deci-
sion to supply power to the
Family Islands then becomes

FROM page one

said in a panel discussion that
his major fear centred on the
fact that “many of the pension
funds themselves are not cre-
ated by a trust”.

A trust is essentially that, a
structure that effectively holds
pension plan assets in escrow
to meet the retirement needs
of plan members, and which
is segregated from the opera-
tional assets of their employ-
er/company sponsor.

“This is the most critical
issue facing the industry here,”
Mr Bosland said. “If trusts do
not arise to own the assets,
who controls and owns them?
In the absence of a trust, does
the employer own the fund?
Do the employees own the
fund? Is it 50/50? That’s a crit-
ical matter.

“Plans that are segregated
but not in trusts do concern
me, because the question aris-
es as to who owns the plan.
We need to enhance plan
transparency.” Disclosure to
plan participants was key, Mr
Bosland said, because if they
did not know how their retire-

less BEC’s business and more
its social obligation.

BEC’s corporate overview
reveals that it holds $900 mil-
lion of assets across the
Bahamas and averages $500
million in revenues, to which
$350 million goes to the pur-
chase of fuels to run 26 power
stations across the Bahamas.

While BEC is moving
towards making its operations
more efficient, hiring a con-
sultancy firm out of Germany,
and devising studies to gauge
the feasibility of alternative

Pension

ment funds were being man-
aged, it could lead to further
problems.

The absence of an overall
regulatory framework for the
Bahamian pension fund indus-
try means there are minimal
to no safeguards preventing
plan sponsors and employers
from investing a large per-
centage of plan assets, osten-
sibly held to meet obligations
to retired employees, in their
own companies.

This, Mr Bosland said, cre-
ated potential conflicts of
interest and investment risk,
with too great a percentage of
plan assets concentrated in
one investment.

He pointed to the collapse
of energy giant Enron earlier
this decade as an example of
the dangers this created, with
the company’s employees los-
ing 80-90 per cent of their
retirement nest eggs because
they were invested so heavily
in the company’s own stock.

“It’s not clear to what

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

energy, it continues to have
to build power generating
facilities using diesel turbines.

“Many of the generators
are old and not very effi-
cient,” Mr Basen said of the
typical generator across the
wider Bahamas. “There are a
lot of breakdowns and
employees have to work very
hard.”

He said that if certain
renewable energy options are
implemented in the Bahamas,
BEC will be able to supple-
ment the existing power gen-

degree that is prevalent in the
Bahamas,” Mr Bosland said.
“But the fact there is nothing
that prevents it, limits it or
requires disclosure of it is a
concern.”

The Colinalmperial resident
actuary added that another
“grey area’ in the Bahamas was
“the ability of people to with-
draw money from a fund prior
to retirement”.

While “most plans don’t
expressly permit it or restrict
it”, Mr Bosland said that plan
members/employees with-
drawing their retirement
funds, so as to meet medical or
family emergencies, created
problems that were not obvi-
ous at first sight.

“The issue is: On what
terms should a plan allow
someone to do that, because
essentially a person is trading
off their retirement needs for
present needs,” Mr Bosland
said. “However pressing that
need, it needs to be explained
to the employee, so they
should Know the consequences
of doing it.

“T’m particularly concerned
about an employee’s ability to
make a sensible decision,
when facing a financial crisis,
on something that affects their
financial future.” Mr Bosland
suggested that counselling and
advisory services be made

eration method of burning
fossil fuels. However, it will
look into allowing private
generation of power via solar
panels, with a view to having
excess power generated rein-
serted into the grid.

Mr Basden restated yester-
day at the Bahamas Society
of Engineers luncheon meet-
ing that BEC does not want
to carry out disconnections,
and moving to find ways to
make power generation more
efficient and more affordable
for every Bahamian.

available to ensure employees
made an informed choice.

Mr Christie said Bahamas-
based companies should first
be encouraged to establish
retirement plans for their
employees, through the use of
incentives and highlighting
that such schemes often cre-
ated a happier, more loyal and
productive workforce.

Apart from pension funds,
he also urged that the
Bahamas’ national savings rate
be increased, pointing out that
75 per cent of this nation’s
bank accounts hold less than
$10,000, and most less than
$1,000.

Acknowledging that there
were concerns over the com-
position of plan Boards and
investment committees, espe-
cially if they were dominated
by plan sponsors or partici-
pants, Mr Christie said he
wanted to see statutory
requirements for the regular
auditing of pension funds,
especially those with assets
above a certain amount, “to
Keep the actuary on their
toes”.

Mr Christie added that poli-
cies governing plan investment
strategies, the concentration
of risk, and rules regarding
investments in related compa-
nies also needed to be man-
dated.

PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPPLEMENTARY TENDER FOR THE SUPPLY

OF DRUGS AND RELATED ITEMS

Tenders are invited for the Supply of Drugs and Related
Items for the Public Hospitals Authority and the Ministry
of Health, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

The Supplementary Tender Document, which includes
instruction to the Tenderers along with other relevant
information, can be collected from the Bahamas National
Drug Agency, Market & McPherson Streets, from
Thursday 24" , September 2009 from 9 am — 5 pm.

A Tender must be submitted in duplicated in a sealed
envelope or package identified as “Supplementary
Tender for the Supply of Drug and Related Items” and
addressed to:

Managing Director
Public Hospitals Authority
Third Terrace, West Centerville
P.O. Box N-8200

Nassau, The Bahamas

Electronic and hard copies must be received at the above
address on or before 5pm Friday, October 16", 2009. A
copy of a valid business license and Nationals Insurance

Certificate must accompany all proposals.

The Public Hospitals Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all Tender(s).

Director

Bis



Money at Work

ROYAL FIDELITY

The Public is hereby advised that |, TAKASHA LETITIA SMITH
of the city of Freeport in the Islands of Grand Bahama,
intend to change my child's name from TA’KAl GRAYLON
ROKER to JAH’REN TA’KI DAVIS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

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CFA L”

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
THURSDAY, 24 SEPTEMBER 2009
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,502.88| CHG -11.01| %CHG -0.73 | YTD -209.48 | YTD % -12.23
FINDEX: CLOSE 789.77 | YTD -5.40% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE:242-323-2330 | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
1.81 1.03 AML Foods Limited 1.08 1.08 0.00 0.127 0.000 B35 0.00%
11.80 9.90 Bahamas Property Fund 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.992 0.200 10.8 1.86%)
9.30 5.90 Bank of Bahamas 5.90 5.90 0.00 0.244 0.260 24.2 4.41%
0.89 0.63 Benchmark 0.63 0.63 0.00 -0.877 0.000 N/M 0.00%
3.49 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.078 0.090 40.4 2.86%
2.37 2.14 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055 0.040 43.1 1.69%]
14.20 10.00 Cable Bahamas 10.03 10.03 0.00 1.406 0.250 7.1 2.49%
2.88 2.74 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.249 0.040 11.0 1.46%]
7.50 6.26 Commonwealth Bank ($1) 5.87 5.87 0.00 5,000 0.419 0.300 14.0 5.11%
3.85 1.27 Consolidated Water BDRs 3.42 3.34 -0.08 0.111 0.052 30.1 1.56%)
2.85 1.32 Doctor's Hospital 2.05 2.05 0.00 0.382 0.080 6.4 3.90%
8.20 6.60 Famguard 6.60 6.60 0.00 0.420 0.240 15.7 3.64%
12.50 8.80 Finco 9.30 9.30 0.00 0.322 0.520 28.9 5.59%
11.71 10.00 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.631 0.350 15.8 3.50%
5.53 4.50 Focol (S$) 4.50 4.50 0.00 0.332 0.150 13.6 3.33%
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.45 0.27 Freeport Concrete 0.27 0.27 0.00 0.035 0.000 #7 0.00%
9.02 5.49 ICD Utilities 5.50 5.50 0.00 0.407 0.500 13.5 9.09%
12.00 9.98 J. S. Johnson 9.98 9.98 0.00 0.952 0.640 10.5 6.41%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 0.180 0.000 55.6 0.00%
BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Security Symbol Last Sale Change Daily Vol. Interest Maturity
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.00 0.00 t% 19 October 2017
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
1000.00 1000.00 Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.00 0.00 1% 30 May 2013
1000.00 1000.00 _ Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.00 0.00 Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 7.92 Bahamas Supermarkets ¢.92 8.42 14.00 -2.246 0.000 N/M 0.00%|
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 2.00 6.25 4.00 o.000 0.480 N/M 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55, 0.001 0.000 256.6 0.00%|
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41.00 29.00 ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.540 0.000 9.03 0.00%|
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.55 0.002 0.000 261.90 0.00%
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
S2wk-Hi S52wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield % NAV Date
1.4038 1.3344 CFAL Bond Fund 1.4038 3.72 6.20 31-Aug-09
3.0350 2.8952 CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 2.8990 -1.39 -4.16 31-Aug-09
1.4905 1.4119 CFAL Money Market Fund 1.4905 3.96 5.49 18-Sep-09
3.6090 3.0941 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0941 -8.61 -13.59 31-Aug-09
13.0484 12.3870 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.1136 3.83, 5.87 31-Aug-09
101.6693 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 101.6693 1.10 1.67 30-Jun-09
100.9600 93.1992 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7398 0.35 -4.18 30-Jun-09
1.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-O07
9.4075 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.3399 2.69 -1.41 31-Jul-09
1.0707 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0707 3.38 5.14 31-Aug-09
1.0364 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0319 -0.11 2.05 31-Aug-09
1.0673 1.0000 FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0673 2.89 4.93 31-Aug-09

MARKET TERMS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 15 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Lew - Lowest closing pric last 52 weeks

ted price fer daily volume













hted price for daily volume.
rom day to day

traded today

DIV $ - Dividends are paid in the last 12 months

PIE - Closing price d by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Steck Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Steck Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007




YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
f



N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Steck Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RENE TELLE of
187 EMERALD CIRCLE, TREASURE COVE, P.O. BOX
CR-56766 NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 18° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GLORIA WILLIAMS of SOLDIER
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-1055, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25" day
of September, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and
Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL FANORD of
CHARLES VINCENT ST., NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason. why — registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25° day of September, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

AS

ep
KING'S

REAL ESTATE

JOB OPPORTUNITY
Real Estate Agents

Applicants must have:

¢ Outstanding personality

¢ Current BREA license

¢ Minimum 2-years experience
¢ Proven sales record

Apply to bahamas@kingsrealty.com
Deadline: September 30, 2009
Information: 394-4397



TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009, PAGE 5B





300 sales for resort project

into sales agreements is
expected, as the price at
which right to buy holders
are entitled to purchase is
extremely attractive. This
has led to some right to
buy agreements changing
hands for a considerable
premium.

“Whilst the pre-sales
from the right to buy

FROM page one

agreements are expected
to result in approximately
25 per cent of the plots at
Port St George being sold
at a substantial discount,
the early revenue generat-
ed is expected to more
than cover the costs of
infrastructure to the entire

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Balance Sheet

site, including construction
of the marina and golf
course.....

“Evidence suggests that
residential values in the
Bahamas have held up
well, and furthermore that
US purchasers are begin-
ning to return to the
region.” Interest, the
developers said, had been







(unaudited)
June 30 December 31
2009 2008
Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 283,956 $ 160,456
Accounts receivable, net 1,612,317 1,496,303
Inventory 351522 304,064
Prepaids and other receivables 199,371 77,835
Deposits 12,900 12,900
Total current assets 2,465,866 2,051,558
Non-current assets
Investment in associate 143,248 143,248
Property, plant and equipment, net 7,212,612 7,391,968
Total non-current assets 7,355,860 7,535,216
Total assets $ 9,821,726 $ 9,586,774
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Bank overdraft $ - $ 17,802
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 321,273 397,783
Current-portion of note payable (note 5) 84,401 98,384
Total current liabilities 405,674 513,969
Non-current liabilities
Security deposits 397,714 407,889
Note payable (note 5) 220,589 254,940
Total non-current liabilities 618,303 662,829
Total liabilities 1,023,977 1,176,798
Shareholders’ equity
Share capital 42,000 42,000
Contributed surplus 2,752,113 2,752,113
Retained earnings 6,003,636 5,615,863
Total shareholders’ equity 8,797,749 8.409.976
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 9,821,726 $ 9,586,774
Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statement of Income and Retained Earnings

(unaudited)

Sales and services rendered
Cost of sales and direct expenses
Gross profit

Expenses
Operating
Interest and bank charges
Total operating expenses

Net income

Retained earnings at beginning of year
Retained earnings at end of period

Earnings per share

Six months ended June 30



2009 2008
$ 3,795,480 $ 3,879,395
2,442,958 2,732,903
1,352,522 1,146,492
951,224 943,592
13,525 13,017
964,749 956,609
387,773 189,883
5,615,863 5,287,247

$ 6,003,636 $ 5,477,130
$ 09 05

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Six months ended June 30



2009 2008
Cash flows from operating activities
Operating activities
Net income $ 387,773 $ 189,883
Adjustments for items not involving use of cash:
Depreciation 615,247 619,386
1,003,020 809,269
Change in non-cash working capital items
Increase in accounts receivable (116,014) (159,900)
Increase in inventory (53,258) (44,167)
Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets (121,536) -
Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities (76,510) (50,901)
(Decrease) increase in security deposits (10,175) 21,593
Net cash flow provided by operating activities 625,527 575,894
Cash flows from investing activities
Purchase of fixed assets (435,891) (892,823)
Investment in associate - (50,000)
Net cash flow (used in) provided by investing activities (435,891) (942,823)
Cash flows from financing activities
Proceeds from note payable - 400,000
Payment of note payable (48,334) -
Net cash flow (used in) provided by financing activities (48,334) 400,000
Net change in cash 141,302 33,071
Cash position at beginning of the period 142,654 (191,960)
Cash position at end of the period $ 283,956 $ (158,889)



See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed interim financial statements.

received from Australia,
the Middle East and India.
The developers added
that they had been able to
reduce the risks associat-
ed with Port St George by
financing the development
costs to date, including the
land acquisition, entirely
from their own equity and
financial resources.

“This debt free status
has allowed Port St
George to emerge
unscathed from the finan-
cial turmoil of 2008-2009,
and the developers are
now well-positioned to
take advantage of reduced
construction costs and the
initiatives to boost the
global economy that are

being taken by govern-
ments around the world,”
the developers said.

The development will be
undertaken in a joint ven-
ture partnership with BDO
Stoy Hayward Investment
Management, the 385
hectare project covering
“less than 1 per cent” of
Long Island.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements
June 30, 2009

1. Corporate Information

Bahamas Waste Limited (“BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987. The Company is engaged in the business of solid and medical waste
collection and disposal, including the sale, installation, rental and maintenance of waste compactors
and containers. The Company has publicly traded shares which are registered on the Bahamas
International Stock Exchange. The latest audited accounts of the BWL were prepared on December
31, 2008.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2008 were authorized
for issue by the directors on September 4, 2006.

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of preparation
These condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 3007 have been
prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2008 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2008, except for the adoption of new standards and interpretations and
amendments to existing standards have been published that are mandatory for the Company’s
accounting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2009 or later periods, noted below. Adoption of
the following Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the financial position or
performance of the Company.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements (Continued)

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

Basis of preparation (continued)

¢ IFRS 2 Share Based Payments (Revised)

¢ IFRS3 Business Combinations (Revised)

¢ IFRS8 Operating Segments

¢ JAS 23 Borrowing Costs (Revised)

¢ JAS 27 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements (Revised)
¢ IFRIC 15 Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate

¢ IFRIC 16 Hedges of a Net Investment in Foreign Operation

¢ IFRIC 17 Distribution to Non-Cash Assets to Owners

¢ IFRIC 18 Transfers of Assets from Customers

3. Earnings per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.
2009 2008

Shares outstanding at June 30 4,200,000 4,200,000

4. Related Party Transactions

During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and significant obligations to the related parties at June 30, 2008.

5. Note Payable
On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing

location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company had paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 promissory note agreement with Davandon Holdings Limited. The term of

Bahamas Waste Limited

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Interim Financial Statements (Continued)

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.

TO DISCUSS STORIES ON THIS PAGE LOG ON TO WWW.TRIBUNE242.COM


THE TRIBUNE

THE WEATHER RE

5-Day FORECAST



FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25TH, 2009, PAGE 7B

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MariNE FORECAST






TL






m1 ra NY



























































a Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
r CH oo . High = Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 6 Miles 86° F
— ‘ a. oe y — ~~ 0| 1 |2 3|4|5|6 18 | gl10 Fic OFC Fic OFC Saturday: E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 10 Miles 86° F
>a i ll | a Acapulco 90/32 77/25 pe 92/33 79/26 t FREEPORT Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 1-2 Feet 6 Miles 86° F
vr. ; — — Low | MoDerATE J HicH } HGH J EX. Amsterdam 63/17 52/11 pc 63/17 50/10 s Saturday: _E at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet __10 Miles 86° F
é ORLANDO A Ankara, Turkey 75/23 47/8 s 76/24 45/7 © = ABACO Today: E at 7-14 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
High: 92° FA3°c Mostly sunny, a t-storm Partly cloudy; a shower Breezy with partial Clouds and sunshine. Partly sunny. An afternoon The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 76/24 63/17 s 81/27 66/18 pc Saturday: _ E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 10 Miles 85° F
Low:75°F/24°C a in spots. or tstorm. sunshine. thunderstorm possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 6317 53/11 6 64/17 51/10 pc
: aay a N ° ° ° ° Bangkok 89/31 78/25 t 89/31 77/25 r
: @ 9% ee as High: 88° High: 88: High: 88° High: 88° Barbados 87/30 77/25 sh 86/30 77/25 sh
TAMPA © is tt High: 89 Low: 73 Low: 74 Low: 75 Low: 75 Low: 75 see ERE Baa 77/25 64/17 s 75/23 G11 $ _ me
is r TET Tae FT
High: 91° F/33° C : 100° F 80°-78° F 92°-81° F 95°-84° F High —_Ht(ft.) Low Ht) — Being S227 S116" pe S12r 616 t
a2 gee i ae - — = ——— : —— — a Beirut 78/25 72/22 s 78/25 71/21 s
Low: 76° F/24°C Pit The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:36 p.m. 29 6:05am. 1.0 Belgrad 76/24 52/11 74/23 50/10
ay @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low forthe day, 710 p.m. 1.3 an e 63417 48/8 = 68/20 52/14 :
c y Ce Saturday 1207am. 24 703am. 12 — Bermuda 83/28 75/23 sh 82/27 72/22 pc
: Ay ' an 1:35 p.m. 28 811pm. 14 Bogota 70/21 41/5 pc 68/20 45/7 pc
hy aX - Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday Sunday 200am. 24 805am 13 Brussels 66/18 49/9 s 70/21 51/10 s
i ‘i Temperature, 2:35p.m. 2.8 9:09pm. 1.4 Budapest 73/22 50/10 s 72/22 50/10 s
ABACO P P
a ai ‘6 GIN, ses seeetactecsheetaceeee eas tcc 90° F/32° C ——aian Dd ONRan 7 a~=—Cs«éBulenos Aires 66/18 48/8 pc 70/21 50/10 s
J - i ae Low sie Fe7¢ Monday a oe ola 13. Cairo 91/82 68/20 s 92/83 72/22 s
: - ere ow: 75° F/24 Normal high... arr rsicG = 93/33 83/28 r 93/33 84/28 1 ! Denver
i YJ Normal low 74° F/24° C Calgary 74/23 41/5 s 66/18 34/1 pc 66/44
# pf SD @ WEST PALM BEACH i Last year's High... ssvsesteneenssee 88° F/31° C SUN AND Moon Cancun 90/32 73/22 t 90/32 73/22 sh
’ — High: 91° F/33°C aor Last year's low Mesut 77° F/25° C " " Caracas 82/27 72/22 t 83/28 73/22 t
Toon Low: 77° F/25°C @ > ae Precipitation Sunrise...... 7:00am. Moonrise ....1:33p.m. Casablanca 79/26 61/16 t 78/25 60/15 pc
aw a, As of 2 p.m. yesterday oo... 0.05" Sunset....... 7:03 p.m. Moonset......... noné —_ Copenhagen 65/18 50/10 c 64/17 51/10 pc
ie FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date 30, First Full Last New Dublin 63/17 50/10 pc 6317 52/11 pc
High: 89° F/32° C @ High: 89° F/32° C Normal year to date oo... 36.98" ee a Frankfurt 68/20 50/10 pc 70/21 48/8 s
Low: 78° F/26°C _— Low: 73° F/23° C f ie Geneva 71/21 53/11 pe 69/20 54/12 pc
Sam ot seccanercen é oe ee ee A
e a : Forecasts and graphics provided by . : a avana 7 t i Ss TN Sh Miami
MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Sep.26 Oct.4 Oct. 11. Oct. 18 ‘Helsinki 55/12 48/8 sh 63/17 52/11 c ea 5 89/79
. High: 89° F/32°C = / f Hong Kong 91/32 81/27 s 91/382 32/27 s 757] Dai
aul i «79° 0 5 slamaba' 7 s 7 s ;
Z 75 ee C High: 89° F/32° C Islamabad 110/43 72/22 106/41 72/22 2 Gagaonts
F High: 89° F/32°C Low: 75° F/24° C Istanbul 76/24 63/17 pc 77/25 60/15 s ie Date Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
jane 3 Jerusalem 81/27 59/15 s 77/25 GING s Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitnfiioni@.
Low: 73° F/23° C [>_ iti i
2 iva @ ‘ Johannesburg 63/17 52/41 t 74/23 55/12 s 77) Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mange
KEY WEST ~ ig a lied (| 106 20 (BO os (ste cos 70s oe (AOS
Se ree ~~ CATISLAND Lima 73/22 58/14 s 73/22 57/13 pc “10s [ate a ae
eee High: 87° F/31°C London 68/20 50/10 pc 72/22 50/10 pc
: @ ¢ _ — Low: 73° F/23°C Madrid 84/28 54/12 s 82/27 57/13 pc
rail . ‘ Manila 85/29 76/24 + 84/28 76/24 +r
: HN z > 7 Mexico City 72/22 55/12 t 72/22 52/11 t
— alll Monterrey 79/26 63/17 ¢ 86/30 70/21 s Poe i LA
>a GREAT EXUMA 7 SAN SALVADOR Montreal 64/17 45/7 s 66/18 54/12 s
all High: 90° F/32° C High: 88°F/31°C Moscow 54/12 45/7 sh 55/12 46/7 pc
Low: 76°F/24°C foc7 aR °C Munich 66/18 48/8 pc 71/21 48/8 s
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDROS | : , Nairobi 88/31 55/12 pc 88/31 56/13 pc
highs and tonights's lows. High: 90 F2°C _ : - . New Delhi 99/37 79/26 s 99/37 77/25 s : ¥ :
Low: 74° F/23°C > al Oslo 63/17 49/9 pc 68/20 45/7 s 7
~ ma Paris 72/22 49/9 pe 72/22 50/10 s ar ul lown
Prague 64/17 45/7 s 6719 47/8 s ni |
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 75/23 67/19 pc 77/25 71/21 ¢ AY ay u Tr1cane
a src a "7303 Gary po oe cites |
"75° ° Rome 75/23 63/17 pc 79/26 61/16 s <— =
Love rs MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 88/31 80/26 i 88/31 79/26 s Or you a rest Casy knowing
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday f : p th t ll
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W ae High: 86° F/30° C San Juan 84/28 49/9 s 81/27 42/5 s a yO ave exce ent Insurance
Fic FIC Fic FIC Fic F/C Fic FIC FIC FIC Fic FIC Low: 75° F/24°C gee tte ee aan ae j ES Tave no matter which
Albuquerque 78/25 55/12 s 81/27 55412 s Indianapolis 73/22 616 4 74/23 56/13 sh Philadelphia 73/22 53/41 pce 68/20 58/14 pc antago ¢ ¢
Anchorage 49/9 41/5 +r 50/40 39/8 c — Jacksonville 90/32 71/21 pe 88/31 71/21 t Phoenix 102/38 73/22 s 103/39 76/24 s coon SA ACKLINS aaa oa a cme r ee ca al Way he wind blows.
Atlanta 87/30 6719 c 81/27 6518 t — KansasCity 76/24 55/12 c 74/23 60/15 pc Pittsburgh 73/22 49/9 pc 66/18 54/12 Fr RAGGEDISLAND High:89°F/s2’ aoa po ’
Atlantic City 74/23 5010 po 66/18 60/15 pc Las Vegas 99/37 69/20 s 101/38 71/21 s Portland,OR 81/27 5311 s 74/23 5010 5 G G JISLA Low: 77° F/25°C ou CMHC ee Nobody does it better.
High: 87° F/31°C Stockholm 63/17 50/10 pc 68/20 52/11 pc
Baltimore 75/23 510 pe 71/21 56/13 pc Little Rock 81/27 638/17 c 83/28 61/16 pc Raleigh-Durham 80/26 61/16 pc 73/22 64/17 Cc Low: 74°F/23°C —_— Syd 77/25 66/18 P 72/29 5A/12 P
Boston 66/18 45/77 s 63/17 55/12 s LosAngeles 94/34 64417 s 96/35 64/17 s St. Louis 78/25 5015 + 78/25 61/16 sh . —_ onnae aU ORERI aR: Cee
Buffalo 69/20 46/7 s 69/20 54/12 1 Louisville 79/26 66/18 r 78/25 59/15 t Salt Lake City 84/28 55/12 s 84/28 57/13 s GREAT INAGUA on Tava 79/26 68/20 pc 75/23 66/18 pc
Charleston, SC 89/31 70/21 c 87/30 71/21 pc Memphis 80/26 68/20 r 82/27 64/17 t San Antonio 82/27 67/19 pce 89/81 71/21 s 5a and 6 y P P
: a : High: 90° F/32° C j Toronto 6417 50/10 s 66/118 55/12 5 '
Chicago 74/23 56/13 1 76/24 58/14 sh Miami 89/31 79/26 pce 89/31 79/26 t San Diego 80/26 64/17 pc 82/27 64/17 pc Low: 77° F/25°C Trinidad 90/32 70/21 pc 96/35 69/20 s (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 73/22 56/13 s 71/21 59/15 Minneapolis 68/20 54/12 r 75/23 58/14 pe San Francisco 79/26 57/13 pce 82/27 56/13 pc . Tana 67/19 54/12 pc 63/17 48/8 pc
Dallas 82/27 62/16 pc 88/31 68/20 s __ Nashville 83/28 68/20 t 79/26 59/15 t Seattle 69/20 52/11 s 67/19 488 s VicHea 66/18 51/10 pe B7/19 54/12 § _ New Providence J Grand Abaco Eleuthera Exuma
Denver 66/18 44/6 c 85/29 50/10 s NewOrleans 87/30 74/23 t 87/30 73/22 t Tallahassee 92/33 74/21 pe 90/32 70/21 t a Rie 63/17 50/10 pc 61/16 50/10 c Tek: (A) Be-a55 ff Tet Tet: (242) 367-4204 ff Tek (22) 502-2062 ff Te: (242) 236-204
Detroit 72/22 56413 s 70/21 5844 + New York 71/21 5241 s 67/19 6146 pc Tampa 91/32 76/24 t 90/32 76/24 t Winnipeg 77/95 57/13 s 73/22 50/10 pe
Honolulu 88/31 76/24 s 88/31 75/23 pc Oklahoma City 78/25 55/12 pce 83/28 60/15 s Tucson 95/35 67/19 s 97/36 67/19 s — ‘
Houston 85/29 70/21 + 90/32 73/22 t Orlando 92/33 75/23 po 91/32 72/22 t Washington, DC 75/23 55/12 pc 68/20 63/17 1 She Oe ee ee